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1

Maternal socialization of emotion : child, maternal, and relational factors.  

E-print Network

??"Previous research has implicated maternal emotion socialization as an important predictor of children's future social competence and behavior. However, the factors related to emotion socialization… (more)

Stone, Caitlin Elizabeth

2005-01-01

2

"How does a child develop emotionally? How do biology and social environment interact in emotional development?  

E-print Network

Citation "How does a child develop emotionally? How do biology and social environment interact to develop- mental theory while helping psychologists understand the im- portant changes wrought by child their careers manipulating human behav- ior through advertising. Because of these early experiences

Wisconsin at Madison, University of

3

Mothers' Socialization Goals, Mothers' Emotion Socialization Behaviors, Child Emotion Regulation, and Child Socioemotional Functioning in Urban India  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Studies examining the link between parental socialization and child functioning in varying cultural contexts are scarce. Focusing on early adolescents in suburban middle-class families in India, the present study examined interrelations among reports of mothers' socialization goals, socialization behaviors in response to child emotion, child

Raval, Vaishali V.; Raval, Pratiksha H.; Deo, Neeraj

2014-01-01

4

Child and Adolescent Social-Emotional Development Within the Context of School  

Microsoft Academic Search

Children and adolescents exposed to violence may develop mental health problems, impacting their ability to develop appropriate social-emotional skills. Limited development of social-emotional skills has been associ- ated with poor performance in school. A review of the literature was conducted to better understand social- emotional development in children and its role in a child's ability to function in the school

Ann M. Aviles; Tanya R. Anderson; Erica R. Davila

2006-01-01

5

Parents' Emotion Expression as a Predictor of Child's Social Competence: Children with or without Intellectual Disability  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Background: Parents' expression of positive emotion towards children who are typically developing (TD) is generally associated with better social development. However, the association between parents' negative emotion expression and social development can be positive or negative depending upon a number of factors, including the child's emotion

Green, S.; Baker, B.

2011-01-01

6

Spanish-Speaking Parent-Child Emotional Narratives and Children's Social Skills  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

We examined whether parents' content and style when discussing past positive and negative emotional experiences with their children were concurrently and predictively linked to prekindergarteners' social skills. Sixty-five low-income Spanish-speaking parent-child dyads discussed a past positive and negative emotional experience at the…

Leyva, Diana; Berrocal, Monica; Nolivos, Virginia

2014-01-01

7

Relationship of Parental Overprotection, Child Vulnerabililty, and Parenting Stress to Emotional, Behavioral, and Social Adjustment in Children Diagnosed with Cancer.  

E-print Network

??This study examined the relationship of parental overprotection, perceived child vulnerability, and parenting stress to parent-reported emotional, behavioral, and social functioning in children with cancer.… (more)

Colletti, Christina

2005-01-01

8

Parents' emotion expression as a predictor of child's social competence: children with or without intellectual disability  

PubMed Central

Background Parents’ expression of positive emotion towards children who are typically developing (TD) is generally associated with better social development. However, the association between parents’ negative emotion expression and social development can be positive or negative depending upon a number of factors, including the child’s emotion regulation abilities. Given the lower emotion regulation capabilities of children with intellectual disability (ID), we hypothesised that parents’ negative emotion expression would be associated with lower social development in children with ID compared to those with TD. Methods Participants were 180 families of children with or without ID enrolled in a longitudinal study. Parents’ positive and negative affect were coded live from naturalistic home interactions at child ages 5–8 years, and child’s social skills were measured by using mother report at child ages 6–9 years. We examined mothers’ and fathers’ emotion expression as a time-varying predictor of social skills across ages 5–9 years. Results Mothers, but not fathers, expressed less positive affect and more negative affect with ID group children. Parents’ positive affect expression was related to social skills only for TD children, with mothers’ positive affect predicting higher social skills. Contrary to expectations, fathers’ positive affect predicted lower social skills. Parents’ negative affect predicted significantly lower social skills for children with ID than for children with TD. Conclusions Findings support the theory that low to moderate levels of negative expression may be less beneficial or detrimental for children with ID compared to children with TD. Implications for further research and intervention are discussed. PMID:21241394

Green, S.; Baker, B.

2014-01-01

9

Emotional Child Abuse  

MedlinePLUS

... control (after a child has been trained), and destructive or antisocial behavior (being constantly withdrawn and sad). Furthermore, poor relationships ... children, but a change in pattern of these behaviors is a strong indicator of emotional ... perpetrator. Parents, teachers, pastors, social workers, neighbors, lawyers, or judges ...

10

Parental Interpersonal Sensitivity and Youth Social Problems: A Mediational Role for Child Emotion Dysregulation  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

We examined the relations between parental interpersonal sensitivity and youth social problems and explored the mediational role of child emotion dysregulation. Mothers (N = 42; M age = 39.38) and fathers (N = 41; M age = 39.38) of youth aged 7-12 (N = 42; M age = 9.12) completed measures of their own interpersonal sensitivity and reported on…

Suveg, Cynthia; Jacob, Marni L.; Payne, Mary

2010-01-01

11

Maternal Socialization and Child Temperament as Predictors of Emotion Regulation in Turkish Preschoolers  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This study investigated the role of maternal socialization and temperament in Turkish preschool children's emotion regulation. Participants consisted of 145 preschoolers (79 boys, 69 girls; M[subscript age]= 62 months), their mothers, and daycare teachers from middle-high socioeconomic suburbs of Istanbul. Maternal child-rearing practices and…

Yagmurlu, Bilge; Altan, Ozge

2010-01-01

12

Parents Interacting with Infants: Strengthening Parent-Child Relationships to Support Social and Emotional Development  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

One of the findings from the ZERO TO THREE "Parenting Infants and Toddlers Today" (Hart Research Associates, 2009) parent survey was that while the majority of parents understood ways of promoting their child's development, their understanding of the milestones related to social and emotional development was less consistent. This is an important…

Yates, Tweety

2011-01-01

13

Peer contagion in child and adolescent social and emotional development.  

PubMed

In this article, we examine the construct of peer contagion in childhood and adolescence and review studies of child and adolescent development that have identified peer contagion influences. Evidence suggests that children's interactions with peers are tied to increases in aggression in early and middle childhood and amplification of problem behaviors such as drug use, delinquency, and violence in early to late adolescence. Deviancy training is one mechanism that accounts for peer contagion effects on problem behaviors from age 5 through adolescence. In addition, we discuss peer contagion relevant to depression in adolescence, and corumination as an interactive process that may account for these effects. Social network analyses suggest that peer contagion underlies the influence of friendship on obesity, unhealthy body images, and expectations. Literature is reviewed that suggests how peer contagion effects can undermine the goals of public education from elementary school through college and impair the goals of juvenile corrections systems. In particular, programs that "select" adolescents at risk for aggregated preventive interventions are particularly vulnerable to peer contagion effects. It appears that a history of peer rejection is a vulnerability factor for influence by peers, and adult monitoring, supervision, positive parenting, structure, and self-regulation serve as protective factors. PMID:19575606

Dishion, Thomas J; Tipsord, Jessica M

2011-01-01

14

Peer Contagion in Child and Adolescent Social and Emotional Development  

PubMed Central

In this article, we examine the construct of peer contagion in childhood and adolescence and review studies of child and adolescent development that have identified peer contagion influences. Evidence suggests that children's interactions with peers are tied to increases in aggression in early and middle childhood and amplification of problem behaviors such as drug use, delinquency, and violence in early to late adolescence. Deviancy training is one mechanism that accounts for peer contagion effects on problem behaviors from age 5 through adolescence. In addition, we discuss peer contagion relevant to depression in adolescence, and corumination as an interactive process that may account for these effects. Social network analyses suggest that peer contagion underlies the influence of friendship on obesity, unhealthy body images, and expectations. Literature is reviewed that suggests how peer contagion effects can undermine the goals of public education from elementary school through college and impair the goals of juvenile corrections systems. In particular, programs that “select” adolescents at risk for aggregated preventive interventions are particularly vulnerable to peer contagion effects. It appears that a history of peer rejection is a vulnerability factor for influence by peers, and adult monitoring, supervision, positive parenting, structure, and self-regulation serve as protective factors. PMID:19575606

Dishion, Thomas J.; Tipsord, Jessica M.

2012-01-01

15

A Caregiver-Child Social/Emotional and Relationship Rating Scale (CCSERRS)1  

PubMed Central

This paper reports the construction and pilot reliability, validity, and psychometric properties of a new caregiver-child rating scale that emphasizes caregiver-child social-emotional interactions and relationships. While the scale was developed and studied in the context of orphanages for young children, it potentially could be used in non-residential early care and education settings as well as for parent-child interactions in the home. The intent was to assess a few dimensions that comprehensively cover the range of caregiver-child social-emotional interactions and relationships but could be administered in a relatively short period of time in a variety of situations and would not require extensive coder training, manuals, or materials. Results showed that the scale can be reliably administered even using observation periods as short as five minutes, reliability was replicated over seven different coders working in three different orphanages, and ratings of caregivers were similar across different types of caregiving activities (i.e., feeding, dressing/bathing, free play) and for caregivers attending to children birth to 4 and 4 to 8 yrs. of age. In the orphanage context, factor analyses showed the scale primarily reflects caregiver-child mutual engagement and relationship with subordinate components of caregiver punitiveness and caregiver- vs. child-directed behaviors and intrusiveness. PMID:20556236

McCall, Robert B.; Groark, Christina J.; Fish, Larry

2010-01-01

16

Maternal Emotional Styles and Child Social Adjustment: Assessment, Correlates, Outcomes and Goodness of Fit in Early Childhood  

Microsoft Academic Search

The goals of the present research were to develop a modified version of an existing self-assessment questionnaire designed to measure parents' emotional style and to examine how the aspects of child regulation may moderate the relation between the emotional styles and social outcomes in childhood. Participants in Study 1 were 140 mothers and children (73 males, 67 females, Mage =

Daniel G. Lagace-Seguin; Robert J. Coplan

2005-01-01

17

Well-Child Check-Up Revised: An Efficient Protocol for Assessing Children's Social–Emotional Development  

Microsoft Academic Search

Well-child check-ups have been a cornerstone of disease prevention and assessment of physical development for young children. However, little has been done to efficiently address the growing social and emotional difficulties in today's 2- to 5-year-old children. The goal of the Well-Child Check-Up Revised protocol is to implement a screening tool for assessing parent–child interactions and promoting healthy family relationships.

Mary R. Talen; Lorraine Stephens; Patricia Marik; Melissa Buchholz

2007-01-01

18

Pathways From Child Sexual Abuse to Adult Depression: The Role of Parental Socialization of Emotions and Alexithymia  

Microsoft Academic Search

Objective: Depression is common among adult survivors of child sexual abuse (CSA), but the intervening processes responsible for this outcome have not yet been fully delineated. The present study investigated the mediating role of perceived parental emotion socialization and alexithymia (difficulties identifying and describing feelings) in explaining the link between CSA and adult depressive symptoms in female veterans. Method: Cross-sectional

Renu Thomas; David DiLillo; Kate Walsh; Melissa A. Polusny

2011-01-01

19

Double Jeopardy: Poorer Social-Emotional Outcomes for Children in the NICHD SECCYD Experiencing Home and Child-Care Environments that Confer Risk  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Using data from the National Institute of Child Health and Human Development Early Child Care Research Network (NICHD SECCYD), the authors examined whether interactions between home and child-care quality affect children's social-emotional adjustment at 24, 36, and 54 months (N = 771). Triadic splits on quality of home and child care were used to…

Watamura, Sarah Enos; Phillips, Deborah A.; Morrissey, Taryn W.; McCartney, Kathleen; Bub, Kristen

2011-01-01

20

Child emotional security and interparental conflict.  

PubMed

Guided by the emotional security hypothesis developed by Davies & Cummings (1994), studies were conducted to test a conceptual refinement of children's adjustment to parental conflict in relation to hypotheses of other prominent theories. Study 1 examined whether the pattern of child responses to simulations of adult conflict tactics and topics was consistent with the emotional security hypothesis and social learning theory in a sample of 327 Welsh children. Supporting the emotional security hypothesis, child reports of fear, avoidance, and involvement were especially prominent responses to destructive conflict. Study 2 examined the relative roles of child emotional insecurity and social-cognitive appraisals in accounting for associations between parental conflict and child psychological symptoms in a sample of 285 Welsh children and parents. Findings indicated that child emotional insecurity was a robust intervening process in the prospective links between parental conflict and child maladjustment even when intervening processes proposed in the social-cognitive models were included in the analyses. Studies 3 and 4 explored pathways among parental conflict, child emotional insecurity, and psychological adjustment in the broader family context with a sample of 174 children and mothers. Supporting the emotional security hypothesis, Study 3 findings indicated that child insecurity continued to mediate the link between parental conflict and child maladjustment even after specifying the effects of other parenting processes. Parenting difficulties accompanying interparental conflict were related to child maladjustment through their association with insecure parent-child attachment. In support of the emotional security hypothesis, Study 4 findings indicated that family instability, parenting difficulties, and parent-child attachment insecurity potentiated mediational pathways among parental conflict, child insecurity, and maladjustment. Family cohesiveness, interparental satisfaction, and interparental expressiveness appeared to be protective factors in these mediational paths. No support was found for the social learning theory prediction that parent-child warmth would amplify associations between parental conflict and child disruptive behaviors. PMID:12528424

Davies, Patrick T; Harold, Gordon T; Goeke-Morey, Marcie C; Cummings, E Mark; Shelton, Katherine; Rasi, Jennifer A

2002-01-01

21

Mothers' Acculturation and Beliefs About Emotions, Mother–Child Emotion Discourse, and Children's Emotion Understanding in Latino Families  

Microsoft Academic Search

Research Findings: We examined associations among Anglo acculturation, Latino enculturation, maternal beliefs, mother–child emotion talk, and emotion understanding in 40 Latino preschool-age children and their mothers. Mothers self-reported Anglo acculturation, Latino enculturation, and beliefs about the value\\/danger of children's emotions and parent\\/child roles in emotion socialization. Mother–child emotion talk was observed during a Lego storytelling task. Children's emotion understanding was

Marie Belle Perez Rivera; Julie C. Dunsmore

2011-01-01

22

Child Refugees, Trauma and Education: Interactionist Considerations on Social and Emotional Needs and Development  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This paper focuses on the social and emotional needs of children and young people who are refugees. It was inspired by casework undertaken by the author involving a 13-year-old boy who was a refugee from Montenegro. A vignette of the case is presented in addition to a review of relevant literature to illustrate and discuss the various sources of…

Hart, Robert

2009-01-01

23

Maternal Depressive Symptoms and Child Social Preference During the Early School Years: Mediation by Maternal Warmth and Child Emotion Regulation  

Microsoft Academic Search

This longitudinal study examined processes that mediate the association between maternal depressive symptoms and peer social\\u000a preference during the early school years. Three hundred and fifty six kindergarten children (182 boys) and their mothers participated\\u000a in the study. During kindergarten, mothers reported their level of depressive symptomatology. In first grade, teachers rated\\u000a children’s emotion regulation at school and observers rated

Chi-Ming Kam; Mark T. Greenberg; Karen L. Bierman; John D. Coie; Kenneth A. Dodge; Michael E. Foster; John E. Lochman; Robert J. McMahon; Ellen E. Pinderhughes

2011-01-01

24

Parental Socialization of Emotion Expression: Gender Differences and Relations to Child Adjustment  

Microsoft Academic Search

The present study examined gender differences in children's submissive and disharmonious emotions and parental attention to these emotions. Sixty children and their mothers and fathers participated when children were 4 and 6 years old. Children's emotion expression and parental responses during a game were coded. Girls expressed more submissive emotion than boys. Fathers attended more to girls' submissive emotion than

Tara M. Chaplin; Pamela M. Cole; Carolyn Zahn-Waxler

2005-01-01

25

Emotional Support Consistency and Teacher-Child Relationships Forecast Social Competence and Problem Behaviors in Prekindergarten and Kindergarten  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Teachers' ratings of conflict and closeness as well as observed emotional support are known predictors of children's social functioning. Consistency in emotional support represents an emerging line of research. The goal of the present study is to understand whether the relation between the consistency of teachers' emotional support…

Brock, Laura L.; Curby, Timothy W.

2014-01-01

26

Mother-Child Affect and Emotion Socialization Processes across the Late Preschool Period: Predictions of Emerging Behaviour Problems  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The current study examined concurrent and longitudinal relations between maternal negative affective behaviour and child negative emotional expression in preschool age children with (n=96) or without (n=126) an early developmental risk, as well as the predictions of later behaviour problems. Maternal negative affective behaviour, child

Newland, Rebecca P.; Crnic, Keith A.

2011-01-01

27

Associations of Preschool Type and Teacher-Child Relational Quality with Young Children's Social-Emotional Competence  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Research Findings: This study examined associations of preschool type (i.e., urban and suburban Head Start and university-affiliated center) and teacher-child variables with positive and negative child outcomes among 145 preschoolers (74 boys). Differences emerged across preschools, with urban Head Start children scoring lowest on the emotional

Garner, Pamela W.; Mahatmya, Duhita; Moses, Laurence Kimberly; Bolt, Elizabeth N.

2014-01-01

28

On the Relationship between the Creative and Social-Emotional Development of Emotionally Handicapped Children.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

A significant relationship was found between changes in social emotional status and creativity. Creative and social-emotional changes occurred independently of most variables known about a child at the beginning of treatment. (Author)

Paget, Kathleen D.

1980-01-01

29

Maternal Emotion Socialization in Maltreating and Non-Maltreating Families: Implications for Children's Emotion Regulation  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This study investigated the socialization of children's emotion regulation in physically maltreating and non-maltreating mother-child dyads (N = 80 dyads). Mother-child dyads participated in the parent-child emotion interaction task (Shipman & Zeman, 1999) in which they talked about emotionally-arousing situations. The PCEIT was coded for maternal…

Shipman, Kimberly L.; Schneider, Renee; Fitzgerald, Monica M.; Sims, Chandler; Swisher, Lisa; Edwards, Anna

2007-01-01

30

Social withdrawal at 1 year is associated with emotional and behavioural problems at 3 and 5 years: the Eden mother-child cohort study.  

PubMed

The objective of the study was to examine how social withdrawal in infants aged 12 months predicted emotional and behavioural problems at ages 3 and 5 years. The sample included 1,586 infants from the French Eden Mother-Child Cohort Study who had a measure of social withdrawal with the Alarm Distress BaBy scale at age 1 year; among these children, emotional and behavioural difficulties were rated by mothers using the Strength and Difficulty Questionnaire (SDQ) at 3 years for 1,257 (79 %) children and at 5 years for 1,123 (72 %) children. Social withdrawal behaviour at age 1 year was significantly associated with the SDQ behavioural disorder scale at 3 years, independently of a host of familial and child temperament confounders. The association with the relational disorder, prosocial and total difficulty scales was close to significance at 3 years after taking into account familial and temperament confounders. Social withdrawal significantly predicted the three aforementioned scales when measured at 5 years. No significant predictivity of the emotional scale and hyperactivity scale was detected at any age. This study made with a large longitudinal sample confirms the negative effects on development of social withdrawal behaviour, shedding light on the unfolding of behavioural disorders and relational difficulties in children; this calls for early detection of sustained social withdrawal behaviour, as it seems to hamper emotional development. PMID:24464247

Guedeney, Antoine; Pingault, Jean-Baptiste; Thorr, Antoine; Larroque, Beatrice

2014-12-01

31

Gender Differences in Parent–Child Emotion Narratives  

Microsoft Academic Search

Early parent–child conversations about past emotional experiences provide a rich environment for the socialization of emotions. This study explored the role of parent and child gender in this process. Participants were 21 White, middle-class, 40- to 45-month-old children and their mothers and fathers. At separate home visits, each parent discussed with their child four specific past events during which the

Robyn Fivush; Melissa A. Brotman; Janine P. Buckner; Sherryl H. Goodman

2000-01-01

32

Delivering "Every Child Matters": The Central Role of Social and Emotional Learning in Schools  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Schools are seen as having a central role to play in the "Every Child Matters" (ECM) effort, which many are finding somewhat challenging, an additional pressure and something of a departure from their usual role. One way forward may be to help schools make links between ECM and other activities with which they are starting to engage but with which…

Weare, Katherine

2007-01-01

33

Maternal Depressive Symptoms and Child Social Preference during the Early School Years: Mediation by Maternal Warmth and Child Emotion Regulation  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This longitudinal study examined processes that mediate the association between maternal depressive symptoms and peer social preference during the early school years. Three hundred and fifty six kindergarten children (182 boys) and their mothers participated in the study. During kindergarten, mothers reported their level of depressive…

Kam, Chi-Ming; Greenberg, Mark T.; Bierman, Karen L.; Coie, John D.; Dodge, Kenneth A.; Foster, Michael E.; Lochman, John E.; McMahon, Robert J.; Pinderhughes, Ellen E.

2011-01-01

34

Parental factors in the social and emotional adjustment of the gifted  

Microsoft Academic Search

As with any child, the social and emotional adjustment of the gifted begins at home with parental love and acceptance. Parental awareness of the gifted child's uniqueness and special needs may prevent emotional problems. Regardless how intellectually precocious a child seems to be, the social and emotional stages are not likely to be equal Misunderstanding the nature of a child's

Albert D. Sebring

1983-01-01

35

A Child-Adult Research Form of the Pittsburgh Scales of Social Extraversion-Introversion and Emotionality  

Microsoft Academic Search

Bendig's (1) Pittsburgh Scales of Social Extraversion-Introversion (SEI) and Emotionality (Em) were translated so that they were of appropriate reading difficulty for children as well as for adults. The revised scales correlated highly (both .90) with the Pittsburgh scales, and they had high test-retest reliabilities (.92 and .89). Data from samples representing third grade to college ages were presented for

Nicholas A. Sieveking

1973-01-01

36

The relation of humor and child development: social, adaptive, and emotional aspects.  

PubMed

A sense of humor has been linked to social competence, popularity, and adaptability. The purpose of this review was to investigate the extant research in humor in childhood. Emerging work on the neuroanatomy of humor was discussed with findings of right hemispheric involvement for the comprehension and appreciation of humor for the affective network and the left hemisphere for cognitive understanding. These findings are intriguing when examining humor functioning in children with various disabilities, particularly the right hemisphere for children with autistic spectrum disorders or nonverbal learning disabilities. Examination of research in humor in childhood disabilities found most articles on humor in children with autistic spectrum disorder or mental retardation, with few to none in learning disabilities or attention deficit hyperactivity disorder. It was concluded that further study is needed to understand humor in children with disabilities and that such understanding will assist with interventions. PMID:20558671

Semrud-Clikeman, Margaret; Glass, Kimberly

2010-10-01

37

Socialization of emotion: Pathway to preschoolers' emotional and social competence  

Microsoft Academic Search

Aspects of 47 preschoolers'emotional competence—their patterns of emotional expressiveness and reactions to others' emotion displays—were observed in two settings, with mother and with peers, and their general social competence was rated by their preschool teachers. Intrapersonal and interpersonal (i.e., socialization correlates of children's emotional competence were identified, and a causal model incorporating direct and indirect influences on social competence was

Susanne A. Denham; Leslie Grout

1993-01-01

38

The Relationship between Child Maltreatment and Emotion Recognition  

PubMed Central

Child abuse and neglect affect the development of social cognition in children and inhibit social adjustment. The purpose of this study was to compare the ability to identify the emotional states of others between abused and non-abused children. The participants, 129 children (44 abused and 85 non-abused children), completed a children’s version of the Reading the Mind in the Eyes Test (RMET). Results showed that the mean accuracy rate on the RMET for abused children was significantly lower than the rate of the non-abused children. In addition, the accuracy rates for positive emotion items (e.g., hoping, interested, happy) were significantly lower for the abused children, but negative emotion and neutral items were not different across the groups. This study found a negative relationship between child abuse and the ability to understand others’ emotions, especially positive emotions. PMID:24465891

Koizumi, Michiko; Takagishi, Haruto

2014-01-01

39

Measuring Emotion Socialization in Schools  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Background: Understanding how school personnel can best support students' development of communication skills around feelings is critical to long-term health outcomes. The measurement of emotion socialization in schools facilitates future research in this area; we review existing measures of emotion socialization to assess their applicability…

Horner, Christy G.; Wallace, Tanner L.

2013-01-01

40

Toddlers' Social-Emotional Competence in the Contexts of Maternal Emotion Socialization and Contingent Responsiveness in a Low-Income Sample  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Early social-emotional development occurs in the context of parenting, particularly via processes such as maternal emotion socialization and parent-child interactions. Results from structural equation modeling indicated that maternal contingent responsiveness partially mediated the relationship between maternal emotion socialization of toddlers (N…

Brophy-Herb, Holly E.; Schiffman, Rachel F.; Bocknek, Erika London; Dupuis, Sara B.; Fitzgerald, Hiram E.; Horodynski, Mildred; Onaga, Esther; Van Egeren, Laurie A.; Hillaker, Barbara

2011-01-01

41

Emotion socialization in formerly homeless families.  

E-print Network

??Emotional competence in children is increasingly understood as an outcome of parents? adaptive socialization behaviors. Parent?s socialization of children?s emotions and children?s emotion competence were… (more)

Davis, Karen Laurel

2012-01-01

42

Emotion Socialization in Families of Children with an Anxiety Disorder  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Compared emotion socialization in 26 children with anxiety disorders ages 8-12 years and their mothers to 26 nonclinical counterparts without psychopathology. Children and their mothers participated in an emotion interaction task in which they discussed occasions when the child felt worry, sadness, and anger. Responses were coded for length of…

Suveg, Cynthia; Zeman, Janice; Flannery-Schroeder, Ellen; Cassano, Michael

2005-01-01

43

Parental Emotion Coaching and Child Emotion Regulation as Protective Factors for Children with Oppositional Defiant Disorder  

PubMed Central

We assessed linkages of mothers’ emotion coaching and children’s emotion regulation and emotion lability/negativity with children’s adjustment in 72 mother-child dyads seeking treatment for Oppositional Defiant Disorder (ODD). Dyads completed questionnaires and discussed emotion-related family events. Maternal emotion coaching was associated with children’s emotion regulation, which in turn was related to higher mother-reported adaptive skills, higher child-reported internalizing symptoms, and lower child-reported adjustment. When children were high in emotion lability/negativity, mothers’ emotion coaching was associated with lower mother and child reports of externalizing behavior. Results suggest the role of emotion regulation and emotion lability in child awareness of socio-emotional problems and support the potential of maternal emotion coaching as a protective factor for children with ODD, especially for those high in emotion lability. PMID:24187441

Dunsmore, Julie C.; Booker, Jordan A.; Ollendick, Thomas H.

2012-01-01

44

The effect of toddler emotion regulation on maternal emotion socialization: Moderation by toddler gender.  

PubMed

Although developmental research continues to connect parenting behaviors with child outcomes, it is critical to examine how child behaviors influence parenting behaviors. Given the emotional, cognitive, and social costs of maladaptive parenting, it is vital to understand the factors that influence maternal socialization behaviors. The current study examined children's observed emotion regulatory behaviors in two contexts (low-threat and high-threat novelty) as one influence. Mother-child dyads (n = 106) with toddlers of 24 months of age participated in novelty episodes from which toddler emotion regulation behaviors (i.e., caregiver-focused, attention, and self-soothing) were coded, and mothers reported their use of emotion socialization strategies when children were 24 and 36 months. We hypothesized that gender-specific predictive relations would occur, particularly from regulatory behaviors in the low-threat contexts. Gender moderated the relation between caregiver-focused emotion regulation in low-threat contexts and nonsupportive emotion socialization. Results from the current study inform the literature on the salience of child-elicited effects on the parent-child relationship. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2014 APA, all rights reserved). PMID:24821395

Premo, Julie E; Kiel, Elizabeth J

2014-08-01

45

Personalization in Mother-Child Emotion Talk across Three Contexts  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

An unexplored aspect of contextual variation in emotion talk is the extent to which the emotions mothers and children discuss relate to the child, mother, or another self. To establish the extent to which mothers and children personalize the emotions they discuss, we examined the emotion talk of 40 American mother-child dyads in three…

Kucirkova, Natalia; Tompkins, Virginia

2014-01-01

46

The Emotionally-Handicapped Child: Altering Home, School, and Social Environments as the Key to Prevention and Cure.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The author examines the causes of behavioral disorders that stem from conditions existing in the home, school, and society, and offers specific recommendations for institutional changes which would reduce the number of behaviorally disordered children. Factors noted to be significantly related to emotional difficulties include divorce; the…

Jones, Vern

47

Social-Emotional Problems in Preschool-Aged Children  

PubMed Central

Objectives To estimate the prevalence of positive screens for social-emotional problems among preschool-aged children in a low-income clinical population and to explore the family context and receptivity to referrals to help guide development of interventions. Design Observational, cross-sectional study. Setting Two urban primary care clinics. Participants A total of 254 parents of 3- and 4-year-old children at 2 urban primary care clinics. Main Outcome Measures Score on a standardized screen for social-emotional problems (Ages and Stages Questionnaire: Social-Emotional) and answers to additional survey questions about child care arrangements, parental depressive symptoms, and attitudes toward preschool and behavioral health referrals. Results Twenty-four percent (95% CI, 16.5%-31.5%) of children screened positive for social-emotional problems. Among those screening positive, 45% had a parent with depressive symptoms, and 27% had no nonparental child care. Among parents of children who screened positive for social-emotional problems, 79% reported they would welcome or would not mind a referral to a counselor or psychologist; only 16% reported a prior referral. Conclusions In a clinical sample, 1 in 4 low-income preschool-aged children screened positive for social-emotional problems, and most parents were amenable to referrals to preschool or early childhood mental health. This represents an opportunity for improvement in primary prevention and early intervention for social-emotional problems. PMID:22926145

Brown, Courtney M.; Copeland, Kristen A.; Sucharew, Heidi; Kahn, Robert S.

2013-01-01

48

Culture and the Emotion Socialization of Preschoolers.  

E-print Network

??Objective:The present study examined mothers’ emotion socialization of 3-year–old children with behavior problems, to determine whether emotion socialization practices, as well as the relation between… (more)

Lugo-Candelas, Claudia I

2012-01-01

49

Boosting Social and Emotional Competence  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Beland maintains that high school students will need a high level of skill in the social and emotional arena to be ready for competitive employment in the 21st century. In a 2006 survey, human resource professionals said five skills were most crucial to high school graduates' success: professionalism/work ethic; teamwork; oral communications;…

Beland, Kathy

2007-01-01

50

Believable Social and Emotional Agents.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

One of the key steps in creating quality interactive drama is the ability to create quality interactive characters (or believable agents). Two important aspects of such characters will be that they appear emotional and that they can engage in social inter...

W. S. Reilly

1996-01-01

51

A Feeling for Books: Using Literature to Promote Social-Emotional Development  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Social-emotional development is a fundamental part of a child's overall well-being. Healthy development forms a critical foundation for building positive relationships and a strong self-esteem. Social-emotional development includes the ability to express and manage emotions and to establish secure relationships. All children have a natural desire…

Tunks, Karen W.; Gilles, Rebecca M.

2013-01-01

52

Task Groups in the School Setting: Promoting Children's Social and Emotional Learning  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Through social and emotional learning (SEL), individuals develop skill in negotiating relationships successfully and expressing emotions appropriately. The socially and emotionally intelligent child reaps benefits in school and later life. Counselors are best qualified to promote children's SEL and the task group in the classroom provides an…

Van Velsor, Patricia

2009-01-01

53

Child Emotional Aggression and Abuse: Definitions and Prevalence  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Objective: Research on and intervention for child emotional abuse and emotional aggression toward children have been severely hampered because there have been no agreed-upon, clinically usable definitions. Methods: We have (a) proposed and field-tested a set of criteria to operationally define child emotional abuse for clinical settings and (b)…

Slep, Amy M. Smith; Heyman, Richard E.; Snarr, Jeffery D.

2011-01-01

54

Social and Emotional Education in the Classroom.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Students' social and emotional development is vital in today's education, especially in light of changing family structures. This paper examines implications of recent cultural changes which have resulted in positive and negative changes in students' social and emotional needs, then describes and presents approaches to social and emotional

Burke, Robert W.

2002-01-01

55

Pregnant and Parenting Adolescents: A Study of Ethnic Identity, Emotional and Behavioral Functioning, Child Characteristics, and Social Support  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This study examined relationships among the ethnic identity, behavior problems, self-esteem, and social support of 166 ethnically diverse pregnant and parenting adolescents, the majority of whom were African American and Hispanic American, and their infants. Results indicated that pregnant and parenting adolescent females were experiencing…

Sieger, Karin; Renk, Kimberly

2007-01-01

56

Mother-Child Conversations about Emotions: Linkages to Child Aggression and Prosocial Behavior  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

We examined associations of maternal and child emotional discourse and child emotion knowledge with children's behavioral competence. Eighty-five upper middle-income, mostly White preschoolers and mothers completed a home-based bookreading task to assess discourse about emotions. Children's anger perception bias and emotion situation knowledge…

Garner, Pamela W.; Dunsmore, Julie C.; Southam-Gerrow, Michael

2008-01-01

57

Pregnant and Parenting Adolescents: A Study of Ethnic Identity, Emotional and Behavioral Functioning, Child Characteristics, and Social Support  

Microsoft Academic Search

This study examined relationships among the ethnic identity, behavior problems, self-esteem, and social support of 166 ethnically\\u000a diverse pregnant and parenting adolescents, the majority of whom were African American and Hispanic American, and their infants.\\u000a Results indicated that pregnant and parenting adolescent females were experiencing nonclinical levels of behavior problems\\u000a on average and did not differ in their ratings of

Karin Sieger; Kimberly Renk

2007-01-01

58

Social-Emotional Development  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Interactions between reactive and regulatory dimensions of temperament may be particularly relevant to children's adjustment but are examined infrequently. This study investigated these interactions by examining effortful control as a moderator of the relations of fear and frustration reactivity to children's social competence, internalizing, and…

Moran, Lyndsey R.; Lengua, Liliana J.; Zalewski, Maureen

2013-01-01

59

Emotion Discourse, Social Cognition, and Social Skills in Children with and without Developmental Delays  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This study examined parent-child emotion discourse, children's independent social information processing, and social skills outcomes in 146 families of 8-year-olds with and without developmental delays. Children's emergent social-cognitive understanding (internal state understanding, perspective taking, and causal reasoning and problem solving)…

Fenning, Rachel M.; Baker, Bruce L.; Juvonen, Jaana

2011-01-01

60

Relations Between Social Contingency in Mother–Child Interaction and 2-Year-Olds' Social Competence  

Microsoft Academic Search

This study examined relations between social contingency in mother–child interaction and low-income 2-year-olds' social competence, using a cross-sectional design (N = 47). Measures of social contingency included time spent in joint attention and dyadic turn-taking behaviors following maternal bids. Measures of child social competence included emotional self-regulation during a delay-of-gratification task and empathic responsiveness toward an experimenter feigning injury. Social

C. Cybele Raver

1996-01-01

61

Mother–Child and Father–Child Emotional Availability in Families of Children with Down Syndrome  

Microsoft Academic Search

Objective. Emotional availability (EA) is a relationship construct that can be considered a global index of the emotional quality of parent–child interaction. The present study aimed to address several specific questions about mother–child and father–child emotional availability in families with a child with Down's syndrome (DS). Design. Free-play interactions of 22 children with DS (M chronological age = 35.32 mo)

Simona de Falco; Paola Venuti; Gianluca Esposito; Marc H. Bornstein

2009-01-01

62

The Social Functioning of Preschool-Age Children Whose Mothers Are Emotionally and Physically Abused  

Microsoft Academic Search

In this study, the social interactions and emotional adjustment of 21 preschool children of battered women and 25 same-age children from nonviolent homes were assessed. Mothers rated the frequency of emotional and physical abuse during the past year, their mental health, parenting qualities, and the child's adjustment. The free play of each child in a small group setting was evaluated

Sandra A. Graham-Bermann; Alytia A. Levendosky

1997-01-01

63

Child and Nonviolent Social Change  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Examines the nature of the child and the impact of socialization experiences on his capacity to act nonviolently in a changing social order. Presents a socialization model that draws on different disciplinary frameworks and research areas (animal and human ethnology, social learning theories, altruism studies, and reviews of protest movements).…

Boulding, Elise

1974-01-01

64

Emotion Socialization by Mothers and Fathers: Coherence among Behaviors and Associations with Parent Attitudes and Children's Social Competence  

PubMed Central

This study examined interrelations among different types of parental emotion socialization behaviors in 88 mothers and 76 fathers (co-residing with participating mothers) of 8-year-old children. Parents completed questionnaires assessing emotion socialization behaviors, emotion-related attitudes, and their children’s social functioning. An observed parent-child emotion discourse task and a child social-problem solving interview were also performed. Parent gender differences and concordance within couples in emotion socialization behaviors were identified for some but not all behaviors. Fathers’ reactions to child emotion, family expressiveness, and fathers’ emotion coaching during discussion cohered, and a model was supported in which the commonality among these behaviors was predicted by fathers’ emotion-coaching attitudes, and was associated with children’s social competence. A cohesive structure for the emotion socialization construct was less clear for mothers, although attitudes predicted all three types of emotion socialization behavior (reactions, expressiveness, and coaching). Implications for developmental theory and for parent-focused interventions are discussed. PMID:21532915

Baker, Jason K.; Fenning, Rachel M.; Crnic, Keith A.

2010-01-01

65

Emotion socialization style in parents of children with callous-unemotional traits.  

