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1

Child Care Teachers' Strategies in Children's Socialization of Emotion  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

An observational study was conducted to examine teachers' emotional socialization strategies in three child care centers. Qualitative analysis of the data suggests that teachers in child care centers respond to children's emotional expressions with various strategies. Teachers clearly expressed a preference for positive emotion through verbal…

Ahn, Hey Jun

2005-01-01

2

Preschoolers' Emotion Regulation Strategy Understanding: Relations with Emotion Socialization and Child Self-Regulation  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Preschool-age children's ability to verbally generate strategies for regulating anger and sadness, and to recognize purported effective strategies for these emotions, were examined in relation to child factors (child age, temperament, and language ability) and maternal emotion socialization (supportiveness and structuring in response to child

Cole, Pamela M.; Dennis, Tracy A.; Smith-Simon, Kristen E.; Cohen, Laura H.

2009-01-01

3

Parental pregnancy wantedness and child social-emotional development.  

PubMed

To examine how maternal and paternal pregnancy wantedness and couple concordance regarding pregnancy wantedness predict children's social-emotional development in kindergarten. We used data from nationally representative US sample from the Early Childhood Longitudinal Study Birth Cohort. Exposures of interest were maternal and paternal pregnancy wantedness, and couple concordance regarding pregnancy wantedness. Children's social-emotional development was evaluated by the child's kindergarten teacher using an adapted version of the Preschool and Kindergarten Behavior Scales. We examined bivariate associations between pregnancy wantedness and key socio-demographic variables in relation to children's social-emotional development. Multiple linear regression was used to assess the relationship between each pregnancy wantedness predictor and children's social-emotional development scores. Items related to child concentration and attention appeared to be the components driving almost all the associations with social-emotional development. Maternal report of unwanted pregnancy, resident father's report of mistimed pregnancy, and discordance of parental pregnancy wantedness (specifically when the mother wanted but the father did not want the pregnancy) predicted lower children's social-emotional development scores. Results suggest that maternal unwanted pregnancy and couple discordance in pregnancy wantedness were associated with poorer social-emotional development, especially in the area of concentration and attention, in kindergarten. PMID:23793490

Saleem, Haneefa T; Surkan, Pamela J

2014-05-01

4

Mothers' Socialization Goals, Mothers' Emotion Socialization Behaviors, Child Emotion Regulation, and Child Socioemotional Functioning in Urban India  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Studies examining the link between parental socialization and child functioning in varying cultural contexts are scarce. Focusing on early adolescents in suburban middle-class families in India, the present study examined interrelations among reports of mothers' socialization goals, socialization behaviors in response to child emotion, child

Raval, Vaishali V.; Raval, Pratiksha H.; Deo, Neeraj

2014-01-01

5

Parents' Emotion Expression as a Predictor of Child's Social Competence: Children with or without Intellectual Disability  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Background: Parents' expression of positive emotion towards children who are typically developing (TD) is generally associated with better social development. However, the association between parents' negative emotion expression and social development can be positive or negative depending upon a number of factors, including the child's emotion

Green, S.; Baker, B.

2011-01-01

6

Emotional responses to child sexual abuse: a comparison between police and social workers in Hong Kong  

Microsoft Academic Search

Objective: Research on specific emotional responses of professionals to child sexual abuse (CSA), other than the overwhelming feeling, is currently lacking in the child welfare literature. This study examines the initial responses to CSA of police and social workers in Hong Kong.Method: Based on their recall of the first child sexual abuse incident, 28 police officers and 86 social workers

Monit Cheung; Needha McNeil Boutte-Queen

2000-01-01

7

Spanish-Speaking Parent-Child Emotional Narratives and Children's Social Skills  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

We examined whether parents' content and style when discussing past positive and negative emotional experiences with their children were concurrently and predictively linked to prekindergarteners' social skills. Sixty-five low-income Spanish-speaking parent-child dyads discussed a past positive and negative emotional experience at the…

Leyva, Diana; Berrocal, Monica; Nolivos, Virginia

2014-01-01

8

Emotion regulation in relation to social functioning: An investigation of child self-reports  

Microsoft Academic Search

Relations between child self-reports of specific aspects of emotion regulation and specific aspects of social functioning in school were studied in two samples (N = 129\\/135) of 8- to 9-year-old children. The newly developed child self-report measure had significant relations to parent (Sample 1) and teacher (Sample 2) ratings of emotion regulation. In line with expectations (Rydell, Berlin, & Bohlin, 2003), poor

Ann-Margret Rydell; Lisa B. Thorell; Gunilla Bohlin

2007-01-01

9

Parents’ emotion expression as a predictor of child’s social competence: children with or without intellectual disability  

PubMed Central

Background Parents’ expression of positive emotion towards children who are typically developing (TD) is generally associated with better social development. However, the association between parents’ negative emotion expression and social development can be positive or negative depending upon a number of factors, including the child’s emotion regulation abilities. Given the lower emotion regulation capabilities of children with intellectual disability (ID), we hypothesised that parents’ negative emotion expression would be associated with lower social development in children with ID compared to those with TD. Methods Participants were 180 families of children with or without ID enrolled in a longitudinal study. Parents’ positive and negative affect were coded live from naturalistic home interactions at child ages 5–8 years, and child’s social skills were measured by using mother report at child ages 6–9 years. We examined mothers’ and fathers’ emotion expression as a time-varying predictor of social skills across ages 5–9 years. Results Mothers, but not fathers, expressed less positive affect and more negative affect with ID group children. Parents’ positive affect expression was related to social skills only for TD children, with mothers’ positive affect predicting higher social skills. Contrary to expectations, fathers’ positive affect predicted lower social skills. Parents’ negative affect predicted significantly lower social skills for children with ID than for children with TD. Conclusions Findings support the theory that low to moderate levels of negative expression may be less beneficial or detrimental for children with ID compared to children with TD. Implications for further research and intervention are discussed. PMID:21241394

Green, S.; Baker, B.

2014-01-01

10

Parental Interpersonal Sensitivity and Youth Social Problems: A Mediational Role for Child Emotion Dysregulation  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

We examined the relations between parental interpersonal sensitivity and youth social problems and explored the mediational role of child emotion dysregulation. Mothers (N = 42; M age = 39.38) and fathers (N = 41; M age = 39.38) of youth aged 7-12 (N = 42; M age = 9.12) completed measures of their own interpersonal sensitivity and reported on…

Suveg, Cynthia; Jacob, Marni L.; Payne, Mary

2010-01-01

11

Maternal Socialization and Child Temperament as Predictors of Emotion Regulation in Turkish Preschoolers  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This study investigated the role of maternal socialization and temperament in Turkish preschool children's emotion regulation. Participants consisted of 145 preschoolers (79 boys, 69 girls; M[subscript age]= 62 months), their mothers, and daycare teachers from middle-high socioeconomic suburbs of Istanbul. Maternal child-rearing practices and…

Yagmurlu, Bilge; Altan, Ozge

2010-01-01

12

Parents Interacting with Infants: Strengthening Parent-Child Relationships to Support Social and Emotional Development  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

One of the findings from the ZERO TO THREE "Parenting Infants and Toddlers Today" (Hart Research Associates, 2009) parent survey was that while the majority of parents understood ways of promoting their child's development, their understanding of the milestones related to social and emotional development was less consistent. This is an important…

Yates, Tweety

2011-01-01

13

Parents' emotional and social experiences of caring for a child through cleft treatment.  

PubMed

Little is known about the experiences of parents caring for a child through long-term treatment for cleft lip and/or cleft palate. We conducted in-depth interviews with 35 parents with children between the ages of 20 weeks and 21 years to explore experiences across the treatment program. We analyzed the data using a constructivist grounded theory approach and present in detail in this article one subcategory from the analysis: managing emotions. Throughout childhood and adolescence, parents experienced conflicting emotions about their child's impairment, uncertainty about cleft treatment, and stigmatizing attitudes. Although parents attempted to manage emotional tensions by pursuing cleft treatments, the interventions could themselves be a source of conflict for them. We suggest that routine assessment of parents' emotional and social well-being should be included in cleft treatment programs, and access to psychosocial support made available. PMID:21890716

Nelson, Pauline A; Kirk, Susan A; Caress, Ann-Louise; Glenny, Anne-Marie

2012-03-01

14

Using a Self-as-Model Video Combined with Social Stories to Help a Child with Asperger Syndrome Understand Emotions  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Using an AB design with generalization, this study sought to determine the effectiveness of presenting videotaped emotions and Social Stories[TM] to teach a 9-year-old child with Asperger syndrome to recognize and understand emotions in himself and to generalize them to other situations in his home. Data collected in the child's home showed an…

Bernad-Ripoll, Susana

2007-01-01

15

Maternal Emotional Styles and Child Social Adjustment: Assessment, Correlates, Outcomes and Goodness of Fit in Early Childhood  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The goals of the present research were to develop a modified version of an existing self-assessment questionnaire designed to measure parents' emotional style and to examine how the aspects of child regulation may moderate the relation between the emotional styles and social outcomes in childhood. Participants in Study 1 were 140 mothers and…

Lagace-Seguin, Daniel G.; Coplan, Robert J.

2005-01-01

16

Double Jeopardy: Poorer Social-Emotional Outcomes for Children in the NICHD SECCYD Experiencing Home and Child-Care Environments that Confer Risk  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Using data from the National Institute of Child Health and Human Development Early Child Care Research Network (NICHD SECCYD), the authors examined whether interactions between home and child-care quality affect children's social-emotional adjustment at 24, 36, and 54 months (N = 771). Triadic splits on quality of home and child care were used to…

Watamura, Sarah Enos; Phillips, Deborah A.; Morrissey, Taryn W.; McCartney, Kathleen; Bub, Kristen

2011-01-01

17

Maternal emotional responsiveness and toddlers' social-emotional competence.  

PubMed

This study investigated, via extended naturalistic observation: (a) how mothers and children responded emotionally to each other's emotional displays; and (b) whether ratings of the child's social-emotional competence (made when the mother was absent) could be predicted by specific maternal responses to the child's emotions. Subjects were 28 mother-toddler pairs. Sequential analyses suggested that emotional dialogue does exist between mothers and children: certain emotional responses of mothers and children occurred more often than expected by their base rate during interaction. Maternal responsiveness to child sadness, anger, fear and neutrality predicted dimensions of children's social-emotional competence. Implications regarding the mother-child affective environment, socialization of emotion and social competency, and developmental methodology are discussed. PMID:8340440

Denham, S A

1993-07-01

18

Parental Socialization of Emotion  

PubMed Central

Recently, there has been a resurgence of research on emotion, including the socialization of emotion. In this article, a heuristic model of factors contributing to the socialization of emotion is presented. Then literature relevant to the socialization of children’s emotion and emotion-related behavior by parents is reviewed, including (a) parental reactions to children’s emotions, (b) socializers’ discussion of emotion, and (c) socializers’ expression of emotion. The relevant literature is not conclusive and most of the research is correlational. However, the existing body of data provides initial support for the view that parental socialization practices have effects on children’s emotional and social competence and that the socialization process is bidirectional. In particular, parental negative emotionality and negative reactions to children’s expression of emotion are associated with children’s negative emotionality and low social competence. In addition, possible moderators of effects such as level of emotional arousal are discussed. PMID:16865170

Cumberland, Amanda; Spinrad, Tracy L.

2006-01-01

19

Child Competence and Maternal Emotion Socialization Correlates of Attachment Q-Sort Variables.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

To validate a new approach to research on the attachment behavior of children beyond toddler age, this study investigated relations between Q-sort outcomes and preschool children's affective perspective-taking; prosocial responsiveness to emotion; social competence, as rated by their teachers; and their mothers' expression and handling of…

Denham, Susanne A.

20

Emotional and Social Development: 8 to 12 Months  

MedlinePLUS

... 12 Months Ages & Stages Listen Emotional and Social Development: 8 to 12 Months Article Body During these ... some ways, this phase of your child’s emotional development will be especially tender for both of you, ...

21

Can parent training for parents with high levels of expressed emotion have a positive effect on their child's social anxiety improvement?  

PubMed

The role that parents' involvement may play in improving their child's social anxiety is still under debate. This paper aimed to investigate whether training parents with high expressed emotion (EE) could improve outcomes for adolescent social anxiety intervention. Fifty-two socially anxious adolescents (aged 13-18 years), whose parents exhibited high levels of expressed emotion, were assigned to either (a) a school-based intervention with an added parent training component, or (b) a school-based program focused solely on intervening with the adolescent (no parental involvement). Post-treatment and 12-month follow-up findings showed that school-based intervention with parent training was superior to the adolescent-specific program, yielding significant reductions in diagnosis remission, social and depressive symptomatology, particularly when the EE status of parents changed. Overall, the findings suggest that high-EE parents of children with social anxiety need to be involved in their child's therapy. PMID:25265549

Garcia-Lopez, Luis Joaquín; Díaz-Castela, Maria del Mar; Muela-Martinez, Jose Antonio; Espinosa-Fernandez, Lourdes

2014-12-01

22

Emotional Support Consistency and Teacher-Child Relationships Forecast Social Competence and Problem Behaviors in Prekindergarten and Kindergarten  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Teachers' ratings of conflict and closeness as well as observed emotional support are known predictors of children's social functioning. Consistency in emotional support represents an emerging line of research. The goal of the present study is to understand whether the relation between the consistency of teachers' emotional support…

Brock, Laura L.; Curby, Timothy W.

2014-01-01

23

Associations of Preschool Type and Teacher-Child Relational Quality with Young Children's Social-Emotional Competence  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Research Findings: This study examined associations of preschool type (i.e., urban and suburban Head Start and university-affiliated center) and teacher-child variables with positive and negative child outcomes among 145 preschoolers (74 boys). Differences emerged across preschools, with urban Head Start children scoring lowest on the emotional

Garner, Pamela W.; Mahatmya, Duhita; Moses, Laurence Kimberly; Bolt, Elizabeth N.

2014-01-01

24

Maternal Emotion Socialization in Maltreating and Non-Maltreating Families: Implications for Children's Emotion Regulation  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This study investigated the socialization of children's emotion regulation in physically maltreating and non-maltreating mother-child dyads (N = 80 dyads). Mother-child dyads participated in the parent-child emotion interaction task (Shipman & Zeman, 1999) in which they talked about emotionally-arousing situations. The PCEIT was coded for maternal…

Shipman, Kimberly L.; Schneider, Renee; Fitzgerald, Monica M.; Sims, Chandler; Swisher, Lisa; Edwards, Anna

2007-01-01

25

Social withdrawal at 1 year is associated with emotional and behavioural problems at 3 and 5 years: the Eden mother-child cohort study.  

PubMed

The objective of the study was to examine how social withdrawal in infants aged 12 months predicted emotional and behavioural problems at ages 3 and 5 years. The sample included 1,586 infants from the French Eden Mother-Child Cohort Study who had a measure of social withdrawal with the Alarm Distress BaBy scale at age 1 year; among these children, emotional and behavioural difficulties were rated by mothers using the Strength and Difficulty Questionnaire (SDQ) at 3 years for 1,257 (79 %) children and at 5 years for 1,123 (72 %) children. Social withdrawal behaviour at age 1 year was significantly associated with the SDQ behavioural disorder scale at 3 years, independently of a host of familial and child temperament confounders. The association with the relational disorder, prosocial and total difficulty scales was close to significance at 3 years after taking into account familial and temperament confounders. Social withdrawal significantly predicted the three aforementioned scales when measured at 5 years. No significant predictivity of the emotional scale and hyperactivity scale was detected at any age. This study made with a large longitudinal sample confirms the negative effects on development of social withdrawal behaviour, shedding light on the unfolding of behavioural disorders and relational difficulties in children; this calls for early detection of sustained social withdrawal behaviour, as it seems to hamper emotional development. PMID:24464247

Guedeney, Antoine; Pingault, Jean-Baptiste; Thorr, Antoine; Larroque, Beatrice

2014-12-01

26

Maternal affect and toddlers' social-emotional competence.  

PubMed

Mothers' and toddlers' discrete emotions, as well as their more general psycho-social functioning, were coded. Indices of maternal emotion and psychosocial functioning showed patterns of correlations with child indices and with each other. Two possible explanations of these patterns, child temperament and socialization of emotion, are discussed. PMID:2764071

Denham, S A

1989-07-01

27

Social-Emotional Development, School Readiness, Teacher-Child Interactions, and Classroom Environment  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This article investigates the effectiveness of a statewide 6-month early childhood mental health consultation (ECMHC) model on teachers' emotional support of children and classroom organization. We provide a brief historical and theoretical background of the field of ECMHC, present the logic model for our ECMHC intervention, and discuss the…

Heller, Sherryl Scott; Rice, Janet; Boothe, Allison; Sidell, Margo; Vaughn, Krystal; Keyes, Angela; Nagle, Geoffrey

2012-01-01

28

Teaching Interaction Procedures: Effects upon the Learning of Social Skills by an Emotionally Disturbed Child.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The study investigated the effects of a behavioral teaching interaction strategy on greeting, departure, and telephone skills of a 10-year-old emotionally disturbed youngster in a residential setting. The interaction included instruction, modeling, rehearsal, and reinforcement components and was found effective in increasing and maintaining the…

Ford, Dennis; And Others

1982-01-01

29

Emotion Framing: Does It Relate to Children's Emotion Knowledge and Social Behavior?  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This study examined the associations between maternal emotion framing and mother--child relationship quality and children's emotional and social competence. Sixty-one mothers and their preschool children (33 boys) completed dyadic and individual measures. Observations were made of mother--child synchrony and maternal emotion framing. Children's…

Colwell, Malinda J.; Hart, Sybil

2006-01-01

30

Social and Emotional Outcomes of Child Sexual Abuse: A Clinical Sample in Turkey  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Childhood sexual abuse is a traumatic life event that may cause psychiatric disorders such as posttraumatic stress disorder and depression. During 2003-2004, 20 sexually abused children were referred to the Child and Adolescent Psychiatry Clinic of Ege University in Izmir, Turkey. Two years later, the psychological adjustment of these children (M…

Ozbaran, Burcu; Erermis, Serpil; Bukusoglu, Nagehan; Bildik, Tezan; Tamar, Muge; Ercan, Eyyup Sabri; Aydin, Cahide; Cetin, Saniye Korkmaz

2009-01-01

31

Maternal Depressive Symptoms and Child Social Preference during the Early School Years: Mediation by Maternal Warmth and Child Emotion Regulation  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This longitudinal study examined processes that mediate the association between maternal depressive symptoms and peer social preference during the early school years. Three hundred and fifty six kindergarten children (182 boys) and their mothers participated in the study. During kindergarten, mothers reported their level of depressive…

Kam, Chi-Ming; Greenberg, Mark T.; Bierman, Karen L.; Coie, John D.; Dodge, Kenneth A.; Foster, Michael E.; Lochman, John E.; McMahon, Robert J.; Pinderhughes, Ellen E.

2011-01-01

32

Ethnic Differences in Social-Emotional Development in Preschool: The Impact of Teacher Child Relationships and Classroom Quality  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Drawing from the National Center for Early Development and Learning (NCEDL) Multi-State Study of Prekindergarten and the State-Wide Early Education Programs Study (SWEEP), this study examined the effects of classroom and teacher variables on social-emotional development in prekindergarten. Results indicated that prekindergarten teachers rated…

Graves, Scott L., Jr.; Howes, Carollee

2011-01-01

33

Emotion Socialization in Families of Children With an Anxiety Disorder  

Microsoft Academic Search

Compared emotion socialization in 26 children with anxiety disorders ages 8–12 years and their mothers to 26 nonclinical counterparts without psychopathology. Children and their mothers participated in an emotion interaction task in which they discussed occasions when the child felt worry, sadness, and anger. Responses were coded for length of discussion, proportion of words spoken by child vs. mother, frequency

Cynthia Suveg; Janice Zeman; Ellen Flannery-Schroeder; Michael Cassano

2005-01-01

34

Parenting styles, parental response to child emotion, and family emotional responsiveness are related to child emotional eating.  

PubMed

The aim of the present study was to examine the relations of parenting style, parent response to negative child emotion, and family emotional expressiveness and support to child emotional eating. Mothers (N=450) completed questionnaires and their 6-8-year-old children (N=450) were interviewed. Results showed that emotional eating was negatively predicted by authoritative parenting style and family open expression of affection and emotion, and positively predicted by parent minimizing response to child negative emotion. Results suggest the need for early prevention/intervention efforts directed to these parenting and family variables. PMID:21232566

Topham, Glade L; Hubbs-Tait, Laura; Rutledge, Julie M; Page, Melanie C; Kennedy, Tay S; Shriver, Lenka H; Harrist, Amanda W

2011-04-01

35

Emotional Development and Delay: The Child in the Context of the Family Environment.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The paper reviews aspects of a young child's emotional development occurring in social interactions and discusses implications for children having, or at risk of having, emotional and behavioral problems. Contributions of ethology and ecology are cited in an examination of the child's interaction with the family. Research findings are reviewed on…

Stone, Nancy W.

36

Child neglect and emotional abuse  

MedlinePLUS

... or neglect, call 911. Call the Childhelp National Child Abuse Hotline (1-800-4-A-CHILD). Know that ... 37. U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. Child Welfare ... Abuse and Neglect. Available at: https://www.childwelfare.gov/ ...

37

Parental and Peer Contributions to the Emotional Support Skills of the Child: From Whom Do Children Learn to Express Support?  

E-print Network

With advancing age, children increasingly turn to peers for emotional support, and the child's ability to provide sensitive emotional support to peers becomes an increasingly important predictor of social acceptance. Although individual differences...

Burleson, Brant R.; Kunkel, Adrianne

2002-01-01

38

Emotion Socialization in Families of Children with an Anxiety Disorder  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Compared emotion socialization in 26 children with anxiety disorders ages 8-12 years and their mothers to 26 nonclinical counterparts without psychopathology. Children and their mothers participated in an emotion interaction task in which they discussed occasions when the child felt worry, sadness, and anger. Responses were coded for length of…

Suveg, Cynthia; Zeman, Janice; Flannery-Schroeder, Ellen; Cassano, Michael

2005-01-01

39

Parental Reactions to Toddlers' Negative Emotions and Child Negative Emotionality as Correlates of Problem Behavior at the Age of Three  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Parent-reported reactions to children's negative emotions and child negative emotionality were investigated as correlates of internalizing and externalizing behaviors. Children (N = 107) and their parents participated in a short-term longitudinal study of social development. Mothers and fathers independently completed questionnaires assessing…

Engle, Jennifer M.; McElwain, Nancy L.

2011-01-01

40

Emotional Intelligence and Social Perception   

E-print Network

The present study had the chief aim of validating the new Social Perception Test (SPT) as a veridically scored, pragmatic measure of Emotional Intelligence (EI). To this end the SPT was compared to three similarly visually based tests – picture...

Teale, Cassandra

2010-06-30

41

Personalization in Mother-Child Emotion Talk across Three Contexts  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

An unexplored aspect of contextual variation in emotion talk is the extent to which the emotions mothers and children discuss relate to the child, mother, or another self. To establish the extent to which mothers and children personalize the emotions they discuss, we examined the emotion talk of 40 American mother-child dyads in three…

Kucirkova, Natalia; Tompkins, Virginia

2014-01-01

42

Cumulative Risk, Negative Emotionality, and Emotion Regulation as Predictors of Social Competence in Transition to School: A Mediated Moderation Model  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The goals of this study were to examine the additive and interactive effects of cumulative risk and child negative emotionality on children's social competence in the transition from preschool to school and to test whether these associations were mediated by child emotion regulation within a sample of 310 low-income, ethnically diverse boys.…

Chang, Hyein; Shelleby, Elizabeth C.; Cheong, JeeWon; Shaw, Daniel S.

2012-01-01

43

Parenting and the Child's World: Influences on Academic, Intellectual, and Social-Emotional Development. Monographs in Parenting.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Conceived around the notion that there are multiple sources of influence on children's development, this volume describes when, where, and how parenting matters and the major antecedents and moderators of effective parenting. The chapters of the volume are as follows: (1) "Beyond the Nurture Assumption: Testing Hypotheses about the Child's…

Borkowski, John G.; Ramey, Sharon Landesman; Bristol-Power, Marie

44

Emotional conflict and social context  

PubMed Central

This paper aims to move the debate over the status of the conflict between emotion and judgement forward by refuting three implicit claims: that conflict between emotion and judgement is always to be avoided; that any conflict should always be resolved and, moreover, that it should be resolved immediately; that judgement should usually take priority in any resolution. Refutation of these three claims leads to recognition of the wide variety of different cases of conflict between emotion and judgement; examination of these cases is aided by consideration of the social context in which the conflicts occur. PMID:22661905

FitzGerald, Chloë

2011-01-01

45

Task Groups in the School Setting: Promoting Children's Social and Emotional Learning  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Through social and emotional learning (SEL), individuals develop skill in negotiating relationships successfully and expressing emotions appropriately. The socially and emotionally intelligent child reaps benefits in school and later life. Counselors are best qualified to promote children's SEL and the task group in the classroom provides an…

Van Velsor, Patricia

2009-01-01

46

A Feeling for Books: Using Literature to Promote Social-Emotional Development  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Social-emotional development is a fundamental part of a child's overall well-being. Healthy development forms a critical foundation for building positive relationships and a strong self-esteem. Social-emotional development includes the ability to express and manage emotions and to establish secure relationships. All children have a natural desire…

Tunks, Karen W.; Gilles, Rebecca M.

2013-01-01

47

Social and Emotional Aging  

PubMed Central

The past several decades have witnessed unidimensional decline models of aging give way to life-span developmental models that consider how specific processes and strategies facilitate adaptive aging. In part, this shift was provoked by the stark contrast between findings that clearly demonstrate decreased biological, physiological, and cognitive capacity with those suggesting that people are generally satisfied in old age and experience relatively high levels of emotional well-being. In recent years, this supposed “paradox” of aging has been reconciled through careful theoretical analysis and empirical investigation. Viewing aging as adaptation sheds light on resilience, wellbeing, and emotional distress across adulthood. PMID:19575618

Charles, Susan; Carstensen, Laura L.

2014-01-01

48

Child Emotional Aggression and Abuse: Definitions and Prevalence  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Objective: Research on and intervention for child emotional abuse and emotional aggression toward children have been severely hampered because there have been no agreed-upon, clinically usable definitions. Methods: We have (a) proposed and field-tested a set of criteria to operationally define child emotional abuse for clinical settings and (b)…

Slep, Amy M. Smith; Heyman, Richard E.; Snarr, Jeffery D.

2011-01-01

49

Parental Emotion Coaching and Child Emotion Regulation as Protective Factors for Children with Oppositional Defiant Disorder  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

We assessed linkages of mothers' emotion coaching and children's emotion regulation and emotion lability/negativity with children's adjustment in 72 mother-child dyads seeking treatment for oppositional defiant disorder (ODD). Dyads completed the questionnaires and discussed emotion-related family events. Maternal emotion coaching…

Dunsmore, Julie C.; Booker, Jordan A.; Ollendick, Thomas H.

2013-01-01

50

Emotion Discourse, Social Cognition, and Social Skills in Children with and without Developmental Delays  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This study examined parent-child emotion discourse, children's independent social information processing, and social skills outcomes in 146 families of 8-year-olds with and without developmental delays. Children's emergent social-cognitive understanding (internal state understanding, perspective taking, and causal reasoning and problem solving)…

Fenning, Rachel M.; Baker, Bruce L.; Juvonen, Jaana

2011-01-01

51

Grief as a Social Emotion: Theoretical Perspectives  

Microsoft Academic Search

The article explores a sociological perspective on grief as a social emotion. Focusing on the social bond with the deceased, the self-concept of the survivor or the power of feeling rules, general sociological theories of emotions (symbolic interactionism, structural theory, behavioral theory) have the potential to deepen the understanding of grief as a social emotion. The article concludes by presenting

Nina R. Jakoby

2012-01-01

52

The developmental–ecological approach of Japanese child welfare professionals to supporting children's social and emotional well-being: The practice of mimamori  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper illustrates a cultural–developmental approach to the study of child welfare. It describes in cultural context everyday socialization beliefs and practices through which Japanese child welfare workers attempt to support the well-being of maltreated children. Through repeated individual and focus group interviews, naturalistic observations, and an intervention, three interrelated concepts emerged: Ibasho (a place necessary to psychological well-being where

Sachiko Bamba; Wendy Haight

2009-01-01

53

Mother-child emotion communication and childhood anxiety symptoms.  

PubMed

This study examined whether several aspects of emotion communication in mother-child dyads relate to child anxiety symptoms. Mother and child behaviours related to emotion communication were coded based on videotaped mother-child interactions in a sample of 87 ten- to twelve-year olds, and children reported on their anxiety symptoms. Mothers of more anxious children were less supportive in that they engaged more in psychologically controlling behaviours designed to manipulate the child's emotional state, exhibited less warmth and interest in the child, and were less elaborative during conversations about an emotionally negative event. Further, more anxious children showed greater affect intensity and lower congruency of emotions and behaviours, and were less engaged in the conversation. Examining the role of child gender did not change the results significantly. Mother and child emotion communication behaviours each explained significant variance in child anxiety. The results showed that how mothers and children approached emotion-related conversations is important for child anxiety, and highlighted the need to consider mother and child behaviours related to emotion communication in assessment and interventions with anxious children. PMID:24892717

Brumariu, Laura E; Kerns, Kathryn A

2015-04-01

54

Predictors of co-parenting in Mexican American families and direct effects on parenting and child social emotional development  

PubMed Central

The present study examined associations between parents' levels of acculturation depressive symptoms, family support, and couple relationship quality with coparenting conflict. We also explored the effects of coparenting conflict on parenting and infant social development in a sample of low-income Mexican American (n=735) infants (age 9 months) and their parents. Results indicated that couple conflict was the strongest predictor of coparenting conflict. Coparenting conflict had a significant effect on mother-infant interaction and father engagement. The effects of coparenting on father caregiving varied by father's level of acculturation; when there is high coparenting conflict, more acculturated fathers engaged in more caregiving than less acculturated fathers. Coparenting conflict was not predictive of infant social development. PMID:20174599

Cabrera, Natasha J.; Shannon, Jacqueline D.; La Taillade, Jaslean J.

2010-01-01

55

Child and Nonviolent Social Change  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Examines the nature of the child and the impact of socialization experiences on his capacity to act nonviolently in a changing social order. Presents a socialization model that draws on different disciplinary frameworks and research areas (animal and human ethnology, social learning theories, altruism studies, and reviews of protest movements).…

Boulding, Elise

1974-01-01

56

Child temperament, parent emotions, and perceptions of the child’s feeding experience  

PubMed Central

Background Associations between parent and child characteristics and how they influence the approach parents take toward children in the feeding environment have not been examined extensively, especially in low-income minority families who are at a higher risk for obesity. The primary aim of the study was to examine positive and negative parent emotions as potential mediators of the relationship between child temperament and parents’ perceptions of strategy effectiveness and problems encountered in feeding children fruit and vegetables. Methods Participants were low-income families (n?=?639, 73% minority, children aged 3–5?years) participating in Head Start programs in two states. Parents completed the Children’s Behavior Questionnaire (CBQ), Positive and Negative Affect Schedule (PANAS), and measures of strategy effectiveness (teachable moments, practical methods, restriction, and enhanced availability) and problems encountered (vegetable characteristics, child attributions for dislike, external influences, and parental demands) in feeding children fruit and vegetables. Results Positive parent emotions partially mediated the relationship between child Effortful Control and strategy effectiveness and fully mediated the relationship between Surgency and strategy effectiveness. Although negative parent emotions were associated with increased perception of problems in feeding children fruit and vegetables, the relationship between Negative Affectivity and problems in feeding was partially mediated by negative parent emotions. Conclusions Positive parent emotions facilitated perceived effectiveness of feeding strategies, with child Effortful Control and Surgency instrumental to this process. Understanding mechanisms in parent–child feeding is important when developing interventions designed to promote healthy child eating behaviors. PMID:22643039

2012-01-01

57

The Nature of Teacher-Child Interactions in Emotion Discourse  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Emotions find their meanings within human relationships that permit emotions to be experienced, expressed, and explored. Social and emotional competence, marked by an understanding, expression, and control of emotion, is one of the hallmarks of emotional discourse--demonstrated in the very nature of interactive communication as individuals relate…

Thomas, Dawn V.

2010-01-01

58

[Psycho-emotional impact of a child's disability on parents].  

PubMed

Care for a child with a disability is a stressful experience for parents. It triggers a range of emotions and feelings that require a set of behaviors and attitudes to manage daily life. To face this situation, parents use coping strategies. The purpose of this study was to assess the psychological reactions (depression and anxiety) of parents and the impact of a child's disability on their quality of life (QOL), and to determine their coping strategies. A survey of 50 parents of handicapped children, treated in the neurology department at the Sfax Teaching Hospital in Tunisia, was conducted in September 2010. The Beck Depression Inventory (BDI), the State Trait Anxiety Inventory (STAI), the SF-36, and the Brief COPE were used to assess, respectively, depression, anxiety, QOL, and coping strategies in parents. Among the group of parents studied, the anxiety and depression rates were, respectively, 68% and 52%. Depression was more frequent among mothers and was correlated with low educational and socioeconomic levels. Anxiety was found in 70.7% of mothers and 55.6% of fathers with no significant correlation. There was a correlation between anxiety and increased family burden related to the presence of a similar case in the family. The range of coping strategies used includes religion (16%), active coping (16%), planning (16%), acceptance (20%), focus and venting of feelings (10%), and seeking emotional social support (10%). Parents used emotion-focused coping in 68% of cases and problem-centered coping in 32% of cases. The coping strategy choice was significantly correlated with gender. Mothers preferentially used emotion-focused coping. Depressed or anxious parents more frequently used emotion-focused strategies. Religious faith was correlated with a strategy centered on religious coping. The length of follow-up (more than 2years) was correlated with a strategy focused on acceptance. Emotion-focused coping was also correlated with low levels of education and socioeconomic status. We found correlations between depression and different types of emotion-focused coping such as emotional support. Impaired QOL was higher among mothers (58.5% versus 33.3%). It was correlated with depression, anxiety, and the use of emotional coping. Also, it was correlated with low educational and socioeconomic levels and increased family burden related to the presence of a similar case in the family. The size most commonly impaired in mothers was limited due to mental health (56.9% versus 44.4% for fathers). Social functioning (D6) was significantly correlated with the presence of a mental disability, the functional dependence of the child, and increased family burden related to the presence of a similar case in the family. Impaired QOL was found in 66.8% of parents dissatisfied with the explanations given by the medical team. More problem-focused coping was found in parents satisfied with the information given by the medical team compared to those inadequately informed (42.1% versus 25.8%). The presence of a disabled child causes profound changes in the family. The impact of anxiety and depression on parents and on their QOL are considerable. This is a situation that involves an adaptation process. At first, parents may be tempted to use coping strategies focused on religion, a choice related to Arab-Muslim fatalism. Parents should be encouraged to use active coping strategies to support their disabled child better. In addition, adequate information given by the healthcare staff would help them to deal with the child's handicap and would contribute to improving their QOL. PMID:23266169

Ben Thabet, J; Sallemi, R; Hasïri, I; Zouari, L; Kamoun, F; Zouari, N; Triki, C; Maâlej, M

2013-01-01

59

Mother–Child and Father–Child Emotional Availability in Families of Children with Down Syndrome  

Microsoft Academic Search

Objective. Emotional availability (EA) is a relationship construct that can be considered a global index of the emotional quality of parent–child interaction. The present study aimed to address several specific questions about mother–child and father–child emotional availability in families with a child with Down's syndrome (DS). Design. Free-play interactions of 22 children with DS (M chronological age = 35.32 mo)

Simona de Falco; Paola Venuti; Gianluca Esposito; Marc H. Bornstein

2009-01-01

60

Social-Emotional Development  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Interactions between reactive and regulatory dimensions of temperament may be particularly relevant to children's adjustment but are examined infrequently. This study investigated these interactions by examining effortful control as a moderator of the relations of fear and frustration reactivity to children's social competence, internalizing, and…

Moran, Lyndsey R.; Lengua, Liliana J.; Zalewski, Maureen

2013-01-01

61

The emotional child witness: effects on juror decision-making.  

PubMed

Despite wide variations in child witness behavior while on the stand, little research has focused on how that behavior influences jurors' perceptions of the child's credibility or the case itself. In the current study, the impact of a child's emotional displays on credibility judgments and verdict preferences was examined in jury-eligible college students and jurors released from jury duty. No significant differences emerged in perceptions or verdicts based on whether a child was shown as crying or not while participants read a transcript of the child's testimony. However, participants who rated the child as more emotional (regardless of whether the image showed a crying child) were more likely to render guilty verdicts, were more certain of guilt, and found the child more credible and the defendant less credible than participants who rated the child as less emotional. Also, when the child was perceived as low in emotion, older children were rated as less credible than younger children. The results have implications for understanding how children's emotional displays and jurors' perceptions of children's emotionality influence decisions in sexual abuse cases. PMID:25537438

Cooper, Alexia; Quas, Jodi A; Cleveland, Kyndra C

2014-01-01

62

Emotion socialization style in parents of children with callous-unemotional traits.  

PubMed

Children with callous-unemotional (CU) traits manifest a range of deficits in their emotional functioning, and parents play a key role in socializing children's understanding, experience, expression, and regulation of emotions. However, research examining emotion-related parenting in families of children with CU traits is scarce. In two independent studies we examined emotion socialization styles in parents of children high on CU traits. In Study 1, we assessed parents' self-reported beliefs and feelings regarding their own and their child's emotions, in a sample of 111 clinic-referred and community children aged 7-12 years. In Study 2, we directly observed parents' responding to child emotion during an emotional reminiscing task, in a clinic sample of 59 conduct-problem children aged 3-9 years. Taken together, the results were consistent in suggesting that the mothers of children with higher levels of CU traits are more likely to have affective attitudes that are less accepting of emotion (Study 1), and emotion socialization practices that are more dismissing of child emotion (Study 2). Fathers' emotion socialization beliefs and practices were unrelated to levels of CU traits. Our findings provide initial evidence for a relationship between CU traits and parents' emotion socialization style, and have significant implications for the design of novel family-based interventions targeting CU traits and co-occurring conduct problems. PMID:23857716

Pasalich, Dave S; Waschbusch, Daniel A; Dadds, Mark R; Hawes, David J

2014-01-01

63

Transactional and Cascading Relations between Early Spanking and Children's Social-Emotional Development  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The authors tested a series of models linking spanking and child social-emotional outcomes using a sample of 3,870 families from the Fragile Families and Child Wellbeing study. Spanking was measured by the number of times the focal child was spanked by the mother at ages 1, 3, and 5. Internalizing and externalizing symptoms were assessed using the…

Gromoske, Andrea N.; Maguire-Jack, Kathryn

2012-01-01

64

Grief as a social emotion: theoretical perspectives.  

PubMed

The article explores a sociological perspective on grief as a social emotion. Focusing on the social bond with the deceased, the self-concept of the survivor or the power of feeling rules, general sociological theories of emotions (symbolic interactionism, structural theory, behavioral theory) have the potential to deepen the understanding of grief as a social emotion. The article concludes by presenting a cognitive-structural model of grief that integrates the different theoretical elements. PMID:24563936

Jakoby, Nina R

2012-09-01

65

Strong Start--Grades K-2: A Social and Emotional Learning Curriculum  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Social-emotional competence--it is a critical part of every child's school success, and just like any academic subject, children need instruction in it. Developed by a top expert, these proven curricula will help promote the social-emotional competence and resilience of children and adolescents. Divided into four age levels from kindergarten…

Merrell, Kenneth W.; Parisi, Danielle M.; Whitcomb, Sara A.

