Science.gov

Sample records for chest radiographic findings

  1. Radiographic findings in the chest of patients following cardiac transplantation

    SciTech Connect

    Shirazi, K.K.; Amendola, M.A.; Tisnado, J.; Cho, S.R.; Beachley, M.C.; Lower, R.R.

    1983-04-01

    The postoperative chest radiographic findings in 38 patients undergoing orthotopic (37 patients) and heterotopic (1 patient) cardiac transplantation were evaluated. Findings were correlated with those of echocardiograms, sputum and blood cultures, and lung and heart biopsies. The radiographic manifestations in the chest of these patients are classified in the following three main categories: 1) newly formed cardiac silhouette findings due to the transplanted heart itself, i.e., changes in size and shape of the new heart and pericardial effusion resulting from the placement of a smaller heart in a larger pericardial sac. 2) infectious complications due to bacteria, fungal, and other opportunistic agents secondary to immunosuppressive therapy, and 3) usual postoperative complications following thoracomoty and open-heart surgery.

  2. Severe adenovirus community-acquired pneumonia in immunocompetent adults: chest radiographic and CT findings

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Dingyu; Fu, Yangyang; Wang, Zhiwei; Cao, Jian; Walline, Joseph; Zhu, Huadong

    2016-01-01

    Background Severe adenovirus pneumonia and its associated imaging features are well-described in immunocompromised patients but are rare and poorly understood in immunocompetent adults. We sought to describe the radiographic and CT findings of severe adenovirus community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) in eight immunocompetent adults. Methods We reviewed systematically chest imaging manifestations of laboratory-confirmed severe adenovirus pneumonia in eight immunocompetent adults from April 2012 to April 2014. Results All patients showed abnormal results on initial chest radiograph and CT, with the exception of one normal initial chest radiograph. The abnormalities of the initial chest radiographs were unilateral (n=4) or bilateral (n=3), including consolidation (n=4), dense patchy opacity (n=3), ground glass opacity (GGO) (n=1), and pleural effusion (n=1). The initial CT findings consisted of unilateral (n=5) and bilateral (n=3) abnormalities, including consolidation (n=8), GGO (n=2), pleural effusion (n=3) and small nodules (n=1). Focal consolidation was the predominant finding in six patients whose initial CT scans were examined within one week after illness onset. Follow-up radiologic findings showed rapid development of bilateral consolidation within ten days after illness onset, usually accompanied by adjacent ground-glass opacity and pleural effusion. The parenchymal abnormalities began to absorb around two weeks after illness onset, with no appearances of fibrosis. Conclusions Severe adenovirus CAP in immunocompetent adults mainly appears as focal consolidation followed by rapid progression to bilateral consolidation, usually accompanied by adjacent GGO and pleural effusion, which may resemble bacterial pneumonia. Adenovirus should be considered in severe pneumonia cases with negative cultures and failure to respond to antibiotics. PMID:27162658

  3. Approach to Pediatric Chest Radiograph.

    PubMed

    Jana, Manisha; Bhalla, Ashu Seith; Gupta, Arun Kumar

    2016-06-01

    Chest radiograph remains the first line imaging modality even today, especially in ICU settings. Hence proper interpretation of chest radiographs is crucial, which can be achieved by adopting a systematic approach and proper description and identification of abnormalities. In this review, the authors describe a short and comprehensive way of interpreting the pediatric chest radiograph. PMID:26983619

  4. Pulmonary scintigraphic findings in children with pectus excavatum by the comparison of chest radiograph indices.

    PubMed

    Kao, C H; Liao, S Q; Wang, S J; Yeh, S H

    1992-11-01

    Pulmonary scintigraphy, including Xe-133 ventilation combined with Tc-99m MAA perfusion scans, was performed in 23 children (3 girls, 20 boys, ages: 2-9 years) with pectus excavatum, and the indices from lateral chest radiography were used for comparison. The findings of pulmonary scintigraphy were analyzed as 1) ventilation fractions (VF), and 2) perfusion fractions (PF) between bilateral lungs; and 3) ventilation-perfusion ratios (V/Q ratio) of both lungs. The results showed that 6 of 23 cases had impaired VF, 11 of 23 cases had impaired PF, and 7 of 23 cases had an impaired V/Q ratio in the right and left lung, respectively. The severity of sternal depression in pectus excavatum was shown as certain indices that were obtained on routine lateral chest radiographs. However, no significant correlations existed between the differences in the fractions and the indices. Our results suggest that pulmonary scintigraphy is not necessary for children with pectus excavatum to predict the severity of sternal depression and pulmonary function, because 1) pulmonary scintigraphy is very difficult to perform in children; 2) unnecessary radiation exposure should be avoided; and 3) it is not well correlated with the severity of the depressed sternum. PMID:1424376

  5. Common errors in evaluating chest radiographs.

    PubMed

    Mann, H

    1990-01-01

    Chest radiographs that are correctly obtained and interpreted provide valuable diagnostic information. However, some radiographs are not taken at total lung capacity, and the appearance of the lungs on film may mimic certain lung disorders. Most common interpretive pitfalls in chest radiography can be avoided by physicians who are familiar with the film appearance of varying degrees of lung inflation, technical limitations of portable radiography, and common chest abnormalities. When further definition is necessary, additional projections should be obtained. Chest fluoroscopy and computed tomography can offer further clarification, if needed. PMID:2296566

  6. Enhancement of chest radiographs using eigenimage processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bones, Philip J.; Butler, Anthony P. H.; Hurrell, Michael

    2006-08-01

    Frontal chest radiographs ("chest X-rays") are routinely used by medical personnel to assess patients for a wide range of suspected disorders. Often large numbers of images need to be analyzed. Furthermore, at times the images need to analyzed ("reported") when no radiological expert is available. A system which enhances the images in such a way that abnormalities are more obvious is likely to reduce the chance that an abnormality goes unnoticed. The authors previously reported the use of principal components analysis to derive a basis set of eigenimages from a training set made up of images from normal subjects. The work is here extended to investigate how best to emphasize the abnormalities in chest radiographs. Results are also reported for various forms of image normalizing transformations used in performing the eigenimage processing.

  7. 42 CFR 37.3 - Chest radiographs required for miners.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Chest radiographs required for miners. 37.3 Section... EXAMINATIONS SPECIFICATIONS FOR MEDICAL EXAMINATIONS OF COAL MINERS Chest Radiographic Examinations § 37.3 Chest radiographs required for miners. (a) Voluntary examinations. Every operator must provide to...

  8. Unsupervised segmentation of lungs from chest radiographs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghosh, Payel; Antani, Sameer K.; Long, L. Rodney; Thoma, George R.

    2012-03-01

    This paper describes our preliminary investigations for deriving and characterizing coarse-level textural regions present in the lung field on chest radiographs using unsupervised grow-cut (UGC), a cellular automaton based unsupervised segmentation technique. The segmentation has been performed on a publicly available data set of chest radiographs. The algorithm is useful for this application because it automatically converges to a natural segmentation of the image from random seed points using low-level image features such as pixel intensity values and texture features. Our goal is to develop a portable screening system for early detection of lung diseases for use in remote areas in developing countries. This involves developing automated algorithms for screening x-rays as normal/abnormal with a high degree of sensitivity, and identifying lung disease patterns on chest x-rays. Automatically deriving and quantitatively characterizing abnormal regions present in the lung field is the first step toward this goal. Therefore, region-based features such as geometrical and pixel-value measurements were derived from the segmented lung fields. In the future, feature selection and classification will be performed to identify pathological conditions such as pulmonary tuberculosis on chest radiographs. Shape-based features will also be incorporated to account for occlusions of the lung field and by other anatomical structures such as the heart and diaphragm.

  9. Bone suppression technique for chest radiographs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huo, Zhimin; Xu, Fan; Zhang, Jane; Zhao, Hui; Hobbs, Susan K.; Wandtke, John C.; Sykes, Anne-Marie; Paul, Narinder; Foos, David

    2014-03-01

    High-contrast bone structures are a major noise contributor in chest radiographic images. A signal of interest in a chest radiograph could be either partially or completely obscured or "overshadowed" by the highly contrasted bone structures in its surrounding. Thus, removing the bone structures, especially the posterior rib and clavicle structures, is highly desirable to increase the visibility of soft tissue density. We developed an innovative technology that offers a solution to suppress bone structures, including posterior ribs and clavicles, on conventional and portable chest X-ray images. The bone-suppression image processing technology includes five major steps: 1) lung segmentation, 2) rib and clavicle structure detection, 3) rib and clavicle edge detection, 4) rib and clavicle profile estimation, and 5) suppression based on the estimated profiles. The bone-suppression software outputs an image with both the rib and clavicle structures suppressed. The rib suppression performance was evaluated on 491 images. On average, 83.06% (±6.59%) of the rib structures on a standard chest image were suppressed based on the comparison of computer-identified rib areas against hand-drawn rib areas, which is equivalent to about an average of one rib that is still visible on a rib-suppressed image based on a visual assessment. Reader studies were performed to evaluate reader performance in detecting lung nodules and pneumothoraces with and without a bone-suppression companion view. Results from reader studies indicated that the bone-suppression technology significantly improved radiologists' performance in the detection of CT-confirmed possible nodules and pneumothoraces on chest radiographs. The results also showed that radiologists were more confident in making diagnoses regarding the presence or absence of an abnormality after rib-suppressed companion views were presented

  10. Chest radiographic data acquisition and quality assurance in multicenter studies

    PubMed Central

    Schluchter, Mark; Wood, Beverly P.; Berdon, Walter E.; Boechat, M. Ines; Easley, Kirk A.; Meziane, Moulay; Mellins, Robert B.; Norton, Karen I.; Singleton, Edward; Trautwein, Lynn

    2015-01-01

    Background Multicenter studies rely on data derived from different institutions. Forms can be designed to standardize the reporting process allowing reliable comparison of data. Objective The purpose of the report is to provide a standardized method, developed as a part of a multicenter study of vertically transmitted HIV, for assessing chest radiographic results. Materials and methods Eight hundred and five infants and children were studied at five centers; 3057 chest radiographs were scored. Data were entered using a forced-choice, graded response for 12 findings. Quality assurance measures and inter- rater agreement statistics are reported. Results The form used for reporting chest radiographic results is presented. Inter-rater agreement was moderate to high for most findings, with the best correlation reported for the presence of bronchovascular markings and/or reticular densities addressed as a composite question (kappa = 0.71). The presence of nodular densities (kappa = 0.56) and parenchymal consolidation (kappa = 0.57) had moderate agreement. Agreement for lung volume was low. Conclusion The current tool, developed for use in the pediatric population, is applicable to any study involving the assessment of pediatric chest radiographs for a large population, whether at one or many centers. PMID:9361051

  11. 42 CFR 37.3 - Chest radiographs required for miners.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Chest radiographs required for miners. 37.3 Section... EXAMINATIONS SPECIFICATIONS FOR MEDICAL EXAMINATIONS OF UNDERGROUND COAL MINERS Chest Roentgenographic Examinations § 37.3 Chest radiographs required for miners. (a) Voluntary examinations. Every operator...

  12. Segmentation of ribs in digital chest radiographs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cong, Lin; Guo, Wei; Li, Qiang

    2016-03-01

    Ribs and clavicles in posterior-anterior (PA) digital chest radiographs often overlap with lung abnormalities such as nodules, and cause missing of these abnormalities, it is therefore necessary to remove or reduce the ribs in chest radiographs. The purpose of this study was to develop a fully automated algorithm to segment ribs within lung area in digital radiography (DR) for removal of the ribs. The rib segmentation algorithm consists of three steps. Firstly, a radiograph was pre-processed for contrast adjustment and noise removal; second, generalized Hough transform was employed to localize the lower boundary of the ribs. In the third step, a novel bilateral dynamic programming algorithm was used to accurately segment the upper and lower boundaries of ribs simultaneously. The width of the ribs and the smoothness of the rib boundaries were incorporated in the cost function of the bilateral dynamic programming for obtaining consistent results for the upper and lower boundaries. Our database consisted of 93 DR images, including, respectively, 23 and 70 images acquired with a DR system from Shanghai United-Imaging Healthcare Co. and from GE Healthcare Co. The rib localization algorithm achieved a sensitivity of 98.2% with 0.1 false positives per image. The accuracy of the detected ribs was further evaluated subjectively in 3 levels: "1", good; "2", acceptable; "3", poor. The percentages of good, acceptable, and poor segmentation results were 91.1%, 7.2%, and 1.7%, respectively. Our algorithm can obtain good segmentation results for ribs in chest radiography and would be useful for rib reduction in our future study.

  13. 42 CFR 37.54 - Notification of abnormal radiographic findings.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... section 203 of the Act (see 30 CFR part 90). Positive findings with regard to pneumoconiosis will be... CARE AND EXAMINATIONS SPECIFICATIONS FOR MEDICAL EXAMINATIONS OF COAL MINERS Chest Radiographic Examinations Specifications for Interpretation, Classification, and Submission of Chest Radiographs §...

  14. Image analysis of chest radiographs. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Hankinson, J.L.

    1982-06-01

    The report demonstrates the feasibility of using a computer for automated interpretation of chest radiographs for pneumoconiosis. The primary goal of this project was to continue testing and evaluating the prototype system with a larger set of films. After review of the final contract report and a review of the current literature, it was clear that several modifications to the prototype system were needed before the project could continue. These modifications can be divided into two general areas. The first area was in improving the stability of the system and compensating for the diversity of film quality which exists in films obtained in a surveillance program. Since the system was to be tested with a large number of films, it was impractical to be extremely selective of film quality. The second area is in terms of processing time. With a large set of films, total processing time becomes much more significant. An image display was added to the system so that the computer determined lung boundaries could be verified for each film. A film handling system was also added, enabling the system to scan films continuously without attendance.

  15. Computer Analysis Of ILO Standard Chest Radiographs Of Pneumoconiosis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, C. C.; Shu, David B. C.; Tai, H. T.; Hou, W.; Kunkle, G. A.; Wang, Y.; Hoy, R. J.

    1982-11-01

    This paper presents study of computer analysis of the 1980 ILO standard chest radiographs of pneumoconiosis. Algorithms developed for detection of individual small rounded and irregular opacities have been experimented and evaluated on these standard radiographs. The density, shape, and size distribution of the detected objects in the lung field, in spite of false positives, can be used as indicators for the beginning of pneumoconiosis. This approach is potentially useful in computer-assisted screening and early detection process where the annual chest radiograph of each worker is compared with his (her) own normal radiograph obtained previously.

  16. Radiographic findings in liveborn triploidy.

    PubMed

    Silverthorn, K G; Houston, C S; Newman, D E; Wood, B J

    1989-01-01

    The detailed radiographic features of triploidy, a fatal congenital disorder with 69 chromosomes, have not previously been reported. Radiographs of ten liveborn infants with chromosomally confirmed triploidy showed six findings highly suggestive of this diagnosis: harlequin orbits, small anterior fontanelle, gracile ribs, diaphyseal overtubulation of long bones, upswept clavicles and antimongoloid pelvis. Sixteen other less specific findings showed many similarities to those found in trisomy 18. PMID:2748230

  17. 42 CFR 37.60 - Submitting required chest radiograph classification and miner identification documents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Submitting required chest radiograph classification... OF COAL MINERS Chest Radiographic Examinations Specifications for Interpretation, Classification, and Submission of Chest Radiographs § 37.60 Submitting required chest radiograph classification and...

  18. Radiographic findings of Proteus Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Gandhi, Nishant Mukesh; Davalos, Eric A.; Varma, Rajeev K.

    2015-01-01

    The extremely rare Proteus Syndrome is a hamartomatous congenital syndrome with substantial variability between clinical patient presentations. The diagnostic criteria consist of a multitude of clinical findings including hemihypertrophy, macrodactyly, epidermal nevi, subcutaneous hamartomatous tumors, and bony abnormalities. These clinical findings correlate with striking radiographic findings. PMID:27186241

  19. Usefulness of chest radiographs in first asthma attacks

    SciTech Connect

    Gershel, J.C.; Goldman, H.S.; Stein, R.E.K.; Shelov, S.P.; Ziprkowski, M.

    1983-08-11

    To assess the value of routine chest radiography during acute first attacks of asthma, we studied 371 consecutive children over one year of age who presented with an initial episode of wheezing. Three hundred fifty children (94.3%) had radiographic findings that were compatible with uncomplicated asthma and were considered negative. Twenty-one (5.7%) had positive findings: atelectasis and pneumonia were noted in seven, segmental atelectasis in six, pneumonia in five, multiple areas of subsegmental atelectasis in two, and pneumomediastinum in one. The patients with positive films were more likely to have a respiratory rate above 60 or a pulse rate above 160 (P < 0.001), localized rales or localized decreased breath sounds before treatment (P < 0.01), and localized rales (P < 0.005) and localized wheezing (P < 0.02) after treatment; also, these patients were admitted to the hospital more often (P < 0.001). Ninety-five percent (20 of 21) of the children with positive films could be identified before treatment on the basis of a combination of tachypnea, tachycardia, fever, and localized rales or localized decreased breath sounds. Most first-time wheezers will not have positive radiographs; careful clinical evaluation should reveal which patients will have abnormal radiographs and will therefore benefit from the procedure. 20 references, 3 tables.

  20. Enhancement and compression of digital chest radiographs.

    PubMed

    Cohn, M; Trefler, M; Young, T Y

    1990-01-01

    The application of digital technologies to chest radiography holds the promise of routine application of image processing techniques to effect image enhancement. Because of their inherent spatial resolution, however, digital chest images impose severe constraints on data storage devices. Compression of these images will relax such constraints and facilitate image transmission on a digital network. We evaluated an algorithm for enhancing digital chest images that has allowed significant data compression while improving the diagnostic quality of the image. This algorithm is based on the photographic technique of unsharp masking. Image quality was measured with respect to the task of tumor detection and compression ratios as high as 2:1 were achieved. This compression can be supplemented by irreversible methods. PMID:2299708

  1. Eliminating rib shadows in chest radiographic images providing diagnostic assistance.

    PubMed

    Oğul, Hasan; Oğul, B Buket; Ağıldere, A Muhteşem; Bayrak, Tuncay; Sümer, Emre

    2016-04-01

    A major difficulty with chest radiographic analysis is the invisibility of abnormalities caused by the superimposition of normal anatomical structures, such as ribs, over the main tissue to be examined. Suppressing the ribs with no information loss about the original tissue would therefore be helpful during manual identification or computer-aided detection of nodules on a chest radiographic image. In this study, we introduce a two-step algorithm for eliminating rib shadows in chest radiographic images. The algorithm first delineates the ribs using a novel hybrid self-template approach and then suppresses these delineated ribs using an unsupervised regression model that takes into account the change in proximal thickness (depth) of bone in the vertical axis. The performance of the system is evaluated using a benchmark set of real chest radiographic images. The experimental results determine that proposed method for rib delineation can provide higher accuracy than existing methods. The knowledge of rib delineation can remarkably improve the nodule detection performance of a current computer-aided diagnosis (CAD) system. It is also shown that the rib suppression algorithm can increase the nodule visibility by eliminating rib shadows while mostly preserving the nodule intensity. PMID:26775736

  2. 42 CFR 37.50 - Interpreting and classifying chest radiographs-film.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Interpreting and classifying chest radiographs-film. 37.50 Section 37.50 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES... Radiographs § 37.50 Interpreting and classifying chest radiographs—film. (a) Chest radiographs must...

  3. 42 CFR 37.4 - Chest radiographic examinations conducted by the Secretary.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Chest radiographic examinations conducted by the... MEDICAL CARE AND EXAMINATIONS SPECIFICATIONS FOR MEDICAL EXAMINATIONS OF COAL MINERS Chest Radiographic Examinations § 37.4 Chest radiographic examinations conducted by the Secretary. (a) The Secretary will...

  4. Adult Hirschprung disease: radiographic findings.

    PubMed

    Mindelzun, R E; Hicks, S M

    1986-09-01

    Hirschprung disease is usually diagnosed in infancy. Occasionally patients reach adulthood without diagnosis or treatment. Four cases of adult Hirschprung disease are described. The principal radiographic findings are a markedly dilated, feces-filled colon above the zone of transition; a narrowed rectum; a cone- or funnel-shaped zone of transition; and a mosaic colonic pattern caused by collapsed redundant mucosa after colonic cleansing. In an adult, identification on a barium enema examination of an abrupt, smooth transition zone in the rectum with proximal colonic dilatation, in conjunction with an appropriate clinical history, should suggest the diagnosis of adult Hirschprung disease. PMID:3737900

  5. Reassessing the standard chest radiograph for intraparenchymal activity

    SciTech Connect

    Putman, C.E.; Hoeck, B.

    1986-01-01

    The results concerning the activity or inactivity of the alveolitis determined with our proposed scoring system were comparable to those determined with gallium scanning in 68.2% of the patients with biopsy-proven sarcoidosis in our study. Certainly, further evaluation of a larger series of patients over a longer period of time will be required to more adequately evaluate this classification method. We also believe this methodology is reproducible and can be utilized by experienced interpreters of chest radiographs. If we closely reevaluate the 32% of the cases in which the radiographic results disagreed with the gallium assessment of activity, two points worthy of mention become evident. In one group the gallium indices were borderline for activity whereas in the other group the radiographic criteria were most likely indicative of irreversible parenchymal changes. When the radiographs for the latter group were reevaluated for signs of fibrosis such as volume loss, cystic changes, and alteration in vascular patterns, it was possible to delineate a significant false-positive group of patients. We will be reporting the long-term results of our observations over the next several years as well as adding more groups of patients to our initial study analysis. At that time, correlation with all other measurable parameters in determining high-intensity alveolitis versus low-intensity alveolitis will be compared to these new chest radiographic profiles.

  6. Use of chest radiographs in epidemiological investigations of pneumoconioses.

    PubMed Central

    Mulloy, K B; Coultas, D B; Samet, J M

    1993-01-01

    The International Labour Organisation (ILO) classification of radiographs of pneumoconioses was developed to limit variation in classification of parenchymal abnormalities. In this study the manner in which chest radiographs were interpreted in 134 investigations reported in four peer reviewed journals during the five year period 1985-90 was examined. The approach for applying the ILO system was poorly described in most studies. For example, of 86 investigations using more than one reader, 66.3% described the method of reconciliation, but methods were not consistent among investigations. Our results indicate a number of potential problems in application of the ILO system, and gaps in existing recommendations that should be considered. PMID:8457495

  7. Automatic segmentation of lung fields on chest radiographic images.

    PubMed

    Carreira, M J; Cabello, D; Mosquera, A

    1999-06-01

    In this work we have implemented a system for the automatic segmentation of lung fields in chest radiographic images. The image analysis process is carried out in three levels. In the first one we perform operations on the image that are independent from domain knowledge. This knowledge is implicitly and not very elaborately used in the intermediate level and used in an explicit manner in the high level block, globally corresponding to the idea of progressive segmentation. The representation of knowledge in the high level block is in the form of production rules. The control structure is in general bottom-up but there are certain hybrid control stages, in which the control is driven by the region model (main organs) we are seeking. We have applied the global system to a set of 45 posteroanterior (PA) chest radiographs, obtaining a mean degree of overlap with contours drawn by radiologists of 87%. PMID:10356306

  8. A Computer-Aided Detection System for Digital Chest Radiographs.

    PubMed

    Carrillo-de-Gea, Juan Manuel; García-Mateos, Ginés; Fernández-Alemán, José Luis; Hernández-Hernández, José Luis

    2016-01-01

    Computer-aided detection systems aim at the automatic detection of diseases using different medical imaging modalities. In this paper, a novel approach to detecting normality/pathology in digital chest radiographs is proposed. The problem tackled is complicated since it is not focused on particular diseases but anything that differs from what is considered as normality. First, the areas of interest of the chest are found using template matching on the images. Then, a texture descriptor called local binary patterns (LBP) is computed for those areas. After that, LBP histograms are applied in a classifier algorithm, which produces the final normality/pathology decision. Our experimental results show the feasibility of the proposal, with success rates above 87% in the best cases. Moreover, our technique is able to locate the possible areas of pathology in nonnormal radiographs. Strengths and limitations of the proposed approach are described in the Conclusions. PMID:27372536

  9. 42 CFR 37.50 - Interpreting and classifying chest radiographs-film.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Interpreting and classifying chest radiographs-film. 37.50 Section 37.50 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES... Interpreting and classifying chest radiographs—film. (a) Chest radiographs must be interpreted and...

  10. Optimum radiographic examination for consideration of compensation awards: I. General methodology and application to chest examination.

    PubMed

    Eisenberg, R L; Hedgcock, M W; Williams, E A; Lyden, B J; Akin, J R; Gooding, G A; Ovenfors, C O

    1980-11-01

    A major goal of the radiologist is to devise methods to decrease health care costs and radiation exposure without sacrificing diagnostic accuracy. In a large Veterans Administration (VA) hospital, a prospective study was undertaken to determine the optimum number of radiographic projections needed to assess applicants for VA compensation for chest disease or injury claimed to be service-related. Three separate readings of every chest radiographic assessment could have been made from a single posteroanterior view. In eight cases, granulomas or mild hyperexpansion of the lungs were only appreciated using the lateral projection, but these findings were not clinically significant and did not affect decisions as to whether compensation sould be awarded. The only potentially serious lesion missed (a possible pulmonary nodule) using the posteroanterior view alone was also missed using the lateral and only suggested by the oblique views. Extrapolating these results to data on compensation examinations performed in the entire VA system (fiscal year 1978), it was concluded that limiting the radiographic examination of the chest to a single posteroanterior view would eliminate 150,000 radiographs in the evaluation of 190,000 applicants and yield an annual savings of almost $900,000. PMID:6778148

  11. Spatial resolution and chest nodule detection: an interesting incidental finding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toomey, R. J.; McEntee, M. F.; Ryan, J. T.; Evanoff, M. G.; Hayes, A.; Brennan, P. C.

    2010-02-01

    This study reports an incidental finding from a larger work. It examines the relationship between spatial resolution and nodule detection for chest radiographs. Twelve examining radiologists with the American Board of Radiology read thirty chest radiographs in two conditions - full (1500 × 1500 pixel) resolution, and 300 × 300 pixel resolution linearly interpolated to 1500 × 1500 pixels. All images were surrounded by a 10-pixel sharp grey border to aid in focussing the observer's eye when viewing the comparatively unsharp interpolated images. Fifteen of the images contained a single simulated pulmonary nodule. Observers were asked to rate their confidence that a nodule was present on each radiograph on a scale of 1 (least confidence, certain no lesion is present) to 6 (most confidence, certain a lesion was present). All other abnormalities were to be ignored. No windowing, levelling or magnification of the images was permitted and viewing distance was constrained to approximately 70cm. Images were displayed on a 3 megapixel greyscale monitor. Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) analysis was applied to the results of the readings using the Dorfman-Berbaum-Metz multiplereader, multiple-case method. No statistically significant differences were found with either readers and cases treated as random or with cases treated as fixed. Low spatial frequency information appears to be sufficient for the detection of chest lesion of the type used in this study.

  12. Digital replication of chest radiographs without altering diagnostic observer performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flynn, Michael J.; Davies, Eric; Spizarny, David; Beute, Gordon H.; Peterson, Edward; Eyler, William R.; Gross, Barry; Chen, Ji

    1991-05-01

    A study to test the ability of a high-fidelity system to digitize chest radiographs, store the data in a computer, and reprint the film without altering diagnostic observer performance is reported. Two hundred and fifty-two (252) chest films with subtle image features indicative of interstitial disease, pulmonary nodule, or pneumothorax, along with 36 normal chest films were used in the study. Films were selected from a key word search on a computerized report archive and were graded by two experienced radiologists. Each film was digitized with 86 micron pixels and stored in 4000 X 5000 arrays using a research instrument. Replicates were printed using a commercial laser film printer (Eastman Kodak Company) having 80 micron pixels. Originals and replicates were observed separately by two different experienced radiologists. Each indicated a graded response for the three possible pathologies. The agreement of observers between responses for replicates and originals was described by the kappa statistic and compared to the agreement when rereading the original film. The final result of this study supports a hypothesis that the replicate is indistinguishable from the original.

  13. Paratracheal lymphadenopathy: radiographic findings and correlation with CT

    SciTech Connect

    Mueler, N.L.; Webb, W.R.; Gamsu, G.

    1985-09-01

    Possible signs of paratracheal lymphadenopathy on the posteroanterior (PA) chest radiograph were assessed in 98 patients and correlated with computed tomography (CT). The nodes were normal is size in 62 patients and enlarged in 36. While the lateral contour of the superior vena cava (SVC) was convex in 46 patients (47%), 81 (83%) had an increased density in the region of the SVC. When all four parameters were combined, lymphadenopathy could be detected on the PA view in 87 patients (89%). CT demonstrated that the enlarged nodes were anterolateral rather than directly lateral to the trachea and also immediately posterior to the SVC, explaining the findings on the PA radiograph.

  14. Organizing pneumonia: chest HRCT findings*

    PubMed Central

    Faria, Igor Murad; Zanetti, Gláucia; Barreto, Miriam Menna; Rodrigues, Rosana Souza; Araujo-Neto, Cesar Augusto; Silva, Jorge Luiz Pereira e; Escuissato, Dante Luiz; Souza, Arthur Soares; Irion, Klaus Loureiro; Mançano, Alexandre Dias; Nobre, Luiz Felipe; Hochhegger, Bruno; Marchiori, Edson

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To determine the frequency of HRCT findings and their distribution in the lung parenchyma of patients with organizing pneumonia. METHODS: This was a retrospective review of the HRCT scans of 36 adult patients (26 females and 10 males) with biopsy-proven organizing pneumonia. The patients were between 19 and 82 years of age (mean age, 56.2 years). The HRCT images were evaluated by two independent observers, discordant interpretations being resolved by consensus. RESULTS: The most common HRCT finding was that of ground-glass opacities, which were seen in 88.9% of the cases. The second most common finding was consolidation (in 83.3% of cases), followed by peribronchovascular opacities (in 52.8%), reticulation (in 38.9%), bronchiectasis (in 33.3%), interstitial nodules (in 27.8%), interlobular septal thickening (in 27.8%), perilobular pattern (in 22.2%), the reversed halo sign (in 16.7%), airspace nodules (in 11.1%), and the halo sign (in 8.3%). The lesions were predominantly bilateral, the middle and lower lung fields being the areas most commonly affected. CONCLUSIONS: Ground-glass opacities and consolidation were the most common findings, with a predominantly random distribution, although they were more common in the middle and lower thirds of the lungs. PMID:26176521

  15. 42 CFR 37.51 - Interpreting and classifying chest radiographs-digital radiography systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Interpreting and classifying chest radiographs-digital radiography systems. 37.51 Section 37.51 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES MEDICAL CARE AND EXAMINATIONS SPECIFICATIONS FOR MEDICAL EXAMINATIONS OF COAL MINERS Chest Radiographic...

  16. Semi-automated location identification of catheters in digital chest radiographs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keller, Brad M.; Reeves, Anthony P.; Cham, Matthew D.; Henschke, Claudia I.; Yankelevitz, David F.

    2007-03-01

    Localization of catheter tips is the most common task in intensive care unit imaging. In this work, catheters appearing in digital chest radiographs acquired by portable chest x-rays were tracked using a semi-automatic method. Due to the fact that catheters are synthetic objects, its profile does not vary drastically over its length. Therefore, we use forward looking registration with normalized cross-correlation in order to take advantage of a priori information of the catheter profile. The registration is accomplished with a two-dimensional template representative of the catheter to be tracked generated using two seed points given by the user. To validate catheter tracking with this method, we look at two metrics: accuracy and precision. The algorithms results are compared to a ground truth established by catheter midlines marked by expert radiologists. Using 12 objects of interest comprised of naso-gastric, endo-tracheal tubes, and chest tubes, and PICC and central venous catheters, we find that our algorithm can fully track 75% of the objects of interest, with a average tracking accuracy and precision of 85.0%, 93.6% respectively using the above metrics. Such a technique would be useful for physicians wishing to verify the positioning of catheter tips using chest radiographs.

  17. Radiographic findings in congenital lead poisoning

    SciTech Connect

    Pearl, M.; Boxt, L.M.

    1980-07-01

    Because lead crosses the placenta throughout pregnancy, the fetus is at risk for lead poisoning. A full term, asymptomatic child was born with congenital lead poisoning secondary to maternal pica. Radiographic findings of a dense cranial vault, lead lines, and delayed skeletal and deciduous dental development were noted at birth. After chelation therapy, when the patient was seven months old, radiographs revealed normal skeletal maturation. Tooth eruption did not occur until 15 months of age. Newborn infants with these radiographic findings should be screened for subclinical, congenital lead poisoning.

  18. Fully automated scoring of chest radiographs in cystic fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Lee, Min-Zhao; Cai, Weidong; Song, Yang; Selvadurai, Hiran; Feng, David Dagan

    2013-01-01

    We present a prototype of a fully automated scoring system for chest radiographs (CXRs) in cystic fibrosis. The system was used to analyze real, clinical CXR data, to estimate the Shwachman-Kulczycki score for the image. Images were resampled and normalized to a standard size and intensity level, then segmented with a patch-based nearest-neighbor mapping algorithm. Texture features were calculated regionally and globally, using Tamura features, local binary patterns (LBP), gray-level co-occurrence matrix and Gabor filtering. Feature selection was guided by current understanding of the disease process, in particular the reorganization and thickening of airways. Combinations of these features were used as inputs for support vector machine (SVM) learning to classify each CXR, and evaluated using two-fold cross-validation for agreement with clinician scoring. The final computed score for each image was compared with the score assigned by a physician. Using this prototype system, we analyzed 139 CXRs from an Australian pediatric cystic fibrosis registry, for which texture directionality showed greatest discriminating power. Computed scores agreed with clinician scores in 75% of cases, and up to 90% of cases in discriminating severe disease from mild disease, similar to the level of human interobserver agreement for this dataset. PMID:24110600

  19. System for pathology categorization and retrieval in chest radiographs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Avni, Uri; Greenspan, Hayit; Konen, Eli; Sharon, Michal; Goldberger, Jacob

    2011-03-01

    In this paper we present an overview of a system we have been developing for the past several years for efficient image categorization and retrieval in large radiograph archives. The methodology is based on local patch representation of the image content, using a bag of visual words approach and similarity-based categorization with a kernel based SVM classifier. We show an application to pathology-level categorization of chest x-ray data, the most popular examination in radiology. Our study deals with pathology detection and identification of individual pathologies including right and left pleural effusion, enlarged heart and cases of enlarged mediastinum. The input from a radiologist provided a global label for the entire image (healthy/pathology), and the categorization was conducted on the entire image, with no need for segmentation algorithms or any geometrical rules. An automatic diagnostic-level categorization, even on such an elementary level as healthy vs pathological, provides a useful tool for radiologists on this popular and important examination. This is a first step towards similarity-based categorization, which has a major clinical implications for computer-assisted diagnostics.

  20. Potential usefulness of a video printer for producing secondary images from digitized chest radiographs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nishikawa, Robert M.; MacMahon, Heber; Doi, Kunio; Bosworth, Eric

    1991-05-01

    Communication between radiologists and clinicians could be improved if a secondary image (copy of the original image) accompanied the radiologic report. In addition, the number of lost original radiographs could be decreased, since clinicians would have less need to borrow films. The secondary image should be simple and inexpensive to produce, while providing sufficient image quality for verification of the diagnosis. We are investigating the potential usefulness of a video printer for producing copies of radiographs, i.e. images printed on thermal paper. The video printer we examined (Seikosha model VP-3500) can provide 64 shades of gray. It is capable of recording images up to 1,280 pixels by 1,240 lines and can accept any raster-type video signal. The video printer was characterized in terms of its linearity, contrast, latitude, resolution, and noise properties. The quality of video-printer images was also evaluated in an observer study using portable chest radiographs. We found that observers could confirm up to 90 of the reported findings in the thorax using video- printer images, when the original radiographs were of high quality. The number of verified findings was diminished when high spatial resolution was required (e.g. detection of a subtle pneumothorax) or when a low-contrast finding was located in the mediastinal area or below the diaphragm (e.g. nasogastric tubes).

