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Sample records for child healthcare pch

  1. Chater 4 Roles of Child Health-Care Providers Roles of Child Health-Care

    E-print Network

    Chater 4 Roles of Child Health-Care Providers 4 Roles of Child Health-Care Providers in Childhood Lead Poisoning Prevention Roles of Child Health-Care Providers 1. Use and disseminate information from 7 #12;Chater 4 Roles of Child Health-Care Providers In addition to routine screening and follow

  2. Paroxysmal cold hemoglobinuria (PCH)

    MedlinePLUS

    ... the urine. PCH has been linked to secondary syphilis, tertiary syphilis, and other viral or bacterial infections. Sometimes the ... help. For example, if PCH is caused by syphilis, symptoms may get better when the syphilis is ...

  3. Increasing Child Compliance with Essential Healthcare Routines: Acquisition, Maintenance, and Generalization

    E-print Network

    Harrison, Kelley Lynne Attix

    2014-08-31

    Child noncompliance with essential healthcare routines is a widely reported problem, especially for children with intellectual and developmental disabilities (IDD) (Allen, Stanley, & McPherson, 1990). Noncompliance with essential healthcare routines...

  4. Applying Motivational Interviewing (MI) in Counselling Obese and Overweight Children and Parents in Swedish Child Healthcare

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Soderlund, Lena L.; Malmsten, Janna; Bendtsen, Preben; Nilsen, Per

    2010-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate how a motivational interviewing (MI) training course for child healthcare nurses in Sweden affected their work with children's weight issues and their attitudes to MI. Design: Cross-sectional survey, descriptive design. Setting: Nurses were recruited from 33 different child healthcare centres in Ostergotland, Sweden. Method:…

  5. Schooling, Child Labor, and the Returns to Healthcare in Tanzania

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Adhvaryu, Achyuta R.; Nyshadham, Anant

    2012-01-01

    We study the effects of accessing better healthcare on the schooling and labor supply decisions of sick children in Tanzania. Using variation in the cost of formal-sector healthcare to predict treatment choice, we show that accessing better healthcare decreases length of illness and changes children's allocation of time to school and work.…

  6. Inhibiting Factors in the Prevention of Overweight in Infants: An Explorative Qualitative Study among Child Healthcare Practitioners in the Netherlands

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dera de Bie, Eveliene; Jansen, Maria; Gerver, Willem Jan

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study was to explore inhibiting factors in the prevention of overweight in infants younger than one year, among practitioners working for municipal child healthcare organisations in the Netherlands. Twelve in-depth interviews with child healthcare physicians and nurses were conducted. All interviews were tape-recorded, after which…

  7. How do public child healthcare professionals and primary school teachers identify and handle child abuse cases? A qualitative study

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Public child healthcare doctors and nurses, and primary school teachers play a pivotal role in the detection and reporting of child abuse, because they encounter almost all children in the population during their daily work. However, they report relatively few cases of suspected child abuse to child protective agencies. The aim of this qualitative study was to investigate Dutch frontline workers’ child abuse detection and reporting behaviors. Methods Focus group interviews were held among 16 primary school teachers and 17 public health nurses and physicians. The interviews were audio recorded, transcribed, and thematically analyzed according to factors of the Integrated Change model, such as knowledge, attitude, self-efficacy, skills, social influences and barriers influencing detection and reporting of child abuse. Results Findings showed that although both groups of professionals are aware of child abuse signs and risks, they are also lacking specific knowledge. The most salient differences between the two professional groups are related to attitude and (communication) skills. Conclusion The results suggest that frontline workers are in need of supportive tools in the child abuse detection and reporting process. On the basis of our findings, directions for improvement of child abuse detection and reporting are discussed. PMID:24007516

  8. What Do I Do Now? Seeking Healthcare and Therapeutic Services for Your Child with Special Needs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Peters, Sarika U.; Chu, Hillary

    2010-01-01

    Nationwide, more than 13.5 million children have special healthcare needs and with increases in the prevalence and diagnosis of development disabilities, this number can be expected to increase in the coming years. For any child with special needs, it is very important that they have a medical home from which all services can be coordinated. The…

  9. Cross-Generational Effects of Discrimination Among Immigrant Mothers: Perceived Discrimination Predicts Child's Healthcare Visits for Illness

    E-print Network

    Cross-Generational Effects of Discrimination Among Immigrant Mothers: Perceived Discrimination Predicts Child's Healthcare Visits for Illness May Ling Halim New York University Hirokazu Yoshikawa mother's perception of ethnic and language-based discrimination affects the health of her child (indexed

  10. Healthcare

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carnevale, Anthony P.; Smith, Nicole; Gulish, Artem; Beach, Bennett H.

    2012-01-01

    This report, provides detailed analyses and projections of occupations in healthcare fields, and wages earned. In addition, the important skills and work values associated with workers in those fields of healthcare are discussed. Finally, the authors analyze the implications of research findings for the racial, ethnic, and class diversity of the…

  11. Improving maternal and child healthcare programme using community-participatory interventions in Ebonyi State Nigeria

    PubMed Central

    Uneke, Chigozie Jesse; Ndukwe, Chinwendu Daniel; Ezeoha, Abel Abeh; Urochukwu, Henry Chukwuemeka; Ezeonu, Chinonyelum Thecla

    2014-01-01

    In Nigeria, the government is implementing the Free Maternal and Child Health Care Programme (FMCHCP). The policy is premised on the notion that financial barriers are one of the most important constraints to equitable access and use of skilled maternal and child healthcare. In Ebonyi State, Southeastern Nigeria the FMCHCP is experiencing implementation challenges including: inadequate human resource for health, inadequate funding, out of stock syndrome, inadequate infrastructure, and poor staff remuneration. Furthermore, there is less emphasis on community involvement in the programme implementation. In this policy brief, we recommend policy options that emphasize the implementation of community-based participatory interventions to strengthen the government’s FMCHCP as follows: Option 1: Training community women on prenatal care, life-saving skills in case of emergency, reproductive health, care of the newborn and family planning. Option 2: Sensitizing the community women towards behavioural change, to understand what quality services that respond to their needs are but also to seek and demand for such. Option 3: Implementation packages that provide technical skills to women of childbearing age as well as mothers’ groups, and traditional birth attendants for better home-based maternal and child healthcare. The effectiveness of this approach has been demonstrated in a number of community-based participatory interventions, building on the idea that if community members take part in decision-making and bring local knowledge, experiences and problems to the fore, they are more likely to own and sustain solutions to improve their communities’ health. PMID:25337602

  12. Four candles. Original perspectives and insights into 18th century hospital child healthcare

    PubMed Central

    Williams, A N

    2007-01-01

    It has only recently been recognised that for more than a century before the opening of Great Ormond Street Hospital for Children (1852) children were treated and even admitted in English Voluntary Hospitals. Among the earliest English 18th century records, that contain the patient‘s age, are those found at the Northampton General Hospital within an archive dating from its foundation as the Northampton Infirmary in 1744. They afford a fascinating glimpse into both inpatient and outpatient child health. Although there are no medical notes as such, the hospital archive has recently rediscovered 1743 statutes, contemporary patient literature entitled Some Friendly Advice to a Patient (written by the Northampton Infirmary‘s founding physician Dr (later Sir) James Stonhouse), minute books, contemporary engravings of the outside and inside of the hospital and inpatient menus. Thus we can speculate with a high degree of certainty as to what would be the then current infirmary environment and treatments for illustrative examples of the children seen in the period 1744–45 (two inpatients and two outpatients). Interestingly one of the inpatient cases, Elizabeth Ager, a child with fever, was admitted against the infirmary regulations, suggesting already a stretching of boundaries in favour of paediatric admissions. This paper gives a flavour of 18th century hospital child healthcare in an era before the formal recognition of paediatrics as a medical specialty and preceding by more than a century the construction of specialist provision through the foundation of the first children‘s hospitals. PMID:17185447

  13. The health-care environment through the eyes of a child--does it soothe or provoke anxiety?

    PubMed

    Norton-Westwood, Deborah

    2012-02-01

    Health-care environments can be intimidating and scary places especially in the eyes of a child. When attempting to create spaces that are engaging to children, how do we know what works and are the needs the same across the age groups? In a 2011 comprehensive systematic review, a total of 20 studies were reviewed to answer the question: Can the health-care environment have an impact on children's anxiety? The results of the review showed that the built environment can support and enhance the coping strategies utilized by children, however further research is needed. The aim of this article is to summarize the findings of the review highlighting simple design strategies of minimal cost to large construction projects warranting extensive resources. Careful evaluation of space incorporating end-user input can result in age appropriate environments that support safe, quality care and enhance a positive health-care experience for all. PMID:22257325

  14. A Brief Educational Intervention to Improve Healthcare Providers' Awareness of Child Passenger Safety

    PubMed Central

    Ekundayo, O. James; Jones, Gennifer; Brown, Angela; Aliyu, Muktar; Levine, Robert; Goldzweig, Irwin

    2013-01-01

    Introduction. Motor vehicle crashes are the leading cause of death among US children aged 4–14 years. In theory, health provider counseling about Child Passenger Safety (CPS) could be a useful deterrent. The data about the effectiveness of CPS dissemination is sparse, but existing results suggest that providers are not well informed. Moreover, there is insufficient evidence to determine whether provider counseling about CPS is effective. Methods. We therefore assessed CPS best practice knowledge among 217 healthcare workers at hospitals in seven cities throughout the USA and evaluated the impact of a brief, lunch and learn educational intervention with a five-item questionnaire. Attendees were comprised of physicians, nurses, social workers, pediatric residents, and pediatric trauma response teams. Results. Pre-post survey completion was nearly 100% (216 of 217 attendees). Participation was fairly evenly distributed according to age (18–29, 30–44, and 45+ years). More than 80% of attendees were women. Before intervention, only 4% of respondents (9/216) answered all five questions correctly; this rose to 77% (167/216) (P < 0.001, using a Wilcoxon signed-rank test) after intervention. Conclusion. Future research should consider implementation and controlled testing of comparable educational programs to determine if they improve dissemination of CPS best practice recommendations in the long term. PMID:23476672

  15. Parents' experiences of parental groups in Swedish child health-care: Do they get what they want?

    PubMed

    Lefèvre, Asa; Lundqvist, Pia; Drevenhorn, Eva; Hallström, Inger

    2014-08-28

    Almost all parents in Sweden are invited to parental groups organized by the child health service (CHS) during their child's first year, but only 40% chose to attend. The aim of this study was to describe parents' experiences of participating in these parental groups. A total of 143 parents from 71 different parental groups at 27 child health-care (CHC) centres in one Swedish county completed an online questionnaire. A majority of the parents found the parental groups to be meaningful and more than 60% met someone in the group who they socialized with outside the meetings. Parents wanted a greater focus on child-related community information, existential questions, relationships and parenting in general. Group leadership seems to be of significance to how parents in a group connect and whether the parental role is affected. Making CHC nurses more aware of the topics parents desire could help them meet parents' needs. Education and training in group dynamics and group leadership could be of value in further improving the high-quality service CHC nurses already offer parents. More knowledge is needed about what would attract those parents who do not participate. PMID:25171811

  16. Abdominal Adiposity and Caregiver Recall of Healthcare Provider Identification of Child Overweight in the United States, 2001–2010

    PubMed Central

    Rossen, Lauren M.; Tarasenko, Yelena N.; Branum, Amy M.; Simon, Alan E.; Schoendorf, Kenneth C.

    2015-01-01

    Background A minority of overweight or obese children are identified as such by a healthcare provider (HCP). The aim of this study was to examine characteristics of caregiver-reported HCP identification of overweight or obesity and whether it is associated with children’s waist circumference (WC). Methods This was an observational study using a nationally representative sample of 14,694 children (2–15 years of age) from the 2001–2010 National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey. Proxy respondents (i.e., caregivers) for 4906 overweight or obese (BMI ? 85th percentile) children reported whether an HCP had ever told them that their child was overweight. Multi-variable logistic regression analyses were used to examine associations between reported HCP identification of overweight and child sociodemographic and anthropometric characteristics. Results Over 75% of caregivers of overweight or obese children did not recall being notified of their child’s weight status by an HCP, though this proportion has decreased over the past decade. A significant WC by weight status interaction indicated abdominal adiposity was positively associated with reported HCP identification for obese children, but not for overweight children. Conclusions Lower levels of reported HCP identification were observed for overweight children, compared to obese children; among obese children, those with lower levels of abdominal adiposity were less likely to be identified as overweight by an HCP, according to caregivers. Reasons for this finding remain unclear. Providers may be relying on a child’s appearance, rather than universally screening all patients for overweight. Additionally, a variety of parent and provider characteristics may influence weight-related communications and caregiver recall of such information. PMID:24028562

  17. Serological Findings in a Child with Paroxysmal Cold Haemoglobinuria

    PubMed Central

    Salido, Eduardo J.; Cabañas, Valentín; Macizo, María I.; García-Candel, Faustino; Pérez-López, Raúl

    2014-01-01

    PCH is a rare autoimmune hemolytic anemia (AIHA) but is one of the most common causes of AIAH in children. For the diagnosis, it is important to perform the appropriate methods of serological investigation and show the typical biphasic reaction. This is a case report of a child who presented with features of haemolysis and was diagnosed with PCH of this way. PMID:25371680

  18. Emerging communities of child-healthcare practice in the management of long-term conditions such as chronic kidney disease: qualitative study of parents’ accounts

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Parents of children and young people with long-term conditions who need to deliver clinical care to their child at home with remote support from hospital-based professionals, often search the internet for care-giving information. However, there is little evidence that the information available online was developed and evaluated with parents or that it acknowledges the communities of practice that exist as parents and healthcare professionals share responsibility for condition management. Methods The data reported here are part of a wider study that developed and tested a condition-specific, online parent information and support application with children and young people with chronic-kidney disease, parents and professionals. Semi-structured interviews were conducted with 19 fathers and 24 mothers who had recently tested the novel application. Data were analysed using Framework Analysis and the Communities of Practice concept. Results Evolving communities of child-healthcare practice were identified comprising three components and several sub components: (1) Experiencing (parents making sense of clinical tasks) through Normalising care, Normalising illness, Acceptance & action, Gaining strength from the affected child and Building relationships to formalise a routine; (2) Doing (Parents executing tasks according to their individual skills) illustrated by Developing coping strategies, Importance of parents’ efficacy of care and Fear of the child’s health failing; and (3) Belonging/Becoming (Parents defining task and group members’ worth and creating a personal identity within the community) consisting of Information sharing, Negotiation with health professionals and Achieving expertise in care. Parents also recalled factors affecting the development of their respective communities of healthcare practice; these included Service transition, Poor parent social life, Psycho-social affects, Family chronic illness, Difficulty in learning new procedures, Shielding and avoidance, and Language and cultural barriers. Health care professionals will benefit from using the communities of child-healthcare practice model when they support parents of children with chronic kidney disease. Conclusions Understanding some of the factors that may influence the development of communities of child-healthcare practice will help professionals to tailor information and support for parents learning to manage their child’s healthcare. Our results are potentially transferrable to professionals managing the care of children and young people with other long-term conditions. PMID:25001236

  19. Patient-Held Maternal and/or Child Health Records: Meeting the Information Needs of Patients and Healthcare Providers in Developing Countries?

    PubMed Central

    Turner, Kathleen E.; Fuller, Sherrilynne

    2011-01-01

    Though improvements in infant and maternal mortality rates have occurred over time, women and children still die every hour from preventable causes. Various regional, social and economic factors are involved in the ability of women and children to receive adequate care and prevention services. Patient-held maternal and/or child health records have been used for a number of years in many countries to help track health risks, vaccinations and other preventative health measures performed. Though these records are primarily designed to record patient histories and healthcare information and guide healthcare workers providing care, because the records are patient-held, they also allow families a greater ability to track their own health and prevention strategies. A literature search was performed to answer these questions: (1) What are maternal information needs regarding pregnancy, post-natal and infant healthcare, especially in developing countries? (2) What is known about maternal information seeking behavior in developing countries? (3) What is the history and current state of maternal and/or child patient-held healthcare records, do they provide for the information needs of the healthcare provider and what are the effects and outcomes of patient-held records in general and for maternal and/or child health in particular? Specific information needs of pregnant women and mothers are rarely studied. The small numbers of maternal information behavior results available indicate that mothers, in general, prefer to receive health information directly from their healthcare provider as opposed to from other sources (written, etc.) Overall, in developing countries, patient-held maternal and/or child healthcare records have a mostly positive effect for both patient and care provider. Mothers and children with records tend to have better outcomes in healthcare and preventative measures. Further research into the information behaviors of pregnant women and mothers to determine the extent of reliance on interpersonal information seeking is recommended before expending significant resources on enhanced patient-held maternal and/or child healthcare records including storage on mobile devices. In particular, research is needed to explore the utility of providing targeted health messages to mothers regarding their own health and that of their children; this might best be accomplished through mobile technologies. PMID:23569604

  20. "The joy to bless and to relieve mankind": child healthcare at Northampton General Infirmary 1744

    PubMed Central

    Williams, A

    2005-01-01

    For more than a century before the opening of Great Ormond Street Hospital for Children (1852), children in England were treated and even admitted in voluntary hospitals in spite of rules prohibiting such care. The earliest English eighteenth century records, that contain the patient's age, are held in Northampton. Reviewing records from the Northampton General Infirmary (from 1903 the Northampton General Hospital) for the period 1744–45 gives a flavour of hospital child health care in an era before the formal recognition of paediatrics as a medical specialty and the construction of specialist provision. Indeed the first patient admitted to the Northampton General Infirmary on 29 March 1744 was Thomasin Grace, a 13 year old child. In Northampton, in its first year of operation, children as young as 2 years of age were seen in outpatients and from 8 years were admitted. Paediatric cases up to and including those 16 years of age made up 26% of the number of patients seen for that year. Within the first year of opening for children of 10 years of age and under, there were eight inpatient admissions and 18 children were treated in outpatients. PMID:16301548

  1. Moving from research to large-scale change in child health care.

    PubMed

    Bergman, David A; Beck, Arne

    2011-01-01

    There is a large and persistent failure to achieve widespread dissemination of evidence-based practices in child health care. Too often studies demonstrating evidence for effective child health care practices are not brought to scale and across different settings and populations. This failure is not due to a lack of knowledge, but rather a failure to bring to bear proven methods in dissemination, diffusion, and implementation (DD&I) science that target the translation of evidence-based medicine to everyday practice. DD&I science offers a framework and a set of tools to identify innovations that are likely to be implemented, and provides methods to better understand the capabilities and preferences of individuals and organizations and the social networks within these organizations that help facilitate widespread adoption. Successful DD&I is dependent on making the intervention context sensitive without losing fidelity to the core components of the intervention. The achievement of these goals calls for new research methods such as pragmatic research trials that combine hypothesis testing with quality improvement, participatory research that engages the target community at the beginning of research design, and other quasi-experimental designs. With the advent of health care reform, it will be extremely important to ensure that the ensuing large demonstration projects that are designed to increase integrated care and better control costs can be rapidly brought to scale across different practices settings, and health plans and will be able to achieve effectiveness in diverse populations. PMID:21783449

  2. TRIP13PCH-2 promotes Mad2 localization to unattached kinetochores in the spindle checkpoint response.

    PubMed

    Nelson, Christian R; Hwang, Tom; Chen, Pin-Hsi; Bhalla, Needhi

    2015-11-01

    The spindle checkpoint acts during cell division to prevent aneuploidy, a hallmark of cancer. During checkpoint activation, Mad1 recruits Mad2 to kinetochores to generate a signal that delays anaphase onset. Yet, whether additional factors contribute to Mad2's kinetochore localization remains unclear. Here, we report that the conserved AAA+ ATPase TRIP13(PCH-2) localizes to unattached kinetochores and is required for spindle checkpoint activation in Caenorhabditis elegans. pch-2 mutants effectively localized Mad1 to unattached kinetochores, but Mad2 recruitment was significantly reduced. Furthermore, we show that the C. elegans orthologue of the Mad2 inhibitor p31(comet)(CMT-1) interacts with TRIP13(PCH-2) and is required for its localization to unattached kinetochores. These factors also genetically interact, as loss of p31(comet)(CMT-1) partially suppressed the requirement for TRIP13(PCH-2) in Mad2 localization and spindle checkpoint signaling. These data support a model in which the ability of TRIP13(PCH-2) to disassemble a p31(comet)/Mad2 complex, which has been well characterized in the context of checkpoint silencing, is also critical for spindle checkpoint activation. PMID:26527744

  3. The impact of primary healthcare in reducing inequalities in child health outcomes, Bogotá – Colombia: an ecological analysis

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Colombia is one of the countries with the widest levels of socioeconomic and health inequalities. Bogotá, its capital, faces serious problems of poverty, social disparities and access to health services. A Primary Health Care (PHC) strategy was implemented in 2004 to improve health care and to address the social determinants of such inequalities. This study aimed to evaluate the contribution of the PHC strategy to reducing inequalities in child health outcomes in Bogotá. Methods An ecological analysis with localities as the unit of analysis was carried out. The variable used to capture the socioeconomic status and living standards was the Quality of Life Index (QLI). Concentration curves and concentration indices for four child health outcomes (infant mortality rate (IMR), under-5 mortality rate, prevalence of acute malnutrition in children under-5, and vaccination coverage for diphtheria, pertussis and tetanus) were calculated to measure socioeconomic inequality. Two periods were used to describe possible changes in the magnitude of the inequalities related with the PHC implementation (2003 year before - 2007 year after implementation). The contribution of the PHC intervention was computed by a decomposition analysis carried out on data from 2007. Results In both 2003 and 2007, concentration curves and indexes of IMR, under-5 mortality rate and acute malnutrition showed inequalities to the disadvantage of localities with lower QLI. Diphtheria, pertussis and tetanus (DPT) vaccinations were more prevalent among localities with higher QLI in 2003 but were higher in localities with lower QLI in 2007. The variation of the concentration index between 2003 and 2007 indicated reductions in inequality for all of the indicators in the period after the PHC implementation. In 2007, PHC was associated with a reduction in the effect of the inequality that affected disadvantaged localities in under-5 mortality (24%), IMR (19%) and acute malnutrition (7%). PHC also contributed approximately 20% to inequality in DPT coverage, favoring the poorer localities. Conclusion The PHC strategy developed in Bogotá appears to be contributing to reductions of the inequality associated with socioeconomic and living conditions in child health outcomes. PMID:23145972

  4. Perceptions of Community Members and Healthcare Workers on Male Involvement in Prevention of Mother-To-Child Transmission Services in Khayelitsha, Cape Town, South Africa.

    PubMed

    Ladur, Alice Norah; Colvin, Christopher J; Stinson, Kathryn

    2015-01-01

    Involving male partners of pregnant women accessing PMTCT programs has the potential to improve health outcomes for women and children. This study explored community members' (men and women) and healthcare workers' perceptions of male involvement in the prevention of mother-to-child transmission of HIV in Khayelitsha, South Africa. Two focus group discussions were held with 25 men of unknown HIV status and one focus group discussion held with 12 HIV-positive women in the community. In depth interviews were conducted with four HIV-positive couples and five service providers purposely sampled from the community and a health facility, respectively. Both men and women interviewed in this study were receptive towards male involvement in PMTCT. However, men were reluctant to engage with health services due to stigma and negative attitudes from nurses. This study also found HIV testing, disclosure and direct health worker engagement with men increases male involvement in PMTCT. Using men in the media and community to reach out to fellow men with prevention messages tailored to suit specific audiences may reduce perceptions of antenatal care as being a woman`s domain. PMID:26218065

  5. Perceptions of Community Members and Healthcare Workers on Male Involvement in Prevention of Mother-To-Child Transmission Services in Khayelitsha, Cape Town, South Africa

    PubMed Central

    Ladur, Alice Norah; Colvin, Christopher J.; Stinson, Kathryn

    2015-01-01

    Involving male partners of pregnant women accessing PMTCT programs has the potential to improve health outcomes for women and children. This study explored community members’ (men and women) and healthcare workers’ perceptions of male involvement in the prevention of mother-to-child transmission of HIV in Khayelitsha, South Africa. Two focus group discussions were held with 25 men of unknown HIV status and one focus group discussion held with 12 HIV-positive women in the community. In depth interviews were conducted with four HIV-positive couples and five service providers purposely sampled from the community and a health facility, respectively. Both men and women interviewed in this study were receptive towards male involvement in PMTCT. However, men were reluctant to engage with health services due to stigma and negative attitudes from nurses. This study also found HIV testing, disclosure and direct health worker engagement with men increases male involvement in PMTCT. Using men in the media and community to reach out to fellow men with prevention messages tailored to suit specific audiences may reduce perceptions of antenatal care as being a woman`s domain. PMID:26218065

  6. Resistance to Oculimacula yallundae and Oculimacula acuformis is conferred by Pch2 in wheat

    E-print Network

    Pappu, Hanu R.

    Resistance to Oculimacula yallundae and Oculimacula acuformis is conferred by Pch2 in wheat K. L University, Pullman, WA 99164-6430, USA The recent report of a differential response of wheat lines of resistance against both O. yallundae and O. acu- formis under these conditions. Keywords: eyespot of wheat

  7. Pch2(TRIP13): controlling cell division through regulation of HORMA domains.

    PubMed

    Vader, Gerben

    2015-09-01

    During meiotic and mitotic cell divisions, numerous chromosomal processes are essential for the faithful transmission of the genetic material. Pch2(TRIP13), a generally conserved member of the AAA(+) ATPase (AAA(+)--ATPases associated with diverse cellular activities) family of ATPases, is rapidly emerging as a key regulator of specific chromosomal events. During the meiotic program, it is involved in controlling G2/prophase processes such as DNA break formation and recombination, checkpoint signaling, and chromosome synapsis. Excitingly, recent work has also implicated a role for Pch2(TRIP13) in wiring of the checkpoint that guards the metaphase-to-anaphase transition. For several of these functions, the Hop1, Rev7, and Mad2 (HORMA) domain-containing proteins Hop1(HORMAD), Mad2, and p31(COMET) are important downstream clients or cofactors of Pch2(TRIP13). Here, I will discuss our current understanding of the function of Pch2(TRIP13) during meiotic and mitotic cell divisions, with a focus on its enzymatic role towards HORMA domain-containing clients. PMID:25895724

  8. Lean healthcare.

    PubMed

    Weinstock, Donna

    2008-01-01

    As healthcare organizations look for new and improved ways to reduce costs and still offer quality healthcare, many are turning to the Toyota Production System of doing business. Rather than focusing on cutting personnel and assets, "lean healthcare" looks to improve patient satisfaction through improved actions and processes. PMID:18615998

  9. The Effect of Parent-Child Function on Physical Activity and Television Viewing among Adolescents with and without Special Healthcare Needs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McManus, Beth M.; Mandic, Carmen Gomez; Carle, Adam C.; Robert, Stephanie A.

    2012-01-01

    Using the 2007 National Survey of Children's Health, the association between parent-child function and physical activity and television viewing was investigated among a national sample of adolescents in the United States. Parent-child function was measured using the National Survey of Children's Health "Family Function" survey items and…

  10. Identification of a candidate gene for the wheat endopeptidase Ep-D1 locus and two other STS markers linked to the eyespot resistance gene Pch1

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Wheat is prone to strawbreaker foot rot (eye- spot), a fungal disease caused by Oculimacula yallundae and O. acuformis. The most effective source of genetic resistance is Pch1, a gene derived from Aegilops ventri- cosa. The endopeptidase isozyme marker allele Ep-D1b, linked to Pch1, has been shown t...

  11. Future Healthcare

    E-print Network

    Datta, Shoumen

    2010-12-15

    Patients want answers, not numbers. Evidence-based medicine must have numbers to generate answers. Therefore, analysis of numbers to provide answers is the Holy Grail of healthcare professionals and its future systems. ...

  12. [Healthcare expenditure].

    PubMed

    Huguier, Michel

    2012-10-01

    Healthcare expenditure is divided between medical infrastructure and individual patient management. Total healthcare costs in France amount to roughly 175 billion euros, financed through public health insurance (77%), private insurance (14%), and individual expenditure (9%). The principal expenditures are for hospitalization (44%), community medical, dental and paramedical care (28%), drugs (20%) and miscellaneous resources (8%). The main factors of rising costs are medical progress and aging. More controllable costs include healthcare provision, the level of reimbursement, public education and information, and physician training. France devotes 9.2% of its gross national product to healthcare, compared to 7-8% in Sweden, Germany and the United Kingdom, representing a diference of about 18 billion euros. In France there is a chronic imbalance between resources and expenditure, creating a cumulative budget deficit of about 100 billlion euros. Major efforts must be made to improve efficiency, and it will be necessary to choose between preserving our healthcare system or our financial system. If the latter is prioritized, healthcare will inevitably deteriorate. PMID:23815025

  13. Healthcare fundamentals.

    PubMed

    Kauk, Justin; Hill, Austin D; Althausen, Peter L

    2014-07-01

    In order for a trauma surgeon to have an intelligent discussion with hospital administrators, healthcare plans, policymakers, or any other physicians, a basic understanding of the fundamentals of healthcare is paramount. It is truly shocking how many surgeons are unable to describe the difference between Medicare and Medicaid or describe how hospitals and physicians get paid. These topics may seem burdensome but they are vital to all business decision making in the healthcare field. The following chapter provides further insight about what we call "the basics" of providing medical care today. Most of the topics presented can be applied to all specialties of medicine. It is broken down into 5 sections. The first section is a brief overview of government programs, their influence on care delivery and reimbursement, and past and future legislation. Section 2 focuses on the compliance, care provision, and privacy statutes that regulate physicians who care for Medicare/Medicaid patient populations. With a better understanding of these obligations, section 3 discusses avenues by which physicians can stay informed of current and pending health policy and provides ways that they can become involved in shaping future legislation. The fourth section changes gears slightly by explaining how the concepts of trade restraint, libel, antitrust legislation, and indemnity relate to physician practice. The fifth, and final, section ties all of components together by describing how physician-hospital alignment can be mutually beneficial in providing patient care under current healthcare policy legislation. PMID:24918828

  14. Healthcare Lean.

    PubMed

    Long, John C

    2003-01-01

    Lean Thinking is an integrated approach to designing, doing and improving the work of people that have come together to produce and deliver goods, services and information. Healthcare Lean is based on the Toyota production system and applies concepts and techniques of Lean Thinking to hospitals and physician practices. PMID:12886662

  15. Measurement of Donath-Landsteiner antibody-producing cells in idiopathic nonsyphilitic paroxysmal cold hemoglobinuria (PCH) in children.

    PubMed

    Miyagawa, Y; Yamada, S; Komiyama, A; Akabane, T

    1978-07-01

    A 2-yr-old girl with a nonsyphilitic type of paroxysmal cold hemoglobinuria (PCH) is reported. We applied the plaque-forming cell (PFC) assay to the measurement of Donath-Landsteiner (DL) antibody-producing cells in the patient. Some of the circulating B lymphocytes formed plaques in our assay system. Initially the number of PFC was 1442 +/- 225/10(6) lymphocytes and DL titer was 1:16. Thereafter the PFC decreased in number as the DL titer decreased. Eight weeks later circulating PFC were not found but the DL titer was still 1:1 positive. The PFC assay appears to be useful as a new method for obtaining rapid imformation as to the disease status of PCH. PMID:350317

  16. [Youth Healthcare guideline 'Skin disorders'].

    PubMed

    Deurloo, Jacqueline A; van Gameren-Oosterom, Helma B M; Kamphuis, Mascha

    2012-01-01

    There is a high incidence of skin disorders; these are also frequently encountered within Youth Healthcare (YHC). Some skin disorders are caused by an underlying disease, syndrome or child abuse. Therefore, detection of these causes in an early stage is important. Skin disorders can have a huge psychosocial impact on both child and parents. This is one of the reasons why prevention, detection, diagnosis, treatment, referral, and uniform advice and guidance are of great importance. The YHC Guideline examines counselling and advice, criteria for referral to primary or secondary healthcare, and skincare in general. It also describes the disorders that should be actively detected. The Guideline also looks at specific aspects of dark skins and ethnic diversity, and the impact of skin disorders on general wellbeing. The accompanying web-based tool includes argumentation and opinions from experts on more than 75 skin disorders, including illustrations and decision trees, to aid the drawing up of a treatment plan. PMID:23151335

  17. Addressing healthcare.

    PubMed

    Daly, Rich

    2013-02-11

    Though President Barack Obama has rarely made healthcare references in his State of the Union addresses, health policy experts are hoping he changes that strategy this year. "The question is: Will he say anything? You would hope that he would, given that that was the major issue he started his presidency with," says Dr. James Weinstein, left, of the Dartmouth-Hitchcock health system. PMID:23487896

  18. Lysine221 is the general base residue of the isochorismate synthase from Pseudomonas aeruginosa (PchA) in a reaction that is diffusion limited

    PubMed Central

    Meneely, Kathleen M.; Luo, Qianyi; Dhar, Prajnaparamita; Lamb, Audrey L.

    2013-01-01

    The isochorismate synthase from Pseudomonas aeruginosa (PchA) catalyzes the conversion of chorismate to isochorismate, which is subsequently converted by a second enzyme (PchB) to salicylate for incorporation into the salicylate-capped siderophore pyochelin. PchA is a member of the MST family of enzymes, which includes the structurally homologous isochorismate synthases from E. coli (EntC and MenF) and salicylate synthases from Yersinia enterocolitica (Irp9) and Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MbtI). The latter enzymes generate isochorismate as an intermediate before generating salicylate and pyruvate. General acid – general base catalysis has been proposed for isochorismate synthesis in all five enzymes, but the residues required for the isomerization are a matter of debate, with both lysine221 and glutamate313 proposed as the general base (PchA numbering). This work includes a classical characterization of PchA with steady state kinetic analysis, solvent kinetic isotope effect analysis and by measuring the effect of viscosogens on catalysis. The results suggest that isochorismate production from chorismate by the MST enzymes is the result of general acid – general base catalysis with a lysine as the base and a glutamic acid as the acid, in reverse protonation states. Chemistry is determined to not be rate limiting, favoring the hypothesis of a conformational or binding step as the slow step. PMID:23942051

  19. GE Healthcare Antibody Purification

    E-print Network

    Lebendiker, Mario

    GE Healthcare Antibody Purification Handbook GE Healthcare imagination at work agination at work from GE Healthcare #12;Antibody Purification Handbook #12; Handbook 18-1037-46 AD Contents Introduction

  20. Lean Healthcare Songklanagarind Healthcare Production System

    E-print Network

    Laksanacharoen, Sathaporn

    Lean Healthcare .. #12;Songklanagarind Healthcare Production System QCDSME Just in time JidokaJust in time (JIT) Jidoka ·Poka-yoke ·Surface error Takt time · · · · One piece flow Std work, parts, space, and worker's time which are absolutely necessary to add value to thewhich are absolutely

  1. Communicating with Healthcare Professionals

    MedlinePLUS

    Communicating with Healthcare Professionals Updated:Nov 16,2015 Adapted from the National Family Caregivers Association A lot can be gained by improving communication between family caregivers and healthcare professionals. Positive outcomes include: Better care for the ...

  2. Mapping healthcare information technology

    E-print Network

    Crawford, William Charles Richards

    2010-01-01

    In this thesis I have developed a map of Healthcare Information Technology applications used in the United States for care delivery, healthcare enterprise management, clinical support, research and patient engagement. No ...

  3. Possibilities for Healthcare Computing

    E-print Network

    Szolovits, Peter

    Advances in computing technology promise to aid in achieving the goals of healthcare. We review how such changes can support each of the goals of healthcare as identified by the U.S. Institute of Medicine: safety, ...

  4. Healthcare Delivery Research Blog

    Cancer.gov

    Skip to main content at the National Institutes of Health | www.cancer.gov Search form Search Search Healthcare Delivery Research Blog Toggle navigation Healthcare Delivery Research Blog Home Blog Purpose and Policies About HDRP Contact Us Subscribe

  5. Fraud Detection in Healthcare

    SciTech Connect

    Chandola, Varun; Schryver, Jack C; Sukumar, Sreenivas R

    2015-01-01

    We discuss the problem of fraud detection in healthcare in this chapter. Given the recent scrutiny of the ineciencies in the US healthcare system, identifying fraud has been on the forefront of the eorts towards reducing the healthcare costs. In this chapter we will focus on understanding the issue of healthcare fraud in detail, and review methods that have been proposed in the literature to combat this issue using data driven approach.

  6. Healthcare. Executive Summary

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carnevale, Anthony P.; Smith, Nicole; Gulish, Artem; Beach, Bennett H.

    2012-01-01

    This executive summary highlights several findings about healthcare. These are: (1) Healthcare is 18 percent of the U.S. economy, twice as high as in other countries; (2) There are two labor markets in healthcare: high-skill, high-wage professional and technical jobs and low-skill, low-wage support jobs; (3) Demand for postsecondary education in…

  7. Human trafficking and the healthcare professional.

    PubMed

    Barrows, Jeffrey; Finger, Reginald

    2008-05-01

    Despite the legislation passed in the 19th century outlawing human slavery, it is more widespread today than at the conclusion of the civil war. Modern human slavery, termed human trafficking, comes in several forms. The most common type of human trafficking is sex trafficking, the sale of women and children into prostitution. Labor trafficking is the sale of men, women, and children into hard labor for which they receive little or no compensation. Other forms of trafficking include child soldiering, war brides, and organ removal. Healthcare professionals play a critical role in both finding victims of human trafficking while they are still in captivity, as well as caring for their mental and physical needs upon release. Those working in the healthcare profession need to be educated regarding how a trafficking victim may present, as well as their unique healthcare needs. PMID:18414161

  8. A Historical Perspective on National Child Mental Health Policy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lourie, Ira S.; Hernandez, Mario

    2003-01-01

    This article traces historical attempts to form a comprehensive child mental health policy in the United States and discusses the latest unsuccessful attempts at the creation of such a policy through the managed behavioral healthcare revolution and the Child and Adolescent Service System Program and Child Mental Health Services initiative.…

  9. Quality management in healthcare.

    PubMed

    Dodwad, Subhash S

    2013-01-01

    Clinical governance and better human resource management practices are important planks in the current health policies emphasizing quality of patient care. There are numerous reasons why it is important to improve quality of healthcare, including enhancing the accountability of health practitioners and managers, resource efficiency, identifying, and minimizing medical errors while maximizing the use of effective care and improving outcomes, and aligning care to what users/patients want in addition to what they need. "Quality in health is doing the right things for the right people at the right time, and doing them right first time and every time." Quality can also refer to the technical quality of care, to nontechnical aspects of service delivery such as clients' waiting time and staff's attitudes, and to programmatic elements such as policies, infrastructure, access, and management. In this oration/article quality initiatives like Reproductive and Child Health (RCH) and National Rural Health Mission (NRHM) of Government of India (GOI), which concentrate on improving the quality of infrastructure of vast rural health facilities including sub-center, primary health center, and community health center has been taken into account with focus on improving quality of health services also. United Nation Population Fund (UNFPA) in collaboration with the GOI has proposed introducing quality assurance program for accessing and improving the quality of services at public sector health facilities. It is felt that improving the quality of health services in public sector will attract the client belonging to low economic strata, and surely will help in achieving the goal of the NRHM, that is, "Reaching the enriched with quality of health services." PMID:24125927

  10. Healthcare financing in Malaysia.

    PubMed

    Kananatu, K

    2002-01-01

    This paper presents an overview of the Malaysian healthcare system and its method of financing. The development of the healthcare delivery system in Malaysia is commendable. However, the strength and weaknesses of the public healthcare system and the financing problems encountered are also discussed. Cost of healthcare and funding of both the public and private sectors were also revealed. One must optimise the advantages of operating a health financing scheme which is affordable and controllable which contribute towards cost-containment and quality assurance. Thus, there is a need for the establishment of a National Healthcare Financing, a mechanism to sustain the healthcare delivery network and operate it as a viable option. A model of the National Health Financing Scheme (NHFS) was proposed. PMID:12597514

  11. Measuring Value in Healthcare

    E-print Network

    Gardner, Christopher

    2008-01-01

    A statistical description and model of individual healthcare expenditures in the US has been developed for measuring value in healthcare. We find evidence that healthcare expenditures are quantifiable as an infusion-diffusion process, which can be thought of intuitively as a steady change in the intensity of treatment superimposed on a random process reflecting variations in the efficiency and effectiveness of treatment. The arithmetic mean represents the net average annual cost of healthcare; and when multiplied by the arithmetic standard deviation, which represents the effective risk, the result is a measure of healthcare cost control. Policymakers, providers, payors, or patients that decrease these parameters are generating value in healthcare. The model has an average absolute prediction error of approximately 10-12% across the range of expenditures which spans 6 orders of magnitude over a nearly 10-year period. For the top 1% of the population with the largest expenditures, representing 20%-30% of total ...