2007-01-01

66

Strong Kids--Grades 6-8: A Social and Emotional Learning Curriculum  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Social-emotional competence--it is a critical part of every child's school success, and just like any academic subject, children need instruction in it. Developed by a top expert, these proven curricula will help promote the social-emotional competence and resilience of children and adolescents. Divided into four age levels from kindergarten…

Merrell, Kenneth W.; Carrizales, Dianna; Feuerborn, Laura; Gueldner, Barbara A.; Tran, Oanh K.

2007-01-01

67

Strong Teens--Grades 9-12: A Social and Emotional Learning Curriculum  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Social-emotional competence--it is a critical part of every child's school success, and just like any academic subject, children need instruction in it. Developed by a top expert, these proven curricula will help promote the social-emotional competence and resilience of children and adolescents. Divided into four age levels from kindergarten…

Merrell, Kenneth W.

2007-01-01

68

Examination of the Social Emotional Assessment Measure (SEAM) Parent-Toddler Interval  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Parent-child relationships serve as the foundation for social emotional competence in young children. To support the healthy social emotional development of their children, parents may need to acquire information, resources, and skills through interventions that are based upon assessment of parent competence. This manuscript presents results from…

Magee, Aoife Rose

2012-01-01

69

Distinguishing between Poor/Dysfunctional Parenting and Child Emotional Maltreatment  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Objective: This paper was intended to distinguish between poor parenting and child emotional maltreatment (CEM), to inform child welfare and public health policymakers of the need for differentiated responses. Methods: Scientific literature was integrated with current practice and assumptions relating to poor/dysfunctional parenting and child

Wolfe, David A.; McIsaac, Caroline

2011-01-01

70

Emotional Competence, Emotion Socialization, and Young Children's Peer-Related Social Competence.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Investigated linkages between aspects of emotional competence and preschoolers' social skills with peers, as well as parental emotion socialization practices as predictors of social skill. Found that emotional competence variables were meaningfully related to the peer variables and that, for non-constructive anger reactions, maternal reports of…

Garner, Pamela W.; Estep, Kimberly M.

2001-01-01

71

Dreams, emotions, and social sharing of dreams  

Microsoft Academic Search

Current life emotional experiences have been demonstrated to elicit a process called social sharing of emotion, consisting of repetitive talking about these experiences in conversations with relevant others. Like many diurnal experiences, dreams are generally loaded with emotional elements, and empirical evidence has suggested that individuals share their dreams with others mainly belonging to the circle of intimates. The present

Antonietta Curci; Bernard Rimé

2008-01-01

72

Detecting Emotional Contagion in Massive Social Networks  

PubMed Central

Happiness and other emotions spread between people in direct contact, but it is unclear whether massive online social networks also contribute to this spread. Here, we elaborate a novel method for measuring the contagion of emotional expression. With data from millions of Facebook users, we show that rainfall directly influences the emotional content of their status messages, and it also affects the status messages of friends in other cities who are not experiencing rainfall. For every one person affected directly, rainfall alters the emotional expression of about one to two other people, suggesting that online social networks may magnify the intensity of global emotional synchrony. PMID:24621792

Coviello, Lorenzo; Sohn, Yunkyu; Kramer, Adam D. I.; Marlow, Cameron; Franceschetti, Massimo; Christakis, Nicholas A.; Fowler, James H.

2014-01-01

73

Affective topic model for social emotion detection.  

PubMed

The rapid development of social media services has been a great boon for the communication of emotions through blogs, microblogs/tweets, instant-messaging tools, news portals, and so forth. This paper is concerned with the detection of emotions evoked in a reader by social media. Compared to classical sentiment analysis conducted from the writer's perspective, analysis from the reader's perspective can be more meaningful when applied to social media. We propose an affective topic model with the intention to bridge the gap between social media materials and a reader's emotions by introducing an intermediate layer. The proposed model can be used to classify the social emotions of unlabeled documents and to generate a social emotion lexicon. Extensive evaluations using real-world data validate the effectiveness of the proposed model for both these applications. PMID:24913903

Rao, Yanghui; Li, Qing; Wenyin, Liu; Wu, Qingyuan; Quan, Xiaojun

2014-10-01

74

Parent-Child Physical and Pretense Play: Links to Children's Social Competence.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This study examined relationships between parent-child pretense and physical play and children's social competence. Observations suggest that mutually responsive parent-child interaction during both pretense and physical play is associated with children's social competence. Children's emotion knowledge was positively associated with social

Lindsey, Eric W.; Mize, Jacquelyn

2000-01-01

75

Child and Adolescent Emotion Regulation: The Role of Parental Emotion Regulation and Expression  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This paper reviews current literature relating to parent and child emotional functioning, specifically their emotion regulatory skills and emotional expression. Included are considerations regarding theoretical, methodological, and sampling strengths and weaknesses of existing literature. On the basis of the review, several directions for future…

Bariola, Emily; Gullone, Eleonora; Hughes, Elizabeth K.

2011-01-01

76

Teacher characteristics, social classroom relationships, and children's social, emotional, and behavioral classroom adjustment in special education.  

PubMed

The goal of this study was to explore relations between teacher characteristics (i.e., competence and wellbeing); social classroom relationships (i.e., teacher-child and peer interactions); and children's social, emotional, and behavioral classroom adjustment. These relations were explored at both the individual and classroom levels among 414 children with emotional and behavioral disorders placed in special education. Two models were specified. In the first model, children's classroom adjustment was regressed on social relationships and teacher characteristics. In the second model, reversed links were examined by regressing teacher characteristics on social relationships and children's adjustment. Results of model 1 showed that, at the individual level, better social and emotional adjustment of children was predicted by higher levels of teacher-child closeness and better behavioral adjustment was predicted by both positive teacher-child and peer interactions. At the classroom level, positive social relationships were predicted by higher levels of teacher competence, which in turn were associated with lower classroom levels of social problems. Higher levels of teacher wellbeing were directly associated with classroom adaptive and maladaptive child outcomes. Results of model 2 showed that, at the individual and classroom levels, only the emotional and behavioral problems of children predicted social classroom relationships. At the classroom level, teacher competence was best predicted by positive teacher-child relationships and teacher wellbeing was best predicted by classroom levels of prosocial behavior. We discuss the importance of positive teacher-child and peer interactions for children placed in special education and suggest ways of improving classroom processes by targeting teacher competence. PMID:25636262

Breeman, L D; Wubbels, T; van Lier, P A C; Verhulst, F C; van der Ende, J; Maras, A; Hopman, J A B; Tick, N T

2015-02-01

77

Mothers' Acculturation and Beliefs about Emotions, Mother-Child Emotion Discourse, and Children's Emotion Understanding in Latino Families  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Research Findings: We examined associations among Anglo acculturation, Latino enculturation, maternal beliefs, mother-child emotion talk, and emotion understanding in 40 Latino preschool-age children and their mothers. Mothers self-reported Anglo acculturation, Latino enculturation, and beliefs about the value/danger of children's emotions and…

Perez Rivera, Marie Belle; Dunsmore, Julie C.

2011-01-01

78

Grief as a Social Emotion: Theoretical Perspectives  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The article explores a sociological perspective on grief as a social emotion. Focusing on the social bond with the deceased, the self-concept of the survivor or the power of feeling rules, general sociological theories of emotions (symbolic interactionism, structural theory, behavioral theory) have the potential to deepen the understanding of…

Jakoby, Nina R.

2012-01-01

79

Integrating Social Emotional Learning into Secondary Curriculum  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

When students are able to cope with, manage and maneuver the social and emotional landscapes of their lives, their ability to learn on all levels improves. Teaching Social / Emotional Learning (SEL), as a component of secondary education, not only increases academic performance, but prepares students to meet the challenges of lifelong learning in…

Lindsay, Marilyn

2013-01-01

80

How social is the social psychology of emotion?  

PubMed

Two classic studies published 50 years ago showed how other people provide information that shapes the activation and interpretation of emotions. The present paper traces development of the social psychology of emotions from this starting point. Subsequent research into group-based and social appraisal has advanced understanding of the impact of social information on emotions and suggested new ways of investigating associated phenomena. Although potential integrations of interpersonal and group-oriented approaches offer promise for the future, the continuing focus on emotions as cognitively mediated effects of social factors should broaden to encompass dynamic relational processes. PMID:21884541

Parkinson, Brian

2011-09-01

81

The Contribution of Childhood Emotional Abuse to Teen Dating Violence among Child Protective Services-Involved Youth  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Objective: For child protective services (CPS) youth who may have experienced more than one form of maltreatment, the unique contribution of emotional abuse may be over-looked when other forms are more salient and more clearly outside of accepted social norms for parenting. This study considers the unique predictive value of childhood emotional

Wekerle, Christine; Leung, Eman; Wall, Anne-Marie; MacMillan, Harriet; Boyle, Michael; Trocme, Nico; Waechter, Randall

2009-01-01

82

Gender and age differences in parent-child emotion talk.  

PubMed

This study examined gender differences in emotion word use during mother-child and father-child conversations. Sixty-five Spanish mothers and fathers and their 4- (M = 53.50, SD = 3.54) and 6-year-old (M = 77.07, SD = 3.94) children participated in this study. Emotion talk was examined during a play-related storytelling task and a reminiscence task (conversation about past experiences). Mothers mentioned a higher proportion of emotion words than did fathers. During the play-related storytelling task, mothers of 4-year-old daughters mentioned a higher proportion of emotion words than did mothers of 4-year-old sons, whereas fathers of 4-year-old daughters directed a higher proportion of emotion words than did fathers of 4-year-old sons during the reminiscence task. No gender differences were found with parents of 6-year-old children. During the reminiscence task daughters mentioned more emotion words with their fathers than with their mothers. Finally, mothers' use of emotion talk was related to whether children used emotion talk in both tasks. Fathers' use of emotion talk was only related to children's emotion talk during the reminiscence task. PMID:25387786

Aznar, Ana; Tenenbaum, Harriet R

2015-03-01

83

Domestic Violence, Emotional Competence, and Child Adjustment  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This article examined emotion competence in children exposed to domestic violence (DV). It also examined the hypothesis that children's emotional competence mediates relations between DV and children's later difficulties with peers and behavioral adjustment. DV was assessed when children were at the age of five, emotional competence was assessed…

Katz, Lynn Fainsilber; Hessler, Danielle M.; Annest, Amalia

2007-01-01

84

Social support and child protection: Lessons learned and learning.  

PubMed

Social support has been a topic of research for nearly 50 years, and its applications to prevention and intervention have grown significantly, including programs advancing child protection. This article summarizes the central conclusions of the 1994 review of research on social support and the prevention of child maltreatment prepared for the U.S. Advisory Board on Child Abuse and Neglect, and surveys advances in the field since its publication. Among the lessons learned twenty years ago are (a) the diversity of the social support needs of at-risk families and their association with child endangerment, (b) the need to supplement the emotionally affirmative aspects of social support with efforts to socialize parenting practices and monitor child well-being, (c) the desirability of integrating formal and informal sources of social support for recipients, and (d) the importance of considering the complex recipient reactions to receiving support from others. The lessons we are now learning derive from research exploring the potential of online communication to enhance social support, the neurobiology of stress and its buffering through social support, and the lessons of evaluation research that are identifying the effective ingredients of social support interventions. PMID:25043921

Thompson, Ross A

2015-03-01

85

Joint Emotion-Topic Modeling for Social Affective Text Mining  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper is concerned with the problem of social affective text mining, which aims to discover the connections between social emotions and affective terms based on user-generated emotion labels. We propose a joint emotion-topic model by augmenting latent Dirichlet allocation with an additional layer for emotion modeling. It first generates a set of latent topics from emotions, followed by generating

Shenghua Bao; Shengliang Xu; Li Zhang; Rong Yan; Zhong Su; Dingyi Han; Yong Yu

2009-01-01

86

Mother and Child Emotions during Mathematics Homework  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Mathematics is often thought of as a purely intellectual and unemotional activity. Recently, researchers have begun to question the validity of this approach, arguing that emotions and cognition are intertwined. The emotions expressed during mathematics work may be linked to mathematics achievement. We used behavioral measures to identify the…

Else-Quest, Nicole M.; Hyde, Janet S.; Hejmadi, Ahalya

2008-01-01

87

Family Conflict, Emotional Security, and Child Development: Translating Research Findings into a Prevention Program for Community Families  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The social problem posed by family conflict to the physical and psychological health and well-being of children, parents, and underlying family relationships is a cause for concern. Inter-parental and parent-child conflict are linked with children's behavioral, emotional, social, academic, and health problems, with children's risk particularly…

Cummings, E. Mark; Schatz, Julie N.

2012-01-01

88

Child Development  

MedlinePLUS

As children grow older, they develop in several different ways. Child development includes physical, intellectual, social, and emotional changes. Children grow and mature at very different rates. It's ...

89

Social theory and emotion: sociological excursions  

Microsoft Academic Search

Purpose – Using the distinction between “private problems” and “public issues” derived from Mill's “sociological imagination”, this paper aims to assess how diverse social theory approaches problematise and define the ways in which social life is shaped and organised with regard to “emotions”. Design\\/methodology\\/approach – The paper's approach is theoretical and novel in the interpretation of an under-development theme in

Jason L. Powell; Tony Gilbert

2008-01-01

90

Functions of parent-child reminiscing about emotionally negative events.  

PubMed

Parent-child reminiscing about negative experiences influences children's developing "emotional self-concept", which comprises three interrelated functions: self-defining (this is the kind of emotional person I am), self-in-relation (this is how I express and share my emotions with others), and coping (this is how I cope with and resolve negative emotion). In this study, we examined how 70 mostly white, middle-class mothers discuss three negative experiences (fear, anger, and sadness) with their 4-year-old children. Conversations about fear elaborate on the facts of the event and emotional resolutions, thus focusing on coping. Conversations about sadness contain evaluative feedback and emotional resolutions, thus focusing on self-in-relation and coping. Finally, conversations about anger highlight the emotional state itself, thus focusing on self-definition. Mothers are also more elaborative and more evaluative with daughters than with sons, and place emotional events in a more interpersonal context with daughters than sons. Thus girls may be forming a more elaborated and more interpersonal emotional self-concept than boys. PMID:12820830

Fivush, Robyn; Berlin, Lisa J; Sales, Jessica McDermott; Mennuti-Washburn, Jean; Cassidy, Jude

2003-03-01

91

Profiling Social, Emotional and Behavioural Difficulties of Children Involved in Direct and Indirect Bullying Behaviours  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Being involved in bullying places a child at risk of poor psychosocial and educational outcomes. This study aimed to examine the profile of behavioural, emotional and social functioning for two subtypes of bullying: direct and indirect (relational). Pupils aged between 7 and 11 years completed sociometric measures of social inclusion and bullying…

Smith, H.; Polenik, K.; Nakasita, S.; Jones, A. P.

2012-01-01

92

Emotional availability, attachment, and intervention in center-based child care for infants and toddlers.  

PubMed

According to data from the 1997 NICHD Study of Child Care, center-based child care can have deleterious effects on children's social-emotional development. We hypothesized that training child care professionals to develop positive relationships with children in their care would improve the quality of center-based child care. Thirty-three professional caregiver-child pairs participated in the intervention group and 24 professional caregiver-child pairs were assigned to a care as usual comparison group. The intervention consisted of an informational and a practice component with an emotional availability (EA) coach. The infants and toddlers (ages 11 to 23 months) in the classrooms were enrolled in the project only if they spent at least 20 hr per week in center-based care. The measures included were (a) the EA Scales, (b) the Attachment Q-Sort, and (c) the Classroom Interaction Scale. The intervention group professional caregiver-child relationships showed improvements on the EA Scales, Attachment Q-Sort, and the Classroom Interaction Scale from pre- to posttest, compared to the comparison group, who showed some decrements over a comparable period of time. PMID:22292991

Biringen, Zeynep; Altenhofen, Shannon; Aberle, Jennifer; Baker, Megan; Brosal, Aubrey; Bennett, Sera; Coker, Ellen; Lee, Carly; Meyer, Beatrice; Moorlag, Albertha; Swaim, Randall

2012-02-01

93

The Burden of Disaster: Part II. Applying Interventions Across the Child’s Social Ecology  

PubMed Central

This second of two articles describes the application of disaster mental health interventions within the context of the child’s social ecology consisting of (he Micro-, Meso-, Exo-, and Macrosystems. Microsystem interventions involving parents, siblings, and close friends include family preparedness planning and practice, psychoeducation, role modeling, emotional support, and redirection. Mesosystem interventions provided by schools and faith-based organizations include safety and support, assessment, referral, and counseling. Exosystem interventions include those provided through community-based mental health programs, healthcare organizations, the workplace, the media, local volunteer disaster organizations, and other local organizations. Efforts to build community resilience to disasters are likely to have influence through the Exosystem. The Macrosystem – including the laws, history, cultural and subcultural characteristics, and economic and social conditions that underlie the other systems – affects the child indirectly through public policies and disaster programs and services that become available in the child’s Exosystem in the aftermath of a disaster. The social ecology paradigm, described more fully in a companion article (Noffsinger, Pfefferbaum, Pfefferbaum, Sherrieb, & Norris,2012), emphasizes relationships among systems and can guide the development and delivery of services embedded in naturally-occurring structures in the child’s environment. PMID:23894798

Pfefferbaum, Rose L.; Pfefferbaum, Betty; Jacobs, Anne K.; Noffsinger, Mary A.; Sherrieb, Kathleen; Norris, Fran H.

2014-01-01

94

African American and European American Mothers' Beliefs About Negative Emotions and Emotion Socialization Practices  

Microsoft Academic Search

Objective. The authors examined mothers’ beliefs about their children's negative emotions and their emotion socialization practices. Design. A total of 65 African American and 137 European American mothers of 5-year-old children reported their beliefs and typical responses to children's negative emotions, and mothers’ emotion teaching practices were observed. Results. African American mothers reported that the display of negative emotions was

Jackie A. Nelson; Esther M. Leerkes; Marion OBrien; Susan D. Calkins; Stuart Marcovitch

2012-01-01

95

Relations among Teachers' Emotion Socialization Beliefs and Practices and Preschoolers' Emotional Competence  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Research Findings: Utilizing a 3-part model of emotion socialization that included modeling, contingent responding, and teaching, this study examined the associations between 44 teachers' self-reported and observed emotion socialization practices and 326 preschoolers' emotion knowledge and observed emotional behavior. Multilevel analyses…

Morris, Carol A. S.; Denham, Susanne A.; Bassett, Hideko H.; Curby, Timothy W.

2013-01-01

96

Gender Differences in the Socialization of Preschoolers' Emotional Competence  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Preschoolers' socialization of emotion and its contribution to emotional competence is likely to be highly gendered. In their work, the authors have found that mothers often take on the role of emotional gatekeeper in the family, and fathers act as loving playmates, but that parents' styles of socialization of emotion do not usually differ for…

Denham, Susanne A.; Bassett, Hideko Hamada; Wyatt, Todd M.

2010-01-01

97

Influences of Parent and Child Negative Emotionality on Young Children’s Everyday Behaviors  

PubMed Central

Negative emotionality is linked to unfavorable life outcomes, but studies have yet to examine negative emotionality of parents and children as predictors of children’s problem behaviors and negative emotion word use in everyday life. This study used a novel naturalistic recording device called the Electronically Activated Recorder (EAR) to investigate the separate and interactive influences of parent and child negative emotionality on daily child behaviors in a sample of 35 preschool-aged children over two time points separated by one year. Fathers’ negative emotionality predicted children’s whining at Time 1; mothers’ negative emotionality predicted children’s negative emotion word use at Time 1 and increases in children’s arguing/fighting from Time 1 to Time 2. Parents’ ratings of child negative emotionality also were associated with increases in children’s arguing/fighting from Time 1 to Time 2, and child negative emotionality moderated the association between mothers’ negative emotionality and children’s arguing/fighting. Further, children with mothers high in negative emotionality displayed higher levels of problem behaviors when their mothers self-reported low levels of positive emotional expressiveness and/or high levels of negative emotional expressiveness. These findings offer preliminary evidence linking parent and child negative emotionality to everyday child behaviors, and suggest that emotional expressiveness may play a key role in moderating the links between maternal negative emotionality and child behavioral problems. PMID:22390707

Slatcher, Richard B.; Trentacosta, Christopher J.

2012-01-01

98

Pathways Between Social Support, Family Well Being, Quality of Parenting, and Child Resilience: What We Know  

Microsoft Academic Search

We contribute to the theoretical and research knowledge base regarding the pathways between parental social support, family well being, quality of parenting, and the development of child resilience in families with a child with serious emotional problems. Little conceptual development has been done that provides a theoretical framework for studying the relationships among these variables. We identify key findings from

Mary I. Armstrong; Shelly Birnie-Lefcovitch; Michael T. Ungar

2005-01-01

99

"Won't Somebody 'Think' of the Children?" Emotions, Child Poverty, and Post-Humanitarian Possibilities for Social Justice Education  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Under models of moral and global citizenship education, compassion and caring are emphasized as a counterpoint to pervasive, heartless, neo-liberal globalization. According to such views, these and related emotions such as empathy, sympathy, and pity, can cause people to act righteously to aid others who are disadvantaged through no fault of their…

Jackson, Liz

2014-01-01

100

Social Emotional Learning and Educational Stress: A Predictive Model  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The purpose of this study is to examine the relationship between social emotional learning and educational stress. Participants were 321 elementary students. Social emotional learning and educational stress scale were used as measures. The relationships between social emotional learning and educational stress were examined using correlation…

Arslan, Serhat

2015-01-01

101

Child Maltreatment Severity and Adult Trauma Symptoms: Does Perceived Social Support Play a Buffering Role?  

PubMed Central

Objectives The current study investigates the moderating effect of perceived social support on associations between child maltreatment severity and adult trauma symptoms. We extend the existing literature by examining the roles of severity of multiple maltreatment types (i.e., sexual, physical, and emotional abuse; physical and emotional neglect) and gender in this process. Methods The sample included 372 newlywed individuals recruited from marriage license records. Participants completed a number of self-report questionnaires measuring the nature and severity of child maltreatment history, perceived social support from friends and family, and trauma-related symptoms. These questionnaires were part of a larger study, investigating marital and intrapersonal functioning. We conducted separate, two-step hierarchical multiple regression models for perceived social support from family and perceived social support from friends. In each of these models, total trauma symptomatology was predicted from each child maltreatment severity variable, perceived social support, and the product of the two variables. In order to examine the role of gender, we conducted separate analyses for women and men. Results As hypothesized, increased severity of several maltreatment types (sexual abuse, emotional abuse, emotional neglect, and physical neglect) predicted greater trauma symptoms for both women and men, and increased physical abuse severity predicted greater trauma symptoms for women. Perceived social support from both family and friends predicted lower trauma symptoms across all levels of maltreatment for men. For women, greater perceived social support from friends, but not from family, predicted decreased trauma symptoms. Finally, among women, perceived social support from family interacted with child maltreatment such that, as the severity of maltreatment (physical and emotional abuse, emotional neglect) increased, the buffering effect of perceived social support from family on trauma symptoms diminished. Conclusions The results of the current study shed new light on the potential for social support to shield individuals against long-term trauma symptoms, and suggest the importance of strengthening perceptions of available social support when working with adult survivors of child maltreatment. PMID:23623620

Evans, Sarah E.; Steel, Anne; DiLillo, David

2013-01-01

102

Emotional Intelligence and Social Perception   

E-print Network

and interpretations. In the present study EI is measured using the following standardized interpersonal perception tests; the Social Perception Test (SPT), Interpersonal Perception Task (IPT), and Reading the Mind in the Eyes Test (RTMITE). The SPT uses a ‘real life...

Forrester, Roisin

2010-06-30

103

Convergent Validity of and Bias in Maternal Reports of Child Emotion  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This study examined the convergent validity of maternal reports of child emotion in a sample of 190 children between the ages of 3 and 6. Children completed a battery of 10 emotion-eliciting laboratory tasks; their mothers and untrained naive observers rated child emotions (happiness, surprise, fear, sadness, and anger) following each task, and…

Durbin, C. Emily; Wilson, Sylia

2012-01-01

104

Treating Conduct Problems and Strengthening Social and Emotional Competence in Young Children: The Dina Dinosaur Treatment Program.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This article describes the Dina Dinosaur Social, Emotional and Problem Solving Child Training Program for young children with conduct problems. The program emphasizes training children in skills such as emotional literacy, empathy or perspective taking, friendship and communication skills, anger management, interpersonal problem solving, and…

Webster-Stratton, Carolyn; Reid, M. Jamila

2003-01-01

105

Relations among Teachers’ Emotion Socialization Beliefs and Practices, and Preschoolers’ Emotional Competence  

PubMed Central

Research Findings Utilizing a three-part model of emotion socialization that includes Modeling, Contingent Responding, and Teaching, this study examined the associations between 44 teachers’ self-reported and observed emotion socialization practices and 326 preschoolers’ emotion knowledge and observed emotional behavior. Multi-level analyses revealed that the majority of the variance in the children’s emotion knowledge scores and observed emotional behavior was predicted by factors within, rather than between, classrooms. Teachers’ use of all three emotion socialization techniques did contribute to the prediction of the children’s scores; however, the nature of these associations differed by children’s age and gender. Practice or Policy The development of children’s emotional competence is a complex, multi-faceted process in which many interaction partners play a role; early childhood teachers act as emotion socialization agents for the children in their care by modeling emotions, responding either supportively or punitively to children’s expressions of emotions, and engaging in direct instruction regarding emotional experience. This research may provide a basis for potential future interventions designed to assist teachers in developing their own emotion socialization skills so that they can be more effective emotion socialization agents for the children in their care. PMID:24159256

Morris, Carol A.S.; Denham, Susanne A.; Bassett, Hideko H.; Curby, Timothy W.

2013-01-01

106

The interaction of social and emotional processes in the brain.  

PubMed

Social stimuli function as emotional barometers for the immediate environment are the catalysts for many emotional reactions, and have inherent value for relationships and survival independent of their current emotional content. We, therefore, propose that the neural mechanisms underlying social and emotional information processing may be interconnected. In the current study, we examined the independent and interactive effects of social and emotional processes on brain activation. Whole-brain images were acquired while participants viewed and categorized affective pictures that varied on two dimensions: emotional content (i. e., neutral, emotional) and social content (i. e., faces/people, objects/scenes). Patterns of activation were consistent with past findings demonstrating that the amygdala and part of the visual cortex were more active to emotionally evocative pictures than to neutral pictures and that the superior temporal sulcus was more active to social than to nonsocial pictures. Furthermore, activation of the superior temporal sulcus and middle occipito-temporal cortex showed evidence of the interactive processing of emotional and social information, whereas activation of the amygdala showed evidence of additive effects. These results indicate that interactive effects occur early in the stream of processing, suggesting that social and emotional information garner greater attentional resources and that the conjunction of social and emotional cues results in synergistic early processing, whereas the amygdala appears to be primarily implicated in processing biologically or personally relevant stimuli, regardless of the nature of the relevance (i. e., social, emotional, or both). PMID:15701231

Norris, Catherine J; Chen, E Elinor; Zhu, David C; Small, Steven L; Cacioppo, John T

2004-12-01

107

Emotional Correlates of Social Competence in Children's Peer Relationships.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Reviews research that provides connections between the constructs of emotional functioning and social competence in children, focusing on such areas as children's understanding and identification of emotions, emotion regulation, emotion display rules, sympathetic responding, and children's mood states. Finds some support for the idea that high…

Hubbard, Julie A.; Coie, John D.

1994-01-01

108

Strengthening Social and Emotional Competence in Young Children—The Foundation for Early School Readiness and Success Incredible Years Classroom Social Skills and Problem-Solving Curriculum  

Microsoft Academic Search

The ability of young children to manage their emotions and behaviors and to make meaningful friendships is an important prerequisite for school readiness and academic success. Socially com- petent children are also more academically successful and poor social skills are a strong predictor of academic failure. This article describes The Incredible Years Dinosaur Social Skills and Problem- Solving Child Training

Carolyn Webster-Stratton; M. Jamila Reid

109

Parent-Child Interactions in Relation to Critical and Emotionally Overinvolved Expressed Emotion (EE): Is EE a Proxy for Behavior?  

Microsoft Academic Search

Expressed emotion measures, encompassing dimensions of criticism (CRIT), and emotional overinvolvement (EOI) are increasingly being used to assess the parent–child relationship in child clinical populations, despite the lack of studies assessing their validity. We examined the correspondence between CRIT, EOI, and parent–child interactions as observed by neutral coders in a sample of 252 clinic-referred children and adolescents, ages 7–17 years.

Carolyn A. McCarty; Anna S. Lau; Sylvia M. Valeri; John R. Weisz

2004-01-01

110

Which Social Emotional Competencies Are Enhanced at a Social Emotional Learning Camp?  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Research studies have shown that educational programmes such as camps and field trips can develop affective and social relationships through personal exposure to outdoor experiences among students. This study will illustrate the outcome of a social emotional learning camp organized for 93 Secondary Two students (mean age 14.1) in Singapore. Both…

Ee, Jessie; Ong, Chew Wei

2014-01-01

111

Differential Effects of Maternal Sensitivity to Infant Distress and Nondistress on Social-Emotional Functioning  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Associations between maternal sensitivity to infant distress and nondistress and infant social-emotional adjustment were examined in a subset of dyads from the NICHD Study of Early Child Care (N = 376). Mothers reported on infant temperament at 1 and 6 months postpartum, and maternal sensitivity to distress and nondistress were observed at 6…

Leerkes, Esther M.; Blankson, A. Nayena; O'Brien, Marion

2009-01-01

112

The Incredible Years Therapeutic Social and Emotional Skills Programme: A Pilot Study  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The Incredible Years (IY) universal child Classroom Dinosaur and Teacher Classroom Management programmes are delivered in all 102 primary schools in Gwynedd County, Wales. This article describes a pilot study of the IY Therapeutic (small group) Dinosaur School social and emotional coaching programme, developed as a treatment programme, in one such…

Hutchings, Judy; Bywater, Tracey; Gridley, Nicole; Whitaker, Christopher J.; Martin-Forbes, Pam; Gruffydd, Stella

2012-01-01

113

The Use of Emotions in Social Work Education  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The role of emotions, although central to social work practice, has been relatively neglected in the process of teaching and learning social work. This article explores how social work educators can incorporate an understanding of the role of emotions in both the teaching and practice of social work. Attention is drawn toward evolutionary and…

Ikebuchi, Johnathan; Rasmussen, Brian Michael

2014-01-01

114

Maternal Depression and Child Internalizing: The Moderating Role of Child Emotion Regulation  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This study tests a model of children's emotion regulation (ER) as a moderator of the link between maternal depression and child internalizing problems. Participants were 78 children (ages 4 to 7), including 45 children of mothers with a history of childhood-onset depression (COD) and 33 children of mothers who had never been depressed. ER was…

Silk, Jennifer S.; Shaw, Daniel S.; Forbes, Erika E.; Lane, Tonya L.; Kovacs, Maria

2006-01-01

115

Relating Emotional and Social Intelligence to Sex and Age  

Microsoft Academic Search

The purpose of this study was to examine the relationship between Emotional and Social Intelligence and age, and to determine if this relationship is different for men and women. Emotional and Social Intelligence (ESI) can be broadly defined as the ability to perceive, understand, and manage your own emotions and those of other people. The four O'Sullivan and Guilford Tests

Kathryn L. Barbera; Kimberly A. Barchard

116

Social Approach and Emotion Recognition in Fragile X Syndrome  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Evidence is emerging that individuals with Fragile X syndrome (FXS) display emotion recognition deficits, which may contribute to their significant social difficulties. The current study investigated the emotion recognition abilities, and social approachability judgments, of FXS individuals when processing emotional stimuli. Relative to…

Williams, Tracey A.; Porter, Melanie A.; Langdon, Robyn

2014-01-01

117

Sense of humor, emotional intelligence, and social competence  

Microsoft Academic Search

Associations among sense of humor, emotional intelligence (EI), and social competence were examined in 111 undergraduate students using measures of humor styles, trait cheerfulness, social competence, and an ability test of EI. Emotional management ability was positively correlated with self-enhancing humor and trait cheerfulness, and negatively correlated with trait bad mood. Ability to accurately perceive emotions was negatively related to

Jeremy A. Yip; Rod A. Martin

2006-01-01

118

Do Students Experience "Social Intelligence," Laughter, and Other Emotions Online?  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Are online activities devoid of emotion and social intelligence? Graduate students in online and blended programs at Texas Tech University and the University of Memphis were surveyed about how often they laughed, felt other emotions, and expressed social intelligence. Laughter, chuckling, and smiling occurred "sometimes" as did other emotions

Meyer, Katrina A.; Jones, Stephanie J.

2012-01-01

119

Parent-Child Talk about Past Emotional Events: Associations with Child Temperament and Goodness-of-Fit  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The aim of this study was to examine associations between children's temperament, parent-child goodness-of-fit, and the emotional content of parent-child conversations about past events. Fifty one New Zealand 5- and 6-year-old children and their parents discussed 4 emotional past events. Parents rated children's temperament along 15 dimensions…

Bird, Amy; Reese, Elaine; Tripp, Gail

2006-01-01

120

Emotion Talk: Helping Caregivers Facilitate Emotion Understanding and Emotion Regulation  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This article focuses on two aspects of emotional intelligence, emotion understanding and emotion regulation. These abilities are important because of their impact on social communication and the way in which they influence a child's access to knowledge. Caregivers who engage their children in emotion talk may strengthen the ability of their…

Brinton, Bonnie; Fujiki, Martin

2011-01-01

121

Emotional intelligence, personality, social networks, and social perception   

E-print Network

to the emotions of others. In order to test this, a social perception inspection time task was carried out in which participants were required to identify if a face was happy, sad, or angry. The faces used were both Caucasian and Far-East Asian, the hypothesis...

DeBusk, Kendra Portia Adrienne Howard

122

Emotional and Social Development: 4 to 7 Months  

MedlinePLUS

... 7 Months Ages & Stages Listen Emotional and Social Development: 4 to 7 Months Article Body Between four ... you have any concerns about your baby’s emotional development. Your pediatrician can help if she knows there ...

123

Emotional Intelligence and Social-Emotional Learning: An Overview  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The term "EI (emotional intelligence)" was first used in 1990 by Salovey and Mayer. EI involves: (1) the ability to perceive accurately, appraise and express emotion; (2) the ability to access and/or generate feelings when they facilitate thought; (3) the ability to understand emotion and emotional knowledge; and (4) the ability to regulate…

Basu, Anamitra; Mermillod, Martial

2011-01-01

124

The role of emotion and emotion regulation in social anxiety disorder.  

PubMed

Many psychiatric disorders involve problematic patterns of emotional reactivity and regulation. In this review, we consider recent findings regarding emotion and emotion regulation in the context of social anxiety disorder (SAD). We first describe key features of SAD which suggest altered emotional and self-related processing difficulties. Next, we lay the conceptual foundation for a discussion of emotion and emotion regulation and present a common framework for understanding emotion regulation, the process model of emotion regulation. Using the process model, we evaluate the recent empirical literature spanning self-report, observational, behavioral, and physiological methods across five specific families of emotion regulation processes-situation selection, situation modification, attentional deployment, cognitive change, and response modulation. Next, we examine the empirical evidence behind two psychosocial interventions for SAD: cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) and mindfulness-based stress reduction (MBSR). Throughout, we present suggestions for future directions in the continued examination of emotion and emotion regulation in SAD. PMID:25413637

Jazaieri, Hooria; Morrison, Amanda S; Goldin, Philippe R; Gross, James J

2015-01-01

125

Narrative Structure and Emotional References in Parent-Child Reminiscing: Associations with Child Gender, Temperament, and the Quality of Parent-Child Interactions  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The present research examined child gender, temperament, and the quality of parent-child interactions as predictors of narrative style and references to emotion during mother-child and father-child reminiscing. Although models predicting parents' narrative styles were non-significant, results revealed significant interactions between parental…

Bost, Kelly K.; Choi, Eunsil; Wong, Maria S.

2010-01-01

126

Social and Emotional Adjustment of Siblings of Children with Autism  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Background: Social and emotional adjustment of siblings of children with autism was examined, to explore their risk or resilience to effects of genetic liability and environmental factors involved in having a sibling with autism. Method: Social-emotional adjustment, behavior problems, socialization skills, and siblings' relationships were compared…

Pilowsky, Tammy; Yirmiya, Nurit; Doppelt, Osnat; Gross-Tsur, Varda; Shalev, Ruth S.

2004-01-01

127

Ethnic Differences in Women's Emotional Reactions to Parental Non-Supportive Emotion Socialization  

PubMed Central

Recent evidence suggests that the association between parents’ use of non-supportive emotion socialization practices and their children's subsequent negative emotional outcomes varies based on ethnicity. The goal of this study is to test the proposition that African American women interpret parental non-supportive emotion socialization practices less negatively than European American women. In this study, 251 European and African American women completed a measure on recalled feelings when their parents engaged in non-supportive emotion socialization practices during childhood. Results indicated that African American women reported feeling more loved and less hurt and ashamed than European American women when their parents enacted non-supportive emotion socialization practices such as ignoring, punishing, minimizing, and teasing them when distressed. Possible mechanisms for this difference and the need for additional research exploring ethnic differences in emotion socialization and its effects on adjustment are discussed. PMID:25419018

Leerkes, Esther M.; Supple, Andrew J.; Gudmunson, Jessica A.

2014-01-01

128

Relationships between a Social-Emotional Learning Program and Emotional Intelligence in Middle School Students  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This study examined the relationships between a social-emotional learning program and the 5 dimensions of emotional intelligence and whether the relationships were moderated by gender. The problem addressed in the study was the lack of research focused on the development of emotional intelligence at the middle school level. The participants…

Brown, Katherine Marie

2013-01-01

129

Social and Emotional Pedagogies: Critiquing the New Orthodoxy of Emotion in Classroom Behaviour Management  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This paper examines new structured attempts to address and manage emotions in the classroom. Critical analysis focuses on the broad emotional literacy agenda operating within schools, and more specifically the Social and Emotional Aspects of Learning (SEAL) programme. Data are drawn on from an ethnographic study located in Behaviour Support Units…

Gillies, Val

2011-01-01

130

Changes in social emotion recognition following traumatic frontal lobe injury?  

PubMed Central

Changes in social and emotional behaviour have been consistently observed in patients with traumatic brain injury. These changes are associated with emotion recognition deficits which represent one of the major barriers to a successful familiar and social reintegration. In the present study, 32 patients with traumatic brain injury, involving the frontal lobe, and 41 age- and education-matched healthy controls were analyzed. A Go/No-Go task was designed, where each participant had to recognize faces representing three social emotions (arrogance, guilt and jealousy). Results suggested that ability to recognize two social emotions (arrogance and jealousy) was significantly reduced in patients with traumatic brain injury, indicating frontal lesion can reduce emotion recognition ability. In addition, the analysis of the results for hemispheric lesion location (right, left or bilateral) suggested the bilateral lesion sub-group showed a lower accuracy on all social emotions.

