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1

Mothers' Socialization Goals, Mothers' Emotion Socialization Behaviors, Child Emotion Regulation, and Child Socioemotional Functioning in Urban India  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Studies examining the link between parental socialization and child functioning in varying cultural contexts are scarce. Focusing on early adolescents in suburban middle-class families in India, the present study examined interrelations among reports of mothers' socialization goals, socialization behaviors in response to child emotion, child

Raval, Vaishali V.; Raval, Pratiksha H.; Deo, Neeraj

2014-01-01

2

Spanish-Speaking Parent-Child Emotional Narratives and Children's Social Skills  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

We examined whether parents' content and style when discussing past positive and negative emotional experiences with their children were concurrently and predictively linked to prekindergarteners' social skills. Sixty-five low-income Spanish-speaking parent-child dyads discussed a past positive and negative emotional experience at the…

Leyva, Diana; Berrocal, Monica; Nolivos, Virginia

2014-01-01

3

Parents Interacting with Infants: Strengthening Parent-Child Relationships to Support Social and Emotional Development  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

One of the findings from the ZERO TO THREE "Parenting Infants and Toddlers Today" (Hart Research Associates, 2009) parent survey was that while the majority of parents understood ways of promoting their child's development, their understanding of the milestones related to social and emotional development was less consistent. This is an important…

Yates, Tweety

2011-01-01

4

Optimal Developmental Outcomes for the Child Aged Six to Twelve: Social, Moral, Cognitive, and Emotional Dimensions.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Discusses Montessori theories for development of social, moral, cognitive, and emotional dimensions of the human personality during the second plane of development--age six to puberty--as these theories relate to the theory of optimal experience. (JPB)

Baker, Kay

2001-01-01

5

Parental Socialization of Emotion  

PubMed Central

Recently, there has been a resurgence of research on emotion, including the socialization of emotion. In this article, a heuristic model of factors contributing to the socialization of emotion is presented. Then literature relevant to the socialization of children’s emotion and emotion-related behavior by parents is reviewed, including (a) parental reactions to children’s emotions, (b) socializers’ discussion of emotion, and (c) socializers’ expression of emotion. The relevant literature is not conclusive and most of the research is correlational. However, the existing body of data provides initial support for the view that parental socialization practices have effects on children’s emotional and social competence and that the socialization process is bidirectional. In particular, parental negative emotionality and negative reactions to children’s expression of emotion are associated with children’s negative emotionality and low social competence. In addition, possible moderators of effects such as level of emotional arousal are discussed. PMID:16865170

Cumberland, Amanda; Spinrad, Tracy L.

2006-01-01

6

Child refugees, trauma and education: interactionist considerations on social and emotional needs and development  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper focuses on the social and emotional needs of children and young people who are refugees. It was inspired by casework undertaken by the author involving a 13?year?old boy who was a refugee from Montenegro. A vignette of the case is presented in addition to a review of relevant literature to illustrate and discuss the various sources of trauma

Robert Hart

2009-01-01

7

Can parent training for parents with high levels of expressed emotion have a positive effect on their child's social anxiety improvement?  

PubMed

The role that parents' involvement may play in improving their child's social anxiety is still under debate. This paper aimed to investigate whether training parents with high expressed emotion (EE) could improve outcomes for adolescent social anxiety intervention. Fifty-two socially anxious adolescents (aged 13-18 years), whose parents exhibited high levels of expressed emotion, were assigned to either (a) a school-based intervention with an added parent training component, or (b) a school-based program focused solely on intervening with the adolescent (no parental involvement). Post-treatment and 12-month follow-up findings showed that school-based intervention with parent training was superior to the adolescent-specific program, yielding significant reductions in diagnosis remission, social and depressive symptomatology, particularly when the EE status of parents changed. Overall, the findings suggest that high-EE parents of children with social anxiety need to be involved in their child's therapy. PMID:25265549

Garcia-Lopez, Luis Joaquín; Díaz-Castela, Maria Del Mar; Muela-Martinez, Jose Antonio; Espinosa-Fernandez, Lourdes

2014-12-01

8

Emotional Support Consistency and Teacher-Child Relationships Forecast Social Competence and Problem Behaviors in Prekindergarten and Kindergarten  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Teachers' ratings of conflict and closeness as well as observed emotional support are known predictors of children's social functioning. Consistency in emotional support represents an emerging line of research. The goal of the present study is to understand whether the relation between the consistency of teachers' emotional support…

Brock, Laura L.; Curby, Timothy W.

2014-01-01

9

Mother-Child Affect and Emotion Socialization Processes across the Late Preschool Period: Predictions of Emerging Behaviour Problems  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The current study examined concurrent and longitudinal relations between maternal negative affective behaviour and child negative emotional expression in preschool age children with (n=96) or without (n=126) an early developmental risk, as well as the predictions of later behaviour problems. Maternal negative affective behaviour, child

Newland, Rebecca P.; Crnic, Keith A.

2011-01-01

10

Maternal Emotion Socialization in Maltreating and Non-Maltreating Families: Implications for Children's Emotion Regulation  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This study investigated the socialization of children's emotion regulation in physically maltreating and non-maltreating mother-child dyads (N = 80 dyads). Mother-child dyads participated in the parent-child emotion interaction task (Shipman & Zeman, 1999) in which they talked about emotionally-arousing situations. The PCEIT was coded for maternal…

Shipman, Kimberly L.; Schneider, Renee; Fitzgerald, Monica M.; Sims, Chandler; Swisher, Lisa; Edwards, Anna

2007-01-01

11

Emotion, Social Function, and Psychopathology  

Microsoft Academic Search

The studies of emotion function and emotional disorders complement one another. In this article, the authors outline relations between the social functions of emotion and four psychological disorders. The authors first present a social-functional account of emotion and argue that emotions help coordinate social interactions through their informative, evocative, and incentive functions. They then review evidence concerning the emotional and

Dacher Keltner; Ann M. Kring

1998-01-01

12

Social and Emotional Outcomes of Child Sexual Abuse: A Clinical Sample in Turkey  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Childhood sexual abuse is a traumatic life event that may cause psychiatric disorders such as posttraumatic stress disorder and depression. During 2003-2004, 20 sexually abused children were referred to the Child and Adolescent Psychiatry Clinic of Ege University in Izmir, Turkey. Two years later, the psychological adjustment of these children (M…

Ozbaran, Burcu; Erermis, Serpil; Bukusoglu, Nagehan; Bildik, Tezan; Tamar, Muge; Ercan, Eyyup Sabri; Aydin, Cahide; Cetin, Saniye Korkmaz

2009-01-01

13

Chronic malnutrition and child behavior: Effects of early caloric supplementation on social and emotional functioning at school age  

Microsoft Academic Search

138 chronically malnourished Ss (aged 6–8 yrs) were observed in social interactions in 6-S groups and administered a battery of cognitive tests, including the Bender-Gestalt. Independent variables were measures of maternal caloric supplementation (CAS) during pregnancy, and child CAS from birth to 2 yrs, and from age 2 to 4. High CAS from birth to 2 yrs predicted high levels

David E. Barrett; Marian Radke-Yarrow; Robert E. Klein

1982-01-01

14

Social functionality of human emotion.  

PubMed

Answers to the question "What are human emotions for?" have stimulated highly productive programs of research on emotional phenomena in psychology and neuroscience in the past decade. Although a variety of functions have been proposed and examined at different levels of abstraction, what is undeniable is that when emotional processing is compromised, most things social go awry. In this review we survey the research findings documenting the functions of emotion and link these to new discoveries about how emotion is accurately processed and transmitted. We focus specifically on emotion processing in dyads and groups, which reflects the current scientific trend. Within dyads, emotional expressions and learning and understanding through vicarious emotion are the phenomena of interest. Behavioral and brain mechanisms supporting their successful occurrence are evaluated. At the group level, group emotions and group-based emotions, two very different phenomena, are discussed, and mechanistic accounts are reviewed. PMID:22017377

Niedenthal, Paula M; Brauer, Markus

2012-01-01

15

Social transgressions, social perspectives, and social emotionality  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper reports two studies on the interrelations involving social transgressions, the perspectives from which the actor who commits such a transgression is evaluated, and the extent and quality of the emotionality experienced by the actor. The first experiment examined subjects' perceptions of vignettes depicting transgressions that were either low or relatively high in apparent intent. The phrasing of the

A. S. R. Manstead; G. R. Semin

1981-01-01

16

Measuring Emotion Socialization in Schools  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Background: Understanding how school personnel can best support students' development of communication skills around feelings is critical to long-term health outcomes. The measurement of emotion socialization in schools facilitates future research in this area; we review existing measures of emotion socialization to assess their applicability…

Horner, Christy G.; Wallace, Tanner L.

2013-01-01

17

Emotion socialization in formerly homeless families.  

E-print Network

??Emotional competence in children is increasingly understood as an outcome of parents? adaptive socialization behaviors. Parent?s socialization of children?s emotions and children?s emotion competence were… (more)

Davis, Karen Laurel

2012-01-01

18

Emotion Socialization in Families of Children with an Anxiety Disorder  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Compared emotion socialization in 26 children with anxiety disorders ages 8-12 years and their mothers to 26 nonclinical counterparts without psychopathology. Children and their mothers participated in an emotion interaction task in which they discussed occasions when the child felt worry, sadness, and anger. Responses were coded for length of…

Suveg, Cynthia; Zeman, Janice; Flannery-Schroeder, Ellen; Cassano, Michael

2005-01-01

19

Parental Reactions to Toddlers' Negative Emotions and Child Negative Emotionality as Correlates of Problem Behavior at the Age of Three  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Parent-reported reactions to children's negative emotions and child negative emotionality were investigated as correlates of internalizing and externalizing behaviors. Children (N = 107) and their parents participated in a short-term longitudinal study of social development. Mothers and fathers independently completed questionnaires assessing…

Engle, Jennifer M.; McElwain, Nancy L.

2011-01-01

20

Emotional Intelligence and Social Perception   

E-print Network

The present study had the chief aim of validating the new Social Perception Test (SPT) as a veridically scored, pragmatic measure of Emotional Intelligence (EI). To this end the SPT was compared to three similarly visually based tests – picture...

Teale, Cassandra

2010-06-30

21

Parenting and the Child's World: Influences on Academic, Intellectual, and Social-Emotional Development. Monographs in Parenting.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Conceived around the notion that there are multiple sources of influence on children's development, this volume describes when, where, and how parenting matters and the major antecedents and moderators of effective parenting. The chapters of the volume are as follows: (1) "Beyond the Nurture Assumption: Testing Hypotheses about the Child's…

Borkowski, John G.; Ramey, Sharon Landesman; Bristol-Power, Marie

22

Social and Emotional Aging  

PubMed Central

The past several decades have witnessed unidimensional decline models of aging give way to life-span developmental models that consider how specific processes and strategies facilitate adaptive aging. In part, this shift was provoked by the stark contrast between findings that clearly demonstrate decreased biological, physiological, and cognitive capacity with those suggesting that people are generally satisfied in old age and experience relatively high levels of emotional well-being. In recent years, this supposed “paradox” of aging has been reconciled through careful theoretical analysis and empirical investigation. Viewing aging as adaptation sheds light on resilience, wellbeing, and emotional distress across adulthood. PMID:19575618

Charles, Susan; Carstensen, Laura L.

2014-01-01

23

Emotion Discourse, Social Cognition, and Social Skills in Children with and without Developmental Delays  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This study examined parent-child emotion discourse, children's independent social information processing, and social skills outcomes in 146 families of 8-year-olds with and without developmental delays. Children's emergent social-cognitive understanding (internal state understanding, perspective taking, and causal reasoning and problem solving)…

Fenning, Rachel M.; Baker, Bruce L.; Juvonen, Jaana

2011-01-01

24

Mother-child emotion communication and childhood anxiety symptoms.  

PubMed

This study examined whether several aspects of emotion communication in mother-child dyads relate to child anxiety symptoms. Mother and child behaviours related to emotion communication were coded based on videotaped mother-child interactions in a sample of 87 ten- to twelve-year olds, and children reported on their anxiety symptoms. Mothers of more anxious children were less supportive in that they engaged more in psychologically controlling behaviours designed to manipulate the child's emotional state, exhibited less warmth and interest in the child, and were less elaborative during conversations about an emotionally negative event. Further, more anxious children showed greater affect intensity and lower congruency of emotions and behaviours, and were less engaged in the conversation. Examining the role of child gender did not change the results significantly. Mother and child emotion communication behaviours each explained significant variance in child anxiety. The results showed that how mothers and children approached emotion-related conversations is important for child anxiety, and highlighted the need to consider mother and child behaviours related to emotion communication in assessment and interventions with anxious children. PMID:24892717

Brumariu, Laura E; Kerns, Kathryn A

2015-04-01

25

Boosting Social and Emotional Competence  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Beland maintains that high school students will need a high level of skill in the social and emotional arena to be ready for competitive employment in the 21st century. In a 2006 survey, human resource professionals said five skills were most crucial to high school graduates' success: professionalism/work ethic; teamwork; oral communications;…

Beland, Kathy

2007-01-01

26

Grief as a Social Emotion: Theoretical Perspectives  

Microsoft Academic Search

The article explores a sociological perspective on grief as a social emotion. Focusing on the social bond with the deceased, the self-concept of the survivor or the power of feeling rules, general sociological theories of emotions (symbolic interactionism, structural theory, behavioral theory) have the potential to deepen the understanding of grief as a social emotion. The article concludes by presenting

Nina R. Jakoby

2012-01-01

27

Social and Emotional Education in the Classroom.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Students' social and emotional development is vital in today's education, especially in light of changing family structures. This paper examines implications of recent cultural changes which have resulted in positive and negative changes in students' social and emotional needs, then describes and presents approaches to social and emotional

Burke, Robert W.

2002-01-01

28

Emotion Discourse, Social Cognition, and Social Skills in Children with and without Developmental Delays  

PubMed Central

This study examined parent-child emotion discourse, children’s independent social information processing, and social skills outcomes in 146 families of 8-year-olds with and without developmental delays. Children’s emergent social-cognitive understanding (internal state understanding, perspective taking, and causal reasoning/problem solving) was coded in the context of parent-child conversations about emotion, and children were interviewed separately to assess social problem solving. Mothers, fathers, and teachers reported on children’s social skills. The proposed strengths-based model partially accounted for social skills differences between typically developing children and children with delays. A multigroup analysis of the model linking emotion discourse to social skills through children’s prosocial problem solving suggested that processes operated similarly across the two groups. Implications for ecologically focused prevention and intervention are discussed. PMID:21410465

Fenning, RM; Baker, BL; Juvonen, J

2009-01-01

29

The Nature of Teacher-Child Interactions in Emotion Discourse  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Emotions find their meanings within human relationships that permit emotions to be experienced, expressed, and explored. Social and emotional competence, marked by an understanding, expression, and control of emotion, is one of the hallmarks of emotional discourse--demonstrated in the very nature of interactive communication as individuals relate…

Thomas, Dawn V.

2010-01-01

30

[Psycho-emotional impact of a child's disability on parents].  

PubMed

Care for a child with a disability is a stressful experience for parents. It triggers a range of emotions and feelings that require a set of behaviors and attitudes to manage daily life. To face this situation, parents use coping strategies. The purpose of this study was to assess the psychological reactions (depression and anxiety) of parents and the impact of a child's disability on their quality of life (QOL), and to determine their coping strategies. A survey of 50 parents of handicapped children, treated in the neurology department at the Sfax Teaching Hospital in Tunisia, was conducted in September 2010. The Beck Depression Inventory (BDI), the State Trait Anxiety Inventory (STAI), the SF-36, and the Brief COPE were used to assess, respectively, depression, anxiety, QOL, and coping strategies in parents. Among the group of parents studied, the anxiety and depression rates were, respectively, 68% and 52%. Depression was more frequent among mothers and was correlated with low educational and socioeconomic levels. Anxiety was found in 70.7% of mothers and 55.6% of fathers with no significant correlation. There was a correlation between anxiety and increased family burden related to the presence of a similar case in the family. The range of coping strategies used includes religion (16%), active coping (16%), planning (16%), acceptance (20%), focus and venting of feelings (10%), and seeking emotional social support (10%). Parents used emotion-focused coping in 68% of cases and problem-centered coping in 32% of cases. The coping strategy choice was significantly correlated with gender. Mothers preferentially used emotion-focused coping. Depressed or anxious parents more frequently used emotion-focused strategies. Religious faith was correlated with a strategy centered on religious coping. The length of follow-up (more than 2years) was correlated with a strategy focused on acceptance. Emotion-focused coping was also correlated with low levels of education and socioeconomic status. We found correlations between depression and different types of emotion-focused coping such as emotional support. Impaired QOL was higher among mothers (58.5% versus 33.3%). It was correlated with depression, anxiety, and the use of emotional coping. Also, it was correlated with low educational and socioeconomic levels and increased family burden related to the presence of a similar case in the family. The size most commonly impaired in mothers was limited due to mental health (56.9% versus 44.4% for fathers). Social functioning (D6) was significantly correlated with the presence of a mental disability, the functional dependence of the child, and increased family burden related to the presence of a similar case in the family. Impaired QOL was found in 66.8% of parents dissatisfied with the explanations given by the medical team. More problem-focused coping was found in parents satisfied with the information given by the medical team compared to those inadequately informed (42.1% versus 25.8%). The presence of a disabled child causes profound changes in the family. The impact of anxiety and depression on parents and on their QOL are considerable. This is a situation that involves an adaptation process. At first, parents may be tempted to use coping strategies focused on religion, a choice related to Arab-Muslim fatalism. Parents should be encouraged to use active coping strategies to support their disabled child better. In addition, adequate information given by the healthcare staff would help them to deal with the child's handicap and would contribute to improving their QOL. PMID:23266169

Ben Thabet, J; Sallemi, R; Hasïri, I; Zouari, L; Kamoun, F; Zouari, N; Triki, C; Maâlej, M

2013-01-01

31

Transactional and Cascading Relations between Early Spanking and Children's Social-Emotional Development  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The authors tested a series of models linking spanking and child social-emotional outcomes using a sample of 3,870 families from the Fragile Families and Child Wellbeing study. Spanking was measured by the number of times the focal child was spanked by the mother at ages 1, 3, and 5. Internalizing and externalizing symptoms were assessed using the…

Gromoske, Andrea N.; Maguire-Jack, Kathryn

2012-01-01

32

Infants' Social-Emotional Adjustment within a Childcare Context of Korea  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

In a child day-care setting, the naturally occurring social-emotional behaviours and play interaction of 51 infants were observed and recorded. Individual differences in gender, age, temperament, and maternal parenting behaviours were examined to understand how these variables might be related to social-emotional adjustment of infants. The…

Kim, Min-Hee; Moon, Hyukjun

2011-01-01

33

Dreams, emotions, and social sharing of dreams  

Microsoft Academic Search

Current life emotional experiences have been demonstrated to elicit a process called social sharing of emotion, consisting of repetitive talking about these experiences in conversations with relevant others. Like many diurnal experiences, dreams are generally loaded with emotional elements, and empirical evidence has suggested that individuals share their dreams with others mainly belonging to the circle of intimates. The present

Antonietta Curci; Bernard Rimé

2008-01-01

34

The Emotional Foundations of Social Understanding  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The infant and toddler years are a watershed of development in the emotional domain. These skills lay the foundation for positive social interactions, and ultimately, academic and life success. This article describes the development of three skills that are central in creating successful relationships: expressing emotion, understanding emotion,…

Warren, Heather K.; Denham, Susanne A.; Bassett, Hideko H.

2008-01-01

35

Detecting Emotional Contagion in Massive Social Networks  

PubMed Central

Happiness and other emotions spread between people in direct contact, but it is unclear whether massive online social networks also contribute to this spread. Here, we elaborate a novel method for measuring the contagion of emotional expression. With data from millions of Facebook users, we show that rainfall directly influences the emotional content of their status messages, and it also affects the status messages of friends in other cities who are not experiencing rainfall. For every one person affected directly, rainfall alters the emotional expression of about one to two other people, suggesting that online social networks may magnify the intensity of global emotional synchrony. PMID:24621792

Coviello, Lorenzo; Sohn, Yunkyu; Kramer, Adam D. I.; Marlow, Cameron; Franceschetti, Massimo; Christakis, Nicholas A.; Fowler, James H.

2014-01-01

36

Teacher characteristics, social classroom relationships, and children's social, emotional, and behavioral classroom adjustment in special education.  

PubMed

The goal of this study was to explore relations between teacher characteristics (i.e., competence and wellbeing); social classroom relationships (i.e., teacher-child and peer interactions); and children's social, emotional, and behavioral classroom adjustment. These relations were explored at both the individual and classroom levels among 414 children with emotional and behavioral disorders placed in special education. Two models were specified. In the first model, children's classroom adjustment was regressed on social relationships and teacher characteristics. In the second model, reversed links were examined by regressing teacher characteristics on social relationships and children's adjustment. Results of model 1 showed that, at the individual level, better social and emotional adjustment of children was predicted by higher levels of teacher-child closeness and better behavioral adjustment was predicted by both positive teacher-child and peer interactions. At the classroom level, positive social relationships were predicted by higher levels of teacher competence, which in turn were associated with lower classroom levels of social problems. Higher levels of teacher wellbeing were directly associated with classroom adaptive and maladaptive child outcomes. Results of model 2 showed that, at the individual and classroom levels, only the emotional and behavioral problems of children predicted social classroom relationships. At the classroom level, teacher competence was best predicted by positive teacher-child relationships and teacher wellbeing was best predicted by classroom levels of prosocial behavior. We discuss the importance of positive teacher-child and peer interactions for children placed in special education and suggest ways of improving classroom processes by targeting teacher competence. PMID:25636262

Breeman, L D; Wubbels, T; van Lier, P A C; Verhulst, F C; van der Ende, J; Maras, A; Hopman, J A B; Tick, N T

2015-02-01

37

Integrating Social Emotional Learning into Secondary Curriculum  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

When students are able to cope with, manage and maneuver the social and emotional landscapes of their lives, their ability to learn on all levels improves. Teaching Social / Emotional Learning (SEL), as a component of secondary education, not only increases academic performance, but prepares students to meet the challenges of lifelong learning in…

Lindsay, Marilyn

2013-01-01

38

Social Appraisal Influences Recognition of Emotions  

Microsoft Academic Search

The notion of social appraisal emphasizes the importance of a social dimension in appraisal theories of emotion by proposing that the way an individual appraises an event is influenced by the way other individuals appraise and feel about the same event. This study directly tested this proposal by asking participants to recognize dynamic facial expressions of emotion (fear, happiness, or

Christian Mumenthaler; David Sander

2012-01-01

39

Social regulation of emotion: messy layers.  

PubMed

Emotions are evolved systems of intra- and interpersonal processes that are regulatory in nature, dealing mostly with issues of personal or social concern. They regulate social interaction and in extension, the social sphere. In turn, processes in the social sphere regulate emotions of individuals and groups. In other words, intrapersonal processes project in the interpersonal space, and inversely, interpersonal experiences deeply influence intrapersonal processes. Thus, I argue that the concepts of emotion generation and regulation should not be artificially separated. Similarly, interpersonal emotions should not be reduced to interacting systems of intraindividual processes. Instead, we can consider emotions at different social levels, ranging from dyads to large scale e-communities. The interaction between these levels is complex and does not only involve influences from one level to the next. In this sense the levels of emotion/regulation are messy and a challenge for empirical study. In this article, I discuss the concepts of emotions and regulation at different intra- and interpersonal levels. I extend the concept of auto-regulation of emotions (Kappas, 2008, 2011a,b) to social processes. Furthermore, I argue for the necessity of including mediated communication, particularly in cyberspace in contemporary models of emotion/regulation. Lastly, I suggest the use of concepts from systems dynamics and complex systems to tackle the challenge of the "messy layers." PMID:23424049

Kappas, Arvid

2013-01-01

40

Social regulation of emotion: messy layers  

PubMed Central

Emotions are evolved systems of intra- and interpersonal processes that are regulatory in nature, dealing mostly with issues of personal or social concern. They regulate social interaction and in extension, the social sphere. In turn, processes in the social sphere regulate emotions of individuals and groups. In other words, intrapersonal processes project in the interpersonal space, and inversely, interpersonal experiences deeply influence intrapersonal processes. Thus, I argue that the concepts of emotion generation and regulation should not be artificially separated. Similarly, interpersonal emotions should not be reduced to interacting systems of intraindividual processes. Instead, we can consider emotions at different social levels, ranging from dyads to large scale e-communities. The interaction between these levels is complex and does not only involve influences from one level to the next. In this sense the levels of emotion/regulation are messy and a challenge for empirical study. In this article, I discuss the concepts of emotions and regulation at different intra- and interpersonal levels. I extend the concept of auto-regulation of emotions (Kappas, 2008, 2011a,b) to social processes. Furthermore, I argue for the necessity of including mediated communication, particularly in cyberspace in contemporary models of emotion/regulation. Lastly, I suggest the use of concepts from systems dynamics and complex systems to tackle the challenge of the “messy layers.” PMID:23424049

Kappas, Arvid

2013-01-01

41

Children's Emotional Expression in Child Care Centers Varying in Quality.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Examined the relationships between day-care quality, children's emotional expression, and temperament among 60 3- to 5-year-olds in 26 day-care centers. Found that the appropriateness of the caregiving, but not the appropriateness of activities in the child-care center, significantly predicted the proportion of positive emotional affect in…

Hestenes, Linda L.; And Others

1993-01-01

42

Gender and age differences in parent-child emotion talk.  

PubMed

This study examined gender differences in emotion word use during mother-child and father-child conversations. Sixty-five Spanish mothers and fathers and their 4- (M = 53.50, SD = 3.54) and 6-year-old (M = 77.07, SD = 3.94) children participated in this study. Emotion talk was examined during a play-related storytelling task and a reminiscence task (conversation about past experiences). Mothers mentioned a higher proportion of emotion words than did fathers. During the play-related storytelling task, mothers of 4-year-old daughters mentioned a higher proportion of emotion words than did mothers of 4-year-old sons, whereas fathers of 4-year-old daughters directed a higher proportion of emotion words than did fathers of 4-year-old sons during the reminiscence task. No gender differences were found with parents of 6-year-old children. During the reminiscence task daughters mentioned more emotion words with their fathers than with their mothers. Finally, mothers' use of emotion talk was related to whether children used emotion talk in both tasks. Fathers' use of emotion talk was only related to children's emotion talk during the reminiscence task. PMID:25387786

Aznar, Ana; Tenenbaum, Harriet R

2015-03-01

43

The Social Functioning of Preschool-Age Children Whose Mothers Are Emotionally and Physically Abused.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This study examined the social interactions and emotional adjustment of 21 preschool children of battered women and 25 same-age children from nonviolent homes. Mothers rated the frequency of their emotional and physical abuse during the past year, their mental health, parenting qualities, and their child's adjustment. Two observers evaluated the…

Graham-Bermann, Sandra A.; Levendosky, Alytia A.

44

Preschool children’s views on emotion regulation: Functional associations and implications for social-emotional adjustment  

PubMed Central

Previous studies show that preschool children view negative emotions as susceptible to intentional control. However, the extent of this understanding and links with child social-emotional adjustment are poorly understood. To examine this, 62 3- and 4-year-olds were presented with puppet scenarios in which characters experienced anger, sadness, and fear. Forty-seven adults were presented with a parallel questionnaire. Participants rated the degree to which six emotion-regulation strategies were effective in decreasing negative emotions. Results showed that even the youngest preschoolers viewed cognitive and behavioral distraction and repairing the situation as relatively effective; compared to adults, however, preschoolers favored relatively “ineffective” strategies such as venting and rumination. Children also showed a functional view of emotion regulation; that effective strategies depend on the emotion being regulated. All participants favored repairing a negative situation to reduce anger and behavioral distraction to reduce sadness and fear. Finally, the more children indicated that venting would reduce negative emotions, the lower their maternal report of social skills. Findings are discussed in terms of functional emotion theory and implications of emotion-regulation understanding for child adjustment. PMID:19724663

Dennis, Tracy A.; Kelemen, Deborah A.

2009-01-01

45

Mother and Child Emotions during Mathematics Homework  

Microsoft Academic Search

Mathematics is often thought of as a purely intellectual and unemotional activity. Recently, researchers have begun to question the validity of this approach, arguing that emotions and cognition are intertwined. The emotions expressed during mathematics work may be linked to mathematics achievement. We used behavioral measures to identify the emotions expressed by U.S. mothers and their 11-year-old children while solving

Nicole M. Else-Quest; Janet S. Hyde; Ahalya Hejmadi

2008-01-01

46

Family Conflict, Emotional Security, and Child Development: Translating Research Findings into a Prevention Program for Community Families  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The social problem posed by family conflict to the physical and psychological health and well-being of children, parents, and underlying family relationships is a cause for concern. Inter-parental and parent-child conflict are linked with children's behavioral, emotional, social, academic, and health problems, with children's risk particularly…

Cummings, E. Mark; Schatz, Julie N.

2012-01-01

47

Parental Emotional Responses to Their Child’s Pain: The Role of Dispositional Empathy and Catastrophizing About Their Child’s Pain  

Microsoft Academic Search

Little is known about how a child’s experience of pain affects his or her parents. Using a vignette methodology, this study investigated the emotional responses of parents who were asked to imagine different painful situations that their child might experience. A sample of 650 parents of school children (325 mothers; 325 fathers) read 8 short stories\\/vignettes about their child, which

Liesbet Goubert; Tine Vervoort; Michael J. L. Sullivan; Katrien Verhoeven; Geert Crombez

2008-01-01

48

Family Day Care Educators: An Exploration of Their Understanding and Experiences Promoting Children's Social and Emotional Wellbeing  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This study aimed to explore family day care (FDC) educators' knowledge of child social and emotional wellbeing and mental health problems, the strategies used to promote children's wellbeing, and barriers and opportunities for promoting children's social and emotional wellbeing. Thirteen FDC educators participated in individual semi-structured…

Davis, Elise; Priest, Naomi; Davies, Belinda; Smyth, Lisa; Waters, Elizabeth; Herrman, Helen; Sims, Margaret; Harrison, Linda; Cook, Kay; Marshall, Bernie; Williamson, Lara

2012-01-01

49

The Relationship Between Prekindergarten Social and Emotional Development and Academic Success among Hispanic Children from Low-Income Families  

Microsoft Academic Search

Social and emotional development has been considered an important factor in child development which has been placed at the end of the learning spectrum due to high stakes testing. Social and emotional development consists of the relationships an individual has with others, the level of self-control, and the motivation and perseverance a person has during an activity (Bandura, 1989). This

Christina More Muelle

2010-01-01

50

The relationship between prekindergarten social and emotional development and academic success among Hispanic children from low-income families  

Microsoft Academic Search

Social and emotional development has been considered an important factor in child development which has been placed at the end of the learning spectrum due to high stakes testing. Social and emotional development consists of the relationships an individual has with others, the level of self-control, and the motivation and perseverance a person has during an activity (Bandura, 1989). This

Christina More Muelle

2010-01-01

51

The Relationship between Prekindergarten Social and Emotional Development and Academic Success among Hispanic Children from Low-Income Families  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Social and emotional development has been considered an important factor in child development which has been placed at the end of the learning spectrum due to high stakes testing. Social and emotional development consists of the relationships an individual has with others, the level of self-control, and the motivation and perseverance a person has…

Muelle, Christina More

2010-01-01

52

Child Development  

MedlinePLUS

As children grow older, they develop in several different ways. Child development includes physical, intellectual, social, and emotional changes. Children grow and mature at very different rates. It's ...

53

Class climate moderates peer relations and emotional adjustment in children with an early history of anxious solitude: a Child X Environment model.  

PubMed

Classroom emotional climate was hypothesized to moderate psychosocial adjustment in 1st grade for children with an early childhood history of anxious solitude. Participants were 1,364 children in the National Institute of Child Health and Human Development (NICHD) Study of Early Child Care and their mothers, child-care providers, and teachers. As anticipated, children with an early childhood history of anxious solitude were more rejected, poorly accepted (boys), and victimized (girls) by peers and demonstrated more depressive symptoms (girls) in 1st-grade classrooms with negative observed emotional climate. Results support a Child x Environment model of children's social and emotional adjustment. PMID:17087551

Gazelle, Heidi

2006-11-01

54

Relations among Teachers' Emotion Socialization Beliefs and Practices and Preschoolers' Emotional Competence  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Research Findings: Utilizing a 3-part model of emotion socialization that included modeling, contingent responding, and teaching, this study examined the associations between 44 teachers' self-reported and observed emotion socialization practices and 326 preschoolers' emotion knowledge and observed emotional behavior. Multilevel analyses…

Morris, Carol A. S.; Denham, Susanne A.; Bassett, Hideko H.; Curby, Timothy W.

2013-01-01

55

Influences of Parent and Child Negative Emotionality on Young Children’s Everyday Behaviors  

PubMed Central

Negative emotionality is linked to unfavorable life outcomes, but studies have yet to examine negative emotionality of parents and children as predictors of children’s problem behaviors and negative emotion word use in everyday life. This study used a novel naturalistic recording device called the Electronically Activated Recorder (EAR) to investigate the separate and interactive influences of parent and child negative emotionality on daily child behaviors in a sample of 35 preschool-aged children over two time points separated by one year. Fathers’ negative emotionality predicted children’s whining at Time 1; mothers’ negative emotionality predicted children’s negative emotion word use at Time 1 and increases in children’s arguing/fighting from Time 1 to Time 2. Parents’ ratings of child negative emotionality also were associated with increases in children’s arguing/fighting from Time 1 to Time 2, and child negative emotionality moderated the association between mothers’ negative emotionality and children’s arguing/fighting. Further, children with mothers high in negative emotionality displayed higher levels of problem behaviors when their mothers self-reported low levels of positive emotional expressiveness and/or high levels of negative emotional expressiveness. These findings offer preliminary evidence linking parent and child negative emotionality to everyday child behaviors, and suggest that emotional expressiveness may play a key role in moderating the links between maternal negative emotionality and child behavioral problems. PMID:22390707

Slatcher, Richard B.; Trentacosta, Christopher J.

2012-01-01

56

Developing social and emotional aspects of learning: the American experience  

Microsoft Academic Search

Developments in American policy, research and professional development to promote social and emotional learning in schools have drawn on work carried out by the Collaborative for Academic, Social, and Emotional Learning (CASEL), encouraged by the popular and political catalyst of Daniel Goleman’s work on emotional intelligence. Based on CASEL’s exploration and articulation of the implications of emotional intelligence for schools,

Maurice J. Elias; Dominic C. Moceri

2012-01-01

57

Pathways Between Social Support, Family Well Being, Quality of Parenting, and Child Resilience: What We Know  

Microsoft Academic Search

We contribute to the theoretical and research knowledge base regarding the pathways between parental social support, family well being, quality of parenting, and the development of child resilience in families with a child with serious emotional problems. Little conceptual development has been done that provides a theoretical framework for studying the relationships among these variables. We identify key findings from

Mary I. Armstrong; Shelly Birnie-Lefcovitch; Michael T. Ungar

2005-01-01

58

"Won't Somebody 'Think' of the Children?" Emotions, Child Poverty, and Post-Humanitarian Possibilities for Social Justice Education  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Under models of moral and global citizenship education, compassion and caring are emphasized as a counterpoint to pervasive, heartless, neo-liberal globalization. According to such views, these and related emotions such as empathy, sympathy, and pity, can cause people to act righteously to aid others who are disadvantaged through no fault of their…

Jackson, Liz

2014-01-01

59

Processing of emotional faces in social phobia  

PubMed Central

Previous research has found that individuals with social phobia differ from controls in their processing of emotional faces. For instance, people with social phobia show increased attention to briefly presented threatening faces. However, when exposure times are increased, the direction of this attentional bias is more unclear. Studies investigating eye movements have found both increased as well as decreased attention to threatening faces in socially anxious participants. The current study investigated eye movements to emotional faces in eight patients with social phobia and 34 controls. Three different tasks with different exposure durations were used, which allowed for an investigation of the time course of attention. At the early time interval, patients showed a complex pattern of both vigilance and avoidance of threatening faces. At the longest time interval, patients avoided the eyes of sad, disgust, and neutral faces more than controls, whereas there were no group differences for angry faces. PMID:25478097

Staugaard, Søren Risløv; Rosenberg, Nicole Kristjansen

2011-01-01

60

Embodiment in attitudes, social perception, and emotion.  

