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1

Child Care Teachers' Strategies in Children's Socialization of Emotion  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

An observational study was conducted to examine teachers' emotional socialization strategies in three child care centers. Qualitative analysis of the data suggests that teachers in child care centers respond to children's emotional expressions with various strategies. Teachers clearly expressed a preference for positive emotion through verbal…

Ahn, Hey Jun

2005-01-01

2

Parental pregnancy wantedness and child social-emotional development.  

PubMed

To examine how maternal and paternal pregnancy wantedness and couple concordance regarding pregnancy wantedness predict children's social-emotional development in kindergarten. We used data from nationally representative US sample from the Early Childhood Longitudinal Study Birth Cohort. Exposures of interest were maternal and paternal pregnancy wantedness, and couple concordance regarding pregnancy wantedness. Children's social-emotional development was evaluated by the child's kindergarten teacher using an adapted version of the Preschool and Kindergarten Behavior Scales. We examined bivariate associations between pregnancy wantedness and key socio-demographic variables in relation to children's social-emotional development. Multiple linear regression was used to assess the relationship between each pregnancy wantedness predictor and children's social-emotional development scores. Items related to child concentration and attention appeared to be the components driving almost all the associations with social-emotional development. Maternal report of unwanted pregnancy, resident father's report of mistimed pregnancy, and discordance of parental pregnancy wantedness (specifically when the mother wanted but the father did not want the pregnancy) predicted lower children's social-emotional development scores. Results suggest that maternal unwanted pregnancy and couple discordance in pregnancy wantedness were associated with poorer social-emotional development, especially in the area of concentration and attention, in kindergarten. PMID:23793490

Saleem, Haneefa T; Surkan, Pamela J

2014-05-01

3

Mothers' Socialization Goals, Mothers' Emotion Socialization Behaviors, Child Emotion Regulation, and Child Socioemotional Functioning in Urban India  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Studies examining the link between parental socialization and child functioning in varying cultural contexts are scarce. Focusing on early adolescents in suburban middle-class families in India, the present study examined interrelations among reports of mothers' socialization goals, socialization behaviors in response to child emotion, child

Raval, Vaishali V.; Raval, Pratiksha H.; Deo, Neeraj

2014-01-01

4

Parents' Emotion Expression as a Predictor of Child's Social Competence: Children with or without Intellectual Disability  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Background: Parents' expression of positive emotion towards children who are typically developing (TD) is generally associated with better social development. However, the association between parents' negative emotion expression and social development can be positive or negative depending upon a number of factors, including the child's emotion

Green, S.; Baker, B.

2011-01-01

5

Child Care Teachers' Beliefs and Practices regarding Socialization of Emotion in Young Children  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This study examines teachers' beliefs and their practices of emotional socialization in three child care centers. Interviews with teachers revealed that teachers shared some, but not all, of their beliefs with regard to their role in children's emotional development and views of their own socialization practices. The findings from classroom…

Ahn, Hey Jun

2005-01-01

6

Emotion regulation in relation to social functioning: An investigation of child self-reports  

Microsoft Academic Search

Relations between child self-reports of specific aspects of emotion regulation and specific aspects of social functioning in school were studied in two samples (N = 129\\/135) of 8- to 9-year-old children. The newly developed child self-report measure had significant relations to parent (Sample 1) and teacher (Sample 2) ratings of emotion regulation. In line with expectations (Rydell, Berlin, & Bohlin, 2003), poor

Ann-Margret Rydell; Lisa B. Thorell; Gunilla Bohlin

2007-01-01

7

Parental Interpersonal Sensitivity and Youth Social Problems: A Mediational Role for Child Emotion Dysregulation  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

We examined the relations between parental interpersonal sensitivity and youth social problems and explored the mediational role of child emotion dysregulation. Mothers (N = 42; M age = 39.38) and fathers (N = 41; M age = 39.38) of youth aged 7-12 (N = 42; M age = 9.12) completed measures of their own interpersonal sensitivity and reported on…

Suveg, Cynthia; Jacob, Marni L.; Payne, Mary

2010-01-01

8

Maternal Socialization and Child Temperament as Predictors of Emotion Regulation in Turkish Preschoolers  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This study investigated the role of maternal socialization and temperament in Turkish preschool children's emotion regulation. Participants consisted of 145 preschoolers (79 boys, 69 girls; M[subscript age]= 62 months), their mothers, and daycare teachers from middle-high socioeconomic suburbs of Istanbul. Maternal child-rearing practices and…

Yagmurlu, Bilge; Altan, Ozge

2010-01-01

9

Parents' emotional and social experiences of caring for a child through cleft treatment.  

PubMed

Little is known about the experiences of parents caring for a child through long-term treatment for cleft lip and/or cleft palate. We conducted in-depth interviews with 35 parents with children between the ages of 20 weeks and 21 years to explore experiences across the treatment program. We analyzed the data using a constructivist grounded theory approach and present in detail in this article one subcategory from the analysis: managing emotions. Throughout childhood and adolescence, parents experienced conflicting emotions about their child's impairment, uncertainty about cleft treatment, and stigmatizing attitudes. Although parents attempted to manage emotional tensions by pursuing cleft treatments, the interventions could themselves be a source of conflict for them. We suggest that routine assessment of parents' emotional and social well-being should be included in cleft treatment programs, and access to psychosocial support made available. PMID:21890716

Nelson, Pauline A; Kirk, Susan A; Caress, Ann-Louise; Glenny, Anne-Marie

2012-03-01

10

Peer Contagion in Child and Adolescent Social and Emotional Development  

PubMed Central

In this article, we examine the construct of peer contagion in childhood and adolescence and review studies of child and adolescent development that have identified peer contagion influences. Evidence suggests that children's interactions with peers are tied to increases in aggression in early and middle childhood and amplification of problem behaviors such as drug use, delinquency, and violence in early to late adolescence. Deviancy training is one mechanism that accounts for peer contagion effects on problem behaviors from age 5 through adolescence. In addition, we discuss peer contagion relevant to depression in adolescence, and corumination as an interactive process that may account for these effects. Social network analyses suggest that peer contagion underlies the influence of friendship on obesity, unhealthy body images, and expectations. Literature is reviewed that suggests how peer contagion effects can undermine the goals of public education from elementary school through college and impair the goals of juvenile corrections systems. In particular, programs that “select” adolescents at risk for aggregated preventive interventions are particularly vulnerable to peer contagion effects. It appears that a history of peer rejection is a vulnerability factor for influence by peers, and adult monitoring, supervision, positive parenting, structure, and self-regulation serve as protective factors.

Dishion, Thomas J.; Tipsord, Jessica M.

2012-01-01

11

A Caregiver-Child Social/Emotional and Relationship Rating Scale (CCSERRS)1  

PubMed Central

This paper reports the construction and pilot reliability, validity, and psychometric properties of a new caregiver-child rating scale that emphasizes caregiver-child social-emotional interactions and relationships. While the scale was developed and studied in the context of orphanages for young children, it potentially could be used in non-residential early care and education settings as well as for parent-child interactions in the home. The intent was to assess a few dimensions that comprehensively cover the range of caregiver-child social-emotional interactions and relationships but could be administered in a relatively short period of time in a variety of situations and would not require extensive coder training, manuals, or materials. Results showed that the scale can be reliably administered even using observation periods as short as five minutes, reliability was replicated over seven different coders working in three different orphanages, and ratings of caregivers were similar across different types of caregiving activities (i.e., feeding, dressing/bathing, free play) and for caregivers attending to children birth to 4 and 4 to 8 yrs. of age. In the orphanage context, factor analyses showed the scale primarily reflects caregiver-child mutual engagement and relationship with subordinate components of caregiver punitiveness and caregiver- vs. child-directed behaviors and intrusiveness.

McCall, Robert B.; Groark, Christina J.; Fish, Larry

2010-01-01

12

Using a Self-as-Model Video Combined With Social Stories™ to Help a Child With Asperger Syndrome Understand Emotions  

Microsoft Academic Search

Using an AB design With generalization, this study sought to determine the effectiveness of presenting videotaped emotions and Social Stories™ to teach a 9-year-old child With Asperger syndrome to recognize and understand emotions in himself and to generalize them to other situations in his home. Data collected in the child's home shoWed an improvement betWeen baseline and intervention in the

Susana Bernad-Ripoll

2007-01-01

13

Social, Emotional, and Academic Competence among Children Who Have Had Contact with Child Protective Services: Prevalence and Stability Estimates  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Objective: To estimate the prevalence and stability of social, emotional, and academic competence in a nationally representative sample of children involved with child protective services. Method: Children were assessed as part of the National Survey of Child and Adolescent Well-Being. Children (N = 2,065) ranged in age from 8 to 16 years and were…

Jaffee, Sara R.; Gallop, Robert

2007-01-01

14

Parental Socialization of Emotion  

PubMed Central

Recently, there has been a resurgence of research on emotion, including the socialization of emotion. In this article, a heuristic model of factors contributing to the socialization of emotion is presented. Then literature relevant to the socialization of children’s emotion and emotion-related behavior by parents is reviewed, including (a) parental reactions to children’s emotions, (b) socializers’ discussion of emotion, and (c) socializers’ expression of emotion. The relevant literature is not conclusive and most of the research is correlational. However, the existing body of data provides initial support for the view that parental socialization practices have effects on children’s emotional and social competence and that the socialization process is bidirectional. In particular, parental negative emotionality and negative reactions to children’s expression of emotion are associated with children’s negative emotionality and low social competence. In addition, possible moderators of effects such as level of emotional arousal are discussed.

Cumberland, Amanda; Spinrad, Tracy L.

2006-01-01

15

Optimal Developmental Outcomes for the Child Aged Six to Twelve: Social, Moral, Cognitive, and Emotional Dimensions.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Discusses Montessori theories for development of social, moral, cognitive, and emotional dimensions of the human personality during the second plane of development--age six to puberty--as these theories relate to the theory of optimal experience. (JPB)

Baker, Kay

2001-01-01

16

Child Refugees, Trauma and Education: Interactionist Considerations on Social and Emotional Needs and Development  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This paper focuses on the social and emotional needs of children and young people who are refugees. It was inspired by casework undertaken by the author involving a 13-year-old boy who was a refugee from Montenegro. A vignette of the case is presented in addition to a review of relevant literature to illustrate and discuss the various sources of…

Hart, Robert

2009-01-01

17

The Informative Value of Emotional Expressions: "Social Referencing" in Mother-Child Pretense  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Mothers begin to pretend with their children during the second year, when children still have much to learn about the real world. Although it would be easy to confuse what is pretend with what is real, children at this young age often demonstrate comprehension during pretense situations. It is plausible that social referencing, in which the child

Nishida, Tracy K.; Lillard, Angeline S.

2007-01-01

18

Teachers' Discussions of Emotion in Child Care Centers  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Teachers have the opportunity to discuss the emotions of children as they occur in the context of the classroom. As such, teachers play an important role in the socialization of emotions of young children. This observational study examines teachers' discussions of emotions in three child care centers. The findings suggest that child care centers…

Ahn, Hey Jun

2005-01-01

19

Mother-Child Affect and Emotion Socialization Processes across the Late Preschool Period: Predictions of Emerging Behaviour Problems  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The current study examined concurrent and longitudinal relations between maternal negative affective behaviour and child negative emotional expression in preschool age children with (n=96) or without (n=126) an early developmental risk, as well as the predictions of later behaviour problems. Maternal negative affective behaviour, child

Newland, Rebecca P.; Crnic, Keith A.

2011-01-01

20

Maternal Emotion Socialization in Maltreating and Non-Maltreating Families: Implications for Children's Emotion Regulation  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This study investigated the socialization of children's emotion regulation in physically maltreating and non-maltreating mother-child dyads (N = 80 dyads). Mother-child dyads participated in the parent-child emotion interaction task (Shipman & Zeman, 1999) in which they talked about emotionally-arousing situations. The PCEIT was coded for maternal…

Shipman, Kimberly L.; Schneider, Renee; Fitzgerald, Monica M.; Sims, Chandler; Swisher, Lisa; Edwards, Anna

2007-01-01

21

Child Care Teachers' Response to Children's Emotional Expression  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This observational study examined practices through which child care teachers socialize children's emotion. A specific aim was to describe strategies of teacher intervention in response to emotion displayed by children in child care centers, and to answer the question of differential interactions based on children's age and gender. The results of…

Ahn, Hey Jun; Stifter, Cynthia

2006-01-01

22

Social-Emotional Development, School Readiness, Teacher-Child Interactions, and Classroom Environment  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This article investigates the effectiveness of a statewide 6-month early childhood mental health consultation (ECMHC) model on teachers' emotional support of children and classroom organization. We provide a brief historical and theoretical background of the field of ECMHC, present the logic model for our ECMHC intervention, and discuss the…

Heller, Sherryl Scott; Rice, Janet; Boothe, Allison; Sidell, Margo; Vaughn, Krystal; Keyes, Angela; Nagle, Geoffrey

2012-01-01

23

Socialization of emotion: Pathway to preschoolers' emotional and social competence  

Microsoft Academic Search

Aspects of 47 preschoolers'emotional competence—their patterns of emotional expressiveness and reactions to others' emotion displays—were observed in two settings, with mother and with peers, and their general social competence was rated by their preschool teachers. Intrapersonal and interpersonal (i.e., socialization correlates of children's emotional competence were identified, and a causal model incorporating direct and indirect influences on social competence was

Susanne A. Denham; Leslie Grout

1993-01-01

24

Emotional mimicry as social regulation.  

PubMed

Emotional mimicry is the imitation of the emotional expressions of others. According to the classic view on emotional mimicry (the Matched Motor Hypothesis), people mimic the specific facial movements that comprise a discrete emotional expression. However, little evidence exists for the mimicry of discrete emotions; rather, the extant evidence supports only valence-based mimicry. We propose an alternative Emotion Mimicry in Context view according to which emotional mimicry is not based on mere perception but rather on the interpretation of signals as emotional intentions in a specific context. We present evidence for the idea that people mimic contextualized emotions rather than simply expressive muscle movements. Our model postulates that (implicit or explicit) contextual information is needed for emotional mimicry to take place. It takes into account the relationship between observer and expresser, and suggests that emotional mimicry depends on this relationship and functions as a social regulator. PMID:23348982

Hess, Ursula; Fischer, Agneta

2013-05-01

25

Toddlers' Social-Emotional Competence in the Contexts of Maternal Emotion Socialization and Contingent Responsiveness in a Low-Income Sample  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Early social-emotional development occurs in the context of parenting, particularly via processes such as maternal emotion socialization and parent-child interactions. Results from structural equation modeling indicated that maternal contingent responsiveness partially mediated the relationship between maternal emotion socialization of toddlers (N…

Brophy-Herb, Holly E.; Schiffman, Rachel F.; Bocknek, Erika London; Dupuis, Sara B.; Fitzgerald, Hiram E.; Horodynski, Mildred; Onaga, Esther; Van Egeren, Laurie A.; Hillaker, Barbara

2011-01-01

26

Parenting styles, parental response to child emotion, and family emotional responsiveness are related to child emotional eating.  

PubMed

The aim of the present study was to examine the relations of parenting style, parent response to negative child emotion, and family emotional expressiveness and support to child emotional eating. Mothers (N=450) completed questionnaires and their 6-8-year-old children (N=450) were interviewed. Results showed that emotional eating was negatively predicted by authoritative parenting style and family open expression of affection and emotion, and positively predicted by parent minimizing response to child negative emotion. Results suggest the need for early prevention/intervention efforts directed to these parenting and family variables. PMID:21232566

Topham, Glade L; Hubbs-Tait, Laura; Rutledge, Julie M; Page, Melanie C; Kennedy, Tay S; Shriver, Lenka H; Harrist, Amanda W

2011-04-01

27

Preschool Children's Views on Emotion Regulation: Functional Associations and Implications for Social-Emotional Adjustment  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Previous studies show that preschool children view negative emotions as susceptible to intentional control. However, the extent of this understanding and links with child social-emotional adjustment are poorly understood. To examine this, 62 3- and 4-year-olds were presented with puppet scenarios in which characters experienced anger, sadness, and…

Dennis, Tracy A.; Kelemen, Deborah A.

2009-01-01

28

The effect of toddler emotion regulation on maternal emotion socialization: Moderation by toddler gender.  

PubMed

Although developmental research continues to connect parenting behaviors with child outcomes, it is critical to examine how child behaviors influence parenting behaviors. Given the emotional, cognitive, and social costs of maladaptive parenting, it is vital to understand the factors that influence maternal socialization behaviors. The current study examined children's observed emotion regulatory behaviors in two contexts (low-threat and high-threat novelty) as one influence. Mother-child dyads (n = 106) with toddlers of 24 months of age participated in novelty episodes from which toddler emotion regulation behaviors (i.e., caregiver-focused, attention, and self-soothing) were coded, and mothers reported their use of emotion socialization strategies when children were 24 and 36 months. We hypothesized that gender-specific predictive relations would occur, particularly from regulatory behaviors in the low-threat contexts. Gender moderated the relation between caregiver-focused emotion regulation in low-threat contexts and nonsupportive emotion socialization. Results from the current study inform the literature on the salience of child-elicited effects on the parent-child relationship. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2014 APA, all rights reserved). PMID:24821395

Premo, Julie E; Kiel, Elizabeth J

2014-08-01

29

Cumulative Risk, Negative Emotionality, and Emotion Regulation as Predictors of Social Competence in Transition to School: A Mediated Moderation Model  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The goals of this study were to examine the additive and interactive effects of cumulative risk and child negative emotionality on children's social competence in the transition from preschool to school and to test whether these associations were mediated by child emotion regulation within a sample of 310 low-income, ethnically diverse boys.…

Chang, Hyein; Shelleby, Elizabeth C.; Cheong, JeeWon; Shaw, Daniel S.

2012-01-01

30

Social-Emotional Problems in Preschool-Aged Children  

PubMed Central

Objectives To estimate the prevalence of positive screens for social-emotional problems among preschool-aged children in a low-income clinical population and to explore the family context and receptivity to referrals to help guide development of interventions. Design Observational, cross-sectional study. Setting Two urban primary care clinics. Participants A total of 254 parents of 3- and 4-year-old children at 2 urban primary care clinics. Main Outcome Measures Score on a standardized screen for social-emotional problems (Ages and Stages Questionnaire: Social-Emotional) and answers to additional survey questions about child care arrangements, parental depressive symptoms, and attitudes toward preschool and behavioral health referrals. Results Twenty-four percent (95% CI, 16.5%-31.5%) of children screened positive for social-emotional problems. Among those screening positive, 45% had a parent with depressive symptoms, and 27% had no nonparental child care. Among parents of children who screened positive for social-emotional problems, 79% reported they would welcome or would not mind a referral to a counselor or psychologist; only 16% reported a prior referral. Conclusions In a clinical sample, 1 in 4 low-income preschool-aged children screened positive for social-emotional problems, and most parents were amenable to referrals to preschool or early childhood mental health. This represents an opportunity for improvement in primary prevention and early intervention for social-emotional problems.

Brown, Courtney M.; Copeland, Kristen A.; Sucharew, Heidi; Kahn, Robert S.

2013-01-01

31

Task Groups in the School Setting: Promoting Children's Social and Emotional Learning  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Through social and emotional learning (SEL), individuals develop skill in negotiating relationships successfully and expressing emotions appropriately. The socially and emotionally intelligent child reaps benefits in school and later life. Counselors are best qualified to promote children's SEL and the task group in the classroom provides an…

Van Velsor, Patricia

2009-01-01

32

The Relation between Emotion Production Behavior and Preschool Social Behavior: In the Eye of the Beholder.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Examined relations between preschoolers' emotion production and classroom social behavior. Also examined influence of familiarity with a child on the perception of emotion expressions and on those relations between emotion expression and social behavior. Found that children who were more negative and dependent had angry production biases and were…

Barth, Joan M.; Archibald, Andrea

2003-01-01

33

A Feeling for Books: Using Literature to Promote Social-Emotional Development  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Social-emotional development is a fundamental part of a child's overall well-being. Healthy development forms a critical foundation for building positive relationships and a strong self-esteem. Social-emotional development includes the ability to express and manage emotions and to establish secure relationships. All children have a natural desire…

Tunks, Karen W.; Gilles, Rebecca M.

2013-01-01

34

Parenting and the Child's World: Influences on Academic, Intellectual, and Social-Emotional Development. Monographs in Parenting.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Conceived around the notion that there are multiple sources of influence on children's development, this volume describes when, where, and how parenting matters and the major antecedents and moderators of effective parenting. The chapters of the volume are as follows: (1) "Beyond the Nurture Assumption: Testing Hypotheses about the Child's…

Borkowski, John G.; Ramey, Sharon Landesman; Bristol-Power, Marie

35

Child Protective Service Workers' Ratings of Likely Emotional Trauma to Child Sexual Abuse Victims  

Microsoft Academic Search

One hundred fifty-four child welfare workers were asked to rate the likely emotional trauma to victims of child sexual abuse. Each caseworker rated twelve scenarios in which the child victim was sexually assaulted by another child. Ratings were made on a scale of 1 (low risk of emotional trauma) to 10 (high risk of emotional trauma). The research literature suggests

Diana J. English

1989-01-01

36

Expressed emotion and social function  

Microsoft Academic Search

We examined whether expressed emotion (EE) influenced the social functioning of schizophrenia. Twenty-nine subjects meeting the diagnostic criteria of ICD-9 or DSM-III-R participated in the study. The Camberwell Family Interview was conducted to evaluate EE, and subjects were divided into high EE and low EE groups. The subjects had been followed up for 9 months and their social functioning was

Shimpei Inoue; Shuichi Tanaka; Shinji Shimodera; Yoshio Mino

1997-01-01

37

Zen, Emotion, and Social Engagement  

Microsoft Academic Search

Some common conceptions of Buddhist meditative practice emphasize the elimi- nation of emotion and desire in the interest of attaining tranquility and spiritual per- fection. But to place too strong an emphasis on this is to miss an important social element emphasized by major figures in the Mahayana and Chan-Zen Buddhist tra- ditions who are sharply critical of these quietistic

Robert Feleppa

2009-01-01

38

Emotion Discourse, Social Cognition, and Social Skills in Children with and without Developmental Delays  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This study examined parent-child emotion discourse, children's independent social information processing, and social skills outcomes in 146 families of 8-year-olds with and without developmental delays. Children's emergent social-cognitive understanding (internal state understanding, perspective taking, and causal reasoning and problem solving)…

Fenning, Rachel M.; Baker, Bruce L.; Juvonen, Jaana

2011-01-01

39

Social-Emotional Development  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Interactions between reactive and regulatory dimensions of temperament may be particularly relevant to children's adjustment but are examined infrequently. This study investigated these interactions by examining effortful control as a moderator of the relations of fear and frustration reactivity to children's social competence, internalizing, and…

Moran, Lyndsey R.; Lengua, Liliana J.; Zalewski, Maureen

2013-01-01

40

Social Structure and Child Poverty  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Child poverty, as a critical indicator of the QOL, is intricately related to the social structure of the community. This hypothesis is explored for the 159 counties of Georgia for the year 2000. The influence of demographic, economic, family and health factors upon child poverty are explored through models of total, black and white child poverty.…

Ferriss, Abbott L.

2006-01-01

41

Pregnant and Parenting Adolescents: A Study of Ethnic Identity, Emotional and Behavioral Functioning, Child Characteristics, and Social Support  

Microsoft Academic Search

This study examined relationships among the ethnic identity, behavior problems, self-esteem, and social support of 166 ethnically\\u000a diverse pregnant and parenting adolescents, the majority of whom were African American and Hispanic American, and their infants.\\u000a Results indicated that pregnant and parenting adolescent females were experiencing nonclinical levels of behavior problems\\u000a on average and did not differ in their ratings of

Karin Sieger; Kimberly Renk

2007-01-01

42

Expressed emotion and social function.  

PubMed

We examined whether expressed emotion (EE) influenced the social functioning of schizophrenia. Twenty-nine subjects meeting the diagnostic criteria of ICD-9 or DSM-III-R participated in the study. The Camberwell Family Interview was conducted to evaluate EE, and subjects were divided into high EE and low EE groups. The subjects had been followed up for 9 months and their social functioning was compared between the two groups as assessed with the Katz Adjustment Scales. In the high EE group, levels of both performance of socially-expected activities and free-time activities slightly declined at follow-up. In contrast, those in the low EE group improved and the score increase in the level of performance of socially-expected activities was significant (P < 0.05). We confirmed the relationship of families' EE status with social functioning in schizophrenia. PMID:9355817

Inoue, S; Tanaka, S; Shimodera, S; Mino, Y

1997-08-29

43

African American and European American Mothers' Beliefs about Negative Emotions and Emotion Socialization Practices  

PubMed Central

SYNOPSIS Objective Mothers’ beliefs about their children’s negative emotions and their emotion socialization practices were examined. Design Sixty-five African American and 137 European American mothers of 5-year-old children reported their beliefs and typical responses to children’s negative emotions, and mothers’ emotion teaching practices were observed. Results African American mothers reported that the display of negative emotions was less acceptable than European American mothers, and African American mothers of boys perceived the most negative social consequences for the display of negative emotions. African American mothers reported fewer supportive responses to children’s negative emotions than European Americans and more nonsupportive responses to children’s anger. African American mothers of boys also reported more nonsupportive responses to submissive negative emotions than African American mothers of girls. However, no differences were found by ethnicity or child gender in observed teaching about emotions. Group differences in mothers’ responses to negative emotions were explained, in part, by mothers’ beliefs about emotions. Conclusions Differences in beliefs and practices may reflect African American mothers’ efforts to protect their children from discrimination.

Nelson, Jackie A.; Leerkes, Esther M.; O'Brien, Marion; Calkins, Susan D.; Marcovitch, Stuart

2012-01-01

44

Preschool Emotional Competence: Pathway to Social Competence?  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Assessed preschoolers' patterns of emotional expressiveness, emotion regulation, and emotion knowledge. Used latent variable modeling to identify their contributions to social competence, evidenced by sociometric liability and teacher ratings. Found that emotional competence assessed at 3 to 4 years of age contributed to both concurrent and…

Denham, Susanne A.; Blair, Kimberly A.; DeMulder, Elizabeth; Levitas, Jennifer; Sawyer, Katherine; Auerbach-Major, Sharon

2003-01-01

45

Child Emotional Aggression and Abuse: Definitions and Prevalence  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Objective: Research on and intervention for child emotional abuse and emotional aggression toward children have been severely hampered because there have been no agreed-upon, clinically usable definitions. Methods: We have (a) proposed and field-tested a set of criteria to operationally define child emotional abuse for clinical settings and (b)…

Slep, Amy M. Smith; Heyman, Richard E.; Snarr, Jeffery D.

2011-01-01

46

Mother-Child Conversations about Emotions: Linkages to Child Aggression and Prosocial Behavior  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

We examined associations of maternal and child emotional discourse and child emotion knowledge with children's behavioral competence. Eighty-five upper middle-income, mostly White preschoolers and mothers completed a home-based bookreading task to assess discourse about emotions. Children's anger perception bias and emotion situation knowledge…

Garner, Pamela W.; Dunsmore, Julie C.; Southam-Gerrow, Michael

2008-01-01

47

Social policy and child health.  

PubMed

Under the rubric of social policy and child mental health are two overlapping but conceptually different areas. The first set is the social policy questions with direct relevance to child mental health programs per se; that is, decisions about whether a given child mental health proposal merits the investment of community resources. The second category of social forces is that which has important secondary consequences for child mental health although child mental health per se may never enter the discussion; for example, policy decisions which have a major impact on family life (women's rights, tax policy, divorce law, employment policy, etc.). This paper will review the first category, the overt policy issues, before moving on to the second category, the "convert" child health debate. PMID:7919614

Eisenberg, L

1994-03-01

48

Family and Child Influences on Early Academic and Emotion Regulatory Behaviors  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Research on child and family factors in early childhood has shown that both are associated with social and instrumental functioning at school entry. The present study sought to examine the direct and indirect effects of child negative emotionality, maternal education, depression, IQ, and quality of maternal instruction on children's academic and…

Supplee, Lauren H.; Shaw, Daniel S.; Hailstones, Karen; Hartman, Kerri

2004-01-01

49

Social Capital and Child Welfare.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Examines social and economic inequalities in the United Kingdom. Demonstrates how children's welfare and family functioning are crucially dependent upon locally available social support. Argues that building social capital in poor communities is more effective in promoting children's welfare than is present emphasis on formal child-protection and…

Jack, Gordon; Jordan, Bill

1999-01-01

50

The Nature of Teacher-Child Interactions in Emotion Discourse  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Emotions find their meanings within human relationships that permit emotions to be experienced, expressed, and explored. Social and emotional competence, marked by an understanding, expression, and control of emotion, is one of the hallmarks of emotional discourse--demonstrated in the very nature of interactive communication as individuals relate…

Thomas, Dawn V.

2010-01-01

51

Grief as a social emotion: theoretical perspectives.  

PubMed

The article explores a sociological perspective on grief as a social emotion. Focusing on the social bond with the deceased, the self-concept of the survivor or the power of feeling rules, general sociological theories of emotions (symbolic interactionism, structural theory, behavioral theory) have the potential to deepen the understanding of grief as a social emotion. The article concludes by presenting a cognitive-structural model of grief that integrates the different theoretical elements. PMID:24563936

Jakoby, Nina R

2012-09-01

52

Toward the ABCs: Building a Healthy Social and Emotional Foundation for Learning and Living.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Noting that most individuals working with young children and their families lack the knowledge and skills to identify early warning signs of significant child distress and that most communities lack resources and expertise to address early social and emotional concerns, this report discusses the importance of healthy social and emotional

Casas, Paula

53

Infants' Social-Emotional Adjustment within a Childcare Context of Korea  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

In a child day-care setting, the naturally occurring social-emotional behaviours and play interaction of 51 infants were observed and recorded. Individual differences in gender, age, temperament, and maternal parenting behaviours were examined to understand how these variables might be related to social-emotional adjustment of infants. The…

Kim, Min-Hee; Moon, Hyukjun

2011-01-01

54

Strong Start--Grades K-2: A Social and Emotional Learning Curriculum  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Social-emotional competence--it is a critical part of every child's school success, and just like any academic subject, children need instruction in it. Developed by a top expert, these proven curricula will help promote the social-emotional competence and resilience of children and adolescents. Divided into four age levels from kindergarten…

Merrell, Kenneth W.; Parisi, Danielle M.; Whitcomb, Sara A.

2007-01-01

55

Dreams, emotions, and social sharing of dreams  

Microsoft Academic Search

Current life emotional experiences have been demonstrated to elicit a process called social sharing of emotion, consisting of repetitive talking about these experiences in conversations with relevant others. Like many diurnal experiences, dreams are generally loaded with emotional elements, and empirical evidence has suggested that individuals share their dreams with others mainly belonging to the circle of intimates. The present

Antonietta Curci; Bernard Rimé

2008-01-01

56

Grief as a Social Emotion: Theoretical Perspectives  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The article explores a sociological perspective on grief as a social emotion. Focusing on the social bond with the deceased, the self-concept of the survivor or the power of feeling rules, general sociological theories of emotions (symbolic interactionism, structural theory, behavioral theory) have the potential to deepen the understanding of…

Jakoby, Nina R.

2012-01-01

57

Distinguishing between Poor/Dysfunctional Parenting and Child Emotional Maltreatment  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Objective: This paper was intended to distinguish between poor parenting and child emotional maltreatment (CEM), to inform child welfare and public health policymakers of the need for differentiated responses. Methods: Scientific literature was integrated with current practice and assumptions relating to poor/dysfunctional parenting and child

Wolfe, David A.; McIsaac, Caroline

2011-01-01

58

Mothers' Acculturation and Beliefs about Emotions, Mother-Child Emotion Discourse, and Children's Emotion Understanding in Latino Families  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Research Findings: We examined associations among Anglo acculturation, Latino enculturation, maternal beliefs, mother-child emotion talk, and emotion understanding in 40 Latino preschool-age children and their mothers. Mothers self-reported Anglo acculturation, Latino enculturation, and beliefs about the value/danger of children's emotions and…

Perez Rivera, Marie Belle; Dunsmore, Julie C.

2011-01-01

59

The Role of Emotion in Parent-Child Relationships: Children's Emotionality, Maternal Meta-Emotion, and Children's Attachment Security  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This study was intended to examine the relationship among children's emotionality, parental meta-emotion, and parent-child attachment. The sample consisted of 546 5th and 6th grade children and their mothers. The test instruments used in this study were the Emotionality subscale of the EAS Temperament Survey (mothers' ratings only), the Parental…

Chen, Fu Mei; Lin, Hsiao Shih; Li, Chun Hao

2012-01-01

60

Evaluation of an early detection tool for social-emotional and behavioral problems in toddlers: The Brief Infant Toddler Social and Emotional Assessment - A cluster randomized trial  

PubMed Central

Background The prevalence of social-emotional and behavioral problems is estimated to be 8 to 9% among preschool children. Effective early detection tools are needed to promote the provision of adequate care at an early stage. The Brief Infant-Toddler Social and Emotional Assessment (BITSEA) was developed for this purpose. This study evaluates the effectiveness of the BITSEA to enhance social-emotional and behavioral health of preschool children. Methods and Design A cluster randomized controlled trial is set up in youth health care centers in the larger Rotterdam area in the Netherlands, to evaluate the BITSEA. The 31 youth health care centers are randomly allocated to either the control group or the intervention group. The intervention group uses the scores on the BITSEA and cut-off points to evaluate a child's social-emotional and behavioral health and to decide whether or not the child should be referred. The control group provides care as usual, which involves administering a questionnaire that structures the conversation between child health professionals and parents. At a one year follow-up measurement the social-emotional and behavioral health of all children included in the study population will be evaluated. Discussion It is hypothesized that better results will be found, in terms of social-emotional and behavioral health in the intervention group, compared to the control group, due to more adequate early detection, referral and more appropriate and timely care. Trial registration Current Controlled Trials NTR2035

2011-01-01

61

Differentiating Emotional Disturbance from Social Maladjustment: Assessing Psychopathy in Aggressive Youth  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (1997) requires identification of emotional disturbance by special education criteria. It also requires that emotional disturbance be distinguished from social maladjustment. In some cases, a thorough evaluation of the child's character pathology can aid in this determination. While methods such as…

Gacono, Carl B.; Hughes, Tammy L.

2004-01-01

62

Child and Adolescent Emotion Regulation: The Role of Parental Emotion Regulation and Expression  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper reviews current literature relating to parent and child emotional functioning, specifically their emotion regulatory\\u000a skills and emotional expression. Included are considerations regarding theoretical, methodological, and sampling strengths\\u000a and weaknesses of existing literature. On the basis of the review, several directions for future research are proposed. First,\\u000a it is argued that consistency in the measurement of emotion regulation is

Emily Bariola; Eleonora Gullone; Elizabeth K. Hughes

2011-01-01

63

Measurement of Emotional/Psychological Child Maltreatment: A Review  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Background: Emotional/psychological child maltreatment (ECM) is a major public health problem with serious consequences including emotional and behavioral problems. Nevertheless, ECM is an understudied area. Objectives: The aims of this review are to identify measures of ECM and to evaluate their psychometric properties and utilities. We provide a…

Tonmyr, Lil; Draca, Jasminka; Crain, Jennifer; MacMillan, Harriet L.

2011-01-01

64

The Restorative Power of Emotions in Child Protection Services  

Microsoft Academic Search

The paper examines the significance of our emotional life for validation, enrichment and guidance in everyday behavior. Child protection services (CPS) workers need to understand how emotions affect family dynamics and, in particular, parental behavior as a basis for their work with families. Moreover, in order for CPS workers to be aware of, and professionally responsive to, the importance of

Beverly Davis

2001-01-01

65

The Interaction of Social and Emotional Processes in the Brain  

Microsoft Academic Search

Social stimuli function as emotional barometers for the immediate environment are the catalysts for many emotional reactions, and have inherent value for relationships and survival independent of their current emotional content. We, therefore, propose that the neural mechanisms underlying social and emotional information processing may be interconnected. In the current study, we examined the independent and interactive effects of social

Catherine J. Norris; E. Elinor Chen; David C. Zhu; Steven L. Small; John T. Cacioppo

2004-01-01

66

Social theory and emotion: sociological excursions  

Microsoft Academic Search

Purpose – Using the distinction between “private problems” and “public issues” derived from Mill's “sociological imagination”, this paper aims to assess how diverse social theory approaches problematise and define the ways in which social life is shaped and organised with regard to “emotions”. Design\\/methodology\\/approach – The paper's approach is theoretical and novel in the interpretation of an under-development theme in

Jason L. Powell; Tony Gilbert

2008-01-01

67

Social Anxiety, Emotional Intelligence, and Interpersonal Adjustment  

Microsoft Academic Search

There has been no published investigation made of the relationship between social anxiety and emotional intelligence (EI), or of their shared impact upon interpersonal adjustment. This study examined these questions using structural equation modeling with self-report data from a large nonclinical sample (N = 2629). EI was found to be highly related to social interaction anxiety, but not performance anxiety.

