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Sample records for chest radiological findings

  1. Chest radiology

    SciTech Connect

    Reed, J.C.

    1990-01-01

    This book is a reference in plain chest film diagnosis provides a thorough background in the differential diagnosis of 22 of the most common radiologic patterns of chest disease. Each chapter is introduced with problem cases and a set of questions, followed by a tabular listing of the appropriate differential considerations. The book emphasizes plain films, CT and some MR scans are integrated to demonstrate how these modalities enhance the work of a case.

  2. Acute non-traumatic gastrothorax: presentation of a case with chest pain and atypical radiologic findings.

    PubMed

    Singh, Deepwant; Mackeith, Pieter; Gopal, Dipesh Pravin

    2016-01-01

    A previously well 71-year-old woman presented to the Emergency Department with acute-onset left-sided chest pain. She was haemodynamically stable with unremarkable systemic examination. Her electrocardiogram and troponin were within normal limits and her chest radiograph showed a raised left hemi-diaphragm. Two hours after admission, this woman became acutely breathless, and suffered a pulseless electrical activity cardiac arrest. After cardiopulmonary resuscitation, there was a return of spontaneous circulation and regained consciousness. A repeat clinical assessment revealed a new left-sided dullness to percussion with contralateral percussive resonance on respiratory examination. CXR revealed a left pan-hemi-thoracic opacity whilst better definition using CT-pulmonary angiography (CTPA) indicated an acute tension gastrothorax secondary to a large left-sided diaphragmatic hernia. Nasogastric (NG) tube insertion was used to decompress the stomach and the patient underwent uncomplicated emergency laparoscopic hernia reduction. She remained well at 1-year follow-up. PMID:27027934

  3. Chest pain due to Pinch-off syndrome: radiological findings and endovascular rescue.

    PubMed

    Viviani, E; Giribono, A M; Ferrara, D; Santagata, A; Narese, D; Midiri, F; Albano, D; Porcellini, M

    2016-01-01

    Port-a-cath is widely used as a route for administration of drugs in hematology and oncology patients and, recently, has been adapted also for hemodialysis patients. Major complications include infection, thrombosis, arrhythmia, and embolization. The Pinch-off-syndrome (POS) means the clavicle and the first rib compress the long-term central venous catheter. The reported incidence rate ranges from 1.4% to 4.1%. This syndrome can be recognized on chest radiography by observing a thinning of the catheter lumen through the passage between the clavicle and the first rib. Catheter fracture is a rare but potentially life-threatening complication that must be recognized and treated promptly. Management of dislodged ports includes percutaneous transcatheter retrieval, open thoracotomy retrieval and oral anticoagulant therapy. Among these techniques, percutaneous transcatheter retrieval is an easy, safe and efficient method. We report the successful percutaneous endovascular retrieval of dislodged intracardiac catheter, separated from its port, in a 58 year-old male patient who presented with chest pain. PMID:26980633

  4. Radiology of occupational chest disease

    SciTech Connect

    Solomon, A. ); Kreel, L.

    1989-01-01

    Radiologic manifestations of occupational lung disease are summarized and classified in this book according to the ILO system. The interpretation of chest roentgenograms outlines the progression of each disease and is accompanied with clinically-oriented explanations. Some of the specific diseases covered include asbestosis, coal worker's pneumoconiosis, silicosis, non-mining inhalation of silica and silicates, beryllium induced disease, inhalation of organics and metallics, and occupationally induced asthma.

  5. Chest tuberculosis: Radiological review and imaging recommendations

    PubMed Central

    Bhalla, Ashu Seith; Goyal, Ankur; Guleria, Randeep; Gupta, Arun Kumar

    2015-01-01

    Chest tuberculosis (CTB) is a widespread problem, especially in our country where it is one of the leading causes of mortality. The article reviews the imaging findings in CTB on various modalities. We also attempt to categorize the findings into those definitive for active TB, indeterminate for disease activity, and those indicating healed TB. Though various radiological modalities are widely used in evaluation of such patients, no imaging guidelines exist for the use of these modalities in diagnosis and follow-up. Consequently, imaging is not optimally utilized and patients are often unnecessarily subjected to repeated CT examinations, which is undesirable. Based on the available literature and our experience, we propose certain recommendations delineating the role of imaging in the diagnosis and follow-up of such patients. The authors recognize that this is an evolving field and there may be future revisions depending on emergence of new evidence. PMID:26288514

  6. Histiocytic disorders of the chest: imaging findings.

    PubMed

    Ahuja, Jitesh; Kanne, Jeffrey P; Meyer, Cristopher A; Pipavath, Sudhakar N J; Schmidt, Rodney A; Swanson, Jonathan O; Godwin, J David

    2015-01-01

    Histiocytic disorders of the chest comprise a broad spectrum of diseases. The lungs may be involved in isolation or as part of systemic disease. Some of these disorders are primary and have unknown etiology, and others result from a histiocytic response to a known cause. Among primary histiocytic disorders, pulmonary Langerhans cell histiocytosis (PLCH) is the most common; others include Erdheim-Chester disease and Rosai-Dorfman disease. Adult PLCH occurs almost exclusively in adults aged 20-40 years who smoke. Pediatric PLCH is extremely rare and typically occurs as part of multisystemic disease. Erdheim-Chester disease affects middle-aged and older adults; thoracic involvement usually occurs as part of systemic disease. Rosai-Dorfman disease affects children and young adults and manifests as painless cervical lymphadenopathy. Examples of secondary histiocytic disorders are storage diseases such as Gaucher disease, Niemann-Pick disease, and Fabry disease; pneumoconiosis such as silicosis and coal workers' pneumoconiosis; and infections such as Whipple disease and malakoplakia. These disorders are characterized at histopathologic examination on the basis of infiltration of alveoli or the pulmonary interstitium by histiocytes, which are a group of cells that includes macrophages and dendritic cells. Dendritic cells are a heterogeneous group of nonphagocytic antigen-presenting immune cells. Immunohistochemical markers help to distinguish among various primary histiocytic disorders. Characteristic radiologic findings in the appropriate clinical context may obviate biopsy to establish a correct diagnosis. However, in the absence of these findings, integration of clinical, pathologic, and radiologic features is required to establish a diagnosis. PMID:25763722

  7. Organizing pneumonia: chest HRCT findings*

    PubMed Central

    Faria, Igor Murad; Zanetti, Gláucia; Barreto, Miriam Menna; Rodrigues, Rosana Souza; Araujo-Neto, Cesar Augusto; Silva, Jorge Luiz Pereira e; Escuissato, Dante Luiz; Souza, Arthur Soares; Irion, Klaus Loureiro; Mançano, Alexandre Dias; Nobre, Luiz Felipe; Hochhegger, Bruno; Marchiori, Edson

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To determine the frequency of HRCT findings and their distribution in the lung parenchyma of patients with organizing pneumonia. METHODS: This was a retrospective review of the HRCT scans of 36 adult patients (26 females and 10 males) with biopsy-proven organizing pneumonia. The patients were between 19 and 82 years of age (mean age, 56.2 years). The HRCT images were evaluated by two independent observers, discordant interpretations being resolved by consensus. RESULTS: The most common HRCT finding was that of ground-glass opacities, which were seen in 88.9% of the cases. The second most common finding was consolidation (in 83.3% of cases), followed by peribronchovascular opacities (in 52.8%), reticulation (in 38.9%), bronchiectasis (in 33.3%), interstitial nodules (in 27.8%), interlobular septal thickening (in 27.8%), perilobular pattern (in 22.2%), the reversed halo sign (in 16.7%), airspace nodules (in 11.1%), and the halo sign (in 8.3%). The lesions were predominantly bilateral, the middle and lower lung fields being the areas most commonly affected. CONCLUSIONS: Ground-glass opacities and consolidation were the most common findings, with a predominantly random distribution, although they were more common in the middle and lower thirds of the lungs. PMID:26176521

  8. Chest radiology: Plain film patterns and differential diagnosis. Second edition

    SciTech Connect

    Reed, J.C.

    1986-01-01

    This second edition is designed to provide a differential diagnosis for 22 of the most common radiologic patterns of chest disease. Each chapter is introduced with problem cases and a set of questions, followed by a tabular listing of the appropriate differential considerations. The discussions center on the problem case and demonstrate how the radiologist can use additional radiologic procedures along with correlative clinical and laboratory data to narrow the differential or to suggest a specific diagnosis.

  9. Spatial resolution and chest nodule detection: an interesting incidental finding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toomey, R. J.; McEntee, M. F.; Ryan, J. T.; Evanoff, M. G.; Hayes, A.; Brennan, P. C.

    2010-02-01

    This study reports an incidental finding from a larger work. It examines the relationship between spatial resolution and nodule detection for chest radiographs. Twelve examining radiologists with the American Board of Radiology read thirty chest radiographs in two conditions - full (1500 × 1500 pixel) resolution, and 300 × 300 pixel resolution linearly interpolated to 1500 × 1500 pixels. All images were surrounded by a 10-pixel sharp grey border to aid in focussing the observer's eye when viewing the comparatively unsharp interpolated images. Fifteen of the images contained a single simulated pulmonary nodule. Observers were asked to rate their confidence that a nodule was present on each radiograph on a scale of 1 (least confidence, certain no lesion is present) to 6 (most confidence, certain a lesion was present). All other abnormalities were to be ignored. No windowing, levelling or magnification of the images was permitted and viewing distance was constrained to approximately 70cm. Images were displayed on a 3 megapixel greyscale monitor. Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) analysis was applied to the results of the readings using the Dorfman-Berbaum-Metz multiplereader, multiple-case method. No statistically significant differences were found with either readers and cases treated as random or with cases treated as fixed. Low spatial frequency information appears to be sufficient for the detection of chest lesion of the type used in this study.

  10. Radiological findings in nine AIDS patients with Rhodococcus equi pneumonia.

    PubMed

    Wicky, S; Cartei, F; Mayor, B; Frija, J; Gevenois, P A; Giron, J; Laurent, F; Perri, G; Schnyder, P

    1996-01-01

    Rhodococcus equi (R. equi) infections have been incidentally reported as a cause of pulmonary infection in severely immunocompromised hosts, including AIDS patients. Our purpose is to describe the radiological findings in nine AIDS patients with R. equi pneumonia assessed by bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL), biopsies, cultures of sputum, and hemocultures. All patients were examined by chest radiographs and contrast-medium-enhanced chest CT. Dense pulmonary consolidations with or without cavitations accounted for the most striking radiological patterns. Chest CT also revealed six mediastinal involvements, strongly mimicking a lymphoma. Two of them had multiple bilateral pulmonary nodular opacities. Pleural effusion was not identified. Although intensive therapies were administered, seven among nine patients died within few months. In an AIDS patient living in a rural area or exposed to horses and presenting these radiological patterns, the possibility of R. equi pneumonia should be considered in the differential diagnosis along with other infectious diseases or lymphomas. PMID:8972317

  11. Cardiac findings on non-gated chest computed tomography: A clinical and pictorial review.

    PubMed

    Kanza, Rene Epunza; Allard, Christian; Berube, Michel

    2016-02-01

    The use of chest computed tomography (CT) as an imaging test for the evaluation of thoracic pathology has significantly increased during the last four decades. Although cardiopulmonary diseases often overlap in their clinical manifestation, radiologists tend to overlook the heart while interpreting routine chest CT. Recent advances in CT technology have led to significant reduction of heart motion artefacts and now allow for the identification of several cardiac findings on chest CT even without electrocardiogram (ECG) gating. These observations range from simple curiosity to both benign and malignant discoveries, to life-threatening discoveries. We here present a clinical and radiologic review of common and less common cardiac findings discovered on non-gated chest CT in order to draw the attention of radiologists and referring physicians to these possibilities. PMID:26781150

  12. Radiology of pulmonary disease. Chest radiography, computed tomography, and gallium scanning

    SciTech Connect

    Golden, J.A.; Sollitto, R.A.

    1988-09-01

    A review of the radiologic manifestations of AIDS pulmonary diseases, with an emphasis on the utility of gallium scanning in the context of the normal or equivocal chest x-ray, is presented.99 references.

  13. Sarcoidosis: a diagnostic challenge in atypical radiologic findings of unilateral lymphadenopathy

    PubMed Central

    Meillier, Andrew; Commodore, Marius

    2015-01-01

    Sarcoidosis is a chronic systemic disease with a wide array of clinical findings. Given that the clinical symptoms are not pathognomonic, chest radiographs have become essential to the initial diagnosis and choice of treatment modality. Diagnosis hinges on ruling out alternative diagnoses; sometimes, advanced radiologic techniques and histopathology are required. On this occasion, we present a case of a patient with generalized symptoms, no significant chest radiograph findings and lymphadenopathy where advanced imaging and pathology assisted in the diagnosis. PMID:26719811

  14. Radiographic findings in the chest of patients following cardiac transplantation

    SciTech Connect

    Shirazi, K.K.; Amendola, M.A.; Tisnado, J.; Cho, S.R.; Beachley, M.C.; Lower, R.R.

    1983-04-01

    The postoperative chest radiographic findings in 38 patients undergoing orthotopic (37 patients) and heterotopic (1 patient) cardiac transplantation were evaluated. Findings were correlated with those of echocardiograms, sputum and blood cultures, and lung and heart biopsies. The radiographic manifestations in the chest of these patients are classified in the following three main categories: 1) newly formed cardiac silhouette findings due to the transplanted heart itself, i.e., changes in size and shape of the new heart and pericardial effusion resulting from the placement of a smaller heart in a larger pericardial sac. 2) infectious complications due to bacteria, fungal, and other opportunistic agents secondary to immunosuppressive therapy, and 3) usual postoperative complications following thoracomoty and open-heart surgery.

  15. Radiological Findings of Michel Aplasia

    PubMed Central

    Umul, Ayse; Demirtas, Hakan; Celik, Ahmet Orhan

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Congenital abnormalities of the inner ear is the most common cause of neurosensory hearing loss. Michel inner ear deformity is a rare developmental anomaly refers to the total aplasia of the inner ear. It is caused by developmental arrest of otic placode early during the third week of gestational age. Case report: We have discussed here that three year old girl diagnosed Michel aplasia with temporal bone computed tomography (CT) and temporal magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) findings. PMID:27482139

  16. Joubert syndrome: the clinical and radiological findings.

    PubMed

    Karakas, Ekrem; Cullu, Nesat; Karakas, Omer; Calik, Mustafa; Boyaci, Fatima Nurefsan; Yildiz, Sema; Cece, Hasan; Akal, Ali

    2014-01-01

    Joubert syndrome is a rare disease characterised by clinical and radiological findings. Among the classic clinical findings of JS are hypotonia, ataxia, mental-motor retardation, respiratory and opthalmological findings. The paediatric cases included in the study comprised nine patients. There was familial consanguinty in seven cases. Clinically, all cases had mental-motor retardation and hypotonia. Episodic hyperpnoea attacks were observed in one case. Facial dysmorphism was the most common additional systemic anomaly and four cases had additional opthalmic findings. Brain MRI examination revealed that all cases had molar tooth sign, bat-wing appearance and vermian cleft. The majority of cases also had vermian hypoplasia. Cerebellar folial disorganisation was observed in approxiamtely half of the cases. Three cases had corpus callosum anomaly and atretic occipital encephalocoele. No pathology was determined in other organs. This study aimed to evaluate the clinical and radiological findings of 9 patients diagnosed with Joubert syndrome. PMID:24605724

  17. Severe adenovirus community-acquired pneumonia in immunocompetent adults: chest radiographic and CT findings

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Dingyu; Fu, Yangyang; Wang, Zhiwei; Cao, Jian; Walline, Joseph; Zhu, Huadong

    2016-01-01

    Background Severe adenovirus pneumonia and its associated imaging features are well-described in immunocompromised patients but are rare and poorly understood in immunocompetent adults. We sought to describe the radiographic and CT findings of severe adenovirus community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) in eight immunocompetent adults. Methods We reviewed systematically chest imaging manifestations of laboratory-confirmed severe adenovirus pneumonia in eight immunocompetent adults from April 2012 to April 2014. Results All patients showed abnormal results on initial chest radiograph and CT, with the exception of one normal initial chest radiograph. The abnormalities of the initial chest radiographs were unilateral (n=4) or bilateral (n=3), including consolidation (n=4), dense patchy opacity (n=3), ground glass opacity (GGO) (n=1), and pleural effusion (n=1). The initial CT findings consisted of unilateral (n=5) and bilateral (n=3) abnormalities, including consolidation (n=8), GGO (n=2), pleural effusion (n=3) and small nodules (n=1). Focal consolidation was the predominant finding in six patients whose initial CT scans were examined within one week after illness onset. Follow-up radiologic findings showed rapid development of bilateral consolidation within ten days after illness onset, usually accompanied by adjacent ground-glass opacity and pleural effusion. The parenchymal abnormalities began to absorb around two weeks after illness onset, with no appearances of fibrosis. Conclusions Severe adenovirus CAP in immunocompetent adults mainly appears as focal consolidation followed by rapid progression to bilateral consolidation, usually accompanied by adjacent GGO and pleural effusion, which may resemble bacterial pneumonia. Adenovirus should be considered in severe pneumonia cases with negative cultures and failure to respond to antibiotics. PMID:27162658

  18. Knee bone tumors: findings on conventional radiology*

    PubMed Central

    Andrade Neto, Francisco; Teixeira, Manuel Joaquim Diógenes; Araújo, Leonardo Heráclio do Carmo; Ponte, Carlos Eduardo Barbosa

    2016-01-01

    The knee is a common site for bone tumors, whether clinically painful or not. Conventional radiology has been established as the first line of investigation in patients with knee pain and can reveal lesions that often generate questions not only for the generalist physician but also for the radiologist or general orthopedist. History, image examination, and histopathological analysis compose the essential tripod of the diagnosis of bone tumors, and conventional radiology is an essential diagnostic tool in patients with knee pain. This pictorial essay proposes to depict the main conventional radiography findings of the most common bone tumors around the knee, including benign and malignant tumors, as well as pseudo-tumors. PMID:27403019

  19. Knee bone tumors: findings on conventional radiology.

    PubMed

    Andrade Neto, Francisco; Teixeira, Manuel Joaquim Diógenes; Araújo, Leonardo Heráclio do Carmo; Ponte, Carlos Eduardo Barbosa

    2016-01-01

    The knee is a common site for bone tumors, whether clinically painful or not. Conventional radiology has been established as the first line of investigation in patients with knee pain and can reveal lesions that often generate questions not only for the generalist physician but also for the radiologist or general orthopedist. History, image examination, and histopathological analysis compose the essential tripod of the diagnosis of bone tumors, and conventional radiology is an essential diagnostic tool in patients with knee pain. This pictorial essay proposes to depict the main conventional radiography findings of the most common bone tumors around the knee, including benign and malignant tumors, as well as pseudo-tumors. PMID:27403019

  20. Pediatric Stroke: Clinical Findings and Radiological Approach

    PubMed Central

    Lanni, Giuseppe; Catalucci, Alessia; Conti, Laura; Di Sibio, Alessandra; Paonessa, Amalia; Gallucci, Massimo

    2011-01-01

    This paper focuses on radiological approach in pediatric stroke including both ischemic stroke (Arterial Ischemic Stroke and Cerebral Sinovenous Thrombosis) and hemorrhagic stroke. Etiopathology and main clinical findings are examined as well. Magnetic Resonance Imaging could be considered as the first-choice diagnostic exam, offering a complete diagnostic set of information both in the discrimination between ischemic/hemorrhagic stroke and in the identification of underlying causes. In addition, Magnetic Resonance vascular techniques supply further information about cerebral arterial and venous circulation. Computed Tomography, for its limits and radiation exposure, should be used only when Magnetic Resonance is not available and on unstable patients. PMID:21603166

  1. Radiologic findings in the Proteus syndrome.

    PubMed

    Azouz, E M; Costa, T; Fitch, N

    1987-01-01

    The radiological findings in two patients with the Proteus syndrome are described. Features in our two cases not previously mentioned or stressed include vertebral dysplasia and enlargement (megaspondylodysplasia), bilateral genu valgum, recurrent after surgery and intraabdominal and mesenteric lipomatosis. Emergency laparotomy was performed on the first patient who had a twisted necrotic portion of mesenteric fat. Macrodactyly, skeletal muscle atrophy and subcutaneous fat accumulation in the abdominal wall were present in both. In addition the second patient was mentally retarded and had frontal bony prominence of skull. Computed tomography was used for the specific diagnosis of the lipomatous tissues in both patients. PMID:3684361

  2. Flat panel detectors--closing the (digital) gap in chest and skeletal radiology.

    PubMed

    Reiff, K J

    1999-08-01

    In the radiological department today the majority of all X-ray procedures on chest and skeletal radiography is performed with classical film-screen-systems. Using digital luminescence radiography (DLR or CR, which stands for Computed Radiography) as a technique has shown a way to replace this 100-year-old procedure of doing general radiography work by acquiring the X-rays digitally via phosphor screens, but this approach has faced criticism from lots of radiologists world wide and therefore has not been widely accepted except in the intensive care environment. A new technology is now rising based on the use of so called flat panel X-ray (FD) detectors. Semi-conducting material detects the X-rays in digital form directly and creates an instantaneous image for display, distribution and diagnosis. This ability combined with a large field of view and compared to existing methods--excellent detective quantum efficiency represents a revolutionary step for chest and skeletal radiography and will put basic X-ray-work back into the focus of radiological solutions. This paper will explain the basic technology of flat panel detectors, possible system solutions based on this new technology, aspects of the user interface influencing the system utilization and versatility as well as the possibility to redefine the patient examination process for chest and skeletal radiography. Furthermore the author discusses limitations for the first released systems, upgrades for the installed base and possible scenarios for the future, e.g. fluoroscopy or angiography application. PMID:10565511

  3. Comparison of radiological findings and microbial aetiology of childhood pneumonia.

    PubMed

    Korppi, M; Kiekara, O; Heiskanen-Kosma, T; Soimakallio, S

    1993-04-01

    Sixty-one children were treated in hospital from 1981 to 1982 because of both radiologically and microbiologically verified viral or bacterial pneumonia. The chest radiographs were interpreted by two radiologists, not familiar with the clinical data, on two occasions three years apart, and only those patients with a definite alveolar (n = 27) or interstitial (n = 34) pneumonia at both evaluations were included in the present analysis. In addition, all patients had viral (n = 20), mixed viral-bacterial (n = 21) or bacterial (n = 20) infections diagnosed by viral or bacterial antibody or antigen assays. Viral infection alone was seen in 7 (26%), mixed viral-bacterial infection in 8 (30%) and bacterial infection alone in 12 (44%) of the 27 patients with alveolar pneumonia. The respective figures were 13 (38%), 13 (38%) and 8 (24%) for the 34 patients with interstitial pneumonia. C-reactive protein concentration was greater than 40 mg/l (a screening limit for viral and bacterial infections) in 15 (56%) of the patients with alveolar and in 11 (32%) of the patients with interstitial pneumonia. Thus 74% of the patients with alveolar and 62% with interstitial pneumonia had bacterial infection, either alone or as a mixed viral-bacterial infection. Our results suggest that the presence of an alveolar infiltrate in a chest radiograph is a specific but insensitive indicator of bacterial pneumonia. We conclude that patients with alveolar pneumonia should be treated with antibiotics. In patients with interstitial pneumonia, however, both viral and bacterial aetiology are possible. In those, the decision concerning antibiotic treatment should be based on clinical and laboratory findings. PMID:8318803

  4. Effective radiology dashboards: key research findings.

    PubMed

    Karami, Mahtab; Safdari, Reza; Rahimi, Azin

    2013-01-01

    Innovative organizations have access to information for business intelligence through the objectives displayed in dashboards. In healthcare organizations, where the goal is to improve quality of care along with reducing costs, the radiology department is important from both financial and clinical aspects. Therefore, how to manage this department has critical impact on the effectiveness and efficiency of the organization. Today, since the information in this department not only has different data structure but also is gathered from different data sources, a well defined, comprehensive dashboard can be an effective tool to enhance performance. PMID:23638580

  5. Characterisation of an anthropomorphic chest phantom for dose measurements in radiology beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Henriques, L. M. S.; Cerqueira, R. A. D.; Santos, W. S.; Pereira, A. J. S.; Rodrigues, T. M. A.; Carvalho Júnior, A. B.; Maia, A. F.

    2014-02-01

    The objective of this study was to characterise an anthropomorphic chest phantom for dosimetric measurements of conventional radiology beams. This phantom was developed by a previous research project at the Federal University of Sergipe for image quality control tests. As the phantom consists of tissue-equivalent material, it is possible to characterise it for dosimetric studies. For comparison, a geometric chest phantom, consisting of PMMA (polymethylmethacrylate) with dimensions of 30×30×15 cm³ was used. Measurements of incident air kerma (Ki) and entrance surface dose (ESD) were performed using ionisation chambers. From the results, backscatter factors (BSFs) of the two phantoms were determined and compared with values estimated by CALDose_X software, based on a Monte Carlo simulation. For the technical parameters evaluated in this study, the ESD and BSF values obtained experimentally showed a good similarity between the two phantoms, with minimum and maximum difference of 0.2% and 7.0%, respectively, and showed good agreement with the results published in the literature. Organ doses and effective doses for the anthropomorphic phantom were also estimated by the determination of conversion coefficients (CCs) using the visual Monte Carlo (VMC) code. Therefore, the results of this study prove that the anthropomorphic thorax phantom proposed is a good tool to use in dosimetry and can be used for risk evaluation of X-ray diagnostic procedures.

  6. Cobalamin Deficiency: Clinical Picture and Radiological Findings

    PubMed Central

    Briani, Chiara; Dalla Torre, Chiara; Citton, Valentina; Manara, Renzo; Pompanin, Sara; Binotto, Gianni; Adami, Fausto

    2013-01-01

    Vitamin B12 deficiency causes a wide range of hematological, gastrointestinal, psychiatric and neurological disorders. Hematological presentation of cobalamin deficiency ranges from the incidental increase of mean corpuscular volume and neutrophil hypersegmentation to symptoms due to severe anemia, such as angor, dyspnea on exertion, fatigue or symptoms related to congestive heart failure, such as ankle edema, orthopnea and nocturia. Neuropsychiatric symptoms may precede hematologic signs and are represented by myelopathy, neuropathy, dementia and, less often, optic nerve atrophy. The spinal cord manifestation, subacute combined degeneration (SCD), is characterized by symmetric dysesthesia, disturbance of position sense and spastic paraparesis or tetraparesis. The most consistent MRI finding is a symmetrical abnormally increased T2 signal intensity confined to posterior or posterior and lateral columns in the cervical and thoracic spinal cord. Isolated peripheral neuropathy is less frequent, but likely overlooked. Vitamin B12 deficiency has been correlated negatively with cognitive functioning in healthy elderly subjects. Symptoms include slow mentation, memory impairment, attention deficits and dementia. Optic neuropathy occurs occasionally in adult patient. It is characterized by symmetric, painless and progressive visual loss. Parenteral replacement therapy should be started soon after the vitamin deficiency has been established. PMID:24248213

  7. Cobalamin deficiency: clinical picture and radiological findings.

    PubMed

    Briani, Chiara; Dalla Torre, Chiara; Citton, Valentina; Manara, Renzo; Pompanin, Sara; Binotto, Gianni; Adami, Fausto

    2013-11-01

    Vitamin B12 deficiency causes a wide range of hematological, gastrointestinal, psychiatric and neurological disorders. Hematological presentation of cobalamin deficiency ranges from the incidental increase of mean corpuscular volume and neutrophil hypersegmentation to symptoms due to severe anemia, such as angor, dyspnea on exertion, fatigue or symptoms related to congestive heart failure, such as ankle edema, orthopnea and nocturia. Neuropsychiatric symptoms may precede hematologic signs and are represented by myelopathy, neuropathy, dementia and, less often, optic nerve atrophy. The spinal cord manifestation, subacute combined degeneration (SCD), is characterized by symmetric dysesthesia, disturbance of position sense and spastic paraparesis or tetraparesis. The most consistent MRI finding is a symmetrical abnormally increased T2 signal intensity confined to posterior or posterior and lateral columns in the cervical and thoracic spinal cord. Isolated peripheral neuropathy is less frequent, but likely overlooked. Vitamin B12 deficiency has been correlated negatively with cognitive functioning in healthy elderly subjects. Symptoms include slow mentation, memory impairment, attention deficits and dementia. Optic neuropathy occurs occasionally in adult patient. It is characterized by symmetric, painless and progressive visual loss. Parenteral replacement therapy should be started soon after the vitamin deficiency has been established. PMID:24248213

  8. Chest X-Ray

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  9. Clinical and radiological findings of a bilateral coronoid hyperplasia case

    PubMed Central

    Torenek, Kubra; Duman, Suayip Burak; Bayrakdar, Ibrahim Sevki; Miloglu, Ozkan

    2015-01-01

    Coronoid hyperplasia (CH) is an infrequent condition that can be defined as an abnormal bony elongation of histologically normal bone. Progressive and painless difficulty in opening the mouth is the main clinical finding of CH. In this case report, the clinical and radiological findings for a 23-year-old male patient with bilateral CH are presented. When plain radiographies are not sufficient for diagnosis and evaluation of the CH, cone-beam computed tomography can be used. PMID:25713499

  10. [Manifestations of lobar atelectasis on chest x-rays and correlation with computed tomography findings].

    PubMed

    Cortés Campos, A; Martínez Rodríguez, M

    2014-01-01

    Atelectasis is an important indicator of potentially severe underlying disease that must be diagnosed as early as possible. One of the most common mechanisms is the reabsorption of air distal to respiratory tract obstruction. The chest x-ray is an excellent tool to diagnose atelectasis, and it is especially useful for ruling out central bronchial obstructions (e.g., from endobronchial tumors). If the signs of volume loss are not recognized correctly, the diagnosis and treatment can be delayed. This article describes the main findings of lobar atelectasis on chest x-rays and their correlations with CT findings, including the classic signs described in the literature and other, less known and sometimes subtle signs. PMID:24252304

  11. Development of automated detection of radiology reports citing adrenal findings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zopf, Jason; Langer, Jessica; Boonn, William; Kim, Woojin; Zafar, Hanna

    2011-03-01

    Indeterminate incidental findings pose a challenge to both the radiologist and the ordering physician as their imaging appearance is potentially harmful but their clinical significance and optimal management is unknown. We seek to determine if it is possible to automate detection of adrenal nodules, an indeterminate incidental finding, on imaging examinations at our institution. Using PRESTO (Pathology-Radiology Enterprise Search tool), a newly developed search engine at our institution that mines dictated radiology reports, we searched for phrases used by attendings to describe incidental adrenal findings. Using these phrases as a guide, we designed a query that can be used with the PRESTO index. The results were refined using a modified version of NegEx to eliminate query terms that have been negated within the report text. In order to validate these findings we used an online random date generator to select two random weeks. We queried our RIS database for all reports created on those dates and manually reviewed each report to check for adrenal incidental findings. This survey produced a ground- truth dataset of reports citing adrenal incidental findings against which to compare query performance. We further reviewed the false positives and negatives identified by our validation study, in an attempt to improve the performance query. This algorithm is an important step towards automating the detection of incidental adrenal nodules on cross sectional imaging at our institution. Subsequently, this query can be combined with electronic medical record data searches to determine the clinical significance of these findings through resultant follow-up.

  12. Chest CT findings of influenza virus‐associated pneumonia in 12 adult patients

    PubMed Central

    Fujita, Jiro; Bandoh, Shuji; Yamaguchi, Masahiro; Higa, Futoshi; Tateyama, Masao

    2008-01-01

    Objective  In this study, we describe the chest computed tomography findings of influenza virus‐associated pneumonia in adult patients. Methods  Our retrospective study included 12 adult patients who had proven influenza virus ‐ associated pneumonia. Results  Out of 12 patients, six were diagnosed as having pure influenza virus pneumonia, five as having bronchopneumonia caused by bacteria associated with influenza A infection, and one as having a cryptogenic organizing pneumonia associated with influenza A infection. Conclusion  Radiographic findings of influenza virus pneumonia in adult patients consist of ground‐glass attenuation. Localized patchy consolidations were observed in cases of bronchopneumonia. PMID:19453425

  13. Radiologic findings in late-onset systemic lupus erythematosus

    SciTech Connect

    Braunstein, E.M.; Weissman, B.N.; Sosman, J.L.; Schur, P.H.

    1983-03-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus in the elderly has a different clinical and serologic course from that in young patients. Radiographic findings in patients in whom the diagnosis was made after age 50 were compared with findings in younger patients to see if the radiologic patterns are also different. The only significant radiographic difference between the two groups was that the older group had a greater incidence of soft-tissue swelling of the hands and wrists (p < 0.001). There was no significant difference in osteopenia, erosion, soft-tissue calcification, alignment abnormalities, or intrathoracic findings. Of 24 patients over age 50, two developed lymphoma and another developed multiple myeloma. The data agree with clinical observations that there is a higher incidence of arthritis in late-onset lupus, but clinical findings of increased incidence of pleuropericardial disease are not confirmed radiographically. The coincidence of hematologic malignancy with late-onset lupus in this series is noteworthy.

  14. Nationwide surveys of chest, abdomen, lumbosacral spine radiography, and upper gastrointestinal fluoroscopy: a summary of findings.

    PubMed

    Spelic, David C; Kaczmarek, Richard V; Hilohi, Mike C; Moyal, Albert E

    2010-03-01

    This paper reports findings from Nationwide Evaluation of X-ray Trends surveys conducted in 2001, 2002, and 2003 of clinical facilities that perform routine radiographic examinations of the adult chest, abdomen, lumbosacral spine, and upper gastrointestinal fluoroscopic examinations. Randomly identified clinical facilities were surveyed in approximately 40 participating states. For the surveyed radiographic exams, additional facilities that use computed radiography or digital radiography were surveyed to ensure adequate sample sizes for determining comparative statistics. State radiation control personnel performed site visits and collected data on patient exposure, radiographic/fluoroscopic technique factors, image quality, and quality-control and quality-assurance practices. Results of the NEXT surveys are compared with those of previous surveys conducted in 1964 and 1970 by the U.S. Public Health Service and the Food and Drug Administration. An estimated 155 million routine adult chest exams were performed in 2001. Average patient entrance skin air kerma from chest radiography at facilities using digital-based imaging modalities was found to be significantly higher (p < 0.001), but not so for routine abdomen or lumbosacral spine radiography. Digital-based imaging showed a substantial reduction in patient exposure for the radiographic portion of the routine upper gastrointestinal fluoroscopy exam. Long-term trends in surveyed diagnostic examinations show that average patient exposures are at their lowest levels. Of concern is the observation that a substantial fraction of surveyed non-hospital sites indicated they do not regularly have a medical physics survey conducted on their radiographic equipment. These facilities are likely unaware of the radiation doses they administer to their patients. PMID:20147791

  15. Retention of uranium in the chest: implications of findings in vivo and postmortem

    SciTech Connect

    Keane, A.T.; Polednak, A.P.

    1981-01-01

    An unusually protracted retention of uranium in the chests of certain workers at a uranium-processing plant has been reported in the literature. This finding has implications for the protection of current uranium workers and for health-effects studies of early workers. It is shown that the limited data obtained postmortem that have been reported do not reveal a significant unusually protracted retention of uranium in the pulmonary region or in the tracheobronchial lymph nodes. Probable explanations of the disparate findings are discussed. Data are presented on mortality from cancers of lymphatic tissues among males who worked in the period from 1943 to 1947 at the Y-12 Plant, Tennessee-Eastman Corp., Oak Ridge. No increased mortality from these cancers was evident.

  16. Retention of uranium in the chest: implications of findings in vivo and postmortem.

    PubMed

    Keane, A T; Polednak, A P

    1983-01-01

    An unusually protracted retention of uranium in the chests of certain workers at a uranium processing plant has been reported in the literature. This finding has implications for the protection of current uranium workers and for health-effects studies of early workers. It is shown that the limited data obtained postmortem that have been reported do not reveal a significant unusually protracted retention of uranium in the pulmonary region or in the tracheobronchial lymph nodes. Probable explanations of the disparate findings are discussed. Data are presented on mortality from cancers of lymphatic tissues among males who worked in the period from 1943 to 1947 at the Y-12 Plant, Tennessee-Eastman Corp., Oak Ridge. No significantly increased mortality from these cancers was evident. PMID:6862916

  17. Radiological findings of pulmonary tuberculosis in indigenous patients in Dourados, MS, Brazil*

    PubMed Central

    Lachi, Tatiana; Nakayama, Mauro

    2015-01-01

    Objective To describe the radiological findings of pulmonary tuberculosis in indigenous patients from the city of Dourados, MS, Brazil, according to age and sex. Materials and Methods Chest radiographic images of 81 patients with pulmonary tuberculosis, acquired in the period from 2007 to 2010, were retrospectively analyzed by two radiologists in consensus for the presence or absence of changes. The findings in abnormal radiographs were classified according to the changes observed and they were correlated to age and sex. The data were submitted to statistical analysis. Results The individuals’ ages ranged from 1 to 97 years (mean: 36 years). Heterogeneous consolidations, nodules, pleural involvement and cavities were the most frequent imaging findings. Most patients (55/81 or 67.9%) were male, and upper lung and right lung were the most affected regions. Fibrosis, heterogeneous consolidations and involvement of the left lung apex were significantly more frequent in males (p < 0.05). Presence of a single type of finding at radiography was most frequent in children (p < 0.05). Conclusion Based on the hypothesis that indigenous patients represent a population without genetically determined resistance to tuberculosis, the present study may enhance the knowledge about how the pulmonary form of this disease manifests in susceptible individuals. PMID:26543277

  18. AN ANALYSIS OF THE POTENTIAL ROLE OF CHEST TOMOSYNTHESIS IN OPTIMISING IMAGING RESOURCES IN THORACIC RADIOLOGY

    PubMed Central

    Petersson, Cecilia; Båth, Magnus; Vikgren, Jenny; Johnsson, Åse Allansdotter

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the study was to investigate the potential role of chest tomosynthesis (CTS) at a tertiary referral centre by exploring to what extent CTS could substitute chest radiography (CXR) and computed tomography (CT). The study comprised 1433 CXR, 523 CT and 216 CTS examinations performed 5 years after the introduction of CTS. For each examination, it was decided if CTS would have been appropriate instead of CXR (CXR cases), if CTS could have replaced the performed CT (CT cases) or if CT would have been performed had CTS not been available (CTS cases). It was judged that (a) CTS had been appropriate in 15 % of the CXR examinations, (b) CTS could have replaced additionally 7 % of the CT examinations and (c) CT would have been carried out in 63 % of the performed CTS examinations, had CTS not been available. In conclusion, the potential role for CTS to substitute other modalities during office hours at a tertiary referral centre may be in the order of 20 and 25 % of performed CXR and chest CT, respectively. PMID:26979807

  19. AN ANALYSIS OF THE POTENTIAL ROLE OF CHEST TOMOSYNTHESIS IN OPTIMISING IMAGING RESOURCES IN THORACIC RADIOLOGY.

    PubMed

    Petersson, Cecilia; Båth, Magnus; Vikgren, Jenny; Johnsson, Åse Allansdotter

    2016-06-01

    The aim of the study was to investigate the potential role of chest tomosynthesis (CTS) at a tertiary referral centre by exploring to what extent CTS could substitute chest radiography (CXR) and computed tomography (CT). The study comprised 1433 CXR, 523 CT and 216 CTS examinations performed 5 years after the introduction of CTS. For each examination, it was decided if CTS would have been appropriate instead of CXR (CXR cases), if CTS could have replaced the performed CT (CT cases) or if CT would have been performed had CTS not been available (CTS cases). It was judged that (a) CTS had been appropriate in 15 % of the CXR examinations, (b) CTS could have replaced additionally 7 % of the CT examinations and (c) CT would have been carried out in 63 % of the performed CTS examinations, had CTS not been available. In conclusion, the potential role for CTS to substitute other modalities during office hours at a tertiary referral centre may be in the order of 20 and 25 % of performed CXR and chest CT, respectively. PMID:26979807

  20. Surgical techniques and radiological findings of meniscus allograft transplantation.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hoseok; Lee, Sang Yub; Na, Young Gon; Kim, Sung Kwan; Yi, Jae Hyuck; Lim, Jae Kwang; Lee, So Mi

    2016-08-01

    Meniscus allograft transplantation has been performed over the past 25 years to relieve knee pain and improve knee function in patients with an irreparable meniscus injury. The efficacy and safety of meniscus allograft transplantation have been established in numerous experimental and clinical researches. However, there is a lack of reviews to aid radiologists who are routinely interpreting images and evaluating the outcome of the procedures, and also meniscus allograft transplantation is not widely performed in most hospitals. This review focuses on the indications of the procedure, the different surgical techniques used for meniscus allograft transplantation according to the involvement of the lateral and medial meniscus, and the associated procedures. The postoperative radiological findings and surgical complications of the meniscus allograft transplantation are also described in detail. PMID:27423673

  1. Pulmonary scintigraphic findings in children with pectus excavatum by the comparison of chest radiograph indices.

    PubMed

    Kao, C H; Liao, S Q; Wang, S J; Yeh, S H

    1992-11-01

    Pulmonary scintigraphy, including Xe-133 ventilation combined with Tc-99m MAA perfusion scans, was performed in 23 children (3 girls, 20 boys, ages: 2-9 years) with pectus excavatum, and the indices from lateral chest radiography were used for comparison. The findings of pulmonary scintigraphy were analyzed as 1) ventilation fractions (VF), and 2) perfusion fractions (PF) between bilateral lungs; and 3) ventilation-perfusion ratios (V/Q ratio) of both lungs. The results showed that 6 of 23 cases had impaired VF, 11 of 23 cases had impaired PF, and 7 of 23 cases had an impaired V/Q ratio in the right and left lung, respectively. The severity of sternal depression in pectus excavatum was shown as certain indices that were obtained on routine lateral chest radiographs. However, no significant correlations existed between the differences in the fractions and the indices. Our results suggest that pulmonary scintigraphy is not necessary for children with pectus excavatum to predict the severity of sternal depression and pulmonary function, because 1) pulmonary scintigraphy is very difficult to perform in children; 2) unnecessary radiation exposure should be avoided; and 3) it is not well correlated with the severity of the depressed sternum. PMID:1424376

  2. Case Report of Fire Eater’s Pneumonia in Adolescent Female Patient – Evolution of Radiologic Findings

    PubMed Central

    Olchowy, Cyprian; Łasecki, Mateusz; Inglot, Marcin; Zaleska-Dorobisz, Urszula

    2015-01-01

    Summary Background We present a case of a 16-year-old girl with fire-eater’s pneumonia (hydrocarbon pneumonitis). The goal of this report was to assess evolution of radiological findings. Case Report The reported case was unique because that was the first completely described case of fire-eater’s pneumonia reported in an under-aged person. Moreover, this disease is very rare even in adults and only a few scientific reports can be found, mostly because of a small occupational group. Conclusions The aim of this report was to show that the problem of fire-eater’s pneumonia can occur in under-aged patients and should be taken into consideration in case of severe pneumonia. Another objective was to point out that chest radiograph is not sufficient to depict the evolution of radiological manifestations. PMID:25593634

  3. Cerebro-costo-mandibular syndrome: Clinical, radiological, and genetic findings.

    PubMed

    Tooley, Madeleine; Lynch, Danielle; Bernier, Francois; Parboosingh, Jillian; Bhoj, Elizabeth; Zackai, Elaine; Calder, Alistair; Itasaki, Nobue; Wakeling, Emma; Scott, Richard; Lees, Melissa; Clayton-Smith, Jill; Blyth, Moira; Morton, Jenny; Shears, Debbie; Kini, Usha; Homfray, Tessa; Clarke, Angus; Barnicoat, Angela; Wallis, Colin; Hewitson, Rebecca; Offiah, Amaka; Saunders, Michael; Langton-Hewer, Simon; Hilliard, Tom; Davis, Peter; Smithson, Sarah

    2016-05-01

    Cerebro-Costo-Mandibular syndrome (CCMS) is a rare autosomal dominant condition comprising branchial arch-derivative malformations with striking rib-gaps. Affected patients often have respiratory difficulties, associated with upper airway obstruction, reduced thoracic capacity, and scoliosis. We describe a series of 12 sporadic and 4 familial patients including 13 infants/children and 3 adults. Severe micrognathia and reduced numbers of ribs with gaps are consistent findings. Cleft palate, feeding difficulties, respiratory distress, tracheostomy requirement, and scoliosis are common. Additional malformations such as horseshoe kidney, hypospadias, and septal heart defect may occur. Microcephaly and significant developmental delay are present in a small minority of patients. Key radiological findings are of a narrow thorax, multiple posterior rib gaps and abnormal costo-transverse articulation. A novel finding in 2 patients is bilateral accessory ossicles arising from the hyoid bone. Recently, specific mutations in SNRPB, which encodes components of the major spliceosome, have been found to cause CCMS. These mutations cluster in an alternatively spliced regulatory exon and result in altered SNRPB expression. DNA was available from 14 patients and SNRPB mutations were identified in 12 (4 previously reported). Eleven had recurrent mutations previously described in patients with CCMS and one had a novel mutation in the alternative exon. These results confirm the specificity of SNRPB mutations in CCMS and provide further evidence for the role of spliceosomal proteins in craniofacial and thoracic development. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26971886

  4. Radiological surveillance of formerly asbestos-exposed power industry workers: rates and risk factors of benign changes on chest X-ray and MDCT

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background To determine the prevalence of asbestos-related changes on chest X-ray (CXR) and low-dose multidetector-row CT (MDCT) of the thorax in a cohort of formerly asbestos-exposed power industry workers and to assess the importance of common risk factors associated with specific radiological changes. Methods To assess the influence of selected risk factors (age, time since first exposure, exposure duration, cumulative exposure and pack years) on typical asbestos-related radiographic changes, we employed multiple logistic regression and receiver operating characteristic (ROC) analysis. Results On CXR, pleural changes and asbestosis were strongly associated with age, years since first exposure and exposure duration. The MDCT results showed an association between asbestosis and age and between plaques and exposure duration, years since first exposure and cumulative exposure. Parenchymal changes on CXR and MDCT, and diffuse pleural thickening on CXR were both associated with smoking. Using a cut-off of 55 years for age, 17 years for exposure duration and 28 years for latency, benign radiological changes in the cohort with CXR could be predicted with a sensitivity of 82.0% for all of the three variables and a specificity of 47.4%, 39.0% and 40.6%, respectively. Conclusions Participants aged 55 years and older and those with an asbestos exposure of at least 17 years or 28 years since first exposure should be seen as having an increased risk of abnormal radiological findings. For implementing a more focused approach the routine use of low-dose MDCT rather than CXR at least for initial examinations would be justified. PMID:24808921

  5. Clinical validation of a medical grade color monitor for chest radiology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jacobs, J.; Zanca, F.; Verschakelen, J.; Marchal, G.; Bosmans, H.

    2009-02-01

    Until recently, the specifications of medical grade monochrome LCD monitors outperformed those of color LCD monitors. New generations of color LCD monitors, however, show specifications that are in many respects similar to those of monochrome monitors typically used in diagnostic workstations. The aim of present study was to evaluate the impact of different medical grade monitors in terms of detection of simulated lung nodules in chest x-ray images. Specifically, we wanted to compare a new medical grade color monitor (Barco Coronis 6MP color) to a medical grade grayscale monitor (Barco Coronis 3MP monochrome) and a consumer color monitor (Philips 200VW 1.7MP color) by means of an observer performance experiment. Using the free-response acquisition data paradigm, seven radiologists were asked to detect and locate lung nodules (170 in total), simulated in half of the 200 chest X-ray images used in the experiment. The jackknife free-response receiver operating characteristic (JAFROC) analysis of the data showed a statistically significant difference between at least two monitors, F-value=3.77 and p-value =0.0481. The different Figure of Merit values were 0.727, 0.723 and 0.697 for the new color LCD monitor, the medical grade monitor and the consumer color monitor respectively. There was no difference between the needed reading times but there was a difference between the mean calculated Euclidian distances between the position marked by the observers and the center of the simulated nodule, indicating a better accuracy with both medical grade monitors. Present data suggests that the new generation of medical grade color monitors could be used as diagnostic workstations.

  6. Radiological findings and the clinical importance of megacalycosis

    PubMed Central

    Kalaitzis, Christos; Patris, Emmanuel; Deligeorgiou, Evangelia; Sountoulides, Petros; Bantis, Athanasios; Giannakopoulos, Stilianos; Touloupidis, Stavros

    2015-01-01

    Objective To describe the radiological findings and the clinical importance of megacalycosis. Materials and methods On the basis of a case report and literature review, diagnostic criteria and clinical significance of megacalycosis are presented. Result Megacalycosis is mostly asymptomatic and is usually discovered either accidentally or as a result of its complications, such as stone formation, flank pain, hematuria, infection, and fever. The renal pelvis, infundibulum, and ureter are not dilated. Calyces have a semilunar configuration rather than the conventional triangular or conical form. The tip of each pyramid is flat, and the calyces possess neither fornix nor papillae impressions. The number of calyces is increased compared to the healthy condition, typically from 20–25. The renal parenchyma has a normal width but with a slight narrowing of the renal medulla. The kidney exhibits normal function, in particular with respect to its ability to concentrate the urine. Conclusion Megacalycosis is a rare, usually unilateral dilatation of the kidney calyces in the presence of a normal, undilated renal pelvis and ureter. Its pathological significance lies in the occurrence of complications. PMID:26528455

  7. From the radiologic pathology archives: gastrointestinal lymphoma: radiologic and pathologic findings.

    PubMed

    Lewis, Rachel B; Mehrotra, Anupamjit K; Rodríguez, Pablo; Manning, Maria A; Levine, Marc S

    2014-01-01

    Gastrointestinal (GI) lymphoma encompasses a heterogeneous group of neoplasms that have a common lymphoid origin but variable pathologic and imaging features. Extranodal marginal zone B-cell lymphoma (ENMZL) and diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL) are the most common. ENMZL usually occurs in the stomach, where it is associated with chronic infection by Helicobacter pylori, and is typically a superficial spreading lesion that causes mucosal nodularity or ulceration and mild wall thickening. DLBCL may arise de novo or from transformation of ENMZL or other low-grade lymphomas. This form of lymphoma produces extensive wall thickening or a bulky mass, but obstruction is uncommon. Mantle cell lymphoma is the classic cause of lymphomatous polyposis, but multiple polyps or nodules can also be seen with ENMZL and follicular lymphoma. Burkitt lymphoma is usually characterized by an ileocecal mass or wall thickening in the terminal ileum in young children, often in the setting of widespread disease. Primary GI Hodgkin lymphoma, which is rare, may be manifested by a variety of findings, though stenosis is more common than with non-Hodgkin lymphoma. Enteropathy-associated T-cell lymphoma is frequently associated with celiac disease and is characterized by wall thickening, ulceration, and even perforation of the jejunum. Accurate radiologic diagnosis of GI lymphoma requires a multifactorial approach based on the clinical findings, site of involvement, imaging findings, and associated complications. PMID:25384294

  8. Spinal radiological findings in nine patients with spontaneous intracranial hypotension.

    PubMed

    Chiapparini, L; Farina, L; D'Incerti, L; Erbetta, A; Pareyson, D; CarrieroM, R; Savoiardo, M

    2002-02-01

    Cranial magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) findings in spontaneous intracranial hypotension (SIH) are well known, while spinal studies have received less attention. Radiological spinal findings in nine patients with SIH are presented, looking for possible characteristic features. Five of the nine patients had histories of previous minor trauma, one of previous surgery; in three patients possible relevant preceding events were completely absent. All nine patients had cervical, seven thoracic, and four lumbar spine MRI studies; post-contrast studies were obtained in seven cases, MRI myelograms in five. Radioisotope myelocisternography was performed in four patients and myelo-CT in four. Epidural fluid collections were found in seven patients. In six cases the dural sac had collapsed, with a festooned appearance; intense epidural enhancement on post-contrast studies demonstrated marked dilatation of the epidural venous plexus. In three cases an irregular root sleeve suggested a possible point of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) leakage. Myelo-CT demonstrated the CSF fistula in two cases, radioisotope myelocisternography in three. The pattern of spinal abnormalities is different from that seen in cranial MRI for anatomical reasons: in the spinal canal the dura is not adherent to the bone; therefore, collapse of the dural sac and dilatation of epidural venous plexus occur, rather than subdural hematomas. In most cases the search for the dural tear is difficult. Radioisotope cisternography is probably the most sensitive examination for documenting the leakage of CSF out of the subarachnoid space; myelo-CT may precisely demonstrate the point of the CSF fistula, whereas MRI may only suggest it. PMID:11942367

  9. Radiological findings in newborn infants with urinary infection.

    PubMed Central

    Drew, J H; Acton, C M

    1976-01-01

    Selective suprapubic urine aspiration was performed in 905 of 12 942 consecutive live-born infants and showed the presence of infection in 64 (0-5%). A majority (84%) of the infected infants were males. Radiological abnormalities were detected in 35 (55%). Because of this high incidence of abnormalities, which when diagnosed might alter management, it is suggested that radiological investigations be performed in newborn infants with proven urinary infection. PMID:986789

  10. Performing chest x-rays at inspiration in uncooperative children: the effect of exercises with a training program for radiology technicians.

    PubMed

    Langen, Heinz-Jakob; Kohlhauser-Vollmuth, Christiane; Sengenberger, Corinna; Bielmeier, Johann; Jocher, Renate; Eschmann, Martina

    2014-01-01

    Objective. It is difficult to acquire a chest X-ray of a crying infant at maximum inspiration. A computer program was developed for technician training. Method. Video clips of 3 babies were used and the moment of deepest inspiration was determined in the single-frame view. 12 technicians simulated chest radiographs at normal video speed by pushing a button. The computer program stopped the video and calculated the period of time to the optimal instant for a chest X-ray. Demonstration software can be tested at website online. Every technician simulated 10 chest X-rays for each of the 3 video clips. The technicians then spent 40 minutes practicing performing chest X-rays at optimal inspiration. The test was repeated after 5, 20, and 40 minutes of practice. Results. 6 participants showed a significant improvement after exercises (collective 1). Deviation from the optimal instant for taking an X-ray at inspiration decreased from 0.39 to 0.22 s after 40 min of practice. 6 technicians showed no significant improvement (collective 2). Deviation decreased from a low starting value of 0.25 s to 0.21 s. Conclusion. The tested computer program improves the ability of radiology technicians to take a chest X-ray at optimal inspiration in a crying child. PMID:25120930

  11. Chest Computed Tomography Findings in HIV-Infected Individuals in the Era of Antiretroviral Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Clausen, Emily; Wittman, Catherine; Gingo, Matthew; Fernainy, Khaled; Fuhrman, Carl; Kessinger, Cathy; Weinman, Renee; McMahon, Deborah; Leader, Joseph; Morris, Alison

    2014-01-01

    Background Chest radiographic abnormalities were common in HIV-infected individuals in the pre-combination antiretroviral therapy era, but findings may differ now due to a changing spectrum of pulmonary complications. Methods Cross-sectional study of radiographic abnormalities in an HIV-infected outpatient population during the antiretroviral therapy era. Demographics, chest computed tomography, and pulmonary function tests were obtained in HIV-infected volunteers without acute respiratory illness from the University of Pittsburgh HIV/AIDS clinic. Overall prevalence of radiographic abnormalities and potential risk factors for having any abnormality, nodules, or emphysema were evaluated using univariate and multivariable analyses. Results A majority of the 121 participants (55.4%) had a radiographic abnormality with the most common being emphysema (26.4%), nodules (17.4%), and bronchiectasis (10.7%). In multivariate models, age (odds ratio [OR] per year  = 1.07, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.04–1.14, p<0.001), pneumonia history (OR  = 3.60, 95% CI  = 1.27–10.20, p = 0.016), and having ever smoked (OR  = 3.66, p = 0.013, 95% CI  = 1.31–10.12) were significant predictors of having any radiographic abnormality. Use of antiretroviral therapy, CD4 cell count, and HIV viral load were not associated with presence of abnormalities. Individuals with radiographic emphysema were more likely to have airway obstruction on pulmonary function tests. Only 85.8% participants with nodules had follow-up imaging resulting in 52.4% having stable nodules, 23.8% resolution of their nodules, 4.8% development of a new nodule, and 4.8% primary lung cancer. Conclusions Radiographic abnormalities remain common in HIV-infected individuals with emphysema, nodules, and bronchiectasis being the most common. Age, smoking, and pneumonia were associated with radiographic abnormalities, but HIV-associated factors did not seem to predict risk. PMID:25409510

  12. Gonadal vein leiomyosarcoma: A case report with radiological findings

    PubMed Central

    Matsuzono, Tomoko; Chan, Cyrus Yin-Ho; Chan, May Yuk-May

    2015-01-01

    Summary A 56 year old postmenopausal lady presented with a rapidly enlarging pelvis mass. Clinical and ultrasonographic features were compatible with a rapidly enlarging fibroid with possible sarcomatous changes, and hence, computated tomography (CT) scan was performed to further delineate the nature and extent of the disease. However, CT scan revealed a huge tumour arising from the retroperitoneal space along the course of the left gonadal vein with typical radiological features of a gonadal vein leiomyosarcoma which were described in previous literatures. With joint collaboration with the surgeons, radical surgery with optimal debulking was subsequently performed for the patient and the diagnosis was confirmed intra-operatively and histologically. PMID:26361567

  13. Exogenous Lipoid Pneumonia in Laryngectomy Patients: Radiological Findings.

    PubMed

    García Latorre, Raquel; Rodríguez Díaz, Ricardo; Barrios Barreto, Deisy; Ayala Carbonero, Ana; García Gómez-Muriel, María Isabel; Gorospe Sarasúa, Luis

    2015-07-01

    Exogenous lipoid pneumonia (ELP) is a rare (incidence 1.0%-2.5%), often under-diagnosed disease, caused by the aspiration and accumulation of exogenous lipids within the pulmonary alveoli. Various cases have been described due to inhalation of lubricants via the nasal passages and oropharynx, aspiration of mineral oils in laxatives in patients with eating disorders, application of lip gloss, occupational exposure to liquid paraffin or mineral oils ("fire-eaters", industrial use in washing of machinery, automobile workshops, plastic paints, etc.) and application of Vaseline during the insertion of nasogastric tubes and in the care of tracheotomy patients. ELP usually presents radiologically as areas of low-attenuation peribronchial consolidation and ground glass opacities, with a predominantly bibasal distribution. We present 5 cases of long-standing laryngectomy patients diagnosed with ELP who admitted using Vaseline in their tracheal stoma care. PMID:25446870

  14. Presumed Perinatal Stroke: Risk Factors, Clinical and Radiological Findings.

    PubMed

    Ilves, Pilvi; Laugesaar, Rael; Loorits, Dagmar; Kolk, Anneli; Tomberg, Tiiu; Lõo, Silva; Talvik, Inga; Kahre, Tiina; Talvik, Tiina

    2016-04-01

    It is unknown why some infants with perinatal stroke present clinical symptoms late during infancy and will be identified as infants with presumed perinatal stroke. The risk factors and clinical and radiological data of 42 infants with presumed perinatal stroke (69% with periventricular venous infarction and 31% with arterial ischemic stroke) from the Estonian Pediatric Stroke Database were reviewed. Children with presumed perinatal stroke were born at term in 95% of the cases and had had no risk factors during pregnancy in 43% of the cases. Children with periventricular venous infarction were born significantly more often (82%) vaginally (P = .0213) compared to children with arterial stroke (42%); nor did they require resuscitation (P = .0212) or had any neurological symptoms after birth (P = .0249). Periventricular venous infarction is the most common type of lesion among infants with the presumed perinatal stroke. Data suggest that the disease is of prenatal origin. PMID:26446909

  15. Handbook of radiologic procedures

    SciTech Connect

    Hedgcock, M.