PubMed

Findings in the social psychology literatures on attitudes, social perception, and emotion demonstrate that social information processing involves embodiment, where embodiment refers both to actual bodily states and to simulations of experience in the brain's modality-specific systems for perception, action, and introspection. We show that embodiment underlies social information processing when the perceiver interacts with actual social objects (online cognition) and when the perceiver represents social objects in their absence (offline cognition). Although many empirical demonstrations of social embodiment exist, no particularly compelling account of them has been offered. We propose that theories of embodied cognition, such as the Perceptual Symbol Systems (PSS) account (Barsalou, 1999), explain and integrate these findings, and that they also suggest exciting new directions for research. We compare the PSS account to a variety of related proposals and show how it addresses criticisms that have previously posed problems for the general embodiment approach. PMID:16083360

Niedenthal, Paula M; Barsalou, Lawrence W; Winkielman, Piotr; Krauth-Gruber, Silvia; Ric, François

2005-01-01

61

Enhancing Embodied Conversational Agents with Social and Emotional Capabilities  

E-print Network

Enhancing Embodied Conversational Agents with Social and Emotional Capabilities Bart van Straalen and realization of conversational behavior. Keywords: Embodied Conversational Agents, Social Agents, Bad News

Theune, Mariët

62

Emotional Intelligence and Social Perception   

E-print Network

and interpretations. In the present study EI is measured using the following standardized interpersonal perception tests; the Social Perception Test (SPT), Interpersonal Perception Task (IPT), and Reading the Mind in the Eyes Test (RTMITE). The SPT uses a ‘real life...

Forrester, Roisin

2010-06-30

63

Convergent Validity of and Bias in Maternal Reports of Child Emotion  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This study examined the convergent validity of maternal reports of child emotion in a sample of 190 children between the ages of 3 and 6. Children completed a battery of 10 emotion-eliciting laboratory tasks; their mothers and untrained naive observers rated child emotions (happiness, surprise, fear, sadness, and anger) following each task, and…

Durbin, C. Emily; Wilson, Sylia

2012-01-01

64

Treating Conduct Problems and Strengthening Social and Emotional Competence in Young Children: The Dina Dinosaur Treatment Program.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This article describes the Dina Dinosaur Social, Emotional and Problem Solving Child Training Program for young children with conduct problems. The program emphasizes training children in skills such as emotional literacy, empathy or perspective taking, friendship and communication skills, anger management, interpersonal problem solving, and…

Webster-Stratton, Carolyn; Reid, M. Jamila

2003-01-01

65

Comparative Effects of Emotion Management Training and Social Skills Training in Korean Children With ADHD.  

PubMed

Objective: ADHD is associated with social and emotional impairment that goes beyond the core symptoms of hyperactivity, impulsivity, and attention deficits. This study evaluates the comparative efficacy of emotional management training (EMT) with social skills training (SST) and no treatment in children with ADHD. Method: A randomized, controlled treatment outcome study was conducted with 32 boys and 40 girls (aged 10-12 years). The Child Behavior Checklist, Emotion Expression Scale for Children, Child Depression Inventory, and State-Trait Anxiety Inventory for children were completed before and after the intervention. Results: The EMT group exhibited a significant improvement in emotion recognition and expressive reluctance. Therefore, focusing on emotion identification and expression in social cognitive processes (i.e., EMT), instead of merely focusing on social skills (SST), enhances treatment efficacy. Conclusion: These results support the hypothesis that focusing on the identification and expression of emotional information processes, instead of merely focusing on social skills (SST) enhances treatment efficacy. (J. of Att. Dis. 2012; XX(X) 1-XX). PMID:23929521

Choi, Eun Sil; Lee, Woo Kyeong

2013-08-01

66

The interaction of social and emotional processes in the brain.  

PubMed

Social stimuli function as emotional barometers for the immediate environment are the catalysts for many emotional reactions, and have inherent value for relationships and survival independent of their current emotional content. We, therefore, propose that the neural mechanisms underlying social and emotional information processing may be interconnected. In the current study, we examined the independent and interactive effects of social and emotional processes on brain activation. Whole-brain images were acquired while participants viewed and categorized affective pictures that varied on two dimensions: emotional content (i. e., neutral, emotional) and social content (i. e., faces/people, objects/scenes). Patterns of activation were consistent with past findings demonstrating that the amygdala and part of the visual cortex were more active to emotionally evocative pictures than to neutral pictures and that the superior temporal sulcus was more active to social than to nonsocial pictures. Furthermore, activation of the superior temporal sulcus and middle occipito-temporal cortex showed evidence of the interactive processing of emotional and social information, whereas activation of the amygdala showed evidence of additive effects. These results indicate that interactive effects occur early in the stream of processing, suggesting that social and emotional information garner greater attentional resources and that the conjunction of social and emotional cues results in synergistic early processing, whereas the amygdala appears to be primarily implicated in processing biologically or personally relevant stimuli, regardless of the nature of the relevance (i. e., social, emotional, or both). PMID:15701231

Norris, Catherine J; Chen, E Elinor; Zhu, David C; Small, Steven L; Cacioppo, John T

2004-12-01

67

Early Childhood Teachers as Socializers of Young Children's Emotional Competence  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Young children's emotional competence--regulation of emotional expressiveness and experience when necessary, and knowledge of their own and other's emotions--is crucial for social and academic (i.e., school) success. Thus, it is important to understand the mechanisms of how young children develop emotional competence. Both parents and teachers are…

Denham, Susanne A.; Bassett, Hideko H.; Zinsser, Katherine

2012-01-01

68

Social worker trauma: Building resilience in child protection social workers  

Microsoft Academic Search

Child protection social workers can experience psychological trauma effects as a result of their work. This article considers the utility of the trauma perspective in understanding and intervening when overwhelming events impact social workers. Psychological trauma theory enhances earlier contributions of the stress and burnout literatures in the effort to increase the efficacy and well?being of child protection staff. Resilience

Mark Horwitz

1998-01-01

69

Strengthening Social and Emotional Competence in Young Children—The Foundation for Early School Readiness and Success Incredible Years Classroom Social Skills and Problem-Solving Curriculum  

Microsoft Academic Search

The ability of young children to manage their emotions and behaviors and to make meaningful friendships is an important prerequisite for school readiness and academic success. Socially com- petent children are also more academically successful and poor social skills are a strong predictor of academic failure. This article describes The Incredible Years Dinosaur Social Skills and Problem- Solving Child Training

Carolyn Webster-Stratton; M. Jamila Reid

70

Sex Differential Item Functioning in the Inventory of Early Development III Social-Emotional Skills  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Social-emotional (SE) skills in the early developmental years of children influence outcomes in psychological, behavioral, and learning domains. The adult ratings of a child's SE skills can be influenced by sex stereotypes. These rating differences could lead to differential conclusions about developmental progress or risk. To ensure that…

Beaver, Jessica L.; French, Brian F.; Finch, W. Holmes; Ullrich-French, Sarah C.

2014-01-01

71

The Incredible Years Therapeutic Social and Emotional Skills Programme: A Pilot Study  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The Incredible Years (IY) universal child Classroom Dinosaur and Teacher Classroom Management programmes are delivered in all 102 primary schools in Gwynedd County, Wales. This article describes a pilot study of the IY Therapeutic (small group) Dinosaur School social and emotional coaching programme, developed as a treatment programme, in one such…

Hutchings, Judy; Bywater, Tracey; Gridley, Nicole; Whitaker, Christopher J.; Martin-Forbes, Pam; Gruffydd, Stella

2012-01-01

72

Developing Social and Emotional Aspects of Learning: The American Experience  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Developments in American policy, research and professional development to promote social and emotional learning in schools have drawn on work carried out by the Collaborative for Academic, Social, and Emotional Learning (CASEL), encouraged by the popular and political catalyst of Daniel Goleman's work on emotional intelligence. Based on CASEL's…

Elias, Maurice J.; Moceri, Dominic C.

2012-01-01

73

The Use of Emotions in Social Work Education  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The role of emotions, although central to social work practice, has been relatively neglected in the process of teaching and learning social work. This article explores how social work educators can incorporate an understanding of the role of emotions in both the teaching and practice of social work. Attention is drawn toward evolutionary and…

Ikebuchi, Johnathan; Rasmussen, Brian Michael

2014-01-01

74

Tuning in to Kids: an effectiveness trial of a parenting program targeting emotion socialization of preschoolers.  

PubMed

This article reports on an effectiveness trial of the Tuning in to Kids (TIK) parenting program. TIK aims to improve emotion socialization practices in parents of preschool children; it is a universal prevention program that teaches parents the skills of emotion coaching and also targets parents' own emotion awareness and regulation. The present study followed a 2 × 2 (Treatment Condition × Time) design. One hundred twenty-eight parents of children ages 4.0-5.11 years were recruited from preschools and randomized into intervention and waitlist conditions. Parents in the intervention condition (n = 62) attended a six-session group parenting program delivered by community practitioners who followed intervention fidelity protocols. Parents and preschool teachers completed questionnaires twice during the preschool year: at preintervention and at follow-up (approximately 7 months later). Parents reported on their emotion socialization beliefs and practices, other parenting practices, and on child behavior. Teachers reported on child behavior (Social Competence and Anger-Aggression). Data were analyzed using multilevel modeling. At follow-up, compared to the control group, intervention parents were significantly less emotionally dismissive in their beliefs, less dismissive and more coaching in their practices in response to children's negative emotions, and more positively involved. Although there were improvements in both conditions over time for parent-reported child behavior and teacher-reported social competence, compared to the waitlist group, intervention parents reported a significantly greater reduction in number of behavior problems. This trial demonstrates the potential for community agencies and practitioners in real-world settings to deliver a new parenting program that targets emotional communication in parent-child relationships. PMID:22182335

Wilson, Katherine R; Havighurst, Sophie S; Harley, Ann E

2012-02-01

75

Emotional Intelligence and Social-Emotional Learning: An Overview  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The term "EI (emotional intelligence)" was first used in 1990 by Salovey and Mayer. EI involves: (1) the ability to perceive accurately, appraise and express emotion; (2) the ability to access and/or generate feelings when they facilitate thought; (3) the ability to understand emotion and emotional knowledge; and (4) the ability to regulate…

Basu, Anamitra; Mermillod, Martial

2011-01-01

76

The role of emotion and emotion regulation in social anxiety disorder.  

PubMed

Many psychiatric disorders involve problematic patterns of emotional reactivity and regulation. In this review, we consider recent findings regarding emotion and emotion regulation in the context of social anxiety disorder (SAD). We first describe key features of SAD which suggest altered emotional and self-related processing difficulties. Next, we lay the conceptual foundation for a discussion of emotion and emotion regulation and present a common framework for understanding emotion regulation, the process model of emotion regulation. Using the process model, we evaluate the recent empirical literature spanning self-report, observational, behavioral, and physiological methods across five specific families of emotion regulation processes-situation selection, situation modification, attentional deployment, cognitive change, and response modulation. Next, we examine the empirical evidence behind two psychosocial interventions for SAD: cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) and mindfulness-based stress reduction (MBSR). Throughout, we present suggestions for future directions in the continued examination of emotion and emotion regulation in SAD. PMID:25413637

Jazaieri, Hooria; Morrison, Amanda S; Goldin, Philippe R; Gross, James J

2015-01-01

77

Emotional intelligence, personality, social networks, and social perception   

E-print Network

to the emotions of others. In order to test this, a social perception inspection time task was carried out in which participants were required to identify if a face was happy, sad, or angry. The faces used were both Caucasian and Far-East Asian, the hypothesis...

DeBusk, Kendra Portia Adrienne Howard

78

Narrative Structure and Emotional References in Parent-Child Reminiscing: Associations with Child Gender, Temperament, and the Quality of Parent-Child Interactions  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The present research examined child gender, temperament, and the quality of parent-child interactions as predictors of narrative style and references to emotion during mother-child and father-child reminiscing. Although models predicting parents' narrative styles were non-significant, results revealed significant interactions between parental…

Bost, Kelly K.; Choi, Eunsil; Wong, Maria S.

2010-01-01

79

Emotion Regulation Abilities and the Quality of Social Interaction  

Microsoft Academic Search

Emotion regulation abilities, measured on a test of emotional intelligence, were related to several indicators of the quality of individuals' social interactions with peers. In a sample of 76 college students, emotion regulation abilities were associated with both self-reports and peer nominations of interpersonal sensitivity and prosocial tendencies, the proportion of positive vs. negative peer nominations, and reciprocal friendship nominations.

Paulo N. Lopes; Peter Salovey; Stéphane Côté; Michael Beers

2005-01-01

80

The Contributions of Teachers' Emotional Support to Children's Social Behaviors and Self-Regulatory Skills in First Grade  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The present observational study used hierarchical linear modeling to examine predictors of children's social and self-regulatory outcomes in first-grade classrooms. Specifically, goals were the following: (1) to explore relations between emotionally supportive teacher-child interactions and children's social behaviors (aggression with peers,…

Merritt, Eileen G.; Wanless, Shannon B.; Rimm-Kaufman, Sara E.; Cameron, Claire; Peugh, James L.

2012-01-01

81

Shifting Definitions of Emotional Maltreatment: An Analysis Child Welfare Investigation Laws and Practices in Canada  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Objective: Although there is growing evidence that the emotional dimensions of child maltreatment are particularly damaging, the feasibility and appropriateness of including emotional maltreatment (EM) in child welfare statutes continues to be questioned. Unlike physical and sexual abuse where investigations focus on discreet incidents of…

Trocme, Nico; Fallon, Barbara; MacLaurin, Bruce; Chamberland, Claire; Chabot, Martin; Esposito, Tonino

2011-01-01

82

Father Locus of Control and Child Emotional and Behavioral Outcomes: A Prospective Study  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

In a prospective longitudinal study the authors examined the associations between parent locus of control of reinforcement (LOCR), measured before the birth of a child, and behavioral-emotional outcomes in that child at age 7 years. A total of 307 couples completed questionnaires regarding their emotional status and LOCR at their first prenatal…

Tone, Erin B.; Goodfellow, Stephanie; Nowicki, Stephen, Jr.

2012-01-01

83

Emotion Management and Strategies for Social Interaction.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Emotion scripts provide children with culturally meaningful emotional experiences and plans of action for managing feelings and the circumstances surrounding emotional experiences. In an effort to understand how developing children acquire these emotion scripts, two studies described here investigated how children deploy emotion scripts to manage…

Saarni, Carolyn

84

Demonstration: interactive Social-Emotional Toolkit (iSET)  

E-print Network

Social communication in autism is significantly hindered by difficulties processing affective cues in realtime face-to-face interaction. The interactive Social-Emotional Toolkit (iSET) allows its users to record and annotate ...

Madsen, Miriam A.

85

How Are Trait Emotional Intelligence and Social Skills Related to Emotional and Behavioural Difficulties in Adolescents?  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Trait emotional intelligence construct shifted the interest in personality research to the investigation of the effect of global personality characteristics on behaviour. The Social and Emotional Learning (SEL) movement emphasised the cultivation of social skills for positive relationships. In this paper we investigate the role of students'…

Poulou, Maria S.

2014-01-01

86

Models of Emotion Skills and Social Competence in the Head Start Classroom  

Microsoft Academic Search

Research Findings: Fostering the social competence of at-risk preschoolers would be facilitated by knowing which of children's emotion skills are most salient to social outcomes. We examined the emotion skills and social competence of 44 children enrolled in a Head Start program. Emotion skills were examined in terms of children's emotional lability and emotion regulation, whereas social competence was measured

Becky L. Spritz; Elisabeth Hollister Sandberg; Edward Maher; Ruth T. Zajdel

2010-01-01

87

Social Emotional Optimization Algorithm for Nonlinear Constrained Optimization Problems  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Nonlinear programming problem is one important branch in operational research, and has been successfully applied to various real-life problems. In this paper, a new approach called Social emotional optimization algorithm (SEOA) is used to solve this problem which is a new swarm intelligent technique by simulating the human behavior guided by emotion. Simulation results show that the social emotional optimization algorithm proposed in this paper is effective and efficiency for the nonlinear constrained programming problems.

Xu, Yuechun; Cui, Zhihua; Zeng, Jianchao

88

Impaired Recognition of Social Emotions following Amygdala Damage  

Microsoft Academic Search

Lesion, functional imaging, and single-unit studies in human and nonhuman animals have demonstrated a role for the amygdala in processing stimuli with emotional and social significance. We investigated the recognition of a wide variety of facial expressions, including basic emotions (e.g., happiness, anger) and social emotions (e.g., guilt, admiration, flirtatiousness). Prior findings with a standardized set of stimuli indicated that

Ralph Adolphs; Simon Baron-Cohen; Daniel Tranel

2002-01-01

89

[The family's emotional environment and social skill level in schizophrenia].  

PubMed

This paper describes the influence of family environment of schizophrenic patients upon their social skills. Patients from different families exhibit deficits in different kinds of interactions with other people. The family emotional environment in the study was described with Expressed Emotion Index. The index was evaluated quantitatively and qualitatively. The determination of dependence of specific social skills upon the characteristics of the family emotional environment made explicit therapeutic programs for the patients and their families possible. PMID:9132767

Motak, E

1996-01-01

90

What's Missing from No Child Left Behind? A Policy Analysis from a Social Work Perspective  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The No Child Left Behind Act of 2001 (NCLB) initiated sweeping changes to the U.S. educational system. However, many have argued that NCLB is not accomplishing its stated purposes of improving education for disadvantaged students and closing the achievement gap. This policy analysis sheds light on the social and emotional risk factors that prevent…

Lagana-Riordan, Christine; Aguilar, Jemel P.

2009-01-01

91

Why is the Socially Disadvantaged Child Retarded? A Rationale and New Concept of Human Development.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Volumes have been written on the socially disadvantaged. Two theories related to the disadvantaged have evolved: the first is the "deprivation theory" which stresses the importance of an enriched environment, during the early years, on the cognitive and emotional development of the child; the second is "the cumulative intellectual deficit theory,"…

Ogletree, Earl J.

92

Exploring social and emotional aspects of giftedness in children  

Microsoft Academic Search

Parents of gifted children have few guidelines about how to deal with issues resulting from their children's giftedness. Not only intellectual, but also, social and emotional issues provide challenges for parents. Five social\\/emotional traits of giftedness (divergent thinking ability, excitability, sensitivity, perceptiveness and entelechy) are described, and the specific issues that parents must face to enable their children to reach

Deirdre V. Lovecky

1992-01-01

93

Social Information Processing and Emotional Understanding in Children with LD  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The present study aimed to comprehensively examine social cognition processes in children with and without learning disabilities (LD), focusing on social information processing (SIP) and complex emotional understanding capabilities such as understanding complex, mixed, and hidden emotions. Participants were 50 children with LD (age range 9.4-12.7;…

Bauminger, Nirit; Edelsztein, Hany Schorr; Morash, Janice

2005-01-01

94

The Effect of Reappraising Social Exclusion on Emotional Distress  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The purpose of this investigation was to examine whether reappraisal, which is a strategy where the personal meaning of an event is reevaluated, would influence participants' emotional reactions to social exclusion feedback. It was expected that reappraising this event would reduce the emotional distress that accompanies social exclusion, but…

Kitchens, Michael B.; Gohm, Carol L.

2010-01-01

95

Maternal and Child Expressed Emotion as Predictors of Treatment Response in Pediatric Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Expressed emotion (EE) is associated with symptoms and treatment outcome in various disorders. Few studies have examined EE in pediatric OCD and none of these has assessed the child's perspective. This study examined the relationship among maternal and child EE, child OCD severity, and OCD-related functioning pre- and post-treatment. At…

Przeworski, Amy; Zoellner, Lori A.; Franklin, Martin E.; Garcia, Abbe; Freeman, Jennifer; March, John S.; Foa, Edna B.

2012-01-01

96

Child-Rearing Practices toward Children with Hemophilia: The Relative Importance of Clinical Characteristics and Parental Emotional Reactions.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Addresses the relative importance of clinical characteristics of the child and parental emotional reactions, to child-rearing practices towards children with hemophilia. Results indicate that mother's emotional reactions appear to have a stronger influence on child-rearing uncertainty and overprotection than clinical characteristics of the child.…

Banis, S.; Suurmeijer, Th. P. B. M.; van Peer, D. R.

1999-01-01

97

Educating Minds and Hearts: Social Emotional Learning and the Passage into Adolescence. Series on Social Emotional Learning.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Based on the view that social and emotional learning (SEL) needs to be an integral part of middle school education, this book provides an overview to social and emotional learning and the development of middle school students, presents a representative range of SEL programs and perspectives, and offers reflections on the current status of SEL and…

Cohen, Jonathan, Ed.

98

Links between Maternal and Child Psychopathology Symptoms: Mediation through Child Emotion Regulation and Moderation through Maternal Behavior  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This study examined the intergenerational transmission of psychopathology symptoms with 7-12 year-old children (N = 97; 44 boys, 53 girls, M age = 9.14, SD = 1.38) and their mothers (M age = 38.46, SD = 6.86). Child emotion regulation mediated the links between maternal psychopathology and child internalizing and externalizing symptoms. In turn,…

Suveg, Cynthia; Shaffer, Anne; Morelen, Diana; Thomassin, Kristel

2011-01-01

99

Child Care Social Work and the Internet.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Explores the Internet's actual and potential uses in relation to child care issues with specific reference to adoption and fostering. Examines both advantages and drawbacks for social workers of this particular development in technology. Cautions that while celebrating the enormous potential of the Internet we should never allow electronic…

Ballantyne, Neil

1996-01-01

100

Social distress and theorizations of child victimization  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper presents an in- depth analysis of theoretical accounts of the epidemiology, process, and causalities of child victimization as the manifestation of social distress. Through a comprehensive search of the literature, 46 theories (also models and perspectives) were compiled and categorized into nine paradigms that were further characterized in terms of three bipolar continua. In this paper, the major

Oliver C. S. Tzeng

1992-01-01

101

Electrified emotions: Modulatory effects of transcranial direct stimulation on negative emotional reactions to social exclusion.  

PubMed

Social exclusion, ostracism, and rejection can be emotionally painful because they thwart the need to belong. Building on studies suggesting that the right ventrolateral prefrontal cortex (rVLPFC) is associated with regulation of negative emotions, the present experiment tests the hypothesis that decreasing the cortical excitability of the rVLPFC may increase negative emotional reactions to social exclusion. Specifically, we applied cathodal transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) over the rVLPFC and predicted an increment of negative emotional reactions to social exclusion. In Study 1, participants were either socially excluded or included, while cathodal tDCS or sham stimulation was applied over the rVLPFC. Cathodal stimulation of rVLPFC boosted the typical negative emotional reaction caused by social exclusion. No effects emerged from participants in the inclusion condition. To test the specificity of tDCS effects over rVLPFC, in Study 2, participants were socially excluded and received cathodal tDCS or sham stimulation over a control region (i.e., the right posterior parietal cortex). No effects of tDCS stimulation were found. Our results showed that the rVLPFC is specifically involved in emotion regulation and suggest that cathodal stimulation can increase negative emotional responses to social exclusion. PMID:25139575

Riva, Paolo; Romero Lauro, Leonor J; Vergallito, Alessandra; DeWall, C Nathan; Bushman, Brad J

2015-01-01

102

Mothering Young Children: Child Care, Stress and Social Life  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This study focuses on mothers' and young children's everyday social experience by analyzing their social relationships, social support in child care, mother-child interaction, and mothers' evaluations of all these aspects. Three hundred and eighty-four mothers with a child aged between 1 and 3 years, living in a city in Central Italy, were…

Rullo, Giuseppina; Musatti, Tullia

2005-01-01

103

Child-to-parent violence: emotional and behavioral predictors.  

PubMed

Child-to-parent violence (CPV) includes acts committed by a child to intentionally cause physical, psychological, or financial pain to a parent. Available data indicate increasing rates of CPV in Spain, which have been attributed to a tendency toward more permissive parenting styles and changes in the power cycles within the families. The primary aim of this study was to assess the predictive role of some behavioral and emotional characteristics of adolescents who perpetrate CPV. A total of 1,072 adolescents (601 girls) filled out measures of CPV, proactive and reactive aggression, depressive symptoms, and substance abuse at Time 1, and measures of CPV 6 months later. The results showed that CPV was predicted by proactive, but not by reactive, aggression. This finding supports an instrumental role for CPV, which should be understood in the context of permissibility and lack of limits within the family. Depression and substance abuse also predicted the increase of CPV over time. Moreover, there were no sex differences in the prevalence of physical CPV, but verbal CPV was more predominant among girls. Although there were sex differences in some of the risk factors for CPV, the predictive model linking these risks to CPV was similar for boys and girls. Findings of this study suggest a psychological profile that combines internalizing problems and an instrumental use of violence in adolescents who perpetrate CPV. These characteristics are important for interventions. PMID:22935948

Calvete, Esther; Orue, Izaskun; Gámez-Guadix, Manuel

2013-03-01

104

Display rules for expressed emotion within organizations and gender: implications for emotional labor and social place marking  

E-print Network

. In this context, emotions and emotional displays at work are seen as affecting individual's subjective social place in organizations. It is argued that gendering influences within the organization make social place marking more difficult and may result...

Griffin, Andrea Eugenie Charlotte

2004-09-30

105

Emotion: commentary. A biopsychosocial perspective on maternal psychopathology and the development of child emotion regulation.  

PubMed

In this commentary, the authors note that Gratz and colleagues (2014) have made an important step in understanding the effect of maternal borderline personality (BP) pathology on children's developing emotion regulation. The emphasis on mechanisms of transmission in their article has implications for our understanding of the relationships between parental mental health and child functioning more generally. The authors of the commentary argue that using a biopsychosocial framework to understand the multiple levels that characterize the developmental system will push this kind of focus on behavioral mechanisms a step further. A biopsychosocial framework implies that a set of hierarchically organized, but reciprocally interacting, processes, from the genetic to the environmental, provide the essential elements of development (Gottlieb, 2007). Thus, in studying the effects of maternal BP pathology on child outcomes, consideration may also be given to the role of underlying biological processes that are influenced by maternal functioning and may alter child outcomes. Challenges to using this general approach in studying the effects of parental psychopathology are discussed. PMID:24344888

Calkins, Susan D; Dollar, Jessica M

2014-02-01

106

The Role of Child Development and Social Interaction in the Selection of Children's Literature To Promote Literacy Acquisition.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Noting that linguistic, social, emotional, and cognitive development are complementary processes that ultimately work together to shape a child's literacy growth, this article discusses the relationship between children's development and their social interaction with knowledgeable others on the selection of children's literature for the promotion…

Johnson, C. Denise

2003-01-01

107

Henri Wallon's Theory of Early Child Development: The Role of Emotions  

PubMed

The present paper gives an account of part of the stage theory of early child development of the French theorist Henri Wallon (1879-1962). Unlike his contemporary Jean Piaget, Wallon concentrated his efforts upon a description of the child's emotional development and the role emotions play in establishing the bond between child and caregiver. The description of Wallon's stage theory is preceded by biographical information and a presentation of his methodological views. It is argued that Wallon's theory is unique in its focus, exerted influence upon theorists such as Lev Vygotsky, and is basically compatible with modern insights about the nature of child development and the growth of intersubjectivity. PMID:8979855

Veer

1996-12-01

108

Emotion Regulation and Culture: Are the Social Consequences of Emotion Suppression Culture-Specific?  

Microsoft Academic Search

Emotional suppression has been associated with generally negative social consequences ( Butler et al., 2003; Gross & John, 2003). A cultural perspective suggests, however, that these consequences may be moderated by cultural values. We tested this hypothesis in a two-part study, and found that, for Americans holding Western-European values, habitual suppression was associated with self-protective goals and negative emotion. In

Emily A. Butler; Tiane L. Lee; James J. Gross

2007-01-01

109

Parenting Style as a Context for Emotion Socialization  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Research Findings: The purpose of this study was to examine parenting style in the domain of emotion socialization through studying the relationships among parenting styles, emotion-related parental practices, and parental goals of Hong Kong-Chinese mothers. Data were collected from 189 Hong Kong-Chinese mothers of 6- to 8-year-old children. Hong…

Chan, Siu Mui; Bowes, Jennifer; Wyver, Shirley

2009-01-01

110

Bridging Emotion Research: From Biology to Social Structure  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Emotion research demonstrates that problems of theoretical interest or practical significance are not divided neatly along disciplinary boundaries. Researchers acknowledge both organic and social underpinnings of emotion, but the intersections between biological and structural processes can be difficult to negotiate. In this article, the authors…

Rogers, Kimberly B.; Kavanagh, Liam

2010-01-01

111

Emotion Responsivity, Social Cognition, and Functional Outcome in Schizophrenia  

E-print Network

Emotion Responsivity, Social Cognition, and Functional Outcome in Schizophrenia Jennifer R. Mathews been a defining feature in schizophrenia, but relatively little research has examined how emotion in schizophrenia. Participants were 40 outpatients with DSM-IV schizophrenia or schizoaffective disorder and 40

112

Future Interfaces: Social and Emotional Rosalind W. Picard  

E-print Network

Future Interfaces: Social and Emotional Rosalind W. Picard MIT Media Lab; 20 Ames Street Cambridge for interface development, design, and testing. Keywords Media Equation, Social Interfaces, Affective Computing principles of design change? What technological advances are needed to accomplish bi-directional social

113

Social Support and Other Factors Related to the Emotional-Wellbeing of Parents of Children with Autism Spectrum Disorders  

Microsoft Academic Search

The CDC estimates that 1 in 110 children are now affected by an autism spectrum disorder. This translates to thousands of families facing the challenges associated with raising a child with an ASD. The purpose of this study was to investigate how parental emotional well-being relates to social support and isolation, as well as other types of coping behaviors. Mothers

Olivia Filipa Macdonald; Bryant Judith Becker

2011-01-01

114

It Takes Two: Sensitive Caregiving across Contexts and Children's Social, Emotional, and Academic Outcomes  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Research Findings: Using longitudinal survey data from the Welfare, Children, and Families Study: A Three-City Study ("n" = 135), this study examines how congruence in maternal and child care provider sensitivities contributes to young children's social, emotional, and academic outcomes among low-income minority families. Congruence…

Vesely, Colleen K.; Brown, Elizabeth Levine; Mahatmya, Duhita

2013-01-01

115

Perspectives on Social/Emotional Development: Guest Editorial Comment.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Briefly highlights the artificial dualism between the affective and cognitive areas of human functioning in terms of history, physiology, and psychology. Previews topics of current research and theory in the area of social/emotional development. (DST)

Slavenas, Rosemarie

1985-01-01

116

Communication, Satisfaction, and Emotional Exhaustion among Child Care Center Staff: Directors, Teachers, and Assistant Teachers.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Examined emotional exhaustion in relation to job satisfaction, communication within centers, and background variables among child care directors and teachers. Found satisfaction with working conditions was related to low emotional exhaustion, and the practice of holding staff meetings on staff development issues was related to increased job…

Stremmel, Andrew J.; And Others

1993-01-01

117

Social neuroscience of child and adolescent depression  

PubMed Central

The social neuroscience of child and adolescent depression is inherently multidisciplinary. Depressive disorders beginning early in life can have serious developmental and functional consequences. Psychopathology research has described depression’s defining clinical and contextual features, and intervention research has characterized its response to treatment and prevention programs. Neuroendocrine, electrophysiological, and neuroimaging studies have identified core neurobiological aspects of early-onset mood disorders. These areas are reviewed using a developmental social neuroscience perspective for integrating disparate observations. The paper introduces a dynamic adaptive systems framework, and it discusses hedonic capacity, stress sensitivity, ruminative self-focus, and attentional impairments as fundamental components of mood disorders. PMID:17624647

Miller, Anita

2007-01-01

118

Long-term effects of child abuse and neglect on emotion processing in adulthood.  

PubMed

To determine whether child maltreatment has a long-term impact on emotion processing abilities in adulthood and whether IQ, psychopathology, or psychopathy mediate the relationship between childhood maltreatment and emotion processing in adulthood. Using a prospective cohort design, children (ages 0-11) with documented cases of abuse and neglect during 1967-1971 were matched with non-maltreated children and followed up into adulthood. Potential mediators (IQ, Post-Traumatic Stress [PTSD], Generalized Anxiety [GAD], Dysthymia, and Major Depressive [MDD] Disorders, and psychopathy) were assessed in young adulthood with standardized assessment techniques. In middle adulthood (Mage=47), the International Affective Picture System was used to measure emotion processing. Structural equation modeling was used to test mediation models. Individuals with a history of childhood maltreatment were less accurate in emotion processing overall and in processing positive and neutral pictures than matched controls. Childhood physical abuse predicted less accuracy in neutral pictures and childhood sexual abuse and neglect predicted less accuracy in recognizing positive pictures. MDD, GAD, and IQ predicted overall picture recognition accuracy. However, of the mediators examined, only IQ acted to mediate the relationship between child maltreatment and emotion processing deficits. Although research has focused on emotion processing in maltreated children, these new findings show an impact child abuse and neglect on emotion processing in middle adulthood. Research and interventions aimed at improving emotional processing deficiencies in abused and neglected children should consider the role of IQ. PMID:24747007

Young, Joanna Cahall; Widom, Cathy Spatz

2014-08-01

119

Links Among Italian Preschoolers’ Socio-Emotional Competence, Teacher-Child Relationship Quality and Peer Acceptance  

PubMed Central

The purpose of the present study was to examine the relations of teacher-child relationship quality (close, conflictive, and dependent), children’s social behavior, and peer likability in a sample of Italian preschool-aged children (46 boys; 42 girls). Preschool teachers evaluated the quality of the teacher-child relationship and children’s social behaviors (i.e., social competence, anger-aggression, and anxiety-withdrawal). Peer-rated likability was measured using a sociometric procedure. Results indicated that conflictual teacher-child relationships were related to high aggressive behavior, and dependent teacher-child relationships were positively associated with children’s anxiety-withdrawal. Moreover, we found an indirect association between close teacher-child relationship quality and peer likability through children’s social competence. The findings provide evidence that the teacher-child relationship is critical for children’s social behaviors, and that social competence was uniquely related to peer likability. PMID:24039375

Sette, Stefania; Spinrad, Tracy; Baumgartner, Emma

2013-01-01

120

Personality and Social Context: Impact on Emotion Induction from Movies  

E-print Network

Personality and Social Context: Impact on Emotion Induction from Movies Ante Odi´c1 , Marko Tkalcic induction in different social circumstances during the consumption of movies, for the purpose of the context-aware recommender system for movies. The purpose of this study is to answer two research questions

Widmer, Gerhard

121

How To Promote Children's Social and Emotional Competence.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This book includes practical scripts, games, activities, pictures, and circle time role plays and plans that teachers can use with children age 4-8 years to promote their social and emotional competence. Activities are based on the empirically validated Dinosaur Social Skills, Problem-solving and Anger Management Curriculum. The book features an…

Webster-Stratton, Carolyn

122

The Relationship between Puberty and Social Emotion Processing  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The social brain undergoes developmental change during adolescence, and pubertal hormones are hypothesized to contribute to this development. We used fMRI to explore how pubertal indicators (salivary concentrations of testosterone, oestradiol and DHEA; pubertal stage; menarcheal status) relate to brain activity during a social emotion task.…

Goddings, Anne-Lise; Burnett Heyes, Stephanie; Bird, Geoffrey; Viner, Russell M.; Blakemore, Sarah-Jayne

2012-01-01

123

Aligning Research and Policy on Social-Emotional and Academic Competence for Young Children  

PubMed Central

Research Findings The purpose of this article is to describe current education policies as they relate to the promotion of social, emotional, and academic (SEA) development and competence for young children. Academic and social–emotional competencies are described and conceptualized as developmentally linked, reciprocal processes that should be supported by education in an integrated, holistic manner. Practice or Policy The article reviews major public policies and national initiatives that have implications for the education of young children (e.g., Head Start, No Child Left Behind, IDEA) and highlights opportunities within these policies to promote programs that can support SEA competencies, as well as the limitations of these policies. The article also includes a review of the limitations of existing resources available to educators to identify evidence-based programs that support SEA competencies and concludes with recommendations for better alignment between research and policy to support SEA competencies.

