Science.gov

Sample records for chemotherapeutic agents effectively

  1. Hormetic Effect of Berberine Attenuates the Anticancer Activity of Chemotherapeutic Agents.

    PubMed

    Bao, Jiaolin; Huang, Borong; Zou, Lidi; Chen, Shenghui; Zhang, Chao; Zhang, Yulin; Chen, Meiwan; Wan, Jian-Bo; Su, Huanxing; Wang, Yitao; He, Chengwei

    2015-01-01

    Hormesis is a phenomenon of biphasic dose response characterized by exhibiting stimulatory or beneficial effects at low doses and inhibitory or toxic effects at high doses. Increasing numbers of chemicals of various types have been shown to induce apparent hormetic effect on cancer cells. However, the underlying significance and mechanisms remain to be elucidated. Berberine, one of the major active components of Rhizoma coptidis, has been manifested with notable anticancer activities. This study aims to investigate the hormetic effect of berberine and its influence on the anticancer activities of chemotherapeutic agents. Our results demonstrated that berberine at low dose range (1.25 ~ 5 μM) promoted cell proliferation to 112% ~170% of the untreated control in various cancer cells, while berberine at high dose rage (10 ~ 80 μM) inhibited cell proliferation. Further, we observed that co-treatment with low dose berberine could significantly attenuate the anticancer activity of chemotherapeutic agents, including fluorouracil (5-FU), camptothecin (CPT), and paclitaxel (TAX). The hormetic effect and thereby the attenuated anticancer activity of chemotherapeutic drugs by berberine may attributable to the activated protective stress response in cancer cells triggered by berberine, as evidenced by up-regulated MAPK/ERK1/2 and PI3K/AKT signaling pathways. These results provided important information to understand the potential side effects of hormesis, and suggested cautious application of natural compounds and relevant herbs in adjuvant treatment of cancer. PMID:26421434

  2. Identification of plumbagin and sanguinarine as effective chemotherapeutic agents for treatment of schistosomiasis☆

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Si-Ming; Coultas, Kristen A.

    2012-01-01

    Schistosomiasis, a snail-borne parasitic disease, affects more than 200 million people worldwide. Currently the treatment of schistosomiasis relies on a single therapy of praziquantel, a drug developed over 30 years ago. Thus, there is an urgent need to develop alternative antischistosomal drugs. In the pursuit of novel antischistosomal drugs, we examined the antischistosomal activities of 45 compounds that had been reported to exhibit antimicrobial and/or antiparasitic activities. Two plant-derived compounds, plumbagin and sanguinarine, were found to possess potent antischistosomal activities in vitro. For both the compounds, a concentration of 10 μM (equivalent to 1.88 μg/ml for plumbagin and 3.68 μg/ml for sanguinarine) resulted in 100% mortality at 48 h, which meets the World Health Organization’s (WHO) criterion of “hit” compounds for the control of schistosomiasis. Morphological changes and tegumental alterations of the dead worms treated by the two compounds were quite different. The significant morphological changes of worms after treatment by the two compounds suggest the two compounds target different biological pathways, both of which result in parasite’s death. This study provides evidence to suggest plumbagin and sanguinarine have real potential as effective alternative chemotherapeutic agents for the treatment of schistosomiasis. PMID:23641325

  3. Preferential effects of the chemotherapeutic DNA crosslinking agent mitomycin C on inducible gene expression in vivo.

    PubMed

    Caron, R M; Hamilton, J W

    1995-01-01

    The immediate effects of a single dose of the chemotherapeutic DNA crosslinking agent, mitomycin C (MMC), on the expression of several constitutive and drug-inducible genes were examined in a simple in vivo system, the 14 day chick embryo. We observed no effect of MMC on the steady-state mRNA expression of the constitutively expressed beta-actin, transferrin, or albumin genes. In contrast, MMC treatment significantly altered both the basal and drug-inducible mRNA expression of two glutethimide-inducible genes, 5-aminolevulinic acid (ALA) synthase and cytochrome P450 CYP2H1. The basal expression of these genes was transiently but significantly increased over a 24 hr period following a single dose of MMC. Conversely, MMC significantly suppressed the glutethimide-inducible expression of these genes when administered 1 to 24 hr prior to the inducing drug. The effects of MMC on both basal and drug-inducible ALA synthase and CYP2H1 mRNA expression were principally a result of changes in the transcription rates of these genes. In contrast, MMC treatment had little or no effect on glutethimide-induced expression of ALA synthase or CYP2H1 when administered 1 hr after the inducing drug, suggesting that a very early event in the induction process represents the target for these MMC effects. Covalent binding studies demonstrated that the effects of MMC on gene expression were closely correlated temporally with formation of [3H]-porfiromycin-DNA adducts. These results support the hypothesis that genotoxic chemicals specifically target their effects to inducible genes in vivo. PMID:7875125

  4. Differential in vitro effects of chemotherapeutic agents on primary cultures of human ovarian carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Kornblith, P; Ochs, R L; Wells, A; Gabrin, M J; Piwowar, J; Chattopadhyay, A; George, L D; Burholt, D

    2004-01-01

    The treatment of ovarian cancer principally relies on the use of platinum and taxane chemotherapeutic agents. Short-term clinical results have been encouraging, but long-term responses remain limited. In this report, an in vitro assay system that utilizes cells grown from human tumor explants has been used to quantitatively evaluate responses to relevant concentrations of alternative chemotherapeutic agents. The results suggest that there are significant differences in the responses of explant-derived cultured cells to the different agents tested. In an evaluation of 276 primary ovarian cancer specimens, five nonstandard drugs were tested in 51 cases. Of these 51 cases, cyclophosphamide had the highest rate of response at 67%, followed by doxorubicin at 61%, gemcitabine at 49%, etoposide at 48%, and topotecan at 14%. Venn diagrams, representing the in vitro responses to the platins and taxanes, as well as the responses to the nonstandard drugs, illustrate that there clearly are distinct differences among patients in a given population. These data underscore the potential importance of evaluating each patient's response to a number of different drugs to optimize the therapeutic decision-making process. PMID:15304154

  5. Anti-cancer effects of newly developed chemotherapeutic agent, glycoconjugated palladium (II) complex, against cisplatin-resistant gastric cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Cisplatin (CDDP) is the most frequently used chemotherapeutic agent for various types of advanced cancer, including gastric cancer. However, almost all cancer cells acquire resistance against CDDP, and this phenomenon adversely affects prognosis. Thus, new chemotherapeutic agents that can overcome the CDDP-resistant cancer cells will improve the survival of advanced cancer patients. Methods We synthesized new glycoconjugated platinum (II) and palladium (II) complexes, [PtCl2 (L)] and [PdCl2 (L)]. CDDP-resistant gastric cancer cell lines were established by continuous exposure to CDDP, and gene expression in the CDDP-resistant gastric cancer cells was analyzed. The cytotoxicity and apoptosis induced by [PtCl2 (L)] and [PdCl2 (L)] in CDDP-sensitive and CDDP-resistant gastric cancer cells were evaluated. DNA double-strand breaks by drugs were assessed by evaluating phosphorylated histone H2AX. Xenograft tumor mouse models were established and antitumor effects were also examined in vivo. Results CDDP-resistant gastric cancer cells exhibit ABCB1 and CDKN2A gene up-regulation, as compared with CDDP-sensitive gastric cancer cells. In the analyses of CDDP-resistant gastric cancer cells, [PdCl2 (L)] overcame cross-resistance to CDDP in vitro and in vivo. [PdCl2 (L)] induced DNA double-strand breaks. Conclusion These results indicate that [PdCl2 (L)] is a potent chemotherapeutic agent for CDDP-resistant gastric cancer and may have clinical applications. PMID:23672493

  6. [Extravasation of chemotherapeutic agents: prevention and therapy].

    PubMed

    Jordan, K; Grothe, W; Schmoll, H-J

    2005-01-01

    Based on the potential to cause local tissue injury drugs are classified as vesicant, irritant and non-irritant. The frequency of extravasation is considered to be between 0.6 % and 6 %. More frequently an inflammatory reaction is caused by thrombophlebitis or a local hypersensitivity reaction following chemotherapy administration rather than by an extravasation. A number of factors are known to increase the risk of extravasation. By the consideration of these risk factors preventive guidelines for the safe administration of chemotherapeutic agents have been published. Central venous devices significantly reduce the risk of extravasation. To date there are no generally approved treatment guidelines for the management of extravasations. Treatment is mostly empirical. Nevertheless some general measures are to be recommended: Firstly, aspiration of the extravasated fluids should be attempted. Furthermore local supportive care such as intermittent topical warming or cooling is at least palliative and to a certain degree reduces the extent of the injury. Beside these non pharmacological therapies the beneficial effects of Dimethylsulfoxid (DMSO) -- or Hyaluronidase-administration dependent on the type of paravasation have been proven. The use of sodium bicarbonate, sodium thiosulfate or corticosteroids is no longer recommended. In the case of extravasation rapid and correct management is crucial for the benefit of any treatment. Therefore, written guidelines for both the handling of cytotoxic agents and also the management of an extravasation should be present in all Departments where cytotoxic agents are administered. In addition to these guidelines an extravasation kit including all necessary materials and drugs to treat extravasations should be available. PMID:15619172

  7. STAT3 Inhibition by Microtubule-Targeted Drugs: Dual Molecular Effects of Chemotherapeutic Agents

    PubMed Central

    Walker, Sarah R.; Chaudhury, Mousumi; Frank, David A.

    2011-01-01

    To improve the effectiveness of anti-cancer therapies, it is necessary to identify molecular targets that are essential to a tumor cell but dispensable in a normal cell. Increasing evidence indicates that the transcription factor STAT3, which regulates the expression of genes controlling proliferation, survival, and self-renewal, constitutes such a target. Recently it has been found that STAT3 can associate with the cytoskeleton. Since many of the tumors in which STAT3 is activated, such as breast cancer and ovarian cancer, are responsive to drugs that target microtubules, we examined the effect of these compounds on STAT3. We found that microtubule stabilizers, such as paclitaxel, or microtubule inhibitors, such as vinorelbine, decrease the activating tyrosine phosphorylation of STAT3 in tumor cells and inhibit the expression of STAT3 target genes. Paclitaxel decreases the association between STAT3 and microtubules, and appears to decrease STAT3 phosphorylation through induction of a negative feedback regulator. The cytotoxic activity of paclitaxel in breast cancer cell lines correlates with its ability to decrease STAT3 phosphorylation. However, consistent with the necessity for expression of a negative regulator, treatment of resistant MDA-MB-231 cells with the DNA demethylating agent 5-azacytidine restores the ability of paclitaxel to block STAT3-dependent gene expression. Finally, the combination of paclitaxel and agents that directly target STAT3 has beneficial effects in killing STAT3-dependent cell lines. Thus, microtubule-targeted agents may exert some of their effects by inhibiting STAT3, and understanding this interaction may be important for optimizing rational targeted cancer therapies. PMID:21949561

  8. Resveratrol enhances the sensitivity of cholangiocarcinoma to chemotherapeutic agents

    PubMed Central

    Frampton, Gabriel; Lazcano, Eric; Li, Huang; Mohamad, Akimuddin; DeMorrow, Sharon

    2010-01-01

    Cholangiocarcinomas are devastating cancers that are resistant to chemotherapies. Resveratrol, a food-derived polyphenol with antitumorigenic properties can regulate the expression of Cytochrome p450 1b1 (Cyp1b1), which may confer chemoresistance in various cancers. Our aims were to assess the effects of resveratrol on the sensitivity of cholangiocarcinoma cells to chemotherapeutic agents and demonstrate an association between Cyp1b1 expression and chemosensitivity. Cholangiocarcinoma cell lines were treated with resveratrol prior to the addition of 5-fluorouracil (5-FU), gemcitabine or mitomycin C. Cell proliferation and apoptosis were assessed by MTS assays and Annexin staining. Resveratrol effects on cholangiocarcinoma tumor sensitivity to 5-FU was assessed in an in vivo xenograft model using Mz-ChA-1 cells. Following resveratrol treatment, Cyp1b1 expression was assessed by real time PCR and immunoblotting. Stable transfected cell lines with Cyp1b1 expression knocked down (Mz-Cyp1b1) were used to assess sensitivity to chemotherapeutic agents by MTS assays and Annexin staining and in a xenograft model using Mz-ChA-1 and Mz-Cyp1b1 cells, respectively. For each chemotherapeutic agent, co-treatment with resveratrol in vitro decreased cell proliferation and increased apoptosis to a greater extent than with the chemotherapeutic agent alone. In vivo, 5-FU+resveratrol decreased tumor size and increased TUNEL staining to a greater extent than 5-FU alone. In parallel, resveratrol decreased Cyp1b1 expression in Mz-ChA-1 cells and in cholangiocarcinoma tumors. Mz-Cyp1b1 cells were more sensitive to chemotherapeutic agents in vitro than mock-transfected cells, and Mz-Cyp1b1-induced tumors were more susceptible to 5-FU treatment. We suggest that resveratrol treatment may be a useful adjunct therapy to improve chemosensitivity in cholangiocarcinoma. PMID:20458282

  9. Targeted Delivery of Chemotherapeutic Agents Using Improved Radiosensitive Liquid Core Microcapsules and Assessment of Their Antitumor Effect

    SciTech Connect

    Harada, Satoshi Ehara, Shigeru; Ishii, Keizo; Yamazaki, Hiromichi; Matsuyama, Shigeo; Sato, Takahiro; Oikawa, Shyoichi; Kamiya, Tomihiro; Arakawa, Kazuo; Yokota, Wataru; Sera, Koichiro; Ito, Jyun

    2009-10-01

    Purpose: Radiation-sensitive microcapsules composed of alginate and hyaluronic acid are being developed. We report the development of improved microcapsules that were prepared using calcium- and yttrium-induced polymerization. We previously reported on the combined antitumor effect of carboplatin-containing microcapsules and radiotherapy. Methods and Materials: We mixed a 0.1% (wt/vol) solution of hyaluronic acid with a 0.2% alginate solution. Carboplatin (l mg) and indocyanine green (12.5 {mu}g) were added to this mixture, and the resultant material was used for capsule preparation. The capsules were prepared by spraying the material into a mixture containing a 4.34% CaCl{sub 2} solution supplemented with 0-0.01% yttrium. These capsules were irradiated with single doses of 0.5, 1.0, 1.5, or 2 Gy {sup 60}Co {gamma}-rays. Immediately after irradiation, the frequency of microcapsule decomposition was determined using a microparticle-induced X-ray emission camera. The amount of core content released was estimated by particle-induced X-ray emission and colorimetric analysis with 0.25% indocyanine green. The antitumor effect of the combined therapy was determined by monitoring its effects on the diameter of an inoculated Meth A fibrosarcoma. Results: Microcapsules that had been polymerized using a 4.34% CaCl{sub 2} solution supplemented with 5.0 x 10{sup -3}% (10{sup -3}% meant or 10%{sup -3}) yttrium exhibited the maximal decomposition, and the optimal release of core content occurred after 2-Gy irradiation. The microcapsules exhibited a synergistic antitumor effect combined with 2-Gy irradiation and were associated with reduced adverse effects. Conclusion: The results of our study have shown that our liquid core microcapsules can be used in radiotherapy for targeted delivery of chemotherapeutic agents.

  10. Warming Effect on Miriplatin-Lipiodol Suspension as a Chemotherapeutic Agent for Transarterial Chemoembolization for Hepatocellular Carcinoma: Preliminary Clinical Experience

    SciTech Connect

    Kora, Shinn-ichi; Urakawa, Hiroshi; Mitsufuji, Toshimichi; Osame, Akinobu; Higashihara, Hideyuki; Yoshimitsu, Kengo

    2013-08-01

    PurposeTo retrospectively elucidate the preliminary clinical impact of warmed miriplatin-lipiodol suspension (MPT-LPD) when used as a chemotherapeutic agent for transarterial chemoembolization (TACE) for hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC).Materials and MethodsBetween June and December 2010, TACE was performed with MPT-LPD at room temperature (RT group), and after January 2011, TACE with MPT-LPD warmed to 40 Degree-Sign C was performed (W group). The intraarterial appearance of MPT-LPD immediately after injection through microcatheters at the second-order branches was compared between the two groups with a 5-point grading system. Local therapeutic effects of HCCs as assessed by follow-up computed tomography (CT) obtained 1-3 months after TACE were compared between the groups with a 4-point grading system (TE1-TE4). After April 2011, angiography-assisted CT was routinely performed at TACE, and HCCs that revealed apparent corona enhancement (CE) were retrospectively selected. The degree of concordance between CE and MPT-LPD accumulation as assessed by CT immediately after TACE was assessed with a 3-point grading scale.ResultsMPT-LPD therapy resulted in a smooth and continuous appearance in the W group (grades 1, 2, 3, 4, and 5 were, respectively, 1, 2, 11, 18, and 4) compared to the RT group (4, 0, 1, 2, and 0). The W group (TE1, TE2, TE3, and TE4 were 1, 9, 11, and 12) revealed better local therapeutic effects than the RT group (6, 3, 9, and 0) (p < 0.05). CE was found in 26 HCC nodules, and concordance between CE and MPT-LPD accumulation was observed in 66 % (grades 1, 2, and 3 were, respectively, 2, 8, and 19).ConclusionWarmed MPT-LPD flowed more smoothly within vascular lumen, passed through tumor sinusoid of HCC, and had better local therapeutic effects at short-term observation than MPT-LPD at room temperature.

  11. Dual targeting of heat shock proteins 90 and 70 promotes cell death and enhances the anticancer effect of chemotherapeutic agents in bladder cancer.

    PubMed

    Ma, Liang; Sato, Fuminori; Sato, Ryuta; Matsubara, Takanori; Hirai, Kenichi; Yamasaki, Mutsushi; Shin, Toshitaka; Shimada, Tatsuo; Nomura, Takeo; Mori, Kenichi; Sumino, Yasuhiro; Mimata, Hiromitsu

    2014-06-01

    Heat shock proteins (HSPs), which are molecular chaperones that stabilize numerous vital proteins, may be attractive targets for cancer therapy. The aim of the present study was to investigate the possible anticancer effect of single or dual targeting of HSP90 and HSP70 and the combination treatment with HSP inhibitors and chemotherapeutic agents in bladder cancer cells. The expression of HSP90 and the anticancer effect of the HSP90 inhibitor 17-N-allylamino-17-demethoxygeldanamycin (17-AAG) coupled with cisplatin, docetaxel, or gemcitabine were examined using immunohistochemistry, quantitative real-time PCR, cell growth, flow cytometry, immunoblots and caspase-3/7 assays. The expression of HSP70 under HSP90 inhibition and the additive effect of HSP70 inhibitor pifithrin-μ (PFT-μ) were examined by the same assays and transmission electron microscopy. HSP90 was highly expressed in bladder cancer tissues and cell lines. 17-AAG enhanced the antiproliferative and apoptotic effects of each chemotherapeutic agent. 17-AAG also suppressed Akt activity but induced the upregulation of HSP70. PFT-μ enhanced the effect of 17-AAG or chemotherapeutic agents; the triple combination of 17-AAG, PFT-μ and a chemotherapeutic agent showed the most significant anticancer effect on the T24 cell line. The combination of 17-AAG and PFT-μ markedly suppressed Akt and Bad activities. With HSP90 suppression, HSP70 overexpression possibly contributes to the avoidance of cell death and HSP70 may be a key molecule for overcoming resistance to the HSP90 inhibitor. The dual targeting of these two chaperones and the combination with conventional anticancer drugs could be a promising therapeutic option for patients with advanced bladder cancer. PMID:24718854

  12. Dual targeting of heat shock proteins 90 and 70 promotes cell death and enhances the anticancer effect of chemotherapeutic agents in bladder cancer

    PubMed Central

    MA, LIANG; SATO, FUMINORI; SATO, RYUTA; MATSUBARA, TAKANORI; HIRAI, KENICHI; YAMASAKI, MUTSUSHI; SHIN, TOSHITAKA; SHIMADA, TATSUO; NOMURA, TAKEO; MORI, KENICHI; SUMINO, YASUHIRO; MIMATA, HIROMITSU

    2014-01-01

    Heat shock proteins (HSPs), which are molecular chaperones that stabilize numerous vital proteins, may be attractive targets for cancer therapy. The aim of the present study was to investigate the possible anticancer effect of single or dual targeting of HSP90 and HSP70 and the combination treatment with HSP inhibitors and chemotherapeutic agents in bladder cancer cells. The expression of HSP90 and the anticancer effect of the HSP90 inhibitor 17-N-allylamino-17-demethoxygeldanamycin (17-AAG) coupled with cisplatin, docetaxel, or gemcitabine were examined using immunohistochemistry, quantitative real-time PCR, cell growth, flow cytometry, immunoblots and caspase-3/7 assays. The expression of HSP70 under HSP90 inhibition and the additive effect of HSP70 inhibitor pifithrin-μ (PFT-μ) were examined by the same assays and transmission electron microscopy. HSP90 was highly expressed in bladder cancer tissues and cell lines. 17-AAG enhanced the antiproliferative and apoptotic effects of each chemotherapeutic agent. 17-AAG also suppressed Akt activity but induced the upregulation of HSP70. PFT-μ enhanced the effect of 17-AAG or chemotherapeutic agents; the triple combination of 17-AAG, PFT-μ and a chemotherapeutic agent showed the most significant anticancer effect on the T24 cell line. The combination of 17-AAG and PFT-μ markedly suppressed Akt and Bad activities. With HSP90 suppression, HSP70 overexpression possibly contributes to the avoidance of cell death and HSP70 may be a key molecule for overcoming resistance to the HSP90 inhibitor. The dual targeting of these two chaperones and the combination with conventional anticancer drugs could be a promising therapeutic option for patients with advanced bladder cancer. PMID:24718854

  13. Accidental overdose of multiple chemotherapeutic agents.

    PubMed

    Kim, I S; Gratwohl, A; Stebler, C; Hausmann, M; Tichelli, A; Stern, A; Speck, B

    1989-07-01

    A 35-year-old man with refractory low grade diffuse centroblastic centrocytic non-Hodgkin's lymphoma was treated accidentally with an overdose of multiple chemotherapeutic agents. He was given adriamycin 50 mg/m2 and cyclophosphamide 350 mg/m2 for 6 days followed by 4 days of vincristine 1 mg/m2 and bleomycin 10 mg/m2. He was transferred when he developed pancytopenia, fever, severe mucositis, ileus and peripheral neuropathy. He was treated with broad spectrum antibiotics, red cell and single donor platelet transfusions and strict parenteral nutrition. In addition, he was given a continuous infusion of 400 micrograms daily human recombinant granulocyte macrophage-colony stimulating factor (rh GM-CSF) for 17 days. Intractable severe bleeding from his oral mucositis necessitated treatment with a continuous infusion of 8-ornithine-vasopressin for 8 days. He recovered and could be discharged home after 36 days of hospitalization with normal blood counts and without severe sequelae. PMID:2486848

  14. Accidental Overdose of Multiple Chemotherapeutic Agents

    PubMed Central

    Kim, In Soon; Gratwohl, A.; Stebler, C.; Hausmann, M.; Tichelli, A.; Stern, A.; Speck, B.

    1989-01-01

    A 35-year-old man with refractory low grade diffuse centroblastic centrocytic non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma was treated accidentally with an overdose of multiple chemotherapeutic agents. He was given adriamycin 50 mg/m2 and cyclophosphamide 350 mg/m2 for 6 days followed by 4 days of vincristine 1 mg/m2 and bleomycin 10 mg/m2. He was transferred when he developed pancytopenia, fever, severe mucositis, ileus and peripheral neuropathy. He was treated with broad spectrum antibiotics, red cell and single donor platelet transfusions and strict parenteral nutrition. In addition, he was given a continuous infusion of 400 ug daily human recombinant granulocyte macrophage-colony stimulating factor (rh GM-CSF) for 17 days. Intractable severe bleeding from his oral mucositis necessitated treatment with a continuous infusion of 8-ornithine-vasopressin for 8 days. He recovered and could be discharged home after 36 days of hospitalization with normal blood counts and without severe sequelae. PMID:2486848

  15. Correlation between HER-2/neu(erbB-2) expression level and therapeutic effect of combination treatment with HERCEPTIN and chemotherapeutic agents in gastric cancer cell lines

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Although advanced gastric cancer has many limitations and response rate is marginal in chemotherapy. Overexpression of human epidermal growth factor receptor 2(HER-2/neu) gene and its protein are associated with increased cell division and a high rate of tumor growth and have been reported in several malignancies. Especially, approximately 30% of breast cancer patients have overexpression of HER-2/neu protein and the overexpression metastasize faster, induces resistance of the chemotherapy and down-regulate function of estrogen receptor. Recombinant humanized anti-HER2 antibody (Herceptin) inhibits proliferation of HER-2/neu overexpressing tumor cells and the use of that in combination in metastatic breast cancer have increased cytotoxicity of chemotherapeutic agents. Methods We evaluated the expression of HER-2/neu protein in gastric cell lines by FACS and then comparing the cytotoxicity in chemotherapeutics (doxorubicin, cisplatin, paclitaxel, 5-FU) alone and in combination with Herceptin according to the expression of HER-2/neu protein by MTT assay. Results 1. NCI-N87 (88%) gastric cancer cell line and SK-BR-3 (89%) breast cancer cell line with strong positivity of HER-2/neu expression. YBC-2 (55%) and YBC-3 (48%) gastric cancer cell line with intermediated, weak positivity respectively. Negative control U-87 MG (6%) brain cancer cell line were showed low expression of HER-2/neu. 2. Cell growth was dose-dependently inhibited in HER-2/neu positive, control cell line SK-BR-3 by Herceptin treatment but not observed in HER-2/neu negative control cell line U-87 MG. Effective growth inhibition was not observed in gastric cancer cell lines with single treatment of Herceptin, all cell lines observed the dose-dependent growth inhibition to chemotherapeutic agents (doxorubicin, cisplatin, paclitaxel and 5-FU). 3. Combination of Herceptin with doxorubicin observed synergistic effects in all cancer cell lines except YBC-3, combination of Herceptin with

  16. Endoscopic spectral domain optical coherence tomography of murine colonic morphology to determine effectiveness of chemopreventive and chemotherapeutic agents in colorectal cancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    LeGendre-McGhee, Susan; Rice, Photini F. S.; Wall, R. Andrew; Klein, Justin; Luttman, Amber; Sprute, Kyle; Gerner, Eugene; Barton, Jennifer K.

    2012-02-01

    Optical coherence tomography (OCT) is a minimally-invasive imaging modality capable of tracking the development of individual colonic adenomas. As such, OCT can be used to evaluate the mechanisms and effectiveness of chemopreventive and chemotherapeutic agents in colorectal cancer models. The data presented here represent part of a larger study evaluating α-difluoromethylornithine (DFMO) and Sulindac as chemopreventive and chemotherapeutic agents using mice treated with the carcinogen azoxymethane (AOM). 27 A/J mice were included in the chemoprevention study, subdivided into four treatment groups (No Drug, DFMO, Sulindac, DFMO/Sulindac). 30 mm lateral images of each colon at eight different rotations were obtained at five different time points using a 2 mm diameter spectral domain OCT endoscopy system centered at 890 nm with 3.5 μm axial resolution in air and 5 μm lateral resolution. Images were visually analyzed to determine number and size of adenomas. Gross photos of the excised colons and histology provided gold standard confirmation of the final imaging time point. Preliminary results show that 100% of mice in the No Drug group developed adenomas over the course of the chemoprevention study. Incidence was reduced to 71.43% in mice given DFMO, 85.71% for Sulindac and 0% for DFMO/Sulindac. Discrete adenoma size did not vary significantly between experimental groups. Additional experiments are currently under way to verify these results and evaluate DFMO and Sulindac for chemotherapeutic applications.

  17. Recent approaches for reducing hemolytic activity of chemotherapeutic agents.

    PubMed

    Jeswani, Gunjan; Alexander, Amit; Saraf, Shailendra; Saraf, Swarnlata; Qureshi, Azra; Ajazuddin

    2015-08-10

    Drug induced hemolysis is a frequent complication associated with chemotherapy. It results from interaction of drug with erythrocyte membrane and leads to cell lysis. In recent past, various approaches were made to reduce drug-induced hemolysis, which includes drug polymer conjugation, drug delivery via colloidal carriers and hydrogels, co-administration of botanical agents and modification in molecular chemistry of drug molecules. The basic concept behind these strategies is to protect the red blood cells from membrane damaging effects of drugs. There are several examples of drug polymer conjugate that either are approved by Food and Drug Administration or are under clinical trial for delivering drugs with reduced toxicities. Likewise, colloidal carriers are also used successfully nowadays for the delivery of various chemotherapeutic agents like gemcitabine and amphotericin B with remarkable decrease in their hemolytic activity. Similarly, co-administration of botanical agents with drugs works as secondary system proving protection and strength to erythrocyte membranes. In addition to the above statement, interaction hindrance between RBC and drug molecule by molecular modification plays an important role in reducing hemolysis. This review predominantly describes the above recent approaches explored to achieve the reduced hemolytic activity of drugs especially chemotherapeutic agents. PMID:26047758

  18. MICs and MBCs of chemotherapeutic agents against Renibacterium salmoninarum.

    PubMed Central

    Bandín, I; Santos, Y; Toranzo, A E; Barja, J L

    1991-01-01

    The efficacies of 21 chemotherapeutic agents for controlling bacterial kidney disease were evaluated. The bactericidal and/or bacteriostatic effects of these drugs were tested against 11 Renibacterium salmoninarum strains with different origins. The most effective compounds displaying both bacteriostatic and bactericidal activity for all the isolates were tetracycline and erythromycin, with MICs ranging from less than 0.62 to 10.95 micrograms/ml for tetracycline and from less than 0.62 to 5.47 micrograms/ml for erythromycin. Whereas tetracycline showed identical MICs and MBCs, erythromycin showed bactericidal effects at concentrations of 5.47 to 21.87 micrograms/ml. Similarly, cefazolin and tiamulin proved to be very effective bactericidal compounds against the majority of R. salmoninarum isolates, with MBCs for 90% of the strains tested of 21.87 and 10.95 micrograms/ml, respectively. Neither nitrofuranes, quinolones, nor sulfonamides showed inhibitory effects on the growth of the strains. PMID:1854157

  19. MICs and MBCs of chemotherapeutic agents against Renibacterium salmoninarum.

    PubMed

    Bandín, I; Santos, Y; Toranzo, A E; Barja, J L

    1991-05-01

    The efficacies of 21 chemotherapeutic agents for controlling bacterial kidney disease were evaluated. The bactericidal and/or bacteriostatic effects of these drugs were tested against 11 Renibacterium salmoninarum strains with different origins. The most effective compounds displaying both bacteriostatic and bactericidal activity for all the isolates were tetracycline and erythromycin, with MICs ranging from less than 0.62 to 10.95 micrograms/ml for tetracycline and from less than 0.62 to 5.47 micrograms/ml for erythromycin. Whereas tetracycline showed identical MICs and MBCs, erythromycin showed bactericidal effects at concentrations of 5.47 to 21.87 micrograms/ml. Similarly, cefazolin and tiamulin proved to be very effective bactericidal compounds against the majority of R. salmoninarum isolates, with MBCs for 90% of the strains tested of 21.87 and 10.95 micrograms/ml, respectively. Neither nitrofuranes, quinolones, nor sulfonamides showed inhibitory effects on the growth of the strains. PMID:1854157

  20. Long-term genetic and reproductive effects of ionizing radiation and chemotherapeutic agents on cancer patients and their offspring.

    PubMed

    Byrne, J

    1999-04-01

    The continuing search for a cure for cancer has lead to more aggressive therapies as new agents are developed with largely unknown late complications. Standard therapy for the majority of cancers today, following surgery, often consists of combinations of high doses of radiation and multi-drug therapy. Compared with exposures experienced by atomic bomb survivors, cancer survivors have been exposed to higher doses of partial body irradiation and combination chemotherapy over longer periods. Thus, cancer survivors provide a model system with which to evaluate the long-term effects on the human organism of high doses of agents known to damage DNA. Five-year survival after cancer diagnosis is now greater than 56%; more than 5 million Americans are considered cured of cancer. However, the late complications of cancer in long-term survivors has been poorly evaluated, especially in adults, and little is known of the most troubling possibility, that is, that the effects of cancer treatments could be passed on to the next generation. What little we know comes from studies of at most 5,000 survivors of childhood cancer, treated decades ago. So far, results are reassuring that with the means now available, we cannot detect clinical evidence of heritable damage. However, reproductive effects, including infertility, are common consequences of cancer therapy and may represent germ cell damage. We are just in the infancy of studies of germ cell mutagenesis in cancer survivors. The relatively small numbers of survivors, and the few types of exposures studied so far, provide only limited grounds for reassurance. More comprehensive, properly designed, studies of modern new agents are urgently need. PMID:10331521

  1. Effect of ceritinib (LDK378) on enhancement of chemotherapeutic agents in ABCB1 and ABCG2 overexpressing cells in vitro and in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Jing; Zhang, Xu; Wang, Fang; Wang, Xiaokun; Yang, Ke; Xu, Meng; To, Kenneth K.W.

    2015-01-01

    Multidrug resistance (MDR) is the leading cause of treatment failure in cancer chemotherapy. The overexpression of ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporters, particularly ABCB1, ABCC1 and ABCG2, play a key role in mediating MDR by pumping anticancer drugs out from cancer cells. Ceritinib (LDK378) is a second-generation tyrosine kinase inhibitor of anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) currently in phase III clinical trial for the treatment of non-small cell lung cancer. Here, we found that ceritinib remarkably enhanced the efficacy of chemotherapeutic drugs in ABCB1 or ABCG2 over-expressing cancer cells in vitro and in vivo. Ceritinib significantly increased the intracellular accumulation of chemotherapeutic agents such as doxorubicin (DOX) by inhibiting ABCB1 or ABCG2-mediated drug efflux in the transporters-overexpressing cells. Mechanistically, ceritinib is likely a competitive inhibitor of ABCB1 and ABCG2 because it competed with [125I]-iodoarylazidoprazosin for photo affinity labeling of the transporters. On the other hand, at the transporters-inhibiting concentrations, ceritinib did not alter the expression level of ABCB1 and ABCG2, and phosphorylation status of AKT and ERK1/2. Thus the findings advocate further clinical investigation of combination chemotherapy of ceritinib and other conventional chemotherapeutic drugs in chemo-refractory cancer patients. PMID:26556876

  2. Blind Snipers: Relevant Off Target Effects of Non-chemotherapeutic Agents in Oncology: Review of the Literature.

    PubMed

    Prochilo, Tiziana; Di Biasi, Brunella; Aroldi, Francesca; Bertocchi, Paola; Sabatini, Tony; Meriggi, Fausto; Zaniboni, Alberto

    2014-01-01

    In recent years an increasing attention is focused on the potential effects of drugs on cancer incidence and/or cancer survival. Many medications of common use, developed for a variety of medical non-cancer situations, have been found to have potential anti- cancer effects. In this article, we performed an overview of the literature evidence for several commonly used non-cancer medications, such as aspirin, beta-blockers, metformin and other anti- diabetics, cardiac glycosides, anticoagulant heparin, statins, psychotropic drugs, vitamins, calcium and estrogens which have been shown to have anticancer effects, in observational and experimental studies. A huge amount of data supports the idea that a few of these commonly used medicines could decrease cancer death-rate, particularly aspirin, statins and metformin, crosswise different types of cancer. To date, no mature data are available from randomized and prospective trials; perhaps, the results of some studies underway will allow us to answer some questions on the possible use of these drugs in our clinical practice in primary and secondary prevention, or even in adjuvant setting. PMID:24854040

  3. Augmentation of Chemotherapeutic Infusion Effect by TSU-68, an Oral Targeted Antiangiogenic Agent, in a Rabbit VX2 Liver Tumor Model

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Hyo-Cheol; Chung, Jin Wook Choi, Seung Hong; Im, Seock-Ah; Yamasaki, Yasundo; Jun, Suryoung; Jae, Hwan Jun; Park, Jae Hyung

    2012-02-15

    Purpose: This study was designed to investigate the in vivo effects of combination therapy with TSU-68 and chemotherapeutic infusion in a rabbit VX2 liver tumor model. Methods: This study was approved by the animal care committee at our institute. Three weeks before chemotherapeutic infusion, VX2 carcinoma was implanted into the livers of 32 rabbits. One week after chemotherapeutic infusion, vehicle was administered orally for 3 weeks in the control group (n = 16), and TSU-68 was administered orally at a daily dose of 200 mg/kg for 3 weeks in the treated group (n = 16). Computed tomography (CT) was performed before and 1, 2, 3, and 4 weeks after chemotherapeutic infusion. Tumor response was assessed according to the Response Evaluation Criteria in Solid Tumors (RECIST) on CT scan. The maximum thickness of viable tumor was measured on microscopic sections. Results: According to the RECIST, stable disease was observed in 9 (56%) rabbits and progressive disease in 7 (44%) in the control group, whereas partial response was observed in 1 (6%) rabbit and stable disease in 15 (94%) in the treated group. On pathologic examination, a viable lesion was present in 12 (75%) rabbits in the control group and in 6 (38%) rabbits in the treated group (P = 0.073). The mean maximum thickness of viable tumor in the treated group was significantly smaller than that in the control group (0.74 mm vs. 3.39 mm; P = 0.02). Conclusions: Oral administration of TSU-68 augmented the effect of chemotherapeutic infusion in a rabbit VX2 liver tumor model.

  4. The Effects of Chemotherapeutic Agents, Bleomycin, Etoposide, and Cisplatin, on Chromatin Remodeling in Male Rat Germ Cells.

    PubMed

    Bagheri-Sereshki, Negar; Hales, Barbara F; Robaire, Bernard

    2016-04-01

    The coadministration of bleomycin, etoposide, and cisplatin (BEP) has increased the survival rate of testicular cancer patients to over 90%. Previous studies have demonstrated that BEP induces germ cell damage during the final stages of spermatogenesis, when major chromatin remodeling occurs. Chromatin remodeling permits histone-protamine exchange, resulting in sperm head chromatin compaction. This process involves different epigenetic modifications of the core histones. The objective of these studies was to investigate the effects of BEP on epigenetic modifications to histones involved in chromatin remodeling. Brown Norway rats were treated with BEP, and their testes were removed to isolate pachytene spermatocytes and round spermatids by unit gravity sedimentation. Western blot analyses were conducted on extracted proteins to detect the expression of key modified histones. In a second cohort testes were prepared for immunohistochemical analysis. The stage-specific expression of each modified histone mark in rat spermatogenesis suggests the involvement of these modifications in chromatin remodeling. BEP treatment significantly increased expression of H3K9m and decreased that of tH2B (or Hist1h2ba) in pachytene spermatocytes, suggesting that nucleosomes were not destabilized to allow for transcription of genes involved in chromatin remodeling. Moreover, BEP treatment altered the expression of H4K8ac in round and elongating spermatids, suggesting that histone eviction was compromised, leading to a looser chromatin structure in mature spermatozoa. Less-compacted sperm chromatin, with alterations to the sperm epigenome, may have an adverse effect on male fertility. PMID:26911428

  5. Antibody against granulin-epithelin precursor sensitizes hepatocellular carcinoma to chemotherapeutic agents.

    PubMed

    Wong, Nicholas C L; Cheung, Phyllis F Y; Yip, Chi Wai; Chan, Kui Fat; Ng, Irene Oi-Lin; Fan, Sheung Tat; Cheung, Siu Tim

    2014-12-01

    Granulin-epithelin precursor (GEP) overexpression has been shown in many cancers with functional role on growth, and recently on regulating chemoresistance and cancer stem cell (CSC) properties. Here, we investigate the combined effect of GEP antibody and chemotherapeutic agent. Combination therapy was compared with monotherapy using hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) cells in vitro and orthotopic liver tumor models in vivo. CD133 and related hepatic CSC marker expressions were investigated by flow cytometry. Antiproliferative and apoptotic effects and signaling mechanisms were examined by immunohistochemistry, flow cytometry, and Western blot analysis. Secretory GEP levels in the serum and culture supernatant samples were measured by ELISA. We demonstrated that HCC cells that survived under chemotherapeutic agents showed upregulation of hepatic CSC markers CD133/GEP/ABCB5, and enhanced colony and spheroid formation abilities. Importantly, GEP antibody sensitized HCC cells to the apoptosis induced by chemotherapy for both HCC cell lines and the chemoresistant subpopulations, and counteracted the chemotherapy-induced GEP/ABCB5 expressions and Akt/Bcl-2 signaling. In human HCC orthotopic xenograft models, GEP antibody treatment alone was consistently capable of inhibiting the tumor growth. Notably, combination of GEP antibody with high dose of cisplatin resulted in the eradication of all established intrahepatic tumor in three weeks. This preclinical study demonstrated that GEP antibody sensitized HCC cells to apoptosis induced by chemotherapeutic agents. Combination treatment with GEP antibody and chemotherapeutic agent has the potential to be an effective therapeutic regimen for GEP-expressing cancers. PMID:25253787

  6. Novel mechanisms of action of classical chemotherapeutic agents on sphingolipid pathways.

    PubMed

    Hajj, Carla; Becker-Flegler, Katrin Anne; Haimovitz-Friedman, Adriana

    2015-06-01

    The prevailing mechanisms of action of traditional chemotherapeutic agents have been challenged by sphingolipid cancer research. Many studies have shown that ceramide generation in response to cytotoxic agents is central to tumor cell death. Ceramide can be generated either via hydrolysis of cell-membrane sphingomyelin by sphingomyelinases, hydrolysis of cerebrosides, or via de novo synthesis by ceramide synthases. Ceramide can act as a second messenger for apoptosis, senescence or autophagy. Inherent or acquired alterations in the sphingolipid pathway can account for resistance to the classic chemotherapeutic agents. In particular, it has been shown that activation of the acid ceramidase can lead to the formation of sphingosine 1-phosphate, which then antagonizes ceramide signaling by initiating a pro-survival signaling pathway. Furthermore, ceramide glycosylation catalyzed by glucosylceramide synthase converts ceramide to glucosylceramide, thus eliminating ceramide and consequently protecting cancer cells from apoptosis. In this review, we describe the effects of some of the most commonly used chemotherapeutic agents on ceramide generation, with a particular emphasis on strategies used to enhance the efficacy of these agents. PMID:25719313

  7. Oncolytic reovirus synergizes with chemotherapeutic agents to promote cell death in canine mammary gland tumor.

    PubMed

    Igase, Masaya; Hwang, Chung Chew; Kambayashi, Satoshi; Kubo, Masato; Coffey, Matt; Miyama, Takako Shimokawa; Baba, Kenji; Okuda, Masaru; Noguchi, Shunsuke; Mizuno, Takuya

    2016-01-01

    The oncolytic effects of reovirus in various cancers have been proven in many clinical trials in human medicine. Oncolytic virotherapy using reovirus for canine cancers is being developed in our laboratory. The objective of this study was to examine the synergistic anti-cancer effects of a combination of reovirus and low doses of various chemotherapeutic agents on mammary gland tumors (MGTs) in dogs. The first part of this study demonstrated the efficacy of reovirus in canine MGTs in vitro and in vivo. Reovirus alone exerted significant cell death by means of caspase-dependent apoptosis in canine MGT cell lines. A single injection of reovirus impeded growth of canine MGT tumors in xenografted mice, but was insufficient to induce complete tumor regression. The second part of this study highlighted the anti-tumor effects of reovirus in combination with low doses of paclitaxel, carboplatin, gemcitabine, or toceranib. Enhanced synergistic activity was observed in the MGT cell line treated concomitantly with reovirus and in all the chemotherapeutic agents except toceranib. In addition, combining reovirus with paclitaxel or gemcitabine at half dosage of half maximal inhibitory concentration (IC50) enhanced cytotoxicity by activating caspase 3. Our data suggest that the combination of reovirus and low dose chemotherapeutic agents provides an attractive option in canine cancer therapy. PMID:26733729

  8. Base-Modified Nucleosides as Chemotherapeutic Agents: Past and Future.

    PubMed

    Burke, Matthew P; Borland, Kayla M; Litosh, Vladislav A

    2016-01-01

    Nucleoside and nucleobase antimetabolites have substantially impacted treatment of cancer and infections. Their close resemblance to natural analogs gives them the power to interfere with a variety of intracellular targets, which on one hand gives them high potency, but on the other hand incurs severe side effects, especially of the chemotherapeutics used against malignancies. Therefore, the development of novel nucleoside analogs with widened therapeutic windows represents an attractive target to synthetic organic and medicinal chemists. This review discusses the current antimetabolite drugs: 5- fluorouracil, 6-mercaptopurine, 6-thioguanine, Cladribine, Vidaza, Decitabine, Emtricitabine, Abacavir, Sorivudine, Clofarabine, Fludarabine, and Nelarabine; gives insight into the nucleoside drug candidates that are being developed; and outlines the approaches to nucleobase modifications that may help discover novel bioactive nucleoside analogs with the mechanism of action focused on termination of DNA synthesis, which is expected to diminish the off-target toxicity in non-proliferating human cells. PMID:26369814

  9. Targeting cancer chemotherapeutic agents by use of lipiodol contrast medium

    SciTech Connect

    Konno, T. )

    1990-11-01

    Arterially administered Lipiodol Ultrafluid contrast medium selectively remained in various malignant solid tumors because of the difference in time required for the removal of Lipiodol contrast medium from normal capillaries and tumor neovasculature. Although blood flow was maintained in the tumor, even immediately after injection Lipiodol contrast medium remained in the neovasculature of the tumor. To target anti-cancer agents to tumors by using Lipiodol contrast medium as a carrier, the characteristics of the agents were examined. Anti-cancer agents had to be soluble in Lipiodol, be stable in it, and separate gradually from it so that the anti-cancer agents would selectively remain in the tumor. These conditions were found to be necessary on the basis of the measurement of radioactivity in VX2 tumors implanted in the liver of 16 rabbits that received arterial injections of 14C-labeled doxorubicin. Antitumor activities and side effects of arterial injections of two types of anti-cancer agents were compared in 76 rabbits with VX2 tumors. Oily anti-cancer agents that had characteristics essential for targeting were compared with simple mixtures of anti-cancer agents with Lipiodol contrast medium that did not have these essential characteristics. Groups of rabbits that received oily anti-cancer agents responded significantly better than groups that received simple mixtures, and side effects were observed more frequently in the groups that received the simple mixtures. These results suggest that targeting of the anti-cancer agent to the tumor is important for treatment of solid malignant tumors.

  10. Quinacrine sensitizes hepatocellular carcinoma cells to TRAIL and chemotherapeutic agents.

    PubMed

    Wang, Wenge; Gallant, Jean-Nicolas; Katz, Sharyn I; Dolloff, Nathan G; Smith, Charles D; Abdulghani, Junaid; Allen, Joshua E; Dicker, David T; Hong, Bo; Navaraj, Arunasalam; El-Deiry, Wafik S

    2011-08-01

    Quinacrine has been widely explored in treatment of malaria, giardiasis, and rheumatic diseases. We find that quinacrine stabilizes p53 and induces p53-dependent and independent cell death. Treatment by quinacrine alone at concentrations of 10-20 mM for 1-2 d cannot kill hepatocellular carcinoma cells, such as HepG2, Hep3B, Huh7, which are also resistant to TRAIL. However, quinacrine renders these cells sensitive to treatment by TRAIL. Co-treatment of these cells with quinacrine and TRAIL induces overwhelming cell death within 3-4 h. Levels of DR5, a pro-apoptotic death receptor of TRAIL, are increased upon treatment with quinacrine, while levels of Mcl-1, an anti-apoptotic member of the Bcl-2 family, are decreased. While the synergistic effect of quinacrine with TRAIL appears to be in part independent of p53, knockdown of p53 in HepG2 cells by siRNA results in more cell death after treatment by quinacrine and TRAIL. The mechanism by which quinacrine sensitizes hepatocellular carcinoma cells to TRAIL and chemotherapies, and the potential for clinical application currently are being further explored. Lastly, quinacrine synergizes with chemotherapeutics, such as adriamycin, 5-FU, etoposide, CPT11, sorafenib, and gemcitabine, in killing hepatocellular carcinoma cells in vitro and the drug enhances the activity of sorafenib to delay tumor growth in vivo. PMID:21725212

  11. Suppression of STN1 enhances the cytotoxicity of chemotherapeutic agents in cancer cells by elevating DNA damage

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Qing; Chai, Weihang

    2016-01-01

    DNA damage-inducing agents are among the most effective treatment regimens in clinical chemotherapy. However, drug resistance and severe side effects caused by these agents greatly limit their efficacy. Sensitizing malignant cells to chemotherapeutic agents has long been a goal of chemotherapy. In the present study, suppression of STN1, a gene important for safeguarding genome stability, potentiated the anticancer effect of chemotherapeutic agents in tumor cells. Using multiple cancer cells from a variety of origins, it was observed that downregulation of STN1 resulted in a significant decrease in the half maximal inhibitory concentration values of several conventional anticancer agents. When cells are treated with anticancer agents, STN1 suppression leads to a decline in colony formation and diminished anchorage-independent growth. Furthermore, it was additionally observed that STN1 knockdown augmented the levels of DNA damage caused by damage-inducing agents. The present study concluded that suppression of STN1 enhances the cytotoxicity of damage-inducing chemotherapeutic agents by increasing DNA damage in cancer cells. PMID:27446354

  12. Mechanisms of Cardiotoxicity of Cancer Chemotherapeutic Agents: Cardiomyopathy and Beyond.

    PubMed

    Moudgil, Rohit; Yeh, Edward T H

    2016-07-01

    Tremendous strides have been made in the treatment of various oncological diseases such that patients are surviving longer and are having better quality of life. However, the success has been tainted by the iatrogenic cardiac toxicities. This is especially concerning in the younger population who are facing cardiac disease such as heart failure in their 30s and 40s as the consequence of the anthracycline's side effects (used for childhood leukemia and lymphoma). This resulted in the awareness of cardiotoxic effects of anticancer drugs and emergence of a new discipline: oncocardiology. Since then, numerous anticancer drugs have been correlated to cardiomyopathy. Additionally, other cardiovascular effects have been identified, which includes but is not limited to myocardial infarction, thrombosis, hypertension, arrhythmias, and pulmonary hypertension. In this review we examine some of the anticancer agents that mitigate cardiotoxicity and present current knowledge of molecular mechanism(s). The aim of the review is to ignite awareness of emerging cardiotoxic effects as new generations of anticancer agents are being tested in clinical trials and introduced as part of the therapeutic armamentarium to our oncological patients. PMID:27117975

  13. [Chalcones and their heterocyclic analogs as potential antifungal chemotherapeutic agents].

    PubMed

    Opletalová, V; Sedivý, D

    1999-11-01

    Chalcones and their heterocyclic analogues show various biological effects, e.g. anti-inflammatory, antitumour, antibacterial, antituberculous, antiviral, antiprotozoal, gastroprotective, and others. The present review discusses in greater detail the fungistatic and fungicide properties of these compounds and presents also their chemical structures. The mechanism of antifungal effects of chalcones and their analogues has not been investigated in greater detail. Due to the presence of a reactive ketovinyl moiety in the molecule the compounds of this type are able to react with the thiol groups of enzymes. It cannot be excluded that chalcones interfere with the normal function of the membranes of fungi and moulds. Further investigation of chemical, physical, and biological properties of chalcones and their analogues could lead to the elucidation of the mechanism of their action and finding of effective fungicidal and fungistatic agents in this group of organic substances. PMID:10748740

  14. In vitro three dimensional culture of hepatocellular carcinoma to measure prognosis and responsiveness to chemotherapeutic agents

    PubMed Central

    Costello, Penny; McDonald, Warren; Howlett, Christopher; Donnelly, Marisa; McAlister, Vivian C.

    2016-01-01

    Background Understanding the prognosis of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) informs plans for care. Tumor morphology and molecular markers have been correlated with outcomes. Three-dimensional tissue culture (3DTC) allows for direct in vitro measurement of a tumor’s ability to grow and metastasize. The impact of chemotherapeutic agents, alone or in combinations, may also be measured. Methods All patients with a presumed diagnosis of HCC were eligible for this study including those undergoing resection, chemoembolization and transplantation. Concomitant diseases and outcomes were recorded. One mm3 HCC specimens were grown in multiwell plates containing gel media, without and with chemotherapeutic agents. Results Tumors were sampled from 17 patients. Only 13 had HCC, all of whom had liver transplantation. Of the confirmed HCC patients, 6 (46%) are alive and disease free 82 months following transplantation, 1 (7%) is alive with recurrence of disease and 6 (46%) died, with a mean survival of 12 months post liver transplant. Ten of thirteen 3DTC samples grew, having an average migration distance of 108.3µm in the first 24 hours. Two of three patients who had prior chemoembolization had successful 3DTC. Migration distances (µm) were 188.8±104.3, 104.5±111.7 and 39.6±32.4 for tumors categorized as high, intermediate and low grade, respectively. Tumor migration was inhibited by irinotecan, paclitaxel and docetaxel (−68%±7%, −61%±19% and −60%±21%, respectively) whereas the effect was variable with 5 fluorouracil (5FU) and doxorubicin (−12%±51% and 9%±76%, respectively). Conclusions It is feasible to grow tissue from HCC in 3DTC to study the tumor’s capacity to grow and migrate and its responsiveness to commonly used chemotherapeutic protocols. PMID:27275461

  15. The ferroptosis inducer erastin enhances sensitivity of acute myeloid leukemia cells to chemotherapeutic agents.

    PubMed

    Yu, Yan; Xie, Yangchun; Cao, Lizhi; Yang, Liangchun; Yang, Minghua; Lotze, Michael T; Zeh, Herbert J; Kang, Rui; Tang, Daolin

    2015-01-01

    Acute myeloid leukemia (AML) is the most common type of leukemia in adults. Development of resistance to chemotherapeutic agents is a major hurdle in the effective treatment of patients with AML. The quinazolinone derivative erastin was originally identified in a screen for small molecules that exhibit synthetic lethality with expression of the RAS oncogene. This lethality was subsequently shown to occur by induction of a novel form of cell death termed ferroptosis. In this study we demonstrate that erastin enhances the sensitivity of AML cells to chemotherapeutic agents in an RAS-independent manner. Erastin dose-dependently induced mixed types of cell death associated with ferroptosis, apoptosis, necroptosis, and autophagy in HL-60 cells (AML, NRAS_Q61L), but not Jurkat (acute T-cell leukemia, RAS wild type), THP-1 (AML, NRAS_G12D), K562 (chronic myelogenous leukemia, RAS wild type), or NB-4 (acute promyelocytic leukemia M3, KRAS_A18D) cells. Treatment with ferrostatin-1 (a potent ferroptosis inhibitor) or necrostatin-1 (a potent necroptosis inhibitor), but not with Z-VAD-FMK (a general caspase inhibitor) or chloroquine (a potent autophagy inhibitor), prevented erastin-induced growth inhibition in HL-60 cells. Moreover, inhibition of c-JUN N-terminal kinase and p38, but not of extracellular signal-regulated kinase activation, induced resistance to erastin in HL-60 cells. Importantly, low-dose erastin significantly enhanced the anticancer activity of 2 first-line chemotherapeutic drugs (cytarabine/ara-C and doxorubicin/adriamycin) in HL-60 cells. Collectively, the induction of ferroptosis and necroptosis contributed to erastin-induced growth inhibition and overcame drug resistance in AML cells. PMID:27308510

  16. The ferroptosis inducer erastin enhances sensitivity of acute myeloid leukemia cells to chemotherapeutic agents

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Yan; Xie, Yangchun; Cao, Lizhi; Yang, Liangchun; Yang, Minghua; Lotze, Michael T.; Zeh, Herbert J.; Kang, Rui; Tang, Daolin

    2015-01-01

    Acute myeloid leukemia (AML) is the most common type of leukemia in adults. Development of resistance to chemotherapeutic agents is a major hurdle in the effective treatment of patients with AML. The quinazolinone derivative erastin was originally identified in a screen for small molecules that exhibit synthetic lethality with expression of the RAS oncogene. This lethality was subsequently shown to occur by induction of a novel form of cell death termed ferroptosis. In this study we demonstrate that erastin enhances the sensitivity of AML cells to chemotherapeutic agents in an RAS-independent manner. Erastin dose-dependently induced mixed types of cell death associated with ferroptosis, apoptosis, necroptosis, and autophagy in HL-60 cells (AML, NRAS_Q61L), but not Jurkat (acute T-cell leukemia, RAS wild type), THP-1 (AML, NRAS_G12D), K562 (chronic myelogenous leukemia, RAS wild type), or NB-4 (acute promyelocytic leukemia M3, KRAS_A18D) cells. Treatment with ferrostatin-1 (a potent ferroptosis inhibitor) or necrostatin-1 (a potent necroptosis inhibitor), but not with Z-VAD-FMK (a general caspase inhibitor) or chloroquine (a potent autophagy inhibitor), prevented erastin-induced growth inhibition in HL-60 cells. Moreover, inhibition of c-JUN N-terminal kinase and p38, but not of extracellular signal-regulated kinase activation, induced resistance to erastin in HL-60 cells. Importantly, low-dose erastin significantly enhanced the anticancer activity of 2 first-line chemotherapeutic drugs (cytarabine/ara-C and doxorubicin/adriamycin) in HL-60 cells. Collectively, the induction of ferroptosis and necroptosis contributed to erastin-induced growth inhibition and overcame drug resistance in AML cells. PMID:27308510

  17. Anti-invasive activities of experimental chemotherapeutic agents.

    PubMed

    Mareel, M M; De Mets, M

    1989-01-01

    We have discussed a number of agents that affect invasion and we have grouped them according to their most probable targets. This strategy is based on the following hypothesis. Invasion is the result of cellular responses to extracellular signals. Candidate signals are components of the extracellular matrix, which are rendered inactive by the flavonoid (+)-catechin (see Section III). Signals are recognized by receptors on the plasma membrane, possibly glycoproteins, that may lose their recognition function through alteration of the oligosaccharide side chains by inhibitors of protein glycosylation (see Section IV) and possibly also by alkyllysophospholipids (see Section V). Synthetic oligopeptides reflecting sequences from cell-binding domains of extracellular matrix molecules are also effective tools for blocking specific receptors (see Section VI). GTP-binding proteins (G proteins) act as signal transducers and can be inactivated by pertussis toxin (see Section VII). An intriguing aspect of both alkyllysophospholipids and pertussis toxin is that they can either inhibit the invasion of constitutively invasive cells or induce invasion of constitutively noninvasive cells. Without doubt, cellular responses implicated in invasion are many-fold. Discussed here are cell motility and directional migration with inhibition through dipyridamole and its analogs and through microtubule inhibitors, respectively (see Section VIII). Alternative hypotheses and alternative strategies for the dissection of the invasion process do exist, and alternative cellular and molecular mechanisms of action may explain the anti-invasive activity of the agents discussed earlier. The latter are mentioned in each section. It is the authors' opinion that the possibilities for exploiting the battery of anti-invasive agents have by no means been exhausted. Introducing researchers to experiments that may lead to an understanding of the mechanisms of invasion and metastasis and to new rationales for

  18. Nanocarrier-mediated co-delivery of chemotherapeutic drugs and gene agents for cancer treatment.

    PubMed

    Kang, Lin; Gao, Zhonggao; Huang, Wei; Jin, Mingji; Wang, Qiming

    2015-05-01

    The efficacy of chemotherapeutic drug in cancer treatment is often hampered by drug resistance of tumor cells, which is usually caused by abnormal gene expression. RNA interference mediated by siRNA and miRNA can selectively knock down the carcinogenic genes by targeting specific mRNAs. Therefore, combining chemotherapeutic drugs with gene agents could be a promising strategy for cancer therapy. Due to poor stability and solubility associated with gene agents and drugs, suitable protective carriers are needed and have been widely researched for the co-delivery. In this review, we summarize the most commonly used nanocarriers for co-delivery of chemotherapeutic drugs and gene agents, as well as the advances in co-delivery systems. PMID:26579443

  19. Nanocarrier-mediated co-delivery of chemotherapeutic drugs and gene agents for cancer treatment

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Lin; Gao, Zhonggao; Huang, Wei; Jin, Mingji; Wang, Qiming

    2015-01-01

    The efficacy of chemotherapeutic drug in cancer treatment is often hampered by drug resistance of tumor cells, which is usually caused by abnormal gene expression. RNA interference mediated by siRNA and miRNA can selectively knock down the carcinogenic genes by targeting specific mRNAs. Therefore, combining chemotherapeutic drugs with gene agents could be a promising strategy for cancer therapy. Due to poor stability and solubility associated with gene agents and drugs, suitable protective carriers are needed and have been widely researched for the co-delivery. In this review, we summarize the most commonly used nanocarriers for co-delivery of chemotherapeutic drugs and gene agents, as well as the advances in co-delivery systems. PMID:26579443

  20. Plant-Derived Urease Inhibitors as Alternative Chemotherapeutic Agents.

    PubMed

    Hassan, Sherif T S; Žemlička, Milan

    2016-07-01

    Inhibition of the metalloenzyme urease has important pharmacologic applications in the field of antiulcer and antigastric cancer agents. Urease is involved in many serious infections caused by Helicobacter pylori in the gastric tract as well as by Proteus and related species in the urinary tract. Although numerous studies have described several novel urease inhibitors (UIs) used for the treatment of gastric and urinary infections, all these compounds have exhibited severe side effects, toxicity, and instability. Therefore, to overcome such problems, it is necessary to search for new sources of UIs, such as natural products, that provide reduced side effects, low toxicity, greater stability, and bioavailability. As limited studies have been conducted on plant-derived UIs, this paper aims to highlight and summarize the most promising compounds isolated and identified from plants, such as terpenoids, phenolic compounds, alkaloids, and other substances with inhibitory activities against plant and bacterial ureases; these are in vitro and in vivo studies with an emphasis on structure-activity relationship studies and types of inhibition that show high and promising levels of anti-urease activity. This will aid medicinal chemists in the design and synthesis of novel and pharmacologically potent UIs useful for the development of antiulcer drugs. PMID:27244041

  1. COX-2 inhibitors block chemotherapeutic agent-induced apoptosis prior to commitment in hematopoietic cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Cerella, Claudia; Sobolewski, Cyril; Chateauvieux, Sébastien; Henry, Estelle; Schnekenburger, Michael; Ghelfi, Jenny; Dicato, Mario; Diederich, Marc

    2011-11-15

    Enzymatic inhibitors of pro-inflammatory cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) possess multiple anti-cancer effects, including chemosensitization. These effects are not always linked to the inhibition of the COX-2 enzyme. Here we analyze the effects of three COX-2 enzyme inhibitors (nimesulide, NS-398 and celecoxib) on apoptosis in different hematopoietic cancer models. Surprisingly, COX-2 inhibitors strongly prevent apoptosis induced by a panel of chemotherapeutic agents. We selected U937 cells as a model of sensitive cells for further studies. Here, we provide evidence that the protective effect is COX-independent. No suppression of the low basal prostaglandin (PG)E(2) production may be observed upon treatment by COX-2 inhibitors. Besides, the non-active celecoxib analog 2,5-dimethyl-celecoxib is able to protect from apoptosis as well. We demonstrate early prevention of the stress-induced apoptotic signaling, prior to Bax/Bak activation. This preventive effect fits with an impairment of the ability of chemotherapeutic agents to trigger apoptogenic stress. Accordingly, etoposide-induced DNA damage is strongly attenuated in the presence of COX-2 inhibitors. In contrast, COX-2 inhibitors do not exert any anti-apoptotic activity when cells are challenged with physiological stimuli (anti-Fas, TNFα or Trail) or with hydrogen peroxide, which do not require internalization and/or are not targeted by chemoresistance proteins. Altogether, our findings show a differential off-target anti-apoptotic effect of COX-2 inhibitors on intrinsic vs. extrinsic apoptosis at the very early steps of intracellular signaling, prior to commitment. The results imply that an exacerbation of the chemoresistance phenomena may be implicated. PMID:21745461

  2. Nobiletin enhances the efficacy of chemotherapeutic agents in ABCB1 overexpression cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Wenzhe; Feng, Senling; Yao, Xiaojun; Yuan, Zhongwen; Liu, Liang; Xie, Ying

    2015-01-01

    Multidrug resistance (MDR) is the major obstacle to the successful chemotherapy treatment of many cancers. Here we found that nobiletin, a citrus methoxyflavone, significantly sensitized ABCB1 overexpressing cells A2780/T and A549/T to chemotherapeutic agents such as paclitaxel (a 433-fold reversal of MDR to PTX at 9 μM), doxorubicin (DOX), docetaxel and dounorubicin. Nobiletin profoundly inhibited ABCB1 transporter activity since it significantly increased the intracellular accumulation of DOX and Flutax-2 in A2780/T cells and decreased the efflux of ABCB1 substrates in Caco2 cells without altering the mRNA and protein expression of ABCB1. Moreover, nobiletin stimulated ATPase activity and inhibited verapamil-stimulated ATPase activity in a concentration-dependent manner, indicating a direct interaction with the transporter. Consistent with these findings, molecular docking analysis also identified favorable binding of nobiletin with the transmemberane region site 1 of homology modeled human ABCB1 transporter. Moreover, the Nrf2 protein expression and phosphorylation levels of AKT/ERK were suppressed by co-treated with nobiletin and PTX at the reversal concentrations, suggesting that inhibition of the AKT/ERK/Nrf2 pathway was associated with the sensitizing effect of nobiletin. These findings encourage further animal and clinical MDR studies with the combination therapy of nobiletin and chemotherapeutic drugs. PMID:26689156

  3. Nobiletin enhances the efficacy of chemotherapeutic agents in ABCB1 overexpression cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Ma, Wenzhe; Feng, Senling; Yao, Xiaojun; Yuan, Zhongwen; Liu, Liang; Xie, Ying

    2015-01-01

    Multidrug resistance (MDR) is the major obstacle to the successful chemotherapy treatment of many cancers. Here we found that nobiletin, a citrus methoxyflavone, significantly sensitized ABCB1 overexpressing cells A2780/T and A549/T to chemotherapeutic agents such as paclitaxel (a 433-fold reversal of MDR to PTX at 9 μM), doxorubicin (DOX), docetaxel and dounorubicin. Nobiletin profoundly inhibited ABCB1 transporter activity since it significantly increased the intracellular accumulation of DOX and Flutax-2 in A2780/T cells and decreased the efflux of ABCB1 substrates in Caco2 cells without altering the mRNA and protein expression of ABCB1. Moreover, nobiletin stimulated ATPase activity and inhibited verapamil-stimulated ATPase activity in a concentration-dependent manner, indicating a direct interaction with the transporter. Consistent with these findings, molecular docking analysis also identified favorable binding of nobiletin with the transmemberane region site 1 of homology modeled human ABCB1 transporter. Moreover, the Nrf2 protein expression and phosphorylation levels of AKT/ERK were suppressed by co-treated with nobiletin and PTX at the reversal concentrations, suggesting that inhibition of the AKT/ERK/Nrf2 pathway was associated with the sensitizing effect of nobiletin. These findings encourage further animal and clinical MDR studies with the combination therapy of nobiletin and chemotherapeutic drugs. PMID:26689156

  4. Use of a human endometrial carcinoma cell line (RL-95) for in vitro testing of chemotherapeutic agents

    SciTech Connect

    Christensen, C.; Deppe, G.; Saunders, D.; Malviya, V.

    1987-09-01

    RL-95, a moderately well-differentiated adenosquamous endometrial carcinoma cell line, can be used as a model for testing chemotherapeutic agents in vitro. Cells are grown in T-75 flasks, transferred to scintillation vials, and grown for 24 hr. Following this, medium is removed and new medium containing Adriamycin (Adr) and cis-platinum (CP) is added. Effects of the two drugs are measured by cell counts and DNA synthesis. To measure DNA synthesis, cells are incubated with (/sup 3/H)thymidine (/sup 3/H-THY) for up to 24 hr. Decreased DNA synthesis is reflected in decreased /sup 3/H-THY uptake. Cell kill is obtained with levels of drugs that are clinically achievable. Evidence is presented for increased cytotoxicity with concomitant, rather than sequential, chemotherapy. Results are also confirmed by testing the agent on MCF-7, a well-known breast cancer cell line. The results indicate that (1) endometrial carcinoma responds to Adriamycin and cis-platinum chemotherapeutic agents in vitro, and (2) RL-95 can be used as a model for testing varying concentrations, time of exposure, and combinations of chemotherapeutic agents.

  5. Effect of Paullinia cupana on MCF-7 breast cancer cell response to chemotherapeutic drugs.

    PubMed

    Hertz, Everaldo; Cadoná, Francine Carla; Machado, Alencar Kolinski; Azzolin, Verônica; Holmrich, Sabrina; Assmann, Charles; Ledur, Pauline; Ribeiro, Euler Esteves; DE Souza Filho, Olmiro Cezimbra; Mânica-Cattani, Maria Fernanda; DA Cruz, Ivana Beatrice Mânica

    2015-01-01

    Previous studies suggested that certain plants, such as guarana (Paullinia cupana), exert a protective effect against cancer-related fatigue in breast cancer patients undergoing chemotherapy. However, guarana possesses bioactive molecules, such as caffeine and catechin, which may affect the pharmacological properties of antitumor drugs. Therefore, the aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of guarana on breast cancer cell response to 7 chemotherapeutic agents currently used in the treatment of breast cancer. To perform this study, MCF-7 breast cancer cells were cultured under controlled conditions and exposed to 1, 5 and 10 µg/ml guarana concentrations, with and without chemotherapeutics (gemcitabine, vinorelbine, methotrexate, 5-fluorouracil, paclitaxel, doxorubicin and cyclophosphamide). The effect of these treatments on MCF-7 cell viability and proliferation was spectrophotometrically analyzed with the MTT assay. The main results demonstrated an antiproliferative effect of guarana at concentrations of 5 and 10 µg/ml and a significant effect on chemotherapeutic drug action. In general, guarana improved the antiproliferative effect of chemotherapeutic agents, causing a decrease of >40% in cell growth after 72 h of exposure. The results suggested an interaction of guarana with the chemotherapeutic drugs, which requires confirmation by in vivo complementary studies. PMID:25469267

  6. Effect of Paullinia cupana on MCF-7 breast cancer cell response to chemotherapeutic drugs

    PubMed Central

    HERTZ, EVERALDO; CADONÁ, FRANCINE CARLA; MACHADO, ALENCAR KOLINSKI; AZZOLIN, VERÔNICA; HOLMRICH, SABRINA; ASSMANN, CHARLES; LEDUR, PAULINE; RIBEIRO, EULER ESTEVES; DE SOUZA FILHO, OLMIRO CEZIMBRA; MÂNICA-CATTANI, MARIA FERNANDA; DA CRUZ, IVANA BEATRICE MÂNICA

    2015-01-01

    Previous studies suggested that certain plants, such as guarana (Paullinia cupana), exert a protective effect against cancer-related fatigue in breast cancer patients undergoing chemotherapy. However, guarana possesses bioactive molecules, such as caffeine and catechin, which may affect the pharmacological properties of antitumor drugs. Therefore, the aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of guarana on breast cancer cell response to 7 chemotherapeutic agents currently used in the treatment of breast cancer. To perform this study, MCF-7 breast cancer cells were cultured under controlled conditions and exposed to 1, 5 and 10 µg/ml guarana concentrations, with and without chemotherapeutics (gemcitabine, vinorelbine, methotrexate, 5-fluorouracil, paclitaxel, doxorubicin and cyclophosphamide). The effect of these treatments on MCF-7 cell viability and proliferation was spectrophotometrically analyzed with the MTT assay. The main results demonstrated an antiproliferative effect of guarana at concentrations of 5 and 10 µg/ml and a significant effect on chemotherapeutic drug action. In general, guarana improved the antiproliferative effect of chemotherapeutic agents, causing a decrease of >40% in cell growth after 72 h of exposure. The results suggested an interaction of guarana with the chemotherapeutic drugs, which requires confirmation by in vivo complementary studies. PMID:25469267

  7. Safe Handling of Chemotherapeutic Agents in the Treatment of Nonmalignant Diseases.

    PubMed

    Menonna-Quinn, Denise

    2015-01-01

    Chemotherapy administration was once limited to inpatient oncology units. Over time, outpatient facilities, physicians' private offices, and patients' homes have become popular areas to administer chemotherapeutic agents. Chemotherapy has been successful in treating malignancies and recently has been proved to be effective in nononcology patients as well. The expanded use of these agents has created the need to amplify safe handling practices among health care providers. Evidence indicates that there is a heightened awareness of safe handling practices and the increased availability of the necessary tools. However, health care professionals resist protecting themselves. To avoid the potential risks associated with working with these agents, it is imperative to appreciate the dangers of these hazardous medications, to adhere to the safety mechanisms, and to use the available safety resources on a daily basis. Continuous education of health care providers is fundamental to ensuring safety and positive outcomes. Safe handling procedures can be implemented by adhering to the current standards and integrating them into policies and procedure manuals at practicing institutions. PMID:26536405

  8. Safe handling of chemotherapeutic agents in the treatment of nonmalignant diseases.

    PubMed

    Menonna-Quinn, Denise

    2013-01-01

    Chemotherapy administration was once limited to inpatient oncology units. Over time, outpatient facilities, physicians' private offices, and patients' homes have become popular areas to administer chemotherapeutic agents. Chemotherapy has been successful in treating malignancies and recently has been proved to be effective in nononcology patients as well. The expanded use of these agents has created the need to amplify safe handling practices among health care providers. Evidence indicates that there is a heightened awareness of safe handling practices and the increased availability of the necessary tools. However, health care professionals resist protecting themselves. To avoid the potential risks associated with working with these agents, it is imperative to appreciate the dangers of these hazardous medications, to adhere to the safety mechanisms, and to use the available safety resources on a daily basis. Continuous education of health care providers is fundamental to ensuring safety and positive outcomes. Safe handling procedures can be implemented by adhering to the current standards and integrating them into policies and procedure manuals at practicing institutions. PMID:23558919

  9. Natural products as a source of potential cancer chemotherapeutic and chemopreventive agents.

    PubMed

    Cassady, J M; Baird, W M; Chang, C J

    1990-01-01

    Recent advances in the chemistry of novel bioactive natural products are reported. This research is directed to the exploration of plants with confirmed activity in bioassays designed to detect potential cancer chemotherapeutic and chemopreventive agents. Structural work and chemical studies are reported for several cytotoxic agents from the plants Annona densicoma, Annona reticulata, Claopodium crispifolium, Polytrichum obioense, and Psorospermum febrifugum. Studies are also reported based on development of a mammalian cell culture benzo[a]pyrene metabolism assay for the detection of potential anticarcinogenic agents from natural products. In this study a number of isoflavonoids and flavonoids with antimutagenic activity have been discovered. PMID:2189947

  10. Treatment of cancer using pulsed electric field in combination with chemotherapeutic agents or genes.

    PubMed

    Nishi, T; Dev, S B; Yoshizato, K; Kuratsu, J; Ushio, Y

    1997-03-01

    Electroporation is a standard laboratory technique originally developed for in vitro transfer of molecules into cells. It involves application of electrical pulses ranging from micro- to milliseconds that create transient pores in the cell membrane allowing intracellular access of exogenous molecules. This technique has been successfully applied to regress tumors in animal models by combining electroporation with chemotherapeutic agents--a process known as electrochemotherapy (ECT) which substantially enhance cytotoxicity of some antineoplastic agents. Recently ECT has moved into clinical arena and patients with cutaneous tumors and head and neck cancers have been treated very effectively with ECT. Parallel to ECT, a technique has also been developed which makes it possible to inject plasmid DNA and combine it with in vivo electroporation--electro--genetherapy (EGT)--to deliver in a highly efficient manner both marker and functional genes into target tissue and achieve gene expression. Thus, in vivo electroporation is contributing to the development of a new strategy for cancer treatment with both drugs and genes. PMID:9234068

  11. Profilin potentiates chemotherapeutic agents mediated cell death via suppression of NF-κB and upregulation of p53.

    PubMed

    Zaidi, Adeel H; Raviprakash, Nune; Mokhamatam, Raveendra B; Gupta, Pankaj; Manna, Sunil K

    2016-04-01

    The molecular mechanism by which Profilin acts as a tumor suppressor is still unclear. Several chemotherapeutic agents, used till date either have unfavorable side effects or acquired resistance in tumor cells. Our findings show that Profilin enhances cell death mediated by several chemotherapeutic-agents. The activation of NF-κB and its dependent genes, mediated by paclitaxel and vinblastine, was completely inhibited in Profilin overexpressing cells. This inhibition was due to the Profilin mediated attenuation of IκBα degradation, thereby preventing p65 nuclear translocation and low NF-κB DNA binding activity.Moreover, Profilin increases level of p53 in the presence of known inducers, such as doxorubicin, vinblastine, and benzofuran. This increased p53 level leads to enhanced cell death as indicated by activation of caspases 3, 8, 9, which results in cleavage of PARP.Furthermore, knocking down of p53 in Profilin overexpressing cells leads to decreased cell death. Ectopic expression of Profilin in HCT116 p53 knock out cells showed lesser cell death as compared to the HCT116 p53 wild type cells. For the first time, we provide evidences, which suggest that Profilin synergizes with chemotherapeutic drugs to induce tumor cell death by regulating NF-κB and p53. Thus, modulation of Profilin may be a useful strategy for effective combination therapy. PMID:26842845

  12. Safe Handling of Oral Chemotherapeutic Agents in Clinical Practice: Recommendations From an International Pharmacy Panel

    PubMed Central

    Goodin, Susan; Griffith, Niesha; Chen, Beth; Chuk, Karen; Daouphars, Mikael; Doreau, Christian; Patel, Rinku A.; Schwartz, Rowena; Tamés, Maria José; Terkola, Robert; Vadnais, Barbara; Wright, Debbie; Meier, Klaus

    2011-01-01

    Although there has been a significant increase in the availability and use of oral chemotherapeutic agents, the guidelines around their safe handling are still evolving. Although oral chemotherapy is associated with ease of administration, it has the same exposure risks to health care practitioners, patients, and their caregivers as intravenous formulations, and because it is administered in the home, to the families of patients. However, the general misconception appears to be that exposure risk is low and therefore oral chemotherapeutic agents present little risk and are safer to handle. In a series of three roundtable meetings, a team of international pharmacists from North America and Europe reviewed existing guidelines and identified gaps in recommendations that we believe are important for safe handling. The present article is a compilation of these gaps, especially applicable to manufacturers and distributors, storage and handling, and patient education regarding safe handling. These recommendations, on the basis of our experience and of best practices, provide an international perspective and can be adapted by institutions and practices for development of standardized procedures specific to their needs for the safe handling of oral chemotherapeutic agents. PMID:21532802

  13. Cetuximab enhanced the efficacy of chemotherapeutic agent in ABCB1/P-glycoprotein-overexpressing cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Tao; Huang, Yue; Zhao, Jianming; Wang, Xiaokun; Yang, Ke; Ma, Shaolin; Huang, Liyan; Wah To, Kenneth Kin; Gu, Yong; Fu, Liwu

    2015-01-01

    The overexpression of ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporters is closely associated with the development of multidrug resistance (MDR) in certain types of cancer, which represents a formidable obstacle to the successful cancer chemotherapy. Here, we investigated that cetuximab, an EGFR monoclonal antibody, reversed the chemoresistance mediated by ABCB1, ABCG2 or ABCC1. Our results showed that cetuximab significantly enhanced the cytotoxicity of ABCB1 substrate agent in ABCB1-overexpressing MDR cells but had no effect in their parental drug sensitive cells and ABCC1, ABCG2 overexpressing cells. Furthermore, cetuximab markedly increased intracellular accumulation of doxorubicin (DOX) and rhodamine 123 (Rho 123) in ABCB1-overexpressing MDR cancer cells in a concentration-dependent manner. Cetuximab stimulated the ATPase activity but did not alter the expression level of ABCB1 or block phosphorylation of AKT and ERK. Interestingly, cetuximab decreased the cell membrane fluidity which was known to decrease the function of ABCB1. Our findings advocate further clinical investigation of combination chemotherapy of cetuximab and conventional chemotherapeutic drugs in ABCB1 overexpressing cancer patients. PMID:26506420

  14. Genome-Wide Mutational Signature of the Chemotherapeutic Agent Mitomycin C in Caenorhabditis elegans

    PubMed Central

    Tam, Annie S.; Chu, Jeffrey S.C.; Rose, Ann M.