  1. On your toes: Detecting mediastinal air on the chest radiograph in ecstasy abusers.

    PubMed

    Naidoo, Mergan; Govind, Mayuri

    2016-01-01

    Abnormal mediastinal air may be caused by inhalational illicit drug use subsequent to barotrauma resulting from coughing after deep inhalation and breath holding. It may also arise from oesophageal rupture due to retching after ingestion of the illicit drug. The history can alert the practitioner to this cause of chest pain. As chest radiographs are widely accessible and mediastinal air is easily recognisable, the chest radiograph should be included and carefully scrutinised in the diagnostic workup of chest pain in the recreational drug abuser. It is prudent to exclude oesophageal rupture, particularly in the setting of retching, before deciding on conservative and expectant management. PMID:27138662

  2. [Chest radiograph of atypical pneumonia: comparison among Chlamydia pneumoniae. Pneumonia, ornithosis, and Mycoplasma pneumoniae pneumonia].

    PubMed

    Itoh, I; Ishida, T; Hashimoto, T; Arita, M; Osawa, M; Tachibana, H; Nishiyama, H; Takakura, S; Bando, K; Nishizawa, Y; Amitani, R; Onishi, H; Taguchi, Y

    2000-11-01

    No report has been found comparing Chlamydia pneumoniae (C. pneumoniae) pneumonia radiographically with other atypical pneumonias, Chlamydia psittaci (C. psittaci) pneumonia and Mycoplasma pneumoniae (M. pneumoniae) pneumonia. We described the chest radiographs of three kinds of pneumonia cases: 46 cases of C. pneumoniae pneumonia, 39 cases of C. psittaci pneumonia, and 131 cases of M. pneumoniae pneumonia. Radiographic shadows were categorized into main shadows and sub-shadows. The main shadows are classified from the viewpoint of the characteristics; air space consolidation(AS), ground-glass opacity(GG), reticular shadow(RS), bronchopneumonia(BP), and small nodular shadows (SN). The size, the site, and the number of the main shadows were also analyzed. In comparison among the three pneumonias, BP was the most frequent in M. pneumoniae pneumonia (0.40/case). AS predominated in C. pneumoniae pneumonia (0.67/case), and GG in C. psittaci pneumonia (0.62/case). The number of main shadows was equal, about 1.4/case in three pneumonias. Large shadows were less frequent in M. pneumoniae pneumonia than C. pneumoniae pneumonia (p = 0.02) and C. psittaci pneumonia (p = 0.01). Main shadows were more frequent in the outer zone in M. pneumoniae pneumonia than C. psittaci pneumonia (p = 0.01), and in the middle zone in C. psittaci pneumonia than in M. pneumoniae pneumonia (p = 0.02). Cases with bilateral main shadows were less common in M. pneumoniae pneumonia (9%) than C. pneumoniae pneumonia(33%, p = 0.001) and C. psittaci pneumonia(30%, p = 0.005). Thickening of bronchovascular bundles as a sub-shadow was most frequently noted in M. pneumoniae pneumonia. Some differences among the three atypical pneumonias were seen in the chest radiograph. However, no specific findings of C. pneumoniae pneumonia were shown radiographically in this study. PMID:11140079

  3. Chest Radiographic Patterns and the Transmission of Tuberculosis: Implications for Automated Systems

    PubMed Central

    Lau, Angela; Barrie, James; Winter, Christopher; Elamy, Abdel-Halim; Tyrrell, Gregory; Long, Richard

    2016-01-01

    Background Computer-aided detection to identify and diagnose pulmonary tuberculosis is being explored. While both cavitation on chest radiograph and smear-positivity on microscopy are independent risk factors for the infectiousness of pulmonary tuberculosis it is unknown which radiographic pattern, were it detectable, would provide the greatest public health benefit; i.e. reduced transmission. Herein we provide that evidence. Objectives 1) to determine whether pulmonary tuberculosis in a high income, low incidence country is more likely to present with “typical” adult-type pulmonary tuberculosis radiographic features and 2) to determine whether those with “typical” radiographic features are more likely than those without such features to transmit the organism and/or cause secondary cases. Methods Over a three-year period beginning January 1, 2006 consecutive adults with smear-positive pulmonary tuberculosis in the Province of Alberta, Canada, were identified and their pre-treatment radiographs scored by three independent readers as “typical” (having an upper lung zone predominant infiltrate, with or without cavitation but no discernable adenopathy) or “atypical” (all others). Each patient’s pre-treatment bacillary burden was carefully documented and, during a 30-month transmission window, each patient’s transmission events were recorded. Mycobacteriology, radiology and transmission were compared in those with “typical” versus “atypical” radiographs. Findings A total of 97 smear-positive pulmonary tuberculosis cases were identified, 69 (71.1%) with and 28 (28.9%) without “typical” chest radiographs. “Typical” cases were more likely to have high bacillary burdens and cavitation (Odds Ratios and 95% Confidence Intervals: 2.75 [1.04–7.31] and 9.10 [2.51–32.94], respectively). Typical cases were also responsible for most transmission events—78% of tuberculin skin test conversions (p<0.002) and 95% of secondary cases in reported

  4. Paratracheal lymphadenopathy: radiographic findings and correlation with CT.

    PubMed

    Müller, N L; Webb, W R; Gamsu, G

    1985-09-01

    Possible signs of paratracheal lymphadenopathy on the posteroanterior (PA) chest radiograph were assessed in 98 patients and correlated with computed tomography (CT). The nodes were normal in size in 62 patients and enlarged (greater than 15 mm) in 36. Among the latter group, widening of the right paratracheal stripe was seen in 11 (31%) and enlargement of the azygos node in 15 (42%). While the lateral contour of the superior vena cava (SVC) was convex in 46 patients (47%), 81 (83%) had an increased density in the region of the SVC. When all four parameters were combined, lymphadenopathy could be detected on the PA view in 87 patients (89%). CT demonstrated that the enlarged nodes were anterolateral rather than directly lateral to the trachea and also immediately posterior to the SVC, explaining the findings on the PA radiograph. PMID:4023240

  5. 42 CFR 37.51 - Interpreting and classifying chest radiographs-digital radiography systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... standard digital chest radiographic images provided for use with the Guidelines for the Use of the ILO... NIOSH-approved standard digital images may be used for classifying digital chest images for pneumoconiosis. Modification of the appearance of the standard images using software tools is not permitted....

  6. Automated localization of costophrenic recesses and costophrenic angle measurement on frontal chest radiographs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maduskar, Pragnya; Hogeweg, Laurens; Philipsen, Rick; van Ginneken, Bram

    2013-03-01

    Computer aided detection (CAD) of tuberculosis (TB) on chest radiographs (CXR) is difficult because the disease has varied manifestations, like opacification, hilar elevation, and pleural effusions. We have developed a CAD research prototype for TB (CAD4TB v1.08, Diagnostic Image Analysis Group, Nijmegen, The Netherlands) which is trained to detect textural abnormalities inside unobscured lung fields. If the only abnormality visible on a CXR would be a blunt costophrenic angle, caused by pleural fluid in the costophrenic recess, this is likely to be missed by texture analysis in the lung fields. The goal of this work is therefore to detect the presence of blunt costophrenic (CP) angles caused by pleural effusion on chest radiographs. The CP angle is the angle formed by the hemidiaphragm and the chest wall. We define the intersection point of both as the CP angle point. We first detect the CP angle point automatically from a lung field segmentation by finding the foreground pixel of each lung with maximum y location. Patches are extracted around the CP angle point and boundary tracing is performed to detect 10 consecutive pixels along the hemidiaphragm and the chest wall and derive the CP angle from these. We evaluate the method on a data set of 250 normal CXRs, 200 CXRs with only one or two blunt CP angles and 200 CXRs with one or two blunt CP angles but also other abnormalities. For these three groups, the CP angle location and angle measurements were accurate in 91%, 88%, and 92% of all the cases, respectively. The average CP angles for the three groups are indeed different with 71.6° +/- 22.9, 87.5° +/- 25.7, and 87.7° +/- 25.3, respectively.

  7. Simulating nodules in chest radiographs with real nodules from multi-slice CT images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schilham, Arnold; van Ginneken, Bram

    2006-03-01

    To improve the detection of nodules in chest radiographs, large databases of chest radiographs with annotated, proven nodules are needed for training of both radiologists and computer-aided detection systems. The construction of such databases is a laborious and time-consuming task. This study presents a novel technique to produce large amounts of chest x-rays with annotated, simulated nodules. Realistic nodules in radiographs are generated using real nodules segmented from CT images. Results from an observer study indicate that the simulated nodules can not be distinguished from real nodules. This method has great potential to aid the development of automated detection systems and to generate teaching files for human observers.

  8. The futility of universal pre-employment chest radiographs.

    PubMed Central

    Lohiya, Ghan-Shyam; Tan-Figueroa, Lilia; Lohiya, Piyush; Bui, De

    2006-01-01

    In a developmental center, a preemployment chest x-ray was required for all job applicants. We scrutinized the pros and cons of this practice through a review of the medical literature and our experience, and discussion with our colleagues. We concluded that such chest x-ray caused unwarranted radiation exposure, did not produce compliance with the tuberculosis laws, gave a false sense of security regarding workers' compensation risk management, was contrary to established occupational medicine practice guidelines, and was unnecessary and wasteful. We discontinued such chest x-rays. The purpose of the pre-employment examination should remain narrowly job related. Even long-established procedures require periodic utilization review. PMID:17225852

  9. Histiocytic disorders of the chest: imaging findings.

    PubMed

    Ahuja, Jitesh; Kanne, Jeffrey P; Meyer, Cristopher A; Pipavath, Sudhakar N J; Schmidt, Rodney A; Swanson, Jonathan O; Godwin, J David

    2015-01-01

    Histiocytic disorders of the chest comprise a broad spectrum of diseases. The lungs may be involved in isolation or as part of systemic disease. Some of these disorders are primary and have unknown etiology, and others result from a histiocytic response to a known cause. Among primary histiocytic disorders, pulmonary Langerhans cell histiocytosis (PLCH) is the most common; others include Erdheim-Chester disease and Rosai-Dorfman disease. Adult PLCH occurs almost exclusively in adults aged 20-40 years who smoke. Pediatric PLCH is extremely rare and typically occurs as part of multisystemic disease. Erdheim-Chester disease affects middle-aged and older adults; thoracic involvement usually occurs as part of systemic disease. Rosai-Dorfman disease affects children and young adults and manifests as painless cervical lymphadenopathy. Examples of secondary histiocytic disorders are storage diseases such as Gaucher disease, Niemann-Pick disease, and Fabry disease; pneumoconiosis such as silicosis and coal workers' pneumoconiosis; and infections such as Whipple disease and malakoplakia. These disorders are characterized at histopathologic examination on the basis of infiltration of alveoli or the pulmonary interstitium by histiocytes, which are a group of cells that includes macrophages and dendritic cells. Dendritic cells are a heterogeneous group of nonphagocytic antigen-presenting immune cells. Immunohistochemical markers help to distinguish among various primary histiocytic disorders. Characteristic radiologic findings in the appropriate clinical context may obviate biopsy to establish a correct diagnosis. However, in the absence of these findings, integration of clinical, pathologic, and radiologic features is required to establish a diagnosis. PMID:25763722

  10. Effect of morphing between unenhanced and multiscale enhanced chest radiographs on pulmonary nodule detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pietrzyk, Mariusz W.; Zöhrer, Fabian; Harz, Markus T.; McEntee, Mark; Hahn, Horst K.; Haygood, Tamara; Evanoff, Michael G.; Brennan, Patrick C.

    2012-02-01

    Aim: This study aims to determine the effectiveness of a novel image-processing algorithm for multi-scale enhancement of chest radiographs to improve detection and localization of real pulmonary nodules. Background: Our wavelet-based enhancement method interactively adjusts the contrast of medical images extracting the spatial frequency components at different scales, followed by a weighting procedure. This study aims to explore the usefulness of this novel procedure for chest image reporting. Method: Sixteen radiologists viewed 50 PA chest radiographs in order to localize pulmonary nodules. The databank contains 25 normal and 25 abnormal images, with multi-nodule cases. Subjects were allowed to mark unlimited number of locations followed by ranking confidence of nodule presence according to a 5-level scale. Subjects viewed all cases at least in two out of three conditions: unprocessed, enhanced and with morphing between these two. MCMR ROC and JAFROC analyses were conducted. Results: No significant differences were found in ROC AUC values across modalities and specialities. Only localization performance with morphing tool is significantly higher (F(1,8)=13.303, p=0.007) for chest expert (JAFROC FOM=0.6355) from non-chest (JAFROC FOM=0.4675) radiologists. Conclusion: Radiologists specialized in chest image interpretation performed consistently well in localizing pulmonary nodules, whereas non-chest radiologists were suffer from distracting effect of morphing tool.

  11. Enhancement of chest radiographs obtained in the intensive care unit through bone suppression and consistent processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Sheng; Zhong, Sikai; Yao, Liping; Shang, Yanfeng; Suzuki, Kenji

    2016-03-01

    Portable chest radiographs (CXRs) are commonly used in the intensive care unit (ICU) to detect subtle pathological changes. However, exposure settings or patient and apparatus positioning deteriorate image quality in the ICU. Chest x-rays of patients in the ICU are often hazy and show low contrast and increased noise. To aid clinicians in detecting subtle pathological changes, we proposed a consistent processing and bone structure suppression method to decrease variations in image appearance and improve the diagnostic quality of images. We applied a region of interest-based look-up table to process original ICU CXRs such that they appeared consistent with each other and the standard CXRs. Then, an artificial neural network was trained by standard CXRs and the corresponding dual-energy bone images for the generation of a bone image. Once the neural network was trained, the real dual-energy image was no longer necessary, and the trained neural network was applied to the consistent processed ICU CXR to output the bone image. Finally, a gray level-based morphological method was applied to enhance the bone image by smoothing other structures on this image. This enhanced image was subtracted from the consistent, processed ICU CXR to produce a soft tissue image. This method was tested for 20 patients with a total of 87 CXRs. The findings indicated that our method suppressed bone structures on ICU CXRs and standard CXRs, simultaneously maintaining subtle pathological changes.

  12. An improved automatic computer aided tube detection and labeling system on chest radiographs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramakrishna, Bharath; Brown, Matthew; Goldin, Jonathan; Cagnon, Christopher; Enzmann, Dieter

    2012-03-01

    Tubes like Endotracheal (ET) tube used to maintain patient's airway and the Nasogastric (NG) tube used to feed the patient and drain contents of the stomach are very commonly used in Intensive Care Units (ICU). The placement of these tubes is critical for their proper functioning and improper tube placement can even be fatal. Bedside chest radiographs are considered the quickest and safest method to check the placement of these tubes. Tertiary ICU's typically generate over 250 chest radiographs per day to confirm tube placement. This paper develops a new fully automatic prototype computer-aided detection (CAD) system for tube detection on bedside chest radiographs. The core of the CAD system is the randomized algorithm which selects tubes based on their average repeatability from seed points. The CAD algorithm is designed as a 5 stage process: Preprocessing (removing borders, histogram equalization, anisotropic filtering), Anatomy Segmentation (to identify neck, esophagus, abdomen ROI's), Seed Generation, Region Growing and Tube Selection. The preliminary evaluation was carried out on 64 cases. The prototype CAD system was able to detect ET tubes with a True Positive Rate of 0.93 and False Positive Rate of 0.02/image and NG tubes with a True Positive Rate of 0.84 and False Positive Rate of 0.02/image respectively. The results from the prototype system show that it is feasible to automatically detect both tubes on chest radiographs, with the potential to significantly speed the delivery of imaging services while maintaining high accuracy.

  13. 78 FR 53645 - Black Lung Benefits Act: Standards for Chest Radiographs

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-08-30

    ... of Workers' Compensation Programs 20 CFR Parts 718 and 725 RIN 1240-AA07 Black Lung Benefits Act: Standards for Chest Radiographs AGENCY: Office of Workers' Compensation Programs, Labor. ACTION: Direct final rule; withdrawal. SUMMARY: The Office of Workers' Compensation Programs (OWCP) published a...

  14. Computerized method for detection of vertebral fractures on lateral chest radiographs based on morphometric data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kasai, Satoshi; Li, Feng; Shiraishi, Junji; Li, Qiang; Straus, Christopher; Vokes, Tamara; MacMahon, Heber; Doi, Kunio

    2007-03-01

    Vertebral fractures are the most common osteoporosis-related fractures. It is important to detect vertebral fractures, because they are associated with increased risk of subsequent fractures, and because pharmacologic therapy can reduce the risk of subsequent fractures. Although vertebral fractures are often not clinically recognized, they can be visualized on lateral chest radiographs taken for other purposes. However, only 15-60% of vertebral fractures found on lateral chest radiographs are mentioned in radiology reports. The purpose of this study was to develop a computerized method for detection of vertebral fractures on lateral chest radiographs in order to assist radiologists' image interpretation. Our computerized method is based on the automated identification of upper and lower vertebral edges. In order to develop the scheme, radiologists provided morphometric data for each identifiable vertebra, which consisted of six points for each vertebra, for 25 normals and 20 cases with severe fractures. Anatomical information was obtained from morphometric data of normal cases in terms of vertebral heights, heights of vertebral disk spaces, and vertebral centerline. Computerized detection of vertebral fractures was based on the reduction in the heights of fractured vertebrae compared to adjacent vertebrae and normal reference data. Vertebral heights from morphometric data on normal cases were used as reference. On 138 chest radiographs (20 with fractures) the sensitivity of our method for detection of fracture cases was 95% (19/20) with 0.93 (110/118) false-positives per image. In conclusion, the computerized method would be useful for detection of potentially overlooked vertebral fractures on lateral chest radiographs.

  15. Multi-scale Morphological Image Enhancement of Chest Radiographs by a Hybrid Scheme.

    PubMed

    Alavijeh, Fatemeh Shahsavari; Mahdavi-Nasab, Homayoun

    2015-01-01

    Chest radiography is a common diagnostic imaging test, which contains an enormous amount of information about a patient. However, its interpretation is highly challenging. The accuracy of the diagnostic process is greatly influenced by image processing algorithms; hence enhancement of the images is indispensable in order to improve visibility of the details. This paper aims at improving radiograph parameters such as contrast, sharpness, noise level, and brightness to enhance chest radiographs, making use of a triangulation method. Here, contrast limited adaptive histogram equalization technique and noise suppression are simultaneously performed in wavelet domain in a new scheme, followed by morphological top-hat and bottom-hat filtering. A unique implementation of morphological filters allows for adjustment of the image brightness and significant enhancement of the contrast. The proposed method is tested on chest radiographs from Japanese Society of Radiological Technology database. The results are compared with conventional enhancement techniques such as histogram equalization, contrast limited adaptive histogram equalization, Retinex, and some recently proposed methods to show its strengths. The experimental results reveal that the proposed method can remarkably improve the image contrast while keeping the sensitive chest tissue information so that radiologists might have a more precise interpretation. PMID:25709942

  16. Multi-scale Morphological Image Enhancement of Chest Radiographs by a Hybrid Scheme

    PubMed Central

    Alavijeh, Fatemeh Shahsavari; Mahdavi-Nasab, Homayoun

    2015-01-01

    Chest radiography is a common diagnostic imaging test, which contains an enormous amount of information about a patient. However, its interpretation is highly challenging. The accuracy of the diagnostic process is greatly influenced by image processing algorithms; hence enhancement of the images is indispensable in order to improve visibility of the details. This paper aims at improving radiograph parameters such as contrast, sharpness, noise level, and brightness to enhance chest radiographs, making use of a triangulation method. Here, contrast limited adaptive histogram equalization technique and noise suppression are simultaneously performed in wavelet domain in a new scheme, followed by morphological top-hat and bottom-hat filtering. A unique implementation of morphological filters allows for adjustment of the image brightness and significant enhancement of the contrast. The proposed method is tested on chest radiographs from Japanese Society of Radiological Technology database. The results are compared with conventional enhancement techniques such as histogram equalization, contrast limited adaptive histogram equalization, Retinex, and some recently proposed methods to show its strengths. The experimental results reveal that the proposed method can remarkably improve the image contrast while keeping the sensitive chest tissue information so that radiologists might have a more precise interpretation. PMID:25709942

  17. Development of computerized method for detection of vertebral fractures on lateral chest radiographs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kasai, Satoshi; Li, Feng; Shiraishi, Junji; Li, Qiang; Nie, Yongkang; Doi, Kunio

    2006-03-01

    Osteoporosis is one of the major public health concerns in the world. Several clinical trials indicated clearly that pharmacologic therapy for osteoporosis is effective for persons with vertebral fractures for preventing subsequent fractures. It is, therefore, important to diagnose vertebral fractures early. Although most vertebral fractures are asymptomatic, they can often be detected on lateral chest radiographs which may be obtained for other purposes. However, investigators have reported that vertebral fractures which were visible on lateral chest radiographs were underdiagnosed or underreported. Therefore, our purpose in this study was to develop a computerized method for detection of vertebral fractures on lateral chest radiographs and to assist radiologists' image interpretation. Our computerized scheme is based on the detection of upper and lower edges of vertebrae on lateral chest images. A curved rectangular area which included a number of visible vertebrae was identified. This area was then straightened such that the upper and lower edges of the vertebrae were oriented horizontally. For detection of vertebral edges, line components were enhanced, and a multiple thresholding technique followed by image feature analysis was applied to the line enhanced image. Finally, vertebral heights determined from the detected vertebral edges were used for characterizing the shape of the vertebrae and for distinguishing fractured from normal vertebrae. Our preliminary results indicated that all of the severely fractured vertebrae in a small database were detected correctly by our computerized method.

  18. Zone-based analysis for automated detection of abnormalities in chest radiographs

    SciTech Connect

    Kao, E-Fong; Kuo, Yu-Ting; Hsu, Jui-Sheng; Chou, Ming-Chung; Liu, Gin-Chung

    2011-07-15

    Purpose: The aim of this study was to develop an automated method for detection of local texture-based and density-based abnormalities in chest radiographs. Methods: The method was based on profile analysis to detect abnormalities in chest radiographs. In the method, one density-based feature, Density Symmetry Index, and two texture-based features, Roughness Maximum Index and Roughness Symmetry Index, were used to detect abnormalities in the lung fields. In each chest radiograph, the lung fields were divided into four zones initially and then the method was applied to each zone separately. For each zone, Density Symmetry Index was obtained from the projection profile of each zone, and Roughness Maximum Index and Roughness Symmetry Index were obtained by measuring the roughness of the horizontal profiles via moving average technique. Linear discriminant analysis was used to classify normal and abnormal cases based on the three indices. The discriminant performance of the method was evaluated using ROC analysis. Results: The method was evaluated on a database of 250 normal and 250 abnormal chest images. In the optimized conditions, the zone-based performance Az of the method for zones 1, 2, 3, and 4 were 0.917, 0.897, 0.892, and 0.814, respectively, and the case-based performance Az of the method was 0.842. Our previous method for detection of gross abnormalities was also evaluated on the same database. The case-based performance of our previous method was 0.689. Conclusions: In comparing the previous method and the new method proposed in this study, there was a great improvement by the new method for detection of local texture-based and density-based abnormalities. The new method combined with the previous one has potential for screening abnormalities in chest radiographs.

  19. Hierarchical Markov random-field modeling for texture classification in chest radiographs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vargas-Voracek, Rene; Floyd, Carey E., Jr.; Nolte, Loren W.; McAdams, Page

    1996-04-01

    A hierarchical Markov random field (MRF) modeling approach is presented for the classification of textures in selected regions of interest (ROIs) of chest radiographs. The procedure integrates possible texture classes and their spatial definition with other components present in an image such as noise and background trend. Classification is performed as a maximum a-posteriori (MAP) estimation of texture class and involves an iterative Gibbs- sampling technique. Two cases are studied: classification of lung parenchyma versus bone and classification of normal lung parenchyma versus miliary tuberculosis (MTB). Accurate classification was obtained for all examined cases showing the potential of the proposed modeling approach for texture analysis of radiographic images.

  20. Follow-up chest radiographs in Vietnam veterans: are they useful?

    PubMed

    Pollei, S; Mettler, F A; Kelsey, C A; Walters, M R; White, R E

    1986-10-01

    Agent Orange exposure and its long-term health consequences on Vietnam veterans have been widely discussed in the past few years. Myriad physical and mental disabilities have been studied with regard to exposure to various herbicides. The number of persons potentially exposed is large, since 2.4-2.8 million U.S. military personnel served in Vietnam. A case-control study was undertaken to determine if persons who served in the U.S. military in Vietnam have either cardiovascular or pulmonary effects that can be demonstrated on long-term follow-up chest radiographs. Information regarding military service in Vietnam was obtained from interviews and, in some cases, review of military records. Vietnam veterans did not have an increased prevalence of abnormalities on follow-up chest radiographs. A subset of Vietnam veterans who had greater estimated opportunities for Agent Orange exposure also did not appear to be at greater risk than the control population. PMID:3763850

  1. Novel Method to Improve Radiologist Agreement in Interpretation of Serial Chest Radiographs in the ICU

    PubMed Central

    Castro, Denise A; Naqvi, Asad A; Manson, David; Flavin, Michael P; VanDenKerkhof, Elizabeth; Soboleski, Donald

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: To determine whether a novel method and device, called a variable attenuation plate (VAP), which equalizes chest radiographic appearance and allows for synchronization of manual image windowing with comparison studies, would improve consistency in interpretation. Materials and Methods: Research ethics board approved the prospective cohort pilot study, which included 50 patients in the intensive care unit (ICU) undergoing two serial chest radiographs with a VAP placed on each one of them. The VAP allowed for equalization of density and contrast between the patients’ serial chest radiographs. Three radiologists interpreted all the studies with and without the use of VAP. Kappa and percent agreement was used to calculate agreement between radiologists’ interpretations with and without the plate. Results: Radiologist agreement was substantially higher with the VAP method, as compared to that with the non-VAP method. Kappa values between Radiologists A and B, A and C, and B and C were 46%, 55%, and 51%, respectively, which improved to 73%, 81%, and 66%, respectively, with the use of VAP. Discrepant report impressions (i.e., one radiologist's impression of unchanged versus one or both of the other radiologists stating improved or worsened in their impression) ranged from 24 to 28.6% without the use of VAP and from 10 to 16% with the use of VAP (χ2 = 7.454, P < 0.01). Opposing views (i.e., one radiologist's impression of improved and one of the others stating disease progression or vice versa) were reported in 7 (12%) cases in the non-VAP group and 4 (7%) cases in the VAP group (χ2 = 0.85, P = 0.54). Conclusion: Numerous factors play a role in image acquisition and image quality, which can contribute to poor consistency and reliability of portable chest radiographic interpretations. Radiologists’ agreement of image interpretation can be improved by use of a novel method consisting of a VAP and associated software and has the potential to improve

  2. Where Does It Lead? Imaging Features of Cardiovascular Implantable Electronic Devices on Chest Radiograph and CT

    PubMed Central

    Lanzman, Rotem S.; Winter, Joachim; Blondin, Dirk; Fürst, Günter; Scherer, Axel; Miese, Falk R; Abbara, Suhny

    2011-01-01

    Pacemakers and implantable cardioverter defibrillators (ICDs) are being increasingly employed in patients suffering from cardiac rhythm disturbances. The principal objective of this article is to familiarize radiologists with pacemakers and ICDs on chest radiographs and CT scans. Therefore, the preferred lead positions according to pacemaker types and anatomic variants are introduced in this study. Additionally, the imaging features of incorrect lead positions and defects, as well as complications subsequent to pacemaker implantation are demonstrated herein. PMID:21927563

  3. Foreign object detection and removal to improve automated analysis of chest radiographs

    SciTech Connect

    Hogeweg, Laurens; Sanchez, Clara I.; Melendez, Jaime; Maduskar, Pragnya; Ginneken, Bram van; Story, Alistair; Hayward, Andrew

    2013-07-15

    Purpose: Chest radiographs commonly contain projections of foreign objects, such as buttons, brassier clips, jewellery, or pacemakers and wires. The presence of these structures can substantially affect the output of computer analysis of these images. An automated method is presented to detect, segment, and remove foreign objects from chest radiographs.Methods: Detection is performed using supervised pixel classification with a kNN classifier, resulting in a probability estimate per pixel to belong to a projected foreign object. Segmentation is performed by grouping and post-processing pixels with a probability above a certain threshold. Next, the objects are replaced by texture inpainting.Results: The method is evaluated in experiments on 257 chest radiographs. The detection at pixel level is evaluated with receiver operating characteristic analysis on pixels within the unobscured lung fields and an A{sub z} value of 0.949 is achieved. Free response operator characteristic analysis is performed at the object level, and 95.6% of objects are detected with on average 0.25 false positive detections per image. To investigate the effect of removing the detected objects through inpainting, a texture analysis system for tuberculosis detection is applied to images with and without pathology and with and without foreign object removal. Unprocessed, the texture analysis abnormality score of normal images with foreign objects is comparable to those with pathology. After removing foreign objects, the texture score of normal images with and without foreign objects is similar, while abnormal images, whether they contain foreign objects or not, achieve on average higher scores.Conclusions: The authors conclude that removal of foreign objects from chest radiographs is feasible and beneficial for automated image analysis.

  4. The usefulness of computed tomography in detecting asbestos-related pleural abnormalities in people who had indeterminate chest radiographs: the Libby, MT, experience.

    PubMed

    Muravov, Oleg I; Kaye, Wendy E; Lewin, Michael; Berkowitz, Zahava; Lybarger, Jeffrey A; Campolucci, Sharon S; Parker, John E

    2005-01-01

    This epidemiological study was conducted to determine whether high-resolution computed tomography (HRCT) is useful to screen for pulmonary abnormalities in people exposed to vermiculite containing asbestos. During June-September 2001, we evaluated HRCT of 353 people in Libby, MT, who had been exposed to asbestiform minerals associated with vermiculite. Of these, 334 participants of the summer 2000 medical testing program underwent HRCT of the chest at St. John's Lutheran Hospital and 19 eligible people who recently had undergone an HRCT scan at the same facility and under the same testing protocol allowed the study reviewers to use that scan. All 353 study participants were former vermiculite mine/mill workers (n = 55), their household contacts (n = 99), and people exposed to vermiculite through recreational or other activities (n = 199). Participants' 2000 medical testing results indicated only one of the three B-reader chest radiograph reviewers had reported a pleural abnormality (indeterminate chest radiograph). Three expert computer tomography (CT) scan evaluators reviewed the HRCT scans and identified pleural abnormalities in 98 (27.8%) of the 353 participants whose previous chest radiographs were classified indeterminate. Of these 98 people, 69 (70.4%) were either former vermiculite mine/mill workers or household contacts, and 40 (40.8%) showed pleural calcification on HRCT. Thirty out of the 40 people with pleural calcification reported having no occupational exposure to either Libby vermiculite or asbestos. Our findings indicate that low-dose HRCT can be considered for screening certain former vermiculite mine/mill workers and their household contacts who have indeterminate chest radiographs and may be useful for diagnosing a suspicious finding on a chest radiograph, particularly in a high-risk person. PMID:15881982

  5. Postprocedural chest radiograph: Impact on the management in critical care unit.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Prashant K; Gupta, Kumkum; Jain, Manish; Garg, Tanuj

    2014-01-01

    Postprocedural chest radiograph is done to illustrate the position of endotracheal tubes (ETTs), nasogastric and drainage tubes, indwelling catheters, and intravascular lines or any other lifesaving devices to confirm their position. These devices are intended to save life, but may be life-threatening if in the wrong place. The incidence of malposition and complications ranges from 3% to 14%, respectively. The portable chest radiograph is of tremendous value, inexpensive and can be obtained quickly at the patient's bedside in any location of the hospital. A systemic literature search was performed in PubMed and the Cochranre library by setting up the search using either single text word or combinations. Those studies were also included where the chest radiograph was compared with other imaging modalities. Its clinical efficacy, cost-effectiveness and practicality allow anesthesiologist to evaluate the post-procedural position and complications of ETT, indwelling catheters, and multi lumen intravascular lines. Knowledge of the radiological features of commonly used devices is of utmost importance. PMID:25886216

  6. Interobserver variation in the chest radiograph component of the lung injury score.

    PubMed

    Beards, S C; Jackson, A; Hunt, L; Wood, A; Frerk, C M; Brear, G; Edwards, J D; Nightingale, P

    1995-11-01

    The lung injury score is a semi-quantitative system used in the definition and grading of the acute respiratory distress syndrome. It is composed of two, three or four equally weighted components. One component is derived from the chest radiograph, which may contribute up to 50% of the total score. A score of 1 is awarded for each quadrant on the chest radiograph which contains alveolar consolidation. We examined the interobserver variation between two anaesthetists, two radiologists and two critical care physicians who scored blindly 100 chest radiographs from patients with adult respiratory distress syndrome. There was very good agreement between the two radiologists in the total scores (kappa 0.97) and in individual scores in each of the 4 quadrants (kappa 0.97-1.0). The agreement between anaesthetists and radiologists was only fair for the total score (kappa 0.37-0.42), but moderate to good for individual quadrant scores (kappa 0.43-0.73). The agreement between the two anaesthetists was moderate for individual quadrant scores (kappa 0.44-0.60), but only fair for total score (kappa 0.34). There was poor agreement between the two critical care physicians for total score (kappa 0.05) and for individual quadrant scores (kappa 0.04-0.20). Agreement between the physicians and other observers was poor to fair for the total score (kappa 0.12-0.32) and poor to moderate for the individual quadrant scores (kappa 0.15-0.63). Both anaesthetists and physician 2 underestimated the overall chest scores (median scores 2, 3 and 1 respectively) in comparison to the radiologists (median scores 3.5). Physician 1 significantly overscored (median score 4). The chest radiograph component of the lung injury score can be consistently assessed by radiologists, but significant variations may be introduced when assessed by other clinicians. This has significant implications for the use of the lung injury score in studies of adult respiratory distress syndrome and other studies which

  7. Nationwide surveys of chest, abdomen, lumbosacral spine radiography, and upper gastrointestinal fluoroscopy: a summary of findings.