    1986-01-01

    This book is organized around radiologic procedures with each discussed from the points of view of: indications, contraindications, materials, method of procedures and complications. Covered in this book are: emergency radiology chest radiology, bone radiology, gastrointestinal radiology, GU radiology, pediatric radiology, computerized tomography, neuroradiology, visceral and peripheral angiography, cardiovascular radiology, nuclear medicine, lymphangiography, and mammography.

  16. Intraorbital Granular Cell Tumor Ophthalmologic and Radiologic Findings

    PubMed Central

    de la Vega, Gabriela; Villegas, Victor M; Velazquez, Jose; Barrios, Mirelys; Murray, Timothy G; Elhammady, Mohamed Samy

    2015-01-01

    Granular cell tumor is a rare soft tissue neoplasm that commonly affects the head and neck regions. We describe a case of a granular cell tumor of the orbit including its clinical presentation, histopathology, and magnetic resonance imaging findings. PMID:25963156

  17. Correlation between Radiological and Pathological Findings in Patients with Mycoplasma pneumoniae Pneumonia

    PubMed Central

    Tanaka, Hiroshi

    2016-01-01

    Studies focused on the pathological–radiological correlation of human Mycoplasma (M) pneumoniae pneumonia have rarely been reported. Therefore, we extensively reviewed the literature regarding pathological and radiological studies of Mycoplasma pneumonia, and compared findings between open lung biopsy specimen and computed tomography (CT). Major three correlations were summarized. (1) Peribronchial and perivascular cuffing characterized by mononuclear cells infiltration was correlated with bronchovascular bundles thickening on CT, which was the most common finding of this pneumonia. (2) Cellular bronchitis in the small airways accompanied with exudates or granulation tissue in the lumen revealed as centrilobular nodules on CT. (3) Neutrophils and exudates in the alveolar lumen radiologically demonstrated as air-space consolidation or ground-glass opacities. In M. pulmonis-infected mice model, pathologic patterns are strikingly different according to host cell-mediated immunity (CMI) levels; treatment with interleukin-2 lead to marked cellular bronchitis in the small airways and treatment with prednisolone or cyclosporin-A lead to neutrophils and exudates in the alveolar lumen. Patients with centrilobular nodules predominant radiologic pattern have a high level of CMI, measuring by tuberculin skin test. From these findings, up-regulation of host CMI could change radiological pattern to centrilobular nodules predominant, on the other hand down-regulation of host CMI would change radiological pattern to ground-glass opacity and consolidation. It was suggested the pathological features of M. pneumoniae pneumonia may be altered by the level of host CMI. PMID:27242720

  18. Multiple cystic lymphangiomas of the spleen: radiologic and histopathologic findings.

    PubMed

    Kim, Se-Young; Kwon, Heon-Ju; Park, Hae Won; Lee, So-Yeon; Son, Byung Ho; Kim, Mi Sung

    2015-07-01

    Splenic cyst(s) may be noted as an incidental finding on conventional imaging techniques, or as a result of evaluation of a patient with left upper quadrant pain, left shoulder pain, abdominal enlargement, or splenomegaly. Lymphangioma of the spleen is an extremely rare and benign neoplasm in adults, which is characterized by cystic dilatation of the lymphatic vessels in splenic parenchyma. This report describes a case of multiple splenic lymphangiomas in a 41-year-old female. She underwent abdominal ultrasonography for a health check-up. She had no symptoms, and physical examination did not reveal any abnormalities apart from splenomegaly. Ultrasonography and computed tomography showed multiple variable-sized cysts replacing the normal parenchyma of the spleen. There were wall calcifications in several cysts. The patient underwent laparoscopic splenectomy, and the final diagnosis was multiple lymphangiomas of the spleen. PMID:26576795

  19. Radiologic and surgical findings in chronic suppurative otitis media.

    PubMed

    Gül, Aylin; Akdağ, Mehmet; Kiniş, Vefa; Yilmaz, Beyhan; Şengül, Engin; Teke, Memik; Meriç, Faruk

    2014-11-01

    Our aim in this study was to evaluate the efficiency of preoperative temporal bone computed tomography (CT) in detecting pathologic conditions in patients with chronic suppurative otitis media (CSOM). The intraoperative findings and temporal bone CT results of 350 patients who were diagnosed with CSOM between September 1, 2010, and June 1, 2013, were compared. Comparison parameters were as follows: the presence of cholesteatoma, erosion of the outer ear bone canal, erosion of the middle ear chain, erosion of the dural plate, erosion of the lateral semicircular canal, erosion of the sigmoid sinus wall, and dehiscence of the facial canal. The contribution of CT was limited in showing the outer ear canal destruction, dural plate destruction, facial canal destruction, lateral semicircular canal destruction, and destruction of the sigmoid sinus wall. However, CT was more sensitive in detecting cholesteatoma and erosion of the ossicular chain. These results indicate that preoperative CT of patients with CSOM serves as an important guide for otolaryngologists, although there are limitations in the evaluation of the CT results. PMID:25377960

  20. Painful Chest Wall Swellings: Tietze Syndrome or Chest Wall Tumor?

    PubMed

    Kaplan, Tevfik; Gunal, Nesimi; Gulbahar, Gultekin; Kocer, Bulent; Han, Serdar; Eryazgan, Mehmet Ali; Ozsoy, Arzu; Naldoken, Seniha; Alhan, Aslıhan; Sakinci, Unal

    2016-04-01

    Background Tietze syndrome (TS) is an inflammatory condition characterized by chest pain and swelling of costochondral junction. Primary chest wall tumors may mimic TS. In this article, we report our experience of approximately 121 patients initially diagnosed as TS and determined chest wall tumor in some cases at the follow-up. Methods This is a retrospective review of patients diagnosed as TS by clinical examination, chest X-ray, electrocardiogram, routine laboratory tests, and computed tomography (CT) of chest: all treated and followed up between March 2001 and July 2012. There were 121 cases (41 males and 80 females; mean age, 39.6 ± 3.2 years) of TS. Results In 27 patients with initial normal radiological findings, the size of swellings had doubled during the follow-up period (mean, 8.51 ± 2.15 months). These patients were reevaluated with chest CT and bone scintigraphy and then early diagnostic biopsy was performed. Pathologic examination revealed primary chest wall tumor in 13 patients (5 malignant, 8 benign). CT had a sensitivity of 92.3% and a specificity of 64.2% in detection of tumors (kappa: 0.56, p = 0.002), whereas the sensitivity and the specificity of bone scan were 84.6 and 35.7%, respectively (kappa: 0.199, p = 0.385). Conclusion Primary chest wall tumors could mimic TS. Bone scintigraphy or CT is not specific enough to determine malignant and other benign disorders of costochondral junction. Therefore, clinicians should follow TS patients more closely, and in case of increasing size of swelling, early diagnostic biopsy should be considered. PMID:25742551

  1. [Pulmonary CO diffusion and radiological findings in subjects formerly exposed to asbestos cement].

    PubMed

    Zona, A; Bruno, C; Agabiti, N; Pizzutelli, G; Forastiere, F

    1998-01-01

    A cross-sectional study on 117 male former asbestos-cement workers was performed. The aims of the study were: evaluation of the prevalence of respiratory symptoms, measurement of pulmonary volumes, flows and DI(co) values, detection of asbestos-related diseases, and data collection for a medical follow-up of the participants. Medical examination included ECSC questionnaire, spirometry, DI(co) measurement and chest x-ray. Time since first exposure (latency) and duration of employment were used as exposure indices: participants were subdivided into three exposure groups, respectively for latency and duration of employment. For statistical analysis, multiple linear regression and logistic regression methods were applied; significance level was p < 0.05. In 28 participants abnormal DI(co) values (< 80% of predicted) were measured, 9 subjects (8%) had radiological asbestos-related abnormalities. Lower values of DI(co), after correcting for smoking, were observed in the third latency group of subjects; an increased risk of radiological asbestos-related abnormalities was observed in relation to the duration of employment and latency. This study confirmed DI(co) as an indicator of (asbestos-related) pulmonary interstitial disease. PMID:9608195

  2. Unusual Radiologic Finding of Intracranial Inflammatory Myofibroblastic Tumor Presenting a Cyst with Mural Nodule

    PubMed Central

    Park, Jong-Heok; Chung, Dong-Sup

    2015-01-01

    An intracranial cyst tumor with a mural nodule can be representative of some types of brain tumors, but is a rare presentation of intracranial inflammatory myofibroblastic tumor (IMT). Herein, we report the case of an intracranial IMT in a 48-year-old woman presenting with the extremely unusual radiologic findings of a cyst with a mural nodule. PMID:26605272

  3. Unexpected Radiologic Findings for a Casting Type of Radiolucent Colorectal Foreign Body Composed of Polyurethane Foam

    PubMed Central

    Tamamoto, Fumihiko; Ogawa, Shoichi; Sano, Maiko; Yoshimura, Tetsunori; Nozaki, Miwako

    2016-01-01

    Radiologic diagnosis of colorectal foreign bodies is usually not very difficult, because inserted materials are often clearly visible on plain abdominal radiographs. However, when they are radiolucent, a plain abdominal radiograph has been reported to be useless. As radiolucent colorectal foreign bodies appear as radiolucent artificial contours or air-trapped materials in the pelvis, almost always the diagnosis itself can be made by careful evaluation of plain abdominal radiographs. We encountered a case of casting type of radiolucent colorectal foreign body formed from polyurethane foam. It presented us with unexpected radiologic findings and led to diagnostic difficulties. PMID:27213072

  4. Unexpected Radiologic Findings for a Casting Type of Radiolucent Colorectal Foreign Body Composed of Polyurethane Foam.

    PubMed

    Sanjo, Emi; Tamamoto, Fumihiko; Ogawa, Shoichi; Sano, Maiko; Yoshimura, Tetsunori; Nozaki, Miwako

    2016-01-01

    Radiologic diagnosis of colorectal foreign bodies is usually not very difficult, because inserted materials are often clearly visible on plain abdominal radiographs. However, when they are radiolucent, a plain abdominal radiograph has been reported to be useless. As radiolucent colorectal foreign bodies appear as radiolucent artificial contours or air-trapped materials in the pelvis, almost always the diagnosis itself can be made by careful evaluation of plain abdominal radiographs. We encountered a case of casting type of radiolucent colorectal foreign body formed from polyurethane foam. It presented us with unexpected radiologic findings and led to diagnostic difficulties. PMID:27213072

  5. The Development of Expertise in Radiology: In Chest Radiograph Interpretation, "Expert" Search Pattern May Predate "Expert" Levels of Diagnostic Accuracy for Pneumothorax Identification.

    PubMed

    Kelly, Brendan S; Rainford, Louise A; Darcy, Sarah P; Kavanagh, Eoin C; Toomey, Rachel J

    2016-07-01

    Purpose To investigate the development of chest radiograph interpretation skill through medical training by measuring both diagnostic accuracy and eye movements during visual search. Materials and Methods An institutional exemption from full ethical review was granted for the study. Five consultant radiologists were deemed the reference expert group, and four radiology registrars, five senior house officers (SHOs), and six interns formed four clinician groups. Participants were shown 30 chest radiographs, 14 of which had a pneumothorax, and were asked to give their level of confidence as to whether a pneumothorax was present. Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve analysis was carried out on diagnostic decisions. Eye movements were recorded with a Tobii TX300 (Tobii Technology, Stockholm, Sweden) eye tracker. Four eye-tracking metrics were analyzed. Variables were compared to identify any differences between groups. All data were compared by using the Friedman nonparametric method. Results The average area under the ROC curve for the groups increased with experience (0.947 for consultants, 0.792 for registrars, 0.693 for SHOs, and 0.659 for interns; P = .009). A significant difference in diagnostic accuracy was found between consultants and registrars (P = .046). All four eye-tracking metrics decreased with experience, and there were significant differences between registrars and SHOs. Total reading time decreased with experience; it was significantly lower for registrars compared with SHOs (P = .046) and for SHOs compared with interns (P = .025). Conclusion Chest radiograph interpretation skill increased with experience, both in terms of diagnostic accuracy and visual search. The observed level of experience at which there was a significant difference was higher for diagnostic accuracy than for eye-tracking metrics. (©) RSNA, 2016 Online supplemental material is available for this article. PMID:27322975

  6. Can chest high-resolution computed tomography findings diagnose pulmonary alveolar microlithiasis?*

    PubMed Central

    Francisco, Flávia Angélica Ferreira; Rodrigues, Rosana Souza; Barreto, Miriam Menna; Escuissato, Dante Luiz; Araujo Neto, Cesar Augusto; Silva, Jorge Luiz Pereira e; Silva, Claudio S.; Hochhegger, Bruno; Souza Jr., Arthur Soares; Zanetti, Gláucia; Marchiori, Edson

    2015-01-01

    Objective The present study was aimed at retrospectively reviewing high-resolution computed tomography (HRCT) findings in patients with pulmonary alveolar microlithiasis in order to evaluate the frequency of tomographic findings and their distribution in the lung parenchyma. Materials and Methods Thirteen patients (9 females and 4 males; age, 9 to 59 years; mean age, 34.5 years) were included in the present study. The HRCT images were independently evaluated by two observers whose decisions were made by consensus. The inclusion criterion was the presence of abnormalities typical of pulmonary alveolar microlithiasis at HRCT, which precludes lung biopsy. However, in 6 cases lung biopsy was performed. Results Ground-glass opacities and small parenchymal nodules were the predominant tomographic findings, present in 100% of cases, followed by small subpleural nodules (92.3%), subpleural cysts (84.6%), subpleural linear calcifications (69.2%), crazy-paving pattern (69.2%), fissure nodularity (53.8%), calcification along interlobular septa (46.2%) and dense consolidation (46.2%). Conclusion As regards distribution of the lesions, there was preferential involvement of the lower third of the lungs. No predominance of distribution in axial and anteroposterior directions was observed. PMID:26379317

  7. Imaging findings of various talus bone tumors-clinico-radiologic features of talus bone tumors.

    PubMed

    Jeon, Ji Young; Chung, Hye Won; Kwon, Jong Won; Hong, Sung Hwan; Lee, Guen Young; Ryu, Kyung Nam

    2016-01-01

    Osseous neoplasms of the foot are uncommon, accounting for only 3.3% of all primary bone tumors. Bone tumors of the talus are even rarer, and there are not many publications that comprehensively evaluate the imaging findings of talus tumors. The purpose of this article is to review the benign and malignant bone tumors affecting this uncommon site and to describe the clinical and radiologic features of each tumor. PMID:27317211

  8. [Neck pain. Functional and radiological findings compared with topical pain descriptions].

    PubMed

    Krasny, C; Tilscher, H; Hanna, M

    2005-01-01

    Topical pain descriptions of the neck are summarized under the unspecific diagnosis "cervical syndrome" (CS). Neck pain localized in the cranial half of the cervical spine attended with occipital extension is defined as "cervicocephalic syndrome" (OCS). Pain concerning the caudal half with extention in both upper limbs or into the interscapular region is called "cervicobrachial syndrom" (UCS). The combination of both syndromes is described as "cervicocephalic and -brachial syndrom" (OUCS).The retrospective analyzed cohort of 75 patients showed a distribution of incidence of 1:20:17 of OCS : UCS : OUCS. Symptoms like headache, vertigo or tinnitus were reported in 34.7% of all cases, only 4% had MRI documented radicular lesions. Functional disturbances showed a maximum in the segments C2-3 (81.4%) and C3-4 (66.7%). Segmental blockades occurred 6 times more frequently than segmental hyper-mobility. Most of the radiological findings were localized in the vertebral segments C4-5 and C5-6, degenerative disc and joint diseases were predominant. The distribution of functional disturbances and radiological findings of the vertebral segments showed no significant coincidence. Therefore this study proved that there are no correlations between manual-medical findings and radiological results related to the subtypes of chronic neck pain. PMID:15375652

  9. Classification of radiological errors in chest radiographs, using support vector machine on the spatial frequency features of false- negative and false-positive regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pietrzyk, Mariusz W.; Donovan, Tim; Brennan, Patrick C.; Dix, Alan; Manning, David J.

    2011-03-01

    Aim: To optimize automated classification of radiological errors during lung nodule detection from chest radiographs (CxR) using a support vector machine (SVM) run on the spatial frequency features extracted from the local background of selected regions. Background: The majority of the unreported pulmonary nodules are visually detected but not recognized; shown by the prolonged dwell time values at false-negative regions. Similarly, overestimated nodule locations are capturing substantial amounts of foveal attention. Spatial frequency properties of selected local backgrounds are correlated with human observer responses either in terms of accuracy in indicating abnormality position or in the precision of visual sampling the medical images. Methods: Seven radiologists participated in the eye tracking experiments conducted under conditions of pulmonary nodule detection from a set of 20 postero-anterior CxR. The most dwelled locations have been identified and subjected to spatial frequency (SF) analysis. The image-based features of selected ROI were extracted with un-decimated Wavelet Packet Transform. An analysis of variance was run to select SF features and a SVM schema was implemented to classify False-Negative and False-Positive from all ROI. Results: A relative high overall accuracy was obtained for each individually developed Wavelet-SVM algorithm, with over 90% average correct ratio for errors recognition from all prolonged dwell locations. Conclusion: The preliminary results show that combined eye-tracking and image-based features can be used for automated detection of radiological error with SVM. The work is still in progress and not all analytical procedures have been completed, which might have an effect on the specificity of the algorithm.

  10. Rare causes of pulmonary hypertension: spectrum of radiological findings and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Rossi, Alice; Zompatori, Maurizio; Tchouante Tchouanhou, Patrick; Amadori, Michele; Palazzini, Massimiliano; Conficoni, Elisa; Galiè, Nazzareno; Poletti, Venerino; Gavelli, Giampaolo

    2014-01-01

    Following a brief introduction covering the clinical signs and symptoms of pulmonary hypertension (PH), its most recent classification into six groups, and the computed tomography (CT) features common to all forms of PH, this paper illustrates the typical patterns that can be found on chest radiography and CT in rare causes of PH. We present and compare with the existing literature our personal series of cases of rare forms of PH, found in the following diseases: veno-occlusive disease, pulmonary capillary haemangiomatosis, non-thrombotic pulmonary embolism (tumour embolism and carcinomatous lymphangitis, talcosis, hydatid disease), pulmonary artery sarcoma, neurofibromatosis, sarcoidosis, and Langerhans cell histiocytosis. Rare forms of PH show low incidence and prevalence, and are, therefore, poorly recognised. Their diagnosis is a challenge for clinicians, pathologists, and radiologists, and any additional knowledge about the CT findings may help the diagnosis in the case of patients affected by PH of unknown origin. PMID:24234182

  11. Use of Coronary Computed Tomographic Angiography Findings to Modify Statin and Aspirin Prescription in Patients With Acute Chest Pain.

    PubMed

    Pursnani, Amit; Celeng, Csilla; Schlett, Christopher L; Mayrhofer, Thomas; Zakroysky, Pearl; Lee, Hang; Ferencik, Maros; Fleg, Jerome L; Bamberg, Fabian; Wiviott, Stephen D; Truong, Quynh A; Udelson, James E; Nagurney, John T; Hoffmann, Udo

    2016-02-01

    Coronary CT angiography (CCTA) is used in patients with low-intermediate chest pain presenting to the emergency department for its reliability in excluding acute coronary syndrome (ACS). However, its influence on medication modification in this setting is unclear. We sought to determine whether knowledge of CCTA-based coronary artery disease (CAD) was associated with change in statin and aspirin prescription. We used the CCTA arm of the Rule Out Myocardial Infarction using Computed Angiographic Tomography II multicenter, randomized control trial (R-II) and comparison cohort from the observational Rule Out Myocardial Infarction using Computed Angiographic Tomography I cohort (R-I). In R-II, subjects were randomly assigned to CCTA to guide decision making, whereas in R-I patients underwent CCTA with results blinded to caregivers and managed according to standard care. Our final cohort consisted of 277 subjects from R-I and 370 from R-II. ACS rate was similar (6.9% vs 6.2% respectively, p = 0.75). For subjects with CCTA-detected obstructive CAD without ACS, initiation of statin was significantly greater after disclosure of CCTA results (0% in R-I vs 20% in R-II, p = 0.009). Conversely, for subjects without CCTA-detected CAD, aspirin prescription was lower with disclosure of CCTA results (16% in R-I vs 4.8% in R-II, p = 0.001). However, only 68% of subjects in R-II with obstructive CAD were discharged on statin and 65% on aspirin. In conclusion, physician knowledge of CCTA results leads to improved alignment of aspirin and statin with the presence and severity of CAD although still many patients with CCTA-detected CAD are not discharged on aspirin or statin. Our findings suggest opportunity for practice improvement when CCTA is performed in the emergency department. PMID:26762723

  12. Tuberculous meningitis with multiple intracranial tuberculomas mimicking neurocysticercosis clinical and radiological findings.

    PubMed

    Oncul, Oral; Baylan, Orhan; Mutlu, Hakan; Cavuslu, Saban; Doganci, Levent

    2005-12-01

    Central nervous system (CNS) tuberculosis (TB), the most dangerous form of TB, remains a public health problem, particularly in developing countries. In the differential diagnosis of intracranial tuberculomas (ICTs), images on radiological findings should be differentiated from other causes of space-occupying lesions. These lesions include malignant diseases such as glioma or lymphoma, pyogenic abscess, toxoplasmosis, neurocysticercosis (NC), sarcoidosis, hydatidosis and late syphilitic involvement of CNS. We present a case with multiple ICTs mimicking NC with similar clinical and imaging manifestations in a young immunocompetent patient. The diagnosis was based on brain magnetic resonance imaging findings. The definitive diagnosis was confirmed mycobacteriologically in cerebrospinal fluid and sputum specimens. Adequate response to anti-TB chemotherapy was achieved while multiple ICTs in the brain disappeared slowly. In the absence of appropriate therapy, these pathologies might be fatal; the possibilities of differential diagnosis would be of great clinical importance, particularly because of the different treatment protocols required for the NC and ICTs. PMID:16377875

  13. Use of chest sonography in acute-care radiology☆

    PubMed Central

    De Luca, C.; Valentino, M.; Rimondi, M.R.; Branchini, M.; Baleni, M. Casadio; Barozzi, L.

    2008-01-01

    Diagnosis of acute lung disease is a daily challenge for radiologists working in acute-care areas. It is generally based on the results of chest radiography performed under technically unfavorable conditions. Computed tomography (CT) is undoubtedly more accurate in these cases, but it cannot always be performed on critically ill patients who need continuous care. The use of thoracic ultrasonography (US) has recently been proposed for the study of acute lung disease. It can be carried out rapidly at the bedside and does not require any particularly sophisticated equipment. This report analyzes our experience with chest sonography as a supplement to chest radiography in an Emergency Radiology Unit. We performed chest sonography – as an adjunct to chest radiography – on 168 patients with acute chest pathology. Static and dynamic US signs were analyzed in light of radiographic findings and, when possible, CT. The use of chest US improved the authors' ability to provide confident diagnoses of acute disease of the chest and lungs. PMID:23397048

  14. A simplified staging system based on the radiological findings in different stages of ochronotic spondyloarthropathy

    PubMed Central

    Jebaraj, Isaac; Chacko, Binita Riya; Chiramel, George Koshy; Matthai, Thomas; Parameswaran, Apurve

    2013-01-01

    This study describes a group of 26 patients with ochronotic spondyloarthropathy who were on regular treatment and follow-up at a tertiary level hospital and proposes a simplified staging system for ochronotic spondyloarthropathy based on radiographic findings seen in the thoracolumbar spine. This proposed classification makes it easy to identify the stage of the disease and start the appropriate management at an early stage. Four progressive stages are described: an inflammatory stage (stage 1), the stage of early discal calcification (stage 2), the stage of fibrous ankylosis (stage 3), and the stage of bony ankylosis (stage 4). To our knowledge, this is the largest reported series of radiological description of spinal ochronosis, and emphasizes the contribution of the spine radiograph in the diagnosis and staging of the disease. PMID:23986625

  15. Plasma cell-free DNA levels and integrity in patients with chest radiological findings: NSCLC versus benign lung nodules.

    PubMed

    Szpechcinski, Adam; Rudzinski, Piotr; Kupis, Wlodzimierz; Langfort, Renata; Orlowski, Tadeusz; Chorostowska-Wynimko, Joanna

    2016-05-01

    Effective discrimination between lung cancer and benign tumours is a common clinical problem in the differential diagnosis of solitary pulmonary nodules. The analysis of cell-free DNA (cfDNA) in blood may greatly aid the early detection of lung cancer by evaluating cancer-related alterations. The plasma cfDNA levels and integrity were analysed in 65 non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients, 28 subjects with benign lung tumours, and 16 healthy controls using real-time PCR. The NSCLC patients demonstrated significantly higher mean plasma cfDNA levels compared with those with benign tumours (P = 0.0009) and healthy controls (P < 0.0001). The plasma cfDNA integrity in healthy individuals was significantly different than that found in patients with NSCLC or benign lung tumours (P < 0.0003). In ROC curve analysis, plasma cfDNA levels >2.8 ng/ml provided 86.4% sensitivity and 61.4% specificity in discriminating NSCLC from benign lung pathologies and healthy controls. cfDNA integrity showed better discriminatory power (91% sensitivity, 68.2% specificity). These data demonstrate that plasma cfDNA concentration and integrity analyses can significantly differentiate between NSCLC and benign lung tumours. The diagnostic capacity of the quantitative cfDNA assay is comparable to the values presented by conventional imaging modalities used in clinical practice. PMID:26854716

  16. Senile Calcification of the Trachea, Aortic Arch, and Mitral Annulus: An Incidental Finding on Chest X-Ray.

    PubMed

    Hosseinzadeh Maleki, Mahmood; Kazemi, Toba; Davoody, Navid

    2015-10-27

    A 94-year-old woman presented with dizziness and hypotension of 2 days' duration. She denied any syncope, presyncope, or angina. She had received a permanent pacemaker 12 years previously for the management of complete heart block (CHB), but she failed to program it. Twelve-lead electrocardiography revealed CHB with ventricular escape rhythm (40/min), so we inserted a temporary pacemaker. Anteroposterior chest X-ray showed trachea, aortic arch, and severe mitral valve calcification. Tracheal calcification is usually seen after 40 years old without clinical importance. However, it is seen in patients with renal failure, metastases, and prolonged use of warfarin as well as in pregnancy.(1) (-) (3). PMID:26985213

  17. Findings of the first comprehensive radiological monitoring program of the Republic of the Marshall Islands

    SciTech Connect

    Simon, S.L.; Graham, J.C.

    1997-07-01

    The Marshall Islands was the primary site of the United States atomic weapons testing program in the Pacific. From 1946 through 1958, 66 atomic weapons were detonated in the island country. For several decades, monitoring was conducted by the U.S. Department of Energy (or its predecessor agencies) on the test site atolls and neighboring atolls. However, 70% of the land area of the over 1,200 islands in the Marshall Islands was never systematically monitored prior to 1990. For the 5-y period from 1990 through 1994, the Government of the Republic of the Marshall Islands undertook an independent program to assess the radiological conditions throughout its 29 atolls. The scientific work was performed under the auspices of the Section 177 Agreement of the Compact of Free Association, U.S. public law 99-239, signed in 1986 by President Ronald Reagan. Although the total land area of the nations is a scant 180 km{sup 2}, the islands are distributed over 6 X 10{sup 5} km{sup 2} of ocean. Consequently, logistics and instrumentation were main considerations, in addition to cultural and language issues. The objective of this paper is to report findings for all atolls of the Marshall Islands on the {sup 137}Cs areal inventory (Bq m{sup -2}) and the external effective dose-rate (mSv y{sup -1}), the projected internal effective dose-rate (mSv y{sup -1}) from an assumed diet model, and surface soil concentrations of {sup 239,240}Pu (Bq kg{sup -1}) for selected northern atolls. Interpretation is also provided on the degree of contamination above global fallout levels. This report provides the first comprehensive summary of the radiological conditions throughout the Marshall Islands. 37 refs., 25 figs., 1 tab.

  18. Diagnostic radiology 1987

    SciTech Connect

    Margulis, A.R.; Gooding, C.A.

    1987-01-01

    This is the latest version of the continuing education course on diagnostic radiology given yearly by the Department of Radiology at the University of California, San Francisco. The lectures are grouped into sections on gastrointestinal radiology, mammography, uroradiology, magnetic resonance, hepatobiliary radiology, pediatric radiology, ultrasound, interventional radiology, chest radiology, nuclear medicine, cardiovascular radiology, and skeletal radiology. Each section contains four to eight topics. Each of these consists of text that represents highlights in narrative form, selected illustrations, and a short bibliography. The presentation gives a general idea of what points were made in the lecture.

  19. Can clinical and radiological findings predict surgery for lumbar disc herniation? A systematic literature review

    PubMed Central

    White, Andrew P.; Harrop, James; Dettori, Joseph R.

    2012-01-01

    Study design: Systematic review. Objective or clinical question: What clinical and radiological findings in patients with lumbar-herniated nucleus pulposus can serve as predictors of surgical intervention? Methods: Articles published between January 1975 and August 2011 were systematically reviewed using Pubmed, Cochrane, National Guideline Clearinghouse Databases, and bibliographies of key articles. Each article was subject to quality rating and was analyzed by two independent reviewers. Results: From 123 citations, 21 underwent full-text review. Four studies met inclusion criteria. Only baseline disability as measured by the Roland Disability Index (RDI) or the Oswestry Disability Index (ODI) was consistently associated with a greater likelihood of having discectomy surgery across multiple studies. With the current literature, we were not able to find an association between surgery and several characteristics including smoking status, body mass index, neurological deficit, positive straight leg testing, and level of herniation. Conclusions: From the limited data available, it appears that individual radiographic and clinical features are not able to predict the likelihood of surgical intervention. Higher baseline disability measurements (Oswestry and Roland) did correlate, however, with surgical treatment. PMID:23236305

  20. Sonography of the Pediatric Chest.

    PubMed

    Goh, Yonggeng; Kapur, Jeevesh

    2016-05-01

    Traditionally, pediatric chest diseases are evaluated with chest radiography. Due to advancements in technology, the use of sonography has broadened. It has now become an established radiation-free imaging tool that may supplement plain-film findings and, in certain cases, the first-line modality for evaluation of the pediatric chest. This pictorial essay will demonstrate the diagnostic potential of sonography, review a spectrum of pediatric chest conditions, and discuss their imaging features and clinical importance. PMID:27009313

  1. Periosteum: characteristic imaging findings with emphasis on radiologic-pathologic comparisons.

    PubMed

    Bisseret, Damien; Kaci, Rachid; Lafage-Proust, Marie-Hélène; Alison, Marianne; Parlier-Cuau, Caroline; Laredo, Jean-Denis; Bousson, Valérie

    2015-03-01

    The periosteum covers most bone structures. It has an outer fibrous layer and an inner cambial layer that exhibits osteogenic activity. The periosteum is a dynamic structure that plays a major role in bone modeling and remodeling under normal conditions. In several disorders such as infections, benign and malignant tumors, and systemic diseases, the osteogenic potential of the periosteum is stimulated and new bone is produced. The newly formed bone added onto the surface of the cortex adopts various configurations depending on the modalities and pace of bone production. Our aim here is to describe the anatomy, histology, and physiology of the periosteum and to review the various patterns of periosteal reaction with emphasis on relations between radiological and histopathological findings. A careful evaluation of the periosteal reaction and appearance of the underlying cortex, in combination with the MRI, clinical, and laboratory data, provides valuable information on lesion duration and aggressiveness, thereby assisting in the etiological diagnosis and optimizing patient management. A solid reaction strongly suggests a benign and slow-growing process that gives the bone enough time to wall off the lesion. Single lamellar reactions occur in acute and usually benign diseases. Multilamellar reactions are associated with intermediate aggressiveness and a growth rate close to the limit of the walling-off capabilities of the bone. Spiculated, interrupted, and complex combined reactions carry the worst prognosis, as they occur in the most aggressive and fast-growing diseases: the periosteum attempts to create new bone but is overwhelmed and may be breached. PMID:25269751

  2. Emergency radiology in the United States-a stepchild finding its way.

    PubMed

    Baker, Stephen R

    2016-05-01

    Emergency radiology as an academic discipline and practice activity is clearly recognized as a distinct category within the community of radiologists in the USA. But, its place among the other branches of diagnostic imaging is as an outlier. Emergency radiology is not recognized as a separate course of study in the curriculum of training. It is not a component of the qualifying exam of the American Board of Radiology. It has few fellowships. It has not engendered a specific designation of care personnel for trauma centres. Moreover, its situation with respect to emergency physicians is bound, by neither regulation nor tradition, to be intellectually or physically close. Yet, it is recognized as encompassing an established society of teachers, practitioners and investigators. Its journal is a repository of new knowledge. Thus, it occupies a definitive if still anomalous position in American medicine in general and radiology in particular. PMID:26607651

  3. Chest Pain

    MedlinePlus

    Having a pain in your chest can be scary. It does not always mean that you are having a heart attack. There can be many other causes, ... embolism Costochondritis - an inflammation of joints in your chest Some of these problems can be serious. Get ...

  4. [Chest pain].

    PubMed

    Horn, Benedikt

    2015-01-01

    Chest pain in ambulatory setting is predominantly not heart-associated. Most patients suffer from muskuloskeletal or functional (psychogenic) chest pain. Differential diagnosis covers aortic dissection, rib-fracture, shingles, GERD, Tietze-Syndrome, pulmonary embolism, pleuritis, pneumothorax, pleurodynia and metastatic disease. In most cases history, symptoms and signs allow a clinical diagnosis of high pretest-probability. PMID:25533261

  5. Clinical demand for and access to images and interpretations of chest radiographs in a medical intensive care unit serviced by an integrated PACS-radiology information system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shile, Peter E.; Kundel, Harold L.; Seshadri, Sridhar B.; Carey, Bruce; Kishore, Sheel; Brikman, Inna; Feingold, Eric R.; Lanken, Paul N.

    1994-05-01

    Digital communication systems have been proposed as a means of improving the flow of information between radiologists and other physicians. In the intensive care unit (ICU), physicians require more rapid access to images and interpretations than physicians in most other hospital settings. Thus these systems must be designed to ensure that rapid exchange of radiological information can be achieved. To better define system design for the electronic communication of radiological information to ICUs, this study examined bottlenecks in information flow through an integrated PACS-Radiology Information System.

  6. Chest MRI

    MedlinePlus

    ... imaging test that uses powerful magnetic fields and radio waves to create pictures of the chest (thoracic area). ... no side effects from the magnetic fields and radio waves have been reported. The most common type of ...

  7. Chest MRI

    MedlinePlus

    ... Restrictive cardiomyopathy Superior vena cava (SVC) obstruction Thoracic aortic aneurysm Thymus tumor Tumors of the chest Consult your ... Restrictive cardiomyopathy SVC obstruction Swollen lymph nodes Thoracic aortic aneurysm Patient Instructions Abdominal aortic aneurysm repair - open - discharge ...

  8. Chest drainage.

    PubMed

    Carter, Chris

    2014-07-15

    As an intensive care nurse with experience of caring for critically ill patients in the UK and on deployed operations overseas, I found the CPD article useful in reviewing the pathophysiology of a pneumothorax, use of intrapleural chest drains, observations that should be recorded, and nursing care and management of a patient with an intrapleural chest drain. Reflecting on the time out activities in the CPD article was valuable. PMID:25005418

  9. [Chest trauma].

    PubMed

    Freixinet Gilart, Jorge; Ramírez Gil, María Elena; Gallardo Valera, Gregorio; Moreno Casado, Paula

    2011-01-01

    Chest trauma is a frequent problem arising from lesions caused by domestic and occupational activities and especially road traffic accidents. These injuries can be analyzed from distinct points of view, ranging from consideration of the most severe injuries, especially in the context of multiple trauma, to the specific characteristics of blunt and open trauma. In the present article, these injuries are discussed according to the involvement of the various thoracic structures. Rib fractures are the most frequent chest injuries and their diagnosis and treatment is straightforward, although these injuries can be severe if more than three ribs are affected and when there is major associated morbidity. Lung contusion is the most common visceral lesion. These injuries are usually found in severe chest trauma and are often associated with other thoracic and intrathoracic lesions. Treatment is based on general support measures. Pleural complications, such as hemothorax and pneumothorax, are also frequent. Their diagnosis is also straightforward and treatment is based on pleural drainage. This article also analyzes other complex situations, notably airway trauma, which is usually very severe in blunt chest trauma and less severe and even suitable for conservative treatment in iatrogenic injury due to tracheal intubation. Rupture of the diaphragm usually causes a diaphragmatic hernia. Treatment is always surgical. Myocardial contusions should be suspected in anterior chest trauma and in sternal fractures. Treatment is conservative. Other chest injuries, such as those of the great thoracic and esophageal vessels, are less frequent but are especially severe. PMID:21640287

  10. Chest x-ray

    MedlinePlus

    ... Images Aortic rupture, chest x-ray Lung cancer, frontal chest x-ray Adenocarcinoma - chest x-ray Coal ... cancer - chest x-ray Lung nodule, right middle lobe - chest x-ray Lung mass, right upper lung - ...

  11. Informatics in radiology: automated structured reporting of imaging findings using the AIM standard and XML.

    PubMed

    Zimmerman, Stefan L; Kim, Woojin; Boonn, William W

    2011-01-01

    Quantitative and descriptive imaging data are a vital component of the radiology report and are frequently of paramount importance to the ordering physician. Unfortunately, current methods of recording these data in the report are both inefficient and error prone. In addition, the free-text, unstructured format of a radiology report makes aggregate analysis of data from multiple reports difficult or even impossible without manual intervention. A structured reporting work flow has been developed that allows quantitative data created at an advanced imaging workstation to be seamlessly integrated into the radiology report with minimal radiologist intervention. As an intermediary step between the workstation and the reporting software, quantitative and descriptive data are converted into an extensible markup language (XML) file in a standardized format specified by the Annotation and Image Markup (AIM) project of the National Institutes of Health Cancer Biomedical Informatics Grid. The AIM standard was created to allow image annotation data to be stored in a uniform machine-readable format. These XML files containing imaging data can also be stored on a local database for data mining and analysis. This structured work flow solution has the potential to improve radiologist efficiency, reduce errors, and facilitate storage of quantitative and descriptive imaging data for research. PMID:21357413

  12. SU-E-I-57: Estimating the Occupational Eye Lens Dose in Interventional Radiology Using Active Personal Dosimeters Worn On the Chest

    SciTech Connect

    Omar, A; Marteinsdottir, M; Kadesjo, N; Fransson, A

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To provide a general formalism for determination of occupational eye lens dose based on the response of an active personal dosimeter (APD) worn at chest level above the radiation protection apron. Methods: The formalism consists of three factors: (1) APD conversion factor converting the reading at chest level (APDchest) to the corresponding personal dose equivalent at eye level, (2) Dose conversion factor transferring the measured dose quantity, Hp(10), into a dose quantity relevant for the eye lens dose, (3) Correction factor accounting for differences in exposure of the eye(s) compared to the exposure at chest level (e.g., due to protective lead glasses).The different factors were investigated and evaluated based on phantom and clinical measurements performed in an x-ray angiography suite for interventional cardiology. Results: The eye lens dose can be conservatively estimated by assigning an appropriate numerical value to each factor entering the formalism that in most circumstances overestimates the dose. Doing so, the eye lens dose to the primary operator and assisting staff was estimated in this work as D-eye,primary = 2.0 APDchest and D-eye,assisting = 1.0 APDchest, respectively.The annual eye lens dose to three nurses and one cardiologist was estimated to be 2, 2, 2, and 13 mSv (Hp(0.07)), respectively, using a TLD dosimeter worn at eye level. In comparison, using the formalism and APDchest measurements, the respective doses were 2, 2, 2, and 16 mSv (Hp(3)). Conclusion: The formalism outlined in this work can be used to estimate the occupational eye lens dose from the response of an APD worn on the chest. The formalism is general and could be applied also to other types of dosimeters. However, the numerical value of the different factors may differ from those obtained with the APD’s used in this work due to differences in dosimeter properties.

  13. Value of normal electrocardiographic findings in predicting resting left ventricular function in patients with chest pain and suspected coronary artery disease

    SciTech Connect

    O'Keefe, J.H. Jr.; Zinsmeister, A.R.; Gibbons, R.J.

    1989-06-01

    Characterization of left ventricular function is important in managing patients with coronary artery disease. Although many methods are available to assess left ventricular function, most are either expensive, invasive, or both. In this study, we examined the ability of normal or near-normal resting electrocardiographic findings to predict resting left ventricular ejection fraction, measured by resting radionuclide angiography, in 874 patients with chest pain and suspected coronary artery disease. A retrospective review was undertaken of 4,410 Mayo Clinic patients who underwent rest and exercise radionuclide ventriculography for the evaluation of chest pain and known or suspected coronary artery disease; of these, 874 patients met the inclusion criteria for the current study. A 15-lead electrocardiogram, which was interpreted by the cardiologist or cardiology trainee working in the laboratory, was obtained at the same evaluation as the radionuclide study. In 590 patients with no previous history of a myocardial infarction and entirely normal resting electrocardiographic results without nonspecific ST-T wave abnormalities, the mean left ventricular ejection fraction was 0.63 +/- 0.004, and 559 patients (95%) had a normal resting ejection fraction (defined as 0.50 or more). Both nonspecific ST-T wave abnormalities (p less than 0.001) and, to a lesser degree, a history of myocardial infarction (p = 0.06) were independent predictors of an abnormal resting ejection fraction. In 185 patients with nonspecific ST-T wave abnormalities and no history of myocardial infarction, the mean left ventricular ejection fraction was 0.61 +/- 0.009, and 85% had a normal resting ejection fraction.

  14. Pediatric digital chest imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Tarver, R.D.; Cohen, M.; Broderick, N.J.; Conces, D.J. Jr. )

    1990-01-01

    The Philips Computed Radiography system performs well with pediatric portable chest radiographs, handling the throughout of a busy intensive care service 24 hours a day. Images are excellent and routinely provide a conventional (unenhanced) image and an edge-enhanced image. Radiation dose is decreased by the lowered frequency of repeat examinations and the ability of the plates to respond to a much lower dose and still provide an adequate image. The high quality and uniform density of serial PCR portable radiographs greatly enhances diagnostic content of the films. Decreased resolution has not been a problem clinically. Image manipulation and electronic transfer to remote viewing stations appear to be helpful and are currently being evaluated further. The PCR system provides a marked improvement in pediatric portable chest radiology.

  15. Partial Recovery of Audiological, Vestibular, and Radiological Findings following Spontaneous Intralabyrinthine Haemorrhage

    PubMed Central

    Pézier, Thomas; Hegemann, Stefan

    2013-01-01

    The diagnosis, work-up, and treatment of sudden sensorineural hearing loss and sudden vestibular loss vary widely between units. With the increasing access to both magnetic resonance imaging and objective vestibular testing, our understanding of the various aetiologies at hand is increasing. Despite this, the therapeutic options are limited and without a particularly strong evidence base. We present a rare, yet increasingly diagnosed, case of intralabyrinthine haemorrhage (ILH) together with radiological, audiological, and vestibular test results. Of note, this occurred spontaneously and has shown partial recovery in all the mentioned modalities. PMID:24455375

  16. Impact of positive chest X-ray findings and blood cultures on adverse outcomes following hospitalized pneumococcal lower respiratory tract infection: a population-based cohort study

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Little is known about the clinical presentation and outcome of pneumococcal lower respiratory tract infection (LRTI) without positive chest X-ray findings and blood cultures. We investigated the prognostic impact of a pulmonary infiltrate and bacteraemia on the clinical course of hospitalized patients with confirmed pneumococcal LRTI. Methods We studied a population-based multi-centre cohort of 705 adults hospitalized with LRTI and Streptococcus pneumoniae in LRT specimens or blood: 193 without pulmonary infiltrate or bacteraemia, 250 with X-ray confirmed pneumonia, and 262 with bacteraemia. We compared adverse outcomes in the three groups and used multiple regression analyses to adjust for differences in age, sex, comorbidity, and lifestyle factors. Results Patients with no infiltrate and no bacteraemia were of similar age but had more comorbidity than the other groups (Charlson index score ≥1: no infiltrate and no bacteraemia 81% vs. infiltrate without bacteraemia 72% vs. bacteraemia 61%), smoked more tobacco, and had more respiratory symptoms. In contrast, patients with a pulmonary infiltrate or bacteraemia had more inflammation (median C-reactive protein: no infiltrate and no bacteraemia 82 mg/L vs. infiltrate without bacteraemia 163 mg/L vs. bacteraemia 316 mg/L) and higher acute disease severity scores. All adverse outcomes increased from patients with no infiltrate and no bacteraemia to those with an infiltrate and to those with bacteraemia: Length of hospital stay (5 vs. 6 vs. 8 days); intensive care admission (7% vs. 20% vs. 23%); pulmonary complications (1% vs. 5% vs. 14%); and 30-day mortality (5% vs. 11% vs. 21%). Compared with patients with no infiltrate and no bacteraemia, the adjusted 30-day mortality rate ratio was 1.9 (95% confidence interval (CI) 0.9-4.1) in patients with an infiltrate without bacteraemia and 4.1 (95% CI 2.0-8.5) in bacteraemia patients. Adjustment for acute disease severity and inflammatory markers weakened these

  17. OSTEOCHONDROSIS IN THE DISTAL FEMURS OF AN ADULT RETICULATED GIRAFFE (GIRAFFA CAMELOPARDALIS RETICULATA): MACROSCOPIC, RADIOLOGIC, AND HISTOLOGIC FINDINGS.

    PubMed

    Basu, Christopher; Stoll, Alexander L; Dixon, Jonathon; Molenaar, Fieke Marije; Flach, Edmund; Smith, Ken C

    2016-03-01

    An adult male reticulated giraffe (Giraffa camelopardalis reticulata) was presented for postmortem examination. During radiologic examination of the hindlimbs, osseous cyst-like lesions were detected in both medial femoral condyles. These lesions were subsequently examined macroscopically and histologically. The gross appearance suggested a diagnosis of bilateral osteochondrosis that was confirmed with histopathologic examination. This finding has not previously been reported in giraffes. Macroscopic visualization of the major limb joints, including the femorotibial joints, is therefore encouraged in future postmortem examinations of giraffes (Giraffa camelopardalis), and further assessment of clinical significance is required. PMID:27010303

  18. Pleural-based changes on chest x-ray after irradiation for primary breast cancer: correlation with findings on computerized tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Srinivasan, G.; Kurtz, D.W.; Lichter, A.S.

    1983-10-01

    In treating breast cancer with excisional biopsy and irradiation, a volume of lung underlying the breast and chest wall receives significant doses of irradiation. This irradiation can produce pleural and pulmonary changes that can be seen on routine chest radiographs. In five such cases, we have examined pre and post-treatment computerized tomograms of the chest and show that these radiographic changes are pleural-based and lie within the high dose radiation volume. Failure to correct radiation treatment plans for the influence of lung density results in an increased dose to lung and pleura that could, in theory, exacerbate pulmonary and pleural radiation effects.

  19. What Is Chest MRI?

    MedlinePlus

    ... page from the NHLBI on Twitter. What Is Chest MRI? Chest MRI (magnetic resonance imaging) is a safe, noninvasive ... creates detailed pictures of the structures in your chest, such as your chest wall, heart, and blood ...

  20. Musculoskeletal chest wall pain

    PubMed Central

    Fam, Adel G.; Smythe, Hugh A.

    1985-01-01

    The musculoskeletal structures of the thoracic wall and the neck are a relatively common source of chest pain. Pain arising from these structures is often mistaken for angina pectoris, pleurisy or other serious disorders. In this article the clinical features, pathogenesis and management of the various musculoskeletal chest wall disorders are discussed. The more common causes are costochondritis, traumatic muscle pain, trauma to the chest wall, “fibrositis” syndrome, referred pain, psychogenic regional pain syndrome, and arthritis involving articulations of the sternum, ribs and thoracic spine. Careful analysis of the history, physical findings and results of investigation is essential for precise diagnosis and effective treatment. ImagesFig. 3Fig. 4Fig. 5 PMID:4027804

  1. Pathophysiology, clinical features and radiological findings of differentiation syndrome/all-trans-retinoic acid syndrome.

    PubMed

    Cardinale, Luciano; Asteggiano, Francesco; Moretti, Federica; Torre, Federico; Ulisciani, Stefano; Fava, Carmen; Rege-Cambrin, Giovanna

    2014-08-28

    In acute promyelocytic leukemia, differentiation therapy based on all-trans-retinoic acid can be complicated by the development of a differentiation syndrome (DS). DS is a life-threatening complication, characterized by respiratory distress, unexplained fever, weight gain, interstitial lung infiltrates, pleural or pericardial effusions, hypotension and acute renal failure. The diagnosis of DS is made on clinical grounds and has proven to be difficult, because none of the symptoms is pathognomonic for the syndrome without any definitive diagnostic criteria. As DS can have subtle signs and symptoms at presentation but progress rapidly, end-stage DS clinical picture resembles the acute respiratory distress syndrome with extremely poor prognosis; so it is of absolute importance to be conscious of these complications and initiate therapy as soon as it was suspected. The radiologic appearance resembles the typical features of cardiogenic pulmonary edema. Diagnosis of DS remains a great skill for radiologists and haematologist but it is of an utmost importance the cooperation in suspect DS, detect the early signs of DS, examine the patients' behaviour and rapidly detect the complications. PMID:25170395

  2. Tympanomastoid cholesterol granuloma: radiological and intraoperative findings of blood source connection.

    PubMed

    Iannella, Giannicola; Stasolla, Alessandro; Pasquariello, Benedetta; Re, Massimo; Magliulo, Giuseppe

    2016-09-01

    The hypothesis that the close contiguity between the cholesterol granulomas and some rich blood sources provided the trigger to the aggressive nature of tympanomastoid cholesterol granulomas has been recently reported. To corroborate this new etiopathogenetic theory we retrospectively reviewed a series of 14 patients with primary middle ear and mastoid cholesterol granulomas and investigated the temporal bone marrow invasion and its hematopoietic potentialities and a possible cholesterol granulomas contiguity with relevant vascular structures such as the carotid artery, sigmoid jugular system, mastoid or dural vein. Eight cases did not show radiological sign of bone marrow invasion or hematopoietic potentialities visible in MRI. Besides no intraoperative vascular connections that could explain an initial bleeding source were found. Cholesterol granulomas bone marrow invasion was present in six patients. A bone marrow hematopoietic potentiality was showed in four of these patients, whereas, an evident anatomical contiguity of the cholesterol granuloma with some important temporal bone vascular structures was visible in five cases. Analysis of cardiovascular risk factors showed that four patients presented one or more of the risk factors analysed. PMID:26521188

  3. Radiologically isolated syndrome: an uncommon finding at a university clinic in a high-prevalence region for multiple sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Granberg, Tobias; Martola, Juha; Aspelin, Peter; Kristoffersen-Wiberg, Maria; Fredrikson, Sten

    2013-01-01

    Objective The improved availability of MRI in medicine has led to an increase in incidental findings. Unexpected brain MRI findings suggestive of multiple sclerosis (MS) without typical symptoms of MS were recently defined as radiologically isolated syndrome (RIS). The prevalence of RIS is uncertain. The aim of this study was to determine the prevalence of RIS at a university hospital in a region with a high prevalence for MS and describe the long-term prognosis of the identified patients. Design Retrospective cohort study conducted in 2012. Setting All brain MRI examinations performed at Karolinska University Hospital in Huddinge, Stockholm, Sweden during 2001 were retrospectively screened by a single rater for findings fulfilling the Okuda criteria. The sample year was chosen in order to establish the long-term prognosis of the patients identified. The examinations of interest were re-evaluated according to the Barkhof criteria by a neuroradiologist with long experience in MS. Participants In total 2105 individuals were included in the study. Ages ranged from 0 to 90 years with a median age of 48 years. Only one patient with RIS was identified, equivalent to a prevalence of 0.05% in the studied population, or 0.15% among patients aged 15–40 years. The patient with RIS developed symptoms consistent with MS within 3 months accompanied with radiological progression and was diagnosed with MS. Conclusions RIS, according to present criteria, is an uncommon finding in a tertiary hospital setting in a high-prevalence region for MS where awareness and clinical suspicion of MS is common. In order to study the prognosis of RIS, multicentre studies, or case–control studies are recommended. PMID:24189079

  4. Is there any correlation between radiologic findings and eradication of symptoms after pyloromyotomy in hypertrophic pyloric stenosis?

    PubMed Central

    Badebarin, Davoud; Aslanabadi, Saeid; Yazdanpanah, Fereshteh; Zarrintan, Sina

    2016-01-01

    Background: Hypertrophic pyloric stenosis (HPS) is one of the most common gastrointestinal disorders during early infancy, with an incidence of 1-2:1000 live births in the world. In this study, we aimed to investigate the correlation between radiologic findings and eradication of symptoms after pyloromyotomy in HPS. Materials and Methods: One hundred and twenty-five (102 boys and 23 girls) patients with suspected infantile HPS were treated surgically by Ramstedt pyloromyotomy between March 21, 2004 and March 20, 2014 at paediatric surgery ward of Tabriz Children's Hospital, Iran. The demographic features, clinical findings, diagnostic work-up, operation type and postoperative specifications of the patients were studied retrospectively. Results: Male to female ratio was 4:1. The patients were 16-90 days of old and the mean age was 39 ± 1.42 days. The range of pyloric canal length was 7.60-29.00 mm and the mean length was 19.54 ± 3.42 mm. Pyloric muscle diameter was 2.70-9.00 mm, and the mean diameter was 4.86 ± 1.14 mm. Seventy-two percent of patients had episodes of vomiting after operation. Mean time of persistence of vomiting after pyloromyotomy was 15.73 ± 0.15 h. Mean discharge time was 55.22 ± 0.08 h. Radiologic findings did not show any significant correlation with persistence of vomiting or discharge time. Conclusion: The present study revealed that radiographic findings could not predict postoperative symptom eradication after pyloromyotomy in HPS. PMID:27251656

  5. Somatosensory evoked potentials in cervical spondylosis. Correlation of median, ulnar and posterior tibial nerve responses with clinical and radiological findings.

    PubMed

    Yu, Y L; Jones, S J

    1985-06-01

    Somatosensory evoked potentials (SEPs) following median, ulnar and tibial nerve stimulation were recorded from sites over the shoulders, neck and scalp in 34 patients with cervical spondylosis. Twenty control subjects were matched for sex and age. Detailed clinical and radiological data were assembled, with particular attention to the sensory modalities impaired and the locus and severity of cord compression. The patients were divided clinically into 4 groups: combined myelopathy and radiculopathy (6 cases), myelopathy alone (15), radiculopathy (6) and neck pain (7). Four cases are described in detail. SEP abnormalities were strongly correlated with clinical myelopathy, but not with radiculopathy. Median and ulnar nerve responses were less often affected than tibial, even with myelopathy above C6 level. Tibial nerve SEP abnormalities were strongly correlated with posterior column signs on the same side of the body, but not with anterolateral column sensory signs. In myelopathy cases, the SEP examination appeared to be more sensitive to sensory pathway involvement than clinical sensory testing. SEP abnormalities were infrequent in cases of radiculopathy and neck pain, bearing no relation to the clinical locus of root lesions. Abnormal SEPs consistent with subclinical posterior column involvement, however, were recorded in 1 patient with radiculopathy and 2 with neck pain. Follow-up recordings made postoperatively in 7 myelopathy cases reflected the clinical course (improvement, deterioration or no change) in 4, but failed to reflect improvement in 3. The correlation of SEP findings with radiological data was generally poor. SEP abnormalities were detected in 6 out of 8 patients with clinical myelopathy but no radiological evidence of posterior cord compression, suggesting that impairment of the blood supply may be an important factor contributing to cord damage. An application for SEPs in the clinical management of cervical spondylosis may lie in the detection of

  6. Incidental Radiologic Findings in the 22q11.2 Deletion Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Schmitt, J.E.; Yi, J.J.; Roalf, D.R.; Loevner, L.A.; Ruparel, K.; Whinna, D.; Souders, M.C.; McDonald-McGinn, D.M.; Yodh, E.; Vandekar, S.; Zackai, E.H.; Gur, R.C.; Emanuel, B.S.; Gur, R.E.

    2015-01-01

    Background and Purpose The 22q11.2 deletion syndrome is a common genetic microdeletion syndrome that results in cognitive delays and an increased risk of several psychiatric disorders, particularly schizophrenia. The current study investigates the prevalence of incidental neuroradiologic findings within this population and their relationships with psychiatric conditions. Materials and Methods Brain MR imaging from 58 individuals with 22q11.2 deletion syndrome was reviewed by board-certified radiologists by using standard clinical procedures. Intracranial incidental findings were classified into 8 categories and compared with a large typically developing cohort. Results The rate of incidental findings was significantly higher (P < .0001) in 22q11.2 deletion syndrome compared with typically developing individuals, driven by a high prevalence of cavum septum pellucidum (19.0%) and white matter abnormalities (10.3%). Both of these findings were associated with psychosis in 22q11.2 deletion syndrome. Conclusions Cavum septum pellucidum and white matter hyperintensities are significantly more prevalent in patients with the 22q11.2 deletion syndrome and may represent biomarkers for psychosis. PMID:24948496

  7. Postmortem computed tomography in victims of military air mishaps: radiological-pathological correlation of CT findings.

    PubMed

    Levy, Gad; Goldstein, Liav; Blachar, Arye; Apter, Sara; Barenboim, Erez; Bar-Dayan, Yaron; Shamis, Ari; Atar, Eli

    2007-10-01

    A thorough medical inquiry is included in every aviation mishap investigation. While the gold standard of this investigation is a forensic pathology examination, numerous reports stress the important role of computed tomography in the postmortem evaluation of trauma victims. To characterize the findings identified by postmortem CT and compare its performance to conventional autopsy in victims of military aviation mishaps, we analyzed seven postmortem CT examinations. Musculoskeletal injuries accounted for 57.8% of the traumatic findings identified by postmortem CT. The most frequent findings were fractures of the rib (47%), skull (9.6%) and facial bones (8.6%). Abnormally located air accounted for 24% of findings, for which CT was superior (3.5% detected by autopsy, 100% by postmortem CT, P < 0.001). The performance of autopsy in detecting injuries was superior (autopsy detected 85.8% of all injuries, postmortem CT detected 53.9%, P < 0.001), especially in the detection of superficial lesions (100% detected by autopsy, 10.5% by postmortem CT, P < 0.001) and solid organ injuries (100% by autopsy, 18.5% by postmortem CT, P < 0.001). Performance in the detection of musculoskeletal injuries was similar (91.3% for autopsy, 90.3% for postmortem CT, P = not significant). Postmortem CT and autopsy have distinct performance profiles, and although the first cannot replace the latter it is a useful complementary examination. PMID:17987755

  8. Nevoid Basal Cell Carcinoma Syndrome - Clinical and Radiological Findings of Three Cases

    PubMed Central

    Ali, Ibrahim K; Karjodkar, Freny R; Sansare, Kaustubh; Salve, Prashant; Goyal, Shikha

    2016-01-01

    Nevoid basal cell carcinoma syndrome (NBCCS) is an autosomal dominant disorder, characterized by skeletal anomalies and multiple keratocystic odontogenic tumors of the jaws. The skeletal anomalies of this syndrome are mandibular prognathism, bossing of frontal and parietal bones, high-arched palate, and bifid rib. We report three cases with NBCCS, emphasizing the clinical and radiographic findings, the importance of the early diagnosis of NBCCS, and a preventive multidisciplinary approach in the management of NBCCS.