Nadeem, Erum; Maslak, Kristi; Chacko, Anil; Hoagwood, Kimberly Eaton

2014-01-01

124

Can Attribution of a Neutral Emotional State in Child Discipline Play an Adaptive Role in Child Internalising Behaviour?  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Maternal rates of child internalising behaviour were compared across children's emotion attributions (neutral, fear, anger, sadness and happiness) to others in a discipline situation, after controlling for socio-demographic covariates. Sixty-five Brazilian mothers provided socio-demographic information and rated their preschool children's…

Alvarenga, Patricia; de Oliveira, Ebenezer A.; Dazzani, Maria Virginia

2011-01-01

125

Parenting Style as a Context for Emotion Socialization  

Microsoft Academic Search

Research Findings: The purpose of this study was to examine parenting style in the domain of emotion socialization through studying the relationships among parenting styles, emotion-related parental practices, and parental goals of Hong Kong–Chinese mothers. Data were collected from 189 Hong Kong–Chinese mothers of 6- to 8-year-old children. Hong Kong–Chinese mothers reported that among authoritarian, authoritative, and permissive parenting styles,

Siu Mui Chan; Jennifer Bowes; Shirley Wyver

2009-01-01

126

Effects of Empathic Paraphrasing – Extrinsic Emotion Regulation in Social Conflict  

PubMed Central

In the present study, we investigated the effects of empathic paraphrasing as an extrinsic emotion regulation technique in social conflict. We hypothesized that negative emotions elicited by social conflict can be regulated extrinsically in a conversation by a listener following the narrator’s perspective and verbally expressing cognitive empathy. Twenty participants were interviewed on an ongoing or recently self-experienced social conflict. The interviewer utilized 10 standardized open questions inviting participants to describe their perception of the conflict. After each of the 10 descriptions, the interviewer responded by either paraphrasing or taking notes (control condition). Valence ratings pertaining to the current emotional state were assessed during the interview along with psychophysiological and voice recordings. Participants reported feeling less negative after hearing the interviewer paraphrase what they had said. In addition, we found a lower sound intensity of participants’ voices when answering to questions following a paraphrase. At the physiological level, skin conductance response, as well as heart rate, were higher during paraphrasing than during taking notes, while blood volume pulse amplitude was lower during paraphrasing, indicating higher autonomic arousal. The results show that demonstrating cognitive empathy through paraphrasing can extrinsically regulate negative emotion on a short-term basis. Paraphrasing led to enhanced autonomic activation in recipients, while at the same time influencing emotional valence in the direction of feeling better. A possible explanation for these results is that being treated in an empathic manner may stimulate a more intense emotion processing helping to transform and resolve the conflict. PMID:23162516

Seehausen, Maria; Kazzer, Philipp; Bajbouj, Malek; Prehn, Kristin

2012-01-01

127

[Subjective parental stress as indicator for child abuse risk: the role of emotional regulation and attachment].  

PubMed

The Child Abuse Potential Inventory (CAPI) is an evidence-based procedure for the assessment of the risk for child abuse in parents. In this study, a German translation of the CAPI was applied to a normal sample of German parents (N = 944). Descriptive analysis of the CAPI scores in the German provides findings comparable to the original standardization sample. The subjects' child abuse risk score was associated with demographic characteristics like education, marital status, occupation and gender. Long-term stability of the child abuse risk score and associations with individual differences in emotional regulation and attachment were investigated in a sub-sample of mothers with high and low child abuse risk scores (N = 69). The findings proved long-term stability. Furthermore associations between the child abuse risk score and anger dispositions were found which, however, were moderated by attachment differences. The findings suggest attachment security as a protective factor against child abuse. PMID:20158169

Spangler, Gottfried; Bovenschen, Ina; Globisch, Jutta; Krippl, Martin; Ast-Scheitenberger, Stephanie

2009-01-01

128

An Integrated Model of Emotion Processes and Cognition in Social Information Processing.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Interprets literature on contributions of social cognitive and emotion processes to children's social competence in the context of an integrated model of emotion processes and cognition in social information processing. Provides neurophysiological and functional evidence for the centrality of emotion processes in personal-social decision making.…

Lemerise, Elizabeth A.; Arsenio, William F.

2000-01-01

129

Maternal Expressiveness & Emotionality: Socialization of Children's Expressiveness.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

A study conducted in two types of laboratory settings and one school setting tested a model of the development of emotional expression. The model included: (1) societal, peer, and family influences; (2) self-factors, such as physiological, affective, motivation, cognitive, and personality variables; and (3) self-mediators, which act as filters…

Halberstadt, Amy G.

130

20 CFR 229.56 - Reduction for child's social security benefit.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...2010-04-01 false Reduction for child's social security benefit. 229.56 Section...REGULATIONS UNDER THE RAILROAD RETIREMENT ACT SOCIAL SECURITY OVERALL MINIMUM GUARANTEE ...§ 229.56 Reduction for child's social security benefit. A child's...

2010-04-01

131

20 CFR 229.56 - Reduction for child's social security benefit.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...2011-04-01 false Reduction for child's social security benefit. 229.56 Section...REGULATIONS UNDER THE RAILROAD RETIREMENT ACT SOCIAL SECURITY OVERALL MINIMUM GUARANTEE ...§ 229.56 Reduction for child's social security benefit. A child's...

2011-04-01

132

Longitudinal Pathways between Political Violence and Child Adjustment: The Role of Emotional Security about the Community in Northern Ireland  

PubMed Central

Links between political violence and children’s adjustment problems are well-documented. However, the mechanisms by which political tension and sectarian violence relate to children’s well-being and development are little understood. This study longitudinally examined children’s emotional security about community violence as a possible regulatory process in relations between community discord and children’s adjustment problems. Families were selected from 18 working class neighborhoods in Belfast, Northern Ireland. Participants (695 mothers and children, M=12.17, SD=1.82) were interviewed in their homes over three consecutive years. Findings supported the notion that politically-motivated community violence has distinctive effects on children’s externalizing and internalizing problems through the mechanism of increasing children’s emotional insecurity about community. Implications are considered for understanding relations between political violence and child adjustment from a social ecological perspective. PMID:20838875

Cummings, E. Mark; Merrilees, Christine E.; Schermerhorn, Alice C.; Goeke-Morey, Marcie C.; Shirlow, Peter; Cairns, Ed

2013-01-01

133

ChildCare Quality and Children's Social Development  

Microsoft Academic Search

This study examined the influence on children's social development of variation in the quality of their child-care environments. The sample consisted of 166 children attending representative child-care centers that varied widely in quality. Possible relations associated with age, child-care experience, and family background were controlled using hierarchical multiple regression. Both global estimates of child-care quality and specific program features, such

Deborah Phillips; Kathleen McCartney; Sandra Scarr

1987-01-01

134

Promoting children's ethical development through social and emotional learning.  

PubMed

In today's climate of increased emphasis on measuring achievement through high-stakes testing, academic subjects are too often divorced from the social context in which they are taught. We know that learning is a social process. In fact, many educators and other youth development practitioners recognize that social, emotional, and ethical development cannot be ignored in the name of better academic preparation, especially in the face of data showing that students are more disengaged than ever before. Social and emotional learning (SEL) offers educators and other youth development personnel a framework for addressing students' social and emotional needs in systematic way. SEL is the process of acquiring the skills to recognize and manage emotions, develop caring and concern for others, establish positive relationships, make responsible decisions, and handle challenging situations effectively. Research has shown that SEL has an impact on every aspect of children's development: their health, ethical development, citizenship, academic learning, and motivation to achieve. This chapter profiles one school in Illinois that has been implementing SEL programming for a number of years. The authors provide evidence of the impact of SEL on school climate, student behavior, and attitudes. Ultimately the authors see this as fostering the kind of understanding of the larger world that leads young people to make ethical choices. They propose that the lessons learned are applicable to a wide variety of settings, including other schools, after-school programs, and summer camps. PMID:16570881

Devaney, Elizabeth; O'Brien, Mary Utne; Tavegia, Mary; Resnik, Hank

2005-01-01

135

A social/emotional theory of 'mental illness'.  

PubMed

One reason that theories of mental illness have made little progress may be their focus on individuals, omitting the social/relational and emotional world. Adding these components will be difficult, however: in modern societies they have become virtually invisible, particularly the emotion of shame. The theory outlined here is based on the work of Cooley, Elias, Lewis and Goffman: shame is both social and individual and, if anticipation is included, virtually omnipresent in modern societies. It is proposed that most symptoms of mental illness are products of shame and relational feedback loops: emotion and alienation can both spiral leading to further alienation and chaotic or hidden emotions. Almost everyone is especially ashamed of their shame. Being ashamed of one's shame and/or anger can spiral when not acknowledged. Under certain conditions, these spirals continue without limit, generating immense force for acting out symptoms or depression. To the extent that this theory is true, we would need to rename the field using non-medical terms, such as emotional/social dysfunction. PMID:22723517

Scheff, Thomas

2013-02-01

136

Maternal and Child Expressed Emotion as Predictors of Treatment Response in Pediatric Obsessive–Compulsive Disorder  

PubMed Central

Expressed emotion (EE) is associated with symptoms and treatment outcome in various disorders. Few studies have examined EE in pediatric OCD and none of these has assessed the child’s perspective. This study examined the relationship among maternal and child EE, child OCD severity, and OCD-related functioning pre- and post-treatment. At pre-treatment, mothers completed speech samples about the child with OCD and an unaffected sibling. Children with OCD completed speech samples about parents. There were low rates of high maternal EE (child with OCD: 16.1%; sibling: 2.6%) and high child EE about parents (mothers: 11.9%; fathers: 10.2%). High EE was primarily characterized by high criticism, not high overinvolvement. High maternal EE and child EE regarding fathers were associated with pre-treatment child OCD severity but not post-treatment severity. High child and maternal EE were predictive of post-treatment OCD-related functioning. EE may be an important child and maternal trait associated with pre-treatment OCD severity and generalization of treatment gains. PMID:22090186

Zoellner, Lori A.; Franklin, Martin E.; Garcia, Abbe; Freeman, Jennifer; March, John S.; Foa, Edna B.

2011-01-01

137

A Preschool Pilot Study of Connecting with Others: Lessons for Teaching Social and Emotional Competence  

Microsoft Academic Search

Social-emotional learning in early childhood sets the stage for students’ future behaviors in schools. The current study examined\\u000a the effects of a social-emotional skills curriculum on the behavior of students in an early childhood program. The children\\u000a received instruction in social and emotional skills using the Connecting with Others: Lessons for Teaching Social and Emotional Competence program. Pre-test and post-test

Betsy L. Schultz; Rita Coombs Richardson; Catherine R. Barber; Daryl Wilcox

2011-01-01

138

Social Workers in Child Welfare: Ready for Duty  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This article responds to "Do Social Workers Make Better Child Welfare Workers than Non-Social Workers?" by Dr. Robin E. Perry. The article articulates National Association of Social Workers' support for a professional social work labor force to serve children and their families and for continued federal investment in the training of these workers.…

Whitaker, Tracy; Clark, Elizabeth J.

2006-01-01

139

Child-to-Parent Violence: Emotional and Behavioral Predictors  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Child-to-parent violence (CPV) includes acts committed by a child to intentionally cause physical, psychological, or financial pain to a parent. Available data indicate increasing rates of CPV in Spain, which have been attributed to a tendency toward more permissive parenting styles and changes in the power cycles within the families. The primary…

Calvete, Esther; Orue, Izaskun; Gamez-Guadix, Manuel

2013-01-01

140

Assessing Teachers' Beliefs about Social and Emotional Learning  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Teachers are the primary implementers of social and emotional learning (SEL) programs. Their beliefs about SEL likely influence program delivery, evaluation, and outcomes. A simple tool for measuring these beliefs could be used by school administrators to determine school readiness for SEL programming and by researchers to better understand…

Brackett, Marc A.; Reyes, Maria R.; Rivers, Susan E.; Elbertson, Nicole A.; Salovey, Peter

2012-01-01

141

The Relationship Between Spatial Abilities and Social-Emotional Factors.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

A study designed to investigate the relationship between spatial ability and selected social and emotional variables is presented. With the total sample of students in a freshman psychology course, and with the 48 females and 45 males separately, the relationship was investigated between spatial ability and participation in, and enjoyment of,…

Guay, Roland B.; McDaniel, Ernest D.

142

Emotional face discrimination in children with early social deprivation  

Microsoft Academic Search

Previous studies indicate that children adopted from Eastern European orphanages, who have experienced early social deprivation, demonstrate decreased glucose metabolism and altered activation patterns in the limbic and para-limbic brain regions. Normal patterns of activation in these brain regions are correlated with the ability to correctly identify emotional expressions in normal populations. Moreover, it has been found that children who

Katherine M Solomon

2005-01-01

143

Enhancing Embodied Conversational Agents with Social and Emotional Capabilities  

Microsoft Academic Search

In this paper we present our current work on an em bodied conversational agent for training medical bad news conversations and discuss the inspiration gained from previous work of our ow n and others. Central in this research is the influence of emotional and social f eatures on the selection and realization of conversational behavior.

Bart Van Straalen; Dirk Heylen; Mariët Theune; Anton Nijholt; Frank Dignum; Jeff Bradshaw; Barry Silverman; Doesburg van Willem

2009-01-01

144

An Architecture for Action, Emotion, and Social Behavior  

Microsoft Academic Search

The Oz project at Carnegie Mellon is studying the construction of artistically effectivesimulated worlds. Such worlds typically include several agents, which must exhibit broadbehavior. To meet this need, we are developing an agent architecture, called Tok, thatpresently supports reactivity, goals, emotions, and social behavior. Here we briefly introducethe requirements of our application, summarize the Tok architecture, and describe aparticular agent

Joseph Bates; A. Bryan Loyall; W. Scott Reilly

1992-01-01

145

Social Skills Training and Students with Emotional and Behavioral Disorders  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

There is a large body of literature suggesting that students with emotional and behavioral disorders (EBD) lack appropriate social skills, including deficits in building and maintaining interpersonal relationships, prosocial behaviors (e.g., sharing, helping, cooperation), and self-management strategies. While the literature shows small to modest…

Casey, Kathryn J.

2012-01-01

146

Introducing Social Emotional Learning to Music Education Professional Development  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

There are more knowledge bases, skills, and dispositions that teachers need to have than can be covered in undergraduate music teacher education. One knowledge base that music teachers could benefit from, which is rarely covered in preservice teacher education, is social emotional learning (SEL) and techniques to implement it in their classrooms.…

Edgar, Scott N.

2013-01-01

147

Emotional and Social Development: Birth to 3 Months  

MedlinePLUS

... Listen Emotional and Social Development: Birth to 3 Months Article Body By the second month, your baby will spend much of each day ... he can smile, too. Even during his first month, he’ll experiment with primitive grins and grimaces. ...

148

Emotional and Social Development: 4 to 7 Months  

MedlinePLUS

... Listen Emotional and Social Development: 4 to 7 Months Article Body Between four and seven months, your baby may undergo a dramatic change in ... these traits will become increasingly apparent during these months. You won’t necessarily find all of their ...

149

Social-Emotional Characteristics and Special Educational Needs  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The aim of the research described in this article was the development of an instrument to measure social emotional characteristics and special educational and pedagogical needs of students in the last grade of primary education. Questionnaires were developed for teachers as well as for students. Exploratory factor analyses showed that the factors…

Meijer, Joost; Fossen, Miriam W. E. B.; van Putten, Cornelis M.; van der Leij, Aryan

2006-01-01

150

Social Judgments and Emotion Attributions about Exclusion in Switzerland  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Adolescents' social judgments and emotion attributions about exclusion in three contexts, nationality, gender, and personality, were measured in a sample of 12- and 15-year-old Swiss and non-Swiss adolescents (N = 247). Overall, adolescents judged exclusion based on nationality as less acceptable than exclusion based on gender or personality.…

Malti, Tina; Killen, Melanie; Gasser, Luciano

2012-01-01

151

Emotional Disturbance/Social Maladjustment: Why Is the Incidence Increasing?  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Numerous arguments have addressed the controversies surrounding the category of emotional disturbance (ED) and the exclusion, or proposed inclusion, of students with social maladjustment (SM). In this article we address the consensually agreed upon characteristics of ED that are in common with SM, in addition to examining characteristics that…

Kehle, Thomas J.; Bray, Melissa A.; Theodore, Lea A.; Zhou, Zheng; McCoach, D. Betsy

2004-01-01

152

Strategies for Teaching Social and Emotional Intelligence in Business Communication  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Incorporating social and emotional skills (EI) training into the business communication curriculum is important for preparing students to function effectively in a global workplace with its complex informal networks, intercultural issues, team emphasis, and participatory leadership. EI skills enhance communication behavior in work groups and…

Sigmar, Lucia Stretcher; Hynes, Geraldine E.; Hill, Kathy L.

2012-01-01

153

A Preschool Pilot Study of "Connecting with Others: Lessons for Teaching Social and Emotional Competence"  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Social-emotional learning in early childhood sets the stage for students' future behaviors in schools. The current study examined the effects of a social-emotional skills curriculum on the behavior of students in an early childhood program. The children received instruction in social and emotional skills using the "Connecting with Others: Lessons…

Schultz, Betsy L.; Richardson, Rita Coombs; Barber, Catherine R.; Wilcox, Daryl

2011-01-01

154

Social Networking Web Sites: Teaching Appropriate Social Competence to Students with Emotional and Behavioral Disorders  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The Internet has opened a variety of different avenues for people to interact with each other. As new digital environments are developed, new sets of social skills are needed to appropriately interact. Students with emotional and behavioral disorders often have deficits in social competence and require specialized training in specific social

Morgan, Joseph J.

2010-01-01

155

Emotional Issues  

MedlinePLUS

Emotional Issues Duchenne’s emotional toll on a child can manifest in a variety of ways. Patience, consistency, understanding, and love are ... of your child. Parents of a child with Duchenne will find straight answers, vital information, and access ...

156

The Role of Child Emotionality in Child Behavior and Maternal Instruction on Planning Tasks  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This study explored the relation of children's emotional functioning to children's behavior during individual planning and mother's and children's behaviors during joint planning. Participants were 118 mothers and their second-grade children. Mothers rated children on their emotional intensity and children rated themselves on their use of emotion

Perez, Susan M.; Gauvain, Mary

2005-01-01

157

Social Cognition in Schizophrenic Patients: The Effect of Semantic Content and Emotional Prosody in the Comprehension of Emotional Discourse  

PubMed Central

Background: The recognition of the emotion expressed during conversation relies on the integration of both semantic processing and decoding of emotional prosody. The integration of both types of elements is necessary for social interaction. No study has investigated how these processes are impaired in patients with schizophrenia during the comprehension of an emotional speech. Since patients with schizophrenia have difficulty in daily interactions, it would be of great interest to investigate how these processes are impaired. We tested the hypothesis that patients present lesser performances regarding both semantic and emotional prosodic processes during emotional speech comprehension compared with healthy participants. Methods: The paradigm is based on sentences built with emotional (anger, happiness, or sadness) semantic content uttered with or without congruent emotional prosody. The study participants had to decide with which of the emotional categories each sentence corresponded. Results: Patients performed significantly worse than their matched controls, even in the presence of emotional prosody, showing that their ability to understand emotional semantic content was impaired. Although prosody improved performances in both groups, it benefited the patients more than the controls. Conclusion: Patients exhibited both impaired semantic and emotional prosodic comprehensions. However, they took greater advantage of emotional prosody adjunction than healthy participants. Consequently, focusing on emotional prosody during carrying may improve social communication. PMID:25309458

Brazo, Perrine; Beaucousin, Virginie; Lecardeur, Laurent; Razafimandimby, Annick; Dollfus, Sonia

2014-01-01

158

The Burden of Disaster: Part I. Challenges and Opportunities Within a Child’s Social Ecology  

PubMed Central

Child development and adaptation are best understood as biological and psychological individual processes occurring within the context of interconnecting groups, systems, and communities which, along with family, constitute the child’s social ecology. This first of two articles describes the challenges and opportunities within a child’s social ecology, consisting of Micro-, Meso-, Exo-, and Macrosystems. The parent-child relationship, the most salient Microsystem influence in children’s lives, plays an influential role in children’s reactions to and recovery from disasters. Children, parents, and other adults participate in Mesosystem activities at schools and faith-based organizations. The Exosystem—including workplaces, spcial agencies, neighborhood, and mass media—directly affects important adults in children’s lives. The Macrosystem affects disaster response and recovery indirectly through intangible cultural, social, economic, and political structures and processes. Children’s responses to adversity occur in the context of these dynamically interconnected and interdependent nested environments, all of which endure the burden of disaster. Increased understanding of the influences of and the relationships between key components contributes to recovery and rebuilding efforts, limiting disruption to the child and his or her social ecology. A companion article (R. L. Pfefferbaum et al., in press) describes interventions across the child’s social ecology. PMID:23156957

Noffsinger, Mary A.; Pfefferbaum, Betty; Pfefferbaum, Rose L.; Sherrieb, Kathleen; Norris, Fran H.

2013-01-01

159

Does a Good Fit Matter? Exploring Teaching Styles, Emotion Regulation, and Child Anxiety in the Classroom  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The central goal of the present study was to examine how a child's emotion regulation ability may moderate the relations between teaching styles and anxiety in childhood. Participants were 33 children (21 males, 12 females; mean age 7.5 years, standard deviation = 0.42), their mothers and teachers. Children completed the Early Adolescent…

LaBillois, James M.; Lagace-Seguin, Daniel G.

2009-01-01

160

Trajectories of Parenting and Child Negative Emotionality during Infancy and Toddlerhood: A Longitudinal Analysis  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The current longitudinal study examined trajectories of child negative emotionality, parenting efficacy, and overreactive parenting among 382 adoptive families during infancy and toddlerhood. Data were collected from adoptive parents when the children were 9-, 18-, and 27-month-old. Latent growth curve modeling indicated age-related increases in…

Lipscomb, Shannon Tierney; Leve, Leslie D.; Harold, Gordon T.; Neiderhiser, Jenae M.; Shaw, Daniel S.; Ge, Xiaojia; Reiss, David

2011-01-01

161

Caring Classrooms/Intelligent Schools: The Social Emotional Education of Young Children. Series on Social Emotional Learning.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This book synthesizes current thinking about effective social and emotional education of young elementary school children. The book's chapters, by leading national experts, describe the range of programs and perspectives that can be used in elementary schools, focusing on concrete strategies and curricular-based programs that can be integrated…

Cohen, Jonathan, Ed.

162

How Social and Emotional Development Add Up: Getting Results in Math and Science Education. Series on Social Emotional Learning.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This book is for math and science teachers who are eager to find creative and stimulating ways to engage student interest and boost their academic performance. A group of contributors including both psychologists and teachers outline the principles of social emotional learning (SEL) that educators can follow to help all students achieve in the…

Haynes, Norris M., Ed.; Ben-Avie, Michael, Ed.; Ensign, Jacque, Ed.

163

Facial Emotion Recognition in Child Psychiatry: A Systematic Review  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This review focuses on facial affect (emotion) recognition in children and adolescents with psychiatric disorders other than autism. A systematic search, using PRISMA guidelines, was conducted to identify original articles published prior to October 2011 pertaining to face recognition tasks in case-control studies. Used in the qualitative…

Collin, Lisa; Bindra, Jasmeet; Raju, Monika; Gillberg, Christopher; Minnis, Helen

2013-01-01

164

Child Abuse and Aggression among Seriously Emotionally Disturbed Children  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Abused children may be at risk for problems with aggression. In a sample of 397 seriously emotionally disturbed children, reactive aggression was associated with documented history of physical abuse but not sexual abuse. Girls were equally likely to be classified as reactively aggressive regardless of physical abuse history, but boys with physical…

Ford, Julian D.; Fraleigh, Lisa A.; Connor, Daniel F.

2010-01-01

165

Social Anxiety in Children with Anxiety Disorders: Relation with Social and Emotional Functioning  

Microsoft Academic Search

Investigated the psychometric properties of the Social Anxiety Scale for children-Revised (SASC-R) as well as relations between social anxiety and children's social and emotional functioning. Participants were a clinic sample of children, ages 6–11 with anxiety disorders (N = 154) who completed the SASC-R. For a subset of these children, parent ratings of social skills, and self-ratings of perceived competence

Golda S. Ginsburg; Annette M. La Greca; Wendy K. Silverman

1998-01-01

166

Chaos as a Social Determinant of Child Health: Reciprocal Associations?  

PubMed Central

This study informs the social determinants of child health by exploring an understudied aspect of children’s social contexts: chaos. Chaos has been conceptualized as crowded, noisy, disorganized, unpredictable settings for child development (Evans et al., 2010). We measure chaos at two levels of children’s ecological environment - the microsystem (household) and the mesosystem (work-family-child care nexus) – and at two points in early childhood (ages 3 and 5). Using data from the Fragile Families and Child Wellbeing Study (N=3288), a study of predominantly low-income women and their partners in large US cities, we develop structural equation models that assess how maternal-rated child health (also assessed at ages 3 and 5) is associated with latent constructs of chaos, and whether there are important reciprocal effects. Autoregressive crosslagged path analysis suggest that increasing chaos (at both the household and maternal work levels) is associated with worse child health, controlling for key confounders like household economic status, family structure, and maternal health status. Child health has little effect on chaos, providing further support for the hypothesis that chaos is an important social determinant of child health in this sample of relatively disadvantaged children. This suggests child health may be improved by supporting families in ways that reduce chaos in their home and work/family environments, and that as researchers move beyond SES, race, and family structure to explore other sources of health inequalities, chaos and its proximate determinants may be a promising avenue for future research. PMID:23541250

Schmeer, Kammi K.; Taylor, Miles

2013-01-01

167

Chaos as a social determinant of child health: Reciprocal associations?  

PubMed

This study informs the social determinants of child health by exploring an understudied aspect of children's social contexts: chaos. Chaos has been conceptualized as crowded, noisy, disorganized, unpredictable settings for child development (Evans, Eckenrode, & Marcynyszyn, 2010). We measure chaos at two levels of children's ecological environment - the microsystem (household) and the mesosystem (work-family-child care nexus) - and at two points in early childhood (ages 3 and 5). Using data from the Fragile Families and Child Wellbeing Study (N = 3288), a study of predominantly low-income women and their partners in large US cities, we develop structural equation models that assess how maternal-rated child health (also assessed at ages 3 and 5) is associated with latent constructs of chaos, and whether there are important reciprocal effects. Autoregressive cross-lagged path analysis suggest that increasing chaos (at both the household and maternal work levels) is associated with worse child health, controlling for key confounders like household economic status, family structure, and maternal health status. Child health has little effect on chaos, providing further support for the hypothesis that chaos is an important social determinant of child health in this sample of relatively disadvantaged children. This suggests child health may be improved by supporting families in ways that reduce chaos in their home and work/family environments, and that as researchers move beyond SES, race, and family structure to explore other sources of health inequalities, chaos and its proximate determinants may be a promising avenue for future research. PMID:23541250

Kamp Dush, Claire M; Schmeer, Kammi K; Taylor, Miles

2013-10-01

168

Implementing an Inpatient Social Early Warning System for Child Maltreatment  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Objectives: The current article describes the process evaluation of a social early warning system (SEWS) for the prevention of child maltreatment in the federal state of Hamburg. This prevention initiative targets expectant mothers and their partners including an initial screening of risk factors for child maltreatment, a subsequent structured…

Atabaki, Armita; Heddaeus, Daniela; Metzner, Franka; Schulz, Holger; Siefert, Sonke; Pawils, Silke

2013-01-01

169

Maternal and Child Predictors of Preschool Children's Social Competence  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The present study examined child and maternal predictors of children's social competence in preschool. One hundred ten mothers and their preschool-aged children participated. Mothers completed parent reports of child temperament and self-regulation, and self-reports of maternal separation anxiety. Mothers' interactional style was coded from…

Diener, Marissa L.; Kim, Do-Yeong

2004-01-01

170

The Effects of Early Social-Emotional and Relationship Experience on the Development of Young Orphanage Children: The St. Petersburg-USA Orphanage Research Team  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This study represents a quasi-experimental test of the role of early social-emotional experience and adult-child relationships in the development of typically developing children and those with disabilities birth to 4 years of age living in orphanages in St. Petersburg, Russian Federation. The three orphanages in the current study were selected…

Monographs of the Society for Research in Child Development, 2008

2008-01-01

171

Computational models of social and emotional turn-taking for embodied conversational agents  

E-print Network

Computational models of social and emotional turn-taking for embodied conversational agents and (social) emotions. We are particularly interested in how in these models emotions of the agent itself into computational mod- els of embodied conversational agents. We focus on models for turn-taking management

Al Hanbali, Ahmad

172

Anticipatory guidance for cognitive and social-emotional development: Birth to five years.  

PubMed

The present article serves as a quick office reference for clinicians, providing anticipatory guidance about the cognitive and social-emotional development of newborns, and children up to five years of age. The present review links recommendations to specific evidence in the medical literature, citing sources of developmental standards and advice, so that these may be further explored if desired. Practising primary care providers have indicated that these are areas of child development that are not well addressed by training and other available resources. The present article includes parenting information on important clinical presentations with which clinicians may be less familiar, such as promoting attachment, prosocial behaviours, healthy sleep habits, self-discipline and problem-solving; as well as on managing behaviours that are part of normal development, such as separation anxiety, tantrums, aggression, picky eating and specific fears. Information on the development of language, literacy and socialization are also included. PMID:23372397

Dosman, Cara; Andrews, Debbi

2012-02-01

173

Emotional Intelligence in Social Phobia and Other Anxiety Disorders  

Microsoft Academic Search

This study examined the associations between clinical anxiety, domains of emotional intelligence (EI), and three clinician-rated\\u000a indices of maladjustment. Of key interest was whether social phobia (SP) is unique among anxiety disorders in being characterized\\u000a by lower levels of Interpersonal and, particularly, Intrapersonal EI, and whether these differentially predict maladjustment.\\u000a Individuals with SP (n?=?169) obsessive-compulsive disorder (n?=?65) and panic disorder

Laura J. Summerfeldt; Patricia H. Kloosterman; Martin M. Antony; Randi E. McCabe; James D. A. Parker

2011-01-01

174

Can Explicit Instruction in Social and Emotional Learning Skills Benefit the Social-Emotional Development, Well-Being, and Academic Achievement of Young Children?  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This study investigated the effect of a social and emotional learning skills curriculum, the "You Can Do It! Early Childhood Education Program" (YCDI), on the social-emotional development, well-being, and academic achievement of 99 preparatory and grade 1 students attending a Catholic school in Melbourne, Australia. One preparatory and one grade 1…

Ashdown, Daniela Maree; Bernard, Michael E.

2012-01-01

175

The burden of disaster: part II. applying interventions across the child's social ecology.  

PubMed

This second of two articles describes the application of disaster mental health interventions within the context of the childs social ecology consisting of the Micro-, Meso-, Exo-, and Macrosystems. Microsystem interventions involving parents, siblings, and close friends include family preparedness planning andpractice, psychoeducation, role modeling, emotional support, and redirection. Mesosystem interventions provided by schools and faith-based organizations include safety and support, assessment, referral, and counseling. Exosystem interventions include those provided through community-based mental health programs, healthcare organizations, the workplace, the media, local volunteer disaster organizations, and other local organizations. Efforts to build community resilience to disasters are likely to have influence through the Exosystem. The Macrosystem - including the laws, history, cultural and subcultural characteristics, and economic and social conditions that underlie the other systems - affects the child indirectly through public policies and disaster programs and services that become available in the child's Exosystem in the aftermath of a disaster The social ecology paradigm, described more fully in a companion article (Noffsinger Pfefferbaum, Pfefferbaum, Sherrieb, & Norris,2012), emphasizes relationships among systems and can guide the development and delivery of services embedded in naturally-occurring structures in the child's environment. PMID:23894798

Pfefferbaum, Rose L; Jacobs, Anne K; Noffsinger, Mary A; Pfefferbaum, Betty; Sherrieb, Kathleen; Norris, Fran H

2012-01-01

176

Developing an interactive social-emotional toolkit for autism spectrum disorders  

E-print Network

A development process consisting of participatory design and iterative implementation was carried out to create a framework for interactive emotion-learning, the Interactive Social-Emotional Toolkit (iSET). iSET is a novel ...

Madsen, Miriam A

2010-01-01

177

Social-Emotional Learning Skill, Self-Regulation, and Social Competence in Typically Developing and Clinic-Referred Children  

Microsoft Academic Search

Social-emotional learning (SEL) skill includes the ability to encode, interpret, and reason about social and emotional information. In two related studies, we examined the relationship between children's SEL skill, their ability to regulate their own behavior, and the competence of their social interactions. Study 1 included 158 typically developing children ages 4 to 14 years. Study 2 included 126 clinic-referred

Clark McKown; Laura M. Gumbiner; Nicole M. Russo; Meryl Lipton

2009-01-01

178

Parent-Child and Triadic Antecedents of Children's Social Competence: Cultural Specificity, Shared Process  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Guided by theories of cultural participation, the authors examined mother-child, father-child, and triadic interactive behaviors in 141 Israeli and Palestinian couples and their firstborn child at 5 and 33 months as antecedents of children's social competence. Four parent-child measures (parent sensitivity, child social engagement, parental…

Feldman, Ruth; Masalha, Shafiq

2010-01-01

179

Child Development and Social Studies Curriculum Design: Toward a Rationale.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This paper is a working draft of a study which has examined the accumulated research on child growth and development. The draft is designed as an input paper to enable the Marin Social Studies Project to refine its rationale and criteria for a recommended K-12 social studies program of curriculum options. Identification of the capabilities of…

Knox, Gary A.

180

Transformation of Child Socialization in Korean Culture.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Examines agents of socialization, socialization skills, the influence of Confucian principles, gender socialization, and the differentiation of parental roles in traditional Korean families; and the value of children, the purpose of education, and family orientation in the modern family. (BC)

Yi, Soon Hyung

1993-01-01

181

Teacher and Observer Ratings of Young African American Children's Social and Emotional Competence  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Children's social and emotional competence abilities have been linked to successful social interactions and academic performance. This study examined the teacher and observer ratings of social and emotional competence for 89 young (3- to 5-year-old), African American children from economically stressed urban environments. There was a specific…

Humphries, Marisha L.; Keenan, Kate; Wakschlag, Lauren S.

2012-01-01

182

Using Social and Emotional Learning to Foster Academic Achievement in Secondary Mathematics  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Teaching social-emotional skills to secondary students has been linked to higher student achievement, more positive student motivation and more socially acceptable classroom behaviors (Elias & Arnold, 2006; Weissburg et al., 2003; Kress et al., 2004). Much of the current literature on social-emotional learning (SEL) focuses on research. This piece…

Jones, Jennifer L.; Jones, Karrie A.; Vermette, Paul J.