Martins, Ana Teresa; Faísca, Luis; Esteves, Francisco; Simão, Cláudia; Justo, Mariline Gomes; Muresan, Angélica; Reis, Alexandra

2012-01-01

131

Emotionally Contentious Social Movements: A Tri-Variate Framework  

E-print Network

of the effectiveness of emotions. Subtle affec- tive or reactive emotional responses, such as undertaking a vegan diet or 2 Examples of those pictures could be found on http://www.prolife.com/ 93 Emotionally Contentious Social Movements throwing away one’s fur coat...

Sin, Ray

2009-01-01

132

Emotions, Social Work Practice and Supervision: An Uneasy Alliance?  

PubMed Central

This paper examines the place of emotions within social work practice. The perceived tensions between emotions and rational decision making are explored and it is argued that their relationship is compatible and necessary. A model for the co-creation of emotionally intelligent supervision is developed to support this vision of practice. PMID:24764612

Ingram, Richard

2012-01-01

133

Affective Environment and Toddlers' Social-Emotional Competence.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The maternal affective environment to which children are exposed, conceptualized by (1) percentage of total emotional displays (happy, sad, angry, tense, or tender) and (2) global indices of current maternal psychosocial functioning, is likely to be related to children's expression of emotions and overall social-emotional competence. Thus,…

Denham, Susanne A.

134

The impact of emotional and material social support on women's drug treatment completion.  

PubMed

This study assessed how women's perceptions of emotional and material social support affect their completion of residential drug treatment. Although previous research has examined how social support affects recovery, few studies, if any, have examined both the types and the sources of social support. The study hypothesized that women's perceptions of the emotional and material social support they receive from family, friends, partners, drug treatment, child welfare, and welfare agencies will affect treatment completion. The sample consisted of 117 women who were enrolled in a women's residential treatment program. Data were collected in semistructured initial and follow-up interviews using a life history calendar; the Scale of Perceived Social Support, which was adapted for this study; and women's treatment records. The results support the hypothesis. Social support can have both positive and negative effects on treatment completion, depending on the type and source of support provided. PMID:19728480

Lewandowski, Cathleen A; Hill, Twyla J

2009-08-01

135

Effortful Control and Parents' Emotion Socialization Patterns Predict Children's Positive Social Behavior: A Person-Centered Approach  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Research Findings: We examined relations of effortful control with parent emotion socialization practices and child social behavior using a person-centered approach in children ages 18 months to 5 years. A total of 76 parents (66 mothers, 10 fathers) completed questionnaires at screening and 6-month follow-up. There were no age differences in…

Miller, Rachel L.; Dunsmore, Julie C.; Smith, Cynthia L.

2015-01-01

136

Shifting Definitions of Emotional Maltreatment: An Analysis Child Welfare Investigation Laws and Practices in Canada  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Objective: Although there is growing evidence that the emotional dimensions of child maltreatment are particularly damaging, the feasibility and appropriateness of including emotional maltreatment (EM) in child welfare statutes continues to be questioned. Unlike physical and sexual abuse where investigations focus on discreet incidents of…

Trocme, Nico; Fallon, Barbara; MacLaurin, Bruce; Chamberland, Claire; Chabot, Martin; Esposito, Tonino

2011-01-01

137

Father Locus of Control and Child Emotional and Behavioral Outcomes: A Prospective Study  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

In a prospective longitudinal study the authors examined the associations between parent locus of control of reinforcement (LOCR), measured before the birth of a child, and behavioral-emotional outcomes in that child at age 7 years. A total of 307 couples completed questionnaires regarding their emotional status and LOCR at their first prenatal…

Tone, Erin B.; Goodfellow, Stephanie; Nowicki, Stephen, Jr.

2012-01-01

138

Parent-Child Emotional Communication and Children's Coping in Middle Childhood  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Parent-child communication regarding children's negative emotions and coping were examined in a sample of 75 5th graders (53% boys) and their mothers and fathers. We predicted that emotionally open communication between a parent and his or her child would be related to children's use of constructive coping strategies. Parents reported on how they…

Gentzler, Amy L.; Contreras-Grau, Josefina M.; Kerns, Kathryn A.; Weimer, Barbara L.

2005-01-01

139

Emotion Recognition in Fathers and Mothers at High-Risk for Child Physical Abuse  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Objective: The present study was designed to determine whether parents at high risk for physical child abuse, in comparison with parents at low risk, show deficits in emotion recognition, as well as to examine the moderator effect of gender and stress on the relationship between risk for physical child abuse and emotion recognition. Methods: Based…

Asla, Nagore; de Paul, Joaquin; Perez-Albeniz, Alicia

2011-01-01

140

Child Abuse Is a Family Social Disease  

PubMed Central

Child maltreatment is a social disease due to a breakdown in family dynamics and parent child relationships. The family doctor is closest to the family. As such he is the most suitable and effective professional for the prevention and management of the syndrome. This article outlines the types of injury common to this syndrome, with frequently heard complaints from parents. ImagesFig. 1Fig. 2Fig. 3Fig. 4Fig. 5 PMID:20468964

Fried, Charles T.

1973-01-01

141

Predicting Mothers' Beliefs about Preschool-Aged Children's Social Behavior: Evidence for Maternal Attitudes Moderating Child Effects.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Assessed mothers' childrearing attitudes and toddler behavior to predict mothers' emotions, attributions, parenting goals, and socialization strategies in response to vignettes depicting aggressive and withdrawn child behaviors two years later. Found that most child effects were moderated by maternal attitudes or gender effects. Authoritarian…

Hastings, Paul D.; Rubin, Kenneth H.

1999-01-01

142

Why is the Socially Disadvantaged Child Retarded? A Rationale and New Concept of Human Development.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Volumes have been written on the socially disadvantaged. Two theories related to the disadvantaged have evolved: the first is the "deprivation theory" which stresses the importance of an enriched environment, during the early years, on the cognitive and emotional development of the child; the second is "the cumulative intellectual deficit theory,"…

Ogletree, Earl J.

143

How Are Trait Emotional Intelligence and Social Skills Related to Emotional and Behavioural Difficulties in Adolescents?  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Trait emotional intelligence construct shifted the interest in personality research to the investigation of the effect of global personality characteristics on behaviour. The Social and Emotional Learning (SEL) movement emphasised the cultivation of social skills for positive relationships. In this paper we investigate the role of students'…

Poulou, Maria S.

2014-01-01

144

Models of Emotion Skills and Social Competence in the Head Start Classroom  

Microsoft Academic Search

Research Findings: Fostering the social competence of at-risk preschoolers would be facilitated by knowing which of children's emotion skills are most salient to social outcomes. We examined the emotion skills and social competence of 44 children enrolled in a Head Start program. Emotion skills were examined in terms of children's emotional lability and emotion regulation, whereas social competence was measured

Becky L. Spritz; Elisabeth Hollister Sandberg; Edward Maher; Ruth T. Zajdel

2010-01-01

145

Psychological control in daily parent-child interactions increases children's negative emotions.  

PubMed

The aim of the present study was to investigate the temporal dynamics between parental behaviors in daily interactions with their offspring, that is, affection and psychological control, and children's negative emotions. The participants were 152 Finnish families with a 6- to 7-year-old child. Children's negative emotions and parental affection and psychological control in interactions with their child were measured daily using diary questionnaires filled in by the mothers and fathers over 7 successive days. The results of multilevel modeling showed that psychological control applied by mothers and fathers in daily interactions with their child leads to an increase in negative emotions in the child. Parental affection in daily interactions with their child was not associated with the child's negative emotions. PMID:23750527

Aunola, Kaisa; Tolvanen, Asko; Viljaranta, Jaana; Nurmi, Jari-Erik

2013-06-01

146

Emotion Socialization in Adolescence: The Roles of Mothers and Fathers  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This chapter provides a review of the literature that examines the role of mothers and fathers in socializing emotion in their sons and daughters during adolescence. Within the context of this chapter, we focus on mother-father similarities, differences, and coordinated efforts in socializing the emotion of their adolescent children. Empirical…

Brand, Ann E.; Klimes-Dougan, Bonnie

2010-01-01

147

The Effect of Reappraising Social Exclusion on Emotional Distress  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The purpose of this investigation was to examine whether reappraisal, which is a strategy where the personal meaning of an event is reevaluated, would influence participants' emotional reactions to social exclusion feedback. It was expected that reappraising this event would reduce the emotional distress that accompanies social exclusion, but…

Kitchens, Michael B.; Gohm, Carol L.

2010-01-01

148

Social Information Processing and Emotional Understanding in Children with LD  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The present study aimed to comprehensively examine social cognition processes in children with and without learning disabilities (LD), focusing on social information processing (SIP) and complex emotional understanding capabilities such as understanding complex, mixed, and hidden emotions. Participants were 50 children with LD (age range 9.4-12.7;…

Bauminger, Nirit; Edelsztein, Hany Schorr; Morash, Janice

2005-01-01

149

Display rules for expressed emotion within organizations and gender: implications for emotional labor and social place marking  

E-print Network

in emotional interactions. Findings indicate that there were no main effects for level of gendering as operationalized by this study on emotional dissonance, emotional exhaustion and subjective social place. Exploratory data analyses conducted further...

Griffin, Andrea Eugenie Charlotte

2004-09-30

150

Child Abuse, Child Development, and Social Policy. Advances in Applied Developmental Psychology: Volume 8.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This book is devoted to the problems of family violence, child abuse, and child maltreatment, including the legal, social, psychological, and community issues. Articles contained in this volume are as follows: (1) "Child Maltreatment Research and Social Policy: The Neglected Nexus" (D. Cicchetti and S. Toth); (2) "Defining Child Maltreatment: The…

Cicchetti, Dante, Ed.; Toth, Sheree L., Ed.

151

Disorganised attachment indicates child maltreatment: how is this link useful for child protection social workers?  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper examines the indicative link between disorganised attachment and child maltreatment in the context of child protection social work in England. Attachment researchers are showing an increasing interest in the concept of disorganised attachment but there is also a growing interest as to how child protection social workers can more reliably detect child maltreatment by developing their knowledge of

David Wilkins

2011-01-01

152

Maternal and Child Expressed Emotion as Predictors of Treatment Response in Pediatric Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Expressed emotion (EE) is associated with symptoms and treatment outcome in various disorders. Few studies have examined EE in pediatric OCD and none of these has assessed the child's perspective. This study examined the relationship among maternal and child EE, child OCD severity, and OCD-related functioning pre- and post-treatment. At…

Przeworski, Amy; Zoellner, Lori A.; Franklin, Martin E.; Garcia, Abbe; Freeman, Jennifer; March, John S.; Foa, Edna B.

2012-01-01

153

Child-Rearing Practices toward Children with Hemophilia: The Relative Importance of Clinical Characteristics and Parental Emotional Reactions.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Addresses the relative importance of clinical characteristics of the child and parental emotional reactions, to child-rearing practices towards children with hemophilia. Results indicate that mother's emotional reactions appear to have a stronger influence on child-rearing uncertainty and overprotection than clinical characteristics of the child.…

Banis, S.; Suurmeijer, Th. P. B. M.; van Peer, D. R.

1999-01-01

154

Does Social Labelling Encourage Child Schooling and Discourage Child Labour in Nepal?  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This paper explores the determinants of child labour vis-a-vis child schooling. It further examines the influence of non-governmental organisations (NGOs) which are engaged in social labelling, on the incidence of child labour and schooling trade-off. The empirical results show that the probability of child schooling increases as well as child

Chakrabarty, Sayan; Grote, Ulrike; Luchters, Guido

2011-01-01

155

Social Neuroscience of Child and Adolescent Depression  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The social neuroscience of child and adolescent depression is inherently multidisciplinary. Depressive disorders beginning early in life can have serious developmental and functional consequences. Psychopathology research has described depression's defining clinical and contextual features, and intervention research has characterized its response…

Miller, Anita

2007-01-01

156

A randomized controlled trial of a parent training and emotion socialization program for families of hyperactive preschool-aged children.  

PubMed

The present study evaluated the effectiveness of a parent training and emotion socialization program designed specifically for hyperactive preschoolers. Participants were 31 preschool-aged children whose parents were randomly assigned to a parent training (PT) or waitlist (WL) control group. PT parents took part in a 14-week parenting program that involved teaching parenting strategies for managing hyperactive and disruptive behavior as well as emotion socialization strategies for improving children's emotion regulation. Compared to WL mothers, PT mothers reported significantly less child inattention, hyperactivity, oppositional defiance, and emotional lability; were observed using significantly more positive and less negative parenting; and reported significantly less maternal verbosity and unsupportive emotion socialization practices. Results provide some support for the effectiveness of this parenting program for reducing attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) symptoms and associated problems in preschool-aged children. PMID:23611079

Herbert, Sharonne D; Harvey, Elizabeth A; Roberts, Jasmin L; Wichowski, Kayla; Lugo-Candelas, Claudia I

2013-06-01

157

Socialization of Emotion: Who Influences Whom and How?  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Emotion socialization begins within the family setting and extends outward as children transition into expanded social worlds. Children contribute to their socialization from the first years of life, so the dynamics between parents and children are reciprocal in nature. Because socialization influences are best inferred from patterns that unfold…

Zahn-Waxler, Carolyn

2010-01-01

158

Implicit Theories of Emotion: Affective and Social Outcomes Across a Major Life Transition  

E-print Network

Implicit Theories of Emotion: Affective and Social Outcomes Across a Major Life Transition Maya in their implicit theories of emotion: Some view emotions as fixed (entity theorists), whereas others view emotions that implicit theories of emotion, as distinct from intelligence, are linked to both emotional and social

Gross, James J.

159

Mother--Child and Father--Child Emotional Expressiveness in Mexican-American Families and Toddlers' Peer Interactions  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The present investigation explored the association of mother--child and father--child emotional expressiveness during toddlerhood to children's prosocial and aggressive behaviour with peers. Data were collected from 62 Mexican-American families with toddlers (29 females, 33 males) during a home visit. Children's peer interactions were also…

Lindsey, Eric W.; Caldera, Yvonne M.; Rivera, Mitzie

2013-01-01

160

Links between Maternal and Child Psychopathology Symptoms: Mediation through Child Emotion Regulation and Moderation through Maternal Behavior  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This study examined the intergenerational transmission of psychopathology symptoms with 7-12 year-old children (N = 97; 44 boys, 53 girls, M age = 9.14, SD = 1.38) and their mothers (M age = 38.46, SD = 6.86). Child emotion regulation mediated the links between maternal psychopathology and child internalizing and externalizing symptoms. In turn,…

Suveg, Cynthia; Shaffer, Anne; Morelen, Diana; Thomassin, Kristel

2011-01-01

161

The role of emotion awareness and mood: Somatic complaints and social adjustment in late childhood.  

PubMed

Emotion awareness is a key concept related to different child adjustment outcomes. This relationship, influenced by mood, has been found in the preadolescent and adolescent population for somatic complaints. However, little is known in the case of younger children and when other adjustment outcomes are included. The objective of this work is to analyze the contribution of emotion awareness and mood upon different adjustment outcomes (somatic complaints, maladjustment, and peer sociometric status), in children aged 8-12 years old. Self-reported questionnaires and peer-nomination scales were administered to 1423 children (mean age = 9.8 years old). Results support the influence of emotion awareness reinforced by mood, not only upon somatic complaints, but also upon new indicators of personal and social maladjustment, within an age bracket that has not been considered previously. These results stress the importance of emotional abilities and the corresponding affective moods in children's daily life. PMID:25233901

Villanueva, Lidón; Górriz, Ana Belén; Prado-Gascó, Vicente; González, Remedios

2015-06-01

162

Social and emotional adjustment in young survivors of childhood cancer  

Microsoft Academic Search

An overview is given of the social and emotional adjustment in young survivors of childhood cancer. The results are described in terms of self-esteem, anxiety, depression and posttraumatic stress (emotional adjustment), and in terms of behavioral functioning, social competence and school performance (socio-behavioral adjustment). Furthermore, factors related to survivors' adjustment are reported: demographics, illness- and treatment-related factors, coping and social

H. Stam; M. A. Grootenhuis; B. F. Last

2001-01-01

163

Electrified emotions: Modulatory effects of transcranial direct stimulation on negative emotional reactions to social exclusion.  

PubMed

Social exclusion, ostracism, and rejection can be emotionally painful because they thwart the need to belong. Building on studies suggesting that the right ventrolateral prefrontal cortex (rVLPFC) is associated with regulation of negative emotions, the present experiment tests the hypothesis that decreasing the cortical excitability of the rVLPFC may increase negative emotional reactions to social exclusion. Specifically, we applied cathodal transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) over the rVLPFC and predicted an increment of negative emotional reactions to social exclusion. In Study 1, participants were either socially excluded or included, while cathodal tDCS or sham stimulation was applied over the rVLPFC. Cathodal stimulation of rVLPFC boosted the typical negative emotional reaction caused by social exclusion. No effects emerged from participants in the inclusion condition. To test the specificity of tDCS effects over rVLPFC, in Study 2, participants were socially excluded and received cathodal tDCS or sham stimulation over a control region (i.e., the right posterior parietal cortex). No effects of tDCS stimulation were found. Our results showed that the rVLPFC is specifically involved in emotion regulation and suggest that cathodal stimulation can increase negative emotional responses to social exclusion. PMID:25139575

Riva, Paolo; Romero Lauro, Leonor J; Vergallito, Alessandra; DeWall, C Nathan; Bushman, Brad J

2015-01-01

164

Emotional Intelligence and Spiritual Development  

Microsoft Academic Search

Recent studies of the human brain have brought into focus the importance of the emotional brain. The development of the emotional brain is closely associated with the proper attachment between parent and child. It is believed that social experiences of the human child shape the genetic expression of that individual. While genes are pivotal in establishing some aspects of emotionality,

Keyvan Geula

165

The effects of social capital and social pressure on the intention to have a second or third child in France, Germany, and Bulgaria, 2004–05  

Microsoft Academic Search

This study investigates the importance of the effect of an individual's web of informal relationships with family and peers on the intention to have a second or third child. Drawing on sociological theories of social capital (help with childcare, emotional support) and social pressure, the study extends existing research by evaluating cross-national differences (between France, Germany, and Bulgaria) in the

Nicoletta Balbo; Melinda Mills

2011-01-01

166

Trajectories of Parenting and Child Negative Emotionality During Infancy and Toddlerhood: A Longitudinal Analysis  

PubMed Central

The current longitudinal study examined trajectories of child negative emotionality, parenting efficacy, and overreactive parenting among 382 adoptive families during infancy and toddlerhood. Data were collected from adoptive parents when the children were 9, 18, and 27 months old. Latent growth curve modeling indicated age-related increases in child negative emotionality and overreactive parenting for adoptive fathers and adoptive mothers, and decreases in parent efficacy among adoptive mothers. Increases in child negative emotionality were also associated with increases in parent overreactivity and decreases in maternal efficacy. Mothers' and fathers' developmental patterns were linked within but not across parenting domains. Limitations and directions for future research are discussed. PMID:21883160

Lipscomb, Shannon Tierney; Leve, Leslie D.; Harold, Gordon T.; Neiderhiser, Jenae M.; Shaw, Daniel S.; Ge, Xiaojia; Reiss, David

2011-01-01

167

Child-to-parent violence: emotional and behavioral predictors.  

PubMed

Child-to-parent violence (CPV) includes acts committed by a child to intentionally cause physical, psychological, or financial pain to a parent. Available data indicate increasing rates of CPV in Spain, which have been attributed to a tendency toward more permissive parenting styles and changes in the power cycles within the families. The primary aim of this study was to assess the predictive role of some behavioral and emotional characteristics of adolescents who perpetrate CPV. A total of 1,072 adolescents (601 girls) filled out measures of CPV, proactive and reactive aggression, depressive symptoms, and substance abuse at Time 1, and measures of CPV 6 months later. The results showed that CPV was predicted by proactive, but not by reactive, aggression. This finding supports an instrumental role for CPV, which should be understood in the context of permissibility and lack of limits within the family. Depression and substance abuse also predicted the increase of CPV over time. Moreover, there were no sex differences in the prevalence of physical CPV, but verbal CPV was more predominant among girls. Although there were sex differences in some of the risk factors for CPV, the predictive model linking these risks to CPV was similar for boys and girls. Findings of this study suggest a psychological profile that combines internalizing problems and an instrumental use of violence in adolescents who perpetrate CPV. These characteristics are important for interventions. PMID:22935948

Calvete, Esther; Orue, Izaskun; Gámez-Guadix, Manuel

2013-03-01

168

Emotion recognition and social competence in chronic schizophrenia.  

PubMed

This study evaluated (a) whether chronic, medicated schizophrenia patients show deficits in emotion recognition compared to nonpatients, and (b) whether deficits in emotion recognition are related to poorer social competence. Two emotion recognition tests developed by S. L. Kerr and J. M. Neale (1993) and Benton's Test of Facial Recognition (A. Benton, M. VanAllen, K. Hamsher, & H. Levin, 1978) were given to patients with chronic schizophrenia and nonpatient controls. Patients' social skills, social adjustment, and symptomatology were assessed. Like Kerr and Neale's unmedicated patients, these patients performed worse than controls on both emotion recognition tests and the control test. For patients, facial perception was related to the chronicity of illness and social competence. Chronicity of illness may contribute to face perception deficits in schizophrenia, which may affect social competence. PMID:8723008

Mueser, K T; Doonan, R; Penn, D L; Blanchard, J J; Bellack, A S; Nishith, P; DeLeon, J

1996-05-01

169

Henri Wallon's Theory of Early Child Development: The Role of Emotions  

PubMed

The present paper gives an account of part of the stage theory of early child development of the French theorist Henri Wallon (1879-1962). Unlike his contemporary Jean Piaget, Wallon concentrated his efforts upon a description of the child's emotional development and the role emotions play in establishing the bond between child and caregiver. The description of Wallon's stage theory is preceded by biographical information and a presentation of his methodological views. It is argued that Wallon's theory is unique in its focus, exerted influence upon theorists such as Lev Vygotsky, and is basically compatible with modern insights about the nature of child development and the growth of intersubjectivity. PMID:8979855

Veer

1996-12-01

170

Engaging Emotions and Practicing Conflict: Emotions and Teaching toward Social Justice  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This inquiry considers the role of emotions and conflict in education practices which align with social justice. The classroom is a significant location to learn and practice resourceful responses to conflict and to the emotions that accompany conflict, and can itself be considered a site of conflict intervention. This research questions how U.S.…

Meeker, Joy

2012-01-01

171

"OK This Is Hard": Doing Emotions in Social Justice Dialogue  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

In this article, I explore emotions in relation to social justice dialogue and share vignettes to illustrate how emotions are embodied, situated and fissured, drawing upon narrative, critical sociocultural and rhizomatic theories. Data comes from a practitioner inquiry while teaching 5- and 6-year-olds in a summer enrichment program in a…

Kuby, Candace R.

2013-01-01

172

Parenting Style as a Context for Emotion Socialization  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Research Findings: The purpose of this study was to examine parenting style in the domain of emotion socialization through studying the relationships among parenting styles, emotion-related parental practices, and parental goals of Hong Kong-Chinese mothers. Data were collected from 189 Hong Kong-Chinese mothers of 6- to 8-year-old children. Hong…

Chan, Siu Mui; Bowes, Jennifer; Wyver, Shirley

2009-01-01

173

Emotion Responsivity, Social Cognition, and Functional Outcome in Schizophrenia  

E-print Network

Emotion Responsivity, Social Cognition, and Functional Outcome in Schizophrenia Jennifer R. Mathews been a defining feature in schizophrenia, but relatively little research has examined how emotion in schizophrenia. Participants were 40 outpatients with DSM-IV schizophrenia or schizoaffective disorder and 40

174

Bridging Emotion Research: From Biology to Social Structure  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Emotion research demonstrates that problems of theoretical interest or practical significance are not divided neatly along disciplinary boundaries. Researchers acknowledge both organic and social underpinnings of emotion, but the intersections between biological and structural processes can be difficult to negotiate. In this article, the authors…

Rogers, Kimberly B.; Kavanagh, Liam

2010-01-01

175

Children's Language and Behavioural, Social and Emotional Difficulties and Prosocial Behaviour during the Toddler Years and at School Entry  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The ability of young children to manage their emotions and behaviours is an important prerequisite for social adjustment and school readiness. With an increase in early-onset behavioural difficulties in children, understanding changes in child behaviour during the preschool years and the factors that influence it is a priority for policy and…

Hartas, Dimitra

2011-01-01

176

It Takes Two: Sensitive Caregiving across Contexts and Children's Social, Emotional, and Academic Outcomes  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Research Findings: Using longitudinal survey data from the Welfare, Children, and Families Study: A Three-City Study ("n" = 135), this study examines how congruence in maternal and child care provider sensitivities contributes to young children's social, emotional, and academic outcomes among low-income minority families. Congruence…

Vesely, Colleen K.; Brown, Elizabeth Levine; Mahatmya, Duhita

2013-01-01

177

Early Childhood Intervention and Early Adolescent Social and Emotional Competence: Second-Generation Evaluation Evidence from the Chicago Longitudinal Study  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Background: To explore whether social or emotional outcomes for high-risk early adolescent youth that attended an established preventive intervention called the Chicago Child-Parent Center Preschool Program (CPC) are moderated by individual, family and program variations. Purpose: Two questions are addressed: (1) Do the effects of CPC preschool…

Niles, Michael D.; Reynolds, Arthur J.; Roe-Sepowitz, Dominique

2008-01-01

178

Preparing Social Workers for Child Welfare Practice  

Microsoft Academic Search

Spurred on by national and local forces, there are currently an array of strategies underway between social work education programs and public child welfare agencies to educate current and future workers, improve agency working conditions and to develop competency-based education. These partnership efforts are frequently funded by Title IV-E and Title IV-B 426 funds. Although the majority of these efforts

Joan Levy Zlotnik

2003-01-01

179

Emotional and Social Development: Birth to 3 Months  

MedlinePLUS

... 3 Months Ages & Stages Listen Emotional and Social Development: Birth to 3 Months Article Body By the ... world around him, not only will his brain development advance, but the more he’ll be distracted ...

180

Child Welfare Interventions: Patterns of Social Work Practice  

Microsoft Academic Search

Some 10 years ago one of the authors embarked on a research study examining the potential for social workers to shift from a child protection to a child welfare practice orientation (Spratt, 2000; 2001; Spratt and Callan, 2004). The research reported here develops that work; examining how social workers respond to ‘child care problems’ (CCPs). The results indicate that Northern

David Hayes; Trevor Spratt

2009-01-01

181

Social neuroscience of child and adolescent depression  

PubMed Central

The social neuroscience of child and adolescent depression is inherently multidisciplinary. Depressive disorders beginning early in life can have serious developmental and functional consequences. Psychopathology research has described depression’s defining clinical and contextual features, and intervention research has characterized its response to treatment and prevention programs. Neuroendocrine, electrophysiological, and neuroimaging studies have identified core neurobiological aspects of early-onset mood disorders. These areas are reviewed using a developmental social neuroscience perspective for integrating disparate observations. The paper introduces a dynamic adaptive systems framework, and it discusses hedonic capacity, stress sensitivity, ruminative self-focus, and attentional impairments as fundamental components of mood disorders. PMID:17624647

Miller, Anita

2007-01-01

182

You smile--I smile: emotion expression in social interaction.  

PubMed

Two studies were conducted to assess the influence of emotional context and social context, in terms of gender and status, on speaker expressivity and observer mimicry in a dyadic interactive setting. For Study 1, 96 same sex dyads and for Study 2, 72 mixed sex dyads participated in a social sharing paradigm. The results showed that in both same sex and mixed sex dyads women smile more than men and members of both sexes use Duchenne smiles rather than non-Duchenne smiles to signal social intent. In same sex dyads facial expressivity and facial mimicry were determined by both the emotional and the social context of the situation. However, whereas emotional context effects maintained, social context effects were absent in mixed sex dyads. The study is the first to show evidence for facial mimicry in an interactional setting and supports the notion that mimicry is dependent on social context. PMID:19913071

Hess, Ursula; Bourgeois, Patrick

2010-07-01

183

The Emotional\\/Relational World: Shame and the Social Bond  

Microsoft Academic Search

The classic sociologists believed that emotions and the social bond are crucially involved in the structure and change of\\u000a whole societies. The authors reviewed here suggest that shame is the premier social emotion. Lynd’s work particularly suggests\\u000a how acknowledgment of shame can strengthen bonds and by implication lack of acknowledgment can create alienation. This idea\\u000a was developed by Lewis into

THOMAS J. SCHEFF

184

Child Sex Trafficking Victims Easily Missed by Doctors, Social Workers  

MedlinePLUS

... features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Child Sex Trafficking Victims Easily Missed by Doctors, Social Workers: ... and training to identify potential victims of child sex trafficking, a new study suggests. "We need to ...

185

Can attribution of a neutral emotional state in child discipline play an adaptive role in child internalising behaviour?  

Microsoft Academic Search

Maternal rates of child internalising behaviour were compared across children's emotion attributions (neutral, fear, anger, sadness and happiness) to others in a discipline situation, after controlling for socio-demographic covariates. Sixty-five Brazilian mothers provided socio-demographic information and rated their preschool children's internalising behaviour. Children attributed emotions to a protagonist in a story facing maternal discipline. Analysis of covariance showed that children

Patricia Alvarenga; Ebenézer A. de Oliveira; Maria Virgínia Dazzani

2011-01-01

186

Can attribution of a neutral emotional state in child discipline play an adaptive role in child internalising behaviour?  

Microsoft Academic Search

Maternal rates of child internalising behaviour were compared across children’s emotion attributions (neutral, fear, anger, sadness and happiness) to others in a discipline situation, after controlling for socio?demographic covariates. Sixty?five Brazilian mothers provided socio?demographic information and rated their preschool children’s internalising behaviour. Children attributed emotions to a protagonist in a story facing maternal discipline. Analysis of covariance showed that children

Patricia Alvarenga; Ebenézer A. de Oliveira; Maria Virgínia Dazzani

2010-01-01

187

Child Care and Employed Parents of Children with Emotional or Behavioral Disorders  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Lack of appropriate child care is frequently reported by parents of children with disabilities as a major obstacle to finding and maintaining their employment. Care for children with emotional or behavioral disorders is particularly difficult to locate because child care providers often lack adequate training. Findings are presented from…

Rosenzweig, Julie M.; Brennan, Eileen M.; Huffstutter, Katherine; Bradley, Jennifer R.

2008-01-01

188

The link between child emotional and behavioral problems and couple functioning  

Microsoft Academic Search

Although considerable research has examined the relation of couple functioning to child emotional and behavioral problems, comparatively few studies have examined the impact of child functioning on couple well-being and even fewer have investigated recursive or bidirectional influences. We review this literature from both perspectives, and differentiate among studies targeting overall couple functioning and those differentiating specific components of couple

Nina Heinrichs; Anna-Luise Cronrath; Mirjana Degen; Douglas K. Snyder

2010-01-01

189

Child Depressive Symptoms, Spanking, and Emotional Support: Differences between African American and European American Youth  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Using data from the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth-Mother and Child samples, we explored the relationships among child and adolescent depressive symptoms, spanking, and emotional support offered to youth. We present cross-sectional and change models for both African Americans and European Americans. Findings showed that regardless of race,…

Christie-Mizell, C. Andre; Pryor, Erin M.; Grossman, Elizabeth R. B.

2008-01-01

190

The impact of early powered mobility on parental stress, negative emotions, and family social interactions.  

PubMed

Powered mobility has been found to have positive effects on young children with severe physical disabilities, but the impact on the family has been less well documented. We evaluated the impact of early powered mobility on parental stress, negative emotions, perceived social interactions, and parental satisfaction with wheelchair characteristics such as size and durability. The participants were parents of 23 children with disabilities-10 with orthopedic disabilities (average age 30.1 months) and 13 with cerebral palsy (average age 47.0 months). Pretest assessments were completed two times: at initial wheelchair evaluation and at wheelchair delivery. A posttest assessment was completed after each child had used the wheelchair for 4-6 months. Parents reported a lower perceived level of stress at the time of wheelchair delivery, although the magnitude of this effect was fairly small, standardized mean difference (?) = .27. They also reported an increased satisfaction with their child's social and play skills (? = .38), ability to go where desired (? = .86), sleep/wake pattern (? = .61), and belief that the general public accepts their child (? = .39) after several months using the wheelchair. Parents reported an increase in interactions within the family at the time of wheelchair delivery (? = .66). There was no decrease in negative emotions. Parents were satisfied with most factors relating to the wheelchair itself, with areas of concern being wheelchair size and difficulty adjusting the wheelchair. The findings suggest that self-initiated powered mobility for a young child had a positive impact on the family. PMID:21080784

Tefft, Donita; Guerette, Paula; Furumasu, Jan

2011-02-01

191

Testing a social ecological model for relations between political violence and child adjustment in Northern Ireland.  

PubMed

Relations between political violence and child adjustment are matters of international concern. Past research demonstrates the significance of community, family, and child psychological processes in child adjustment, supporting study of interrelations between multiple social ecological factors and child adjustment in contexts of political violence. Testing a social ecological model, 300 mothers and their children (M = 12.28 years, SD = 1.77) from Catholic and Protestant working class neighborhoods in Belfast, Northern Ireland, completed measures of community discord, family relations, and children's regulatory processes (i.e., emotional security) and outcomes. Historical political violence in neighborhoods based on objective records (i.e., politically motivated deaths) were related to family members' reports of current sectarian antisocial behavior and nonsectarian antisocial behavior. Interparental conflict and parental monitoring and children's emotional security about both the community and family contributed to explanatory pathways for relations between sectarian antisocial behavior in communities and children's adjustment problems. The discussion evaluates support for social ecological models for relations between political violence and child adjustment and its implications for understanding relations in other parts of the world. PMID:20423550

Cummings, E Mark; Merrilees, Christine E; Schermerhorn, Alice C; Goeke-Morey, Marcie C; Shirlow, Peter; Cairns, Ed

2010-05-01

192

Going for Goals: An Evaluation of a Short, Social-Emotional Intervention for Primary School Children  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

We report on an effectiveness trial of a short, social-emotional intervention called "Going for Goals", developed as part of the primary social and emotional aspects of learning (SEAL) programme in England. Our aim was to investigate the impact of Going for Goals on childrens' social and emotional skills, behaviour and emotional well-being. The…

Humphrey, Neil; Kalambouka, Afroditi; Wigelsworth, Michael; Lendrum, Ann

2010-01-01

193

Parent Emotion Representations and the Socialization of Emotion Regulation in the Family  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

There is considerable knowledge of parental socialization processes that directly and indirectly influence the development of children's emotion self-regulation, but little understanding of the specific beliefs and values that underlie parents' socialization approaches. This study examined multiple aspects of parents' self-reported…

Meyer, Sara; Raikes, H. Abigail; Virmani, Elita A.; Waters, Sara; Thompson, Ross A.

2014-01-01

194

Applying the polyvagal theory to children's emotion regulation: Social context, socialization, and adjustment  

Microsoft Academic Search

Effective emotion regulation is essential for children's positive development. Polyvagal theory provides a framework for understanding how parasympathetic regulation of cardiac activity contributes to children's adaptive versus maladaptive functioning. Maintenance of cardiac respiratory sinus arrhythmia (RSA) under social challenge should support emotion regulation and behavioral adjustment. Children's effective parasympathetic regulation and behavioral adjustment should be supported by appropriate parental socialization.

Paul D. Hastings; Jacob N. Nuselovici; William T. Utendale; Julie Coutya; Kelly E. McShane; Caroline Sullivan

2008-01-01

195

Social Acceptability of Five Screening Instruments for Social, Emotional, and Behavioral Challenges  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Social, emotional, and behavioral (SEB) screening occurs in only two percent of our schools. This is unfortunate because universal screening is linked to prevention and early intervention with emotional and behavioral disorders (EBD) in children and youth, a population who continues to experience a plethora of poor outcomes. The social

Harrison, Judith R.; Vannest, Kimberly J.; Reynolds, Cecil R.

2013-01-01

196

You smile–I smile: Emotion expression in social interaction  

Microsoft Academic Search

Two studies were conducted to assess the influence of emotional context and social context, in terms of gender and status, on speaker expressivity and observer mimicry in a dyadic interactive setting. For Study 1, 96 same sex dyads and for Study 2, 72 mixed sex dyads participated in a social sharing paradigm. The results showed that in both same sex

Ursula Hess; Patrick Bourgeois

2010-01-01

197

The Relationship between Puberty and Social Emotion Processing  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The social brain undergoes developmental change during adolescence, and pubertal hormones are hypothesized to contribute to this development. We used fMRI to explore how pubertal indicators (salivary concentrations of testosterone, oestradiol and DHEA; pubertal stage; menarcheal status) relate to brain activity during a social emotion task.…

Goddings, Anne-Lise; Burnett Heyes, Stephanie; Bird, Geoffrey; Viner, Russell M.; Blakemore, Sarah-Jayne

2012-01-01

198

Social development and the girl child.  

PubMed

This article discusses the social development of female children in India. Social development is "not merely an effort to provide ad hoc growth targets in each of the sectors of planning," but an integrative concept. Sustainable human development, according to Gus Speth (1994), is development that not only generates economic growth, it distributes its benefits equitably, regenerates the environment, and empowers people. India is ranked as 5th out of 132 countries in the 1994 World Bank Report, but 135th out of 173 in the Human Development Report. In India, there were 9000 dowry-related deaths in 1993. Son preference occurs regardless of social class. The sex ratio declined as low as 811 females per 1000 males in Jaisalmer district of Rajasthan. The government of India developed a National Action Plan that is committed to the survival, protection, and development of female children. The Integrated Child Development Scheme, in 2696 blocks with a coverage of 250,000 villages and 224 urban slum areas, has demonstrated its effectiveness in increased child nutrition. Survival of girl children is 50% less than male survival in the first 30 days of life. Under 50% of girls are enrolled in schools. Bihar state is particularly backward in enhancing girls' status through modernization and increased female enrollments. Child labor may contribute about 25-29% of gross national product. Bihar, Madhya Pradesh, Rajasthan, and Uttar Pradesh, with 40% of the total population, have over 60% of their females marrying below the age of 20 years. Recommended are universal enrollment of all children from scheduled caste and tribes; nonformal educational options for school drop outs, working children, and girls who cannot attend school; and increasing upper school education of girls. A variety of other recommendations are made on improving the status of women for working women, unmarried single women, and women in general. PMID:12158018

Gangrade, K D

1995-01-01

199

Parents’ Beliefs about Emotions and Children’s Recognition of Parents’ Emotions  

PubMed Central

This study investigated parents’ emotion-related beliefs, experience, and expression, and children’s recognition of their parents’ emotions with 40 parent-child dyads. Parents reported beliefs about danger and guidance of children’s emotions. While viewing emotion-eliciting film clips, parents self-reported their emotional experience and masking of emotion. Children and observers rated videos of parents watching emotion-eliciting film clips. Fathers reported more masking than mothers and their emotional expressions were more difficult for both observers and children to recognize compared with mothers’ emotional expressions. For fathers, but not mothers, showing clearer expressions was related to children’s general skill at recognizing emotional expressions. Parents who believe emotions are dangerous reported greater masking of emotional expression. Contrary to hypothesis, when parents strongly believe in guiding their child’s emotion socialization, children showed less accurate recognition of their parents’ emotions. PMID:20160992

Dunsmore, Julie C.; Her, Pa; Halberstadt, Amy G.; Perez-Rivera, Marie B.