PubMed

Children with callous-unemotional (CU) traits manifest a range of deficits in their emotional functioning, and parents play a key role in socializing children's understanding, experience, expression, and regulation of emotions. However, research examining emotion-related parenting in families of children with CU traits is scarce. In two independent studies we examined emotion socialization styles in parents of children high on CU traits. In Study 1, we assessed parents' self-reported beliefs and feelings regarding their own and their child's emotions, in a sample of 111 clinic-referred and community children aged 7-12 years. In Study 2, we directly observed parents' responding to child emotion during an emotional reminiscing task, in a clinic sample of 59 conduct-problem children aged 3-9 years. Taken together, the results were consistent in suggesting that the mothers of children with higher levels of CU traits are more likely to have affective attitudes that are less accepting of emotion (Study 1), and emotion socialization practices that are more dismissing of child emotion (Study 2). Fathers' emotion socialization beliefs and practices were unrelated to levels of CU traits. Our findings provide initial evidence for a relationship between CU traits and parents' emotion socialization style, and have significant implications for the design of novel family-based interventions targeting CU traits and co-occurring conduct problems. PMID:23857716

Pasalich, Dave S; Waschbusch, Daniel A; Dadds, Mark R; Hawes, David J

2014-04-01

66

Emotion Socialization in the Home  

E-print Network

emotional understanding in preschool children. Developmental Psychology,emotional adjustment: A birth-to-maturity perspective. Developmental Psychology,emotional life of families: Theoretical models and preliminary data. Journal of Family Psychology,

Sperling, Jacqueline

2012-01-01

67

Detecting emotional contagion in massive social networks.  

PubMed

Happiness and other emotions spread between people in direct contact, but it is unclear whether massive online social networks also contribute to this spread. Here, we elaborate a novel method for measuring the contagion of emotional expression. With data from millions of Facebook users, we show that rainfall directly influences the emotional content of their status messages, and it also affects the status messages of friends in other cities who are not experiencing rainfall. For every one person affected directly, rainfall alters the emotional expression of about one to two other people, suggesting that online social networks may magnify the intensity of global emotional synchrony. PMID:24621792

Coviello, Lorenzo; Sohn, Yunkyu; Kramer, Adam D I; Marlow, Cameron; Franceschetti, Massimo; Christakis, Nicholas A; Fowler, James H

2014-01-01

68

Detecting Emotional Contagion in Massive Social Networks  

PubMed Central

Happiness and other emotions spread between people in direct contact, but it is unclear whether massive online social networks also contribute to this spread. Here, we elaborate a novel method for measuring the contagion of emotional expression. With data from millions of Facebook users, we show that rainfall directly influences the emotional content of their status messages, and it also affects the status messages of friends in other cities who are not experiencing rainfall. For every one person affected directly, rainfall alters the emotional expression of about one to two other people, suggesting that online social networks may magnify the intensity of global emotional synchrony. PMID:24621792

Coviello, Lorenzo; Sohn, Yunkyu; Kramer, Adam D. I.; Marlow, Cameron; Franceschetti, Massimo; Christakis, Nicholas A.; Fowler, James H.

2014-01-01

69

Functions of parent-child reminiscing about emotionally negative events  

Microsoft Academic Search

Parent-child reminiscing about negative experiences influences children's developing “emotional self-concept”, which comprises three interrelated functions: self-defining (this is the kind of emotional person I am), self-in-relation (this is how I express and share my emotions with others), and coping (this is how I cope with and resolve negative emotion). In this study, we examined how 70 mostly white, middle-class mothers

Robyn Fivush; Lisa Berlin; Jessica McDermott Sales; Jean Mennuti-Washburn; Jude Cassidy

2003-01-01

70

Toward the ABCs: Building a Healthy Social and Emotional Foundation for Learning and Living.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Noting that most individuals working with young children and their families lack the knowledge and skills to identify early warning signs of significant child distress and that most communities lack resources and expertise to address early social and emotional concerns, this report discusses the importance of healthy social and emotional

Casas, Paula

71

Parents' Reasoning about the Social and Emotional Development of Their Intellectually Gifted Children.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

A year-long qualitative study of 10 families of gifted children (grades 5 to 8) found 4 levels of parental reasoning concerning their child's social and emotional development: (1) no framework; (2) an intellectual framework only; (3) a full intellectual and partial social-emotional framework; and (4) a comprehensive framework recognizing both…

Solow, Razel E.

1995-01-01

72

Strong Teens--Grades 9-12: A Social and Emotional Learning Curriculum  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Social-emotional competence--it is a critical part of every child's school success, and just like any academic subject, children need instruction in it. Developed by a top expert, these proven curricula will help promote the social-emotional competence and resilience of children and adolescents. Divided into four age levels from kindergarten…

Merrell, Kenneth W.

2007-01-01

73

Strong Start--Grades K-2: A Social and Emotional Learning Curriculum  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Social-emotional competence--it is a critical part of every child's school success, and just like any academic subject, children need instruction in it. Developed by a top expert, these proven curricula will help promote the social-emotional competence and resilience of children and adolescents. Divided into four age levels from kindergarten…

Merrell, Kenneth W.; Parisi, Danielle M.; Whitcomb, Sara A.

2007-01-01

74

Infants' Social-Emotional Adjustment within a Childcare Context of Korea  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

In a child day-care setting, the naturally occurring social-emotional behaviours and play interaction of 51 infants were observed and recorded. Individual differences in gender, age, temperament, and maternal parenting behaviours were examined to understand how these variables might be related to social-emotional adjustment of infants. The…

Kim, Min-Hee; Moon, Hyukjun

2011-01-01

75

Transactional and Cascading Relations between Early Spanking and Children's Social-Emotional Development  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The authors tested a series of models linking spanking and child social-emotional outcomes using a sample of 3,870 families from the Fragile Families and Child Wellbeing study. Spanking was measured by the number of times the focal child was spanked by the mother at ages 1, 3, and 5. Internalizing and externalizing symptoms were assessed using the…

Gromoske, Andrea N.; Maguire-Jack, Kathryn

2012-01-01

76

Neural correlates of emotion processing: from emotional to social brain.  

PubMed

Different models of emotion highlight the role of strategic brain regions in emotion identification, response and regulation. Cortical, subcortical and limbic structures constitute the emotional brain. In this short review, we focus on the function of the amygdala and medial prefrontal cortex. Both regions have reciprocal connections and are densely connected with cortical and subcortical structures. Beyond its classical role in fear processing, the amygdala is considered as a region that detects salient and personally relevant stimuli in cooperation with ventral and dorsal medial prefrontal cortex. Amygdala and medial prefrontal cortex are also engaged in the processing of socially relevant stimuli. Our review emphasized the overlap between the emotional and the social brain. Adopting a socio-affective neuroscience perspective is a promising perspective to identify new pathophysiological pathways in the study of emotion and mental disorders, especially major depressive disorder. PMID:22959113

Fossati, P

2012-01-01

77

Cognitive control: social evolution and emotional regulation.  

PubMed

This commentary argues that theories of cognitive control risk being incomplete unless they incorporate social/emotional factors. Social factors very likely played a critical role in the evolution of human cognitive control abilities, and emotional states are the primary regulatory mechanisms of cognitive control. PMID:25164290

Rossano, Matt J

2011-04-01

78

Grief as a Social Emotion: Theoretical Perspectives  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The article explores a sociological perspective on grief as a social emotion. Focusing on the social bond with the deceased, the self-concept of the survivor or the power of feeling rules, general sociological theories of emotions (symbolic interactionism, structural theory, behavioral theory) have the potential to deepen the understanding of…

Jakoby, Nina R.

2012-01-01

79

Evaluating Social and Emotional Learning Programs.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

After describing social-emotional learning, provides a framework for implementing an effective program that includes, for example, building connections between students and their schools, involving families and communities as partners. Describes three exemplary social and emotional learning programs for grades K-6: Caring School Community,…

Weissberg, Roger P.; Resnik, Hank; Payton, John; O'Brien, Mary Utne

2003-01-01

80

Social regulation of emotion: messy layers  

PubMed Central

Emotions are evolved systems of intra- and interpersonal processes that are regulatory in nature, dealing mostly with issues of personal or social concern. They regulate social interaction and in extension, the social sphere. In turn, processes in the social sphere regulate emotions of individuals and groups. In other words, intrapersonal processes project in the interpersonal space, and inversely, interpersonal experiences deeply influence intrapersonal processes. Thus, I argue that the concepts of emotion generation and regulation should not be artificially separated. Similarly, interpersonal emotions should not be reduced to interacting systems of intraindividual processes. Instead, we can consider emotions at different social levels, ranging from dyads to large scale e-communities. The interaction between these levels is complex and does not only involve influences from one level to the next. In this sense the levels of emotion/regulation are messy and a challenge for empirical study. In this article, I discuss the concepts of emotions and regulation at different intra- and interpersonal levels. I extend the concept of auto-regulation of emotions (Kappas, 2008, 2011a,b) to social processes. Furthermore, I argue for the necessity of including mediated communication, particularly in cyberspace in contemporary models of emotion/regulation. Lastly, I suggest the use of concepts from systems dynamics and complex systems to tackle the challenge of the “messy layers.” PMID:23424049

Kappas, Arvid

2013-01-01

81

The Role of Emotion in Parent-Child Relationships: Children's Emotionality, Maternal Meta-Emotion, and Children's Attachment Security  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This study was intended to examine the relationship among children's emotionality, parental meta-emotion, and parent-child attachment. The sample consisted of 546 5th and 6th grade children and their mothers. The test instruments used in this study were the Emotionality subscale of the EAS Temperament Survey (mothers' ratings only), the Parental…

Chen, Fu Mei; Lin, Hsiao Shih; Li, Chun Hao

2012-01-01

82

Mothers' Acculturation and Beliefs about Emotions, Mother-Child Emotion Discourse, and Children's Emotion Understanding in Latino Families  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Research Findings: We examined associations among Anglo acculturation, Latino enculturation, maternal beliefs, mother-child emotion talk, and emotion understanding in 40 Latino preschool-age children and their mothers. Mothers self-reported Anglo acculturation, Latino enculturation, and beliefs about the value/danger of children's emotions and…

Perez Rivera, Marie Belle; Dunsmore, Julie C.

2011-01-01

83

Child and Adolescent Emotion Regulation: The Role of Parental Emotion Regulation and Expression  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper reviews current literature relating to parent and child emotional functioning, specifically their emotion regulatory\\u000a skills and emotional expression. Included are considerations regarding theoretical, methodological, and sampling strengths\\u000a and weaknesses of existing literature. On the basis of the review, several directions for future research are proposed. First,\\u000a it is argued that consistency in the measurement of emotion regulation is

Emily Bariola; Eleonora Gullone; Elizabeth K. Hughes

2011-01-01

84

Girl child and social change.  

PubMed

This article discusses the state of social change and the disparity between India's Constitutional aims and actual practice in addressing gender inequality and the special risks of female children in India. The second part of this article summarizes Constitutional articles and laws relating to protection of women and a girl child. Before birth, a female child is at risk of fetal death. A woman is at risk of poorly performed abortions and maternal mortality. After birth, a girl child is at risk of child care of younger siblings, housework, lack of education, wage work for the household, sexual abuse, vulnerability at work or school or on the street, murder by her parents, abuse, malnutrition, and desertion. The SAARC summit declared 1990 the Year of the Girl Child. UN conventions and a world summit focused on the Rights of the Child. A child has a right to freedom from exploitation, neglect and abuse, and access to food, health care, and education. Articles 14, 15, and 16 of India's Constitution guarantee protection from discrimination on grounds of religion, race, caste, sex, or place of birth and equality of opportunity in public employment. Article 23 prohibits trafficking in humans and forced labor. Article 24 prohibits child labor under the age of 14 years. Article 39 assures an adequate means of livelihood, equal pay, and protection from child abuse and economic pressure to work in jobs unsuitable to a child's age and strength. Article 45 provides for free and compulsory education up to 14 years of age. Article 51 prohibits derogatory practices against women. Article 325 and 326 prohibits sex discrimination. Other laws pertain to dowry, marriage age, prostitution, abortion, juvenile justice, kidnapping, obscenity, procurement of a minor, sexual offenses, divorce and child support, child care, maternity benefits, and cruelty by a husband or relatives. The girl child in India continues to live in perpetual threat, both physiological and psychological. PMID:12157998

Seth, P

1995-01-01

85

Gender differences in parent-child conversations about past emotions  

Microsoft Academic Search

In this study, we examined the emotional content of parents’ conversations about past events with their 40-month-old children.\\u000a Subjects were 24 white middle-class children and their mothers and fathers. At separate home visits, each parent independently\\u000a engaged the child in conversation about three events that parent and child had experienced together only once before. Mothers\\u000a and fathers talked about emotional

Janet Kuebli; Robyn Fivush

1992-01-01

86

A Study of Child Variance, Volume 3: The Future; Conceptual Project in Emotional Disturbance.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The third volume of a series on child variance discusses delivery systems that service emotionally disturbed children, including educational, legal-correctional, mental health, social welfare, religious, and counter-cultural institutions. Each type of institution is described extensively in terms of the history of its delivery systems in the…

Rhodes, William C.; Head, Sabin

87

Domestic Violence, Emotional Competence, and Child Adjustment  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This article examined emotion competence in children exposed to domestic violence (DV). It also examined the hypothesis that children's emotional competence mediates relations between DV and children's later difficulties with peers and behavioral adjustment. DV was assessed when children were at the age of five, emotional competence was assessed…

Katz, Lynn Fainsilber; Hessler, Danielle M.; Annest, Amalia

2007-01-01

88

Evaluation of an early detection tool for social-emotional and behavioral problems in toddlers: The Brief Infant Toddler Social and Emotional Assessment - A cluster randomized trial  

PubMed Central

Background The prevalence of social-emotional and behavioral problems is estimated to be 8 to 9% among preschool children. Effective early detection tools are needed to promote the provision of adequate care at an early stage. The Brief Infant-Toddler Social and Emotional Assessment (BITSEA) was developed for this purpose. This study evaluates the effectiveness of the BITSEA to enhance social-emotional and behavioral health of preschool children. Methods and Design A cluster randomized controlled trial is set up in youth health care centers in the larger Rotterdam area in the Netherlands, to evaluate the BITSEA. The 31 youth health care centers are randomly allocated to either the control group or the intervention group. The intervention group uses the scores on the BITSEA and cut-off points to evaluate a child's social-emotional and behavioral health and to decide whether or not the child should be referred. The control group provides care as usual, which involves administering a questionnaire that structures the conversation between child health professionals and parents. At a one year follow-up measurement the social-emotional and behavioral health of all children included in the study population will be evaluated. Discussion It is hypothesized that better results will be found, in terms of social-emotional and behavioral health in the intervention group, compared to the control group, due to more adequate early detection, referral and more appropriate and timely care. Trial registration Current Controlled Trials NTR2035 PMID:21702936

2011-01-01

89

Assessing Emotion Regulation in Social Anxiety Disorder: The Emotion Regulation Interview  

E-print Network

specified by Gross's (Review of General Psychology 2: 271­299, 1998) process model of emotion regulationAssessing Emotion Regulation in Social Anxiety Disorder: The Emotion Regulation Interview Kelly H to involve emotional hyper-reactivity and emotion dysregulation. How- ever, the precise nature of the emotion

Gross, James J.

90

Mother and Child Emotions during Mathematics Homework  

Microsoft Academic Search

Mathematics is often thought of as a purely intellectual and unemotional activity. Recently, researchers have begun to question the validity of this approach, arguing that emotions and cognition are intertwined. The emotions expressed during mathematics work may be linked to mathematics achievement. We used behavioral measures to identify the emotions expressed by U.S. mothers and their 11-year-old children while solving

Nicole M. Else-Quest; Janet S. Hyde; Ahalya Hejmadi

2008-01-01

91

From Birth to Sixteen: Children's Health, Social, Emotional and Linguistic Development  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

"From Birth to Sixteen" outlines children's physical, social, emotional and language development from infancy through to adolescence. In both its practical application of research and its contribution to the assessment of child development, this text provides essential reading for those studying, or indeed practising, child development in the…

Cowie, Helen

2012-01-01

92

Educators' Social and Emotional Skills Vital to Learning  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Teachers' social and emotional competencies are very important to their overall effectiveness, but such skills are frequently overlooked. Social and emotional competencies like managing emotions and stress are needed more today than ever before. More practices and policies to support and foster educators' social and emotional

Jones, Stephanie M.; Bouffard, Suzanne M.; Weissbourd, Richard

2013-01-01

93

Enhancing Students Emotional Intelligence and Social Adeptness.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This action research project implemented and evaluated a curriculum designed to help students with varying degrees of emotional intelligence improve their social adeptness. The targeted population consisted of sixth-grade students in a large urban setting in central Illinois. The students' levels of social ineptness were determined and documented…

Gore, Scott W.

94

Social anxiety, emotion, and helping behavior  

Microsoft Academic Search

The present study tested the hypothesis that while moderately socially anxious persons would demonstrate enhanced helping activity following the perpetration or observation of harm, low socially anxious individuals would not. This hypothesis was supported, suggesting that harm-produced helping is emotionally mediated. A self-report MACL measure of mood states, however, failed to reveal consistent mood differences among conditions, leading to speculation

Robert W. McPeek; Robert B. Cialdini

1977-01-01

95

Marital conflict and child adjustment: an emotional security hypothesis.  

PubMed

An emotional security hypothesis that builds on attachment theory is proposed to account for recent empirical findings on the impact of marital conflict on children and to provide directions for future research. Children's concerns about emotional security play a role in their regulation of emotional arousal and organization and in their motivation to respond in the face of marital conflict. Over time these response processes and internalized representations of parental relations that develop have implications for children's long-term adjustment. Emotional security is seen as a product of past experiences with marital conflict and as a primary influence on future responding. The impact and interaction of other experiential histories within the family that affect children's emotional security are also examined, with a focus on parent-child relations. PMID:7809306

Davies, P T; Cummings, E M

1994-11-01

96

New Beginnings: evaluation of a short social–emotional intervention for primary?aged children  

Microsoft Academic Search

We report on an effectiveness trial of ‘New Beginnings’, a short social–emotional intervention for primary?aged children. The sample comprised 253 children (aged 6–11) attending 37 primary schools across England. Data on social and emotional competence and mental health difficulties were collected using child self?report, and parent? and teacher?informant report questionnaires in a pre?test–post?test control group design. One hundred and fifty?nine

Neil Humphrey; Afroditi Kalambouka; Michael Wigelsworth; Ann Lendrum; Clare Lennie; Peter Farrell

2010-01-01

97

African American and European American Mothers' Beliefs About Negative Emotions and Emotion Socialization Practices  

Microsoft Academic Search

Objective. The authors examined mothers’ beliefs about their children's negative emotions and their emotion socialization practices. Design. A total of 65 African American and 137 European American mothers of 5-year-old children reported their beliefs and typical responses to children's negative emotions, and mothers’ emotion teaching practices were observed. Results. African American mothers reported that the display of negative emotions was

Jackie A. Nelson; Esther M. Leerkes; Marion OBrien; Susan D. Calkins; Stuart Marcovitch

2012-01-01

98

The Relationship between Prekindergarten Social and Emotional Development and Academic Success among Hispanic Children from Low-Income Families  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Social and emotional development has been considered an important factor in child development which has been placed at the end of the learning spectrum due to high stakes testing. Social and emotional development consists of the relationships an individual has with others, the level of self-control, and the motivation and perseverance a person has…

Muelle, Christina More

2010-01-01

99

The Relationship Between Prekindergarten Social and Emotional Development and Academic Success among Hispanic Children from Low-Income Families  

Microsoft Academic Search

Social and emotional development has been considered an important factor in child development which has been placed at the end of the learning spectrum due to high stakes testing. Social and emotional development consists of the relationships an individual has with others, the level of self-control, and the motivation and perseverance a person has during an activity (Bandura, 1989). This

Christina More Muelle

2010-01-01

100

The relationship between prekindergarten social and emotional development and academic success among Hispanic children from low-income families  

Microsoft Academic Search

Social and emotional development has been considered an important factor in child development which has been placed at the end of the learning spectrum due to high stakes testing. Social and emotional development consists of the relationships an individual has with others, the level of self-control, and the motivation and perseverance a person has during an activity (Bandura, 1989). This

Christina More Muelle

2010-01-01

101

Family Conflict, Emotional Security, and Child Development: Translating Research Findings into a Prevention Program for Community Families  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The social problem posed by family conflict to the physical and psychological health and well-being of children, parents, and underlying family relationships is a cause for concern. Inter-parental and parent-child conflict are linked with children's behavioral, emotional, social, academic, and health problems, with children's risk particularly…

Cummings, E. Mark; Schatz, Julie N.

2012-01-01

102

The relation of young children's vicarious emotional responding to social competence, regulation, and emotionality  

Microsoft Academic Search

The relation of preschool and kindergarten children's vicarious emotional responding to their social competence, regulation (attentional and coping styles), and emotionality (negative emotional intensity and dispositional negative affect) was examined. Vicarious responding was assessed by means of facial reactions to a film about a peer in a social conflict and children's reported negative affect to viewing peers' real-life negative emotion.

Nancy Eisenberg; Richard A. Fabes

1995-01-01

103

Relations among Teachers' Emotion Socialization Beliefs and Practices and Preschoolers' Emotional Competence  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Research Findings: Utilizing a 3-part model of emotion socialization that included modeling, contingent responding, and teaching, this study examined the associations between 44 teachers' self-reported and observed emotion socialization practices and 326 preschoolers' emotion knowledge and observed emotional behavior. Multilevel analyses…

Morris, Carol A. S.; Denham, Susanne A.; Bassett, Hideko H.; Curby, Timothy W.

2013-01-01

104

Maternal Depression and Child Internalizing: The Moderating Role of Child Emotion Regulation  

Microsoft Academic Search

This study tests a model of children's emotion regulation (ER) as a moderator of the link between maternal depression and child internalizing problems. Participants were 78 children (ages 4 to 7), including 45 children of mothers with a history of child- hood-onset depression (COD) and 33 children of mothers who had never been de- pressed. ER was assessed observationally during

Jennifer S. Silk; Daniel S. Shaw; Erika E. Forbes; Maria Kovacs

2006-01-01

105

Profiling Social, Emotional and Behavioural Difficulties of Children Involved in Direct and Indirect Bullying Behaviours  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Being involved in bullying places a child at risk of poor psychosocial and educational outcomes. This study aimed to examine the profile of behavioural, emotional and social functioning for two subtypes of bullying: direct and indirect (relational). Pupils aged between 7 and 11 years completed sociometric measures of social inclusion and bullying…

Smith, H.; Polenik, K.; Nakasita, S.; Jones, A. P.

2012-01-01

106

Gender Differences in the Socialization of Preschoolers' Emotional Competence  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Preschoolers' socialization of emotion and its contribution to emotional competence is likely to be highly gendered. In their work, the authors have found that mothers often take on the role of emotional gatekeeper in the family, and fathers act as loving playmates, but that parents' styles of socialization of emotion do not usually differ for…

Denham, Susanne A.; Bassett, Hideko Hamada; Wyatt, Todd M.

2010-01-01

107

Parental Contributions to Preschoolers' Emotional Competence: Direct and Indirect Effects  

Microsoft Academic Search

The present study examines the contributions of (1) parental socialization of emotion and preschoolers' emotional interaction with parents to their emotional competence, and (2) parental socialization and child emotional competence to their general social competence. Both observational and self-report techniques were used to measure emotion socialization, emotional competence, and social competence of preschoolers (average age = 49.8 months) from 60

Susanne A. Denham; Jennifer Mitchell-Copeland; Katherine Strandberg; Sharon Auerbach; Kimberly Blair

1997-01-01

108

Touchpoints: Your Child's Emotional and Behavioral Development.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This book looks at children's early development through what are called "touchpoints": times just before a surge of rapid motor, cognitive, or emotional development when, for a short time, children regress in several areas and become difficult to understand. Part 1, called "Touchpoints of Development," is organized around the areas of behavioral…

Brazelton, T. Berry

109

Parent Prediction of Child Mood and Emotional Resilience: The Role of Parental Responsiveness and Psychological Control  

PubMed Central

Research consistently shows low to moderate agreement between parent and child reports of child mood, suggesting that parents are not always the best predictors of child emotional functioning. This study examines parental responsiveness and psychological control for improving prediction of early adolescent mood and emotional resilience beyond parent report of child emotional functioning. Participants were 268 early adolescents administered measures of depression symptoms, emotional resilience, and perceptions of parenting. Parents of participating youth completed measures of youth emotional functioning. Parental responsiveness and psychological control each emerged as family variables that may be of value for predicting child emotional functioning beyond parent reports. Specifically, responsiveness explained significant variance in child depression and resilience after accounting for parent reports, while parental psychological control increased prediction of child mood alone. Results generally suggest that parenting behaviours may be an important consideration when children and parents provide discrepant reports of child emotional well-being. Conceptual and clinical implications of these results are discussed. PMID:22110912

Boughton, Kristy L.; Lumley, Margaret N.

2011-01-01

110

"Won't Somebody 'Think' of the Children?" Emotions, Child Poverty, and Post-Humanitarian Possibilities for Social Justice Education  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Under models of moral and global citizenship education, compassion and caring are emphasized as a counterpoint to pervasive, heartless, neo-liberal globalization. According to such views, these and related emotions such as empathy, sympathy, and pity, can cause people to act righteously to aid others who are disadvantaged through no fault of their…

Jackson, Liz

2014-01-01

111

Needed Research on Child Socialization. A Special Report of the USOE-Sponsored Grant Study: Critical Appraisal of Research in the Personality-Emotions-Motivation Domain.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The task group report presented in this publication is one of a series prepared by eminent psychologists who have served as consultants in the U.S. Office of Education-sponsored grant study to conduct a Critical Appraisal of the Personality-Emotions-Motivation Domain. In order to achieve the goal of identifying important problems and areas for new…

Gorsuch, Richard L.; And Others

112

Emotionally Grounded Social Interaction * Dolores Caamero  

E-print Network

Emotionally Grounded Social Interaction * Dolores Cañamero Artificial Intelligence Research it --- implicitly and explicitly, directly and through internalisation mechanisms --- regulates daily interaction of artificial societies. In particular, it enlarges the scope of behaviour control in agents, which is not only

Cañamero, Lola

113

Negative emotion and superficial social processing  

Microsoft Academic Search

Two studies examined whether negative emotional arousal increases the tendency to process social information less carefully. In both studies, subjects were dental patients waiting to receive a filling from a student dentist. In Study 1, 48 subjects responded to illusory correlation materials adopted from Hamilton & Rose (1980). As expected, those above the median on self-reported anxiety were more likely

Robert S. Baron; Mary L. Inman; Chuan Feng Kao; Henrietta Logan

1992-01-01

114

Influences of Parent and Child Negative Emotionality on Young Children's Everyday Behaviors  

PubMed Central

Negative emotionality is linked to unfavorable life outcomes, but studies have yet to examine negative emotionality of parents and children as predictors of children’s problem behaviors and negative emotion word use in everyday life. This study used a novel naturalistic recording device called the Electronically Activated Recorder (EAR) to investigate the separate and interactive influences of parent and child negative emotionality on daily child behaviors in a sample of 35 preschool-aged children over two time points separated by one year. Fathers’ negative emotionality predicted children’s whining at Time 1; mothers’ negative emotionality predicted children’s negative emotion word use at Time 1 and increases in children’s arguing/fighting from Time 1 to Time 2. Parents’ ratings of child negative emotionality also were associated with increases in children’s arguing/fighting from Time 1 to Time 2, and child negative emotionality moderated the association between mothers’ negative emotionality and children’s arguing/fighting. Further, children with mothers high in negative emotionality displayed higher levels of problem behaviors when their mothers self-reported low levels of positive emotional expressiveness and/or high levels of negative emotional expressiveness. These findings offer preliminary evidence linking parent and child negative emotionality to everyday child behaviors, and suggest that emotional expressiveness may play a key role in moderating the links between maternal negative emotionality and child behavioral problems. PMID:22390707

Slatcher, Richard B.; Trentacosta, Christopher J.

2012-01-01

115

Child Development  

MedlinePLUS

As children grow older, they develop in several different ways. Child development includes physical, intellectual, social, and emotional changes. Children grow and mature at very different rates. It's ...

116

Introducing Emotions into the Computational Study of Social Norms  

Microsoft Academic Search

We argue that modelling emotions among agents in artificial societies will further the computational study of social norms. The appraisal theory of emotions is presented as theoretical underpinning of Jon Elster's view that social norms are sustained not only by material sanctions but also by emotions such as shame and contempt. Appraisal theory suggests the following twofold relationship between social

Alexander Staller; Paolo Petta

117

Mothers’ Socialization of Emotion Regulation: The Moderating Role of Children’s Negative Emotional Reactivity  

Microsoft Academic Search

During the toddler period, children begin to shift from being primarily dependent on parents to regulate their emotions to\\u000a managing their emotions independently. The present study considers how children’s propensity towards negative emotional arousal\\u000a interacts with mothers’ efforts to socialize emotion regulation. Fifty-five low income mothers and their 2-year-old children\\u000a completed observational assessments measuring mothers’ socialization of emotion regulation, children’s

Scott P. Mirabile; Laura V. Scaramella; Sara L. Sohr-Preston; Sarah D. Robison

2009-01-01

118

Analysis and Support of Lifestyle via Emotions Using Social Media  

E-print Network

1 Analysis and Support of Lifestyle via Emotions Using Social Media Ward van Breda, Jan Treur Neuroscience this paper addresses how affective states in social interactions can be used through social media this has been implemented for the social medium Twitter. Keywords. Social media, emotion, lifestyle support

Treur, Jan

119

Social-Emotional Screening Status in Early Childhood Predicts Elementary School Outcomes  

PubMed Central

OBJECTIVE The goal was to examine whether children who screen positive for social-emotional/behavioral problems at 12 to 36 months of age are at elevated risk for social-emotional/behavioral problems in early elementary school. METHODS The sample studied (N = 1004) comprised an ethnically (33.3% minority) and socioeconomically (17.8% living in poverty and 11.3% living in borderline poverty) diverse, healthy, birth cohort from a metropolitan region of the northeastern United States. When children were 12 to 36 months of age (mean age: 23.8 months; SD: 7.1 months), parents completed the Brief Infant-Toddler Social and Emotional Assessment and questions concerning their level of worry about their child’s behavior, emotions, and social development. When children were in early elementary school (mean age: 6.0 years; SD: 0.4 years), parents completed the Child Behavior Checklist and teachers completed the Teacher Report Form regarding behavioral problems. In a subsample (n = 389), parents reported child psychiatric status. RESULTS Brief Infant-Toddler Social and Emotional Assessment screen status and parental worry were associated significantly with school-age symptoms and psychiatric disorders. In multivariate analyses that included Brief Infant-Toddler Social and Emotional Assessment status and parental worry, Brief Infant-Toddler Social and Emotional Assessment scores significantly predicted all school-age problems, whereas worry predicted only parent reports with the Child Behavior Checklist. Children with of-concern scores on the problem scale of the Brief Infant-Toddler Social and Emotional Assessment were at increased risk for parent-reported subclinical/clinical levels of problems and for psychiatric disorders. Low competence scores predicted later teacher-reported subclinical/clinical problems and parent-reported disorders. Worry predicted parent-reported subclinical/clinical problems. Moreover, the Brief Infant-Toddler Social and Emotional Assessment identified 49.0% of children who exhibited subclinical/clinical symptoms according to teachers and 67.9% of children who later met the criteria for a psychiatric disorder. CONCLUSIONS Screening with a standardized tool in early childhood has the potential to identify the majority of children who exhibit significant emotional/behavioral problems in early elementary school. PMID:18450899

Briggs-Gowan, Margaret J.; Carter, Alice S.

2011-01-01

120

Living Emotions, Avoiding Emotions: Behavioral Investigation of the Regulation of Socially Driven Emotions  

PubMed Central

Emotion regulation is important for psychological well-being. Although it is known that alternative regulation strategies may have different emotional consequences, the effectiveness of such strategies for socially driven emotions remains unclear. In this study we investigated the efficacy of different forms of reappraisal on responses to the selfish and altruistic behavior of others in the Dictator Game. In Experiment 1, subjects mentalized the intentions of the other player in one condition, and took distance from the situation in the other. Emotion ratings were recorded after each offer. Compared with a baseline condition, mentalizing led subjects to experience their emotions more positively when receiving both selfish and altruistic proposals, whereas distancing decreased the valence when receiving altruistic offers, but did not affect the perception of selfish behavior. In Experiment 2, subjects played with both computer and human partners while reappraising the meaning of the player’s intentions (with a human partner) or the meaning of the situation (with a computer partner). Results showed that both contexts were effectively modulated by reappraisal, however a stronger effect was observed when the donor was a human partner, as compared to a computer partner. Taken together, these results demonstrate that socially driven emotions can be successfully modulated by reappraisal strategies that focus on the reinterpretation of others’ intentions. PMID:23349645

Grecucci, Alessandro; Giorgetta, Cinzia; Bonini, Nicolao; Sanfey, Alan G.

2013-01-01

121

Memories of social interactions: age differences in emotional intensity.  

PubMed

The current study examined age differences in the intensity of emotions experienced during social interactions. Because emotions are felt most intensely in situations central to motivational goals, age differences in emotional intensity may exist in social situations that meet the goals for one age group more than the other. Guided by theories of emotional intensity and socioemotional selectivity, it was hypothesized that social partner type would elicit different affective responses by age. Younger (n = 71) and older (n = 71) adults recalled experiences of positive and negative emotions with new friends, established friends, and family members from the prior week. Compared with younger adults, older adults reported lower intensity positive emotions with new friends, similarly intense positive emotions with established friends, and higher intensity positive emotions with family members. Older adults reported lower intensity negative emotions for all social partners than did younger adults, but this difference was most pronounced for interactions with new friends. PMID:17563185

Charles, Susan Turk; Piazza, Jennifer R

2007-06-01

122

Early Childhood Teachers as Socializers of Young Children's Emotional Competence  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Young children's emotional competence--regulation of emotional expressiveness and experience when necessary, and knowledge of their own and other's emotions--is crucial for social and academic (i.e., school) success. Thus, it is important to understand the mechanisms of how young children develop emotional competence. Both parents and teachers are…

Denham, Susanne A.; Bassett, Hideko H.; Zinsser, Katherine

2012-01-01

123

Which Social Emotional Competencies Are Enhanced at a Social Emotional Learning Camp?  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Research studies have shown that educational programmes such as camps and field trips can develop affective and social relationships through personal exposure to outdoor experiences among students. This study will illustrate the outcome of a social emotional learning camp organized for 93 Secondary Two students (mean age 14.1) in Singapore. Both…

Ee, Jessie; Ong, Chew Wei

2014-01-01

124

Physiology and Functioning: Parents' Vagal Tone, Emotion Socialization, and Children's Emotion Knowledge  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This study examined relationships among parents' physiological regulation, their emotion socialization behaviors, and their children's emotion knowledge. Parents' resting cardiac vagal tone was measured, and parents provided information regarding their socialization behaviors and family emotional expressiveness. Their 4- or 5-year-old children (N…

Perlman, Susan B.; Camras, Linda A.; Pelphrey, Kevin A.

2008-01-01

125

Social and Emotional Learning Hikes Interest and Resiliency  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Social Emotional Learning (SEL) is the process by which people develop the skills to recognize and manage emotions, form positive relationships, solve problems that arise, motivate themselves to accomplish a goal, make responsible decisions, and avoid risky behavior. The Collaborative for Social and Emotional Learning (CASEL), at the University of…

Beland, Kathy

2007-01-01

126

Developing Social and Emotional Aspects of Learning: The American Experience  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Developments in American policy, research and professional development to promote social and emotional learning in schools have drawn on work carried out by the Collaborative for Academic, Social, and Emotional Learning (CASEL), encouraged by the popular and political catalyst of Daniel Goleman's work on emotional intelligence. Based on CASEL's…

Elias, Maurice J.; Moceri, Dominic C.

2012-01-01

127

Social Approach and Emotion Recognition in Fragile X Syndrome  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Evidence is emerging that individuals with Fragile X syndrome (FXS) display emotion recognition deficits, which may contribute to their significant social difficulties. The current study investigated the emotion recognition abilities, and social approachability judgments, of FXS individuals when processing emotional stimuli. Relative to…

Williams, Tracey A.; Porter, Melanie A.; Langdon, Robyn

2014-01-01

128

The Use of Emotions in Social Work Education  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The role of emotions, although central to social work practice, has been relatively neglected in the process of teaching and learning social work. This article explores how social work educators can incorporate an understanding of the role of emotions in both the teaching and practice of social work. Attention is drawn toward evolutionary and…

Ikebuchi, Johnathan; Rasmussen, Brian Michael

2014-01-01

129

Assessing Emotion Regulation in Social Anxiety Disorder: The Emotion Regulation Interview  

Microsoft Academic Search

Social anxiety disorder (SAD) is thought to involve emotional hyper-reactivity and emotion dysregulation. However, the precise\\u000a nature of the emotion dysregulation in SAD has not been well characterized. In the present study, the Emotion Regulation Interview\\u000a (ERI) was developed to quantify the frequency and self-efficacy of five emotion regulation strategies specified by Gross’s\\u000a (Review of General Psychology 2: 271–299, 1998)

Kelly H. Werner; Philippe R. Goldin; Tali M. Ball; Richard G. Heimberg; James J. Gross

130

Parent-Child Interactions in Relation to Critical and Emotionally Overinvolved Expressed Emotion (EE): Is EE a Proxy for Behavior?  

Microsoft Academic Search

Expressed emotion measures, encompassing dimensions of criticism (CRIT), and emotional overinvolvement (EOI) are increasingly being used to assess the parent–child relationship in child clinical populations, despite the lack of studies assessing their validity. We examined the correspondence between CRIT, EOI, and parent–child interactions as observed by neutral coders in a sample of 252 clinic-referred children and adolescents, ages 7–17 years.