2009-01-01

183

Social Behavior, Emotion and Learning in a Pack of Virtual Wolves  

E-print Network

Social Behavior, Emotion and Learning in a Pack of Virtual Wolves Bill Tomlinson and Bruce Blumberg-existing behaviors for use in novel social contexts; to have and express emotional states; and to form context and function in the wolf and dog. American Zoologist. 1967, p. 325 Social behavior is often evolutionarily

Tomlinson, Bill

184

The Social and Emotional Development of Gifted Children: What Do We Know?  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This text on the social and emotional development of gifted children includes the following 24 papers: (1) "Effects of Acceleration on Gifted Learners" (Karen Rogers); (2) "Peer Pressures and Social Acceptance of Gifted Students" (Sylvia Rimm); (3) "Social and Emotional Issues for Exceptional Intellectually Gifted Students" (Miraca Gross); (4)…

Neihart, Maureen, Ed.; Reis, Sally M., Ed.; Robinson, Nancy M., Ed.; Moon, Sidney M., Ed.

185

A Child's View: Social and Physical Environmental Features Differentially Predict Parent and Child Perceived Neighborhood Safety.  

PubMed

Parent and child perceived neighborhood safety predicts child health outcomes such as sleep quality, asthma, physical activity, and psychological distress. Although previous studies identify environmental predictors of parent perceived safety, little is known about predictors of child perceived safety. This study aims to identify the social and physical environmental neighborhood features that predict child and parent perceived neighborhood safety and, simultaneously, to assess the association between child and parent perceptions. Data were from the QUebec Adipose and Lifestyle InvesTigation in Youth (QUALITY) cohort, an ongoing study of Caucasian children (aged 8-10 years) with a parental history of obesity, and their biological parents from Québec, Canada. Measures of social and physical neighborhood features were collected using a spatial data infrastructure and in-person audits. Structural equation modeling was used to test direct and indirect associations between neighborhood features, child and parent perceived safety. Results suggest that among children (N?=?494), trees and lighting were positively associated with perceived neighborhood safety, whereas a high proportion of visible minorities was associated with poorer perceived safety. Parents' perceptions of safety were more strongly tied to indicators of disorder and a lack of community involvement, and to traffic. Child perceived safety was partly explained by parent perceived safety, suggesting moderate concordance between perceptions. Although associated with each other, parent and child perceived safety seemed to be determined by distinct environmental features. Though this study focused on determinants of child and parent perceived safety, future research investigating the impact of neighborhood safety on child health should consider both child and parent perspectives. PMID:25450517

Côté-Lussier, Carolyn; Jackson, Jonathan; Kestens, Yan; Henderson, Melanie; Barnett, Tracie A

2014-12-01

186

'Ecstasy' as a social drug: MDMA preferentially affects responses to emotional stimuli with social content.  

PubMed

3,4-Methylenedioxymethamphetamine (MDMA, 'ecstasy') is used recreationally to improve mood and sociability, and has generated clinical interest as a possible adjunct to psychotherapy. One way that MDMA may produce positive 'prosocial' effects is by changing responses to emotional stimuli, especially stimuli with social content. Here, we examined for the first time how MDMA affects subjective responses to positive, negative and neutral emotional pictures with and without social content. We hypothesized that MDMA would dose-dependently increase reactivity to positive emotional stimuli and dampen reactivity to negative stimuli, and that these effects would be most pronounced for pictures with people in them. The data were obtained from two studies using similar designs with healthy occasional MDMA users (total N = 101). During each session, participants received MDMA (0, 0.75 and 1.5 mg/kg oral), and then rated their positive and negative responses to standardized positive, negative and neutral pictures with and without social content. MDMA increased positive ratings of positive social pictures, but reduced positive ratings of non-social positive pictures. We speculate this 'socially selective' effect contributes to the prosocial effects of MDMA by increasing the comparative value of social contact and closeness with others. This effect may also contribute to its attractiveness to recreational users. PMID:24682132

Wardle, Margaret C; Kirkpatrick, Matthew G; de Wit, Harriet

2014-08-01

187

Engaging Education: Developing Emotional Literacy, Equity and Coeducation  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This is the first book to link the issues of emotional literacy, equity and social justice, and the education of the whole child, thus providing the social and political context for emotional literacy. In connecting emotional literacy and equity with the structure of schooling, it establishes that co-educational schools can contribute to enabling…

Matthews, Brian

2005-01-01

188

Social and Emotional Learning Programs for Elementary School Students: A Pilot Study.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This study applied the theoretical frameworks of emotional and social intelligence to the development and implementation of an education program for elementary school children. The key component in strengthening emotional intelligence involves the correct identification and understanding of internal physiologically anchored emotional states and of…

Bruno, Kristie; England, Eileen; Chambliss, Catherine

189

The Social Costs of Emotional Suppression: A Prospective Study of the Transition to College  

E-print Network

in understanding how emotion regulation affects adaptation. The present study examined expressive suppression of adaptation, social functioning. This investigation focused on the transition to college, a time that presents According to contemporary theories of emotion, emotions begin with an evaluation of internal or external

Gross, James J.

190

Mother's social capital and child health in Indonesia.  

PubMed

Social capital has been shown to be positively associated with a range of health outcomes, yet few studies have explored the association between mother's social capital and children's health. This study examines the relation between mothers' access to social capital (via participation in community activities) and child health. Instrumental variable estimation was applied to cross sectional data of the Indonesian Family Life Survey (IFLS) 2007 which consist of face-to-face interviews among the adult population in Indonesia (N(mothers) = 3450, N(children) = 4612, N(communities) = 309, and participation rate at 92%). The findings show strong evidence for the causal flow running from a mother's social capital to her children's health. All instruments are highly correlated with mothers' social capital but uncorrelated with child health. The findings are also robust to individual and community characteristics associated with child health, and suggest that enlarging mothers' social capital through various community activities is a particularly relevant intervention for reducing child health disparities in Indonesia. PMID:23849232

Sujarwoto, Sujarwoto; Tampubolon, Gindo

2013-08-01

191

Child Psychology Child psychology is one of the  

E-print Network

Child Psychology Child psychology is one of the many branches of psychology and one of the most prenatal development through adolescence. Child psychology deals not only with how children grow physically, but with their mental, emotional and social development, as well. www.uwindsor.ca/psychology A Rigorous, Enriching

192

The Facilitation of Social-Emotional Understanding and Social Interaction in High-Functioning Children with Autism: Intervention Outcomes  

Microsoft Academic Search

This study evaluated the effectiveness of a 7-month cognitive behavioral intervention for the facilitation of the social-emotional understanding and social interaction of 15 high-functioning children (8 to 17 years old) with autism. Intervention focused on teaching interpersonal problem solving, affective knowledge, and social interaction. Preintervention and postintervention measures included observations of social interaction, measures of problem solving and of emotion

Nirit Bauminger

2002-01-01

193

The social perception of emotional abilities: Expanding what we know about observer ratings of emotional intelligence.  

PubMed

We examine the social perception of emotional intelligence (EI) through the use of observer ratings. Individuals frequently judge others' emotional abilities in real-world settings, yet we know little about the properties of such ratings. This article examines the social perception of EI and expands the evidence to evaluate its reliability and cross-judge agreement, as well as its convergent, divergent, and predictive validity. Three studies use real-world colleagues as observers and data from 2,521 participants. Results indicate significant consensus across observers about targets' EI, moderate but significant self-observer agreement, and modest but relatively consistent discriminant validity across the components of EI. Observer ratings significantly predicted interdependent task performance, even after controlling for numerous factors. Notably, predictive validity was greater for observer-rated than for self-rated or ability-tested EI. We discuss the minimal associations of observer ratings with ability-tested EI, study limitations, future directions, and practical implications. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2015 APA, all rights reserved). PMID:25664949

Elfenbein, Hillary Anger; Barsade, Sigal G; Eisenkraft, Noah

2015-02-01

194

The Relationship Between Sources and Functions of Social Support and Dimensions of Child- and Parent-Related Stress  

PubMed Central

Background In this longitudinal study, we examined the relationship between the sources and functions of social support and dimensions of child- and parent-related stress for mothers of young children with mild developmental delays. Methods Sixty-three mothers completed assessments of stress and support at two time points. Results Multiple regression analyses revealed that parenting support during the early childhood period (i.e., advice on problems specific to their child and assistance with child care responsibilities), irrespective of source, consistently predicted most dimensions of parent stress assessed during the early elementary years and contributed unique variance. General support (i.e., primarily emotional support and validation) from various sources had other, less widespread effects on parental stress. Conclusions The multi-dimensional perspective of the construct of social support that emerged suggested mechanisms mediating the relationship between support and stress and provided a framework for intervention. PMID:18507703

Guralnick, Michael J.; Hammond, Mary A.; Neville, Brian; Connor, Robert T.

2008-01-01

195

[Heart transplant: an emotional storm for the child and his family].  

PubMed

The purpose of the present study was a psychological analysis of the emotional state of a family awaiting heart transplantation. Current practice suggests that such emotional reaction is characterized by mixed and contradictory feelings which require further investigation. Subjects were 5 children waiting for transplant and 5 with previous transplant. Methods were: 1) open interview with children and parents; 2) projective drawing test for children (Corman family test, H.T.P., L.A.D.S., M.U.C.T., K.F.D.); 3) "palinomas" questionnaire which investigates: awareness of the illness, child relation with the food, feelings of competence and control, self-esteem and perception of the self. "Palinomas" was created in Italy by a hospital psychological team in order to give a chance to the child to talk about himself and to maintain control over the situation. The information we obtained by "palinomas" revealed to be very useful to understand the personality of the child through the main areas reported above. Within the limits of an introductory study, results indicate that family needs an active psychological support in order to develop a more positive attitude. PMID:8029083

Medioli, M; Cavalli, C; Podestà, A; Mascheroni, S; Agnetti, A; Ferrazzi, P; Squarcia, U

1994-01-01

196

The Impact of Extreme Emotional Distance in the Mother-Child Relationship on the Offspring’s Future Risk of Maltreatment Perpetration  

Microsoft Academic Search

Emotional qualities of the parent-child relationship are thought to influence the offspring’s risk for perpetrating child\\u000a maltreatment in adulthood. The current study examined whether having grown up in an enmeshed or disengaged mother-child relationship,\\u000a hence a relationship characterized by extremes on the continuum of emotional distance, increased the offspring’s risk of child\\u000a maltreatment perpetration in a sample of 178 undergraduate

Yuko Okado; Sandra T. Azar

2011-01-01

197

Neuropsychological Impairments and Changes in Emotional and Social Behaviour Following Severe Traumatic Brain Injury  

Microsoft Academic Search

Changes in emotional and social behaviour are relatively common following severe traumatic brain injury (TBI). Despite the serious consequences of these changes, little is known about the underlying neuropsychological deficits. In this study, we investigated which deficits might underlie these behavioural changes. The emotional and social behaviour of 17 patients with severe TBI was assessed with questionnaires, completed by the

Maarten Milders; Sandra Fuchs; John R. Crawford

2003-01-01

198

Facial Emotion Recognition in Children with High Functioning Autism and Children with Social Phobia  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Recognizing facial affect is essential for effective social functioning. This study examines emotion recognition abilities in children aged 7-13 years with High Functioning Autism (HFA = 19), Social Phobia (SP = 17), or typical development (TD = 21). Findings indicate that all children identified certain emotions more quickly (e.g., happy [less…

Wong, Nina; Beidel, Deborah C.; Sarver, Dustin E.; Sims, Valerie

2012-01-01

199

"The Room under the Steps": Creating a Sense of Community for Socially-Emotionally Disturbed Adolescents.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This paper describes the outcomes of an action research project that implemented a program for increasing social-emotional functioning and improving academic achievement in 18 high school students with social and emotional disabilities. Analysis of probable cause data revealed that these students lacked a sense of affiliation to the high school…

Sullivan, Marie E.

200

Use of Social Emotional Learning Skills to Predict Future Academic Success and Progress toward Graduation  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This study evaluated the degree to which a range of social emotional learning skills--academic self-efficacy, academic motivation, social connections, importance of school, and managing psychological and emotional distress and academic stress--could be used as an indicator of future academic outcomes. Using a sample of 4,797 from a large urban…

Davis, Alan; Solberg, V. Scott; de Baca, Christine; Gore, Taryn Hargrove

2014-01-01

201

An Investigation of Preschool Classroom Behavioral Adjustment Problems and Social-Emotional School Readiness Competencies  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The study examined the unique relationship between multiple dimensions of classroom behavioral adjustment problems and salient social-emotional competencies for urban Head Start children. These relationships were investigated using a hierarchical model that controlled for the variance in social-emotional outcomes attributed to age, gender, and…

Fantuzzo, John W.; Bulotsky-Shearer, Rebecca; Fusco, Rachel A.; McWayne, Christine

2005-01-01

202

Social-Emotional Characteristics of Gifted Accelerated and Non-Accelerated Students in the Netherlands  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Background: In the studies of acceleration conducted so far a multidimensional perspective has largely been neglected. No attempt has been made to relate social-emotional characteristics of accelerated versus non-accelerated students in perspective of environmental factors. Aims: In this study, social-emotional characteristics of accelerated…

Hoogeveen, Lianne; van Hell, Janet G.; Verhoeven, Ludo

2012-01-01

203

A Psychometric Study of the Infant and Toddler Intervals of the Social Emotional Assessment Measure  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Psychometric and utility studies on Social Emotional Assessment Measure (SEAM), an innovative tool for assessing and monitoring social-emotional and behavioral development in infants and toddlers with disabilities, were conducted. The Infant and Toddler SEAM intervals were the study focus, using mixed methods, including item response theory…

Squires, Jane K.; Waddell, Misti L.; Clifford, Jantina R.; Funk, Kristin; Hoselton, Robert M.; Chen, Ching-I

2013-01-01

204

The Relationships among Facial Emotion Recognition, Social Skills, and Quality of Life.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Forty-six institutionalized adults with mild or moderate mental retardation were administered the Vineland Adaptive Behavior Scales (socialization domain), a subjective measure of quality of life, and a facial emotion recognition test. Facial emotion recognition, quality of life, and social skills appeared to be independent of one another. Facial…

Simon, Elliott W.; And Others

1995-01-01

205

The Relationships among Language Ability, Emotion Regulation and Social Competence in Second-Grade Students  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Relationships exist between language ability, emotion regulation, and social competence in preschool children. This study examines how these relationships function in elementary school children, and explores whether language ability partially mediates the relationship between emotion regulation and social competence. Second-grade students (N = 67)…

Monopoli, W. John; Kingston, Sharon

2012-01-01

206

Moderators of the Relation between Shyness and Behavior with Peers: Cortisol Dysregulation and Maternal Emotion Socialization  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This study investigated the relations among shyness, physiological dysregulation, and maternal emotion socialization in predicting children's social behavior with peers during the kindergarten year (N = 66; 29 girls). For shy children, interactions with peers represent potential stressors that can elicit negative emotion and physiological…

Davis, Elizabeth L.; Buss, Kristin A.

2012-01-01

207

Deficient saccadic inhibition in Asperger's disorder and the social-emotional processing disorder  

E-print Network

PAPER Deficient saccadic inhibition in Asperger's disorder and the social-emotional processing;75:1719­1726. doi: 10.1136/jnnp.2003.025981 Background: Both Asperger's disorder and the social-emotional processing executive functions in Asperger's disorder and SEPD, inhibition and task switching, using a single saccadic

Manoach, Dara S.

208

Kentucky's Early Childhood Professional Development Initiative to Promote Social-Emotional Competence  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This article examines the Kentucky Initiative for Social Skill and Emotional Development which provides annual training and technical assistance to build early childhood programs' capacity to deliver practices known to promote social and emotional competency. The initiative is based on the 3-tiered Positive Behavior Support model that teaches…

McLaren, Elizabeth M.; Hall, Phyllis J.; Fox, Pamela

2009-01-01

209

Teaching Online Social Skills to Students with Emotional and Behavioral Disorders  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Students with emotional and behavioral disorders often lack appropriate social skills. This deficit can lead to negative outcomes including peer and teacher rejection, increased behavioral problems at school, and decreased academic achievement. In order to improve the social outcomes of students with emotional and behavioral disorders, teachers…

Morgan, Joseph John

2012-01-01

210

False Belief, Emotion Understanding, and Social Skills among Head Start and Non-Head Start Children  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The present study investigated relationships among false belief, emotion understanding, and social skills with 60 3- to 5-year-olds (29 boys, 31 girls) from Head Start and two other preschools. Children completed language, false belief, and emotion understanding measures; parents and teachers evaluated children's social skills. Children's false…

Weimer, Amy A.; Guajardo, Nicole R.

2005-01-01

211

Linking Prevention Science and Social and Emotional Learning: The Oregon Resiliency Project  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This article reviews the contributions of the Oregon Resiliency Project, an effort to enhance positive social-emotional development of children and youth through social and emotional learning (SEL). The project was launched in 2001 as a collaborative effort between faculty and graduate student researchers at the University of Oregon. The primary…

Merrell, Kenneth W.

2010-01-01

212

Casting the Conceptual Net: Cognitive Possibilities for Embracing the Social and Emotional Richness of Art Education  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Although the argument for art as cognition has gained significant momentum since the cognitive revolution, recent scientific investigations of cognition have revealed the import of social and emotional thinking for meaningful, contextualized learning, thereby highlighting the inherent social and emotional properties of artmaking as inevitably…

Blatt-Gross, Carolina

2010-01-01

213

Program Development and Outcomes Assessment of Social Emotional Curriculum Utilized with High School Special Education Population  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The present study will assess the effectiveness of a social emotional learning curriculum implemented in a Midwestern high school with special education students. The specific social emotional curriculum utilized at this particular school was organized and delivered by the school psychologists at the high school, based on the Strong Teens…

Wedam, Allison

2012-01-01

214

Social-Emotional School Readiness: How Do We Ensure Children Are Ready to Learn?  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This article begins with a review of research providing evidence that social-emotional competence is a key component of school readiness and that the foundations for social-emotional competence are laid down in the earliest years. We go on to review effective practices and specific interventions that have been found to strengthen children's…

Gray, Sarah A. O.; Herberle, Amy E.; Carter, Alice S.

2012-01-01

215

A Study of Social-Emotional Adjustment Levels of Preschool Children in Relation to Peer Relationships  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The aim of this research is to study social--emotional adaptation levels of 5-to 6-year old preschool children in relation to peer relationships. One hundred and forty-four children aged between 5 and 6 joined in this relational survey study. According to the results of the research analysing the relationship between the social-emotional

Gülay, Hülya; Önder, Alev

2013-01-01

216

Reviving Oral Reading Practices with English Learners by Integrating Social-Emotional Learning  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The purpose of this article is to provide background on integrating social-emotional learning (SEL) into classroom oral reading practices. The section that follows outlines some of the language and academic demands English learners (ELs) face at school. Another section considers the relationship between academic and social-emotional learning. The…

Dresser, Rocio

2012-01-01

217

Human resource development, social capital, emotional intelligence : Any link to productivity?  

Microsoft Academic Search

Purpose – This article aims to offer a theoretical framework that attempts to show the integration among human resource development (HRD), social capital (SC), emotional intelligence (EI) and organizational productivity. Design\\/methodology\\/approach – The literature search included the following: a computerized search of accessible and available material using the key words “human resource development”, “emotional intelligence”, “social capital”, “human capital”, “organizational

Kit Brooks; Fredrick Muyia Nafukho

2006-01-01

218

Improving Instruction and Services in Schools for Socially Maladjusted, Emotionally Disturbed Children.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This program was designed to supplement the New York City tax levy educational program provided for 2128 underachieving socially maladjusted, emotionally disturbed students in grades three through twelve. Most of the students were enrolled in 16 special day schools for the socially maladjusted and emotionally disturbed. The remaining students were…

Curtis, Rebecca C.

219

The Relation of Children's Everyday Nonsocial Peer Play Behavior to Their Emotionality, Regulation, and Social Functioning  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The relations of children's nonsocial behavior to their emotionality, regulation, and social functioning were examined in a short-term longitudinal study. Parents (primarily mothers) and teachers rated children's effortful regulation, emotionality, asocial behaviors, problem behaviors, and social acceptance, and children's nonsocial play behaviors…

Spinrad, Tracy L.; Eisenberg, Nancy; Harris, Elizabeth; Hanish, Laura; Fabes, Richard A.; Kupanoff, Kristina; Ringwald, Staci; Holmes, Julie

2004-01-01

220

Child Watching: Determining the Quality of Handicapped Children's Social Interaction.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The paper presents an observational system for use in evaluating preschool handicapped children's social integration in mainstreamed classrooms. An adaptation of LeBlanc, Etzel, and Tyler's observational system, this model also employs White's system of evaluating affective tone. The method entails choosing a handicapped child in a classroom and a…

Herink, Nancy

221

Tissue plasminogen activator modulates emotion in a social context.  

PubMed

Tissue plasminogen activator (tPA) is known to play physiologically and pathologically crucial roles in the central nervous system. However, it is still obscure whether it affects social behavior. We investigated social behavior and neuronal activation after social stimulation in tPA knockout (KO) mice. In a resident-intruder test, the latency to the first contact was significantly delayed in tPA KO mice compared with that in tPA heterogenic (Het) mice. However, tPA KO mice spent significantly more time undertaking active behavior than tPA Het mice did. In a sociability test, tPA KO mice significantly spent more time and walked a greater distance in the chamber containing an empty cage than tPA Het mice. Furthermore, tPA KO mice approached an empty cage more frequently than tPA Het mice did. In a social novelty test, there was no difference in the duration spent sniffing a stimulator mouse between genotypes. However, tPA KO mice approached even a familiar mouse more frequently than tPA Het mice did. tPA KO mice spent similar durations in a chamber containing a familiar mouse and that containing an unfamiliar mouse, and tPA KO mice walked a significantly greater distance in the former chamber than tPA Het mice did. Furthermore, at the cingulate and prelimbic cortices, the number of cFos-positive cells was significantly increased in tPA KO mice compared with that in tPA Het mice after social stimulation. Our results suggest that tPA modulates emotion in a social context through the function of the prefrontal cortex. PMID:25499620

Nakamura, Kazuki; Takabe, Ayumi; Shimizu, Fuki; Takahashi, Maiko; Matsuo, Osamu; Mitsui, Shinichi

2015-03-15

222

Measuring Child Care Quality.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Child care quality is not a single dimension, but rather a multidimensional characteristic of programs that support the family in its child-rearing role and programs in which children thrive developmentally, socially, cognitively, physically, and emotionally. At the regulatory and accreditation level, approaches to quality focus on group size,…

Fiene, Richard

223

A Longitudinal Process Analysis of Mother-Child Emotional Relationships in a Rural Appalachian European American Community  

PubMed Central

This prospective longitudinal study examines emotional relationships in 58 Appalachian mother-child dyads observed at home at 5 and 20 months. Between infancy and toddlerhood, 3 of 4 dimensions of dyadic emotional relationships were stable, and 3 remained continuous in their mean level. Increasing maternal age was associated with greater maternal sensitivity and structuring and with more responsive and involving children. Marital status and father presence in the home as well as maternal openness, parenting knowledge, investment, and satisfaction accounted for effects of maternal age on dyadic emotional relationships. This longitudinal process analysis provides unique insights into temporal dynamics of mother-child emotional relationships and their determinants in an underserved and underresearched U.S. community. Implications for community-specific interventions are discussed. PMID:22080397

Bornstein, Marc H.; Putnick, Diane L.; Suwalsky, Joan T. D.

2012-01-01

224

Mediating and Moderating Processes in the Relation between Maltreatment and Psychopathology: Mother-Child Relationship Quality and Emotion Regulation  

Microsoft Academic Search

The present study investigated underlying processes of the effect of maltreatment on psychopathology (i.e., internalizing\\u000a and externalizing problems) in a group of 111 maltreated and 110 nonmaltreated 7–10 year-old children (60% boys). We tested\\u000a the moderating and\\/or mediating roles of emotion regulation and the mother-child relationship quality (pattern of relatedness)\\u000a using Structural Equation Modeling. Emotion regulation, but not the pattern of

Lenneke R. A. Alink; Dante Cicchetti; Jungmeen Kim; Fred A. Rogosch

2009-01-01

225

Social and emotional decision-making following frontal lobe injury.  

PubMed

Neuropsychological, psychophysiological and functional imaging research has begun to offer insights into the everyday difficulties in decision-making experienced by some patients with frontal lobe damage. It is widely accepted that the ventral prefrontal cortex plays a pivotal role in social and emotional decision-making. This article will review experimental findings using the Iowa Gambling Task and the Cambridge Gamble Task that explore the brain mechanisms of decision-making. Convergent evidence from the two tasks confirms the importance of ventral PFC, but also highlights the relevance of lesion laterality, lesion aetiology, and the contribution of other brain regions (including the dorsal prefrontal cortex and amygdala) to decision-making abilities. The extent to which disrupted decision-making can be separated from the broader domain of executive function is discussed. PMID:15788279

Clark, Luke; Manes, Facundo

2004-10-01

226

Enhancing social cognition by training children in emotion understanding: a primary school study.  

PubMed

We investigated whether training school-age children in emotion understanding had a significant effect on their social cognition. Participants were 110 children (mean age=7 years 3 months) assigned to training and control conditions. Over a 2-month intervention program, after the reading of illustrated scenarios based on emotional scripts, the training group was engaged in conversations on emotion understanding, whereas the control group was simply asked to produce a drawing about the story. The training group outperformed the control group on emotion comprehension, theory of mind, and empathy, and the positive training outcomes for emotion understanding remained stable over 6 months. Implications of the findings are discussed. PMID:24280639

Ornaghi, Veronica; Brockmeier, Jens; Grazzani, Ilaria

2014-03-01

227

Orbitofrontal Cortex and Social Behavior: Integrating Self-monitoring and EmotionCognition Interactions  

E-print Network

Orbitofrontal Cortex and Social Behavior: Integrating Self-monitoring and Emotion & The role of the orbitofrontal cortex in social behavior re- mains a puzzle. Various theories of the social damage, orbitofrontal damage was associated with objectively inappro- priate social behavior. Although

Beer, Jennifer

228

Social Skills Instruction for Adolescents with Emotional Disabilities: A Technology-Based Intervention  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This study explored the use of multimedia, student-generated social skills lessons coupled with teacher facilitation to improve the social skills of middle-school students with emotional disabilities. The effects of teacher-led social skills instruction and the combination of teacher-led and multimedia student-generated social skills instruction…

Cummings, Therese M.; Higgins, Kyle; Pierce, Tom; Miller, Susan; Boone, Randall; Tandy, Richard

2009-01-01

229

Dynamic Planning For Agents in Games using Social Norms and Emotions  

E-print Network

Dynamic Planning For Agents in Games using Social Norms and Emotions Palli R Thrainsson, Arnkell. In realistic social game environments, agents need to exhibit a certain level of social awareness to maintain that imbues game agents with socially reactive behavior based on a continuous steering framework and a model

Vilhjálmsson, Hannes Högni

230

Differentiating emotions across contexts: comparing adults with and without social anxiety disorder using random, social interaction, and daily experience sampling.  

PubMed

The ability to recognize and label emotional experiences has been associated with well-being and adaptive functioning. This skill is particularly important in social situations, as emotions provide information about the state of relationships and help guide interpersonal decisions, such as whether to disclose personal information. Given the interpersonal difficulties linked to social anxiety disorder (SAD), deficient negative emotion differentiation may contribute to impairment in this population. We hypothesized that people with SAD would exhibit less negative emotion differentiation in daily life, and these differences would translate to impairment in social functioning. We recruited 43 people diagnosed with generalized SAD and 43 healthy adults to describe the emotions they experienced over 14 days. Participants received palmtop computers for responding to random prompts and describing naturalistic social interactions; to complete end-of-day diary entries, they used a secure online website. We calculated intraclass correlation coefficients to capture the degree of differentiation of negative and positive emotions for each context (random moments, face-to-face social interactions, and end-of-day reflections). Compared to healthy controls, the SAD group exhibited less negative (but not positive) emotion differentiation during random prompts, social interactions, and (at trend level) end-of-day assessments. These differences could not be explained by emotion intensity or variability over the 14 days, or to comorbid depression or anxiety disorders. Our findings suggest that people with generalized SAD have deficits in clarifying specific negative emotions felt at a given point of time. These deficits may contribute to difficulties with effective emotion regulation and healthy social relationship functioning. PMID:24512246

Kashdan, Todd B; Farmer, Antonina S

2014-06-01

231

Child behaviour checklist emotional dysregulation profiles in youth with disruptive behaviour disorders: Clinical correlates and treatment implications.  

PubMed

Two Child Behaviour Checklist (CBCL) profiles were correlated to poor self-regulation, Deficient Emotional Self-Regulation (DESR) (elevation between 1 and 2 Standard Deviations (SD) in Anxiety/Depression, Aggression, Attention subscales), and Dysregulation Profile (DP) (elevation of 2 Standard Deviations or more). We explored youths with Oppositional Defiant Disorder (ODD) and Conduct Disorder (CD) whether these profiles are associated with specific clinical features. The sample included 57 patients with DESR profile and 41 with DP profile, ages 9 to 15 years, all assigned to a non-pharmacological Multimodal Treatment Program. No differences resulted between groups in demographic features, diagnosis ratio, and comorbidities with Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD), Bipolar Disorder (BD), and Anxiety Disorder. The DP group was associated with higher scores in Withdrawn, Social Problem, Thought, Rule Breaking, and Somatic CBCL subscales, and higher scores in Narcissism and Impulsivity (but not Callous-Unemotional (CU)), according to the Antisocial Process Screening Device (APSD). After treatment, patients with DESR improved their personality traits (Narcissistic and Callous-Unemotional, but not Impulsivity), while changes in CBCL scales were modest. Patients with DP improved scales of Attention, Aggression, Anxiety-Depression, Rule Breaking, Withdrawal, Social Problem and Thought, while personality features did not change. These results suggest diagnostic implications of CBCL profiles, and indications for targeted treatment strategies. PMID:25480545

Gabriele, Masi; Pietro, Muratori; Azzurra, Manfredi; Simone, Pisano; Annarita, Milone

2015-01-30

232

Parent–Child and Triadic Antecedents of Children’s Social Competence: Cultural Specificity, Shared Process  

Microsoft Academic Search

Guided by theories of cultural participation, the authors examined mother–child, father–child, and triadic interactive behaviors in 141 Israeli and Palestinian couples and their firstborn child at 5 and 33 months as antecedents of children’s social competence. Four parent–child measures (parent sensitivity, child social engagement, parental control, dyadic reciprocity) and two family-level measures (cohesion and rigidity) were coded at each age.

Ruth Feldman; Shafiq Masalha

2010-01-01

233

Emotion dialogues of foster caregivers with their children: the role of the caregivers, above and beyond child characteristics, in shaping the interactions.  

PubMed

The study examined foster caregivers' sensitive guidance of conversations about emotional themes in a sample of foster caregivers living in Family Group Homes. Thirty caregivers were observed with two out of the several children under their care: one that was nominated by the Family Group Home's social worker as the most challenging child in the Family Group Home, and one that was nominated as the least challenging child. Based on attachment theory that argues that mothers possess a central role in shaping the interaction with the child by adapting their caregiving to the child's individual characteristics (Bowlby, 1982), we argued that caregivers' sensitivity will reflect the differences between the caregivers and not the differences between the children. We therefore hypothesized that the caregivers would show similar levels of sensitive guidance regarding their children, irrespective of the level of difficulty the children presented. The results supported our hypotheses by showing that caregivers' sensitive guidance of the conversations was similar across the most and least challenging children. The results highlight the importance of the caregiver in shaping the interactions with their children regardless of the degree to which the child is challenging. PMID:23186141

Koren-Karie, Nina; Oppenheim, David; Yuval-Adler, Shira; Mor, Hila

2013-01-01

234

Reappraising social emotions: the role of inferior frontal gyrus, temporo-parietal junction and insula in interpersonal emotion regulation  

PubMed Central

Previous studies have reported the effect of emotion regulation (ER) strategies on both individual and social decision-making, however, the effect of regulation on socially driven emotions independent of decisions is still unclear. In the present study, we investigated the neural effects of using reappraisal to both up- and down-regulate socially driven emotions. Participants played the Dictator Game (DG) in the role of recipient while undergoing fMRI, and concurrently applied the strategies of either up-regulation (reappraising the proposer's intentions as more negative), down-regulation (reappraising the proposer's intentions as less negative), as well as a baseline “look” condition. Results showed that regions responding to the implementation of reappraisal (effect of strategy, that is, “regulating regions”) were the inferior and middle frontal gyrus, temporo parietal junction and insula bilaterally. Importantly, the middle frontal gyrus activation correlated with the frequency of regulatory strategies in daily life, with the insula activation correlating with the perceived ability to reappraise the emotions elicited by the social situation. Regions regulated by reappraisal (effect of regulation, that is, “regulated regions”) were the striatum, the posterior cingulate and the insula, showing increased activation for the up-regulation and reduced activation for down-regulation, both compared to the baseline condition. When analyzing the separate effects of partners' behavior, selfish behavior produced an activation of the insula, not observed when subjects were treated altruistically. Here we show for the first time that interpersonal ER strategies can strongly affect neural responses when experiencing socially driven emotions. Clinical implications of these findings are also discussed to understand how the way we interpret others' intentions may affect the way we emotionally react. PMID:24027512

Grecucci, Alessandro; Giorgetta, Cinzia; Bonini, Nicolao; Sanfey, Alan G.

2013-01-01

235

Neurophysiological Markers for Child Emotion Regulation from the Perspective of Emotion-Cognition Integration: Current Directions and Future Challenges  

PubMed Central

Neuroscientific research on emotion regulation suggests that the interplay between emotion and cognition may be fundamental to the ability to adaptively regulate emotions. Although emotion and cognition have historically been considered to be in opposition, more recent research suggests that they are also integrated, coordinated, and complementary. In this article, I review studies showing that scalp-recorded event-related potentials (ERPs) reflecting emotion-cognition integration can be used as clinically meaningful indices of emotion regulation in children and adults, and have the potential to serve as biomarkers for emotion regulation and risk for specific affective disorders. Drawing on neuroscience and behavioral research, I propose a model in which ERP measures of emotion-cognition integration rather than opposition is the guiding principle for detecting neural markers for emotion regulation. Suggestions for a future research agenda are then presented. PMID:20390603

Dennis, Tracy A.