  9. Radiologic and Audiologic Findings in the Temporal Bone of Patients with CHARGE Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Ha, Jennifer; Ong, Frederick; Wood, Bradley; Vijayasekaran, Shyan

    2016-01-01

    Background: CHARGE syndrome is a common congenital anomaly. Hearing loss affects 60%-90% of these children. As temporal bone computed tomography (CT) has become more sophisticated, more abnormalities of the middle and inner ear have been found. We present the detailed CT findings for children with CHARGE syndrome and the correlation of the CT findings with audiograms. Methods: We performed a retrospective medical records review of 12 patients with CHARGE syndrome, identified between 1990-2011 at Princess Margaret Hospital for Children in Western Australia, who underwent temporal bone CT for evaluation of hearing loss. Results: We present our findings for the 24 ears in terms of the cochlear, semicircular canal, middle ear, facial nerve, external auditory canal, venous, and jugular anomalies. The internal auditory canal was normal in 83.3% (n=20) of ears. Three (12.5%) ears had enlarged basal turns, and 4 (16.7%) each had hypoplastic and incompletely partitioned apical turns. The majority (n=13, 56.5%) of the vestibules were dysplastic. Up to 70.8% had abnormalities of the semicircular canal. The middle ear cavity was normal in 55% (n=11) of ears; however, up to 80% of the ears had some abnormality of the ossicles, and up to 70% had an abnormality of the facial nerve (7th cranial nerve) segments, especially in the labyrinthine segment. CT findings did not correlate with the audiograms. Conclusion: The management of children with CHARGE syndrome is complex, requiring early evaluation and close attention of the multidisciplinary team. Early identification of hearing deficits is vital for patients' linguistic development. PMID:27303220

  10. Investigating the link between the radiological experience and the allocation of an 'equivocal finding'

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rawashdeh, Mohammad A.; Vidotti, Camila; Lee, Warwick; Lewis, Sarah J.; Mello-Thoms, Claudia; Reed, Warren M.; Tapia, Kriscia; Brennan, Patrick C.

    2016-03-01

    Rationale and Objectives: This study will investigate the link between radiologists' experience in reporting mammograms, their caseloads and the decision to give a classification of Royal Australian and New Zealand College of Radiologists (RANZCR) category `3' (indeterminate or equivocal finding). Methods: A test set of 60 mammograms comprising of 20 abnormal and 40 normal cases were shown to 92 radiologists. Each radiologist was asked to identify and localize abnormalities and provide a RANZCR assessment category. Details were obtained from each reader regarding their experience, qualifications and breast reading activities. `Equivocal fractions' were calculated by dividing the number of `equivocal findings' given by each radiologist in the abnormal and normal cases by the total number of cases analyzed: 20 and 40 respectively. The `equivocal fractions' for each of the groups (normal vs abnormal) were calculated and independently correlated with age, number of years since qualification as a radiologist, number of years reading mammograms, number of mammograms read per year, number of hours reading mammograms per week and number of mammograms read over lifetime (the number of years reading mammograms multiplied by the number of mammograms read per year). The non-parametric Spearman test was used. Results: Statistically negative correlations were noted between `equivocal fractions' for the following groups: • For abnormal cases: hours per week (r= -0.38 P= 0.0001) • For normal cases: total number of mammograms read per year (r= -0.29, P= 0.006); number of mammograms read over lifetime (r= -0.21, P= 0.049)); hours reading mammograms per week (r= - 0.20, P= 0.05). Conclusion: Radiologists with greater reading experience assign fewer RANZCR category 3 or equivocal classifications. The findings have implications for screening program efficacy and recall rates. This work is still in progress and further data will be presented at the conference.

  11. Synovial Chondromatosis of the Ankle Joint: Clinical, Radiological, and Intraoperative Findings

    PubMed Central

    Sedeek, Sedeek Mohamed; Choudry, Q.; Garg, S.

    2015-01-01

    Synovial chondromatosis, also termed synovial osteochondromatosis, is a rare benign disorder characterized by the presence of cartilaginous nodules in the synovium of the joints, tendon sheaths, and bursae. It most commonly involves large joints, such as the knee, hip, and shoulder, but its presence in smaller joints has also been reported. Nevertheless, ankle involvement is unusual. The diagnosis is commonly made following a thorough history, clinical, physical, and radiographic examination. We report a case of a young patient with primary synovial chondromatosis of the ankle joint and present the clinical, radiographic, and intraoperative findings. PMID:26177002

  12. Synovial Chondromatosis of the Ankle Joint: Clinical, Radiological, and Intraoperative Findings.

    PubMed

    Sedeek, Sedeek Mohamed; Choudry, Q; Garg, S

    2015-01-01

    Synovial chondromatosis, also termed synovial osteochondromatosis, is a rare benign disorder characterized by the presence of cartilaginous nodules in the synovium of the joints, tendon sheaths, and bursae. It most commonly involves large joints, such as the knee, hip, and shoulder, but its presence in smaller joints has also been reported. Nevertheless, ankle involvement is unusual. The diagnosis is commonly made following a thorough history, clinical, physical, and radiographic examination. We report a case of a young patient with primary synovial chondromatosis of the ankle joint and present the clinical, radiographic, and intraoperative findings. PMID:26177002

  13. Cervical osteomyelitis due to i.v. heroin use: radiologic findings in 14 patients.

    PubMed

    Endress, C; Guyot, D R; Fata, J; Salciccioli, G

    1990-08-01

    We reviewed the radiographs of 14 patients who had cervical osteomyelitis and were IV heroin users. Eleven were men and three were women. Their age range was 33-48 years (mean, 39 years). Eleven regularly used the jugular vein access, and three alternated between the jugular and femoral veins. Initial radiographs of the cervical spine in 13 patients showed destruction of two or more vertebral bodies and the adjacent intervertebral disk, as well as a prevertebral soft-tissue mass. In one patient, findings on initial radiographs were normal, but marked destruction at two contiguous intervertebral levels and a large prevertebral abscess were identified 2 weeks later. All the patients had positive results on cultures of joint aspirates or bone biopsy materials (10 patients) or blood (four patients). Ten grew Staphylococcus aureus; two, Staphylococcus epidermidis; one, Streptococcus viridans; and one, Pseudomonas aeruginosa. CT in nine patients showed inflammatory reaction adjacent to the carotid sheath resulting from the repeated jugular injections and delineated the extent of prevertebral abscess and bone destruction. Scintigrams were of minimal value in establishing the diagnosis. Advanced vertebral body destruction, disk space infection, prevertebral abscess, and anterior cervical inflammatory reaction appear to be typical findings on radiographs in heroin abusers with cervical osteomyelitis. PMID:2115262

  14. Correlation between the radiological observation of isolated tertiary waves on an esophagram and findings on high-resolution esophageal manometry.

    PubMed

    Halland, M; Ravi, K; Barlow, J; Arora, A

    2016-01-01

    Barium esophagrams are a frequently performed test, and radiological observations about potential abnormal esophageal motility, such as tertiary contractions, are commonly reported. We sought to assess the correlation between tertiary waves, and in particular isolated tertiary waves, on esophagrams and findings on non-synchronous high-resolution esophageal manometry. We retrospectively reviewed reports of esophagrams performed at a tertiary referral center and identified patients in whom tertiary waves were observed and a high-resolution esophageal manometry had been performed. We defined two groups; group 1 was defined as patients with isolated tertiary waves, whereas group 2 had tertiary waves and evidence of achalasia or an obstructing structural abnormality on the esophagram. We collected data on demographics, dysphagia score, associated findings on esophagram, and need for intervention. We reviewed the reports of 2100 esophagrams of which tertiary waves were noted as an isolated abnormality in 92, and in association with achalasia or a structural obstruction in 61. High-resolution manometry was performed in 17 patients in group 1, and five had evidence of a significant esophageal motility disorder and 4 required any intervention. Twenty-one patients in group 2 underwent manometry, and 18 had a significant esophageal motility disorder. An isolated finding of tertiary waves on an esophagram is rarely associated with a significant esophageal motility disorder that requires intervention. All patients with isolated tertiary waves who required intervention had a dysphagia to liquids. Tertiary contractions, in the absence of dysphagia to liquids, indicate no significant esophageal motility disorder. PMID:25327483

  15. Cystic and Cavitary Lung Lesions in Children: Radiologic Findings with Pathologic Correlation

    PubMed Central

    Odev, Kemal; Guler, İbrahim; Altinok, Tamer; Pekcan, Sevgi; Batur, Abdussamed; Ozbiner, Hüseyin

    2013-01-01

    A number of diseases produce focal or multiple thin-walled or thick-walled air- or fluid-containing cysts or cavitary lung lesions in both infants and children. In infants and children, there is a spectrum of focal or multifocal cystic and cavitary lung lesions including congenital lobar emphysema, congenital cystic adenomatoid malformation, pleuropulmonary blastoma, bronchogenic cyst, pulmonary sequestration, Langerhans cell histiocytosis, airway diseases, infectious diseases (bacterial infection, fungal infection, etc.), hydatid cysts, destroid lung, and traumatic pseudocyst. For the evaluation of cystic or cavitary lung lesion in infants and children, imaging plays an important role in accurate early diagnosis and optimal patient management. Therefore, a practical imaging approach based on the most sensitive and least invasive imaging modality in an efficient and cost-effective manner is paramount. We reviewed the conventional radiographs and computed tomography findings of the most common cystic and cavitary lung lesions in infants and children. PMID:24605255

  16. Abdominal tuberculosis: a radiological review with emphasis on computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging findings*

    PubMed Central

    da Rocha, Eduardo Lima; Pedrassa, Bruno Cheregati; Bormann, Renata Lilian; Kierszenbaum, Marcelo Longo; Torres, Lucas Rios; D’Ippolito, Giuseppe

    2015-01-01

    Tuberculosis is a disease whose incidence has increased principally as a consequence of HIV infection and use of immunosuppressive drugs. The abdomen is the most common site of extrapulmonary tuberculosis. It may be confused with several different conditions such as inflammatory bowel disease, cancer and other infectious diseases. Delay in the diagnosis may result in significantly increased morbidity, and therefore an early recognition of the condition is essential for proper treatment. In the present essay, cases with confirmed diagnosis of abdominal tuberculosis were assessed by means of computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging, demonstrating the involvement of different organs and systems, and presentations which frequently lead radiologists to a diagnostic dilemma. A brief literature review was focused on imaging findings and their respective prevalence. PMID:26185345

  17. Abdominal tuberculosis: a radiological review with emphasis on computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging findings.

    PubMed

    da Rocha, Eduardo Lima; Pedrassa, Bruno Cheregati; Bormann, Renata Lilian; Kierszenbaum, Marcelo Longo; Torres, Lucas Rios; D'Ippolito, Giuseppe

    2015-01-01

    Tuberculosis is a disease whose incidence has increased principally as a consequence of HIV infection and use of immunosuppressive drugs. The abdomen is the most common site of extrapulmonary tuberculosis. It may be confused with several different conditions such as inflammatory bowel disease, cancer and other infectious diseases. Delay in the diagnosis may result in significantly increased morbidity, and therefore an early recognition of the condition is essential for proper treatment. In the present essay, cases with confirmed diagnosis of abdominal tuberculosis were assessed by means of computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging, demonstrating the involvement of different organs and systems, and presentations which frequently lead radiologists to a diagnostic dilemma. A brief literature review was focused on imaging findings and their respective prevalence. PMID:26185345

  18. A Case of Metastatic Esophageal Carcinoma in a Pregnant Woman with Radiologic Findings.

    PubMed

    Akdemir, Zülküf; Karaman, Erbil; Arslan, Harun; Çalli, Iskan; Akdeniz, Hüseyin

    2016-01-01

    The incidence of all malignant tumours during pregnancy is extremely rare and esophageal carcinoma ranges from 0.07 to 0.1% of all malignant neoplasms. The physiological changes during pregnancy frequently mask the complaints and symptoms related to the disease. The physical and physiological clinical conditions limit the diagnostic approaches. Therefore, the stage of cancer at the time of diagnosis is usually advanced. The management with cancer surgery and chemotherapy regimens must be modified in pregnant women in order to minimize fetal and maternal risks. Here, we report a very rare case of metastatic esophagus cancer in a 39-year-old woman with 28 weeks of pregnancy and aim to show the ultrasound (USG) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) findings with treatment and follow up management. PMID:26894146

  19. A Case of Metastatic Esophageal Carcinoma in a Pregnant Woman with Radiologic Findings

    PubMed Central

    Akdemir, Zülküf; Arslan, Harun; Çalli, Iskan; Akdeniz, Hüseyin

    2016-01-01

    The incidence of all malignant tumours during pregnancy is extremely rare and esophageal carcinoma ranges from 0.07 to 0.1% of all malignant neoplasms. The physiological changes during pregnancy frequently mask the complaints and symptoms related to the disease. The physical and physiological clinical conditions limit the diagnostic approaches. Therefore, the stage of cancer at the time of diagnosis is usually advanced. The management with cancer surgery and chemotherapy regimens must be modified in pregnant women in order to minimize fetal and maternal risks. Here, we report a very rare case of metastatic esophagus cancer in a 39-year-old woman with 28 weeks of pregnancy and aim to show the ultrasound (USG) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) findings with treatment and follow up management. PMID:26894146

  20. Hepatic metastases of primary jejunal carcinoid tumor: A case report with radiological findings

    PubMed Central

    Avcu, Serhat; Özen, Özkan; Bulut, Mehmet Deniz; Bora, Aydın

    2009-01-01

    Context: Carcinoid tumors represent a group of well-differentiated tumors originating from the diffuse endocrine system outside the pancreas and thyroid. The overall prevalence of carcinoid tumors in the United States is estimated to be one to two cases per 100,000 persons. Various sites of origin of this neoplasm are appendix - 30-45%, small bowel - 25-35% (duodenum 2%, jejunum 7%, ileum 91%, multiple sites 15-35%), rectum 10-15%, caecum - 5%, and stomach - 0.5%. Liver metastases from jejunal and ileal carcinoids are generally hypervascular. Case report: Here we report a case of primary jejunal carcinoid tumor in a 66-year-old woman metastasizing to liver with ultrasonography, computed tomography, and diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging (DWI) findings. Conclusion: Primary jejunal carcinoid tumor is a rare entity. DWI can help in the differential diagnosis of hepatic hypervascular metastatic mass lesions from benign ones, as well as in the diagnosis of carcinoid tumor. PMID:22666712

  1. Radiological Findings and Endovascular Management of Three Cases with Segmental Arterial Mediolysis

    SciTech Connect

    Davran, Ramazan; Cinar, Celal; Parildar, Mustafa; Oran, Ismail

    2010-06-15

    Segmental arterial mediolysis (SAM) is an uncommon self-limited disorder that can cause abdominal catastrophes through massive bleeding or bowel infarction. The former arise from arterial aneurysms, and the latter from arterial stenosis or occlusions. Although this is an acute self-limiting disease, the catastrophic consequence, originating from intra-abdominal hemorrhage (arterial dilatation, aneurysms, dissecting hematomas) or bowel infarction (arterial stenosis, arterial occlusions), is not rare. The identification of these lesions is very important in the differential diagnosis of suspected patients with complaints of abdominal pain with hemorrhage. We report computerized tomography angiography and digital subtraction angiography findings of three cases with abdominal SAM, who were treated with endovascular management due to abdominal bleeding. Angiography showed arterial dilatations, aneurysms, and occlusions of visceral arteries in all three cases, The string-of-beads appearance was present in only one case. Bleeding stopped immediately after embolization of three cases and follow-up revealed no evidence of recurrences at 23, 18, and 15 months, respectively, Arterial coil embolization is an effective treatment modality for bleeding complications of SAM. Close follow-up is recommended, primarily to ascertain the fate of the nontreated arterial lesions.

  2. Technique for chest radiography for pneumoconiosis

    SciTech Connect

    Sargent, E.N.

    1982-01-01

    Routine radiographic chest examinations have been performed using a variety of techniques. Although chest radiography is one of the most commonly performed radiographic examinations, it is often difficult to obtain consistently good quality roentgenograms. This publication provides a simple guide and relatively easy solution to the many problems that radiologic technologists might encounter. The language is purposely relatively simple and care has been taken to avoid difficult mathematical and physical explanations. The intent is to provide an easily referrable text for those who may encounter difficulties in producing acceptable chest radiographs.

  3. Chest tube insertion

    MedlinePlus

    Chest drainage tube insertion; Insertion of tube into chest; Tube thoracostomy; Pericardial drain ... When your chest tube is inserted, you will lie on your side or sit partly upright, with one arm over your ...

  4. Chest tube insertion

    MedlinePlus

    ... leaks from inside the lung into the chest ( pneumothorax ) Fluid buildup in the chest (called a pleural ... on the reason a chest tube is inserted. Pneumothorax usually improves, but sometimes needs minimally invasive surgery. ...

  5. Radiation Organ Doses Received in a Nationwide Cohort of U.S. Radiologic Technologists: Methods and Findings

    PubMed Central

    Simon, Steven L.; Preston, Dale L.; Linet, Martha S.; Miller, Jeremy S.; Sigurdson, Alice J.; Alexander, Bruce H.; Kwon, Deukwoo; Yoder, R. Craig; Bhatti, Parveen; Little, Mark P.; Rajaraman, Preetha; Melo, Dunstana; Drozdovitch, Vladimir; Weinstock, Robert M.; Doody, Michele M.

    2014-01-01

    In this article, we describe recent methodological enhancements and findings from the dose reconstruction component of a study of health risks among U.S. radiologic technologists. An earlier version of the dosimetry published in 2006 used physical and statistical models, literature-reported exposure measurements for the years before 1960, and archival personnel monitoring badge data from cohort members through 1984. The data and models previously described were used to estimate annual occupational radiation doses for 90,000 radiological technologists, incorporating information about each individual's employment practices based on a baseline survey conducted in the mid-1980s. The dosimetry methods presented here, while using many of the same methods as before, now estimate 2.23 million annual badge doses (personal dose equivalent) for the years 1916–1997 for 110,374 technologists, but with numerous methodological improvements. Every technologist's annual dose is estimated as a probability density function to reflect uncertainty about the true dose. Multiple realizations of the entire cohort distribution were derived to account for shared uncertainties and possible biases in the input data and assumptions used. Major improvements in the dosimetry methods from the earlier version include: A substantial increase in the number of cohort member annual badge dose measurements; Additional information on individual apron usage obtained from surveys conducted in the mid-1990s and mid-2000s; Refined modeling to develop lognormal annual badge dose probability density functions using censored data regression models; Refinements of cohort-based annual badge probability density functions to reflect individual work patterns and practices reported on questionnaires and to more accurately assess minimum detection limits; and Extensive refinements in organ dose conversion coefficients to account for uncertainties in radiographic machine settings for the radiographic techniques

  6. Is it useful to perform a chest X-ray in asymptomatic patients with late latent syphilis?

    PubMed

    Dabis, R; Radcliffe, K

    2011-02-01

    According to the British Association for Sexual Health and HIV (BASHH) guidelines, a chest X-ray is recommended as part of the assessment of patients with late latent syphilis to exclude cardiovascular complications. The aims of this study were firstly to audit all cases of late latent syphilis seen at our centre since 1994 and to see whether a chest X-ray was requested and secondly to assess whether performing a chest X-ray was clinically useful. Of the 456 case notes audited, 298 chest X-rays were requested; 182 (61%) were reported as normal. Results were not available for 64 (21%) and 32 (11%) patients either declined or did not attend for follow-up. There were 20 (7%) chest X-rays that were reported as abnormal, yet none of these radiological findings were consistent with the cardiovascular complications of syphilis. In view of the lack of significant chest X-ray findings in asymptomatic patients with late latent syphilis, a chest X-ray should not be requested. PMID:21427433

  7. Jackson-Weiss syndrome: Clinical and radiological findings in a large kindred and exclusion of the gene from 7p21 and 5qter

    SciTech Connect

    Ades, L.C.; Haan, E.A.; Mulley, J.C.; Senga, I.P.; Morris, L.L.; David, D.J.

    1994-06-01

    We describe the clinical and radiological manifestations of the Jackson-Weiss syndrome (JWS) in a large South Australian kindred. Radiological abnormalities not previously described in the hands include coned epiphyses, distal and middle phalangeal hypoplasia, and carpal bone malsegmentation. New radiological findings in the feet include coned epiphyses, hallux valgus, phalangeal, tarso-navicular and calcaneo-navicular fusions, and uniform absence of metatarsal fusions. Absence of linkage to eight markers along the short arm of chromosome 7 excluded allelian between JWS and Saethre-Chotzen syndrome at 7p21. No linkage was detected to D5S211, excluding allelism to another recently described cephalosyndactyly syndrome mapping to 5qter. 35 refs., 5 figs., 4 tabs.

  8. [Imaging signs in chest diagnostics].

    PubMed

    Krombach, G A

    2016-08-01

    Signs in chest imaging are defined as typical findings which can be easily recognized on x‑ray photographs or computed tomography (CT) scans of the chest. They are caused by different typical pathophysiological processes. Due to the association of a certain pathophysiological cause with a given sign, knowledge and use of these signs can allow the possible differential diagnoses to be narrowed down. If other imaging findings and clinical data are additionally taken into account, the diagnosis can be made with a high degree of confidence in many cases. PMID:27369549

  9. Routine chest x-ray examinations in occupational medicine

    SciTech Connect

    Ashenburg, N.J.

    1982-01-01

    To collect some data on the yield of the chest x-ray examination in pre-employment health evaluations, a retrospective study was carried out. Pre-employment chest x-ray examination reports on 3,266 applicants were reviewed in Eastman Kodak Company's Medical Department in Rochester, N.Y. All radiographs were interpreted by Board-certified radiologists. For the purpose of this study, positive findings were restricted to the pulmonary and cardiovascular systems. The findings included items that would not be considered completely normal. However, many were of no clinical significance. An important point in regard to the findings is that 80% of the applicants were under the age of 35. The data are summarized in Table 1. Positive findings were noted in 52 (1.6%) radiographs. Of these, 25 (0.7%) had some radiologic finding that was relevant in terms of clinical follow-up, appropriate job placement or deferment of employment. Only two of the 3,266 applicants were not employed because of the x-ray examination findings. Results suggests that a selective program, based on clinical history and examination and on past and proposed job exposure, might be appropriate.

  10. Practical interventional radiology

    SciTech Connect

    Von Sonnenberg, E.; Mueller, P.R.

    1988-01-01

    This book describes techniques employed in interventional radiology with emphasis on imaging leading to intervention. Includes the entire array of procedures available to the radiologist, discussing the indications, materials, technique, results, and complications for each. Covers the chest, abdomen, bone, pediatric considerations, and nursing care.

  11. Comparison of Rates of Coronary Angiography and Combined Testing Procedures in Patients Seen in the Emergency Room With Chest Pain (But No Objective Acute Coronary Syndrome Findings) Having Coronary Computed Tomography Versus Exercise Stress Testing.

    PubMed

    Grunau, Brian; Leipsic, Jonathon; Purssell, Elizabeth; Kasteel, Naomi; Nguyen, Kimchi; Kazem, Mikameh; Naoum, Christopher; Raju, Rekha; Blanke, Philipp; Heilbron, Brett; Taylor, Carolyn; Scheuermeyer, Frank X

    2016-07-15

    Coronary computed tomography angiography (CCTA) appears comparable to standard care, including exercise stress testing (EST), in diagnosing acute coronary syndrome in emergency department (ED) patients with chest pain but may increase downstream testing. The objective of this study was to investigate rates of post-CCTA versus post-EST testing for (1) invasive angiography and (2) all combined cardiac testing. This was a retrospective cohort study performed at 2 urban Canadian EDs involving patients aged up to 65 years with chest pain but no objective ACS findings that were evaluated with CCTA or EST at the physician's discretion. The primary outcome was the proportion of patients who had 30-day invasive angiography in each group; secondary outcomes included all subsequent 30-day cardiac testing, including nuclear medicine scanning. From July 1, 2012, to June 30, 2014, we collected 1,700 patients: 521 CCTA and 1,179 EST. Demographics and risk factors were similar in both cohorts. In the following 30 days, 30 CCTA (5.8%) and 297 EST (25.2%) patients underwent any type of additional cardiac testing (difference 19.4%, 95% CI 16.0 to 22.6), whereas 12 CCTA (2.3%) and 20 EST patients (1.7%) underwent angiography (difference 0.6%, 95% CI -0.8% to 2.6%). No patients in either group died or had a myocardial infarction within 30 days. For ED patients with chest pain who underwent brief observation, CCTA and EST had similar 30-day angiography rates, but CCTA patients underwent significantly less overall cardiac investigations. PMID:27236251

  12. Chest pain in children.

    PubMed Central

    Leung, A. K.; Robson, W. L.; Cho, H.

    1996-01-01

    Chest pain is usually a benign symptom in children. The most common identifiable causes are musculoskeletal. Often, no cause can be identified. Cardiac disorders are uncommon causes of chest pain children. Most causes can be diagnosed from history and physical examination. Treatment should be directed at the underlying cause. For idiopathic chest pain, reassurance and regular follow-up examinations are important. PMID:8704491

  13. Chest x-ray

    MedlinePlus

    Chest radiography; Serial chest x-ray; X-ray - chest ... You stand in front of the x-ray machine. You will be told to hold your breath when the x-ray is taken. Two images are usually taken. You will ...

  14. Crush injuries of the chest

    PubMed Central

    Davidson, I. A.; Bargh, W.; Cruickshank, A. N.; Duthie, W. H.

    1969-01-01

    Fifty-four patients previously treated for a severe chest injury in an artificial ventilation unit have been followed up. An attempt has been made to determine their state of health and activity. Particular attention has been paid to their respiratory function. The significance of the findings has been discussed. Images PMID:4899979

  15. American College of Chest Physicians

    MedlinePlus

    ... of Certification (MOC) CHEST GAIN NSCLC CHEST SEEK Innovation, Simulation, and Training Center Professional Representative Education Program ( ... of Certification (MOC) CHEST GAIN NSCLC CHEST SEEK Innovation, Simulation, and Training Center Professional Representative Education Program ( ...

  16. The “dirty chest”—correlations between chest radiography, multislice CT and tobacco burden

    PubMed Central

    Kirchner, J; Goltz, J P; Lorenz, F; Obermann, A; Kirchner, E M; Kickuth, R

    2012-01-01

    Objectives Cigarette smoking-induced airway disease commonly results in an overall increase of non-specific lung markings on chest radiography. This has been described as “dirty chest”. As the morphological substrate of this condition is similar to the anthracosilicosis of coal workers, we hypothesised that it is possible to quantify the radiological changes using the International Labour Organization (ILO) classification of pneumoconiosis. The aims of this study were to evaluate whether there is a correlation between the extent of cigarette smoking and increased lung markings on chest radiography and to correlate the chest radiographic scores with findings on CT studies. Methods In a prospective analysis a cohort of 85 smokers was examined. The cigarette consumption was evaluated in pack years (defined as 20 cigarettes per day over 1 year). Film reading was performed by two board-certified radiologists. Chest radiographs were evaluated for the presence of thickening of bronchial walls, the presence of linear or nodular opacities, and emphysema. To correlate the smoking habits with the increase of overall lung markings in chest radiography, the ILO profusion score was converted to numbers ranging from zero to nine. Chest radiographs were rated according to the complete set of standard films of the revised ILO classification. Results 63/85 (74%) of the smokers showed an increase in overall lung markings on chest radiography; 32 (37%) had an ILO profusion score of <1/1, 29 (34%) had an ILO profusion score of <2/2 and 2 (2%) had an ILO score of ≥2/2. There was a significant positive linear correlation between the increase of overall lung markings on chest radiography and the cigarette consumption quantified as pack years (r=0.68). The majority of the heavy smokers (>40 pack years) showed emphysema; there was no significant difference between the prevalence of emphysema as diagnosed by CT (62%) or chest radiography (71%) (p<0.05).The most common findings in CT

  17. Radiologic and Pathologic Findings of a Follicular Variant of Papillary Thyroid Cancer with Extensive Stromal Fat: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Jin Woo; Kim, Tae Hyung; Roh, Hong Gee; Moon, Won-Jin; Lee, Sang Hwa; Hwang, Tae Sook

    2015-01-01

    Thyroid cancer may have small adipose structures detected by microscopy. However, there are no reports of thyroid cancer with gross fat evaluated by radiological methods. We reported a case of a 58-year-old woman with a fat containing thyroid mass. The mass was hyperechoic and ovoid in shape with a smooth margin on ultrasonography. On computed tomography, the mass had markedly low attenuation suggestive of fat, and fine reticular and thick septa-like structures. The patient underwent a right lobectomy. The mass was finally diagnosed as a follicular variant of papillary thyroid cancer with massive stromal fat. PMID:26576126

  18. Findings

    MedlinePlus

    ... Issue All Issues Explore Findings by Topic Cell Biology Cellular Structures, Functions, Processes, Imaging, Stress Response Chemistry ... Glycobiology, Synthesis, Natural Products, Chemical Reactions Computers in Biology Bioinformatics, Modeling, Systems Biology, Data Visualization Diseases Cancer, ...

  19. Primary hypertrophic osteoarthropathy caused by homozygous deletion in HPGD gene in a family: changing clinical and radiological findings with long-term follow-up.

    PubMed

    Tüysüz, Beyhan; Yılmaz, Saliha; Kasapçopur, Özgür; Erener-Ercan, Tuğba; Ceyhun, Emre; Bilguvar, Kaya; Günel, Murat

    2014-11-01

    Autosomal recessive primary hypertrophic osteoarthropathy1 (PHOAR1) is characterized by delayed closure of the fontanels, digital clubbing, arthropathy and periostosis. Homozygous mutations in hydroxyprostaglandin dehydrogenase (HPGD) gene are the underlying pathology of PHOAR1. The aim of this study was to analyze the HPGD gene and the changing clinical and radiological findings with advancing age of two siblings with the diagnosis of PHOAR1. A novel 2-bp homozygous deletion was found in exon 3 (c.310-311delCT) of HPGD gene in the patients. Clinical and radiological findings of the siblings were evaluated between 4 months and 8 years and 6 months of age. The painful swelling and sweating of the hands and feet, cranial ossification defect and expanded diaphyses were evident at infantile period and gradually showed improvement until 4 years of age. After the age of 4 years, digital clubbing and swelling of knees persisted, palmoplantar hyperkeratosis developed and acro-osteolysis became evident on hand radiographs. In conclusion, we suggest that the clinical findings of the patients with PHOAR1 should be classified in two periods as early and late childhood. We also observed that there was intrafamilial variability of clinical findings. PMID:24816859

  20. Post-mortems in recreational scuba diver deaths: the utility of radiology.

    PubMed

    Wheen, Lyndsae Clair; Williams, Michael Philip

    2009-07-01

    Post-mortem radiology and autopsy findings in a series of six diving-related deaths are presented. The cases had different causes of death but essentially similar radiological findings. We propose that the so-called classical radiological features of cerebral arterial gas embolism more likely represent "off-gassing" (gas coming out of solution into intra-vascular spaces due to pressure changes). As such, we suggest that post-mortem radiology, when accompanying a competent autopsy examination, be limited to the chest, whereby it may be useful in the demonstration of pneumothoraces which might not be demonstrated at autopsy, thereby providing supporting evidence for barotrauma in the context of appropriate clinical and autopsy findings. PMID:19481710

  1. Enhancement of chest radiographs using eigenimage processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bones, Philip J.; Butler, Anthony P. H.; Hurrell, Michael

    2006-08-01

    Frontal chest radiographs ("chest X-rays") are routinely used by medical personnel to assess patients for a wide range of suspected disorders. Often large numbers of images need to be analyzed. Furthermore, at times the images need to analyzed ("reported") when no radiological expert is available. A system which enhances the images in such a way that abnormalities are more obvious is likely to reduce the chance that an abnormality goes unnoticed. The authors previously reported the use of principal components analysis to derive a basis set of eigenimages from a training set made up of images from normal subjects. The work is here extended to investigate how best to emphasize the abnormalities in chest radiographs. Results are also reported for various forms of image normalizing transformations used in performing the eigenimage processing.

  2. Rare and challenging extra-axial brain lesions: CT and MRI findings with clinico-radiological differential diagnosis and pathological correlation

    PubMed Central

    Demir, Mustafa Kemal; Yapıcıer, Özlem; Onat, Elif; Toktaş, Zafer Orkun; Akakın, Akın; Urgun, Kamran; Kılıç, Türker

    2014-01-01

    There are many kinds of extra-axial brain tumors and tumor-like lesions, and definitive diagnosis is complicated in some cases. In this pictorial essay, we present rare and challenging extra-axial brain lesions including neuroenteric cyst, primary leptomeningeal melanomatosis, isolated dural neurosarcoidosis, intradiploic epidermoid cyst, ruptured dermoid cyst, intraventricular cavernoma, and cavernous hemangioma of the skull with imaging findings and clinico-radiological differential diagnosis, including the pathologic correlation. Familiarity with these entities may improve diagnostic accuracy and patient management. PMID:25010368

  3. Atypical radiological and intraoperative findings of acute cerebral hemorrhage caused by ruptured cerebral aneurysm in a patient with severe chronic anemia.

    PubMed

    Matano, Fumihiro; Murai, Yasuo; Nakagawa, Shunsuke; Kato, Taisei; Kitamura, Takayuki; Sekine, Tetsuro; Takagi, Ryo; Teramoto, Akira

    2014-01-01

    Acute intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH) associated with mild anemia is commonly observed on radiological examination, and there are several reports of ruptured aneurysms occurring with ICH but without accompanying subarachnoid hemorrhage. However, the relationship among computed tomography (CT), magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), and intraoperative findings of ICH caused by ruptured cerebral aneurysm in patients with severe chronic anemia has been rarely reported and is poorly understood. Here, we report atypical radiological and intraoperative findings of acute ICH caused by ruptured cerebral aneurysm in a patient with severe chronic anemia. A 64-year-old man with anemia was admitted to our hospital after he experienced left hemiparesis and a disturbance of consciousness. At a referring institution, he showed evidence of macrocytic anemia (white blood cell count, 9,000/μL; red blood cell count, 104×10(4)/μL; hemoglobin, 4.0 g/dL; hematocrit, 12.2%; and platelet count, 26.6×10(4)/μL). Both CT and MRI showed a right frontal ICH. The outer ring of the hematoma appeared as low-density area on CT, a low-intensity area on T1-weighted MRI, and a high-intensity area on T2-weighted MRI with a serous component. The patient received a blood transfusion and underwent surgical removal of the hematoma the following day. The white serous effusion visualized with CT and MRI was identified as a blood clot in the hematoma cavity. The blood that leaks from blood vessels appears as a high-intensity area on CT because it undergoes plasma absorption in a solidification shrinkage process, and is, therefore, concentrated. Although we did not examine the white effusion to determine if serous components were present, we speculated that the effusion may have contained serous components. Therefore, we removed the part of the effusion that appeared as a low-density area on CT. The presence of ICH without subarachnoid hemorrhage suggested the possible adhesion and rupture of a previous

  4. Radiologic Findings of Ductal Carcinoma in Situ Arising Within a Juvenile Fibroadenoma: Mammographic, Sonographic and Dynamic Contrast-Enhanced Breast MRI Features.

    PubMed

    Park, Eun Kyung; Cho, Kyu Ran; Seo, Bo Kyoung; Woo, Ok Hee; Lee, Jeong Hyeon; Song, Sung Eun; Bae, Jeong Won

    2015-04-01

    Juvenile fibroadenoma is an uncommon histologic variant of fibroadenoma that frequently shows a remarkable and rapid growth. The development of a carcinoma within a fibroadenoma, either in situ or invasive, is a rare condition. We encountered a 36-year-old woman with a palpable mass in the right breast. The radiologic findings were indicative of a fibroadenoma in the breast. Sonographic guided biopsy using a 14G core needle revealed the presence of ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) within the juvenile fibroadenoma. Focal excision was performed and the patient underwent radiation therapy in the right breast after surgery. PMID:26060554

  5. Radiologic Findings of Ductal Carcinoma in Situ Arising Within a Juvenile Fibroadenoma: Mammographic, Sonographic and Dynamic Contrast-Enhanced Breast MRI Features

    PubMed Central

    Park, Eun Kyung; Cho, Kyu Ran; Seo, Bo Kyoung; Woo, Ok Hee; Lee, Jeong Hyeon; Song, Sung Eun; Bae, Jeong Won

    2015-01-01

    Juvenile fibroadenoma is an uncommon histologic variant of fibroadenoma that frequently shows a remarkable and rapid growth. The development of a carcinoma within a fibroadenoma, either in situ or invasive, is a rare condition. We encountered a 36-year-old woman with a palpable mass in the right breast. The radiologic findings were indicative of a fibroadenoma in the breast. Sonographic guided biopsy using a 14G core needle revealed the presence of ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) within the juvenile fibroadenoma. Focal excision was performed and the patient underwent radiation therapy in the right breast after surgery. PMID:26060554

  6. Exercises in chest X-ray diagnosis

    SciTech Connect

    Elliott, J.A.; Cowan, M.D.

    1986-01-01

    In the fifty exercises which form the first part of the book, radiographs are combined with a group of questions designed to test the readers clinical and radiological knowledge. The exercises cover all the common and many of the rarer cardiothoracic disorders which are revealed on the chest x-ray. Increasingly, computed tomography is used in the differential diagnosis of thoracic problems, and several examples have been included.

  7. Non-malignant chest x ray changes in patients with mesothelioma in a large cohort of asbestos insulation workers.

    PubMed Central

    Lilis, R; Ribak, J; Suzuki, Y; Penner, L; Bernstein, N; Selikoff, I J

    1987-01-01

    To assess the prevalence of non-malignant chest x ray abnormalities in cases of mesothelioma 184 cases of mesothelioma (72 pleural and 112 peritoneal) which had occurred in a cohort of asbestos insulation workers followed up since 1967 were studied. Chest x ray films of satisfactory quality, on which the presence or absence of non-malignant radiological changes indicating interstitial pulmonary fibrosis or pleural fibrosis or both, could be assessed with a high degree of certainty were available. In some cases (20% for pleural mesothelioma, 11.6% for peritoneal mesothelioma) non-malignant radiological changes were not radiologically detectable. Parenchymal interstitial fibrosis (small irregular opacities) only was found in a proportion of cases (25.4% of pleural mesotheliomas, 12.5% of peritoneal mesotheliomas). Pleural fibrosis only was detected in 17% of cases of pleural mesothelioma and 27% of cases of peritoneal mesothelioma. Most patients had both parenchymal and pleural fibrosis. Although these results tend to indicate that in peritoneal mesothelioma the proportion of pleural fibrosis is significantly higher, these findings might have been due to the fact that in most cases of pleural mesothelioma non-malignant changes were interpreted in one hemithorax only. In 46 cases (21 pleural, 25 peritoneal) in which sufficient lung tissue was available histopathology of lung parenchyma indicated the presence of interstitial fibrosis; in 20 (43.5%) of these the chest x ray film had been read as negative. Thus the absence of radiologically detectable small opacities on the chest x ray film does not exclude the existence of interstitial pulmonary fibrosis in cases of mesothelioma among insulation workers. With lower levels of exposure (such as in family contacts of asbestos workers) it is conceivable that mesothelioma might occur in the absence of interstitial pulmonary fibrosis. PMID:3606969

  8. Radiologic Findings and Risk Factors of Adjacent Segment Degeneration after Anterior Cervical Discectomy and Fusion : A Retrospective Matched Cohort Study with 3-Year Follow-Up Using MRI

    PubMed Central

    So, Wan-Soo; Ku, Min-Geun; Kim, Sang-Hyeon; Kim, Dong-Won; Lee, Byung-Hun

    2016-01-01

    Objective The purpose of this study was to figure out the radiologic findings and risk factors related to adjacent segment degeneration (ASD) after anterior cervical discectomy and fusion (ACDF) using 3-year follow-up radiography, computed tomography (CT), and magnetic resonance image (MRI). Methods A retrospective matched comparative study was performed for 64 patients who underwent single-level ACDF with a cage and plate. Radiologic parameters, including upper segment range of motion (USROM), lower segment range of motion (LSROM), upper segment disc height (UDH), and lower segment disc height (LDH), clinical outcomes assessed with neck and arm visual analogue scale (VAS), and risk factors were analyzed. Results Patients were categorized into the ASD (32 patients) and non-ASD (32 patients) group. The decrease of UDH was significantly greater in the ASD group at each follow-up visit. At 36 months postoperatively, the difference for USROM value from the preoperative one significantly increased in the ASD group than non-ASD group. Preoperative other segment degeneration was significantly associated with the increased incidence of ASD at 36 months. However, pain intensity for the neck and arm was not significantly different between groups at any post-operative follow-up visit. Conclusion The main factor affecting ASD is preoperative other segment degeneration out of the adjacent segment. In addition, patients over the age of 50 are at higher risk of developing ASD. Although there was definite radiologic degeneration in the ASD group, no significant difference was observed between the ASD and non-ASD groups in terms of the incidence of symptomatic disease. PMID:26962418

  9. Derivation and Validation of Two Decision Instruments for Selective Chest CT in Blunt Trauma: A Multicenter Prospective Observational Study (NEXUS Chest CT)

    PubMed Central

    Rodriguez, Robert M.; Langdorf, Mark I.; Nishijima, Daniel; Baumann, Brigitte M.; Hendey, Gregory W.; Medak, Anthony J.; Raja, Ali S.; Allen, Isabel E.; Mower, William R.

    2015-01-01

    Background Unnecessary diagnostic imaging leads to higher costs, longer emergency department stays, and increased patient exposure to ionizing radiation. We sought to prospectively derive and validate two decision instruments (DIs) for selective chest computed tomography (CT) in adult blunt trauma patients. Methods and Findings From September 2011 to May 2014, we prospectively enrolled blunt trauma patients over 14 y of age presenting to eight US, urban level 1 trauma centers in this observational study. During the derivation phase, physicians recorded the presence or absence of 14 clinical criteria before viewing chest imaging results. We determined injury outcomes by CT radiology readings and categorized injuries as major or minor according to an expert-panel-derived clinical classification scheme. We then employed recursive partitioning to derive two DIs: Chest CT-All maximized sensitivity for all injuries, and Chest CT-Major maximized sensitivity for only major thoracic injuries (while increasing specificity). In the validation phase, we employed similar methodology to prospectively test the performance of both DIs. We enrolled 11,477 patients—6,002 patients in the derivation phase and 5,475 patients in the validation phase. The derived Chest CT-All DI consisted of (1) abnormal chest X-ray, (2) rapid deceleration mechanism, (3) distracting injury, (4) chest wall tenderness, (5) sternal tenderness, (6) thoracic spine tenderness, and (7) scapular tenderness. The Chest CT-Major DI had the same criteria without rapid deceleration mechanism. In the validation phase, Chest CT-All had a sensitivity of 99.2% (95% CI 95.4%–100%), a specificity of 20.8% (95% CI 19.2%–22.4%), and a negative predictive value (NPV) of 99.8% (95% CI 98.9%–100%) for major injury, and a sensitivity of 95.4% (95% CI 93.6%–96.9%), a specificity of 25.5% (95% CI 23.5%–27.5%), and a NPV of 93.9% (95% CI 91.5%–95.8%) for either major or minor injury. Chest CT-Major had a sensitivity

  10. [A rare case of chest pain].

    PubMed

    Bodócsi, Beáta; Koncz, István; Hum, Zsigmond; Serfőző, Orsolya; Pap-Szekeres, József; Szabó, István

    2016-09-01

    Chest pain is a common symptom in patients who visit Emergency Departments. The main task is to exclude life-threatening diseases such as acute coronary syndrome, pulmonary embolization and dissection of thoracic aorta. The authors present the history of a patient, who had an intense chest pain for 7 hours. In accordance with the diagnostic algorithm of chest pain, ECG, blood collection, chest X-ray and chest computed tomography angiography were performed. Acute coronary syndrome, pulmonary embolization and dissection of the thoracic aorta were excluded, however, chest computed tomography CT revealed a huge hiatal hernia as an incidental finding. An emergency surgical repair was performed and the patient recovered without any complications. The authors emphasize that the diagnostic algorithms focus on the confirmation or rejection of possible life threatening diseases in case of chest pain. However, it should be kept in mind that rarer causes may occur, which may require involvement of the relevant disciplines and multidisciplinary thinking. Orv. Hetil., 2016, 157(36), 1445-1448. PMID:27596512

  11. Characterisation of inflammatory response, coagulation, and radiological findings in Katayama fever: a report of three cases at the Medical University of Vienna, Austria

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Katayama fever is an acute clinical condition characterised by high fever, dry cough and general malaise occurring during early Schistosoma spp. infection. It is predominantly reported in travellers from non-endemic regions. Whereas the immunological response to Schistosoma infection is well characterised, alterations in inflammatory markers and coagulation in response to acute infection are poorly understood. Methods Here we report the clinical, laboratory and radiological characteristics of three returning travellers with Katayama fever. Inflammatory markers and coagulation status were assessed repeatedly during follow-up to characterise the host response to infection. Radiographic findings were correlated with clinical and laboratory markers. Results Clinical symptoms were suggestive of a significant inflammatory response in all patients including high fever (>39°C), cough, and general malaise. Classical inflammatory markers including blood sedimentation rate, C-reactive protein, and serum amyloid A were only moderately elevated. Marked eosinophilia (33–42% of white blood cells) was observed and persisted despite anti-inflammatory and anthelminthic treatment for up to 32 weeks. Analysis of blood coagulation markers indicated increased coagulability reflected by elevated D-dimer values (0.57–1.17 μg/ml) and high thrombin generating potentials (peak thrombin activity: 311–384 nM). One patient showed particularly high levels of microparticle-associated tissue factor activity at initial presentation (1.64 pg/ml). Multiple pulmonary and hepatic opacities demonstrated by computed tomography (CT) scanning were associated with raised inflammatory markers in one patient. Conclusions The characterisation of the inflammatory response, blood coagulation parameters and radiological findings in three patients adds to our current understanding of Katayama fever and serves as a starting point for further systematic investigations of the pathophysiology of

  12. Chest CT Scan

    MedlinePlus

    ... pictures to create a very detailed, three-dimensional (3D) model of organs. Sometimes, a substance called contrast dye is injected into a vein in your arm for the CT scan. This substance highlights areas in your chest, which ...

  13. Chest Injuries and Disorders

    MedlinePlus

    ... your neck and your abdomen. It includes the ribs and breastbone. Inside your chest are several organs, ... and collapsed lung Pleural disorders Esophagus disorders Broken ribs Thoracic aortic aneurysms Disorders of the mediastinum, the ...

  14. Genitourinary radiology

    SciTech Connect

    McClennan, B.L.

    1982-01-01

    A literature review of genitourinary radiology highlights new findings in the field that have occurred in the past year. The physiology of contrast media, and the occasional life-threatening contrast medial reaction are discussed. Common urologic problems such as stones, infection, and obstruction are examined in order to interpret static radiographs in a more meaningful way. The field of interventional uroradiology continues to expand, with new procedures being tried and new indications for old procedures being developed. (KRM)

  15. Chronic Lipoid Pneumonia in a 9-Year-Old Child Revealed by Recurrent Chest Pain.

    PubMed

    Hochart, A; Thumerelle, C; Petyt, L; Mordacq, C; Deschildre, A

    2015-01-01

    Lipoid pneumonia in children is a rare disorder due to accumulation of fatty oily material in the alveoli and usually associated with an underlying condition. In absence of obvious context, diagnosis remains difficult with nonspecific clinical and radiological features. We report the first case of voluntary chronic aspiration of olive oil responsible for exogenous lipoid pneumonia, in a previously healthy 9-year-old boy. Clinical presentation was atypical; LP was revealed by isolated chest pain. We discuss radiological and bronchial alveolar lavage characteristics suggestive of lipoid pneumonia. Conclusion. Lipoid pneumonia is a disease to be reminded of in children, which can occur with original findings in terms of etiology and clinical presentation. PMID:26078902

  16. Chronic Lipoid Pneumonia in a 9-Year-Old Child Revealed by Recurrent Chest Pain

    PubMed Central

    Hochart, A.; Thumerelle, C.; Petyt, L.; Mordacq, C.; Deschildre, A.

    2015-01-01

    Lipoid pneumonia in children is a rare disorder due to accumulation of fatty oily material in the alveoli and usually associated with an underlying condition. In absence of obvious context, diagnosis remains difficult with nonspecific clinical and radiological features. We report the first case of voluntary chronic aspiration of olive oil responsible for exogenous lipoid pneumonia, in a previously healthy 9-year-old boy. Clinical presentation was atypical; LP was revealed by isolated chest pain. We discuss radiological and bronchial alveolar lavage characteristics suggestive of lipoid pneumonia. Conclusion. Lipoid pneumonia is a disease to be reminded of in children, which can occur with original findings in terms of etiology and clinical presentation. PMID:26078902

  17. [Comparative diagnostic value of echography and oral radiologic examination of the gallbladder in relation to surgical findings].

    PubMed

    Cervi, P M; Scutellari, P N; Calzolari, F; Pavani, F; Pelizzola, D; Pollinzi, V; Piffanelli, A; Tosi, S P

    1983-07-14

    For nearly 60 years, since it was introduced by Graham and Cole (1924), oral cholecystography (OCG) has been used as the imaging technique of choice in investigation of gallbladder disorders. Recently, the future of OCG has come into doubt, principally as a result of ultrasonography, with the advent of high-resolution real-time scanning. Stones are seen as echoes within the lumen of the gallbladder and are associated with an acoustic shadow, findings which are highly specific. On this basis, to evaluate the accuracy of ultrasonography in detecting cholelithiasis, the A. have performed by real-time cholecystosonography 60 patients with not diagnostic OCG in a group of 546 patients affected by gallbladder diseases. Our results have confirmed that sonography revealed 4 normal gallbladders, 51 gallstones and 1 primary gallbladder cancer, with 5 cases of false positive. The true false negative rate has been difficult to determine, as surgery is usually not performed after a negative study. The accuracy of cholecystosonography for gallstone diagnosis was found to be 88,1% for all three Crade's categories. PMID:6866302

  18. JC Virus PCR Detection Is Not Infallible: A Fulminant Case of Progressive Multifocal Leukoencephalopathy with False-Negative Cerebrospinal Fluid Studies despite Progressive Clinical Course and Radiological Findings

    PubMed Central

    Babi, Mohamed-Ali; Pendlebury, William; Braff, Steven; Waheed, Waqar

    2015-01-01

    We describe a case with a false-negative PCR-based analysis for JC virus in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) in a patient with clinical and radiological findings suggestive of progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy (PML) who was on chronic immunosuppressive therapy for rheumatoid arthritis. Our patient developed rapidly progressive global decline with clinical and radiographic findings suggestive of PML, but JC virus PCR in CSF was negative. The patient passed away 3 months from the onset of her neurological symptoms. Autopsy confirmed the diagnosis of PML with presence of JC-polyoma virus by immunohistochemical staining. This case highlights the potential of false-negative JC virus PCR in CSF when radiographic and clinical features are suggestive of “possible PML.” We review the plausible causes of potential false-negative CSF results and suggest that when the clinical presentation is suspicious for PML repeat CSF analysis utilizing ultrasensitive PCR assay and subsequent brain biopsy should be considered if CSF remains negative. Additionally, appropriate exclusion of other neurologic conditions is essential. PMID:25861493

  19. Selection of patients for x-ray examinations: Chest x-ray screening examinations

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1983-08-01

    Five chest x-ray referral criteria statements have been developed and unanimously endorsed by a panel of physicians convened as part of a major voluntary cooperative effort between FDA's National Center for Devices and Radiological Health (NCDRH) and the medical professional community. The referral criteria statements include recommendations concerning the following applications of chest x-ray screening: mandated routine chest x-ray screening examinations, routine prenatal chest x-ray examinations, routine hospital admission chest x-ray examinations, chest x-ray examinations for tuberculosis detection and control, and routine chest x-ray examinations for occupational medicine. The complete text of the five referral criterial statements plus a brief discussion of the rationale for the development of each statement is presented.

  20. Imaging findings in patients with myelofibrosis.

    PubMed

    Guermazi, A; de Kerviler, E; Cazals-Hatem, D; Zagdanski, A M; Frija, J

    1999-01-01

    The purpose of this review is to illustrate the wide range of radiological abnormalities in myelofibrosis. Myelofibrosis, also called myeloid metaplasia, is a myeloproliferative disorder of unknown etiology. The common imaging findings in patients with myelofibrosis are osteosclerosis, hepatosplenomegaly, and lymphadenopathies. In addition, extramedullary hematopoiesis may develop in multiple sites such as chest, abdomen, pelvis, and central nervous system, simulating malignant disease. Selected plain-film, CT, and MR images in patients with myelofibrosis are shown as pictorial essay to allow ready recognition of the most common imaging abnormalities of the disease. PMID:10460376

  1. Calcific retropharyngeal tendinitis. [Radiological findings

    SciTech Connect

    Karasick, D.; Karasick, S.

    1981-12-01

    Calcific retropharyngeal tendinitis is an imflammation of the longus colli muscle tendon which is located on the anterior surface of the verterbral column extending from the atlas to the third thoracic vertebra. The acute inflammatory condition is selflimiting with symptoms consisting of a gradually increasing neck pain often associated with throat pain and difficulty swallowing. The pain is aggravated by head and neck movement. Clinically the condition can be confused with retropharyngeal absecess, meningitis, infectious spondylitis, and post-traumatic muscle spasm. The radiographic features of this condition consist of pre-vertebral soft tissue swelling from C1 to C4 and amorphous calcific density in the longus colli tendon anterior to the body of C2 and inferior to the anterior arch of C1.

  2. [Chest wall reconstruction after resection of malignant chest wall tumors].

    PubMed

    Ayabe, H; Oka, T; Akamine, S; Takahashi, T; Nagayasu, T

    1998-05-01

    Full-thickness chest wall resection is performed for complete removal of primary and secondary malignant chest wall tumors. Large defects of the chest wall after resection must be repaired to maintain adequate ventilation, to protect important intrathoracic structures, and to preserve cosmetic integrity. Various materials have been utilized over the years to replace the rigid chest wall. At present, Marlex mesh and a composite of Marlex mesh and methylmethacrylate are frequently used to reconstruct rigid chest wall defects. On the other hand, to replace the soft part of the chest wall and cover the rigid materials, pedicled muscle flaps, myocutaneous flaps, or omentum are used. Major pedicled flaps include the pectoralis major, rectus abdominis and latissimus dorsi muscular, and musculocutaneous flaps. Techniques are now available to repair any chest wall site, and to restore chest continuity in patients whose tumors are curatively resected. PMID:9656244

  3. Atypical radiological findings in achondroplasia with uncommon mutation of the fibroblast growth factor receptor-3 (FGFR-3) gene (Gly to Cys transition at codon 375)

    SciTech Connect

    Nishimuri, Gen; Fukushima, Yoshimitsu; Ohashi, Hirofumi; Ikegawa, Shiro

    1995-11-20

    The recent discovery of mutations in the FGFR-3 (fibroblast growth factor receptor-3) gene (FGFR3) as the cause of achondroplasia has provided new insight into understanding genetic diseases. It was surprising from the viewpoint of molecular genetics that most patients with achondroplasia showed the same mutation at nucleotide 1138, leading to a single amino acid substitution from glycine to arginine at codon 380 (Gly380Arg). All 39 patients examined by two groups had the Gly380Arg; 38 patients and the other demonstrated a G to A and a G to C transition at nucleotide 1138, respectively. Subsequently another group disclosed a G to A transition at the same nucleotide 1138 in 21/23 patients of diverse ethnic origin, although mutations were not identified in two patients. To date, a total of 193 patients with the mutation of the G380Arg have been reported; a single patient with another mutation resulting in a substitution from glycine to cysteine at codon 375 (Gly375Cys) has been described. The presence of this common mutation is consistent with the clinical fact that achondroplastic individuals show less phenotypic variability than is unusual for autosomal dominant diseases. We encountered a Japanese boy with the Gly375Cys. His mother with achondroplasia has the same mutation. The molecular investigation of these patients was reported elsewhere. Here we report the clinical and radiological findings in this boy who demonstrated some atypical manifestations from those of typical achondroplasia. 8 refs., 1 fig.

  4. Primary Chronic Osteomyelitis of the Jaws in Children: An Update on Pathophysiology, Radiological Findings, Treatment Strategies, and Prospective Analysis of Two Cases

    PubMed Central

    Berglund, Caroline; Ekströmer, Karin; Abtahi, Jahan

    2015-01-01

    Objective. Primary chronic osteomyelitis (PCO) of the jaws in children is associated with pain, trismus, and swelling. In children, temporomandibular joint involvement is rare and few studies have been published due to the relatively low incidence. This paper presents two cases of mandibular PCO in children with the involvement of the collum mandibulae. In addition, a review of the literature regarding demographic data, histological, radiological, and laboratory findings, and treatment strategies of PCO was also performed. Material and Methods. Prospective analyses of two PCO cases. A PubMed search was used and the articles were sorted according to their corresponding key area of focus. Results. Review of the literature revealed twenty-four cases of PCO with two cases of mandibular condyle involvement. The mean age was 18 years; the male to female ratio was 1 : 3. Most of the patients were treated with anti-inflammatory drugs in combination with decortication. Clinical recurrence was seen in 7 cases. Conclusion. A combination of anti-inflammatory drugs and surgical intervention appears to be the first choice of treatment. However, surgical removal of necrotic tissue adjacent to collum mandibulae has its limitations in children. Further investigations are of utmost importance in order to increase our knowledge and understanding of this disease. PMID:26435856

  5. Multidetector Computer Tomography: Evaluation of Blunt Chest Trauma in Adults

    PubMed Central

    Matos, António P.; Mascarenhas, Vasco; Herédia, Vasco

    2014-01-01

    Imaging plays an essential part of chest trauma care. By definition, the employed imaging technique in the emergency setting should reach the correct diagnosis as fast as possible. In severe chest blunt trauma, multidetector computer tomography (MDCT) has become part of the initial workup, mainly due to its high sensitivity and diagnostic accuracy of the technique for the detection and characterization of thoracic injuries and also due to its wide availability in tertiary care centers. The aim of this paper is to review and illustrate a spectrum of characteristic MDCT findings of blunt traumatic injuries of the chest including the lungs, mediastinum, pleural space, and chest wall. PMID:25295188

  6. Multidetector computer tomography: evaluation of blunt chest trauma in adults.

    PubMed

    Palas, João; Matos, António P; Mascarenhas, Vasco; Herédia, Vasco; Ramalho, Miguel

    2014-01-01

    Imaging plays an essential part of chest trauma care. By definition, the employed imaging technique in the emergency setting should reach the correct diagnosis as fast as possible. In severe chest blunt trauma, multidetector computer tomography (MDCT) has become part of the initial workup, mainly due to its high sensitivity and diagnostic accuracy of the technique for the detection and characterization of thoracic injuries and also due to its wide availability in tertiary care centers. The aim of this paper is to review and illustrate a spectrum of characteristic MDCT findings of blunt traumatic injuries of the chest including the lungs, mediastinum, pleural space, and chest wall. PMID:25295188

  7. Chest Pain (Beyond the Basics)

    MedlinePlus

    ... coronary arteries. Heart attack — A heart attack, or myocardial infarction (MI), occurs when the surface covering of a ... chest pain Criteria for the diagnosis of acute myocardial infarction Outpatient evaluation of the adult with chest pain ...