Carolyn A. McCarty; Anna S. Lau; Sylvia M. Valeri; John R. Weisz

2004-01-01

131

The Incredible Years Therapeutic Social and Emotional Skills Programme: A Pilot Study  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The Incredible Years (IY) universal child Classroom Dinosaur and Teacher Classroom Management programmes are delivered in all 102 primary schools in Gwynedd County, Wales. This article describes a pilot study of the IY Therapeutic (small group) Dinosaur School social and emotional coaching programme, developed as a treatment programme, in one such…

Hutchings, Judy; Bywater, Tracey; Gridley, Nicole; Whitaker, Christopher J.; Martin-Forbes, Pam; Gruffydd, Stella

2012-01-01

132

Differential Effects of Maternal Sensitivity to Infant Distress and Nondistress on Social-Emotional Functioning  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Associations between maternal sensitivity to infant distress and nondistress and infant social-emotional adjustment were examined in a subset of dyads from the NICHD Study of Early Child Care (N = 376). Mothers reported on infant temperament at 1 and 6 months postpartum, and maternal sensitivity to distress and nondistress were observed at 6…

Leerkes, Esther M.; Blankson, A. Nayena; O'Brien, Marion

2009-01-01

133

Maternal Depression and Child Internalizing: The Moderating Role of Child Emotion Regulation  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This study tests a model of children's emotion regulation (ER) as a moderator of the link between maternal depression and child internalizing problems. Participants were 78 children (ages 4 to 7), including 45 children of mothers with a history of childhood-onset depression (COD) and 33 children of mothers who had never been depressed. ER was…

Silk, Jennifer S.; Shaw, Daniel S.; Forbes, Erika E.; Lane, Tonya L.; Kovacs, Maria

2006-01-01

134

Gender differences in parent-child conversations about past emotions: A longitudinal investigation  

Microsoft Academic Search

In this longitudinal investigation, we examined the emotional content of 17 white middle-class parents' conversations about past events with their children at 40 and 70 months of age. Parents' use of emotion language did not differ depending upon parent gender, but strong differences were found in parents' use of emotion terms depending upon child gender. Parents' references to emotion were

Susan Adams; Janet Kuebli; Patricia A. Boyle; Robyn Fivush

1995-01-01

135

Emotion Talk: Helping Caregivers Facilitate Emotion Understanding and Emotion Regulation  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This article focuses on two aspects of emotional intelligence, emotion understanding and emotion regulation. These abilities are important because of their impact on social communication and the way in which they influence a child's access to knowledge. Caregivers who engage their children in emotion talk may strengthen the ability of their…

Brinton, Bonnie; Fujiki, Martin

2011-01-01

136

Reading, Social Development, and the Child.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Social development stresses the importance of working together with others in life. The home setting can emphasize social development and its objectives of instruction. How should parents assist the child in quality social development in which good human relations exist? First and foremost, parents should serve as models to children for good human…

Ediger, Marlow

137

Social Distress and Theorizations of Child Victimization.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Reviews the literature on child victimization as the manifestation of social distress, and evaluates major representative concepts of 9 paradigms identified from 46 theories, models, and perspectives. The following three stages in child victimization theories have occurred: (1) speculations (1960s); (2) introspective explorations (1970s); and (3)…

Tzeng, Oliver C. S.

1992-01-01

138

Narrative Structure and Emotional References in Parent-Child Reminiscing: Associations with Child Gender, Temperament, and the Quality of Parent-Child Interactions  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The present research examined child gender, temperament, and the quality of parent-child interactions as predictors of narrative style and references to emotion during mother-child and father-child reminiscing. Although models predicting parents' narrative styles were non-significant, results revealed significant interactions between parental…

Bost, Kelly K.; Choi, Eunsil; Wong, Maria S.

2010-01-01

139

The Importance of Emotions for the Effectiveness of Social Punishment  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper experimentally explores how the enforcement of cooperative behavior in a social dilemma is facilitated through institutional as well as emotional mechanisms. Recent studies emphasize the importance of negatively valued emotions, such as anger, which motivate individuals to punish free riders. However, these types of emotions also trigger retaliatory behavior by the punished individuals. This makes the enforcement of

Astrid Hopfensitz; Ernesto Reuben

2005-01-01

140

Emotions, Social Work Practice and Supervision: An Uneasy Alliance?  

PubMed Central

This paper examines the place of emotions within social work practice. The perceived tensions between emotions and rational decision making are explored and it is argued that their relationship is compatible and necessary. A model for the co-creation of emotionally intelligent supervision is developed to support this vision of practice. PMID:24764612

Ingram, Richard

2012-01-01

141

Social-Emotional Development of Infants and Young Children With Orofacial Clefts  

Microsoft Academic Search

Children with orofacial clefts are believed to have distinctly elevated risk for a variety of adverse social-emotional outcomes including behavior problems, poor self-concept, and parent-child rela- tionship difficulties. This assumption has been based primarily on theories of facial appearance and social bias, a handful of empirical studies, and clinical impressions. Studies of these children have been limited by methodological problems

Brent R. Collett; Matthew L. Speltz

142

Individual differences in emotion lateralisation and the processing of emotional information arising from social interactions.  

PubMed

Previous research examining the possible association between emotion lateralisation and social anxiety has found conflicting results. In this paper two studies are presented to assess two aspects related to different features of social anxiety: fear of negative evaluation (FNE) and emotion regulation. Lateralisation for the processing of facial emotion was measured using the chimeric faces test. Individuals with greater FNE were more strongly lateralised to the right hemisphere for the processing of anger, happiness and sadness; and, for the processing of fearful faces the relationship was found for females only. Emotion regulation strategies were reduced to two factors: positive strategies and negative strategies. For males, but not females, greater reported use of negative emotion strategies is associated with stronger right hemisphere lateralisation for processing negative emotions. The implications for further understanding the neuropsychological processing of emotion in individuals with social anxiety are discussed. PMID:24921427

Bourne, Victoria J; Watling, Dawn

2015-01-01

143

Father locus of control and child emotional and behavioral outcomes: a prospective study.  

PubMed

In a prospective longitudinal study the authors examined the associations between parent locus of control of reinforcement (LOCR), measured before the birth of a child, and behavioral-emotional outcomes in that child at age 7 years. A total of 307 couples completed questionnaires regarding their emotional status and LOCR at their first prenatal care appointment. When their children turned 7 years old, teachers completed questionnaires regarding each participating child's behavior. Findings indicate significant associations between fathers' prenatal LOCR and child outcomes, particularly hyperactivity in sons. Hyperactivity and behavioral-emotional problems in girls, in contrast, were better predicted by maternal prenatal emotional distress. Results provide evidence that paternal and maternal characteristics that predate the birth of a child relate to later behavioral outcomes in that child. Implications for prevention of child psychopathology are discussed. PMID:22428373

Tone, Erin B; Goodfellow, Stephanie; Nowicki, Stephen

2012-01-01

144

Social anxiety and interpretation biases for facial displays of emotion: Emotion detection and ratings of social cost  

Microsoft Academic Search

The current study assessed the processing of facial displays of emotion (Happy, Disgust, and Neutral) of varying emotional intensities in participants with high vs. low social anxiety. Use of facial expressions of varying intensities allowed for strong external validity and a fine-grained analysis of interpretation biases. Sensitivity to perceiving negative evaluation in faces (i.e., emotion detection) was assessed at both

Casey A. Schofield; Meredith E. Coles; Brandon E. Gibb

2007-01-01

145

How Are Trait Emotional Intelligence and Social Skills Related to Emotional and Behavioural Difficulties in Adolescents?  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Trait emotional intelligence construct shifted the interest in personality research to the investigation of the effect of global personality characteristics on behaviour. The Social and Emotional Learning (SEL) movement emphasised the cultivation of social skills for positive relationships. In this paper we investigate the role of students'…

Poulou, Maria S.

2014-01-01

146

Social Emotional Optimization Algorithm for Nonlinear Constrained Optimization Problems  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Nonlinear programming problem is one important branch in operational research, and has been successfully applied to various real-life problems. In this paper, a new approach called Social emotional optimization algorithm (SEOA) is used to solve this problem which is a new swarm intelligent technique by simulating the human behavior guided by emotion. Simulation results show that the social emotional optimization algorithm proposed in this paper is effective and efficiency for the nonlinear constrained programming problems.

Xu, Yuechun; Cui, Zhihua; Zeng, Jianchao

147

The Contributions of Teachers' Emotional Support to Children's Social Behaviors and Self-Regulatory Skills in First Grade  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The present observational study used hierarchical linear modeling to examine predictors of children's social and self-regulatory outcomes in first-grade classrooms. Specifically, goals were the following: (1) to explore relations between emotionally supportive teacher-child interactions and children's social behaviors (aggression with peers,…

Merritt, Eileen G.; Wanless, Shannon B.; Rimm-Kaufman, Sara E.; Cameron, Claire; Peugh, James L.

2012-01-01

148

Emotion Recognition in Fathers and Mothers at High-Risk for Child Physical Abuse  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Objective: The present study was designed to determine whether parents at high risk for physical child abuse, in comparison with parents at low risk, show deficits in emotion recognition, as well as to examine the moderator effect of gender and stress on the relationship between risk for physical child abuse and emotion recognition. Methods: Based…

Asla, Nagore; de Paul, Joaquin; Perez-Albeniz, Alicia

2011-01-01

149

Circle Time for Social and Emotional Learning in Primary School  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This paper discusses the findings and implications of a semi-randomised control trial study on the effectiveness of circle time (CT) on primary school students' social and emotional learning, as well as classroom teachers' and students' experience of CT. A social and emotional learning programme was delivered through CT by trained…

Cefai, Carmel; Ferrario, Erika; Cavioni, Valeria; Carter, Audrey; Grech, Tracy

2014-01-01

150

The Effect of Reappraising Social Exclusion on Emotional Distress  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The purpose of this investigation was to examine whether reappraisal, which is a strategy where the personal meaning of an event is reevaluated, would influence participants' emotional reactions to social exclusion feedback. It was expected that reappraising this event would reduce the emotional distress that accompanies social exclusion, but…

Kitchens, Michael B.; Gohm, Carol L.

2010-01-01

151

Improving Social and Emotional Skills through Cooperative Learning.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Noting that poor social and emotional skills can interfere with academic growth of elementary school students, this action research project examined the impact of an intervention to improve students' emotional and social skills. Participating in the study were students from one fifth-grade public school class, one fifth-grade class in a private…

Kennedy, Patricia L.; Linwick, Marla A.; Vercell, Julie A.

152

Enhancing Embodied Conversational Agents with Social and Emotional Capabilities  

E-print Network

Enhancing Embodied Conversational Agents with Social and Emotional Capabilities Bart van Straalen, Dirk Heylen, Mariët Theune, Anton Nijholt Human Media Interaction, University of Twente P.O. Box 217. Central in this research is the influence of emotional and social features on the selection

Theune, Mariët

153

Social-Emotional Assessment Practices in School Psychology  

Microsoft Academic Search

This study examined the social-emotional assessment practices of a random sample of school psychologists in the United States. For each assessment instrument, respondents indicated frequency of use, rationale for use, information gained, importance, and scoring system used. Results indicate that projective tests remain popular, are used primarily to generate hypotheses about social-emotional functioning, are viewed as important in the assessment

Mary Lynne Kennedy; David Faust; W. Grant Willis; Chris Piotrowski

1994-01-01

154

Exploring social and emotional aspects of giftedness in children  

Microsoft Academic Search

Parents of gifted children have few guidelines about how to deal with issues resulting from their children's giftedness. Not only intellectual, but also, social and emotional issues provide challenges for parents. Five social\\/emotional traits of giftedness (divergent thinking ability, excitability, sensitivity, perceptiveness and entelechy) are described, and the specific issues that parents must face to enable their children to reach

Deirdre V. Lovecky

1992-01-01

155

Models of Emotion Skills and Social Competence in the Head Start Classroom  

Microsoft Academic Search

Research Findings: Fostering the social competence of at-risk preschoolers would be facilitated by knowing which of children's emotion skills are most salient to social outcomes. We examined the emotion skills and social competence of 44 children enrolled in a Head Start program. Emotion skills were examined in terms of children's emotional lability and emotion regulation, whereas social competence was measured

Becky L. Spritz; Elisabeth Hollister Sandberg; Edward Maher; Ruth T. Zajdel

2010-01-01

156

Parents' Beliefs about Emotions and Children's Recognition of Parents' Emotions  

PubMed Central

This study investigated parents’ emotion-related beliefs, experience, and expression, and children’s recognition of their parents’ emotions with 40 parent-child dyads. Parents reported beliefs about danger and guidance of children’s emotions. While viewing emotion-eliciting film clips, parents self-reported their emotional experience and masking of emotion. Children and observers rated videos of parents watching emotion-eliciting film clips. Fathers reported more masking than mothers and their emotional expressions were more difficult for both observers and children to recognize compared with mothers’ emotional expressions. For fathers, but not mothers, showing clearer expressions was related to children’s general skill at recognizing emotional expressions. Parents who believe emotions are dangerous reported greater masking of emotional expression. Contrary to hypothesis, when parents strongly believe in guiding their child’s emotion socialization, children showed less accurate recognition of their parents’ emotions. PMID:20160992

Dunsmore, Julie C.; Her, Pa; Halberstadt, Amy G.; Perez-Rivera, Marie B.

2009-01-01

157

Educating Minds and Hearts: Social Emotional Learning and the Passage into Adolescence. Series on Social Emotional Learning.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Based on the view that social and emotional learning (SEL) needs to be an integral part of middle school education, this book provides an overview to social and emotional learning and the development of middle school students, presents a representative range of SEL programs and perspectives, and offers reflections on the current status of SEL and…

Cohen, Jonathan, Ed.

158

[Child neuropsychiatric perspectives can contribute to understanding of social disadvantage].  

PubMed

At least five per cent of the general population of children suffer from severe neuropsychiatric impairment. Autism spectrum disorders, ADHD/DAMP, Tourette's syndrome, and a variety of cognitive impairment/neurological syndromes with severe behavioral/emotional symptoms are included among the child neuropsychiatric disorders, the majority of which will lead to ongoing social and academic problems in adult life. Substantial numbers of those affected commit crimes in early adult life, and the incidence of the above-mentioned disorders is higher among young criminal offenders. Early diagnosis, educational, psychological, and, occasionally, medical therapies can affect outcome in a positive way. Child neuropsychiatric disorders should therefore be recognized at an early age so that attitudes can be changed from rejection to understanding, and a gloomy psychosocial outcome avoided. PMID:11374232

Gillberg, C

2001-04-25

159

Emotional Self-Regulation in Preschoolers: The Interplay of Child Approach Reactivity, Parenting, and Control Capacities  

Microsoft Academic Search

This study examined whether child temperamental approach reactivity moderated the association between 2 factors, parenting and child control capacities and child emotional self-regulation. Participants (N = 113) were 3- and 4-year-olds (M = 48 months, SD = 5.78) and their mothers. Emotional self-regulation was measured as observed persistence and frustration and as maternal report of compliance. Parental approach, avoidance, control,

Tracy Dennis

2006-01-01

160

Socialization of Emotion: Who Influences Whom and How?  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Emotion socialization begins within the family setting and extends outward as children transition into expanded social worlds. Children contribute to their socialization from the first years of life, so the dynamics between parents and children are reciprocal in nature. Because socialization influences are best inferred from patterns that unfold…

Zahn-Waxler, Carolyn

2010-01-01

161

Electrified emotions: Modulatory effects of transcranial direct stimulation on negative emotional reactions to social exclusion.  

PubMed

Social exclusion, ostracism, and rejection can be emotionally painful because they thwart the need to belong. Building on studies suggesting that the right ventrolateral prefrontal cortex (rVLPFC) is associated with regulation of negative emotions, the present experiment tests the hypothesis that decreasing the cortical excitability of the rVLPFC may increase negative emotional reactions to social exclusion. Specifically, we applied cathodal transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) over the rVLPFC and predicted an increment of negative emotional reactions to social exclusion. In Study 1, participants were either socially excluded or included, while cathodal tDCS or sham stimulation was applied over the rVLPFC. Cathodal stimulation of rVLPFC boosted the typical negative emotional reaction caused by social exclusion. No effects emerged from participants in the inclusion condition. To test the specificity of tDCS effects over rVLPFC, in Study 2, participants were socially excluded and received cathodal tDCS or sham stimulation over a control region (i.e., the right posterior parietal cortex). No effects of tDCS stimulation were found. Our results showed that the rVLPFC is specifically involved in emotion regulation and suggest that cathodal stimulation can increase negative emotional responses to social exclusion. PMID:25139575

Riva, Paolo; Romero Lauro, Leonor J; Vergallito, Alessandra; DeWall, C Nathan; Bushman, Brad J

2015-02-01

162

Acute ischemic cardiomyopathy after extreme emotional stress in a child.  

PubMed

Ischemic cardiomyopathy is rare in children. It is usually caused by congenital anomalies of coronary arteries, coronary anomalies after coronary artery transfer, or Kawasaki disease. In recent years, a new cardiac syndrome-named "Tako-Tsubo cardiomyopathy" for the particular shape of the end systolic ventricle-has been described in adults. In the absence of coronary artery obstruction, it mimics acute myocardial infarction with chest pain and typical electrocardiography changes. Emotional or physical stress usually precedes this cardiomyopathy. At present, this entity has only been described in adults, with a strong predominance in postmenopausal women. We report a case of acute ischemic cardiomyopathy after extreme stress in a child that may share the same pathophysiology. PMID:19740196

Bajolle, Fanny; Basquin, Adeline; Lucron, Hugues; Bonnet, Damien

2009-01-01

163

Faculty of Social and Behavioural Sciences Graduate School of Child Development and Education  

E-print Network

education, family support Developmental and rearing problems Forensic child and youth care sciences Learning and social-emotional disorders Research into education Micro-processes at school and learning Distal and proximal processes at school #12;www.studeren.uva.nl/ma-educational- sciences 4 #12;5 Two

van Rooij, Robert

164

What's Missing from No Child Left Behind? A Policy Analysis from a Social Work Perspective  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The No Child Left Behind Act of 2001 (NCLB) initiated sweeping changes to the U.S. educational system. However, many have argued that NCLB is not accomplishing its stated purposes of improving education for disadvantaged students and closing the achievement gap. This policy analysis sheds light on the social and emotional risk factors that prevent…

Lagana-Riordan, Christine; Aguilar, Jemel P.

2009-01-01

165

Emotional and Behavioral Problems Reported in Child Welfare over 3 Years  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Child welfare agencies are required to provide services that ensure that children receive adequate mental health care. This study provides a comprehensive view of the emotional and behavioral problems of children who are referred to child welfare services, using nationally representative data. Bivariate analyses compare rates by child

McCrae, Julie S.

2009-01-01

166

Child-Rearing Practices toward Children with Hemophilia: The Relative Importance of Clinical Characteristics and Parental Emotional Reactions.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Addresses the relative importance of clinical characteristics of the child and parental emotional reactions, to child-rearing practices towards children with hemophilia. Results indicate that mother's emotional reactions appear to have a stronger influence on child-rearing uncertainty and overprotection than clinical characteristics of the child.…

Banis, S.; Suurmeijer, Th. P. B. M.; van Peer, D. R.

1999-01-01

167

Child-to-parent violence: emotional and behavioral predictors.  

PubMed

Child-to-parent violence (CPV) includes acts committed by a child to intentionally cause physical, psychological, or financial pain to a parent. Available data indicate increasing rates of CPV in Spain, which have been attributed to a tendency toward more permissive parenting styles and changes in the power cycles within the families. The primary aim of this study was to assess the predictive role of some behavioral and emotional characteristics of adolescents who perpetrate CPV. A total of 1,072 adolescents (601 girls) filled out measures of CPV, proactive and reactive aggression, depressive symptoms, and substance abuse at Time 1, and measures of CPV 6 months later. The results showed that CPV was predicted by proactive, but not by reactive, aggression. This finding supports an instrumental role for CPV, which should be understood in the context of permissibility and lack of limits within the family. Depression and substance abuse also predicted the increase of CPV over time. Moreover, there were no sex differences in the prevalence of physical CPV, but verbal CPV was more predominant among girls. Although there were sex differences in some of the risk factors for CPV, the predictive model linking these risks to CPV was similar for boys and girls. Findings of this study suggest a psychological profile that combines internalizing problems and an instrumental use of violence in adolescents who perpetrate CPV. These characteristics are important for interventions. PMID:22935948

Calvete, Esther; Orue, Izaskun; Gámez-Guadix, Manuel

2013-03-01

168

Links between Maternal and Child Psychopathology Symptoms: Mediation through Child Emotion Regulation and Moderation through Maternal Behavior  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This study examined the intergenerational transmission of psychopathology symptoms with 7-12 year-old children (N = 97; 44 boys, 53 girls, M age = 9.14, SD = 1.38) and their mothers (M age = 38.46, SD = 6.86). Child emotion regulation mediated the links between maternal psychopathology and child internalizing and externalizing symptoms. In turn,…

Suveg, Cynthia; Shaffer, Anne; Morelen, Diana; Thomassin, Kristel

2011-01-01

169

Mother--Child and Father--Child Emotional Expressiveness in Mexican-American Families and Toddlers' Peer Interactions  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The present investigation explored the association of mother--child and father--child emotional expressiveness during toddlerhood to children's prosocial and aggressive behaviour with peers. Data were collected from 62 Mexican-American families with toddlers (29 females, 33 males) during a home visit. Children's peer interactions were also…

Lindsey, Eric W.; Caldera, Yvonne M.; Rivera, Mitzie

2013-01-01

170

The relationship between puberty and social emotion processing  

PubMed Central

The social brain undergoes developmental change during adolescence, and pubertal hormones are hypothesized to contribute to this development. We used fMRI to explore how pubertal indicators (salivary concentrations of testosterone, oestradiol and DHEA; pubertal stage; menarcheal status) relate to brain activity during a social emotion task. Forty-two females aged 11.1 to 13.7 years underwent fMRI scanning while reading scenarios pertaining either to social emotions, which require the representation of another person’s mental states, or to basic emotions, which do not. Pubertal stage and menarcheal status were used to assign girls to early or late puberty groups. Across the entire sample, the contrast between social versus basic emotion resulted in activity within the social brain network, including dorsomedial prefrontal cortex (DMPFC), the posterior superior temporal sulcus, and the anterior temporal cortex (ATC) in both hemispheres. Increased hormone levels (independent of age) were associated with higher left ATC activity during social emotion processing. More advanced age (independent of hormone levels) was associated with lower DMPFC activity during social emotion processing. Our results suggest functionally dissociable effects of pubertal hormones and age on the adolescent social brain. PMID:23106734

Goddings, Anne-Lise; Burnett Heyes, Stephanie; Bird, Geoffrey; Viner, Russell M; Blakemore, Sarah-Jayne

2012-01-01

171

Social competence and emotional\\/behavioural problems in children of psychiatric inpatients  

Microsoft Academic Search

The social competence and emotional\\/behavioural problems among 80 5–16-year-old children of 46 inpatients with various psychiatric\\u000a disorders were assessed by the parents using a Swedish version of the Child Behavior Checklist (CBCL). The ratings of these\\u000a children were compared to a normative sample of school children, but also whether type of psychiatric disorder among the parents\\u000a was related to psychosocial

B. Larsson; L. Knutsson-Medin; C. Sundelin; A. C. Trost von Werder

2000-01-01

172

The relation of parenting, child temperament, and attachment security in early childhood to social competence at school entry.  

PubMed

A wealth of research demonstrates the importance of early parent-child interactions on children's social functioning. However, less is known about the interrelations between child and parent characteristics and parent-child interactions in early childhood. Moreover, few studies have broadly examined the longitudinal relations between these constructs and social competence. This study is an examination of the relations between parent responsiveness, negativity, and emotional supportiveness, attachment security, and child temperament, and their impact on children's social competence from infancy to kindergarten entry. The sample was derived from the Early Childhood Longitudinal Study--Birth Cohort and included 6850 parent-child dyads. Observational and rating scale data were used. The proposed model was nearly fully supported by path analysis, and it provides insight into the complex relations between early parenting behaviors, child characteristics, and parent-child interactions in the development of social competence. PMID:24060065

Rispoli, Kristin M; McGoey, Kara E; Koziol, Natalie A; Schreiber, James B

2013-10-01

173

Bringing emotion to strategic issue diagnosis: contributions from emotion psychology and social psychology  

Microsoft Academic Search

Managers analyze their environment in order to diagnose strategic issues, events which may have an important impact on the organizational performance. But to date little has been said about the role of emotion in the process of strategic issue diagnosis (SID). Our paper focuses on how emotions and social identities can influence SID, which has been primarily discussed from a

Patricia Garcia-Prieto Sol; Véronique Tran; Susan Schneider

2009-01-01

174

Preschool Children's Emotional Expressions with Peers: The Roles of Gender and Emotion Socialization  

Microsoft Academic Search

This study examined whether mothers and fathers reported using different emotion socialization strategies and whether these differences were related to preschoolers' gender and emotional expressiveness during peer play. Ninety percent of the children were Caucasian, 6% were Asian-American, and 4% were Mexican-American. The positive expressive behavior of 82 preschoolers participating in two conflict eliciting situations with two same gender peers

Pamela W. Garner; Shannon Robertson; Gail Smith

1997-01-01

175

Social and emotional patterns in adulthood: support for socioemotional selectivity theory.  

PubMed

This investigation explored 2 hypotheses derived from socioemotional selectivity theory: (a) Selective reductions in social interaction begin in early adulthood and (b) emotional closeness to significant others increases rather than decreases in adulthood even when rate reductions occur. Transcribed interviews with 28 women and 22 men from the Child Guidance Study, conducted over 34 years, were reviewed and rated for frequency of interaction, satisfaction with the relationship, and degree of emotional closeness in 6 types of relationships. Interaction frequency with acquaintances and close friends declined from early adulthood on. Interaction frequency with spouses and siblings increased across the same time period and emotional closeness increased throughout adulthood in relationships with relatives and close friends. Findings suggest that individuals begin narrowing their range of social partners long before old age. PMID:1388852

Carstensen, L L

1992-09-01

176

Emotion regulation in context: the jealousy complex between young siblings and its relations with child and family characteristics.  

PubMed

Jealousy is a social emotion that has received little attention by developmental researchers. The current study examined sibling jealousy and its relations to child and family characteristics in 60 families with a 16-month-old toddler and an older preschool-age sibling. Sibling jealousy was elicited in social triads consisting of a parent (mother or father) and the two siblings. Positive marital relationship quality (i.e., love and relationship maintenance) was a particularly strong predictor of the older siblings' abilities to regulate jealousy reactions in the mother sessions. Younger siblings' jealous affect with mothers was linked to the child's temperament, whereas older siblings' jealous affect with mothers was related to the child's emotional understanding. Younger siblings displayed more behavioral dysregulation in the mother-sibling triads if there was greater sibling rivalry reported by mothers. Session order (i.e., which sibling was challenged first in the jealousy paradigm) had a strong effect on both the affect and behavioral dysregulation displayed by the older and younger siblings. Results are discussed with respect to the need for future research to consider social relationships as developmental contexts for young children's emotion regulation. PMID:11949910

Volling, Brenda L; McElwain, Nancy L; Miller, Alison L

2002-01-01

177

Emotional maltreatment.  

PubMed

Child abuse is a problem that affects the lives of many American children. The public is often bombarded with information regarding horrific cases of physical and sexual abuse. Emotional maltreatment, however, has been slow to achieve recognition as a serious social problem for a variety of reasons. Compared with physical or sexual abuse, emotional maltreatment is more difficult to identify and define, and good epidemiological data are not available. An erroneous perception also exists that the sequelae of emotional maltreatment are less severe than that of physical and/or sexual abuse. Prompt identification of emotional maltreatment, appropriate intervention and referral, and reporting of concerns to child protective services are essential to the health and well-being of the child. This article will define emotional maltreatment, discuss consequences of emotional maltreatment, and provide implications for pediatric nurse practitioner practice. PMID:23099310

Hornor, Gail

2012-01-01

178

Emotional but not physical maltreatment is independently related to psychopathology in subjects with various degrees of social anxiety: a web-based internet survey  

PubMed Central

Background Previous studies reported that social phobia is associated with a history of child maltreatment. However, most of these studies focused on physical and sexual maltreatment whilst little is known about the specific impact of emotional abuse and neglect on social anxiety. We examined the association between emotional maltreatment, including parental emotional maltreatment as well as emotional peer victimization, and social anxiety symptoms in subjects with various degrees of social anxiety. Methods The study was conducted as a web-based Internet survey of participants (N?=?995) who had social anxiety symptoms falling within the high range, and including many respondents who had scores in the clinical range. The assessment included measures of child maltreatment, emotional peer victimization, social anxiety symptoms and general psychopathology. Results Regression and mediation analyses revealed that parental emotional maltreatment and emotional peer victimization were independently related to social anxiety and mediated the impact of physical and sexual maltreatment. Subjects with a history of childhood emotional maltreatment showed higher rates of psychopathology than subjects with a history of physical maltreatment. Conclusions Although our findings are limited by the use of an Internet survey and retrospective self-report measures, data indicated that social anxiety symptoms are mainly predicted by emotional rather than physical or sexual types of victimization. PMID:22632167

2012-01-01

179

Trajectories of Parenting and Child Negative Emotionality During Infancy and Toddlerhood: A Longitudinal Analysis  

PubMed Central

The current longitudinal study examined trajectories of child negative emotionality, parenting efficacy, and overreactive parenting among 382 adoptive families during infancy and toddlerhood. Data were collected from adoptive parents when the children were 9, 18, and 27 months old. Latent growth curve modeling indicated age-related increases in child negative emotionality and overreactive parenting for adoptive fathers and adoptive mothers, and decreases in parent efficacy among adoptive mothers. Increases in child negative emotionality were also associated with increases in parent overreactivity and decreases in maternal efficacy. Mothers' and fathers' developmental patterns were linked within but not across parenting domains. Limitations and directions for future research are discussed. PMID:21883160

Lipscomb, Shannon Tierney; Leve, Leslie D.; Harold, Gordon T.; Neiderhiser, Jenae M.; Shaw, Daniel S.; Ge, Xiaojia; Reiss, David

2011-01-01

180

Parenting Style as a Context for Emotion Socialization  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Research Findings: The purpose of this study was to examine parenting style in the domain of emotion socialization through studying the relationships among parenting styles, emotion-related parental practices, and parental goals of Hong Kong-Chinese mothers. Data were collected from 189 Hong Kong-Chinese mothers of 6- to 8-year-old children. Hong…

Chan, Siu Mui; Bowes, Jennifer; Wyver, Shirley

2009-01-01

181

Bridging Emotion Research: From Biology to Social Structure  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Emotion research demonstrates that problems of theoretical interest or practical significance are not divided neatly along disciplinary boundaries. Researchers acknowledge both organic and social underpinnings of emotion, but the intersections between biological and structural processes can be difficult to negotiate. In this article, the authors…

Rogers, Kimberly B.; Kavanagh, Liam

2010-01-01

182

Emotion Responsivity, Social Cognition, and Functional Outcome in Schizophrenia  

E-print Network

Emotion Responsivity, Social Cognition, and Functional Outcome in Schizophrenia Jennifer R. Mathews been a defining feature in schizophrenia, but relatively little research has examined how emotion in schizophrenia. Participants were 40 outpatients with DSM-IV schizophrenia or schizoaffective disorder and 40

183

Future Interfaces: Social and Emotional Rosalind W. Picard  

E-print Network

for interface development, design, and testing. Keywords Media Equation, Social Interfaces, Affective Computing in the rich and complex emotional lives of people? What kinds of systems might we build, and how would-emotional communication between people and machines, and how close are we to obtaining these advances? This panel brings

184

Self-Conscious Emotions and Social Functioning  

Microsoft Academic Search

\\u000a Have you ever felt guilty about hurting a loved one, or been proud after achieving something that you always dreamed of? These\\u000a emotions, but also embarrassment, shame, and hubris, are called self-conscious emotions. They are a special kind of emotions\\u000a that cannot be described solely by examining facial movements (Darwin, 1872\\/1965) and that do not have clear, distinct elicitors\\u000a (Lewis,

Ilona E. de Hooge; Marcel Zeelenberg; Seger M. Breugelmans

2011-01-01

185

Predicting Postpartum Changes in Emotion and Behavior via Social Media  

E-print Network

Predicting Postpartum Changes in Emotion and Behavior via Social Media Munmun De Choudhury Scott}@microsoft.com ABSTRACT We consider social media as a promising tool for public health, focusing on the use of Twitter of postnatal data. The study is motivated by the opportunity to use social media to identify mothers at risk

Horvitz, Eric

186

Emotional and Social Issues in Children with Neuroblastoma  

MedlinePLUS

... alternative therapies for neuroblastoma Treatment of neuroblastoma by risk group Emotional and social issues in children with ... about neuroblastoma Previous Topic Treatment of neuroblastoma by risk group Next Topic More treatment information about neuroblastoma ...

187

Mothering Young Children: Child Care, Stress and Social Life  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This study focuses on mothers' and young children's everyday social experience by analyzing their social relationships, social support in child care, mother-child interaction, and mothers' evaluations of all these aspects. Three hundred and eighty-four mothers with a child aged between 1 and 3 years, living in a city in Central Italy, were…

Rullo, Giuseppina; Musatti, Tullia

2005-01-01

188

Social origins and implications of child labor.  

PubMed

Child labor continues to present a serious health threat to millions of children worldwide. Not all work is detrimental to children, and under carefully controlled conditions can benefit them in terms of physical and intellectual development as well as make positive contributions to their financial status. Unfortunately, most situations where children are used as a labor force are not designed with the health of the laborers as a primary concern. This article will review the current status of child labor, present theories regarding the social, cultural and economic bases of the practice, discuss its health implications and finally, explore possible solutions to this complex problem. PMID:24441409

Budd, P P; McIvor Joss, D

1998-01-01

189

Social reactions to the expression of emotion  

Microsoft Academic Search

Weeping has traditionally been seen as a sign of weakness, and laughter as a sign of health. In the current study, attitudes and reactions toward emotional expressions were evaluated in a laboratory setting. Subjects (n = 168) viewed a movie with a confederate who cried, laughed, or expressed no emotion; they then engaged in 3 minutes of videotaped interaction. Results

Susan M. Labott; Randall B. Martin; Patricia S. Eason; Elayne Y. Berkey

1991-01-01

190

Development of an experimental platform for child friendly emotional robot  

Microsoft Academic Search

It becomes to extend robot service domains to user friendly emotional services from simple passive services in the ubiquitous computing environment. In this paper, we present a development case of an experimental robot platform for the URC emotional model. The emotional robot platform is the thing which induces the intimate sense to children and contributes to the emotional stability of

Sangseung Kang; Jaehong Kim; Joochan Sohn; Hyunkyu Cho

2007-01-01

191

HIPPOCAMPAL CONTRIBUTIONS TO THE PROCESSING OF SOCIAL EMOTIONS  

PubMed Central

Inducing and experiencing emotions about others’ mental and physical circumstances is thought to involve self-relevant processing and personal memories of similar experiences. The hippocampus is important for self-referential processing during recall and prospection; however, its contributions during social emotions have not been systematically investigated. We use event-related averaging and Granger causal connectivity mapping to investigate hippocampal contributions during the processing of varieties of admiration and compassion pertaining to protagonists’ mental versus physical circumstances (admiration for virtue, AV, versus for skill; compassion for social/psychological pain, CSP, versus for physical pain). Data were collected using a multistep emotion induction paradigm that included psychosocial interviews, BOLD fMRI and simultaneous psychophysiological recording. Given that mnemonic demands were equivalent among conditions, we tested whether: (1) the hippocampi would be recruited more strongly and for a longer duration during the processing of AV and CSP; (2) connectivity between the hippocampi and cortical systems involved in visceral somatosensation/emotional feeling, social cognitive, and self-related processing would be more extensive during AV and CSP. Results elucidate the hippocampus’ facilitative role in inducing and sustaining appropriate emotional reactions, the importance of self-related processing during social emotions, and corroborate the conception that varieties of emotional processing pertaining to others’ mental and physical situations engage at least partially distinct neural mechanisms. PMID:22012639

Immordino-Yang, Mary Helen; Singh, Vanessa

2012-01-01

192

The effects of social capital and social pressure on the intention to have a second or third child in France, Germany, and Bulgaria, 2004–05  

Microsoft Academic Search

This study investigates the importance of the effect of an individual's web of informal relationships with family and peers on the intention to have a second or third child. Drawing on sociological theories of social capital (help with childcare, emotional support) and social pressure, the study extends existing research by evaluating cross-national differences (between France, Germany, and Bulgaria) in the

Nicoletta Balbo; Melinda Mills

2011-01-01

193

The Importance of Early Parenting in At-Risk Families and Children's Social-Emotional Adaptation to School  

PubMed Central

Objective To determine the specific aspects of early parenting in psychosocially at-risk families most strongly related to children’s social-emotional adaptation to school. Methods Cohort study of families (n=318) identified as at-risk for maltreatment of their newborns. Quality of early parenting was observed in the home when the child was one year old. Social-emotional adaptation to school was reported by teachers in first grade. Multivariable models assessed the independent influence of early parenting variables on social-emotional adaptation. Results Early parenting and social-emotional adaptation to school varied greatly across families. Parental warmth was associated with lower teacher ratings of shyness, concentration problems, and peer rejection. Parental lack of hostility was associated with decreased teacher ratings of concentration problems and peer rejection. Parental encouragement of developmental advance was associated with lower ratings of aggression and peer rejection. Provision of materials to promote learning and literacy was associated with lower ratings of concentration problems. Conclusions In this sample of families with multiple psychosocial risks for child maltreatment, specific aspects of early parenting were associated with better social-emotional adaptation to school in the first grade in theoretically predicted ways. Improving parental knowledge about positive parenting via anticipatory guidance should be a focus of well child visits. Well child visit-based interventions to improve the quality of early parenting especially among at-risk families should be studied for their impact on parenting behavior and on children’s successful social-emotional adaptation to school. Primary care providers should reinforce complementary services, such as home visiting, that seek to promote positive parenting. PMID:20816655

McFarlane, Elizabeth; Dodge, Rachel A. B.; Burrell, Lori; Crowne, Sarah; Cheng, Tina L.; Duggan, Anne K.