Laura J. Summerfeldt; Patricia H. Kloosterman; Martin M. Antony; James D. A. Parker

2006-01-01

68

Family Day Care Educators: An Exploration of Their Understanding and Experiences Promoting Children's Social and Emotional Wellbeing  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This study aimed to explore family day care (FDC) educators' knowledge of child social and emotional wellbeing and mental health problems, the strategies used to promote children's wellbeing, and barriers and opportunities for promoting children's social and emotional wellbeing. Thirteen FDC educators participated in individual semi-structured…

Davis, Elise; Priest, Naomi; Davies, Belinda; Smyth, Lisa; Waters, Elizabeth; Herrman, Helen; Sims, Margaret; Harrison, Linda; Cook, Kay; Marshall, Bernie; Williamson, Lara

2012-01-01

69

The Relationship between Social Anxiety and Emotional Expressivity  

Microsoft Academic Search

Social anxiety is a devastating and persistent condition that is characterized by a fear of social interactions (Luterek, 2006). Emotional expressivity is the tendency to express emotions nonverbally, such as through actions, facial expressions, tone of voice, and posture (Barchard & Matsumoto, in prep). Because social anxiety and emotional expressivity are both related to social interactions, there may be a

Stephanie L. Rojas; Jocelyn C. Bartlett; Nathalie K. Thomas; Krystle A. Donnelly; Kimberly A. Barchard

70

Profiling Social, Emotional and Behavioural Difficulties of Children Involved in Direct and Indirect Bullying Behaviours  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Being involved in bullying places a child at risk of poor psychosocial and educational outcomes. This study aimed to examine the profile of behavioural, emotional and social functioning for two subtypes of bullying: direct and indirect (relational). Pupils aged between 7 and 11 years completed sociometric measures of social inclusion and bullying…

Smith, H.; Polenik, K.; Nakasita, S.; Jones, A. P.

2012-01-01

71

Parental Contributions to Preschoolers' Emotional Competence: Direct and Indirect Effects  

Microsoft Academic Search

The present study examines the contributions of (1) parental socialization of emotion and preschoolers' emotional interaction with parents to their emotional competence, and (2) parental socialization and child emotional competence to their general social competence. Both observational and self-report techniques were used to measure emotion socialization, emotional competence, and social competence of preschoolers (average age = 49.8 months) from 60

Susanne A. Denham; Jennifer Mitchell-Copeland; Katherine Strandberg; Sharon Auerbach; Kimberly Blair

1997-01-01

72

Relations among Teachers' Emotion Socialization Beliefs and Practices and Preschoolers' Emotional Competence  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Research Findings: Utilizing a 3-part model of emotion socialization that included modeling, contingent responding, and teaching, this study examined the associations between 44 teachers' self-reported and observed emotion socialization practices and 326 preschoolers' emotion knowledge and observed emotional behavior. Multilevel analyses…

Morris, Carol A. S.; Denham, Susanne A.; Bassett, Hideko H.; Curby, Timothy W.

2013-01-01

73

Social approach and emotion recognition in fragile X syndrome.  

PubMed

Evidence is emerging that individuals with Fragile X syndrome (FXS) display emotion recognition deficits, which may contribute to their significant social difficulties. The current study investigated the emotion recognition abilities, and social approachability judgments, of FXS individuals when processing emotional stimuli. Relative to chronological age- (CA-) and mental age- (MA-) matched controls, the FXS group performed significantly more poorly on the emotion recognition tasks, and displayed a bias towards detecting negative emotions. Moreover, after controlling for emotion recognition deficits, the FXS group displayed significantly reduced ratings of social approachability. These findings suggest that a social anxiety pattern, rather than poor socioemotional processing, may best explain the social avoidance observed in FXS. PMID:24679350

Williams, Tracey A; Porter, Melanie A; Langdon, Robyn

2014-03-01

74

Family Conflict, Emotional Security, and Child Development: Translating Research Findings into a Prevention Program for Community Families  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The social problem posed by family conflict to the physical and psychological health and well-being of children, parents, and underlying family relationships is a cause for concern. Inter-parental and parent-child conflict are linked with children's behavioral, emotional, social, academic, and health problems, with children's risk particularly…

Cummings, E. Mark; Schatz, Julie N.

2012-01-01

75

Emotion Regulation in Context: The Jealousy Complex between Young Siblings and Its Relations with Child and Family Characteristics  

Microsoft Academic Search

Jealousy is a social emotion that has received little attention by developmental researchers. The current study examined sibling jealousy and its relations to child and family characteristics in 60 families with a 16-month- old toddler and an older preschool-age sibling. Sibling jealousy was elicited in social triads consisting of a par- ent (mother or father) and the two siblings. Positive

Brenda L. Volling; Nancy L. McElwain; Alison L. Miller

2002-01-01

76

Early childhood intervention and early adolescent social and emotional competence: second-generation evaluation evidence from the Chicago Longitudinal Study  

Microsoft Academic Search

Background:?To explore whether social or emotional outcomes for high-risk early adolescent youth that attended an established preventive intervention called the Chicago Child–Parent Center Preschool Program (CPC) are moderated by individual, family and program variations.Purpose:?Two questions are addressed: (1) Do the effects of CPC preschool participation on early adolescent social and emotional competency vary by sex of child, family risk status,

Michael D. Niles; Arthur J. Reynolds; Dominique Roe-Sepowitz

2008-01-01

77

Mother and Child Emotions during Mathematics Homework  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Mathematics is often thought of as a purely intellectual and unemotional activity. Recently, researchers have begun to question the validity of this approach, arguing that emotions and cognition are intertwined. The emotions expressed during mathematics work may be linked to mathematics achievement. We used behavioral measures to identify the…

Else-Quest, Nicole M.; Hyde, Janet S.; Hejmadi, Ahalya

2008-01-01

78

Recognizing child's emotional state in problem-solving child-machine interactions  

Microsoft Academic Search

The need for automatic recognition of a speaker's emotion within a spoken dialog system framework has received increased attention with demand for computer interfaces that provide natural and user-adaptive spoken interaction. This paper addresses the problem of automatically recognizing a child's emotional state using information obtained from audio and video signals. The study is based on a multimodal data corpus

Serdar Yildirim; Shrikanth Narayanan

2009-01-01

79

Child Development  

MedlinePLUS

As children grow older, they develop in several different ways. Child development includes physical, intellectual, social, and emotional changes. Children grow and mature at very different rates. It's ...

80

Child temperament, parent emotions, and perceptions of the child's feeding experience  

PubMed Central

Background Associations between parent and child characteristics and how they influence the approach parents take toward children in the feeding environment have not been examined extensively, especially in low-income minority families who are at a higher risk for obesity. The primary aim of the study was to examine positive and negative parent emotions as potential mediators of the relationship between child temperament and parents’ perceptions of strategy effectiveness and problems encountered in feeding children fruit and vegetables. Methods Participants were low-income families (n?=?639, 73% minority, children aged 3–5?years) participating in Head Start programs in two states. Parents completed the Children’s Behavior Questionnaire (CBQ), Positive and Negative Affect Schedule (PANAS), and measures of strategy effectiveness (teachable moments, practical methods, restriction, and enhanced availability) and problems encountered (vegetable characteristics, child attributions for dislike, external influences, and parental demands) in feeding children fruit and vegetables. Results Positive parent emotions partially mediated the relationship between child Effortful Control and strategy effectiveness and fully mediated the relationship between Surgency and strategy effectiveness. Although negative parent emotions were associated with increased perception of problems in feeding children fruit and vegetables, the relationship between Negative Affectivity and problems in feeding was partially mediated by negative parent emotions. Conclusions Positive parent emotions facilitated perceived effectiveness of feeding strategies, with child Effortful Control and Surgency instrumental to this process. Understanding mechanisms in parent–child feeding is important when developing interventions designed to promote healthy child eating behaviors.

2012-01-01

81

Perceived Social Support as a Mediator of the Link Between Intimate Partner Conflict and Child Adjustment  

Microsoft Academic Search

This study examined if mother or child’s perceived social support decreased the emotional and behavioral consequences of intimate\\u000a partner conflict for 148 African American children ages 8–12. Results revealed that children’s perceived social support mediated\\u000a the relation between intimate partner conflict and children’s internalizing and externalizing problems. Findings also indicated\\u000a a mediational role of mother’s perceived social support in the

Ashley E. Owen; Martie P. Thompson; Michelle D. Mitchell; Sigrid Y. Kennebrew; Anuradha Paranjape; Tiffany L. Reddick; Gabrielle L. Hargrove; Nadine J. Kaslow

2008-01-01

82

Maternal Depression and Child Internalizing: The Moderating Role of Child Emotion Regulation  

Microsoft Academic Search

This study tests a model of children's emotion regulation (ER) as a moderator of the link between maternal depression and child internalizing problems. Participants were 78 children (ages 4 to 7), including 45 children of mothers with a history of child- hood-onset depression (COD) and 33 children of mothers who had never been de- pressed. ER was assessed observationally during

Jennifer S. Silk; Daniel S. Shaw; Erika E. Forbes; Maria Kovacs

2006-01-01

83

Experiencing infertility--social work dilemmas in child adoption procedures.  

PubMed

The research deals with experiencing infertility and its consequences in the adoption of a child and focuses on infertile couples that have wished to adopt a child and joined a program preparing them to be foster parents. The results show that most of the infertile couples experience infertility very much as being different from couples with children as well as having to cope with the feelings of deep emotional loss resulting from the inability to reproduce biologically. There is therefore the question whether these facts should be taken into account by the profession (i.e. social workers) when dealing with child adoption as, according to most of the respondents of our survey, the process of coming to terms with infertility and its consequences is an important factor in establishing healthy family relationships and the child's identity within the adoptive family. We concluded from the results of the research that the infertile couples preparation program for adopting a child carried out by the Society of Adoptive Families "Deteljica", is a comprehensive autopoietic social workers' answer to the needs of participants for a successful adoption of a child, as it makes it possible to supply these future adoptive parents with the requisite information and experience and provides support to the entire family upon accepting a child in its midst, while its fundamental attribute is offering help to couples in overcoming the traumas resulting from their infertility. PMID:14746131

Bevc, Viktorija; Jerman, Janja; Ovsenik, Rok; Ovsenik, Marija

2003-12-01

84

Emotional responsivity to others: behavioral correlates and socialization antecedents.  

PubMed

We have proposed that how children deal with emotional arousal in social situations affects the quality of their social interactions. More specifically, we have argued that children who can regulate negative emotions so that they are not overly aroused interact in more adaptive ways. Based on these assumptions, we have started to examine the relations of parental characteristics and practices to children's emotional responding and social behavior. Initial research findings provide partial support for the conclusion that parental encouragement of children's expression of their own sadness, distress, and sympathy, as well as parental practices that teach children ways to deal with negative emotion-eliciting situations and their own negative emotions, are associated with sympathetic emotional responding and with adaptive social behavior. These findings suggest that further examination of the ways in which children learn to manage their emotions in social interactions will serve to augment our understanding of the socialization of social competence. PMID:1608515

Eisenberg, N; Fabes, R A; Carlo, G; Karbon, M

1992-01-01

85

The interaction of social and emotional processes in the brain.  

PubMed

Social stimuli function as emotional barometers for the immediate environment are the catalysts for many emotional reactions, and have inherent value for relationships and survival independent of their current emotional content. We, therefore, propose that the neural mechanisms underlying social and emotional information processing may be interconnected. In the current study, we examined the independent and interactive effects of social and emotional processes on brain activation. Whole-brain images were acquired while participants viewed and categorized affective pictures that varied on two dimensions: emotional content (i. e., neutral, emotional) and social content (i. e., faces/people, objects/scenes). Patterns of activation were consistent with past findings demonstrating that the amygdala and part of the visual cortex were more active to emotionally evocative pictures than to neutral pictures and that the superior temporal sulcus was more active to social than to nonsocial pictures. Furthermore, activation of the superior temporal sulcus and middle occipito-temporal cortex showed evidence of the interactive processing of emotional and social information, whereas activation of the amygdala showed evidence of additive effects. These results indicate that interactive effects occur early in the stream of processing, suggesting that social and emotional information garner greater attentional resources and that the conjunction of social and emotional cues results in synergistic early processing, whereas the amygdala appears to be primarily implicated in processing biologically or personally relevant stimuli, regardless of the nature of the relevance (i. e., social, emotional, or both). PMID:15701231

Norris, Catherine J; Chen, E Elinor; Zhu, David C; Small, Steven L; Cacioppo, John T

2004-12-01

86

Influences of parent and child negative emotionality on young children's everyday behaviors.  

PubMed

Negative emotionality is linked to unfavorable life outcomes, but studies have yet to examine negative emotionality of parents and children as predictors of children's problem behaviors and negative emotion word use in everyday life. This study used a novel naturalistic recording device called the Electronically Activated Recorder to investigate the separate and interactive influences of parent and child negative emotionality on daily child behaviors in a sample of 35 preschool-aged children over two time points separated by 1 year. Fathers' negative emotionality predicted children's whining at Time 1; mothers' negative emotionality predicted children's negative emotion word use at Time 1 and increases in children's arguing/fighting from Time 1 to Time 2. Parents' ratings of child negative emotionality also were associated with increases in children's arguing/fighting from Time 1 to Time 2, and child negative emotionality moderated the association between mothers' negative emotionality and children's arguing/fighting. Further, children with mothers high in negative emotionality displayed higher levels of problem behaviors when their mothers self-reported low levels of positive emotional expressiveness and/or high levels of negative emotional expressiveness. These findings offer preliminary evidence linking parent and child negative emotionality to everyday child behaviors and suggest that emotional expressiveness may play a key role in moderating the links between maternal negative emotionality and child behavioral problems. PMID:22390707

Slatcher, Richard B; Trentacosta, Christopher J

2012-10-01

87

Which Social Emotional Competencies Are Enhanced at a Social Emotional Learning Camp?  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Research studies have shown that educational programmes such as camps and field trips can develop affective and social relationships through personal exposure to outdoor experiences among students. This study will illustrate the outcome of a social emotional learning camp organized for 93 Secondary Two students (mean age 14.1) in Singapore. Both…

Ee, Jessie; Ong, Chew Wei

2014-01-01

88

Relations among Teachers' Emotion Socialization Beliefs and Practices, and Preschoolers' Emotional Competence  

PubMed Central

Research Findings Utilizing a three-part model of emotion socialization that includes Modeling, Contingent Responding, and Teaching, this study examined the associations between 44 teachers’ self-reported and observed emotion socialization practices and 326 preschoolers’ emotion knowledge and observed emotional behavior. Multi-level analyses revealed that the majority of the variance in the children’s emotion knowledge scores and observed emotional behavior was predicted by factors within, rather than between, classrooms. Teachers’ use of all three emotion socialization techniques did contribute to the prediction of the children’s scores; however, the nature of these associations differed by children’s age and gender. Practice or Policy The development of children’s emotional competence is a complex, multi-faceted process in which many interaction partners play a role; early childhood teachers act as emotion socialization agents for the children in their care by modeling emotions, responding either supportively or punitively to children’s expressions of emotions, and engaging in direct instruction regarding emotional experience. This research may provide a basis for potential future interventions designed to assist teachers in developing their own emotion socialization skills so that they can be more effective emotion socialization agents for the children in their care.

Morris, Carol A.S.; Denham, Susanne A.; Bassett, Hideko H.; Curby, Timothy W.

2013-01-01

89

Touchpoints: Your Child's Emotional and Behavioral Development.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This book looks at children's early development through what are called "touchpoints": times just before a surge of rapid motor, cognitive, or emotional development when, for a short time, children regress in several areas and become difficult to understand. Part 1, called "Touchpoints of Development," is organized around the areas of behavioral…

Brazelton, T. Berry

90

Can we develop a neurobiological model of human social-emotional development? Integrative thoughts on the effects of separation on parent-child interactions.  

PubMed

After summarizing the main points raised in articles by Kaslow et al. and Plotsk, a number of questions that derive from these authors' work are listed. Additional questions are then posed, the answers to which will likely facilitate one's ability to translate animal models of child psychopathology into human terms. After summarizing the various advantages and disadvantages to models using mice, rats, and monkeys, several examples of recent research that have attempted to meld animal models with human studies are described. PMID:14998871

Nelson, Charles A

2003-12-01

91

Social worker trauma: Building resilience in child protection social workers  

Microsoft Academic Search

Child protection social workers can experience psychological trauma effects as a result of their work. This article considers the utility of the trauma perspective in understanding and intervening when overwhelming events impact social workers. Psychological trauma theory enhances earlier contributions of the stress and burnout literatures in the effort to increase the efficacy and well?being of child protection staff. Resilience

Mark Horwitz

1998-01-01

92

Associations between child emotional eating and general parenting style, feeding practices, and parent psychopathology.  

PubMed

Emotional eating is the tendency to eat in response to negative emotions. Prior research has identified a relationship between parenting style and child emotional eating, but this has not been examined in clinical samples. Furthermore, the relationship between specific parenting practices (e.g., parent feeding practices) and child emotional eating has not yet been investigated. The current study examined relationships between child emotional eating and both general and specific parenting constructs as well as maternal symptoms of depression and binge eating among a treatment-seeking sample of overweight children. Participants included 106 mother-child dyads who attended a baseline assessment for enrollment in a behavioral intervention for overeating. Ages of children ranged from 8 to 12?years old. Mothers completed self-report measures of their child's emotional eating behavior, their own feeding practices, and symptoms of depression and binge eating. Children completed a self-report measure of their mothers' general parenting style. A stepwise regression analysis was conducted to identify the parent variable that was most strongly related to child emotional eating, controlling for child age and gender. Emotional feeding behavior (i.e., a tendency to offer food to soothe a child's negative emotions) was the parent factor most significantly related to child emotional eating. Findings suggest that emotional feeding practices in parents may be related to emotional eating in children. Treatment with overweight children who engage in emotional eating may be improved by targeting parent feeding practices. PMID:24780349

Braden, Abby; Rhee, Kyung; Peterson, Carol B; Rydell, Sarah A; Zucker, Nancy; Boutelle, Kerri

2014-09-01

93

Exploring the neurological substrate of emotional and social intelligence  

Microsoft Academic Search

Summary The somatic marker hypothesis posits that deficits in emotional signalling (somatic states) lead to poor judg- ment in decision-making, especially in the personal and social realms. Similar to this hypothesis is the concept of emotional intelligence, which has been defined as an array of emotional and social abilities, competencies and skills that enable individuals to cope with daily demands

Reuven Bar-On; Daniel Tranel; Natalie L. Denburg; Antoine Bechara

2003-01-01

94

Social Approach and Emotion Recognition in Fragile X Syndrome  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Evidence is emerging that individuals with Fragile X syndrome (FXS) display emotion recognition deficits, which may contribute to their significant social difficulties. The current study investigated the emotion recognition abilities, and social approachability judgments, of FXS individuals when processing emotional stimuli. Relative to…

Williams, Tracey A.; Porter, Melanie A.; Langdon, Robyn

2014-01-01

95

Sense of humor, emotional intelligence, and social competence  

Microsoft Academic Search

Associations among sense of humor, emotional intelligence (EI), and social competence were examined in 111 undergraduate students using measures of humor styles, trait cheerfulness, social competence, and an ability test of EI. Emotional management ability was positively correlated with self-enhancing humor and trait cheerfulness, and negatively correlated with trait bad mood. Ability to accurately perceive emotions was negatively related to

Jeremy A. Yip; Rod A. Martin

2006-01-01

96

Do Students Experience "Social Intelligence," Laughter, and Other Emotions Online?  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Are online activities devoid of emotion and social intelligence? Graduate students in online and blended programs at Texas Tech University and the University of Memphis were surveyed about how often they laughed, felt other emotions, and expressed social intelligence. Laughter, chuckling, and smiling occurred "sometimes" as did other emotions

Meyer, Katrina A.; Jones, Stephanie J.

2012-01-01

97

Developing Social and Emotional Aspects of Learning: The American Experience  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Developments in American policy, research and professional development to promote social and emotional learning in schools have drawn on work carried out by the Collaborative for Academic, Social, and Emotional Learning (CASEL), encouraged by the popular and political catalyst of Daniel Goleman's work on emotional intelligence. Based on CASEL's…

Elias, Maurice J.; Moceri, Dominic C.

2012-01-01

98

Physiology and Functioning: Parents' Vagal Tone, Emotion Socialization, and Children's Emotion Knowledge  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This study examined relationships among parents' physiological regulation, their emotion socialization behaviors, and their children's emotion knowledge. Parents' resting cardiac vagal tone was measured, and parents provided information regarding their socialization behaviors and family emotional expressiveness. Their 4- or 5-year-old children (N…

Perlman, Susan B.; Camras, Linda A.; Pelphrey, Kevin A.

2008-01-01

99

Treating Conduct Problems and Strengthening Social and Emotional Competence in Young Children: The Dina Dinosaur Treatment Program.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This article describes the Dina Dinosaur Social, Emotional and Problem Solving Child Training Program for young children with conduct problems. The program emphasizes training children in skills such as emotional literacy, empathy or perspective taking, friendship and communication skills, anger management, interpersonal problem solving, and…

Webster-Stratton, Carolyn; Reid, M. Jamila

2003-01-01

100

The contribution of childhood emotional abuse to teen dating violence among child protective services-involved youth  

Microsoft Academic Search

ObjectiveFor child protective services (CPS) youth who may have experienced more than one form of maltreatment, the unique contribution of emotional abuse may be over-looked when other forms are more salient and more clearly outside of accepted social norms for parenting. This study considers the unique predictive value of childhood emotional abuse for understanding adolescent post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) symptomatology

Christine Wekerle; Eman Leung; Anne-Marie Wall; Harriet MacMillan; Michael Boyle; Nico Trocme; Randall Waechter

2009-01-01

101

The Incredible Years Therapeutic Social and Emotional Skills Programme: A Pilot Study  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The Incredible Years (IY) universal child Classroom Dinosaur and Teacher Classroom Management programmes are delivered in all 102 primary schools in Gwynedd County, Wales. This article describes a pilot study of the IY Therapeutic (small group) Dinosaur School social and emotional coaching programme, developed as a treatment programme, in one such…

Hutchings, Judy; Bywater, Tracey; Gridley, Nicole; Whitaker, Christopher J.; Martin-Forbes, Pam; Gruffydd, Stella

2012-01-01

102

Differential Effects of Maternal Sensitivity to Infant Distress and Nondistress on Social-Emotional Functioning  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Associations between maternal sensitivity to infant distress and nondistress and infant social-emotional adjustment were examined in a subset of dyads from the NICHD Study of Early Child Care (N = 376). Mothers reported on infant temperament at 1 and 6 months postpartum, and maternal sensitivity to distress and nondistress were observed at 6…

Leerkes, Esther M.; Blankson, A. Nayena; O'Brien, Marion

2009-01-01

103

Reading, Social Development, and the Child.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Social development stresses the importance of working together with others in life. The home setting can emphasize social development and its objectives of instruction. How should parents assist the child in quality social development in which good human relations exist? First and foremost, parents should serve as models to children for good human…

Ediger, Marlow

104

Emotional Intelligence and Social-Emotional Learning: An Overview  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The term "EI (emotional intelligence)" was first used in 1990 by Salovey and Mayer. EI involves: (1) the ability to perceive accurately, appraise and express emotion; (2) the ability to access and/or generate feelings when they facilitate thought; (3) the ability to understand emotion and emotional knowledge; and (4) the ability to regulate…

Basu, Anamitra; Mermillod, Martial

2011-01-01

105

Social and Emotional Adjustment of Siblings of Children with Autism  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Background: Social and emotional adjustment of siblings of children with autism was examined, to explore their risk or resilience to effects of genetic liability and environmental factors involved in having a sibling with autism. Method: Social-emotional adjustment, behavior problems, socialization skills, and siblings' relationships were compared…

Pilowsky, Tammy; Yirmiya, Nurit; Doppelt, Osnat; Gross-Tsur, Varda; Shalev, Ruth S.

2004-01-01

106

Initiating a Program in Social and Emotional Education.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

School programs in social and emotional education seek to increase student self-awareness, help students deal with their emotions and interpersonal relationships, and improve social decision-making abilities. A schoolwide social-education program at a Providence, Rhode Island, academy focuses on overall school climate, specially designed events…

Pasi, Raymond J.

1997-01-01

107

Family income, parenting styles and child behavioural-emotional outcomes.  

PubMed

A positive relationship between income and child outcomes has been observed in data from numerous countries. A key question concerns the extent to which this association represents a causal relationship as opposed to unobserved heterogeneity. We use data from the National Longitudinal Survey of Children and Youth to implement a series of empirical strategies for estimating the existence and size of the effect of income on behavioural-emotional outcomes. We also examine the role of parenting style. Our results indicate that there is little evidence of an effect of income on behavioural-emotional scores. The exclusion of parenting style from the models was found to not bias the estimated income effect, but parenting style was found to have a consistent impact on child outcomes. PMID:17024716

Dooley, Martin; Stewart, Jennifer

2007-02-01

108

Development during Adolescence of the Neural Processing of Social Emotion  

Microsoft Academic Search

In this fMRI study, we investigated the development between adolescence and adulthood of the neural processing of social emotions. Unlike basic emotions (such as disgust and fear), social emotions (such as guilt and embarrassment) require the representation of another's mental states. Nineteen adolescents (10–18 years) and 10 adults (22–32 years) were scanned while thinking about scenarios featuring either social or

Stephanie Burnett; Geoffrey Bird; Jorge Moll; Chris Frith; Sarah-jayne Blakemore

2009-01-01

109

Executive function and the promotion of social–emotional competence  

Microsoft Academic Search

Executive function is understood as an umbrella term encompassing a number of interrelated sub-skills necessary for purposeful, goal-directed activity. Research suggests a vital role for executive function in children's social–emotional development. However, executive function is rarely considered in models of intervention programs that attempt to promote social–emotional competence. This article reviews the literature linking executive function to children's social–emotional development,

Nathaniel R. Riggs; Laudan B. Jahromi; Rachel P. Razza; Janean E. Dillworth-Bart; Ulrich Mueller

2006-01-01

110

Emotion Talk: Helping Caregivers Facilitate Emotion Understanding and Emotion Regulation  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This article focuses on two aspects of emotional intelligence, emotion understanding and emotion regulation. These abilities are important because of their impact on social communication and the way in which they influence a child's access to knowledge. Caregivers who engage their children in emotion talk may strengthen the ability of their…

Brinton, Bonnie; Fujiki, Martin

2011-01-01

111

Child Negative Emotionality and Parenting from Infancy to Preschool: A Meta-Analytic Review  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This meta-analytic review (k = 62 studies; N = 7,613 mother-child dyads) shows that effect sizes for the association between child negative emotionality and parenting were generally small and were moderated by sample and measurement characteristics. The association between more child negative emotionality and less supportive parenting was…

Paulussen-Hoogeboom, Marja C.; Stams, Geert Jan J. M.; Hermanns, Jo M. A.; Peetsma, Thea T. D.

2007-01-01

112

Henri Wallon's Theory of Early Child Development: The Role of Emotions  

Microsoft Academic Search

The present paper gives an account of part of the stage theory of early child development of the French theorist Henri Wallon (1879–1962). Unlike his contemporary Jean Piaget, Wallon concentrated his efforts upon a description of the child's emotional development and the role emotions play in establishing the bond between child and caregiver. The description of Wallon's stage theory is

René van der Veer

1996-01-01

113

Emotional Self-Regulation in Preschoolers: The Interplay of Child Approach Reactivity, Parenting, and Control Capacities  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This study examined whether child temperamental approach reactivity moderated the association between 2 factors, parenting and child control capacities and child emotional self-regulation. Participants (N=113) were 3- and 4-year-olds (M=48 months, SD=5.78) and their mothers. Emotional self-regulation was measured as observed persistence and…

Dennis, Tracy

2006-01-01

114

Maternal Depression and Child Internalizing: The Moderating Role of Child Emotion Regulation  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This study tests a model of children's emotion regulation (ER) as a moderator of the link between maternal depression and child internalizing problems. Participants were 78 children (ages 4 to 7), including 45 children of mothers with a history of childhood-onset depression (COD) and 33 children of mothers who had never been depressed. ER was…

Silk, Jennifer S.; Shaw, Daniel S.; Forbes, Erika E.; Lane, Tonya L.; Kovacs, Maria

2006-01-01

115

Évaluation du développement socioémotionnel de l'enfant d'un à trois ans : validation de la version française de l'Infant-Toddler Social and Emotional Assessment A French adaptation of the Infant-Toddler Social and Emotional Assessment  

Microsoft Academic Search

Objective. - This paper presents the psychometric properties of the French adaptation of the Infant Toddler Social and Emotional Assessment (ITSEA), named the Évaluation sociale et émotionnelle de jeunes enfants (ESEJE). Methods. - The French adaptation involved translation and back translation and was administered to 179 parents in pediatric well-baby centers and 115 parents in child care centers. Confirmatory factor

Z. Bracha; F. Perez-Diaz; Y. Perriot; M.-C. Leroux; D. Cohen; P. Reinert; P. Mazeta

116

Parent-Child Talk about Past Emotional Events: Associations with Child Temperament and Goodness-of-Fit  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The aim of this study was to examine associations between children's temperament, parent-child goodness-of-fit, and the emotional content of parent-child conversations about past events. Fifty one New Zealand 5- and 6-year-old children and their parents discussed 4 emotional past events. Parents rated children's temperament along 15 dimensions…

Bird, Amy; Reese, Elaine; Tripp, Gail

2006-01-01

117

Emotions, Social Work Practice and Supervision: An Uneasy Alliance?  

PubMed Central

This paper examines the place of emotions within social work practice. The perceived tensions between emotions and rational decision making are explored and it is argued that their relationship is compatible and necessary. A model for the co-creation of emotionally intelligent supervision is developed to support this vision of practice.

Ingram, Richard

2012-01-01

118

Affective Environment and Toddlers' Social-Emotional Competence.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The maternal affective environment to which children are exposed, conceptualized by (1) percentage of total emotional displays (happy, sad, angry, tense, or tender) and (2) global indices of current maternal psychosocial functioning, is likely to be related to children's expression of emotions and overall social-emotional competence. Thus,…

Denham, Susanne A.

119

What You Can Do to Change Your Child's Behavior  

MedlinePLUS

... child? Normal behavior in children depends on the child's age, personality, and physical and emotional development. A child's behavior ... as it may confuse your child. Accept your child's basic personality, whether it's shy, social, talkative or active. Basic ...

120

Emotional Face Processing and Emotion Regulation in Children: An ERP Study  

Microsoft Academic Search

Emotion regulation is a critical component of healthy development, yet few studies examine neural correlates of emotion regulation in childhood. In the present study, we assessed whether children's neurophysiological responses to salient and socially significant emotional distracters—emotional faces—were related to broader emotion regulation capacities. Emotion regulation was measured as attention performance following emotional distracters and as maternal report of child

Tracy A. Dennis; Melville M. Malone; Chao-Cheng Chen

2009-01-01

121

The Contributions of Teachers' Emotional Support to Children's Social Behaviors and Self-Regulatory Skills in First Grade  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The present observational study used hierarchical linear modeling to examine predictors of children's social and self-regulatory outcomes in first-grade classrooms. Specifically, goals were the following: (1) to explore relations between emotionally supportive teacher-child interactions and children's social behaviors (aggression with peers,…

Merritt, Eileen G.; Wanless, Shannon B.; Rimm-Kaufman, Sara E.; Cameron, Claire; Peugh, James L.

2012-01-01

122

Social Emotional Optimization Algorithm for Nonlinear Constrained Optimization Problems  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Nonlinear programming problem is one important branch in operational research, and has been successfully applied to various real-life problems. In this paper, a new approach called Social emotional optimization algorithm (SEOA) is used to solve this problem which is a new swarm intelligent technique by simulating the human behavior guided by emotion. Simulation results show that the social emotional optimization algorithm proposed in this paper is effective and efficiency for the nonlinear constrained programming problems.

Xu, Yuechun; Cui, Zhihua; Zeng, Jianchao

123

Emotion Socialization in Adolescence: The Roles of Mothers and Fathers  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This chapter provides a review of the literature that examines the role of mothers and fathers in socializing emotion in their sons and daughters during adolescence. Within the context of this chapter, we focus on mother-father similarities, differences, and coordinated efforts in socializing the emotion of their adolescent children. Empirical…

Brand, Ann E.; Klimes-Dougan, Bonnie

2010-01-01

124

Social Information Processing and Emotional Understanding in Children with LD  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The present study aimed to comprehensively examine social cognition processes in children with and without learning disabilities (LD), focusing on social information processing (SIP) and complex emotional understanding capabilities such as understanding complex, mixed, and hidden emotions. Participants were 50 children with LD (age range 9.4-12.7;…

Bauminger, Nirit; Edelsztein, Hany Schorr; Morash, Janice

2005-01-01

125

Circle Time for Social and Emotional Learning in Primary School  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This paper discusses the findings and implications of a semi-randomised control trial study on the effectiveness of circle time (CT) on primary school students' social and emotional learning, as well as classroom teachers' and students' experience of CT. A social and emotional learning programme was delivered through CT by trained…

Cefai, Carmel; Ferrario, Erika; Cavioni, Valeria; Carter, Audrey; Grech, Tracy

2014-01-01

126

Narrative Structure and Emotional References in Parent-Child Reminiscing: Associations with Child Gender, Temperament, and the Quality of Parent-Child Interactions  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The present research examined child gender, temperament, and the quality of parent-child interactions as predictors of narrative style and references to emotion during mother-child and father-child reminiscing. Although models predicting parents' narrative styles were non-significant, results revealed significant interactions between parental…

Bost, Kelly K.; Choi, Eunsil; Wong, Maria S.

2010-01-01

127

159 Mother-Child Discourse Surrounding a Child’s Past Behavior at 30 Months: Links to Emotional Understanding and Early Conscience Development at 36 Months  

Microsoft Academic Search

Recent research supports the idea that both the content and style of mother-child discourse is important in shaping a child’s early moral understanding. This study was designed to further this research by examining how the clarity, elaborativeness, and emotional content of conversations about the past related to a child’s sociomoral development. Sixty-three mother-child dyads took part in the study. When

Deborah J. Laible

2004-01-01

128

Child negative emotionality and parenting from infancy to preschool: a meta-analytic review.  

PubMed

This meta-analytic review (k = 62 studies; N = 7,613 mother-child dyads) shows that effect sizes for the association between child negative emotionality and parenting were generally small and were moderated by sample and measurement characteristics. The association between more child negative emotionality and less supportive parenting was relatively strong in lower socioeconomic status families, reversed in higher socioeconomic status families, and limited to studies with relatively high percentages of participants from ethnic minorities and studies using parent report to assess negative emotionality. Higher levels of child negative emotionality were associated with more restrictive control in samples with less than 75% 1st-born children, as well as in infants and preschoolers, and in studies using parent report or composite measures to assess both negative emotionality and restrictive parenting. Finally, more child negative emotionality was associated with less inductive control. PMID:17352551

Paulussen-Hoogeboom, Marja C; Stams, Geert Jan J M; Hermanns, Jo M A; Peetsma, Thea T D

2007-03-01

129

Educating Minds and Hearts: Social Emotional Learning and the Passage into Adolescence. Series on Social Emotional Learning.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Based on the view that social and emotional learning (SEL) needs to be an integral part of middle school education, this book provides an overview to social and emotional learning and the development of middle school students, presents a representative range of SEL programs and perspectives, and offers reflections on the current status of SEL and…

Cohen, Jonathan, Ed.

130

The relation of parenting, child temperament, and attachment security in early childhood to social competence at school entry.  

PubMed

A wealth of research demonstrates the importance of early parent-child interactions on children's social functioning. However, less is known about the interrelations between child and parent characteristics and parent-child interactions in early childhood. Moreover, few studies have broadly examined the longitudinal relations between these constructs and social competence. This study is an examination of the relations between parent responsiveness, negativity, and emotional supportiveness, attachment security, and child temperament, and their impact on children's social competence from infancy to kindergarten entry. The sample was derived from the Early Childhood Longitudinal Study--Birth Cohort and included 6850 parent-child dyads. Observational and rating scale data were used. The proposed model was nearly fully supported by path analysis, and it provides insight into the complex relations between early parenting behaviors, child characteristics, and parent-child interactions in the development of social competence. PMID:24060065

Rispoli, Kristin M; McGoey, Kara E; Koziol, Natalie A; Schreiber, James B

2013-10-01

131

Emotion Recognition in Fathers and Mothers at High-Risk for Child Physical Abuse  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Objective: The present study was designed to determine whether parents at high risk for physical child abuse, in comparison with parents at low risk, show deficits in emotion recognition, as well as to examine the moderator effect of gender and stress on the relationship between risk for physical child abuse and emotion recognition. Methods: Based…

Asla, Nagore; de Paul, Joaquin; Perez-Albeniz, Alicia

2011-01-01

132

Henri Wallon's Theory of Early Child Development: The Role of Emotions.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Discusses the stage theory of early child development of French theorist Henri Wallon. Describes Wallon's efforts (in contrast to contemporary Piaget) to describe emotional development and the role emotions play in establishing the child-caregiver bond. Argues that Wallon's theory is unique in its focus, influenced theorists such as Vygotsky, and…

Van der Veer, Rene

1996-01-01

133

Shifting Definitions of Emotional Maltreatment: An Analysis Child Welfare Investigation Laws and Practices in Canada  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Objective: Although there is growing evidence that the emotional dimensions of child maltreatment are particularly damaging, the feasibility and appropriateness of including emotional maltreatment (EM) in child welfare statutes continues to be questioned. Unlike physical and sexual abuse where investigations focus on discreet incidents of…

Trocme, Nico; Fallon, Barbara; MacLaurin, Bruce; Chamberland, Claire; Chabot, Martin; Esposito, Tonino

2011-01-01

134

Emotion Recognition in Fathers and Mothers at High-Risk for Child Physical Abuse  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Objective: The present study was designed to determine whether parents at high risk for physical child abuse, in comparison with parents at low risk, show deficits in emotion recognition, as well as to examine the moderator effect of gender and stress on the relationship between risk for physical child abuse and emotion recognition. Methods: Based…

Asla, Nagore; de Paul, Joaquin; Perez-Albeniz, Alicia

2011-01-01

135

Parenting Daily Hassles, Child Temperament, and Social Adjustment in Preschool.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Explored relations between child temperament, parenting daily hassles, and children's social adjustment in preschool. Found that parenting daily hassles predicted child externalizing problems beyond the contribution of child temperament characteristics. Child temperament interacted with parenting hassles in predicting adjustment outcomes. Child

Coplan, Robert J.; Bowker, Anne; Cooper, Suzanne M.