    2015-01-01

    Cancer therapy largely depends on chemotherapeutic agents that generate DNA lesions. However, our understanding of the nature of the resulting lesions as well as the mutational profiles of these chemotherapeutic agents is limited. Among these lesions, DNA interstrand crosslinks are among the more toxic types of DNA damage. Here, we have characterized the mutational spectrum of the commonly used DNA interstrand crosslinking agent mitomycin C (MMC). Using a combination of genetic mapping, whole genome sequencing, and genomic analysis, we have identified and confirmed several genomic lesions linked to MMC-induced DNA damage in Caenorhabditis elegans. Our data indicate that MMC predominantly causes deletions, with a 5′-CpG-3′ sequence context prevalent in the deleted regions of DNA. Furthermore, we identified microhomology flanking the deletion junctions, indicative of DNA repair via nonhomologous end joining. Based on these results, we propose a general repair mechanism that is likely to be involved in the biological response to this highly toxic agent. In conclusion, the systematic study we have described provides insight into potential sequence specificity of MMC with DNA. PMID:26564951

  15. Tunable release of chemotherapeutic and vascular disrupting agents from injectable fiber fragments potentiates combination chemotherapy.

    PubMed

    Luo, Xiaoming; Xu, Guisen; Wei, Jiaojun; Chen, Maohua; Zhang, Hong; Li, Xiaohong

    2016-06-15

    Cancer progression and metastasis relies much on vasculature networks in tumor microenvironment, and the combination treatment with chemotherapeutic drugs and vascular disrupting agents represents apparent clinical benefits. In the current study, fiber fragments with loadings of hydroxycamptothecin (HCPT) or combretastatin A-4 (CA4) were proposed for tumor inhibition and blood vessel disruption after local administration in tumors. To address challenges in balancing the disruption of tumor vessels and intratumoral uptake of chemotherapeutic agents, this study is focus on release tuning of HCPT and CA4 from the fiber fragment mixtures. Hydroxypropyl-β-cyclodextrin (HPCD) was blended at ratios from 0 to 10% into CA4-loaded fiber fragments (Fc) to modulate CA4 release durations from 0.5 to 24days, and HCPT-loaded fiber fragments (Fh) indicated a sustained release for over 35days. In vitro cytotoxicity tests indicated a sequential inhibition on the endothelial and tumor cell growth, and the growth inhibition of tumor cells was more significant after treatment with mixtures of Fh and Fc containing 2% HPCD (Fc2) than that of other mixtures. In an orthotopic breast tumor model, compared with those of free CA4, or Fc with a fast or slow release of CA4, Fh/Fc mixtures with CA4 release durations from 2 to 12days indicated a lower tumor growth rate, a prolonged animal survival, a lower vessel density in tumors, and a less significant tumor metastasis. In addition, the tumor cell proliferation rate, hypoxia-inducible factor-1α expression within tumors, and the number of surface metastatic nodules in lungs were significantly lower after treatment with Fh/Fc2 mixtures with a CA4 release duration of 5days than those of other mixtures. It demonstrates the advantages of fiber fragment mixtures in independently modulating the release of multiple drugs and the essential role of release tuning of chemotherapeutic drugs and vascular disrupting agents in improving the therapeutic

  16. Natural Products as a Vital Source for the Discovery of Cancer Chemotherapeutic and Chemopreventive Agents.

    PubMed

    Cragg, Gordon M; Pezzuto, John M

    2016-01-01

    Throughout history, natural products have played a dominant role in the treatment of human ailments. For example, the legendary discovery of penicillin transformed global existence. Presently, natural products comprise a large portion of current-day pharmaceutical agents, most notably in the area of cancer therapy. Examples include Taxol, vinblastine, and camptothecin. These structurally unique agents function by novel mechanisms of action; isolation from natural sources is the only plausible method that could have led to their discovery. In addition to terrestrial plants as sources for starting materials, the marine environment (e.g., ecteinascidin 743, halichondrin B, and dolastatins), microbes (e.g., bleomycin, doxorubicin, and staurosporin), and slime molds (e.g., epothilone B) have yielded remarkable cancer chemotherapeutic agents. Irrespective of these advances, cancer remains a leading cause of death worldwide. Undoubtedly, the prevention of human cancer is highly preferable to treatment. Cancer chemoprevention, the use of vaccines or pharmaceutical agents to inhibit, retard, or reverse the process of carcinogenesis, is another important approach for easing this formidable public health burden. Similar to cancer chemotherapeutic agents, natural products play an important role in this field. There are many examples, including dietary phytochemicals such as sulforaphane and phenethyl isothiocyanate (cruciferous vegetables) and resveratrol (grapes and grape products). Overall, natural product research is a powerful approach for discovering biologically active compounds with unique structures and mechanisms of action. Given the unfathomable diversity of nature, it is reasonable to suggest that chemical leads can be generated that are capable of interacting with most or possibly all therapeutic targets. PMID:26679767

  17. Chemotherapeutic activities of Carthami Flos and its reversal effect on multidrug resistance in cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Wu, Jimmy Yiu-Cheong; Yu, Zhi-Ling; Fong, Wang-Fun; Shi, Yi-Qian

    2013-01-01

    Multidrug-resistance (MDR) represents a major cause of failure in cancer chemotherapy. The need for a reduction in MDR by natural-product-based drugs of low toxicity led to the current investigation of applying medicinal herbs in future cancer adjuvant therapy. Carthami Flos (CF), the dried flower of safflower (Carthamus tinctorius L.), is one of the most popular traditional Chinese medicinal herbs used to alleviate pain, increase circulation, and reduce blood-stasis syndrome. The drug resistance index of the total extract of CF in MDR KB-V1 cells and its synergistic effects with other chemotherapeutic agents were studied. SRB cell viability assays were used to quantify growth inhibition after exposure to single drug and in combinations with other chemotherapeutic agents using the median effect principle. The combination indexes were then calculated according to the classic isobologram equation. The results revealed that CF showed a drug resistance index of 0.096. In combination with other chemotherapeutic agents, it enhanced their chemo-sensitivities by 2.8 to 4.0 folds and gave a general synergism in cytotoxic effect. These results indicate that CF could be a potential alternative adjuvant antitumour herbal medicine representing a promising approach to the treatment of some malignant and MDR cancers in the future. PMID:24146498

  18. Lapatinib promotes the incidence of hepatotoxicity by increasing chemotherapeutic agent accumulation in hepatocytes

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Fang; Zhao, HongYun; Wu, XingPing; Huang, ZhenCong; Chen, ZheSheng; To, Kenneth; Fu, LiWu

    2015-01-01

    Lapatinib has been used in combination with capecitabine or paclitaxel to treat patients with progressive HER2-overexpressing metastatic breast cancer (MBC). Unfortunately, an increased incidence of hepatotoxicity had been reported in the combinational therapy. The aim of this study was to investigate the potential mechanisms of this combinational therapy. We found that the patients receiving lapatinib and paclitaxel treatment showed a higher incidence of hepatobiliary system disorders than those receiving paclitaxel alone. Lapatinib was shown to increase the accumulation of doxorubicin in ABCB1-overexpressing hepatocellular cancer cells and normal liver tissues without altering the protein level of ABCB1. Pharmacokinetic studies revealed that lapatinib could increase the systematic exposure of paclitaxel and doxorubicin. Moreover, the in vivo experiments showed that the levels of alanine aminotransferase and serious hepatocyte injury in the group of lapatinib plus chemotherapeutic agent were significantly higher than those in the group of single chemotherapeutic agent such as paclitaxel or doxorubicin. Our study thus revealed for the first time that the higher incidence of hepatotoxicity during this combinational treatment was due to the increased drug accumulation in hepatocytes mediated by the inhibition of ABCB1 by lapatinib. Appropriate dose adjustment may be needed to optimize the combination therapy. PMID:26036634

  19. Lapatinib promotes the incidence of hepatotoxicity by increasing chemotherapeutic agent accumulation in hepatocytes.

    PubMed

    Dai, ChunLing; Ma, ShaoLin; Wang, Fang; Zhao, HongYun; Wu, XingPing; Huang, ZhenCong; Chen, ZheSheng; To, Kenneth; Fu, LiWu

    2015-07-10

    Lapatinib has been used in combination with capecitabine or paclitaxel to treat patients with progressive HER2-overexpressing metastatic breast cancer (MBC). Unfortunately, an increased incidence of hepatotoxicity had been reported in the combinational therapy. The aim of this study was to investigate the potential mechanisms of this combinational therapy. We found that the patients receiving lapatinib and paclitaxel treatment showed a higher incidence of hepatobiliary system disorders than those receiving paclitaxel alone. Lapatinib was shown to increase the accumulation of doxorubicin in ABCB1-overexpressing hepatocellular cancer cells and normal liver tissues without altering the protein level of ABCB1. Pharmacokinetic studies revealed that lapatinib could increase the systematic exposure of paclitaxel and doxorubicin. Moreover, the in vivo experiments showed that the levels of alanine aminotransferase and serious hepatocyte injury in the group of lapatinib plus chemotherapeutic agent were significantly higher than those in the group of single chemotherapeutic agent such as paclitaxel or doxorubicin. Our study thus revealed for the first time that the higher incidence of hepatotoxicity during this combinational treatment was due to the increased drug accumulation in hepatocytes mediated by the inhibition of ABCB1 by lapatinib. Appropriate dose adjustment may be needed to optimize the combination therapy. PMID:26036634

  20. Antimetastasis and antitumor efficacy promoted by sequential release of vascular disrupting and chemotherapeutic agents from electrospun fibers.

    PubMed

    Luo, Xiaoming; Zhang, Hong; Chen, Maohua; Wei, Jiaojun; Zhang, Yun; Li, Xiaohong

    2014-11-20

    The vasculature in tumor microenvironment plays important roles in the tumor growth and metastasis, and the combination of vascular disrupting agents with chemotherapeutic drugs should be effective in inhibiting tumor progression. But the dosing schedules are essential to achieve a balance between vascular collapse and intratumoral uptake of chemotherapeutic agents. In the current study, emulsion and blend electrospinning were used to create compartmental fibers accommodating both combretastatin A-4 (CA4) and hydroxycamptothecin (HCPT). The release durations of CA4 and HCPT were modulated through the structure of fibers for dual drug loadings and the inoculation of 2-hydroxypropyl-β-cyclodextrin in fiber matrices. Under a noncontact cell coculture in Transwell, the sequential release of CA4 and HCPT indicated a sequential killing of endothelial and tumor cells. In an orthotopic breast tumor model, all the CA4/HCPT-loaded fibers showed superior antitumor efficacy and higher survival rate than fibers with loaded individual drug. Compared with fibrous mats with infiltrated free CA4 and fibers with extended release of CA4 for over 30 days, fibers with sustained release of CA4 for 3-7 days from CA4/HCPT-loaded fibers resulted in the most significant antitumor efficacy, tumor vasculature destruction, and the least tumor metastasis to lungs. A judicious selection of CA4 release durations in the combination therapy should be essential to enhance the tumor suppression efficacy and antimetastasis activity. PMID:25218185

  1. Testing chemotherapeutic agents in the feather follicle identifies a selective blockade of cell proliferation and a key role for sonic hedgehog signaling in chemotherapy-induced tissue damage.

    PubMed

    Xie, Guojiang; Wang, Hangwei; Yan, Zhipeng; Cai, Linyan; Zhou, Guixuan; He, Wanzhong; Paus, Ralf; Yue, Zhicao

    2015-03-01

    Chemotherapeutic agents induce complex tissue responses in vivo and damage normal organ functions. Here we use the feather follicle to investigate details of this damage response. We show that cyclophosphamide treatment, which causes chemotherapy-induced alopecia in mice and man, induces distinct defects in feather formation: feather branching is transiently and reversibly disrupted, thus leaving a morphological record of the impact of chemotherapeutic agents, whereas the rachis (feather axis) remains unperturbed. Similar defects are observed in feathers treated with 5-fluorouracil or taxol but not with doxorubicin or arabinofuranosyl cytidine (Ara-C). Selective blockade of cell proliferation was seen in the feather branching area, along with a downregulation of sonic hedgehog (Shh) transcription, but not in the equally proliferative rachis. Local delivery of the Shh inhibitor, cyclopamine, or Shh silencing both recapitulated this effect. In mouse hair follicles, those chemotherapeutic agents that disrupted feather formation also downregulated Shh gene expression and induced hair loss, whereas doxorubicin or Ara-C did not. Our results reveal a mechanism through which chemotherapeutic agents damage rapidly proliferating epithelial tissue, namely via the cell population-specific, Shh-dependent inhibition of proliferation. This mechanism may be targeted by future strategies to manage chemotherapy-induced tissue damage. PMID:25233072

  2. ADVANCED MOLECULAR DESIGN OF BIOPOLYMERS FOR TRANSMUCOSAL AND INTRACELLULAR DELIVERY OF CHEMOTHERAPEUTIC AGENTS AND BIOLOGICAL THERAPEUTICS

    PubMed Central

    Liechty, William B.; Caldorera-Moore, Mary; Phillips, Margaret A.; Schoener, Cody; Peppas, Nicholas A.

    2011-01-01

    Hydrogels have been instrumental in the development of polymeric systems for controlled release of therapeutic agents. These materials are attractive for transmucosal and intracellular drug delivery because of their facile synthesis, inherent biocompatibility, tunable physicochemical properties, and capacity to respond to various physiological stimuli. In this contribution, we outline a multifaceted hydrogel-based approach for expanding the range of therapeutics in oral formulations from classical small-molecule drugs to include proteins, chemotherapeutics, and nucleic acids. Through judicious materials selection and careful design of copolymer composition and molecular architecture, we can engineer systems capable of responding to distinct physiological cues, with tunable physicochemical properties that are optimized to load, protect, and deliver valuable macromolecular payloads to their intended site of action. These hydrogel carriers, including complexation hydrogels, tethered hydrogels, interpenetrating networks, nanoscale hydrogels, and hydrogels with decorated structures are investigated for their ability respond to changes in pH, to load and release insulin and fluorescein, and remain non-toxic to Caco-2 cells. Our results suggest these novel hydrogel networks have great potential for controlled delivery of proteins, chemotherapeutics, and nucleic acids. PMID:21699934

  3. Advanced molecular design of biopolymers for transmucosal and intracellular delivery of chemotherapeutic agents and biological therapeutics.

    PubMed

    Liechty, William B; Caldorera-Moore, Mary; Phillips, Margaret A; Schoener, Cody; Peppas, Nicholas A

    2011-10-30

    Hydrogels have been instrumental in the development of polymeric systems for controlled release of therapeutic agents. These materials are attractive for transmucosal and intracellular drug delivery because of their facile synthesis, inherent biocompatibility, tunable physicochemical properties, and capacity to respond to various physiological stimuli. In this contribution, we outline a multifaceted hydrogel-based approach for expanding the range of therapeutics in oral formulations from classical small-molecule drugs to include proteins, chemotherapeutics, and nucleic acids. Through judicious material selection and careful design of copolymer composition and molecular architecture, we can engineer systems capable of responding to distinct physiological cues, with tunable physicochemical properties that are optimized to load, protect, and deliver valuable macromolecular payloads to their intended site of action. These hydrogel carriers, including complexation hydrogels, tethered hydrogels, interpenetrating networks, nanoscale hydrogels, and hydrogels with decorated structures are investigated for their ability to respond to changes in pH, to load and release insulin and fluorescein, and remain non-toxic to Caco-2 cells. Our results suggest these novel hydrogel networks have great potential for controlled delivery of proteins, chemotherapeutics, and nucleic acids. PMID:21699934

  4. Small interfering RNAs targeting cyclin D1 and cyclin D2 enhance the cytotoxicity of chemotherapeutic agents in mantle cell lymphoma cell lines.

    PubMed

    Tiemann, Katrin; Alluin, Jessica V; Honegger, Anja; Chomchan, Pritsana; Gaur, Shikha; Yun, Yen; Forman, Stephen J; Rossi, John J; Chen, Robert W

    2011-11-01

    Cyclin D1 (CCND1) is a known cell cycle regulator whose overexpression is a hallmark of mantle cell lymphoma (MCL). Although molecular techniques have unified the diagnostic approach to MCL, no therapeutic advances have been made to target this particular pathway. The significance of CCND1 in the pathogenesis and treatment of MCL has yet to be defined. We have taken advantage of RNA interference (RNAi) to down-regulate CCND1 expression in two MCL cell lines (Granta-519 and Jeko-1) to investigate the cytotoxic effect of combining RNAi with conventional chemotherapeutic agents. We designed four small interfering RNAs (siRNAs) specific to CCND1, one specific to CCND2, and one dual-targeting siRNA that simultaneously down-regulates CCND1 and CCND2. Etoposide and doxorubicin were used as chemotherapeutics in combination with the siRNAs. The transfected siRNAs in MCL cell lines triggered 40-60% reduction in target mRNA and protein levels. Importantly, the siRNA-mediated reduction in cyclins resulted in decreased IC(50) (50% inhibitory concentration) values for both doxorubicin and etoposide. The combination of siRNA-mediated inhibition of the cyclins along with chemotherapeutic agents could potentially be used to lower the effective doses of the chemotherapeutic agents and reduce drug-related toxicities. PMID:21745168

  5. Chemotherapeutic Agents for the Treatment of Hepatocellular Carcinoma: Efficacy and Mode of Action

    PubMed Central

    Shaaban, Saad; Negm, Amr; Ibrahim, Elsayed E.; Elrazak, Ahmed A.

    2014-01-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is a dreaded malignancy that every year causes half a million deaths worldwide. Being an aggressive cancer, its incidence exceeds 700,000 new cases per year worldwide with a median survival of 6-8 months. Despite advances in prognosis and early detection, effective HCC chemoprevention or treatment strategies are still lacking, therefore its dismal survival rate remains largely unchanged. This review will characterize currently available chemotherapeutic drugs used in the treatment of HCC. The respective mode(s) of action, side effects and recommendations will be also described for each drug. PMID:25992234

  6. Repurposing the Clinically Efficacious Antifungal Agent Itraconazole as an Anticancer Chemotherapeutic.

    PubMed

    Pace, Jennifer R; DeBerardinis, Albert M; Sail, Vibhavari; Tacheva-Grigorova, Silvia K; Chan, Kelly A; Tran, Raymond; Raccuia, Daniel S; Wechsler-Reya, Robert J; Hadden, M Kyle

    2016-04-28

    Itraconazole (ITZ) is an FDA-approved member of the triazole class of antifungal agents. Two recent drug repurposing screens identified ITZ as a promising anticancer chemotherapeutic that inhibits both the angiogenesis and hedgehog (Hh) signaling pathways. We have synthesized and evaluated first- and second-generation ITZ analogues for their anti-Hh and antiangiogenic activities to probe more fully the structural requirements for these anticancer properties. Our overall results suggest that the triazole functionality is required for ITZ-mediated inhibition of angiogenesis but that it is not essential for inhibition of Hh signaling. The synthesis and evaluation of stereochemically defined des-triazole ITZ analogues also provides key information as to the optimal configuration around the dioxolane ring of the ITZ scaffold. Finally, the results from our studies suggest that two distinct cellular mechanisms of action govern the anticancer properties of the ITZ scaffold. PMID:27014922

  7. Bioactivity of some chemotherapeutic agents in selected polyethylene glycol ointment bases.

    PubMed

    Farouk, A; Béla, S; Géza, R; Mohamed, S; Abdei Hadi, I

    1989-03-01

    Six different chemotherapeutic agents were individually incorporated in each of fourteen selected polyethylene glycol ointment bases, and their bioactivities were assessed using different diffusion techniques. The prepared medicated ointments were evaluated for drug release using the standard microbiological agar cup diffusion, the long period method and the short period method, as well as dialysis through artificial kidney membrane. On the basis of consistency, stability and diffusion results, formulation 11 was the most suitable base for ampicillin, formulation 14 for oxytetracycline HCl, formulation 10 and 9 for neomycin sulphate, and preparation 10 for chloramphenicol. On the basis of the results of drug release, it was evident that formulation 3 was the best for ampicillin and chloramphenicol, formulation 2 for erythromycin, formulation 4 for neomycin sulphate, formulation 12 for sulphadimidine, and formulation 14 for oxytetracycline HCl. PMID:2735193

  8. Nanostructured nanoparticles of self-assembled lipid pro-drugs as a route to improved chemotherapeutic agents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sagnella, Sharon M.; Gong, Xiaojuan; Moghaddam, Minoo J.; Conn, Charlotte E.; Kimpton, Kathleen; Waddington, Lynne J.; Krodkiewska, Irena; Drummond, Calum J.

    2011-03-01

    We demonstrate that oral delivery of self-assembled nanostructured nanoparticles consisting of 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) lipid prodrugs results in a highly effective, target-activated, chemotherapeutic agent, and offers significantly enhanced efficacy over a commercially available alternative that does not self-assemble. The lipid prodrug nanoparticles have been found to significantly slow the growth of a highly aggressive mouse 4T1 breast tumour, and essentially halt the growth of a human MDA-MB-231 breast tumour in mouse xenografts. Systemic toxicity is avoided as prodrug activation requires a three-step, enzymatic conversion to 5-FU, with the third step occurring preferentially at the tumour site. Additionally, differences in the lipid prodrug chemical structure and internal nanostructure of the nanoparticle dictate the enzymatic conversion rate and can be used to control sustained release profiles. Thus, we have developed novel oral nanomedicines that combine sustained release properties with target-selective activation.

  9. NOTCH1 inhibition enhances the efficacy of conventional chemotherapeutic agents by targeting head neck cancer stem cell

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Zhi-Li; Zhang, Lu; Huang, Cong-Fa; Ma, Si-Rui; Bu, Lin-Lin; Liu, Jian-Feng; Yu, Guang-Tao; Liu, Bing; Gutkind, J. Silvio; Kulkarni, Ashok B.; Zhang, Wen-Feng; Sun, Zhi-Jun

    2016-01-01

    Cancer stem cells (CSCs) are considered responsible for tumor initiation and chemoresistance. This study was aimed to investigate the possibility of targeting head neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) by NOTCH1 pathway inhibition and explore the synergistic effect of combining NOTCH inhibition with conventional chemotherapy. NOTCH1/HES1 elevation was found in human HNSCC, especially in tissue post chemotherapy and lymph node metastasis, which is correlated with CSCs markers. NOTCH1 inhibitor DAPT (GSI-IX) significantly reduces CSCs population and tumor self-renewal ability in vitro and in vivo. Flow cytometry analysis showed that NOTCH1 inhibition reduces CSCs frequency either alone or in combination with chemotherapeutic agents, namely, cisplatin, docetaxel, and 5-fluorouracil. The combined strategy of NOTCH1 blockade and chemotherapy synergistically attenuated chemotherapy-enriched CSC population, promising a potential therapeutic exploitation in future clinical trial. PMID:27108536

  10. Nanostructured nanoparticles of self-assembled lipid pro-drugs as a route to improved chemotherapeutic agents

    SciTech Connect

    Sagnella, Sharon M.; Gong, Xiaojuan; Moghaddam, Minoo J.; Conn, Charlotte E.; Kimpton, Kathleen; Waddington, Lynne J.; Krodkiewska, Irena; Drummond, Calum J.

    2014-09-24

    We demonstrate that oral delivery of self-assembled nanostructured nanoparticles consisting of 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) lipid prodrugs results in a highly effective, target-activated, chemotherapeutic agent, and offers significantly enhanced efficacy over a commercially available alternative that does not self-assemble. The lipid prodrug nanoparticles have been found to significantly slow the growth of a highly aggressive mouse 4T1 breast tumour, and essentially halt the growth of a human MDA-MB-231 breast tumour in mouse xenografts. Systemic toxicity is avoided as prodrug activation requires a three-step, enzymatic conversion to 5-FU, with the third step occurring preferentially at the tumour site. Additionally, differences in the lipid prodrug chemical structure and internal nanostructure of the nanoparticle dictate the enzymatic conversion rate and can be used to control sustained release profiles. Thus, we have developed novel oral nanomedicines that combine sustained release properties with target-selective activation.

  11. New synthetic aliphatic sulfonamido-quaternary ammonium salts as anticancer chemotherapeutic agents.

    PubMed

    Song, Doona; Yang, Jee Sun; Oh, Changmok; Cui, Shuolin; Kim, Bo-Kyung; Won, Misun; Lee, Jang-ik; Kim, Hwan Mook; Han, Gyoonhee

    2013-11-01

    RhoB is expressed during tumor cell proliferation, survival, invasion, and metastasis. In malignant progression, the expression levels of RhoB are commonly attenuated. RhoB is known to be linked to the regulation of the PI3K/Akt survival pathways. Based on aliphatic amido-quaternary ammonium salts that induce apoptosis via up-regulation of RhoB, we synthesized novel aliphatic sulfonamido-quaternary ammonium salts. These new synthetic compounds were evaluated for their biological activities using an in vitro RhoB promoter assay in HeLa cells, and in a growth inhibition assay using human cancer cell lines including PC-3, NUGC-3, MDA-MB-231, ACHN, HCT-15, and NCI-H23. Compound 5b (ethyl-dimethyl-{3-[methyl-(tetradecane-1-sulfonyl)-amino]-propyl}-ammonium; iodide) was the most promising anticancer agent in the series, based upon the potency of growth inhibition and RhoB promotion. These new aliphatic sulfonamido-quaternary ammonium salts could be a valuable series for development of new anticancer chemotherapeutic agents. PMID:24095759

  12. Tumor vascular-targeted co-delivery of anti-angiogenesis and chemotherapeutic agents by mesoporous silica nanoparticle-based drug delivery system for synergetic therapy of tumor

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xiaoyu; Wu, Meiying; Pan, Limin; Shi, Jianlin

    2016-01-01

    To overcome the drawback of drug non-selectivity in traditional chemotherapy, the construction of multifunctional targeting drug delivery systems is one of the most effective and prevailing approaches. The intratumoral anti-angiogenesis and the tumor cell-killing are two basic approaches in fighting tumors. Herein we report a novel tumor vascular-targeting multidrug delivery system using mesoporous silica nanoparticles as carrier to co-load an antiangiogenic agent (combretastatin A4) and a chemotherapeutic drug (doxorubicin) and conjugate with targeting molecules (iRGD peptide) for combined anti-angiogenesis and chemotherapy. Such a dual-loaded drug delivery system is capable of delivering the two agents at tumor vasculature and then within tumors through a differentiated drug release strategy, which consequently results in greatly improved antitumor efficacy at a very low doxorubicin dose of 1.5 mg/kg. The fast release of the antiangiogenic agent at tumor vasculatures led to the disruption of vascular structure and had a synergetic effect with the chemotherapeutic drug slowly released in the following delivery of chemotherapeutic drug into tumors. PMID:26766908

  13. Focal therapy of neuroblastoma using silk films to deliver kinase and chemotherapeutic agents in vivo.

    PubMed

    Seib, F Philipp; Coburn, Jeannine; Konrad, Ilona; Klebanov, Nikolai; Jones, Gregory T; Blackwood, Brian; Charest, Alain; Kaplan, David L; Chiu, Bill

    2015-07-01

    Current methods for treatment of high-risk neuroblastoma patients include surgical intervention, in addition to systemic chemotherapy. However, only limited therapeutic tools are available to pediatric surgeons involved in neuroblastoma care, so the development of intraoperative treatment modalities is highly desirable. This study presents a silk film library generated for focal therapy of neuroblastoma; these films were loaded with either the chemotherapeutic agent doxorubicin or the targeted drug crizotinib. Drug release kinetics from the silk films were fine-tuned by changing the amount and physical crosslinking of silk; doxorubicin loaded films were further refined by applying a gold nanocoating. Doxorubicin-loaded, physically crosslinked silk films showed the best in vitro activity and superior in vivo activity in orthotopic neuroblastoma studies when compared to the doxorubicin-equivalent dose administered intravenously. Silk films were also suitable for delivery of the targeted drug crizotinib, as crizotinib-loaded silk films showed an extended release profile and an improved response both in vitro and in vivo when compared to freely diffusible crizotinib. These findings, when combined with prior in vivo data on silk, support a viable future for silk-based anticancer drug delivery systems. PMID:25861948

  14. Effective delivery of chemotherapeutic nanoparticles by depleting host Kupffer cells.

    PubMed

    Ohara, Yusuke; Oda, Tatsuya; Yamada, Keiichi; Hashimoto, Shinji; Akashi, Yoshimasa; Miyamoto, Ryoichi; Kobayashi, Akihiko; Fukunaga, Kiyoshi; Sasaki, Ryoko; Ohkohchi, Nobuhiro

    2012-11-15

    Although chemotherapeutic nanoparticles would confer various advantages, the majority of administrated nanoparticles are known to be spoiled by the reticuloendothelial system (RES). Intending to more effectively deliver therapeutic nanoparticles to target regions in vivo, host RES, especially Kupffer cells in the liver, have been depleted ahead of drug administration. To demonstrate this hypothesis, clodronate liposomes were preinjected into BALB/c nude mice for depletion of Kupffer cells 2 days before, and pegylated liposomal doxorubicin (Doxil) at the doses of 1.25, 2.5 and 5.0 mg/kg was administered. As a result, doxorubicin accumulation in the liver was decreased from 36 to 26% injected dose/organ by the Kupffer cells depletion, and consequently, the plasma concentration of doxorubicin was significantly enhanced threefold (from 11 to 33 μg/mL) on day 1 at 1.25 mg/kg-dose group. Doxorubicin accumulation in the tumor was increased from 0.78 to 3.0 μg/g-tissue on day 3, and tumor growth inhibition by Doxil was significantly boosted (tumor volumes from 751 to 482 mm(3) on day 24) by the Kupffer cells depletion. In conclusion, Kupffer cells depletion by clodronate liposomes enhanced the plasma concentration and antitumor effects of Doxil, and would be widely applicable for various clinical cancer chemotherapies using nanoparticles. PMID:22362271

  15. A Novel Agent Enhances the Chemotherapeutic Efficacy of Doxorubicin in MCF-7 Breast Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Liang; Chan, Judy Y.; Zhou, Xinhua; Cui, Guozhen; Yan, Zhixiang; Wang, Li; Yan, Ru; Di, Lijun; Wang, Yuqiang; Hoi, Maggie P.; Shan, Luchen; Lee, Simon M.

    2016-01-01

    We have previously demonstrated that DT-010, a novel conjugate of danshensu (DSS) and tetramethylpyrazine (TMP), displays anti-tumor effects in breast cancer cells both in vitro and in vivo. In the present study, we investigated whether DT-010 enhances the chemotherapeutic effect of doxorubicin (Dox) in MCF-7 breast cancer cells and exerts concurrent cardioprotective benefit at the same time. Our findings showed that DT-010 was more potent than TMP, DSS, or their combination in potentiating Dox-induced toxicity in MCF-7 cells. Co-treatment with DT-010 and Dox increased apoptosis in MCF-7 cells relative to Dox alone. Further study indicated that glycolytic capacity, glycolytic reserve and lactate level of MCF-7 cells were significantly inhibited after DT-010 treatment. DT-010 also increased the expression of the pro-survival protein GRP78, which was inhibited by co-treatment with Dox. Both endoplasmic reticulum stress inhibitor 4-PBA and knockdown of the expression of GRP78 protein potentiated DT-010-mediated apoptosis in MCF-7 cells. Moreover, DT-010 inhibited Dox-induced cardiotoxicity in H9c2 myoblasts. In conclusion, DT-010 and Dox confer synergistic anti-tumor effect in MCF-7 breast cancer cells through downregulation of the glycolytic pathway and inhibition of the expression of GRP78. Meanwhile, DT-010 also protects against Dox-induced cardiotoxicity. PMID:27559313

  16. GTP depletion synergizes the anti-proliferative activity of chemotherapeutic agents in a cell type-dependent manner

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, Tao; Meng, Lingjun; Tsai, Robert Y.L.

    2011-10-22

    Highlights: {yields} Strong synergy between mycophenolic acid (MPA) and 5-FU in MDA-MB-231 cells. {yields} Cell type-dependent synergy between MPA and anti-proliferative agents. {yields} The synergy of MPA on 5-FU is recapitulated by RNA polymerase-I inhibition. {yields} The synergy of MPA on 5-FU requires the expression of nucleostemin. -- Abstract: Mycophenolic acid (MPA) depletes intracellular GTP by blocking de novo guanine nucleotide synthesis. GTP is used ubiquitously for DNA/RNA synthesis and as a signaling molecule. Here, we made a surprising discovery that the anti-proliferative activity of MPA acts synergistically with specific chemotherapeutic agents in a cell type-dependent manner. In MDA-MB-231 cells, MPA shows an extremely potent synergy with 5-FU but not with doxorubicin or etoposide. The synergy between 5-FU and MPA works most effectively against the highly tumorigenic mammary tumor cells compared to the less tumorigenic ones, and does not work in the non-breast cancer cell types that we tested, with the exception of PC3 cells. On the contrary, MPA shows the highest synergy with paclitaxel but not with 5-FU in SCC-25 cells, derived from oral squamous cell carcinomas. Mechanistically, the synergistic effect of MPA on 5-FU in MDA-MB-231 cells can be recapitulated by inhibiting the RNA polymerase-I activity and requires the expression of nucleostemin. This work reveals that the synergy between MPA and anti-proliferative agents is determined by cell type-dependent factors.

  17. Repurposing the FDA-Approved Pinworm Drug Pyrvinium as a Novel Chemotherapeutic Agent for Intestinal Polyposis

    PubMed Central

    Giambelli, Camilla; Fei, Dennis Liang; Han, Lu; Hang, Brian I.; Bai, Feng; Pei, Xin-Hai; Nose, Vania; Burlingame, Oname; Capobianco, Anthony J.; Orton, Darren; Lee, Ethan; Robbins, David J.

    2014-01-01

    Mutations in the WNT-pathway regulator ADENOMATOUS POLYPOSIS COLI (APC) promote aberrant activation of the WNT pathway that is responsible for APC-associated diseases such as Familial Adenomatous Polyposis (FAP) and 85% of spontaneous colorectal cancers (CRC). FAP is characterized by multiple intestinal adenomas, which inexorably result in CRC. Surprisingly, given their common occurrence, there are few effective chemotherapeutic drugs for FAP. Here we show that the FDA-approved, anti-helminthic drug Pyrvinium attenuates the growth of WNT-dependent CRC cells and does so via activation of CK1α. Furthermore, we show that Pyrvinium can function as an in vivo inhibitor of WNT-signaling and polyposis in a mouse model of FAP: APCmin mice. Oral administration of Pyrvinium, a CK1α agonist, attenuated the levels of WNT-driven biomarkers and inhibited adenoma formation in APCmin mice. Considering its well-documented safe use for treating enterobiasis in humans, our findings suggest that Pyrvinium could be repurposed for the clinical treatment of APC-associated polyposes. PMID:25003333

  18. Modification of in vitro and in vivo BCG cell wall-induced immunosuppression by treatment with chemotherapeutic agents or indomethacin

    SciTech Connect

    DeSilva, M.A.; Wepsic, H.T.; Mizushima, Y.; Nikcevich, D.A.; Larson, C.H.

    1985-04-01

    The in vitro inhibition of spleen cell blastogenesis response and the in vivo enhancement of tumor growth are phenomena associated with BCG cell wall (BCGcw) immunization. What effect treatment with chemotherapeutic agents and the prostaglandin inhibitor indomethacin would have on the in vitro and in vivo responses to BCGcw immunization was evaluated. In vitro blastogenesis studies showed that chemotherapy pretreatment prior to immunization with BCGcw resulted in a restoration of the spleen cell blastogenesis response. In blastogenesis addback studies, where BCGcw-induced irradiated splenic suppressor cells were admixed with normal cells, less inhibition of blastogenesis occurred when spleen cells were obtained from rats that had received the combined treatment of chemotherapy and BCGcw immunization versus only BCGcw immunization. The cocultivation of spleen cells from BCGcw-immunized rats with indomethacin resulted in a 30-40% restoration of the blastogenesis response. In vivo studies showed that BCGcw-mediated enhancement of intramuscular tumor growth of the 3924a ACI rat tumor could be abrogated by either pretreatment with busulfan or mitomycin or by the feeding of indomethacin.

  19. Chemotherapeutics challenges in developing effective treatments for the endemic malarias.

    PubMed

    Kevin Baird, J

    2012-12-01

    The endemic malarias threaten the several billion people residing where transmission occurs. Chemotherapeutic strategy pitted against these threats hinges upon species- and stage-specific treatments guided by diagnosis and screening against sometime dangerous contraindications. This approach suits malaria as it occurs among travelers in the developed, non-endemic world. However, limiting treatment to that which diagnosis affirms may not be rational in endemic zones. Most of the endemic malarias remain out of diagnostic reach, either by inaccessibility of the parasite stage, insensitivity of the technology, or unavailability of diagnostic services. The partial and fragmented chemotherapeutic attack of malaria guided by confirmed diagnostics leaves most of the endemic malarias unchallenged. Development of elimination therapy, a single course of treatment aimed at all species and stages, would significantly advance progress against the major killers known collectively as malaria. PMID:24533286

  20. Nanocarrier mediated Delivery of siRNA/miRNA in Combination with Chemotherapeutic Agents for Cancer Therapy: Current Progress and Advances

    PubMed Central

    Gandhi, Nishant S.; Tekade, Rakesh K.; Chougule, Mahavir B.

    2014-01-01

    Chemotherapeutic agents have certain limitations when it comes to treating cancer, the most important being severe side effects along with multidrug resistance developed against them. Tumor cells exhibits drug resistance due to activation of various cellular level processes viz. activation of drug efflux pumps, anti-apoptotic defense mechanisms etc. Currently, RNA interference (RNAi) based therapeutic approaches are under vibrant scrutinization to seek cancer cure. Especially small interfering RNA (siRNA) and micro RNA (miRNA), are able to knock down the carcinogenic genes by targeting the mRNA expression, which underlies the uniqueness of this therapeutic approach. Recent research focus in the regime of cancer therapy involves the engagement of targeted delivery of siRNA/miRNA in combinations with other therapeutic agents (such as gene, DNA or chemotherapeutic drug) for targeting permeability glycoprotein (P-gp), Multidrug resistant protein 1(MRP-1), B-cell lymphoma (BCL-2) and other targets that are mainly responsible for resistance in cancer therapy. RNAi-chemotherapeutic drug combinations have also been found to be effective against different molecular targets as well and can increase the sensitization of cancer cells to therapy several folds. However, due to stability issues associated with siRNA/miRNA suitable protective carrier is needed and nanotechnology based approaches have been widely explored to overcome these drawbacks. Furthermore, it has been univocally advocated that the co-delivery of siRNA/miRNA with other chemodrugs significantly enhances their capability to overcome cancer resistance compared to naked counterparts. The objective of this article is to review recent nanocarrier based approaches adopted for the delivery of siRNA/miRNA combinations with other anticancer agents (siRNA/miRNA/pDNA/chemodrugs) to treat cancer. PMID:25204288

  1. Optimal Classes of Chemotherapeutic Agents Sensitized by Specific Small-Molecule Inhibitors of Akt In Vitro and In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Yan; Liu, Xuesong; Han, Edward K.; Guan, Ran; Shoemaker, Alexander R.; Oleksijew, Anatol; Woods, Keith W.; Fisher, John P.; Klinghofer, Vered; Lasko, Loren; McGonigal, Thomas; Li, Qun; Rosenberg, Saul H.; Giranda, Vincent L.; Luo, Yan

    2005-01-01

    Abstract Akt is a serine/threonine kinase that transduces survival signals from survival/growth factors. Deregulation and signal imbalance in cancer cells make them prone to apoptosis. Upregulation or activation of Akt to aid the survival of cancer cells is a common theme in human malignancies. We have developed small-molecule Akt inhibitors that are potent and specific. These Akt inhibitors can inhibit Akt activity and block phosphorylation by Akt on multiple downstream targets in cells. Synergy in apoptosis induction was observed when Akt inhibitors were combined with doxorubicin or camptothecin. Akt inhibitor–induced enhancement of topoisomerase inhibitor cytotoxicity was also evident in long-term cell survival assay. Synergy with paclitaxel in apoptosis induction was evident in cells pretreated with paclitaxel, and enhancement of tumor delay by paclitaxel was demonstrated through cotreatment with Akt inhibitor Compound A (A-443654). Combination with other classes of chemotherapeutic agents did not yield any enhancement of cytotoxicity. These findings provide important guidance in selecting appropriate classes of chemotherapeutic agents for combination with Akt inhibitors in cancer treatment. PMID:16331885

  2. Sec61β Controls Sensitivity to Platinum-Containing Chemotherapeutic Agents through Modulation of the Copper-Transporting ATPase ATP7A

    PubMed Central

    Larson, Christopher A.; Manorek, Gerald; Adams, Preston; Howell, Stephen B.

    2012-01-01

    The Sec61 protein translocon is a multimeric complex that transports proteins across lipid bilayers. We discovered that the Sec61β subunit modulates cellular sensitivity to chemotherapeutic agents, particularly the platinum drugs. To investigate the mechanism, expression of Sec61β was constitutively knocked down in 2008 ovarian cancer cells. Sec61β knockdown (KD) resulted in 8-, 16.8-, and 9-fold resistance to cisplatin (cDDP), carboplatin, and oxaliplatin, respectively. Sec61β KD reduced the cellular accumulation of cDDP to 67% of that in parental cells. Baseline copper levels, copper uptake, and copper cytotoxicity were also reduced. Because copper transporters and chaperones regulate platinum drug accumulation and efflux, their expression in 2008 Sec61β-KD cells was analyzed; ATP7A was found to be 2- to 3-fold overexpressed, whereas there was no change in ATP7B, ATOX1, CTR1, or CTR2 levels. Cells lacking ATP7A did not exhibit increased cDDP resistance upon knockdown of Sec61β. Sec61β-KD cells also exhibited altered ATP7A cellular distribution. We conclude that Sec61β modulates the cytotoxicity of many chemotherapeutic agents, with the largest effect being on the platinum drugs. This modulation occurs through effects of Sec61β on the expression and distribution of ATP7A, which was shown previously to control platinum drug sequestration and cytotoxicity. PMID:22710939

  3. Chemotherapeutic agents subvert tumor immunity by generating agonists of platelet-activating factor.

    PubMed

    Sahu, Ravi P; Ocana, Jesus A; Harrison, Kathleen A; Ferracini, Matheus; Touloukian, Christopher E; Al-Hassani, Mohammed; Sun, Louis; Loesch, Mathew; Murphy, Robert C; Althouse, Sandra K; Perkins, Susan M; Speicher, Paul J; Tyler, Douglas S; Konger, Raymond L; Travers, Jeffrey B

    2014-12-01

    Oxidative stress suppresses host immunity by generating oxidized lipid agonists of the platelet-activating factor receptor (PAF-R). Because many classical chemotherapeutic drugs induce reactive oxygen species (ROS), we investigated whether these drugs might subvert host immunity by activating PAF-R. Here, we show that PAF-R agonists are produced in melanoma cells by chemotherapy that is administered in vitro, in vivo, or in human subjects. Structural characterization of the PAF-R agonists induced revealed multiple oxidized glycerophosphocholines that are generated nonenzymatically. In a murine model of melanoma, chemotherapeutic administration could augment tumor growth by a PAF-R-dependent process that could be blocked by treatment with antioxidants or COX-2 inhibitors or by depletion of regulatory T cells. Our findings reveal how PAF-R agonists induced by chemotherapy treatment can promote treatment failure. Furthermore, they offer new insights into how to improve the efficacy of chemotherapy by blocking its heretofore unknown impact on PAF-R activation. PMID:25304264

  4. Non-alkaloids extract from Stemona sessilifolia enhances the activity of chemotherapeutic agents through P-glycoprotein-mediated multidrug-resistant cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Han, Lu; Ma, Yang-Mei; An, Li; Zhang, Qiao; Wang, Chang-Li; Zhao, Qing-Chun

    2016-01-01

    One of the major impediments to the successful treatment of cancer is the development of resistant cancer cells, which could cause multidrug resistance (MDR), and overexpression of ABCB1/P-glycoprotein (P-gp) is one of the most common causes of MDR in cancer cells. Recently, natural products or plant-derived chemicals have been investigated more and more widely as potential multidrug-resistant (MDR) reversing agents. The current study demonstrated for the first time that non-alkaloids extract from Stemona sessilifolia significantly reversed the resistance of chemotherapeutic agents, adriamycin, paclitaxel and vincristine to MCF-7/ADR cells compared with MCF-7/S cells in a dose-dependent manner. The results obtained from these studies indicated that the non-alkaloids extract from S. sessilifolia plays an important role in reversing MDR of cancer as a P-gp modulator in vitro and may be effective in the treatment of multidrug-resistant cancers. PMID:26190165

  5. Sensitivity of Human Intrahepatic Cholangiocarcinoma Subtypes to Chemotherapeutics and Molecular Targeted Agents: A Study on Primary Cell Cultures

    PubMed Central

    Fraveto, Alice; Cardinale, Vincenzo; Bragazzi, Maria Consiglia; Giuliante, Felice; De Rose, Agostino Maria; Grazi, Gian Luca; Napoletano, Chiara; Semeraro, Rossella; Lustri, Anna Maria; Costantini, Daniele; Nevi, Lorenzo; Di Matteo, Sabina; Renzi, Anastasia; Carpino, Guido; Gaudio, Eugenio; Alvaro, Domenico

    2015-01-01

    We investigated the sensitivity of intrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma (IHCCA) subtypes to chemotherapeutics and molecular targeted agents. Primary cultures of mucin- and mixed-IHCCA were prepared from surgical specimens (N. 18 IHCCA patients) and evaluated for cell proliferation (MTS assay) and apoptosis (Caspase 3) after incubation (72 hours) with increasing concentrations of different drugs. In vivo, subcutaneous human tumor xenografts were evaluated. Primary cultures of mucin- and mixed-IHCCA were characterized by a different pattern of expression of cancer stem cell markers, and by a different drug sensitivity. Gemcitabine and the Gemcitabine-Cisplatin combination were more active in inhibiting cell proliferation in mixed-IHCCA while Cisplatin or Abraxane were more effective against mucin-IHCCA, where Abraxane also enhances apoptosis. 5-Fluoracil showed a slight inhibitory effect on cell proliferation that was more significant in mixed- than mucin-IHCCA primary cultures and, induced apoptosis only in mucin-IHCCA. Among Hg inhibitors, LY2940680 and Vismodegib showed slight effects on proliferation of both IHCCA subtypes. The tyrosine kinase inhibitors, Imatinib Mesylate and Sorafenib showed significant inhibitory effects on proliferation of both mucin- and mixed-IHCCA. The MEK 1/2 inhibitor, Selumetinib, inhibited proliferation of only mucin-IHCCA while the aminopeptidase-N inhibitor, Bestatin was more active against mixed-IHCCA. The c-erbB2 blocking antibody was more active against mixed-IHCCA while, the Wnt inhibitor, LGK974, similarly inhibited proliferation of mucin- and mixed-IHCCA. Either mucin- or mixed-IHCCA showed high sensitivity to nanomolar concentrations of the dual PI3-kinase/mTOR inhibitor, NVP-BEZ235. In vivo, in subcutaneous xenografts, either NVP-BEZ235 or Abraxane, blocked tumor growth. In conclusion, mucin- and mixed-IHCCA are characterized by a different drug sensitivity. Cisplatin, Abraxane and the MEK 1/2 inhibitor, Selumetinib were more

  6. Synthesis and Biological Evaluation of Novel N-phenyl-5-carboxamidyl Isoxazoles as Potential Chemotherapeutic Agents for Colon Cancer.

    PubMed

    Shaw, Jiajiu; Chen, Ben; Bourgault, Jean P; Jiang, Hao; Kumar, Narendra; Mishra, Jayshree; Valeriote, Frederick A; Media, Joe; Bobbitt, Kevin; Pietraszkiewicz, Halina; Edelstein, Matthew; Andreana, Peter R

    2012-01-01

    A new series of isoxazole derivatives, N-phenyl-5-carboxamidyl isoxazoles, was investigated for their anticancer activity with solid tumor selectivity. Six N-phenyl-5-carboxamidylisoxazoles were chemically synthesized and evaluated by the in vitro disk-diffusion assay and IC50 cytotoxicity determination. The results showed that one of the derivatives, compound 3, N-(4-chlorophenyl)-5-carboxamidyl isoxazole, was the most active against colon 38 and CT-26 mouse colon tumor cells with an IC50 of 2.5 μg/mL for both cell lines. Western blot analysis showed that compound 3 significantly down-regulated the expression of phosphorylated STAT3 in both human and mouse colon cancer cells indicating that the mechanism of action for compound 3 may involve the inhibition of JAK3/STAT3 signaling pathways. Flow cytometric analysis with Annexin V staining showed that the death induced by compound 3 is mediated through cell necrosis and not apoptotic pathway. In summary, our results show that compound 3 is a new N-phenyl-5-carboxamidyl isoxazole with potential anticancer activity. Compound 3 inhibits the phosphorylation of STAT3, a novel target for chemotherapeutic drugs, and is worthy of further investigation as a potential chemotherapeutic agent for treating colon cancer. PMID:25285182

  7. Culture at a Higher Temperature Mildly Inhibits Cancer Cell Growth but Enhances Chemotherapeutic Effects by Inhibiting Cell-Cell Collaboration

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Shengming; Wang, Jiangang; Xie, Bingkun; Luo, Zhiguo; Lin, Xiukun; Liao, D. Joshua

    2015-01-01

    Acute febrile infections have historically been used to treat cancer. To explore the underlying mechanism, we studied chronic effects of fever on cancer cell growth and chemotherapeutic efficacy in cell culture. We found that culturing cancer cells at 39°C mildly inhibited cell growth by arresting the cells at the G1 phase of the cell cycle. When cells were seeded in culture dishes at a lower density, e.g. about 1000–2000 cells per 35-mm dish, the growth inhibition was much greater, manifested as many fewer cell colonies in the 39°C dishes, compared with the results at a higher density seeding, e.g. 20,000 cells per dish, suggesting that cell-cell collaboration as the Allee effect in cell culture is inhibited at 39°C. Withdrawal of cells from serum enhanced the G1 arrest at 39°C and, for some cell lines such as A549 lung cancer cells, serum replenishment failed to quickly drive the cells from the G1 into the S and G2-M phases. Therapeutic effects of several chemotherapeutic agents, including clove bud extracts, on several cancer cell lines were more potent at 39°C than at 37°C, especially when the cells were seeded at a low density. For some cell lines and some agents, this enhancement is long-lasting, i.e. continuing after the cessation of the treatment. Collectively these results suggest that hyperthermia may inhibit cancer cell growth by G1 arrest and by inhibition of cell-cell collaboration, and may enhance the efficacy of several chemotherapeutic agents, an effect which may persist beyond the termination of chemotherapy. PMID:26495849

  8. Culture at a Higher Temperature Mildly Inhibits Cancer Cell Growth but Enhances Chemotherapeutic Effects by Inhibiting Cell-Cell Collaboration.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Shengming; Wang, Jiangang; Xie, Bingkun; Luo, Zhiguo; Lin, Xiukun; Liao, D Joshua

    2015-01-01

    Acute febrile infections have historically been used to treat cancer. To explore the underlying mechanism, we studied chronic effects of fever on cancer cell growth and chemotherapeutic efficacy in cell culture. We found that culturing cancer cells at 39°C mildly inhibited cell growth by arresting the cells at the G1 phase of the cell cycle. When cells were seeded in culture dishes at a lower density, e.g. about 1000-2000 cells per 35-mm dish, the growth inhibition was much greater, manifested as many fewer cell colonies in the 39°C dishes, compared with the results at a higher density seeding, e.g. 20,000 cells per dish, suggesting that cell-cell collaboration as the Allee effect in cell culture is inhibited at 39°C. Withdrawal of cells from serum enhanced the G1 arrest at 39°C and, for some cell lines such as A549 lung cancer cells, serum replenishment failed to quickly drive the cells from the G1 into the S and G2-M phases. Therapeutic effects of several chemotherapeutic agents, including clove bud extracts, on several cancer cell lines were more potent at 39°C than at 37°C, especially when the cells were seeded at a low density. For some cell lines and some agents, this enhancement is long-lasting, i.e. continuing after the cessation of the treatment. Collectively these results suggest that hyperthermia may inhibit cancer cell growth by G1 arrest and by inhibition of cell-cell collaboration, and may enhance the efficacy of several chemotherapeutic agents, an effect which may persist beyond the termination of chemotherapy. PMID:26495849

  9. The DNA damage/repair cascade in glioblastoma cell lines after chemotherapeutic agent treatment.

    PubMed

    Annovazzi, Laura; Caldera, Valentina; Mellai, Marta; Riganti, Chiara; Battaglia, Luigi; Chirio, Daniela; Melcarne, Antonio; Schiffer, Davide

    2015-01-01

    Therapeutic resistance in glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) has been linked to a subpopulation of cells with stem cell-like properties, the glioma stem cells (GSCs), responsible for cancer progression and recurrence. This study investigated the in vitro cytotoxicity of three chemotherapeutics, temozolomide (TMZ), doxorubicin (Dox) and paclitaxel (PTX) on glioma cell lines, by analyzing the molecular mechanisms leading to DNA repair and cell resistance, or to cell death. The drugs were tested on 16 GBM cell lines, grown as neurospheres (NS) or adherent cells (AC), by studying DNA damage occurrence by Comet assay, the expression by immunofluorescence and western blotting of checkpoint/repair molecules and apoptosis. The three drugs were able to provoke a genotoxic injury and to inhibit dose- and time-dependently cell proliferation, more evidently in AC than in NS. The first cell response to DNA damage was the activation of the damage sensors (p-ATM, p-53BP1, γ-H2AX), followed by repair effectors; the expression of checkpoint/repair molecules appeared higher in NS than in AC. The non-homologous repair pathway (NHEJ) seemed more involved than the homologous one (HR). Apoptosis occurred after long treatment times, but only a small percentage of cells in NS underwent death, even at high drug concentration, whereas most cells survived in a quiescent state and resumed proliferation after drug removal. In tumor specimens, checkpoint/repair proteins were constitutively expressed in GBMs, but not in low-grade gliomas. PMID:25892134

  10. Chemotherapeutic effect of Berberis integerrima hydroalcoholic extract on colon cancer development in the 1,2-dimethyl hydrazine rat model.

    PubMed

    Malayeri, Mohammad R Mohammadi; Dadkhah, Abolfazl; Fatemi, Faezeh; Dini, Salome; Torabi, Fatemeh; Tavajjoh, Mohammad M; Rabiei, Javad

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the efficacy of a Berberis integerrima hydroalcoholic extract as a chemotherapeutic agent in colon carcinogenesis in the rat induced by 1,2-dimethyl hydrazine (DMH). Male Wistar rats were divided into five groups: a negative control group without DMH treatment; a control group injected DMH (20 mg/kg b.w); two groups receiving B. integerrima extract (50 and 100 mg/kg b.w), concomitant with injected DMH, as chemotherapeutic groups; a positive control group receiving 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) along with DMH. The effects of the extracts were determined by assessment of hepatic malondialdehyde (MDA), glutathione (GSH), ferric reducing ability of plasma (FRAP), and the activities of hepatic glutathione S-transferase and cytochrome P450 (GST and CYP450). Additionally, colon tissues were assessed for colonic β-catenin and histopathological analysis. In DMH-treated rats, the extracts partially normalized the levels of FRAP, CYP450, β-catenin, and GST. Likewise, formation of aberrant crypt foci (ACF) in colon tissue of DMH-treated was reduced by the extracts. Thus, the extracts possess chemotherapeutic activity against colon carcinogenesis. PMID:27232632

  11. Examination of the activities of 43 chemotherapeutic agents against Neospora caninum tachyzoites in cultured cells.

    PubMed

    Lindsay, D S; Rippey, N S; Cole, R A; Parsons, L C; Dubey, J P; Tidwell, R R; Blagburn, B L

    1994-07-01

    Neospora caninum causes serious disease in dogs, and it, or a similar parasite, is a major cause of abortion in cattle. Little is known about the susceptibility of this protozoan to antimicrobial agents. We studied several antimicrobial agents to determine which classes might have activity against this parasite. We also determined whether activity of such agents was coccidiocidal or coccidiostatic. A 2-day of treatment, monoclonal antibody-based enzyme immunoassay and a 5-day of treatment, cell culture flask (CCF), lesion-based assay were developed to examine the ability of test agents to inhibit tachyzoite multiplication. Seven sulfonamides were examined, with the following activities observed: sulfathiazole > or = sulfamethoxazole > sulfadiazine > sulfaquinoxaline > or = sulfamethazine > sulfadimethoxine > sulfamerazine. Dapsone, a sulfone, had little activity. Six dihydrofolate reductase/thymidylate synthase inhibitors were examined, with the following activities observed: piritrexim > pyrimethamine > ormetoprim > trimethoprim = diaveridine > methotrexate. Six ionophorous antibiotics were examined; lasalocid, maduramicin, monensin, narasin, and salinomycin had equivalent activities, but alborixin was toxic for host cells at the lowest concentration examined. Three macrolide antibiotics--azithromycin, clarithromycin, and erythromycin--were examined and had equivalent activities. Two tetracycline antibiotics, doxycycline and minocycline, were examined and had equivalent activities. Three lincosamide antibiotics were examined, with the following activities observed: clindamycin hydrochloride > clindamycin phosphate > lincomycin hydrochloride. Pentamidine and 6 of its analogs were examined, and only hexamidine and 1,4-Di[4-(2-imidazolinyl)-2-methoxy-phenoxy]butane had activity. Eight miscellaneous antiprotozoal agents were examined for activity. Amprolium, metronidazole, paromomycin, and roxarsone had little activity.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:7978638

  12. Suppression of PRKAR1A expression enhances anti-proliferative and apoptotic effects of protein kinase inhibitors and chemotherapeutic drugs on cholangiocarcinoma cells.

    PubMed

    Loilome, Watcharin; Juntana, Sirinun; Pinitsoontorn, Chadamas; Namwat, Nisana; Tassaneeyakul, Wichittra; Yongvanit, Puangrat

    2012-01-01

    Suppression of protein kinase A regulatory subunit 1 alpha (PRKAR1A) has been proven to inhibit cholangiocarcinoma (CCA) cell growth and enhance apoptosis. In the present study, we aimed to determine synergistic and/or additive effects of chemotherapeutic agents, including protein kinase inhibitors (i.e. sorafenib, sunitinib, gefitinib, Met inhibitor) and conventional chemotherapeutic drugs (i.e. 5-fluorouracil, doxorubicin, paclitaxel, gemcitabine), in PRKARIA knockdown CCA cell lines. The results revealed that PRKAR1A suppressed CCA cell lines demonstrated enhanced sensitivity to some chemotherapeutic drugs when compared to control cells. Moreover, PRKAR1A knockdown in combination with either sorafenib or 5-fluorouracil increased apoptotic effects on CCA cell lines. Therefore, selective inhibition of PRKAR1A appears to enhance the growth inhibitory effects of chemotherapeutic drugs as well as induce apoptotic cell death. Our findings suggest that additional suppression of PRKAR1A expression may increase the efficacy of conventional CCA chemotherapeutic treatment. Clinical studies in CCA patients now need to be conducted. PMID:23480756

  13. Chemotherapeutic attack of hypoxic tumor cells by the bioreductive alkylating agent mitomycin C.

    PubMed

    Keyes, S R; Heimbrook, D C; Fracasso, P M; Rockwell, S; Sligar, S G; Sartorelli, A C

    1985-01-01

    Since the cure of solid tumors is limited by the presence of cells with low oxygen contents, we have approached the development of treatment regimens and of new drugs for these tumors by investigating agents which are preferentially bioactivated under hypoxia. Major emphasis has been directed at studying the mode of action of the mitomycin antibiotics, as bioreductive alkylating agents. Using primarily the EMT6 mouse mammary carcinoma as a solid tumor model, we have found that mitomycin C and porfiromycin are preferentially toxic to cells with low oxygen contents. The mitomycin analog BMY-25282 is more toxic to hypoxic cells than are mitomycin C and porfiromycin; however, unlike these antibiotics, BMY-25282 is preferentially toxic to well-oxygenated cells. With these three mitomycins, we have observed a correlation between cytotoxicity to hypoxic cells, the rate of generation of reactive products, and the redox potentials of the drugs. Investigations of the enzymes in EMT6 cells that could possibly activate mitomycin C have revealed that cytochrome P-450 and xanthine oxidase are not present in measurable quantities and therefore are not responsible for activation of mitomycin C. Activities representative of NADPH-cytochrome c reductase and DT-diaphorase are present in these neoplastic cells. Comparison of these enzymatic activities in EMT6, CHO, and V79 cells with the rate of generation of reactive products under hypoxia shows a direct correlation between these two parameters, but there is no quantitative correlation between these two parameters and the amount of cytotoxicity. Use of purified NADPH-cytochrome c reductase and inhibitors of this enzyme demonstrated that NADPH-cytochrome c reductase can activate mitomycin C, but that it is probably not the only enzyme participating in this bioactivation in EMT6 cells. The DT-diaphorase inhibitor dicoumarol was employed to show that this enzyme is not involved in the activation of mitomycin C to a cytotoxic agent

  14. [Ebola hemorrhagic fever: Properties of the pathogen and development of vaccines and chemotherapeutic agents].

    PubMed

    Kiselev, O I; Vasin, A V; Shevyryova, M P; Deeva, E G; Sivak, K V; Egorov, V V; Tsvetkov, V B; Egorov, A Yu; Romanovskaya-Romanko, E A; Stepanova, L A; Komissarov, A B; Tsybalova, L M; Ignatjev, G M

    2015-01-01

    Ebola hemorrhagic fever (EHF) epidemic currently ongoing in West Africa is not the first among numerous epidemics in the continent. Yet it seems to be the worst EHF epidemic outbreak caused by Ebola virus Zaire since 1976 as regards its extremely large scale and rapid spread in the population. Experiments to study the agent have continued for more than 20 years. The EHF virus has a relatively simple genome with seven genes and additional reading frame resulting from RNA editing. While being of a relatively low genetic capacity, the virus can be ranked as a standard for pathogenicity with the ability to evade the host immune response in uttermost perfection. The EHF virus has similarities with retroviruses, but belongs to (-)RNA viruses of a nonretroviral origin. Genetic elements of the virus, NIRV, were detected in animal and human genomes. EHF virus glycoprotein (GP) is a class I fusion protein and shows more similarities than distinctions in tertiary structure with SIV and HIV gp41 proteins and even influenza virus hemagglutinin. EHF is an unusual infectious disease, and studying the molecular basis of its pathogenesis may contribute to new findings in therapy of severe conditions leading to a fatal outcome. PMID:26299853

  15. Aurora B kinase inhibitor AZD1152: determinants of action and ability to enhance chemotherapeutics effectiveness in pancreatic and colon cancer

    PubMed Central

    Azzariti, A; Bocci, G; Porcelli, L; Fioravanti, A; Sini, P; Simone, G M; Quatrale, A E; Chiarappa, P; Mangia, A; Sebastian, S; Del Bufalo, D; Del Tacca, M; Paradiso, A

    2011-01-01

    Background: AZD1152, the prodrug for AZD1152-hydroxyquinazoline pyrazol anilide (HQPA), is a selective inhibitor of Aurora B kinase activity. Preclinical evaluation of AZD1152 has been reported in several human cancer models. The potentiality of this compound in combination therapy warrants further investigation in solid tumours. Experimental design: This study explored the effects of AZD1152-HQPA in colon and pancreatic tumour cells. The antitumour properties of AZD1152, either as single agent or in combination with chemotherapeutics, were evaluated in each study model. The efficacy and the toxicity of AZD1152 alone and in combination with gemcitabine were validated in pancreatic tumour xenograft model. Results: AZD1152-HQPA treatment resulted in a dramatic increase of chromosome number, modification of cell cycle and induction of apoptosis. The most effective combination was that with chemotherapeutics given soon after AZD1152 in both tumour cell types. The effectiveness of the sequential schedule of AZD1152 with gemcitabine was confirmed in nude mice bearing MiaPaCa-2 tumours, showing inhibition of tumour volumes and delaying of tumour growth after the interruption of the treatments. Conclusion: Here we show that AZD1152-HQPA enhances oxaliplatin and gemcitabine effectiveness in colon and pancreatic cancer, respectively. First, we provide advances into administration schedules and dosing regimens for the combination treatment in in vivo pancreatic tumour. PMID:21304529

  16. Peripheral neuropathies from chemotherapeutics and targeted agents: diagnosis, treatment, and prevention

    PubMed Central

    Grisold, Wolfgang; Cavaletti, Guido; Windebank, Anthony J.

    2012-01-01

    Peripheral neuropathies induced by chemotherapy (CIPN) are an increasingly frequent problem. Contrary to hema­tologic adverse effects, which can be treated with hematopoetic growth factors, neither prophylaxis nor spe­cific treatment is available, and only symptomatic treatment can be offered. Neurotoxic drugs are becoming a major dose-limiting factor. The epidemiology is still unclear. Several drug-dependent pathogenetic mechanisms exist. CIPN are predominately sensory, length-dependent neuropathies that develop after a typical cumulative dose. Usually, the appearance of CIPN is dose dependent, although in at least 2 drugs (oxaliplatin and taxanes), immediate toxic effects occur. The most frequent substances causing CIPN are platin compounds, vinka alkaloids, taxanes, and bortezomib and thalidomide. The role of synergistic neurotoxicity caused by previously given chemo­therapies and concomitant chemotherapies and the role pre-existent neuropathy on the development of a CIPN is not clear. As the number of long-term cancer survivors increases and a new focus on long-term effects of chemotherapy-induced neuropathies emerge, concepts of rehabili­tation need to be implemented to improve the patients’ functions and quality of life. PMID:23095830

  17. In-vitro susceptibility of Giardia lamblia to albendazole, mebendazole and other chemotherapeutic agents.

    PubMed

    Cedillo-Rivera, R; Muñoz, O

    1992-09-01

    The susceptibility of a strain of Giardia lamblia to benzimidazole carbamates, 5-nitroimidazoles, nitrofurans and other drugs was studied in vitro. Albendazole was the most active compound, with a 50% inhibitory concentration (IC50) of 0.01 mg/L and a minimal lethal concentration (MLC) of less than 0.04 mg/L; the IC50 of mebendazole was 0.06 mg/L and the MLC less than 0.5 mg/L. Among the 5-nitroimidazoles tested, ornidazole was the most effective (IC50 0.12 mg/L); tinidazole, metronidazole, secnidazole and hemezole were less active. Nifuroxazide, etofamide and nalidixic acid exhibited modest anti-giardial activity; quinfamide did not inhibit the growth of the parasite at a concentration of 200 mg/L. Albendazole and mebendazole are promising candidates for clinical use and should be further evaluated. PMID:1518040

  18. Synergistic Combinations of Multiple Chemotherapeutic Agents in High Capacity Poly(2-oxazoline) Micelles

    PubMed Central

    Han, Yingchao; He, Zhijian; Schulz, Anita; Bronich, Tatiana K.; Jordan, Rainer; Luxenhofer, Robert; Kabanov, Alexander V.

    2012-01-01

    Many effective drugs for cancer treatment are poorly water-soluble. In combination chemotherapy, needed excipients in additive formulations are often toxic and restrict their applications in clinical intervention. Here, we report on amphiphilic poly(2-oxazoline)s (POx) micelles as a promising high capacity delivery platform for multi-drug cancer chemotherapy. A variety of binary and ternary drugs combinations of paclitaxel (PTX), docetaxel (DTX), 17-allylamino-17-demethoxygeldanamycin (17-AAG), etoposide (ETO) and bortezomib (BTZ) were solubilized in defined polymeric micelles achieving unprecedented high total loading capacities of up to 50 wt.% drug per final formulation. Multi-drug loaded POx micelles showed enhanced stability in comparison to single-drug loaded micelles. Drug ratio dependent synergistic cytotoxicity of micellar ETO/17-AAG was observed in MCF-7 cancer cells and of micellar BTZ/17-AAG in MCF-7, PC3, MDA-MB-231 and HepG2 cells. PMID:22681126

  19. Identification of lead chemotherapeutic agents from medicinal plants against blood flukes and whipworms

    PubMed Central

    Wangchuk, Phurpa; Giacomin, Paul R.; Pearson, Mark S.; Smout, Michael J.; Loukas, Alex

    2016-01-01

    Schistosomiasis and trichuriasis are two of the most common neglected tropical diseases (NTD) that affect almost a billion people worldwide. There is only a limited number of effective drugs to combat these NTD. Medicinal plants are a viable source of parasiticides. In this study, we have investigated six of the 19 phytochemicals isolated from two Bhutanese medicinal plants, Corydalis crispa and Pleurospermum amabile, for their anthelmintic properties. We used the xWORM technique and Scanning Electron Microscope-based imaging to determine the activity of the compounds. Of the six compounds tested, isomyristicin and bergapten showed significant anthelmintic activity against Schistosoma mansoni and Trichuris muris with bergapten being the most efficacious compound one against both parasites (S. mansoni IC50 = 8.6 μg/mL and T. muris IC50 = 10.6 μg/mL) and also against the schistosomulum stage of S. mansoni. These two compounds induced tegumental damage to S. mansoni and affected the cuticle, bacillary bands and bacillary glands of T. muris. The efficacy against multiple phylogenetically distinct parasites and different life stages, especially the schistosomulum where praziquantel is ineffective, makes isomyristicin and bergapten novel scaffolds for broad-spectrum anthelmintic drug development that could be used for the control of helminths infecting humans and animals. PMID:27572696

  20. A systematic review of pentacyclic triterpenes and their derivatives as chemotherapeutic agents against tropical parasitic diseases.

    PubMed

    Isah, Murtala Bindawa; Ibrahim, Mohammed Auwal; Mohammed, Aminu; Aliyu, Abubakar Babando; Masola, Bubuya; Coetzer, Theresa H T

    2016-09-01

    Parasitic infections are among the leading global public health problems with very high economic and mortality burdens. Unfortunately, the available treatment drugs are beset with side effects and continuous parasite drug resistance is being reported. However, new findings reveal more promising compounds especially of plant origin. Among the promising leads are the pentacyclic triterpenes (PTs) made up of the oleanane, ursane, taraxastane, lupane and hopane types. This paper reviews the literature published from 1985 to date on the in vitro and in vivo anti-parasitic potency of this class of phytochemicals. Of the 191 natural and synthetic PT reported, 85 have shown high anti-parasitic activity against various species belonging to the genera of Plasmodium, Leishmania, Trypanosoma, as well as various genera of Nematoda. Moreover, structural modification especially at carbon 3 (C3) and C27 of the parent backbone of PT has led to improved anti-parasitic activity in some cases and loss of activity in others. The potential of this group of compounds as future alternatives in the treatment of parasitic diseases is discussed. It is hoped that the information presented herein will contribute to the full exploration of this promising group of compounds as possible drugs for parasitic diseases. PMID:27240847

  1. Identification of lead chemotherapeutic agents from medicinal plants against blood flukes and whipworms.

    PubMed

    Wangchuk, Phurpa; Giacomin, Paul R; Pearson, Mark S; Smout, Michael J; Loukas, Alex

    2016-01-01

    Schistosomiasis and trichuriasis are two of the most common neglected tropical diseases (NTD) that affect almost a billion people worldwide. There is only a limited number of effective drugs to combat these NTD. Medicinal plants are a viable source of parasiticides. In this study, we have investigated six of the 19 phytochemicals isolated from two Bhutanese medicinal plants, Corydalis crispa and Pleurospermum amabile, for their anthelmintic properties. We used the xWORM technique and Scanning Electron Microscope-based imaging to determine the activity of the compounds. Of the six compounds tested, isomyristicin and bergapten showed significant anthelmintic activity against Schistosoma mansoni and Trichuris muris with bergapten being the most efficacious compound one against both parasites (S. mansoni IC50 = 8.6 μg/mL and T. muris IC50 = 10.6 μg/mL) and also against the schistosomulum stage of S. mansoni. These two compounds induced tegumental damage to S. mansoni and affected the cuticle, bacillary bands and bacillary glands of T. muris. The efficacy against multiple phylogenetically distinct parasites and different life stages, especially the schistosomulum where praziquantel is ineffective, makes isomyristicin and bergapten novel scaffolds for broad-spectrum anthelmintic drug development that could be used for the control of helminths infecting humans and animals. PMID:27572696

  2. Determination of six chemotherapeutic agents in municipal wastewater using online solid-phase extraction coupled to liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Rabii, Farida W; Segura, Pedro A; Fayad, Paul B; Sauvé, Sébastien

    2014-07-15

    Due to the increased consumption of chemotherapeutic agents, their high toxicity, carcinogenicity, their occurrence in the aquatic environment must be properly evaluated. An analytical method based on online solid-phase extraction coupled to liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry was developed and validated. A 1 mL injection volume was used to quantify six of the most widely used cytotoxic drugs (cyclophosphamide, gemcitabine, ifosfamide, methotrexate, irinotecan and epirubicin) in municipal wastewater. The method was validated using standard additions. The validation results in wastewater influent had coefficients of determination (R(2)) between 0.983 and 0.998 and intra-day precision ranging from 7 to 13% (expressed as relative standard deviation %RSD), and from 9 to 23% for inter-day precision. Limits of detection ranged from 4 to 20 ng L(-1) while recovery values were greater than 70% except for gemcitabine, which is the most hydrophilic compound in the selected group and had a recovery of 47%. Matrix effects were interpreted by signal suppression and ranged from 55 to 118% with cyclophosphamide having the highest value. Two of the target anticancer drugs (cyclophosphamide and methotrexate) were detected and quantified in wastewater (effluent and influent) and ranged from 13 to 60 ng L(-1). The proposed method thus allows proper monitoring of potential environmental releases of chemotherapy agents. PMID:24388503

  3. Therapeutic potential and critical analysis of trastuzumab and bevacizumab in combination with different chemotherapeutic agents against metastatic breast/colorectal cancer affecting various endpoints.

    PubMed

    Wahid, Mohd; Mandal, Raju K; Dar, Sajad A; Jawed, Arshad; Lohani, Mohtashim; Areeshi, Mohammad Y; Akhter, Naseem; Haque, Shafiul

    2016-08-01

    Researchers are working day and night across the globe to eradicate or at least lessen the menace of cancer faced by the mankind. The two very frequently occurring cancers faced by the human beings are metastatic breast cancer and metastatic colorectal cancer. The various chemotherapeutic agents like anthracycline, cyclophosphamide, paclitaxel, irinotecan, fluorouracil and leucovorin etc., have been used impressively for long. But the obstinate character of metastatic breast cancer and metastatic colorectal cancer needs more to tackle the threat. So, the scientists found the use of monoclonal antibodies trastuzumab (Herceptin(®)) and bevacizumab (Avastin(®)) for the same. The current study critically investigates the therapeutic potential of trastuzumab and bevacizumab in combination with various chemotherapeutic agents against metastatic breast cancer and metastatic colorectal cancer. To the best of our knowledge, this is the very first critical analysis showing percent wise increase in various positive endpoints like median time to disease progression, median survival, and progression free survival etc. for the treatment of metastatic breast/colorectal cancer using trastuzumab and bevacizumab in combination with different chemotherapeutic agents and provides the rational for the success and failure of the selected monoclonal antibodies. PMID:27357488

  4. Increased γ-H2AX and Rad51 DNA Repair Biomarker Expression in Human Cell Lines Resistant to the Chemotherapeutic Agents Nitrogen Mustard and Cisplatin.

    PubMed

    Adam-Zahir, Sheba; Plowman, Piers N; Bourton, Emma C; Sharif, Fariha; Parris, Christopher N

    2014-01-01

    Chemotherapeutic anticancer drugs mediate cytotoxicity by a number of mechanisms. However, alkylating agents which induce DNA interstrand crosslinks (ICL) are amongst the most effective anticancer agents and often form the mainstay of many anticancer therapies. The effectiveness of these drugs can be limited by the development of drug resistance in cancer cells and many studies have demonstrated that alterations in DNA repair kinetics are responsible for drug resistance. In this study we developed two cell lines resistant to the alkylating agents nitrogen mustard (HN2) and cisplatin (Pt). To determine if drug resistance was associated with enhanced ICL DNA repair we used immunocytochemistry and imaging flow cytometry to quantitate the number of γ-H2AX and Rad51 foci in the nuclei of cells after drug exposure. γ-H2AX was used to evaluate DNA strand breaks caused by repair incision nucleases and Rad51 was used to measure the activity of homologous recombination in the repair of ICL. In the drug-resistant derivative cell lines there was overall a significant increase in the number and persistence of both γ-H2AX and Rad51 foci in the nuclei of cells over a 72-hour period, when compared to the non-resistant parental cell lines (ANOVA p < 0.0001). In a Pt-resistant ovarian cancer cell line (A2780cis(R)) a similar enhancement of DNA repair was observed when compared to the non-drug-resistant wild-type ovarian cancer cells (A2780) following exposure to HN2. Our data suggest that using DNA repair biomarkers to evaluate mechanisms of resistance in cancer cell lines and human tumours may be of experimental and clinical benefit. We concede, however, that examination of a larger population of cell lines and tumours is required to fully evaluate the validity of this approach. PMID:26138778

  5. Synergistic activities of a silver(I) glutamic acid complex and reactive oxygen species (ROS): a novel antimicrobial and chemotherapeutic agent.

    PubMed

    Batarseh, K I; Smith, M A

    2012-01-01

    The antimicrobial and chemotherapeutic activities of a silver(I) glutamic acid complex with the synergistic concomitant generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) were investigated here. The ROS generation system employed was via Fenton chemistry. The antimicrobial and chemotherapeutic activities were investigated on Staphylococcus aureus ATCC 43300 and Escherichia coli bacteria, and Vero and MCF-7 tumor cell lines, respectively. Antimicrobial activities were conducted by determining minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC), while chemotherapeutic efficacies were done by serial dilution using standard techniques to determine the half maximal inhibitory concentration (IC50). The antimicrobial and chemotherapeutic results obtained were compared with positive control drugs gentamicin, oxacillin, penicillin, streptomycin and cisplatin, a ubiquitously used platinum-based antitumor drug, and with the silver(I) glutamic acid complex and hydrogen peroxide separately. Based on MIC and IC50 values, it was determined that this synergistic approach was very effective at extremely low concentrations, especially when compared with the other drugs evaluated here. This finding might be of great significance regarding metronomic dosing when this synergistic approach is clinically implemented. Since silver at low concentrations exhibits no toxic, mutagenic and carcinogenic activities, this might offer an alternative approach for the development of safer silver-based antimicrobial and chemotherapeutic drugs, thereby reducing or even eliminating the toxicity associated with current drugs. Accordingly, the present approach might be integrated into the systemic clinical treatment of infectious diseases and cancer. PMID:22680634

  6. STAT3 blockade enhances the efficacy of conventional chemotherapeutic agents by eradicating head neck stemloid cancer cell

    PubMed Central

    Bu, Lin-Lin; Zhao, Zhi-Li; Liu, Jian-Feng; Ma, Si-Rui; Huang, Cong-Fa; Liu, Bing; Zhang, Wen-Feng; Sun, Zhi-Jun

    2015-01-01

    Signaling transducer and activator 3 (STAT3) and cancer stem cells (CSCs) have garnered huge attention as a therapeutic focus, based on evidence that they may represent an etiologic root of tumor initiation and radio-chemoresistance. Here, we investigated the high phosphorylation status of STAT3 (p-STAT3) and its correlation with self-renewal markers in head neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC). Over-expression of p-STAT3 was found to have increased in post chemotherapy HNSCC tissue. We showed that blockade of p-STAT3 eliminated both bulk tumor and side population (SP) cells with characteristics of CSCs in vitro. Inhibition of p-STAT3 using small molecule S3I-201 significantly delayed tumorigenesis of spontaneous HNSCC in mice. Combining blockade of p-STAT3 with cytotoxic drugs cisplatin, docetaxel, 5-fluorouracil (TPF) enhanced the antitumor effect in vitro and in vivo with decreased tumor sphere formation and SP cells. Taken together, our results advocate blockade of p-STAT3 in combination with conventional chemotherapeutic drugs enhance efficacy by improving CSCs eradication in HNSCC. PMID:26556875

  7. STAT3 blockade enhances the efficacy of conventional chemotherapeutic agents by eradicating head neck stemloid cancer cell.

    PubMed

    Bu, Lin-Lin; Zhao, Zhi-Li; Liu, Jian-Feng; Ma, Si-Rui; Huang, Cong-Fa; Liu, Bing; Zhang, Wen-Feng; Sun, Zhi-Jun

    2015-12-01

    Signaling transducer and activator 3 (STAT3) and cancer stem cells (CSCs) have garnered huge attention as a therapeutic focus, based on evidence that they may represent an etiologic root of tumor initiation and radio-chemoresistance. Here, we investigated the high phosphorylation status of STAT3 (p-STAT3) and its correlation with self-renewal markers in head neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC). Over-expression of p-STAT3 was found to have increased in post chemotherapy HNSCC tissue. We showed that blockade of p-STAT3 eliminated both bulk tumor and side population (SP) cells with characteristics of CSCs in vitro. Inhibition of p-STAT3 using small molecule S3I-201 significantly delayed tumorigenesis of spontaneous HNSCC in mice. Combining blockade of p-STAT3 with cytotoxic drugs cisplatin, docetaxel, 5-fluorouracil (TPF) enhanced the antitumor effect in vitro and in vivo with decreased tumor sphere formation and SP cells. Taken together, our results advocate blockade of p-STAT3 in combination with conventional chemotherapeutic drugs enhance efficacy by improving CSCs eradication in HNSCC. PMID:26556875

  8. Using Agent-Based Modelling to Predict the Role of Wild Refugia in the Evolution of Resistance of Sea Lice to Chemotherapeutants

    PubMed Central

    McEwan, Gregor F.; Groner, Maya L.; Fast, Mark D.; Revie, Crawford W.