  8. Atypical chest discomfort in a 36-year-old man.

    PubMed

    Alexander, Lisa Mustone; Robie, Stephen; Baute, Scott

    2016-07-01

    This article focuses on aortic aneurysms and the evaluation of patients with atypical chest pain. A complete and accurate family history is essential. Clinicians should pay close attention to persistence of symptoms and age in patients with atypical chest discomfort who do not have routine confirmatory cardiac findings. PMID:27351640

  9. Diagnostic radiology

    SciTech Connect

    Leeds, N.E.; Jacobson, H.G.

    1986-10-17

    Developments in the burgeoning field of diagnostic radiology have continued apace. Four areas that represent either subspecialities or technological advances in diagnostic radiology will be considered in this report: ultrasonography, interventional radiology, nuclear radiology, and magnetic resonance. In no sense is the exclusion of other subdisciplines and modalities (eg, pediatric radiology, computed tomography) and indication of their of importance or their failure to include innovative concepts.

  10. Long-term outcome after whiplash injury. A 2-year follow-up considering features of injury mechanism and somatic, radiologic, and psychosocial findings.

    PubMed

    Radanov, B P; Sturzenegger, M; Di Stefano, G

    1995-09-01

    With the increased incidence of whiplash injury following the introduction of compulsory car seat belts, a large number of reports have dealt with the aftermath of this condition. Previous studies, however, focused on somatic symptoms on the one hand or considered only psychological or neuropsychological variables on the other hand, often in loosely defined or selected groups of patients. No study so far has analyzed the long-term outcome in a nonselected group of patients using a clear injury definition considering patient history; somatic, radiologic, and neuropsychological findings; and features of the injury mechanisms assessed soon after trauma and during follow-up. the present investigation was designed to assess these combined factors. According to a strict definition of whiplash injury, we assessed a consecutive nonselected sample of 117 patients with recent injury who had similar sociocultural and educational backgrounds. The patients had been in automobile crashes and were all equally covered by accident insurance according to the country-wide scheme. Initial examination was performed 7.2 +/- 4.2 days after trauma, and follow-up examinations 3, 6, 12, and 24 months later. At baseline, features of injury mechanism, subjective complaints, and different aspects of patient history were documented and cervical spine X rays performed. At all examinations patients underwent neurologic examination and cognitive and psychosocial factor assessment. At 2 years, patients were divided into symptomatic and asymptomatic groups and then compared with regard to the initial findings. In addition, symptomatic patients who were disabled at the 2-year follow-up examination and symptomatic patients not disabled (that is, they were able to work at the pretraumatic level) were compared regarding initial and 2-year findings. At 2 years, 18% of patients still had injury-related symptoms. With regard to baseline findings the following significant differences were found: Symptomatic

  11. Approach to Pediatric Chest Radiograph.

    PubMed

    Jana, Manisha; Bhalla, Ashu Seith; Gupta, Arun Kumar

    2016-06-01

    Chest radiograph remains the first line imaging modality even today, especially in ICU settings. Hence proper interpretation of chest radiographs is crucial, which can be achieved by adopting a systematic approach and proper description and identification of abnormalities. In this review, the authors describe a short and comprehensive way of interpreting the pediatric chest radiograph. PMID:26983619

  12. Coccidioidomycosis - chest x-ray (image)

    MedlinePlus

    This chest x-ray shows the affects of a fungal infection, coccidioidomycosis. In the middle of the left lung (seen on the ... defined borders. Other diseases that may explain these x-ray findings include lung abscesses, chronic pulmonary tuberculosis, chronic ...

  13. Treatment of Morbidity with Atypical Chest Pain

    PubMed Central

    Cott, Arthur

    1987-01-01

    The appropriate management of atypical chest pain requires an integration of medical and behavioural treatments. Unnecessary medicalization can increase morbidity. A sensitivity to the behavioural factors contributing to symptoms and disability may reduce both. The purpose of this paper is to provide physicians with a cognitive-behavioural perspective of the nature of morbidity and disability associated with chronic chest discomfort; some strategies for detecting heretofore unsuspected disability associated with chronic chest pain and related discomfort in patients with organic findings (both cardiac and non-cardiac), as well those with no identifiable disease process or organic cause; and some simple behavioural and cognitive-behavioural therapeutic techniques for treating and preventing such problems. PMID:21263912

  14. Filters For Chest Radiography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramanathan, N.; Paron, J.

    1980-08-01

    The objective of low dose radiography is achieved by a judicious combination of proper kV selection, fast film-screen systems and beam filtration. A systematic study of filters was undertaken to evaluate the improvements that can be realized in terms of patient Entrance Skin Exposures (ESE) for chest radiographs. The Picker CD 135 Generator and the Automatic Chest Filmer with dynamic phototiming were used for the study. The kV dependence of ESE with various amounts of zinc and aluminum filtration is presented. The effect of filtration on image contrast is discussed. The variations of ESE with phantom thickness under different filtration conditions are also considered. It was found that the ESE can be reduced by as much as a factor of 1.8 ± .1 with no significant increase in tube loading.

  15. [Acute Chest Pain].

    PubMed

    Gmür, Christian

    2016-02-17

    Acute chest pain is a frequent consultation reason in general practice as well as in emergency departments. With the help of history, physical examination, ECG, laboratory and newly developed risk scores, potentially life-threatening diseases and high-risk patients may be detected and treated early, quickly and cost-effectively. New biomarkers and their combination with risk scores can increase the negative predictive value to exclude certain diseases. PMID:26886697

  16. Oblique Chest Views as a Routine Part of Skeletal Surveys Performed for Possible Physical Abuse--Is This Practice Worthwhile?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hansen, Karen Kirhofer; Prince, Jeffrey S.; Nixon, G. William

    2008-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the utility of oblique chest views in the diagnosis of rib fractures when used as a routine part of the skeletal survey performed for possible physical abuse. Methods: Oblique chest views have been part of the routine skeletal survey protocol at Primary Children's Medical Center since October 2002. Dictated radiology reports…

  17. Chest neoplasms with infectious etiologies

    PubMed Central

    Restrepo, Carlos S; Chen, Melissa M; Martinez-Jimenez, Santiago; Carrillo, Jorge; Restrepo, Catalina

    2011-01-01

    A wide spectrum of thoracic tumors have known or suspected viral etiologies. Oncogenic viruses can be classified by the type of genomic material they contain. Neoplastic conditions found to have viral etiologies include post-transplant lymphoproliferative disease, lymphoid granulomatosis, Kaposi’s sarcoma, Castleman’s disease, recurrent respiratory papillomatosis, lung cancer, malignant mesothelioma, leukemia and lymphomas. Viruses involved in these conditions include Epstein-Barr virus, human herpes virus 8, human papillomavirus, Simian virus 40, human immunodeficiency virus, and Human T-lymphotropic virus. Imaging findings, epidemiology and mechanism of transmission for these diseases are reviewed in detail to gain a more thorough appreciation of disease pathophysiology for the chest radiologist. PMID:22224176

  18. Quick identification of acute chest pain patients study (QICS)

    PubMed Central

    Willemsen, Hendrik M; de Jong, Gonda; Tio, René A; Nieuwland, Wybe; Kema, Ido P; van der Horst, Iwan CC; Oudkerk, Mattijs; Zijlstra, Felix

    2009-01-01

    Background Patients with acute chest pain are often referred to the emergency ward and extensively investigated. Investigations are costly and could induce unnecessary complications, especially with invasive diagnostics. Nevertheless, chest pain patients have high mortalities. Fast identification of high-risk patients is crucial. Therefore several strategies have been developed including specific symptoms, signs, laboratory measurements, and imaging. Methods/Design The Quick Identification of acute Chest pain Study (QICS) will investigate whether a combined use of specific symptoms and signs, electrocardiography, routine and new laboratory measures, adjunctive imaging including electron beam (EBT) computed tomography (CT) and contrast multislice CT (MSCT) will have a high diagnostic yield for patients with acute chest pain. All patients will be investigated according a standardized protocol in the Emergency Department. Serum and plasma will be frozen for future analysis for a wide range of biomarkers at a later time point. The primary endpoint is the safe recognition of low-risk chest pain patients directly at presentation. Secondary endpoint is the identification of a wide range of sensitive predictive clinical markers, chemical biomarkers and radiological markers in acute chest pain patients. Chemical biomarkers will be compared to quantitative CT measurements of coronary atherosclerosis as a surrogate endpoint. Chemical biomarkers will also be compared in head to head comparison and for their additional value. Discussion This will be a very extensive investigation of a wide range of risk predictors in acute chest pain patients. New reliable fast and cheap diagnostic algorithm resulting from the test results might improve chest pain patients' prognosis, and reduce unnecessary costs and diagnostic complications. PMID:19527487

  19. Determination of chest x-ray cost using activity based costing approach at Penang General Hospital, Malaysia

    PubMed Central

    Atif, Muhammad; Sulaiman, Syed Azhar Syed; Shafie, Asrul Akmal; Saleem, Fahad; Ahmad, Nafees

    2012-01-01

    Background Activity based costing (ABC) is an approach to get insight of true costs and to solve accounting problems. It provides more accurate information on product cost than conventional accounting system. The purpose of this study was to identify detailed resource consumption for chest x-ray procedure. Methods Human resource cost was calculated by multiplying the mean time spent by employees doing specific activity to their per-minute salaries. The costs of consumables and clinical equipments were obtained from the procurement section of the Radiology Department. The cost of the building was calculated by multiplying the area of space used by the chest X-ray facility with the unit cost of public building department. Moreover, straight-line deprecation with a discount rate of 3% was assumed for calculation of equivalent annual costs for building and machines. Cost of electricity was calculated by multiplying number of kilo watts used by electrical appliance in the year 2010 with electricity tariff for Malaysian commercial consumers (MYR 0.31 per kWh). Results Five activities were identified which were required to develop one chest X-ray film. Human resource, capital, consumable and electricity cost was MYR 1.48, MYR 1.98, MYR 2.15 and MYR 0.04, respectively. Total cost of single chest X-ray was MYR 5.65 (USD 1.75). Conclusion By applying ABC approach, we can have more detailed and precise estimate of cost for specific activity or service. Choice of repeating a chest X-ray can be based on our findings, when cost is a limiting factor. PMID:22891098

  20. Is there an association between clinical features, response to diagnostic analgesia and radiological findings in horses with a magnetic resonance imaging diagnosis of navicular disease or other injuries of the podotrochlear apparatus?

    PubMed

    Parkes, Rebecca; Newton, Richard; Dyson, Sue

    2015-04-01

    Previous descriptions of the clinical features of navicular disease occurred before the widespread use of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) allowed a more definitive diagnosis of foot pain. The objective of this study was to compare the clinical features of horses with lesions of the podotrochlear apparatus with those with other causes of foot pain. It was hypothesised that primary navicular bone disease would be associated with more advanced radiological findings than other diagnoses. A retrospective study was performed of all horses examined at a referral centre with a definitive diagnosis of foot pain based on MRI ± post-mortem examination. Clinical examination findings, response to diagnostic analgesia and radiological grading of the navicular bone were compared among five diagnosis groups: (1) primary navicular bone pathology (NB); (2) lesions of the collateral sesamoidean ligament and/or distal sesamoidean impar ligament (CSL + DSIL); (3) primary deep digital flexor tendon injury (DDFT); (4) navicular bone pathology and other lesions of the podotrochlear apparatus ± DDFT (PTA) and (5) Other. There were 702 horses (NB, 62; CSL + DSIL, 180; DDFT, 69; PTA, 92; Other, 299). Horses with PTA injuries were more frequently unilaterally lame than other groups (P = 0.04). Horses with DDFT injury were more likely to exhibit pain on turning than other groups (P <0.01). There were no associations between response to diagnostic analgesia and diagnostic group, and no association between radiological grade and diagnostic group. Clinical examination findings generally did not discriminate between diseases of the PTA and other causes of foot pain. Overall radiological scores of the navicular bone did not accurately predict navicular bone pathology. PMID:25724857

  1. Findings from an evaluation of PlanAlyzer's double cross-over trials of computer-based, self-paced, case-based programs in anemia and chest pain diagnosis.

    PubMed Central

    Lyon, H. C.; Healy, J. C.; Bell, J. R.; O'Donnell, J. F.; Shultz, E. K.; Wigton, R. S.; Hirai, F.; Beck, J. R.

    1991-01-01

    We report on three years of research trials of the PlanAlyzer I Project--a carefully controlled research study using a microcomputer-based, self-paced, case-based, event-driven system for medical education. PlanAlyzer presents cases, elicits and critiques a second year student's approach to the diagnosis of anemias and chest pain. PlanAlyzer uses text, hypertext, images and critiquing theory. Students were randomized, one half becoming the experimental group who received the interactive PlanAlyzer cases in anemia, the other half becoming the controls who received the exact same content material in a text format. Later in each year there was a crossover, the controls becoming the experimentals for a similar intervention with the cardiology PlanAlyzer cases. Results at the end of the first two years of trials show that the programs have achieved some significant efficiency and economy gains. 96 faculty hours of classroom time were saved by using PlanAlyzer in their place, with no loss in student achievement. In terms of student proficiency and efficiency, combining the anemia and cardiology trials, the 328 students in the two years of full scale trials were able to accomplish the project's instructional objectives. The experimentals accomplished this in 43% less time than the controls. On the average, for both the anemia and chest pain programs, this amounted to students spending 7.5 hours longer on the 30 text cases than on the same 30 computer cases to achieve the same level of mastery. There have been no significant proficiency differences (as measured by current post-tests) between the experimental and control groups.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:1807738

  2. Imaging and radiology

    MedlinePlus

    Interventional radiology; Diagnostic radiology; X-ray imaging ... DIAGNOSTIC RADIOLOGY Diagnostic radiology helps health care professionals see structures inside your body. Doctors that specialize in the ...

  3. Imaging and radiology

    MedlinePlus

    Interventional radiology; Diagnostic radiology; X-ray imaging ... DIAGNOSTIC RADIOLOGY Diagnostic radiology helps health care professionals see structures inside your body. Doctors that specialize in the interpretation ...

  4. Epithelioid hemangioendothelioma originating from the chest wall with rib metastases.

    PubMed

    Shimamura, Junichi; Kiyoshima, Moriyuki; Suzuki, Hisashi; Kitahara, Miyuki; Asato, Yuji; Iijima, Tatsuo; Amemiya, Ryuta

    2015-11-01

    An asymptomatic 39-year-old woman was referred to us for an abnormal nodular opacity detected on the chest X-ray. Histopathological and further examinations revealed findings consistent with epithelioid hemangioendothelioma (EHE) originating from the chest wall with metastases to the ribs. Complete excision was performed; however, adjuvant chemotherapy was not administered because of the patient's mental disorder. There are very few reports of EHE arising from the chest wall; therefore, we present this case report with the clinicopathological features of EHE and discuss the therapeutic aspects. PMID:24399489

  5. Algorithm of chest wall keloid treatment.

    PubMed

    Long, Xiao; Zhang, Mingzi; Wang, Yang; Zhao, Ru; Wang, Youbin; Wang, Xiaojun

    2016-08-01

    Keloids are common in the Asian population. Multiple or huge keloids can appear on the chest wall because of its tendency to develop acne, sebaceous cyst, etc. It is difficult to find an ideal treatment for keloids in this area due to the limit of local soft tissues and higher recurrence rate. This study aims at establishing an individualized protocol that could be easily applied according to the size and number of chest wall keloids.A total of 445 patients received various methods (4 protocols) of treatment in our department from September 2006 to September 2012 according to the size and number of their chest wall keloids. All of the patients received adjuvant radiotherapy in our hospital. Patient and Observer Scar Assessment Scale (POSAS) was used to assess the treatment effect by both doctors and patients. With mean follow-up time of 13 months (range: 6-18 months), 362 patients participated in the assessment of POSAS with doctors.Both the doctors and the patients themselves used POSAS to evaluate the treatment effect. The recurrence rate was 0.83%. There was an obvious significant difference (P < 0.001) between the before-surgery score and the after-surgery score from both doctors and patients, indicating that both doctors and patients were satisfied with the treatment effect.Our preliminary clinical result indicates that good clinical results could be achieved by choosing the proper method in this algorithm for Chinese patients with chest wall keloids. This algorithm could play a guiding role for surgeons when dealing with chest wall keloid treatment. PMID:27583896

  6. Algorithm of chest wall keloid treatment

    PubMed Central

    Long, Xiao; Zhang, Mingzi; Wang, Yang; Zhao, Ru; Wang, Youbin; Wang, Xiaojun

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Keloids are common in the Asian population. Multiple or huge keloids can appear on the chest wall because of its tendency to develop acne, sebaceous cyst, etc. It is difficult to find an ideal treatment for keloids in this area due to the limit of local soft tissues and higher recurrence rate. This study aims at establishing an individualized protocol that could be easily applied according to the size and number of chest wall keloids. A total of 445 patients received various methods (4 protocols) of treatment in our department from September 2006 to September 2012 according to the size and number of their chest wall keloids. All of the patients received adjuvant radiotherapy in our hospital. Patient and Observer Scar Assessment Scale (POSAS) was used to assess the treatment effect by both doctors and patients. With mean follow-up time of 13 months (range: 6–18 months), 362 patients participated in the assessment of POSAS with doctors. Both the doctors and the patients themselves used POSAS to evaluate the treatment effect. The recurrence rate was 0.83%. There was an obvious significant difference (P < 0.001) between the before-surgery score and the after-surgery score from both doctors and patients, indicating that both doctors and patients were satisfied with the treatment effect. Our preliminary clinical result indicates that good clinical results could be achieved by choosing the proper method in this algorithm for Chinese patients with chest wall keloids. This algorithm could play a guiding role for surgeons when dealing with chest wall keloid treatment. PMID:27583896

  7. Eye-tracking AFROC study of the influence of experience and training on chest x-ray interpretation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manning, David; Ethell, Susan C.; Crawford, Trevor

    2003-05-01

    Four observer groups with different levels of expertise were tested in an investigation into the comparative nature of expert performance. The radiological task was the detection and localization of significant pulmonary nodules in postero-anterior vies of the chest in adults. Three test banks of 40 images were used. The observer groups were 6 experienced radiographers prior to a six month training program in chest image interpretation, the same radiographers after their tr4aining program, and 6 fresher undergraduate radiography students. Eye tracking was carried out on all observers to demonstrate differences in visual activity and nodule detection performance was measured with an AFROC technique. Detection performances of the four groups showed the radiologists and radiographers after training were measurably superior at the task. The eye-tracking parameters saccadic length, number of fixations visual coverage and scrutiny timer per film were measured for all subjects and compared. The missed nodules fixated and not fixated were also determined for the radiologist group. Results have shown distinct stylistic differences in the visual scanning strategies between the experienced and inexperienced observers that we believe can be generalized into a description of characteristics of expert versus non-expert performance. The findings will be used in the educational program of image interpretation for non-radiology practitioners.

  8. Radiology of thoracic diseases

    SciTech Connect

    Swensen, S.J.; Pugatch, R.D.

    1989-01-01

    This book presents the essential clinical and radiologic findings of a wide variety of thoracic diseases. The authors include conventional, CT and MR images of each disease discussed. In addition, they present practical differential diagnostic considerations for most of the radiographic findings or patterns portrayed.

  9. Orthopaedic radiology

    SciTech Connect

    Park, W.M.; Hughes, S.P.F.

    1987-01-01

    This book is an account of the principles of modern diagnostic imaging techniques and their applications in orthopedics. The aim is to show radiology as a dynamic subject. Orthopaedic Radiology is divided into two sections with the first part focusing on the principles of diagnostic imaging and interpretation and the second applying this information to practical clinical problems.

  10. Skeletal radiology

    SciTech Connect

    Bowerman, J.W.

    1982-01-01

    The main emphasis of the chapter on skeletal radiology is CAT scanning and its use in the diagnosis of neoplasms. Other topics that are discussed include infections, arthritis, trauma, and metabolic and endocrine diseases as they relate to skeletal radiology. (KRM)

  11. A software system for the simulation of chest lesions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ryan, John T.; McEntee, Mark; Barrett, Saoirse; Evanoff, Michael; Manning, David; Brennan, Patrick

    2007-03-01

    We report on the development of a novel software tool for the simulation of chest lesions. This software tool was developed for use in our study to attain optimal ambient lighting conditions for chest radiology. This study involved 61 consultant radiologists from the American Board of Radiology. Because of its success, we intend to use the same tool for future studies. The software has two main functions: the simulation of lesions and retrieval of information for ROC (Receiver Operating Characteristic) and JAFROC (Jack-Knife Free Response ROC) analysis. The simulation layer operates by randomly selecting an image from a bank of reportedly normal chest x-rays. A random location is then generated for each lesion, which is checked against a reference lung-map. If the location is within the lung fields, as derived from the lung-map, a lesion is superimposed. Lesions are also randomly selected from a bank of manually created chest lesion images. A blending algorithm determines which are the best intensity levels for the lesion to sit naturally within the chest x-ray. The same software was used to run a study for all 61 radiologists. A sequence of images is displayed in random order. Half of these images had simulated lesions, ranging from subtle to obvious, and half of the images were normal. The operator then selects locations where he/she thinks lesions exist and grades the lesion accordingly. We have found that this software was very effective in this study and intend to use the same principles for future studies.

  12. Male chest enhancement: pectoral implants.

    PubMed

    Benito-Ruiz, J; Raigosa, J M; Manzano-Surroca, M; Salvador, L

    2008-01-01

    The authors present their experience with the pectoral muscle implant for male chest enhancement in 21 patients. The markings and technique are thoroughly described. The implants used were manufactured and custom made. The candidates for implants comprised three groups: group 1 (18 patients seeking chest enhancement), group 2 (1 patient with muscular atrophy), and group 3 (2 patients with muscular injuries). Because of the satisfying results obtained, including significant enhancement of the chest contour and no major complications, this technique is used for an increasing number of male cosmetic surgeries. PMID:17676376

  13. Mesenchymal Hamartoma of Chest Wall in an Infant: Mimicking Persistent Pneumonia

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Amitabh; Pai, Gautham; Dawman, Lesa; Satapathy, Amit

    2015-01-01

    Mesenchymal Hamartoma of the chest wall (MHCW) is a very rare benign tumour. They are usually discovered in infancy. Spontaneous regression is known to occur in this benign condition. Management is surgical removal of mass if respiratory compromise is present. Conservative management is preferred modality in asymptomatic children as malignant transformation is not reported. Herein, we present a case of MHCW in a 5 month old infant presenting with acute respiratory distress with history of respiratory problem at 3 months of age. Child was suspected to have persistent pneumonia in view of radiological findings. Child’s respiratory distress improved with antibiotics and bronchodilators. Respiratory symptoms in MHCW are due to extrinsic compression of lung parenchyma. Present case had respiratory symptoms with persistent radiological findings leading to suspicion of persistent pneumonia. His respiratory symptoms and exacerbation on follow up was attributed to hyper reactive airway disease and MHCW was managed conservatively. The non-neoplastic nature, characteristic presentation, histopathology, imaging modality and management options of MHCW are discussed. PMID:26500976

  14. Chest drainage systems in use.

    PubMed

    Zisis, Charalambos; Tsirgogianni, Katerina; Lazaridis, George; Lampaki, Sofia; Baka, Sofia; Mpoukovinas, Ioannis; Karavasilis, Vasilis; Kioumis, Ioannis; Pitsiou, Georgia; Katsikogiannis, Nikolaos; Tsakiridis, Kosmas; Rapti, Aggeliki; Trakada, Georgia; Karapantzos, Ilias; Karapantzou, Chrysanthi; Zissimopoulos, Athanasios; Zarogoulidis, Konstantinos; Zarogoulidis, Paul

    2015-03-01

    A chest tube is a flexible plastic tube that is inserted through the chest wall and into the pleural space or mediastinum. It is used to remove air in the case of pneumothorax or fluid such as in the case of pleural effusion, blood, chyle, or pus when empyema occurs from the intrathoracic space. It is also known as a Bülau drain or an intercostal catheter. Insertion of chest tubes is widely performed by radiologists, pulmonary physicians and thoracic surgeons. Large catheters or small catheters are used based on each situation that the medical doctor encounters. In the current review we will focus on the chest drain systems that are in use. PMID:25815304

  15. Chest drainage systems in use

    PubMed Central

    Zisis, Charalambos; Tsirgogianni, Katerina; Lazaridis, George; Lampaki, Sofia; Baka, Sofia; Mpoukovinas, Ioannis; Karavasilis, Vasilis; Kioumis, Ioannis; Pitsiou, Georgia; Katsikogiannis, Nikolaos; Tsakiridis, Kosmas; Rapti, Aggeliki; Trakada, Georgia; Karapantzos, Ilias; Karapantzou, Chrysanthi; Zissimopoulos, Athanasios; Zarogoulidis, Konstantinos

    2015-01-01

    A chest tube is a flexible plastic tube that is inserted through the chest wall and into the pleural space or mediastinum. It is used to remove air in the case of pneumothorax or fluid such as in the case of pleural effusion, blood, chyle, or pus when empyema occurs from the intrathoracic space. It is also known as a Bülau drain or an intercostal catheter. Insertion of chest tubes is widely performed by radiologists, pulmonary physicians and thoracic surgeons. Large catheters or small catheters are used based on each situation that the medical doctor encounters. In the current review we will focus on the chest drain systems that are in use. PMID:25815304

  16. Pulmonary fungal infections in patients with acute myeloid leukaemia: is it the time to revise the radiological diagnostic criteria?

    PubMed

    Maccioni, Francesca; Vetere, Simone; De Felice, Carlo; Al Ansari, Najwa; Micozzi, Alessandra; Gentile, Giuseppe; Foà, Robin; Girmenia, Corrado

    2016-06-01

    The definition of pulmonary fungal infections (PFI) according to the EORTC-MSG criteria may lack diagnostic sensitivity due to the possible presentation of PFI with different radiological pictures. We evaluated the hypothesis to apply less restrictive radiological criteria to define PFI in patients with acute myeloid leukaemia (AML) submitted to chemotherapy. Overall, 73 consecutive episodes of pulmonary infiltrates associated to positive serum galactomannan test or fungal isolation or galactomannan detection from respiratory specimens were considered. CT scans acquired at the onset of symptoms (time-0) and within 4 weeks (time-1) were analysed to identify specific (group A) or aspecific radiological signs (group B). Pulmonary infiltrates fulfilled the EORTC-MSG criteria in 49 patients (group A), whereas in 24 patients (group B) they did not reach the criteria due to aspecific CT findings at time-0. Eleven of 21 (52.4%) patients of the group B evaluable for the evolution of the radiological findings fulfilled EORTC-MSG criteria at time-1. All the analysed clinical and mycological characteristics, response to antifungal therapy and survival were comparable in the two groups. Our study seems to confirm the possibility to extend the radiological suspicion of PFI to less restrictive chest CT findings when supported by microbiological criteria in high-risk haematological patients. PMID:26865204

  17. Establishing a Chest MRI Practice and its Clinical Applications: Our Insight and Protocols

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Christine U.; White, Darin B.; Sykes, Anne-Marie G.

    2014-01-01

    Despite its nonionizing technique and exquisite soft tissue characterization, noncardiovascular, and nonmusculoskeletal magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the chest has been considered impractical due to various challenges such as respiratory motion, cardiac motion, vascular pulsatility, air susceptibility, and paucity of signal in the lung. With advances in MRI, it is now possible to perform diagnostically useful and good quality MRIs of the chest, but literature on subspecialized chest MRI practices is limited. The purpose of this manuscript is to describe the rationale, nuances, and logistics that went into developing such a practice in the Division of Thoracic Radiology at our institution. The topics addressed include technical and clinical considerations, support at administrative and clinical levels, protocol development, and economic considerations compared with conventional practices. Various MRI techniques are also specifically discussed to facilitate chest MRI at other sites. Although chest MRI is used in a relatively small number of patients at this point, in certain patients, chest MRI can provide additional information to optimize medical management. A few clinical cases illustrate the quality and clinical utility of chest MRI. Given recent advances in MRI techniques, it is now an opportune time to develop a chest MRI practice. PMID:24744974

  18. Common problems in gastrointestinal radiology

    SciTech Connect

    Thompson, W.M.

    1989-01-01

    This book covers approximately 70 common diagnostic problems in gastro-intestinal radiology. Each problem, includes a short illustrated case history, a discussion of the radiologic findings, a general discussion of the case, the differential diagnosis, a description of the management of the problem or procedure used, and, where appropriate, the results of the therapy suggested.

  19. Comparison of scanning equalization and conventional chest radiography.

    PubMed

    Wandtke, J C; Plewes, D B

    1989-09-01

    A clinical comparison study of scanning equalization radiography (SER) and conventional chest radiography was performed with the latest prototype SER system. Conventional chest radiography was performed at 120 kVp with Lanex regular screens (Eastman Kodak, Rochester, NY) and Kodak Ortho-G or Ortho-C film (Eastman Kodak). The 253 volunteer patients were examined with both techniques. The chest radiographs were interpreted by four radiologists. The study group was composed of 58 normal and 195 abnormal posteroanterior and lateral chest radiographs. In 31 cases there were two major radiologic diagnoses. The number of correct interpretations increased when the SER images were examined, compared with the conventional Ortho-G (chi 2 = 4.17, P less than .05) and conventional Ortho-C (chi 2 = 16.9, P less than .001) radiographs. The overall accuracy of disease detection improved for all radiologists with the SER system. There was no disease category in which the accuracy of interpretation decreased when the SER system was used. The SER system is a clinically reliable method of improving image quality and increasing diagnostic accuracy. PMID:2772170

  20. Clinical outcome study and radiological findings of Zweymuller metal on metal total hip arthroplasty. a follow-up of 6 to 15 years.

    PubMed

    Paleochorlidis, Ilias S; Badras, Leonidas S; Skretas, Efstathios F; Georgaklis, Vasilios A; Karachalios, Theofilos S; Malizos, Konstantinos N

    2009-01-01

    We report the clinical and radiological outcome of 99 Zweymuller metal on metal total hip arthroplasties in 84 patients followed up prospectively for a mean period of 9.5 (range, 6-15) years. There were 29 (34.5%) male and 55 (65.5%) female patients with a mean age of 62.85 years (range, 50-70 years) at the time of surgery. All patients had osteoarthritis. One acetabular component and one stem were revised due to aseptic loosening. One femoral stem was revised due to a periprosthetic fracture. HHS score improved from a preoperative mean of 62.56 points (SD 8.87) to a final postoperative follow-up mean of 93.48 (SD 7.7). Cumulative success rate for both implants at 13 years, with aseptic loosening as the end point, was 97.05%, while for both implants at 13 years, with revision for any reason as the end point, it was 91.17%. Satisfactory results were observed with the use of this prosthesis. PMID:20041375

  1. Radiographic evaluation of the patient with chest pain of suspected myocardial origin

    SciTech Connect

    Green, C.E.; Satler, L.F.; Elliott, L.P.

    1984-11-01

    The evaluation of the patient with suspected angina pectoris is discussed and an approach presented which makes use of radiologic tests in conjunction with exercise testing to quickly and efficiently determine the likelihood and severity of coronary artery disease. The relative merits and limitations of chest radiography, cardiac fluoroscopy, nuclear medicine, and coronary arteriography are discussed.

  2. The radiology informed consent form: recommendations from the European Society of Cardiology position paper.

    PubMed

    Carpeggiani, Clara; Picano, Eugenio

    2016-06-01

    Every radiological and nuclear medicine examination confers a definite long-term risk of cancer, but most patients undergoing such examinations receive no or inaccurate information about radiation dose and corresponding risk related to the dose received. Informed consent is a procedure to support (not substitute) the physician/patient dialogue and relationship, facilitating a free, informed and aware expression of the patient's will in the principle of patient autonomy. Physicians are responsible for providing patients with all the information on risks, benefits and alternatives useful to the patient to make the decision. In current radiological practice the information on the radiation dose and long-term cancer risks is difficult to find and not easy to understand. The form using plain language should spell-out the type of examination, the effective dose (mSv), the effective dose expressed in number of chest radiographs and the risk of cancer. The current practice clashes against the guidelines and the law. PMID:27269736

  3. Potential for optimisation of paediatric chest X-ray examination.

    PubMed

    Kostova-Lefterova, D; Taseva, D; Ingilizova, K; Hristova-Popova, J; Vassileva, J

    2011-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare the important aspects of paediatric radiological practice and the patient doses from chest X-ray examinations performed in three hospitals in Bulgaria. Data from 163 paediatric patients were recorded using a standardised form. Entrance surface air kerma (ESAK) to patient was calculated from the air-kerma air product (KAP) and field size measurements. Large variations were found for KAP and ESAK. Inappropriate film size and insufficient collimation were often used. Inappropriate use of automatic exposure control and antiscatter grid was found. In most cases, no attention was paid to reduce dose to sensitive organs by means of shielding or proper collimation. Recommendations were given to the hospitals on how to reduce patient doses in paediatric chest radiography. PMID:21824872

  4. Image-Guided Cryoablation of the Spine in a Swine Model: Clinical, Radiological, and Pathological Findings with Light and Electron Microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Freitas, Ricardo Miguel Costa de Andrade, Celi Santos Caldas, José Guilherme Mendes Pereira; Tsunemi, Miriam Harumi; Ferreira, Lorraine Braga Arana-Chavez, Victor Elias; Cury, Patrícia Maluf

    2015-10-15

    PurposeThis study was designed to present the feasibility of an in vivo image-guided percutaneous cryoablation of the porcine vertebral body.MethodsThe institutional animal care committee approved this study. Cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT)-guided vertebral cryoablations (n = 22) were performed in eight pigs with short, 2-min, single or double-freezing protocols. Protective measures to nerves included dioxide carbon (CO{sub 2}) epidural injections and spinal canal temperature monitoring. Clinical, radiological, and pathological data with light (n = 20) or transmission electron (n = 2) microscopic analyses were evaluated after 6 days of clinical follow-up and euthanasia.ResultsCBCT/fluoroscopic-guided transpedicular vertebral body cryoprobe positioning and CO{sub 2} epidural injection were successful in all procedures. No major complications were observed in seven animals (87.5 %, n = 8). A minor complication was observed in one pig (12.5 %, n = 1). Logistic regression model analysis showed the cryoprobe-spinal canal (Cp-Sc) distance as the most efficient parameter to categorize spinal canal temperatures lower than 19 °C (p < 0.004), with a significant Pearson’s correlation test (p < 0.041) between the Cp-Sc distance and the lowest spinal canal temperatures. Ablation zones encompassed pedicles and the posterior wall of the vertebral bodies with an inflammatory rim, although no inflammatory infiltrate was depicted in the surrounding neural structures at light microscopy. Ultrastructural analyses evidenced myelin sheath disruption in some large nerve fibers, although neurological deficits were not observed.ConclusionsCBCT-guided vertebral cryoablation of the porcine spine is feasible under a combination of a short freezing protocol and protective measures to the surrounding nerves. Ultrastructural analyses may be helpful assess the early modifications of the nerve fibers.

  5. Dust exposure and pneumoconiosis in a South African pottery. 2. Pneumoconiosis and factors influencing reading of radiological opacities.

    PubMed

    Rees, D; Steinberg, M; Becker, P J; Solomon, A

    1992-07-01

    A cross sectional radiological survey of workers exposed to pottery dust during the manufacture of wall tiles and bathroom fittings was conducted in a South African factory. Roughly one third of workers with 15 or more years of service in high dust sections of the factory had pneumoconiosis. Previously undiagnosed advanced cases, including two with progressive massive fibrosis, were working in dusty occupations. A firm diagnosis of potters' pneumoconiosis was made in 11 of the 358 workers radiographed; all had served more than 10 years suggesting that radiography of workers with more than 10 years service would be a successful case finding strategy in South Africa. A combination of rounded and irregular opacities was the most common radiological finding in the workers with pneumoconiosis (55%). Three readers reported on the chest radiographs, and all found an association between small radiological opacities, which were usually irregular or a combination of irregular and rounded, and exposure to pottery dust. The occurrence of irregular radiological opacities in workers exposed to pottery dust deserves further study. The least experienced reader significantly associated age with small opacities when duration of service (years) was used to measure exposure to dust. Sex was not an important predictor of radiological changes consistent with pneumoconiosis. Breast shadows were not an important cause of false positive readings and participating women did not develop pneumoconiosis after less exposure than men. PMID:1637706

  6. Radiologic and Clinical Bronchiectasis Associated with Autosomal Dominant Polycystic Kidney Disease

    PubMed Central

    Moua, Teng; Zand, Ladan; Hartman, Robert P.; Hartman, Thomas E.; Qin, Dingxin; Peikert, Tobias; Qian, Qi

    2014-01-01

    Background Polycystin 1 and 2, the protein abnormalities associated with autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD), are also found in airway cilia and smooth muscle cells. There is evidence of increased radiologic bronchiectasis associated with ADPKD, though the clinical and functional implications of this association are unknown. We hypothesized an increased prevalence of both radiologic and clinical bronchiectasis is associated with APDKD as compared to non-ADPKD chronic kidney disease (CKD) controls. Materials and Methods A retrospective case-control study was performed at our institution involving consecutive ADPKD and non-ADPKD chronic kidney disease (CKD) patients seen over a 13 year period with both chest CT and PFT. CTs were independently reviewed by two blinded thoracic radiologists. Manually collected clinical data included symptoms, smoker status, transplant history, and PFT findings. Results Ninety-two ADPKD and 95 non-ADPKD CKD control patients were compared. Increased prevalence of radiologic bronchiectasis, predominantly mild lower lobe disease, was found in ADPKD patients compared to CKD control (19 vs. 9%, P = 0.032, OR 2.49 (CI 1.1–5.8)). After adjustment for covariates, ADPKD was associated with increased risk of radiologic bronchiectasis (OR 2.78 (CI 1.16–7.12)). Symptomatic bronchiectasis occurred in approximately a third of ADPKD patients with radiologic disease. Smoking was associated with increased radiologic bronchiectasis in ADPKD patients (OR 3.59, CI 1.23–12.1). Conclusions Radiological bronchiectasis is increased in patients with ADPKD particularly those with smoking history as compared to non-ADPKD CKD controls. A third of such patients have symptomatic disease. Bronchiectasis should be considered in the differential in ADPKD patients with respiratory symptoms and smoking history. PMID:24747723

  7. [Chest ultrasonography in pleurapulmonary disease].

    PubMed

    Gallego Gómez, M P; García Benedito, P; Pereira Boo, D; Sánchez Pérez, M

    2014-01-01

    Although the initial diagnosis and follow-up of pleuropulmonary disease are normally done with plain chest films and the gold standard for chest disease is computed tomography, diverse studies have established the usefulness of chest ultrasonography in the diagnosis of different pleuropulmonary diseases like pleural effusion and lung consolidation, among others. In this article, we show the different ultrasonographic patterns for pleuropulmonary disease. The availability of ultrasonography in different areas (ICU, recovery areas) makes this technique especially important for critical patients because it obviates the need to transfer the patient. Moreover, ultrasonography is noninvasive and easy to repeat. On the other hand, it enables the direct visualization of pleuropulmonary disease that is necessary for interventional procedures. PMID:22819690

  8. Chest pain syndromes in pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Sahni, Gagan

    2012-08-01

    Chest pain syndromes in pregnancy include numerous catastrophic cardiovascular events. Acute myocardial infarction, aortic dissection, pulmonary embolism, and amniotic fluid embolism are the most important causes of nonobstetric mortality and morbidity in pregnancy. Each of these could result in poor maternal and fetal outcomes if not diagnosed and treated in a timely fashion. However, their diagnosis and management is limited by fetal risks of diagnostic procedures, dangers of pharmacotherapy and interventions that have neither been widely studied nor validated. This article reviews the current literature on epidemiology, risk factors, pathogenesis, diagnosis, and management of 4 potentially lethal chest pain syndromes in pregnancy. PMID:22813362

  9. Contemporary management of flail chest.

    PubMed

    Vana, P Geoff; Neubauer, Daniel C; Luchette, Fred A

    2014-06-01

    Thoracic injury is currently the second leading cause of trauma-related death and rib fractures are the most common of these injuries. Flail chest, as defined by fracture of three or more ribs in two or more places, continues to be a clinically challenging problem. The underlying pulmonary contusion with subsequent inflammatory reaction and right-to-left shunting leading to hypoxia continues to result in high mortality for these patients. Surgical stabilization of the fractured ribs remains controversial. We review the history of management for flail chest alone and when combined with pulmonary contusion. Finally, we propose an algorithm for nonoperative and surgical management. PMID:24887787

  10. Acute Myocardial Infarction Following Blunt Chest Trauma and Coronary Artery Dissection.

    PubMed

    Abdolrahimi, Safar Ali; Sanati, Hamid Reza; Ansari-Ramandi, Mohammad Mostafa; Heris, Saeed Oni; Maadani, Mohsen

    2016-06-01

    Blunt chest traumatic coronary artery dissection is an uncommon cause of atherosclerotic and non-atherosclerotic Acute Myocardial Infarction (AMI). Injuries of the coronary artery after blunt chest trauma are caused by different mechanisms such as vascular spasm, dissection and intimal tear or rupture of an existing thrombus formation. Chest pain might be masked by other injuries in patients with multiple traumas in car accident. Present case report is on a 37-year-old male without any specific past medical history who reported to the emergency department of a hospital with chest discomfort and was discharged with the impression of chest wall pain. After three days he experienced severe chest pain and he was admitted with the impression of acute coronary syndrome and underwent coronary angiography which showed Left Anterior Descending (LAD) artery dissection. The possibility of injury of the coronary artery should be kept in mind after blunt trauma to the chest. This condition is sometimes underdiagnosed. Its diagnosis may be difficult because chest pain can be interpreted as being secondary to chest wall contusion or it may be overshadowed by other injuries. Coronary dissection diagnosis after chest trauma requires clinical suspicion and systematic evaluation. Electrocardiography (ECG) should be done for every patient with thoracic trauma as the clinical findings may be misleading. PMID:27504338

  11. Acute Myocardial Infarction Following Blunt Chest Trauma and Coronary Artery Dissection

    PubMed Central

    Abdolrahimi, Safar Ali; Sanati, Hamid Reza; Ansari-Ramandi, Mohammad Mostafa; Heris, Saeed Oni

    2016-01-01

    Blunt chest traumatic coronary artery dissection is an uncommon cause of atherosclerotic and non-atherosclerotic Acute Myocardial Infarction (AMI). Injuries of the coronary artery after blunt chest trauma are caused by different mechanisms such as vascular spasm, dissection and intimal tear or rupture of an existing thrombus formation. Chest pain might be masked by other injuries in patients with multiple traumas in car accident. Present case report is on a 37-year-old male without any specific past medical history who reported to the emergency department of a hospital with chest discomfort and was discharged with the impression of chest wall pain. After three days he experienced severe chest pain and he was admitted with the impression of acute coronary syndrome and underwent coronary angiography which showed Left Anterior Descending (LAD) artery dissection. The possibility of injury of the coronary artery should be kept in mind after blunt trauma to the chest. This condition is sometimes underdiagnosed. Its diagnosis may be difficult because chest pain can be interpreted as being secondary to chest wall contusion or it may be overshadowed by other injuries. Coronary dissection diagnosis after chest trauma requires clinical suspicion and systematic evaluation. Electrocardiography (ECG) should be done for every patient with thoracic trauma as the clinical findings may be misleading. PMID:27504338

  12. Chest tomosynthesis: technical and clinical perspectives.

    PubMed

    Johnsson, Ase Allansdotter; Vikgren, Jenny; Bath, Magnus

    2014-02-01

    The recent implementation of chest tomosynthesis is built on the availability of large, dose-efficient, high-resolution flat panel detectors, which enable the acquisition of the necessary number of projection radiographs to allow reconstruction of section images of the chest within one breath hold. A chest tomosynthesis examination obtains the increased diagnostic information provided by volumetric imaging at a radiation dose comparable to that of conventional chest radiography. There is evidence that the sensitivity of chest tomosynthesis may be at least three times higher than for conventional chest radiography for detection of pulmonary nodules. The sensitivity increases with increasing nodule size and attenuation and decreases for nodules with subpleural location. Differentiation between pleural and subpleural lesions is a known pitfall due to the limited depth resolution in chest tomosynthesis. Studies on different types of pathology report increased detectability in favor of chest tomosynthesis in comparison to chest radiography. The technique provides improved diagnostic accuracy and confidence in the diagnosis of suspected pulmonary lesions on chest radiography and facilitates the exclusion of pulmonary lesions in a majority of patients, avoiding the need for computed tomography (CT). However, motion artifacts can be a cumbersome limitation and breathing during the tomosynthesis image acquisition may result in severe artifacts significantly affecting the detectability of pathology. In summary, chest tomosynthesis has been shown to be superior to chest conventional radiography for many tasks and to be able to replace CT in selected cases. In our experience chest tomosynthesis is an efficient problem solver in daily clinical work. PMID:24481756

  13. Interventional radiology

    SciTech Connect

    Castaneda-Zuniga, W.R.

    1987-01-01

    This reference gives a step-by-step presentation of the elements of interventional radiology. CONTENTS: Introduction; Radiation protection; Embolotherapy; Interventional techniques in the management of gastrointestinal bleeding; Transluminal angioplasty; Thrombolytic therapy; Foreign body removal; Inferior vena cava filter placement; Percutaneous uroradiologic techniques; Interventional techniques in the biliary tract; Nonvascular gastrointestinal tract dilations; Percutaneous biopsy techniques; Drainage of abscess fluid collections in the abdomen.

  14. Orthopaedic radiology

    SciTech Connect

    Park, W.M.; Hughes, S.P.F.

    1985-01-01

    This book provides an account of the principles of modern diagnostic imaging techniques and their applications in orthopedics. The aim of the book is to show radiology as a dynamic subject which can help clinicians, while at the same time assisting radiologists to understand the needs of the orthopedic surgeon.

  15. Chest physiotherapy in acute bronchiolitis.

    PubMed Central

    Webb, M S; Martin, J A; Cartlidge, P H; Ng, Y K; Wright, N A

    1985-01-01

    Forty four children with acute bronchiolitis were given twice daily chest physiotherapy in addition to standard supportive measures and were compared with 46 controls who were not given physiotherapy. There was no clinically discernable benefit on the course of their illness. PMID:3907510

  16. Device Assists Cardiac Chest Compression

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eichstadt, Frank T.

    1995-01-01

    Portable device facilitates effective and prolonged cardiac resuscitation by chest compression. Developed originally for use in absence of gravitation, also useful in terrestrial environments and situations (confined spaces, water rescue, medical transport) not conducive to standard manual cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) techniques.

  17. Determination of lung volumes from chest films

    PubMed Central

    O'Shea, J.; Lapp, N. L.; Russakoff, A. D.; Reger, R.; Morgan, W. K. C.

    1970-01-01

    The results obtained from two radiological methods of determining total lung capacity (TLC) (Kovach's parabo oid and Barnhard's ellipsoid) were compared with those obtained with the body plethysmograph. Determinations of TLC were made in four groups of subjects: group 1 consisted of 26 miners most of whom had simple pneumoconiosis; group 2 consisted of 12 normal subjects; group 3 consisted of eight subjects who had a variety of chest disease, but with no demonstrable parenchymal or pleural opacification; and group 4 consisted of 19 subjects with miscellaneous diseases, all showing demonstrable infiltration or opacification. The values obtained by the method of Kovach and his colleagues often differed markedly from the plethysmographic determinations, and it became apparent that this method was not sufficiently accurate. On the other hand, the technique of Barnhard and his colleagues gave results that were essentially similar to, and as far as we can say interchangeable with, those obtained by the body plethysmograph in groups 1, 2, and 3. In subjects with marked pulmonary opacification or infiltration, the disparity between Barnhard's method and the plethysmograph tended to be more sizeable. It was concluded that Barnhard's method for determining total lung capacity is accurate and could be applied to epidemiological surveys. PMID:5489177

  18. A visual query-by-example image database for chest CT images: potential role as a decision and educational support tool for radiologists.

    PubMed

    Sasso, Giuseppe; Marsiglia, Hugo Raul; Pigatto, Francesca; Basilicata, Antonio; Gargiulo, Mario; Abate, Andrea Francesco; Nappi, Michele; Pulley, Jenny; Sasso, Francesco Silvano

    2005-03-01

    Primary reading or further evaluation of diagnostic imaging examination often needs a comparison between the actual findings and the relevant prior images of the same patient or similar radiological data found in other patients. This support is of clinical importance and may have significant effects on physicians' examination reading efficiency, service-quality, and work satisfaction. We developed a visual query-by-example image database for storing and retrieving chest CT images by means of a visual browser Image Management Environment (IME) and tested its retrieval efficiency. The visual browser IME included four fundamental features (segmentation, indexing, quick load and recall, user-friendly interface) in an integrated graphical environment for a user-friendly image database management. The system was tested on a database of 2000 chest CT images, randomly chosen from the digital archives of our institutions. A sample of eight heterogeneous images were used as queries and, for each of them a team of three expert radiologists selected the most similar images from the database (a set of 15 images containing similar abnormalities in the same position of the query). The sensitivity and the positive predictive factor, both averaged over the 8 test queries and 15 answers, were respectively 0.975 and 0.91 The IME system is currently under evaluation at our institutions as an experimental application. We consider it a useful work-in-progress tool for clinical practice facilitating searches for a variety of radiological tasks. PMID:15937719

  19. Potential usefulness of a video printer for producing secondary images from digitized chest radiographs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nishikawa, Robert M.; MacMahon, Heber; Doi, Kunio; Bosworth, Eric

    1991-05-01

    Communication between radiologists and clinicians could be improved if a secondary image (copy of the original image) accompanied the radiologic report. In addition, the number of lost original radiographs could be decreased, since clinicians would have less need to borrow films. The secondary image should be simple and inexpensive to produce, while providing sufficient image quality for verification of the diagnosis. We are investigating the potential usefulness of a video printer for producing copies of radiographs, i.e. images printed on thermal paper. The video printer we examined (Seikosha model VP-3500) can provide 64 shades of gray. It is capable of recording images up to 1,280 pixels by 1,240 lines and can accept any raster-type video signal. The video printer was characterized in terms of its linearity, contrast, latitude, resolution, and noise properties. The quality of video-printer images was also evaluated in an observer study using portable chest radiographs. We found that observers could confirm up to 90 of the reported findings in the thorax using video- printer images, when the original radiographs were of high quality. The number of verified findings was diminished when high spatial resolution was required (e.g. detection of a subtle pneumothorax) or when a low-contrast finding was located in the mediastinal area or below the diaphragm (e.g. nasogastric tubes).

  20. 30 CFR 56.6133 - Powder chests.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... CFR part 51. Copies are available at MSHA, 1100 Wilson Blvd., Room 2436, Arlington, Virginia 22209... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Powder chests. 56.6133 Section 56.6133 Mineral... chests. (a) Powder chests (day boxes) shall be— (1) Structurally sound, weather-resistant, equipped...

  1. 30 CFR 57.6133 - Powder chests.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... in accordance with 5 U.S.C. 552(a) and 1 CFR part 51. Copies are available at MSHA, 1100 Wilson Blvd... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Powder chests. 57.6133 Section 57.6133 Mineral... § 57.6133 Powder chests. (a) Powder chests (day boxes) shall be— (1) Structurally sound,...

  2. 30 CFR 57.6133 - Powder chests.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... in accordance with 5 U.S.C. 552(a) and 1 CFR part 51. Copies are available at MSHA, 1100 Wilson Blvd... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Powder chests. 57.6133 Section 57.6133 Mineral... § 57.6133 Powder chests. (a) Powder chests (day boxes) shall be— (1) Structurally sound,...

  3. 30 CFR 56.6133 - Powder chests.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... CFR part 51. Copies are available at MSHA, 1100 Wilson Blvd., Room 2436, Arlington, Virginia 22209... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Powder chests. 56.6133 Section 56.6133 Mineral... chests. (a) Powder chests (day boxes) shall be— (1) Structurally sound, weather-resistant, equipped...

  4. 30 CFR 57.6133 - Powder chests.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... in accordance with 5 U.S.C. 552(a) and 1 CFR part 51. Copies are available at MSHA, 1100 Wilson Blvd... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Powder chests. 57.6133 Section 57.6133 Mineral... § 57.6133 Powder chests. (a) Powder chests (day boxes) shall be— (1) Structurally sound,...

  5. 30 CFR 56.6133 - Powder chests.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... CFR part 51. Copies are available at MSHA, 1100 Wilson Blvd., Room 2436, Arlington, Virginia 22209... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Powder chests. 56.6133 Section 56.6133 Mineral... chests. (a) Powder chests (day boxes) shall be— (1) Structurally sound, weather-resistant, equipped...

  6. Chest pain in sickle cell disease.

    PubMed

    Tonino, S H; Nur, E; Otten, H M; Wykrzykowska, J J; Hoekstra, J B L; Biemond, B J

    2013-06-01

    The differential diagnosis of chest pain in a patient with sickle cell disease is difficult and may encompass several serious conditions, including chest syndrome, pulmonary embolism and infectious complications. In this manuscript we provide an overview on the various underlying diseases that may cause chest pain in patients with sickle cell disease and provide clues for a proper diagnostic workup. PMID:23799317

  7. 30 CFR 57.6133 - Powder chests.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... in accordance with 5 U.S.C. 552(a) and 1 CFR part 51. Copies are available at MSHA, 1100 Wilson Blvd... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Powder chests. 57.6133 Section 57.6133 Mineral... § 57.6133 Powder chests. (a) Powder chests (day boxes) shall be— (1) Structurally sound,...

  8. 30 CFR 57.6133 - Powder chests.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... in accordance with 5 U.S.C. 552(a) and 1 CFR part 51. Copies are available at MSHA, 1100 Wilson Blvd... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Powder chests. 57.6133 Section 57.6133 Mineral... § 57.6133 Powder chests. (a) Powder chests (day boxes) shall be— (1) Structurally sound,...

  9. System for definition of the central-chest vasculature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taeprasartsit, Pinyo; Higgins, William E.

    2009-02-01

    Accurate definition of the central-chest vasculature from three-dimensional (3D) multi-detector CT (MDCT) images is important for pulmonary applications. For instance, the aorta and pulmonary artery help in automatic definition of the Mountain lymph-node stations for lung-cancer staging. This work presents a system for defining major vascular structures in the central chest. The system provides automatic methods for extracting the aorta and pulmonary artery and semi-automatic methods for extracting the other major central chest arteries/veins, such as the superior vena cava and azygos vein. Automatic aorta and pulmonary artery extraction are performed by model fitting and selection. The system also extracts certain vascular structure information to validate outputs. A semi-automatic method extracts vasculature by finding the medial axes between provided important sites. Results of the system are applied to lymph-node station definition and guidance of bronchoscopic biopsy.

  10. Computed tomography of the chest

    SciTech Connect

    Godwin, J.D.

    1984-01-01

    In this reference book readers have access to information pertaining to the role of thoracic CT, its limitations, normal anatomy and variations, scanning techniques, confusing artifacts, and pathologic anatomy. Major sections provide detailed, explicit data on lung cancer staging, the thoracic inlet, the heart, the esophagus, CT-guided invasive techniques, and the pediatric chest CT. Controversies are explored fully and presented fairly. This book is profusely illustrated with almost 500 CT scans for greater recognition and comprehension of the material presented.

  11. Medical Student Assessment of Videotape for Teaching in Diagnostic Radiology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moss, J. R.; McLachlan, M. S. F.

    1976-01-01

    A series of six recordings that describe some aspects of the radiology of the chest, using only radiographs, were viewed by a small group of final year medical students. Their scores for factual questions immediately afterwards were compared with their attitudes to the learning experience; higher scores correlated with positive attitudes. (LBH)

  12. Catastrophic chest pain: blinded by cardiopulmonary disease.

    PubMed

    Barreiro, Timothy John; Asiimwe, Denis D; Gemmel, David; Brine, Patrick

    2015-01-01

    A 53-year-old man with a history of diabetic foot ulcer, osteomyelitis, coronary artery disease, hypertension and hyperlipidaemia, presented with chest pain of 3 weeks duration. Eleven days earlier, the patient had had a drug-eluting stent (DES) placed in a branch of the right coronary artery (RCA) after similar chest pain, leading to the findings of a positive nuclear stress test. Since discharge, he was not compliant with taking clopidegrel (Plavix), a concern for in-stent thrombosis with recurrent myocardial ischaemia; but work up was negative and medications were restarted. Within 24 h of admission, he developed bilateral flaccid leg weakness, urine retention and loss of sensation from the umbilicus level down. MRI revealed a T4-T6 epidural abscess. Emergent decompression laminectomy and abscess drainage was completed. Neurological symptoms improved hours after surgery with complete resolution of sensory deficits. Cultures grew Streptococcus sp., treated with intravenous nafcillin for 8 weeks. He regained leg strength with continued improvement seen in rehabilitation. PMID:26135489

  13. Comparison of dual energy subtraction chest radiography and traditional chest X-rays in the detection of pulmonary nodules

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jiheng; Norman, Geoff; Wang, Zhou; Koff, David

    2016-01-01

    Background Dual energy subtraction (DES) radiography is a powerful but underutilized technique which aims to improve the diagnostic value of an X-ray by separating soft tissue from bones, producing two different images. Compared to traditional chest X-rays, DES requires exposure to higher doses of radiation but may achieve higher accuracy. The objective of this study was to assess the clinical benefits of DES radiography by comparing the speed and accuracy of diagnosis of pulmonary nodules with DES versus traditional chest X-rays. Methods Five radiologists and five radiology residents read the DES and traditional chest X-rays of 51 patients, 34 with pulmonary nodules and 17 without. Their accuracy and speed in the detection of nodules were measured using specialized image display software. Results DES radiography reduced reading time from 13 to 10 sec (P<0.0001) in staff and from 21 to 15 sec in residents (P<0.0001). There was also a small increase in sensitivity 0.58 to 0.67 overall (P<0.10) with no change in specificity (0.85 overall). Conclusions By eliminating rib shadows in soft tissue images, DES improved the speed and accuracy of radiologists in the diagnosis of pulmonary nodules. PMID:26981449

  14. Massive chest wall resection and reconstruction for malignant disease

    PubMed Central

    Foroulis, Christophoros N; Kleontas, Athanassios D; Tagarakis, George; Nana, Chryssoula; Alexiou, Ioannis; Grosomanidis, Vasilis; Tossios, Paschalis; Papadaki, Elena; Kioumis, Ioannis; Baka, Sofia; Zarogoulidis, Paul; Anastasiadis, Kyriakos

    2016-01-01

    Objective Malignant chest wall tumors are rare neoplasms. Resection with wide-free margins is an important prognostic factor, and massive chest wall resection and reconstruction are often necessary. A recent case series of 20 consecutive patients is reported in order to find any possible correlation between tumor histology, extent of resection, type of reconstruction, and adjuvant treatment with short- and long-term outcomes. Methods Twenty patients were submitted to chest wall resection and reconstruction for malignant chest wall neoplasms between 2006 and 2014. The mean age (ten males) was 59±4 years. The size and histology of the tumor, the technique of reconstruction, and the short- and long-term follow-up records were noted. Results The median maximum diameter of tumors was 10 cm (5.4–32 cm). Subtotal sternal resection was performed in nine cases, and the resection of multiple ribs was performed in eleven cases. The median area of chest wall defect was 108 cm2 (60–340 cm2). Histology revealed soft tissue, bone, and cartilage sarcomas in 16 cases (80%), most of them chondrosarcomas. The rest of the tumors was metastatic tumors in two cases and localized malignant pleural mesothelioma and non-Hodgkin lymphoma in one case. The chest wall defect was reconstructed by using the “sandwich technique” (propylene mesh/methyl methacrylate/propylene mesh) in nine cases of large anterior defects or by using a 2 mm polytetrafluoroethylene (e-PTFE) mesh in nine cases of lateral or posterior defects. Support from a plastic surgeon was necessary to cover the full-thickness chest wall defects in seven cases. Adjuvant oncologic treatment was administered in 13 patients. Local recurrences were observed in five cases where surgical reintervention was finally necessary in two cases. Recurrences were associated with larger tumors, histology of malignant fibrous histiocytoma, and initial incomplete resection or misdiagnosis made by nonthoracic surgeons. Three patients died

  15. Pediatric radiology

    SciTech Connect

    Silverman, F.N.