  12. Healthcare Information Framework.

    PubMed

    Saranummi, N; Demeester, M; Fernandez Perez de Talens, A; Harrington, J; Heimly, V; de la Riva Grandal, J M; Taylor, J

    1995-04-01

    CEN committee TC 251 Medical Informatics, has set up a project team charged with producing a European pre-standard ENV on Healthcare Information Framework (HIF). The HIF is based on abstraction from a specific information system architecture to a reference architecture and further to a conceptual architectural framework based on serving open, distributed and heterogeneous healthcare enterprises. To specify the suitable healthcare information system architecture modelling of the healthcare enterprise is required. As there is no one method serving all needs, the HIF gives guidance on what aspects to look at in selecting a suitable modelling method. It is expected that the work will be completed by early 1995. PMID:7601549

  13. Child's Name:_______________________________

    E-print Network

    Royer, Dana

    · Child's Name:_______________________________ · Grade Level non-refundable deposit due at Hme of applicaHon to reserve your child's space assistance along with documentaHon of your child's free lunch status · Applica

  14. Healthcare Service Use and Costs for Autism Spectrum Disorder: A Comparison between Medicaid and Private Insurance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wang, Li; Mandell, David S.; Lawer, Lindsay; Cidav, Zuleyha; Leslie, Douglas L.

    2013-01-01

    Healthcare costs and service use for autism spectrum disorder (ASD) were compared between Medicaid and private insurance, using 2003 insurance claims data in 24 states. In terms of costs and service use per child with ASD, Medicaid had higher total healthcare costs (22,653 vs. 5,254), higher ASD-specific costs (7,438 vs. 928), higher psychotropic…

  15. Mycobacterium abscessus in Healthcare Settings

    MedlinePLUS

    ... HAI Commentaries Map: HAI Prevention Activities Research Environmental Hygiene in Healthcare Prevention Epicenters (PE) Patient Safety Outpatient ... Safety Dialysis Safety Get Smart for Healthcare Hand Hygiene HICPAC Injection Safety Medication Safety MRSA National Healthcare ...

  16. Healthcare. State Report

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carnevale, Anthony P.; Smith, Nicole; Gulish, Artem; Beach, Bennett H.

    2012-01-01

    This report projects education requirements linked to forecasted job growth in healthcare by state and the District of Columbia from 2010 through 2020. It complements a larger national report which projects educational demand for healthcare for the same time period. The national report shows that with or without Obamacare, the United States will…

  17. Child Abuse

    MedlinePLUS

    ... puts a child at risk of harm. Child abuse can be physical, sexual or emotional. Neglect, or not providing for a child's needs, is also a form of abuse. Most abused children suffer greater emotional than physical damage. An abused child may become ...

  18. Healthcare Science Is Healthcare Science right for me?

    E-print Network

    Martin, Ralph R.

    communication skills · Research and analysis skills. These skills will help you gain work as a HealthcareHealthcare Science Is Healthcare Science right for me? If you are interested in caring for people and want to be able to provide specialised help to those who need it then Healthcare Science is a subject

  19. What the Medical Records Revolution Means to Your Special Child

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dorsett, Tom

    2008-01-01

    As every exceptional parent knows, the needs of a special child are, simply put, special. For every area of life, an extra amount of thought and care must be taken--whether it is education, traveling considerations, and, especially, healthcare. However, it is in the area of healthcare that parents say they face the most challenge. For years,…

  20. Electronics for better healthcare.

    PubMed

    Wolf, Bernhard; Herzog, Karolin

    2013-06-01

    Microelectronics and microsystem technology have changed our daily lives considerably in the past 50 years. Countless everyday objects contain microelectronic components. In healthcare up to the present, however, it has not been possible to make major alterations in introducing electronics and information technology that would lead to innovative improvements and greater transparency. This paper describes initial steps in diagnostics and oncological therapy including telematic healthcare systems which can, for example, assist patients with cardiovascular diseases and shows, through these areas, how electronics and microsystems technology can contribute to better healthcare. PMID:23702983

  1. Child Maltreatment

    PubMed Central

    Al-Saadoon, Muna; Al-Sharbati, Marwan; Nour, Ibtisam El; Al-Said, Basma

    2012-01-01

    Child maltreatment (CM) is common worldwide, and can take many forms. It may even endanger the child’s life, especially when younger children are the victims. CM affects the child’s quality of life and consequently leads to long term issues to be dealt with by the child, family and community. This case series discusses six children who have been subjected to CM, and diagnosed by the child protection team of the departments of Child Health and Behavioural Medicine at Sultan Qaboos University Hospital (SQUH), Oman. The aim of this case series is to increase the level of awareness of CM among Oman’s medical professionals and to highlight the difficulties encountered in diagnosing and providing optimal care for these children. Although treatment is provided in Oman’s health care system, it is clear that there are gaps in the existing system which affect the quality of child protection services provided to the children and their families. PMID:22375265

  2. Child Development

    MedlinePLUS

    ... grow older, they develop in several different ways. Child development includes physical, intellectual, social, and emotional changes. ... same sex. Peer approval becomes very important. Your child may try new behaviors to be part of " ...

  3. The health of healthcare, Part II: patient healthcare has cancer.

    PubMed

    Waldman, Deane

    2013-01-01

    In this article, we make the etiologic diagnosis for a sick patient named Healthcare: the cancer of greed. When we explore the two forms of this cancer--corporate and bureaucratic--we find the latter is the greater danger to We the Patients. The "treatments" applied to patient Healthcare by the Congressional "doctors" have consistently made the patient worse, not better. At the core of healthcare's woes is the government's diversion of money from healthcare services to healthcare bureaucracy. As this is the root cause, it is what we must address in order to cure, not sedate or palliate, patient Healthcare. PMID:24236323

  4. Expect the Best for Your Child's Dental Home

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Casamassimo, Paul

    2007-01-01

    Too many parents of children with special healthcare needs come upon dental care for their child out of necessity or urgency. In order to make the relationship most beneficial, the preferred way is to establish a Dental Home during the child's infancy. The Dental Home is the oral health corollary of the Medical Home concept that the American…

  5. Child Daycare.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cook, Jackqueline T.

    Based on the thesis that the absence of adequate child care resources in the United States presents a crisis not only for the child but for the parent, the employer, and society as a whole, this book provides an overview of that crisis in child day care. Part 1 briefly indicates the dimensions of the crisis; discusses the historical antecedents of…

  6. Child Development

    MedlinePLUS

    Start of Search Controls Search Form Controls Child Development Cancel Submit Search The CDC CDC A-Z Index MENU CDC A-Z SEARCH A B C D E F G H I ... Z # Start of Search Controls Search Form Controls Child Development Cancel Submit Search The CDC Child Development Note: ...

  7. Mobile healthcare informatics.

    PubMed

    Siau, Keng; Shen, Zixing

    2006-06-01

    Advances in wireless technology give pace to the rapid development of mobile applications. The coming mobile revolution will bring dramatic and fundamental changes to our daily life. It will influence the way we live, the way we do things, and the way we take care of our health. For the healthcare industry, mobile applications provide a new frontier in offering better care and services to patients, and a more flexible and mobile way of communicating with suppliers and patients. Mobile applications will provide important real time data for patients, physicians, insurers, and suppliers. In addition, it will revolutionalize the way information is managed in the healthcare industry and redefine the doctor - patient communication. This paper discusses different aspects of mobile healthcare. Specifically, it presents mobile applications in healthcare, and discusses possible challenges facing the development of mobile applications. Obstacles in developing mobile healthcare applications include mobile device limitations, wireless networking problems, infrastructure constraints, security concerns, and user distrust. Research issues in resolving or alleviating these problems are also discussed in the paper. PMID:16777784

  8. Healthcare Software Assurance

    PubMed Central

    Cooper, Jason G.; Pauley, Keith A.

    2006-01-01

    Software assurance is a rigorous, lifecycle phase-independent set of activities which ensure completeness, safety, and reliability of software processes and products. This is accomplished by guaranteeing conformance to all requirements, standards, procedures, and regulations. These assurance processes are even more important when coupled with healthcare software systems, embedded software in medical instrumentation, and other healthcare-oriented life-critical systems. The current Food and Drug Administration (FDA) regulatory requirements and guidance documentation do not address certain aspects of complete software assurance activities. In addition, the FDA’s software oversight processes require enhancement to include increasingly complex healthcare systems such as Hospital Information Systems (HIS). The importance of complete software assurance is introduced, current regulatory requirements and guidance discussed, and the necessity for enhancements to the current processes shall be highlighted. PMID:17238324

  9. Characteristics of healthcare wastes

    SciTech Connect

    Diaz, L.F. Eggerth, L.L.; Enkhtsetseg, Sh.; Savage, G.M.

    2008-07-01

    A comprehensive understanding of the quantities and characteristics of the material that needs to be managed is one of the most basic steps in the development of a plan for solid waste management. In this case, the material under consideration is the solid waste generated in healthcare facilities, also known as healthcare waste. Unfortunately, limited reliable information is available in the open literature on the quantities and characteristics of the various types of wastes that are generated in healthcare facilities. Thus, sound management of these wastes, particularly in developing countries, often is problematic. This article provides information on the quantities and properties of healthcare wastes in various types of facilities located in developing countries, as well as in some industrialized countries. Most of the information has been obtained from the open literature, although some information has been collected by the authors and from reports available to the authors. Only data collected within approximately the last 15 years and using prescribed methodologies are presented. The range of hospital waste generation (both infectious and mixed solid waste fractions) varies from 0.016 to 3.23 kg/bed-day. The relatively wide variation is due to the fact that some of the facilities surveyed in Ulaanbaatar include out-patient services and district health clinics; these facilities essentially provide very basic services and thus the quantities of waste generated are relatively small. On the other hand, the reported amount of infectious (clinical, yellow bag) waste varied from 0.01 to 0.65 kg/bed-day. The characteristics of the components of healthcare wastes, such as the bulk density and the calorific value, have substantial variability. This literature review and the associated attempt at a comparative analysis point to the need for worldwide consensus on the terms and characteristics that describe wastes from healthcare facilities. Such a consensus would greatly facilitate comparative analyses among different facilities, studies and countries.

  10. Factors influencing healthcare service quality

    PubMed Central

    Mosadeghrad, Ali Mohammad

    2014-01-01

    Background: The main purpose of this study was to identify factors that influence healthcare quality in the Iranian context. Methods: Exploratory in-depth individual and focus group interviews were conducted with 222 healthcare stakeholders including healthcare providers, managers, policy-makers, and payers to identify factors affecting the quality of healthcare services provided in Iranian healthcare organisations. Results: Quality in healthcare is a production of cooperation between the patient and the healthcare provider in a supportive environment. Personal factors of the provider and the patient, and factors pertaining to the healthcare organisation, healthcare system, and the broader environment affect healthcare service quality. Healthcare quality can be improved by supportive visionary leadership, proper planning, education and training, availability of resources, effective management of resources, employees and processes, and collaboration and cooperation among providers. Conclusion: This article contributes to healthcare theory and practice by developing a conceptual framework that provides policy-makers and managers a practical understanding of factors that affect healthcare service quality. PMID:25114946

  11. Literacy and Learning in Healthcare

    PubMed Central

    Wolf, Michael S.; Wilson, Elizabeth A.H.; Rapp, David N.; Waite, Katherine R.; Bocchini, Mary V.; Davis, Terry C.; Rudd, and Rima E.

    2014-01-01

    The relationship between literacy and health outcomes are well documented in adult medicine, yet specific causal pathways are not entirely clear. Despite an incomplete understanding of the problem, numerous interventions have already been implemented with variable success. Many of the earlier strategies assumed the problem to originate from reading difficulties only. Given the timely need for more effective interventions, it is of increasing importance to reconsider the meaning of health literacy in order to advance our conceptual understanding of the problem and how best to respond. One potentially effective approach might involve recognizing the known associations between a larger set of cognitive and psychosocial abilities with functional literacy skills. We review the current health literacy definition and literature and draw upon relevant research from the fields of education, cognitive science, and psychology. In this framework, a research agenda is proposed that considers an individual's health learning capacity, referring to the broad constellation of cognitive and psychosocial skills patients or family members must draw upon to effectively promote, protect, and manage their own or a child's health. This new, related concept will ideally lead to more effective ways of thinking about health literacy interventions, including the design of health education materials, instructional strategies, and the delivery of healthcare services to support patients and families across the lifespan. PMID:19861481

  12. Lean six sigma in healthcare.

    PubMed

    de Koning, Henk; Verver, John P S; van den Heuvel, Jaap; Bisgaard, Soren; Does, Ronald J M M

    2006-01-01

    Healthcare, as with any other service operation, requires systematic innovation efforts to remain competitive, cost efficient, and up-to-date. This article outlines a methodology and presents examples to illustrate how principles of Lean Thinking and Six Sigma can be combined to provide an effective framework for producing systematic innovation efforts in healthcare. Controlling healthcare cost increases, improving quality, and providing better healthcare are some of the benefits of this approach. PMID:16749293

  13. Lean Healthcare Takt time ()

    E-print Network

    Laksanacharoen, Sathaporn

    Lean Healthcare .. #12;Takt time () Available time / Customer demand (Available Time ) (/) 6 (=360 ) 20 Takt time = 360 / 20 = 18 18 18 #12;Cycle Time vs Takt Timey M ins 35 30 35 20 25 Takt Time 10 15 0 5 0 Registration Triage Consultation Billing Pharmacy #12;68 #12;Cycle

  14. Will healthcare reform work?

    PubMed

    Mulvany, Chad

    2010-11-01

    Providers should support efforts to reorganize the healthcare delivery system by undertaking four key market-centric activities: Improve customer service. Develop a deeper understanding of utilization patterns and the health statuses of the populations they serve. Build patient engagement. Help patients understand value in health care. PMID:21061818

  15. imagination at work GE Healthcare

    E-print Network

    Lebendiker, Mario

    imagination at work GE Healthcare Data File 28-9662-37 AA Custom Designed Media VIIISelect Electric Company. Capto is a trademark of GE Healthcare Companies. All third party trademarks within GE Healthcare which supplies them. A copy of these terms and conditions is available on request

  16. imagination at work GE Healthcare

    E-print Network

    Lebendiker, Mario

    imagination at work GE Healthcare Data File 28-9207-54 AA Custom Designed Media AVB Sepharose High is a trademarks of GE Healthcare Companies. All third party trademarks are the property of their respective owners are sold subject to the terms and conditions of sale of the company within GE Healthcare which supplies

  17. magination at work GE Healthcare

    E-print Network

    Lebendiker, Mario

    magination at work GE Healthcare Life Sciences imagination at work Multimodal Chromatography Handbook #12;Handbooks from GE Healthcare Life Sciences For more information refer to www.gelifesciences.com/handbooks 2-D Electrophoresis Principles and Methods GE Healthcare Life Sciences 2-D Electrophoresis using

  18. Integrated Decision Making in Healthcare

    E-print Network

    Boucherie, Richard J.

    Integrated Decision Making in Healthcare An Operations Research and Management Science Perspective Peter J.H. Hulshof #12;Integrated Decision Making in Healthcare An Operations Research and Management and Logistics (No. D-172) Industrial Engineering and Business Information Systems Center for Healthcare

  19. GE Healthcare Product Guide 2007

    E-print Network

    Lebendiker, Mario

    GE Healthcare BioProcess Product Guide 2007 #12;How to contact us Europe www 3272 741 299 F: +7 3272 754 243 Email: vitas@nursat.kz GE Healthcare Bio-Sciences AB Björkgatan 30 SE-751 84 Uppsala Sweden T: +46 (0) 18 612 00 00 F: +46 (0) 18 612 18 00 GE Healthcare Europe Gmb

  20. Modification of residue 42 of the active site loop with a lysine-mimetic sidechain rescues isochorismate-pyruvate lyase activity in Pseudomonas aeruginosa PchB

    PubMed Central

    Olucha, José; Meneely, Kathleen M.; Lamb, Audrey L.

    2012-01-01

    PchB is an isochorismate-pyruvate lyase from Pseudomonas aeruginosa. A positively charged lysine residue is located in a flexible loop that behaves as a lid to the active site, and the lysine residue is required for efficient production of salicylate. A variant of PchB that lacks the lysine at residue 42 has a reduced catalytic free energy of activation of up to 4.4 kcal/mol. Construction of a lysine isosteric residue bearing a positive charge at the appropriate position leads to the recovery of 2.5–2.7 kcal/mol (about 60%) of the 4.4 kcal/mol by chemical rescue. Exogenous addition of ethylamine to the K42A variant leads to a neglible recovery of activity (0.180 kcal/mol, roughly 7% rescue), whereas addition of propylamine caused an additional modest loss in catalytic power (0.056 kcal/mol, or ?2% loss). This is consistent with the view that (a) the lysine-42 residue is required in a specific conformation to stabilize the transition state and (b) the correct conformation is achieved for a lysine-mimetic sidechain at site 42 in the course of loop closure, as expected for transition-state stabilization by the side chain ammonio-function. That the positive charge is the main effector of transition state stabilization is shown by the construction of a lysine-isosteric residue capable of exerting steric effects and hydrogen bonding but not electrostatic effects, leading to a modest increase of catalytic power (0.267 – 0.505 kcal/mol of catalytic free energy, or roughly 6 – 11% rescue). PMID:22970849

  1. [The healthcare democracy].

    PubMed

    Saout, Christian

    2015-06-01

    Thirteen years after the law of 4th March 2002, known as the "Kouchner law", what is the situation regarding the much talked about healthcare democracy? Individual and collective rights have been granted to the users of the health care system. In addition, a series of actions have been promoted in order to exert them. Finally, a number of places and processes favouring consultation have been put in place. PMID:26146320

  2. Innovation Concepts in Healthcare

    ScienceCinema

    None

    2011-04-25

    AbstractDemographic change and advances in medical science pose increased challenges to healthcare systems globally: The economic basis is aging and thus health is becoming more and more a productivity factor. At the same time, with today?s new communication possibilities the demand and expectations of effective medical treatment have been increased. This presentation will illustrate the need for the ?industrialization? of healthcare in order to achieve highest results at limited budgets. Thereby, industrialization is not meaning the medical treatment based on the assembly line approach. Rather it is to recognize the cost of medical care as an investment with respective expectations on the return of the investment. Innovations in imaging and pharmaceutical products as well as in processes - that lead to similar medical results, but with lower efforts - are keys in such scenarios.BiographyProf. Dr. Hermann Requardt, 54, is a member of the Managing Board of Siemens AG and Chief Executive Officer of the Healthcare Sector. In addition he is the CTO of Siemens AG and Head of Corporate Technology, the central research department at Siemens.After completing his studies in physics and philosophy at the Darmstadt University of Technology and Johann Wolfgang Goethe University in Frankfurt and receiving a doctorate in biophysics, he worked at the Institute of Aerospace Medicine at the German Aerospace Center.In 1984 he joined the Medical Technology Group of Siemens AG, where he was responsible for projects in the Magnetic Resonance (MR) division. He was appointed head of the division in 1995. From 2001 to 2006, as a member of the Executive Management of the Medical Solutions Group, he was responsible for several areas, including technological development.In 2006 he became a Member of the Siemens? Managing Board and head of Corporate Technology. He was additionally appointed as the Sector Healthcare CEO in 2008.Since 2006 he is an honorary professor in physics of the Johann Wolfgang Goethe University in Frankfurt.                                                                                

  3. Innovation Concepts in Healthcare

    SciTech Connect

    2011-01-06

    AbstractDemographic change and advances in medical science pose increased challenges to healthcare systems globally: The economic basis is aging and thus health is becoming more and more a productivity factor. At the same time, with today’s new communication possibilities the demand and expectations of effective medical treatment have been increased. This presentation will illustrate the need for the “industrialization” of healthcare in order to achieve highest results at limited budgets. Thereby, industrialization is not meaning the medical treatment based on the assembly line approach. Rather it is to recognize the cost of medical care as an investment with respective expectations on the return of the investment. Innovations in imaging and pharmaceutical products as well as in processes - that lead to similar medical results, but with lower efforts - are keys in such scenarios.BiographyProf. Dr. Hermann Requardt, 54, is a member of the Managing Board of Siemens AG and Chief Executive Officer of the Healthcare Sector. In addition he is the CTO of Siemens AG and Head of Corporate Technology, the central research department at Siemens.After completing his studies in physics and philosophy at the Darmstadt University of Technology and Johann Wolfgang Goethe University in Frankfurt and receiving a doctorate in biophysics, he worked at the Institute of Aerospace Medicine at the German Aerospace Center.In 1984 he joined the Medical Technology Group of Siemens AG, where he was responsible for projects in the Magnetic Resonance (MR) division. He was appointed head of the division in 1995. From 2001 to 2006, as a member of the Executive Management of the Medical Solutions Group, he was responsible for several areas, including technological development.In 2006 he became a Member of the Siemens’ Managing Board and head of Corporate Technology. He was additionally appointed as the Sector Healthcare CEO in 2008.Since 2006 he is an honorary professor in physics of the Johann Wolfgang Goethe University in Frankfurt.                                                                                

  4. Child Nutrition

    MedlinePLUS

    ... prevent obesity and weight-related diseases, such as diabetes. To give your child a nutritious diet Make half of what is ... requirements for iron and calcium, change as your child ages. NIH: National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases

  5. Data mining applications in healthcare.

    PubMed

    Koh, Hian Chye; Tan, Gerald

    2005-01-01

    Data mining has been used intensively and extensively by many organizations. In healthcare, data mining is becoming increasingly popular, if not increasingly essential. Data mining applications can greatly benefit all parties involved in the healthcare industry. For example, data mining can help healthcare insurers detect fraud and abuse, healthcare organizations make customer relationship management decisions, physicians identify effective treatments and best practices, and patients receive better and more affordable healthcare services. The huge amounts of data generated by healthcare transactions are too complex and voluminous to be processed and analyzed by traditional methods. Data mining provides the methodology and technology to transform these mounds of data into useful information for decision making. This article explores data mining applications in healthcare. In particular, it discusses data mining and its applications within healthcare in major areas such as the evaluation of treatment effectiveness, management of healthcare, customer relationship management, and the detection of fraud and abuse. It also gives an illustrative example of a healthcare data mining application involving the identification of risk factors associated with the onset of diabetes. Finally, the article highlights the limitations of data mining and discusses some future directions. PMID:15869215

  6. Maternal – Child Health Needs Assessment in Haiti

    PubMed Central

    Cianelli, Rosina; Mitchell, Emma; Albuja, Laura; Wilkinson, Carole; Anglade, Debbie; Chery, Marie; Peragallo, Nilda

    2015-01-01

    Maternal and neonatal mortality in Haiti are among the highest in the world. This study investigated maternal-child health needs in Haiti, using a mixed method approach including qualitative and quantitative data collection. Participants (n=119) comprised of 39 healthcare workers and 80 Haitian women. The focus group centered around three major themes: difficult access to healthcare; health issues affecting mothers-child; and healthcare workers training. The interviews revealed that 60% of the deliveries happened at home, 52.5% of them were assisted by a lay birth attendant, 42% of the women gave their newborn a drink other than breast milk within the first week of birth, 70% of the women had not been, or did not know, if they had been tested for HIV, 92% did not use condoms during sexual encounters, and 47.5% justified violence against themselves from their partner. Considering the dearth of research concerning maternal-child health in Haiti that incorporates the opinions of healthcare workers and Haitian women, identifying their needs is essential to developing programs, such as the following that contribute to improving their health: nurse-midwife programs, training for lay birth attendants, obstetric-pediatric training, breastfeeding training, and programs to prevent intimate partner violence and HIV. PMID:26097809

  7. Child Care and Child Nutrition

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Karolak, Eric

    2009-01-01

    The weak economy is challenging the child care program budget. Fluctuations in enrollment come up against rising costs making every penny count. So for many reasons a federal program that helps defray the costs of snacks and meals in child care programs is particularly important and timely. In this article, the author pushes for the…

  8. [Reality of healthcare access for migrant children in Mayotte].

    PubMed

    Baillot, J; Luminet, B; Drouot, N; Corty, J F

    2012-05-01

    The implementation of the social security system in 2005 in Mayotte has resulted in the end of free healthcare for all non-affiliated residents, primarily Comorians, due to the absence of the State Medical Aid (AME) in this department. Doctors of the World France opened a paediatric clinic in December 2009. The sociomedical data were collected during 5286 consultations in 2010. Analysis of these data demonstrates a link between access to healthcare for children and the residential status of their parents. The analysis concerns 2,350 patients met during consultations held by Doctors of the World France in Mayotte in 2010. The data have been electronically recorded and analysed by the Sphinx software. The results show that there are several obstacles to healthcare resulting in non-attendance. This situation is made worse if one of the parents has an irregular residential status and all the more so if both the parents have an irregular status. Affiliation to the social security system, however, improves the situation. The results show a delay in accessing healthcare, a poor vaccination programme and disturbing data on severe acute malnutrition. The specific healthcare measures in Mayotte do not respect the International Convention on the Rights of the Child. Direct affiliation to the social security system for children would entail a reduction in health insecurity for the children of parents with irregular residential status. It would also be necessary to reduce the factors that provoke fear of displacement, which would facilitate physical access to consultations. PMID:22383116

  9. Determining a healthcare organization's value.

    PubMed

    Hahn, W

    1994-08-01

    As the consolidation activity among healthcare providers increases, it becomes more important than ever for healthcare financial managers to understand how to determine a healthcare organization's fair market value. There are many methods of determining an organization's value, but three general methods are the foundation of all others: the market comparable method, the underlying assets method, and the income, or cash flow, method. PMID:10146044

  10. OHSU Healthcare Patient rights, responsibilities

    E-print Network

    Chapman, Michael S.

    OHSU Healthcare Patient rights, responsibilities and safety OHSU Patient Relations Mail code: UHS-3, discrimination or harassment based on age, race, color, ethnicity, national origin, culture, language, sex

  11. Inorganic-organic hybrid compounds: hydrothermal synthesis and characterization of a new three-dimensional metal tetraphosphonate Mn[(HO 3PCH 2)N(H)(CH 2) 4(H)N(CH 2PO 3H) 2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stock, Norbert; Rauscher, Max; Bein, Thomas

    2004-03-01

    The new manganese tetraphosphonate, Mn[(HO 3PCH 2) 2N(H)(CH 2) 4(H)N(CH 2PO 3) 2] ( 1) was hydrothermally synthesized from MnCl 2 and N, N, N', N'-tetrametylphosphono-1,4-diaminobutane, (H 2O 3PCH 2) 2N-(CH 2) 4-N(CH 2PO 3H 2) 2. The structure was determined from single-crystal X-ray diffraction data (Mn[(HO 3PCH 2) 2N(H)(CH 2) 4(H)N(CH 2PO 3) 2], monoclinic, P2 1/a, with a=9.6663(1), b=9.2249(2), c=10.5452(1) pm, ?=105.676(1)°, V=905.35(3)×10 6 pm, Z=2, R1=0.051, w R2=0.109 (all data). The structure contains the zwitter ions [(HO 3PCH 2) 2N(H)-(CH 2) 4-(H)N(CH 2PO 3) 2] 2- and is built from alternating corner-linked [MnO 6] and [PO 3C] polyhedra forming a two-dimensional net of eight-rings. These layers are connected to a pillared structure by the diaminobutane groups. Magnetic susceptibility data confirms the presence of Mn 2+ ions. Thermogravimetric measurements show a stability of 1 up to ˜290°C. Between 290°C and 345°C a one-step loss of ˜7.0% is observed, and above 345°C the continuous decomposition of the organic part of the structures takes place.

  12. Healthcare Wide Hazards: Bloodborne Pathogens

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Updates US Public Health Service recommendations for the management of the health-care personnel (HCP) who have occupational exposure to blood ... Updates US Public Health Service recommendations for the management of the health-care personnel (HCP) who have occupational exposure to blood ...

  13. Consumer reaction to healthcare advertising.

    PubMed

    Klein, R F

    1998-07-01

    How do consumers view healthcare advertising? This question, along with many others, was addressed in a national survey conducted by Market Strategies for The Alliance For Healthcare Strategy And Marketing, and presented during The Alliance's annual advertising and promotion conference last June. PMID:10346006

  14. The Chinese healthcare challenge

    PubMed Central

    Fabre, Guilhem

    2015-01-01

    Investments in the extension of health insurance coverage, the strengthening of public health services, as well as primary care and better hospitals, highlights the emerging role of healthcare as part of China’s new growth regime, based on an expansion of services, and redistributive policies. Such investments, apart from their central role in terms of relief for low-income people, serve to rebalance the Chinese economy away from export-led growth toward the domestic market, particularly in megacity-regions as Shanghai and the Pearl River Delta, which confront the challenge of integrating migrant workers. Based on the paper by Gusmano and colleagues, one would expect improvements in population health for permanent residents of China’s cities. The challenge ahead, however, is how to address the growth of inequalities in income, wealth and the social wage. PMID:25774379

  15. Accountability and Primary Healthcare

    PubMed Central

    Mukhi, Shaheena; Barnsley, Jan; Deber, Raisa B.

    2014-01-01

    This paper examines the accountability structures within primary healthcare (PHC) in Ontario; in particular, who is accountable for what and to whom, and the policy tools being used. Ontario has implemented a series of incremental reforms, using expenditure policy instruments, enforced through contractual agreements to provide a defined set of publicly financed services that are privately delivered, most often by family physicians. The findings indicate that reporting, funding, evaluation and governance accountability requirements vary across service provider models. Accountability to the funder and patients is most common. Agreements, incentives and compensation tools have been used but may be insufficient to ensure parties are being held responsible for their activities related to stated goals. Clear definitions of various governance structures, a cohesive approach to monitoring critical performance indicators and associated improvement strategies are important elements in operationalizing accountability and determining whether goals are being met. PMID:25305392

  16. Leading healthcare in complexity.

    PubMed

    Cohn, Jeffrey

    2014-12-01

    Healthcare institutions and providers are in complexity. Networks of interconnections from relationships and technology create conditions in which interdependencies and non-linear dynamics lead to surprising, unpredictable outcomes. Previous effective approaches to leadership, focusing on top-down bureaucratic methods, are no longer effective. Leading in complexity requires leaders to accept the complexity, create an adaptive space in which innovation and creativity can flourish and then integrate the successful practices that emerge into the formal organizational structure. Several methods for doing adaptive space work will be discussed. Readers will be able to contrast traditional leadership approaches with leading in complexity. They will learn new behaviours that are required of complexity leaders, along with challenges they will face, often from other leaders within the organization. PMID:25815410

  17. Accountability and primary healthcare.

    PubMed

    Mukhi, Shaheena; Barnsley, Jan; Deber, Raisa B

    2014-09-01

    This paper examines the accountability structures within primary healthcare (PHC) in Ontario; in particular, who is accountable for what and to whom, and the policy tools being used. Ontario has implemented a series of incremental reforms, using expenditure policy instruments, enforced through contractual agreements to provide a defined set of publicly financed services that are privately delivered, most often by family physicians. The findings indicate that reporting, funding, evaluation and governance accountability requirements vary across service provider models. Accountability to the funder and patients is most common. Agreements, incentives and compensation tools have been used but may be insufficient to ensure parties are being held responsible for their activities related to stated goals. Clear definitions of various governance structures, a cohesive approach to monitoring critical performance indicators and associated improvement strategies are important elements in operationalizing accountability and determining whether goals are being met. PMID:25305392

  18. Practical Ways Psychotherapy Can Support Physical Healthcare Experiences for Male Survivors of Childhood Sexual Abuse

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hovey, Angela; Stalker, Carol A.; Schachter, Candice L.; Teram, Eli; Lasiuk, Gerri

    2011-01-01

    Many survivors of child sexual abuse who engage in psychotherapy also experience physical health problems. This article summarizes the findings of a multiphased qualitative study about survivors' experiences in healthcare settings. The study informed the development of the "Handbook on Sensitive Practice for Health Care Practitioners: Lessons from…

  19. Child Care Aware

    MedlinePLUS

    ... learn about high-quality child care. Welcome to Child Care Aware® E-Mail Print Share Tweet Military Child ... 2246 Call TTY#: 1-866-278-9428 Free Child Care Search Please enter your zip code. Your local ...

  20. Child abuse - sexual

    MedlinePLUS

    ... child protective services and the police. Medical professionals, teachers, and child care professionals are required by law ... depends on: Family and social support The child's personality The length of time the child was abused ...

  1. Toilet Training Your Child

    MedlinePLUS

    ... following: Your child signals that his or her diaper is wet or soiled. Your child seems interested ... Your child feels uncomfortable if his or her diaper is wet or soiled. Your child stays dry ...

  2. A Randomized Controlled Trial of Consensus-Based Child Abuse Case Management

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goldbeck, L.; Laib-Koehnemund, A.; Fegert, J. M.

    2007-01-01

    Objective: This study evaluates the effects of expert-assisted child abuse and neglect case management in the German child welfare and healthcare system as perceived by the case workers themselves. Methods: Case workers with different professions (social workers, counselors, clinic-based and office-based psychotherapists, and physicians)…

  3. Introducing the Healthcare Delivery Research Program | Healthcare Delivery Research Blog

    Cancer.gov

    Understanding the many challenges of cancer care is the focus of the new Healthcare Delivery Research Program in the Division of Cancer Control and Population Sciences at the National Cancer Institute (NCI).

  4. Improving healthcare using Lean processes.

    PubMed

    Baker, G Ross

    2014-01-01

    For more than a decade, healthcare organizations across Canada have been using Lean management tools to improve care processes, reduce preventable adverse events, increase patient satisfaction and create better work environments. The largest system-wide effort in Canada, and perhaps anywhere, is currently under way in Saskatchewan. The jury is still out on whether Lean efforts in that province, or elsewhere in Canada, are robust enough to transform current delivery systems and sustain new levels of performance. This issue of Healthcare Quarterly features several articles that provide a perspective on Lean methods in healthcare. PMID:25191802

  5. Child Find

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Arizona Department of Education, 2006

    2006-01-01

    This brochure describes "Child Find," a component of the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA) that requires states to identify, locate, and evaluate all children with disabilities, aged birth through 21, who are in need of early intervention or special education services.

  6. ElizabethDeadman, CommunicationsManager(Healthcare)

    E-print Network

    Oakley, Jeremy

    ElizabethDeadman, CommunicationsManager(Healthcare) RoomSJ012, BrunelUniversity, Kingston, and healthcare providers such as the NHS. MATCH operates an affiliate scheme that brings together healthcare-practice in healthcare technology assessment and user needs analysis. Joining the scheme will help you focus more

  7. Healthcare information technology and economics

    PubMed Central

    Bates, David W; Berner, Eta S; Bernstam, Elmer V; Covvey, H Dominic; Frisse, Mark E; Graf, Thomas; Greenes, Robert A; Hoffer, Edward P; Kuperman, Gil; Lehmann, Harold P; Liang, Louise; Middleton, Blackford; Omenn, Gilbert S; Ozbolt, Judy

    2013-01-01

    At the 2011 American College of Medical Informatics (ACMI) Winter Symposium we studied the overlap between health IT and economics and what leading healthcare delivery organizations are achieving today using IT that might offer paths for the nation to follow for using health IT in healthcare reform. We recognized that health IT by itself can improve health value, but its main contribution to health value may be that it can make possible new care delivery models to achieve much larger value. Health IT is a critically important enabler to fundamental healthcare system changes that may be a way out of our current, severe problem of rising costs and national deficit. We review the current state of healthcare costs, federal health IT stimulus programs, and experiences of several leading organizations, and offer a model for how health IT fits into our health economic future. PMID:22781191

  8. Your Heart Failure Healthcare Team

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Tools & Resources Stroke More Your Heart Failure Healthcare Team Updated:Sep 29,2015 Patients with heart failure ... good relationships with all the members of this team. Learn to talk to them openly and honestly ...

  9. Homebased healthcare : issues and challenges

    E-print Network

    Nagpure, Prashant

    2008-01-01

    Healthcare costs in United States are projected to rise to 20% of GDP by 2015. This is a cause of major concern and current political debate. The largest contributor to this cost is the hospital cost accounting for 30 % ...

  10. Healthcare Access in Rural Communities

    MedlinePLUS

    ... retention of healthcare providers and using telehealth services. Health Insurance Status Individuals who do not have health insurance ... can help. How many rural Americans are without health insurance? According to the 2014 policy brief, The Uninsured: ...

  11. Applying lean principles in healthcare.

    PubMed

    Rinehart, Brenda

    2013-01-01

    Healthcare is charged to do more with less and improve patient satisfaction at the same time in order to balance the bottom line. Lean is a proven and effective way to remove waste, identify issues, and successfully implement change. The principle of Lean is based on the reality that there are value added and non-value added processes in every workflow. To improve quality and reduce loss, the non-value added processes need to be eliminated. In healthcare, value is determined from the perspective of the patient. While not exhaustive of the Lean processes that a healthcare system can employ, this article provides a general outline of Lean, definitions, and its benefits to any healthcare organization. PMID:24358583

  12. Securing Information Technology in Healthcare

    PubMed Central

    Anthony, Denise; Campbell, Andrew T.; Candon, Thomas; Gettinger, Andrew; Kotz, David; Marsch, Lisa A.; Molina-Markham, Andrés; Page, Karen; Smith, Sean W.; Gunter, Carl A.; Johnson, M. Eric

    2014-01-01

    Dartmouth College’s Institute for Security, Technology, and Society conducted three workshops on securing information technology in healthcare, attended by a diverse range of experts in the field. This article summarizes the three workshops. PMID:25379030

  13. A prescription for Lean healthcare.

    PubMed

    Wood, David

    2014-01-01

    The adoption of Lean in the healthcare industry has been an important advancement, and not just for healthcare management. Evidence suggests that Lean can improve labour and capital efficiencies, reduce the throughput time for patients and enhance the quality of care. However, the adoption of Lean has generated large variations in results and even wider-ranging suggestions on how to implement Lean in a healthcare setting. In this article, the author examines three very similar hospitals that implemented Lean in the emergency department during the same time. Through an examination of longitudinal data and a collection of unstructured interviews, the author found that implementation does make a substantial difference to long-term results. Although the presence of strong and persistent leadership can have favourable results on performance in the short term, these performance improvements are not sustainable. To have a long-term impact, healthcare providers need to engage all of the stakeholders in the healthcare system and create a culture that is continuously focused on the improvement of the patient healthcare experience. PMID:25191804

  14. Designing the future of healthcare.

    PubMed

    Fidsa, Gianfranco Zaccai

    2009-01-01

    This paper describes the application of a holistic design process to a variety of problems plaguing current healthcare systems. A design process for addressing complex, multifaceted problems is contrasted with the piecemeal application of technological solutions to specific medical or administrative problems. The goal of this design process is the ideal customer experience, specifically the ideal experience for patients, healthcare providers, and caregivers within a healthcare system. Holistic design is shown to be less expensive and wasteful in the long run because it avoids solving one problem within a complex system at the cost of creating other problems within that system. The article applies this approach to the maintenance of good health throughout life; to the creation of an ideal experience when a person does need medical care; to the maintenance of personal independence as one ages; and to the enjoyment of a comfortable and dignified death. Virginia Mason Medical Center is discussed as an example of a healthcare institution attempting to create ideal patient and caregiver experiences, in this case by applying the principles of the Toyota Production System ("lean manufacturing") to healthcare. The article concludes that healthcare is inherently dedicated to an ideal, that science and technology have brought it closer to that ideal, and that design can bring it closer still. PMID:19745471

  15. Child Care Options MSU Child Development Center

    E-print Network

    Maxwell, Bruce D.