2010-01-01

194

Effects of Kindergarten Retention on Children's Social-Emotional Development: An Application of Propensity Score Method to Multivariate, Multilevel Data  

Microsoft Academic Search

This study examines the effects of kindergarten retention on children's social-emotional development in the early, middle, and late elementary years. Previous studies have generated mixed results partly due to some major methodological challenges, including selection bias, measurement error, and divergent perceptions of multiple respondents in different domains of child development. The authors address these challenges by using propensity score stratification

Guanglei Hong; Bing Yu

2008-01-01

195

Early Childhood Intervention and Early Adolescent Social and Emotional Competence: Second-Generation Evaluation Evidence from the Chicago Longitudinal Study  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Background: To explore whether social or emotional outcomes for high-risk early adolescent youth that attended an established preventive intervention called the Chicago Child-Parent Center Preschool Program (CPC) are moderated by individual, family and program variations. Purpose: Two questions are addressed: (1) Do the effects of CPC preschool…

Niles, Michael D.; Reynolds, Arthur J.; Roe-Sepowitz, Dominique

2008-01-01

196

It Takes Two: Sensitive Caregiving across Contexts and Children's Social, Emotional, and Academic Outcomes  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Research Findings: Using longitudinal survey data from the Welfare, Children, and Families Study: A Three-City Study ("n" = 135), this study examines how congruence in maternal and child care provider sensitivities contributes to young children's social, emotional, and academic outcomes among low-income minority families. Congruence…

Vesely, Colleen K.; Brown, Elizabeth Levine; Mahatmya, Duhita

2013-01-01

197

Influence of the social characteristics of both father and child on the tendency to report child abuse  

Microsoft Academic Search

To investigate factors involved in the decision to report a possible case of child abuse, 385 college students were exposed to 1 or 4 descriptions of the situation: (a) a socially attractive father with a socially attractive child, (b) a socially attractive father with a socially unattractive child, (c) a socially unattractive father with a socially attractive child, and (d)

Richard F. Jensen; Karen B. Nicholas

1984-01-01

198

[A shortened scale for overall, emotional and social loneliness].  

PubMed

Loneliness is an indicator of social well-being and pertains to the feeling of missing an intimate relationship (emotional loneliness) or missing a wider social network (social loneliness). The 11-item De Jong Gierveld scale has proved to be a valid and reliable measuring instrument for overall, emotional and social loneliness, although its length has sometimes rendered it difficult to use the scale in large surveys. In this study, we empirically tested a shortened version of the scale on data from two surveys (N=9448). Confirmatory factor analyses confirmed the specification of two latent factors. Congruent validity and the relationship with determinants (partner status, health) proved to be optimal. The 6-item De Jong Gierveld scale is a reliable and valid measuring instrument for overall, emotional and social loneliness, which is suitable for large surveys. PMID:18365511

de Jong Gierveld, J; van Tilburg, T

2008-02-01

199

The abused and neglected foster child: Determinants of emotional conflict and oppositional behavior  

Microsoft Academic Search

Behavioral and emotional problems have been observed in emotionally vulnerable children in foster care under certain circumstances. A common pattern involves the unpredictable appearance of a previously absent or unavailable natural parent. Such an occurrence precipitates the reawakening of the child's ambivalent feelings toward both natural and foster parents as well as their fears of abandonment. This frequently leads to

Beverly Greene; Daniel Pilowsky

1994-01-01

200

Interparental Discord and Child Adjustment: Prospective Investigations of Emotional Security as an Explanatory Mechanism  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Advancing the process-oriented study of links between interparental discord and child adjustment, 2 multimethod prospective tests of emotional security as an explanatory mechanism are reported. On the basis of community samples, with waves spaced 2 years apart, Study 1 (113 boys and 113 girls, ages 9-18) identified emotional security as a mediator…

Cummings, E. Mark; Schermerhorn, Alice C.; Davies, Patrick T.; Goeke-Morey, Marcie C.; Cummings, Jennifer S.

2006-01-01

201

Does a good fit matter? Exploring teaching styles, emotion regulation, and child anxiety in the classroom  

Microsoft Academic Search

The central goal of the present study was to examine how a child's emotion regulation ability may moderate the relations between teaching styles and anxiety in childhood. Participants were 33 children (21 males, 12 females; mean age 7.5 years, standard deviation = 0.42), their mothers and teachers. Children completed the Early Adolescent Temperament Questionnaire – Revised to assess their emotion

James M. LaBilloisa

2009-01-01

202

Relationships between Parent and Child Emotion Regulation Strategy Use: A Brief Report  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

We examined the direct relationships between parent and child emotion regulation (ER) strategy use during the transitionary and understudied developmental periods of middle childhood through to adolescence. Three hundred and seventy-nine participants aged between 9 and 19 years, completed the Emotion Regulation Questionnaire for Children and…

Bariola, Emily; Hughes, Elizabeth K.; Gullone, Eleonora

2012-01-01

203

A State Space Analysis of Emotion and Flexibility in Parent-Child Interactions  

Microsoft Academic Search

Negative emotion has been shown to reduce flexibility in cognition and behavior. We examined interpersonal flexibility during negative emotional episodes within parent-child interactions. Fifty-five mothers and early-adolescent daughters were observed during a positive discussion, a negative (conflict) discussion, and another positive discussion. Codes of moment-to-moment changes in emotion expression were used to create state space grids from which measures of

Tom Hollenstein; Marc D. Lewis

2006-01-01

204

Parent Emotion Representations and the Socialization of Emotion Regulation in the Family  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

There is considerable knowledge of parental socialization processes that directly and indirectly influence the development of children's emotion self-regulation, but little understanding of the specific beliefs and values that underlie parents' socialization approaches. This study examined multiple aspects of parents' self-reported…

Meyer, Sara; Raikes, H. Abigail; Virmani, Elita A.; Waters, Sara; Thompson, Ross A.

2014-01-01

205

Models of Emotion Skills and Social Competence in the Head Start Classroom  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Research Findings: Fostering the social competence of at-risk preschoolers would be facilitated by knowing which of children's emotion skills are most salient to social outcomes. We examined the emotion skills and social competence of 44 children enrolled in a Head Start program. Emotion skills were examined in terms of children's emotional

Spritz, Becky L.; Sandberg, Elisabeth Hollister; Maher, Edward; Zajdel, Ruth T.

2010-01-01

206

Building Emotional Literacy: Groundwork to Early Learning  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Part of social and emotional development is a child's emotional literacy. Numerous strategies exist for the development of children's emotional and social development, and for their emotional readiness for school. Teachers might arrange a classroom environment that is not overly structured or regimented. The environment should reflect who the…

Figueroa-Sanchez, Magali

2008-01-01

207

Child Care and Employed Parents of Children with Emotional or Behavioral Disorders  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Lack of appropriate child care is frequently reported by parents of children with disabilities as a major obstacle to finding and maintaining their employment. Care for children with emotional or behavioral disorders is particularly difficult to locate because child care providers often lack adequate training. Findings are presented from…

Rosenzweig, Julie M.; Brennan, Eileen M.; Huffstutter, Katherine; Bradley, Jennifer R.

2008-01-01

208

The link between child emotional and behavioral problems and couple functioning  

Microsoft Academic Search

Although considerable research has examined the relation of couple functioning to child emotional and behavioral problems, comparatively few studies have examined the impact of child functioning on couple well-being and even fewer have investigated recursive or bidirectional influences. We review this literature from both perspectives, and differentiate among studies targeting overall couple functioning and those differentiating specific components of couple

Nina Heinrichs; Anna-Luise Cronrath; Mirjana Degen; Douglas K. Snyder

2010-01-01

209

Parents’ Reflections on their Child's Experiences of Emotionally Abusive Coaching Practices  

Microsoft Academic Search

The purpose of this study was to explore parents’ reflections on their child's experiences of emotionally abusive coaching practices. Semi-structured interviews were conducted with 16 parents of retired elite athletes, and data were coded using open, axial, and selective coding techniques. Parents’ reflections indicated a process of accepting disconcerting coaching practices across their child's athletic career. Findings are interpreted to

Gretchen A. Kerr; Ashley E. Stirling

2012-01-01

210

The impact of early powered mobility on parental stress, negative emotions, and family social interactions.  

PubMed

Powered mobility has been found to have positive effects on young children with severe physical disabilities, but the impact on the family has been less well documented. We evaluated the impact of early powered mobility on parental stress, negative emotions, perceived social interactions, and parental satisfaction with wheelchair characteristics such as size and durability. The participants were parents of 23 children with disabilities-10 with orthopedic disabilities (average age 30.1 months) and 13 with cerebral palsy (average age 47.0 months). Pretest assessments were completed two times: at initial wheelchair evaluation and at wheelchair delivery. A posttest assessment was completed after each child had used the wheelchair for 4-6 months. Parents reported a lower perceived level of stress at the time of wheelchair delivery, although the magnitude of this effect was fairly small, standardized mean difference (?) = .27. They also reported an increased satisfaction with their child's social and play skills (? = .38), ability to go where desired (? = .86), sleep/wake pattern (? = .61), and belief that the general public accepts their child (? = .39) after several months using the wheelchair. Parents reported an increase in interactions within the family at the time of wheelchair delivery (? = .66). There was no decrease in negative emotions. Parents were satisfied with most factors relating to the wheelchair itself, with areas of concern being wheelchair size and difficulty adjusting the wheelchair. The findings suggest that self-initiated powered mobility for a young child had a positive impact on the family. PMID:21080784

Tefft, Donita; Guerette, Paula; Furumasu, Jan

2011-02-01

211

The Relationship between Puberty and Social Emotion Processing  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The social brain undergoes developmental change during adolescence, and pubertal hormones are hypothesized to contribute to this development. We used fMRI to explore how pubertal indicators (salivary concentrations of testosterone, oestradiol and DHEA; pubertal stage; menarcheal status) relate to brain activity during a social emotion task.…

Goddings, Anne-Lise; Burnett Heyes, Stephanie; Bird, Geoffrey; Viner, Russell M.; Blakemore, Sarah-Jayne

2012-01-01

212

Social Acceptability of Five Screening Instruments for Social, Emotional, and Behavioral Challenges  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Social, emotional, and behavioral (SEB) screening occurs in only two percent of our schools. This is unfortunate because universal screening is linked to prevention and early intervention with emotional and behavioral disorders (EBD) in children and youth, a population who continues to experience a plethora of poor outcomes. The social

Harrison, Judith R.; Vannest, Kimberly J.; Reynolds, Cecil R.

2013-01-01

213

Relation between emotional face memory and social anhedonia in schizophrenia  

PubMed Central

Background There is an interest in investigating the relation between emotional memory impairments in schizophrenia and specific symptom dimensions. We explored potential links between emotional memory and social anhedonia severity in patients with schizophrenia and in healthy individuals. Methods Twenty-nine patients with schizophrenia and 27 matched healthy individuals completed the Chapman Revised Social Anhedonia Scale and then performed an emotional face recognition memory task involving happy, sad and neutral face expressions. We calculated emotional memory performance using 2 independent measures: the discrimination accuracy index Pr and the response bias Br. We also measured valence ratings of the face stimuli. We performed correlation analyses using the inter-individual variability in social anhedonia severity and the individual score obtained for each memory performance variable and for each face valence rating condition. Results Patients with schizophrenia reported higher levels of social anhedonia compared with healthy individuals. They also showed lower recognition accuracy for faces compared with healthy participants. We found no significant correlation between social anhedonia severity and any of the memory performance variables for both patients with schizophrenia and healthy individuals. Regarding potential links between social anhedonia severity and face valence ratings, we found that individuals with elevated social anhedonia had a tendency to rate the face stimuli as more negative. Limitations Our negative finding may be partly explained by a lack of statistical power owing to our small patient sample. In addition, our patient sample had unusually high estimated IQ scores, which highlights potential issues regarding the generalization of our findings. Finally, we used a yes–no recognition memory task with a very short retention interval delay. Conclusion Our results suggest that social anhedonia is not directly linked to emotional memory deficits and biases and does not interfere with the modulatory effect of positively valenced emotion on memory. PMID:19270760

Harvey, Philippe-Olivier; Bodnar, Michael; Sergerie, Karine; Armony, Jorge; Lepage, Martin

2009-01-01

214

The embodiment of emotion: language use during the feeling of social emotions predicts cortical somatosensory activity  

PubMed Central

Complex social emotions involve both abstract cognitions and bodily sensations, and individuals may differ on their relative reliance on these. We hypothesized that individuals’ descriptions of their feelings during a semi-structured emotion induction interview would reveal two distinct psychological styles—a more abstract, cognitive style and a more body-based, affective style—and that these would be associated with somatosensory neural activity. We examined 28 participants’ open-ended verbal responses to admiration- and compassion-provoking narratives in an interview and BOLD activity to the same narratives during subsequent functional magnetic resonance imaging scanning. Consistent with hypotheses, individuals’ affective and cognitive word use were stable across emotion conditions, negatively correlated and unrelated to reported emotion strength in the scanner. Greater use of affective relative to cognitive words predicted more activation in SI, SII, middle anterior cingulate cortex and insula during emotion trials. The results suggest that individuals’ verbal descriptions of their feelings reflect differential recruitment of neural regions supporting physical body awareness. Although somatosensation has long been recognized as an important component of emotion processing, these results offer ‘proof of concept’ that individual differences in open-ended speech reflect different processing styles at the neurobiological level. This study also demonstrates SI involvement during social emotional experience. PMID:22798396

Saxbe, Darby E.; Yang, Xiao-Fei; Borofsky, Larissa A.

2013-01-01

215

The relation of parent-child interaction qualities to social skills in children with and without autism spectrum disorders.  

PubMed

This study examined associations between parent-child interactions and the development of social skills in 42 children (21 typically developing and 21 with autism spectrum disorders) between the ages of 3 years, 0 months and 6 years, 11 months. We expected that positive parent-child interaction qualities would be related to children's social skills and would mediate the negative relation between children's developmental status (typical development vs autism spectrum disorders) and social skills. Videotapes of parents and children during a 5-min wordless book task were coded for parent positive affect and emotional support as well as parent-child cohesiveness. Emotional support and cohesiveness were significantly related to children's social skills, such that higher emotional support and cohesiveness were associated with higher social skills, R (2) = .29, p = .02, and R (2) = .38, p = .002, respectively. Additionally, cohesiveness mediated the relation between children's developmental status and social skills. These findings suggest that parent emotional support and cohesiveness between parents and children positively influence children's social skills. Parent positive affect was unrelated to social skills. Implications of these findings for social skills interventions are discussed, particularly for young children with autism spectrum disorders. PMID:24072662

Haven, Erin L; Manangan, Christen N; Sparrow, Joanne K; Wilson, Beverly J

2014-04-01

216

Parenting Style as a Context for Emotion Socialization  

Microsoft Academic Search

Research Findings: The purpose of this study was to examine parenting style in the domain of emotion socialization through studying the relationships among parenting styles, emotion-related parental practices, and parental goals of Hong Kong–Chinese mothers. Data were collected from 189 Hong Kong–Chinese mothers of 6- to 8-year-old children. Hong Kong–Chinese mothers reported that among authoritarian, authoritative, and permissive parenting styles,

Siu Mui Chan; Jennifer Bowes; Shirley Wyver

2009-01-01

217

The Role of Communicating Social Emotions Accompanying Apologies in Forgiveness  

Microsoft Academic Search

Apologies are an effective strategy used by transgressors to restore relationships with an injured party. Apologies are often\\u000a motivated by emotions the transgressor feels in relation to the situation. We report the results of two studies that examined\\u000a how an injured person's knowledge that an apology was driven by one or more of the social emotions of guilt, shame, and

Shlomo Hareli; Zvi Eisikovits

2006-01-01

218

Preschool Teachers' Emotional Experience Traits, Awareness of Their Own Emotions, and Their Emotional Socialization Practices.  

E-print Network

??Emotions are composed of three interrelated sets of processes, which are (a) neurophysiologic and biochemical processes, (b) motor and behavioral expressive processes, and (c) cognitive-experiential… (more)

ERSAY, EBRU

2007-01-01

219

Effects of Empathic Paraphrasing - Extrinsic Emotion Regulation in Social Conflict  

PubMed Central

In the present study, we investigated the effects of empathic paraphrasing as an extrinsic emotion regulation technique in social conflict. We hypothesized that negative emotions elicited by social conflict can be regulated extrinsically in a conversation by a listener following the narrator’s perspective and verbally expressing cognitive empathy. Twenty participants were interviewed on an ongoing or recently self-experienced social conflict. The interviewer utilized 10 standardized open questions inviting participants to describe their perception of the conflict. After each of the 10 descriptions, the interviewer responded by either paraphrasing or taking notes (control condition). Valence ratings pertaining to the current emotional state were assessed during the interview along with psychophysiological and voice recordings. Participants reported feeling less negative after hearing the interviewer paraphrase what they had said. In addition, we found a lower sound intensity of participants’ voices when answering to questions following a paraphrase. At the physiological level, skin conductance response, as well as heart rate, were higher during paraphrasing than during taking notes, while blood volume pulse amplitude was lower during paraphrasing, indicating higher autonomic arousal. The results show that demonstrating cognitive empathy through paraphrasing can extrinsically regulate negative emotion on a short-term basis. Paraphrasing led to enhanced autonomic activation in recipients, while at the same time influencing emotional valence in the direction of feeling better. A possible explanation for these results is that being treated in an empathic manner may stimulate a more intense emotion processing helping to transform and resolve the conflict. PMID:23162516

Seehausen, Maria; Kazzer, Philipp; Bajbouj, Malek; Prehn, Kristin

2012-01-01

220

PERSONALITY AND SOCIAL PSYCHOLOGY BULLETIN Fossum, Barrett / EVALUATION IN EMOTION AND PERSONALITY  

E-print Network

PERSONALITY AND SOCIAL PSYCHOLOGY BULLETIN Fossum, Barrett / EVALUATION IN EMOTION AND PERSONALITY Distinguishing Evaluation From Description in the Personality-Emotion Relationship Thyra A. Fossum The Pennsylvania State University Lisa Feldman Barrett Boston College Personality characteristics and emotional

Barrett, Lisa Feldman

221

Links Among Italian Preschoolers' Socio-Emotional Competence, Teacher-Child Relationship Quality and Peer Acceptance  

PubMed Central

The purpose of the present study was to examine the relations of teacher-child relationship quality (close, conflictive, and dependent), children’s social behavior, and peer likability in a sample of Italian preschool-aged children (46 boys; 42 girls). Preschool teachers evaluated the quality of the teacher-child relationship and children’s social behaviors (i.e., social competence, anger-aggression, and anxiety-withdrawal). Peer-rated likability was measured using a sociometric procedure. Results indicated that conflictual teacher-child relationships were related to high aggressive behavior, and dependent teacher-child relationships were positively associated with children’s anxiety-withdrawal. Moreover, we found an indirect association between close teacher-child relationship quality and peer likability through children’s social competence. The findings provide evidence that the teacher-child relationship is critical for children’s social behaviors, and that social competence was uniquely related to peer likability. PMID:24039375

Sette, Stefania; Spinrad, Tracy; Baumgartner, Emma

2013-01-01

222

European American and African American Mothers' Emotion Socialization Practices Relate Differently to their Children's Academic and Social-Emotional Competence  

PubMed Central

The current study examines whether the relation between mothers’ responses to their children’s negative emotions and teachers’ reports of children’s academic performance and social-emotional competence are similar or different for European American and African American families. Two hundred mothers (137 European American, 63 African American) reported on their responses to their 5-year-old children’s negative emotions and 150 kindergarten teachers reported on these children’s current academic standing and skillfulness with peers. Problem-focused responses to children’s negative emotions, which have traditionally been considered a supportive response, were positively associated with children’s school competence for European American children, but expressive encouragement, another response considered supportive, was negatively associated with children’s competence for African American children. The findings highlight the need to examine parental socialization practices from a culturally-specific lens. PMID:23914076

Nelson, Jackie A.; Leerkes, Esther M.; Perry, Nicole B.; O'Brien, Marion; Calkins, Susan D.; Marcovitch, Stuart

2012-01-01

223

Differential subjective and psychophysiological responses to socially and nonsocially generated emotional stimuli.  

PubMed

Sociality may determine the subjective experience and physiological response to emotional stimuli. Film segments induced socially and nonsocially generated emotions. Comedy (social positive), bereavement (social negative), pizza scenes (nonsocial positive), and wounded bodies (nonsocial negative) elicited four distinct emotional patterns. Per subjective report, joy, sadness, appetite, and disgust were elicited by the targeted stimulus condition. The social/nonsocial dimension influenced which emotional valence(s) elicited a skin conductance response, a finding that could not be explained by differences in subjective arousal. Heart rate deceleration was more responsive to nonsocially generated emotions. Taken together, these findings suggest that sociality affects the physiological profile of responses to emotional valence. PMID:16637758

Britton, Jennifer C; Taylor, Stephan F; Berridge, Kent C; Mikels, Joseph A; Liberzon, I

2006-02-01

224

Frequent Social Comparisons and Destructive Emotions and Behaviors: The Dark Side of Social Comparisons  

Microsoft Academic Search

Social comparisons may seem to serve several positive functions, including self-enhancement. Frequent social comparisons, however, have a dark side. Two studies examined the relationship between frequent social comparisons and destructive emotions and behaviors. In Study 1, people who said they made frequent social comparisons were more likely to experience envy, guilt, regret, and defensiveness, and to lie, blame others, and

Judith B. White; Ellen J. Langer; Leeat Yariv; John C. Welch

2006-01-01

225

Testing a Social Ecological Model for Relations between Political Violence and Child Adjustment in Northern Ireland  

PubMed Central

Relations between political violence and child adjustment are matters of international concern. Past research demonstrates the significance of community, family and child psychological processes in child adjustment, supporting study of inter-relations between multiple social ecological factors and child adjustment in contexts of political violence. Testing a social ecological model, 300 mothers and their children (M= 12.28 years, SD = 1.77) from Catholic and Protestant working class neighborhoods in Belfast, Northern Ireland completed measures of community discord, family relations, and children’s regulatory processes (i.e., emotional security) and outcomes. Historical political violence in neighborhoods based on objective records (i.e., politically motivated deaths) were related to family members’ reports of current sectarian and non-sectarian antisocial behavior. Interparental conflict and parental monitoring and children’s emotional security about both the community and family contributed to explanatory pathways for relations between sectarian antisocial behavior in communities and children’s adjustment problems. The discussion evaluates support for social ecological models for relations between political violence and child adjustment and its implications for understanding relations in other parts of the world. PMID:20423550

Cummings, E. Mark; Merrilees, Christine E.; Schermerhorn, Alice C.; Goeke-Morey, Marcie C.; Shirlow, Peter; Cairns, Ed

2013-01-01

226

Don't Hide Your Happiness! Positive Emotion Dissociation, Social Connectedness, and Psychological Functioning  

E-print Network

Don't Hide Your Happiness! Positive Emotion Dissociation, Social Connectedness, and Psychological: positive emotion, social-functional, experience­behavior dissociation, psychological functioning, social emotions might lead to better psychological function- ing. From a social-functional perspective (Frijda

Gross, James J.

227

The Role of Social-Emotional Learning in Bullying Prevention Efforts  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This article examines how social emotional learning contributes to bullying prevention efforts in schools. Bullying behavior is impacted by multiple levels of the social-ecology of schools. Social emotional learning (SEL) is a structured way to improve a wide range of students' social and emotional competencies and impact bullying at the…

Smith, Brian H.; Low, Sabina

2013-01-01

228

Can Attribution of a Neutral Emotional State in Child Discipline Play an Adaptive Role in Child Internalising Behaviour?  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Maternal rates of child internalising behaviour were compared across children's emotion attributions (neutral, fear, anger, sadness and happiness) to others in a discipline situation, after controlling for socio-demographic covariates. Sixty-five Brazilian mothers provided socio-demographic information and rated their preschool children's…

Alvarenga, Patricia; de Oliveira, Ebenezer A.; Dazzani, Maria Virginia

2011-01-01

229

How Do I Feel about Feelings? Emotion Socialization in Families of Depressed and Healthy Adolescents  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Emotional and cognitive changes that occur during adolescence set the stage for the development of adaptive or maladaptive beliefs about emotions. Although research suggests that parents' behaviors and beliefs about emotions relate to children's emotional abilities, few studies have looked at parental socialization of children's emotions,…

Hunter, Erin C.; Katz, Lynn Fainsilber; Shortt, Joann Wu; Davis, Betsy; Leve, Craig; Allen, Nicholas B.; Sheeber, Lisa B.

2011-01-01

230

Parental and Peer Contributions to the Emotional Support Skills of the Child: From Whom Do Children Learn to Express Support?  

E-print Network

in emotional support skills become evident in early childhood, little is known about the social experiences that lead some children to become more skillful providers of emotional support than others. The present study assessed the influence of two socialization...

Burleson, Brant R.; Kunkel, Adrianne

2002-01-01

231

Social anxiety and romantic relationships: The costs and benefits of negative emotion expression are context-dependent  

Microsoft Academic Search

In general, expressing emotions is beneficial and withholding emotions has personal and social costs. Yet, to serve social functions there are situations when emotions are withheld strategically. We examined whether social anxiety influenced when and how emotion expressiveness influences interpersonal closeness in existing romantic relationships. For people with greater social anxiety, withholding the expression of negative emotions was proposed to

Todd B. Kashdan; Jeffrey R. Volkmann; William E. Breen; Susan Han

2007-01-01

232

Towards Greater Specificity in Identifying Associations Among Interparental Aggression, Child Emotional Reactivity to Conflict, and Child Problems  

PubMed Central

This study examined specific forms of emotional reactivity to conflict and temperamental emotionality as explanatory mechanisms in pathways among interparental aggression and child psychological problems. Participants of the multi-method, longitudinal study included 201 two-year-old children and their mothers who had experienced elevated violence in the home. Consistent with emotional security theory, autoregressive structural equation model analyses indicated that children’s fearful reactivity to conflict was the only consistent mediator in the associations among interparental aggression and their internalizing and externalizing symptoms one year later. Pathways remained significant across maternal and observer ratings of children’s symptoms and with the inclusion of other predictors and mediators, including children’s sad and angry forms of reactivity to conflict, temperamental emotionality, gender, and socioeconomic status. PMID:22716918

Davies, Patrick T.; Cicchetti, Dante; Martin, Meredith J.

2012-01-01

233

Emotion Socialization by Mothers and Fathers: Coherence among Behaviors and Associations with Parent Attitudes and Children's Social Competence  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This study examined inter-relations among different types of parental emotion socialization behaviors in 88 mothers and 76 fathers (co-residing with participating mothers) of eight-year-old children. Parents completed questionnaires assessing emotion socialization behaviors, emotion-related attitudes, and their children's social functioning. An…

Baker, Jason K.; Fenning, Rachel M.; Crnic, Keith A.

2011-01-01

234

Doll Play Narratives about Starting School in Children of Socially Anxious Mothers, and Their Relation to Subsequent Child School-Based Anxiety  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Child social anxiety is common, and predicts later emotional and academic impairment. Offspring of socially anxious mothers are at increased risk. It is important to establish whether individual vulnerability to disorder can be identified in young children. The responses of 4.5 year-old children of mothers with social phobia (N = 62) and…

Pass, Laura; Arteche, Adriane; Cooper, Peter; Creswell, Cathy; Murray, Lynne

2012-01-01

235

Emotion: Theoretical Investigations and Implications for Artificial Social Aggregates  

Microsoft Academic Search

\\u000a One of the most pressing issues in the social sciences and in distributed artificial intelligence research is the micro-macro\\u000a link that is the question of how individual action and social structure are interrelated. Besides others disciplines, sociological\\u000a research has identified emotion as being a possible key component in this link. Unfortunately, sociological theories in question\\u000a remain relatively basic, and do

Christian Von Scheve; Daniel Moldt

2002-01-01

236

How To Launch a Social and Emotional Learning Program.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Addresses attitudinal and logistical roadblocks to launching social and emotional learning programs. Debunks ideas that such programs are either faddish, ineffective, "New-Age," or detractions from academic learning. Stresses conceptual origins in the work of Daniel Goleman, Howard Gardner, and Robert Sylwester. Notes educators must work to…

Elias, Maurice J.; And Others

1997-01-01

237

Social Exchange and Emotional Investment in Work Groups  

Microsoft Academic Search

This study applied a social exchange perspective to examine three related aspects of work group behavior: individuals' assessment of the personal costs and rewards of group membership, the overall level of emotional investment in a group, and the external evaluation of group performance. Regression analyses of survey data from 28 ongoing student work groups (134 individuals) indicated that perceptions of

Richard Saavedra; Linn Van Dyne

1999-01-01

238

The Social and Emotional Development of Gifted Students  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This research monograph on the social and emotional development of gifted students' is divided into four parts. Part 1 of the report focuses on analysis of the literature. Parts 2-4 present results of seven qualitative and quantitative studies of adolescent development. In Part 2, Studies 1 and 2 expand Lazarus and Folkman's cognitive appraisal…

Callahan, Carolyn M.; Sowa, Claudia J.; May, Kathleen M.; Tomchin, Ellen Menaker; Plucker, Jonathan A.; Cunningham, Caroline M.; Taylor, Wesley

2004-01-01

239

Social Judgments and Emotion Attributions about Exclusion in Switzerland  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Adolescents' social judgments and emotion attributions about exclusion in three contexts, nationality, gender, and personality, were measured in a sample of 12- and 15-year-old Swiss and non-Swiss adolescents (N = 247). Overall, adolescents judged exclusion based on nationality as less acceptable than exclusion based on gender or personality.…

Malti, Tina; Killen, Melanie; Gasser, Luciano

2012-01-01

240

Social-Emotional Effects of Day Care. Final Project Report.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This study compared the effects of group day care, family day care, and full parental care on such aspects of children's social-emotional adjustment as curiosity, attachment, self-concept, sex role, achievement motivation, impulse control, cooperation, and sharing. Initial differences between groups were controlled by matching on race, sex, number…

Lippman, Marcia Z.; Grote, Barbara H.

241

Introducing Social Emotional Learning to Music Education Professional Development  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

There are more knowledge bases, skills, and dispositions that teachers need to have than can be covered in undergraduate music teacher education. One knowledge base that music teachers could benefit from, which is rarely covered in preservice teacher education, is social emotional learning (SEL) and techniques to implement it in their classrooms.…

Edgar, Scott N.

2013-01-01

242

Social-Emotional Characteristics and Special Educational Needs  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The aim of the research described in this article was the development of an instrument to measure social emotional characteristics and special educational and pedagogical needs of students in the last grade of primary education. Questionnaires were developed for teachers as well as for students. Exploratory factor analyses showed that the factors…

Meijer, Joost; Fossen, Miriam W. E. B.; van Putten, Cornelis M.; van der Leij, Aryan

2006-01-01

243

Responsible Behavior: The Importance of Social Cognition and Emotion  

Microsoft Academic Search

Traditionally, the development of responsible behavior has been a primary aim of American education. Responsible behavior entails self-motivation and self-guidance, and not obedience and compliance to rules merely in response to external supervision, rewards, and punishment. External factors certainly play a major role in responsible behavior, but so too do social cognition and emotion. The purpose of this article is

George G. Bear; Maureen A. Manning; Carroll E. Izard

2003-01-01

244

Executive Function and the Promotion of Social-Emotional Competence  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Executive function is understood as an umbrella term encompassing a number of interrelated sub-skills necessary for purposeful, goal-directed activity. Research suggests a vital role for executive function in children's social-emotional development. However, executive function is rarely considered in models of intervention programs that attempt to…

Riggs, Nathaniel R.; Jahromi, Laudan B.; Razza, Rachel P.; Dillworth-Bart, Janean E.; Mueller, Ulrich

2006-01-01

245

Social and Emotional Development of Gifted Children: Straight Talk  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This article discusses eight topics on the social and emotional development of gifted children. These issues bring to light some of the current thinking that can be helpful to parents, teachers, and counselors. Understanding what giftedness actually is and is not, how to identify it, moving from an entity model of giftedness to an incremental…

Cross, Tracy L.

2009-01-01

246

Giving Youth the Social and Emotional Skills to Succeed  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

In these days of tremendous political pressure for results measured by standardized tests, time constraints can make social and emotional learning (SEL) a difficult undertaking for many classroom teachers. It seemed that after-school programs would be effective learning environments for supplying the missing piece in children's education. In this…

Deerin, Ginny

2005-01-01

247

Social and Emotional Impacts of Farmwork Injuries: An Exploratory Study  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Context: The physical hazards of farming have been extensively studied and reported upon. Far less studied are the social and emotional impacts of farmwork injuries and deaths. Purpose: To investigate and document broad but targeted issues regarding the impact on individuals, families, and communities of farmwork injuries and fatalities of farmer…

Robertson, S. M.; Murphy, Dennis J.; Davis, Lisa A.

2006-01-01

248

Deaf College Students' Perceptions of Their Social-Emotional Adjustment  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This study examined differences between deaf and hearing students' perceptions of their social emotional adjustment as they transition to college. The 16PF-Adolescent Personality Questionnaire Life Difficulties Scale was completed by 205 deaf students and 185 hearing students. A multivariate analyses of variance and subsequent univariate tests…

Lukomski, Jennifer

2007-01-01

249

Strategies for Teaching Social and Emotional Intelligence in Business Communication  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Incorporating social and emotional skills (EI) training into the business communication curriculum is important for preparing students to function effectively in a global workplace with its complex informal networks, intercultural issues, team emphasis, and participatory leadership. EI skills enhance communication behavior in work groups and…

Sigmar, Lucia Stretcher; Hynes, Geraldine E.; Hill, Kathy L.

2012-01-01

250

Social-Emotional Learning Is Essential to Classroom Management  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Research tells us that children's social-emotional development can propel learning. A new program, SECURe, embeds that research into classroom management strategies that improve teaching and learning. Across all classrooms and grade levels, four principles of effective management are constant: Effective classroom management is based in…

Jones, Stephanie M.; Bailey, Rebecca; Jacob, Robin

2014-01-01

251

ADULT HOUSEHOLD SMOKING IS ASSOCIATED WITH INCREASED CHILD EMOTIONAL AND BEHAVIORAL PROBLEMS  

PubMed Central

Context While maternal smoking has been associated with child emotional and behavioral problems, to our knowledge, no study has evaluated the association between overall household smoking and such problems. Objectives To investigate whether children who live with smokers are more likely than children who do not live with smokers to have emotional or behavioral problems and to explore this association in households with non-smoking mothers. Design, Setting, and Participants Nationally representative data from the 2000–2004 Medical Expenditure Panel Surveys, involving 30,668 children aged 5–17 years, were utilized. Associations between child emotional or behavioral problems and household smoking, and child, maternal and family characteristics, were examined. SUDAAN software was used to adjust for complex sampling design. Main Outcome Measures Overall score on the Columbia Impairment Scale (CIS), a 13 item parent-report measure of child emotional or behavioral functioning (range, 0–52, ?16 indicates a child with such problems). Results Children in smoking vs. non-smoking households were significantly more likely to have behavioral problems (17.39% vs 9.29%, P<0.001). After adjusting for all covariates, male sex, older age of child, younger age of mother, unmarried mother, maternal depression, below average maternal physical and mental health, each were independently associated with increased likelihood of emotional and behavioral problems, as was the presence of one or more adult smokers in the household (Adjusted OR 1.42; 95% CI:1.26–1.60). The odds of CIS?16 increased with increasing number of smokers in the household, even among children whose mothers did not smoke. Conclusion Children living with smokers are at increased risk for emotional or behavioral problems, and rates of such problems increase with increasing numbers of smokers in the household, even in the absence of maternal smoking. PMID:20110826

Salvo, Elizabeth Poole-Di; Liu, Ying-Hua; Brenner, Samantha; Weitzman, Michael

2010-01-01

252

Randomized Social Policy Experiments and Research on Child Development  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Randomized social policy experiments (SPEs) are an important methodology for investigating topics in child development. This article provides a framework for understanding how evidence from SPEs can add to knowledge about child development. The use of SPEs for child development questions to date is summarized and lessons from the applied economics…

Romich, Jennifer L.

2006-01-01

253

A Preschool Pilot Study of Connecting with Others: Lessons for Teaching Social and Emotional Competence  

Microsoft Academic Search

Social-emotional learning in early childhood sets the stage for students’ future behaviors in schools. The current study examined\\u000a the effects of a social-emotional skills curriculum on the behavior of students in an early childhood program. The children\\u000a received instruction in social and emotional skills using the Connecting with Others: Lessons for Teaching Social and Emotional Competence program. Pre-test and post-test

Betsy L. Schultz; Rita Coombs Richardson; Catherine R. Barber; Daryl Wilcox

2011-01-01

254

Social and emotional impact of diabetic retinopathy: a review.  

PubMed

People with vision-threatening diabetic retinopathy are likely to experience enhanced social and emotional strain. Critically, those with both vision-threatening diabetic retinopathy and psychosocial problems may have significantly reduced levels of functioning compared with psychologically healthy counterparts. This can cause inadequate compliance, increased strain on family functioning, worse diabetes control, increased progression of diabetic retinopathy and, consequently, further psychosocial stress resulting in a number of concerning implications for disease management, clinical outcomes and healthcare costs. However, the emotional and social health consequences of diabetic retinopathy have not yet been systematically explored. This information is crucial as it allows for a targeted approach to treatment and prevention and avoidance of the potentially detrimental implications described above. Therefore, this paper reviews the current qualitative and quantitative evidence regarding the social and emotional impact of diabetic retinopathy and identifies directions for future research. Key search terms were applied to the electronic databases Pubmed, ISI Web of Science and Embase and the bibliographies of relevant papers were systematically reviewed for additional references. Overall, the evidence suggests that diabetic retinopathy and associated vision loss have several debilitating effects, including disruption of family functioning, relationships and roles; increased social isolation and dependence; and deterioration of work prospects resulting in increased financial strain. Adverse emotional responses include fear, anxiety, vulnerability, guilt, loss of confidence, anger, stress and self-perception issues. However, the research to date is largely qualitative in nature, with most quantitative studies being small, cross-sectional and somewhat outdated. Similarly, the outcome measures used in many studies to date are suboptimal in terms of content and validity. Therefore, this review identifies the need for improved outcome measures to provide valid, meaningful measurement of the social and emotional impact of diabetic retinopathy and discusses potential directions for future research such as item banking and computer adaptive testing. PMID:21575125

Fenwick, Eva; Rees, Gwyn; Pesudovs, Konrad; Dirani, Mohamed; Kawasaki, Ryo; Wong, Tien Y; Lamoureux, Ecosse

2012-01-01

255

Social Networking Web Sites: Teaching Appropriate Social Competence to Students with Emotional and Behavioral Disorders  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The Internet has opened a variety of different avenues for people to interact with each other. As new digital environments are developed, new sets of social skills are needed to appropriately interact. Students with emotional and behavioral disorders often have deficits in social competence and require specialized training in specific social

Morgan, Joseph J.