2003-01-01

136

Parental Social Networks and Child Development.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This paper looks at the relationship between parents' social networks and aspects of child development. It has often been suggested that parents' links with kin, neighbors, friends, and local and non-local organizations are likely to have many effects on their children's development. These effects, however, have never been systematically…

Homel, R.; Burns, A.

137

Social Neuroscience of Child and Adolescent Depression  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The social neuroscience of child and adolescent depression is inherently multidisciplinary. Depressive disorders beginning early in life can have serious developmental and functional consequences. Psychopathology research has described depression's defining clinical and contextual features, and intervention research has characterized its response…

Miller, Anita

2007-01-01

138

Emotional but not physical maltreatment is independently related to psychopathology in subjects with various degrees of social anxiety: a web-based internet survey  

PubMed Central

Background Previous studies reported that social phobia is associated with a history of child maltreatment. However, most of these studies focused on physical and sexual maltreatment whilst little is known about the specific impact of emotional abuse and neglect on social anxiety. We examined the association between emotional maltreatment, including parental emotional maltreatment as well as emotional peer victimization, and social anxiety symptoms in subjects with various degrees of social anxiety. Methods The study was conducted as a web-based Internet survey of participants (N?=?995) who had social anxiety symptoms falling within the high range, and including many respondents who had scores in the clinical range. The assessment included measures of child maltreatment, emotional peer victimization, social anxiety symptoms and general psychopathology. Results Regression and mediation analyses revealed that parental emotional maltreatment and emotional peer victimization were independently related to social anxiety and mediated the impact of physical and sexual maltreatment. Subjects with a history of childhood emotional maltreatment showed higher rates of psychopathology than subjects with a history of physical maltreatment. Conclusions Although our findings are limited by the use of an Internet survey and retrospective self-report measures, data indicated that social anxiety symptoms are mainly predicted by emotional rather than physical or sexual types of victimization.

2012-01-01

139

Social anxiety and emotion regulation in daily life: spillover effects on positive and negative social events.  

PubMed

To minimize the possibility of scrutiny, people with social anxiety difficulties exert great effort to manage their emotions, particularly during social interactions. We examined how the use of two emotion regulation strategies, emotion suppression and cognitive reappraisal, predict the generation of emotions and social events in daily life. Over 14 consecutive days, 89 participants completed daily diary entries on emotions, positive and negative social events, and their regulation of emotions. Using multilevel modeling, we found that when people high in social anxiety relied more on positive emotion suppression, they reported fewer positive social events and less positive emotion on the subsequent day. In contrast, people low in social anxiety reported fewer negative social events on days subsequent to using cognitive reappraisal to reduce distress; the use of cognitive reappraisal did not influence the daily lives of people high in social anxiety. Our findings support theories of emotion regulation difficulties associated with social anxiety. In particular, for people high in social anxiety, maladaptive strategy use contributed to diminished reward responsiveness. PMID:22428662

Farmer, Antonina Savostyanova; Kashdan, Todd B

2012-01-01

140

Mothering Young Children: Child Care, Stress and Social Life  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This study focuses on mothers' and young children's everyday social experience by analyzing their social relationships, social support in child care, mother-child interaction, and mothers' evaluations of all these aspects. Three hundred and eighty-four mothers with a child aged between 1 and 3 years, living in a city in Central Italy, were…

Rullo, Giuseppina; Musatti, Tullia

2005-01-01

141

Social competence and emotional\\/behavioural problems in children of psychiatric inpatients  

Microsoft Academic Search

The social competence and emotional\\/behavioural problems among 80 5–16-year-old children of 46 inpatients with various psychiatric\\u000a disorders were assessed by the parents using a Swedish version of the Child Behavior Checklist (CBCL). The ratings of these\\u000a children were compared to a normative sample of school children, but also whether type of psychiatric disorder among the parents\\u000a was related to psychosocial

B. Larsson; L. Knutsson-Medin; C. Sundelin; A. C. Trost von Werder

2000-01-01

142

Links between maternal and child psychopathology symptoms: mediation through child emotion regulation and moderation through maternal behavior.  

PubMed

This study examined the intergenerational transmission of psychopathology symptoms with 7-12 year-old children (N = 97; 44 boys, 53 girls, M age = 9.14, SD = 1.38) and their mothers (M age = 38.46, SD = 6.86). Child emotion regulation mediated the links between maternal psychopathology and child internalizing and externalizing symptoms. In turn, the indirect effect was dependent on the level of maternal support in response to youth's expressions of negative emotions when considering particular constellations of maternal reactions and type of psychopathology symptoms. The findings indicate that the relations between maternal and child psychopathology symptoms and child emotion regulation are complex and vary by context. Regardless of the complexity, however, for both internalizing and externalizing symptoms in youth, the results suggest that building adaptive emotion regulation skills is an important target for prevention among children who are at risk for problems due to exposure to maternal psychopathology. PMID:21484417

Suveg, Cynthia; Shaffer, Anne; Morelen, Diana; Thomassin, Kristel

2011-10-01

143

Emotional intelligence, personality, and the perceived quality of social relationships  

Microsoft Academic Search

This study explored links between emotional intelligence, measured as a set of abilities, and personality traits, as well as the contribution of both to the perceived quality of one's interpersonal relationships. In a sample of 103 college students, we found that both emotional intelligence and personality traits were associated with concurrent self-reports of satisfaction with social relationships. Individuals scoring highly

Paulo N. Lopes; Peter Salovey; Rebecca Straus

2003-01-01

144

Parenting Style as a Context for Emotion Socialization  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Research Findings: The purpose of this study was to examine parenting style in the domain of emotion socialization through studying the relationships among parenting styles, emotion-related parental practices, and parental goals of Hong Kong-Chinese mothers. Data were collected from 189 Hong Kong-Chinese mothers of 6- to 8-year-old children. Hong…

Chan, Siu Mui; Bowes, Jennifer; Wyver, Shirley

2009-01-01

145

Using Emotional and Social Factors To Predict Student Success.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

College academic success and retention have traditionally been predicted using demographic and academic variables. This study moved beyond traditional predictors. A survey of 218 undergraduate students revealed that emotional and social factors (e.g., stress, frequency of alcohol consumption) related to GPA and emotional factors (e.g.,…

Pritchard, Mary E.; Wilson, Gregory S.

2003-01-01

146

"OK This Is Hard": Doing Emotions in Social Justice Dialogue  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

In this article, I explore emotions in relation to social justice dialogue and share vignettes to illustrate how emotions are embodied, situated and fissured, drawing upon narrative, critical sociocultural and rhizomatic theories. Data comes from a practitioner inquiry while teaching 5- and 6-year-olds in a summer enrichment program in a…

Kuby, Candace R.

2013-01-01

147

Mother-Child Discourse Surrounding a Child?s Past Behavior at 30 Months: Links to Emotional Understanding and Early Conscience Development at 36 Months  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Recent research supports the idea that both the content and style of mother-child discourse is important in shaping a child's early moral understanding. This study was designed to further this research by examining how the clarity, elaborativeness, and emotional content of conversations about the past related to a child's sociomoral development.…

Laible, Deborah J.

2004-01-01

148

Toward Greater Specificity in Identifying Associations among Interparental Aggression, Child Emotional Reactivity to Conflict, and Child Problems  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This study examined specific forms of emotional reactivity to conflict and temperamental emotionality as explanatory mechanisms in pathways among interparental aggression and child psychological problems. Participants of the multimethod, longitudinal study included 201 two-year-old children and their mothers who had experienced elevated violence…

Davies, Patrick T.; Cicchetti, Dante; Martin, Meredith J.

2012-01-01

149

Emotion regulation in context: the jealousy complex between young siblings and its relations with child and family characteristics.  

PubMed

Jealousy is a social emotion that has received little attention by developmental researchers. The current study examined sibling jealousy and its relations to child and family characteristics in 60 families with a 16-month-old toddler and an older preschool-age sibling. Sibling jealousy was elicited in social triads consisting of a parent (mother or father) and the two siblings. Positive marital relationship quality (i.e., love and relationship maintenance) was a particularly strong predictor of the older siblings' abilities to regulate jealousy reactions in the mother sessions. Younger siblings' jealous affect with mothers was linked to the child's temperament, whereas older siblings' jealous affect with mothers was related to the child's emotional understanding. Younger siblings displayed more behavioral dysregulation in the mother-sibling triads if there was greater sibling rivalry reported by mothers. Session order (i.e., which sibling was challenged first in the jealousy paradigm) had a strong effect on both the affect and behavioral dysregulation displayed by the older and younger siblings. Results are discussed with respect to the need for future research to consider social relationships as developmental contexts for young children's emotion regulation. PMID:11949910

Volling, Brenda L; McElwain, Nancy L; Miller, Alison L

2002-01-01

150

Emotional and Behavioral Problems Reported in Child Welfare over 3 Years  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Child welfare agencies are required to provide services that ensure that children receive adequate mental health care. This study provides a comprehensive view of the emotional and behavioral problems of children who are referred to child welfare services, using nationally representative data. Bivariate analyses compare rates by child

McCrae, Julie S.

2009-01-01

151

Child-Rearing Practices toward Children with Hemophilia: The Relative Importance of Clinical Characteristics and Parental Emotional Reactions.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Addresses the relative importance of clinical characteristics of the child and parental emotional reactions, to child-rearing practices towards children with hemophilia. Results indicate that mother's emotional reactions appear to have a stronger influence on child-rearing uncertainty and overprotection than clinical characteristics of the child.…

Banis, S.; Suurmeijer, Th. P. B. M.; van Peer, D. R.

1999-01-01

152

Emotional maltreatment.  

PubMed

Child abuse is a problem that affects the lives of many American children. The public is often bombarded with information regarding horrific cases of physical and sexual abuse. Emotional maltreatment, however, has been slow to achieve recognition as a serious social problem for a variety of reasons. Compared with physical or sexual abuse, emotional maltreatment is more difficult to identify and define, and good epidemiological data are not available. An erroneous perception also exists that the sequelae of emotional maltreatment are less severe than that of physical and/or sexual abuse. Prompt identification of emotional maltreatment, appropriate intervention and referral, and reporting of concerns to child protective services are essential to the health and well-being of the child. This article will define emotional maltreatment, discuss consequences of emotional maltreatment, and provide implications for pediatric nurse practitioner practice. PMID:23099310

Hornor, Gail

2012-01-01

153

Early Childhood Intervention and Early Adolescent Social and Emotional Competence: Second-Generation Evaluation Evidence from the Chicago Longitudinal Study  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Background: To explore whether social or emotional outcomes for high-risk early adolescent youth that attended an established preventive intervention called the Chicago Child-Parent Center Preschool Program (CPC) are moderated by individual, family and program variations. Purpose: Two questions are addressed: (1) Do the effects of CPC preschool…

Niles, Michael D.; Reynolds, Arthur J.; Roe-Sepowitz, Dominique

2008-01-01

154

Families Created by the New Reproductive Technologies: Quality of Parenting and Social and Emotional Development of the Children.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Compared family relationships and the social and emotional development of children in families created by new reproductive technologies with those of natural and adoptive families. Found that quality of parenting in experimental families was superior to that of families with a naturally conceived child. No group differences were found for measures…

Golombok, Susan; And Others

1995-01-01

155

It Takes Two: Sensitive Caregiving across Contexts and Children's Social, Emotional, and Academic Outcomes  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Research Findings: Using longitudinal survey data from the Welfare, Children, and Families Study: A Three-City Study ("n" = 135), this study examines how congruence in maternal and child care provider sensitivities contributes to young children's social, emotional, and academic outcomes among low-income minority families. Congruence…

Vesely, Colleen K.; Brown, Elizabeth Levine; Mahatmya, Duhita

2013-01-01

156

Links between Maternal and Child Psychopathology Symptoms: Mediation through Child Emotion Regulation and Moderation through Maternal Behavior  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This study examined the intergenerational transmission of psychopathology symptoms with 7-12 year-old children (N = 97; 44 boys, 53 girls, M age = 9.14, SD = 1.38) and their mothers (M age = 38.46, SD = 6.86). Child emotion regulation mediated the links between maternal psychopathology and child internalizing and externalizing symptoms. In turn,…

Suveg, Cynthia; Shaffer, Anne; Morelen, Diana; Thomassin, Kristel

2011-01-01

157

Social neuroscience of child and adolescent depression  

PubMed Central

The social neuroscience of child and adolescent depression is inherently multidisciplinary. Depressive disorders beginning early in life can have serious developmental and functional consequences. Psychopathology research has described depression’s defining clinical and contextual features, and intervention research has characterized its response to treatment and prevention programs. Neuroendocrine, electrophysiological, and neuroimaging studies have identified core neurobiological aspects of early-onset mood disorders. These areas are reviewed using a developmental social neuroscience perspective for integrating disparate observations. The paper introduces a dynamic adaptive systems framework, and it discusses hedonic capacity, stress sensitivity, ruminative self-focus, and attentional impairments as fundamental components of mood disorders.

Miller, Anita

2007-01-01

158

Emotional intelligence skills for maintaining social networks in healthcare organizations.  

PubMed

For healthcare organizations to survive in these increasingly challenging times, leadership and management must face mounting interpersonal concerns. The authors present the boundaries of internal and external social networks with respect to leadership and managerial functions: Social networks within the organization are stretched by reductions in available resources and structural ambiguity, whereas external social networks are stressed by interorganizational competitive pressures. The authors present the development of emotional intelligence skills in employees as a strategic training objective that can strengthen the internal and external social networks of healthcare organizations. The authors delineate the unique functions of leadership and management with respect to the application of emotional intelligence skills and discuss training and future research implications for emotional intelligence skill sets and social networks. PMID:15754856

Freshman, Brenda; Rubino, Louis

2004-01-01

159

Social and Emotional Learning for Leaders.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

To succeed, educational leaders must be able to forge working relationships with many people and be mediators and mentors, negotiators and networkers. Administrators must be self-confident, be able to modulate emotions, be unusually persuasive, cultivate positive relationships, and continually develop their emotional intelligence. The right kind…

Cherniss, Cary

1998-01-01

160

Emotional responses during social information seeking on Facebook.  

PubMed

Based on existing research on social networking and information seeking, it was proposed that Facebook.com use could be conceptualized as serving two primary goals: passive social browsing (i.e., newsfeeds) and extractive social searching (i.e., friends' profiles). This study explored whether these categories adequately reflect Facebook use and whether they moderate physiological indicators of emotion. Thirty-six participants navigated Facebook.com while their on-screen activity and physiological responses associated with motivation and emotion were recorded. Results showed that the majority of screens encountered during Facebook use could be categorized as devoted to social browsing or social searching. Participants spent more time on social browsing than they spent on social searching. Skin-conductance data indicated that sympathetic activation diminished during the course of both social browsing and social searching. Facial EMG data indicated that participants experienced more pleasantness during the course of social searching than they experienced during social browsing. These results are discussed in terms of existing social-networking research and an evaluative space model of emotion. PMID:20950180

Wise, Kevin; Alhabash, Saleem; Park, Hyojung

2010-10-01

161

Emotion: commentary. A biopsychosocial perspective on maternal psychopathology and the development of child emotion regulation.  

PubMed

In this commentary, the authors note that Gratz and colleagues (2014) have made an important step in understanding the effect of maternal borderline personality (BP) pathology on children's developing emotion regulation. The emphasis on mechanisms of transmission in their article has implications for our understanding of the relationships between parental mental health and child functioning more generally. The authors of the commentary argue that using a biopsychosocial framework to understand the multiple levels that characterize the developmental system will push this kind of focus on behavioral mechanisms a step further. A biopsychosocial framework implies that a set of hierarchically organized, but reciprocally interacting, processes, from the genetic to the environmental, provide the essential elements of development (Gottlieb, 2007). Thus, in studying the effects of maternal BP pathology on child outcomes, consideration may also be given to the role of underlying biological processes that are influenced by maternal functioning and may alter child outcomes. Challenges to using this general approach in studying the effects of parental psychopathology are discussed. PMID:24344888

Calkins, Susan D; Dollar, Jessica M

2014-02-01

162

Models of Emotion Skills and Social Competence in the Head Start Classroom  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Research Findings: Fostering the social competence of at-risk preschoolers would be facilitated by knowing which of children's emotion skills are most salient to social outcomes. We examined the emotion skills and social competence of 44 children enrolled in a Head Start program. Emotion skills were examined in terms of children's emotional

Spritz, Becky L.; Sandberg, Elisabeth Hollister; Maher, Edward; Zajdel, Ruth T.

2010-01-01

163

The Relationship between Puberty and Social Emotion Processing  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The social brain undergoes developmental change during adolescence, and pubertal hormones are hypothesized to contribute to this development. We used fMRI to explore how pubertal indicators (salivary concentrations of testosterone, oestradiol and DHEA; pubertal stage; menarcheal status) relate to brain activity during a social emotion task.…

Goddings, Anne-Lise; Burnett Heyes, Stephanie; Bird, Geoffrey; Viner, Russell M.; Blakemore, Sarah-Jayne

2012-01-01

164

THE OBESE CHILD AS A SOCIAL BEING AND DEVELOPING SELF  

Microsoft Academic Search

The social and emotional concomitants of childhood obesity are discussed. The extant empirical literature is reviewed and placed in the context of relevant social-psychological and developmental theory. Implications for treatment are also outlined.

ERIK Z. WOODY

1986-01-01

165

Parent Emotion Representations and the Socialization of Emotion Regulation in the Family  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

There is considerable knowledge of parental socialization processes that directly and indirectly influence the development of children's emotion self-regulation, but little understanding of the specific beliefs and values that underlie parents' socialization approaches. This study examined multiple aspects of parents' self-reported…

Meyer, Sara; Raikes, H. Abigail; Virmani, Elita A.; Waters, Sara; Thompson, Ross A.

2014-01-01

166

Parent-Child Interactions in Relation to Critical and Emotionally Overinvolved Expressed Emotion (EE): Is EE a Proxy for Behavior?  

PubMed Central

Expressed emotion measures, encompassing dimensions of criticism (CRIT), and emotional overinvolvement (EOI) are increasingly being used to assess the parent–child relationship in child clinical populations, despite the lack of studies assessing their validity. We examined the correspondence between CRIT, EOI, and parent–child interactions as observed by neutral coders in a sample of 252 clinic-referred children and adolescents, ages 7–17 years. We found support for the validity of the CRIT code, with high critical parents showing more antagonism, negativity, disgust, harshness, and less responsiveness, compared to parents who scored in the low or borderline ranges. In contrast, none of the observed behaviors were found to correspond with parental EOI, suggesting either that this construct lacks validity with juvenile samples or that behaviors that correspond to EOI are difficult to observe. We conclude that high parental CRIT can be used as an index of problematic parent–child interactions.

McCarty, Carolyn A.; Lau, Anna S.; Valeri, Sylvia M.; Weisz, John R.

2006-01-01

167

Positive emotions and the social broadening effects of Barack Obama.  

PubMed

Past experiments have demonstrated that the cognitive broadening produced by positive emotions may extend to social contexts. Building on this evidence, we hypothesized that positive emotions triggered by thinking about Barack Obama may broaden and expand people's sense of self to include others. Results from an expressive-writing study demonstrated that African American college students prompted to write about Obama immediately prior to and after the 2008 presidential election used more plural self-references, fewer other-references, and more social references. Mediation analyses revealed that writing about Obama increased positive emotions, which in turn increased the likelihood that people thought in terms of more-inclusive superordinate categories (we and us rather than they and them). Implications of these findings for the role of positive emotions in perspective-taking and intergroup relations are considered. PMID:22905966

Ong, Anthony D; Burrow, Anthony L; Fuller-Rowell, Thomas E

2012-10-01

168

Relationships between Parent and Child Emotion Regulation Strategy Use: A Brief Report  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

We examined the direct relationships between parent and child emotion regulation (ER) strategy use during the transitionary and understudied developmental periods of middle childhood through to adolescence. Three hundred and seventy-nine participants aged between 9 and 19 years, completed the Emotion Regulation Questionnaire for Children and…

Bariola, Emily; Hughes, Elizabeth K.; Gullone, Eleonora

2012-01-01

169

Positive and Negative Emotions and Coping as Mediators of Mother-Child Attachment and Peer Relationships  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This study examined whether emotions and coping explain (mediate) the association between mother-child attachment and peer relationships. Attachment, positive and negative emotion experience, coping, and peer relationships were examined in 106 fourth-grade through sixth-grade girls attending a 6-day residential camp. Attachment, experience of…

Abraham, Michelle M.; Kerns, Kathryn A.

2013-01-01

170

Emotional Indicators on the Bender-Gestalt and the Devereux Child Behavior Rating Scale  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

A heterogeneous group of elementary school children referred for psycho-educational diagnosis were rated on the Devereux Child Behavior Rating Scale and the Bender Visual-Motor Gestalt Test, scoring for Koppitz Emotional Indicators. Findings suggests that certain DCB factors may be more predictive of emotional problems than others in the scale.…

Gregory Mary K.

1977-01-01

171

Longitudinal Pathways Linking Child Maltreatment, Emotion Regulation, Peer Relations, and Psychopathology  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Background: The aim of this study was to investigate longitudinal relations among child maltreatment, emotion regulation, peer acceptance and rejection, and psychopathology. Methods: Data were collected on 215 maltreated and 206 nonmaltreated children (ages 6-12 years) from low-income families. Children were evaluated by camp counselors on emotion

Kim, Jungmeen; Cicchetti, Dante

2010-01-01

172

An Integrated Model of Emotion Processes and Cognition in Social Information Processing.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Interprets literature on contributions of social cognitive and emotion processes to children's social competence in the context of an integrated model of emotion processes and cognition in social information processing. Provides neurophysiological and functional evidence for the centrality of emotion processes in personal-social decision making.…

Lemerise, Elizabeth A.; Arsenio, William F.

2000-01-01

173

The Role of Social-Emotional Learning in Bullying Prevention Efforts  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This article examines how social emotional learning contributes to bullying prevention efforts in schools. Bullying behavior is impacted by multiple levels of the social-ecology of schools. Social emotional learning (SEL) is a structured way to improve a wide range of students' social and emotional competencies and impact bullying at the…

Smith, Brian H.; Low, Sabina

2013-01-01

174

Maternal Expressiveness & Emotionality: Socialization of Children's Expressiveness.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

A study conducted in two types of laboratory settings and one school setting tested a model of the development of emotional expression. The model included: (1) societal, peer, and family influences; (2) self-factors, such as physiological, affective, motivation, cognitive, and personality variables; and (3) self-mediators, which act as filters…

Halberstadt, Amy G.

175

Emotion Socialization by Mothers and Fathers: Coherence among Behaviors and Associations with Parent Attitudes and Children's Social Competence  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This study examined inter-relations among different types of parental emotion socialization behaviors in 88 mothers and 76 fathers (co-residing with participating mothers) of eight-year-old children. Parents completed questionnaires assessing emotion socialization behaviors, emotion-related attitudes, and their children's social functioning. An…

Baker, Jason K.; Fenning, Rachel M.; Crnic, Keith A.

2011-01-01

176

How Do I Feel about Feelings? Emotion Socialization in Families of Depressed and Healthy Adolescents  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Emotional and cognitive changes that occur during adolescence set the stage for the development of adaptive or maladaptive beliefs about emotions. Although research suggests that parents' behaviors and beliefs about emotions relate to children's emotional abilities, few studies have looked at parental socialization of children's emotions,…

Hunter, Erin C.; Katz, Lynn Fainsilber; Shortt, Joann Wu; Davis, Betsy; Leve, Craig; Allen, Nicholas B.; Sheeber, Lisa B.

2011-01-01

177

Social Context, Social Behavior, and Socialization: Investigating the Child's Developing Organization of the Behavioral Field.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Gives an overview of the 10 research articles in this issue. Notes that all studies in this issue examine child behavior from a perspective that views behavior as mediated by social context, challenging the logical positivism of conventional experimentation. (MM)

Costanzo, Philip R.; Siegel, Alexander W.

1993-01-01

178

Rites of protection: Child protection conferences as social transformation  

Microsoft Academic Search

The author, a child psychiatrist working in Britain, attempted to understand his place in the state's protection of children by using an anthropological approach to analyse a state?sanctioned process: the Child Protection Procedure. Essential to this Procedure is a multi?professional meeting called the Initial Child Protection Conference. This can be seen as a significant event marking changes in the social

David Goldberg

1999-01-01

179

Social Networking Web Sites: Teaching Appropriate Social Competence to Students with Emotional and Behavioral Disorders  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The Internet has opened a variety of different avenues for people to interact with each other. As new digital environments are developed, new sets of social skills are needed to appropriately interact. Students with emotional and behavioral disorders often have deficits in social competence and require specialized training in specific social

Morgan, Joseph J.

2010-01-01

180

Effects of acute social stress on emotion processing in children.  

PubMed

The current study investigates the effect of a single episode of acute social stress on healthy children's processing of facial expressions of emotion. Healthy nine- and ten-year-old boys (N=39) underwent either a standardized psychosocial laboratory stressor (the Trier Social Stress Test for Children) or a control condition without exposure to socio-evaluative stress. Immediately thereafter, they classified pictures of faces displaying ambiguous facial expressions. Boys who had undergone the stress procedure were more likely to categorize ambiguously angry-fearful faces as fearful (and simultaneously less likely to categorize them as angry) relative to boys who had undergone the control condition. We suggest (i) that decreased sensitivity to anger cues following a stressful experience may represent an adaptive coping mechanism in healthy children, and/or (ii) that a heightened sensitivity to fearful cues may indicate the influence of children's own emotional states on their interpretations of others' emotional states. PMID:24485480

Chen, Frances S; Schmitz, Julian; Domes, Gregor; Tuschen-Caffier, Brunna; Heinrichs, Markus

2014-02-01

181

Social Skills Intervention for a Child Who Is Blind  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This study evaluated the effectiveness of a social skills intervention plan for a preschool child who is blind and has no additional disabilities. After the plan was implemented, the child demonstrated an increased frequency and range of play behaviors and social interactions. (Contains 3 figures.)

Celeste, Marie

2007-01-01

182

ChildCare Quality and Children's Social Development  

Microsoft Academic Search

This study examined the influence on children's social development of variation in the quality of their child-care environments. The sample consisted of 166 children attending representative child-care centers that varied widely in quality. Possible relations associated with age, child-care experience, and family background were controlled using hierarchical multiple regression. Both global estimates of child-care quality and specific program features, such

Deborah Phillips; Kathleen McCartney; Sandra Scarr

1987-01-01

183

Social and Emotional Impacts of Farmwork Injuries: An Exploratory Study  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Context: The physical hazards of farming have been extensively studied and reported upon. Far less studied are the social and emotional impacts of farmwork injuries and deaths. Purpose: To investigate and document broad but targeted issues regarding the impact on individuals, families, and communities of farmwork injuries and fatalities of farmer…

Robertson, S. M.; Murphy, Dennis J.; Davis, Lisa A.

2006-01-01

184

Social and Emotional Development of Gifted Children: Straight Talk  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This article discusses eight topics on the social and emotional development of gifted children. These issues bring to light some of the current thinking that can be helpful to parents, teachers, and counselors. Understanding what giftedness actually is and is not, how to identify it, moving from an entity model of giftedness to an incremental…

Cross, Tracy L.

2009-01-01

185

Rejection Sensitivity in Late Adolescence: Social and Emotional Sequelae  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This study used longitudinal, multireporter data, in a community sample, to examine the role of rejection sensitivity in late adolescents' social and emotional development. Rejection sensitivity was linked to a relative increase in adolescent depressive and anxiety symptoms over a 3-year period, even after accounting for teens' baseline level of…

Marston, Emily G.; Hare, Amanda; Allen, Joseph P.

2010-01-01

186

Social Skills Training and Students with Emotional and Behavioral Disorders  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

There is a large body of literature suggesting that students with emotional and behavioral disorders (EBD) lack appropriate social skills, including deficits in building and maintaining interpersonal relationships, prosocial behaviors (e.g., sharing, helping, cooperation), and self-management strategies. While the literature shows small to modest…

Casey, Kathryn J.

2012-01-01

187

Assessment of the Social and Emotional Functioning of Preschool Children.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This article reviews selected issues and techniques in interviewing, direct observation, rating scales, sociometry, and associative techniques as used in the context of preschool assessment. Special problems encountered in assessing the social and emotional functioning of preschool children are discussed. (Author/LMO)

Martin, Roy P.

1986-01-01

188

Executive Function and the Promotion of Social-Emotional Competence  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Executive function is understood as an umbrella term encompassing a number of interrelated sub-skills necessary for purposeful, goal-directed activity. Research suggests a vital role for executive function in children's social-emotional development. However, executive function is rarely considered in models of intervention programs that attempt to…

Riggs, Nathaniel R.; Jahromi, Laudan B.; Razza, Rachel P.; Dillworth-Bart, Janean E.; Mueller, Ulrich

2006-01-01

189

Social-Emotional Effects of Day Care. Final Project Report.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This study compared the effects of group day care, family day care, and full parental care on such aspects of children's social-emotional adjustment as curiosity, attachment, self-concept, sex role, achievement motivation, impulse control, cooperation, and sharing. Initial differences between groups were controlled by matching on race, sex, number…

Lippman, Marcia Z.; Grote, Barbara H.

190

Social Judgments and Emotion Attributions about Exclusion in Switzerland  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Adolescents' social judgments and emotion attributions about exclusion in three contexts, nationality, gender, and personality, were measured in a sample of 12- and 15-year-old Swiss and non-Swiss adolescents (N = 247). Overall, adolescents judged exclusion based on nationality as less acceptable than exclusion based on gender or personality.…

Malti, Tina; Killen, Melanie; Gasser, Luciano

2012-01-01

191

An Architecture for Action, Emotion, and Social Behavior  

Microsoft Academic Search

The Oz project at Carnegie Mellon is studying the construction of artistically effectivesimulated worlds. Such worlds typically include several agents, which must exhibit broadbehavior. To meet this need, we are developing an agent architecture, called Tok, thatpresently supports reactivity, goals, emotions, and social behavior. Here we briefly introducethe requirements of our application, summarize the Tok architecture, and describe aparticular agent

Joseph Bates; A. Bryan Loyall; W. Scott Reilly

1992-01-01

192

Giving Youth the Social and Emotional Skills to Succeed  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

In these days of tremendous political pressure for results measured by standardized tests, time constraints can make social and emotional learning (SEL) a difficult undertaking for many classroom teachers. It seemed that after-school programs would be effective learning environments for supplying the missing piece in children's education. In this…

Deerin, Ginny

2005-01-01

193

How To Launch a Social and Emotional Learning Program.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Addresses attitudinal and logistical roadblocks to launching social and emotional learning programs. Debunks ideas that such programs are either faddish, ineffective, "New-Age," or detractions from academic learning. Stresses conceptual origins in the work of Daniel Goleman, Howard Gardner, and Robert Sylwester. Notes educators must work to…

Elias, Maurice J.; And Others

1997-01-01

194

Strategies for Teaching Social and Emotional Intelligence in Business Communication  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Incorporating social and emotional skills (EI) training into the business communication curriculum is important for preparing students to function effectively in a global workplace with its complex informal networks, intercultural issues, team emphasis, and participatory leadership. EI skills enhance communication behavior in work groups and…

Sigmar, Lucia Stretcher; Hynes, Geraldine E.; Hill, Kathy L.

2012-01-01

195

Assessing Teachers' Beliefs about Social and Emotional Learning  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Teachers are the primary implementers of social and emotional learning (SEL) programs. Their beliefs about SEL likely influence program delivery, evaluation, and outcomes. A simple tool for measuring these beliefs could be used by school administrators to determine school readiness for SEL programming and by researchers to better understand…

Brackett, Marc A.; Reyes, Maria R.; Rivers, Susan E.; Elbertson, Nicole A.; Salovey, Peter

2012-01-01

196

[Elective mutism--a disorder of social functioning or an emotional disorder?].  

PubMed

Elective mutism is a relatively uncommon disorder characterized by consistent failure to speak in specific social settings, such as in school, despite speaking fluently in a variety of other situations. Elective mutism is a very debilitating disorder for the affected child, as well as for their families, with detrimental implications for the development of social skills and learning if not offered appropriate support and treatment. The most promising treatment results have thus by far been achieved through a combination of cognitive behaviour therapy and supportive cooperation between parents, the school, and the treating child psychiatrist, occasionally supplemented with pharmacological treatments such as selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors. The available literature on this disorder is still very limited and consists predominantly of case reports. In recent years, however, there has been a growing focus on the etiology and general understanding of the disorder. While still disputed, it has been suggested that elective mutism might be understood as an emotional disorder on a par with e.g. separation anxiety and social phobia. Studies looking at the long-term course of the disorder are urgently required to elucidate whether children presenting elective mutism will be more likely to suffer from emotional disorders in adulthood, and may also ultimately lead to improved treatments for this disabling psychiatric disorder of childhood. PMID:12617045

Storgaard, Per; Thomsen, Per Hove

2003-02-10

197

Social Workers in Child Welfare: Ready for Duty  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This article responds to "Do Social Workers Make Better Child Welfare Workers than Non-Social Workers?" by Dr. Robin E. Perry. The article articulates National Association of Social Workers' support for a professional social work labor force to serve children and their families and for continued federal investment in the training of these workers.…

Whitaker, Tracy; Clark, Elizabeth J.

2006-01-01

198

Attitudes to emotional expression, social support and postnatal adjustment in new parents  

Microsoft Academic Search

The study investigated whether perceived antenatal social support and attitudes to emotional expression are associated with postnatal distress in new parents and whether attitudes to emotional expression are themselves linked with perceptions of social support. Eighty?six women and 66 men expecting their first baby completed the DUKE?UNC Functional Social Support Questionnaire (FSSQ) and the Attitudes Towards Emotional Expression (AEE) both

Helen Castle; Pauline Slade; Maeve Rogers

2008-01-01

199

Social and emotional impact of diabetic retinopathy: a review.  

PubMed

People with vision-threatening diabetic retinopathy are likely to experience enhanced social and emotional strain. Critically, those with both vision-threatening diabetic retinopathy and psychosocial problems may have significantly reduced levels of functioning compared with psychologically healthy counterparts. This can cause inadequate compliance, increased strain on family functioning, worse diabetes control, increased progression of diabetic retinopathy and, consequently, further psychosocial stress resulting in a number of concerning implications for disease management, clinical outcomes and healthcare costs. However, the emotional and social health consequences of diabetic retinopathy have not yet been systematically explored. This information is crucial as it allows for a targeted approach to treatment and prevention and avoidance of the potentially detrimental implications described above. Therefore, this paper reviews the current qualitative and quantitative evidence regarding the social and emotional impact of diabetic retinopathy and identifies directions for future research. Key search terms were applied to the electronic databases Pubmed, ISI Web of Science and Embase and the bibliographies of relevant papers were systematically reviewed for additional references. Overall, the evidence suggests that diabetic retinopathy and associated vision loss have several debilitating effects, including disruption of family functioning, relationships and roles; increased social isolation and dependence; and deterioration of work prospects resulting in increased financial strain. Adverse emotional responses include fear, anxiety, vulnerability, guilt, loss of confidence, anger, stress and self-perception issues. However, the research to date is largely qualitative in nature, with most quantitative studies being small, cross-sectional and somewhat outdated. Similarly, the outcome measures used in many studies to date are suboptimal in terms of content and validity. Therefore, this review identifies the need for improved outcome measures to provide valid, meaningful measurement of the social and emotional impact of diabetic retinopathy and discusses potential directions for future research such as item banking and computer adaptive testing. PMID:21575125

Fenwick, Eva; Rees, Gwyn; Pesudovs, Konrad; Dirani, Mohamed; Kawasaki, Ryo; Wong, Tien Y; Lamoureux, Ecosse

2012-01-01

200

Clinical Validity of a Brief Measure of Early Childhood Social-Emotional/Behavioral Problems  

PubMed Central

Objective?To address a pressing need for measures of clinically significant social–emotional/behavioral problems in young children by examining several validity indicators for a brief parent-report questionnaire.?Methods?An ethnically and economically diverse sample of 213 referred and nonreferred 2- and 3-year-olds was studied. The validity of the Brief Infant–Toddler Social–Emotional Assessment (BITSEA) Problem Index and Internalizing and Externalizing scales was evaluated relative to a “gold standard” diagnostic interview, as well as the Child Behavior Checklist (CBCL).?Results?The validity of the BITSEA Problem Index relative to Diagnosis (sensitivity = 72.7%–80.8%, specificity = 70.0%–83.3%) and clinical-range CBCL scores (sensitivity = 80.0%–96.2%, specificity = 75.0%–89.9%) was supported in the full sample and within minority/nonminority groups. Additional results supported the validity of the BITSEA Internalizing and Externalizing scales.?Conclusions?Documented validity suggests that the BITSEA may be a valuable tool to aid screening, identification, and assessment efforts targeting early-emergent social–emotional/behavioral problems. Practical implications and generalizability are discussed.

Carter, Alice S.; McCarthy, Kimberly; Augustyn, Marilyn; Caronna, Elizabeth; Clark, Roseanne

2013-01-01

201

Issues in Social and Emotional Development.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Education for gifted elementary students should concentrate on developing intrapsychic and social competencies. A foundation in which students share in goal setting, increase task persistence, and learn to question and challenge will promote later intellectual achievement. (CL)

Perrone, Philip A.