    Child Care Options on Campus MSU Child Development Center 105 Herrick Hall / 406-994-5010 The MSU Child Development Center offers a year-round early education program for Bozeman area young children, ages 3 to 5 years. Emphasis is placed on the development of the whole child through playful learning

  16. Healthcare Fraud and Abuse

    PubMed Central

    Rudman, William J; Eberhardt, John S; Pierce, William; Hart-Hester, Susan

    2009-01-01

    In Texas, a supplier of durable medical equipment was found guilty of five counts of healthcare fraud due to submission of false claims to Medicare. The court sentenced the supplier to 120 months of incarceration and restitution of $1.6 million.1 Raritan Bay Medical Center agreed to pay the government $7.5 million to settle allegations that it defrauded the Medicare program, purposely inflating charges for inpatient and outpatient care, artificially obtaining outlier payments from Medicare.2 AmeriGroup Illinois, Inc., fraudulently skewed enrollment into the Medicaid HMO program by refusing to register pregnant women and discouraging registration for individuals with preexisting conditions. Under the False Claims Act and the Illinois Whistleblower Reward and Protection Act, AmeriGroup paid $144 million in damages to Illinois and the U.S. government and $190 million in civil penalties.3 In Florida, a dermatologist was sentenced to 22 years in prison, paid $3.7 million in restitution, forfeited an addition $3.7 million, and paid a $25,000 fine for performing 3,086 medically unnecessary surgeries on 865 Medicare beneficiaries.4 In Florida, a physician was sentenced to 24 months incarceration, ordered to pay $727,000 in restitution for cash payments where the physician signed blank prescriptions and certificates for medical necessity for patients he never saw.5 The U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) Office of the Inspector General (OIG) found that providers in 8 out of 10 audited states received an estimated total of $27.3 million in Medicaid overpayments for services claimed after beneficiaries' deaths.6 PMID:20169019

  17. The Puerto Rico Healthcare Crisis.

    PubMed

    Roman, Jesse

    2015-12-01

    The Commonwealth of Puerto Rico is an organized nonincorporated territory of the United States with a population of more than 3.5 million U.S. citizens. The island has been the focus of much recent attention due to the recent default on its debt (estimated at more than $70 billion), high poverty rates, and increasing unemployment. Less attention, however, has been given to the island's healthcare system, which many believe is on the verge of collapsing. Healthcare makes up 20% of the Puerto Rican economy, and this crisis affects reimbursement rates for physicians while promoting the disintegration of the island's healthcare infrastructure. A major contributor relates to a disparity in federal funding provided to support the island's healthcare system when compared with that provided to the states in the mainland and Hawaii. Puerto Rico receives less federal funding for healthcare than the other 50 states and the District of Columbia even though it pays its share of social security and Medicare taxes. To make matters worse, the U.S. Center for Medicaid and Medicare Services is planning soon to implement another 11% cut in Medical Advantage reimbursements. This disparity in support for healthcare is considered responsible for ?$25 billion of Puerto Rico's total debt. The impact of these events on the health of Puerto Ricans in the island cannot be entirely predicted, but the loss of healthcare providers and diminished access to care are a certainty, and quality care will suffer, leading to serious implications for those with chronic medical disorders including respiratory disease. PMID:26551268

  18. Healthcare waste management in Asia

    SciTech Connect

    Prem Ananth, A.; Prashanthini, V.; Visvanathan, C.

    2010-01-15

    The risks associated with healthcare waste and its management has gained attention across the world in various events, local and international forums and summits. However, the need for proper healthcare waste management has been gaining recognition slowly due to the substantial disease burdens associated with poor practices, including exposure to infectious agents and toxic substances. Despite the magnitude of the problem, practices, capacities and policies in many countries in dealing with healthcare waste disposal, especially developing nations, is inadequate and requires intensification. This paper looks upon aspects to drive improvements to the existing healthcare waste management situation. The paper places recommendation based on a 12 country study reflecting the current status. The paper does not advocate for any complex technology but calls for changes in mindset of all concerned stakeholders and identifies five important aspects for serious consideration. Understanding the role of governments and healthcare facilities, the paper also outlines three key areas for prioritized action for both parties - budget support, developing policies and legislation and technology and knowledge management.

  19. Oxidative addition of H/sub 2/ to the A-frame complex (Tr/sub 2/(CO)/sub 2/(. mu. -S)(Ph/sub 2/PCH/sub 2/PPh/sub 2/)/sub 2/): a reinvestigation

    SciTech Connect

    Vaartstra, B.A.; O'Brien, K.N.; Eisenberg, R.; Cowie, M.

    1988-10-05

    A reinvestigation of the reaction of the A-frame complex (Ir/sub 2/(CO)/sub 2/(..mu..-S)(DPPM)/sub 2/) (DPPM = Ph/sub 2/PCH/sub 2/PPh/sub 2/) with H/sub 2/ using improved spectroscopic techniques is reported herein. It is proposed that the reaction is an oxidative addition of H/sub 2/ at one metal center followed by transfer of one hydride ligand to the other metal and concomitant Ir-Ir bond formation. 23 references, 1 figure, 1 table.

  20. Big Data Analytics in Healthcare

    PubMed Central

    Belle, Ashwin; Thiagarajan, Raghuram; Soroushmehr, S. M. Reza; Navidi, Fatemeh; Beard, Daniel A.; Najarian, Kayvan

    2015-01-01

    The rapidly expanding field of big data analytics has started to play a pivotal role in the evolution of healthcare practices and research. It has provided tools to accumulate, manage, analyze, and assimilate large volumes of disparate, structured, and unstructured data produced by current healthcare systems. Big data analytics has been recently applied towards aiding the process of care delivery and disease exploration. However, the adoption rate and research development in this space is still hindered by some fundamental problems inherent within the big data paradigm. In this paper, we discuss some of these major challenges with a focus on three upcoming and promising areas of medical research: image, signal, and genomics based analytics. Recent research which targets utilization of large volumes of medical data while combining multimodal data from disparate sources is discussed. Potential areas of research within this field which have the ability to provide meaningful impact on healthcare delivery are also examined. PMID:26229957

  1. Big Data Analytics in Healthcare.

    PubMed

    Belle, Ashwin; Thiagarajan, Raghuram; Soroushmehr, S M Reza; Navidi, Fatemeh; Beard, Daniel A; Najarian, Kayvan

    2015-01-01

    The rapidly expanding field of big data analytics has started to play a pivotal role in the evolution of healthcare practices and research. It has provided tools to accumulate, manage, analyze, and assimilate large volumes of disparate, structured, and unstructured data produced by current healthcare systems. Big data analytics has been recently applied towards aiding the process of care delivery and disease exploration. However, the adoption rate and research development in this space is still hindered by some fundamental problems inherent within the big data paradigm. In this paper, we discuss some of these major challenges with a focus on three upcoming and promising areas of medical research: image, signal, and genomics based analytics. Recent research which targets utilization of large volumes of medical data while combining multimodal data from disparate sources is discussed. Potential areas of research within this field which have the ability to provide meaningful impact on healthcare delivery are also examined. PMID:26229957

  2. Waste, Economists and American Healthcare

    PubMed Central

    Evans, Robert G.

    2013-01-01

    Twenty-five years ago, Uwe Reinhardt pointed out that sheer bureaucratic waste, particularly in the private sector, accounted for much of the extraordinarily high cost of American health-care. Last year an expert panel of the Institute of Medicine reconfirmed his point, estimating that in 2009, administrative waste accounted for $190 billion out of a total of $765 billion in various forms of waste – 31% of overall American spending on healthcare. Reinhardt recently noted a peculiar schizophrenia among American economists, simultaneously deploring this monumental waste while celebrating the contribution of healthcare, and particularly medical research, to the American economy. The apparent paradox may arise from a confusion between the meanings of “value” in economic and everyday language, and from economists' tendency to create pseudo-aggregates of diverse and non-commensurate entities. PMID:24359713

  3. My Child Is Stealing

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Deal With Bullies Pregnant? What to Expect My Child Is Stealing KidsHealth > Parents > Emotions & Behavior > Behavior > My ... between parents and kids. Back Continue If a Child Keeps Stealing If your child has stolen more ...

  4. Your Child's Immunizations

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Deal With Bullies Pregnant? What to Expect Your Child's Immunizations KidsHealth > Parents > Infections > Immunizations > Your Child's Immunizations ... receives. Take Our Quiz! Continue The Vaccines Your Child Needs The following vaccinations and schedules are recommended ...

  5. Your Child's Habits

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Deal With Bullies Pregnant? What to Expect Your Child's Habits KidsHealth > Parents > Emotions & Behavior > Behavior > Your Child's ... Mom or Dad. Back Continue Coping With Your Child's Habit The good news is that most habits ...

  6. Asthma - child - discharge

    MedlinePLUS

    ... sure your child warms up before being very active and cools down after. Understand your child's asthma medicines and how they should be taken. These include: Control medicines that your child takes every day Quick- ...

  7. FAQ: Child Sexual Exploitation

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Support FAQ: Child Sexual Exploitation What is child pornography? Federal law (18 U.S.C. §2256(8)) defines ... person under the age of 18. Is child pornography a crime? It is a federal crime to ...

  8. Safe design of healthcare facilities

    PubMed Central

    Reiling, J

    2006-01-01

    The physical environment has a significant impact on health and safety; however, hospitals have not been designed with the explicit goal of enhancing patient safety through facility design. In April 2002, St Joseph's Community Hospital of West Bend, a member of SynergyHealth, brought together leaders in healthcare and systems engineering to develop a set of safety?driven facility design recommendations and principles that would guide the design of a new hospital facility focused on patient safety. By introducing safety?driven innovations into the facility design process, environmental designers and healthcare leaders will be able to make significant contributions to patient safety. PMID:17142606

  9. Folding 'health' back into healthcare.

    PubMed

    Green, David

    2015-03-01

    David Green, AlA, principal at the London offices of Perkins + Will, and Basak Alkan, AICP, LEED AP/healthcare district planner, at the architect, interior, and urban design company's Atlanta, US base, examine growing moves in the US to re-evaluate planning policies to ensure that local environments are built that promote healthy activities, with the creation of so-called 'Health Districts'. Equally, they explain, healthcare 'systems' are starting to see the value in using their campuses to promote this process. In the UK, they argue, 'the timing is perfect for the re-evaluation of the relationship between the medical campus and the city'. PMID:26268031

  10. Helping Your Child through Early Adolescence -- Helping Your Child Series

    MedlinePLUS

    ... CHILD'S ACADEMIC SUCCESS Helping Your Child Through Early Adolescence -- Helping Your Child Series PDF (1 MB) For ... Acknowledgements Tips to Help Your Child through Early Adolescence No Child Left Behind < Previous page | ^ Top ^ | Next ...

  11. Brushing Your Child’s Teeth

    MedlinePLUS

    ... age. Taking care of your child's gums and teeth every day helps prevent tooth decay and gum ... child. Learn how to care for your children's teeth and gums starting when they are newborn. When ...

  12. Handovers and Interference Mitigation in Healthcare Environments

    E-print Network

    Handovers and Interference Mitigation in Healthcare Environments N. Chevrollier, N. Montavont support medical and healthcare informatics applications. The main questions that we try to answer are: (1 local area network (WLAN) communication in the unlicensed bands, has focused the attention

  13. [Fostering LGBT-friendly healthcare services].

    PubMed

    Wei, Han-Ting; Chen, Mu-Hong; Ku, Wen-Wei

    2015-02-01

    LGBT (lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender) patients suffer from stigma and discrimination when seeking healthcare. A large LGBT healthcare survey revealed that 56% of gay patients and 70% of transgender patients suffered some type of discrimination while seeking healthcare in 2014. The fostering of LGBT-friendly healthcare services is not just an advanced step of gender mainstreaming but also a fulfillment of health equality and equity. Additionally, LGBT-friendly healthcare services are expected to provide new opportunities for healthcare workers. Therefore, proactive government policies, education, research, and clinical practice should all encourage the development of these healthcare services. We look forward to a well-developed LGBT-friendly healthcare system in Taiwan. PMID:25631181

  14. Healthcare Cost and Utilization Project (HCUP)

    Cancer.gov

    The Healthcare Cost and Utilization Project is a family of health care databases and related software tools and products developed through a Federal-State-Industry partnership and sponsored by the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality.

  15. Discussing Diabetes with Your Healthcare Provider

    MedlinePLUS

    ... of this page please turn Javascript on. Feature: Diabetes Discussing Diabetes with Your Healthcare Provider Past Issues / Fall 2009 Table of Contents Diabetes Medicines—Always Discuss Them with Your Healthcare Provider ...

  16. GE Healthcare Applications that meet your needs

    E-print Network

    Lebendiker, Mario

    GE Healthcare Applications that meet your needs Protein purification #12;2 Contents Histidine proteins, the Protein Separations specialists at GE Healthcare are ready to help you gain real competitive

  17. Compose tips | Healthcare Delivery Research Blog

    Cancer.gov

    Skip to main content at the National Institutes of Health | www.cancer.gov Search form Search Search Healthcare Delivery Research Blog Toggle navigation Healthcare Delivery Research Blog Home Blog Purpose and Policies About HDRP Contact Us Subscribe

  18. Vancomycin-Resistant Enterococci in Healthcare Settings

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Websites Antibiotic Resistance Blood Safety Dialysis Safety Get Smart for Healthcare Hand Hygiene HICPAC Injection Safety Medication Safety MRSA National Healthcare Safety Network (NHSN) Nursing Homes and Assisted Living Sepsis Sharps Safety Transplant Safety ...

  19. Types of Healthcare-Associated Infections

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Websites Antibiotic Resistance Blood Safety Dialysis Safety Get Smart for Healthcare Hand Hygiene HICPAC Injection Safety Medication Safety MRSA National Healthcare Safety Network (NHSN) Nursing Homes and Assisted Living Sepsis Sharps Safety Transplant Safety ...

  20. Behavior-Based Access Control for Distributed Healthcare Systems

    E-print Network

    Sartipi, Kamran

    and communication technologies. The new pro- posals for national and international healthcare standardization meetBehavior-Based Access Control for Distributed Healthcare Systems Mohammad H. Yarmand, Kamran healthcare systems. The amalgamation of new information tech- nology with traditional healthcare workflows

  1. Bill Gates eyes healthcare market.

    PubMed

    Dunbar, C

    1995-02-01

    The entrepreneurial spirit is still top in Bill Gates' mind as he look toward healthcare and other growth industries. Microsoft's CEO has not intention of going the way of other large technology companies that became obsolete before they could compete today. PMID:10161163

  2. POST-QUALIFICATION FOR HEALTHCARE

    E-print Network

    Applebaum, David

    POST-QUALIFICATION DIRECTORY FOR HEALTHCARE PROFESSIONALS 2014-15 Florence Nightingale Faculty-nm@kcl.ac.uk Website: www.kcl.ac.uk/nursing Florence Nightingale Faculty of Nursing & Midwifery King's College London to the 2014­15 post-qualification education prospectus for the Florence Nightingale Faculty of Nursing

  3. Telemedicine can make healthcare greener.

    PubMed

    Yellowlees, Peter M; Chorba, Kathy; Burke Parish, Michelle; Wynn-Jones, Hannah; Nafiz, Najia

    2010-03-01

    The American healthcare industry is generally lacking environmentally sustainable practices. The environmental impact of healthcare practices in the country has been largely disregarded due to ambivalence, ignorance, and fears of additional costs and regulations. The current practices continue to pollute the environment by requiring large amounts of travel and paperwork by both the patient and the clinician. Telemedicine and health information technology help save time, energy, raw materials (such as paper and plastic), and fuel, thereby lowering the carbon footprint of the health industry. By implementing green practices, for instance, by engaging in carbon credit programs, the health industry could benefit financially as well as reduce its negative impact on the health of our planet. Companies that reduce their carbon emissions by implementing energy-saving practices can sell their carbon credits to companies that emit more carbon than permissible by their legally binding commitment. These carbon profits can then be used for healthcare research or to provide healthcare to the underserved. Alternatively, the savings could be used for green purchasing and to implement other carbon-reducing activities. This report reviews the numerous possible options for the American health industry to become greener and lower its carbon footprint while at the same time becoming more time- and cost efficient. PMID:20156125

  4. Lean Healthcare (product/service)

    E-print Network

    Laksanacharoen, Sathaporn

    Lean Healthcare .. #12; : : ( ) ) #12; #12; (product of equipment, materials, parts, space, and worker's time which are absolutely necessary to add value · · #12;#12;Spaghetti diagramSpaghetti diagram #12;Traditional vs. Lean Results T r a d i t i o n a l R e

  5. Trustworthiness of Pervasive Healthcare Folders

    E-print Network

    with the objective to increase the quality of care while decreasing its cost. Pervasive healthcare aims itself) with a large external Flash memory on a USB key form factor. Embedding the patient folder as well as a database. INTRODUCTION Driven by the need to improve the quality of care while decreasing costs, many countries around

  6. Visualizing desirable patient healthcare experiences.

    PubMed

    Liu, Sandra S; Kim, Hyung T; Chen, Jie; An, Lingling

    2010-01-01

    High healthcare cost has drawn much attention and healthcare service providers (HSPs) are expected to deliver high-quality and consistent care. Therefore, an intimate understanding of the most desirable experience from a patient's and/or family's perspective as well as effective mapping and communication of such findings should facilitate HSPs' efforts in attaining sustainable competitive advantage in an increasingly discerning environment. This study describes (a) the critical quality attributes (CQAs) of the experience desired by patients and (b) the application of two visualization tools that are relatively new to the healthcare sector, namely the "spider-web diagram" and "promotion and detraction matrix." The visualization tools are tested with primary data collected from telephone surveys of 1,800 patients who had received care during calendar year 2005 at 6 of 61 hospitals within St. Louis, Missouri-based, Ascension Health. Five CQAs were found by factor analysis. The spider-web diagram illustrates that communication and empowerment and compassionate and respectful care are the most important CQAs, and accordingly, the promotion and detraction matrix shows those attributes that have the greatest effect for creating promoters, preventing detractors, and improving consumer's likelihood to recommend the healthcare provider. PMID:20155554

  7. Ph.D. Graduate Research Assistantship in Healthcare Modeling / Healthcare Logistics

    E-print Network

    Taaffe, Kevin M.

    Ph.D. Graduate Research Assistantship in Healthcare Modeling / Healthcare Logistics Industrial Engineering at Clemson University To support his research in healthcare modeling and healthcare logistics, Dr outcome will be identification of changes that will potentially improve patient safety, reduce costs

  8. Healthcare and Listening: A Relationship for Caring

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Davis, Janis; Foley, Amy; Crigger, Nancy; Brannigan, Michael C.

    2008-01-01

    The optimal relationship between healthcare provider and patient is one of trust. This therapeutic relationship is dependent on the ability of the healthcare provider to communicate effectively with the patient. Research indicates that when healthcare providers listen to patients, there is more compliance with medical regimens, patient…

  9. HEALTHCARE COST AND UTILIZATION PROJECT (HCUP)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Healthcare Cost and Utilization Project (HCUP) is a family of healthcare databases and related software tools and products developed through a Federal-State-industry partnership and sponsored by the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (AHRQ). HCUP databases bring toget...

  10. Regulating Exceptions in Healthcare using Policy Spaces

    E-print Network

    Samarati, Pierangela

    , USA 3 George Mason University, USA Abstract. One truth holds for the healthcare industry - nothing in healthcare to regulate and restrict the disclosure of data are often bypassed. This "break the glass solution aimed at a better management of exceptions that occur in healthcare. Our solution is based

  11. Lillian Rstad Access Control in Healthcare

    E-print Network

    Lillian Røstad Access Control in Healthcare Information Systems Thesis for the degree will take you everywhere. (Albert Einstein) #12;#12;Abstract Access control is a key feature of healthcare to resources in a system. In healthcare systems this means protecting patient privacy. How- ever, the top

  12. Multidisciplinary Assessment of Technology Centre for Healthcare

    E-print Network

    Oakley, Jeremy

    Multidisciplinary Assessment of Technology Centre for Healthcare Annual Report 2010-11 www's Introduction THE MATCH Vision To provide what healthcare users really need: more effective and efficient industry healthcare service providers and academics. The research threads that support this include

  13. Multidisciplinary Assessment of Technology Centre for Healthcare

    E-print Network

    Oakley, Jeremy

    Multidisciplinary Assessment of Technology Centre for Healthcare Year 7 Annual Report www of device users, the medical device industry, regulators and reimbursement agencies and healthcare providers healthcare users really need: more effective and efficient service, based on better technology that has been

  14. Child Support Report, 2002.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sharman, Phil, Ed.

    2002-01-01

    This document comprises the 12 issues for 2002 of the Child Support Report, which explores problems related to child support enforcement, reports on federal and state government child support enforcement initiatives, and summarizes research related to child support. Featured regularly are editorials and information on events of interest and…

  15. THE DIFFICULT CHILD.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    ROUCEK, JOSEPH S.

    THIS BOOK CONSISTS OF 16 ESSAYS BY SPECIALISTS ON PROBLEMS WHICH MAY MAKE A CHILD DIFFICULT. EACH AUTHOR DISCUSSES ETIOLOGICAL FACTORS, CHARACTERISTICS, AND HOW DIFFICULTIES MAY BE REDUCED. THE FOLLOWING TOPICS ARE CONSIDERED--(1) "THE CREATIVE CHILD" BY E.P. TORRANCE, (2) "THE INATTENTIVE CHILD" BY I.W. SCHERER, (3) "THE CHILD WITH LANGUAGE…

  16. Your Child's Immunization Record

    MedlinePLUS

    Your Child’s Immunization Record It’s important to keep up-to-date records of all your child’s immunizations, beginning at birth and ... vaccination by filling in the date. Record of Immunizations Date Given: Where Given: Reaction: Hepatitis B Rotavirus ...

  17. Child Support Report, 2001.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sharman, Phil, Ed.

    2001-01-01

    This document comprises the 12 issues for 2001 of the "Child Support Report," which explores problems related to child support enforcement, reports on federal and state government child support enforcement initiatives, and summarizes research related to child support. Featured regularly are editorials and information on events of interest and…

  18. Child Care Center APPLICATION

    E-print Network

    Harms, Kyle E.

    Child Care Center APPLICATION Child's name:_______________________Date of birth/Expected due date payroll deduction Community #12;Child Care Center Application Process To apply for enrollment at the LSU Child Care Center, this application form must be completed, signed and received with the $45

  19. Child Support Report, 1999.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sharman, Phil, Ed.

    1999-01-01

    This document comprises the 12 issues for 1999 of the "Child Support Report," which explores problems related to child support enforcement, reports on federal and state government child support enforcement initiatives, and summarizes research related to child support. Editorials and information on events and conferences of interest and funding…

  20. Child Support Report, 2000.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sharman, Phil, Ed.

    2000-01-01

    This document comprises the 12 issues for 2000 of the "Child Support Report," which explores problems related to child support enforcement, reports on federal and state government child support enforcement initiatives, and summarizes research related to child support. Featured regularly are editorials and information on events of interest and…

  1. The status of TQM in healthcare.

    PubMed

    Yasin, M M; Meacham, K A; Alavi, J

    1998-01-01

    The face of the healthcare industry has changed dramatically over the last few years. This study examines the literature related to Total Quality Management (TQM) and Benchmarking (BM) applications in healthcare. Recommendations for healthcare managers and administrators, as they chart operational and strategic directions for their organization, are provided. In this context, a conceptual framework which stresses the significance of viewing the healthcare organization as an open system is provided. The framework underscores the fact that TQM and BM efforts should not be viewed in isolation. Rather, these efforts should be viewed as an integral part of the operational and strategic facets of the healthcare organization. PMID:10181447

  2. Policy Capacity in the Learning Healthcare System

    PubMed Central

    Gardner, William

    2015-01-01

    Pierre-Gerlier Forest and his colleagues make a strong argument for the need to expand policy capacity among healthcare actors. In this commentary, I develop an additional argument in support of Forest et al view. Forest et al rightly point to the need to have embedded policy experts to successfully translate healthcare reform policy into healthcare change. Translation of externally generated innovation policy into local solutions is only one source of healthcare system change. We also need to build learning healthcare systems that can discover new health solutions at the frontline of care. Enhanced policy capacity staffing in those organizations will be key to building continuously learning health systems. PMID:26673470

  3. Mothers' Perception and Healthcare Seeking Behavior of Pneumonia Children in Rural Bangladesh

    PubMed Central

    Ferdous, Farzana; Dil Farzana, Fahmida; Ahmed, Shahnawaz; Das, Sumon Kumar; Malek, Mohammad Abdul; Das, Jui; Faruque, Abu Syed Golam; Chisti, Mohammod Jobayer

    2014-01-01

    We describe mothers' perception about signs and symptoms, causes of the illness, and healthcare seeking behaviors related to pneumonia and express the major modifiable barriers to seeking timely treatment when their under-5 children had pneumonia in rural Bangladesh. Using focus group discussion, we understood mothers' perception and healthcare seeking behavior of childhood pneumonia. Although mothers described pneumonia as a serious life threatening disease in young children but most of the mothers (n = 24) could not diagnose whether their child had pneumonia or not. Environmental factors such as dust particles, spread from coughing mother, and drinking cold water or playing with water were perceived as the causes for pneumonia. Three common barriers noted were as follows: illness was not perceived as serious enough or distance from healthcare facility or lack of money at household for seeking treatment outside. Most of the rural mothers did not have knowledge about severity of childhood pneumonia. PMID:24967328

  4. UNIVERSITY REPORTING PROTOCOLS: CHILD ABUSE, SEXUAL ASSAULT, AND CHILD PORNOGRAPHY

    E-print Network

    UNIVERSITY REPORTING PROTOCOLS: CHILD ABUSE, SEXUAL ASSAULT, AND CHILD PORNOGRAPHY I. Background with respect to child abuse, sexual assault, and child pornography. II. Applicability These protocols apply, knowledge of the risk. D. Child Pornography: Any depiction which is of a child or appears to include a child

  5. Clinical practice of dual-certified music therapists/child life specialists: a phenomenological study.

    PubMed

    Ghetti, Claire M

    2011-01-01

    The discipline of child life enjoys a strong presence in many medical settings within the current pediatric healthcare environment. Due to the widespread establishment of child life programs, music therapists often find themselves negotiating their role and contributions to pediatric healthcare in relation to the field of child life. There is increasing interest among music therapy interns and clinicians in pursuing certification in child life to increase clinical knowledge and enhance marketability. A small, but strong, cohort of dual-certified music therapists/child life specialists is currently practicing in the field, but the nuances of their clinical practice have not been systematically examined. The current study used an interpretative phenomenological approach to explore the lived experiences of eight dual-certified clinicians, and to interpret how clinicians make sense of those lived experiences. Two overarching themes of identity and flexibility arose from the analysis: issues relating to establishing, challenging, and modifying professional identity; and flexibility manifested within areas of theoretical orientation, professional role, and clinical approach. Dual-certified clinicians vary in the degree to which they integrate the fields of music therapy and child life in practice, from complete and seamless integration of the two, to exclusive practice of only one field, depending upon the bounds of their positions. Participants reported that child life training is beneficial, but not necessary for achieving advanced practice in pediatric medical music therapy. Implications for the continuing advancement of music therapy in pediatric healthcare are discussed. PMID:22097101

  6. Public policy and healthcare systems.

    PubMed

    Nuwer, Marc R

    2013-01-01

    Public policy in healthcare affects physician and patient choices. In many ways it may limit choices. These choices present conflicts that are discussed here. Some issues depend on the laws enacted to enable either a single-payer system or that mixed with a private-payer system. In each case, the systems attain some cost controls through means such as gatekeepers, long wait lists, authorization processes, national fee schedules, complex coding schemes, or placing physicians on salary. National health systems are compared here. No one system has proven completely satisfactory, and each has its advantages. There are many factors that contribute to the escalating costs of care that lead to many healthcare public policies to constrain costs. Initiatives to incentivize preventive actions are a more positive step, but ones that are difficult to define in detail. PMID:24182385

  7. Healthcare Energy Metering Guidance (Brochure)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    2011-07-01

    This brochure is intended to help facility and energy managers plan and prioritize investments in energy metering. It offers healthcare-specific examples of metering applications, benefits, and steps that other health systems can reproduce. It reflects collaborative input from the U.S. Department of Energy national laboratories and the health system members of the DOE Hospital Energy Alliance's Benchmarking and Measurement Project Team.

  8. Workplace Bullying among Healthcare Workers

    PubMed Central

    Ariza-Montes, Antonio; Muniz, Noel M.; Montero-Simó, María José; Araque-Padilla, Rafael Angel

    2013-01-01

    This paper aims to assess consistent predictors through the use of a sample that includes different actors from the healthcare work force to identify certain key elements in a set of job-related organizational contexts. The utilized data were obtained from the 5th European Working Conditions Survey, conducted in 2010 by the European Foundation for the Improvement of Living and Working Conditions. In light of these objectives, we collected a subsample of 284 health professionals, some of them from the International Standard Classification of Occupations—subgroup 22—(ISCO-08). The results indicated that the chance of a healthcare worker referring to him/herself as bullied increases among those who work on a shift schedule, perform monotonous and rotating tasks, suffer from work stress, enjoy little satisfaction from their working conditions, and do not perceive opportunities for promotions in their organizations. The present work summarizes an array of outcomes and proposes within the usual course of events that workplace bullying could be reduced if job demands were limited and job resources were increased. The implications of these findings could assist human resource managers in facilitating, to some extent, good social relationships among healthcare workers. PMID:23887621

  9. Workplace bullying among healthcare workers.

    PubMed

    Ariza-Montes, Antonio; Muniz, Noel M; Montero-Simó, María José; Araque-Padilla, Rafael Angel

    2013-08-01

    This paper aims to assess consistent predictors through the use of a sample that includes different actors from the healthcare work force to identify certain key elements in a set of job-related organizational contexts. The utilized data were obtained from the 5th European Working Conditions Survey, conducted in 2010 by the European Foundation for the Improvement of Living and Working Conditions. In light of these objectives, we collected a subsample of 284 health professionals, some of them from the International Standard Classification of Occupations--subgroup 22--(ISCO-08). The results indicated that the chance of a healthcare worker referring to him/herself as bullied increases among those who work on a shift schedule, perform monotonous and rotating tasks, suffer from work stress, enjoy little satisfaction from their working conditions, and do not perceive opportunities for promotions in their organizations. The present work summarizes an array of outcomes and proposes within the usual course of events that workplace bullying could be reduced if job demands were limited and job resources were increased. The implications of these findings could assist human resource managers in facilitating, to some extent, good social relationships among healthcare workers. PMID:23887621

  10. Decision-making in healthcare as a complex adaptive system.

    PubMed

    Kuziemsky, Craig

    2016-01-01

    Healthcare transformation requires a change in how the business of healthcare is done. Traditional decision-making approaches based on stable and predictable systems are inappropriate in healthcare because of the complex nature of healthcare delivery. This article reviews challenges to using traditional decision-making approaches in healthcare and how insight from Complex Adaptive Systems (CAS) could support healthcare management. The article also provides a system model to guide decision-making in healthcare as a CAS. PMID:26656389

  11. Quality indicators and quality assessment in child health

    PubMed Central

    Kavanagh, Patricia L.; Adams, William G.; Wang, C. Jason

    2009-01-01

    Quality indicators are systematically developed statements that can be used to assess the appropriateness of specific healthcare decisions, services and outcomes. In this review, we highlight the range and type of indicators that have been developed for children in the UK and US by prominent governmental agencies and private organizations. We also classify these indicators in an effort to identify areas of child health that may lack quality measurement activity. We review the current state of health information technology in both countries since these systems are vital to quality efforts. Finally, we propose several recommendations to advance the quality indicator development agenda for children. The convergence of quality measurement and indicator development, a growing scientific evidence base and integrated information systems in healthcare may lead to substantial improvements for child health in the 21st century. PMID:19307196

  12. Stakeholders’ Perceptions on Shortage of Healthcare Workers in Primary Healthcare in Botswana: Focus Group Discussions

    PubMed Central

    Nkomazana, Oathokwa; Mash, Robert; Shaibu, Sheila; Phaladze, Nthabiseng

    2015-01-01

    Background An adequate health workforce force is central to universal health coverage and positive public health outcomes. However many African countries have critical shortages of healthcare workers, which are worse in primary healthcare. The aim of this study was to explore the perceptions of healthcare workers, policy makers and the community on the shortage of healthcare workers in Botswana. Method Fifteen focus group discussions were conducted with three groups of policy makers, six groups of healthcare workers and six groups of community members in rural, urban and remote rural health districts of Botswana. All the participants were 18 years and older. Recruitment was purposive and the framework method was used to inductively analyse the data. Results There was a perceived shortage of healthcare workers in primary healthcare, which was believed to result from an increased need for health services, inequitable distribution of healthcare workers, migration and too few such workers being trained. Migration was mainly the result of unfavourable personal and family factors, weak and ineffective healthcare and human resources management, low salaries and inadequate incentives for rural and remote area service. Conclusions Botswana has a perceived shortage of healthcare workers, which is worse in primary healthcare and rural areas, as a result of multiple complex factors. To address the scarcity the country should train adequate numbers of healthcare workers and distribute them equitably to sufficiently resourced healthcare facilities. They should be competently managed and adequately remunerated and the living conditions and rural infrastructure should also be improved. PMID:26284617

  13. Big Data and Analytics in Healthcare.

    PubMed

    Tan, S S-L; Gao, G; Koch, S

    2015-11-27

    This editorial is part of the Focus Theme of Methods of Information in Medicine on "Big Data and Analytics in Healthcare". The amount of data being generated in the healthcare industry is growing at a rapid rate. This has generated immense interest in leveraging the availability of healthcare data (and "big data") to improve health outcomes and reduce costs. However, the nature of healthcare data, and especially big data, presents unique challenges in processing and analyzing big data in healthcare. This Focus Theme aims to disseminate some novel approaches to address these challenges. More specifically, approaches ranging from efficient methods of processing large clinical data to predictive models that could generate better predictions from healthcare data are presented. PMID:26577624

  14. Information analytics for healthcare service discovery.

    PubMed

    Sun, Lily; Yamin, Mohammad; Mushi, Cleopa; Liu, Kecheng; Alsaigh, Mohammed; Chen, Fabian

    2014-01-01

    The concept of being 'patient-centric' is a challenge to many existing healthcare service provision practices. This paper focuses on the issue of referrals, where multiple stakeholders, such as General Practitioners (GPs) and patients, are encouraged to make a consensual decision based on patients' needs. In this paper, we present an ontology-enabled healthcare service provision, which facilitates both patients and GPs in jointly deciding upon the referral decision. In the healthcare service provision model, we define three types of profiles which represent different stakeholders' requirements. This model also comprises a set of healthcare service discovery processes: articulating a service need, matching the need with the healthcare service offerings, and deciding on a best-fit service for acceptance. As a result, the healthcare service provision can carry out coherent analysis using personalised information and iterative processes that deal with requirements which change over time. PMID:25516128

  15. Healthcare mergers and acquisitions: strategies for consolidation.

    PubMed

    Zuckerman, Alan M

    2011-01-01

    The passage of federal healthcare reform legislation, in combination with other factors, makes it likely that the next few years will be a major period of consolidation for healthcare organizations. This article examines the seven key forces reshaping healthcare delivery--from insurance industry consolidation to cost inflation to the increasing gap between financially strong and struggling providers--and provides advice for organizations on both sides of an acquisition. PMID:21793480

  16. Leading Lean: a Canadian healthcare leader's guide.

    PubMed

    Fine, Benjamin A; Golden, Brian; Hannam, Rosemary; Morra, Dante

    2009-01-01

    Canadian healthcare organizations are increasingly asked to do more with less, and too often this has resulted in demands on staff to simply work harder and longer. Lean methodologies, originating from Japanese industrial organizations and most notably Toyota, offer an alternative - tried and tested approaches to working smarter. Lean, with its systematic approaches to reducing waste, has found its way to Canadian healthcare organizations with promising results. This article reports on a study of five Canadian healthcare providers that have recently implemented Lean. We offer stories of success but also identify potential obstacles and ways by which they may be surmounted to provide better value for our healthcare investments. PMID:19553764

  17. FPG Child Development Institute

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Awards October 29, 2015 More Frank Porter Graham Child Development Institute The University of North Carolina at Chapel ... Information: 919.966.2622 © 2015 Frank Porter Graham Child Development Institute Contact Us Web Policies Portal Staff Login

  18. Normal Child Behavior

    MedlinePLUS

    ... age. Development can be uneven, too, with a child's social development lagging behind his intellectual growth, or vice versa. ... members, and others. They may interfere with the child's intellectual development. They may be forbidden by law, ethics, religion, ...

  19. Child Behavior Disorders

    MedlinePLUS

    ... a death in the family may cause a child to act out. Behavior disorders are more serious. ... The behavior is also not appropriate for the child's age. Warning signs can include Harming or threatening ...

  20. Child Mental Health

    MedlinePLUS

    ... develops, it becomes a regular part of your child's behavior and is more difficult to treat. But it's not always easy to know when your child has a serious problem. Everyday stresses can cause ...

  1. Child Dental Health

    MedlinePLUS

    Healthy teeth are important to your child's overall health. From the time your child is born, there are things you can do to promote healthy teeth and prevent cavities. For babies, you should clean ...

  2. Child Sexual Abuse

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Your Child When To Seek Help For Your Child When Children Have Children When A Pet Dies When a Parent Has Cancer: Tips for Talking to Kids What Is Psychotherapy For Children And Adolescents? Understanding Your Mental Health ...