2010-01-01

256

Expressing Emotions with the Social Robot Probo  

Microsoft Academic Search

Probo is a huggable animal-like robot, designed to act as a social interface. It will be used as a platform to study human\\u000a robot interaction (HRI) while employing human-like social cues and communication modalities. The robot has a fully actuated\\u000a head, with 20 degrees of freedom, capable of showing facial expressions and making eye-contact. The basic facial expressions\\u000a are represented

Jelle Saldien; Kristof Goris; Bram Vanderborght; Johan Vanderfaeillie; Dirk Lefeber

2010-01-01

257

Introducing Emotions into the Computational Study of Social Norms: A First Evaluation  

Microsoft Academic Search

Abstract We argue that modelling emotions among agents in artificial societies will further the computational study of social norms The appraisal theory of emotions is presented as theoretical underpinning of Jon Elster's view that social norms are sustained not only by material sanctions but also by emotions such as shame and contempt theory suggests the following twofold relationship between social

Alexander Staller; Paolo Petta

2001-01-01

258

Social Cognition in Schizophrenic Patients: The Effect of Semantic Content and Emotional Prosody in the Comprehension of Emotional Discourse  

PubMed Central

Background: The recognition of the emotion expressed during conversation relies on the integration of both semantic processing and decoding of emotional prosody. The integration of both types of elements is necessary for social interaction. No study has investigated how these processes are impaired in patients with schizophrenia during the comprehension of an emotional speech. Since patients with schizophrenia have difficulty in daily interactions, it would be of great interest to investigate how these processes are impaired. We tested the hypothesis that patients present lesser performances regarding both semantic and emotional prosodic processes during emotional speech comprehension compared with healthy participants. Methods: The paradigm is based on sentences built with emotional (anger, happiness, or sadness) semantic content uttered with or without congruent emotional prosody. The study participants had to decide with which of the emotional categories each sentence corresponded. Results: Patients performed significantly worse than their matched controls, even in the presence of emotional prosody, showing that their ability to understand emotional semantic content was impaired. Although prosody improved performances in both groups, it benefited the patients more than the controls. Conclusion: Patients exhibited both impaired semantic and emotional prosodic comprehensions. However, they took greater advantage of emotional prosody adjunction than healthy participants. Consequently, focusing on emotional prosody during carrying may improve social communication. PMID:25309458

Brazo, Perrine; Beaucousin, Virginie; Lecardeur, Laurent; Razafimandimby, Annick; Dollfus, Sonia

2014-01-01

259

ChildCare Quality and Children's Social Development  

Microsoft Academic Search

This study examined the influence on children's social development of variation in the quality of their child-care environments. The sample consisted of 166 children attending representative child-care centers that varied widely in quality. Possible relations associated with age, child-care experience, and family background were controlled using hierarchical multiple regression. Both global estimates of child-care quality and specific program features, such

Deborah Phillips; Kathleen McCartney; Sandra Scarr

1987-01-01

260

Caring Classrooms/Intelligent Schools: The Social Emotional Education of Young Children. Series on Social Emotional Learning.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This book synthesizes current thinking about effective social and emotional education of young elementary school children. The book's chapters, by leading national experts, describe the range of programs and perspectives that can be used in elementary schools, focusing on concrete strategies and curricular-based programs that can be integrated…

Cohen, Jonathan, Ed.

261

How Social and Emotional Development Add Up: Getting Results in Math and Science Education. Series on Social Emotional Learning.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This book is for math and science teachers who are eager to find creative and stimulating ways to engage student interest and boost their academic performance. A group of contributors including both psychologists and teachers outline the principles of social emotional learning (SEL) that educators can follow to help all students achieve in the…

Haynes, Norris M., Ed.; Ben-Avie, Michael, Ed.; Ensign, Jacque, Ed.

262

Maternal and Child Expressed Emotion as Predictors of Treatment Response in Pediatric Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder  

PubMed Central

Expressed emotion (EE) is associated with symptoms and treatment outcome in various disorders. Few studies have examined EE in pediatric OCD and none of these has assessed the child’s perspective. This study examined the relationship among maternal and child EE, child OCD severity, and OCD-related functioning pre- and post-treatment. At pre-treatment, mothers completed speech samples about the child with OCD and an unaffected sibling. Children with OCD completed speech samples about parents. There were low rates of high maternal EE (child with OCD: 16.1%; sibling: 2.6%) and high child EE about parents (mothers: 11.9%; fathers: 10.2%). High EE was primarily characterized by high criticism, not high overinvolvement. High maternal EE and child EE regarding fathers were associated with pre-treatment child OCD severity but not post-treatment severity. High child and maternal EE were predictive of post-treatment OCD-related functioning. EE may be an important child and maternal trait associated with pre-treatment OCD severity and generalization of treatment gains. PMID:22090186

Zoellner, Lori A.; Franklin, Martin E.; Garcia, Abbe; Freeman, Jennifer; March, John S.; Foa, Edna B.

2011-01-01

263

20 CFR 229.56 - Reduction for child's social security benefit.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

... Reduction for child's social security benefit. 229.56 Section 229... Reduction for child's social security benefit. A child's benefit...zero, by the amount of any social security benefit being paid to the...

2010-04-01

264

The Role of Child Emotionality in Child Behavior and Maternal Instruction on Planning Tasks  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This study explored the relation of children's emotional functioning to children's behavior during individual planning and mother's and children's behaviors during joint planning. Participants were 118 mothers and their second-grade children. Mothers rated children on their emotional intensity and children rated themselves on their use of emotion

Perez, Susan M.; Gauvain, Mary

2005-01-01

265

Mother-child talk about past emotions: Relations of maternal language and child gender over time  

Microsoft Academic Search

Emotional understanding and expression is largely constructed in sociocul-tural contexts; thus examination of the ways in which parents talk about emotions with their young children is critical for understanding emotional socialisation. In this longitudinal research, 18 white, middle-class mothers and their preschool children discussed salient past events when the children were 40, 58, and 70 months of age. Analyses revealed

Janet Kuebli; Susan Butler; Robyn Fivush

1995-01-01

266

Flow of Emotional Messages in Artificial Social Networks  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Models of message flows in an artificial group of users communicating via the Internet are introduced and investigated using numerical simulations. We assumed that messages possess an emotional character with a positive valence and that the willingness to send the next affective message to a given person increases with the number of messages received from this person. As a result, the weights of links between group members evolve over time. Memory effects are introduced, taking into account that the preferential selection of message receivers depends on the communication intensity during the recent period only. We also model the phenomenon of secondary social sharing when the reception of an emotional e-mail triggers the distribution of several emotional e-mails to other people.

Chmiel, Anna; Ho?yst, Janusz A.

267

Mother's home healthcare: emotion work when a child has cancer.  

PubMed

Home healthcare work, involving physical labor, nursing care, medical monitoring, administrative, planning and accounting, advocacy and emotion work, is unpaid and largely invisible. This article, based on focus group interviews with mothers whose children have had cancer, describes one part of their home healthcare labor, their emotion work. Specifically, it examines how mothers: manage the moral imperatives of mothering; think about and try to manage the strong feelings, particularly of fear and uncertainty that they often have when their children are ill with cancer; work to understand and maintain their marital relationships; the strategies that seemed to help; and finally, the self-transformation that many mothers experience. The article concludes with a discussion of the substantive, theoretical, research, and policy implications of emotion work in the provision of home healthcare work. PMID:16557122

Clarke, Juanne N

2006-01-01

268

Evidence That Emotion Mediates Social Attention in Rhesus Macaques  

PubMed Central

Background Recent work on non-human primates indicates that the allocation of social attention is mediated by characteristics of the attending animal, such as social status and genotype, as well as by the value of the target to which attention is directed. Studies of humans indicate that an individual’s emotion state also plays a crucial role in mediating their social attention; for example, individuals look for longer towards aggressive faces when they are feeling more anxious, and this bias leads to increased negative arousal and distraction from other ongoing tasks. To our knowledge, no studies have tested for an effect of emotion state on allocation of social attention in any non-human species. Methodology We presented captive adult male rhesus macaques with pairs of adult male conspecific face images - one with an aggressive expression, one with a neutral expression - and recorded gaze towards these images. Each animal was tested twice, once during a putatively stressful condition (i.e. following a veterinary health check), and once during a neutral (or potentially positive) condition (i.e. a period of environmental enrichment). Initial analyses revealed that behavioural indicators of anxiety and stress were significantly higher after the health check than during enrichment, indicating that the former caused a negative shift in emotional state. Principle Findings The macaques showed initial vigilance for aggressive faces across both conditions, but subsequent responses differed between conditions. Following the health check, initial vigilance was followed by rapid and sustained avoidance of aggressive faces. By contrast, during the period of enrichment, the macaques showed sustained attention towards the same aggressive faces. Conclusions/Significance These data provide, to our knowledge, the first evidence that shifts in emotion state mediate social attention towards and away from facial cues of emotion in a non-human animal. This work provides novel insights into the evolution of emotion-attention interactions in humans, and mechanisms of social behaviour in non-human primates, and may have important implications for understanding animal psychological wellbeing. PMID:22952968

Bethell, Emily J.; Holmes, Amanda; MacLarnon, Ann; Semple, Stuart

2012-01-01

269

“When I have a Bad Dream, Mommy Holds Me”: Preschoolers’ Conceptions of Emotions, Parental Socialisation, and Emotional Competence  

Microsoft Academic Search

Described preschoolers’ conceptions of the consequences of their own emotions within the family demonstrated the linkage between this aspect of social cognition and emotional competence with peers, and examined contributions of parental emotion to both child variables. A total of 77 4- and 5-year-olds enacted dollhouse vignettes depicting consequences of their emotions. Parents completed questionnaires on negative emotion and sharing

Susanne A. Denham

1997-01-01

270

Parent-Child Relationships, Partner Relationships, and Emotional Adjustment: A Birth-to-Maturity Prospective Study  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This study examined whether detrimental childhood relationships with parents were related to partner relationship quality and emotional adjustment in adulthood. The authors tested a theoretical model in which (a) low-quality parent-child relationships were related to conflict and low-quality communication with parents in adolescence, (b)…

Overbeek, Geertjan; Stattin, Hakan; Vermulst, Ad; Ha, Thao; Engels, Rutger C. M. E.

2007-01-01

271

Shyness, Teacher-Child Relationships, and Socio-Emotional Adjustment in Grade 1  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The goal of the present study was to explore the moderating role of teacher-child relationships in the relation between shyness and socio-emotional adjustment in early elementary school. Participants were n = 169 grade 1 children (M[subscript age] = 76.93 mos, SD = 3.86). Shortly after the start of the school year (September), parents completed an…

Arbeau, Kimberley A.; Coplan, Robert J.; Weeks, Murray

2010-01-01

272

The generational transmission of socioeconomic inequalities in child cognitive development and emotional health  

Microsoft Academic Search

Socioeconomic inequalities in the health of adults have been largely attributed to lifestyle inequalities. The cognitive development (CD) and emotional health (EH) of the child provides a basis for many of the health-related behaviours which are observed in adulthood. There has been relatively little attention paid to the way CD and EH are transmitted in the foetal and childhood periods,

Jake M. Najman; Rosemary Aird; William Bor; Michael O’Callaghan; Gail M. Williams; Gregory J. Shuttlewood

2004-01-01

273

Emotional Abuse: The Work of a Multidisciplinary Consultation Group in a Child Psychiatric Service  

Microsoft Academic Search

The identification, assessment and treatment of emotional abuse demands a multi- disciplinary approach due to the complexity and multifactoral nature of the task in hand. Child psychiatry services have an important part to play. Common themes emerging in our work are outlined, illustrated with case material, which have furthered our understanding of damaging family interactional patterns and the psychological effect

Sylvia Boulton; Debbie Hindle

2000-01-01

274

Processes and outcomes of story-based and skill-based social competency programs for children with emotional disabilities  

Microsoft Academic Search

This study compared process and outcome variables in STORIES [J. Sch. Psychol. 39 (2001) 71] and Skillstreaming [McGinnis, E., Goldstein, A.P. (1997). Skillstreaming the elementary school child. Champaign, IL: Research Press], two distinct types of social competency programs, conducted in small groups with elementary school children (2nd–6th grades) identified with emotional disabilities (ED). Process variables included group leader ratings of

Stephanie A Rahill; Hedwig Teglasi

2003-01-01

275

Emotions promote social interaction by synchronizing brain activity across individuals.  

PubMed

Sharing others' emotional states may facilitate understanding their intentions and actions. Here we show that networks of brain areas "tick together" in participants who are viewing similar emotional events in a movie. Participants' brain activity was measured with functional MRI while they watched movies depicting unpleasant, neutral, and pleasant emotions. After scanning, participants watched the movies again and continuously rated their experience of pleasantness-unpleasantness (i.e., valence) and of arousal-calmness. Pearson's correlation coefficient was used to derive multisubject voxelwise similarity measures [intersubject correlations (ISCs)] of functional MRI data. Valence and arousal time series were used to predict the moment-to-moment ISCs computed using a 17-s moving average. During movie viewing, participants' brain activity was synchronized in lower- and higher-order sensory areas and in corticolimbic emotion circuits. Negative valence was associated with increased ISC in the emotion-processing network (thalamus, ventral striatum, insula) and in the default-mode network (precuneus, temporoparietal junction, medial prefrontal cortex, posterior superior temporal sulcus). High arousal was associated with increased ISC in the somatosensory cortices and visual and dorsal attention networks comprising the visual cortex, bilateral intraparietal sulci, and frontal eye fields. Seed-voxel-based correlation analysis confirmed that these sets of regions constitute dissociable, functional networks. We propose that negative valence synchronizes individuals' brain areas supporting emotional sensations and understanding of another's actions, whereas high arousal directs individuals' attention to similar features of the environment. By enhancing the synchrony of brain activity across individuals, emotions may promote social interaction and facilitate interpersonal understanding. PMID:22623534

Nummenmaa, Lauri; Glerean, Enrico; Viinikainen, Mikko; Jääskeläinen, Iiro P; Hari, Riitta; Sams, Mikko

2012-06-12

276

Emotion regulation difficulties, low social support, and interpersonal violence mediate the link between childhood abuse and posttraumatic stress symptoms.  

PubMed

We examined how difficulties with emotion regulation, social support, and interpersonal violence in adult relationships mediated the relationship between childhood abuse and post traumatic symptoms (PTS) in adults. We fit a multiple mediation model to data from 139 socio-economically disadvantaged women (85% African American) of whom 44% endorsed moderate to severe levels of childhood physical, sexual, or emotional abuse and 12% screened positive for probable posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD). The model accounted for 63% of the variance in adult PTS symptoms. Child abuse exerted a direct effect on PTS symptoms and indirect effects through difficulties with emotion regulation, lower social support, and greater exposure to adult interpersonal violence. Implications of findings for the treatment of individuals at high risk of having experienced childhood abuse and PTS are discussed. PMID:23312434

Stevens, Natalie R; Gerhart, James; Goldsmith, Rachel E; Heath, Nicole M; Chesney, Samantha A; Hobfoll, Stevan E

2013-03-01

277

The Reformulation of Emotional Security Theory: The Role of Children's Social Defense in Developmental Psychopathology  

PubMed Central

Although children’s security in the context of the interparental relationship has been identified as a key explanatory mechanism in pathways between family discord and child psychopathology, little is known about the inner workings of emotional security as a goal system. Accordingly, the objective of this paper is to describe how our reformulation of emotional security theory (EST-R) within an ethological and evolutionary framework may advance the characterization of the architecture and operation of emotional security and, in the process, cultivate sustainable growing points in developmental psychopathology. The first section of the paper describes how children’s security in the interparental relationship is organized around a distinctive behavioral system designed to defend against interpersonal threat. Building on this evolutionary foundation for emotional security, the paper offers an innovative taxonomy for identifying qualitatively different ways children try to preserve their security and its innovative implications for more precisely informing understanding of the mechanisms in pathways between family and developmental precursors and children’s trajectories of mental health. In the final section, the paper highlights the potential of EST-R to stimulate new generations of research on understanding how children defend against social threats in ecologies beyond the interparental dyad, including both familial and extrafamilial settings. PMID:24342849

Davies, Patrick T.; Martin, Meredith J.

2014-01-01

278

Social Anxiety in Children with Anxiety Disorders: Relation with Social and Emotional Functioning  

Microsoft Academic Search

Investigated the psychometric properties of the Social Anxiety Scale for children-Revised (SASC-R) as well as relations between social anxiety and children's social and emotional functioning. Participants were a clinic sample of children, ages 6–11 with anxiety disorders (N = 154) who completed the SASC-R. For a subset of these children, parent ratings of social skills, and self-ratings of perceived competence

Golda S. Ginsburg; Annette M. La Greca; Wendy K. Silverman

1998-01-01

279

Social emotion recognition, social functioning, and attempted suicide in late-life depression  

PubMed Central

Objectives Lack of feeling connected and poor social problem solving has been described in suicide attempters. However, cognitive substrates of this apparent social impairment in suicide attempters remain unknown. One possible deficit, the inability to recognize others' complex emotional states has been observed not only in disorders characterized by prominent social deficits (autism-spectrum disorders and frontotemporal dementia) but also in depression and normal aging. This study assessed the relationship between social emotion recognition, problem solving, social functioning, and attempted suicide in late-life depression. Design, Participants, Measurements There were 90 participants: 24 older depressed suicide attempters, 38 non-suicidal depressed elders, and 28 comparison subjects with no psychiatric history. We compared performance on the Reading the Mind in the Eyes test and measures of social networks, social support, social problem solving, and chronic interpersonal difficulties in these three groups. Results Suicide attempters committed significantly more errors in social emotion recognition and showed poorer global cognitive performance than elders with no psychiatric history. Attempters had restricted social networks: they were less likely to talk to their children, had fewer close friends, and did not engage in volunteer activities, compared to non-suicidal depressed elders and those with no psychiatric history. They also reported a pattern of struggle against others and hostility in relationships, felt a lack of social support, perceived social problems as impossible to resolve, and displayed a careless/ impulsive approach to problems. Conclusions Suicide attempts in depressed elders were associated with poor social problem-solving, constricted social networks, and disruptive interpersonal relationships. Impaired social emotion recognition in the suicide attempter group was related to global cognitive decline, thus it is possible that cognitive decline is one of the risk factors for suicide attempt in late-life, interacting with social deficits and psychosocial factors. PMID:22354116

Szanto, Katalin; Dombrovski, Alexandre Y.; Sahakian, Barbara J.; Mulsant, Benoit H.; Houck, Patricia R.; Reynolds, Charles F.; Clark, Luke

2011-01-01

280

Child Abuse and Aggression Among Seriously Emotionally Disturbed Children  

Microsoft Academic Search

Abused children may be at risk for problems with aggression. In a sample of 397 seriously emotionally disturbed children, reactive aggression was associated with documented history of physical abuse but not sexual abuse. Girls were equally likely to be classified as reactively aggressive regardless of physical abuse history, but boys with physical abuse histories were 50% more likely to be

Julian D. Ford; Lisa A. Fraleigh; Daniel F. Connor

2009-01-01

281

Facial Emotion Recognition in Child Psychiatry: A Systematic Review  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This review focuses on facial affect (emotion) recognition in children and adolescents with psychiatric disorders other than autism. A systematic search, using PRISMA guidelines, was conducted to identify original articles published prior to October 2011 pertaining to face recognition tasks in case-control studies. Used in the qualitative…

Collin, Lisa; Bindra, Jasmeet; Raju, Monika; Gillberg, Christopher; Minnis, Helen

2013-01-01

282

Emotional labour, burnout and job satisfaction in UK teachers: the role of workplace social support  

Microsoft Academic Search

Although teaching has been described as a profoundly emotional activity, little is known about the emotional demands faced by teachers or how this impacts on their well-being. This study examined relationships between ‘emotional labour’, burnout (emotional exhaustion, depersonalisation and personal accomplishment) and job satisfaction in a sample of UK teachers. Also examined was whether workplace social support moderated any relationships

Gail Kinman; Siobhan Wray; Calista Strange

2011-01-01

283

Pilot Study of Aurora, a Social, Mobile-Phone-Based Emotion Sharing and Recording System  

PubMed Central

Background: Emotion is a ubiquitous aspect of humanity that governs behavior in a number of ways and is linked inextricably with health. Pausing to evaluate one’s emotional state in the face of decisions and reflecting on past patterns of emotion have been shown to improve behaviors. Further, social expression of emotion has been shown to directly improve health outcomes. While the virtual reality research community does not ignore emotion on the whole, there does exist a need to explore what roles emotional awareness and emotion sharing can play in this domain. Methods: A mobile-phone-based social emotion recording and sharing system, Aurora, was developed to provide individuals with a means to pause and evaluate their emotional state, reflect on past emotions, share emotions with others, and participate in socially supportive activities with peers. A study was conducted with 65 subjects to evaluate Aurora as a tool to encourage emotional reflection and awareness as well as social sharing of emotion. Results: Users of Aurora reported an increased comfort in socially expressing emotion and were encouraged to share emotions, even with strangers. Subjects also reported liking reflecting on their emotional state and found it valuable. Subjects’ behavior also suggested that the system encouraged individuals to reach out to one another in acts of social support. Conclusions: The Aurora system offers a tool for encouraging emotional awareness, emotion sharing, and socially supportive behavior. Such a tool could be impactful in numerous health settings where emotion is considered to be an important indicator of or influence on outcome, such as for weight loss, alcohol cessation, or cancer sufferers. PMID:21527101

Gay, Geri; Pollak, JP; Adams, Phil; Leonard, John P

2011-01-01

284

Mechanisms of child abuse public service announcement effectiveness: roles of emotional response and perceived effectiveness.  

PubMed

This study tests the processes through which child abuse public service announcements (PSAs) are effective. The proposed model builds upon the persuasion mediation model of Dillard and Peck (2000 ), which integrates emotional response and perceived effectiveness as antecedents of issue attitudes and behavioral intention. The model tested the mediating role of perceived effectiveness in the persuasion process. Multigroup structural equation modeling was performed for three different types of child abuse prevention PSAs shown on YouTube to 486 college students. The model was well fitted across all three child abuse PSAs. Emotional response seems to exert the largest influence on behavioral intention directly and indirectly through perceived effectiveness and issue attitudes. In addition, perceived effectiveness has both a direct and an indirect impact on behavioral intention. PMID:21512928

Paek, Hye-Jin; Hove, Thomas; Kim, Mikyoung; Jeong, Hyun Ju

2011-09-01

285

Social and Emotional Development From a Cultural Perspective  

Microsoft Academic Search

The study of social and emotional development is recognized for its complexity. To better understand developmental norms, and deviations thereof, researchers typically focus on individual (e.g., temperament), interactional (e.g., parenting behaviors), and relational (e.g., attachment, friendship) levels of analysis. Often forgotten, however, is the extent to which cultural beliefs and norms play a role in the interpretation of the acceptability

Kenneth H. Rubin

1998-01-01

286

Social-emotional characteristics and special educational needs  

Microsoft Academic Search

The aim of the research described in this article was the development of an instrument to measure social emotional characteristics\\u000a and special educational and pedagogical needs of students in the last grade of primary education. Questionnaires were developed\\u000a for teachers as well as for students.\\u000a \\u000a Exploratory factor analyses showed that the factors underlying the structure of the teacher questionnaire corresponded

Joost Meijer; Miriam Fossen; Cornelis M. van Putten; Aryan van der Leij

2006-01-01

287

Promoting Social and Emotional Learning in Preschool Students: A Study of "Strong Start Pre-K"  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The inclusion of social and emotional learning (SEL) curricula in preschools may help prevent emotional and behavioral problems. This study evaluated the effects of a SEL curriculum, "Strong Start Pre-K," on the social and emotional competence of 52 preschool students using a quasi-experimental, non-equivalent control group design. Teachers rated…

Gunter, Leslie; Caldarella, Paul; Korth, Byran B.; Young, K. Richard

2012-01-01

288

The Contribution of Inhibitory Control to Preschoolers' Social-Emotional Competence  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Social-emotional competence is a key developmental task during early childhood. This study examined concurrent relationships between maternal education and employment status, children's sex, ethnicity, age, receptive vocabulary, emotional knowledge, attention skills, inhibitory control and social-emotional competence in a sample of 146 preschool,…

Rhoades, Brittany L.; Greenberg, Mark T.; Domitrovich, Celene E.

2009-01-01

289

Attachment with parents and peers in late adolescence: Links with emotional competence and social behavior  

Microsoft Academic Search

The goal of this study was to examine whether the links between attachment security and social behavior in late adolescence were mediated by emotional competence. One hundred and seventeen late adolescents completed self-report measures of parent and peer attachment, social behavior, and emotional competence. Attachment security with both parents and peers was significantly related to aspects of adolescent emotional and

Deborah Laible

2007-01-01

290

Written Emotional Disclosure Buffers the Effects of Social Constraints on Distress Among Cancer Patients  

Microsoft Academic Search

The aims of the present study were to examine whether written emotional disclosure would reduce distress among cancer patients and whether it would buffer the effects of high levels of social constraint (negative social responses to patients' expressions of emotion regarding their cancer) on distress. Cancer patients (N = 104) were randomly assigned to write about their emotions regarding their

Sandra G. Zakowski; Alona Ramati; Carla Morton; Peter Johnson; Robert Flanigan

2004-01-01

291

Child Abduction, Parents' Distress, and Social Support  

Microsoft Academic Search

This study examines how parents of family and nonfamily abducted children cope with stress due to the disappearance of their child. The results show that all parents experience distress, regardless of whether it was a family or nonfamily abduction. Associated with parental distress are factors such as prior family stress, age of the child, recovery status of the child, and

Sarah K. Spilman

2006-01-01

292

Pubertal development of the understanding of social emotions: Implications for education  

PubMed Central

Recent developmental cognitive neuroscience research has supported the notion that puberty and adolescence are periods of profound socio-emotional development. The current study was designed to investigate whether the onset of puberty marks an increase in the awareness of complex, or “mixed,” emotions. Eighty-three female participants (aged 9–16 years) were divided into three groups according to a self-report measure of puberty stage (early-, mid- and post-puberty). Participants were presented with emotional scenarios, and used four linear scales to rate their emotional response to each scenario. Scenarios were designed to evoke social emotions (embarrassment or guilt) or basic emotions (anger or fear), where social emotions are defined as those which require the representation of others' mental states. We measured the relative complexity or “mixedness” of emotional responses, that is, the degree to which participants reported feeling more than one emotion for a given scenario. We found that mixed emotion reporting increased between early- and post-puberty for social emotion scenarios, and showed no relationship with age, whereas there was no change in mixed emotion reporting for basic emotion scenarios across age or puberty groups. This suggests that the awareness of mixed emotions develops during the course of puberty, and that this development is specific to social emotions. Results are discussed in the context of brain development across puberty and adolescence, with speculation regarding the potential implications for education. PMID:22211052

Burnett, Stephanie; Thompson, Stephanie; Bird, Geoffrey; Blakemore, Sarah-Jayne

2011-01-01

293

Anticipatory guidance for cognitive and social-emotional development: Birth to five years  

PubMed Central

The present article serves as a quick office reference for clinicians, providing anticipatory guidance about the cognitive and social-emotional development of newborns, and children up to five years of age. The present review links recommendations to specific evidence in the medical literature, citing sources of developmental standards and advice, so that these may be further explored if desired. Practising primary care providers have indicated that these are areas of child development that are not well addressed by training and other available resources. The present article includes parenting information on important clinical presentations with which clinicians may be less familiar, such as promoting attachment, prosocial behaviours, healthy sleep habits, self-discipline and problem-solving; as well as on managing behaviours that are part of normal development, such as separation anxiety, tantrums, aggression, picky eating and specific fears. Information on the development of language, literacy and socialization are also included. PMID:23372397

Dosman, Cara; Andrews, Debbi

2012-01-01

294

Developing an interactive social-emotional toolkit for autism spectrum disorders  

E-print Network

A development process consisting of participatory design and iterative implementation was carried out to create a framework for interactive emotion-learning, the Interactive Social-Emotional Toolkit (iSET). iSET is a novel ...

Madsen, Miriam A

2010-01-01

295

The Effects of Early Social-Emotional and Relationship Experience on the Development of Young Orphanage Children: The St. Petersburg-USA Orphanage Research Team  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This study represents a quasi-experimental test of the role of early social-emotional experience and adult-child relationships in the development of typically developing children and those with disabilities birth to 4 years of age living in orphanages in St. Petersburg, Russian Federation. The three orphanages in the current study were selected…

Monographs of the Society for Research in Child Development, 2008

2008-01-01

296

Teaching Emotion Words Using Social Stories and Created Experiences in Group Instruction with Preschoolers Who Are Deaf or Hard of Hearing: An Exploratory Study  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The purpose of this study was to investigate whether specific emotion vocabulary could be taught to children with hearing impairments using child-specific social stories and demonstration tasks. The participants were three preschool-aged children who were being served in an auditory-verbal preschool classroom. An A-B single-subject design was used…

Richels, Corrin; Bobzien, Jonna; Raver, Sharon A.; Schwartz, Kathryn; Hester, Peggy; Reed, Lauren

2014-01-01

297

How Do I Feel About Feelings? Emotion Socialization in Families of Depressed and Healthy Adolescents  

Microsoft Academic Search

Emotional and cognitive changes that occur during adolescence set the stage for the development of adaptive or maladaptive\\u000a beliefs about emotions. Although research suggests that parents’ behaviors and beliefs about emotions relate to children’s\\u000a emotional abilities, few studies have looked at parental socialization of children’s emotions, particularly in families with\\u000a depressed adolescents. The present study examined associations between parent and

Erin C. HunterLynn; Lynn Fainsilber Katz; Joann Wu Shortt; Betsy Davis; Craig Leve; Nicholas B. Allen; Lisa B. Sheeber

2011-01-01

298

Chaos as a Social Determinant of Child Health: Reciprocal Associations?  

PubMed Central

This study informs the social determinants of child health by exploring an understudied aspect of children’s social contexts: chaos. Chaos has been conceptualized as crowded, noisy, disorganized, unpredictable settings for child development (Evans et al., 2010). We measure chaos at two levels of children’s ecological environment - the microsystem (household) and the mesosystem (work-family-child care nexus) – and at two points in early childhood (ages 3 and 5). Using data from the Fragile Families and Child Wellbeing Study (N=3288), a study of predominantly low-income women and their partners in large US cities, we develop structural equation models that assess how maternal-rated child health (also assessed at ages 3 and 5) is associated with latent constructs of chaos, and whether there are important reciprocal effects. Autoregressive crosslagged path analysis suggest that increasing chaos (at both the household and maternal work levels) is associated with worse child health, controlling for key confounders like household economic status, family structure, and maternal health status. Child health has little effect on chaos, providing further support for the hypothesis that chaos is an important social determinant of child health in this sample of relatively disadvantaged children. This suggests child health may be improved by supporting families in ways that reduce chaos in their home and work/family environments, and that as researchers move beyond SES, race, and family structure to explore other sources of health inequalities, chaos and its proximate determinants may be a promising avenue for future research. PMID:23541250

Schmeer, Kammi K.; Taylor, Miles

2013-01-01

299

Implementing an Inpatient Social Early Warning System for Child Maltreatment  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Objectives: The current article describes the process evaluation of a social early warning system (SEWS) for the prevention of child maltreatment in the federal state of Hamburg. This prevention initiative targets expectant mothers and their partners including an initial screening of risk factors for child maltreatment, a subsequent structured…

Atabaki, Armita; Heddaeus, Daniela; Metzner, Franka; Schulz, Holger; Siefert, Sonke; Pawils, Silke

2013-01-01

300

Socialization of Discrete Negative Emotions: Gender Differences and Links with Psychological Distress  

Microsoft Academic Search

On the basis of Malatesta-Magai's model (Magai, 1996) of emotion socialization, parental contingent responses to expressed emotion in children were expected to facilitate (e.g., Reward, Magnify) or inhibit (e.g., Override, Neglect, Punish) the expression of various discrete emotions. In this study, retrospective reports of parental emotion socialization in childhood were reported by 322 young adult participants. Perceptions of 3 negative

Rula Bayrakdar Garside; Bonnie Klimes-Dougan

2002-01-01

301

Irony comprehension: social conceptual knowledge and emotional response.  

PubMed

Verbal irony conveys various emotional messages, from criticism to humor, that differ from the meaning of the actual words. To understand irony, we need conceptual knowledge of irony in addition to an understanding of context. We investigated the neural mechanism of irony comprehension, focusing on two overlooked issues: conceptual knowledge and emotional response. We studied 35 healthy subjects who underwent functional MRI. During the scan, the subject examined first-person-view stories describing verbal interactions, some of which included irony directed toward the subject. After MRI, the subject viewed the stories again and rated the degree of irony, humor, and negative emotion evoked by the statements. We identified several key findings about irony comprehension: (1) the right anterior superior temporal gyrus may be responsible for representing social conceptual knowledge of irony, (2) activation in the medial prefrontal cortex and the right anterior inferior temporal gyrus might underlie the understanding of context, (3) modulation of activity in the right amygdala, hippocampus, and parahippocampal gyrus is associated with the degree of irony perceived, and (4) modulation of activity in the right dorsolateral prefrontal cortex varies with the degree of humor perceived. Our results clarified the differential contributions of the neural loci of irony comprehension, enriching our understanding of pragmatic language communication from a social behavior point of view. PMID:23408440

Akimoto, Yoritaka; Sugiura, Motoaki; Yomogida, Yukihito; Miyauchi, Carlos Makoto; Miyazawa, Shiho; Kawashima, Ryuta

2014-04-01

302

Does Emotional Intelligence Depend on Gender? The Socialization of Emotional Competencies in Men and Women and Its Implications  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This article attempts to justify gender differences found for the main factors that comprise emotional intelligence from the standpoint of the Mayer and Salovey Skill Model (1997). In order to do so, we carry out a review of the different emotional socialization patterns used by parents on the basis of their children's gender and look into their…

Sanchez-Nunez, M. Trinidad; Fernandez-Berrocal, Pablo; Montanes, Juan; Latorre, Jose Miguel

2008-01-01

303

Child Temperament Moderates Effects of Parent-Child Mutuality on Self-Regulation: A Relationship-Based Path for Emotionally Negative Infants  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This study examined infants' negative emotionality as moderating the effect of parent-child mutually responsive orientation (MRO) on children's self-regulation (n = 102). Negative emotionality was observed in anger-eliciting episodes and in interactions with parents at 7 months. MRO was coded in naturalistic interactions at 15 months.…

Kim, Sanghag; Kochanska, Grazyna

2012-01-01

304

The Development of Infant Detection of Inauthentic Emotion  

E-print Network

Child Psychology: Vol. 3, Social, emotional, and personalityemotional signaling: Its effect on the visual cliff behavior of 1-year-olds. Developmental Psychology,Psychology University of California, Berkeley Professor Joseph J. Campos, Chair Appreciating authentic and inauthentic emotional

Walle, Eric Alf

2012-01-01

305

Temperament and Maternal Emotion Socialization Beliefs as Predictors of Early Childhood Social Behavior in the Laboratory and Classroom  

Microsoft Academic Search

Objective. The authors examined the roles of children's approach behavior and maternal emotion socialization practices in the development of social behavior in unfamiliar and familiar contexts from preschool to early childhood years. Design. At 4.5 years of age, children were observed, and an assessment of approach behavior was obtained; at this time, mothers reported about their emotion socialization beliefs. Two

Amy Kennedy Root; Cynthia Stifter

2010-01-01

306

Social-Emotional Learning Skill, Self-Regulation, and Social Competence in Typically Developing and Clinic-Referred Children  

Microsoft Academic Search

Social-emotional learning (SEL) skill includes the ability to encode, interpret, and reason about social and emotional information. In two related studies, we examined the relationship between children's SEL skill, their ability to regulate their own behavior, and the competence of their social interactions. Study 1 included 158 typically developing children ages 4 to 14 years. Study 2 included 126 clinic-referred

Clark McKown; Laura M. Gumbiner; Nicole M. Russo; Meryl Lipton

2009-01-01

307

Trajectories of change in emotion regulation and social anxiety during cognitive-behavioral therapy for social anxiety disorder  

E-print Network

Trajectories of change in emotion regulation and social anxiety during cognitive-behavioral therapy for social anxiety disorder Philippe R. Goldin a,*, Ihno Lee a , Michal Ziv a , Hooria Jazaieri a , Richard G Received in revised form 31 January 2014 Accepted 20 February 2014 Keywords: Social anxiety Emotion

Gross, James J.