2009-01-01

200

Aligning Research and Policy on Social-Emotional and Academic Competence for Young Children  

PubMed Central

Research Findings The purpose of this article is to describe current education policies as they relate to the promotion of social, emotional, and academic (SEA) development and competence for young children. Academic and social–emotional competencies are described and conceptualized as developmentally linked, reciprocal processes that should be supported by education in an integrated, holistic manner. Practice or Policy The article reviews major public policies and national initiatives that have implications for the education of young children (e.g., Head Start, No Child Left Behind, IDEA) and highlights opportunities within these policies to promote programs that can support SEA competencies, as well as the limitations of these policies. The article also includes a review of the limitations of existing resources available to educators to identify evidence-based programs that support SEA competencies and concludes with recommendations for better alignment between research and policy to support SEA competencies. PMID:25632216

Nadeem, Erum; Maslak, Kristi; Chacko, Anil; Hoagwood, Kimberly Eaton

2014-01-01

201

The embodiment of emotion: language use during the feeling of social emotions predicts cortical somatosensory activity  

PubMed Central

Complex social emotions involve both abstract cognitions and bodily sensations, and individuals may differ on their relative reliance on these. We hypothesized that individuals’ descriptions of their feelings during a semi-structured emotion induction interview would reveal two distinct psychological styles—a more abstract, cognitive style and a more body-based, affective style—and that these would be associated with somatosensory neural activity. We examined 28 participants’ open-ended verbal responses to admiration- and compassion-provoking narratives in an interview and BOLD activity to the same narratives during subsequent functional magnetic resonance imaging scanning. Consistent with hypotheses, individuals’ affective and cognitive word use were stable across emotion conditions, negatively correlated and unrelated to reported emotion strength in the scanner. Greater use of affective relative to cognitive words predicted more activation in SI, SII, middle anterior cingulate cortex and insula during emotion trials. The results suggest that individuals’ verbal descriptions of their feelings reflect differential recruitment of neural regions supporting physical body awareness. Although somatosensation has long been recognized as an important component of emotion processing, these results offer ‘proof of concept’ that individual differences in open-ended speech reflect different processing styles at the neurobiological level. This study also demonstrates SI involvement during social emotional experience. PMID:22798396

Saxbe, Darby E.; Yang, Xiao-Fei; Borofsky, Larissa A.

2013-01-01

202

The embodiment of emotion: language use during the feeling of social emotions predicts cortical somatosensory activity.  

PubMed

Complex social emotions involve both abstract cognitions and bodily sensations, and individuals may differ on their relative reliance on these. We hypothesized that individuals' descriptions of their feelings during a semi-structured emotion induction interview would reveal two distinct psychological styles-a more abstract, cognitive style and a more body-based, affective style-and that these would be associated with somatosensory neural activity. We examined 28 participants' open-ended verbal responses to admiration- and compassion-provoking narratives in an interview and BOLD activity to the same narratives during subsequent functional magnetic resonance imaging scanning. Consistent with hypotheses, individuals' affective and cognitive word use were stable across emotion conditions, negatively correlated and unrelated to reported emotion strength in the scanner. Greater use of affective relative to cognitive words predicted more activation in SI, SII, middle anterior cingulate cortex and insula during emotion trials. The results suggest that individuals' verbal descriptions of their feelings reflect differential recruitment of neural regions supporting physical body awareness. Although somatosensation has long been recognized as an important component of emotion processing, these results offer 'proof of concept' that individual differences in open-ended speech reflect different processing styles at the neurobiological level. This study also demonstrates SI involvement during social emotional experience. PMID:22798396

Saxbe, Darby E; Yang, Xiao-Fei; Borofsky, Larissa A; Immordino-Yang, Mary Helen

2013-10-01

203

Can Attribution of a Neutral Emotional State in Child Discipline Play an Adaptive Role in Child Internalising Behaviour?  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Maternal rates of child internalising behaviour were compared across children's emotion attributions (neutral, fear, anger, sadness and happiness) to others in a discipline situation, after controlling for socio-demographic covariates. Sixty-five Brazilian mothers provided socio-demographic information and rated their preschool children's…

Alvarenga, Patricia; de Oliveira, Ebenezer A.; Dazzani, Maria Virginia

2011-01-01

204

Parenting Style as a Context for Emotion Socialization  

Microsoft Academic Search

Research Findings: The purpose of this study was to examine parenting style in the domain of emotion socialization through studying the relationships among parenting styles, emotion-related parental practices, and parental goals of Hong Kong–Chinese mothers. Data were collected from 189 Hong Kong–Chinese mothers of 6- to 8-year-old children. Hong Kong–Chinese mothers reported that among authoritarian, authoritative, and permissive parenting styles,

Siu Mui Chan; Jennifer Bowes; Shirley Wyver

2009-01-01

205

Differential subjective and psychophysiological responses to socially and nonsocially generated emotional stimuli.  

PubMed

Sociality may determine the subjective experience and physiological response to emotional stimuli. Film segments induced socially and nonsocially generated emotions. Comedy (social positive), bereavement (social negative), pizza scenes (nonsocial positive), and wounded bodies (nonsocial negative) elicited four distinct emotional patterns. Per subjective report, joy, sadness, appetite, and disgust were elicited by the targeted stimulus condition. The social/nonsocial dimension influenced which emotional valence(s) elicited a skin conductance response, a finding that could not be explained by differences in subjective arousal. Heart rate deceleration was more responsive to nonsocially generated emotions. Taken together, these findings suggest that sociality affects the physiological profile of responses to emotional valence. PMID:16637758

Britton, Jennifer C; Taylor, Stephan F; Berridge, Kent C; Mikels, Joseph A; Liberzon, I

2006-02-01

206

Developing Your Child's Self-Esteem On the left side of the table below, four domain of development are listed (physical, cognitive, social, and  

E-print Network

Developing Your Child's Self-Esteem On the left side of the table below, four domain of development are listed (physical, cognitive, social, and emotional). In the columns to the right of each domain-esteem. Domain of Development Words or Actions that BUILD UP Your Child's Self-Esteem Words or Actions that TEAR

207

Film Portrayals of Social Workers Doing Child Welfare Work  

Microsoft Academic Search

This article reports on research that investigated the images of social workers engaged in child welfare work as portrayed in movies, a major medium of popular culture. Findings from an analysis of 27 movies spanning from 1938 to 1999 are presented with particular attention to themes about how children are depicted as recipients of child welfare services and how child

Deborah P. Valentine; Miriam Freeman

2002-01-01

208

Randomized Social Policy Experiments and Research on Child Development  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Randomized social policy experiments (SPEs) are an important methodology for investigating topics in child development. This article provides a framework for understanding how evidence from SPEs can add to knowledge about child development. The use of SPEs for child development questions to date is summarized and lessons from the applied economics…

Romich, Jennifer L.

2006-01-01

209

Gender and Emotion Regulation: A Social Appraisal Perspective on Anger  

Microsoft Academic Search

\\u000a Men and women differ in the regulation of their anger expressions. As the regulation of anger expressions often occurs in\\u000a social interactions, where the pressure for emotion regulation is high, the social context can be considered as important\\u000a in explaining these gender differences. In the present chapter, the association between the social context and the regulation\\u000a of anger expression for

Catharine Evers; Agneta H. Fischer; Antony S. R. Manstead

2011-01-01

210

The Role of Social-Emotional Learning in Bullying Prevention Efforts  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This article examines how social emotional learning contributes to bullying prevention efforts in schools. Bullying behavior is impacted by multiple levels of the social-ecology of schools. Social emotional learning (SEL) is a structured way to improve a wide range of students' social and emotional competencies and impact bullying at the…

Smith, Brian H.; Low, Sabina

2013-01-01

211

20 CFR 229.56 - Reduction for child's social security benefit.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...false Reduction for child's social security benefit. 229.56 Section...THE RAILROAD RETIREMENT ACT SOCIAL SECURITY OVERALL MINIMUM GUARANTEE ...56 Reduction for child's social security benefit. A child's...

2011-04-01

212

20 CFR 229.56 - Reduction for child's social security benefit.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...false Reduction for child's social security benefit. 229.56 Section...THE RAILROAD RETIREMENT ACT SOCIAL SECURITY OVERALL MINIMUM GUARANTEE ...56 Reduction for child's social security benefit. A child's...

2012-04-01

213

20 CFR 229.56 - Reduction for child's social security benefit.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...true Reduction for child's social security benefit. 229.56 Section...THE RAILROAD RETIREMENT ACT SOCIAL SECURITY OVERALL MINIMUM GUARANTEE ...56 Reduction for child's social security benefit. A child's...

2013-04-01

214

20 CFR 229.56 - Reduction for child's social security benefit.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

...true Reduction for child's social security benefit. 229.56 Section...THE RAILROAD RETIREMENT ACT SOCIAL SECURITY OVERALL MINIMUM GUARANTEE ...56 Reduction for child's social security benefit. A child's...

2014-04-01

215

How Do I Feel about Feelings? Emotion Socialization in Families of Depressed and Healthy Adolescents  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Emotional and cognitive changes that occur during adolescence set the stage for the development of adaptive or maladaptive beliefs about emotions. Although research suggests that parents' behaviors and beliefs about emotions relate to children's emotional abilities, few studies have looked at parental socialization of children's emotions,…

Hunter, Erin C.; Katz, Lynn Fainsilber; Shortt, Joann Wu; Davis, Betsy; Leve, Craig; Allen, Nicholas B.; Sheeber, Lisa B.

2011-01-01

216

Towards Greater Specificity in Identifying Associations Among Interparental Aggression, Child Emotional Reactivity to Conflict, and Child Problems  

PubMed Central

This study examined specific forms of emotional reactivity to conflict and temperamental emotionality as explanatory mechanisms in pathways among interparental aggression and child psychological problems. Participants of the multi-method, longitudinal study included 201 two-year-old children and their mothers who had experienced elevated violence in the home. Consistent with emotional security theory, autoregressive structural equation model analyses indicated that children’s fearful reactivity to conflict was the only consistent mediator in the associations among interparental aggression and their internalizing and externalizing symptoms one year later. Pathways remained significant across maternal and observer ratings of children’s symptoms and with the inclusion of other predictors and mediators, including children’s sad and angry forms of reactivity to conflict, temperamental emotionality, gender, and socioeconomic status. PMID:22716918

Davies, Patrick T.; Cicchetti, Dante; Martin, Meredith J.

2012-01-01

217

Social anxiety and romantic relationships: The costs and benefits of negative emotion expression are context-dependent  

Microsoft Academic Search

In general, expressing emotions is beneficial and withholding emotions has personal and social costs. Yet, to serve social functions there are situations when emotions are withheld strategically. We examined whether social anxiety influenced when and how emotion expressiveness influences interpersonal closeness in existing romantic relationships. For people with greater social anxiety, withholding the expression of negative emotions was proposed to

Todd B. Kashdan; Jeffrey R. Volkmann; William E. Breen; Susan Han

2007-01-01

218

Developing Art Experiences for the Emotionally Handicapped Child.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Presented are the proceedings of a special study institute for educators on the development of art experiences with emotionally disturbed children. The planning committee, institute faculty, program agenda, and participants are listed. Puppet presentations by emotionally disturbed children are reported to have opened the institute. Institute…

New York State Education Dept., Albany. Div. for Handicapped Children.

219

The reformulation of emotional security theory: the role of children's social defense in developmental psychopathology.  

PubMed

Although children's security in the context of the interparental relationship has been identified as a key explanatory mechanism in pathways between family discord and child psychopathology, little is known about the inner workings of emotional security as a goal system. Thus, the objective of this paper is to describe how our reformulation of emotional security theory within an ethological and evolutionary framework may advance the characterization of the architecture and operation of emotional security and, in the process, cultivate sustainable growing points in developmental psychopathology. The first section of the paper describes how children's security in the interparental relationship is organized around a distinctive behavioral system designed to defend against interpersonal threat. Building on this evolutionary foundation for emotional security, the paper offers an innovative taxonomy for identifying qualitatively different ways children try to preserve their security and its innovative implications for more precisely informing understanding of the mechanisms in pathways between family and developmental precursors and children's trajectories of mental health. In the final section, the paper highlights the potential of the reformulation of emotional security theory to stimulate new generations of research on understanding how children defend against social threats in ecologies beyond the interparental dyad, including both familial and extrafamilial settings. PMID:24342849

Davies, Patrick T; Martin, Meredith J

2013-11-01

220

Automatic integration of social information in emotion recognition.  

PubMed

This study investigated the automaticity of the influence of social inference on emotion recognition. Participants were asked to recognize dynamic facial expressions of emotion (fear or anger in Experiment 1 and blends of fear and surprise or of anger and disgust in Experiment 2) in a target face presented at the center of a screen while a subliminal contextual face appearing in the periphery expressed an emotion (fear or anger) or not (neutral) and either looked at the target face or not. Results of Experiment 1 revealed that recognition of the target emotion of fear was improved when a subliminal angry contextual face gazed toward-rather than away from-the fearful face. We replicated this effect in Experiment 2, in which facial expression blends of fear and surprise were more often and more rapidly categorized as expressing fear when the subliminal contextual face expressed anger and gazed toward-rather than away from-the target face. With the contextual face appearing for 30 ms in total, including only 10 ms of emotion expression, and being immediately masked, our data provide the first evidence that social influence on emotion recognition can occur automatically. (PsycINFO Database Record PMID:25688908

Mumenthaler, Christian; Sander, David

2015-04-01

221

Social Workers in Child Welfare: Ready for Duty  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This article responds to "Do Social Workers Make Better Child Welfare Workers than Non-Social Workers?" by Dr. Robin E. Perry. The article articulates National Association of Social Workers' support for a professional social work labor force to serve children and their families and for continued federal investment in the training of these workers.…

Whitaker, Tracy; Clark, Elizabeth J.

2006-01-01

222

Hormone-Driven Kids: A Call for Social and Emotional Learning in the Middle School Years.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Describes the basic tenets of social and emotional learning; discusses the emotional and social challenges that middle school children face; and provides suggestions for parents and teachers to help promote smooth sailing through these rocky middle school years. (SR)

Stern, Robin

1999-01-01

223

A Preschool Pilot Study of Connecting with Others: Lessons for Teaching Social and Emotional Competence  

Microsoft Academic Search

Social-emotional learning in early childhood sets the stage for students’ future behaviors in schools. The current study examined\\u000a the effects of a social-emotional skills curriculum on the behavior of students in an early childhood program. The children\\u000a received instruction in social and emotional skills using the Connecting with Others: Lessons for Teaching Social and Emotional Competence program. Pre-test and post-test

Betsy L. Schultz; Rita Coombs Richardson; Catherine R. Barber; Daryl Wilcox

2011-01-01

224

"Stop Doing That, "la Komu Skazala!"": Language Choice and Emotions in Parent-Child Communication  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The goal of this paper is to discuss the role of emotion-related factors in language choice in bi- and multilingual families. Most of the time, factors other than emotions govern language choice and use in such families, among them language dominance, social context and linguistic competence of the interlocutors. However, quantitative and…

Pavlenko, Aneta

2004-01-01

225

Children's Social Status as a Function of Emotionality and Attention Control  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

A recent meta-analysis found that across studies individual differences in aspects of children's emotionality predict social status [Dougherty, L.R., (2006). Children's emotionality and social status: a meta-analytic review. Social Development, 15, 394-417.]. In the present study we extended these findings by examining the emotion of interest and…

Schultz, David; Izard, Carroll E.; Stapleton, Laura M.; Buckingham-Howes, Stacy; Bear, George A.

2009-01-01

226

Self-Assessing Social and Emotional Instruction and Competencies: A Tool for Teachers  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Social and emotional learning (SEL) is crucial for improved educational attainment. As teachers help students achieve new college and career readiness standards, they need to use teaching practices that promote student social and emotional learning in the classroom. Our new resource, "Self-Assessing Social and Emotional Instruction and…

Yoder, Nicholas

2014-01-01

227

Complexities of emotional responses to social and non-social affective stimuli in schizophrenia  

PubMed Central

Background: Adaptive emotional responses are important in interpersonal relationships. We investigated self-reported emotional experience, physiological reactivity, and micro-facial expressivity in relation to the social nature of stimuli in individuals with schizophrenia (SZ). Method: Galvanic skin response (GSR) and facial electromyography (fEMG) were recorded in medicated outpatients with SZ and demographically matched healthy controls (CO) while they viewed social and non-social images from the International Affective Pictures System. Participants rated the valence and arousal, and selected a label for experienced emotions. Symptom severity in the SZ and psychometric schizotypy in CO were assessed. Results: The two groups did not differ in their labeling of the emotions evoked by the stimuli, but individuals with SZ were more positive in their valence ratings. Although self-reported arousal was similar in both groups, mean GSR was greater in SZ, suggesting differential awareness, or calibration of internal states. Both groups reported social images to be more arousing than non-social images but their physiological responses to non-social vs. social images were different. Self-reported arousal to neutral social images was correlated with positive symptoms in SZ. Negative symptoms in SZ and disorganized schizotypy in CO were associated with reduced mean fEMG. Greater corrugator mean fEMG activity for positive images in SZ indicates valence-incongruent facial expressions. Conclusion: The patterns of emotional responses differed between the two groups. While both groups were in broad agreement in self-reported arousal and emotion labels, their mean GSR, and fEMG correlates of emotion diverged in relation to the social nature of the stimuli and clinical measures. Importantly, these results suggest disrupted self awareness of internal states in SZ and underscore the complexities of emotion processing in health and disease. PMID:25859230

Peterman, Joel S.; Bekele, Esubalew; Bian, Dayi; Sarkar, Nilanjan; Park, Sohee

2015-01-01

228

Social and Emotional Decision-making Following Frontal Lobe Injury  

Microsoft Academic Search

Neuropsychological, psychophysiological and functional imaging research has begun to offer insights into the everyday difficulties in decision-making experienced by some patients with frontal lobe damage. It is widely accepted that the ventral prefrontal cortex plays a pivotal role in social and emotional decision-making. This article will review experimental findings using the Iowa Gambling Task and the Cambridge Gamble Task that

Luke Clark; Facundo Manes

2004-01-01

229

Rejection Sensitivity in Late Adolescence: Social and Emotional Sequelae  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This study used longitudinal, multireporter data, in a community sample, to examine the role of rejection sensitivity in late adolescents' social and emotional development. Rejection sensitivity was linked to a relative increase in adolescent depressive and anxiety symptoms over a 3-year period, even after accounting for teens' baseline level of…

Marston, Emily G.; Hare, Amanda; Allen, Joseph P.

2010-01-01

230

Social-Emotional Characteristics and Special Educational Needs  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The aim of the research described in this article was the development of an instrument to measure social emotional characteristics and special educational and pedagogical needs of students in the last grade of primary education. Questionnaires were developed for teachers as well as for students. Exploratory factor analyses showed that the factors…

Meijer, Joost; Fossen, Miriam W. E. B.; van Putten, Cornelis M.; van der Leij, Aryan

2006-01-01

231

An Architecture for Action, Emotion, and Social Behavior  

Microsoft Academic Search

The Oz project at Carnegie Mellon is studying the construction of artistically effectivesimulated worlds. Such worlds typically include several agents, which must exhibit broadbehavior. To meet this need, we are developing an agent architecture, called Tok, thatpresently supports reactivity, goals, emotions, and social behavior. Here we briefly introducethe requirements of our application, summarize the Tok architecture, and describe aparticular agent

Joseph Bates; A. Bryan Loyall; W. Scott Reilly

1992-01-01

232

Social-Emotional Learning Is Essential to Classroom Management  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Research tells us that children's social-emotional development can propel learning. A new program, SECURe, embeds that research into classroom management strategies that improve teaching and learning. Across all classrooms and grade levels, four principles of effective management are constant: Effective classroom management is based in…

Jones, Stephanie M.; Bailey, Rebecca; Jacob, Robin

2014-01-01

233

Social-Emotional Skills Can Boost Common Core Implementation  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The same competencies neglected in the implementation of the Common Core are those that ultimately most help students become what the author calls college-ready, career-ready, and contribution-ready. These include communication, meta-cognition, resilient mindset, responsible character, and social-emotional learning, intertwined with academic…

Elias, Maurice J.

2014-01-01

234

Running head: BIOLOGICAL AND SOCIAL EMOTION 1 Supplementary Methods  

E-print Network

neutral and 10 control) in a randomized order. To reduce the primary/recency effects, additional three filler trials were added both at the beginning and at the end of the task. As in the control condition threat (e.g., snake, spider) and other pictures (e.g., gun). Socially emotional pictures were also

Mather, Mara

235

Wriggle: An Exploration of Emotional and Social Effects of Movement  

E-print Network

are becoming an increasingly common mode of engaging with computers. The dream of using sweeping gestures jonathanmfrye@gmail.com CHI 2011 · Work-in-Progress May 7­12, 2011 · Vancouver, BC, Canada 1885 #12;reality the emotional and social effects of movement as a game mechanic (versus keyboard input). The most closely

Isbister, Katherine

236

Social Skills Training and Students with Emotional and Behavioral Disorders  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

There is a large body of literature suggesting that students with emotional and behavioral disorders (EBD) lack appropriate social skills, including deficits in building and maintaining interpersonal relationships, prosocial behaviors (e.g., sharing, helping, cooperation), and self-management strategies. While the literature shows small to modest…

Casey, Kathryn J.

2012-01-01

237

Deaf College Students' Perceptions of Their Social-Emotional Adjustment  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This study examined differences between deaf and hearing students' perceptions of their social emotional adjustment as they transition to college. The 16PF-Adolescent Personality Questionnaire Life Difficulties Scale was completed by 205 deaf students and 185 hearing students. A multivariate analyses of variance and subsequent univariate tests…

Lukomski, Jennifer

2007-01-01

238

Strategies for Teaching Social and Emotional Intelligence in Business Communication  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Incorporating social and emotional skills (EI) training into the business communication curriculum is important for preparing students to function effectively in a global workplace with its complex informal networks, intercultural issues, team emphasis, and participatory leadership. EI skills enhance communication behavior in work groups and…

Sigmar, Lucia Stretcher; Hynes, Geraldine E.; Hill, Kathy L.

2012-01-01

239

Social Competence of Learning Disabled Children: Cognitive and Emotional Aspects  

Microsoft Academic Search

The aim of the study was to investigate the structure of social competence among learning disabled children, as reported by themselves and their teachers, and the cognitive and emotional aspects that mediate its level. The sample consisted of 40 learning disabled children and 37 matched nondisabled children. Within Harter's competence model and Schaefer's spherical model, the learning disabled group demonstrated

Malka Margalit; Amiram Raviv

1988-01-01

240

Social Judgments and Emotion Attributions about Exclusion in Switzerland  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Adolescents' social judgments and emotion attributions about exclusion in three contexts, nationality, gender, and personality, were measured in a sample of 12- and 15-year-old Swiss and non-Swiss adolescents (N = 247). Overall, adolescents judged exclusion based on nationality as less acceptable than exclusion based on gender or personality.…

Malti, Tina; Killen, Melanie; Gasser, Luciano

2012-01-01

241

Cognitive, emotional and social markers of serial murdering.  

PubMed

Although criminal psychopathy is starting to be relatively well described, our knowledge of the characteristics and scientific markers of serial murdering is still very poor. A serial killer who murdered more than five people, KT, was administered a battery of standardized tests aimed at measuring neuropsychological impairment and social/emotional cognition deficits. KT exhibited a striking dissociation between a high level of emotional detachment and a low score on the antisocial behavior scale on the Psychopathy Checklist-Revised (PCL-R). The Minnesota Multiphasic Personality Inventory-2 showed a normal pattern with the psychotic triad at borderline level. KT had a high intelligence score and showed almost no impairment in cognitive tests sensitive to frontal lobe dysfunction (Wisconsin Card Sorting Test, Theory of Mind, Tower of London, this latter evidenced a mild impairment in planning performance). In the tests on moral, emotional and social cognition, his patterns of response differed from matched controls and from past reports on criminal psychopaths as, unlike these individuals, KT exhibited normal recognition of fear and a relatively intact knowledge of moral rules but he was impaired in the recognition of anger, embarrassment and conventional social rules. The overall picture of KT suggests that serial killing may be closer to normality than psychopathy defined according to either the DSM IV or the PCL-R, and it would be characterized by a relatively spared moral cognition and selective deficits in social and emotional cognition domains. PMID:23414440

Angrilli, Alessandro; Sartori, Giuseppe; Donzella, Giovanna

2013-01-01

242

Executive Function and the Promotion of Social-Emotional Competence  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Executive function is understood as an umbrella term encompassing a number of interrelated sub-skills necessary for purposeful, goal-directed activity. Research suggests a vital role for executive function in children's social-emotional development. However, executive function is rarely considered in models of intervention programs that attempt to…

Riggs, Nathaniel R.; Jahromi, Laudan B.; Razza, Rachel P.; Dillworth-Bart, Janean E.; Mueller, Ulrich

2006-01-01

243

Social Networking Web Sites: Teaching Appropriate Social Competence to Students with Emotional and Behavioral Disorders  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The Internet has opened a variety of different avenues for people to interact with each other. As new digital environments are developed, new sets of social skills are needed to appropriately interact. Students with emotional and behavioral disorders often have deficits in social competence and require specialized training in specific social

Morgan, Joseph J.

2010-01-01

244

Child-to-Parent Violence: Emotional and Behavioral Predictors  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Child-to-parent violence (CPV) includes acts committed by a child to intentionally cause physical, psychological, or financial pain to a parent. Available data indicate increasing rates of CPV in Spain, which have been attributed to a tendency toward more permissive parenting styles and changes in the power cycles within the families. The primary…

Calvete, Esther; Orue, Izaskun; Gamez-Guadix, Manuel

2013-01-01

245

The Burden of Disaster: Part I. Challenges and Opportunities Within a Child’s Social Ecology  

PubMed Central

Child development and adaptation are best understood as biological and psychological individual processes occurring within the context of interconnecting groups, systems, and communities which, along with family, constitute the child’s social ecology. This first of two articles describes the challenges and opportunities within a child’s social ecology, consisting of Micro-, Meso-, Exo-, and Macrosystems. The parent-child relationship, the most salient Microsystem influence in children’s lives, plays an influential role in children’s reactions to and recovery from disasters. Children, parents, and other adults participate in Mesosystem activities at schools and faith-based organizations. The Exosystem—including workplaces, spcial agencies, neighborhood, and mass media—directly affects important adults in children’s lives. The Macrosystem affects disaster response and recovery indirectly through intangible cultural, social, economic, and political structures and processes. Children’s responses to adversity occur in the context of these dynamically interconnected and interdependent nested environments, all of which endure the burden of disaster. Increased understanding of the influences of and the relationships between key components contributes to recovery and rebuilding efforts, limiting disruption to the child and his or her social ecology. A companion article (R. L. Pfefferbaum et al., in press) describes interventions across the child’s social ecology. PMID:23156957

Noffsinger, Mary A.; Pfefferbaum, Betty; Pfefferbaum, Rose L.; Sherrieb, Kathleen; Norris, Fran H.

2013-01-01

246

Social and emotional impact of diabetic retinopathy: a review.  

PubMed

People with vision-threatening diabetic retinopathy are likely to experience enhanced social and emotional strain. Critically, those with both vision-threatening diabetic retinopathy and psychosocial problems may have significantly reduced levels of functioning compared with psychologically healthy counterparts. This can cause inadequate compliance, increased strain on family functioning, worse diabetes control, increased progression of diabetic retinopathy and, consequently, further psychosocial stress resulting in a number of concerning implications for disease management, clinical outcomes and healthcare costs. However, the emotional and social health consequences of diabetic retinopathy have not yet been systematically explored. This information is crucial as it allows for a targeted approach to treatment and prevention and avoidance of the potentially detrimental implications described above. Therefore, this paper reviews the current qualitative and quantitative evidence regarding the social and emotional impact of diabetic retinopathy and identifies directions for future research. Key search terms were applied to the electronic databases Pubmed, ISI Web of Science and Embase and the bibliographies of relevant papers were systematically reviewed for additional references. Overall, the evidence suggests that diabetic retinopathy and associated vision loss have several debilitating effects, including disruption of family functioning, relationships and roles; increased social isolation and dependence; and deterioration of work prospects resulting in increased financial strain. Adverse emotional responses include fear, anxiety, vulnerability, guilt, loss of confidence, anger, stress and self-perception issues. However, the research to date is largely qualitative in nature, with most quantitative studies being small, cross-sectional and somewhat outdated. Similarly, the outcome measures used in many studies to date are suboptimal in terms of content and validity. Therefore, this review identifies the need for improved outcome measures to provide valid, meaningful measurement of the social and emotional impact of diabetic retinopathy and discusses potential directions for future research such as item banking and computer adaptive testing. PMID:21575125

Fenwick, Eva; Rees, Gwyn; Pesudovs, Konrad; Dirani, Mohamed; Kawasaki, Ryo; Wong, Tien Y; Lamoureux, Ecosse

2012-01-01

247

Maternal attachment feelings mediate between maternal reports of depression, infant social–emotional development, and parenting stress  

Microsoft Academic Search

Objective: The current study examined whether having a positive maternal postpartum depression screening was associated with maternal report of poorer infant social–emotional development and more negative maternal report of parent–child interaction, and whether scores on a measure of maternal feelings of attachment influenced this relationship. Methods: Two hundred and thirty-two first-time mothers and their infants were assessed using self-reporting questionnaires

Z. S. Mason; R. D. Briggs; E. J. Silver

2011-01-01

248

Family Reminiscing Style: Parent Gender and Emotional Focus in Relation to Child Well-Being  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Family reminiscing is a critical part of family interaction related to child outcome. In this study, we extended previous research by examining both mothers and fathers, in two-parent racially diverse middle-class families, reminiscing with their 9- to 12-year-old children about both the facts and the emotional aspects of shared positive and…

Fivush, Robyn; Marin, Kelly; McWilliams, Kelly; Bohanek, Jennifer G.

2009-01-01

249

Associations between Parents' Marital Functioning, Maternal Parenting Quality, Maternal Emotion and Child Cortisol Levels  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Associations between family functioning and children's stress hormone levels are explored, by examining how aspects of the interparental relationship (parents' marital satisfaction and parent conflict styles), the mother-child relationship (maternal involvement and warmth) and maternal emotional functioning (depression, anxiety and self-esteem)…

Pendry, Patricia; Adam, Emma K.

2007-01-01

250

Relationships between Child Emotional and Behavioral Symptoms and Caregiver Strain and Parenting Stress  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Children with emotional and behavioral disturbance often have difficulties in multiple symptom domains. This study investigates the relationships between child symptoms and caregiver strain and parenting stress among 177 youth and their caregivers participating in a school-based system of care. Youth were grouped by symptom domain and included…

Vaughan, Ellen L.; Feinn, Richard; Bernard, Stanley; Brereton, Maria; Kaufman, Joy S.

2013-01-01

251

The generational transmission of socioeconomic inequalities in child cognitive development and emotional health  

Microsoft Academic Search

Socioeconomic inequalities in the health of adults have been largely attributed to lifestyle inequalities. The cognitive development (CD) and emotional health (EH) of the child provides a basis for many of the health-related behaviours which are observed in adulthood. There has been relatively little attention paid to the way CD and EH are transmitted in the foetal and childhood periods,

Jake M. Najman; Rosemary Aird; William Bor; Michael O’Callaghan; Gail M. Williams; Gregory J. Shuttlewood

2004-01-01

252

Mother-Child Emotional Availability in Ecological Perspective: Three Countries, Two Regions, Two Genders  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This study used a cross-national framework to examine country, region, and gender differences in emotional availability (EA), a prominent index of mutual socioemotional adaptation in the parent-child dyad. Altogether 220 Argentine, Italian, and U.S. mothers and their daughters and sons from both rural and metropolitan areas took part in home…

Bornstein, Marc H.; Putnick, Diane L.; Heslington, Marianne; Gini, Motti; Suwalsky, Joan T. D.; Venuti, Paola; de Falco, Simona; Giusti, Zeno; de Galperin, Celia Zingman

2008-01-01

253

Parent-Child Relationships, Partner Relationships, and Emotional Adjustment: A Birth-to-Maturity Prospective Study  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This study examined whether detrimental childhood relationships with parents were related to partner relationship quality and emotional adjustment in adulthood. The authors tested a theoretical model in which (a) low-quality parent-child relationships were related to conflict and low-quality communication with parents in adolescence, (b)…

Overbeek, Geertjan; Stattin, Hakan; Vermulst, Ad; Ha, Thao; Engels, Rutger C. M. E.

2007-01-01

254

Does a Good Fit Matter? Exploring Teaching Styles, Emotion Regulation, and Child Anxiety in the Classroom  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The central goal of the present study was to examine how a child's emotion regulation ability may moderate the relations between teaching styles and anxiety in childhood. Participants were 33 children (21 males, 12 females; mean age 7.5 years, standard deviation = 0.42), their mothers and teachers. Children completed the Early Adolescent…

LaBillois, James M.; Lagace-Seguin, Daniel G.

2009-01-01

255

Emotional functioning, attachment style, and attributions as predictors of child abuse potential in domestic violence victims.  

PubMed

To explore cognitive and emotional factors that may exacerbate child-abuse potential among domestic violence victims, 80 participants reported on their depression, hopelessness, anxiety, and anger as well as their attachment style and attributional style. Increased emotional difficulties as well as insecure attachment styles were significantly positively correlated with child abuse potential, although depression and anxiety were the strongest predictors. Externalizing blame for the spousal abuse was not associated with abuse risk. Women residing in shelters demonstrated significantly greater abuse risk than those in transitional housing programs, suggesting that greater temporal proximity to the spousal abuse may in part account for the increased abuse potential. Depression and hopelessness, however, appeared particularly relevant to increased abuse risk in domestic violence victims in the transitional housing system. Implications of these findings for working with battered women in terms of their emotional functioning and attachment style are discussed. PMID:16642739

Rodriguez, Christina M

2006-04-01

256

Faculty of Social and Behavioural Sciences Graduate School of Child Development and Education  

E-print Network

Faculty of Social and Behavioural Sciences Graduate School of Child Development and Education Research Master Child Development and Education #12;2 Research Master Child Development and Education Content Research into pedagogy (parenting, child development) Research into education (school research

van Rooij, Robert

257

Children's Mental Health in Child Welfare: A Child-Focused Curriculum for Child Welfare Workers and Social Work Students  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This paper describes a child-focused curriculum developed for child welfare workers and social work students. The results from a focus group evaluation are also provided that highlight how the content areas in the curriculum were perceived by participants in terms of interest, practicality, and importance. The major goal of the curriculum was to…

Mathiesen, Sally; Cash, Scottye; Barbanell Johnson, Lisa D.; Smith, Thomas E.; Graham, Pamela

2006-01-01

258

Chaos as a Social Determinant of Child Health: Reciprocal Associations?  

PubMed Central

This study informs the social determinants of child health by exploring an understudied aspect of children’s social contexts: chaos. Chaos has been conceptualized as crowded, noisy, disorganized, unpredictable settings for child development (Evans et al., 2010). We measure chaos at two levels of children’s ecological environment - the microsystem (household) and the mesosystem (work-family-child care nexus) – and at two points in early childhood (ages 3 and 5). Using data from the Fragile Families and Child Wellbeing Study (N=3288), a study of predominantly low-income women and their partners in large US cities, we develop structural equation models that assess how maternal-rated child health (also assessed at ages 3 and 5) is associated with latent constructs of chaos, and whether there are important reciprocal effects. Autoregressive crosslagged path analysis suggest that increasing chaos (at both the household and maternal work levels) is associated with worse child health, controlling for key confounders like household economic status, family structure, and maternal health status. Child health has little effect on chaos, providing further support for the hypothesis that chaos is an important social determinant of child health in this sample of relatively disadvantaged children. This suggests child health may be improved by supporting families in ways that reduce chaos in their home and work/family environments, and that as researchers move beyond SES, race, and family structure to explore other sources of health inequalities, chaos and its proximate determinants may be a promising avenue for future research. PMID:23541250

Schmeer, Kammi K.; Taylor, Miles

2013-01-01

259

Chaos as a social determinant of child health: Reciprocal associations?  

PubMed

This study informs the social determinants of child health by exploring an understudied aspect of children's social contexts: chaos. Chaos has been conceptualized as crowded, noisy, disorganized, unpredictable settings for child development (Evans, Eckenrode, & Marcynyszyn, 2010). We measure chaos at two levels of children's ecological environment - the microsystem (household) and the mesosystem (work-family-child care nexus) - and at two points in early childhood (ages 3 and 5). Using data from the Fragile Families and Child Wellbeing Study (N = 3288), a study of predominantly low-income women and their partners in large US cities, we develop structural equation models that assess how maternal-rated child health (also assessed at ages 3 and 5) is associated with latent constructs of chaos, and whether there are important reciprocal effects. Autoregressive cross-lagged path analysis suggest that increasing chaos (at both the household and maternal work levels) is associated with worse child health, controlling for key confounders like household economic status, family structure, and maternal health status. Child health has little effect on chaos, providing further support for the hypothesis that chaos is an important social determinant of child health in this sample of relatively disadvantaged children. This suggests child health may be improved by supporting families in ways that reduce chaos in their home and work/family environments, and that as researchers move beyond SES, race, and family structure to explore other sources of health inequalities, chaos and its proximate determinants may be a promising avenue for future research. PMID:23541250

Kamp Dush, Claire M; Schmeer, Kammi K; Taylor, Miles

2013-10-01

260

Implementing an Inpatient Social Early Warning System for Child Maltreatment  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Objectives: The current article describes the process evaluation of a social early warning system (SEWS) for the prevention of child maltreatment in the federal state of Hamburg. This prevention initiative targets expectant mothers and their partners including an initial screening of risk factors for child maltreatment, a subsequent structured…

Atabaki, Armita; Heddaeus, Daniela; Metzner, Franka; Schulz, Holger; Siefert, Sonke; Pawils, Silke

2013-01-01

261

Marital conflict and the quality of young children's peer play behavior: the mediating and moderating role of parent-child emotional reciprocity and attachment security.  

PubMed

Parent-child attachment security and dyadic measures of parent-child positive and negative emotional reciprocity were examined as possible mediators and moderators of the connection between marital conflict and children's peer play behavior. Eighty parents were observed in a laboratory play session with their 15- to 18-month-old child. Subsequently, at 36 months children were observed interacting with peers at their child care setting. Connections between marital conflict and children's positive peer interaction were mediated by mother-child attachment security, mother-child positive emotional reciprocity, and father-child negative emotional reciprocity. Connections between marital conflict and children's negative peer interaction were mediated by mother-child positive emotional reciprocity and father-child attachment security. Parent-child attachment security and negative emotional reciprocity emerged as important moderators of the connection between marital conflict and children's peer play behavior. PMID:19364208

Lindsey, Eric W; Caldera, Yvonne M; Tankersley, Laura

2009-04-01

262

Child Abuse and Aggression Among Seriously Emotionally Disturbed Children  

Microsoft Academic Search

Abused children may be at risk for problems with aggression. In a sample of 397 seriously emotionally disturbed children, reactive aggression was associated with documented history of physical abuse but not sexual abuse. Girls were equally likely to be classified as reactively aggressive regardless of physical abuse history, but boys with physical abuse histories were 50% more likely to be

Julian D. Ford; Lisa A. Fraleigh; Daniel F. Connor

2009-01-01

263

Emotional Closeness with Perpetrators and Amnesia for Child Sexual Abuse  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Over the past decade, a contentious debate regarding delayed memories of childhood sexual abuse (CSA) has existed. In order to address this debate, 240 female participants completed questions about CSA, the Dissociative Experience Scale (Bernstein & Putnam, 1986), Perceived Emotional Closeness with Perpetrator Scale (Schultz, Passmore, & Yoder,…

Schultz, Tammy; Passmore, J. Lawrence; Yoder, C. Y.