  3. Influenza vaccination of healthcare personnel.

    PubMed

    Wicker, Sabine; Marckmann, Georg

    2014-01-01

    The thought is terrifying--you are admitted to the hospital and you die of a nosocomial infection. What sounds like a horror scenario, happens every day in hospitals all over the world. Nosocomial influenza is associated with considerable morbidity and mortality among patients with underlying diseases (especially immunocompromised patients), the elderly, and neonates. Although vaccination of healthcare personnel (HCP) is the main measure for preventing nosocomial influenza and is consistently recommended by public-health authorities, vaccine uptake among HCP remains low. (1.) PMID:25483507

  4. Child Care Subsidies and Child Development

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Herbst, Chris M.; Tekin, Erdal

    2010-01-01

    Child care subsidies are an important part of federal and state efforts to move welfare recipients into employment. One of the criticisms of the current subsidy system, however, is that it overemphasizes work and does little to encourage parents to purchase high-quality child care. Consequently, there are reasons to be concerned about the…

  5. Healthcare

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Website You are exiting the Department of Labor's Web server. The Department of Labor does not endorse, ... the use of copyrighted materials contained in linked Web sites. Users must request such authorization from the ...

  6. National Healthcare in the United States: What Counselors Should Know.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hannon, J. Wade

    Few articles in the professional counseling literature address the healthcare crisis. This paper examines the current state of the United States healthcare affairs. Topics discussed include the problems in healthcare, including an inspection of the uninsured, the underinsured, rising healthcare costs, and the growing inequality in the healthcare

  7. HEALTHCARE ENVIRONMENTAL ASSISTANCE RESOURCES: POLLUTION PREVENTION AND COMPLIANCE ASSISTANCE FOR HEALTHCARE FACILITIES

    EPA Science Inventory

    This CD ROM is a result of several healthcare guidance documents coming into existence around the same time and the need for one tool where healthcare facilities could have access to these documents and other valuable healthcare resources regardless of connection to the internet....

  8. Supporting Each Child's Spirit

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baumgartner, Jennifer J.; Buchanan, Teresa

    2010-01-01

    In using developmentally appropriate practices, teachers should intentionally address all aspects of a child's being, the spiritual along with the physical and the cognitive. Because spirituality is a vital part of human nature, a whole-child teaching approach must include the part of the child some call spirituality. Many have attempted to…

  9. Child Care Bulletin, 1997.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McGhee, Marilyn, Ed.

    1997-01-01

    This document is comprised of six issues of the Child Care Bulletin, a bimonthly publication of the National Child Care Information Center. The January-February issue focuses on involving communities in child care planning. Topics discussed in this issue include: community mobilization strategies, assessing needs and establishing goals, and…

  10. Child Povertyy Prevention Council

    E-print Network

    Harms, Kyle E.

    Child Povertyy Prevention Council for Louisianafor Louisiana Implementation Plan February 2009eb ua In response to ACT 559 of the 2008 Regular Session of the Louisiana Legislature #12;Child Poverty Prevention Council for Louisiana Implementation Plan ­ 2009 #12;Child Poverty Prevention Council for Louisiana 3

  11. Child Sexual Abuse

    MedlinePLUS

    ... worthlessness and an abnormal or distorted view of sex. The child may become withdrawn and mistrustful of adults, and ... Violent Behavior In Children and Adolescents The Depressed Child Teen Suicide Talking To Your Kids About Sex Self-Injury In Adolescents Responding To Child Sexual ...

  12. Child Care Bulletin, 1996.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McGhee, Marilyn, Ed.

    1996-01-01

    This document consists of six issues of the Child Care Bulletin, a bimonthly publication of the National Child Care Information Center. The January-February issue focuses on infants and toddlers in child care. Topics discussed include caring for infants with special needs, designing quality group care environments, Early Head Start programs, and…

  13. Child Nutrition. Beginnings Workshop.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hayden, Jacqueline; Eastman, Wayne; Aird, Laura Dutil; McCrea, Nadine L.

    2002-01-01

    Four workshops focus on nutrition for infants and children in child care settings. Articles are: (1) "Nutrition and Child Development: Global Perspectives" (Jacqueline Hayden); (2) "Working with Families around Nutritional Issues" (Wayne Eastman); (3) "Breastfeeding Promotion in Child Care" (Laura Dutil Aird); and (4) "Food as Shared…

  14. Mother-Child Bonding.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pearce, Joseph Chilton

    1994-01-01

    Examines the nature of mother-child bonding from the prenatal stage through early infancy, discussing how the mother's actions, even before birth, stimulate her child's senses. Explains the crucial role that physical contact, breastfeeding, and visual stimuli have on mother-child bonding in human and animal newborns. (MDM)

  15. Improving the quality of healthcare for children: implementing the results of the AHSR research agenda conference.

    PubMed Central

    Halfon, N; Schuster, M; Valentine, W; McGlynn, E

    1998-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To describe the rationale, development, content, and results of the AHSR-sponsored conference on developing a research agenda focused on improving the quality of care for children. DATA SOURCES AND METHODS: Planning documents, background papers, and conference proceedings. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: The conference developed the research agenda focused on (1) monitoring the health of children; (2) evaluating the efficacy and effectiveness of health services for children; (3) assessing the quality of healthcare provided to children; (4) improving the quality of healthcare within health systems; (5) assessing the performance of community systems for children; (6) exploring the impact of different financial incentives on the provision of pediatric healthcare; and (7) developing and disseminating clinical practice guidelines and other information to physicians, families, and consumers. Specific issues and research questions in each area are also presented. Strategies for implementing the research agenda are presented and include: (1) expanding the child health services research workforce; (2) developing child healthcare quality improvement research centers; (3) conducting research in specific high-priority areas; (4) focusing research on improving the health of vulnerable populations; (5) improving child health data and collection systems at the national level; (6) developing better community health monitoring for children; (7) building and supporting research networks and a consortium of research users; and (8) developing a coordinated interagency federal effort to advance this agenda and to provide accountability for its completion. CONCLUSION: The proposed research agenda should be a national priority so that all Americans can be assured that children are receiving the best quality of care that the United States can provide. PMID:9776945

  16. 78 FR 28221 - Healthcare Infection Control Practices Advisory Committee (HICPAC)

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-05-14

    ... SERVICES Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Healthcare Infection Control Practices Advisory... charged with providing advice and guidance to the Director, Division of Healthcare Quality Promotion, the... Secretary, Health and Human Services regarding (1) the practice of healthcare infection prevention...

  17. 78 FR 6329 - Healthcare Infection Control Practices Advisory Committee (HICPAC)

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-01-30

    ... SERVICES Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Healthcare Infection Control Practices Advisory... guidance to the Director, Division of Healthcare Quality Promotion, the Director, National Center for... healthcare infection prevention and control; (2) strategies for surveillance, prevention, and control...

  18. 75 FR 3912 - Healthcare Infection Control Practices Advisory Committee (HICPAC)

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-01-25

    ... SERVICES Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Healthcare Infection Control Practices Advisory..., and related events in settings where healthcare is provided; and (3) periodic updating of guidelines and other policy statements regarding prevention of healthcare-associated infections and...

  19. 76 FR 29756 - Healthcare Infection Control Practices Advisory Committee (HICPAC)

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-05-23

    ... SERVICES Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Healthcare Infection Control Practices Advisory... Center for Emerging and Zoonotic Infectious Diseases (NCEZID), and the Director, Division of Healthcare Quality Promotion regarding (1) The practice of healthcare infection control; (2) strategies...

  20. 78 FR 62636 - Healthcare Infection Control Practices Advisory Committee (HICPAC)

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-10-22

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Healthcare Infection Control Practices... Healthcare Quality Promotion, the Director, National Center for Emerging and Zoonotic Infectious Diseases... healthcare infection prevention and control; (2) strategies for surveillance, prevention, and control...

  1. 75 FR 63844 - Healthcare Infection Control Practices Advisory Committee (HICPAC)

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-10-18

    ...Disease Control and Prevention Healthcare Infection Control Practices Advisory Committee...regarding the practice of healthcare infection control and strategies for surveillance...and control of healthcare-associated infections (e.g., nosocomial...

  2. In the Middle: Experiencing Medicaid as a Texas Healthcare Provider 

    E-print Network

    Spaulding, Cade

    2011-08-08

    In this study I investigate how healthcare workers, involved in the Texas Medicaid program as healthcare providers, cope with four workplace constraints. Healthcare workers are constrained by: 1) the policies and practices ...

  3. Integrating Healthcare Knowledge Artifacts for Clinical Decision Support: Towards Semantic

    E-print Network

    Abidi, Syed Sibte Raza

    Integrating Healthcare Knowledge Artifacts for Clinical Decision Support: Towards Semantic Web Based Healthcare Knowledge Morphing Sajjad Hussain and Syed Sibte Raza Abidi NICHE Research Group, Faculty of Computer Science, Dahousie University, Canada Abstract. Healthcare decision making demands

  4. USG Retiree Healthcare Coverage Update for USG retirees

    E-print Network

    1 USG Retiree Healthcare Coverage Update for USG retirees (2 to the retiree healthcare benefit. Effective January 1, 2016, the University System of Georgia (USG) will provide supplemental healthcare coverage for Medicare

  5. Safety Science & Solutions Integrating Human Factors in Healthcare

    E-print Network

    Neri, Peter

    Safety Science & Solutions Integrating Human Factors in Healthcare Tuesday 2nd December 2014 entitled "Integrating Human Factors in Healthcare" is coming to London. The conference will be held safety, quality and productivity in healthcare. Showcasing enduring solutions to patient safety

  6. IT support for healthcare processes premises, challenges, perspectives

    E-print Network

    Ulm, Universität

    IT support for healthcare processes ­ premises, challenges, perspectives Richard Lenz *, Manfred in revised form 11 April 2006; accepted 11 April 2006 Available online 24 May 2006 Abstract Healthcare- ronment optimal process support becomes crucial. Though healthcare processes frequently change

  7. Discourse Analysis of Encouragement in Healthcare Manga

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Matsuoka, Rieko; Smith, Ian; Uchimura, Mari

    2011-01-01

    This article examines how healthcare professionals use encouragement. Focusing on GAMBARU ["to try hard"], forty-one scenes were collected from healthcare manga. Each scene of encouragement was analyzed from three perspectives; the contextual background of the communication, the relationship with the patients and the patients' response to the…

  8. Individualized Healthcare Plans (IHP). Position Statement. Revised

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Association of School Nurses (NJ1), 2008

    2008-01-01

    It is the position of the National Association of School Nurses (NASN) that students whose healthcare needs affect or have the potential to affect safe and optimal school attendance and academic performance require the professional school nurse to write an Individualized Healthcare Plan (IHP), in collaboration with the student, family, educators,…

  9. Can MSAs help reduce healthcare costs?

    PubMed

    Bond, M T

    1996-04-01

    Medical savings accounts (MSAs) have been proposed as one possible solution to the problem of escalating healthcare costs. Because MSAs allow consumers to shop for healthcare services and negotiate the cost, MSAs have the potential to restrain the rise in medical costs. This article compares MSAs to traditional insurance plans, highlighting the advantages and disadvantages of MSA. PMID:10156595

  10. Using data analytics to streamline healthcare costs

    E-print Network

    Using data analytics to streamline healthcare costs The STFC Hartree Centre has helped Albatross of complex healthcare data with the visualisation facilities required for detailed exploration that create insights and value using high performance computing, big data analytics, simulation and modelling

  11. Right to Healthcare: The Way Forward

    PubMed Central

    Peer, Rafia F.

    2013-01-01

    From the Bhore Committee Report of 1946 to the present Universal Health Coverage (UHC) 2011, nothing much has changed in terms of health status in India. The overall health status continues to be dismal and disappointing. One factor that is mainly responsible for this state of affairs is that healthcare has not been realized as a right. If healthcare becomes a right, the state will become responsible and accountable to the people, for enhancing their health. If people are invoked into a sense of belonging to the health system and made to look at healthcare as their right, there is a strong possibility of a positive change in the overall health status of the people. The article looks at healthcare from the rights perspective and explores the methods in which it can be translated into reality. It tries to look at the moral basis of the right to healthcare. For healthcare to be achieved as a right, the state can no longer be a mute spectator of the predominant market forces dictating the healthcare delivery system. The article argues that translation of healthcare as a right is only possible if the state takes full responsibility to improve the health status of the people. PMID:24479035

  12. Integrating Healthcare Ethical Issues into IS Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cellucci, Leigh W.; Layman, Elizabeth J.; Campbell, Robert; Zeng, Xiaoming

    2011-01-01

    Federal initiatives are encouraging the increase of IS graduates to work in the healthcare environment because they possess knowledge of datasets and dataset management that are key to effective management of electronic health records (EHRs) and health information technology (IT). IS graduates will be members of the healthcare team, and as such,…

  13. Architecture Capabilities to Improve Healthcare Environments

    PubMed Central

    Ebrahimi, Ali; Mardomi, Karim; Hassanpour Rahimabad, Kasra

    2013-01-01

    Background The physical environment of healthcare buildings has great importance in issues such as patient safety, functional efficiency, user satisfaction, healthcare outcomes, and energy and resources consumption. Objectives The present study assesses physical environments of Iranian healthcare buildings. Materials and Methods This study was performed using a descriptive-analytical method. Data collection was carried out via a written questionnaire. Results Based on the findings of this study, "functional efficiency", "user satisfaction", "environmental issues", "patient safety”, “accountability in incidents and disasters", and "flexibility" are regarded as the most issues in the country's hospitals. Also, none of the parameters is "without any problem" and has a "desirable status". Conclusions According to the responses, all of the healthcare buildings in this research had flaws in their physical environment, which require attention. Thus, it is necessary to review and pay more attention to the architecture of the country's healthcare buildings. PMID:24350145

  14. Technology and the Future of Healthcare

    PubMed Central

    Thimbleby, Harold

    2013-01-01

    Healthcare changes dramatically because of technological developments, from anesthetics and antibiotics to magnetic resonance imaging scanners and radiotherapy. Future technological innovation is going to keep transforming healthcare, yet while technologies (new drugs and treatments, new devices, new social media support for healthcare, etc) will drive innovation, human factors will remain one of the stable limitations of breakthroughs. No predictions can satisfy everybody; instead, this article explores fragments of the future to see how to think more clearly about how to get where we want to go. Significance for public health Technology drives healthcare more than any other force, and in the future it will continue to develop in dramatic ways. While we can glimpse and debate the details of future trends in healthcare, we need to be clear about the drivers so we can align with them and actively work to ensure the best outcomes for society as a whole. PMID:25170499

  15. Guest editorial. Integrated healthcare information systems.

    PubMed

    Li, Ling; Ge, Ri-Li; Zhou, Shang-Ming; Valerdi, Ricardo

    2012-07-01

    The use of integrated information systems for healthcare has been started more than a decade ago. In recent years, rapid advances in information integration methods have spurred tremendous growth in the use of integrated information systems in healthcare delivery. Various techniques have been used for probing such integrated systems. These techniques include service-oriented architecture (SOA), EAI, workflow management, grid computing, and others. Many applications require a combination of these techniques, which gives rise to the emergence of enterprise systems in healthcare. Development of the techniques originated from different disciplines has the potential to significantly improve the performance of enterprise systems in healthcare. This editorial paper briefly introduces the enterprise systems in the perspective of healthcare informatics. PMID:22760931

  16. [Improving Access to Evidence Based Interventions for Children and Adolescents with Mental Disorders After Child Abuse and Neglect].

    PubMed

    Ganser, Helene G; Münzer, Annika; Seitz, Diana C M; Witt, Andreas; Goldbeck, Lutz

    2015-01-01

    Victims of child abuse and neglect are more likely to develop emotional and behavioral problems than their non-abused peers. In many cases they do not receive evidence based treatments. Based on pilot studies and clinical experience, a structured and manualized case-management protocol was developed to provide child welfare professionals guidance, direction and support in helping these families find and engage in appropriate treatment. The protocol is described. A survey among child welfare workers indicates a lack of knowledge about mental disorders in victims of child abuse as well as an insufficient cooperation between the child welfare and the mental healthcare system. Child welfare workers who have applied the manual evaluate it positively. This study shows that the structured case-management can be implemented in a child welfare setting. PMID:25832576

  17. Potential Barriers to Healthcare in Malawi for Under-five Children with Cough and Fever: A National Household Survey

    PubMed Central

    Ngwira, Bagrey; Stockman, Lauren J.; Deming, Michael; Nyasulu, Peter; Bowie, Cameron; Msyamboza, Kelias; Meyrowitsch, Dan W.; Cunliffe, Nigel A.; Bresee, Joseph; Fischer, Thea K.

    2014-01-01

    Failure to access healthcare is an important contributor to child mortality in many developing countries. In a national household survey in Malawi, we explored demographic and socioeconomic barriers to healthcare for childhood illnesses and assessed the direct and indirect costs of seeking care. Using a cluster-sample design, we selected 2,697 households and interviewed 1,669 caretakers. The main reason for households not being surveyed was the absence of a primary caretaker in the household. Among 2,077 children aged less than five years, 504 episodes of cough and fever during the previous two weeks were reported. A trained healthcare provider was visited for 48.0% of illness episodes. A multivariate regression model showed that children from the poorest households (p=0.02) and children aged >12 months (p=0.02) were less likely to seek care when ill compared to those living in wealthier households and children of higher age-group respectively. Families from rural households spent more time travelling compared to urban households (68.9 vs 14.1 minutes; p<0.001). In addition, visiting a trained healthcare provider was associated with longer travel time (p<0.001) and higher direct costs (p<0.001) compared to visiting an untrained provider. Thus, several barriers to accessing healthcare in Malawi for childhood illnesses exist. Continued efforts to reduce these barriers are needed to narrow the gap in the health and healthcare equity in Malawi. PMID:24847595

  18. 76 FR 63622 - Healthcare Infection Control Practices Advisory Committee, (HICPAC)

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-10-13

    ... Quality Promotion regarding (1) The practice of healthcare infection control; (2) strategies for... priorities dictate. For Further Information Contact: Heidi Williams, HICPAC, Division of Healthcare ]...

  19. Understanding bullying in healthcare organisations.

    PubMed

    Allen, Belinda

    2015-12-01

    Bullying is a pervasive problem in healthcare organisations. Inquiries and reports on patient care and poor practice in the NHS have emphasised the substantial negative effects this behaviour may have on patient care. If bullying is to be addressed, it is crucial we develop clarity about what behaviours constitute bullying and how these behaviours differ from other negative behaviours in the workplace. It is important that we recognise the extent of the problem; statistics on the prevalence of bullying are likely to be an underestimate because of under-reporting of bullying. Effective interventions may only be designed and implemented if there is knowledge about what precipitates bullying and the magnitude of the changes required in organisations to tackle bullying. Individuals should also be aware of the options that are available to them should they be the target of bullying behaviour and what they should do if they witness bullying in their workplace. PMID:26639294

  20. Presence of Medical Home and School Attendance: An Analysis of the 2005-2006 National Survey of Children With Special Healthcare Needs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Willits, Kathryn A.; Troutman-Jordan, Meredith L.; Nies, Mary A.; Racine, Elizabeth F.; Platonova, Elena; Harris, Henry L.

    2013-01-01

    Background: Children with special healthcare needs (CSHCN) tend to miss more school because of illness. Medical homes are a model of primary health care that coordinate services to better meet the needs of the child. The purpose of this study was to examine the association between presence of medical home and missed school days among CSHCN.…

  1. Leadership and Cultural Competence of Healthcare Professionals

    PubMed Central

    Dauvrin, Marie; Lorant, Vincent

    2015-01-01

    Background International migration is a global phenomenon challenging healthcare professionals to provide culturally competent care. Objectives The purpose of this study was to investigate the influence of leaders on the cultural competence of healthcare professionals. Methods A cross-sectional survey was conducted from 2010 to 2012 to obtain data for a social network analysis in 19 inpatient services and five primary care services in Belgium. The Competences in Ethnicity and Health questionnaire was used. A total of 507 healthcare professionals, including 302 nurses, identified their social relationships with other healthcare professionals working in their service. Highest in-degree centrality was used to identify the leaders within each health service. Multiple regressions with the Huber sandwich estimator were used to link cultural competence of leaders with the cultural competence of the rest of the healthcare staff. Results Cultural competence of the healthcare staff was associated with the cultural competence of the leaders. This association remained significant for two specific domains of cultural competence—mediation and paradigm—after controlling for contextual and sociodemographic variables. Interaction analysis suggested that the leadership effect varied with the degree of cultural competence of the leaders. Discussion Cultural competence among healthcare professionals is acquired partly through leadership. Social relationships and leadership effects within health services should be considered when developing and implementing culturally competent strategies. This requires a cautious approach as the most central individuals are not always the same persons as the formal leaders. PMID:25871625

  2. Macroergonomics in Healthcare Quality and Patient Safety.

    PubMed

    Carayon, Pascale; Karsh, Ben-Tzion; Gurses, Ayse P; Holden, Richard; Hoonakker, Peter; Hundt, Ann Schoofs; Montague, Enid; Rodriguez, Joy; Wetterneck, Tosha B

    2013-09-01

    The US Institute of Medicine and healthcare experts have called for new approaches to manage healthcare quality problems. In this chapter, we focus on macroergonomics, a branch of human factors and ergonomics that is based on the systems approach and considers the organizational and sociotechnical context of work activities and processes. Selected macroergonomic approaches to healthcare quality and patient safety are described such as the SEIPS model of work system and patient safety and the model of healthcare professional performance. Focused reviews on job stress and burnout, workload, interruptions, patient-centered care, health IT and medical devices, violations, and care coordination provide examples of macroergonomics contributions to healthcare quality and patient safety. Healthcare systems and processes clearly need to be systematically redesigned; examples of macroergonomic approaches, principles and methods for healthcare system redesign are described. Further research linking macroergonomics and care processes/patient outcomes is needed. Other needs for macroergonomics research are highlighted, including understanding the link between worker outcomes (e.g., safety and well-being) and patient outcomes (e.g., patient safety), and macroergonomics of patient-centered care and care coordination. PMID:24729777

  3. Macroergonomics in Healthcare Quality and Patient Safety

    PubMed Central

    Carayon, Pascale; Karsh, Ben-Tzion; Gurses, Ayse P.; Holden, Richard; Hoonakker, Peter; Hundt, Ann Schoofs; Montague, Enid; Rodriguez, Joy; Wetterneck, Tosha B.

    2014-01-01

    The US Institute of Medicine and healthcare experts have called for new approaches to manage healthcare quality problems. In this chapter, we focus on macroergonomics, a branch of human factors and ergonomics that is based on the systems approach and considers the organizational and sociotechnical context of work activities and processes. Selected macroergonomic approaches to healthcare quality and patient safety are described such as the SEIPS model of work system and patient safety and the model of healthcare professional performance. Focused reviews on job stress and burnout, workload, interruptions, patient-centered care, health IT and medical devices, violations, and care coordination provide examples of macroergonomics contributions to healthcare quality and patient safety. Healthcare systems and processes clearly need to be systematically redesigned; examples of macroergonomic approaches, principles and methods for healthcare system redesign are described. Further research linking macroergonomics and care processes/patient outcomes is needed. Other needs for macroergonomics research are highlighted, including understanding the link between worker outcomes (e.g., safety and well-being) and patient outcomes (e.g., patient safety), and macroergonomics of patient-centered care and care coordination. PMID:24729777

  4. Healthcare financing: approaches and trends in India.

    PubMed

    Bajpai, Vikas; Saraya, Anoop

    2010-01-01

    Despite the importance of healthcare for the well-being of society, there is little public debate in India on issues relating to it. The 'human capital approach' to finance healthcare largely relies on private investment in health, while the 'human development approach' envisages the State as the guarantorof preventive as well as curative care to achieve universalization of healthcare. The prevailing health indices of India and challenges in the field of public health require a human developmentapproach to healthcare. On the eve of independence, India adopted the human development approach, with the report of the Bhore Committee emphasizing the role of the State in the development and provision of healthcare. However, more recently, successive governments have moved towards the human capital approach. Instead of increasing state spending on health and expanding the public health infrastructure, the government has been relying more and more on the private sector. The public-private partnership has been touted as the new-age panacea for the ills of the Indian healthcare system. This approach has led to a stagnation of public health indices and a decrease in the access of the poor to healthcare. PMID:21192520

  5. Knowledge Discovery from Massive Healthcare Claims Data

    SciTech Connect

    Chandola, Varun; Sukumar, Sreenivas R; Schryver, Jack C

    2013-01-01

    The role of big data in addressing the needs of the present healthcare system in US and rest of the world has been echoed by government, private, and academic sectors. There has been a growing emphasis to explore the promise of big data analytics in tapping the potential of the massive healthcare data emanating from private and government health insurance providers. While the domain implications of such collaboration are well known, this type of data has been explored to a limited extent in the data mining community. The objective of this paper is two fold: first, we introduce the emerging domain of big"healthcare claims data to the KDD community, and second, we describe the success and challenges that we encountered in analyzing this data using state of art analytics for massive data. Specically, we translate the problem of analyzing healthcare data into some of the most well-known analysis problems in the data mining community, social network analysis, text mining, and temporal analysis and higher order feature construction, and describe how advances within each of these areas can be leveraged to understand the domain of healthcare. Each case study illustrates a unique intersection of data mining and healthcare with a common objective of improving the cost-care ratio by mining for opportunities to improve healthcare operations and reducing hat seems to fall under fraud, waste,and abuse.

  6. Child health in complex emergencies.

    PubMed Central

    Moss, William J.; Ramakrishnan, Meenakshi; Storms, Dory; Henderson Siegle, Anne; Weiss, William M.; Lejnev, Ivan; Muhe, Lulu

    2006-01-01

    Coordinated and effective interventions are critical for relief efforts to be successful in addressing the health needs of children in situations of armed conflict, population displacement, and/or food insecurity. We reviewed published literature and surveyed international relief organizations engaged in child health activities in complex emergencies. Our aim was to identify research needs and improve guidelines for the care of children. Much of the literature details the burden of disease and the causes of morbidity and mortality; few interventional studies have been published. Surveys of international relief organizations showed that most use World Health Organization (WHO), United Nations Children's Fund (UNICEF), and ministry of health guidelines designed for use in stable situations. Organizations were least likely to have formal guidelines on the management of asphyxia, prematurity, and infection in neonates; diagnosis and management of children with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection; active case-finding and treatment of tuberculosis; paediatric trauma; and the diagnosis and management of mental-health problems in children. Guidelines often are not adapted to the different types of health-care workers who provide care in complex emergencies. Evidence-based, locally adapted guidelines for the care of children in complex emergencies should be adopted by ministries of health, supported by WHO and UNICEF, and disseminated to international relief organizations to ensure appropriate, effective, and uniform care. PMID:16501716

  7. Healthcare Utilization Monitoring System in Korea

    PubMed Central

    Shin, Hyun Chul; Lee, Youn Tae; Jo, Emmanuel C.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives It is important to monitor the healthcare utilization of patients at the national level to make evidence-based policy decisions and manage the nation's healthcare sector. The Health Insurance Review & Assessment Service (HIRA) has run a Healthcare Utilization Monitoring System (HUMS) since 2008. The objective of this paper is to introduce HIRA's HUMS. Methods This study described the HUMS's system structure, capacity, functionalities, and output formats run by HIRA in the Republic of Korea. Regarding output formats, this study extracted diabetes related health insurance claims through the HUMS from August 1, 2014 to May 31, 2015. Results The HUMS has kept records of health insurance claim data for 4 years. It has a 14-terabyte hardware capacity and employs several easy-to-use programs for maintenance of the system, such as MSTR, SAS, etc. Regarding functionalities, users should input diseases codes, target periods, facility types, and types of attributes, such as the number of healthcare utilizations or healthcare costs. It also has a functionality to predict healthcare utilization and costs. When this study extracted diabetes related data, it was found that the trend of healthcare costs for the treatment of diabetes and the number of patients with diabetes were increasing. Conclusions HIRA's HUMS works well to monitor healthcare utilization of patients at the national level. The HUMS has a high-capacity hardware infrastructure and several operational programs that allows easy access to summaries as well as details to identify contributing factors for abnormality, but it has a limitation in that there is often a time lag between the provision of healthcare to patients and the filing of health claims. PMID:26279955

  8. Board Governance: Transformational Approaches Under Healthcare Reform.

    PubMed

    Zastocki, Deborah K

    2015-01-01

    Previous successes of healthcare organizations and effective governance practices in the pre-reform environment are not predictive of future success. Healthcare has been through numerous phases of growth and development using tried-and-true strategies. The challenge is that our toolbox does not contain what is needed to build the future healthcare delivery systems required in the post-reform world. Healthcare has had a parochial focus at the local level, with some broadening of horizons at the state and national levels. But healthcare delivery is now a global issue that requires a totally different perspective, and many countries are confronting similar issues. US healthcare reform initiatives have far-reaching implications. Compounding the reform dynamics are the simultaneously occurring, gamechanging accelerants such as enabling information technologies and mobile health, new providers of healthcare, increased consumer demands, and limited healthcare dollars, to name a few. Operating in this turbulent environment requires transformational board, executive, and physician leadership because traditional ways of planning for incremental change and attempting to time those adjustments can prove disastrous. Creating the legacy healthcare system for tomorrow requires governing boards and executive leadership to act today as they would in the desired future system. Boards need to create a culture that fosters.innovation with a tolerance for risk and some failure. To provide effective governance, boards must essentially develop new skills, expertise, and ways of thinking. The rapid rate of change requires board members to possess certain capabilities, including the ability to deal with ambiguity and uncertainty while demonstrating flexibility and adaptability, all with a driving commitment to metrics and results. This requires development plans for both individual members and the overall board. In short, the board needs to function differently, particularly regarding the types of discussions at and the focus of board meetings. PMID:26495543

  9. Unhealthy incentives: healthcare's basic dilemma(s).

    PubMed

    May, Jonathan R

    2009-01-01

    The topic of an existing healthcare crisis has resounded in articles, papers, and the media for years. Amidst the ongoing healthcare crisis, several other global and economic crises have arisen to further complicate the focus for resolve. This article takes a basic look at the foundation of U.S. healthcare and evaluates the inappropriate incentives that currently drive the industry and prevent meaningful change. The commentary identifies causes of administrative and fiscal waste while proposing alternative concepts for consideration and further discussion. PMID:19663362

  10. Healthcare economics for the emergency physician.

    PubMed

    Propp, Douglas A; Krubert, Christopher; Sasson, Andres

    2003-01-01

    Although the principles of healthcare economics are not usually part of the fundamental education of emergency physicians, an understanding of these elements will enhance our ability to contribute to improved health-care value. This article introduces the practical aspects of microeconomics, insurance, the supply-and-demand relationship, competition, and costs as they affect the practice of medicine on a daily basis. Being cognizant of how these elements create a dynamic interplay in the health-care industry will allow physicians to better understand the expanded role they need to assume in the ongoing cost and quality debate. PMID:12563583

  11. Death of an Adult Child

    MedlinePLUS

    ... iGive.com Purchase Through AmazonSmile Contact Us Donate Death of an Adult Child The death of any child, regardless of cause or age, ... the situations that may have caused their child’s death. Judgmental statements from others indicating that the child ...

  12. Beginning Child Care Fact Sheets.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tweedie, Pat

    These six fact sheets from Child Care Aware are designed to help parents ease their children's transition to child care. The first fact sheet, "Before Your Child's First Day," discusses tips such as: (1) "prepare your child"; (2) read and look at picture books about child care; and (3) "prepare yourself." The second fact sheet, "First Day Tips,"…

  13. The US healthcare workforce and the labor market effect on healthcare spending and health outcomes.

    PubMed

    Pellegrini, Lawrence C; Rodriguez-Monguio, Rosa; Qian, Jing

    2014-06-01

    The healthcare sector was one of the few sectors of the US economy that created new positions in spite of the recent economic downturn. Economic contractions are associated with worsening morbidity and mortality, declining private health insurance coverage, and budgetary pressure on public health programs. This study examines the causes of healthcare employment growth and workforce composition in the US and evaluates the labor market's impact on healthcare spending and health outcomes. Data are collected for 50 states and the District of Columbia from 1999-2009. Labor market and healthcare workforce data are obtained from the Bureau of Labor Statistics. Mortality and health status data are collected from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's Vital Statistics program and Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System. Healthcare spending data are derived from the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services. Dynamic panel data regression models, with instrumental variables, are used to examine the effect of the labor market on healthcare spending, morbidity, and mortality. Regression analysis is also performed to model the effects of healthcare spending on the healthcare workforce composition. All statistical tests are based on a two-sided [Formula: see text] significance of [Formula: see text] .05. Analyses are performed with STATA and SAS. The labor force participation rate shows a more robust effect on healthcare spending, morbidity, and mortality than the unemployment rate. Study results also show that declining labor force participation negatively impacts overall health status ([Formula: see text] .01), and mortality for males ([Formula: see text] .05) and females ([Formula: see text] .001), aged 16-64. Further, the Medicaid and Medicare spending share increases as labor force participation declines ([Formula: see text] .001); whereas, the private healthcare spending share decreases ([Formula: see text] .001). Public and private healthcare spending also has a differing effect on healthcare occupational employment per 100,000 people. Private healthcare spending positively impacts primary care physician employment ([Formula: see text] .001); whereas, Medicare spending drives up employment of physician assistants, registered nurses, and personal care attendants ([Formula: see text] .001). Medicaid and Medicare spending has a negative effect on surgeon employment ([Formula: see text] .05); the effect of private healthcare spending is positive but not statistically significant. Labor force participation, as opposed to unemployment, is a better proxy for measuring the effect of the economic environment on healthcare spending and health outcomes. Further, during economic contractions, Medicaid and Medicare's share of overall healthcare spending increases with meaningful effects on the configuration of state healthcare workforces and subsequently, provision of care for populations at-risk for worsening morbidity and mortality. PMID:24652416

  14. Device Data Protection in Mobile Healthcare Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weerasinghe, Dasun; Rajarajan, Muttukrishnan; Rakocevic, Veselin

    The rapid growth in mobile technology makes the delivery of healthcare data and services on mobile phones a reality. However, the healthcare data is very sensitive and has to be protected against unauthorized access. While most of the development work on security of mobile healthcare today focuses on the data encryption and secure authentication in remote servers, protection of data on the mobile device itself has gained very little attention. This paper analyses the requirements and the architecture for a secure mobile capsule, specially designed to protect the data that is already on the device. The capsule is a downloadable software agent with additional functionalities to enable secure external communication with healthcare service providers, network operators and other relevant communication parties.

  15. Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality

    MedlinePLUS

    ... All Research & Data What's new on the AHRQ Web Site Press Release: National patient safety efforts save ... White House USA.gov: The U.S. Government's Official Web Portal Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality 5600 ...

  16. How can healthcare standards be standardised?

    PubMed

    Shaw, Charles D

    2015-10-01

    International travel, medical tourism and trade have created a demand for reliable assessment of healthcare provision across borders, and for information which is accessible to patients, insurers and referring institutions. External assessment schemes for healthcare providers may be clustered into three types: statutory regulation and institutional licensing, International Standardization Organisation certification, and voluntary systems such as peer review and healthcare accreditation. Increasing complexity of healthcare provision, pressures for public accountability and expectations of professional self-governance place a burden on the inspectors and the inspected. If only to contain costs of external assessment and to increase access to reliable information for patients and insurers, the three approaches must work together rather than compete. This paper summarises the origins, aims, authority and methods of the three general models, describing current pressures and opportunities for convergence (between systems and across borders) in the UK and in Europe. PMID:26130813

  17. Leading ladies: women in healthcare leadership.

    PubMed

    Fontenot, Teri

    2012-01-01

    Women represent an overwhelming majority of the healthcare workforce, yet they are significantly underrepresented in leadership positions, particularly at the executive and board levels. However, women are uniquely positioned to leverage traits such as compassion, transparency, and the ability to foster teamwork to lead organizations into the next phase of contemporary healthcare delivery. In the future, the pace with which women gain access to the C-suite will accelerate as organizations embrace diversity and select the best qualified leaders in terms of both experience and leadership style that supports organizational culture. While the future for women in healthcare leadership looks bright, many women are currently struggling to reach the executive office, facing glass ceilings, competing priorities, and lack of access to support and guidance. In this article I discuss the role of women in healthcare leadership and offer practical suggestions on how women can reach the top echelon and achieve their goals and aspirations. PMID:22787907

  18. Current Ergonomics Projects with Healthcare Focus

    E-print Network

    Kaber, David B.

    Current Ergonomics Projects with Healthcare Focus · Using virtual reality (VR) and haptic devices skill training. #12;Surgical Simulation · Method: ­ Develop prototype simulator based on task analysis device (Phantom) with simulation ­ Conduct experiment to assess discrete movement and tracking task

  19. Modeling Second Order Impacts of Healthcare Innovation 

    E-print Network

    Edwardson, Nicholas

    2014-08-13

    three innovations currently being implemented in the healthcare industry—training primary care residents to perform in-office colonoscopies, Studer Group’s ‘Evidence Based Leadership,’ and implementation of electronic health records in a hospital...

  20. Making existing technology safer in healthcare

    E-print Network

    Akiyama, Masanori

    Background: Technology, equipment and medical devices are vital for effective healthcare throughout the world but are associated with risks. These risks include device failure, inappropriate use, insufficient user-training ...

  1. Emergency preparedness for home healthcare providers.

    PubMed

    Ruder, Shirley

    2012-06-01

    Unfortunately, disasters occur. We cannot always know the effects ahead of time, but we do know that lives can be lost, property damaged, and public health and home care agencies may not be able to provide the normal standard of care. Studies have shown that disaster preparedness content is limited in U.S. nursing programs (). Given the magnitude of recent natural disasters, such as the Japanese earthquake and tsunami in 2011, these findings are alarming. The increasing demands on healthcare providers in response to emergencies force home healthcare clinicians to identify their roles and responsibilities in emergency preparedness. This article discusses 1 model of disaster response and the role of the home healthcare provider at each stage. It further guides home healthcare nurses in creating a personal and professional plan, enabling them to understand how to minimize the impact of disasters and address the needs of their patients and those close to them. PMID:21987023

  2. Architecting the Healthcare System for Stakeholder Value

    E-print Network

    Fradinho Oliveira, Jorge

    2009-01-21

    The healthcare industry is a complex socio technical system comprised of multiple stakeholders driven by incentives, which often times are not aligned with one another, and with compromised ability to deliver to the patient ...

  3. Education for healthcare clinical support workers.

    PubMed

    Lewis, Robin; Kelly, Shona

    2015-12-01

    This article reviews the current situation regarding the provision of education and training for healthcare clinical support workers (HCSWs). In the UK, there has been an increasing reliance on unqualified clinical support staff to provide a significant proportion of the direct patient care in all healthcare settings. HCSWs routinely undertake several nursing activities that were traditionally the responsibility of nursing students or junior staff nurses. There is a need for an urgent review of the training of healthcare support staff. A 'tick box' approach to training, with an emphasis on classroom-based or on-the-job learning, makes it difficult for HCSWs to integrate theory into practice, and supports a transactional approach to caring rather than a relational approach to caregiving. Lessons from the educational experiences of other healthcare groups should be applied to the training of HCSWs. An immersive, participatory teaching and learning strategy is one approach that could be used. PMID:26647705

  4. "Intelligent systems for healthcare and robotics"

    E-print Network

    Zhigilei, Leonid V.