1983-01-01

202

Parental Problem Drinking, Marital Aggression, and Child Emotional Insecurity: A Longitudinal Investigation*  

PubMed Central

Objective: Marital aggression plays an important role in relations between parental problem drinking and child maladjustment. The purpose of the current study was to apply emotional security theory as a framework for understanding the role of marital aggression. Method: A community sample of 235 children in kindergarten participated once a year for 3 years. Parents completed measures of parental problem drinking and marital aggression, and children were interviewed about their emotional security reactions to marital conflict vignettes. Results: Greater parental problem drinking was directly associated with children's more negative emotional reactions to conflict. Maternal problem drinking predicted increased sad reactions and negative expectations for the future. Paternal problem drinking predicted increases in child anger reactions and negative expectations for the future. Parental problem drinking was also indirectly associated with child reactions via marital aggression. Conclusions: Results confirmed hypotheses that parental problem drinking would be related to child emotional insecurity and that associations would be indirect via greater marital conflict. Findings are interpreted in terms of emotional security theory as a framework for understanding the effects of parental problem drinking on marital aggression and child development.

Keller, Peggy S.; Gilbert, Lauren R.; Koss, Kalsea J.; Cummings, E. Mark; Davies, Patrick T.

2011-01-01

203

Caring Classrooms/Intelligent Schools: The Social Emotional Education of Young Children. Series on Social Emotional Learning.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This book synthesizes current thinking about effective social and emotional education of young elementary school children. The book's chapters, by leading national experts, describe the range of programs and perspectives that can be used in elementary schools, focusing on concrete strategies and curricular-based programs that can be integrated…

Cohen, Jonathan, Ed.

204

Social Work and Child Psychoanalysis: Where the Twain Shall Meet  

Microsoft Academic Search

This essay explores the ways in which social work theory can contribute to the theory and practice of child psychoanalysis.\\u000a Both clinical social work and child psychoanalysis borrow from psychoanalytic theory for explanations of motivation, development,\\u000a and technique. The fundamental premises of social work theory, including a psychosocial perspective, the centrality of relationship\\u000a as a medium of change, a commitment

Erika S. Schmidt

2009-01-01

205

Social Anxiety in Children with Anxiety Disorders: Relation with Social and Emotional Functioning  

Microsoft Academic Search

Investigated the psychometric properties of the Social Anxiety Scale for children-Revised (SASC-R) as well as relations between social anxiety and children's social and emotional functioning. Participants were a clinic sample of children, ages 6–11 with anxiety disorders (N = 154) who completed the SASC-R. For a subset of these children, parent ratings of social skills, and self-ratings of perceived competence

Golda S. Ginsburg; Annette M. La Greca; Wendy K. Silverman

1998-01-01

206

Maltreated children's thoughts and emotions as behavioral predictors: evidence for social work action.  

PubMed

The purpose of this secondary data analysis was to explore the mediating influence of internalizing behavior on the link between child maltreatment and externalizing behavior (for example, rule-breaking behavior and aggressive behavior) among children. Using a longitudinal comparison group design and a sample of 300 youths (56 percent maltreated), the relationship among maltreatment and internalizing and externalizing behavior was explored. Structural equation modeling revealed a mediating effect in which initial internalizing symptoms had a longitudinal residual effect on externalizing behavior among maltreated youths. Practice and policy strategies should include early identification, comprehensive assessment, and treatment for child maltreatment that include emotional, psychological, and behavioral issues. A comprehensive social work response may serve to reduce the risk of adverse behavioral outcomes among youths that place them at risk of juvenile delinquency and juvenile justice involvement. PMID:19366162

Maschi, Tina; Morgen, Keith; Hatcher, Schnavia Smith; Rosato, Nancy Scotto; Violette, Nancy M

2009-04-01

207

Emotion regulation difficulties, low social support, and interpersonal violence mediate the link between childhood abuse and posttraumatic stress symptoms.  

PubMed

We examined how difficulties with emotion regulation, social support, and interpersonal violence in adult relationships mediated the relationship between childhood abuse and post traumatic symptoms (PTS) in adults. We fit a multiple mediation model to data from 139 socio-economically disadvantaged women (85% African American) of whom 44% endorsed moderate to severe levels of childhood physical, sexual, or emotional abuse and 12% screened positive for probable posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD). The model accounted for 63% of the variance in adult PTS symptoms. Child abuse exerted a direct effect on PTS symptoms and indirect effects through difficulties with emotion regulation, lower social support, and greater exposure to adult interpersonal violence. Implications of findings for the treatment of individuals at high risk of having experienced childhood abuse and PTS are discussed. PMID:23312434

Stevens, Natalie R; Gerhart, James; Goldsmith, Rachel E; Heath, Nicole M; Chesney, Samantha A; Hobfoll, Stevan E

2013-03-01

208

"You Got It!" Teaching Social and Emotional Skills  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Universal classroom practices include developmentally appropriate, child-centered classroom environments that promote children's developing independence, successful interactions, and engagement in learning. While universal practices may be enough to promote the development of social competence in the majority of children in the classroom, teachers…

Fox, Lise; Lentini, Rochelle Harper

2006-01-01

209

Emotions promote social interaction by synchronizing brain activity across individuals  

PubMed Central

Sharing others’ emotional states may facilitate understanding their intentions and actions. Here we show that networks of brain areas “tick together” in participants who are viewing similar emotional events in a movie. Participants’ brain activity was measured with functional MRI while they watched movies depicting unpleasant, neutral, and pleasant emotions. After scanning, participants watched the movies again and continuously rated their experience of pleasantness–unpleasantness (i.e., valence) and of arousal–calmness. Pearson’s correlation coefficient was used to derive multisubject voxelwise similarity measures [intersubject correlations (ISCs)] of functional MRI data. Valence and arousal time series were used to predict the moment-to-moment ISCs computed using a 17-s moving average. During movie viewing, participants' brain activity was synchronized in lower- and higher-order sensory areas and in corticolimbic emotion circuits. Negative valence was associated with increased ISC in the emotion-processing network (thalamus, ventral striatum, insula) and in the default-mode network (precuneus, temporoparietal junction, medial prefrontal cortex, posterior superior temporal sulcus). High arousal was associated with increased ISC in the somatosensory cortices and visual and dorsal attention networks comprising the visual cortex, bilateral intraparietal sulci, and frontal eye fields. Seed-voxel–based correlation analysis confirmed that these sets of regions constitute dissociable, functional networks. We propose that negative valence synchronizes individuals’ brain areas supporting emotional sensations and understanding of another’s actions, whereas high arousal directs individuals’ attention to similar features of the environment. By enhancing the synchrony of brain activity across individuals, emotions may promote social interaction and facilitate interpersonal understanding.

Nummenmaa, Lauri; Glerean, Enrico; Viinikainen, Mikko; Jaaskelainen, Iiro P.; Hari, Riitta; Sams, Mikko

2012-01-01

210

Social sharing of emotion following exposure to a negatively valenced situation  

Microsoft Academic Search

Three experimental studies are reported in which we tested the prediction that negative emotion elicits the social sharing of the emotional experience. In two experiments, participants arrived at the laboratory with a friend and then viewed one of three film excerpts (nonemotional, moderate emotion, or intense emotion) alone. Afterwards, the participants who saw the film had an opportunity to interact

Olivier Luminet IV; Patrick Bouts; Frédérique Delie; Antony S. R. Manstead; Bernard Rimé

2000-01-01

211

Infants' monitoring of social interactions: the effect of emotional cues.  

PubMed

Relying on information about the emotional state of others is vital for a proper monitoring and representation of social interactions. We tested the impact of vocal emotional cues on 12-month-old infants' monitoring of animated movies that involved the separation of a smaller and a larger oval shape. The separation was accompanied by the sound of either a crying or a laughing baby and was followed either by the return of the larger figure to, or its further separation from, the smaller figure. Eye tracking showed that infants' monitoring pattern was influenced by the type of emotional signal during both the separation phase and the response phase of the animations: During the separation phase infants fixated longer at the larger figure if the separation was accompanied by a crying sound than if laughter could be heard. In the response phase, the influence of the emotional signal depended on the type of response. Infants overall looked more often at the animations during the crying than the laughter sound but only when the larger figure did not return to the smaller figure. These results suggest that infants are able to integrate vocal emotional cues in their representation of observed interactions. Our findings are also discussed in relation to the source of negativity bias in infants' information processing. PMID:24708507

Biro, Szilvia; Alink, Lenneke R A; van IJzendoorn, Marinus H; Bakermans-Kranenburg, Marian J

2014-04-01

212

Promoting Social and Emotional Learning in Preschool Students: A Study of "Strong Start Pre-K"  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The inclusion of social and emotional learning (SEL) curricula in preschools may help prevent emotional and behavioral problems. This study evaluated the effects of a SEL curriculum, "Strong Start Pre-K," on the social and emotional competence of 52 preschool students using a quasi-experimental, non-equivalent control group design. Teachers rated…

Gunter, Leslie; Caldarella, Paul; Korth, Byran B.; Young, K. Richard

2012-01-01

213

Gender Differences in Caregiver Emotion Socialization of Low-Income Toddlers  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Low-income children are at elevated risk for emotion-related problems; however, little research has examined gender and emotion socialization in low-income families. The authors describe the ways in which emotion socialization may differ for low-income versus middle-income families. They also present empirical data on low-income caregivers'…

Chaplin, Tara M.; Casey, James; Sinha, Rajita; Mayes, Linda C.

2010-01-01

214

Social Support: A Mediator between Child Maltreatment and Developmental Outcomes  

Microsoft Academic Search

The purpose of the current study was to investigate the relationship between child maltreatment, social support, and developmental outcomes in first-year college students. Participants were 202 undergraduate students (137 female, 65 male) who completed surveys at two time points: once before entering college and once during their first year of college. It was hypothesized that child maltreatment would predict poorer

Elise N. Pepin; Victoria L. Banyard

2006-01-01

215

Legal and Social Alternatives in Treating Older Child Sexual Offenders.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Discusses child molestation cases in which accused is older person, basing discussion on author's experience over five years on professional review panel advising social services agencies and courts in disposition of child abuse cases. Examines principle of diminished responsibility and considers such treatment alternatives as prisons, psychiatry…

Watson, J. Mark

1989-01-01

216

Maternal and Child Predictors of Preschool Children's Social Competence  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The present study examined child and maternal predictors of children's social competence in preschool. One hundred ten mothers and their preschool-aged children participated. Mothers completed parent reports of child temperament and self-regulation, and self-reports of maternal separation anxiety. Mothers' interactional style was coded from…

Diener, Marissa L.; Kim, Do-Yeong

2004-01-01

217

Chaos as a social determinant of child health: Reciprocal associations?  

PubMed

This study informs the social determinants of child health by exploring an understudied aspect of children's social contexts: chaos. Chaos has been conceptualized as crowded, noisy, disorganized, unpredictable settings for child development (Evans, Eckenrode, & Marcynyszyn, 2010). We measure chaos at two levels of children's ecological environment - the microsystem (household) and the mesosystem (work-family-child care nexus) - and at two points in early childhood (ages 3 and 5). Using data from the Fragile Families and Child Wellbeing Study (N = 3288), a study of predominantly low-income women and their partners in large US cities, we develop structural equation models that assess how maternal-rated child health (also assessed at ages 3 and 5) is associated with latent constructs of chaos, and whether there are important reciprocal effects. Autoregressive cross-lagged path analysis suggest that increasing chaos (at both the household and maternal work levels) is associated with worse child health, controlling for key confounders like household economic status, family structure, and maternal health status. Child health has little effect on chaos, providing further support for the hypothesis that chaos is an important social determinant of child health in this sample of relatively disadvantaged children. This suggests child health may be improved by supporting families in ways that reduce chaos in their home and work/family environments, and that as researchers move beyond SES, race, and family structure to explore other sources of health inequalities, chaos and its proximate determinants may be a promising avenue for future research. PMID:23541250

Kamp Dush, Claire M; Schmeer, Kammi K; Taylor, Miles

2013-10-01

218

Social and emotional competence in traumatic brain injury: New and established assessment tools  

Microsoft Academic Search

Chronic social\\/emotional deficits are common in moderate to severe traumatic brain injury (TBI), leading to significant functional difficulties. Objective, quantitative tools for assessing social\\/emotional competence are an important adjunct to cognitive assessments. We review existing social\\/emotional measures, conclude that theory of mind tests are not adequate for clinical assessments of social competence, and explain the development and piloting of novel

Catherine A. Hynes; Valerie E. Stone; Louise A. Kelso

2011-01-01

219

Anticipatory guidance for cognitive and social-emotional development: Birth to five years  

PubMed Central

The present article serves as a quick office reference for clinicians, providing anticipatory guidance about the cognitive and social-emotional development of newborns, and children up to five years of age. The present review links recommendations to specific evidence in the medical literature, citing sources of developmental standards and advice, so that these may be further explored if desired. Practising primary care providers have indicated that these are areas of child development that are not well addressed by training and other available resources. The present article includes parenting information on important clinical presentations with which clinicians may be less familiar, such as promoting attachment, prosocial behaviours, healthy sleep habits, self-discipline and problem-solving; as well as on managing behaviours that are part of normal development, such as separation anxiety, tantrums, aggression, picky eating and specific fears. Information on the development of language, literacy and socialization are also included.

Dosman, Cara; Andrews, Debbi

2012-01-01

220

Pubertal development of the understanding of social emotions: Implications for education  

PubMed Central

Recent developmental cognitive neuroscience research has supported the notion that puberty and adolescence are periods of profound socio-emotional development. The current study was designed to investigate whether the onset of puberty marks an increase in the awareness of complex, or “mixed,” emotions. Eighty-three female participants (aged 9–16 years) were divided into three groups according to a self-report measure of puberty stage (early-, mid- and post-puberty). Participants were presented with emotional scenarios, and used four linear scales to rate their emotional response to each scenario. Scenarios were designed to evoke social emotions (embarrassment or guilt) or basic emotions (anger or fear), where social emotions are defined as those which require the representation of others' mental states. We measured the relative complexity or “mixedness” of emotional responses, that is, the degree to which participants reported feeling more than one emotion for a given scenario. We found that mixed emotion reporting increased between early- and post-puberty for social emotion scenarios, and showed no relationship with age, whereas there was no change in mixed emotion reporting for basic emotion scenarios across age or puberty groups. This suggests that the awareness of mixed emotions develops during the course of puberty, and that this development is specific to social emotions. Results are discussed in the context of brain development across puberty and adolescence, with speculation regarding the potential implications for education.

Burnett, Stephanie; Thompson, Stephanie; Bird, Geoffrey; Blakemore, Sarah-Jayne

2011-01-01

221

The Effects of Early Social-Emotional and Relationship Experience on the Development of Young Orphanage Children: The St. Petersburg-USA Orphanage Research Team  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This study represents a quasi-experimental test of the role of early social-emotional experience and adult-child relationships in the development of typically developing children and those with disabilities birth to 4 years of age living in orphanages in St. Petersburg, Russian Federation. The three orphanages in the current study were selected…

Monographs of the Society for Research in Child Development, 2008

2008-01-01

222

Social-Emotional Learning Skill, Self-Regulation, and Social Competence in Typically Developing and Clinic-Referred Children  

Microsoft Academic Search

Social-emotional learning (SEL) skill includes the ability to encode, interpret, and reason about social and emotional information. In two related studies, we examined the relationship between children's SEL skill, their ability to regulate their own behavior, and the competence of their social interactions. Study 1 included 158 typically developing children ages 4 to 14 years. Study 2 included 126 clinic-referred

Clark McKown; Laura M. Gumbiner; Nicole M. Russo; Meryl Lipton

2009-01-01

223

Temperament and Maternal Emotion Socialization Beliefs as Predictors of Early Childhood Social Behavior in the Laboratory and Classroom  

Microsoft Academic Search

Objective. The authors examined the roles of children's approach behavior and maternal emotion socialization practices in the development of social behavior in unfamiliar and familiar contexts from preschool to early childhood years. Design. At 4.5 years of age, children were observed, and an assessment of approach behavior was obtained; at this time, mothers reported about their emotion socialization beliefs. Two

Amy Kennedy Root; Cynthia Stifter

2010-01-01

224

Social-Emotional Learning Skill, Self-Regulation, and Social Competence in Typically Developing and Clinic-Referred Children  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Social-emotional learning (SEL) skill includes the ability to encode, interpret, and reason about social and emotional information. In two related studies, we examined the relationship between children's SEL skill, their ability to regulate their own behavior, and the competence of their social interactions. Study 1 included 158 typically…

McKown, Clark; Gumbiner, Laura M.; Russo, Nicole M.; Lipton, Meryl

2009-01-01

225

Understanding discrepancies in parent-child reporting of emotional and behavioural problems: Effects of relational and socio-demographic factors  

PubMed Central

Background Discrepancies between parents and children in their assessment of children's mental health affect the evaluation of need for services and must be taken seriously. This article presents the differences between parents' and children's reports of the children's symptoms and social impairment, based on the results of the Strengths and Difficulties Questionnaire (SDQ). The interrelationship between relational aspects and socio-demographic factors with patterns of disagreement are explored. Methods Differences in the prevalence and means of SDQ symptom and impact scores were obtained from 8,154 primary school children, aged between 10 and 13 years, and their parents. Agreement between matched pairs was measured using Pearson's and Spearman's rho correlations. Socio-demographic variables, communication patterns and parental engagement were analysed as possible correlates of informant discrepancies using bivariate and multivariate logistic regression models. Results In general, although children reported more symptoms, they reported less impact of perceived difficulties than parents. The parents were more consistent in their evaluation of symptoms and impact than were the children. Exploration of highly discrepant subgroups showed that, when children reported the most symptoms and impact, qualitative aspects of the parent-child relationship and family structure seemed to be more powerful predictors of disagreement than were gender of the child and socio-demographic variables. When parents reported the most symptoms and impact, low parental educational level, low income and male gender of the child played an additional role. Conclusions Our findings underline the importance of paying attention to child reports of emotional-behavioural difficulties, particularly when parents do not identify these problems. Considerations on what meaning parent-child discrepancy might have in the context of the parent-child relationship or the family's psychosocial status should be integrated in the overall understanding of the child's situation and subsequent recommendations.

2010-01-01

226

Trajectories of Parenting and Child Negative Emotionality during Infancy and Toddlerhood: A Longitudinal Analysis  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The current longitudinal study examined trajectories of child negative emotionality, parenting efficacy, and overreactive parenting among 382 adoptive families during infancy and toddlerhood. Data were collected from adoptive parents when the children were 9-, 18-, and 27-month-old. Latent growth curve modeling indicated age-related increases in…

Lipscomb, Shannon Tierney; Leve, Leslie D.; Harold, Gordon T.; Neiderhiser, Jenae M.; Shaw, Daniel S.; Ge, Xiaojia; Reiss, David

2011-01-01

227

Relationships between Child Emotional and Behavioral Symptoms and Caregiver Strain and Parenting Stress  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Children with emotional and behavioral disturbance often have difficulties in multiple symptom domains. This study investigates the relationships between child symptoms and caregiver strain and parenting stress among 177 youth and their caregivers participating in a school-based system of care. Youth were grouped by symptom domain and included…

Vaughan, Ellen L.; Feinn, Richard; Bernard, Stanley; Brereton, Maria; Kaufman, Joy S.

2013-01-01

228

Mother-Child Emotional Availability in Ecological Perspective: Three Countries, Two Regions, Two Genders  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This study used a cross-national framework to examine country, region, and gender differences in emotional availability (EA), a prominent index of mutual socioemotional adaptation in the parent-child dyad. Altogether 220 Argentine, Italian, and U.S. mothers and their daughters and sons from both rural and metropolitan areas took part in home…

Bornstein, Marc H.; Putnick, Diane L.; Heslington, Marianne; Gini, Motti; Suwalsky, Joan T. D.; Venuti, Paola; de Falco, Simona; Giusti, Zeno; de Galperin, Celia Zingman

2008-01-01

229

Shyness, Teacher-Child Relationships, and Socio-Emotional Adjustment in Grade 1  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The goal of the present study was to explore the moderating role of teacher-child relationships in the relation between shyness and socio-emotional adjustment in early elementary school. Participants were n = 169 grade 1 children (M[subscript age] = 76.93 mos, SD = 3.86). Shortly after the start of the school year (September), parents completed an…

Arbeau, Kimberley A.; Coplan, Robert J.; Weeks, Murray

2010-01-01

230

Does a Good Fit Matter? Exploring Teaching Styles, Emotion Regulation, and Child Anxiety in the Classroom  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The central goal of the present study was to examine how a child's emotion regulation ability may moderate the relations between teaching styles and anxiety in childhood. Participants were 33 children (21 males, 12 females; mean age 7.5 years, standard deviation = 0.42), their mothers and teachers. Children completed the Early Adolescent…

LaBillois, James M.; Lagace-Seguin, Daniel G.

2009-01-01

231

Written Emotional Expression as a Coping Method in Child Protective Services Officers  

Microsoft Academic Search

This study evaluated a writing intervention (journaling) to reduce stress reactions in child protective services workers. The intervention group participants were asked to write about their stress reactions or emotions in a private journal for 15–20 min each day for 3 consecutive days. The control group members were not asked to carry out any intervention activities. Participants in the intervention

Wendy K. Alford; John M. Malouff; Kristy S. Osland

2005-01-01

232

Parent-Child Relationships, Partner Relationships, and Emotional Adjustment: A Birth-to-Maturity Prospective Study  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This study examined whether detrimental childhood relationships with parents were related to partner relationship quality and emotional adjustment in adulthood. The authors tested a theoretical model in which (a) low-quality parent-child relationships were related to conflict and low-quality communication with parents in adolescence, (b)…

Overbeek, Geertjan; Stattin, Hakan; Vermulst, Ad; Ha, Thao; Engels, Rutger C. M. E.

2007-01-01

233

Children's Self-Esteem and Moral Self: Links to Parent-Child Conversations Regarding Emotion  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The current study has two aims: (1) to examine associations between the emotional content of parent-child past event conversations and two aspects of children's self-concept--moral self and self-esteem; and (2) to examine the degree to which talk about past events is uniquely associated with self-concept when compared with talk about ongoing…

Reese, Elaine; Bird, Amy; Tripp, Gail

2007-01-01

234

Associations between Parents' Marital Functioning, Maternal Parenting Quality, Maternal Emotion and Child Cortisol Levels  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Associations between family functioning and children's stress hormone levels are explored, by examining how aspects of the interparental relationship (parents' marital satisfaction and parent conflict styles), the mother-child relationship (maternal involvement and warmth) and maternal emotional functioning (depression, anxiety and self-esteem)…

Pendry, Patricia; Adam, Emma K.

2007-01-01

235

Relating Emotional Abilities to Social Functioning: A Comparison of Self-Report and Performance Measures of Emotional Intelligence  

Microsoft Academic Search

Three studies used J. D. Mayer and P. Salovey's (1997) theory of emotional intelligence (EI) as a framework to examine the role of emotional abilities (assessed with both self-report and performance measures) in social functioning. Self-ratings were assessed in ways that mapped onto the Mayer-Salovey-Caruso Emotional Intelligence Test (MSCEIT), a validated performance measure of EI. In Study 1, self-ratings and

Marc A. Brackett; Susan E. Rivers; Sara Shiffman; Nicole Lerner; Peter Salovey

2006-01-01

236

Children's negative emotions and ego-resiliency: longitudinal relations with social competence.  

PubMed

We examined the relations of negative emotions in toddlerhood to the development of ego-resiliency and social competence across early childhood. Specifically, we addressed whether fear and anger/frustration in 30-month-old children (N = 213) was associated with the development of ego-resiliency across 4 time points (42 to 84 months), and, in turn, whether ego-resiliency predicted social competence at 84 months. Child anger/frustration negatively predicted the intercept of ego-resiliency at 42 months (controlling for prior ego-resiliency at 18 months) as well as the slope. Fear did not significantly predict either the intercept or slope of ego-resiliency in the structural model, although it was positively correlated with anger/frustration and was negatively related to ego-resiliency in zero-order correlations. The slope of ego-resiliency was positively related to children's social competence at 84 months; however, the intercept of ego-resiliency (set at 42 months) was not a significant predictor of later social competence. Furthermore, the slope of ego-resiliency mediated the relations between anger/frustration and children's later social competence. The results suggest that individual differences in anger/frustration might contribute to the development of ego-resiliency, which, in turn, is associated with children's social competence. PMID:24364850

Taylor, Zoe E; Eisenberg, Nancy; VanSchyndel, Sarah K; Eggum-Wilkens, Natalie D; Spinrad, Tracy L

2014-04-01

237

The social functions of the emotion of gratitude via expression.  

PubMed

Recent theory posits that the emotion of gratitude uniquely functions to build a high-quality relationship between a grateful person and the target of his or her gratitude, that is, the person who performed a kind action (Algoe et al., 2008). Therefore, gratitude is a prime candidate for testing the dyadic question of whether one person's grateful emotion has consequences for the other half of the relational unit, the person who is the target of that gratitude. The current study tests the critical hypothesis that being the target of gratitude forecasts one's relational growth with the person who expresses gratitude. The study employed a novel behavioral task in which members of romantic relationships expressed gratitude to one another in a laboratory paradigm. As predicted, the target's greater perceptions of the expresser's responsiveness after the interaction significantly predicted improvements in relationship quality over 6 months. These effects were independent from perceptions of responsiveness following two other types of relationally important and emotionally evocative social interactions in the lab, suggesting the unique weight that gratitude carries in cultivating social bonds. PMID:23731434

Algoe, Sara B; Fredrickson, Barbara L; Gable, Shelly L

2013-08-01

238

Longitudinal pathways linking child maltreatment, emotion regulation, peer relations, and psychopathology  

PubMed Central

Background The aim of this study was to investigate longitudinal relations among child maltreatment, emotion regulation, peer acceptance and rejection, and psychopathology. Methods Data were collected on 215 maltreated and 206 nonmaltreated children (ages 6–12 years) from low-income families. Children were evaluated by camp counselors on emotion regulation and internalizing and externalizing symptomatology and were nominated by peers for peer acceptance and rejection. Results Structural equation modeling analyses revealed that experiencing neglect, physical and/or sexual abuse, multiple maltreatment subtypes, and earlier onset of maltreatment were related to emotion dysregulation. Lower emotion regulation (Time 1) was associated with higher externalizing symptomatology (Time 1) that contributed to later peer rejection (Time 2), which in turn was related to higher externalizing symptomatology (Time 2). Conversely, higher emotion regulation was predictive of higher peer acceptance over time, which was related to lower internalizing symptomatology controlling for initial levels of symptomatology. Conclusions The findings emphasize the important role of emotion regulation as a risk or a protective mechanism in the link between earlier child maltreatment and later psychopathology through its influences on peer relations.

Kim, Jungmeen; Cicchetti, Dante

2012-01-01

239

Social and emotional difficulties in children with ADHD and the impact on school attendance and healthcare utilization  

PubMed Central

Background The objective of this study was to examine the impact of co-occurring social and emotional difficulties on missed school days and healthcare utilization among children with attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). Methods Data were from the 2007 U.S. National Health Interview Survey (NHIS) and were based on parental proxy responses to questions in the Sample Child Core, which includes questions on demographics, health, healthcare treatment, and social and emotional status as measured by questions about depression, anxiety, and phobias, as well as items from the brief version of the Strength and Difficulties Questionnaire (SDQ). Logistic regression was used to assess the association between co-occurring social and emotional difficulties with missed school days and healthcare utilization, adjusting for demographics. Results Of the 5896 children aged 6–17 years in the 2007 NHIS, 432 (7.3%) had ADHD, based on parental report. Children with ADHD and comorbid depression, anxiety, or phobias had significantly greater odds of experiencing > 2 weeks of missed school days, ? 6 visits to a healthcare provider (HCP), and ? 2 visits to the ER, compared with ADHD children without those comorbidities (OR range: 2.1 to 10.4). Significantly greater odds of missed school days, HCP visits, and ER visits were also experienced by children with ADHD who were worried, unhappy/depressed, or having emotional difficulties as assessed by the SDQ, compared with ADHD children without those difficulties (OR range: 2.2 to 4.4). Conclusions In children with ADHD, the presence of social and emotional problems resulted in greater odds of missed school days and healthcare utilization. These findings should be viewed in light of the limited nature of the parent-report measures used to assess social and emotional problems.

2012-01-01

240

Beyond arousal and valence: The importance of the biological versus social relevance of emotional stimuli  

PubMed Central

The present study addressed the hypothesis that emotional stimuli relevant to survival or reproduction (biologically emotional stimuli) automatically affect cognitive processing (e.g., attention; memory), while those relevant to social life (socially emotional stimuli) require elaborative processing to modulate attention and memory. Results of our behavioral studies showed that: a) biologically emotional images hold attention more strongly than socially emotional images, b) memory for biologically emotional images was enhanced even with limited cognitive resources, but c) memory for socially emotional images was enhanced only when people had sufficient cognitive resources at encoding. Neither images’ subjective arousal nor their valence modulated these patterns. A subsequent functional magnetic resonance imaging study revealed that biologically emotional images induced stronger activity in visual cortex and greater functional connectivity between amygdala and visual cortex than did socially emotional images. These results suggest that the interconnection between the amygdala and visual cortex supports enhanced attention allocation to biological stimuli. In contrast, socially emotional images evoked greater activity in medial prefrontal cortex (MPFC) and yielded stronger functional connectivity between amygdala and MPFC than biological images. Thus, it appears that emotional processing of social stimuli involves elaborative processing requiring frontal lobe activity.

Sakaki, Michiko; Niki, Kazuhisa; Mather, Mara

2012-01-01

241

Emotional Closeness with Perpetrators and Amnesia for Child Sexual Abuse  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Over the past decade, a contentious debate regarding delayed memories of childhood sexual abuse (CSA) has existed. In order to address this debate, 240 female participants completed questions about CSA, the Dissociative Experience Scale (Bernstein & Putnam, 1986), Perceived Emotional Closeness with Perpetrator Scale (Schultz, Passmore, & Yoder,…

Schultz, Tammy; Passmore, J. Lawrence; Yoder, C. Y.

2003-01-01

242

Child Abuse and Aggression Among Seriously Emotionally Disturbed Children  

Microsoft Academic Search

Abused children may be at risk for problems with aggression. In a sample of 397 seriously emotionally disturbed children, reactive aggression was associated with documented history of physical abuse but not sexual abuse. Girls were equally likely to be classified as reactively aggressive regardless of physical abuse history, but boys with physical abuse histories were 50% more likely to be

Julian D. Ford; Lisa A. Fraleigh; Daniel F. Connor

2009-01-01

243

Facial Emotion Recognition in Child Psychiatry: A Systematic Review  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This review focuses on facial affect (emotion) recognition in children and adolescents with psychiatric disorders other than autism. A systematic search, using PRISMA guidelines, was conducted to identify original articles published prior to October 2011 pertaining to face recognition tasks in case-control studies. Used in the qualitative…

Collin, Lisa; Bindra, Jasmeet; Raju, Monika; Gillberg, Christopher; Minnis, Helen

2013-01-01

244

A MAGNA CARTA FOR THE EMOTIONALLY DISTURBED CHILD.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

IN AN ADDRESS, THE AUTHOR ANTICIPATED BARRIERS AND PROBLEMS WHICH MIGHT ARISE WHEN JULY 1, 1966, LEGISLATION BECAME EFFECTIVE, REQUIRING SCHOOL DISTRICTS TO PROVIDE APPROPRIATE EDUCATION FOR EMOTIONALLY DISTURBED CHILDREN. ASPECTS INCLUDED ARE PROBLEMS OF DEFINITION AND DIAGNOSIS, COMMUNITY RESPONSIBILITIES IN PROVIDING COOPERATIVE MEDICAL AND…

SIMCHES, RAPHAEL F.

245

Child Abuse and Aggression among Seriously Emotionally Disturbed Children  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Abused children may be at risk for problems with aggression. In a sample of 397 seriously emotionally disturbed children, reactive aggression was associated with documented history of physical abuse but not sexual abuse. Girls were equally likely to be classified as reactively aggressive regardless of physical abuse history, but boys with physical…

Ford, Julian D.; Fraleigh, Lisa A.; Connor, Daniel F.

2010-01-01

246

The Importance of Emotional and Social Isolation to Loneliness among Very Old Rural Adults.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Examined relative importance of emotional and social isolation to loneliness among very old rural adults (n=119). Found that emotional isolation, specifically loss of spouse, accounted for more loneliness than did social isolation. Hearing acuity and visits with siblings (social isolation variables) also were significant predictors of loneliness.…

Dugan, Elizabeth; Kivett, Vira R.

1994-01-01

247

The Social and Emotional Development of Gifted Children: What Do We Know?  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This text on the social and emotional development of gifted children includes the following 24 papers: (1) "Effects of Acceleration on Gifted Learners" (Karen Rogers); (2) "Peer Pressures and Social Acceptance of Gifted Students" (Sylvia Rimm); (3) "Social and Emotional Issues for Exceptional Intellectually Gifted Students" (Miraca Gross); (4)…

Neihart, Maureen, Ed.; Reis, Sally M., Ed.; Robinson, Nancy M., Ed.; Moon, Sidney M., Ed.

248

Using Social and Emotional Learning to Foster Academic Achievement in Secondary Mathematics  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Teaching social-emotional skills to secondary students has been linked to higher student achievement, more positive student motivation and more socially acceptable classroom behaviors (Elias & Arnold, 2006; Weissburg et al., 2003; Kress et al., 2004). Much of the current literature on social-emotional learning (SEL) focuses on research. This piece…

Jones, Jennifer L.; Jones, Karrie A.; Vermette, Paul J.

2009-01-01

249

Teacher and Observer Ratings of Young African American Children's Social and Emotional Competence  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Children's social and emotional competence abilities have been linked to successful social interactions and academic performance. This study examined the teacher and observer ratings of social and emotional competence for 89 young (3- to 5-year-old), African American children from economically stressed urban environments. There was a specific…

Humphries, Marisha L.; Keenan, Kate; Wakschlag, Lauren S.

2012-01-01

250

Emotion regulation in social anxiety disorder: behavioral and neural responses to three socio-emotional tasks  

PubMed Central

Background Social anxiety disorder (SAD) is thought to involve deficits in emotion regulation, and more specifically, deficits in cognitive reappraisal. However, evidence for such deficits is mixed. Methods Using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) of blood oxygen-level dependent (BOLD) signal, we examined reappraisal-related behavioral and neural responses in 27 participants with generalized SAD and 27 healthy controls (HC) during three socio-emotional tasks: (1) looming harsh faces (Faces); (2) videotaped actors delivering social criticism (Criticism); and (3) written autobiographical negative self-beliefs (Beliefs). Results Behaviorally, compared to HC, participants with SAD had lesser reappraisal-related reduction in negative emotion in the Beliefs task. Neurally, compared to HC, participants with SAD had lesser BOLD responses in reappraisal-related brain regions when reappraising faces, in visual and attention related regions when reappraising criticism, and in the left superior temporal gyrus when reappraising beliefs. Examination of the temporal dynamics of BOLD responses revealed late reappraisal-related increased responses in HC, compared to SAD. In addition, the dorsomedial prefrontal cortex (DMPFC), which showed reappraisal-related increased activity in both groups, had similar temporal dynamics in SAD and HC during the Faces and Criticism tasks, but greater late response increases in HC, compared to SAD, during the Beliefs task. Reappraisal-related greater late DMPFC responses were associated with greater percent reduction in negative emotion ratings in SAD patients. Conclusions These results suggest a dysfunction of cognitive reappraisal in SAD patients, with overall reduced late brain responses in prefrontal regions, particularly when reappraising faces. Decreased late activity in the DMPFC might be associated with deficient reappraisal and greater negative reactivity. Trial registration ClinicalTrials.gov identifier: NCT00380731

2013-01-01

251

Parent-Child and Triadic Antecedents of Children's Social Competence: Cultural Specificity, Shared Process  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Guided by theories of cultural participation, the authors examined mother-child, father-child, and triadic interactive behaviors in 141 Israeli and Palestinian couples and their firstborn child at 5 and 33 months as antecedents of children's social competence. Four parent-child measures (parent sensitivity, child social engagement, parental…

Feldman, Ruth; Masalha, Shafiq

2010-01-01

252

Child Development and Social Studies Curriculum Design: Toward a Rationale.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This paper is a working draft of a study which has examined the accumulated research on child growth and development. The draft is designed as an input paper to enable the Marin Social Studies Project to refine its rationale and criteria for a recommended K-12 social studies program of curriculum options. Identification of the capabilities of…

Knox, Gary A.

253

Parent Imprisonment and Child Socialization Research Project. Executive Summary.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This executive summary reports on an investigation of the impact of parent-absence on the socialization of black children. Four different studies were conducted by the Parent Improvement and Child Socialization Project among respondents identified through lists of inmates supplied by the D.C. Department of Corrections and by visits to penal…

Howard Univ., Washington, DC. Dept. of Psychology.

254

The Ambiguity of the Child's "Voice" in Social Research  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This article addresses the ambiguity of the child's "voice" in social research. Drawing on a recent research project on young children's communication difficulties, the author argues that the currently popular discourse on "listening to children" is beset with practical and ethical ambiguities that result from the "socialness" of human…

Komulainen, Sirkka

2007-01-01

255

Longitudinal Associations among Child Maltreatment, Social Functioning, and Cortisol Regulation  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Child maltreatment increases the risk for impaired social functioning and cortisol regulation. However, the longitudinal interplay among these factors is still unclear. This study aimed to shed light on the effect of maltreatment on social functioning and cortisol regulation over time. The sample consisted of 236 children (mean age 7.64 years, SD…

Alink, Lenneke R. A.; Cicchetti, Dante; Kim, Jungmeen; Rogosch, Fred A.