2003-01-01

264

Child Abuse and Aggression among Seriously Emotionally Disturbed Children  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Abused children may be at risk for problems with aggression. In a sample of 397 seriously emotionally disturbed children, reactive aggression was associated with documented history of physical abuse but not sexual abuse. Girls were equally likely to be classified as reactively aggressive regardless of physical abuse history, but boys with physical…

Ford, Julian D.; Fraleigh, Lisa A.; Connor, Daniel F.

2010-01-01

265

Facial Emotion Recognition in Child Psychiatry: A Systematic Review  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This review focuses on facial affect (emotion) recognition in children and adolescents with psychiatric disorders other than autism. A systematic search, using PRISMA guidelines, was conducted to identify original articles published prior to October 2011 pertaining to face recognition tasks in case-control studies. Used in the qualitative…

Collin, Lisa; Bindra, Jasmeet; Raju, Monika; Gillberg, Christopher; Minnis, Helen

2013-01-01

266

Emotional Disturbance in Fifty Children in the Care of the Child Welfare System  

Microsoft Academic Search

Fifty Canadian children in out-of-home placements under the jurisdiction of a child welfare district office were administered a battery of psychological assessment instruments. The purpose was to obtain an estimate of the proportion showing psychopathology. The child's social worker's opinion on the presence or absence of psychopathology and need for mental health services was also determined. The results showed that

A. H. Thompson; Deanna Fuhr

1992-01-01

267

The Effects of Early Social-Emotional and Relationship Experience on the Development of Young Orphanage Children: The St. Petersburg-USA Orphanage Research Team  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This study represents a quasi-experimental test of the role of early social-emotional experience and adult-child relationships in the development of typically developing children and those with disabilities birth to 4 years of age living in orphanages in St. Petersburg, Russian Federation. The three orphanages in the current study were selected…

Monographs of the Society for Research in Child Development, 2008

2008-01-01

268

Dynamic Planning For Agents in Games using Social Norms and Emotions  

E-print Network

call social norms. But the agent perform- ing the planning also brings to it a personal emotionalDynamic Planning For Agents in Games using Social Norms and Emotions Palli R Thrainsson, Arnkell. In realistic social game environments, agents need to exhibit a certain level of social awareness to maintain

Vilhjálmsson, Hannes Högni

269

Forgetting in context: The effects of age, emotion, and social factors on retrieval-induced forgetting  

E-print Network

Forgetting in context: The effects of age, emotion, and social factors on retrieval varies as a function of age, emotion, and social factors. Retrieval-induced forgetting is typically retrieval-induced forgetting . Aging . Emotion . Interference/inhibition . Memory retrieval Across

Mather, Mara

270

The Contribution of Inhibitory Control to Preschoolers' Social-Emotional Competence  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Social-emotional competence is a key developmental task during early childhood. This study examined concurrent relationships between maternal education and employment status, children's sex, ethnicity, age, receptive vocabulary, emotional knowledge, attention skills, inhibitory control and social-emotional competence in a sample of 146 preschool,…

Rhoades, Brittany L.; Greenberg, Mark T.; Domitrovich, Celene E.

2009-01-01

271

Associations between Young Children's Emotion Attributions and Prediction of Outcome in Differing Social Situations  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Associations between young children's attributions of emotion at different points in a story, and with regard to their own prediction about the story's outcome, were investigated using two hypothetical scenarios of social and emotional challenge (social entry and negative event). First grade children (N = 250) showed an understanding that emotions

Eivers, Areana R.; Brendgen, Mara; Borge, Anne I. H.

2010-01-01

272

Anticipatory guidance for cognitive and social-emotional development: Birth to five years.  

PubMed

The present article serves as a quick office reference for clinicians, providing anticipatory guidance about the cognitive and social-emotional development of newborns, and children up to five years of age. The present review links recommendations to specific evidence in the medical literature, citing sources of developmental standards and advice, so that these may be further explored if desired. Practising primary care providers have indicated that these are areas of child development that are not well addressed by training and other available resources. The present article includes parenting information on important clinical presentations with which clinicians may be less familiar, such as promoting attachment, prosocial behaviours, healthy sleep habits, self-discipline and problem-solving; as well as on managing behaviours that are part of normal development, such as separation anxiety, tantrums, aggression, picky eating and specific fears. Information on the development of language, literacy and socialization are also included. PMID:23372397

Dosman, Cara; Andrews, Debbi

2012-02-01

273

The burden of disaster: part II. applying interventions across the child's social ecology.  

PubMed

This second of two articles describes the application of disaster mental health interventions within the context of the childs social ecology consisting of the Micro-, Meso-, Exo-, and Macrosystems. Microsystem interventions involving parents, siblings, and close friends include family preparedness planning andpractice, psychoeducation, role modeling, emotional support, and redirection. Mesosystem interventions provided by schools and faith-based organizations include safety and support, assessment, referral, and counseling. Exosystem interventions include those provided through community-based mental health programs, healthcare organizations, the workplace, the media, local volunteer disaster organizations, and other local organizations. Efforts to build community resilience to disasters are likely to have influence through the Exosystem. The Macrosystem - including the laws, history, cultural and subcultural characteristics, and economic and social conditions that underlie the other systems - affects the child indirectly through public policies and disaster programs and services that become available in the child's Exosystem in the aftermath of a disaster The social ecology paradigm, described more fully in a companion article (Noffsinger Pfefferbaum, Pfefferbaum, Sherrieb, & Norris,2012), emphasizes relationships among systems and can guide the development and delivery of services embedded in naturally-occurring structures in the child's environment. PMID:23894798

Pfefferbaum, Rose L; Jacobs, Anne K; Noffsinger, Mary A; Pfefferbaum, Betty; Sherrieb, Kathleen; Norris, Fran H

2012-01-01

274

Pubertal development of the understanding of social emotions: Implications for education  

PubMed Central

Recent developmental cognitive neuroscience research has supported the notion that puberty and adolescence are periods of profound socio-emotional development. The current study was designed to investigate whether the onset of puberty marks an increase in the awareness of complex, or “mixed,” emotions. Eighty-three female participants (aged 9–16 years) were divided into three groups according to a self-report measure of puberty stage (early-, mid- and post-puberty). Participants were presented with emotional scenarios, and used four linear scales to rate their emotional response to each scenario. Scenarios were designed to evoke social emotions (embarrassment or guilt) or basic emotions (anger or fear), where social emotions are defined as those which require the representation of others' mental states. We measured the relative complexity or “mixedness” of emotional responses, that is, the degree to which participants reported feeling more than one emotion for a given scenario. We found that mixed emotion reporting increased between early- and post-puberty for social emotion scenarios, and showed no relationship with age, whereas there was no change in mixed emotion reporting for basic emotion scenarios across age or puberty groups. This suggests that the awareness of mixed emotions develops during the course of puberty, and that this development is specific to social emotions. Results are discussed in the context of brain development across puberty and adolescence, with speculation regarding the potential implications for education. PMID:22211052

Burnett, Stephanie; Thompson, Stephanie; Bird, Geoffrey; Blakemore, Sarah-Jayne

2011-01-01

275

Child Temperament Moderates Effects of Parent-Child Mutuality on Self-Regulation: A Relationship-Based Path for Emotionally Negative Infants  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This study examined infants' negative emotionality as moderating the effect of parent-child mutually responsive orientation (MRO) on children's self-regulation (n = 102). Negative emotionality was observed in anger-eliciting episodes and in interactions with parents at 7 months. MRO was coded in naturalistic interactions at 15 months.…

Kim, Sanghag; Kochanska, Grazyna

2012-01-01

276

Protective Informal Social Control of Child Maltreatment and Child Abuse Injury in Seoul.  

PubMed

Previous findings on the relationship between neighborhood informal social control and child abuse have been mixed. We implemented a scale created by Emery, Trung, and Wu to study protective informal social control of child maltreatment (ISC_CM) by neighbors in a three-stage random cluster sample of 541 families in Seoul, South Korea. Random-effects regression models found that protective ISC_CM significantly moderated the relationship between very severe abuse and child injuries. Very severe abuse was associated with fewer injuries when levels of protective ISC_CM were higher. Implications are discussed. PMID:25392376

Emery, Clifton R; Eremina, Tatiana; Yang, Hye Lin; Yoo, Changgeun; Yoo, Jieun; Jang, Ja Kyung

2014-11-11

277

Developing an interactive social-emotional toolkit for autism spectrum disorders  

E-print Network

A development process consisting of participatory design and iterative implementation was carried out to create a framework for interactive emotion-learning, the Interactive Social-Emotional Toolkit (iSET). iSET is a novel ...

Madsen, Miriam A

2010-01-01

278

Messages to Social Work Education: What Makes Social Workers Continue and Cope in Child Welfare?  

Microsoft Academic Search

This article examines the positive elements which make social workers continue their career with a focus on statutory child welfare. Such analysis is needed, as existing research tends to highlight stress, exhaustion and career break-up issues. The empirical data consist of focus groups of 28 social workers and a questionnaire addressed to 56 professionals in child welfare in two Finnish

Tarja Pösö; Sinikka Forsman

2012-01-01

279

Parent-Child and Triadic Antecedents of Children's Social Competence: Cultural Specificity, Shared Process  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Guided by theories of cultural participation, the authors examined mother-child, father-child, and triadic interactive behaviors in 141 Israeli and Palestinian couples and their firstborn child at 5 and 33 months as antecedents of children's social competence. Four parent-child measures (parent sensitivity, child social engagement, parental…

Feldman, Ruth; Masalha, Shafiq

2010-01-01

280

Temperament and Maternal Emotion Socialization Beliefs as Predictors of Early Childhood Social Behavior in the Laboratory and Classroom  

Microsoft Academic Search

Objective. The authors examined the roles of children's approach behavior and maternal emotion socialization practices in the development of social behavior in unfamiliar and familiar contexts from preschool to early childhood years. Design. At 4.5 years of age, children were observed, and an assessment of approach behavior was obtained; at this time, mothers reported about their emotion socialization beliefs. Two

Amy Kennedy Root; Cynthia Stifter

2010-01-01

281

Social-Emotional Learning Skill, Self-Regulation, and Social Competence in Typically Developing and Clinic-Referred Children  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Social-emotional learning (SEL) skill includes the ability to encode, interpret, and reason about social and emotional information. In two related studies, we examined the relationship between children's SEL skill, their ability to regulate their own behavior, and the competence of their social interactions. Study 1 included 158 typically…

McKown, Clark; Gumbiner, Laura M.; Russo, Nicole M.; Lipton, Meryl

2009-01-01

282

Adolescent Fathers Involved with Child Protection: Social Workers Speak  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This study examined adolescent paternity through structured interviews with their social workers. It adds to the literature by exploring if there were young men involved with the child protection services (CPS) system who are fathers, identifying their unique needs, and beginning discussions on working with these young men. CPS social workers from…

Gordon, Derrick M.; Watkins, Natasha D.; Walling, Sherry M.; Wilhelm, Sara; Rayford, Brett S.

2011-01-01

283

The Ambiguity of the Child's "Voice" in Social Research  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This article addresses the ambiguity of the child's "voice" in social research. Drawing on a recent research project on young children's communication difficulties, the author argues that the currently popular discourse on "listening to children" is beset with practical and ethical ambiguities that result from the "socialness" of human…

Komulainen, Sirkka

2007-01-01

284

Child Development and Social Studies Curriculum Design: Toward a Rationale.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This paper is a working draft of a study which has examined the accumulated research on child growth and development. The draft is designed as an input paper to enable the Marin Social Studies Project to refine its rationale and criteria for a recommended K-12 social studies program of curriculum options. Identification of the capabilities of…

Knox, Gary A.

285

Child welfare informatics: A proposed subspecialty for social work  

Microsoft Academic Search

Informatics is a term that has been used and applied to data collection, analysis, and information and communication technologies across many disciplines including public health, nursing, medicine, and, more recently, to social work. To date, no collective discussion involving policy makers, practitioners, and researchers in the social work field defining child welfare informatics and its implications to the discipline, including

Toni Naccarato

2010-01-01

286

Geographic Location and Social Work Supervision in Child Welfare  

Microsoft Academic Search

Although the idea of person in the environment is a dominant paradigm in social work, the concept of environment does not emphasize the idea of geographic location. This qualitative research explores social work supervision of child welfare workers from the perspective of geographic place. Ten supervisors from urban communities and 12 supervisors from northern remote communities were interviewed to assess

Glen Schmidt

2008-01-01

287

Parent Imprisonment and Child Socialization Research Project. Executive Summary.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This executive summary reports on an investigation of the impact of parent-absence on the socialization of black children. Four different studies were conducted by the Parent Improvement and Child Socialization Project among respondents identified through lists of inmates supplied by the D.C. Department of Corrections and by visits to penal…

Howard Univ., Washington, DC. Dept. of Psychology.

288

Longitudinal Associations among Child Maltreatment, Social Functioning, and Cortisol Regulation  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Child maltreatment increases the risk for impaired social functioning and cortisol regulation. However, the longitudinal interplay among these factors is still unclear. This study aimed to shed light on the effect of maltreatment on social functioning and cortisol regulation over time. The sample consisted of 236 children (mean age 7.64 years, SD…

Alink, Lenneke R. A.; Cicchetti, Dante; Kim, Jungmeen; Rogosch, Fred A.

2012-01-01

289

Transformation of Child Socialization in Korean Culture.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Examines agents of socialization, socialization skills, the influence of Confucian principles, gender socialization, and the differentiation of parental roles in traditional Korean families; and the value of children, the purpose of education, and family orientation in the modern family. (BC)

Yi, Soon Hyung

1993-01-01

290

Social Anxiety and Positive Emotions: A Prospective Examination of a Self-Regulatory Model With Tendencies to Suppress or Express Emotions as a Moderating Variable  

Microsoft Academic Search

The purpose of the present study was to examine social anxiety as a predictor of positive emotions using a short-term prospective design. We examined whether the effects of social anxiety on positive emotions are moderated by tendencies to openly express or supress emotions. Over the course of a 3-month interval, people with excessive social anxiety endorsed stable, low levels of

Todd B. Kashdan; William E. Breen

2008-01-01

291

Mother–Child Emotional Availability in Ecological Perspective: Three Countries, Two Regions, Two Genders  

Microsoft Academic Search

This study used a cross-national framework to examine country, region, and gender differences in emotional availability (EA), a prominent index of mutual socioemotional adaptation in the parent–child dyad. Altogether 220 Argentine, Italian, and U.S. mothers and their daughters and sons from both rural and metropolitan areas took part in home observations when the children were 20 months old. In terms

Marc H. Bornstein; Diane L. Putnick; Marianne Heslington; Motti Gini; Joan T. D. Suwalsky; Paola Venuti; Simona de Falco; Zeno Giusti; Celia Zingman de Galperín

2008-01-01

292

Playtherapy Gives Evidence of Curative Power of Mother-Child Holding as Treatment for Autistic and Emotionally Disturbed Children.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The paper offers a play therapist's evidence for the curative power of intensive mother-child holding of children with emotional problems resulting from separation from the parent and emotional disturbances including autism. Dramatic improvements were observed in the play behaviors of autistic children after enforced cuddling--and these were…

Stades-Veth, Jo

293

Emotion Talk in Mother-Child Conversations of the Shared Past: The Effects of Culture, Gender, and Event Valence  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

We examined how mother-child emotional reminiscing is affected by culture, gender, and the valence of the event. Thirty-one Euro-American and 30 Chinese middle-class mothers and their 3-year-old children discussed 1 highly positive and 1 highly negative experience. Mothers and children in both cultures used a greater variety of negative emotion

Fivush, Robyn; Wang, Qi

2005-01-01

294

Emotion in robot cultures Cultural models of affect in social robot design  

E-print Network

. A more implicit approach to emotional expression in Japanese robotics is related to community1 Emotion in robot cultures Cultural models of affect in social robot design Selma Sabanovi are reflected in social robot design through a comparative analysis of social robotics in Japan and the US

Sabanovic, Selma

295

The Social and Emotional Development of Gifted Children: What Do We Know?  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This text on the social and emotional development of gifted children includes the following 24 papers: (1) "Effects of Acceleration on Gifted Learners" (Karen Rogers); (2) "Peer Pressures and Social Acceptance of Gifted Students" (Sylvia Rimm); (3) "Social and Emotional Issues for Exceptional Intellectually Gifted Students" (Miraca Gross); (4)…

Neihart, Maureen, Ed.; Reis, Sally M., Ed.; Robinson, Nancy M., Ed.; Moon, Sidney M., Ed.

296

Using Social and Emotional Learning to Foster Academic Achievement in Secondary Mathematics  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Teaching social-emotional skills to secondary students has been linked to higher student achievement, more positive student motivation and more socially acceptable classroom behaviors (Elias & Arnold, 2006; Weissburg et al., 2003; Kress et al., 2004). Much of the current literature on social-emotional learning (SEL) focuses on research. This piece…

Jones, Jennifer L.; Jones, Karrie A.; Vermette, Paul J.

2009-01-01

297

The Relations of Parental Emotional Expressivity With Quality of Indonesian Children's Social Functioning  

Microsoft Academic Search

In Western societies, parental expression of positive emotion has been positively related to the quality of children's social functioning, whereas their expression of negative emotion has been negatively or inconsistently related. The relations of parental expressivity to 3rd-grade Indonesian children's dispositional regulation, socially appropriate behavior, popularity, and sympathy were examined. Parents, teachers, and peers reported on children's social functioning and

Nancy Eisenberg; Jeffrey Liew; Sri Untari Pidada

2001-01-01

298

Emotion regulation in social anxiety disorder: behavioral and neural responses to three socio-emotional tasks  

PubMed Central

Background Social anxiety disorder (SAD) is thought to involve deficits in emotion regulation, and more specifically, deficits in cognitive reappraisal. However, evidence for such deficits is mixed. Methods Using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) of blood oxygen-level dependent (BOLD) signal, we examined reappraisal-related behavioral and neural responses in 27 participants with generalized SAD and 27 healthy controls (HC) during three socio-emotional tasks: (1) looming harsh faces (Faces); (2) videotaped actors delivering social criticism (Criticism); and (3) written autobiographical negative self-beliefs (Beliefs). Results Behaviorally, compared to HC, participants with SAD had lesser reappraisal-related reduction in negative emotion in the Beliefs task. Neurally, compared to HC, participants with SAD had lesser BOLD responses in reappraisal-related brain regions when reappraising faces, in visual and attention related regions when reappraising criticism, and in the left superior temporal gyrus when reappraising beliefs. Examination of the temporal dynamics of BOLD responses revealed late reappraisal-related increased responses in HC, compared to SAD. In addition, the dorsomedial prefrontal cortex (DMPFC), which showed reappraisal-related increased activity in both groups, had similar temporal dynamics in SAD and HC during the Faces and Criticism tasks, but greater late response increases in HC, compared to SAD, during the Beliefs task. Reappraisal-related greater late DMPFC responses were associated with greater percent reduction in negative emotion ratings in SAD patients. Conclusions These results suggest a dysfunction of cognitive reappraisal in SAD patients, with overall reduced late brain responses in prefrontal regions, particularly when reappraising faces. Decreased late activity in the DMPFC might be associated with deficient reappraisal and greater negative reactivity. Trial registration ClinicalTrials.gov identifier: NCT00380731 PMID:24517388

2013-01-01

299

A Child's View: Social and Physical Environmental Features Differentially Predict Parent and Child Perceived Neighborhood Safety.  

PubMed

Parent and child perceived neighborhood safety predicts child health outcomes such as sleep quality, asthma, physical activity, and psychological distress. Although previous studies identify environmental predictors of parent perceived safety, little is known about predictors of child perceived safety. This study aims to identify the social and physical environmental neighborhood features that predict child and parent perceived neighborhood safety and, simultaneously, to assess the association between child and parent perceptions. Data were from the QUebec Adipose and Lifestyle InvesTigation in Youth (QUALITY) cohort, an ongoing study of Caucasian children (aged 8-10 years) with a parental history of obesity, and their biological parents from Québec, Canada. Measures of social and physical neighborhood features were collected using a spatial data infrastructure and in-person audits. Structural equation modeling was used to test direct and indirect associations between neighborhood features, child and parent perceived safety. Results suggest that among children (N?=?494), trees and lighting were positively associated with perceived neighborhood safety, whereas a high proportion of visible minorities was associated with poorer perceived safety. Parents' perceptions of safety were more strongly tied to indicators of disorder and a lack of community involvement, and to traffic. Child perceived safety was partly explained by parent perceived safety, suggesting moderate concordance between perceptions. Although associated with each other, parent and child perceived safety seemed to be determined by distinct environmental features. Though this study focused on determinants of child and parent perceived safety, future research investigating the impact of neighborhood safety on child health should consider both child and parent perspectives. PMID:25450517

Côté-Lussier, Carolyn; Jackson, Jonathan; Kestens, Yan; Henderson, Melanie; Barnett, Tracie A

2015-02-01

300

The indirect effects of maternal emotion socialization on friendship quality in middle childhood.  

PubMed

Emotion development processes have long been linked to social competence in early childhood but rarely have these associations been examined in middle childhood or with relational outcomes. Guided by theories of interpersonal relationships and emotion socialization, the current study was designed to fill these gaps by examining a longitudinal process model indirectly linking emotion development to friendship quality. Data were drawn from 336 children (179 girls, 65% White), their mothers, and their teachers across 3 time points spanning the ages of 5-10 years. A path analysis model was utilized to examine the way in which maternal emotion socialization indirectly affects children's friendship quality. Results supported the hypothesized model in which maternal emotion socialization strategies used when children were age 5 were associated with changes in friendship quality from ages 7 to 10 via changes in children's emotion regulation. Findings highlight the importance of emotional processes for relational outcomes in middle childhood. PMID:23795555

Blair, Bethany L; Perry, Nicole B; O'Brien, Marion; Calkins, Susan D; Keane, Susan P; Shanahan, Lilly

2014-02-01

301

The Indirect Effects of Maternal Emotion Socialization on Friendship Quality in Middle Childhood  

PubMed Central

Emotion development processes have long been linked to social competence in early childhood but rarely have these associations been examined in middle childhood or with relational outcomes. Guided by theories of interpersonal relationships and emotion socialization, the current study was designed to fill these gaps by examining a longitudinal process model indirectly linking emotion development to friendship quality. Data were drawn from 336 children (179 girls, 65% White), their mothers, and their teachers across 3 time points spanning the ages of 5–10 years. A path analysis model was utilized to examine the way in which maternal emotion socialization indirectly affects children’s friendship quality. Results supported the hypothesized model in which maternal emotion socialization strategies used when children were age 5 were associated with changes in friendship quality from ages 7 to 10 via changes in children’s emotion regulation. Findings highlight the importance of emotional processes for relational outcomes in middle childhood. PMID:23795555

Blair, Bethany L.; Perry, Nicole B.; O’Brien, Marion; Calkins, Susan D.; Keane, Susan P.; Shanahan, Lilly

2014-01-01

302

Social determiants of parent-child interaction in the UK  

Microsoft Academic Search

BackgroundResearch has shown that activities such as play and reading are beneficial for the development of a child. This study examined the social and demographic characteristics of mothers who play with, read to and tell stories to their child, using data from the UK-wide Millennium Cohort Study (MCS).MethodsData were obtained from 14 034 mothers of singleton 5-year-old children. Using data

R L Brocklebank; H Bedford; L Griffiths

2011-01-01

303

Emotion laterality and social behaviour Accepted Laterality: Asymmetries of Body, Brain and Cognition. 15 May 2014  

E-print Network

strongly lateralised to the right hemisphere for the processing of anger, happiness and sadness; and and social behaviour - 3 - Introduction According to the right hemisphere hypothesis, emotional stimuli

Royal Holloway, University of London

304

Maternal and Child Contributions to Cortisol Response to Emotional Arousal in Young Children from Low-Income, Rural Communities  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Relations of maternal and child characteristics to child cortisol reactivity to and recovery from emotional arousal were examined prospectively at approximately 7 months of age (infancy) and then again at approximately 15 months of age (toddlerhood). The sample was diverse and population based (N = 1,292 mother-infant dyads) and included families…

Blair, Clancy; Granger, Douglas A.; Kivlighan, Katie T.; Mills-Koonce, Roger; Willoughby, Michael; Greenberg, Mark T.; Hibel, Leah C.; Fortunato, Christine K.

2008-01-01

305

Culture and the socialization of child cardiovascular regulation at school entry in the US.  

PubMed

The measurement of cardiovascular functioning targets an important bridge between social conditions and differential well-being. Nevertheless, the biocultural, psychosocial processes that link human ecology to cardiovascular function in children remain inadequately characterized. Childrearing practices shaped by parents' cultural beliefs should moderate children's affective responses to daily experience, and hence their psychophysiology. The present study concerns interactions among family ecology, the normative social challenge of entry into kindergarten, and parasympathetic (vagal) cardiac regulation in US middle-class children (N = 30). Although parents believed children must be protected from overscheduling to reduce stress and improve socio-emotional adaptation, maternal rather than child schedules predicted parasympathetic regulation during a nonthreatening social engagement task following school entry. Children of busier married mothers, but less busy single mothers, showed the context-appropriate pattern of parasympathetic regulation, low respiratory sinus arrhythmia (RSA). These findings are expected if: maternal and family functioning, rather than the scheduling of the child's daily life, principally drive young children's cardiovascular responsiveness to a normative challenge; and busy schedules represent high family functioning with married mothers, but not under single-parent conditions wherein adult staffing is uniquely constrained. Family ecology is shaped by culture, and in turn shapes the development of children's cardiovascular responses. Appropriately fine-grained analysis of daily experience can illustrate how culturally driven parenting practices may have unintended consequences for child biological outcomes that vary by family structure. PMID:18442079

DeCaro, Jason A; Worthman, Carol M

2008-01-01

306

Emotion beliefs and cognitive behavioural therapy for social anxiety disorder.  

PubMed

Despite strong support for the efficacy of cognitive behavioural therapy (CBT) for social anxiety disorder (SAD), little is known about mechanisms of change in treatment. Within the context of a randomized controlled trial of CBT, this study examined patients' beliefs about the fixed versus malleable nature of anxiety-their 'implicit theories'-as a key variable in CBT for SAD. Compared to waitlist (n = 29; 58% female), CBT (n = 24; 52% female) led to significantly lower levels of fixed beliefs about anxiety (Mbaseline = 11.70 vs. MPost = 7.08, d = 1.27). These implicit beliefs indirectly explained CBT-related changes in social anxiety symptoms (?(2) = .28, [95% CI = 0.12, 0.46]). Implicit beliefs also uniquely predicted treatment outcomes when controlling for baseline social anxiety and other kinds of maladaptive beliefs (perceived social costs, perceived social self-efficacy, and maladaptive interpersonal beliefs). Finally, implicit beliefs continued to predict social anxiety symptoms at 12 months post-treatment. These findings suggest that changes in patients' beliefs about their emotions may play an important role in CBT for SAD. PMID:25380179

De Castella, Krista; Goldin, Philippe; Jazaieri, Hooria; Heimberg, Richard G; Dweck, Carol S; Gross, James J

2015-03-01

307

Affective Social Quest (ASQ) Teaching Emotion Recognition with Interactive Media & Wireless Expressive Toys  

E-print Network

and multimedia tools to augment a child's learning of emotional expression. I develop the hypothesis that these tools can be particularly useful to children with autism and their practitioners. I test the hypothesis with the movies. Each doll embodied an emotional expression: happy, angry, sad, and surprise. In operation

308

Relations between Political Violence and Child Adjustment: A Four-Wave Test of the Role of Emotional Insecurity about Community  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This study further explored the impact of sectarian violence and children's emotional insecurity about community on child maladjustment using a 4-wave longitudinal design. The study included 999 mother-child dyads in Belfast, Northern Ireland (482 boys, 517 girls). Across the 4 waves, child mean age was 12.19 (SD = 1.82), 13.24 (SD = 1.83),…

Cummings, E. Mark; Taylor, Laura K.; Merrilees, Christine E.; Goeke-Morey, Marcie C.; Shirlow, Peter; Cairns, Ed

2013-01-01

309

An Emotion Dimensional Model based on Social Tags: Crossing Folksonomies and Enhancing Recommendations  

E-print Network

An Emotion Dimensional Model based on Social Tags: Crossing Folksonomies and Enhancing, Spain {i.fernandez, ivan.cantador, laura.plaza}@uam.es Abstract. In this paper we present an emotion that describes emotions by means of synonym and antonym terms, and that is linked to multiple domain

Cantador, Iván

310

Mothers' Emotional Expressivity and Children' Behavior Problems and Social Competence: Mediation through Children's Regulation.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Examined relations between mothers' expressed positive and negative emotion and 55- to 79-month-olds' regulation, social competence, and adjustment. Structural equation modeling revealed unique effects of positive and negative maternal expressed emotion on children's regulation, and the relations of maternal expressed emotion to children's…

Eisenberg, Nancy; Gershoff, Elizabeth Thompson; Fabes, Richard A.; Shepard, Stephanie A.; Cumberland, Amanda J.; Losoya, Sandra H.; Guthrie, Ivanna K.; Murphy, Bridget C.

2001-01-01

311

Child Psychology Child psychology is one of the  

E-print Network

Child Psychology Child psychology is one of the many branches of psychology and one of the most prenatal development through adolescence. Child psychology deals not only with how children grow physically, but with their mental, emotional and social development, as well. www.uwindsor.ca/psychology A Rigorous, Enriching

312

Relations between political violence and child adjustment: a four-wave test of the role of emotional insecurity about community.  

PubMed

This study further explored the impact of sectarian violence and children's emotional insecurity about community on child maladjustment using a 4-wave longitudinal design. The study included 999 mother-child dyads in Belfast, Northern Ireland (482 boys, 517 girls). Across the 4 waves, child mean age was 12.19 (SD = 1.82), 13.24 (SD = 1.83), 13.61 (SD = 1.99), and 14.66 years (SD = 1.96), respectively. Building on previous studies of the role of emotional insecurity in child adjustment, the current study examines within-person change in emotional insecurity using latent growth curve analyses. The results showed that children's trajectories of emotional insecurity about community were related to risk for developing conduct and emotion problems. These findings controlled for earlier adjustment problems, age, and gender, and took into account the time-varying nature of experience with sectarian violence. Discussion considers the implications for children's emotional insecurity about community for relations between political violence and children's adjustment, including the significance of trajectories of emotional insecurity over time. PMID:23527495

Cummings, E Mark; Taylor, Laura K; Merrilees, Christine E; Goeke-Morey, Marcie C; Shirlow, Peter; Cairns, Ed

2013-12-01

313

Evaluating Standards of Social Work Supervision in Child Welfare and Hospital Social Work  

Microsoft Academic Search

Using the Recommended Standards for Social Work Supervision developed by the Australian Association of Social Workers, supervisors and supervisees who occupied social work positions in Community Services Victoria (CSV), a statutory child welfare department (N=94) and in nine Melbourne teaching hospitals (N=139) completed self-administered questionnaires on the nature of the supervision which they gave or received. The extent to which

Dorothy Scott; Janet Farrow

1993-01-01

314

"Cycling around an emotional core of sadness": emotion regulation in a couple after the loss of a child.  

PubMed

In contrast to the traditional view of working through grief by confronting it, recent theories have emphasized an oscillating process of confronting and avoiding the pain of loss. In this qualitative study, we sought a better understanding of this process by conducting a detailed case study of a bereaved couple after the loss of their infant daughter. We employed multiple data collection methods (using interviews and written feedback) and an intensive auditing process in our thematic analysis, with special attention to a recurrent metaphor used by this bereaved couple in describing their personal and relational experience. The findings suggest the presence of a dialectic tension between the need to be close to the deceased child and the need for distance from the pain of the loss, which was evidenced on both individual and relational levels. For this couple, the image of "cycling around an emotional core of sadness" captured their dynamic way of dealing with this dialectic of closeness and distance. PMID:22745365

Hooghe, An; Neimeyer, Robert A; Rober, Peter

2012-09-01

315

Factors impacting intention to leave in social workers and child care workers employed at voluntary agencies  

Microsoft Academic Search

IntroductionTo ameliorate high turnover in child welfare, researchers have attempted to identify factors that lead to undesirable turnover. While this has been studied extensively, little attention has been paid to turnover based upon job roles. Like social workers in child welfare, the field of child care also experiences high turnover. Child care workers employed in child welfare settings are no

Wendy Schudrich; Charles Auerbach; Junqing Liu; Gretta Fernandes; Brenda McGowan; Nancy Claiborne

316

Your Child From 6 to 12: Social and Moral Development.  

E-print Network

don't come automatically to children. They need help and guidance from their parents with these as well as with other social behaviors such as keeping promises and respecting others' property. The elementary school years are especially important... for guiding children socially because peer pressure to follow the group begins during this time. How Parents Can Help ? Treat all members of the family the same way you want the child to treat others. ? Point out positive behavior at home, on TV, -in...

Stegelin, Dolores A.; Krogh, Suzanne

1983-01-01

317

A Social Relations Model Analysis of Parent and Child Play  

Microsoft Academic Search

Within the context of the family, the dyadic play of young children and their parents is influenced by each family member’s own characteristics and by the characteristics and behavior of his or her social partners. This article introduces the Social Relations Model (Kenny & LaVoie, 1984) as a new approach for understanding reciprocity during parent—child and sibling play. Thirty-two 12-month-old

Marguerite B. Stevenson; Lewis A. Leavitt; Richard H. Thompson; Mary A. Roach

1988-01-01

318

The Impact of Extreme Emotional Distance in the Mother-Child Relationship on the Offspring’s Future Risk of Maltreatment Perpetration  

Microsoft Academic Search

Emotional qualities of the parent-child relationship are thought to influence the offspring’s risk for perpetrating child\\u000a maltreatment in adulthood. The current study examined whether having grown up in an enmeshed or disengaged mother-child relationship,\\u000a hence a relationship characterized by extremes on the continuum of emotional distance, increased the offspring’s risk of child\\u000a maltreatment perpetration in a sample of 178 undergraduate

Yuko Okado; Sandra T. Azar

2011-01-01

319

Phases of Social–Emotional Development from Birth to School Age  

Microsoft Academic Search

\\u000a Stages of social–emotional development are the subject of this chapter. Infants and toddlers live in a maelstrom of strong\\u000a emotions, most of which involve interactions with other people. But the social situations that induce strong emotions, and\\u000a the cognitive capacities children have for coping with them, change dramatically from one stage to the next. The timetable\\u000a of cognitive development helps

Marc D. Lewis; Isabela Granic

2010-01-01

320

Effects of a Social-Emotional and Character Development Program on the Trajectory of Behaviors Associated with Social-Emotional and Character Development: Findings from Three Randomized Trials  

Microsoft Academic Search

The effects of a school-based social-emotional and character development program, Positive Action, on the developmental trajectory of social-emotional and character-related behaviors was evaluated using data from three\\u000a school-based randomized trials in elementary schools. Results come from 1) 4 years of data from students in 20 Hawai’i schools,\\u000a 2) 3 years of data from students in 14 schools in Chicago and 3) 3 years

Isaac J. Washburn; Alan Acock; Sam Vuchinich; Frank Snyder; Kin-Kit Li; Peter Ji; Joseph Day; David DuBois; Brian R. Flay

2011-01-01

321

The Relationships among Language Ability, Emotion Regulation and Social Competence in Second-Grade Students  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Relationships exist between language ability, emotion regulation, and social competence in preschool children. This study examines how these relationships function in elementary school children, and explores whether language ability partially mediates the relationship between emotion regulation and social competence. Second-grade students (N = 67)…

Monopoli, W. John; Kingston, Sharon

2012-01-01

322

Parental Attachment and Adolescents' Emotional Adjustment: The Associations With Social Skills and Relational Competence  

Microsoft Academic Search

Young people learn from their interactions with their parents how to initiate and maintain satisfying and warm friendships. Attachment with parents thereby plays an important role in adolescents' social and emotional adjustment. The model tested in this study proposes that the relation between parental attachment and emotional adjustment is mediated by social skills and relational competence. Structural equation modeling was

Rutger C. M. E. Engels; Catrin Finkenauer; Wim Meeus; Maja Dekovi?

2001-01-01

323

Emotion socialization and the relation between parental depression and children's externalizing and internalizing problems  

Microsoft Academic Search

Parental depression and emotion socialization, and the impact of their relationship on preschool children's behavior problems, has not been extensively studied. Given that children, from minority, disadvantaged backgrounds are at familial and socio-cultural risk for behavioral problems, this is an important area of research. This study proposed a risk-resilience model to investigate the roles of parental depression and emotion socialization

Jaclyn Lauren Balkan

2012-01-01

324

The Personal-Emotional Social Adjustment of English-Language Learners to a Community College  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This study investigated the effects of locus of control and other predictors on personal-emotional and social adjustment to community college in English-language-learner students. Results indicated that locus of control was significantly associated with both social adjustment and personal-emotional adjustment. Students with more external locus of…

Estrada, Lisi; Dupoux, Errol; Wolman, Clara

2005-01-01

325

Promoting Social and Emotional Learning with Games: "It's Fun and We Learn Things"  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This article has two broad objectives: (a) It reviews the theoretical and practical literature on the use of games to facilitate social and emotional learning (SEL). (b) Based on this review, it argues that games are a powerful way of developing social and emotional learning in young people. In addition, we draw on our collective experience as…

Hromek, Robyn; Roffey, Sue

2009-01-01

326

Social-Emotional School Readiness: How Do We Ensure Children Are Ready to Learn?  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This article begins with a review of research providing evidence that social-emotional competence is a key component of school readiness and that the foundations for social-emotional competence are laid down in the earliest years. We go on to review effective practices and specific interventions that have been found to strengthen children's…

Gray, Sarah A. O.; Herberle, Amy E.; Carter, Alice S.

2012-01-01

327

Social Emotional Development in Infants and Toddlers Who are Homeless as Reported by Mothers  

Microsoft Academic Search

Children who are homeless are reported to have mental health problems at rates of 44% compared to 18% of homed children (1, 2.) A contributing factor to mental health problems can be poor social emotional development (3.) Mothers who experience homelessness may find facilitating social emotional development a challenge when basic necessities such as securing food, shelter and clothing are

Debra Rybski

2008-01-01

328

Look How Far We Have Come: Assessing Children's Social and Emotional Development throughout the School Year  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Educators of young children know how important children's social and emotional development is, not only in terms of developing empathy, compassion, friendships, confidence and the like, but also as an essential component of cognitive growth. As children gain skills in the social/emotional domain, they build language and problem-solving skills, as…

Burrington, Barbara

2006-01-01

329

Identification of Social-Emotional Problems among Young Children in Foster Care  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Background: Little is known about how best to implement behavioral screening recommendations in practice, especially for children in foster care, who are at risk for having social-emotional problems. Two validated screening tools are recommended for use with young children: the Ages and Stages Questionnaire: Social Emotional (ASQ-SE) identifies…

Jee, Sandra H.; Conn, Anne-Marie; Szilagyi, Peter G.; Blumkin, Aaron; Baldwin, Constance D.; Szilagyi, Moira A.