    "Intelligent systems for healthcare and robotics" Laura Barnes Assistant Professor lbarnes, and robotics. We are interested in problems such as computationally modeling group behavior and interactions and clinicians. Robotics & Multiagent Systems Research in this area is specifically focused on multiagent

  5. Hospital Acquisitions Before Healthcare Reform.

    PubMed

    McCue, Michael J; Thompson, Jon M; Kim, Tae Hyun

    2015-01-01

    The hospital industry has experienced increased consolidation in the past 20 years. Since 2010, in particular, there has been a large rise in the number of hospital acquisitions, and observers have suggested this is due in part to the expected impact of federal healthcare reform legislation. This article reports on a study undertaken to identify the market, management, and financial factors affecting acute care, community hospitals acquired between 2010 and 2012. We identified 77 such hospitals and compared them to other acute care facilities. To assess how different factors were associated with acquisitions, the study used multiple logistic regressions whereby market factors were included first, followed by management and financial factors. Study findings show that acquired hospitals were located in markets with lower rates of preferred provider organization (PPO) penetration compared with nonacquired hospitals. Occupancy rate was found to be inversely related to acquisition rate; however, case-mix index was significantly and positively related to a hospital's being acquired. Financial factors negatively associated with a hospital's being acquired included age of plant and cash flow margin. In contrast to the findings from earlier studies of hospital acquisitions, our results showed that acquired hospitals possessed newer assets. However, similar to the findings of other studies, the cash flow margin of acquired hospitals was lower than that of nonacquired facilities. PMID:26554263

  6. Child Abuse: The Hidden Bruises

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Medical Students and Residents Medical Student Resources Child Psychiatry Residents (Fellows) Early Career Psychiatrists Member Resources Early ... 20090. The American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry (AACAP) represents over 8,700 child and adolescent ...

  7. What's Inside: Child Labor Laws

    E-print Network

    What's Inside: · Child Labor Laws · Attachments to Online Job Announcements · Hiring Officials child labor laws that apply. Below is a brief overview. 14 and 15 year olds: Departments must keep-year age groupmayworkatanytimeforunlimitedhoursinany non-hazardousposition. CHILD LABOR LAWS

  8. Birth of a Second Child

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Pregnant? What to Expect Birth of a Second Child KidsHealth > Parents > School & Family Life > Family Life > Birth ... things settle down. Back Continue Helping Your First Child Adjust Your first child may experience a range ...

  9. Loss of a child - resources

    MedlinePLUS

    Child death - resources; Resources - loss of a child ... The following organizations are good resources for information on the loss of a child: The Compassionate Friends -- www.compassionatefriends.org Bereaved Parents of the USA -- www.bereavedparentsusa. ...

  10. Customer privacy on UK healthcare websites.

    PubMed

    Mundy, Darren P

    2006-09-01

    Privacy has been and continues to be one of the key challenges of an age devoted to the accumulation, processing, and mining of electronic information. In particular, privacy of healthcare-related information is seen as a key issue as health organizations move towards the electronic provision of services. The aim of the research detailed in this paper has been to analyse privacy policies on popular UK healthcare-related websites to determine the extent to which consumer privacy is protected. The author has combined approaches (such as approaches focused on usability, policy content, and policy quality) used in studies by other researchers on e-commerce and US healthcare websites to provide a comprehensive analysis of UK healthcare privacy policies. The author identifies a wide range of issues related to the protection of consumer privacy through his research analysis using quantitative results. The main outcomes from the author's research are that only 61% of healthcare-related websites in their sample group posted privacy policies. In addition, most of the posted privacy policies had poor readability standards and included a variety of privacy vulnerability statements. Overall, the author's findings represent significant current issues in relation to healthcare information protection on the Internet. The hope is that raising awareness of these results will drive forward changes in the industry, similar to those experienced with information quality. PMID:16954055

  11. Applications of Business Analytics in Healthcare

    PubMed Central

    Ward, Michael J.; Marsolo, Keith A.

    2014-01-01

    The American healthcare system is at a crossroads, and analytics, as an organizational skill, figures to play a pivotal role in its future. As more healthcare systems capture information electronically and as they begin to collect more novel forms of data, such as human DNA, how will we leverage these resources and use them to improve human health at a manageable cost? In this article, we argue that analytics will play a fundamental role in the transformation of the American healthcare system. However, there are numerous challenges to the application and use of analytics, namely the lack of data standards, barriers to the collection of high-quality data, and a shortage of qualified personnel to conduct such analyses. There are also multiple managerial issues, such as how to get end users of electronic data to employ it consistently for improving healthcare delivery, and how to manage the public reporting and sharing of data. In this article, we explore applications of analytics in healthcare, barriers and facilitators to its widespread adoption, and how analytics can help us achieve the goals of the modern healthcare system: high-quality, responsive, affordable, and efficient care. PMID:25429161

  12. Advanced networks and computing in healthcare

    PubMed Central

    Ackerman, Michael

    2011-01-01

    As computing and network capabilities continue to rise, it becomes increasingly important to understand the varied applications for using them to provide healthcare. The objective of this review is to identify key characteristics and attributes of healthcare applications involving the use of advanced computing and communication technologies, drawing upon 45 research and development projects in telemedicine and other aspects of healthcare funded by the National Library of Medicine over the past 12?years. Only projects publishing in the professional literature were included in the review. Four projects did not publish beyond their final reports. In addition, the authors drew on their first-hand experience as project officers, reviewers and monitors of the work. Major themes in the corpus of work were identified, characterizing key attributes of advanced computing and network applications in healthcare. Advanced computing and network applications are relevant to a range of healthcare settings and specialties, but they are most appropriate for solving a narrower range of problems in each. Healthcare projects undertaken primarily to explore potential have also demonstrated effectiveness and depend on the quality of network service as much as bandwidth. Many applications are enabling, making it possible to provide service or conduct research that previously was not possible or to achieve outcomes in addition to those for which projects were undertaken. Most notable are advances in imaging and visualization, collaboration and sense of presence, and mobility in communication and information-resource use. PMID:21486877

  13. Prisoners right to healthcare, a European perspective.

    PubMed

    Abbing, Henriette Roscam

    2013-03-01

    The right to healthcare applies regardless of a person's legal status. Prisoners have a right to a healthcare equivalent to the one in the community at large: access to medical care and preventive measures of good quality and costs covered. States have a positive duty to provide for appropriate healthcare in prison, including harm reduction policies (for instance health screening, vaccination and needle exchange). Denial of access to appropriate health facilities to prisoners and other detainees is likely to result in bodily harm, unnecessary morbidity and avoidable death. Essential elements of the social right to care for the health of prisoners are protected through the positive obligations individual human rights impose on States (e.g., the right to life, the prohibition of torture, degrading treatment and punishment, the right to liberty and the right to private life). Health related human rights standards for prison healthcare have been formulated over worldwide and in Europe. The Council of Europe's Committee of Prevention of Torture monitors the situation of prisoners in Member States. Still, healthcare for prisoners falls short of what is required. Prison healthcare is an essential part of public health. A major involvement of the Minister of Health is indispensable. PMID:23544314

  14. Measuring Child Care Quality.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fiene, Richard

    Child care quality is not a single dimension, but rather a multidimensional characteristic of programs that support the family in its child-rearing role and programs in which children thrive developmentally, socially, cognitively, physically, and emotionally. At the regulatory and accreditation level, approaches to quality focus on group size,…

  15. University Child Care Proposal.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eastern Michigan Univ., Ypsilanti.

    Options for expanding child care services to Eastern Michigan University students, staff, and faculty are presented by the special assistant to the university vice president for university marketing and student affairs. The university's policy statement concerning child care services is considered, along with the relationship of these services to…

  16. Child Care '92.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mitchell, Anne; Gage, Diane

    1992-01-01

    This special issue on child care presents articles on children's health, day care, grandparents, father-child relationships, pregnancy after age 40, children's dental care, children's moral development, parties for children, children's fighting, fashions in children's clothes, sibling relationships, and health care programs for children. (BC)

  17. The Fragile Child

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wills, I. H.; Banas, Norma

    1971-01-01

    The feelings and the personal and learning problems of the child with a language disability which are concomitant with a fragile ego are presented, to give parents a feeling of the nature and effect of their child's disability. (Author/KW)

  18. Child Safety Curriculum Standards.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National School Safety Center, Malibu, CA.

    This document presents a set of child safety curriculum guidelines intended to help prevent child victimization and to promote safer living and learning environments for children and adolescents across America. These guidelines were developed to help educators, law enforcement personnel, and members of other youth-serving agencies teach children…

  19. Introduction: Understanding Child Labour.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miljeteig, Per

    1999-01-01

    Explores contributions from the Urban Childhood Conference for the purpose of developing the child-labor discourse further and indicating the implications of the new understandings for further research and policy development. Highlights the nine articles in this issue, which address child labor at the international level, children's viewpoints,…

  20. Child Transportation Safety Tips.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (DOT), Washington, DC.

    This document presents nine tips regarding safe infant and child transportation, each tip explained in one to two pages. The tips are as follows: (1) quick safety seat checkup; (2) where should your child ride? (3) how to protect your new baby in the car; (4) what safety seat to use for a big baby or toddler? (5) how should preschool and school…

  1. CHILD HEALTH USA 2002

    EPA Science Inventory

    Child Health USA 2002, the thirteenth annual report on the health status and service needs of America's children is presented by the Health Resources and Services Administration's Maternal and Child Health Bureau (MCHB). To assess the bureau's progress toward achieving its vision...

  2. Child Wellness and Happiness

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rettew, David C.

    2009-01-01

    Wellness and happiness should be considered in the clinical treatment of child and adolescent psychiatry, in addition with thinking about illness. Meanwhile, various studies on child and adolescent psychiatry,which includes an article from the "Journal of Happiness Studies," are discussed.

  3. Bullying and Your Child

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McGee, Christy D.

    2011-01-01

    Bullying happens every day in classrooms and on playgrounds all over the world. Parents, when faced with the fact that their child has become the target of a bully, experience a stream of emotions: anger, fear, the need to protect, and the realization that the child must go back to school or out to play and face the bully again the next day. Many…

  4. Weaning Your Child

    MedlinePLUS

    ... want to keep the milk flowing. If your child is breastfeeding less, make sure he or she is getting ... Easing the Transition Weaning is easier if a child has also taken milk ... your little one once breastfeeding is well-established. Even if you plan to ...

  5. The Chicano Migrant Child.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alfaro, Manuel R., Jr.; Hawkins, Homer C.

    The paper deals with the culture and background of the Chicano migrant child and with his frustrations and conflicts in encountering the Anglo culture as represented by the school. It is pointed out that the Chicano migrant child, whose home base is in the Rio Grande Valley, lives in either a barrio or, in summer, a migrant camp and has little…

  6. Child prostitution in Thailand.

    PubMed

    Lau, Carmen

    2008-06-01

    Child prostitution is an old, global and complex phenomenon, which deprives children of their childhood, human rights and dignity. Child prostitution can be seen as the commercial sexual exploitation of children involving an element of forced labour, and thus can be considered as a contemporary form of slavery. Globally, child prostitution is reported to be a common problem in Central and South America and Asia. Of all the south-east Asian nations, the problem is most prolific in Thailand. In Thailand, there appears to be a long history of child prostitution, and this article explores the factors that underpin the Thai child sex industry and the lessons and implications that can be drawn for health care and nursing around the world. PMID:18469298

  7. Mother/Child, Father/Child Relationships.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stevens, Joseph H., Jr., Ed.; Mathews, Marilyn, Ed.

    This collection of papers on parent-child relationships consists of three research reports, six research reviews and two position papers on issues critical to research and practice. Papers included were selected on the basis of their relevance to the work of practitioners who counsel parents. The volume's four thematic sections are entitled: (1)…

  8. Child protection network and the intersector implementation of the circle of security as alternatives to medication?

    PubMed Central

    Becker, Ana Laura Martins M.M.; de Souza, Paulo Haddad; de Oliveira, Mônica Martins; Paraguay, Nestor Luiz Bruzzi B.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives: To describe the clinical history of a child with aggressive behavior and recurring death-theme speech, and report the experience of the team of authors, who proposed an alternative to medication through the establishment of a protection network and the inter-sector implementation of the circle of security concept. Case description: A 5-year-old child has a violent and aggressive behavior at the daycare. The child was diagnosed by the healthcare center with depressive disorder and behavioral disorder, and was medicated with sertraline and risperidone. Side effects were observed, and the medications were discontinued. Despite several actions, such as talks, teamwork, psychological and psychiatric follow-up, the child's behavior remained unchanged. Remarks: A unique therapeutic project was developed by Universidade Estadual de Campinas' Medical School students in order to establish a connection between the entities responsible for the child's care (daycare center, healthcare center, and family). Thus, the team was able to develop a basic care protection network. The implementation of the inter-sector circle of security, as well as the communication and cooperation among the teams, produced very favorable results in this case. This initiative was shown to be a feasible and effective alternative to the use of medication for this child. PMID:25479857

  9. No hospital left behind? Education policy lessons for value-based payment in healthcare.

    PubMed

    Maurer, Kristin A; Ryan, Andrew M

    2016-01-01

    Value-based payment systems have been widely implemented in healthcare in an effort to improve the quality of care. However, these programs have not broadly improved quality, and some evidence suggests that they may increase inequities in care. No Child Left Behind is a parallel effort in education to address uneven achievement and inequalities. Yet, by penalizing the lowest performers, No Child Left Behind's approach to accountability has led to a number of unintended consequences. This article draws lessons from education policy, arguing that financial incentives should be designed to support the lowest performers to improve quality. Journal of Hospital Medicine 2016;11:62-64. © 2015 Society of Hospital Medicine. PMID:26415850

  10. Child Labor: A Forgotten Focus for Child Welfare.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Otis, Jack; Pasztor, Eileen Mayers; McFadden, Emily Jean

    2001-01-01

    Discusses the worldwide problem of child labor and efforts to advocate for the welfare of these impoverished children. Considers factors that contribute to the continued use of child labor and the resistance of these labor practices to reform. Discusses child labor in the United States, and urges public advocacy for labor reform within child

  11. CHILD-to-Child Trial Program. Ajoya, Sinaloa, Mexico.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Werner, David

    1983-01-01

    The CHILD-to-Child program is based on the recognition that older siblings often influence their younger family members. Activities of the CHILD-to-Child Program in Ajoya, Sinaloa, Mexico, relating to teaching about diarrhea and breast-feeding, are described. (CJ)

  12. Child effects and child care: Implications for risk and adjustment.

    PubMed

    Snell, Emily K; Hindman, Annemarie H; Belsky, Jay

    2015-11-01

    Evocative effects of child characteristics on the quality and quantity of child care were assessed in two studies using longitudinal data from the NICHD Study of Early Child Care. We focus on the influence of child characteristics on two important aspects of the child care experience: language stimulation provided by caregivers and quantity of care. In Study 1, associations between the developmental status of children aged 15 to 54 months and the language stimulation provided by their caregivers were examined using path models, and longitudinal child effects were detected across the earliest time points of the study. In Study 2, the associations among child behavior, temperament, development, and time in care were examined. Little evidence was found for such child effects on time in care. The results are discussed in terms of the effects of child care on child development and implications for developmental processes, particularly for children at greatest risk for developmental delay or psychopathology. PMID:26439062

  13. Enhancing Maternal and Child Health using a Combined Mother & Child Health Booklet in Kenya.

    PubMed

    Mudany, Mildred A; Sirengo, Martin; Rutherford, George W; Mwangi, Mary; Nganga, Lucy W; Gichangi, Anthony

    2015-12-01

    Under Kenyan guidelines, HIV-exposed infants should be tested for HIV DNA at 6 weeks or at first clinical contact thereafter, as infants come for immunization. Following the introduction of early infant diagnoses programmes, however, many infants were not being tested and linked to care and treatment. We developed the Mother & Child Health Booklet to help relate mothers' obstetrical history to infants' healthcare providers to facilitate follow-up and timely management. The booklet contains information on the mother's pregnancy, delivery and postpartum course and her child's growth and development, immunization, nutrition and other data need to monitor the child to 5 years of age. It replaced three separate record clinical cards. In a 1 year pilot evaluation of the booklet in Nyanza province in 2007-08, the number of HIV DNA tests on infants increased by 34% from 9966 to 13?379. The booklet was subsequently distributed nationwide in 2009. Overall, the numbers of infants tested for HIV DNA rose from 27?000 in 2007 to 60?000 in 2012, which represents approximately 60% of the estimated HIV-exposed infants in Kenya. We believe that the booklet is an important strategy for identifying and treating infected infants and, thus, in progress toward Millennium Development Goal 4. PMID:26342124

  14. Child universes UV regularization?

    E-print Network

    E. I. Guendelman

    2007-03-26

    It is argued that high energy density excitations, responsible for UV divergences in quantum field theories, including quantum gravity, are likely to be the source of child universes which carry them out of the original space time. This decoupling prevents these high UV excitations from having any influence on physical amplitudes. Child universe production could therefore be responsible for UV regularization in quantum field theories which takes into account gravitational effects. Also child universe production in the last stages of black hole evaporation, the prediction of absence of tranplanckian primordial perturbations, connection to the minimum length hypothesis and in particular connection to the maximal curvature hypothesis are discussed.

  15. Merger offers IS managers flexibility & less stressful integrating, downsizing, & outsourcing. Interview by Bill Childs.

    PubMed

    Montgomery, R; Carpenter, S

    1994-02-01

    A merger between two multi-million dollar IS firms in July 1993 created a company with $315 million in sales and a sharp focus on healthcare. National Healthtech Corp., parent firm of MRI, brought the focus to the deal. And Dallas-based Affiliated Computer Services, a data services provider to financial, commercial and healthcare organizations, brought telecommunications and outsourcing expertise. Bill Childs, editor-in-chief, recently spoke with the two firms' principals--Richard A. Montgomery, CEO of National Healthtech Corp., and Steve Carpenter, senior VP of ACS and COO of NHC. Excerpts from their conversation follow. PMID:10132394

  16. Active X based standards for healthcare integration.

    PubMed

    Greenberg, D S; Welcker, B

    1998-02-01

    With cost pressures brought to the forefront by the growth of managed care, the integration of healthcare information systems is more important than ever. Providers of healthcare information are under increasing pressure to provide timely information to end users in a cost effective manner. Organizations have had to decide between the strong functionality that a multi-vendor 'best of breed' architecture provides and the strong integration provided by a single-vendor solution. As connectivity between systems increased, these interfaces were migrated to work across serial and eventually, network, connections. In addition, the content of the information became standardized through efforts like HL7 and ANSI X12 and Edifact. Although content-based standards go a long way towards facilitating interoperability, there is also quite a bit of work required to connect two systems even when they both adhere to the standard. A key to accomplishing this goal is increasing the connectivity between disparate systems in the healthcare environment. Microsoft is working with healthcare organizations and independent software vendors to bring Microsoft's powerful enterprise object technology, ActiveX, to the healthcare industry. Whilst object orientation has been heralded as the 'next big thing' in computer applications development, Microsoft believe that, in fact, component software is the technology which will provide the greatest benefit to end users. PMID:9600418

  17. History of healthcare technology assessment in Japan.

    PubMed

    Hisashige, Akinori

    2009-07-01

    There has been a rapid growth of healthcare technology assessment (HTA) activities among health service researchers and physicians in Japan in the younger generation since the mid-1980s. HTA has become visible since the Ministry of Health, Labor, and Welfare (MHLW) set up the several committees related to HTA in the late 1990s. The MHLW had to participate in regulatory and administrative reform, coping with the serious economic stagnation since 1991, following the economic recession in the 1980s. However, HTA has not been developed as expected. The most important failure is that the application of HTA to health policy has been neglected by the MHLW. Only application to clinical practice has been implemented by developing evidence-based clinical practice guidelines. The MHLW had the main aim of containing costs by reducing excess or useless healthcare services through guidelines, rather than to implement a radical reform. Without a central organization for HTA, several researchers have still continued to do HTA studies, but most researchers and physicians promoting HTA have been moved into diverse related areas. Ultimately, increasing efficiency may be the only way of reconciling rising demands for health care with public financing constraints. Therefore, the reconsideration and reorganization of HTA, which covers not only healthcare services but also the healthcare system as a whole, is becoming an urgent matter for healthcare reform. PMID:19527539

  18. [Big data in medicine and healthcare].

    PubMed

    Rüping, Stefan

    2015-08-01

    Healthcare is one of the business fields with the highest Big Data potential. According to the prevailing definition, Big Data refers to the fact that data today is often too large and heterogeneous and changes too quickly to be stored, processed, and transformed into value by previous technologies. The technological trends drive Big Data: business processes are more and more executed electronically, consumers produce more and more data themselves - e.g. in social networks - and finally ever increasing digitalization. Currently, several new trends towards new data sources and innovative data analysis appear in medicine and healthcare. From the research perspective, omics-research is one clear Big Data topic. In practice, the electronic health records, free open data and the "quantified self" offer new perspectives for data analytics. Regarding analytics, significant advances have been made in the information extraction from text data, which unlocks a lot of data from clinical documentation for analytics purposes. At the same time, medicine and healthcare is lagging behind in the adoption of Big Data approaches. This can be traced to particular problems regarding data complexity and organizational, legal, and ethical challenges. The growing uptake of Big Data in general and first best-practice examples in medicine and healthcare in particular, indicate that innovative solutions will be coming. This paper gives an overview of the potentials of Big Data in medicine and healthcare. PMID:26063521

  19. Trends in Family Child Care

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Neugebauer, Roger

    2011-01-01

    The author presents insights from various readers of "ExchangeEveryDay" regarding trends in the world of family child care. Kathleen Reticker of Acre Family Child Care in Lowell, Massachusetts thinks an increasing trend in Family Child Care is the pressure to emulate a Center, instead of seeing family child care as a different model. Over the…

  20. Child and Adolescent Mental Health

    E-print Network

    Banaji,. Murad

    Child and Adolescent Mental Health www.le.ac.uk/greenwood Greenwood Institute of Child Health #12. Contents Background to the course 2 aims 3 why study child and adolescent Mental health at Leicester? 3 Learning outcomes 4 relevance to child and adolescent Mental health services 4 who will the course Benefit

  1. carleton.ca Child Studies

    E-print Network

    Dawson, Jeff W.

    carleton.ca Child Studies #12;You should consider an interdisciplinary degree in child studies (Master's degree or a PhD) in a child-related discipline. If these are some of your goals, then Carleton's Child Studies program is for you! The Carleton advantage A unique program Carleton University is one

  2. Dependent Child Tuition Remission Application

    E-print Network

    Garfunkel, Eric

    of the parent-child or guardian-ward relationship is required and must be submitted to University Human of the parent-child relationship which will be evaluated by Rutgers as to its adequacy. B. Adopted Child stating that a court-appointed legal guardianship exists will be accepted as evidence of the parent-child

  3. Geographical accessibility to healthcare and malnutrition in Rwanda.

    PubMed

    Aoun, Nael; Matsuda, Hirotaka; Sekiyama, Makiko

    2015-04-01

    The prevalence of stunting in children less than five years of age is elevated in Rwanda. It is one of the main health challenges upon which the government is struggling to achieve progress. Health centers and district hospitals in Rwanda are expected to provide a package of health services including nutrition related activities, nutritional rehabilitation, education, and growth monitoring. They can hence play a potent role in alleviating malnutrition and stunting in Rwanda. This study tested whether travel time from household clusters to the nearest health center was significantly and negatively associated with the distribution of height-for-age z-scores of younger than five year old children in the eastern province of Rwanda. Data for 974 children was extracted from the Rwanda Demographic and Health Survey (DHS) database. However, since DHS does not contain any information on travel time to health centers, the latter was simulated using AccessMod 4.0, an extension to ArcGIS 9.3.1 that simulates health facilities' catchment areas and travel times to health facilities. Travel time was found to be negatively associated with height-for-age z-scores at the 5% level in a stepwise regression analysis that controlled for wealth index, mother's primary and secondary education, sex of the child, preceding birth interval, and birth order of the child. Field measurements are needed to validate travel time. If validated, results point to the importance of improved access to healthcare facilities as a potential pathway in reducing stunting in Rwanda. PMID:25697636

  4. Healthcare @ the speed of thought.

    PubMed

    Cochrane, J D

    1999-05-01

    It is daunting to realize that we have just touched the surface of health-related Internet web sites. The use of the Internet as a vital patient care tool is a very real prospect on the near horizon. Yet most hospital systems and physicians groups today just use the Net to post "billboards.'' In the rest of America, the Internet has been much more than a billboard. It has changed the way business is conducted. There's e-mail. There's e-trading for those who invest. On mother's day moms receive e-cards, and there is e-commerce which includes buying and selling online, and also collecting and organizing data that will help a business serve customers better, building that relationship. The Internet is a transaction tool. The latest survey indicates that the volume of commerce on the Net has grown 300% this year over last. According to a survey sponsored by Cisco Systems. Net sales volume accounts for $200 billion and is doubling every 6 months. And, the search for health information is among the top three reasons people use the web. The surveys indicate that people would like better communication with their physicians and most would like to communicate by e-mail. Yet, very few physicians are interested. As part of the research for this article we reviewed dozens of web sites for hospitals and medical groups. While some of these sites are attractive, most simply don't do anything more than provide maps and telephone numbers. People might as well look in the Yellow Pages for the information they can find on th web. Meanwhile, a number of well-funded health sites have sprung up just in the past few months. We searched the web to find sites that would actually allow people to interact in ways that went beyond just finding information. Clearly there is movement toward the ability to conduct transactions over the Net, i.e, patient monitoring, checking on status of claims, ask-a-doc, etc. But, we are just at the front end of this movement and physicians and hospitals have an opportunity to play a leadership role. A number of the sites reviewed for this article, for example, offer the patient the ability to develop his or her own health record and maintain it on the web. It is not conceivable that a healthcare system, along with its affiliated physician, might develop a secure web site that included a combined inpatient and outpatient rcord, accessible electronically by patients and authorized providers from any telephone in the world. It is clear that armed with Internet data, consumers will play an increasingly important role in their own care. Employers are acquiescing to their demands for increasing choice. Copayments are also going up and employees are likely to vote with their feet in selecting providers. Companies like WebMd, Physicians Online, Planetrx.com, drugstore.com, Yahoo and the other mentioned above are filling a need. It should be a wakeup call for healthcare systems and physicians. According to the latest data from Medimetrix, (see medimetrix.com), the most frequently visited health sites on the web today are Intelihealth.com (Johns Hopkins), Mayohealth.org, and OnHealth.com. These sites provide a highly interactive experience for consumers and tons of news and information. They are compelling and traffic-building, have fresh news that is frequently updated and many are transaction. That's what people want. There are so many potential uses of the Internet for physicians and hospitals that it is difficult to properly cover them in this article. Why shouldn't a patient be able to check the status of their account? Has the insurance paid? Is there a patient balance? Consumers can check their bank balances on the Internet. Why not their hospital or medical office accounts? Why not let them pay their balances online? As noted above, some the the HMOs are providing account status information to patients already. Why not the hospitals and physicians? Web sites are multiplying like rabbits. It's going to take a lot of effort to PMID:10557655

  5. Your Child's Cough

    MedlinePLUS

    ... and when to go to the doctor. "Barky" Cough Barky coughs are usually caused by a swelling ... happens when the child inhales (breathes in). Whooping Cough Whooping cough is another name for pertussis, an ...

  6. Understanding Child Traumatic Stress

    MedlinePLUS

    Understanding Child Traumatic Stress Page Contents: Responding to Danger When Danger Turns Into Trauma What a Traumatic Situation is Like for a Young ... malevolence, and human accountability. Back to Top Posttraumatic Stress Responses For reasons that are basic to survival, ...

  7. Child Maltreatment Prevention

    MedlinePLUS

    ... abuse and neglect reported to Child Protective Services (CPS) in 2013. The youngest children are the most ... reported victims being under the age of three. CPS reports may underestimate the true occurrence of abuse ...

  8. Wormholes and Child Universes

    E-print Network

    Guendelman, E I

    2010-01-01

    Evidence to the case that classical gravitation provides the clue to make sense out of quantum gravity is presented. The key observation is the existence in classical gravitation of child universe solutions or "almost" solutions, "almost" because of some singularity problems. The difficulties of these child universe solutions due to their generic singularity problems will be very likely be cured by quantum effects, just like for example "almost" instanton solutions are made relevant in gauge theories with breaking of conformal invariance. Some well motivated modifcations of General Relativity where these singularity problems are absent even at the classical level are discussed. High energy density excitations, responsible for UV divergences in quantum field theories, including quantum gravity, are likely to be the source of child universes which carry them out of the original space time. This decoupling could prevent these high UV excitations from having any influence on physical amplitudes. Child universe pr...

  9. Dental care - child

    MedlinePLUS

    ... dental exams, and getting necessary treatments such as fluoride, extractions, fillings, or braces and other orthodontics. ... provider if your infant needs to take oral fluoride . THE FIRST TRIP TO THE DENTIST Your child's ...

  10. Toilet Teaching Your Child

    MedlinePLUS

    ... and feel stable and supported while having a bowel movement. It's usually best for boys to first learn ... express the act of using the toilet ("pee," "poop," and "potty"). Ask your child to let you ...

  11. Feeding Your Child Athlete

    MedlinePLUS

    ... snacks. The child athlete, however, will have higher energy and fluid requirements. Kids and teens who are ... consume more food to keep up with increased energy demands. Most athletes will naturally eat the right ...

  12. Concussion - child - discharge

    MedlinePLUS

    ... avoid sports, hard play at recess, being overly active, and physical education class. Ask the doctor when ... have mild headaches and be less tolerant of noise. If your child has symptoms in school, have ...

  13. Child safety seats

    MedlinePLUS

    ... to use the seat. Read your vehicle owner's manual, too. Car seats and booster seats should always be used ... manufacturer's instructions for installing and using your child's ... owner's manual to determine the safest place in your vehicle ...

  14. Disciplining Your Child

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Give your child one warning (unless it is aggression). If it happens again, send her to the ... are less likely to be consistent. Spanking increases aggression and anger instead of teaching responsibility. Parents may ...

  15. Prevention of Child Maltreatment

    PubMed Central

    Lane, Wendy Gwirtzman

    2014-01-01

    Pediatricians and other health care providers can play a number of important roles in the prevention of child maltreatment. As part of routine patient care, pediatricians can provide anticipatory guidance for effective discipline and parent-child communication, screen for maltreatment risk factors, and refer parents and families to effective community-based programs. This article will help pediatricians incorporate child abuse prevention into their practice. Resources for systematizing anticipatory guidance and child maltreatment risk factor screening will be described. The modalities and strengths and weaknesses of community-based prevention programs will be discussed, and providers will be given tools to identify the effectiveness of available community-based programs. At a broader level, the article will describe ways that pediatricians can advocate at the local, state, and national level for policies and programs that support families and children. PMID:25242703

  16. Scoliosis surgery - child

    MedlinePLUS

    ... will use steel rods, hooks, screws, or other metal devices to straighten your child's spine and support ... will often be put in to replace them. Metal instruments, such as rods, screws, hooks, or wires ...

  17. Stretchable inorganic nanomembrane electronics for healthcare devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Dae-Hyeong; Son, Donghee; Kim, Jaemin

    2015-05-01

    Flexible or stretchable electronic devices for healthcare technologies have attracted much attention in terms of usefulness to assist doctors in their operating rooms and to monitor patients' physical conditions for a long period of time. Each device to monitor the patients' physiological signals real-time, such as strain, pressure, temperature, and humidity, etc. has been reported recently. However, their limitations are found in acquisition of various physiological signals simultaneously because all the functions are not assembled in one skin-like electronic system. Here, we describe a skin-like, multi-functional healthcare system, which includes single crystalline silicon nanomembrane based sensors, nanoparticle-integrated non-volatile memory modules, electro-resistive thermal actuators, and drug delivery. Smart prosthetics coupled with therapeutic electronic system would provide new approaches to personalized healthcare.

  18. The child in hospital*

    PubMed Central

    1955-01-01

    In 1951 the WHO Regional Office for Europe as a part of its long-term activities in child health initiated plans for a meeting between paediatricians and child psychiatrists, at which they could discuss their respective roles and the co-ordination of their work. Early in 1953 an ad hoc committee was called together to discuss the possibility of holding a conference which would delineate the role of the paediatrician in the management of psychosomatic and behaviour disorders in young children. This committee, consisting of leading specialists in paediatrics and child psychiatry, under the chairmanship of Professor R. Debré (France), felt that any wider conference should be devoted to considering more fully the inter-relation of somatic and psychological processes in sick children, the respective roles of paediatricians and child psychiatrists in their treatment, and the working relations between the different disciplines responsible for the care of children. In order to avoid diffusion of effort, and to arrive as far as possible at practical conclusions, the study group that was subsequently convened in Stockholm concentrated on one important aspect of child care—the child in hospital. PMID:14364192

  19. Wormholes and Child Universes

    E-print Network

    E. I. Guendelman

    2010-03-21

    Evidence to the case that classical gravitation provides the clue to make sense out of quantum gravity is presented. The key observation is the existence in classical gravitation of child universe solutions or "almost" solutions, "almost" because of some singularity problems. The difficulties of these child universe solutions due to their generic singularity problems will be very likely be cured by quantum effects, just like for example "almost" instanton solutions are made relevant in gauge theories with breaking of conformal invariance. Some well motivated modifcations of General Relativity where these singularity problems are absent even at the classical level are discussed. High energy density excitations, responsible for UV divergences in quantum field theories, including quantum gravity, are likely to be the source of child universes which carry them out of the original space time. This decoupling could prevent these high UV excitations from having any influence on physical amplitudes. Child universe production could therefore be responsible for UV regularization in quantum field theories which take into account semiclassically gravitational effects. Child universe production in the last stages of black hole evaporation, the prediction of absence of tranplanckian primordial perturbations, connection to the minimum length hypothesis and in particular the connection to the maximal curvature hypothesis are discussed. Some discussion of superexcited states in the case these states are Kaluza Klein excitations is carried out. Finally, the posibility of obtaining "string like" effects from the wormholes associated with the child universes is discussed.

  20. Healthcare Reform 2010- a surgeon's perspective.

    PubMed

    Ullyot, Daniel J

    2010-01-01

    The Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act (PPACA) was signed into law President Barack Obama in March 2010. From the standpoint of a clinical surgeon, Dan Ullyot examines healthcare reform of the US system and asks: What is healthcare reform? Do we need it? What would ideal reform look like? And to what extent does the PPACA approach ideal reform? This article is a primer for understanding the salient features of this complex piece of federal legislation, which will have an enormous influence on the lives of this generation and those of the future. PMID:21928185

  1. HIT plants SEEDS in healthcare education.

    PubMed

    Connors, Helen; Warren, Judith; Weaver, Charlotte

    2007-01-01

    By incorporating a clinical information system in the education curriculum as a teaching platform, the University of Kansas School of Nursing teaches nurses and other health professional students how to assess, plan, document and manage care in an electronic medium that develops healthcare informatics competencies. The outcomes of this integrated technology curriculum brings hope for transforming health professional education for 21st century practice and graduating a workforce with the leadership and competencies for improving quality and safety in patient care. It results in IT savvy healthcare providers who will cross the quality chasm. PMID:17413506

  2. Competition in Healthcare: Good, Bad or Ugly?

    PubMed Central

    Goddard, Maria

    2015-01-01

    The role of competition in healthcare is much debated. Despite a wealth of international experience in relation to competition, evidence is mixed and contested and the debate about the potential role for competition is often polarised. This paper considers briefly some of the reasons for this, focusing on what is meant by "competition in healthcare" and why it is more valuable to think about the circumstances in which competition is more and less likely to be a good tool to achieve benefits, rather than whether or not it is "good" or "bad," per se.M PMID:26340484

  3. Networkcentric healthcare: applying the tools, techniques and strategies of knowledge management to create superior healthcare operations.

    PubMed

    von Lubitz, Dag; Wickramasinghe, Nilmini

    2006-01-01

    The proliferation of Information Computer and Communication Technologies (IC2T) throughout the business environment has led to exponentially increasing amounts of data and information. Although these technologies were implemented to enhance and facilitate superior decision-making, the reality is information overload. Knowledge Management (KM) is a recent management technique designed to make sense of this information chaos. Critical to knowledge management is the application of IC2T. This paper discusses how effective and efficient healthcare operations can ensue through the adoption of a networkcentric healthcare perspective that is grounded in process-oriented knowledge generation and enabled through World Healthcare Information Grid (WHIG). PMID:18048258

  4. Addressing maternal and child health in post-conflict Afghanistan: the way forward.

    PubMed

    Singh, P K; Rai, R K; Alagarajan, M

    2013-09-01

    Afghanistan's maternal and child mortality rates are among the highest in the world. The country faces challenges to meet the Millennium Development Goals set for 2015 which can be attributed to multiple causes related to accessibility, affordability and availability of health-care services. This report addresses the challenges in strengthening maternal and child health care in Afghanistan, as well discussing the areas to be prioritized. In order to ensure sound maternal and child health care in Afghanistan, policy-makers must prioritize monitoring and surveillance systems, integrating maternal and child health care with rights-based family planning methods, building human resources, offering incentives (such as the provision of a conditional cash transfer to women) and promoting action-oriented, community-based interventions. On a wider scale, the focus must be to improve the health infrastructure, organizing international collaboration and expanding sources of funding. PMID:24313047

  5. Impact on child mortality of removing user fees: simulation model

    PubMed Central

    James, Chris; Morris, Saul S; Keith, Regina; Taylor, Anna

    2005-01-01

    Objective To estimate how many child deaths might be prevented if user fees were removed in 20 African countries Design Simulation model combining evidence on key health interventions' impacts on reducing child mortality with analysis of the effect of fee abolition on access to healthcare services. Results Elimination of user fees could prevent approximately 233 000 (estimate range 153 000-305 000) deaths annually in children aged under 5 in 20 African countries. Conclusion Given the relatively low cost of abolition, replacing user fees with alternative financing mechanisms should be seen as an effective first step towards improving households' access to health care and achieving the millennium development goals for health. PMID:16195292

  6. 78 FR 62636 - Healthcare Infection Control Practices Advisory Committee (HICPAC)

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-10-22

    ...Disease Control and Prevention Healthcare Infection Control Practices Advisory Committee...regarding (1) the practice of healthcare infection prevention and control; (2) strategies...surveillance, prevention, and control of infections, antimicrobial resistance, and...

  7. 75 FR 29772 - Healthcare Infection Control Practices Advisory Committee, (HICPAC)

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-05-27

    ...Control and Prevention Healthcare Infection Control Practices Advisory Committee...1) The practice of healthcare infection control; (2) strategies for surveillance, prevention, and control of infections (e.g., nosocomial...

  8. 78 FR 6329 - Healthcare Infection Control Practices Advisory Committee (HICPAC)

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-01-30

    ...Disease Control and Prevention Healthcare Infection Control Practices Advisory Committee...regarding: (1) The practice of healthcare infection prevention and control; (2) strategies...surveillance, prevention, and control of infections, antimicrobial resistance, and...

  9. 77 FR 4820 - Healthcare Infection Control Practices Advisory Committee (HICPAC)

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-01-31

    ...Control and Prevention Healthcare Infection Control Practices Advisory Committee...1) the practice of healthcare infection control; (2) strategies for surveillance, prevention, and control of infections (e.g., nosocomial...

  10. 76 FR 63622 - Healthcare Infection Control Practices Advisory Committee, (HICPAC)

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-10-13

    ...Control and Prevention Healthcare Infection Control Practices Advisory Committee...1) The practice of healthcare infection control; (2) strategies for surveillance, prevention, and control of infections (e.g., nosocomial...

  11. 75 FR 22816 - Healthcare Infection Control Practices Advisory Committee (HICPAC)

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-04-30

    ...Disease Control and Prevention Healthcare Infection Control Practices Advisory Committee...regarding the practice of hospital infection control and strategies for surveillance...and control of healthcare-associated infections (e.g., nosocomial...