    2015-01-01

    A major challenge for Atlantic salmon farming in the northern hemisphere is infestation by the sea louse parasite Lepeophtheirus salmonis. The most frequent method of controlling these sea louse infestations is through the use of chemical treatments. However, most major salmon farming areas have observed resistance to common chemotherapeutants. In terrestrial environments, many strategies employed to manage the evolution of resistance involve the use of refugia, where a portion of the population is left untreated to maintain susceptibility. While refugia have not been deliberately used in Atlantic salmon farming, wild salmon populations that migrate close to salmon farms may act as natural refugia. In this paper we describe an agent-based model that explores the influence of different sizes of wild salmon populations on resistance evolution in sea lice on a salmon farm. Using the model, we demonstrate that wild salmon populations can act as refugia that limit the evolution of resistance in the sea louse populations. Additionally, we demonstrate that an increase in the size of the population of wild salmon results in an increased effect in slowing the evolution of resistance. We explore the effect of a population fitness cost associated with resistance, finding that in some cases it substantially reduces the speed of evolution to chemical treatments. PMID:26485023

  9. Using Agent-Based Modelling to Predict the Role of Wild Refugia in the Evolution of Resistance of Sea Lice to Chemotherapeutants.

    PubMed

    McEwan, Gregor F; Groner, Maya L; Fast, Mark D; Gettinby, George; Revie, Crawford W

    2015-01-01

    A major challenge for Atlantic salmon farming in the northern hemisphere is infestation by the sea louse parasite Lepeophtheirus salmonis. The most frequent method of controlling these sea louse infestations is through the use of chemical treatments. However, most major salmon farming areas have observed resistance to common chemotherapeutants. In terrestrial environments, many strategies employed to manage the evolution of resistance involve the use of refugia, where a portion of the population is left untreated to maintain susceptibility. While refugia have not been deliberately used in Atlantic salmon farming, wild salmon populations that migrate close to salmon farms may act as natural refugia. In this paper we describe an agent-based model that explores the influence of different sizes of wild salmon populations on resistance evolution in sea lice on a salmon farm. Using the model, we demonstrate that wild salmon populations can act as refugia that limit the evolution of resistance in the sea louse populations. Additionally, we demonstrate that an increase in the size of the population of wild salmon results in an increased effect in slowing the evolution of resistance. We explore the effect of a population fitness cost associated with resistance, finding that in some cases it substantially reduces the speed of evolution to chemical treatments. PMID:26485023

  10. Inhibition of phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase promotes tumor cell resistance to chemotherapeutic agents via a mechanism involving delay in cell cycle progression

    SciTech Connect

    McDonald, Gail T.; Sullivan, Richard; Pare, Genevieve C.; Graham, Charles H.

    2010-11-15

    Approaches to overcome chemoresistance in cancer cells have involved targeting specific signaling pathways such as the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K) pathway, a stress response pathway known to be involved in the regulation of cell survival, apoptosis and growth. The present study determined the effect of PI3K inhibition on the clonogenic survival of human cancer cells following exposure to various chemotherapeutic agents. Treatment with the PI3K inhibitors LY294002 or Compound 15e resulted in increased survival of MDA-MB-231 breast carcinoma cells after exposure to doxorubicin, etoposide, 5-fluorouracil, and vincristine. Increased survival following PI3K inhibition was also observed in DU-145 prostate, HCT-116 colon and A-549 lung carcinoma cell lines exposed to doxorubicin. Increased cell survival mediated by LY294002 was correlated with a decrease in cell proliferation, which was linked to an increase in the proportion of cells in the G{sub 1} phase of the cell cycle. Inhibition of PI3K signaling also resulted in higher levels of the cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitors p21{sup Waf1/Cip1} and p27{sup Kip1}; and knockdown of p27{sup kip1} with siRNA attenuated resistance to doxorubicin in cells treated with LY294002. Incubation in the presence of LY294002 after exposure to doxorubicin resulted in decreased cell survival. These findings provide evidence that PI3K inhibition leads to chemoresistance in human cancer cells by causing a delay in cell cycle; however, the timing of PI3K inhibition (either before or after exposure to anti-cancer agents) may be a critical determinant of chemosensitivity.

  11. Conserved molecular mechanisms underlying the effects of small molecule xenobiotic chemotherapeutics on cells

    PubMed Central

    SARIN, HEMANT

    2016-01-01

    For proper determination of the apoptotic potential of chemoxenobiotics in synergism, it is important to understand the modes, levels and character of interactions of chemoxenobiotics with cells in the context of predicted conserved biophysical properties. Chemoxenobiotic structures are studied with respect to atom distribution over molecular space, the predicted overall octanol-to-water partition coefficient (Log OWPC; unitless) and molecular size viz a viz van der Waals diameter (vdWD). The Log OWPC-to-vdWD (nm−1) parameter is determined, and where applicable, hydrophilic interacting moiety/core-to-vdWD (nm−1) and lipophilic incorporating hydrophobic moiety/core-to-vdWD (nm−1) parameters of their part-structures are determined. The cellular and sub-cellular level interactions of the spectrum of xenobiotic chemotherapies have been characterized, for which a classification system has been developed based on predicted conserved biophysical properties with respect to the mode of chemotherapeutic effect. The findings of this study are applicable towards improving the effectiveness of existing combination chemotherapy regimens and the predictive accuracy of personalized cancer treatment algorithms as well as towards the selection of appropriate novel xenobiotics with the potential to be potent chemotherapeutics for dendrimer nanoparticle-based effective transvascular delivery. PMID:26998284

  12. 1,3-Bis(2-chloroethyl)-1-nitrosourea-loaded bovine serum albumin nanoparticles with dual magnetic resonance–fluorescence imaging for tracking of chemotherapeutic agents

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Kuo-Chen; Lin, Feng-Wei; Huang, Chiung-Yin; Ma, Chen-Chi M; Chen, Ju-Yu; Feng, Li-Ying; Yang, Hung-Wei

    2016-01-01

    To date, knowing how to identify the location of chemotherapeutic agents in the human body after injection is still a challenge. Therefore, it is urgent to develop a drug delivery system with molecular imaging tracking ability to accurately understand the distribution, location, and concentration of a drug in living organisms. In this study, we developed bovine serum albumin (BSA)-based nanoparticles (NPs) with dual magnetic resonance (MR) and fluorescence imaging modalities (fluorescein isothiocyanate [FITC]-BSA-Gd/1,3-bis(2-chloroethyl)-1-nitrosourea [BCNU] NPs) to deliver BCNU for inhibition of brain tumor cells (MBR 261-2). These BSA-based NPs are water dispersible, stable, and biocompatible as confirmed by XTT cell viability assay. In vitro phantoms and in vivo MR and fluorescence imaging experiments show that the developed FITC-BSA-Gd/BCNU NPs enable dual MR and fluorescence imaging for monitoring cellular uptake and distribution in tumors. The T1 relaxivity (R1) of FITC-BSA-Gd/BCNU NPs was 3.25 mM−1 s−1, which was similar to that of the commercial T1 contrast agent (R1 =3.36 mM−1 s−1). The results indicate that this multifunctional drug delivery system has potential bioimaging tracking of chemotherapeutic agents ability in vitro and in vivo for cancer therapy. PMID:27601895

  13. 1,3-Bis(2-chloroethyl)-1-nitrosourea-loaded bovine serum albumin nanoparticles with dual magnetic resonance-fluorescence imaging for tracking of chemotherapeutic agents.

    PubMed

    Wei, Kuo-Chen; Lin, Feng-Wei; Huang, Chiung-Yin; Ma, Chen-Chi M; Chen, Ju-Yu; Feng, Li-Ying; Yang, Hung-Wei

    2016-01-01

    To date, knowing how to identify the location of chemotherapeutic agents in the human body after injection is still a challenge. Therefore, it is urgent to develop a drug delivery system with molecular imaging tracking ability to accurately understand the distribution, location, and concentration of a drug in living organisms. In this study, we developed bovine serum albumin (BSA)-based nanoparticles (NPs) with dual magnetic resonance (MR) and fluorescence imaging modalities (fluorescein isothiocyanate [FITC]-BSA-Gd/1,3-bis(2-chloroethyl)-1-nitrosourea [BCNU] NPs) to deliver BCNU for inhibition of brain tumor cells (MBR 261-2). These BSA-based NPs are water dispersible, stable, and biocompatible as confirmed by XTT cell viability assay. In vitro phantoms and in vivo MR and fluorescence imaging experiments show that the developed FITC-BSA-Gd/BCNU NPs enable dual MR and fluorescence imaging for monitoring cellular uptake and distribution in tumors. The T1 relaxivity (R1) of FITC-BSA-Gd/BCNU NPs was 3.25 mM(-1) s(-1), which was similar to that of the commercial T1 contrast agent (R1 =3.36 mM(-1) s(-1)). The results indicate that this multifunctional drug delivery system has potential bioimaging tracking of chemotherapeutic agents ability in vitro and in vivo for cancer therapy. PMID:27601895

  14. Synthesis and characterization of a new retinoic acid ECPIRM as potential chemotherapeutic agent for human cutaneous squamous carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Mengli; Tao, Yue; Ma, Pengcheng; Wang, Dechuan; He, Chundi; Cao, Yuping; Wei, Jun; Li, Lingjun; Tao, Lei

    2015-01-01

    Cutaneous squamous cell carcinoma (CSCC) is one of the most common cancers worldwide, requiring effective therapeutic interventions. Retinoids are important chemopreventive and therapeutic agents for a variety of human cancers including CSCC. In this study we synthesized a novel retinoic derivative N-(4-ethoxycarbonylphenyl) isoretinamide (ECPIRM) and evaluated its biological activities and possible mechanisms in human cutaneous squamous cell lines. ECPIRM had better inhibitory effect on the proliferation of squamous carcinoma cells SCL-1 and colo-16, compared with All-trans retinoic acid and 13-cis retinoic acid. ECPIRM had less toxicity to normal keratinocyte cell line HaCaT. Mechanistically, ECPIRM induced G1 cell cycle arrest in SCL-1 cells, via the downregulation of CDK2, CDK4, cycling D1 and cyclin E expression and upregulation of p21. In addition, these effects were at least partially due to the inhibition of JNK/ ERK-AP-1 signaling pathway by ECPIRM. Importantly, these effects of ECPIRM are independent of the classical retinoid receptor pathway, suggesting that the novel compound will have less side-effects in chemotherapy. These findings demonstrate that ECPIRM is a potential inhibitor of MPAK-AP-1 pathway, and is a potential therapeutic agent against CSCC. PMID:25991427

  15. Linifanib (ABT-869) Potentiates the Efficacy of Chemotherapeutic Agents through the Suppression of Receptor Tyrosine Kinase-Mediated AKT/mTOR Signaling Pathways in Gastric Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Jing; Guo, Jiawei; Chen, Zhi; Wang, Jieqiong; Liu, Mingyao; Pang, Xiufeng

    2016-01-01

    Gastric cancer, highly dependent on tumor angiogenesis, causes uncontrolled lethality, in part due to chemoresistance. Here, we demonstrate that linifanib (ABT-869), a novel multi-targeted receptor tyrosine kinase inhibitor, markedly augments cytotoxicity of chemotherapies in human gastric cancer. ABT-869 and chemotherapeutic agents exhibited a strong synergy to inhibit the viability of several gastric cancer cell lines, with combination index values ranging from 0.017 to 0.589. Additionally, the combination of ABT-869 and chemotherapeutic agents led to remarkable suppression of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF)-induced angiogenesis in vitro and in vivo. Importantly, in a preclinical gastric cancer xenograft mouse model, drug co-treatments led to increased mouse survival as well as a synergistic reduction in tumor size and the inhibition of tumor angiogenesis. Mechanistic studies further revealed that all of the co-treatments containing ABT-869 resulted in decreased activation of the VEGF receptor, the epidermal growth factor receptor and the insulin growth factor receptor. Inhibition of these receptor tyrosine kinases consequently attenuated the activation of the downstream AKT/mTOR signaling pathway both in cultured gastric cancer cells and in gastric cancer xenografts. Collectively, our findings suggest that the addition of ABT-869 to traditional chemotherapies may be a promising strategy for the treatment of human gastric cancer. PMID:27387652

  16. The Selective PI3K Inhibitor XL147 (SAR245408) Inhibits Tumor Growth and Survival and Potentiates the Activity of Chemotherapeutic Agents in Preclinical Tumor Models.

    PubMed

    Foster, Paul; Yamaguchi, Kyoko; Hsu, Pin P; Qian, Fawn; Du, Xiangnan; Wu, Jianming; Won, Kwang-Ai; Yu, Peiwen; Jaeger, Christopher T; Zhang, Wentao; Marlowe, Charles K; Keast, Paul; Abulafia, Wendy; Chen, Jason; Young, Jenny; Plonowski, Artur; Yakes, F Michael; Chu, Felix; Engell, Kelly; Bentzien, Frauke; Lam, Sanh T; Dale, Stephanie; Yturralde, Olivia; Matthews, David J; Lamb, Peter; Laird, A Douglas

    2015-04-01

    Dysregulation of PI3K/PTEN pathway components, resulting in hyperactivated PI3K signaling, is frequently observed in various cancers and correlates with tumor growth and survival. Resistance to a variety of anticancer therapies, including receptor tyrosine kinase (RTK) inhibitors and chemotherapeutic agents, has been attributed to the absence or attenuation of downregulating signals along the PI3K/PTEN pathway. Thus, PI3K inhibitors have therapeutic potential as single agents and in combination with other therapies for a variety of cancer indications. XL147 (SAR245408) is a potent and highly selective inhibitor of class I PI3Ks (α, β, γ, and δ). Moreover, broad kinase selectivity profiling of >130 protein kinases revealed that XL147 is highly selective for class I PI3Ks over other kinases. In cellular assays, XL147 inhibits the formation of PIP3 in the membrane, and inhibits phosphorylation of AKT, p70S6K, and S6 in multiple tumor cell lines with diverse genetic alterations affecting the PI3K pathway. In a panel of tumor cell lines, XL147 inhibits proliferation with a wide range of potencies, with evidence of an impact of genotype on sensitivity. In mouse xenograft models, oral administration of XL147 results in dose-dependent inhibition of phosphorylation of AKT, p70S6K, and S6 with a duration of action of at least 24 hours. Repeat-dose administration of XL147 results in significant tumor growth inhibition in multiple human xenograft models in nude mice. Administration of XL147 in combination with chemotherapeutic agents results in antitumor activity in xenograft models that is enhanced over that observed with the corresponding single agents. PMID:25637314

  17. Molecular docking of chemotherapeutic agents to CYP3A4 in non-small cell lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Subhani, Syed; Jamil, Kaiser

    2015-07-01

    CYP3A4, a "heme" containing isoform, abundantly found in the liver, gastro-intestinal tract, lungs and renal cells, also known as drug metabolising enzyme (DME) may be responsible for the disease progression in cancers such as lung cancer. Hence, we have targeted this protein for improving drug selection and in preventing adverse reactions. The aim of this study was to examine chemotherapeutic drug binding to CYP3A4 and the interactions therein. We have used Schrödinger suite 2014, to perform molecular docking of human CYP3A4, by Induced Fit Docking using gemcitabine, cisplatin, carboplatin, docetaxel and paclitaxel drugs. We evaluated drug-binding affinities using Prime/MMGBSA and using these scores we compared the affinities of combination therapies against CYP3A4. Analysis of the docking results showed gemcitabine>carboplatin>cisplatin as the order of binding affinities, with gemcitabine having the best docking score. Interestingly, docetaxel and paclitaxel did not bind to CYP3A4*1B. The combination drug-binding affinity analysis showed gemcitabine+carboplatin to have the best docking score and hence, efficacy. Our investigation has identified the residue Arg 105 to be more frequently involved in drug binding to CYP3A4. Our results suggest that gemcitabine or combination of gemcitabine+carboplatin could serve as an excellent therapy against CYP3A4 in NSCLC patients. Thus, our study depicts binding of chemotherapeutic drugs to CYP3A4 and has identified the residues that may be targeted for therapy in NSCLC patients. PMID:26211584

  18. Ethanol Extract of Oldenlandia diffusa – an Effective Chemotherapeutic for the Treatment of Colorectal Cancer in Humans

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Soojin; Shim, Ji Hwan; Gim, Huijin; Park, Hyun Soo

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: Oldenlandia diffusa is traditionally used to relieve the symptoms of and to treat various diseases, but its anti-cancer activity has not been well studied. In the present study, the authors investigated the anti-cancer effects of an ethanol extract of Oldenlandia diffusa (EOD) on HT-29 human adenocarcinoma cells. Methods: Cells were treated with different concentrations of an EOD, and cell death was assessed by using a 3-[4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl]-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT) assay. Analyses of the sub G1 peak, the caspase-3 and -9 activities, and the mitochondrial membrane depolarizations were conducted to confirm cell death by apoptosis. Also, intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation was determined using carboxy-H2DCFDA (5-(and-6)-carboxy-20,70-dichlorodihydrofluorescein diacetate). Results: EOD inhibited the proliferation of HT-29 cells for 24 hours by 78.6% ± 8.1% at 50 μg/mL, 74.4% ± 4.6% at 100 μg/mL, 65.9% ± 5.2% at 200 μg/mL, 51.4% ± 6.2% at 300 μg/mL, and by 41.7% ± 8.9% at 400 μg/mL, and treatment for 72 hours reduced the proliferation at the corresponding concentrations by 43.3% ± 8.8%, 24.3 ± 5.1 mV, 13.5 ± 3.2 mV, 6.5 ± 2.3 mV, and by 2.6 ± 2.3 mV. EOD increased the number of cells in the sub-G1 peak in a dose-dependent manner. The mitochondrial membrane depolarization was elevated by EOD. Also, caspase activities were dose-dependently elevated in the presence of EOD, and these activities were repressed by a pan-caspase inhibitor (zVAD-fmk). The ROS generation was significantly increased by EOD and N-acetyl-L-cysteine (NAC; a ROS scavenger) remarkably abolished EOD-induced cell death. In addition, a combination of sub-optimal doses of EOD and chemotherapeutic agents noticeably suppressed the growth of HT-29 cancer cells. Conclusion: These results indicate that EOD might be an effective chemotherapeutic for the treatment of human colorectal cancer. PMID:27280050

  19. Redox nanoparticle increases the chemotherapeutic efficiency of pioglitazone and suppresses its toxic side effects.

    PubMed

    Thangavel, Sindhu; Yoshitomi, Toru; Sakharkar, Meena Kishore; Nagasaki, Yukio

    2016-08-01

    Pioglitazone is a widely used anti-diabetic drug that induces cytotoxicity in cancer cells; however, its clinical use is questioned due to its associated liver toxicity caused by increased oxidative stress. We therefore employed nitroxide-radical containing nanoparticle, termed redox nanoparticle (RNP(N)) which is an effective scavenger of reactive oxygen species (ROS) as a drug carrier. RNP(N) encapsulation increased pioglitazone solubility, thus increasing cellular uptake of encapsulated pioglitazone which reduced the dose required to induce toxicity in prostate cancer cell lines. Investigation of in vitro molecular mechanism of pioglitazone revealed that both apoptosis and cell cycle arrest were involved in tumor cell death. In addition, intravenously administered pioglitazone-loaded RNP(N) produced significant tumor volume reduction in vivo due to enhanced permeation and retention effect. Most importantly, oxidative damage caused by pioglitazone in the liver was significantly suppressed by pioglitazone-loaded RNP(N) due to the presence of nitroxide radicals. It is interesting to note that oral administration of encapsulated pioglitazone, and co-administration of RNP(N) and pioglitazone, i.e., no encapsulation of pioglitazone in RNP(N) also significantly contributed to suppression of the liver injury. Therefore, use of RNP(N) either as an adjuvant or as a carrier for drugs with severe side effects is a promising chemotherapeutic strategy. PMID:27235996

  20. Osimertinib (AZD9291) Enhanced the Efficacy of Chemotherapeutic Agents in ABCB1- and ABCG2-Overexpressing Cells In Vitro, In Vivo, and Ex Vivo.

    PubMed

    Chen, Zhen; Chen, Yifan; Xu, Meng; Chen, Likun; Zhang, Xu; To, Kenneth Kin Wah; Zhao, Hongyun; Wang, Fang; Xia, Zhongjun; Chen, Xiaoqin; Fu, Liwu

    2016-08-01

    The overexpression of ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporters has been proved to be a major trigger for multidrug resistance (MDR) in certain types of cancer. In our study, we investigated whether osimertinib (AZD9291), a third-generation irreversible tyrosine kinase inhibitor of both activating EGFR mutations and resistance-associated T790M point mutation, could reverse MDR induced by ABCB1 and ABCG2 in vitro, in vivo, and ex vivo Our results showed that osimertinib significantly increased the sensitivity of ABCB1- and ABCG2-overexpressing cells to their substrate chemotherapeutic agents in vitro and in the model of ABCB1-overexpressing KBv200 cell xenograft in nude mice. Mechanistically, osimertinib increased the intracellular accumulations of doxorubicin (DOX) and Rhodamine 123 (Rho 123) by inhibiting the efflux function of the transporters in ABCB1- or ABCG2-overexpressing cells but not in their parental sensitive cells. Furthermore, osimertinib stimulated the ATPase activity of both ABCB1 and ABCG2 and competed with the [(125)I] iodoarylazidoprazosin photolabeling bound to ABCB1 or ABCG2, but did not alter the localization and expression of ABCB1 or ABCG2 in mRNA and protein levels nor the phosphorylations of EGFR, AKT, and ERK. Importantly, osimertinib also enhanced the cytotoxicity of DOX and intracellular accumulation of Rho 123 in ABCB1-overexpressing primary leukemia cells. Overall, these findings suggest osimertinib reverses ABCB1- and ABCG2-mediated MDR via inhibiting ABCB1 and ABCG2 from pumping out chemotherapeutic agents and provide possibility for cancer combinational therapy with osimertinib in the clinic. Mol Cancer Ther; 15(8); 1845-58. ©2016 AACR. PMID:27196753

  1. UMMS-4 enhanced sensitivity of chemotherapeutic agents to ABCB1-overexpressing cells via inhibiting function of ABCB1 transporter.

    PubMed

    Qiao, Dongjuan; Tang, Shangjun; Aslam, Sana; Ahmad, Matloob; To, Kenneth Kin Wah; Wang, Fang; Huang, Zhencong; Cai, Jiye; Fu, Liwu

    2014-01-01

    Multidrug resistance (MDR) mediated by ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporters through efflux of antineoplastic agents from cancer cells is a major obstacle to successful cancer chemotherapy. The inhibition of these ABC transporters is thus a logical approach to circumvent MDR. There has been intensive research effort to design and develop novel inhibitors for the ABC transporters to achieve this goal. In the present study, we evaluated the ability of UMMS-4 to modulate P-glycoprotein (P-gp/ABCB1)-, breast cancer resistance protein (BCRP/ABCG2)- and multidrug resistance protein (MRP1/ABCC1)-mediated MDR in cancer cells. Our findings showed that UMMS-4, at non-cytotoxic concentrations, apparently circumvents resistance to ABCB1 substrate anticancer drugs in ABCB1-overexpressing cells. When used at a concentration of 20 μmol/L, UMMS-4 produced a 17.53-fold reversal of MDR, but showed no effect on the sensitivity of drug-sensitive parental cells. UMMS-4, however, did not significantly alter the sensitivity of non-ABCB1 substrates in all cells and was unable to reverse ABCG2- and ABCC1-mediated MDR. Additionally, UMMS-4 profoundly inhibited the transport of rhodamine 123 (Rho 123) and doxorubicin (Dox) by the ABCB1 transporter. Furthermore, UMMS-4 did not alter the expression of ABCB1 at the mRNA and protein levels. In addition, the results of ATPase assays showed that UMMS-4 stimulated the ATPase activity of ABCB1. Taken together, we conclude that UMMS-4 antagonizes ABCB1-mediated MDR in cancer cells through direct inhibition of the drug efflux function of ABCB1. These findings may be useful for the development of safer and more effective MDR modulator. PMID:24660104

  2. Integrin Targeted Delivery of Chemotherapeutics

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Kai; Chen, Xiaoyuan

    2011-01-01

    Targeted delivery of chemotherapeutics is defined in the sense, that is, to maximize the therapeutic index of a chemotherapeutic agent by strictly localizing its pharmacological activity to the site or tissue of action. Integrins are a family of heterodimeric transmembrane glycoproteins involved in a wide range of cell-to-extracellular matrix (ECM) and cell-to-cell interactions. As cell surface receptors, integrins readily interact with extracellular ligands and play a vital role in angiogenesis, leukocytes function and tumor development, which sets up integrins as an excellent target for chemotherapy treatment. The peptide ligands containing the arginine-glycine-aspartic acid (RGD), which displays a strong binding affinity and selectivity to integrins, particularly to integrin αvβ3, have been developed to conjugate with various conventional chemotherapeutic agents, such as small molecules, peptides and proteins, and nanoparticle-carried drugs for integtrin targeted therapeutic studies. This review highlights the recent advances in integrin targeted delivery of chemotherapeutic agents with emphasis on target of integrin αvβ3, and describes the considerations for the design of the diverse RGD peptide-chemotherapeutics conjugates and their major applications. PMID:21547159

  3. The possibility of simvastatin as a chemotherapeutic agent for all-trans retinoic acid-resistant promyelocytic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Tomiyama, Naoki; Matzno, Sumio; Kitada, Chihiro; Nishiguchi, Eri; Okamura, Noboru; Matsuyama, Kenji

    2008-03-01

    In this study, the authors evaluated the possible use of 3-hydroxymethylglutaryl coenzyme A (HMG-CoA) reductase inhibitors (statins) in anti-leukemic chemotherapy. Cytotoxic potency against HL-60 was as follows; simvastatin (SV)>atorvastatin>cerivastatin>fluvastatin. Interestingly, HL-60-R2, an all-trans retinoic acid (ATRA)-resistant HL-60 variant, was twice as sensitive to SV than HL-60. Further studies revealed the particular mechanism of action of SV-induced apoptosis in leukemia. SV directly and rapidly disordered mitochondria with a loss of its membrane potential, reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation and subsequent irreversible damage with cytochrome c leakage and, finally, SV induced apoptosis through caspase-9 activation, whereas several studies have shown that other statins induced apoptosis to leukemia by the depletion of isoprenoids used for the prenylation of small GTPases, which are essential for cellular signal transduction. Our findings suggest that the mitochondrial pathway plays an important role in the higher potency of SV as a new class of agents for anti-leukemic therapy alone and/or in combination with agents. PMID:18310894

  4. A robust and rapid xenograft model to assess efficacy of chemotherapeutic agents for human acute myeloid leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Saland, E; Boutzen, H; Castellano, R; Pouyet, L; Griessinger, E; Larrue, C; de Toni, F; Scotland, S; David, M; Danet-Desnoyers, G; Vergez, F; Barreira, Y; Collette, Y; Récher, C; Sarry, J-E

    2015-01-01

    Relevant preclinical mouse models are crucial to screen new therapeutic agents for acute myeloid leukemia (AML). Current in vivo models based on the use of patient samples are not easy to establish and manipulate in the laboratory. Our objective was to develop robust xenograft models of human AML using well-characterized cell lines as a more accessible and faster alternative to those incorporating the use of patient-derived AML cells. Five widely used AML cell lines representing various AML subtypes were transplanted and expanded into highly immunodeficient non-obese diabetic/LtSz-severe combined immunodeficiency IL2Rγcnull mice (for example, cell line-derived xenografts). We show here that bone marrow sublethal conditioning with busulfan or irradiation has equal efficiency for the xenotransplantation of AML cell lines. Although higher number of injected AML cells did not change tumor engraftment in bone marrow and spleen, it significantly reduced the overall survival in mice for all tested AML cell lines. On the basis of AML cell characteristics, these models also exhibited a broad range of overall mouse survival, engraftment, tissue infiltration and aggressiveness. Thus, we have established a robust, rapid and straightforward in vivo model based on engraftment behavior of AML cell lines, all vital prerequisites for testing new therapeutic agents in preclinical studies. PMID:25794133

  5. Interaction of standardized mistletoe (Viscum album) extracts with chemotherapeutic drugs regarding cytostatic and cytotoxic effects in vitro

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Given the importance of complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) to cancer patients, there is an increasing need to learn more about possible interactions between CAM and anticancer drugs. Mistletoe (Viscum album L.) belongs to the medicinal herbs that are used as supportive care during chemotherapy. In the in vitro study presented here the effect of standardized mistletoe preparations on the cytostatic and cytotoxic activity of several common conventional chemotherapeutic drugs was investigated using different cancer cell lines. Methods Human breast carcinoma cell lines HCC1937 and HCC1143 were treated with doxorubicin hydrochloride, pancreas adenocarcinoma cell line PA-TU-8902 with gemcitabine hydrochloride, prostate carcinoma cell line DU145 with docetaxel and mitoxantrone hydrochloride and lung carcinoma cell line NCI-H460 was treated with docetaxel and cisplatin. Each dose of the respective chemotherapeutic drug was combined with Viscum album extract (VAE) in clinically relevant concentrations and proliferation and apoptosis were measured. Results VAE did not inhibit chemotherapy induced cytostasis and cytotoxicity in any of our experimental settings. At higher concentrations VAE showed an additive inhibitory effect. Conclusions Our in vitro results suggest that no risk of safety by herb drug interactions has to be expected from the exposition of cancer cells to chemotherapeutic drugs and VAE simultaneously. PMID:24397864

  6. N-acetylaspartate (NAA) induces neuronal differentiation of SH-SY5Y neuroblastoma cell line and sensitizes it to chemotherapeutic agents.

    PubMed

    Mazzoccoli, Carmela; Ruggieri, Vitalba; Tataranni, Tiziana; Agriesti, Francesca; Laurenzana, Ilaria; Fratello, Angelo; Capitanio, Nazzareno; Piccoli, Claudia

    2016-05-01

    Neuroblastoma is the most commonly extra-cranial solid tumor of childhood frequently diagnosed. The nervous system-specific metabolite N-acetylaspartate (NAA) is synthesized from aspartate and acetyl-CoA in neurons, it is among the most abundant metabolites present in the central nervous system (CNS) and appears to be involved in many CNS disorders. The functional significance of the high NAA concentration in the brain remains uncertain, but it confers to NAA a unique clinical significance exploited in magnetic resonance spectroscopy. In the current study, we show that treatment of SH-SY5Y neuroblastoma-derived cell line with sub-cytotoxic physiological concentrations of NAA inhibits cell growth. This effect is partly due to enhanced apoptosis, shown by decrease of the anti-apoptotic factors survivin and Bcl-xL, and partly to arrest of the cell-cycle progression, linked to enhanced expression of the cyclin-inhibitors p53, p21Cip1/Waf1 and p27Kip1. Moreover, NAA-treated SH-SY5Y cells exhibited morphological changes accompanied with increase of the neurogenic markers TH and MAP2 and down-regulation of the pluripotency markers OCT4 and CXCR4/CD184. Finally, NAA-pre-treated SH-SY5Y cells resulted more sensitive to the cytotoxic effect of the chemotherapeutic drugs Cisplatin and 5-fluorouracil.To our knowledge, this is the first study demonstrating the neuronal differentiating effects of NAA in neuroblastoma cells. NAA may be a potential preconditioning or adjuvant compound in chemotherapeutic treatment. PMID:27036033

  7. Low-density lipoprotein as a potential vehicle for chemotherapeutic agents and radionucleotides in the management of gynecologic neoplasms

    SciTech Connect

    Gal, D.; Ohashi, M.; MacDonald, P.C.; Buchsbaum, H.J.; Simpson, E.R.

    1981-04-15

    Cholesterol metabolism was studied in cells from two established gynecologic cancer cell lines which were maintained in monolayer cultures. The cell lines were derived and established from poorly differentiated epidermoid cervical carcinoma and endometrial adenocarcinoma. The specific activity of 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A reductase, the rate-limiting enzyme of cholesterol de novo synthesis, in AC-258 cells was three times higher than that found in EC-50 cells. However, epidermoid cervical cancer cells metabolized low-density lipoprotein, the major transport vehicle for cholesterol in plasma, at a very high rate. This rate is fifteen times greater than the rate observed in fetal adrenal tissue and fifty times greater than the rate observed in nonneoplastic gynecologic tissue, each in organ culture. Both cancer cells in monolayer culture were shown to have specific receptors for LDL. These cancer cells demonstrate no defect in LDL metabolism, and lysosomal degradation of LDL was blocked by chloroquine. From the results of studies of specific binding of LDL in tissues obtained from nude mice it was demonstrated that membrane fractions prepared from EC-50 cells, after propagation in the mice, contained fifteen to thirty times more specific binding capacity for (125I)iodo-LDL than vital organs of the mouse, such as the liver, heart, lung, kidney, or brain. The results of these studies are suggestive that certain tumor cells might have a higher affinity for LDL than normal tissues and cytotoxic drugs or radionucleotides ligated to the LDL macromolecule may be utilized for the specific delivery of these agents.

  8. Low-density lipoprotein as a potential vehicle for chemotherapeutic agents and radionucleotides in the management of gynecologic neoplasms

    SciTech Connect

    Gal, D.; Ohashi, M.; MacDonald, P.C.; Buchsbaum, H.J.; Simpson, E.R.

    1981-04-15

    Cholesterol metabolism was studied in cells from two established gynecologic cancer cell lines which were maintained in monolayer cultures. The cell lines were derived and established from poorly differentiated epidermoid cervical carcinoma (EC-50) and endometrial adenocarcinoma (AC-258). The specific activity of 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A (HMG CoA) reductase, the rate-limiting enzyme of cholesterol de novo synthesis, in AC-258 cells (1700 pmoles x mg-1 microsomal protein x min-1) was three times higher than that found in EC-50 cells (550 pmoles x mg-1 microsomal protein x min-1). However, epidermoid cervical cancer cells (EC-50) metabolized low-density lipoprotein (LDL), the major transport vehicle for cholesterol in plasma, at a very high rate (14,000 ng x mg-1 cell protein x 6 hours). This rate is fifteen times greater than the rate observed in fetal adrenal tissue and fifty times greater than the rate observed in nonneoplastic gynecologic tissue, each in organ culture. Both cancer cells (EC-50 and AC-258) in monolayer culture were shown to have specific receptors for LDL. These cancer cells demonstrate no defect in LDL metabolism, and lysosomal degradation of LDL was blocked by chloroquine. From the results of studies of specific binding of LDL in tissues obtained from nude mice it was demonstrated that membrane fractions prepared from EC-50 cells, after propagation in the mice, contained fifteen to thirty times more specific binding capacity for (125I)iodo-LDL than vital organs of the mouse, such as the liver, heart, lung, kidney, or brain. The results of these studies are suggestive that certain tumor cells might have a higher affinity for LDL than normal tissues and cytotoxic drugs or radionucleotides ligated to the LDL macromolecule may be utilized for the specific delivery of these agents.

  9. The Src and c-Kit kinase inhibitor dasatinib enhances p53-mediated targeting of human acute myeloid leukemia stem cells by chemotherapeutic agents

    PubMed Central

    Dos Santos, Cedric; McDonald, Tinisha; Ho, Yin Wei; Liu, Hongjun; Lin, Allen; Forman, Stephen J.; Kuo, Ya-Huei

    2013-01-01

    The SRC family kinases (SFKs) and the receptor tyrosine kinase c-Kit are activated in human acute myeloid leukemia (AML) cells. We show here that the SFKs LYN, HCK, or FGR are overexpressed and activated in AML progenitor cells. Treatment with the SFK and c-KIT inhibitor dasatinib selectively inhibits human AML stem/progenitor cell growth in vitro. Importantly, dasatinib markedly increases the elimination of AML stem cells capable of engrafting immunodeficient mice by chemotherapeutic agents. In vivo dasatinib treatment enhances chemotherapy-induced targeting of primary murine AML stem cells capable of regenerating leukemia in secondary recipients. Our studies suggest that enhanced targeting of AML cells by the combination of dasatinib with daunorubicin may be related to inhibition of AKT-mediated human mouse double minute 2 homolog phosphorylation, resulting in enhanced p53 activity in AML cells. Combined treatment using dasatinib and chemotherapy provides a novel approach to increasing p53 activity and enhancing targeting of AML stem cells. PMID:23896410

  10. A novel copper(I) complex induces ER-stress-mediated apoptosis and sensitizes B-acute lymphoblastic leukemia cells to chemotherapeutic agents

    PubMed Central

    Porcù, Elena; Consolaro, Francesca; Marzano, Cristina; Pellei, Maura; Gandin, Valentina; Basso, Giuseppe

    2014-01-01

    A phosphine copper(I) complex [Cu(thp)4][PF6] (CP) was recently identified as an efficient in vitro antitumor agent. In this study, we evaluated the antiproliferative activity of CP in leukemia cell lines finding a significant efficacy, especially against SEM and RS4;11 cells. Immunoblot analysis showed the activation of caspase-12 and caspase-9 and of the two effector caspase-3 and -7, suggesting that cell death occurred in a caspase-dependent manner. Interestingly we did not observe mitochondrial involvement in the process of cell death. Measures on semipurified proteasome from RS4;11 and SEM cell extracts demonstrated that chymotrypsin-, trypsin- and caspase-like activity decreased in the presence of CP. Moreover, we found an accumulation of ubiquitinated proteins and a remarkable increase of ER stress markers: GRP78, CHOP, and the spliced form of XBP1. Accordingly, the protein synthesis inhibitor cycloheximide significantly protected cancer cells from CP-induced cell death, suggesting that protein synthesis machinery was involved. In well agreement with results obtained on stabilized cell lines, CP induced ER-stress and apoptosis also in primary cells from B-acute lymphoblastic leukemia patients. Importantly, we showed that the combination of CP with some chemotherapeutic drugs displayed a good synergy that strongly affected the survival of both RS4;11 and SEM cells. PMID:24980813

  11. Differential Interactions of Cytochrome P450 3A5 and 3A4 with Chemotherapeutic Agent-Vincristine: A Comparative Molecular Dynamics Study.

    PubMed

    Saba, Nikhat; Bhuyan, Rajabrata; Nandy, Suman Kumar; Seal, Alpana

    2015-01-01

    The chemotherapeutic agent vincristine, used for treatment of acute lymphoblastic leukemia is metabolized preferentially by polymorphic cytochrome P450 3A5 (CYP3A5) with higher clearance rate than cytochrome P450 3A4 (CYP3A4). As a result, CYP3A5 expressers have a reduced amount of vincristine-induced peripheral neuropathy than non-expressers. We modeled the structure of CYP3A5 and its interaction with vincristine, compared with CYP3A4-vincristine complex using molecular docking and simulation studies. This relative study helped us to understand the molecular mechanisms behind the interaction at the atomic level through interaction energy, binding free energy, hydrogen bond and solvent accessible surface area analysis - giving an insight into the binding mode and the main residues involved in this particular interaction. Our results show that the interacting groups get closer in CYP3A5-vincristine complex due to different orientation of vincristine. This leads to higher binding affinity of vincristine towards CYP3A5 compared to CYP3A4 and explains the preferential metabolism of vincristine by CYP3A5. We believe that, the results of the current study will be helpful for future studies on structure-based drug design in this area. PMID:25634447

  12. The Hepatoprotective Effect of Haoqin Qingdan Decoction against Liver Injury Induced by a Chemotherapeutic Drug Cyclophosphamide

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xiaojiang; Li, Baole; Jia, Yingjie

    2015-01-01

    Haoqin Qingdan decoction (HQQD), a modern Chinese formula, has been widely used in Eastern Asia. Our study focuses on the hepatoprotective effect of HQQD against cyclophosphamide-induced hepatotoxicity. S180, a kind of ascites tumor cells, was used to establish S180-bearing mice, followed by the injection of cyclophosphamide (CP, 80 mg/kg) every other day for 5 times. HQQD was used intragastrically at the dose of 80 g/kg, 40 g/kg, and 20 g/kg twice a day for 12 days. HL-7702 hepatic cell line was incubated with HQQD-medicated serum. Then we detected the effects of HQQD on (i) tumor suppression; (ii) morphological examination; (iii) SOD, MDA, GSH, ALT, and AST; (iv) cleaved caspase-3 expression and (v) cellular viability. CP caused dramatic elevations of AST, ALT, and MDA, while HQQD notably attenuated these elevations. SOD and GSH were notably increased, which were efficiently attenuated by HQQD. CP injection significantly increased apoptosis by increasing cleaved caspase-3 expression, which was obviously inhibited by HQQD, accompanied by the improvement of cells viability. Histopathological examinations supported the above findings. Therefore, HQQD may protect liver tissue through attenuating oxidative stress and the caspase-3-dependent intrinsic apoptosis induced by CP, which suggests the potentially therapeutic effect of HQQD in the use of alkylating agent for cancer chemotherapy. PMID:26101538

  13. Modification of polyethylene glycol onto solid lipid nanoparticles encapsulating a novel chemotherapeutic agent (PK-L4) to enhance solubility for injection delivery

    PubMed Central

    Fang, Yi-Ping; Wu, Pao-Chu; Huang, Yaw-Bin; Tzeng, Cherng-Chyi; Chen, Yeh-Long; Hung, Yu-Han; Tsai, Ming-Jun; Tsai, Yi-Hung

    2012-01-01

    Background The synthetic potential chemotherapeutic agent 3-Chloro-4-[(4-methoxyphenyl) amino]furo[2,3-b]quinoline (PK-L4) is an analog of amsacrine. The half-life of PK-L4 is longer than that of amsacrine; however, PK-L4 is difficult to dissolve in aqueous media, which is problematic for administration by intravenous injection. Aims To utilize solid lipid nanoparticles (SLNs) modified with polyethylene glycol (PEG) to improve the delivery of PK-L4 and investigate its biodistribution behavior after intravenous administration. Results The particle size of the PK-L4-loaded SLNs was 47.3 nm and the size of the PEGylated form was smaller, at 28 nm. The entrapment efficiency (EE%) of PK-L4 in SLNs with and without PEG showed a high capacity of approximately 100% encapsulation. Results also showed that the amount of PK-L4 released over a prolonged period from SLNs both with and without PEG was comparable to the non-formulated group, with 16.48% and 30.04%, respectively, of the drug being released, which fit a zero-order equation. The half-maximal inhibitory concentration values of PK-L4-loaded SLNs with and those without PEG were significantly reduced by 45%–64% in the human lung carcinoma cell line (A549), 99% in the human breast adenocarcinoma cell line with estrogen receptor (MCF7), and 95% in the human breast adenocarcinoma cell line (MDA-MB-231). The amount of PK-L4 released by SLNs with PEG was significantly higher than that from the PK-L4 solution (P < 0.05). After intravenous bolus of the PK-L4-loaded SLNs with PEG, there was a marked significant difference in half-life alpha (0.136 ± 0.046 hours) when compared with the PK-L4 solution (0.078 ± 0.023 hours); also the area under the curve from zero to infinity did not change in plasma when compared to the PK-L4 solution. This demonstrated that PK-L4-loaded SLNs were rapidly distributed from central areas to tissues and exhibited higher accumulation in specific organs. The highest deposition of PK-L4-loaded SLNs

  14. Drug-eluting microarrays to identify effective chemotherapeutic combinations targeting patient-derived cancer stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Carstens, Matthew R.; Fisher, Robert C.; Acharya, Abhinav P.; Butterworth, Elizabeth A.; Scott, Edward; Huang, Emina H.; Keselowsky, Benjamin G.

    2015-01-01

    A new paradigm in oncology establishes a spectrum of tumorigenic potential across the heterogeneous phenotypes within a tumor. The cancer stem cell hypothesis postulates that a minute fraction of cells within a tumor, termed cancer stem cells (CSCs), have a tumor-initiating capacity that propels tumor growth. An application of this discovery is to target this critical cell population using chemotherapy; however, the process of isolating these cells is arduous, and the rarity of CSCs makes it difficult to test potential drug candidates in a robust fashion, particularly for individual patients. To address the challenge of screening drug libraries on patient-derived populations of rare cells, such as CSCs, we have developed a drug-eluting microarray, a miniaturized platform onto which a minimal quantity of cells can adhere and be exposed to unique treatment conditions. Hundreds of drug-loaded polymer islands acting as drug depots colocalized with adherent cells are surrounded by a nonfouling background, creating isolated culture environments on a solid substrate. Significant results can be obtained by testing <6% of the cells required for a typical 96-well plate. Reliability was demonstrated by an average coefficient of variation of 14% between all of the microarrays and 13% between identical conditions within a single microarray. Using the drug-eluting array, colorectal CSCs isolated from two patients exhibited unique responses to drug combinations when cultured on the drug-eluting microarray, highlighting the potential as a prognostic tool to identify personalized chemotherapeutic regimens targeting CSCs. PMID:26124098

  15. A Novel Pentamethoxyflavone Down-Regulates Tumor Cell Survival and Proliferative and Angiogenic Gene Products through Inhibition of IκB Kinase Activation and Sensitizes Tumor Cells to Apoptosis by Cytokines and Chemotherapeutic Agents

    PubMed Central

    Phromnoi, Kanokkarn; Reuter, Simone; Sung, Bokyung; Prasad, Sahdeo; Kannappan, Ramaswamy; Yadav, Vivek R.; Chanmahasathien, Wisinee; Limtrakul, Pornngarm

    2011-01-01

    Most anticancer drugs have their origin in traditional medicinal plants. We describe here a flavone, 5,3′-dihydroxy-3,6,7,8,4′-pentamethoxyflavone (PMF), from the leaves of the Thai plant Gardenia obtusifolia, that has anti-inflammatory and anticancer potential. Because the nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) pathway is linked to inflammation and tumorigenesis, we investigated the effect of PMF on this pathway. We found that PMF suppressed NF-κB activation induced by inflammatory agents, tumor promoters, and carcinogens. This suppression was not specific to the cell type. Although PMF did not directly modify the ability of NF-κB proteins to bind to DNA, it inhibited IκBα (inhibitory subunit of NF-κB) kinase, leading to suppression of phosphorylation and degradation of IκBα, and suppressed consequent p65 nuclear translocation, thus abrogating NF-κB-dependent reporter gene expression. Suppression of the NF-κB cell signaling pathway by the flavone led to the inhibition of expression of NF-κB-regulated gene products that mediate inflammation (cyclooxygenase-2), survival (XIAP, survivin, Bcl-xL, and cFLIP), proliferation (cyclin D1), invasion (matrix metalloproteinase-9), and angiogenesis (vascular endothelial growth factor). Suppression of antiapoptotic gene products by PMF correlated with the enhancement of apoptosis induced by tumor necrosis factor-α and the chemotherapeutic agents cisplatin, paclitaxel, and 5-flurouracil. Overall, our results indicate that PMF suppresses the activation of NF-κB and NF-κB-regulated gene expression, leading to the enhancement of apoptosis. This is the first report to demonstrate that this novel flavone has anti-inflammatory and anticancer effects by targeting the IKK complex. PMID:20930110

  16. Experimental and clinical observations of the effects of cytotoxic chemotherapeutic drugs on wound healing.

    PubMed Central

    Bland, K I; Palin, W E; von Fraunhofer, J A; Morris, R R; Adcock, R A; Tobin, G R

    1984-01-01

    The administration of perioperative doxorubicin HCl (Adriamycin) had profound effects on wound healing for 5 out of 7 breast cancer patients and 5 of 5 melanoma patients following intravenous and intra-arterial infusional chemotherapy, respectively. The clinical observation of significant reduction in wound tear strength (WTS) and wound tear energy ( WTE ) in the group of patients with cutaneous melanoma initiated this experimental analysis. A study of WTS ( kNm -2) in nontumor-bearing (non-TB) and Morris Hepatoma (MH)-7777 (TB) rats treated with therapeutic doses of Adriamycin (ADR) and methotrexate (MTX) was compared with saline-treated controls. Mean tumor volume (cm3) was unaffected by MTX, while significant tumor inhibition (p less than 0.01) was evident for ADR-treated TB animals. A correlation (r = 0.516, p less than 0.01) was observed for tumor volume and WTS. Separate analysis of TB and non-TB animals identified a significant correlation (r = 0.6259, p less than 0.01) between advancing cachexia in TB rats and WTS. A 21-day analysis was done for 160 animals to determine the effect of MTX and ADR on WTS ( kNm -2) and WTE ( Ncm -1). The presence of MH-7777 significantly (p less than 0.01) reduced WTE for TB animals not treated with chemotherapy. TB animals treated with ADR had significant (p less than 0.01) improvement in WTE at day 21 compared with TB controls. This enhancement in WTE was not observed in rats treated with MTX. These clinical and experimental observations suggest significant retardation of the early phases of wound fibroplasia as determined by WTS and WTE following operative trauma and subsequent administration of therapeutic dosages of cytotoxic agents. PMID:6732317

  17. Using Cytochalasins to Improve Current Chemotherapeutic Approaches

    PubMed Central

    Trendowski, Matthew

    2015-01-01

    Although the amount of progress cancer therapy has made in recent years is commendable, considerable limitations still remain. Most agents preferentially target rapidly proliferating cells, thereby destroying tumorigenic growths. Unfortunately, there are many labile cells in the patient that are also rapidly dividing, ultimately perpetuating significant side effects, including immunosuppression. Cytochalasins are microfilament-directed agents most commonly known for their use in basic research to understand cytoskeletal mechanisms. However, such agents also exhibit profound anticancer activity, as indicated by numerous in vitro and in vivo studies. Cytochalasins appear to preferentially damage malignant cells, as shown by their minimal effects on normal epithelial and immune cells. Further, cytochalasins influence the end stages of mitosis, suggesting that such agents could be combined with microtubule-directed agents to elicit a profound synergistic effect on malignant cells. Therefore, it is likely that cytochalasins could be used to supplement current chemotherapeutic measures to improve efficacy rates, as well as decrease the prevalence of drug resistance in the clinical setting. PMID:25322987

  18. Synergistic interactions of the anti-casein kinase 2 CIGB-300 peptide and chemotherapeutic agents in lung and cervical preclinical cancer models

    PubMed Central

    PERERA, YASSER; TORO, NEYLEN DEL; GOROVAYA, LARISA; FERNANDEZ-DE-COSSIO, JORGE; FARINA, HERNAN G.; PEREA, SILVIO E.

    2014-01-01

    CIGB-300 is a novel clinical-stage synthetic peptide that impairs the casein kinase 2 (CK2)-mediated phosphorylation of B23/nucleophosmin in different experimental settings and cancer models. As a single agent, CIGB-300 induces apoptosis in vitro and in vivo and modulates an array of proteins that are mainly involved in drug resistance, cell proliferation and apoptosis, as determined by proteomic analysis. However, the clinical oncology practice and cumulative knowledge on tumor biology suggest that drug combinations are more likely to cope with tumor complexity compared to single agents. In this study, we investigated the antiproliferative effect of CIGB-300 when combined with different anticancer drugs, such as cisplatin (alkylating), paclitaxel (antimitotic), doxorubicin (antitopoisomerase II) or 5-fluorouracil (DNA/RNA antimetabolite) in cell lines derived from lung and cervical cancer. Of note, using a Latin square design and subsequent analysis by CalcuSyn software, we observed that paclitaxel and cisplatin exhibited the best synergistic/additive profile when combined with CIGB-300, according to the combination and dose reduction indices. Such therapeutically favorable profiles may be explained by a direct cytotoxic effect and also by the observed cell cycle impairment following incubation of tumor cells with selected drug combinations. Importantly, on in vivo dose-finding schedules in human cervical tumors xenografted in nude mice, we observed that concomitant administration of CIGB-300 and cisplatin increased mice survival compared to single-agent treatment. Collectively, these findings provide a rationale for combining the anti-CK2 CIGB-300 peptide with currently available anticancer agents in the clinical setting and indicate platins and taxanes as compounds with major perspectives. PMID:25279177

  19. Synergistic interactions of the anti-casein kinase 2 CIGB-300 peptide and chemotherapeutic agents in lung and cervical preclinical cancer models.

    PubMed

    Perera, Yasser; Toro, Neylen Del; Gorovaya, Larisa; Fernandez-DE-Cossio, Jorge; Farina, Hernan G; Perea, Silvio E

    2014-11-01

    CIGB-300 is a novel clinical-stage synthetic peptide that impairs the casein kinase 2 (CK2)-mediated phosphorylation of B23/nucleophosmin in different experimental settings and cancer models. As a single agent, CIGB-300 induces apoptosis in vitro and in vivo and modulates an array of proteins that are mainly involved in drug resistance, cell proliferation and apoptosis, as determined by proteomic analysis. However, the clinical oncology practice and cumulative knowledge on tumor biology suggest that drug combinations are more likely to cope with tumor complexity compared to single agents. In this study, we investigated the antiproliferative effect of CIGB-300 when combined with different anticancer drugs, such as cisplatin (alkylating), paclitaxel (antimitotic), doxorubicin (antitopoisomerase II) or 5-fluorouracil (DNA/RNA antimetabolite) in cell lines derived from lung and cervical cancer. Of note, using a Latin square design and subsequent analysis by CalcuSyn software, we observed that paclitaxel and cisplatin exhibited the best synergistic/additive profile when combined with CIGB-300, according to the combination and dose reduction indices. Such therapeutically favorable profiles may be explained by a direct cytotoxic effect and also by the observed cell cycle impairment following incubation of tumor cells with selected drug combinations. Importantly, on in vivo dose-finding schedules in human cervical tumors xenografted in nude mice, we observed that concomitant administration of CIGB-300 and cisplatin increased mice survival compared to single-agent treatment. Collectively, these findings provide a rationale for combining the anti-CK2 CIGB-300 peptide with currently available anticancer agents in the clinical setting and indicate platins and taxanes as compounds with major perspectives. PMID:25279177

  20. Phosphorescence Monitoring of Hypoxic Microenvironment in Solid-Tumors to Evaluate Chemotherapeutic Effects Using the Hypoxia-Sensitive Iridium (III) Coordination Compound

    PubMed Central

    Shang, Jin; Ma, Jingwen; Wang, Rong; Deng, Lei; Guo, Youmin; Zhong, Fan; Bai, Mingfeng; Zhang, Shaojuan; Wu, Daocheng

    2015-01-01

    Objectives To utilize phosphorescence to monitor hypoxic microenvironment in solid-tumors and investigate cancer chemotherapeutic effects in vivo. Methods A hypoxia-sensitive probe named BTP was used to monitor hypoxic microenvironment in solid-tumors. The low-dose metronomic treatment with cisplatin was used in anti-angiogenetic chemotherapeutic programs. The phosphorescence properties of BTP were detected by a spectrofluorometer. BTP cytotoxicity utilized cell necrosis and apoptosis, which were evaluated by trypan blue dye exclusion and Hoechst33342 plus propidium iodide assays. Tumor-bearing mouse models of colon adenocarcinoma were used for tumor imaging in vivo. Monitoring of the hypoxic microenvironment in tumors was performed with a Maestro 2 fluorescence imaging system. Tumor tissues in each group were harvested regularly and treated with pathological hematoxylin and eosin and immunohistochemical staining to confirm imaging results. Results BTP did not feature obvious cytotoxicity for cells, and tumor growth in low-dose metronomic cisplatin treated mice was significantly inhibited by chemotherapy. Hypoxic levels significantly increased due to cisplatin, as proven by the expression level of related proteins. Phosphorescence intensity in the tumors of mice in the cisplatin group was stronger and showed higher contrast than that in tumors of saline treated mice. Conclusions We develop a useful phosphorescence method to evaluate the chemotherapeutic effects of cisplatin. The proposed method shows potential as a phosphorescence imaging approach for evaluating chemotherapeutic effects in vivo, especially anti-angiogenesis. PMID:25786221

  1. Efficacy of combined photothermal therapy and chemotherapeutic drugs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Madsen, Steen J.; Shih, En-Chung; Hirschberg, Henry

    2015-03-01

    Hyperthermia has been shown to enhance the effects of chemotherapeutic agents in a wide variety of cancers. The purpose of this study was to investigate the combined effects of a number of commonly used chemotherapeutic drugs (bleomycin, doxorubicin and cisplatin) with photothermal therapy (PTT)-induced hyperthermia in an in vitro system consisting of human head and neck squamous carcinoma cells and murine lymphocytic monocytes which were used as delivery vehicles for gold-silica nanoshells (AuNS). PTT was accomplished via near infra-red (NIR) irradiation of AuNS. The results showed that PTT combined with cisplatin resulted in only a mild degree of synergism while additive effects were observed for concurrent treatments of PTT and doxorubicin and PTT and bleomycin.

  2. Bevacizumab potentiates chemotherapeutic effect on T-leukemia/lymphoma cells by direct action on tumor endothelial cells

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Li; Shi, Wen-Yu; Yang, Fan; Tang, Wei; Gapihan, Guillaume; Varna, Mariana; Shen, Zhi-Xiang; Chen, Sai-Juan; Leboeuf, Christophe; Janin, Anne; Zhao, Wei-Li

    2011-01-01

    Vascular endothelial growth factor-A, an angiogenesis stimulator expressed on both tumor endothelial and malignant T cells, is involved in tumor progression in T-leukemia/lymphoma. Here, we assessed the impact of therapeutic vascular endothelial growth factor-A blockade on tumor-endothelial cell interaction and on tumor progression. In a murine xenograft T-leukemia/lymphoma model, combined bevacizumab (monoclonal antibody against vascular endothelial growth factor-A) with doxorubicin, compared with doxorubicin alone, significantly delayed tumor growth and induced prevalence of tumor cell apoptosis over mitosis. More importantly, the combined treatment induced endothelial cell swelling, microvessel occlusions, and tumor necrosis. In vitro, co-culture of endothelial cells with T-leukemia/lymphoma cells showed that doxorubicin induced expression of intracellular cell adhesion molecule-1, provided endothelial and malignant T cells were in direct contact. This was abrogated by bevacizumab treatment with doxorubicin. Taken together, bevacizumab enhances the chemotherapeutic effect on T-leukemia/lymphoma cells. Directly targeting tumor endothelial cells might be a promising therapeutic strategy to counteract tumor progression in T-cell malignancies. PMID:21330328

  3. Inhibitory effects of chemotherapeutics on human organic anion transporter hOAT4

    PubMed Central

    Toh, May Fern; Suh, Wonmo; Wang, Haoxun; Zhou, Peter; Hu, Longqin; You, Guofeng

    2016-01-01

    Human organic anion transporter 4 (hOAT4) belongs to a family of organic anion transporters which play critical roles in the body disposition of clinically important drugs. hOAT4 is expressed in the kidney and placenta. In the current study, we examined the inhibitory effects of 101 anticancer drugs from a clinical drug library on hOAT4 transport activity. The studies were carried out in hOAT4-expressing human kidney HEK-293 cells and human placenta BeWo cells. Among these drugs, only chlorambucil and cabazitaxel demonstrated more than 50% cis-inhibitory effect on hOAT4-mediated uptake of 3H-labeled estrone sulfate, a prototypical substrate for the transporter. The IC50 values for chlorambucil and cabazitaxel were 44.28 and 3.5 µM respectively. Dixon plot analysis revealed that inhibition by chlorambucil was competitive with a Ki = 55.73 µM whereas inhibition by cabazitaxel was non-competitive with a Ki = 1.78 µM. Our results demonstrated that chlorambucil and cabazitaxel were inhibitors of hOAT4. Furthermore, by comparing our data with clinically relevant exposures of these drugs, we conclude that the propensity for chlorambucil and cabazitaxel to cause drug-drug interaction through inhibition of hOAT4 is low. PMID:27335682

  4. Chemotherapeutic (cyclophosphamide) effects on rat breast tumor hemodynamics monitored by multi-channel NIRS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Jae G.; Zhao, Dawen; Mason, Ralph P.; Liu, Hanli

    2005-04-01

    We previously suggested that the two time constants quantified from the increase of tumor oxyhemoglobin concentration, ▵ [HbO2], during hyperoxic gas intervention are associated with two blood flow/perfusion rates in well perfused and poorly perfused regions of tumors. In this study, our hypothesis is that when cancer therapy is applied to a tumor, changes in blood perfusion will occur and be detected by the NIRS. For experiments, systemic chemotherapy, cyclophosphamide (CTX), was applied to two groups of rats bearing syngeneic 13762NF mammary adenocarcinomas: one group received a single high dose i. p. (200 mg/kg CTX) and the other group continuous low doses (20 mg/kg CTX i. p. for 10 days). Time courses of changes in tumor ▵ [HbO2] were measured at four different locations on the breast tumors non-invasively with an inhaled gas sequence of air-oxygen-air before and after CTX administration. Both rat body weight and tumor volume decreased after administration of high dose CTX, but continuous low doses showed decrease of tumor volume only. Baselines (without any therapy) intra- and inter-tumor heterogeneity of vascular oxygenation during oxygen inhalation were similar to our previous observations. After CTX treatment, significant changes in vascular hemodynamic response to oxygen inhalation were observed from both groups. By fitting the increase of ▵ [HbO2] during oxygen inhalation, we have obtained changes of vascular structure ratio and also of perfusion rate ratio before and after chemotherapy. The preliminary results suggest that cyclophosphamide has greatest effect on the well perfused tumor vasculature. Overall, our study supports our earlier hypothesis, proving that the effects of chemotherapy in tumor may be monitored non-invasively by using NIRS to detect changes of hemodynamics induced with respiratory challenges.

  5. Dietary chalcones with chemopreventive and chemotherapeutic potential.

    PubMed

    Orlikova, Barbora; Tasdemir, Deniz; Golais, Frantisek; Dicato, Mario; Diederich, Marc

    2011-05-01

    Chalcones are absorbed in the daily diet and appear to be promising cancer chemopreventive agents. Chalcones represent an important group of the polyphenolic family, which includes a large number of naturally occurring molecules. This family possesses an interesting spectrum of biological activities, including antioxidative, antibacterial, anti-inflammatory, anticancer, cytotoxic, and immunosuppressive potential. Compounds of this family have been shown to interfere with each step of carcinogenesis, including initiation, promotion and progression. Moreover, numerous compounds from the family of dietary chalcones appear to show activity against cancer cells, suggesting that these molecules or their derivatives may be considered as potential anticancer drugs. This review will focus primarily on prominent members of the chalcone family with an 1,3-diphenyl-2-propenon core structure. Specifically, the inhibitory effects of these compounds on the different steps of carcinogenesis that reveal interesting chemopreventive and chemotherapeutic potential will be discussed. PMID:21484163

  6. Effect of dicycloplatin, a novel platinum chemotherapeutical drug, on inhibiting cell growth and inducing cell apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Li, Guang-quan; Chen, Xing-gui; Wu, Xing-ping; Xie, Jing-dun; Liang, Yong-ju; Zhao, Xiao-qin; Chen, Wei-qiang; Fu, Li-wu

    2012-01-01

    Dicycloplatin, a new supramolecular platinum-based antitumor drug, has been approved by the State Food and Administration (SFDA) of China. In this study, we investigated the anticancer activity of dicycloplatin in cancer cells and signaling pathways involved in dicycloplatin-induced apoptosis. Dicycloplatin inhibited the proliferation of cancer cells and increased the percentage of apoptosis in a concentration-dependent manner. Besides, some apoptosis related events were observed after treatment with dicycloplatin, including increase of reactive oxygen species (ROS), collapse of mitochondrial membrane potential (Δψm), release of cytochrome c from the mitochondria to the cytosol, upregulation of p53, which were accompanied by activation of caspase-9, caspase-3, caspase-8, and poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase cleavage in a concentration-dependent manner. The role of apoptosis in dicycloplatin-mediated cell death was further confirmed by the concomitant treatment with caspase-8 or caspase-9 inhibitors, which inhibited apoptosis and PARP cleavage. Intracellular glutathione (GSH) was also found to inhibit the cytotoxic effect of dicycloplatin. In conclusion, these findings suggest that dicycloplatin induces apoptosis through ROS stress-mediated death receptor pathway and mitochondrial pathway which is similar to carboplatin. PMID:23152837

  7. (Radiopharmaceutical and chemotherapeutic drug technology)

    SciTech Connect

    Srivastava, P.C.

    1988-01-14

    The purpose was to undertake a TOKTEN Distinguished Scientist Award assignment sponsored by the United Nations Development Programme (UNDP) in cooperation with the Council of Scientific and Industrial Research (CSIR) of India to conduct research in the areas of nucleosides and protein labeling agents at the Central Drug Research Institute (CDRI), Lucknow, and to help research scientists develop chemotherapeutic drugs in India. His work at CDRI consisted of syntheses of imidazole nucleosides, iodination reactions of nucleosides, synthesis of a bifunctional bismaleimide protein labeling agent, coordination of protein labeling studies with the Membrane Biology Group of CDRI, and initiation of several new collaborative research projects at CDRI. In addition, as a part of the CSIR-UNDP, the traveler visited several academic and industrial research institutions in India, delivered five seminars describing various aspects of radiopharmaceutical development at ORNL, and interacted extensively with scientists in India on current drug and radiopharmaceutical develop technologies in India and abroad.

  8. A dual-responsive superparamagnetic Fe 3O 4/Silica/PAH/PSS material used for controlled release of chemotherapeutic agent, keggin polyoxotungstate, PM-19

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Rui; Sun, Guoying; Li, Qiuyu; Wang, Enbo; Gu, Jianmin

    2010-10-01

    A bicontrollable drug release system was developed by layer-by-layer assembly of poly(allylamine hydrochloride) (PAH)/sodium poly(styrene sulfonate) (PSS) multilayers onto a Fe 3O 4/SiO 2 composite core. The saturated magnetization of this system reaches up to 38.6 emu/g at RT, making targeting easily controlled by an external magnetic field. Meanwhile, the packing of the polyelectrolyte multilayers is sensitive to pH values, generating a pH-switch on-off mode for the release of loaded drugs. In this specific case, the release of a chemotherapeutic polyoxometalate K 7Ti 2W 10PO 40·6H 2O (PM-19) was tested. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) was used to examine the nanostructure of the composite drug release system. UV-vis absorption was used to monitor the drug release. Fourier transform infrared (FTIR), Powder X-ray diffraction, and Elemental analyses were used to study the composition of tested systems. The structure and composition of the composite system was also studied using magnetism measurement and nitrogen adsorption-desorption.

  9. Potentiation of chemotherapeutics by bromelain and N-acetylcysteine: sequential and combination therapy of gastrointestinal cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Amini, Afshin; Masoumi-Moghaddam, Samar; Ehteda, Anahid; Liauw, Winston; Morris, David Lawson

    2016-01-01

    Intraperitoneal chemotherapy together with cytoreductive surgery is the standard of care for a number of peritoneal surface malignancies. However, this approach fails to maintain the complete response and disease recurs due to microscopic residual disease. Although safer than systemic chemotherapy regimens, locoregional treatment with chemotherapeutics can induce toxicity which is a major concern affecting the patient's treatment protocol and outcome. For an enhanced treatment efficacy, efforts should be made to maximize cytotoxic effects of chemotherapeutic agents on tumor cells while minimizing their toxic effects on host cells. Bromelain and N-acetylcysteine are two natural agents with good safety profiles shown to have anti-cancer effects. However, their interaction with chemotherapeutics is unknown. In this study, we investigated if these agents have the potential to sensitize in vitro gastrointestinal cancer models to cisplatin, paclitaxel, 5-fluorouracil, and vincristine. The drug-drug interaction was also analyzed. Our findings suggest that combination of bromelain and N-acetylcysteine with chemotherapeutic agents could give rise to an improved chemotherapeutic index in therapeutic approaches to peritoneal surface malignancies of gastrointestinal origin so that maximum benefits could result from less toxic and more patient-friendly doses. This represents a potentially efficacious strategy for the enhancement of microscopic cytoreduction and is a promising area for future research. PMID:27186409

  10. Potentiation of chemotherapeutics by bromelain and N-acetylcysteine: sequential and combination therapy of gastrointestinal cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Amini, Afshin; Masoumi-Moghaddam, Samar; Ehteda, Anahid; Liauw, Winston; Morris, David Lawson

    2016-01-01

    Intraperitoneal chemotherapy together with cytoreductive surgery is the standard of care for a number of peritoneal surface malignancies. However, this approach fails to maintain the complete response and disease recurs due to microscopic residual disease. Although safer than systemic chemotherapy regimens, locoregional treatment with chemotherapeutics can induce toxicity which is a major concern affecting the patient’s treatment protocol and outcome. For an enhanced treatment efficacy, efforts should be made to maximize cytotoxic effects of chemotherapeutic agents on tumor cells while minimizing their toxic effects on host cells. Bromelain and N-acetylcysteine are two natural agents with good safety profiles shown to have anti-cancer effects. However, their interaction with chemotherapeutics is unknown. In this study, we investigated if these agents have the potential to sensitize in vitro gastrointestinal cancer models to cisplatin, paclitaxel, 5-fluorouracil, and vincristine. The drug-drug interaction was also analyzed. Our findings suggest that combination of bromelain and N-acetylcysteine with chemotherapeutic agents could give rise to an improved chemotherapeutic index in therapeutic approaches to peritoneal surface malignancies of gastrointestinal origin so that maximum benefits could result from less toxic and more patient-friendly doses. This represents a potentially efficacious strategy for the enhancement of microscopic cytoreduction and is a promising area for future research. PMID:27186409

  11. [Chemotherapeutic effectiveness of a new derivative of 5-alkyl-3N-furanones in experimental staphylococcal infection].

    PubMed

    Tomnikov, A Iu; Shub, G M

    1990-02-01

    High chemotherapeutic efficacy of the compound 1929, a new derivative of 5-alkyl-3H-furanones was shown in albino mice with experimental staphylococcal infection caused by intraperitoneal administration to the animals. The efficacy was found to be higher than that of furagin used for comparison. The average therapeutic dose (AD50) of the compound for intraperitoneal administration amounted to 40 mg/kg while the average lethal dose (LD50) was 3000 mg/kg. PMID:2337370

  12. Double-Walled Microparticles-Embedded Self-Cross-Linked, Injectable, and Antibacterial Hydrogel for Controlled and Sustained Release of Chemotherapeutic Agents.

    PubMed

    Davoodi, Pooya; Ng, Wei Cheng; Yan, Wei Cheng; Srinivasan, Madapusi P; Wang, Chi-Hwa

    2016-09-01

    First-line cancer chemotherapy has been prescribed for patients suffered from cancers for many years. However, conventional chemotherapy provides a high parenteral dosage of anticancer drugs over a short period, which may cause serious toxicities and detrimental side effects in healthy tissues. This study aims to develop a new drug delivery system (DDS) composed of double-walled microparticles and an injectable hydrogel for localized dual-agent drug delivery to tumors. The uniform double-walled microparticles loaded with cisplatin (Cis-DDP) and paclitaxel (PTX) were fabricated via coaxial electrohydrodynamic atomization (CEHDA) technique and subsequently were embedded into injectable alginate-branched polyethylenimine. The findings show the uniqueness of CEHDA technique for simply swapping the place of drugs to achieve a parallel or a sequential release profile. This study also presents the simulation of CEHDA technique using computational fluid dynamics (CFD) that will help in the optimization of CEHDA's operating conditions prior to large-scale production of microparticles. The new synthetic hydrogel provides an additional diffusion barrier against Cis-DDP and confines premature release of drugs. In addition, the hydrogel can provide a versatile tool for retaining particles in the tumor resected cavity during the injection after debulking surgery and preventing surgical site infection due to its inherent antibacterial properties. Three-dimensional MDA-MB-231 (breast cancer) spheroid studies demonstrate a superior efficacy and a greater reduction in spheroid growth for drugs released from the proposed composite formulation over a prolonged period, as compared with free drug treatment. Overall, the new core-shell microparticles embedded into injectable hydrogel can serve as a flexible controlled release platform for modulating the release profiles of anticancer drugs and subsequently providing a superior anticancer response. PMID:27530316

  13. Efficacy of Combination Chemotherapy Using a Novel Oral Chemotherapeutic Agent, TAS-102, with Oxaliplatin on Human Colorectal and Gastric Cancer Xenografts.

    PubMed

    Nukatsuka, Mamoru; Nakagawa, Fumio; Takechi, Teiji

    2015-09-01

    TAS-102 is a novel oral nucleoside antitumor agent consisting of trifluridine (FTD) and the thymidine phosphorylase inhibitor tipiracil hydrochloride (at a molar ratio of 1:0.5) that was approved in Japan in 2014 for the treatment of unresectable advanced or recurrent colorectal cancer. In the present study, the enhancement of therapeutic efficacy using a combination of TAS-102 and oxaliplatin was evaluated in a xenograft-bearing nude mouse model of colorectal and gastric cancer. TAS-102 was orally administered twice-a-day from day 1 to 14, and oxaliplatin was administered intravenously on days 1 and 8. The in vivo growth-inhibitory activity was evaluated based on the tumor volume and the growth-delay period, was estimated based on the period required to reach a tumor volume five-times greater than the initial volume (RTV5). The tumor growth-inhibitory activity and RTV5 in mice administered TAS-102 with oxaliplatin were significantly superior to those associated with either monotherapy in mice with colorectal (HCT 116, SW-48; p<0.001) and gastric cancer (SC-2, MKN74; p<0.001). MKN74/5FU, a 5-fluorouracil-resistant MKN74 sub-line, was sensitive to both FTD and oxaliplatin in vitro. In vivo, TAS-102 alone was effective in MKN74/5FU, and its anti-tumor activity was significantly enhanced in combination with oxaliplatin (p<0.001). No significant decrease in body weight or toxicity was observed compared to either monotherapy. The present pre-clinical findings indicate that combination of TAS-102 and oxaliplatin is a promising treatment option for colorectal or gastric cancer, and can be utilized in both chemo-naïve tumors and recurrent tumors after 5-fluorouracil treatment. PMID:26254349

  14. The chemotherapeutic effect of essential oil of Plectranthus amboinicus (Lour) on lung metastasis developed by B16F-10 cell line in C57BL/6 mice.

    PubMed

    Manjamalai, A; Grace, V M Berlin

    2013-01-01

    Current investigation is to evaluate the anticancer activity of the essential oil of Plectranthus amboinicus (Lour) on B16F-10 melanoma cell line injected C57BL/6 mice, and it was simultaneously treated with the essential oil of P. amboinicus (Lour) (50 μg/dose) via i.p. for 21 days. The present investigation exhibited the potent chemotherapeutic/chemopreventive effect of the essential oil of P. amboinicus (Lour) over lung metastasis that developed. To our knowledge, this is the first report in evaluating the effect of essential oil of P. amboinicus (Lour) using lung cancer model. PMID:23249189

  15. Orthomolecular oncology: a mechanistic view of intravenous ascorbate's chemotherapeutic activity.

    PubMed

    González, Michael J; Miranda-Massari, Jorge R; Mora, Edna M; Jiménez, Ivonne Z; Matos, María Isabel; Riordan, Hugh D; Casciari, Joseph J; Riordan, Neil H; Rodríguez, Marielys; Guzmán, Angelik

    2002-03-01

    The effect of vitamin C in cancer has been a subject of great controversy; mainly because of the inconsistent results obtained by oral intakes of ascorbate when used as an anticancer agent. We believe the intravenous application of ascorbate will provide more consistent results in cancer patients since Vitamin C blood levels attained are substantially higher in a range proven cytotoxic to malignant cells. In this article we will present and discuss our proposed mechanism on the chemotherapeutic activity exhibited by ascorbate. PMID:12013679

  16. Effects of Chemotherapy on the Brain in Women With Newly Diagnosed Early-Stage Breast Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-05-12

    Breast Cancer; Chemotherapeutic Agent Toxicity; Cognitive/Functional Effects; Fatigue; Long-term Effects Secondary to Cancer Therapy in Adults; Neurotoxicity; Psychosocial Effects of Cancer and Its Treatment

  17. Ultrasound-targeted microbubble destruction for chemotherapeutic drug delivery to solid tumors

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Ultrasound-targeted microbubble destruction (UTMD) is a promising technique for non-invasive, targeted drug delivery, and its applications in chemotherapeutic drug delivery to solid tumors have attracted growing interest. Ultrasound, which has been conventionally used for diagnostic imaging, has evolved as a promising tool for therapeutic applications mainly because of its ability to be focused deep inside the human body, providing a modality for targeted delivery. Although originally being introduced into clinics as ultrasound contrast agents, microbubbles (MBs) have been developed as a diagnostic and therapeutic agent that can both be tracked through non-invasive imaging and deliver therapeutic agents selectively at ultrasound-targeted locations. Whereas free drugs often possess harmful side effects, their encapsulation in MBs and subsequent local release at the targeted tissue by ultrasound triggering may help improve the margin of safety. In the past 10 years, the feasibility and safety of UTMD have been extensively tested using normal animal models. Most recently, a growing number of preclinical studies have been reported on the therapeutic benefits of UTMD in the delivery of chemotherapeutic drugs to various malignant tumors, such as brain, liver, eyelid, pancreas, and breast tumors. Increased drug concentration in tumors and reduced tumor sizes were achieved in those tumors treated with UTMD in combination with chemotherapeutic drugs, when compared to tumors treated with chemotherapy drugs alone. This review presents an overview of current preclinical applications of UTMD in chemotherapeutic drug delivery for the treatment of cancers along with a discussion of its future developments. PMID:25512858

  18. In vitro synergistic anticancer activity of the combination of T-type calcium channel blocker and chemotherapeutic agent in A549 cells.

    PubMed

    Byun, Joon Seok; Sohn, Joo Mi; Leem, Dong Gyu; Park, Byeongyeon; Nam, Ji Hye; Shin, Dong Hyun; Shin, Ji Sun; Kim, Hyoung Ja; Lee, Kyung-Tae; Lee, Jae Yeol

    2016-02-01

    As a result of our continuous research, new 3,4-dihydroquinazoline derivative containing ureido group, KCP10043F was synthesized and evaluated for T-type Ca(2+) channel (Cav3.1) blockade, cytotoxicity, and cell cycle arrest against human non-small cell lung (A549) cells. KCP10043F showed both weaker T-type Ca(2+) channel blocking activity and less cytotoxicity against A549 cells than parent compound KYS05090S [4-(benzylcarbamoylmethyl)-3-(4-biphenylyl)-2-(N,N',N'-trimethyl-1,5-pentanediamino)-3,4-dihydroquinazoline 2 hydrochloride], but it exhibited more potent G1-phase arrest than KYS05090S in A549 cells. This was found to be accompanied by the downregulations of cyclin-dependent kinase (CDK) 2, CDK4, CDK6, cyclin D2, cyclin D3, and cyclin E at the protein levels. However, p27(KIP1) as a CDK inhibitor was gradually upregulated at the protein levels and increased recruitment to CDK2, CDK4 and CDK6 after KCP10043F treatment. Based on the strong G1-phase cell cycle arrest of KCP10043F in A549 cells, the combination of KCP10043F with etoposide (or cisplatin) resulted in a synergistic cell death (combination index=0.2-0.8) via the induction of apoptosis compared with either agent alone. Taken together with these overall results and the favorable in vitro ADME (absorption, distribution, metabolism, and excretion) profiles of KCP10043F, therefore, it could be used as a potential agent for the combination therapy on human lung cancer. PMID:26739776

  19. Spectroscopic and electronic structure calculation of a potential chemotherapeutic agent 5-propyl-6-(p-tolylsulfanyl)pyrimidine-2,4(1H,3H)-dione using first principles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Al-Alshaikh, Monirah A.; Al-Deeb, Omar A.; Alzoman, Nourah Z.; El-Emam, Ali A.; Srivastava, Ruchi; Sachan, Alok K.; Prasad, Onkar; Sinha, Leena

    2015-11-01

    Quantum chemical calculations of energy, geometrical structure and vibrational wavenumbers of a potential chemotherapeutic agent namely, 5-propyl-6-(p-tolylsulfanyl)pyrimidine-2,4(1H,3H)-dione were carried out, using DFT method. Comprehensive interpretation of the experimental FT-IR and FT-Raman spectra of the compound under study is based on potential energy distribution. The difference between the observed and scaled wavenumbers of most of the normal modes is very small with B3LYP/6-311 + +G(d,p) method. The UV-Vis spectrum of the compound was recorded and the electronic properties, such as frontier orbitals and band gap energies were calculated by the TD-DFT approach. The values of the electric dipole moment, polarizability and first static hyperpolarizability of the title compound have also been investigated. NBO analysis has been performed to explain the charge transfer within the molecule along with the calculation of different thermo-dynamical properties.

  20. Prevalence and safety of off-label use of chemotherapeutic agents in older breast cancer patients: estimates from SEER-Medicare data

    PubMed Central

    Eaton, Anne A.; Sima, Camelia S.; Panageas, Katherine S.