2010-01-01

330

Secondary Social, Emotional and Behavioural Skills (SEBS) Pilot Evaluation. Research Report No. DCFS-RR003  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

In 2005, the National Foundation for Educational Research (NFER) was commissioned by the Department for Children, Schools and Families (DCSF) to evaluate the secondary Social, Emotional and Behavioural Skills (SEBS) pilot. The aim of the pilot was to encourage secondary schools to take a whole-school approach to developing social, emotional and…

Smith, Paula; O'Donnell, Lisa; Easton, Claire; Rudd, Peter

2007-01-01

331

Use of Social Emotional Learning Skills to Predict Future Academic Success and Progress toward Graduation  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This study evaluated the degree to which a range of social emotional learning skills--academic self-efficacy, academic motivation, social connections, importance of school, and managing psychological and emotional distress and academic stress--could be used as an indicator of future academic outcomes. Using a sample of 4,797 from a large urban…

Davis, Alan; Solberg, V. Scott; de Baca, Christine; Gore, Taryn Hargrove

2014-01-01

332

A Study of Social-Emotional Adjustment Levels of Preschool Children in Relation to Peer Relationships  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The aim of this research is to study social--emotional adaptation levels of 5-to 6-year old preschool children in relation to peer relationships. One hundred and forty-four children aged between 5 and 6 joined in this relational survey study. According to the results of the research analysing the relationship between the social-emotional

Gülay, Hülya; Önder, Alev

2013-01-01

333

Predicting Teacher Commitment: The Impact of School Climate and Social-Emotional Learning  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The aim of this study was to investigate whether school climate and social-emotional learning impact teacher commitment. The sample included 664 public schoolteachers from British Columbia and Ontario in Canada. Participants completed an online questionnaire about teacher commitment, school climate, and social-emotional learning. Binary logistic…

Collie, Rebecca J.; Shapka, Jennifer D.; Perry, Nancy E.

2011-01-01

334

Teaching Online Social Skills to Students with Emotional and Behavioral Disorders  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Students with emotional and behavioral disorders often lack appropriate social skills. This deficit can lead to negative outcomes including peer and teacher rejection, increased behavioral problems at school, and decreased academic achievement. In order to improve the social outcomes of students with emotional and behavioral disorders, teachers…

Morgan, Joseph John

2012-01-01

335

Facial Emotion Recognition in Children with High Functioning Autism and Children with Social Phobia  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Recognizing facial affect is essential for effective social functioning. This study examines emotion recognition abilities in children aged 7-13 years with High Functioning Autism (HFA = 19), Social Phobia (SP = 17), or typical development (TD = 21). Findings indicate that all children identified certain emotions more quickly (e.g., happy [less…

Wong, Nina; Beidel, Deborah C.; Sarver, Dustin E.; Sims, Valerie

2012-01-01

336

Casting the Conceptual Net: Cognitive Possibilities for Embracing the Social and Emotional Richness of Art Education  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Although the argument for art as cognition has gained significant momentum since the cognitive revolution, recent scientific investigations of cognition have revealed the import of social and emotional thinking for meaningful, contextualized learning, thereby highlighting the inherent social and emotional properties of artmaking as inevitably…

Blatt-Gross, Carolina

2010-01-01

337

LINKING PREVENTION SCIENCE AND SOCIAL AND EMOTIONAL LEARNING: THE OREGON RESILIENCY PROJECT  

Microsoft Academic Search

This article reviews the contributions of the Oregon Resiliency Project, an effort to enhance positive social - emotional development of children and youth through social and emotional learning (SEL). The project was launched in 2001 as a collaborative effort between faculty and graduate student researchers at the University of Oregon. The primary aims have included training, outreach, and research in

KENNETH W. MERRELL

2010-01-01

338

The Indirect Effects of Maternal Emotion Socialization on Friendship Quality in Middle Childhood  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Emotion development processes have long been linked to social competence in early childhood but rarely have these associations been examined in middle childhood or with relational outcomes. Guided by theories of interpersonal relationships and emotion socialization, the current study was designed to fill these gaps by examining a longitudinal…

Blair, Bethany L.; Perry, Nicole B.; O'Brien, Marion; Calkins, Susan D.; Keane, Susan P.; Shanahan, Lilly

2014-01-01

339

False Belief, Emotion Understanding, and Social Skills among Head Start and Non-Head Start Children  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The present study investigated relationships among false belief, emotion understanding, and social skills with 60 3- to 5-year-olds (29 boys, 31 girls) from Head Start and two other preschools. Children completed language, false belief, and emotion understanding measures; parents and teachers evaluated children's social skills. Children's false…

Weimer, Amy A.; Guajardo, Nicole R.

2005-01-01

340

Neuropsychological Impairments and Changes in Emotional and Social Behaviour Following Severe Traumatic Brain Injury  

Microsoft Academic Search

Changes in emotional and social behaviour are relatively common following severe traumatic brain injury (TBI). Despite the serious consequences of these changes, little is known about the underlying neuropsychological deficits. In this study, we investigated which deficits might underlie these behavioural changes. The emotional and social behaviour of 17 patients with severe TBI was assessed with questionnaires, completed by the

Maarten Milders; Sandra Fuchs; John R. Crawford

2003-01-01

341

Moderators of the Relation between Shyness and Behavior with Peers: Cortisol Dysregulation and Maternal Emotion Socialization  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This study investigated the relations among shyness, physiological dysregulation, and maternal emotion socialization in predicting children's social behavior with peers during the kindergarten year (N = 66; 29 girls). For shy children, interactions with peers represent potential stressors that can elicit negative emotion and physiological…

Davis, Elizabeth L.; Buss, Kristin A.

2012-01-01

342

MBSR vs aerobic exercise in social anxiety: fMRI of emotion regulation of negative self-beliefs  

E-print Network

. Meditation practice was associated with decreases in negative emotion and social anxiety symptom severity that helps to explain how mindfulness meditation training benefits patients with anxiety disorders. Keywords: social anxiety; emotion regulation; mindfulness; fMRI; attention INTRODUCTION Mindfulness meditation

Gross, James J.

343

Mother-Child Conversations of Emotionally Salient Events: Exploring the Functions of Emotional Reminiscing in European-American and Chinese Families  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This study explores the functional variations in mother-child conversations of emotionally salient events in European-American and Chinese families. Thirty Chinese and 31 European-American 3-year-old children and their mothers participated. Mothers were asked to discuss with their children at home two specific one-point-in-time events in which…

Wang, Qi; Fivush, Robyn

2005-01-01

344

Anticipating Adolescence: How To Cope with Your Child's Emotional Upheaval and Forge a New Relationship Together.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Noting that with informed understanding, parents can prepare for and cope with their adolescents' profound internal turmoil, this book provides parents with a clear view of what to expect during their child's adolescence: the major biological and psychological developments of adolescence; the most significant social, sexual, and cultural…

Gabriel, H. Paul; Wool, Robert

345

Tissue plasminogen activator modulates emotion in a social context.  

PubMed

Tissue plasminogen activator (tPA) is known to play physiologically and pathologically crucial roles in the central nervous system. However, it is still obscure whether it affects social behavior. We investigated social behavior and neuronal activation after social stimulation in tPA knockout (KO) mice. In a resident-intruder test, the latency to the first contact was significantly delayed in tPA KO mice compared with that in tPA heterogenic (Het) mice. However, tPA KO mice spent significantly more time undertaking active behavior than tPA Het mice did. In a sociability test, tPA KO mice significantly spent more time and walked a greater distance in the chamber containing an empty cage than tPA Het mice. Furthermore, tPA KO mice approached an empty cage more frequently than tPA Het mice did. In a social novelty test, there was no difference in the duration spent sniffing a stimulator mouse between genotypes. However, tPA KO mice approached even a familiar mouse more frequently than tPA Het mice did. tPA KO mice spent similar durations in a chamber containing a familiar mouse and that containing an unfamiliar mouse, and tPA KO mice walked a significantly greater distance in the former chamber than tPA Het mice did. Furthermore, at the cingulate and prelimbic cortices, the number of cFos-positive cells was significantly increased in tPA KO mice compared with that in tPA Het mice after social stimulation. Our results suggest that tPA modulates emotion in a social context through the function of the prefrontal cortex. PMID:25499620

Nakamura, Kazuki; Takabe, Ayumi; Shimizu, Fuki; Takahashi, Maiko; Matsuo, Osamu; Mitsui, Shinichi

2015-03-15

346

Towards unobtrusive emotion recognition for affective social communication  

Microsoft Academic Search

Awareness of the emotion of those who communicate with others is a fundamental challenge in building affective intelligent systems. Emotion is a complex state of the mind influenced by external events, physiological changes, or relationships with others. Because emotions can represent a user's internal context or intention, researchers suggested various methods to measure the user's emotions from analysis of physiological

Hosub Lee; Young Sang Choi; Sunjae Lee; I. P. Park

2012-01-01

347

A national evaluation of the impact of the secondary social and emotional aspects of learning (SEAL) programme  

Microsoft Academic Search

In recent years, the English education system has reflected a worldwide interest in social and emotional learning (SEL), as evidenced by the national launch of the secondary social and emotional aspects of learning (SEAL) programme in 2007. SEAL is a whole-school approach designed to positively influence a range of pupil outcomes, including increased social and emotional skills, better behaviour and

Michael Wigelsworth; Neil Humphrey; Ann Lendrum

2011-01-01

348

A national evaluation of the impact of the secondary social and emotional aspects of learning (SEAL) programme  

Microsoft Academic Search

In recent years, the English education system has reflected a worldwide interest in social and emotional learning (SEL), as evidenced by the national launch of the secondary social and emotional aspects of learning (SEAL) programme in 2007. SEAL is a whole-school approach designed to positively influence a range of pupil outcomes, including increased social and emotional skills, better behaviour and

Michael Wigelsworth; Neil Humphrey; Ann Lendrum

2012-01-01

349

Parent–Child and Triadic Antecedents of Children’s Social Competence: Cultural Specificity, Shared Process  

Microsoft Academic Search

Guided by theories of cultural participation, the authors examined mother–child, father–child, and triadic interactive behaviors in 141 Israeli and Palestinian couples and their firstborn child at 5 and 33 months as antecedents of children’s social competence. Four parent–child measures (parent sensitivity, child social engagement, parental control, dyadic reciprocity) and two family-level measures (cohesion and rigidity) were coded at each age.

Ruth Feldman; Shafiq Masalha

2010-01-01

350

Do Provocateurs' Emotion Displays Influence Children's Social Goals and Problem Solving?  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The social goals and social problem-solving of children who varied in social adjustment were examined in the context of hypothetical ambiguous provocation situations in which provocateurs' emotion displays were systematically manipulated. Children rated the importance of six different social goals and explained how they would solve the problems.…

Lemerise, Elizabeth A.; Fredstrom, Bridget K.; Kelley, Brenna M.; Bowersox, April L.; Waford, Rachel N.

2006-01-01

351

Social Skills Instruction for Adolescents with Emotional Disabilities: A Technology-Based Intervention  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This study explored the use of multimedia, student-generated social skills lessons coupled with teacher facilitation to improve the social skills of middle-school students with emotional disabilities. The effects of teacher-led social skills instruction and the combination of teacher-led and multimedia student-generated social skills instruction…

Cummings, Therese M.; Higgins, Kyle; Pierce, Tom; Miller, Susan; Boone, Randall; Tandy, Richard

2009-01-01

352

Brief Report: Integrating Social-Emotional Learning with Literacy Instruction--An Intervention for Children at Risk for Emotional and Behavioral Disorders  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

It is widely believed that children's social-emotional growth and academic learning are inextricably connected. Pressured by high-stakes assessments, however, school professionals find it difficult to devote adequate time to children's social/behavioral development. As a response, we developed and piloted Social-Emotional Learning…

Daunic, Ann; Corbett, Nancy; Smith, Stephen; Barnes, Tia; Santiago-Poventud, Lourdes; Chalfant, Pam; Pitts, Donna; Gleaton, Jeisha

2013-01-01

353

Cognitive neuroscience of social emotions and implications for psychopathology: examining embarrassment, guilt, envy, and schadenfreude.  

PubMed

Social emotions are affective states elicited during social interactions and integral for promoting socially appropriate behaviors and discouraging socially inappropriate ones. Social emotion-processing deficits significantly impair interpersonal relationships, and play distinct roles in the manifestation and maintenance of clinical symptomatology. Elucidating the neural correlates of discrete social emotions can serve as a window to better understanding and treating neuropsychiatric disorders. Moral cognition and social emotion-processing broadly recruit a fronto-temporo-subcortical network, supporting empathy, perspective-taking, self-processing, and reward-processing. The present review specifically examines the neural correlates of embarrassment, guilt, envy, and schadenfreude. Embarrassment and guilt are self-conscious emotions, evoked during negative evaluation following norm violations and supported by a fronto-temporo-posterior network. Embarrassment is evoked by social transgressions and recruits greater anterior temporal regions, representing conceptual social knowledge. Guilt is evoked by moral transgressions and recruits greater prefrontal regions, representing perspective-taking and behavioral change demands. Envy and schadenfreude are fortune-of-other emotions, evoked during social comparison and supported by a prefronto-striatal network. Envy represents displeasure in others' fortunes, and recruits increased dorsal anterior cingulate cortex, representing cognitive dissonance, and decreased reward-related striatal regions. Schadenfreude represents pleasure in others' misfortunes, and recruits reduced empathy-related insular regions and increased reward-related striatal regions. Implications for psychopathology and treatment design are discussed. PMID:24649887

Jankowski, Kathryn F; Takahashi, Hidehiko

2014-05-01

354

Differentiating emotions across contexts: comparing adults with and without social anxiety disorder using random, social interaction, and daily experience sampling.  

PubMed

The ability to recognize and label emotional experiences has been associated with well-being and adaptive functioning. This skill is particularly important in social situations, as emotions provide information about the state of relationships and help guide interpersonal decisions, such as whether to disclose personal information. Given the interpersonal difficulties linked to social anxiety disorder (SAD), deficient negative emotion differentiation may contribute to impairment in this population. We hypothesized that people with SAD would exhibit less negative emotion differentiation in daily life, and these differences would translate to impairment in social functioning. We recruited 43 people diagnosed with generalized SAD and 43 healthy adults to describe the emotions they experienced over 14 days. Participants received palmtop computers for responding to random prompts and describing naturalistic social interactions; to complete end-of-day diary entries, they used a secure online website. We calculated intraclass correlation coefficients to capture the degree of differentiation of negative and positive emotions for each context (random moments, face-to-face social interactions, and end-of-day reflections). Compared to healthy controls, the SAD group exhibited less negative (but not positive) emotion differentiation during random prompts, social interactions, and (at trend level) end-of-day assessments. These differences could not be explained by emotion intensity or variability over the 14 days, or to comorbid depression or anxiety disorders. Our findings suggest that people with generalized SAD have deficits in clarifying specific negative emotions felt at a given point of time. These deficits may contribute to difficulties with effective emotion regulation and healthy social relationship functioning. PMID:24512246

Kashdan, Todd B; Farmer, Antonina S

2014-06-01

355

Social-emotional predictors of preschoolers' responses to adult negative emotion.  

PubMed

The study examined predictors of children's prosocial responses to adult negative emotions. An adult displayed anger, sadness and pain during play sessions with 39 preschoolers (mean age = 43 months). Older children responded more prosocially to all three emotions, whereas children with greater emotion knowledge responded more prosocially to the adult's sadness. Children who behaved prosocially in response to peers' negative emotions also were prosocial after the adult's negative emotions, even with effects of age and emotion knowledge held constant. Assertive children responded more prosocially to the adult's anger, even with effects of other variables held constant. Both theoretical and practical implications are discussed. PMID:1864891

Denham, S A; Couchoud, E A

1991-05-01

356

Child behaviour checklist emotional dysregulation profiles in youth with disruptive behaviour disorders: clinical correlates and treatment implications.  

PubMed

Two Child Behaviour Checklist (CBCL) profiles were correlated to poor self-regulation, Deficient Emotional Self-Regulation (DESR) (elevation between 1 and 2 Standard Deviations (SD) in Anxiety/Depression, Aggression, Attention subscales), and Dysregulation Profile (DP) (elevation of 2 Standard Deviations or more). We explored youths with Oppositional Defiant Disorder (ODD) and Conduct Disorder (CD) whether these profiles are associated with specific clinical features. The sample included 57 patients with DESR profile and 41 with DP profile, ages 9 to 15 years, all assigned to a non-pharmacological Multimodal Treatment Program. No differences resulted between groups in demographic features, diagnosis ratio, and comorbidities with Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD), Bipolar Disorder (BD), and Anxiety Disorder. The DP group was associated with higher scores in Withdrawn, Social Problem, Thought, Rule Breaking, and Somatic CBCL subscales, and higher scores in Narcissism and Impulsivity (but not Callous-Unemotional (CU)), according to the Antisocial Process Screening Device (APSD). After treatment, patients with DESR improved their personality traits (Narcissistic and Callous-Unemotional, but not Impulsivity), while changes in CBCL scales were modest. Patients with DP improved scales of Attention, Aggression, Anxiety-Depression, Rule Breaking, Withdrawal, Social Problem and Thought, while personality features did not change. These results suggest diagnostic implications of CBCL profiles, and indications for targeted treatment strategies. PMID:25480545

Gabriele, Masi; Pietro, Muratori; Azzurra, Manfredi; Simone, Pisano; Annarita, Milone

2015-01-30

357

Social Inequalities, Family Relationships, and Child Health  

Microsoft Academic Search

\\u000a Humans are extraordinarily social creatures. We evolved large brains with a unique suite of abilities, including empathy,\\u000a consciousness, and language. Our sociocognitive adaptations involve complex integration of neurological (brain) and neuroendocrine\\u000a (hormone) systems. We are just beginning to understand the genetics that underpin these core aspects of the human psyche.\\u000a In this chapter, my goal is to develop ideas from

Mark V. Flinn

358

Milestones and Mechanisms of Emotional Development  

Microsoft Academic Search

This chapter describes central stages in the development of emotions and emotion regulation. A developmental theory is proposed\\u000a that focuses on the complex interaction of emotions and social interactions. Expression signs for emotions in caregiver–child\\u000a interaction are seen as an important mediating factor that serves as the critical means of communication, particularly during\\u000a early ontogenesis, and through which culture enters

Manfred Holodynski

359

Sustained neural activity to gaze and emotion perception in dynamic social scenes.  

PubMed

To understand social interactions, we must decode dynamic social cues from seen faces. Here, we used magnetoencephalography (MEG) to study the neural responses underlying the perception of emotional expressions and gaze direction changes as depicted in an interaction between two agents. Subjects viewed displays of paired faces that first established a social scenario of gazing at each other (mutual attention) or gazing laterally together (deviated group attention) and then dynamically displayed either an angry or happy facial expression. The initial gaze change elicited a significantly larger M170 under the deviated than the mutual attention scenario. At around 400 ms after the dynamic emotion onset, responses at posterior MEG sensors differentiated between emotions, and between 1000 and 2200 ms, left posterior sensors were additionally modulated by social scenario. Moreover, activity on right anterior sensors showed both an early and prolonged interaction between emotion and social scenario. These results suggest that activity in right anterior sensors reflects an early integration of emotion and social attention, while posterior activity first differentiated between emotions only, supporting the view of a dual route for emotion processing. Altogether, our data demonstrate that both transient and sustained neurophysiological responses underlie social processing when observing interactions between others. PMID:23202662

Ulloa, José Luis; Puce, Aina; Hugueville, Laurent; George, Nathalie

2014-03-01

360

Reappraising social emotions: the role of inferior frontal gyrus, temporo-parietal junction and insula in interpersonal emotion regulation  

PubMed Central

Previous studies have reported the effect of emotion regulation (ER) strategies on both individual and social decision-making, however, the effect of regulation on socially driven emotions independent of decisions is still unclear. In the present study, we investigated the neural effects of using reappraisal to both up- and down-regulate socially driven emotions. Participants played the Dictator Game (DG) in the role of recipient while undergoing fMRI, and concurrently applied the strategies of either up-regulation (reappraising the proposer's intentions as more negative), down-regulation (reappraising the proposer's intentions as less negative), as well as a baseline “look” condition. Results showed that regions responding to the implementation of reappraisal (effect of strategy, that is, “regulating regions”) were the inferior and middle frontal gyrus, temporo parietal junction and insula bilaterally. Importantly, the middle frontal gyrus activation correlated with the frequency of regulatory strategies in daily life, with the insula activation correlating with the perceived ability to reappraise the emotions elicited by the social situation. Regions regulated by reappraisal (effect of regulation, that is, “regulated regions”) were the striatum, the posterior cingulate and the insula, showing increased activation for the up-regulation and reduced activation for down-regulation, both compared to the baseline condition. When analyzing the separate effects of partners' behavior, selfish behavior produced an activation of the insula, not observed when subjects were treated altruistically. Here we show for the first time that interpersonal ER strategies can strongly affect neural responses when experiencing socially driven emotions. Clinical implications of these findings are also discussed to understand how the way we interpret others' intentions may affect the way we emotionally react. PMID:24027512

Grecucci, Alessandro; Giorgetta, Cinzia; Bonini, Nicolao; Sanfey, Alan G.

2013-01-01

361

Information Processing in Everyday Life: Emotion-Congruent Bias in Mothers’ Reports of Parent-Child Interactions  

Microsoft Academic Search

The authors examined the role of emotions in mothers’ perceptions of the parent-child relationship. Ninety-nine mothers completed a measure of trait affect and then interacted with their preschool children under low- and high-stress conditions. After each interaction session, mothers rated their mood states and positive and negative aspects of parent-child behavior. To control for differences in the quality of dyadic

Robert Weis; M. Christine Lovejoy

2002-01-01

362

Cultivating the Socially Competent Body: Bodies and Risk in Swedish Programmes for Social Emotional Learning in Preschools and Schools  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Social emotional learning (SEL) is common in preschools and schools both in Europe and North America today. Programmes for socio-emotional training and the rise of what is labelled therapeutic education have dramatically increased during the first decade of the millennium. In this article, a manual-based programme used for SEL in a Swedish school…

Bartholdsson, Åsa; Gustafsson-Lundberg, Johanna; Hultin, Eva

2014-01-01

363

Screening for Autism Spectrum Disorders with the Brief Infant-Toddler Social and Emotional Assessment  

PubMed Central

Objective Using parent-completed questionnaires in (preventive) child health care can facilitate the early detection of psychosocial problems and psychopathology, including autism spectrum disorders (ASD). A promising questionnaire for this purpose is the Brief Infant-Toddler Social and Emotional Assessment (BITSEA). The screening accuracy with regard to ASD of the BITSEA Problem and Competence scales and a newly calculated Autism score were evaluated. Method Data, that was collected between April 2010 and April 2011, from a community sample of 2-year-olds (N?=?3127), was combined with a sample of preschool children diagnosed with ASD (N?=?159). For the total population and for subgroups by child's gender, area under the Receiver Operating Characteristic (ROC) curve was examined, and across a range of BITSEA Problem, Competence and Autism scores, sensitivity, specificity, positive and negative likelihood ratio's, diagnostic odds ratio and Youden's index were reported. Results The area under the ROC curve (95% confidence interval, [95%CI]) of the Problem scale was 0.90(0.87–0.92), of the Competence scale 0.93(0.91–0.95), and of the Autism score 0.95(0.93–0.97). For the total population, the screening accuracy of the Autism score was significantly better, compared to the Problem scale. The screening accuracy of the Competence scale was significantly better for girls (AUC?=?0.97; 95%CI?=?0.95–0.98) than for boys (AUC?=?0.91; 95%CI?=?0.88–0.94). Conclusion The results indicate that the BITSEA scales and newly calculated Autism score have good discriminative power to differentiate children with and without ASD. Therefore, the BITSEA may be helpful in the early detection of ASD, which could have beneficial effects on the child's development. PMID:24851868

Kruizinga, Ingrid; Visser, Janne C.; van Batenburg-Eddes, Tamara; Carter, Alice S.; Jansen, Wilma; Raat, Hein

2014-01-01

364

Are Women the ``More Emotional'' Sex? Evidence From Emotional Experiences in Social Context  

E-print Network

. These beliefs pervade American culture, from self-help books to talk shows, from ® lms to comedy routines between global, retrospective, and on-line, momentary self-descriptions of emotional experience-related differences in emotion in global self-descriptions, but not in the averaged momentary ratings of emotion

Barrett, Lisa Feldman

365

Questioning as a Component of Scaffolding in Predicting Emotion Knowledge in Preschoolers  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The following study expands Denham and Auerbach's (1995, "Mother-child dialogue about emotions and preschoolers' emotional competence." "Genetic, Social, and General Psychology Monographs," 121, 313-337) findings, demonstrating a link between mothers' talk about emotions and preschoolers' knowledge of emotions. We investigate the maternal language…

Bailey, Craig S.; Denham, Susanne A.; Curby, Timothy W.

2013-01-01

366

The Reformulation of Emotional Security Theory: The Role of Children’s Social Defense in Developmental Psychopathology  

PubMed Central

Although children’s security in the context of the interparental relationship has been identified as a key explanatory mechanism in pathways between family discord and child psychopathology, little is known about the inner workings of emotional security as a goal system. Accordingly, the objective of this paper is to describe how our reformulation of emotional security theory (EST-R) within an ethological and evolutionary framework may advance the characterization of the architecture and operation of emotional security and, in the process, cultivate sustainable growing points in developmental psychopathology. The first section of the paper describes how children’s security in the interparental relationship is organized around a distinctive behavioral system designed to defend against interpersonal threat. Building on this evolutionary foundation for emotional security, the paper offers an innovative taxonomy for identifying qualitatively different ways children try to preserve their security and its innovative implications for more precisely informing understanding of the mechanisms in pathways between family and developmental precursors and children’s trajectories of mental health. In the final section, the paper highlights the potential of EST-R to stimulate new generations of research on understanding how children defend against social threats in ecologies beyond the interparental dyad, including both familial and extrafamilial settings. PMID:24342849

Davies, Patrick T.; Martin, Meredith J.

2014-01-01

367

Working in Human Services: How Do Experiences and Working Conditions in Child Welfare Social Work Compare?  

Microsoft Academic Search

SummaryChild welfare agencies in many rich countries are having difficulty recruiting and retaining social workers. However, these problems are not unique to child welfare: retention problems have also been widely reported in both mental and general health facilities. In this paper, we compare the perceptions of work and working conditions held by child welfare social workers with the perceptions held

Pia Tham; Gabrielle Meagher

2009-01-01

368

Caregiver Social Support for Children Involved With Child Welfare: Correlates and Racial\\/Ethnic Variations  

Microsoft Academic Search

This study examined correlates of and racial\\/ethnic variations in social support for caregivers involved in child protective services. A subsample of caregivers and children from the National Survey of Child and Adolescent Well-Being (NSCAW) was used to examine whether sources and amount of social support for parents in child welfare would vary by race and ethnicity. The findings indicate that

Sunny Hyucksun Shin; Sungkyu Lee

2011-01-01

369

Children's Emotional Abuse and Relational Functioning: Social Support and Internalizing Symptoms as Moderators  

Microsoft Academic Search

Emotional abuse in childhood has deleterious consequences across development and may be a key factor that underlies all forms of childhood maltreatment. This study examined the association between emotional abuse and relationship functioning among 139 low-income, African American 8- to 12-year-old children, with internalizing symptoms and social support from family, peers, and teachers tested as moderators. Emotional abuse was significantly

Megan Key Gabalda; Michelle Robbins Broth; Martie P. Thompson; Nadine J. Kaslow

2009-01-01

370

Effects of Mindfulness-Based Stress Reduction (MBSR) on Emotion Regulation in Social Anxiety Disorder  

Microsoft Academic Search

Mindfulness-based stress reduction (MBSR) is an established program shown to reduce symptoms of stress, anxiety, and depression. MBSR is believed to alter emotional responding by modifying cognitive–affective processes. Given that social anxiety disorder (SAD) is characterized by emotional and attentional biases as well as distorted negative self-beliefs, we examined MBSR-related changes in the brain–behavior indices of emotional reactivity and regulation

Philippe R. Goldin; James J. Gross

2010-01-01

371

Emotional interfaces for interactive aardvarks: designing affect into social interfaces for children  

Microsoft Academic Search

Character-based social interfaces present a unique opportunityto integrate emotion into technology interactions. The presentpaper reports on the use of three emotional interactions (humor,praise, and affection) in the audio interfaces for twocharacter-based interactive learning toys. The reasons forselecting the emotions used, the design rationale for theirapplication, and findings from usability testing are reviewed. Itis suggested that as a form of pretend

Erik Strommen; Kristin Alexander

1999-01-01

372

The Role of Family Expressed Emotion and Perceived Social Support in Predicting Addiction Relapse  

PubMed Central

Background: Emotional conditions governing the family and patients’ perceived social support play important roles in the treatment or relapse process of the chronic disease. Objectives: The current study aimed to investigate the role of family expressed emotion and perceived social support in prediction of addiction relapse. Patients and Methods: The descriptive-correlation method was used in the current study. The study population consisted of the individuals referred to the addiction treatment centers in Ardabil from October 2013 to January 2014. The subjects (n = 80) were randomly selected using cluster sampling method. To collect data, expressed emotion test by Cole and Kazaryan, and Multidimensional Scale of Perceived Social Support (MSPSS) were used, and the obtained data was analyzed using the Pearson's correlation coefficient and multiple regression analyses. Results: Results showed a positive relationship between family expressed emotions and the frequency of relapse (r = 0.26, P = 0.011) and a significant negative relationship between perceived social support and the frequency of relapse (r = -0.34, P = 0.001). Multiple regression analysis also showed that perceived social support from family and the family expressed emotions significantly explained 12% of the total variance of relapse frequency. Conclusions: These results have implications for addicted people, their families and professionals working in addiction centers to use the emotional potential of families especially their expressed emotions and the perceived social support of addicts to increase the success rate of addiction treatment. PMID:25883918

Atadokht, Akbar; Hajloo, Nader; Karimi, Masoud; Narimani, Mohammad

2015-01-01

373

How Do I Feel About Feelings? Emotion Socialization in Families of Depressed and Healthy Adolescents  

PubMed Central

Emotional and cognitive changes that occur during adolescence set the stage for the development of adaptive or maladaptive beliefs about emotions. Although research suggests that parents’ behaviors and beliefs about emotions relate to children’s emotional abilities, few studies have looked at parental socialization of children’s emotions, particularly in families with depressed adolescents. The present study examined associations between parent and adolescent meta-emotion philosophies (MEP), defined as thoughts, reactions, and feelings about their own emotions. Additionally, adolescent depressive status was tested as a moderator of relationships between parents’ and adolescents’ MEP. One hundred and 52 adolescents, aged 14–18 (65.8% female), and their parents (148 mothers, 106 fathers) participated in a study on emotion socialization in families of depressed and healthy adolescents. Depressed adolescents (n = 75) and matched healthy adolescents (n = 77) were recruited based on research criteria for mental health status. The sample was largely Caucasian (82%) and of middle socioeconomic class status. Results indicated that mothers’ and fathers’ MEP about their children’s emotions were associated with adolescents’ MEP, although parents’ MEP about their own emotions was unrelated to adolescents’ MEP. Fathers’ MEP about children’s emotions made unique contributions to adolescents’ MEP across both adolescent groups. Adolescents’ depressive status moderated the relationship between mothers’ and adolescents’ MEP such that mothers’ MEP was particularly relevant for depressed adolescents. The continued influence of parents in the emotional lives of adolescents is discussed as well as differences in emotion socialization in families with depressed and healthy adolescents. PMID:20473712

Hunter, Erin C.; Katz, Lynn Fainsilber; Shortt, Joann Wu; Davis, Betsy; Leve, Craig; Allen, Nicholas B.

2010-01-01

374

The Emotional Well-Being of Our Nation's Youth and the Promise of Social-Emotional Learning  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

A public health crisis is looming in US schools. Millions of children do not receive mental health services, are poorly bonded to supportive educational communities, and fail to develop important social and emotional competencies. Considering these problems, many of which relate to students' school functioning, efforts are needed to support…

Lazarus, Philip J.; Sulkowski, Michael L.

2011-01-01

375

Emotional granularity and social functioning in individuals with schizophrenia: an experience sampling study.  

PubMed

Previous research has shown that healthy individuals who fail to differentiate among emotional states (i.e., those with low emotional granularity; EG) have poorer social functioning (SF) than those with high EG. It is unknown, however, whether these associations extend to clinical disorders characterized by impaired SF, such as schizophrenia. In the present study, we compared SF and EG in individuals with schizophrenia and healthy controls, and then, within the schizophrenia group, we examined the links between EG and SF. Employing an Experience Sampling Method approach, 77 individuals with schizophrenia and 27 healthy controls rated their momentary emotions (sadness, anxiety, anger, and happiness) up to 10 times/day over a two-day period using mobile electronic devices. For each participant, we then calculated the within-subject average correlations among the momentary emotion ratings, producing two EG indices - EGIall for all emotions and EGIneg for negative ones. A subsample of participants with schizophrenia also completed self-report, interview, and ability-based measures of SF. Compared to healthy controls, individuals with schizophrenia displayed significantly poorer SF and lower EGIall, but comparable EGIneg. Within the schizophrenia group, hierarchical multiple regression analyses indicated that EGIall, but not EGIneg, significantly predicted social dysfunction after controlling for emotional awareness, symptoms, and emotional intensity and variability. Our findings indicate that individuals with schizophrenia have a relatively intact ability to differentiate among negative emotions in everyday life. However, they experience significant difficulties differentiating between positive and negative emotions, and this may contribute to their social difficulties. PMID:24561000

Kimhy, David; Vakhrusheva, Julia; Khan, Samira; Chang, Rachel W; Hansen, Marie C; Ballon, Jacob S; Malaspina, Dolores; Gross, James J

2014-06-01

376

Experimental evidence of massive-scale emotional contagion through social networks.  

PubMed

Emotional states can be transferred to others via emotional contagion, leading people to experience the same emotions without their awareness. Emotional contagion is well established in laboratory experiments, with people transferring positive and negative emotions to others. Data from a large real-world social network, collected over a 20-y period suggests that longer-lasting moods (e.g., depression, happiness) can be transferred through networks [Fowler JH, Christakis NA (2008) BMJ 337:a2338], although the results are controversial. In an experiment with people who use Facebook, we test whether emotional contagion occurs outside of in-person interaction between individuals by reducing the amount of emotional content in the News Feed. When positive expressions were reduced, people produced fewer positive posts and more negative posts; when negative expressions were reduced, the opposite pattern occurred. These results indicate that emotions expressed by others on Facebook influence our own emotions, constituting experimental evidence for massive-scale contagion via social networks. This work also suggests that, in contrast to prevailing assumptions, in-person interaction and nonverbal cues are not strictly necessary for emotional contagion, and that the observation of others' positive experiences constitutes a positive experience for people. PMID:24889601

Kramer, Adam D I; Guillory, Jamie E; Hancock, Jeffrey T

2014-06-17

377

Oxytocin improves behavioural and neural deficits in inferring others' social emotions in autism.  

PubMed

Recent studies have suggested oxytocin's therapeutic effects on deficits in social communication and interaction in autism spectrum disorder through improvement of emotion recognition with direct emotional cues, such as facial expression and voice prosody. Although difficulty in understanding of others' social emotions and beliefs under conditions without direct emotional cues also plays an important role in autism spectrum disorder, no study has examined the potential effect of oxytocin on this difficulty. Here, we sequentially conducted both a case-control study and a clinical trial to investigate the potential effects of oxytocin on this difficulty at behavioural and neural levels measured using functional magnetic resonance imaging during a psychological task. This task was modified from the Sally-Anne Task, a well-known first-order false belief task. The task was optimized for investigation of the abilities to infer another person's social emotions and beliefs distinctively so as to test the hypothesis that oxytocin improves deficit in inferring others' social emotions rather than beliefs, under conditions without direct emotional cues. In the case-control study, 17 males with autism spectrum disorder showed significant behavioural deficits in inferring others' social emotions (P = 0.018) but not in inferring others' beliefs (P = 0.064) compared with 17 typically developing demographically-matched male participants. They also showed significantly less activity in the right anterior insula and posterior superior temporal sulcus during inferring others' social emotions, and in the dorsomedial prefrontal cortex during inferring others' beliefs compared with the typically developing participants (P < 0.001 and cluster size > 10 voxels). Then, to investigate potential effects of oxytocin on these behavioural and neural deficits, we conducted a double-blind placebo-controlled crossover within-subject trial for single-dose intranasal administration of 24 IU oxytocin in an independent group of 20 males with autism spectrum disorder. Behaviourally, oxytocin significantly increased the correct rate in inferring others' social emotions (P = 0.043, one-tail). At the neural level, the peptide significantly enhanced the originally-diminished brain activity in the right anterior insula during inferring others' social emotions (P = 0.004), but not in the dorsomedial prefrontal cortex during inferring others' beliefs (P = 0.858). The present findings suggest that oxytocin enhances the ability to understand others' social emotions that have also required second-order false belief rather than first-order false beliefs under conditions without direct emotional cues in autism spectrum disorder at both the behaviour and neural levels. PMID:25149412

Aoki, Yuta; Yahata, Noriaki; Watanabe, Takamitsu; Takano, Yosuke; Kawakubo, Yuki; Kuwabara, Hitoshi; Iwashiro, Norichika; Natsubori, Tatsunobu; Inoue, Hideyuki; Suga, Motomu; Takao, Hidemasa; Sasaki, Hiroki; Gonoi, Wataru; Kunimatsu, Akira; Kasai, Kiyoto; Yamasue, Hidenori

2014-11-01

378

Parental Emotion Socialization in Adolescence: Differences in Sex, Age and Problem Status  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

There is a paucity of research on how mothers and fathers socialize emotion in their adolescent sons and daughters. This study was based on 220 adolescents (range 11- to 16-years-old) who exhibit a range of emotional and behavioral problems and their parents. Parental responses to their children's displays of sadness, anger and fear were assessed.…

Klimes-Dougan, Bonnie; Brand, Ann E.; Zahn-Waxler, Carolyn; Usher, Barbara; Hastings, Paul D.; Kendziora, Kimberly; Garside, Rula B.

2007-01-01

379

Tears, Fears and Careers: Antiracism and Emotion in Social Movement Organizations  

Microsoft Academic Search

Debates about anti-racism in many organizations often collapse into emotional and turbulent scenes characterized by anger and tears. The central concerns of this paper are the practices and discourses of emotional expression that shape what can be said in these organizational debates about racism and anti-racism. A predominant mode of discussion in many social movement organizations, particularly those inspired by

Sarita Srivastava

2006-01-01

380

The Place of Health Information and Socio-Emotional Support in Social Questioning and Answering  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Introduction: Little is known about the quality of health information in social contexts or how socio-emotional factors impact users' evaluations of quality. We explored how librarians, nurses and users assessed the quality of health answers posted on Yahoo! Answers, focusing on socio-emotional reactions displayed, advice given to users and…

Worrall, Adam; Oh, Sanghee

2013-01-01

381

Parental attachment, interparental conflict, and late adolescents' emotional adjustment: The associations with social functioning  

Microsoft Academic Search

The purpose of he study was to extend a previously examined model of emotional adjustment, which suggested that middle adolescents' perceptions of their social skills and relational competence partially mediated the relationship between parental attachment and subsequent emotional adjustment. The present study examined two research questions. First, the initial model is extended to account for a late adolescent (18- to

Jennifer Ross

2008-01-01

382

Validity of Social, Moral and Emotional Facets of Self-Description Questionnaire II  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Studies adopting a construct validity approach can be categorized into within- and between-network studies. Few studies have applied between-network approach and tested the correlations of the social (same-sex relations, opposite-sex relations, parent relations), moral (honesty-trustworthiness), and emotional (emotional stability) facets of the…

Leung, Kim Chau; Marsh, Herbert W.; Yeung, Alexander Seeshing; Abduljabbar, Adel S.