308

Social-Emotional Learning Skill, Self-Regulation, and Social Competence in Typically Developing and Clinic-Referred Children  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Social-emotional learning (SEL) skill includes the ability to encode, interpret, and reason about social and emotional information. In two related studies, we examined the relationship between children's SEL skill, their ability to regulate their own behavior, and the competence of their social interactions. Study 1 included 158 typically…

McKown, Clark; Gumbiner, Laura M.; Russo, Nicole M.; Lipton, Meryl

2009-01-01

309

Physical child abuse and social change  

Microsoft Academic Search

Objective: To show changes in the way juvenile judges and judicial child protection workers deal with physical child abuse in the period 1960–1995 in the Netherlands.Method: The study is based on an analysis of files on adolescent and younger children placed by juvenile judges in the Dutch judicial child protection system during the 1960s, 1970s, 1980s, and 1990s.Results: The prevalence

Mieke Komen

2003-01-01

310

Beyond arousal and valence: The importance of the biological versus social relevance of emotional stimuli  

PubMed Central

The present study addressed the hypothesis that emotional stimuli relevant to survival or reproduction (biologically emotional stimuli) automatically affect cognitive processing (e.g., attention; memory), while those relevant to social life (socially emotional stimuli) require elaborative processing to modulate attention and memory. Results of our behavioral studies showed that: a) biologically emotional images hold attention more strongly than socially emotional images, b) memory for biologically emotional images was enhanced even with limited cognitive resources, but c) memory for socially emotional images was enhanced only when people had sufficient cognitive resources at encoding. Neither images’ subjective arousal nor their valence modulated these patterns. A subsequent functional magnetic resonance imaging study revealed that biologically emotional images induced stronger activity in visual cortex and greater functional connectivity between amygdala and visual cortex than did socially emotional images. These results suggest that the interconnection between the amygdala and visual cortex supports enhanced attention allocation to biological stimuli. In contrast, socially emotional images evoked greater activity in medial prefrontal cortex (MPFC) and yielded stronger functional connectivity between amygdala and MPFC than biological images. Thus, it appears that emotional processing of social stimuli involves elaborative processing requiring frontal lobe activity. PMID:21964552

Sakaki, Michiko; Niki, Kazuhisa; Mather, Mara

2012-01-01

311

Differential Effects Of Maternal Sensitivity To Infant Distress And Non-Distress On Social-Emotional Functioning  

PubMed Central

Associations between maternal sensitivity to infant distress and non-distress and infant social-emotional adjustment were examined in a subset of dyads from the NICHD Study of Early Child Care (N = 376). Mothers reported on infant temperament at 1 and 6 months postpartum, and maternal sensitivity to distress and non-distress were observed at 6 months. Child behavior problems, social competence, and affect dysregulation were measured at 24 and 36 months. Maternal sensitivity to distress but not to non-distress was related to fewer behavioral problems and higher social competence. In addition, for temperamentally reactive infants, maternal sensitivity to distress was associated with less affect dysregulation. Sensitivity to non-distress only prevented affect dysregulation if sensitivity to distress was also high. PMID:19489902

Leerkes, Esther M.; Blankson, A. Nayena; O'Brien, Marion

2010-01-01

312

The burden of disaster: part II. applying interventions across the child's social ecology.  

PubMed

This second of two articles describes the application of disaster mental health interventions within the context of the childs social ecology consisting of the Micro-, Meso-, Exo-, and Macrosystems. Microsystem interventions involving parents, siblings, and close friends include family preparedness planning andpractice, psychoeducation, role modeling, emotional support, and redirection. Mesosystem interventions provided by schools and faith-based organizations include safety and support, assessment, referral, and counseling. Exosystem interventions include those provided through community-based mental health programs, healthcare organizations, the workplace, the media, local volunteer disaster organizations, and other local organizations. Efforts to build community resilience to disasters are likely to have influence through the Exosystem. The Macrosystem - including the laws, history, cultural and subcultural characteristics, and economic and social conditions that underlie the other systems - affects the child indirectly through public policies and disaster programs and services that become available in the child's Exosystem in the aftermath of a disaster The social ecology paradigm, described more fully in a companion article (Noffsinger Pfefferbaum, Pfefferbaum, Sherrieb, & Norris,2012), emphasizes relationships among systems and can guide the development and delivery of services embedded in naturally-occurring structures in the child's environment. PMID:23894798

Pfefferbaum, Rose L; Jacobs, Anne K; Noffsinger, Mary A; Pfefferbaum, Betty; Sherrieb, Kathleen; Norris, Fran H

2012-01-01

313

Using Social and Emotional Learning to Foster Academic Achievement in Secondary Mathematics  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Teaching social-emotional skills to secondary students has been linked to higher student achievement, more positive student motivation and more socially acceptable classroom behaviors (Elias & Arnold, 2006; Weissburg et al., 2003; Kress et al., 2004). Much of the current literature on social-emotional learning (SEL) focuses on research. This piece…

Jones, Jennifer L.; Jones, Karrie A.; Vermette, Paul J.

2009-01-01

314

Effects of Computer Environments on Social-Emotional Development: Logo and Computer-Assisted Instruction.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Reviews research on the effects of the educational application of computers on student social-emotional development and details a study which examined the effects of two computer environments--computer assisted instruction and Logo--on six specific components of social-emotional competence (initiation and participation, social problem-solving,…

Clements, Douglas H.; Nastasi, Bonnie K.

1985-01-01

315

Teacher and Observer Ratings of Young African American Children's Social and Emotional Competence  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Children's social and emotional competence abilities have been linked to successful social interactions and academic performance. This study examined the teacher and observer ratings of social and emotional competence for 89 young (3- to 5-year-old), African American children from economically stressed urban environments. There was a specific…

Humphries, Marisha L.; Keenan, Kate; Wakschlag, Lauren S.

2012-01-01

316

The Social and Emotional Development of Gifted Children: What Do We Know?  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This text on the social and emotional development of gifted children includes the following 24 papers: (1) "Effects of Acceleration on Gifted Learners" (Karen Rogers); (2) "Peer Pressures and Social Acceptance of Gifted Students" (Sylvia Rimm); (3) "Social and Emotional Issues for Exceptional Intellectually Gifted Students" (Miraca Gross); (4)…

Neihart, Maureen, Ed.; Reis, Sally M., Ed.; Robinson, Nancy M., Ed.; Moon, Sidney M., Ed.

317

Characteristics of client-identified helpful events in emotion-focused therapy for child abuse trauma  

Microsoft Academic Search

This study investigated the characteristics of client-identified helpful events (n=29) in emotion-focused therapy for child abuse trauma (EFTT). Helpful events (HE) were identified on the Helpful Aspects of Therapy Questionnaire and in Post Therapy Interviews, located in video-taped therapy sessions, and compared to researcher-defined control events (CE) for each client. Results indicated a greater focus on childhood abuse (particularly during

Karen Anne Marie Holowaty; Sandra Clare Paivio

2012-01-01

318

Characteristics of client-identified helpful events in emotion-focused therapy for child abuse trauma  

Microsoft Academic Search

This study investigated the characteristics of client-identified helpful events (n=29) in emotion-focused therapy for child abuse trauma (EFTT). Helpful events (HE) were identified on the Helpful Aspects of Therapy Questionnaire and in Post Therapy Interviews, located in video-taped therapy sessions, and compared to researcher-defined control events (CE) for each client. Results indicated a greater focus on childhood abuse (particularly during

Karen Anne Marie Holowaty; Sandra Clare Paivio

2011-01-01

319

'Ecstasy' as a social drug: MDMA preferentially affects responses to emotional stimuli with social content.  

PubMed

3,4-Methylenedioxymethamphetamine (MDMA, 'ecstasy') is used recreationally to improve mood and sociability, and has generated clinical interest as a possible adjunct to psychotherapy. One way that MDMA may produce positive 'prosocial' effects is by changing responses to emotional stimuli, especially stimuli with social content. Here, we examined for the first time how MDMA affects subjective responses to positive, negative and neutral emotional pictures with and without social content. We hypothesized that MDMA would dose-dependently increase reactivity to positive emotional stimuli and dampen reactivity to negative stimuli, and that these effects would be most pronounced for pictures with people in them. The data were obtained from two studies using similar designs with healthy occasional MDMA users (total N = 101). During each session, participants received MDMA (0, 0.75 and 1.5 mg/kg oral), and then rated their positive and negative responses to standardized positive, negative and neutral pictures with and without social content. MDMA increased positive ratings of positive social pictures, but reduced positive ratings of non-social positive pictures. We speculate this 'socially selective' effect contributes to the prosocial effects of MDMA by increasing the comparative value of social contact and closeness with others. This effect may also contribute to its attractiveness to recreational users. PMID:24682132

Wardle, Margaret C; Kirkpatrick, Matthew G; de Wit, Harriet

2014-08-01

320

Emotion Talk in Mother-Child Conversations of the Shared Past: The Effects of Culture, Gender, and Event Valence  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

We examined how mother-child emotional reminiscing is affected by culture, gender, and the valence of the event. Thirty-one Euro-American and 30 Chinese middle-class mothers and their 3-year-old children discussed 1 highly positive and 1 highly negative experience. Mothers and children in both cultures used a greater variety of negative emotion

Fivush, Robyn; Wang, Qi

2005-01-01

321

The Associations of Emotion Knowledge and Teacher-Child Relationships to Preschool Children's School-Related Developmental Competence  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This study examined the relative contributions of emotion knowledge and teacher-child relational variables to school competence. Seventy-four economically and ethnically diverse preschoolers (40 boys, 34 girls) completed an emotion knowledge task and a standardized school competence measure. Classroom teachers and their assistants rated the…

Garner, Pamela W.; Waajid, Badiyyah

2008-01-01

322

Examining Relationships Between Social-Emotional, Cultural, and Academic Outcomes of Culturally Diverse Adolescents  

E-print Network

early adolescents: Mediated relationships to academicsignificant relationships, where adolescents who reportRelationships Between Social-Emotional, Cultural, and Academic Outcomes of Culturally Diverse Adolescents

Garcia, Nicole Marie

2011-01-01

323

Emotion Awareness and Regulation in Individuals with Schizophrenia: Implications for Social Functioning  

PubMed Central

Successful social functioning requires adaptive forms of emotion awareness and regulation. However, despite well-documented deficits in social functioning in individuals with schizophrenia, little is known about emotion awareness and regulation in this population. Therefore, we compared emotion awareness and regulation in individuals with schizophrenia and healthy controls, and then, within the schizophrenia group, we examined their impact on social functioning. Forty-four individuals with schizophrenia and 20 healthy controls completed measures of emotion awareness, emotion regulation, and social functioning, in addition to control measures, including neurocognitive functioning. Compared to controls, individuals with schizophrenia displayed significant deficits describing and identifying their emotions and used significantly less reappraisal and more suppression to regulate their emotions. Among the schizophrenia group, better social functioning was associated with the ability to identify, and in particular to describe emotions, better emotion management, as well as greater use of reappraisal and less use of suppression. A hierarchical multiple regression analysis indicated that, after controlling for age and neurocognition, difficulties describing feelings accounted for 35% of the social functioning variance. The present study highlights the importance of emotion awareness and regulation in schizophrenia, pointing to their substantial influence on social functioning above and beyond the impact of neurocognitive functioning. PMID:22749227

Kimhy, David; Vakhrusheva, Julia; Jobson-Ahmed, Lauren; Tarrier, Nicholas; Malaspina, Dolores; Gross, James J.

2012-01-01

324

The Ambiguity of the Child's "Voice" in Social Research  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This article addresses the ambiguity of the child's "voice" in social research. Drawing on a recent research project on young children's communication difficulties, the author argues that the currently popular discourse on "listening to children" is beset with practical and ethical ambiguities that result from the "socialness" of human…

Komulainen, Sirkka

2007-01-01

325

Longitudinal Associations among Child Maltreatment, Social Functioning, and Cortisol Regulation  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Child maltreatment increases the risk for impaired social functioning and cortisol regulation. However, the longitudinal interplay among these factors is still unclear. This study aimed to shed light on the effect of maltreatment on social functioning and cortisol regulation over time. The sample consisted of 236 children (mean age 7.64 years, SD…

Alink, Lenneke R. A.; Cicchetti, Dante; Kim, Jungmeen; Rogosch, Fred A.

2012-01-01

326

Screening Accuracy and Clinical Application of the Brief Infant-Toddler Social and Emotional Assessment (BITSEA)  

PubMed Central

Background The Brief Infant-Toddler Social and Emotional Assessment (BITSEA) is a promising questionnaire for the early detection of psychosocial problems in toddlers. The screening accuracy and clinical application were evaluated. Methods In a community sample of 2-year-olds (N?=?2060), screening accuracy of the BITSEA Problem scale was examined regarding a clinical CBCL1.5-5 Total Problem score. For the total population and subgroups by child’s gender and ethnicity Receiver Operating Characteristic (ROC) curves were calculated, and across a range of BITSEA Problem scores, sensitivity, specificity, likelihood ratio’s, diagnostic odds ratio and Youden’s index. Clinical application of the BITSEA was examined by evaluating the relation between the scale scores and the clinical decision of the child health professional. Results The area under the ROC curve (95% confidence interval) of the Problem scale was 0.97(0.95–0.98), there were no significant differences between subgroups. The association between clinical decision and BITSEA Problem score (B?=?2.5) and Competence score (B?=??0.7) was significant (p<0.05). Conclusions The results indicate that the BITSEA Problem scale has good discriminative power to differentiate children with and without psychosocial problems. Referred children had less favourable scores compared to children that were not referred. The BITSEA may be helpful in the early detection of psychosocial problems. PMID:24023626

Kruizinga, Ingrid; Jansen, Wilma; Mieloo, Cathelijne L.; Carter, Alice S.; Raat, Hein

2013-01-01

327

Social and Emotional Competencies: Contributions to Young African-American Children's Peer Acceptance.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Explored the relation between measures of emotional competence, behavioral regulation, and general social competence and African American preschoolers' peer acceptance and popularity. Found that gender, emotional knowledge, emotion regulation, and themes of violence in response to hypothetical situations of interpersonal conflict were strongly…

Smith, Maureen

2001-01-01

328

A Computer Model of the Interpersonal Effect of Emotion Displayed in a Social Dilemma*  

E-print Network

A Computer Model of the Interpersonal Effect of Emotion Displayed in a Social Dilemma* Celso M. de into account the other party's emotion displays. The model is based on data collected in a series of recent the same action strategy, show different emotion displays according to how the game unfolds. We collapse

Chen, Yiling

329

Maternal and Child Contributions to Cortisol Response to Emotional Arousal in Young Children from Low-Income, Rural Communities  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Relations of maternal and child characteristics to child cortisol reactivity to and recovery from emotional arousal were examined prospectively at approximately 7 months of age (infancy) and then again at approximately 15 months of age (toddlerhood). The sample was diverse and population based (N = 1,292 mother-infant dyads) and included families…

Blair, Clancy; Granger, Douglas A.; Kivlighan, Katie T.; Mills-Koonce, Roger; Willoughby, Michael; Greenberg, Mark T.; Hibel, Leah C.; Fortunato, Christine K.

2008-01-01

330

Assessment of young children's social-emotional development and psychopathology: recent advances and recommendations for practice.  

PubMed

In this paper we have tried to document some of the recent advances in the conceptualization and assessment of early-emerging social-emotional and behavior problems, competencies, and psychopathology. Considerable evidence documents that young children evidence significant psychopathology (cf., Del Carmen & Carter, in press; Emde, 1999; Zeanah, 2001; Zeanah et al., 1997). Given the range of new assessment measures that have become available over the past 10 years, the field of young child mental health is poised for dramatic gains in knowledge. It is critical to conduct large-scale, longitudinal, epidemiological studies to inform our understanding of the course of psychopathological conditions within the context of a normative developmental framework. Multi-method, multi-informant assessment approaches are more essential in early childhood due to young children's inability to provide self-reports and the embedded nature of children's development in their caregiving contexts. Screening large representative samples affords the opportunity to ascertain unbiased clinically informative sub-samples for methodologically intensive sub-studies. These sub-studies can address the child's cognitive and linguistic developmental capacities as well as utilize observational methods to examine the relational context. This approach provides an opportunity to merge dimensional and diagnostic assessments and will yield critical information for disentangling continuities and discontinuities in normative and atypical development. The assessment methodology currently exists to routinely screen very young children for social-emotional and behavior problems as well as delays in the acquisition of competencies in pediatric settings as well as in early intervention programs. Yet, despite the likely long-term benefits and cost-saving potential of early identification and intervention services, short-term cost and knowledge barriers currently limit widespread implementation. Discussions with pediatricians suggest that one of the greatest barriers to screening is the limited availability of mental health referral sources. Indeed, very few children who are rated by parents as having elevated social-emotional and behavior problems are receiving any behavioral health services (Horwitz et al., in press). Unmet mental health needs exist among non-referred children in the community as well as among children receiving early intervention services for developmental concerns. Documenting the mental health needs of young children may promote training of professionals who have the competence to treat young children and their families. Moreover, the availability of social-emotional and behavior problem assessment tools should increase studies that focus on the clinical efficacy and effectiveness of prevention and early intervention programs designed to promote positive mental health. Finally, although significant progress is occurring in the arena of young child diagnosis, a strong case can be made for intervening when young children are exhibiting elevations in problem behaviors or delays in the acquisition of competence. This is particularly true when children are also experiencing exposure to multiple contextual risk factors. It is therefore important to advocate for changes to systems that require child diagnosis as a gateway to intervention. As we learn more about the precursors or prodromal manifestations of clinical psychopathology we will be able to examine the efficacy of earlier targeted preventive intervention approaches. PMID:14959805

Carter, Alice S; Briggs-Gowan, Margaret J; Davis, Naomi Ornstein

2004-01-01

331

The Facilitation of Social-Emotional Understanding and Social Interaction in High-Functioning Children with Autism: Intervention Outcomes  

Microsoft Academic Search

This study evaluated the effectiveness of a 7-month cognitive behavioral intervention for the facilitation of the social-emotional understanding and social interaction of 15 high-functioning children (8 to 17 years old) with autism. Intervention focused on teaching interpersonal problem solving, affective knowledge, and social interaction. Preintervention and postintervention measures included observations of social interaction, measures of problem solving and of emotion

Nirit Bauminger

2002-01-01

332

Relations between political violence and child adjustment: a four-wave test of the role of emotional insecurity about community.  

PubMed

This study further explored the impact of sectarian violence and children's emotional insecurity about community on child maladjustment using a 4-wave longitudinal design. The study included 999 mother-child dyads in Belfast, Northern Ireland (482 boys, 517 girls). Across the 4 waves, child mean age was 12.19 (SD = 1.82), 13.24 (SD = 1.83), 13.61 (SD = 1.99), and 14.66 years (SD = 1.96), respectively. Building on previous studies of the role of emotional insecurity in child adjustment, the current study examines within-person change in emotional insecurity using latent growth curve analyses. The results showed that children's trajectories of emotional insecurity about community were related to risk for developing conduct and emotion problems. These findings controlled for earlier adjustment problems, age, and gender, and took into account the time-varying nature of experience with sectarian violence. Discussion considers the implications for children's emotional insecurity about community for relations between political violence and children's adjustment, including the significance of trajectories of emotional insecurity over time. PMID:23527495

Cummings, E Mark; Taylor, Laura K; Merrilees, Christine E; Goeke-Morey, Marcie C; Shirlow, Peter; Cairns, Ed

2013-12-01

333

Child Wellness and Social Inclusion: Values for Action  

Microsoft Academic Search

Participatory Action Research (PAR) with children and youth is at the intersection of child wellness and social inclusion.\\u000a Exclusion and marginalization detract from personal and collective health. Inclusion, on the contrary, contributes to wellness.\\u000a Hence, we should study inclusion and exclusion in the overall context of child wellness. This special issue offers a wealth\\u000a of methodologies and lessons for fostering

Isaac Prilleltensky

2010-01-01

334

Applying the polyvagal theory to children's emotion regulation: Social context, socialization, and adjustment.  

PubMed

Effective emotion regulation is essential for children's positive development. Polyvagal theory provides a framework for understanding how parasympathetic regulation of cardiac activity contributes to children's adaptive versus maladaptive functioning. Maintenance of cardiac respiratory sinus arrhythmia (RSA) under social challenge should support emotion regulation and behavioral adjustment. Children's effective parasympathetic regulation and behavioral adjustment should be supported by appropriate parental socialization. These proposals were evaluated in a short-term longitudinal study of 94 preschool-aged children. Parenting and basal RSA were measured at home, then 6-10 months later behavioral adjustment and RSA in lab baseline and socially challenging contexts were measured. Children with relatively higher RSA in social challenge than at baseline (DeltaRSA) had fewer internalizing problems (IP) and externalizing problems (EP), and better behavioral self-regulation (SR). Mothers who used more negative control had children with lower DeltaRSA, more IP and EP, and less SR. Structural equation modeling showed that vagal regulation mediated associations between maternal negative control and children's adjustment; maternal negative control did not predict EP or SR after accounting for DeltaRSA. Associations were consistent across boys and girls, with one exception: Higher DeltaRSA was significantly associated with fewer EP in boys only. These findings suggest that the practical significance of physiological regulation might be best revealed in ecologically valid procedures, and that children's physiological mechanisms of emotion regulation are shaped by their experiences of parental socialization. PMID:18722499

Hastings, Paul D; Nuselovici, Jacob N; Utendale, William T; Coutya, Julie; McShane, Kelly E; Sullivan, Caroline

2008-12-01

335

Phases of Social–Emotional Development from Birth to School Age  

Microsoft Academic Search

\\u000a Stages of social–emotional development are the subject of this chapter. Infants and toddlers live in a maelstrom of strong\\u000a emotions, most of which involve interactions with other people. But the social situations that induce strong emotions, and\\u000a the cognitive capacities children have for coping with them, change dramatically from one stage to the next. The timetable\\u000a of cognitive development helps

Marc D. Lewis; Isabela Granic

2010-01-01

336

Engaging with issues of emotionality in mathematics teacher education for social justice  

Microsoft Academic Search

This article focuses on the relationship between social justice, emotionality and mathematics teaching in the context of the\\u000a education of prospective teachers of mathematics. A relational approach to social justice calls for giving attention to enacting\\u000a socially just relationships in mathematics classrooms. Emotionality and social justice in teaching mathematics variously intersect,\\u000a interrelate or interweave. An intervention, using creative action methods,

Mark Boylan

2009-01-01

337

Enhancing Academic Performance and Social and Emotional Competence with the RULER Feeling Words Curriculum  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

A pre- and post-test quasi-experimental design was used to test the impact of a 30-week, theoretically-based social and emotional learning (SEL) curriculum, The RULER Feeling Words Curriculum ("RULER"), on the academic performance and social and emotional competence of 5th and 6th grade students (N = 273) in fifteen classrooms in three schools.…

Brackett, Marc A.; Rivers, Susan E.; Reyes, Maria R.; Salovey, Peter

2012-01-01

338

Understanding Social and Emotional Needs as an Approach in Developing a Positive Classroom Environment  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The classroom environment is an important aspect of classroom management that concerns many teachers. Properly engaging students in the classroom can foster a positive environment. This study examines social and emotional needs of students and its implications in developing a positive classroom. How can meeting social and emotional needs of…

Ozorio, Kristen

2014-01-01

339

Assessment Instruments for Measuring Young Children's Social-Emotional Behavioral Development  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Early identification of social-emotional behavioral problems in infants and preschoolers is critical. Nine parent-report and caregiver/teacher-report instruments measuring preschool social-emotional behavioral problems and strengths are reviewed. Advantages to the use of parent-report and caregiver/teacher-report instruments are that they are easy…

Caselman, Tonia D.; Self, Patricia A.

2008-01-01

340

Teaching Online Social Skills to Students with Emotional and Behavioral Disorders  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Students with emotional and behavioral disorders often lack appropriate social skills. This deficit can lead to negative outcomes including peer and teacher rejection, increased behavioral problems at school, and decreased academic achievement. In order to improve the social outcomes of students with emotional and behavioral disorders, teachers…

Morgan, Joseph John

2012-01-01

341

A Review of the Beck Youth Inventories of Emotional and Social Impairment  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This review focused on the Beck Youth Inventories of Emotional and Social Impairment (BYI) [Beck, J., Beck, A., & Jolly, J. (2001). Beck Youth Inventories of Emotional and Social Impairment manual. San Antonio: Psychological Corporation]. The BYI were designed as self-report instruments for assessing maladaptive cognitions and behaviors of…

Bose-Deakins, Jillayne E.; Floyd, Randy G.

2004-01-01

342

Family Emotion Socialization and Affective Distress in Asian American and White American College Students  

Microsoft Academic Search

This study examined the retrospective reports of family emotion socialization experiences and current affective distress among 23 Asian American and 31 White American university students with subclinical levels of distress. Results indicated that most of the Asian Americans interviewed recalled being socialized by their family to suppress their emotions, whereas more than half of White Americans recalled being encouraged by

Anne Saw; Sumie Okazaki

2010-01-01

343

A Study of Social-Emotional Adjustment Levels of Preschool Children in Relation to Peer Relationships  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The aim of this research is to study social--emotional adaptation levels of 5-to 6-year old preschool children in relation to peer relationships. One hundred and forty-four children aged between 5 and 6 joined in this relational survey study. According to the results of the research analysing the relationship between the social-emotional

Gülay, Hülya; Önder, Alev

2013-01-01

344

Understanding How Social and Emotional Skill Deficits Contribute to School Failure  

Microsoft Academic Search

A growing number of children are entering kindergarten without the skills that enable them to be successful in an academic setting. However, it is not children's cognitive skills that concern educators; it is their social and emotional skill deficits that are most troublesome. This article discusses how family and community risk factors can inhibit social and emotional development (i.e., skills

Kathryn S. Whitted

2011-01-01

345

Kentucky's Early Childhood Professional Development Initiative to Promote Social-Emotional Competence  

Microsoft Academic Search

This article examines the Kentucky Initiative for Social Skill and Emotional Development which provides annual training and technical assistance to build early childhood programs' capacity to deliver practices known to promote social and emotional competency. The initiative is based on the 3-tiered Positive Behavior Support model that teaches educators to both prevent and intervene with challenging behaviors. The training and

Elizabeth M. McLaren; Phyllis J. Hall; Pamela Fox

2009-01-01

346

Popular and Rejected Children's Reasoning regarding Negative Emotions in Social Situations: The Role of Gender  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Two studies compared popular and rejected children's reasoning regarding social interactions involving negative emotions. The first study, with 23 rejected and 23 popular 10- to 11-year-olds, involved hypothetical social scenarios where a classmate "victim" was likely to experience a negative emotion. Although popular and rejected children both…

Banerjee, Robin; Rieffe, Carolien; Terwogt, Mark Meerum; Gerlein, Ana Maria; Voutsina, Maria

2006-01-01

347

An Investigation of Preschool Classroom Behavioral Adjustment Problems and Social-Emotional School Readiness Competencies  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The study examined the unique relationship between multiple dimensions of classroom behavioral adjustment problems and salient social-emotional competencies for urban Head Start children. These relationships were investigated using a hierarchical model that controlled for the variance in social-emotional outcomes attributed to age, gender, and…

Fantuzzo, John W.; Bulotsky-Shearer, Rebecca; Fusco, Rachel A.; McWayne, Christine

2005-01-01

348

Casting the Conceptual Net: Cognitive Possibilities for Embracing the Social and Emotional Richness of Art Education  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Although the argument for art as cognition has gained significant momentum since the cognitive revolution, recent scientific investigations of cognition have revealed the import of social and emotional thinking for meaningful, contextualized learning, thereby highlighting the inherent social and emotional properties of artmaking as inevitably…

Blatt-Gross, Carolina

2010-01-01

349

Linking Prevention Science and Social and Emotional Learning: The Oregon Resiliency Project  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This article reviews the contributions of the Oregon Resiliency Project, an effort to enhance positive social-emotional development of children and youth through social and emotional learning (SEL). The project was launched in 2001 as a collaborative effort between faculty and graduate student researchers at the University of Oregon. The primary…

Merrell, Kenneth W.

2010-01-01

350

The Social and Emotional Development of Preschool Children Under Two Types of Educational Program  

Microsoft Academic Search

The present investigation was undertaken to study the effects of two curricula differing in amounts of teacher personal guidance on the social and emotional development of four-year-old children. The objectives for the two curricula were formulated in terms of meeting in varying degrees the children's social and emotional needs. In one group (A) the teachers were instructed to adopt an

George G. Thompson

1944-01-01

351

Social Emotional Development in Infants and Toddlers Who are Homeless as Reported by Mothers  

Microsoft Academic Search

Children who are homeless are reported to have mental health problems at rates of 44% compared to 18% of homed children (1, 2.) A contributing factor to mental health problems can be poor social emotional development (3.) Mothers who experience homelessness may find facilitating social emotional development a challenge when basic necessities such as securing food, shelter and clothing are

Debra Rybski

2008-01-01

352

Facial Emotion Recognition in Children with High Functioning Autism and Children with Social Phobia  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Recognizing facial affect is essential for effective social functioning. This study examines emotion recognition abilities in children aged 7-13 years with High Functioning Autism (HFA = 19), Social Phobia (SP = 17), or typical development (TD = 21). Findings indicate that all children identified certain emotions more quickly (e.g., happy [less…

Wong, Nina; Beidel, Deborah C.; Sarver, Dustin E.; Sims, Valerie

2012-01-01

353

A Psychometric Study of the Infant and Toddler Intervals of the Social Emotional Assessment Measure  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Psychometric and utility studies on Social Emotional Assessment Measure (SEAM), an innovative tool for assessing and monitoring social-emotional and behavioral development in infants and toddlers with disabilities, were conducted. The Infant and Toddler SEAM intervals were the study focus, using mixed methods, including item response theory…

Squires, Jane K.; Waddell, Misti L.; Clifford, Jantina R.; Funk, Kristin; Hoselton, Robert M.; Chen, Ching-I

2013-01-01

354

LINKING PREVENTION SCIENCE AND SOCIAL AND EMOTIONAL LEARNING: THE OREGON RESILIENCY PROJECT  

Microsoft Academic Search

This article reviews the contributions of the Oregon Resiliency Project, an effort to enhance positive social - emotional development of children and youth through social and emotional learning (SEL). The project was launched in 2001 as a collaborative effort between faculty and graduate student researchers at the University of Oregon. The primary aims have included training, outreach, and research in

KENNETH W. MERRELL

2010-01-01

355

The Relationships among Facial Emotion Recognition, Social Skills, and Quality of Life.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Forty-six institutionalized adults with mild or moderate mental retardation were administered the Vineland Adaptive Behavior Scales (socialization domain), a subjective measure of quality of life, and a facial emotion recognition test. Facial emotion recognition, quality of life, and social skills appeared to be independent of one another. Facial…

Simon, Elliott W.; And Others

1995-01-01

356

Social-Emotional Characteristics of Gifted Accelerated and Non-Accelerated Students in the Netherlands  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Background: In the studies of acceleration conducted so far a multidimensional perspective has largely been neglected. No attempt has been made to relate social-emotional characteristics of accelerated versus non-accelerated students in perspective of environmental factors. Aims: In this study, social-emotional characteristics of accelerated…

Hoogeveen, Lianne; van Hell, Janet G.; Verhoeven, Ludo

2012-01-01

357

Social-Emotional School Readiness: How Do We Ensure Children Are Ready to Learn?  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This article begins with a review of research providing evidence that social-emotional competence is a key component of school readiness and that the foundations for social-emotional competence are laid down in the earliest years. We go on to review effective practices and specific interventions that have been found to strengthen children's…

Gray, Sarah A. O.; Herberle, Amy E.; Carter, Alice S.

2012-01-01

358

The Relationships among Language Ability, Emotion Regulation and Social Competence in Second-Grade Students  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Relationships exist between language ability, emotion regulation, and social competence in preschool children. This study examines how these relationships function in elementary school children, and explores whether language ability partially mediates the relationship between emotion regulation and social competence. Second-grade students (N = 67)…

Monopoli, W. John; Kingston, Sharon

2012-01-01

359

Reviving Oral Reading Practices with English Learners by Integrating Social-Emotional Learning  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The purpose of this article is to provide background on integrating social-emotional learning (SEL) into classroom oral reading practices. The section that follows outlines some of the language and academic demands English learners (ELs) face at school. Another section considers the relationship between academic and social-emotional learning. The…

Dresser, Rocio

2012-01-01

360

Building Strong Foundations: Practical Guidance for Promoting the Social-Emotional Development of Infants and Toddlers.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Supportive relationships, especially those with primary caregivers, are crucial for both the physical survival and the healthy social-emotional development of infants and toddlers. This guide, the first in a series on infant mental health from the Center for Program Excellence, describes how supportive relationships promote the social-emotional

Parlakian, Rebecca; Seibel, Nancy L.

361

Prevalence of sexual, physical and emotional abuse in the Norwegian mother and child cohort study  

PubMed Central

Background Abuse of women occurs in every society of the world. Increased information about the prevalence in industrialized countries, like Norway, is required to make strategies to prevent abuse. Our aim was to investigate the prevalence of self-reported sexual, physical and emotional abuse in a large obstetric population in Norway, and the associations between exposure to adult abuse, socio-demographics and other characteristics. Methods Our study is based on the Norwegian Mother and Child (MoBa) Cohort study, conducted by the Norwegian Institute of Public Health. The current study included 65,393 women who responded to two extensive postal questionnaires during pregnancy. Any adult abuse is defined as being exposed to one or more types of adult abuse, any child abuse is defined as being exposed to one or more types of child abuse, and any lifetime abuse is defined as being exposed to abuse either as a child and/or as an adult. Perpetrators were categorized as known or stranger. Results Overall, 32% of the women reported any lifetime abuse, 20% reported any adult abuse, 19% reported any child abuse and 6% reported abuse both as adults and as children. Emotional abuse was the most frequently reported type of abuse both as adults (16%) and children (14%). Adult sexual abuse was reported by 5% and child sexual abuse by 7%. Physical abuse was reported by 6% as adults and by 6% as children. Approximately 30% of those reporting adult or child abuse reported exposure to two or three types of abuse. Five percent of the women reported exposure to any abuse during the last 12?months. For all types of abuse, a known perpetrator was more commonly reported. Logistic regression showed that being exposed to child abuse, smoking and drinking alcohol in the first trimester of pregnancy, living alone, and belonging to the eldest age group were significantly associated with being exposed to any adult abuse. Conclusion The reported prevalence of any lifetime abuse was substantial in our low-risk pregnant population. Antenatal care is an opportunity for clinicians to ask about experiences of abuse and identify those at risk. PMID:23452504

2013-01-01

362

Development and Assessment of Social and Emotional Competence Through Simulated Patient Consultations  

PubMed Central

Objective. To determine whether a quantitative tool could be used to measure social emotional competence and whether the development of social emotional competence through a pharmacy practicum course is possible. Design. First-year pharmacy students completed the Social Emotional Development Inventory (SED-I) online and then participated in a series of mock patient consultations on smoking cessation and nonprescription medication. Assessment. The 212 students enrolled in the course completed the SED-I. Evaluation of students’ performance in the clinical cases using a patient counseling assessment form showed that students’ social emotional competencies significantly improved. Observer ratings for “influence” and “connection” on the assessment form predicted student performance in the clinical cases. Conclusions. Role-play exercises in which students engage in patient consultations can be used to develop social emotional competence in pharmacy students, and the SED-I and a patient counseling assessment form can be used to assess learning and improvement in this area. PMID:23049104

Carr-Lopez, Sian; Seal, Craig R.; Scott, Amy N.; Lopez, Chris

2012-01-01

363

Influence of children's emotional states on the recognition of emotion in peers and social motives to change another's emotional state  

Microsoft Academic Search

This experiment addressed the question of whether children's own emotional states influence their accuracy in recognizing emotional states in peers and any motives they may have to intervene in order to change their peers' emotional states. Happiness, sadness, anger, or a neutral state were induced in preschool children, who then viewed slides of other 4-year-old children who were actually experiencing

Charles R. Carlson; Elyse Schwartz Felleman; John C. Masters

1983-01-01

364

MBSR vs aerobic exercise in social anxiety: fMRI of emotion regulation of negative self-beliefs  

E-print Network

. Meditation practice was associated with decreases in negative emotion and social anxiety symptom severity that helps to explain how mindfulness meditation training benefits patients with anxiety disorders. Keywords: social anxiety; emotion regulation; mindfulness; fMRI; attention INTRODUCTION Mindfulness meditation

Gross, James J.

365

Mother-Child Conversations of Emotionally Salient Events: Exploring the Functions of Emotional Reminiscing in European-American and Chinese Families  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This study explores the functional variations in mother-child conversations of emotionally salient events in European-American and Chinese families. Thirty Chinese and 31 European-American 3-year-old children and their mothers participated. Mothers were asked to discuss with their children at home two specific one-point-in-time events in which…

Wang, Qi; Fivush, Robyn

2005-01-01

366

Rehabilitation of severely mutilated teeth under general anesthesia in an emotionally immature child.  

PubMed

Dental caries is the single most common chronic childhood disease. In rampant caries, there is early pulp involvement and gross destruction of the maxillary anterior teeth as well as posterior teeth. This leads to decreased masticatory efficiency, difficulty in speech, compromised esthetics, development of abnormal tongue habits and subsequent malocclusion and psychological problems. The restoration of severely decayed primary incisors is often a procedure that presents a special challenge to dentists, particularly in an uncooperative child. This case report documents the restoration of severely mutilated deciduous teeth in an emotionally immature patient under general anesthesia. PMID:20215672

Navit, S; Katiyar, A; Samadi, F; Jaiswal, J N

2010-01-01

367

Attributions and emotional reactions to the identity disclosure ("coming out") of a homosexual child.  

PubMed

This study examined factors that contribute to parental rejection of gay and lesbian youth. College students (N = 356) were asked to imagine being the parent of an adolescent son who recently disclosed that he was gay. Consistent with study hypotheses and based on attribution and moral affect theory, results of regression analyses indicated that greater perceptions of control over homosexuality, higher proneness to experience shame, and lower proneness to experience guilt were associated with increasing negative reactions toward an imagined homosexual child. Also in line with study hypotheses, greater willingness to offer help to the hypothetical child was predicted by lower perceptions of control over homosexuality, less intensely unfavorable emotional reactions, less proneness to experience guilt, and greater reported likelihood of experiencing affection toward him. Theoretical and clinical implications of this research are discussed. PMID:11444053

Armesto, J C; Weisman, A G

2001-01-01

368

A Social Relations Model Analysis of Parent and Child Play  

Microsoft Academic Search

Within the context of the family, the dyadic play of young children and their parents is influenced by each family member’s own characteristics and by the characteristics and behavior of his or her social partners. This article introduces the Social Relations Model (Kenny & LaVoie, 1984) as a new approach for understanding reciprocity during parent—child and sibling play. Thirty-two 12-month-old

Marguerite B. Stevenson; Lewis A. Leavitt; Richard H. Thompson; Mary A. Roach

1988-01-01

369

Enhancing social cognition by training children in emotion understanding: a primary school study.  