2012-01-01

256

A review of key issues in the measurement of children’s social and emotional skills  

Microsoft Academic Search

Recent policy developments (such as the Children’s Plan) and the introduction of a new national strategy (the Social and Emotional Aspects of Learning programme) have re?emphasised the importance of social and emotional skills in educational contexts. As such, educational psychologists are increasingly likely to be involved in the measurement of social and emotional skills, either as part of their case?work

Michael Wigelsworth; Neil Humphrey; Afroditi Kalambouka; Ann Lendrum

2010-01-01

257

Aspects of Social and Emotional Competence in Adult Attention-Deficit\\/Hyperactivity Disorder  

Microsoft Academic Search

Social and emotional competence were evaluated using self-report and behavioral measures in adults with attention-deficit\\/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) and controls. Adults with ADHD viewed themselves as less socially competent but more sensitive toward violations of social norms than controls. Films depicting emotional interactions were used to assess linguistic properties of free recall and perceived emotional intensity. Although adults with ADHD used

Sara R. Friedman; Lisa J. Rapport; Mark Lumley; Angela Tzelepis; Amy VanVoorhis; Lawrence Stettner; Laura Kakaati

2003-01-01

258

Aspects of social and emotional competence in adult attention-deficit\\/hyperactivity disorder  

Microsoft Academic Search

Wayne State University Social and emotional competence were evaluated using self-report and behavioral measures in adults with attention-deficit\\/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) and controls. Adults with ADHD viewed themselves as less socially competent but more sensitive toward violations of social norms than controls. Films depicting emotional interactions were used to assess linguistic properties of free recall and perceived emotional intensity. Although adults

Sara R. Friedman; Lisa J. Rapport; Mark Lumley; Angela Tzelepis; Amy VanVoorhis; Lawrence Stettner; Laura Kakaati

2003-01-01

259

[Judgements and emotional reactions about socially unjust situations].  

PubMed

Our research studies investigated situations involving perceived social injustice. In the first study, we collected 79 items involving unjust situations from 213 undergraduate students. Then, 270 undergraduates completed a questionnaire evaluating the social injustice for these situations. The results of a factor analysis showed that these 79 unjust situations could be classified into four types: (a) deviation from social norms, (b) inhumanity, (c) lack of economic benefit, and (d) deviation from interpersonal norms. In a second research study, we collected 124 items involving unjust situations from 599 undergraduates. The results of factor analyses of data from 386 undergraduates showed eight factors: (a) deviation from public rule, (b) deviation from public manner, (c) violence, (d) misery, (e) low benefit, (f) others benefit by incorrect ways, (g) aggression against others, and (h) lack of concern for others. In a third study, we measured the emotional reactions of 224 undergraduates for 96 of the unjust situations collected in Study 2. The results showed that the emotional reactions differed for each unjust situation. PMID:21400862

Nakamura, Shinsuke; Morikami, Yukio; Nishisako, Seiichiro; Kuwabara, Takashi

2011-02-01

260

The indirect effects of maternal emotion socialization on friendship quality in middle childhood.  

PubMed

Emotion development processes have long been linked to social competence in early childhood but rarely have these associations been examined in middle childhood or with relational outcomes. Guided by theories of interpersonal relationships and emotion socialization, the current study was designed to fill these gaps by examining a longitudinal process model indirectly linking emotion development to friendship quality. Data were drawn from 336 children (179 girls, 65% White), their mothers, and their teachers across 3 time points spanning the ages of 5-10 years. A path analysis model was utilized to examine the way in which maternal emotion socialization indirectly affects children's friendship quality. Results supported the hypothesized model in which maternal emotion socialization strategies used when children were age 5 were associated with changes in friendship quality from ages 7 to 10 via changes in children's emotion regulation. Findings highlight the importance of emotional processes for relational outcomes in middle childhood. PMID:23795555

Blair, Bethany L; Perry, Nicole B; O'Brien, Marion; Calkins, Susan D; Keane, Susan P; Shanahan, Lilly

2014-02-01

261

Child Temperament Moderates Effects of Parent-Child Mutuality on Self-Regulation: A Relationship-Based Path for Emotionally Negative Infants  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This study examined infants' negative emotionality as moderating the effect of parent-child mutually responsive orientation (MRO) on children's self-regulation (n = 102). Negative emotionality was observed in anger-eliciting episodes and in interactions with parents at 7 months. MRO was coded in naturalistic interactions at 15 months.…

Kim, Sanghag; Kochanska, Grazyna

2012-01-01

262

The Facilitation of Social-Emotional Understanding and Social Interaction in High-Functioning Children with Autism: Intervention Outcomes  

Microsoft Academic Search

This study evaluated the effectiveness of a 7-month cognitive behavioral intervention for the facilitation of the social-emotional understanding and social interaction of 15 high-functioning children (8 to 17 years old) with autism. Intervention focused on teaching interpersonal problem solving, affective knowledge, and social interaction. Preintervention and postintervention measures included observations of social interaction, measures of problem solving and of emotion

Nirit Bauminger

2002-01-01

263

Social determiants of parent-child interaction in the UK  

Microsoft Academic Search

BackgroundResearch has shown that activities such as play and reading are beneficial for the development of a child. This study examined the social and demographic characteristics of mothers who play with, read to and tell stories to their child, using data from the UK-wide Millennium Cohort Study (MCS).MethodsData were obtained from 14 034 mothers of singleton 5-year-old children. Using data

R L Brocklebank; H Bedford; L Griffiths

2011-01-01

264

Assessment of young children's social-emotional development and psychopathology: recent advances and recommendations for practice.  

PubMed

In this paper we have tried to document some of the recent advances in the conceptualization and assessment of early-emerging social-emotional and behavior problems, competencies, and psychopathology. Considerable evidence documents that young children evidence significant psychopathology (cf., Del Carmen & Carter, in press; Emde, 1999; Zeanah, 2001; Zeanah et al., 1997). Given the range of new assessment measures that have become available over the past 10 years, the field of young child mental health is poised for dramatic gains in knowledge. It is critical to conduct large-scale, longitudinal, epidemiological studies to inform our understanding of the course of psychopathological conditions within the context of a normative developmental framework. Multi-method, multi-informant assessment approaches are more essential in early childhood due to young children's inability to provide self-reports and the embedded nature of children's development in their caregiving contexts. Screening large representative samples affords the opportunity to ascertain unbiased clinically informative sub-samples for methodologically intensive sub-studies. These sub-studies can address the child's cognitive and linguistic developmental capacities as well as utilize observational methods to examine the relational context. This approach provides an opportunity to merge dimensional and diagnostic assessments and will yield critical information for disentangling continuities and discontinuities in normative and atypical development. The assessment methodology currently exists to routinely screen very young children for social-emotional and behavior problems as well as delays in the acquisition of competencies in pediatric settings as well as in early intervention programs. Yet, despite the likely long-term benefits and cost-saving potential of early identification and intervention services, short-term cost and knowledge barriers currently limit widespread implementation. Discussions with pediatricians suggest that one of the greatest barriers to screening is the limited availability of mental health referral sources. Indeed, very few children who are rated by parents as having elevated social-emotional and behavior problems are receiving any behavioral health services (Horwitz et al., in press). Unmet mental health needs exist among non-referred children in the community as well as among children receiving early intervention services for developmental concerns. Documenting the mental health needs of young children may promote training of professionals who have the competence to treat young children and their families. Moreover, the availability of social-emotional and behavior problem assessment tools should increase studies that focus on the clinical efficacy and effectiveness of prevention and early intervention programs designed to promote positive mental health. Finally, although significant progress is occurring in the arena of young child diagnosis, a strong case can be made for intervening when young children are exhibiting elevations in problem behaviors or delays in the acquisition of competence. This is particularly true when children are also experiencing exposure to multiple contextual risk factors. It is therefore important to advocate for changes to systems that require child diagnosis as a gateway to intervention. As we learn more about the precursors or prodromal manifestations of clinical psychopathology we will be able to examine the efficacy of earlier targeted preventive intervention approaches. PMID:14959805

Carter, Alice S; Briggs-Gowan, Margaret J; Davis, Naomi Ornstein

2004-01-01

265

Impact of a College Freshman Social and Emotional Learning Curriculum on Student Learning Outcomes: An Exploratory Study  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This study investigates the impact of implementing a social and emotional learning curriculum for college freshmen on student learning outcomes, including social and emotional competence and academic performance. Through the use of a quasi-experimental design, the growth in social and emotional competence of students who participated in the social

Wang, Ning; Wilhite, Stephen C.; Wyatt, Jeannette; Young, Thomas; Bloemker, Geraldine; Wilhite, Emily

2012-01-01

266

Child Emotion Regulation and Attentional Control in Pre-Kindergarten: Associations with Parental Stress, Parenting Practices, and Parent-Child Interaction Quality  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This study focuses on three aspects of parenting that have been linked theoretically and empirically with the development of child emotion regulation and attention control skills in early childhood: 1) parental stress and distress, 2) the degree of warmth and sensitivity evident in the parent-child relationship, and 3) parental support for the…

Mathis, Erin; Bierman, Karen

2012-01-01

267

European-American and African-American Mothers' Emotion Socialization Practices Relate Differently to Their Children's Academic and Social-Emotional Competence  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The current study examines whether the relation between mothers' responses to their children's negative emotions and teachers' reports of children's academic performance and social-emotional competence are similar or different for European-American and African-American families. Two hundred mothers (137 European-American, 63…

Nelson, Jackie A.; Leerkes, Esther M.; Perry, Nicole B.; O'Brien, Marion; Calkins, Susan D.; Marcovitch, Stuart

2013-01-01

268

Emotion Regulation and Peer-Rated Social Functioning: A Four-Year Longitudinal Study  

PubMed Central

Different emotion regulation strategies have been linked to distinct social outcomes, but only concurrently or in the short-term. The present research employed a four-year longitudinal design with peer-reported measures of social functioning to examine the long-term social effects of emotion regulation. Individual differences in suppression before entering college predicted weaker social connections (e.g., less close relationships) at the end of college, whereas reappraisal predicted stronger social connections and more favorable sociometric standing (e.g., higher social status). These effects of emotion regulation remained intact even when controlling for baseline social functioning and Big Five personality traits. These findings suggest that individual differences in the use of particular emotion regulation strategies have an enduring impact, shaping the individual’s social environment over time.

English, Tammy; John, Oliver P.; Srivastava, Sanjay; Gross, James J.

2012-01-01

269

Subjective emotional over-arousal to neutral social scenes in paranoid schizophrenia  

Microsoft Academic Search

From the clinical practice and some experimental studies, it is apparent that paranoid schizophrenia patients tend to assign\\u000a emotional salience to neutral social stimuli. This aberrant cognitive bias has been conceptualized to result from increased\\u000a emotional arousal, but direct empirical data are scarce. The aim of the present study was to quantify the subjective emotional\\u000a arousal (SEA) evoked by emotionally

Evelina Haralanova; Svetlozar Haralanov; Anna Beraldi; Hans-Jürgen Möller; Kristina Hennig-Fast

270

Associations between social anxiety and emotional intelligence within clinically depressed patients.  

PubMed

Impairments in emotional intelligence (EI) have been found in individuals with high general and social anxiety; however, no studies have examined this relationship in a clinically depressed population. Thirty-one patients (11 male, 20 female) with a DSM-IV-TR diagnosis of a major affective disorder and 28 non-clinical controls (5 male, 23 female) completed self-report instruments assessing EI, depression and social anxiety. Compared to a control group, the clinical group scored lower on the EI dimensions of Emotional Recognition and Expression, Understanding Emotions, Emotional Management, and Emotional Control. Regression analyses revealed Emotional Control was a significant predictor of interaction, performance, and generalised social anxiety. Self-report measures of EI may have predictive value in terms of early identification of those at risk of developing social anxiety and depression. The current study points to the potential value of conducting further studies of a prospective nature. PMID:23632828

Nolidin, Karen; Downey, Luke A; Hansen, Karen; Schweitzer, Issac; Stough, Con

2013-12-01

271

Child temperament moderates effects of parent-child mutuality on self-regulation: a relationship-based path for emotionally negative infants.  

PubMed

This study examined infants' negative emotionality as moderating the effect of parent-child mutually responsive orientation (MRO) on children's self-regulation (n=102). Negative emotionality was observed in anger-eliciting episodes and in interactions with parents at 7 months. MRO was coded in naturalistic interactions at 15 months. Self-regulation was measured at 25 months in effortful control battery and as self-regulated compliance to parental requests and prohibitions. Negative emotionality moderated the effects of mother-child, but not father-child, MRO. Highly negative infants were less self-regulated when they were in unresponsive relationships (low MRO), but more self-regulated when in responsive relationships (high MRO). For infants not prone to negative emotionality, there was no link between MRO and self-regulation. The "regions of significance" analysis supported the differential susceptibility model not the diathesis-stress model. PMID:22670684

Kim, Sanghag; Kochanska, Grazyna

2012-01-01

272

An intervention aimed at helping parents with their emotional attunement to their child.  

PubMed

Comfort Zone for Children is an intervention that practitioners in a range of settings can use in their work with parents, with the aim of enhancing parental emotional attunement to their child. This article describes the development and evaluation of the intervention using preliminary outcomes, focus groups and interviews with staff and parents. The ongoing development of the intervention in the light of the feedback and future development is discussed. PMID:23646815

McLackland, Brenda; Channon, Sue; Fowles, Kathryn; Jones, Laura Ashley

2013-04-01

273

Preparing Your Child for Social Situations  

MedlinePLUS

... your child teased about? Was it a mean comment, a joke that went bad, or a remark based on a lack of understanding? After looking ... Conference For the Win! 3 weeks ago , 1 Comment Summer Surgery is on the Calendar Today , No ...

274

Effects of a Social-Emotional and Character Development Program on the Trajectory of Behaviors Associated with Social-Emotional and Character Development: Findings from Three Randomized Trials  

Microsoft Academic Search

The effects of a school-based social-emotional and character development program, Positive Action, on the developmental trajectory of social-emotional and character-related behaviors was evaluated using data from three\\u000a school-based randomized trials in elementary schools. Results come from 1) 4 years of data from students in 20 Hawai’i schools,\\u000a 2) 3 years of data from students in 14 schools in Chicago and 3) 3 years

Isaac J. Washburn; Alan Acock; Sam Vuchinich; Frank Snyder; Kin-Kit Li; Peter Ji; Joseph Day; David DuBois; Brian R. Flay

2011-01-01

275

Fast recognition of social emotions takes the whole brain: Interhemispheric cooperation in the absence of cerebral asymmetry  

Microsoft Academic Search

Hemispheric asymmetry in emotional perception has been traditionally studied for basic emotions and very little is known about laterality for more complex social emotions. Here, we used the “redundant target paradigm” to investigate interhemispheric asymmetry and cooperation for two social emotions in healthy subjects. Facial expressions of flirtatiousness or arrogance were briefly presented either unilaterally in the left (LVF) or

Marco Tamietto; Mauro Adenzato; Giuliano Geminiani; Beatrice de Gelder

2007-01-01

276

Neuroimaging in Disorders of Social and Emotional Functioning: What Is the Question?  

Microsoft Academic Search

Social and emotional processing uses neural systems involving structures ranging from the brain stem to the associational cortex. Neuroimaging research has attempted to identify abnormalities in components of these systems that would underlie the behavioral abnormalities seen in disorders of social and emotional processing, notably autism spectrum disorders, the focus of this review. However, the findings have been variable. The

Martha R. Herbert

2004-01-01

277

Predicting Teacher Commitment: The Impact of School Climate and Social-Emotional Learning  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The aim of this study was to investigate whether school climate and social-emotional learning impact teacher commitment. The sample included 664 public schoolteachers from British Columbia and Ontario in Canada. Participants completed an online questionnaire about teacher commitment, school climate, and social-emotional learning. Binary logistic…

Collie, Rebecca J.; Shapka, Jennifer D.; Perry, Nancy E.

2011-01-01

278

The Role of Emotion Regulation in the Social Problems of Boys With Developmental Delays  

Microsoft Academic Search

Parents and teachers reported that 6- to 8-year-old boys with developmental delays were less able to regulate their emotions than nondelayed boys matched on chronological age. Compared to nondelayed boys, boys with developmental delays had more social problems, which persisted and increased over a 3-year period. Children's ability to regulate their emotions explained significant variance in their social problems after

Beverly J. Wilson; Siobhan Fernandes-Richards; Cyrena Aarskog; Teresa Osborn; Darla Capetillo

2007-01-01

279

Emotional Intelligence, Social Coping, and Psychological Distress among Chinese Gifted Students in Hong Kong  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The relationships among emotional intelligence, social coping, and psychological distress were investigated in a sample of 624 Chinese gifted students in Hong Kong. A mediation-effect model specifying that emotional intelligence had an effect on psychological distress mediated by social coping was hypothesized and tested using structural equation…

Chan, David W.

2005-01-01

280

Social-Emotional School Readiness: How Do We Ensure Children Are Ready to Learn?  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This article begins with a review of research providing evidence that social-emotional competence is a key component of school readiness and that the foundations for social-emotional competence are laid down in the earliest years. We go on to review effective practices and specific interventions that have been found to strengthen children's…

Gray, Sarah A. O.; Herberle, Amy E.; Carter, Alice S.

2012-01-01

281

Understanding How Social and Emotional Skill Deficits Contribute to School Failure  

Microsoft Academic Search

A growing number of children are entering kindergarten without the skills that enable them to be successful in an academic setting. However, it is not children's cognitive skills that concern educators; it is their social and emotional skill deficits that are most troublesome. This article discusses how family and community risk factors can inhibit social and emotional development (i.e., skills

Kathryn S. Whitted

2011-01-01

282

Casting the Conceptual Net: Cognitive Possibilities for Embracing the Social and Emotional Richness of Art Education  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Although the argument for art as cognition has gained significant momentum since the cognitive revolution, recent scientific investigations of cognition have revealed the import of social and emotional thinking for meaningful, contextualized learning, thereby highlighting the inherent social and emotional properties of artmaking as inevitably…

Blatt-Gross, Carolina

2010-01-01

283

A Study of Social-Emotional Adjustment Levels of Preschool Children in Relation to Peer Relationships  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The aim of this research is to study social--emotional adaptation levels of 5-to 6-year old preschool children in relation to peer relationships. One hundred and forty-four children aged between 5 and 6 joined in this relational survey study. According to the results of the research analysing the relationship between the social-emotional

Gülay, Hülya; Önder, Alev

2013-01-01

284

Promoting Social and Emotional Learning with Games: "It's Fun and We Learn Things"  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This article has two broad objectives: (a) It reviews the theoretical and practical literature on the use of games to facilitate social and emotional learning (SEL). (b) Based on this review, it argues that games are a powerful way of developing social and emotional learning in young people. In addition, we draw on our collective experience as…

Hromek, Robyn; Roffey, Sue

2009-01-01

285

The Prosocial Classroom: Teacher Social and Emotional Competence in Relation to Student and Classroom Outcomes  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The authors propose a model of the prosocial classroom that highlights the importance of teachers' social and emotional competence (SEC) and well-being in the development and maintenance of supportive teacher-student relationships, effective classroom management, and successful social and emotional learning program implementation. This model…

Jennings, Patricia A.; Greenberg, Mark T.

2009-01-01

286

The Relationships among Language Ability, Emotion Regulation and Social Competence in Second-Grade Students  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Relationships exist between language ability, emotion regulation, and social competence in preschool children. This study examines how these relationships function in elementary school children, and explores whether language ability partially mediates the relationship between emotion regulation and social competence. Second-grade students (N = 67)…

Monopoli, W. John; Kingston, Sharon

2012-01-01

287

Moderators of the Relation between Shyness and Behavior with Peers: Cortisol Dysregulation and Maternal Emotion Socialization  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This study investigated the relations among shyness, physiological dysregulation, and maternal emotion socialization in predicting children's social behavior with peers during the kindergarten year (N = 66; 29 girls). For shy children, interactions with peers represent potential stressors that can elicit negative emotion and physiological…

Davis, Elizabeth L.; Buss, Kristin A.

2012-01-01

288

A Review of the Beck Youth Inventories of Emotional and Social Impairment  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This review focused on the Beck Youth Inventories of Emotional and Social Impairment (BYI) [Beck, J., Beck, A., & Jolly, J. (2001). Beck Youth Inventories of Emotional and Social Impairment manual. San Antonio: Psychological Corporation]. The BYI were designed as self-report instruments for assessing maladaptive cognitions and behaviors of…

Bose-Deakins, Jillayne E.; Floyd, Randy G.

2004-01-01

289

Nurture Groups in School and at Home: Connecting with Children with Social, Emotional and Behavioural Difficulties  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This book explores the ways in which pupils with social, emotional and behavioural difficulties can be effectively engaged in schooling -- either in school or at home. It explains the social and emotional underpinnings of learning and presents practical strategies for aiding engagement. "Nurture Groups", originally devised and implemented in the…

Cooper, Paul; Tiknaz, Yonca

2007-01-01

290

It's Time We Teach Social-Emotional Competence as Well as We Teach Academic Competence  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This article discusses the non-academic, social-emotional factors that contribute to student academic achievement, including the cognitive-behavioral characteristics of underachieving students and those with learning disabilities; the "You Can Do It! Education" (YCDI) theory of achievement; derivative research on social-emotional capabilities,…

Bernard, Michael E.

2006-01-01

291

Explaining Elevated Social Anxiety Among Asian Americans: Emotional Attunement and a Cultural Double Bind  

Microsoft Academic Search

Previous research has documented elevated levels of social anxiety in Asian American college students when compared with their European American peers. The authors hypothesized that higher symptoms among Asians could be explained by cultural differences in attunement to the emotional states of others. Socialization within interdependent cultures may cultivate concerns about accurately perceiving other's emotional responses, yet at the same

Anna S. Lau; Joey Fung; Shu-wen Wang; Sun-Mee Kang

2009-01-01

292

Identification of Social-Emotional Problems among Young Children in Foster Care  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Background: Little is known about how best to implement behavioral screening recommendations in practice, especially for children in foster care, who are at risk for having social-emotional problems. Two validated screening tools are recommended for use with young children: the Ages and Stages Questionnaire: Social Emotional (ASQ-SE) identifies…

Jee, Sandra H.; Conn, Anne-Marie; Szilagyi, Peter G.; Blumkin, Aaron; Baldwin, Constance D.; Szilagyi, Moira A.

2010-01-01

293

Look How Far We Have Come: Assessing Children's Social and Emotional Development throughout the School Year  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Educators of young children know how important children's social and emotional development is, not only in terms of developing empathy, compassion, friendships, confidence and the like, but also as an essential component of cognitive growth. As children gain skills in the social/emotional domain, they build language and problem-solving skills, as…

Burrington, Barbara

2006-01-01

294

Kentucky's Early Childhood Professional Development Initiative to Promote Social-Emotional Competence  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This article examines the Kentucky Initiative for Social Skill and Emotional Development which provides annual training and technical assistance to build early childhood programs' capacity to deliver practices known to promote social and emotional competency. The initiative is based on the 3-tiered Positive Behavior Support model that teaches…

McLaren, Elizabeth M.; Hall, Phyllis J.; Fox, Pamela

2009-01-01

295

Participation and Emotions: Troubling Encounters between Children and Social Welfare Professionals  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This paper explores the emotional aspects of participation within social welfare contexts. The focus is on individual professionals, such as social workers and children's rights workers and their articulation, management and negotiation of the emotional when working with children and young people. The institutions of welfare are also shown to be…

Pinkney, Sharon

2011-01-01

296

The Personal-Emotional Social Adjustment of English-Language Learners to a Community College  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This study investigated the effects of locus of control and other predictors on personal-emotional and social adjustment to community college in English-language-learner students. Results indicated that locus of control was significantly associated with both social adjustment and personal-emotional adjustment. Students with more external locus of…

Estrada, Lisi; Dupoux, Errol; Wolman, Clara

2005-01-01

297

Linking Prevention Science and Social and Emotional Learning: The Oregon Resiliency Project  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This article reviews the contributions of the Oregon Resiliency Project, an effort to enhance positive social-emotional development of children and youth through social and emotional learning (SEL). The project was launched in 2001 as a collaborative effort between faculty and graduate student researchers at the University of Oregon. The primary…

Merrell, Kenneth W.

2010-01-01

298

Social-Emotional Characteristics of Gifted Accelerated and Non-Accelerated Students in the Netherlands  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Background: In the studies of acceleration conducted so far a multidimensional perspective has largely been neglected. No attempt has been made to relate social-emotional characteristics of accelerated versus non-accelerated students in perspective of environmental factors. Aims: In this study, social-emotional characteristics of accelerated…

Hoogeveen, Lianne; van Hell, Janet G.; Verhoeven, Ludo

2012-01-01

299

The impact of maternal emotional intelligence and parenting style on child anxiety and behavior in the dental setting  

PubMed Central

Objective. The present study investigated the correlations between maternal emotional intelligence (EQ), parenting style, child trait anxiety and child behavior in the dental setting. Study design. One-hundred seventeen children, aged 4-6 years old (mean 5.24 years), and their mothers participated in the study. The BarOn Emotional Quotient Inventory and Bumrind?s parenting style questionnaire were used to quantify maternal emotional intelligence and parenting style. Children?s anxiety and behavior was evaluated using the Spence Children?s Anxiety Scale (SCAS) and Frankl behavior scale. Results. Significant correlation was found between maternal EQ and child behavior (r=0.330; p<0.01); but not between parenting style and child behavior. There was no significant correlation between mother?s total EQ and child?s total anxiety; however, some subscales of EQ and anxiety showed significant correlations. There were significant correlations between authoritarian parenting style and separation anxiety (r=0.186; p<0.05) as well as authoritative parenting style and mother?s EQ (r=0.286; p<0.01). There was no significant correlation between child anxiety and behavior (r = -0.81). Regression analysis revealed maternal EQ is effective in predicting child behavior (?=0.340; p<0.01). Conclusion. This study provides preliminary evidence that the child?s behavior in the dental setting is correlated to mother?s emotional intelligence. Emotionally intelligent mothers were found to have predominantly authoritative parenting style. Key words:Anxiety, child behavior, parenting, pediatric dentistry.

Pourkazemi, Maryam; Babapour, Jalil; Oskouei, Sina-Ghertasi

2012-01-01

300

The impact of emotional and physical violence during pregnancy on maternal and child health at one year post-partum  

Microsoft Academic Search

Intimate partner violence (IPV) during pregnancy is increasingly recognized as having a negative impact on both the mother and her unborn child. The current study extends previous work to examine the impact of both physical and emotional IPV separately and cumulatively on the mother and her child. Specifically, we used the Fragile Families dataset (N=3961) to determine the effect of

Sarah McMahon; Chien-Chung Huang; Paul Boxer; Judy L. Postmus

2011-01-01

301

Maternal and Child Contributions to Cortisol Response to Emotional Arousal in Young Children from Low-Income, Rural Communities  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Relations of maternal and child characteristics to child cortisol reactivity to and recovery from emotional arousal were examined prospectively at approximately 7 months of age (infancy) and then again at approximately 15 months of age (toddlerhood). The sample was diverse and population based (N = 1,292 mother-infant dyads) and included families…

Blair, Clancy; Granger, Douglas A.; Kivlighan, Katie T.; Mills-Koonce, Roger; Willoughby, Michael; Greenberg, Mark T.; Hibel, Leah C.; Fortunato, Christine K.

2008-01-01

302

"My Mom Makes Me So Angry!" Adolescent Perceptions of Mother-Child Interactions as Correlates of Adolescent Emotions  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The purpose of the current study was to examine adolescents' perceptions of mother-child interactions as correlates of adolescents' positive, negative, and guilt emotions. Two hundred thirty-four adolescents (M age = 16.39, SD = 1.17) completed measures assessing parenting practices in response to typical mother-child interactions in both positive…

Padilla-Walker, Laura M.

2008-01-01

303

The Development of Emotional Competence. The Guilford Series on Social and Emotional Development.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The concept of emotional competence entails resilience, self-efficacy, and acting in accord with one's sense of moral character. This suggests argues that emotional competence is demonstrated by the self-efficacy in emotion-eliciting encounters and identifies eight key emotional skills that support its acquisition in interpersonal contexts. The…

Saarni, Carolyn

304

Social Support: A Mediator between Child Maltreatment and Developmental Outcomes  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The purpose of the current study was to investigate the relationship between child maltreatment, social support, and developmental outcomes in first-year college students. Participants were 202 undergraduate students (137 female, 65 male) who completed surveys at two time points: once before entering college and once during their first year of…

Pepin, Elise N.; Banyard, Victoria L.

2006-01-01

305

Child Development Associate. Social Science: Children in the Cosmos.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This Child Development Associate (CDA) training module, one of a series of 18, is designed to help the CDA intern provide learning experiences in the social sciences for young children. The module stipulates competency-based objectives and provides essential information, suggestions, examples and learning activities on three topics related to the…

Oscar Rose Junior Coll., Midwest City, OK.

306

Assessment of Social Skills in Students with Emotional and Behavioral Disorders  

Microsoft Academic Search

Social competence deficits are characteristic of students with emotional and behavioral disorders (EBD), given that one criterion specified in the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act include the inability to build or maintain satisfactory interpersonal relationships with peers and teachers. Social skills can be defined as specific behaviors that an individual performs competently on a social task, whereas social competence is

Frank M. Gresham

2000-01-01

307

Differentiating emotions across contexts: Comparing adults with and without social anxiety disorder using random, social interaction, and daily experience sampling.  

PubMed

The ability to recognize and label emotional experiences has been associated with well-being and adaptive functioning. This skill is particularly important in social situations, as emotions provide information about the state of relationships and help guide interpersonal decisions, such as whether to disclose personal information. Given the interpersonal difficulties linked to social anxiety disorder (SAD), deficient negative emotion differentiation may contribute to impairment in this population. We hypothesized that people with SAD would exhibit less negative emotion differentiation in daily life, and these differences would translate to impairment in social functioning. We recruited 43 people diagnosed with generalized SAD and 43 healthy adults to describe the emotions they experienced over 14 days. Participants received palmtop computers for responding to random prompts and describing naturalistic social interactions; to complete end-of-day diary entries, they used a secure online website. We calculated intraclass correlation coefficients to capture the degree of differentiation of negative and positive emotions for each context (random moments, face-to-face social interactions, and end-of-day reflections). Compared to healthy controls, the SAD group exhibited less negative (but not positive) emotion differentiation during random prompts, social interactions, and (at trend level) end-of-day assessments. These differences could not be explained by emotion intensity or variability over the 14 days, or to comorbid depression or anxiety disorders. Our findings suggest that people with generalized SAD have deficits in clarifying specific negative emotions felt at a given point of time. These deficits may contribute to difficulties with effective emotion regulation and healthy social relationship functioning. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2014 APA, all rights reserved). PMID:24512246

Kashdan, Todd B; Farmer, Antonina S

2014-06-01

308

"Cycling around an emotional core of sadness": emotion regulation in a couple after the loss of a child.  

PubMed

In contrast to the traditional view of working through grief by confronting it, recent theories have emphasized an oscillating process of confronting and avoiding the pain of loss. In this qualitative study, we sought a better understanding of this process by conducting a detailed case study of a bereaved couple after the loss of their infant daughter. We employed multiple data collection methods (using interviews and written feedback) and an intensive auditing process in our thematic analysis, with special attention to a recurrent metaphor used by this bereaved couple in describing their personal and relational experience. The findings suggest the presence of a dialectic tension between the need to be close to the deceased child and the need for distance from the pain of the loss, which was evidenced on both individual and relational levels. For this couple, the image of "cycling around an emotional core of sadness" captured their dynamic way of dealing with this dialectic of closeness and distance. PMID:22745365

Hooghe, An; Neimeyer, Robert A; Rober, Peter

2012-09-01

309

Peer Nominations of Emotional Expressivity among Urban Children: Social and Psychological Correlates  

PubMed Central

The current study examined associations between peer nominations of children's expression of negative emotions and psychological, social, and behavioral correlates in a sample of 523 first graders. Children (85% African American) completed a peer nomination measure for expressing negative emotions. In addition, three other domains of functioning were assessed using multiple raters: internalizing symptoms (self, parent), externalizing behavior (parent, teacher), and social competence (parent, teacher). Regression analyses indicated that peer nominations of negative emotions predicted higher levels of teacher-rated externalizing behavior and lower levels of teacher-rated social competence. Peer nominations of emotions were significantly associated with teacher ratings but unrelated to self- and parent-report measures. Adding to a small but growing literature, our findings underscore the importance of assessing peer perceptions of children's emotional expressivity and their associations to social and psychological functioning in an urban, predominantly African American sample.

Perry-Parrish, Carisa; Waasdorp, Tracy Evian; Bradshaw, Catherine P.

2011-01-01

310

Transforming "apathy into movement": the role of prosocial emotions in motivating action for social change.  

PubMed

This article explores the synergies between recent developments in the social identity of helping, and advantaged groups' prosocial emotion. The authors review the literature on the potential of guilt, sympathy, and outrage to transform advantaged groups' apathy into positive action. They place this research into a novel framework by exploring the ways these emotions shape group processes to produce action strategies that emphasize either social cohesion or social change. These prosocial emotions have a critical but underrecognized role in creating contexts of in-group inclusion or exclusion, shaping normative content and meaning, and informing group interests. Furthermore, these distinctions provide a useful way of differentiating commonly discussed emotions. The authors conclude that the most "effective" emotion will depend on the context of the inequality but that outrage seems particularly likely to productively shape group processes and social change outcomes. PMID:19755664

Thomas, Emma F; McGarty, Craig; Mavor, Kenneth I

2009-11-01

311

Brief Report: Integrating Social-Emotional Learning with Literacy Instruction--An Intervention for Children at Risk for Emotional and Behavioral Disorders  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

It is widely believed that children's social-emotional growth and academic learning are inextricably connected. Pressured by high-stakes assessments, however, school professionals find it difficult to devote adequate time to children's social/behavioral development. As a response, we developed and piloted Social-Emotional Learning…

Daunic, Ann; Corbett, Nancy; Smith, Stephen; Barnes, Tia; Santiago-Poventud, Lourdes; Chalfant, Pam; Pitts, Donna; Gleaton, Jeisha

2013-01-01

312

Interacting with Emotion and Memory Enabled Virtual Characters and Social Robots  

Microsoft Academic Search

\\u000a Personality and emotion modeling is being used recently in order to create variation in the behaviour of virtual characters\\u000a and social robots and to make them socially intelligent for more engaged interaction with people. For these characters to\\u000a be everyday social actors, it is also important that they can remember and maintain their feelings and establish unique emotional\\u000a interpersonal relationships

Zerrin Kasap; Nadia Magnenat-Thalmann

313

SOCIAL CLASS AND CHILD-REARING PRACTICES.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

THE BEHAVIORAL NORMS OF LOWER CLASS DISADVANTAGED CHILDREN ARE DIFFERENT FROM CHILDREN IN MORE MIDDLE CLASS GROUPS. THE BEHAVIOR OF LOWER CLASS CHILDREN IS INFLUENCED NOT ONLY BY GENERAL SOCIAL CLASS AND CULTURAL BACKGROUND BUT ALSO BY SUCH SPECIFIC INTRACLASS VARIABLES AS FAMILY ENVIRONMENT. THE PRESENT ABSENCE IN THE LITERATURE AND IN PRACTICE…

CHESS, STELLA; AND OTHERS

314

Cultivating the Socially Competent Body: Bodies and Risk in Swedish Programmes for Social Emotional Learning in Preschools and Schools  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Social emotional learning (SEL) is common in preschools and schools both in Europe and North America today. Programmes for socio-emotional training and the rise of what is labelled therapeutic education have dramatically increased during the first decade of the millennium. In this article, a manual-based programme used for SEL in a Swedish school…

Bartholdsson, Åsa; Gustafsson-Lundberg, Johanna; Hultin, Eva

2014-01-01

315

Reappraising social emotions: the role of inferior frontal gyrus, temporo-parietal junction and insula in interpersonal emotion regulation  

PubMed Central

Previous studies have reported the effect of emotion regulation (ER) strategies on both individual and social decision-making, however, the effect of regulation on socially driven emotions independent of decisions is still unclear. In the present study, we investigated the neural effects of using reappraisal to both up- and down-regulate socially driven emotions. Participants played the Dictator Game (DG) in the role of recipient while undergoing fMRI, and concurrently applied the strategies of either up-regulation (reappraising the proposer's intentions as more negative), down-regulation (reappraising the proposer's intentions as less negative), as well as a baseline “look” condition. Results showed that regions responding to the implementation of reappraisal (effect of strategy, that is, “regulating regions”) were the inferior and middle frontal gyrus, temporo parietal junction and insula bilaterally. Importantly, the middle frontal gyrus activation correlated with the frequency of regulatory strategies in daily life, with the insula activation correlating with the perceived ability to reappraise the emotions elicited by the social situation. Regions regulated by reappraisal (effect of regulation, that is, “regulated regions”) were the striatum, the posterior cingulate and the insula, showing increased activation for the up-regulation and reduced activation for down-regulation, both compared to the baseline condition. When analyzing the separate effects of partners' behavior, selfish behavior produced an activation of the insula, not observed when subjects were treated altruistically. Here we show for the first time that interpersonal ER strategies can strongly affect neural responses when experiencing socially driven emotions. Clinical implications of these findings are also discussed to understand how the way we interpret others' intentions may affect the way we emotionally react.

Grecucci, Alessandro; Giorgetta, Cinzia; Bonini, Nicolao; Sanfey, Alan G.