2015-01-01

383

Training Emotional and Social Competences in Higher Education: The Seminar Methodology  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This article discusses the importance of emotional and social competences in higher education and presents a training model. In 1991, Ramon Llull University of Barcelona (Spain) created the Seminar methodology to tackle these challenges. A general model derived from the Emotional Intelligence concept and the general principles of this methodology…

Oberst, Ursula; Gallifa, Josep; Farriols, Nuria; Vilaregut, Anna

2009-01-01

384

Decrease of Prefrontal-Posterior EEG Coherence: Loose Control during Social-Emotional Stimulation  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

In two experiments we aimed to investigate if individual differences in state-dependent decreases or increases of EEG coherence between prefrontal and posterior cortical regions may be indicative of a mechanism modulating the impact social-emotional information has on an individual. Two independent samples were exposed to an emotional stimulation…

Reiser, Eva M.; Schulter, Gunter; Weiss, Elisabeth M.; Fink, Andreas; Rominger, Christian; Papousek, Ilona

2012-01-01

385

Changes in Emotional-Social Intelligence, Caring, Leadership and Moral Judgment during Health Science Education Programs  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

In addition to having academic knowledge and clinical skills, health professionals need to be caring, ethical practitioners able to understand the emotional concerns of their patients and to effect change. The purpose of this study was to determine whether emotional-social intelligence, caring, leadership and moral judgment of health science…

Larin, Helene; Benson, Gerry; Wessel, Jean; Martin, Lynn; Ploeg, Jenny

2014-01-01

386

An exploration of relationships among measures of social cognition, decision making, and emotional intelligence  

Microsoft Academic Search

The present study examined the relationships among measures that purportedly assess emotional intelligence (EI), social cognition, and emotional decision making within a sample of nonclinical undergraduate participants. Forty participants, both male and female, who scored in either the highest or the lowest quartiles of an EI measure (the Trait Meta-Mood Scale) completed the Reading the Mind in the Eyes Test

Claire M. Brabec; Jeffrey D. Gfeller; Michael J. Ross

2012-01-01

387

Emotional Versus Neutral Expressions and Perceptions of Social Dominance and Submissiveness  

Microsoft Academic Search

Emotional expressions influence social judgments of personality traits. The goal of the present research was to show that it is of interest to assess the impact of neutral expressions in this context. In 2 studies using different methodologies, the authors found that participants perceived men who expressed neutral and angry emotions as higher in dominance when compared with men expressing

Shlomo Hareli; Noga Shomrat; Ursula Hess

2009-01-01

388

Ostracism in childhood and adolescence: Emotional, cognitive, and behavioral effects of social exclusion  

Microsoft Academic Search

Drawing on theories of development, motivation, and personality we examined children's and adolescents’ emotional and cognitive perception of, and explained their behavioral reactions to, ostracism in two experimental studies. In Study one, 93 fourth- and eighth-graders (49 girls) were either socially included or excluded within a virtual ball-tossing game (cyberball). Results demonstrated that ostracism causes negative emotions and a selective

Ralf Wölfer; Herbert Scheithauer

2012-01-01

389

Art-Based Program for Social and Emotional Development of Children  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

For eight weeks, we ran an art-based program for social and emotional development in Grade 5 of primary school for children aged 11-12. We met once a week for 45 minutes and worked with 25 children on improving their skills in communication, cooperation, manifestation, and recognition of emotions and identity enforcement. Each skill was covered by…

Mynarikova, Lenka

2012-01-01

390

Theory of Mind "Emotion", Developmental Characteristics and Social Understanding in Children and Adolescents with Intellectual Disabilities  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Patterns of development of ToM-emotion abilities in intellectually disabled (ID) children and typically developing (TD) children matched on their developmental age were investigated. The links between cognition, language, social understanding and ToM-emotion abilities were examined. EDEI-R (Perron-Borelli, M. (1996). "Echelles Differentielles…

Thirion-Marissiaux, Anne-Francoise; Nader-Grosbois, Nathalie

2008-01-01

391

Emotion Regulation and Aggressive Behavior in Preschoolers: The Mediating Role of Social Information Processing  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This study examined whether the relation between maladaptive emotion regulation and aggression was mediated by deviant social information processing (SIP). Participants were 193 preschool children. Emotion regulation and aggression were rated by teachers. Deviant SIP (i.e., attribution of hostile intent, aggressive response generation, aggressive…

Helmsen, Johanna; Koglin, Ute; Petermann, Franz

2012-01-01

392

Intrapersonal and Interpersonal Functions of Non Suicidal Self-Injury: Associations with Emotional and Social Functioning  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Understanding the functions of nonsuicidal self-injury (NSSI) has important implications for the development and refinement of theoretical models and treatments of NSSI. Emotional and social vulnerabilities associated with five common functions of NSSI-emotion relief (ER), feeling generation (FG), self-punishment (SP), interpersonal influence…

Turner, Brianna J.; Chapman, Alexander L.; Layden, Brianne K.

2012-01-01

393

Idealism, Altruism, Career Orientation, and Emotional Exhaustion among Social Work Undergraduates  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The present study examines the genesis of emotional exhaustion among undergraduate social work students in Hong Kong. Of particular concern are the relationships among key factors, including the student's idealism, altruism and career orientation, and emotional exhaustion. To investigate this, the study employed survey data collected from 165…

Ngai, Steven Sek-yum; Cheung, Chau-kiu

2009-01-01

394

Shyness, Child-Teacher Relationships, and Socio-Emotional Adjustment in a Sample of Italian Preschool-Aged Children  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The purpose of the present study was to examine the moderating role of child-teacher relationship quality (i.e., closeness, conflict, and dependence) in the association between children's shyness and indices of socio-emotional adjustment and maladjustment. The participants were Italian preschool children (63 boys; 66 girls) and two lead…

Sette, Stefania; Baumgartner, Emma; Schneider, Barry H.

2014-01-01

395

Mediating and Moderating Processes in the Relation between Maltreatment and Psychopathology: Mother-Child Relationship Quality and Emotion Regulation  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The present study investigated underlying processes of the effect of maltreatment on psychopathology (i.e., internalizing and externalizing problems) in a group of 111 maltreated and 110 nonmaltreated 7-10 year-old children (60% boys). We tested the moderating and/or mediating roles of emotion regulation and the mother-child relationship quality…

Alink, Lenneke R. A.; Cicchetti, Dante; Kim, Jungmeen; Rogosch, Fred A.

2009-01-01

396

Cross-Cultural Comparisons of Child-Reported Emotional and Physical Abuse: Rates, Risk Factors and Psychosocial Symptoms  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Objectives: This study was designed to assess the incidence of child emotional and physical abuse, associated risk factors and psychosocial symptoms in a cross-cultural comparison between post-communist bloc countries. Method: One-thousand one-hundred forty-five children ages 10-14 from Latvia (N=297), Lithuania (N=300), Macedonia (N=302), and…

Sebre, Sandra; Sprugevica, Ieva; Novotni, Antoni; Bonevski, Dimitar; Pakalniskiene, Vilmante; Popescu, Daniela; Turchina, Tatiana; Friedrich, William; Lewis, Owen

2004-01-01

397

Roles for Schools and School Social Workers in Improving Child Food Security  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Food insecurity is associated with a range of child developmental, behavioral, and emotional challenges, all of which can inhibit a child's school success. Schools offer a number of formal and informal services aimed at reducing food insecurity, but the problems associated with identifying children in need, addressing issues of stigma, and…

Fram, Maryah Stella; Frongillo, Edward A.; Fishbein, Eliza M.; Burke, Michael P.

2014-01-01

398

Perceived Social Support and Domain-Specific Adjustment of Children with Emotional and Behavioural Difficulties  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The perceived availability of social support has been documented as a protective mechanism among adults and adolescents. However, little research has explored the role of social support among children with emotional and behavioural difficulties (E/BD). The current study sought to investigate the effects of perceived social support from family,…

Popliger, Mina; Toste, Jessica R.; Heath, Nancy L.

2009-01-01

399

PEARL: An Interactive Visual Analytic Tool for Understanding Personal Emotion Style Derived from Social Media  

E-print Network

Social Media Jian Zhao, Liang Gou, Fei Wang, and Michelle Zhou a e b c d Fig. 1. A person's emotional footprints on social media (e.g., Twitter and Facebook). Such data not only disclose a person's demographics from this person's social media text. Compared to other visual text analytic systems, our work offers

Toronto, University of

400

The Impact of Emotional and Material Social Support on Women's Drug Treatment Completion  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This study assessed how women's perceptions of emotional and material social support affect their completion of residential drug treatment. Although previous research has examined how social support affects recovery, few studies, if any, have examined both the types and the sources of social support. The study hypothesized that women's perceptions…

Lewandowski, Cathleen A.; Hill, Twyla J.

2009-01-01

401

Selective Narrowing of Social Networks across Adulthood is Associated with Improved Emotional Experience in Daily Life  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Past research has documented age differences in the size and composition of social networks that suggest that networks grow smaller with age and include an increasingly greater proportion of well-known social partners. According to socioemotional selectivity theory, such changes in social network composition serve an antecedent emotion regulatory…

English, Tammy; Carstensen, Laura L.

2014-01-01

402

Parasympathetic Regulation and Parental Socialization of Emotion: Biopsychosocial Processes of Adjustment in Preschoolers  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Variations in parents' emotion socialization have been linked to children's social competence (SC) and behavior problems, but parental influences do not act independently of children's characteristics. A biopsychosocial model was tested, in which children's parasympathetic regulation of cardiac function and paternal and maternal socialization of…

Hastings, Paul D.; De, Ishani

2008-01-01

403

Doug MacLellan 2014 Child Psychology  

E-print Network

© Doug MacLellan 2014 Child Psychology Child psychology is one of the many branches of psychology and behaviour of children from prenatal development through adolescence. Child psychology deals not only with how children grow physically, but with their mental, emotional and social development, as well. www.uwindsor.ca/psychology

404

Predicting the Quality of Mother-Child Reminiscing Surrounding Negative Emotional Events at 42- and 48-Months  

PubMed Central

Researchers have speculated that a number of factors likely predict the quality of reminiscing between preschool children and their mothers. This study was designed to investigate three such factors, including child temperament, maternal personality, and maternal caregiving representations. 70 mothers and their preschool children were recruited for the study. When the child was 42 months of age, mothers completed measures of her personality and the child’s temperament. Mothers also took part in the shortened Parent Development Inventory that was coded for coherence, pleasure, comfort, and perspective taking. At both 42 and 48 months, the mother-child dyad reminisced about a past event in which the child experienced a negative emotion. These conversations were coded for the amount of maternal elaboration, the discussion of emotion, and dyadic qualities (such as collaboration and intersubjectivity). At 42 months, aspects of maternal personality and child temperament were most associated with reminiscing quality. However, at 48 months, it was primarily maternal representations of relationships that predicted high quality reminiscing in the dyad. PMID:23789023

Laible, Deborah; Panfile, Tia; Augustine, Mairin

2012-01-01

405

Is social anhedonia related to emotional responsivity and expressivity? A laboratory study in women.  

PubMed

Social anhedonia is an important feature of schizophrenia and it is a promising indicator of schizotypy. Although social anhedonia is defined as an affective construct (less pleasure derived from social encounters), little is known about the emotional responsivity and expressivity of individuals with high levels of social anhedonia. After screening a large sample of female undergraduate students (N = 1 085), a cohort of psychometrically identified individuals with high levels of social anhedonia (n = 34) and normally hedonic controls (n = 45) participated in laboratory assessments involving trait affectivity, self-reported dispositional emotional expressiveness, and the expression and experience of emotion in response to neutral, non-affiliative (i.e., comedy) and affiliative film clips. Results revealed that individuals with high levels of social anhedonia are characterized by lower positive affect, both as a trait and in response to emotionally evocative stimuli, and are less facially expressive, both by their own self-report and in response to film clips. Attenuated positive affect was observed across film stimuli, indicating a general reduction in affective response rather than a specific decrease in responsivity for affiliative stimuli. Future work should continue to investigate whether there is a unique role for social stimuli in the emotional lives of individuals with high levels of social anhedonia or whether these individuals tend to experience anhedonia more broadly regardless of social context. PMID:20620020

Leung, Winnie W; Couture, Shannon M; Blanchard, Jack J; Lin, Stephanie; Llerena, Katiah

2010-12-01

406

Information processing in everyday life: emotion-congruent bias in mothers' reports of parent-child interactions.  

PubMed

The authors examined the role of emotions in mothers' perceptions of the parent-child relationship. Ninety-nine mothers completed a measure of trait affect and then interacted with their preschool children under low- and high-stress conditions. After each interaction session, mothers rated their mood states and positive and negative aspects of parent-child behavior. To control for differences in the quality of dyadic interaction, observers also rated behavior. Across sessions, mood was a more robust predictor of mothers' perceptions than was trait affect. When trait effects did occur, they were mediated by mood states. Results suggest that when emotionally congruent information processing occurs in real-life situations, emotions generated by the interactions play a preeminent role in the immediate interpretation of the exchange. PMID:12088127

Weis, Robert; Lovejoy, M Christine

2002-07-01

407

Examining the roles of victim-perpetrator relationship and emotional closeness in judgments toward a depicted child sexual abuse case.  

PubMed

The current study investigated the impact that respondent gender, victim-perpetrator relationship, and the level of emotional closeness had on attributions in a hypothetical child sexual abuse case. A total of 160 university students read a hypothetical scenario depicting a female child sexually abused by an adult male. The perpetrator was either the victim's biological father or her stepfather, with this relationship described as being either emotionally close or emotionally distant. Respondents read one of four (2 victim-perpetrator relationship × 2 emotional closeness) scenarios before completing 26 attribution items pertaining to credibility, blame, and severity. Principle components analysis yielded five factors, namely victim credibility, mother culpability, perpetrator culpability, assault severity, and victim culpability. Multivariate analysis of covariance--controlling for respondent (Caucasian vs. non-Caucasian) ethnicity--revealed, as predicted, significant main effects for respondent gender, victim-perpetrator relationship, and emotional closeness. In general, females assigned more provictim/ antiperpetrator/antimother attributions than males. Results were also suggested that both victim-perpetrator relationship and emotional closeness influence attributions made toward the victim, perpetrator, and nonoffending mother. Methodological issues and suggestions for future work are also discussed. PMID:23027835

Davies, Michelle; Patel, Fehmida; Rogers, Paul

2013-03-01

408

The Effects of Social Comparison on Social Emotions and Behavior during Childhood: The Ontogeny of Envy and Schadenfreude Predicts Developmental Changes in Equity-Related Decisions  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Social comparison can elicit emotions such as envy, which can affect social interactions. The emergence and development of such social emotions through ontogeny, and their influence on social interaction, are unknown. We tested 182 children from 7 to 13 years of age with a novel monetary reward-and-punishment task measuring envy and Schadenfreude…

Steinbeis, Nikolaus; Singer, Tania

2013-01-01

409

Self-disclosure, emotional expression and intimacy within romantic relationships of people with social phobia.  

PubMed

The current study examined aspects of communication and intimacy between people with social phobia and their romantic partners. Forty-eight individuals with social phobia and 58 community controls completed a series of questionnaires to measure self-disclosure, emotional expression and levels of intimacy within their romantic relationships. Participants with social phobia reported less emotional expression, self-disclosure and intimacy than controls, even after controlling for a diagnosis of mood disorder. The group differences did not differ significantly by gender. A continuous measure of social anxiety also correlated significantly with the three relationship measures and these associations held for emotional expression and self-disclosure after controlling for levels of dysphoria. People with social phobia report reduced quality within their romantic relationships, which may have implications for impairment, social support and ultimately maintenance of the disorder. PMID:19665694

Sparrevohn, Roslyn M; Rapee, Ronald M

2009-12-01

410

The BarOn Model of Emotional-Social Intelligence (ESI)1  

Microsoft Academic Search

The present manuscript is an empirically based theoretical paper that presents, describes, and exami- nes the Bar-On Model of Emotional-Social Intelligence (ESI) in deep. First, a description of the Emo- tional Quotient Inventory (the EQ-i), which has played an instrumental role in developing the model, is given. The EQ-i is a self-report measure of emotionally and socially intelligent behaviour. It

Reuven Bar-On

2005-01-01

411

Social and Emotional Learning in the Kindergarten Classroom: Evaluation of the Strong Start Curriculum  

Microsoft Academic Search

There has been increasing interest in the promotion of social and emotional learning in schools, and research has shown positive\\u000a outcomes. However, relatively few studies have been conducted in kindergarten classrooms or considered the feasibility of\\u000a kindergarten implementation. This study examined the effects of Strong Start on the social and emotional competence of 67 kindergarten students, using a time-series design.

Thomas J. Kramer; Paul Caldarella; Lynnette Christensen; Ryan H. Shatzer

2010-01-01

412

Impact of parental catastrophizing and contextual threat on parents' emotional and behavioral responses to their child's pain.  

PubMed

Limited research has addressed processes underlying parents' empathic responses to their child's pain. The present study investigated the effects of parental catastrophizing, threatening information about the child's pain, and child pain expression upon parental emotional and behavioral responses to their child's pain. A total of 56 school children participated in a heat pain task consisting of 48 trials while being observed by 1 of their parents. Trials were preceded by a blue or yellow circle, signaling possible pain stimulation (i.e., pain signal) or no pain stimulation (i.e., safety signal). Parents received either neutral or threatening information regarding the heat stimulus. Parents' negative emotional responses when anticipating their child's pain were assessed using psychophysiological measures- i.e., fear-potentiated startle and corrugator EMG activity. Parental behavioral response to their child's pain (i.e., pain attending talk) was assessed during a 3-minute parent-child interaction that followed the pain task. The Child Facial Coding System (CFCS) was used to assess children's facial pain expression during the pain task. Results indicated that receiving threatening information was associated with a stronger parental corrugator EMG activity during pain signals in comparison with safety signals. The same pattern was found for parental fear-potentiated startle reflex, particularly when the child's facial pain expression was high. In addition, parents who reported high levels of catastrophizing thought about their child's pain engaged, in comparison with low-catastrophizing parents, in more pain-attending talk when they received threatening information. The findings are discussed in the context of affective-motivational theories of pain. PMID:22273548

Caes, Line; Vervoort, Tine; Trost, Zina; Goubert, Liesbet

2012-03-01

413

“Manufacturing” Failed Parenthood: An Unintended Consequence of Child Welfare Social Work under the Influence of Positivism  

Microsoft Academic Search

This article aims to examine the differences between the assumptions of social work and the assumptions of positivism. The article focuses on the influences of positivism on child welfare social work and the resulting unintended consequences. The alternative research methodologies that are more compatible with social work values are discussed. The background of this article is based on child welfare

Siu-ming Kwok; M. Y. Dora Tam

2002-01-01

414

Indicators of Social Well-Being and Elements of Child Welfare in Minnesota Rural Counties.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Analyzed the relationship between elements of child welfare and an index of social well-being in Minnesota counties. Found that all except two rural counties and only two urban counties had negative social well-being scores. Counties with low social well-being scores tended to have larger numbers of child welfare recipients. Findings suggest that…

Menanteau-Horta, Dario; Yigzaw, Michael

2002-01-01

415

Endogenous Testosterone Modulates Prefrontal–Amygdala Connectivity during Social Emotional Behavior  

PubMed Central

It is clear that the steroid hormone testosterone plays an important role in the regulation of social emotional behavior, but it remains unknown which neural circuits mediate these hormonal influences in humans. We investigated the modulatory effects of endogenous testosterone on the control of social emotional behavior by applying functional magnetic resonance imaging while healthy male participants performed a social approach–avoidance task. This task operationalized social emotional behavior by having participants approach and avoid emotional faces by pulling and pushing a joystick, respectively. Affect-congruent trials mapped the automatic tendency to approach happy faces and avoid angry faces. Affect-incongruent trials required participants to override those automatic action tendencies and select the opposite response (approach-angry, avoid-happy). The social emotional control required by affect-incongruent responses resulted in longer reaction times (RTs) and increased activity at the border of the ventrolateral prefrontal cortex and frontal pole (VLPFC/FP). We show that endogenous testosterone modulates these cerebral congruency effects through 2 mechanisms. First, participants with lower testosterone levels generate larger VLPFC/FP responses during affect-incongruent trials. Second, during the same trials, endogenous testosterone modulates the effective connectivity between the VLPFC/FP and the amygdala. These results indicate that endogenous testosterone influences local prefrontal activity and interregional connectivity supporting the control of social emotional behavior. PMID:21339377

Toni, Ivan; Verhagen, Lennart; Roelofs, Karin

2011-01-01

416

Unsupportive social interactions influence emotional eating behaviors. The role of coping styles as mediators.  

PubMed

Psychopathologies, such as depression, are frequently accompanied by poor coping strategies, including impaired social support resources. As well, unsupportive social interactions have been related to adverse health outcomes beyond any contribution of limited social support resources. There is reason to believe that increased eating associated with stressors represents a method of coping, albeit one that has negative consequences. The present investigation examined the relation between both unsupportive and supportive social interactions and emotional eating, and assessed whether this relationship was mediated by individual coping styles. Study 1 (N=221) indicated that unsupportive social interactions were associated with emotional eating, and with emotion- and avoidant-focused coping. Furthermore, multiple mediation analyses indicated that emotion-focused coping mediated the relation between unsupportive social interactions and emotional eating. Study 2 (N=169) replicated these findings, and also indicated that these effects were above and beyond those of social support and depressive symptomatology. Thus unsupportive social interactions may have implications for health outcomes and behaviors, beyond mood disorder symptomatology. The observed relations can be explained by theories of affect-regulation such as negative urgency and expectancy theory as well as on the basis of biological processes associated with eating and stress responses. PMID:23228905

Raspopow, Kate; Matheson, Kimberly; Abizaid, Alfonso; Anisman, Hymie

2013-03-01

417

Improving Socialization and Emotion Recognition for Autistic Children Using a Smartphone App  

E-print Network

the button that matches the emotion displayed. While the child is playing, the game will keep score of how to keep track of the score, the current picture, and the number of questions left in the quiz. After" message appeared. An incorrect answer also increased the missed variable by one. When the number

Gray, Jeffrey G.

418

Socialization of Emotion and Offspring Internalizing Symptoms in Mothers with Childhood-Onset Depression  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This study examines how mothers with and without a history of childhood-onset depression respond to their 3-9 year-old children's emotions. Mother-child dyads included 55 offspring of mothers with a history of childhood-onset depressive disorders and 57 offspring of never-depressed mothers. Mothers with a history of childhood depression were less…

Silk, Jennifer S.; Shaw, Daniel S.; Prout, Joanna T.; O'Rourke, Flannery; Lane, Tonya J.; Kovacs, Maria

2011-01-01

419

Social Structure Shapes Cultural Stereotypes and Emotions: A Causal Test of the Stereotype Content Model  

PubMed Central

The stereotype content model (SCM) posits that social structure predicts specific cultural stereotypes and associated emotional prejudices. No prior evidence at a societal level has manipulated both structural predictors and measured both stereotypes and prejudices. In the present study, participants (n = 120) responded to an immigration scenario depicting a high- or low-status group, competitive or not competitive, and rated their likely stereotype (on warmth and competence) and elicited emotional prejudices (admiration, contempt, envy, and pity). Seven of eight specific predictions are fully confirmed, supporting the SCM's predicted causality for social structural effects on cultural stereotypes and emotional prejudices. PMID:24285928

Caprariello, Peter A.; Cuddy, Amy J. C.; Fiske, Susan T.

2013-01-01

420

Parent-Child Discussions of Anger and Sadness: The Importance of Parent and Child Gender during Middle Childhood  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This chapter provides conceptual background and empirical evidence that parental emotion socialization continues well into middle childhood and is influenced by the social context. Data are presented to illustrate the influence of parent and child gender on parental socialization of emotion in 113 Caucasian, middle-class children. Mothers and…

Zeman, Janice; Perry-Parrish, Carisa; Cassano, Michael

2010-01-01

421

Social-emotional aspects of male escorting: experiences of men working for an agency.  

PubMed

Social situations and emotional correlates associated with male sex work have not been well documented. Most of the research in this area focuses on sexual activity with little mention of other aspects of the job. Yet, research with female sex workers finds significant social and emotional components to sex work. The current study focused on how male sex workers (MSWs) perceived and adapted to the social-emotional aspects of their job. As part of a larger project examining MSWs working for a single escort agency, 40 men (M age, 22.3 years, 75 % Caucasian) located in the mid-Atlantic U.S. participated in semi-structured interviews. The agency owner was also interviewed. Participants reported a range of social and emotional factors regarding sex work and employed a variety of strategies to provide good customer service and adapt to negative experiences. For most, social support was inhibited due to fear of stigmatization that might result if participants disclosed sex work to significant others outside the agency. Instead, interactions within the agency provided core work-related social support for most MSWs. Emotional and relational tasks inherent to escort work grew easier with experience and negativity about the job declined. Our data suggested that socially connected individuals seemed to be more satisfied with sex work. Social and emotional requirements represented a significant but unanticipated component of male sex work to which escorts actively adapted. Escorting may be similar to other service occupations in terms of the social-emotional situations and skills involved. PMID:25119388

Smith, Michael D; Grov, Christian; Seal, David W; Bernhardt, Nicholas; McCall, Peter

2015-05-01

422

Correlates of social and emotional loneliness in older people: evidence from an English community study  

PubMed Central

Objectives Loneliness is an important influence on quality of life in old age and has been conceptualised as consisting of two dimensions, social and emotional. This article describes analyses that sought to produce models of social and emotional loneliness in older people, using demographic, psychological and health, and social variables. Method Older people (aged 65+, n = 1255) from the Barnsley metropolitan area of the United Kingdom were recruited randomly from within a stratified sampling frame and received a questionnaire-based interview (response rate: 68.1%). The questionnaire contained items and scales on demographic, psychological and health, and social characteristics, and a validated measure of loneliness that assesses both social and emotional loneliness. Results Of the respondents, 7.7% were found to be severely or very severely lonely, while another 38.3% were moderately lonely. Social and emotional loneliness shared 19.36% variance. Being male, being widowed, low well-being, low self-esteem, low-income comfort, low contact with family, low contact with friends, low activity, low perceived community integration, and receipt of community care were significant predictors of social loneliness (R = 0.50, R2 = 0.25, F(18, 979) = 18.17, p < 0.001). Being widowed, low well-being, low self-esteem, high activity restriction, low-income comfort, and non-receipt of informal care were significant predictors of emotional loneliness (R = 0.55, R2 = 0.30, F(18, 973) = 23.00, p < 0.001). Conclusion This study provides further empirical support for the conceptual separation of emotional and social loneliness. Consequently, policy on loneliness in older people should be directed to developing a range of divergent intervention strategies if both emotional and social loneliness are to be reduced. PMID:24251626

Dahlberg, Lena; McKee, Kevin J.

2013-01-01

423

How do shared-representations and emotional processes cooperate in response to social threat signals?  

PubMed

Research in social cognition has mainly focused on the detection and comprehension of others' mental and emotional states. Doing so, past studies have adopted a "contemplative" view of the role of the observer engaged in a social interaction. However, the adaptive problem posed by the social environment is first and foremost that of coordination, which demands more of social cognition beyond mere detection and comprehension of others' hidden states. Offering a theoretical framework that takes into account the dynamical aspect of social interaction - notably by accounting for constant interplay between emotional appraisal and motor processes in socially engaged human brain - thus constitutes an important challenge for the field of social cognition. Here, we propose that our social environment can be seen as presenting opportunities for actions regarding others. Within such a framework, non-verbal social signals such as emotional displays are considered to have evolved to influence the observer in consistent ways. Consequently, social signals can modulate motor responses in observers. In line with this theoretical framework we provide evidence that emotional and motor processes are actually tightly linked during the perception of threat signals. This is ultimately reflected in the human brain by constant interplay between limbic and motor areas. PMID:24080262

Grèzes, Julie; Dezecache, Guillaume

2014-03-01

424

Predicting the Quality of Mother-Child Reminiscing Surrounding Negative Emotional Events at 42- and 48-Months.  

PubMed

Researchers have speculated that a number of factors likely predict the quality of reminiscing between preschool children and their mothers. This study was designed to investigate three such factors, including child temperament, maternal personality, and maternal caregiving representations. 70 mothers and their preschool children were recruited for the study. When the child was 42 months of age, mothers completed measures of her personality and the child's temperament. Mothers also took part in the shortened Parent Development Inventory that was coded for coherence, pleasure, comfort, and perspective taking. At both 42 and 48 months, the mother-child dyad reminisced about a past event in which the child experienced a negative emotion. These conversations were coded for the amount of maternal elaboration, the discussion of emotion, and dyadic qualities (such as collaboration and intersubjectivity). At 42 months, aspects of maternal personality and child temperament were most associated with reminiscing quality. However, at 48 months, it was primarily maternal representations of relationships that predicted high quality reminiscing in the dyad. PMID:23789023

Laible, Deborah; Panfile, Tia; Augustine, Mairin

2013-01-01

425

Challenges to practice and knowledge in child welfare social work: From the ‘social’ to the ‘informational’?  

Microsoft Academic Search

Recent years have witnessed the emergence of an important debate about whether and how far social work practice with children and families is being dominated by a relatively narrow and often legalistic focus on child protection, at the cost of the broader concern with ensuring the welfare of children. Family support is often the operative word used to address the

Nigel Parton

2009-01-01

426

Facial emotion recognition in children with high functioning autism and children with social phobia.  

PubMed

Recognizing facial affect is essential for effective social functioning. This study examines emotion recognition abilities in children aged 7-13 years with High Functioning Autism (HFA = 19), Social Phobia (SP = 17), or typical development (TD = 21). Findings indicate that all children identified certain emotions more quickly (e.g., happy < anger, disgust, sad < fear) and more accurately (happy) than other emotions (disgust). No evidence was found for negative interpretation biases in children with HFA or SP (i.e., all groups showed similar ability to discriminate neutral from non-neutral facial expressions). However, distinct between-group differences emerged when considering facial expression intensity. Specifically, children with HFA detected mild affective expressions less accurately than TD peers. Behavioral ratings of social effectiveness or social anxiety were uncorrelated with facial affect recognition abilities across children. Findings have implications for social skills treatment programs targeting youth with skill deficits. PMID:22528028

Wong, Nina; Beidel, Deborah C; Sarver, Dustin E; Sims, Valerie

2012-10-01

427

Social Learning Modulates the Lateralization of Emotional Valence  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Although neuropsychological studies of lateralization of emotion have emphasized valence (positive vs. negative) or type (basic vs. complex) dimensions, the interaction between the two dimensions has yet to be elucidated. The purpose of the current study was to test the hypothesis that recognition of basic emotions is processed preferentially by…

Shamay-Tsoory, Simone G.; Lavidor, Michal; Aharon-Peretz, Judith

2008-01-01

428

Teaching in Physical Education: Socialization, Play and Emotions  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Introduction: Emotions have not been regarded as very relevant in educational processes, despite early sociologists underlining the importance of feelings in education. The focus of this research is on the teaching of Physical Education at the Primary School level in Spain. Method: We reflect on the importance of emotions in education from the…

Molina, Fidel

2012-01-01

429

Social support, collective efficacy, and child physical abuse: does parent gender matter?  

PubMed

Social support and collective efficacy are related to child physical abuse. However, little is known about whether these relationships differ by gender, although mothers and fathers differ in the quantity and quality of time spent with children. This study examined whether the relationship between social support, collective efficacy, and physical abuse is stronger for mothers than fathers. Telephone interviews were conducted with parent respondents in 50 California cities (N = 3,023). Data were analyzed via overdispersed multi-level Poisson models. Results suggest that high levels of emotional support were inversely associated with physical abuse for women and men, although this effect was stronger for women. High levels of companionship support were positively associated with physical abuse for women; however, the opposite was true for men. There were no significant interactions between collective efficacy variables and gender. The relationships between some types of social support and physical abuse appear to vary for men and women suggesting possibilities for more targeted intervention. PMID:25520320

Price-Wolf, Jennifer

2015-05-01

430

Social and Emotional Learning as a Universal Level of Student Support: Evaluating the Follow-Up Effect of Strong Kids on Social and Emotional Outcomes  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The authors examined the initial and follow-up effect of Strong Kids, a social and emotional learning (SEL) curriculum, among a sample of 106 third- and fourth-grade students. Students were assigned to either the treatment or the wait-list condition and completed questionnaires on SEL knowledge and perceived use of SEL skills across 3 assessment…

Harlacher, Jason E.; Merrell, Kenneth W.

2010-01-01

431

Neural activity during emotion recognition after combined cognitive plus social-cognitive training in schizophrenia  

PubMed Central

Cognitive remediation training has been shown to improve both cognitive and social-cognitive deficits in people with schizophrenia, but the mechanisms that support this behavioral improvement are largely unknown. One hypothesis is that intensive behavioral training in cognition and/or social-cognition restores the underlying neural mechanisms that support targeted skills. However, there is little research on the neural effects of cognitive remediation training. This study investigated whether a 50 hour (10-week) remediation intervention which included both cognitive and social-cognitive training would influence neural function in regions that support social-cognition. Twenty-two stable, outpatient schizophrenia participants were randomized to a treatment condition consisting of auditory-based cognitive training (AT) [Brain Fitness Program/auditory module ~60 minutes/day] plus social-cognition training (SCT) which was focused on emotion recognition [~5–15 minutes per day] or a placebo condition of non-specific computer games (CG) for an equal amount of time. Pre and post intervention assessments included an fMRI task of positive and negative facial emotion recognition, and standard behavioral assessments of cognition, emotion processing, and functional outcome. There were no significant intervention-related improvements in general cognition or functional outcome. FMRI results showed the predicted group-by-time interaction. Specifically, in comparison to CG, AT+SCT participants had a greater pre-to-post intervention increase in postcentral gyrus activity during emotion recognition of both positive and negative emotions. Furthermore, among all participants, the increase in postcentral gyrus activity predicted behavioral improvement on a standardized test of emotion processing (MSCEIT: Perceiving Emotions). Results indicate that combined cognition and social-cognition training impacts neural mechanisms that support social-cognition skills. PMID:22695257

Hooker, Christine I.; Bruce, Lori; Fisher, Melissa; Verosky, Sara C.; Miyakawa, Asako; Vinogradov, Sophia

2012-01-01

432

Evaluation of an Innovative Social Work Education Model: The Kentucky Public Child Welfare Certification Program (PCWCP)  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This research evaluated the effectiveness of the Public Child Welfare Certification Program, a specialized child welfare program delivered in bachelor of social work (BSW) curricula across the state of Kentucky. This evaluation gathered data for 10 years on satisfaction with the program, preparation for work in the state's child welfare agency,…

Barbee, Anita; Sullivan, Dana; Borders, Kevin; Antle, Becky; Hall, J. Christopher; Fox, Steve; Moran, Erin Beth

2009-01-01

433

Fit for Purpose? Post-Qualifying Social Work Education in Child Protection in Scotland  

Microsoft Academic Search

Recommendations for post-qualifying training and education in child protection social work consistently form part of the political response to child abuse scandals. The influence of child abuse politics upon the push towards post-qualifying training and education has been consistent across the United Kingdom. Within Scotland educators have been quick to respond to the market demand for programme provision and there

Lynn Kelly; Sharon Jackson

2011-01-01

434

AlphaWolf: Social Learning, Emotion and Development in Autonomous Virtual Agents  

E-print Network

that captures a subset of the social behavior of wild wolves, involving models of learning, emotion interfaces that can interact more appropriately with humans by utilizing human social abilities. Our research by creating computational entities that are inspired by animals. Over the last several years, we have

Tomlinson, Bill

435

Emotions and Positional Identity in Becoming a Social Justice Science Teacher: Nicole's Story  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Becoming a social justice teacher, for high-poverty urban settings, is fraught with emotional ambivalence related to personal, professional, relational, political, and cultural social justice issues. Prospective teachers must navigate their sense of justice, grapple with issues of educational disparity, engage with theories of critical,…

Rivera Maulucci, Maria S.

2013-01-01

436

The Relationship between Emotion Recognition Ability and Social Skills in Young Children with Autism  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This study assessed the relationship between emotion recognition ability and social skills in 42 young children with autistic disorder aged 4-7 years. The analyses revealed that accuracy in recognition of sadness, but not happiness, anger or fear, was associated with higher ratings on the Vineland-II Socialization domain, above and beyond the…

Williams, Beth T.; Gray, Kylie M.

2013-01-01

437

Children's Theory of Mind: Understanding of Desire, Belief and Emotion with Social Referents  

Microsoft Academic Search

Preschoolers' understanding of belief, desire, and emotion was assessed in a new false belief task that explored children's mental state reasoning about social situations. The social analog task presented a change in a partner's play activity rather than a change in the location of a physical object. Two main differences from the usual pattern of theory of mind results were

Leanh Nguyen; Douglas Frye

1999-01-01

438

Victims of Their Own Cognitions: Implicit Social Cognitions, Emotional Distress, and Peer Victimization  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This study investigated the relation between victimization and victimization-related distress and implicit social-cognitive processing. Eighty-seven 9-13 year old children completed measures of victimization experience and social cognitive processing tasks, including the emotional Stroop task and the self-concept Implicit Association Test (IAT).…

Rosen, Paul J.; Milich, Richard; Harris, Monica J.

2007-01-01

439

Social and Emotional Aspects of Learning: Complementing, Compensating and Countering Parental Practices  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This article draws on a study which investigated the interpretation and use of Social and Emotional Aspects of Learning (SEAL) in primary schools in the UK (the authors gratefully acknowledge Studentship funding from the Economic and Social Research Council for this study). The paper focuses on school staff members' perceptions about the…

Wood, Peter; Warin, Jo

2014-01-01

440

A Meta-Analysis of Social Skill Interventions for Students with Emotional or Behavioral Disorders  

Microsoft Academic Search

Many programs designed for children and youth with emotional or behavioral disorders (EBD) include a social skill training component. Using quantitative methods of meta-analysis, the findings from 35 studies investigating the effects of social skill interventions for students with EBD were synthesized. The pooled mean effect size (ES) was 0.199, from which the average student with EBD would be expected

Mary Magee Quinn; Kenneth A. Kavale; Sarup R. Mathur; Robert B. Rutherford; Steven R. Forness

1999-01-01

441

Is There Evidence to Support the Use of Social Skills Interventions for Students with Emotional Disabilities?  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Scholars and practitioners advocate for the use of social skills interventions for students with emotional disabilities because significant social skills deficits are common among these students. Yet contemporary practices must be vetted for empirical evidence of their efficacy and effectiveness to ensure students are provided appropriate…

Sullivan, Amanda L.; Sadeh, Shanna S.

2014-01-01

442

Kurt Lewin's Influence on Social Emotional Climate Research in Germany and the United States.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Believing that an individual's development is strongly influenced by the way the person perceives his or her environment, Kurt Lewin had a strong influence on the theoretical foundations of social-emotional climate research. Lewin's theories may be compared with the following basic theoretical foundations of social climate research: symbolic…

Saldern, Matthias V.

443

Sensory Over-Responsivity in Elementary School: Prevalence and Social-Emotional Correlates  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Sensory over-responsivity (SOR) towards tactile and auditory input can impact children's participation in academic and social activities; however the prevalence of SOR behaviors and their relation to social-emotional problems and competence has not been rigorously studied. This study investigated SOR in a representative sample of elementary…

Ben-Sasson, A.; Carter, A. S.; Briggs-Gowan, M. J.