    1982-01-01

    A literature review with 186 references of diagnostic pediatric radiology, a speciality restricted to an age group rather than to an organ system or technique of examination, is presented. In the present chapter topics follow the basic organ system divisions with discussions of special techniques within these divisions. The diagnosis of congenital malformations, infectious diseases and neoplasms are a few of the topics discussed for the head and neck region, the vertebrae, the cardiovascular system, the respiratory system, the gastrointestinal tract, the urinary tract, and the skeleton. (KRM)

  16. Informatics in radiology: Render: an online searchable radiology study repository.

    PubMed

    Dang, Pragya A; Kalra, Mannudeep K; Schultz, Thomas J; Graham, Steven A; Dreyer, Keith J

    2009-01-01

    Radiology departments are a rich source of information in the form of digital radiology reports and images obtained in patients with a wide spectrum of clinical conditions. A free text radiology report and image search application known as Render was created to allow users to find pertinent cases for a variety of purposes. Render is a radiology report and image repository that pools researchable information derived from multiple systems in near real time with use of (a) Health Level 7 links for radiology information system data, (b) periodic file transfers from the picture archiving and communication system, and (c) the results of natural language processing (NLP) analysis. Users can perform more structured and detailed searches with this application by combining different imaging and patient characteristics such as examination number; patient age, gender, and medical record number; and imaging modality. Use of NLP analysis allows a more effective search for reports with positive findings, resulting in the retrieval of more cases and terms having greater relevance. From the retrieved results, users can save images, bookmark examinations, and navigate to an external search engine such as Google. Render has applications in the fields of radiology education, research, and clinical decision support. PMID:19564253

  17. Dental radiology.

    PubMed

    Woodward, Tony M

    2009-02-01

    Dental radiology is the core diagnostic modality of veterinary dentistry. Dental radiographs assist in detecting hidden painful pathology, estimating the severity of dental conditions, assessing treatment options, providing intraoperative guidance, and also serve to monitor success of prior treatments. Unfortunately, most professional veterinary training programs provide little or no training in veterinary dentistry in general or dental radiology in particular. Although a technical learning curve does exist, the techniques required for producing diagnostic films are not difficult to master. Regular use of dental x-rays will increase the amount of pathology detected, leading to healthier patients and happier clients who notice a difference in how their pet feels. This article covers equipment and materials needed to produce diagnostic intraoral dental films. A simplified guide for positioning will be presented, including a positioning "cheat sheet" to be placed next to the dental x-ray machine in the operatory. Additionally, digital dental radiograph systems will be described and trends for their future discussed. PMID:19410234

  18. Chest radiographic data acquisition and quality assurance in multicenter studies

    PubMed Central

    Schluchter, Mark; Wood, Beverly P.; Berdon, Walter E.; Boechat, M. Ines; Easley, Kirk A.; Meziane, Moulay; Mellins, Robert B.; Norton, Karen I.; Singleton, Edward; Trautwein, Lynn

    2015-01-01

    Background Multicenter studies rely on data derived from different institutions. Forms can be designed to standardize the reporting process allowing reliable comparison of data. Objective The purpose of the report is to provide a standardized method, developed as a part of a multicenter study of vertically transmitted HIV, for assessing chest radiographic results. Materials and methods Eight hundred and five infants and children were studied at five centers; 3057 chest radiographs were scored. Data were entered using a forced-choice, graded response for 12 findings. Quality assurance measures and inter- rater agreement statistics are reported. Results The form used for reporting chest radiographic results is presented. Inter-rater agreement was moderate to high for most findings, with the best correlation reported for the presence of bronchovascular markings and/or reticular densities addressed as a composite question (kappa = 0.71). The presence of nodular densities (kappa = 0.56) and parenchymal consolidation (kappa = 0.57) had moderate agreement. Agreement for lung volume was low. Conclusion The current tool, developed for use in the pediatric population, is applicable to any study involving the assessment of pediatric chest radiographs for a large population, whether at one or many centers. PMID:9361051

  19. [A man with an abnormality of the upper arm on an X-ray of the chest].

    PubMed

    van Deudekom, Floor J A; Kuper, Ingeborg M J A; Groote, Maureen E

    2015-01-01

    A 82-year-old man was referred to our hospital because of a history of falling. Routine radiography of the chest accidentally showed an abnormality of the left upper arm. The x-ray showed calcifications - rings and arcs - also known as popcorn calcifications. This is a typical radiological sign which may indicate a tumour of the condroid matrix. PMID:26556494

  20. Data mining in radiology

    PubMed Central

    Kharat, Amit T; Singh, Amarjit; Kulkarni, Vilas M; Shah, Digish

    2014-01-01

    Data mining facilitates the study of radiology data in various dimensions. It converts large patient image and text datasets into useful information that helps in improving patient care and provides informative reports. Data mining technology analyzes data within the Radiology Information System and Hospital Information System using specialized software which assesses relationships and agreement in available information. By using similar data analysis tools, radiologists can make informed decisions and predict the future outcome of a particular imaging finding. Data, information and knowledge are the components of data mining. Classes, Clusters, Associations, Sequential patterns, Classification, Prediction and Decision tree are the various types of data mining. Data mining has the potential to make delivery of health care affordable and ensure that the best imaging practices are followed. It is a tool for academic research. Data mining is considered to be ethically neutral, however concerns regarding privacy and legality exists which need to be addressed to ensure success of data mining. PMID:25024513

  1. Data mining in radiology.

    PubMed

    Kharat, Amit T; Singh, Amarjit; Kulkarni, Vilas M; Shah, Digish

    2014-04-01

    Data mining facilitates the study of radiology data in various dimensions. It converts large patient image and text datasets into useful information that helps in improving patient care and provides informative reports. Data mining technology analyzes data within the Radiology Information System and Hospital Information System using specialized software which assesses relationships and agreement in available information. By using similar data analysis tools, radiologists can make informed decisions and predict the future outcome of a particular imaging finding. Data, information and knowledge are the components of data mining. Classes, Clusters, Associations, Sequential patterns, Classification, Prediction and Decision tree are the various types of data mining. Data mining has the potential to make delivery of health care affordable and ensure that the best imaging practices are followed. It is a tool for academic research. Data mining is considered to be ethically neutral, however concerns regarding privacy and legality exists which need to be addressed to ensure success of data mining. PMID:25024513

  2. New guidance on imaging tests for a range of chest pain scenarios.

    PubMed

    2016-04-01

    New recommendations from the American College of Cardiology and the American College of Radiology offer guidance to emergency providers on which imaging tests to use in 20 different clinical scenarios involving chest pain. For each clinical scenario, an expert panel rated the appropriateness of a range of imaging modalities as rarely appropriate (R), may be appropriate (M), or appropriate (A). The guidelines are constructed to flow from the clinician's judgment as to the probable cause of the chest pain. The recommendations for each clinical scenario are condensed into tables that can be fashioned into notecards or a smartphone app for quick reference. Developers note that the guidelines will need to be revisited when high-sensitivity troponin tests are approved for use in the United States, as these newer-generation blood tests may negate the need for many imaging tests when patients present with chest pain. PMID:27093767

  3. Chest wall resection for extrapulmonary tumor.

    PubMed

    Long, W P; Kline, R; Levine, E A

    1997-09-01

    Despite progress in early detection of breast cancer, a minority of women continue to present with extensive disease which may necessitate chest wall resection. Between 1992 and 1996, 14 patients were treated by surgical resection of the chest wall and reconstruction by the LSU Sections of Surgical Oncology and Plastic Surgery. Indications included resection of primary tumor, resection of recurrent tumor, and resection of radiation therapy induced damage to the chest wall. We report chest wall excision and reconstruction with no operative mortality and minor surgical morbidity in 21% of cases. Local control was achieved in 13 of 14 cases. Additionally we report uniform success in the palliation of ulcerating, painful, or infected chest wall lesions. Approximately 25% of patients treated for breast cancer and followed up for more than 6 months have remained free of disease. Chest wall resection is a useful modality in selected patients with extensive disease. PMID:9316348

  4. Technique for chest compressions in adult CPR

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Chest compressions have saved the lives of countless patients in cardiac arrest as they generate a small but critical amount of blood flow to the heart and brain. This is achieved by direct cardiac massage as well as a thoracic pump mechanism. In order to optimize blood flow excellent chest compression technique is critical. Thus, the quality of the delivered chest compressions is a pivotal determinant of successful resuscitation. If a patient is found unresponsive without a definite pulse or normal breathing then the responder should assume that this patient is in cardiac arrest, activate the emergency response system and immediately start chest compressions. Contra-indications to starting chest compressions include a valid Do Not Attempt Resuscitation Order. Optimal technique for adult chest compressions includes positioning the patient supine, and pushing hard and fast over the center of the chest with the outstretched arms perpendicular to the patient's chest. The rate should be at least 100 compressions per minute and any interruptions should be minimized to achieve a minimum of 60 actually delivered compressions per minute. Aggressive rotation of compressors prevents decline of chest compression quality due to fatigue. Chest compressions are terminated following return of spontaneous circulation. Unconscious patients with normal breathing are placed in the recovery position. If there is no return of spontaneous circulation, then the decision to terminate chest compressions is based on the clinical judgment that the patient's cardiac arrest is unresponsive to treatment. Finally, it is important that family and patients' loved ones who witness chest compressions be treated with consideration and sensitivity. PMID:22152601

  5. Chest pain evaluation in the emergency department.

    PubMed

    Foy, Andrew J; Filippone, Lisa

    2015-07-01

    Chest pain is a common complaint in the emergency department. Recognition of chest pain symptoms and electrocardiographic changes consistent with acute coronary syndrome (ACS) can lead to prompt initiation of goal-directed therapy. Cardiac troponin testing confirms the diagnosis of acute myocardial infarction, but does not reveal the mechanism of injury. When patients with chest pain rule out for ACS the use of advanced, noninvasive testing has not been found to be associated with better patient outcomes. PMID:26042885

  6. Battlefield radiology

    PubMed Central

    Graham, R N J

    2012-01-01

    With the increasing tempo of military conflicts in the last decade, much has been learnt about imaging battlefield casualties in the acute setting. Ultrasound in the form of focused abdominal sonography in trauma (FAST) has proven invaluable in emergency triage of patients for immediate surgery. Multidetector CT allows accurate determination of battlefield trauma injuries. It permits the surgeons and anaesthetists to plan their interventions more thoroughly and to be made aware of clinically occult injuries. There are common injury patterns associated with blast injury, gunshot wounds and blunt trauma. While this body of knowledge is most applicable to the battlefield, there are parallels with peacetime radiology, particularly in terrorist attacks and industrial accidents. This pictorial review is based on the experiences of a UK radiologist deployed in Afghanistan in 2010. PMID:22806621

  7. Hydatid disease of the chest

    PubMed Central

    Xanthakis, D.; Efthimiadis, M.; Papadakis, G.; Primikirios, N.; Chassapakis, G.; Roussaki, A.; Veranis, N.; Akrivakis, A.; Aligizakis, C. J.

    1972-01-01

    Ninety-one cases of hydatid disease of the chest are reported. Eighty-eight were involving the lung, two the chest wall, and one the mediastinum. All the patients were treated surgically. Conservative operations (simple removal of the parasite and closure of the remaining cavity) were performed in 78 patients, 37 unruptured and 41 ruptured cysts. Late postoperative complications occurred in eleven. In 10 patients, recurrent haemoptysis was the main symptom due to residual cavity in four, bronchiectatic changes in two, and unknown aetiology in four. In one patient, recurrence of multiple cysts occurred in the affected lobe. Radical operations were carried out in 10 patients, including segmental resection in four and lobectomy in six. Conservative operations were performed in all cases of unruptured cysts, with the exception of a giant cyst in which resection was the operation of choice. For ruptured cysts with mild infection conservative operation was also performed. Resection was necessary only in patients with ruptured cysts with suppuration, bronchiectatic changes, and giant cysts replacing a whole lobe. There was no mortality. We believe that conservative operation is the treatment of choice for hydatid disease of the lung. Indications for resection are very limited. Images

  8. Common errors in evaluating chest radiographs.

    PubMed

    Mann, H

    1990-01-01

    Chest radiographs that are correctly obtained and interpreted provide valuable diagnostic information. However, some radiographs are not taken at total lung capacity, and the appearance of the lungs on film may mimic certain lung disorders. Most common interpretive pitfalls in chest radiography can be avoided by physicians who are familiar with the film appearance of varying degrees of lung inflation, technical limitations of portable radiography, and common chest abnormalities. When further definition is necessary, additional projections should be obtained. Chest fluoroscopy and computed tomography can offer further clarification, if needed. PMID:2296566

  9. Hodgkin disease and non-Hodgkin lymphomas in children: utilization of radiological modalities

    SciTech Connect

    Cohen, M.D.; Siddiqui, A.; Weetman, R.; Provisor, A.; Coates, T.

    1986-02-01

    If costs of medical care are to be reduced, the choice of which imaging modality to use must be made as carefully as possible. This study was done to show how radiological modalities were used to evaluate patients with Hodgkin disease and non-Hodgkin lymphoma. We kept a record of every radiological study performed on 66 children with both diseases seen in the past 6 1/3 years. The results of these studies were analyzed to see which areas of the body were studied, which imaging modality was used, how frequently the studies were repeated, and how frequently the studies gave abnormal results. Our findings disclosed that radiological studies have been appropriately performed in anatomic regions of the body in which disease is present. New imaging modalities have been introduced, and the use of some of the older modalities has been decreased. With some modalities, such as skeletal survey, liver/spleen scan, whole-lung tomography, contrast studies of the bowel, and excretory urography, utilization is higher than it ought to be in view of the fact that the yield of positive results is low and the information is obtainable in many cases from other more sensitive procedures. These studies should not be performed as a routine on initial evaluation or follow-up of all patients with Hodgkin or non-Hodgkin lymphomas. On initial presentation all patients should undergo chest radiography and CT scanning of both chest and abdomen. A problem area is that the timing of follow-up studies has been somewhat erratic, with some inappropriate studies particularly 3 or 4 years after diagnosis. Too many imaging procedures have probably been done in follow-up of our patients.

  10. The Importance of Esophageal and Gastric Diseases as Causes of Chest Pain

    PubMed Central

    Shin, Eun Jung; Kim, Nam Su; Lee, Young Ho; Nam, Eun Woo

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Pediatric chest pain is considered to be idiopathic or caused by benign diseases. This study was to find out how much upper gastrointestinal (UGI) diseases are major causes of chest pain in pediatric patients. Methods The records of 75 children (42 boys and 33 girls, aged 3-17 years old) who have presented with mainly chest pain from January 1995 to March 2015 were retrospectively reviewed. Chest X-ray and electrocardiography (ECG) were performed in all aptients. Further cardiologic and gastrointestinal (GI) evaluations were performed in indicated patients. Results Chest pain was most common in the children of 6 and 9 to 14 years old. Esopha-gogastric diseases were unexpectedly the most common direct causes of the chest pain, the next are idiopathic, cardiac diseases, chest trauma, respiratory disease, and psychosomatic disease. Even though 21 showed abnormal ECG findings and 7 showed abnormalities on echocardiography, cardiac diseases were determined to be the direct causes only in 9. UGI endoscopy was performed in 57 cases, and esophago-gastric diseases which thereafter were thought to be causative diseases were 48 cases. The mean age of the children with esophago-gastric diseases were different with marginal significance from that of the other children with chest pain not related with esophago-gastric diseases. All the 48 children diagnosed with treated with GI medicines based on the diagnosis, and 37 cases (77.1%) subsequently showed clinical improvement. Conclusion Diagnostic approaches to find out esophageal and gastric diseases in children with chest pain are important as well as cardiac and respiratory investigations. PMID:26770901

  11. Cocaine-induced pulmonary changes: HRCT findings *

    PubMed Central

    de Almeida, Renata Rocha; Zanetti, Gláucia; Souza, Arthur Soares; de Souza, Luciana Soares; Silva, Jorge Luiz Pereira e; Escuissato, Dante Luiz; Irion, Klaus Loureiro; Mançano, Alexandre Dias; Nobre, Luiz Felipe; Hochhegger, Bruno; Marchiori, Edson

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Objective: To evaluate HRCT scans of the chest in 22 patients with cocaine-induced pulmonary disease. Methods: We included patients between 19 and 52 years of age. The HRCT scans were evaluated by two radiologists independently, discordant results being resolved by consensus. The inclusion criterion was an HRCT scan showing abnormalities that were temporally related to cocaine use, with no other apparent causal factors. Results: In 8 patients (36.4%), the clinical and tomographic findings were consistent with "crack lung", those cases being studied separately. The major HRCT findings in that subgroup of patients included ground-glass opacities, in 100% of the cases; consolidations, in 50%; and the halo sign, in 25%. In 12.5% of the cases, smooth septal thickening, paraseptal emphysema, centrilobular nodules, and the tree-in-bud pattern were identified. Among the remaining 14 patients (63.6%), barotrauma was identified in 3 cases, presenting as pneumomediastinum, pneumothorax, and hemopneumothorax, respectively. Talcosis, characterized as perihilar conglomerate masses, architectural distortion, and emphysema, was diagnosed in 3 patients. Other patterns were found less frequently: organizing pneumonia and bullous emphysema, in 2 patients each; and pulmonary infarction, septic embolism, eosinophilic pneumonia, and cardiogenic pulmonary edema, in 1 patient each. Conclusions: Pulmonary changes induced by cocaine use are varied and nonspecific. The diagnostic suspicion of cocaine-induced pulmonary disease depends, in most of the cases, on a careful drawing of correlations between clinical and radiological findings. PMID:26398752

  12. Bronchial cancer - chest x-ray (image)

    MedlinePlus

    This is a chest x-ray of a person with bronchial cancer. This is a front view. The lungs are the two dark ... white areas visible in the middle of the chest. The light areas that appear as subtle branches ...

  13. Current radiology. Volume 5

    SciTech Connect

    Wilson, G.H.; Hanafee, W.N.

    1984-01-01

    This book contains 10 selections. They are: Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Imaging, Interventional Vascular Radiology, Genitourinary Radiology, Skeletal Radiology, Digital Subtraction Angiography, Neuroradiology, Computed Tomographic Evaluation of Degenerative Diseases of the Lumbar Spine, The Lung, Otolaringology and Opthalmology, and Pediatric Radiology: Cranial, Facial, Cervical, Vertebral, and Appendicular.

  14. Small bowel radiology

    SciTech Connect

    Antes, G.; Eggemann, F.

    1987-01-01

    This book deals mainly with technique, experiences and results of the biphasic small bowel enema (enteroclysis) with barium and methyl cellulose. The method allows the evaluation of both morphology and function of the small bowel. The introduction describes the examination technique, basic patterns, interpretation and indications, while the atlas shows a broad spectrum of small bowel diseases (Crohn's disease, other inflammatory diseases, tumors, motility disorders, obstructions and malformations). The possibilities of small bowel radiology are demonstrated with reference to clinical findings and differential diagnoses.

  15. Imaging of Chest and Abdominal Trauma in Children.

    PubMed

    Goodwin, Susie J; Flanagan, Sean G; McDonald, Kirsteen

    2015-01-01

    Trauma is the commonest cause of death in children over a year old. The injuries sustained and management of these children differs to adults, due to differences in anatomy and physiology. Careful thought must also be given to exposing children to radiation, and CT scans should be performed only in select patients. This article reviews these important points and explains the imaging findings in chest and abdominal trauma. PMID:26219741

  16. Radiological Control Manual

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-04-01

    This manual has been prepared by Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory to provide guidance for site-specific additions, supplements, and clarifications to the DOE Radiological Control Manual. The guidance provided in this manual is based on the requirements given in Title 10 Code of Federal Regulations Part 835, Radiation Protection for Occupational Workers, DOE Order 5480.11, Radiation Protection for Occupational Workers, and the DOE Radiological Control Manual. The topics covered are (1) excellence in radiological control, (2) radiological standards, (3) conduct of radiological work, (4) radioactive materials, (5) radiological health support operations, (6) training and qualification, and (7) radiological records.

  17. [Wooden chests for the midwife's equipment].

    PubMed

    Carlén-Nilsson, C

    1993-01-01

    In the museum of medical history in Lund there are several wooden chests containing partly identical instruments apparently belonging to a midwife. The instruments dated from before 1900, e.g. lancets and horn cups for blood-letting, a pewter enema syringe, a wooden stethoscope, a "tobacco pipe" and glass bottles. The use of the tobacco pipe was first puzzling, but it appeared to be a breast reliver. What do we know about the date of the chests? One chest has belonged to Kjersti Nilsdotter, a midwife educated in Lund 1872-1873. Her certificate was in the chest. From Ronnie Hunt, Minnesota we have got information about another chest of the same type. That belonged to Nelly Gustafsson, a midwife educated in Lund probably about 1870. She emigrated to USA and was a practising midwife in Lindstrom, Minnesota from about 1900. PMID:11639439

  18. Intercostal hemangioma of the chest wall

    PubMed Central

    Hamzík, Julian

    2016-01-01

    The authors describe a case of a 36-year-old patient who had six months’ pain of the thoracic spine and left chest. A soft slowly growing resistance was present on the dorso-lateral side of the left chest wall, in the range of the seventh to ninth rib. According to the medical history, the patient did not have any prior trauma and malignancy. A well-defined tumor of the left chest wall with calcifications, which grew to the seventh and eighth intercostal space, was present on computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance (MR) scans. The patient underwent resection of the tumor with the chest wall and reconstruction with polypropylene mesh. Histologically, it was a venous hemangioma, one of very rare tumors of the chest wall. PMID:27212983

  19. [How to do - the chest tube drainage].

    PubMed

    Klopp, Michael; Hoffmann, Hans; Dienemann, Hendrik

    2015-03-01

    A chest tube is used to drain the contents of the pleural space to reconstitute the physiologic pressures within the pleural space and to allow the lungs to fully expand. Indications for chest tube placement include pneumothorax, hemothorax, pleural effusion, pleural empyema, and major thoracic surgery. The most appropriate site for chest tube placement is the 4th or 5th intercostal space in the mid- or anterior- axillary line. Attention to technique in placing the chest tube is vital to avoid complications from the procedure. Applying the step-by-step technique presented, placement of a chest tube is a quick and safe procedure. Complications - frequently occurring when the tube is inserted with a steel trocar - include hemothorax, dislocation, lung lacerations, and injury to organs in the thoracic or abdominal cavity." PMID:25734676

  20. Supine chest compression: alternative to prone ventilation in acute respiratory distress syndrome.

    PubMed

    Samanta, Sukhen; Samanta, Sujay; Soni, Kapil Dev

    2014-05-01

    Prone ventilation is usually used for severe acute respiratory distress syndrome. We applied an alternative method to prone position. We described 2 cases of trauma where prone position could not be done. Chest wall compression was performed by 2-kg weight in front of the chest wall bilaterally while the patient was in a supine position. Respiratory mechanics work to improve oxygenation almost as same as the mechanism proposed for prone position without any major adverse effects and serious complications. We suggest a larger randomized study to determine the efficacy and also to find out the optimum weight required to compress the chest. PMID:24332252

  1. Chest Compression-Only CPR: A Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Hüpfl, Michael; Selig, Harald F; Nagele, Peter

    2010-01-01

    Summary Background Evidence suggests that dispatcher-assisted chest compression-only bystander CPR may be superior to standard CPR (chest compressions and rescue ventilation) in out-of-hospital cardiac arrest, yet recent clinical trials did not observe improved outcomes. The goal of the study was to determine the association between chest compression-only CPR and survival after out-of-hospital cardiac arrest. Methods Studies published until August 2010 were systematically searched and identified in MEDLINE and EMBASE databases. For the primary meta-analysis only clinical trials were included that prospectively randomized dispatcher instructions to chest compression-only versus standard bystander CPR in out-of-hospital adult cardiac arrest patients; for the secondary meta-analysis observational cohort studies were included that distinguished between standard CPR and chest compression-only CPR. All studies were required to contain survival data. Data on study characteristics, methods and outcomes (return of spontaneous circulation, survival to discharge, 30-day survival, and favourable neurologic outcome) were extracted. A fixed-effects model was used for both meta-analyses for lack of heterogeneity among the studies (I2 0%). Findings All three published randomized clinical trials were included in the meta-analysis. The pooled analyses shows that dispatcher-assisted chest compression-only bystander CPR for adult out-of-hospital cardiac arrest was associated with a 22% improved chance of survival (risk ratio [RR] 1.22 [95% confidence interval {CI}, 1.01 – 1.47]; I2, 0%) compared to standard CPR. The absolute increase in survival was 2.4%; the number needed to treat was 41. The secondary meta-analysis included seven observational studies of bystander-CPR (not dispatcher-assisted) and showed no difference between the two CPR techniques (RR, 0.96 [95% CI, 0.83 – 1.11]; I2, 0%). Interpretation Dispatcher-assisted chest compression-only bystander CPR is associated with

  2. Pleuropulmonary blastoma in a young adult presenting as a ruptured cystic teratoma in radiology.

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Chang Hun; Kim, Keun Il; Kim, Young Dae; Lee, Min Ki; Kim, Jee Yeon; Park, Do Youn; Sol, Mee Young; Suh, Kang Suek

    2003-01-01

    Pleuropulmonary blastoma (PPB) is a rare malignant dysontogenetic neoplasm primarily affecting children and is characterized histologically by a variably mixed blastematous and sarcomatous patterns. We herein report a very exceptional adult case of PPB. A 21-yr-old male patient presented with a left chest pain of two weeks' duration. A computed tomography scan revealed a large, multicystic tumor occupying the left lower hemithorax, leading to the impression of a ruptured mediastinal cystic teratoma. A thoracotomy for resection of the tumor was performed. On histologic examination, the tumor consisted of cystic walls and associated solid lesions which showed undifferentiated blastemal tissues with focal fibrosarcomatous and rhabdoid features. Immunohistochemically the tumor cells only showed diffuse strong positivity for vimentin. The histologic findings corresponded to a type II PPB. The authors suggest that PPB, especially of type I or II, should be included in the radiologic differential diagnosis of mediastinal cystic neoplasms in a young adult. PMID:12923341

  3. Analysis of biological tissues in infant chest for the development of an equivalent radiographic phantom

    SciTech Connect

    Pina, D. R.; Souza, Rafael T. F.; Duarte, Sergio B.; Alvarez, Matheus; Miranda, Jose R. A.

    2012-03-15

    Purpose: The main purpose of the present study was to determine the amounts of different tissues in the chest of the newborn patient (age {<=}1 year), with the aim of developing a homogeneous phantom chest equivalent. This type of phantom is indispensable in the development of optimization procedures for radiographic techniques, including dosimetric control, which is a crucial aspect of pediatric radiology. The authors present a systematic set of procedures, including a computational algorithm, to estimate the amounts of tissues and thicknesses of the corresponding simulator material plates used to construct the phantom. Methods: The Gaussian fit of computed tomographic (CT) analysis was applied to classify and quantify different biological tissues. The methodology is summarized with a computational algorithm, which was used to quantify tissues through automated CT analysis. The thicknesses of the equivalent homogeneous simulator material plates were determined to construct the phantom. Results: A total of 180 retrospective CT examinations with anterior-posterior diameter values ranging 8.5-13.0 cm were examined. The amounts of different tissues were evaluated. The results provided elements to construct a phantom to simulate the infant chest in the posterior-anterior or anterior-posterior (PA/AP) view. Conclusions: To our knowledge, this report represents the first demonstration of an infant chest phantom dedicated to the radiology of children younger than one year. This phantom is a key element in the development of clinical charts for optimizing radiographic technique in pediatric patients. Optimization procedures for nonstandard patients were reported previously [Pina et al., Phys. Med. Biol. 49, N215-N226 (2004) and Pina et al., Appl. Radiat. Isot. 67, 61-69 (2009)]. The constructed phantom represents a starting point to obtain radiologic protocols for the infant patient.

  4. Time analysis for optimization of radiology workflow in conventional radiology during RIS-PACS-integration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Falkensammer, Peter; Soegner, Peter I.; zur Nedden, Dieter

    2002-05-01

    The integration of RIS-PACS systems in radiology units are intended to reduce time consumption in radiology workflow and thus to increase radiologist productivity. Along with the RIS-PACS integration at the University Hospital Innsbruck we analyzed workflow from patient admission to release of final reports before implementation. The follow up study after six months of the implementation is currently in work. In this study we compared chest to skeletal x-ray examinations in 969 patients before the implementation. Drawing the admission-to-release-of-final-report period showed a two-peak diagram with the first peak corresponding to a release of final results on the same day and the second peak to a release on the following day. In the chest x-ray group, 57% were released the same day (mean value 4:02 hours) and 43% the next day (mean value 21:47 hours). Looking at the skeletal x-rays 40% were released the same day (mean value 3:58 hours) and 60% were released the next day (mean value 21:05 hours). Summarizing the results we should say, that the average chest x-ray requires less time than an skeletal x-ray, due to the fact that a greater percentage of reports is released the same day. The most important result is, that the most time consuming workstep is the exchange of data media between radiologist and secretary with at least 5 hours.

  5. Investigation of the dosimetry of chest tomosynthesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Svalkvist, Angelica; Zachrisson, Sara; Månsson, Lars Gunnar; Båth, Magnus

    2009-02-01

    Chest tomosynthesis has recently been introduced to healthcare as a low-dose alternative to CT or as a tool for improved diagnostics in chest radiography with only a modest increase in radiation dose to the patient. However, no detailed description of the dosimetry for this type of examination has been presented. The aim of this work was therefore to investigate the dosimetry of chest tomosynthesis. The chest tomosynthesis examination was assumed to be performed using a stationary detector and a vertically moving x-ray tube, exposing the patient from different angles. The Monte Carlo based computer software PCXMC was used to determine the effective dose delivered to a standard-sized patient from various angles using different assumptions of the distribution of the effective dose over the different projections. The obtained conversion factors between input dose measures and effective dose for chest tomosynthesis for different angular intervals were then compared with the horizontal projection. The results indicate that the error introduced by using conversion factors for the PA projection in chest radiography for estimating the effective dose of chest tomosynthesis is small for normally sized patients, especially if a conversion factor between KAP and effective dose is used.

  6. Radiological evaluation of post-tracheostomy lesions

    PubMed Central

    Macmillan, Alexander S.; James, A. Everette; Stitik, Frederick P.; Grillo, Hermes C.

    1971-01-01

    Post-tracheostomy lesions are becoming more commonplace and surgical techniques for definitive repair of these abnormalities are being developed. These lesions, in general, occur at two sites, the proximal lesions at the tracheostomy incision and the distal lesions 1·5 to 2·5 cm inferior in the area of the tracheostomy balloon cuff. Granuloma formation, stenosis, tracheomalacia, and perforation of the tracheal wall have been encountered in our experience. Clinical symptoms depend upon the type and location of the lesion as well as on the patient's awareness and physical activity. Radiological evaluation offers an accurate method to depict the anatomical and physiological alterations. This radiological assessment should begin with routine postero-anterior and lateral chest radiographs followed by fluoroscopy. Laminograms and special oblique views are often helpful. Contrast tracheograms using powdered tantalum allow good mucosal detail as well as excellent delineation of structural and physiological abnormalities. Images PMID:5144647

  7. Impact of routine admission chest X-ray films on patient care

    SciTech Connect

    Hubbell, F.A.; Greenfield, S.; Tyler, J.L.; Chetty, K.; Wyle, F.A.

    1985-01-24

    The authors evaluated the impact of routine chest X-ray films, obtained on admission, on the treatment of patients on internal medicine wards of the Veterans Administration Medical Center, Long Beach, California - a population known to have a high prevalence of cardiopulmonary disease. The reasons for ordering chest films were determined prospectively, and three Department of Medicine faculty members reviewed the charts of admitted patients to determine the impact of chest-film results on patient care. Routine chest X-ray films were ordered for 294 (60 per cent) of the 491 patients studied. Abnormalities were noted in 106 (36 per cent) of these 294 patients. The findings were previously known, chronic, and stable in 86 patients; they were new in only 20. Treatment was changed because of chest-film results in only 12 (4 per cent) of the patients. In only one of these patients would appropriate treatment probably have been omitted if a chest film had not been obtained, and the patient's outcome was not improved by the treatment instituted. The authors conclude that the impact of routine admission chest X-ray films on patient care is very small, even in a population with a high prevalence of cardiopulmonary disease. They recommend that such films not be ordered solely because of admission. 16 references, 3 tables.

  8. Impacts to the chest of PMHSs - Influence of impact location and load distribution on chest response.

    PubMed

    Holmqvist, Kristian; Svensson, Mats Y; Davidsson, Johan; Gutsche, Andreas; Tomasch, Ernst; Darok, Mario; Ravnik, Dean

    2016-02-01

    The chest response of the human body has been studied for several load conditions, but is not well known in the case of steering wheel rim-to-chest impact in heavy goods vehicle frontal collisions. The aim of this study was to determine the response of the human chest in a set of simulated steering wheel impacts. PMHS tests were carried out and analysed. The steering wheel load pattern was represented by a rigid pendulum with a straight bar-shaped front. A crash test dummy chest calibration pendulum was utilised for comparison. In this study, a set of rigid bar impacts were directed at various heights of the chest, spanning approximately 120mm around the fourth intercostal space. The impact energy was set below a level estimated to cause rib fracture. The analysed results consist of responses, evaluated with respect to differences in the impacting shape and impact heights on compression and viscous criteria chest injury responses. The results showed that the bar impacts consistently produced lesser scaled chest compressions than the hub; the Middle bar responses were around 90% of the hub responses. A superior bar impact provided lesser chest compression; the average response was 86% of the Middle bar response. For inferior bar impacts, the chest compression response was 116% of the chest compression in the middle. The damping properties of the chest caused the compression to decrease in the high speed bar impacts to 88% of that in low speed impacts. From the analysis it could be concluded that the bar impact shape provides lower chest criteria responses compared to the hub. Further, the bar responses are dependent on the impact location of the chest. Inertial and viscous effects of the upper body affect the responses. The results can be used to assess the responses of human substitutes such as anthropomorphic test devices and finite element human body models, which will benefit the development process of heavy goods vehicle safety systems. PMID:26687541

  9. Compression of digital chest x-rays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cohn, Michael; Trefler, Martin; Young, Tzay S.

    1990-07-01

    The application of digital technologies to chest radiography holds the promise of routine application of intage processing techniques to effect image enhancement. However, due to their inherent spatial resolution, digital chest images impose severe constraints on data storage devices. Compression of these images will relax such constraints and facilitate image transmission on a digital network. We have evaluated image processing algorithms aimed at compression of digital chest images while improving the diagnostic quality of the image. The image quality has been measured with respect to the task of tumor detection. Compression ratios of as high as 2:1 have been achieved. This compression can then be supplemented by irreversible methods.

  10. Classification of chest wall diseases.

    PubMed

    Pozzi, E; Gulotta, C

    1993-01-01

    Several disorders of the thoracic cage are known to cause respiratory failure, by means of relatively simple mechanisms, such as the increased work of breathing, which results in alveolar hypoventilation. A variety of pathogenic mechanisms may be considered, as functions of the types of thoracic disorders present. As causes of these additional potential mechanisms, we considered the following: 1) ventilation-perfusion (V/Q) inhomogeneity; 2) inability to cough; 3) malformation or acquired defect of the respiratory centres; and 4) excess blood volume and fluid retention, which aggravate work of breathing and V/Q inhomogeneity. All of these disorders can be grouped into two major categories (which nevertheless have some of the pathophysiology in common): the mechanical syndrome and the neuromuscular or paralytic syndrome. In this paper we discuss chest wall diseases falling into the first category; namely, kyphoscoliosis, fibrothorax, thoracoplasty, ankylosing spondylitis and obesity-hypoventilation. Congenital deformities of the thoracic cage, which do not have important effects on ventilatory apparatus (e.g. pectus excavatum and pectus carinatum), were also considered. PMID:8472068

  11. Integrating IT into the radiology environment.

    PubMed

    McDonald, Andrea

    2002-01-01

    meetings between the two departments are held monthly; informal and project-related meetings and discussion are frequent and vital to the continued good relationship between them. When CHOMP either upgrades or replaces its DICOM archive, and Radiology becomes completely filmless, the vendor's contract will include an on-site vendor-supplied picture archiving and communications systems support person for at least 6 months after deployment, to insure a better knowledge transfer. Having an on-site support person would have reduced the number of technical challenges the Radiology Department has faced over the past 2 years. Finding and maintaining qualified staff versed in both IT and Radiology has been and will continue to be difficult. A blend of IT and Radiology support staff and open communication between the departments is working for CHOMP. PMID:12105700

  12. How to Start Interventional Radiology

    PubMed Central

    Ghanaati, Hossein; Firouznia, Kavous; Jalali, Amir Hossein; Shakiba, Madjid

    2013-01-01

    Interventional techniques aim to find safer and better ways to treat vascular diseases even in many instances, the interventional radiology solutions has been considered the only treatment option for the patients. Interventional radiologists are specialists who perform minimally invasive procedures instead of surgery or other treatments. These procedures apply various imaging and catheterization procedures in order to diagnose and treat diseases. In each country, interventional radiology practice establishment of varies according to local factors, but following a standard strategy seems better to set up this facility. According to above mentioned points, we decided to establish this specialty in our hospital since 2001 as the pioneer center in Iran. In this presentation we will discuss about our experience for start interventional radiology. PMID:24693402

  13. Chest imaging features of patients afflicted with Influenza A (H1N1) in a Malaysian tertiary referral centre

    PubMed Central

    Bux, SI; Mohd. Ramli, N; Ahmad Sarji, S; Kamarulzaman, A

    2010-01-01

    This is a retrospective descriptive study of the chest imaging findings of 118 patients with confirmed A(H1N1) in a tertiary referral centre. About 42% of the patients had positive initial chest radiographic (CXR) findings. The common findings were bi-basal air-space opacities and perihilar reticular and alveolar infiltrates. In select cases, high-resolution computed tomography (CT) imaging showed ground-glass change with some widespread reticular changes and atelectasis. PMID:21611071

  14. Gastrointestinal Lymphoma: Radiologic-Pathologic Correlation.

    PubMed

    Manning, Maria A; Somwaru, Alexander S; Mehrotra, Anupamjit K; Levine, Marc S

    2016-07-01

    Extranodal lymphoma is a heterogeneous group of hematologic neoplasms that can affect every abdominal organ, with distinctive pathologic, radiologic, and clinical features. The radiologic findings are closely related to the underlying pathophysiology, and an understanding of these characteristic features should facilitate recognition of extranodal lymphoma and its various subtypes. Within the abdomen, lymphoma is found most commonly in the gastrointestinal tract, especially the stomach. This article presents the findings in gastrointestinal tract lymphoma. PMID:27265607

  15. Obesity Increases the Risk of Chest Wall Pain From Thoracic Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Welsh, James; Thomas, Jimmy; Shah, Deep; Allen, Pamela K.; Wei, Xiong; Mitchell, Kevin; Gao, Song; Balter, Peter; Komaki, Ritsuko; Chang, Joe Y.

    2011-09-01

    Purpose: Stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) is increasingly being used to treat thoracic tumors. We attempted here to identify dose-volume parameters that predict chest wall toxicity (pain and skin reactions) in patients receiving thoracic SBRT. Patients and Methods: We screened a database of patients treated with SBRT between August 2004 and August 2008 to find patients with pulmonary tumors within 2.5 cm of the chest wall. All patients received a total dose of 50 Gy in four daily 12.5-Gy fractions. Toxicity was scored according to the NCI-CTCAE V3.0. Results: Of 360 patients in the database, 265 (268 tumors) had tumors within <2.5 cm of the chest wall; 104 (39%) developed skin toxicity (any grade); 14 (5%) developed acute pain (any grade), and 45 (17%) developed chronic pain (Grade 1 in 22 cases [49%] and Grade 2 or 3 in 23 cases [51%]). Both skin toxicity and chest wall pain were associated with the V{sub 30}, or volume of the chest wall receiving 30 Gy. Body mass index (BMI) was also strongly associated with the development of chest pain: patients with BMI {>=}29 had almost twice the risk of chronic pain (p = 0.03). Among patients with BMI >29, diabetes mellitus was a significant contributing factor to the development of chest pain. Conclusion: Safe use of SBRT with 50 Gy in four fractions for lesions close to the chest wall requires consideration of the chest wall volume receiving 30 Gy and the patient's BMI and diabetic state.

  16. Aspergillosis - chest x-ray (image)

    MedlinePlus

    ... usually occurs in immunocompromised individuals. Here, a chest x-ray shows that the fungus has invaded the lung ... are usually seen as black areas on an x-ray. The cloudiness on the left side of this ...

  17. Tuberculosis, advanced - chest x-rays (image)

    MedlinePlus

    ... tissue, and can cause tissue death. These chest x-rays show advanced pulmonary tuberculosis. There are multiple light ... location of cavities within these light areas. The x-ray on the left clearly shows that the opacities ...

  18. Imaging of diseases of the chest

    SciTech Connect

    Armstrong, P.; Dee, P.; Wilson, A.

    1988-01-01

    This book promises to be the first intermediate length chest imaging book that successfully integrates material on the newer modalities (MRI, Nuclear Medicine) with that on conventional techniques (plain film radiography).

  19. Chest pain in focal musculoskeletal disorders.

    PubMed

    Stochkendahl, Mette Jensen; Christensen, Henrik Wulff

    2010-03-01

    The musculoskeletal system is a recognized source of chest pain. However, despite the apparently benign origin, patients with musculoskeletal chest pain remain under-diagnosed, untreated, and potentially continuously disabled in terms of anxiety, depression, and activities of daily living. Several overlapping conditions and syndromes of focal disorders, including Tietze syndrome, costochondritis, chest wall syndrome, muscle tenderness, slipping rib, cervical angina, and segmental dysfunction of the cervical and thoracic spine, have been reported to cause pain. For most of these syndromes, evidence arises mainly from case stories and empiric knowledge. For segmental dysfunction, clinical features of musculoskeletal chest pain have been characterized in a few clinical trials. This article summarizes the most commonly encountered syndromes of focal musculoskeletal disorders in clinical practice. PMID:20380955

  20. [Dedifferentiated Chondrosarcoma of the Chest Wall].

    PubMed

    Saitoh, Genkichi; Yoneshima, Yasuto; Nakamura, Toshihiko; Kitagawa, Dai; Kinjo, Nao; Ohgaki, Kippei; Maehara, Shinichiro; Teramoto, Seiichi; Adachi, Eisuke; Ikeda, Yoichi; Mine, Mari

    2016-08-01

    A 79-year-old man complaining of an anterior chest mass with pain had an abnormal shadow on chest X-ray. A mass, 7 cm in size, with destruction of the right 4th rib was found on chest computed tomography. A F-18 fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography (FDG-PET) corresponding to the lesion showed an abnormal accumulation of FDG with the standardized uptake value(SUV) max=16.19. A malignant tumor of the chest wall origin was suspected and the tumor was resected with the 3th, 4th, and 5th ribs. Histologically, the tumor was diagnosed as dedifferentiated chondrosarcoma. He died of local recurrence about 5 months after the operation. PMID:27476566

  1. Tuberculosis, advanced - chest x-rays (image)

    MedlinePlus

    Tuberculosis is an infectious disease that causes inflammation, the formation of tubercules and other growths within tissue, ... death. These chest x-rays show advanced pulmonary tuberculosis. There are multiple light areas (opacities) of varying ...

  2. Thymic carcinoma presenting as atypical chest pain.

    PubMed

    Siddiqui, Sadiq; Connelly, Tara; Keita, Luther; Blazkova, Sylvie; Veerasingam, Dave

    2015-01-01

    A 58-year-old woman with a 2-month history of atypical chest pain was referred to the chest pain clinic by the general practitioner. Exercise stress test was positive and subsequent coronary angiogram revealed significant triple vessel disease with left ventricular impairment requiring a coronary artery bypass graft (CABG). The patient had a chest X-ray as part of the preoperative work up. Chest X-ray revealed a large anterior mediastinal mass. Subsequent thorax CT revealed a 7.2 cm anterior mediastinal mass. CT-guided biopsy of the mass revealed the diagnosis of a poorly differentiated thymic basaloid carcinoma. The patient was successfully treated with concomitant surgery involving complete resection of the mass and a CABG procedure. PMID:26607199

  3. Fluoroscopic chest tube insertion and patient care.

    PubMed Central

    Collins, J. D.; Shaver, M. L.; Disher, A. C.; Miller, T. Q.

    1992-01-01

    Catheters and chest tubes may be placed under fluoroscopic control to reduce pleural effusions. This procedure has been adopted as a routine procedure at the UCLA School of Medicine in Los Angeles, California to improve patient care. This technique was modified for the placement of large chest tubes, which can be placed by a radiologist without multiple attempts or complications. Our experience with 2234 patients who underwent this procedure between 1977 and 1990 is described. PMID:1404463

  4. Common Interventional Radiology Procedures

    MedlinePlus

    ... of common interventional techniques is below. Common Interventional Radiology Procedures Angiography An X-ray exam of the ... into the vertebra. Copyright © 2016 Society of Interventional Radiology. All rights reserved. 3975 Fair Ridge Drive • Suite ...

  5. Mechanical properties of chest protectors and the likelihood of ventricular fibrillation due to commotio cordis.

    PubMed

    Drewniak, Elizabeth I; Spenciner, David B; Crisco, Joseph J

    2007-11-01

    Sudden death resulting from ventricular fibrillation (VF) caused by a nonpenetrating chest wall impact, known as commotio cordis (CC), is the second leading cause of death among young athletes. To date, seven young athletes wearing chest protectors have died from CC. The purpose of this study was to determine whether a relationship exists between mechanical properties of chest protectors and occurrence of VF, previously determined by Weinstock et al., using an established swine model. A servo-hydraulic material tester was used to determine properties of the chest protectors, including displacement, permanent deformation, stiffness, and area of pressure distribution. These properties were then compared with the occurrence of VF. We found that a decreased proportion of hits resulting in VF was significantly associated (R2 = 0.59, p = 0.001) with an increase in the area of pressure distribution. These findings are a limited, but crucial, first step in understanding the prevention of this complex and perplexing phenomenon. PMID:18089926

  6. Cavernous hemangioma with hematoma in the chest wall due to penetration from the anterior mediastinum.

    PubMed

    Nakamura, Hiroshige; Miwa, Ken; Miyoshi, Kenichirou; Adachi, Yoshin; Fujioka, Shinji; Taniguchi, Yuji; Yaniguchi, Yuji

    2007-04-01

    The patient was a 51-year-old man who visited the hospital with swelling of the anterior chest. Chest computed tomography detected a tumor developing from the anterior mediastinum to the anterior chest wall. There was weak contrast enhancement inside the tumor, and calcification was observed in the central region. A soft tumor with an obscure border and that adhered to the back of the left sternum was surgically removed with thymic fat including the region of the chest wall that had been penetrated by the tumor. The tumor measured 30 x 25 mm, and a phlebolith was observed in the center. The pathological tissue was diagnosed to be a cavernous hemangioma, and there were no malignant findings in the endothelial cells. Mediastinal hemangioma should therefore be kept in mind during an evaluation of mediastinal tumors, and one must also take into account the effect on the surrounding organs. PMID:17491358

  7. Estimated Probabililty of Chest Injury During an International Space Station Mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lewandowski, Beth E.; Milo, Eric A.; Brooker, John E.; Weaver, Aaron S.; Myers, Jerry G., Jr.

    2013-01-01

    The Integrated Medical Model (IMM) is a decision support tool that is useful to spaceflight mission planners and medical system designers when assessing risks and optimizing medical systems. The IMM project maintains a database of medical conditions that could occur during a spaceflight. The IMM project is in the process of assigning an incidence rate, the associated functional impairment, and a best and a worst case end state for each condition. The purpose of this work was to develop the IMM Chest Injury Module (CIM). The CIM calculates the incidence rate of chest injury per person-year of spaceflight on the International Space Station (ISS). The CIM was built so that the probability of chest injury during one year on ISS could be predicted. These results will be incorporated into the IMM Chest Injury Clinical Finding Form and used within the parent IMM model.

  8. Management of chest trauma: a review.

    PubMed

    Adebonojo, S A

    1993-01-01

    The incidence of chest trauma has increased significantly since the turn of the century especially in developed countries where rapid means of transportation has become part of daily life. Although gunshot wounds (GSWs) were the commonest causes of chest trauma in wartime, road traffic accidents (RTAs) have become the scourge of peacetime and modern civilization. Chest trauma is more common in males during the 2nd to the 5th decades of life with an average age of 40 years reducing their life expectancy by another 40 years at the most productive and active period of their lives. Despite improvement in ambulance service and rapid mobilization of victims from the scene of accident, about 10% of chest injured patients will die on the spot and another 5% die within an hour of reaching the hospital. Of the remaining 85%, five percent will require emergency thoracotomy for various reasons while 80% will respond to resuscitative measures and tube thoracostomy drainage alone. The primary aims in the management of chest trauma are prompt restoration of normal cardiorespiratory functions, control of haemorrhage, treatment of associated injuries and prevention of sepsis. Although the overall survival rate of trauma has improved in recent years, deaths are often due to airway obstruction, exsanguinating haemorrhage, flail chest, tension pneumothorax, cardiac tamponade and associated intracranial, intraabdominal and skeletal injuries. PMID:8398932

  9. [Differential diagnosis "non-cardiac chest pain"].

    PubMed

    Frieling, Thomas

    2015-07-01

    Non cardiac chest pain (NCCP) are recurrent angina pectoris like pain without evidence of coronary heart diesease in conventional diagnostic evaluation. The prevalence of NCCP is up to 70% and may be detected in this order at all levels of the medical health care system (general practitioner, emergency department, chest pain unit, coronary care). Reduction of quality of life in NCCP is comparable, partially even higher compared to cardiac chest pain. Reasons for psychological strain are symptom recurrence in app. 50%, nonspecific diagnosis with resulting uncertainty and insufficient integration of other medical disciplines in diagnostic work-up. Managing of patients with NCCP has to be interdisciplinary because non cardiac causes of chest pain may be found frequently. This are musculosceletal in app. 40%, gastrointestinal in app. 20%, psychiatric in app. 10% and pulmonary and mediastinal diseases in app. 5% of cases. Also gastroenterological expertise is required because here gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) in app. 60%, hypercontractile esophageal motility disorders with nutcracker, jackhammer esophagus or distal esophageal spasmus or achalasia in app. 20% and other esophageal alterations (e. g. infectious esophageal inflammation, drug-induced ulcer, rings, webs, eosinophilic esophagits) in app. 30% of cases may be detected as cause of chest pain may. This implicates that regular interdisciplinary round wards and interdisciplinary management of chest pain units are mandatory. PMID:26230070

  10. How to remove a chest drain.

    PubMed

    Allibone, Elizabeth

    2015-10-01

    RATIONALE AND KEY POINTS: This article aims to help nurses to undertake the removal of a chest drain in a safe, effective and patient-centred manner. This procedure requires two practitioners. The chest drain will have been inserted aseptically to remove air, blood, fluid or pus from the pleural cavity. ▶ Chest drains may be small or wide bore depending on the underlying condition and clinical setting. They may be secured with a mattress suture and/or an anchor suture. ▶ Chest drains are usually removed under medical instructions when the patient's lung has inflated, the underlying condition has resolved, there is no evidence of respiratory compromise or failure, and their anticoagulation status has been assessed as satisfactory. ▶ Chest drains secured with a mattress suture should be removed by two practitioners. One practitioner is required to remove the tube and the other to tie the mattress suture (if present) and secure the site. REFLECTIVE ACTIVITY: Clinical skills articles can help update your practice and ensure it remains evidence based. Apply this article to your practice. Reflect on and write a short account of: 1. How reading this article will change your practice. 2. How this article could be used to educate patients with chest drains. Subscribers can upload their reflective accounts at: rcni.com/portfolio . PMID:26443174

  11. Surgical stabilization of traumatic flail chest.

    PubMed Central

    París, F; Tarazona, V; Blasco, E; Cantó, A; Casillas, M; Pastor, J; París, M; Montero, R

    1975-01-01

    Since 1970 we have stabilized the ribs to correct paradoxical movement of the chest wall in chest injuries, using an original technique, in order to avoid as far as possible the need for long-term chest wall stabilization by intermittent positive pressure respiration (IPPR). The technical details of surgical stabilization are described, and the different types of stainless steel struts are shown. Type I was originally used either as an intramedullary nail or as an external brace. Types II and III were designed for external fixation of the strut to the rib. Treatment of 29 patients with severe flail chest, classified into four groups is shown: group I was treated by IPPR, group II by IPPR plus surgical stabilization, group III by surgical stabilization only, and group IV by surgical stabilization after exploratory thoracotomy. The clinical results are discussed. We conclude that surgical stabilization of the paradoxial movement of the chest wall can avoid the use of the respirator or at least reduce the interval of IPPR to a short period during the initial recovery from trauma. Using type III struts, we have obtained stabilization of the flail chest in all cases even in patients with severe anterior paradoxical movement. The patients' tolerance of surgical stainless steel struts was good. Images PMID:1105874

  12. Mobile computing for radiology.

    PubMed

    Auffermann, William F; Chetlen, Alison L; Sharma, Arjun; Colucci, Andrew T; DeQuesada, Ivan M; Grajo, Joseph R; Kung, Justin W; Loehfelm, Thomas W; Sherry, Steven J

    2013-12-01

    The rapid advances in mobile computing technology have the potential to change the way radiology and medicine as a whole are practiced. Several mobile computing advances have not yet found application to the practice of radiology, while others have already been applied to radiology but are not in widespread clinical use. This review addresses several areas where radiology and medicine in general may benefit from adoption of the latest mobile computing technologies and speculates on potential future applications. PMID:24200475

  13. Dynamic chest radiography: flat-panel detector (FPD) based functional X-ray imaging.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Rie

    2016-07-01

    Dynamic chest radiography is a flat-panel detector (FPD)-based functional X-ray imaging, which is performed as an additional examination in chest radiography. The large field of view (FOV) of FPDs permits real-time observation of the entire lungs and simultaneous right-and-left evaluation of diaphragm kinetics. Most importantly, dynamic chest radiography provides pulmonary ventilation and circulation findings as slight changes in pixel value even without the use of contrast media; the interpretation is challenging and crucial for a better understanding of pulmonary function. The basic concept was proposed in the 1980s; however, it was not realized until the 2010s because of technical limitations. Dynamic FPDs and advanced digital image processing played a key role for clinical application of dynamic chest radiography. Pulmonary ventilation and circulation can be quantified and visualized for the diagnosis of pulmonary diseases. Dynamic chest radiography can be deployed as a simple and rapid means of functional imaging in both routine and emergency medicine. Here, we focus on the evaluation of pulmonary ventilation and circulation. This review article describes the basic mechanism of imaging findings according to pulmonary/circulation physiology, followed by imaging procedures, analysis method, and diagnostic performance of dynamic chest radiography. PMID:27294264

  14. Recent advances in radiology and medical imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Steiner, R.E.; Sherwood, T.

    1986-01-01

    The first chapter, on the radiology of arthritis, is an overview. The second and seventh chapters are on the chest the former, on adult respiratory distress syndrome, is a brief summary, and the latter, on digital radiography of the chest with the prototype slit-scanning technique. The third chapter reviews computed tomography of the lumbar spine. The following two chapters are on MR imaging, one on the central nervous system (covering demyelinating diseases, cardiovascular disease, infections, and tumors), with excellent illustrations; and one on MR imaging of the body. The illustrations are good. The following chapter is on extracardiac digital subtraction angiography (DSA), with an interesting table comparing and contrasting conventional angiography with both intraveneous and intraarterial DSA. The eighth chapter on pediatric imaging fits a world of experience. Chapter 9 is an update on contrast media, while the next chapter is on barium infusion examination of the small intestine. The final three chapters are concerned with the present state of angioplasty, interventional radiology in the urinary tract.

  15. Radiological diagnosis of pneumonia in children.

    PubMed

    Kiekara, O; Korppi, M; Tanska, S; Soimakallio, S

    1996-02-01

    During 12 months in 1981-82, 201 children were hospitalized due to radiologically verified definite or probable pneumonia. In 1985, 194 chest radiographs (anteroposterior views) were re-evaluated jointly by two radiologists, and classified into three categories: alveolar, interstitial and probable pneumonia. In 127 cases definite pneumonia was diagnosed on both occasions, alveolar in 48 cases and interstitial in 79 cases. Variation between the two evaluations 3 years apart was observed in 46 (24%) of the 194 cases; the adjusted kappa (0.47) was in the modest region. Factors contributing to this variation were young age, less than 12 months, and the presence of interstitial infiltration, bronchial obstruction and low C-reactive protein. Factors associated with less marked variation were the presence of alveolar infiltration, auscultatory fine rates and elevated C-reactive protein. The microbial aetiology of infection, assessed by viral and bacterial antigen and antibody assays, showed no association with diagnostic variation. A lateral view of the chest radiograph was obtained from 158 patients; it was positive in 99 (91%) of the 109 cases with definite pneumonia. In only three cases the diagnosis was based on the lateral view alone. Our results show that the radiological diagnosis of pneumonia is difficult in children, especially in young children with interstitial pneumonia. PMID:8932509

  16. 46 CFR 196.37-47 - Portable magazine chests.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Portable magazine chests. 196.37-47 Section 196.37-47... Markings for Fire and Emergency Equipment, etc. § 196.37-47 Portable magazine chests. (a) Portable magazine chests shall be marked in letters at least 3 inches high: PORTABLE MAGAZINE CHEST — FLAMMABLE —...