    PubMed

    Spelic, David C; Kaczmarek, Richard V; Hilohi, Mike C; Moyal, Albert E

    2010-03-01

    This paper reports findings from Nationwide Evaluation of X-ray Trends surveys conducted in 2001, 2002, and 2003 of clinical facilities that perform routine radiographic examinations of the adult chest, abdomen, lumbosacral spine, and upper gastrointestinal fluoroscopic examinations. Randomly identified clinical facilities were surveyed in approximately 40 participating states. For the surveyed radiographic exams, additional facilities that use computed radiography or digital radiography were surveyed to ensure adequate sample sizes for determining comparative statistics. State radiation control personnel performed site visits and collected data on patient exposure, radiographic/fluoroscopic technique factors, image quality, and quality-control and quality-assurance practices. Results of the NEXT surveys are compared with those of previous surveys conducted in 1964 and 1970 by the U.S. Public Health Service and the Food and Drug Administration. An estimated 155 million routine adult chest exams were performed in 2001. Average patient entrance skin air kerma from chest radiography at facilities using digital-based imaging modalities was found to be significantly higher (p < 0.001), but not so for routine abdomen or lumbosacral spine radiography. Digital-based imaging showed a substantial reduction in patient exposure for the radiographic portion of the routine upper gastrointestinal fluoroscopy exam. Long-term trends in surveyed diagnostic examinations show that average patient exposures are at their lowest levels. Of concern is the observation that a substantial fraction of surveyed non-hospital sites indicated they do not regularly have a medical physics survey conducted on their radiographic equipment. These facilities are likely unaware of the radiation doses they administer to their patients. PMID:20147791

  8. An image-based technique to assess the perceptual quality of clinical chest radiographs

    SciTech Connect

    Lin Yuan; Luo Hui; Dobbins, James T. III; Page McAdams, H.; Wang, Xiaohui; Sehnert, William J.; Barski, Lori; Foos, David H.; Samei, Ehsan

    2012-11-15

    Purpose: Current clinical image quality assessment techniques mainly analyze image quality for the imaging system in terms of factors such as the capture system modulation transfer function, noise power spectrum, detective quantum efficiency, and the exposure technique. While these elements form the basic underlying components of image quality, when assessing a clinical image, radiologists seldom refer to these factors, but rather examine several specific regions of the displayed patient images, further impacted by a particular image processing method applied, to see whether the image is suitable for diagnosis. In this paper, the authors developed a novel strategy to simulate radiologists' perceptual evaluation process on actual clinical chest images. Methods: Ten regional based perceptual attributes of chest radiographs were determined through an observer study. Those included lung grey level, lung detail, lung noise, rib-lung contrast, rib sharpness, mediastinum detail, mediastinum noise, mediastinum alignment, subdiaphragm-lung contrast, and subdiaphragm area. Each attribute was characterized in terms of a physical quantity measured from the image algorithmically using an automated process. A pilot observer study was performed on 333 digital chest radiographs, which included 179 PA images with 10:1 ratio grids (set 1) and 154 AP images without grids (set 2), to ascertain the correlation between image perceptual attributes and physical quantitative measurements. To determine the acceptable range of each perceptual attribute, a preliminary quality consistency range was defined based on the preferred 80% of images in set 1. Mean value difference ({mu}{sub 1}-{mu}{sub 2}) and variance ratio ({sigma}{sub 1}{sup 2}/{sigma}{sub 2}{sup 2}) were investigated to further quantify the differences between the selected two image sets. Results: The pilot observer study demonstrated that our regional based physical quantity metrics of chest radiographs correlated very well with

  9. A patient image-based technique to assess the image quality of clinical chest radiographs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Yuan; Samei, Ehsan; Luo, Hui; Dobbins, James T., III; McAdams, H. Page; Wang, Xiaohui; Sehnert, William J.; Barski, Lori; Foos, David H.

    2011-03-01

    Current clinical image quality assessment techniques mainly analyze image quality for the imaging system in terms of factors such as the capture system DQE and MTF, the exposure technique, and the particular image processing method and processing parameters. However, when assessing a clinical image, radiologists seldom refer to these factors, but rather examine several specific regions of the image to see whether the image is suitable for diagnosis. In this work, we developed a new strategy to learn and simulate radiologists' evaluation process on actual clinical chest images. Based on this strategy, a preliminary study was conducted on 254 digital chest radiographs (38 AP without grids, 35 AP with 6:1 ratio grids and 151 PA with 10:1 ratio grids). First, ten regional based perceptual qualities were summarized through an observer study. Each quality was characterized in terms of a physical quantity measured from the image, and as a first step, the three physical quantities in lung region were then implemented algorithmically. A pilot observer study was performed to verify the correlation between image perceptual qualities and physical quantitative qualities. The results demonstrated that our regional based metrics have promising performance for grading perceptual properties of chest radiographs.

  10. Chest radiograph--a poor method for determining the size of a pneumothorax.

    PubMed

    Engdahl, O; Toft, T; Boe, J

    1993-01-01

    The ability of chest radiographs to determine the size of a pneumothorax was tested in 16 patients using computed tomographic (CT) scan as a reference method. To determine if CT with a slice thickness of 12 mm could be used, its accuracy was assessed in a lung model experiment. The lung model consisted of a water-filled plastic bag (lung) fitted into a plastic chamber (hemithorax), both of approximately the same size and shape as in man. Water was drawn off in incremental steps and a CT was done after each step. The area of the pneumothorax was calculated by computer and when multiplied by slice thickness and number of slices, the total volume of the pneumothorax could be compared with the extracted amount of water. A good correlation (r = 0.99), with the line of regression close to the line of identity, was found between the CT investigation and the artificial pneumothorax. In the patients, the size of the pneumothorax, judged by radiograph using two different methods of calculation, was correlated to the size obtained by CT. The correlation was poor (r = 0.71) irrespective of method of calculation. The size of the pneumothorax estimated by CT showed a good correlation (r = 0.99) to the initial aspirated air volumes in 12 of the 16 patients treated with drainage. A cautious attitude toward the use of chest radiographs for calculations of the degree of lung collapse in patients with pneumothorax is recommended. PMID:8417891

  11. 42 CFR 37.54 - Notification of abnormal radiographic findings.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... in accordance with section 203 of the Act (see 30 CFR part 90). Positive findings with regard to... CARE AND EXAMINATIONS SPECIFICATIONS FOR MEDICAL EXAMINATIONS OF UNDERGROUND COAL MINERS Chest Roentgenographic Examinations Specifications for Interpretation, Classification, and Submission of...

  12. Chest CT findings of influenza virus‐associated pneumonia in 12 adult patients

    PubMed Central

    Fujita, Jiro; Bandoh, Shuji; Yamaguchi, Masahiro; Higa, Futoshi; Tateyama, Masao

    2008-01-01

    Objective  In this study, we describe the chest computed tomography findings of influenza virus‐associated pneumonia in adult patients. Methods  Our retrospective study included 12 adult patients who had proven influenza virus ‐ associated pneumonia. Results  Out of 12 patients, six were diagnosed as having pure influenza virus pneumonia, five as having bronchopneumonia caused by bacteria associated with influenza A infection, and one as having a cryptogenic organizing pneumonia associated with influenza A infection. Conclusion  Radiographic findings of influenza virus pneumonia in adult patients consist of ground‐glass attenuation. Localized patchy consolidations were observed in cases of bronchopneumonia. PMID:19453425

  13. Radiographic findings in recurrent parathyroid carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Krudy, A.G.; Doppman, J.L.; Marx, S.J.; Brennan, M.F.; Spiegel, A.; Aurback, G.D.

    1982-03-01

    Seven cases of recurrent parathyroid carcinoma were reviewed. Subperiosteal resorption was seen in 6, pulmonary nodules in 4, renal calculi in 5, brown tumors in 5, and pancreatic calcifications in 1. Angiography was performed in 5 patients, showing 1 definite and 2 probable cervical recurrences, 1 mediastinal lesion, and 1 case of possible bone metastases. Venous sampling for parathyroid hormone was carried out in 4 patients and suggested residual disease in 2; in addition, there were 1 false and 1 true negative. CT was performed in 4 patients and was useful in delineating metastatic pulmonary nodules, cervical recurrence, and hepatic metastases. The radiographic approach to recurrent parathryoid carcinoma and the use of CT and angiography are discussed.

  14. Improved texture analysis for automatic detection of tuberculosis (TB) on chest radiographs with bone suppression images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maduskar, Pragnya; Hogeweg, Laurens; Philipsen, Rick; Schalekamp, Steven; van Ginneken, Bram

    2013-03-01

    Computer aided detection (CAD) of tuberculosis (TB) on chest radiographs (CXR) is challenging due to over-lapping structures. Suppression of normal structures can reduce overprojection effects and can enhance the appearance of diffuse parenchymal abnormalities. In this work, we compare two CAD systems to detect textural abnormalities in chest radiographs of TB suspects. One CAD system was trained and tested on the original CXR and the other CAD system was trained and tested on bone suppression images (BSI). BSI were created using a commercially available software (ClearRead 2.4, Riverain Medical). The CAD system is trained with 431 normal and 434 abnormal images with manually outlined abnormal regions. Subtlety rating (1-3) is assigned to each abnormal region, where 3 refers to obvious and 1 refers to subtle abnormalities. Performance is evaluated on normal and abnormal regions from an independent dataset of 900 images. These contain in total 454 normal and 1127 abnormal regions, which are divided into 3 subtlety categories containing 280, 527 and 320 abnormal regions, respectively. For normal regions, original/BSI CAD has an average abnormality score of 0.094+/-0.027/0.085+/-0.032 (p - 5.6×10-19). For abnormal regions, subtlety 1, 2, 3 categories have average abnormality scores for original/BSI of 0.155+/-0.073/0.156+/-0.089 (p = 0.73), 0.194+/-0.086/0.207+/-0.101 (p = 5.7×10-7), 0.225+/-0.119/0.247+/-0.117 (p = 4.4×10-7), respectively. Thus for normal regions, CAD scores slightly decrease when using BSI instead of the original images, and for abnormal regions, the scores increase slightly. We therefore conclude that the use of bone suppression results in slightly but significantly improved automated detection of textural abnormalities in chest radiographs.

  15. Quantification and visualization of relative local ventilation on dynamic chest radiographs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanaka, Rie; Sanada, Shigeru; Okazaki, Nobuo; Kobayashi, Takeshi; Nakayama, Kazuya; Matsui, Takeshi; Hayashi, Norio; Matsui, Osamu

    2006-03-01

    Recently-developed dynamic flat-panel detector (FPD) with a large field of view is possible to obtain breathing chest radiographs, which provide respiratory kinetics information. This study was performed to investigate the ability of dynamic chest radiography using FPD to quantify relative ventilation according to respiratory physiology. We also reported the results of primary clinical study and described the possibility of clinical use of our method. Dynamic chest radiographs of 12 subjects involving abnormal subjects during respiration were obtained using a modified FPD system (30 frames in 10 seconds). Imaging was performed in three different positions (standing, and right and left decubitus positions) to change the distribution of local ventilation by changing the lung's own gravity in each area. The distance from the lung apex to the diaphragm (abbr. DLD) was measured by the edge detection technique for use as an index of respiratory phase. We measured pixel values in each lung area and calculated correlation coefficients with DLD. Differences in the pixel values between the maximum inspiratory and expiratory frame were calculated, and the trend of distribution was evaluated by two-way analysis of variance. Pixel value in each lung area was strongly associated with respiratory phase and its time variation and distribution were consistent with known properties in respiratory physiology. Dynamic chest radiography using FPD combined with our computerized methods was capable of quantifying relative amount of ventilation during respiration, and of detecting regional differences in ventilation. In the subjects with emphysema, areas with decreased respiratory changes in pixel value are consisted with the areas with air trapping. This method is expected to be a useful novel diagnostic imaging method for supporting diagnosis and follow-up of pulmonary disease, which presents with abnormalities in local ventilation.

  16. Analysis of biological tissues in infant chest for the development of an equivalent radiographic phantom

    SciTech Connect

    Pina, D. R.; Souza, Rafael T. F.; Duarte, Sergio B.; Alvarez, Matheus; Miranda, Jose R. A.

    2012-03-15

    Purpose: The main purpose of the present study was to determine the amounts of different tissues in the chest of the newborn patient (age {<=}1 year), with the aim of developing a homogeneous phantom chest equivalent. This type of phantom is indispensable in the development of optimization procedures for radiographic techniques, including dosimetric control, which is a crucial aspect of pediatric radiology. The authors present a systematic set of procedures, including a computational algorithm, to estimate the amounts of tissues and thicknesses of the corresponding simulator material plates used to construct the phantom. Methods: The Gaussian fit of computed tomographic (CT) analysis was applied to classify and quantify different biological tissues. The methodology is summarized with a computational algorithm, which was used to quantify tissues through automated CT analysis. The thicknesses of the equivalent homogeneous simulator material plates were determined to construct the phantom. Results: A total of 180 retrospective CT examinations with anterior-posterior diameter values ranging 8.5-13.0 cm were examined. The amounts of different tissues were evaluated. The results provided elements to construct a phantom to simulate the infant chest in the posterior-anterior or anterior-posterior (PA/AP) view. Conclusions: To our knowledge, this report represents the first demonstration of an infant chest phantom dedicated to the radiology of children younger than one year. This phantom is a key element in the development of clinical charts for optimizing radiographic technique in pediatric patients. Optimization procedures for nonstandard patients were reported previously [Pina et al., Phys. Med. Biol. 49, N215-N226 (2004) and Pina et al., Appl. Radiat. Isot. 67, 61-69 (2009)]. The constructed phantom represents a starting point to obtain radiologic protocols for the infant patient.

  17. Radiation safety education reduces the incidence of adult fingers on neonatal chest radiographs.

    PubMed

    Sahota, N; Burbridge, B E; Duncan, M D

    2014-06-01

    A previous audit revealed a high frequency of adult fingers visualised on neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) chest radiographs-representing an example of inappropriate occupational radiation exposure. Radiation safety education was provided to staff and we hypothesised that the education would reduce the frequency of adult fingers visualised on NICU chest radiographs. Two cross-sectional samples taken before and after the administration of the education were compared. We examined fingers visualised directly in the beam, fingers in the direct beam but eliminated by technologists editing the image, and fingers under the cones of the portable x-ray machine. There was a 46.2% reduction in fingers directly in the beam, 50.0% reduction in fingers directly in the beam but cropped out, and 68.4% reduction in fingers in the coned area. There was a 57.1% overall reduction in adult fingers visualised, which was statistically significant (Z value - 7.48, P < 0.0001). This study supports radiation safety education in minimising inappropriate occupational radiation exposure. PMID:24705198

  18. Pneumothorax detection in chest radiographs using local and global texture signatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geva, Ofer; Zimmerman-Moreno, Gali; Lieberman, Sivan; Konen, Eli; Greenspan, Hayit

    2015-03-01

    A novel framework for automatic detection of pneumothorax abnormality in chest radiographs is presented. The suggested method is based on a texture analysis approach combined with supervised learning techniques. The proposed framework consists of two main steps: at first, a texture analysis process is performed for detection of local abnormalities. Labeled image patches are extracted in the texture analysis procedure following which local analysis values are incorporated into a novel global image representation. The global representation is used for training and detection of the abnormality at the image level. The presented global representation is designed based on the distinctive shape of the lung, taking into account the characteristics of typical pneumothorax abnormalities. A supervised learning process was performed on both the local and global data, leading to trained detection system. The system was tested on a dataset of 108 upright chest radiographs. Several state of the art texture feature sets were experimented with (Local Binary Patterns, Maximum Response filters). The optimal configuration yielded sensitivity of 81% with specificity of 87%. The results of the evaluation are promising, establishing the current framework as a basis for additional improvements and extensions.

  19. Chest Computed Tomography Findings in HIV-Infected Individuals in the Era of Antiretroviral Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Clausen, Emily; Wittman, Catherine; Gingo, Matthew; Fernainy, Khaled; Fuhrman, Carl; Kessinger, Cathy; Weinman, Renee; McMahon, Deborah; Leader, Joseph; Morris, Alison

    2014-01-01

    Background Chest radiographic abnormalities were common in HIV-infected individuals in the pre-combination antiretroviral therapy era, but findings may differ now due to a changing spectrum of pulmonary complications. Methods Cross-sectional study of radiographic abnormalities in an HIV-infected outpatient population during the antiretroviral therapy era. Demographics, chest computed tomography, and pulmonary function tests were obtained in HIV-infected volunteers without acute respiratory illness from the University of Pittsburgh HIV/AIDS clinic. Overall prevalence of radiographic abnormalities and potential risk factors for having any abnormality, nodules, or emphysema were evaluated using univariate and multivariable analyses. Results A majority of the 121 participants (55.4%) had a radiographic abnormality with the most common being emphysema (26.4%), nodules (17.4%), and bronchiectasis (10.7%). In multivariate models, age (odds ratio [OR] per year  = 1.07, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.04–1.14, p<0.001), pneumonia history (OR  = 3.60, 95% CI  = 1.27–10.20, p = 0.016), and having ever smoked (OR  = 3.66, p = 0.013, 95% CI  = 1.31–10.12) were significant predictors of having any radiographic abnormality. Use of antiretroviral therapy, CD4 cell count, and HIV viral load were not associated with presence of abnormalities. Individuals with radiographic emphysema were more likely to have airway obstruction on pulmonary function tests. Only 85.8% participants with nodules had follow-up imaging resulting in 52.4% having stable nodules, 23.8% resolution of their nodules, 4.8% development of a new nodule, and 4.8% primary lung cancer. Conclusions Radiographic abnormalities remain common in HIV-infected individuals with emphysema, nodules, and bronchiectasis being the most common. Age, smoking, and pneumonia were associated with radiographic abnormalities, but HIV-associated factors did not seem to predict risk. PMID:25409510

  20. Bone Suppression Increases the Visibility of Invasive Pulmonary Aspergillosis in Chest Radiographs

    PubMed Central

    Schalekamp, Steven; van Ginneken, Bram; van den Berk, Inge A. H.; Hartmann, Ieneke J. C.; Snoeren, Miranda M.; Odink, Arlette E.; van Lankeren, Winnifred; Pegge, Sjoert A. H.; Schijf, Laura J.; Karssemeijer, Nico; Schaefer-Prokop, Cornelia M.

    2014-01-01

    Objective Chest radiographs (CXR) are an important diagnostic tool for the detection of invasive pulmonary aspergillosis (IPA) in critically ill patients, but their diagnostic value is limited by a poor sensitivity. By using advanced image processing, the aim of this study was to increase the value of chest radiographs in the diagnostic work up of neutropenic patients who are suspected of IPA. Methods The frontal CXRs of 105 suspected cases of IPA were collected from four institutions. Radiographs could contain single or multiple sites of infection. CT was used as reference standard. Five radiologists and two residents participated in an observer study for the detection of IPA on CXRs with and without bone suppressed images (ClearRead BSI 3.2; Riverain Technologies). The evaluation was performed separately for the right and left lung, resulting in 78 diseased cases (or lungs) and 132 normal cases (or lungs). For each image, observers scored the likelihood of focal infectious lesions being present on a continuous scale (0–100). The area under the receiver operating characteristics curve (AUC) served as the performance measure. Sensitivity and specificity were calculated by considering only the lungs with a suspiciousness score of greater than 50 to be positive. Results The average AUC for only CXRs was 0.815. Performance significantly increased, to 0.853, when evaluation was aided with BSI (p = 0.01). Sensitivity increased from 49% to 66% with BSI, while specificity decreased from 95% to 90%. Conclusion The detection of IPA in CXRs can be improved when their evaluation is aided by bone suppressed images. BSI improved the sensitivity of the CXR examination, outweighing a small loss in specificity. PMID:25279774

  1. Use of effective detective quantum efficiency to optimise radiographic exposures for chest imaging with computed radiography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ertan, Ferihan; Mackenzie, Alistair; Urbanczyk, Hannah J.; Ranger, Nicole T.; Samei, Ehsan

    2009-02-01

    The purpose of the work was to test if effective detective quantum efficiency (eDQE) could be useful for optimisation of radiographic factors for computed radiography (CR) for adult chest examinations. The eDQE was therefore measured across a range of kilovoltage, with and without an anti-scatter grid. The modulation transfer function, noise power spectra, transmission factor and scatter fraction were measured with a phantom made of sheets of Aluminum and Acrylic. The entrance air kerma was selected to give an effective dose of 4.9 μSv. The effective noise equivalent quanta (eNEQ) is introduced in this work. eNEQ can be considered equal to the number of X-ray quanta equivalent in the image corrected for the amount of scatter and the blurring processes. The eNEQ was then normalised to account for slight differences in the effective dose (eNEQED). The peak eNEQED was largest at 80 kV and 100 kV with no grid and with grid respectively. At each kilovoltage, the eNEQED and eDQE were between 10% and 70% larger when the grid was not used. The results show that 80 kV without grid is the most suitable exposure conditions for CR in chest. This is consistent with clinical practice in the UK and previous publications recommending a low kV technique for CR for average sized adult chest imaging.

  2. Evaluation of the usefulness of modified biological fingerprints in chest radiographs for patient recognition and identification.

    PubMed

    Shimizu, Yoichiro; Matsunobu, Yusuke; Morishita, Junji

    2016-07-01

    We have been developing an image-searching method to identify misfiled images in a PACS server. Developing new biological fingerprints (BFs) that would reduce the influence of differences in positioning and breathing phases to improve the performance of recognition is desirable. In our previous studies, the whole lung field (WLF) that included the shadows of the body and lungs was affected by differences in positioning and/or breathing phases. In this study, we showed the usefulness of a circumscribed lung with a rectangular region of interest and the upper half of a chest radiograph as modified BFs. We used 200 images as hypothetically misfiled images. The cross-correlation identifies the resemblance between the BFs in the misfiled images and the corresponding BFs in the database images. The modified BFs indicated better results than did WLF in a receiver operating characteristic analysis; therefore, they could be used as identifiers for patient recognition and identification. PMID:27132238

  3. Unsupervised segmentation of lung fields in chest radiographs using multiresolution fractal feature vector and deformable models.

    PubMed

    Lee, Wen-Li; Chang, Koyin; Hsieh, Kai-Sheng

    2016-09-01

    Segmenting lung fields in a chest radiograph is essential for automatically analyzing an image. We present an unsupervised method based on multiresolution fractal feature vector. The feature vector characterizes the lung field region effectively. A fuzzy c-means clustering algorithm is then applied to obtain a satisfactory initial contour. The final contour is obtained by deformable models. The results show the feasibility and high performance of the proposed method. Furthermore, based on the segmentation of lung fields, the cardiothoracic ratio (CTR) can be measured. The CTR is a simple index for evaluating cardiac hypertrophy. After identifying a suspicious symptom based on the estimated CTR, a physician can suggest that the patient undergoes additional extensive tests before a treatment plan is finalized. PMID:26530048

  4. Cavity contour segmentation in chest radiographs using supervised learning and dynamic programming

    SciTech Connect

    Maduskar, Pragnya Hogeweg, Laurens; Sánchez, Clara I.; Ginneken, Bram van; Jong, Pim A. de; Peters-Bax, Liesbeth; Dawson, Rodney; Ayles, Helen

    2014-07-15

    Purpose: Efficacy of tuberculosis (TB) treatment is often monitored using chest radiography. Monitoring size of cavities in pulmonary tuberculosis is important as the size predicts severity of the disease and its persistence under therapy predicts relapse. The authors present a method for automatic cavity segmentation in chest radiographs. Methods: A two stage method is proposed to segment the cavity borders, given a user defined seed point close to the center of the cavity. First, a supervised learning approach is employed to train a pixel classifier using texture and radial features to identify the border pixels of the cavity. A likelihood value of belonging to the cavity border is assigned to each pixel by the classifier. The authors experimented with four different classifiers:k-nearest neighbor (kNN), linear discriminant analysis (LDA), GentleBoost (GB), and random forest (RF). Next, the constructed likelihood map was used as an input cost image in the polar transformed image space for dynamic programming to trace the optimal maximum cost path. This constructed path corresponds to the segmented cavity contour in image space. Results: The method was evaluated on 100 chest radiographs (CXRs) containing 126 cavities. The reference segmentation was manually delineated by an experienced chest radiologist. An independent observer (a chest radiologist) also delineated all cavities to estimate interobserver variability. Jaccard overlap measure Ω was computed between the reference segmentation and the automatic segmentation; and between the reference segmentation and the independent observer's segmentation for all cavities. A median overlap Ω of 0.81 (0.76 ± 0.16), and 0.85 (0.82 ± 0.11) was achieved between the reference segmentation and the automatic segmentation, and between the segmentations by the two radiologists, respectively. The best reported mean contour distance and Hausdorff distance between the reference and the automatic segmentation were

  5. Computer-aided detection of malpositioned endotracheal tubes in portable chest radiographs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huo, Zhimin; Mao, Hongda; Zhang, Jane; Sykes, Anne-Marie; Munn, Samson; Wandtke, John

    2014-03-01

    Portable chest radiographic images play a critical role in examining and monitoring the condition and progress of critically ill patients in intensive care units (ICUs). For example, portable chest images are acquired to ensure that tubes inserted into the patients are properly positioned for effective treatment. In this paper, we present a system that automatically detects the position of an endotracheal tube (ETT), which is inserted into the trachea to assist patients who have difficulty breathing. The computer detection includes the detections of the lung field, spine line, and aortic arch. These detections lead to the identification of regions of interest (ROIs) used for the subsequent detection of the ETT and carina. The detection of the ETT and carina is performed within the ROIs. Our ETT and carina detection methods were trained and tested on a large number of images. The locations of the ETT and carina were confirmed by an experienced radiologist for the purpose of performance evaluation. Our ETT detection achieved an average sensitivity of 85% at less than 0.1 false-positive detections per image. The carina approach correctly identified the carina location within a 10 mm distance from the truth location for 81% of the 217 testing images. We expect our system will assist ICU clinicians to detect malpositioned ETTs and reposition malpositioned ETTs more effectively and efficiently.

  6. Eye-position study of the effects of a verbal prompt and pictorial backgrounds on the search for lung nodules in chest radiographs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kundel, Harold L.; Nodine, Calvin F.; Toto, Lawrence C.

    1999-05-01

    Peripherally inconspicuous nodules on chest radiographs are frequently missed by competent readers. In order to find a peripherally inconspicuous nodule the reader must inspect the nodule site with the central vision and decide if the features at the site are sufficiently characteristic to report a nodule. The experiment reported here was carried out to examine the effect of a nodule prompt and distraction by unrelated native abnormalities on the location and recognition of inconspicuous lung nodules on chest x-ray images. On two occasions separated by 3 years, 4 radiologists had their eye- position recorded while viewing 24 chest radiographs, 12 with prominent native abnormalities and 12 with no abnormalities. An inconspicuous nodule was simulated in the lungs of half of the radiographs on the first viewing and in the other half on the second viewing. For the first viewing, the readers were instructed to report any abnormalities. For the second viewing the readers were told to report any abnormalities including nodules. A nodule prompt triggers a scanning strategy that sends the central vision to high probability nodule sites early in search and at the same time relaxes the criteria used to evaluate nodule features resulting in more true positives and false positives without a change in absolute detectability. Prominent native abnormalities, unrelated to nodules, do not affect the search strategy but competitively inhibit the nodule feature recognition mechanism.

  7. A method to produce and validate a digitally reconstructed radiograph-based computer simulation for optimisation of chest radiographs acquired with a computed radiography imaging system

    PubMed Central

    Moore, C S; Liney, G P; Beavis, A W; Saunderson, J R

    2011-01-01

    Objectives The purpose of this study was to develop and validate a computer model to produce realistic simulated computed radiography (CR) chest images using CT data sets of real patients. Methods Anatomical noise, which is the limiting factor in determining pathology in chest radiography, is realistically simulated by the CT data, and frequency-dependent noise has been added post-digitally reconstructed radiograph (DRR) generation to simulate exposure reduction. Realistic scatter and scatter fractions were measured in images of a chest phantom acquired on the CR system simulated by the computer model and added post-DRR calculation. Results The model has been validated with a phantom and patients and shown to provide predictions of signal-to-noise ratios (SNRs), tissue-to-rib ratios (TRRs: a measure of soft tissue pixel value to that of rib) and pixel value histograms that lie within the range of values measured with patients and the phantom. The maximum difference in measured SNR to that calculated was 10%. TRR values differed by a maximum of 1.3%. Conclusion Experienced image evaluators have responded positively to the DRR images, are satisfied they contain adequate anatomical features and have deemed them clinically acceptable. Therefore, the computer model can be used by image evaluators to grade chest images presented at different tube potentials and doses in order to optimise image quality and patient dose for clinical CR chest radiographs without the need for repeat patient exposures. PMID:21933979

  8. Subtle radiographic findings of acute, isolated distal radioulnar joint dislocation.

    PubMed

    Duryea, Dennis M; Payatakes, Alexander H; Mosher, Timothy J

    2016-09-01

    Distal radioulnar dislocations typically occur in association with fractures of the distal radius and/or ulna. Rare isolated dislocations or subluxations are more difficult to diagnose and are initially missed in up to 50 % of cases. We present two cases of missed isolated volar rotatory dislocation of the distal radioulnar joint. Subtle, overlooked radiographic findings of abnormal radioulnar alignment and ulnar styloid projection are highlighted. The supplemental role of cross-sectional imaging is reviewed. Adequate clinical information, appropriate radiographic technique, and high index of suspicion are necessary for the accurate and timely diagnosis of this rare injury pattern. PMID:27229875

  9. Unusual thoracic radiographic findings in children treated for Hodgkin's disease

    SciTech Connect

    Jochelson, M.S.; Tarbell, N.J.; Weinstein, H.J.

    1986-06-01

    Mantle irradiation is often part of the treatment for Hodgkin's disease. Localized pneumonitis and fibrosis are well-known sequelae of this treatment. We report nine patients with unusual thoracic radiographic findings following treatment for Hodgkin's disease. All nine had mediastinal widening. Seven of these patients received combined modality therapy in which prednisone was given with their MOPP. In these seven patients, an increase in mediastinal width developed at the same time as the radiographic changes of radiation pneumonitis. Two patients developed bilateral infiltrates extending beyond the field of radiation to the lung periphery. In one of these patients, a spontaneous pneumomediastinum developed. One patient underwent mediastinal biopsy that revealed inflammatory changes similar to those seen in radiation pneumonitis. All patients either responded to steroids or had spontaneous regression of radiographic abnormalities supporting the presumed diagnosis of treatment related changes. Recognition of these unusual sequelae of mantle irradiation will aid in differentiating them from infection or tumor and lead to prompt, appropriate treatment.

  10. Acute, proximal aortic dissection with negative D-Dimer assay and normal portable chest radiograph: a case report.

    PubMed

    Thota, Darshan; Zanoni, Steve; Mells, Cary; Auten, Jonathan D

    2015-01-01

    Acute aortic dissection is one of the most devastating and time-sensitive diagnosis to consider in young adults with chest pain. Military medicine is represented by a larger proportion of 18- to 50-year-old individuals than is seen in the general medical population. Although uncommon in frequency, younger patients are more likely to suffer from proximal, aortic dissections. Chest radiographs and D-Dimer assays are used frequently as risk stratification tools, but have significant limitations in these more proximal dissections. Because of the frequency and lethality of nonspecific presentations, there exists a need for a sensitive screening tool. This case report presents a 43-year-old male with a concerning history and physical examination for aortic dissection, but a normal portable chest radiograph and a normal D-Dimer assay. It highlights the importance of clinical acumen in developing and maintaining a high clinical index of suspicion based on a Bayesian pretest probability model. PMID:25562879

  11. Correlations of Radiographic Findings in Patients with Low Back Pain

    PubMed Central

    Igbinedion, B. O. E; Akhigbe, A.

    2011-01-01

    Background: Low back pain can cause severe debilitating pain that may lead to loss of productivity. The pain is usually non-specific and imaging request protocols varies. However, physicians may order lumbo-sacral x-ray in the initial radiologic assessment of the patient. This study aims to determine the frequency of occurrence of radiographic findings in patients reporting low back pain including the presence of osteophytes, spondylolisthesis and degenerative disc diseases and determine the relationship with patients’ features including age, sex, marital status, level of education, body mass index and other radiographic findings. Method: Patients who presented at our department for radiographic assessment of the lumbo-sacral spine were voluntarily recruited. Their radiographs were reviewed and questionnaire administered. Height and weight were measured. The radiographic findings were documented and data analysis using Chi square with significant level set at p < 0.05. Result: Lumbo-sacral x-rays of 337 patients were reviewed with more females than males, ratio 1:1.4. Osteophytes were demonstrable in 73.6%; spondylolisthesis, 13.4%; and disc degeneration, 28.2%. Disc degeneration correlated with age, educational status, osteophytosis, osteopenia and spondylolisthesis. Osteophytosis correlated with age, BMI and educational level. While spondylolisthesis correlated with educational level and sex. Conclusion: Osteophytosis was the commonest finding in patients presenting with LBP. Disc degeneration shows a strong association with osteophytosis and spondylolisthesis and it is reported to herald these changes. Radiography still shows some correlations between the findings in LBP and patients’ characteristics. PMID:21969104

  12. Automated characterization of perceptual quality of clinical chest radiographs: Validation and calibration to observer preference

    SciTech Connect

    Samei, Ehsan; Lin, Yuan; Choudhury, Kingshuk R.; Page McAdams, H.

    2014-11-01

    Purpose: The authors previously proposed an image-based technique [Y. Lin et al. Med. Phys. 39, 7019–7031 (2012)] to assess the perceptual quality of clinical chest radiographs. In this study, an observer study was designed and conducted to validate the output of the program against rankings by expert radiologists and to establish the ranges of the output values that reflect the acceptable image appearance so the program output can be used for image quality optimization and tracking. Methods: Using an IRB-approved protocol, 2500 clinical chest radiographs (PA/AP) were collected from our clinical operation. The images were processed through our perceptual quality assessment program to measure their appearance in terms of ten metrics of perceptual image quality: lung gray level, lung detail, lung noise, rib–lung contrast, rib sharpness, mediastinum detail, mediastinum noise, mediastinum alignment, subdiaphragm–lung contrast, and subdiaphragm area. From the results, for each targeted appearance attribute/metric, 18 images were selected such that the images presented a relatively constant appearance with respect to all metrics except the targeted one. The images were then incorporated into a graphical user interface, which displayed them into three panels of six in a random order. Using a DICOM calibrated diagnostic display workstation and under low ambient lighting conditions, each of five participating attending chest radiologists was tasked to spatially order the images based only on the targeted appearance attribute regardless of the other qualities. Once ordered, the observer also indicated the range of image appearances that he/she considered clinically acceptable. The observer data were analyzed in terms of the correlations between the observer and algorithmic rankings and interobserver variability. An observer-averaged acceptable image appearance was also statistically derived for each quality attribute based on the collected individual acceptable ranges

  13. Morphometric Comparison of Clavicle Outlines from 3D Bone Scans and 2D Chest Radiographs: A Short-listing Tool to Assist Radiographic Identification of Human Skeletons

    SciTech Connect

    Stephan, Carl N.; Amidan, Brett G.; Trease, Harold E.; Guyomarch, Pierre; Pulsipher, Trenton C.; Byrd, John E.

    2014-03-01

    This paper describes a computerized clavicle identification system, primarily designed to resolve the identities of unaccounted for US soldiers who fought in the Korean War. Elliptical Fourier analysis is used to quantify the clavicle outline shape from skeletons and postero-anterior antemortem chest radiographs to rank individuals in terms of metric distance. Similar to leading fingerprint identification systems, shortlists of the top matching candidates are extracted for subsequent human visual assessment. Two independent tests of the computerized system using 17 field-recovered skeletons and 409 chest radiographs demonstrate that true positive matches are captured within the top 5% of the sample 75% of the time. These results are outstanding given the eroded state of some field-recovered skeletons and the faintness of the 1950’s photoflurographs. These methods enhance the capability to resolve several hundred cold cases for which little circumstantial information exists and current DNA and dental record technologies cannot be applied.

  14. Morphometric comparison of clavicle outlines from 3D bone scans and 2D chest radiographs: a shortlisting tool to assist radiographic identification of human skeletons.