2009-01-01

444

Social Behavior, Emotion and Learning in a Pack of Virtual Wolves  

Microsoft Academic Search

We are creating a pack of virtual creatures who exhibit the kinds of social interactions found in a natural species of animal, the gray wolf (Canis lupus). To do this, we are extending our synthetic character building toolkit to enable our characters to learn to adapt pre-existing behaviors for use in novel social contexts; to have and express emotional states;

Bill Tomlinson; Bruce Blumberg

2001-01-01

445

Validation of the Emotion Regulation and Social Skills Questionnaire for Young People with Autism Spectrum Disorders  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The current study aims to evaluate the psychometric properties of the Emotion Regulation and Social Skills Questionnaire (ERSSQ), a rating scale designed specifically to assess the social skills of young people with Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD). The participants were 84 children and young adolescents with ASD, aged between 7.97 and 14.16 years…

Butterworth, Thomas W.; Hodge, M. Antoinette; Sofronoff, Kate; Beaumont, Renae; Gray, Kylie M.; Roberts, Jacqueline; Horstead, Siân K.; Clarke, Kristina S.; Howlin, Patricia; Taffe, John R.; Einfeld, Stewart L.

2014-01-01

446

Sociocultural Considerations in Social Skills Training Research with African American Students with Emotional or Behavioral Disorders  

Microsoft Academic Search

Students with emotional or behavioral disorders (EBD) often have been identified on the basis of their social competence deficits. The overrepresentation of African American students in special education programs for EBD has been recognized for decades. This suggests that African American students with EBD have been in urgent need of social skills training (SST) if they have not been misidentified.

Rosa E. Olmeda; James M. Kauffman

2003-01-01

447

Social Information Processing, Security of Attachment, and Emotion Regulation in Children with Learning Disabilities  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This study examined the contribution of attachment security and emotion regulation (ER) to the explanation of social information processing (SIP) in middle childhood boys with learning disabilities (LD) and without LD matched on age and grade level. Children analyzed four social vignettes using Dodge's SIP model and completed the Kerns security…

Bauminger, Nirit; Kimhi-Kind, Ilanit

2008-01-01

448

Social and Emotional Learning in the Kindergarten Classroom: Evaluation of the "Strong Start" Curriculum  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

There has been increasing interest in the promotion of social and emotional learning in schools, and research has shown positive outcomes. However, relatively few studies have been conducted in kindergarten classrooms or considered the feasibility of kindergarten implementation. This study examined the effects of "Strong Start" on the social and…

Kramer, Thomas J.; Caldarella, Paul; Christensen, Lynnette; Shatzer, Ryan H.

2010-01-01

449

Parent-Infant Synchrony and the Social-Emotional Development of Triplets  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

To study the social-emotional development of triplets, 23 sets of triplets, 23 sets of twins, and 23 singleton infants (N=138) were followed from birth to 2 years. Maternal depression and social support were assessed in the postpartum period, mother-infant and father-infant interaction and the home environment were observed at 3 months, a…

Feldman, Ruth; Eidelman, Arthur I.

2004-01-01

450

Social Behavior, Emotion and Learning in a Pack of Virtual Wolves  

E-print Network

the benefits of social behavior for use in computational systems. One species of animal that is renownedSocial Behavior, Emotion and Learning in a Pack of Virtual Wolves Bill Tomlinson and Bruce Blumberg Synthetic Characters Group, The Media Lab, MIT E15-320G, 20 Ames Street, Cambridge, MA 02139 USA {badger

Tomlinson, Bill

451

An android for enhancing social skills and emotion recognition in people with autism  

Microsoft Academic Search

It is well documented that the processing of social and emotional information is impaired in people with autism. Recent studies have shown that individuals, particularly those with high functioning autism, can learn to cope with common social situations if they are made to enact possible scenarios they may encounter in real life during therapy. The main aim of this work

Giovanni Pioggia; Roberta Igliozzi; Marcello Ferro; Arti Ahluwalia; Filippo Muratori; Danilo De Rossi

2005-01-01

452

Effects of mindfulness-based stress reduction (MBSR) on emotion regulation in social anxiety disorder.  

PubMed

Mindfulness-based stress reduction (MBSR) is an established program shown to reduce symptoms of stress, anxiety, and depression. MBSR is believed to alter emotional responding by modifying cognitive-affective processes. Given that social anxiety disorder (SAD) is characterized by emotional and attentional biases as well as distorted negative self-beliefs, we examined MBSR-related changes in the brain-behavior indices of emotional reactivity and regulation of negative self-beliefs in patients with SAD. Sixteen patients underwent functional MRI while reacting to negative self-beliefs and while regulating negative emotions using 2 types of attention deployment emotion regulation-breath-focused attention and distraction-focused attention. Post-MBSR, 14 patients completed neuroimaging assessments. Compared with baseline, MBSR completers showed improvement in anxiety and depression symptoms and self-esteem. During the breath-focused attention task (but not the distraction-focused attention task), they also showed (a) decreased negative emotion experience, (b) reduced amygdala activity, and (c) increased activity in brain regions implicated in attentional deployment. MBSR training in patients with SAD may reduce emotional reactivity while enhancing emotion regulation. These changes might facilitate reduction in SAD-related avoidance behaviors, clinical symptoms, and automatic emotional reactivity to negative self-beliefs in adults with SAD. PMID:20141305

Goldin, Philippe R; Gross, James J

2010-02-01

453

The effect of partner-directed emotion in social exchange decision-making  

PubMed Central

Despite the prevalence of studies examining economic decision-making as a purely rational phenomenon, common sense suggests that emotions affect our decision-making particularly in a social context. To explore the influence of emotions on economic decision-making, we manipulated opponent-directed emotions prior to engaging participants in two social exchange decision-making games (the Trust Game and the Prisoner's Dilemma). Participants played both games with three different (fictional) partners and their tendency to defect was measured. Prior to playing each game, participants exchanged handwritten “essays” with their partners, and subsequently exchanged evaluations of each essay. The essays and evaluations, read by the participant, were designed to induce either anger, sympathy, or a neutral emotional response toward the confederate with whom they would then play the social exchange games. Galvanic skin conductance level (SCL) showed enhanced physiological arousal during anger induction compared to both the neutral and sympathy conditions. In both social exchange games, participants were most likely to defect against their partner after anger induction and least likely to defect after sympathy induction, with the neutral condition eliciting intermediate defection rates. This pattern was found to be strongest in participants exhibiting low cognitive control (as measured by a Go/no-Go task). The findings indicate that emotions felt toward another individual alter how one chooses to interact with them, and that this influence depends both on the specific emotion induced and the cognitive control of the individual. PMID:23898313

Eimontaite, Iveta; Nicolle, Antoinette; Schindler, Igor; Goel, Vinod

2013-01-01

454

Relationships matter: the role for social-emotional learning in an interprofessional global health education.  

PubMed

As global health curricula and competencies are defined, the instructional foundation of practice-based learning and soft skills training requires reexamination. This paper explores the integration of social-emotional instruction into global health education, specifically highlighting its role in interprofessional learning environments. One method to teach the core competencies in the higher education context is through restorative practices. Restorative practices is a "social science that integrates developments from a variety of disciplines and fields in order to build healthy communities, increase social capital, decrease crime and antisocial behavior, repair harm and restore relationships." The restorative philosophy incorporates the core competencies of socio-emotional learning and views conflict as an opportunity for learning. The first part discusses the foundations of social-emotional learning (SEL). It then explores the applicability of SEL in interprofessional and global health education. PMID:25564709

Guerin, Toby Treem

2014-12-01

455

Social and Emotional Issues of Living with OI  

MedlinePLUS

... of their emotions, everyday activities, career choices and finances. Life with OI is uncertain when the next ... or 301-947-0083 Fax: 301-947-0456 Internet: www.oif.org E-mail: bonelink@oif.org ...

456

Social Cognition in Anorexia Nervosa: Evidence of Preserved Theory of Mind and Impaired Emotional Functioning  

PubMed Central

Background The findings of the few studies that have to date investigated the way in which individuals with Anorexia Nervosa (AN) navigate their social environment are somewhat contradictory. We undertook this study to shed new light on the social-cognitive profile of patients with AN, analysing Theory of Mind and emotional functioning. Starting from previous evidence on the role of the amygdala in the neurobiology of AN and in the social cognition, we hypothesise preserved Theory of Mind and impaired emotional functioning in patients with AN. Methodology Thirty women diagnosed with AN and thirty-two women matched for education and age were involved in the study. Theory of Mind and emotional functioning were assessed with a set of validated experimental tasks. A measure of perceived social support was also used to test the correlations between this dimension and the social-cognitive profile of AN patients. Principal Findings The performance of patients with AN is significantly worse than that of healthy controls on tasks assessing emotional functioning, whereas patients’ performance is comparable to that of healthy controls on the Theory of Mind task. Correlation analyses showed no relationship between scores on any of the social-cognition tasks and either age of onset or duration of illness. A correlation between social support and emotional functioning was found. This latter result seems to suggest a potential role of social support in the treatment and recovery of AN. Conclusions The pattern of results followed the experimental hypothesis. They may be useful to help us better understand the social-cognitive profile of patients with AN and to contribute to the development of effective interventions based on the ways in which patients with AN actually perceive their social environment. PMID:22952975

Adenzato, Mauro; Todisco, Patrizia; Ardito, Rita B.

2012-01-01

457

Attachment Security and Child's Empathy: The Mediating Role of Emotion Regulation  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The current study examined the influence of multiple factors on individual differences in empathy; namely, attachment, negative emotionality, and emotion regulation. A total of 63 mothers completed the Attachment Q-set and questionnaires about their children's empathy, negative emotionality, and emotion regulation when children were 3 years old.…

Panfile, Tia M.; Laible, Deborah J.

2012-01-01

458

Managing Emotion in a Maltreating Context: A Pilot Study Examining Child Neglect  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Objective: The primary goal of this pilot study was to examine emotion management skills (i.e., emotional understanding, emotion regulation) in children who had experienced neglect and a control group to determine the ways that neglect may interfere with children's emotional development. Method: Participants included children 6-12 years of age and…

Shipman, Kimberly; Edwards, Anna; Brown, Amy; Swisher, Lisa; Jennings, Ernestine

2005-01-01

459

Child Health-Related Quality of Life and Parental Social Capital in Greece: An Exploratory Study  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

In this paper, we examined dimensions of child health-related quality of life in Greece in relation to parental assessments of neighbourhood social capital and social support networks. For the analysis, two main measures were used: (1) child self-reported health-related quality of life in ten dimensions, as measured by the KIDSCREEN questionnaire;…

El-Dardiry, Giulia; Dimitrakaki, Christine; Tzavara, Chara; Ravens-Sieberer, Ulrike; Tountas, Yannis

2012-01-01

460

Do Collaborations with Schools of Social Work Make a Difference for the Field of Child Welfare?  

Microsoft Academic Search

Historically, the profession of social work has held a leadership role in the field of child welfare. Opportunities provided in a number of significant public policies allow schools of social work to be eligible to receive Title IV-E funding for professional development of child welfare workers. Today, hundreds of these partnerships throughout the country (Zlotnik, 1997) are spending millions of

Maria Scannapieco; Kelli Connell-Corrick

2003-01-01

461

Transactions between Child Social Wariness and Observed Structured Parenting: Evidence from a Prospective Adoption Study  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This investigation examined the mutual influences between structured parenting and child social wariness during toddlerhood using a longitudinal adoption design. The sample consisted of 361 adoption-linked families, each including an adopted child, adoptive parents, and a birth mother. Heightened social wariness in children at age 18 months…

Natsuaki, Misaki N.; Leve, Leslie D.; Harold, Gordon T.; Neiderhiser, Jenae M.; Shaw, Daniel S.; Ganiban, Jody; Scaramella, Laura V.; Reiss, David

2013-01-01

462

PROGRAMME SPECIFICATION Programme name MSc Advanced Practice in Health and Social Care (Child and  

E-print Network

PROGRAMME SPECIFICATION KEY FACTS Programme name MSc Advanced Practice in Health and Social Care (Child and Adolescent Mental Health) Award MSc School School of Health Sciences Department or equivalent The MSc Advanced Practice in Health and Social Care (Child and Adolescent Mental Health) is aimed at all

Weyde, Tillman

463

Grandparents' and social workers' experiences with the child welfare system: A case for mutual resources  

Microsoft Academic Search

The objective of this study was to explore the circumstances under which grandparents and child welfare workers have contact with each other, as well as factors that contribute to positive working relationships between them. Data were gathered from 63 grandparents whose grandchild was receiving service from a child welfare agency, as well as from 21 social workers. Grandparents and social

James W. Gladstone; Ralph A. Brown

2007-01-01

464

Teacher Support as a Buffer between Interparental Conflict and Child Social Skills  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This study, conducted in 2004, investigated the direct effect of interparental conflict (IPC) about child-raising issues on the social skills of middle-class US children who attended a suburban preschool and the buffering effect of teacher support (n = 170). Findings indicated that greater IPC was associated with poorer child social skills. The…

Spjeldnes, Solveig; Koeske, Gary; Sales, Esther

2010-01-01

465

Child Socialization among Native Americans: The Lakota (Sioux) in Cultural Context.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Child socialization research among American Indians must account for tribal differences, examining gender roles in a given tribal culture, and employing studies of enculturation and acculturation, life histories, and ethnographies. Child socialization in the Teton Sioux or Lakota tribe can be used to illustrate these research techniques. The…

Medicine, Beatrice

1985-01-01

466

Emotion Attribution to a Non-Humanoid Robot in Different Social Situations  

PubMed Central

In the last few years there was an increasing interest in building companion robots that interact in a socially acceptable way with humans. In order to interact in a meaningful way a robot has to convey intentionality and emotions of some sort in order to increase believability. We suggest that human-robot interaction should be considered as a specific form of inter-specific interaction and that human–animal interaction can provide a useful biological model for designing social robots. Dogs can provide a promising biological model since during the domestication process dogs were able to adapt to the human environment and to participate in complex social interactions. In this observational study we propose to design emotionally expressive behaviour of robots using the behaviour of dogs as inspiration and to test these dog-inspired robots with humans in inter-specific context. In two experiments (wizard-of-oz scenarios) we examined humans' ability to recognize two basic and a secondary emotion expressed by a robot. In Experiment 1 we provided our companion robot with two kinds of emotional behaviour (“happiness” and “fear”), and studied whether people attribute the appropriate emotion to the robot, and interact with it accordingly. In Experiment 2 we investigated whether participants tend to attribute guilty behaviour to a robot in a relevant context by examining whether relying on the robot's greeting behaviour human participants can detect if the robot transgressed a predetermined rule. Results of Experiment 1 showed that people readily attribute emotions to a social robot and interact with it in accordance with the expressed emotional behaviour. Results of Experiment 2 showed that people are able to recognize if the robot transgressed on the basis of its greeting behaviour. In summary, our findings showed that dog-inspired behaviour is a suitable medium for making people attribute emotional states to a non-humanoid robot. PMID:25551218

Lakatos, Gabriella; Gácsi, Márta; Konok, Veronika; Brúder, Ildikó; Bereczky, Boróka; Korondi, Péter; Miklósi, Ádám

2014-01-01

467

Emotions in social information processing and their relations with reactive and proactive aggression in referred aggressive boys  

Microsoft Academic Search

We studied emotional aspects of social information processing (SIP) and their spe- cific relations with reactive and proactive aggression in 54 boys ages 7 to 13 who had been referred for aggressive behavior problems and a comparison group. Partici- pants listened to vignettes concerning provocations by peers and answered questions concerning SIP, own and peer's emotions, and emotion regulation. Aggressive

Bram Orobio de Castro; Welmoet Merk; Willem Koops; Jan Veerman; Joop Bosch

2005-01-01

468

Fostering a social child with autism: a moment-by-moment sequential analysis of an early social engagement intervention.  

PubMed

Young children with autism often experience limited social motivation and responsiveness that restricts establishment of crucial social momentum. These characteristics can lead to decreased opportunities for parental engagement and the social learning associated with these moments. Early social interventions that capitalize on pre-existing interests may be able to re-establish this developmentally critical feedback loop, in which both child and parent social behaviors simultaneously increase and influence one another. This investigation examined the moment-by-moment, micro-transactional relationship between parent and child social behavior gains observed in an early intervention study. Time-window sequential analyses revealed the presence of clinically and statistically significant sequential associations between parent and child social behaviors during an embedded social interaction intervention, but not in a comparable motivational intervention that utilized highly preferred toys and objects. Specifically, the onset of parent eye contact, directed positive affect, or offer of a reinforcing incentive predicted the immediate occurrence of child eye contact and positive affect in the experimental social intervention condition. Additionally, child verbal initiations, positive affect, and eye contact immediately predicted the onset of parent positive affect during this social intervention paradigm. Theoretical implications for the social developmental trajectory of autism are discussed. PMID:24974256

Vernon, Ty W

2014-12-01

469

Predicting maternal parenting stress in middle childhood: the roles of child intellectual status, behaviour problems and social skills  

PubMed Central

Background Parents of children with intellectual disabilities (ID) typically report elevated levels of parenting stress, and child behaviour problems are a strong predictor of heightened parenting stress. Interestingly, few studies have examined child characteristics beyond behaviour problems that may also contribute to parenting stress. The present longitudinal study examined the contribution of child social skills to maternal parenting stress across middle childhood, as well as the direction of the relationship between child social skills and parenting stress. Method Families of children with ID (n = 74) or typical development (TD) (n = 115) participated over a 2-year period. Maternal parenting stress, child behaviour problems and child social skills were assessed at child ages six and eight. Results Child social skills accounted for unique variance in maternal parenting stress above and beyond child intellectual status and child behaviour problems. As the children matured, there was a significant interaction between child social skills and behaviour problems in predicting parenting stress. With respect to the direction of these effects, a cross-lagged panel analysis indicated that early parenting stress contributed to later social skills difficulties for children, but the path from children’s early social skills to later parenting stress was not supported, once child behaviour problems and intellectual status were accounted for. Conclusion When examining parenting stress, child social skills are an important variable to consider, especially in the context of child behaviour problems. Early parenting stress predicted child social skills difficulties over time, highlighting parenting stress as a key target for intervention. PMID:18513339

Neece, C.; Baker, B.

2009-01-01

470

Genetic and Environmental Influences on Socio-Emotional Behavior in Toddlers: An Initial Twin Study of the Infant-Toddler Social and Emotional Assessment  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Background: Relatively little is known about the genetic architecture of childhood behavioral disorders in very young children. Method: In this study, parents completed the Infant-Toddler Social and Emotional Assessment, a questionnaire that assesses symptoms of childhood disorders, as well as socio-emotional competencies, for 822 twin pairs…

Van Hulle, C. A.; Lemery-Chalfant, K.; Goldsmith, H. H.

2007-01-01

471

Behavioural and neural correlates of self-focused emotion regulation in social anxiety disorder  

PubMed Central

Background In healthy individuals, voluntary modification of self-relevance has proven effective in regulating subjective emotional experience as well as physiologic responses evoked by emotive stimuli. As social anxiety disorder (SAD) is characterized by both altered emotional and self-related processing, we tested if emotion regulation through self-focused reappraisal is effective in individuals with SAD. Methods While undergoing 3 T functional magnetic resonance imaging, individuals with SAD and matched healthy controls either passively viewed neutral and aversive pictures or actively increased or decreased their negative emotional experience through the modification of self-relevance or personal distance to aversive pictures. Participants rated all pictures with regard to the intensity of elicited emotions and self-relatedness. Results We included 21 individuals with SAD and 23 controls in our study. Individuals with SAD reported significantly stronger emotional intensity across conditions and showed a nonsignificant tendency to judge pictures as more self-related than controls. Compared with controls, individuals with SAD showed an overactivation in bilateral temporoparietal regions and in the posterior midcingulate cortex during the passive viewing of aversive compared with neutral pictures. During instructed emotion regulation, activation patterns normalized and no significant group differences were detected. Limitations As no positive pictures were presented, results might be limited to the regulation of negative emotion. Conclusion During passive viewing of aversive images, individuals with SAD showed evidence of neural hyperreactivity that may be interpreted as increased bodily self-consciousness and heightened perspective-taking. During voluntary increase and decrease of negative emotional intensity, group differences disappeared, suggesting self-focused reappraisal as a successful emotion regulation strategy for individuals with SAD. PMID:24690369

Gaebler, Michael; Daniels, Judith K.; Lamke, Jan-Peter; Fydrich, Thomas; Walter, Henrik

2014-01-01

472

Emotion differentiation as resilience against excessive alcohol use: an ecological momentary assessment in underage social drinkers.  

PubMed

Some people are adept at using discrete emotion categories (anxious, angry, sad) to capture their felt experience; other people merely communicate how good or bad they feel. We theorized that people who are better at describing their emotions might be less likely to self-medicate with alcohol. During a 3-week period, 106 underage social drinkers used handheld computers to self-monitor alcohol intake. From participants' reported experiences during random prompts, we created an individual difference measure of emotion differentiation. Results from a 30-day timeline follow-back revealed that people with intense negative emotions consumed less alcohol if they were better at describing emotions and less reliant on global descriptions. Results from ecological momentary assessment procedures revealed that people with intense negative emotions prior to drinking episodes consumed less alcohol if they were better at describing emotions. These findings provide support for a novel methodology and dimension for understanding the influence of emotions on substance-use patterns. PMID:20696854

Kashdan, Todd B; Ferssizidis, Patty; Collins, R Lorraine; Muraven, Mark

2010-09-01

473

Improving the Social Skills of Children and Youth with Emotional/Behavioral Disorders. Retrospective Series on Critical Issues in Emotional/Behavioral Disorders.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The nine readings in this monograph focus on ways to improve the social skills of students with emotional/behavioral disorders. The following readings are included: (1) "Analysis of Literature on Social Competence of Behaviorally Disordered Children and Youth" (Sarup R. Mathur and Robert B. Rutherford, Jr.); (2) "A Validation of Social Skills for…

Council for Children with Behavioral Disorders.

474

Social–Emotional Factors Affecting Achievement Outcomes Among Disadvantaged Students: Closing the Achievement Gap  

PubMed Central

Despite concentrated efforts at improving inferior academic outcomes among disadvantaged students, a substantial achievement gap between the test scores of these students and others remains (Jencks & Phillips, 1998; National Center for Education Statistics, 2000a, 2000b; Valencia & Suzuki, 2000). Existing research used ecological models to document social–emotional factors at multiple levels of influence that undermine academic performance. This article integrates ideas from various perspectives in a comprehensive and interdisciplinary model that will inform policy makers, administrators, and schools about the social–emotional factors that act as both risk and protective factors for disadvantaged students’ learning and opportunities for academic success. Four critical social–emotional components that influence achievement performance (academic and school attachment, teacher support, peer values, and mental health) are reviewed. PMID:23255834

Becker, Bronwyn E.; Luthar, Suniya S.

2012-01-01

475

Social Structure-Personality: What is the relationship between social class and child-rearing values?  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This exercise was developed for use in an introductory sociology course. The exercise was presented as part of a unit to better understand the relationship between social class and child-rearing values. Students will analyze the relationship between two variables and fill out a table, and answer optional questions to assess their critical thinking skills. This activity uses the charts, rankings and maps on http://www.gss.norc.org/. The General Social Survey is an easy-to-use tool to investigate U.S. trends using census data.

Jeffrey Lashbrook

476

Social and emotional information processing in preschoolers: Indicator of early school success?  

PubMed

To better connect emotional development and social cognition literatures, the intersection of preschoolers' emotion and behaviour response choices to hypothetical peer conflicts was examined among 305 4 ½-year-olds in private childcare and Head Start. Latent class analyses identified five subgroups of children with connections between their emotion and behaviour response choices (Happy/Passive, Sad/Socially Competent, Angry/Passive, Angry/Aggressive, Sad/Passive). Subgroup membership differed across gender and economic risk status, and was also a predictor of early school success (i.e., social competence, classroom adjustment, and academic readiness). Overall, even after accounting for the associations between known predictors of young children's behaviour and school success (i.e., gender and SES), membership in the subgroups at preschool was uniquely predictive of both concurrent and later social competence, classroom adjustment, and academic readiness. Further, preschool social competence partially mediated contributions of subgroup membership on kindergarten classroom adjustment. These findings are discussed in relation to existing social information processing and emotional development literatures, including potential implications for understanding young children's early school success. PMID:23687402

Denham, Susanne A; Kalb, Sara; Way, Erin; Warren-Khot, Heather; Rhoades, Brittany L; Bassett, Hideko H

2013-01-01

477

Sex Differences in Facial, Prosodic, and Social Context Emotional Recognition in Early-Onset Schizophrenia  

PubMed Central

The purpose of the present study was to determine sex differences in facial, prosodic, and social context emotional recognition in schizophrenia (SCH). Thirty-eight patients (SCH, 20 females) and 38 healthy controls (CON, 20 females) participated in the study. Clinical scales (BPRS and PANSS) and an Affective States Scale were applied, as well as tasks to evaluate facial, prosodic, and within a social context emotional recognition. SCH showed lower accuracy and longer response times than CON, but no significant sex differences were observed in either facial or prosody recognition. In social context emotions, however, females showed higher empathy than males with respect to happiness in both groups. SCH reported being more identified with sad films than CON and females more with fear than males. The results of this study confirm the deficits of emotional recognition in male and female patients with schizophrenia compared to healthy subjects. Sex differences were detected in relation to social context emotions and facial and prosodic recognition depending on age. PMID:22970365

Ramos-Loyo, Julieta; Mora-Reynoso, Leonor; Sánchez-Loyo, Luis Miguel; Medina-Hernández, Virginia

2012-01-01

478

The Impact of Child-Centered Group Play Therapy on Social Skills Development of Kindergarten Children  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The development of social adjustment during elementary school is of critical importance because early socialization skills are an important predictor of both future social and emotional functioning. However, an examination of current literature reveals there is limited research utilizing sound research methodology and evaluation protocols for…

Kascsak, Theresa Marie

2012-01-01

479

Conceptualizing Emotions Along the Dimensions of Valence, Arousal, and Communicative Frequency – Implications for Social-Cognitive Tests and Training Tools  

PubMed Central

Background and Objectives: Emotion words are mostly characterized along the classic dimensions of arousal and valence. In the current study we sought to complement this characterization by investigating the frequency of emotions in human everyday communication, which may be crucial information for designing new diagnostic or intervention tools to test and improve emotion recognition. Methods: One hundred healthy German individuals were asked to indicate the valence and arousal of 62 emotion words in a questionnaire. Importantly, participants were additionally asked to indicate the frequency with which they experience each emotion themselves and observe it in others. Results: Positive emotions were judged to occur more often than negative emotions in everyday life. The more negatively valenced emotions were rated to be observed more often in others than experienced in one-self. On the other hand more positively valenced emotions were experienced more often in one-self than they were observed in others. Finally, increasing age was associated with a decrease in the frequency of observing an emotion in other people. Limitations: Future studies with larger sample sizes are needed to ascertain if the findings also apply to other cultural and language contexts. Conclusion: These results imply a greater frequency of positive emotions than negative emotions in everyday communication. The finding of such a bias toward positive emotions can guide the selection of emotion words for implementation in socio-emotional intervention tools. Such a selection may represent an effective means for improving social-cognitive functioning in people with respective impairments. PMID:22022317

Hepach, Robert; Kliemann, Dorit; Grüneisen, Sebastian; Heekeren, Hauke R.; Dziobek, Isabel

2011-01-01

480

Cognitive, social, and physiological determinants of emotional state  

Microsoft Academic Search

It is suggested that emotional states may be considered a function of a state of physiological arousal and of a cognition appropriate to this state of arousal. From this follows these propositions: (a) Given a state of physiological arousal for which an individual has no immediate explanation, he will label this state and describe his feelings in terms of the

Stanley Schachter; Jerome Singer

1962-01-01

481

Predicting Postpartum Changes in Emotion and Behavior via Social Media  

E-print Network

of postpartum depression, an underreported health concern among large populations, and to inform the design wellness postpartum. Author Keywords behavioral health; childbirth; depression; emotion; health; language , between 12 and 20 percent of new mothers report postpartum depression (a 13% incidence rate in a meta

Horvitz, Eric

482

Social disorganization and the profile of child welfare: Explaining child welfare activity by the community-level factors.  

PubMed

This article addresses the question of the structure of local child welfare activities in light of community-level factors. It poses the following research questions: how are different community-level factors related to child welfare client structures in communities and what is the extent to which these factors explain structural differences? The applied theoretical framework is based on social disorganization and strain theories as well as human developmental approach. The data has been collected from two Finnish national databases and it consists of variables containing 257 Finnish municipalities. The method of analysis is multinomial logistic regression. The results suggest that the local child welfare structures are tied to social disorganization, policing and culture as well as to the intensity of control in the communities. In general, the more fragile the communal structures, the more last-resort child welfare there is in the community. Combining fragile communal structures with weak dependency ratio and high proportion of social workers, the more intense the level of child welfare statistics indicated. The results indicate that the theoretical framework for the application of child welfare activity analysis is justified, but they also suggest that it requires further development through both context-bound reflection and application. PMID:25082431

Harrikari, Timo

2014-10-01

483

Social and Emotional Learning as a Universal Level of Student Support: Evaluating the Follow-up Effect of Strong Kids on Social and Emotional Outcomes  

Microsoft Academic Search

The authors examined the initial and follow-up effect of Strong Kids, a social and emotional learning (SEL) curriculum, among a sample of 106 third- and fourth-grade students. Students were assigned to either the treatment or the wait-list condition and completed questionnaires on SEL knowledge and perceived use of SEL skills across 3 assessment periods (pretest, posttest, and follow-up). The classroom

Jason E. Harlacher; Kenneth W. Merrell

2010-01-01

484

Attachment to Parents, Social Competence, and Emotional Well-Being: A Comparison of Black and White Late Adolescents  

Microsoft Academic Search

The model tested in this study proposed that the association of parental attachment bonds to emotional adjustment would be mediated by social competence. Relational variables were expected to be more important in the development of social competence and emotional adjustment for Black students than for White students; there were no directional hypotheses for gender differences. Single-group analyses and multiple-group comparisons

Kenneth G. Rice; Teddi J. Cunningham; Mitchell B. Young

1997-01-01

485

Effects of Teacher Efficacy on Student Academic and Social Emotional Achievements as Reported on Georgia Kindergarten Inventory of Developing Skills  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Students in kindergarten are not meeting state standards on standardized academic and social/emotional scores in the southeastern United States. The focus of this study was to determine if a teacher's perceptions of self-efficacy affects student success in academic and social/emotional standards as reported on the Georgia Kindergarten of…

Brown, Tisha J.

2012-01-01

486

The Effects of a Social-Emotional Learning Program on Elementary School Children: The Role of Pupils' Characteristics  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This quasi-experimental exploratory study investigated whether a social-emotional learning program, implemented during a 1-year period, could lead to gains in social-emotional competencies and a reduction in internalizing and externalizing problems. Furthermore, it showed which pupils would benefit most from the program. The program was applied to…

Raimundo, Raquel; Marques-Pinto, Alexandra; Lima, Maria Luisa

2013-01-01

487

Regional Cerebral Development at Term Relates to School-Age Social-Emotional Development in Very Preterm Children  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Objective: Preterm children are at risk for social-emotional difficulties, including autism and attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder. We assessed the relationship of regional brain development in preterm children, evaluated via magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) at term-equivalent postmenstrual age (TEA), to later social-emotional difficulties.…

Rogers, Cynthia E.; Anderson, Peter J.; Thompson, Deanne K.; Kidokoro, Hiroyuki; Wallendorf, Michael; Treyvaud, Karli; Roberts, Gehan; Doyle, Lex W.; Neil, Jeffrey J.; Inder, Terrie E.

2012-01-01

488

Screening Accuracy for Risk of Autism Spectrum Disorder Using the Brief Infant-Toddler Social and Emotional Assessment (BITSEA)  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Early identification of autism spectrum disorders (ASDs) is facilitated by the use of standardized screening scales that assess the social emotional behaviors associated with ASD. Authors examined accuracy of Brief Infant-Toddler Social and Emotional Assessment (BITSEA) subscales in detecting Modified Checklist for Autism in Toddlers (M-CHAT) risk…

Gardner, Lauren M.; Murphy, Laura; Campbell, Jonathan M.; Tylavsky, Frances; Palmer, Frederick B.; Graff, J. Carolyn

2013-01-01

489

The Center on the Social and Emotional Foundations for Early Learning: Addressing Challenging Behavior in Infants and Toddlers  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The Center on the Social and Emotional Foundations for Early Learning (CSEFEL) is a federally funded national resource center designed to support early care and education providers address the social-emotional needs of children birth through age 5 years. Recent research has found that an extraordinarily high number of young children are being…

Hunter, Amy; Hemmeter, Mary Louise

2009-01-01

490

Social, Emotional, Ethical, and Academic Education: Creating a Climate for Learning, Participation in Democracy, and Well-Being  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

In this article, Jonathan Cohen argues that the goals of education need to be reframed to prioritize not only academic learning, but also social, emotional, and ethical competencies. Surveying the current state of research in the fields of social-emotional education, character education, and school-based mental health in the United States, Cohen…

Cohen, Jonathan

2006-01-01

491

Making the Most Out of School-Based Prevention: Lessons from the Social and Emotional Aspects of Learning (SEAL) Programme  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This paper considers the role played by universal, school-based social and emotional learning (SEL) programmes in addressing the mental health needs of children and young people. Theory and research in the field are discussed. Particular attention is paid to the social and emotional aspects of learning (SEAL) programme in England, a flagship…

Humphrey, Neil; Lendrum, Ann; Wigelsworth, Michael

2013-01-01

492

Teacher Beliefs and Practices Relating to Development in Preschool: Importance Placed on Social-Emotional Behaviours and Skills  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Preschool teachers' beliefs relating to the importance of social-emotional competence and teacher practices that support children's competence were investigated through surveys and focus groups. Survey results indicated that Head Start and public school pre-K teachers placed higher importance on social-emotional behaviours and skills…

Hollingsworth, Heidi L.; Winter, Marna K.

2013-01-01

493

Does Self-Reported Bullying and Victimization Relate to Social, Emotional Problems in Adolescents with and without Criminal History  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This research was conducted to explore predictors and moderators of bullying involvement, social and emotional problems, vocabulary knowledge, and crimes. There was one main research question: (1) Is there a the relationship between adolescents with social and emotional problems as measured by the SDQ (Goodman, 1997) and adolescents'…

Zach-Vanhorn, Sara M.

2013-01-01

494

A Critical Review of Five Commonly Used Social-Emotional and Behavioral Screeners for Elementary or Secondary Schools  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The goal of this paper was to critically review and evaluate five common social-emotional and behavioral screeners: Behavioral and Emotional Screening System (Kamphaus and Reynolds 2007), Behavior Intervention Monitoring Assessment System (McDougal et al. 2011), Social Skills Improvement System Performance Screening Guide (Elliott and Gresham…

Jenkins, Lyndsay N.; Demaray, Michelle K.; Wren, Nicole Smit; Secord, Stephanie M.; Lyell, Kelly M.; Magers, Amy M.; Setmeyer, Andrea J.; Rodelo, Carlota; Newcomb-McNeal, Ericka; Tennant, Jaclyn

2014-01-01

495

Promoting Social-Emotional Learning in Adolescent Latino ELLs: A Study of the Culturally Adapted "Strong Teens" Program  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The current study evaluated the effects of the culturally adapted "Jóvenes Fuertes" ("Strong Teens") Social-Emotional Learning (SEL) program on the social-emotional outcomes of Latino English language learners (ELLs). A quasi-experimental design with random assignment by classrooms was used to assess the intervention's…

Castro-Olivo, Sara M.

2014-01-01

496

Hispanic Preschoolers' School Readiness: A Study Examining the Impact of Cultural, Social-Emotional, and Sociodemographic Factors  

E-print Network

................................................................................... 70 Predictors of School Readiness and Social-Emotional Competence .. 71 Sociodemographic Variables ..................................................... 73 Socioeconomic Status (SES) or Income... cultural and sociodemographic factors. The study examined the impact of socioeconomic factors, cultural factors, and social-emotional competence on school readiness. Family size, income, single parent, working caregiver, and caregiver highest level...

Avila Brizuela, Leonor

2012-02-14

497

The Role of Classroom-Level Child Behavior Problems in Predicting Preschool Teacher Stress and Classroom Emotional Climate  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Research Findings: Despite the abundance of research suggesting that preschool classroom quality influences children's social-emotional development, the equally important and related question of how characteristics of children enrolled in a classroom influence classroom quality has rarely been addressed. The current article focuses on this…

Friedman-Krauss, Allison Hope; Raver, C. Cybele; Morris, Pamela A.; Jones, Stephanie M.

2014-01-01

498

Child Physical and Sexual Abuse in a Community Sample of Young Adults: Results from the Ontario Child Health Study  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Objectives: Exposure to child maltreatment is associated with physical, emotional, and social impairment, yet in Canada there is a paucity of community-based information about the extent of this problem and its determinants. We examined the prevalence of child physical and sexual abuse and the associations of child abuse with early contextual,…

MacMillan, Harriet L.; Tanaka, Masako; Duku, Eric; Vaillancourt, Tracy; Boyle, Michael H.

2013-01-01

499

Working with "Social and Emotional Aspects of Learning" (SEAL): Associations with School Ethos, Pupil Social Experiences, Attendance, and Attainment  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

A programme of resources and activities relating to "Social and Emotional Aspects of Learning" (SEAL) has been rolled out nationally to primary and secondary schools in the UK, but we know little about how variations in the implementation of this work relate to key indicators of school success. In the present study, a team of experienced…

Banerjee, Robin; Weare, Katherine; Farr, William

2014-01-01

500

Impaired emotional empathy and related social network deficits in cocaine users.  

PubMed

Chronic cocaine users consistently display neurochemical and functional alterations in brain areas involved in social cognition (e.g. medial and orbitofrontal cortex). Although social functioning plays a crucial role in the development and treatment of drug dependence, studies investigating social cognition in cocaine users are lacking. Therefore, we investigated mental perspective taking ('theory of mind') and emotional and cognitive empathy in recreational (RCU) and dependent (DCU) cocaine users. Furthermore, we related these measures to real-life indicators of social functioning. One-hundred cocaine users (69 RCU, 31 DCU) and 68 stimulant-naïve healthy controls were tested with the Multifaceted Empathy Test (MET), Movie for the Assessment of Social Cognition (MASC) and Reading the Mind in the Eyes Test (RMET). The Social Network Questionnaire was conducted to assess social network size. Furthermore, participants provided information on committed criminal offenses. RCU and DCU showed less emotional empathy compared to controls (MET), whereas cognitive empathy was not impaired (MET, RMET). Additionally, DCU made more errors in mental perspective taking (MASC). Notably, cocaine users committed more criminal offenses and displayed a smaller social network and higher cocaine use was correlated with less social contacts. Diminished mental perspective taking was tentatively correlated with more intense cocaine use as well. Finally, younger age of onset of cocaine use was associated with more pronounced empathy impairment. In conclusion, social cognition impairments in cocaine users were related to real-life social functioning and should therefore be considered in therapy and prevention strategies. PMID:23800218

Preller, Katrin H; Hulka, Lea M; Vonmoos, Matthias; Jenni, Daniela; Baumgartner, Markus R; Seifritz, Erich; Dziobek, Isabel; Quednow, Boris B

2014-05-01