2013-01-01

316

Prevalence of sexual, physical and emotional abuse in the Norwegian mother and child cohort study  

PubMed Central

Background Abuse of women occurs in every society of the world. Increased information about the prevalence in industrialized countries, like Norway, is required to make strategies to prevent abuse. Our aim was to investigate the prevalence of self-reported sexual, physical and emotional abuse in a large obstetric population in Norway, and the associations between exposure to adult abuse, socio-demographics and other characteristics. Methods Our study is based on the Norwegian Mother and Child (MoBa) Cohort study, conducted by the Norwegian Institute of Public Health. The current study included 65,393 women who responded to two extensive postal questionnaires during pregnancy. Any adult abuse is defined as being exposed to one or more types of adult abuse, any child abuse is defined as being exposed to one or more types of child abuse, and any lifetime abuse is defined as being exposed to abuse either as a child and/or as an adult. Perpetrators were categorized as known or stranger. Results Overall, 32% of the women reported any lifetime abuse, 20% reported any adult abuse, 19% reported any child abuse and 6% reported abuse both as adults and as children. Emotional abuse was the most frequently reported type of abuse both as adults (16%) and children (14%). Adult sexual abuse was reported by 5% and child sexual abuse by 7%. Physical abuse was reported by 6% as adults and by 6% as children. Approximately 30% of those reporting adult or child abuse reported exposure to two or three types of abuse. Five percent of the women reported exposure to any abuse during the last 12?months. For all types of abuse, a known perpetrator was more commonly reported. Logistic regression showed that being exposed to child abuse, smoking and drinking alcohol in the first trimester of pregnancy, living alone, and belonging to the eldest age group were significantly associated with being exposed to any adult abuse. Conclusion The reported prevalence of any lifetime abuse was substantial in our low-risk pregnant population. Antenatal care is an opportunity for clinicians to ask about experiences of abuse and identify those at risk.

2013-01-01

317

Social paediatrics and early child development: Part 1  

PubMed Central

Diseases of modernism, rather than infectious diseases and chronic medical conditions, increasingly cause childhood morbidity and mortality. Thus, the goal of enhancing life outcomes for all children has become imperative. Paediatricans may begin with a renewed interest in social paediatrics – the care of the disadvantaged child in Canada, requiring a focus on all the complex factors that impact families and the community. New paediatricians need the tools to impact both social determinants of health and political policies to support health for all. Such interest is as old as the field of paediatrics (social medicine began with the great pathologist, Virchow, in the 1800s). The new neuroscience of experience-based brain and biological development has caught up with the social epidemiology literature. It is now known from both domains that a child’s poor developmental and health outcomes are a product of early and ongoing socioeconomic and psychological experiences. In the era of epigenetics, it is now understood that both nature and nurture control the genome. Future paediatricians need to understand the science of experience-based brain development, and the interventions demonstrated to improve life trajectories. A challenge is to connect the traditional population health approach with traditional primary care responsibilities. New and enhanced collaborative interdisciplinary networks with, for example, public health, primary care, community resources, education and justice systems are required.

Ford-Jones, Elizabeth Lee; Williams, Robin; Bertrand, Jane

2008-01-01

318

Maternal Emotion-Related Socialization and Preschoolers' Developing Emotion Self-Awareness  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Preschoolers' ability to demonstrate awareness of their own emotion is an important socio-emotional competence which has received increasing attention in the developmental literature. The present study examined emotion self-awareness of happiness, sadness, and anger in response to a delay of gratification task in 78 preschool children. Maternal…

Warren, Heather K.; Stifter, Cynthia A.

2008-01-01

319

Screening for Autism Spectrum Disorders with the Brief Infant-Toddler Social and Emotional Assessment  

PubMed Central

Objective Using parent-completed questionnaires in (preventive) child health care can facilitate the early detection of psychosocial problems and psychopathology, including autism spectrum disorders (ASD). A promising questionnaire for this purpose is the Brief Infant-Toddler Social and Emotional Assessment (BITSEA). The screening accuracy with regard to ASD of the BITSEA Problem and Competence scales and a newly calculated Autism score were evaluated. Method Data, that was collected between April 2010 and April 2011, from a community sample of 2-year-olds (N?=?3127), was combined with a sample of preschool children diagnosed with ASD (N?=?159). For the total population and for subgroups by child's gender, area under the Receiver Operating Characteristic (ROC) curve was examined, and across a range of BITSEA Problem, Competence and Autism scores, sensitivity, specificity, positive and negative likelihood ratio's, diagnostic odds ratio and Youden's index were reported. Results The area under the ROC curve (95% confidence interval, [95%CI]) of the Problem scale was 0.90(0.87–0.92), of the Competence scale 0.93(0.91–0.95), and of the Autism score 0.95(0.93–0.97). For the total population, the screening accuracy of the Autism score was significantly better, compared to the Problem scale. The screening accuracy of the Competence scale was significantly better for girls (AUC?=?0.97; 95%CI?=?0.95–0.98) than for boys (AUC?=?0.91; 95%CI?=?0.88–0.94). Conclusion The results indicate that the BITSEA scales and newly calculated Autism score have good discriminative power to differentiate children with and without ASD. Therefore, the BITSEA may be helpful in the early detection of ASD, which could have beneficial effects on the child's development.

Kruizinga, Ingrid; Visser, Janne C.; van Batenburg-Eddes, Tamara; Carter, Alice S.; Jansen, Wilma; Raat, Hein

2014-01-01

320

Children's Emotional Abuse and Relational Functioning: Social Support and Internalizing Symptoms as Moderators  

Microsoft Academic Search

Emotional abuse in childhood has deleterious consequences across development and may be a key factor that underlies all forms of childhood maltreatment. This study examined the association between emotional abuse and relationship functioning among 139 low-income, African American 8- to 12-year-old children, with internalizing symptoms and social support from family, peers, and teachers tested as moderators. Emotional abuse was significantly

Megan Key Gabalda; Michelle Robbins Broth; Martie P. Thompson; Nadine J. Kaslow

2009-01-01

321

The Emotional Well-Being of Our Nation's Youth and the Promise of Social-Emotional Learning  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

A public health crisis is looming in US schools. Millions of children do not receive mental health services, are poorly bonded to supportive educational communities, and fail to develop important social and emotional competencies. Considering these problems, many of which relate to students' school functioning, efforts are needed to support…

Lazarus, Philip J.; Sulkowski, Michael L.

2011-01-01

322

The social sharing of emotions in HIV/AIDS: a comparative study of HIV/AIDS, diabetic and cancer patients.  

PubMed

Studies have shown that chronic illness patients encounter difficulties in the social sharing of emotions. Do HIV/AIDS patients present distinguishing traits in the inhibition of illness and non-illness-related emotions? The differences in the social sharing of emotion between 35 HIV/AIDS, 35 diabetic and 34 cancer outpatients were studied. A questionnaire assessed illness-related emotions, social sharing of emotion and emotional inhibition. The HIV/AIDS group significantly presented superior scoring in shame, guilt and non-sharing of illness-related emotions, lower frequencies of social sharing of emotion and less sharing partners. These findings could lead to future research examining the emotional expression of guilt and shame in HIV/AIDS. PMID:23129833

Cantisano, Nicole; Rimé, Bernard; Muñoz-Sastre, María T

2013-10-01

323

Rehabilitation of severely mutilated teeth under general anesthesia in an emotionally immature child.  

PubMed

Dental caries is the single most common chronic childhood disease. In rampant caries, there is early pulp involvement and gross destruction of the maxillary anterior teeth as well as posterior teeth. This leads to decreased masticatory efficiency, difficulty in speech, compromised esthetics, development of abnormal tongue habits and subsequent malocclusion and psychological problems. The restoration of severely decayed primary incisors is often a procedure that presents a special challenge to dentists, particularly in an uncooperative child. This case report documents the restoration of severely mutilated deciduous teeth in an emotionally immature patient under general anesthesia. PMID:20215672

Navit, S; Katiyar, A; Samadi, F; Jaiswal, J N

2010-01-01

324

Early Childhood Student Teacher Expectations toward Kindergarten Children's Social and Emotional Competencies  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This study investigates the importance of student teachers expectations as a predictor of future social and emotional competencies of young children. These predicted expectations were estimated from a 42 item questionnaire that was designed by the author and it addressed five domains: social skills, social awareness, self-control, relationship…

Betawi, Amy

2013-01-01

325

Selective Narrowing of Social Networks across Adulthood is Associated with Improved Emotional Experience in Daily Life  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Past research has documented age differences in the size and composition of social networks that suggest that networks grow smaller with age and include an increasingly greater proportion of well-known social partners. According to socioemotional selectivity theory, such changes in social network composition serve an antecedent emotion regulatory…

English, Tammy; Carstensen, Laura L.

2014-01-01

326

Nordic sports – from social movements via emotional to bodily movement – and back again?  

Microsoft Academic Search

When talking about bodily movement, emotional movement and social movements, one applies the same term, ‘movement’, to very different practical, psychological and social relations. This is not accidental. This essay inquires into the connections between these three dimensions, via an analysis of sports in the Nordic countries. In relation to social movements, Nordic sports developed historically from dynamic popular movements.

Henning Eichberg; Sigmund Loland

2010-01-01

327

Extending the Use of Social Stories to Young Children with Emotional and Behavioral Disabilities  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Many students identified with emotional or behavioral disorders have social skill deficits, often displayed as less mature or inappropriate social behavior. Students may have difficulty engaging in appropriate play or social interactions and may at times become aggressive. The inability to interact with others has a negative impact on academic…

Delano, Monica E.; Stone, Liz

2008-01-01

328

Processing of faces and emotional expressions in infants at risk of social phobia  

Microsoft Academic Search

Individuals with social phobia display social information processing biases yet their aetiological significance is unclear. Infants of mothers with social phobia and control infants’ responses were assessed at 10 days, 10 and 16 weeks, and 10 months to faces versus non-faces, variations in intensity of emotional expressions, and gaze direction. Infant temperament and maternal behaviours were also assessed. Both groups

Cathy Creswell; Matt Woolgar; Peter Cooper; Andreas Giannakakis; Elizabeth Schofield; Andrew W. Young; Lynne Murray

2008-01-01

329

Influence of expressed emotion and perceived criticism on cognitive-behavioral therapy for social phobia  

Microsoft Academic Search

This study examined significant others’ expressed emotion (EE) and a closely related construct, perceived criticism, as predictors of cognitive-behavioral therapy outcome in a sample of 40 patients with social phobia (social anxiety disorder). Patients enrolled in group therapy for social phobia completed pre- and post-treatment questionnaire measures of perceived criticism and anxious and depressive symptoms. Designated significant others were assessed

Jason M. Fogler; Martha C. Tompson; Gail Steketee; Stefan G. Hofmann

2007-01-01

330

Expressed Emotion, Social Skill, and Response to Negative Affect in Schizophrenia  

Microsoft Academic Search

The social skills and social perception of schizophrenia patients in response to negative affect was examined as a function of family expressed emotion (EE). Patients participated in a role-play test, a social perception test, and a problem-solving discussion with a family member and were assessed on several measures of symptomatology. EE of family members was evaluated with the Camberwell Family

Kim T. Mueser; Alan S. Bellack; Julie H. Wade; Steven L. Sayers; Ann Tierney; Gretchen Haas

1993-01-01

331

Social Skills Group Therapy For Children With Emotional And Behavioral Problems  

Microsoft Academic Search

The topic of this research was the utilization of social skills group therapy with children with poor social skills and emotional and behavioral problems. The literature explains that group therapy has many benefits to clients that are not available in individual work with clients. Social skills group therapy is theorized to be helpful for children with mental health disorders, especially

Lilith Chunn

2007-01-01

332

Parasympathetic Regulation and Parental Socialization of Emotion: Biopsychosocial Processes of Adjustment in Preschoolers  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Variations in parents' emotion socialization have been linked to children's social competence (SC) and behavior problems, but parental influences do not act independently of children's characteristics. A biopsychosocial model was tested, in which children's parasympathetic regulation of cardiac function and paternal and maternal socialization of…

Hastings, Paul D.; De, Ishani

2008-01-01

333

Perceived Social Support and Domain-Specific Adjustment of Children with Emotional and Behavioural Difficulties  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The perceived availability of social support has been documented as a protective mechanism among adults and adolescents. However, little research has explored the role of social support among children with emotional and behavioural difficulties (E/BD). The current study sought to investigate the effects of perceived social support from family,…

Popliger, Mina; Toste, Jessica R.; Heath, Nancy L.

2009-01-01

334

Experimental evidence of massive-scale emotional contagion through social networks.  

PubMed

Emotional states can be transferred to others via emotional contagion, leading people to experience the same emotions without their awareness. Emotional contagion is well established in laboratory experiments, with people transferring positive and negative emotions to others. Data from a large real-world social network, collected over a 20-y period suggests that longer-lasting moods (e.g., depression, happiness) can be transferred through networks [Fowler JH, Christakis NA (2008) BMJ 337:a2338], although the results are controversial. In an experiment with people who use Facebook, we test whether emotional contagion occurs outside of in-person interaction between individuals by reducing the amount of emotional content in the News Feed. When positive expressions were reduced, people produced fewer positive posts and more negative posts; when negative expressions were reduced, the opposite pattern occurred. These results indicate that emotions expressed by others on Facebook influence our own emotions, constituting experimental evidence for massive-scale contagion via social networks. This work also suggests that, in contrast to prevailing assumptions, in-person interaction and nonverbal cues are not strictly necessary for emotional contagion, and that the observation of others' positive experiences constitutes a positive experience for people. PMID:24889601

Kramer, Adam D I; Guillory, Jamie E; Hancock, Jeffrey T

2014-06-17

335

Experimental evidence of massive-scale emotional contagion through social networks  

PubMed Central

Emotional states can be transferred to others via emotional contagion, leading people to experience the same emotions without their awareness. Emotional contagion is well established in laboratory experiments, with people transferring positive and negative emotions to others. Data from a large real-world social network, collected over a 20-y period suggests that longer-lasting moods (e.g., depression, happiness) can be transferred through networks [Fowler JH, Christakis NA (2008) BMJ 337:a2338], although the results are controversial. In an experiment with people who use Facebook, we test whether emotional contagion occurs outside of in-person interaction between individuals by reducing the amount of emotional content in the News Feed. When positive expressions were reduced, people produced fewer positive posts and more negative posts; when negative expressions were reduced, the opposite pattern occurred. These results indicate that emotions expressed by others on Facebook influence our own emotions, constituting experimental evidence for massive-scale contagion via social networks. This work also suggests that, in contrast to prevailing assumptions, in-person interaction and nonverbal cues are not strictly necessary for emotional contagion, and that the observation of others’ positive experiences constitutes a positive experience for people.

Kramer, Adam D. I.; Guillory, Jamie E.; Hancock, Jeffrey T.

2014-01-01

336

Reflecting on Social Emotional Learning: A Critical Perspective on Trends in the United States  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This critical cultural analysis of trends in the field of social emotional learning (SEL) in the United States considers how ideas concerning emotional skills and competencies have informed programmatic discourse. While currently stressing links between SEL and academic achievement, program literature also places emphasis on ideals of caring,…

Hoffman, Diane M.

2009-01-01

337

Young People with Specific Language Impairment: A Review of Social and Emotional Functioning in Adolescence  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This article provides a review of research into the social and emotional functioning of adolescents with specific language impairment (SLI). In particular, we focus on peer relations, peer friendships, bullying, emotional difficulties and psychiatric difficulties. As a group, adolescents with SLI tend to be more vulnerable to problems in these…

Durkin, Kevin; Conti-Ramsden, Gina

2010-01-01

338

The Efficacy of Rational Emotive Education for Acting-Out and Socially Withdrawn Adolescents.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Rational Emotive Education (REE), derived from Rational Emotive Therapy (RET), is a humanistic approach for helping children cope more objectively and effectively with the stress of modern living and personal problems. To investigate the efficacy of teaching REE, 38 acting-out and 42 socially withdrawn adolescents were randomly assigned to one of…

Voelm, Clint E.; And Others

339

Theory of Mind "Emotion", Developmental Characteristics and Social Understanding in Children and Adolescents with Intellectual Disabilities  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Patterns of development of ToM-emotion abilities in intellectually disabled (ID) children and typically developing (TD) children matched on their developmental age were investigated. The links between cognition, language, social understanding and ToM-emotion abilities were examined. EDEI-R (Perron-Borelli, M. (1996). "Echelles Differentielles…

Thirion-Marissiaux, Anne-Francoise; Nader-Grosbois, Nathalie

2008-01-01

340

Puzzlingly High Correlations in fMRI Studies of Emotion, Personality, and Social Cognition  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging (fMRI) studies of emotion, personality, and social cognition have drawn much attention in recent years, with high-profile studies frequently reporting extremely high (e.g., > 8) correlations between behavioral and self-report measures of personality or emotion and measures of brain activation. We show that…

Vul, Edward; Harris, Christine; Winkielman, Piotr; Pashler, Harold

2009-01-01

341

"I'm Not Scared of Anything": Emotion as Social Power in Children's Worlds  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This article examines how American middle-class children learn and acquire culturally appropriate emotions and sentiments, focusing especially on children's experiences. By analysing children's emotional worlds as well as adult socialization practices, the article shows that children actively reinterpret, reconstruct and reformulate various…

Ahn, Junehui

2010-01-01

342

Training Emotional and Social Competences in Higher Education: The Seminar Methodology  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This article discusses the importance of emotional and social competences in higher education and presents a training model. In 1991, Ramon Llull University of Barcelona (Spain) created the Seminar methodology to tackle these challenges. A general model derived from the Emotional Intelligence concept and the general principles of this methodology…

Oberst, Ursula; Gallifa, Josep; Farriols, Nuria; Vilaregut, Anna

2009-01-01

343

An exploration of relationships among measures of social cognition, decision making, and emotional intelligence  

Microsoft Academic Search

The present study examined the relationships among measures that purportedly assess emotional intelligence (EI), social cognition, and emotional decision making within a sample of nonclinical undergraduate participants. Forty participants, both male and female, who scored in either the highest or the lowest quartiles of an EI measure (the Trait Meta-Mood Scale) completed the Reading the Mind in the Eyes Test

Claire M. Brabec; Jeffrey D. Gfeller; Michael J. Ross

2012-01-01

344

Intrapersonal and Interpersonal Functions of Non Suicidal Self-Injury: Associations with Emotional and Social Functioning  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Understanding the functions of nonsuicidal self-injury (NSSI) has important implications for the development and refinement of theoretical models and treatments of NSSI. Emotional and social vulnerabilities associated with five common functions of NSSI-emotion relief (ER), feeling generation (FG), self-punishment (SP), interpersonal influence…

Turner, Brianna J.; Chapman, Alexander L.; Layden, Brianne K.

2012-01-01

345

Children's Interpretive Understanding, Moral Judgments, and Emotion Attributions: Relations to Social Behaviour  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The study investigated interpretive understanding, moral judgments, and emotion attributions in relation to social behaviour in a sample of 59 5-year-old, 123 7-year-old, and 130 9-year-old children. Interpretive understanding was assessed by two tasks measuring children's understanding of ambiguous situations. Moral judgments and emotion

Malti, Tina; Gasser, Luciano; Gutzwiller-Helfenfinger, Eveline

2010-01-01

346

Changes in Emotional-Social Intelligence, Caring, Leadership and Moral Judgment during Health Science Education Programs  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

In addition to having academic knowledge and clinical skills, health professionals need to be caring, ethical practitioners able to understand the emotional concerns of their patients and to effect change. The purpose of this study was to determine whether emotional-social intelligence, caring, leadership and moral judgment of health science…

Larin, Helene; Benson, Gerry; Wessel, Jean; Martin, Lynn; Ploeg, Jenny

2014-01-01

347

Reasoning on Social Dilemmas Varying in Emotional Saliency: An Adult Developmental Perspective  

Microsoft Academic Search

The purpose of this study was to provide age-comparative evidence of social cognitive reasoning in adulthood, as mediated by the emotional saliency of tasks tapping postformal reasoning. Specifically, the tasks focused on the ability to resolve discrepant accounts of the same event sequence. It was assumed that less mature thinking may be more evident in reasoning contexts in which emotional

Fredda Blanchard-Fields

1986-01-01

348

Relationship between Students' Emotional Intelligence, Social Bond, and Interactions in Online Learning  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The purpose of the study was to investigate the relationship between students' emotional intelligence, social bond, and their interactions in an online learning environment. This study examined emotional aspects of online interaction in both synchronous and asynchronous online learning environments. A conceptual framework was developed based on…

Han, Hee Young

2009-01-01

349

Emotion Knowledge, Social Competence, and Behavior Problems in Childhood and Adolescence: A Meta-Analytic Review  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The present meta-analytic review examined the magnitude of the relation between discrete emotion knowledge and three of its most commonly studied correlates in childhood and adolescence: social competence, internalizing problems, and externalizing problems. Emotion knowledge demonstrated small to medium-sized relations with each correlate.…

Trentacosta, Christopher J.; Fine, Sarah E.

2010-01-01

350

Tears, Fears and Careers: Antiracism and Emotion in Social Movement Organizations  

Microsoft Academic Search

Debates about anti-racism in many organizations often collapse into emotional and turbulent scenes characterized by anger and tears. The central concerns of this paper are the practices and discourses of emotional expression that shape what can be said in these organizational debates about racism and anti-racism. A predominant mode of discussion in many social movement organizations, particularly those inspired by

Sarita Srivastava

2006-01-01

351

Art-Based Program for Social and Emotional Development of Children  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

For eight weeks, we ran an art-based program for social and emotional development in Grade 5 of primary school for children aged 11-12. We met once a week for 45 minutes and worked with 25 children on improving their skills in communication, cooperation, manifestation, and recognition of emotions and identity enforcement. Each skill was covered by…

Mynarikova, Lenka

2012-01-01

352

Peer Nominations of Emotional Expressivity among Urban Children: Social and Psychological Correlates  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The current study examined associations between peer nominations of children's expression of negative emotions and psychological, social, and behavioral correlates in a sample of 523 first graders. Children (85 percent African-American) completed a peer nomination measure for expressing negative emotions. In addition, three other domains of…

Perry-Parrish, Carisa; Waasdorp, Tracy E.; Bradshaw, Catherine P.

2012-01-01

353

Idealism, Altruism, Career Orientation, and Emotional Exhaustion among Social Work Undergraduates  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The present study examines the genesis of emotional exhaustion among undergraduate social work students in Hong Kong. Of particular concern are the relationships among key factors, including the student's idealism, altruism and career orientation, and emotional exhaustion. To investigate this, the study employed survey data collected from 165…

Ngai, Steven Sek-yum; Cheung, Chau-kiu

2009-01-01

354

Emotion Regulation and Aggressive Behavior in Preschoolers: The Mediating Role of Social Information Processing  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This study examined whether the relation between maladaptive emotion regulation and aggression was mediated by deviant social information processing (SIP). Participants were 193 preschool children. Emotion regulation and aggression were rated by teachers. Deviant SIP (i.e., attribution of hostile intent, aggressive response generation, aggressive…

Helmsen, Johanna; Koglin, Ute; Petermann, Franz

2012-01-01

355

Social-Emotional Development of Gifted Children and Adolescents: A Research Model.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The article summarizes the contradictory evidence regarding the social and emotional stability of gifted youngsters. Finally, a research model capable of both generating empirical studies and integrating the results from diverse investigators is suggested. (Author/CL)

Altman, Reuben

1983-01-01

356

Social anxiety and positive emotions: a prospective examination of a self-regulatory model with tendencies to suppress or express emotions as a moderating variable.  

PubMed

The purpose of the present study was to examine social anxiety as a predictor of positive emotions using a short-term prospective design. We examined whether the effects of social anxiety on positive emotions are moderated by tendencies to openly express or suppress emotions. Over the course of a 3-month interval, people with excessive social anxiety endorsed stable, low levels of positive emotions. In addition, people with low social anxiety who frequently display their emotions openly, whether negative or positive, reported the greatest increases in positive emotions. Similar results were found when using a measure of emotion suppression (low social anxiety and less tendency to rely on these types of regulatory acts led to the greatest positive emotions). These social anxiety main and interactive effects could not be attributed to depressive symptoms. Our findings suggest that relations between social anxiety and positive emotional experiences over time are best understood in the context of meaningful individual differences such as affect regulatory strategies. PMID:18328865

Kashdan, Todd B; Breen, William E

2008-03-01

357

Social influence in child care centers: a test of the theory of normative social behavior.  

PubMed

Child care centers are a unique context for studying communication about the social and personal expectations about health behaviors. The theory of normative social behavior (TNSB; Rimal & Real, 2005 ) provides a framework for testing the role of social and psychological influences on handwashing behaviors among child care workers. A cross-sectional survey of child care workers in 21 centers indicates that outcome expectations and group identity increase the strength of the relationship between descriptive norms and handwashing behavior. Injunctive norms also moderate the effect of descriptive norms on handwashing behavior such that when strong injunctive norms are reported, descriptive norms are positively related to handwashing, but when weak injunctive norms are reported, descriptive norms are negatively related to handwashing. The findings suggest that communication interventions in child care centers can focus on strengthening injunctive norms in order to increase handwashing behaviors in child care centers. The findings also suggest that the theory of normative social behavior can be useful in organizational contexts. PMID:23682754

Lapinski, Maria Knight; Anderson, Jenn; Shugart, Alicia; Todd, Ewen

2014-01-01

358

The BarOn Model of Emotional-Social Intelligence (ESI)1  

Microsoft Academic Search

The present manuscript is an empirically based theoretical paper that presents, describes, and exami- nes the Bar-On Model of Emotional-Social Intelligence (ESI) in deep. First, a description of the Emo- tional Quotient Inventory (the EQ-i), which has played an instrumental role in developing the model, is given. The EQ-i is a self-report measure of emotionally and socially intelligent behaviour. It

Reuven Bar-On

2005-01-01

359

The impacts of core self-evaluations on customer-related social stressors and emotional exhaustion  

Microsoft Academic Search

Based on data collected from frontline bank employees in Northern Cyprus as the study setting, the authors developed and tested a model, which investigated the effects of core self-evaluations on customer-related social stressors and emotional exhaustion. The researchers' model also tested the impacts of these customer-related social stressors on emotional exhaustion. The results indicated that employees with positive core self-evaluations

Osman M. Karatepe; Mine Haktanir; Ilkay Yorganci

2010-01-01

360

Cross-cultural comparisons of child-reported emotional and physical abuse: rates, risk factors and psychosocial symptoms  

Microsoft Academic Search

Objectives: This study was designed to assess the incidence of child emotional and physical abuse, associated risk factors and psychosocial symptoms in a cross-cultural comparison between post-communist bloc countries.Method: One-thousand one-hundred forty-five children ages 10–14 from Latvia (N=297), Lithuania (N=300), Macedonia (N=302), and Moldova (N=246) participated in the study. They completed questionnaires assessing their experience of emotional or physical abuse,

Sandra Sebre; Ieva Sprugevica; Antoni Novotni; Dimitar Bonevski; Vilmante Pakalniskiene; Daniela Popescu; Tatiana Turchina; William Friedrich; Owen Lewis

2004-01-01

361

Unsupportive social interactions influence emotional eating behaviors. The role of coping styles as mediators.  

PubMed

Psychopathologies, such as depression, are frequently accompanied by poor coping strategies, including impaired social support resources. As well, unsupportive social interactions have been related to adverse health outcomes beyond any contribution of limited social support resources. There is reason to believe that increased eating associated with stressors represents a method of coping, albeit one that has negative consequences. The present investigation examined the relation between both unsupportive and supportive social interactions and emotional eating, and assessed whether this relationship was mediated by individual coping styles. Study 1 (N=221) indicated that unsupportive social interactions were associated with emotional eating, and with emotion- and avoidant-focused coping. Furthermore, multiple mediation analyses indicated that emotion-focused coping mediated the relation between unsupportive social interactions and emotional eating. Study 2 (N=169) replicated these findings, and also indicated that these effects were above and beyond those of social support and depressive symptomatology. Thus unsupportive social interactions may have implications for health outcomes and behaviors, beyond mood disorder symptomatology. The observed relations can be explained by theories of affect-regulation such as negative urgency and expectancy theory as well as on the basis of biological processes associated with eating and stress responses. PMID:23228905

Raspopow, Kate; Matheson, Kimberly; Abizaid, Alfonso; Anisman, Hymie

2013-03-01

362

Tuning the developing brain to social signals of emotions  

PubMed Central

PREFACE Humans in diverse cultures develop a similar capacity to recognize the emotional signals of different facial expressions. This capacity is mediated by a brain network that involves emotion-related brain circuits and higher-level visual representation areas. Recent studies suggest that the key components of this network begin to emerge early in life. The studies also suggest that initial biases in emotion-related brain circuits and the early coupling of these circuits and cortical perceptual areas provides a foundation for a rapid acquisition of representations of those facial features that denote specific emotions.

Leppanen, Jukka M.; Nelson, Charles A.

2010-01-01

363

Emotion dialogues of foster caregivers with their children: the role of the caregivers, above and beyond child characteristics, in shaping the interactions.  

PubMed

The study examined foster caregivers' sensitive guidance of conversations about emotional themes in a sample of foster caregivers living in Family Group Homes. Thirty caregivers were observed with two out of the several children under their care: one that was nominated by the Family Group Home's social worker as the most challenging child in the Family Group Home, and one that was nominated as the least challenging child. Based on attachment theory that argues that mothers possess a central role in shaping the interaction with the child by adapting their caregiving to the child's individual characteristics (Bowlby, 1982), we argued that caregivers' sensitivity will reflect the differences between the caregivers and not the differences between the children. We therefore hypothesized that the caregivers would show similar levels of sensitive guidance regarding their children, irrespective of the level of difficulty the children presented. The results supported our hypotheses by showing that caregivers' sensitive guidance of the conversations was similar across the most and least challenging children. The results highlight the importance of the caregiver in shaping the interactions with their children regardless of the degree to which the child is challenging. PMID:23186141

Koren-Karie, Nina; Oppenheim, David; Yuval-Adler, Shira; Mor, Hila

2013-01-01

364

Correlates of social and emotional loneliness in older people: evidence from an English community study  

PubMed Central

Objectives Loneliness is an important influence on quality of life in old age and has been conceptualised as consisting of two dimensions, social and emotional. This article describes analyses that sought to produce models of social and emotional loneliness in older people, using demographic, psychological and health, and social variables. Method Older people (aged 65+, n = 1255) from the Barnsley metropolitan area of the United Kingdom were recruited randomly from within a stratified sampling frame and received a questionnaire-based interview (response rate: 68.1%). The questionnaire contained items and scales on demographic, psychological and health, and social characteristics, and a validated measure of loneliness that assesses both social and emotional loneliness. Results Of the respondents, 7.7% were found to be severely or very severely lonely, while another 38.3% were moderately lonely. Social and emotional loneliness shared 19.36% variance. Being male, being widowed, low well-being, low self-esteem, low-income comfort, low contact with family, low contact with friends, low activity, low perceived community integration, and receipt of community care were significant predictors of social loneliness (R = 0.50, R2 = 0.25, F(18, 979) = 18.17, p < 0.001). Being widowed, low well-being, low self-esteem, high activity restriction, low-income comfort, and non-receipt of informal care were significant predictors of emotional loneliness (R = 0.55, R2 = 0.30, F(18, 973) = 23.00, p < 0.001). Conclusion This study provides further empirical support for the conceptual separation of emotional and social loneliness. Consequently, policy on loneliness in older people should be directed to developing a range of divergent intervention strategies if both emotional and social loneliness are to be reduced.

Dahlberg, Lena; McKee, Kevin J.

2013-01-01

365

How do shared-representations and emotional processes cooperate in response to social threat signals?  

PubMed

Research in social cognition has mainly focused on the detection and comprehension of others' mental and emotional states. Doing so, past studies have adopted a "contemplative" view of the role of the observer engaged in a social interaction. However, the adaptive problem posed by the social environment is first and foremost that of coordination, which demands more of social cognition beyond mere detection and comprehension of others' hidden states. Offering a theoretical framework that takes into account the dynamical aspect of social interaction - notably by accounting for constant interplay between emotional appraisal and motor processes in socially engaged human brain - thus constitutes an important challenge for the field of social cognition. Here, we propose that our social environment can be seen as presenting opportunities for actions regarding others. Within such a framework, non-verbal social signals such as emotional displays are considered to have evolved to influence the observer in consistent ways. Consequently, social signals can modulate motor responses in observers. In line with this theoretical framework we provide evidence that emotional and motor processes are actually tightly linked during the perception of threat signals. This is ultimately reflected in the human brain by constant interplay between limbic and motor areas. PMID:24080262

Grèzes, Julie; Dezecache, Guillaume

2014-03-01

366

Social paediatrics and early child development: Part 1.  

PubMed

Diseases of modernism, rather than infectious diseases and chronic medical conditions, increasingly cause childhood morbidity and mortality. Thus, the goal of enhancing life outcomes for all children has become imperative. Paediatricans may begin with a renewed interest in social paediatrics - the care of the disadvantaged child in Canada, requiring a focus on all the complex factors that impact families and the community. New paediatricians need the tools to impact both social determinants of health and political policies to support health for all. Such interest is as old as the field of paediatrics (social medicine began with the great pathologist, Virchow, in the 1800s). The new neuroscience of experience-based brain and biological development has caught up with the social epidemiology literature. It is now known from both domains that a child's poor developmental and health outcomes are a product of early and ongoing socioeconomic and psychological experiences. In the era of epigenetics, it is now understood that both nature and nurture control the genome. Future paediatricians need to understand the science of experience-based brain development, and the interventions demonstrated to improve life trajectories. A challenge is to connect the traditional population health approach with traditional primary care responsibilities. New and enhanced collaborative interdisciplinary networks with, for example, public health, primary care, community resources, education and justice systems are required. PMID:19436534

Ford-Jones, Elizabeth Lee; Williams, Robin; Bertrand, Jane

2008-11-01

367

The Effects of Social Skills Instruction on the Social Behaviors of Students at Risk for Emotional or Behavioral Disorders.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

A study examined the effects of pullout small-group and teacher-directed classroom-based social skills instruction on antisocial behaviors of five third- and fourth-grade students at risk for emotional or behavioral disorders. Results indicated moderate reduction in antisocial behaviors during small-group social skills instruction. (Contains…

Lo, Ya-yu; Loe, Scott A.; Cartledge, Gwendolyn

2002-01-01

368

Determining a Child's Ability to Read a Social Studies Textbook: A Preliminary, Informal Diagnosis  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Demonstrates a preliminary, informal diagnostic procedure that a social studies teacher can adapt to the child and the textbook to determine the extent of a child's ability to read and understand the content read. (Author)

Rushdoony, Haig A.

1976-01-01

369

Teaching in Physical Education: Socialization, Play and Emotions  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Introduction: Emotions have not been regarded as very relevant in educational processes, despite early sociologists underlining the importance of feelings in education. The focus of this research is on the teaching of Physical Education at the Primary School level in Spain. Method: We reflect on the importance of emotions in education from the…

Molina, Fidel

2012-01-01

370

Socialization of Emotion and Offspring Internalizing Symptoms in Mothers with Childhood-Onset Depression  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This study examines how mothers with and without a history of childhood-onset depression respond to their 3-9 year-old children's emotions. Mother-child dyads included 55 offspring of mothers with a history of childhood-onset depressive disorders and 57 offspring of never-depressed mothers. Mothers with a history of childhood depression were less…

Silk, Jennifer S.; Shaw, Daniel S.; Prout, Joanna T.; O'Rourke, Flannery; Lane, Tonya J.; Kovacs, Maria

2011-01-01

371

Human hypocretin and melanin concentrating hormone levels are linked to emotion and social interaction  

PubMed Central

The neurochemical changes underlying human emotions and social behavior are largely unknown. Here we report on the changes in the levels of two hypothalamic neuropeptides, hypocretin-1 (Hcrt-1) and melanin concentrating hormone (MCH), measured in the human amygdala. We show that Hcrt-1 levels are maximal during positive emotion, social interaction, and anger, behaviors that induce cataplexy in human narcoleptics. In contrast, MCH levels are minimal during social interaction, but are increased after eating. Both peptides are at minimal levels during periods of postoperative pain despite high levels of arousal. MCH levels increase at sleep onset, consistent with a role in sleep induction, whereas Hcrt-1 levels increase at wake onset, consistent with a role in wake induction. Levels of these two peptides in humans are not simply linked to arousal, but rather to specific emotions and state transitions. Other arousal systems may be similarly emotionally specialized.

Blouin, Ashley M.; Fried, Itzhak; Wilson, Charles L.; Staba, Richard J.; Behnke, Eric J.; Lam, Hoa A.; Maidment, Nigel T.; Karlsson, Karl AE.; Lapierre, Jennifer L.; Siegel, Jerome M.

2013-01-01

372

Indicators of Social Well-Being and Elements of Child Welfare in Minnesota Rural Counties.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Analyzed the relationship between elements of child welfare and an index of social well-being in Minnesota counties. Found that all except two rural counties and only two urban counties had negative social well-being scores. Counties with low social well-being scores tended to have larger numbers of child welfare recipients. Findings suggest that…

Menanteau-Horta, Dario; Yigzaw, Michael

2002-01-01

373

Effects of a social-emotional and character development program on the trajectory of behaviors associated with social-emotional and character development: findings from three randomized trials.  