    PubMed

    Stephan, Carl N; Amidan, Brett; Trease, Harold; Guyomarc'h, Pierre; Pulsipher, Trenton; Byrd, John E

    2014-03-01

    This paper describes a computerized clavicle identification system primarily designed to resolve the identities of unaccounted-for U.S. soldiers who fought in the Korean War. Elliptical Fourier analysis is used to quantify the clavicle outline shape from skeletons and postero-anterior antemortem chest radiographs to rank individuals in terms of metric distance. Similar to leading fingerprint identification systems, shortlists of the top matching candidates are extracted for subsequent human visual assessment. Two independent tests of the computerized system using 17 field-recovered skeletons and 409 chest radiographs demonstrate that true-positive matches are captured within the top 5% of the sample 75% of the time. These results are outstanding given the eroded state of some field-recovered skeletons and the faintness of the 1950's photofluorographs. These methods enhance the capability to resolve several hundred cold cases for which little circumstantial information exists and current DNA and dental record technologies cannot be applied. PMID:24313347

  15. Use of a digitally reconstructed radiograph-based computer simulation for the optimisation of chest radiographic techniques for computed radiography imaging systems

    PubMed Central

    Moore, C S; Avery, G; Balcam, S; Needler, L; Swift, A; Beavis, A W; Saunderson, J R

    2012-01-01

    Objectives The purpose of this study was to derive an optimum radiographic technique for computed radiography (CR) chest imaging using a digitally reconstructed radiograph computer simulator. The simulator is capable of producing CR chest radiographs of adults with various tube potentials, receptor doses and scatter rejection. Methods Four experienced image evaluators graded images of average and obese adult patients at different potentials (average-sized, n=50; obese, n=20), receptor doses (n=10) and scatter rejection techniques (average-sized, n=20; obese, n=20). The quality of the images was evaluated using visually graded analysis. The influence of rib contrast was also assessed. Results For average-sized patients, image quality improved when tube potential was reduced compared with the reference (102 kVp). No scatter rejection was indicated. For obese patients, it has been shown that an antiscatter grid is indicated, and should be used in conjunction with as low a tube potential as possible (while allowing exposure times <20 ms). It is also possible to reduce receptor air kerma by 50% without adversely influencing image quality. Rib contrast did not interfere at any tube potential. Conclusions A virtual clinical trial has been performed with simulated chest CR images. Results indicate that low tube potentials (<102 kVp) are optimal for average and obese adults, the former acquired without scatter rejection, the latter with an anti-scatter grid. Lower receptor (and therefore patient doses) than those used clinically are possible while maintaining adequate image quality. PMID:22253349

  16. Are daily routine chest radiographs necessary after pulmonary surgery in adult patients?

    PubMed Central

    Reeb, Jeremie; Falcoz, Pierre-Emmanuel; Olland, Anne; Massard, Gilbert

    2013-01-01

    A best evidence topic was constructed according to a structured protocol. The question addressed was whether daily routine (DR) chest radiographs (CXRs) are necessary after pulmonary surgery in adult patients. Of the 66 papers found using a report search, seven presented the best evidence to answer the clinical question. Four of these seven studies specifically addressed post-cardiothoracic adult patients. Three of these seven studies addressed intensive care unit (ICU) patients and included post-cardiothoracic adult patients in well-designed studies. Six of these seven studies compared the DR CXRs strategy to the clinically indicated, on-demand (OD) CXRs strategy. Another study analysed the clinical impact of ceasing to perform the DR, postoperative, post-chest tubes removal CXRs. The authors, journal, date and country of publication, study type, group studied, relevant outcomes and results of these papers are given. We conclude that, on the whole, the seven studies are unanimously in favour of forgoing DR CXRs after lung resection and advocate OD CXRs. One study suggested that hypoxic patients could benefit from a DR CXRs strategy, while other studies failed to identify any subgroup for whom performing DR CXRs was beneficial. Indeed, DR CXRs, commonly taken after thoracic surgery, have poor diagnostic and therapeutic value. Eliminating them for adult patients having undergone thoracic surgery significantly decreases the number of CXRs per patient without increasing mortality rates, length of hospital stays (LOSs), readmission rates and adverse events. Hence, current evidence shows that DR CXRs could be forgone after lung resection because OD CXRs, recommended by clinical monitoring, have a better impact on management and have not been proved to negatively affect patient outcomes. Moreover, an OD CXRs strategy lowers the cost of care. Nevertheless, an OD CXRs strategy requires close clinical monitoring by experienced surgeons and dedicated intensivists. However

  17. The prevalence of chondrocalcinosis (CC) of the acromioclavicular (AC) joint on chest radiographs and correlation with calcium pyrophosphate dihydrate (CPPD) crystal deposition disease

    PubMed Central

    Carrera, Guillermo; Baynes, Keith; Mautz, Alan; DuBois, Melissa; Cerniglia, Ross; Ryan, Lawrence M.

    2016-01-01

    Digital imaging combined with picture archiving and communication system (PACS) access allows detailed image retrieval and magnification. Calcium pyrophosphate dihydrate (CPPD) crystals preferentially deposit in fibrocartilages, the cartilage of the acromioclavicular (AC) joint being one such structure. We sought to determine if examination of the AC joints on magnified PACS imaging of chest films would be useful in identifying chondrocalcinosis (CC). Retrospective radiographic readings and chart reviews involving 1,920 patients aged 50 or more who had routine outpatient chest radiographs over a 4-month period were performed. Knee radiographs were available for comparison in 489 patients. Medical records were reviewed to abstract demographics, chest film reports, and diagnoses. AC joint CC was identified in 1.1 % (21/1,920) of consecutive chest films. Patients with AC joint CC were 75 years of age versus 65.4 in those without CC (p<0.0002). Four hundred eighty-nine patients had knee films. Six of these patients had AC joint CC, and of these, five also had knee CC (83 %). Of the 483 without AC joint CC, 62 (12 %) had knee CC (p=0.002). Patients with AC joint CC were more likely to have a recorded history of CPPD crystal deposition disease than those without AC joint CC (14 versus 1 %, p=0.0017). The prevalence of AC joint CC increases with age and is associated with knee CC. A finding of AC joint CC should heighten suspicion of pseudogout or secondary osteoarthritis in appropriate clinical settings and, in a young patient, should alert the clinician to the possibility of an associated metabolic condition. PMID:23609408

  18. Application of phase congruency for discriminating some lung diseases using chest radiograph.

    PubMed

    Rijal, Omar Mohd; Ebrahimian, Hossein; Noor, Norliza Mohd; Hussin, Amran; Yunus, Ashari; Mahayiddin, Aziah Ahmad

    2015-01-01

    A novel procedure using phase congruency is proposed for discriminating some lung disease using chest radiograph. Phase congruency provides information about transitions between adjacent pixels. Abrupt changes of phase congruency values between pixels may suggest a possible boundary or another feature that may be used for discrimination. This property of phase congruency may have potential for deciding between disease present and disease absent where the regions of infection on the images have no obvious shape, size, or configuration. Five texture measures calculated from phase congruency and Gabor were shown to be normally distributed. This gave good indicators of discrimination errors in the form of the probability of Type I Error (δ) and the probability of Type II Error (β). However, since 1 -  δ is the true positive fraction (TPF) and β is the false positive fraction (FPF), an ROC analysis was used to decide on the choice of texture measures. Given that features are normally distributed, for the discrimination between disease present and disease absent, energy, contrast, and homogeneity from phase congruency gave better results compared to those using Gabor. Similarly, for the more difficult problem of discriminating lobar pneumonia and lung cancer, entropy and homogeneity from phase congruency gave better results relative to Gabor. PMID:25918551

  19. Pattern-histogram-based temporal change detection using personal chest radiographs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ugurlu, Yucel; Obi, Takashi; Hasegawa, Akira; Yamaguchi, Masahiro; Ohyama, Nagaaki

    1999-05-01

    An accurate and reliable detection of temporal changes from a pair of images has considerable interest in the medical science. Traditional registration and subtraction techniques can be applied to extract temporal differences when,the object is rigid or corresponding points are obvious. However, in radiological imaging, loss of the depth information, the elasticity of object, the absence of clearly defined landmarks and three-dimensional positioning differences constraint the performance of conventional registration techniques. In this paper, we propose a new method in order to detect interval changes accurately without using an image registration technique. The method is based on construction of so-called pattern histogram and comparison procedure. The pattern histogram is a graphic representation of the frequency counts of all allowable patterns in the multi-dimensional pattern vector space. K-means algorithm is employed to partition pattern vector space successively. Any differences in the pattern histograms imply that different patterns are involved in the scenes. In our experiment, a pair of chest radiographs of pneumoconiosis is employed and the changing histogram bins are visualized on both of the images. We found that the method can be used as an alternative way of temporal change detection, particularly when the precise image registration is not available.

  20. Incidental radiographic finding of the concealed art of susuk.

    PubMed

    Devang Divakar, Darshan; Mavinapalla, Seema; Al Kheraif, Abdulaziz Abdullah; Ramakrishnaiah, Ravikumar; Abd Rahim, Muhammad Furqon Bin; Khan, Aftab Ahmed

    2016-07-01

    Susuk, or charm needles, are small, metallic needles inserted under the skin, considered to enhance beauty, health and luck. This hidden secret of inserting susuk is a traditional superstitious ritual, widely practiced among women of Southeast Asia. Here, we present an interesting case of incidental radiographic finding of the concealed art of susuk, which was exposed on a panoramic radiograph taken on a routine basis as a part of diagnostic work up at our centre. An orthopantomogram revealed bilateral metallic foreign bodies in the maxillo-facial region. Anamnestic data affirmed the practice of the body art of susuk. The charm needles were present in the orofacial region without the patient experiencing any pathological signs or symptoms. PMID:26271077

  1. The value of radiographic findings for the progression of pandemic 2009 influenza A/H1N1 virus infection

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Most illnesses caused by pandemic influenza A (H1N1) pdm09 virus (A/H1N1) infection are acute and self-limiting among children. However, in some children, disease progression is rapid and may require hospitalization and transfer to a pediatric intensive care unit (PICU). We investigated factors associated with rapid disease progression among children admitted to hospital for A/H1N1 infection, particularly findings on initial chest radiographs. Methods In this retrospective study, we investigated the records of children who had received a laboratory or clinical diagnosis of A/H1N1 infection and were admitted to the largest children’s hospital in Japan between May 2009 and March 2010. The medical records were reviewed for age, underlying diseases, vital signs on admission, initial chest radiographic findings, and clinical outcomes. According to chest radiographic findings, patients were classified into 4 groups, as follows: [1] normal (n = 46), [2] hilar and/or peribronchial markings alone (n = 64), [3] consolidation (n = 64), and [4] other findings (n = 29). Factors associated with clinical outcomes were analyzed using logistic regression. Results Two hundreds and three patients (median 6.8 years) were enrolled in this study. Fifteen percent (31/203) of patients were admitted to PICU. Among 31 patients, 39% (12/31) of patients required mechanical ventilation (MV). When the initial chest radiographic findings were compared between patients with consolidation (n = 64) and those without consolidation (n = 139), a higher percentage of patients with consolidation were admitted to PICU (29.7% vs.8.6%, P < 0.001) and required MV (17.2% vs. 0.7%, P < 0.001). These findings remain significant when the data were analyzed with the logistic regression (P < 0.001, P < 0.001, respectively). Conclusions Consolidation on initial chest radiographs was the most significant factor to predict clinical course of hospitalized children with the 2009 A/H1N1 infection. PMID

  2. Radiation risk assessment in neonatal radiographic examinations of the chest and abdomen: a clinical and Monte Carlo dosimetry study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Makri, T.; Yakoumakis, E.; Papadopoulou, D.; Gialousis, G.; Theodoropoulos, V.; Sandilos, P.; Georgiou, E.

    2006-10-01

    Seeking to assess the radiation risk associated with radiological examinations in neonatal intensive care units, thermo-luminescence dosimetry was used for the measurement of entrance surface dose (ESD) in 44 AP chest and 28 AP combined chest-abdominal exposures of a sample of 60 neonates. The mean values of ESD were found to be equal to 44 ± 16 µGy and 43 ± 19 µGy, respectively. The MCNP-4C2 code with a mathematical phantom simulating a neonate and appropriate x-ray energy spectra were employed for the simulation of the AP chest and AP combined chest-abdominal exposures. Equivalent organ dose per unit ESD and energy imparted per unit ESD calculations are presented in tabular form. Combined with ESD measurements, these calculations yield an effective dose of 10.2 ± 3.7 µSv, regardless of sex, and an imparted energy of 18.5 ± 6.7 µJ for the chest radiograph. The corresponding results for the combined chest-abdominal examination are 14.7 ± 7.6 µSv (males)/17.2 ± 7.6 µSv (females) and 29.7 ± 13.2 µJ. The calculated total risk per radiograph was low, ranging between 1.7 and 2.9 per million neonates, per film, and being slightly higher for females. Results of this study are in good agreement with previous studies, especially in view of the diversity met in the calculation methods.

  3. Radiation risk assessment in neonatal radiographic examinations of the chest and abdomen: a clinical and Monte Carlo dosimetry study.

    PubMed

    Makri, T; Yakoumakis, E; Papadopoulou, D; Gialousis, G; Theodoropoulos, V; Sandilos, P; Georgiou, E

    2006-10-01

    Seeking to assess the radiation risk associated with radiological examinations in neonatal intensive care units, thermo-luminescence dosimetry was used for the measurement of entrance surface dose (ESD) in 44 AP chest and 28 AP combined chest-abdominal exposures of a sample of 60 neonates. The mean values of ESD were found to be equal to 44 +/- 16 microGy and 43 +/- 19 microGy, respectively. The MCNP-4C2 code with a mathematical phantom simulating a neonate and appropriate x-ray energy spectra were employed for the simulation of the AP chest and AP combined chest-abdominal exposures. Equivalent organ dose per unit ESD and energy imparted per unit ESD calculations are presented in tabular form. Combined with ESD measurements, these calculations yield an effective dose of 10.2 +/- 3.7 microSv, regardless of sex, and an imparted energy of 18.5 +/- 6.7 microJ for the chest radiograph. The corresponding results for the combined chest-abdominal examination are 14.7 +/- 7.6 microSv (males)/17.2 +/- 7.6 microSv (females) and 29.7 +/- 13.2 microJ. The calculated total risk per radiograph was low, ranging between 1.7 and 2.9 per million neonates, per film, and being slightly higher for females. Results of this study are in good agreement with previous studies, especially in view of the diversity met in the calculation methods. PMID:16985285

  4. The clinical value of daily routine chest radiographs in a mixed medical–surgical intensive care unit is low

    PubMed Central

    Graat, Marleen E; Choi, Goda; Wolthuis, Esther K; Korevaar, Johanna C; Spronk, Peter E; Stoker, Jaap; Vroom, Margreeth B; Schultz, Marcus J

    2006-01-01

    Introduction The clinical value of daily routine chest radiographs (CXRs) in critically ill patients is unknown. We conducted this study to evaluate how frequently unexpected predefined major abnormalities are identified with daily routine CXRs, and how often these findings lead to a change in care for intensive care unit (ICU) patients. Method This was a prospective observational study conducted in a 28-bed, mixed medical–surgical ICU of a university hospital. Results Over a 5-month period, 2,457 daily routine CXRs were done in 754 consecutive ICU patients. The majority of these CXRs did not reveal any new predefined major finding. In only 5.8% of daily routine CXRs (14.3% of patients) was one or more new and unexpected abnormality encountered, including large atelectases (24 times in 20 patients), large infiltrates (23 in 22), severe pulmonary congestion (29 in 25), severe pleural effusion (13 in 13), pneumothorax/pneumomediastinum (14 in 13), and malposition of the orotracheal tube (32 in 26). Fewer than half of the CXRs with a new and unexpected finding were ultimately clinically relevant; in only 2.2% of all daily routine CXRs (6.4% of patients) did these radiologic abnormalities result in a change to therapy. Subgroup analysis revealed no differences between medical and surgical patients with regard to the incidence of new and unexpected findings on daily routine CXRs and the effect of new and unexpected CXR findings on daily care. Conclusion In the ICU, daily routine CXRs seldom reveal unexpected, clinically relevant abnormalities, and they rarely prompt action. We propose that this diagnostic examination be abandoned in ICU patients. PMID:16420655

  5. Elimination of routine chest radiographs following off-pump coronary artery bypass surgery: A randomized controlled trial study

    PubMed Central

    Forouzannia, Seyed Khalil; Sarvi, Ali; Sarebanhassanabadi, Mohammadtaghi; Nafisi-Moghadam, Reza

    2015-01-01

    Background: Post cardiac surgery routine chest radiographs (CXRs), ordered without any clinical and laboratory indications, is a standard obligatory practice in many cardiothoracic centers. Routine CXRs incur cost, manpower, and radiation. The objective of this study is to assess early outcome in off-pump coronary artery bypass (OPCAB) patients with postoperative routine versus clinically indicated CXR protocols. Materials and Methods: This study is a randomized clinical trial conducted on 231 OPCAB candidates in Afshar Cardiac Center, Yazd, Iran. Patients were categorized into two groups. All 118 patients in group A had routine postoperative CXRs. The 113 patients in group B were selectively exposed to CXR only on clinical indications. All patients were postoperatively followed up for 30 days. Data gathered from both groups were statistically analyzed. Results: Routine postoperative CXRs obtained in 118 OPCAB group A candidates showed abnormal findings in 20 patients that did not require new intervention. One month follow-up of these patients showed no complications. In 113 OPCAB candidates of group B, 7 on-demand CXRs were obtained on clinical evaluation that required added intervention. In a 1-month follow-up of this group, five patients presented with symptomatic complaints. On re-examination, none needed readmission, intervention, or paraclinical evaluation. No complications were observed due to CXR elimination. Conclusion: The study suggests that postoperative CXR selected on clinical grounds in place of routine CXR does not change early postoperative outcome of OPCAB procedure. PMID:26682202

  6. Computerized detection of vertebral compression fractures on lateral chest radiographs: Preliminary results with a tool for early detection of osteoporosis

    SciTech Connect

    Kasai, Satoshi; Li Feng; Shiraishi, Junji; Li Qiang; Doi, Kunio

    2006-12-15

    Vertebral fracture (or vertebral deformity) is a very common outcome of osteoporosis, which is one of the major public health concerns in the world. Early detection of vertebral fractures is important because timely pharmacologic intervention can reduce the risk of subsequent additional fractures. Chest radiographs are used routinely for detection of lung and heart diseases, and vertebral fractures can be visible on lateral chest radiographs. However, investigators noted that about 50% of vertebral fractures visible on lateral chest radiographs were underdiagnosed or under-reported, even when the fractures were severe. Therefore, our goal was to develop a computerized method for detection of vertebral fractures on lateral chest radiographs in order to assist radiologists' image interpretation and thus allow the early diagnosis of osteoporosis. The cases used in this study were 20 patients with severe vertebral fractures and 118 patients without fractures, as confirmed by the consensus of two radiologists. Radiologists identified the locations of fractured vertebrae, and they provided morphometric data on the vertebral shape for evaluation of the accuracy of detecting vertebral end plates by computer. In our computerized method, a curved search area, which included a number of vertebral end plates, was first extracted automatically, and was straightened so that vertebral end plates became oriented horizontally. Edge candidates were enhanced by use of a horizontal line-enhancement filter in the straightened image, and a multiple thresholding technique, followed by feature analysis, was used for identification of the vertebral end plates. The height of each vertebra was determined from locations of identified vertebral end plates, and fractured vertebrae were detected by comparison of the measured vertebral height with the expected height. The sensitivity of our computerized method for detection of fracture cases was 95% (19/20), with 1.03 (139/135) false

  7. [Radiographic and pathological findings in 4 patients with pulmonary cryptococcosis].

    PubMed

    Hidaka, T; Ichinose, I; Tamura, K

    1997-01-01

    We reviewed the records of 4 patients with pathologically diagnosed pulmonary cryptococcosis to determine whether there was any relationship between radiographic and pathological findings. The underlying disease were diabetes mellitus (patient 1), rheumatoid arthritis treated with glucocorticoids (patient 2), and adultonset T cell leukemia (patients 3 and 4). All radiographs showed multiple nodules, and patchy and localized infiltrates, which progressed to diffuse interstitial infiltration. According to Mark's classification, the pathological findings in patients 1 and 2 showed granulomatous pneumonia, those in patient 3 showed histiocytic pneumonia, and patient 4 had intercapillary cryptococci with no inflammatory response. The granuloma appeared larger in patient 1 than in patient 2. This concurred with the clinical findings, i.e. large granulomas formed in immunocompetent patients, and diffuse pulmonary infiltrates developed in those whose immune systems had been compromised. When a granuloma formed, roentgenograms showed a well defined nodular shadow, with some nodules developing in the cavity. When granuloma formation became unclear, roentgenograms tended to show localized-to-diffuse infiltration, or interstitial shadows. PMID:9071170

  8. Vascular Pedicle Width on Chest Radiograph as a Measure of Volume Overload: Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Hao; Shi, Runhua; Mahler, Simon; Gaspard, Joseph; Gorchynski, Julie; D'Etienne, James; Arnold, Thomas

    2011-01-01

    Introduction Vascular pedicle width (VPW), a measurement obtained from a chest radiograph (CR), is thought to be an indicator of circulating blood volume. To date there are only a handful of studies that demonstrate a correlation between high VPW and volume overload, each utilizing different VPW values and CR techniques. Our objective was to determine a mean VPW measurement from erect and supine CRs and to determine whether VPW correlates with volume overload. Methods MEDLINE database, Web of Science, and the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials were searched electronically for relevant articles. References from the original and review publications selected electronically were manually searched for additional relevant articles. Two investigators independently reviewed relevant articles for inclusion criteria and data extraction. Mean VPW measurements from both supine and erect CRs and their correlation with volume overload were calculated. Results Data from 8 studies with a total of 363 subjects were included, resulting in mean VPW measurements of 71 mm (95% confidence interval [CI] 64.9–77.3) and 62 mm (95% CI 49.3–75.1) for supine and erect CRs, respectively. The correlation coefficients for volume overload and VPW were 0.81 (95% CI 0.74–0.86) for both CR techniques and 0.81 (95% CI 0.72–0.87) for supine CR and 0.80 (95% CI 0.69–0.87) for erect CR, respectively. Conclusion There is a clinical and statistical correlation between VPW and volume overload. VPW may be used to evaluate the volume status of a patient regardless of the CR technique used. PMID:22224132

  9. Rib suppression in chest radiographs to improve classification of textural abnormalities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hogeweg, Laurens E.; Mol, Christian; de Jong, Pim A.; van Ginneken, Bram

    2010-03-01

    The computer aided diagnosis (CAD) of abnormalities on chest radiographs is difficult due to the presence of overlapping normal anatomy. Suppression of the normal anatomy is expected to improve performance of a CAD system, but such a method has not yet been applied to the computer detection of interstitial abnormalities such as occur in tuberculosis (TB). The aim of this research is to evaluate the effect of rib suppression on a CAD system for TB. Profiles of pixel intensities sampled perpendicular to segmented ribs were used to create a local PCA-based shape model of the rib. The model was normalized to the local background intensity and corrected for gradients perpendicular to the rib. Subsequently rib suppressed images were created by subtracting the models for each rib from the original image. The effect of rib suppression was evaluated using a CAD system for TB detection. Small square image patches were sampled randomly from 15 normal and 35 TB-affected images containing textural abnormalities. Abnormalities were outlined by a radiologist and were given a subtlety rating from 1 to 5. Features based on moments of intensity distributions of Gaussian derivative filtered images were extracted. A supervised learning approach was used to discriminate between normal and diseased image patches. The use of rib suppressed images increased the overall performance of the system, as measured by the area under the receiver operator characteristic (ROC) curve, from 0.75 to 0.78. For the more subtly rated patches (rated 1-3) the performance increased from 0.62 to 0.70.

  10. Dentomaxillofacial manifestations of Gaucher's disease: preliminary clinical and radiographic findings

    PubMed Central

    Nobre, RM; Ribeiro, ALR; Alves-Junior, SM; Tuji, FM; Rodrigues Pinheiro, M das G; Pinheiro, LR; Pinheiro, JJV

    2012-01-01

    Objectives A wide variety of manifestations is presented in patients with Gaucher's disease (GD), including bone, haematology and visceral disturbances. This study was conducted to ascertain the main maxillofacial abnormalities by means of clinical survey, panoramic and cone beam CT (CBCT); to compare the patient's group with an age–sex matched control group; and to correlate clinical and radiological data. Methods Ten patients previously diagnosed with GD were submitted to clinical and radiological surveys (CBCT and panoramic radiographs). The examination consisted of anamnesis, extra- and intraoral examinations and analyses of each patient's records. Imaging data were collected from the point of view of 3 observers, and the results compared with a healthy group (20 individuals) by means of statistical analysis (Fisher's exact test). Results Gaucher patients had significantly more manifestations than otherwise healthy carriers. The most prevalent findings were enlarged marrow spaces, generalized osteopenia and effacement of jaw structures (mandibular canal, lamina dura and mental foramen). Here we describe a case in which thickening of the maxillary sinus mucosa was observed on CBCT rather than opacification of the sinus as seen on panoramic radiographs. Pathological fractures, root resorption and delay on tooth eruption were not observed. Conclusions A poor relationship could be observed between clinical and radiological data. Patients showed important bone manifestations, which require careful diagnostic and surgical planning whenever necessary. Although panoramic radiographs have shown significant differences, CBCT is more effective in pointing out differences between patients and a control group, thus showing it as an important tool for evaluation of Gaucher patients. PMID:22988312

  11. [A study on chest radiographs in medical check-ups for over-staying foreigners].

    PubMed

    Yamamura, J

    2001-01-01

    During the past nine years from 1991 to 1999, Minatomachi Medical Center and other organizations have provided free medical check-ups for foreigners in Kanagawa, Tokyo and Chiba. Eighty-five percent of the total of the 2370 examined were over-staying foreigners who were not covered by national health insurance system. The ratio of male to female was two to one and the most of them were in the twenties and thirties. As for their ethnic origins from forty-three countries, the Filipinos were the largest numbers, followed by Koreans, Iranians, Bangladeshi, and Chinese/Taiwanese. As a result of chest radiographs, 82% were normal, 8.3% mostly normal, 9.6% tuberculosis shadow (TBS) including active, non active and previous, 0.09% suspected pneumonia, 0.05% suspected cardiac disease, and 0.05% suspected sarcoidosis. The TBS and active tuberculosis (ATB) rates of all examined were 9.6% and 0.69% respectively. There was no significant difference in each TBS and ATB rate between the two sexes. Seen from the age group, it was found that the more aged they were, the higher the TBS and the ATB rates were. The TBS and the ATB rates were 24.6% and 2.73% in the Koreans, 10.7% and 0% in the Chinese/Taiwanese, 10.2% and 0.65% in the Filipinos, 11.3% and 1.44% in the South-East Asians, 6.3% and 0.25% in the South Asians, 2.3% and 0% in the Iranians, 3.7% and 0% in the sub-Saharan Africans, 8.5% and 0.61% in the Latin Americans, and 0% and 0% in the Europeans/North Americans. Based on a presumed ATB rate of 0.75%, approximately two thousand cases with ATB could be calculated to exist among the estimated 270,000 over-staying foreigners. It is, therefore, important to give them more frequent medical check-ups for early detection of latent cases with ATB. PMID:11211779

  12. Validation of an image-based technique to assess the perceptual quality of clinical chest radiographs with an observer study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Yuan; Choudhury, Kingshuk R.; McAdams, H. Page; Foos, David H.; Samei, Ehsan

    2014-03-01

    We previously proposed a novel image-based quality assessment technique1 to assess the perceptual quality of clinical chest radiographs. In this paper, an observer study was designed and conducted to systematically validate this technique. Ten metrics were involved in the observer study, i.e., lung grey level, lung detail, lung noise, riblung contrast, rib sharpness, mediastinum detail, mediastinum noise, mediastinum alignment, subdiaphragm-lung contrast, and subdiaphragm area. For each metric, three tasks were successively presented to the observers. In each task, six ROI images were randomly presented in a row and observers were asked to rank the images only based on a designated quality and disregard the other qualities. A range slider on the top of the images was used for observers to indicate the acceptable range based on the corresponding perceptual attribute. Five boardcertificated radiologists from Duke participated in this observer study on a DICOM calibrated diagnostic display workstation and under low ambient lighting conditions. The observer data were analyzed in terms of the correlations between the observer ranking orders and the algorithmic ranking orders. Based on the collected acceptable ranges, quality consistency ranges were statistically derived. The observer study showed that, for each metric, the averaged ranking orders of the participated observers were strongly correlated with the algorithmic orders. For the lung grey level, the observer ranking orders completely accorded with the algorithmic ranking orders. The quality consistency ranges derived from this observer study were close to these derived from our previous study. The observer study indicates that the proposed image-based quality assessment technique provides a robust reflection of the perceptual image quality of the clinical chest radiographs. The derived quality consistency ranges can be used to automatically predict the acceptability of a clinical chest radiograph.

  13. The Effect Of Pixel Size On The Detection Rate Of Early Pulmonary Sarcoidosis In Digital Chest Radiographic Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    MacMahon, Heber; Vyborny, Carl; Powell, Gregory; Doi, Kunio; Metz, Charles E.

    1984-08-01

    In digital radiography the pixel size used determines the potential spatial resolution of the system. The need for spatial resolution varies depending on the subject matter imaged. In many areas, including the chest, the minimum spatial resolution requirements have not been determined. Sarcoidosis is a disease which frequently causes subtle interstitial infiltrates in the lungs. As the initial step in an investigation designed to determine the minimum pixel size required in digital chest radiographic systems, we have studied 1 mm pixel digitized images on patients with early pulmonary sarcoidosis. The results of this preliminary study suggest that neither mild interstitial pulmonary infiltrates nor other abnormalities such as pneumothoraces may be detected reliably with 1 mm pixel digital images.

  14. Pseudolesion of the chest. A conglomerate shadow on the lateral radiograph.

    PubMed

    Stark, P; Lester, R G; Greene, R E

    1985-04-01

    A pseudolesion encountered in the lateral chest roentgenogram of normal patients is described. This concatenation of shadows can produce an opacity which projects over the distal aortic arch and can simulate a mass or pneumonia. This pseudolesion can be found in 4 to 5 percent of normal lateral chest films and is formed by superimposition of normal upper lobe vascular structures. PMID:3979146

  15. Computer-aided detection of interstitial abnormalities in chest radiographs using a reference standard based on computed tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Arzhaeva, Yulia; Prokop, Mathias; Tax, David M. J.; De Jong, Pim A.; Schaefer-Prokop, Cornelia M.; Ginneken, Bram van

    2007-12-15

    A computer-aided detection (CAD) system is presented for the localization of interstitial lesions in chest radiographs. The system analyzes the complete lung fields using a two-class supervised pattern classification approach to distinguish between normal texture and texture affected by interstitial lung disease. Analysis is done pixel-wise and produces a probability map for an image where each pixel in the lung fields is assigned a probability of being abnormal. Interstitial lesions are often subtle and ill defined on x-rays and hence difficult to detect, even for expert radiologists. Therefore a new, semiautomatic method is proposed for setting a reference standard for training and evaluating the CAD system. The proposed method employs the fact that interstitial lesions are more distinct on a computed tomography (CT) scan than on a radiograph. Lesion outlines, manually drawn on coronal slices of a CT scan of the same patient, are automatically transformed to corresponding outlines on the chest x-ray, using manually indicated correspondences for a small set of anatomical landmarks. For the texture analysis, local structures are described by means of the multiscale Gaussian filter bank. The system performance is evaluated with ROC analysis on a database of digital chest radiographs containing 44 abnormal and 8 normal cases. The best performance is achieved for the linear discriminant and support vector machine classifiers, with an area under the ROC curve (A{sub z}) of 0.78. Separate ROC curves are built for classification of abnormalities of different degrees of subtlety versus normal class. Here the best performance in terms of A{sub z} is 0.90 for differentiation between obviously abnormal and normal pixels. The system is compared with two human observers, an expert chest radiologist and a chest radiologist in training, on evaluation of regions. Each lung field is divided in four regions, and the reference standard and the probability maps are converted into

  16. Synchronization of radiograph film exposure with the inspiratory pause. Effect on the appearance of bedside chest radiographs in mechanically ventilated patients.

    PubMed

    Langevin, P B; Hellein, V; Harms, S M; Tharp, W K; Cheung-Seekit, C; Lampotang, S

    1999-12-01

    The appearance of portable chest radiographs (CXRs) may be affected by changes in ventilation, particularly when patients are mechanically ventilated. Synchronization of the CXR with the ventilatory cycle should limit the influence of respiratory variation on the appearance of the CXR. This study evaluates the effect of synchronizing the CXR film exposure with ventilation on the appearance of the radiograph. Twenty-five patients who remained intubated postoperatively, were mechanically ventilated, and required a CXR were enrolled in this triple-blind, randomized prospective study. Each patient received one radiograph using conventional techniques and another using the interface. The sequence of the two films was randomized, and the two films were taken on the same patient within a few minutes of each other. Hence, each patient served as his own control and the position of the patient, source-film distance, intensity (Kvp), and duration of the exposure (mAs) were identical for the two films. Five board-certified radiologists were then asked to compare paired films for clarity of lines and tubes, definition of the pulmonary vasculature, visibility of the mediastinum, definition of the diaphragm, and degree of lung inflation. Radiologists were also asked to choose which films they preferred. A majority of board certified radiologists preferred CXRs taken with the interface in 21 of 25 patients (p < 0.0001). Furthermore, four of the five criteria evaluated were improved (p < 0.05) on synchronized CXRs. Synchronization of the bedside CXR with the end of inspiration ensures that they are always obtained at maximal inflation, which improves the appearance of a majority of radiographs by at least one of five criteria. PMID:10588630

  17. Integration of temporal subtraction and nodule detection system for digital chest radiographs into picture archiving and communication system (PACS): four-year experience.

    PubMed

    Sakai, Shuji; Yabuuchi, Hidetake; Matsuo, Yoshio; Okafuji, Takashi; Kamitani, Takeshi; Honda, Hiroshi; Yamamoto, Keiji; Fujiwara, Keiichi; Sugiyama, Naoki; Doi, Kunio

    2008-03-01

    Since May 2002, temporal subtraction and nodule detection systems for digital chest radiographs have been integrated into our hospital's picture archiving and communication systems (PACS). Image data of digital chest radiographs were stored in PACS with the digital image and communication in medicine (DICOM) protocol. Temporal subtraction and nodule detection images were produced automatically in an exclusive server and delivered with current and previous images to the work stations. The problems that we faced and the solutions that we arrived at were analyzed. We encountered four major problems. The first problem, as a result of the storage of the original images' data with the upside-down, reverse, or lying-down positioning on portable chest radiographs, was solved by postponing the original data storage for 30 min. The second problem, the variable matrix sizes of chest radiographs obtained with flat-panel detectors (FPDs), was solved by improving the computer algorithm to produce consistent temporal subtraction images. The third problem, the production of temporal subtraction images of low quality, could not be solved fundamentally when the original images were obtained with different modalities. The fourth problem, an excessive false-positive rate on the nodule detection system, was solved by adjusting this system to chest radiographs obtained in our hospital. Integration of the temporal subtraction and nodule detection system into our hospital's PACS was customized successfully; this experience may be helpful to other hospitals. PMID:17333415

  18. Comparison of gated radionuclide scans and chest radiographs. Assessment of left ventricular impairment in patients with coronary disease.

    PubMed

    Bianco, J A; Reinke, D B; Makey, D G; Shafer, R B

    1980-03-01

    Diagnostic efficacy of gated cardiac blood pool imaging was studied in 41 consecutive patients with LV ejection fractions (LVEF) less than or equal to 0.50. Eighty percent of patients were receiving therapy for LV failure at the time of the study. All patients had documented coronary-artery disease (CAD). Chest x-ray films were interpreted blindly by a senior radiologist. Cardiothoracic ratio of less than or equal to 0.50 was recorded as normal. Radionuclide assessment of LV function contributes importantly to the diagnostic and screening value of chest x-ray films. Patients with coronary disease and clinical evidence of heart failure should have radioisotopic studies even if chest x-ray film findings are normal. In patients with coronary artery disease and enlarged LV on chest films, radionuclide study of left ventricular performance aids in defining LV impairment, and in the prognostication of subsequent clinical course. PMID:6444573

  19. Using Standardized Interpretation of Chest Radiographs to Identify Adults with Bacterial Pneumonia—Guatemala, 2007–2012

    PubMed Central

    Wortham, Jonathan M.; Gray, Jennifer; Verani, Jennifer; Contreras, Carmen Lucia; Bernart, Chris; Moscoso, Fabiola; Moir, Juan Carlos; Reyes Marroquin, Emma Lissette; Castellan, Rigoberto; Arvelo, Wences; Lindblade, Kim; McCracken, John P.