    2016-01-01

    Background The practice of prescribing oncology drugs outside of the label indication is legal and may reflect standard practice. However, some off-label use is against practice guidelines and may be inappropriate. We aimed to measure the prevalence and safety of off-label use in accordance with NCCN guidelines and off-label use inconsistent with guidelines in older breast cancer patients. Patients and Methods The SEER-Medicare dataset was used to identify women diagnosed with a first primary breast cancer between 2000-2007. Intravenous chemotherapy agents were identified using Medicare claims and classified as on-label, off-label/NCCN supported or off-label/unsupported using contemporary FDA approvals and NCCN guidelines. Off-label/unsupported regimens were matched to off-label/supported and on-label regimens using 1:1:1 matching on patient factors, and hospitalization/ER admission rates were compared across indication categories using conditional logistic regression. Results 13,347 women were treated with 16,127 regimens (12% of women switched to a new regimen during followup). Sixty-four percent (10,391) of regimens were off-label/supported, 25% (3,987) were on-label and 11% (1,749) were off-label/unsupported. Drugs never supported for breast cancer accounted for 19% of off-label/unsupported use and 1% of total use. Hospitalization/ER admission occurred in 32% of off-label/unsupported regimens, compared to 27% of off-label/supported and 25% of on-label regimens (p<.0001). Conclusions Off-label use of chemotherapy without scientific support was not common in this cohort. Off-label/supported use accounted for 64% of use, reflecting the fact that widely-accepted indications are often not tested in registration trials. Off-label/supported use will likely increase as more drugs are expected to have activity across cancer sites, and understanding the safety implications of such use is critical. PMID:26733555

  1. Spectroscopic detection of chemotherapeutics and antioxidants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Latka, Ines; Grüner, Roman; Matthäus, Christian; Dietzek, Benjamin; Werncke, W.; Lademann, Jürgen; Popp, Jürgen

    2012-06-01

    The hand-foot-syndrome presents a severe dermal side-effect of chemotherapeutic cancer treatment. The cause of this side-effect is the elimination of systemically administered chemotherapeutics with the sweat. Transported to the skin surface, the drugs subsequently penetrate into the skin in the manner of topically applied substances. Upon accumulation of the chemotherapeutics in the skin the drugs destroy cells and tissue - in the same way as they are supposed to act in cancer cells. Aiming at the development of strategies to illuminate the molecular mechanism underlying the handfoot- syndrome (and, in a second step, strategies to prevent this severe side-effect), it might be important to evaluate the concentration and distribution of chemotherapeutics and antioxidants in the human skin. The latter can be estimated by the carotenoid concentration, as carotenoids serve as marker substances for the dermal antioxidative status.Following the objectives outlined above, this contribution presents a spectroscopic study aiming at the detection and quantification of carotenoids and selected chemotherapeutics in human skin. To this end, spontaneous Raman scattering and coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS) microspectroscopy are combined with two-photon excited fluorescence. While the latter technique is Please verify that (1) all pages are present, (2) all figures are correct, (3) all fonts and special characters are correct, and (4) all text and figures fit within the red margin lines shown on this review document. Complete formatting information is available at http://SPIE.org/manuscripts Return to your MySPIE To Do List at http://myspie.org and approve or disapprove this submission. Your manuscript will not be published without this approval.restricted to the detection of fluorescent chemotherapeutics, e.g., doxorubicin, the vibrational spectroscopic techniques can - in principle - be applied to any type of analyte molecules. Furthermore, we will present the

  2. Human toxoplasmosis-Searching for novel chemotherapeutics.

    PubMed

    Antczak, Magdalena; Dzitko, Katarzyna; Długońska, Henryka

    2016-08-01

    The protozoan Toxoplasma gondii, an obligate intracellular parasite, is an etiological agent of human and animal toxoplasmosis. Treatment regimens for T. gondii-infected patients have not essentially changed for years. The most common chemotherapeutics used in the therapy of symptomatic toxoplasmosis are a combination of pyrimethamine and sulfadiazine plus folinic acid or a combination of pyrimethamine with lincosamide or macrolide antibiotics. To protect a fetus from parasite transplacental transmission, therapy of pregnant women is usually based on spiramycin, which is quite safe for the organism, but not efficient in the treatment of infected children. Application of recommended drugs limits replication of T. gondii, however, it may be associated with numerous an severe adverse effects. Moreover, medicines have no impact on the tissue cysts of the parasite located predominantly in a brain and muscles. Thus, there is urgent need to develop new drugs and establish "gold standard" treatment. In this review classical treatment of toxoplasmosis as well as potential compounds active against T. gondii have been discussed. For two last decades studies on the development of new anti-T. gondii medications have been focused on both natural and novel synthetic compounds based on existing chemical scaffolds. They have revealed several promising drug candidates characterized by a high selectivity, the low IC50 (the half maximal inhibitory concentration) and low cytotoxicity towards host cells. These drugs are expected to replace or supplement current anti-T. gondii drug arsenal soon. PMID:27470411

  3. (Coordinated research of chemotherapeutic agents and radiopharmaceuticals)

    SciTech Connect

    Srivastava, P.C.

    1991-01-14

    The traveler received a United Nations Development Program (UNDP) Award for Distinguished Scientists to visit Indian Research Institutions including Central Drug Research Institute (CDRI), Lucknow, the host institution, in cooperation with the Council of Scientific and Industrial Research (CSIR) of India. At CDRI, the traveler had meetings to discuss progress and future directions of on-going collaborative research work on nucleosides and had the opportunity to initiate new projects with the divisions of pharmacology, biopolymers, and membrane biology. As a part of this program, the traveler also visited Sanjay Gandhi Post Graduate Institute (SGPI) of Medical Sciences, Lucknow; Board of Radiation and Isotope Technology (BRIT) and Bhabha Atomic Research Center (BARC), Bombay; Variable Energy Cyclotron Center (VECC) and Indian Institute of Chemical Biology, Calcutta. He also attended the Indo-American Society of Nuclear Medicine Meeting held in Calcutta. The traveler delivered five seminars describing various aspects of radiopharmaceutical development at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) and discussed the opportunities for exchange visits to ORNL by Indian scientists.

  4. Lapatinib as a chemotherapeutic drug.

    PubMed

    Obajimi, Oluwakemi

    2009-11-01

    Human epidermal growth factor receptor (HER) signaling is frequently associated with the development and progression of several types of cancers. Both the MAPK and the PI3K/Akt pathways have been implicated as effectors of HER signaling by promoting anti-apoptotic and pro-proliferative effects in cancer cells. As a result, many anti-HER drugs have been developed and patented for use in cancer therapy. One such drug that was recently approved for clinical trials is lapatinib (Tykerb, GW572016). Lapatinib is a small molecule inhibitor that is active at the ATP binding site of the tyrosine kinase involved in HER signaling. Importantly, this drug has dual specificity acting at the ATP binding sites of both HER-2 and HER-1 (EGFR). This review therefore summarizes the current knowledge based on pre-clinical and clinical evidence of the therapeutic effects of lapatinib against cancer and the promising strategy of combination therapy with the possibility of circumventing the problems of drug resistance commonly faced by chemotherapeutic drugs. PMID:19522695

  5. Dual-Blocking of PI3K and mTOR Improves Chemotherapeutic Effects on SW620 Human Colorectal Cancer Stem Cells by Inducing Differentiation.

    PubMed

    Kim, Min-Jung; Koo, Jeong-Eun; Han, Gi-Yeon; Kim, Buyun; Lee, Yoo-Sun; Ahn, Chiyoung; Kim, Chan-Wha

    2016-03-01

    Cancer stem cells (CSCs) have tumor initiation, self-renewal, metastasis and chemo-resistance properties in various tumors including colorectal cancer. Targeting of CSCs may be essential to prevent relapse of tumors after chemotherapy. Phosphatidylinositol-3-kinase (PI3K) and mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) signals are central regulators of cell growth, proliferation, differentiation, and apoptosis. These pathways are related to colorectal tumorigenesis. This study focused on PI3K and mTOR pathways by inhibition which initiate differentiation of SW620 derived CSCs and investigated its effect on tumor progression. By using rapamycin, LY294002, and NVP-BEZ235, respectively, PI3K and mTOR signals were blocked independently or dually in colorectal CSCs. Colorectal CSCs gained their differentiation property and lost their stemness properties most significantly in dual-blocked CSCs. After treated with anti-cancer drug (paclitaxel) on the differentiated CSCs cell viability, self-renewal ability and differentiation status were analyzed. As a result dual-blocking group has most enhanced sensitivity for anti-cancer drug. Xenograft tumorigenesis assay by using immunodeficiency mice also shows that dual-inhibited group more effectively increased drug sensitivity and suppressed tumor growth compared to single-inhibited groups. Therefore it could have potent anti-cancer effects that dual-blocking of PI3K and mTOR induces differentiation and improves chemotherapeutic effects on SW620 human colorectal CSCs. PMID:26955235

  6. Dual-Blocking of PI3K and mTOR Improves Chemotherapeutic Effects on SW620 Human Colorectal Cancer Stem Cells by Inducing Differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Buyun

    2016-01-01

    Cancer stem cells (CSCs) have tumor initiation, self-renewal, metastasis and chemo-resistance properties in various tumors including colorectal cancer. Targeting of CSCs may be essential to prevent relapse of tumors after chemotherapy. Phosphatidylinositol-3-kinase (PI3K) and mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) signals are central regulators of cell growth, proliferation, differentiation, and apoptosis. These pathways are related to colorectal tumorigenesis. This study focused on PI3K and mTOR pathways by inhibition which initiate differentiation of SW620 derived CSCs and investigated its effect on tumor progression. By using rapamycin, LY294002, and NVP-BEZ235, respectively, PI3K and mTOR signals were blocked independently or dually in colorectal CSCs. Colorectal CSCs gained their differentiation property and lost their stemness properties most significantly in dual-blocked CSCs. After treated with anti-cancer drug (paclitaxel) on the differentiated CSCs cell viability, self-renewal ability and differentiation status were analyzed. As a result dual-blocking group has most enhanced sensitivity for anti-cancer drug. Xenograft tumorigenesis assay by using immunodeficiency mice also shows that dual-inhibited group more effectively increased drug sensitivity and suppressed tumor growth compared to single-inhibited groups. Therefore it could have potent anti-cancer effects that dual-blocking of PI3K and mTOR induces differentiation and improves chemotherapeutic effects on SW620 human colorectal CSCs. PMID:26955235

  7. Ferulic acid in combination with PARP inhibitor sensitizes breast cancer cells as chemotherapeutic strategy.

    PubMed

    Choi, Young Eun; Park, Eunmi

    2015-03-13

    Homologous-recombination (HR)-dependent repair defective cells are hypersensitive to poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP) inhibitors. Combinations of defective HR pathway and PARP inhibitors have been an effective chemotherapeutic modality. We previously showed that knockdown of the WD40-repeat containing protein, Uaf1, causes an HR repair defect in mouse embryo fibroblast cells and therefore, increases sensitivity to PARP inhibitor, ABT-888. Similarly, here, we show that ferulic acid reduces HR repair, inhibits RAD 51 foci formation, and accumulates γ-H2AX in breast cancer cells. Moreover, ferulic acid, when combined with ABT-888, renders breast cancer cells become hypersensitive to ABT-888. Our study indicates that ferulic acid in combination with ABT-888 treatment may serve as an effective combination chemotherapeutic agent as a natural bioactive compound. PMID:25677620

  8. Local bacteria affect the efficacy of chemotherapeutic drugs

    PubMed Central

    Lehouritis, Panos; Cummins, Joanne; Stanton, Michael; Murphy, Carola T.; McCarthy, Florence O.; Reid, Gregor; Urbaniak, Camilla; Byrne, William L.; Tangney, Mark

    2015-01-01

    In this study, the potential effects of bacteria on the efficacy of frequently used chemotherapies was examined. Bacteria and cancer cell lines were examined in vitro and in vivo for changes in the efficacy of cancer cell killing mediated by chemotherapeutic agents. Of 30 drugs examined in vitro, the efficacy of 10 was found to be significantly inhibited by certain bacteria, while the same bacteria improved the efficacy of six others. HPLC and mass spectrometry analyses of sample drugs (gemcitabine, fludarabine, cladribine, CB1954) demonstrated modification of drug chemical structure. The chemoresistance or increased cytotoxicity observed in vitro with sample drugs (gemcitabine and CB1954) was replicated in in vivo murine subcutaneous tumour models. These findings suggest that bacterial presence in the body due to systemic or local infection may influence tumour responses or off-target toxicity during chemotherapy. PMID:26416623

  9. The Role of Transporters in the Toxicity of Chemotherapeutic Drugs: Focus on Transporters for Organic Cations.

    PubMed

    Hucke, Anna; Ciarimboli, Giuliano

    2016-07-01

    The introduction of chemotherapy in the treatment of cancer is one of the most important achievements of modern medicine, even allowing the cure of some lethal diseases such as testicular cancer and other malignant neoplasms. The number and type of chemotherapeutic agents available have steadily increased and have developed until the introduction of targeted tumor therapy. It is now evident that transporters play an important role for determining toxicity of chemotherapeutic drugs not only against target but also against nontarget cells. This is of special importance for intracellularly active hydrophilic drugs, which cannot freely penetrate the plasma membrane. Because many important chemotherapeutic agents are substrates of transporters for organic cations, this review discusses the known interaction of these substances with these transporters. A particular focus is given to the role of transporters for organic cations in the development of side effects of chemotherapy with platinum derivatives and in the efficacy of recently developed tyrosine kinase inhibitors to specifically target cancer cells. It is evident that specific inhibition of uptake transporters may be a possible strategy to protect against undesired side effects of platinum derivatives without compromising their antitumor efficacy. These transporters are also important for efficient targeting of tyrosine kinase inhibitors to cancer cells. However, in order to achieve the aims of protecting from undesired toxicities and improving the specificity of uptake by tumor cells, an exact knowledge of transporter expression, function, regulation under normal and pathologic conditions, and of genetically and epigenetically regulation is mandatory. PMID:27385173

  10. Based on Nucleotides Analysis of Tumor Cell Lines to Construct and Validate a Prediction Model of Mechanisms of Chemotherapeutics.

    PubMed

    Liu, Cuichai; Wang, Fang; Liu, Xi; Liu, Min; Liu, Zheng; Sun, Lixin

    2016-01-01

    Cancer is one of the diseases that seriously threaten to human life worldwide. Up to now, chemotherapy remains to be a critical means of cancer treatment, thus the development of chemotherapeutical drugs has become a top priority. An ion pair high performance liquid chromatography (ion pair RP-HPLC) was established for analyzing intracellular nucleotides of tumor cell lines. In this article, a partial least-squares discriminant analysis (PLS-DA) prediction model of mechanisms of chemotherapeutics was established based on four types of drugs with different mechanisms, including antimetabolic agents, antineoplastic agents that affect protein synthesis, agents directly acting on DNA, and RNA interference agents. Then four anti-tumor agents commonly used in clinical were used to validate the availability of the prediction model. Three natural compounds, including 16- dehydropregnenolone (16-DHP), apigenin (API) and diosgenin (DIO), were reported to display anti-tumor effect with unclear mechanisms. The three components were applied to this prediction model firstly. In conclusion, the recognition model was proved to be accurate and feasible to some degree and might become a promising auxiliary method in the process of chemotherapeutic drugs development. PMID:26234361

  11. Effect of Chemotherapeutic Drugs on Caspase-3 Activity, as a Key Biomarker for Apoptosis in Ovarian Tumor Cell Cultured as Monolayer. A Pilot Study

    PubMed Central

    Gregoraszczuk, Ewa L; Rak-Mardyła, Agnieszka; Ryś, Janusz; Jakubowicz, Jerzy; Urbański, Krzysztof

    2015-01-01

    We aimed to develop a cost-effective and robust method to predict drug resistance in individual patients. Representative tissue fragments were obtained from tumors removed from female patients, aged 24-74 years old. The tumor tissue was taken by a histopathology’s or a surgeon under sterile conditions. Cells obtained by enzymatic dissociation from tumor after surgery, were cultured as a monolayer for 6 days. Paclitaxel, doxorubicin, carboplatin and endoxan alone or in combination were added at the beginning of culture and after 6 days, Alamar blue test was used for showing action on cell proliferation why caspase- 3 activity assays for verifying action on apoptosis. Inhibitory action on cell proliferation was noted in 2 of 12 patients tumor treated with both single and combined drugs. Using caspase-3 assay we showed that 50% of tumor cells was resistant to single chemotherapeutic drugs and 40% for combined. In 2 of 12 tumors, which did not reacted on single drugs, positive synergistic action on cell proliferation was observed in combination of D + E and C + E. This pilot study suggests: 1) monolayer culture of tumor cells, derived from individual patients, before chemotherapy could provide a suitable model for studying resistance for drugs; 2) caspase-3 activity is cheap and useful methods; 3) Alamar blue test should be taken into consideration for measuring cell proliferation. PMID:26664382

  12. Grape Seed Extract Dose-Responsively Decreases Disease Severity in a Rat Model of Mucositis; Concomitantly Enhancing Chemotherapeutic Effectiveness in Colon Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Cheah, Ker Yeaw; Howarth, Gordon Stanley; Bastian, Susan Elaine Putnam

    2014-01-01

    Objective Mucositis is a serious disorder of the gastrointestinal tract that results from cancer chemotherapy. We investigated the effects of increasing grape seed extract doses on the severity of chemotherapy in a rat model and its coincident impact on chemotherapeutic effectiveness in colon cancer cells. Design Female Dark Agouti rats were gavaged with grape seed extract (400–1000 mg/kg) or water (day 3–11) and were injected intraperitoneally with 5-Fluorouracil (150 mg/kg) or saline (control) on day 9 to induce mucositis. Daily metabolic data were collected and rats were sacrificed on day 12. Intestinal tissues were collected for histological and myeloperoxidase analyses. Caco-2 cell viability was examined in response to grape seed extract in combination with 5-Fluorouracil by 3-(4,5-Dimethylthiazol-2yl)-2,5-diphenyl-tetrazolium bromide) assay. Results Compared with 5-Fluorouracil controls, grape seed extract (400–1000 mg/kg) significantly decreased the histological damage score (P<0.05) in the jejunum. Grape seed extract (1000 mg/kg) increased jejunal crypt depth by 25% (P<0.05) in 5-Fluorouracil treated rats compared to 5-Fluorouracil controls, and attenuated the 5-Fluorouracil -induced reduction of mucosal thickness (25%, P<0.05). Grape seed extract (600 mg/kg) decreased myeloperoxidase activity by 55% (P<0.01) compared to 5-Fluorouracil controls. Grape seed extract was more effective at ameliorating 5-Fluorouracil induced intestinal injury, with effects most pronounced in the proximal jejunum. Grape seed extract (10–25 ug/mL) significantly enhanced the growth-inhibitory effects of 5-Fluorouracil by 26% (P<0.05) in Caco-2 cells and was more potent than 5-Fluorouracil at 50–100 µg/mL. Conclusion Grape seed extract may represent a new therapeutic option to decrease the symptoms of intestinal mucositis while concurrently impacting on the viability of colon cancer cells. PMID:24465501

  13. Synergistically enhanced photocatalytic and chemotherapeutic effects of aptamer-functionalized ZnO nanoparticles towards cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Han, Zhou; Wang, Xinhuan; Heng, Chenglin; Han, Qiusen; Cai, Shuanfei; Li, Jingying; Qi, Cui; Liang, Wei; Yang, Rong; Wang, Chen

    2015-09-01

    Today cancer is one of the most life-threatening diseases in the world. The conventional cancer therapies, including surgery, chemo- and radiation therapies, have some disadvantages, such as limited efficiency and significant side effects. It is necessary to develop new therapeutic treatments. Herein, we integrated the targeted photocatalytic and chemotherapy in a multifunctional drug-delivery platform. The aptamer-functionalized ZnO nanoparticles (NPs) were successfully synthesized. The anti-cancer drug was loaded in the aptamer-ZnO NP system. In vitro cell cytotoxicity experiments showed that combined therapy had a higher rate of death of cancer cells compared to that of single photocatalytic or chemotherapy. Furthermore, aptamer-functionalization could greatly increase the accumulation of nanoparticles within cancer cells and lead to better therapeutic effects. The results suggest that aptamer-functionalized semiconductor nanoparticles may have potential in the development of targeted photocatalytic and chemotherapy against cancer. PMID:26220437

  14. Diffusely discordant In-111 WBC/Tc-99m SC bone marrow uptake: A possible chemotherapeutic effect

    SciTech Connect

    Achong, D.M.; Oates, E.

    1995-07-01

    In-111 WBC scintigraphy in a women with relapsed acute lymphoid leukemia demonstrated normal uptake of white blood cells by the liver and spleen, but virtually absent bone marrow activity. Tc-99m Sc imaging confirmed normal marrow function and distribution. A bone marrow biopsy revealed mildly hypocellular, regenerating marrow without leukemic infiltration. The effects of systemic cytotoxic chemotherapy on marrow reticuloendothelial function may have been responsible for this discordant uptake. 5 refs., 2 figs.

  15. Oxidative stress triggered by naturally occurring flavone apigenin results in senescence and chemotherapeutic effect in human colorectal cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Banerjee, Kacoli; Mandal, Mahitosh

    2015-08-01

    Recent studies involving phytochemical polyphenolic compounds have suggested flavones often exert pro-oxidative effect in vitro against wide array of cancer cell lines. The aim of this study was to evaluate the in-vitro pro-oxidative activity of apigenin, a plant based flavone against colorectal cancer cell lines and investigate cumulative effect on long term exposure. In the present study, treatment of colorectal cell lines HT-29 and HCT-15 with apigenin resulted in anti-proliferative and apoptotic effects characterized by biochemical and morphological changes, including loss of mitochondrial membrane potential which aided in reversing the impaired apoptotic machinery leading to negative implications in cancer pathogenesis. Apigenin induces rapid free radical species production and the level of oxidative damage was assessed by qualitative and quantitative estimation of biochemical markers of oxidative stress. Increased level of mitochondrial superoxide suggested dose dependent mitochondrial oxidative damage which was generated by disruption in anti-apoptotic and pro-apoptotic protein balance. Continuous and persistent oxidative stress induced by apigenin at growth suppressive doses over extended treatment time period was observed to induce senescence which is a natural cellular mechanism to attenuate tumor formation. Senescence phenotype inducted by apigenin was attributed to changes in key molecules involved in p16-Rb and p53 independent p21 signaling pathways. Phosphorylation of retinoblastoma was inhibited and significant up-regulation of p21 led to simultaneous suppression of cyclins D1 and E which indicated the onset of senescence. Pro-oxidative stress induced premature senescence mediated by apigenin makes this treatment regimen a potential chemopreventive strategy and an in vitro model for aging research. PMID:25965143

  16. ZEB1 knockdown mediated using polypeptide cationic micelles inhibits metastasis and effects sensitization to a chemotherapeutic drug for cancer therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fang, Shengtao; Wu, Lei; Li, Mingxing; Yi, Huqiang; Gao, Guanhui; Sheng, Zonghai; Gong, Ping; Ma, Yifan; Cai, Lintao

    2014-08-01

    Metastasis and drug resistance are the main causes for the failure in clinical cancer therapy. Emerging evidence suggests an intricate role of epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) and cancer stem cells (CSCs) in metastasis and drug resistance. The EMT-activator ZEB1 is crucial in malignant tumor progression by linking EMT-activation and stemness-maintenance. Here, we used multifunctional polypeptide micelle nanoparticles (NP) as nanocarriers for the delivery of ZEB1 siRNA and doxorubicin (DOX). The nanocarriers could effectively deliver siRNA to the cytoplasm and knockdown the target gene in H460 cells and H460 xenograft tumors, leading to reduced EMT and repressed CSC properties in vitro and in vivo. The complex micelle nanoparticles with ZEB1 siRNA (siRNA-NP) significantly reduced metastasis in the lung. When DOX and siRNA were co-delivered by the nanocarriers (siRNA-DOX-NP), a synergistic therapeutic effect was observed, resulting in dramatic inhibition of tumor growth in a H460 xenograft model. These results demonstrated that the siRNA-NP or siRNA-DOX-NP complex targeting ZEB1 could be developed into a new therapeutic approach for non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) treatment.Metastasis and drug resistance are the main causes for the failure in clinical cancer therapy. Emerging evidence suggests an intricate role of epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) and cancer stem cells (CSCs) in metastasis and drug resistance. The EMT-activator ZEB1 is crucial in malignant tumor progression by linking EMT-activation and stemness-maintenance. Here, we used multifunctional polypeptide micelle nanoparticles (NP) as nanocarriers for the delivery of ZEB1 siRNA and doxorubicin (DOX). The nanocarriers could effectively deliver siRNA to the cytoplasm and knockdown the target gene in H460 cells and H460 xenograft tumors, leading to reduced EMT and repressed CSC properties in vitro and in vivo. The complex micelle nanoparticles with ZEB1 siRNA (siRNA-NP) significantly reduced

  17. Dietary phytochemicals as potent chemotherapeutic agents against breast cancer: Inhibition of NF-κB pathway via molecular interactions in rel homology domain of its precursor protein p105

    PubMed Central

    Khan, Mohammad K. A.; Ansari, Irfan A.; Khan, M. Salman; Arif, Jamal M.

    2013-01-01

    Background: Dietary phytochemicals consist of a wide variety of biologically active compounds that are ubiquitous in plants, many of which have been reported to have anti-tumor as well as anti-inflammatory properties. Objective: In the present study, we aimed to validate these findings by using docking protocols and explicate the possible mechanism of action for a dataset of nine phytochemicals namely boswellic acid, 1-caffeoylquinic acid, ellagic acid, emodin, genistein, guggulsterone, quercetin, resveratrol, and sylibinin from different plants against the nuclear factor- kappaB (NF-κB) precursor protein p105, an important transcription factor reported to be overexpressed in breast cancer. Materials and Methods: 2-D structures of all phytochemicals were retrieved from PubChem Compound database and their subsequent conversion into 3-D structures was performed by using online software system CORINA. The X-ray crystallographic structure of the NF-κB precursor p105 was extracted from Brookhaven Protein Data Bank. Molecular docking simulation study was carried out by using AutoDock Tools 4.0. Results: Our results showed significant binding affinity of different phytochemicals with the Rel homology domain of the NF-κB precursor protein p105. Quercetin and 1-caffeoylquinic acid were found to be very effective inhibitors against target molecule as they showed binding energy of −12.11 and −11.50 Kcal/mol, respectively. The order of affinity of other ligands with p105 was found as follows: guggulsterone > sylibinin > emodin > resveratrol > genistein > boswellic acid > ellagic acid. Conclusion: Our in silico study has explored the possible chemopreventive mechanism of these phytochemicals against the NF-κB precursor protein p105 and deciphered that quercetin, 1-caffeoylquinic acid and guggulsterone were the potent inhibitors against target molecule. In addition, large scale preclinical and clinical trials are needed to explore the role of these chemotherapeutic

  18. The influence of active hexose correlated compound (AHCC) on cisplatin-evoked chemotherapeutic and side effects in tumor-bearing mice

    SciTech Connect

    Hirose, Aya; Sato, Eri; Fujii, Hajime; Sun Buxiang; Nishioka, Hiroshi . E-mail: nishioka@aminoup.co.jp; Aruoma, Okezie I. . E-mail: okezie.aruoma@touro.edu

    2007-07-15

    Cisplatin (cis-diaminedichloroplatinum (II) or CDDP) (a widely used platinum-containing anticancer drug) is nephrotoxic and has a low percentage of tolerance in patients during chemotherapy. The active hexose correlated compound (AHCC) is an extract of Basidiomycotina marketed as a supplement for cancer patients due to its nutrients and fibre content and its ability to strengthen and optimize the capacity of the immune system. The possibility that AHCC could reduce the side effects of cisplatin was assessed in the tumor-bearing BALB/cA mice on the basis of the ability to ameliorate the cisplatin-induced body weight loss, anorexia, nephrotoxicity and hematopoietic toxicity. Although cisplatin (8 mg/kg body weight) reduced the size and weight of the solid tumors, supplementation with AHCC significantly enhanced cisplatin-induced antitumor effect in both the size (p < 0.05) and weight (p < 0.05). Food intake in the cisplatin-treated mice were decreased following commencement of treatment and this remained low compared with the cisplatin-untreated group (control) throughout the experiment period. Supplementation with AHCC increased the food intake in the cisplatin-treated mice. The blood urea nitrogen and serum creatinine concentrations, and the ratio of blood urea nitrogen to serum creatinine were significantly increased in the cisplatin alone treated group compared to the control group. Their increased levels were mitigated by supplementation with AHCC (100 mg/kg body weight) in the cisplatin-treated group. AHCC was also able to modulate the suppression of bone marrow due to cisplatin and the improvement was statistically significant. The histopathological examination of the kidney revealed the presence of cisplatin-induced damage and this was modulated by AHCC treatment. The potential for AHCC to ameliorate the cisplatin-evoked toxicity as well as the chemotherapeutic effect could have beneficial economic implications for patients undergoing chemotherapy with

  19. Xenon fluoride solutions effective as fluorinating agents

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hyman, H. H.; Quarterman, L. A.; Sheft, I.

    1967-01-01

    Solutions of xenon fluorides in anhydrous hydrogen fluoride have few disruptive effects and leave a residue consisting of gaseous xenon, which can be recovered and refluorinated. This mild agent can be used with materials which normally must be fluorinated with fluorine alone at high temperatures.

  20. Clinical effectiveness of contemporary dentin bonding agents

    PubMed Central

    Krithikadatta, Jogikalmat

    2010-01-01

    Aim: The purpose of this paper is to review the literature on the clinical effectiveness of contemporary resin-based dentin bonding agents primarily focussing on the longevity of restoration. Materials and Methods: The literature published from June 2004 up to September 2010 was reviewed for clinical trials that tested the effectiveness of dentin bonding agents in the longevity of noncarious class V restoration. Results of each study reported using the USPHS criteria for clinical assessment of restoration were included and tabulated. The American Dental Association guidelines for dentin and enamel adhesives were used as a reference to compare the performance of individual bonding agents. Kruskal–Wallis followed by Mann–Whitney U was done to compare the mean Alfa score percentage for the three categories of bonding systems [etch-and-rinse (ER), self-etch primer (SEP), and self-etch-adhesive (SEA)]. Results: A comparison of the mean Alfa score percentages revealed no difference between the ER, SEP, and SEA categories of bonding systems except for marginal adaptation where ER was found to be superior to SEA. Conclusion: The clinical effectiveness of resin-based bonding agents is comparable among the three categories. PMID:21217944

  1. Chemotherapeutic Approaches Against Trypanosoma evansi: Retrospective Analysis, Current Status and Future Outlook.

    PubMed

    Rathore, Nitu S; Manuja, Anju; Manuja, Balvinder Kumar; Choudhary, Shalki

    2016-01-01

    Trypanosoma evansi, the causative agent of surra, is pathogenic to a wide variety of wild and domestic animals, including equines, camels, goats, sheep, cattle, buffaloes, pigs, dogs, tigers, elephants etc. The infection is mainly restricted to animals but ability to infect human beings has also been reported due to the lack of efficient apolipoprotein L 1. The parasite is mechanically transmitted by blood-sucking flies such as Tabanus and Stomoxys species. The disease has a major economic impact in tropical countries. The control of trypanosomosis may be aimed either at the fly or against the parasite. Due to difficulties in large scale fly control, trypanocides have been widely used to control the disease. However, current chemotherapeutic agents are limited in number and usually associated with severe side effects. Moreover, current therapeutic agents are far from ideal. The emergence of drug resistant trypanosomes results in failure of prophylaxis and treatment of the disease. Retrospective and prospective studies on drug and delivery against T. evansi will provide an overview of the chemotherapeutic and prophylactic measures in vogue and suggest future strategies for combating this neglected disease. In this perspective, we have reviewed the currently used drugs available for prophylaxis and therapy, their mechanism of action and associated limitations. The options available for prophylaxis and therapy along with potential new molecules/therapeutic agents and novel approaches for delivery of the drugs to enhance their therapeutic value are presented in this review. PMID:27072712

  2. Development of a novel, physiologically relevant cytotoxicity model: Application to the study of chemotherapeutic damage to mesenchymal stromal cells

    SciTech Connect

    May, Jennifer E. Morse, H. Ruth Xu, Jinsheng Donaldson, Craig

    2012-09-15

    There is an increasing need for development of physiologically relevant in-vitro models for testing toxicity, however determining toxic effects of agents which undergo extensive hepatic metabolism can be particularly challenging. If a source of such metabolic enzymes is inadequate within a model system, toxicity from prodrugs may be grossly underestimated. Conversely, the vast majority of agents are detoxified by the liver, consequently toxicity from such agents may be overestimated. In this study we describe the development of a novel in-vitro model, which could be adapted for any toxicology setting. The model utilises HepG2 liver spheroids as a source of metabolic enzymes, which have been shown to more closely resemble human liver than traditional monolayer cultures. A co-culture model has been developed enabling the effect of any metabolised agent on another cell type to be assessed. This has been optimised to enable the study of damaging effects of chemotherapy on mesenchymal stem cells (MSC), the supportive stem cells of the bone marrow. Several optimisation steps were undertaken, including determining optimal culture conditions, confirmation of hepatic P450 enzyme activity and ensuring physiologically relevant doses of chemotherapeutic agents were appropriate for use within the model. The developed model was subsequently validated using several chemotherapeutic agents, both prodrugs and active drugs, with resulting MSC damage closely resembling effects seen in patients following chemotherapy. Minimal modifications would enable this novel co-culture model to be utilised as a general toxicity model, contributing to the drive to reduce animal safety testing and enabling physiologically relevant in-vitro study. -- Highlights: ► An in vitro model was developed for study of drugs requiring hepatic metabolism ► HepG2 spheroids were utilised as a physiologically relevant source of liver enzymes ► The model was optimised to enable study of chemotherapeutic

  3. Silencing of PKCη induces cycle arrest of EBV(+) B lymphoma cells by upregulating expression of p38-MAPK/TAp73/GADD45α and increases susceptibility to chemotherapeutic agents.

    PubMed

    Park, Ga Bin; Choi, Yunock; Kim, Yeong-Seok; Lee, Hyun-Kyung; Kim, Daejin; Hur, Dae Young

    2014-08-01

    PKCη is involved in proliferation, differentiation, and drug resistance. However, PKCη function in EBV(+) B lymphoma remains poorly understood. Gene silencing of PKCη through siRNA knockdown inhibited cellular proliferation, induced cell cycle arrest in G0/G1 and G2/M phases, and sensitized cells to chemotherapeutic drugs. Upon PKCη knockdown, expression levels of p21, GADD45α, and TAp73 were all increased, whereas expression levels of CDK2, CDK4, CDK6, cyclin E, cyclin B1, and cdc2 were all downregulated. PKCη silencing also activated p38-MAPK, which in turn contributed to the expression of cell cycle arrest-related molecules. These results suggest that siRNA-mediated silencing of PKCη can be a potent tool to complement existing chemotherapy regimens for treating EBV(+) B lymphoma. PMID:24784886

  4. Chemotherapeutic potential of quercetin on human bladder cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Oršolić, Nada; Karač, Ivo; Sirovina, Damir; Kukolj, Marina; Kunštić, Martina; Gajski, Goran; Garaj-Vrhovac, Vera; Štajcar, Damir

    2016-07-28

    In an effort to improve local bladder cancer control, we investigated the cytotoxic and genotoxic effects of quercetin on human bladder cancer T24 cells. The cytotoxic effect of quercetin against T24 cells was examined by MTT test, clonogenic assay as well as DNA damaging effect by comet assay. In addition, the cytotoxic effect of quercetin on the primary culture of papillary urothelial carcinoma (PUC), histopathological stage T1 of low- or high-grade tumours, was investigated. Our analysis demonstrated a high correlation between reduced number of colony and cell viability and an increase in DNA damage of T24 cells incubated with quercetin at doses of 1 and 50 µM during short term incubation (2 h). At all exposure times (24, 48 and 72 h), the efficacy of quercetin, administered at a 10× higher dose compared to T24 cells, was statistically significant (P < 0.05) for the primary culture of PUC. In conclusion, our study suggests that quercetin could inhibit cell proliferation and colony formation of human bladder cancer cells by inducing DNA damage and that quercetin may be an effective chemopreventive and chemotherapeutic agent for papillary urothelial bladder cancer after transurethral resection. PMID:27149655

  5. Addition agents effects on hydrocarbon fuels burning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Larionov, V. M.; Mitrofanov, G. A.; Sakhovskii, A. V.

    2016-01-01

    Literature review on addition agents effects on hydrocarbon fuels burning has been conducted. The impact results in flame pattern and burning velocity change, energy efficiency increase, environmentally harmful NOx and CO emission reduction and damping of self-oscillations in flow. An assumption about water molecules dissociation phenomenon existing in a number of practical applications and being neglected in most explanations for physical- chemical processes taking place in case of injection of water/steam into combustion zone has been noted. The hypothesis about necessity of water dissociation account has been proposed. It can be useful for low temperature combustion process control and NOx emission reduction.

  6. A novel targeted system to deliver chemotherapeutic drugs to EphA2-expressing cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Si; Placzek, William J.; Stebbins, John L.; Mitra, Sayantan; Noberini, Roberta; Koolpe, Mitchell; Zhang, Ziming; Dahl, Russell; Pasquale, Elena B.; Pellecchia, Maurizio

    2012-01-01

    The efficacy of anti-cancer drugs is often limited by their systemic toxicities and adverse side effects. We report that the EphA2 receptor is over-expressed preferentially in several human cancer cell lines compared to normal tissues and that an EphA2 targeting peptide (YSAYPDSVPMMS) can be effective in delivering anti-cancer agents to such tumors. Hence, we report on the synthesis and characterizations of a novel EphA2-targeting agent conjugated with the chemotherapeutic drug paclitaxel. We found that the peptide-drug conjugate is dramatically more effective than paclitaxel alone at inhibiting tumor growth in a prostate cancer xenograft model, delivering significantly higher levels of drug to the tumor site. We believe these studies open the way to the development of a new class of therapeutic compounds that exploit the EphA2 receptor for drug delivery to cancer cells. PMID:22329578

  7. The Use of Chemotherapeutics for the Treatment of Keloid Scars

    PubMed Central

    Jones, Christopher David; Guiot, Luke; Samy, Mike; Gorman, Mark; Tehrani, Hamid

    2015-01-01

    Keloid scars are pathological scars, which develop as a result of exaggerated dermal tissue proliferation following cutaneous injury and often cause physical, psychological and cosmetic problems. Various theories regarding keloidogenesis exist, however the precise pathophysiological events remain unclear. Many different treatment modalities have been implicated in their management, but currently there is no entirely satisfactory method for treating all keloid lesions. We review a number of different chemotherapeutic agents which have been proposed for the treatment of keloid and hypertrophic scars while giving insight into some of the novel chemotherapeutic drugs which are currently being investigated. Non-randomized trials evaluating the influence of different chemotherapeutic agents, such as 5-fluorouracil (5-FU); mitomycin C; bleomycin and steroid injection, either alone or in combination with other chemotherapeutic agents or alternative treatment modalities, for the treatment of keloids were identified using a predefined PubMed search strategy. Twenty seven papers were identified. Scar improvement ≥50% was found in the majority of cases treated with 5-FU, with similar results found for mitomycin C, bleomycin and steroid injection. Combined intralesional 5-FU and steroid injection produced statistically significant improvements when compared to monotherapy. Monotherapy recurrence rates ranged from 0-47% for 5-FU, 0-15% for bleomycin and 0-50% for steroid injection. However, combined therapy in the form of surgical excision and adjuvant 5-FU or steroid injections demonstrated lower recurrence rates; 19% and 6% respectively. Currently, most of the literature supports the use of combination therapy (usually surgery and adjuvant chemotherapy) as the mainstay treatment of keloids, however further investigation is necessary to determine success rates over longer time frames. Furthermore, there is the potential for novel therapies, but further investigation is

  8. Effects of psoralens as anti-tumoral agents in breast cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Panno, Maria Luisa; Giordano, Francesca

    2014-01-01

    This review examines the biological properties of coumarins, widely distributed at the highest levels in the fruit, followed by the roots, stems and leaves, by considering their beneficial effects in the prevention of some diseases and as anti-cancer agents. These compounds are well known photosensitizing drugs which have been used as pharmaceuticals for a broad number of therapeutic applications requiring cell division inhibitors. Despite this, even in the absence of ultraviolet rays they are active. The current paper mainly focuses on the effects of psoralens on human breast cancer as they are able to influence many aspects of cell behavior, such as cell growth, survival and apoptosis. In addition, analytical and pharmacological data have demonstrated that psoralens antagonize some metabolizing enzymes, affect estrogen receptor stability and counteract cell invasiveness as well as cancer drug resistance. The scientific findings summarized highlight the pleiotropic functions of phytochemical drugs, given that recently their target signals and how these are modified in the cells have been identified. The encouraging results in this field suggest that multiple modulating strategies based on coumarin drugs in combination with canonical chemotherapeutic agents or radiotherapy could be a useful approach to address the treatment of many types of cancer. PMID:25114850

  9. Cell Membrane Capsules for Encapsulation of Chemotherapeutic and Cancer Cell Targeting in Vivo.

    PubMed

    Peng, Li-Hua; Zhang, Yuan-Hong; Han, Li-Jie; Zhang, Chen-Zhen; Wu, Jia-He; Wang, Xia-Rong; Gao, Jian-Qing; Mao, Zheng-Wei

    2015-08-26

    Systemic administration of chemotherapeutic agents can cause indiscriminate drug distribution and severe toxicity. Until now, encapsulation and targeting of drugs have typically relied on synthetic vehicles, which cannot minimize the clearance by the renal system and may also increase the risk of chemical side effects. Cell membrane capsules (CMCs) provide a generic and far more natural approach to the challenges of drug encapsulation and delivery in vivo. Here aptamer AS1411, which can recognize and bind overexpressed nucleolin on a cancer cell membrane, was chemically conjugated onto CMCs. As a result, AS1411 modified CMCs showed enhanced ingestion in certain cancer cells in vitro and accumulation in mouse cancer xenografts in vivo. Chemotherapeutics and contrast agents with therapeutically significant concentrations can be packaged into CMCs by reversible permeating their plasma membranes. The systematic administration of cancer targeting CMCs loaded with doxorubicin hydrochloride can significantly inhibit tumor growth in mouse xenografts, with significantly reduced toxicity compared to free drug. These findings suggest that cancer targeting CMCs may have considerable benefits in drug delivery and cancer treatment. PMID:26262951

  10. Inductions of Caspase-, MAPK- and ROS-dependent Apoptosis and Chemotherapeutic Effects Caused by an Ethanol Extract of Scutellaria barbata D. Don in Human Gastric Adenocarcinom Cells

    PubMed Central

    Shim, Ji Hwan; Gim, Huijin; Lee, Soojin

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: The crude extracts of Scutellaria barbata D. Don (SB) have traditionally demonstrated inhibitory effects on numerous human cancers both in vitro and in vivo. Gastric cancer is one of the most common types of cancer on world. The authors investigated the effects of an ethanol extract of Scutellaria barbata D. Don (ESB) on the growth and survival of MKN-45 cells (a human gastric adenocarcinoma cell line). Methods: The MKN-45 cells were treated with different concentrations of ESB, and cell death was examined using an MTT (3-[4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl]-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide) assay. Analyses of sub-G1 peaks, caspase-3 and -9 activities, and mitochondrial membrane depolarizations were conducted to determine the anti-cancer effects of SB on MKN-45 cells. Also, intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation was investigated. Results: ESB inhibited the growth of MKN-45 cells, caused cell cycle arrest, and increased the sub-G1 population. In addition, ESB markedly increased mitochondrial membrane depolarization and the activities of caspase-3 and -9. ESB exerted anti-proliferative effects on MKN-45 cells by modulating the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) signaling pathway and by increasing the generation of ROS. Furthermore, combinations of anti-cancer drugs plus ESB suppressed cell growth more than treatments with an agent or ESB, and this was especially true for cisplatin, etoposide, and doxorubicin. Conclusion: ESB has a dose-dependent cytotoxic effect on MKN-45 cells and this is closely associated with the induction of apoptosis. ESB-induced apoptosis is mediated by mitochondria- , caspase- and MAPK dependent pathways. In addition, ESB enhances ROS generation and increases the chemosensitivity of MKN-45 cells. These results suggest that treatment with ESB can inhibit the proliferation and promote the apoptosis of human gastric adenocarcinoma cells by modulating the caspase-, MAPK- and ROS-dependent pathway. PMID:27386146

  11. Capsaicin Enhances the Drug Sensitivity of Cholangiocarcinoma through the Inhibition of Chemotherapeutic-Induced Autophagy

    PubMed Central

    Hong, Zai-Fa; Zhao, Wen-Xiu; Yin, Zhen-Yu; Xie, Cheng-Rong; Xu, Ya-Ping; Chi, Xiao-Qin; Zhang, Sheng; Wang, Xiao-Min

    2015-01-01

    Cholangiocarcinoma (CCA), a devastating cancer with a poor prognosis, is resistant to the currently available chemotherapeutic agents. Capsaicin, the major pungent ingredient found in hot red chili peppers of the genus Capsicum, suppresses the growth of several malignant cell lines. Our aims were to investigate the role and mechanism of capsaicin with respect to the sensitivity of CCA cells to chemotherapeutic agents. The effect of capsaicin on CCA tumor sensitivity to 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) was assessed in vitro in CCA cells and in vivo in a xenograft model. The drug sensitivity of QBC939 to 5-FU was significantly enhanced by capsaicin compared with either agent alone. In addition, the combination of capsaicin with 5-FU was synergistic, with a combination index (CI) < 1, and the combined treatment also suppressed tumor growth in the CCA xenograft to a greater extent than 5-FU alone. Further investigation revealed that the autophagy induced by 5-FU was inhibited by capsaicin. Moreover, the decrease in AKT and S6 phosphorylation induced by 5-FU was effectively reversed by capsaicin, indicating that capsaicin inhibits 5-FU-induced autophagy by activating the phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K)/protein kinase B (AKT)/mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) pathway in CCA cells. Taken together, these results demonstrate that capsaicin may be a useful adjunct therapy to improve chemosensitivity in CCA. This effect likely occurs via PI3K/AKT/mTOR pathway activation, suggesting a promising strategy for the development of combination drugs for CCA. PMID:25933112

  12. Capsaicin Enhances the Drug Sensitivity of Cholangiocarcinoma through the Inhibition of Chemotherapeutic-Induced Autophagy.

    PubMed

    Hong, Zai-Fa; Zhao, Wen-Xiu; Yin, Zhen-Yu; Xie, Cheng-Rong; Xu, Ya-Ping; Chi, Xiao-Qin; Zhang, Sheng; Wang, Xiao-Min

    2015-01-01

    Cholangiocarcinoma (CCA), a devastating cancer with a poor prognosis, is resistant to the currently available chemotherapeutic agents. Capsaicin, the major pungent ingredient found in hot red chili peppers of the genus Capsicum, suppresses the growth of several malignant cell lines. Our aims were to investigate the role and mechanism of capsaicin with respect to the sensitivity of CCA cells to chemotherapeutic agents. The effect of capsaicin on CCA tumor sensitivity to 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) was assessed in vitro in CCA cells and in vivo in a xenograft model. The drug sensitivity of QBC939 to 5-FU was significantly enhanced by capsaicin compared with either agent alone. In addition, the combination of capsaicin with 5-FU was synergistic, with a combination index (CI) < 1, and the combined treatment also suppressed tumor growth in the CCA xenograft to a greater extent than 5-FU alone. Further investigation revealed that the autophagy induced by 5-FU was inhibited by capsaicin. Moreover, the decrease in AKT and S6 phosphorylation induced by 5-FU was effectively reversed by capsaicin, indicating that capsaicin inhibits 5-FU-induced autophagy by activating the phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K)/protein kinase B (AKT)/mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) pathway in CCA cells. Taken together, these results demonstrate that capsaicin may be a useful adjunct therapy to improve chemosensitivity in CCA. This effect likely occurs via PI3K/AKT/mTOR pathway activation, suggesting a promising strategy for the development of combination drugs for CCA. PMID:25933112

  13. Smac mimetics increase cancer cell response to chemotherapeutics in a TNF-α-dependent manner

    PubMed Central

    Probst, BL; Liu, L; Ramesh, V; Li, L; Sun, H; Minna, JD; Wang, L

    2011-01-01

    Second mitochondria-derived activator of caspase (Smac) is a mitochondrial protein released into the cytosol during apoptosis. Smac mimetics have recently been touted as a novel therapeutic to induce apoptosis in cancer cells. The ability of Smac mimetics to induce apoptosis in vitro has been shown to be dependent upon both XIAP neutralization and cancer cell autocrine tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) production. In this study we provide new evidence for the utility of Smac mimetics in combination with conventional chemotherapy agents to exacerbate caspase activation and induce cancer cell death. Furthermore, we find that the combination effect is because of a multifaceted mechanism involving both inhibition of cell proliferation by the chemotherapy agents and an enhanced autocrine TNF-α feedback loop by the Smac mimetic/chemotherapy agent combination. Surprisingly, although genotoxic agents typically induce apoptosis through the mitochondrial intrinsic pathway, we show that this synergism is mediated through a TNF-α/RIP1-dependent pathway, leading to activation of the extrinsic apoptotic pathway. Finally, we report that autocrine TNF-α contributes to Smac mimetic-induced tumor regression as a single agent or in combination with chemotherapeutics in xenograft mouse models. Collectively, we provide mechanistic and applicable data to support translational studies in the use of a Smac mimetic/chemotherapy antineoplasm modality. PMID:20431601

  14. Tumour suppressor genes in chemotherapeutic drug response

    PubMed Central

    Lai, Dulcie; Visser-Grieve, Stacy; Yang, Xiaolong

    2012-01-01

    Since cancer is one of the leading causes of death worldwide, there is an urgent need to find better treatments. Currently, the use of chemotherapeutics remains the predominant option for cancer therapy. However, one of the major obstacles for successful cancer therapy using these chemotherapeutics is that patients often do not respond or eventually develop resistance after initial treatment. Therefore identification of genes involved in chemotherapeutic response is critical for predicting tumour response and treating drug-resistant cancer patients. A group of genes commonly lost or inactivated are tumour suppressor genes, which can promote the initiation and progression of cancer through regulation of various biological processes such as cell proliferation, cell death and cell migration/invasion. Recently, mounting evidence suggests that these tumour suppressor genes also play a very important role in the response of cancers to a variety of chemotherapeutic drugs. In the present review, we will provide a comprehensive overview on how major tumour suppressor genes [Rb (retinoblastoma), p53 family, cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitors, BRCA1 (breast-cancer susceptibility gene 1), PTEN (phosphatase and tensin homologue deleted on chromosome 10), Hippo pathway, etc.] are involved in chemotherapeutic drug response and discuss their applications in predicting the clinical outcome of chemotherapy for cancer patients. We also propose that tumour suppressor genes are critical chemotherapeutic targets for the successful treatment of drug-resistant cancer patients in future applications. PMID:22762204

  15. An effective processing agent for dichromated gelatin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pirodda, Luciano; Moriconi, Marcella

    1988-01-01

    It has been found that the proteolytic enzyme papain in diluted water solutions possesses remarkable properties as a developing agent of light exposed DCG layers, since it strongly enhances the relief character of the images. Said properties are particularly evident with not-too-high spacial frequencies and high contrast in the exposure. Some experimental applications are presented.

  16. Improving chemotherapeutic efficiency in acute myeloid leukemia treatments by chemically synthesized peptide interfering with CXCR4/CXCL12 axis

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xiaojin; Guo, Hua; Duan, Hongyang; Yang, Yanlian; Meng, Jie; Liu, Jian; Wang, Chen; Xu, Haiyan

    2015-01-01

    Bone marrow stroma can protect acute myeloid leukemia (AML) cells against chemotherapeutic agents and provide anti-apoptosis and chemoresistance signals through secreting chemokine CXCL12 to activate its receptor CXCR4 on AML cells, resulting in minimal residual leukemia and relapse. Therefore disrupting the CXCR4/CXCL12 axis with antagonists is of great significance for improving chemosensitivity and decreasing relapse rate. In a previous study, we reported a novel synthetic peptide E5 with its remarkable effect on inhibiting CXCR4/CXCL12-mediated adhesion and migration of AML cells. Here we presented E5’s capacity of enhancing the therapeutic efficiency of various chemotherapeutics on AML in vitro and in vivo. Results showed that E5 can diminish bone marrow stromal cell-provided protection to leukemia cells, significantly increasing the apoptosis induced by various chemotherapeutics in multiple AML cell lines. In an AML mouse xenograft model, E5 induced 1.84-fold increase of circulating AML cells out of protective stroma niche. Combined with vincristine or cyclophosphamide, E5 inhibited infiltration of AML cells into bone marrow, liver and spleen, as well as prolonged the lifespan of AML mice compared with mice treated with chemotherapy alone. In addition, E5 presented no toxicity in vivo according to the histological analysis and routine clinical parameters of serum analysis. PMID:26538086

  17. Principles and major agents in clinical oncology chemotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Weller, R.E.

    1991-10-01

    This paper provides a brief classification of drugs available for veterinary chemotherapy, as well as justifications for their use. Some common neoplasia and the drugs of choice for their treatment are described. A listing by class of systemic chemotherapeutic agents, their mode of action, tumors responsive to the drugs, precautions and common adverse effects and mode of administration is provided. 2 tabs. (MHB)

  18. Survivin suppressor (YM155) enhances chemotherapeutic efficacy against canine histiocytic sarcoma in murine transplantation models.

    PubMed

    Yamazaki, Hiroki; Takagi, Satoshi; Hosoya, Kenji; Okumura, Masahiro

    2015-04-01

    Histiocytic sarcoma (HS) in dogs exhibits aggressive clinical and biological behavior. Currently, no effective treatments are available for dogs with HS. Survivin, a member of a family of apoptosis protein inhibitors, could serve as a potential therapeutic target in several canine cancers. Sepantronium bromide (YM155) has recently been established as a novel survivin-targeting agent. The aim of this study was to use YM155 as a tool for evaluating survivin-targeted therapies against dogs with HS, and to investigate how YM155 treatment affects antitumor and chemotherapeutic efficacies in murine xenograft models using canine HS cells. The results showed that in HS cells with lomustine (CCNU) resistance, YM155 treatment suppressed both the cell-growth potential and cell resistance to CCNU, which essentially increases the chemotherapy efficacy in the murine models. The evidence presented here supports the favorable preclinical evaluation that survivin-targeted therapies might be effective against HS in dogs. PMID:25744435

  19. The use of ultrasound to release chemotherapeutic drugs from micelles and liposomes.

    PubMed

    Ahmed, Salma E; Martins, Ana M; Husseini, Ghaleb A

    2015-01-01

    Several drug delivery systems have been investigated to reduce the side effects of chemotherapy by encapsulating the therapeutic agent in a nanosized carrier until it reaches the tumor site. Many of these particles are designed to be responsive to the mechanical and thermal perturbations delivered by ultrasound. Once the nanoparticle reaches the desired location, ultrasound is applied to release the chemotherapy drug only in the vicinity of the targeted (cancer) site, thus avoiding any detrimental interaction with healthy cells in the body. Studies using liposomes and micelles have shown promising results in this area, as these nanoparticles with simple, yet effective structures, showed high efficiency as drug delivery vehicles both in vitro and in vivo. This article reviews the design and application of two novel nanosized chemotherapeutic carriers (i.e. micelles and liposomes) intended to be actuated by ultrasound. PMID:25203857

  20. Antibiotic and chemotherapeutic enhanced three-dimensional printer filaments and constructs for biomedical applications

    PubMed Central

    Weisman, Jeffery A; Nicholson, James C; Tappa, Karthik; Jammalamadaka, UdayaBhanu; Wilson, Chester G; Mills, David K

    2015-01-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) printing and additive manufacturing holds potential for highly personalized medicine, and its introduction into clinical medicine will have many implications for patient care. This paper demonstrates the first application of 3D printing as a method for the potential sustained delivery of antibiotic and chemotherapeutic drugs from constructs for patient treatment. Our design is focused on the on-demand production of anti-infective and chemotherapeutic filaments that can be used to create discs, beads, catheters, or any medical construct using a 3D printing system. The design parameters for this project were to create a system that could be modularly loaded with bioactive agents. All 3D-printed constructs were loaded with either gentamicin or methotrexate and were optimized for efficient and extended antibacterial and cancer growth-inhibiting cytostatic activity. Preliminary results demonstrate that combining gentamicin and methotrexate with polylactic acid forms a composite possessing a superior combination of strength, versatility, and enhanced drug delivery. Antibacterial effects and a reduction in proliferation of osteosarcoma cells were observed with all constructs, attesting to the technical and clinical viability of our composites. In this study, 3D constructs were loaded with gentamicin and methotrexate, but the method can be extended to many other drugs. This method could permit clinicians to provide customized and tailored treatment that allows patient-specific treatment of disease and has significant potential for use as a tunable drug delivery system with sustained-release capacity for an array of biomedical applications. PMID:25624758

  1. Use of Targeted Liposome-based Chemotherapeutics to Treat Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Khan, David R; Webb, Maggie N; Cadotte, Thomas H; Gavette, Madison N

    2015-01-01

    The use of nanocarriers such as liposomes to deliver anticancer drugs to tumors can significantly enhance the therapeutic index of otherwise unencapsulated cytotoxic agents. This is in part because of the fact that the phospholipid bilayer can protect healthy sensitive tissue from the damaging effects of these types of drugs. Furthermore, the ease with which the phospholipid bilayer surface can be modified to allow for polyethylene glycol incorporation resulting in pegylated liposomes allow for increased circulation times in vivo, and thus an overall increase in the concentration of the drug delivered to the tumor site. This explains the clinical success of the liposomal-based drug Doxil, which has proven to be quite efficacious in the treatment of breast cancer. However, significant challenges remain involving poor drug transfer between the liposome and tumor cells with this type of nontargeted drug delivery system. Thus, future work involves the development of “smart” drugs, or targeted drug delivery intended for improved colocalization between the drug and cancerous cells. While it is not possible to entirely discuss such a rapidly growing field of study involving many different types of chemotherapeutics here, in this review, we discuss some of the recent advancements involving the development of targeted liposome-based chemotherapeutics to treat breast cancer. PMID:26309409

  2. Antibiotic and chemotherapeutic enhanced three-dimensional printer filaments and constructs for biomedical applications.

    PubMed

    Weisman, Jeffery A; Nicholson, James C; Tappa, Karthik; Jammalamadaka, UdayaBhanu; Wilson, Chester G; Mills, David K

    2015-01-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) printing and additive manufacturing holds potential for highly personalized medicine, and its introduction into clinical medicine will have many implications for patient care. This paper demonstrates the first application of 3D printing as a method for the potential sustained delivery of antibiotic and chemotherapeutic drugs from constructs for patient treatment. Our design is focused on the on-demand production of anti-infective and chemotherapeutic filaments that can be used to create discs, beads, catheters, or any medical construct using a 3D printing system. The design parameters for this project were to create a system that could be modularly loaded with bioactive agents. All 3D-printed constructs were loaded with either gentamicin or methotrexate and were optimized for efficient and extended antibacterial and cancer growth-inhibiting cytostatic activity. Preliminary results demonstrate that combining gentamicin and methotrexate with polylactic acid forms a composite possessing a superior combination of strength, versatility, and enhanced drug delivery. Antibacterial effects and a reduction in proliferation of osteosarcoma cells were observed with all constructs, attesting to the technical and clinical viability of our composites. In this study, 3D constructs were loaded with gentamicin and methotrexate, but the method can be extended to many other drugs. This method could permit clinicians to provide customized and tailored treatment that allows patient-specific treatment of disease and has significant potential for use as a tunable drug delivery system with sustained-release capacity for an array of biomedical applications. PMID:25624758

  3. Schistosoma mansoni Sirtuins: Characterization and Potential as Chemotherapeutic Targets

    PubMed Central

    Lancelot, Julien; Caby, Stéphanie; Dubois-Abdesselem, Florence; Vanderstraete, Mathieu; Trolet, Jacques; Oliveira, Guilherme; Bracher, Franz; Jung, Manfred; Pierce, Raymond J.

    2013-01-01

    Background The chemotherapy of schistosomiasis currently depends on the use of a single drug, praziquantel. In order to develop novel chemotherapeutic agents we are investigating enzymes involved in the epigenetic modification of chromatin. Sirtuins are NAD+ dependent lysine deacetylases that are involved in a wide variety of cellular processes including histone deacetylation, and have been demonstrated to be therapeutic targets in various pathologies, including cancer. Methodology, Principal Findings In order to determine whether Schistosoma mansoni sirtuins are potential therapeutic targets we first identified and characterized their protein sequences. Five sirtuins (SmSirt) are encoded in the S. mansoni genome and phylogenetic analysis showed that they are orthologues of mammalian Sirt1, Sirt2, Sirt5, Sirt6 and Sirt7. Both SmSirt1 and SmSirt7 have large insertion in the catalytic domain compared to their mammalian orthologues. SmSirt5 is the only mitochondrial sirtuin encoded in the parasite genome (orthologues of Sirt3 and Sirt4 are absent) and transcripts corresponding to at least five splicing isoforms were identified. All five sirtuins are expressed throughout the parasite life-cycle, but with distinct patterns of expression. Sirtuin inhibitors were used to treat both schistosomula and adult worms maintained in culture. Three inhibitors in particular, Sirtinol, Salermide and MS3 induced apoptosis and death of schistosomula, the separation of adult worm pairs, and a reduction in egg laying. Moreover, Salermide treatment led to a marked disruption of the morphology of ovaries and testes. Transcriptional knockdown of SmSirt1 by RNA interference in adult worms led to morphological changes in the ovaries characterized by a marked increase in mature oocytes, reiterating the effects of sirtuin inhibitors and suggesting that SmSirt1 is their principal target. Conclusion, Significance Our data demonstrate the potential of schistosome sirtuins as therapeutic targets

  4. Research to Identify Effective Antifungal Agents, 1991 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect

    Schreck, Carl

    1991-09-01

    This study is a continuation of ``Research to Identify Effective Antifungal Agents'' sponsored by Bonneville Power Administration (Schreck et al. 1990). The objectives of the present study was to evaluate up to 10 candidate fungicides.

  5. Research to Identify Effective Antifungal Agents, 1993 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect

    Schreck, Carl

    1993-10-01

    This study is a continuation of ``Research to Identify Effective Antifungal Agents'' sponsored by Bonneville Power Administration (Schreck et al. 1990, 1991, and 1992). The objectives of the present study were to select and evaluate candidate fungicides.

  6. In vitro testing to a panel of potential chemotherapeutics and current concepts of chemotherapy in benign meningiomas.

    PubMed

    Balik, Vladimir; Sulla, Igor; Park, Hun Ho; Sarissky, Marek

    2015-09-01

    Treatment of benign meningiomas remains a challenge, especially when they involve the skull-base or when surgery and radiation fail. Moreover, a recent in vitro MTT (3-(4,5-dimethyl-2-thiazolyl)-2,5-diphenyl-2H-tetrazolium bromide) study testing hydroxyurea, temozolomide and other targeting agents failed to identify drugs effective in their treatment; therefore the search for further more effective agents continues. We performed a thorough review of in vitro investigations, animal studies and human clinical trials and endeavoured to integrate our results of MTT assay into current concepts of chemotherapy in benign meningiomas. Our results demonstrated that other chemotherapeutics with various mechanisms of action have the potential to be incorporated into second line therapy. Our study shows for the first time that chemosensitivity/resistance may be associated with histopathological variants of benign meningiomas. PMID:26099192

  7. Effects of a Pedagogical Agent's Emotional Expressiveness on Learner Perceptions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Romero, Enilda J.; Watson, Ginger S.

    2012-01-01

    The use of animated pedagogical agents or avatars in instruction has lagged behind their use in entertainment. This is due in part to the cost and complexity of development and implementation of agents in educational settings, but also results from a lack of research to understand how emotions from animated agents influence instructional effectiveness. The phenomenological study presented here assesses the perceptions of eight learners interacting with low and high intensity emotionally expressive pedagogical agents in a computer-mediated environment. Research methods include maximum variation and snowball sampling with random assignment to treatment. The resulting themes incorporate perceptions of importance, agent humanness, enjoyment, implementation barriers, and suggested improvements. Design recommendations and implications for future research are presented.

  8. A Comprehensive Review on Cyclodextrin-Based Carriers for Delivery of Chemotherapeutic Cytotoxic Anticancer Drugs

    PubMed Central

    Gidwani, Bina; Vyas, Amber

    2015-01-01

    Most of the cytotoxic chemotherapeutic agents have poor aqueous solubility. These molecules are associated with poor physicochemical and biopharmaceutical properties, which makes the formulation difficult. An important approach in this regard is the use of combination of cyclodextrin and nanotechnology in delivery system. This paper provides an overview of limitations associated with anticancer drugs, their complexation with cyclodextrins, loading/encapsulating the complexed drugs into carriers, and various approaches used for the delivery. The present review article aims to assess the utility of cyclodextrin-based carriers like liposomes, niosomes, nanoparticles, micelles, millirods, and siRNA for delivery of antineoplastic agents. These systems based on cyclodextrin complexation and nanotechnology will camouflage the undesirable properties of drug and lead to synergistic or additive effect. Cyclodextrin-based nanotechnology seems to provide better therapeutic effect and sustain long life of healthy and recovered cells. Still, considerable study on delivery system and administration routes of cyclodextrin-based carriers is necessary with respect to their pharmacokinetics and toxicology to substantiate their safety and efficiency. In future, it would be possible to resolve the conventional and current issues associated with the development and commercialization of antineoplastic agents. PMID:26582104

  9. Diaryl sulfide analogs of combretastatin A-4: Toxicogenetic, immunomodulatory and apoptotic evaluations and prospects for use as a new chemotherapeutic drug.

    PubMed

    Carvalho, Pamela Castilho; Santos, Edson Anjos; Schneider, Beatriz Ursinos Catelán; Matuo, Renata; Pesarini, João Renato; Cunha-Laura, Andréa Luiza; Monreal, Antônio Carlos Duenhas; Lima, Dênis Pires; Antoniolli, Andréia Conceição Milan Brochado; Oliveira, Rodrigo Juliano

    2015-11-01

    Combretastatin A-4 exhibits efficient anti-cancer potential in human tumors, including multidrug-resistant tumors. We evaluated the mutagenic, apoptotic and immunomodulatory potential of two diaryl sulfide analogs of combretastatin A-4, 1,2,3-trimethoxy-5-([4-methoxy-3-nitrophenyl]thio)benzene (analog 1) and 1,2,3-trimethoxy-5-([3-amino-4-methoxyphenyl]thio)benzene (analog 2), as well as their association with the anti-tumor agent cyclophosphamide, in Swiss mice. Such evaluation was achieved using the comet assay, peripheral blood micronucleus test, splenic phagocytosis assay, and apoptosis assay. Both analogs were found to be genotoxic, mutagenic and to induce apoptosis. They also increased splenic phagocytosis, although this increase was more pronounced for analog 2. When combined with cyclophosphamide, analog 1 enhanced the mutagenic and apoptotic effects of this anti-tumor agent. In contrast, analog 2 did not enhance the effects of cyclophosphamide and prevented apoptosis at lower doses. These data suggest that analog 1 could be an adjuvant chemotherapeutic agent and possibly improve the anti-neoplastic effect of cyclophosphamide. Additionally, this compound could be a candidate chemotherapeutic agent and/or an adjuvant for use in combined anti-cancer therapy. PMID:26410090

  10. Novel Drug Therapies for Fertility Preservation in Men Undergoing Chemotherapy: Clinical Relevance of Protector Agents.

    PubMed

    Rabaça, A; Sousa, M; Alves, M G; Oliveira, P F; Sá, R

    2015-01-01

    Cancer has been affecting a growing number of children, adolescents and adult males in reproductive age. Male reproductive potential is adversely affected by chemotherapeutic drugs and patients are at risk for prolonged infertility. Fertility recovery is related to the chemotherapeutic agent and dosage used, being thus difficult to predict. As a result, there is a strong need to identify a natural or synthetic compound that is able to preserve male fertility without interfering with the efficacy of the chemotherapeutic regimen. New procedures, as well as several drugs, are being investigated to assess their efficiency in protecting male reproductive functions from the chemotherapy side-effects. This review provides an overview of the wide range of chemotherapeutic drugs regularly used in cancer treatment and their detrimental effects on male fertility. In addition, it also assesses the existing protector agents for male fertility and their usefulness in preserving and protecting male reproductive functions exposed to chemotherapeutics. Several protector agents for male fertility are being studied, and results are promising. Nonetheless, further research must be implemented to identify a supplemental therapy that addresses the multiple side effects of chemotherapy on male reproductive function. Until such therapy is discovered, it is fundamental that all fertility preservation options are discussed with patients, before treatment is initiated, to assure parenthood. PMID:26295467

  11. Inhibitory effects of antimicrobial agents against Fusarium species.

    PubMed

    Kawakami, Hideaki; Inuzuka, Hiroko; Hori, Nobuhide; Takahashi, Nobumichi; Ishida, Kyoko; Mochizuki, Kiyofumi; Ohkusu, Kiyofumi; Muraosa, Yasunori; Watanabe, Akira; Kamei, Katsuhiko

    2015-08-01

    We investigated the inhibitory effects of antibacterial, biocidal, and antifungal agents against Fusarium spp. Seven Fusarium spp: four F. falciforme (Fusarium solani species complex), one Fusarium spp, one Fusarium spp. (Fusarium incarnatum-equiseti species complex), and one F. napiforme (Gibberella fujikuroi species complex), isolated from eyes with fungal keratitis were used in this study. Their susceptibility to antibacterial agents: flomoxef, imipenem, gatifloxacin, levofloxacin, moxifloxacin, gentamicin, tobramycin, and Tobracin® (contained 3,000 μg/ml of tobramycin and 25 μg/ml of benzalkonium chloride (BAK), a biocidal agent: BAK, and antifungal agents: amphotericin B, pimaricin (natamycin), fluconazole, itraconazole, miconazole, voriconazole, and micafungin, was determined by broth microdilution tests. The half-maximal inhibitory concentration (IC50), 100% inhibitory concentration (IC100), and minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) against the Fusarium isolates were determined. BAK had the highest activity against the Fusarium spp. except for the antifungal agents. Three fluoroquinolones and two aminoglycosides had inhibitory effects against the Fusarium spp. at relatively high concentrations. Tobracin® had a higher inhibitory effect against Fusarium spp. than tobramycin alone. Amphotericin B had the highest inhibitory effect against the Fusarium spp, although it had different degrees of activity against each isolate. Our findings showed that fluoroquinolones, aminoglycosides, and BAK had some degree of inhibitory effect against the seven Fusarium isolates, although these agents had considerably lower effect than amphotericin B. However, the inhibitory effects of amphotericin B against the Fusarium spp. varied for the different isolates. Further studies for more effective medications against Fusarium, such as different combinations of antibacterial, biocidal, and antifungal agents are needed. PMID:25841054

  12. Methionine depletion with recombinant methioninase: In vitro and in vivo efficacy against neuroblastoma and its synergism with chemotherapeutic drugs

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Jian; Cheung, Nai-Kong V.

    2009-01-01

    Methionine starvation can modulate gene methylation, cell cycle transition, and pathways related to survival following DNA damage. Methionine depletion by recombinant methioninase (rMETase) may have in vitro and in vivo efficacy against neuroblastoma (NB), especially when combined with chemotherapeutic drugs. rMETase from Pseudomonas Putida was produced in E. Coli and purified by ion-exchange chromatography. rMETase alone inhibited the proliferation of 15/15 NB cell lines in vitro. Among these 15 cell lines, only 66N demonstrated rMETase-induced apoptosis. rMETase alone suppressed LAN-1 and NMB-7 xenografts (p<0.01) and no toxicities were noted other than reversible weight loss. In vitro efficacy experiments combining rMETase and chemotherapeutic agents were carried out using SK-N-LD and SK-N-BE(1)N established at diagnosis, as well as LAN-1, SK-N-BE(2)C, and NMB-7 established at relapse. Microtubule depolymerization agents including vincristine, vinorelbine, vinblatine, and mebendazole showed synergism when tested in combination with rMETase in all 5 cell lines. Among DNA damaging agents, synergy with rMETase was observed only in cell lines established at diagnosis, and not at relapse. Cell cycle analysis showed that rMETase arrested G2 phase, and not M phase. In vivo efficacy experiments using LAN-1 and NMB-7 xenografts showed that rMETase rendered vincristine more effective than vincristine alone in tumor growth suppression (p<0.001). In conclusion, methionine depletion inhibited NB proliferation and arrested tumor cells at G2 phase. rMETase synergized with microtubule depolymerization agents. Moreover, synergism between rMETase and DNA damaging agents was dependent on whether cell lines were established at diagnosis or at relapse. PMID:19089915

  13. Dissociative electron attachment to the radiosensitizing chemotherapeutic agent hydroxyurea.

    PubMed

    Huber, S E; Śmiałek, M A; Tanzer, K; Denifl, S

    2016-06-14

    Dissociative electron attachment to hydroxyurea was studied in the gas phase for electron energies ranging from zero to 9 eV in order to probe its radiosensitizing capabilities. The experiments were carried out using a hemispherical electron monochromator coupled with a quadrupole mass spectrometer. Diversified fragmentation of hydroxyurea was observed upon low energy electron attachment and here we highlight the major dissociation channels. Moreover, thermodynamic thresholds for various fragmentation reactions are reported to support the discussion of the experimental findings. The dominant dissociation channel, which was observed over a broad range of energies, is associated with formation of NCO(-), water, and the amidogen (NH2) radical. The second and third most dominant dissociation channels are associated with formation of NCNH(-) and NHCONH2 (-), respectively, which are both directly related to formation of the highly reactive hydroxyl radical. Other ions observed with significant abundance in the mass spectra were NH2 (-)/O(-), OH(-), CN(-), HNOH(-), NCONH2 (-), and ONHCONH2 (-). PMID:27306009

  14. Dissociative electron attachment to the radiosensitizing chemotherapeutic agent hydroxyurea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huber, S. E.; Śmiałek, M. A.; Tanzer, K.; Denifl, S.

    2016-06-01

    Dissociative electron attachment to hydroxyurea was studied in the gas phase for electron energies ranging from zero to 9 eV in order to probe its radiosensitizing capabilities. The experiments were carried out using a hemispherical electron monochromator coupled with a quadrupole mass spectrometer. Diversified fragmentation of hydroxyurea was observed upon low energy electron attachment and here we highlight the major dissociation channels. Moreover, thermodynamic thresholds for various fragmentation reactions are reported to support the discussion of the experimental findings. The dominant dissociation channel, which was observed over a broad range of energies, is associated with formation of NCO-, water, and the amidogen (NH2) radical. The second and third most dominant dissociation channels are associated with formation of NCNH- and NHCONH2-, respectively, which are both directly related to formation of the highly reactive hydroxyl radical. Other ions observed with significant abundance in the mass spectra were NH2-/O-, OH-, CN-, HNOH-, NCONH2-, and ONHCONH2-.

  15. Role of chemotherapeutic agents in the management of cystic echinococcosis.

    PubMed

    Nazligul, Yasar; Kucukazman, Metin; Akbulut, Sami

    2015-01-01

    Hydatid disease is caused by infection with the metacestode stage of Echinococcus tapeworms of the family Taeniidae. The primary carriers are dogs and wolves, and humans are accidental hosts that do not contribute to the normal life cycle of this organism. The liver is the most commonly involved organ in the body by cystic echinococcosis (CE) secondary to infection with Echinococcus granulosus . Management options for CE should depend on the World Health Organization (WHO) diagnostic classification. Small (<5 cm) WHO stage CE1 and CE3a cysts may be primarily treated with benzimidazoles; the first-choice drug is albendazole. In some situations the combination of albendazole and praziquantel may be preferred. Chemotherapy with a benzimidazole or albendazole plus praziquantel is also used as adjunctive treatment to surgery and percutaneous treatment. Drug treatments have been the indispensable therapeutic modalities for cystic echinococcosis. PMID:25594649

  16. Acetamides: chemotherapeutic agents for inflammation-associated cancers.

    PubMed

    Rani, Priyanka; Pal, Dilipkumar; Hegde, Rahul Rama; Hashim, Syed Riaz

    2016-08-01

    Now clear evidences are available to support the hypothesis that inflammation accelerates the conditions including events and molecules that reach to various types of cancers. Inflammation is a normal response to infection containing the innate and adaptive immune systems. However, when allowed to continue, unresolved, perturbation of cellular microenvironment takes place; therefore, it leads to adaptations in genes that are linked to cancer. In addition, a lot of data are accessible confirming the concept that tumour microenvironment is orchestrated by various inflammatory cells and goes to neoplastic process and finally invasion, migration and metastasis. However, infiltrations of leucocytes lead to angiogenesis, propagation and invasion. An inflammatory microenvironment that perhaps fostering impact of angiogenesis include cytokines, chemokines, enzymes and growth factors that play key role for expansion and invasion of cancer cells. This insight highlights the pathogenesis of inflammation-associated cancers and also touches and fosters the role of acetamides for the treatment and chemoprevention of carcinomas that are allied with inflammation. PMID:26198312

  17. Co-administration of epithelial junction opener JO-1 improves the efficacy and safety of chemotherapeutic drugs

    PubMed Central

    Beyer, Ines; Cao, Hua; Persson, Jonas; Song, Hui; Richter, Maximilian; Feng, Qinghua; Yumul, Roma; van Rensburg, Ruan; Li, Zongyi; Berenson, Ronald; Carter, Darrick; Roffler, Steve; Drescher, Charles; Lieber, André

    2013-01-01

    Purpose Epithelial junctions between tumor cells inhibit the penetration of anti-cancer drugs into tumors. We previously reported on recombinant adenovirus serotype 3 derived protein (JO-1), which triggers transient opening of intercellular junctions in epithelial tumors through binding to desmoglein 2 (DSG2), and enhances the anti-tumor effects of several therapeutic monoclonal antibodies. The goal of this study was to evaluate whether JO-1 co-therapy can also improve the efficacy of chemotherapeutic drugs. Experimental Design The effect of intravenous application of JO-1 in combination with several chemotherapy drugs including paclitaxel/Taxol™, nanoparticle albumin bound paclitaxel/Abraxane™, liposomal doxorubicin/Doxil™ and irinotecan/Camptosar™, was tested in xenograft models for breast, colon, ovarian, gastric and lung cancer. Because JO-1 does not bind to mouse cells, for safety studies with JO-1, we also used human DSG2 (hDSG2) transgenic mice with tumors that overexpressed human DSG2. Results JO-1 increased the efficacy of chemotherapeutic drugs, and in several models overcame drug resistance. JO-1 treatment also allowed for the reduction of drug doses required to achieve anti-tumor effects. Importantly, JO-1 co-admininstration protected normal tissues, including bone marrow and intestinal epithelium, against toxic effects that are normally associated with chemotherapeutic agents. Using the hDSG2 transgenic mouse model, we demonstrated that JO-1 predominantly accumulates in tumors. Except for a mild, transient diarrhea, intravenous injection of JO-1 (2mg/kg) had no critical side effects on other tissues or hematological parameters in hDSG2-transgenic mice. Conclusions Our preliminary data suggest that JO-1 co-therapy has the potential to improve the therapeutic outcome of cancer chemotherapy. PMID:22535153

  18. A Retrospective 30 Years After Discovery of the Enhanced Permeability and Retention Effect of Solid Tumors: Next-Generation Chemotherapeutics and Photodynamic Therapy--Problems, Solutions, and Prospects.

    PubMed

    Maeda, Hiroshi; Tsukigawa, Kenji; Fang, Jun

    2016-04-01

    Solid tumor has unique vascular architecture, excessive production of vascular mediators, and extravasation of macromolecules from blood vessels into the tumor tissue interstitium. These features comprise the phenomenon named the EPR effect of solid tumors, described in 1986. Our investigations on the EPR revealed that many mediators, such as bradykinin, NO, and prostaglandins, are involved in the EPR effect, which is now believed to be the most important element for cancer-selective drug delivery. However, tumors in vivo manifest great diversity, and some demonstrate a poor EPR effect, for example, because of impaired vascular flow involving thrombosis, with poor drug delivery and therapeutic failure. Another important element of this effect is that it operates in metastatic cancers. Because few drugs are currently effective against metastases, the EPR effect offers a great advantage in nanomedicine therapy. The EPR effect can also be augmented two to three times via nitroglycerin, ACE inhibitors, and angiotensin II-induced hypertension. The delivery of nanomedicines to tumors can thereby be enhanced. In traditional PDT, most PSs had low MW and little tumor-selective accumulation. Our hydroxypropylmetacrylamide-polymer-conjugated-PS, zinc protoporphyrin (apparent MW >50 kDa) showed tumor-selective accumulation, as revealed by fluorescent imaging of autochthonous cancers. After one i.v. injection of polymeric PS followed by two or three xenon light irradiation/treatments, most tumors regressed. Thus, nanoprobes with the EPR effect seem to have remarkable effects. Enhancing the EPR effect by using vascular modulators will aid innovations in PDT for greater tumor-targeted drug delivery. PMID:26237291

  19. EFFECT OF A FLYASH CONDITIONING AGENT ON POWER PLANT EMISSIONS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report gives results of a study undertaken as a preliminary program to provide data on the environmental effects of a chemical flyash conditioning agent (Apollo Chemicals conditioner LPA 402A). Both the emissions due to the chemical and its effect on electrostatic precipitato...