2010-01-01

236

Political violence and child adjustment in Northern Ireland: Testing pathways in a social ecological model including single and two-parent families  

PubMed Central

Moving beyond simply documenting that political violence negatively impacts children, a social ecological hypothesis for relations between political violence and child outcomes was tested. Participants were 700 mother-child (M=12.1years, SD=1.8) dyads from 18 working class, socially deprived areas in Belfast, Northern Ireland, including single- and two-parent families. Sectarian community violence was associated with elevated family conflict and children’s reduced security about multiple aspects of their social environment (i.e., family, parent-child relations, and community), with links to child adjustment problems and reductions in prosocial behavior. By comparison, and consistent with expectations, links with negative family processes, child regulatory problems and child outcomes were less consistent for nonsectarian community violence. Support was found for a social ecological model for relations between political violence and child outcomes among both single and two parent families, with evidence that emotional security and adjustment problems were more negatively affected in single-parent families. The implications for understanding social ecologies of political violence and children’s functioning are discussed. PMID:20604605

Cummings, E. Mark; Schermerhorn, Alice C.; Merrilees, Christine E.; Goeke-Morey, Marcie C.; Shirlow, Peter; Cairns, Ed

2013-01-01

237

Cultivating the Socially Competent Body: Bodies and Risk in Swedish Programmes for Social Emotional Learning in Preschools and Schools  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Social emotional learning (SEL) is common in preschools and schools both in Europe and North America today. Programmes for socio-emotional training and the rise of what is labelled therapeutic education have dramatically increased during the first decade of the millennium. In this article, a manual-based programme used for SEL in a Swedish school…

Bartholdsson, Åsa; Gustafsson-Lundberg, Johanna; Hultin, Eva

2014-01-01

238

Screening for Autism Spectrum Disorders with the Brief Infant-Toddler Social and Emotional Assessment  

PubMed Central

Objective Using parent-completed questionnaires in (preventive) child health care can facilitate the early detection of psychosocial problems and psychopathology, including autism spectrum disorders (ASD). A promising questionnaire for this purpose is the Brief Infant-Toddler Social and Emotional Assessment (BITSEA). The screening accuracy with regard to ASD of the BITSEA Problem and Competence scales and a newly calculated Autism score were evaluated. Method Data, that was collected between April 2010 and April 2011, from a community sample of 2-year-olds (N?=?3127), was combined with a sample of preschool children diagnosed with ASD (N?=?159). For the total population and for subgroups by child's gender, area under the Receiver Operating Characteristic (ROC) curve was examined, and across a range of BITSEA Problem, Competence and Autism scores, sensitivity, specificity, positive and negative likelihood ratio's, diagnostic odds ratio and Youden's index were reported. Results The area under the ROC curve (95% confidence interval, [95%CI]) of the Problem scale was 0.90(0.87–0.92), of the Competence scale 0.93(0.91–0.95), and of the Autism score 0.95(0.93–0.97). For the total population, the screening accuracy of the Autism score was significantly better, compared to the Problem scale. The screening accuracy of the Competence scale was significantly better for girls (AUC?=?0.97; 95%CI?=?0.95–0.98) than for boys (AUC?=?0.91; 95%CI?=?0.88–0.94). Conclusion The results indicate that the BITSEA scales and newly calculated Autism score have good discriminative power to differentiate children with and without ASD. Therefore, the BITSEA may be helpful in the early detection of ASD, which could have beneficial effects on the child's development. PMID:24851868

Kruizinga, Ingrid; Visser, Janne C.; van Batenburg-Eddes, Tamara; Carter, Alice S.; Jansen, Wilma; Raat, Hein

2014-01-01

239

The Reformulation of Emotional Security Theory: The Role of Children’s Social Defense in Developmental Psychopathology  

PubMed Central

Although children’s security in the context of the interparental relationship has been identified as a key explanatory mechanism in pathways between family discord and child psychopathology, little is known about the inner workings of emotional security as a goal system. Accordingly, the objective of this paper is to describe how our reformulation of emotional security theory (EST-R) within an ethological and evolutionary framework may advance the characterization of the architecture and operation of emotional security and, in the process, cultivate sustainable growing points in developmental psychopathology. The first section of the paper describes how children’s security in the interparental relationship is organized around a distinctive behavioral system designed to defend against interpersonal threat. Building on this evolutionary foundation for emotional security, the paper offers an innovative taxonomy for identifying qualitatively different ways children try to preserve their security and its innovative implications for more precisely informing understanding of the mechanisms in pathways between family and developmental precursors and children’s trajectories of mental health. In the final section, the paper highlights the potential of EST-R to stimulate new generations of research on understanding how children defend against social threats in ecologies beyond the interparental dyad, including both familial and extrafamilial settings. PMID:24342849

Davies, Patrick T.; Martin, Meredith J.

2014-01-01

240

Effects of Mindfulness-Based Stress Reduction (MBSR) on Emotion Regulation in Social Anxiety Disorder  

Microsoft Academic Search

Mindfulness-based stress reduction (MBSR) is an established program shown to reduce symptoms of stress, anxiety, and depression. MBSR is believed to alter emotional responding by modifying cognitive–affective processes. Given that social anxiety disorder (SAD) is characterized by emotional and attentional biases as well as distorted negative self-beliefs, we examined MBSR-related changes in the brain–behavior indices of emotional reactivity and regulation

Philippe R. Goldin; James J. Gross

2010-01-01

241

Adding emotional tag to augment context-awareness in social network services  

Microsoft Academic Search

In this paper we address the challenges and design considerations to add emotional tag to existing Internet-based social network services. We propose an emotion tagger that takes content from diversified Internet-based services and maps the analyzed content to an emotional value which can be used to augment semantic values of Internet-based service. To show a proof of concept working environment,

Kazi Masudul Alam; Abdulmotaleb El Saddik; Wail Gueaieb

2011-01-01

242

The Emotional Well-Being of Our Nation's Youth and the Promise of Social-Emotional Learning  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

A public health crisis is looming in US schools. Millions of children do not receive mental health services, are poorly bonded to supportive educational communities, and fail to develop important social and emotional competencies. Considering these problems, many of which relate to students' school functioning, efforts are needed to support…

Lazarus, Philip J.; Sulkowski, Michael L.

2011-01-01

243

Social Workers’ Preparation for Child Protection: Revisiting the Question of Specialisation  

Microsoft Academic Search

Child welfare work is a key field of practice for social work graduates and for graduates of a growing range of disciplines. In the present paper, the authors drew on a survey of 208 child welfare workers and interviews with 28 senior personnel in child and family welfare agencies to analyse perceptions of the educational preparation of social workers and

Karen Healy; Gabrielle Meagher

2007-01-01

244

Dissociation is associated with emotional maltreatment in a sample of traumatized women with a history of child abuse.  

PubMed

Theories of dissociation emphasize that symptoms of dissociation are correlated with traumatic events. Although the association of dissociative symptoms and retrospective reports of child abuse with a focus on mainly sexual and physical abuse has been well documented, investigation of the contribution of emotional or psychological types of maltreatment to the prediction of dissociation has been neglected to a great extent. The aim of this study was to determine the differential impact of different types of maltreatment on dissociative symptoms in a sample of 203 female residential patients treated for posttraumatic stress disorder linked to child maltreatment. Moreover, it was examined whether the link between dissociation and child maltreatment is direct or indirect. Subjects completed questionnaires on child maltreatment, posttraumatic stress, and dissociative symptoms. Although all types of maltreatment were related to dissociative symptoms, emotional abuse was the strongest and most direct predictor of dissociation in multivariate hierarchical analyses with the influence of other trauma types being confounded by emotional abuse. This study highlights the importance of emotional types of maltreatment for the genesis of dissociative symptoms in patients with posttraumatic stress disorder. PMID:25365464

Haferkamp, Lisa; Bebermeier, Anke; Möllering, Andrea; Neuner, Frank

2015-01-01

245

Sensitivity and Specificity of the Screen for Child Anxiety Related Emotional Disorders (SCARED): A Community-Based Study  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The aim of this cross-sectional community-based study was to examine the sensitivity and specificity of the Screen for Child Anxiety Related Emotional Disorders (SCARED) to the diagnosis of anxiety disorders (AD). Participants were 119 students aged 9-18. Psychiatric diagnoses were assessed by a psychiatrist throughout a structural clinical…

DeSousa, Diogo Araujo; Salum, Giovanni Abrahao; Isolan, Luciano Rassier; Manfro, Gisele Gus

2013-01-01

246

Cross-Cultural Comparisons of Child-Reported Emotional and Physical Abuse: Rates, Risk Factors and Psychosocial Symptoms  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Objectives: This study was designed to assess the incidence of child emotional and physical abuse, associated risk factors and psychosocial symptoms in a cross-cultural comparison between post-communist bloc countries. Method: One-thousand one-hundred forty-five children ages 10-14 from Latvia (N=297), Lithuania (N=300), Macedonia (N=302), and…

Sebre, Sandra; Sprugevica, Ieva; Novotni, Antoni; Bonevski, Dimitar; Pakalniskiene, Vilmante; Popescu, Daniela; Turchina, Tatiana; Friedrich, William; Lewis, Owen

2004-01-01

247

Experimental evidence of massive-scale emotional contagion through social networks.  

PubMed

Emotional states can be transferred to others via emotional contagion, leading people to experience the same emotions without their awareness. Emotional contagion is well established in laboratory experiments, with people transferring positive and negative emotions to others. Data from a large real-world social network, collected over a 20-y period suggests that longer-lasting moods (e.g., depression, happiness) can be transferred through networks [Fowler JH, Christakis NA (2008) BMJ 337:a2338], although the results are controversial. In an experiment with people who use Facebook, we test whether emotional contagion occurs outside of in-person interaction between individuals by reducing the amount of emotional content in the News Feed. When positive expressions were reduced, people produced fewer positive posts and more negative posts; when negative expressions were reduced, the opposite pattern occurred. These results indicate that emotions expressed by others on Facebook influence our own emotions, constituting experimental evidence for massive-scale contagion via social networks. This work also suggests that, in contrast to prevailing assumptions, in-person interaction and nonverbal cues are not strictly necessary for emotional contagion, and that the observation of others' positive experiences constitutes a positive experience for people. PMID:24889601

Kramer, Adam D I; Guillory, Jamie E; Hancock, Jeffrey T

2014-06-17

248

Experimental evidence of massive-scale emotional contagion through social networks  

PubMed Central

Emotional states can be transferred to others via emotional contagion, leading people to experience the same emotions without their awareness. Emotional contagion is well established in laboratory experiments, with people transferring positive and negative emotions to others. Data from a large real-world social network, collected over a 20-y period suggests that longer-lasting moods (e.g., depression, happiness) can be transferred through networks [Fowler JH, Christakis NA (2008) BMJ 337:a2338], although the results are controversial. In an experiment with people who use Facebook, we test whether emotional contagion occurs outside of in-person interaction between individuals by reducing the amount of emotional content in the News Feed. When positive expressions were reduced, people produced fewer positive posts and more negative posts; when negative expressions were reduced, the opposite pattern occurred. These results indicate that emotions expressed by others on Facebook influence our own emotions, constituting experimental evidence for massive-scale contagion via social networks. This work also suggests that, in contrast to prevailing assumptions, in-person interaction and nonverbal cues are not strictly necessary for emotional contagion, and that the observation of others’ positive experiences constitutes a positive experience for people. PMID:24889601

Kramer, Adam D. I.; Guillory, Jamie E.; Hancock, Jeffrey T.

2014-01-01

249

Participation of Primary School Pupils Who Stay at Institution of Social Services and Child Protection Dormitories in Social Science Lessons  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This research aims to understand to what extent primary school pupils who stay at the Institution of Social Services and Child Protection dormitories participate in social science lessons. Data were obtained from pupils staying at the Institution of Social Services and Child Protection dormitories and attending primary schools in Istanbul and…

Guven, Sibel; Sahin Taskin, Cigdem

2008-01-01

250

Oxytocin improves behavioural and neural deficits in inferring others' social emotions in autism.  

PubMed

Recent studies have suggested oxytocin's therapeutic effects on deficits in social communication and interaction in autism spectrum disorder through improvement of emotion recognition with direct emotional cues, such as facial expression and voice prosody. Although difficulty in understanding of others' social emotions and beliefs under conditions without direct emotional cues also plays an important role in autism spectrum disorder, no study has examined the potential effect of oxytocin on this difficulty. Here, we sequentially conducted both a case-control study and a clinical trial to investigate the potential effects of oxytocin on this difficulty at behavioural and neural levels measured using functional magnetic resonance imaging during a psychological task. This task was modified from the Sally-Anne Task, a well-known first-order false belief task. The task was optimized for investigation of the abilities to infer another person's social emotions and beliefs distinctively so as to test the hypothesis that oxytocin improves deficit in inferring others' social emotions rather than beliefs, under conditions without direct emotional cues. In the case-control study, 17 males with autism spectrum disorder showed significant behavioural deficits in inferring others' social emotions (P = 0.018) but not in inferring others' beliefs (P = 0.064) compared with 17 typically developing demographically-matched male participants. They also showed significantly less activity in the right anterior insula and posterior superior temporal sulcus during inferring others' social emotions, and in the dorsomedial prefrontal cortex during inferring others' beliefs compared with the typically developing participants (P < 0.001 and cluster size > 10 voxels). Then, to investigate potential effects of oxytocin on these behavioural and neural deficits, we conducted a double-blind placebo-controlled crossover within-subject trial for single-dose intranasal administration of 24 IU oxytocin in an independent group of 20 males with autism spectrum disorder. Behaviourally, oxytocin significantly increased the correct rate in inferring others' social emotions (P = 0.043, one-tail). At the neural level, the peptide significantly enhanced the originally-diminished brain activity in the right anterior insula during inferring others' social emotions (P = 0.004), but not in the dorsomedial prefrontal cortex during inferring others' beliefs (P = 0.858). The present findings suggest that oxytocin enhances the ability to understand others' social emotions that have also required second-order false belief rather than first-order false beliefs under conditions without direct emotional cues in autism spectrum disorder at both the behaviour and neural levels. PMID:25149412

Aoki, Yuta; Yahata, Noriaki; Watanabe, Takamitsu; Takano, Yosuke; Kawakubo, Yuki; Kuwabara, Hitoshi; Iwashiro, Norichika; Natsubori, Tatsunobu; Inoue, Hideyuki; Suga, Motomu; Takao, Hidemasa; Sasaki, Hiroki; Gonoi, Wataru; Kunimatsu, Akira; Kasai, Kiyoto; Yamasue, Hidenori

2014-11-01

251

"I'm Not Scared of Anything": Emotion as Social Power in Children's Worlds  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This article examines how American middle-class children learn and acquire culturally appropriate emotions and sentiments, focusing especially on children's experiences. By analysing children's emotional worlds as well as adult socialization practices, the article shows that children actively reinterpret, reconstruct and reformulate various…

Ahn, Junehui

2010-01-01

252

Children's Interpretive Understanding, Moral Judgments, and Emotion Attributions: Relations to Social Behaviour  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The study investigated interpretive understanding, moral judgments, and emotion attributions in relation to social behaviour in a sample of 59 5-year-old, 123 7-year-old, and 130 9-year-old children. Interpretive understanding was assessed by two tasks measuring children's understanding of ambiguous situations. Moral judgments and emotion

Malti, Tina; Gasser, Luciano; Gutzwiller-Helfenfinger, Eveline

2010-01-01

253

Intrapersonal and Interpersonal Functions of Non Suicidal Self-Injury: Associations with Emotional and Social Functioning  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Understanding the functions of nonsuicidal self-injury (NSSI) has important implications for the development and refinement of theoretical models and treatments of NSSI. Emotional and social vulnerabilities associated with five common functions of NSSI-emotion relief (ER), feeling generation (FG), self-punishment (SP), interpersonal influence…

Turner, Brianna J.; Chapman, Alexander L.; Layden, Brianne K.

2012-01-01

254

Playing It Cool: Temperament, Emotion Regulation, and Social Behavior in Preschoolers  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The contributions of temperamental styles and emotional coping strategies to the development of preschoolers' social competence and behavior problems were investigated. The ability to cope with emotion was found to be more important than temperament alone in the development of prosocial behavior. Our results indicate that the use of passive coping…

Blair, Kimberly A.; Denham, Susanne A.; Kochanoff, Anita; Whipple, Beth

2004-01-01

255

The Place of Health Information and Socio-Emotional Support in Social Questioning and Answering  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Introduction: Little is known about the quality of health information in social contexts or how socio-emotional factors impact users' evaluations of quality. We explored how librarians, nurses and users assessed the quality of health answers posted on Yahoo! Answers, focusing on socio-emotional reactions displayed, advice given to users and…

Worrall, Adam; Oh, Sanghee

2013-01-01

256

Puzzlingly High Correlations in fMRI Studies of Emotion, Personality, and Social Cognition  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging (fMRI) studies of emotion, personality, and social cognition have drawn much attention in recent years, with high-profile studies frequently reporting extremely high (e.g., > 8) correlations between behavioral and self-report measures of personality or emotion and measures of brain activation. We show that…

Vul, Edward; Harris, Christine; Winkielman, Piotr; Pashler, Harold

2009-01-01

257

Decrease of Prefrontal-Posterior EEG Coherence: Loose Control during Social-Emotional Stimulation  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

In two experiments we aimed to investigate if individual differences in state-dependent decreases or increases of EEG coherence between prefrontal and posterior cortical regions may be indicative of a mechanism modulating the impact social-emotional information has on an individual. Two independent samples were exposed to an emotional stimulation…

Reiser, Eva M.; Schulter, Gunter; Weiss, Elisabeth M.; Fink, Andreas; Rominger, Christian; Papousek, Ilona

2012-01-01

258

Reflecting on Social Emotional Learning: A Critical Perspective on Trends in the United States  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This critical cultural analysis of trends in the field of social emotional learning (SEL) in the United States considers how ideas concerning emotional skills and competencies have informed programmatic discourse. While currently stressing links between SEL and academic achievement, program literature also places emphasis on ideals of caring,…

Hoffman, Diane M.

2009-01-01

259

Theory of Mind "Emotion", Developmental Characteristics and Social Understanding in Children and Adolescents with Intellectual Disabilities  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Patterns of development of ToM-emotion abilities in intellectually disabled (ID) children and typically developing (TD) children matched on their developmental age were investigated. The links between cognition, language, social understanding and ToM-emotion abilities were examined. EDEI-R (Perron-Borelli, M. (1996). "Echelles Differentielles…

Thirion-Marissiaux, Anne-Francoise; Nader-Grosbois, Nathalie

2008-01-01

260

Class Climate Moderates Peer Relations and Emotional Adjustment in Children with an Early History of Anxious Solitude: A Child x Environment Model  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Classroom emotional climate was hypothesized to moderate psychosocial adjustment in 1st grade for children with an early childhood history of anxious solitude. Participants were 1,364 children in the National Institute of Child Health and Human Development (NICHD) Study of Early Child Care and their mothers, child-care providers, and teachers.…

Gazelle, Heidi

2006-01-01

261

Selective Narrowing of Social Networks across Adulthood is Associated with Improved Emotional Experience in Daily Life  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Past research has documented age differences in the size and composition of social networks that suggest that networks grow smaller with age and include an increasingly greater proportion of well-known social partners. According to socioemotional selectivity theory, such changes in social network composition serve an antecedent emotion regulatory…

English, Tammy; Carstensen, Laura L.

2014-01-01

262

The Impact of Emotional and Material Social Support on Women's Drug Treatment Completion  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This study assessed how women's perceptions of emotional and material social support affect their completion of residential drug treatment. Although previous research has examined how social support affects recovery, few studies, if any, have examined both the types and the sources of social support. The study hypothesized that women's perceptions…

Lewandowski, Cathleen A.; Hill, Twyla J.

2009-01-01

263

Perceived Social Support and Domain-Specific Adjustment of Children with Emotional and Behavioural Difficulties  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The perceived availability of social support has been documented as a protective mechanism among adults and adolescents. However, little research has explored the role of social support among children with emotional and behavioural difficulties (E/BD). The current study sought to investigate the effects of perceived social support from family,…

Popliger, Mina; Toste, Jessica R.; Heath, Nancy L.

2009-01-01

264

Early Childhood Student Teacher Expectations toward Kindergarten Children's Social and Emotional Competencies  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This study investigates the importance of student teachers expectations as a predictor of future social and emotional competencies of young children. These predicted expectations were estimated from a 42 item questionnaire that was designed by the author and it addressed five domains: social skills, social awareness, self-control, relationship…

Betawi, Amy

2013-01-01

265

Longitudinal Study of Emotional, Social, and Physical Changes after Traumatic Brain Injury.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The article discusses research on the chronic emotional, social, and physical changes associated with traumatic brain injury (TBI) as it relates to the planning and effective management of TBI patients' behavioral and social problems. At five years post-trauma most of 39 patients followed were still socially dysfunctional in one or more ways.…

Lezak, Muriel D.; O'Brien, Kevin P.

1988-01-01

266

Examining the Link between Preschool Social-Emotional Competence and First Grade Academic Achievement: The Role of Attention Skills  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Recently, research has begun to identify cognitive and social-emotional predictors of early academic success. Yet few studies have examined the mechanisms by which children's social-emotional skills are associated with later academic success. The present study examines the associations between preschool emotion knowledge, kindergarten attention…

Rhoades, Brittany L.; Warren, Heather K.; Domitrovich, Celene E.; Greenberg, Mark T.

2011-01-01

267

Examining the roles of victim-perpetrator relationship and emotional closeness in judgments toward a depicted child sexual abuse case.  

PubMed

The current study investigated the impact that respondent gender, victim-perpetrator relationship, and the level of emotional closeness had on attributions in a hypothetical child sexual abuse case. A total of 160 university students read a hypothetical scenario depicting a female child sexually abused by an adult male. The perpetrator was either the victim's biological father or her stepfather, with this relationship described as being either emotionally close or emotionally distant. Respondents read one of four (2 victim-perpetrator relationship × 2 emotional closeness) scenarios before completing 26 attribution items pertaining to credibility, blame, and severity. Principle components analysis yielded five factors, namely victim credibility, mother culpability, perpetrator culpability, assault severity, and victim culpability. Multivariate analysis of covariance--controlling for respondent (Caucasian vs. non-Caucasian) ethnicity--revealed, as predicted, significant main effects for respondent gender, victim-perpetrator relationship, and emotional closeness. In general, females assigned more provictim/ antiperpetrator/antimother attributions than males. Results were also suggested that both victim-perpetrator relationship and emotional closeness influence attributions made toward the victim, perpetrator, and nonoffending mother. Methodological issues and suggestions for future work are also discussed. PMID:23027835

Davies, Michelle; Patel, Fehmida; Rogers, Paul

2013-03-01

268

Doug MacLellan 2014 Child Psychology  

E-print Network

© Doug MacLellan 2014 Child Psychology Child psychology is one of the many branches of psychology and behaviour of children from prenatal development through adolescence. Child psychology deals not only with how children grow physically, but with their mental, emotional and social development, as well. www.uwindsor.ca/psychology

269

Positive and Negative Emotionality: Trajectories Across Six Years and Relations With Social Competence  

PubMed Central

The goals of the present study were to examine (1) the mean-level stability and differential stability of children’s positive emotional intensity, negative emotional intensity, expressivity, and social competence from early elementary school-aged to early adolescence, and (2) the associations between the trajectories of children’s emotionality and social functioning. Using four waves of longitudinal data (with assessments 2 years apart), parents and teachers of children (199 kindergarten through third grade children at the first assessment) rated children’s emotion-related responding and social competence. For all constructs, there was evidence of mean-level decline with age and stability in individual differences in rank ordering. Based on age-centered growth-to-growth curve analyses, the results indicated that children who had a higher initial status on positive emotional intensity, negative emotional intensity, and expressivity had a steeper decline in their social skills across time. These findings provide insight into the stability and association of emotion-related constructs to social competence across the elementary and middle school years. PMID:19186913

Sallquist, Julie Vaughan; Eisenberg, Nancy; Spinrad, Tracy L.; Reiser, Mark; Hofer, Claire; Liew, Jeffrey; Zhou, Qing; Eggum, Natalie

2009-01-01

270

Impact of parental catastrophizing and contextual threat on parents' emotional and behavioral responses to their child's pain.  

PubMed

Limited research has addressed processes underlying parents' empathic responses to their child's pain. The present study investigated the effects of parental catastrophizing, threatening information about the child's pain, and child pain expression upon parental emotional and behavioral responses to their child's pain. A total of 56 school children participated in a heat pain task consisting of 48 trials while being observed by 1 of their parents. Trials were preceded by a blue or yellow circle, signaling possible pain stimulation (i.e., pain signal) or no pain stimulation (i.e., safety signal). Parents received either neutral or threatening information regarding the heat stimulus. Parents' negative emotional responses when anticipating their child's pain were assessed using psychophysiological measures- i.e., fear-potentiated startle and corrugator EMG activity. Parental behavioral response to their child's pain (i.e., pain attending talk) was assessed during a 3-minute parent-child interaction that followed the pain task. The Child Facial Coding System (CFCS) was used to assess children's facial pain expression during the pain task. Results indicated that receiving threatening information was associated with a stronger parental corrugator EMG activity during pain signals in comparison with safety signals. The same pattern was found for parental fear-potentiated startle reflex, particularly when the child's facial pain expression was high. In addition, parents who reported high levels of catastrophizing thought about their child's pain engaged, in comparison with low-catastrophizing parents, in more pain-attending talk when they received threatening information. The findings are discussed in the context of affective-motivational theories of pain. PMID:22273548

Caes, Line; Vervoort, Tine; Trost, Zina; Goubert, Liesbet

2012-03-01

271

The Effects of Social Comparison on Social Emotions and Behavior during Childhood: The Ontogeny of Envy and Schadenfreude Predicts Developmental Changes in Equity-Related Decisions  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Social comparison can elicit emotions such as envy, which can affect social interactions. The emergence and development of such social emotions through ontogeny, and their influence on social interaction, are unknown. We tested 182 children from 7 to 13 years of age with a novel monetary reward-and-punishment task measuring envy and Schadenfreude…

Steinbeis, Nikolaus; Singer, Tania

2013-01-01

272

Tuning the developing brain to social signals of emotions  

Microsoft Academic Search

Humans in different cultures develop a similar capacity to recognize the emotional signals of diverse facial expressions. This capacity is mediated by a brain network that involves emotion-related brain circuits and higher-level visual-representation areas. Recent studies suggest that the key components of this network begin to emerge early in life. The studies also suggest that initial biases in emotion-related brain

Jukka M. Leppänen; Charles A. Nelson

2008-01-01

273

Socialization of Emotion and Offspring Internalizing Symptoms in Mothers with Childhood-Onset Depression  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This study examines how mothers with and without a history of childhood-onset depression respond to their 3-9 year-old children's emotions. Mother-child dyads included 55 offspring of mothers with a history of childhood-onset depressive disorders and 57 offspring of never-depressed mothers. Mothers with a history of childhood depression were less…

Silk, Jennifer S.; Shaw, Daniel S.; Prout, Joanna T.; O'Rourke, Flannery; Lane, Tonya J.; Kovacs, Maria

2011-01-01

274

Indicators of Social Well-Being and Elements of Child Welfare in Minnesota Rural Counties.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Analyzed the relationship between elements of child welfare and an index of social well-being in Minnesota counties. Found that all except two rural counties and only two urban counties had negative social well-being scores. Counties with low social well-being scores tended to have larger numbers of child welfare recipients. Findings suggest that…

Menanteau-Horta, Dario; Yigzaw, Michael

2002-01-01

275

Social support in child abuse and neglect: Support functions, sources, and contexts  

Microsoft Academic Search

Objectives: The objective of the present paper was to examine the social support functions, sources and temporal contexts of Argentinian mothers in relation to child abuse and neglect.Method: To test the impact of social support on child abuse and neglect, a sample of 101 Argentinian mothers was drawn from the pediatric hospital. The interview contained questions regarding maternal social support

Marta Albarracin; MARTIN J. REPETTO

1997-01-01

276

Parent-Child Discussions of Anger and Sadness: The Importance of Parent and Child Gender during Middle Childhood  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This chapter provides conceptual background and empirical evidence that parental emotion socialization continues well into middle childhood and is influenced by the social context. Data are presented to illustrate the influence of parent and child gender on parental socialization of emotion in 113 Caucasian, middle-class children. Mothers and…

Zeman, Janice; Perry-Parrish, Carisa; Cassano, Michael

2010-01-01

277

How do shared-representations and emotional processes cooperate in response to social threat signals?  

PubMed

Research in social cognition has mainly focused on the detection and comprehension of others' mental and emotional states. Doing so, past studies have adopted a "contemplative" view of the role of the observer engaged in a social interaction. However, the adaptive problem posed by the social environment is first and foremost that of coordination, which demands more of social cognition beyond mere detection and comprehension of others' hidden states. Offering a theoretical framework that takes into account the dynamical aspect of social interaction - notably by accounting for constant interplay between emotional appraisal and motor processes in socially engaged human brain - thus constitutes an important challenge for the field of social cognition. Here, we propose that our social environment can be seen as presenting opportunities for actions regarding others. Within such a framework, non-verbal social signals such as emotional displays are considered to have evolved to influence the observer in consistent ways. Consequently, social signals can modulate motor responses in observers. In line with this theoretical framework we provide evidence that emotional and motor processes are actually tightly linked during the perception of threat signals. This is ultimately reflected in the human brain by constant interplay between limbic and motor areas. PMID:24080262

Grèzes, Julie; Dezecache, Guillaume

2014-03-01

278

The social nature of the mother's tie to her child: John Bowlby's theory of attachment in post-war America.  

PubMed

This paper examines the development of British psychiatrist and psychoanalyst John Bowlby's views and their scientific and social reception in the United States during the 1950s. In a 1951 report for the World Health Organization Bowlby contended that the mother is the child's psychic organizer, as observational studies of children worldwide showed that absence of mother love had disastrous consequences for children's emotional health. By the end of the decade Bowlby had moved from observational studies of children in hospitals to animal research in order to support his thesis that mother love is a biological need. I examine the development of Bowlby's views and their scientific and social reception in the United States during the 1950s, a central period in the evolution of his views and in debates about the social implications of his work. I argue that Bowlby's view that mother love was a biological need for children influenced discussions about the desirability of mothers working outside the home during the early Cold War. By claiming that the future of a child's mind is determined by her mother's heart, Bowlby's argument exerted an unusually strong emotional demand on mothers and had powerful implications for the moral valuation of maternal care and love. PMID:22164644

Vicedo, Marga

2011-09-01

279

Human hypocretin and melanin concentrating hormone levels are linked to emotion and social interaction  

PubMed Central

The neurochemical changes underlying human emotions and social behavior are largely unknown. Here we report on the changes in the levels of two hypothalamic neuropeptides, hypocretin-1 (Hcrt-1) and melanin concentrating hormone (MCH), measured in the human amygdala. We show that Hcrt-1 levels are maximal during positive emotion, social interaction, and anger, behaviors that induce cataplexy in human narcoleptics. In contrast, MCH levels are minimal during social interaction, but are increased after eating. Both peptides are at minimal levels during periods of postoperative pain despite high levels of arousal. MCH levels increase at sleep onset, consistent with a role in sleep induction, whereas Hcrt-1 levels increase at wake onset, consistent with a role in wake induction. Levels of these two peptides in humans are not simply linked to arousal, but rather to specific emotions and state transitions. Other arousal systems may be similarly emotionally specialized. PMID:23462990

Blouin, Ashley M.; Fried, Itzhak; Wilson, Charles L.; Staba, Richard J.; Behnke, Eric J.; Lam, Hoa A.; Maidment, Nigel T.; Karlsson, Karl Æ.; Lapierre, Jennifer L.; Siegel, Jerome M.

2013-01-01

280

Teaching in Physical Education: Socialization, Play and Emotions  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Introduction: Emotions have not been regarded as very relevant in educational processes, despite early sociologists underlining the importance of feelings in education. The focus of this research is on the teaching of Physical Education at the Primary School level in Spain. Method: We reflect on the importance of emotions in education from the…

Molina, Fidel

2012-01-01

281

Child ADHD Severity and Positive and Negative Parenting as Predictors of Child Social Functioning: Evaluation of Three Theoretical Models  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Objective: Prior research has established links between child social functioning and both parenting and child ADHD severity; however, research examining the way that these variables work together is lacking. The current article aims to test three possible models (main effects, mediation, and moderation) by which ADHD severity and positive and…

Kaiser, Nina M.; McBurnett, Keith; Pfiffner, Linda J.

2011-01-01

282

The Importance of Rural, Township, and Urban Life in the Interaction between Social and Emotional Learning and Social Behaviors  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Whether an individual lives in a rural or urban setting may have direct impact on a wide variety of psychological patterns adopted by students. In this study, the effects of positive and negative social behaviors on the relationship between social and emotional learning needs and skills gaps of students who reside in both rural and urban areas…

Totan, Tarik; Ozyesil, Zümra; Deniz, M. Engin; Kiyar, Fatma

2014-01-01

283

Counting on Kin: Social Networks, Social Support, and Child Health Status  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This article presents the results of new data collection in Mexico about the relationship between child well-being and social networks. Two research questions guide the analysis. First, under what conditions do networks generate greater (lesser) support? Second, what kinds of networks are associated with healthier children? We explore the health…

Kana'iaupuni, Shawn Malia; Donato, Katharine M.; Thompson-Colon, Theresa; Stainback, Melissa

2005-01-01

284

Social-emotional learning skill, self-regulation, and social competence in typically developing and clinic-referred children.  

PubMed

Social-emotional learning (SEL) skill includes the ability to encode, interpret, and reason about social and emotional information. In two related studies, we examined the relationship between children's SEL skill, their ability to regulate their own behavior, and the competence of their social interactions. Study 1 included 158 typically developing children ages 4 to 14 years. Study 2 included 126 clinic-referred children ages 5 to 17 years. Findings from both studies supported the conclusion that SEL skill includes three broad factors: awareness of nonverbal cues; the ability to interpret social meaning through theory of mind, empathy, and pragmatic language; and the ability to reason about social problems. Furthermore, the better children perform on measures of SEL skill and the more their parents and teachers report that children can regulate their behavior, the more competent their social interactions. PMID:20183669

McKown, Clark; Gumbiner, Laura M; Russo, Nicole M; Lipton, Meryl

2009-11-01

285

The effect of partner-directed emotion in social exchange decision-making  

PubMed Central

Despite the prevalence of studies examining economic decision-making as a purely rational phenomenon, common sense suggests that emotions affect our decision-making particularly in a social context. To explore the influence of emotions on economic decision-making, we manipulated opponent-directed emotions prior to engaging participants in two social exchange decision-making games (the Trust Game and the Prisoner's Dilemma). Participants played both games with three different (fictional) partners and their tendency to defect was measured. Prior to playing each game, participants exchanged handwritten “essays” with their partners, and subsequently exchanged evaluations of each essay. The essays and evaluations, read by the participant, were designed to induce either anger, sympathy, or a neutral emotional response toward the confederate with whom they would then play the social exchange games. Galvanic skin conductance level (SCL) showed enhanced physiological arousal during anger induction compared to both the neutral and sympathy conditions. In both social exchange games, participants were most likely to defect against their partner after anger induction and least likely to defect after sympathy induction, with the neutral condition eliciting intermediate defection rates. This pattern was found to be strongest in participants exhibiting low cognitive control (as measured by a Go/no-Go task). The findings indicate that emotions felt toward another individual alter how one chooses to interact with them, and that this influence depends both on the specific emotion induced and the cognitive control of the individual. PMID:23898313

Eimontaite, Iveta; Nicolle, Antoinette; Schindler, Igor; Goel, Vinod

2013-01-01

286

Parent-Infant Synchrony and the Social-Emotional Development of Triplets  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

To study the social-emotional development of triplets, 23 sets of triplets, 23 sets of twins, and 23 singleton infants (N=138) were followed from birth to 2 years. Maternal depression and social support were assessed in the postpartum period, mother-infant and father-infant interaction and the home environment were observed at 3 months, a…

Feldman, Ruth; Eidelman, Arthur I.

2004-01-01

287

Sociocultural Considerations in Social Skills Training Research with African American Students with Emotional or Behavioral Disorders  

Microsoft Academic Search

Students with emotional or behavioral disorders (EBD) often have been identified on the basis of their social competence deficits. The overrepresentation of African American students in special education programs for EBD has been recognized for decades. This suggests that African American students with EBD have been in urgent need of social skills training (SST) if they have not been misidentified.