  12. 77 FR 58397 - Healthcare Infection Control Practices Advisory Committee (HICPAC)

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-09-20

    ...Disease Control and Prevention Healthcare Infection Control Practices Advisory Committee...CDC, regarding (1) the practice of infection control; (2) strategies for surveillance...and control of healthcare-associated infections (e.g., nosocomial infections)...

  13. 77 FR 28392 - Healthcare Infection Control Practices Advisory Committee (HICPAC)

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-05-14

    ...Control and Prevention Healthcare Infection Control Practices Advisory Committee...regarding 1) the practice of healthcare infection control; 2) strategies for surveillance, prevention, and control of infections (e.g., nosocomial...

  14. 78 FR 28221 - Healthcare Infection Control Practices Advisory Committee (HICPAC)

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-05-14

    ...Disease Control and Prevention Healthcare Infection Control Practices Advisory Committee...regarding (1) the practice of healthcare infection prevention and control; (2) strategies...surveillance, prevention, and control of infections, antimicrobial resistance, and...

  15. 76 FR 29756 - Healthcare Infection Control Practices Advisory Committee (HICPAC)

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-05-23

    ...Control and Prevention Healthcare Infection Control Practices Advisory Committee...1) The practice of healthcare infection control; (2) strategies for surveillance, prevention, and control of infections (e.g., nosocomial...

  16. A wearable context aware system for ubiquitous healthcare.

    PubMed

    Kang, Dong-Oh; Lee, Hyung-Jik; Ko, Eun-Jung; Kang, Kyuchang; Lee, Jeunwoo

    2006-01-01

    Recent developments of information technologies are leading the advent of the era of ubiquitous healthcare, which means healthcare services at any time and at any places. The ubiquitous healthcare service needs a wearable system for more continual measurement of biological signals of a user, which gives information of the user from wearable sensors. In this paper, we propose a wearable context aware system for ubiquitous healthcare, and its systematic design process of a ubiquitous healthcare service. Some wearable sensor systems are introduced with Zigbee communication. We develop a context aware framework to send information from wearable sensors to healthcare service entities as a middleware to solve the interoperability problem between sensor makers and healthcare service providers. And, we propose a systematic process of design of ubiquitous healthcare services with the context aware framework. In order to show the feasibility of the proposed system, some application examples are given, which are applied to remote monitoring, and a self check service. PMID:17947132

  17. Transition to cloud computing in healthcare information systems

    E-print Network

    Ren, Haiying, S.M. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

    2012-01-01

    This thesis is a study on the adoption of cloud computing in healthcare information technology industry. It provides a guideline for people who are trying to bring cloud computing into healthcare information systems through ...

  18. Picture archiving and communications systems for integrated healthcare information solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goldburgh, Mitchell M.; Glicksman, Robert A.; Wilson, Dennis L.

    1997-05-01

    The rapid and dramatic shifts within the US healthcare industry have created unprecedented needs to implement changes in the delivery systems. These changes must not only address the access to healthcare, but the costs of delivery, and outcomes reporting. The resulting vision to address these needs has been called the Integrated Healthcare Solution whose core is the Electronic Patient Record. The integration of information by itself is not the issue, nor will it address the challenges in front of the healthcare providers. The process and business of healthcare delivery must adopt, apply and expand its use of technology which can assist in re-engineering the tools for healthcare. Imaging is becoming a larger part of the practice of healthcare both as a recorder of health status and as a defensive record for gatekeepers of healthcare. It is thus imperative that imaging specialists adopt technology which competitively integrates them into the process, reduces the risk, and positively effects the outcome.

  19. Disparities in Healthcare for Racial, Ethnic, and Sexual Minorities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Collins, Joshua C.; Rocco, Tonette S.

    2014-01-01

    This chapter situates healthcare as a concern for the field of adult education through a critique of disparities in access to healthcare, quality of care received, and caregiver services for racial, ethnic, and sexual minorities.

  20. Home Healthcare Workers: How to Prevent Latex Allergies

    MedlinePLUS

    ... can help prevent allergic reactions for both home healthcare workers and their clients. LATEX EXPOSURE REACTIONS Three ... being used). • Inform your employer and your personal healthcare professionals that you have latex allergy. • Wear a ...

  1. Subscribe to This Blog | Healthcare Delivery Research Blog

    Cancer.gov

    Skip to main content at the National Institutes of Health | www.cancer.gov Search form Search Search Healthcare Delivery Research Blog Toggle navigation Healthcare Delivery Research Blog Home Blog Purpose and Policies About HDRP Contact Us Subscribe

  2. Occupational Health for Healthcare Providers - Multiple Languages: MedlinePlus

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Are Here: Home ? Multiple Languages ? All Health Topics ? Occupational Health for Healthcare Providers URL of this page: https:// ... V W XYZ List of All Topics All Occupational Health for Healthcare Providers - Multiple Languages To use the ...

  3. Home Healthcare Medical Devices: A Checklist

    MedlinePLUS

    R Please use this checklist to use and maintain your medical device safely and effectively in your home. As a homecare medical device user, you ... home monitoring devices. Home Healthcare Medical Devices: A Checklist For additional government sources and information visit: CDRH ...

  4. Healthcare Information for Visitors & Students from

    E-print Network

    Zernicka-Goetz, Magdalena

    are visiting England on holiday or to study, please bring a valid European Health Insurance Card (EHIC) issued bring a European Healthcare Insurance Card (EHIC)? The NHS provides free hospital treatment to people conditions and routine maternity care, providing the reason for a visit to the UK is not specifically to give

  5. Lean in healthcare: the unfilled promise?

    PubMed

    Radnor, Zoe J; Holweg, Matthias; Waring, Justin

    2012-02-01

    In an effort to improve operational efficiency, healthcare services around the world have adopted process improvement methodologies from the manufacturing sector, such as Lean Production. In this paper we report on four multi-level case studies of the implementation of Lean in the English NHS. Our results show that this generally involves the application of specific Lean 'tools', such as 'kaizen blitz' and 'rapid improvement events', which tend to produce small-scale and localised productivity gains. Although this suggests that Lean might not currently deliver the efficiency improvements desired in policy, the evolution of Lean in the manufacturing sector also reveals this initial focus on the 'tool level'. In moving to a more system-wide approach, however, we identify significant contextual differences between healthcare and manufacturing that result in two critical breaches of the assumptions behind Lean. First, the customer and commissioner in the private sector are the one and the same, which is essential in determining 'customer value' that drives process improvement activities. Second, healthcare is predominantly designed to be capacity-led, and hence there is limited ability to influence demand or make full use of freed-up resources. What is different about this research is that these breaches can be regarded as not being primarily 'professional' in origin but actually more 'organisational' and 'managerial' and, if not addressed could severely constrain Lean's impact on healthcare productivity at the systems level. PMID:21414703

  6. Does Outdoor Behavioral Healthcare Really Work?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Russell, Keith C.

    2002-01-01

    Outdoor behavioral healthcare (OBH), using wilderness therapy and related outdoor programming, is an emerging treatment for adolescents with behavioral, psychological, and substance abuse disorders. A literature review examining OBH outcomes related to self-concept, interpersonal skills, substance abuse, criminal recidivism, and behavioral and…

  7. Healthcare Learning Community and Student Retention

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Sherryl W.

    2014-01-01

    Teaching, learning, and retention processes have evolved historically to include multifaceted techniques beyond the traditional lecture. This article presents related results of a study using a healthcare learning community in a southwest Georgia university. The value of novel techniques and tools in promoting student learning and retention…

  8. Individualized Healthcare Plans for the School Nurse

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    American School Health Association (NJ3), 2005

    2005-01-01

    This resource sets the standard for school nurses concerning the formulation of individualized healthcare plans designed to fit the unique health needs of students. Eighteen chapters focus on special issues and school nursing concepts. Computer software, which accompanies the manual, assists in the development and creation of individualized…

  9. A conceptual model for healthcare facility design.

    PubMed

    Stichler, Jaynelle F

    2014-06-01

    A conceptual model for healthcare facility design provides nurse leaders a framework for measuring the effect of specific or more global design features on patient, provider, and organizational outcomes. The model can help to explain relationships among variables of interest in facility design and be used to guide research studies or measures of change or improvement. PMID:24853794

  10. Lean healthcare: rhetoric, ritual and resistance.

    PubMed

    Waring, Justin J; Bishop, Simon

    2010-10-01

    This paper presents an ethnographic account of the implementation of Lean service redesign methodologies in one UK NHS hospital operating department. It is suggested that this popular management 'technology', with its emphasis on creating value streams and reducing waste, has the potential to transform the social organisation of healthcare work. The paper locates Lean healthcare within wider debates related to the standardisation of clinical practice, the re-configuration of occupational boundaries and the stratification of clinical communities. Drawing on the 'technologies-in-practice' perspective the study is attentive to the interaction of both the intent to transform work and the response of clinicians to this intent as an ongoing and situated social practice. In developing this analysis this article explores three dimensions of social practice to consider the way Lean is interpreted and articulated (rhetoric), enacted in social practice (ritual), and experienced in the context of prevailing lines of power (resistance). Through these interlinked analytical lenses the paper suggests the interaction of Lean and clinical practice remains contingent and open to negotiation. In particular, Lean follows in a line of service improvements that bring to the fore tensions between clinicians and service leaders around the social organisation of healthcare work. The paper concludes that Lean might not be the easy remedy for making both efficiency and effectiveness improvements in healthcare. PMID:20702013

  11. Character, Leadership, and the Healthcare Professions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Holmes, Elizabeth

    2010-01-01

    The presentation by Elizabeth Holmes, PhD, summarized the integration of character and leadership development in the education of healthcare professionals. Citing the mission, vision, values, graduate attributes, and various examples of current programs and initiatives from both the United States Naval Academy and the University of Botswana, the…

  12. Lean ImplementationLean Implementation in Healthcare

    E-print Network

    Laksanacharoen, Sathaporn

    = value / (cycle time) value / (cycle time) #12; 5 F t (L ) St t M 5 - Future (Lean) State Map To Stream #12; Waste cycle time - - - - - #12; Lean · ( Keizen)( KeizenLean ImplementationLean Implementation in Healthcare Lean Concept : Application & Simulation

  13. 32 CFR 105.11 - Healthcare provider procedures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Healthcare provider procedures. 105.11 Section... AND CIVILIAN SEXUAL ASSAULT PREVENTION AND RESPONSE PROGRAM PROCEDURES § 105.11 Healthcare provider... standardized, timely, accessible, and comprehensive healthcare for victims of sexual assault, to include...

  14. BANip: enabling remote healthcare monitoring with Body Area Networks1

    E-print Network

    Widya, Ing

    Area Network (BAN) to remote healthcare center. Introduction Information and Communication TechnologyBANip: enabling remote healthcare monitoring with Body Area Networks1 Nikolay Dokovsky, Aart van,halteren,widya}@cs.utwente.nl Abstract ­ This paper presents a Java service platform for mobile healthcare that enables remote health

  15. 32 CFR 105.11 - Healthcare provider procedures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Healthcare provider procedures. 105.11 Section... AND CIVILIAN SEXUAL ASSAULT PREVENTION AND RESPONSE PROGRAM PROCEDURES § 105.11 Healthcare provider... standardized, timely, accessible, and comprehensive healthcare for victims of sexual assault, to include...

  16. An Analysis of Knowledge Management Mechanisms in Healthcare Portals

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lee, Chei Sian; Goh, Dion Hoe-Lian; Chua, Alton Y. K.

    2010-01-01

    Healthcare portals are becoming increasingly popular with Internet users since they play an important role in supporting interaction between individuals and healthcare organizations with a Web presence. Additionally, many of these organizations make use of knowledge management mechanisms on their healthcare portals to manage the abundance of…

  17. Healthcare Process Support: Achievements, Challenges, Current Research Richard Lenz1

    E-print Network

    Ulm, Universität

    Healthcare Process Support: Achievements, Challenges, Current Research Richard Lenz1 , Mor Peleg2, Haifa, Israel 3 University of Ulm, Germany ABSTRACT Healthcare organizations are facing the challenge guidelines. At the same time, business process management (BPM) enables IT support for healthcare processes

  18. Survey on Healthcare IT systems Standards, Regulations and Security

    E-print Network

    Polze, Andreas

    Report Survey on Healthcare IT systems ­ Standards, Regulations and Security Christian Neuhaus for healthcare are a complex and exciting field. One the one hand, there is a vast number of improvements and work alleviations that computers can bring to everyday healthcare. Some ways of treatment, diagnoses

  19. Access Control: how can it improve patients' healthcare?

    E-print Network

    Kent, University of

    Access Control: how can it improve patients' healthcare? Ana FERREIRAabd , Ricardo CRUZ) is a very important support tool for patients and healthcare professionals but it has some barriers that prevent its successful integration within the healthcare practice. These barriers comprise not only

  20. Using Logic Programming to Detect Activities in Pervasive Healthcare

    E-print Network

    Christensen, Henrik Bærbak

    Using Logic Programming to Detect Activities in Pervasive Healthcare Henrik Bærbak Christensen- gramming in a pervasive computing project in the healthcare domain. An expert system is used to detect healthcare activities in a pervasive hospital environment where positions of people and things are tracked

  1. Center for Digital Transformation White Paper Series Organizing Healthcare

    E-print Network

    Al Faruque, Mohammad Abdullah

    Center for Digital Transformation White Paper Series Organizing Healthcare Delivery in the 21st;Organizing Healthcare Delivery in the 21st Century Nicholas P. Vitalari, Ph.D. Senior Research Fellow, Center is a challenge for US healthcare providers as they face significant industry transformation wrought by government

  2. AHI PRELIM NOTES 11/14 v5 AFFORDABLE HEALTHCARE

    E-print Network

    Rambaut, Andrew

    AHI PRELIM NOTES 11/14 v5 AFFORDABLE HEALTHCARE A Wellcome Trust Scheme to support R&D in India the Affordable Healthcare Preliminary Application Form. They must be read by all those concerned with writing applications. All preliminary applications to the Affordable Healthcare scheme are taken forward by invitation

  3. High-Touch Healthcare Volume 6 | Issue 2 | Spring 2011

    E-print Network

    Mease, Kenneth D.

    ® High-Touch Healthcare Volume 6 | Issue 2 | Spring 2011 University of California, Irvine personalized, participatory healthcare 1 Blazing the Path Forward Calit2 celebrates 10 years of achievement at the mattress." Advances in information technology are creating revolutionary healthcare- delivery mechanisms

  4. The effect of healthcare environments on a pandemic influenza outbreak.

    SciTech Connect

    Cannon, Daniel C.; Davey, Victoria J.; Glass, Robert John, Jr.

    2010-12-01

    The objectives of this presentation are: (1) To determine if healthcare settings serve as intensive transmission environments for influenza epidemics, increasing effects on communities; (2) To determine which mitigation strategies are best for use in healthcare settings and in communities to limit influenza epidemic effects; and (3) To determine which mitigation strategies are best to prevent illness in healthcare workers.

  5. 78 FR 61362 - Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-10-03

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality Notice of Meetings AGENCY: Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (AHRQ), HHS. ACTION: Notice of Five AHRQ Subcommittee Meetings. SUMMARY: The... remainder of the meeting) 4. Healthcare Safety and Quality Improvement Research (HSQR) Date: October...

  6. Primary health-care network monitoring: a hierarchical resource allocation

    E-print Network

    Erjavec, Toma?

    Primary health-care network monitoring: a hierarchical resource allocation modeling approach, Slovenia 4 Temida, d.o.o., Ljubljana, Slovenia SUMMARY Management of a primary health-care network (PHCN management, especially given a large quantity of health-care data that is produced daily in the network

  7. Against Simple Universal Health-Care Identifiers Peter Szolovits

    E-print Network

    Szolovits, Peter

    as P. Szolovits and I. Kohane. Against Universal Health-care Identifiers. Journal of the American1 Against Simple Universal Health-Care Identifiers Peter Szolovits MIT Laboratory for Computer Security Number (extended by a check digit) as the universal health-care identifier [1]. The advantages

  8. Pittsburgh Regional Healthcare Initiative puts new spin on improving healthcare quality.

    PubMed

    2002-11-01

    For nearly 4 years, the Pittsburgh Regional Healthcare Initiative (PRHI) has been working to improve the way healthcare is delivered in southwestern Pennsylvania by combining the voices and resources of hospitals, providers, the business community, insurers, health plans, and federal agencies. As one example of borrowing from business, the PRHI has created a new learning and management system, called Perfecting Patient Care, which is based on the Toyota Production System model and is now being used successfully in hospitals. PMID:12497771

  9. Common competencies for all healthcare managers: the Healthcare Leadership Alliance model.

    PubMed

    Stefl, Mary E

    2008-01-01

    Today's healthcare executives and leaders must have management talent sophisticated enough to match the increased complexity of the healthcare environment. Executives are expected to demonstrate measurable outcomes and effectiveness and to practice evidence-based management. At the same time, academic and professional programs are emphasizing the attainment of competencies related to workplace effectiveness. The shift to evidence-based management has led to numerous efforts to define the competencies most appropriate for healthcare. The Healthcare Leadership Alliance (HLA), a consortium of six major professional membership organizations, used the research from and experience with their individual credentialing processes to posit five competency domains common among all practicing healthcare managers: (1) communication and relationship management, (2) professionalism, (3) leadership, (4) knowledge of the healthcare system, and (5) business skills and knowledge. The HLA engaged in a formal process to delineate the knowledge, skills, and abilities within each domain and to determine which of these competencies were core or common among the membership of all HLA associations and which were specialty or specific to the members of one or more HLA organizations. This process produced 300 competency statements, which were then organized into the Competency Directory, a unique and interactive database that can be used for assessing individual and organizational competencies. Overall, this work helps to unify the field of healthcare management and provides a lexicon and a basis for collaboration among different types of healthcare executives. This article discusses the steps that the HLA followed. It also presents the HLA Competency Directory; its application and relevance to the practitioner and academic communities; and its strengths, limitations, and potential. PMID:19070332

  10. Biomaterials and bioengineering tomorrow’s healthcare

    PubMed Central

    Bhat, Sumrita; Kumar, Ashok

    2013-01-01

    Biomaterials are being used for the healthcare applications from ancient times. But subsequent evolution has made them more versatile and has increased their utility. Biomaterials have revolutionized the areas like bioengineering and tissue engineering for the development of novel strategies to combat life threatening diseases. Together with biomaterials, stem cell technology is also being used to improve the existing healthcare facilities. These concepts and technologies are being used for the treatment of different diseases like cardiac failure, fractures, deep skin injuries, etc. Introduction of nanomaterials on the other hand is becoming a big hope for a better and an affordable healthcare. Technological advancements are underway for the development of continuous monitoring and regulating glucose levels by the implantation of sensor chips. Lab-on-a-chip technology is expected to modernize the diagnostics and make it more easy and regulated. Other area which can improve the tomorrow’s healthcare is drug delivery. Micro-needles have the potential to overcome the limitations of conventional needles and are being studied for the delivery of drugs at different location in human body. There is a huge advancement in the area of scaffold fabrication which has improved the potentiality of tissue engineering. Most emerging scaffolds for tissue engineering are hydrogels and cryogels. Dynamic hydrogels have huge application in tissue engineering and drug delivery. Furthermore, cryogels being supermacroporous allow the attachment and proliferation of most of the mammalian cell types and have shown application in tissue engineering and bioseparation. With further developments we expect these technologies to hit the market in near future which can immensely improve the healthcare facilities. PMID:23628868

  11. Priority-setting in Finnish healthcare.

    PubMed

    Rissanen, P; Häkkinen, U

    1999-12-01

    The characteristics which affect priority setting in the Finnish healthcare system include strong municipal (local) administration, no clear separation between producers and purchasers, a duality in funding, and the potential for physicians in public hospitals to practice in the private sector. This system has its strengths, such as the possibility to effectively co-ordinate social and healthcare services, and a strong incentive to take care of local needs, because of municipal responsibility to finance these services largely through local taxes. However, the municipalities are typically too small to take advantage of these potentials, their knowledge is scarce especially of secondary care and their negotiating power with respect to hospitals is low. Local politicians also have a dual role: they represent the needs of the local population but simultaneously they are decision-makers in hospitals. Full-time physicians are allowed to act in a dual role as well; they can run a private practice, which is paid for on a fee-for-service basis, while the hospital pays (mostly) a fixed monthly salary. The share of financing which flows from the National Sickness Insurance system to healthcare users may have adverse effects on the local use of resources. The broad national consensus statement on patient-level priorities did not reach any general rules on priorities. Strong support was given to citizens' equal right to access all healthcare services. In healthcare practice, this general rule has some exemptions. First, the reimbursement schemes for prescribed drugs vary depending on the severity and chronic nature of the disease. Secondly, the tax-financed dental services for the young are clearly prioritised over those of older citizens. In the consensus statement, emphasis was put on improving the efficiency of producing health services in order to avoid having to impose patient-level priorities. PMID:10827305

  12. Diarrheal Illness and Healthcare Seeking Behavior among a Population at High Risk for Diarrhea in Dhaka, Bangladesh

    PubMed Central

    Chowdhury, Fahima; Khan, Iqbal Ansary; Patel, Sweta; Siddiq, Ashraf Uddin; Saha, Nirod Chandra; Khan, Ashraful I.; Saha, Amit; Cravioto, Alejandro; Clemens, John; Qadri, Firdausi; Ali, Mohammad

    2015-01-01

    Diarrhea remains one of the major causes of death in Bangladesh. We studied diarrheal disease risk and healthcare seeking behavior among populations at high risk for diarrhea in Dhaka, Bangladesh. Data were obtained from a cross-sectional survey conducted during April and September 2010. The prevalence of diarrhea was calculated by age-group and sex. A generalized estimating equation with logit link function was used to predict diarrheal disease risk and seeking care from a professional healthcare provider. Of 316,766 individuals, 10% were young children (<5 years). The prevalence of diarrhea was 16 per 1000 persons among all ages; young children accounted for 44 per 1000 persons. Prevalence of diarrhea was significantly higher (p=.003) among younger males (<15 years) compared to that among younger females. In contrast, prevalence of diarrhea was significantly higher (p<.0001) among older females (?15 years) compared to that among older males. An increased risk for diarrhea was observed in young children, males, and those staying in rented houses, lower family members in the house, using non-sanitary toilets, living in the area for short times, living in a community with less educated persons, living in a community with less use of safe water source for drinking, or living close to the hospital. About 80% of those with diarrhea sought care initially from a non-professional healthcare provider. Choice of the professional healthcare provider was driven by age of the patient, educational status of the household head, and hygienic practices by the household. The study reaffirms that young children are at greater risk for diarrhea. Like other developing countries most people in this impoverished setting of Dhaka are less likely to seek care from a professional healthcare provider than from a non-professional healthcare provider, which could be attributed to a higher number of diarrheal deaths among young children in Bangladesh. Dissemination of information on health education, increasing the supply of skilled healthcare providers, and low-cost and quality healthcare services may encourage more people to seek care from professional healthcare providers, thus may help reduce child mortality in the country. Further studies are warranted to validate the results. PMID:26121650

  13. 45 CFR 98.20 - A child's eligibility for child care services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... false A child's eligibility for child care services. 98.20 Section...SERVICES GENERAL ADMINISTRATION CHILD CARE AND DEVELOPMENT FUND Eligibility for Services § 98.20 A child's eligibility for child care...

  14. 45 CFR 98.20 - A child's eligibility for child care services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... false A child's eligibility for child care services. 98.20 Section...Services GENERAL ADMINISTRATION CHILD CARE AND DEVELOPMENT FUND Eligibility for Services § 98.20 A child's eligibility for child care...

  15. 45 CFR 98.20 - A child's eligibility for child care services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... false A child's eligibility for child care services. 98.20 Section...SERVICES GENERAL ADMINISTRATION CHILD CARE AND DEVELOPMENT FUND Eligibility for Services § 98.20 A child's eligibility for child care...

  16. 45 CFR 98.20 - A child's eligibility for child care services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... false A child's eligibility for child care services. 98.20 Section...SERVICES GENERAL ADMINISTRATION CHILD CARE AND DEVELOPMENT FUND Eligibility for Services § 98.20 A child's eligibility for child care...

  17. 45 CFR 98.20 - A child's eligibility for child care services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... false A child's eligibility for child care services. 98.20 Section...SERVICES GENERAL ADMINISTRATION CHILD CARE AND DEVELOPMENT FUND Eligibility for Services § 98.20 A child's eligibility for child care...

  18. Disparities in Quality of Healthcare of Children from Immigrant Families in the US.

    PubMed

    Calvo, Rocío; Hawkins, Summer Sherburne

    2015-10-01

    The objective of this study was to examine disparities in quality of pediatric primary care among children from immigrant families in the US. Drawing from a nationally representative sample of 83,528 children ages 0-17 years from the 2007 National Survey of Children's Health, weighted logistic regression was used to assess the effect of immigrant family type on five indicators of quality of healthcare across children's racial/ethnic groups. Analyses controlled for indicators of child's access to care, family socio-economic characteristics, and primary language spoken in the household. Unadjusted estimates revealed a pattern of decreasing disparities from immigrant children to second-generation children, native-born children of immigrant parents, and to third-generation children, native-born children of native-born parents. Controlling for confounders showed that the positive effect of generational status on the quality of healthcare of children from immigrant families varied across indicators and among racial/ethnic groups. Not even third-generation Hispanic and Black children reached parity with third-generation White children on reported amount of time that providers devoted to their care and on providers' sensitivity to their family's values and customs. In contrast, disparities in reports of providers listening carefully to caregivers disappeared after adjusting for confounders, and only families headed by immigrant parents reported receiving less specific health-related information than the families of native-born White children. Our study suggests that it is important to develop interventions that help healthcare professionals to learn how different types of immigrant families perceive the interactions with the healthcare system and how to deliver care that increases the satisfaction of children from different racial/ethnic groups. PMID:25987471

  19. BENEFITS | Request for Review of Healthcare Coverage Eligibility: rev. 9.14 (EBP)1 Request for Review of Healthcare

    E-print Network

    Kunkle, Tom

    BENEFITS | Request for Review of Healthcare Coverage Eligibility: rev. 9.14 (EBP)1 Request for Review of Healthcare Coverage Eligibility Please read prior to completing this form: This form is used to request a review of the healthcare eligibility determination and may be completed by an employee

  20. MountainStar Healthcare makes a unique appeal to healthcare brokers. Improves recognition in a competitive market.

    PubMed

    Botvin, J D

    2001-01-01

    MountainStar Healthcare, the Utah segment of HCA (The Healthcare Company), partnered with the health plans that shared a common interest: all were in competition with multi-state Intermountain Health Care. Mountain Star promoted its outstanding record of service--to healthcare brokers! An information kit, including a "Quality Report Card" and cost analysis proved to be an effective tool. PMID:11467200

  1. Child Care Subsidy Use and Child Development: Potential Causal Mechanisms

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hawkinson, Laura E.

    2011-01-01

    Research using an experimental design is needed to provide firm causal evidence on the impacts of child care subsidy use on child development, and on underlying causal mechanisms since subsidies can affect child development only indirectly via changes they cause in children's early experiences. However, before costly experimental research is…

  2. Kindergarten Child Care Experiences and Child Achievement and Socioemotional Skills

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Claessens, Amy

    2012-01-01

    Young children's experiences outside of both home and school are important for their development. As women have entered the labor force, child care has become an increasingly important context for child development. Child care experiences prior to school entry have been well-documented as important influences on children's academic and…

  3. The Role of Child Care Providers in Child Abuse Prevention

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Seibel, Nancy L.; Gillespie, Linda G.; Temple, Tabitha

    2008-01-01

    Child care providers are likely to be the professionals who most frequently interact with families with young children. Thus, infant and toddler child care providers are uniquely positioned to recognize and respond to families' needs for information and support. This article describes knowledge, skills, and strategies that support child care…

  4. Mother-Child Agreement on the Child's Past Food Exposure

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thongudomporn, Udom; Chongsuvivatwong, Virasakdi; Geater, Alan F.

    2010-01-01

    Objective: To assess mother-child agreement on the child's past food exposure, and factors affecting response discrepancy. Methods: Twelve- to 14-year-old children and their mothers (n = 78) in an urban community, a rural community, and 2 orthodontic clinics completed a 69-item food questionnaire to determine mother-child level of agreement on the…

  5. Soldier and Child 

    E-print Network

    Unknown

    2011-09-05

    . The Early Childhood Development Division provides Pierre the Texas Pelican to parents of first-born children in Texas. Pierre the Texas Pelican is a series of 28 leaflets designed to help first-time parents learn more about infants and toddlers. The child... about your baby ? Fathers ? Communication between husband and wife ? One-parent families ? Adoption ? Family planning Points To Ponder 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8 . 9. 10. 11. 12. 13. 14. Your child's emotional health is as important...

  6. Health is wealth: considerations to european healthcare.

    PubMed

    Unger, F

    2012-07-01

    (Full text is available at http://www.manu.edu.mk/prilozi). European Healthcare is a duty, imbedded in our European culture, to help people in sickness, to promote a healthy society through education and the prevention of diseases. Human Life is our highest value; the concept of Health is fundamental to Life and leads to the creation of Wealth. Health is the result of a common European cultural endeavour. The provision of Healthcare in Europe is highly diverse and must be understood in the light of different geographical and cultural development perspectives. In the 21st century Health is becoming a matter of general European interest and will be an increasingly important priority within the enlarged European Union. Healthcare Systems must enshrine the principal of Health for All as their ultimate goal. Healthcare, essential to life, is enormously complex and dependent on: -the needs of the population and its demographic structures; -progress in all aspects of medical practice; -financing models. Healthcare provision is developing from a National to a European endeavour as a European Healthcare Market (EHCM) serving its people, legitimised by the European Convention, which sets out the principals of a socio-market economy, competition and self-responsibility (Fig. 1). The component parts of the EHCM are the Patient, Medical Arts and Sciences, Medical Providers, Medical Organisation and all stakeholders. The Medical Arts and Sciences together with the Medical Organization are to be entirely reshaped as strategic European tasks, while the stakeholder, financing, monitoring and controlling are subsidiary tasks for the national authorities. The Convention provides a unique opportunity to create a European Market for Health. Greater European cooperation enables effective use of resources, access and quality of care (2512th Council meeting, EU, June 2003). The EHCM serves the patients and creates the conditions for continuing wealth creation. To achieve sustainable effects, the main component in structuring medicine is the clinical leadership. Demographics and Healthcare financing issues are the most sensible areas to tackle as a priority. This requires reconciling national health policies with European obligations. In the spirit of the Lisbon Council conclusions and the European Convention the EHCM provides: -Health for all; -Provision based on evidence and effectiveness; -Control of costs. The European Institute of Medicine sees this as a great opportunity to consolidate the different National models and inherited systems in an EHCM and consequently to stimulate clinical leadership to achieve sustainable reforms. The common concern is the increasing cost of provision. Stabilizing costs in an environment of a decreasing working population is very challenging. By modernizing systems there is potential for controlling costs, the processes for which have to be identified. Most national reforms have failed due to massive political influence especially where Healthcare together with Welfare is operated as a state-monopoly. This Strategic Vision has four mutually dependent parts: the patient is in the centre, and surrounded by clusters representing the Medical Arts, the Medical Organization and Financing. This Strategic Vision is structured in 4 segments, which are the cornerstones for establishing systems for the EHCM: A. The Patient There is a change in today's paradigm: The patient becomes the focal point. The patient of today is increasingly well informed and motivated. The patient is at the centre of all efforts, and all healthcare provisions are constructed around the patient. The patient is both a consumer and a contributor to the EHCM. B. Cluster I: Medical Arts The optimisation of Medical Arts and Sciences is an essential prere-quisite of the Strategic Visions. This cluster focuses on the basics of diagnosis, therapy and prevention. Conservative, invasive and prophylactic principles cover the whole range of possibilities including the prediction and prevention of diseases. To use Outcome Related Medicine (ORM) as a measure

  7. VCU School of Education Child Development Center

    E-print Network

    Hammack, Richard

    VCU School of Education Child Development Center For questions, please contact Dr. Alyson Williams, VA 23284 or aewilliams@vcu.edu Child's Name:____________________________ Child's DOB or EDD (required): __ __ / __ __ / __ __ ____Current families check for sibling preference. Child's Name / Class:__________________________ Parent

  8. CPR - child (1 to 8 years old)

    MedlinePLUS

    Rescue breathing and chest compressions - child; Resuscitation - cardiopulmonary - child; Cardiopulmonary resuscitation - child ... take care of children should learn infant and child CPR if they haven't already. See www. ...

  9. Integrated Environment for Ubiquitous Healthcare and Mobile IPv6 Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cagalaban, Giovanni; Kim, Seoksoo

    The development of Internet technologies based on the IPv6 protocol will allow real-time monitoring of people with health deficiencies and improve the independence of elderly people. This paper proposed a ubiquitous healthcare system for the personalized healthcare services with the support of mobile IPv6 networks. Specifically, this paper discusses the integration of ubiquitous healthcare and wireless networks and its functional requirements. This allow an integrated environment where heterogeneous devices such a mobile devices and body sensors can continuously monitor patient status and communicate remotely with healthcare servers, physicians, and family members to effectively deliver healthcare services.

  10. Human factors systems approach to healthcare quality and patient safety

    PubMed Central

    Carayon, Pascale; Wetterneck, Tosha B.; Rivera-Rodriguez, A. Joy; Hundt, Ann Schoofs; Hoonakker, Peter; Holden, Richard; Gurses, Ayse P.

    2013-01-01

    Human factors systems approaches are critical for improving healthcare quality and patient safety. The SEIPS (Systems Engineering Initiative for Patient Safety) model of work system and patient safety is a human factors systems approach that has been successfully applied in healthcare research and practice. Several research and practical applications of the SEIPS model are described. Important implications of the SEIPS model for healthcare system and process redesign are highlighted. Principles for redesigning healthcare systems using the SEIPS model are described. Balancing the work system and encouraging the active and adaptive role of workers are key principles for improving healthcare quality and patient safety. PMID:23845724

  11. Child and Adolescent Psychiatrist Finder

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Medical Students and Residents Medical Student Resources Child Psychiatry Residents (Fellows) Early Career Psychiatrists Member Resources Early ... Page Copyright ©2015 - American Academy of Child Adolescent Psychiatry. All Rights Reserved. Contact Us | Disclaimer | Privacy Statement ...

  12. When Your Child Has Tinnitus

    MedlinePLUS

    ... ENT Doctor Near You When Your Child Has Tinnitus When Your Child Has Tinnitus Patient Health Information News media interested in covering ... and public relations staff at newsroom@entnet.org . Tinnitus is a condition where the patient hears a ...

  13. Child Labor in America's History

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goldstein, Harold

    1976-01-01

    A brief history of child labor and the fight for legislation to control it at both the state and federal level. The current legal status and the continued existence of child labor in modern times are also discussed. (MS)

  14. Child Abuse: The Hidden Bruises

    MedlinePLUS

    ... 5; Updated November 2014 The statistics on physical child abuse are alarming. It is estimated hundreds of thousands ... Physical abuse is not the only kind of child abuse. Many children are also victims of neglect, or ...

  15. Does Your Child Have Glaucoma?

    MedlinePLUS

    ... About Us Donate In This Section Does Your Child Have Glaucoma? email Send this article to a ... of these signs or symptoms in your own child, check with a pediatric ophthalmologist. Signs and Symptoms ...

  16. FastStats: Child Health

    MedlinePLUS

    ... this? Submit What's this? Submit Button NCHS Home Child Health Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir Data ... Health, United States, trend tables with data on child and adolescent health Measures of Muscular Strength in ...

  17. Allergy Relief for Your Child

    MedlinePLUS

    ... For Consumers Consumer Updates Allergy Relief for Your Child Share Tweet Linkedin Pin it More sharing options ... excitability or excessive drowsiness.” back to top More Child-Friendly Medicines Recent pediatric legislation, including a combination ...

  18. Keeping Your Child's Teeth Healthy

    MedlinePLUS

    ... With Bullies Pregnant? What to Expect Keeping Your Child's Teeth Healthy KidsHealth > Parents > General Health > Your Kid's ... brushing and regular flossing. Back Continue If Your Child Has a Problem If you are prone to ...

  19. Is My Child's Appetite Normal?

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Nutrition Newsletters for Parents of Young Children, USDA, Food and Nutrition Service Is My Child’s Appetite Normal? Overfeeding can be ... Nutrition Newsletters for Parents of Young Children, USDA, Food and Nutrition Service

  20. Factors affecting the adoption of healthcare information technology.

    PubMed

    Phichitchaisopa, Nisakorn; Naenna, Thanakorn

    2013-01-01

    In order to improve the quality and performance of healthcare services, healthcare information technology is among the most important technology in healthcare supply chain management. This study sets out to apply and test the Unified Theory of Acceptance and Use of Technology (UTAUT), to examine the factors influencing healthcare Information Technology (IT) services. A structured questionnaire was developed and distributed to healthcare representatives in each province surveyed in Thailand. Data collected from 400 employees including physicians, nurses, and hospital staff members were tested the model using structural equation modeling technique. The results found that the factors with a significant effect are performance expectancy, effort expectancy and facilitating conditions. They were also found to have a significant impact on behavioral intention to use the acceptance healthcare technology. In addition, in Thai provincial areas, positive significance was found with two factors: social influence on behavioral intention and facilitating conditions to direct using behavior. Based on research findings, in order for healthcare information technology to be widely adopted and used by healthcare staffs in healthcare supply chain management, the healthcare organizational management should improve healthcare staffs' behavioral intention and facilitating conditions. PMID:26417235

  1. Factors affecting the adoption of healthcare information technology

    PubMed Central

    Phichitchaisopa, Nisakorn; Naenna, Thanakorn

    2013-01-01

    In order to improve the quality and performance of healthcare services, healthcare information technology is among the most important technology in healthcare supply chain management. This study sets out to apply and test the Unified Theory of Acceptance and Use of Technology (UTAUT), to examine the factors influencing healthcare Information Technology (IT) services. A structured questionnaire was developed and distributed to healthcare representatives in each province surveyed in Thailand. Data collected from 400 employees including physicians, nurses, and hospital staff members were tested the model using structural equation modeling technique. The results found that the factors with a significant effect are performance expectancy, effort expectancy and facilitating conditions. They were also found to have a significant impact on behavioral intention to use the acceptance healthcare technology. In addition, in Thai provincial areas, positive significance was found with two factors: social influence on behavioral intention and facilitating conditions to direct using behavior. Based on research findings, in order for healthcare information technology to be widely adopted and used by healthcare staffs in healthcare supply chain management, the healthcare organizational management should improve healthcare staffs' behavioral intention and facilitating conditions. PMID:26417235

  2. A long time coming: primary healthcare renewal in Canada.

    PubMed

    Hutchison, Brian

    2008-01-01

    Following decades of stagnation, potentially transformative changes in primary healthcare are proceeding in several Canadian provinces. These changes - primarily collaborative and interdisciplinary models of care delivery and quality improvement programs - have been impelled by an improved fiscal climate, increased federal transfers (some earmarked for primary healthcare), pressure generated by the recommendations of the Romanow Commission and the Kirby Committee and growing political and public concern about healthcare access and quality. Transformation has begun, but much remains to be done to address Canada's poor primary healthcare performance relative to other wealthy industrialized countries. Processes are needed at the regional and provincial levels to collectively engage the full range of key stakeholders in providing policy advice and informing the articulation of clear policy direction for primary healthcare. Critical areas for investment include integrated health information systems, quality improvement processes, interdisciplinary primary healthcare teams and group practices, and systematic evaluation of primary healthcare innovations and ongoing system performance. PMID:18453816

  3. Parent readiness to change differs for overweight child dietary and physical activity behaviors

    PubMed Central

    Rhee, Kyung; McEachern, Rebecca; Jelalian, Elissa

    2014-01-01

    Parent involvement is important to help overweight children lose weight. However, parent readiness to make changes around child eating and physical activity (PA) behaviors can differ across domains. Using a cross-sectional design, our aim was to examine which factors were associated with parents being in the action/maintenance stage of change (SOC) in each domain. From November 2008 – August 2009, parents of overweight/obese children (n=202) attending a tertiary care obesity clinic in Providence, RI answered questions assessing their SOC, beliefs about child health and weight, and provider behaviors. Separate multivariate logistic regression models were created to determine which factors were associated with parent readiness to make changes for child dietary and PA behaviors. Almost 62% of parents were in the action SOC for child dietary behaviors, but only 41% were in the action SOC for PA behaviors. Parents who believed their own weight was a health problem were less likely to be ready to make changes to their child’s dietary behaviors. Physician discussion of strategies was related to readiness to make changes for child dietary behaviors, but not PA behaviors. In the PA domain, parents of younger children were more likely to be ready to make changes. Training healthcare providers to address PA readiness and be aware of factors influencing dietary and PA readiness may result in more effective conversations with parents and improve behavior change efforts for pediatric weight loss. PMID:24953789

  4. The "Discovery" of Child Abuse

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pfohl, Stephen J.