PubMed

The effects of a school-based social-emotional and character development program, Positive Action, on the developmental trajectory of social-emotional and character-related behaviors was evaluated using data from three school-based randomized trials in elementary schools. Results come from 1) 4 years of data from students in 20 Hawai'i schools, 2) 3 years of data from students in 14 schools in Chicago and 3) 3 years of data from students in 8 schools in a southeastern state. Random intercept, multilevel, growth-curve analyses showed that students in both control and Positive Action schools exhibited a general decline in the number of positive behaviors associated with social-emotional and character development that were endorsed. However, the Positive Action intervention significantly reduced these declines in all three trials. Taken together, these analyses 1) give insight into the normative trajectory of behaviors associated with social-emotional and character development and 2) provide evidence for the effectiveness of Positive Action in helping children maintain a relatively beneficial developmental trajectory. PMID:21720782

Washburn, Isaac J; Acock, Alan; Vuchinich, Sam; Snyder, Frank; Li, Kin-Kit; Ji, Peter; Day, Joseph; DuBois, David; Flay, Brian R

2011-09-01

374

Social and Emotional Learning as a Universal Level of Student Support: Evaluating the Follow-Up Effect of Strong Kids on Social and Emotional Outcomes  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The authors examined the initial and follow-up effect of Strong Kids, a social and emotional learning (SEL) curriculum, among a sample of 106 third- and fourth-grade students. Students were assigned to either the treatment or the wait-list condition and completed questionnaires on SEL knowledge and perceived use of SEL skills across 3 assessment…

Harlacher, Jason E.; Merrell, Kenneth W.

2010-01-01

375

Counting on Kin: Social Networks, Social Support, and Child Health Status  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This article presents the results of new data collection in Mexico about the relationship between child well-being and social networks. Two research questions guide the analysis. First, under what conditions do networks generate greater (lesser) support? Second, what kinds of networks are associated with healthier children? We explore the health…

Kana'iaupuni, Shawn Malia; Donato, Katharine M.; Thompson-Colon, Theresa; Stainback, Melissa

2005-01-01

376

Mother-child conflict in the toddler years: lessons in emotion, morality, and relationships.  

PubMed

Sixty-three mother-toddler dyads took part in a 6-month prospective study that examined how differences in the frequency and nature of early mother-toddler conflict related to individual differences in children's subsequent socioemotional development. When the children were 30 months, mothers and children participated in a series of laboratory tasks and in a 1.5-hr unstructured home observation. All episodes of verbal conflict between mothers and their children were identified from these sessions, transcribed, and coded for certain elements (e.g., strategy, discussion of emotion, and resolution). At 36 months, children participated in measures of emotional understanding, social competence, and early conscience development. Mothers' use of justification, resolution, and mitigation in conflict at 30 months predicted high levels of socioemotional development at age 3. These findings suggest that conflict may be an important context for children's socioemotional development. PMID:12146742

Laible, Deborah J; Thompson, Ross A

2002-01-01

377

The social nature of the mother's tie to her child: John Bowlby's theory of attachment in post-war America.  

PubMed

This paper examines the development of British psychiatrist and psychoanalyst John Bowlby's views and their scientific and social reception in the United States during the 1950s. In a 1951 report for the World Health Organization Bowlby contended that the mother is the child's psychic organizer, as observational studies of children worldwide showed that absence of mother love had disastrous consequences for children's emotional health. By the end of the decade Bowlby had moved from observational studies of children in hospitals to animal research in order to support his thesis that mother love is a biological need. I examine the development of Bowlby's views and their scientific and social reception in the United States during the 1950s, a central period in the evolution of his views and in debates about the social implications of his work. I argue that Bowlby's view that mother love was a biological need for children influenced discussions about the desirability of mothers working outside the home during the early Cold War. By claiming that the future of a child's mind is determined by her mother's heart, Bowlby's argument exerted an unusually strong emotional demand on mothers and had powerful implications for the moral valuation of maternal care and love. PMID:22164644

Vicedo, Marga

2011-09-01

378

From rhetoric to reality: the problematic nature and assessment of children and young people's social and emotional learning  

Microsoft Academic Search

There is little doubt of the educational and social merits of developing children and young people's social and emotional capabilities. But there lacks consensus on what these capabilities are; what should be assessed or shown to have developed over time; and the most appropriate methods for doing this. Through the conceptual framework of ‘social and emotional dispositions and skills’ (SEDS),

Deborah Lynette Watson; Carl Emery

2010-01-01

379

Neural activity during emotion recognition after combined cognitive plus social cognitive training in schizophrenia.  

PubMed

Cognitive remediation training has been shown to improve both cognitive and social cognitive deficits in people with schizophrenia, but the mechanisms that support this behavioral improvement are largely unknown. One hypothesis is that intensive behavioral training in cognition and/or social cognition restores the underlying neural mechanisms that support targeted skills. However, there is little research on the neural effects of cognitive remediation training. This study investigated whether a 50 h (10-week) remediation intervention which included both cognitive and social cognitive training would influence neural function in regions that support social cognition. Twenty-two stable, outpatient schizophrenia participants were randomized to a treatment condition consisting of auditory-based cognitive training (AT) [Brain Fitness Program/auditory module ~60 min/day] plus social cognition training (SCT) which was focused on emotion recognition [~5-15 min per day] or a placebo condition of non-specific computer games (CG) for an equal amount of time. Pre and post intervention assessments included an fMRI task of positive and negative facial emotion recognition, and standard behavioral assessments of cognition, emotion processing, and functional outcome. There were no significant intervention-related improvements in general cognition or functional outcome. fMRI results showed the predicted group-by-time interaction. Specifically, in comparison to CG, AT+SCT participants had a greater pre-to-post intervention increase in postcentral gyrus activity during emotion recognition of both positive and negative emotions. Furthermore, among all participants, the increase in postcentral gyrus activity predicted behavioral improvement on a standardized test of emotion processing (MSCEIT: Perceiving Emotions). Results indicate that combined cognition and social cognition training impacts neural mechanisms that support social cognition skills. PMID:22695257

Hooker, Christine I; Bruce, Lori; Fisher, Melissa; Verosky, Sara C; Miyakawa, Asako; Vinogradov, Sophia

2012-08-01

380

Acute tryptophan depletion attenuates conscious appraisal of social emotional signals in healthy female volunteers  

PubMed Central

Rationale Acute tryptophan depletion (ATD) decreases levels of central serotonin. ATD thus enables the cognitive effects of serotonin to be studied, with implications for the understanding of psychiatric conditions, including depression. Objective To determine the role of serotonin in conscious (explicit) and unconscious/incidental processing of emotional information. Materials and methods A randomized, double-blind, cross-over design was used with 15 healthy female participants. Subjective mood was recorded at baseline and after 4 h, when participants performed an explicit emotional face processing task, and a task eliciting unconscious processing of emotionally aversive and neutral images presented subliminally using backward masking. Results ATD was associated with a robust reduction in plasma tryptophan at 4 h but had no effect on mood or autonomic physiology. ATD was associated with significantly lower attractiveness ratings for happy faces and attenuation of intensity/arousal ratings of angry faces. ATD also reduced overall reaction times on the unconscious perception task, but there was no interaction with emotional content of masked stimuli. ATD did not affect breakthrough perception (accuracy in identification) of masked images. Conclusions ATD attenuates the attractiveness of positive faces and the negative intensity of threatening faces, suggesting that serotonin contributes specifically to the appraisal of the social salience of both positive and negative salient social emotional cues. We found no evidence that serotonin affects unconscious processing of negative emotional stimuli. These novel findings implicate serotonin in conscious aspects of active social and behavioural engagement and extend knowledge regarding the effects of ATD on emotional perception.

Gray, Marcus A.; Minati, Ludovico; Whale, Richard; Harrison, Neil A.; Critchley, Hugo D.

2010-01-01

381

Socioeconomic status and child mental health: the role of parental emotional well-being and parenting practices.  

PubMed

This study examined the role of parental emotional well-being and parenting practices as mediators of the association between familial socioeconomic status (SES) and child mental health problems. The sample included 2,043 5th-7th graders (50.7 % female) participating in the second wave of the Bergen Child Study. Children completed the Strengths and Difficulties Questionnaire, parents reported family economy and education level, emotional well-being (measured with the Everyday Feelings Questionnaire), and the use of negative disciplinary and affirmative parenting practices (measured using the Family Life Questionnaire). Path analyses were conducted to examine the associations between SES and externalizing and internalizing problems. Results supported a model where family economy was associated with externalizing problems through parental emotional well-being and parenting practices, whereas maternal education level was associated with externalizing problems through negative discipline. The direct association between paternal education level and externalizing problems was not mediated by parenting. For internalizing problems, we found both direct associations with family economy and indirect associations with family economy through parental emotional well-being and parenting. The results suggest that parental emotional well-being and parenting practices are two potential mechanisms through which low socioeconomic status is associated with child mental health problems. PMID:24150864

Bøe, Tormod; Sivertsen, Børge; Heiervang, Einar; Goodman, Robert; Lundervold, Astri J; Hysing, Mari

2014-07-01

382

Cross-Cultural Comparisons of Child-Reported Emotional and Physical Abuse: Rates, Risk Factors and Psychosocial Symptoms  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Objectives: This study was designed to assess the incidence of child emotional and physical abuse, associated risk factors and psychosocial symptoms in a cross-cultural comparison between post-communist bloc countries. Method: One-thousand one-hundred forty-five children ages 10-14 from Latvia (N=297), Lithuania (N=300), Macedonia (N=302), and…

Sebre, Sandra; Sprugevica, Ieva; Novotni, Antoni; Bonevski, Dimitar; Pakalniskiene, Vilmante; Popescu, Daniela; Turchina, Tatiana; Friedrich, William; Lewis, Owen

2004-01-01

383

Short-Term Reliability and Continuity of Emotional Availability in Mother-Child Dyads across Contexts of Observation  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Emotional availability (EA) is a prominent index of socioemotional adaptation in the parent-child dyad. Is EA affected by context? In this methodological study, 34 mothers and their 2-year-olds were observed in 2 different settings (home vs. laboratory) 1 week apart. Significant cross-context reliability and continuity in EA as measured with the…

Bornstein, Marc H.; Gini, Motti; Putnick, Diane L.; Haynes, O. Maurice; Painter, Kathleen M.; Suwalsky, Joan T. D.

2006-01-01

384

The Relationship between Emotion Recognition Ability and Social Skills in Young Children with Autism  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This study assessed the relationship between emotion recognition ability and social skills in 42 young children with autistic disorder aged 4-7 years. The analyses revealed that accuracy in recognition of sadness, but not happiness, anger or fear, was associated with higher ratings on the Vineland-II Socialization domain, above and beyond the…

Williams, Beth T.; Gray, Kylie M.

2013-01-01

385

Assessment of Social Skills in Students with Emotional and Behavioral Disorders.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This article discusses the process of assessing social skills with students who have emotional and/or behavioral disorders. It describes a three-stage problem-solving model of problem identification, problem analysis, and treatment evaluation. Specific social skills assessment strategies are described and linked to a classification system of…

Gresham, Frank M.

2001-01-01

386

Sociocultural Considerations in Social Skills Training Research with African American Students with Emotional or Behavioral Disorders  

Microsoft Academic Search

Students with emotional or behavioral disorders (EBD) often have been identified on the basis of their social competence deficits. The overrepresentation of African American students in special education programs for EBD has been recognized for decades. This suggests that African American students with EBD have been in urgent need of social skills training (SST) if they have not been misidentified.

Rosa E. Olmeda; James M. Kauffman

2003-01-01

387

Social Emotional Competence of Pre-School Children: Relationship to Intelligence and Maturity.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Social-emotional competence (SEC) is considered a measure of an individual's total effectiveness in dealing with the environment. To verify empirically whether SEC depends on the intelligence and social maturity of young children, a study of 40 preschool children was undertaken in India. A standardized intelligence test was administered to the…

Brar, S.

388

Social Information Processing, Security of Attachment, and Emotion Regulation in Children with Learning Disabilities  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This study examined the contribution of attachment security and emotion regulation (ER) to the explanation of social information processing (SIP) in middle childhood boys with learning disabilities (LD) and without LD matched on age and grade level. Children analyzed four social vignettes using Dodge's SIP model and completed the Kerns security…

Bauminger, Nirit; Kimhi-Kind, Ilanit

2008-01-01

389

Maternal Socialization of Positive Affect: The Impact of Invalidation on Adolescent Emotion Regulation and Depressive Symptomatology  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This study examined the relations among maternal socialization of positive affect (PA), adolescent emotion regulation (ER), and adolescent depressive symptoms. Two hundred early adolescents, 11-13 years old, provided self-reports of ER strategies and depressive symptomatology; their mothers provided self-reports of socialization responses to…

Yap, Marie B. H.; Allen, Nicholas B.; Ladouceur, Cecile D.

2008-01-01

390

Emotions and Positional Identity in Becoming a Social Justice Science Teacher: Nicole's Story  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Becoming a social justice teacher, for high-poverty urban settings, is fraught with emotional ambivalence related to personal, professional, relational, political, and cultural social justice issues. Prospective teachers must navigate their sense of justice, grapple with issues of educational disparity, engage with theories of critical,…

Rivera Maulucci, Maria S.

2013-01-01

391

Schooling with Care? Developing Provision for Children and Young People Presenting Social, Emotional and Behavioural Difficulties.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This book is the product of collaboration between Education and Social Work, at both the national and local level, on a project to identify and disseminate examples of good practice in the provision for children and young people presenting social, emotional, and behavioral difficulties. There are many issues which surround the setting up and…

Munn, Pamela, Ed.

392

Interpersonal and Emotional Processes in Generalized Anxiety Disorder Analogues during Social Interaction Tasks  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Persons with chronic worry and generalized anxiety disorder (GAD) report maladaptive social cognitions, interpersonal behaviors, and emotional regulation. Because research has neither investigated these processes in actual social situations nor explored whether they take heterogeneous forms, the present study provides the first attempt to do so in…

Erickson, Thane M.; Newman, Michelle G.

2007-01-01

393

Prefrontal Activation Associated with Social Attachment: Facial-Emotion Recognition in Mothers and Infants  

Microsoft Academic Search

Attachment between mothers and infants is the most primitive and primary form of human social relationship. Many reports have suggested that the orbitofrontal cortex (OFC) plays a significant role in this attachment; however, only a select few provide experimental neurophysiological evidence. In the present study, to determine the neural substrates underlying the social and emotional attachment between mothers and infants,

Yasuyo Minagawa-Kawai; Sunao Matsuoka; Ippeita Dan; Nozomi Naoi; Katsuki Nakamura; Shozo Kojima

2009-01-01

394

The Social and Emotional Well-Being of Divorced Residential Parents.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Examination of the social and emotional well-being of 177 divorced mothers and fathers with live-in children revealed no differences between their reports of psychosomatic symptomatology, life satisfaction, life-area rankings, family cooperation, social support, and ex-spouse contact satisfaction. More health improvements and family esteem were…

Buehler, Cheryl

1988-01-01

395

Kurt Lewin's Influence on Social Emotional Climate Research in Germany and the United States.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Believing that an individual's development is strongly influenced by the way the person perceives his or her environment, Kurt Lewin had a strong influence on the theoretical foundations of social-emotional climate research. Lewin's theories may be compared with the following basic theoretical foundations of social climate research: symbolic…

Saldern, Matthias V.

396

Victims of Their Own Cognitions: Implicit Social Cognitions, Emotional Distress, and Peer Victimization  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This study investigated the relation between victimization and victimization-related distress and implicit social-cognitive processing. Eighty-seven 9-13 year old children completed measures of victimization experience and social cognitive processing tasks, including the emotional Stroop task and the self-concept Implicit Association Test (IAT).…

Rosen, Paul J.; Milich, Richard; Harris, Monica J.

2007-01-01

397

Predicting the Quality of Mother-Child Reminiscing Surrounding Negative Emotional Events at 42- and 48-Months  

PubMed Central

Researchers have speculated that a number of factors likely predict the quality of reminiscing between preschool children and their mothers. This study was designed to investigate three such factors, including child temperament, maternal personality, and maternal caregiving representations. 70 mothers and their preschool children were recruited for the study. When the child was 42 months of age, mothers completed measures of her personality and the child’s temperament. Mothers also took part in the shortened Parent Development Inventory that was coded for coherence, pleasure, comfort, and perspective taking. At both 42 and 48 months, the mother-child dyad reminisced about a past event in which the child experienced a negative emotion. These conversations were coded for the amount of maternal elaboration, the discussion of emotion, and dyadic qualities (such as collaboration and intersubjectivity). At 42 months, aspects of maternal personality and child temperament were most associated with reminiscing quality. However, at 48 months, it was primarily maternal representations of relationships that predicted high quality reminiscing in the dyad.

Laible, Deborah; Panfile, Tia; Augustine, Mairin

2012-01-01

398

The effect of partner-directed emotion in social exchange decision-making  

PubMed Central

Despite the prevalence of studies examining economic decision-making as a purely rational phenomenon, common sense suggests that emotions affect our decision-making particularly in a social context. To explore the influence of emotions on economic decision-making, we manipulated opponent-directed emotions prior to engaging participants in two social exchange decision-making games (the Trust Game and the Prisoner's Dilemma). Participants played both games with three different (fictional) partners and their tendency to defect was measured. Prior to playing each game, participants exchanged handwritten “essays” with their partners, and subsequently exchanged evaluations of each essay. The essays and evaluations, read by the participant, were designed to induce either anger, sympathy, or a neutral emotional response toward the confederate with whom they would then play the social exchange games. Galvanic skin conductance level (SCL) showed enhanced physiological arousal during anger induction compared to both the neutral and sympathy conditions. In both social exchange games, participants were most likely to defect against their partner after anger induction and least likely to defect after sympathy induction, with the neutral condition eliciting intermediate defection rates. This pattern was found to be strongest in participants exhibiting low cognitive control (as measured by a Go/no-Go task). The findings indicate that emotions felt toward another individual alter how one chooses to interact with them, and that this influence depends both on the specific emotion induced and the cognitive control of the individual.

Eimontaite, Iveta; Nicolle, Antoinette; Schindler, Igor; Goel, Vinod

2013-01-01

399

Aligning identities, emotions, and beliefs to create commitment to sustainable social and political action.  

PubMed

In this article the authors explore the social psychological processes underpinning sustainable commitment to a social or political cause. Drawing on recent developments in the collective action, identity formation, and social norm literatures, they advance a new model to understand sustainable commitment to action. The normative alignment model suggests that one solution to promoting ongoing commitment to collective action lies in crafting a social identity with a relevant pattern of norms for emotion, efficacy, and action. Rather than viewing group emotion, collective efficacy, and action as group products, the authors conceptualize norms about these as contributing to a dynamic system of meaning, which can shape ongoing commitment to a cause. By exploring emotion, efficacy, and action as group norms, it allows scholars to reenergize the theoretical connections between collective identification and subjective meaning but also allows for a fresh perspective on complex questions of causality. PMID:19622800

Thomas, Emma F; McGarty, Craig; Mavor, Kenneth I

2009-08-01

400

Emotional and Social Development: 8 to 12 Months  

MedlinePLUS

... Teen: 12-18 yrs. Dating & Sex Fitness Nutrition Safety School Substance Abuse Young Adult: 18-21 yrs. Healthy Living Nutrition Fitness Sports Oral Health Emotional Wellness Growing Healthy Safety & Prevention Immunizations Chickenpox Tdap Haemophilus Influenzae Type B ( ...

401

Emotional and Social Development: 4 to 7 Months  

MedlinePLUS

... Teen: 12-18 yrs. Dating & Sex Fitness Nutrition Safety School Substance Abuse Young Adult: 18-21 yrs. Healthy Living Nutrition Fitness Sports Oral Health Emotional Wellness Growing Healthy Safety & Prevention Immunizations Chickenpox Tdap Haemophilus Influenzae Type B ( ...

402

Emotional and Social Development: Birth to 3 Months  

MedlinePLUS

... Teen: 12-18 yrs. Dating & Sex Fitness Nutrition Safety School Substance Abuse Young Adult: 18-21 yrs. Healthy Living Nutrition Fitness Sports Oral Health Emotional Wellness Growing Healthy Safety & Prevention Immunizations Chickenpox Tdap Haemophilus Influenzae Type B ( ...

403

Class Climate Moderates Peer Relations and Emotional Adjustment in Children with an Early History of Anxious Solitude: A Child x Environment Model  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Classroom emotional climate was hypothesized to moderate psychosocial adjustment in 1st grade for children with an early childhood history of anxious solitude. Participants were 1,364 children in the National Institute of Child Health and Human Development (NICHD) Study of Early Child Care and their mothers, child-care providers, and teachers.…

Gazelle, Heidi

2006-01-01

404

Child ADHD Severity and Positive and Negative Parenting as Predictors of Child Social Functioning: Evaluation of Three Theoretical Models  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Objective: Prior research has established links between child social functioning and both parenting and child ADHD severity; however, research examining the way that these variables work together is lacking. The current article aims to test three possible models (main effects, mediation, and moderation) by which ADHD severity and positive and…

Kaiser, Nina M.; McBurnett, Keith; Pfiffner, Linda J.

2011-01-01

405

Examining the roles of victim-perpetrator relationship and emotional closeness in judgments toward a depicted child sexual abuse case.  

PubMed

The current study investigated the impact that respondent gender, victim-perpetrator relationship, and the level of emotional closeness had on attributions in a hypothetical child sexual abuse case. A total of 160 university students read a hypothetical scenario depicting a female child sexually abused by an adult male. The perpetrator was either the victim's biological father or her stepfather, with this relationship described as being either emotionally close or emotionally distant. Respondents read one of four (2 victim-perpetrator relationship × 2 emotional closeness) scenarios before completing 26 attribution items pertaining to credibility, blame, and severity. Principle components analysis yielded five factors, namely victim credibility, mother culpability, perpetrator culpability, assault severity, and victim culpability. Multivariate analysis of covariance--controlling for respondent (Caucasian vs. non-Caucasian) ethnicity--revealed, as predicted, significant main effects for respondent gender, victim-perpetrator relationship, and emotional closeness. In general, females assigned more provictim/ antiperpetrator/antimother attributions than males. Results were also suggested that both victim-perpetrator relationship and emotional closeness influence attributions made toward the victim, perpetrator, and nonoffending mother. Methodological issues and suggestions for future work are also discussed. PMID:23027835

Davies, Michelle; Patel, Fehmida; Rogers, Paul

2013-03-01

406

Direct Observation of Mother-Child Communication in Pediatric Cancer: Assessment of Verbal and Non-verbal Behavior and Emotion  

PubMed Central

Objective?To examine the acceptability and feasibility of coding observed verbal and nonverbal behavioral and emotional components of mother–child communication among families of children with cancer.?Methods?Mother–child dyads (N?=?33, children ages 5–17 years) were asked to engage in a videotaped 15-min conversation about the child’s cancer. Coding was done using the Iowa Family Interaction Rating Scale (IFIRS).?Results?Acceptability and feasibility of direct observation in this population were partially supported: 58% consented and 81% of those (47% of all eligible dyads) completed the task; trained raters achieved 78% agreement in ratings across codes. The construct validity of the IFIRS was demonstrated by expected associations within and between positive and negative behavioral/emotional code ratings and between mothers’ and children’s corresponding code ratings.?Conclusions?Direct observation of mother–child communication about childhood cancer has the potential to be an acceptable and feasible method of assessing verbal and nonverbal behavior and emotion in this population.

Dunn, Madeleine J.; Rodriguez, Erin M.; Miller, Kimberly S.; Gerhardt, Cynthia A.; Vannatta, Kathryn; Saylor, Megan; Scheule, C. Melanie

2011-01-01

407

Don't Hide Your Happiness! Positive Emotion Dissociation, Social Connectedness, and Psychological Functioning  

PubMed Central

It is now clear that positive emotion leads to enhanced psychological functioning. What is less clear, however, is just why this is so. Drawing on a social-functional perspective, we argue that positive emotional behavior that accurately signals to others the individual's internal state will enhance social connectedness. Positive emotional behavior that does not accurately signal a person's experience—such as a smile that is not felt—may impede social connectedness and, in turn, psychological functioning. This perspective suggests that (a) the degree to which experience and behavior are dissociated during positive emotional episodes, over and above level of positive behavior, should predict worse psychological functioning and (b) the effect of dissociation should be mediated by social connectedness. To test these hypotheses, we conducted a short-term prospective longitudinal study, with a baseline assessment of depressive symptoms and well-being at Time 1. Six months later, at Time 2, we used a novel within-individual laboratory paradigm to measure the degree to which positive emotional behavior was dissociated from (vs. coherent with) a participant's positive emotional experience. We also assessed level of positive behavior and experience. Then, another 6 months later, we assessed social connectedness as a mediator and depressive symptoms and well-being as outcomes at Time 3. Even when controlling for baseline functioning and for level of positive emotion behavior and experience, we found that greater positive experience-behavior dissociation at Time 2 predicted higher levels of depressive symptoms and lower levels of well-being at Time 3. As predicted, these associations were mediated by social connectedness.

Mauss, Iris B.; Shallcross, Amanda J.; Troy, Allison S.; John, Oliver P.; Ferrer, Emilio; Wilhelm, Frank H.; Gross, James J.

2012-01-01

408

Adolescent fathers involved with child protection: social workers speak.  

PubMed

This study examined adolescent paternity through structured interviews with their social workers. It adds to the literature by exploring if there were young men involved with the child protection services (CPS) system who are fathers, identifying their unique needs, and beginning discussions on working with these young men. CPS social workers from six area offices and one juvenile detention facility completed surveys for each father on their caseload. A 3.5% rate of adolescent paternity was observed across these offices. Information about the nature of the young men's involvement with CPS, their involvement with their children, and their unique needs as fathers are provided. This paper also identifies some practice and policy implications for adolescent fathers and CPS charged with their care. PMID:22533056

Gordon, Derrick M; Watkins, Natasha D; Walling, Sherry M; Wilhelm, Sara; Rayford, Brett S

2011-01-01

409

Parent-Child Discussions of Anger and Sadness: The Importance of Parent and Child Gender during Middle Childhood  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This chapter provides conceptual background and empirical evidence that parental emotion socialization continues well into middle childhood and is influenced by the social context. Data are presented to illustrate the influence of parent and child gender on parental socialization of emotion in 113 Caucasian, middle-class children. Mothers and…

Zeman, Janice; Perry-Parrish, Carisa; Cassano, Michael

2010-01-01

410

Perceived social support and domain-specific adjustment of children with emotional and behavioural difficulties  

Microsoft Academic Search

The perceived availability of social support has been documented as a protective mechanism among adults and adolescents. However, little research has explored the role of social support among children with emotional and behavioural difficulties (E\\/BD). The current study sought to investigate the effects of perceived social support from family, friends and teachers on domain-specific adjustment for children with E\\/BD. Fifty-four

Mina Popliger; Jessica R. Toste; Nancy L. Heath

2009-01-01

411

Differential Relations of Depression and Social Anxiety Symptoms to the Facets of Extraversion\\/Positive Emotionality  

Microsoft Academic Search

Previous research has shown that both depression and social anxiety—2 facets of internalizing psychopathology—are characterized by low levels of extraversion\\/positive emotionality (E\\/PE). However, little is known about the relations of the facets of E\\/PE with the symptoms of depression and social anxiety. This study utilized multiple measures of each facet of E\\/PE, as well as depression and social anxiety symptoms.

Kristin Naragon-Gainey; David Watson; Kristian E. Markon

2009-01-01

412

Emotional Intelligence and Staff Training in After-School Environments  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The core concept of emotional intelligence is the ever-emerging process of self-awareness, where individuals are able to identify their emotions and manage them in various social environments. This capacity is viewed as an asset in child care because new insights in human development have highlighted the importance of children's social and…

Seligson, Michelle; MacPhee, Marybeth

2004-01-01

413

A longitudinal study of behavioral, emotional and social difficulties in individuals with a history of specific language impairment (SLI).  

PubMed

Children with specific language impairment (SLI) have often been reported to have associated behavioral, emotional and social difficulties. Most previous studies involve observations at a single time point, or cross sectional designs, and longitudinal evidence of the developmental trajectories of particular difficulties is limited. The Strengths and Difficulties Questionnaire was used to measure behavioral (hyperactivity and conduct), emotional and social (peer) problems in a sample of individuals with a history of SLI at four time points from childhood (age 7) to adolescence (age 16). A decrease in behavioral and emotional problems was observed from childhood to adolescence, although emotional problems were still evident in adolescence. In contrast, there was an increase in social problems. Reading skills and expressive language were related only to behavioral problems. Pragmatic abilities were related to behavioral, emotional and social difficulties. As a group, those with a history of SLI have poorer long term social and, to a lesser extent, emotional outcomes. In contrast, behavioral difficulties appear to decrease to normative levels by adolescence. Different aspects of early language abilities and reading skills exert different types and degrees of influence on behavioral, emotional and social difficulties. Learning outcomes: Readers will be able to: (1) understand the types of behavioral, emotional and social difficulties present in individuals with a history of SLI; (2) be familiar with the developmental trajectory of these difficulties from childhood to adolescence; and (3) understand the relationships between behavioral, emotional and social difficulties and early language and literacy ability. PMID:20970811

St Clair, Michelle C; Pickles, Andrew; Durkin, Kevin; Conti-Ramsden, Gina

2011-01-01

414

Distinct contributions of frontal areas to emotion and social behaviour in the rat  

PubMed Central

Although the lesions of patients with impaired social behaviour encompass both orbitofrontal and anterior cingulate cortex (OFC and ACC), attempts to model such impairments in animals have focused on the OFC. However, recent neuroimaging attempts to identify the neural correlates of social interaction have emphasized the relative importance of ACC. Here we report the effect of circumscribed excitotoxic lesions of either OFC or ACC on ethological, unconditioned tests of emotion and social behaviour in the Lister hooded rat. OFC lesions altered emotional responsiveness to stimuli in non-social, fear-inducing situations (hyponeophagia test), and produced a small but statistically significant increase in aggression to other rats, but did not compromise other aspects of social interaction and appraisal. ACC lesions did, however, affect the utilization of social information. Specifically, ACC lesions diminished interest in other individuals and caused a relative reduction in memory for social stimuli. Whereas normal animals habituated to repeated presentations of the same individual, the poor performance of ACC animals entailed continued higher levels of responsiveness to repeated presentations of the same individual. The ACC impairment cannot simply be attributed to a general reduction in arousal, or a general impairment in recognition memory. Neither lesion affected anxiety per se (successive alleys test). Further analyses were conducted to investigate whether the changes in aggressive and social behaviour were related to different aspects of decision-making. Although the relationship between changes in social interaction and decision-making after ACC lesions is unclear, OFC impairments in emotionality were correlated with increased impulsive choice.

Rudebeck, Peter H; Walton, Mark E; Millette, Benjamin H P; Shirley, Elizabeth; Rushworth, Matthew F S; Bannerman, David M

2007-01-01

415

Emotions in social information processing and their relations with reactive and proactive aggression in referred aggressive boys  

Microsoft Academic Search

We studied emotional aspects of social information processing (SIP) and their spe- cific relations with reactive and proactive aggression in 54 boys ages 7 to 13 who had been referred for aggressive behavior problems and a comparison group. Partici- pants listened to vignettes concerning provocations by peers and answered questions concerning SIP, own and peer's emotions, and emotion regulation. Aggressive

Bram Orobio de Castro; Welmoet Merk; Willem Koops; Jan Veerman; Joop Bosch

2005-01-01

416

Political correctness, social work, and the breakdown of the child abuse system  

Microsoft Academic Search

This article examines the relationship between political correctness, social work, and the breakdown of the child abuse system. Specifically, the authors explore the myth of the classlessness of child abuse by providing a brief overview of studies relating socioeconomic factors to child abuse. In addition, the article examines groups that stand to gain from perpetuating the myth of classlessness, including

Howard Jacob Karger; David Stoesz

1995-01-01

417

Evaluation of an Innovative Social Work Education Model: The Kentucky Public Child Welfare Certification Program (PCWCP)  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This research evaluated the effectiveness of the Public Child Welfare Certification Program, a specialized child welfare program delivered in bachelor of social work (BSW) curricula across the state of Kentucky. This evaluation gathered data for 10 years on satisfaction with the program, preparation for work in the state's child welfare agency,…

Barbee, Anita; Sullivan, Dana; Borders, Kevin; Antle, Becky; Hall, J. Christopher; Fox, Steve; Moran, Erin Beth

2009-01-01

418

Behavioural and neural correlates of self-focused emotion regulation in social anxiety disorder  

PubMed Central

Background In healthy individuals, voluntary modification of self-relevance has proven effective in regulating subjective emotional experience as well as physiologic responses evoked by emotive stimuli. As social anxiety disorder (SAD) is characterized by both altered emotional and self-related processing, we tested if emotion regulation through self-focused reappraisal is effective in individuals with SAD. Methods While undergoing 3 T functional magnetic resonance imaging, individuals with SAD and matched healthy controls either passively viewed neutral and aversive pictures or actively increased or decreased their negative emotional experience through the modification of self-relevance or personal distance to aversive pictures. Participants rated all pictures with regard to the intensity of elicited emotions and self-relatedness. Results We included 21 individuals with SAD and 23 controls in our study. Individuals with SAD reported significantly stronger emotional intensity across conditions and showed a nonsignificant tendency to judge pictures as more self-related than controls. Compared with controls, individuals with SAD showed an overactivation in bilateral temporoparietal regions and in the posterior midcingulate cortex during the passive viewing of aversive compared with neutral pictures. During instructed emotion regulation, activation patterns normalized and no significant group differences were detected. Limitations As no positive pictures were presented, results might be limited to the regulation of negative emotion. Conclusion During passive viewing of aversive images, individuals with SAD showed evidence of neural hyperreactivity that may be interpreted as increased bodily self-consciousness and heightened perspective-taking. During voluntary increase and decrease of negative emotional intensity, group differences disappeared, suggesting self-focused reappraisal as a successful emotion regulation strategy for individuals with SAD.

Gaebler, Michael; Daniels, Judith K.; Lamke, Jan-Peter; Fydrich, Thomas; Walter, Henrik

2014-01-01

419

Impact and Characteristics of Positive and Fearful Emotional Messages during Infant Social Referencing  

PubMed Central

Studies of infant social referencing have indicated that infants might be more influenced by vocal information contained in emotional messages than by facial expression, especially during fearful message conditions. The present study investigated the characteristics of emotional channels that parents used during social referencing, and corresponding infants’ behavioral changes. Results of Study 1 indicated that parents used more vocal information during positive message conditions. Unlike previous findings, infants’ behavioral change was related to the frequency of vocal information during positive condition. For fearful messages, infants were more influenced by the number of multi-modal channels used and the frequency of visual information. Study 2 further showed that the intensity of vocal tone was related to infant regulation only during positive message conditions. The results imply that understanding of social context is important to make sense of parent-infant’s emotional interaction.

Kim, Geunyoung; Walden, Tedra A.; Knieps, Linda J.

2014-01-01

420

Imitating emotions instead of strategies in spatial games elevates social welfare  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The success of imitation as an evolutionary driving force in spatial games has often been questioned, especially for social dilemmas such as the snowdrift game, where the most profitable one may be the mixed phase sustaining both the cooperative and the defective strategy. Here we reexamine this assumption by investigating the evolution of cooperation in spatial social-dilemma games, where, instead of pure strategies, players can adopt emotional profiles of their neighbors. For simplicity, the emotional profile of each player is determined by two pivotal factors only, namely how it behaves towards less and how towards more successful neighbors. We find that imitating emotions such as goodwill and envy instead of pure strategies from the more successful players reestablishes imitation as a tour de force for resolving social dilemmas on structured populations without any additional assumptions or strategic complexity.

Szolnoki, Attila; Xie, Neng-Gang; Wang, Chao; Perc, Matjaž

2011-11-01

421

Social and emotional information processing in preschoolers: Indicator of early school success?  

PubMed Central

To better connect emotional development and social cognition literatures, the intersection of preschoolers’ emotion and behaviour response choices to hypothetical peer conflicts was examined among 305 4 ½-year-olds in private childcare and Head Start. Latent class analyses identified five subgroups of children with connections between their emotion and behaviour response choices (Happy/Passive, Sad/Socially Competent, Angry/Passive, Angry/Aggressive, Sad/Passive). Subgroup membership differed across gender and economic risk status, and was also a predictor of early school success (i.e., social competence, classroom adjustment, and academic readiness). Overall, even after accounting for the associations between known predictors of young children’s behaviour and school success (i.e., gender and SES), membership in the subgroups at preschool was uniquely predictive of both concurrent and later social competence, classroom adjustment, and academic readiness. Further, preschool social competence partially mediated contributions of subgroup membership on kindergarten classroom adjustment. These findings are discussed in relation to existing social information processing and emotional development literatures, including potential implications for understanding young children’s early school success.

Denham, Susanne A.; Kalb, Sara; Way, Erin; Warren-Khot, Heather; Rhoades, Brittany L.; Bassett, Hideko H.

2012-01-01

422

Effects of home-based, informal social support on child health.  

PubMed

To enhance mother-infant interaction, paraprofessional home visitors provided parents with emotional support, information, and help in using community resources during pregnancy and throughout the infants' first 14 months. This study reports effects on child health. Both home-visited women and controls made good use of well-child care. Home-visited women made greater use of sick-child care (p = 0.002), most of which was appropriate. The greater use of sick-child care was concentrated among mothers with moderate or high family stress, with whom home visitors had closer relationships. Case histories showed a variety of individual effects on parents. PMID:2708538

Dawson, P; van Doorninck, W J; Robinson, J L

1989-04-01

423

Child versus Parent Reports of Parenting Practices: Implications for the Conceptualization of Child Behavioral and Emotional Problems  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This study examined parent and child reports of parenting practices separately to predict child and parent reports of child externalizing and internalizing features, as well as delinquent activity. Participants included 98 children (51 male, 47 female) from a community sample, aged 9-15 at the beginning of the study. Results revealed that child

Barry, Christopher T.; Frick, Paul J.; Grafeman, Sarah J.