    2015-01-01

    Background Bacterial pneumonia is a leading cause of illness and death worldwide, but quantifying its burden is difficult due to insensitive diagnostics. Although World Health Organization (WHO) protocol standardizes pediatric chest radiograph (CXR) interpretation for epidemiologic studies of bacterial pneumonia, its validity in adults is unknown. Methods Patients (age ≥15 years) admitted with respiratory infections to two Guatemalan hospitals between November 2007 and March 2012 had urine and nasopharyngeal/oropharyngeal (NP/OP) swabs collected; blood cultures and CXR were also performed at physician clinical discretion. ‘Any bacterial infection’ was defined as a positive urine pneumococcal antigen test, isolation of a bacterial pneumonia pathogen from blood culture, or detection of an atypical bacterial pathogen by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) of nasopharyngeal/oropharyngeal (NP/OP) specimens. ‘Viral infection’ was defined as detection of viral pathogens by PCR of NP/OP specimens. CXRs were interpreted according to the WHO protocol as having ‘endpoint consolidation’, ‘other infiltrate’, or ‘normal’ findings. We examined associations between bacterial and viral infections and endpoint consolidation. Findings Urine antigen and/or blood culture results were available for 721 patients with CXR interpretations; of these, 385 (53%) had endpoint consolidation and 253 (35%) had other infiltrate. Any bacterial infection was detected in 119 (17%) patients, including 106 (89%) pneumococcal infections. Any bacterial infection (Diagnostic Odds Ratio [DOR] = 2.9; 95% confidence Interval (CI): 1.3–7.9) and pneumococcal infection (DOR = 3.4; 95% CI: 1.5–10.0) were associated with ‘endpoint consolidation’, but not ‘other infiltrate’ (DOR = 1.7; 95% CI: 0.7–4.9, and 1.7; 95% CI: 0.7–4.9 respectively). Viral infection was not significantly associated with ‘endpoint consolidation’, ‘other infiltrate,’ or ‘normal’ findings

  20. Radiographer.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ohio State Univ., Columbus. Center on Education and Training for Employment.

    This document, which is designed for use in developing a tech prep competency profile for the occupation of radiographer, lists technical competencies and competency builders for 18 units pertinent to the health technologies cluster in general as well as those specific to the occupation of radiographer. The following skill areas are covered in the…

  1. Radiographic evaluation of the patient with chest pain of suspected myocardial origin

    SciTech Connect

    Green, C.E.; Satler, L.F.; Elliott, L.P.

    1984-11-01

    The evaluation of the patient with suspected angina pectoris is discussed and an approach presented which makes use of radiologic tests in conjunction with exercise testing to quickly and efficiently determine the likelihood and severity of coronary artery disease. The relative merits and limitations of chest radiography, cardiac fluoroscopy, nuclear medicine, and coronary arteriography are discussed.

  2. Artifacts in chest radiographs with a third-generation computed radiography system.

    PubMed

    Volpe, J P; Storto, M L; Andriole, K P; Gamsu, G

    1996-03-01

    Photostimulable phosphor computed radiography (CR) is a developing and increasingly widespread technology. The purpose of this pictorial essay is to familiarize readers with the appearance and cause of image artifacts that can occur in a third-generation computed radiographic system. Artifacts are described that relate to imaging plates, image readers, image processing, and film processing. PMID:8623644

  3. 42 CFR 37.42 - Chest radiograph specifications-digital radiography systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... one, the facility must provide a clean gown. Facilities must be heated to a comfortable temperature... resolution, modulation transfer function (MTF), image signal-to-noise and detective quantum efficiency must... aligned to the grid; (10) Radiographs must not be made when the environmental temperatures and humidity...

  4. Assessment of congestive heart failure in chest radiographs. Observer performance with two common film-screen systems.

    PubMed

    Henriksson, L; Sundin, A; Smedby, O; Albrektsson, P

    1990-09-01

    The effect of observer variations and film-screen quality on the diagnosis of congestive heart failure based on chest radiographs was studied in 27 patients. For each patient, two films were exposed, one with the Kodak Lanex Medium system and one with the Agfa MR 400 system. The films were presented to three observers who assessed the presence of congestive heart failure on a three-graded scale. The results showed no significant difference between the two systems but large systematic differences between the observers. There were also differences between the two ratings by the same observer that could not be explained by the film-screen factor. It is concluded that the choice between these two systems is of little importance in view of the interobserver and intraobserver variability that can exist within the same department. PMID:2261292

  5. New finding in the radiographic diagnosis of Achilles tendon rupture

    SciTech Connect

    Newmark, H.; Mellon, W.S. Jr.; Malhotra, A.K.; Olken, S.M.; Halls, J.

    1982-06-01

    The authors describe a new radiographic sign of rupture of the Achilles tendon system. It is a fracture, with separation through an osteophyte at the insertion of this tendon. Previously reported signs are also discussed as well as the present case report.

  6. Evaluation of dental panoramic radiographic findings in edentulous jaws: A retrospective study of 743 patients "Radiographic features in edentulous jaws"

    PubMed Central

    Kose, Taha Emre; Cakir Karabas, Hulya; Ozcan, Ilknur

    2015-01-01

    PURPOSE The aim of this study was to determine the frequency of significant panoramic radiographic findings and eventual treatment requirements before conventional or implant supported prosthetic treatment in asymptomatic edentulous patients. MATERIALS AND METHODS A total of 743 asymptomatic edentulous patients were retrospectively evaluated using a digital panoramic system. We analyzed the radiographic findings, including impacted teeth, retained root fragments, foreign bodies, severe atrophy of the posterior maxillary alveolar bone, mucous retention cysts, soft tissue calcifications and radiopaque-radiolucent conditions. RESULTS Four-hundred-eighty-seven (65.6%) patients had no radiographic finding. A total of 331 radiographic findings were detected in 256 (34%) patients. In 52.9% (n=175) of these conditions, surgical treatment was required before application of implant-supported fixed prosthesis. However, before application of conventional removable prosthesis surgical treatment was required for 6% (n=20) of these conditions. CONCLUSION The edentulous patients who will have implant placement for implant-supported fixed prosthesis can frequently require additional surgical procedures to eliminate pathological conditions. PMID:26576254

  7. Detection of radiographic findings in lung fibrosis using storage phosphor plates.

    PubMed

    Müller, R D; Herting, D; Hirche, H; John, V; Buddenbrock, B; Gocke, P; Wiebringhaus, R; Konietzko, N; Langer, R

    1997-01-01

    The aim of this work was to examine the influence of the filter kernel size on the detectability of differing radiological findings in interstitial lung disease. In 97 patients with confirmed pulmonary fibrosis chest radiographs were obtained with a filmscreen system of speed class 200 and with correspondingly exposed storage phosphorous plates. The size of the filter kernel used for the image postprocessing varied between sigma 5 and sigma 70. The detectability of interstitial lung changes was evaluated independently by eight readers on the basis of a defined rating system. The results were analysed using multifactorial analysis of variance with Scheffé test at a significance level of p = 0.05. Small kernel sizes (S 5, S 10) combined with high edge enhancement were only of benefit in the imaging of septal lines, but reduced the detectability of nodular and reticular structures. Good detail detectability of both micronodules and septal lines was obtained with a medium kernel size of sigma 40. Storage phosphor radiography utilizing the appropriate choice of postprocessing parameters provides equivalent image quality for evaluating interstitial lung changes compared with a modern filmscreen technique. PMID:9204345

  8. Acute non-traumatic gastrothorax: presentation of a case with chest pain and atypical radiologic findings.

    PubMed

    Singh, Deepwant; Mackeith, Pieter; Gopal, Dipesh Pravin

    2016-01-01

    A previously well 71-year-old woman presented to the Emergency Department with acute-onset left-sided chest pain. She was haemodynamically stable with unremarkable systemic examination. Her electrocardiogram and troponin were within normal limits and her chest radiograph showed a raised left hemi-diaphragm. Two hours after admission, this woman became acutely breathless, and suffered a pulseless electrical activity cardiac arrest. After cardiopulmonary resuscitation, there was a return of spontaneous circulation and regained consciousness. A repeat clinical assessment revealed a new left-sided dullness to percussion with contralateral percussive resonance on respiratory examination. CXR revealed a left pan-hemi-thoracic opacity whilst better definition using CT-pulmonary angiography (CTPA) indicated an acute tension gastrothorax secondary to a large left-sided diaphragmatic hernia. Nasogastric (NG) tube insertion was used to decompress the stomach and the patient underwent uncomplicated emergency laparoscopic hernia reduction. She remained well at 1-year follow-up. PMID:27027934

  9. Cardiac findings on non-gated chest computed tomography: A clinical and pictorial review.

    PubMed

    Kanza, Rene Epunza; Allard, Christian; Berube, Michel

    2016-02-01

    The use of chest computed tomography (CT) as an imaging test for the evaluation of thoracic pathology has significantly increased during the last four decades. Although cardiopulmonary diseases often overlap in their clinical manifestation, radiologists tend to overlook the heart while interpreting routine chest CT. Recent advances in CT technology have led to significant reduction of heart motion artefacts and now allow for the identification of several cardiac findings on chest CT even without electrocardiogram (ECG) gating. These observations range from simple curiosity to both benign and malignant discoveries, to life-threatening discoveries. We here present a clinical and radiologic review of common and less common cardiac findings discovered on non-gated chest CT in order to draw the attention of radiologists and referring physicians to these possibilities. PMID:26781150

  10. Incidental Finding of a Foreign Object on a Panoramic Radiograph.

    PubMed

    Schafer, Tara; Riggs, Bruce; Murakaru, June; Kalathingal, Sajitha

    2015-01-01

    This study's purpose was to describe a case involving the discovery of a foreign body in the ear canal of an eight-year-old boy, revealed during a recall evaluation to a dental clinic. A panoramic radiograph revealed a radiopaque object in the area of the external auditory meatus. The patient's mother reported one incidence of reported ear pain that resolved spontaneously, but the patient denied placing any object into his ear both in our clinic and at the time he reported ear pain to his mother. The patient was referred to an otolaryngologist, and the object was removed. PMID:26531089

  11. Computer-assisted instruction and diagnosis of radiographic findings.

    PubMed

    Harper, D; Butler, C; Hodder, R; Allman, R; Woods, J; Riordan, D

    1984-04-01

    Recent advances in computer technology, including high bit-density storage, digital imaging, and the ability to interface microprocessors with videodisk, create enormous opportunities in the field of medical education. This program, utilizing a personal computer, videodisk, BASIC language, a linked textfile system, and a triangulation approach to the interpretation of radiographs developed by Dr. W. L. Thompson, can enable the user to engage in a user-friendly, dynamic teaching program in radiology, applicable to various levels of expertise. Advantages include a relatively more compact and inexpensive system with rapid access and ease of revision which requires little instruction to the user. PMID:6376675

  12. A comparative study for chest radiograph image retrieval using binary texture and deep learning classification.

    PubMed

    Anavi, Yaron; Kogan, Ilya; Gelbart, Elad; Geva, Ofer; Greenspan, Hayit

    2015-08-01

    In this work various approaches are investigated for X-ray image retrieval and specifically chest pathology retrieval. Given a query image taken from a data set of 443 images, the objective is to rank images according to similarity. Different features, including binary features, texture features, and deep learning (CNN) features are examined. In addition, two approaches are investigated for the retrieval task. One approach is based on the distance of image descriptors using the above features (hereon termed the "descriptor"-based approach); the second approach ("classification"-based approach) is based on a probability descriptor, generated by a pair-wise classification of each two classes (pathologies) and their decision values using an SVM classifier. Best results are achieved using deep learning features in a classification scheme. PMID:26736908

  13. Lung segmentation in chest radiographs using anatomical atlases with nonrigid registration.

    PubMed

    Candemir, Sema; Jaeger, Stefan; Palaniappan, Kannappan; Musco, Jonathan P; Singh, Rahul K; Zhiyun Xue; Karargyris, Alexandros; Antani, Sameer; Thoma, George; McDonald, Clement J

    2014-02-01

    The National Library of Medicine (NLM) is developing a digital chest X-ray (CXR) screening system for deployment in resource constrained communities and developing countries worldwide with a focus on early detection of tuberculosis. A critical component in the computer-aided diagnosis of digital CXRs is the automatic detection of the lung regions. In this paper, we present a nonrigid registration-driven robust lung segmentation method using image retrieval-based patient specific adaptive lung models that detects lung boundaries, surpassing state-of-the-art performance. The method consists of three main stages: 1) a content-based image retrieval approach for identifying training images (with masks) most similar to the patient CXR using a partial Radon transform and Bhattacharyya shape similarity measure, 2) creating the initial patient-specific anatomical model of lung shape using SIFT-flow for deformable registration of training masks to the patient CXR, and 3) extracting refined lung boundaries using a graph cuts optimization approach with a customized energy function. Our average accuracy of 95.4% on the public JSRT database is the highest among published results. A similar degree of accuracy of 94.1% and 91.7% on two new CXR datasets from Montgomery County, MD, USA, and India, respectively, demonstrates the robustness of our lung segmentation approach. PMID:24239990

  14. Comparison of two methods for evaluating image quality of chest radiographs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herrmann, C.; Sund, P.; Tingberg, A.; Keddache, S.; Mansson, L. G.; Almen, A.; Mattsson, S.

    2000-04-01

    The Imix radiography system (Oy Imix Ab, Finland) consists of an intensifying screen, optics, and a CCD camera. An upgrade of this system (Imix 2000) with a red-emitting screen and new optics has recently been released. The image quality of Imix (original version), Imix 2000, and two storage-phosphor systems, Fuji FCR 9501 and Agfa ADC70 was evaluated in physical terms (DQE) and with visual grading of the visibility of anatomical structures in clinical images (141 kV). PA chest images of 50 healthy volunteers were evaluated by experienced radiologists. All images were evaluated on Siemens Simomed monitors, using the European Quality Criteria. The maximum DQE values for Imix, Imix 2000 Agfa and Fuji were 11%, 14%, 17% and 19%, respectively (141 kV, 5 (mu) Gy). Using the visual grading, the observers rated the systems in the following descending order: Fuji, Imix 2000, Agfa, and Imix. Thus, the upgrade to Imix 2000 resulted in higher DQE values and a significant improvement in clinical image quality. The visual grading agrees reasonably well with the DQE results; however, Imix 2000 received a better score than what could be expected from the DQE measurements.

  15. Radiographic and ultrasonographic findings of uterine neoplasms in nine dogs.

    PubMed

    Patsikas, Michail; Papazoglou, Lysimachos G; Jakovljevic, Samuel; Papaioannou, Nikolaos G; Papadopoulou, Paraskevi L; Soultani, Christina B; Chryssogonidis, Ioannis A; Kouskouras, Konstantinos A; Tziris, Nikolaos E; Charitanti, Afroditi A

    2014-01-01

    The records of nine female intact dogs with histologically confirmed uterine tumors were reviewed retrospectively, and the related radiographic and ultrasonographic signs of the lesions detected were recorded. Radiography revealed a soft-tissue opacity between the urinary bladder and colon in six of seven dogs with uterine body and/or cervical tumors, and a soft-tissue opacity in the midventral abdomen in two dogs with uterine horn tumors. Ultrasonography revealed masses in all dogs with uterine body/cervical tumors and could delineate the origin of the mass in one of two dogs with uterine horn tumors. The mass was characterized ultrasonographically as solid in three dogs (all leiomyomas), solid with cystic component in four dogs (two adenocarcinomas, one leiomyoma, and one fibroleiomyoma), and cystic in two (both leiomyomas). Hyperechoic foci in the mass were observed in three dogs. Ultrasonography was a useful method for demonstrating uterine body and/or cervical tumors. However, it was not possible to ascertain sonographically that a mass originated in a uterine horn unless there was associated evidence of uterine horn to which the mass could be traced. The ultrasonographic appearance of uterine tumors was variable, and the type of neoplasm could only be determined by taking biopsies of the mass. PMID:25028432

  16. Chest radiographic image quality: comparison of asymmetric screen-film, digital storage phosphor, and digital selenium drum systems--preliminary study.

    PubMed

    Beute, G H; Flynn, M J; Eyler, W R; Samei, E; Spizarny, D L; Zylak, C J

    1998-01-01

    Conventional screen-film radiography does not display all regions of the thorax satisfactorily. Three chest radiographic techniques display both the lung and the mediastinum with good contrast. These techniques are asymmetric screen-film (ASF), digital storage phosphor (DSP), and digital selenium drum (DSD) imaging. ASF systems use two asymmetric screen-film combinations to produce a wide-latitude image of the thorax with good contrast in the lungs. In DSP systems, image data are acquired digitally with a wide dynamic range by using the optical output of a photostimulable phosphor plate; in DSD systems, the wide-range digital image data are acquired by using the electronic charge generated on a drum coated with a thin layer of amorphous selenium. The appearance of a DSP or DSD radiograph is then determined by user-selected image processing operations: tone scaling, spatial frequency processing, and dynamic range compensation. Digital chest radiographs processed with strong regional equalization provide both excellent contrast in the lungs and effective display of the mediastinum and chest wall. At visual comparison, the high lung contrast and good mediastinal, retrocardiac, and subdiaphragmatic detail provided by the DSD method distinguish it from the other two methods. PMID:9599395

  17. Ossification of the Medial Clavicular Epiphysis on Chest Radiographs: Utility and Diagnostic Accuracy in Identifying Korean Adolescents and Young Adults under the Age of Majority.

    PubMed

    Yoon, Soon Ho; Yoo, Hye Jin; Yoo, Roh Eul; Lim, Hyun Ju; Yoon, Jeong Hwa; Park, Chang Min; Lee, Sang Seob; Yoo, Seong Ho

    2016-10-01

    The aim of our study was to evaluate the utility and diagnostic accuracy of the ossification grade of medial clavicular epiphysis on chest radiographs for identifying Korean adolescents and young adults under the age of majority. Overall, 1,151 patients (age, 16-30) without any systemic disease and who underwent chest radiography were included for ossification grading. Two radiologists independently classified the ossification of the medial clavicular epiphysis from chest radiographs into five grades. The age distribution and inter-observer agreement on the ossification grade were assessed. The diagnostic accuracy of the averaged ossification grades for determining whether the patient is under the age of majority was analyzed by using receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curves. Two separate inexperienced radiologists assessed the ossification grade in a subgroup of the patients after reviewing the detailed descriptions and image atlases developed for ossification grading. The median value of the ossification grades increased with increasing age (from 16 to 30 years), and the trend was best fitted by a quadratic function (R-square, 0.978). The inter-observer agreements on the ossification grade were 0.420 (right) and 0.404 (left). The area under the ROC curve (AUC) was 0.922 (95% CI, 0.902-0.942). The averaged ossification scores of 2.62 and 4.37 provided 95% specificity for a person < 19 years of age and a person ≥ 19 years of age, respectively. A preliminary assessment by inexperienced radiologists resulted in an AUC of 0.860 (95% CI, 0.740-0.981). The age of majority in Korean adolescents and young adults can be estimated using chest radiographs. PMID:27550480

  18. Wassel's Type V Polydactyly with Plain Radiographic and CT Findings

    PubMed Central

    Mete, Berna Dirim; Altay, Canan; Gursoy, Merve; Oyar, Orhan

    2015-01-01

    Duplication of the thumb is the most common polydactyly of the hand. Wassel's classification is frequently used to classify the polydactyly of the hand. His classification was based on the level of duplication and the number of bones in the thumb, and has seven groups (Types I–VII) according to the level of the bifurcation, except for his Type VII. The most common type is the bifurcation at the metacarpophalangeal joint (Type IV). In this paper, we report a very rare case of Type V thumb polydactyly in a 42-year-old man, who presented with swan neck deformity of the radial thumb and discuss the plain radiography and computed tomography (CT) findings. Kumar recently reported plain radiography findings in a case of bifid first metacarpal in a 13-year-old girl, who presented with swan neck deformity of the left thumb. To our knowledge, our case is the second presented case that has a swan neck deformity with bifid metacarpal. PMID:25861550

  19. [Manifestations of lobar atelectasis on chest x-rays and correlation with computed tomography findings].

    PubMed

    Cortés Campos, A; Martínez Rodríguez, M

    2014-01-01

    Atelectasis is an important indicator of potentially severe underlying disease that must be diagnosed as early as possible. One of the most common mechanisms is the reabsorption of air distal to respiratory tract obstruction. The chest x-ray is an excellent tool to diagnose atelectasis, and it is especially useful for ruling out central bronchial obstructions (e.g., from endobronchial tumors). If the signs of volume loss are not recognized correctly, the diagnosis and treatment can be delayed. This article describes the main findings of lobar atelectasis on chest x-rays and their correlations with CT findings, including the classic signs described in the literature and other, less known and sometimes subtle signs. PMID:24252304

  20. Elimination of daily routine chest radiographs in a mixed medical–surgical intensive care unit

    PubMed Central

    Graat, Marleen E.; Kröner, Anke; Spronk, Peter E.; Korevaar, Johanna C.; Stoker, Jaap; Vroom, Margreeth B.

    2007-01-01

    Objective To determine the impact of elimination of daily routine chest radiographs (CXRs) in a mixed medical–surgical intensive care unit (ICU) on utility of on demand CXRs, length of stay (LOS) in ICU, readmission rate, and mortality rate. Design and setting Prospective, nonrandomized, controlled study in a 28-bed ICU. Analysis included data of all admitted ICU patients during 5 months before and after elimination of daily routine CXRs. Results Before elimination, 2457 daily routine CXRs and 1437 on demand CXRs were obtained from 754 patients. After elimination, 1267 CXRs were obtained from 622 patients. The ratio of CXRs/patient day decreased from 1.1 ± 0.3 to 0.6 ± 0.4 (p < 0.05). Elimination did not result in a change in utility and timing of on demand CXRs. The absolute diagnostic and therapeutic value of on demand CXRs increased with elimination of daily routine CXRs: before intervention, 147 unexpected predefined abnormalities were found (10.2% of all on demand CXRs in 15.9% of all patients), of which 57 (3.9%) in 6.4% of all patients led to a change in therapy. After intervention, 156 unexpected predefined abnormalities were found (11.6%; p < 0.05), of which 61 (4.8%) in 9.5% of all patients (p < 0.05) led to a change in therapy. The LOS in ICU, readmission rate and ICU, and hospital mortality rate were not influenced by the change in strategy. Conclusions Elimination of daily routine CXRs reduced the number of CXRs in a mixed medical–surgical ICU, while not affecting readmission rate and ICU and hospital mortality rates. Electronic supplementary material The online version of this article (doi:10.1007/s00134-007-0542-1) contains supplementary material, which is available to authorized users PMID:17333118

  1. Radiographic Findings in Revision Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstructions from the MARS Cohort

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    The Multicenter ACL (anterior cruciate ligament) Revision Study (MARS) group was developed to investigate revision ACL reconstruction outcomes. An important part of this is obtaining and reviewing radiographic studies. The goal for this radiographic analysis is to establish radiographic findings for a large revision ACL cohort to allow comparison with future studies. The study was designed as a cohort study. Various established radiographic parameters were measured by three readers. These included sagittal and coronal femoral and tibial tunnel position, joint space narrowing, and leg alignment. Inter- and intraobserver comparisons were performed. Femoral sagittal position demonstrated 42% were more than 40% anterior to the posterior cortex. On the sagittal tibia tunnel position, 49% demonstrated some impingement on full-extension lateral radiographs. Limb alignment averaged 43% medial to the medial edge of the tibial plateau. On the Rosenberg view (45-degree flexion view), the minimum joint space in the medial compartment averaged 106% of the opposite knee, but it ranged down to a minimum of 4.6%. Lateral compartment narrowing at its minimum on the Rosenberg view averaged 91.2% of the opposite knee, but it ranged down to a minimum of 0.0%. On the coronal view, verticality as measured by the angle from the center of the tibial tunnel aperture to the center of the femoral tunnel aperture measured 15.8 degree ± 6.9% from vertical. This study represents the radiographic findings in the largest revision ACL reconstruction series ever assembled. Findings were generally consistent with those previously demonstrated in the literature. PMID:23404491

  2. Radiographic findings in revision anterior cruciate ligament reconstructions from the Mars cohort.

    PubMed

    2013-08-01

    The Multicenter ACL (anterior cruciate ligament) Revision Study (MARS) group was developed to investigate revision ACL reconstruction outcomes. An important part of this is obtaining and reviewing radiographic studies. The goal for this radiographic analysis is to establish radiographic findings for a large revision ACL cohort to allow comparison with future studies. The study was designed as a cohort study. Various established radiographic parameters were measured by three readers. These included sagittal and coronal femoral and tibial tunnel position, joint space narrowing, and leg alignment. Inter- and intraobserver comparisons were performed. Femoral sagittal position demonstrated 42% were more than 40% anterior to the posterior cortex. On the sagittal tibia tunnel position, 49% demonstrated some impingement on full-extension lateral radiographs. Limb alignment averaged 43% medial to the medial edge of the tibial plateau. On the Rosenberg view (45-degree flexion view), the minimum joint space in the medial compartment averaged 106% of the opposite knee, but it ranged down to a minimum of 4.6%. Lateral compartment narrowing at its minimum on the Rosenberg view averaged 91.2% of the opposite knee, but it ranged down to a minimum of 0.0%. On the coronal view, verticality as measured by the angle from the center of the tibial tunnel aperture to the center of the femoral tunnel aperture measured 15.8 degree ± 6.9% from vertical. This study represents the radiographic findings in the largest revision ACL reconstruction series ever assembled. Findings were generally consistent with those previously demonstrated in the literature. PMID:23404491

  3. Pleural-based changes on chest x-ray after irradiation for primary breast cancer: correlation with findings on computerized tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Srinivasan, G.; Kurtz, D.W.; Lichter, A.S.

    1983-10-01

    In treating breast cancer with excisional biopsy and irradiation, a volume of lung underlying the breast and chest wall receives significant doses of irradiation. This irradiation can produce pleural and pulmonary changes that can be seen on routine chest radiographs. In five such cases, we have examined pre and post-treatment computerized tomograms of the chest and show that these radiographic changes are pleural-based and lie within the high dose radiation volume. Failure to correct radiation treatment plans for the influence of lung density results in an increased dose to lung and pleura that could, in theory, exacerbate pulmonary and pleural radiation effects.

  4. The Development of Expertise in Radiology: In Chest Radiograph Interpretation, "Expert" Search Pattern May Predate "Expert" Levels of Diagnostic Accuracy for Pneumothorax Identification.

    PubMed

    Kelly, Brendan S; Rainford, Louise A; Darcy, Sarah P; Kavanagh, Eoin C; Toomey, Rachel J

    2016-07-01

    Purpose To investigate the development of chest radiograph interpretation skill through medical training by measuring both diagnostic accuracy and eye movements during visual search. Materials and Methods An institutional exemption from full ethical review was granted for the study. Five consultant radiologists were deemed the reference expert group, and four radiology registrars, five senior house officers (SHOs), and six interns formed four clinician groups. Participants were shown 30 chest radiographs, 14 of which had a pneumothorax, and were asked to give their level of confidence as to whether a pneumothorax was present. Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve analysis was carried out on diagnostic decisions. Eye movements were recorded with a Tobii TX300 (Tobii Technology, Stockholm, Sweden) eye tracker. Four eye-tracking metrics were analyzed. Variables were compared to identify any differences between groups. All data were compared by using the Friedman nonparametric method. Results The average area under the ROC curve for the groups increased with experience (0.947 for consultants, 0.792 for registrars, 0.693 for SHOs, and 0.659 for interns; P = .009). A significant difference in diagnostic accuracy was found between consultants and registrars (P = .046). All four eye-tracking metrics decreased with experience, and there were significant differences between registrars and SHOs. Total reading time decreased with experience; it was significantly lower for registrars compared with SHOs (P = .046) and for SHOs compared with interns (P = .025). Conclusion Chest radiograph interpretation skill increased with experience, both in terms of diagnostic accuracy and visual search. The observed level of experience at which there was a significant difference was higher for diagnostic accuracy than for eye-tracking metrics. (©) RSNA, 2016 Online supplemental material is available for this article. PMID:27322975

  5. Coal worker's pneumoconiosis: CT assessment in exposed workers and correlation with radiographic findings.

    PubMed

    Remy-Jardin, M; Degreef, J M; Beuscart, R; Voisin, C; Remy, J

    1990-11-01

    To study the signs of coal worker's pneumoconiosis (CWP) at computed tomography (CT), the authors obtained thoracic CT scans in 170 coal-dust-exposed workers who were concomitantly evaluated with conventional posteroanterior and lateral radiography. The profusion and extent of disease was assessed by means of CT in two groups of miners: group 1 (n = 86), miners with worker's compensation and radiographic evidence of CWP, and group 2(n = 84), miners who had applied for compensation without radiographic evidence of CWP. The CT signs of CWP consisted of micronodules, nodules, and progressive massive fibrosis. The comparative analysis demonstrates the superiority of an optimal CT technique over chest radiography in the evaluation of simple silicosis, with improved sensitivity in the detection of small parenchymal opacities. CT provides additional information on the stage of the disease but also clarifies some ambiguities of the ILO classification of small opacities. CT was equivalent to radiography for complicated silicosis, except in the identification of necrosis. CT evaluations are complementary to plain radiography in the assessment of CWP, and the addition of high-resolution CT is useful in achieving a more accurate evaluation of the small parenchymal opacities. PMID:2217770

  6. Genetic correlations between performance traits and radiographic findings in the limbs of German Warmblood riding horses.

    PubMed

    Stock, K F; Distl, O

    2007-01-01

    Results of mare performance tests in the field (MPT-F) of 10,949 mares, mare performance tests at station (MPT-S) of 1,712 mares, and inspections of horses intended for sale at riding horse auctions (AU) of 4,772 horses were used to investigate genetic correlations between corresponding performance traits. Mare performance tests were held in 1995 to 2004 and auction inspections in 1999 to 2004. Scores on a scale from 0 to 10 were given for gaits under rider (walk, trot, canter), rideability (evaluated by judging commission and test rider), free-jumping (ability, style, total), and character. Radiography results of 5,102 Hanoverian Warmblood horses were used to investigate genetic correlations between performance traits and particular radiographic findings. The radiographic findings included osseous fragments in fetlock and hock joints, deforming arthropathy in hock joints, and distinct radiographic findings in the navicular bones, which were analyzed as binary traits, and radiographic appearance of the navicular bones, which was analyzed as a quasi-linear trait. Genetic parameters were estimated multivariately in linear animal models with REML using information on the horses radiographed and their contemporaries (n = 18,609). Heritability of performance traits ranged between 0.14 and 0.61, and heritability of radiographic findings between 0.14 and 0.33. Additive genetic correlations between corresponding performance traits were close to unity for MPT-F and MPT-S, ranged from 0.81 to 0.90 for MPT-F and AU, and were 0.75 to 0.92 for MPT-S and AU. Genetic correlations between performance and radiography results were mostly close to zero. Indications of negative additive genetic correlations were observed for deforming arthropathy in hock joints and canter, rideability evaluated by test rider, jumping traits and character, and osseous fragments in hock joints and character. Selection of horses for radiological health of their limbs will assist further genetic

  7. Evaluation of the image quality of ink-jet printed paper copies of digital chest radiographs as compared with film: a receiver operating characteristic study.

    PubMed

    Lyttkens, K; Kirkhorn, T; Kehler, M; Andersson, B; Ebbesen, A; Hochbergs, P; Jarlman, O; Lindberg, C G; Holmer, N G

    1994-05-01

    Paper copies of digital radiographs printed with the continuous ink-jet technique have proved to be of a high enough quality for demonstration purposes. We present a study on the image quality of ink-jet printed paper copies of digital chest radiographs, based on receiver operating characteristic (ROC) analysis. Eighty-three digital radiographs of a chest phantom with simulated tumors in the mediastinum and right lung, derived from a computed radiography (CR) system were presented in two series of hard copies as ink-jet printed paper copies and as laser recorded film. The images, with a matrix of 1,760 x 2,140 pixels, were printed with a spatial resolution of 10 pixels/mm in the CR film recorder as well as in the ink-jet printer. On film, every image was recorded in two versions, one optimized for the mediastinum and one for the lungs. On paper, only one image was printed; this constituted an effort to optimize both the mediastinum and the lungs. The ink-jet printed images, printed on a matt coated paper, were viewed as on-sight images with reflected light. The examinations were reviewed by six radiologists, and ROC curves were constructed. No significant difference was found between the performance of film and that of ink-jet paper prints. Because the cost for a paper copy is only a tenth of that of film, remarkable cost reductions can be achieved by using the ink jet technique instead. Our results show that further quality studies of ink-jet printed images are worthwhile. PMID:8075185

  8. Pneumothorax in the Supine Patient: Subtle Radiographic Signs.

    PubMed

    Rierson, Davis; Bueno, Juliana

    2016-07-01

    Routine posteroanterior chest radiographs and computed tomography scans are more sensitive for detecting pneumothoraces than anteroposterior chest radiographs. However, supine chest radiographs are commonly performed as part of the initial and routine assessment of trauma and critically ill patients. Rates of occult pneumothorax can be as high as 50% and have a significant impact in the mortality of these patients; thus, a prompt diagnosis of this entity is important. This pictorial essay will illustrate the pleural anatomy, explain the distribution of air within the pleural space in the supine position, and review the radiologic findings that characterize this entity. PMID:27105051

  9. Radiographic findings on 3rd molars removed in 20-year-old men.

    PubMed

    Rajasuo, Ari; Peltola, Jaakko; Ventä, Irja; Murtomaa, Heikki

    2003-10-01

    In this study we assess radiographic findings characteristic of mandibular 3rd molars that had required either routine or surgical extraction. X-ray findings relating to acute pericoronitis were also examined. The material was collected by investigating patient records and rotational panoramic radiographs of 20-year-old Finnish male conscripts (n = 738) treated during military service because of 3rd-molar-related problems. The follicle around the crown of mandibular 3rd molars with acute pericoronitis was enlarged in 19% of cases and in 13% of chronic symptom-free pericoronitis cases (not statistically significant difference). Mandibular 3rd molars extracted surgically were more often mesially inclined than those extracted routinely (61% vs. 23%; P < 0.001), partially or totally intrabony impacted (92% vs. 66%; P < 0.001) and deep situated (on average 4.2 mm vs. 2.5 mm under the occlusal plane). Surgical extraction was also associated with the roots completely developed [92% vs. 84% of the teeth routinely extracted, odds ratio (OR) 2.6, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.2-5.5] and with the absence of radiographic pericoronitis [around 27% vs. 39% of the teeth routinely extracted (OR 0.5, 95% CI 0.3-0.8)]. In 86% of cases the space between 2nd molar and ramus of the mandible was narrower than the 3rd molar extracted surgically, whereas this was 62% in routine extraction cases (P < 0.001). We conclude that there are some typical 3rd-molar findings in rotational panoramic radiographs that show a need for surgical extraction. PMID:14763776

  10. Genetic correlations between conformation traits and radiographic findings in the limbs of German Warmblood riding horses.

    PubMed

    Stock, Kathrin Friederike; Distl, Ottmar

    2006-01-01

    Studbook inspection (SBI) data of 20 768 German Warmblood mares and radiography results (RR) data of 5102 Hanoverian Warmblood horses were used for genetic correlation analyses. The scores on a scale from 0 to 10 were given for conformation and basic quality of gaits, resulting in 14 SBI traits which were used for the correlation analyses. The radiographic findings considered included osseous fragments in fetlock (OFF) and hock joints (OFH), deforming arthropathy in hock joints (DAH) and distinct radiographic findings in the navicular bones (DNB) which were analyzed as binary traits, and radiographic appearance of the navicular bones (RNB) which was analyzed as a quasi-linear trait. Genetic parameters were estimated multivariately in linear animal models with REML using information on 24 448 horses with SBI and/or RR records. The ranges of heritability estimates were h2 = 0.14-0.34 for the RR traits and h2 = 0.09-0.50 for the SBI traits. Negative additive genetic correlations of r(g) = -0.19 to -0.56 were estimated between OFF and conformation of front and hind limbs and walk at hand, and between DNB and hind limb conformation. There were indications of negative additive genetic correlations between DAH and all SBI traits, but because of low prevalence and low heritability of DAH, these results require further scrutiny. Positive additive genetic correlations of r(g) = 0.37-0.52 were estimated between OFF and withers height and between OFH and withers height, indicating that selection for taller horses will increase disposition to develop OFF and OFH. Selection of broodmares with regards to functional conformation will assist, but cannot replace possible selection against radiographic findings in the limbs of young Warmblood riding horses, particularly with regards to OFF. PMID:17129565

  11. Retention of uranium in the chest: implications of findings in vivo and postmortem

    SciTech Connect

    Keane, A.T.; Polednak, A.P.