    1977-01-01

    Surveys the history of social reaction to child abuse, discusses the cultural values promoting the protection of children, points out how much pediatric radiology benefited from its "discovery" of "the battered child syndrome" in the early sixties, and concludes that the labeling of child abusers as "sick" has shielded them from criminal…

  5. What Works in Child Welfare.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kluger, Miriam P., Ed.; Alexander, Gina, Ed.; Curtis, Patrick A., Ed.

    Noting the importance of identifying the effectiveness of child welfare programs for future policy planning, this book examines features of successful programs. The book is presented in six sections: family preservation and family support services, child protective services, out-of-home care, adoption, child care, and adolescent services. Each…

  6. Trends in Child Maltreatment Literature.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Behl, Leah E.; Conyngham, Heather A.; May, Patricia F.

    2003-01-01

    Child maltreatment articles (n=2090) published from 1977-1998 were reviewed. Across the period studied, quantitative articles and articles on child sexual abuse increased and theoretical articles and articles on physical abuse decreased. Articles examining child neglect or emotional abuse remained consistently low. Participant recruitment from…

  7. Morphosyntactic Annotation of CHILDES Transcripts

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sagae, Kenji; Davis, Eric; Lavie, Alon; MacWhinney, Brian; Wintner, Shuly

    2010-01-01

    Corpora of child language are essential for research in child language acquisition and psycholinguistics. Linguistic annotation of the corpora provides researchers with better means for exploring the development of grammatical constructions and their usage. We describe a project whose goal is to annotate the English section of the CHILDES database…

  8. Campus Child Care News, 1998.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Newton, Marion F., Ed.

    1998-01-01

    This document is comprised of the three 1998 issues of a newsletter disseminating information on the National Coalition for Campus Child Care Centers (NCCCC) and providing a forum for news, research, and information concerning campus child care centers. The February issue contains stories on the White House Conference on Child Care, registration…

  9. Child Development Center Parent Handbook

    E-print Network

    Hammack, Richard

    Child Development Center Parent Handbook 2013-2014 #12;Parent Handbook September 2013 2 Table INTRODUCTION Welcome to the Virginia Commonwealth University (VCU) Child Development Center! This Parent of the VCU Child Development Center (CDC) is to provide high quality, developmentally appropriate care

  10. Whats Inside: Child Labor Laws

    E-print Network

    Whats Inside: Child Labor Laws Annual Performance Review BDS Reminders All International Part- Time are under the age of eighteen (18). The Oklahoma Department of Labor has specific child labor laws work up to eight hours a day, 40 hours in any one week, and only between the hours of CHILD LABOR LAWS

  11. Ingham County Child Care Centers

    E-print Network

    Feeny, Brian

    Ingham County Child Care Centers Ages Full-Time Part-time Before/AfterSchool Transportation Preschool and Child Development Center 1317 Mason, Dansvilee, MI 517-623-6904 0-17 years · · · · · Site, East Lansing, MI 517-332-2311 12 months - 5 years · · · · ·EAST LANSING RECREATION AND ARTS CHILD CARE

  12. Whats Inside: Child Labor Laws

    E-print Network

    Whats Inside: · Child Labor Laws · Computer Training Update · Annual Performance Review · Meet the age of eighteen (18). The Oklahoma Department of Labor has specific child labor laws that apply. Below) 744-5373. CHILD LABOR LAWS ANNUAL PERFORMANCE REVIEW Policy and Procedures 3-0741, Performance

  13. CHILD'S FULL NAME_____________________________________________________ MEDICAL RELEASE

    E-print Network

    Quigg, Chris

    CHILD'S FULL NAME_____________________________________________________ MEDICAL RELEASE In the event that my child becomes ill or sustains an injury while in the care of the Children's Center, I give my think the existing emergency requires for the relief of pain and to preserve my child's life and health

  14. Child Care Health Connections, 2002.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Guralnick, Eva, Ed.; Zamani, Rahman, Ed.; Evinger, Sara, Ed.; Dailey, Lyn, Ed.; Sherman, Marsha, Ed.; Oku, Cheryl, Ed.; Kunitz, Judith, Ed.

    2002-01-01

    This document is comprised of the six 2002 issues of a bimonthly newsletter on children's health for California's child care professionals. The newsletter provides information on current and emerging health and safety issues relevant to child care providers and links the health, safety, and child care communities. Regular features include columns…

  15. Social Structure and Child Poverty

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ferriss, Abbott L.

    2006-01-01

    Child poverty, as a critical indicator of the QOL, is intricately related to the social structure of the community. This hypothesis is explored for the 159 counties of Georgia for the year 2000. The influence of demographic, economic, family and health factors upon child poverty are explored through models of total, black and white child poverty.…

  16. Child neglect and emotional abuse

    MedlinePLUS

    ... or neglect, call 911. Call the Childhelp National Child Abuse Hotline (1-800-4-A-CHILD). Know that ... 37. U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. Child Welfare ... Abuse and Neglect. Available at: https://www.childwelfare.gov/ ...

  17. Parent-child Interactions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Erlich, A. C., Ed.

    This survey investigates 6 major questions: (1) do adolescents and their parents perceive youth as overindulged; (2) are parent-child communication channels open; (3) has understanding between parents and their children broken down; (4) do children identify with their parents; (5) has discipline been permissive; and (6) do adolescents reject the…

  18. The Young Hospitalized Child.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Winters, Anne

    This literature review examines the effects of hospitalization on the young child and suggests ways in which parents and hospital personnel can protect children from the potentially harmful emotional and intellectual effects of hospitalization. The history of attitudes toward the hospitalization of children is discussed. Children's emotional…

  19. Your Child's Growth

    MedlinePLUS

    ... of communication open. Another way to boost your child's mood is to encourage activities that don't focus on height or weight. Emphasize special talents or individual qualities, such as musical aptitude or a love of literature. Back Continue If You Suspect a ...

  20. Toward Communal Child Rearing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sands, Rosalind M.

    1973-01-01

    Social work's preoccupation with the preservation of the nuclear family has blinded it to the necessity of finding new ways to care for children. This myopia has impeded recognition of the forces in American life that are bringing social change and new forms of child rearing. This article describes some of these phenomena and concludes that…

  1. The Migrant Child.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reyes, Manuel C.

    A migrant child is one who has moved with his family from one school district to another during the preceding 12 months so that a parent or other immediate family member might secure employment in agricultural or fishery activity. In California, the 92,000 migrants living in 48 of the state's 58 counties include Chicanos, Mexican Americans,…

  2. The Child Whisperer

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Peters, Dane L.

    2012-01-01

    Unquestionably, Maria Montessori's insights into child development were both innate and learned, derived from her many years of working with children. Her work, practices, philosophy, and passion have staying power that, so far, spans a century and are a testament to her dedication and abilities. In this article, the author explains why he sees…

  3. The Gifted Dyslexic Child

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eide, Brock; Eide, Fernette

    2009-01-01

    A major reason why dyslexia is likely to be missed or mislabeled in an intellectually gifted child is the lack of a specific, clearly recognized definition to enable diagnosis of dyslexia. It's crucial that adults working with gifted students understand that average or even above reading comprehension does not by itself guarantee that a gifted…

  4. Helping Your Overweight Child.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Inst. of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases (NIH), Bethesda, MD.

    Currently, at least one child in five is overweight. Although children have fewer health problems from weight than adults, overweight children are at high risk for many health problems including heart disease, diabetes, high blood pressure, and stroke. Several factors are cited as to why children become overweight. Genetics, lack of exercise, and…

  5. The Hyperactive Child.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Murphy, Linda; Della Corte, Suzanne

    1987-01-01

    The newsletter's main article focuses on hyperactivity and attention deficit disorder. The causes of hyperactivity, which affects 3-5 percent of all children, are elusive but may include neurological immaturity, inherent genetic problems, or fetal exposure to harmful substances. Patterns of behavior that typify a hyperactive child include a short…

  6. Understanding fatal child abuse.

    PubMed

    Hicks, R A; Gaughan, D C

    1995-07-01

    Medical, social service and coroner reports were reviewed for 14 cases of fatal child abuse and neglect identified at a children's hospital from 1988-1992. Twelve cases involved physical abuse and two neglect. The median age was 6.5 months (range 24 days to 3 years). Six families (43%) had prior protective service involvement; however, four of the referrals involved a sibling. Only two of 12 physical abuse victims had a history of a prior suspicious injury. Clinical and postmortem findings are presented. The cause of death in all physically abused patients was blunt impact head injury; one also had contributing intraabdominal injuries. Ten cases were ruled due to homicide; 12 have come to legal closure resulting in nine felony convictions. These findings emphasize the role of blunt impact brain injury in fatal child abuse cases. Two findings have significant implications for prevention: (a) the paucity of injuries recognized prior to the fatal event, and (b) among families known to child protection agencies the focus was not the fatally injured child. PMID:7583743

  7. Nurturing the Whole Child.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ungar, Manya; And Others

    1988-01-01

    Ten articles considering ways in which to help in the development of the whole child address play, childhood fears, making children feel loved, how parents can help children learn, decision making, peer pressure, competition, sports, and reading materials for adolescents. (CB)

  8. Fussy or irritable child

    MedlinePLUS

    ... stress, sadness, or anger in your home. Young children are sensitive to stress at home, and to the mood of their ... Poor sleep patterns Noise or stimulation around your child (too ... a problem) Stress around the home Irregular day-to-day schedule ...

  9. The Underachieving Gifted Child

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Siegle, Del

    2012-01-01

    Why are some gifted children willing to tackle new challenges whereas others seem insecure or uninterested? Why do some gifted students achieve while others become caught in a cycle of underachievement? Are there strategies teachers and parents can implement that promote an achievement-oriented attitude? "The Underachieving Gifted Child:…

  10. A Grieving Child.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moller, Barabara

    2001-01-01

    Schools are sometimes the last to know when a child loses a parent. What some counselors and teachers may assume is misbehavior could actually be indications of grief. This article focuses on helping school counselors recognize some of the symptoms of childhood grief and what to do about them. (GCP)

  11. Rights of the Child.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cahn, Claude, Ed.

    2000-01-01

    This newsletter examines problems and rights of Romani children in East Central Europe, focusing on such topics as: the displaced childhoods of Romani children; snapshots of living conditions in various European countries; Roma child rights; Romani and non-Romani schools in Bulgaria; Romani children's rights to education in Central and Eastern…

  12. Measuring Child Rhythm

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Payne, Elinor; Post, Brechtje; Astruc, Lluisa; Prieto, Pilar; Vanrell, Maria del Mar

    2012-01-01

    Interval-based rhythm metrics were applied to the speech of English, Catalan and Spanish 2, 4 and 6 year-olds, and compared with the (adult-directed) speech of their mothers. Results reveal that child speech does not fall into a well-defined rhythmic class: for all three languages, it is more "vocalic" (higher %V) than adult speech and has a…

  13. E-commerce for healthcare supply procurement.

    PubMed

    Arbietman, D; Lirov, E; Lirov, R; Lirov, Y

    2001-01-01

    The total investment of the more than fifty e-commerce startups that entered healthcare supply chain management in the past three years has surpassed $500 million. However, none of these early entrants has delivered on the initial promise of restructuring the entire supply chain, replacing the traditional intermediaries, or at least achieving substantial revenue. This article offers a new business-to-business (B2B) e-commerce solution classification paradigm and uses it to analyze the functional requirements for an effective and, efficient healthcare supply chain marketplace. The analysis exposes several fundamental B2B market complexities that prevent the early entrants from creating a solid customer base and reaching desired liquidity goals. It also identifies several technological solutions to the problems mentioned. These new technologies create a comprehensive and symmetric order-matching engine that is capable of aggregating buy orders, requesting quotes from multiple vendors simultaneously, and negotiating along multiple criteria. PMID:11338910

  14. Measuring the value of healthcare business assets.

    PubMed

    Evans, C J

    2000-04-01

    Healthcare organizations obtain valuations of business assets for many reasons, including to support decisions regarding potential mergers, sale of business components, or financing; for tax assessments; and for defense against law-suits. If compliance with regulations may be an issue, such as when a not-for-profit organization is involved in a transaction, healthcare organizations should seek an independent appraisal to ensure that applicable legal standards are met. Whether or not regulatory issues are involved, however, an accurate and useful valuation of business assets depends on many factors. Financial managers must understand the purpose and function of the valuation, choice of appropriate valuation techniques, proper assessment of intangible value, use of realistic growth rates, appropriate emphasis on key focus areas of the valuation (e.g., risk and future income streams), and an accounting of physician compensation. PMID:10915353

  15. A responsible method of making healthcare choices.

    PubMed

    Scandlen, Greg

    2002-01-01

    The essential problem in healthcare has never been fee-for-service. The problem is third-party payment that inevitably leads to excessive demand for services. Third-party payers will always try to limit the use and cost of services to reduce their exposure. The big question facing us in the next 10 years is who decides what gets paid for and what doesn't. Will it be employers, insurers, the government? Or it will it be consumers? Many employers have concluded that Americans are perfectly capable of expressing their preferences and choices in healthcare. But they need to understand that resources are limited and trade-offs are required. PMID:12148476

  16. Do healthcare professionals understand asthma devices?

    PubMed

    Goodwin, Richard; Heraghty, Jane

    2015-12-01

    Asthma is a common, complex and multifactorial respiratory condition affecting a significant number of children within the UK. Recent department of health reports and national guidance has highlighted that healthcare professionals have a poor understanding of asthma treatments and are failing to provide patients with basic care. This article aims to explore some of the reasons why the use of inhalers is inadequate and discusses the research surrounding the reported knowledge of healthcare professionals' ability to counsel on inhaler devices. We hope the article will help clinicians explore their understanding of how to administer commonly prescribed inhaler devices, provide useful general and simple steps for inhaler counselling and act as a prompt to review personal competence and confidence in counselling on inhaler devices. PMID:26407731

  17. INFECTION CONTROL IN ALTERNATIVE HEALTHCARE SETTINGS

    PubMed Central

    Flanagan, Elaine; Chopra, Teena; Mody, Lona

    2011-01-01

    SYNOPSIS With the changing healthcare delivery, patients receive care at various settings including acute care hospitals, skilled nursing facilities, outpatient primary care and specialty clinics, as well as at home, exposing them to pathogens in various settings. Various healthcare settings face unique challenges requiring individualized infection control programs. Infection control programs in skilled nursing facilities should address: surveillance for infections and antimicrobial resistance, outbreak investigation and control plan for epidemics, isolation precautions, hand hygiene, staff education, and employee and resident health programs. Infection control programs in ambulatory clinics should address: Triage and standard – transmission based precautions, cleaning, disinfection and sterilization principles, surveillance in surgical clinics, safe injection practices, and bioterrorism and disaster planning for ambulatory clinics. PMID:21316005

  18. Medical Tourism: Globalization of the Healthcare Marketplace

    PubMed Central

    Horowitz, Michael D.; Rosensweig, Jeffrey A.; Jones, Christopher A.

    2007-01-01

    The citizens of many countries have long traveled to the United States and to the developed countries of Europe to seek the expertise and advanced technology available in leading medical centers. In the recent past, a trend known as medical tourism has emerged wherein citizens of highly developed countries choose to bypass care offered in their own communities and travel to less developed areas of the world to receive a wide variety of medical services. Medical tourism is becoming increasingly popular, and it is projected that as many as 750,000 Americans will seek offshore medical care in 2007. This phenomenon is driven by marketplace forces and occurs outside of the view and control of the organized healthcare system. Medical tourism presents important concerns and challenges as well as potential opportunities. This trend will have increasing impact on the healthcare landscape in industrialized and developing countries around the world. PMID:18311383

  19. Intergroup relationships and quality improvement in healthcare

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Intergroup problems among physicians, nurses and administrators in healthcare settings sometimes retard such settings' ability to foster enhanced quality of care. Without knowledge of the social dynamics that generate the difficulties, it is impossible to address some crucial issues that may affect quality initiatives. Methods This paper reviews three types of dynamics, social identity, communities of practice and socialisation into particular professional identities that affect relationships among professional groups in healthcare settings. Recommendations A suggestion is made for the creation of cross-boundary communities of practice, socialisation into them and dual, superordinate identities as a means to foster more effective intergroup dynamics and, thus, contribute to a greater quality of care. PMID:21450775

  20. A perspective of adaptation in healthcare.

    PubMed

    Mezghani, Emna; Da Silveira, Marcos; Pruski, Cédric; Exposito, Ernesto; Drira, Khalil

    2014-01-01

    Emerging new technologies in healthcare has proven great promises for managing patient care. In recent years, the evolution of Information and Communication Technologies pushes many research studies to think about treatment plan adaptation in this area. The main goal is to accelerate the decision making by dynamically generating new treatment due to unexpected situations. This paper portrays the treatment adaptation from a new perspective inspired from the human nervous system named autonomic computing. Thus, the selected potential studies are classified according to the maturity levels of this paradigm. To guarantee optimal and accurate treatment adaptation, challenges related to medical knowledge and data are identified and future directions to be explored in healthcare systems are discussed. PMID:25160175

  1. Developing healthcare facilities for a changing environment.

    PubMed

    Campobasso, Fred; Kucharz, Joe

    2012-05-01

    When approaching facility and real estate development, healthcare leaders should: Enhance clinical integration and ensure more patient-friendly facilities. Focus on a facility's business requirements and operating needs. Create a business plan that demonstrates how a project would help deliver better care at lower cost during a time of declining payment levels. Develop an approach that balances the needs of all stakeholders, including payers, staff, and patients. PMID:22616514

  2. A civil rights primer for healthcare organizations.

    PubMed

    de Guzman, M M

    1997-03-01

    "Diversity helps us build a better product for the diverse customers we're serving," says University of Michigan Hospitals' Ellen J. Gaucher. And several healthcare organizations stand out for their efforts to build a diverse workforce. Leaders agree that an atmosphere open to diversity starts at the top. They identify four major steps that board members and senior executives can take to ensure a system that welcomes all racial and ethnic groups into the fold. PMID:10166222

  3. Healthcare provider perceptions of clinical prediction rules

    PubMed Central

    Richardson, Safiya; Khan, Sundas; McCullagh, Lauren; Kline, Myriam; Mann, Devin; McGinn, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    Objectives To examine internal medicine and emergency medicine healthcare provider perceptions of usefulness of specific clinical prediction rules. Setting The study took place in two academic medical centres. A web-based survey was distributed and completed by participants between 1 January and 31 May 2013. Participants Medical doctors, doctors of osteopathy or nurse practitioners employed in the internal medicine or emergency medicine departments at either institution. Primary and secondary outcome measures The primary outcome was to identify the clinical prediction rules perceived as most useful by healthcare providers specialising in internal medicine and emergency medicine. Secondary outcomes included comparing usefulness scores of specific clinical prediction rules based on provider specialty, and evaluating associations between usefulness scores and perceived characteristics of these clinical prediction rules. Results Of the 401 healthcare providers asked to participate, a total of 263 (66%), completed the survey. The CHADS2 score was chosen by most internal medicine providers (72%), and Pulmonary Embolism Rule-Out Criteria (PERC) score by most emergency medicine providers (45%), as one of the top three most useful from a list of 24 clinical prediction rules. Emergency medicine providers rated their top three significantly more positively, compared with internal medicine providers, as having a better fit into their workflow (p=0.004), helping more with decision-making (p=0.037), better fitting into their thought process when diagnosing patients (p=0.001) and overall, on a 10-point scale, more useful (p=0.009). For all providers, the perceived qualities of useful at point of care, helps with decision making, saves time diagnosing, fits into thought process, and should be the standard of clinical care correlated highly (?0.65) with overall 10-point usefulness scores. Conclusions Healthcare providers describe clear preferences for certain clinical prediction rules, based on medical specialty. PMID:26338684

  4. Quality of Big Data in Healthcare

    SciTech Connect

    Sukumar, Sreenivas R; Ramachandran, Natarajan; Ferrell, Regina Kay

    2015-01-01

    The current trend in Big Data Analytics and in particular Health information technology is towards building sophisticated models, methods and tools for business, operational and clinical intelligence, but the critical issue of data quality required for these models is not getting the attention it deserves. The objective of the paper is to highlight the issues of data quality in the context of Big Data Healthcare Analytics.

  5. Personal healthcare system using cloud computing.

    PubMed

    Takeuchi, Hiroshi; Mayuzumi, Yuuki; Kodama, Naoki; Sato, Keiichi

    2013-01-01

    A personal healthcare system used with cloud computing has been developed. It enables a daily time-series of personal health and lifestyle data to be stored in the cloud through mobile devices. The cloud automatically extracts personally useful information, such as rules and patterns concerning lifestyle and health conditions embedded in the personal big data, by using a data mining technology. The system provides three editions (Diet, Lite, and Pro) corresponding to users' needs. PMID:23920710

  6. Secure Healthcare Internet Employee Learning Drill

    SciTech Connect

    2005-08-01

    SHIELD solves the problem of rapidly training large numbers of healthcare or other facility personnel who work around the clock - especially the non-professional semi-skilled employees who usually have "first contact" with patients and visitors - about how to limit or prevent exposure of facilities to infectious illness or other disease threats. This tool provides a very brief, realistic training experience that shows a range of facility personnel how to identify and respond to possible acute infectious respiratory illness outbreaks.

  7. Why healthcare workers are sick of TB.

    PubMed

    von Delft, Arne; Dramowski, Angela; Khosa, Celso; Kotze, Koot; Lederer, Philip; Mosidi, Thato; Peters, Jurgens A; Smith, Jonathan; van der Westhuizen, Helene-Mari; von Delft, Dalene; Willems, Bart; Bates, Matthew; Craig, Gill; Maeurer, Markus; Marais, Ben J; Mwaba, Peter; Nunes, Elizabete A; Nyirenda, Thomas; Oliver, Matt; Zumla, Alimuddin

    2015-03-01

    Dr Thato Mosidi never expected to be diagnosed with tuberculosis (TB), despite widely prevalent exposure and very limited infection control measures. The life-threatening diagnosis of primary extensively drug-resistant TB (XDR-TB) came as an even greater shock. The inconvenient truth is that, rather than being protected, Dr Mosidi and thousands of her healthcare colleagues are at an increased risk of TB and especially drug-resistant TB. In this viewpoint paper we debunk the widely held false belief that healthcare workers are somehow immune to TB disease (TB-proof) and explore some of the key factors contributing to the pervasive stigmatization and subsequent non-disclosure of occupational TB. Our front-line workers are some of the first to suffer the consequences of a progressively more resistant and fatal TB epidemic, and urgent interventions are needed to ensure the safety and continued availability of these precious healthcare resources. These include the rapid development and scale-up of improved diagnostic and treatment options, strengthened infection control measures, and focused interventions to tackle stigma and discrimination in all its forms. We call our colleagues to action to protect themselves and those they care for. PMID:25809771

  8. Oral healthcare protocols in a nursing home.

    PubMed

    Hollands, Kate; Burns, Jacqueline

    2015-09-01

    DesignCluster-randomised controlled trial, in Belgian nursing homes.InterventionSupervised implementation of the 'Oral health care Guideline for Older people in Long-term care Institutes' (OGOLI) and the daily oral healthcare protocol derived from the guideline. This included appointing project supervisors and oral healthcare teams responsible for the implementation process, a three stage educational programme and oral healthcare records for each resident.Outcome measureThe primary outcome variables were the knowledge and attitudes of nurses and nurses' aides towards oral health and oral hygiene. This was collected through a 15-item self-reported knowledge questionnaire and a four item attitude survey administered both at baseline and six months after the start of the study.ResultsOf the 651 participants who completed the initial survey 259 had complete data at six months. There were no significant differences between the control and intervention groups at baseline or follow up for baseline characteristics, knowledge or attitudes (p=0.42, p=0.37). At six months the intervention group showed higher knowledge scores (p<0.0001) but no difference in attitude scores (p=0.78).ConclusionsSignificant improvements in knowledge followed an educational programme where participants' initial knowledge was low and no improvement in knowledge was found in the intervention group. Educational activities alone had no impact on attitudes and further research on how to improve attitudes is required. PMID:26492810

  9. Racial Healthcare Disparities: A Social Psychological Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Penner, Louis A.; Hagiwara, Nao; Eggly, Susan; Gaertner, Samuel L.; Albrecht, Terrance L.; Dovidio, John F.

    2014-01-01

    Around the world, members of racial/ethnic minority groups typically experience poorer health than members of racial/ethnic majority groups. The core premise of this article is that thoughts, feelings, and behaviors related to race and ethnicity play a critical role in healthcare disparities. Social psychological theories of the origins and consequences of these thoughts, feelings, and behaviors offer critical insights into the processes responsible for these disparities and suggest interventions to address them. We present a multilevel model that explains how societal, intrapersonal, and interpersonal factors can influence ethnic/racial health disparities. We focus our literature review, including our own research, and conceptual analysis at the intrapersonal (the race-related thoughts and feelings of minority patients and non-minority physicians) and interpersonal levels (intergroup processes that affect medical interactions between minority patients and non-minority physicians). At both levels of analysis, we use theories of social categorization, social identity, contemporary forms of racial bias, stereotype activation, stigma, and other social psychological processes to identify and understand potential causes and processes of health and healthcare disparities. In the final section, we identify theory-based interventions that might reduce ethnic/racial disparities in health and healthcare. PMID:25197206

  10. Racial Healthcare Disparities: A Social Psychological Analysis.

    PubMed

    Penner, Louis A; Hagiwara, Nao; Eggly, Susan; Gaertner, Samuel L; Albrecht, Terrance L; Dovidio, John F

    2013-01-01

    Around the world, members of racial/ethnic minority groups typically experience poorer health than members of racial/ethnic majority groups. The core premise of this article is that thoughts, feelings, and behaviors related to race and ethnicity play a critical role in healthcare disparities. Social psychological theories of the origins and consequences of these thoughts, feelings, and behaviors offer critical insights into the processes responsible for these disparities and suggest interventions to address them. We present a multilevel model that explains how societal, intrapersonal, and interpersonal factors can influence ethnic/racial health disparities. We focus our literature review, including our own research, and conceptual analysis at the intrapersonal (the race-related thoughts and feelings of minority patients and non-minority physicians) and interpersonal levels (intergroup processes that affect medical interactions between minority patients and non-minority physicians). At both levels of analysis, we use theories of social categorization, social identity, contemporary forms of racial bias, stereotype activation, stigma, and other social psychological processes to identify and understand potential causes and processes of health and healthcare disparities. In the final section, we identify theory-based interventions that might reduce ethnic/racial disparities in health and healthcare. PMID:25197206

  11. [Competition in healthcare--political intentions].

    PubMed

    Knieps, Franz

    2009-01-01

    Over the last 20 years strategies introducing regulated competition have gradually been implemented in the corporatistically structured German healthcare system. In particular, this applies to the structure of health insurance organisation where the corporatively organised allocation system has deliberately been transformed to ensure health insurance choice. Accordingly, the laws governing membership, health insurance premiums and health benefits have been adapted and new rules for public finance including a risk structure compensation scheme encompassing the different kinds of health insurances have been established. The options for competition arising in the area of health service provision do not only affect the health insurance companies themselves, but also the relations to the providers of healthcare as well as their relationship with each other. This holds especially true of the role and function of the (regional) physicians' associations. The relation between collective agreements and individual contracts is still unclear. With the further development of strategies introducing regulated competition the possibilities and limitations of competition will have to be explored and many details--such as, for example, the implementation of the responsibility for ensuring the provision of healthcare services--need to be resolved. PMID:20120188

  12. Workplace Bullying in Healthcare: Part 3.

    PubMed

    Lamberth, By Becky

    2015-01-01

    As many as 53.5 million American workers have experienced workplace bullying, which can cost organizations an estimated $200 billion annually in lost productivity, increased sick d ays, increased med ical claims, legal costs, and staff turnover. Bullying can occur in any profession, but for many reasons it is most prevalent in healthcare. Bullying behavior in healthcare has been reported and documented in literature for over 35 years. Although physicians are often considered to be the primary culprit of bullying, healthcare bullies can be one any one of the professionals who work in the organization including nurses, radiology technologists, pharmacists, ancillary staff personnel, administrators, or other non-physician staff members. The first installment of the series focused on defining bullying and its impact on the organization. Part 2 discussed three legal protections for the bully to include at-will laws, unions, and bylaws related to physician privileging. The final installment in this series will evaluate specific bully types and implementing processes to address inappropriate behavior. PMID:26314175

  13. Kumbh Mela 2013: Healthcare for the millions.

    PubMed

    Cariappa, M P; Singh, B P; Mahen, A; Bansal, A S

    2015-07-01

    Mass gatherings pose challenges to healthcare systems anywhere in the world. The Kumbh Mela 2013 at Allahabad, India was the largest gathering of humanity in the history of mankind, and posed an exciting challenge to the provision of healthcare services. At the finale of the Mela, it was estimated that about 120 million pilgrims had visited the site. Equitable geospatial distribution of adhoc health care facilities were created on a standardised template with integrated planning of evacuation modalities. Innovative and low cost response measures for disaster mitigation were implemented. Emergency patient management kits were prepared and stocked across the health care facilities for crisis response. Dynamic resource allocation (in terms of manpower and supplies) based on patient volumes was done on a daily basis, in response to feedback. An adhoc mega township created on the banks of a perennial river (Ganga) in the Indian subcontinent for accommodating millions of Hindu pilgrims. Conventional mindset of merely providing limited and static healthcare through adhoc facilities was done away with. Innovative concepts such as riverine ambulances and disaster kits were introduced. Managing the medical aspects of a mass gathering mega event requires allocation of adequate funds, proactive and integrated medical planning and preparedness. PMID:26288497

  14. The Relationships between Child Temperament, Teacher-Child Relationships, and Teacher-Child Interactions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oren, Meral; Jones, Ithel

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of the study was to examine the relationships between child temperament, teacher-child relationships, and teacher-child interactions in four preschool classrooms. The preliminary analyses revealed classroom differences for all variables. In all the classrooms except one, the temperament factor Reactivity had positive and high…

  15. Global Threats to Child Safety.

    PubMed

    Mace, Sharon E

    2016-02-01

    Children have rights, as enumerated in the Declaration of the Rights of the Child, and need protection from violence, exploitation, and abuse. Global threats to child safety exist. These threats include lack of basic needs (food, clean water, sanitation), maltreatment, abandonment, child labor, child marriage, female genital mutilation, child trafficking, disasters, and armed conflicts/wars. Recent disasters and armed conflicts have led to a record number of displaced people especially children and their families. Strategies and specific programs can be developed and implemented for eliminating threats to the safety of children. PMID:26613687

  16. A Q-methodology study of parental understandings of infant immunisation: Implications for health-care advice.

    PubMed

    Harvey, Hannah; Good, James; Mason, James; Reissland, Nadja

    2015-11-01

    This study used Q-methodology to explore systematically parental judgements about infant immunisation. A total of 45 parents completed a 31-statement Q-sort. Data were collected after vaccination in general practitioner practices or a private day nursery. Q factor analysis revealed four distinct viewpoints: a duty to immunise based on medical benefits, child-orientated protection based on parental belief, concern and distress and surprise at non-compliance. Additionally, there was a common view among parents that they did not regret immunising their children. Implications of these results are discussed in terms of health-care policy and future research. PMID:24335536

  17. Patient-centredness in integrated healthcare delivery systems - needs, expectations and priorities for organised healthcare systems

    PubMed Central

    Juhnke, Christin; Mühlbacher, Axel C.

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Patient-centred healthcare is becoming a more significant success factor in the design of integrated healthcare systems. The objective of this study is to structure a patient-relevant hierarchy of needs and expectations for the design of organised healthcare delivery systems. Methods A questionnaire with 84 items was conducted with N = 254 healthcare experts and N = 670 patients. Factor analyses were performed using SPSS©18. The number of factors retained was controlled by Kaiser's criterion, validation of screeplots and interpretability of the items. Cronbach's ? was used to assess the internal consistency of the subscales. Results Exploratory factor analysis led to 24 factors in the expert sample and 20 in the patient sample. After analysing the screeplots, confirmatory factor analyses were computed for 7-factor solutions accounting for 42.963% of the total variance and Kaiser–Meyer–Olkin of 0.914 for the patients (experts: 38.427%, Kaiser–Meyer–Olkin = 0.797). Cronbach's ? ranged between 0.899 and 0.756. Based on the analysis, coordinated care could be differentiated into seven dimensions: access, data and information, service and infrastructure, professional care, interpersonal care, individualised care, continuity and coordination. Conclusion and Discussion The study provides insight into patient and experts expectations towards the organisation of integrated healthcare delivery systems. If providers and payers can take into account patient needs and expectations while implementing innovative healthcare delivery systems, greater acceptance and satisfaction will be achieved. In the best case, this will lead to better adherence resulting in better clinical outcomes. PMID:24363639

  18. Child health inequalities and its dimensions in Pakistan

    PubMed Central

    Murtaza, Fowad; Mustafa, Tajammal; Awan, Rabia

    2015-01-01

    Background and Objective: Poverty and inequality in health is pervasive in Pakistan. The provisions and conditions of health are very dismal. A significant proportion of the population (16.34%) of Pakistan is under 5 years, but Pakistan is in the bottom 5% of countries in the world in terms of spending on health and education. It is ranked the lowest in the world with sub-Sahara Africa in terms of child health equality. The objective of this study was to examine child health inequalities in Pakistan. Materials and Methods: We analyzed data from Pakistan Integrated Household Survey/Household Integrated Economic Survey 2001–2002, collected by the Pakistan Bureau of Statistics, Government of Pakistan. Coverage of diarrhea and immunization were used as indicators of child health. Stata 11.0 was used for data analysis. Descriptive statistics including frequency distribution and proportions for categorical variables and mean for continuous variables were computed. Results: Children under 5 years of age account for about 16.34% of the total population, 11.76% (2.5 million) of whom suffered from diarrhea in 1-month. The average duration of a diarrheal episode was 7 days. About 72% of the children who had diarrhea lived in a house without pipe-borne water supply. Around 22% children who had diarrhea had no advice or treatment. More than one-third of the households had no toilet in the house, and only 29% of the households were connected with pipe-borne drinking water. About 7.73% (1.6 million) children had never been immunized. The main reason for nonimmunization was parents’ lack of knowledge and of immunization. Conclusion: Child health inequalities in Pakistan are linked with several factors such as severe poverty, illiteracy, lack of knowledge, and awareness of child healthcare, singularly inadequate provision of health services, and poor infrastructure. PMID:26392798

  19. Genomics is changing personal healthcare and medicine: the dawn of iPH (individualized preventive healthcare).

    PubMed

    Mehrian-Shai, Ruty; Reichardt, Juergen K V

    2015-01-01

    This opinion piece focuses on the convergence of information technology (IT) in the form of personal monitors, especially smart phones and possibly also smart watches, individual genomic information and preventive healthcare and medicine. This may benefit each one of us not only individually but also society as a whole through iPH (individualized preventive healthcare). This shift driven by genomic and other technologies may well also change the relationship between patient and physician by empowering the former but giving him/her also much more individual responsibility. PMID:26537019

  20. Building an evidence base in complementary and integrative healthcare for child and adolescent psychiatry.

    PubMed

    Edwards, Emmeline; Mischoulon, David; Rapaport, Mark; Stussman, Barbara; Weber, Wendy

    2013-07-01

    Complementary and integrative strategies are widely used by families with children who have mental health diagnoses. The therapies used by these children include herbs, dietary supplements, massage, acupuncture, meditation, and naturopathy. The literature on efficacy of complementary and alternative approaches is of limited value, and studies are needed to test efficacy and safety. Interpretation of complementary and integrative health care studies for symptomatic management of mental health conditions is hampered by study design and methodological limitations. Well-designed, adequately powered, and suitably controlled clinical trials on promising complementary and integrative modalities are needed for children and adolescents with psychiatric conditions. PMID:23806317

  1. The Medically Fragile Child: Caring for Children with Special Healthcare Needs in the School Setting

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    American Federation of Teachers (NJ), 2009

    2009-01-01

    This publication is designed to help teachers, nurses and paraprofessionals meet the challenges of dealing with children who have serious medical problems. It contains information on training, health and safety, and legal rights and responsibilities. Specifically, this third edition sets out to accomplish three goals: (1) to educate American…

  2. A Comprehensive Ubiquitous Healthcare Solution on an Android™ Mobile Device

    PubMed Central

    Hii, Pei-Cheng; Chung, Wan-Young

    2011-01-01

    Provision of ubiquitous healthcare solutions which provide healthcare services at anytime anywhere has become more favorable nowadays due to the emphasis on healthcare awareness and also the growth of mobile wireless technologies. Following this approach, an Android™ smart phone device is proposed as a mobile monitoring terminal to observe and analyze ECG (electrocardiography) waveforms from wearable ECG devices in real time under the coverage of a wireless sensor network (WSN). The exploitation of WSN in healthcare is able to substitute the complicated wired technology, moving healthcare away from a fixed location setting. As an extension to the monitoring scheme, medicine care is taken into consideration by utilizing the mobile phone as a barcode decoder, to verify and assist out-patients in the medication administration process, providing a better and more comprehensive healthcare service. PMID:22163986

  3. A comprehensive ubiquitous healthcare solution on an Android™ mobile device.

    PubMed

    Hii, Pei-Cheng; Chung, Wan-Young

    2011-01-01

    Provision of ubiquitous healthcare solutions which provide healthcare services at anytime anywhere has become more favorable nowadays due to the emphasis on healthcare awareness and also the growth of mobile wireless technologies. Following this approach, an Android™ smart phone device is proposed as a mobile monitoring terminal to observe and analyze ECG (electrocardiography) waveforms from wearable ECG devices in real time under the coverage of a wireless sensor network (WSN). The exploitation of WSN in healthcare is able to substitute the complicated wired technology, moving healthcare away from a fixed location setting. As an extension to the monitoring scheme, medicine care is taken into consideration by utilizing the mobile phone as a barcode decoder, to verify and assist out-patients in the medication administration process, providing a better and more comprehensive healthcare service. PMID:22163986

  4. Healthcare technology, economics, and policy: an evolving balance.

    PubMed

    Kern, Steven E; Jaron, Dov

    2003-01-01

    Economic and policy issues increasingly influence healthcare technology solutions as we wrestle with keeping healthcare quality high while keeping costs under control. The healthcare system is also undergoing rapid change brought about by managed care, shifting care to team providers in an outpatient or home environment. The development of health technologies under new market arrangements needs to be examined so that quality of care and cost are not at cross roads. As these issues continue to evolve in the public forum, it is critical for engineers and contributors to technology in healthcare to understand the dynamics that influence technology need and and adoption in the healthcare market. We hope that this special issue will provide a basis for initial understanding of these issues and stimulate further involvement by the bioengineering community at large, for the improvement of healthcare across all of society. PMID:12683057

  5. Child passenger safety.

    PubMed

    Durbin, Dennis R

    2011-04-01

    Child passenger safety has dramatically evolved over the past decade; however, motor vehicle crashes continue to be the leading cause of death of children 4 years and older. This policy statement provides 4 evidence-based recommendations for best practices in the choice of a child restraint system to optimize safety in passenger vehicles for children from birth through adolescence: (1) rear-facing car safety seats for most infants up to 2 years of age; (2) forward-facing car safety seats for most children through 4 years of age; (3) belt-positioning booster seats for most children through 8 years of age; and (4) lap-and-shoulder seat belts for all who have outgrown booster seats. In addition, a fifth evidence-based recommendation is for all children younger than 13 years to ride in the rear seats of vehicles. It is important to note that every transition is associated with some decrease in protection; therefore, parents should be encouraged to delay these transitions for as long as possible. These recommendations are presented in the form of an algorithm that is intended to facilitate implementation of the recommendations by pediatricians to their patients and families and should cover most situations that pediatricians will encounter in practice. The American Academy of Pediatrics urges all pediatricians to know and promote these recommendations as part of child passenger safety anticipatory guidance at every health-supervision visit. PMID:21422088

  6. Girl child and social change.

    PubMed

    Seth, P

    1995-01-01

    This article discusses the state of social change and the disparity between India's Constitutional aims and actual practice in addressing gender inequality and the special risks of female children in India. The second part of this article summarizes Constitutional articles and laws relating to protection of women and a girl child. Before birth, a female child is at risk of fetal death. A woman is at risk of poorly performed abortions and maternal mortality. After birth, a girl child is at risk of child care of younger siblings, housework, lack of education, wage work for the household, sexual abuse, vulnerability at work or school or on the street, murder by her parents, abuse, malnutrition, and desertion. The SAARC summit declared 1990 the Year of the Girl Child. UN conventions and a world summit focused on the Rights of the Child. A child has a right to freedom from exploitation, neglect and abuse, and access to food, health care, and education. Articles 14, 15, and 16 of India's Constitution guarantee protection from discrimination on grounds of religion, race, caste, sex, or place of birth and equality of opportunity in public employment. Article 23 prohibits trafficking in humans and forced labor. Article 24 prohibits child labor under the age of 14 years. Article 39 assures an adequate means of livelihood, equal pay, and protection from child abuse and economic pressure to work in jobs unsuitable to a child's age and strength. Article 45 provides for free and compulsory education up to 14 years of age. Article 51 prohibits derogatory practices against women. Article 325 and 326 prohibits sex discrimination. Other laws pertain to dowry, marriage age, prostitution, abortion, juvenile justice, kidnapping, obscenity, procurement of a minor, sexual offenses, divorce and child support, child care, maternity benefits, and cruelty by a husband or relatives. The girl child in India continues to live in perpetual threat, both physiological and psychological. PMID:12157998

  7. Identifying and assessing competencies: a strategy to improve healthcare leadership.

    PubMed

    Baker, G Ross

    2003-01-01

    There appears to be a growing consensus that better leadership is needed in healthcare, although there is much less agreement on the specific knowledge and skills required to improve performance. This commentary suggests that the articulation of healthcare leadership and management competencies provides a framework and a language for identifying the leadership knowledge and skills required for high-quality healthcare in the 21st century. PMID:14660896

  8. Standard Treatment Guidelines in Primary Healthcare Practice

    PubMed Central

    Gopalakrishnan, S.; Udayshankar, P.M.; Rama, R.