Rosa E. Olmeda; James M. Kauffman

2003-01-01

288

AlphaWolf: Social Learning, Emotion and Development in Autonomous Virtual Agents  

E-print Network

(Canis lupus), and the social behavior exhibited by packs of wolves, to use as the target that captures a subset of the social behavior of wild wolves, involving models of learning, emotion in which people play the role of wolf pups in a pack of autonomous and semi-autonomous virtual wolves

Tomlinson, Bill

289

The Social and Emotional Well-Being of Divorced Residential Parents.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Examination of the social and emotional well-being of 177 divorced mothers and fathers with live-in children revealed no differences between their reports of psychosomatic symptomatology, life satisfaction, life-area rankings, family cooperation, social support, and ex-spouse contact satisfaction. More health improvements and family esteem were…

Buehler, Cheryl

1988-01-01

290

Jumping to interpretations: Social anxiety disorder and the identification of emotional facial expressions  

Microsoft Academic Search

A small body of research suggests that socially anxious individuals show biases in interpreting the facial expressions of others. The current study included a clinically anxious sample in a speeded emotional card-sorting task in two conditions (baseline and threat) to investigate several hypothesized biases in interpretation. Following the threat manipulation, participants with generalized social anxiety disorders (GSADs) sorted angry cards

Jan Mohlman; Cheryl N. Carmin; Rebecca B. Price

2007-01-01

291

Is There Evidence to Support the Use of Social Skills Interventions for Students with Emotional Disabilities?  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Scholars and practitioners advocate for the use of social skills interventions for students with emotional disabilities because significant social skills deficits are common among these students. Yet contemporary practices must be vetted for empirical evidence of their efficacy and effectiveness to ensure students are provided appropriate…

Sullivan, Amanda L.; Sadeh, Shanna S.

2014-01-01

292

The Relationship between Emotion Recognition Ability and Social Skills in Young Children with Autism  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This study assessed the relationship between emotion recognition ability and social skills in 42 young children with autistic disorder aged 4-7 years. The analyses revealed that accuracy in recognition of sadness, but not happiness, anger or fear, was associated with higher ratings on the Vineland-II Socialization domain, above and beyond the…

Williams, Beth T.; Gray, Kylie M.

2013-01-01

293

A Meta-Analysis of Social Skill Interventions for Students with Emotional or Behavioral Disorders  

Microsoft Academic Search

Many programs designed for children and youth with emotional or behavioral disorders (EBD) include a social skill training component. Using quantitative methods of meta-analysis, the findings from 35 studies investigating the effects of social skill interventions for students with EBD were synthesized. The pooled mean effect size (ES) was 0.199, from which the average student with EBD would be expected

Mary Magee Quinn; Kenneth A. Kavale; Sarup R. Mathur; Robert B. Rutherford; Steven R. Forness

1999-01-01

294

Emotion laterality and social behaviour Accepted Laterality: Asymmetries of Body, Brain and Cognition. 15 May 2014  

E-print Network

Royal Holloway, University of London Corresponding author: Victoria Bourne Department of Psychology information arising from social interactions. Victoria J. Bourne and Dawn Watling Department of Psychology association between emotion lateralisation and social anxiety has found conflicting results. In this paper two

Royal Holloway, University of London

295

Social and Emotional Aspects of Learning: Complementing, Compensating and Countering Parental Practices  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This article draws on a study which investigated the interpretation and use of Social and Emotional Aspects of Learning (SEAL) in primary schools in the UK (the authors gratefully acknowledge Studentship funding from the Economic and Social Research Council for this study). The paper focuses on school staff members' perceptions about the…

Wood, Peter; Warin, Jo

2014-01-01

296

Relationships matter: the role for social-emotional learning in an interprofessional global health education.  

PubMed

As global health curricula and competencies are defined, the instructional foundation of practice-based learning and soft skills training requires reexamination. This paper explores the integration of social-emotional instruction into global health education, specifically highlighting its role in interprofessional learning environments. One method to teach the core competencies in the higher education context is through restorative practices. Restorative practices is a "social science that integrates developments from a variety of disciplines and fields in order to build healthy communities, increase social capital, decrease crime and antisocial behavior, repair harm and restore relationships." The restorative philosophy incorporates the core competencies of socio-emotional learning and views conflict as an opportunity for learning. The first part discusses the foundations of social-emotional learning (SEL). It then explores the applicability of SEL in interprofessional and global health education. PMID:25564709

Guerin, Toby Treem

2014-12-01

297

Managing Emotion in a Maltreating Context: A Pilot Study Examining Child Neglect  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Objective: The primary goal of this pilot study was to examine emotion management skills (i.e., emotional understanding, emotion regulation) in children who had experienced neglect and a control group to determine the ways that neglect may interfere with children's emotional development. Method: Participants included children 6-12 years of age and…

Shipman, Kimberly; Edwards, Anna; Brown, Amy; Swisher, Lisa; Jennings, Ernestine

2005-01-01

298

Parenting, Child Behavior, and Academic and Social Functioning: Does Ethnicity Make a Difference?  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Background: Most research on the relation between parenting behaviors and child outcomes has not focused on cross-ethnic variation in these relations. Objective: This study examined if ethnicity moderates associations between parenting, child agency/persistence, and child academic achievement and social competence. Design: Participants included…

Bae, Hyo; Hopkins, Joyce; Gouze, Karen R.; Lavigne, John V.

2014-01-01

299

Evaluating child homicide inquests as a learning process: A social constructionist analysis of a Canadian experience  

Microsoft Academic Search

The death of a child who is known to protection agencies is perhaps the gravest critical incident affecting child welfare today. The media coverage that these tragedies receive has fuelled public demand for solutions to this social problem. In response, several countries have conducted judicial or public investigations into child homicide deaths. However, there has been very little critical analysis

Patricia Longlade

1999-01-01

300

Emotional reactivity to social rejection and negative evaluation among persons with borderline personality features.  

PubMed

The present study examined the emotional reactivity of persons with heightened borderline personality (BP) features to social rejection and negative evaluation in the laboratory. Individuals with high levels of BP features (n = 30) and controls with low levels of BP features (n = 44) were randomly assigned to a condition involving negative evaluation based on writing (negative evaluation/academic), or a condition involving negative evaluation based on personal characteristics as well as social rejection (negative evaluation/social rejection). Hypothesis 1 was that high-BP individuals, but not low-BP controls, would show greater emotional reactivity to the negative evaluation/social rejection stressor, compared with the negative evaluation/academic (writing) stressor. Hypothesis 2 was that high-BP individuals would specifically show greater reactivity of shame- and anger-related emotions to the negative evaluation/social rejection stressor compared with the negative evaluation/academic stressor. Findings indicated that high-BP individuals showed heightened emotional reactivity to the social rejection stressor but not to the negative evaluation stressor, but the opposite pattern occurred for controls. In addition, there was evidence for heightened reactivity of irritability, distress, and shame for the high-BP group, specifically in the social rejection condition. PMID:23130813

Chapman, Alexander L; Walters, Kristy N; Gordon, Katherine L Dixon

2014-10-01

301

Modeling the Impact of Motivation, Personality, and Emotion on Social Behavior  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Models seeking to predict human social behavior must contend with multiple sources of individual and group variability that underlie social behavior. One set of interrelated factors that strongly contribute to that variability - motivations, personality, and emotions - has been only minimally incorporated in previous computational models of social behavior. The Personality, Affect, Culture (PAC) framework is a theory-based computational model that addresses this gap. PAC is used to simulate social agents whose social behavior varies according to their personalities and emotions, which, in turn, vary according to their motivations and underlying motive control parameters. Examples involving disease spread and counter-insurgency operations show how PAC can be used to study behavioral variability in different social contexts.

Miller, Lynn C.; Read, Stephen J.; Zachary, Wayne; Rosoff, Andrew

302

Emotion Attribution to a Non-Humanoid Robot in Different Social Situations  

PubMed Central

In the last few years there was an increasing interest in building companion robots that interact in a socially acceptable way with humans. In order to interact in a meaningful way a robot has to convey intentionality and emotions of some sort in order to increase believability. We suggest that human-robot interaction should be considered as a specific form of inter-specific interaction and that human–animal interaction can provide a useful biological model for designing social robots. Dogs can provide a promising biological model since during the domestication process dogs were able to adapt to the human environment and to participate in complex social interactions. In this observational study we propose to design emotionally expressive behaviour of robots using the behaviour of dogs as inspiration and to test these dog-inspired robots with humans in inter-specific context. In two experiments (wizard-of-oz scenarios) we examined humans' ability to recognize two basic and a secondary emotion expressed by a robot. In Experiment 1 we provided our companion robot with two kinds of emotional behaviour (“happiness” and “fear”), and studied whether people attribute the appropriate emotion to the robot, and interact with it accordingly. In Experiment 2 we investigated whether participants tend to attribute guilty behaviour to a robot in a relevant context by examining whether relying on the robot's greeting behaviour human participants can detect if the robot transgressed a predetermined rule. Results of Experiment 1 showed that people readily attribute emotions to a social robot and interact with it in accordance with the expressed emotional behaviour. Results of Experiment 2 showed that people are able to recognize if the robot transgressed on the basis of its greeting behaviour. In summary, our findings showed that dog-inspired behaviour is a suitable medium for making people attribute emotional states to a non-humanoid robot. PMID:25551218

Lakatos, Gabriella; Gácsi, Márta; Konok, Veronika; Brúder, Ildikó; Bereczky, Boróka; Korondi, Péter; Miklósi, Ádám

2014-01-01

303

Emotions in social information processing and their relations with reactive and proactive aggression in referred aggressive boys  

Microsoft Academic Search

We studied emotional aspects of social information processing (SIP) and their spe- cific relations with reactive and proactive aggression in 54 boys ages 7 to 13 who had been referred for aggressive behavior problems and a comparison group. Partici- pants listened to vignettes concerning provocations by peers and answered questions concerning SIP, own and peer's emotions, and emotion regulation. Aggressive

Bram Orobio de Castro; Welmoet Merk; Willem Koops; Jan Veerman; Joop Bosch

2005-01-01

304

The "Reading the Mind in Films" Task [Child Version]: Complex Emotion and Mental State Recognition in Children with and without Autism Spectrum Conditions  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Children with autism spectrum conditions (ASC) have difficulties recognizing others' emotions. Research has mostly focused on "basic" emotion recognition, devoid of context. This study reports the results of a new task, assessing recognition of "complex" emotions and mental states in social contexts. An ASC group (n = 23) was compared to a general…

Golan, Ofer; Baron-Cohen, Simon; Golan, Yael

2008-01-01

305

X Chromosomal effects on social cognitive processing and emotion regulation: A study with Klinefelter men (47,XXY).  

PubMed

Studying Klinefelter syndrome (47,XXY), a genetically defined disorder characterized by the presence of an additional X chromosome, can reveal insights into genotype-phenotype associations. Increased vulnerability to psychiatric disorders characterized by difficulties in social interactions, such as schizophrenia and autism, has been reported for this population. The reported social difficulties in 47,XXY men may arise as a consequence of impairments in the processing of social and emotional information. The present study is the first investigation of social-emotional information processing in this X chromosomal disorder. 32 Klinefelter men and 26 men from the general population, with the groups matched for age, educational level and I.Q., participated in the study. Several tasks were included, reflecting aspects of social-emotional information processing on levels of perception, experience and expression: labeling of facial expressions of emotion, emotion-cognition interactions in decision making and emotion regulation, that refers to subjective experience and identification of emotional arousal as well as verbal expression of emotions. A discrepancy between cognitive appraisal of emotions and emotional arousal was observed in Klinefelter syndrome. Taken together, Klinefelter men seem less accurate in perception of socio-emotional cues such as angry facial expressions, they are less able to identify and verbalize their emotions, but experience increased levels of emotional arousal, in comparison to the general population. Besides describing the social-emotional phenotype of this X chromosomal disorder, the present data may prove to be an important contribution to the development of more general models describing pathways to neuropsychiatric disorders characterized by social cognitive disturbances. PMID:16603340

van Rijn, Sophie; Swaab, Hanna; Aleman, André; Kahn, René S

2006-06-01

306

Moderators of the Relation between Shyness and Behavior with Peers: Cortisol Dysregulation and Maternal Emotion Socialization  

PubMed Central

This study investigated the relations among shyness, physiological dysregulation, and maternal emotion socialization in predicting children’s social behavior with peers during the kindergarten year (n = 66; 29 girls). For shy children, interactions with peers represent potential stressors that can elicit negative emotion and physiological reactions. Behavior during these contexts can be viewed as adaptive (e.g., playing alone) or maladaptive (e.g., watching other children play without joining in) attempts to regulate the ensuing distress. Whether shy children employ adaptive or maladaptive regulatory behaviors was expected to depend on two aspects of emotion regulatory skill: (1) children’s physiological regulation and (2) maternal emotion socialization. Findings supported the hypotheses. Specifically, shy children with poorer cortisol regulation or mothers who endorsed a higher level of non-supportive emotion reactions engaged in more maladaptive play behaviors, whereas shy children with better cortisol regulation or a high level of supportive maternal emotion reactions engaged in more adaptive play behaviors. PMID:23226925

Davis, Elizabeth L.; Buss, Kristin A.

2011-01-01

307

The Effect of You Can Do It! Education on the Emotional Resilience of Primary School Students with Social, Emotional, Behavioural and Achievement Challenges  

Microsoft Academic Search

This study examined the effect of the You Can Do It! Education (YCDI) cognitive-behavioural intervention program on the emotional resilience of students in grades 4 to 6 who were identified with achievement, behavioural, social and\\/or emotional challenges. 61 students were randomly assigned to either small groups receiving an eight week YCDI cognitive-behavioural intervention or small groups receiving \\

Michael E. Bernard

308

Bidirectional Longitudinal Relations between Father-Child Relationships and Chinese Children's Social Competence during Early Childhood  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Using a two-year and three-wave cross-lagged design with a sample of 118 Chinese preschoolers, the present study examined bidirectional longitudinal relations between father-child relationships and children's social competence. The results of structural equation modeling showed bidirectional effects between father-child conflict and social

Zhang, Xiao

2013-01-01

309

Teacher Support as a Buffer between Interparental Conflict and Child Social Skills  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This study, conducted in 2004, investigated the direct effect of interparental conflict (IPC) about child-raising issues on the social skills of middle-class US children who attended a suburban preschool and the buffering effect of teacher support (n = 170). Findings indicated that greater IPC was associated with poorer child social skills. The…

Spjeldnes, Solveig; Koeske, Gary; Sales, Esther

2010-01-01

310

PROGRAMME SPECIFICATION Programme name MSc Advanced Practice in Health and Social Care (Child and  

E-print Network

PROGRAMME SPECIFICATION KEY FACTS Programme name MSc Advanced Practice in Health and Social Care (Child and Adolescent Mental Health) Award MSc School School of Health Sciences Department or equivalent The MSc Advanced Practice in Health and Social Care (Child and Adolescent Mental Health) is aimed at all

Weyde, Tillman

311

Child Health-Related Quality of Life and Parental Social Capital in Greece: An Exploratory Study  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

In this paper, we examined dimensions of child health-related quality of life in Greece in relation to parental assessments of neighbourhood social capital and social support networks. For the analysis, two main measures were used: (1) child self-reported health-related quality of life in ten dimensions, as measured by the KIDSCREEN questionnaire;…

El-Dardiry, Giulia; Dimitrakaki, Christine; Tzavara, Chara; Ravens-Sieberer, Ulrike; Tountas, Yannis

2012-01-01

312

Perceived Neighborhood Social Disorder and Residents' Attitudes toward Reporting Child Physical Abuse  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Objective: This study aimed to explore the relationship between perceived neighborhood social disorder and attitudes toward reporting child physical abuse. Method: Data from a national probabilistic sample (N = 9,759) were used. Responses about the perception of neighborhood social disorder, perceived frequency of child physical abuse in Spanish…

Gracia, Enrique; Herrero, Juan

2006-01-01

313

Transactions between Child Social Wariness and Observed Structured Parenting: Evidence from a Prospective Adoption Study  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This investigation examined the mutual influences between structured parenting and child social wariness during toddlerhood using a longitudinal adoption design. The sample consisted of 361 adoption-linked families, each including an adopted child, adoptive parents, and a birth mother. Heightened social wariness in children at age 18 months…

Natsuaki, Misaki N.; Leve, Leslie D.; Harold, Gordon T.; Neiderhiser, Jenae M.; Shaw, Daniel S.; Ganiban, Jody; Scaramella, Laura V.; Reiss, David

2013-01-01

314

Improving the Social Skills of Children and Youth with Emotional/Behavioral Disorders. Retrospective Series on Critical Issues in Emotional/Behavioral Disorders.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The nine readings in this monograph focus on ways to improve the social skills of students with emotional/behavioral disorders. The following readings are included: (1) "Analysis of Literature on Social Competence of Behaviorally Disordered Children and Youth" (Sarup R. Mathur and Robert B. Rutherford, Jr.); (2) "A Validation of Social Skills for…

Council for Children with Behavioral Disorders.

315

Alcohol Use and Perceived Social and Emotional Consequences among Perpetrators of General and Sexual Aggression  

PubMed Central

This study examined the relation between alcohol use, alcohol-related aggression expectancies, and the perceived negative consequences of perpetrating general and sexual aggression. Participants (N = 2,941; 59% female) were incoming college freshmen who reported on the last three months of their senior year of high school. Hierarchical multiple regression analyses for general aggression revealed that heavy alcohol consumption at the time of the aggression and strong alcohol-related aggression expectancies were associated with more frequent social and emotional consequences. For sexual aggression, similar regression analyses found that any alcohol use at the time of the aggression, but not outcome expectancies, was associated with social and emotional consequences. Among individuals who perpetrated general and sexual aggression, consuming alcohol at the time of the aggression was positively associated with perceived negative social and emotional consequences. Results do not support the idea that alcohol is used as an excuse for aggressive behavior. PMID:19528632

Stappenbeck, Cynthia A.; Fromme, Kim

2013-01-01

316

Fostering a social child with autism: a moment-by-moment sequential analysis of an early social engagement intervention.  

PubMed

Young children with autism often experience limited social motivation and responsiveness that restricts establishment of crucial social momentum. These characteristics can lead to decreased opportunities for parental engagement and the social learning associated with these moments. Early social interventions that capitalize on pre-existing interests may be able to re-establish this developmentally critical feedback loop, in which both child and parent social behaviors simultaneously increase and influence one another. This investigation examined the moment-by-moment, micro-transactional relationship between parent and child social behavior gains observed in an early intervention study. Time-window sequential analyses revealed the presence of clinically and statistically significant sequential associations between parent and child social behaviors during an embedded social interaction intervention, but not in a comparable motivational intervention that utilized highly preferred toys and objects. Specifically, the onset of parent eye contact, directed positive affect, or offer of a reinforcing incentive predicted the immediate occurrence of child eye contact and positive affect in the experimental social intervention condition. Additionally, child verbal initiations, positive affect, and eye contact immediately predicted the onset of parent positive affect during this social intervention paradigm. Theoretical implications for the social developmental trajectory of autism are discussed. PMID:24974256

Vernon, Ty W

2014-12-01

317

Emotions as infectious diseases in a large social network: the SISa model  

PubMed Central

Human populations are arranged in social networks that determine interactions and influence the spread of diseases, behaviours and ideas. We evaluate the spread of long-term emotional states across a social network. We introduce a novel form of the classical susceptible–infected–susceptible disease model which includes the possibility for ‘spontaneous’ (or ‘automatic’) infection, in addition to disease transmission (the SISa model). Using this framework and data from the Framingham Heart Study, we provide formal evidence that positive and negative emotional states behave like infectious diseases spreading across social networks over long periods of time. The probability of becoming content is increased by 0.02 per year for each content contact, and the probability of becoming discontent is increased by 0.04 per year per discontent contact. Our mathematical formalism allows us to derive various quantities from the data, such as the average lifetime of a contentment ‘infection’ (10 years) or discontentment ‘infection’ (5 years). Our results give insight into the transmissive nature of positive and negative emotional states. Determining to what extent particular emotions or behaviours are infectious is a promising direction for further research with important implications for social science, epidemiology and health policy. Our model provides a theoretical framework for studying the interpersonal spread of any state that may also arise spontaneously, such as emotions, behaviours, health states, ideas or diseases with reservoirs. PMID:20610424

Hill, Alison L.; Rand, David G.; Nowak, Martin A.; Christakis, Nicholas A.

2010-01-01

318

The Battered Child—Family Physician's Role  

PubMed Central

The physician's role in the management of the battered child is first one of diagnosis and protection before a child is seriously injured, followed by health and social assistance to the family. Our ultimate hope is to be able to anticipate such breakdowns in a parent or guardian before they lead to physical or emotional injury in a child. Close liaison between medical and social workers is essential. Imagesp54-a PMID:20468521

Boone, J. E.

1970-01-01

319

Classroom emotional climate as a moderator of anxious solitary children's longitudinal risk for peer exclusion: a child × environment model.  

PubMed

This study tests the ability of classroom emotional climate to moderate anxious solitary children's risk for peer exclusion over a 3-year period from 3rd through 5th grade. Six hundred eighty-eight children completed peer nominations for anxious solitude and peer exclusion in the fall and spring semesters of each grade, and observations of classroom emotional climate were conducted at the same time points. Results revealed a positive relation between anxious solitude and peer exclusion in the fall semester of each grade. However, in classrooms with supportive versus unsupportive emotional climates, this relation demonstrated a different pattern of change from fall to spring semesters. In classrooms with supportive emotional climates, children with high versus low levels of anxious solitude experienced relative elevation in fall peer exclusion, but this disappeared by the spring, such that spring peer exclusion levels were equalized among children who differed in anxious solitude. This result is consistent with hypotheses guided by the Child × Environment model. However, in classrooms with unsupportive emotional climates, results did not conform to expectations that children with high anxious solitude would experience stable or increased peer exclusion over time. PMID:21688897

Avant, Tamara Spangler; Gazelle, Heidi; Faldowski, Richard

2011-11-01

320

Conceptualizing Emotions Along the Dimensions of Valence, Arousal, and Communicative Frequency – Implications for Social-Cognitive Tests and Training Tools  

PubMed Central

Background and Objectives: Emotion words are mostly characterized along the classic dimensions of arousal and valence. In the current study we sought to complement this characterization by investigating the frequency of emotions in human everyday communication, which may be crucial information for designing new diagnostic or intervention tools to test and improve emotion recognition. Methods: One hundred healthy German individuals were asked to indicate the valence and arousal of 62 emotion words in a questionnaire. Importantly, participants were additionally asked to indicate the frequency with which they experience each emotion themselves and observe it in others. Results: Positive emotions were judged to occur more often than negative emotions in everyday life. The more negatively valenced emotions were rated to be observed more often in others than experienced in one-self. On the other hand more positively valenced emotions were experienced more often in one-self than they were observed in others. Finally, increasing age was associated with a decrease in the frequency of observing an emotion in other people. Limitations: Future studies with larger sample sizes are needed to ascertain if the findings also apply to other cultural and language contexts. Conclusion: These results imply a greater frequency of positive emotions than negative emotions in everyday communication. The finding of such a bias toward positive emotions can guide the selection of emotion words for implementation in socio-emotional intervention tools. Such a selection may represent an effective means for improving social-cognitive functioning in people with respective impairments. PMID:22022317

Hepach, Robert; Kliemann, Dorit; Grüneisen, Sebastian; Heekeren, Hauke R.; Dziobek, Isabel

2011-01-01

321

Class Climate Moderates Peer Relations and Emotional Adjustment in Children With an Early History of Anxious Solitude: A Child × Environment Model  

Microsoft Academic Search

Classroom emotional climate was hypothesized to moderate psychosocial adjustment in 1st grade for children with an early childhood history of anxious solitude. Participants were 1,364 children in the National Institute of Child Health and Human Development (NICHD) Study of Early Child Care and their mothers, child-care providers, and teachers. As anticipated, children with an early childhood history of anxious solitude

Heidi Gazelle

2006-01-01

322

Social and Emotional Learning as a Universal Level of Student Support: Evaluating the Follow-up Effect of Strong Kids on Social and Emotional Outcomes  

Microsoft Academic Search

The authors examined the initial and follow-up effect of Strong Kids, a social and emotional learning (SEL) curriculum, among a sample of 106 third- and fourth-grade students. Students were assigned to either the treatment or the wait-list condition and completed questionnaires on SEL knowledge and perceived use of SEL skills across 3 assessment periods (pretest, posttest, and follow-up). The classroom

Jason E. Harlacher; Kenneth W. Merrell

2010-01-01

323

The Impact of Child-Centered Group Play Therapy on Social Skills Development of Kindergarten Children  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The development of social adjustment during elementary school is of critical importance because early socialization skills are an important predictor of both future social and emotional functioning. However, an examination of current literature reveals there is limited research utilizing sound research methodology and evaluation protocols for…

Kascsak, Theresa Marie

2012-01-01

324

Social-Emotional Competence in Young Children with Developmental Delays: Our Reflection and Vision for the Future  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The authors provide a brief historical reflection on social-emotional competence intervention research along with their vision for future directions of intervention investigations for young children with developmental delays and difficulties. Specifically, they summarize "what we 'know'" and "what we "need to know"" in the area of social-emotional

Brown, William H.; Conroy, Maureen A.

2011-01-01

325

Regional Cerebral Development at Term Relates to School-Age Social-Emotional Development in Very Preterm Children  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Objective: Preterm children are at risk for social-emotional difficulties, including autism and attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder. We assessed the relationship of regional brain development in preterm children, evaluated via magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) at term-equivalent postmenstrual age (TEA), to later social-emotional difficulties.…

Rogers, Cynthia E.; Anderson, Peter J.; Thompson, Deanne K.; Kidokoro, Hiroyuki; Wallendorf, Michael; Treyvaud, Karli; Roberts, Gehan; Doyle, Lex W.; Neil, Jeffrey J.; Inder, Terrie E.

2012-01-01

326

Making the Most Out of School-Based Prevention: Lessons from the Social and Emotional Aspects of Learning (SEAL) Programme  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This paper considers the role played by universal, school-based social and emotional learning (SEL) programmes in addressing the mental health needs of children and young people. Theory and research in the field are discussed. Particular attention is paid to the social and emotional aspects of learning (SEAL) programme in England, a flagship…

Humphrey, Neil; Lendrum, Ann; Wigelsworth, Michael

2013-01-01

327

A Critical Review of Five Commonly Used Social-Emotional and Behavioral Screeners for Elementary or Secondary Schools  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The goal of this paper was to critically review and evaluate five common social-emotional and behavioral screeners: Behavioral and Emotional Screening System (Kamphaus and Reynolds 2007), Behavior Intervention Monitoring Assessment System (McDougal et al. 2011), Social Skills Improvement System Performance Screening Guide (Elliott and Gresham…

Jenkins, Lyndsay N.; Demaray, Michelle K.; Wren, Nicole Smit; Secord, Stephanie M.; Lyell, Kelly M.; Magers, Amy M.; Setmeyer, Andrea J.; Rodelo, Carlota; Newcomb-McNeal, Ericka; Tennant, Jaclyn

2014-01-01

328

Comparing the Effectiveness of Regulation and Pro-Social Emotions to Enhance Cooperation: Experimental Evidence from Fishing Communities in Colombia  

E-print Network

Comparing the Effectiveness of Regulation and Pro-Social Emotions to Enhance Cooperation John K. Stranlund* RRH: LOPEZ ET AL.: REGULATION VS. PRO-SOCIAL EMOTIONS * We are particularly grateful greatly from the efforts of Ana Maria Roldan, Laura Estevez, Melisa Arboleda and Juan Carlos Rocha

Murphy, James J.

329

Social, Emotional, Ethical, and Academic Education: Creating a Climate for Learning, Participation in Democracy, and Well-Being  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

In this article, Jonathan Cohen argues that the goals of education need to be reframed to prioritize not only academic learning, but also social, emotional, and ethical competencies. Surveying the current state of research in the fields of social-emotional education, character education, and school-based mental health in the United States, Cohen…

Cohen, Jonathan

2006-01-01

330

The Center on the Social and Emotional Foundations for Early Learning: Addressing Challenging Behavior in Infants and Toddlers  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The Center on the Social and Emotional Foundations for Early Learning (CSEFEL) is a federally funded national resource center designed to support early care and education providers address the social-emotional needs of children birth through age 5 years. Recent research has found that an extraordinarily high number of young children are being…

Hunter, Amy; Hemmeter, Mary Louise

2009-01-01

331

A Case Study of a Kindergarten Teacher: Examining Practices and Beliefs That Support the Social-Emotional Classroom Climate  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This 5-month qualitative case study investigated the social-emotional climate of one half-day kindergarten classroom by examining the role of the teacher in establishing and sustaining a classroom climate that nurtured the social-emotional lives of students. This case study asks: How and why did the teacher establish and sustain a classroom…

Pech, Sandra L.

2010-01-01

332

Effects of Teacher Efficacy on Student Academic and Social Emotional Achievements as Reported on Georgia Kindergarten Inventory of Developing Skills  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Students in kindergarten are not meeting state standards on standardized academic and social/emotional scores in the southeastern United States. The focus of this study was to determine if a teacher's perceptions of self-efficacy affects student success in academic and social/emotional standards as reported on the Georgia Kindergarten of…

Brown, Tisha J.

2012-01-01

333

Screening Accuracy for Risk of Autism Spectrum Disorder Using the Brief Infant-Toddler Social and Emotional Assessment (BITSEA)  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Early identification of autism spectrum disorders (ASDs) is facilitated by the use of standardized screening scales that assess the social emotional behaviors associated with ASD. Authors examined accuracy of Brief Infant-Toddler Social and Emotional Assessment (BITSEA) subscales in detecting Modified Checklist for Autism in Toddlers (M-CHAT) risk…

Gardner, Lauren M.; Murphy, Laura; Campbell, Jonathan M.; Tylavsky, Frances; Palmer, Frederick B.; Graff, J. Carolyn

2013-01-01

334

Modifying Defining Issues Test (DIT) as a Tool for Assessing Secondary Students' Social-Emotional Competencies  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This paper discusses the use of an alternative instrument to assess the social-emotional competence (SEC) of secondary school students in Singapore. The instrument was used in a larger study to explore an approach to infuse social-emotional learning in the curriculum for children in school. The design of this research instrument is based on the…

Ee, Jessie

2014-01-01

335

Teacher Beliefs and Practices Relating to Development in Preschool: Importance Placed on Social-Emotional Behaviours and Skills  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Preschool teachers' beliefs relating to the importance of social-emotional competence and teacher practices that support children's competence were investigated through surveys and focus groups. Survey results indicated that Head Start and public school pre-K teachers placed higher importance on social-emotional behaviours and skills…

Hollingsworth, Heidi L.; Winter, Marna K.

2013-01-01

336

The Effects of a Social-Emotional Learning Program on Elementary School Children: The Role of Pupils' Characteristics  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This quasi-experimental exploratory study investigated whether a social-emotional learning program, implemented during a 1-year period, could lead to gains in social-emotional competencies and a reduction in internalizing and externalizing problems. Furthermore, it showed which pupils would benefit most from the program. The program was applied to…

Raimundo, Raquel; Marques-Pinto, Alexandra; Lima, Maria Luisa

2013-01-01

337

An Exploratory Social-Emotional Prosthetic for Autism Spectrum Disorders Rana el Kaliouby, Alea Teeters, and Rosalind W. Picard  

E-print Network

to change their beliefs and actions [1]. As an example of where social-emotional communication breaks downAn Exploratory Social-Emotional Prosthetic for Autism Spectrum Disorders Rana el Kaliouby, Alea Teeters, and Rosalind W. Picard MIT Media Lab {kaliouby, alea, picard @media.mit.edu} Abstract We describe

338

Impaired emotional empathy and related social network deficits in cocaine users.  

PubMed

Chronic cocaine users consistently display neurochemical and functional alterations in brain areas involved in social cognition (e.g. medial and orbitofrontal cortex). Although social functioning plays a crucial role in the development and treatment of drug dependence, studies investigating social cognition in cocaine users are lacking. Therefore, we investigated mental perspective taking ('theory of mind') and emotional and cognitive empathy in recreational (RCU) and dependent (DCU) cocaine users. Furthermore, we related these measures to real-life indicators of social functioning. One-hundred cocaine users (69 RCU, 31 DCU) and 68 stimulant-naïve healthy controls were tested with the Multifaceted Empathy Test (MET), Movie for the Assessment of Social Cognition (MASC) and Reading the Mind in the Eyes Test (RMET). The Social Network Questionnaire was conducted to assess social network size. Furthermore, participants provided information on committed criminal offenses. RCU and DCU showed less emotional empathy compared to controls (MET), whereas cognitive empathy was not impaired (MET, RMET). Additionally, DCU made more errors in mental perspective taking (MASC). Notably, cocaine users committed more criminal offenses and displayed a smaller social network and higher cocaine use was correlated with less social contacts. Diminished mental perspective taking was tentatively correlated with more intense cocaine use as well. Finally, younger age of onset of cocaine use was associated with more pronounced empathy impairment. In conclusion, social cognition impairments in cocaine users were related to real-life social functioning and should therefore be considered in therapy and prevention strategies. PMID:23800218

Preller, Katrin H; Hulka, Lea M; Vonmoos, Matthias; Jenni, Daniela; Baumgartner, Markus R; Seifritz, Erich; Dziobek, Isabel; Quednow, Boris B

2014-05-01

339

Doll play narratives about starting school in children of socially anxious mothers, and their relation to subsequent child school-based anxiety.  

PubMed

Child social anxiety is common, and predicts later emotional and academic impairment. Offspring of socially anxious mothers are at increased risk. It is important to establish whether individual vulnerability to disorder can be identified in young children. The responses of 4.5 year-old children of mothers with social phobia (N?=?62) and non-anxious mothers (N?=?60) were compared, two months before school entry, using a Doll Play (DP) procedure focused on the social challenge of starting school. DP responses were examined in relation to teacher reports of anxious-depressed symptoms and social worries at the end of the child's first school term. The role of earlier child behavioral inhibition and attachment, assessed at 14 months, was also considered. Compared to children of non-anxious mothers, children of mothers with social phobia were significantly more likely to give anxiously negative responses in their school DP (OR?=?2.57). In turn, negative DP predicted teacher reported anxious-depressed and social worry problems. There were no effects of infant behavioral inhibition or attachment. Vulnerability in young children at risk of anxiety can be identified using Doll Play narratives. PMID:22588362

Pass, Laura; Arteche, Adriane; Cooper, Peter; Creswell, Cathy; Murray, Lynne

2012-11-01

340

Social cultural and situative perspective of studying emotions in teaching and learning: characteristics, challenges and opportunities  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

In this forum, I take a learning sciences perspective to examine the paper by Bellocchi, Ritchie, Tobin, Sandhu and Sandhu ( Cultural Studies of Science Education, doi: 10.1007/s11422-013-9526-3 , 2013) titled "Examining emotional climate of preservice science teacher education." I characterize their approach as a social cultural and situative perspective of studying emotions in teaching and learning. Such an approach overcomes the limitations of examining emotions as individual psychological constructs, but it also incurs other methodological challenges. I suggest an alternative approach of examining the individual's emotions, as well as their aggregates as a group measure. This approach allows us to study variations in emotional outcomes at an individual level or at a group level. I also suggest examining interplay of emotions with other aspects of learning outcomes, for example, cognitive learning outcomes. Finally, I suggest studying development of meta-emotional knowledge among teachers as another fertile area of research that could benefit the teachers in their classroom practices.

Tan, Seng-Chee

2013-09-01

341

Social support, work-family conflict, and emotional exhaustion in South Korea.  

PubMed

With an increase of female workforce and dual-earner families, work-family conflict has received particular attention. Using a sample of 159 employees in South Korea, this study examined whether work-family conflict mediated the relationship between social support and emotional exhaustion. Supervisor and family support were found to be related negatively to two different aspects of work-family conflict, i.e., work interference with family and family interference with work, respectively. Also, each dimension of work-family conflict was associated with employees emotional exhaustion. The relationship between supervisor support and emotional exhaustion was mediated by work interference with family; whereas, the relationship between family support and emotional exhaustion was mediated by family interference with work. Implications and future research directions are discussed. PMID:24597453

Lee, Soojin; Kim, Seckyoung Loretta; Park, Eun Kyung; Yun, Seokhwa

2013-10-01

342

Emotional non-acceptance links early life stress and blunted cortisol reactivity to social threat.  