    1981-01-01

    An unusually protracted retention of uranium in the chests of certain workers at a uranium-processing plant has been reported in the literature. This finding has implications for the protection of current uranium workers and for health-effects studies of early workers. It is shown that the limited data obtained postmortem that have been reported do not reveal a significant unusually protracted retention of uranium in the pulmonary region or in the tracheobronchial lymph nodes. Probable explanations of the disparate findings are discussed. Data are presented on mortality from cancers of lymphatic tissues among males who worked in the period from 1943 to 1947 at the Y-12 Plant, Tennessee-Eastman Corp., Oak Ridge. No increased mortality from these cancers was evident.

  12. Retention of uranium in the chest: implications of findings in vivo and postmortem.

    PubMed

    Keane, A T; Polednak, A P

    1983-01-01

    An unusually protracted retention of uranium in the chests of certain workers at a uranium processing plant has been reported in the literature. This finding has implications for the protection of current uranium workers and for health-effects studies of early workers. It is shown that the limited data obtained postmortem that have been reported do not reveal a significant unusually protracted retention of uranium in the pulmonary region or in the tracheobronchial lymph nodes. Probable explanations of the disparate findings are discussed. Data are presented on mortality from cancers of lymphatic tissues among males who worked in the period from 1943 to 1947 at the Y-12 Plant, Tennessee-Eastman Corp., Oak Ridge. No significantly increased mortality from these cancers was evident. PMID:6862916

  13. Histological evaluation of pulp tissue from second primary molars correlated with clinical and radiographic caries findings

    PubMed Central

    Gopinath, Vellore Kannan; Anwar, Khurshid

    2014-01-01

    Background: Managing dental caries in young children is demanding due to the elusions present on the right diagnostic criteria for treatment. The present study evaluated the histological status of pulp tissues extracted from primary second molar with caries involvement. Histological findings are correlated with clinical and radiographic assessment. Materials and Methods: Simple experimental study was conducted on upper or lower second primary molars with occlusal (22 teeth) or proximal (22 teeth) dental caries. Selected children were below 6 years of age. Percentage of caries involvement, residual dentin thickness (RDT), radiographic assessment of interradicular and periapical areas, clinical caries depth and signs and symptoms are the parameters considered for comparing with the histological findings. The specimens were grouped based on the nature of the inflammatory process as acute or chronic. The data were analyzed by Student t-test to compare histological types of inflammation with clinical parameters. P value < 0.05 was considered as significant. Results: Four cases revealed severe acute inflammation in coronal and relatively mild acute inflammation in radicular pulp. In the rest of the specimen coronal and radicular pulp had similar acute or chronic inflammatory changes. Histological evidence of pulpitis correlated with dental caries depth of ≥80%, RDT of ≤1 mm, radiographic rarefactions in the interradicular regions and symptoms of pain. Conclusion: Primary second molars with more than two-third caries involvement with symptoms of pain histologically showed inflammation of both coronal and radicular pulp tissues in all cases. PMID:24932190

  14. An 81-year-old man with an abnormal right-sided heart shadow on chest radiograph.

    PubMed

    Shah, Rahman; Khan, M Rehan; Fan, Tai-Hwang M; Ruff, Genina; Ramanathan, Kodangudi B

    2015-02-01

    An 81-year-old man presented with a 1-week history of dry cough. He also complained of mild dyspnea, wheezing, and low-grade fever. He denied hemoptysis, fever, rashes, or chest pain. The patient's medical history included coronary artery bypass surgery, hypertension, gastroesophageal reflux disease, and COPD. The patient was a retired welder and an ex-smoker. PMID:25644917

  15. The x-ray light valve: A potentially low-cost, digital radiographic imaging system--a liquid crystal cell design for chest radiography

    SciTech Connect

    Szeto, Timothy C.; Webster, Christie Ann; Koprinarov, Ivaylo; Rowlands, J. A.

    2008-03-15

    Digital x-ray radiographic systems are desirable as they offer high quality images which can be processed, transferred, and stored without secondary steps. However, current clinical systems are extraordinarily expensive in comparison to film-based systems. Thus, there is a need for an economical digital imaging system for general radiology. The x-ray light valve (XLV) is a novel digital x-ray detector concept with the potential for high image quality and low cost. The XLV is comprised of a photoconductive detector layer and liquid crystal (LC) cell physically coupled in a sandwich structure. Upon exposure to x rays, charge is collected at the surface of the photoconductor, causing a change in the reflective properties of the LC cell. The visible image so formed can subsequently be digitized with an optical scanner. By choosing the properties of the LC cell in combination with the appropriate photoconductor thickness and bias potentials, the XLV can be optimized for various diagnostic imaging tasks. Specifically for chest radiography, we identified three potentially practical reflective cell designs by selecting from those commonly used in LC display technology. The relationship between reflectance and x-ray exposure (i.e., the characteristic curve) was determined for all three cells using a theoretical model. The results indicate that the reflective electrically controlled birefringence (r-ECB) cell is the preferred choice for chest radiography, provided that the characteristic curve can be shifted towards lower exposures. The feasibility of the shift of the characteristic curve is shown experimentally. The experimental results thus demonstrate that an XLV based on the r-ECB cell design exhibits a characteristic curve suitable for chest radiography.

  16. Computer aided detection of lung cancer in the absence of the cancer on chest radiographs: effect of the computer-aided detection on radiologists' performance on cancer-free cases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Osicka, Teresa; Freedman, Matthew T.; Lo, Shih-Chung B.; Lure, Fleming; Xu, Xin-Wei; Lin, Jesse; Zhang, Ron; Zhao, Hui

    2005-04-01

    Using data from a clinical trial of a commercial CAD system for lung cancer detection we separately analyzed the location, if any, selected on each film by 15 radiologists as they interpreted chest radiographs, 160 of which did not contain cancers. On the cancer-free cases, the radiologists showed statistically significant difference in decisions while using the CAD (p-value 0.002). Average specificity without computer assistance was 78%, and with computer assistance 73%. In a clinical trial with CAD for lung cancer detection there are multiple machine false positives. On chest radiographs of older current or former smokers, there are many scars that can appear like cancer to the interpreting radiologists. We are reporting on the radiologists' false positives and on the effect of machine false positive detections on observer performance on cancer-free cases. The only difference between radiologists occurred when they changed their initial true negative decision to false positive (p-value less than 0.0001), average confidence level increased, on the scale from 0.0 to 100.0, from 16.9 (high confidence of non-cancer) to 53.5 (moderate confidence cancer was present). We are reporting on the consistency of misinterpretation by multiple radiologists when they interpret cancer-free radiographs of smokers in the absence of CAD prompts. When multiple radiologists selected the same false positive location, there was usually a definite abnormality that triggered this response. The CAD identifies areas that are of sufficient concern for cancer that the radiologists will switch from a correct decision of no cancer to mark a false positive, previously overlooked, but suspicious appearing cancer-free area; one that has often been marked by another radiologist without the use of the CAD prompt. This work has implications on what should be accepted as ground truth in ROC studies: One might ask, "What a false positive response means?" when the finding, clinically, looks like cancer

  17. Male Pectoral Implants: Radiographic Appearance of Complications.

    PubMed

    Kuzmiak, Cherie M; Damitz, Lynn; Burke, Rachael; Hwang, Michael

    2016-03-01

    There has been a significant surge in aesthetic chest surgery for men in the last several years. Male chest enhancement is performed with surgical placement of a solid silicone pectoral implant. In the past, male chest correction and implantation were limited to the treatment of men who had congenital absence or atrophy of the pectoralis muscle and pectus excavatum deformity. But today, the popularization of increased chest and pectoral size fostered by body builders has more men desiring chest correction with implantation for non-medical reasons. We present a case of a 44-year-old, male with a displaced left pectoral implant with near extrusion and with an associated peri-implant soft tissue mass and fluid collection. While the imaging of these patients is uncommon, our case study presents the radiographic findings of male chest enhancement with associated complications. PMID:27200162

  18. Effect of Picture Archiving and Communication System Image Manipulation on the Agreement of Chest Radiograph Interpretation in the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit

    PubMed Central

    Castro, Denise A.; Naqvi, Asad Ahmed; Vandenkerkhof, Elizabeth; Flavin, Michael P.; Manson, David; Soboleski, Donald

    2016-01-01

    Objective: Variability in image interpretation has been attributed to differences in the interpreters’ knowledge base, experience level, and access to the clinical scenario. Picture archiving and communication system (PACS) has allowed the user to manipulate the images while developing their impression of the radiograph. The aim of this study was to determine the agreement of chest radiograph (CXR) impressions among radiologists and neonatologists and help determine the effect of image manipulation with PACS on report impression. Materials and Methods: Prospective cohort study included 60 patients from the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit undergoing CXRs. Three radiologists and three neonatologists reviewed two consecutive frontal CXRs of each patient. Each physician was allowed manipulation of images as needed to provide a decision of “improved,” “unchanged,” or “disease progression” lung disease for each patient. Each physician repeated the process once more; this time, they were not allowed to individually manipulate the images, but an independent radiologist presets the image brightness and contrast to best optimize the CXR appearance. Percent agreement and opposing reporting views were calculated between all six physicians for each of the two methods (allowing and not allowing image manipulation). Results: One hundred percent agreement in image impression between all six observers was only seen in 5% of cases when allowing image manipulation; 100% agreement was seen in 13% of the cases when there was no manipulation of the images. Conclusion: Agreement in CXR interpretation is poor; the ability to manipulate the images on PACS results in a decrease in agreement in the interpretation of these studies. New methods to standardize image appearance and allow improved comparison with previous studies should be sought to improve clinician agreement in interpretation consistency and advance patient care. PMID:27274414

  19. Clinical, radiographic and MRI findings of the temporomandibular joint in patients with different rheumatic diseases.

    PubMed

    Helenius, L M J; Tervahartiala, P; Helenius, I; Al-Sukhun, J; Kivisaari, L; Suuronen, R; Kautiainen, H; Hallikainen, D; Lindqvist, C; Leirisalo-Repo, M

    2006-11-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the condition of the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) in patients with different rheumatic diseases, and report correlations between the clinical, radiographic and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) findings. The 67 patients were divided into four groups: 16 with rheumatoid arthritis (RA), 15 with mixed connective tissue disease (MCTD), 18 with ankylosing spondylitis (AS) and 18 with spondyloarthropathy (SPA). They were clinically examined, and panoramic tomography, lateral panoramic radiography and MRI of the TMJ were performed. MRI showed reduced articular cartilage in 25% (4/16) of RA, 0% (0/15) of MCTD, 17% (3/18) of AS and 17% (3/18) of SPA patients. Condylar changes included erosion, osteophytes and abnormal shape. Disc alterations included perforation, abnormal anterior position and decreased movement. These abnormalities were most frequent in RA patients, and least frequent in MCTD and SPA patients. Crepitation and reduced maximum opening of the mouth correlated with abnormalities of the disc and articular cartilage as shown by MRI. Severe condylar erosion in panoramic tomograms significantly correlated with MRI findings of condylar erosion (P<0.01), diminished thickness of condylar cartilage, abnormal condylar shape, and abnormal shape of the temporal surface of the TMJ (P< or =0.001). The presence of crepitation, limited mandibular movement and/or pain on movement of the jaw often indicated structural damage to the TMJ. Panoramic radiographs provide an alternative method to MRI but, to obtain a more detailed anatomic picture, MRI is recommended for patients with acute unexplained pain or as part of preoperative work up. A panoramic recording is not indicated when MRI is planned. PMID:17052893

  20. Classification of radiological errors in chest radiographs, using support vector machine on the spatial frequency features of false- negative and false-positive regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pietrzyk, Mariusz W.; Donovan, Tim; Brennan, Patrick C.; Dix, Alan; Manning, David J.

    2011-03-01

    Aim: To optimize automated classification of radiological errors during lung nodule detection from chest radiographs (CxR) using a support vector machine (SVM) run on the spatial frequency features extracted from the local background of selected regions. Background: The majority of the unreported pulmonary nodules are visually detected but not recognized; shown by the prolonged dwell time values at false-negative regions. Similarly, overestimated nodule locations are capturing substantial amounts of foveal attention. Spatial frequency properties of selected local backgrounds are correlated with human observer responses either in terms of accuracy in indicating abnormality position or in the precision of visual sampling the medical images. Methods: Seven radiologists participated in the eye tracking experiments conducted under conditions of pulmonary nodule detection from a set of 20 postero-anterior CxR. The most dwelled locations have been identified and subjected to spatial frequency (SF) analysis. The image-based features of selected ROI were extracted with un-decimated Wavelet Packet Transform. An analysis of variance was run to select SF features and a SVM schema was implemented to classify False-Negative and False-Positive from all ROI. Results: A relative high overall accuracy was obtained for each individually developed Wavelet-SVM algorithm, with over 90% average correct ratio for errors recognition from all prolonged dwell locations. Conclusion: The preliminary results show that combined eye-tracking and image-based features can be used for automated detection of radiological error with SVM. The work is still in progress and not all analytical procedures have been completed, which might have an effect on the specificity of the algorithm.

  1. Chest pain due to Pinch-off syndrome: radiological findings and endovascular rescue.

    PubMed

    Viviani, E; Giribono, A M; Ferrara, D; Santagata, A; Narese, D; Midiri, F; Albano, D; Porcellini, M

    2016-01-01

    Port-a-cath is widely used as a route for administration of drugs in hematology and oncology patients and, recently, has been adapted also for hemodialysis patients. Major complications include infection, thrombosis, arrhythmia, and embolization. The Pinch-off-syndrome (POS) means the clavicle and the first rib compress the long-term central venous catheter. The reported incidence rate ranges from 1.4% to 4.1%. This syndrome can be recognized on chest radiography by observing a thinning of the catheter lumen through the passage between the clavicle and the first rib. Catheter fracture is a rare but potentially life-threatening complication that must be recognized and treated promptly. Management of dislodged ports includes percutaneous transcatheter retrieval, open thoracotomy retrieval and oral anticoagulant therapy. Among these techniques, percutaneous transcatheter retrieval is an easy, safe and efficient method. We report the successful percutaneous endovascular retrieval of dislodged intracardiac catheter, separated from its port, in a 58 year-old male patient who presented with chest pain. PMID:26980633

  2. Phantom tumour of the lung in a patient with renal failure misdiagnosed as chest infection

    PubMed Central

    Althomali, Sarah Ali; Almalki, Mazen Mohammed; Mohiuddin, Syed Atif

    2014-01-01

    Phantom or vanishing tumour of the lung is a rare finding on chest radiographs that has been reported secondary to heart failure or chronic kidney disease. It has been described as an interlobular effusion of the transverse or oblique fissure of the right lung. Although it is uncommon, it should always be considered as a differential diagnosis for a radiographic opacity of the right-middle lung zone because it can be easily mistaken for a lung mass or infiltration. We herein present a case involving a patient with chronic kidney disease and a radiographic opacity of the right-middle lung that was diagnosed as a chest infection. The patient did not respond to various antibiotics and showed a poor response to diuretics, the standard treatment for phantom tumour. However, the patient markedly improved after dialysis, and the radiographic chest opacity disappeared. PMID:24943144

  3. Phantom tumour of the lung in a patient with renal failure misdiagnosed as chest infection.

    PubMed

    Althomali, Sarah Ali; Almalki, Mazen Mohammed; Mohiuddin, Syed Atif

    2014-01-01

    Phantom or vanishing tumour of the lung is a rare finding on chest radiographs that has been reported secondary to heart failure or chronic kidney disease. It has been described as an interlobular effusion of the transverse or oblique fissure of the right lung. Although it is uncommon, it should always be considered as a differential diagnosis for a radiographic opacity of the right-middle lung zone because it can be easily mistaken for a lung mass or infiltration. We herein present a case involving a patient with chronic kidney disease and a radiographic opacity of the right-middle lung that was diagnosed as a chest infection. The patient did not respond to various antibiotics and showed a poor response to diuretics, the standard treatment for phantom tumour. However, the patient markedly improved after dialysis, and the radiographic chest opacity disappeared. PMID:24943144

  4. Can chest high-resolution computed tomography findings diagnose pulmonary alveolar microlithiasis?*

    PubMed Central

    Francisco, Flávia Angélica Ferreira; Rodrigues, Rosana Souza; Barreto, Miriam Menna; Escuissato, Dante Luiz; Araujo Neto, Cesar Augusto; Silva, Jorge Luiz Pereira e; Silva, Claudio S.; Hochhegger, Bruno; Souza Jr., Arthur Soares; Zanetti, Gláucia; Marchiori, Edson

    2015-01-01

    Objective The present study was aimed at retrospectively reviewing high-resolution computed tomography (HRCT) findings in patients with pulmonary alveolar microlithiasis in order to evaluate the frequency of tomographic findings and their distribution in the lung parenchyma. Materials and Methods Thirteen patients (9 females and 4 males; age, 9 to 59 years; mean age, 34.5 years) were included in the present study. The HRCT images were independently evaluated by two observers whose decisions were made by consensus. The inclusion criterion was the presence of abnormalities typical of pulmonary alveolar microlithiasis at HRCT, which precludes lung biopsy. However, in 6 cases lung biopsy was performed. Results Ground-glass opacities and small parenchymal nodules were the predominant tomographic findings, present in 100% of cases, followed by small subpleural nodules (92.3%), subpleural cysts (84.6%), subpleural linear calcifications (69.2%), crazy-paving pattern (69.2%), fissure nodularity (53.8%), calcification along interlobular septa (46.2%) and dense consolidation (46.2%). Conclusion As regards distribution of the lesions, there was preferential involvement of the lower third of the lungs. No predominance of distribution in axial and anteroposterior directions was observed. PMID:26379317

  5. [Estimation of population genetic parameters for radiographical findings of elbow dsyplasia in the Labrador Retriever].

    PubMed

    Engler, Jennifer; Hamann, Henning; Distl, Ottmar

    2009-01-01

    specific genetic effects from a body side or sex-specific genetic effects could be observed for the expression of ED. Dogs showing radiographic signs of ED or dogs having been submitted for a surgery due to clinical signs of ED have to be precluded from breeding. The veterinary practitioner can help to reduce the frequency of dogs exhibiting a genetic disposition to ED when the radiographs of the elbow joints of many as possible purebred dogs are submitted to the respective dog breeding associations. PMID:19863010

  6. Learning from others: effects of viewing another person's eye movements while searching for chest nodules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Litchfield, Damien; Ball, Linden J.; Donovan, Tim; Manning, David J.; Crawford, Trevor

    2008-03-01

    We report a study that investigated whether experienced and inexperienced radiographers benefit from knowing where another person looked during pulmonary nodule detection. Twenty-four undergraduate radiographers (1 year of experience) and 24 postgraduate radiographers (5+ years of experience) searched 42 chest x-rays for nodules and rated how confident they were in their decisions. Eye movements were also recorded. Performance was compared across three within-participant conditions: (1) free search - where radiographers could identify nodules as normal; (2) image preview - where radiographers were first shown each chest x-ray for 20 seconds before they could then proceed to mark the location of any nodules; and (3) eye movement preview - which was identical to image preview except that the 20 second viewing period displayed an overlay of the real-time eye movements of another radiographer's scanpath for that image. For this preview condition half of each group were shown where a novice radiographer looked, and the other half were shown where an experienced radiologist looked. This was not made known to the participants until after the experiment. Performance was assessed using JAFROC analysis. Both groups of radiographers performed better in the eye movement preview condition compared with the image preview or free search conditions, with inexperienced radiographers improving the most. We discuss our findings in terms of the task-specific information interpreted from eye movement previews, task difficulty across images, and whether it matters if radiographers are previewing the eye movements of an expert or a novice.

  7. Morbidity and mortality of vermiculite miners and millers exposed to tremolite-actinolite: Part III. Radiographic findings

    SciTech Connect

    Amandus, H.E.; Althouse, R.; Morgan, W.K.; Sargent, E.N.; Jones, R.

    1987-01-01

    A study was conducted to estimate the exposure-response relationship for tremolite-actinolite fiber exposure and radiographic findings among 184 men employed at a Montana vermiculite mine and mill. Workers were included if they had been employed during 1975-1982 and had achieved at least 5 years tenure at the Montana site. Past fiber exposure was associated with an increased prevalence of parenchymal and pleural radiographic abnormalities. Smoking was not significantly related to the prevalence of small opacities. However, the number of workers who had never smoked was small, and this prevented measurement of the smoking effect. Under control for smoking and age, the prevalence of small opacities was significantly greater for vermiculite workers with greater than 100 fiber/cc-years exposure than for comparison groups (cement workers, blue collar workers, and coal miners) who had no known occupational fiber exposure. A logistic model predicted an increase of 1.3% in the odds ratio for small opacities at an additional exposure of 5 fiber-years.

  8. Chest imaging features of patients afflicted with Influenza A (H1N1) in a Malaysian tertiary referral centre

    PubMed Central

    Bux, SI; Mohd. Ramli, N; Ahmad Sarji, S; Kamarulzaman, A

    2010-01-01

    This is a retrospective descriptive study of the chest imaging findings of 118 patients with confirmed A(H1N1) in a tertiary referral centre. About 42% of the patients had positive initial chest radiographic (CXR) findings. The common findings were bi-basal air-space opacities and perihilar reticular and alveolar infiltrates. In select cases, high-resolution computed tomography (CT) imaging showed ground-glass change with some widespread reticular changes and atelectasis. PMID:21611071

  9. Sarcoidosis: a diagnostic challenge in atypical radiologic findings of unilateral lymphadenopathy

    PubMed Central

    Meillier, Andrew; Commodore, Marius

    2015-01-01

    Sarcoidosis is a chronic systemic disease with a wide array of clinical findings. Given that the clinical symptoms are not pathognomonic, chest radiographs have become essential to the initial diagnosis and choice of treatment modality. Diagnosis hinges on ruling out alternative diagnoses; sometimes, advanced radiologic techniques and histopathology are required. On this occasion, we present a case of a patient with generalized symptoms, no significant chest radiograph findings and lymphadenopathy where advanced imaging and pathology assisted in the diagnosis. PMID:26719811

  10. Frequency and number of ultrasound lung rockets (B-lines) using a regionally based lung ultrasound examination named vet BLUE (veterinary bedside lung ultrasound exam) in dogs with radiographically normal lung findings.

    PubMed

    Lisciandro, Gregory R; Fosgate, Geoffrey T; Fulton, Robert M

    2014-01-01

    Lung ultrasound is superior to lung auscultation and supine chest radiography for many respiratory conditions in human patients. Ultrasound diagnoses are based on easily learned patterns of sonographic findings and artifacts in standardized images. By applying the wet lung (ultrasound lung rockets or B-lines, representing interstitial edema) versus dry lung (A-lines with a glide sign) concept many respiratory conditions can be diagnosed or excluded. The ultrasound probe can be used as a visual stethoscope for the evaluation of human lungs because dry artifacts (A-lines with a glide sign) predominate over wet artifacts (ultrasound lung rockets or B-lines). However, the frequency and number of wet lung ultrasound artifacts in dogs with radiographically normal lungs is unknown. Thus, the primary objective was to determine the baseline frequency and number of ultrasound lung rockets in dogs without clinical signs of respiratory disease and with radiographically normal lung findings using an 8-view novel regionally based lung ultrasound examination called Vet BLUE. Frequency of ultrasound lung rockets were statistically compared based on signalment, body condition score, investigator, and reasons for radiography. Ten left-sided heart failure dogs were similarly enrolled. Overall frequency of ultrasound lung rockets was 11% (95% confidence interval, 6-19%) in dogs without respiratory disease versus 100% (95% confidence interval, 74-100%) in those with left-sided heart failure. The low frequency and number of ultrasound lung rockets observed in dogs without respiratory disease and with radiographically normal lungs suggests that Vet BLUE will be clinically useful for the identification of canine respiratory conditions. PMID:24382172

  11. Experimental Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae challenge in swine: Comparison of computed tomographic and radiographic findings during disease

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background In pigs, diseases of the respiratory tract like pleuropneumonia due to Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae (App) infection have led to high economic losses for decades. Further research on disease pathogenesis, pathogen-host-interactions and new prophylactic and therapeutic approaches are needed. In most studies, a large number of experimental animals are required to assess lung alterations at different stages of the disease. In order to reduce the required number of animals but nevertheless gather information on the nature and extent of lung alterations in living pigs, a computed tomographic scoring system for quantifying gross pathological findings was developed. In this study, five healthy pigs served as control animals while 24 pigs were infected with App, the causative agent of pleuropneumonia in pigs, in an established model for respiratory tract disease. Results Computed tomographic (CT) findings during the course of App challenge were verified by radiological imaging, clinical, serological, gross pathology and histological examinations. Findings from clinical examinations and both CT and radiological imaging, were recorded on day 7 and day 21 after challenge. Clinical signs after experimental App challenge were indicative of acute to chronic disease. Lung CT findings of infected pigs comprised ground-glass opacities and consolidation. On day 7 and 21 the clinical scores significantly correlated with the scores of both imaging techniques. At day 21, significant correlations were found between clinical scores, CT scores and lung lesion scores. In 19 out of 22 challenged pigs the determined disease grades (not affected, slightly affected, moderately affected, severely affected) from CT and gross pathological examination were in accordance. Disease classification by radiography and gross pathology agreed in 11 out of 24 pigs. Conclusions High-resolution, high-contrast CT examination with no overlapping of organs is superior to radiography in the

  12. Use of chest sonography in acute-care radiology☆

    PubMed Central

    De Luca, C.; Valentino, M.; Rimondi, M.R.; Branchini, M.; Baleni, M. Casadio; Barozzi, L.

    2008-01-01

    Diagnosis of acute lung disease is a daily challenge for radiologists working in acute-care areas. It is generally based on the results of chest radiography performed under technically unfavorable conditions. Computed tomography (CT) is undoubtedly more accurate in these cases, but it cannot always be performed on critically ill patients who need continuous care. The use of thoracic ultrasonography (US) has recently been proposed for the study of acute lung disease. It can be carried out rapidly at the bedside and does not require any particularly sophisticated equipment. This report analyzes our experience with chest sonography as a supplement to chest radiography in an Emergency Radiology Unit. We performed chest sonography – as an adjunct to chest radiography – on 168 patients with acute chest pathology. Static and dynamic US signs were analyzed in light of radiographic findings and, when possible, CT. The use of chest US improved the authors' ability to provide confident diagnoses of acute disease of the chest and lungs. PMID:23397048

  13. Pure neuritic leprosy presenting as ulnar nerve neuropathy: a case report of electrodiagnostic, radiographic, and histopathological findings.

    PubMed

    Payne, Russell; Baccon, Jennifer; Dossett, John; Scollard, David; Byler, Debra; Patel, Akshal; Harbaugh, Kimberly

    2015-11-01

    Hansen's disease, or leprosy, is a chronic infectious disease with many manifestations. Though still a major health concern and leading cause of peripheral neuropathy in the developing world, it is rare in the United States, with only about 150 cases reported each year. Nevertheless, it is imperative that neurosurgeons consider it in the differential diagnosis of neuropathy. The causative organism is Mycobacterium leprae, which infects and damages Schwann cells in the peripheral nervous system, leading first to sensory and then to motor deficits. A rare presentation of Hansen's disease is pure neuritic leprosy. It is characterized by nerve involvement without the characteristic cutaneous stigmata. The authors of this report describe a case of pure neuritic leprosy presenting as ulnar nerve neuropathy with corresponding radiographic, electrodiagnostic, and histopathological data. This 11-year-old, otherwise healthy male presented with progressive right-hand weakness and numbness with no cutaneous abnormalities. Physical examination and electrodiagnostic testing revealed findings consistent with a severe ulnar neuropathy at the elbow. Magnetic resonance imaging revealed diffuse thickening and enhancement of the ulnar nerve and narrowing at the cubital tunnel. The patient underwent ulnar nerve decompression with biopsy. Pathology revealed acid-fast organisms within the nerve, which was pathognomonic for Hansen's disease. He was started on antibiotic therapy, and on follow-up he had improved strength and sensation in the ulnar nerve distribution. Pure neuritic leprosy, though rare in the United States, should be considered in the differential diagnosis of those presenting with peripheral neuropathy and a history of travel to leprosy-endemic areas. The long incubation period of M. leprae, the ability of leprosy to mimic other conditions, and the low sensitivity of serological tests make clinical, electrodiagnostic, and radiographic evaluation necessary for diagnosis

  14. Image processing in digital chest radiography: effect on diagnostic efficacy.

    PubMed

    Manninen, H; Partanen, K; Lehtovirta, J; Matsi, P; Soimakallio, S

    1992-01-01

    The usefulness of digital image processing of chest radiographs was evaluated in a clinical study. In 54 patients, chest radiographs in the posteroanterior projection were obtained by both 14 inch digital image intensifier equipment and the conventional screen-film technique. The digital radiographs (512 x 512 image format) viewed on a 625 line monitor were processed in three different ways: (1) standard display; (2) digital edge enhancement for the standard display; and (3) inverse intensity display. The radiographs were interpreted independently by three radiologists. The diagnoses were confirmed by CT, follow-up radiographs and clinical records. Chest abnormalities of the films analyzed included 21 primary lung tumors, 44 pulmonary nodules, 16 cases with mediastinal disease and 17 cases with pneumonia/atelectasis. Interstitial lung disease, pleural plaques, and pulmonary emphysema were found in 30, 18 and 19 cases, respectively. The sensitivity of conventional radiography when averaged overall findings was better than that of the digital techniques (P less than 0.001). The differences in diagnostic accuracy measured by sensitivity and specificity between the three digital display modes were small. Standard image display showed better sensitivity for pulmonary nodules (0.74 vs 0.66; P less than 0.05) but poorer specificity for pulmonary emphysema (0.85 vs. 0.93; P less than 0.05) compared with inverse intensity display. We conclude that when using 512 x 512 image format, the routine use of digital edge enhancement and tone reversal at digital chest radiographs is not warranted. PMID:1563421

  15. Use of Coronary Computed Tomographic Angiography Findings to Modify Statin and Aspirin Prescription in Patients With Acute Chest Pain.

    PubMed

    Pursnani, Amit; Celeng, Csilla; Schlett, Christopher L; Mayrhofer, Thomas; Zakroysky, Pearl; Lee, Hang; Ferencik, Maros; Fleg, Jerome L; Bamberg, Fabian; Wiviott, Stephen D; Truong, Quynh A; Udelson, James E; Nagurney, John T; Hoffmann, Udo

    2016-02-01

    Coronary CT angiography (CCTA) is used in patients with low-intermediate chest pain presenting to the emergency department for its reliability in excluding acute coronary syndrome (ACS). However, its influence on medication modification in this setting is unclear. We sought to determine whether knowledge of CCTA-based coronary artery disease (CAD) was associated with change in statin and aspirin prescription. We used the CCTA arm of the Rule Out Myocardial Infarction using Computed Angiographic Tomography II multicenter, randomized control trial (R-II) and comparison cohort from the observational Rule Out Myocardial Infarction using Computed Angiographic Tomography I cohort (R-I). In R-II, subjects were randomly assigned to CCTA to guide decision making, whereas in R-I patients underwent CCTA with results blinded to caregivers and managed according to standard care. Our final cohort consisted of 277 subjects from R-I and 370 from R-II. ACS rate was similar (6.9% vs 6.2% respectively, p = 0.75). For subjects with CCTA-detected obstructive CAD without ACS, initiation of statin was significantly greater after disclosure of CCTA results (0% in R-I vs 20% in R-II, p = 0.009). Conversely, for subjects without CCTA-detected CAD, aspirin prescription was lower with disclosure of CCTA results (16% in R-I vs 4.8% in R-II, p = 0.001). However, only 68% of subjects in R-II with obstructive CAD were discharged on statin and 65% on aspirin. In conclusion, physician knowledge of CCTA results leads to improved alignment of aspirin and statin with the presence and severity of CAD although still many patients with CCTA-detected CAD are not discharged on aspirin or statin. Our findings suggest opportunity for practice improvement when CCTA is performed in the emergency department. PMID:26762723

  16. Demographic and clinical factors associated with radiographic severity of first metatarsophalangeal joint osteoarthritis: cross-sectional findings from the Clinical Assessment Study of the Foot

    PubMed Central

    Menz, H.B.; Roddy, E.; Marshall, M.; Thomas, M.J.; Rathod, T.; Myers, H.; Thomas, E.; Peat, G.M.

    2015-01-01

    Summary Objective To explore demographic and clinical factors associated with radiographic severity of first metatarsophalangeal joint osteoarthritis (OA) (First MTPJ OA). Design Adults aged ≥50 years registered with four general practices were mailed a Health Survey. Responders reporting foot pain within the last 12 months were invited to undergo a clinical assessment and weight-bearing dorso-plantar and lateral radiographs of both feet. Radiographic first MTPJ OA in the most severely affected foot was graded into four categories using a validated atlas. Differences in selected demographic and clinical factors were explored across the four radiographic severity subgroups using analysis of variance (ANOVA) and ordinal regression. Results Clinical and radiographic data were available from 517 participants, categorised as having no (n = 105), mild (n = 228), moderate (n = 122) or severe (n = 62) first MTPJ OA. Increased radiographic severity was associated with older age and lower educational attainment. After adjusting for age, increased radiographic first MTPJ OA severity was significantly associated with an increased prevalence of dorsal hallux and first MTPJ pain, hallux valgus, first interphalangeal joint (IPJ) hyperextension, keratotic lesions on the dorsal aspect of the hallux and first MTPJ, decreased first MTPJ dorsiflexion, ankle/subtalar joint eversion and ankle joint dorsiflexion range of motion, and a trend towards a more pronated foot posture. Conclusions This cross-sectional study has identified several dose–response associations between radiographic severity of first MTPJ OA and a range of demographic and clinical factors. These findings highlight the progressive nature of first MTPJ OA and provide insights into the spectrum of presentation of the condition in clinical practice. PMID:25450852

  17. Hypoxia and hydrothoraces in a case of liver cirrhosis: correlation of physiological, radiographic, scintigraphic, and pathological findings

    PubMed Central

    Stanley, N. N.; Williams, A. J.; Dewar, C. A.; Blendis, L. M.; Reid, Lynne

    1977-01-01

    Stanley, N. N., Williams, A. J., Dewar, C. A., Blendis, L. M., and Reid, Lynne (1977).Thorax, 32, 457-471. Hypoxia and hydrothoraces in a case of liver cirrhosis: correlation of physiological, radiographic, scintigraphic, and pathological findings. A case is reported of liver cirrhosis complicated by cyanosis and recurrent right hydrothorax. A diagnostic pneumoperitoneum demonstrated that direct movement of ascites through a diaphragmatic defect was responsible for the hydrothoraces. Pulmonary function tests between episodes of hydrothorax showed severe arterial hypoxaemia, a 23% right-to-left shunt, and a reduction in the carbon monoxide transfer factor to less than half of the predicted value. Evidence of abnormal intrapulmonary arteriovenous communications was obtained by perfusion scanning. At necropsy the central tendon of the diaphragm showed numerous areas of thinning which were easily ruptured. Injection of the pulmonary arterial tree demonstrated precapillary arteriovenous anastomoses and pleural spider naevi. A morphometric analysis provided quantitative evidence of pulmonary vasodilatation limited to the intra-acinar arteries, consistent with the effect of a circulating vasodilator. The scintigraphic and pathological findings suggested that shunting had been greater in the right than the left lung. Examination of thin lung sections by light microscopy showed that the walls of small veins were thickened, and electron microscopy showed that this was due to a layer of collagen. The walls of capillaries were similarly thickened, which caused an approximately two-fold increase in the minimum blood-gas distance and contributed to the reduction in transfer factor. Images PMID:929488

  18. Technique for chest radiography for pneumoconiosis

    SciTech Connect

    Sargent, E.N.