  17. 46 CFR 196.37-47 - Portable magazine chests.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Portable magazine chests. 196.37-47 Section 196.37-47... Markings for Fire and Emergency Equipment, etc. § 196.37-47 Portable magazine chests. (a) Portable magazine chests shall be marked in letters at least 3 inches high: PORTABLE MAGAZINE CHEST — FLAMMABLE —...

  18. 46 CFR 196.37-47 - Portable magazine chests.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Portable magazine chests. 196.37-47 Section 196.37-47... Markings for Fire and Emergency Equipment, etc. § 196.37-47 Portable magazine chests. (a) Portable magazine chests shall be marked in letters at least 3 inches high: PORTABLE MAGAZINE CHEST — FLAMMABLE —...

  19. 42 CFR 37.4 - Plans for chest roentgenographic examinations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Plans for chest roentgenographic examinations. 37.4... EXAMINATIONS SPECIFICATIONS FOR MEDICAL EXAMINATIONS OF UNDERGROUND COAL MINERS Chest Roentgenographic Examinations § 37.4 Plans for chest roentgenographic examinations. (a) Every plan for chest...

  20. 46 CFR 196.37-47 - Portable magazine chests.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Portable magazine chests. 196.37-47 Section 196.37-47... Markings for Fire and Emergency Equipment, etc. § 196.37-47 Portable magazine chests. (a) Portable magazine chests shall be marked in letters at least 3 inches high: PORTABLE MAGAZINE CHEST — FLAMMABLE —...

  1. 42 CFR 37.4 - Plans for chest roentgenographic examinations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Plans for chest roentgenographic examinations. 37.4... EXAMINATIONS SPECIFICATIONS FOR MEDICAL EXAMINATIONS OF UNDERGROUND COAL MINERS Chest Roentgenographic Examinations § 37.4 Plans for chest roentgenographic examinations. (a) Every plan for chest...

  2. 46 CFR 196.37-47 - Portable magazine chests.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Portable magazine chests. 196.37-47 Section 196.37-47... Markings for Fire and Emergency Equipment, etc. § 196.37-47 Portable magazine chests. (a) Portable magazine chests shall be marked in letters at least 3 inches high: PORTABLE MAGAZINE CHEST — FLAMMABLE —...

  3. Pulmonary complications of AIDS: radiologic features. [AIDS

    SciTech Connect

    Cohen, B.A.; Pomeranz, S.; Rabinowitz, J.G.; Rosen, M.J.; Train, J.S.; Norton, K.I.; Mendelson, D.S.

    1984-07-01

    Fifty-two patients with pulmonary complications of acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) were studied over a 3-year period. The vast majority of the patients were homosexual; however, a significant number were intravenous drug abusers. Thirteen different organisms were noted, of which Pneumocystis carinii was by far the most common. Five patients had neoplasia. Most patients had initial abnormal chest films; however, eight patients subsequently shown to have Pneumocystis carinii pneumonia had normal chest films. A significant overlap in chest radiographic findings was noted among patients with different or multiple organisms. Lung biopsy should be an early consideration for all patients with a clinical history consistent with the pulmonary complications of AIDS. Of the 52 patients, 41 had died by the time this report was completed.

  4. Calibration of phoswich-based lung counting system using realistic chest phantom.

    PubMed

    Manohari, M; Mathiyarasu, R; Rajagopal, V; Meenakshisundaram, V; Indira, R

    2011-03-01

    A phoswich detector, housed inside a low background steel room, coupled with a state-of-art pulse shape discrimination (PSD) electronics is recently established at Radiological Safety Division of IGCAR for in vivo monitoring of actinides. The various parameters of PSD electronics were optimised to achieve efficient background reduction in low-energy regions. The PSD with optimised parameters has reduced steel room background from 9.5 to 0.28 cps in the 17 keV region and 5.8 to 0.3 cps in the 60 keV region. The Figure of Merit for the timing spectrum of the system is 3.0. The true signal loss due to PSD was found to be less than 2 %. The phoswich system was calibrated with Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory realistic chest phantom loaded with (241)Am activity tagged lung set. Calibration factors for varying chest wall composition and chest wall thickness in terms of muscle equivalent chest wall thickness were established. (241)Am activity in the JAERI phantom which was received as a part of IAEA inter-comparison exercise was estimated. This paper presents the optimisation of PSD electronics and the salient results of the calibration. PMID:21044995

  5. Multi-scale Morphological Image Enhancement of Chest Radiographs by a Hybrid Scheme.

    PubMed

    Alavijeh, Fatemeh Shahsavari; Mahdavi-Nasab, Homayoun

    2015-01-01

    Chest radiography is a common diagnostic imaging test, which contains an enormous amount of information about a patient. However, its interpretation is highly challenging. The accuracy of the diagnostic process is greatly influenced by image processing algorithms; hence enhancement of the images is indispensable in order to improve visibility of the details. This paper aims at improving radiograph parameters such as contrast, sharpness, noise level, and brightness to enhance chest radiographs, making use of a triangulation method. Here, contrast limited adaptive histogram equalization technique and noise suppression are simultaneously performed in wavelet domain in a new scheme, followed by morphological top-hat and bottom-hat filtering. A unique implementation of morphological filters allows for adjustment of the image brightness and significant enhancement of the contrast. The proposed method is tested on chest radiographs from Japanese Society of Radiological Technology database. The results are compared with conventional enhancement techniques such as histogram equalization, contrast limited adaptive histogram equalization, Retinex, and some recently proposed methods to show its strengths. The experimental results reveal that the proposed method can remarkably improve the image contrast while keeping the sensitive chest tissue information so that radiologists might have a more precise interpretation. PMID:25709942

  6. Multi-scale Morphological Image Enhancement of Chest Radiographs by a Hybrid Scheme

    PubMed Central

    Alavijeh, Fatemeh Shahsavari; Mahdavi-Nasab, Homayoun

    2015-01-01

    Chest radiography is a common diagnostic imaging test, which contains an enormous amount of information about a patient. However, its interpretation is highly challenging. The accuracy of the diagnostic process is greatly influenced by image processing algorithms; hence enhancement of the images is indispensable in order to improve visibility of the details. This paper aims at improving radiograph parameters such as contrast, sharpness, noise level, and brightness to enhance chest radiographs, making use of a triangulation method. Here, contrast limited adaptive histogram equalization technique and noise suppression are simultaneously performed in wavelet domain in a new scheme, followed by morphological top-hat and bottom-hat filtering. A unique implementation of morphological filters allows for adjustment of the image brightness and significant enhancement of the contrast. The proposed method is tested on chest radiographs from Japanese Society of Radiological Technology database. The results are compared with conventional enhancement techniques such as histogram equalization, contrast limited adaptive histogram equalization, Retinex, and some recently proposed methods to show its strengths. The experimental results reveal that the proposed method can remarkably improve the image contrast while keeping the sensitive chest tissue information so that radiologists might have a more precise interpretation. PMID:25709942

  7. Image processing in digital chest radiography: effect on diagnostic efficacy.

    PubMed

    Manninen, H; Partanen, K; Lehtovirta, J; Matsi, P; Soimakallio, S

    1992-01-01

    The usefulness of digital image processing of chest radiographs was evaluated in a clinical study. In 54 patients, chest radiographs in the posteroanterior projection were obtained by both 14 inch digital image intensifier equipment and the conventional screen-film technique. The digital radiographs (512 x 512 image format) viewed on a 625 line monitor were processed in three different ways: (1) standard display; (2) digital edge enhancement for the standard display; and (3) inverse intensity display. The radiographs were interpreted independently by three radiologists. The diagnoses were confirmed by CT, follow-up radiographs and clinical records. Chest abnormalities of the films analyzed included 21 primary lung tumors, 44 pulmonary nodules, 16 cases with mediastinal disease and 17 cases with pneumonia/atelectasis. Interstitial lung disease, pleural plaques, and pulmonary emphysema were found in 30, 18 and 19 cases, respectively. The sensitivity of conventional radiography when averaged overall findings was better than that of the digital techniques (P less than 0.001). The differences in diagnostic accuracy measured by sensitivity and specificity between the three digital display modes were small. Standard image display showed better sensitivity for pulmonary nodules (0.74 vs 0.66; P less than 0.05) but poorer specificity for pulmonary emphysema (0.85 vs. 0.93; P less than 0.05) compared with inverse intensity display. We conclude that when using 512 x 512 image format, the routine use of digital edge enhancement and tone reversal at digital chest radiographs is not warranted. PMID:1563421

  8. Cardio-embolic stroke following remote blunt chest trauma.

    PubMed

    Arora, Sonali; Atreya, Auras R; Penumetsa, Srikanth C; Hiser, William L

    2013-03-01

    A cardio-embolic stroke as a sequela of remote blunt chest trauma is a rare clinical presentation. Blunt chest trauma can cause various acute cardiac complications like arrhythmias, cardiac contusion etc. However, delayed consequences such as left ventricular thrombus resulting in thromboembolic phenomena are reported infrequently. A 30-year-old healthy man presented to an outside facility with transient neurological deficits. An MRI brain showed lesions suggestive of embolic etiology. A trans-thoracic echocardiogram (TTE) showed a 1.5 × 1.5 cm mass present in the left ventricular (LV) apex. Patient was transferred to our institution for cardiac surgery evaluation. On detailed questioning, he reported an incident of blunt chest trauma during a martial arts exhibition fight that took place 2 years back. Given this history, a cardiac catheterization was done, which showed 30% stenosis in mid-left anterior descending artery (LAD) without any other significant obstructive lesion. A trans-esophageal echocardiogram (TEE) showed akinesis of the LV apex and confirmed TTE finding of a mass, consistent with an apical thrombus. Surgery was deferred and patient was started on anticoagulation. A cardiac MRI done 2 weeks later showed evidence of apical infarction in the LAD territory. LAD is the most commonly affected coronary vessel by blunt traumatic injuries, likely due to its vulnerable anatomical position on the anterior aspect of the heart. A variety of mechanisms including intimal tear, rupture and spasm have been implicated in the pathogenesis of myocardial infarction after blunt chest trauma. PMID:24023477

  9. Chest Radiographic Patterns and the Transmission of Tuberculosis: Implications for Automated Systems

    PubMed Central

    Lau, Angela; Barrie, James; Winter, Christopher; Elamy, Abdel-Halim; Tyrrell, Gregory; Long, Richard

    2016-01-01

    Background Computer-aided detection to identify and diagnose pulmonary tuberculosis is being explored. While both cavitation on chest radiograph and smear-positivity on microscopy are independent risk factors for the infectiousness of pulmonary tuberculosis it is unknown which radiographic pattern, were it detectable, would provide the greatest public health benefit; i.e. reduced transmission. Herein we provide that evidence. Objectives 1) to determine whether pulmonary tuberculosis in a high income, low incidence country is more likely to present with “typical” adult-type pulmonary tuberculosis radiographic features and 2) to determine whether those with “typical” radiographic features are more likely than those without such features to transmit the organism and/or cause secondary cases. Methods Over a three-year period beginning January 1, 2006 consecutive adults with smear-positive pulmonary tuberculosis in the Province of Alberta, Canada, were identified and their pre-treatment radiographs scored by three independent readers as “typical” (having an upper lung zone predominant infiltrate, with or without cavitation but no discernable adenopathy) or “atypical” (all others). Each patient’s pre-treatment bacillary burden was carefully documented and, during a 30-month transmission window, each patient’s transmission events were recorded. Mycobacteriology, radiology and transmission were compared in those with “typical” versus “atypical” radiographs. Findings A total of 97 smear-positive pulmonary tuberculosis cases were identified, 69 (71.1%) with and 28 (28.9%) without “typical” chest radiographs. “Typical” cases were more likely to have high bacillary burdens and cavitation (Odds Ratios and 95% Confidence Intervals: 2.75 [1.04–7.31] and 9.10 [2.51–32.94], respectively). Typical cases were also responsible for most transmission events—78% of tuberculin skin test conversions (p<0.002) and 95% of secondary cases in reported

  10. The usefulness of ultrasound in the diagnosis of patients after chest trauma – two case reports

    PubMed Central

    Siwiera, Wojciech; Białas, Adam Jerzy

    2015-01-01

    The effectiveness of ultrasound in diagnosing fractures of the ribs and sternum has been confirmed in the literature. The aim of our study was to present two case reports of patients with chest trauma history in whom ultrasound examination proved useful in the diagnostic process. The role of thoracic ultrasound in the diagnosis of ribs and sternal fractures is discussed as well. The authors conclude the following: 1) the examination was easy to perform and assess, and provided clinically useful conclusions; 2) due to the mobility of the ultrasound machine, the examination may be carried out outside of radiology departments, e.g. by the patient's bedside – in departments of surgery; 3) ultrasound should be the examination of choice after chest trauma and can be performed successfully by non-radiologist physicians. PMID:26855659

  11. Use of a titanium alloy (Chest Way) in the surgical stabilization of flail chest.

    PubMed

    Nakagawa, Tomoki; Matsuzaki, Tomohiko; Aruga, Naohiro; Imamura, Naoko; Hamanaka, Rurika; Ikoma, Yoichiro; Masuda, Ryota; Iwazaki, Masayuki

    2016-09-01

    To avoid the complications of internal pneumatic stabilization for flail chest, we performed stabilization of the chest wall with a metal bar using the Nuss procedure. Here, we used a highly elastic lightweight biocompatible titanium alloy Chest Way (Solve Corporation, Kanagawa, Japan), enabling magnetic resonance imaging. The patient was a 37-year-old man who sustained injuries in a car crash. Gradually increasing subcutaneous emphysema was present. Bilateral pleural drainage and tracheal intubation were conducted on the scene, and a peripheral venous line was established. The patient was then transferred to our hospital by helicopter. A titanium alloy Chest Way was inserted to manage his flail chest accompanied by multiple rib fractures on the left side. Two days later, artificial respiration was no longer required. PMID:26096325

  12. A Review of Esophageal Chest Pain

    PubMed Central

    Coss-Adame, Enrique

    2015-01-01

    Noncardiac chest pain is a term that encompasses all causes of chest pain after a cardiac source has been excluded. This article focuses on esophageal sources for chest pain. Esophageal chest pain (ECP) is common, affects quality of life, and carries a substantial health care burden. The lack of a systematic approach toward the diagnosis and treatment of ECP has led to significant disability and increased health care costs for this condition. Identifying the underlying cause(s) or mechanism(s) for chest pain is key for its successful management. Common etiologies include gastroesophageal reflux disease, esophageal hypersensitivity, dysmotility, and psychological conditions, including panic disorder and anxiety. However, the pathophysiology of this condition is not yet fully understood. Randomized controlled trials have shown that proton pump inhibitor therapy (either omeprazole, lansoprazole, or rabeprazole) can be effective. Evidence for the use of antidepressants and the adenosine receptor antagonist theophylline is fair. Psychological treatments, notably cognitive behavioral therapy, may be useful in select patients. Surgery is not recommended. There remains a large unmet need for identifying the phenotype and prevalence of pathophysiologic mechanisms of ECP as well as for well-designed multicenter clinical trials of current and novel therapies. PMID:27134590

  13. A Review of Esophageal Chest Pain.

    PubMed

    Coss-Adame, Enrique; Rao, Satish S C

    2015-11-01

    Noncardiac chest pain is a term that encompasses all causes of chest pain after a cardiac source has been excluded. This article focuses on esophageal sources for chest pain. Esophageal chest pain (ECP) is common, affects quality of life, and carries a substantial health care burden. The lack of a systematic approach toward the diagnosis and treatment of ECP has led to significant disability and increased health care costs for this condition. Identifying the underlying cause(s) or mechanism(s) for chest pain is key for its successful management. Common etiologies include gastroesophageal reflux disease, esophageal hypersensitivity, dysmotility, and psychological conditions, including panic disorder and anxiety. However, the pathophysiology of this condition is not yet fully understood. Randomized controlled trials have shown that proton pump inhibitor therapy (either omeprazole, lansoprazole, or rabeprazole) can be effective. Evidence for the use of antidepressants and the adenosine receptor antagonist theophylline is fair. Psychological treatments, notably cognitive behavioral therapy, may be useful in select patients. Surgery is not recommended. There remains a large unmet need for identifying the phenotype and prevalence of pathophysiologic mechanisms of ECP as well as for well-designed multicenter clinical trials of current and novel therapies. PMID:27134590

  14. Results Of A Six-State Pilot Study To Collect Exposure, Technique And Processing Data In Chest Radiography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Butler, P. F.; Conway, B. J.; Suleiman, O. H.; Koustenis, G. H.; Showalter, C. K.

    1984-08-01

    The routine measurement of exposures for a reference dimension patient in diagnostic radiology is regarded as an important part of an effective quality assurance program. The most frequent radiologic examination conducted in the United States is chest radiography. If manual techniques are used to conduct the exam, the procedure for measuring exposure to the reference patient is straight-forward. However, if automatic exposure controlled (AEC) techniques are used, a patient-equivalent chest phantom must be employed to reproducibly attenuate the x-ray beam. This is of particular importance if exposures are to be compared among AEC systems with different entrance x-ray spectra. Exposure monitoring is just part of the quality assurance story. Radiographic techniques, filtration, scatter reduction, film/screen use, and film processing performance (among other factors) must also be assessed, in order to effectively evaluate and modify these exposures so that they provide appropriate image quality. The first four factors are relatively easy to determine through measurement or documentation. Poor processor performance, potentially a major cause of abnormally high patient exposure, is more difficult to assess. We have designed, constructed and tested a Lucite/aluminum patient-equivalent attenuation chest phantom (LucAl) to use in the estimation of standard posteroanterior (22-23 cm) patient exposures for both manual and AEC chest systems. A sensitometric procedure that can be used to assess relative processor performance has also been developed. This paper describes these two procedures and their use in a six-State pilot study to monitor and evaluate exposure, technique and processor data in chest radiography. Results from approximately 200 chest systems will be summarized.

  15. Lower threshold for adenosine-induced chest pain in patients with angina and normal coronary angiograms

    PubMed Central

    Lagerqvist, Bo; Sylvén, Christer; Waldenström, Anders

    1992-01-01

    Objective—To investigate whether patients with angina-like chest pain and normal coronary angiograms are more sensitive to adenosine as an inducer of chest pain. Design—Increasing doses of adenosine were given in a single blind study as intravenous bolus injections. Chest pain and the electrocardioǵraphic findings were noted. Patients—Eight patients with anginalike chest pain but no coronary stenoses (group A), nine patients with angina and coronary stenoses (group B), and 16 healthy volunteers (group C). Results—In the absence of ischaemic signs on the electrocardiogram adenosine provoked angina-like pain in all patients in groups A and B. The pain was located in the chest, and its quality and location were described as being no different from the patient's habitual angina. In group C, 14 of 16 subjects reported chest pain. The lowest dose resulting in chest pain was lower in group A (0·9 (0·6) mg) than in group B (3·1 (1·5) mg) (p < 0·005) and in group C (6·2 (3·7) mg) (p < 0·005). The maximum tolerable dose was lower in group A (4·7 (2·1) mg) than in group B (9·2 (3·8) mg) (p < 0·05) and in group C (12·0 (4·1) mg) (p < 0·005). Conclusions—Patients with anginalike chest pain and normal coronary angiograms have a low pain threshold and low tolerance to pain induced by adenosine. PMID:1389759

  16. The clinical value of daily routine chest radiographs in a mixed medical–surgical intensive care unit is low

    PubMed Central

    Graat, Marleen E; Choi, Goda; Wolthuis, Esther K; Korevaar, Johanna C; Spronk, Peter E; Stoker, Jaap; Vroom, Margreeth B; Schultz, Marcus J

    2006-01-01

    Introduction The clinical value of daily routine chest radiographs (CXRs) in critically ill patients is unknown. We conducted this study to evaluate how frequently unexpected predefined major abnormalities are identified with daily routine CXRs, and how often these findings lead to a change in care for intensive care unit (ICU) patients. Method This was a prospective observational study conducted in a 28-bed, mixed medical–surgical ICU of a university hospital. Results Over a 5-month period, 2,457 daily routine CXRs were done in 754 consecutive ICU patients. The majority of these CXRs did not reveal any new predefined major finding. In only 5.8% of daily routine CXRs (14.3% of patients) was one or more new and unexpected abnormality encountered, including large atelectases (24 times in 20 patients), large infiltrates (23 in 22), severe pulmonary congestion (29 in 25), severe pleural effusion (13 in 13), pneumothorax/pneumomediastinum (14 in 13), and malposition of the orotracheal tube (32 in 26). Fewer than half of the CXRs with a new and unexpected finding were ultimately clinically relevant; in only 2.2% of all daily routine CXRs (6.4% of patients) did these radiologic abnormalities result in a change to therapy. Subgroup analysis revealed no differences between medical and surgical patients with regard to the incidence of new and unexpected findings on daily routine CXRs and the effect of new and unexpected CXR findings on daily care. Conclusion In the ICU, daily routine CXRs seldom reveal unexpected, clinically relevant abnormalities, and they rarely prompt action. We propose that this diagnostic examination be abandoned in ICU patients. PMID:16420655

  17. Non-invasive diagnosis in clinically suspected atrial septal defect of secundum or sinus venosus type. Value of combining chest x-ray, phonocardiography, and M-mode echocardiography.

    PubMed Central

    Egeblad, H; Berning, J; Efsen, F; Wennevold, A

    1980-01-01

    Twenty-three consecutive patients with clinical (auscultatory and electrocardiographic) signs of uncomplicated atrial septal defect of secundum or sinus venosus type were examined by chest x-ray, phonocardiography, and echocardiography, before right heart catheterisation. Seventeen (74%) had atrial septal defect, two patients (9%) had insignificant pulmonary stenosis, and four subjects (17%) were normal. No false positive diagnosis of atrial septal defect was made by chest x-ray examination, whereas increased vascular markings were incorrectly interpreted as pulmonary congestion in one case. Four patients had x-ray films showing questionable signs of left-to-right shunt. Six of 15 patients with a large left-to-right shunt were correctly selected for surgery based on radiological findings. One false negative but no false positive diagnosis of atrial septal defect was made by phonocardiography. Four cases with and four cases without atrial septal defect were classified as having questionable phonocardiographic signs of atrial septal defect. Echocardiographic distinction between those with atrial septal defect and those without atrial septal defect was correct in all cases; quantitative measurement of left-to-right shunt, however, was unsatisfactory. Combined normal findings by x-ray film and echocardiography appeared adequate in all cases for the exclusion of atrial septal defect (six patients). When the six patients who were correctly identified for surgery from the radiological findings are included, there was a total of 12 patients out of 23 (52%:95% confidence limits 31 to 73%) who were evaluated definitively by the non-invasive tests. PMID:7426189

  18. Differential diagnosis in pediatric radiology

    SciTech Connect

    Grunebaum, M.

    1986-01-01

    This work presents 415 tables of differential diagnosis applicable to pediatric radiology, emphasizing clinical presentation and the findings of conventional radiographs. The six chapters cover the respiratory, cardiovascular, urinary, gastrointestinal, and skeletal systems, and the head. The first few tables in each chapter cover major clinical signs, the next few deal with the newborn period only, and the remainder deal with radiographic differential diagnoses seen in children. An index and brief reference list complete the book.

  19. Multiplane gallium tomography in assessment of occupational chest diseases

    SciTech Connect

    Cordasco, E.M.; O'Donnell, J.; MacIntyre, W.; Demeter, S.; Gonzalez, L.; Eren, M.; McMahon, W.; Burns, D.; Feiglin, D.H. )

    1990-01-01

    Gallium-67 scintigraphy is helpful in the evaluation of inflammatory, respiratory diseases. Single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) provides three-dimensional tomographic reconstruction of radioisotope distribution in the body. The addition of SPECT to gallium-67 scanning in 27 patients demonstrated an improvement in the sensitivity for detecting the presence and extent of interstitial occupational lung disease. This technique may provide earlier detection of parenchymal lung changes than can the chest x-ray and planar scanning in some patients with asbestosis. Findings in six patients with asbestosis are reported.

  20. VAC® for external fixation of flail chest

    PubMed Central

    Winge, Rikke; Berg, Jais O.; Albret, Rikke; Krag, Christen

    2012-01-01

    A large aterior chest wall defect following tumor resection was reconstructed with a Gore-Tex® membrane and a combined musculocutaneous rectus femoris and tensor fasciae latae free flap. Subsequent paradoxical respiration impeded weaning from the ventilator. Appliance of Vacuum Assisted Closure® (VAC®) resulted in immediate chest wall stability and a decrease in the patient's need for respiratory support. Shortly thereafter, the VAC® was discontinued and the patient was discharged from the intensive care unit (ICU). This case report is the first to describe the successful use of VAC® as an adjuvant to a one-stage procedure for large thoracic wall reconstruction, allowing sufficient temporary external fixation to eliminate paradoxical respiration and plausibly shorten the stay in the ICU. No adverse effects on flap healing or haemodynamics were recorded. It is likely that external VAC® can improve thoracic stability and pulmonary function in a patient with flail chest and decrease the need for mechanical ventilation. PMID:24765464

  1. VAC® for external fixation of flail chest.

    PubMed

    Winge, Rikke; Berg, Jais O; Albret, Rikke; Krag, Christen

    2012-05-29

    A large aterior chest wall defect following tumor resection was reconstructed with a Gore-Tex® membrane and a combined musculocutaneous rectus femoris and tensor fasciae latae free flap. Subsequent paradoxical respiration impeded weaning from the ventilator. Appliance of Vacuum Assisted Closure® (VAC®) resulted in immediate chest wall stability and a decrease in the patient's need for respiratory support. Shortly thereafter, the VAC® was discontinued and the patient was discharged from the intensive care unit (ICU). This case report is the first to describe the successful use of VAC® as an adjuvant to a one-stage procedure for large thoracic wall reconstruction, allowing sufficient temporary external fixation to eliminate paradoxical respiration and plausibly shorten the stay in the ICU. No adverse effects on flap healing or haemodynamics were recorded. It is likely that external VAC® can improve thoracic stability and pulmonary function in a patient with flail chest and decrease the need for mechanical ventilation. PMID:24765464

  2. Enhancement and compression of digital chest radiographs.

    PubMed

    Cohn, M; Trefler, M; Young, T Y

    1990-01-01

    The application of digital technologies to chest radiography holds the promise of routine application of image processing techniques to effect image enhancement. Because of their inherent spatial resolution, however, digital chest images impose severe constraints on data storage devices. Compression of these images will relax such constraints and facilitate image transmission on a digital network. We evaluated an algorithm for enhancing digital chest images that has allowed significant data compression while improving the diagnostic quality of the image. This algorithm is based on the photographic technique of unsharp masking. Image quality was measured with respect to the task of tumor detection and compression ratios as high as 2:1 were achieved. This compression can be supplemented by irreversible methods. PMID:2299708

  3. Image quality for five modern chest radiography techniques: a modified FROC study with an anthropomorphic chest phantom.

    PubMed

    Månsson, L G; Kheddache, S; Lanhede, B; Tylén, U

    1999-01-01

    The purpose of the study was to compare the image quality for one conventional and four digital chest radiography techniques. Three storage phosphor systems, one selenium drum system, and one film-screen system were compared using a modified receiver-operating-characteristics method. Simulated pathology was randomly positioned over the parenchymal regions and the mediastinum of an anthropomorphic phantom. Eight observers (four chest radiologists, one specialist in general radiology, one hospital physicist, and two radiographers) evaluated 60 images for each technique. The selenium drum system (Philips, Eindhoven, The Netherlands) rated best for the detection of parenchymal nodules. Together with the storage phosphor system of generation IIIN (Philips/Fuji), the selenium drum system also rated best for detection of thin linear structures. The storage phosphor system of generation V (Fuji) rated best for the detection of mediastinal nodules. The first generation of the storage phosphor system from Agfa (Mortsel, Belgium) rated worst for the detection of parenchymal nodules and thin linear structures. These differences were significant (p < 0.0001). Averaging the results for all test objects, the selenium drum system and the storage phosphor system of generation V were significantly better than the other systems tested. The film/screen system performed significantly better than the first-generation storage phosphor system from Agfa, equal to the generation IIIN storage phosphor system (Philips/Fuji) and significantly worse than the selenium drum system (Philips) and the generation-V storage phosphor system (Fuji). The conclusion is therefore that the image quality of selenium-based digital technique and of the more recent generations of storage phosphor systems is superior to both conventional technique and storage phosphor systems using image plates of older types. PMID:10602958

  4. Reading a radiologist's mind: monitoring rising and falling interest levels while scanning chest x-rays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alzubaidi, Mohammad; Patel, Ameet; Panchanathan, Sethuraman; Black, John A., Jr.

    2010-02-01

    Radiological images constitute a special class of images that are captured (or computed) specifically for the purpose of diagnosing patients. However, because these are not "natural" images, radiologists must be trained to interpret them through a process called "perceptual learning". However, because perceptual learning is implicit, experienced radiologists may sometimes find it difficult to explicitly (i.e. verbally) train less experienced colleagues. As a result, current methods of training can take years before a new radiologist is fully competent to independently interpret medical images. We hypothesize that eye tracking technology (coupled with multimedia technology) can be used to accelerate the process of perceptual training, through a Hebbian learning process. This would be accomplished by providing a radiologist-in-training with real-time feedback as he/she is fixating on important regions of an image. Of course this requires that the training system have information about what regions of an image are important - information that could presumably be solicited from experienced radiologists. However, our previous work has suggested that experienced radiologists are not always aware of those regions of an image that attract their attention, but are not clinically significant - information that is very important to a radiologist in training. This paper discusses a study in which local entropy computations were done on scan path data, and were found to provide a quantitative measure of the moment-by-moment interest level of radiologists as they scanned chest x-rays. The results also showed a striking contrast between the moment-by-moment deployment of attention between experienced radiologists and radiologists in training.

  5. Pulmonary complications of crack cocaine use: high-resolution computed tomography of the chest.

    PubMed

    Mançano, Alexandre; Marchiori, Edson; Zanetti, Gláucia; Escuissato, Dante Luiz; Duarte, Beatriz Cunha; Apolinário, Lourenço de Araujo

    2008-05-01

    Here, we report high-resolution computed tomography (HRCT) findings in a patient who developed sudden hemoptysis, dyspnea and chest pain after smoking crack cocaine. Chest X-rays showed consolidations, primarily in the upper lobes, and HRCT scans showed ground glass attenuation opacities, consolidations and air-space nodules. A follow-up CT, after drug use discontinuation and administration of corticosteroids, showed partial resolution of pulmonary lesions and the appearance of cavitations. Clinical, imaging and laboratory findings led to a diagnosis of 'crack lung'. PMID:18545829

  6. Chest CT for suspected pulmonary complications of oncologic therapies: how I review and report.

    PubMed

    Diederich, Stefan

    2016-01-01

    In cancer patient during or following oncologic therapies with respiratory symptoms and pulmonary pathology at chest CT the differential diagnosis includes infection, therapy-induced disease and tumour progression.Although CT morphology may be typical or even pathognomonic in some conditions the diagnosis is usually made by a synopsis of imaging, clinical and laboratory features.Close communication with referring colleagues and a good knowledge of potential side effects of therapeutic concepts, their time course and CT morphology is crucial in the differential diagnosis.This review describes a personal approach to the radiological diagnosis of therapy-induced pulmonary abnormalities in cancer patients. PMID:27067027

  7. Noninvasive ventilation in large postoperative flail chest.

    PubMed

    Piastra, Marco; De Luca, Daniele; Zorzi, Giulia; Ruggiero, Antonio; Antonelli, Massimo; Conti, Giorgio; Pietrini, Domenico

    2008-12-01

    An 11-year-old male developed a severe respiratory failure due to a iatrogenic flail chest following a surgery for removing a large chest wall area. A rare Ewing sarcoma was histologically diagnosed and intensive chemotherapy was administered. Postoperatively, because of the failure in ventilation weaning, the patient was electively extubated and noninvasive positive pressure ventilation through face-mask was provided. Respiratory support avoided asynchronous paradoxical movements and achieved pneumatic stabilization. Clinical and respiratory improvement allowed a successful weaning from ventilator. PMID:18798557

  8. Homicidal tandem bullet wound of the chest.

    PubMed

    Bentley, A J; Busuttil, A; Clifton, B; Sibbald, P

    1997-03-01

    An unusual case of a homicidal gunshot wound to the chest is reported in which two bullets were fired in unison as tandem bullets from a handgun. At autopsy, two intact bullets were retrieved from the body of the victim, yet there was only one entrance wound and a single bullet track across the chest wall and thoracic organs. An examination of the weapon and ammunition supported the likelihood of tandem bullets and suggested the probable mechanism for this event. Very few similar cases have been documented. PMID:9095302

  9. Misdiagnosed Chest Pain: Spontaneous Esophageal Rupture

    PubMed Central

    Inci, Sinan; Gundogdu, Fuat; Gungor, Hasan; Arslan, Sakir; Turkyilmaz, Atila; Eroglu, Atila

    2013-01-01

    Chest pain is one of themost common complaints expressed by patients presenting to the emergency department, and any initial evaluation should always consider life-threatening causes. Esophageal rupture is a serious condition with a highmortality rate. If diagnosed, successful therapy depends on the size of the rupture and the time elapsed between rupture and diagnosis.We report on a 41-year-old woman who presented to the emergency department complaining of left-sided chest pain for two hours. PMID:27122690

  10. [Coronary artery dissection following blunt chest trauma].

    PubMed

    Seven, Ekim; Henningsen, Kristoffer; Abildgaard, Ulrik

    2015-03-16

    A previously healthy 38-year-old man was admitted to hospital with chest pain. The day before the patient had been to a karate session and had received multiple punches and kicks to the chest region. An ECG showed Q-waves in V1 and V2 and flattening of the T-waves in V1-V6. Levels of cardiac enzyme markers were elevated. The patient subsequently underwent coronary angiography with supplemental optical coherence tomography that revealed a bifurcate dissection involving the proximal parts of left ramus interventricularis anterior and circumflex coronary artery. Two drug-eluting stents were implanted with good angiographic result. PMID:25786846

  11. Radiological contribution to the diagnosis of early postoperative complications after lung resection for primary tumor: a revisional study

    PubMed Central

    Priola, Adriano Massimiliano; Priola, Sandro Massimo; Boccuzzi, Francesco; Dervishi, Najada; Lisi, Elena; Veltri, Andrea; Ardissone, Francesco

    2016-01-01

    In the post-operative course of the interventions of lung resection for primary tumor, complications of different nature and severity can arise, recognizing different pathogenetic mechanisms and differing according to the type of resection performed and to the time elapsed after surgery. The low diagnostic accuracy of chest radiography requires a thorough knowledge of the radiologist about all radiographic findings, both normal and pathological, which can be found in the immediate post-operative period (within 30 days after surgery). This article aims to describe the incidence, the clinical features and the radiological aspects of immediate complications following pulmonary resections, with specific reference to those in which the diagnostic imaging provides a fundamental contribution. PMID:27621893

  12. Characteristics of chest pain and its acute management in a low-middle income country: analysis of emergency department surveillance data from Pakistan

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Background Chest pain is one of the most frequent causes of emergency department (ED) visits in high-income countries. Little is known about chest pain patients presenting to EDs of low- and middle-income countries (LMICs). The objective of this study was to describe the characteristics of chest pain patients presenting to emergency departments (EDs) of Pakistan and to determine the utilization of ED resources in the management of chest pain patients and their outcomes. Methods This study used pilot active surveillance data from seven major EDs in Pakistan. Data were collected on all patients presenting to the EDs of the participating sites to seek emergency care for chest pain. Results A total of 20,435 patients were admitted to the EDs with chest pain. The majority were males (M 60%, F 40%) and the mean age was 42 years (SD+/- 14). The great majority (97%, n = 19,164) of patients were admitted to the EDs of public hospitals compared to private hospitals and only 3% arrived by ambulance. Electrocardiograms (ECGs) were used in more than half of all chest pain patients (55%, n = 10,890) while cardiac enzymes were performed in less than 5% of cases. Chest X-rays were the most frequently performed radiological procedure (21%, n = 4,135); more than half of the admitted chest pain patients were discharged from the EDs and less than 1% died in the ED. Conclusion Chest pain is a common presenting complaint in EDs in Pakistan. The majority received an ECG and the use of diagnostic testing, such as cardiac enzymes, is quite uncommon. PMID:26691439

  13. The radiology of adverse drug reactions and toxic hazards

    SciTech Connect

    Ansell, G.

    1985-01-01

    Dr. Ansell has produced a scholarly review of the radiology of drug reactions and toxic hazards in his latest book, which is based on over 1,200 articles in the world literature. About 800 of these articles are taken from outside the radiology literature, which indicates the need for this subject to be brought to the attention of the radiologist, particularly as concern about drug reactions and toxic hazards is always increasing. The book includes sections covering the chest, gastrointestinal tract, renal tract, skeletal system and soft tissues, and skull and central nervous system. Each section treats specific substances, such as steroids and heavy metals; specific radiologic signs, such as ureteric dilation; specific symptoms, such as dysphagia; industrial toxins; radiographic abnormalities are discussed; and numerous high-quality radiographs.

  14. [Silicosis: computed tomography findings].

    PubMed

    González Vázquez, M; Trinidad López, C; Castellón Plaza, D; Calatayud Moscoso Del Prado, J; Tardáguila Montero, F

    2013-01-01

    Silicosis is an occupational lung disease, which is caused by the inhalation of silica and affects a wide range of jobs. There are many clinical forms of silicosis: acute silicosis, results from exposure to very large amounts of silica dust over a period of less than 2 years. Simple chronic silicosis, the most common type that we see today, results from exposure to low amounts of silica between 2 and 10 years. Chronic silicosis complicated, with silicotic conglomerates. In many cases the diagnosis of silicosis is made according to epidemiological and radiological data, without a histological confirmation. It is important to know the various radiological manifestations of silicosis to differentiate it from other lung diseases and to recognize their complications. The objective of this work is to describe typical and atypical radiological findings of silicosis and their complications in helical and high resolution (HRCT) thorax CT. PMID:22884889

  15. Computerized method for detection of vertebral fractures on lateral chest radiographs based on morphometric data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kasai, Satoshi; Li, Feng; Shiraishi, Junji; Li, Qiang; Straus, Christopher; Vokes, Tamara; MacMahon, Heber; Doi, Kunio

    2007-03-01

    Vertebral fractures are the most common osteoporosis-related fractures. It is important to detect vertebral fractures, because they are associated with increased risk of subsequent fractures, and because pharmacologic therapy can reduce the risk of subsequent fractures. Although vertebral fractures are often not clinically recognized, they can be visualized on lateral chest radiographs taken for other purposes. However, only 15-60% of vertebral fractures found on lateral chest radiographs are mentioned in radiology reports. The purpose of this study was to develop a computerized method for detection of vertebral fractures on lateral chest radiographs in order to assist radiologists' image interpretation. Our computerized method is based on the automated identification of upper and lower vertebral edges. In order to develop the scheme, radiologists provided morphometric data for each identifiable vertebra, which consisted of six points for each vertebra, for 25 normals and 20 cases with severe fractures. Anatomical information was obtained from morphometric data of normal cases in terms of vertebral heights, heights of vertebral disk spaces, and vertebral centerline. Computerized detection of vertebral fractures was based on the reduction in the heights of fractured vertebrae compared to adjacent vertebrae and normal reference data. Vertebral heights from morphometric data on normal cases were used as reference. On 138 chest radiographs (20 with fractures) the sensitivity of our method for detection of fracture cases was 95% (19/20) with 0.93 (110/118) false-positives per image. In conclusion, the computerized method would be useful for detection of potentially overlooked vertebral fractures on lateral chest radiographs.

  16. Chest wall reconstruction after resection using hernia repair piece

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Yimin; Zhang, Guofei; Zhu, Zhouyu

    2016-01-01

    Reconstruction of chest wall tumor is very important link of chest wall tumor resection. Many implants have been reported to be used to reconstruct the chest wall, such as steelwire, titanium mesh and polypropylene mesh. It is really hard for clinicians to decide which implant is the best one to replace the chest wall. We herein report a 68-year-old man who had underwent a chest wall reconstruction with a hernia repair piece and a Dacron hernia repair piece. The patient has maintained an excellent cosmetic and functional outcome since surgery, which proves that the hernia piece still has its place in reconstruction of chest wall. PMID:27293859

  17. Spontaneous Pneumomediastinum: A Rare Disease Associated with Chest Pain in Adolescents

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Sung Hoon; Song, Jinyoung; Kang, I-Seok

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Spontaneous pneumomediastinum (SPM) is a rare entity, with only a few cases reported, especially in adolescents. We aimed to analyze the clinical characteristics of SPM in adolescents and the diagnostic implications of computed tomography (CT) and esophagography therein. Materials and Methods This retrospective descriptive study was conducted as a review of medical records of 416 adolescents (10-18 years of age) with chest pain from March 2005 to June 2013. Information on clinical presentation, methods of diagnosis, hospital stay, and outcomes were collected and analyzed. Results Among adolescents complaining of chest pain, 11 patients had SPM (11/416, 2.64%). All patients presented with pleuritic chest pain, and 54.5% reported neck pain as the most common associated complaint. Clinical findings were nonspecific, and initial chest X-ray assessment was diagnostic only in three of 11 patients. However, reassessment of chest X-ray revealed diagnostic findings of SPM in five of the remaining eight patients. CT was diagnostic in all patients, while esophagography and echocardiogram were uninformative. Symptomatic improvement was noted within 2.45±1.2 hours (range, 0.5 to 4) after supportive care; mean hospital stay was 4.54±0.99 days (range, 2 to 6). No recurrence was observed. Conclusion SPM is a rare disease that should be considered in adolescent patients with pleuritic chest pain. Careful reading of initial chest X-rays is important to avoiding further unnecessary investigations. SPM is self-limited and treatment is supportive; nevertheless, if there are no indications of esophageal rupture, urgent esophagography is not recommended. PMID:26256992

  18. Machine Learning and Radiology

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Shijun; Summers, Ronald M.

    2012-01-01

    In this paper, we give a short introduction to machine learning and survey its applications in radiology. We focused on six categories of applications in radiology: medical image segmentation, registration, computer aided detection and diagnosis, brain function or activity analysis and neurological disease diagnosis from fMR images, content-based image retrieval systems for CT or MRI images, and text analysis of radiology reports using natural language processing (NLP) and natural language understanding (NLU). This survey shows that machine learning plays a key role in many radiology applications. Machine learning identifies complex patterns automatically and helps radiologists make intelligent decisions on radiology data such as conventional radiographs, CT, MRI, and PET images and radiology reports. In many applications, the performance of machine learning-based automatic detection and diagnosis systems has shown to be comparable to that of a well-trained and experienced radiologist. Technology development in machine learning and radiology will benefit from each other in the long run. Key contributions and common characteristics of machine learning techniques in radiology are discussed. We also discuss the problem of translating machine learning applications to the radiology clinical setting, including advantages and potential barriers. PMID:22465077

  19. Radiological evaluation of dysphagia

    SciTech Connect

    Ott, D.J.; Gelfand, D.W.; Wu, W.C.; Chen, Y.M.

    1986-11-21

    Dysphagia is a common complaint in patients presenting for radiological or endoscopic examination of the esophagus and is usually due to functional or structural abnormalities of the esophageal body or esophagogastric region. The authors review the radiological evaluation of the esophagus and esophagogastric region in patients with esophageal dysphagia and discuss the roentgenographic techniques used, radiological efficacy for common structural disorders, and evaluation of esophageal motor function. Comparison is made with endoscopy in assessing dysphagia, with the conclusion that the radiological examination be used initially in patients with this complaint.

  20. Thoracic textilomas: CT findings*

    PubMed Central

    Machado, Dianne Melo; Zanetti, Gláucia; Araujo, Cesar Augusto; Nobre, Luiz Felipe; Meirelles, Gustavo de Souza Portes; Pereira e Silva, Jorge Luiz; Guimarães, Marcos Duarte; Escuissato, Dante Luiz; Souza, Arthur Soares; Hochhegger, Bruno; Marchiori, Edson

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study was to analyze chest CT scans of patients with thoracic textiloma. METHODS: This was a retrospective study of 16 patients (11 men and 5 women) with surgically confirmed thoracic textiloma. The chest CT scans of those patients were evaluated by two independent observers, and discordant results were resolved by consensus. RESULTS: The majority (62.5%) of the textilomas were caused by previous heart surgery. The most common symptoms were chest pain (in 68.75%) and cough (in 56.25%). In all cases, the main tomographic finding was a mass with regular contours and borders that were well-defined or partially defined. Half of the textilomas occurred in the right hemithorax and half occurred in the left. The majority (56.25%) were located in the lower third of the lung. The diameter of the mass was ≤ 10 cm in 10 cases (62.5%) and > 10 cm in the remaining 6 cases (37.5%). Most (81.25%) of the textilomas were heterogeneous in density, with signs of calcification, gas, radiopaque marker, or sponge-like material. Peripheral expansion of the mass was observed in 12 (92.3%) of the 13 patients in whom a contrast agent was used. Intraoperatively, pleural involvement was observed in 14 cases (87.5%) and pericardial involvement was observed in 2 (12.5%). CONCLUSIONS: It is important to recognize the main tomographic aspects of thoracic textilomas in order to include this possibility in the differential diagnosis of chest pain and cough in patients with a history of heart or thoracic surgery, thus promoting the early identification and treatment of this postoperative complication. PMID:25410842

  1. Determination of cardiac size from chest roentgenograms following Skylab missions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nicogossian, A. E.; Hoffler, G. W.; Johnson, R. L.; Gowen, R. J.

    1977-01-01

    The majority of crewmembers who exhibited postflight decreases in the cardiac silhouette size also showed a decreased orthostatic tolerance to lower body negative pressure. Similar findings were also reported by the Soviet investigators following 30-day bedrest studies and in cosmonauts upon return from space missions. Further radiological data from all three Skylab manned missions are presented and the physiological factors possibly involved in the cardiac silhouette changes are discussed.

  2. Adenocarcinoma - chest x-ray (image)

    MedlinePlus

    This chest x-ray shows adenocarcinoma of the lung. There is a rounded light spot in the right upper lung (left side ... density. Diseases that may cause this type of x-ray result would be tuberculous or fungal granuloma, and ...

  3. Effect of gravity on chest wall mechanics.

    PubMed

    Bettinelli, D; Kays, C; Bailliart, O; Capderou, A; Techoueyres, P; Lachaud, J L; Vaïda, P; Miserocchi, G

    2002-02-01

    Chest wall mechanics was studied in four subjects on changing gravity in the craniocaudal direction (G(z)) during parabolic flights. The thorax appears very compliant at 0 G(z): its recoil changes only from -2 to 2 cmH(2)O in the volume range of 30-70% vital capacity (VC). Increasing G(z) from 0 to 1 and 1.8 G(z) progressively shifted the volume-pressure curve of the chest wall to the left and also caused a fivefold exponential decrease in compliance. For lung volume <30% VC, gravity has an inspiratory effect, but this effect is much larger going from 0 to 1 G(z) than from 1 to 1.8 G(z). For a volume from 30 to 70% VC, the effect is inspiratory going from 0 to 1 G(z) but expiratory from 1 to 1.8 G(z). For a volume greater than approximately 70% VC, gravity always has an expiratory effect. The data suggest that the chest wall does not behave as a linear system when exposed to changing gravity, as the effect depends on both chest wall volume and magnitude of G(z). PMID:11796685

  4. Salmonella typhimurium abscess of the chest wall

    PubMed Central

    Tonziello, Gilda; Valentinotti, Romina; Arbore, Enrico; Cassetti, Paolo; Luzzati, Roberto

    2013-01-01

    Patient: Male, 73 Final Diagnosis: Salmonella typhimurium abscess of the chest wall Symptoms: — Medication: Ciprofloxacin Clinical Procedure:— Specialty: Infectious Diseases Objective: Unusual clinical course Background: Non-typhoid Salmonella extra-intestinal infections usually develop in infants and in adult patients with pre-existing predisposing conditions. Blood stream infections and urinary tract infections are the most common clinical presentations, but other sites of infection may be involved as well. Case Report: We describe a case of invasive salmonellosis caused by Salmonella typhimurium involving the chest wall in a 73-year-old man. The patient had suffered from gastroenteritis followed by left basal pneumonia with pleural effusion 7 weeks before. The CT scan of the chest wall showed a pericostal abscess with shirt-stud morphology near the left last cartilaginous arch. The abscess was surgically drained and patient was cured after a 40-day ciprofloxacin treatment. Conclusions: A review of the literature on extra-intestinal non-typhoid salmonellosis shows that pleuropulmonary and soft-tissue infections are uncommon. We argue that non-typhoid Salmonella might be considered as a possible cause of chest wall abscess in individuals with recent history of gastroenteritis complicated by pneumonia and pleural effusion. PMID:24298305

  5. [Optimal beam quality for chest digital radiography].

    PubMed

    Oda, Nobuhiro; Tabata, Yoshito; Nakano, Tsutomu

    2014-11-01

    To investigate the optimal beam quality for chest computed radiography (CR), we measured the radiographic contrast and evaluated the image quality of chest CR using various X-ray tube voltages. The contrast between lung and rib or heart increased on CR images obtained by lowering the tube voltage from 140 to 60 kV, but the degree of increase was less. Scattered radiation was reduced on CR images with a lower tube voltage. The Wiener spectrum of CR images with a low tube voltage showed a low value under identical conditions of amount of light stimulated emission. The quality of chest CR images obtained using a lower tube voltage (80 kV and 100 kV) was evaluated as being superior to those obtained with a higher tube voltage (120 kV and 140 kV). Considering the problem of tube loading and exposure in clinical applications, a tube voltage of 90 to 100 kV (0.1 mm copper filter backed by 0.5 mm aluminum) is recommended for chest CR. PMID:25410333

  6. Unsupervised segmentation of lungs from chest radiographs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghosh, Payel; Antani, Sameer K.; Long, L. Rodney; Thoma, George R.

    2012-03-01

    This paper describes our preliminary investigations for deriving and characterizing coarse-level textural regions present in the lung field on chest radiographs using unsupervised grow-cut (UGC), a cellular automaton based unsupervised segmentation technique. The segmentation has been performed on a publicly available data set of chest radiographs. The algorithm is useful for this application because it automatically converges to a natural segmentation of the image from random seed points using low-level image features such as pixel intensity values and texture features. Our goal is to develop a portable screening system for early detection of lung diseases for use in remote areas in developing countries. This involves developing automated algorithms for screening x-rays as normal/abnormal with a high degree of sensitivity, and identifying lung disease patterns on chest x-rays. Automatically deriving and quantitatively characterizing abnormal regions present in the lung field is the first step toward this goal. Therefore, region-based features such as geometrical and pixel-value measurements were derived from the segmented lung fields. In the future, feature selection and classification will be performed to identify pathological conditions such as pulmonary tuberculosis on chest radiographs. Shape-based features will also be incorporated to account for occlusions of the lung field and by other anatomical structures such as the heart and diaphragm.

  7. Uncommon Flaps for Chest Wall Reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Matros, Evan; Disa, Joseph J.

    2011-01-01

    The omentum, external oblique musculocutaneous, and thoracoepigastric flaps are uncommonly used for chest wall reconstruction. Nevertheless, awareness and knowledge of these flaps is essential for reconstructive surgeons because they fill specific niche indications or serve as lifeboats when workhorse flaps are unavailable. The current report describes the anatomic basis, technical aspects of flap elevation, and indications for these unusual flaps. PMID:22294943

  8. [Functional Outcome after Chest Wall Stabilisation].

    PubMed

    Kyriss, T; Lenz, U; Friedel, G

    2016-09-01

    This overview reviews the current literature to compare the functional results after surgical and conservative treatment of patients with flail chest and multiple rib fractures. Regarding functional aspects, patients in the early phase after a thoracic trauma are those that benefit most from the stabilisation of the chest wall by internal fixation of the ribs. Patients recover faster from restrictive respiratory disorders, have less pain and return to the workplace earlier after an operation compared with those that receive conservative treatment. In the medium term, however, patients that are treated conservatively also achieve normal pulmonary function values and become free of pain. The period of convalescence after blunt thoracic trauma is generally underestimated. Future studies of the functional outcome after severe chest injuries should take this into account and the development of functional parameters should be monitored for at least 24 months. A prospective data collection of early and long-term surgical results in registries would be suitable to evaluate benefits and indications of chest wall stabilisation. PMID:27607891

  9. 30 CFR 56.6133 - Powder chests.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... CFR part 51. Copies are available at MSHA, 1100 Wilson Blvd., Room 2436, Arlington, Virginia 22209... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Powder chests. 56.6133 Section 56.6133 Mineral... HEALTH SAFETY AND HEALTH STANDARDS-SURFACE METAL AND NONMETAL MINES Explosives Storage § 56.6133...

  10. 30 CFR 56.6133 - Powder chests.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... CFR part 51. Copies are available at MSHA, 1100 Wilson Blvd., Room 2436, Arlington, Virginia 22209... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Powder chests. 56.6133 Section 56.6133 Mineral... HEALTH SAFETY AND HEALTH STANDARDS-SURFACE METAL AND NONMETAL MINES Explosives Storage § 56.6133...

  11. Radiological Evaluation of Bowel Ischemia.

    PubMed

    Dhatt, Harpreet S; Behr, Spencer C; Miracle, Aaron; Wang, Zhen Jane; Yeh, Benjamin M

    2015-11-01

    Intestinal ischemia, which refers to insufficient blood flow to the bowel, is a potentially catastrophic entity that may require emergent intervention or surgery in the acute setting. Although the clinical signs and symptoms of intestinal ischemia are nonspecific, computed tomography (CT) findings can be highly suggestive in the correct clinical setting. In our article, we review the CT diagnosis of arterial, venous, and nonocclusive intestinal ischemia. We discuss the vascular anatomy, pathophysiology of intestinal ischemia, CT techniques for optimal imaging, key and ancillary radiological findings, and differential diagnosis. PMID:26526436

  12. Bone suppression technique for chest radiographs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huo, Zhimin; Xu, Fan; Zhang, Jane; Zhao, Hui; Hobbs, Susan K.; Wandtke, John C.; Sykes, Anne-Marie; Paul, Narinder; Foos, David

    2014-03-01

    High-contrast bone structures are a major noise contributor in chest radiographic images. A signal of interest in a chest radiograph could be either partially or completely obscured or "overshadowed" by the highly contrasted bone structures in its surrounding. Thus, removing the bone structures, especially the posterior rib and clavicle structures, is highly desirable to increase the visibility of soft tissue density. We developed an innovative technology that offers a solution to suppress bone structures, including posterior ribs and clavicles, on conventional and portable chest X-ray images. The bone-suppression image processing technology includes five major steps: 1) lung segmentation, 2) rib and clavicle structure detection, 3) rib and clavicle edge detection, 4) rib and clavicle profile estimation, and 5) suppression based on the estimated profiles. The bone-suppression software outputs an image with both the rib and clavicle structures suppressed. The rib suppression performance was evaluated on 491 images. On average, 83.06% (±6.59%) of the rib structures on a standard chest image were suppressed based on the comparison of computer-identified rib areas against hand-drawn rib areas, which is equivalent to about an average of one rib that is still visible on a rib-suppressed image based on a visual assessment. Reader studies were performed to evaluate reader performance in detecting lung nodules and pneumothoraces with and without a bone-suppression companion view. Results from reader studies indicated that the bone-suppression technology significantly improved radiologists' performance in the detection of CT-confirmed possible nodules and pneumothoraces on chest radiographs. The results also showed that radiologists were more confident in making diagnoses regarding the presence or absence of an abnormality after rib-suppressed companion views were presented

  13. Evaluation of entrance surface air kerma in pediatric chest radiography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Porto, L.; Lunelli, N.; Paschuk, S.; Oliveira, A.; Ferreira, J. L.; Schelin, H.; Miguel, C.; Denyak, V.; Kmiecik, C.; Tilly, J.; Khoury, H.

    2014-11-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the entrance surface air kerma in pediatric chest radiography. An evaluation of 301 radiographical examinations in anterior-posterior (AP) and posterior-anterior (PA) (166 examinations) and lateral (LAT) (135 examinations) projections was performed. The analyses were performed on patients grouped by age; the groups included ages 0-1 y, 1-5 y, 5-10 y, and 10-15 y. The entrance surface air kerma was determined with DoseCal software (Radiological Protection Center of Saint George's Hospital, London) and thermoluminescent dosimeters. Two different exposure techniques were compared. The doses received by patients who had undergone LAT examinations were 40% higher, on average, those in AP/PA examinations because of the difference in tube voltage. A large high-dose “tail” was observed for children up to 5 y old. An increase in tube potential and corresponding decrease in current lead to a significant dose reduction. The difference between the average dose values for different age ranges was not practically observed, implying that the exposure techniques are still not optimal. Exposure doses received using the higher tube voltage and lower current-time product correspond to the international diagnostic reference levels.

  14. Radiation doses in chest, abdomen and pelvis CT procedures.

    PubMed

    Manssor, E; Abuderman, A; Osman, S; Alenezi, S B; Almehemeid, S; Babikir, E; Alkhorayef, M; Sulieman, A

    2015-07-01

    Computed tomography (CT) scanning is recognised as a high-radiation dose modality and estimated to be 17 % of the radiological procedure and responsible for 70 % of medical radiation exposure. Although diagnostic X rays provide great benefits, their use involves some risk for developing cancer. The objectives of this study are to estimate radiation doses during chest, abdomen and pelvis CT. A total of 51 patients were examined for the evaluation of metastasis of a diagnosed primary tumour during 4 months. A calibrated CT machine from Siemens 64 slice was used. The mean age was 48.0 ± 18.6 y. The mean patient weight was 73.8 ± 16.1 kg. The mean dose-length product was 1493.8 ± 392.1 mGy cm, Volume CT dose index (CTDI vol) was 22.94 ± 5.64 mGy and the mean effective dose was 22.4 ± 5.9 mSv per procedure. The radiation dose per procedure was higher as compared with previous studies. Therefore, the optimisation of patient's radiation doses is required in order to reduce the radiation risk. PMID:25852181

  15. System for pathology categorization and retrieval in chest radiographs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Avni, Uri; Greenspan, Hayit; Konen, Eli; Sharon, Michal; Goldberger, Jacob

    2011-03-01

    In this paper we present an overview of a system we have been developing for the past several years for efficient image categorization and retrieval in large radiograph archives. The methodology is based on local patch representation of the image content, using a bag of visual words approach and similarity-based categorization with a kernel based SVM classifier. We show an application to pathology-level categorization of chest x-ray data, the most popular examination in radiology. Our study deals with pathology detection and identification of individual pathologies including right and left pleural effusion, enlarged heart and cases of enlarged mediastinum. The input from a radiologist provided a global label for the entire image (healthy/pathology), and the categorization was conducted on the entire image, with no need for segmentation algorithms or any geometrical rules. An automatic diagnostic-level categorization, even on such an elementary level as healthy vs pathological, provides a useful tool for radiologists on this popular and important examination. This is a first step towards similarity-based categorization, which has a major clinical implications for computer-assisted diagnostics.

  16. [Chest Wall Reconstruction Using Titanium Plates Sandwiched Between Sheets after Resection of Chest Wall Chondrosarcoma].