PubMed

Early life stress (ELS) has been recently associated with blunted cortisol reactivity and emotion dysregulation, but no study until now examined whether these characteristics are related. The main goal of this study was to examine the potential mediator role of emotion dysregulation in the relation between ELS and cortisol reactivity to social threat. Only women who were free of psychiatric and endocrine disorders, had regular menstrual cycle and did not use oral contraceptives were selected for this study (N=62). After filling in ELS and multidimensional emotion dysregulation measures, participants underwent the Trier Social Stress Test during which cortisol and autonomic responses were assessed. Most participants (85.5%) reported one or more major stressful events (i.e., physical abuse, sexual abuse, major parental conflicts, death of a family or close friend, severe illness) experienced before age 17. ELS was negatively associated with cortisol reactivity and positively associated with skin conductance level (SCL) reactivity, but it did not influence heart rate and respiratory sinus arrhythmia. In addition, ELS was positively related to emotional non-acceptance (i.e., a tendency to develop secondary emotional responses to one's negative emotions), and the latter was negatively related to cortisol responses and positively related to SCL responses. Bootstrapping analyses indicated that emotional non-acceptance was a significant mediator in the relationships between ELS and both cortisol and SCL responses. Emotional non-acceptance is thus one of the psychological mechanisms underlying blunted cortisol and increased sympathetic reactivity in young healthy volunteers with a history of ELS. PMID:25462891

C?rnu??, Mihai; Cri?an, Liviu G; Vulturar, Romana; Opre, Adrian; Miu, Andrei C

2015-01-01

343

The Social and Emotional Development of the Gifted/Talented.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The author contends that a comprehensive approach to differentiating instruction for the gifted must involve values, feelings, personal growth, and interpersonal relations so the gifted child is free to realize his optimum potential. The paper describes some of the major adjustment problems faced by the gifted as well as some approaches to…

Lacy, Grace

344

Emotional and Social Development: 8 to 12 Months  

MedlinePLUS

... objects. Some people may tell you that your child is fearful or shy because you’re “spoiling” her, but don’t believe it. Her widely diverse behavior patterns aren’t caused by you or your parenting style; they occur because she’s now, for the first ...

345

Processes linking cultural ingroup bonds and mental health: the roles of social connection and emotion regulation  

PubMed Central

Cultural and ethnic identities influence the relationships individuals seek out and how they feel and behave in these relationships, which can strongly affect mental and physical health through their impacts on emotions, physiology, and behavior. We proposed and tested a model in which ethnocultural identifications and ingroup affiliations were hypothesized explicitly to enhance social connectedness, which would in turn promote expectancy for effective regulation of negative emotions and reduce self-reported symptoms of depression and anxiety. Our sample comprised women aged 18–30 currently attending college in the Southwestern US, who self-identified as Hispanic of Mexican descent (MAs; n = 82) or as non-Hispanic White/European American (EAs; n = 234) and who completed an online survey. In the full sample and in each subgroup, stronger ethnocultural group identity and greater comfort with mainstream American culture were associated with higher social connectedness, which in turn was associated with expectancy for more effective regulation of negative emotions, fewer depressive symptoms, and less anxiety. Unexpectedly, preference for ingroup affiliation predicted lower social connectedness in both groups. In addition to indirect effects through social connection, direct paths from mainstream comfort and preference for ingroup affiliation to emotion regulation expectancy were found for EAs. Models of our data underscore that social connection is a central mechanism through which ethnocultural identities—including with one's own group and the mainstream cultural group—relate to mental health, and that emotion regulation may be a key aspect of this linkage. We use the term ethnocultural social connection to make explicit a process that, we believe, has been implied in the ethnic identity literature for many years, and that may have consequential implications for mental health and conceptualizations of processes underlying mental disorders. PMID:23450647

Roberts, Nicole A.; Burleson, Mary H.

2013-01-01

346

Emotion and emotion regulation: from another perspective.  

PubMed

An overview of the content of the From Another Perspective collection on emotion and emotion regulation is provided. The lead article identifies fundamental issues of definition and the commentaries represent varying theoretical and methodological perspectives on emotion and emotion regulation. Together, the articles discuss the promises and pitfalls of emotion research and its potential for understanding child development. PMID:15056185

Langlois, Judith H

2004-01-01

347

Social Skills Training for Taiwanese Students at Risk for Emotional and Behavioral Disorders  

Microsoft Academic Search

Two third-grade Taiwanese students at risk for emotional and behavioral disorders participated in a pull-out, small-group social skills training program developed to promote their skill acquisition and maintenance. Using a multiple baseline across skills design, the authors demonstrated that both participants made marked performance improvement in all three targeted social skills of on-task, appropriate conflict resolution, and cooperation during the

Chiu-yen Wu; Ya-yu Lo; Hua Feng; Yafen Lo

2010-01-01

348

Using Social Emotional Optimization Algorithm to Direct Orbits of Chaotic Systems  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Social emotional optimization algorithm (SEOA) is a new novel population-based stochastic optimization algorithm. In SEOA, each individual simulates one natural person. All of them are communicated through cooperation and competition to increase social status. The winner with the highest status will be the final solution. In this paper, SEOA is employed to solve the directing orbits of chaotic systems, simulation results show this new variant increases the performance significantly when compared with particle swarm optimization algorithm.

Cui, Zhihua; Shi, Zhongzhi; Zeng, Jianchao

349

Learners with Behavioural, Emotional and Social Difficulties' Experiences of Reintegration into Mainstream Education  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Behavioural, emotional and social difficulties (BESD) are a significant impediment to effective teaching and learning in England and Wales. Initiatives such as in-school Learning Support Units (LSUs) and off-site Pupil Referral Units (PRUs) aim to address BESD through short-term individualised learning programmes, followed by mandatory…

Pillay, Jace; Dunbar-Krige, Helen; Mostert, Jacques

2013-01-01

350

The therapeutic value of adolescents' blogging about social-emotional difficulties.  

PubMed

Research shows that writing a personal diary is a valuable therapeutic means for relieving emotional distress and promoting well-being, and that diary writing during adolescence helps in coping with developmental challenges. Current technologies and cultural trends make it possible and normative to publish personal diaries on the Internet through blogs--interactive, online forms of the traditional personal diary. We examined the therapeutic value of blogging for adolescents who experience social-emotional difficulties. The field experiment included randomly assigned adolescents, preassessed as having social-emotional difficulties, to 6 groups (26-28 participants in each): Four groups were assigned to blogging (writing about their difficulties or free writing; either open or closed to responses), a group assigned to writing a diary on personal computers, and a no-treatment control group. Participants in the 5 writing groups were instructed to post messages at least twice a week over 10 weeks. Outcome measures included scales of social-emotional difficulties and self-esteem, a social activities checklist, and textual analyses of participants' posts. Measurement took place at pre- and postintervention and at follow-up 2 months later. Results showed that participants maintaining a blog significantly improved on all measures. Participants writing about their difficulties in blogs open to responses gained the most. These results were consistent in the follow-up evaluation. PMID:23937092

Boniel-Nissim, Meyran; Barak, Azy

2013-08-01

351

The Infant-Toddler Social and Emotional Assessment (ITSEA): Factor Structure, Reliability, and Validity  

Microsoft Academic Search

In this paper the refinement and psychometric properties of the Infant-Toddler Social and Emotional Assessment (ITSEA) are described. Results from a sociodemographically diverse birth cohort sample of 1,235 parents of children between the ages of 12 and 36 months are presented. Confirmatory factor analyses supported the hypothesized Internalizing, Externalizing, Regulatory, and Competence do- mains as well as the 17 individual

Alice S. Carter; Margaret J. Briggs-Gowan; Stephanie M. Jones; Todd D. Little

2003-01-01

352

Moral Judgments and Emotions: Adolescents' Evaluations in Intergroup Social Exclusion Contexts  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This article examines children's moral judgments and emotional evaluations in the context of social exclusion. As they age, children and adolescents face increasingly complex situations in which group membership and allegiance are in opposition with morally relevant decisions, such as the exclusion of an individual from a group. While adolescents…

Cooley, Shelby; Elenbaas, Laura; Killen, Melanie

2012-01-01

353

Technology and the Unseen World of Gifted Students: Social Emotional Needs  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The social and emotional development of gifted students can be influenced by many factors. Genetics, experiences, learning, family values, perceptions, and interactions all contribute to the development of gifted children. Under the heading of experiences is students? use of computers. The potential effects of using these technologies is…

Cross, Tracy L.

2004-01-01

354

Promoting Children's Mental, Emotional and Social Health through Contact with Nature: A Model  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Purpose: This paper aims to determine educators' perceptions about the benefits of contact with nature for children's mental, emotional and social health. Design/methodology/approach: The approach was exploratory using qualitative methods. Face-to-face interviews were conducted with school principals and teachers as well as professionals from the…

Maller, Cecily Jane

2009-01-01

355

Comprehensive Evidence-Based Social Emotional Curricula for Young Children: An Analysis of Efficacious Adoption Potential  

Microsoft Academic Search

his article reviews eight comprehensive social-emotional curricula for children under 6 years of age and describes two promising curricula currently under in- vestigation. These programs have been successful in the promotion of interper- sonal skills and the reduction or prevention of challenging behavior for a wide range of children. Particular attention is paid to the level of evidence or scientific

Gail E. Joseph; P. S. Strain

2003-01-01

356

The Differential Effects of General Mental Ability and Emotional Intelligence on Academic Performance and Social Interactions  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This study considers the debate about whether emotional intelligence (EI) has incremental validity over and above traditional intelligence dimensions. We propose that EI and general mental abilities (GMA) differ in predicting academic performance and the quality of social interactions among college students. Using two college student samples, we…

Song, Lynda Jiwen; Huang, Guo-hua; Peng, Kelly Z.; Law, Kenneth S.; Wong, Chi-Sum; Chen, Zhijun

2010-01-01

357

The Association between Observed Parental Emotion Socialization and Adolescent Self-Medication  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The current study examined the moderating influence of observed parental emotion socialization (PES) on self-medication in adolescents. Strengths of the study include the use of a newly developed observational coding system further extending the study of PES to adolescence, the use of an experience sampling method to assess the daily covariation…

Hersh, Matthew A.; Hussong, Andrea M.

2009-01-01

358

Facial Emotion Processing and Social Adaptation in Adults with and without Autism Spectrum Disorder  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Individuals with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) and individuals with intellectual disabilities without ASD have limited facial emotion recognition abilities, which may adversely impact social adjustment and other adaptive behavior. This study was designed to examine this relationship in adults with and without ASD. Two groups of adults with…

Garcia-Villamisar, Domingo; Rojahn, Johannes; Zaja, Rebecca H.; Jodra, Marina

2010-01-01

359

Emotional, Social, and Academic Adjustment of College Students: A Longitudinal Study of Retention.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

New undergraduates (n=198) completed surveys on expectations about college adjustment; later completed survey of actual adjustment. Six years later, results indicated that two different sets of items best discriminated among good-standing persisters and leavers, and among poor-standing persisters and leavers. Emotional and social adjustment items…

Gerdes, Hilary; Mallinckrodt, Brent

1994-01-01

360

Social Support, Negative Life Events and Emotional Problems Among Norwegian Adolescents  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Relationships between negative life events, perceived social support and emotional problems were assessed in a national representative sample of 1,053 adolescents in eighth grade. Thirty-one percent of the adolescents reported that they had experienced at least one negative life event during the last year. Serious illness or injury among close…

Murberg, Terje A.; Bru, Edvin

2004-01-01

361

Commentary: Implementing Social-Emotional and Academic Innovations--Reflections, Reactions, and Research  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The article "Implementation, Sustainability, and Scaling Up of Social-Emotional and Academic Innovations in Public Schools" by Elias, Zins, Graczyk, and Weissberg (2003) is a thought-provoking contribution, and one that begs for more application. Some of the points the authors raise have been articulated in the school and clinical evidence-based…

Elliott, Stephen N.; Kratochwill, Thomas R.; Roach, Andrew T.

2003-01-01

362

Dropping out of School as a Meaningful Action for Adolescents with Social, Emotional and Behavioural Difficulties  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This study examines and discusses dropping out of school related to adolescents with social, emotional and behavioural difficulties (SEBD). It is based on in-depth interviews of 10 adolescents between the ages of 16 and 20, three girls and two boys with internalised problems, and two girls and three boys with extroverted behavioural problems.…

Lund, Ingrid

2014-01-01

363

School Climate and Social-Emotional Learning: Predicting Teacher Stress, Job Satisfaction, and Teaching Efficacy  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The aims of this study were to investigate whether and how teachers' perceptions of social-emotional learning and climate in their schools influenced three outcome variables--teachers' sense of stress, teaching efficacy, and job satisfaction--and to examine the interrelationships among the three outcome variables. Along with sense of job…

Collie, Rebecca J.; Shapka, Jennifer D.; Perry, Nancy E.

2012-01-01

364

Building Inclusive Education on Social and Emotional Learning: Challenges and Perspectives--A Review  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This article focuses on conceptual and empirical issues related to the links between social and emotional learning (SEL) and inclusive education. SEL can be defined as the process of socialisation and education related to personal, interpersonal and problem-solving skills and competencies. This process takes place in formal and informal settings…

Reicher, Hannelore

2010-01-01

365

Understanding Implementation and Effectiveness of "Strong Start K-2" on Social-Emotional Behavior  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

"Strong Start K-2" is a social-emotional learning curriculum, designed for use with children in kindergarten through grade 2. The objectives of this study were twofold. First, authors aimed to evaluate the feasibility and quality of "Strong Start" implementation. Additionally authors examined the effect of "Strong Start" on first grade students'…

Whitcomb, Sara A.; Merrell, Kenneth W.

2012-01-01

366

Temperamental Surgency and Emotion Regulation as Predictors of Childhood Social Competence  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The primary aims of the current study were to longitudinally examine the direct relationship between children's temperamental surgency and social behaviors as well as the moderating role of children's emotion regulation. A total of 90 4.5-year-old children participated in a laboratory visit where children's temperamental surgency was rated by…

Dollar, Jessica M.; Stifter, Cynthia A.

2012-01-01

367

Understanding How Social and Emotional Skill Deficits Contribute to School Failure  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

A growing number of children are entering kindergarten without the skills that enable them to be successful in an academic setting. However, it is not children's cognitive skills that concern educators; it is their social and emotional skill deficits that are most troublesome. This article discusses how family and community risk factors can…

Whitted, Kathryn S.

2011-01-01

368

Sharing Good Practice: Prevention and Support Concerning Pupils Presenting Social, Emotional and Behavioural Difficulties.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This book is the result of a project to identify and disseminate examples of good practice in providing for children experiencing social, emotional, and behavioral difficulties in schools. The focus is on whole-school or classroom approaches to mainstreaming with experience from teachers of preschool to secondary grades. A major theme is providing…

Lloyd, Gwynedd, Ed.; Munn, Pamela, Ed.

369

The Strength of Weak Identities: Social Structural Sources of Self, Situation and Emotional Experience  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Modern societies are highly differentiated, with relatively uncorrelated socially salient dimensions and a preponderance of weak, unidimensional (as opposed to strong, multiplex) ties. What are the implications of a society with fewer strong ties and more weak ties for the self? What do these changes mean for our emotional experience in everyday…

Smith-Lovin, Lynn

2007-01-01

370

Social-Emotional Effects of Early Childhood Education Programs in Tulsa  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This article assesses the effects of Tulsa, Oklahoma's early childhood education programs on social-emotional outcomes, examining teacher ratings of children's behavior from the Adjustment Scales for Preschool Intervention and a measure of attentiveness using fixed effects regressions with propensity score matching. The sample includes 2,832…

Gormley, William T., Jr.; Phillips, Deborah A.; Newmark, Katie; Welti, Kate; Adelstein, Shirley

2011-01-01

371

The Link between Emotion Regulation, Social Functioning, and Depression in Boys with ASD  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Purpose: Symptoms of depression are common in children and adolescents with an autism spectrum disorder (ASD), but information about underlying developmental factors is limited. Depression is often linked to aspects of emotional functioning such as coping strategies, but in children with ASD difficulties with social interactions are also a likely…

Pouw, Lucinda B. C.; Rieffe, Carolien; Stockmann, Lex; Gadow, Kenneth D.

2013-01-01

372

Evaluating the Adequacy of Social-Emotional Measures in Early Childhood  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Technical adequacy and usability are important considerations in selecting early childhood social-emotional (SE) screening and assessment measures. As identification of difficulties can be tied to programming, intervention, accountability, and funding, it is imperative that practitioners and decision makers select appropriate and quality measures…

Gokiert, Rebecca J.; Georgis, Rebecca; Tremblay, Melissa; Krishnan, Vijaya; Vandenberghe, Christine; Lee, Clara

2014-01-01

373

Coordinating Social-Emotional and Character Development (SECD) Initiatives Improves School Climate and Student Learning  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Many schools attempt to implement multiple programs to promote positive young adolescent development; however, these programs are often fragmented and lack coordination. The authors describe an initiative designed to help schools coordinate their social-emotional and character development (SECD) efforts to improve school climate and help students…

Elias, Maurice J.; DeFini, Jennifer; Bergmann, Jennifer

2010-01-01

374

Deconstructing a Definition: Social Maladjustment versus Emotional Disturbance and Moving the EBD Field Forward  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

In this article we discuss the definition of emotionally disturbed (ED) from the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act, with a specific focus on the clause contained in this definition, which is designed to exclude from special education services students who are considered to be socially maladjusted (SM). The history of the SM exclusionary…

Merrell, Kenneth W.; Walker, Hill M.

2004-01-01

375

A framework for understanding the social and emotional development of gifted and talented adolescents  

Microsoft Academic Search

Does the process of adolescence produce different reactions and repercussions among gifted and talented adolescents than their normal peers? Identifying the origins of social and emotional concerns among these unique adolescents is the first step in designing an effective counseling program. This article probes patterns of adolescent development believed to exist among both normal and gifted students, and previews issues

Thomas M. Buescher

1985-01-01

376

Development of a Questionnaire Assessing Teacher Perceived Support for and Attitudes about Social and Emotional Learning  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Research Findings: In the past 20 years school districts have increasingly adopted classroom-based social and emotional development programs. The dissemination of these programs, however, has surpassed our understanding of and ability to assess factors that influence program implementation. The present study responded to this gap by developing a…

Schultz, David; Ambike, Archana; Stapleton, Laura M.; Domitrovich, Celene E.; Schaeffer, Cindy M.; Bartels, Barbara

2010-01-01

377

Befriending the Two-Headed Monster: Personal, Social and Emotional Development in Schools in Challenging Times  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Schools in the UK and beyond continue to experience the damaging effects of "top down," "one size fits all" "outcome-based" educational reforms. Educators struggle to meet the dual demands of a punishing performativity- and accountability-driven regime alongside the personal, social, emotional and learning needs of their pupils, especially those…

Harris, Belinda

2008-01-01

378

Self-Determined Motivation and Social Achievement Goals in Children's Emotions  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

In this cross-sectional study we investigated to what extent autonomous and controlled motivation and social achievement goals are associated with students' emotional experiences at school. We found in a sample of 426 elementary school students, aged from 10 to 12 years, autonomous motivation (i.e. students' engagement in class activities because…

Mouratidis, Athanasios; Michou, Aikaterini

2011-01-01

379

Social and Emotional Learning Strategies to Support Students in Challenging Schools  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

New and veteran educators often face particular challenges in the classroom. Problems include classroom management, student academic achievement, and job satisfaction. This research examines the effects of implementing a Social and Emotional Learning (SEL) approach for students as part of the regular education for elementary public schools. SEL is…

Marulanda, Zandra K.

2010-01-01

380

Building inclusive education on social and emotional learning: challenges and perspectives – a review  

Microsoft Academic Search

This article focuses on conceptual and empirical issues related to the links between social and emotional learning (SEL) and inclusive education. SEL can be defined as the process of socialisation and education related to personal, interpersonal and problem?solving skills and competencies. This process takes place in formal and informal settings and is influenced by a complex interplay of individual, situational

Hannelore Reicher

2010-01-01

381

Social-Cognitive Competence, Peer Rejection and Neglect, and Behavioral and Emotional Problems in Middle Childhood  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This prospective, longitudinal study examines individual differences in two conceptually related but empirically distinct domains of social-cognitive competence (cognitive interpretive understanding and interpersonal perspective co-ordination) as moderators of the relation between peer rejection and neglect and behavioral and emotional problems in…

Hoglund, Wendy L. G.; Lalonde, Christopher E.; Leadbeater, Bonnie J.

2008-01-01

382

Who Said School Administration Would Be Fun?: Coping With a New Emotional and Social Reality  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

School administrators fill a crucial need in education, but all too often their social and emotional worlds turn upside-down when they make this momentous career move. This second edition provides an insightful look at the unwritten and unspoken rules of school administration, helping new and sitting administrators work through the initial…

Sigford, Jane L.

2005-01-01

383

EmotionSense: a mobile phones based adaptive platform for experimental social psychology research  

Microsoft Academic Search

Today's mobile phones represent a rich and powerful computing platform, given their sensing, processing and communication capabilities. Phones are also part of the everyday life of billions of people, and therefore represent an exceptionally suitable tool for conducting social and psychological experiments in an unobtrusive way. de the ability of sensing individual emotions as well as activities, verbal and proximity

Kiran K. Rachuri; Mirco Musolesi; Cecilia Mascolo; Peter J. Rentfrow; Chris Longworth; Andrius Aucinas

2010-01-01

384

Teacher Strategies for Effective Intervention with Students Presenting Social, Emotional and Behavioural Difficulties: An International Review  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

A review of international research literature on teacher strategies for effective intervention with students presenting social, emotional and behavioural difficulties (SEBD) is presented. Particular attention is given to evidence defining the qualities and skills of effective teachers and the value of behavioural and cognitive behavioural…

Cooper, Paul

2011-01-01

385

The Infant–Toddler Social and Emotional Assessment (ITSEA): Factor Structure, Reliability, and Validity  

Microsoft Academic Search

In this paper the refinement and psychometric properties of the Infant–Toddler Social and Emotional Assessment (ITSEA) are described. Results from a sociodemographically diverse birth cohort sample of 1,235 parents of children between the ages of 12 and 36 months are presented. Confirmatory factor analyses supported the hypothesized Internalizing, Externalizing, Regulatory, and Competence domains as well as the 17 individual scales

Alice S. Carter; Margaret J. Briggs-Gowan; Stephanie M. Jones; Todd D. Little

2003-01-01

386

The Relationship between Social-Emotional Difficulties and Underachievement of Gifted Students  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Gifted students are a diverse minority group with high intelligence and talent whose needs are often unrecognised and unmet. It is believed that this group of students, from a range of backgrounds, socio-economic statuses and abilities, may experience a range of social-emotional difficulties, including peer exclusion, isolation, stress, anxiety,…

Blaas, Sabrina

2014-01-01

387

Emotional Intelligence and Social Responsibility of Boy Students in Middle School  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The present study has been undertaken to know the relationship between emotional intelligence and social responsibility of boy students in middle school using correlation. Survey method was adopted for the study. Data were collected from 100 boy students studying in Miandoab City of Iran during the academic year, 2012-13 who were selected…

Moradi Sheykhjan, Tohid; Jabari, Kamran; K, Rajeswari

2014-01-01

388

Human Resource Development, Social Capital, Emotional Intelligence: Any Link to Productivity?  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Purpose: This article aims to offer a theoretical framework that attempts to show the integration among human resource development (HRD), social capital (SC), emotional intelligence (EI) and organizational productivity. Design/methodology/approach: The literature search included the following: a computerized search of accessible and available…

Brooks, Kit; Nafukho, Fredrick Muyia

2006-01-01

389

Effectiveness of School-Based Universal Social, Emotional, and Behavioral Programs: Do They Enhance Students' Development in the Area of Skill, Behavior, and Adjustment?  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

To answer the question of whether teaching social and emotional skills to foster social-emotional development can help schools extend their role beyond the transfer of knowledge, the authors conducted a meta-analytical review of 75 recently published studies that reported the effects of universal, school-based social, emotional, and/or behavioral…

Sklad, Marcin; Diekstra, Rene; De Ritter, Monique; Ben, Jehonathan; Gravesteijn, Carolien

2012-01-01

390

Using Emotional Memories to Form Synthetic Social Relationships  

Microsoft Academic Search

We present a simple, biologically-inspired mechanism by which synthetic entities can be made to form social relationships with each other. We describe an interactive multi-agent system, based on the social behavior of the gray wolf (Canis lupus), that features this mechanism of social relationship formation. This installation, shown at SIGGRAPH 2001, allowed several participants to direct semi-autonomous wolf pups in

Bruce Blumberg

391

Transactions Between Child Social Wariness and Observed Structured Parenting: Evidence From a Prospective Adoption Study  

PubMed Central

This investigation examined the mutual influences between structured parenting and child social wariness during toddlerhood using a longitudinal adoption design. The sample consisted of 361 adoption-linked families, each including an adopted child, adoptive parents, and a birth mother. Heightened social wariness in children at age 18 months predicted reduced levels of observed structured parenting (i.e., less directive parenting with fewer commands and requests) in adoptive mothers at age 27 months. Adoptive fathers’ lower structured parenting at age 18 months predicted subsequent elevation in child social wariness. Birth mothers’ history of fear-related anxiety disorders was not associated with child social wariness. Findings highlight the role of dynamic family transactions in the development of social wariness during toddlerhood. PMID:23448430

Natsuaki, Misaki N.; Leve, Leslie D.; Harold, Gordon T.; Neiderhiser, Jenae M.; Shaw, Daniel S.; Ganiban, Jody; Scaramella, Laura V.; Reiss, David

2013-01-01

392

Relationship between Children’s Intelligence and Their Emotional/Behavioral Problems and Social Competence: Gender Differences in First Graders  

PubMed Central

Background The present study examines gender differences in the correlations between intelligence and developmental problems as well as social competence in first graders. Methods Ninety parent-child dyads participated in this study. The children comprised 7-year-olds recruited from the first grade of an elementary school. All the children were administered the Wechsler Intelligence Scale for Children–Third Edition (WISC-III), Parent-child Interaction Rating Scale (IRS), and the parent report version of Strength and Difficulties Questionnaire (SDQ). Results The findings clarified that the processing speed of boys significantly correlated with their peer relationship. On the other hand, the emotional symptoms exhibited by girls had a more common association with their intellectual abilities. The correlations between parenting and intellectual abilities differed in boys and girls. Conclusions Children’s gender should be taken into account when assessing the diversity in their intellectual abilities and developmental problems. Moreover, parenting also influences the development of children in various ways. PMID:20179377

Tong, Lian; Shinohara, Ryoji; Sugisawa, Yuka; Tanaka, Emiko; Watanabe, Taeko; Onda, Yoko; Kawashima, Yuri; Yato, Yuko; Yamakawa, Noriko; Koeda, Tatsuya; Ishida, Hiraku; Terakawa, Shinako; Seki, Ayumi; Anme, Tokie

2010-01-01

393

Oxytocin and social pretreatment have similar effects on processing of negative emotional faces in healthy adult males  

PubMed Central

Oxytocin has been shown to affect several aspects of human social cognition, including facial emotion processing. There is also evidence that social stimuli (such as eye-contact) can effectively modulate endogenous oxytocin levels. In the present study we directly tested whether intranasal oxytocin administration and pre-treatment with social stimuli had similar effects on face processing at the behavioral level. Subjects (N = 52 healthy adult males) were presented with a set of faces with expressions of different valence (negative, neutral, positive) following different types of pretreatment (oxytocin—OT or placebo—PL and social interaction—Soc or no social interaction—NSoc, N = 13 in each) and were asked to rate all faces for perceived emotion and trustworthiness. On the next day subjects' recognition memory was tested on a set of neutral faces and additionally they had to again rate each face for trustworthiness and emotion. Subjects in both the OT and the Soc pretreatment group (as compared to the PL and to the NSoc groups) gave higher emotion and trustworthiness scores for faces with negative emotional expression. Moreover, 24 h later, subjects in the OT and Soc groups (unlike in control groups) gave lower trustworthiness scores for previously negative faces, than for faces previously seen as emotionally neutral or positive. In sum these results provide the first direct evidence of the similar effects of intranasal oxytocin administration and social stimulation on the perception of negative facial emotions as well as on the delayed recall of negative emotional information. PMID:23966970

Kis, Anna; Kemerle, Kinga; Hernádi, Anna; Topál, József

2013-01-01

394

Lateral prefrontal cortex activity during cognitive control of emotion predicts response to social stress in schizophrenia  

PubMed Central

LPFC dysfunction is a well-established neural impairment in schizophrenia and is associated with worse symptoms. However, how LPFC activation influences symptoms is unclear. Previous findings in healthy individuals demonstrate that lateral prefrontal cortex (LPFC) activation during cognitive control of emotional information predicts mood and behavior in response to interpersonal conflict, thus impairments in these processes may contribute to symptom exacerbation in schizophrenia. We investigated whether schizophrenia participants show LPFC deficits during cognitive control of emotional information, and whether these LPFC deficits prospectively predict changes in mood and symptoms following real-world interpersonal conflict. During fMRI, 23 individuals with schizophrenia or schizoaffective disorder and 24 healthy controls completed the Multi-Source Interference Task superimposed on neutral and negative pictures. Afterwards, schizophrenia participants completed a 21-day online daily-diary in which they rated the extent to which they experienced mood and schizophrenia-spectrum symptoms, as well as the occurrence and response to interpersonal conflict. Schizophrenia participants had lower dorsal LPFC activity (BA9) during cognitive control of task-irrelevant negative emotional information. Within schizophrenia participants, DLPFC activity during cognitive control of emotional information predicted changes in positive and negative mood on days following highly distressing interpersonal conflicts. Results have implications for understanding the specific role of LPFC in response to social stress in schizophrenia, and suggest that treatments targeting LPFC-mediated cognitive control of emotion could promote adaptive response to social stress in schizophrenia. PMID:25379415

Tully, Laura M.; Lincoln, Sarah Hope; Hooker, Christine I.

2014-01-01

395

Systematically Identifying Relevant Research: Case Study on Child Protection Social Workers' Resilience  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Context: The development of a consolidated knowledge base for social work requires rigorous approaches to identifying relevant research. Method: The quality of 10 databases and a web search engine were appraised by systematically searching for research articles on resilience and burnout in child protection social workers. Results: Applied Social

McFadden, Paula; Taylor, Brian J.; Campbell, Anne; McQuilkin, Janice

2012-01-01

396

Social Conformity and Autism Spectrum Disorder: A Child-Friendly Take on a Classic Study  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Perhaps surprisingly, given the importance of conformity as a theoretical construct in social psychology and the profound implications autism has for social function, little research has been done on whether autism is associated with the propensity to conform to a social majority. This study is a modern, child-friendly implementation of the…

Yafai, Abdul-Fattah; Verrier, Diarmuid; Reidy, Lisa

2014-01-01

397

More than words: the emotional maltreatment of children.  

PubMed

Emotional maltreatment may be the most complex, prevalent, and damaging form of child maltreatment and can occur simultaneously with other forms of abuse. Children in the first few years of life seem to be at the greatest risk of suffering the most negative outcomes. Medical professionals can help identify and protect victims of emotional maltreatment by carefully observing caregiver-child interactions, paying attention to a family's social history, making referrals to community or counseling programs when necessary, and reporting any suspicions of maltreatment to Child Protective Services. A well-coordinated, multidisciplinary response must be enacted whenever emotional maltreatment is suspected or reported. PMID:25242708

Campbell, Andrew M; Hibbard, Roberta

2014-10-01

398

Improving classroom quality with the RULER Approach to Social and Emotional Learning: proximal and distal outcomes.  

PubMed

The RULER Approach to Social and Emotional Learning ("RULER") is designed to improve the quality of classroom interactions through professional development and classroom curricula that infuse emotional literacy instruction into teaching-learning interactions. Its theory of change specifies that RULER first shifts the emotional qualities of classrooms, which are then followed, over time, by improvements in classroom organization and instructional support. A 2-year, cluster randomized controlled trial was conducted to test hypotheses derived from this theory. Sixty-two urban schools either integrated RULER into fifth- and sixth-grade English language arts (ELA) classrooms or served as comparison schools, using their standard ELA curriculum only. Results from multilevel modeling with baseline adjustments and structural equation modeling support RULER's theory of change. Compared to classrooms in comparison schools, classrooms in RULER schools exhibited greater emotional support, better classroom organization, and more instructional support at the end of the second year of program delivery. Improvements in classroom organization and instructional support at the end of Year 2 were partially explained by RULER's impacts on classroom emotional support at the end of Year 1. These findings highlight the important contribution of emotional literacy training and development in creating engaging, empowering, and productive learning environments. PMID:23444004

Hagelskamp, Carolin; Brackett, Marc A; Rivers, Susan E; Salovey, Peter

2013-06-01

399

Evolution of emotions on networks leads to the evolution of cooperation in social dilemmas.  

PubMed

We show that the resolution of social dilemmas in random graphs and scale-free networks is facilitated by imitating not the strategy of better-performing players but, rather, their emotions. We assume sympathy and envy to be the two emotions that determine the strategy of each player in any given interaction, and we define them as the probabilities of cooperating with players having a lower and a higher payoff, respectively. Starting with a population where all possible combinations of the two emotions are available, the evolutionary process leads to a spontaneous fixation to a single emotional profile that is eventually adopted by all players. However, this emotional profile depends not only on the payoffs but also on the heterogeneity of the interaction network. Homogeneous networks, such as lattices and regular random graphs, lead to fixations that are characterized by high sympathy and high envy, while heterogeneous networks lead to low or modest sympathy but also low envy. Our results thus suggest that public emotions and the propensity to cooperate at large depend, and are in fact determined by, the properties of the interaction network. PMID:23679471

Szolnoki, Attila; Xie, Neng-Gang; Ye, Ye; Perc, Matjaž

2013-04-01

400

Child and Adult Social--Emotional Benefits of Response-Contingent Child Learning Opportunities  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Findings from two studies of 42 children with profound developmental delays (26 males and 15 females) using systematic and intense response-contingent learning opportunities interventions are reported. Response-contingent learning games were used to promote the participants' use of behavior that either produced environmental consequences or…

Dunst, Carl J,; Raab, Melinda; Trivette, Carol M.; Parkey, Cindy; Gatens, Mary; Wilson, Linda L.; French, Jennie; Hamby, Deborah W.

2007-01-01

401

The Disappointing Gift: Dispositional and Situational Moderators of Emotional Expressions  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Inferences about emotions in children are limited by studies that rely on only one research method. Convergence across methods provides a stronger basis for inference by identifying method variance. This multimethod study of 116 children (mean age = 8.21 years) examined emotional displays during social exchange. Each child received a desirable…

Tobin, Renee M.; Graziano, William G.

2011-01-01

402

Temperamental surgency and emotion regulation as predictors of childhood social competence  

PubMed Central

The primary aims of the current study were to longitudinally examine the direct relationship between children's temperamental surgency and social behaviors as well as the moderating role of children's emotion regulation. A total of 90 4.5-year-old children participated in a laboratory visit where children's temperamental surgency was rated by experimenters and children's emotion regulation abilities were assessed. The summer before entry into first grade, children's social behaviors with unfamiliar peers were observed in the laboratory and mothers completed a questionnaire about children's social behaviors. Supporting our hypotheses, results revealed that children high in temperamental surgency developed more negative peer behaviors, whereas children low in temperamental surgency were more likely to develop behavioral wariness with peers. Emotion regulatory behaviors were found to moderate the relation between temperamental surgency and aggression, where high-surgent children who showed high levels of social support seeking were less likely to be rated by their mothers as high in aggression. Furthermore, results revealed that low-surgent children who showed high levels of distraction/self-soothing were more likely to show behavioral wariness around unfamiliar peers, whereas high-surgent children who used more distraction/self-soothing behaviors were rated by their mothers as lower in social competence. PMID:22414737

Dollar, Jessica M.; Stifter, Cynthia A.