PubMed

We investigated whether training school-age children in emotion understanding had a significant effect on their social cognition. Participants were 110 children (mean age=7 years 3 months) assigned to training and control conditions. Over a 2-month intervention program, after the reading of illustrated scenarios based on emotional scripts, the training group was engaged in conversations on emotion understanding, whereas the control group was simply asked to produce a drawing about the story. The training group outperformed the control group on emotion comprehension, theory of mind, and empathy, and the positive training outcomes for emotion understanding remained stable over 6 months. Implications of the findings are discussed. PMID:24280639

Ornaghi, Veronica; Brockmeier, Jens; Grazzani, Ilaria

2014-03-01

370

An Exploratory Social-Emotional Prosthetic for Autism Spectrum Disorders Rana el Kaliouby, Alea Teeters, and Rosalind W. Picard  

E-print Network

to change their beliefs and actions [1]. As an example of where social-emotional communication breaks down-emotional intelligence skills [1]. These deficits are characterized by a reduced ability to regulate social interactionAn Exploratory Social-Emotional Prosthetic for Autism Spectrum Disorders Rana el Kaliouby, Alea

371

Brief Report: Integrating Social-Emotional Learning with Literacy Instruction--An Intervention for Children at Risk for Emotional and Behavioral Disorders  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

It is widely believed that children's social-emotional growth and academic learning are inextricably connected. Pressured by high-stakes assessments, however, school professionals find it difficult to devote adequate time to children's social/behavioral development. As a response, we developed and piloted Social-Emotional Learning…

Daunic, Ann; Corbett, Nancy; Smith, Stephen; Barnes, Tia; Santiago-Poventud, Lourdes; Chalfant, Pam; Pitts, Donna; Gleaton, Jeisha

2013-01-01

372

Differentiating emotions across contexts: comparing adults with and without social anxiety disorder using random, social interaction, and daily experience sampling.  

PubMed

The ability to recognize and label emotional experiences has been associated with well-being and adaptive functioning. This skill is particularly important in social situations, as emotions provide information about the state of relationships and help guide interpersonal decisions, such as whether to disclose personal information. Given the interpersonal difficulties linked to social anxiety disorder (SAD), deficient negative emotion differentiation may contribute to impairment in this population. We hypothesized that people with SAD would exhibit less negative emotion differentiation in daily life, and these differences would translate to impairment in social functioning. We recruited 43 people diagnosed with generalized SAD and 43 healthy adults to describe the emotions they experienced over 14 days. Participants received palmtop computers for responding to random prompts and describing naturalistic social interactions; to complete end-of-day diary entries, they used a secure online website. We calculated intraclass correlation coefficients to capture the degree of differentiation of negative and positive emotions for each context (random moments, face-to-face social interactions, and end-of-day reflections). Compared to healthy controls, the SAD group exhibited less negative (but not positive) emotion differentiation during random prompts, social interactions, and (at trend level) end-of-day assessments. These differences could not be explained by emotion intensity or variability over the 14 days, or to comorbid depression or anxiety disorders. Our findings suggest that people with generalized SAD have deficits in clarifying specific negative emotions felt at a given point of time. These deficits may contribute to difficulties with effective emotion regulation and healthy social relationship functioning. PMID:24512246

Kashdan, Todd B; Farmer, Antonina S

2014-06-01

373

The quantum of social action and the function of emotion in decision-making  

Microsoft Academic Search

The rational model of the interaction, as derived from the individual perspective, has been unable to replicate the emergence of social phenomena. But by focusing on the physics of interaction, the recently developed social quantum uncertainty relations provide a computational model that functions for individual and social decisions. In this model, emotion signals in the interaction bind individuals into social

W. F. Lawless

2001-01-01

374

How Attributional Ambiguity Shapes Physiological and Emotional Responses to Social Rejection and Acceptance  

Microsoft Academic Search

The authors examined White and Black participants’ emotional, physiological, and behavioral responses to same-race or different-race evaluators, following rejecting social feedback or accepting social feedback. As expected, in ingroup interactions, the authors observed deleterious responses to social rejection and benign responses to social acceptance. Deleterious responses included cardiovascular (CV) reactivity consistent with threat states and poorer performance, whereas benign responses

Wendy Berry Mendes; Brenda Major; Shannon McCoy; Jim Blascovich

2008-01-01

375

Improving Socialization and Emotion Recognition for Autistic Children Using a Smartphone App  

E-print Network

Improving Socialization and Emotion Recognition for Autistic Children Using a Smartphone App of Socialization After we found the gap in social apps already on the market, we decided to focus on six different). In order to maximize learning and social skills, the app will consist of three separate phases using

Gray, Jeffrey G.

376

Reading a Child's Writing as a Social Text.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Contends that children assimilate enormous amounts of information from society. Reveals the presence, in one child's fictional piece of writing, of complex layers of gender (including gender stereotypes), societal tensions, and economic social forces which one might expect to be beyond the grasp of a seven-year-old. (SR)

Sumida, Anna Y.

2000-01-01

377

Social Support: A Mediator between Child Maltreatment and Developmental Outcomes  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The purpose of the current study was to investigate the relationship between child maltreatment, social support, and developmental outcomes in first-year college students. Participants were 202 undergraduate students (137 female, 65 male) who completed surveys at two time points: once before entering college and once during their first year of…

Pepin, Elise N.; Banyard, Victoria L.

2006-01-01

378

Child Development Associate. Social Science: Children in the Cosmos.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This Child Development Associate (CDA) training module, one of a series of 18, is designed to help the CDA intern provide learning experiences in the social sciences for young children. The module stipulates competency-based objectives and provides essential information, suggestions, examples and learning activities on three topics related to the…

Oscar Rose Junior Coll., Midwest City, OK.

379

Emotion-Related Behavioral Regulation in African American Preschoolers: Social-Emotional Correlates of Teacher Perceptions  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This preliminary and exploratory study examined the correlates of 5 aspects of teacher-rated emotion-related regulation (modulation, flexibility, organization, emotion-focused coping, aggressive-coping strategies) in a sample of 36 low- to middle-income African American preschoolers. Results showed that children's empathy, emotional intensity,…

Smith, Maureen C.

2004-01-01

380

Maternal Emotion-Related Socialization and Preschoolers' Developing Emotion Self-Awareness  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Preschoolers' ability to demonstrate awareness of their own emotion is an important socio-emotional competence which has received increasing attention in the developmental literature. The present study examined emotion self-awareness of happiness, sadness, and anger in response to a delay of gratification task in 78 preschool children. Maternal…

Warren, Heather K.; Stifter, Cynthia A.

2008-01-01

381

Reappraising social emotions: the role of inferior frontal gyrus, temporo-parietal junction and insula in interpersonal emotion regulation  

PubMed Central

Previous studies have reported the effect of emotion regulation (ER) strategies on both individual and social decision-making, however, the effect of regulation on socially driven emotions independent of decisions is still unclear. In the present study, we investigated the neural effects of using reappraisal to both up- and down-regulate socially driven emotions. Participants played the Dictator Game (DG) in the role of recipient while undergoing fMRI, and concurrently applied the strategies of either up-regulation (reappraising the proposer's intentions as more negative), down-regulation (reappraising the proposer's intentions as less negative), as well as a baseline “look” condition. Results showed that regions responding to the implementation of reappraisal (effect of strategy, that is, “regulating regions”) were the inferior and middle frontal gyrus, temporo parietal junction and insula bilaterally. Importantly, the middle frontal gyrus activation correlated with the frequency of regulatory strategies in daily life, with the insula activation correlating with the perceived ability to reappraise the emotions elicited by the social situation. Regions regulated by reappraisal (effect of regulation, that is, “regulated regions”) were the striatum, the posterior cingulate and the insula, showing increased activation for the up-regulation and reduced activation for down-regulation, both compared to the baseline condition. When analyzing the separate effects of partners' behavior, selfish behavior produced an activation of the insula, not observed when subjects were treated altruistically. Here we show for the first time that interpersonal ER strategies can strongly affect neural responses when experiencing socially driven emotions. Clinical implications of these findings are also discussed to understand how the way we interpret others' intentions may affect the way we emotionally react. PMID:24027512

Grecucci, Alessandro; Giorgetta, Cinzia; Bonini, Nicolao; Sanfey, Alan G.

2013-01-01

382

Cultivating the Socially Competent Body: Bodies and Risk in Swedish Programmes for Social Emotional Learning in Preschools and Schools  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Social emotional learning (SEL) is common in preschools and schools both in Europe and North America today. Programmes for socio-emotional training and the rise of what is labelled therapeutic education have dramatically increased during the first decade of the millennium. In this article, a manual-based programme used for SEL in a Swedish school…

Bartholdsson, Åsa; Gustafsson-Lundberg, Johanna; Hultin, Eva

2014-01-01

383

Neurophysiological Markers for Child Emotion Regulation from the Perspective of Emotion-Cognition Integration: Current Directions and Future Challenges  

PubMed Central

Neuroscientific research on emotion regulation suggests that the interplay between emotion and cognition may be fundamental to the ability to adaptively regulate emotions. Although emotion and cognition have historically been considered to be in opposition, more recent research suggests that they are also integrated, coordinated, and complementary. In this article, I review studies showing that scalp-recorded event-related potentials (ERPs) reflecting emotion-cognition integration can be used as clinically meaningful indices of emotion regulation in children and adults, and have the potential to serve as biomarkers for emotion regulation and risk for specific affective disorders. Drawing on neuroscience and behavioral research, I propose a model in which ERP measures of emotion-cognition integration rather than opposition is the guiding principle for detecting neural markers for emotion regulation. Suggestions for a future research agenda are then presented. PMID:20390603

Dennis, Tracy A.

2010-01-01

384

Cognitive Emotion Regulation: Insights from Social Cognitive and Affective Neuroscience  

PubMed Central

Recent developments in the study of cognitive emotion regulation illustrate how functional imaging is extending behavioral analyses. Imaging studies have contributed to the development of a multi-level model of emotion regulation that describes the interactions between neural systems implicated in emotion generation and those implicated in emotional control. In this article, we review imaging studies of one type of cognitive emotion regulation, namely reappraisal. We show how imaging studies have contributed to the construction of this model, illustrate the interplay of psychological theory and neuroscience data in its development, and describe how this model can be used as the basis for future basic and translational research.

Ochsner, Kevin N.; Gross, James J.

2014-01-01

385

What about the Child's Tie to the Father? A New Insight into Fathering, Father-Child Attachment, Children's Socio-Emotional Development and the Activation Relationship Theory  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The broad aim of this study on father-child attachment was to verify whether the Risky Situation (RS) procedure is a more valid means than the Strange Situation (SS) procedure of predicting children's socio-emotional development, and to evaluate the moderator effect of day-to-day involvement on attachment and activation. Participants were 53…

Dumont, Caroline; Paquette, Daniel

2013-01-01

386

The Facilitation of Social-Emotional Understanding and Social Interaction in High-Functioning Children with Autism: Intervention Outcomes.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

A study evaluated a 7-month cognitive behavioral intervention for facilitating social-emotional understanding and social interaction of 15 high-functioning children (ages 8-17) with autism. Intervention focused on interpersonal problem solving, affective knowledge, and social interaction. After treatment, children were more likely to initiate…

Bauminger, Nirit

2002-01-01

387

How social context moderates the self-evaluative emotions experienced due to health risk behaviour  

Microsoft Academic Search

When people are confronted with the potential negative physical outcomes of their own health risk behaviour, they experience a self-threat. This threat is felt as negative self-evaluative emotions. We hypothesise that the threat will lead to more private self-evaluative emotions (e.g. regret) in a private social context, whereas more public self-evaluative emotions (e.g. embarrassment) will be felt in a public

Judith D. M. Grob; Arie Dijkstra; Carla de Groot

2011-01-01

388

How Do I Feel About Feelings? Emotion Socialization in Families of Depressed and Healthy Adolescents  

PubMed Central

Emotional and cognitive changes that occur during adolescence set the stage for the development of adaptive or maladaptive beliefs about emotions. Although research suggests that parents’ behaviors and beliefs about emotions relate to children’s emotional abilities, few studies have looked at parental socialization of children’s emotions, particularly in families with depressed adolescents. The present study examined associations between parent and adolescent meta-emotion philosophies (MEP), defined as thoughts, reactions, and feelings about their own emotions. Additionally, adolescent depressive status was tested as a moderator of relationships between parents’ and adolescents’ MEP. One hundred and 52 adolescents, aged 14–18 (65.8% female), and their parents (148 mothers, 106 fathers) participated in a study on emotion socialization in families of depressed and healthy adolescents. Depressed adolescents (n = 75) and matched healthy adolescents (n = 77) were recruited based on research criteria for mental health status. The sample was largely Caucasian (82%) and of middle socioeconomic class status. Results indicated that mothers’ and fathers’ MEP about their children’s emotions were associated with adolescents’ MEP, although parents’ MEP about their own emotions was unrelated to adolescents’ MEP. Fathers’ MEP about children’s emotions made unique contributions to adolescents’ MEP across both adolescent groups. Adolescents’ depressive status moderated the relationship between mothers’ and adolescents’ MEP such that mothers’ MEP was particularly relevant for depressed adolescents. The continued influence of parents in the emotional lives of adolescents is discussed as well as differences in emotion socialization in families with depressed and healthy adolescents. PMID:20473712

Hunter, Erin C.; Katz, Lynn Fainsilber; Shortt, Joann Wu; Davis, Betsy; Leve, Craig; Allen, Nicholas B.

2010-01-01

389

The effects of socioeconomic diversity on the language, cognitive and social–emotional development of children from low?income backgrounds  

Microsoft Academic Search

Previous studies on the influence of mixed groupings within preschool classrooms have indicated positive effects on children’s development. This study extended earlier findings to determine the effects of socioeconomic diversity within the classroom on the language, cognitive and social–emotional development of preschool children of low?income backgrounds. Twenty?seven preschool children were enrolled in two classrooms in a private university’s child development

Janet H. Bagby; Loretta C. Rudd; Majka Woods

2005-01-01

390

Explaining elevated social anxiety among Asian Americans: emotional attunement and a cultural double bind.  

PubMed

Previous research has documented elevated levels of social anxiety in Asian American college students when compared with their European American peers. The authors hypothesized that higher symptoms among Asians could be explained by cultural differences in attunement to the emotional states of others. Socialization within interdependent cultures may cultivate concerns about accurately perceiving other's emotional responses, yet at the same time, norms governing emotional control may limit competencies in emotion recognition. A sample of 264 Asian American and European American college students completed measures of social anxiety, attunement concerns (shame socialization and loss of face), and attunement competencies (self-reported sensitivity and performance on emotion recognition tasks). Results confirmed that ethnic differences in social anxiety symptoms were mediated by differences in attunement concerns and competencies in emotion recognition. Asian American college students may find themselves in a double bind that leads to social unease because of a cultural emphasis on sensitivity to others' emotions in the midst of barriers to developing this attunement skill set. PMID:19209982

Lau, Anna S; Fung, Joey; Wang, Shu-Wen; Kang, Sun-Mee

2009-01-01

391

Agent-based simulations of emotion spreading in online social networks  

E-print Network

Quantitative analysis of empirical data from online social networks reveals group dynamics in which emotions are involved (\\v{S}uvakov et al). Full understanding of the underlying mechanisms, however, remains a challenging task. Using agent-based computer simulations, in this paper we study dynamics of emotional communications in online social networks. The rules that guide how the agents interact are motivated, and the realistic network structure and some important parameters are inferred from the empirical dataset of \\texttt{MySpace} social network. Agent's emotional state is characterized by two variables representing psychological arousal---reactivity to stimuli, and valence---attractiveness or aversiveness, by which common emotions can be defined. Agent's action is triggered by increased arousal. High-resolution dynamics is implemented where each message carrying agent's emotion along the network link is identified and its effect on the recipient agent is considered as continuously aging in time. Our res...

Šuvakov, Milovan; Schweitzer, Frank; Tadi?, Bosiljka

2012-01-01

392

Gender Differences in the Relationship Between Social Communication and Emotion Recognition  

PubMed Central

Objective To investigate the association between autistic traits and emotion recognition in a large community sample of children using facial and social motion cues, additionally stratifying by gender. Method A general population sample of 3,666 children from the Avon Longitudinal Study of Parents and Children (ALSPAC) were assessed on their ability to correctly recognize emotions using the faces subtest of the Diagnostic Analysis of Non-Verbal Accuracy, and the Emotional Triangles Task, a novel test assessing recognition of emotion from social motion cues. Children with autistic-like social communication difficulties, as assessed by the Social Communication Disorders Checklist, were compared with children without such difficulties. Results Autistic-like social communication difficulties were associated with poorer recognition of emotion from social motion cues in both genders, but were associated with poorer facial emotion recognition in boys only (odds ratio = 1.9, 95% CI = 1.4, 2.6, p = .0001). This finding must be considered in light of lower power to detect differences in girls. Conclusions In this community sample of children, greater deficits in social communication skills are associated with poorer discrimination of emotions, implying there may be an underlying continuum of liability to the association between these characteristics. As a similar degree of association was observed in both genders on a novel test of social motion cues, the relatively good performance of girls on the more familiar task of facial emotion discrimination may be due to compensatory mechanisms. Our study might indicate the existence of a cognitive process by which girls with underlying autistic traits can compensate for their covert deficits in emotion recognition, although this would require further investigation. PMID:24157389

Kothari, Radha; Skuse, David; Wakefield, Justin; Micali, Nadia

2013-01-01

393

Information Processing in Everyday Life: Emotion-Congruent Bias in Mothers’ Reports of Parent-Child Interactions  

Microsoft Academic Search

The authors examined the role of emotions in mothers’ perceptions of the parent-child relationship. Ninety-nine mothers completed a measure of trait affect and then interacted with their preschool children under low- and high-stress conditions. After each interaction session, mothers rated their mood states and positive and negative aspects of parent-child behavior. To control for differences in the quality of dyadic

Robert Weis; M. Christine Lovejoy

2002-01-01

394

Emotional granularity and social functioning in individuals with schizophrenia: an experience sampling study.  

PubMed

Previous research has shown that healthy individuals who fail to differentiate among emotional states (i.e., those with low emotional granularity; EG) have poorer social functioning (SF) than those with high EG. It is unknown, however, whether these associations extend to clinical disorders characterized by impaired SF, such as schizophrenia. In the present study, we compared SF and EG in individuals with schizophrenia and healthy controls, and then, within the schizophrenia group, we examined the links between EG and SF. Employing an Experience Sampling Method approach, 77 individuals with schizophrenia and 27 healthy controls rated their momentary emotions (sadness, anxiety, anger, and happiness) up to 10 times/day over a two-day period using mobile electronic devices. For each participant, we then calculated the within-subject average correlations among the momentary emotion ratings, producing two EG indices - EGIall for all emotions and EGIneg for negative ones. A subsample of participants with schizophrenia also completed self-report, interview, and ability-based measures of SF. Compared to healthy controls, individuals with schizophrenia displayed significantly poorer SF and lower EGIall, but comparable EGIneg. Within the schizophrenia group, hierarchical multiple regression analyses indicated that EGIall, but not EGIneg, significantly predicted social dysfunction after controlling for emotional awareness, symptoms, and emotional intensity and variability. Our findings indicate that individuals with schizophrenia have a relatively intact ability to differentiate among negative emotions in everyday life. However, they experience significant difficulties differentiating between positive and negative emotions, and this may contribute to their social difficulties. PMID:24561000

Kimhy, David; Vakhrusheva, Julia; Khan, Samira; Chang, Rachel W; Hansen, Marie C; Ballon, Jacob S; Malaspina, Dolores; Gross, James J

2014-06-01

395

Experimental evidence of massive-scale emotional contagion through social networks  

PubMed Central

Emotional states can be transferred to others via emotional contagion, leading people to experience the same emotions without their awareness. Emotional contagion is well established in laboratory experiments, with people transferring positive and negative emotions to others. Data from a large real-world social network, collected over a 20-y period suggests that longer-lasting moods (e.g., depression, happiness) can be transferred through networks [Fowler JH, Christakis NA (2008) BMJ 337:a2338], although the results are controversial. In an experiment with people who use Facebook, we test whether emotional contagion occurs outside of in-person interaction between individuals by reducing the amount of emotional content in the News Feed. When positive expressions were reduced, people produced fewer positive posts and more negative posts; when negative expressions were reduced, the opposite pattern occurred. These results indicate that emotions expressed by others on Facebook influence our own emotions, constituting experimental evidence for massive-scale contagion via social networks. This work also suggests that, in contrast to prevailing assumptions, in-person interaction and nonverbal cues are not strictly necessary for emotional contagion, and that the observation of others’ positive experiences constitutes a positive experience for people. PMID:24889601

Kramer, Adam D. I.; Guillory, Jamie E.; Hancock, Jeffrey T.

2014-01-01

396

Oxytocin improves behavioural and neural deficits in inferring others' social emotions in autism.  

PubMed

Recent studies have suggested oxytocin's therapeutic effects on deficits in social communication and interaction in autism spectrum disorder through improvement of emotion recognition with direct emotional cues, such as facial expression and voice prosody. Although difficulty in understanding of others' social emotions and beliefs under conditions without direct emotional cues also plays an important role in autism spectrum disorder, no study has examined the potential effect of oxytocin on this difficulty. Here, we sequentially conducted both a case-control study and a clinical trial to investigate the potential effects of oxytocin on this difficulty at behavioural and neural levels measured using functional magnetic resonance imaging during a psychological task. This task was modified from the Sally-Anne Task, a well-known first-order false belief task. The task was optimized for investigation of the abilities to infer another person's social emotions and beliefs distinctively so as to test the hypothesis that oxytocin improves deficit in inferring others' social emotions rather than beliefs, under conditions without direct emotional cues. In the case-control study, 17 males with autism spectrum disorder showed significant behavioural deficits in inferring others' social emotions (P = 0.018) but not in inferring others' beliefs (P = 0.064) compared with 17 typically developing demographically-matched male participants. They also showed significantly less activity in the right anterior insula and posterior superior temporal sulcus during inferring others' social emotions, and in the dorsomedial prefrontal cortex during inferring others' beliefs compared with the typically developing participants (P < 0.001 and cluster size > 10 voxels). Then, to investigate potential effects of oxytocin on these behavioural and neural deficits, we conducted a double-blind placebo-controlled crossover within-subject trial for single-dose intranasal administration of 24 IU oxytocin in an independent group of 20 males with autism spectrum disorder. Behaviourally, oxytocin significantly increased the correct rate in inferring others' social emotions (P = 0.043, one-tail). At the neural level, the peptide significantly enhanced the originally-diminished brain activity in the right anterior insula during inferring others' social emotions (P = 0.004), but not in the dorsomedial prefrontal cortex during inferring others' beliefs (P = 0.858). The present findings suggest that oxytocin enhances the ability to understand others' social emotions that have also required second-order false belief rather than first-order false beliefs under conditions without direct emotional cues in autism spectrum disorder at both the behaviour and neural levels. PMID:25149412

Aoki, Yuta; Yahata, Noriaki; Watanabe, Takamitsu; Takano, Yosuke; Kawakubo, Yuki; Kuwabara, Hitoshi; Iwashiro, Norichika; Natsubori, Tatsunobu; Inoue, Hideyuki; Suga, Motomu; Takao, Hidemasa; Sasaki, Hiroki; Gonoi, Wataru; Kunimatsu, Akira; Kasai, Kiyoto; Yamasue, Hidenori

2014-11-01

397

Relationship between Students' Emotional Intelligence, Social Bond, and Interactions in Online Learning  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The purpose of the study was to investigate the relationship between students' emotional intelligence, social bond, and their interactions in an online learning environment. This study examined emotional aspects of online interaction in both synchronous and asynchronous online learning environments. A conceptual framework was developed based on…

Han, Hee Young

2009-01-01

398

Art-Based Program for Social and Emotional Development of Children  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

For eight weeks, we ran an art-based program for social and emotional development in Grade 5 of primary school for children aged 11-12. We met once a week for 45 minutes and worked with 25 children on improving their skills in communication, cooperation, manifestation, and recognition of emotions and identity enforcement. Each skill was covered by…

Mynarikova, Lenka

2012-01-01

399

Young People with Specific Language Impairment: A Review of Social and Emotional Functioning in Adolescence  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This article provides a review of research into the social and emotional functioning of adolescents with specific language impairment (SLI). In particular, we focus on peer relations, peer friendships, bullying, emotional difficulties and psychiatric difficulties. As a group, adolescents with SLI tend to be more vulnerable to problems in these…

Durkin, Kevin; Conti-Ramsden, Gina

2010-01-01

400

Puzzlingly High Correlations in fMRI Studies of Emotion, Personality, and Social Cognition  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging (fMRI) studies of emotion, personality, and social cognition have drawn much attention in recent years, with high-profile studies frequently reporting extremely high (e.g., > 8) correlations between behavioral and self-report measures of personality or emotion and measures of brain activation. We show that…

Vul, Edward; Harris, Christine; Winkielman, Piotr; Pashler, Harold

2009-01-01

401

Social-cognitive Competence, Peer Rejection and Neglect, and Behavioral and Emotional Problems in Middle Childhood  

Microsoft Academic Search

This prospective, longitudinal study examines individual differences in two conceptu- ally related but empirically distinct domains of social-cognitive competence (cognitive interpretive understanding and interpersonal perspective co-ordination) as modera- tors of the relation between peer rejection and neglect and behavioral and emotional problems in grades 2 and 3. As expected, peer rejection and neglect increased risks for behavioral and emotional problems

Wendy L. G. Hoglund; Christopher E. Lalonde; Bonnie J. Leadbeater

2008-01-01

402

Peer Nominations of Emotional Expressivity among Urban Children: Social and Psychological Correlates  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The current study examined associations between peer nominations of children's expression of negative emotions and psychological, social, and behavioral correlates in a sample of 523 first graders. Children (85 percent African-American) completed a peer nomination measure for expressing negative emotions. In addition, three other domains of…

Perry-Parrish, Carisa; Waasdorp, Tracy E.; Bradshaw, Catherine P.

2012-01-01

403

Emotion in robot cultures Cultural models of affect in social robot design  

E-print Network

cultural models of affect as they are embodied in technological artifacts, we gain a new perspective on the repeated assembly of culture through technology. Key words: Cultural models, social robotics, affective. These "emotional machines" can incite affective reactions from people as well as display and even "feel" emotions

Sabanovic, Selma

404

Social and Emotional Supports for Children with Disabilities and Their Families.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This theme issue addresses emotional and social issues faced by children and their families across a number of disability areas, with emphasis on needs the disabled have in common with all people, the value of tangible and emotional support for all family members, the need for comprehensive services, and the expertise that families can bring to…

Focal Point, 1991

1991-01-01

405

Intrapersonal and Interpersonal Functions of Non Suicidal Self-Injury: Associations with Emotional and Social Functioning  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Understanding the functions of nonsuicidal self-injury (NSSI) has important implications for the development and refinement of theoretical models and treatments of NSSI. Emotional and social vulnerabilities associated with five common functions of NSSI-emotion relief (ER), feeling generation (FG), self-punishment (SP), interpersonal influence…

Turner, Brianna J.; Chapman, Alexander L.; Layden, Brianne K.

2012-01-01

406

An Android Head for Social-Emotional Intervention for Children with Autism Spectrum  

E-print Network

An Android Head for Social-Emotional Intervention for Children with Autism Spectrum Conditions.Adams,Peter.Robinson}@cl.cam.ac.uk Abstract. Many children with autism spectrum conditions (ASC) have difficulties recognizing emotions from have prompted the exploration of new intervention strategies. Robots have proven to be an engaging

Robinson, Peter

407

Emotion Regulation and Aggressive Behavior in Preschoolers: The Mediating Role of Social Information Processing  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This study examined whether the relation between maladaptive emotion regulation and aggression was mediated by deviant social information processing (SIP). Participants were 193 preschool children. Emotion regulation and aggression were rated by teachers. Deviant SIP (i.e., attribution of hostile intent, aggressive response generation, aggressive…

Helmsen, Johanna; Koglin, Ute; Petermann, Franz

2012-01-01

408

"I'm Not Scared of Anything": Emotion as Social Power in Children's Worlds  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This article examines how American middle-class children learn and acquire culturally appropriate emotions and sentiments, focusing especially on children's experiences. By analysing children's emotional worlds as well as adult socialization practices, the article shows that children actively reinterpret, reconstruct and reformulate various…

Ahn, Junehui

2010-01-01

409

Decrease of Prefrontal-Posterior EEG Coherence: Loose Control during Social-Emotional Stimulation  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

In two experiments we aimed to investigate if individual differences in state-dependent decreases or increases of EEG coherence between prefrontal and posterior cortical regions may be indicative of a mechanism modulating the impact social-emotional information has on an individual. Two independent samples were exposed to an emotional stimulation…

Reiser, Eva M.; Schulter, Gunter; Weiss, Elisabeth M.; Fink, Andreas; Rominger, Christian; Papousek, Ilona

2012-01-01

410

Measuring Child Care Quality.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Child care quality is not a single dimension, but rather a multidimensional characteristic of programs that support the family in its child-rearing role and programs in which children thrive developmentally, socially, cognitively, physically, and emotionally. At the regulatory and accreditation level, approaches to quality focus on group size,…

Fiene, Richard

411

Emotion regulation deficits in generalized anxiety disorder, social anxiety disorder, and their co-occurrence  

PubMed Central

Preliminary evidence supports the role of emotion-related deficits in generalized anxiety disorder (GAD), including heightened emotional intensity, poor understanding of emotion, negative cognitive reactivity to emotions, and maladaptive emotion management. However, questions remain concerning the specificity of these emotion-related deficits compared to highly comorbid conditions such as social anxiety disorder (SAD). In the current study, 113 undergraduate students were administered measures of GAD, SAD, and emotion-related factors in order to clarify relationships among these variables. In univariate analyses, presence of SAD did not significantly impact the association between GAD and the emotion-related measures. Further, a discriminant function analysis revealed that emotional intensity and impaired regulation strategies provided the greatest discrimination between groups and best predicted a diagnosis of GAD (regardless of SAD comorbidity). Although their discriminatory ability was weaker, poor emotional understanding best predicted a diagnosis of SAD (regardless of GAD comorbidity), and non-acceptance of emotions best predicted comorbid GAD and SAD. PMID:19464142

Mennin, Douglas S.; McLaughlin, Katie A.; Flanagan, Thomas J.

2014-01-01

412

Early Childhood Student Teacher Expectations toward Kindergarten Children's Social and Emotional Competencies  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This study investigates the importance of student teachers expectations as a predictor of future social and emotional competencies of young children. These predicted expectations were estimated from a 42 item questionnaire that was designed by the author and it addressed five domains: social skills, social awareness, self-control, relationship…

Betawi, Amy

2013-01-01

413

Selective Narrowing of Social Networks across Adulthood is Associated with Improved Emotional Experience in Daily Life  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Past research has documented age differences in the size and composition of social networks that suggest that networks grow smaller with age and include an increasingly greater proportion of well-known social partners. According to socioemotional selectivity theory, such changes in social network composition serve an antecedent emotion regulatory…

English, Tammy; Carstensen, Laura L.

2014-01-01

414

The Impact of Emotional and Material Social Support on Women's Drug Treatment Completion  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This study assessed how women's perceptions of emotional and material social support affect their completion of residential drug treatment. Although previous research has examined how social support affects recovery, few studies, if any, have examined both the types and the sources of social support. The study hypothesized that women's perceptions…

Lewandowski, Cathleen A.; Hill, Twyla J.

2009-01-01

415

Expressed Emotion, Social Skill, and Response to Negative Affect in Schizophrenia  

Microsoft Academic Search

The social skills and social perception of schizophrenia patients in response to negative affect was examined as a function of family expressed emotion (EE). Patients participated in a role-play test, a social perception test, and a problem-solving discussion with a family member and were assessed on several measures of symptomatology. EE of family members was evaluated with the Camberwell Family

Kim T. Mueser; Alan S. Bellack; Julie H. Wade; Steven L. Sayers; Ann Tierney; Gretchen Haas

1993-01-01

416

AlphaWolf: Social Learning, Emotion and Development in Autonomous Virtual Agents  

E-print Network

, Cambridge, MA 02139 USA {badger, bruce}@media.mit.edu Abstract. We present research in synthetic social in social learning currently under way in the Synthetic Characters Group at the MIT Media Lab, headedAlphaWolf: Social Learning, Emotion and Development in Autonomous Virtual Agents Bill Tomlinson

Tomlinson, Bill

417

Positive and negative emotionality: trajectories across six years and relations with social competence.  

PubMed

The goals of the present study were to examine (1) the mean-level stability and differential stability of children's positive emotional intensity, negative emotional intensity, expressivity, and social competence from early elementary school-aged to early adolescence, and (2) the associations between the trajectories of children's emotionality and social functioning. Using four waves of longitudinal data (with assessments 2 years apart), parents and teachers of children (199 kindergarten through third grade children at the first assessment) rated children's emotion-related responding and social competence. For all constructs, there was evidence of mean-level decline with age and stability in individual differences in rank ordering. Based on age-centered growth-to-growth curve analyses, the results indicated that children who had a higher initial status on positive emotional intensity, negative emotional intensity, and expressivity had a steeper decline in their social skills across time. These findings provide insight into the stability and association of emotion-related constructs to social competence across the elementary and middle school years. PMID:19186913

Sallquist, Julie Vaughan; Eisenberg, Nancy; Spinrad, Tracy L; Reiser, Mark; Hofer, Claire; Zhou, Qing; Liew, Jeffrey; Eggum, Natalie

2009-02-01

418

Positive and Negative Emotionality: Trajectories Across Six Years and Relations With Social Competence  

PubMed Central

The goals of the present study were to examine (1) the mean-level stability and differential stability of children’s positive emotional intensity, negative emotional intensity, expressivity, and social competence from early elementary school-aged to early adolescence, and (2) the associations between the trajectories of children’s emotionality and social functioning. Using four waves of longitudinal data (with assessments 2 years apart), parents and teachers of children (199 kindergarten through third grade children at the first assessment) rated children’s emotion-related responding and social competence. For all constructs, there was evidence of mean-level decline with age and stability in individual differences in rank ordering. Based on age-centered growth-to-growth curve analyses, the results indicated that children who had a higher initial status on positive emotional intensity, negative emotional intensity, and expressivity had a steeper decline in their social skills across time. These findings provide insight into the stability and association of emotion-related constructs to social competence across the elementary and middle school years. PMID:19186913

Sallquist, Julie Vaughan; Eisenberg, Nancy; Spinrad, Tracy L.; Reiser, Mark; Hofer, Claire; Liew, Jeffrey; Zhou, Qing; Eggum, Natalie

2009-01-01

419

Are young adolescents' social and emotional skills protective against involvement in violence and bullying behaviors?  

PubMed

This study examined relationships between social-emotional skills and involvement in bullying and violence among young adolescents from ethnically diverse, economically disadvantaged urban neighborhoods. Data were from 171 sixth- and seventh-grade students involved in a larger intervention study. Analyses examined relationships between social-emotional skills measures (intrapersonal skills, stress management skills, interpersonal skills) and involvement in violence, physical bullying, and relational aggression. Of social-emotional skills indicators, interpersonal skills and stress management skills demonstrated significant bivariate relationships with each of the bullying and violence outcomes. In multivariate models, greater interpersonal skills and greater stress management skills were significantly associated with lower odds of violence involvement. Greater stress management skills were also significantly associated with lower levels of physical bullying and relational aggression. Findings suggest that efforts to foster development of young adolescents' social-emotional skills may, in turn, reduce their risk for involvement in bullying and violence. PMID:23075502

Polan, Julie C; Sieving, Renee E; McMorris, Barbara J

2013-07-01

420

Training elements of elementary teachers in social and emotional development of gifted students  

E-print Network

Student needs are ever changing within today??s classroom. Training elements for teachers must be adapted so that all students?? individual needs are being met. Training offered by school districts must incorporate specific social and emotional...

Broughton, Lori Saunders

2005-11-01

421

Music Therapy Groups: A Path to Social-Emotional Growth and Academic Success.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

In a New York City community school, music therapy addresses the following social and emotional developmental goals: participation, interaction, relationships, communication, expression, space sharing, problem solving, self-esteem, respect, and awareness. (SK)

Camilleri, Vanessa

2000-01-01

422

Differential Impact of Parent Functioning on Infant Social Emotional Functioning During the Transition to Parenthood  

E-print Network

The current study examined the relations between parental and relationship functioning and infant social-emotional functioning, with an emphasis on the differential predictive power of mothers and fathers. This is the first study to examine certain...

Carhart, Kathryn Patricia

2012-07-16

423

Do Provocateurs’ Emotion Displays Influence Children’s Social Goals and Problem Solving?  

Microsoft Academic Search

The social goals and social problem-solving of children who varied in social adjustment were examined in the context of hypothetical ambiguous provocation situations in which provocateurs’ emotion displays were systematically manipulated. Children rated the importance of six different social goals and explained how they would solve the problems. Social adjustment was measured with rating and nomination sociometric procedures. Rejected-aggressive, rejected-nonaggressive,

Elizabeth A. Lemerise; Bridget K. Fredstrom; Brenna M. Kelley; April L. Bowersox; Rachel N. Waford

2006-01-01

424

The presence of a culturally similar or dissimilar social partner affects neural responses to emotional stimuli  

PubMed Central

Background Emotional responding is sensitive to social context; however, little emphasis has been placed on the mechanisms by which social context effects changes in emotional responding. Objective We aimed to investigate the effects of social context on neural responses to emotional stimuli to inform on the mechanisms underpinning context-linked changes in emotional responding. Design We measured event-related potential (ERP) components known to index specific emotion processes and self-reports of explicit emotion regulation strategies and emotional arousal. Female Chinese university students observed positive, negative, and neutral photographs, whilst alone or accompanied by a culturally similar (Chinese) or dissimilar researcher (British). Results There was a reduction in the positive versus neutral differential N1 amplitude (indexing attentional capture by positive stimuli) in the dissimilar relative to alone context. In this context, there was also a corresponding increase in amplitude of a frontal late positive potential (LPP) component (indexing engagement of cognitive control resources). In the similar relative to alone context, these effects on differential N1 and frontal LPP amplitudes were less pronounced, but there was an additional decrease in the amplitude of a parietal LPP component (indexing motivational relevance) in response to positive stimuli. In response to negative stimuli, the differential N1 component was increased in the similar relative to dissimilar and alone (trend) context. Conclusion These data suggest that neural processes engaged in response to emotional stimuli are modulated by social context. Possible mechanisms for the social-context-linked changes in attentional capture by emotional stimuli include a context-directed modulation of the focus of attention, or an altered interpretation of the emotional stimuli based on additional information proportioned by the context. PMID:24693352

Woodcock, Kate A.; Yu, Dian; Liu, Yi; Han, Shihui

2013-01-01

425

Examining the Link between Preschool Social-Emotional Competence and First Grade Academic Achievement: The Role of Attention Skills  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Recently, research has begun to identify cognitive and social-emotional predictors of early academic success. Yet few studies have examined the mechanisms by which children's social-emotional skills are associated with later academic success. The present study examines the associations between preschool emotion knowledge, kindergarten attention…

Rhoades, Brittany L.; Warren, Heather K.; Domitrovich, Celene E.; Greenberg, Mark T.