  20. Chemotherapy and Dietary Phytochemical Agents

    PubMed Central

    Sak, Katrin

    2012-01-01

    Chemotherapy has been used for cancer treatment already for almost 70 years by targeting the proliferation potential and metastasising ability of tumour cells. Despite the progress made in the development of potent chemotherapy drugs, their toxicity to normal tissues and adverse side effects in multiple organ systems as well as drug resistance have remained the major obstacles for the successful clinical use. Cytotoxic agents decrease considerably the quality of life of cancer patients manifesting as acute complaints and impacting the life of survivors also for years after the treatment. Toxicity often limits the usefulness of anticancer agents being also the reason why many patients discontinue the treatment. The nutritional approach may be the means of helping to raise cancer therapy to a new level of success as supplementing or supporting the body with natural phytochemicals cannot only reduce adverse side effects but improve also the effectiveness of chemotherapeutics. Various plant-derived compounds improve the efficiency of cytotoxic agents, decrease their resistance, lower and alleviate toxic side effects, reduce the risk of tumour lysis syndrome, and detoxify the body of chemotherapeutics. The personalised approach using various phytochemicals provides thus a new dimension to the standard cancer therapy for improving its outcome in a complex and complementary way. PMID:23320169

  1. Effect of pharmacological agents on male reproduction.

    PubMed

    Chowdhury, A R

    1987-01-01

    The main groups of drugs that affect male libido, potency, sperm production, structure and function are summarized and their mechanisms described when known. About 15% of the 200 most commonly prescribed drugs can have adverse effects on male reproduction. Sedatives, tranquilizers, hypnotics, antiandrogens and the common antihypertensive methyldopa can depress libido. Spironoacetone has been reported to impair libido, potency, sperm count and motility, although reversibly. The phenothiazines and tricyclic antidepressants may induce prolactin secretion and consequent gynecomastia. Narcotics and hallucinogens influence male sexual performance. Morphine and methadone decrease LH and testosterone, and increase prolactin. Cannabis, hashish and marijuana initially increase libido and potency, but chronic use causes sexual inversion. Chronic alcoholism also may upset testosterone metabolism, causing testicular atrophy. Cyclophosphamide, used for nephrotic syndrome, and nitrofurans, used as food preservatives, cause direct damage to seminiferous tubules. Synthetic oganochlorine pesticides, especially DDT, have also been reported to damage spermatogenic cells directly, when injected in mice. Steroids such as ACTH, hydrocortisone and dexamethasone may inhibit steroidogenesis in animals. PMID:12341906

  2. Multiphysics and Multiscale Analysis for Chemotherapeutic Drug

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Linan; Kim, Sung Youb; Kim, Dongchoul

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents a three-dimensional dynamic model for the chemotherapy design based on a multiphysics and multiscale approach. The model incorporates cancer cells, matrix degrading enzymes (MDEs) secreted by cancer cells, degrading extracellular matrix (ECM), and chemotherapeutic drug. Multiple mechanisms related to each component possible in chemotherapy are systematically integrated for high reliability of computational analysis of chemotherapy. Moreover, the fidelity of the estimated efficacy of chemotherapy is enhanced by atomic information associated with the diffusion characteristics of chemotherapeutic drug, which is obtained from atomic simulations. With the developed model, the invasion process of cancer cells in chemotherapy treatment is quantitatively investigated. The performed simulations suggest a substantial potential of the presented model for a reliable design technology of chemotherapy treatment. PMID:26491672

  3. Chemotherapy Agents: A Primer for the Interventional Radiologist

    PubMed Central

    Mihlon, Frank; Ray, Charles E.; Messersmith, Wells

    2010-01-01

    In this article, the authors review the basic principles of cancer chemotherapy and provide an overview of each of the general classes of chemotherapeutic agents with a target audience of interventional radiologists in mind. Special attention is paid to agents used in regional chemotherapy as well as agents commonly included in systemic chemotherapeutic regimens for patients who also require regional chemotherapy. PMID:22550380

  4. Triacetin-based acetate supplementation as a chemotherapeutic adjuvant therapy in glioma

    PubMed Central

    Tsen, Andrew R.; Long, Patrick M.; Driscoll, Heather E.; Davies, Matthew T.; Teasdale, Benjamin A.; Penar, Paul L.; Pendlebury, William W.; Spees, Jeffrey L.; Lawler, Sean E.; Viapiano, Mariano S.; Jaworski, Diane M.

    2013-01-01

    Cancer is associated with epigenetic (i.e., histone hypoacetylation) and metabolic (i.e., aerobic glycolysis) alterations. Levels of N-acetyl-L-aspartate (NAA), the primary storage form of acetate in the brain, and aspartoacylase (ASPA), the enzyme responsible for NAA catalysis to generate acetate, are reduced in glioma; yet, few studies have investigated acetate as a potential therapeutic agent. This preclinical study sought to test the efficacy of the food additive Triacetin (glyceryl triacetate, GTA) as a novel therapy to increase acetate bioavailability in glioma cells. The growth-inhibitory effects of GTA, compared to the histone deacetylase inhibitor Vorinostat (SAHA), were assessed in established human glioma cell lines (HOG and Hs683 oligodendroglioma, U87 and U251 glioblastoma) and primary tumor-derived glioma stem-like cells (GSCs), relative to an oligodendrocyte progenitor line (Oli-Neu), normal astrocytes, and neural stem cells (NSCs) in vitro. GTA was also tested as a chemotherapeutic adjuvant with temozolomide (TMZ) in orthotopically grafted GSCs. GTA induced cytostatic growth arrest in vitro comparable to Vorinostat, but, unlike Vorinostat, GTA did not alter astrocyte growth and promoted NSC expansion. GTA alone increased survival of mice engrafted with glioblastoma GSCs and potentiated TMZ to extend survival longer than TMZ alone. GTA was most effective on GSCs with a mesenchymal cell phenotype. Given that GTA has been chronically administered safely to infants with Canavan disease, a leukodystrophy due to ASPA mutation, GTA-mediated acetate supplementation may provide a novel, safe chemotherapeutic adjuvant to reduce the growth of glioma tumors, most notably the more rapidly proliferating, glycolytic, and hypoacetylated mesenchymal glioma tumors. PMID:23996800

  5. Enhancing glioblastoma cell sensitivity to chemotherapeutics: A strategy involving survivin gene silencing mediated by gemini surfactant-based complexes.

    PubMed

    Cruz, Rita Q; Morais, Catarina M; Cardoso, Ana M; Silva, Sandra G; Vale, Maria L; Marques, Eduardo F; Pedroso de Lima, Maria C; Jurado, Amália S

    2016-07-01

    Glioblastoma (GBM), the highest grade astrocytoma, is one of the most aggressive and challenging cancers to treat. The standard treatment is usually limited due to the intrinsic resistance of GBM to chemotherapy and drug non-specific effects. Therefore, new therapeutic strategies need to be developed to target tumor cells, sparing healthy tissues. In this context, the inhibitor-of-apoptosis protein (IAP) survivin emerges as an ideal target for a gene silencing approach, since it is sharply differentially expressed in cancer tissues. In this work, two different families of cationic gemini surfactants (bis-quat conventional and serine-derived) were tested regarding their efficiency to deliver small interfering RNAs (siRNAs) in a human GBM cell line (U87), in order to select an effective siRNA anti-survivin carrier. Importantly, survivin downregulation combined with administration of the chemotherapeutic agents temozolomide or etoposide resulted in a synergistic cytotoxic effect, thus revealing to be a promising strategy to reduce the chemotherapeutic doses for GBM treatment. PMID:27106606

  6. Protective effect of Korean Red Ginseng against chemotherapeutic drug-induced premature catagen development assessed with human hair follicle organ culture model

    PubMed Central

    Keum, Dong In; Pi, Long-Quan; Hwang, Sungjoo Tommy; Lee, Won-Soo

    2015-01-01

    Background Chemotherapy-induced alopecia (CIA) is one of the most distressing side effects for patients undergoing chemotherapy. This study evaluated the protective effect of Korean Red Ginseng (KRG) on CIA in a well-established in vitro human hair follicle organ culture model as it occurs in vivo. Methods We examined whether KRG can prevent premature hair follicle dystrophy in a human hair follicle organ culture model during treatment with a key cyclophosphamide metabolite, 4-hydroperoxycyclophosphamide (4-HC). Results 4-HC inhibited human hair growth, induced premature catagen development, and inhibited proliferation and stimulated apoptosis of hair matrix keratinocytes. In addition, 4-HC increased p53 and Bax protein expression and decreased Bcl2 protein expression. Pretreatment with KRG protected against 4-HC-induced hair growth inhibition and premature catagen development. KRG also suppressed 4-HC-induced inhibition of matrix keratinocyte proliferation and stimulation of matrix keratinocyte apoptosis. Moreover, KRG restored 4-HC-induced p53 and Bax/Bcl2 expression. Conclusion Overall, our results indicate that KRG may protect against 4-HC-induced premature catagen development through modulation of p53 and Bax/Bcl2 expression. PMID:27158238

  7. Research to Identify Effective Antifungal Agents, 1992 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect

    Schreck, Carl

    1993-03-01

    This study is a continuation of ``Research to Identify Effective Antifungal Agents'' sponsored by Bonneville Power Administration (Schreck et al. 1990 and Schreck et al. 1991). The objectives of the present study were to select and evaluate up to 10 candidate fungicides.

  8. Antitumor effects of energy restriction-mimetic agents: thiazolidinediones.

    PubMed

    Omar, Hany A; Salama, Samir A; Arafa, El-Shaimaa A; Weng, Jing-Ru

    2013-07-01

    Distinct metabolic strategies used by cancer cells to gain growth advantages, such as shifting from oxidative phosphorylation to glycolysis, constitute a basis for their selective targeting as a novel approach for cancer therapy. Thiazolidinediones (TZDs) are ligands for the nuclear transcription factor peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPARγ) and they are clinically used as oral hypoglycemic agents. Accumulating evidence suggests that the ability of TZDs to suppress cancer cell proliferation through the interplay between apoptosis and autophagy was, at least in part, mediated through PPARγ-independent mechanisms. This review highlights recent advances in the pharmacological exploitation of the PPARγ-independent anticancer effects of TZDs to develop novel agents targeting tumor metabolism, including glucose transporter inhibitors and adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase, which have translational potential as cancer therapeutic agents. PMID:23612598

  9. Effects of Anesthetic Agent Propofol on Postoperative Sex Hormone Levels

    PubMed Central

    Kim, H.; Ku, S.-Y.; Kim, H. C.; Suh, C. S.; Kim, S. H.; Choi, Y. M.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Several studies have found anesthetic agents including propofol in ovarian follicular fluid. However, little is known about the effect of anesthetic agents on ovarian function. We aimed to investigate whether there were differences in the postoperative levels of sex hormones when propofol was used as the anesthetic agent. Methods: A retrospective review was done of 80 patients who underwent ovarian surgery, with 72 infertile women serving as controls. Patients were included in the study if their serum estradiol (E2) and follicle stimulating hormone (FSH) levels were measured during their first postoperative menstrual cycle. Results: Patients were grouped according to the use or non-use of propofol as follows: propofol group (n = 39) and non-propofol group (n = 41). The control group did not undergo surgery. Postoperative E2 levels did not differ between the three groups, but FSH levels were significantly higher in the patients who had undergone surgery compared to controls (p < 0.05). Post-hoc analysis of E2 and FSH levels in the propofol and non-propofol groups did not show any significant differences. Conclusions: The use of propofol did not result in any differences compared to other anesthetic agents in terms of postoperative sex hormone levels after gynecologic surgery. The type of anesthetic agent does not seem to affect the postoperative levels of female sex hormones. PMID:27134297

  10. Chemotherapeutic response to cisplatin-like drugs in human breast cancer cells probed by vibrational microspectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Batista de Carvalho, A L M; Pilling, M; Gardner, P; Doherty, J; Cinque, G; Wehbe, K; Kelley, C; Batista de Carvalho, L A E; Marques, M P M

    2016-06-23

    Studies of drug-cell interactions in cancer model systems are essential in the preclinical stage of rational drug design, which relies on a thorough understanding of the mechanisms underlying cytotoxic activity and biological effects, at a molecular level. This study aimed at applying complementary vibrational spectroscopy methods to evaluate the cellular impact of two Pt(ii) and Pd(ii) dinuclear chelates with spermine (Pt2Spm and Pd2Spm), using cisplatin (cis-Pt(NH3)2Cl2) as a reference compound. Their effects on cellular metabolism were monitored in a human triple-negative metastatic breast cancer cell line (MDA-MB-231) by Raman and synchrotron-radiation infrared microspectroscopies, for different drug concentrations (2-8 μM) at 48 h exposure. Multivariate data analysis was applied (unsupervised PCA), unveiling drug- and concentration-dependent effects: apart from discrimination between control and drug-treated cells, a clear separation was obtained for the different agents studied - mononuclear vs. polynuclear, and Pt(ii) vs. Pd(ii). Spectral biomarkers of drug action were identified, as well as the cellular response to the chemotherapeutic insult. The main effect of the tested compounds was found to be on DNA, lipids and proteins, the Pd(ii) agent having a more significant impact on proteins while its Pt(ii) homologue affected the cellular lipid content at lower concentrations, which suggests the occurrence of distinct and unconventional pathways of cytotoxicity for these dinuclear polyamine complexes. Raman and FTIR microspectroscopies were confirmed as powerful non-invasive techniques to obtain unique spectral signatures of the biochemical impact and physiological reaction of cells to anticancer agents. PMID:27063935

  11. Can immunostimulatory agents enhance the abscopal effect of radiotherapy?

    PubMed

    Levy, Antonin; Chargari, Cyrus; Marabelle, Aurelien; Perfettini, Jean-Luc; Magné, Nicolas; Deutsch, Eric

    2016-07-01

    Ionising radiation (IR) may harm cancer cells through a rare indirect out-of-field phenomenon described as the abscopal effect. Increasing evidence demonstrates that radiotherapy could be capable of generating tumour-specific immune responses. On the other hand, effects of IR also include inhibitory immune signals on the tumour microenvironment. Following these observations, and in the context of newly available immunostimulatory agents in metastatic cancers (anti-cytotoxic T lymphocyte-associated antigen 4 and programmed cell death protein-1 or -ligand 1 [PD1 or PDL-1]), there is a remarkable potential for synergistic combinations of IR with such agents that act through the reactivation of immune surveillance. Here, we present and discuss the pre-clinical and clinical rationale supporting the enhancement of the abscopal effect of IR on the blockade of immune checkpoints and discuss the evolving potential of immunoradiotherapy. PMID:27200491

  12. Can CA describe collective effects of polluting agents?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Troisi, A.

    2015-03-01

    Pollution represents one of the most relevant issues of our time. Several studies are on stage but, generally, they do not consider competitive effects, paying attention only to specific agents and their impact. In this paper, it is suggested a different scheme. At first, it is proposed a formal model of competitive noxious effects. Second, by generalizing a previous algorithm capable of describing urban growth, it is developed a cellular automata (CA) model that provides the effective impact of a variety of pollutants. The final achievement is a simulation tool that can model pollution combined effects and their dynamical evolution in relation to anthropized environments.

  13. Possible involvement of the Sigma-1 receptor chaperone in chemotherapeutic-induced neuropathic pain.

    PubMed

    Tomohisa, Mori; Junpei, Ohya; Aki, Masumoto; Masato, Harumiya; Mika, Fukase; Kazumi, Yoshizawa; Teruo, Hayashi; Tsutomu, Suzuki

    2015-11-01

    Previous studies have shown that ligands of the sigma-1 receptor chaperone (Sig-1R) regulate pain-related behaviors. Clinical use of chemotherapeutics is often compromised due to their adverse side effects, particularly those related to neuropathy. Previous studies have shown that repeated administration of oxaliplatin and paclitaxel produces neuropathy in rodents. Therefore, the aim of the present study was to clarify the involvement of the Sig-1R in chemotherapeutic-induced neuropathy by examining the effects of oxaliplatin and paclitaxel on the Sig-1R levels in the spinal cord, and by examining the effects of Sig-1R agonist and antagonist on oxaliplatin- and paclitaxel-induced neuropathy in rats. Chemotherapeutic-induced neuropathic pain was accompanied by a significant reduction of the Sig-1R level in the spinal cord. Furthermore, the administration of paclitaxel to CHO cells that stably overexpressed Sig-1Rs induced the clustering of Sig-1Rs. We also found that the Sig-1R agonist SA4503 potently inhibited the neuropathy induced by oxaliplatin- and paclitaxel, whereas this action was abolished by the Sig-1R antagonist NE-100. These results suggest that the reduction of Sig-1R activity is involved in chemotherapeutic-induced neuropathy, and the Sig-1R agonist SA4503 could serve as a potential candidate for the treatment of chemotherapeutic-induced neuropathy. PMID:26234785

  14. Role of pregnane X receptor in chemotherapeutic treatment

    PubMed Central

    Zhuo, Wei; Hu, Lei; Lv, Jinfeng; Wang, Hongbing; Zhou, Honghao; Fan, Lan

    2015-01-01

    Pregnane X receptor (PXR) is a member of the nuclear receptor superfamily that differently expresses not only in human normal tissues but also in numerous types of human cancers. PXR can be activated by many endogenous substances and exogenous chemicals, and thus affects chemotherapeutic effects and intervenes drug–drug interactions by regulating its target genes involving drug metabolism and transportation, cell proliferation and apoptosis, and modulating endobiotic homeostasis. Tissue and context-specific regulation of PXR contributes to diverse effects in the treatment for numerous cancers. Genetic variants of PXR lead to intra- and inter-individual differences in the expression and inducibility of PXR, resulting in different responses to chemotherapy in PXR-positive cancers. The purpose of this review is to summarize and discuss the role of PXR in the metabolism and clearance of anticancer drugs. It is also expected that this review will provide insights into PXR-mediated enhancement for chemotherapeutic treatment, prediction of drug–drug interactions and personalized medicine. PMID:24889719

  15. Combination Chemotherapeutic Dry Powder Aerosols via Controlled Nanoparticle Agglomeration

    PubMed Central

    El-Gendy, Nashwa; Berkland, Cory

    2014-01-01

    Purpose To develop an aerosol system for efficient local lung delivery of chemotherapeutics where nanotechnology holds tremendous potential for developing more valuable cancer therapies. Concurrently, aerosolized chemotherapy is generating interest as a means to treat certain types of lung cancer more effectively with less systemic exposure to the compound. Methods Nanoparticles of the potent anticancer drug, paclitaxel, were controllably assembled to form low density microparticles directly after preparation of the nanoparticle suspension. The amino acid, L-leucine, was used as a colloid destabilizer to drive the assembly of paclitaxel nanoparticles. A combination chemotherapy aerosol was formed by assembling the paclitaxel nanoparticles in the presence of cisplatin in solution. Results Freeze-dried powders of the combination chemotherapy possessed desirable aerodynamic properties for inhalation. In addition, the dissolution rates of dried nanoparticle agglomerate formulations (~60% to 66% after 8 h) were significantly faster than that of micronized paclitaxel powder as received (~18% after 8 h). Interestingly, the presence of the water soluble cisplatin accelerated the dissolution of paclitaxel. Conclusions Nanoparticle agglomerates of paclitaxel alone or in combination with cisplatin may serve as effective chemotherapeutic dry powder aerosols to enable regional treatment of certain lung cancers. PMID:19415471

  16. TIMP3 regulates osteosarcoma cell migration, invasion, and chemotherapeutic resistances.

    PubMed

    Han, Xiu-Guo; Li, Yan; Mo, Hui-Min; Li, Kang; Lin, Du; Zhao, Chang-Qing; Zhao, Jie; Tang, Ting-Ting

    2016-07-01

    Tissue inhibitors of metalloproteinases (TIMPs) inhibit matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) to limit degradation of the extracellular matrix. Low levels of TIMP3 have been demonstrated in cancer tissues at advanced clinical stages, with positive distant metastasis and chemotherapeutic resistance. We examined the role of TIMP3 in osteosarcoma (OS) cell invasiveness and chemoresistance. TIMP3 was overexpressed or knocked down in the human OS cell lines Saos2 and MG63. Cell migration and invasion capacities were then evaluated using Transwell assays, and resistance to cisplatin was assessed by CCK-8 assay and flow cytometry. Real-time PCR and western blotting were used to investigate activation of signaling pathways downstream of TIMP3. Overexpression of TIMP3 inhibited the migration and invasion of Saos2 and MG63 cells, while knockdown of TIMP3 had the opposite effect. Cell survival after exposure to cisplatin was inhibited by TIMP3 overexpression in both Saos2 and MG63 cells. Consistently, downregulation of TIMP3 gene expression significantly decreased the sensitivity of OS cells to cisplatin treatment. MMP1, MMP2, Bcl-2, and Akt1 were all downregulated following TIMP3 overexpression, while Bax and cleaved caspase-3 were upregulated. TIMP3 knockdown had opposite effects on the regulation of these genes. Taken together, our findings suggest TIMP3 as a new target for inhibition of OS progression and chemotherapeutic resistance. PMID:26749283

  17. Chemotherapeutic-Induced Apoptosis – A Phenotype for Pharmacogenomics Studies

    PubMed Central

    Wen, Yujia; Gorsic, Lidija K.; Wheeler, Heather E.; Ziliak, Dana M.; Huang, R. Stephanie; Dolan, M. Eileen

    2011-01-01

    Lymphoblastoid cell lines have been used as a model system to identify genetic determinants of chemotherapeutic-induced cytotoxicity, a phenotype thought to represent cellular sensitivity to drug. However, cytotoxicity is a broad measurement encompassing cell cycle inhibition as well as cell death (apoptotic and non-apoptotic). We evaluated caspase 3/7 mediated cellular apoptosis with six chemotherapeutic agents: 5′-deoxy-fluorouridine, pemetrexed, cytarabine, paclitaxel, carboplatin and cisplatin. Using monozygotic twin pair and sibling pair lymphoblastoid cell lines, we identified conditions for measurement of caspase activity. Although treatment with 5′-deoxy-fluorouridine and pemetrexed for up to 24 h did not result in significant apoptosis or inter-individual variation in caspase dependent cell death; paclitaxel, cisplatin, carboplain and cytarabine treatment for 24 h resulted in 9.4, 9.1, 7.0 and 6.0 fold increases in apoptosis relative to control, respectively. There was a weak correlation between caspase activity and cytotoxicity (r2=0.03 to 0.29) demonstrating that cytotoxicity and apoptosis are two distinct phenotypes that may produce independent genetic associations. Estimated heritability (h2) for apoptosis was 0.57 and 0.29 for cytarabine (5 μM and 40 μM respectively), 0.22 for paclitaxel (12.5 nM), and 0.34 for cisplatin (5 μM). The HapMap CEU panel of lymphoblastoid cell lines (n = 77) were evaluated for sensitivity to cisplatin followed by genome wide association studies with over 2 million SNPs at p < 0.001. We identified a significant enrichment of cisplatin-induced apoptosis SNPs within the significant cisplatin induced cytotoxicity SNPs and an enrichment of expression quantitative trait loci. PMID:21642893

  18. Synergistic anti-cancer effects of silibinin with conventional cytotoxic agents doxorubicin, cisplatin and carboplatin against human breast carcinoma MCF-7 and MDA-MB468 cells.

    PubMed

    Tyagi, Anil K; Agarwal, Chapla; Chan, Daniel C F; Agarwal, Rajesh

    2004-02-01

    Significant emphasis is being placed on combination chemotherapy of cancer using cytotoxic agents and naturally occurring chemopreventive agents, having different mechanisms of action with non-overlapping toxicity. In this regard, here we assessed whether a cancer preventive agent silibinin synergizes the therapeutic potential of doxorubicin (Dox), cisplatin or carboplatin, the chemotherapeutic drugs, in both estrogen-dependent and -independent human breast carcinoma, MCF-7 and MDA-MB468 cells, respectively. When tested alone, each of the four agents showed growth inhibition in both the cell lines in a dose- and a time-dependent manner. Based on their growth inhibitory effects, several combinations of silibinin (25-100 microM) with Dox (10-75 nM), cisplatin (0.2-2 microg/ml) or carboplatin (2-20 microg/ml) were next assessed for their synergistic, additive and/or antagonistic efficacy towards cell growth inhibition and apoptotic death. The strongest synergistic effects for cell growth inhibition [combination index (CI) 0.35 for MCF-7 and 0.45 for MDA-MB468 cells] were evident at a silibinin dose of 100 microM plus 25 nM Dox, in both the cell lines. Most of the CIs for other combinations of these three drugs with silibinin also suggested strong synergistic effects for cell growth inhibition in both MCF-7 and MDA-MB468 cells. In quantitative apoptosis studies, combination of silibinin with Dox resulted in much stronger apoptotic death compared to each agent alone in both cell lines. In case of silibinin combination with cisplatin, it showed no additional apoptotic effect in either cell line. Similarly, silibinin plus carboplatin combination showed stronger apoptotic effect only in MCF-7 cells. Together, these results suggest a possible synergism between silibinin and conventional cytotoxic agents for breast cancer treatment, and warrant further in vivo studies in pre-clinical breast cancer models. PMID:14719089

  19. Corneal toxicity induced by vesicating agents and effective treatment options.

    PubMed

    Goswami, Dinesh G; Tewari-Singh, Neera; Agarwal, Rajesh

    2016-06-01

    The vesicating agents sulfur mustard (SM) and lewisite (LEW) are potent chemical warfare agents that primarily cause damage to the ocular, skin, and respiratory systems. However, ocular tissue is the most sensitive organ, and vesicant exposure results in a biphasic injury response, including photophobia, corneal lesions, corneal edema, ulceration, and neovascularization, and may cause loss of vision. There are several reports on ocular injury from exposure to SM, which has been frequently used in warfare. However, there are very few reports on ocular injury by LEW, which indicate that injury symptoms appear instantly after exposure and faster than SM. In spite of extensive research efforts, effective therapies for vesicant-induced ocular injuries, mainly to the most affected corneal tissue, are not available. Hence, we have established primary human corneal epithelial cells and rabbit corneal organ culture models with the SM analog nitrogen mustard, which have helped to test the efficacy of potential therapeutic agents. These agents will then be further evaluated against in vivo SM- and LEW-induced corneal injury models, which will assist in the development of potential broad-spectrum therapies against vesicant-induced ocular injuries. PMID:27327041

  20. Effect of the mineralizing agent on the permanent teeth.

    PubMed

    Kolmakow, S; Honkala, E; Borovsky, E V; Kuzmina, E M; Vasina, S A

    1991-01-01

    In a two-year pragmatic clinical trial, the effect of the mineralizing agent was evaluated on permanent teeth of the first eruption group among Finnish children (7-years old at the beginning of the study) with a low prevalence of DFS. In the test group (n = 123, biweekly mouthrinsing with a 2% solution of mineralizing agent and 0.2% NaF solution) the percentage reduction in increment of both EFDS and DFS was high, whereas in the control group (n = 123, biweekly mouthrinsing with placebo and 0.2% NaF solutions) the incidence for symptoms of caries disease did not differ from that normally found in this age cohort. Positive clinical effect of tested solution was age-related and was associated with remineralization of old and inhibition of occurrence of new EFD lesions. PMID:1878329

  1. BMX Negatively Regulates BAK Function, Thereby Increasing Apoptotic Resistance to Chemotherapeutic Drugs.

    PubMed

    Fox, Joanna L; Storey, Alan

    2015-04-01

    The ability of chemotherapeutic agents to induce apoptosis, predominantly via the mitochondrial (intrinsic) apoptotic pathway, is thought to be a major determinant of the sensitivity of a given cancer to treatment. Intrinsic apoptosis, regulated by the BCL2 family, integrates diverse apoptotic signals to determine cell death commitment and then activates the nodal effector protein BAK to initiate the apoptotic cascade. In this study, we identified the tyrosine kinase BMX as a direct negative regulator of BAK function. BMX associates with BAK in viable cells and is the first kinase to phosphorylate the key tyrosine residue needed to maintain BAK in an inactive conformation. Importantly, elevated BMX expression prevents BAK activation in tumor cells treated with chemotherapeutic agents and is associated with increased resistance to apoptosis and decreased patient survival. Accordingly, BMX expression was elevated in prostate, breast, and colon cancers compared with normal tissue, including in aggressive triple-negative breast cancers where BMX overexpression may be a novel biomarker. Furthermore, BMX silencing potentiated BAK activation, rendering tumor cells hypersensitive to otherwise sublethal doses of clinically relevant chemotherapeutic agents. Our finding that BMX directly inhibits a core component of the intrinsic apoptosis machinery opens opportunities to improve the efficacy of existing chemotherapy by potentiating BAK-driven cell death in cancer cells. PMID:25649765

  2. Effects of anesthetic agents on systemic critical O2 delivery.

    PubMed

    Van der Linden, P; Gilbart, E; Engelman, E; Schmartz, D; Vincent, J L

    1991-07-01

    The present study tested the hypothesis that anesthetic agents can alter tissue O2 extraction capabilities in a dog model of progressive hemorrhage. After administration of pentobarbital sodium (25 mg/kg iv) and endotracheal intubation, the dogs were paralyzed with pancuronium bromide, ventilated with room air, and splenectomized. A total of 60 dogs were randomized in 10 groups of 6 dogs each. The first group served as control (C). A second group (P) received a continuous infusion of pentobarbital (4 mg.kg-2.h-2), which was started immediately after the bolus dose. Three groups received enflurane (E), halothane (HL), or isoflurane (I) at the end-tidal concentration of 0.7 minimum alveolar concentration (MAC). The sixth group received halothane at the end-tidal concentration of 1 MAC (HH). Two groups received intravenous alfentanil at relatively low dose (AL) or high dose (AH). The last two groups received intravenous ketamine at either relatively low dose (KL) or high dose (KH). In each group, O2 delivery (Do2) was progressively reduced by hemorrhage. At each step, systemic Do2 and O2 consumption (VO2) were measured separately and the critical point was determined from a plot of Vo2 vs. Do2. The critical O2 extraction ratio (OER) in the control group was 65.0 +/- 7.8%. OER was lower in all anesthetized groups (P, 44.3 +/- 11.8%; E, 47.0 +/- 7.7%; HL, 45.7 +/- 11.2%; I, 44.3 +/- 7.1%; HH, 33.7 +/- 6.0%; AL, 56.5 +/- 9.6%; AH, 43.5 +/- 5.9%; KH, 57.7 +/- 7.1%), except in the KL group (78.3 +/- 10.0%). The effects of halothane and alfentanil on critical OER were dose dependent (P less than 0.05), whereas critical OER was significantly lower in the KH than in the KL group. Moreover, the effects of anesthetic agents on critical Do2 appeared related to their effects on systemic vascular resistance. Anesthetic agents therefore alter O2 extraction by their peripheral vascular effects. However, ketamine, with its unique sympathetic stimulant properties, had a lesser effect

  3. The effects of thermally reversible agents on PVC stability properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, J.; Yao, J.; Xiong, X. H.; Jia, C. X.; Ren, R.; Chen, P.; Liu, X. M.

    2016-07-01

    One kind of thermally reversible cross-linking agents for improving PVC thermally stability was synthesized. The chemical structure and thermally reversible characteristics of cross-linking agents were investigated by FTIR and DSC analysis, respectively. FTIR results confirmed that the cyclopentadienyl barium mercaptides ((CPD-C2H4S)2Ba) were successfully synthesized. DSC results showed it has thermally reversible characteristics and the depolymerization temperature was between 170 °C and 205 °C. The effects of cross-linking reaction time on gel content of Poly(vinyl chloride) compounds was evaluated. The gel content value arrived at 42% after being cross-linked for 25 min at 180 C. The static thermally stability measurement proved that the thermally stability of PVC compounds was improved.

  4. Immunological Effects of Conventional Chemotherapy and Targeted Anticancer Agents.

    PubMed

    Galluzzi, Lorenzo; Buqué, Aitziber; Kepp, Oliver; Zitvogel, Laurence; Kroemer, Guido

    2015-12-14

    The tremendous clinical success of checkpoint blockers illustrates the potential of reestablishing latent immunosurveillance for cancer therapy. Although largely neglected in the clinical practice, accumulating evidence indicates that the efficacy of conventional and targeted anticancer agents does not only involve direct cytostatic/cytotoxic effects, but also relies on the (re)activation of tumor-targeting immune responses. Chemotherapy can promote such responses by increasing the immunogenicity of malignant cells, or by inhibiting immunosuppressive circuitries that are established by developing neoplasms. These immunological "side" effects of chemotherapy are desirable, and their in-depth comprehension will facilitate the design of novel combinatorial regimens with improved clinical efficacy. PMID:26678337

  5. HISTOCHEMICAL EFFECTS OF SOME BIOLOGICAL AGENTS ON CULEX PIPIENS LARVAE.

    PubMed

    El Sobky, Mona M; Ismail, Howaida I H; Assar, Abada A

    2016-04-01

    The histochemical effects of the lethal concentration that kills 50% of larvae (LC50) of three biological agents, abamectin, Bacillus thuringiensis and spinosad on the carbohydrates (polysaccharides), proteins, nucleic acids and lipids content of the midgut and fat bodies of Culex pipiens 2nd instar larvae were studied. The results showed that the three tested compounds reduced the carbohydrates (polysaccharides), proteins, RNA synthesis and lipids content after 72 hours of treatment where abamectin was the most effective followed by Bacillus thuringiensis then spinosad. PMID:27363043

  6. Effect of the combination of different depigmenting agents in vitro.

    PubMed

    Martínez-Gutiérrez, Alfredo; Asensio, Juan Antonio; Aran, Begoña

    2014-01-01

    Melanin plays a key role in our skin, protecting us against ultraviolet radiation, but there are situations in which its anomalous accumulation can lead to either aesthetic problems or diseases like melasma. For this reason, it is important to find agents that are able to decrease the skin pigmentation. It has been demonstrated that the melanin synthesis pathway can be inhibited at different levels by different mechanisms of action. The aim of this project is to combine some of these agents with different mechanisms of action on this pathway in order to find synergistic effects in the inhibition of tyrosinase and melanin synthesis. Kojic acid + α-lipoic acid combination are the only ones that have shown a synergistic effect over mushroom tyrosinase. However, this effect is not seen in melanin synthesis inhibition, although this combination is the most effective one. A potentiation effect is seen in arbutin + α-lipoic acid and kojic acid + azelaic acid combination. Kojic acid and α-lipoic acid combination might prove a good approach as treatment for hyperpigmentation disorders. PMID:25898763

  7. Effects of Agent's Repulsion in 2d Flocking Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moussa, Najem; Tarras, Iliass; Mazroui, M'hammed; Boughaleb, Yahya

    In nature many animal groups, such as fish schools or bird flocks, clearly display structural order and appear to move as a single coherent entity. In order to understand the complex behavior of these systems, many models have been proposed and tested so far. This paper deals with an extension of the Vicsek model, by including a second zone of repulsion, where each agent attempts to maintain a minimum distance from the others. The consideration of this zone in our study seems to play an important role during the travel of agents in the two-dimensional (2D) flocking models. Our numerical investigations show that depending on the basic ingredients such as repulsion radius (R1), effect of density of agents (ρ) and noise (η), our nonequilibrium system can undergo a kinetic phase transition from no transport to finite net transport. For different values of ρ, kinetic phase diagrams in the plane (η ,R1) are found. Implications of these findings are discussed.

  8. Improved Chemotherapeutic Activity by Morus alba Fruits through Immune Response of Toll-Like Receptor 4

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Bo Yoon; Kim, Seon Beom; Lee, Mi Kyeong; Park, Hyun; Kim, Sung Yeon

    2015-01-01

    Morus alba L. fruits have long been used in traditional medicine by many cultures. Their medicinal attributes include cardiovascular, hepatoprotective, neuroprotective and immunomodulatory actions. However, their mechanism of macrophage activation and anti-cancer effects remain unclear. The present study investigated the molecular mechanisms of immune stimulation and improved chemotherapeutic effect of M. alba L. fruit extract (MFE). MFE stimulated the production of cytokines, nitric oxide (NO) and tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) and tumoricidal properties of macrophages. MFE activated macrophages through the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPKinase) and nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) signaling pathways downstream from toll-like receptor (TLR) 4. MFE was shown to exhibit cytotoxicity of CT26 cells via the activated macrophages, even though MFE did not directly affect CT26 cells. In a xenograft mouse model, MFE significantly enhanced anti-cancer activity combined with 5-fluorouracil and markedly promoted splenocyte proliferation, natural killer (NK) cell activity, cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL) activity and IFN-γ production. Immunoglobulin G (IgG) antibody levels were significantly increased. These results indicate the indirect anti-cancer activity of MFE through improved immune response mediated by TLR4 signaling. M. alba L. fruit extract might be a potential anti-tumor immunomodulatory candidate chemotherapy agent. PMID:26473845

  9. A class of iron chelators with a wide spectrum of potent antitumor activity that overcomes resistance to chemotherapeutics

    PubMed Central

    Whitnall, Megan; Howard, Jonathan; Ponka, Prem; Richardson, Des R.

    2006-01-01

    Novel chemotherapeutics with marked and selective antitumor activity are essential to develop, particularly those that can overcome resistance to established therapies. Iron (Fe) is critical for cell-cycle progression and DNA synthesis and potentially represents a novel molecular target for the design of new anticancer agents. The aim of this study was to evaluate the antitumor activity and Fe chelation efficacy of a new class of Fe chelators using human tumors. In this investigation, the ligands showed broad antitumor activity and could overcome resistance to established antitumor agents. The in vivo efficacy of the most effective chelator identified, di-2-pyridylketone-4,4,-dimethyl-3-thiosemicarbazone (Dp44mT), was assessed by using a panel of human xenografts in nude mice. After 7 weeks, net growth of a melanoma xenograft in Dp44mT-treated mice was only 8% of that in mice treated with vehicle. In addition, no differences in these latter animals were found in hematological indices between Dp44mT-treated mice and controls. No marked systemic Fe depletion was observed comparing Dp44mT- and vehicle-treated mice, probably because of the very low doses required to induce anticancer activity. Dp44mT caused up-regulation of the Fe-responsive tumor growth and metastasis suppressor Ndrg1 in the tumor but not in the liver, indicating a potential mechanism of selective anticancer activity. These results indicate that the novel Fe chelators have potent and broad antitumor activity and can overcome resistance to established chemotherapeutics because of their unique mechanism of action. PMID:17003122

  10. Effect of certain anesthetic agents on mallard ducks

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cline, D.R.; Greenwood, R.J.

    1972-01-01

    Four anesthetic agents used in human or veterinary medicine and 3 experimental anesthetic preparations were evaluated for effectiveness in inducing narcosis when administered orally to game-farm mallard ducks (Anas platyrhynchos).Tribromoethanol was the only compound to satisfy criteria of initial tests. Mean duration of the induction, immobilization, and recovery periods was 2.4 minutes, 8.7 minutes, and 1.3 hours, respectively, at the median effective dosage for immobilization (ED50; 100 mg./kg. of body weight). The median lethal dosage (LD50) was 400 mg./kg. of body weight.Tribromoethanol was also tested on mallards during the reproductive season. Effects on the hatchability of eggs or the survival of young were not detected.

  11. Bacteriocins as Potential Anticancer Agents

    PubMed Central

    Kaur, Sumanpreet; Kaur, Sukhraj

    2015-01-01

    Cancer remains one of the leading causes of deaths worldwide, despite advances in its treatment and detection. The conventional chemotherapeutic agents used for the treatment of cancer have non-specific toxicity toward normal body cells that cause various side effects. Secondly, cancer cells are known to develop chemotherapy resistance in due course of treatment. Thus, the demand for novel anti-cancer agents is increasing day by day. Some of the experimental studies have reported the therapeutic potential of bacteriocins against various types of cancer cell lines. Bacteriocins are ribosomally-synthesized cationic peptides secreted by almost all groups of bacteria. Some bacteriocins have shown selective cytotoxicity toward cancer cells as compared to normal cells. This makes them promising candidates for further investigation and clinical trials. In this review article, we present the overview of the various cancer cell-specific cytotoxic bacteriocins, their mode of action and efficacies. PMID:26617524

  12. Assessment of the chemotherapeutic potential of a new camptothecin derivative, ZBH-1205.

    PubMed

    Wu, Di; Shi, Weiguo; Zhao, Jing; Wei, Zhengren; Chen, Zhijia; Zhao, Dawei; Lan, Shijie; Tai, Jiandong; Zhong, Bohua; Yu, Hong

    2016-08-15

    CPT-11 (irinotecan) is a derivative of camptothecin which is a natural product derived from the Chinese tree Camptotheca acuminta and widely used in antitumor therapy. Here, the in vitro anti-tumor activity and associated mechanisms of a novel derivative of camptothecin, ZBH-1205, were investigated in a panel of 9 human tumor cell lines, as well as in HEK 293 and SK-OV-3/DPP, a multi-drug resistant (MDR) cell line, and compared to CPT-11 and 7-ethyl-10-hydroxy-camptothecin (SN38). Comparisons between the different compounds were made on the basis of IC50 values as determined by the MTT assay, and flow cytometry was used to evaluate cell cycle progression, apoptosis, and the levels of pro- and active caspase-3 among different treatment groups. Interaction between the molecules and topoisomerase-1 (Topo-1)-DNA complexes was detected by a DNA relaxation assay. Our results demonstrated that IC50 values for ZBH-1205 ranged from 0.0009 μmol/L to 2.5671 μmol/L, which were consistently lower than IC50 values of CPT-11 or SN38 in the panel of cell lines, including SK-OV-3/DPP. Furthermore, ZBH-1205 was more effective than CPT-11 or SN38 at stabilizing Topo-1-DNA complexes and inducing tumor cell apoptosis. Therefore, ZBH-1205 is a promising chemotherapeutic agent to be further assessed in large-scale clinical trials. PMID:27302903

  13. Synthetic lethal approaches for assessing combinatorial efficacy of chemotherapeutic drugs.

    PubMed

    Jackson, Rebecca A; Chen, Ee Sin

    2016-06-01

    The recent advances in pharmacogenomics have made personalized medicine no longer a pipedream but a precise and powerful way to tailor individualized cancer treatment strategies. Cancer is a devastating disease, and contemporary chemotherapeutic strategies now integrate several agents in the treatment of some types of cancer, with the intent to block more than one target simultaneously. This constitutes the premise of synthetic lethality, an attractive therapeutic strategy already demonstrating clinical success in patients with breast and ovarian cancers. Synthetic lethal combinations offer the potential to also target the hitherto "undruggable" mutations that have challenged the cancer field for decades. However, synthetic lethality in clinical cancer therapy is very much still in its infancy, and selecting the most appropriate combinations-or synthetic lethal pairs-is not always an intuitive process. Here, we review some of the recent progress in identifying synthetic lethal combinations and their potential for therapy and highlight some of the tools through which synthetic lethal pairs are identified. PMID:26803999

  14. Pharmacological telomerase inhibition can sensitize drug-resistant and drug-sensitive cells to chemotherapeutic treatment.

    PubMed

    Ward, Ryan J; Autexier, Chantal

    2005-09-01

    Effective strategies to reverse or prevent chemotherapeutic resistance are required before cancer therapies can be curative. Telomerase is the ribonucleoprotein responsible for de novo synthesis and maintenance of telomeres, and its activity is predominantly observed in cancer cells. The telomerase enzyme has been successfully inhibited or inactivated to sensitize cells to cellular stresses; however, no studies have determined yet the effect of combining a pharmacological inhibitor of telomerase catalysis and traditional chemotherapeutics for the treatment of drug-sensitive or drug-resistant cancers. Here, we describe the effect of 2-[(E)-3-naphtalen-2-yl-but-2-enoylamino]-benzoic acid (BIBR1532), a small-molecule inhibitor of telomerase catalytic activity, on drug-resistant leukemia and breast cancer cells and their parental counterparts when treated in combination with chemotherapeutics. We observed that BIBR1532-treated cells show progressive telomere shortening, decreased proliferative capacity, and sensitization to chemotherapeutic treatment. These effects are telomere length-dependent, because cells insensitive to BIBR1532 or cells released from telomerase inhibition did not demonstrate changes in growth ability or drug sensitivity. Our novel observations suggest that pharmacological telomerase inhibition in combination therapy may be a valid strategy for the treatment of both drug-sensitive and drug-resistant cancers. PMID:15939802

  15. Effects of cleaning agents on bond strength to dentin.

    PubMed

    Rosin, Celso; Arana-Chavez, Victor Elias; Netto, Narciso Garone; Luz, Maria Aparecida Alves de Cerqueira

    2005-01-01

    The cleaning of cavity walls aims to improve adhesive restorative procedures and longevity of restorations. This study has compared the effect of three cleaning agents--sodium bicarbonate jet (Profi II, Dabi Atlante, São Paulo, Brazil); pumice paste plus a biologic detergent (Tergestesim, Probem, São Paulo, Brazil); air water spray--on the bond strength between dentin and two different adhesive systems: Clearfil SE Bond (Kuraray, Kioto, Japan) and Scotchbond Multi-Purpose Plus (3M-ESPE, São Paulo, Brazil). Six groups (n: 10) of dental fragments obtained from young adult extracted teeth were prepared, and each one received one of the listed surface cleaning techniques. After the adhesive application, a cone-shaped test body was built with AP-X (Kuraray, Kioto, Japan) or Z100 (3M-ESPE, São Paulo, Brazil) composite resins, using a Teflon matrix. The specimens were tested for tensile bond strength after one-week storage in distilled water at 37 degrees C. Two pairs of fractured specimens of each group were randomly chosen and processed for scanning electron microscopy (SEM) analysis. ANOVA test of the bond strength values showed no statistical differences among the cleaning agents and neither between their interactions with the bonding systems. Upon SEM analysis, most surfaces showed mixed fractures of adhesive and cohesive failures in bonding resin to dentin. Based on statistical and SEM analysis, it was concluded that the cleaning agents studied did not interfere with the bond strength of the adhesive systems used to dentin. PMID:16292446

  16. Effectiveness of three bulking agents for food waste composting

    SciTech Connect

    Adhikari, Bijaya K.; Barrington, Suzelle Martinez, Jose; King, Susan

    2009-01-15

    Rather than landfilling, composting the organic fraction of municipal solid wastes recycles the waste as a safe and nutrient enriched soil amendment, reduces emissions of greenhouse gases and generates less leachate. The objective of this project was to investigate the composting effectiveness of three bulking agents, namely chopped wheat (Triticum) straw, chopped mature hay consisting of 80% timothy (milium) and 20% clover (triphullum) and pine (pinus) wood shavings. These bulking agents were each mixed in duplicates at three different ratios with food waste (FW) and composted for 10 days using prototype in-vessel composters to observe their temperature and pH trends. Then, each mixture was matured in vertical barrels for 56 days to measure their mass loss and final nutrient content and to visually evaluate their level of decomposition. Chopped wheat straw (CWS) and chopped hay (CH) were the only two formulas that reached thermophilic temperatures during the 10 days of active composting when mixed with FW at a wet mass ratio of 8.9 and 8.6:1 (FW:CWS and FW:CH), respectively. After 56 days of maturation, these two formulas were well decomposed with no or very few recognizable substrate particles, and offered a final TN exceeding the original. Wood shavings (WS) produced the least decomposed compost at maturation, with wood particles still visible in the final product, and with a TN lower than the initial. Nevertheless, all bulking agents produced compost with an organic matter, TN, TP and TK content suitable for use as soil amendment.

  17. Differential effectiveness of berry polyphenols as anti-giardial agents

    PubMed Central

    ANTHONY, J.-P.; FYFE, L.; STEWART, D.; McDOUGALL, G. J.

    2011-01-01

    SUMMARY Following previous work on the anti-giardial effect of blueberry polyphenols, a range of polyphenol-rich extracts from berries and other fruits was screened for their ability to kill Giardia duodenalis, an intestinal parasite of humans. Polyphenol-rich extracts were prepared from berries using solid-phase extraction and applied to trophozoites of Giardia duodenalis grown in vitro. All berry extracts caused inhibition at 166 μg gallic acid equivalents (GAE)/ml phenol content but extracts from strawberry, arctic bramble, blackberry and cloudberry were as effective as the currently used drug, metronidazole, causing complete trophozoite mortality in vitro. Cloudberry extracts were found to be the most effective causing effectively complete trophozoite mortality at 66 μg GAE/ml. The polyphenol composition of the more effective berry extracts suggested that the presence of ellagitannins could be an important factor. However, the potency of cloudberry could be related to high ellagitannin content but also to the presence of substantial amounts of unconjugated p-coumaric acid and benzoic acid. These in vitro effects occur at concentrations easily achievable in the gut after berry ingestion and we discuss the likelihood that berry extracts could be effective anti-giardial agents in vivo. PMID:21813029

  18. Differential effectiveness of berry polyphenols as anti-giardial agents.

    PubMed

    Anthony, J-P; Fyfe, L; Stewart, D; McDougall, G J

    2011-08-01

    Following previous work on the anti-giardial effect of blueberry polyphenols, a range of polyphenol-rich extracts from berries and other fruits was screened for their ability to kill Giardia duodenalis, an intestinal parasite of humans. Polyphenol-rich extracts were prepared from berries using solid-phase extraction and applied to trophozoites of Giardia duodenalis grown in vitro. All berry extracts caused inhibition at 166 μg gallic acid equivalents (GAE)/ml phenol content but extracts from strawberry, arctic bramble, blackberry and cloudberry were as effective as the currently used drug, metronidazole, causing complete trophozoite mortality in vitro. Cloudberry extracts were found to be the most effective causing effectively complete trophozoite mortality at 66 μg GAE/ml. The polyphenol composition of the more effective berry extracts suggested that the presence of ellagitannins could be an important factor. However, the potency of cloudberry could be related to high ellagitannin content but also to the presence of substantial amounts of unconjugated p-coumaric acid and benzoic acid. These in vitro effects occur at concentrations easily achievable in the gut after berry ingestion and we discuss the likelihood that berry extracts could be effective anti-giardial agents in vivo. PMID:21813029

  19. Effects of anti-foaming agents on biohydrogen production.

    PubMed

    Sivagurunathan, Periyasamy; Anburajan, Parthiban; Kumar, Gopalakrishnan; Bakonyi, Péter; Nemestóthy, Nándor; Bélafi-Bakó, Katalin; Kim, Sang-Hyoun

    2016-08-01

    The effects of antifoaming agents on fermentative hydrogen production using galactose in batch and continuous operations were investigated. Batch hydrogen production assays with LS-303 (dimethylpolysiloxane), LG-109 (polyalkylene), LG-126 (polyoxyethylenealkylene), and LG-299 (polyether) showed that the doses and types of antifoaming agents played a significant role in hydrogen production. During batch tests, LS-303 at 100μL/L resulted in the maximum hydrogen production rate (HPR) and hydrogen yield (HY) of 2.5L/L-d and 1.08mol H2/mol galactoseadded, respectively. The following continuously stirred tank reactor operated at 12h HRT with LS-303 at 100μL/L showed a stable HPR and HY of 4.9L/L-d and 1.17mol H2/mol galactoseadded, respectively, which were higher than those found for the control reactor. Microbial community analysis supported the alterations in H2 generation under different operating conditions and the stimulatory impact of certain antifoaming chemicals on H2 production was demonstrated. PMID:26995320

  20. Properties of agents that effectively entrap liquid lipids.

    PubMed

    Imagi, J; Yamanouchi, T; Okada, K; Tanimoto, M; Matsuno, R

    1992-03-01

    A droplet of an oil-in-water emulsion of methyl linoleate in a saccharide or protein solution that contained with a surfactant, a stabilizer, or both was dehydrated by drying equipment for a single droplet that resembled a spray drier. The lipid exposed on the surface of dehydated samples was extracted and measured by gas chromatography. Gum arabic or gelatin without additives resulted in little lipid being exposed; they were good entrapping agents. Little lipid was exposed with a pullulan solution containing lecithin, sugar ester, carboxymethylcellulose, or sodium caseinate but much was exposed with a maltodextrin solution containing any of the surfactants tested. When both the surfactant lecithin and the stabilizer xanthan gum were added to the emulsion prepared in a maltodextrin solution, lipid was not detected. The results suggested that effective entrapping agents of liquid lipids cause much emulsification, stabilize the emulsion (that is, they cause the continuous phase to be very viscous), and create a dehydrated matrix of fine, dense network layers. PMID:1368332

  1. Effectiveness of septisol antiseptic foam as a surgical scrub agent.

    PubMed

    Dewar, N E; Gravens, D L

    1973-10-01

    Septisol antiseptic foam (0.23% hexachlorophene in a 46% ethyl alcohol base) is a new surgical scrub agent for both primary and re-entry use that is designed to minimize the harsh effects to the skin of the conventional scrub while retaining effective antibacterial properties. A preliminary surgical scrub study of 1-week duration yielded an immediate reduction in resident flora of 92% from an average single scrub coupled with a residual bacteriostatic effect from repeated use that gave a plateau at 57% of the pretest resident population level. A separate study demonstrated complete elimination of both gram-positive and gram-negative transients from the skin with a single application of the product. In an 8-week surgical scrub study, equal effectiveness was shown between Septisol antiseptic foam and a standard 3% hexachlorophene detergent. However, Septisol antiseptic foam offers considerable advantage in minimizing the harsh effects to the skin of the conventional surgical scrub and results in a substantially lower hemic level of hexachlorophene in the user than that obtained with 3% hexachlorophene detergent. Sampling was conducted by the fingerprint impression plate technique of Gale. PMID:4584593

  2. The effect of anti-plaque agents on gingivitis.

    PubMed

    Spivakovsky, Silvia; Keenan, Analia

    2016-06-01

    Data sourcesAn electronic search was conducted on PubMed Central. References of retrieved papers and previously published systematic reviews were hand searched.Study selectionRandomised controlled trials (RCTs) with at least six months follow-up evaluating the use of test products used in mouthrinses, toothpastes or gels as adjuncts to mechanical oral hygiene (including toothbrushing) were considered.Data extraction and synthesisTwo trained and calibrated reviewers independently assessed the studies for eligibility, with any disagreement being resolved by discussion. Two reviewers under the supervision of a third reviewer extracted data. Risk of bias was evaluated using the Cochrane risk of bias tool and the CONSORT statement. Outcomes were summarised as means and standard deviation (SD) or standard error (SE), the results were pooled and analysed using weighted mean differences (WMD), and heterogeneity among the studies was calculated.ResultsEighty-seven articles with 133 comparisons were included in the review. A majority of the studies (75) were considered to be at high risk of bias, eight at unclear risk and four at low risk. Fifteen different categories of active agent were used in toothpastes and ten in mouthwashes. The additional effects of the tested products were statistically significant for the Loe & Silness gingival index (46 studies), WMD -0.217, the modified gingival index (23 studies) - 0.415, gingivitis severity index (26 studies) - 14.939% or bleeding index (23 studies) - 7.626% with significant heterogeneity. For plaque, additional effects were found for Turesky (66 studies) WMD - 0.0475, Silness & Loe (26 studies) - 0.109 and for plaque severity (12 studies) - 23.4% indices, with significant heterogeneity.ConclusionsWithin the limitations of the present study, formulations with specific agents for chemical plaque control provide statistically significant improvements in terms of gingival, bleeding and plaque indices. PMID:27339238

  3. Molecular effects of supraphysiological doses of doping agents on health.

    PubMed

    Imperlini, Esther; Mancini, Annamaria; Alfieri, Andreina; Martone, Domenico; Caterino, Marianna; Orrù, Stefania; Buono, Pasqualina

    2015-06-01

    Performance-enhancing drugs (PEDs) gained wide popularity not only among sportsmen but also among specific subsets of population, such as adolescents. Apart from their claimed effects on athletic performance, they are very appealing due to the body shaping effect exerted on fat mass and fat-free mass. Besides the "underestimated" massive misuse of PEDs, the short- as well as long-term consequences of such habits remain largely unrecognized. They have been strictly associated with serious adverse effects, but molecular mechanisms are yet to be elucidated. Here, we analyze the current understanding of the molecular effects of supraphysiological doses of doping agents in healthy biological systems, at genomic and proteomic levels, in order to define the molecular sensors of organ/tissue impairment, determined by their misuse. The focus is put on the anabolic androgenic steroids (AASs), specifically testosterone (T) and its most potent derivative dihydrotestosterone (DHT), and on the peptide hormones, specifically the growth hormone (GH) and the insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1). A map of molecular targets is defined and the risk incidence for human health is taken into account. PMID:25787095

  4. C60(Nd) nanoparticles enhance chemotherapeutic susceptibility of cancer cells by modulation of autophagy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Pengfei; Zhang, Li; Lu, Yang; Man, Na; Wen, Longping

    2010-12-01

    Autophagy, an evolutionally conserved intracellular process degrading cytoplasmic proteins and organelles for recycling, has become one of the most remarkable strategies applied in cancer research. The fullerene C60 nanoparticle (nC60) has been shown to induce autophagy and sensitize chemotherapeutic killing of cancer cells, but the details still remain unknown. Here we show that a water-dispersed nanoparticle solution of derivatized fullerene C60, C60(Nd) nanoparticles (nC60(Nd)), has greater potential in inducing autophagy and sensitizing chemotherapeutic killing of both normal and drug-resistant cancer cells than nC60 does in an autophagy-dependent fashion. Additionally we further demonstrated that autophagy induced by nC60/C60(Nd) and Rapamycin had completely different roles in cancer chemotherapy. Our results, for the first time, revealed a novel and more potent derivative of the C60 nanoparticle in enhancing the cytotoxicity of chemotherapeutic agents and reducing drug resistance through autophagy modulation, which may ultimately lead to novel therapeutic strategies in cancer therapy.

  5. DEVELOPMENT OF PROTOCOLS FOR TESTING THE EFFECTIVENESS OF SURFACE WASHING AGENTS AND OIL SPILL BIOREMEDIATION AGENTS AND SPILLS OF OPPORTUNITY.

    EPA Science Inventory

    This project concerns the need by the program office to develop reproducible protocols for testing the effectiveness of surface washing agents and bioremediation products, and to devise a protocol for testing a remediation strategy in the event of a spill of opportunity. The bior...

  6. How Effective Are Pedagogical Agents for Learning? A Meta-Analytic Review

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schroeder, Noah L.; Adesope, Olusola O.; Gilbert, Rachel Barouch

    2013-01-01

    Research on the use of software programs and tools such as pedagogical agents has peaked over the last decade. Pedagogical agents are on-screen characters that facilitate instruction. This meta-analysis examined the effect of using pedagogical agents on learning by reviewing 43 studies involving 3,088 participants. Analysis of the results…

  7. The Effects of Animated Agents on Students' Achievement and Attitudes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Unal-Colak, Figen; Ozan, Ozlem

    2012-01-01

    Animated agents are electronic agents that interact with learners through voice, visuals or text and that carry human-like characteristics such as gestures and facial expressions with the purpose of creating a social learning environment, and provide information and guidance and when required feedback and motivation to students during their…

  8. Stabilizing Agents for Drug Nanocrystals: Effect on Bioavailability.

    PubMed

    Tuomela, Annika; Hirvonen, Jouni; Peltonen, Leena

    2016-01-01

    Drug nanocrystals are a versatile option for drug delivery purposes, and while the number of poorly soluble drug materials is all the time increasing, more research in this area is performed. Drug nanocrystals have a simple structure-a solid drug core is surrounded by a layer of stabilizing agent. However, despite the considerably simple structure, the selection of an appropriate stabilizer for a certain drug can be challenging. Mostly, the stabilizer selection is based purely on the requirement of physical stability, e.g., maintaining the nanosized particle size as long as possible after the formation of drug nanocrystals. However, it is also worth taking into account that stabilizer can affect the bioavailability in the final formulation via interactions with cells and cell layers. In addition, formation of nanocrystals is only one process step, and for the final formulation, more excipients are often added to the composition. The role of the stabilizers in the final formulation can be more than only stabilizing the nanocrystal particle size. A good example is the stabilizer's role as cryoprotectant during freeze drying. In this review, the stabilizing effect, role of stabilizers in final nanocrystalline formulations, challenges in reaching in vitro-in vivo correlation with nanocrystalline products, and stabilizers' effect on higher bioavailability are discussed. PMID:27213435

  9. Stabilizing Agents for Drug Nanocrystals: Effect on Bioavailability

    PubMed Central

    Tuomela, Annika; Hirvonen, Jouni; Peltonen, Leena

    2016-01-01

    Drug nanocrystals are a versatile option for drug delivery purposes, and while the number of poorly soluble drug materials is all the time increasing, more research in this area is performed. Drug nanocrystals have a simple structure—a solid drug core is surrounded by a layer of stabilizing agent. However, despite the considerably simple structure, the selection of an appropriate stabilizer for a certain drug can be challenging. Mostly, the stabilizer selection is based purely on the requirement of physical stability, e.g., maintaining the nanosized particle size as long as possible after the formation of drug nanocrystals. However, it is also worth taking into account that stabilizer can affect the bioavailability in the final formulation via interactions with cells and cell layers. In addition, formation of nanocrystals is only one process step, and for the final formulation, more excipients are often added to the composition. The role of the stabilizers in the final formulation can be more than only stabilizing the nanocrystal particle size. A good example is the stabilizer’s role as cryoprotectant during freeze drying. In this review, the stabilizing effect, role of stabilizers in final nanocrystalline formulations, challenges in reaching in vitro–in vivo correlation with nanocrystalline products, and stabilizers’ effect on higher bioavailability are discussed. PMID:27213435

  10. Effect of radioprotective agents on X-ray cataracts

    SciTech Connect

    Reddy, V.N.; Ikebe, H.; Giblin, F.J.; Clark, J.I.; Livesey, J.C. )

    1989-01-01

    The effect of some protective agents on cataract development is briefly reviewed and new evidence is presented on the efficacy of a phosphorothioate compound (Amifostine) in inhibiting the development of X-ray-induced cataract. Morphological studies showed that at the end of 4 months, lenses from X-irradiated rats which had not received any drugs showed liquefaction in the equatorial region and at the posterior pole, as well as a marked swelling of the fibers in the anterior cortex. Animals which received 1.16g/kg of WR77913 showed considerable protection against the development of radiation induced cataracts with morphological changes in the lens being less severe than in animals receiving no drugs. When animals were treated with 0.5g/kg of Amifostine (WR2721) the lenses showed much greater protection against cataract development than with WR77913. Amifostine appears to be more effective than WR77913 in inhibiting X-ray-induced cataract development. 20 refs.

  11. The effects of three different desensitizing agents on the shear bond strength of composite resin bonding agents.

    PubMed

    Zorba, Yahya Orcun; Erdemir, Ali; Ercan, Ertugrul; Eldeniz, Ayce Unverdi; Kalaycioglu, Baris; Ulker, Mustafa

    2010-07-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of three desensitizing agents on the shear bond strengths of four different bonding agents used to bond composite resin to dentin. A total of 160 extracted human molars were sectioned parallel to the occlusal plane under water cooling, polished and randomly divided into 4 groups of 40. Each group was treated with a different desensitizing agent (Tooth Mousse, Ultra-EZ, Cervitec Plus), except for an untreated control group. Each group was then randomly subdivided into 4 groups of 10, and a different dentin bonding agent (XP Bond, AdheSE, Adper Prompt L-pop, GBond) was applied to each group in order to bond the specimens to a resin composite (Gradia Direct) built up using a plastic apparatus. A Universal Testing Machine was used to measure the shear bond strength of each specimen. Statistical analysis was performed using one-way ANOVA and Tukey's tests. With the exception of the Control/AdheSE and Ultra-EZ/XP Bond groups, no statistically significant differences were found in the shear bond strength values of the groups tested. These findings suggest that the use of different desensitizing agents does not affect the shear bond strength of various adhesive systems used to bond resin composite to dentin. PMID:20416554

  12. Correlation between radioactivity and chemotherapeutics of the 111In-VNB-liposome in pharmacokinetics and biodistribution in rats

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Wen-Chuan; Chang, Chih-Hsien; Huang, Chih-Min; Wu, Yu-Tse; Chen, Liang-Cheng; Ho, Chung-Li; Chang, Tsui-Jung; Lee, Te-Wei; Tsai, Tung-Hu

    2012-01-01

    Background The combination of a radioisotope with a chemotherapeutic agent in a liposomal carrier (ie, Indium-111-labeled polyethylene glycol pegylated liposomal vinorelbine, [111In-VNB-liposome]) has been reported to show better therapeutic efficiency in tumor growth suppression. Nevertheless, the challenge remains as to whether this therapeutic effect is attributable to the combination of a radioisotope with chemotherapeutics. The goal of this study was to investigate the pharmacokinetics, biodistribution, and correlation of Indium-111 radioactivity and vinorelbine concentration in the 111In-VNB-liposome. Methods The VNB-liposome and 111In-VNB-liposome were administered to rats. Blood, liver, and spleen tissue were collected to determine the distribution profile of the 111In-VNB-liposome. A liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry system and gamma counter were used to analyze the concentration of vinorelbine and radioactivity of Indium-111. Results High uptake of the 111In-VNB-liposome in the liver and spleen demonstrated the properties of a nanosized drug delivery system. Linear regression showed a good correlation (r = 0.97) between Indium-111 radioactivity and vinorelbine concentration in the plasma of rats administered the 111In-VNB-liposome. Conclusion A significant positive correlation between the pharmacokinetics and biodistribution of 111Indium radioactivity and vinorelbine in blood, spleen, and liver was found following administration of the 111In-VNB-liposome. The liposome efficiently encapsulated both vinorelbine and Indium-111, and showed a similar concentration-radioactivity time profile, indicating the correlation between chemotherapy and radiotherapy could be identical in the liposomal formulation. PMID:22359447

  13. Novel Resveratrol and 5-Fluorouracil Coencapsulated in PEGylated Nanoliposomes Improve Chemotherapeutic Efficacy of Combination against Head and Neck Squamous Cell Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Sethuraman, Swaminathan

    2014-01-01

    Increasing consumption of tobacco and alcohol has led to a steady increase in the incidence of head and neck cancers in Asia. The drawbacks associated with the existing chemotherapeutic and surgical interventions have necessitated the development of a safer alternative for therapy of head and neck cancers. In this study we have explored the synergistic therapeutic potential of a phytochemical and chemotherapeutic agent using PEGylated liposomes as a delivery vehicle. Resveratrol and 5-fluorouracil were successfully coencapsulated in a single PEGylated nanoliposome. The thermal analysis and the nuclear magnetic resonance results revealed that resveratrol localized near the glycerol backbone of the liposomal membrane while 5-fluorouracil localized closer to the phosphate moiety, which influenced the release kinetics of both drugs. The nanoformulation was tested in vitro on a head and neck cancer cell line NT8e and was found to exhibit a GI50 similar to that of free 5-fluorouracil. Further, gene expression studies showed that the combination of resveratrol and 5-fluorouracil exhibited different effects on different genes that may influence the net antagonistic effect. The coencapsulation of resveratrol and 5-fluorouracil in a liposomal nanocarrier improved the cytotoxicity in comparison with the free drug combination when tested in vitro. PMID:25114900

  14. Antibody–drug conjugates as novel anti-cancer chemotherapeutics

    PubMed Central

    Peters, Christina; Brown, Stuart

    2015-01-01

    Over the past couple of decades, antibody–drug conjugates (ADCs) have revolutionized the field of cancer chemotherapy. Unlike conventional treatments that damage healthy tissues upon dose escalation, ADCs utilize monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) to specifically bind tumour-associated target antigens and deliver a highly potent cytotoxic agent. The synergistic combination of mAbs conjugated to small-molecule chemotherapeutics, via a stable linker, has given rise to an extremely efficacious class of anti-cancer drugs with an already large and rapidly growing clinical pipeline. The primary objective of this paper is to review current knowledge and latest developments in the field of ADCs. Upon intravenous administration, ADCs bind to their target antigens and are internalized through receptor-mediated endocytosis. This facilitates the subsequent release of the cytotoxin, which eventually leads to apoptotic cell death of the cancer cell. The three components of ADCs (mAb, linker and cytotoxin) affect the efficacy and toxicity of the conjugate. Optimizing each one, while enhancing the functionality of the ADC as a whole, has been one of the major considerations of ADC design and development. In addition to these, the choice of clinically relevant targets and the position and number of linkages have also been the key determinants of ADC efficacy. The only marketed ADCs, brentuximab vedotin and trastuzumab emtansine (T-DM1), have demonstrated their use against both haematological and solid malignancies respectively. The success of future ADCs relies on improving target selection, increasing cytotoxin potency, developing innovative linkers and overcoming drug resistance. As more research is conducted to tackle these issues, ADCs are likely to become part of the future of targeted cancer therapeutics. PMID:26182432

  15. Chemotherapeutic efficiency of drugs in vitro: Comparison of doxorubicin exposure in 3D and 2D culture matrices.

    PubMed

    Casey, A; Gargotti, M; Bonnier, F; Byrne, H J

    2016-06-01

    The interest in the use of 3D matrices for in vitro analysis, with a view to increasing the relevance of in vitro studies and reducing the dependence on in vivo studies, has been growing in recent years. Cells grown in a 3D in vitro matrix environment have been reported to exhibit significantly different properties to those in a conventional 2D culture environment. However, comparison of 2D and 3D cell culture models have recently been noted to result in differing responses of cytotoxic assays, without any associated change in viability. The effect was attributed to differing conversion rates and effective concentrations of the resazurin assay in 2D and 3D environments, rather than differences in cellular metabolism. In this study, the efficacy of a chemotherapeutic agent, doxorubicin, is monitored and compared in conventional 2D and 3D collagen gel exposures of immortalized human cervical cells. Viability was monitored with the aid of the Alamar Blue assay and drug internalisation was verified using confocal microscopy. Drug uptake and retention within the collagen matrix was monitored by absorption spectroscopy. The viability studies showed apparent differences between the 2D and 3D culture systems, the differences attributed in part to the physical transition from 2D to a 3D environment causing alterations to dye resazurin uptake and conversion rates. The use of 3D culture matrices has widely been interpreted to result in "reduced" toxicity or cellular "resistance" to the chemotherapeutic agent. The results of this study show that the reduced efficiency of the drug to cells grown in the 3D environment can be accounted for by a sequential reduction of the effective concentration of the test compound and assay. This is due to absorption within the collagen gel inducing a higher uptake of both drug and assay thereby influencing the toxic impact of the drug and conversion rate of resazurin, and. The increased effective surface area of the cell exposed to the drug

  16. Tricyclic Neovibsanin Scaffold (TCNS) as an Effective Antidepressant Agent.

    PubMed

    Qiao, D-D; Mi, G-L; Tang, M-Q

    2016-02-01

    Neovibsanin type natural products were found to display neurite outgrowth activity in PC12 cells. This suggests that such type of compounds could be promising candidates for the development of novel therapeutic agents to treat neurological diseases. In the present study rats after chronic mild stress (CMS) were treated with tricyclic neovibsanin scaffold (TCNS) to study its effect on depression. The results revealed that 15 mg/kg doses of TCNS reduced the duration of immobility in CMS model of depression. It led to a significant increase in neurite outgrowths which increased the synaptic and structural plasticity of neurons. Treatment with TCNS decreased the levels of MAO-A and caspase-3 expression both of which were found to be higher in CMS. TCNS also led to an increase in expression of heat shock protein 70 (Hsp70) in the hippocampus. These findings suggest that TCNS possesses antidepressant activity in CMS model of depression. Therefore the relief in depression by TCNS may be due to suppression of MAO-A expression and the apoptosis cascade by increased expression of Hsp70. PMID:25823508

  17. The effect of fluorescent whitening agent on hunter camouflage clothing.

    PubMed

    Beckner, D; Roth, N; Yolton, R L

    1993-05-01

    Fluorescent whitening agents (FWAs) are chemicals added to most fabrics and papers during manufacture to increase color temperature, "whiteness," and "brightness." FWAs accomplish this by absorbing energy in the ultraviolet (UV) part of the spectrum and emitting it as visible blue light. Recently, hunters have become concerned that FWA could be reducing the effectiveness of their camouflage clothing. As a result, some manufacturers have begun making their camouflage clothing (camo) without FWA, and a spray-on product has been introduced to block the action of FWA. Radiometric spectra from camo and foliage samples suggest, however, that these concerns might not be fully justified. Under full sun and in the shade, spectra from 300 to 500 nanometers (nm) (i.e., UV and visible blue light) showed that camo samples containing FWA matched the foliage reasonably well. No evidence of a major problem caused by the FWA was detected, and no significant need for the use of UV absorbing dyes to block the action of FWA was found. PMID:8320420

  18. Non-cancer effects of chemical agents on children's health.

    PubMed

    Röösli, Martin

    2011-12-01

    This paper provides an overview about the non-cancer health effects for children from relevant chemical agents in our environment. In addition, a meta-analysis was conducted on the association between sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS) and maternal smoking during pregnancy as well as postnatal exposure to environmental tobacco smoke (ETS). In children, birth deformities, neurodevelopment, reproductive outcomes and respiratory system are mainly affected by chemical exposures. According to recent systematic reviews, evidence is sufficient for cognitive impairments caused by low lead exposure levels. Evidence for neurotoxicity from prenatal methylmercury exposure is sufficient for high exposure levels and limited for low levels. Prenatal exposure to polychlorinated biphenyls (PCB) and related toxicants results in cognitive and motor deficits. Maternal smoking during pregnancy is a risk factor for preterm birth, foetal growth deficit and SIDS. The meta-analytic pooled risk estimate for SIDS based on 15 studies is 2.94 (95% confidence interval: 2.43-3.57). Postnatal exposure to ETS was found to increase the SIDS risk by a factor of 1.72 (95% CI: 1.28-2.30) based on six studies which took into account maternal smoking during pregnancy. Additionally, postnatal ETS exposure causes acute respiratory infections, ear problems, respiratory symptoms, more severe asthma, and it slows lung growth. These health effects are also of concern for postnatal exposure to ambient and indoor air pollution. Children differ from adults with respect to several aspects which are relevant for assessing their health risk. Thus, independent evaluation of toxicity in childhood populations is essential. PMID:21906619

  19. Nanostructured Lipid Carriers: A Novel Platform for Chemotherapeutics.

    PubMed

    Rizwanullah, Md; Ahmad, Javed; Amin, Saima

    2016-01-01

    Cancer is a disease manifested as abnormal cells division without control. If it is not detected and cured very timely, it can invade other healthy tissues resulting in metastasis. Chemotherapy is the first line treatment for cancer, but due to lack of specificity of most of the anticancer drugs, is associated with side effects that affect the quality of life. Nanostructured lipid carriers (NLC) are one of the promising nano-carriers for the development of effective targeted therapies for cancer chemotherapeutics. These bio-compatible and/or bio-degradable lipids based nanoparticles are composed of solid and liquid lipids as a core matrix dispersed in surfactant solution. NLC improve the aqueous solubility of most of the hydrophobic cancer therapeutics. Their surface modification can be used for overcoming drug resistance in cancer chemotherapy, to achieve site specific targeting for better efficacy and reduced dose related toxicity. The present review is an attempt to contemplate their pharmaceutical, biopharmaceutical aspects and application in cell targeting, gene delivery and in theranostics. PMID:26279117

  20. Chronic chemotherapeutic stress promotes evolution of stemness and WNT/beta-catenin signaling in colorectal cancer cells: implications for clinical use of WNT-signaling inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Ayadi, Meriam; Bouygues, Anaïs; Ouaret, Djamila; Ferrand, Nathalie; Chouaib, Salem; Thiery, Jean-Paul; Muchardt, Christian; Sabbah, Michèle; Larsen, Annette K

    2015-01-01

    Most solid tumors contain a subfraction of cells with stem/progenitor cell features. Stem cells are naturally chemoresistant suggesting that chronic chemotherapeutic stress may select for cells with increased “stemness”. We carried out a comprehensive molecular and functional analysis of six independently selected colorectal cancer (CRC) cell lines with acquired resistance to three different chemotherapeutic agents derived from two distinct parental cell lines. Chronic drug exposure resulted in complex alterations of stem cell markers that could be classified into three categories: 1) one cell line, HT-29/5-FU, showed increased “stemness” and WNT-signaling, 2) three cell lines showed decreased expression of stem cell markers, decreased aldehyde dehydrogenase activity, attenuated WNT-signaling and lost the capacity to form colonospheres and 3) two cell lines displayed prominent expression of ABC transporters with a heterogeneous response for stem cell markers. While WNT-signaling could be attenuated in the HT-29/5-FU cells by the WNT-signaling inhibitors ICG-001 and PKF-118, this was not accompanied by any selective growth inhibitory effect suggesting that the cytotoxic activity of these compounds is not directly linked to WNT-signaling inhibition. We conclude that classical WNT-signaling inhibitors have toxic off-target activities that need to be addressed for clinical development. PMID:26041882

  1. Chronic chemotherapeutic stress promotes evolution of stemness and WNT/beta-catenin signaling in colorectal cancer cells: implications for clinical use of WNT-signaling inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Ayadi, Meriam; Bouygues, Anaïs; Ouaret, Djamila; Ferrand, Nathalie; Chouaib, Salem; Thiery, Jean-Paul; Muchardt, Christian; Sabbah, Michèle; Larsen, Annette K

    2015-07-30

    Most solid tumors contain a subfraction of cells with stem/progenitor cell features. Stem cells are naturally chemoresistant suggesting that chronic chemotherapeutic stress may select for cells with increased "stemness". We carried out a comprehensive molecular and functional analysis of six independently selected colorectal cancer (CRC) cell lines with acquired resistance to three different chemotherapeutic agents derived from two distinct parental cell lines. Chronic drug exposure resulted in complex alterations of stem cell markers that could be classified into three categories: 1) one cell line, HT-29/5-FU, showed increased "stemness" and WNT-signaling, 2) three cell lines showed decreased expression of stem cell markers, decreased aldehyde dehydrogenase activity, attenuated WNT-signaling and lost the capacity to form colonospheres and 3) two cell lines displayed prominent expression of ABC transporters with a heterogeneous response for stem cell markers. While WNT-signaling could be attenuated in the HT-29/5-FU cells by the WNT-signaling inhibitors ICG-001 and PKF-118, this was not accompanied by any selective growth inhibitory effect suggesting that the cytotoxic activity of these compounds is not directly linked to WNT-signaling inhibition. We conclude that classical WNT-signaling inhibitors have toxic off-target activities that need to be addressed for clinical development. PMID:26041882

  2. Chemotherapy-induced pulmonary hypertension: role of alkylating agents.

    PubMed

    Ranchoux, Benoît; Günther, Sven; Quarck, Rozenn; Chaumais, Marie-Camille; Dorfmüller, Peter; Antigny, Fabrice; Dumas, Sébastien J; Raymond, Nicolas; Lau, Edmund; Savale, Laurent; Jaïs, Xavier; Sitbon, Olivier; Simonneau, Gérald; Stenmark, Kurt; Cohen-Kaminsky, Sylvia; Humbert, Marc; Montani, David; Perros, Frédéric

    2015-02-01

    Pulmonary veno-occlusive disease (PVOD) is an uncommon form of pulmonary hypertension (PH) characterized by progressive obstruction of small pulmonary veins and a dismal prognosis. Limited case series have reported a possible association between different chemotherapeutic agents and PVOD. We evaluated the relationship between chemotherapeutic agents and PVOD. Cases of chemotherapy-induced PVOD from the French PH network and literature were reviewed. Consequences of chemotherapy exposure on the pulmonary vasculature and hemodynamics were investigated in three different animal models (mouse, rat, and rabbit). Thirty-seven cases of chemotherapy-associated PVOD were identified in the French PH network and systematic literature analysis. Exposure to alkylating agents was observed in 83.8% of cases, mostly represented by cyclophosphamide (43.2%). In three different animal models, cyclophosphamide was able to induce PH on the basis of hemodynamic, morphological, and biological parameters. In these models, histopathological assessment confirmed significant pulmonary venous involvement highly suggestive of PVOD. Together, clinical data and animal models demonstrated a plausible cause-effect relationship between alkylating agents and PVOD. Clinicians should be aware of this uncommon, but severe, pulmonary vascular complication of alkylating agents. PMID:25497573

  3. PTCH-1 and MDM2 expression in ameloblastoma from a West African sub-population: implication for chemotherapeutics

    PubMed Central

    Udeabor, Samuel Ebele; Adisa, Akinyele Olumuyiwa; Lawal, Ahmed Oluwatoyin; Barbeck, Mike; Booms, Patrick; Sader, Robert Alexander; Ghanaati, Shahram

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Ameloblastoma is a slow growing, painless odontogenic swelling which can attain sizes that result in severe deformities of the craniofacial complex. It is the most commonly encountered odontogenic tumor in Nigeria. Surgical intervention is currently the method of treatment; however identification of altered molecular pathways may inform chemotherapeutic potential. The Protein Patched homolog 1 (PTCH-1) is overexpressed in ameloblastoma. Also, mutation in the MDM2 gene can reduce the tumor suppressor function of p53 and promote ameloblastoma growth. No study however has characterized the molecular profile of African cases of ameloblastoma with a view to developing chemotherapeutic alternatives. The objective was to characterize the PTCH-1 genetic profile of Ameloblastoma in Nigerian patients as a first step in investigating its potential for chemotherapeutic intervention. Methods Twenty-eight FFPE blocks of ameloblastoma cases from Nigerian patients were prepared for antibody processing to PTCH-1 (Polyclonal Anti-PTCH antibody ab39266) and MDM2 (Monoclonal Anti-MDM2 antibody (2A10) ab16895). Cytoplasmic brown staining was considered as positive for PTCH while nuclear staining was positive for MDM2. Results Moderate and strong expressions for PTCH in ameloblast and stellate reticulum were 78.6% and 60.7% respectively. Only 3 (10.7%) cases expressed MDM2. Conclusion The importance of our study is that it supports, in theory, anti-PTCH/SHH chemotherapeutics for Nigerian ameloblastoma cases and also infers the possible additional use of anti-p53 agents. PMID:27386018

  4. Effective Team Support: From Modeling to Software Agents

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Remington, Roger W. (Technical Monitor); John, Bonnie; Sycara, Katia

    2003-01-01

    The purpose of this research contract was to perform multidisciplinary research between CMU psychologists, computer scientists and engineers and NASA researchers to design a next generation collaborative system to support a team of human experts and intelligent agents. To achieve robust performance enhancement of such a system, we had proposed to perform task and cognitive modeling to thoroughly understand the impact technology makes on the organization and on key individual personnel. Guided by cognitively-inspired requirements, we would then develop software agents that support the human team in decision making, information filtering, information distribution and integration to enhance team situational awareness. During the period covered by this final report, we made substantial progress in modeling infrastructure and task infrastructure. Work is continuing under a different contract to complete empirical data collection, cognitive modeling, and the building of software agents to support the teams task.