2008-01-01

424

Improving the Social Skills of Children and Youth with Emotional/Behavioral Disorders. Retrospective Series on Critical Issues in Emotional/Behavioral Disorders.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The nine readings in this monograph focus on ways to improve the social skills of students with emotional/behavioral disorders. The following readings are included: (1) "Analysis of Literature on Social Competence of Behaviorally Disordered Children and Youth" (Sarup R. Mathur and Robert B. Rutherford, Jr.); (2) "A Validation of Social Skills for…

Council for Children with Behavioral Disorders.

425

The Effect of You Can Do It! Education on the Emotional Resilience of Primary School Students with Social, Emotional, Behavioural and Achievement Challenges  

Microsoft Academic Search

This study examined the effect of the You Can Do It! Education (YCDI) cognitive-behavioural intervention program on the emotional resilience of students in grades 4 to 6 who were identified with achievement, behavioural, social and\\/or emotional challenges. 61 students were randomly assigned to either small groups receiving an eight week YCDI cognitive-behavioural intervention or small groups receiving \\

Michael E. Bernard

426

Sex Differences in Facial, Prosodic, and Social Context Emotional Recognition in Early-Onset Schizophrenia  

PubMed Central

The purpose of the present study was to determine sex differences in facial, prosodic, and social context emotional recognition in schizophrenia (SCH). Thirty-eight patients (SCH, 20 females) and 38 healthy controls (CON, 20 females) participated in the study. Clinical scales (BPRS and PANSS) and an Affective States Scale were applied, as well as tasks to evaluate facial, prosodic, and within a social context emotional recognition. SCH showed lower accuracy and longer response times than CON, but no significant sex differences were observed in either facial or prosody recognition. In social context emotions, however, females showed higher empathy than males with respect to happiness in both groups. SCH reported being more identified with sad films than CON and females more with fear than males. The results of this study confirm the deficits of emotional recognition in male and female patients with schizophrenia compared to healthy subjects. Sex differences were detected in relation to social context emotions and facial and prosodic recognition depending on age.

Ramos-Loyo, Julieta; Mora-Reynoso, Leonor; Sanchez-Loyo, Luis Miguel; Medina-Hernandez, Virginia

2012-01-01

427

Early Environmental Correlates of Maternal Emotion Talk  

PubMed Central

SYNOPSIS Objective The primary goal of this study was to examine contextual, child, and maternal factors that are associated with mothers’ early emotion talk in an ethnically diverse, low-income sample. Design Emotion talk (positive and negative labels) was coded for 1111 mothers while engaged with their 7-month-olds in viewing an emotion-faces picture book. Infant attention during the interaction was also coded. Mothers’ parenting style (positive engagement and negative intrusiveness) was coded during a dyadic free-play interaction. Demographic information was obtained, as well as maternal ratings of child temperament and mother’s knowledge of infant development. Results Hierarchical regression analyses revealed that social context and maternal qualities are significant predictors of mothers’ early positive and negative emotion talk. In particular, mothers who were African American, had higher income, and who showed more positive engagement when interacting with their infants demonstrated increased rates of positive and negative emotion talk with their infants. For negative emotion talk, social context variables moderated other predictors. Specifically, infant attention was positively associated with negative emotion talk only for African American mothers, and knowledge of infant development was positively associated with negative emotion talk only for non-African American mothers. The positive association between maternal positive engagement and negative emotion talk was greater for lower-income families than for higher-income families. Conclusions Mothers’ emotion language with infants is not sensitive to child factors but is associated with social contextual factors and characteristics of the mothers themselves.

Garrett-Peters, Patricia; Mills-Koonce, Roger; Adkins, Daniel; Vernon-Feagans, Lynne; Cox, Martha

2009-01-01

428

Sensory over-responsivity in elementary school: prevalence and social-emotional correlates.  

PubMed

Sensory over-responsivity (SOR) towards tactile and auditory input can impact children's participation in academic and social activities; however the prevalence of SOR behaviors and their relation to social-emotional problems and competence has not been rigorously studied. This study investigated SOR in a representative sample of elementary school-aged children (n = 925, 50% boys, ages 7-11 years) who were followed from infancy. Sixteen percent of parents reported that at least four tactile or auditory sensations bothered their children. Being bothered by certain sensations was common while others were relatively rare. Parents of children with versus without elevated SOR in school-age reported higher frequencies of early and co-occurring internalizing, externalizing, and dysregulation problems, and lower levels of concurrent adaptive social behaviors. Early identification of elevated SOR and assessment of concurrent social-emotional status are important to minimize their impact on social adaptive behaviors at school age. PMID:19153827

Ben-Sasson, A; Carter, A S; Briggs-Gowan, M J

2009-07-01

429

Third and Fourth Grade Teacher Practices in Cognitive and Emotional/Social Development, Their Students' Opportunities for Emotional/Social Development, and Academic Self-Concept Moderated by Students' Mothers' Level of Education and Time Reading at Home  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This study examines the relationships among third and fourth grade teacher practices in cognitive development: understanding, application, synthesis, and judgment; emotional/social development; their students' self-reported opportunities for emotional/social development; and academic self-concept. In addition, this study investigates the…

Santos, Carol A.

2009-01-01

430

Transactions between Child Social Wariness and Observed Structured Parenting: Evidence from a Prospective Adoption Study  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This investigation examined the mutual influences between structured parenting and child social wariness during toddlerhood using a longitudinal adoption design. The sample consisted of 361 adoption-linked families, each including an adopted child, adoptive parents, and a birth mother. Heightened social wariness in children at age 18 months…

Natsuaki, Misaki N.; Leve, Leslie D.; Harold, Gordon T.; Neiderhiser, Jenae M.; Shaw, Daniel S.; Ganiban, Jody; Scaramella, Laura V.; Reiss, David

2013-01-01

431

Perceived Neighborhood Social Disorder and Residents' Attitudes toward Reporting Child Physical Abuse  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Objective: This study aimed to explore the relationship between perceived neighborhood social disorder and attitudes toward reporting child physical abuse. Method: Data from a national probabilistic sample (N = 9,759) were used. Responses about the perception of neighborhood social disorder, perceived frequency of child physical abuse in Spanish…

Gracia, Enrique; Herrero, Juan

2006-01-01

432

Teacher support as a buffer between interparental conflict and child social skills  

Microsoft Academic Search

This study, conducted in 2004, investigated the direct effect of interparental conflict (IPC) about child?raising issues on the social skills of middle?class US children who attended a suburban preschool and the buffering effect of teacher support (n = 170). Findings indicated that greater IPC was associated with poorer child social skills. The prediction that teacher support buffers the association between

Solveig Spjeldnes; Gary Koeske; Esther Sales

2010-01-01

433

Clinical social work and the family court: A new role in child sexual abuse cases  

Microsoft Academic Search

Clinical social workers encounter difficult treatment issues when working with children where there is a suspicion of child sexual abuse, or where there has been an indicated child protective services case but no family court action. This article outlines a new role for the clinical social worker to play in relationship to the family court system. The author argues that

Virginia C. Strand

1994-01-01

434

Childhood Physical Abuse, Childhood Social Support, and Adult Child Abuse Potential.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Examines the role of social support in the discrimination of physical child abusers and nonabusers, both with a childhood history of physical child abuse. In contrast to expectations, none of the social support factors distinguished between the abusers and nonabusers. (JPS)

Caliso, John A.; Milner, Joel S.

1994-01-01

435

Jealousy and the Social Psychology of Emotional Experience  

Microsoft Academic Search

Jealousy is investigated as a focus for the symbolic interactionist analysis of emotion. We define jealousy in terms of the features of the contexts in which it is evoked. Three related elements are essential: an attachment between two persons; valued resources that flow through and are controlled by that attachment; and intrusion on that attachment by a third person who

Carolyn S Ellis; Eugene Weinstein

1986-01-01

436

Social Structure-Personality: What is the relationship between social class and child-rearing values?  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This exercise was developed for use in an introductory sociology course. The exercise was presented as part of a unit to better understand the relationship between social class and child-rearing values. Students will analyze the relationship between two variables and fill out a table, and answer optional questions to assess their critical thinking skills. This activity uses the charts, rankings and maps on http://www.gss.norc.org/. The General Social Survey is an easy-to-use tool to investigate U.S. trends using census data.

Lashbrook, Jeffrey

437

Emotion Regulation, Parenting and Display of Social Reticence in Preschoolers.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Examined social reticence and its association with the quality of parenting behaviors. Found that children's shy, socially reticent behavior was predicted by the extent to which mothers were over-solicitous during free-play. Suggested that early childhood educators offer reticent-shy children opportunities to explore their personal and social

Rubin, Kenneth H.; Cheah, Charissa S. L.; Fox, Nathan

2001-01-01

438

The Influence of Provocateurs' Emotion Displays on the Social Information Processing of Children Varying in Social Adjustment and Age  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This study examined the effect of provocateurs' emotion displays on first through fourth graders' social information processing (SIP). Rating and nomination sociometric techniques were used to identify rejected-aggressive, rejected-nonaggressive, average-nonaggressive, and popular-nonaggressive groups. Children viewed videotaped ambiguous…

Lemerise, E.A.; Gregory, D.S.; Fredstrom, B.K.

2005-01-01

439

Conceptualizing Emotions Along the Dimensions of Valence, Arousal, and Communicative Frequency - Implications for Social-Cognitive Tests and Training Tools  

PubMed Central

Background and Objectives: Emotion words are mostly characterized along the classic dimensions of arousal and valence. In the current study we sought to complement this characterization by investigating the frequency of emotions in human everyday communication, which may be crucial information for designing new diagnostic or intervention tools to test and improve emotion recognition. Methods: One hundred healthy German individuals were asked to indicate the valence and arousal of 62 emotion words in a questionnaire. Importantly, participants were additionally asked to indicate the frequency with which they experience each emotion themselves and observe it in others. Results: Positive emotions were judged to occur more often than negative emotions in everyday life. The more negatively valenced emotions were rated to be observed more often in others than experienced in one-self. On the other hand more positively valenced emotions were experienced more often in one-self than they were observed in others. Finally, increasing age was associated with a decrease in the frequency of observing an emotion in other people. Limitations: Future studies with larger sample sizes are needed to ascertain if the findings also apply to other cultural and language contexts. Conclusion: These results imply a greater frequency of positive emotions than negative emotions in everyday communication. The finding of such a bias toward positive emotions can guide the selection of emotion words for implementation in socio-emotional intervention tools. Such a selection may represent an effective means for improving social-cognitive functioning in people with respective impairments.

Hepach, Robert; Kliemann, Dorit; Gruneisen, Sebastian; Heekeren, Hauke R.; Dziobek, Isabel

2011-01-01

440

Conceptualizing emotions along the dimensions of valence, arousal, and communicative frequency - implications for social-cognitive tests and training tools.  

PubMed

Background and Objectives: Emotion words are mostly characterized along the classic dimensions of arousal and valence. In the current study we sought to complement this characterization by investigating the frequency of emotions in human everyday communication, which may be crucial information for designing new diagnostic or intervention tools to test and improve emotion recognition. Methods: One hundred healthy German individuals were asked to indicate the valence and arousal of 62 emotion words in a questionnaire. Importantly, participants were additionally asked to indicate the frequency with which they experience each emotion themselves and observe it in others. Results: Positive emotions were judged to occur more often than negative emotions in everyday life. The more negatively valenced emotions were rated to be observed more often in others than experienced in one-self. On the other hand more positively valenced emotions were experienced more often in one-self than they were observed in others. Finally, increasing age was associated with a decrease in the frequency of observing an emotion in other people. Limitations: Future studies with larger sample sizes are needed to ascertain if the findings also apply to other cultural and language contexts. Conclusion: These results imply a greater frequency of positive emotions than negative emotions in everyday communication. The finding of such a bias toward positive emotions can guide the selection of emotion words for implementation in socio-emotional intervention tools. Such a selection may represent an effective means for improving social-cognitive functioning in people with respective impairments. PMID:22022317

Hepach, Robert; Kliemann, Dorit; Grüneisen, Sebastian; Heekeren, Hauke R; Dziobek, Isabel

2011-01-01

441

Buffers for the Bereaved: the Impact of Social Factors On the Emotional Health of Bereaving Parents  

Microsoft Academic Search

Emotional health of bereaving parents (N = 62; control N = 56) were explored 5 years after the death of a child (age 0-12) in Israel. The Symptom Check List-90 was utilized as the primary measurement instrument. Comparisons to controls according to geographic area of birth indicated more interpersonal (over)sensitivity, obsessive-compulsiveness and anxiety among Asia\\/African born parents as compared to

Michael Roskin

1984-01-01

442

Reduced facial expression and social context in major depression: discrepancies between facial muscle activity and self-reported emotion  

Microsoft Academic Search

The expression of emotion is determined by emotion and the presence and absence of others, i.e. social context. The present study examined social context differences in facial muscle activity and self-reported emotion of 11 major depressed and 11 non-depressed patients. Subjects were asked to imagine happy and sad situations with and without visualizing other people. Facial muscle activity over the

Jean-Guido Gehricke; David Shapiro

2000-01-01

443

Social-Emotional Learning Profiles of Preschoolers' Early School Success: A Person-Centered Approach  

PubMed Central

Examined how aspects of social-emotional learning (SEL)—specifically, emotion knowledge, emotional and social behaviors, social problem-solving, and self-regulation—clustered to typify groups of children who differ in terms of their motivation to learn, participation in the classroom, and other indices of early school adjustment and academic success. 275 four-year-old children from private day schools and Head Start were directly assessed and observed in these areas, and preschool and kindergarten teachers provided information on social and academic aspects of their school success. Three groups of children were identified: SEL Risk, SEL Competent-Social/Expressive, and SEL Competent-Restrained. Group members differed on demographic dimensions of gender and center type, and groups differed in meaningful ways on school success indices, pointing to needed prevention/intervention programming. In particular, the SEL Risk group could benefit from emotion-focused programming, and the long-term developmental trajectory of the SEL Competent-Restrained group requires study.

Denham, Susanne A.; Bassett, Hideko H.; Mincic, Melissa; Kalb, Sara; Way, Erin; Wyatt, Todd; Segal, Yana

2011-01-01

444

A Good Beginning: Sending America's Children to School with the Social and Emotional Competence They Need To Succeed.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Recognizing that what, how, and how much children learn in school depends in large part on the social and emotional competence they developed as preschoolers, this monograph examines the current state of research regarding the social and emotional risk and protective factors that predict early school problems or success. The first part of the…

Peth-Pierce, Robin

445

The Center on the Social and Emotional Foundations for Early Learning: Addressing Challenging Behavior in Infants and Toddlers  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The Center on the Social and Emotional Foundations for Early Learning (CSEFEL) is a federally funded national resource center designed to support early care and education providers address the social-emotional needs of children birth through age 5 years. Recent research has found that an extraordinarily high number of young children are being…

Hunter, Amy; Hemmeter, Mary Louise

2009-01-01

446

Social-Emotional Competence in Young Children with Developmental Delays: Our Reflection and Vision for the Future  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The authors provide a brief historical reflection on social-emotional competence intervention research along with their vision for future directions of intervention investigations for young children with developmental delays and difficulties. Specifically, they summarize "what we 'know'" and "what we "need to know"" in the area of social-emotional

Brown, William H.; Conroy, Maureen A.

2011-01-01

447

A Case Study of a Kindergarten Teacher: Examining Practices and Beliefs That Support the Social-Emotional Classroom Climate  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This 5-month qualitative case study investigated the social-emotional climate of one half-day kindergarten classroom by examining the role of the teacher in establishing and sustaining a classroom climate that nurtured the social-emotional lives of students. This case study asks: How and why did the teacher establish and sustain a classroom…

Pech, Sandra L.

2010-01-01

448

Examining Developmental Differences in the Social-Emotional Problems among Frequent Bullies, Victims, and Bully/Victims  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Bullying poses a threat to children's social-emotional functioning and their perceptions of school climate, yet few studies have examined different types of social-emotional and behavior problems presented by children involved in bullying, as a bully, victim, or bully/victim across multiple school levels. The current study used data from 24,345…

O'Brennan, Lindsey M.; Bradshaw, Catherine P.; Sawyer, Anne L.

2009-01-01

449

Read Two Books and Write Me in the Morning! Bibliotherapy for Social Emotional Intervention in the Inclusive Classroom  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This article explains a practical strategy for dealing with social emotional problems in the inclusive classroom environment. The potential need for bibliotherapy is introduced by discussing how role boundaries of teachers are changing and how teachers may take on a range of roles in their classrooms. An example of a social emotional scenario…

Maich, Kimberly; Kean, Sharon

2004-01-01

450

Read Two Books and Write Me in the Morning! Bibliotherapy for social emotional intervention in the inclusive classroom  

Microsoft Academic Search

This article explains a practical strategy for dealing with social emotional problems in the inclusive classroom environment. The potential need for bibliotherapy is introduced by discussing how role boundaries of teachers are changing and how teachers may take on a range of roles in their classrooms. An example of a social emotional scenario where bibliotherapy might be used in a

Kimberly Maich; Sharon Kean

2004-01-01

451

Screening Accuracy for Risk of Autism Spectrum Disorder Using the Brief Infant-Toddler Social and Emotional Assessment (BITSEA)  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Early identification of autism spectrum disorders (ASDs) is facilitated by the use of standardized screening scales that assess the social emotional behaviors associated with ASD. Authors examined accuracy of Brief Infant-Toddler Social and Emotional Assessment (BITSEA) subscales in detecting Modified Checklist for Autism in Toddlers (M-CHAT) risk…

Gardner, Lauren M.; Murphy, Laura; Campbell, Jonathan M.; Tylavsky, Frances; Palmer, Frederick B.; Graff, J. Carolyn

2013-01-01

452

Making the Most Out of School-Based Prevention: Lessons from the Social and Emotional Aspects of Learning (SEAL) Programme  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This paper considers the role played by universal, school-based social and emotional learning (SEL) programmes in addressing the mental health needs of children and young people. Theory and research in the field are discussed. Particular attention is paid to the social and emotional aspects of learning (SEAL) programme in England, a flagship…

Humphrey, Neil; Lendrum, Ann; Wigelsworth, Michael

2013-01-01

453

Teacher Beliefs and Practices Relating to Development in Preschool: Importance Placed on Social-Emotional Behaviours and Skills  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Preschool teachers' beliefs relating to the importance of social-emotional competence and teacher practices that support children's competence were investigated through surveys and focus groups. Survey results indicated that Head Start and public school pre-K teachers placed higher importance on social-emotional behaviours and skills…

Hollingsworth, Heidi L.; Winter, Marna K.

2013-01-01

454

Three Year Cumulative Impacts of the 4Rs Program on Children's Social-Emotional, Behavioral, and Academic Outcomes  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Over the last two decades, developmental science has made significant progress in understanding children's trajectories toward social-emotional and academic outcomes. At the same time, there has been dramatic growth in the design, implementation, and rigorous evaluation of school-based interventions to promote positive social-emotional development…

Jones, Stephanie M.; Brown, Joshua L.; Aber, J. Lawrence

2010-01-01

455

When vocal processing gets emotional: on the role of social orientation in relevance detection by the human amygdala.  

PubMed

Previous work on vocal emotional processing provided little evidence for involvement of emotional processing areas such as the amygdala or the orbitofrontal cortex (OFC). Here, we sought to specify whether involvement of these areas depends on how relevant vocal expressions are for the individual. To this end, we assessed participants' social orientation--a measure of the interest and concern for other individuals and hence the relevance of social signals. We then presented task-irrelevant syllable sequences that contained rare changes in tone of voice that could be emotional or neutral. Processing differences between emotional and neutral vocal change in the right amygdala and the bilateral OFC were significantly correlated with the social orientation measure. Specifically, higher social orientation scores were associated with enhanced amygdala and OFC activity to emotional as compared to neutral change. Given the presumed role of the amygdala in the detection of emotionally relevant information, our results suggest that social orientation enhances this detection process and the activation of emotional representations mediated by the OFC. Moreover, social orientation may predict listener responses to vocal emotional cues and explain interindividual variability in vocal emotional processing. PMID:18299209

Schirmer, Annett; Escoffier, Nicolas; Zysset, Stefan; Koester, Dirk; Striano, Tricia; Friederici, Angela D

2008-04-15

456

Social cultural and situative perspective of studying emotions in teaching and learning: characteristics, challenges and opportunities  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

In this forum, I take a learning sciences perspective to examine the paper by Bellocchi, Ritchie, Tobin, Sandhu and Sandhu ( Cultural Studies of Science Education, doi: 10.1007/s11422-013-9526-3 , 2013) titled "Examining emotional climate of preservice science teacher education." I characterize their approach as a social cultural and situative perspective of studying emotions in teaching and learning. Such an approach overcomes the limitations of examining emotions as individual psychological constructs, but it also incurs other methodological challenges. I suggest an alternative approach of examining the individual's emotions, as well as their aggregates as a group measure. This approach allows us to study variations in emotional outcomes at an individual level or at a group level. I also suggest examining interplay of emotions with other aspects of learning outcomes, for example, cognitive learning outcomes. Finally, I suggest studying development of meta-emotional knowledge among teachers as another fertile area of research that could benefit the teachers in their classroom practices.

Tan, Seng-Chee

2013-09-01

457

Helping Families Connect Early Literacy with Social-Emotional Development  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Early childhood educators know that home is a child's first learning environment. From birth, children are comforted by hearing and listening to their caregivers' voices. The language used by families supports young children's development of oral language skills. Exposure to print materials in the home also supports literacy development. Literacy…

Santos, Rosa Milagros; Fettig, Angel; Shaffer, LaShorage

2012-01-01

458

Connecting Social and Emotional Learning with Mental Health  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

As knowledge of effective treatments for mental disorders has grown, so too has the field of mental health promotion and positive development. Studies completed during the last two decades have synthesized the state of mental health promotion and documented that universal mental health supports positively affect child and adolescent developmental…

Collaborative for Academic, Social, and Emotional Learning (NJ1), 2008

2008-01-01

459

Errors in identifying and expressing emotion in facial expressions, voices, and postures unique to social anxiety.  

PubMed

The purpose of the present study was to see if 7-10-year-old socially anxious children (n = 26) made systematic errors in identifying and sending emotions in facial expressions, paralanguage, and postures as compared with the more random errors of children who were inattentive-hyperactive (n = 21). It was found that socially anxious children made more errors in identifying anger and fear in children's facial expressions and anger in adults' postures and in expressing anger in their own facial expressions than did their inattentive-hyperactive peers. Results suggest that there may be systematic difficulties specifically in visual nonverbal emotion communication that contribute to the personal and social difficulties socially anxious children experience. PMID:21902007

Walker, Amy S; Nowicki, Stephen; Jones, Jeffrey; Heimann, Lisa

2011-01-01

460

Attachment Security and Child's Empathy: The Mediating Role of Emotion Regulation  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The current study examined the influence of multiple factors on individual differences in empathy; namely, attachment, negative emotionality, and emotion regulation. A total of 63 mothers completed the Attachment Q-set and questionnaires about their children's empathy, negative emotionality, and emotion regulation when children were 3 years old.…

Panfile, Tia M.; Laible, Deborah J.

2012-01-01

461

Recognizing emotion in faces: Developmental effects of child abuse and neglect  

Microsoft Academic Search

The contributions to the recognition of emotional signals of (a) experience and learning versus (b) internal predispositions are difficult to investigate because children are virtually always exposed to complex emotional experiences from birth. The recognition of emotion among physically abused and physically neglected preschoolers was assessed in order to examine the effects of atypical experience on emotional development. In Experiment

Seth D. Pollak; Dante Cicchetti; Katherine Hornung; Alex Reed

2000-01-01

462

Managing Emotion in a Maltreating Context: A Pilot Study Examining Child Neglect  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Objective: The primary goal of this pilot study was to examine emotion management skills (i.e., emotional understanding, emotion regulation) in children who had experienced neglect and a control group to determine the ways that neglect may interfere with children's emotional development. Method: Participants included children 6-12 years of age and…

Shipman, Kimberly; Edwards, Anna; Brown, Amy; Swisher, Lisa; Jennings, Ernestine

2005-01-01

463

Adaptive and maladaptive emotion regulation strategies: Interactive effects during CBT for social anxiety disorder.  

PubMed

There has been a increasing interest in understanding emotion regulation deficits in social anxiety disorder (SAD; e.g., Hofmann, Sawyer, Fang, & Asnaani, 2012). However, much remains to be understood about the patterns of associations among regulation strategies in the repertoire. Doing so is important in light of the growing recognition that people's ability to flexibly implement strategies is associated with better mental health (e.g., Kashdan et al., 2014). Based on previous work (Aldao & Nolen-Hoeksema, 2012), we examined whether putatively adaptive and maladaptive emotion regulation strategies interacted with each other in the prediction of social anxiety symptoms in a sample of 71 participants undergoing CBT for SAD. We found that strategies interacted with each other and that this interaction was qualified by a three-way interaction with a contextual factor, namely treatment study phase. Consequently, these findings underscore the importance of modeling contextual factors when seeking to understand emotion regulation deficits in SAD. PMID:24742755

Aldao, Amelia; Jazaieri, Hooria; Goldin, Philippe R; Gross, James J

2014-05-01

464

Recognizing emotion in faces: developmental effects of child abuse and neglect.  

PubMed

The contributions to the recognition of emotional signals of (a) experience and learning versus (b) internal predispositions are difficult to investigate because children are virtually always exposed to complex emotional experiences from birth. The recognition of emotion among physically abused and physically neglected preschoolers was assessed in order to examine the effects of atypical experience on emotional development. In Experiment 1, children matched a facial expression to an emotional situation. Neglected children had more difficulty discriminating emotional expressions than did control or physically abused children. Physically abused children displayed a response bias for angry facial expressions. In Experiment 2, children rated the similarity of facial expressions. Control children viewed discrete emotions as dissimilar, neglected children saw fewer distinctions between emotions, and physically abused children showed the most variance across emotions. These results suggest that to the extent that children's experience with the world varies, so too will their interpretation and understanding of emotional signals. PMID:10976606

Pollak, S D; Cicchetti, D; Hornung, K; Reed, A

2000-09-01

465

The "Reading the Mind in Films" Task [Child Version]: Complex Emotion and Mental State Recognition in Children with and without Autism Spectrum Conditions  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Children with autism spectrum conditions (ASC) have difficulties recognizing others' emotions. Research has mostly focused on "basic" emotion recognition, devoid of context. This study reports the results of a new task, assessing recognition of "complex" emotions and mental states in social contexts. An ASC group (n = 23) was compared to a general…

Golan, Ofer; Baron-Cohen, Simon; Golan, Yael

2008-01-01

466

The Burden of Disaster: Part I. Challenges and Opportunities Within a Child's Social Ecology  

PubMed Central

Child development and adaptation are best understood as biological and psychological individual processes occurring within the context of interconnecting groups, systems, and communities which, along with family, constitute the child’s social ecology. This first of two articles describes the challenges and opportunities within a child’s social ecology, consisting of Micro-, Meso-, Exo-, and Macrosystems. The parent-child relationship, the most salient Microsystem influence in children’s lives, plays an influential role in children’s reactions to and recovery from disasters. Children, parents, and other adults participate in Mesosystem activities at schools and faith-based organizations. The Exosystem—including workplaces, spcial agencies, neighborhood, and mass media—directly affects important adults in children’s lives. The Macrosystem affects disaster response and recovery indirectly through intangible cultural, social, economic, and political structures and processes. Children’s responses to adversity occur in the context of these dynamically interconnected and interdependent nested environments, all of which endure the burden of disaster. Increased understanding of the influences of and the relationships between key components contributes to recovery and rebuilding efforts, limiting disruption to the child and his or her social ecology. A companion article (R. L. Pfefferbaum et al., in press) describes interventions across the child’s social ecology.

Noffsinger, Mary A.; Pfefferbaum, Betty; Pfefferbaum, Rose L.; Sherrieb, Kathleen; Norris, Fran H.

2013-01-01

467

Translating Knowledge of Social-Emotional Learning and Evidence-Based Practice Into Responsive School Innovations  

Microsoft Academic Search

As the number of children engaging in problem behaviors grows, teachers increasingly report feeling unprepared to effectively meet students' mental health needs. Social-emotional learning (SEL) should be a prominent goal of school programs because social competence prevents school failure. This commentary reviews the challenges associated with implementing and researching school-based SEL programs, examines the current state of the evidence-based literature

Karen Callan Stoiber

2011-01-01

468

Orbitofrontal Cortex and Social Behavior: Integrating Self-monitoring and Emotion-Cognition Interactions  

Microsoft Academic Search

The role of the orbitofrontal cortex in social behavior re- mains a puzzle. Various theories of the social functions of the orbitofrontal cortex focus on the role of this area in either emotional processing or its involvement in online monitoring of behavior (i.e., self-monitoring). The present research at- tempts to integrate these two theories by examining whether improving the self-monitoring

Jennifer S. Beer; Oliver P. John; Donatella Scabini; Robert T. Knight

2006-01-01

469

Doll play narratives about starting school in children of socially anxious mothers, and their relation to subsequent child school-based anxiety.  

PubMed

Child social anxiety is common, and predicts later emotional and academic impairment. Offspring of socially anxious mothers are at increased risk. It is important to establish whether individual vulnerability to disorder can be identified in young children. The responses of 4.5 year-old children of mothers with social phobia (N?=?62) and non-anxious mothers (N?=?60) were compared, two months before school entry, using a Doll Play (DP) procedure focused on the social challenge of starting school. DP responses were examined in relation to teacher reports of anxious-depressed symptoms and social worries at the end of the child's first school term. The role of earlier child behavioral inhibition and attachment, assessed at 14 months, was also considered. Compared to children of non-anxious mothers, children of mothers with social phobia were significantly more likely to give anxiously negative responses in their school DP (OR?=?2.57). In turn, negative DP predicted teacher reported anxious-depressed and social worry problems. There were no effects of infant behavioral inhibition or attachment. Vulnerability in young children at risk of anxiety can be identified using Doll Play narratives. PMID:22588362

Pass, Laura; Arteche, Adriane; Cooper, Peter; Creswell, Cathy; Murray, Lynne

2012-11-01

470

Befriending the Two-Headed Monster: Personal, Social and Emotional Development in Schools in Challenging Times  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Schools in the UK and beyond continue to experience the damaging effects of "top down," "one size fits all" "outcome-based" educational reforms. Educators struggle to meet the dual demands of a punishing performativity- and accountability-driven regime alongside the personal, social, emotional and learning needs of their pupils, especially those…

Harris, Belinda

2008-01-01

471

The Link between Emotion Regulation, Social Functioning, and Depression in Boys with ASD  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Purpose: Symptoms of depression are common in children and adolescents with an autism spectrum disorder (ASD), but information about underlying developmental factors is limited. Depression is often linked to aspects of emotional functioning such as coping strategies, but in children with ASD difficulties with social interactions are also a likely…

Pouw, Lucinda B. C.; Rieffe, Carolien; Stockmann, Lex; Gadow, Kenneth D.

2013-01-01

472

Moral Judgments and Emotions: Adolescents' Evaluations in Intergroup Social Exclusion Contexts  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This article examines children's moral judgments and emotional evaluations in the context of social exclusion. As they age, children and adolescents face increasingly complex situations in which group membership and allegiance are in opposition with morally relevant decisions, such as the exclusion of an individual from a group. While adolescents…

Cooley, Shelby; Elenbaas, Laura; Killen, Melanie

2012-01-01

473

School Context and the Problem Behavior and Social Skills of Students with Emotional Disturbance  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Variability in the social and behavioral characteristics of students with emotional disturbance (ED) in the public schools may impact special education effectiveness; yet very little evidence exists on how such variability may express itself from school to school. One place to begin such investigation involves school context as expressed by income…

Wiley, Andrew L.; Siperstein, Gary N.; Forness, Steven R.; Brigham, Frederick J.

2010-01-01

474

Towards the development of self-regulation in pupils experiencing social and emotional behavioural difficulties (SEBD)  

Microsoft Academic Search

The paper focuses upon the development of self-regulation as it pertains to pupils experiencing social and emotional behavioural difficulties (SEBD) within the context of a case study evaluating an intervention, designed and implemented by the author, to support such pupils within a Scottish secondary school situated in an area of multiple deprivation. The paper examines the extent to which pupils

Joan Gaynor Mowat

2010-01-01

475

Examining Teachers' Perceptions of Social-Emotional and Behavioral Referral Concerns  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Although a number of empirical studies have investigated the nature of school-based referrals, predominant focus has been on referrals for psychoeducational evaluation, and social-emotional and behavioral concerns have typically been too broadly defined to provide insight into the specific problems encountered. This study aimed to identify the…

Briesch, Amy M.; Ferguson, Tyler D.; Volpe, Robert J.; Briesch, Jacquelyn M.

2013-01-01

476

Social and Emotional Aspects of Learning: Teaching and Learning or Playing and Becoming?  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This article advocates the use of free play in the provision of the Social and Emotional Aspects of Learning (SEAL) programme in schools. It uses case studies to illustrate how children develop and use the five strands of SEAL while playing. The author draws on recent research and literature to support the idea that SEAL skills are caught rather…

Woolf, Alison Margaret

2013-01-01

477

Sustainable Schoolwide Social and Emotional Learning (SEL): Implementation Guide and Toolkit  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Following up on the SEL program guide, "Safe and Sound: An Educational Leader's Guide to Evidence-Based Social and Emotional Learning (SEL) Programs," this latest tool for front-line educators provides answers to questions frequently asked by educators, such as, "Now that I have selected a good program, how do I integrate it with the rest of what…

Devaney, Elizabeth; O'Brien, Mary Utne; Resnik, Hank; Keister, Susan; Weissberg, Roger P.

2006-01-01

478

Emotion and attention interactions in social cognition: brain regions involved in processing anger prosody  

Microsoft Academic Search

Multiple levels of processing are thought to be involved in the appraisal of emotionally relevant events, with some processes being engaged relatively independently of attention, whereas other processes may depend on attention and current task goals or context. We conducted an event-related fMRI experiment to examine how processing angry voice prosody, an affectively and socially salient signal, is modulated by

David Sander; Didier Grandjean; Gilles Pourtois; Sophie Schwartz; Mohamed L. Seghier; Klaus R. Scherer; Patrik Vuilleumier

2005-01-01

479

Myth 17: Gifted and Talented Individuals Do Not Have Unique Social and Emotional Needs  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Empirical and clinical literatures have challenged the myth that gifted students do not have unique social and emotional concerns. When this myth prevails, pertinent concerns are not recognized and addressed formally or informally, proactively or reactively. Educators, parents, coaches, and even counselors may miss indications of distress. Lack of…

Peterson, Jean Sunde

2009-01-01

480

Students without Voices: The Unheard Accounts of Secondary School Students with Social, Emotional and Behaviour Difficulties  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The student voice is growing rapidly in education, driving many educational initiatives and policies as well as research. The voice of students with social, emotional and behaviour difficulties, however, is one of the least heard, with relatively few studies that sought to capture the voice of these students in an authentic and emancipatory way.…

Cefai, Carmel; Cooper, Paul

2010-01-01

481

Human Resource Development, Social Capital, Emotional Intelligence: Any Link to Productivity?  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Purpose: This article aims to offer a theoretical framework that attempts to show the integration among human resource development (HRD), social capital (SC), emotional intelligence (EI) and organizational productivity. Design/methodology/approach: The literature search included the following: a computerized search of accessible and available…

Brooks, Kit; Nafukho, Fredrick Muyia

2006-01-01

482

Understanding Implementation and Effectiveness of "Strong Start K-2" on Social-Emotional Behavior  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

"Strong Start K-2" is a social-emotional learning curriculum, designed for use with children in kindergarten through grade 2. The objectives of this study were twofold. First, authors aimed to evaluate the feasibility and quality of "Strong Start" implementation. Additionally authors examined the effect of "Strong Start" on first grade students'…

Whitcomb, Sara A.; Merrell, Kenneth W.

2012-01-01

483

Understanding How Social and Emotional Skill Deficits Contribute to School Failure  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

A growing number of children are entering kindergarten without the skills that enable them to be successful in an academic setting. However, it is not children's cognitive skills that concern educators; it is their social and emotional skill deficits that are most troublesome. This article discusses how family and community risk factors can…

Whitted, Kathryn S.

2011-01-01

484

Social and Emotional Aspects of Learning: teaching and learning or playing and becoming?  

Microsoft Academic Search

This article advocates the use of free play in the provision of the Social and Emotional Aspects of Learning (SEAL) programme in schools. It uses case studies to illustrate how children develop and use the five strands of SEAL while playing. The author draws on recent research and literature to support the idea that SEAL skills are caught rather than

Alison Margaret Woolf

2012-01-01

485

Inclusion of Pupils Perceived as Experiencing Social and Emotional Behavioural Difficulties (SEBD): Affordances and Constraints  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This paper takes as its principal theme barriers to the inclusion of pupils perceived as experiencing social and emotional behavioural difficulties (SEBD) and how these might be overcome. It draws upon an evaluative case study of an initiative, devised by the author, to support pupils--the Support Group Initiative (SGI)--which was conducted over a…

Mowat, Joan Gaynor

2010-01-01

486

Social and Emotional Learning Strategies to Support Students in Challenging Schools  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

New and veteran educators often face particular challenges in the classroom. Problems include classroom management, student academic achievement, and job satisfaction. This research examines the effects of implementing a Social and Emotional Learning (SEL) approach for students as part of the regular education for elementary public schools. SEL is…

Marulanda, Zandra K.

2010-01-01

487

Social-Emotional Effects of Early Childhood Education Programs in Tulsa  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This article assesses the effects of Tulsa, Oklahoma's early childhood education programs on social-emotional outcomes, examining teacher ratings of children's behavior from the Adjustment Scales for Preschool Intervention and a measure of attentiveness using fixed effects regressions with propensity score matching. The sa