2011-01-01

426

Adaptive Associations between Social Cognition and Emotion Regulation are Absent in Schizophrenia and Bipolar Disorder  

PubMed Central

Schizophrenia (SZ) and bipolar disorder (BD) are associated with impairments in facial emotion perception and Theory of Mind (ToM). These social cognitive skills deficits may be related to a reduced capacity to effectively regulate one’s own emotions according to the social context. We therefore set out to examine the relationship between social cognitive abilities and the use of cognitive strategies for regulating negative emotion in SZ and BD. Participants were 56 SZ, 33 BD, and 58 healthy controls (HC) who completed the Ekman 60-faces test of facial emotion recognition; a sub-set of these participants also completed The Awareness of Social Inference Test (TASIT) and the Cognitive Emotion Regulation Questionnaire (CERQ). SZ participants demonstrated impairments in emotion perception on both the Ekman and the TASIT Emotion Evaluation tests relative to BD and HC. While both SZ and BD patients showed ToM deficits (i.e., perception of sarcasm and lie) compared to HC, SZ patients demonstrated significantly greater ToM impairment compared to BD. There were also distinct patterns of cognitive strategies used to regulate emotion in both patient groups: those with SZ were more likely to engage in catastrophizing and rumination, while BD subjects were more likely to blame themselves and were less likely to engage in positive reappraisal, relative to HC. In addition, those with SZ were more likely to blame others compared to BD. Associations between social cognition and affect regulation were revealed for HC only: TASIT performance was negatively associated with more frequent use of rumination, catastrophizing, and blaming others, such that more frequent use of maladaptive cognitive emotion regulation strategies was associated with poor social cognitive performance. These associations were not present in either patient group. However, both SZ and BD patients demonstrated poor ToM performance and aberrant use of emotion regulation strategies consistent with previous studies. SZ also showed basic emotion recognition deficits relative to BD and HC. That there were no associations between social cognition and the capacity to self-regulate negative emotion in SZ and BD (in the context of poor social cognition and maladaptive regulatory strategies) suggests that dysfunction in fronto-limbic brain networks may underpin both social cognitive deficits and the use of maladaptive cognitive strategies in these disorders, albeit by potentially different routes. PMID:23423878

Rowland, Jesseca E.; Hamilton, Meelah K.; Vella, Nicholas; Lino, Bianca J.; Mitchell, Philip B.; Green, Melissa J.

2013-01-01

427

Self-disclosure, emotional expression and intimacy within romantic relationships of people with social phobia.  

PubMed

The current study examined aspects of communication and intimacy between people with social phobia and their romantic partners. Forty-eight individuals with social phobia and 58 community controls completed a series of questionnaires to measure self-disclosure, emotional expression and levels of intimacy within their romantic relationships. Participants with social phobia reported less emotional expression, self-disclosure and intimacy than controls, even after controlling for a diagnosis of mood disorder. The group differences did not differ significantly by gender. A continuous measure of social anxiety also correlated significantly with the three relationship measures and these associations held for emotional expression and self-disclosure after controlling for levels of dysphoria. People with social phobia report reduced quality within their romantic relationships, which may have implications for impairment, social support and ultimately maintenance of the disorder. PMID:19665694

Sparrevohn, Roslyn M; Rapee, Ronald M

2009-12-01

428

Emotional intelligence, social coping, and psychological distress among Chinese gifted students in Hong Kong  

Microsoft Academic Search

The relationships among emotional intelligence, social coping, and psychological distress were investigated in a sample of 624 Chinese gifted students in Hong Kong. A mediation?effect model specifying that emotional intelligence had an effect on psychological distress mediated by social coping was hypothesized and tested using structural equation modeling procedures. For comparison, a direct?effect model and a direct?and?mediation?effect model were also

David W. Chan

2006-01-01

429

The BarOn Model of Emotional-Social Intelligence (ESI)1  

Microsoft Academic Search

The present manuscript is an empirically based theoretical paper that presents, describes, and exami- nes the Bar-On Model of Emotional-Social Intelligence (ESI) in deep. First, a description of the Emo- tional Quotient Inventory (the EQ-i), which has played an instrumental role in developing the model, is given. The EQ-i is a self-report measure of emotionally and socially intelligent behaviour. It

Reuven Bar-On

2005-01-01

430

Social and Emotional Learning in the Kindergarten Classroom: Evaluation of the Strong Start Curriculum  

Microsoft Academic Search

There has been increasing interest in the promotion of social and emotional learning in schools, and research has shown positive\\u000a outcomes. However, relatively few studies have been conducted in kindergarten classrooms or considered the feasibility of\\u000a kindergarten implementation. This study examined the effects of Strong Start on the social and emotional competence of 67 kindergarten students, using a time-series design.

Thomas J. Kramer; Paul Caldarella; Lynnette Christensen; Ryan H. Shatzer

2010-01-01

431

A study of play as a predictor of social-emotional development  

Microsoft Academic Search

Wolfgang, Charles H. A study of Play as a Predictor of Social-Emotional Development, 1983. In order to determine what forms of Piaget play forms and play materials best predicted social-emotional development, preschool-aged children (ages 3#fr1\\/2> to 5#fr1\\/2>) were rated in play performance on macrosymbolic play (socio-dramatic), construction-fluids (sand, easel painting, clay and drawing), construction-structured (carpentry, blocks. Lego and puzzles), gross

Charles H. Wolfgang

1983-01-01

432

Denial and social and emotional outcomes in lung cancer patients: The protective effect of denial  

Microsoft Academic Search

Denial is a well-known phenomenon in clinical oncology practice. Yet whether the impact of denial on patient well-being is beneficial or harmful remains unknown. The purpose of the current study is to investigate the relationship between denial and social and emotional outcomes in a large sample of lung cancer patients over an extended time period.Denial and social and emotional outcomes

Martina S. Vos; Hein Putter; Hans C. van Houwelingen

2011-01-01

433

Sensitivity and Specificity of the Screen for Child Anxiety Related Emotional Disorders (SCARED): A Community-Based Study  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The aim of this cross-sectional community-based study was to examine the sensitivity and specificity of the Screen for Child Anxiety Related Emotional Disorders (SCARED) to the diagnosis of anxiety disorders (AD). Participants were 119 students aged 9-18. Psychiatric diagnoses were assessed by a psychiatrist throughout a structural clinical…

DeSousa, Diogo Araujo; Salum, Giovanni Abrahao; Isolan, Luciano Rassier; Manfro, Gisele Gus

2013-01-01

434

Cross-Cultural Comparisons of Child-Reported Emotional and Physical Abuse: Rates, Risk Factors and Psychosocial Symptoms  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Objectives: This study was designed to assess the incidence of child emotional and physical abuse, associated risk factors and psychosocial symptoms in a cross-cultural comparison between post-communist bloc countries. Method: One-thousand one-hundred forty-five children ages 10-14 from Latvia (N=297), Lithuania (N=300), Macedonia (N=302), and…

Sebre, Sandra; Sprugevica, Ieva; Novotni, Antoni; Bonevski, Dimitar; Pakalniskiene, Vilmante; Popescu, Daniela; Turchina, Tatiana; Friedrich, William; Lewis, Owen

2004-01-01

435

Emotional Issues  

MedlinePLUS

Emotional Issues Duchenne’s emotional toll on a child can manifest in a variety of ways. Patience, consistency, understanding, and love are some of the most important things you can provide to ensure the emotional health of your child. Parents of a ...

436

Predicting the Quality of Mother-Child Reminiscing Surrounding Negative Emotional Events at 42- and 48-Months  

PubMed Central

Researchers have speculated that a number of factors likely predict the quality of reminiscing between preschool children and their mothers. This study was designed to investigate three such factors, including child temperament, maternal personality, and maternal caregiving representations. 70 mothers and their preschool children were recruited for the study. When the child was 42 months of age, mothers completed measures of her personality and the child’s temperament. Mothers also took part in the shortened Parent Development Inventory that was coded for coherence, pleasure, comfort, and perspective taking. At both 42 and 48 months, the mother-child dyad reminisced about a past event in which the child experienced a negative emotion. These conversations were coded for the amount of maternal elaboration, the discussion of emotion, and dyadic qualities (such as collaboration and intersubjectivity). At 42 months, aspects of maternal personality and child temperament were most associated with reminiscing quality. However, at 48 months, it was primarily maternal representations of relationships that predicted high quality reminiscing in the dyad. PMID:23789023

Laible, Deborah; Panfile, Tia; Augustine, Mairin

2012-01-01

437

The extent of evidence-based information about child maltreatment fatalities in social science textbooks.  

PubMed

Previous research has established that child welfare workers lack important information about child maltreatment fatalities and risk factors leading to death. Further, training has not been associated with improvements in knowledge. The authors assessed the presence of evidence-based information about child maltreatment fatalities and risk factors for death in 24 social science textbooks about child abuse and neglect or child welfare. The results indicate that basic information, such as definitions and incidence rates of child maltreatment fatalities are routinely included in social science textbooks, but information about child, parent, and household risk factors are not, and that inaccurate information is often included. Implications of the findings are discussed. PMID:24066634

Douglas, Emily M; Serino, Patricia J

2013-10-01

438

Questioning as a Component of Scaffolding in Predicting Emotion Knowledge in Preschoolers  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The following study expands Denham and Auerbach's (1995, "Mother-child dialogue about emotions and preschoolers' emotional competence." "Genetic, Social, and General Psychology Monographs," 121, 313-337) findings, demonstrating a link between mothers' talk about emotions and preschoolers' knowledge of emotions. We investigate the maternal language…

Bailey, Craig S.; Denham, Susanne A.; Curby, Timothy W.

2013-01-01

439

The Effects of Social Comparison on Social Emotions and Behavior during Childhood: The Ontogeny of Envy and Schadenfreude Predicts Developmental Changes in Equity-Related Decisions  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Social comparison can elicit emotions such as envy, which can affect social interactions. The emergence and development of such social emotions through ontogeny, and their influence on social interaction, are unknown. We tested 182 children from 7 to 13 years of age with a novel monetary reward-and-punishment task measuring envy and Schadenfreude…

Steinbeis, Nikolaus; Singer, Tania

2013-01-01

440

Evolution of emotions on networks leads to the evolution of cooperation in social dilemmas  

E-print Network

We show that the resolution of social dilemmas on random graphs and scale-free networks is facilitated by imitating not the strategy of better performing players but rather their emotions. We assume sympathy and envy as the two emotions that determine the strategy of each player by any given interaction, and we define them as probabilities to cooperate with players having a lower and higher payoff, respectively. Starting with a population where all possible combinations of the two emotions are available, the evolutionary process leads to a spontaneous fixation to a single emotional profile that is eventually adopted by all players. However, this emotional profile depends not only on the payoffs but also on the heterogeneity of the interaction network. Homogeneous networks, such as lattices and regular random graphs, lead to fixations that are characterized by high sympathy and high envy, while heterogeneous networks lead to low or modest sympathy but also low envy. Our results thus suggest that public emotion...

Szolnoki, Attila; Ye, Ye; Perc, Matjaz

2013-01-01

441

Social Structure Shapes Cultural Stereotypes and Emotions: A Causal Test of the Stereotype Content Model  

PubMed Central

The stereotype content model (SCM) posits that social structure predicts specific cultural stereotypes and associated emotional prejudices. No prior evidence at a societal level has manipulated both structural predictors and measured both stereotypes and prejudices. In the present study, participants (n = 120) responded to an immigration scenario depicting a high- or low-status group, competitive or not competitive, and rated their likely stereotype (on warmth and competence) and elicited emotional prejudices (admiration, contempt, envy, and pity). Seven of eight specific predictions are fully confirmed, supporting the SCM's predicted causality for social structural effects on cultural stereotypes and emotional prejudices. PMID:24285928

Caprariello, Peter A.; Cuddy, Amy J. C.; Fiske, Susan T.

2013-01-01

442

Examining the roles of victim-perpetrator relationship and emotional closeness in judgments toward a depicted child sexual abuse case.  

PubMed

The current study investigated the impact that respondent gender, victim-perpetrator relationship, and the level of emotional closeness had on attributions in a hypothetical child sexual abuse case. A total of 160 university students read a hypothetical scenario depicting a female child sexually abused by an adult male. The perpetrator was either the victim's biological father or her stepfather, with this relationship described as being either emotionally close or emotionally distant. Respondents read one of four (2 victim-perpetrator relationship × 2 emotional closeness) scenarios before completing 26 attribution items pertaining to credibility, blame, and severity. Principle components analysis yielded five factors, namely victim credibility, mother culpability, perpetrator culpability, assault severity, and victim culpability. Multivariate analysis of covariance--controlling for respondent (Caucasian vs. non-Caucasian) ethnicity--revealed, as predicted, significant main effects for respondent gender, victim-perpetrator relationship, and emotional closeness. In general, females assigned more provictim/ antiperpetrator/antimother attributions than males. Results were also suggested that both victim-perpetrator relationship and emotional closeness influence attributions made toward the victim, perpetrator, and nonoffending mother. Methodological issues and suggestions for future work are also discussed. PMID:23027835

Davies, Michelle; Patel, Fehmida; Rogers, Paul

2013-03-01

443

Affective Social Quest (ASQ) Teaching Emotion Recognition with Interactive Media & Wireless Expressive Toys  

E-print Network

that these tools can be particularly useful to children with autism and their practitioners. I test the hypothesis animated movie clips, together with a set of stuffed dolls through which a child can interact, the test children are shown one of 200 emotive clips and they respond by touching the doll whose expression

444

Correlates of social and emotional loneliness in older people: evidence from an English community study  

PubMed Central

Objectives Loneliness is an important influence on quality of life in old age and has been conceptualised as consisting of two dimensions, social and emotional. This article describes analyses that sought to produce models of social and emotional loneliness in older people, using demographic, psychological and health, and social variables. Method Older people (aged 65+, n = 1255) from the Barnsley metropolitan area of the United Kingdom were recruited randomly from within a stratified sampling frame and received a questionnaire-based interview (response rate: 68.1%). The questionnaire contained items and scales on demographic, psychological and health, and social characteristics, and a validated measure of loneliness that assesses both social and emotional loneliness. Results Of the respondents, 7.7% were found to be severely or very severely lonely, while another 38.3% were moderately lonely. Social and emotional loneliness shared 19.36% variance. Being male, being widowed, low well-being, low self-esteem, low-income comfort, low contact with family, low contact with friends, low activity, low perceived community integration, and receipt of community care were significant predictors of social loneliness (R = 0.50, R2 = 0.25, F(18, 979) = 18.17, p < 0.001). Being widowed, low well-being, low self-esteem, high activity restriction, low-income comfort, and non-receipt of informal care were significant predictors of emotional loneliness (R = 0.55, R2 = 0.30, F(18, 973) = 23.00, p < 0.001). Conclusion This study provides further empirical support for the conceptual separation of emotional and social loneliness. Consequently, policy on loneliness in older people should be directed to developing a range of divergent intervention strategies if both emotional and social loneliness are to be reduced. PMID:24251626

Dahlberg, Lena; McKee, Kevin J.

2013-01-01

445

Participation of Primary School Pupils Who Stay at Institution of Social Services and Child Protection Dormitories in Social Science Lessons  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This research aims to understand to what extent primary school pupils who stay at the Institution of Social Services and Child Protection dormitories participate in social science lessons. Data were obtained from pupils staying at the Institution of Social Services and Child Protection dormitories and attending primary schools in Istanbul and…

Guven, Sibel; Sahin Taskin, Cigdem

2008-01-01

446

Parental physical activity as a moderator of the parental social influence – child physical activity relationship: A social control approach  

Microsoft Academic Search

This study utilized a social control framework to assess whether parents' physical activity level moderated the relationship between parents' use of social influences and their children's physical activity level. Parents reported their personal and child's physical activity levels as well as the frequency with which they used various social control tactics in relation to their child's physical activity. A series

Kevin S. Spink; Shaelyn M. Strachan; Patrick Odnokon

2008-01-01

447

Working in Human Services: How Do Experiences and Working Conditions in Child Welfare Social Work Compare?  

Microsoft Academic Search

SummaryChild welfare agencies in many rich countries are having difficulty recruiting and retaining social workers. However, these problems are not unique to child welfare: retention problems have also been widely reported in both mental and general health facilities. In this paper, we compare the perceptions of work and working conditions held by child welfare social workers with the perceptions held

Pia Tham; Gabrielle Meagher

2009-01-01

448

How do shared-representations and emotional processes cooperate in response to social threat signals?  

PubMed

Research in social cognition has mainly focused on the detection and comprehension of others' mental and emotional states. Doing so, past studies have adopted a "contemplative" view of the role of the observer engaged in a social interaction. However, the adaptive problem posed by the social environment is first and foremost that of coordination, which demands more of social cognition beyond mere detection and comprehension of others' hidden states. Offering a theoretical framework that takes into account the dynamical aspect of social interaction - notably by accounting for constant interplay between emotional appraisal and motor processes in socially engaged human brain - thus constitutes an important challenge for the field of social cognition. Here, we propose that our social environment can be seen as presenting opportunities for actions regarding others. Within such a framework, non-verbal social signals such as emotional displays are considered to have evolved to influence the observer in consistent ways. Consequently, social signals can modulate motor responses in observers. In line with this theoretical framework we provide evidence that emotional and motor processes are actually tightly linked during the perception of threat signals. This is ultimately reflected in the human brain by constant interplay between limbic and motor areas. PMID:24080262

Grèzes, Julie; Dezecache, Guillaume

2014-03-01

449

PSY 478/578: Social Development Summer 2010  

E-print Network

with parents, emergence of self-understanding, emotion regulation, and contextual factors (such as variations in child rearing styles and family organization), which influence social and personality development

Lockery, Shawn

450

Affecting others: social appraisal and emotion contagion in everyday decision making.  

PubMed

In a diary study of interpersonal affect transfer, 41 participants reported on decisions involving other people over 3 weeks. Reported anxiety and excitement were reliably related to the perceived anxiety and excitement of another person who was present during decision making. Risk and importance appraisals partially mediated effects of other's anxiety on own anxiety as predicted by social appraisal theory. However, other's emotion remained a significant independent predictor of own emotion after controlling for appraisals, supporting the additional impact of more direct forms of affect transfer such as emotion contagion. Significant affect-transfer effects remained even after controlling for participants' perceptions of the other's emotion in addition to all measured appraisals, confirming that affect transfer does not require explicit registration of someone else's feelings. This research provides some of the clearest evidence for the operation of both social appraisal and automatic affect transfer in everyday social life. PMID:19474455

Parkinson, Brian; Simons, Gwenda

2009-08-01

451

Roles for Schools and School Social Workers in Improving Child Food Security  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Food insecurity is associated with a range of child developmental, behavioral, and emotional challenges, all of which can inhibit a child's school success. Schools offer a number of formal and informal services aimed at reducing food insecurity, but the problems associated with identifying children in need, addressing issues of stigma, and…

Fram, Maryah Stella; Frongillo, Edward A.; Fishbein, Eliza M.; Burke, Michael P.

2014-01-01

452

Neuroimaging social emotional processing in women: fMRI study of script-driven imagery  

PubMed Central

Emotion theory emphasizes the distinction between social vs non-social emotional-processing (E-P) although few functional neuroimaging studies have examined whether the neural systems that mediate social vs non-social E-P are similar or distinct. The present fMRI study of script-driven imagery in 20 women demonstrates that social E-P, independent of valence, more strongly recruits brain regions involved in social- and self-referential processing, specifically the dorsomedial prefrontal cortex, posterior cingulate/precuneus, bilateral temporal poles, bilateral temporoparietal junction and right amygdala. Functional response within brain regions involved in E-P was also significantly more pronounced during negatively relative to positively valenced E-P. Finally, the effect for social E-P was increased for positive relative to negative stimuli in many of these same regions. Future research directions for social and affective neuroscience are discussed. PMID:20525743

Dozois, David J. A.; Neufeld, Richard W. J.; Densmore, Maria; Stevens, Todd K.; Lanius, Ruth A.

2011-01-01

453

The role of teachers' positive attitude toward emotions in implementation of a social-emotional intervention  

E-print Network

This study investigates the role of elementary teachers' attitude toward teaching emotions in their implementation of the Promoting Alternative THinking Skills (PATHS) curriculum. The measure of teachers’ attitudes, the Positive Attitude Toward...

Buss, Michelle Therese

2009-06-02

454

The Importance of Rural, Township, and Urban Life in the Interaction between Social and Emotional Learning and Social Behaviors  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Whether an individual lives in a rural or urban setting may have direct impact on a wide variety of psychological patterns adopted by students. In this study, the effects of positive and negative social behaviors on the relationship between social and emotional learning needs and skills gaps of students who reside in both rural and urban areas…

Totan, Tarik; Ozyesil, Zümra; Deniz, M. Engin; Kiyar, Fatma

2014-01-01

455

Neural activity during emotion recognition after combined cognitive plus social cognitive training in schizophrenia.  

PubMed

Cognitive remediation training has been shown to improve both cognitive and social cognitive deficits in people with schizophrenia, but the mechanisms that support this behavioral improvement are largely unknown. One hypothesis is that intensive behavioral training in cognition and/or social cognition restores the underlying neural mechanisms that support targeted skills. However, there is little research on the neural effects of cognitive remediation training. This study investigated whether a 50 h (10-week) remediation intervention which included both cognitive and social cognitive training would influence neural function in regions that support social cognition. Twenty-two stable, outpatient schizophrenia participants were randomized to a treatment condition consisting of auditory-based cognitive training (AT) [Brain Fitness Program/auditory module ~60 min/day] plus social cognition training (SCT) which was focused on emotion recognition [~5-15 min per day] or a placebo condition of non-specific computer games (CG) for an equal amount of time. Pre and post intervention assessments included an fMRI task of positive and negative facial emotion recognition, and standard behavioral assessments of cognition, emotion processing, and functional outcome. There were no significant intervention-related improvements in general cognition or functional outcome. fMRI results showed the predicted group-by-time interaction. Specifically, in comparison to CG, AT+SCT participants had a greater pre-to-post intervention increase in postcentral gyrus activity during emotion recognition of both positive and negative emotions. Furthermore, among all participants, the increase in postcentral gyrus activity predicted behavioral improvement on a standardized test of emotion processing (MSCEIT: Perceiving Emotions). Results indicate that combined cognition and social cognition training impacts neural mechanisms that support social cognition skills. PMID:22695257

Hooker, Christine I; Bruce, Lori; Fisher, Melissa; Verosky, Sara C; Miyakawa, Asako; Vinogradov, Sophia

2012-08-01

456

Influence of social factors on lead exposure and child development  

SciTech Connect

A brief overview of current views of child development is provided, with particular attention given to the role the child's physical and social environment plays in influencing the developmental process. Examples from the recent literature are used to illustrate how these factors can influence lead exposure and most importantly how they might interact with lead to ameliorate or exacerbate possible lead effects. An example is provided which demonstrates that failure to control adequately and to adjust the data statistically to correct for the influence of these factors can lead one erroneously to attribute cognitive and behavioral changes to lead. Finally, data from the Cincinnati Prospective Lead Study are presented to illustrate the application of structural equation modeling as a means for unraveling the complex web of sociodemographic, environmental and behavioral influences on childhood lead exposure.

Bornschein, R.L.

1985-10-01

457

The effect of partner-directed emotion in social exchange decision-making  

PubMed Central

Despite the prevalence of studies examining economic decision-making as a purely rational phenomenon, common sense suggests that emotions affect our decision-making particularly in a social context. To explore the influence of emotions on economic decision-making, we manipulated opponent-directed emotions prior to engaging participants in two social exchange decision-making games (the Trust Game and the Prisoner's Dilemma). Participants played both games with three different (fictional) partners and their tendency to defect was measured. Prior to playing each game, participants exchanged handwritten “essays” with their partners, and subsequently exchanged evaluations of each essay. The essays and evaluations, read by the participant, were designed to induce either anger, sympathy, or a neutral emotional response toward the confederate with whom they would then play the social exchange games. Galvanic skin conductance level (SCL) showed enhanced physiological arousal during anger induction compared to both the neutral and sympathy conditions. In both social exchange games, participants were most likely to defect against their partner after anger induction and least likely to defect after sympathy induction, with the neutral condition eliciting intermediate defection rates. This pattern was found to be strongest in participants exhibiting low cognitive control (as measured by a Go/no-Go task). The findings indicate that emotions felt toward another individual alter how one chooses to interact with them, and that this influence depends both on the specific emotion induced and the cognitive control of the individual. PMID:23898313

Eimontaite, Iveta; Nicolle, Antoinette; Schindler, Igor; Goel, Vinod

2013-01-01

458

An android for enhancing social skills and emotion recognition in people with autism  

Microsoft Academic Search

It is well documented that the processing of social and emotional information is impaired in people with autism. Recent studies have shown that individuals, particularly those with high functioning autism, can learn to cope with common social situations if they are made to enact possible scenarios they may encounter in real life during therapy. The main aim of this work

Giovanni Pioggia; Roberta Igliozzi; Marcello Ferro; Arti Ahluwalia; Filippo Muratori; Danilo De Rossi

2005-01-01

459

Emotions and Positional Identity in Becoming a Social Justice Science Teacher: Nicole's Story  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Becoming a social justice teacher, for high-poverty urban settings, is fraught with emotional ambivalence related to personal, professional, relational, political, and cultural social justice issues. Prospective teachers must navigate their sense of justice, grapple with issues of educational disparity, engage with theories of critical,…

Rivera Maulucci, Maria S.

2013-01-01

460

Concurrent Validity and Clinical Usefulness of Several Individually Administered Tests of Children's Social-Emotional Cognition  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

In this study, the validity of 5 tests of children's social-emotional cognition, defined as their encoding, memory, and interpretation of social information, was tested. Participants were 126 clinic-referred children between the ages of 5 and 17. All 5 tests were evaluated in terms of their (a) concurrent validity, (b) incremental validity, and…

McKown, Clark

2007-01-01

461

Children's Theory of Mind: Understanding of Desire, Belief and Emotion with Social Referents  

Microsoft Academic Search

Preschoolers' understanding of belief, desire, and emotion was assessed in a new false belief task that explored children's mental state reasoning about social situations. The social analog task presented a change in a partner's play activity rather than a change in the location of a physical object. Two main differences from the usual pattern of theory of mind results were

Leanh Nguyen; Douglas Frye

1999-01-01

462

Sociocultural Considerations in Social Skills Training Research with African American Students with Emotional or Behavioral Disorders  

Microsoft Academic Search

Students with emotional or behavioral disorders (EBD) often have been identified on the basis of their social competence deficits. The overrepresentation of African American students in special education programs for EBD has been recognized for decades. This suggests that African American students with EBD have been in urgent need of social skills training (SST) if they have not been misidentified.

Rosa E. Olmeda; James M. Kauffman

2003-01-01

463

Associations between Social Potential and Emotional and Behavioural Difficulties in Egyptian Children  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

A number of Egyptian children experience psychiatric or mental health problems owing to a variety of internal and external qualities in their social context. These problems may mask strengths, particularly their social potential represented in their prosocial behaviour (PB). Research on emotional and behavioural difficulties (EBDs) should thus…

Emam, Mahmoud Mohamed

2012-01-01

464

The Relationship between Emotion Recognition Ability and Social Skills in Young Children with Autism  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This study assessed the relationship between emotion recognition ability and social skills in 42 young children with autistic disorder aged 4-7 years. The analyses revealed that accuracy in recognition of sadness, but not happiness, anger or fear, was associated with higher ratings on the Vineland-II Socialization domain, above and beyond the…

Williams, Beth T.; Gray, Kylie M.

2013-01-01

465

A Blueprint for Promoting Academic, Social, and Emotional Learning: The Salmon Program  

Microsoft Academic Search

The chapters in this volume lead in a literal and figurative sense to this paper and the Salmon program for promoting social and emotional growth and academic learning in school-aged children. The Salmon program is an extension of earlier work undertaken by two of the authors of this chapter and colleagues to promote the social competency of preschool children (Chesebrough,

Thomas P. Gullotta; Martin Bloom; Christianne F. Gullotta; Jennifer C. Messina

466

A Framework for Professional Development Focused on Social and Emotional Competencies  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This article presents a framework for planning professional development opportunities to increase teachers' confidence and competence in supporting young children's social-emotional development and addressing challenging behaviors. The framework makes use of a comprehensive collection of training materials developed by the Center on the Social and…

Quesenberry, Amanda; Doubet, Sharon

2006-01-01

467

Social identity, attribution, and emotion: Comparisons of Americans, Korean Americans, and Koreans  

Microsoft Academic Search

The social identity of another person, in addition to the social identity of self, can be an important factor affecting the types of attribution judgments and emotions that individuals indicate for the other person. In April 2007, the perpetrator of the shooting incident on the Virginia Tech University campus was identified as a person who emigrated to the USA from

Hee Sun Park; Doshik Yun; Hye Jeong Choi; Hye Eun Lee; Dong Wook Lee; Jiyoung Ahn

2012-01-01

468

The Social and Emotional Well-Being of Divorced Residential Parents.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Examination of the social and emotional well-being of 177 divorced mothers and fathers with live-in children revealed no differences between their reports of psychosomatic symptomatology, life satisfaction, life-area rankings, family cooperation, social support, and ex-spouse contact satisfaction. More health improvements and family esteem were…

Buehler, Cheryl

1988-01-01

469

The Social World of Twitter: Topics, Geography, and Emotions Daniele Quercia  

E-print Network

The Social World of Twitter: Topics, Geography, and Emotions Daniele Quercia§ , Licia Capra , Jon is open as to whether social media communities resemble real-life communities, and to what extent. We hold in Twitter. In particular, for 228,359 Twitter profiles, we compute network metrics (e

Hand, Steven

470

Response to Intervention in the Social-Emotional-Behavioral Domain: Perspectives from Urban Schools  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This article examines the application of the popular Response to Intervention (RTI) approach to the early identification and service delivery for students with social, emotional, and behavioral difficulties in schools. The article begins with an explanation of the RTI model as applied to the social behavior domain, based on the empirical research…

Pavri, Shireen

2010-01-01

471

Maternal Socialization of Positive Affect: The Impact of Invalidation on Adolescent Emotion Regulation and Depressive Symptomatology  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This study examined the relations among maternal socialization of positive affect (PA), adolescent emotion regulation (ER), and adolescent depressive symptoms. Two hundred early adolescents, 11-13 years old, provided self-reports of ER strategies and depressive symptomatology; their mothers provided self-reports of socialization responses to…

Yap, Marie B. H.; Allen, Nicholas B.; Ladouceur, Cecile D.

2008-01-01

472

Victims of Their Own Cognitions: Implicit Social Cognitions, Emotional Distress, and Peer Victimization  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This study investigated the relation between victimization and victimization-related distress and implicit social-cognitive processing. Eighty-seven 9-13 year old children completed measures of victimization experience and social cognitive processing tasks, including the emotional Stroop task and the self-concept Implicit Association Test (IAT).…

Rosen, Paul J.; Milich, Richard; Harris, Monica J.

2007-01-01

473

Social and Emotional Learning in the Kindergarten Classroom: Evaluation of the "Strong Start" Curriculum  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

There has been increasing interest in the promotion of social and emotional learning in schools, and research has shown positive outcomes. However, relatively few studies have been conducted in kindergarten classrooms or considered the feasibility of kindergarten implementation. This study examined the effects of "Strong Start" on the social and…

Kramer, Thomas J.; Caldarella, Paul; Christensen, Lynnette; Shatzer, Ryan H.

2010-01-01

474

A Reformal Approach for Turkey: Emotional- and Social-Oriented Teacher Education  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Social skills and emotional intelligence are closely related to each other. The analysis of the relationships between these two variables constitutes the problem of this study, considering the influence of teachers on improving these important features. This study made an evaluation on the relationships between levels of social skills and…

Ozabaci, Nilufer

2005-01-01

475

The effects of caregiver depression and caregiver stress on the relationship between poverty and social and emotional development in children  

Microsoft Academic Search

Literature on the course of children's social emotional development in early childhood is abundant. In addition, literature has identified that various family level variables play a role in a children's social emotional development. However, little research has utilized longitudinal panel data to investigate the relationship between children's social emotional development and caregiver's psychological well being.\\u000aIn this paper, latent growth

William Roy Henninger Iv

2010-01-01

476

Construct Validation of the concepts Social Presence, Emotional Presence and Connectedness and an Application of Zajonc's Social Facilitation Theory to Social Presence Research  

Microsoft Academic Search

Social presence' is a frequently used concept in Presence research. However, as several authors have noted, it is also a problematic concept. A literature review reveals that some of the recent discussion about the definition of 'social presence' deals with the distinction between 'perceptual social presence' (the perceptual awareness that you are not alone) and 'connectedness' (the emotional feeling that

Mariek Vanden Abeele

477

Counting on Kin: Social Networks, Social Support, and Child Health Status  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This article presents the results of new data collection in Mexico about the relationship between child well-being and social networks. Two research questions guide the analysis. First, under what conditions do networks generate greater (lesser) support? Second, what kinds of networks are associated with healthier children? We explore the health…

Kana'iaupuni, Shawn Malia; Donato, Katharine M.; Thompson-Colon, Theresa; Stainback, Melissa

2005-01-01

478

Parent-child and triadic antecedents of children's social competence: cultural specificity, shared process.  

PubMed

Guided by theories of cultural participation, the authors examined mother-child, father-child, and triadic interactive behaviors in 141 Israeli and Palestinian couples and their firstborn child at 5 and 33 months as antecedents of children's social competence. Four parent-child measures (parent sensitivity, child social engagement, parental control, dyadic reciprocity) and two family-level measures (cohesion and rigidity) were coded at each age. Children's social competence was observed at child-care locations. Cultural differences were observed for parent sensitivity and child social engagement, and the large cultural differences in sensitivity observed in infancy were attenuated by the toddler age. Interactive behaviors correlated with culture-specific parenting practices, child-rearing goals, and sex-role attitudes. Mother-child reciprocity in infancy and child engagement with father and family-level cohesion at both time points predicted social competence. Maternal sensitivity in infancy facilitated social competence only among Israeli children. Paternal control in toddlerhood interfered with Israeli children's social functioning but contributed to competence among Palestinians. Results underscore the links between early relational experiences and children's adaptation to the social milieu. PMID:20210505

Feldman, Ruth; Masalha, Shafiq

2010-03-01

479

Neural Correlates of Using Distancing to Regulate Emotional Responses to Social Situations  

PubMed Central

Cognitive reappraisal is a commonly used and highly adaptive strategy for emotion regulation that has been studied in healthy volunteers. Most studies to date have focused on forms of reappraisal that involve reinterpreting the meaning of stimuli and have intermixed social and non-social emotional stimuli. Here we examined the neural correlates of the regulation of negative emotion elicited by social situations using a less studied form of reappraisal known as distancing. Whole brain fMRI data were obtained as participants viewed aversive and neutral social scenes with instructions to either simply look at and respond naturally to the images or to downregulate their emotional responses by distancing. Three key findings were obtained accompanied with the reduced aversive response behaviorally. First, across both instruction types, aversive social images activated the amygdala. Second, across both image types, distancing activated the precuneus and posterior cingulate cortex (PCC), intraparietal sulci (IPS), and middle/superior temporal gyrus (M/STG). Third, when distancing one’s self from aversive images, activity increased in dorsal anterior cingulate (dACC), medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC), lateral prefrontal cortex, precuneus and PCC, IPS, and M/STG, meanwhile, and decreased in the amygdala. These findings demonstrate that distancing from aversive social cues modulates amygdala activity via engagement of networks implicated in social perception, perspective-taking, and attentional allocation. PMID:20226799

Koenigsberg, Harold W.; Fan, Jin; Ochsner, Kevin N.; Liu, Xun; Guise, Kevin; Pizzarello, Scott; Dorantes, Christine; Tecuta, Lucia; Guerreri, Stephanie; Goodman, Marianne; New, Antonia; Flory, Janine; Siever, Larry J

2010-01-01

480

Labels and Explanations in Mother--Child Emotion Talk: Age and Gender Differentiation.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Examined mothers' and preschoolers' emotion talk for age- and gender-related patterns in use of labels and explanations. Found that children used emotion words mainly in labels. Boys' emotion talk increased with age. The youngest girls had more emotion talk than same-age boys. Mothers used more explanations than labels with boys but similar…

Cervantes, Christi A.; Callanan, Maureen A.

1998-01-01

481

Attachment Security and Child's Empathy: The Mediating Role of Emotion Regulation  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The current study examined the influence of multiple factors on individual differences in empathy; namely, attachment, negative emotionality, and emotion regulation. A total of 63 mothers completed the Attachment Q-set and questionnaires about their children's empathy, negative emotionality, and emotion regulation when children were 3 years old.…

Panfile, Tia M.; Laible, Deborah J.

2012-01-01

482

Modeling the Impact of Motivation, Personality, and Emotion on Social Behavior  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Models seeking to predict human social behavior must contend with multiple sources of individual and group variability that underlie social behavior. One set of interrelated factors that strongly contribute to that variability - motivations, personality, and emotions - has been only minimally incorporated in previous computational models of social behavior. The Personality, Affect, Culture (PAC) framework is a theory-based computational model that addresses this gap. PAC is used to simulate social agents whose social behavior varies according to their personalities and emotions, which, in turn, vary according to their motivations and underlying motive control parameters. Examples involving disease spread and counter-insurgency operations show how PAC can be used to study behavioral variability in different social contexts.