  5. Enhanced delivery of the RAPTA-C macromolecular chemotherapeutic by conjugation to degradable polymeric micelles.

    PubMed

    Blunden, Bianca M; Lu, Hongxu; Stenzel, Martina H

    2013-12-01

    Macromolecular ruthenium complexes are a promising avenue to better and more selective chemotherapeutics. We have previously shown that RAPTA-C [RuCl2(p-cymene)(PTA)], with the water-soluble 1,3,5-phosphaadamantane (PTA) ligand, could be attached to a polymer moiety via nucleophilic substitution of an available iodide with an amide in the PTA ligand. To increase the cell uptake of this macromolecule, we designed an amphiphilic block copolymer capable of self-assembling into polymeric micelles. The block copolymer was prepared by ring-opening polymerization of d,l-lactide (3,6-dimethyl-1,4-dioxane-2,5-dione) using a RAFT agent with an additional hydroxyl functionality, followed by the RAFT copolymerization of 2-hydroxyethyl acrylate (HEA) and 2-chloroethyl methacrylate (CEMA). The Finkelstein reaction and reaction with PTA led to polymers that can readily react with the dimer of RuCl2(p-cymene) to create a macromolecular RAPTA-C drug. RAPTA-C conjugation, micellization, and subsequent cytotoxicity and cell uptake of these polymeric moieties was tested on ovarian cancer A2780, A2780cis, and Ovcar-3 cell lines. Confocal microscopy images confirmed cell uptake of the micelles into the lysosome of the cells, indicative of an endocytic pathway. On average, a 10-fold increase in toxicity was found for the macromolecular drugs when compared to the RAPTA-C molecule. Furthermore, the cell uptake of ruthenium was analyzed and a significant increase was found for the micelles compared to RAPTA-C. Notably, micelles prepared from the polymer containing fewer HEA units had the highest cytotoxicity, the best cell uptake of ruthenium and were highly effective in suppressing the colony-forming ability of cells. PMID:24266669

  6. Effect of the capping agents on cobalt nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sciortino, L.; Longo, A.; Giannici, F.; Martorana, A.

    2009-11-01

    The achievement of high information density and fast recording rate in memory devices crucially depends on the structure of magnetic domains. In this paper cobalt nanoparticles are synthesised using two capping agents (TOA, ODA) and two different preparation routes: thermal decomposition (TD) and Solvated Metal Atom Dispersion (SMAD). The interaction of capping agents with free metal clusters and their influence on Co nanoparticles size, atomic structure and oxidation state is investigated by means of X-ray diffraction and X-ray absorption spectroscopy.

  7. The effect of alkylating agents on model supported metal clusters

    SciTech Connect

    Erdem-Senatalar, A.; Blackmond, D.G.; Wender, I. . Dept. of Chemical and Petroleum Engineering); Oukaci, R. )

    1988-01-01

    Interactions between model supported metal clusters and alkylating agents were studied in an effort to understand a novel chemical trapping technique developed for identifying species adsorbed on catalyst surfaces. It was found that these interactions are more complex than had previously been suggested. Studies were completed using deuterium-labeled dimethyl sulfate (DMS), (CH{sub 3}){sub 2}SO{sub 4}, as a trapping agent to interact with the supported metal cluster ethylidyne tricobalt enneacarbonyl. Results showed that oxygenated products formed during the trapping reaction contained {minus}OCD{sub 3} groups from the DMS, indicating that the interaction was not a simple alkylation. 18 refs., 1 fig., 3 tabs.

  8. An embodiment effect in computer-based learning with animated pedagogical agents.

    PubMed

    Mayer, Richard E; DaPra, C Scott

    2012-09-01

    How do social cues such as gesturing, facial expression, eye gaze, and human-like movement affect multimedia learning with onscreen agents? To help address this question, students were asked to twice view a 4-min narrated presentation on how solar cells work in which the screen showed an animated pedagogical agent standing to the left of 11 successive slides. Across three experiments, learners performed better on a transfer test when a human-voiced agent displayed human-like gestures, facial expression, eye gaze, and body movement than when the agent did not, yielding an embodiment effect. In Experiment 2 the embodiment effect was found when the agent spoke in a human voice but not in a machine voice. In Experiment 3, the embodiment effect was found both when students were told the onscreen agent was consistent with their choice of agent characteristics and when inconsistent. Students who viewed a highly embodied agent also rated the social attributes of the agent more positively than did students who viewed a nongesturing agent. The results are explained by social agency theory, in which social cues in a multimedia message prime a feeling of social partnership in the learner, which leads to deeper cognitive processing during learning, and results in a more meaningful learning outcome as reflected in transfer test performance. PMID:22642688

  9. Effects of chelating agents on protein, oil, fatty acid amd seed mineral concentrations in soybean

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Soybean seed is a major source of protein and oil for human diet. Since not much information is available on the effects of chelating agents on soybean seed composition constituents, the current study aimed to investigate the effects of various chelating agents on soybean [(Glycine max (L.) Merr.)] ...

  10. Agent Orange exposure and attributed health effects in Vietnam veterans.

    PubMed

    Young, Alvin L; Cecil, Paul F

    2011-07-01

    Serum dioxin studies of Vietnam (VN) veterans, military historical records of tactical herbicide use in Vietnam, and the compelling evidence of the photodegradation of 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD) and other aspects of environmental fate and low bioavailability of TCDD are consistent with few, if any, ground troop veterans being exposed to Agent Orange. That conclusion, however, is contrary to the presumption by the Department of Veterans Affairs (DVA) that military service in Vietnam anytime from January 9, 1962 to May 7, 1975 is a proxy for exposure to Agent Orange. The DVA assumption is inconsistent with the scientific principles governing determinations of disease causation. The DVA has nonetheless awarded Agent Orange-related benefits and compensation to an increasing number of VN veterans based on the presumption of exposure and the published findings of the Institute of Medicine that there is sufficient evidence of a "statistical association" (a less stringent standard than "causal relationship") between exposure to tactical herbicides or TCDD and 15 different human diseases. A fairer and more valid approach for VN veterans would have been to enact a program of "Vietnam experience" benefits for those seriously ill, rather than benefits based on the dubious premise of injuries caused by Agent Orange. PMID:21916327

  11. Effects of ultrasound and ultrasound contrast agent on vascular tissue

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Ultrasound (US) imaging can be enhanced using gas-filled microbubble contrast agents. Strong echo signals are induced at the tissue-gas interface following microbubble collapse. Applications include assessment of ventricular function and virtual histology. Aim While ultrasound and US contrast agents are widely used, their impact on the physiological response of vascular tissue to vasoactive agents has not been investigated in detail. Methods and results In the present study, rat dorsal aortas were treated with US via a clinical imaging transducer in the presence or absence of the US contrast agent, Optison. Aortas treated with both US and Optison were unable to contract in response to phenylephrine or to relax in the presence of acetylcholine. Histology of the arteries was unremarkable. When the treated aortas were stained for endothelial markers, a distinct loss of endothelium was observed. Importantly, terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase mediated dUTP nick-end-labeling (TUNEL) staining of treated aortas demonstrated incipient apoptosis in the endothelium. Conclusions Taken together, these ex vivo results suggest that the combination of US and Optison may alter arterial integrity and promote vascular injury; however, the in vivo interaction of Optison and ultrasound remains an open question. PMID:22805356

  12. Effect of fungicides and of biocontrol agents against powdery mildew of turnip.

    PubMed

    Gilardi, G; Gullino, M L; Garibaldi, A

    2008-01-01

    The activity of several fungicides and of two biocontrol agents, Bacillus subtilis and Ampelomyces quisqualis, alone and in combination, against Erysiphe cruciferarum, causal agent of powdery mildew, was evaluated on turnip under controlled conditions. Among the tested fungicides, quinoxyfen and azoxystrobin provided the best disease control, followed by penconazole, myclobutanil, dinocap and meptyldinocap. Sulphur provided a only partial control. The two biocontrol agents used alone provided a only partial disease control, with B. subtilis being generally more effective. The mixture B. subtilis + azoxystrobin was very effective and generally more active than the two components applied alone. The possibility of introducing biocontrol agents into IPM is discussed. PMID:19226738

  13. Vascular effects induced by anti-VEGF agents in the CAM model: effect of the DMSO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nowak-Sliwinska, Patrycja; Ballini, Jean-Pierre; van den Bergh, Hubert; Wagnières, Georges

    2009-06-01

    The chicken embryo's chorioallantoic membrane (CAM) is widely used as an in vivo model to study the vascular effects induced by agents administrated topically or intravenously. Hence, in the vascular plexus of this respiratory membrane, angiogenic and anti-angiogenic agents, as well as phototoxic effects have been studied. The main goal of this study was to characterize the capillary network of the CAM after topical administration of dimethyl sulfoxid (DMSO), a frequently used solvent of lipophylic drugs, including potent anti-VEGF agents. The CAM capillaries were observed between days 8 and 9 of the embryo development, with an epi-fluorescence microscope equipped with a sensitive camera by intravenous injection of a fluorescent agent and a non-fluorescing absorber (in the extra-embryonic cavity) to screen the tissue background fluorescence. The fluorescence images of the CAM vasculature were then processed in order to obtain a skeleton of the vessels and capillaries. This was done to quantify descriptors such as the number of branching points/mm2, the mean area value of the vessels network meshes, and the mean of the 3rd quartile of the histogram of these meshes, were then extracted. Our results demonstrate that the topical administration of an aqueous solution of 20 μl of DMSO at concentrations equal or larger than 0.1% turned out to modify the capillary network morphology in a dose-dependent manner as compared to the control (20 μl of 0.9% NaCl).

  14. Huntington's disease: effect of cysteamine, a somatostatin-depleting agent.

    PubMed

    Shults, C; Steardo, L; Barone, P; Mohr, E; Juncos, J; Serrati, C; Fedio, P; Tamminga, C A; Chase, T N

    1986-08-01

    Somatostatin levels in the basal ganglia are elevated in Huntington's disease. A controlled therapeutic trial of the somatostatin-depleting agent, cysteamine, was therefore conducted in five patients, including one with the rigid-akinetic form. Maximum tolerated dosage for 2 weeks produced no consistent change in extrapyramidal or dementia scores. Somatostatin concentrations were not significantly altered in plasma or CSF. Growth hormone levels, on the other hand, more than doubled, suggesting a functionally significant decrease in central somatostatin levels. PMID:2874527

  15. Effect of Fluoropolymer Antidripping Agent on Rheological Behavior of LLDPE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Obr, Aleš; Zatloukal, Martin

    2011-07-01

    In this work, high molecular weight polytetrafluoroethylene based antidripping agent was blended with Ziegler-Natta based LLDPE in different concentrations. Rheological characterization was consequently performed for all the blends and the obtained results were compared with the pure LLDPE. It has been found that high molecular weight PTFE based melt modifier MM 5935 EF significantly enhancing the shear viscosity/elasticity and especially the extensional viscosity of the LLDPE melt.

  16. Engineering novel targeted nanoparticle formulations to increase the therapeutic efficacy of conventional chemotherapeutics against multiple myeloma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ashley, Jonathan D.

    Multiple myeloma (MM) is a hematological malignancy which results from the uncontrolled clonal expansion of plasma cells within the body. Despite recent medical advances, this disease remains largely incurable, with a median survival of ˜7 years, owing to the development of drug resistance. This dissertation will explore new advances in nanotechnology that will combine the cytotoxic effects of small molecule chemotherapeutics with the tumor targeting capabilities of nanoparticles to create novel nanoparticle formulations that exhibit enhanced therapeutic indices in the treatment of MM. First, doxorubicin was surfaced conjugated onto micellar nanoparticles via an acid labile hydrazone bond to increase the drug accumulation at the tumor. The cell surface receptor Very Late Antigen-4 (VLA-4; alpha4beta1) is expressed on cancers of hematopoietic origin and plays a vital role in the cell adhesion mediated drug resistance (CAM-DR) in MM. Therefore, VLA-4 antagonist peptides were conjugated onto the nanoparticles via a multifaceted procedure to actively target MM cells and simultaneously inhibit CAM-DR. The micellar doxorubicin nanoparticles were able to overcome CAM-DR and demonstrated improved therapeutic index relative to free doxorubicin. In addition to doxorubicin, other classes of therapeutic agents, such as proteasome inhibitors, can be incorporated in nanoparticles for improved therapeutic outcomes. Utilizing boronic acid chemistry, bortezomib prodrugs were synthesized using a reversible boronic ester bond and then incorporated into liposomes. The different boronic ester bonds that could be potentially used in the synthesis of bortezomib prodrugs were screened based on stability using isobutylboronic acid. The liposomal bortezomib nanoparticles demonstrated significant proteasome inhibition and cytotoxicity in MM cells in vitro, and dramatically reduced the non-specific toxicities associated with free bortezomib while maintaining significant tumor growth

  17. Dipeptidyl Peptidase IV as a Potential Target for Selective Prodrug Activation and Chemotherapeutic Action in Cancers

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    The efficacy of chemotherapeutic drugs is often offset by severe side effects attributable to poor selectivity and toxicity to normal cells. Recently, the enzyme dipeptidyl peptidase IV (DPPIV) was considered as a potential target for the delivery of chemotherapeutic drugs. The purpose of this study was to investigate the feasibility of targeting chemotherapeutic drugs to DPPIV as a strategy to enhance their specificity. The expression profile of DPPIV was obtained for seven cancer cell lines using DNA microarray data from the DTP database, and was validated by RT-PCR. A prodrug was then synthesized by linking the cytotoxic drug melphalan to a proline-glycine dipeptide moiety, followed by hydrolysis studies in the seven cell lines with a standard substrate, as well as the glycyl-prolyl-melphalan (GP-Mel). Lastly, cell proliferation studies were carried out to demonstrate enzyme-dependent activation of the candidate prodrug. The relative RT-PCR expression levels of DPPIV in the cancer cell lines exhibited linear correlation with U95Av2 Affymetrix data (r2 = 0.94), and with specific activity of a standard substrate, glycine-proline-p-nitroanilide (r2 = 0.96). The significantly higher antiproliferative activity of GP-Mel in Caco-2 cells (GI50 = 261 μM) compared to that in SK-MEL-5 cells (GI50 = 807 μM) was consistent with the 9-fold higher specific activity of the prodrug in Caco-2 cells (5.14 pmol/min/μg protein) compared to SK-MEL-5 cells (0.68 pmol/min/μg protein) and with DPPIV expression levels in these cells. Our results demonstrate the great potential to exploit DPPIV as a prodrug activating enzyme for efficient chemotherapeutic drug targeting. PMID:25365774

  18. Barriers and Effective Educational Strategies to Develop Extension Agents' Professional Competencies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lakai, Dona; Jayaratne, K. S. U.; Moore, Gary E.; Kistler, Mark J.

    2012-01-01

    The study reported here determined the barriers and effective educational strategies to develop Extension agents' professional competencies. This was a descriptive survey research conducted with a random sample of Extension agents. Increased workload and lack of time and funding were identified as the most constraining barriers of Extension…

  19. Lapse of time effects on tax evasion in an agent-based econophysics model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seibold, Götz; Pickhardt, Michael

    2013-05-01

    We investigate an inhomogeneous Ising model in the context of tax evasion dynamics where different types of agents are parameterized via local temperatures and magnetic fields. In particular, we analyze the impact of lapse of time effects (i.e. backauditing) and endogenously determined penalty rates on tax compliance. Both features contribute to a microfoundation of agent-based econophysics models of tax evasion.

  20. EVALUATION OF LABORATORY TESTS TO DETERMINE THE EFFECTIVENESS OF CHEMICAL SURFACE WASHING AGENTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    When spilled oil reaches a shoreline, it coats a myriad of surfaces. n many cases, chemical agents are used to clean the shoreline substrates, with varying degrees of effectiveness. oth dispersants and surface washing agents have been used. n this study, the Environmental Protect...

  1. Effects of Cueing by a Pedagogical Agent in an Instructional Animation: A Cognitive Load Approach

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yung, Hsin I.; Paas, Fred

    2015-01-01

    This study investigated the effects of a pedagogical agent that cued relevant information in a story-based instructional animation on the cardiovascular system. Based on cognitive load theory, it was expected that the experimental condition with the pedagogical agent would facilitate students to distinguish between relevant and irrelevant…

  2. The over-expression of survivin enhances the chemotherapeutic efficacy of YM155 in human hepatocellular carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Xia, Hongping; Chen, Jianxiang; Shi, Ming; Deivasigamani, Amudha; Ooi, London Lucien P J; Hui, Kam M

    2015-03-20

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is the second leading cause of cancer-related deaths worldwide. The inability of chemotherapeutic drugs to selectively target HCC tumor cells because of their predominant resistant phenotype to most conventional anticancer agents bestows a major obstacle for the clinical management of HCC. In this report, we have examined and demonstrated the remarkable heterogeneity of expression of survivin and its phosphorylated active form (p-survivin) in HCC patients' tissues and cell lines. Furthermore, the expression of survivin and p-survivin in HCC cell lines was found to be associated with response to the small-molecule survivin suppressant YM155. Therefore, in the HCC cell lines that express elevated level of survivin and p-survivin, YM155 efficiently inhibited their proliferation, induced cell cycle arrest and apoptosis resulting in DNA damage through the dysregulation of cell-cycle checkpoint-related regulatory genes. Importantly, YM155 yielded significantly better therapeutic effect than sorafenib when tested in an orthotopic mouse model using patient-derived HCC xenografts with elevated survivin and p-survivin expression. Our results clearly demonstrated that the level of survivin and p-survivin expression could serve as molecular predictive biomarkers to select potential YM155-responsive patients, in a move towards delivering precision medicine for HCC patients. PMID:25714025

  3. Validation of N-myristoyltransferase as Potential Chemotherapeutic Target in Mammal-Dwelling Stages of Trypanosoma cruzi

    PubMed Central

    Herrera, Linda J.; Brand, Stephen; Santos, Andres; Nohara, Lilian L.; Harrison, Justin; Norcross, Neil R.; Thompson, Stephen; Smith, Victoria; Lema, Carolina; Varela-Ramirez, Armando; Gilbert, Ian H.; Almeida, Igor C.; Maldonado, Rosa A.

    2016-01-01

    Background Trypanosoma cruzi causes Chagas disease, an endemic and debilitating illness in Latin America. Lately, owing to extensive population movements, this neglected tropical disease has become a global health concern. The two clinically available drugs for the chemotherapy of Chagas disease have rather high toxicity and limited efficacy in the chronic phase of the disease, and may induce parasite resistance. The development of new anti-T. cruzi agents is therefore imperative. The enzyme N-myristoyltransferase (NMT) has recently been biochemically characterized, shown to be essential in Leishmania major, Trypanosoma brucei, and T. cruzi¸ and proposed as promising chemotherapeutic target in these trypanosomatids. Methodology/Principal Findings Here, using high-content imaging we assayed eight known trypanosomatid NMT inhibitors, against mammal-dwelling intracellular amastigote and trypomastigote stages and demonstrated that three of them (compounds 1, 5, and 8) have potent anti-proliferative effect at submicromolar concentrations against T. cruzi, with very low toxicity against human epithelial cells. Moreover, metabolic labeling using myristic acid, azide showed a considerable decrease in the myristoylation of proteins in parasites treated with NMT inhibitors, providing evidence of the on-target activity of the inhibitors. Conclusions/Significance Taken together, our data point out to the potential use of NMT inhibitors as anti-T. cruzi chemotherapy. PMID:27128971

  4. An in vitro screening method to evaluate chemicals as potential chemotherapeutants to control Aeromonas hydrophila infection in channel catfish

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Using catfish gill cells G1B and four chemicals (hydrogen peroxide, sodium chloride, potassium permanganate, and D-mannose), the feasibility of using an in vitro screening method to identify potential effective chemotherapeutants was evaluated in this study. In vitro screening results revealed that,...

  5. EMOTION RECOGNITION OF VIRTUAL AGENTS FACIAL EXPRESSIONS: THE EFFECTS OF AGE AND EMOTION INTENSITY

    PubMed Central

    Beer, Jenay M.; Fisk, Arthur D.; Rogers, Wendy A.

    2014-01-01

    People make determinations about the social characteristics of an agent (e.g., robot or virtual agent) by interpreting social cues displayed by the agent, such as facial expressions. Although a considerable amount of research has been conducted investigating age-related differences in emotion recognition of human faces (e.g., Sullivan, & Ruffman, 2004), the effect of age on emotion identification of virtual agent facial expressions has been largely unexplored. Age-related differences in emotion recognition of facial expressions are an important factor to consider in the design of agents that may assist older adults in a recreational or healthcare setting. The purpose of the current research was to investigate whether age-related differences in facial emotion recognition can extend to emotion-expressive virtual agents. Younger and older adults performed a recognition task with a virtual agent expressing six basic emotions. Larger age-related differences were expected for virtual agents displaying negative emotions, such as anger, sadness, and fear. In fact, the results indicated that older adults showed a decrease in emotion recognition accuracy for a virtual agent's emotions of anger, fear, and happiness. PMID:25552896

  6. The effects of anesthetic agents on oxidative stress

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yakan, Selvinaz; Düzgüner, Vesile

    2016-04-01

    Oxidative stress can be defined as the instability between antioxidant defense of the body and the production of free radical that causes peroxydation on the lipid layer. Free radicals are reactive oxygen species that are produced in the course of normal metabolisms of aerobe organisms and they may cause disorders in cell structure and organelles by interacting macromolecules, like lipid, protein, nucleic acids. Therefore, they may cause cardiovascular, immune system, liver, kidney illnesses and many other illnesses like cancer, aging, cataract, diabetes. It is known that many drugs used for the purpose of anesthetizing may cause lipid peroxidation in organism. For these reasons, determining the Oxidative stress index of anaesthetic stress chosen in the ones that are exposed to long term anaesthetic agents and anaesthesia appliccations, is so substantial.

  7. The effect of coupling agents on composite durability

    SciTech Connect

    Macturk, K.S.; Schultheisz, C.R.; Hunston, D.L.; Schutte, C.L.

    1996-12-31

    The relationship between fiber surface treatments and glass fiber/epoxy composite durability was investigated. The type of silane coupling agent deposited on the fiber surface was varied, and the single fiber fragmentation test was used to measure strengths of the fiber and the fiber-matrix interface. The samples were tested dry and after conditioned in 75{degrees}C distilled water for up to 10 weeks. With dry samples the interface strengths varied with the reactivity of the silane deposited on the surface. Moisture exposure produced little change in fiber strengths and, for samples containing silane treated fibers, little change in interface strength, even when the silane was unreactive with the epoxy. In contrast, samples containing unsized fibers exhibited significant losses in interface strengths.

  8. Chemovirotherapy: combining chemotherapeutic treatment with oncolytic virotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Binz, Eike; Lauer, Ulrich M

    2015-01-01

    Oncolytic virotherapy has made significant progress in recent years, however, widespread approval of virotherapeutics is still limited. Primarily, this is due to the fact that currently available virotherapeutics are mostly tested in monotherapeutic clinical trials exclusively (ie, not in combination with other therapies) and so far have achieved only small and often clinically insignificant responses. Given that the predominantly immunotherapeutic mechanism of virotherapeutics is somewhat time-dependent and rapidly growing tumors therefore exhibit only minor chances of being captured in time, scenarios with combination partners are postulated to be more effective. Combinatory settings would help to achieve a rapid stabilization or even reduction of onset tumor masses while providing enough time (numerous months) for achieving immuno(viro)therapeutic success. For this reason, combination strategies of virotherapy with highly genotoxic regimens, such as chemotherapy, are of major interest. A number of clinical trials bringing the concepts of chemotherapy and virotherapy together have previously been undertaken, but optimal scheduling of chemovirotherapy (maximizing the anti-tumor effect while minimizing the risk of overlapping toxicity) still constitutes a major challenge. Therefore, an overview of published as well as ongoing Phase I–III trials should improve our understanding of current challenges and future developments in this field.

  9. Strategies for improving chemotherapeutic delivery to solid tumors mediated by vascular permeability modulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roy Chaudhuri, Tista

    An essential mode of distribution of blood-borne chemotherapeutic agents within a solid tumor is via the micro-circulation. Poor tumor perfusion, because of a lack of functional vasculature or a lack of microvessels, as well as low tumor vascular permeability, can prevent adequate deposition of even low molecular-weight agents into the tumor. The modulation of tumor vascular function and density can provides numerous strategies for improving intratumor deposition of chemotherapeutic agents. Here we investigated strategies to improve drug delivery to two tumor types that share in common poor drug delivery, but differ in the underlying cause. First, in an angiogenesis-driven brain tumor model of Glioblastoma, the vascular permeability barrier, along with poorly-functional vasculature, hinders drug delivery. A strategy of nanoparticle-based tumor 'priming' to attack the vascular permeability barrier, employing sterically stabilized liposomal doxorubicin (SSL-DXR), was investigated. Functional and histological evaluation of tumor vasculature revealed that after an initial period of depressed vascular permeability and vascular pruning 3--4 days after SSL-DXR administration, vascular permeability and perfusion were restored and then elevated after 5--7 days. As a result of tumor priming, deposition of subsequently-administered nanoparticles was enhanced, and the efficacy of temozolomide (TMZ), if administered during the window of elevated permeability, was increased. The sequenced regimen resulted in a persistent reduction of the tumor proliferative index and a 40% suppression of tumor volume, compared to animals that received both agents simultaneously. Second, in a hypovascular, pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma model, disruption of tumor-stromal communication via sonic hedgehog (sHH) signaling pathway inhibition mediated an indirect vascular proliferation and a more than 2-fold increase in intratumor nanoparticle deposition. Enhanced delivery of SSL-DXR in tumors pre

  10. Chemotherapeutic potential of cow urine: A review

    PubMed Central

    Randhawa, Gurpreet Kaur; Sharma, Rajiv

    2015-01-01

    In the grim scenario where presently about 70% of pathogenic bacteria are resistant to at least one of the drugs for the treatment, cue is to be taken from traditional/indigenous medicine to tackle it urgently. The Indian traditional knowledge emanates from ayurveda, where Bos indicus is placed at a high pedestal for numerous uses of its various products. Urine is one of the products of a cow with many benefits and without toxicity. Various studies have found good antimicrobial activity of cow’s urine (CU) comparable with standard drugs such as ofloxacin, cefpodoxime, and gentamycin, against a vast number of pathogenic bacteria, more so against Gram-positive than negative bacteria. Interestingly antimicrobial activity has also been found against some resistant strains such as multidrug-resistant (MDR) Escherichia coli and Klebsiella pneumoniae. Antimicrobial action is enhanced still further by it being an immune-enhancer and bioenhancer of some antibiotic drugs. Antifungal activity was comparable to amphotericin B. CU also has anthelmintic and antineoplastic action. CU has, in addition, antioxidant properties, and it can prevent the damage to DNA caused by the environmental stress. In the management of infectious diseases, CU can be used alone or as an adjunctive to prevent the development of resistance and enhance the effect of standard antibiotics. PMID:26401404

  11. Biocontrol of fouling pests: Effect of diversity, identity and density of control agents.

    PubMed

    Atalah, Javier; Newcombe, Emma M; Zaiko, Anastasija

    2016-04-01

    Augmentative biocontrol, using native natural enemies, has been suggested as a promising tool to control marine biofouling pests on artificial structures. However, there are still important knowledge gaps to be addressed before biocontrol can be considered as a management tool. In a field experiment on floating marine structures we examined intra- and interspecific consumer interactions among biocontrol agents on different surface orientations. We tested the effect of identity, density and diversity of three invertebrates (the 11-arm seastar Coscinasterias muricata, the sea urchin Evechinus chloroticus and the gastropod Cook's turban Cookia sulcata) to reduce established biofouling and to prevent fouling growth on defouled surfaces. High densities of biocontrol agents were not more effective at fouling control (cover and biomass) than low densities. Nor did multi-species treatments function more effectively than mono-specific ones. However, biocontrol agent identity was important, with the 11-arm seastar and Cook's turban being the most effective at fouling reduction and prevention, respectively. Surface orientation had a strong effect on the effectiveness of control agents, with the best results obtained on vertical compared to diagonal and underside surfaces. This study confirmed the potential of biocontrol as a management tool for marine pest, indicating that identity is more important than richness and density of control agents. It also highlighted the limitations of this approach on diagonal and underside surfaces, where control agents have limited retention ability. PMID:26845376

  12. Comparative study of the effects of two bleaching agents on oral microbiota.

    PubMed

    Alkmin, Yara Tardelli; Sartorelli, Renata; Flório, Flávia Martão; Basting, Roberta Tarkany

    2005-01-01

    This study evaluated the in vivo effects of bleaching agents containing 10% carbamide peroxide (Platinum/Colgate) or 7.5% hydrogen peroxide (Day White 2Z/Discus Dental) on mutans Streptococcus during dental bleaching. The products were applied on 30 volunteers who needed dental bleaching. In each volunteer, one of the two bleaching agents was used on both dental arches one hour a day for three weeks. Analysis of the bacterial counts was made by collecting saliva before (baseline values), during (7 and 21 days) bleaching treatments and 14 days posttreatment. The Friedman non-parametric analysis (alpha=0.05) found no differences in microorganism counts at different times for each group for both agents (p>0.05). The Mann Whitney nonparametric test (alpha=0.05) showed no differences in micro-organism counts for both agents (p>0.05). Different bleaching agents did not change the oral cavity mutans Streptococcus counts. PMID:16130860

  13. The Effect of a Change Agent on Use of Evidence-Based Mental Health Practices.

    PubMed

    Leathers, Sonya J; Spielfogel, Jill E; Blakey, Joan; Christian, Errick; Atkins, Marc S

    2016-09-01

    Children's service systems are faced with a critical need to disseminate evidence-based mental health interventions. Despite the proliferation of comprehensive implementation models, little is known about the key active processes in effective implementation strategies. This proof of concept study focused on the effect of change agent interactions as conceptualized by Rogers' diffusion of innovation theory on providers' (N = 57) use of a behavioral intervention in a child welfare agency. An experimental design compared use for providers randomized to training as usual or training as usual supplemented by change agent interactions after the training. Results indicate that the enhanced condition increased use of the intervention, supporting the positive effect of change agent interactions on use of new practices. Change agent types of interaction may be a key active process in implementation strategies following training. PMID:26487393

  14. Dual agents loaded polymeric nanoparticle: Effect of process variables

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Deepak; Philip, Gilphy; Gabrani, Reema; Ali, Javed; Dang, Shweta

    2015-01-01

    Aim and Objectives: In the present investigation dual agents i.e., hesperidin and diazepam loaded polymeric nanoparticles (NPs) were formulated by nanoprecipitation method and optimized using three-level factorial design. Methods: The developed NPs were optimized keeping poly (lactic-co-glycolic) acid (PLGA), poloxamer amount as independent process variable and z-average, percentage drug entrapment as a dependent response. The optimized NP was subjected to in vitro drug release study to investigate drug release mechanism from NP. Cell viability assay was performed on Vero cell line to confirm the safety of NP. Results: Drug loaded NP showed z-average in the range of 189-307 d.nm with percentage drug entrapment for diazepam and hesperidin 62-89% and 68-92%, respectively. In vitro drug release studies showed controlled drug release behavior was observed from polymeric NP across dialysis membrane compared to aqueous drug solution. Cell viability assay showed drug dependent cytotoxicity on Vero cell line, however, polymeric NP showed less cytotoxicity compared with aqueous drug solution. PMID:26258057

  15. New hopes from old drugs: revisiting DNA-binding small molecules as anticancer agents

    PubMed Central

    Gurova, Katerina

    2010-01-01

    Most of the anticancer chemotherapeutic drugs that are broadly and successfully used today are DNA-damaging agents. Targeting of DNA has been proven to cause relatively potent and selective destruction of tumor cells. However, the clinical potential of DNA-damaging agents is limited by the adverse side effects and increased risk of secondary cancers that are consequences of the agents' genotoxicity. In this review, we present evidence that those agents capable of targeting DNA without inducing DNA damage would not be limited in these ways, and may be as potent as DNA-damaging agents in the killing of tumor cells. We use as an example literature data and our own research of the well-known antimalarial drug quinacrine, which binds to DNA without inducing DNA damage, yet modulates a number of cellular pathways that impact tumor cell survival. PMID:20001804

  16. Copper complexes of bis(thiosemicarbazones): from chemotherapeutics to diagnostic and therapeutic radiopharmaceuticals.

    PubMed

    Paterson, Brett M; Donnelly, Paul S

    2011-05-01

    The molecules known as bis(thiosemicarbazones) derived from 1,2-diones can act as tetradentate ligands for Cu(II), forming stable, neutral complexes. As a family, these complexes possess fascinating biological activity. This critical review presents an historical perspective of their progression from potential chemotherapeutics through to more recent applications in nuclear medicine. Methods of synthesis are presented followed by studies focusing on their potential application as anti-cancer agents and more recent investigations into their potential as therapeutics for Alzheimer's disease. The Cu(II) complexes are of sufficient stability to be used to coordinate copper radioisotopes for application in diagnostic and therapeutic radiopharmaceuticals. Detailed understanding of the coordination chemistry has allowed careful manipulation of the metal based properties to engineer specific biological activities. Perhaps the most promising complex radiolabelled with copper radioisotopes to date is Cu(II)(atsm), which has progressed to clinical trials in humans (162 references). PMID:21409228

  17. Willow Leaves' Extracts Contain Anti-Tumor Agents Effective against Three Cell Types

    PubMed Central

    El-Shemy, Hany A.; Aboul-Enein, Ahmed M.; Aboul-Enein, Khalid Mostafa; Fujita, Kounosuke

    2007-01-01

    Many higher plants contain novel metabolites with antimicrobial, antifungal and antiviral properties. However, in the developed world almost all clinically used chemotherapeutics have been produced by in vitro chemical synthesis. Exceptions, like taxol and vincristine, were structurally complex metabolites that were difficult to synthesize in vitro. Many non-natural, synthetic drugs cause severe side effects that were not acceptable except as treatments of last resort for terminal diseases such as cancer. The metabolites discovered in medicinal plants may avoid the side effect of synthetic drugs, because they must accumulate within living cells. The aim here was to test an aqueous extract from the young developing leaves of willow (Salix safsaf, Salicaceae) trees for activity against human carcinoma cells in vivo and in vitro. In vivo Ehrlich Ascites Carcinoma Cells (EACC) were injected into the intraperitoneal cavity of mice. The willow extract was fed via stomach tube. The (EACC) derived tumor growth was reduced by the willow extract and death was delayed (for 35 days). In vitro the willow extract could kill the majority (75%–80%) of abnormal cells among primary cells harvested from seven patients with acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) and 13 with AML (acute myeloid leukemia). DNA fragmentation patterns within treated cells inferred targeted cell death by apoptosis had occurred. The metabolites within the willow extract may act as tumor inhibitors that promote apoptosis, cause DNA damage, and affect cell membranes and/or denature proteins. PMID:17264881

  18. [Effects of mucolytic agents and macrolides in the treatment of COPD].

    PubMed

    Yamaya, Mutsuo

    2016-05-01

    Mucolytic agents and macrolides have been used in the treatment of patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). These drugs improve symptoms, such as sputum, and quality of life in COPD patients and reduce the frequency of COPD exacerbation. Mucolytic agents have various biological effects, such as reduction of mucin production, improvement of goblet cell hyperplasia and mucociliary transport, reduction of airway inflammation, and anti-oxidant and anti-viral effects. Similarly, in addition to antimicrobial effects, macrolides have biological effects, including reduction of mucin production and airway inflammation induced by airway infection, improvement of mucociliary transport, and anti-bacterial and anti-viral effects. These biological effects may be associated with clinical benefits of mucolvtic agents and macrolides in the treatment of COPD patients. PMID:27254955

  19. Emergent Societal Effects of Crimino-Social Forces in an Animat Agent Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scogings, Chris J.; Hawick, Ken A.

    Societal behaviour can be studied at a causal level by perturbing a stable multi-agent model with new microscopic behaviours and observing the statistical response over an ensemble of simulated model systems. We report on the effects of introducing criminal and law-enforcing behaviours into a large scale animat agent model and describe the complex spatial agent patterns and population changes that result. Our well-established predator-prey substrate model provides a background framework against which these new microscopic behaviours can be trialled and investigated. We describe some quantitative results and some surprising conclusions concerning the overall societal health when individually anti-social behaviour is introduced.

  20. Effectiveness of prokinetic agents against diseases external to the gastrointestinal tract.

    PubMed

    Hiyama, Toru; Yoshihara, Masaharu; Tanaka, Shinji; Haruma, Ken; Chayama, Kazuaki

    2009-04-01

    Prokinetic agents are effective not only for disease of the gastrointestinal (GI) tract but also for those external to the GI tract such as the central nervous system, and the respiratory, urologic, and metabolic organs. This article reviews the effectiveness of prokinetic agents against diseases external to the GI tract. Studies were identified by computerized and manual searches of the available literature. A Medline search was performed (1975-July, 2008) using the following medical subject headings: prokinetic agent, metoclopramide, domperidone, trimebutine, cisapride, itopride, mosapride, tegaserod, and human. The identified diseases for which prokinetic agents may be effective are various: bronchial asthma, chronic cough, hiccup, spontaneous bacterial peritonitis, cholelithiasis, diabetes mellitus, acute migraine, Parkinson's disease, anorexia nervosa, Tourette's disorder, urologic sequelae of spinal cord injury and of radical hysterectomy for cervical cancer, laryngeal dysfunction and so on. These agents are also useful for prevention of aspiration pneumonia during anesthesia, and in tube-fed patients. Prokinetic agents should be a valuable addition to our currently limited pharmacological armamentarium not only for functional bowel disease, but also for diseases external to the GI tract. PMID:19220673

  1. Vanadium Compounds as Pro-Inflammatory Agents: Effects on Cyclooxygenases.

    PubMed

    Korbecki, Jan; Baranowska-Bosiacka, Irena; Gutowska, Izabela; Chlubek, Dariusz

    2015-01-01

    This paper discusses how the activity and expression of cyclooxygenases are influenced by vanadium compounds at anticancer concentrations and recorded in inorganic vanadium poisonings. We refer mainly to the effects of vanadate (orthovanadate), vanadyl and pervanadate ions; the main focus is placed on their impact on intracellular signaling. We describe the exact mechanism of the effect of vanadium compounds on protein tyrosine phosphatases (PTP), epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR), PLCγ, Src, mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) cascades, transcription factor NF-κB, the effect on the proteolysis of COX-2 and the activity of cPLA2. For a better understanding of these processes, a lot of space is devoted to the transformation of vanadium compounds within the cell and the molecular influence on the direct targets of the discussed vanadium compounds. PMID:26053397

  2. Vanadium Compounds as Pro-Inflammatory Agents: Effects on Cyclooxygenases

    PubMed Central

    Korbecki, Jan; Baranowska-Bosiacka, Irena; Gutowska, Izabela; Chlubek, Dariusz

    2015-01-01

    This paper discusses how the activity and expression of cyclooxygenases are influenced by vanadium compounds at anticancer concentrations and recorded in inorganic vanadium poisonings. We refer mainly to the effects of vanadate (orthovanadate), vanadyl and pervanadate ions; the main focus is placed on their impact on intracellular signaling. We describe the exact mechanism of the effect of vanadium compounds on protein tyrosine phosphatases (PTP), epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR), PLCγ, Src, mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) cascades, transcription factor NF-κB, the effect on the proteolysis of COX-2 and the activity of cPLA2. For a better understanding of these processes, a lot of space is devoted to the transformation of vanadium compounds within the cell and the molecular influence on the direct targets of the discussed vanadium compounds. PMID:26053397

  3. Novel agents in the management of Mycobacterium tuberculosis disease.

    PubMed

    Barry, P J; O'Connor, T M

    2007-01-01

    The goals of tuberculosis control are to cure active disease, prevent relapse, reduce transmission and avert the emergence of drug resistance. However, since the 1960s, there have been few developments in available therapies. Currently available agents are complicated by numerous side-effects, drug interactions and the need for a long duration of therapy. Rifampicin-containing regimes lead to hepatic enzyme induction which can complicate or preclude the use of protease inhibitors and non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors in patients infected with the human immunodeficiency virus. Furthermore, emerging drug resistance has complicated management for many patients and clinicians. Therefore, new chemotherapeutic agents are urgently needed. Existing antimicrobials are emerging as potent antituberculous agents. Recent studies have demonstrated the antituberculous activity of newer fluoroquinolones including levofloxacin, moxifloxacin, and gatifloxacin. Their use as first line antituberculous agents is currently under investigation. Furthermore, the oxazolidinones linezolid and PNU-100480 have been shown to have antituberculous activity in addition to their antibacterial effects. Several other agents are currently being developed for the treatment of tuberculosis. These agents include diarylquinolones (R207910), nitroimidazopyrans (PA-824, OPC-67683), ethambutol analogues (SQ109), cerulenin, trans-cinnamic acid, macrolides, pyrroles (LL3858), long-acting rifamycins and inhaled interferon-gamma. Furthermore, vaccines are being explored for pre-exposure and post-exposure use. This review will describe therapeutic developments in the management of tuberculosis, highlighting mechanisms of action of new pharmacological agents and their potential for clinical use. PMID:17691942

  4. Genome-Wide Local Ancestry Approach Identifies Genes and Variants Associated with Chemotherapeutic Susceptibility in African Americans

    PubMed Central

    Wheeler, Heather E.; Gorsic, Lidija K.; Welsh, Marleen; Stark, Amy L.; Gamazon, Eric R.; Cox, Nancy J.; Dolan, M. Eileen

    2011-01-01

    Chemotherapeutic agents are used in the treatment of many cancers, yet variable resistance and toxicities among individuals limit successful outcomes. Several studies have indicated outcome differences associated with ancestry among patients with various cancer types. Using both traditional SNP-based and newly developed gene-based genome-wide approaches, we investigated the genetics of chemotherapeutic susceptibility in lymphoblastoid cell lines derived from 83 African Americans, a population for which there is a disparity in the number of genome-wide studies performed. To account for population structure in this admixed population, we incorporated local ancestry information into our association model. We tested over 2 million SNPs and identified 325, 176, 240, and 190 SNPs that were suggestively associated with cytarabine-, 5′-deoxyfluorouridine (5′-DFUR)-, carboplatin-, and cisplatin-induced cytotoxicity, respectively (p≤10−4). Importantly, some of these variants are found only in populations of African descent. We also show that cisplatin-susceptibility SNPs are enriched for carboplatin-susceptibility SNPs. Using a gene-based genome-wide association approach, we identified 26, 11, 20, and 41 suggestive candidate genes for association with cytarabine-, 5′-DFUR-, carboplatin-, and cisplatin-induced cytotoxicity, respectively (p≤10−3). Fourteen of these genes showed evidence of association with their respective chemotherapeutic phenotypes in the Yoruba from Ibadan, Nigeria (p<0.05), including TP53I11, COPS5 and GAS8, which are known to be involved in tumorigenesis. Although our results require further study, we have identified variants and genes associated with chemotherapeutic susceptibility in African Americans by using an approach that incorporates local ancestry information. PMID:21755009

  5. Differential orientation effect in the neural response to interacting biological motion of two agents

    PubMed Central

    Hirai, Masahiro; Kakigi, Ryusuke

    2009-01-01

    Background A recent behavioral study demonstrated that the meaningful interaction of two agents enhances the detection sensitivity of biological motion (BM), however, it remains unclear when and how the 'interaction' information of two agents is represented in our neural system. To clarify this point, we used magnetoencephalography and introduced a novel experimental technique to extract a neuromagnetic response relating to two-agent BM perception. We then investigated how this response was modulated by the interaction of two agents. In the present experiment, we presented two kinds of visual stimuli (interacting and non-interacting BM) with two orientations (upright and inverted). Results We found a neuromagnetic response in the bilateral occipitotemporal region, on average 300 – 400 ms after the onset of a two-agent BM stimulus. This result showed that interhemispheric differences were apparent for the peak amplitudes. For the left hemisphere, the orientation effect was manifest when the two agents were made to interact, and the interaction effect was manifest when the stimulus was inverted. In the right hemisphere, the main effects of both orientation and interaction were significant, suggesting that the peak amplitude was attenuated when the visual stimulus was inverted or made to interact. Conclusion These results demonstrate that the 'interaction' information of two agents can affect the neural activities in the bilateral occipitotemporal region, on average 300 – 400 ms after the onset of a two-agent BM stimulus, however, the modulation was different between hemispheres: the left hemisphere is more concerned with dynamics, whereas the right hemisphere is more concerned with form information. PMID:19397815

  6. Effects of Tooth Coating Material and Finishing Agent on Bleached Enamel Surfaces by KTP Laser

    PubMed Central

    Kameda, Ayumi; Masuda, Yoshiko Murakami; Teruo, Toko; Yamada, Yoshishige; Kimura, Yuichi; Tamaki, Yukimichi; Miyazaki, Takashi

    2013-01-01

    Objective: The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of tooth coating material and finishing agent on bleached enamel surfaces after using KTP laser with 27% hydrogen peroxide. Background data: There have been few reports on the effects of tooth coating materials and finishing agents after bleaching. Methods: After 40 crowns of human extracted maxillary incisors were bleached by KTP laser, bleached enamels were finished with fluoride only or both of fluoride and nano-hydroxyapatite as a finishing agent. After application(s) of fluoride and/or finishing agent, the enamel surfaces were divided into 2 groups, which were covered with the coating material or without coating material. After application of coating materials, all specimens were kept for 2 weeks at 37°C of 100% humidity. After removing the coating material, color changing was measured and enamel surfaces were examined by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Results: SEM observation of enamel surfaces treated the fluoride gel, finishing agent and coating material showed the most flattered surface compared to other groups. By measuring the color changing, few color changing was observed on the enamel surfaces treated the fluoride gel, finishing agents and coating material. Conclusion: These results suggested that applications of fluoride gel, finishing agent and coating material made the enamel-surfaces flattered and kept effects of bleaching, could prevent the re-coloration. After applications of fluoride gel and finishing agent, covering the bleached-enamel surfaces with the coating material enhanced the keeping whiteness. It would give the patients satisfaction of whiteness. PMID:24155557

  7. A review on promising natural agents effective on hyperlipidemia.

    PubMed

    Bahmani, Mahmoud; Mirhoseini, Mahmoud; Shirzad, Hedayatollah; Sedighi, Mehrnoosh; Shahinfard, Nejmeh; Rafieian-Kopaei, Mahmoud

    2015-07-01

    Hyperlipidemia is a prevalent disease and a major component of the metabolic syndrome resulting from various factors. This disease increases morbidity and mortality when combined with other prevalent diseases such as diabetes mellitus, hypertension, and cardiovascular diseases. The side effects of the current lipid-lowering drugs have increased the tendency to move toward traditional and alternative treatments. Epidemiological observations indicate that using alternative treatments, consumption of medicinal plants, diet, and consumption of fruits have had satisfactory results on the effects of hyperlipidemia in many societies. It should be noted that in majority of societies, even developed countries, the tendency toward eating lipid-lowering medicinal plants has increased extensively. Using these plants especially when common remedies cannot control the disease is significant. Although consumption of medicinal plants by hyperlipidemic patients may show improvement in disease state, drug interaction and side effects may cause complications in disease control. Therefore, in this review, apart from introducing some of the reliable plants effective in inhibition and decrease of hyperlipidemia, the possibility of their intoxication and drug interaction is also presented. PMID:25633423

  8. Molecular effective coverage surface area of optical clearing agents for predicting optical clearing potential

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Wei; Ma, Ning; Zhu, Dan

    2015-03-01

    The improvement of methods for optical clearing agent prediction exerts an important impact on tissue optical clearing technique. The molecular dynamic simulation is one of the most convincing and simplest approaches to predict the optical clearing potential of agents by analyzing the hydrogen bonds, hydrogen bridges and hydrogen bridges type forming between agents and collagen. However, the above analysis methods still suffer from some problem such as analysis of cyclic molecule by reason of molecular conformation. In this study, a molecular effective coverage surface area based on the molecular dynamic simulation was proposed to predict the potential of optical clearing agents. Several typical cyclic molecules, fructose, glucose and chain molecules, sorbitol, xylitol were analyzed by calculating their molecular effective coverage surface area, hydrogen bonds, hydrogen bridges and hydrogen bridges type, respectively. In order to verify this analysis methods, in vitro skin samples optical clearing efficacy were measured after 25 min immersing in the solutions, fructose, glucose, sorbitol and xylitol at concentration of 3.5 M using 1951 USAF resolution test target. The experimental results show accordance with prediction of molecular effective coverage surface area. Further to compare molecular effective coverage surface area with other parameters, it can show that molecular effective coverage surface area has a better performance in predicting OCP of agents.

  9. Comparative effects of chelating agents on distribution, excretion, and renal toxicity of inorganic mercury in rats

    SciTech Connect

    Kojima, S.; Shimada, H.; Kiyozumi, M. )

    1989-06-01

    The effects of three chelating agents, sodium N-benzyl-D-glucamine dithiocarbamate(NBG-DTC), 2,3-dimercaptopropanol(BAL), and D-penicillamine(D-PEN), on the distribution, excretion, and renal toxicity of inorganic mercury were compared in rats exposed to HgCl2. Rats were injected i.p. with 203HgCl2 (300 micrograms of Hg and 2 microCi of 203Hg/kg) and 30 min or 24 h later they were injected with a chelating agent (a quarter of an LD50). The injection of the chelating agents significantly enhanced the biliary and urinary excretions of mercury. BAL was the most effective for removal of mercury from the body at 30 min after mercury treatment. The extent of enhancing effect of the chelating agents for removal of mercury at 24 h after mercury was in the order NBG-DTC = BAL greater than D-PEN. The injection of BAL at 24 h after mercury treatment caused the redistribution of mercury to the heart and lung. NBG-DTC did not result in the redistribution of mercury to the heart, lung, and brain. Urinary excretion of protein and AST significantly increased 24-48 h after mercury treatment and decreased to the control values 72 h after mercury. The injection of the chelating agents at 30 min after mercury treatment significantly decreased the urinary excretion of protein and AST. In rats pretreated with mercury 24 h earlier, the chelating agents significantly decreased the urinary protein at 48 h after mercury treatment, but did not decrease the urinary AST. The results of this study indicate that the chelating agents are effective in removing mercury from the body, resulting in the protective effect against the mercury-induced renal damage.

  10. Early effects of the antineoplastic agent salinomycin on mitochondrial function.

    PubMed

    Managò, A; Leanza, L; Carraretto, L; Sassi, N; Grancara, S; Quintana-Cabrera, R; Trimarco, V; Toninello, A; Scorrano, L; Trentin, L; Semenzato, G; Gulbins, E; Zoratti, M; Szabò, I

    2015-01-01

    Salinomycin, isolated from Streptomyces albus, displays antimicrobial activity. Recently, a large-scale screening approach identified salinomycin and nigericin as selective apoptosis inducers of cancer stem cells. Growing evidence suggests that salinomycin is able to kill different types of non-stem tumor cells that usually display resistance to common therapeutic approaches, but the mechanism of action of this molecule is still poorly understood. Since salinomycin has been suggested to act as a K(+) ionophore, we explored its impact on mitochondrial bioenergetic performance at an early time point following drug application. In contrast to the K(+) ionophore valinomycin, salinomycin induced a rapid hyperpolarization. In addition, mitochondrial matrix acidification and a significant decrease of respiration were observed in intact mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs) and in cancer stem cell-like HMLE cells within tens of minutes, while increased production of reactive oxygen species was not detected. By comparing the chemical structures and cellular effects of this drug with those of valinomycin (K(+) ionophore) and nigericin (K(+)/H(+) exchanger), we conclude that salinomycin mediates K(+)/H(+) exchange across the inner mitochondrial membrane. Compatible with its direct modulation of mitochondrial function, salinomycin was able to induce cell death also in Bax/Bak-less double-knockout MEF cells. Since at the concentration range used in most studies (around 10 μM) salinomycin exerts its effect at the level of mitochondria and alters bioenergetic performance, the specificity of its action on pathologic B cells isolated from patients with chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) versus B cells from healthy subjects was investigated. Mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs), proposed to mimic the tumor environment, attenuated the apoptotic effect of salinomycin on B-CLL cells. Apoptosis occurred to a significant extent in healthy B cells as well as in MSCs and human primary

  11. Early effects of the antineoplastic agent salinomycin on mitochondrial function

    PubMed Central

    Managò, A; Leanza, L; Carraretto, L; Sassi, N; Grancara, S; Quintana-Cabrera, R; Trimarco, V; Toninello, A; Scorrano, L; Trentin, L; Semenzato, G; Gulbins, E; Zoratti, M; Szabò, I

    2015-01-01

    Salinomycin, isolated from Streptomyces albus, displays antimicrobial activity. Recently, a large-scale screening approach identified salinomycin and nigericin as selective apoptosis inducers of cancer stem cells. Growing evidence suggests that salinomycin is able to kill different types of non-stem tumor cells that usually display resistance to common therapeutic approaches, but the mechanism of action of this molecule is still poorly understood. Since salinomycin has been suggested to act as a K+ ionophore, we explored its impact on mitochondrial bioenergetic performance at an early time point following drug application. In contrast to the K+ ionophore valinomycin, salinomycin induced a rapid hyperpolarization. In addition, mitochondrial matrix acidification and a significant decrease of respiration were observed in intact mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs) and in cancer stem cell-like HMLE cells within tens of minutes, while increased production of reactive oxygen species was not detected. By comparing the chemical structures and cellular effects of this drug with those of valinomycin (K+ ionophore) and nigericin (K+/H+ exchanger), we conclude that salinomycin mediates K+/H+ exchange across the inner mitochondrial membrane. Compatible with its direct modulation of mitochondrial function, salinomycin was able to induce cell death also in Bax/Bak-less double-knockout MEF cells. Since at the concentration range used in most studies (around 10 μM) salinomycin exerts its effect at the level of mitochondria and alters bioenergetic performance, the specificity of its action on pathologic B cells isolated from patients with chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) versus B cells from healthy subjects was investigated. Mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs), proposed to mimic the tumor environment, attenuated the apoptotic effect of salinomycin on B-CLL cells. Apoptosis occurred to a significant extent in healthy B cells as well as in MSCs and human primary fibroblasts. The

  12. [Toxicological effects of weapons of mass destruction and noxious agents in modern warfare and terrorism].

    PubMed

    Vucemilović, Ante

    2010-06-01

    Weapons of mass destruction (WMD) best portray the twisted use of technological achievements against the human species. Despite arm control efforts, WMD threat continues to exist and even proliferate. This in turn calls for improvement in defensive measures against this threat. The modern soldier is exposed to a number of chemical, biological, and radiological agents in military and peace operations, while civilians are mainly exposed to terrorist attacks. Regardless of origin or mode of action, WMDs and other noxious agents aim for the same - to make an organism dysfunctional. Because their effects are often delayed, these agents are hard to spot on time and treat. This review presents a biomedical aspect of agents used in warfare and terrorism, including polonium-210, depleted uranium, salmonella, anthrax, genetically modified bacteria, cobweb-like polymer fibre, sarin, and mustard gas. PMID:20587400

  13. Activation of aluminum as an effective reducing agent by pitting corrosion for wet-chemical synthesis.

    PubMed

    Li, Wei; Cochell, Thomas; Manthiram, Arumugam

    2013-01-01

    Metallic aluminum (Al) is of interest as a reducing agent because of its low standard reduction potential. However, its surface is invariably covered with a dense aluminum oxide film, which prevents its effective use as a reducing agent in wet-chemical synthesis. Pitting corrosion, known as an undesired reaction destroying Al and is enhanced by anions such as F⁻, Cl⁻, and Br⁻ in aqueous solutions, is applied here for the first time to activate Al as a reducing agent for wet-chemical synthesis of a diverse array of metals and alloys. Specifically, we demonstrate the synthesis of highly dispersed palladium nanoparticles on carbon black with stabilizers and the intermetallic Cu₂Sb/C, which are promising candidates, respectively, for fuel cell catalysts and lithium-ion battery anodes. Atomic hydrogen, an intermediate during the pitting corrosion of Al in protonic solvents (e.g., water and ethylene glycol), is validated as the actual reducing agent. PMID:23390579

  14. Activation of Aluminum as an Effective Reducing Agent by Pitting Corrosion for Wet-chemical Synthesis

    PubMed Central

    Li, Wei; Cochell, Thomas; Manthiram, Arumugam

    2013-01-01

    Metallic aluminum (Al) is of interest as a reducing agent because of its low standard reduction potential. However, its surface is invariably covered with a dense aluminum oxide film, which prevents its effective use as a reducing agent in wet-chemical synthesis. Pitting corrosion, known as an undesired reaction destroying Al and is enhanced by anions such as F−, Cl−, and Br− in aqueous solutions, is applied here for the first time to activate Al as a reducing agent for wet-chemical synthesis of a diverse array of metals and alloys. Specifically, we demonstrate the synthesis of highly dispersed palladium nanoparticles on carbon black with stabilizers and the intermetallic Cu2Sb/C, which are promising candidates, respectively, for fuel cell catalysts and lithium-ion battery anodes. Atomic hydrogen, an intermediate during the pitting corrosion of Al in protonic solvents (e.g., water and ethylene glycol), is validated as the actual reducing agent. PMID:23390579

  15. Effects of surface active agents on DNAPL migration and distribution in saturated porous media.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Zhou; Gao, Bin; Xu, Hongxia; Sun, Yuanyuan; Shi, Xiaoqing; Wu, Jichun

    2016-11-15

    Dissolved surface active agents such as surfactant and natural organic matter can affect the distribution and fate of dense nonaqueous liquids (DNAPLs) in soil and groundwater systems. This work investigated how two common groundwater surface active agents, humic acid (HA) and Tween 80, affected tetrachloroethylene (PCE) migration and source zone architecture in saturated porous media under environmentally relevant conditions. Batch experiments were first conducted to measure the contact angles and interfacial tensions (IFT) between PCE and quartz surface in water containing different amount of surface active agents. Results showed that the contact angle increased and IFT decreased with concentration of surface active agent increasing, and Tween 80 was much more effective than HA. Five 2-D flow cell experiments were then conducted. Correspondingly, Tween 80 showed strong effects on the migration and distribution of PCE in the porous media due to its ability to change the medium wettability from water-wet into intermediate/NAPL-wet. The downward migration velocities of the PCE in three Tween 80 cells were slower than those in the other two cells. In addition, the final saturation of the PCE in the cells containing surface active agents was higher than that in the water-only cell. Results from this work indicate that the presence of surface active agents in groundwater may strongly affect the fate and distribution of DNAPL through altering porous medium wettability. PMID:27450259

  16. [Effect of prosthesis cleansing agent on the prosthetic base fungi].

    PubMed

    Temmer, K; Stipetić, D; Cekić-Arambasin, A; Kraljević, K

    1991-01-01

    Candida albicans and other fungi are frequently found in subjects wearing prostheses, especially in prostheses with poor hygiene, i.e. with accumulations of food, plaques and calculi. The aim of this study was to assess the efficacy of Corega extradent relative to fungi adhering to the prosthetic base. Results of the study showed the prosthesis hygiene to be substantially related to inflammation of palatal mucosa. The mean number of fungi per sq.cm of prosthetic base was 64 x 10(5). The number of fungi was redetermined after a two-day treatment with Corega extradent, with unchanged other habits of the prosthesis wearing and cleansing. The number of fungi decreased in all study subjects, the mean value of individual differences being 2238 times. In prostheses with a great number of fungi and extremely poor hygiene, the effect of Corega extradent was poorer, indicating the need of additional mechanical cleansing with a brush. PMID:1819938

  17. Structural effects of nogalamycin, an antibiotic antitumour agent, on DNA

    SciTech Connect

    Banerjee, T.; Mukhopadhyay, R.

    2008-09-19

    The structural changes of DNA, induced by the antitumour antibiotic nogalamycin, have been studied by atomic force microscopy (AFM). The transformation in the tertiary structure of 4361 bp long plasmid pBR322 DNA, after incubation with nogalamycin at 37 deg. C, has been monitored at the single molecule level. The AFM topographs of free DNA and the DNA-nogalamycin complex, incubated for 6, 12, 24, 36 and 48 h, reveal a gradual change from the circular supercoiled form having strand crossovers to the more compact plectonemic superhelix. With increasing incubation time, the extent of plectonemic coiling increases, indicating increasing level of drug binding via intercalative mode. Supportive evidences are obtained from the CD and UV-vis spectroscopic studies. To our knowledge, this is the first report on an AFM imaging study of the effects of nogalamycin, an anthracyclin intercalator, on DNA.

  18. Biogenic silver nanoparticles: efficient and effective antifungal agents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Netala, Vasudeva Reddy; Kotakadi, Venkata Subbaiah; Domdi, Latha; Gaddam, Susmila Aparna; Bobbu, Pushpalatha; Venkata, Sucharitha K.; Ghosh, Sukhendu Bikash; Tartte, Vijaya

    2016-04-01

    Biogenic synthesis of silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) by exploiting various plant materials is an emerging field and considered green nanotechnology as it involves simple, cost effective and ecofriendly procedure. In the present study AgNPs were successfully synthesized using aqueous callus extract of Gymnema sylvestre. The aqueous callus extract treated with 1nM silver nitrate solution resulted in the formation of AgNPs and the surface plasmon resonance (SPR) of the formed AgNPs showed a peak at 437 nm in the UV Visible spectrum. The synthesized AgNPs were characterized using Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), Transmission electron microscopy (TEM), and X-ray diffraction spectroscopy (XRD). FTIR spectra showed the peaks at 3333, 2928, 2361, 1600, 1357 and 1028 cm-1 which revealed the role of different functional groups possibly involved in the synthesis and stabilization of AgNPs. TEM micrograph clearly revealed the size of the AgNPs to be in the range of 3-30 nm with spherical shape and poly-dispersed nature; it is further confirmed by Particle size analysis that the stability of AgNPs is due its high negative Zeta potential (-36.1 mV). XRD pattern revealed the crystal nature of the AgNPs by showing the braggs peaks corresponding to (111), (200), (220) and (311) planes of face-centered cubic crystal phase of silver. Selected area electron diffraction pattern showed diffraction rings and confirmed the crystalline nature of synthesized AgNPs. The synthesized AgNPs exhibited effective antifungal activity against Candida albicans, Candida nonalbicans and Candida tropicalis.

  19. Effects of competition and cooperation interaction between agents on networks in the presence of a market capacity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sonubi, A.; Arcagni, A.; Stefani, S.; Ausloos, M.

    2016-08-01

    A network effect is introduced taking into account competition, cooperation, and mixed-type interaction among agents along a generalized Verhulst-Lotka-Volterra model. It is also argued that the presence of a market capacity undoubtedly enforces a definite limit on the agent's size growth. The state stability of triadic agents, i.e., the most basic network plaquette, is investigated analytically for possible scenarios, through a fixed-point analysis. It is discovered that: (i) market demand is only satisfied for full competition when one agent monopolizes the market; (ii) growth of agent size is encouraged in full cooperation; (iii) collaboration among agents to compete against one single agent may result in the disappearance of this single agent out of the market; and (iv) cooperating with two rivals may become a growth strategy for an intelligent agent.

  20. Radioprotective agents for the prevention of side effects induced by radioiodine-131 therapy.

    PubMed

    Noaparast, Zohreh; Hosseinimehr, Seyed Jalal

    2013-08-01

    Radioiodine 131 ((131)I) has been used worldwide for the ablation of remnant thyroidal tissue after surgery or as the first-line treatment for Graves' disease. Although the use of (131)I is becoming increasingly prevalent, there is evidence suggesting that this treatment is associated with side effects such as salivary gland dysfunction and an increased risk of leukemia. This article aims to review the potential use of radioprotective agents and the side effects induced by (131)I therapy. Several synthetic and natural compounds have been investigated in preclinical and clinical studies. The protective agents reduced the toxicity of (131)I, mainly in the salivary glands, and mitigated the genetic damage through different mechanisms. There are limited clinical studies evaluating the use of radioprotective agents in patients undergoing radioiodine therapy. However, lemon candies, lemon juice and sugarless chewing gum have been proposed to be beneficial for minimizing the side effects of radioiodine within the salivary glands. PMID:23902246

  1. [Effect of anticancer agents on rat prostate. Evaluation of organ weight, histological finding and 5 alpha-reductase activities].

    PubMed

    Takeda, M; Hosaka, M; Kitajima, N; Noguchi, K; Fujii, H; Oshima, H; Harada, M

    1985-01-01

    To evaluate the effect of anticancer chemotherapeutic antigens on rat prostate, ten kinds of anticancer agents corresponding to the dose generally used for humans were intraperitoneally injected to 63-day-old Wistar rats. The anticancer agents were administered as follows: Cyclophosphamide (CPM) was used at the dose of 8 mg/kg for 7 days. Methotrexate (MTX), actinomycin-D (ACD) and cis-platinum (CDDP), 163 micrograms/kg, 8 micrograms/kg and 833 micrograms/kg for 5 days, respectively. Nitrogen mustard (NM), bleomycin (BLM), peplomycin (PLM), adriamycin (ADM), vincristine (VCR), and vinblastine (VBL), 500 micrograms/kg, 250 micrograms/kg, 170 micrograms/kg, 2.5 mg/kg, 33 micrograms/kg and 83 micrograms/kg, twice in a week, respectively. The rats were killed on the fifth day after completion of the schedule. Then, the weight of the body, the prostate, the epididymis and the adrenal gland were measured. In addition, 5 alpha-reductase activities and histological findings in the prostate were examined. For determination of 5 alpha-reductase activities, cell-free homogenate obtained from the rat ventral prostate was incubated with C14-testosterone at 37 degrees C for 30 minutes in an atmosphere of 95% of O2 and 5% of CO2. Subsequently, the metabolites from testosterone were separated and purified with thin layer chromatography using the solvent system with benzene acetone, 4:1 (v/v). 5 alpha-Reductase activity was determined with the sum of dihydrotestosterone (DHT) and androstanediol converted from testosterone and indicated as pmol product/mg protein. The 5 alpha-reductase activity was employed as a biological marker for the degree of androgenic dependency in the prostate. The results were summarized as follows. CDDP significantly reduced the weight of the body (p less than 0.001, n = 7), but not the activity of 5 alpha-reductase. NM and VBL had a specific action to reduce the weight of the prostate (p less than 0.01, n = 8) without causing loss of body weight. NM and

  2. Effect of a new conditioning agent on dentin.

    PubMed

    Hamlin, P; Lynch, E; Samarawickrama, D

    1990-06-01

    The effect of varying the duration of application of the conditioner for light-cured Zionomer was studied. The conditioner is a solution of oxalic acid and aluminum nitrate in a weak mineral acid and has a pH of 2.06. Recently extracted non-carious human premolars were sectioned horizontally 300 microns below the amelodentinal junction and then lightly ground with a high-speed diamond bur under copious water-spray to produce a smear layer. Each was then sectioned vertically into three and all the specimens were either treated with the Zionomer Conditioner for 5, 10, 20 or 30 seconds, or with distilled water as a control. All the specimens were examined in a scanning electron microscope at x1000 and photomicrographs taken which were then assessed, independently, by the authors. The results revealed that application of Zionomer Conditioner for as little as 5 seconds was sufficient to remove most of the smear layer. There was complete removal of the surface smear layer in specimens treated for 10 seconds or more. Either a 20 second or a 30 second application removed the smear layer completely and could also widen the exposed tubule orifices. PMID:2076233

  3. Cardiometabolic risk in psoriasis: differential effects of biologic agents

    PubMed Central

    Kaplan, Mariana J

    2008-01-01

    Psoriasis is associated to an increased risk of cardiovascular (CV) complications. Overall, the pathogenic mechanisms involved in premature CV complications in psoriasis appear to be complex and multifactorial, with traditional and nontraditional risk factors possibly contributing to the increased risk. Based on what is known about the pathogenesis of psoriasis and extrapolating the current knowledge on CV complications in other inflammatory diseases, studies are needed to investigate if appropriate control of the inflammatory, immunologic and metabolic disturbances present in psoriasis can prevent the development of this potentially lethal complication. It is clear that there is a great need for heightened awareness of the increased risk for vascular damage in patients with psoriasis. It is also crucial to closely monitor patients with psoriasis for CV risk factors including obesity, hypertension, diabetes, and hyperlipidemia. Whether treatment regimens that effectively manage systemic inflammation will lead to prevention of CV complications in psoriasis needs to be investigated. Clearly, studies should focus on establishing the exact mechanisms that determine CV risk in psoriasis so that appropriate preventive strategies and treatment guidelines can be established. PMID:19337536

  4. Effects of sub-minimum inhibitory concentrations of antimicrobial agents on Streptococcus mutans biofilm formation.

    PubMed

    Dong, Liping; Tong, Zhongchun; Linghu, Dake; Lin, Yuan; Tao, Rui; Liu, Jun; Tian, Yu; Ni, Longxing

    2012-05-01

    Many studies have demonstrated that sub-minimum inhibitory concentrations (sub-MICs) of antimicrobial agents can inhibit bacterial biofilm formation. However, the mechanisms by which antimicrobial agents at sub-MICs inhibit biofilm formation remain unclear. At present, most studies are focused on Gram-negative bacteria; however, the effects of sub-MICs of antimicrobial agents on Gram-positive bacteria may be more complex. Streptococcus mutans is a major cariogenic bacterium. In this study, the S. mutans growth curve as well as the expression of genes related to S. mutans biofilm formation were evaluated following treatment with 0.5× MIC of chlorhexidine (CHX), tea polyphenols and sodium fluoride (NaF), which are common anticaries agents. The BioFlux system was employed to generate a biofilm under a controlled flow. Morphological changes of the S. mutans biofilm were observed and analysed using field emission scanning electron microscopy and confocal laser scanning microscopy. The results indicated that these three common anticaries agents could significantly upregulate expression of the genes related to S. mutans biofilm formation, and S. mutans exhibited a dense biofilm with an extensive extracellular matrix following treatment with sub-MICs of NaF and CHX. These findings suggest that sub-MICs of anticaries agents favour S. mutans biofilm formation, which might encourage dental caries progression. PMID:22421330

  5. An agent-based modeling approach for determining corn stover removal rate and transboundary effects.

    PubMed

    Gan, Jianbang; Langeveld, J W A; Smith, C T

    2014-02-01

    Bioenergy production involves different agents with potentially different objectives, and an agent's decision often has transboundary impacts on other agents along the bioenergy value chain. Understanding and estimating the transboundary impacts is essential to portraying the interactions among the different agents and in the search for the optimal configuration of the bioenergy value chain. We develop an agent-based model to mimic the decision making by feedstock producers and feedstock-to-biofuel conversion plant operators and propose multipliers (i.e., ratios of economic values accruing to different segments and associated agents in the value chain) for assessing the transboundary impacts. Our approach is generic and thus applicable to a variety of bioenergy production systems at different sites and geographic scales. We apply it to the case of producing ethanol using corn stover in Iowa, USA. The results from the case study indicate that stover removal rate is site specific and varies considerably with soil type, as well as other factors, such as stover price and harvesting cost. In addition, ethanol production using corn stover in the study region would have strong positive ripple effects, with the values of multipliers varying with greenhouse gas price and national energy security premium. The relatively high multiplier values suggest that a large portion of the value associated with corn stover ethanol production would accrue to the downstream end of the value chain instead of stover producers. PMID:24276896

  6. An Agent-Based Modeling Approach for Determining Corn Stover Removal Rate and Transboundary Effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gan, Jianbang; Langeveld, J. W. A.; Smith, C. T.

    2014-02-01

    Bioenergy production involves different agents with potentially different objectives, and an agent's decision often has transboundary impacts on other agents along the bioenergy value chain. Understanding and estimating the transboundary impacts is essential to portraying the interactions among the different agents and in the search for the optimal configuration of the bioenergy value chain. We develop an agent-based model to mimic the decision making by feedstock producers and feedstock-to-biofuel conversion plant operators and propose multipliers (i.e., ratios of economic values accruing to different segments and associated agents in the value chain) for assessing the transboundary impacts. Our approach is generic and thus applicable to a variety of bioenergy production systems at different sites and geographic scales. We apply it to the case of producing ethanol using corn stover in Iowa, USA. The results from the case study indicate that stover removal rate is site specific and varies considerably with soil type, as well as other factors, such as stover price and harvesting cost. In addition, ethanol production using corn stover in the study region would have strong positive ripple effects, with the values of multipliers varying with greenhouse gas price and national energy security premium. The relatively high multiplier values suggest that a large portion of the value associated with corn stover ethanol production would accrue to the downstream end of the value chain instead of stover producers.

  7. Long-term health effects of exposure to sarin and other anticholinesterase chemical warfare agents.

    PubMed

    Page, William F

    2003-03-01

    In a telephone survey of 4,022 military volunteers for a 1955-1975 program of experimental exposures to chemical agents at Edgewood, Maryland, the current health of those exposed to anticholinesterase agents was compared with that of men exposed to no active chemicals (no chemical test) and to two or more other types of chemical agents (other chemical tests). The survey posed questions about general health and about neurological and psychological deficits. There were only two statistically significant differences: volunteers in anticholinesterase agent tests reported fewer attention problems than those in other chemical tests and greater sleep disturbance than those in no chemical tests. In contrast, volunteers who reported exposure to civilian or military chemical agents outside of their participation in the Edgewood program reported many statistically significant adverse neurological and psychological effects, regardless of their experimental exposure. In this study, the health effects of self-reported, nonexperimental exposure, which are subject to recall bias, were greater than the health effects of experimental exposure. PMID:12685692

  8. Synergistic Effects of Nonthermal Plasma and Disinfecting Agents against Dental Biofilms In Vitro

    PubMed Central

    Koban, Ina; Geisel, Marie Henrike; Holtfreter, Birte; Jablonowski, Lukasz; Hübner, Nils-Olaf; Matthes, Rutger; Masur, Kai; Weltmann, Klaus-Dieter; Kramer, Axel; Kocher, Thomas

    2013-01-01

    Aim. Dental biofilms play a major role in the pathogenesis of many dental diseases. In this study, we evaluated the synergistic effect of atmospheric pressure plasma and different agents in dentistry on the reduction of biofilms. Methods and Results. We used monospecies (S. mutans) and multispecies dental biofilm models grown on titanium discs in vitro. After treatment with one of the agents, the biofilms were treated with plasma. Efficacy of treatment was determined by the number of colony forming units (CFU) and by live-dead staining. For S. mutans biofilms no colonies could be detected after treatment with NaOCl or H2O2. For multispecies biofilms the combination with plasma achieved a higher CFU reduction than each agent alone. We found an additive antimicrobial effect between argon plasma and agents irrespective of the treatment order with cultivation technique. For EDTA and octenidine, antimicrobial efficacy assessed by live-dead staining differed significantly between the two treatment orders (P < 0.05). Conclusions. The effective treatment of dental biofilms on titanium discs with atmospheric pressure plasma could be increased by adding agents in vitro. PMID:24159388

  9. Effects of mononuclear phagocyte system modulating agents on Fc and C3 receptors of adherent cells.

    PubMed Central

    Hitomi, M.; Shimizu, F.

    1985-01-01

    Agents which modulate the mononuclear phagocyte system (MPS) were examined for their effects on Fc and C3 receptors of adherent cells (A-cells) as judged by rosette formation. Dextran sulphate, carrageenan, and immune complexes, known as MPS suppressants, reduced the percentage of receptor-positive A-cells, while levamisole, known as a MPS-activator, increased the percentage in vitro. The changes in the percentage of Fc receptor were parallel to those of the C3 receptor in vitro. The effects of these agents were also examined in vivo. PMID:2408651

  10. Therapeutic efficacy of ferrofluid bound anticancer agent

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alexiou, Ch.; Arnold, W.; Hulin, P.; Klein, R.; Schmidt, A.; Bergemannand, Ch.; Parak, F. G.

    2001-09-01

    Ferrofluids coated with starch polymers can be used as biocompatible carriers in a new field of locoregional tumor therapy called "magnetic drug targeting". Bound to medical drugs, such magnetic nanoparticles can be enriched in a desired body compartment using an external magnetic field. In the present study, we confirm the concentration of ferrofluids in VX2 squamous cell carcinoma tissue of the rabbit using histological investigations and MR imaging. The therapeutic efficacy of "magnetic drug targeting" was studied using the rabbit VX2 squamous cell carcinoma model. Mitoxantrone coupled ferrofluids were injected intraarterially into the artery supplying the tumor (femoral artery). The magnetic field (1.7 Tesla) was focused to the tumor placed at the medial portion of the hind limb of New Zealand White rabbits. Complete tumor remissions could be seen without any negative side effects by using only 20% of the normal systemic dosage of the chemotherapeutic agent mitoxantrone. Figs 3, Refs 14.

  11. Level Up, My-Pet: The Effects of Level-up Mechanism of Educational Agents on Student Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chen, Zhi-Hong; Chao, Po-Yao; Hsu, Ming-Chieh; Teng, Chin-Hung

    2013-01-01

    A number of studies have been devoted to investigating the influence of educational agents on different aspects of student learning. However, little attention has been paid to the effects of the level-up mechanism of educational agents on students although this is a significant issue. Thus, this study develops an educational agent with the…

  12. Xenograft models for undifferentiated pleomorphic sarcoma not otherwise specified are essential for preclinical testing of therapeutic agents

    PubMed Central

    Becker, Marc; Graf, Claudine; Tonak, Marcus; Radsak, Markus P.; Bopp, Tobias; Bals, Robert; Bohle, Rainer M.; Theobald, Matthias; Rommens, Pol-Maria; Proschek, Dirk; Wehler, Thomas C.