    1982-01-01

    Routine radiographic chest examinations have been performed using a variety of techniques. Although chest radiography is one of the most commonly performed radiographic examinations, it is often difficult to obtain consistently good quality roentgenograms. This publication provides a simple guide and relatively easy solution to the many problems that radiologic technologists might encounter. The language is purposely relatively simple and care has been taken to avoid difficult mathematical and physical explanations. The intent is to provide an easily referrable text for those who may encounter difficulties in producing acceptable chest radiographs.

  19. Mucopolysaccharidosis type I (Hurler syndrome): oral and radiographic findings and ultrastructural/chemical features of enamel and dentin.

    PubMed

    Guven, Gunseli; Cehreli, Zafer C; Altun, Ceyhan; Sençimen, Metin; Ide, Semra; Bayari, Sevgi H; Karaçay, Seniz

    2008-01-01

    Mucopolysaccharidosis type I (Hurler syndrome, MPS I-H) is an autosomal recessive inborn error of metabolism due to deficient alpha-L-iduronidase enzyme activity and is characterized by accumulation of incompletely degraded glycosaminoglycans that generally lead to impairment of organ and body functions. This report presents oral, dental, and radiographic findings in a boy who presented with MPS I-H. Nine of the patient's primary teeth were extracted and investigated using scanning electron microscopy, x-ray diffraction analysis, and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. Compared with the teeth of otherwise healthy patients, MPS I-H-affected dentin was characterized by extremely narrow dentinal tubules, whose direction followed an irregular wave-like pattern. The enamel-dentin junction was defective, as evidenced by microgaps, and the enamel displayed irregular arrangement of prisms. The additional novel observation was made that the protein structure of enamel and dentin changed in MPS I-H-affected teeth. Also, an increase was observed in the relative mineral/matrix ratio of MPS I-H-affected dentin, indicating that its protein content had decreased in comparison with normal dentin. PMID:17604658

  20. Pediatric digital chest imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Tarver, R.D.; Cohen, M.; Broderick, N.J.; Conces, D.J. Jr. )

    1990-01-01

    The Philips Computed Radiography system performs well with pediatric portable chest radiographs, handling the throughout of a busy intensive care service 24 hours a day. Images are excellent and routinely provide a conventional (unenhanced) image and an edge-enhanced image. Radiation dose is decreased by the lowered frequency of repeat examinations and the ability of the plates to respond to a much lower dose and still provide an adequate image. The high quality and uniform density of serial PCR portable radiographs greatly enhances diagnostic content of the films. Decreased resolution has not been a problem clinically. Image manipulation and electronic transfer to remote viewing stations appear to be helpful and are currently being evaluated further. The PCR system provides a marked improvement in pediatric portable chest radiology.

  1. 42 CFR 37.43 - Approval of radiographic facilities that use film.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... MEDICAL CARE AND EXAMINATIONS SPECIFICATIONS FOR MEDICAL EXAMINATIONS OF COAL MINERS Chest Radiographic... their ability to make high quality diagnostic chest radiographs by submitting to NIOSH six or more sample chest radiographs made and processed at the applicant facility and which are of acceptable...

  2. Boerhaave's syndrome - tension hydropneumothorax and rapidly developing hydropneumothorax: two radiographic clues in one case.

    PubMed

    Nguyen Ho, Lam; Tran Van, Ngoc; Le, Thuong Vu

    2016-07-01

    Boerhaave's syndrome is a rare and severe condition with high mortality partly because of its atypical presentation resulting in delayed diagnosis and management. Diagnostic clues play an important role in the approach to this syndrome. Here, we report a 48 year-old male patient hospitalized with fever and left chest pain radiating into the interscapular area. Two chest radiographs undertaken 22 h apart showed a rapidly developing tension hydropneumothorax. The amylase level in the pleural fluid was high. The fluid in the chest tube turned bluish after the patient drank methylene blue. The diagnosis of Boerhaave's syndrome was suspected based on the aforementioned clinical clues and confirmed at the operation. The patient recovered completely with the use of antibiotics and surgical treatment. In this case, we describe key findings on chest radiographs that are useful in diagnosing Boerhaave's syndrome. PMID:27512563

  3. Boerhaave's syndrome – tension hydropneumothorax and rapidly developing hydropneumothorax: two radiographic clues in one case

    PubMed Central

    Tran Van, Ngoc; Le, Thuong Vu

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Boerhaave's syndrome is a rare and severe condition with high mortality partly because of its atypical presentation resulting in delayed diagnosis and management. Diagnostic clues play an important role in the approach to this syndrome. Here, we report a 48 year‐old male patient hospitalized with fever and left chest pain radiating into the interscapular area. Two chest radiographs undertaken 22 h apart showed a rapidly developing tension hydropneumothorax. The amylase level in the pleural fluid was high. The fluid in the chest tube turned bluish after the patient drank methylene blue. The diagnosis of Boerhaave's syndrome was suspected based on the aforementioned clinical clues and confirmed at the operation. The patient recovered completely with the use of antibiotics and surgical treatment. In this case, we describe key findings on chest radiographs that are useful in diagnosing Boerhaave's syndrome. PMID:27512563

  4. New developed DR detector performs radiographs of hand, pelvic and premature chest anatomies at a lower radiation dose and/or a higher image quality.

    PubMed

    Precht, Helle; Tingberg, Anders; Waaler, Dag; Outzen, Claus Bjørn

    2014-02-01

    A newly developed Digital Radiography (DR) detector has smaller pixel size and higher fill factor than earlier detector models. These technical advantages should theoretically lead to higher sensitivity and higher spatial resolution, thus making dose reduction possible without scarifying image quality compared to previous DR detector versions. To examine whether the newly developed Canon CXDI-70C DR detector provides an improved image quality and/or allows for dose reductions in hand and pelvic bone examinations as well as premature chest examinations, compared to the previous (CXDI-55C) DR detector version. A total of 450 images of a technical Contrast-Detail phantom were imaged on a DR system employing various kVp and mAs settings, providing an objective image quality assessment. In addition, 450 images of anthropomorphic phantoms were taken and analyzed by three specialized radiologists using Visual Grading Analysis (VGA). The results from the technical phantom studies showed that the image quality expressed as IQFINV values was on average approximately 45 % higher with the CXDI-70C detector compared to the CXDI-55C detector. Consistently, the VGA results from the anatomical phantom studies indicated that by using the CXDI-70C detector, diagnostic image quality could be maintained at a dose reduction of in average 30 %, depending on anatomy and kVp level. This indicates that the CXDI-70C detector is significantly more sensitive than the previous model, and supports a better clinical image quality. By using the newly developed DR detector a significant dose reduction is possible while maintaining image quality. PMID:24221693

  5. 42 CFR 37.44 - Approval of radiographic facilities that use digital radiography systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... (45 CFR Part 160 and Subparts A, C, and E of Part 164). ... quality digital chest radiographs by submitting to NIOSH digital radiographic image files of a test object... digital radiographic image files from six or more sample chest radiographs that are of acceptable...

  6. 42 CFR 37.44 - Approval of radiographic facilities that use digital radiography systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... AND HUMAN SERVICES MEDICAL CARE AND EXAMINATIONS SPECIFICATIONS FOR MEDICAL EXAMINATIONS OF... quality digital chest radiographs by submitting to NIOSH digital radiographic image files of a test object... digital radiographic image files from six or more sample chest radiographs that are of acceptable...

  7. Senile Calcification of the Trachea, Aortic Arch, and Mitral Annulus: An Incidental Finding on Chest X-Ray.

    PubMed

    Hosseinzadeh Maleki, Mahmood; Kazemi, Toba; Davoody, Navid

    2015-10-27

    A 94-year-old woman presented with dizziness and hypotension of 2 days' duration. She denied any syncope, presyncope, or angina. She had received a permanent pacemaker 12 years previously for the management of complete heart block (CHB), but she failed to program it. Twelve-lead electrocardiography revealed CHB with ventricular escape rhythm (40/min), so we inserted a temporary pacemaker. Anteroposterior chest X-ray showed trachea, aortic arch, and severe mitral valve calcification. Tracheal calcification is usually seen after 40 years old without clinical importance. However, it is seen in patients with renal failure, metastases, and prolonged use of warfarin as well as in pregnancy.(1) (-) (3). PMID:26985213

  8. Clinical predictors of radiographic abnormalities among infants with bronchiolitis in a paediatric emergency department

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Acute viral respiratory exacerbation is one of the most common conditions encountered in a paediatric emergency department (PED) during winter months. We aimed at defining clinical predictors of chest radiography prescription and radiographic abnormalities, among infants with bronchiolitis in a paediatric emergency department. Methods We conducted a prospective cohort study of children less than 2 years of age with clinical bronchiolitis, who presented for evaluation at the paediatric emergency department of an urban general hospital in France. Detailed information regarding historical features, examination findings, and management were collected. Clinical predictors of interest were explored in multivariate logistic regression models. Results Among 410 chest radiographs blindly interpreted by two experts, 40 (9.7%) were considered as abnormal. Clinical predictors of chest radiography achievement were age (under three months), feeding difficulties, fever over 38°C, hypoxia under than 95% of oxygen saturation, respiratory distress, crackles, and bronchitis rales. Clinical predictors of radiographic abnormalities were fever and close to significance hypoxia and conjunctivitis. Conclusion Our study provides arguments for reducing chest radiographs in infants with bronchiolitis. For infants with clinical factors such as age less than three months, feeding difficulties, respiratory distress without hypoxia, isolated crackles or bronchitis rales, careful clinical follow-up should be provided instead of chest radiography. PMID:24906343

  9. Sonography of the Pediatric Chest.

    PubMed

    Goh, Yonggeng; Kapur, Jeevesh

    2016-05-01

    Traditionally, pediatric chest diseases are evaluated with chest radiography. Due to advancements in technology, the use of sonography has broadened. It has now become an established radiation-free imaging tool that may supplement plain-film findings and, in certain cases, the first-line modality for evaluation of the pediatric chest. This pictorial essay will demonstrate the diagnostic potential of sonography, review a spectrum of pediatric chest conditions, and discuss their imaging features and clinical importance. PMID:27009313

  10. No Value for Routine Chest Radiography in the Work-Up of Early Stage Cervical Cancer Patients

    PubMed Central

    Hoogendam, Jacob P.; Zweemer, Ronald P.; Verkooijen, Helena M.; de Jong, Pim A.; van den Bosch, Maurice A. A. J.; Verheijen, René H. M.; Veldhuis, Wouter B.

    2015-01-01

    Aim Evidence supporting the recommendation to include chest radiography in the work-up of all cervical cancer patients is limited. We investigated the diagnostic value of routine chest radiography in cervical cancer staging. Methods All consecutive cervical cancer patients who presented at our tertiary referral center in the Netherlands (January 2006 – September 2013), and for whom ≥6 months follow-up was available, were included. As part of the staging procedure, patients underwent a routine two-directional digital chest radiograph. Findings were compared to a composite reference standard consisting of all imaging studies and histology obtained during the 6 months following radiography. Results Of the 402 women who presented with cervical cancer, 288 (71.6%) underwent chest radiography and had ≥6 months follow-up. Early clinical stage (I/II) cervical cancer was present in 244/288 (84.7%) women, while 44 (15.3%) presented with advanced disease (stage III/IV). The chest radiograph of 1 woman – with advanced pre-radiograph stage (IVA) disease – showed findings consistent with pulmonary metastases. Radiographs of 7 other women – 4 early, 3 advanced stage disease – were suspicious for pulmonary metastases which was confirmed by additional imaging in only 1 woman (with pre-radiograph advanced stage (IIIB) disease) and excluded in 6 cases, including all women with early stage disease. In none of the 288 women were thoracic skeletal metastases identified on imaging or during 6 months follow up. Radiography was unremarkable in 76.4% of the study population, and showed findings unrelated to the cervical carcinoma in 21.2%. Conclusion Routine chest radiography was of no value for any of the early stage cervical cancer patients presenting at our tertiary center over a period of 7.7 years. PMID:26135733

  11. [Chest pain].

    PubMed

    Horn, Benedikt

    2015-01-01

    Chest pain in ambulatory setting is predominantly not heart-associated. Most patients suffer from muskuloskeletal or functional (psychogenic) chest pain. Differential diagnosis covers aortic dissection, rib-fracture, shingles, GERD, Tietze-Syndrome, pulmonary embolism, pleuritis, pneumothorax, pleurodynia and metastatic disease. In most cases history, symptoms and signs allow a clinical diagnosis of high pretest-probability. PMID:25533261

  12. Chest Pain

    MedlinePlus

    Having a pain in your chest can be scary. It does not always mean that you are having a heart attack. There can be many other causes, ... embolism Costochondritis - an inflammation of joints in your chest Some of these problems can be serious. Get ...

  13. Chest tomosynthesis: technical and clinical perspectives.

    PubMed

    Johnsson, Ase Allansdotter; Vikgren, Jenny; Bath, Magnus

    2014-02-01

    The recent implementation of chest tomosynthesis is built on the availability of large, dose-efficient, high-resolution flat panel detectors, which enable the acquisition of the necessary number of projection radiographs to allow reconstruction of section images of the chest within one breath hold. A chest tomosynthesis examination obtains the increased diagnostic information provided by volumetric imaging at a radiation dose comparable to that of conventional chest radiography. There is evidence that the sensitivity of chest tomosynthesis may be at least three times higher than for conventional chest radiography for detection of pulmonary nodules. The sensitivity increases with increasing nodule size and attenuation and decreases for nodules with subpleural location. Differentiation between pleural and subpleural lesions is a known pitfall due to the limited depth resolution in chest tomosynthesis. Studies on different types of pathology report increased detectability in favor of chest tomosynthesis in comparison to chest radiography. The technique provides improved diagnostic accuracy and confidence in the diagnosis of suspected pulmonary lesions on chest radiography and facilitates the exclusion of pulmonary lesions in a majority of patients, avoiding the need for computed tomography (CT). However, motion artifacts can be a cumbersome limitation and breathing during the tomosynthesis image acquisition may result in severe artifacts significantly affecting the detectability of pathology. In summary, chest tomosynthesis has been shown to be superior to chest conventional radiography for many tasks and to be able to replace CT in selected cases. In our experience chest tomosynthesis is an efficient problem solver in daily clinical work. PMID:24481756

  14. Filters For Chest Radiography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramanathan, N.; Paron, J.

    1980-08-01

    The objective of low dose radiography is achieved by a judicious combination of proper kV selection, fast film-screen systems and beam filtration. A systematic study of filters was undertaken to evaluate the improvements that can be realized in terms of patient Entrance Skin Exposures (ESE) for chest radiographs. The Picker CD 135 Generator and the Automatic Chest Filmer with dynamic phototiming were used for the study. The kV dependence of ESE with various amounts of zinc and aluminum filtration is presented. The effect of filtration on image contrast is discussed. The variations of ESE with phantom thickness under different filtration conditions are also considered. It was found that the ESE can be reduced by as much as a factor of 1.8 ± .1 with no significant increase in tube loading.

  15. Psychogenic Dyspnea and Therapeutic Chest Radiograph

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kaufman, Kenneth R.; Endres, Jennifer K.; Kaufman, Nathaniel D.

    2007-01-01

    Conversion disorders, the physical expression of unresolved psychological pain, can be associated with mourning. This case report is third in a series of articles by the authors on childhood mourning reflecting the effects of multiple losses (K. R. Kaufman & N. D. Kaufman, 2005; K. R. Kaufman & N. D. Kaufman, 2006). In this case report, perception…

  16. Surgical Management of Minimally Invasive Anterior Lumbar Interbody Fusion with Stand-Alone Interbody Cage for L4-5 Degenerative Disorders: Clinical and Radiographic Findings

    PubMed Central

    Hironaka, Yasuo; Morimoto, Tetsuya; Motoyama, Yasushi; Park, Young-Su; Nakase, Hiroyuki

    2013-01-01

    Surgical treatment for degenerative spinal disorders is controversial, although lumbar fusion is considered an acceptable option for disabling lower back pain. Patients underwent instrumented minimally invasive anterior lumbar interbody fusion (mini-ALIF) using a retroperitoneal approach except for requiring multilevel fusions, severe spinal canal stenosis, high-grade spondylolisthesis, and a adjacent segments disorders. We retrospectively reviewed the clinical records and radiographs of 142 patients who received mini-ALIF for L4-5 degenerative lumbar disorders between 1998 and 2010. We compared preoperative and postoperative clinical data and radiographic measurements, including the modified Japanese Orthopaedic Association (JOA) score, visual analog scale (VAS) score for back and leg pain, disc height (DH), whole lumbar lordosis (WL), and vertebral wedge angle (WA). The mean follow-up period was 76 months. The solid fusion rate was 90.1% (128/142 patients). The average length of hospital stay was 6.9 days (range, 3–21 days). The mean blood loss was 63.7 ml (range, 10–456 ml). The mean operation time was 155.5 min (range, 96–280 min). The postoperative JOA and VAS scores for back and leg pain were improved compared with the preoperative scores. Radiological analysis showed significant postoperative improvements in DH, WL, and WA, and the functional and radiographical outcomes improved significantly after 2 years. The 2.8% complication rate included cases of wound infection, liquorrhea, vertebral body fractures, and a misplaced cage that required revision. Mini-ALIF was found to be associated with improved clinical results and radiographic findings for L4-5 disorders. A retroperitoneal approach might therefore be a valuable treatment option. PMID:24140782

  17. Development and evaluation of a computer-aided diagnostic scheme for lung nodule detection in chest radiographs by means of two-stage nodule enhancement with support vector classification

    SciTech Connect

    Chen Sheng; Suzuki, Kenji; MacMahon, Heber

    2011-04-15

    Purpose: To develop a computer-aided detection (CADe) scheme for nodules in chest radiographs (CXRs) with a high sensitivity and a low false-positive (FP) rate. Methods: The authors developed a CADe scheme consisting of five major steps, which were developed for improving the overall performance of CADe schemes. First, to segment the lung fields accurately, the authors developed a multisegment active shape model. Then, a two-stage nodule-enhancement technique was developed for improving the conspicuity of nodules. Initial nodule candidates were detected and segmented by using the clustering watershed algorithm. Thirty-one shape-, gray-level-, surface-, and gradient-based features were extracted from each segmented candidate for determining the feature space, including one of the new features based on the Canny edge detector to eliminate a major FP source caused by rib crossings. Finally, a nonlinear support vector machine (SVM) with a Gaussian kernel was employed for classification of the nodule candidates. Results: To evaluate and compare the scheme to other published CADe schemes, the authors used a publicly available database containing 140 nodules in 140 CXRs and 93 normal CXRs. The CADe scheme based on the SVM classifier achieved sensitivities of 78.6% (110/140) and 71.4% (100/140) with averages of 5.0 (1165/233) FPs/image and 2.0 (466/233) FPs/image, respectively, in a leave-one-out cross-validation test, whereas the CADe scheme based on a linear discriminant analysis classifier had a sensitivity of 60.7% (85/140) at an FP rate of 5.0 FPs/image. For nodules classified as ''very subtle'' and ''extremely subtle,'' a sensitivity of 57.1% (24/42) was achieved at an FP rate of 5.0 FPs/image. When the authors used a database developed at the University of Chicago, the sensitivities was 83.3% (40/48) and 77.1% (37/48) at an FP rate of 5.0 (240/48) FPs/image and 2.0 (96/48) FPs /image, respectively. Conclusions: These results compare favorably to those described for

  18. [Effects of surgery on muscles on clinical and radiographic findings in the hip joint region in cerebral palsy patients].

    PubMed

    Schejbalová, A; Havlas, V

    2008-10-01

    PURPOSE OF THE STUDY Isolated or combined surgical procedures on muscles around the hip joint are currently indicated by many authors. In cerebral palsy patients they are regarded as essential intervention. MATERIAL In the years 2005-2007, surgery in the hip joint region was essential for 150 children between 3 and 18 years of age. At the time of surgery, the patients' locomotion ranged from stage 1 to stage 7 of the Vojta system. METHODS The outcome was evaluated by clinical and radiographic examination at 2 and 6 months post-operatively and hip migration percentage and Wiberg's CE angle were measured. RESULTS The best clinical and radiographic outcomes were achieved in children younger than 6 years of age. On the other hand, isolated transfer of the distal rectus femoris muscle significantly affected pelvis anteflexion in adolescent patients. The most marked decrease in migration percentage was found after adductor tenotomy combined with surgery on the iliopsoas muscle (55.6 %) or when the two procedures were combined with distal rectus femoris transfer. DISCUSSION Combined surigical procedures, i.e., adductor tenotomy, surgery on the iliopsoas muscle or rectus femoris muscle and medial hamstrings, with fixation using an abduction modified Atlanta brace, are effective in patients with marked lateral hip migration who are younger that 6 years. Isolated adductor tenotomy and distal transfer of the rectus femoris muscle markedly improve standing position in walking patients. CONCLUSION An appropriate combination of surgical procedures on muscles in the hip region and on medial hamstrings can significantly improve the patient's locomotion and, if lateral migration is present, help to avoid surgery on bones. PMID:19026189

  19. Chest MRI

    MedlinePlus

    ... Restrictive cardiomyopathy Superior vena cava (SVC) obstruction Thoracic aortic aneurysm Thymus tumor Tumors of the chest Consult your ... Restrictive cardiomyopathy SVC obstruction Swollen lymph nodes Thoracic aortic aneurysm Patient Instructions Abdominal aortic aneurysm repair - open - discharge ...

  20. Chest MRI

    MedlinePlus

    ... imaging test that uses powerful magnetic fields and radio waves to create pictures of the chest (thoracic area). ... no side effects from the magnetic fields and radio waves have been reported. The most common type of ...

  1. Chest drainage.

    PubMed

    Carter, Chris

    2014-07-15

    As an intensive care nurse with experience of caring for critically ill patients in the UK and on deployed operations overseas, I found the CPD article useful in reviewing the pathophysiology of a pneumothorax, use of intrapleural chest drains, observations that should be recorded, and nursing care and management of a patient with an intrapleural chest drain. Reflecting on the time out activities in the CPD article was valuable. PMID:25005418

  2. Chest radiology

    SciTech Connect

    Reed, J.C.

    1990-01-01

    This book is a reference in plain chest film diagnosis provides a thorough background in the differential diagnosis of 22 of the most common radiologic patterns of chest disease. Each chapter is introduced with problem cases and a set of questions, followed by a tabular listing of the appropriate differential considerations. The book emphasizes plain films, CT and some MR scans are integrated to demonstrate how these modalities enhance the work of a case.

  3. 42 CFR 37.43 - Approval of radiographic facilities that use film.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... MEDICAL CARE AND EXAMINATIONS SPECIFICATIONS FOR MEDICAL EXAMINATIONS OF UNDERGROUND COAL MINERS Chest... demonstrating their ability to make high quality diagnostic chest radiographs by submitting to NIOSH six or more sample chest radiographs made and processed at the applicant facility and which are of acceptable...

  4. [Chest trauma].

    PubMed

    Freixinet Gilart, Jorge; Ramírez Gil, María Elena; Gallardo Valera, Gregorio; Moreno Casado, Paula

    2011-01-01

    Chest trauma is a frequent problem arising from lesions caused by domestic and occupational activities and especially road traffic accidents. These injuries can be analyzed from distinct points of view, ranging from consideration of the most severe injuries, especially in the context of multiple trauma, to the specific characteristics of blunt and open trauma. In the present article, these injuries are discussed according to the involvement of the various thoracic structures. Rib fractures are the most frequent chest injuries and their diagnosis and treatment is straightforward, although these injuries can be severe if more than three ribs are affected and when there is major associated morbidity. Lung contusion is the most common visceral lesion. These injuries are usually found in severe chest trauma and are often associated with other thoracic and intrathoracic lesions. Treatment is based on general support measures. Pleural complications, such as hemothorax and pneumothorax, are also frequent. Their diagnosis is also straightforward and treatment is based on pleural drainage. This article also analyzes other complex situations, notably airway trauma, which is usually very severe in blunt chest trauma and less severe and even suitable for conservative treatment in iatrogenic injury due to tracheal intubation. Rupture of the diaphragm usually causes a diaphragmatic hernia. Treatment is always surgical. Myocardial contusions should be suspected in anterior chest trauma and in sternal fractures. Treatment is conservative. Other chest injuries, such as those of the great thoracic and esophageal vessels, are less frequent but are especially severe. PMID:21640287

  5. Chest x-ray

    MedlinePlus

    ... Images Aortic rupture, chest x-ray Lung cancer, frontal chest x-ray Adenocarcinoma - chest x-ray Coal ... cancer - chest x-ray Lung nodule, right middle lobe - chest x-ray Lung mass, right upper lung - ...

  6. Value of normal electrocardiographic findings in predicting resting left ventricular function in patients with chest pain and suspected coronary artery disease

    SciTech Connect

    O'Keefe, J.H. Jr.; Zinsmeister, A.R.; Gibbons, R.J.

    1989-06-01

    Characterization of left ventricular function is important in managing patients with coronary artery disease. Although many methods are available to assess left ventricular function, most are either expensive, invasive, or both. In this study, we examined the ability of normal or near-normal resting electrocardiographic findings to predict resting left ventricular ejection fraction, measured by resting radionuclide angiography, in 874 patients with chest pain and suspected coronary artery disease. A retrospective review was undertaken of 4,410 Mayo Clinic patients who underwent rest and exercise radionuclide ventriculography for the evaluation of chest pain and known or suspected coronary artery disease; of these, 874 patients met the inclusion criteria for the current study. A 15-lead electrocardiogram, which was interpreted by the cardiologist or cardiology trainee working in the laboratory, was obtained at the same evaluation as the radionuclide study. In 590 patients with no previous history of a myocardial infarction and entirely normal resting electrocardiographic results without nonspecific ST-T wave abnormalities, the mean left ventricular ejection fraction was 0.63 +/- 0.004, and 559 patients (95%) had a normal resting ejection fraction (defined as 0.50 or more). Both nonspecific ST-T wave abnormalities (p less than 0.001) and, to a lesser degree, a history of myocardial infarction (p = 0.06) were independent predictors of an abnormal resting ejection fraction. In 185 patients with nonspecific ST-T wave abnormalities and no history of myocardial infarction, the mean left ventricular ejection fraction was 0.61 +/- 0.009, and 85% had a normal resting ejection fraction.

  7. Morphological variations of the anterior thoracic skeleton and their forensic significance: radiographic findings in a Spanish autopsy sample.

    PubMed

    Macaluso, P James; Lucena, Joaquín

    2014-08-01

    The anterior thoracic skeleton may exhibit a number of morphological variations or anomalies, including accessory ossicles, atypical fusion or nonfusion of bony segments, and accessory foramina. Awareness of these minor skeletal variants is important in forensic medicine given that they may be mistakenly identified as pathological or traumatic lesions. The identification of subtle morphological anomalies may also aid in the process of individualization by serving as points of similarity if their occurrence was recorded antemortem. This study assessed the prevalence of anatomical variants of the sternum and ribs in a modern population from Spain, since the frequency of these skeletal anomalies differs between population groups. The occurrence of sternal clefts and foramina, bifurcated ribs, fusion of the manubriosternal and sternoxiphoidal junctions, and type of xiphoid process end was evaluated on posterior-anterior digital radiographs. None of the morphological variations were associated with sex or age, with the exception of two traits related to the xiphoid process. The xiphoid process was absent more often in younger individuals, particularly specimens below the age of 30 years, whereas, complete fusion of the sternoxiphoidal junction was more often observed in individuals above 50 years of age. However, these morphological variants are highly variable in the study sample and thus they have limited utility in forensic age estimation in the Spanish population. Nonetheless, the presence of various morphological anomalies such as sternal foramina, bifid ribs, and triple-ended xiphoid processes may provide information useful for establishing a personal identification. PMID:24933632

  8. 42 CFR 37.6 - Chest roentgenographic examinations conducted by the Secretary.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Chest roentgenographic examinations conducted by... Chest Roentgenographic Examinations § 37.6 Chest roentgenographic examinations conducted by the Secretary. (a) The Secretary will give chest radiographs or make arrangements with an appropriate...

  9. 42 CFR 37.60 - Submitting required chest roentgenograms and miner identification documents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Submitting required chest roentgenograms and miner... Chest Roentgenographic Examinations Specifications for Interpretation, Classification, and Submission of Chest Radiographs § 37.60 Submitting required chest roentgenograms and miner identification...

  10. Routine chest x-ray examinations in occupational medicine

    SciTech Connect

    Ashenburg, N.J.

    1982-01-01

    To collect some data on the yield of the chest x-ray examination in pre-employment health evaluations, a retrospective study was carried out. Pre-employment chest x-ray examination reports on 3,266 applicants were reviewed in Eastman Kodak Company's Medical Department in Rochester, N.Y. All radiographs were interpreted by Board-certified radiologists. For the purpose of this study, positive findings were restricted to the pulmonary and cardiovascular systems. The findings included items that would not be considered completely normal. However, many were of no clinical significance. An important point in regard to the findings is that 80% of the applicants were under the age of 35. The data are summarized in Table 1. Positive findings were noted in 52 (1.6%) radiographs. Of these, 25 (0.7%) had some radiologic finding that was relevant in terms of clinical follow-up, appropriate job placement or deferment of employment. Only two of the 3,266 applicants were not employed because of the x-ray examination findings. Results suggests that a selective program, based on clinical history and examination and on past and proposed job exposure, might be appropriate.

  11. The “dirty chest”—correlations between chest radiography, multislice CT and tobacco burden

    PubMed Central

    Kirchner, J; Goltz, J P; Lorenz, F; Obermann, A; Kirchner, E M; Kickuth, R

    2012-01-01

    Objectives Cigarette smoking-induced airway disease commonly results in an overall increase of non-specific lung markings on chest radiography. This has been described as “dirty chest”. As the morphological substrate of this condition is similar to the anthracosilicosis of coal workers, we hypothesised that it is possible to quantify the radiological changes using the International Labour Organization (ILO) classification of pneumoconiosis. The aims of this study were to evaluate whether there is a correlation between the extent of cigarette smoking and increased lung markings on chest radiography and to correlate the chest radiographic scores with findings on CT studies. Methods In a prospective analysis a cohort of 85 smokers was examined. The cigarette consumption was evaluated in pack years (defined as 20 cigarettes per day over 1 year). Film reading was performed by two board-certified radiologists. Chest radiographs were evaluated for the presence of thickening of bronchial walls, the presence of linear or nodular opacities, and emphysema. To correlate the smoking habits with the increase of overall lung markings in chest radiography, the ILO profusion score was converted to numbers ranging from zero to nine. Chest radiographs were rated according to the complete set of standard films of the revised ILO classification. Results 63/85 (74%) of the smokers showed an increase in overall lung markings on chest radiography; 32 (37%) had an ILO profusion score of <1/1, 29 (34%) had an ILO profusion score of <2/2 and 2 (2%) had an ILO score of ≥2/2. There was a significant positive linear correlation between the increase of overall lung markings on chest radiography and the cigarette consumption quantified as pack years (r=0.68). The majority of the heavy smokers (>40 pack years) showed emphysema; there was no significant difference between the prevalence of emphysema as diagnosed by CT (62%) or chest radiography (71%) (p<0.05).The most common findings in CT

  12. Cervical spine disc prosthesis: radiographic, biomechanical and morphological post mortal findings 12 weeks after implantation. A retrieval example.

    PubMed

    Pitzen, Tobias; Kettler, Annette; Drumm, Joerg; Nabhan, Abdullah; Steudel, Wolf Ingo; Claes, Lutz; Wilke, Hans Joachim

    2007-07-01

    There is a gap between in vitro and clinical studies concerning performance of spinal disc prosthesis. Retrieval studies may help to bridge this gap by providing more detailed information about motion characteristics, wear properties and osseous integration. Here, we report on the radiographic, mechanical, histological properties of a cervical spine segment treated with a cervical spine disc prosthesis (Prodisc C, Synthes Spine, Paoli, USA) for 3 months. A 48-year-old male received the device due to symptomatic degenerative disc disease within C5-C6. The patient recovered completely from his symptoms. Twelve weeks later, he died from a subarachnoid hemorrhage. During routine autopsy, C3-T1 was removed with all attached muscles and ligaments and subjected to plain X-rays and computed tomography, three dimensional flexibility tests, shear test as well as histological and electronic microscopic investigations. We detected radiolucencies mainly at the cranial interface between bone and implant. The flexibility of the segment under pure bending moments of +/-2.5 Nm applied in flexion/extension, axial rotation and lateral bending was preserved, with, however, reduced lateral bending and enlarged neutral zone compared to the adjacent segments C4-C5, and C6-C7. Stepwise increase of loading in flexion/extension up to +/-9.5 Nm did not result in segmental destruction. A postero-anterior force of 146 N was necessary to detach the lower half of the prosthesis from the vertebra. At the polyethylene (PE) core, signs of wear were observed compared to an unused core using electronic microscopy. Metal and PE debris without signs of severe inflammatory reaction was found within the surrounding soft tissue shell of the segment. A thin layer of soft connective tissue covered the major part of the implant endplate. Despite the limits of such a case report, the results show: that such implants are able to preserve at least a certain degree of segmental flexibility, that direct bone

  13. Impact of positive chest X-ray findings and blood cultures on adverse outcomes following hospitalized pneumococcal lower respiratory tract infection: a population-based cohort study

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Little is known about the clinical presentation and outcome of pneumococcal lower respiratory tract infection (LRTI) without positive chest X-ray findings and blood cultures. We investigated the prognostic impact of a pulmonary infiltrate and bacteraemia on the clinical course of hospitalized patients with confirmed pneumococcal LRTI. Methods We studied a population-based multi-centre cohort of 705 adults hospitalized with LRTI and Streptococcus pneumoniae in LRT specimens or blood: 193 without pulmonary infiltrate or bacteraemia, 250 with X-ray confirmed pneumonia, and 262 with bacteraemia. We compared adverse outcomes in the three groups and used multiple regression analyses to adjust for differences in age, sex, comorbidity, and lifestyle factors. Results Patients with no infiltrate and no bacteraemia were of similar age but had more comorbidity than the other groups (Charlson index score ≥1: no infiltrate and no bacteraemia 81% vs. infiltrate without bacteraemia 72% vs. bacteraemia 61%), smoked more tobacco, and had more respiratory symptoms. In contrast, patients with a pulmonary infiltrate or bacteraemia had more inflammation (median C-reactive protein: no infiltrate and no bacteraemia 82 mg/L vs. infiltrate without bacteraemia 163 mg/L vs. bacteraemia 316 mg/L) and higher acute disease severity scores. All adverse outcomes increased from patients with no infiltrate and no bacteraemia to those with an infiltrate and to those with bacteraemia: Length of hospital stay (5 vs. 6 vs. 8 days); intensive care admission (7% vs. 20% vs. 23%); pulmonary complications (1% vs. 5% vs. 14%); and 30-day mortality (5% vs. 11% vs. 21%). Compared with patients with no infiltrate and no bacteraemia, the adjusted 30-day mortality rate ratio was 1.9 (95% confidence interval (CI) 0.9-4.1) in patients with an infiltrate without bacteraemia and 4.1 (95% CI 2.0-8.5) in bacteraemia patients. Adjustment for acute disease severity and inflammatory markers weakened these

  14. What Is Chest MRI?

    MedlinePlus

    ... page from the NHLBI on Twitter. What Is Chest MRI? Chest MRI (magnetic resonance imaging) is a safe, noninvasive ... creates detailed pictures of the structures in your chest, such as your chest wall, heart, and blood ...

  15. The early development of medial coronoid disease in growing Labrador retrievers: radiographic, computed tomographic, necropsy and micro-computed tomographic findings.