    PubMed

    Endoh, Makoto; Oizumi, Hiroyuki; Kato, Hirohisa; Suzuki, Jun; Watarai, Hikaru; Hamada, Akira; Suzuki, Katsuyuki; Takahashi, Ai; Nakahashi, Kenta; Sugawara, Masato; Tsuchiya, Takashi; Sadahiro, Mitsuaki

    2016-07-01

    Extensive chest wall resection carries the risk of difficult reconstruction and surgical complications. We report our experience on chest wall reconstruction using titanium plates for a wide thoracic defect after tumor resection. A 74-year-old man was diagnosed with chondrosarcoma of the 6th rib on the right. He needed extensive chest wall resection because of skip lesions on 4th rib noted on operative inspection, leaving a defect measuring 33 × 20 cm. Reconstruction using 5 transverse titanium plates sandwiched between an expanded polytetrafluoroethylene patch and a polypropylene mesh sheet stabilized the chest wall. This reconstruction allowed successful separation from ventilatory support after operation. The postoperative course was uneventful, and he was discharged on postoperative day 20. The advantages of this form of reconstruction over conventional prostheses are rigidity, and stability and usability. PMID:27365062

  17. Psoriasis, guttate on the arms and chest (image)

    MedlinePlus

    ... guttate (drop-shaped) psoriasis on the arms and chest. Guttate psoriasis is a rare form of psoriasis. ... streptococcal infection, appears rapidly and affects the face, chest, and nearest limbs. The patches are small and ...

  18. Coughing Wheezing Shortness of Breath Tightness in Chest

    MedlinePlus

    ... Issues Coughing Wheezing Shortness of Breath Tightness in Chest Past Issues / Fall 2006 Table of Contents For ... short of breath or feel tightness in your chest, you might have asthma. If you do, you ...

  19. 42 CFR 37.50 - Interpreting and classifying chest roentgenograms.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Interpreting and classifying chest roentgenograms... MEDICAL CARE AND EXAMINATIONS SPECIFICATIONS FOR MEDICAL EXAMINATIONS OF UNDERGROUND COAL MINERS Chest Roentgenographic Examinations Specifications for Interpretation, Classification, and Submission of...

  20. 42 CFR 37.50 - Interpreting and classifying chest roentgenograms.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Interpreting and classifying chest roentgenograms... MEDICAL CARE AND EXAMINATIONS SPECIFICATIONS FOR MEDICAL EXAMINATIONS OF UNDERGROUND COAL MINERS Chest Roentgenographic Examinations Specifications for Interpretation, Classification, and Submission of...

  1. 42 CFR 37.50 - Interpreting and classifying chest roentgenograms.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Interpreting and classifying chest roentgenograms... MEDICAL CARE AND EXAMINATIONS SPECIFICATIONS FOR MEDICAL EXAMINATIONS OF UNDERGROUND COAL MINERS Chest Roentgenographic Examinations Specifications for Interpretation, Classification, and Submission of...

  2. Noncardiac chest pain: epidemiology, natural course and pathogenesis.

    PubMed

    Fass, Ronnie; Achem, Sami R

    2011-04-01

    Noncardiac chest pain is defined as recurrent chest pain that is indistinguishable from ischemic heart pain after a reasonable workup has excluded a cardiac cause. Noncardiac chest pain is a prevalent disorder resulting in high healthcare utilization and significant work absenteeism. However, despite its chronic nature, noncardiac chest pain has no impact on patients' mortality. The main underlying mechanisms include gastroesophageal reflux, esophageal dysmotility and esophageal hypersensitivity. Gastroesophageal reflux disease is likely the most common cause of noncardiac chest pain. Esophageal dysmotility affects only the minority of noncardiac chest pain patients. Esophageal hypersensitivity may be present in non-GERD-related noncardiac chest pain patients regardless if esophageal dysmotility is present or absent. Psychological co-morbidities such as panic disorder, anxiety, and depression are also common in noncardiac chest pain patients and often modulate patients' perception of disease severity. PMID:21602987

  3. Coughing Wheezing Shortness of Breath Tightness in Chest

    MedlinePlus

    ... Current Issue Past Issues Coughing Wheezing Shortness of Breath Tightness in Chest Past Issues / Fall 2006 Table ... you cough a lot, wheeze, are short of breath or feel tightness in your chest, you might ...

  4. Corporate social responsibility of future radiology professionals.

    PubMed

    Collins, Sandra K; Collins, Kevin S

    2011-01-01

    Plagued by difficult economic times, many radiology managers may find themselves faced with ethical dilemmas surrounding ongoing organizational pressures to maintain high levels of productivity with restricted resources. This often times tests the level of moral resilience and corporate social consciousness of even the most experienced radiology professionals. A study was conducted to determine what Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR) orientation and viewpoint future radiology professionals may have. The results of the study indicate that these study participants may initially consider patient care more important than profit maximization. Study results indicate that these specific future radiology professionals will not need laws, legal sanctions, and intensified rules to force them to act ethically. However,they may need ongoing training as to the necessity of profit maximization if they seek the highest quality of care possible for their patients. PMID:21366145

  5. Data Standards in Tele-radiology

    PubMed Central

    Fatehi, Mansoor; Safdari, Reza; Ghazisaeidi, Marjan; Jebraeily, Mohamad; Habibi-koolaee, Mahdi

    2015-01-01

    Data standards play an important role to provide interoperability among different system. As other applications of telemedicine, the tele-radiology needs these standards to work properly. In this article, we conducted a review to introduce some data standards about tele-radiology. By searching PUBMED and Google Scholar database, we find more relevant articles about data standards in tele-radiology. Three categories of standards identified, including data interchange, document and terminology standards. Data interchange standards, including those which facilitate the understanding of the format of a massage between systems, such as DICOM and HL7. Document standards, including those which facilitate the contents of a massage, such as DICOM SR and HL7 CDA. And terminology standards, including those which facilitate the understanding of concepts of the domain. Since, the harmonization between different standards are important to meet interoperability, so the more effort is needed to conduct harmonization between tele-radiology standards and other domain. PMID:26236084

  6. Data Standards in Tele-radiology.

    PubMed

    Fatehi, Mansoor; Safdari, Reza; Ghazisaeidi, Marjan; Jebraeily, Mohamad; Habibi-Koolaee, Mahdi

    2015-06-01

    Data standards play an important role to provide interoperability among different system. As other applications of telemedicine, the tele-radiology needs these standards to work properly. In this article, we conducted a review to introduce some data standards about tele-radiology. By searching PUBMED and Google Scholar database, we find more relevant articles about data standards in tele-radiology. Three categories of standards identified, including data interchange, document and terminology standards. Data interchange standards, including those which facilitate the understanding of the format of a massage between systems, such as DICOM and HL7. Document standards, including those which facilitate the contents of a massage, such as DICOM SR and HL7 CDA. And terminology standards, including those which facilitate the understanding of concepts of the domain. Since, the harmonization between different standards are important to meet interoperability, so the more effort is needed to conduct harmonization between tele-radiology standards and other domain. PMID:26236084

  7. [Fibrous dysplasia of the skull. Radiologic diagnosis].

    PubMed

    Amato, C; Moschini, M; Colavita, N; Tagliaferri, G

    1993-09-01

    The authors examined 11 patients with fibrous dysplasia of the skull pointing out its radiologic features and preferential sites. Conventional radiology, CT and MR imaging were used. As for conventional radiology, tangential scans which of great value to depict the most typical morphologic patterns. Lesions of the skull base were most frequent in the sphenoid (7 of 11 cases), where 5 of 7 exhibited a sclerotic pattern. Bone changes in the skull vault were: mixed (3 cases), pagetoid (2 cases), "ground glass" (1 case) and lytic (1 case): none of these cases was of the sclerotic type. A typical feature of vault lesions was the widening of diploic space associated with expansion of the outer bone and integrity of the inner bone. Radiologic findings, often associated with suggestive clinical manifestations, always allowed a diagnostic hypothesis; histopathologic confirmation was needed only in a few cases (4 of 11 patients). PMID:8210526

  8. Radiological Defense. Textbook.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Defense Civil Preparedness Agency (DOD), Washington, DC.

    This textbook has been prepared under the direction of the Defense Civil Preparedness Agency (DCPA) Staff College for use as a student reference manual in radiological defense (RADEF) courses. It provides much of the basic technical information necessary for a proper understanding of radiological defense and summarizes RADEF planning and expected…

  9. Tube thoracostomy; chest tube implantation and follow up

    PubMed Central

    Kuhajda, Ivan; Zarogoulidis, Konstantinos; Kougioumtzi, Ioanna; Huang, Haidong; Li, Qiang; Dryllis, Georgios; Kioumis, Ioannis; Pitsiou, Georgia; Machairiotis, Nikolaos; Katsikogiannis, Nikolaos; Papaiwannou, Antonis; Lampaki, Sofia; Papaiwannou, Antonis; Zaric, Bojan; Branislav, Perin; Porpodis, Konstantinos

    2014-01-01

    Pneumothorax is an urgent medical situation that requires urgent treatment. We can divide this entity based on the etiology to primary and secondary. Chest tube implantation can be performed either in the upper chest wall or lower. Both thoracic surgeons and pulmonary physicians can place a chest tube with minimal invasive techniques. In our current work, we will demonstrate chest tube implantation to locations, methodology and tools. PMID:25337405

  10. 42 CFR 37.54 - Notification of abnormal radiographic findings.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... section 203 of the Act (see 30 CFR part 90). Positive findings with regard to pneumoconiosis will be... CARE AND EXAMINATIONS SPECIFICATIONS FOR MEDICAL EXAMINATIONS OF COAL MINERS Chest Radiographic Examinations Specifications for Interpretation, Classification, and Submission of Chest Radiographs §...

  11. Morbidity of "DSM-IV" Axis I Disorders in Patients with Noncardiac Chest Pain: Psychiatric Morbidity Linked with Increased Pain and Health Care Utilization

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    White, Kamila S.; Raffa, Susan D.; Jakle, Katherine R.; Stoddard, Jill A.; Barlow, David H.; Brown, Timothy A.; Covino, Nicholas A.; Ullman, Edward; Gervino, Ernest V.

    2008-01-01

    The present study examined current and lifetime psychiatric morbidity, chest pain, and health care utilization in 229 patients with noncardiac chest pain (NCCP), angina-like pain in the absence of cardiac etiology. Diagnostic interview findings based on the "Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders" (4th ed.; "DSM-IV"; American…

  12. Clinical decision aids for chest pain in the emergency department: identifying low-risk patients

    PubMed Central

    Alley, William; Mahler, Simon A

    2015-01-01

    Chest pain is one of the most common presenting complaints in the emergency department, though only a small minority of patients are subsequently diagnosed with acute coronary syndrome (ACS). However, missing the diagnosis has potential for significant morbidity and mortality. ACS presentations can be atypical, and their workups are often prolonged and costly. In order to risk-stratify patients and better direct the workup and care given, many decision aids have been developed. While each may have merit in certain clinical settings, the most useful aid in the emergency department is one that finds all cases of ACS while also identifying a substantial subset of patients at low risk who can be discharged without stress testing or coronary angiography. This review describes several of the chest pain decision aids developed and studied through the recent past, starting with the thrombolysis in myocardial infarction (TIMI) risk score and Global Registry of Acute Coronary Events (GRACE) scores, which were developed as prognostic aids for patients already diagnosed with ACS, then subsequently validated in the undifferentiated chest pain population. Asia-Pacific Evaluation of Chest Pain Trial (ASPECT); Accelerated Diagnostic Protocol to Assess Patients With Chest Pain Symptoms Using Contemporary Troponins (ADAPT); North American Chest Pain Rule (NACPR); and History, Electrocardiogram, Age, Risk factors, Troponin (HEART) score have been developed exclusively for use in the undifferentiated chest pain population as well, with improved performance compared to their predecessors. This review describes the relative merits and limitations of these decision aids so that providers can determine which tool fits the needs of their clinical practice setting. PMID:27147894

  13. Intra-thoracic rheumatoid arthritis: Imaging spectrum of typical findings and treatment related complications

    PubMed Central

    Chansakul, Thanissara; Dellaripa, Paul F.; Doyle, Tracy J.; Madan, Rachna

    2015-01-01

    Non-cardiac thoracic manifestations of rheumatoid arthritis (RA) cause significant morbidity and mortality among RA patients. Essentially all anatomic compartments in the chest can be affected including the pleura, pulmonary parenchyma, airway, and vasculature. In addition, treatment-related complications and opportunistic infections are not uncommon. Accurate diagnosis of intra-thoracic disease in an RA patient can be difficult as the radiologic findings may be nonspecific and many of these conditions may coexist. This review article serves to highlight the multitude of RA-related intra-thoracic pathological processes, emphasize differential diagnosis, diagnostic conundrums and discuss how tailoring of CT imaging and image-guided biopsy plays a key role in the management of RA-related pulmonary disease. PMID:26210094

  14. Community-Acquired Pneumonia Caused by Mycoplasma pneumoniae: How Physical and Radiological Examination Contribute to Successful Diagnosis

    PubMed Central

    Kishaba, Tomoo

    2016-01-01

    Mycoplasma pneumoniae is one of the most common causes of community-acquired pneumonia (CAP), particularly in young adults. Vital signs are usually normal except for temperature. On physical examination, general appearance is normal compared with that of typical pneumonia such as pneumococcal pneumonia patients. Mycoplasma sometimes causes ear infections such as otitis media. It is important to distinguish between typical pneumonia and atypical pneumonia such as mycoplasma pneumonia because having the right diagnosis allows for the use of the correct antibiotic to treat CAP while preventing development of drug-resistant bacteria and also decreasing medical cost. The symptoms and diagnosis of mycoplasma pneumonia is multi-fold. Auscultation of patients can demonstrate trace late inspiratory crackles or normal alveolar sounds; however, bilateral polyphonic wheezes can sometimes be heard because of bronchiolitis. With regard to radiological findings, a chest radiogragh often shows bilateral reticulonodular or patchy consolidation in both lower lobes. Pleural effusion is rarely observed in adult cases. Immunocompetent patients tend to reveal more extensive shadowing compared with immunocompromised patients. As serological diagnostic methods are not able to offer 100% reliable diagnosis, integration of physical and radiological examination is crucial to accurately diagnose mycoplasma pneumonia. Herein, I review the typical findings from physical examination and imaging patterns of patients with mycoplasma pneumonia. PMID:27379238

  15. 20 CFR 718.102 - Chest roentgenograms (X-rays).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 3 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Chest roentgenograms (X-rays). 718.102... roentgenograms (X-rays). (a) A chest roentgenogram (X-ray) shall be of suitable quality for proper classification of pneumoconiosis and shall conform to the standards for administration and interpretation of chest...

  16. 20 CFR 718.102 - Chest roentgenograms (X-rays).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 4 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Chest roentgenograms (X-rays). 718.102... roentgenograms (X-rays). (a) A chest roentgenogram (X-ray) shall be of suitable quality for proper classification of pneumoconiosis and shall conform to the standards for administration and interpretation of chest...

  17. 20 CFR 718.102 - Chest roentgenograms (X-rays).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 4 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Chest roentgenograms (X-rays). 718.102... roentgenograms (X-rays). (a) A chest roentgenogram (X-ray) shall be of suitable quality for proper classification of pneumoconiosis and shall conform to the standards for administration and interpretation of chest...

  18. 20 CFR 718.102 - Chest roentgenograms (X-rays).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 3 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Chest roentgenograms (X-rays). 718.102... roentgenograms (X-rays). (a) A chest roentgenogram (X-ray) shall be of suitable quality for proper classification of pneumoconiosis and shall conform to the standards for administration and interpretation of chest...

  19. 20 CFR 718.102 - Chest roentgenograms (X-rays).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 4 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Chest roentgenograms (X-rays). 718.102... roentgenograms (X-rays). (a) A chest roentgenogram (X-ray) shall be of suitable quality for proper classification of pneumoconiosis and shall conform to the standards for administration and interpretation of chest...

  20. 46 CFR 108.651 - Portable magazine chests.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Portable magazine chests. 108.651 Section 108.651... AND EQUIPMENT Equipment Markings and Instructions § 108.651 Portable magazine chests. Each portable magazine chest must be marked: “PORTABLE MAGAZINE CHEST—FLAMMABLE—KEEP LIGHTS AND FIRE AWAY” in letters...

  1. 42 CFR 37.3 - Chest radiographs required for miners.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Chest radiographs required for miners. 37.3 Section... EXAMINATIONS SPECIFICATIONS FOR MEDICAL EXAMINATIONS OF COAL MINERS Chest Radiographic Examinations § 37.3 Chest radiographs required for miners. (a) Voluntary examinations. Every operator must provide to...

  2. 46 CFR 108.651 - Portable magazine chests.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Portable magazine chests. 108.651 Section 108.651... AND EQUIPMENT Equipment Markings and Instructions § 108.651 Portable magazine chests. Each portable magazine chest must be marked: “PORTABLE MAGAZINE CHEST—FLAMMABLE—KEEP LIGHTS AND FIRE AWAY” in letters...

  3. 46 CFR 78.47-70 - Portable magazine chests.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 3 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Portable magazine chests. 78.47-70 Section 78.47-70... Fire and Emergency Equipment, Etc. § 78.47-70 Portable magazine chests. (a) Portable magazine chest shall be marked in letters of at least 3 inches high “PORTABLE MAGAZINE CHEST—FLAMMABLE—KEEP LIGHTS...

  4. 46 CFR 97.37-47 - Portable magazine chests.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Portable magazine chests. 97.37-47 Section 97.37-47... OPERATIONS Markings for Fire and Emergency Equipment, Etc. § 97.37-47 Portable magazine chests. (a) Portable magazine chests shall be marked in letters at least 3 inches high: “PORTABLE MAGAZINE...

  5. 46 CFR 169.743 - Portable magazine chests.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Portable magazine chests. 169.743 Section 169.743... Vessel Control, Miscellaneous Systems, and Equipment Markings § 169.743 Portable magazine chests. Portable magazine chests must be marked in letters at least 3 inches high: “PORTABLE MAGAZINE...

  6. 46 CFR 78.47-70 - Portable magazine chests.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 3 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Portable magazine chests. 78.47-70 Section 78.47-70... Fire and Emergency Equipment, Etc. § 78.47-70 Portable magazine chests. (a) Portable magazine chest shall be marked in letters of at least 3 inches high “PORTABLE MAGAZINE CHEST—FLAMMABLE—KEEP LIGHTS...

  7. 46 CFR 108.651 - Portable magazine chests.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Portable magazine chests. 108.651 Section 108.651... AND EQUIPMENT Equipment Markings and Instructions § 108.651 Portable magazine chests. Each portable magazine chest must be marked: “PORTABLE MAGAZINE CHEST—FLAMMABLE—KEEP LIGHTS AND FIRE AWAY” in letters...

  8. 46 CFR 78.47-70 - Portable magazine chests.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 3 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Portable magazine chests. 78.47-70 Section 78.47-70... Fire and Emergency Equipment, Etc. § 78.47-70 Portable magazine chests. (a) Portable magazine chest shall be marked in letters of at least 3 inches high “PORTABLE MAGAZINE CHEST—FLAMMABLE—KEEP LIGHTS...

  9. 46 CFR 169.743 - Portable magazine chests.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Portable magazine chests. 169.743 Section 169.743... Vessel Control, Miscellaneous Systems, and Equipment Markings § 169.743 Portable magazine chests. Portable magazine chests must be marked in letters at least 3 inches high: “PORTABLE MAGAZINE...

  10. 42 CFR 37.3 - Chest roentgenograms required for miners.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Chest roentgenograms required for miners. 37.3... EXAMINATIONS SPECIFICATIONS FOR MEDICAL EXAMINATIONS OF UNDERGROUND COAL MINERS Chest Roentgenographic Examinations § 37.3 Chest roentgenograms required for miners. (a) Voluntary examinations. Every operator...

  11. 42 CFR 37.3 - Chest roentgenograms required for miners.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Chest roentgenograms required for miners. 37.3... EXAMINATIONS SPECIFICATIONS FOR MEDICAL EXAMINATIONS OF UNDERGROUND COAL MINERS Chest Roentgenographic Examinations § 37.3 Chest roentgenograms required for miners. (a) Voluntary examinations. Every operator...

  12. 46 CFR 169.743 - Portable magazine chests.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Portable magazine chests. 169.743 Section 169.743... Vessel Control, Miscellaneous Systems, and Equipment Markings § 169.743 Portable magazine chests. Portable magazine chests must be marked in letters at least 3 inches high: “PORTABLE MAGAZINE...

  13. 46 CFR 108.651 - Portable magazine chests.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Portable magazine chests. 108.651 Section 108.651... AND EQUIPMENT Equipment Markings and Instructions § 108.651 Portable magazine chests. Each portable magazine chest must be marked: “PORTABLE MAGAZINE CHEST—FLAMMABLE—KEEP LIGHTS AND FIRE AWAY” in letters...

  14. 46 CFR 97.37-47 - Portable magazine chests.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Portable magazine chests. 97.37-47 Section 97.37-47... OPERATIONS Markings for Fire and Emergency Equipment, Etc. § 97.37-47 Portable magazine chests. (a) Portable magazine chests shall be marked in letters at least 3 inches high: “PORTABLE MAGAZINE...

  15. 46 CFR 78.47-70 - Portable magazine chests.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 3 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Portable magazine chests. 78.47-70 Section 78.47-70... Fire and Emergency Equipment, Etc. § 78.47-70 Portable magazine chests. (a) Portable magazine chest shall be marked in letters of at least 3 inches high “PORTABLE MAGAZINE CHEST—FLAMMABLE—KEEP LIGHTS...

  16. 42 CFR 37.3 - Chest roentgenograms required for miners.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Chest roentgenograms required for miners. 37.3... EXAMINATIONS SPECIFICATIONS FOR MEDICAL EXAMINATIONS OF UNDERGROUND COAL MINERS Chest Roentgenographic Examinations § 37.3 Chest roentgenograms required for miners. (a) Voluntary examinations. Every operator...

  17. 46 CFR 169.743 - Portable magazine chests.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Portable magazine chests. 169.743 Section 169.743... Vessel Control, Miscellaneous Systems, and Equipment Markings § 169.743 Portable magazine chests. Portable magazine chests must be marked in letters at least 3 inches high: “PORTABLE MAGAZINE...

  18. 46 CFR 97.37-47 - Portable magazine chests.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Portable magazine chests. 97.37-47 Section 97.37-47... OPERATIONS Markings for Fire and Emergency Equipment, Etc. § 97.37-47 Portable magazine chests. (a) Portable magazine chests shall be marked in letters at least 3 inches high: “PORTABLE MAGAZINE...

  19. 46 CFR 97.37-47 - Portable magazine chests.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Portable magazine chests. 97.37-47 Section 97.37-47... OPERATIONS Markings for Fire and Emergency Equipment, Etc. § 97.37-47 Portable magazine chests. (a) Portable magazine chests shall be marked in letters at least 3 inches high: “PORTABLE MAGAZINE...

  20. 46 CFR 108.651 - Portable magazine chests.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Portable magazine chests. 108.651 Section 108.651... AND EQUIPMENT Equipment Markings and Instructions § 108.651 Portable magazine chests. Each portable magazine chest must be marked: “PORTABLE MAGAZINE CHEST—FLAMMABLE—KEEP LIGHTS AND FIRE AWAY” in letters...

  1. 46 CFR 169.743 - Portable magazine chests.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Portable magazine chests. 169.743 Section 169.743... Vessel Control, Miscellaneous Systems, and Equipment Markings § 169.743 Portable magazine chests. Portable magazine chests must be marked in letters at least 3 inches high: “PORTABLE MAGAZINE...

  2. 46 CFR 78.47-70 - Portable magazine chests.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Portable magazine chests. 78.47-70 Section 78.47-70... Fire and Emergency Equipment, Etc. § 78.47-70 Portable magazine chests. (a) Portable magazine chest shall be marked in letters of at least 3 inches high “PORTABLE MAGAZINE CHEST—FLAMMABLE—KEEP LIGHTS...

  3. 42 CFR 37.3 - Chest radiographs required for miners.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Chest radiographs required for miners. 37.3 Section... EXAMINATIONS SPECIFICATIONS FOR MEDICAL EXAMINATIONS OF UNDERGROUND COAL MINERS Chest Roentgenographic Examinations § 37.3 Chest radiographs required for miners. (a) Voluntary examinations. Every operator...

  4. 46 CFR 97.37-47 - Portable magazine chests.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Portable magazine chests. 97.37-47 Section 97.37-47... OPERATIONS Markings for Fire and Emergency Equipment, Etc. § 97.37-47 Portable magazine chests. (a) Portable magazine chests shall be marked in letters at least 3 inches high: “PORTABLE MAGAZINE...

  5. The value of routine preoperative chest roentgenograms in infants and children

    SciTech Connect

    Farnsworth, P.B.; Steiner, E.; Klein, R.M.; SanFilippo, J.A.

    1980-08-01

    The charts and routine preoperative roentgenograms of 350 children admitted for elective pediatric surgery were analyzed to evaluate the clinical importance of routine preoperative chest roentgenograms. This analysis, and a review of the literature, should indicate that routine preoperative roentgenograms for elective pediatric surgery are unnecessary. Indications for selected preoperative roentgenograms based on patients' history and clinical findings are enumerated.

  6. Annual Screening with Chest X-Ray Does Not Reduce Lung Cancer Deaths

    Cancer.gov

    Annual screening for lung cancer using a standard chest x-ray does not reduce the risk of dying from lung cancer when compared with no annual screening, according to findings from the NCI-led Prostate, Lung, Colorectal, and Ovarian (PLCO) screening trial.

  7. Postprocedural chest radiograph: Impact on the management in critical care unit.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Prashant K; Gupta, Kumkum; Jain, Manish; Garg, Tanuj

    2014-01-01

    Postprocedural chest radiograph is done to illustrate the position of endotracheal tubes (ETTs), nasogastric and drainage tubes, indwelling catheters, and intravascular lines or any other lifesaving devices to confirm their position. These devices are intended to save life, but may be life-threatening if in the wrong place. The incidence of malposition and complications ranges from 3% to 14%, respectively. The portable chest radiograph is of tremendous value, inexpensive and can be obtained quickly at the patient's bedside in any location of the hospital. A systemic literature search was performed in PubMed and the Cochranre library by setting up the search using either single text word or combinations. Those studies were also included where the chest radiograph was compared with other imaging modalities. Its clinical efficacy, cost-effectiveness and practicality allow anesthesiologist to evaluate the post-procedural position and complications of ETT, indwelling catheters, and multi lumen intravascular lines. Knowledge of the radiological features of commonly used devices is of utmost importance. PMID:25886216

  8. Phantom tumour of the lung in a patient with renal failure misdiagnosed as chest infection

    PubMed Central

    Althomali, Sarah Ali; Almalki, Mazen Mohammed; Mohiuddin, Syed Atif

    2014-01-01

    Phantom or vanishing tumour of the lung is a rare finding on chest radiographs that has been reported secondary to heart failure or chronic kidney disease. It has been described as an interlobular effusion of the transverse or oblique fissure of the right lung. Although it is uncommon, it should always be considered as a differential diagnosis for a radiographic opacity of the right-middle lung zone because it can be easily mistaken for a lung mass or infiltration. We herein present a case involving a patient with chronic kidney disease and a radiographic opacity of the right-middle lung that was diagnosed as a chest infection. The patient did not respond to various antibiotics and showed a poor response to diuretics, the standard treatment for phantom tumour. However, the patient markedly improved after dialysis, and the radiographic chest opacity disappeared. PMID:24943144

  9. Phantom tumour of the lung in a patient with renal failure misdiagnosed as chest infection.

    PubMed

    Althomali, Sarah Ali; Almalki, Mazen Mohammed; Mohiuddin, Syed Atif

    2014-01-01

    Phantom or vanishing tumour of the lung is a rare finding on chest radiographs that has been reported secondary to heart failure or chronic kidney disease. It has been described as an interlobular effusion of the transverse or oblique fissure of the right lung. Although it is uncommon, it should always be considered as a differential diagnosis for a radiographic opacity of the right-middle lung zone because it can be easily mistaken for a lung mass or infiltration. We herein present a case involving a patient with chronic kidney disease and a radiographic opacity of the right-middle lung that was diagnosed as a chest infection. The patient did not respond to various antibiotics and showed a poor response to diuretics, the standard treatment for phantom tumour. However, the patient markedly improved after dialysis, and the radiographic chest opacity disappeared. PMID:24943144

  10. Undisclosed cocaine use and chest pain in emergency departments of Spain

    PubMed Central

    Burillo-Putze, Guillermo; López, Beatriz; León, Juan María Borreguero; Sánchez, Miquel Sánchez; González, Martin García; Rodriguez, Alberto Domínguez; Afonso, Eva Vallbona; Sosa, Alejandro Jiménez; Mirò, Oscar

    2009-01-01

    Aims Illicit cocaine consumption in Spain is one of the highest in Europe. Our objective was to study the incidence of undisclosed cocaine consumption in patients attending in two Spanish Emergency Departments for chest pain. Methods We analysed urine samples from consenting consecutive patients attending ED for chest pain to determine the presence of cocaine, and other drugs, by semiquantative tests with fluorescence polarization immunoassay (FPIA). Results Of 140 cases, 15.7 presented positive test for drugs, and cocaine was present in 6.4%. All cocaine-positive patients were younger (p < 0.001); none was admitted to Hospital (p = 0.08). No significant differences in ED stay or need for hospitalization were found between cocaine-positive and negative patients. Conclusion This finding in chest pain patients who consented to urine analysis suggests that the true incidence of cocaine use leading to such ED visits may be higher. PMID:19254377

  11. [NECROTIZING FASCIITIS OF THE CHEST WALL].

    PubMed

    Farah, Raymond; Asla, Husam

    2016-04-01

    Necrotizing fasciitis (NF) is a bacterial dermo-hypodermitis affecting the soft tissue and muscular fascia. It is an uncommon and severe infection caused by microorganisms called 'flesh eating bacteria', mainly represented by group A beta-haemolytic streptococcus. NF remains a life-threatening condition associated with a high mortality rate. Its location on the chest wall is extremely rare. The few reported cases are subsequent to thoracic drainage, lung surgery or esophageal resection. This is a case report of an 80-year old female with comorbidity of heart disease, a past history of coronary artery by-pass and diabetes. She was admitted to the emergency room with acute NF of the chest and shortly after diagnosis, the patient died. Due to the fast decline observed in this disease, we would like to emphasize the importance of early recognition and diagnosis. PMID:27323534

  12. Myocardial contusion following nonfatal blunt chest trauma

    SciTech Connect

    Kumar, S.A.; Puri, V.K.; Mittal, V.K.; Cortez, J.

    1983-04-01

    Currently available diagnostic techniques for myocardial contusion following blunt chest trauma were evaluated. We investigated 30 patients prospectively over a period of 1 year for the presence of myocardial contusion. Among the 30 patients, eight were found to have myocardial contusion on the basis of abnormal electrocardiograms, elevated creatine phosphokinase MB fraction (CPK-MB), and positive myocardial scan. Myocardial scan was positive in seven of eight patients (87.5%). CPK-MB fraction was elevated in four of eight patients (50%). Definitive electrocardiographic changes were seen in only two of eight patients (25%). It appears that myocardial scan using technetium pyrophosphate and CPK-MB fraction determinations are the most reliable aids in diagnosis of myocardial contusion following blunt chest trauma.

  13. Advances in chest drain management in thoracic disease

    PubMed Central

    George, Robert S.

    2016-01-01

    An adequate chest drainage system aims to drain fluid and air and restore the negative pleural pressure facilitating lung expansion. In thoracic surgery the post-operative use of the conventional underwater seal chest drainage system fulfills these requirements, however they allow great variability amongst practices. In addition they do not offer accurate data and they are often inconvenient to both patients and hospital staff. This article aims to simplify the myths surrounding the management of chest drains following chest surgery, review current experience and explore the advantages of modern digital chest drain systems and address their disease-specific use. PMID:26941971

  14. [Chest wall tuberculosis: report of 3 cases].

    PubMed

    Zidane, A; Bakzaza, O; Afandi, O; Baiz, Y; Chafik, A

    2015-10-01

    Despite the dramatic decline in the incidence of tuberculosis during the last decades, the disease remains a significant public health problem especially in developing countries. Chest wall tuberculosis is a very rare location. Clinically, it can present as a pyogenic abscess or soft tumor, making diagnosis difficult, particularly in the absence of warning signs. Optimal therapeutic management is controversial. Medical treatment alone in often insufficient and must be associated with a surgical excision or debridement. PMID:25725600

  15. Hazard control indices for radiological and non-radiological materials

    SciTech Connect

    Boothe, G.F.

    1994-12-21

    This document devises a method of comparing radiological and non-radiological hazard control levels. Such a comparison will be useful in determining the design control features for facilities that handle radioactive mixed waste. The design control features of interest are those that assure the protection of workers and the environment from unsafe airborne levels of radiological or non-radiological hazards.

  16. The disaggregation of radiology.

    PubMed

    Brant-Zawadzki, Michael N; Enzmann, Dieter R

    2008-12-01

    The authors discuss certain market and political forces buffeting the traditional structure of radiology, both in practice and in the academic setting. These forces can be, to a certain degree, disruptive and produce fragmentation of what are now integrated radiology services and specialties. The potential fallout from the current rapidly changing environment of health care, including strategies for delivering care along service lines or within discrete episodes of care, may have a profound impact on the future of radiology. Understanding the dynamics of the current environment may help plan strategies for dealing with the potential impact on our specialty. PMID:19027680

  17. Enhanced radiological work planning

    SciTech Connect

    DECKER, W.A.

    1999-05-21

    The purpose of this standard is to provide Project Hanford Management Contractors (PHMC) with guidance for ensuring radiological considerations are adequately addressed throughout the work planning process. Incorporating radiological controls in the planning process is a requirement of the Hanford Site Radiological Control Manual (HSRCM-I), Chapter 3, Part 1. This standard is applicable to all PHMC contractors and subcontractors. The essential elements of this standard will be incorporated into the appropriate site level work control standard upon implementation of the anticipated revision of the PHMC Administration and Procedure System.

  18. Reconstruction of full thickness chest wall defects.

    PubMed Central

    Morgan, R F; Edgerton, M T; Wanebo, H J; Daniel, T M; Spotnitz, W D; Kron, I L

    1988-01-01

    Over the last 5 years, 14 patients were treated by wide en bloc resection of chest wall tumors with primary reconstruction. There were nine females and five male patients with an age range of 31-77 years. All patients had a skeletal resection of the chest wall. An average of 3.9 ribs were resected in the patients treated. In three patients a partial sternectomy was carried out in conjunction with the rib resections. Chest wall skeletal defects were reconstructed with Prolene mesh, which was placed under tension. Soft tissue reconstruction utilized selected portions of the latissimus dorsi musculocutaneous territory with fasciocutaneous extensions beyond the muscle itself. Primary healing was obtained in all patients and secondary procedures were not required. The average hospitalization was 23 days. All patients survived the resection and reconstruction and were alive 30 days after operation. In selected patients the preservation of a portion of the innervated muscle in situ or the transfer of the muscle with the preservation of its resting length has maintained the majority of the muscle function. Images Fig. 3A. Fig. 3C. Fig. 3D. Fig. 4A. Fig. 4C. Fig. 4D. Fig. 4E. Fig. 5A. Fig. 5B. Fig. 5D. Fig. 6A. Fig. 6C. Fig. 6D. Fig. 6E. Fig. 6F. Fig. 6G. Fig. 6H. PMID:3389939

  19. Chest pain: coronary CT in the ER.

    PubMed

    Maffei, Erica; Seitun, Sara; Guaricci, Andrea I; Cademartiri, Filippo

    2016-01-01

    Cardiac CT has developed into a robust clinical tool during the past 15 years. Of the fields in which the potential of cardiac CT has raised more interest is chest pain in acute settings. In fact, the possibility to exclude with high reliability obstructive coronary artery disease (CAD) in patients at low-to-intermediate risk is of great interest both from the clinical standpoint and from the management standpoint. Several other modalities, with or without imaging, have been used during the past decades in the settings of new onset chest pain or in acute chest pain for both diagnostic and prognostic assessment of CAD. Each one has advantages and disadvantages. Most imaging modalities also focus on inducible ischaemia to guide referral to invasive coronary angiography. The advent of cardiac CT has introduced a new practice diagnostic paradigm, being the most accurate non-invasive method for identification and exclusion of CAD. Furthermore, the detection of subclinical CAD and plaque imaging offer the opportunity to improve risk stratification. Moreover, recent advances of the latest generation CT scanners allow combining both anatomical and functional imaging by stress myocardial perfusion. The role of cardiac CT in acute settings is already important and will become progressively more important in the coming years. PMID:26866681

  20. Surface chest motion decomposition for cardiovascular monitoring.

    PubMed

    Shafiq, Ghufran; Veluvolu, Kalyana C

    2014-01-01

    Surface chest motion can be easily monitored with a wide variety of sensors such as pressure belts, fiber Bragg gratings and inertial sensors, etc. The current applications of these sensors are mainly restricted to respiratory motion monitoring/analysis due to the technical challenges involved in separation of the cardiac motion from the dominant respiratory motion. The contribution of heart to the surface chest motion is relatively very small as compared to the respiratory motion. Further, the heart motion spectrally overlaps with the respiratory harmonics and their separation becomes even more challenging. In this paper, we approach this source separation problem with independent component analysis (ICA) framework. ICA with reference (ICA-R) yields only desired component with improved separation, but the method is highly sensitive to the reference generation. Several reference generation approaches are developed to solve the problem. Experimental validation of these proposed approaches is performed with chest displacement data and ECG obtained from healthy subjects under normal breathing and post-exercise conditions. The extracted component morphologically matches well with the collected ECG. Results show that the proposed methods perform better than conventional band pass filtering. PMID:24865183

  1. Chest wall tumour following iodized talc pleurodesis

    PubMed Central

    Jackson, John W.; Bennett, M. H.

    1973-01-01

    Jackson, J. W., and Bennett, M. H. (1973).Thorax, 28, 788-793. Chest wall tumour following iodized talc pleurodesis. A man of 37 had an iodized talc pleurodesis carried out for recurrent spontaneous pneumothorax. There was no history of industrial exposure to asbestos. Two years later he presented with pain in the right chest and radiographs at that time showed some localized pleural thickening at the site of the thoracoscopy cannulation for introduction of talc. A provisional diagnosis of talc granuloma, chemical abscess or tumour was made and exploratory thoracotomy revealed a tumour involving the chest wall, lung, and pleura which, on histological examination, showed adenocarcinoma of varying degrees of differentiation and in some parts also presenting a more squamoid appearance. Numerous doubly refractile talc particles were intimately associated with the tumour and fibrous tissue. Shortly after excision the patient developed evidence of systemic dissemination of the disease and died four months later. The possibility of this tumour being induced by the talc is discussed. A brief review is made of the various forms of talc used in surgery over the past 40 years and attention is drawn to the significance of the proportion of asbestos mineral which is present in talc as mined in various parts of the world. We do not consider that this is a case of mesothelioma of the pleura. Images PMID:4787992

  2. Reconstruction of full thickness chest wall defects.

    PubMed

    Morgan, R F; Edgerton, M T; Wanebo, H J; Daniel, T M; Spotnitz, W D; Kron, I L

    1988-06-01

    Over the last 5 years, 14 patients were treated by wide en bloc resection of chest wall tumors with primary reconstruction. There were nine females and five male patients with an age range of 31-77 years. All patients had a skeletal resection of the chest wall. An average of 3.9 ribs were resected in the patients treated. In three patients a partial sternectomy was carried out in conjunction with the rib resections. Chest wall skeletal defects were reconstructed with Prolene mesh, which was placed under tension. Soft tissue reconstruction utilized selected portions of the latissimus dorsi musculocutaneous territory with fasciocutaneous extensions beyond the muscle itself. Primary healing was obtained in all patients and secondary procedures were not required. The average hospitalization was 23 days. All patients survived the resection and reconstruction and were alive 30 days after operation. In selected patients the preservation of a portion of the innervated muscle in situ or the transfer of the muscle with the preservation of its resting length has maintained the majority of the muscle function. PMID:3389939

  3. Surface Chest Motion Decomposition for Cardiovascular Monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shafiq, Ghufran; Veluvolu, Kalyana C.

    2014-05-01

    Surface chest motion can be easily monitored with a wide variety of sensors such as pressure belts, fiber Bragg gratings and inertial sensors, etc. The current applications of these sensors are mainly restricted to respiratory motion monitoring/analysis due to the technical challenges involved in separation of the cardiac motion from the dominant respiratory motion. The contribution of heart to the surface chest motion is relatively very small as compared to the respiratory motion. Further, the heart motion spectrally overlaps with the respiratory harmonics and their separation becomes even more challenging. In this paper, we approach this source separation problem with independent component analysis (ICA) framework. ICA with reference (ICA-R) yields only desired component with improved separation, but the method is highly sensitive to the reference generation. Several reference generation approaches are developed to solve the problem. Experimental validation of these proposed approaches is performed with chest displacement data and ECG obtained from healthy subjects under normal breathing and post-exercise conditions. The extracted component morphologically matches well with the collected ECG. Results show that the proposed methods perform better than conventional band pass filtering.

  4. Surface Chest Motion Decomposition for Cardiovascular Monitoring

    PubMed Central

    Shafiq, Ghufran; Veluvolu, Kalyana C.

    2014-01-01

    Surface chest motion can be easily monitored with a wide variety of sensors such as pressure belts, fiber Bragg gratings and inertial sensors, etc. The current applications of these sensors are mainly restricted to respiratory motion monitoring/analysis due to the technical challenges involved in separation of the cardiac motion from the dominant respiratory motion. The contribution of heart to the surface chest motion is relatively very small as compared to the respiratory motion. Further, the heart motion spectrally overlaps with the respiratory harmonics and their separation becomes even more challenging. In this paper, we approach this source separation problem with independent component analysis (ICA) framework. ICA with reference (ICA-R) yields only desired component with improved separation, but the method is highly sensitive to the reference generation. Several reference generation approaches are developed to solve the problem. Experimental validation of these proposed approaches is performed with chest displacement data and ECG obtained from healthy subjects under normal breathing and post-exercise conditions. The extracted component morphologically matches well with the collected ECG. Results show that the proposed methods perform better than conventional band pass filtering. PMID:24865183

  5. Fatal right coronary artery rupture following blunt chest trauma: detection by postmortem selective coronary angiography.

    PubMed

    Inokuchi, Go; Makino, Yohsuke; Motomura, Ayumi; Chiba, Fumiko; Torimitsu, Suguru; Hoshioka, Yumi; Iwase, Hirotaro

    2016-05-01

    Coronary artery injury is a rare complication following blunt chest trauma (BCT), and can be fatal. Here we report findings on postmortem selective coronary angiography of right coronary artery rupture after an assault involving blunt trauma to the chest. A woman in her 60s died after her son stomped on her chest. There were no appreciable signs of injury on external examination, and cause of death could not be determined by postmortem computed tomography (PMCT). Internal findings indicated that an external force had been applied to the anterior chest, as evidenced by subcutaneous hemorrhage and pericardial and cardiac contusions. Postmortem coronary angiography revealed irregularity of the intima and of the fat tissue surrounding the proximal part of the right coronary artery associated with a local filling defect. Histopathological examination suggested coronary rupture with dissection of the tunica media and compression of the lumen cavity. The key points in the present case are that no fatal injuries could be determined on external examination, and the heart and coronary artery injuries were not evident on PMCT. Criminality might be overlooked in such cases, as external investigation at the crime scene would be inadequate and could result in a facile diagnosis of cause of death. This is the first report of coronary artery rupture with dissection that was detected by CT coronary angiography, and provides helpful findings for reaching an appropriate decision both forensically and clinically. PMID:26126482

  6. Measurement of entrance skin dose and estimation of organ dose during pediatric chest radiography.

    PubMed

    Kumaresan, M; Kumar, Rajesh; Biju, K; Choubey, Ajay; Kantharia, S

    2011-06-01

    Entrance skin dose (ESD) was measured to calculate the organ doses from the anteroposterior (AP) and posteroanterior (PA) chest x-ray projections for pediatric patients in an Indian hospital. High sensitivity tissue-equivalent thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLD, LiF: Mg, Cu, P chips) were used for measuring entrance skin dose. The respective organ doses were calculated using the Monte Carlo method (MCNP 3.1) to simulate the examination set-up and a three-dimensional mathematical phantom for representing an average 5-y-old Indian child. Using this method, conversion coefficients were derived for translating the measured ESD to organ doses. The average measured ESDs for the chest AP and PA projections were 0.305 mGy and 0.171 mGy, respectively. The average calculated organ doses in the AP and the PA projections were 0.196 and 0.086 mSv for the thyroid, 0.167 and 0.045 mSv for the trachea, 0.078 and 0.043 mSv for the lungs, 0.110 and 0.013 mSv for the liver, 0.002 and 0.016 mSv for the bone marrow, 0.024 and 0.002 mSv for the kidneys, and 0.109 and 0.023 mSv for the heart, respectively. The ESD and organ doses can be reduced significantly with the proper radiological technique. According to these results, the chest PA projection should be preferred over the AP projection in pediatric patients. The estimated organ doses for the chest AP and PA projections can be used for the estimation of the associated risk. PMID:22004934

  7. 3.3 Diagnostic Radiology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kramer, H.-M.; Moores, B. M.; Stieve, F.-E.

    This document is part of Subvolume A 'Fundamentals and Data in Radiobiology, Radiation Biophysics, Dosimetry and Medical Radiological Protection' of Volume 7 'Medical Radiological Physics' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group VIII 'Advanced Materials and Technologies'. It contains the Section '3.3 Diagnostic Radiology' of the Chapter '3 Dosimetry in Diagnostic Radiology and Radiotherapy' with the contents:

  8. Radiologic Technology Program Standards.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Georgia Univ., Athens. Dept. of Vocational Education.

    This publication contains statewide standards for the radiologic technology program in Georgia. The standards are divided into 12 categories; Foundations (philosophy, purpose, goals, program objectives, availability, evaluation); Admissions (admission requirements, provisional admission requirements, recruitment, evaluation and planning); Program…

  9. Society of Interventional Radiology

    MedlinePlus

    ... how interventional radiology research improves patients’ lives at Society of Interventional Radiology’s 2017 Annual Scientific Meeting; read ... comments to CMS on two MACRA coding issues; society is engaged with CMS as they develop codes ...

  10. Radiation risk assessment in neonatal radiographic examinations of the chest and abdomen: a clinical and Monte Carlo dosimetry study.

    PubMed

    Makri, T; Yakoumakis, E; Papadopoulou, D; Gialousis, G; Theodoropoulos, V; Sandilos, P; Georgiou, E

    2006-10-01

    Seeking to assess the radiation risk associated with radiological examinations in neonatal intensive care units, thermo-luminescence dosimetry was used for the measurement of entrance surface dose (ESD) in 44 AP chest and 28 AP combined chest-abdominal exposures of a sample of 60 neonates. The mean values of ESD were found to be equal to 44 +/- 16 microGy and 43 +/- 19 microGy, respectively. The MCNP-4C2 code with a mathematical phantom simulating a neonate and appropriate x-ray energy spectra were employed for the simulation of the AP chest and AP combined chest-abdominal exposures. Equivalent organ dose per unit ESD and energy imparted per unit ESD calculations are presented in tabular form. Combined with ESD measurements, these calculations yield an effective dose of 10.2 +/- 3.7 microSv, regardless of sex, and an imparted energy of 18.5 +/- 6.7 microJ for the chest radiograph. The corresponding results for the combined chest-abdominal examination are 14.7 +/- 7.6 microSv (males)/17.2 +/- 7.6 microSv (females) and 29.7 +/- 13.2 microJ. The calculated total risk per radiograph was low, ranging between 1.7 and 2.9 per million neonates, per film, and being slightly higher for females. Results of this study are in good agreement with previous studies, especially in view of the diversity met in the calculation methods. PMID:16985285

  11. Radiation risk assessment in neonatal radiographic examinations of the chest and abdomen: a clinical and Monte Carlo dosimetry study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Makri, T.; Yakoumakis, E.; Papadopoulou, D.; Gialousis, G.; Theodoropoulos, V.; Sandilos, P.; Georgiou, E.

    2006-10-01

    Seeking to assess the radiation risk associated with radiological examinations in neonatal intensive care units, thermo-luminescence dosimetry was used for the measurement of entrance surface dose (ESD) in 44 AP chest and 28 AP combined chest-abdominal exposures of a sample of 60 neonates. The mean values of ESD were found to be equal to 44 ± 16 µGy and 43 ± 19 µGy, respectively. The MCNP-4C2 code with a mathematical phantom simulating a neonate and appropriate x-ray energy spectra were employed for the simulation of the AP chest and AP combined chest-abdominal exposures. Equivalent organ dose per unit ESD and energy imparted per unit ESD calculations are presented in tabular form. Combined with ESD measurements, these calculations yield an effective dose of 10.2 ± 3.7 µSv, regardless of sex, and an imparted energy of 18.5 ± 6.7 µJ for the chest radiograph. The corresponding results for the combined chest-abdominal examination are 14.7 ± 7.6 µSv (males)/17.2 ± 7.6 µSv (females) and 29.7 ± 13.2 µJ. The calculated total risk per radiograph was low, ranging between 1.7 and 2.9 per million neonates, per film, and being slightly higher for females. Results of this study are in good agreement with previous studies, especially in view of the diversity met in the calculation methods.

  12. An audit of the management of 250 patients with chest trauma in a regional thoracic surgical centre.

    PubMed Central

    Jones, N S

    1989-01-01

    Two hundred and fifty patients with chest trauma admitted consecutively over a 6-year period to the Royal Surrey County Hospital were reviewed. This is a large series by British standards. The cause and nature of their chest and associated injuries were studied, together with the management, complications and outcome. The aim of this study was to find areas where diagnosis and treatment could be improved. It was found that where there was no lung contusion, flail chest injuries could be managed without ventilation. The review suggests that even small traumatically induced pneumothoraces should be drained. It illustrates the need for an awareness of the wide range of concurrent problems in patients with chest injuries and the variety of possible complications. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 PMID:2742679

  13. Comparison of gated radionuclide scans and chest radiographs. Assessment of left ventricular impairment in patients with coronary disease.

    PubMed

    Bianco, J A; Reinke, D B; Makey, D G; Shafer, R B

    1980-03-01

    Diagnostic efficacy of gated cardiac blood pool imaging was studied in 41 consecutive patients with LV ejection fractions (LVEF) less than or equal to 0.50. Eighty percent of patients were receiving therapy for LV failure at the time of the study. All patients had documented coronary-artery disease (CAD). Chest x-ray films were interpreted blindly by a senior radiologist. Cardiothoracic ratio of less than or equal to 0.50 was recorded as normal. Radionuclide assessment of LV function contributes importantly to the diagnostic and screening value of chest x-ray films. Patients with coronary disease and clinical evidence of heart failure should have radioisotopic studies even if chest x-ray film findings are normal. In patients with coronary artery disease and enlarged LV on chest films, radionuclide study of left ventricular performance aids in defining LV impairment, and in the prognostication of subsequent clinical course. PMID:6444573

  14. Interventional Radiology in China

    SciTech Connect

    Teng Gaojun Xu Ke; Ni Caifang; Li Linsun

    2008-03-15

    With more than 3000 members, the Chinese Society of Interventional Radiology (CSIR) is one of the world's largest societies for interventional radiology (IR). Nevertheless, compared to other societies such as CIRSE and SIR, the CSIR is a relatively young society. In this article, the status of IR in China is described, which includes IR history, structure and patient management, personnel, fellowship, training, modalities, procedures, research, turf battle, and insightful visions for IR from Chinese interventional radiologists.

  15. Basic bone radiology

    SciTech Connect

    Griffiths, H.J.

    1987-01-01

    This clinical book surveys the skeletal system as seen through radiological imaging. It emphasizing abnormalities, disease, and trauma, and includes vital information on bones, bone growth, and the cells involved in bone pathology. It covers many bone diseases and injuries which are rarely covered in medical texts, as well as descriptions of radiologic procedures that specifically relate to the skeleton. This edition includes many illustrations, information on MR imaging and CT scanning, and discussions of osteoporosis, dysplasias, and metabolic bone disease.

  16. Association of chest pain versus dyspnea as presenting symptom for coronary angiography with demographics, coronary anatomy, and 2-year mortality

    PubMed Central

    Paudel, Rajiv; Beridze, Natalia; Ahn, Chul; Sanaani, Abdallah; Agarwal, Pallak; Farell, Kim; Jain, Diwakar; Timmermans, Robert; Cooper, Howard A.; Panza, Julio A

    2016-01-01

    Introduction The association of chest pain versus dyspnea with demographics, coronary angiographic findings, and outcomes of patients undergoing coronary angiography is unknown. Material and methods We studied 1,053 patients who had coronary angiography to investigate the association of chest pain versus dyspnea with demographics, coronary angiographic findings, and outcomes. Results Of 1,053 patients, 654 (62%) had chest pain, 229 (22%) had dyspnea, and 117 (11%) had chest pain and dyspnea. Patients with dyspnea were older (p < 0.0001) and had higher serum creatinine (p = 0.0011), lower left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF) (p < 0.0001), more cardiogenic shock (p = 0.0004), less obstructive coronary artery disease (CAD) (p < 0.0001), less percutaneous coronary intervention (p < 0.0001), and similar 2-year mortality. Stepwise Cox regression analysis showed no significant difference in mortality between chest pain and dyspnea. Significant risk factors for time to death were age (hazard ratio (HR) = 1.07, p < 0.0001), serum creatinine (HR = 1.5, p < 0.0001), body mass index (HR = 0.93, p = 0.005), and obstructive CAD graft (HR = 3.2, p = 0.011). Conclusions Patients undergoing coronary angiography presenting with dyspnea were older and had higher serum creatinine, lower LVEF, more frequent cardiogenic shock, less obstructive CAD, and less percutaneous coronary intervention compared to patients presenting with chest pain but similar 2-year mortality. PMID:27478454

  17. An autopsy study of combined pulmonary fibrosis and emphysema: correlations among clinical, radiological, and pathological features

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Clinical evaluation to differentiate the characteristic features of pulmonary fibrosis and emphysema is often difficult in patients with combined pulmonary fibrosis and emphysema (CPFE), but diagnosis of pulmonary fibrosis is important for evaluating treatment options and the risk of acute exacerbation of interstitial pneumonia of such patients. As far as we know, it is the first report describing a correlation among clinical, radiological, and whole-lung pathological features in an autopsy cases of CPFE patients. Methods Experts retrospectively reviewed the clinical charts and examined chest computed tomography (CT) images and pathological findings of an autopsy series of 22 CPFE patients, and compared these with findings from 8 idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF) patients and 17 emphysema-alone patients. Results All patients had a history of heavy smoking. Forced expiratory volume in 1 s/forced vital capacity (FEV1/FVC%) was significantly lower in the emphysema-alone group than the CPFE and IPF-alone groups. The percent predicted diffusing capacity of the lung for carbon monoxide (DLCO%) was significantly lower in the CPFE group than the IPF- and emphysema-alone groups. Usual interstitial pneumonia (UIP) pattern was observed radiologically in 15 (68.2%) CPFE and 8 (100%) IPF-alone patients and was pathologically observed in all patients from both groups. Pathologically thick-cystic lesions involving one or more acini with dense wall fibrosis and occasional fibroblastic foci surrounded by honeycombing and normal alveoli were confirmed by post-mortem observation as thick-walled cystic lesions (TWCLs). Emphysematous destruction and enlargement of membranous and respiratory bronchioles with fibrosis were observed in the TWCLs. The cystic lesions were always larger than the cysts of honeycombing. The prevalence of both radiological and pathological TWCLs was 72.7% among CPFE patients, but no such lesions were observed in patients with IPF or emphysema

  18. [Instruction in dental radiology].