    2016-01-01

    Undifferentiated pleomorphic sarcoma not otherwise specified belongs to the heterogeneous group of soft tissue tumors. It is preferentially located in the upper and lower extremities of the body, and surgical resection remains the only curative treatment. Preclinical animal models are crucial to improve the development of novel chemotherapeutic agents for the treatment of undifferentiated pleomorphic sarcoma. However, this approach has been hampered by the lack of reproducible animal models. The present study established two xenograft animal models generated from stable non-clonal cell cultures, and investigated the difference in chemotherapeutic effects on tumor growth between undifferentiated pleomorphic sarcoma in vivo and in vitro. The cell cultures were generated from freshly isolated tumor tissues of two patients with undifferentiated pleomorphic sarcoma. For the in vivo analysis, these cells were injected subcutaneously into immunodeficient mice. The mice were monitored for tumor appearance and treated with the most common or innovative chemotherapeutic agents available to date. Furthermore, the same drugs were administered to in vitro cell cultures. The most effective tumor growth inhibition in vitro was observed with doxorubicin and the histone deacetylase inhibitor suberoylanilide hydroxamic acid (SAHA), also known as vorinostat. In the in vivo xenograft mouse model, the combination of doxorubicin and the tyrosine kinase inhibitor pazopanib induced a significant tumor reduction. By contrast, treatment with vorinostat did not reduce the tumor growth. Taken together, the results obtained from drug testing in vitro differed significantly from the in vivo results. Therefore, the novel and reproducible xenograft animal model established in the present study demonstrated that in vivo models are required to test potential chemotherapeutic agents for the treatment of undifferentiated pleomorphic sarcoma prior to clinical use, since animal models are more similar

  13. The efficacy of negative pressure wound therapy on chemotherapeutic extravasation ulcers: An experimental study

    PubMed Central

    Iscı, Evren; Canter, Halil I.; Dadacı, Mehmet; Atılla, Pergin; Cakar, Ayse N.; Kecık, Abdullah

    2014-01-01

    Context: The extravasation of the chemotherapeutic agents is not an unusual phenomenon. Necrosis of the skin and underlying structures has been reported, depending on the cytotoxicity of the extravasating drug. Despite the presence of some antidotes, such wounds tend to enlarge with time and are likely to resist the treatment. Aims: The objective of this study was to investigate the efficacy of negative pressure wound therapy (NPWT) on extravasation ulcers. Settings and Design: Animals were separated into two groups; conventional dressing group and NPWT group. Materials and Methods: Extravasation necrosis was established by intradermal doxorubicin injection. Following the debridement of the necrotic areas, one group of animals was treated with the conventional dressing while NPWT was applied to the other group. The wound areas were measured, and then biopsies were taken on the 3rd, 7th and 14th days after the debridement. Statistical Analysis Used: SPSS 11.5 for Windows was used. Two-way ANOVA test was used to compare wound areas between groups. Willcoxon sign test with Bonferroni correction was used to compare histological scores between groups. Chi-square test with Bonferroni correction was used to compare histological scores within the group between the days. Results: There is no significant difference in terms of inflammatory cell count, neovascularisation, granulation tissue formation between the groups. Contrary to these results wound areas at the end of the treatment were smaller in the NPWT group compared with the dressing group. Conclusion: There is the superiority of NPWT over conventional dressing in chemotherapeutic extravasation wounds as well as the wound area is concerned, but it is not proven histologically. PMID:25593426

  14. Measuring the effects of topically applied skin optical clearing agents and modeling the effects and consequences for laser therapies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verkruysse, Wim; Khan, Misbah; Choi, Bernard; Svaasand, Lars O.; Nelson, J. Stuart

    2005-04-01

    Human skin prepared with an optical clearing agent manifests reduced scattering as a result of de-hydration and refractive index matching. This has potentially large effects for laser therapies of several skin lesions such as port wine stain, hair removal and tattoo removal. With most topically applied clearing agents the clearing effect is limited because they penetrate poorly through the intact superficial skin layer (stratum corneum). Agent application modi other than topical are impractical and have limited the success of optical clearing in laser dermatology. In recent reports, however, a mixture of lipofylic and hydrofylic agents was shown to successfully penetrate through the intact stratum corneum layer which has raised new interest in this field. Immediately after application, the optical clearing effect is superficial and, as the agent diffuses through the skin, reduced scattering is manifested in deeper skin layers. For practical purposes as well as to maximize therapeutic success, it is important to quantify the reduced scattering as well as the trans-cutaneous transport dynamics of the agent. We determined the time and tissue depth resolved effects of optically cleared skin by inserting a microscopic reflector array in the skin. Depth dependent light intensity was measured by quantifying the signal of the reflector array with optical coherence tomography. A 1-dimensional mass diffusion model was used to estimate a trans-cutaneous transport diffusion constant for the clearing agent mixture. The results are used in Monte Carlo modeling to determine the optimal time of laser treatment after topical application of the optical clearing agent.

  15. Proarrhythmic effects of fluoroquinolone antibacterial agents: in vivo effects as physiologic substrate for torsades.

    PubMed

    Chiba, K; Sugiyama, A; Satoh, Y; Shiina, H; Hashimoto, K

    2000-11-15

    Drug-induced prolongation of the QT interval is often associated with the onset of Torsades de Pointes (TdP) resulting in a life-threatening ventricular arrhythmia. The potential of the proarrhythmic effects of the new fluoroquinolone antibacterial agents, levofloxacin and sparfloxacin, was examined in the chronic complete atrioventricular block dogs with stable idioventricular automaticity using Holter ECG monitoring in conscious state (Experiment 1). Next, to better analyze the mechanisms of the proarrhythmic property, the cardiovascular effects of these two drugs were compared in the halothane-anesthetized dogs under the monitoring of ECG, His bundle electrogram, systemic and left ventricular pressure, monophasic action potential, cardiac output, and effective refractory period (Experiment 2). In Experiment 1, oral administration of 6 mg/kg (n = 4) as well as 60 mg/kg (n = 4) of levofloxacin did not induce any ventricular premature depolarization. On the other hand, oral administration of 60 mg/kg of sparfloxacin (n = 4) induced TdP leading to ventricular fibrillation in all animals within 24 h, while 6 mg/kg of sparfloxacin (n = 4) did not induce any ventricular premature depolarization. In Experiment 2, intravenous administration of 0.3 mg/kg as well as 3.0 mg/kg of levofloxacin slightly increased cardiac output, but no significant changes were detected in the other parameters (n = 6). On the other hand, intravenous administration of 0.3 mg/kg of sparfloxacin prolonged the effective refractory period. Additional administration of 3.0 mg/kg of sparfloxacin decreased the heart rate and prolonged the effective refractory period and ventricular repolarization phase in a similar extent, but no significant changes were detected in the other parameters (n = 6). These results suggest that backward shift of the relative repolarization period in a cardiac cycle may be the mechanism responsible for the torsadegenic effect of sparfloxacin. PMID:11076691

  16. A potential adjuvant chemotherapeutics, 18β-glycyrrhetinic acid, inhibits renal tubular epithelial cells apoptosis via enhancing BMP-7 epigenetically through targeting HDAC2

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Taotao; Huang, Cheng; Meng, Xiaoming; Li, Xiaofeng; Zhang, Yilong; Ji, Shuai; Li, Jun; Ye, Min; Liang, Hong

    2016-01-01

    Cisplatin, a highly effective and widely used chemotherapeutic agent, has a major limitation for its nephrotoxicity. We recently identified a novel strategy for attenuating its nephrotoxicity in chemotherapy by an effective adjuvant via epigenetic modification through targeting HDAC2. Molecular docking and SPR assay firstly reported that 18βGA, major metabolite of GA, could directly bind to HDAC2 and inhibit the activity of HDAC2. The effects and mechanisms of GA and 18βGA were assessed in CP-induced AKI in C57BL/6 mice, and in CP-treated HK-2 and mTEC cells lines. TUNEL and FCM results confirmed that GA and 18βGA could inhibit apoptosis of renal tubular epithelial cells induced by CP in vivo and in vitro. Western blot and immunofluorescence results demonstrated that the expression of BMP-7 was clearly induced by 18βGA in AKI models while siRNA BMP-7 could reduce the inhibitory effect of 18βGA on apoptosis. Results of current study indicated that 18βGA inhibited apoptosis of renal tubular epithelial cells via enhancing the level of BMP-7 epigenetically through targeting HDAC2, therefore protecting against CP-induced AKI. These available evidence, which led to an improved understanding of molecular recognition, suggested that 18βGA could serve as a potential clinical adjuvant in chemotherapy. PMID:27145860

  17. Nanoscale Coordination Polymers Codeliver Chemotherapeutics and siRNAs to Eradicate Tumors of Cisplatin-Resistant Ovarian Cancer.

    PubMed

    He, Chunbai; Poon, Christopher; Chan, Christina; Yamada, S Diane; Lin, Wenbin

    2016-05-11

    Drug resistance impedes the successful treatment of many types of cancers, especially ovarian cancer (OCa). To counter this problem, we developed novel long-circulating, self-assembled core-shell nanoscale coordination polymer (NCP) nanoparticles that efficiently deliver multiple therapeutics with different mechanisms of action to enhance synergistic therapeutic effects. These NCP particles contain high payloads of chemotherapeutics cisplatin or cisplatin plus gemcitabine in the core and pooled siRNAs that target multidrug resistant (MDR) genes in the shell. The NCP particles possess efficient endosomal escape via a novel carbon dioxide release mechanism without compromising the neutral surface charge required for long blood circulation and effectively downregulate MDR gene expression in vivo to enhance chemotherapeutic efficacy by several orders of magnitude. Even at low doses, intraperitoneal injections of nanoparticles led to effective and long-lasting tumor regression/eradication in subcutaneous and intraperitoneal xenograft mouse models of cisplatin-resistant OCa. By silencing MDR genes in tumors, self-assembled core-shell nanoparticles promise a more effective chemotherapeutic treatment for many challenging cancers. PMID:27088560

  18. Effects of multifunctional crosslinking agents on the thermomechanical properties of polyimide films

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Delvigs, P.

    1975-01-01

    Three polyfunctional amines were synthesized. Polyimide films containing varying amounts of the amine crosslinking agents were prepared. Their thermomechanical properties were compared with those of control film samples prepared from difunctional amines. The effect of crosslink density on isothermal weight loss, polymer softening, and glass transition temperature is discussed.

  19. The effect of three desensitizing agents on dentin hypersensitivity: a randomized, split-mouth clinical trial.

    PubMed

    Torres, C R G; Silva, T M; Fonseca, B M; Sales, A L L S; Holleben, P; Di Nicolo, R; Borges, A B

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of three desensitizing agents to provide relief to dentin hypersensitivity after one session in a four-week follow-up. Forty selected patients participated in a double-blind study following a split-mouth model. One application of the desensitizing agents (A, Admira Protect [Voco]; B, Bifluorid 12 [Voco]; and C, Colgate Pro-Relief in office [Colgate Palmolive]) was performed in three different quadrants for each patient. Each tooth was evaluated by tactile and evaporative stimuli, and the sensitivity response was measured using the Visual Analogue Scale. Evaluations were performed at baseline, immediately after treatment, and after one, two, three, and four weeks. The application of Kruskal-Wallis and Dunn multiple comparisons tests (5%) for both tactile and evaporative stimuli showed that all agents presented a significant desensitizing effect. In groups A and B this relief was maintained for four and three weeks, respectively, as measured by tactile stimulus and for four weeks with evaporative stimulus. The desensitizing effect for group C was maintained for two weeks for both tactile and evaporative stimuli. It is concluded that all desensitizing agents tested were effective in reducing sensitivity compared to baseline values. One application of Admira Protect and Bifluorid 12 presented a longer-lasting desensitizing effect than did Colgate Pro-Relief (applied in the office) on both tactile and evaporative stimuli. PMID:24720265

  20. Indirect ecological effects in invaded landscapes: Spillover and spillback from biological control agents to native analogues

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Biological control remains an effective option for managing large-scale weed problems in natural areas. The predation or parasitism of biological control agents by other species present in the introduced range (biotic resistance) is well studied and is often cited as the cause for a lack of establis...

  1. NEUROTOXIC EFFECTS OF ENVIRONMENTAL AGENTS: DATA GAPS THAT CHALLENGE DOSE-RESPONSE ESTIMATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    Neurotoxic effects of environmental agents: Data gaps that challenge dose-response estimation
    S Gutter*, P Mendola+, SG Selevan**, D Rice** (*UNC Chapel Hill; +US EPA, NHEERL; **US EPA, NCEA)

    Dose-response estimation is a critical feature of risk assessment. It can be...

  2. CHARACTERIZATION AND IDENTIFICATION OF SUPER-EFFECTIVE THERMAL FIRE EXTINGUISHING AGENTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The use of halons for fire fighting is being phased out due to their deleterious effects on stratospheric ozone. This report summarizes the first-year findings of a three-year study designed to characterize and identify supereffective thermal fire-fighting agents as possible repl...

  3. Paradoxical effects of anti-TNF-α agents in inflammatory diseases.

    PubMed

    Wendling, Daniel; Prati, Clément

    2014-01-01

    Anti-TNF agents represent a major breakthrough in the management of inflammatory diseases. Among the side effects of these agents are the so-called paradoxical effects described in this review. They represent new onset or exacerbation of a condition (symptom/disease), usually improved with TNF blockers. These paradoxical effects are mainly psoriasiform skin reactions, uveitis and granulomatous diseases (such as sarcoidosis and Crohn's disease). Infrequent and probably underreported, they should be discussed from the viewpoint of spontaneous features of the underlying disease (e.g., uveitis or psoriasis in a case of spondyloarthritis). The causal mechanism of occurrence is still a matter of debate, but may implicate an imbalance of cytokines toward interferons, chemokines and probably IL-17. These reactions may raise differential diagnosis problems. Symptoms resolve, most of the time, due to the discontinuation of the anti-TNF agent or sometimes a switch to another TNF blocker; but in some cases, it is a class effect that could lead to the withdrawal of all anti-TNF agents. PMID:24325385

  4. Effects of an Animated Pedagogical Agent with Instructional Strategies in Multimedia Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yung, Hsin I.

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the instructional effects of a computer-generated agent in providing verbal and visual prompts as needed to facilitate student achievement of educational objectives. Sixty-seven college students were randomly selected into two instructional treatment groups and a control group. Significant differences in…

  5. Diffuse reflectance study of the effects of bleaching agents in damaged dental pieces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bante-Guerra, J.; Trejo-Tzab, R.; Macias, J. D.; Quintana, P.; Alvarado-Gil, J. J.

    2011-03-01

    One of the most important subjects of interest in dentistry and teeth preservation is related to the effects of bleaching agents on the integrity of the dental pieces. This is especially crucial when teeth surface has received some damage, generated by chemical, biological and mechanical agents or weathering in the case of dental pieces recovered from burial sites. In this work the time evolution of the effects of bleaching agents on the surface of dental pieces is monitored using diffuse reflectance in the visible spectrum is reported. The effects were monitored in teeth previously subject to chemical agents. Bleaching was induced using commercial whitening products. It is shown that the time evolution of the reflectance depends strongly on the condition of the surface as well as on the thickness of enamel. Additionally the colorimetric analysis of the samples during the bleaching is presented. This is especially useful in for comparing with previous studies. In order to complement our studies, the effects of the bleaching on the surface of the teeth were monitored by scanning electron microscopy.

  6. Supporting Multimedia Learning with Visual Signalling and Animated Pedagogical Agent: Moderating Effects of Prior Knowledge

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, A. M.; Ozogul, G.; Reisslein, M.

    2015-01-01

    An experiment examined the effects of visual signalling to relevant information in multiple external representations and the visual presence of an animated pedagogical agent (APA). Students learned electric circuit analysis using a computer-based learning environment that included Cartesian graphs, equations and electric circuit diagrams. The…

  7. A Study of Some Effects of Early Change Agent Behavior on a Group Client System.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Darden, Douglas Wylie

    A study was conducted to explore some of the relationships existing between the early behavior of a change agent with a group client system and its subsequent effects on the helping relationship established between them. A review of related literature was made. The model of helping relationship which formed the basis for the design of the study…

  8. Comparison of Cantharidin Toxicity in Breast Cancer Cells to Two Common Chemotherapeutics

    PubMed Central

    Kern, Katie M.; Schroeder, Jennifer R.

    2014-01-01

    As part of a larger study synthesizing a more directed form of chemotherapy, we have begun to assess the efficacy of different potential toxins that could be delivered locally rather than systemically. In doing so, we hope to reduce the systemic side effects commonly observed, while maintaining a high level of toxicity and eliminating the need for metabolic alterations. In a search for this more efficient method for killing cancerous cells, we have begun studying cantharidin, a toxin used in traditional Chinese medicine, as a potential chemotherapeutic. Using an MTT cell viability assay, the toxicity of cantharidin was compared to both cyclophosphamide and paclitaxel in three different breast cancer cell lines: MCF-7, MDA-MB-231, and SK-BR-3. Increasing the concentration of chemotherapy drugs did decrease cell viability in all cell lines when cantharidin and cyclophosphamide were applied; however differences for paclitaxel were cell-specific. Additionally, cantharidin exhibited the highest decrease in cell viability regardless of cell type, indicating it may be a much more potent and less specific chemotherapeutic. These results will help us move forward in developing a potentially more potent treatment for breast cancer that might eliminate the need for subtype-specific treatments. PMID:25302124

  9. PSMA-targeted SPECT agents: Mode of Binding effect on in vitro Performance

    PubMed Central

    Nedrow-Byers, Jessie R.; Moore, Adam L.; Ganguly, Tanushree; Hopkins, Mark R.; Fulton, Melody D.; Benny, Paul; Berkman, Clifford E.

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND The enzyme-biomarker prostate-specific membrane antigen (PSMA) is an active target for imaging and therapeutic applications for prostate cancer. The internalization of PSMA has been shown to vary with inhibitors’ mode of binding: irreversible, slowly reversible and reversible. METHODS In the present study, PSMA-targeted clickable derivatives of an irreversible phosphoramidate inhibitor DBCO-PEG4-CTT-54 (IC50 = 1.0 nM) and a slowly reversible phosphate inhibitor, DBCO-PEG4-CTT-54.2 (IC50 = 6.6 nM) were clicked to 99mTc(CO)3-DPA-azide to assemble a PSMA-targeted SPECT agent. The selectivity, percent uptake, and internalization of these PSMA-targeted SPECT agents were evaluated in PSMA-positive and PSMA-negative cells. RESULTS In vitro studies demonstrated that PSMA-targeted SPECT agents exhibited selective cellular uptake in the PSMA-positive LNCaP cells compared to PSMA-negative PC3 cells. More importantly, it was found that 99mTc(CO)3-DPA-DBCO-PEG4-CTT-54 based on an irreversible PSMA inhibitor core, exhibited greater uptake and internalization than 99mTc(CO)3-DPA-DBCO-PEG4-CTT-54.2 constructed from a slowly-reversible PSMA inhibitor core. CONCLUSIONS We have demonstrated that a PSMA-targeted SPECT agent can be assembled efficiently using copper-less click chemistry. In addition, we demonstrated that mode of binding has an effect on internalization and percent uptake of PSMA-targeted SPECT agents; with the irreversible targeting agent demonstrating superior uptake and internalization in PSMA+ cells. The approach demonstrated in this work now supports a modular approach for the assembly of PSMA-targeted imaging and therapeutic agents. PMID:22911263

  10. Effect of dispersing agent in heating process for high dispersion of coal liquefaction catalyst

    SciTech Connect

    Okada, Y.; Haneda, M.; Inokuchi, K.; Aihara, Y.; Imada, K.; Kai, T.; Sakaki, T.; Shibata, M.

    1999-07-01

    This work deals with one proposal concerning the improvement of catalytic activity on coal liquefaction. It is known that pyrite (FeS{sub 2}) transform into pyrrhotite (Fe{sub 1{minus}x}S) and aggregate at the heating process on coal liquefaction. The aggregation of liquefaction catalyst decreases the specific surface area, and causes the decline in catalytic activity. The authors investigated the effects of dispersing agent on the morphological change and the dispersing state of liquefaction catalyst at the rapid heating process. For the liquefaction tests with added dispersing agent, the product yields were compared with the results of other tests.

  11. Effect of using miscible and immiscible healing agent on solid state self-healing system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Makenan, Siti Mastura; Jamil, Mohd Suzeren Md.

    2014-09-01

    The aim of this study is to identify the effect of using various healing agent which are miscible; poly(bisphenol-A-co-epichlorohydrin), and immiscible; poly(ethylene-co-acetate) and poly(ethylene-co-acrylic acid), on self-healing resin system. The specimens were analysed by Fourier-transform Infrared Spectrometer (FTIR), Dynamic Mechanical Thermal Analysis (DMTA), and izod test. Optical image of the sample morphology was observed using optical microscope. Healing efficiencies (HE) were evaluated using izod test. The concept of healing recovery was proved based on the use of miscible and immiscible healing agent. From the results, it can be concluded that the healable resin with miscible healing agent has the highest HE within the third healing cycle.

  12. Effects of different encapsulation agents and drying process on stability of betalains extract.

    PubMed

    Ravichandran, Kavitha; Palaniraj, Ravichandran; Saw, Nay Min Min Thaw; Gabr, Ahmed M M; Ahmed, Abdelrahman R; Knorr, Dietrich; Smetanska, Iryna

    2014-09-01

    Red beet plants are rich in betalains that can be used as food natural colorants. Betalains were extracted from red beet and encapsulated with different carrier agents and freeze or spray dried. Effect of different encapsulating agents as maltodextrin, guar gum, gum Arabic, pectin and xanthan gum with different concentration (as encapsulating agents) were studied on the betalain stability. Encapsulated betalains with xanthan gum with maltodextrin showed about 65 % more recovery than the control. Encapsulation showed a higher recovery of betalains during freeze drying by 1.3 times than during spray drying. Spray dried samples has L* (lightness) higher than the freeze dried samples. The variations of maltodextrin with xanthan and guar gum freeze dried have highest chroma value of 21. The stabilization of pure betalain pigments may boost the use of these colouring molecules in the food industry and promote their application. PMID:25190886

  13. Effectiveness of dynamic rescheduling in agent-based flexible manufacturing systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saad, Ashraf; Biswas, Gautam; Kawamura, Kazuhiko; Johnson, Eric M.

    1997-12-01

    This work has been developed within the framework of agent- based decentralized scheduling for flexible manufacturing systems. In this framework, all workcells comprising the manufacturing system, and the products to be generated, are modeled via intelligent software agents. These agents interact dynamically using a bidding production reservation (BPRS) scheme, based on the Contract Net Protocol, to devise the production schedule for each product unit. Simulation studies of a job shop have demonstrated the gains in performance achieved by this approach over heuristic dispatching rules commonly used in industry. Manufacturing environments are also prone to operational uncertainties such as variations in processing times and machine breakdowns. In order to cope with these uncertainties, the BPRS algorithm has been extended for dynamic rescheduling to also occur in a fully decentralized manner. The resulting multi-agent rescheduling scheme results in decentralized control of flexible manufacturing systems that are capable of responding dynamically to such operational uncertainties, thereby enhancing the robustness and fault tolerance of the proposed scheduling approach. This paper also presents the effects of the proposed agent-based decentralized scheduling approach on the performance of the underlying flexible manufacturing system under a variety of production and scheduling scenarios, including forward and backward scheduling. Future directions for this work include applying the proposed scheduling approach to other advanced manufacturing areas such as agile and holonic manufacturing.

  14. Growth inhibitory effect of shelf life extending agents on Bacillus subtilis IAM 1026.

    PubMed

    Mitsuboshi, Saori; Obitsu, Rie; Muramatsu, Kanako; Furube, Kentaro; Yoshitake, Shigehiro; Kiuchi, Kan

    2007-06-01

    Natural shelf life extending agents and sugar fatty acid esters that might inhibit the growth of B. subtilis IAM 1026 were screened, and the effective agents were as follows: beta-thujaplicin (Hinokitiol) and chitosan, inhibited the growth of IAM 1026 at a concentration of 0.001% ; epsilon-polylysine and M-1695 (a sugar fatty acid ester) at 0.005%; citrus seed extract, thiamin lauryl sulfate, and grapefruit seed extract at 0.01%; CT-1695 and L-1695 (sugar fatty acid esters) at 0.05%; pectin digests and SM-800 (a sugar fatty acid ester) at 0.5%; water pepper seed extract and the sugar fatty acid esters SM-1000 and CE-1695 at 1.0%. The growth inhibitory effects of the agents in custard cream were not necessarily similar to those in liquid culture. The agent that showed the highest inhibitory effect in custard cream was 0.3% beta-thujaplicin, followed by 0.3% epsilon-polylysine. PMID:17629249

  15. Synergic effect of chelating agent and oxidant on chemical mechanical planarization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weijuan, Liu; Yuling, Liu

    2015-02-01

    Chemically dominant alkaline slurry, which is free of BTA (benzotriazole) and other inhibitors, was investigated. The synergic effect of the chelating agent and oxidant on the chemical mechanical planarization (CMP) was taken into consideration. Copper CMP slurry is mainly composed of an oxidizer, nonionic surfactant, chelating agent and abrasive particles. The effect of different synergic ratios of oxidant with chelating agent on the polishing removal rate, static etch rate and planarization were detected. The planarization results reveal that with the increase of oxidant concentration, the dishing value firstly diminished and then increased again. When the synergic ratios is 3, the dishing increases the least. A theoretical model combined with chemical-mechanical kinetics process was proposed in the investigation, which can explain this phenomenon. Based on the theoretical model, the effect of synergic ratios of oxidant with chelating agent on velocity D-value (convex removal rate minus recessed removal rate) was analyzed. The results illustrate that when the synergic ratio is between 2.5-3.5, the velocity D-value is relatively higher, thereby good planarization can be achieved in this interval. This investigation provides a new guide to analyze and study copper line corrosion in the recessed region during copper clearing polishing.

  16. Mixture toxicity effects of sea louse control agents in Daphnia magna.

    PubMed

    Rose, Stephanie; Altenburger, Rolf; Sturm, Armin

    2016-02-01

    Caligid sea lice are ectoparasites causing major disease problems in industrial salmon farming. Sea louse control currently relies widely on parasiticides. Among non-target species, crustaceans are particularly susceptible to salmon delousing agents. Drug combinations have recently been suggested for sea louse control; however, no information is available on the non-target effects of such mixtures. To obtain first insights into combination effects of salmon parasiticides, acute toxicity tests with the crustacean model species Daphnia magna were conducted. Four compounds, including two organophosphates and two pyrethroids, were tested individually and in all pair-wise combinations at one fixed concentration ratio. For most combinations, observed toxicities were close to predictions assuming concentration additivity. However, deltamethrin and cypermethrin showed greater than predicted combination effects, while the inverse was observed for deltamethrin and malathion. The results demonstrate combination effects of anti-sea louse agents and suggest that predictions based on concentration additivity are in most cases protective. PMID:26401637

  17. Protective effects of intravenous immunoglobulin and antimicrobial agents on acute pneumonia in leukopenic mice.

    PubMed

    Shimizu, Masaru; Katoh, Hideya; Hamaoka, Saeko; Kinoshita, Mao; Akiyama, Koichi; Naito, Yoshifumi; Sawa, Teiji

    2016-04-01

    Multi-drug resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa causes the type of acute lung injury that is strongly associated with bacteremia, sepsis, and mortality, especially under immunocompromised conditions. Although administration of immunoglobulin solution is an applicable immunotherapy in immunocompromised patients, efficacy of immunoglobulin administration against multi-drug resistant P. aeruginosa pneumonia has not been well evaluated. In this study, we investigated the effectiveness of prophylactic administration of immunoglobulin solution (IVIG) in comparison with that of other types of antimicrobial agents, such as anti-PcrV IgG, piperacillin/tazobactam, or colistin in an immunocompromised mouse model of P. aeruginosa pneumonia. Colistin was the most effective agent for preventing acute lung injury, bacteremia, cytokinemia, and sepsis. Among the four tested antimicrobial agents, after colistin, anti-PcrV IgG and IVIG were the most effective at protecting mice from mortality. Piperacillin/tazobactam did not prevent acute lung injury or bacteremia; rather, it worsened lung histology. The data suggest that using an agent for which a positive result in an in vitro susceptibility test has been obtained may not always prevent acute lung injury in a leukopenic host infected with P. aeruginosa. Clinicians should consider the possibility of discrepancies between in vitro and in vivo tests because the absence of in vitro bactericidal activity in an antimicrobial agent is not always a reliable predictor of its lack of ability to eradicate bacteria in vivo, even in immunocompromised hosts. Based on our findings, the potential protective effects of IVIG against the acute lung injury induced by P. aeruginosa should be reevaluated. PMID:26867796

  18. Neonatal behavioral assessment scale as a biomarker of the effects of environmental agents on the newborn

    SciTech Connect

    Tronick, E.Z.

    1987-10-01

    The organization of the newborn's brain and the nature of the effects of toxins and pollutants conspire to produce complex and difficult problems for the assessment of the behavioral effects of environmental agents. The newborn's brain can be characterized as relatively undifferentiated, and more vulnerable to, but potentially more capable of recovery from, the effects of environmental agents specific to this time period than it will be later in development. Environmental agents tend to have nonspecific, possibly subtle, effects that invade many areas of newborn functioning. These characteristics of the newborn and the behavioral effects of teratogens make assessment at this point in development difficult. Further exacerbating this difficulty is the nature of development. Development is critically dependent on the care the newborn receives. Distortions of a newborn's behavior can produce disturbances in the caretaking environment, and these caretaking disturbances can amplify the original behavioral distortion and produce other distortions. Attention to these types of effects must be built into an assessment. These considerations lead to the conclusion that an apical assessment of newborn behavior is required. The most standardized, valid, and reliable instrument currently available is the Neonatal Behavioral Assessment Scale developed by Brazelton. It assesses the integrated actions of the infant that function to regulate simultaneously the infant's internal state and exchanges with the animate (caretaking) and inanimate environment. The scale uses a set of reflex and behavioral items to assess the critical domains of infant functioning (e.g., the infant's ability to control his states of consciousness). 52 references.

  19. Effects of aminosalicylates and immunosuppressive agents on nitric oxide-dependent N-nitrosation reactions.

    PubMed

    Grisham, M B; Miles, A M

    1994-05-18

    Recent studies have demonstrated that nitric oxide (NO) rapidly and spontaneously decomposes in oxygenated solutions to generate potent N-nitrosating agents. These electrophilic substances have been shown to mediate mutagenesis and carcinogenesis via the formation of aliphatic and aromatic nitrosamines. We have also demonstrated that extravasated neutrophils and macrophages produce significant amounts of N-nitrosating agents derived exclusively from NO. During the course of these studies, we found that certain antioxidants, including 5-aminosalicylic acid (5-ASA), inhibited the leukocyte-mediated N-nitrosation reaction. Because 5-ASA and other anti-inflammatory and immunosuppressive drugs are used to treat inflammatory bowel disease, we wondered if any of these other compounds might also modulate N-nitrosation reactions in vitro. Therefore, the objectives of this study were to assess the ability of aminosalicylates and certain immunosuppressive agents to inhibit NO-dependent N-nitrosation of a model aromatic amine (2,3-diaminonaphthalene) and to determine whether this inhibitory activity correlated with their oxidation potential. We found that the concentrations necessary to inhibit the N-nitrosation reaction by 50% (IC50) were 25, 50 and 100 microM for 5-ASA, olsalazine (dimeric 5-ASA) and sulfasalazine, respectively. In contrast, sulfapyridine, 4-ASA, N-acetyl-5-ASA, 6-mercaptopurine, azathioprine, and methotrexate were either much less effective or inactive at inhibiting the N-nitrosation reaction. Although 5-ASA was able to fully scavenge the stable free radical 1,1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl, neither olsalazine nor sulfasalazine was found to be effective at scavenging this weak oxidant. We did find that olsalazine possessed an oxidation potential substantially less than that of sulfasalazine, suggesting that it may, in fact, scavenge more potent oxidizing agents such as the N-nitrosating agent. We conclude that 5-ASA and olsalazine inhibit NO-dependent N

  20. Cisplatin@US-tube Carbon Nanocapsules For Enhanced Chemotherapeutic Delivery

    PubMed Central

    Guven, Adem; Rusakova, Irene A.; Lewis, Michael T.; Wilson, Lon J.

    2012-01-01

    The use of chemotherapeutic drugs in cancer therapy is often limited by problems with administration such as insolubility, inefficient biodistribution, lack of selectivity, and inability of the drug to cross cellular barriers. To overcome these limitations, various types of drug delivery systems have been explored, and recently, carbon nanotube (CNT) materials have also garnered attention in the area of drug delivery. In this study, we describe the preparation, characterization, and in vitro testing of a new ultra-short single-walled carbon nanotube (US-tube)-based drug delivery system for the treatment of cancer. In particular, the encapsulation of cisplatin (CDDP), a widely-used anticancer drug, within US-tubes has been achieved, and the resulting CDDP@US-tube material characterized by high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HR-TEM), energy-dispersive spectroscopy (EDS), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), and inductively-coupled optical emission spectrometry (ICP-OES). Dialysis studies performed in phosphate-buffered saline (PBS) at 37 °C have demonstrated that CDDP release from CDDP@US-tubes can be controlled (retarded) by wrapping the CDDP@US-tubes with Pluronic-F108 surfactant. Finally, the anticancer activity of pluronic-wrapped CDDP@US-tubes has been evaluated against two different breast cancer cell lines, MCF-7 and MDA-MB-231, and found to exhibit enhanced cytotoxicity over free CDDP after 24 hours. These studies have laid the foundation for developing US-tube-based delivery of chemotherapeutics, with drug release mainly limited to within cancer cells only. PMID:22078812

  1. Biological effects of a root conditioning agent for dentin surface modification in vitro

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jue-Yeon; Seol, Yang-Jo; Park, Jang-Ryul; Park, Yoon-Jeong

    2010-01-01

    Purpose Connective tissue reattachment to periodontally damaged root surfaces is one of the most important goals of periodontal therapy. The aim of this study was to develop a root conditioning agent that can demineralize and detoxify the infected root surface. Methods Dentin slices obtained from human teeth were treated with a novel root planing agent for 2 minutes and then washed with phosphate-buffered saline. Smear layer removal and type I collagen exposure were observed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and type I collagen immunostaining, respectively. Cell attachment and lipopolysaccharides (LPS) removal demonstrated the efficiency of the root conditioning agent. Results SEM revealed that the smear layer was entirely removed and the dentinal tubules were opened by the experimental gel. Type I collagen was exposed on the surfaces of the dentin slices treated by the experimental gel, which were compared with dentin treated with other root planing agents. Dentin slices treated with the experimental gel showed the highest number of attached fibroblasts and flattened cell morphology. The agar diffusion assay demonstrated that the experimental gel also has effective antimicrobial activity. Escherichia coli LPS were effectively removed from well plates by the experimental gel. Conclusions These results demonstrated that this experimental gel is a useful tool for root conditioning of infected root surfaces and can also be applied for detoxification of ailing implant surface threads. PMID:21246015

  2. Mesoscopic effects in an agent-based bargaining model in regular lattices.

    PubMed

    Poza, David J; Santos, José I; Galán, José M; López-Paredes, Adolfo

    2011-01-01

    The effect of spatial structure has been proved very relevant in repeated games. In this work we propose an agent based model where a fixed finite population of tagged agents play iteratively the Nash demand game in a regular lattice. The model extends the multiagent bargaining model by Axtell, Epstein and Young modifying the assumption of global interaction. Each agent is endowed with a memory and plays the best reply against the opponent's most frequent demand. We focus our analysis on the transient dynamics of the system, studying by computer simulation the set of states in which the system spends a considerable fraction of the time. The results show that all the possible persistent regimes in the global interaction model can also be observed in this spatial version. We also find that the mesoscopic properties of the interaction networks that the spatial distribution induces in the model have a significant impact on the diffusion of strategies, and can lead to new persistent regimes different from those found in previous research. In particular, community structure in the intratype interaction networks may cause that communities reach different persistent regimes as a consequence of the hindering diffusion effect of fluctuating agents at their borders. PMID:21408019

  3. Graphene-based nanocomposite as an effective, multifunctional, and recyclable antibacterial agent.

    PubMed

    Tian, Tengfei; Shi, Xiaoze; Cheng, Liang; Luo, Yinchan; Dong, Ziliang; Gong, Hua; Xu, Ligeng; Zhong, Zengtao; Peng, Rui; Liu, Zhuang

    2014-06-11

    The development of new antibacterial agents that are highly effective are of great interest. Herein, we present a recyclable and synergistic nanocomposite by growing both iron oxide nanoparticles (IONPs) and silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) on the surface of graphene oxide (GO), obtaining GO-IONP-Ag nanocomposite as a novel multifunctional antibacterial material. Compared with AgNPs, which have been widely used as antibacterial agents, our GO-IONP-Ag shows much higher antibacterial efficiency toward both Gram-negative bacteria Escherichia coli (E. coli) and Gram-positive bacteria Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus). Taking the advantage of its strong near-infrared (NIR) absorbance, photothermal treatment is also conducted with GO-IONP-Ag, achieving a remarkable synergistic antibacterial effect to inhibit S. aureus at a rather low concentration of this agent. Moreover, with magnetic IONPs existing in the composite, we can easily recycle GO-IONP-Ag by magnetic separation, allowing its repeated use. Given the above advantages as well as its easy preparation and cheap cost, GO-IONP-Ag developed in this work may find potential applications as a useful antibacterial agent in the areas of healthcare and environmental engineering. PMID:24806506

  4. Mesoscopic Effects in an Agent-Based Bargaining Model in Regular Lattices

    PubMed Central

    Poza, David J.; Santos, José I.; Galán, José M.; López-Paredes, Adolfo

    2011-01-01

    The effect of spatial structure has been proved very relevant in repeated games. In this work we propose an agent based model where a fixed finite population of tagged agents play iteratively the Nash demand game in a regular lattice. The model extends the multiagent bargaining model by Axtell, Epstein and Young [1] modifying the assumption of global interaction. Each agent is endowed with a memory and plays the best reply against the opponent's most frequent demand. We focus our analysis on the transient dynamics of the system, studying by computer simulation the set of states in which the system spends a considerable fraction of the time. The results show that all the possible persistent regimes in the global interaction model can also be observed in this spatial version. We also find that the mesoscopic properties of the interaction networks that the spatial distribution induces in the model have a significant impact on the diffusion of strategies, and can lead to new persistent regimes different from those found in previous research. In particular, community structure in the intratype interaction networks may cause that communities reach different persistent regimes as a consequence of the hindering diffusion effect of fluctuating agents at their borders. PMID:21408019

  5. Acquisition of anoikis resistance in human osteosarcoma cells does not alter sensitivity to chemotherapeutic agents

    PubMed Central

    Díaz-Montero, C Marcela; McIntyre, Bradley W

    2005-01-01

    Background Chemotherapy-induced cell death can involve the induction of apoptosis. Thus, aberrant function of the pathways involved might result in chemoresistance. Since cell adhesion to the extracellular matrix acts as a survival factor that homeostatically maintains normal tissue architecture, it was tested whether acquisition of resistance to deadhesion-induced apoptosis (anoikis) in human osteosarcoma would result in resistance to chemotherapy. Methods Osteosarcoma cell lines (SAOS-2 and TE-85) obtained from ATCC and were maintained in complete Eagle's MEM medium. Suspension culture was established by placing cells in tissue culture wells coated with poly-HEMA. Cell cytotoxicity was determined using a live/dead cytotoxicity assay. Cell cycle/apoptosis analyses were performed using propidium iodide (PI) staining with subsequent FACS analysis. Apoptosis was also assayed by Annexin-FITC/PI staining. Results Etoposide, adriamycin, vinblastine, cisplatin and paclitaxel were able to induce apoptosis in human osteosarcoma cells SAOS-2 regardless of their anoikis resistance phenotype or the culture conditions (adhered vs. suspended). Moreover, suspended anoikis resistant TE-85 cells (TE-85ar) retained their sensitivity to chemotherapy as well. Conclusion Acquisition of anoikis resistance in human osteosarcoma cells does not result in a generalized resistance to all apoptotic stimuli, including chemotherapy. Moreover, our results suggest that the pathways regulating anoikis resistance and chemotherapy resistance might involve the action of different mediators. PMID:15829011

  6. MULTIDRUG RESISTANT TRANSPORT ACTIVITY PROTECTS OOCYTES FROM CHEMOTHERAPEUTIC AGENTS AND CHANGES DURING OOCYTE MATURATION

    PubMed Central

    Brayboy, Lynae M.; Oulhen, Nathalie; Witmyer, Jeannine; Robins, Jared; Carson, Sandra; Wessel, Gary M.

    2013-01-01

    Objective To determine the multidrug resistant (MDR) transporter activity in oocytes and their potential role in oocyte susceptibility to chemotherapy. Design Experimental laboratory study Setting University and Academic Center for reproductive medicine. Patients/Animals Women with eggs retrieved for ICSI cycles and adult female FVBN and B6C3F1 mouse strains. Intervention Inhibition of MDR activity in oocytes. Main Outcome measure(s) Efflux activity of MDRs using quantitative fluorescent dye efflux and oocyte cell death when exposed to chemotherapy. Results Oocytes effluxed fluorescent reporters and this activity was significantly reduced in the presence of the MDR inhibitor PSC 833. GV oocytes are more efficient at efflux compared to M2 oocytes. Human oocytes exposed to cyclophosphamide and PSC 833 showed cell death using two different viability assays compared to controls and those exposed to cyclophosphamide alone. Immunoblots detected MDR-1 in all oocytes with the greatest accumulation in the GV stage. Conclusions Oocytes have a vast repertoire of active MDRs. The implications of this study are that these protective mechanisms are important during oogenesis, and these activities change with maturation, increasing susceptibility to toxicants. Future directions may exploit the up regulation of these transporters during gonadotoxic therapy. PMID:23953328

  7. KAP1 dictates p53 response induced by chemotherapeutic agents via Mdm2 interaction

    SciTech Connect

    Okamoto, Koji . E-mail: kojokamo@gan2.res.ncc.go.jp; Kitabayashi, Issay; Taya, Yoichi . E-mail: ytaya@gan2.res.ncc.go.jp

    2006-12-08

    KAP1 recruits many proteins involved in gene silencing and functions as an integral part of co-repressor complex. KAP1 was identified as Mdm2-binding protein and shown to form a complex with Mdm2 and p53 in vivo. We examined the role of KAP1 in p53 activation after the treatment of cells with different types of external stresses. KAP1 reduction markedly enhanced the induction of p21, a product of the p53 target gene, after treatment with actinomycin D or {gamma}-irradiation, but not with camptothecin. Treatment with actinomycin D, but not with camptothecin, augmented the interaction of p53 with Mdm2 and KAP1. Further, KAP1 reduction in actinomycin D-treated cells facilitated cell cycle arrest and negatively affected clonal cell growth. Thus, the reduction of KAP1 levels promotes p53-dependent p21 induction and inhibits cell proliferation in actinomycin D-treated cells. KAP1 may serve as a therapeutic target against cancer in combination with actinomycin D.

  8. Mycophenolic Acid and Its Derivatives as Potential Chemotherapeutic Agents Targeting Inosine Monophosphate Dehydrogenase in Trypanosoma congolense.

    PubMed

    Suganuma, Keisuke; Sarwono, Albertus Eka Yudistira; Mitsuhashi, Shinya; Jąkalski, Marcin; Okada, Tadashi; Nthatisi, Molefe; Yamagishi, Junya; Ubukata, Makoto; Inoue, Noboru

    2016-07-01

    This study aimed to evaluate the trypanocidal activity of mycophenolic acid (MPA) and its derivatives for Trypanosoma congolense The proliferation of T. congolense was completely inhibited by adding <1 μM MPA and its derivatives. In addition, the IMP dehydrogenase in T. congolense was molecularly characterized as the target of these compounds. The results suggest that MPA and its derivatives have the potential to be new candidates as novel trypanocidal drugs. PMID:27139487

  9. Lithium Modulates Autophagy in Esophageal and Colorectal Cancer Cells and Enhances the Efficacy of Therapeutic Agents In Vitro and In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    O’Donovan, Tracey R.; Rajendran, Simon; O’Reilly, Seamus; McKenna, Sharon L.

    2015-01-01

    Many epithelial cancers, particularly gastrointestinal tract cancers, remain poor prognosis diseases, due to resistance to cytotoxic therapy and local or metastatic recurrence. We have previously shown that apoptosis incompetent esophageal cancer cells induce autophagy in response to chemotherapeutic agents and this can facilitate their recovery. However, known pharmacological inhibitors of autophagy could not enhance cytotoxicity. In this study, we have examined two well known, clinically approved autophagy inducers, rapamycin and lithium, for their effects on chemosensitivity in apoptosis incompetent cancer cells. Both lithium and rapamycin were shown to induce autophagosomes in esophageal and colorectal cancer cells by western blot analysis of LC3 isoforms, morphology and FACS quantitation of Cyto-ID or mCherry-GFP-LC3. Analysis of autophagic flux indicates inefficient autophagosome processing in lithium treated cells, whereas rapamycin treated cells showed efficient flux. Viability and recovery was assessed by clonogenic assays. When combined with the chemotherapeutic agent 5-fluorouracil, rapamycin was protective. In contrast, lithium showed strong enhancement of non-apoptotic cell death. The combination of lithium with 5-fluorouracil or oxaliplatin was then tested in the syngenic mouse (balb/c) colorectal cancer model—CT26. When either chemotherapeutic agent was combined with lithium a significant reduction in tumor volume was achieved. In addition, survival was dramatically increased in the combination group (p < 0.0001), with > 50% of animals achieving long term cure without re-occurrence (> 1 year tumor free). Thus, combination treatment with lithium can substantially improve the efficacy of chemotherapeutic agents in apoptosis deficient cancer cells. Induction of compromised autophagy may contribute to this cytotoxicity. PMID:26248051

  10. Creating chemotherapeutic-resistant breast cancer cell lines: advances and future perspectives.

    PubMed

    Steding, Catherine E

    2016-06-01

    The development of resistance remains the most significant impediment to generating effective treatments for cancer. In the modern age of personalized medicine, it is of critical importance to understand the principles of both innate and acquired resistance to achieve the most effective therapeutic outcomes. Significant differences exist between cancer cells that exhibit innate resistance verses those that acquire resistance over time. Studying the acquisition of resistance is essential to obtaining a complete understanding of how treatments contribute to disease recurrence and progression. This review will evaluate the current understanding of chemotherapeutic resistance and its role in personalized medicine. This review will also explore how generating resistant cells in culture is essential to the development of improved cancer therapeutics. PMID:27063568

  11. Multi-agent systems: effective approach for cancer care information management.

    PubMed

    Mohammadzadeh, Niloofar; Safdari, Reza; Rahimi, Azin

    2013-01-01

    Physicians, in order to study the causes of cancer, detect cancer earlier, prevent or determine the effectiveness of treatment, and specify the reasons for the treatment ineffectiveness, need to access accurate, comprehensive, and timely cancer data. The cancer care environment has become more complex because of the need for coordination and communication among health care professionals with different skills in a variety of roles and the existence of large amounts of data with various formats. The goals of health care systems in such a complex environment are correct health data management, providing appropriate information needs of users to enhance the integrity and quality of health care, timely access to accurate information and reducing medical errors. These roles in new systems with use of agents efficiently perform well. Because of the potential capability of agent systems to solve complex and dynamic health problems, health care system, in order to gain full advantage of E- health, steps must be taken to make use of this technology. Multi-agent systems have effective roles in health service quality improvement especially in telemedicine, emergency situations and management of chronic diseases such as cancer. In the design and implementation of agent based systems, planning items such as information confidentiality and privacy, architecture, communication standards, ethical and legal aspects, identification opportunities and barriers should be considered. It should be noted that usage of agent systems only with a technical view is associated with many problems such as lack of user acceptance. The aim of this commentary is to survey applications, opportunities and barriers of this new artificial intelligence tool for cancer care information as an approach to improve cancer care management. PMID:24460364

  12. Can patients with metastatic breast cancer be cured after introduction of newer and more effective agents?

    PubMed

    Ohno, Shinji; Tanaka, Kimihiro; Koga, Chinami; Nishimura, Sumiko; Yamaguchi, Hiroshi; Kawaguchi, Hidetoshi; Yoshiyama, Tomoyuki; Nakamura, Yoshiaki

    2012-07-01

    Unlike early stage breast cancer, metastatic breast cancer (MBC) is generally considered incurable except for a small number of patients with oligometastatic disease. The goal of treatment of MBC should be the prolongation of life and improvement of symptoms and quality of life. The prognoses of patients with MBC, however, have been improved with the introduction of newer, more effective agents. Therefore, the clinical question arises whether MBC patients can be cured with these new therapeutic agents. However, there are a couple of problems in tackling this question, including the duration of follow-up and the presence of strong adjuvant therapy. Firstly, most trials in MBC have a relatively short follow-up; long-term surveillance (>3-5 years) is exceptional, so little is known about the definitive outcome and the exact proportion of long-term survivors. Secondly, most of the patients have received pre- or postoperative adjuvant therapy. The cancer cells at metastatic sites are considered to be relatively resistant to the agents used in metastatic settings. Promisingly, a number of novel therapeutic agents including antibody-drug conjugates, irreversible small molecule HER2-tyrosine inhibitors, and HER2 dimerization inhibitors show promise in the treatment of HER2-overexpressing MBC, as well as PARP-1 [poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase-1] inhibitors for triple-negative breast cancer. PMID:21630056

  13. Effectiveness of laser therapy and topical desensitising agents in treating dentine hypersensitivity: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    He, S; Wang, Y; Li, X; Hu, D

    2011-05-01

    The aim of this systematic review was to compare the effectiveness of laser therapy with that of topical desensitising agents in treating dentine hypersensitivity. A secondary objective was to determine the safety of laser application according to the relevant studies. A systematic search was performed in the MEDLINE, EMBASE, the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, the National Research Register, the Cochrane Oral Health Group's Trials Register database to retrieve all articles that were about randomised controlled trials involving the application of laser desensitising procedures and topical desensitising agents in the treatment of dentine hypersensitivity. A total of eight trials that met all inclusion criteria involving 234 participants were reviewed. Based upon the 'quality' of evidence, one study was classified as A level, five as B level and two as C level. Owing to the heterogeneity of the studies, a meta-analysis was not performed. Half of the included studies compared GaALAS laser with topical desensitising agents, but the findings were conflicting. The remaining studies involved Nd:YAG laser, Er:YAG laser and CO2 laser, and all showed that the three types of lasers were superior to topical desensitising agents, but the superiority was slight. A systematic review of the literature indicates the likelihood that laser therapy has a slight clinical advantage over topical medicaments in the treatment of dentine hypersensitivity. More large sample-sized, long-term, high-quality randomised controlled clinical trials are needed before definitive conclusions were made. PMID:21223353

  14. An in vitro evaluation of the effects of desensitizing agents on microleakage of Class V cavities

    PubMed Central

    Yikilgan, İhsan; Özcan, Suat; Bala, Oya; Ömürlü, Hüma

    2016-01-01

    Background The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of a desensitizing agent on microleakage of Class V cavities. Material and Methods 72 premolar teeth were used. There were 6 groups. Class V restorations were prepared with two different restorative materials (Equia fil, GC, America and Grandio, VOCO, Germany) and two adhesive systems (Clearfil SE Bond, Kuraray, Japan and S3 Bond Plus, Kuraray, Japan) with and without desensitizing agent (Gluma Desensitizer, Heraeus Kulzer, Germany). Restorations were polished with aluminum oxide abrasive discs. Then a range of 5 - 55C thermocycling was performed 10.000 times. The microleakage of restorations was examined with dye penetration method (Basic fuchsine). Bonferroni corrections and Kruskal-Wallis test were used to determine the significance of differences in occlusal and gingival dye penetration scores between groups. Results There was no stastistical significance between the occlusal and gingival microleakage scores within the groups were shown. Conclusions It can be concluded that use of desensitizing agent under both high viscosity glass ionomer restorative materials and resin composites doesn’t affect the microleakage. Key words:High viscosity glass ionomer cement, composite resin, desensitizing agent, microleakage. PMID:26855707

  15. Effects of biradical deuteration on the performance of DNP: Towards better performing polarizing agents

    SciTech Connect

    Perras, Frédéric A.; Reinig, Regina R.; Slowing, Igor I.; Sadow, Aaron D.; Pruski, Marek

    2015-11-20

    We study the effects of the deuteration of biradical polarizing agents on the efficiency of dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) via the cross-effect. To this end, we synthesized a series of bTbK and TOTAPol biradicals with systematically increased deuterium substitution. The deuteration increases the radicals' relaxation time, thus contributing to a higher saturation factor and larger DNP enhancement, and reduces the pool of protons within the so-called spin diffusion barrier. Notably, we report that full or partial deuteration leads to improved DNP enhancement factors in standard samples, but also slows down the build-up of hyperpolarization. Improvements in DNP enhancements factors of up to 70% and time savings of up to 38% are obtained upon full deuteration. As a result, it is foreseen that this approach may be applied to other DNP polarizing agents thus enabling further sensitivity improvements.

  16. Effects of biradical deuteration on the performance of DNP: Towards better performing polarizing agents

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Perras, Frédéric A.; Reinig, Regina R.; Slowing, Igor I.; Sadow, Aaron D.; Pruski, Marek

    2015-11-20

    We study the effects of the deuteration of biradical polarizing agents on the efficiency of dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) via the cross-effect. To this end, we synthesized a series of bTbK and TOTAPol biradicals with systematically increased deuterium substitution. The deuteration increases the radicals' relaxation time, thus contributing to a higher saturation factor and larger DNP enhancement, and reduces the pool of protons within the so-called spin diffusion barrier. Notably, we report that full or partial deuteration leads to improved DNP enhancement factors in standard samples, but also slows down the build-up of hyperpolarization. Improvements in DNP enhancements factors ofmore » up to 70% and time savings of up to 38% are obtained upon full deuteration. As a result, it is foreseen that this approach may be applied to other DNP polarizing agents thus enabling further sensitivity improvements.« less

  17. Bioaccumulations of aluminum and the effects of chelating agents on different organs of Cirrhinus mrigala.

    PubMed

    Sivakumar, S; Khatiwada, Chandra Prasad; Sivasubramanian, J

    2012-11-01

    The study of biological indicator organisms may be more informative than analyzing water or sediments for monitoring heavy metal pollution in the aquatic environment. Non-essential elements enter into the animals and accumulate at the different organs so that chelating agents are most versatile and effective antidotes to eliminate the metals toxicities. The aim of our present study is to find out bioaccumulations of aluminum and the effects of chelating agents DFO and DFP in Muscle, gill, kidney, brain and liver tissues of Cirrhinus mrigala by using inductively coupled atomic emission spectrometry (ICP-AES). This study determined that the accumulation pattern of aluminum is muscle > gill > kidney > brain > liver. The present result suggests that DFO and DFP reduce the aluminum concentration in the tissues of C. mrigala fish and both are efficient chelators. Aluminum toxicity is a widespread problem in all forms of life, including humans, animals, fish, plants, and causes wide spread degradation of the environment and health. PMID:23063109

  18. Pharmacokinetic interactions of breast cancer chemotherapeutics with human doxorubicin reductases.

    PubMed

    Hofman, Jakub; Skarka, Adam; Havrankova, Jana; Wsol, Vladimir

    2015-08-01

    Paclitaxel (PTX), docetaxel (DTX), 5-fluorouracil (5-FU), cyclophosphamide (CYC) or tamoxifen (TMX) are combined with doxorubicin (DOX) in first-line chemotherapy regimens that are indicated for breast cancer patients. Although the efficacies of these drugs in combination treatments have been demonstrated in clinical practice, their possible interference with DOX metabolism has not been described in detail to date. In the present study, we investigated the possible interactions of human carbonyl reducing enzymes with 5-FU, PTX, DTX, CYC and TMX. First, the reducing activities of carbonyl reducing enzymes toward DOX were tested using incubations with purified recombinant enzymes. In the subsequent studies, we investigated the possible effects of the tested anticancer agents on the DOX-reducing activities of the most potent enzymes (AKR1C3, CBR1 and AKR1A1) and on the DOX metabolism driven by MCF7, HepG2 and human liver cytosols. In both of these assays, we observed that CYC and its active metabolites inhibited DOX metabolism. In the final study, we tracked the changes in AKR1C3, CBR1 and AKR1A1 expression levels following exposure to the tested cytostatics in MCF7 and HepG2 cells. Consequently, no significant changes in the expression levels of tested enzymes were detected in either cell line. Based on these findings, it is feasible to presume that inhibition rather than induction plays a role in the interactions of the tested anticancer agents with DOX-reducing enzymes. In conclusion, our results describe important molecular events that occur during combination breast cancer therapies and might modulate pharmacokinetic DOX resistance and/or behaviour. PMID:25986883

  19. Highly effective configurational assignment using bisthioureas as chiral solvating agents in the presence of DABCO.

    PubMed

    Bian, Guangling; Fan, Hongjun; Huang, Huayin; Yang, Shiwei; Zong, Hua; Song, Ling; Yang, Genjin

    2015-03-20

    A highly effective (1)H NMR method for determining the absolute configurations of various chiral α-hydroxyl acids and their derivatives has been developed with the use of bisthioureas (R)-CSA 1 and (S)-CSA 1 as chiral solvating agents in the presence of DABCO, giving distinguishable proton signals with up to 0.66 ppm chemical shift nonequivalence. Computational modeling studies were performed with Gaussian09 to reveal the chiral recognition mechanism. PMID:25751415

  20. Effects of chemical and biological warfare remediation agents on the materials of museum objects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Solazzo, C.; Erhardt, D.; Marte, F.; von Endt, D.; Tumosa, C.

    In the fall of 2001, anthrax-contaminated letters were sent to public figures in the United States. Chemical and radiation treatments were employed to decontaminate exposed buildings, objects, and materials. These treatments are effective, but potentially damaging to exposed objects and materials. The recommended surface chemical treatments include solutions, gels, and foams of oxidizing agents such as peroxides or chlorine bleaching agents. Such oxidizing agents are effective against a wide range of hazardous chemical and biological agents. Knowing how these reagents affect various substrates would help to anticipate and to minimize any potential damage. We are examining the effects on typical museum materials of reagents likely to be used, including hydrogen peroxide, sodium hypochlorite, and potassium peroxymonosulfate. Results so far show significant changes in a number of materials. Surface corrosion was observed on metals such as copper, silver, iron, and brass. Color changes occurred with at least one reagent in about one-fourth of the dyed fabric swatches tested, and about half of the inks. Samples of aged yellowed paper are bleached. Effects varied with both the substrate and the tested reagent. The observed changes were generally less drastic than might have been expected. Enough materials were affected, though, to preclude the use of these reagents on museum objects unless no less drastic alternative is available. It appears that many objects of lesser intrinsic value can be treated without severe loss of properties or usefulness. For example, most documents should remain legible if the appropriate reagent is used. This work will provide a basis for determining which treatment is most appropriate for a specific situation and what consequences are to be expected from other treatments.

  1. Effects of various pharmacological agents on the function of norepinephrine transporter.

    PubMed

    Satoh, Noriaki; Toyohira, Yumiko; Takahashi, Keita; Yanagihara, Nobuyuki

    2015-03-01

    The norepinephrine transporter is selectively expressed in noradrenergic nerve terminals, where it can exert spatial and temporal control over the action of norepinephrine. The norepinephrine transporter mediates the termination of neurotransmission via the reuptake of norepinephrine released into the extracellular milieu. In the present brief review, we report our recent studies about the effects of various pharmacological agents such as fasudil, nicotine, pentazocine, ketamine and genistein on norepinephrine transporter function. PMID:25787100

  2. Nanoparticle-facilitated autophagy inhibition promotes the efficacy of chemotherapeutics against breast cancer stem cells.

    PubMed

    Sun, Rong; Shen, Song; Zhang, Yun-Jiao; Xu, Cong-Fei; Cao, Zhi-Ting; Wen, Long-Ping; Wang, Jun

    2016-10-01

    Cancer stem cells (CSCs) have garnered increasing attention over the past decade, as they are believed to play a crucial role in tumor initiation, progression and metastasis, relapse and drug resistance. Therapeutic strategies which simultaneously exterminate both bulk tumor cells and the rare CSC subpopulation may produce striking response and result in long-term tumor remission. Accumulating evidence provides insight into the function of autophagy in maintenance, plasticity and survival of CSCs. The role of autophagy in the susceptibility of breast CSCs to chemotherapeutics was investigated in the present work, reduced 'stemness' and increased susceptibility to chemotherapy drugs (doxorubicin, DOX and docetaxel, DTXL) were observed after chloroquine (CQ)-mediated autophagy inhibition in sorted ALDH(hi) cells of breast cancer cell line MDA-MB-231. We further proved that nanoparticle-mediated autophagy inhibition promoted the efficacy of chemotherapeutics against ALDH(hi) MDA-MB-231 cells in vitro. Administration of drug delivery systems significantly prolonged the circulation half-life and augmented enrichment of two different drugs in tumor tissues and ALDH(hi) cells. More importantly, compared with single treatment, the combined delivery systems NPCQ/NPDOX and NPCQ/DOX (NPCQ/NPDTXL and NPCQ/DTXL) showed most effective and persistent tumor growth inhibitory effect by eliminating bulk tumor cells as well as CSCs (p < 0.01) in an MDA-MB-231 orthotopic tumor murine model. Therefore, our research provides new insights into the nanoparticle-facilitated combination of autophagy inhibition and chemotherapy for effective therapy of breast cancer. PMID:27376558

  3. Effect of antifungal agents on lipid biosynthesis and membrane integrity in Candida albicans.

    PubMed Central

    Georgopapadakou, N H; Dix, B A; Smith, S A; Freudenberger, J; Funke, P T

    1987-01-01

    Eight antifungal agents were examined for effects on lipid biosynthesis and membrane integrity in Candida albicans. Lipids were labeled in vivo or in vitro with [14C]acetate and analyzed by thin-layer and gas chromatography. Membrane integrity was measured by a recently developed [14C]aminoisobutyric acid radiolabel release assay. The imidazole antifungal agents miconazole, econazole, clotrimazole, and ketoconazole, at concentrations inhibiting ergosterol biosynthesis (0.1 microM), decreased the ratio of unsaturated to saturated fatty acids in vivo but not in vitro. Similarly, naftifine, tolnaftate, and the azasterol A25822B, at concentrations inhibiting ergosterol biosynthesis (10, 100, and 1 microM, respectively), decreased the ratio of unsaturated to saturated fatty acids in vivo only. This suggests that the effect on fatty acids observed with ergosterol biosynthesis inhibitors may be secondary to the effect on ergosterol. With imidazoles, oleic acid antagonized inhibition of cell growth but not inhibition of ergosterol. This suggests that, with the C-14 demethylase inhibitors, decreased unsaturated fatty acids, rather than decreased ergosterol, are responsible for growth inhibition. Cerulenin, previously reported to be a potent inhibitor of both fatty acid and ergosterol biosynthesis, was found in the present study to inhibit the former (at 5 microM) but not the latter (up to 100 microM). Of the antifungal agents tested, econazole and miconazole (at 100 microM) produced complete release of [14C]aminoisobutyric acid, which is consistent with membrane damage. PMID:3551826

  4. Effect of the lactoperoxidase system against three major causal agents of disease in mangoes.

    PubMed

    Le Nguyen, Doan Duy; Ducamp, Marie-Noelle; Dornier, Manuel; Montet, Didier; Loiseau, Gérard

    2005-07-01

    The antibacterial activity of the lactoperoxidase system (LPS) on the growth of Xanthomonas campestris, the causal agent of bacterial black spot in mangoes, Botryodiplodia theobromae, the causal agent of stem-end rot disease in mangoes, and Colletotrichum gloeosporioides, the causal agent of anthracnose disease in mangoes, was determined during culture at 30 degrees C and at several pH values (4.5, 5.5, and 6.5). When the results of using the LPS were compared with those from control cultures without the LPS reagents, the growth of the three microorganisms was totally inhibited in all of the conditions tested. Viability tests enumerating cultivable cells of X. campestris showed that the LPS had a bactericidal effect, whatever the pH value. This effect is faster at pH 5.5, corroborating the results reported in the literature (optimal pH for the LPS efficiency). Further, we proved that hydrogen peroxide alone had little inhibition effect on the growth of the microorganisms studied. This compound is essentially used to convert thiocyanate into hypothiocyanate during the lactoperoxidase reaction. The potential of the LPS for the postharvest treatment of the fruits for controlling microbial diseases was thus demonstrated. Nevertheless, further studies are needed on fresh fruits before envisaging any application. PMID:16013395

  5. Bayesian Nonparametric Estimation of Targeted Agent Effects on Biomarker Change to Predict Clinical Outcome

    PubMed Central

    Graziani, Rebecca; Guindani, Michele; Thall, Peter F.

    2015-01-01

    Summary The effect of a targeted agent on a cancer patient's clinical outcome putatively is mediated through the agent's effect on one or more early biological events. This is motivated by pre-clinical experiments with cells or animals that identify such events, represented by binary or quantitative biomarkers. When evaluating targeted agents in humans, central questions are whether the distribution of a targeted biomarker changes following treatment, the nature and magnitude of this change, and whether it is associated with clinical outcome. Major difficulties in estimating these effects are that a biomarker's distribution may be complex, vary substantially between patients, and have complicated relationships with clinical outcomes. We present a probabilistically coherent framework for modeling and estimation in this setting, including a hierarchical Bayesian nonparametric mixture model for biomarkers that we use to define a functional profile of pre-versus-post treatment biomarker distribution change. The functional is similar to the receiver operating characteristic used in diagnostic testing. The hierarchical model yields clusters of individual patient biomarker profile functionals, and we use the profile as a covariate in a regression model for clinical outcome. The methodology is illustrated by analysis of a dataset from a clinical trial in prostate cancer using imatinib to target platelet-derived growth factor, with the clinical aim to improve progression-free survival time. PMID:25319212

  6. Bayesian nonparametric estimation of targeted agent effects on biomarker change to predict clinical outcome.

    PubMed

    Graziani, Rebecca; Guindani, Michele; Thall, Peter F

    2015-03-01

    The effect of a targeted agent on a cancer patient's clinical outcome putatively is mediated through the agent's effect on one or more early biological events. This is motivated by pre-clinical experiments with cells or animals that identify such events, represented by binary or quantitative biomarkers. When evaluating targeted agents in humans, central questions are whether the distribution of a targeted biomarker changes following treatment, the nature and magnitude of this change, and whether it is associated with clinical outcome. Major difficulties in estimating these effects are that a biomarker's distribution may be complex, vary substantially between patients, and have complicated relationships with clinical outcomes. We present a probabilistically coherent framework for modeling and estimation in this setting, including a hierarchical Bayesian nonparametric mixture model for biomarkers that we use to define a functional profile of pre-versus-post-treatment biomarker distribution change. The functional is similar to the receiver operating characteristic used in diagnostic testing. The hierarchical model yields clusters of individual patient biomarker profile functionals, and we use the profile as a covariate in a regression model for clinical outcome. The methodology is illustrated by analysis of a dataset from a clinical trial in prostate cancer using imatinib to target platelet-derived growth factor, with the clinical aim to improve progression-free survival time. PMID:25319212

  7. Is matching ruthenium with dithiocarbamato ligands a potent chemotherapeutic weapon in oncology?

    PubMed

    Nardon, Chiara; Brustolin, Leonardo; Fregona, Dolores

    2016-02-01

    In the last years, several metal-based compounds have been designed and biologically investigated worldwide in order to obtain chemotherapeutics with a better toxicological profile and comparable or higher antiblastic activity than the clinically-established platinum-based drugs. In this context, researchers have addressed their attention to alternative nonplatinum derivatives able to maximize the anticancer activity of the new drugs and to minimize the side effects. Among them, a number of ruthenium complexes have been developed, including the compounds NAMI-A and KP1019, now in clinical trials. Here, we report the results collected so far for a particular class of ruthenium complexes - the ruthenium(II/III)-dithiocarbamates - which proved more potent than cisplatin in vitro, even at nanomolar concentrations, against a wide panel of human tumor cell lines. PMID:26807601

  8. The Effectiveness of Physical Agents for Lower-Limb Soft Tissue Injuries: A Systematic Review.

    PubMed

    Yu, Hainan; Randhawa, Kristi; Côté, Pierre; Optima Collaboration

    2016-07-01

    Study Design Systematic review. Background Soft tissue injuries to the lower limb bring a substantial health and economic burden to society. Physical agents are commonly used to treat these injuries. However, the effectiveness of many such physical agents is not clearly established in the literature. Objective To evaluate the effectiveness and safety of physical agents for soft tissue injuries of the lower limb. Methods We searched 5 databases from 1990 to 2015 for randomized controlled trials (RCTs), cohort studies, and case-control studies. Paired reviewers independently screened the retrieved literature and appraised relevant studies using the Scottish Intercollegiate Guidelines Network criteria. Studies with a high risk of bias were excluded. We synthesized low-risk-of-bias studies according to principles of best-evidence synthesis. Results We screened 10261 articles. Of 43 RCTs identified, 20 had a high risk of bias and were excluded from the analysis, and 23 RCTs had a low risk of bias and were included in the analysis. The available higher-quality evidence suggests that patients with persistent plantar fasciitis may benefit from ultrasound or foot orthoses, while those with persistent midportion Achilles tendinopathy may benefit from shockwave therapy. However, the current evidence does not support the use of shockwave therapy for recent plantar fasciitis, low-Dye taping for persistent plantar fasciitis, low-level laser therapy for recent ankle sprains, or splints for persistent midportion Achilles tendinopathy. Finally, evidence on the effectiveness of the following interventions is not established in the current literature: (1) shockwave therapy for persistent plantar fasciitis, (2) cryotherapy or assistive devices for recent ankle sprains, (3) braces for persistent midportion Achilles tendinopathy, and (4) taping or electric muscle stimulation for patellofemoral pain syndrome. Conclusion Almost half the identified RCTs that evaluated the effectiveness of

  9. The effects of physical therapeutic agents on serum levels of stress hormones in patients with osteoarthritis

    PubMed Central

    Tönük, Şükrü Burak; Serin, Erdinc; Ayhan, Fikriye Figen; Yorgancioglu, Zeynep Rezan

    2016-01-01

    Abstract To investigate the effects of physical agents on the levels of stress hormones in patients with osteoarthritis (OA). Transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation, hot packs, and therapeutic ultrasound were applied to the lumbar region and knees of patients with OA. Blood samples were taken for the measurement of the serum levels of glucose, insulin (INS), growth hormone (GH), prolactin (PRL), cortisol (COR), and plasma adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) immediately before and after the 1st session, to investigate the acute effects of those physical agents on the endocrine system. The hormone levels were also measured every 5 sessions in a total of 10 sessions. The treatment response was also evaluated by using the visual analogue scale (VAS), Roland Morris Disability Questionnaire (RMDQ), and Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Arthritis Index (WOMAC) throughout the therapy period. After the 1st session, there was a decrease in INS levels and a mild decrease in PRL levels (P = 0.001 and P < 0.05, respectively). Throughout the 10-session therapy period, the INS levels increased, whereas the ACTH and COR levels decreased (P < 0.05 for all). The VAS-spine, RMDQ, VAS-knee, and WOMAC scores decreased (P = 0.001 for VAS-spine and P < 0.001 for all others). A positive correlation was detected between the changes in serum COR and WOMAC-pain score (P < 0.05). Although the combination therapy caused changes in INS level accompanied with steady glucose levels, the application of physical agents did not adversely affect the hormone levels. The decrease in ACTH and COR levels may be attributed to the analgesic effect of agents and may be an indicator of patient comfort through a central action. PMID:27583888

  10. The effects of physical therapeutic agents on serum levels of stress hormones in patients with osteoarthritis.

    PubMed

    Tönük, Şükrü Burak; Serin, Erdinc; Ayhan, Fikriye Figen; Yorgancioglu, Zeynep Rezan

    2016-08-01

    To investigate the effects of physical agents on the levels of stress hormones in patients with osteoarthritis (OA).Transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation, hot packs, and therapeutic ultrasound were applied to the lumbar region and knees of patients with OA. Blood samples were taken for the measurement of the serum levels of glucose, insulin (INS), growth hormone (GH), prolactin (PRL), cortisol (COR), and plasma adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) immediately before and after the 1st session, to investigate the acute effects of those physical agents on the endocrine system. The hormone levels were also measured every 5 sessions in a total of 10 sessions. The treatment response was also evaluated by using the visual analogue scale (VAS), Roland Morris Disability Questionnaire (RMDQ), and Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Arthritis Index (WOMAC) throughout the therapy period.After the 1st session, there was a decrease in INS levels and a mild decrease in PRL levels (P = 0.001 and P < 0.05, respectively). Throughout the 10-session therapy period, the INS levels increased, whereas the ACTH and COR levels decreased (P < 0.05 for all). The VAS-spine, RMDQ, VAS-knee, and WOMAC scores decreased (P = 0.001 for VAS-spine and P < 0.001 for all others). A positive correlation was detected between the changes in serum COR and WOMAC-pain score (P < 0.05).Although the combination therapy caused changes in INS level accompanied with steady glucose levels, the application of physical agents did not adversely affect the hormone levels. The decrease in ACTH and COR levels may be attributed to the analgesic effect of agents and may be an indicator of patient comfort through a central action. PMID:27583888

  11. Pharmacokinetics of Chemotherapeutic Drugs in Pediatric Patients With Down Syndrome and Leukemia.

    PubMed

    Hefti, Erik; Blanco, Javier G

    2016-05-01

    Children with Down syndrome (DS) have a 10- to 30-fold increased risk of developing acute myeloid leukemia or acute lymphoblastic leukemia. Patients with DS and leukemia are treated with the same chemotherapeutic agents as patients without DS. Treatment regimens for pediatric leukemia comprise multiple cytotoxic drugs including methotrexate, doxorubicin, vincristine, cytarabine, and etoposide. There have been reports of increased toxicity, as well as altered therapeutic outcomes in pediatric patients with DS and leukemia. This review is focused on the pharmacokinetics of cytotoxic drugs in pediatric patients with leukemia and DS. The available literature suggests that methotrexate and thioguanine display altered pharmacokinetic parameters in pediatric patients with DS. It has been hypothesized that the variable pharmacokinetics of these drugs may contribute to the increased incidence of treatment-related toxicities seen in DS. Data from a small number of studies suggest that the pharmacokinetics of vincristine, etoposide, doxorubicin, and busulfan are similar between patients with and without DS. Definitive conclusions regarding the pharmacokinetics of cytotoxic drugs in pediatric patients with leukemia and DS are difficult to reach due to limitations in the available studies. PMID:26907658

  12. The structure-activity relationships of the antiviral chemotherapeutic activity of isatin β-thiosemicarbazone

    PubMed Central

    Bauer, D. J.; Sadler, P. W.

    1960-01-01

    As part of an investigation devoted to the development of new antiviral agents a compound of established antiviral activity has been subjected to systematic structural modification. The structure-activity data so obtained have been used in the design of new compounds, some of which are described. The compound chosen was isatin β-thiosemicarbazone, which has high activity against neurovaccinia infection in mice, and a 4-point parallel-line assay of in vivo chemotherapeutic activity has been developed, which has enabled the activity of the derivatives to be determined against isatin β-thiosemicarbazone as a standard. The overall dimensions of the isatin β-thiosemicarbazone molecule appear to be nearly maximal for the retention of high activity, as all substituents in the aromatic ring decrease the activity irrespective of their nature or position. The projection of the -CS.NH2 group in relation to the ring nitrogen was found to be critical, as the α-thiosemicarbazone was inactive. A number of modifications of the side-chain were investigated:all led to reduction or loss of antiviral activity. The antiviral activity showed a positive correlation with chloroform solubility over a considerable range. The most active compound encountered was 1-ethylisatin β-thiosemicarbazone, with an activity of 286 (isatin β-thiosemicarbazone≡100). Isatin β-thiosemicarbazone showed no activity against 15 other viruses, and 20 related compounds showed on activity against ectromelia. PMID:13797622

  13. Combined effect of levan and cytotoxic agents on the growth of experimental tumours in mice.

    PubMed Central

    Leibovici, J.; Stark, Y.; Wolman, M.

    1983-01-01

    The combined effect of the polysaccharide levan (previously shown to exert a host-dependent as well as direct antitumoural activity) and the cytotoxic agents cyclophosphamide (CY), methotrexate (MTX), vincristine (VINC) and 5-fluoro-uracil (SFU) was studied in Lewis lung carcinoma and AKR lymphoma. Combined chemo- and immunotherapy was applied beginning on the day of tumour cell inoculation. Additive effects were obtained with the combined treatments, compared to single treatments, with all the combinations except MTX-levan in Lewis lung carcinoma, where the combined effect was synergistic. The additive effect was obtained with different doses and routes of chemotherapy, whether local or intraperitoneal. A 2 mg dose of CY combined with levan administered at daily doses of 10 mg, resulted in a 100% prevention of Lewis lung carcinoma growth. It is suggested that the levan may have two beneficial effects: it can exert an inhibitory effect on tumour growth and diminish the deleterious effect of cytotoxic agents on the immune system. PMID:6882675

  14. Interleukin 6 augments lung cancer chemotherapeutic resistance via ataxia-telangiectasia mutated/NF-kappaB pathway activation

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Hong Qiong; Huang, Xiao Bo; Ke, Shi Zhong; Jiang, Yi Na; Zhang, Yue Hua; Wang, Yi Nan; Li, Juan; Gao, Feng Guang

    2014-01-01

    Although it is known that ataxia-telangiectasia mutated (ATM) and interleukin 6 (IL-6) contribute to multiple drug resistance (MDR) in tumor chemotherapy, the exact role of ATM activation in MDR resulting from increased IL-6 expression is still unclear. In the present study, we demonstrate that the activation of the ATM-NF-kappaB pathway, resulting from increased IL-6 expression, plays a central role in augmented chemoresistance in lung cancer cell lines. This result was supported by the increased expressions of Bcl-2, Mcl-1, Bcl-xl, and the upregulation of MDR-associated protein ABCG2. The higher level of IL-6 reveals not only higher ATM/NF-kappaB activity but also increased expressions of ABCG2, Bcl-2, Mcl-1 and Bcl-xl. Most importantly, lung cancer cells themselves upregulated IL-6 secretion by activating the p38/NF-kappaB pathway through treatment with cisplatin and camptothecin. Taken together, these findings demonstrate that chemotherapeutic agents increase IL-6 expression, hence activating the ATM/NF-kappaB pathway, augmenting anti-apoptotic protein expression and contributing to MDR. This indicates that both IL-6 and ATM are potential targets for the treatment of chemotherapeutic resistance in lung cancer. PMID:24988892

  15. Interleukin 6 augments lung cancer chemotherapeutic resistance via ataxia-telangiectasia mutated/NF-kappaB pathway activation.

    PubMed

    Yan, Hong Qiong; Huang, Xiao Bo; Ke, Shi Zhong; Jiang, Yi Na; Zhang, Yue Hua; Wang, Yi Nan; Li, Juan; Gao, Feng Guang

    2014-09-01

    Although it is known that ataxia-telangiectasia mutated (ATM) and interleukin 6 (IL-6) contribute to multiple drug resistance (MDR) in tumor chemotherapy, the exact role of ATM activation in MDR resulting from increased IL-6 expression is still unclear. In the present study, we demonstrate that the activation of the ATM-NF-kappaB pathway, resulting from increased IL-6 expression, plays a central role in augmented chemoresistance in lung cancer cell lines. This result was supported by the increased expressions of Bcl-2, Mcl-1, Bcl-xl, and the upregulation of MDR-associated protein ABCG2. The higher level of IL-6 reveals not only higher ATM/NF-kappaB activity but also increased expressions of ABCG2, Bcl-2, Mcl-1 and Bcl-xl. Most importantly, lung cancer cells themselves upregulated IL-6 secretion by activating the p38/NF-kappaB pathway through treatment with cisplatin and camptothecin. Taken together, these findings demonstrate that chemotherapeutic agents increase IL-6 expression, hence activating the ATM/NF-kappaB pathway, augmenting anti-apoptotic protein expression and contributing to MDR. This indicates that both IL-6 and ATM are potential targets for the treatment of chemotherapeutic resistance in lung cancer. PMID:24988892

  16. Comparative sporicidal effects of disinfectants after release of a biological agent.

    PubMed

    Kenar, Levent; Ortatatli, Mesut; Yaren, Hakan; Karayilanoglu, Turan; Aydogan, Hakan

    2007-06-01

    Because of spore formation, Bacillus anthracis is considered the most resistant biological warfare agent known. The present study aimed to assess and compare well-known decontamination routes to inactivate the spores on daily-use environmental tools contaminated previously. To simulate the agent, Bacillus atrophaeus was used. Various environmental samples (such as tile, fabric clothing, wood, protective suit, glass, paper, soil, water, plastic, and metal) that may be contaminated after a biological incident were used as test carriers and inoculated with B. atrophaeus. Sodium hypochlorite, free chlorine, autoclaving, ethylene oxide, hydrogen peroxide, ultraviolet irradiation, and boiling decontaminated the samples. Glutaraldehyde (2%) and free chlorine solution (10,000 mg/L) were also found to be effective in decontaminating the samples and are recommended as alternatives to the use of sodium hypochlorite solution. Soil, tile, paper, and metal were determined to be the most difficult materials to decontaminate. It was concluded that 5% hypochlorite adjusted with acetic acid might also be used for decontamination. Decontamination strategies to reduce contamination of the environment by biological warfare agents need to be applied to mitigate the number of victims, in terms of prominent characteristics like cost-effectiveness and user-friendliness. PMID:17615843

  17. Palladium nanosheets as highly stable and effective contrast agents for in vivo photoacoustic molecular imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nie, Liming; Chen, Mei; Sun, Xiaolian; Rong, Pengfei; Zheng, Nanfeng; Chen, Xiaoyuan

    2014-01-01

    A stable and efficient contrast agent is highly desirable for photoacoustic (PA) imaging applications. Recently gold nanostructures have been widely reported and studied for PA imaging and photothermal therapy. However, the structures of the nonspherical gold nanoparticles are easily destroyed after laser irradiation and thus may fail to complete the intended tasks. In this study, we propose to apply palladium nanosheets (PNSs), with strong optical absorption in the near-infrared (NIR) region, as a new class of exogenous PA contrast agents. PA and ultrasound (US) images were acquired sequentially by a portable and fast photoacoustic tomography (PAT) system with a hand-held transducer. Significant and long-lasting imaging enhancement in SCC7 head and neck squamous cell carcinoma was successfully observed in mice by PAT over time after tail vein administration of PNSs. The morphology and functional perfusion of the tumors were delineated in PA images due to the nanoparticle accumulation. PAT of the main organs was also conducted ex vivo to trace the fate of PNSs, which was further validated by inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry (ICP-AES). No obvious toxic effect was observed by in vitro MTT assay and ex vivo histological examination 7 days after PNS administration. With the combination of a portable imaging instrument and signal specificity, PNSs might be applied as stable and effective agents for photoacoustic cancer detection, diagnosis and treatment guidance.