    PubMed

    Lau, S F; Wolschrijn, C F; Hazewinkel, H A W; Siebelt, M; Voorhout, G

    2013-09-01

    Medial coronoid disease (MCD) encompasses lesions of the entire medial coronoid process (MCP), both of the articular cartilage and the subchondral bone. To detect the earliest signs of MCD, radiography and computed tomography were used to monitor the development of MCD in 14 Labrador retrievers, from 6 to 7 weeks of age until euthanasia. The definitive diagnosis of MCD was based on necropsy and micro-computed tomography findings. The frequency of MCD in the dogs studied was 50%. Radiographic findings did not provide evidence of MCD, ulnar subtrochlear sclerosis or blunting of the cranial edge of the MCP. Computed tomography was more sensitive (30.8%) than radiography (0%) in detecting early MCD, with the earliest signs detectable at 14 weeks of age. A combination of the necropsy and micro-computed tomography findings of the MCP showed that MCD was manifested as a lesion of only the subchondral bone in dogs <18 weeks of age. In all dogs (affected and unaffected), there was close contact between the base of the MCP and the proximal radial head in the congruent joints. Computed tomography and micro-computed tomography findings indicated that the lesions of MCD probably originated at the base of the MCP. PMID:23702281

  16. Musculoskeletal chest wall pain

    PubMed Central

    Fam, Adel G.; Smythe, Hugh A.

    1985-01-01

    The musculoskeletal structures of the thoracic wall and the neck are a relatively common source of chest pain. Pain arising from these structures is often mistaken for angina pectoris, pleurisy or other serious disorders. In this article the clinical features, pathogenesis and management of the various musculoskeletal chest wall disorders are discussed. The more common causes are costochondritis, traumatic muscle pain, trauma to the chest wall, “fibrositis” syndrome, referred pain, psychogenic regional pain syndrome, and arthritis involving articulations of the sternum, ribs and thoracic spine. Careful analysis of the history, physical findings and results of investigation is essential for precise diagnosis and effective treatment. ImagesFig. 3Fig. 4Fig. 5 PMID:4027804

  17. Comparing Clinicopathologic and Radiographic Findings Between TT-UMP, Classical, and Non-Encapsulated Follicular Variants of Papillary Thyroid Carcinomas.

    PubMed

    Baser, Husniye; Topaloglu, Oya; Tam, Abbas Ali; Alkan, Afra; Kilicarslan, Aydan; Ersoy, Reyhan; Cakir, Bekir

    2016-09-01

    Thyroid tumors of uncertain malignant potential (TT-UMP) comprise an accepted subgroup of follicular-patterned thyroid tumors for which benignancy or malignancy cannot be precisely assessed. We aimed to evaluate the demographic characteristics, ultrasound (US) findings, and cytological results of patients with TT-UMP and compare these findings to a classical variant of papillary thyroid carcinoma (CV-PTC) and non-encapsulated follicular variant of PTC (NEFV-PTC) patients; we also evaluated the immunohistochemical characteristics of patients with TT-UMP. Twenty-four patients with TT-UMP, 672 with CV-PTC, and 132 with NEFV-PTC were included in the study. Mean longitudinal nodule size and median nodule volume were higher in the TT-UMP group than in the CV-PTC and NEFV-PTC groups (p < 0.001 and p < 0.001 for CV-PTC; p < 0.001 and p = 0.008 for NEFV-PTC). The presence of halo and peripheral vascularization was observed more frequently in the TT-UMP group than in the CV-PTC group (p = 0.002 and p = 0.024). Benign and follicular neoplasm/suspicious for follicular neoplasm cytological results were higher in the TT-UMP group than in the CV-PTC group (p = 0.030 and p = 0.001). US findings were similar between TT-UMP and NEFV-PTC groups (all, p > 0.05). However, none of the patients with TT-UMP were called malignant; 105 patients (31.2 %) of CV-PTC and 11 patients (9.5 %) of NEFV-PTC (infiltrative FV) were classified as malignant cytologically. Tumor size was higher in the TT-UMP group than in the CV-PTC and NEFV-PTC groups (p < 0.001 and p = 0.006). In the TT-UMP group, positive expression of HBME-1, CK-19, and Gal-3 was found in 50, 33.3, and 25 % of patients, respectively. This study demonstrated that none of the TT-UMP patients were evaluated as malignant in preoperative cytology. However, patients with TT-UMP had higher nodule and tumor sizes than CV-PTC and NEFV-PTC patients; US features were similar between NEFV-PTC and TT

  18. Hepatic Hydatid Disease: Radiographics Findings

    PubMed Central

    Polat, Pınar; Atamanalp, S. Selçuk

    2009-01-01

    Hydatid disease (HD) is a unique parasitic disease that primarily affects the liver and is endemic in many parts of the world. There are four types of hydatid cysts (HCs) with various levels of organ involvement. All four HC types can be seen in the liver, with the right lobe being the most common site of involvement. There are many potential intrahepatic and extrahepatic complications that affect the liver and other organs. Intrahepatic complications include vascular and biliary complications and infection. With rare portal vein compression and decreased vascular supply, the involved lobe may show atrophic changes while the other lobe becomes hypertrophic. Intrahepatic biliary dilatation results from large cysts compressing intrahepatic ducts or due to cyst rupture into the biliary ducts. Cyst infection may also occur via a similar mechanism. Extrahepatic complications result from exophytic growth and hematogeneous dissemination. Exophytic growth causes migration of cysts into the lungs, mediastinum, heart and peritoneum. Hematogeneous dissemination involves all other organs. PMID:25610064

  19. Chest radiography in acute aortic syndrome: pearls and pitfalls.

    PubMed

    Chawla, Ashish; Rajendran, Surendran; Yung, Wai Heng; Babu, Suresh Balasubramanian; Peh, Wilfred C

    2016-08-01

    Acute aortic syndrome is a group of life-threatening diseases of the thoracic aorta that usually present to the emergency department. It includes aortic dissection, aortic intramural hematoma, and penetrating aortic ulcer. Rare aortic pathologies of aorto-esophageal fistula and mycotic aneurysm may also be included in this list. All these conditions require urgent treatment with complex clinical care and management. Most patients who present with chest pain are evaluated with a chest radiograph in the emergency department. It is important that maximum diagnostic information is extracted from the chest radiograph as certain signs on the chest radiograph are extremely useful in pointing towards the diagnosis of acute aortic syndrome. PMID:27282377

  20. Chest tube insertion

    MedlinePlus

    Chest drainage tube insertion; Insertion of tube into chest; Tube thoracostomy; Pericardial drain ... When your chest tube is inserted, you will lie on your side or sit partly upright, with one arm over your ...

  1. Chest tube insertion

    MedlinePlus

    ... leaks from inside the lung into the chest ( pneumothorax ) Fluid buildup in the chest (called a pleural ... on the reason a chest tube is inserted. Pneumothorax usually improves, but sometimes needs minimally invasive surgery. ...

  2. Chest imaging and lung function impairment after long-term occupational exposure to low concentrations of chrysotile.

    PubMed

    Spyratos, Dionisios; Chloros, Diamantis; Haidich, Bettina; Dagdilelis, Loukas; Markou, Stamatia; Sichletidis, Lazaros

    2012-01-01

    The aim of the present study was the investigation of radiographic findings in relation to lung function after occupational exposure to permissible levels of relatively pure chrysotile (0.5-3% amphiboles). We studied 266 out of the total 317 employees who have worked in an asbestos cement factory during the period 1968-2004 with chest x-ray, high-resolution computed tomography (HRCT) and lung function tests. Sensitivity of chest x-ray was 43% compared to HRCT. Abnormal HRCT findings were found in 75 subjects (67%) and were related to age, occupational exposure duration, and spirometric data. The presence of parenchymal or visceral pleural lesions (exclusively or as the predominant abnormality) was being accompanied by lower total lung capacity and diffusion capacity. HRCT was much more sensitive than chest x-ray for occupational chrysotile exposure. Lung function impairment was related with parenchymal but not with pleural HRCT abnormalities. PMID:22524648

  3. [Radiographic assessment of pulmonary hypertension: Methodical aspects].

    PubMed

    Korobkova, I Z; Lazutkina, V K; Nizovtsova, L A; Riden, T V

    2015-01-01

    Pulmonary hypertension is a menacing complication of a number of diseases, which is responsible for high mortality rates and considerably poorer quality of life in a patient. The timely detection for pulmonary hypertension allows timely initiation of treatment, thus improvement in prognosis in the patient. Chest X-ray is the most commonly used radiographic technique for various causes. Physicians' awareness about the radiographic manifestations of pulmonary hypertension may contribute to the earlier detection of this severe disease. Owing to the natural contrast of reflected structures, a chest X-ray film gives a unique opportunity to assess pulmonary circulation vessels, to reveal the signs of pulmonary hypertension, and to estimate trends in the course of the disease. The paper details a procedure for analysis and the normal radiographic anatomy of pulmonary circulation vessels, gives the present classification of pulmonary hypertension, and sets forth its X-ray semiotics. PMID:26552229

  4. Painful Chest Wall Swellings: Tietze Syndrome or Chest Wall Tumor?

    PubMed

    Kaplan, Tevfik; Gunal, Nesimi; Gulbahar, Gultekin; Kocer, Bulent; Han, Serdar; Eryazgan, Mehmet Ali; Ozsoy, Arzu; Naldoken, Seniha; Alhan, Aslıhan; Sakinci, Unal

    2016-04-01

    Background Tietze syndrome (TS) is an inflammatory condition characterized by chest pain and swelling of costochondral junction. Primary chest wall tumors may mimic TS. In this article, we report our experience of approximately 121 patients initially diagnosed as TS and determined chest wall tumor in some cases at the follow-up. Methods This is a retrospective review of patients diagnosed as TS by clinical examination, chest X-ray, electrocardiogram, routine laboratory tests, and computed tomography (CT) of chest: all treated and followed up between March 2001 and July 2012. There were 121 cases (41 males and 80 females; mean age, 39.6 ± 3.2 years) of TS. Results In 27 patients with initial normal radiological findings, the size of swellings had doubled during the follow-up period (mean, 8.51 ± 2.15 months). These patients were reevaluated with chest CT and bone scintigraphy and then early diagnostic biopsy was performed. Pathologic examination revealed primary chest wall tumor in 13 patients (5 malignant, 8 benign). CT had a sensitivity of 92.3% and a specificity of 64.2% in detection of tumors (kappa: 0.56, p = 0.002), whereas the sensitivity and the specificity of bone scan were 84.6 and 35.7%, respectively (kappa: 0.199, p = 0.385). Conclusion Primary chest wall tumors could mimic TS. Bone scintigraphy or CT is not specific enough to determine malignant and other benign disorders of costochondral junction. Therefore, clinicians should follow TS patients more closely, and in case of increasing size of swelling, early diagnostic biopsy should be considered. PMID:25742551

  5. Work related respiratory symptoms in radiographers.

    PubMed Central

    Smedley, J; Inskip, H; Wield, G; Coggon, D

    1996-01-01

    OBJECTIVE--To determine the prevalence of work related symptoms among radiographers compared with a control group of physiotherapists. METHOD--A postal questionnaire was used to collect information from radiographers and physiotherapists who registered in the United Kingdom during 1985-9. RESULTS--Satisfactory questionnaires were returned by 2354 (65%) of the radiographers and 3048 (69%) of the physiotherapists. There was a clear excess of work related symptoms among the radiographers. In particular, they were more likely to complain of symptoms that were worse at work, mouth soreness, sore, itchy, or runny eyes, persistent blocked nose, persistent itchy nose or sneezing, sore throat, headache, and of lower respiratory tract symptoms, which were also worse on workdays. These symptoms were associated particularly with the use of automatic processing machines. 235 radiographers gave a history of wheeze or chest tightness that had been worse at work or on days when at work. CONCLUSIONS--Work related symptoms suggesting irritation of the eyes and upper airways were more common in radiographers than controls, and may be related to exposure to x ray film processing chemicals. Men and women who reported work related wheeze or chest tightness will be followed up in more detail to assess the prevalence of occupational asthma in the cohort. PMID:8704868

  6. [Imaging signs in chest diagnostics].

    PubMed

    Krombach, G A

    2016-08-01

    Signs in chest imaging are defined as typical findings which can be easily recognized on x‑ray photographs or computed tomography (CT) scans of the chest. They are caused by different typical pathophysiological processes. Due to the association of a certain pathophysiological cause with a given sign, knowledge and use of these signs can allow the possible differential diagnoses to be narrowed down. If other imaging findings and clinical data are additionally taken into account, the diagnosis can be made with a high degree of confidence in many cases. PMID:27369549

  7. Exercises in chest X-ray diagnosis

    SciTech Connect

    Elliott, J.A.; Cowan, M.D.

    1986-01-01

    In the fifty exercises which form the first part of the book, radiographs are combined with a group of questions designed to test the readers clinical and radiological knowledge. The exercises cover all the common and many of the rarer cardiothoracic disorders which are revealed on the chest x-ray. Increasingly, computed tomography is used in the differential diagnosis of thoracic problems, and several examples have been included.

  8. [Development of breathing chest radiography: study of exposure timing].

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Rie; Sanada, Shigeru; Kobayashi, Takeshi; Suzuki, Masayuki; Matsui, Takeshi; Inoue, Hitoshi

    2003-08-01

    The flat-panel detector (FPD) has been introduced into clinical practice. A modified FPD, which has the ability to obtain dynamic chest radiographs, was introduced into our hospital, and clinical testing is ongoing. Both the inspiratory and expiratory phases have to be included in dynamic chest radiographs. The purpose of this study was to investigate the most appropriate chest radiography signal for observation of the respiratory process. We prepared ten protocol patterns that differed in terms of respiratory phase at X-ray exposure, exposure duration, and signal multiplicity. We also performed preliminary experiments and administered several questionnaires to ten volunteers. The volunteers breathed according to vocal and visual signals, and their respiratory waves were recorded by spirometer. The most appropriate protocol was similar to the method used for conventional chest radiography. PMID:12960952

  9. Cleidocranial Dysplasia: A Clinico-radiographic Spectrum with Differential Diagnosis

    PubMed Central

    Patil, Purva Prakash; Barpande, Suresh Ramchandra; Bhavthankar, Jyoti Dilip; Humbe, Jayanti G.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Cleidocranial dysplasia (CCD) is characterized by aplasia or hypoplasia of the clavicles, characteristic craniofacial malformations, and the presence of numerous supernumerary and unerupted teeth. It affects bones derived from both intra-membranous and endochondral ossification. Incidence has been reported as 1 in 10,00,000. It is caused by mutation in the gene encoding transcription factor Core Binding Factor Subunit Alpha l (CBFAl) or Runt related transcription factor 2 (RUNX2). Case Report: This presentation discusses the clinical and radiographic features of a familial case of cleidocranial dysplasia occurring in a father and a child. All the clinical and radiographic features, except that of the chest x-ray, were more prominent in the child than the father. This supports the fact that CCD is transmitted by an autosomal-dominant mode of inheritance with high penetrance and variable expressivity. It is sporadic in about 40% of cases. Each child of an individual with CCD has a 50% chance of in heriting the mutation. Conclusion: Diagnosis is mostly made on the basis of clinical and radiographic features. Molecular genetic testing such as sequence analysis or deletion analysis can be used in cleidocranial dysplasia. Some cases are diagnosed through incidental findings by physicians, treating patients for unrelated conditions. Treatment of these patients requires a multidisciplinary approach which includes orthopaedic and dental corrections along with management of any complications of cleidocranial dysplasia. PMID:27299035

  10. Chest X-Ray

    MedlinePlus Videos and Cool Tools

    ... Prostate Ultrasound Video: IMRT Video: Chest CT Video:Thyroid Ultrasound Video: Pediatric MRI Radiology and You About ... Prostate Ultrasound Video: IMRT Video: Chest CT Video:Thyroid Ultrasound Video: Pediatric MRI Radiology and You About ...

  11. Validation of the International Labour Office Digitized Standard Images for Recognition and Classification of Radiographs of Pneumoconiosis

    PubMed Central

    Halldin, Cara N.; Petsonk, Edward L.; Laney, A. Scott

    2015-01-01

    Rationale and Objectives Chest radiographs are recommended for prevention and detection of pneumoconiosis. In 2011, the International Labour Office (ILO) released a revision of the International Classification of Radiographs of Pneumoconioses that included a digitized standard images set. The present study compared results of classifications of digital chest images performed using the new ILO 2011 digitized standard images to classification approaches used in the past. Materials and Methods Underground coal miners (N = 172) were examined using both digital and film-screen radiography (FSR) on the same day. Seven National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health-certified B Readers independently classified all 172 digital radiographs, once using the ILO 2011 digitized standard images (DRILO2011-D) and once using digitized standard images used in the previous research (DRRES). The same seven B Readers classified all the miners’ chest films using the ILO film-based standards. Results Agreement between classifications of FSR and digital radiography was identical, using a standard image set (either DRILO2011-D or DRRES). The overall weighted κ value was 0.58.Somespecific differences in the results were seen and noted. However, intrareader variability in this study was similar to the published values and did not appear to be affected by the use of the new ILO 2011 digitized standard images. Conclusions These findings validate the use of the ILO digitized standard images for classification of small pneumoconiotic opacities. When digital chest radiographs are obtained and displayed appropriately, results of pneumoconiosis classifications using the 2011 ILO digitized standards are comparable to film-based ILO classifications and to classifications using earlier research standards. PMID:24507420

  12. Comparison of Rates of Coronary Angiography and Combined Testing Procedures in Patients Seen in the Emergency Room With Chest Pain (But No Objective Acute Coronary Syndrome Findings) Having Coronary Computed Tomography Versus Exercise Stress Testing.

    PubMed

    Grunau, Brian; Leipsic, Jonathon; Purssell, Elizabeth; Kasteel, Naomi; Nguyen, Kimchi; Kazem, Mikameh; Naoum, Christopher; Raju, Rekha; Blanke, Philipp; Heilbron, Brett; Taylor, Carolyn; Scheuermeyer, Frank X

    2016-07-15

    Coronary computed tomography angiography (CCTA) appears comparable to standard care, including exercise stress testing (EST), in diagnosing acute coronary syndrome in emergency department (ED) patients with chest pain but may increase downstream testing. The objective of this study was to investigate rates of post-CCTA versus post-EST testing for (1) invasive angiography and (2) all combined cardiac testing. This was a retrospective cohort study performed at 2 urban Canadian EDs involving patients aged up to 65 years with chest pain but no objective ACS findings that were evaluated with CCTA or EST at the physician's discretion. The primary outcome was the proportion of patients who had 30-day invasive angiography in each group; secondary outcomes included all subsequent 30-day cardiac testing, including nuclear medicine scanning. From July 1, 2012, to June 30, 2014, we collected 1,700 patients: 521 CCTA and 1,179 EST. Demographics and risk factors were similar in both cohorts. In the following 30 days, 30 CCTA (5.8%) and 297 EST (25.2%) patients underwent any type of additional cardiac testing (difference 19.4%, 95% CI 16.0 to 22.6), whereas 12 CCTA (2.3%) and 20 EST patients (1.7%) underwent angiography (difference 0.6%, 95% CI -0.8% to 2.6%). No patients in either group died or had a myocardial infarction within 30 days. For ED patients with chest pain who underwent brief observation, CCTA and EST had similar 30-day angiography rates, but CCTA patients underwent significantly less overall cardiac investigations. PMID:27236251

  13. Chest pain in children.

    PubMed Central

    Leung, A. K.; Robson, W. L.; Cho, H.

    1996-01-01

    Chest pain is usually a benign symptom in children. The most common identifiable causes are musculoskeletal. Often, no cause can be identified. Cardiac disorders are uncommon causes of chest pain children. Most causes can be diagnosed from history and physical examination. Treatment should be directed at the underlying cause. For idiopathic chest pain, reassurance and regular follow-up examinations are important. PMID:8704491

  14. Chest x-ray

    MedlinePlus

    Chest radiography; Serial chest x-ray; X-ray - chest ... You stand in front of the x-ray machine. You will be told to hold your breath when the x-ray is taken. Two images are usually taken. You will ...

  15. Crush injuries of the chest

    PubMed Central

    Davidson, I. A.; Bargh, W.; Cruickshank, A. N.; Duthie, W. H.

    1969-01-01

    Fifty-four patients previously treated for a severe chest injury in an artificial ventilation unit have been followed up. An attempt has been made to determine their state of health and activity. Particular attention has been paid to their respiratory function. The significance of the findings has been discussed. Images PMID:4899979

  16. American College of Chest Physicians

    MedlinePlus

    ... of Certification (MOC) CHEST GAIN NSCLC CHEST SEEK Innovation, Simulation, and Training Center Professional Representative Education Program ( ... of Certification (MOC) CHEST GAIN NSCLC CHEST SEEK Innovation, Simulation, and Training Center Professional Representative Education Program ( ...

  17. Plain radiographic diagnosis of thrombosis of left atrial appendage in mitral valve disease

    SciTech Connect

    Matsuyama, S.; Watabe, T.; Kuribayashi, S.; Ootaki, M.; Suzuki, Y.; Sugihara, M.; Kawada, S.; Koide, S.; Shohtsu, A.; Tomoda, H.

    1983-01-01

    Conventional posteroanterior chest radiographs of 42 patients with mitral valve disease who had had surgery were analyzed, and particular attention was directed to the presence or absence of the convexity of the left lower midcardiac border (left artrial segment). The flatness or concavity of this segment, despite other evidence of left atrial enlargement, was observed in six (60%) of 10 patients who had left atrial thrombosis, and in three (9%) of 32 patients who did not have thrombosis (false positive diagnosis). Four of the 10 patients who had left atrial thrombosis did not show this finding on the radiographs (false negative diagnosis). One of these four had a thrombus only against the posterior wall of the body of the left atrium. Therefore, the accuracy in the diagnosis of thrombosis of the left atrial appendage was 66.7% (six of nine) for patients who had thrombosis of the appendage. Standard chest radiographs are important in the evaluation of the patient with thrombosis of the left atrial appendage.

  18. Java interface to a computer-aided diagnosis system for acute pulmonary embolism using PIOPED findings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frederick, Erik D.; Tourassi, Georgia D.; Gauger, Matthew; Floyd, Carey E., Jr.

    1999-05-01

    An interface to a Computer Aided Diagnosis (CAD) system for diagnosis of Acute Pulmonary Embolism (PE) from PIOPED radiographic findings was developed. The interface is based on Internet technology which is user-friendly and available on a broad range of computing platforms. It was designed to be used as a research tool and as a data collection tool, allowing researchers to observe the behavior of a CAD system and to collect radiographic findings on ventilation-perfusion lung scans and chest radiographs. The interface collects findings from physicians in the PIOPED reporting format, processes those findings and presents them as inputs to an artificial neural network (ANN) previously trained on findings from 1,064 patients from the Prospective Investigation of Pulmonary Embolism Diagnosis (PIOPED) study. The likelihood of PE predicted by the ANN and by the physician using the system is then saved for later analysis.

  19. Community-acquired pneumonia in primary care: clinical assessment and the usability of chest radiography

    PubMed Central

    Moberg, A.B.; Taléus, U.; Garvin, P.; Fransson, S.-G.; Falk, M.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives To investigate the diagnostic value of different clinical and laboratory findings in pneumonia and to explore the association between the doctor’s degree of suspicion and chest X-ray (CXR) result and to evaluate whether or not CXR should be used routinely in primary care, when available. Design A three-year prospective study was conducted between September 2011 and December 2014. Setting Two primary care settings in Linköping, Sweden. Subjects A total of 103 adult patients with suspected pneumonia in primary care. Main outcome measures The physicians recorded results of a standardized medical physical examination, including laboratory results, and rated their suspicion into three degrees. The outcome of the diagnostic variables and the degree of suspicion was compared with the result of CXR. Results Radiographic pneumonia was reported in 45% of patients. When the physicians were sure of the diagnosis radiographic pneumonia was found in 88% of cases (p < 0.001), when quite sure the frequency of positive CXR was 45%, and when not sure 28%. Elevated levels of C-reactive protein (CRP) ≥ 50mg/L were associated with the presence of radiographic pneumonia when the diagnosis was suspected (p < 0.001). Conclusion This study indicates that CXR can be useful if the physician is not sure of the diagnosis, but when sure one can rely on one’s judgement without ordering CXR. Key pointsThere are different guidelines but no consensus on how to manage community-acquired pneumonia in primary care.When the physician is sure of the diagnosis the judgement is reliable without chest X-ray and antibiotics can be safely prescribed.Chest X-ray can be useful in the assessment of pneumonia in primary care, when the physician is not sure of the diagnosis. PMID:26849394

  20. Findings

    MedlinePlus

    ... Issue All Issues Explore Findings by Topic Cell Biology Cellular Structures, Functions, Processes, Imaging, Stress Response Chemistry ... Glycobiology, Synthesis, Natural Products, Chemical Reactions Computers in Biology Bioinformatics, Modeling, Systems Biology, Data Visualization Diseases Cancer, ...

  1. Colonic interposition: radiographic evaluation.

    PubMed

    Agha, F P; Orringer, M B

    1984-04-01

    This report reviews the clinical and radiographic features of 40 patients who underwent visceral esophageal substitution with colon for benign or malignant lesions of the esophagus. The incidence and radiographic identification of complications are discussed. All patients were routinely examined with barium esophagrams on postoperative day 10. If an anastomotic leak was suspected clinically before this time, studies were performed using water-soluble iodinated contrast material. Follow-up barium esophagrams were obtained 1-96 months after operation (average, 60 months) in 24 patients. Eight patients (21%) demonstrated asymptomatic "jejunization" of the colonic mucosa with no attributable clinical manifestations; this finding resolved in 1-3 months, without sequelae, and has not been reported before. The spectrum of ischemic changes in the colonic segment included mucosal edema, spasm, ulceration, loss of haustration, and frank necrosis. Radiographically detectable early postoperative complications included anastomotic leak in six (three pharyngocolic, three cervical esophagocolic) and aspiration of barium into the tracheobronchial tree due to incoordinated swallowing in eight. Late postoperative complications included anastomotic narrowing (12) malfunctioning of the colon due to impaired emptying (five), recurrent aspiration pneumonia (three), small bowel obstruction (three), transhiatal herniation of small bowel through the diaphragmatic hiatus (one), and reflux into the retained bypassed esophagus (one). PMID:6608225

  2. Radiological findings in nine AIDS patients with Rhodococcus equi pneumonia.

    PubMed

    Wicky, S; Cartei, F; Mayor, B; Frija, J; Gevenois, P A; Giron, J; Laurent, F; Perri, G; Schnyder, P

    1996-01-01

    Rhodococcus equi (R. equi) infections have been incidentally reported as a cause of pulmonary infection in severely immunocompromised hosts, including AIDS patients. Our purpose is to describe the radiological findings in nine AIDS patients with R. equi pneumonia assessed by bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL), biopsies, cultures of sputum, and hemocultures. All patients were examined by chest radiographs and contrast-medium-enhanced chest CT. Dense pulmonary consolidations with or without cavitations accounted for the most striking radiological patterns. Chest CT also revealed six mediastinal involvements, strongly mimicking a lymphoma. Two of them had multiple bilateral pulmonary nodular opacities. Pleural effusion was not identified. Although intensive therapies were administered, seven among nine patients died within few months. In an AIDS patient living in a rural area or exposed to horses and presenting these radiological patterns, the possibility of R. equi pneumonia should be considered in the differential diagnosis along with other infectious diseases or lymphomas. PMID:8972317

  3. Clinical efficacy, radiographic and safety findings through 5 years of subcutaneous golimumab treatment in patients with active psoriatic arthritis: results from a long-term extension of a randomised, placebo-controlled trial (the GO-REVEAL study)

    PubMed Central

    Kavanaugh, Arthur; McInnes, Iain B; Mease, Philip; Krueger, Gerald G; Gladman, Dafna; van der Heijde, Désirée; Zhou, Yiying; Lu, Jiandong; Leu, Jocelyn H; Goldstein, Neil; Beutler, Anna

    2014-01-01

    Objectives Assess golimumab's long-term efficacy/safety in psoriatic arthritis (PsA). Methods Adults with active PsA (≥3 swollen and tender joints, active psoriasis) were randomly assigned to subcutaneous placebo, golimumab 50 mg, or golimumab 100 mg every 4 weeks (q4wks) through wk20. All patients received golimumab 50 mg or 100 mg q4wks from wk24 forward. Methotrexate was allowed and taken by approximately half the patients. Findings through 5 years are reported herein. Efficacy assessments included ≥20% improvement in American College of Rheumatology (ACR20) response, C-reactive-protein-based, 28-joint-count Disease Activity Score (DAS28-CRP) response, ≥75% improvement in Psoriasis Area and Severity Index (PASI75) scores, and PsA-modified Sharp/van der Heijde scores (SHSs). Results 126/405 (31%) randomised patients discontinued treatment through wk252. Golimumab was effective in maintaining clinical improvement through year-5 (ACR20: 62.8–69.9%, DAS28-CRP: 75.2-84.9% for randomised patients; PASI75: 60.8–72.2% among randomised patients with ≥3% body surface area involvement) and inhibiting radiographic progression (mean changes in PsA-modified SHS: 0.1–0.3) among patients with radiographic data. While concomitant methotrexate did not affect ACR20/PASI75, it appeared to reduce radiographic progression. No new safety signals were identified. Antibodies-to-golimumab occurred in 1.8%/10.0% of patients with/without methotrexate). Conclusions Long-term golimumab safety/efficacy in PsA was demonstrated through 5 years. Trial registration number NCT00265096. PMID:24748630

  4. Impact of patient photos on visual search during radiograph interpretation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krupinski, Elizabeth A.; Applegate, Kimberly; DeSimone, Ariadne; Chung, Alex; Tridandanpani, Srini

    2016-03-01

    To increase detection of mislabeled medical imaging studies evidence shows it may be useful to include patient photographs during interpretation. This study examined how inclusion of photos impacts visual search. Ten radiologists viewed 21 chest radiographs with and without a photo of the patient while search was recorded. Their task was to note tube/line placement. Eye-tracking data revealed that presence of the photo reduced the number of fixations and total dwell on the chest image as a result of periodically looking at the photo. Average preference for having photos was 6.10 on 0-10 scale and neck and chest were preferred areas.

  5. Eye-tracking AFROC study of the influence of experience and training on chest x-ray interpretation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manning, David; Ethell, Susan C.; Crawford, Trevor

    2003-05-01

    Four observer groups with different levels of expertise were tested in an investigation into the comparative nature of expert performance. The radiological task was the detection and localization of significant pulmonary nodules in postero-anterior vies of the chest in adults. Three test banks of 40 images were used. The observer groups were 6 experienced radiographers prior to a six month training program in chest image interpretation, the same radiographers after their tr4aining program, and 6 fresher undergraduate radiography students. Eye tracking was carried out on all observers to demonstrate differences in visual activity and nodule detection performance was measured with an AFROC technique. Detection performances of the four groups showed the radiologists and radiographers after training were measurably superior at the task. The eye-tracking parameters saccadic length, number of fixations visual coverage and scrutiny timer per film were measured for all subjects and compared. The missed nodules fixated and not fixated were also determined for the radiologist group. Results have shown distinct stylistic differences in the visual scanning strategies between the experienced and inexperienced observers that we believe can be generalized into a description of characteristics of expert versus non-expert performance. The findings will be used in the educational program of image interpretation for non-radiology practitioners.

  6. Traumatic pulmonary pseudocysts: CT findings.

    PubMed

    Tsitouridis, Ioannis; Tsinoglou, Konstantinos; Tsandiridis, Christos; Papastergiou, Christos; Bintoudi, Antonia

    2007-08-01

    Traumatic pulmonary pseudocyst constitutes an uncommon, though well recognized, manifestation of closed chest trauma. It is usually encountered in young patients, whose compliant chest wall permits the transmission of great compressive forces to the lung parenchyma and the laceration of the latter. Traumatic pulmonary pseudocyst is usually detected during the imaging evaluation of multi-injured patients with the use of computed tomography, as it is often not apparent in the initial supine anteroposterior chest radiographs. We present 5 cases of trauma patients, in whom we detected the presence of multiple traumatic pulmonary pseudocysts during the imaging evaluation of blunt chest trauma with the use of computed tomography. PMID:17721334

  7. Value of routine preoperative chest x-rays: a meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Archer, C; Levy, A R; McGregor, M

    1993-11-01

    The purpose of this study was to estimate the frequency with which routine postoperative chest x-rays lead to clinically relevant new information. All articles in English, French and Spanish relating to routine chest radiography in North American or European populations were reviewed, using the Medline database and references listed in reviews and periodicals published from 1966 to 1992, inclusive. Twenty-one reports which supplied sufficient information were included for meta-analysis. On average, abnormalities were found in 10% of routine preoperative chest films. In only 1.3% of films were the abnormalities unexpected, i.e., were not already known or would not otherwise have been detected (95% CI: 0 to 2.8%). These findings were of sufficient importance to cause modification of management in only 0.1% (95% CI: 0 to 0.6%). The frequency with which the new information influenced health could not be estimated. Assuming only the direct cost to the health care system of each radiograph ($23), each finding which influenced management in any way would cost $23,000. It is concluded that in North American or European populations when a reliable history and a clinical examination are carried out, the cost of this test is so high relation to the clinical information provided that it is no longer justifiable. PMID:8269561

  8. Gallium-67 scans of the chest in patients with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome

    SciTech Connect

    Kramer, E.L.; Sanger, J.J.; Garay, S.M.; Greene, J.B.; Tiu, S.; Banner, H.; McCauley, D.I.

    1987-07-01

    Eighty-six (/sup 67/Ga)citrate chest scans were performed in 71 adult patients with the acquired immunodeficiency syndrome. Forty-five of these patients also had Kaposi's sarcoma. Only 29 of 57 abnormal scans were correlated with abnormal chest radiographs. Chest radiographs were negative for 27 scans and unavailable for one. Several scan patterns were seen. Diffusely increased lung uptake was seen most commonly with Pneumocystis carinii pneumonia, but also other infections and noninfectious inflammatory conditions. Focal uptake corresponding to regional lymph node groups occurred most often with Mycobacterium avium-intracellulare but aslo with lymphoma. Localized intrapulmonary uptake was seen in bacterial pneumonias. Perihilar activity occurred in two cases. When chest radiographs were abnormal and /sup 67/Ga scans negative, the most common diagnosis was pulmonary Kaposi's sarcoma.

  9. Radiographic scale grid for supervoltage radiographs.

    PubMed

    Wong, J T

    1975-01-01

    This paper deals with the construction and practical application of a radiographic scale grid incorporated into high energy radiation therapy machines in making port radiographs. The gadet is designed especially for the numerous small radiation therapy departments in community hospitals and private practices that do not have the sophistication provided by a simulator. PMID:812144

  10. Detection and labeling ribs on expiration chest radiographs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Mira; Jin, Jesse S.; Wilson, Laurence S.

    2003-06-01

    Typically, inspiration is preferred when xraying the lungs. The x-ray technologist will ask a patient to be still and to take a deep breath and to hold it. This not only reduces the possibility of a blurred image but also enhances the quality of the image since air-filled lungs are easier to see on x-ray film. However, inspiration causes low density in the inner part of lung field. That means that ribs in the inner part of lung field have lower density than the other parts nearer to the border of the lung field. That is why edge detection algorithms often fail to detect ribs. Therefore to make rib edges clear we try to produce an expiration lung field using a 'hemi-elliptical cavity.' Based on the expiration lung field, we extract the rib edges using canny edge detector and a new connectivity method, called '4 way with 10-neighbors connectivity' to detect clavicle and rib edge candidates. Once the edge candidates are formed, our system selects the best candidates using knowledge-based constraints such as a gradient, length and location. The edges can be paired and labeled as superior rib edge and inferior rib edge. Then the system uses the clavicle, which is obtained in a same method for the rib edge detection, as a landmark to label all detected ribs.