    PubMed

    van der Sanden, W J M; Kreulen, C M; Berkhout, W E R

    2016-04-01

    The diagnostic use of oral radiology is an essential part of daily dental practice. Due to the potentially harmful nature of ionising radiation, the clinical use of oral radiology in the Netherlands is framed by clinical practice guidelines and regulatory requirements. Undergraduate students receive intensive theoretical and practical training in practical and theoretical radiology, with the aim of obtaining the 'Eindtermen Stralingshygiëne voor Tandartsen en Orthodontisten'-certificate, which is required for legal permission to use oral radiology in dental practice. It is recommended that the curriculum be expanded to include the areas of knowledge required to qualify for the 'Eindtermen Stralingshygiëne voor het gebruik van CBCT-toestellen door tandartsen' (the certificate for the use of conebeam radiology by dentists). The general dental practitioner is faced with changing laws and regulations in all areas of practice. One of the most significant legal changes in the field of dental radiology was the introduction of the new radiation protection and safety rules in 2014. Moreover, a large group of dentists is also being confronted with the transition from conventional to digital images, with all its challenges and changes in everyday practice. PMID:27073811

  19. Scoring of the radiological picture of idiopathic interstitial pneumonia: a study to verify the reliability of the method

    PubMed Central

    Vanasek, Jiri; Koblizek, Vladimir; Novosad, Jakub; Elias, Pavel; Bartos, Vladimir; Sterclova, Martina

    2015-01-01

    Background Idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF) is a clinical form of usual interstitial pneumonia (UIP). Computed chest tomography (CT) has a fundamental role in the multidisciplinary diagnostics. However, it has not been verified if and how a subjective opinion of a radiologists or pneumologists can influence the assessment and overall diagnostic summary. Purpose To verify the reliability of the scoring system. Material and Methods Assessment of conformity of the radiological score of high-resolution CT (HRCT) of lungs in patients with IPF was performed by a group of radiologists and pneumologists. Personal data were blinded and the assessment was performed independently using the Dutka/Vasakova scoring system (modification of the Gay system). The final score of the single assessors was then evaluated by means of the paired Spearman’s correlation and analysis of the principal components. Results Two principal components explaining cumulatively a 62% or 73% variability of the assessment of the single assessors were extracted during the analysis. The groups did not differ both in terms of specialty and experience with the assessment of the HRCT findings. Conclusion According to our study, scoring of a radiological image using the Dutka/Vasakova system is a reliable method in the hands of experienced radiologists. Significant differences occur during the assessment performed by pneumologists especially during the evaluation of the alveolar changes. PMID:26600944

  20. CT after reconstructive repair of the sternum and chest wall.

    PubMed

    Maddern, I R; Goodman, L R; Almassi, G H; Haasler, G B; McManus, R P; Olinger, G N

    1993-03-01

    Acute mediastinitis and sternal infection after sternotomy are potentially devastating complications, but considerable advances in treatment have been made during the past decade. Sternectomy followed by reconstruction with use of either an omental transposition or a muscle flap has markedly decreased mortality and morbidity. After extensive rib resection, various reconstructive repairs, including the use of polytetrafluoroethylene mesh, have proved successful. The authors retrospectively reviewed 27 postoperative computed tomographic (CT) scans obtained in 19 patients. Twelve of these patients had sternal wounds repaired with either omental or muscle flap procedures. Seven patients had chest wall reconstructions with polytetrafluoroethylene patches, muscle transpositions, or both. The authors found no cases of unexpected or unexplained fluid collections on CT scans obtained beyond the 1st month. Any persistent or recurrent collection is suggestive of infection. If clinical and imaging findings are at odds, imaging-directed needle aspiration can help determine whether a fluid collection is infected and in need of further treatment. PMID:8430171

  1. Death following rubber bullet wounds to the chest: case report.

    PubMed

    Kalebi, A; Olumbe, A K O

    2005-07-01

    The rubber bullet has been portrayed as a non-lethal weapon and has gained preference in riot-control over live ammunition. Despite the fact that it was designed to be safer than live ammunition, several cases of fatalities have been reported from its use. Most of these fatalities were because of abuse of the weapon in terms of range of fire and anatomical area of the body targeted. This is a case report of such a fatality following shotgun rubber bullet injury, including the circumstance surrounding this unusual occurrence, the autopsy findings and reports of the ballistic analysis. Four projectiles penetrated the right chest lodging in the right lung and injuring the right pulmonary artery, causing death. The mechanism of death in this case is rapid massive pulmonary haemorrhage. PMID:16167715

  2. Nonspecific Interstitial Pneumonia/Fibrosis: Clinical Manifestations, Histologic and Radiologic Features

    PubMed Central

    Park, Choon Sik; Jeon, Jin Woo; Park, Sung Woo; Lim, Gune-Il; Jeong, Seong Hwan; Uh, Soo-Taek; Park, Jai Soung; Choi, Deuk Lin; Jin, So Young; Kang, Chang Hee

    1996-01-01

    Objectives Customarily used classification of IPF did not satisfy a sizable group of patients with IPF that in the past had been lumped with UIP and now currently has begun to be recognized as nonspecific interstitial pneumonia/fibrosis (NIP). There are few reports about the clinical features of NIP. Methods The pathologic slides of 66 patients having open lung biopsy (OLB) for the differential diagnosis of interstitial lung diseases (ILD) from 1984 to 1995 were reviewed. Seven cases were confirmed as NIP. The clinical record, pulmonay function tests (PFT), chest PA and HRCT were reviewed and analysed retrospectively. Results Six patients with NIP were female. The median age was 56 years. Mean duration of symptoms was 4 months. Five patients had systemic flu-like symptoms. the most common respiratory symptom was gradual dyspnea Two patients revealed a mild degree of anemia Four cases had leukocytois of more than 10,000/mm3. ESR and CRP O.K. elevated in all measured cases. Anti-nuclear antibody (ANA) was positive in three of six patients and ds-DNA antibody was positive in one of six patients Restrictive pattern of PFT was predominant. Diffusion capacity of carbonmonoxide (DLCO) decreased markedly. In bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL), total cell counts elevated about three times of normal value. On differntial counts of BAL cells, lymphocytes, neutrophils and eosinophils were higher than those of normal controls. The prominent finding of chest radiology was bilaterally patchy opacifications in parenchyme of lower lung zones. On HRCT, bilaterally patchy areas of ground-glass attenuation and/or areas of alveolar consolidation were commonly shown. The number of pathologic type was one case of group I, four cases of group II and two cases of group III. The average period from diagnosis to the last follow-up was 24.8 months. Five patients were clinically recovered to the previously well-being state. Conclusion Patients with NIP had different clinical features from UIP, AIP

  3. Aircraft mishap investigation with radiology-assisted autopsy: helicopter crash with control injury.

    PubMed

    Folio, R Les; Harcke, H Theodore; Luzi, Scott A

    2009-04-01

    Radiology-assisted autopsy traditionally has been plain film-based, but now is being augmented by computed tomography (CT). The authors present a two-fatality rotary wing crash scenario illustrating application of advanced radiographic techniques that can guide and supplement the forensic pathologist's physical autopsy. The radiographic findings also have the potential for use by the aircraft mishap investigation board. Prior to forensic autopsy, the two crash fatalities were imaged with conventional two-dimensional radiographs (digital technique) and with multidetector CT The CT data were used for multiplanar two-dimensional and three-dimensional (3D) image reconstruction. The forensic pathologist was provided with information about skeletal fractures, metal fragment location, and other pathologic findings of potential use in the physical autopsy. The radiologic autopsy served as a supplement to the physical autopsy and did not replace the traditional autopsy in these cases. Both individuals sustained severe blunt force trauma with multiple fractures of the skull, face, chest, pelvis, and extremities. Individual fractures differed; however, one individual showed hand and lower extremity injuries similar to those associated with control of the aircraft at the time of impact. The concept of "control injury" has been challenged by Campman et al., who found that control surface injuries have a low sensitivity and specificity for establishing who the pilot was in an accident. The application of new post mortem imaging techniques may help to resolve control injury questions. In addition, the combination of injuries in our cases may contribute to further understanding of control surface injury patterns in helicopter mishaps. PMID:19378913

  4. Segmentation of ribs in digital chest radiographs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cong, Lin; Guo, Wei; Li, Qiang

    2016-03-01

    Ribs and clavicles in posterior-anterior (PA) digital chest radiographs often overlap with lung abnormalities such as nodules, and cause missing of these abnormalities, it is therefore necessary to remove or reduce the ribs in chest radiographs. The purpose of this study was to develop a fully automated algorithm to segment ribs within lung area in digital radiography (DR) for removal of the ribs. The rib segmentation algorithm consists of three steps. Firstly, a radiograph was pre-processed for contrast adjustment and noise removal; second, generalized Hough transform was employed to localize the lower boundary of the ribs. In the third step, a novel bilateral dynamic programming algorithm was used to accurately segment the upper and lower boundaries of ribs simultaneously. The width of the ribs and the smoothness of the rib boundaries were incorporated in the cost function of the bilateral dynamic programming for obtaining consistent results for the upper and lower boundaries. Our database consisted of 93 DR images, including, respectively, 23 and 70 images acquired with a DR system from Shanghai United-Imaging Healthcare Co. and from GE Healthcare Co. The rib localization algorithm achieved a sensitivity of 98.2% with 0.1 false positives per image. The accuracy of the detected ribs was further evaluated subjectively in 3 levels: "1", good; "2", acceptable; "3", poor. The percentages of good, acceptable, and poor segmentation results were 91.1%, 7.2%, and 1.7%, respectively. Our algorithm can obtain good segmentation results for ribs in chest radiography and would be useful for rib reduction in our future study.

  5. 42 CFR 37.54 - Notification of abnormal radiographic findings.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... in accordance with section 203 of the Act (see 30 CFR part 90). Positive findings with regard to... CARE AND EXAMINATIONS SPECIFICATIONS FOR MEDICAL EXAMINATIONS OF UNDERGROUND COAL MINERS Chest Roentgenographic Examinations Specifications for Interpretation, Classification, and Submission of...

  6. Al Hirschfeld's NINA as a prototype search task for studying perceptual error in radiology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nodine, Calvin F.; Kundel, Harold L.

    1997-04-01

    Artist Al Hirschfeld has been hiding the word NINA (his daughter's name) in line drawings of theatrical scenes that have appeared in the New York Times for over 50 years. This paper shows how Hirschfeld's search task of finding the name NINA in his drawings illustrates basic perceptual principles of detection, discrimination and decision-making commonly encountered in radiology search tasks. Hirschfeld's hiding of NINA is typically accomplished by camouflaging the letters of the name and blending them into scenic background details such as wisps of hair and folds of clothing. In a similar way, pulmonary nodules and breast lesions are camouflaged by anatomic features of the chest or breast image. Hirschfeld's hidden NINAs are sometimes missed because they are integrated into a Gestalt overview rather than differentiated from background features during focal scanning. This may be similar to overlooking an obvious nodule behind the heart in a chest x-ray image. Because it is a search game, Hirschfeld assigns a number to each drawing to indicate how many NINAs he has hidden so as not to frustrate his viewers. In the radiologists' task, the number of targets detected in a medical image is determined by combining perceptual input with probabilities generated from clinical history and viewing experience. Thus, in the absence of truth, searching for abnormalities in x-ray images creates opportunities for recognition and decision errors (e.g. false positives and false negatives). We illustrate how camouflage decreases the conspicuity of both artistic and radiographic targets, compare detection performance of radiologists with lay persons searching for NINAs, and, show similarities and differences between scanning strategies of the two groups based on eye-position data.

  7. [Isolated chest trauma in elderly patients].

    PubMed

    Yersin, Bertrand; Carron, Pierre-Nicolas; Pasquier, Mathieu; Zingg, Tobias

    2015-08-12

    In elderly patients, a blunt trauma of the chest is associated with a significant risk of complications and mortality. The number of ribs fractures (≥ 4), the presence of bilateral rib fractures, of a pulmonary contusion, of existent comorbidities or acute extra-thoracic traumatic lesions, and lastly the severity of thoracic pain, are indeed important risk factors of complications and mortality. Their presence may require hospitalization of the patient. When complications do occur, they are represented by alveolar hypoventilation, pulmonary atelectasia and broncho-pulmonary infections. When hospitalization is required, it may allow for the specific treatment of thoracic pain, including locoregional anesthesia techniques. PMID:26449103

  8. Results of chest wall resection and reconstruction in 162 patients with benign and malignant chest wall disease

    PubMed Central

    Aghajanzadeh, Manoucheher; Alavy, Ali; Taskindost, Mehrdad; Pourrasouly, Zahra; Aghajanzadeh, Gilda; massahnia, Sara

    2010-01-01

    Background Chest wall resection is a complicated treatment modality with significant morbidity. The purpose of this study is to report our experience with chest wall resections and reconstructions. Methods The records of all patients undergoing chest wall resection and reconstruction were reviewed. Diagnostic procedures, surgical indications, the location and size of the chest wall defect, performance of lung resection, the type of prosthesis, and postoperative complications were recorded. Results From 1997 to 2008, 162 patients underwent chest wall resection.113 (70%) of patients were male. Age of patients was 14 to 69 years. The most common indications for surgery were primary chest wall tumors. The most common localized chest wall mass has been seen in the anterior chest wall. Sternal resection was required in 22 patients, Lung resection in 15 patients, Rigid prosthetic reconstruction has been used in 20 patients and nonrigid prolene mesh and Marlex mesh in 40 patients. Mean intensive care unit stay was 8 days. In-hospital mortality was 3.7 % (six patients). Conclusions Chest wall resection and reconstruction with Bone cement sandwich with mesh can be performed as a safe and effective surgical procedure for major chest wall defects and respiratory failure is lower in prosthetic reconstruction patients than previously reported (6). PMID:22263024

  9. Pneumonia caused by Pittsburgh pneumonia agent: radiologic manifestations

    SciTech Connect

    Muder, R.R.; Reddy, S.C.; Yu, V.L.; Kroboth, F.J.

    1984-03-01

    Using an objective scoring system, chest radiographs were reviewed in 23 cases of pneumonia due to the Pittsburgh pneumonia agent (PPA, Tatlockia micdadei, Legionella micdadei), including six cases of pneumonia with simultaneous isolation of PPA and L pneumophila (Legionnaires' disease). Infiltrates were typically segmental to lobar; nodular infiltrates were noted in three cases. Spread to additional lobes after presentation occurred in four of 17 PPA infections. Pneumonia caused by both PPA and L pneumophila was unusually severe, with involvement of all lobes occurring in four of six cases, compared with one of 17 cases of PPA infection (p>0.02). Radiographic severity did not correlate with underlying disease, immune status, or outcome. The majority of patients receiving erythromycin demonstrated objective radiologic improvement. In a patients, population that included nonimmunosuppressed patient, nodule formation and rapid radiologic progression were not found to be characteristic of PPA pneumonia.

  10. SU-E-I-74: Image-Matching Technique of Computed Tomography Images for Personal Identification: A Preliminary Study Using Anthropomorphic Chest Phantoms

    SciTech Connect

    Matsunobu, Y; Shiotsuki, K; Morishita, J

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: Fingerprints, dental impressions, and DNA are used to identify unidentified bodies in forensic medicine. Cranial Computed tomography (CT) images and/or dental radiographs are also used for identification. Radiological identification is important, particularly in the absence of comparative fingerprints, dental impressions, and DNA samples. The development of an automated radiological identification system for unidentified bodies is desirable. We investigated the potential usefulness of bone structure for matching chest CT images. Methods: CT images of three anthropomorphic chest phantoms were obtained on different days in various settings. One of the phantoms was assumed to be an unidentified body. The bone image and the bone image with soft tissue (BST image) were extracted from the CT images. To examine the usefulness of the bone image and/or the BST image, the similarities between the two-dimensional (2D) or threedimensional (3D) images of the same and different phantoms were evaluated in terms of the normalized cross-correlation value (NCC). Results: For the 2D and 3D BST images, the NCCs obtained from the same phantom assumed to be an unidentified body (2D, 0.99; 3D, 0.93) were higher than those for the different phantoms (2D, 0.95 and 0.91; 3D, 0.89 and 0.80). The NCCs for the same phantom (2D, 0.95; 3D, 0.88) were greater compared to those of the different phantoms (2D, 0.61 and 0.25; 3D, 0.23 and 0.10) for the bone image. The difference in the NCCs between the same and different phantoms tended to be larger for the bone images than for the BST images. These findings suggest that the image-matching technique is more useful when utilizing the bone image than when utilizing the BST image to identify different people. Conclusion: This preliminary study indicated that evaluating the similarity of bone structure in 2D and 3D images is potentially useful for identifying of an unidentified body.

  11. Severe Pulmonary Valve Regurgitation 40 Years After Blunt Chest Trauma.

    PubMed

    Fuglsang, Simon; Heiberg, Johan; Hjortdal, Vibeke Elisabeth

    2015-10-01

    Severe pulmonary valve regurgitation caused by a pulmonary valve tear is a rare complication to a blunt chest trauma. In this case report, we present a patient with pulmonary regurgitation originating from a chest trauma 40 years ago. Possible mechanisms are osseous pinch of the pulmonary valve between the anterior chest wall and the vertebral column, and retrograde blowout from severe compression of the lungs. PMID:26434447

  12. [A case of esophageal cancer with a funnel chest].

    PubMed

    Takemura, Manabu; Matsuyama, Takeshi; Nishibeppu, Keiji; Matsumura, Atsushi; Ogino, Shiro; Mugitani, Tatsuro; Akami, Toshikazu; Shimode, Yoshikazu

    2013-11-01

    Esophageal cancer is a disease that is difficult to manage before and after surgery and is associated with a high in-hospital mortality rate despite there being reports of improved outcomes after multidisciplinary treatment. Meanwhile, although funnel chest is generally a subclinical condition, patients with this deformity may sometimes present with cardiac failure and chest pain. We report a case of advanced esophageal cancer with a funnel chest deformity that was very difficult to reconstruct after thoracoscopy-assisted resection. PMID:24394024

  13. Recurrent Chest Pain, as a Presenting Sign of Ovarian Endometrioma

    PubMed Central

    Yildirim, Mehmet; Oztekin, Ozgur; Oztekin, Deniz

    2011-01-01

    Chest pain is a rare sign of thoracal endometriosis associated with endometrioma of the tubo-ovarian endometrioma. We report the case periodic episodes of chest pain concurrent with menstruation in a 35-year-old female, in which ovarian endometrioma was diagnosed and left-sided oophorectomy was performed. After surgery, patient underwent medical treatment which included a Gn-RH agonist and a combined oral contraceptive. In the follow-up period, there was no evidence of chest pain. PMID:22084779

  14. Cross-chest liposuction in gynaecomastia

    PubMed Central

    Murali, Biju; Vijayaraghavan, Sundeep; Kishore, P.; Iyer, Subramania; Jimmy, Mathew; Sharma, Mohit; Paul, George; Chavare, Sachin

    2011-01-01

    Background: Gynaecomastia is usually treated with liposuction or liposuction with excision of the glandular tissue. The type of surgery chosen depends on the grade of the condition. Objective: Because gynaecomastia is treated primarily as a cosmetic procedure, we aimed at reducing the invasiveness of the surgery. Materials and Methods: The technique complies with all recommended protocols for different grades of gynaecomastia. It uses liposuction, gland excision, or both, leaving only minimal post-operative scars. The use of cross-chest liposuction through incisions on the edge of the areola helps to get rid of all the fat under the areola without an additional scar as in the conventional method. Results: This is a short series of 20 patients, all with bilateral gynaecomastia (i.e., 40 breasts), belonging to Simon's Stage 1 and 2, studied over a period of 2 years. The average period of follow-up was 15 months. Post-operative complications were reported in only two cases, with none showing long-term complications or issues specifically due to the procedure. Conclusions : Cross-chest liposuction for gynaecomastia is a simple yet effective surgical tool in bilateral gynaecomastia treatment to decrease the post-operative scars. The use of techniques like incision line drain placement and post-drain removal suturing of wounds aid in decreasing the scar. PMID:21713166

  15. Solitary fibrous tumour of the chest wall.

    PubMed

    Mohtarrudin, N; Nor Hanipah, Z; Mohd Dusa, N

    2016-04-01

    Extrapleural solitary fibrous tumours (SFTs) are rare tumours characterized by patternless spindle cells with haemangiopericytoma-like vascular spaces. Previously the tumours have been classified as haemangiopericytoma, an entity that is now considered obsolete. We report a case of extrapleural SFT arising in the soft tissue of the chest wall. The patient was a 31-year-old Malay lady presenting with a mobile swelling of the right chest wall for more than five years. During excision the tumour was noted to be well-circumscribed and yellowish in colour, giving an impression of lipoma. Microscopically, the tumour had patternless architecture, characterized by hypocellular and hypercellular areas. It was composed of uniform, spindle-shaped cells displaying oval nuclei, inconspicuous nucleoli, pale cytoplasm and indistinct cell borders. The mitotic count was 2 per 10 HPF. Branching, medium-sized thin-walled blood vessels in a haemangiopericytomatous growth pattern, some with hyalinised wall were identified. The neoplastic cells were immunoreactive to CD99 and CD34 and were non-immunoreactive to Desmin, Smooth Muscle Actin, S100 protein and EMA. We elucidate the challenges in diagnosing this tumour in this unusual location. PMID:27126667

  16. Acute chest pain emergencies - spouses' prehospital experiences.

    PubMed

    Forslund, Kerstin; Quell, Robin; Sørlie, Venke

    2008-10-01

    The call to the Emergency Medical Dispatch Centre is often a person's first contact with the health-care system in cases of acute illness or injury and acute chest pain is a common reason for calling. The aim was to illuminate how spouses to persons with acute chest pain experienced the alarm situation, the emergency call and the prehospital emergency care. Interviews were conducted with nineteen spouses. A phenomenological-hermeneutic approach was used for the analyses. The themes responsibility and uneasiness emerged as well as an overall theme of aloneness. Being a spouse to a person in need of acute medical and nursing assistance was interpreted as "Being responsible and trying to preserve life" and "Being able to manage the uneasiness and having trust in an uncertain situation." When their partners' life was at risk the spouses were in an escalating spiral of worry, uncertainty, stress, fear of loss, feeling of loneliness and desperation. They had to manage emotional distress and felt compelled to act to preserve life, a challenging situation. PMID:18929341

  17. Evaluation of the safety of high-frequency chest wall oscillation (HFCWO) therapy in blunt thoracic trauma patients

    PubMed Central

    Anderson, Casandra A; Palmer, Cassandra A; Ney, Arthur L; Becker, Brian; Schaffel, Steven D; Quickel, Robert R

    2008-01-01

    Background Airway clearance is frequently needed by patients suffering from blunt chest wall trauma. High Frequency Chest Wall Oscillation (HFCWO) has been shown to be effective in helping to clear secretions from the lungs of patients with cystic fibrosis, bronchiectasis, asthma, primary ciliary dyskinesia, emphysema, COPD, and many others. Chest wall trauma patients are at increased risk for development of pulmonary complications related to airway clearance. These patients frequently have chest tubes, drains, catheters, etc. which could become dislodged during HFCWO. This prospective observational study was conducted to determine if HFCWO treatment, as provided by The Vest™ Airway Clearance System (Hill-Rom, Saint Paul, MN), was safe and well tolerated by these patients. Methods Twenty-five blunt thoracic trauma patients were entered into the study. These patients were consented. Each patient was prescribed 2, 15 minute HFCWO treatments per day using The Vest® Airway Clearance System (Hill-Rom, Inc., St Paul, MN). The Vest® system was set to a frequency of 10–12 Hz and a pressure of 2–3 (arbitrary unit). Physiological parameters were measured before, during, and after treatment. Patients were free to refuse or terminate a treatment early for any reason. Results No chest tubes, lines, drains or catheters were dislodged as a result of treatment. One patient with flail chest had a chest tube placed after one treatment due to increasing serous effusion. No treatments were missed and continued without further incident. Post treatment survey showed 76% experienced mild or no pain and more productive cough. Thirty days after discharge there were no deaths or hospital re-admissions. Conclusion This study suggests that HFCWO treatment is safe for trauma patients with lung and chest wall injuries. These findings support further work to demonstrate the airway clearance benefits of HFCWO treatment. PMID:18837992

  18. Alternative diagnoses based on CT angiography of the chest in patients with suspected pulmonary thromboembolism

    PubMed Central

    Ferreira, Eleci Vaz; Gazzana, Marcelo Basso; Sarmento, Muriel Bossle; Guazzelli, Pedro Arends; Hoffmeister, Mariana Costa; Guerra, Vinicius André; Seligman, Renato; Knorst, Marli Maria

    2016-01-01

    Objective : To determine the prevalence of alternative diagnoses based on chest CT angiography (CTA) in patients with suspected pulmonary thromboembolism (PTE) who tested negative for PTE, as well as whether those alternative diagnoses had been considered prior to the CTA. Methods : This was a cross-sectional, retrospective study involving 191 adult patients undergoing CTA for suspected PTE between September of 2009 and May of 2012. Chest X-rays and CTAs were reviewed to determine whether the findings suggested an alternative diagnosis in the cases not diagnosed as PTE. Data on symptoms, risk factors, comorbidities, length of hospital stay, and mortality were collected. Results : On the basis of the CTA findings, PTE was diagnosed in 47 cases (24.6%). Among the 144 patients not diagnosed with PTE via CTA, the findings were abnormal in 120 (83.3%). Such findings were consistent with an alternative diagnosis that explained the symptoms in 75 patients (39.3%). Among those 75 cases, there were only 39 (20.4%) in which the same alterations had not been previously detected on chest X-rays. The most common alternative diagnosis, made solely on the basis of the CTA findings, was pneumonia (identified in 20 cases). Symptoms, risk factors, comorbidities, and the in-hospital mortality rate did not differ significantly between the patients with and without PTE. However, the median hospital stay was significantly longer in the patients with PTE than in those without (18.0 and 9.5 days, respectively; p = 0.001). Conclusions : Our results indicate that chest CTA is useful in cases of suspected PTE, because it can confirm the diagnosis and reveal findings consistent with an alternative diagnosis in a significant number of patients. PMID:26982039

  19. Factors modulating effective chest compressions in the neonatal period.

    PubMed

    Mildenhall, Lindsay F J; Huynh, Trang K

    2013-12-01

    The need for chest compressions in the newborn is a rare occurrence. The methods employed for delivery of chest compressions have been poorly researched. Techniques that have been studied include compression:ventilation ratios, thumb versus finger method of delivering compressions, depth of compression, site on chest of compression, synchrony or asynchrony of breaths with compressions, and modalities to improve the compression technique and consistency. Although still in its early days, an evidence-based guideline for chest compressions is beginning to take shape. PMID:23920076

  20. Primary chest wall abscess mimicking a breast tumor that occurred after blunt chest trauma: a case report.

    PubMed

    Yamaoka, Yusuke; Yamamura, Jun; Masuda, Norikazu; Yasojima, Hiroyuki; Mizutani, Makiko; Nakamori, Shoji; Kanazawa, Toru; Kuriyama, Keiko; Mano, Masayuki; Sekimoto, Mitsugu

    2014-01-01

    Primary chest wall abscess occurring after blunt chest trauma is rare. We present the case of a 50-year-old woman who presented with a swelling in her left breast. The patient had experienced blunt chest trauma 2 months back. Needle aspiration revealed pus formation in the patient's chest. Computed tomography revealed a mass in the lower region of the left mammary gland, with thickening of the parietal pleura and skin and fracture of the fifth rib under the abscess. Following antibiotic administration and irrigation of the affected region, surgical debridement was performed. During surgery, we found that the pectoralis major muscle at the level of the fifth rib was markedly damaged, although the necrotic tissue did not contact the mammary gland. We diagnosed the lesion as a chest wall abscess that occurred in response to blunt chest trauma. Her postoperative course was uneventful. There has been no recurrence for six months after surgery. PMID:24660001

  1. Radiology's value chain.

    PubMed

    Enzmann, Dieter R

    2012-04-01

    A diagnostic radiology value chain is constructed to define its main components, all of which are vulnerable to change, because digitization has caused disaggregation of the chain. Some components afford opportunities to improve productivity, some add value, while some face outsourcing to lower labor cost and to information technology substitutes, raising commoditization risks. Digital image information, because it can be competitive at smaller economies of scale, allows faster, differential rates of technological innovation of components, initiating a centralization-to-decentralization technology trend. Digitization, having triggered disaggregation of radiology's professional service model, may soon usher in an information business model. This means moving from a mind-set of "reading images" to an orientation of creating and organizing information for greater accuracy, faster speed, and lower cost in medical decision making. Information businesses view value chain investments differently than do small professional services. In the former model, producing a better business product will extend image interpretation beyond a radiologist's personal fund of knowledge to encompass expanding external imaging databases. A follow-on expansion with integration of image and molecular information into a report will offer new value in medical decision making. Improved interpretation plus new integration will enrich and diversify radiology's key service products, the report and consultation. A more robust, information-rich report derived from a "systems" and "computational" radiology approach will be facilitated by a transition from a professional service to an information business. Under health care reform, radiology will transition its emphasis from volume to greater value. Radiology's future brightens with the adoption of a philosophy of offering information rather than "reads" for decision making. Staunchly defending the status quo via turf wars is unlikely to constitute a

  2. Radiological worker training

    SciTech Connect

    1998-10-01

    This Handbook describes an implementation process for core training as recommended in Implementation Guide G441.12, Radiation Safety Training, and as outlined in the DOE Radiological Control Standard (RCS). The Handbook is meant to assist those individuals within the Department of Energy, Managing and Operating contractors, and Managing and Integrating contractors identified as having responsibility for implementing core training recommended by the RCS. This training is intended for radiological workers to assist in meeting their job-specific training requirements of 10 CFR 835. While this Handbook addresses many requirements of 10 CFR 835 Subpart J, it must be supplemented with facility-specific information to achieve full compliance.

  3. Westinghouse radiological containment guide

    SciTech Connect

    Aitken, S.B.; Brown, R.L.; Cantrell, J.R.; Wilcox, D.P.

    1994-03-01

    This document provides uniform guidance for Westinghouse contractors on the implementation of radiological containments. This document reflects standard industry practices and is provided as a guide. The guidance presented herein is consistent with the requirements of the DOE Radiological Control Manual (DOE N 5480.6). This guidance should further serve to enable and encourage the use of containments for contamination control and to accomplish the following: Minimize personnel contamination; Prevent the spread of contamination; Minimize the required use of protective clothing and personal protective equipment; Minimize the generation of waste.

  4. Successful Transformational Radiology Leaders.

    PubMed

    Douget, Karen

    2015-01-01

    Transformational radiology leaders elevate subordinates, expand self-awareness, develop lasting relationships, strive to exceed expectations, and uphold the vision and goals of the organization. In order for radiology leaders to become more transformational in their leadership style there are four fundamental elements they must learn: idealized influence, individualized consideration, inspirational motivation, and intellectual stimulation. Leaders can utilize personality and self-assessments to learn more about themselves, identify areas of strengths and weaknesses, and learn to be more effective when leading employees. PMID:26710553

  5. Back to Basics – ‘Must Know’ Classical Signs in Thoracic Radiology

    PubMed Central

    Kumaresh, Athiyappan; Kumar, Mitesh; Dev, Bhawna; Gorantla, Rajani; Sai, PM Venkata; Thanasekaraan, Vijayalakshmi

    2015-01-01

    There are a few signs in radiology which are based on many common objects or patterns that we come across in our routine lives. The objective behind the association between such common objects and the corresponding pathologies is to make the reader understand and remember the disease process. These signs do not necessarily indicate a particular disease, but are usually suggestive of a group of similar pathologies which will facilitate in the narrowing down of the differential diagnosis. These signs can be seen in different imaging modalities like plain radiograph and computed tomography. In this essay, we describe 24 classical radiological signs used in chest imaging, which would be extremely helpful in routine clinical practice not only for radiologists but also for chest physicians and cardiothoracic surgeons. PMID:26312141

  6. Relationship between Radiological Stages and Prognoses of Pneumocystis Pneumonia in Non-AIDS Immunocompromised Patients

    PubMed Central

    Mu, Xiang-Dong; Jia, Peng; Gao, Li; Su, Li; Zhang, Cheng; Wang, Ren-Gui; Wang, Guang-Fa

    2016-01-01

    Background: Although radiological features of pneumocystis pneumonia (PCP) in non-Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome (AIDS) immunocompromised patients have been reported by other authors, there were no studies on the radiological stages of PCP previously. This study aimed to elucidate the radiological stages and prognoses of PCP in non-AIDS immunocompromised patients. Methods: Retrospective analysis of radiological manifestations and prognoses of 105 non-AIDS PCP immunocompromised patients from August 2009 to April 2016 was conducted. Chest radiograph was divided into three stages: early stage (normal or nearly normal chest radiograph), mid stage (bilateral pulmonary infiltrates), and late stage (bilateral pulmonary consolidations); chest high-resolution computed tomography (HRCT) was also divided into three stages: early stage (bilateral diffuse ground-glass opacity [GGO]), mid stage (bilateral diffuse GGO and patchy consolidations), and late stage (bilateral diffuse consolidations). Results: The case fatality rate (CFR) of all patients was 34.3% (36/105), all of them took routine chest X-ray (CXR), and 84 underwent chest CT examinations. According to the CXR most near the beginning of anti-PCP therapy, 18 cases were at early stage and CFR was 0 (0/18, P < 0.01), 50 cases were at mid stage and CFR was 28.0% (14/50, P > 0.05), and 37 cases were at late stage and CFR was 59.5% (22/37, P < 0.01). According to the chest HRCT most near the beginning of anti-PCP therapy, 40 cases were at early stage and CFR was 20.0% (8/40, P > 0.05), 34 cases were at mid stage and CFR was 47.1% (16/34, P > 0.05), and 10 cases were at late stage and CFR was 80.0% (8/10, P < 0.05); barotrauma, including pneumothorax, pneumomediastinum, and pneumohypoderma, was found in 18 cases and the CFR was 77.8% (14/18, P < 0.01). Conclusions: Based on the radiological manifestations, the course of PCP in non-AIDS immunocompromised patients can be divided into three stages: early stage, mid stage

  7. Is diagnostic accuracy for detecting pulmonary nodules in chest CT reduced after a long day of reading?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krupinski, Elizabeth A.; Berbaum, Kevin S.; Caldwell, Robert; Schartz, Kevin M.

    2012-02-01

    Radiologists are reading more cases with more images, especially in CT and MRI and thus working longer hours than ever before. There have been concerns raised regarding fatigue and whether it impacts diagnostic accuracy. This study measured the impact of reader visual fatigue by assessing symptoms, visual strain via dark focus of accommodation, and diagnostic accuracy. Twenty radiologists and 20 radiology residents were given two diagnostic performance tests searching CT chest sequences for a solitary pulmonary nodule before (rested) and after (tired) a day of clinical reading. 10 cases used free search and navigation, and the other 100 cases used preset scrolling speed and duration. Subjects filled out the Swedish Occupational Fatigue Inventory (SOFI) and the oculomotor strain subscale of the Simulator Sickness Questionnaire (SSQ) before each session. Accuracy was measured using ROC techniques. Using Swensson's technique yields an ROC area = 0.86 rested vs. 0.83 tired, p (one-tailed) = 0.09. Using Swensson's LROC technique yields an area = 0.73 rested vs. 0.66 tired, p (one-tailed) = 0.09. Using Swensson's Loc Accuracy technique yields an area = 0.77 rested vs. 0.72 tired, p (one-tailed) = 0.13). Subjective measures of fatigue increased significantly from early to late reading. To date, the results support our findings with static images and detection of bone fractures. Radiologists at the end of a long work day experience greater levels of measurable visual fatigue or strain, contributing to a decrease in diagnostic accuracy. The decrease in accuracy was not as great however as with static images.

  8. Biotin-responsive basal ganglia disease should be renamed biotin-thiamine-responsive basal ganglia disease: a retrospective review of the clinical, radiological and molecular findings of 18 new cases

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Biotin-responsive basal ganglia disease (BBGD) is an autosomal recessive neurometabolic disorder. It is characterized by sub acute encephalopathy with confusion, seizure, dysarthria and dystonia following a history of febrile illness. If left untreated with biotin, the disease can progress to severe quadriparesis and even death. Method A retrospective chart review of 18 patients with BBGD from two tertiary institutions describing their clinical, magnetic resonance imaging and molecular findings was conducted. Result Eighteen children from 13 families seen over a period of nine years (2003–2012) were included. (Age range: 14month to 23 years, M: F: 1:1). The clinical features included sub acute encephalopathy, ataxia (n= 18), seizures (n= 13) dystonia (n=12) ,dysarthria (n= 9), quadriparesis and hyperreflexia (n=9). Magnetic resonance imaging demonstrated abnormal signal intensity with swelling in the basal ganglia during acute crises (n= 13/13) and atrophy of the basal ganglia and necrosis during follow up (n= 13/13). One-third of the present patients showed the recurrence of acute crises while on biotin therapy alone, but after the addition of thiamine, crises did not recur. All of the patients have a homozygous missense mutation in exon 5 of the SLC19A3 gene. The frequency of acute crises, delay in diagnosis and initiation of treatment significantly influenced the outcome. On follow up, four patients died, two had spastic quadriplegia, six had normal outcome and the rest had speech and motor dysfunctions. Conclusion Clinicians should suspect BBGD in any child presenting with sub acute encephalopathy, abnormal movement and MRI findings as described above. Both biotin and thiamine are essential for disease management. Since biotin alone could not prevent the recurrence of crises in some patients, a more appropriate term to describe the disease would be biotin-thiamine-responsive basal ganglia disease (BTBGD). PMID:23742248

  9. Comparison of chest compression quality between the modified chest compression method with the use of smartphone application and the standardized traditional chest compression method during CPR.

    PubMed

    Park, Sang-Sub

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to grasp difference in quality of chest compression accuracy between the modified chest compression method with the use of smartphone application and the standardized traditional chest compression method. Participants were progressed 64 people except 6 absentees among 70 people who agreed to participation with completing the CPR curriculum. In the classification of group in participants, the modified chest compression method was called as smartphone group (33 people). The standardized chest compression method was called as traditional group (31 people). The common equipments in both groups were used Manikin for practice and Manikin for evaluation. In the meantime, the smartphone group for application was utilized Android and iOS Operating System (OS) of 2 smartphone products (G, i). The measurement period was conducted from September 25th to 26th, 2012. Data analysis was used SPSS WIN 12.0 program. As a result of research, the proper compression depth (mm) was shown the proper compression depth (p< 0.01) in traditional group (53.77 mm) compared to smartphone group (48.35 mm). Even the proper chest compression (%) was formed suitably (p< 0.05) in traditional group (73.96%) more than smartphone group (60.51%). As for the awareness of chest compression accuracy, the traditional group (3.83 points) had the higher awareness of chest compression accuracy (p< 0.001) than the smartphone group (2.32 points). In the questionnaire that was additionally carried out 1 question only in smartphone group, the modified chest compression method with the use of smartphone had the high negative reason in rescuer for occurrence of hand back pain (48.5%) and unstable posture (21.2%). PMID:24704648

  10. Doses to patients from diagnostic radiology in France

    SciTech Connect

    Maccia, C.; Benedittini, M.; Lefaure, C.; Fagnani, F.

    1988-04-01

    Reported here are results of a 1982 national survey in France to establish the collective effective dose equivalent associated with the main types of radiological examinations practiced annually in this country (except nuclear medicine, C.T. scans, dental radiology and mass chest screening). This report describes the methodology followed in achieving dose measurements either on an anthropomorphic phantom or directly on the patient, and it highlights the importance of the radiological procedures (number of x-ray films, fluoroscopy screening time, etc.) on the patient organ doses. The estimated collective effective dose equivalent associated with these radiological practices is 86,000 person-Sv, i.e., an individual effective dose equivalent of 1.58 mSv y-1; the genetically significant dose figure is 0.29 mSv and the collective red bone marrow dose due to 45 million x-ray exams practiced in France (1982) is 40,300 person-Sv, i.e. 0.74 mSv per inhabitant.

  11. Unusual chest wall pain caused by thoracic disc herniation in a professional baseball pitcher.

    PubMed

    Kato, Kinshi; Yabuki, Shoji; Otani, Koji; Nikaido, Takuya; Otoshi, Ken-Ichi; Watanabe, Kazuyuki; Kikuchi, Shin-Ichi; Konno, Shin-Ichi

    2016-06-01

    Symptomatic thoracic disc herniation is clinically rare. There are few cases of disc herniation of the thoracic spine in top athletes described in the literature. We herein present a rare case of chest wall pain due to thoracic disc herniation in a professional baseball pitcher. A 30-year-old, left-handed pitcher complained of left-sided chest wall pain in the region of his lower ribs during a game. Neurological examination revealed hypoesthesia of the left side of the chest at the level of the lower thoracic spine. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the thoracic spine showed a left-sided paramedian disc herniation at the T9-T10 level. The player was initially prescribed rest, administration of pregabalin (150 mg twice a day), and subsequent physical rehabilitation. He was able to resume full training and pitching without medication 6 months after the onset. A follow-up MRI of the thoracic spine showed a reduction in the size of the herniated disc compared to the initial findings. Though relatively rare, thoracic disc herniation should be considered in cases of chest wall pain in athletes. PMID:26983590

  12. Semi-automated location identification of catheters in digital chest radiographs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keller, Brad M.; Reeves, Anthony P.; Cham, Matthew D.; Henschke, Claudia I.; Yankelevitz, David F.

    2007-03-01

    Localization of catheter tips is the most common task in intensive care unit imaging. In this work, catheters appearing in digital chest radiographs acquired by portable chest x-rays were tracked using a semi-automatic method. Due to the fact that catheters are synthetic objects, its profile does not vary drastically over its length. Therefore, we use forward looking registration with normalized cross-correlation in order to take advantage of a priori information of the catheter profile. The registration is accomplished with a two-dimensional template representative of the catheter to be tracked generated using two seed points given by the user. To validate catheter tracking with this method, we look at two metrics: accuracy and precision. The algorithms results are compared to a ground truth established by catheter midlines marked by expert radiologists. Using 12 objects of interest comprised of naso-gastric, endo-tracheal tubes, and chest tubes, and PICC and central venous catheters, we find that our algorithm can fully track 75% of the objects of interest, with a average tracking accuracy and precision of 85.0%, 93.6% respectively using the above metrics. Such a technique would be useful for physicians wishing to verify the positioning of catheter tips using chest radiographs.

  13. Chest CT abnormalities and quality of life: relationship in adult cystic fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Kilcoyne, Aoife; Lavelle, Lisa P.; McCarthy, Colin J.; McEvoy, Sinead H.; Fleming, Hannah; Gallagher, Annika; Loeve, Martine; Tiddens, Harm; McKone, Edward; Gallagher, Charles C.

    2016-01-01

    Background To evaluate the relationship between lung parenchymal abnormalities on chest CT and health-related quality of life in adult cystic fibrosis (CF). Methods The chest CT scans of 101 consecutive CF adults (mean age 27.8±7.9, 64 males) were prospectively scored by two blinded radiologists in consensus using a modified Bhalla score. Health-related quality of life was assessed using the revised Quittner Cystic Fibrosis Questionnaire (CFQ-R). Multiple regressions were performed with each of the CFQ-R domains and all clinical and imaging findings to assess independent correlations. Results There were 18 inpatients and 83 outpatients. For the cohort of inpatients, CT abnormalities were significantly (P<0.005 for all) associated with Respiratory Symptoms (Air Trapping), and also with Social Functioning (Consolidation) and Role Functioning (Consolidation). For outpatients, CT abnormalities were significantly (P<0.005 for all) associated with Respiratory Symptoms (Consolidation) and also with Physical Functioning (Consolidation), Vitality (Consolidation, Severity of Bronchiectasis), Eating Problems (airway wall thickening), Treatment Burden (Total CT Score), Body Image (Severity of Bronchiectasis) and Role Functioning (Tree-in-bud nodules). Consolidation was the commonest independent CT predictor for both inpatients (predictor for 2 domains) and outpatients (predictor in 3 domains). Several chest CT abnormalities excluded traditional measures such as FEV1 and BMI from the majority of CFQ-R domains. Conclusions Chest CT abnormalities are significantly associated with quality of life measures in adult CF, independent of clinical or spirometric measurements. PMID:27047946

  14. Respiratory chest movement measurement as a chair quality indicator – preliminary observations

    PubMed Central

    Szczygieł, Elżbieta; Zielonka, Katarzyna; Mazur, Tadeusz; Mętel, Sylwia; Golec, Joanna

    2015-01-01

    Regardless of the constantly increasing time man is spending in a sitting position, there is still a lack of objective chair quality assessment criteria. The aim of this paper is to find the answer to whether respiratory chest movement measurements can be a chair quality indicator. The study included 34 participants (mean 34.7 years ± 5.2). Their chest movements were assessed using respiratory inductive plethysmography while sitting on two subsequent chairs. Significant differences in chest movements depending on chair type were observed concerning the breathing duct (upper and lower) and breathing movement amplitude. The amplitude of the upper respiratory track in the first chair was higher (239.4 mV) compared with the second seat (207.3 mV) (p = .018). The analyzed parameters of respiratory chest movement may become a helpful indicator for design and selection of chairs which enable people to both work and relax in the most ergonomic conditions. PMID:26323780

  15. CR softcopy display presets based on optimum visualization of specific findings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andriole, Katherine P.; Gould, Robert G.; Webb, W. R.

    1999-07-01

    The purpose of this research is to assess the utility of providing presets for computed radiography (CR) softcopy display, based not on the window/level settings, but on image processing applied to the image based on optimization for visualization of specific findings, pathologies, etc. Clinical chest images are acquired using an Agfa ADC 70 CR scanner, and transferred over the PACS network to an image processing station which has the capability to perform multiscale contrast equalization. The optimal image processing settings per finding are developed in conjunction with a thoracic radiologist by manipulating the multiscale image contrast amplification algorithm parameters. Softcopy display of images processed with finding-specific settings are compared with the standard default image presentation for fifty cases of each category. Comparison is scored using a five point scale with positive one and two denoting the standard presentation is preferred over the finding-specific presets, negative one and two denoting the finding-specific preset is preferred over the standard presentation, and zero denoting no difference. Presets have been developed for pneumothorax and clinical cases are currently being collected in preparation for formal clinical trials. Subjective assessments indicate a preference for the optimized-preset presentation of images over the standard default, particularly by inexperienced radiology residents and referring clinicians.

  16. 324 Building Baseline Radiological Characterization

    SciTech Connect

    R.J. Reeder, J.C. Cooper

    2010-06-24

    This report documents the analysis of radiological data collected as part of the characterization study performed in 1998. The study was performed to create a baseline of the radiological conditions in the 324 Building.

  17. Radiological abnormalities among sheet-metal workers in the construction industry in the United States and Canada: Relationship to asbestos exposure

    SciTech Connect

    Selikoff, I.J.; Lilis, R. )

    1991-01-01

    We investigated the possible adverse health effects to sheet-metal workers who had past exposure to asbestos. A cross-sectional medical examination of 1,330 workers was conducted during 1986 and 1987 in seven cities in the United States and Canada. A total of 1,016 workers had been employed for at least 35 y in the industry, and the mean duration from onset of asbestos exposure was 39.5 y (SD = 7.41 y). Chest x-ray abnormalities were found in more than half of the group. Pleural fibrosis, the most frequently found abnormality, was present in 47.0% of the cases and was the only abnormality found in 27.8% of cases; parenchymal interstitial fibrosis, found in 33.1% of cases, was the only abnormality found in 16.2% of cases. Radiologic abnormalities increased as duration of exposure increased. A positive smoking history was associated with a higher prevalence of radiologically detectable parenchymal abnormalities, a finding confirmed by us and others. Dyspnea on exertion was graded by a Medical Research Council questionnaire, the examinee's self-assessment, and a more detailed 12-point scale questionnaire. Few persons had marked shortness of breath, and approximately one-third had slight dyspnea. Individuals who had radiologic abnormalities experienced more shortness of breath than did those who had no radiologic abnormalities. Cigarette smoking also resulted in a higher prevalence of dyspnea. The results indicate that during the past, construction sheet-metal workers have been significantly exposed to asbestos on the job. Every effort should be made to minimize the anticipated serious health consequences, and further asbestos exposure for those who continue in this trade should be avoided.

  18. Radiological Safety Handbook.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Army Ordnance Center and School, Aberdeen Proving Ground, MD.

    Written to be used concurrently with the U.S. Army's Radiological Safety Course, this publication discusses the causes, sources, and detection of nuclear radiation. In addition, the transportation and disposal of radioactive materials are covered. The report also deals with the safety precautions to be observed when working with lasers, microwave…

  19. Radiological Defense Manual.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Defense Civil Preparedness Agency (DOD), Washington, DC.

    Originally prepared for use as a student textbook in Radiological Defense (RADEF) courses, this manual provides the basic technical information necessary for an understanding of RADEF. It also briefly discusses the need for RADEF planning and expected postattack emergency operations. There are 14 chapters covering these major topics: introduction…

  20. Research Training in Radiology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Inst. of General Medical Sciences (NIH), Bethesda, MD.

    Radiology today is a major clinical specialty of medicine in terms of the number and complexity of patient examinations, and the financial resources, physician manpower, and supporting personnel required for performing its functions. It reached its present status because it provides accurate methods of diagnosis for so many diseases. However, this…

  1. Radiology of spinal curvature

    SciTech Connect

    De Smet, A.A.

    1985-01-01

    This book offers the only comprehensive, concise summary of both the clinical and radiologic features of thoracic and lumbar spine deformity. Emphasis is placed on idiopathic scoliosis, which represents 85% of all patients with scoliosis, but less common areas of secondary scoliosis, kyphosis and lordosis are also covered.

  2. PACS for GU radiology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hayrapetian, Alek S.; Barbaric, Zoran L.; Weinberg, Wolfram S.; Chan, Kelby K.; Loloyan, Mansur; Taira, Ricky K.; Huang, H. K.

    1991-07-01

    The authors have developed a PACS module for genito-urinary radiology. This module is based on image acquisition subsystem, database and storage server/cluster controllers, communication networks, display workstation and local database, and dedicated digitizer and printer. The design guideline for this system is generality and flexibility. As such this module serves as a prototype for future PACS module designs.

  3. Radiologic Technology Program Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Georgia Univ., Athens. Dept. of Vocational Education.

    This guide presents the standard curriculum for technical institutes in Georgia. The curriculum addresses the minimum competencies for a radiologic technology program. The guide contains four major sections. The General Information section contains an introduction giving an overview and defining purpose and objectives; a program description,…

  4. Radiology Technician (AFSC 90370).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sobczak, James

    This five-volume student text is designed for use by Air Force personnel enrolled in a self-study extension course for radiology technicians. Covered in the individual volumes are radiographic fundamentals (x-ray production; primary beams; exposure devices; film, film holders, and darkrooms; control of film quality; and environmental safety);…

  5. Ethical problems in radiology: radiological consumerism.

    PubMed

    Magnavita, N; Bergamaschi, A

    2009-10-01

    One of the causes of the increasing request for radiological examinations occurring in all economically developed countries is the active role played by the patient-consumer. Consumerism places the radiologist in an ethical dilemma, between the principle of autonomy on the one hand and the ethical principles of beneficence, nonmaleficence and justice on the other. The choice made by radiologists in moral dilemmas is inspired by an adherence to moral principles, which in Italy and elsewhere refer to the Judaeo-Christian tradition or to neo-Darwinian relativism. Whatever the choice, the radiologist is bound to adhere to that choice and to provide the patient with all the relevant information regarding his or her state of health. PMID:19662338

  6. Chest imaging and lung function impairment after long-term occupational exposure to low concentrations of chrysotile.

    PubMed

    Spyratos, Dionisios; Chloros, Diamantis; Haidich, Bettina; Dagdilelis, Loukas; Markou, Stamatia; Sichletidis, Lazaros

    2012-01-01

    The aim of the present study was the investigation of radiographic findings in relation to lung function after occupational exposure to permissible levels of relatively pure chrysotile (0.5-3% amphiboles). We studied 266 out of the total 317 employees who have worked in an asbestos cement factory during the period 1968-2004 with chest x-ray, high-resolution computed tomography (HRCT) and lung function tests. Sensitivity of chest x-ray was 43% compared to HRCT. Abnormal HRCT findings were found in 75 subjects (67%) and were related to age, occupational exposure duration, and spirometric data. The presence of parenchymal or visceral pleural lesions (exclusively or as the predominant abnormality) was being accompanied by lower total lung capacity and diffusion capacity. HRCT was much more sensitive than chest x-ray for occupational chrysotile exposure. Lung function impairment was related with parenchymal but not with pleural HRCT abnormalities. PMID:22524648

  7. Tracheobronchial injury due to blunt chest trauma.

    PubMed

    Mahmodlou, Rahim; Sepehrvand, Nariman

    2015-01-01

    Tracheobronchial avulsion resulting from blunt trauma is a very rare and serious condition, mostly due to high-speed traffic crashes. In this article, we briefly report the case of an 18-year-old man who was injured in a car accident and because of massive persistent air leakage (despite appropriate chest tube drainage), deemed to have a deep tracheobronchial injury. Due to a rapid drop in the patient's O2 saturation, he underwent an anterolateral thoracotomy. Endotracheal intubation was performed under direct visualization. The right mainstem bronchus was disrupted from the carina with a 1.5-cm stump remaining on the carina, and the remainder was crushed to the origin of the right superior lobe bronchus. Hence, a right superior lobectomy was performed and the postoperative course was uneventful. PMID:26157657

  8. Chest magnetic resonance imaging: a protocol suggestion*

    PubMed Central

    Hochhegger, Bruno; de Souza, Vinícius Valério Silveira; Marchiori, Edson; Irion, Klaus Loureiro; Souza Jr., Arthur Soares; Elias Junior, Jorge; Rodrigues, Rosana Souza; Barreto, Miriam Menna; Escuissato, Dante Luiz; Mançano, Alexandre Dias; Araujo Neto, César Augusto; Guimarães, Marcos Duarte; Nin, Carlos Schuler; Santos, Marcel Koenigkam; Silva, Jorge Luiz Pereira e

    2015-01-01

    In the recent years, with the development of ultrafast sequences, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has been established as a valuable diagnostic modality in body imaging. Because of improvements in speed and image quality, MRI is now ready for routine clinical use also in the study of pulmonary diseases. The main advantage of MRI of the lungs is its unique combination of morphological and functional assessment in a single imaging session. In this article, the authors review most technical aspects and suggest a protocol for performing chest MRI. The authors also describe the three major clinical indications for MRI of the lungs: staging of lung tumors; evaluation of pulmonary vascular diseases; and investigation of pulmonary abnormalities in patients who should not be exposed to radiation. PMID:26811555

  9. Peripartum cardiac chest pain and troponin rise.

    PubMed

    Tatham, K; Hughes-Roberts, Y; Davies, S; Johnson, M; Ashpole, K; Cox, M

    2010-10-01

    The incidence of myocardial ischaemia is increasing in the obstetric population. This has been attributed to several factors including greater maternal age, the increasing incidence of obesity and diabetes, and the growing population of patients with grown-up congenital heart disease who now reach adulthood and become pregnant. A number of cases of myocardial ischaemia in pregnant women have been documented, during and after delivery, for which no cause has been established. We present a case of a nulliparous woman who developed cardiac chest pain, bradycardia, hypertension and a raised troponin I after vaginal delivery of twin boys at 36 weeks of gestation. Ischaemic electrocardiogram changes were noted. Detailed investigations demonstrated a normal coronary circulation. A patent foramen ovale was found on bubble echocardiography. PMID:20833026

  10. Radiologic technology educators and andragogy.

    PubMed

    Galbraith, M W; Simon-Galbraith, J A

    1984-01-01

    Radiologic technology educators are in constant contact with adult learners. However, the theoretical framework that radiologic educators use to guide their instruction may not be appropriate for adults. This article examines the assumptions of the standard instructional theory and the most modern approach to adult education-- andragogy . It also shows how these assumptions affect the adult learner in a radiologic education setting. PMID:6729091

  11. Magnetic resonance imaging of the chest in the evaluation of cancer patients: state of the art

    PubMed Central

    Guimaraes, Marcos Duarte; Hochhegger, Bruno; Santos, Marcel Koenigkam; Santana, Pablo Rydz Pinheiro; Sousa, Arthur Soares; Souza, Luciana Soares; Marchiori, Edson

    2015-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has several advantages in the evaluation of cancer patients with thoracic lesions, including involvement of the chest wall, pleura, lungs, mediastinum, esophagus and heart. It is a quite useful tool in the diagnosis, staging, surgical planning, treatment response evaluation and follow-up of these patients. In the present review, the authors contextualize the relevance of MRI in the evaluation of thoracic lesions in cancer patients. Considering that MRI is a widely available method with high contrast and spatial resolution and without the risks associated with the use of ionizing radiation, its use combined with new techniques such as cine-MRI and functional methods such as perfusion- and diffusion-weighted imaging may be useful as an alternative tool with performance comparable or complementary to conventional radiological methods such as radiography, computed tomography and PET/CT imaging in the evaluation of patients with thoracic neoplasias. PMID:25798006

  12. Automated Image Retrieval of Chest CT Images Based on Local Grey Scale Invariant Features.

    PubMed

    Arrais Porto, Marcelo; Cordeiro d'Ornellas, Marcos

    2015-01-01

    Textual-based tools are regularly employed to retrieve medical images for reading and interpretation using current retrieval Picture Archiving and Communication Systems (PACS) but pose some drawbacks. All-purpose content-based image retrieval (CBIR) systems are limited when dealing with medical images and do not fit well into PACS workflow and clinical practice. This paper presents an automated image retrieval approach for chest CT images based local grey scale invariant features from a local database. Performance was measured in terms of precision and recall, average retrieval precision (ARP), and average retrieval rate (ARR). Preliminary results have shown the effectiveness of the proposed approach. The prototype is also a useful tool for radiology research and education, providing valuable information to the medical and broader healthcare community. PMID:26262345

  13. Poul Erik Andersen's radiological work on Osteochondrodysplasias and interventional radiology

    PubMed Central

    Andersen, Poul Erik

    2011-01-01

    Poul Erik Andersen is a Professor and Interventional Radiologist at the University of Southern Denmark, Odense and Odense University Hospital, Denmark. His innovative and expertise is primarily in vascular interventions where he has introduced and developed many procedures at Odense University Hospital. His significant experience and extensive scientific work has led to many posts in the Danish Society of Interventional Radiology, the European Society of Radiology and the Cardiovascular and Interventional Radiological Society of Europe, where he is a fellow and has passed the European Board of Interventional Radiology - The European qualification in Interventional Radiology. PMID:22022640

  14. Coping in Chest Pain Patients with and without Psychiatric Disorders.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vitaliano, Peter P.; And Others

    1989-01-01

    Examined relations between psychiatric disorder and coronary heart disease (CHD) in 77 patients with chest pain, and compared coping profiles of chest pain patients with and without psychiatric disorders and CHD. Psychiatric patients with no medical disease were also studied. Results are discussed in the context of illness behavior and…

  15. 46 CFR 194.10-20 - Magazine chest construction.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... lid shall have a minimum thickness of 1/8 inch. (b) Permanent sun shields shall be provided for sides... distance of 11/2 inches. Sun shields may be omitted when chests are installed “on deck protected,” shielded from direct exposure to the sun. (c) Chests shall be limited to a gross capacity of 100 cubic feet....

  16. Lung mass, right upper lung - chest x-ray (image)

    MedlinePlus

    This picture is a chest x-ray of a person with a lung mass. This is a front view, where the lungs are the two dark areas and ... visible in the middle of the chest. The x-ray shows a mass in the right upper lung, ...

  17. Management of chest drainage tubes after lung surgery.

    PubMed

    Satoh, Yukitoshi

    2016-06-01

    Since chest tubes have been routinely used to drain the pleural space, particularly after lung surgery, the management of chest tubes is considered to be essential for the thoracic surgeon. The pleural drainage system requires effective drainage, suction, and water-sealing. Another key point of chest tube management is that a water seal is considered to be superior to suction for most air leaks. Nowadays, the most common pleural drainage device attached to the chest tube is the three-bottle system. An electronic chest drainage system has been developed that is effective in standardizing the postoperative management of chest tubes. More liberal use of digital drainage devices in the postoperative management of the pleural space is warranted. The removal of chest tubes is a common procedure occurring almost daily in hospitals throughout the world. Extraction of the tube is usually done at the end of full inspiration or at the end of full expiration. The tube removal technique is not as important as how it is done and the preparation for the procedure. The management of chest tubes must be based on careful observation, the patient's characteristics, and the operative procedures that had been performed. PMID:27048219

  18. Sexual, Physical, Verbal/Emotional Abuse and Unexplained Chest Pain

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eslick, Guy D.; Koloski, Natasha A.; Talley, Nicholas J.

    2011-01-01

    Objectives: Approximately one third of patients with non cardiac chest pain (NCCP) report a history of abuse, however no data exists on the prevalence of abuse among people with unexplained chest pain in the general population. We aimed to determine if there is a relationship between childhood sexual, physical, emotional abuse and unexplained…

  19. Triptans and chest symptoms: the role of pulmonary vasoconstriction.

    PubMed

    Dodick, D W

    2004-04-01

    Triptans are effective and well tolerated in the treatment of acute migraine. Chest symptoms are a common adverse effect unrelated to coronary vasoconstriction in most patients. Although the aetiology of chest symptoms remains to be fully defined, pulmonary vasoconstriction is a possible underlying mechanism. Pre-clinical studies of isolated human blood vessels were used to identify the cerebral selectivity of triptans and ascertain if selectivity vs the pulmonary vasculature predicts a lower rate of chest symptoms. Controlled clinical trials and post-marketing surveillance studies were reviewed to document the incidence of chest symptoms after triptan therapy. In clinical trials, the incidence of chest symptoms at usual therapeutic doses ranged from 1 to 4% depending on the triptan and study design, whereas in post-marketing surveillance studies, up to 41% of patients specifically asked about chest symptoms reported them. A comparative clinical trial showed that almotriptan was associated with lower incidence of chest symptoms than sumatriptan (0.3 vs 2.2%). The intrinsic activity of almotriptan, a second-generation triptan, on human pulmonary arteries and veins was lower than that of sumatriptan. Pre-clinical studies of isolated pulmonary blood vessels may predict the clinical likelihood of chest symptoms; however, additional comparisons are needed. PMID:15030540

  20. An original technique for surgical stabilisation of traumatic flail chest.

    PubMed Central

    Beltrami, V; Martinelli, G; Giansante, P; Gentile, K

    1978-01-01

    The treatment of chest wall injuries with severe paradoxical movement remains controversial. Intermittent positive-pressure respiration may be appropriate, but in some, especially those requiring exploratory thoracotomy for a visceral lesion, surgical fixation is desirable. We present a simple method using two or three stainless Kirschner wires placed in the chest wall. Results in five cases have been good. Images PMID:694812