    2014-01-01

    In India, healthcare delivery is implemented at primary, secondary and tertiary levels. Of these, primary health care is the essential health care and is the first point of care for the public across the country. The primary health care system caters to nearly 70% of the population by treating about 90% of the common and locally prevailing problems. One of the integral elements of primary health care is provision of essential medicines, which should be available at all times in adequate amounts in appropriate dosage forms and at an affordable cost. It has an important bearing on the medical, economical and social outcomes of the healthcare delivery system. This situation mandates the need for rational use of medicines by standardizing the treatment of commonly occurring illness at the primary health care level. Standard Treatment Guidelines (STGs) have been in vogue in India only since recent times and is gaining popularity among practitioners. STGs have many advantages for the patients, healthcare providers, drug manufacturers and marketing agencies, and above all, the policy makers and the legislative system of the country. The drawback in STGs lies in the difficulties in implementation on a large scale. With due efforts to prioritize the health needs, comprehensive coverage of national health programs involving all the stakeholders including professional organizations, undergraduate medical curriculum planners and medical practitioners, STGs can be implemented effectively and thereby we can ensure a quality health care at the primary care level at an affordable cost as part of the now redefined Universal Health Coverage. This article is intended as a guide to understand the concept of STGs, prepared with the aim of capacity building for medical professionals in rationally treating patients in their day-to-day clinical practice. PMID:25657957

  9. Healthcare worker competencies for disaster training

    PubMed Central

    Hsu, Edbert B; Thomas, Tamara L; Bass, Eric B; Whyne, Dianne; Kelen, Gabor D; Green, Gary B

    2006-01-01

    Background Although training and education have long been accepted as integral to disaster preparedness, many currently taught practices are neither evidence-based nor standardized. The need for effective evidence-based disaster training of healthcare staff at all levels, including the development of standards and guidelines for training in the multi-disciplinary health response to major events, has been designated by the disaster response community as a high priority. We describe the application of systematic evidence-based consensus building methods to derive educational competencies and objectives in criteria-based preparedness and response relevant to all hospital healthcare workers. Methods The conceptual development of cross-cutting competencies incorporated current evidence through a systematic consensus building process with the following steps: (1) review of peer-reviewed literature on relevant content areas and educational theory; (2) structured review of existing competencies, national level courses and published training objectives; (3) synthesis of new cross-cutting competencies; (4) expert panel review; (5) refinement of new competencies and; (6) development of testable terminal objectives for each competency using similar processes covering requisite knowledge, attitudes, and skills. Results Seven cross-cutting competencies were developed: (1) Recognize a potential critical event and implement initial actions; (2) Apply the principles of critical event management; (3) Demonstrate critical event safety principles; (4) Understand the institutional emergency operations plan; (5) Demonstrate effective critical event communications; (6) Understand the incident command system and your role in it; (7) Demonstrate the knowledge and skills needed to fulfill your role during a critical event. For each of the cross-cutting competencies, comprehensive terminal objectives are described. Conclusion Cross-cutting competencies and objectives developed through a systematic evidence-based consensus building approach may serve as a foundation for future hospital healthcare worker training and education in disaster preparedness and response. PMID:16549004

  10. Standard treatment guidelines in primary healthcare practice.

    PubMed

    Gopalakrishnan, S; Udayshankar, P M; Rama, R

    2014-01-01

    In India, healthcare delivery is implemented at primary, secondary and tertiary levels. Of these, primary health care is the essential health care and is the first point of care for the public across the country. The primary health care system caters to nearly 70% of the population by treating about 90% of the common and locally prevailing problems. One of the integral elements of primary health care is provision of essential medicines, which should be available at all times in adequate amounts in appropriate dosage forms and at an affordable cost. It has an important bearing on the medical, economical and social outcomes of the healthcare delivery system. This situation mandates the need for rational use of medicines by standardizing the treatment of commonly occurring illness at the primary health care level. Standard Treatment Guidelines (STGs) have been in vogue in India only since recent times and is gaining popularity among practitioners. STGs have many advantages for the patients, healthcare providers, drug manufacturers and marketing agencies, and above all, the policy makers and the legislative system of the country. The drawback in STGs lies in the difficulties in implementation on a large scale. With due efforts to prioritize the health needs, comprehensive coverage of national health programs involving all the stakeholders including professional organizations, undergraduate medical curriculum planners and medical practitioners, STGs can be implemented effectively and thereby we can ensure a quality health care at the primary care level at an affordable cost as part of the now redefined Universal Health Coverage. This article is intended as a guide to understand the concept of STGs, prepared with the aim of capacity building for medical professionals in rationally treating patients in their day-to-day clinical practice. PMID:25657957

  11. Factors Influencing Time Lag Between Initial Parental Concern and First Visit to Child Psychiatric Services Among ADHD Children in Japan.

    PubMed

    Yamauchi, Yuko; Fujiwara, Takeo; Okuyama, Makiko

    2015-10-01

    The aim of this study was to examine the factors associated with a time lag between initial parental concern about ADHD symptoms and the first visit to a hospital in Japan that offers child psychiatric services. We investigated the demographic characteristic, symptoms, diagnosis, and healthcare system factors including duration between initial parental concern about symptoms and the first visit to a hospital (N = 387). The mean time lag between initial parental concern and the first visit to a hospital was 2.6 years. Risk factors for a longer time lag include the young age of a child, behavioral problems of the child, lower maternal education, difficulty in determining appropriate medical institution, referral route, and the distance from home to the hospital. A more established connection between a hospital with child psychiatric services and other health institutions is recommended for earlier referral to an appropriate hospital. PMID:25535050

  12. E-commerce in healthcare: changing the traditional landscape.

    PubMed

    Aggarwal, A K; Travers, S

    2001-01-01

    The healthcare industry, with more than one trillion dollars in revenue, accounts for about one-seventh of the U.S. economy. A significant portion of this revenue is lost to escalating healthcare system costs. This article examines the shortcomings of the traditional healthcare delivery system in terms of information flow, communication standards, case collections, and IT spending. It makes the case that e-commerce has the ability to transact some healthcare business more efficiently and cost-effectively. With the Internet as a delivery platform, several models offer improvement over the status quo. PMID:11338906

  13. 75 FR 50770 - Healthcare Infection Control Practices Advisory Committee (HICPAC)

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-08-17

    ...Control and Prevention Healthcare Infection Control Practices Advisory Committee...1) The practice of hospital infection control; strategies for surveillance, prevention, and control of infections (e.g., nosocomial...

  14. Safety and Accountability in Healthcare From Past to Present

    SciTech Connect

    Hendee, William R.

    2008-05-01

    Healthcare is transitioning into a new era-an era of accountability. This era demands heightened awareness of the quality, cost, and safety of healthcare, with value (quality/cost) and safety being the watchwords of accountability. Many factors are driving this transition, and it is affecting all healthcare disciplines, including radiation oncology. The transition is accompanied by the transformation of healthcare from a craft-based culture to an information-age culture in which patient needs and information are given top priority. These changes call for new measures to quantify and document the value and safety of procedures in radiation oncology.

  15. Healthcare systems engineering: an interdisciplinary approach to achieving continuous improvement.

    PubMed

    Wu, Bin; Klein, Cerry; Stone, Tamara T

    2006-01-01

    This paper argues that a systems approach can significantly enhance healthcare improvement efforts in patient safety, service quality and healthcare cost containment. The application of systems thinking to healthcare improvement encompasses three key principles: the systems perspective of healthcare processes, structured problem solving and the closed loop of continuous system improvement. These are encapsulated in a conceptual framework of continuous system improvement, which includes a reference architecture model and an analysis and design process model. Combined into a closed-loop, this framework allows users to understand and appropriately apply relevant functions, issues and analytical techniques. Practical applications of the framework are presented. PMID:18048245

  16. Washington University Dependent Social Security Number (SSN) Healthcare Form

    E-print Network

    Subramanian, Venkat

    Washington University Dependent Social Security Number (SSN) Healthcare Form Per the mandatory/or children) social security number (SSN) ______________________ ______________ _________________ Employee: _______________________ ________________ _______________________ Dependent's Name Relationship Social Security Number (SSN

  17. Three Wishes for Performing Arts Healthcare.

    PubMed

    Manchester, Ralph A

    2015-12-01

    As I think back over my 30-plus years as a physician and researcher in performing arts healthcare and try to imagine what might happen in the next 30 years, I sometimes fantasize about having three wishes that some supernatural force would grant. While waiting for something like that to happen is not likely to be an effective strategy for improving the health of performing artists around the world, the thought exercise might help to flesh out some ideas that could lead to further progress. While others will come up with different wishes (that I'm sure would be at least as valid), here are mine. PMID:26614982

  18. Healthcare Energy End-Use Monitoring

    SciTech Connect

    Sheppy, M.; Pless, S.; Kung, F.

    2014-08-01

    NREL partnered with two hospitals (MGH and SUNY UMU) to collect data on the energy used for multiple thermal and electrical end-use categories, including preheat, heating, and reheat; humidification; service water heating; cooling; fans; pumps; lighting; and select plug and process loads. Additional data from medical office buildings were provided for an analysis focused on plug loads. Facility managers, energy managers, and engineers in the healthcare sector will be able to use these results to more effectively prioritize and refine the scope of investments in new metering and energy audits.

  19. A universal exchange language for healthcare.

    PubMed

    Robson, Barry; Caruso, Thomas P

    2013-01-01

    We have defined a Universal Exchange Language (UEL) for healthcare that takes a green field approach to the development of a novel "XML-like" language. We consider here what given a free hand might mean: a UEL that incorporates an advanced mathematical foundation that uses Dirac's notation and algebra. For consented and public information, it allows probabilistic inference from UEL semantic web triplet tags. But also it is possible to use similar thinking to maximize the security and analytic characteristics of private health data by disaggregating or "shredding" it. Both are scalable to millions of records that could be spread across the Internet. PMID:23920723

  20. Dragons' Den: promoting healthcare research and innovation.

    PubMed

    Mazhindu, Deborah; Gregory, Siobhan

    2015-07-01

    The changing health and social care landscape, and, in particular, the financial challenges affecting the NHS, can present difficulties for staff looking for funding to support innovation and new ways of working. One method of competitive tendering that is becoming more accepted as a way of allocating funds, encouraging staff engagement and developing innovation for research is a format based the BBC television series, Dragons' Den. This article describes how Hounslow and Richmond Community Healthcare NHS Trust, London, has developed a 'Dragons' Den initiative' of annual competitive research funding allocation to ensure that some of the most dynamic practice in the trust is captured. PMID:26135194

  1. Secure Healthcare Internet Employee Learning Drill

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    2005-08-01

    SHIELD solves the problem of rapidly training large numbers of healthcare or other facility personnel who work around the clock - especially the non-professional semi-skilled employees who usually have "first contact" with patients and visitors - about how to limit or prevent exposure of facilities to infectious illness or other disease threats. This tool provides a very brief, realistic training experience that shows a range of facility personnel how to identify and respond to possiblemore »acute infectious respiratory illness outbreaks.« less

  2. Relationships of Shared Decision Making with Parental Perceptions of Child Mental Health Functioning and Care.

    PubMed

    Butler, Ashley M; Weller, Bridget; Titus, Courtney

    2015-11-01

    Experts encourage parents and practitioners to engage in shared decision making (SDM) to provide high quality child mental health care. However, little is known regarding SDM among families of children with common mental health conditions. The objectives of this study were to examine associations between parental report of SDM and parental perceptions of (a) receiving child mental health care and (b) child mental health functioning. We analyzed cross-sectional data on children with a common mental health condition (attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder, oppositional-defiant or conduct disorder, anxiety, or depression) from the 2009/2010 National Survey of Children with Special Healthcare Needs (N = 9,434). The primary independent variable was parent-reported SDM, and the dependent variables were parental perception of (a) their child receiving all needed mental health care (b) their children's impairment in school attendance and extracurricular activity participation, and (c) severity of their children's mental health condition. Multivariate logistic and multinomial regression analyses were conducted. Greater parent-reported SDM was associated with parental perceptions of receiving all needed child mental health care and children not having school or extracurricular impairment. Greater SDM was also associated with perceptions of children having a mild mental health condition compared to children having a moderate or severe condition. Findings provide a basis for future longitudinal and intervention studies to examine the benefit of SDM for improving parental perceptions of the quality of child mental health care and mental health functioning among children with common mental health conditions. PMID:25577238

  3. Straight talk new approaches in healthcare. Rebuilding healthcare in Louisiana--a blueprint for the nation. Roundtable discussion.

    PubMed

    Burgess, George E; Quinlan, Patrick J; Levy, David L; McDougall, Gerald

    2006-06-19

    When Hurricane Katrina struck Louisiana last August, it ravaged the healthcare system, which has since been struggling to cope with day-to-day challenges while also preparing for the future. The The Louisiana Recovery Authority (LRA) has been working to develop a blueprint for an equitable, affordable, high-quality healthcare system that's also equipped to respond to future disasters. In this installment of Straight Talk, representatives from Franciscan Missionaries Of Our Lady Health System, Baton Rouge, and Ochsner Health System, New Orleans, discuss the present and future state of healthcare in Louisiana. Modern Healthcare and PricewaterhouseCoopers present Straight Talk. The session on rebuilding Louisiana was held on June 8, 2006 at Modern Healthcare's Chicago headquarters. Fawn Lopez, publisher of Modern Healthcare, was the moderator. PMID:16827481

  4. An Exploration of Healthcare Inventory and Lean Management in Minimizing Medical Supply Waste in Healthcare Organizations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hicks, Rodney

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to understand how lean thinking and inventory management technology minimize expired medical supply waste in healthcare organizations. This study was guided by Toyota's theory of lean and Mintzberg's theory of management development to explain why the problem of medical supply waste exists. Government…

  5. Educating the Child with Bipolar Disorder

    MedlinePLUS

    ... 12 positive comments to every negative comment. In addition, the child’s team should have a behavior intervention plan.When a child is stable, the team needs to build the child’s skills that lead to appropriate reactions and behavior, including emotion labeling, empathy, anger management, ...

  6. Struggle for the Soul: John Lawrence Childs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stallones, Jared

    2010-01-01

    John Lawrence Childs was born in Eau Claire, Wisconsin on January 11, 1889, the second child of John Nelson Childs and Helen Janette (Nettie) Smith. In childhood Childs absorbed the values of industry, democracy, and a traditional, but socially conscious, religion. Childs was a Methodist and an intensely private person not given to talking about…

  7. NIST Child Care Center Parent Handbook

    E-print Network

    2012 NIST Child Care Center Parent Handbook Jolene Wayne Director NIST Child Care Center Parent Handbook #12;NIST Child Care Center Parent Handbook 2 August 2012 This page left intentionally blank. #12;NIST Child Care Center Parent Handbook 3 August 2012 Contents WELCOME TO THE NIST CHILD CARE CENTER

  8. The Child Care Problem: An Economic Analysis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blau, David M.

    Addressed to both social scientists and to nonacademic readers, this book provides an overview of the United States child care market, analyzes the main aspects of child care and child care policy, and proposes a new child care policy. The main thesis of the book is that the child care market functions much better than is commonly believed.…

  9. A comparative analysis of early child health and development services and outcomes in countries with different redistributive policies

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The social environment is a fundamental determinant of early child development and, in turn, early child development is a determinant of health, well-being, and learning skills across the life course. Redistributive policies aimed at reducing social inequalities, such as a welfare state and labour market policies, have shown a positive association with selected health indicators. In this study, we investigated the influence of redistributive policies specifically on the social environment of early child development in five countries with different political traditions. The objective of this analysis was to highlight similarities and differences in social and health services between the countries and their associations with other health outcomes that can inform better global early child development policies and improve early child health and development. Methods Four social determinants of early child development were selected to provide a cross-section of key time periods in a child’s life from prenatal to kindergarten. They included: 1) prenatal care, 2) maternal leave, 3) child health care, and 4) child care and early childhood education. We searched international databases and reports (e.g. Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development, World Bank, and UNICEF) to obtain information about early child development policies, services and outcomes. Results Although a comparative analysis cannot claim causation, our analysis suggests that redistributive policies aimed at reducing social inequalities are associated with a positive influence on the social determinants of early child development. Generous redistributive policies are associated with a higher maternal leave allowance and pay and more preventive child healthcare visits. A decreasing trend in infant mortality, low birth weight rate, and under five mortality rate were observed with an increase in redistributive policies. No clear influence of redistributive policies was observed on breastfeeding and immunization rates. In the analysis of child care and early education, the lack of uniform measures of early child development outcomes was apparent. Conclusions This paper provides further support for an association between redistributive policies and early child health and development outcomes, along with the organization of early child health and development services. PMID:24195544

  10. [Digital health as a motor for change towards new healthcare models and the relationship between patients and healthcare professionals. Disruption of healthcare processes].

    PubMed

    Garcia-Cuyàs, Francesc; San Pedro, Marc de; Roldan, Jordi Martínez

    2015-11-01

    We find ourselves at the end of an era of asymmetry in the domain of health information where the majority of this data is in the hands of the healthcare system. Increasingly, the public are calling for a more central role in the new paradigm that enables them to duly exercise their right of access to their health data while availing of more reliable and safer technologies which contribute to the management of their condition and promote healthy lifestyles. So far, the TIC Salud strategic plan has been developed independently from the Generalitat de Catalunya Health Department's Healthcare Plan, which sets out health policy strategy in Catalonia. However, from its initial design stage the new Healthcare Plan (2016- 2020) envisages incorporating a new strategic Information and communications technology (ICT) line called "Digital Health". Incorporating ICT into the Health Plan will allow these technologies to become integral part of all strategic healthcare processes, acting as a driving force for a shift towards a new healthcare models and an innovative relationship between the public and healthcare professionals. The Digital Health implies a disruption in itself, by way of the convergence of several technologies and their positive impact on health and healthcare procedures, by way of the public's access to information concerning their health, and by creating new opportunities for promoting health and the salutogenic paradigm which empowers people to develop their health, welfare and quality of life. PMID:26711061

  11. Explaining household socio-economic related child health inequalities using multiple methods in three diverse settings in South Africa

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Despite free healthcare to pregnant women and children under the age of six, access to healthcare has failed to secure better child health outcomes amongst all children of the country. There is growing evidence of socioeconomic gradient on child health outcomes Methods The objectives of this study were to measure inequalities in child mortality, HIV transmission and vaccination coverage within a cohort of infants in South Africa. We also used the decomposition technique to identify the factors that contribute to the inequalities in these three child health outcomes. We used data from a prospective cohort study of mother-child pairs in three sites in South African. A relative index of household socio-economic status was developed using principal component analysis. This paper uses the concentration index to summarise inequalities in child mortality, HIV transmission and vaccination coverage. Results We observed disparities in the availability of infrastructure between least poor and most poor families, and inequalities in all measured child health outcomes. Overall, 75 (8.5%) infants died between birth and 36 weeks. Infant mortality and HIV transmission was higher among the poorest families within the sample. Immunisation coverage was higher among the least poor. The inequalities were mainly due to the area of residence and socio-economic position. Conclusion This study provides evidence that socio-economic inequalities are highly prevalent within the relatively poor black population. Poor socio-economic position exposes infants to ill health. In addition, the use of immunisation services was lower in the poor households. These inequalities need to be explicitly addressed in future programme planning to improve child health for all South Africans. PMID:21463530

  12. Parental use of child feeding practices and outcomes in child and adolescent nutrition 

    E-print Network

    Yeley, Genevieve Connors

    2005-02-17

    )..........................................................................................170 150 Regression of child?s percent dietary reference intake (DRI) for vitamin B6 on child ethnicity for female subjects (Ordinary least squares regression) (model 2A) ...................................171 151 Regression of child?s... percent dietary reference intake (DRI) for vitamin B12 on child ethnicity for female subjects (Generalized method of moments) (model 2A)....................................171 152 Regression of child?s percent dietary reference intake (DRI...

  13. Child Labor in Texas Agriculture 

    E-print Network

    Smith, David

    2005-04-28

    contractor employees or farm family members. Child labor laws exist to ensure that a child is not employed in an occupation or manner that can harm him or her. However, these laws do not cover workers under age 16 who work on their parent?s or guardian?s... The Texas A&M University System Some child labor restrictions are specifically for the employment of minors in agriculture: ? The Federal Fair Labor Standards Act provisions for child labor specify the ages at which minors can be employed. ? Hazardous...

  14. Multimodal flexible sensor for healthcare systems.

    PubMed

    Ho, Van Anh; Imai, Sho; Hirai, Shinichi

    2014-01-01

    This paper describes potential applications of our previously developed fabric sensor into wearable healthcare or nursing systems based on its sensing modalities. This sensor is knitted from tension-sensitive electro-conductive yarns; whose structure has an elastic core, wound around by two separated tension-sensitive electro-conductive threads. This makes the sensor inherently flexible and stretchable, allowing it to conform to any complicated surface. We have equipped the sensor with three modalities, including proximity that allows the sensor to estimate a distance from the sensor to human hand and activates a light touch sensing, which could initiate comfortable and friendly interfaces in order to reduce burden of patients/disable people during interactions with healthcare devices; tactile perception that can measures contact force or applied load, especially realize slippage acting on the sensor surface, which is promising to be embedded into wearable devices or smart carpets; and tensile that can quantify a volume's contraction/expansion, which can be employed to monitoring muscles activity and so on. PMID:25571358

  15. Fully Integrated Biochip Platforms for Advanced Healthcare

    PubMed Central

    Carrara, Sandro; Ghoreishizadeh, Sara; Olivo, Jacopo; Taurino, Irene; Baj-Rossi, Camilla; Cavallini, Andrea; de Beeck, Maaike Op; Dehollain, Catherine; Burleson, Wayne; Moussy, Francis Gabriel; Guiseppi-Elie, Anthony; De Micheli, Giovanni

    2012-01-01

    Recent advances in microelectronics and biosensors are enabling developments of innovative biochips for advanced healthcare by providing fully integrated platforms for continuous monitoring of a large set of human disease biomarkers. Continuous monitoring of several human metabolites can be addressed by using fully integrated and minimally invasive devices located in the sub-cutis, typically in the peritoneal region. This extends the techniques of continuous monitoring of glucose currently being pursued with diabetic patients. However, several issues have to be considered in order to succeed in developing fully integrated and minimally invasive implantable devices. These innovative devices require a high-degree of integration, minimal invasive surgery, long-term biocompatibility, security and privacy in data transmission, high reliability, high reproducibility, high specificity, low detection limit and high sensitivity. Recent advances in the field have already proposed possible solutions for several of these issues. The aim of the present paper is to present a broad spectrum of recent results and to propose future directions of development in order to obtain fully implantable systems for the continuous monitoring of the human metabolism in advanced healthcare applications. PMID:23112644

  16. Africa must revoultionize healthcare, say experts.

    PubMed

    Borst, B

    1995-03-01

    The World Health Organization (WHO) and the World Bank have published a study that suggests low-income African countries can overhaul their health systems and offer health services for as little as thirteen dollars per person per year. The average per capita African expenditure is now fourteen dollars on health care, with the poorest spending ten dollars and some spending more than one hundred dollars. A new approach calls for comprehensive plans to reach the greatest number of people with appropriate care, while integrating care with clean water and sanitation. The report suggests that user fees even in impoverished areas tend to produce both better services and better consumers who value the information and medication they receive. Wadi Haddad of the World Bank states that there is a consensus among international donors not to support individual projects but to encourage healthcare reform, for which each country would develop its own plan and priorities. Haddad revealed the bank has pledged 1.4 billion dollars in loans for thirty countries to reform their healthcare systems. PMID:11362313

  17. Interprofessional Competencies in Integrative Primary Healthcare.

    PubMed

    Kligler, Benjamin; Brooks, Audrey J; Maizes, Victoria; Goldblatt, Elizabeth; Klatt, Maryanna; Koithan, Mary S; Kreitzer, Mary Jo; Lee, Jeannie K; Lopez, Ana Marie; McClafferty, Hilary; Rhode, Robert; Sandvold, Irene; Saper, Robert; Taren, Douglas; Wells, Eden; Lebensohn, Patricia

    2015-09-01

    In October 2014, the National Center for Integrative Primary Healthcare (NCIPH) was launched as a collaboration between the University of Arizona Center for Integrative Medicine and the Academic Consortium for Integrative Health and Medicine and supported by a grant from the Health Resources and Services Administration. A primary goal of the NCIPH is to develop a core set of integrative healthcare (IH) competencies and educational programs that will span the interprofessional primary care training and practice spectra and ultimately become a required part of primary care education. This article reports on the first phase of the NCIPH effort, which focused on the development of a shared set of competencies in IH for primary care disciplines. The process of development, refinement, and adoption of 10 "meta-competencies" through a collaborative process involving a diverse interprofessional team is described. Team members represent nursing, the primary care medicine professions, pharmacy, public health, acupuncture, naturopathy, chiropractic, nutrition, and behavioral medicine. Examples of the discipline-specific sub-competencies being developed within each of the participating professions are provided, along with initial results of an assessment of potential barriers and facilitators of adoption within each discipline. The competencies presented here will form the basis of a 45-hour online curriculum produced by the NCIPH for use in primary care training programs that will be piloted in a wide range of programs in early 2016 and then revised for wider use over the following year. PMID:26421232

  18. Developing Forensic Mental Healthcare in Kosovo

    PubMed Central

    Salize, Hans Joachim; Lavikainen, Juha; Seppänen, Allan; Gjocaj, Milazim

    2014-01-01

    In many economically struggling societies, forensic psychiatry is still in its initial developmental stages and thus forensic patients pose an ongoing challenge for the healthcare and juridical systems. In this article, we present the various issues and problems that arose when establishing the first forensic psychiatric institute in Kosovo – a country whose population has constantly been reported as suffering from a high psychiatric morbidity due to long-lasting traumatic experiences during the war of 1999. The implementation of a new forensic psychiatric institute in the developing mental healthcare system of Kosovo, still characterized by considerable shortages, required substantial effort on various levels. On the policy and financial level, it was made possible by a clear intent and coordinated commitment of all responsible national stakeholders and authorities, such as the Ministries of Health and Justice, and by the financial contribution of the European Commission. Most decisive in terms of the success of the project was capacity building in human resources, i.e., the recruitment and training of motivated staff. Training included essential clinical and theoretical issues as well as clearly defined standard operation procedures, guidelines, and checklists to aid daily routine work and the management of challenging situations. PMID:24779004

  19. Curbing child marriages.

    PubMed

    Rajan, S I

    Demographers are interested in marriage age because women who marry early are exposed to conceptions through the most fecund years of their lives. Women who marry young are exposed comparatively to a longer duration and tend to shorten the intergenerational years, consequently influencing the fertility to be higher. In India, despite the law, child marriages occur in many states, more prevalent among the backward conservative communities. According to India's Child Marriage Restraint Act, a woman must be 18 to marry (a man 21), but in fact in 1981 the marriage age of females was 15. This young marriage age is substantiated by available survey and report data. For example, in a mass marriage solemnized at Wardha village in Vidisha district in 1981, there was not 1 of the 110 couples of the prescribed marriage age. 55 of the brides were below age 10 and 48 were between 10-12 years. Only 8 brides were older than 14 years. A survey conducted by the Population Research Center, Lucknow University, revealed that more than half of the females surveyed were married before age 15. The census data for 1981 provide the following information: 1.19 million or 2.63% of the total 45.18 million boys aged 10-14 years and 2.67 million or 6.59% of the total 40.49 million girls were married. Christians had the highest mean age at marriage followed by Sikhs and Jains, but all religious groups had shown an improvement in their age at marriage. Several factors are responsible for child marriage. Consequently, a multidimensional approach to dealing with the problem is needed. The way to bring about this change is through creating more job and educational opportunities for women. PMID:12280896

  20. Child-Directed Interaction: Prediction of Change in Impaired Mother-Child Functioning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harwood, Michelle D.; Eyberg, Sheila M.

    2006-01-01

    The first phase of parent-child interaction therapy (PCIT), called child-directed interaction, teaches parents to use positive and differential social attention to improve the parent-child relationship. This study examined predictors of change in mother and child functioning during the child-directed interaction for 100 mother-child dyads. The…

  1. Child Guidance Techniques. 

    E-print Network

    Fraiser, Roberta C.

    1982-01-01

    University_ Child Guidance Techniques Every parent or person who works with children is faced in anyone day with a myriad of situations in which he wants to get cooperation from children and teach them a better way to act. Some people seem to have a... special ability which enables them to work with a minimal amount of frustration and few major conflicts. Others seem to be in a constant power struggle. Observations of intuitive parents and pro fessional workers with children reveal some tech niques...

  2. Musings: Does Criticizing Your Child's Teacher Disempower Your Child?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gross, Miraca U. M.

    2003-01-01

    This article discusses the negative effects of criticizing a child's teacher in front of the child and the positive effects of modeling a healthy respect of the educational system. Study findings are discussed which indicate high-achieving children saw themselves as active partners with their teachers or coaches, not empty vessels. (Contains 6…

  3. Abstracts on Child Play Areas and Child Support Facilities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hill, Ann; And Others

    Abstracts of 40 selected books and articles on the topic of interactions between children and their environments are provided in this document. Works abstracted were selected from a pool of over 1200 items. The abstracts are organized into five categories: (1) theories of child care and play; (2) child-environment research; (3) descriptions of…

  4. Infant and Child Development Inf. Child Dev. 17: 4353 (2008)

    E-print Network

    Meeden, Lisa A.

    2008-01-01

    Infant and Child Development Inf. Child Dev. 17: 43­53 (2008) Published online in Wiley Inter, University of Washington, Seattle, WA, USA Interesting systems, whether biological or artificial, develop capabilities infants are born with and how these capabilities develop over time and with experience. Imitation

  5. Children, Child Abuse and Child Protection: Placing Children Centrally.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    1999

    This book provides an overview of the political, moral, and social context within which British child welfare practitioners and managers attempt to work with children, families, and others. The book reviews the development of improved policy and practices in child protection. Placing children at the center of policy, practice, and discourse, it…

  6. 48 CFR 873.109 - General requirements for acquisition of health-care resources.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 2011-10-01 false General requirements for acquisition of health-care resources. 873...ACQUISITION PROCEDURES FOR HEALTH-CARE RESOURCES 873.109 General requirements for acquisition of health-care resources....

  7. 78 FR 9054 - National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health Respiratory Protection for Healthcare...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-02-07

    ... communication difficulties. One strategy taken to improve healthcare worker compliance is to develop better... Respiratory Protection for Healthcare Workers: Stakeholder Meeting AGENCY: The National Institute for... following public meeting: ``Stakeholder Meeting on Respiratory Protection for Healthcare...

  8. Dr. Raza Abidi, Dalhousie University2 Health Informatics (The logic of healthcare)

    E-print Network

    Abidi, Syed Sibte Raza

    information and communication technologies to meet needs of citizens, patients, healthcare professionals. Raza Abidi, Dalhousie University8 Three main communication parties Physicians Patients Healthcare communications Physician ­ Healthcare institution communications Physician ­ Patient Communications Patient

  9. Exploring the Use of Technology in Healthcare Spaces and its Impact on Empathic Communication

    E-print Network

    Anderson, Richard

    Exploring the Use of Technology in Healthcare Spaces and its Impact on Empathic Communication of healthcare spaces and the technologies inside affect doctor-patient interaction and communication Design, Human Factors Keywords Healthcare, communication, patient, doctors, clinicians, empathy, design

  10. 78 FR 6328 - Healthcare Infection Control Practices Advisory Committee: Notice of Charter Renewal

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-01-30

    ...Disease Control and Prevention Healthcare Infection Control Practices Advisory Committee...October 6, 1972, that the Healthcare Infection Control Practices Advisory Committee...Executive Secretary, Healthcare Infection Control Practices Advisory...

  11. 76 FR 9577 - Healthcare Infection Control Practices Advisory Committee: Notice of Charter Renewal

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-02-18

    ...Disease Control and Prevention Healthcare Infection Control Practices Advisory Committee...October 6, 1972, that the Healthcare Infection Control Practices Advisory Committee...Executive Secretary, Healthcare Infection Control Practices Advisory...

  12. 77 FR 70179 - Notice of HUD-Held Multifamily and Healthcare Loan Sale

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-11-23

    ...Notice of HUD-Held Multifamily and Healthcare Loan Sale AGENCY: Office of the Assistant...certain unsubsidized multifamily and healthcare mortgage loans, without Federal Housing...Mortgage Loans) secured by multifamily and healthcare properties located throughout the...

  13. 45 CFR 61.14 - Confidentiality of Healthcare Integrity and Protection Data Bank information.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ...2010-10-01 false Confidentiality of Healthcare Integrity and Protection Data Bank information...SERVICES GENERAL ADMINISTRATION HEALTHCARE INTEGRITY AND PROTECTION DATA BANK...PRACTITIONERS Disclosure of Information by the Healthcare Integrity and Protection Data Bank...

  14. 78 FR 16279 - HUD Healthcare Facility Documents: Notice Announcing Final Approved Documents and Assignment of...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-03-14

    ...Docket No. FR-5623-N-03] HUD Healthcare Facility Documents: Notice Announcing...SUMMARY: This notice announces that the healthcare facility documents have completed the...Deputy Assistant Secretary, Office of Healthcare Programs, Office of Housing,...

  15. 77 FR 31361 - Medicare and Medicaid Programs; Application by American Osteopathic Association/Healthcare...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-05-25

    ...by American Osteopathic Association/Healthcare Facilities Accreditation Program (AOA...from American Osteopathic Association/Healthcare Facilities Accreditation Program (AOA...The American Osteopathic Association/Healthcare Facilities Accreditation...

  16. 75 FR 12775 - Notice of HUD-Held Multifamily and Healthcare Loan Sale

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-03-17

    ...Notice of HUD-Held Multifamily and Healthcare Loan Sale AGENCY: Office of the Assistant...certain unsubsidized multifamily and healthcare mortgage loans, without Federal Housing...Mortgage Loans) secured by multifamily and healthcare properties located throughout the...

  17. 76 FR 61707 - Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality Agency Information Collection Activities: Proposed...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-10-05

    ...HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality Agency Information...Comment Request AGENCY: Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality, HHS. ACTION...announces the intention of the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (AHRQ) to...

  18. 78 FR 25184 - Federal Housing Administration (FHA): Section 232 Healthcare Facility Insurance Program...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-04-30

    ...Administration (FHA): Section 232 Healthcare Facility Insurance Program--Strengthening...regulations governing the insurance of healthcare facilities under section 232 of the...Residential Care Facilities, Office of Healthcare Programs, Office of Housing,...

  19. 78 FR 17677 - Medicare and Medicaid Programs: Application From the American Osteopathic Association/Healthcare...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-03-22

    ...the American Osteopathic Association/Healthcare Facilities Accreditation Program for...the American Osteopathic Association/ Healthcare Facilities Accreditation Program (AOA...The American Osteopathic Association/Healthcare Facilities Accreditation Program...

  20. 77 FR 72920 - Federal Housing Administration (FHA) Section 232 Healthcare Mortgage Insurance Program: Partial...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-12-07

    ...Housing Administration (FHA) Section 232 Healthcare Mortgage Insurance Program: Partial...regulations governing FHA's Section 232 Healthcare Mortgage Insurance program (Section...payment of claim also allows FHA- insured healthcare projects to continue operating and...