  18. Concentration Effect of Reducing Agents on Green Synthesis of Gold Nanoparticles: Size, Morphology, and Growth Mechanism.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hyun-Seok; Seo, Yu Seon; Kim, Kyeounghak; Han, Jeong Woo; Park, Youmie; Cho, Seonho

    2016-12-01

    Under various concentration conditions of reducing agents during the green synthesis of gold nanoparticles (AuNPs), we obtain the various geometry (morphology and size) of AuNPs that play a crucial role in their catalytic properties. Through both theoretical and experimental approaches, we studied the relationship between the concentration of reducing agent (caffeic acid) and the geometry of AuNPs. As the concentration of caffeic acid increases, the sizes of AuNPs were decreased due to the adsorption and stabilizing effect of oxidized caffeic acids (OXCAs). Thus, it turns out that optimal concentration exists for the desired geometry of AuNPs. Furthermore, we investigated the growth mechanism for the green synthesis of AuNPs. As the caffeic acid is added and adsorbed on the surface of AuNPs, the aggregation mechanism and surface free energy are changed and consequently resulted in the AuNPs of various geometry. PMID:27119158

  19. Concentration Effect of Reducing Agents on Green Synthesis of Gold Nanoparticles: Size, Morphology, and Growth Mechanism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Hyun-seok; Seo, Yu Seon; Kim, Kyeounghak; Han, Jeong Woo; Park, Youmie; Cho, Seonho

    2016-04-01

    Under various concentration conditions of reducing agents during the green synthesis of gold nanoparticles (AuNPs), we obtain the various geometry (morphology and size) of AuNPs that play a crucial role in their catalytic properties. Through both theoretical and experimental approaches, we studied the relationship between the concentration of reducing agent (caffeic acid) and the geometry of AuNPs. As the concentration of caffeic acid increases, the sizes of AuNPs were decreased due to the adsorption and stabilizing effect of oxidized caffeic acids (OXCAs). Thus, it turns out that optimal concentration exists for the desired geometry of AuNPs. Furthermore, we investigated the growth mechanism for the green synthesis of AuNPs. As the caffeic acid is added and adsorbed on the surface of AuNPs, the aggregation mechanism and surface free energy are changed and consequently resulted in the AuNPs of various geometry.

  20. Short cationic lipopeptides as effective antibacterial agents: Design, physicochemical properties and biological evaluation.

    PubMed

    Azmi, Fazren; Elliott, Alysha G; Marasini, Nirmal; Ramu, Soumya; Ziora, Zyta; Kavanagh, Angela M; Blaskovich, Mark A T; Cooper, Matthew A; Skwarczynski, Mariusz; Toth, Istvan

    2016-05-15

    The spread of drug-resistant bacteria has imparted a sense of urgency in the search for new antibiotics. In an effort to develop a new generation of antibacterial agents, we have designed de novo charged lipopeptides inspired by natural antimicrobial peptides. These short lipopeptides are composed of cationic lysine and hydrophobic lipoamino acids that replicate the amphiphilic properties of natural antimicrobial peptides. The resultant lipopeptides were found to self-assemble into nanoparticles. Some were effective against a variety of Gram-positive bacteria, including strains resistant to methicillin, daptomycin and/or vancomycin. The lipopeptides were not toxic to human kidney and liver cell lines and were highly resistant to tryptic degradation. Transmission electron microscopy analysis of bacteria cells treated with lipopeptide showed membrane-damage and lysis with extrusion of cytosolic contents. With such properties in mind, these lipopeptides have the potential to be developed as new antibacterial agents against drug-resistant Gram-positive bacteria. PMID:27048775

  1. Methods coagulation/flocculation and flocculation with ballast agent for effective harvesting of microalgae.

    PubMed

    Gorin, Kirill V; Sergeeva, Yana E; Butylin, Victor V; Komova, Anastasiya V; Pojidaev, Victor M; Badranova, Gulfiya U; Shapovalova, Anna A; Konova, Irina A; Gotovtsev, Pavel M

    2015-10-01

    The effects of coagulant (FeCl3·6H2O), various flocculants based on polyacrylamide (PAA), polyethylenoxide (PEO) and flocculated biomass as ballast agent, dosage and sedimental time on flocculation efficiency of harvesting Chlorella vulgaris GKV1 cultivated in a laboratory were investigated. The results of this work indicated that the flocculation efficiency achieved about 90% after 5 min of sedimentation when adding of coagulant and flocculant mixture (FeCl3 50 mg/l+PEO based Sibfloc-718 7.5 mg/l) or flocculant with ballast agent (Sibfloc-718 7.5 mg/l+10% flocculated biomass). PAA and PEO showed good flocculation efficiency at dosage of 0.025 and 0.015 g/l, respectively without pH adjustment. Finally, the most suitable flocculation method was discussed in this paper. PMID:26133475

  2. [The effect of coccidiostats on the growth capacity and the survival ability of Salmonella live vaccine agents].

    PubMed

    Martin, G; Meyer, H

    1994-11-01

    Anticoccidial agents are obligatory feed additives during several rearing periods of poultry. The success of an oral immunization of young chicken with Salmonella live vaccines depends on the insensitivity of the vaccine strain against such anticoccidial agents because the vaccination success depends on the survival of the vaccine strain in the gut of the chick and the temporary colonization of lymphatic tissue. We investigated the in vitro sensitivity of the vaccine strain in the S. typhimurium live vaccine "Zoosaloral H" registered for the vaccination of poultry in Germany in connection with often used anticoccidial agents (Diclazuril, Monensin, Narasin and Salinomycin). No differences in growth and survival between the samples containing and lacking anticoccidial agents were found even by using double amounts of the permitted concentration of the anticoccidial agents. No negative effects of the tested anticoccidial agents on Salmonella being used as oral live vaccines in poultry should be expected. PMID:7872948

  3. Ikaros expression sensitizes leukemic cells to the chemotherapeutic drug doxorubicin

    PubMed Central

    He, Licai; Gao, Shenmeng; Zhu, Zhenfeng; Chen, Shang; Gu, Haihua

    2016-01-01

    Ikaros is an important transcription factor involved in the development and differentiation of hematopoietic cells. However, its role in the treatment of hematopoietic malignancies such as leukemia is less well understood. In the present study, it was observed by data mining of the Oncomine database that high expression levels of full-length Ikaros (IK1) is correlated with increased sensitivity of cancer cells to treatments with chemotherapeutic drugs, including doxorubicin (DOX). To examine the functional significance of this observation, the expression of IK1 in a leukemia cell line was altered, and the response of leukemic cells to DOX treatment was analyzed. It was observed that overexpression of IK1 could enhance DOX-induced apoptosis, while knockdown of IK1 attenuated DOX-induced apoptosis in leukemic cells. Further experiments demonstrated that IK1 sensitized leukemic cells to DOX-induced apoptosis, probably through upregulation of caspase-9. These data suggest that high expression levels of IK1 may be a potential biomarker to predict responses of leukemia patients to treatment with chemotherapy.

  4. Alterations of chemotherapeutic pharmacokinetic profiles by drug–drug interactions

    PubMed Central

    Ghalib, Mohammed; Chaudhary, Imran; Goel, Sanjay

    2012-01-01

    Background Drug interactions in oncology are common place and largely ignored as we tolerate high thresholds of ‘toxic’ drug responses in these patients. However, in the era of ‘targeted’ or seemingly ‘less toxic’ therapy, these interactions are more commonly flagged and contribute significantly towards poor ‘quality of life’ and medical fatalities. Objective This review and opinion article focuses on alteration of chemotherapeutic pharmacokinetic profiles by drug interactions in the setting of polypharmacy. The assumption is that the drugs, with changes in their pharmacokinetics, will contribute towards changes in their pharmacodynamics. Methods The examples cited for such drug–drug interactions are culled from published literature with an emphasis on those interactions that have been well characterized at the molecular level. Results Although very few drug interaction studies have been performed on approved oncology based drugs, it is clear that drugs whose pharmacokinetics profiles are closely related to their pharmacodynamics will indeed result in clinically important drug interactions. Some newer mechanisms are described that involve interactions at the level of gene transcription, whereby, drug metabolism is significantly altered. However, for any given drug interaction, there does not seem to be a comprehensive model describing interactions. Conclusions Mechanisms based drug interactions are plentiful in oncology; however, there is an absolute lack of a comprehensive model that would predict drug–drug interactions. PMID:19239394

  5. In vitro synergy, pharmacodynamics, and postantibiotic effect of 11 antimicrobial agents against Rhodococcus equi.

    PubMed

    Giguère, Steeve; Lee, Elise A; Guldbech, Kristen M; Berghaus, Londa J

    2012-11-01

    There are no studies investigating interactions between clarithromycin or azithromycin and rifampin or other commonly used antimicrobial agents against virulent isolates of Rhodococcus equi. In addition, there is no published data on the postantibiotic effects (PAEs) and pharmacodynamics properties of antimicrobial agents against R. equi. The objectives were to assess in vitro interactions, pharmacodynamics, and PAEs of 11 antimicrobial agents belonging to various antimicrobial classes against R. equi. Antimicrobial agents investigated (erythromycin, clarithromycin, azithromycin, rifampin, amikacin, gentamicin, enrofloxacin, vancomycin, imipenem, ceftiofur, and doxycycline) were selected based on in vitro activity against large numbers of isolates of R. equi and frequency of use in foals or humans infected with R. equi. Three virulent strains of R. equi were evaluated by time-kill curves and checkerboard assays, and the postantibiotic effect was measured at 5×MIC. Only amikacin, gentamicin, enrofloxacin, and vancomycin were bactericidal against R. equi. Combinations including a macrolide (erythromycin, clarithromycin, azithromycin) and either rifampin or doxycycline, and the combination doxycycline-rifampin were synergistic. Combinations containing amikacin and erythromycin, clarithromycin, azithromycin, or rifampin and the combination gentamicin-rifampin were antagonistic. The PAEs of rifampin, erythromycin, clarithromycin, vancomycin, and doxycycline were relatively long with median values ranging between 4.5 and 6.5h. Azithromycin, gentamicin, and imipenem had intermediate PAEs ranging between 3.3 and 3.5h. Amikacin, enrofloxacin, and ceftiofur had shorter PAEs ranging between 1.3 and 2.1h. Gentamicin, amikacin, enrofloxacin, and doxycycline exhibited concentration-dependent activity whereas erythromycin, clarithromycin, azithromycin, rifampin, ceftiofur, imipenem, and vancomycin exhibited time-dependent activity against R. equi. PMID:22704561

  6. Immunological off-target effects of standard treatments in gastrointestinal cancers

    PubMed Central

    Duffy, A. G.; Greten, T. F.

    2014-01-01

    The effects on immune cells and the inflammatory microenvironment of commonly applied cancer treatments (chemotherapeutic or biologic agents, interventional radiologic procedures) have become better appreciated. Likewise, the contribution of the immune system toward the effectiveness of these treatments is clearer. The relevance of immune evasion by developing tumors is endorsed by its inclusion as one of the (updated) hallmarks of cancer. A greater understanding of this dimension can potentially lead to novel applications of existing standard of care therapies, in addition to potentiating their effect. This review summarizes the immune aspects of currently employed therapies—cytotoxic chemotherapeutics, biologic agents and interventional radiologic procedures—in solid tumor malignancies with a particular focus on those agents used in gastrointestinal cancers. PMID:24201974

  7. STAT3/IRF1 Pathway Activation Sensitizes Cervical Cancer Cells to Chemotherapeutic Drugs.

    PubMed

    Walch-Rückheim, Barbara; Pahne-Zeppenfeld, Jennifer; Fischbach, Jil; Wickenhauser, Claudia; Horn, Lars Christian; Tharun, Lars; Büttner, Reinhard; Mallmann, Peter; Stern, Peter; Kim, Yoo-Jin; Bohle, Rainer Maria; Rübe, Christian; Ströder, Russalina; Juhasz-Böss, Ingolf; Solomayer, Erich-Franz; Smola, Sigrun

    2016-07-01

    Neoadjuvant radio/chemotherapy regimens can markedly improve cervical cancer outcome in a subset of patients, while other patients show poor responses, but may encounter severe adverse effects. Thus, there is a strong need for predictive biomarkers to improve clinical management of cervical cancer patients. STAT3 is considered as a critical antiapoptotic factor in various malignancies. We therefore investigated STAT3 activation during cervical carcinogenesis and its impact on the response of cervical cancer cells to chemotherapeutic drugs. Tyr705-phosphorylated STAT3 increased from low-grade cervical intraepithelial neoplasia (CIN1) to precancerous CIN3 lesions. Notably, pTyr705-STAT3 activation significantly declined from CIN3 to invasive cancer, also when compared in the same clinical biopsy. pTyr705-STAT3 was also low or absent in cultured human cervical cancer cell lines, consistent with the in vivo expression data. Unexpectedly, IL6-type cytokine signaling inducing STAT3 activation rendered cervical cancer cells significantly more susceptible to chemotherapeutic drugs, that is, cisplatin or etoposide. This chemosensitization was STAT3-dependent and we identified IFN regulatory factor-1 (IRF1) as the STAT3-inducible mediator required for cell death enhancement. In line with these data, pTyr705-STAT3 significantly correlated with nuclear IRF1 expression in cervical cancer in vivo Importantly, high IRF1 expression in pretreatment cervical cancer biopsy cells was associated with a significantly better response to neoadjuvant radio/chemotherapy of the patients. In summary, our study has identified a key role of the STAT3/IRF1 pathway for chemosensitization in cervical cancer. Our results suggest that pretherapeutic IRF1 expression should be evaluated as a novel predictive biomarker for neoadjuvant radio/chemotherapy responses. Cancer Res; 76(13); 3872-83. ©2016 AACR. PMID:27216197

  8. MicroRNA-181a enhances the chemotherapeutic sensitivity of chronic myeloid leukemia to imatinib

    PubMed Central

    WANG, GUANGYU; ZHAO, RAN; ZHAO, XINGSHENG; CHEN, XI; WANG, DONG; JIN, YINJI; LIU, XI; ZHAO, CI; ZHU, YUANYUAN; REN, CHENGCHENG; LI, MINGHUI; JIN, XIAOMING; ZHANG, FENGMIN; ZHONG, ZHAOHUA; WANG, TIANZHEN; LI, XIAOBO

    2015-01-01

    MicroRNA-181 (miR-181) has been recently demonstrated to participate in the differentiation and development of immune cells, including natural killer cells and B and T lymphocytes, and myeloid linages, including erythroid and megakaryocytic cells. The aberrant expression of miR-181, particularly low expression levels, has been observed in a number of leukemia types, including B-cell chronic lymphocytic leukemia and cytogenetically abnormal acute myeloid leukemia. However, the expression and function of miR-181 in chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) remains unknown. In the present study, the aberrant expression of miR-181a was analyzed in a patient with CML and in the CML K562 cell line. In addition, the function and potential mechanisms of miR-181a in K562 cells with regard to their chemotherapeutic sensitivity to imatinib were investigated. The expression levels of miR-181a were significantly reduced in the patient with CML and in the CML K562 cell line. Furthermore, the overexpression of miR-181a in the K562 cells enhanced the chemotherapeutic sensitivity of these cells to imatinib. The potential mechanism mediating these effects may be associated with the capacity of miR-181a to inhibit cell growth and/or to induce cells apoptosis and differentiation in K562 cells. The results of the present study suggested that miR-181a may be a target for the treatment of CML and a useful indicator of the therapeutic sensitivity of CML to imatinib. PMID:26722250

  9. Dendrimer-curcumin conjugate: a water soluble and effective cytotoxic agent against breast cancer cell lines.

    PubMed

    Debnath, Shawon; Saloum, Darin; Dolai, Sukanta; Sun, Chong; Averick, Saadyah; Raja, Krishnaswami; Fata, Jimmie E

    2013-12-01

    Curcumin, which is derived from the plant Curcuma longa, has received considerable attention as a possible anti-cancer agent. In cell culture, curcumin is capable of inducing apoptosis in cancer cells at concentrations that do not affect normal cells. One draw-back holding curcumin back from being an effective anti-cancer agent in humans is that it is almost completely insoluble in water and therefore has poor absorption and subsequently poor bioavailability. Here we have generated a number of curcumin derivatives (tetrahydro-curcumin, curcumin mono-carboxylic acid, curcumin mono-galactose, curcumin mono-alkyne and dendrimer-curcumin conjugate) to test whether any of them display both cytotoxicity and water solubility. Of those tested only dendrimer-curcumin conjugate exhibited both water solubility and cytotoxicity against SKBr3 and BT549 breast cancer cells. When compared to curcumin dissolved in DMSO, dendrimer-curcumin conjugate dissolved in water was significantly more effective in inducing cytotoxicity, as measured by the MTT assay and effectively induced cellular apoptosis measured by caspase-3 activation. Since dendrimer-curcumin conjugate is water soluble and capable of inducing potent cytotoxic effects on breast cancer cell lines, it may prove to be an effective anti-cancer therapy to be used in humans. PMID:23387971

  10. [Immunomodulative effects of Chinese herbs in mice treated with anti-tumor agent cyclophosphamide].

    PubMed

    Jin, R; Wan, L L; Mitsuishi, T; Kodama, K; Kurashige, S

    1994-07-01

    Extracts of Chinese herbs were administered with antitumor agent, cyclophosphamide (CY), and their effects on macrophages and lymphocytes were studied. Number of peritoneal macrophages significantly decreased and their chemotactic activity was suppressed by treatment with CY. Blastogenic responsiveness to Concanavalin A and NK cell activity of spleen lymphocytes were suppressed significantly in CY-treated mice. Extracts of Lithospermi radix, Astragali radix and Glycyrrhizae radix showed protective effects on immunosuppressive mice. The number of macrophages, chemotactic activity of macrophages and blastogenic response of lymphocytes were recovered to the same or more than that of normal levels. An extract of Ginseng radix showed protective effects on the number and functions of macrophages by treatment with CY but did not show any effects on the lymphocytic blastogenesis. On the contrary it showed a strong inhibitory effect on the NK cell activity. These results suggest that Chinese herbs could modulate cellular immune response, especially in the activation of macrophages and splenic lymphocytes. PMID:7932098

  11. Effects of complexing agents on electrochemical deposition of FeS x O y thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Supee, Aizuddin; Ichimura, Masaya

    2016-08-01

    FeS x O y thin films were deposited on indium–tin-oxide (ITO)-coated glass substrates at 15 °C via galvanostatic electrochemical deposition from an aqueous solution containing 100 mM Na2S2O3 and 30 mM FeSO4. The effects of l(+)-tartaric acid (C4H4O6) and lactic acid [CH3CH(OH)COOH] at different concentrations were investigated. All the deposited films were amorphous. With the complexing agents, the thickness was increased, and the oxygen content was reduced significantly compared with the sample deposited without the complexing agents. In the photoelectrochemical measurement, p-type conductivity was confirmed. The photoresponsivity was not influenced significantly by the complexing agent, suggesting that the oxygen content does not drastically affect the properties of the deposited films probably because the local bonding configuration around Fe atoms in FeS x O y is similar to that in FeS2.

  12. Redox-directed cancer therapeutics: Taurolidine and Piperlongumine as broadly effective antineoplastic agents (review).

    PubMed

    Möhler, Hanns; Pfirrmann, Rolf W; Frei, Karl

    2014-10-01

    Targeting the oxygen stress response pathway is considered a promising strategy to exert antineoplastic activity in a broad spectrum of tumor types. Supporting this view, we summarize the mechanism of action of Taurolidine and Piperlongumine, two antineoplastic agents with strikingly broad tumor selectivity. Taurolidine enhances the oxidative stress (ROS) selectively in tumor cells. Its cytotoxicity for various tumor cells in vitro and in vivo, which includes tumor stem cells, is based on the induction of programmed cell death, largely via apoptosis but also necroptosis and autophagy. The redox-directed mechanism of action of Taurolidine is apparent from the finding that reducing agents e.g., N-acetylcysteine or glutathione impair its cytotoxicity, while its effectiveness is enhanced by agents which inhibit the cellular anti‑oxidant capacity. A similar redox-directed antineoplastic action is shown by Piperlongumine, a recently described experimental drug of plant origin. Taurolidine is particularly advantageous in surgical oncology as this taurine-derivative can be applied perioperatively or systemically with good tolerability as shown in initial clinical applications. PMID:25175943

  13. Redox-directed cancer therapeutics: Taurolidine and Piperlongumine as broadly effective antineoplastic agents (Review)

    PubMed Central

    MÖHLER, HANS; PFIRMAN, ROLF W.; FREI, KARL

    2014-01-01

    Targeting the oxygen stress response pathway is considered a promising strategy to exert antineoplastic activity in a broad spectrum of tumor types. Supporting this view, we summarize the mechanism of action of Taurolidine and Piperlongumine, two antineoplastic agents with strikingly broad tumor selectivity. Taurolidine enhances the oxidative stress (ROS) selectively in tumor cells. Its cytotoxicity for various tumor cells in vitro and in vivo, which includes tumor stem cells, is based on the induction of programmed cell death, largely via apoptosis but also necroptosis and autophagy. The redox-directed mechanism of action of Taurolidine is apparent from the finding that reducing agents e.g., N-acetylcysteine or glutathione impair its cytotoxicity, while its effectiveness is enhanced by agents which inhibit the cellular anti-oxidant capacity. A similar redox-directed antineoplastic action is shown by Piperlongumine, a recently described experimental drug of plant origin. Taurolidine is particularly advantageous in surgical oncology as this taurine-derivative can be applied perioperatively or systemically with good tolerability as shown in initial clinical applications. PMID:25175943

  14. Effect of modifying agents on the hydrophobicity and yield of zinc borate synthesized by zinc oxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Acarali, Nil Baran; Bardakci, Melek; Tugrul, Nurcan; Derun, Emek Moroydor; Piskin, Sabriye

    2013-06-01

    The aim of this study was to synthesize zinc borate using zinc oxide, reference boric acid, and reference zinc borate (reference ZB) as the seed, and to investigate the effects of modifying agents and reaction parameters on the hydrophobicity and yield, respectively. The reaction parameters include reaction time (1-5 h), reactant ratio (H3BO3/ZnO by mass: 2-5), seed ratio (seed crystal/(H3BO3+ZnO) by mass: 0-2wt%), reaction temperature (50-120°C), cooling temperature (10-80°C), and stirring rate (400-700 r/min); the modifying agents involve propylene glycol (PG, 0-6wt%), kerosene (1wt%-6wt%), and oleic acid (OA, 1wt%-6wt%) with solvents (isopropyl alcohol (IPA), ethanol, and methanol). The results of reaction yield obtained from either magnetically or mechanically stirred systems were compared. Zinc borate produced was characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR), and contact angle tests to identify the hydrophobicity. In conclusion, zinc borate is synthesized successfully under the optimized reaction conditions, and the different modifying agents with various solvents affect the hydrophobicity of zinc borate.

  15. Antibacterial Effect and Physical-Mechanical Properties of Temporary Restorative Material Containing Antibacterial Agents

    PubMed Central

    Mushashe, Amanda Mahammad; Gonzaga, Carla Castiglia; Tomazinho, Paulo Henrique; da Cunha, Leonardo Fernandes; Leonardi, Denise Piotto; Pissaia, Janes Francio; Correr, Gisele Maria

    2015-01-01

    Introduction. For the maintenance of the aseptic chain created during the treatment the coronal sealing becomes paramount. Aim. Evaluating the antibacterial effect and the physical-mechanical properties of a temporary restorative material containing different antibacterial agents. Material and Methods. Two antibacterial agents (triclosan and chloramine T) were manually added to a temporary restorative material used as base (Coltosol). The antibacterial action of the material was analyzed using the agar diffusion method, in pure cultures of Escherichia coli (ATCC BAA-2336) and Staphylococcus aureus (ATCC 11632) and mixed culture of saliva collection. The microleakage rate was analyzed using bovine teeth, previously restored with the materials, and submitted to thermocycling, in a solution of 0.5% methylene blue, for a period of 24 hours. The physical and mechanical properties of the materials analyzed were setting time, water sorption, solubility, and compression strength. Results. No marginal leakage was observed for all groups. There was no statistical significant difference in antimicrobial activity, setting time, water sorption, solubility, and compression strength among the materials. Conclusion. The addition of antibacterial agents on a temporary restorative material did not optimize the antibacterial ability of the material and also did not change its physical-mechanical properties. PMID:27347539

  16. Effect of Ductile Agents on the Dynamic Behavior of SiC3D Network Composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Jingbo; Wang, Yangwei; Wang, Fuchi; Fan, Qunbo

    2016-07-01

    Co-continuous SiC ceramic composites using pure aluminum, epoxy, and polyurethane (PU) as ductile agents were developed. The dynamic mechanical behavior and failure mechanisms were investigated experimentally using the split Hopkinson pressure bar (SHPB) method and computationally by finite element (FE) simulations. The results show that the SiC3D/Al composite has the best overall performance in comparison with SiC3D/epoxy and SiC3D/PU composites. FE simulations are generally consistent with experimental data. These simulations provide valuable help in predicting mechanical strength and in interpreting the experimental results and failure mechanisms. They may be combined with micrographs for fracture characterizations of the composites. We found that interactions between the SiC phase and ductile agents under dynamic compression in the SHPB method are complex, and that interfacial condition is an important parameter that determines the mechanical response of SiC3D composites with a characteristic interlocking structure during dynamic compression. However, the effect of the mechanical properties of ductile agents on dynamic behavior of the composites is a second consideration in the production of the composites.

  17. Immunotoxicological effects of Agent Orange exposure to the Vietnam War Korean veterans.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hyoung-Ah; Kim, Eun-Mi; Park, Yeong-Chul; Yu, Ji-Yeon; Hong, Seung-Kwon; Jeon, Seong-Hoon; Park, Kui-Lea; Hur, Sook-Jin; Heo, Yong

    2003-07-01

    Immunomodulatory effects of 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD) demonstrated using animals are thymic atrophy, downregulation of cytotoxic T or B lymphocyte differentiation or activation, whereas human immunotoxicities have not been investigated well. This study was undertaken to evaluate overall immunologic spectrum of the Vietnam War Korean veterans exposed to Agent Orange contaminated with TCDD. Quantity of red blood cells, hemoglobin and hematocrit in the veterans suffered from chronic diseases associated with Agent Orange exposure (Veterans-patient group) were decreased in comparison with those of the veterans without the diseases and the age-matched healthy controls, but no differences in leukocyte populations. Plasma IgG levels were lowered in the veterans than the controls, owing to significant decrease in the IgG1 levels. Increase in the IgE levels was observed in the plasma from the veterans. Alteration of T cell-mediated immunity was also resulted from activation of peripheral blood mononuclear cells with polyclonal T cell activators. Production of IFNgamma, a major cytokine mediating host resistance against infection or tumoregenesis, was lowered in the veterans-patient group. However, production of IL-4 and IL-10, representative cytokines involved with hypersensitivity induction, was enhanced in the patient group. Overall, this study suggests that military service in Vietnam and/or Agent Orange exposure disturbs immune-homeostasis resulting in dysregulation of B and T cell activities. PMID:12916745

  18. Effect of carboxylic acids as compatibilizer agent on mechanical properties of thermoplastic starch and polypropylene blends.

    PubMed

    Martins, Andréa Bercini; Santana, Ruth Marlene Campomanes

    2016-01-01

    In this work, polypropylene/thermoplastic starch (PP/TPS) blends were prepared as an alternative material to use in disposable packaging, reducing the negative polymeric environmental impact. Unfortunately, this material displays morphological characteristics typical of immiscible polymer blends and a compatibilizer agent is needed. Three different carboxyl acids: myristic (C14), palmitic (C16) and stearic acids (C18) were used as natural compatibilizer agent (NCA). The effects of NCA on the mechanical, physical, thermal and morphological properties of PP/TPS blends were investigated and compared against PP/TPS with and without PP-grafted maleic anhydride (PPgMA). When compared to PP/TPS, blends with C18, PPgMA and C14 presented an improvement of 25, 22 and 17% in tensile strength at break and of 180, 194 and 259% in elongation at break, respectively. The highest increase, 54%, in the impact strength was achieved with C14 incorporation. Improvements could be seen, through scanning electron microscopy (SEM) images, in the compatibility between the immiscible components by acids incorporation. These results showed that carboxylic acids, specifically C14, could be used as compatibilizer agent and could substitute PPgMA. PMID:26453854

  19. In Vitro Effects of Antimicrobial Agents on Planktonic and Biofilm Forms of Staphylococcus lugdunensis Clinical Isolates▿

    PubMed Central

    Frank, Kristi L.; Reichert, Emily J.; Piper, Kerryl E.; Patel, Robin

    2007-01-01

    Staphylococcus lugdunensis is an atypically virulent coagulase-negative staphylococcal species associated with acute and destructive infections that often resemble Staphylococcus aureus infections. Several types of infection caused by S. lugdunensis (e.g., native valve endocarditis, prosthetic joint infection, and intravascular catheter infection) are associated with biofilm formation, which may lead to an inability to eradicate the infection due to the intrinsic nature of biofilms to resist high levels of antibiotics. In this study, planktonic MICs and MBCs and biofilm bactericidal concentrations of 10 antistaphylococcal antimicrobial agents were measured for 15 S. lugdunensis isolates collected from patients with endocarditis, medical device infections, or skin and soft tissue infections. Planktonic isolates were susceptible to all agents studied, but biofilms were resistant to high concentrations of most of the drugs. However, moxifloxacin was able to kill 73% of isolates growing in biofilms at ≤0.5 μg/ml. Relative to the effect on cell density, subinhibitory concentrations of nafcillin substantially stimulated biofilm formation of most isolates, whereas tetracycline and linezolid significantly decreased biofilm formation in 93 and 80% of isolates, respectively. An unexpected outcome of MBC testing was the observation that vancomycin was not bactericidal against 93% of S. lugdunensis isolates, suggesting widespread vancomycin tolerance in this species. These data provide insights into the response of S. lugdunensis isolates when challenged with various levels of antimicrobial agents in clinical use. PMID:17158933

  20. Perception of actions performed by external agents presupposes knowledge about the relationship between action and effect.

    PubMed

    Raos, Vassilis; Savaki, Helen E

    2016-05-15

    We used the (14)C-deoxyglucose method to reveal changes in activity, in the lateral sulcus of monkeys, elicited by reaching-to-grasp in the light or in the dark and by observation of the same action executed by an external agent. Both visually-guided execution and observation of the same action activated the secondary somatosensory cortex, the ventral somatosensory area, the somatorecipient parietal ventral area, the retroinsula and the caudo-medial area of the auditory belt. These matching activations indicate that the somesthetic consequences of movements, generated bottom-up during action execution, may also be triggered top-down during action observation to represent the predicted sensory consequences of the perceived movement. The posterior granular part of insula found to be activated only for action execution and its anterior agranular part activated only for action observation may contribute to the attribution of action to the correct agent. Also, execution in the dark implicated all components activated by execution in the light but the retroinsula. In conclusion, activation of the somatorecipient parietal areas, not only for action-execution but also for action-observation, indicates that perception of actions performed by an external agent presupposes knowledge about the action-effect relationships, and that understanding others' actions consists of running off-line previously stored sensory-motor programs. PMID:26892857

  1. Effects of surface treatment on bond strength between dental resin agent and zirconia ceramic.

    PubMed

    Moradabadi, Ashkan; Roudsari, Sareh Esmaeily Sabet; Yekta, Bijan Eftekhari; Rahbar, Nima

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents the results of an experimental study to understand the dominant mechanism in bond strength between dental resin agent and zirconia ceramic by investigating the effects of different surface treatments. Effects of two major mechanisms of chemical and micromechanical adhesion were evaluated on bond strength of zirconia to luting agent. Specimens of yttrium-oxide-partially-stabilized zirconia blocks were fabricated. Seven groups of specimens with different surface treatment were prepared. 1) zirconia specimens after airborne particle abrasion (SZ), 2) zirconia specimens after etching (ZH), 3) zirconia specimens after airborne particle abrasion and simultaneous etching (HSZ), 4) zirconia specimens coated with a layer of a Fluorapatite-Leucite glaze (GZ), 5) GZ specimens with additional acid etching (HGZ), 6) zirconia specimens coated with a layer of salt glaze (SGZ) and 7) SGZ specimens after etching with 2% HCl (HSGZ). Composite cylinders were bonded to airborne-particle-abraded surfaces of ZirkonZahn specimens with Panavia F2 resin luting agent. Failure modes were examined under 30× magnification and the effect of surface treatments was analyzed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and atomic force microscopy (AFM). SZ and HSZ groups had the highest and GZ and SGZ groups had the lowest mean shear bond strengths among all groups. Mean shear bond strengths were significantly decreased by applying a glaze layer on zirconia surfaces in GZ and SGZ groups. However, bond strengths were improved after etching process. Airborne particle abrasion resulted in higher shear bond strengths compared to etching treatment. Modes of failure varied among different groups. Finally, it is concluded that micromechanical adhesion was a more effective mechanism than chemical adhesion and airborne particle abrasion significantly increased mean shear bond strengths compared with another surface treatments. PMID:24268263

  2. Using Physiological Measures to Assess the Effects of Animated Pedagogical Agents in Multimedia Instruction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Romero-Hall, Enilda; Watson, Ginger; Papelis, Yiannnis

    2014-01-01

    To examine the visual attention, emotional responses, learning, perceptions and attitudes of learners interacting with an animated pedagogical agent, this study compared a multimedia learning environment with an emotionally-expressive animated pedagogical agent, with a non-expressive animated pedagogical agent, and without an agent. Visual…

  3. Behavioral side effects in rats treated with acetylcholinesterase inhibitors suggested used as prophylactics against nerve agents.

    PubMed

    Myhrer, Trond; Enger, Siri; Aas, Pål

    2010-05-01

    Acetylcholinesterase inhibitors in combination with an anticholinergic, particularly anticholinergics with antiglutamatergic properties, can effectively protect against nerve agent-induced seizures and lethality. The objective of the present study was to examine potential behavioral side effects of the anticholinesterases physostigmine (0.1mg/kg), galantamine (3mg/kg), huperzine (0.5mg/kg), and donepezil (2.5mg/kg) alone or each drug in combination with anticholinergic procyclidine (3mg/kg). The results showed that rats injected intraperitoneally with galantamine displayed a mild cognitive deficit in terms of reduced preference for novelty that was similarly found among animals treated with procyclidine combined with either galantamine or donepezil. Locomotor activity and rearing were radically depressed in all groups treated with anticholinesterases as well as in combination with procyclidine. Reductions in activity were most prominent for rats injected with galantamine alone. Equalizing effects of cholinesterase inhibitors and anticholinergics were absent in the present context. Findings from previous studies that both systemic and local (amygdala) application of physostigmine cause increased fear-motivated freezing response in rats, may explain the marked reductions in activity among the present rats. In view of these findings, use of anticholinesterases (crossing the blood-brain barrier) as prophylactics against nerve agents must be carefully examined to avoid severe side effects. PMID:20184916

  4. [Hypoxia and memory. Specific features of nootropic agents effects and their use].

    PubMed

    Voronina, T A

    2000-01-01

    Hypoxia and hypoxic adaptation are powerful factors of controlling memory and behavior processes. Acute hypoxia exerts a differential impact on different deficits of mnestic and cognitive functions. Instrumental reflexes of active and passive avoidance, negative learning, behavior with a change in the stereotype of learning are more greatly damaged. Memory with spatial and visual differentiation and their rearrangement change to a lesser extent and conditional reflexes are not deranged. In this contract, altitude hypoxic adaptation enhances information fixation and increases the degree and duration of retention of temporary relations. Nootropic agents with an antihypoxic action exert a marked effect on hypoxia-induced cognitive and memory disorders and the magnitude of this effect depends on the ration of proper nootropic to antihypoxic components in the spectrum of the drugs' pharmacological activity. The agents that combine a prevailing antiamnestic effect and a marked and moderate antihypoxic action (mexidole, nooglutil, pyracetam, beglymin, etc.) are most effective in eliminating different hypoxia-induced cognitive and memory disorders, nootropic drugs that have a pronounced antiamnestic activity (centrophenoxine, etc.) and no antihypoxic component also restore the main types of mnestic disorders after hypoxia, but to a lesser extent. PMID:11055197

  5. The effects of acoustic radiation force on contrast agents: Experimental and theoretial analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dayton, Paul Alexander

    The goal of this research is to understand the response of ultrasound contrast agents to acoustic radiation force. Ultrasound contrast agents are encapsulated microbubbles similar in size and rheologic behavior to human erythrocytes. A core of either air or a high- molecular weight gas makes these microbubbles extremely compressible and highly echogenic. Clinically, the detection of blood is difficult without contrast agents because the echoes from blood cells are typically 30-40 dB less than tissue echoes. Ultrasound contrast agents have been shown to be extremely useful in assisting delineation of perfused tissue in echocardiography, and are being increasingly used for tumor detection in radiology. The high compressibility of gas-filled contrast agents makes these microbubbles susceptible to translation due to radiation force. Thus, it is important to understand the effects of this force in order to avoid erroneous measurements based on the location and flow velocity of microbubbles. In addition, the ability to displace and concentrate microbubbles may be an advantage in targeted imaging, targeted therapy, or industrial applications where it is desired to localize microbubbles in a region. In this study, experimental and theoretical tools are combined to investigate the interaction between microbubbles and an acoustic pulse. Several unique experimental systems allow visualization and analysis of the radius-time curves of individual microbubbles, the displacement of individual microbubbles in-vitro, and the displacement of microbubbles in-vivo. Theoretical analysis illustrates that the effect of radiation force on microbubbles is directly proportional to the product of the bubble volume and the acoustic pressure gradient. A model designed to simulate the radius-time behavior of individual microbubbles is verified from experimental data, and used to estimate the magnitude of radiation force. The resulting bubble translation is determined using a second model

  6. Effects of Anti-Tumor Necrosis Factor α (anti-TNF) agents on Bone

    PubMed Central

    Kawai, Vivian K.; Stein, C. Michael; Perrien, Daniel S.; Griffin, Marie R.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose of the review TNF inhibitors are effective for achieving disease control in several inflammatory diseases. Although anti-TNF agents can inhibit bone loss in vitro, their role in the prevention of clinically relevant outcomes such as osteoporosis and fractures has not been clearly established. Recent findings There are many studies of the effects of TNF inhibitors on markers of bone turnover; however few have measured bone mineral density (BMD) or fractures. Most of these studies have small sample sizes and a minority had a placebo control group. Overall these studies suggest that the anti-resorptive effects of anti-TNF therapy are related to control of disease activity. Summary The antiresorptive effects of TNF inhibitors are likely related to their anti-inflammatory properties. Studies to date have not demonstrated any advantages of TNF inhibitors over traditional non biologic therapies in the prevention of bone loss and fractures. PMID:22810364

  7. In vitro effectiveness of 13 agents in otomycosis and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Stern, J C; Shah, M K; Lucente, F E

    1988-11-01

    Many agents have been recommended for treating otomycosis, but no preparation has been widely accepted. To compare the effectiveness of many recommended preparations, we performed an in vitro study using 15 species of fungi and yeast cultured from patients presenting with otomycosis during the past year. By measuring zones of inhibition, we assessed the effectiveness of aqueous Merthiolate, Burow's solution (2%), VoSol HC, VoSol plain, Cortisporin suspension, clotrimazole 1%, Mycostatin, amphotericin B, ethanol 95%, miconazole, tolnaftate 1%, natamycin, and flucytosine. Most otic preparations showed little or no growth inhibition. However, Merthiolate was very effective against all organisms tested, clotrimazole was very effective against most yeast and fungi tested, and nystatin had the widest spectrum of activity among the antifungals. Tolnaftate was ineffective. Vigorous cleaning of the external auditory canal remains the mainstay in treating otymycosis, but proper laboratory identification and suitable topical therapy are also important in dealing with this capricious infection. PMID:3054372

  8. New approaches to assessing the effects of mutagenic agents on the integrity of the human genome.

    PubMed

    Elespuru, R K; Sankaranarayanan, K

    2007-03-01

    Heritable genetic alterations, although individually rare, have a substantial collective health impact. Approximately 20% of these are new mutations of unknown cause. Assessment of the effect of exposures to DNA damaging agents, i.e. mutagenic chemicals and radiations, on the integrity of the human genome and on the occurrence of genetic disease remains a daunting challenge. Recent insights may explain why previous examination of human exposures to ionizing radiation, as in Hiroshima and Nagasaki, failed to reveal heritable genetic effects. New opportunities to assess the heritable genetic damaging effects of environmental mutagens are afforded by: (1) integration of knowledge on the molecular nature of genetic disorders and the molecular effects of mutagens; (2) the development of more practical assays for germline mutagenesis; (3) the likely use of population-based genetic screening in personalized medicine. PMID:17174354

  9. Advances in the discovery of kinesin spindle protein (Eg5) inhibitors as antitumor agents.

    PubMed

    El-Nassan, Hala Bakr

    2013-04-01

    Cancer is considered as one of the most serious health problems. Despite the presence of many effective chemotherapeutic agents, their severe side effects together with the appearance of mutant tumors limit the use of these drugs and increase the need for new anticancer agents. Eg5 represents an attractive target for medicinal chemists since Eg5 is overexpressed in many proliferative tissues while almost no Eg5 is detected in nonproliferative tissues. Many Eg5 inhibitors displayed potent anticancer activity against some of the mutant tumors with limited side effects. The present review provides an overview about the progress in the discovery of Eg5 inhibitors especially from 2009 to 2012 as well as the clinical trials conducted on some of these inhibitors. PMID:23434636

  10. Determination of Hypersensitivity to Genotoxic Agents Among Escherichia coli Single Gene Knockout Mutants

    PubMed Central

    Becket, Elinne; Chen, Frank; Tamae, Cindy; Miller, Jeffrey H.

    2010-01-01

    Summary We have tested the KEIO collection of 3985 different viable single gene knockouts in Escherichia coli to identify genes whose loss increases sensitivity to one or more of six different chemotherapeutic agents and mutagens: Bleomycin (BLM), Cisplatin (CPT), ICR-191 (ICR), 5-azacytidine (5AZ), Zebularine (ZEB), and 5-bromo-2’-deoxyuridine (5BdU). We discovered a set of 156 strains that display a significant increase in sensitivity to at least one of the agents tested. Each genotoxic agent generates a distinct “sensitivity profile” that is characteristic of the agent. Comparison with an independent study of sensitivity profiles for an extensive set of antibiotics pinpoints those effects that are relatively specific for each agent. In some cases engineered double mutants have greatly increased effects. These results provide insight into the mechanism of action of each agent, and define targets for the design of co-drugs that can potentiate these agents. An example is the finding that mutants lacking one of several genes in the folate biosynthetic pathway are hypersensitive to ZEB, leading to a demonstration of synergy between trimethoprim and ZEB. PMID:20674514

  11. Determination of hypersensitivity to genotoxic agents among Escherichia coli single gene knockout mutants.

    PubMed

    Becket, Elinne; Chen, Frank; Tamae, Cindy; Miller, Jeffrey H

    2010-09-01

    We have tested the KEIO collection of 3985 different viable single gene knockouts in Escherichia coli to identify genes whose loss increases sensitivity to one or more of six different chemotherapeutic agents and mutagens: Bleomycin (BLM), Cisplatin (CPT), ICR-191 (ICR), 5-azacytidine (5AZ), Zebularine (ZEB), and 5-bromo-2'-deoxyuridine (5BdU). We discovered a set of 156 strains that display a significant increase in sensitivity to at least one of the agents tested. Each genotoxic agent generates a distinct "sensitivity profile" that is characteristic of the agent. Comparison with an independent study of sensitivity profiles for an extensive set of antibiotics pinpoints those effects that are relatively specific for each agent. In some cases engineered double mutants have greatly increased effects. These results provide insight into the mechanism of action of each agent, and define targets for the design of co-drugs that can potentiate these agents. An example is the finding that mutants lacking one of several genes in the folate biosynthetic pathway are hypersensitive to ZEB, leading to a demonstration of synergy between trimethoprim and ZEB. PMID:20674514

  12. EFFECT OF CHELATING AGENTS ON THE GROWTH OF ESCHERICHIA COLI IN SEAWATER1

    PubMed Central

    Jones, Galen E.

    1964-01-01

    Jones, Galen E. (Scripps Institution of Oceanography, University of California, La Jolla). Effect of chelating agents on the growth of Escherichia coli in seawater. J. Bacteriol. 87:483–499. 1964.—Escherichia coli did not grow at 37 C, or grew only after a prolonged lag phase in filter-sterilized basal seawater medium (synthetic or natural seawater supplemented with glucose, NH4Cl, and K2HPO4). When this basal medium was enriched with 0.01% or less organic matter, such as casein hydrolysate, peptone, or yeast extract, growth always occurred after a short lag phase. Adding 10−5m cysteine or autoclaving the seawater gave a similar effect. A variety of organic chelating agents (histidine, glycine, methionine, glycylglycine, 8-hydroxyquinoline, thioglycolic acid, o-phenanthroline, disodium ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid, etc.) reversed the toxicity of filter-sterilized basal seawater medium in concentrations predictable from stability constants. Even metal-complexing agents such as Na2S2O3, Na2S, and NaCN in appropriate concentrations reversed toxicity. The quality of the distilled water and the treatment of glassware had a significant effect on the growth of E. coli in basal seawater medium. It was concluded that iodate is probably not the toxic substance for E. coli in seawater, since relatively high concentrations were stimulatory. The inhibition resulting from the individual salts of synthetic seawater was proportional to their concentration; NaCl was most inhibitory. This toxicity is believed to be derived from trace impurities in the reagent-grade chemicals used to prepare synthetic seawater. Evidence was also found for the toxicity of heavy metals in natural seawater. Heavy metals in seawater appear to inhibit growth but not respiration. PMID:14127563

  13. EFFECT OF CHELATING AGENTS ON THE GROWTH OF ESCHERICHIA COLI IN SEAWATER.

    PubMed

    JONES, G E

    1964-03-01

    Jones, Galen E. (Scripps Institution of Oceanography, University of California, La Jolla). Effect of chelating agents on the growth of Escherichia coli in seawater. J. Bacteriol. 87:483-499. 1964.-Escherichia coli did not grow at 37 C, or grew only after a prolonged lag phase in filter-sterilized basal seawater medium (synthetic or natural seawater supplemented with glucose, NH(4)Cl, and K(2)HPO(4)). When this basal medium was enriched with 0.01% or less organic matter, such as casein hydrolysate, peptone, or yeast extract, growth always occurred after a short lag phase. Adding 10(-5)m cysteine or autoclaving the seawater gave a similar effect. A variety of organic chelating agents (histidine, glycine, methionine, glycylglycine, 8-hydroxyquinoline, thioglycolic acid, o-phenanthroline, disodium ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid, etc.) reversed the toxicity of filter-sterilized basal seawater medium in concentrations predictable from stability constants. Even metal-complexing agents such as Na(2)S(2)O(3), Na(2)S, and NaCN in appropriate concentrations reversed toxicity. The quality of the distilled water and the treatment of glassware had a significant effect on the growth of E. coli in basal seawater medium. It was concluded that iodate is probably not the toxic substance for E. coli in seawater, since relatively high concentrations were stimulatory. The inhibition resulting from the individual salts of synthetic seawater was proportional to their concentration; NaCl was most inhibitory. This toxicity is believed to be derived from trace impurities in the reagent-grade chemicals used to prepare synthetic seawater. Evidence was also found for the toxicity of heavy metals in natural seawater. Heavy metals in seawater appear to inhibit growth but not respiration. PMID:14127563

  14. Long-term effects of the antibacterial agent triclosan on marine periphyton communities.

    PubMed

    Eriksson, K Martin; Johansson, C Henrik; Fihlman, Viktor; Grehn, Alexander; Sanli, Kemal; Andersson, Mats X; Blanck, Hans; Arrhenius, Åsa; Sircar, Triranta; Backhaus, Thomas

    2015-09-01

    Triclosan is a widely used antibacterial agent that has become a ubiquitous contaminant in freshwater, estuary, and marine environments. Concerns about potential adverse effects of triclosan have been described in several recent risk assessments. Its effects on freshwater microbial communities have been well studied, but studies addressing effects on marine microbial communities are scarce. In the present study, the authors describe short- and long-term effects of triclosan on marine periphyton (microbial biofilm) communities. Short-term effects on photosynthesis were estimated after 60 min to 210 min of exposure. Long-term effects on photosynthesis, chlorophyll a fluorescence, pigment content, community tolerance, and bacterial carbon utilization were studied after exposing periphyton for 17 d in flow-through microcosms to 0.316 nM to 10,000 nM triclosan. Results from the short-term studies show that triclosan is toxic to periphyton photosynthesis. Half maximal effective concentration (EC50) values of 1080 nM and 3000 nM were estimated using (14)CO2-incorporation and pulse amplitude modulation (PAM) fluorescence measurements, respectively. After long-term triclosan exposure in flow-through microcosms, photosynthesis estimated using PAM fluorometry was not inhibited by triclosan concentrations up to 1000 nM but instead increased with increasing triclosan concentration. Similarly, at exposure concentrations of 31.6 nM and higher, triclosan caused an increase in photosynthetic pigments. At 316 nM triclosan, the pigment amounts were increased by a factor of 1.4 to 1.9 compared with the control level. Pollution-induced community tolerance was observed for algae and cyanobacteria at 100 nM triclosan and higher. Despite the widespread use of triclosan as an antibacterial agent, the compound did not have any effects on bacterial carbon utilization after long-term exposure. PMID:25904164

  15. Ethyl-2-amino-pyrrole-3-carboxylates are novel potent anticancer agents that affect tubulin polymerization, induce G2/M cell-cycle arrest, and effectively inhibit soft tissue cancer cell growth in vitro.

    PubMed

    Boichuk, Sergei; Galembikova, Aigul; Zykova, Svetlana; Ramazanov, Bulat; Khusnutdinov, Ramil; Dunaev, Pavel; Khaibullina, Svetlana; Lombardi, Vincent

    2016-08-01

    Microtubules are known to be one of the most attractive and validated targets in cancer therapy. However, the clinical use of drugs that affect the dynamic state of microtubules has been hindered by chemoresistance and toxicity issues. Accordingly, the development of novel agents that target microtubules is needed. Here, we report the identification of novel compounds with pirrole and carboxylate structures: ethyl-2-amino-pyrrole-3-carboxylates (EAPCs) that provide potent cytotoxic activities against multiple soft tissue cancer cell lines in vitro. Using the MTS cell proliferation assay, we assessed the activity of EAPCs on various cancer cell lines including leiomyosarcoma SK-LMS-1, rhabdomyosarcoma RD, gastrointestinal stromal tumor GIST-T1, A-673 Ewing's sarcoma, and U-2 OS osteosarcoma. We found that in the majority of cases, two EAPC compounds (EAPC-20 and EAPC-24) considerably inhibited cancer cell proliferation in vitro. The growth-inhibitory effects of EAPC-20 and EAPC-24 were time and dose dependent. The molecular mechanisms of action of these compounds were because of the inhibition of tubulin polymerization and induction of a robust G2/M cell-cycle arrest, leading to considerable accumulation of tumor cells in the M-phase. Finally, EAPCs induced tumor cell death by apoptotic pathways. The above-mentioned effects were also observed in most soft tissue tumor cell lines and the gastrointestinal stromal tumor cell line investigated. Taken together, our data identify potent antitumor activity of EAPCs in vitro, thus providing a novel scaffold with which to develop potent chemotherapeutic agents for cancer therapy. PMID:27129079

  16. Effect of different agents onto multidrug resistant cells revealed by fluorescence correlation spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boutin, C.; Roche, Y.; Jaffiol, R.; Millot, J.-M.; Millot, C.; Plain, J.; Deturche, R.; Jeannesson, P.; Manfait, M.; Royer, P.

    Fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (FCS), which is a sensitive and non invasive technique, has been used to characterize the plasma membrane fluidity and heterogeneity of multidrug resistant living cells. At the single cell level, the effects of different membrane agents present in the extra-cellular medium have been analyzed. Firstly, we reveal a modification of plasma membrane microviscosity according to the addition of a fluidity modulator, benzyl alcohol. In the other hand, revertant such as verapamil and cyclosporin-A appears to act more specifically on the slow diffusion sites as microdomains.

  17. The effect of iron on the biodistribution of bone scanning agents in humans

    SciTech Connect

    Choy, D.; Murray, I.P.; Hoschl, R.

    1981-07-01

    Nine patients with chronic iron overload, resulting from either repeated transfusions or hemochromatosis, had bone scans that were characterized by a reduction of bony uptake, marked increase in renal activity, and a significant increase in soft-tissue accumulation of 99mTc-labeled bone-seeking agents. These findings were supported by semiquantitative computer analysis. The probable mechanisms of altered biodistribution and the possible role of serum ferritin are discussed. The importance of realizing the effect of excess iron on skeletal scintigraphy is further emphasized by the results of bone scanning in another patient in whom acute iron overload following infusion of iron-dextran resulted in excessive blood pool labeling.

  18. Effect of selective sorptive agents on leachability of {sup 137}Cs and {sup 90}Sr

    SciTech Connect

    Spence, R.D.

    1998-06-01

    Decades ago it was established that illite effectively improves {sup 137}Cs leach resistance. Subsequently, illite has become a standard ingredient used at Oak Ridge National Laboratory in grouts developed to stabilize {sup 137}Cs. Adding illite improves {sup 137}Cs leach resistance by three orders of magnitude, and increasing the illite concentration can add another order of magnitude improvement. Adding crystalline silicotitanate, a selective sorptive agent developed more recently for {sup 137}Cs, not only improves {sup 137}Cs leach resistance by an order-of-magnitude over that obtained using illite but also improves {sup 85}Sr leach resistance by two orders of magnitude.

  19. The effect of interstitial pressure on therapeutic agent transport: coupling with the tumor blood and lymphatic vascular systems.

    PubMed

    Wu, Min; Frieboes, Hermann B; Chaplain, Mark A J; McDougall, Steven R; Cristini, Vittorio; Lowengrub, John S

    2014-08-21

    Vascularized tumor growth is characterized by both abnormal interstitial fluid flow and the associated interstitial fluid pressure (IFP). Here, we study the effect that these conditions have on the transport of therapeutic agents during chemotherapy. We apply our recently developed vascular tumor growth model which couples a continuous growth component with a discrete angiogenesis model to show that hypertensive IFP is a physical barrier that may hinder vascular extravasation of agents through transvascular fluid flux convection, which drives the agents away from the tumor. This result is consistent with previous work using simpler models without blood flow or lymphatic drainage. We consider the vascular/interstitial/lymphatic fluid dynamics to show that tumors with larger lymphatic resistance increase the agent concentration more rapidly while also experiencing faster washout. In contrast, tumors with smaller lymphatic resistance accumulate less agents but are able to retain them for a longer time. The agent availability (area-under-the curve, or AUC) increases for less permeable agents as lymphatic resistance increases, and correspondingly decreases for more permeable agents. We also investigate the effect of vascular pathologies on agent transport. We show that elevated vascular hydraulic conductivity contributes to the highest AUC when the agent is less permeable, but to lower AUC when the agent is more permeable. We find that elevated interstitial hydraulic conductivity contributes to low AUC in general regardless of the transvascular agent transport capability. We also couple the agent transport with the tumor dynamics to simulate chemotherapy with the same vascularized tumor under different vascular pathologies. We show that tumors with an elevated interstitial hydraulic conductivity alone require the strongest dosage to shrink. We further show that tumors with elevated vascular hydraulic conductivity are more hypoxic during therapy and that the response

  20. Effects of spill-treating agents on growth kinetics of marine microalgae.

    PubMed

    Rial, Diego; Murado, Miguel A; Menduiña, Araceli; Fuciños, Pablo; González, Pilar; Mirón, Jesús; Vázquez, José A

    2013-12-15

    The effects of four spill-treating agents (STAs) (CytoSol, Finasol(®) OSR 51, Agma OSD 569 and OD4000) on the growth kinetics of three marine microalgae (Isochrysis galbana, Chaetoceros gracilis, Phaeodactylum tricornutum) were studied. Chlorophyll a concentration and optical density at 700 nm were assessed to describe the logistic growth of algae in batch cultures. The optical density data were initially analyzed as described for standard algal growth inhibition tests and subsequently modelled by a bivariate model, as a function of time and dose, to assess the toxic effects on growth parameters. Increasing trends in EC50 and EC10 values with time were found with the standard approach. In 8 of the 11 tests, the lag phase (λ) or the time required to achieve half the maximum biomass (τ) was significantly dependent on the STA concentration. A global parameter (EC50,τ) was calculated to summarize the effects of STAs on growth parameters in the bivariate model. The ranking of sensitivity as EC50,τ values was I. galbana>C. gracilis>P. tricornutum. For all species tested, the least toxic agent was Agma OSD 569, followed by CytoSol. The mathematical model allowed successful ecotoxicological evaluation of chemicals on microalgal growth. PMID:23911058

  1. Effect of individual protective behaviors on influenza transmission: an agent-based model.

    PubMed

    Karimi, Elnaz; Schmitt, Ketra; Akgunduz, Ali

    2015-09-01

    It is well established in the epidemiological literature that individual behaviors have a significant effect on the spread of infectious diseases. Agent-based models are increasingly being recognized as the next generation of epidemiological models. In this research, we use the ability of agent-based models to incorporate behavior into simulations by examining the relative importance of vaccination and social distancing, two common measures for controlling the spread of infectious diseases, with respect to seasonal influenza. We modeled health behaviour using the result of a Health Belief Model study focused on influenza. We considered a control and a treatment group to explore the effect of education on people's health-related behaviors patterns. The control group reflects the behavioral patterns of students based on their general knowledge of influenza and its interventions while the treatment group illustrates the level of behavioral changes after individuals have been educated by a health care expert. The results of this study indicate that self-initiated behaviors are successful in controlling an outbreak in a high contact rate location such as a university. Self-initiated behaviors resulted in a population attack rate decrease of 17% and a 25% reduction in the peak number of cases. The simulation also provides significant evidence for the effect of an HBM theory-based educational program to increase the rate of applying the target interventions (vaccination by 22% percent and social distancing by 41%) and consequently to control the outbreak. PMID:25578039

  2. Effect of anti-glycolytic agents on tumour cells in vitro

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korshunov, D. A.; Kondakova, I. V.

    2016-08-01

    A metabolic change is one of the tumour hallmarks, which has recently attracted a great amount of attention. One of the main metabolic characteristics of tumour cells is a high level of glycolysis even in the presence of oxygen, known as aerobic glycolysis or the Warburg effect. The energy production is much less in a glycolysis pathway than that in a tricarboxylic acid cycle. The Warburg effect constitutes a fundamental adaptation of tumour cells to a relatively hostile environment, and supports the evolution of aggressive and metastatic phenotypes. As a result, tumour glycolysis may become an attractive target for cancer therapy. Here, we research the effect of potential anticancer agents on tumour cells in vitro. In our study, we found a high sensitivity of tumour cells to anti-glycolityc drugs. In addition, tumour cells are more resistant to the agents studied in comparison with normal cells. We also observed an atypical cooperative interaction of tumour cells in the median lethal dose of drugs. They formed the specific morphological structure of the surviving cells. This behavior is not natural for the culture of tumour cells. Perhaps this is one of the mechanisms of cells' adaptation to the aggressive environment.

  3. Potential water-quality effects from iron cyanide anticaking agents in road salt

    SciTech Connect

    Paschka, M.G.; Ghosh, R.S.; Dzombak, D.A.

    1999-10-01

    Water-soluble iron cyanide compounds are widely used as anticaking agents in road salt, which creates potential contamination of surface and groundwater with these compounds when the salt dissolves and is washed off roads in runoff. This paper presents a summary of available information on iron cyanide use in road salt and its potential effects on water quality. Also, estimates of total cyanide concentrations in snow-melt runoff from roadways are presented as simple mass-balance calculations. Although available information does not indicate a widespread problem, it also is clear that the water-quality effects of cyanide in road salt have not been examined much. Considering the large, and increasing, volume of road salt used for deicing, studies are needed to determine levels of total and free cyanide in surface and groundwater adjacent to salt storage facilities and along roads with open drainage ditches. Results could be combined with current knowledge of the fate and transport of cyanide to assess water-quality effects of iron cyanide anticaking agents used in road salt.

  4. Effect of a novel chelating agent on defect removal during post-CMP cleaning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hong, Jiao; Niu, Xinhuan; Liu, Yuling; He, Yangang; Zhang, Baoguo; Wang, Juan; Han, Liying; Yan, Chenqi; Zhang, Jin

    2016-08-01

    Chemical mechanical polishing (CMP) has become widely accepted for the planarization of device interconnect structures in deep submicron semiconductor manufacturing. However, during CMP process the foreign particles, metal contaminants, and other chemical components are introduced onto the wafer surface, so CMP process is considered as one of the dirtiest process to wafer surface defects which may damage the GLSI patterns and the metallic impurities can induce many crystal defects in wafers during the following furnace processing. Therefore, the post-CMP cleaning of wafers has become a key step in successful CMP process and the polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) brush cleaning is the most effective method for post-CMP in situ cleaning. In this study, the effect of the chelating agent with different concentrations on defect removal by using PVA brush cleaning was discussed emphatically. It can be seen from the surface images obtained by scanning electron microscopy and KLA digital comparison system analysis confirmed that the chelating agent can effectively act on the defect removal.

  5. EVALUATION OF METHODS FOR DETECTING ECOLOGICAL EFFECTS FROM GENETICALLY ENGINEERED MICROORGANISMS AND PEST CONTROL AGENTS IN TERRESTRIAL SYSTEMS

    EPA Science Inventory

    This report summarizes and evaluates research from several laboratories that deals with the detection of ecological effects induced through exposure of microbes or plants to genetically engineered microorganisms (GEMS) and microbial pest control agents (MPCAS) . The development o...

  6. Showering effectiveness for human hair decontamination of the nerve agent VX.

    PubMed

    Josse, Denis; Wartelle, Julien; Cruz, Catherine

    2015-05-01

    In this work, our goals were to establish whether hair decontamination by showering one hour post-exposure to the highly toxic organophosphate nerve agent VX was effective, whether it required the addition of a detergent to water and, if it could be improved by using the adsorbent Fuller's Earth (FE) or the Reactive Skin Decontamination Lotion (RSDL) 30 min prior to showering. Hair exposure to VX and decontamination was performed by using an in vitro model. Hair showering led to 72% reduction of contamination. Addition of detergent to water slightly increased the decontamination effectiveness. Hair treatment with FE or RSDL improved the decontamination rate. Combination of FE use and showering, which yielded a decontamination factor of 41, was demonstrated to be the most effective hair decontamination procedure. Hair wiping after showering was shown to contribute to hair decontamination. Altogether, our results highlighted the importance of considering hair decontamination as an important part of body surface decontamination protocols. PMID:25791764

  7. Comparison of the lethal effects of chemical warfare nerve agents across multiple ages.

    PubMed

    Wright, Linnzi K M; Lee, Robyn B; Vincelli, Nicole M; Whalley, Christopher E; Lumley, Lucille A

    2016-01-22

    Children may be inherently more vulnerable than adults to the lethal effects associated with chemical warfare nerve agent (CWNA) exposure because of their closer proximity to the ground, smaller body mass, higher respiratory rate, increased skin permeability and immature metabolic systems. Unfortunately, there have only been a handful of studies on the effects of CWNA in pediatric animal models, and more research is needed to confirm this hypothesis. Using a stagewise, adaptive dose design, we estimated the 24h median lethal dose for subcutaneous exposure to seven CWNA in both male and female Sprague-Dawley rats at six different developmental times. Perinatal (postnatal day [PND] 7, 14 and 21) and adult (PND 70) rats were more susceptible than pubertal (PND 28 and 42) rats to the lethal effects associated with exposure to tabun, sarin, soman and cyclosarin. Age-related differences in susceptibility were not observed in rats exposed to VM, Russian VX or VX. PMID:26621540

  8. Effectiveness of dental bleaching in depth after using different bleaching agents

    PubMed Central

    Lima, Débora A N L.; Aguiar, Flávio H B.; Bertoldo, Carlos E S.; Ambrosano, Gláucia M B.; Lovadino, José R.

    2013-01-01

    Objectives: This study evaluated the effectiveness of low- and high-concentration bleaching agents on enamel and deep dentin. Study design: Stained bovine incisors fragments were randomized placed into 10 groups (n=5), according to the sample thicknesses (2.0 mm or 3.5 mm) and bleaching agent: 10% carbamide peroxide (CP) (4 h a day/21 days); 6% hydrogen peroxide (HP) with calcium (1:30 h a day/21 days); HP 20% with calcium (50 min a day/3 sessions with a 7-day interval); HP 35% (3 x 15 min a day/3 sessions with a 7-day interval); HP 35% with calcium (40 min a day/3 sessions with a 7-day interval). The samples were stored in artificial saliva during the experiment. The color change was evaluated using a spectrophotometer at the initial analysis, after artificially staining with black tea and after each of the bleaching weeks, and data was expressed in CIE Lab System values. The L* coordinate data was submitted to analysis of variance and Tukey-Kramer test and the ?E values data was submitted for analysis of variance in a split-plot ANOVA and Tukey’s test (?=0.05). Results: None of the bleaching agents tested differed from the reflectance values on the enamel surface. For deep dentin HP 20% and HP 35%, both with calcium, showed the lowest reflectance values, which differed from CP 10%. Conclusion: It is concluded that high concentration hydrogen peroxide with calcium was less effective in deep dentin than 10% carbamide peroxide. Key words:Dental bleaching; hydrogen peroxide; carbamide peroxide; dental staining. PMID:24455056

  9. Sunscreening Agents

    PubMed Central

    Martis, Jacintha; Shobha, V; Sham Shinde, Rutuja; Bangera, Sudhakar; Krishnankutty, Binny; Bellary, Shantala; Varughese, Sunoj; Rao, Prabhakar; Naveen Kumar, B.R.

    2013-01-01

    The increasing incidence of skin cancers and photodamaging effects caused by ultraviolet radiation has increased the use of sunscreening agents, which have shown beneficial effects in reducing the symptoms and reoccurrence of these problems. Many sunscreen compounds are in use, but their safety and efficacy are still in question. Efficacy is measured through indices, such as sun protection factor, persistent pigment darkening protection factor, and COLIPA guidelines. The United States Food and Drug Administration and European Union have incorporated changes in their guidelines to help consumers select products based on their sun protection factor and protection against ultraviolet radiation, whereas the Indian regulatory agency has not yet issued any special guidance on sunscreening agents, as they are classified under cosmetics. In this article, the authors discuss the pharmacological actions of sunscreening agents as well as the available formulations, their benefits, possible health hazards, safety, challenges, and proper application technique. New technologies and scope for the development of sunscreening agents are also discussed as well as the role of the physician in patient education about the use of these agents. PMID:23320122

  10. Involvement of Akt and mTOR in chemotherapeutic and hormonal-based drug resistance and response to radiation in breast cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Steelman, Linda S; Navolanic, Patrick; Chappell, William H; Abrams, Stephen L; Wong, Ellis WT; Martelli, Alberto M; Cocco, Lucio; Stivala, Franca; Libra, Massimo; Nicoletti, Ferdinando; Drobot, Lyudmyla B; Franklin, Richard A

    2011-01-01

    Elucidating the response of breast cancer cells to chemotherapeutic and hormonal based drugs and radiation is clearly important as these are common treatment approaches. Signaling cascades often involved in chemo-, hormonal- and radiation resistance are the Ras/PI3K/PTE N/Akt/mTO R, Ras/Raf/MEK/ERK and p53 pathways. In the following studies we have examined the effects of activation of the Ras/PI3K/PTE N/Akt/mTO R cascade in the response of MCF-7 breast cancer cells to chemotherapeutic- and hormonal-based drugs and radiation. Activation of Akt by introduction of conditionally-activated Akt-1 gene could result in resistance to chemotherapeutic and hormonal based drugs as well as radiation. We have determined that chemotherapeutic drugs such as doxorubicin or the hormone based drug tamoxifen, both used to treat breast cancer, resulted in the activation of the Raf/MEK/ERK pathway which is often associated with a proproliferative, anti-apoptotic response. In drug sensitive MCF-7 cells which have wild-type p53; ERK, p53 and downstream p21Cip-1 were induced upon exposure to doxorubicin. In contrast, in the drug resistant cells which expressed activated Akt-1, much lower levels of p53 and p21Cip1 were induced upon exposure to doxorubicin. These results indicate the involvement of the Ras/PI3K/PTE N/Akt/mTO R, Ras/Raf/MEK/ERK and p53 pathways in the response to chemotherapeutic and hormonal based drugs. Understanding how breast cancers respond to chemo- and hormonal-based therapies and radiation may enhance the ability to treat breast cancer more effectively. PMID:21869603

  11. Protective effect of diethyldithiocarbamate and carbon disulfide against liver injury induced by various hepatotoxic agents.

    PubMed

    Masuda, Y; Nakayama, N

    1982-09-01

    Diethyldithiocarbamate (DTC) and carbon disulfide (CS2), at nearly equimolar oral dose levels, protected mice against liver damage induced by carbon tetrachloride, chloroform, bromotrichloromethane, thioacetamide, bromobenzene, furosemide, acetaminophen, dimethylnitrosamine and trichloroethylene, as evidenced by the suppression of elevations in plasma GPT activity and liver calcium content, and of histopathological alterations. Both agents also prolonged hexobarbital sleeping time and zoxazolamine paralysis time in mice. DTC and SC, alone, given orally, decreased microsomal metabolism of several substrates (aniline, p-nitroanisole, hexobarbital, zoxazolamine, aminopyrine and 3,4-benzopyrene), CC14-induced lipid peroxidation, and cytochrome P-450 content. The loss of microsomal drug-metabolizing enzyme activity was also observed in the experiments in vitro using liver slices and isolated microsomes. Since a characteristic common to such diverse hepatotoxins is that they require metabolic activation before exhibiting hepatotoxicity, the protective mechanisms of DTC and CS2 may involve their interference with the process of metabolic activation of these hepatotoxins. The protective action of DTC may be mediated almost entirely through CS2 when administered orally and at least partly with parenteral administration, since, in CCl4-induced liver injury, DTC was most effective when given orally, while the action of CS2 was less dependent on the route of administration. Thus CS2 and CS2-producing agents in vivo such as dithiocarbamate derivatives and disulfiram may modify toxicological and pharmacological effects of foreign compounds by inhibiting microsomal drug-metabolizing enzyme activity in the liver. PMID:6291543

  12. The effects of node exclusion on the centrality measures in graph models of interacting economic agents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caetano, Marco Antonio Leonel; Yoneyama, Takashi

    2015-07-01

    This work concerns the study of the effects felt by a network as a whole when a specific node is perturbed. Many real world systems can be described by network models in which the interactions of the various agents can be represented as an edge of a graph. With a graph model in hand, it is possible to evaluate the effect of deleting some of its edges on the architecture and values of nodes of the network. Eventually a node may end up isolated from the rest of the network and an interesting problem is to have a quantitative measure of the impact of such an event. For instance, in the field of finance, the network models are very popular and the proposed methodology allows to carry out "what if" tests in terms of weakening the links between the economic agents, represented as nodes. The two main concepts employed in the proposed methodology are (i) the vibrational IC-Information Centrality, which can provide a measure of the relative importance of a particular node in a network and (ii) autocatalytic networks that can indicate the evolutionary trends of the network. Although these concepts were originally proposed in the context of other fields of knowledge, they were also found to be useful in analyzing financial networks. In order to illustrate the applicability of the proposed methodology, a case of study using the actual data comprising stock market indices of 12 countries is presented.

  13. Polymer/TiO₂ hybrid vesicles for excellent UV screening and effective encapsulation of antioxidant agents.

    PubMed

    Du, Jianzhong; Sun, Hui

    2014-08-27

    Presented in this paper is a hybrid polymer/titanium dioxide (TiO2) vesicle that has excellent UV-screening efficacy and strong capacity to encapsulate antioxidant agents. Poly(ethylene oxide)-block-poly(2-(dimethylamino)ethyl methacrylate)-block-polystyrene (PEO-b-PDMAEMA-b-PS) triblock terpolymer was synthesized by atom transfer radical polymerization (ATRP) and then self-assembled into vesicles. Those vesicles showed excellent UV-screening property due to the scattering by vesicles and the absorption by PS vesicle membrane. The selective deposition of solvophobic tetrabutyl titanate in the PDMAEMA shell and the PS membrane of the vesicles led to the formation of polymer/TiO2 hybrid vesicles, resulting in an enhanced UV-screening property by further reflecting and scattering UV radiation. The vesicles can effectively encapsulate antioxidant agents such as ferulic acid (up to 57%), showing a rapid antioxidant capability (within 1 min) and a long-lasting antioxidant effect. PMID:25059274

  14. Effects of the methyltrimethoxysilane coupling agent on phenolic and miscanthus composites containing calcium sulfite scrubber material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, Sean

    The purpose of this research is to test the effects of methyltrimethoxysilane coupling agent on composite material containing calcium sulfite obtained from the Southern Illinois Power Co-operative. This scrubber material and the miscanthus plant are of interest due to their use in coal burning power plants to reduce toxic emission. When calcium sulfate is passed through coal fire gas emissions it absorbs mercury and sulfur. In these composites it is used as filler to reduce cost. Miscanthus is a source of both cellulose reinforcement and some natural resin. This plant has low care requirements, little mineral content, useful energy return, and positive environmental effects. Under investigation is whether a post-cure procedure or a silane coupling agent will positively impact the composite. Hot pressing alone may not be enough to fully cure the phenolic. It is hoped that the silane will increase the strength characteristics of the composite by enhancing adhesion between the calcium sulfite and phenolic resin. Possible effects on the miscanthus by the silane will also be tested. Phenolic is being utilized because of its recycling and biodegradable properties along with cost effectiveness in mass production. Composite mechanical performance was measured through 3-point bending to measure flexural strength and strain at breakage. A dynamic mechanical analyzer (DMA) was used to find thermomechanical properties. The post-cure was found to be effective, particularly on the final composite containing silane. When methyltrimethoxysilane was added to the miscanthus prior to fabrication, it was found to reduce flexural strength and density. However the addition of methyltrimethoxysilane to the calcium sulfite altered thermo-mechanical properties to a state more like pure phenolic, with added flexibility and thermal stability.

  15. The Effects of Peer-Like and Expert-Like Pedagogical Agents on Learners' Agent Perceptions, Task-Related Attitudes, and Learning Achievement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Liew, Tze Wei; Tan, Su-Mae; Jayothisa, Chandrika

    2013-01-01

    The present study examined the impact of peer-like and expert-like agent stereotypes, as operationalized by agent's image and voice, on learners' agent perceptions, task-related attitudes, and learning achievement. 56 university freshmen (23 males and 33 females) interacted with either the peer-like agent (female college student) or the…

  16. Chemotherapeutic implications in microsatellite unstable colorectal cancer1

    PubMed Central

    Jo, Won-Seok; Carethers, John M.

    2016-01-01

    alternative chemotherapeutic regimens for patients with MSI-H tumors to improve survival. PMID:17192059

  17. Effects of sealant, viscosity, and bonding agents on microleakage of fissure sealants: An in vitro study

    PubMed Central

    Mehrabkhani, Maryam; Mazhari, Fatemeh; Sadeghi, Samaneh; Ebrahimi, Masoumeh

    2015-01-01

    Objective: The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of enamel or dentin bonding agent (DBA) and sealant viscosity on sealant microleakage. Materials and Methods: Sixty extracted human premolars were randomly divided into two equal groups (based on sealant viscosity) and each group was divided into three subgroups of 10 teeth. Group 1 (low viscosity sealant, Seal-Rite, Pulpdent, USA with 7.7% filler): Prophylaxis, enameloplasty, etching of occlusal surfaces with 38% of phosphoric acid gel, rinsing and drying, followed by (1) enamel bonding agent (EBA) (Margin Bond, Coltène/Whaledent AG) or (2) DBA (Excite, Ivoclar Vivadent AG, Liechtenstein) or (3) no bonding (NB) prior to sealant application. In Group 2, similar procedures were performed except for applying a high viscosity sealant (Seal-Rite, Pulpdent, The USA with 34.4% filler). Specimens were thermocycled and then immersed in a 0.5% basic fuchsine solution for 24 h next, buccolingual slices of samples were scored under a stereomicroscope. The Kruskal–Wallis and Mann–Whitney U-tests were used for data analysis. Results: There was no significant difference between DBA, EBA, and NB subgroups in the microleakage scores in both groups. Low viscosity sealant had a lower microleakage than the high viscosity sealant in both DBA (P = 0.002) and NB (P = 0.041) subgroups. Conclusion: The results indicated that the use of low viscosity sealant reduced the microleakage of pit and fissure sealants. However, the use of a bonding agent before sealant placement didn’t affect the microleakage. PMID:26929696

  18. A comparison of the antifertility effects of alkylating agents and vinca alkaloids in male rats.

    PubMed Central

    Cooke, R A; Nikles, A; Roeser, H P

    1978-01-01

    1 The anti-fertility effects of cyclophosphamide, nitrogen mustard, vincristine and vinblastine were studied and compared in male rats. 2 The effects of the drugs on body weight and haematological values were used to monitor the pharmacological actions of the drugs. 3 All four drugs impaired fertility, the severity of the impairment depending on dose and duration of treatment. 4 Testicular size and histological appearances remained mostly normal, even in infertile animals, but seminiferous tubules were fewer in number and maturation arrest at the spermatid level was evident in some sections. 5 Recovery of drug-induced infertility occurred in 64% of treated animals, 9 to 40 weeks after cessation of treatment. 6 Morbidity and mortality were much higher with alkylating agents than with vinca alkaloids for approximately similar degrees of impairment in fertility. PMID:687878

  19. The Compatibility Effect Of Coupling Agent On Rheological-Morphological Relationship Of Banana Fibre Reinforced Polypropylene

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, S. Y.; Shamsudin, Z.

    2009-06-01

    The rheological properties of banana fibre reinforced polypropylene (PP/BF) composites at different composition were analysed using Shimadzu capillary rheometer. The effect of coupling agent concentration on the rheological properties was studied and followed by drawing a relationship of rheological-morphological properties of PP/BF composites. It was found that all composite system exhibits pseudoplasticity and incorporation of treated fibres consequents enhanced viscosity due to improved interfacial adhesion at fibre-matrix interface. However, it was observed that PP/BF composite with 2 wt% silane concentration does not yield further enhancement in the rheological properties when compared to that of 1 wt%. Composites with 1 wt% silane concentration were found to yield most promising compatibility effect with well-oriented and uniformly dispersed fibre morphology.

  20. Neuroprotective Effects of Erythropoiesis Stimulating Agents in Term and Preterm Neonates

    PubMed Central

    Messier, Amber M.; Ohls, Robin K.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose of Review The use of erythropoiesis stimulating agents (ESAs) such as erythropoietin (Epo) and Darbepoetin (Darbe) in preterm and term infants has been studied for over 20 years. Recent investigations have explored potential neuroprotective effects of ESAs. We review recent clinical trials and experimental animal models that provide evidence in support of using ESA to improve neurodevelopmental outcomes in term and preterm infants. Recent Findings Continued work using animal models have confirmed neuroprotective properties of ESAs, including promotion of oligodendrocyte development in the face of neuronal injury. Clinical studies in term and preterm infants have reported neuroprotective effects following ESA administration, and improved neurodevelopmental outcomes have been reported in studies of preterm infants. Summary ESAs show great promise in preventing and treating brain injury in term and preterm infants. PMID:24535496