2015-01-01

403

Have we met before? Neural correlates of emotional learning in women with social phobia  

PubMed Central

Background Altered memory processes are thought to be a key mechanism in the etiology of anxiety disorders, but little is known about the neural correlates of fear learning and memory biases in patients with social phobia. The present study therefore examined whether patients with social phobia exhibit different patterns of neural activation when confronted with recently acquired emotional stimuli. Methods Patients with social phobia and a group of healthy controls learned to associate pseudonames with pictures of persons displaying either a fearful or a neutral expression. The next day, participants read the pseudonames in the magnetic resonance imaging scanner. Afterwards, 2 memory tests were carried out. Results We enrolled 21 patients and 21 controls in our study. There were no group differences for learning performance, and results of the memory tests were mixed. On a neural level, patients showed weaker amygdala activation than controls for the contrast of names previously associated with fearful versus neutral faces. Social phobia severity was negatively related to amygdala activation. Moreover, a detailed psychophysiological interaction analysis revealed an inverse correlation between disorder severity and frontolimbic connectivity for the emotional > neutral pseudonames contrast. Limitations Our sample included only women. Conclusion Our results support the theory of a disturbed corticolimbic interplay, even for recently learned emotional stimuli. We discuss the findings with regard to the vigilance–avoidance theory and contrast them to results indicating an oversensitive limbic system in patients with social phobia. PMID:24758944

Laeger, Inga; Keuper, Kati; Heitmann, Carina; Kugel, Harald; Dobel, Christian; Eden, Annuschka; Arolt, Volker; Zwitserlood, Pienie; Dannlowski, Udo; Zwanzger, Peter

2014-01-01

404

Promoting Academic and Social-Emotional School Readiness: The Head Start REDI Program  

PubMed Central

Forty-four Head Start classrooms were randomly assigned to enriched intervention (Head Start REDI- Research-based, Developmentally Informed) or “usual practice” conditions. The intervention involved brief lessons, “hands on” extension activities, and specific teaching strategies linked empirically with the promotion of: 1) social-emotional competencies, and 2) language development and emergent literacy skills. Take-home materials were provided to parents to enhance skill development at home. Multi-method assessments of 356 4-year-old children tracked their progress over the course of the one-year program. Results revealed significant differences favoring children in the enriched intervention classrooms on measures of vocabulary, emergent literacy, emotional understanding, social problem-solving, social behavior, and learning engagement. Implications are discussed for developmental models of school readiness and for early educational programs and policies. PMID:19037951

Bierman, Karen L.; Domitrovich, Celene E.; Nix, Robert L.; Gest, Scott D.; Welsh, Janet A.; Greenberg, Mark T.; Blair, Clancy; Nelson, Keith E.; Gill, Sukhdeep

2013-01-01

405

Emotional and Social Loneliness in Individuals With and Without Substance Dependence Disorder  

PubMed Central

Background: Loneliness is one of the psychological variables related to high risk behaviors that should be investigated more. Objectives: The current study aimed to assess emotional, social, romantic, and familial dimensions of loneliness in drug abuser and nondrug abuser individuals. Patients and Methods: Two hundred and twenty eight individuals were enrolled in this cross sectional study. Hundred and eighteen drug abusers were recruited through random sampling among the clients referred to Baharan Psychiatric Hospital, and 110 non-substance dependent individuals were selected from their companions, students, and staffs. In addition to clinical interview, the Iranian short version of the social and emotional loneliness scale for adults (SELSA-S) was used to evaluate the participants. Results: There were statistically significant difference between the scores of all four emotional, social, familial, and romantic dimensions of loneliness in substance dependent individuals. Although there was no difference between the scores of men and women, the mean scores of romantic and emotional dimensions were higher in non-substance dependent women. Conclusions: The feeling of loneliness is stronger in drug abusers rather than non-drug abusers that could develop the sense of being different from community and increase the probability of taking high risk behaviors and abusing drugs. Thus, it is suggested to consider the feeling of loneliness in all programs designed to prevent or treat addiction.

Hosseinbor, Mohsen; Yassini Ardekani, Seyed Mojtaba; Bakhshani, Saeed; Bakhshani, Somayeh

2014-01-01

406

Theories of Emotion: Integrating philosophy and the social sciences  

E-print Network

a theory's ability to incorporate the two distinct aspects of affective experience (i.e., evolutionary psychology and social constructionism and their debate over the role cognitive and non-cognitive processes play in affective experience) which...

Stolzle, Michael

2011-02-28

407

Emotional Exhaustion Among Employees Without Social or Client Contact: The Key Role of Nonstandard Work Schedules  

Microsoft Academic Search

Purpose  The current study examines emotional exhaustion and its predictors among employees without social or client contact on multiple\\u000a nonstandard shifts.\\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a Design\\/methodology\\/approach  Data were obtained through surveys from U.S. Postal Service employees at three mail processing centers (N = 353).\\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a Findings  While we hypothesized that the day, evening, and night shift employees would differ significantly on emotional exhaustion,\\u000a we found that the day and evening

Jenell L. S. WittmerJames; James E. Martin

2010-01-01

408

CHILD POVERTY - A PERSISTING CHALLENGE European Journal of Social Security 2007 Special Issue on Child Poverty  

Microsoft Academic Search

The five papers in this Special Issue devoted to child poverty examine major issues relating to the problem. Peter Whiteford and Willem Adema set out the basic trends in child poverty across OECD countries. The hard comparative evidence of the different rates of child poverty and their changes over time bring home the importance of both policy packages and the

Adrian Sinfield; Axel West Pedersen

409

Adoption and the American Indian Child: A Manual for Social Service Workers.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Written for social service workers involved with Indian child welfare cases in which adoption through a state court is being considered, this manual presents basic information about the requirements of the Indian Child Welfare Act of 1978 (ICWA) in cases of Indian adoption. Background material explains that the ICWA--intended to establish…

Zokan delos Reyes, Louise

410

A Parent-Child Interactional Model of Social Anxiety Disorder in Youth  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

In this paper, one of the most common disorders of childhood and adolescence, social anxiety disorder (SAD), is examined to illustrate the complex and delicate interplay between parent and child factors that can result in normal development gone awry. Our parent-child model of SAD posits a host of variables that converge to occasion the onset and…

Ollendick, Thomas H.; Benoit, Kristy E.

2012-01-01

411

Mai dongxi: Social influence, materialism and China's one-child policy  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper investigates the moderating role of the China's one-child policy on the relationship between susceptibility to social influence from parents and peers and the levels of materialism of consumers. By comparing Chinese consumers who were born after the implementation of the one-child policy with their Indian and Thai counterparts, our study finds that the previously documented positive relationship between

Yoshiko DeMotta; Kritika Kongsompong; Sankar Sen

2012-01-01

412

Legal and Social Service Responses to Child Sexual Abuse: A Primer and Discussion of Relevant Research  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This paper provides a broad overview of legal and social service responses to child sexual abuse, the overarching legal framework provided by federal legislation, and funding mandates and the unique and shared investigative concerns of law enforcement and child protective service entities. Relevant psychological research is highlighted throughout,…

Wiley, Tisha R. A.

2009-01-01

413

Emotion Regulation as a Scientific Construct: Methodological Challenges and Directions for Child Development Research  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Emotion regulation has emerged as a popular topic, but there is doubt about its viability as a scientific construct. This article identifies conceptual and methodological challenges in this area of study and describes exemplar studies that provide a substantive basis for inferring emotion regulation. On the basis of those studies, 4 methods are…

Cole, Pamela M.; Martin, Sarah E.; Dennis, Tracy A.

2004-01-01

414

Emotional Maltreatment in Canada: Prevalence, Reporting and Child Welfare Responses (CIS2)  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Objectives: To determine the prevalence and characteristics of reports of emotional maltreatment (EMT) in Canada, as well as changes in these reports between 1998 and 2003. Methods: This study is based on a secondary analysis of data collected in the first and second Canadian Incidence Study. Emotional maltreatment (excluding exposure to intimate…

Chamberland, Claire; Fallon, Barbara; Black, Tara; Trocme, Nico

2011-01-01

415

Parents' Emotion Related Beliefs and Behaviors and Child Grade: Associations with Children's Perceptions of Peer Competence  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Mothers' and fathers' beliefs and reported behaviors regarding negative emotional expression and observed family negative emotion expressiveness were investigated as predictors of first-, third-, and fifth-grade children's self-reported peer competence. Parents' beliefs were related to their reported behaviors, and mothers accepted and encouraged…

Wong, Maria S.; Diener, Marissa L.; Isabella, Russell A.

2008-01-01

416

Emotional Intelligence, Emotion and Social Work: Context, Characteristics, Complications and Contribution  

Microsoft Academic Search

Tony Morrison is an independent trainer and consultant working with a background in children's services. He works with social services, health and other agencies both in the UK and overseas on issues including staff supervision; inter-agency collaboration; change management; and team development. He has a special interest in attachment theory and has been involved in work to develop services to

Tony Morrison

2006-01-01

417

Childhood emotional maltreatment severity is associated with dorsal medial prefrontal cortex responsivity to social exclusion in young adults.  

PubMed

Children who have experienced chronic parental rejection and exclusion during childhood, as is the case in childhood emotional maltreatment, may become especially sensitive to social exclusion. This study investigated the neural and emotional responses to social exclusion (with the Cyberball task) in young adults reporting childhood emotional maltreatment. Using functional magnetic resonance imaging, we investigated brain responses and self-reported distress to social exclusion in 46 young adult patients and healthy controls (mean age?=?19.2±2.16) reporting low to extreme childhood emotional maltreatment. Consistent with prior studies, social exclusion was associated with activity in the ventral medial prefrontal cortex and posterior cingulate cortex. In addition, severity of childhood emotional maltreatment was positively associated with increased dorsal medial prefrontal cortex responsivity to social exclusion. The dorsal medial prefrontal cortex plays a crucial role in self-and other-referential processing, suggesting that the more individuals have been rejected and maltreated in childhood, the more self- and other- processing is elicited by social exclusion in adulthood. Negative self-referential thinking, in itself, enhances cognitive vulnerability for the development of psychiatric disorders. Therefore, our findings may underlie the emotional and behavioural difficulties that have been reported in adults reporting childhood emotional maltreatment. PMID:24416347

van Harmelen, Anne-Laura; Hauber, Kirsten; Gunther Moor, Bregtje; Spinhoven, Philip; Boon, Albert E; Crone, Eveline A; Elzinga, Bernet M

2014-01-01

418

Relations of Cohesion and Power in Family Dyads to Social and Emotional Adjustment during Early Adolescence.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Examined family cohesion and power in relation to depressive affect, social self-concept, and behavioral restraint in young adolescents. Cohesion and power were examined within the context of parent-child and mother-father relationships. The cohesive nature of family relationships affected adjustment more consistently for girls than boys, whereas…

Wentzel, Kathryn R.; Feldman, S. Shirley

1996-01-01

419

Representations of the caregiver–child relationship and of the self, and emotion regulation in the narratives of young children whose mothers have borderline personality disorder  

PubMed Central

Borderline personality disorder (BPD) represents a severe distortion in the development of attachment, self, and emotion regulation. Study of children at high risk of developing BPD may inform precursors to BPD. In a low socioeconomic status sample of 30 children aged 4–7 whose mothers have BPD and 30 normative comparisons, representations of the caregiver–child relationship and of the self, and emotion regulation were assessed with a story-stem completion measure. In contrast to comparisons and controlling for major depressive disorder, children whose mothers have BPD told stories with the following: (a) more parent–child role reversal, more fear of abandonment, and more negative mother–child and father–child relationship expectations; (b) more incongruent and shameful representations of the self; and (c) poorer emotion regulation indicated by more confusion of boundaries between fantasy and reality and between self and fantasy, more fantasy proneness, less narrative coherence, and marginally more intrusion of traumatic themes. In the sample as a whole, (a) a maladaptive caregiver–child relationship composite was associated with maternal identity disturbance and self-harm; (b) a maladaptive self-composite was associated with maternal self-harm; and (c) a maladaptive emotion regulation composite was associated with maternal identity disturbance, negative relationships, and self-harm. Results are discussed in terms of putative precursors to BPD and preventive interventions. PMID:19583894

Macfie, Jenny; Swan, Scott A.

2010-01-01

420

Promoting Children's Social-Emotional Skills in Preschool Can Enhance Academic and Behavioral Functioning in Kindergarten: Findings from Head Start REDI  

PubMed Central

This study examined processes of change associated with the positive preschool and kindergarten outcomes of children who received the Head Start REDI intervention, compared to “usual practice” Head Start. In a large-scale randomized-controlled trial (N = 356 children, 42% African American or Latino, all from low-income families), this study tests the logic model that improving preschool social-emotional skills (e.g., emotion understanding, social problem solving, and positive social behavior) as well as language/emergent literacy skills will promote cross-domain academic and behavioral adjustment after children transition into kindergarten. Validating this logic model, the present study finds that intervention effects on three important kindergarten outcomes (e.g., reading achievement, learning engagement, and positive social behavior) were mediated by preschool gains in the proximal social-emotional and language/emergent literacy skills targeted by the REDI intervention. Importantly, preschool gains in social-emotional skills made unique contributions to kindergarten outcomes in reading achievement and learning engagement, even after accounting for the concurrent preschool gains in vocabulary and emergent literacy skills. These findings highlight the importance of fostering at-risk children's social-emotional skills during preschool as a means of promoting school readiness. The REDI (Research-Based, Developmentally-Informed) enrichment intervention was designed to complement and strengthen the impact of existing Head Start programs in the dual domains of language/emergent literacy skills and social-emotional competencies. REDI was one of several projects funded by the Interagency School Readiness Consortium, a partnership of four federal agencies (the National Institute of Child Health and Human Development, the Administration for Children and Families, the Assistant Secretary for Planning and Evaluation in the Department of Health and Human Services, and the Office of Special Education and Rehabilitation Services in the Department of Education). The projects funded through this partnership were designed to assess how integrative early interventions for at-risk children could promote learning and development across multiple domains of functioning. In addition, the projects were charged with examining processes of change and identifying mechanisms of action by which the early childhood interventions fostered later school adjustment and academic achievement. This study examined such processes of change, with the goal of documenting hypothesized cross-domain influences on kindergarten outcomes. In particular, this study tested whether gains in the proximal language/emergent literacy and social-emotional competencies targeted during Head Start would mediate the REDI intervention effects on kindergarten academic and behavioral outcomes. In addition, it tested the hypothesis that gains in social-emotional competencies during preschool would make unique contributions to intervention effects on both academic and behavioral outcomes, even after accounting for the effects of preschool gains in language and emergent literacy skills. PMID:24311939

Nix, Robert L.; Bierman, Karen L.; Domitrovich, Celene E.; Gill, Sukhdeep

2013-01-01

421

The relationship between the social management of emotional intelligence and academic performance among medical students.  

PubMed

Positive social interaction with peers was said to facilitate cognitive and intellectual development leading to good academic performance. There was paucity of published data on the effect of social management (SM) emotional intelligence (EI) on academic performance. We conducted this study to examine their relationship in the undergraduate medical students in a public medical school in Malaysia. This was a cross-sectional study using the Mayer-Salovey-Caruso Emotional Intelligence Test (MSCEIT) to measure the SM. The first and final year medical students were invited to participate. Students answered a paper-based demography questionnaire and completed the online MSCEIT in privacy. Independent predictors were identified using multivariate analyses. A total of 163 (84?first year and 79?final year) medical students completed the study (at a response rate of 66.0%). SM score (B?=?-.10 95% CI -.175 to -.015, p?=?.021) was significantly related to the continuous assessment (CA) marks (adjusted R(2)?=?.45, F13,137?=?10.26, p?emotional social intelligence and academic success in undergraduate medical students. A different collection of social skills and SM EI could be constructive towards academic achievement in medical schools. PMID:24773524

Chew, Boon-How; Md Zain, Azhar; Hassan, Faezah

2015-03-01

422

Emotion recognition and social cognition in temporal lobe epilepsy and the effect of epilepsy surgery.  

PubMed

The abilities to identify facial expression from another person's face and to attribute mental states to others refer to preserved function of the temporal lobes. In the present study, we set out to evaluate emotion recognition and social cognition in presurgical and postsurgical patients with unilateral refractory temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE). The aim of our study was to investigate the effects of TLE surgery and to identify the main risk factors for impairment in these functions. We recruited 30 patients with TLE for longitudinal data analysis (14 with right-sided and 16 with left-sided TLE) and 74 patients for cross-sectional data analysis (37 with right-sided and 37 with left-sided TLE) plus 20 healthy controls. Besides standard neuropsychological assessment, we administered an analog of the Ekman and Friesen test and the Faux Pas Test to assess emotion recognition and social cognition, respectively. Both emotion recognition and social cognition were impaired in the group of patients with TLE, irrespective of the focus side, compared with healthy controls. The performance in both tests was strongly dependent on the intelligence level. Beyond intelligence level, earlier age at epilepsy onset, longer disease duration, and history of early childhood brain injury predicted social cognition problems in patients with TLE. Epilepsy surgery within the temporal lobe seems to have neutral effect on patients' performances in both domains. However, there are a few individual patients who appear to be at risk of postoperative decline, even when seizure freedom is achieved following epilepsy surgery. PMID:24892754

Amlerova, Jana; Cavanna, Andrea E; Bradac, Ondrej; Javurkova, Alena; Raudenska, Jaroslava; Marusic, Petr

2014-07-01

423

Behavioral Risk, Teacher-Child Relationships, and Social Skill Development across Middle Childhood: A Child-by-Environment Analysis of Change  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The purposes of the present study were to examine the growth trajectories of children's social skills from kindergarten through sixth grade, and to investigate the roles of early behavior problems and teacher-child relationships in children's social skill development, using data from phases I, II, and III of the NICHD Study of Early Child Care and…

Berry, Daniel; O'Connor, Erin

2010-01-01

424

Evaluation of Child Care Subsidy Strategies: Massachusetts Family Child Care Study  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This report presents findings from the Massachusetts Family Child Care study, a two-year evaluation of the impacts of an early childhood education program on providers and children in family child care. The program--"LearningGames"--is designed to train caregivers to stimulate children's cognitive, language, and social-emotional development. The…

Collins, Ann; Goodson, Barbara; Luallen, Jeremy; Fountain, Alyssa Rulf; Checkoway, Amy

2010-01-01

425

Promoting Social and Emotional Growth of Students with Disabilities  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Students with disabilities are often faced with numerous challenges as they progress through their school years. In addition to disability-related challenges, they may encounter additional difficulties such as bullying in school and lack of social acceptance by their peers. It is important that students with disabilities develop competence in…

Darrow, Alice-Ann

2014-01-01

426

When vocal processing gets emotional: On the role of social orientation in relevance detection by the human amygdala  

Microsoft Academic Search

Previous work on vocal emotional processing provided little evidence for involvement of emotional processing areas such as the amygdala or the orbitofrontal cortex (OFC). Here, we sought to specify whether involvement of these areas depends on how relevant vocal expressions are for the individual. To this end, we assessed participants' social orientation — a measure of the interest and concern

Annett Schirmer; Nicolas Escoffier; Stefan Zysset; Dirk Koester; Tricia Striano; Angela D. Friederici

2008-01-01

427

Modeling Maternal Emotion-Related Socialization Behaviors in a Low-Income Sample: Relations with Toddlers' Self-Regulation  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This study tested the validity of an emotion-related parenting construct, indicated by six key emotion-related socialization behaviors (ERSBs) occurring in daily, developmentally salient parenting in a low-income sample of mothers (N=123) of toddlers, and examined the relationship between the ERSB construct and toddlers' self-regulation.…

Brophy-Herb, Holly E.; Stansbury, Kathy; Bocknek, Erika; Horodynski, Mildred A.

2012-01-01

428

The Role of Knowledge and Skills for Managing Emotions in Adaptation to School: Social Behavior and Misconduct in the Classroom  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Students' ability to evaluate emotionally challenging situations and identify effective strategies for managing emotions in themselves and others was negatively related to poor classroom social behavior across three studies. These studies, involving 463 students from two Spanish high schools and one American university, examined indicators of…

Lopes, Paulo N.; Mestre, Jose M.; Guil, Rocio; Kremenitzer, Janet Pickard; Salovey, Peter

2012-01-01

429

Effects of Response Cards on Performance and Participation in Social Studies for Middle School Students with Emotional and Behavioral Disorders  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This study investigated the use of the instructional strategy of response cards during social studies instruction in five middle school emotional support classrooms. Twenty-nine middle school students identified as emotionally and behaviorally disordered from four public school campuses participated using a crossover design, in which all students…

George, Cheryl L.

2010-01-01

430

The Role of Emotion Regulation in the Predictive Association between Social Information Processing and Aggressive Behavior in Adolescents  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The primary aim of this study was to assess the moderating role of emotion regulation in the relationship between some components of social information processing (hostile interpretation and anger) and aggressive behavior. The secondary aim was to assess whether emotion regulation, hostile interpretation, and anger account for gender differences…

Calvete, Esther; Orue, Izaskun

2012-01-01

431

The Social Power of Regret: The Effect of Social Appraisal and Anticipated Emotions on Fair and Unfair Allocations in Resource Dilemmas  

PubMed Central

We investigated how another person’s emotions about resource allocation decisions influence observers’ resource allocations by influencing the emotions that observers anticipate feeling if they were to act in the same way. Participants were exposed to an exemplar who made a fair or unfair division in an economic game and expressed pride or regret about this decision. Participants then made their own resource allocation decisions. Exemplar regret about acting fairly decreased the incidence of fair behavior (Studies 1A and 1B). Likewise, exemplar regret about acting unfairly increased the incidence of fair behavior (Study 2). The effect of others’ emotions on observers’ behavior was mediated by the observers’ anticipated emotions. We discuss our findings in light of the view that social appraisal and anticipated emotions are important tools for social learning and may contribute to the formation and maintenance of social norms about greed and fairness. PMID:25384163

2014-01-01

432

The social power of regret: The effect of social appraisal and anticipated emotions on fair and unfair allocations in resource dilemmas.  

PubMed

We investigated how another person's emotions about resource allocation decisions influence observers' resource allocations by influencing the emotions that observers anticipate feeling if they were to act in the same way. Participants were exposed to an exemplar who made a fair or unfair division in an economic game and expressed pride or regret about this decision. Participants then made their own resource allocation decisions. Exemplar regret about acting fairly decreased the incidence of fair behavior (Studies 1A and 1B). Likewise, exemplar regret about acting unfairly increased the incidence of fair behavior (Study 2). The effect of others' emotions on observers' behavior was mediated by the observers' anticipated emotions. We discuss our findings in light of the view that social appraisal and anticipated emotions are important tools for social learning and may contribute to the formation and maintenance of social norms about greed and fairness. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2015 APA, all rights reserved). PMID:25384163

van der Schalk, Job; Kuppens, Toon; Bruder, Martin; Manstead, Antony S R

2015-02-01

433

Emotional Intelligence, Theory of Mind, and Executive Functions as Predictors of Social Outcomes in Young Adults with Asperger Syndrome  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Social difficulties are frequently cited as a core deficit of individuals with Asperger syndrome (AS). This deficit is particularly evident when processing of emotional information is required in social situations. Deficits in theory of mind and executive functions are the two explanatory hypotheses for social deficits in AS that are predominant…

Montgomery, Janine M.; Stoesz, Brenda M.; McCrimmon, Adam W.

2013-01-01

434

The influence of social skills instruction on sport and game related behaviours of students with emotional or behavioural disorders  

Microsoft Academic Search

Background: Many educators assume that students develop appropriate social skills as a by-product of participation in physical education and sports (Hellison 2003). However, it has been demonstrated that appropriate social behaviours improve when interventions are implemented (Balderson and Sharpe 2005). It is known that students with disabilities, especially those with emotional or behavioural disorders, typically do not exhibit appropriate social

Amaury Samalot-Rivera; David Porretta

2012-01-01

435

Further Examination of Job-Related Social Skills Measures for Adolescents and Young Adults with Emotional and Behavioral Disorders.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This study conducted item reduction analyses on two measures of job-related social behavior for adolescents and young adults with emotional/behavioral disorders (Scale of Job-Related Social Skill Knowledge and Scale of Job-Related Social Skill Performance). The shortened measures contained 40 and 94 items, respectively. Reliability was…

Bullis, Michael; Davis, Cheryl

1996-01-01

436

Educating the Heart as well as the Mind: Social and Emotional Learning for School and Life Success  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The research shows that people cannot--and should not--separate how they feel (about themselves, their relationships, their environments) from teaching or learning. It makes the case for social emotional learning (SEL) in schools clear. First, schools are social places and learning is a social process. Students do not learn alone, but rather in…

Schonert-Reichl, Kimberly A.; Hymel, Shelley

2007-01-01

437

A single case design evaluation of a software and tutor intervention addressing emotion recognition and social interaction in four boys with ASD  

Microsoft Academic Search

Many students with Autism Spectrum Disorders (ASD) have delays learning to recognize emotions. Social behavior is also challenging, including initiating interactions, responding to others, developing peer relationships, and so forth. In this single case design study we investigated the relationship between use of computer software (Mind Reading: The Interactive Guide to Emotions) and emotion recognition (ER) and social behavior change.

Paul G. Lacava; Ana Rankin; Emily Mahlios; Katie Cook; Richard L. Simpson

2010-01-01

438

Transition to Child Care: Associations With Infant-Mother Attachment, Infant Negative Emotion, and Cortisol Elevations  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Seventy 15-month-old infants were studied at home before starting child care, during adaptation (mothers present) and separation (first 9 days without mothers) phases, and 5 months later. Security of infantmother attachment was assessed before and 3 months after child care began. In the separation phase, salivary cortisol rose over the first 60…

Ahnert, Lieselotte; Gunnar, Megan R.; Lamb, Michael E.; Barthel, Martina

2004-01-01

439

Hispanic Preschoolers' School Readiness: A Study Examining the Impact of Cultural, Social-Emotional, and Sociodemographic Factors  

E-print Network

-emotional competence would have an impact on school readiness, above and beyond sociodemographic factors. This study used hierarchical regression analyses. Results suggest that cultural variables were not good predictors of school readiness or social...

Avila Brizuela, Leonor

2012-02-14

440

Group therapy with adolescents who have learning disabilities and social\\/emotional problems  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper presents group therapy with adolescents who have learning disabilities and social\\/emotional problems. First, the\\u000a paper reviews the literature on psychosocial development and interventions offered to these adolescents. There is agreement\\u000a in the literature that group therapy is beneficial for adolescents. Learning disabled adolescents meet the criteria for receiving\\u000a this intervention. Despite this, review of the literature suggests that

Faye Mishna; Janice Kaiman; Sandra Little; Elizabeth Tarshis

1994-01-01

441

School-Based Social and Emotional Learning (SEL) Programming: Current Perspectives  

Microsoft Academic Search

\\u000a In 1994, the Fetzer Institute hosted a conference to address concerns about the various, disjointed school-based efforts that\\u000a had surfaced over the years. In attendance were a range of researchers, educators, and advocates with diverse interests related\\u000a to meeting the developmental, psychological, educational, and general health needs of children. These issues were discussed,\\u000a and the term social and emotional learning

Nicole A. Elbertson; Marc A. Brackett; Roger P. Weissberg

442

School Context and the Problem Behavior and Social Skills of Students with Emotional Disturbance  

Microsoft Academic Search

Variability in the social and behavioral characteristics of students with emotional disturbance (ED) in the public schools\\u000a may impact special education effectiveness; yet very little evidence exists on how such variability may express itself from\\u000a school to school. One place to begin such investigation involves school context as expressed by income level and academic\\u000a performance. In this study, we selected

Andrew L. WileyGary; Gary N. Siperstein; Steven R. Forness; Frederick J. Brigham

2010-01-01

443

Who Deserves Help? Evolutionary Psychology, Social Emotions, and Public Opinion about Welfare  

PubMed Central

Evidence suggests that our foraging ancestors engaged in the small-scale equivalent of social insurance as an essential tool of survival and evolved a sophisticated psychology of social exchange (involving the social emotions of compassion and anger) to regulate mutual assistance. Here, we hypothesize that political support for modern welfare policies are shaped by these evolved mental programs. In particular, the compassionate motivation to share with needy nonfamily could not have evolved without defenses against opportunists inclined to take without contributing. Cognitively, such parasitic strategies can be identified by the intentional avoidance of productive effort. When detected, this pattern should trigger anger and down-regulate support for assistance. We tested predictions derived from these hypotheses in four studies in two cultures, showing that subjects’ perceptions of recipients’ effort to find work drive welfare opinions; that such perceptions (and not related perceptions) regulate compassion and anger (and not related emotions); that the effects of perceptions of recipients’ effort on opinions about welfare are mediated by anger and compassion, independently of political ideology; and that these emotions not only influence the content of welfare opinions but also how easily they are formed. PMID:23355755

Petersen, Michael Bang; Sznycer, Daniel; Cosmides, Leda; Tooby, John

2013-01-01

444

Teacher-Child Relationships and Social Competence: A Two-Year Longitudinal Study of Chinese Preschoolers  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Based on a two-year and three-wave longitudinal sample of 118 Chinese preschoolers, the present study examined the cross-lagged associations between teacher-child relationships and social competence, and the cross-system generalization of social competence between home and school. At each of the three waves, teachers rated the children's…

Zhang, Xiao; Nurmi, Jari-Erik

2012-01-01

445

Parent and Child Representations of Social Relationships: Linkages between Families and Peers.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Explored similarities between social-cognitive representations of relationships of mothers and their fourth- and fifth-grade children. Subjects responded to a series of hypothetical social dilemmas involving peer and family contexts. Found that maternal and child cognitions are related, but the relations are highly dependent upon the component of…

Burks, Virginia Salzer

1996-01-01

446

Expressed emotion, social skill, and response to negative affect in schizophrenia.  

PubMed

The social skills and social perception of schizophrenia patients in response to negative affect was examined as a function of family expressed emotion (EE). Patients participated in a role-play test, a social perception test, and a problem-solving discussion with a family member and were assessed on several measures of symptomatology. EE of family members was evaluated with the Camberwell Family Interview. On the role-play test, patients with less critical relatives became more assertive in response to increased negative affect from a confederate portraying either a family member or friend, but patients with highly critical relatives did not. Patients with highly critical relatives were also less assertive when confronted with negative affect from a confederate portraying a family member rather than a friend. The behaviors of both relatives and patients during a family problem-solving interaction were related to the EE dimensions of criticism, emotional overinvolvement, and warmth. Patient gender was also related to family problem solving but was independent of EE. Patient ratings of affect on a videotaped social perception task were not related to family EE, and there were few differences in psychopathology between patients with high and low EE relatives. The results support the validity of the EE construct as an index of relatives' affective behavior and suggest that patients' social skills, such as assertiveness, may mediate negative affective exchanges in their families. PMID:8408945

Mueser, K T; Bellack, A S; Wade, J H; Sayers, S L; Tierney, A; Haas, G

1993-08-01

447

[Child labour: a social problem that we are committed to].  

PubMed

Child labor is a complex problem that violates the fundamental rights of children and affects their psychophysical development. Child labor affects 215 million children in the world and 115 million perform activities defined as the "worst forms of child labor". Most child labor is in agriculture (60%), where the majority are unpaid family workers, compared to 26% in services and 7% in industry. Argentina has adopted the abolitionist position, promoting prevention and eradication within an inclusive public policy aimed to all children can exercise their rights. The Sociedad Argentina de Pediatría endorses this approach and proposes a course of action: the health team training, and dissemination of the risks of child labor and occupational teenager safety standards. As pediatricians we must be involved in defending children rights, and be able to detect any situation of child labor, and protect the health of children and adolescents. The joint interaction with family, community and other sectors of society will strengthen the network needed to implement child labor eradication policies. PMID:22859332

Cutri, Adrián; Hammermüller, Erica; Zubieta, Ana; Müller Opet, Beatriz; Miguelez, Lilia

2012-08-01

448

"You Feel Sad?" Emotion Understanding Mediates Effects of Verbal Ability and Mother-Child Mutuality on Prosocial Behaviors: Findings from 2 Years to 4 Years  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Early individual differences in prosocial behaviors are pivotal for children's peer relationships. To investigate the interplay among verbal ability, emotion understanding, and mother-child mutuality as predictors of prosocial behaviors, we observed 102 children at the ages of two, three, and four. All time points included verbal ability and…

Ensor, Rosie; Spencer, Debra; Hughes, Claire

2011-01-01

449

Emotional Availability in Mother-Child Dyads: Short-Term Stability and Continuity from Variable-Centered and Person-Centered Perspectives  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Emotional availability (EA) is a prominent index of socioemotional adaptation in the parent-child dyad. Can basic psychometric properties of EA be looked at from both variable (scale) and person (cluster) points of view in individuals and in dyads? Is EA stable and continuous over a short period of time? This methodological study shows significant…

Bornstein, Marc H.; Gini, Motti; Suwalsky, Joan T. D.; Putnick, Diane L.; Haynes, O. Maurice

2006-01-01

450

Child maltreatment and marijuana problems in young adults: examining the role of motives and emotion dysregulation.  

PubMed

It is well established that childhood maltreatment is an important predictor of marijuana use, but few studies have examined the mechanisms underlying this relationship. The current study examines marijuana motives as mediators of the relationship between childhood maltreatment and marijuana use in a sample of young adults. In addition, pathways from childhood maltreatment to emotion dysregulation, coping motives, and marijuana use were explored. Participants were 125 young adults (ages 19-25, 66.9% female) recruited through online community advertising. All participants completed questionnaires assessing childhood maltreatment, emotion dysregulation, marijuana motives, past year and past three-month marijuana use, and marijuana problems. Correlational analyses revealed bivariate relationships between childhood maltreatment, emotion dysregulation, marijuana motives and marijuana problems (rs=.24-.50). Mediation analyses revealed that coping motives mediated the relationship between childhood maltreatment and marijuana problems, and emotion dysregulation was associated with marijuana problems both directly and indirectly via coping motives. The present findings highlight emotion dysregulation and coping motives as important underlying mechanisms in the relationship between childhood maltreatment and marijuana problems. PMID:24268374

Vilhena-Churchill, Natalie; Goldstein, Abby L

2014-05-01

451

Your Child From 6 to 12: Social and Moral Development.  

E-print Network

public. Give your reasons for approval. ? When your child behaves as you want him or her to, show your approval and appreciation. ? Avoid lecturing about what is good; conduct a two? way conversation instead. ? Ask the child what he or she thinks... may be surprised by the response. For example, one mother asked her 8-year-old daughter, "Why are you going to give all your friends the same number of candies?" The child responded, "Because it's good for every? body to get the same." The mother...

Stegelin, Dolores A.; Krogh, Suzanne

1983-01-01

452

Automatic vocal recognition of a child's perceived emotional state within the Speechome corpus  

E-print Network

With over 230,000 hours of audio/video recordings of a child growing up in the home setting from birth to the age of three, the Human Speechome Project has pioneered a comprehensive, ecologically valid observational dataset ...

Yuditskaya, Sophia

2010-01-01

453

The Impact of Group Drumming on Social-Emotional Behavior in Low-Income Children  

PubMed Central

Low-income youth experience social-emotional problems linked to chronic stress that are exacerbated by lack of access to care. Drumming is a non-verbal, universal activity that builds upon a collectivistic aspect of diverse cultures and does not bear the stigma of therapy. A pretest-post-test non-equivalent control group design was used to assess the effects of 12 weeks of school counselor-led drumming on social-emotional behavior in two fifth-grade intervention classrooms versus two standard education control classrooms. The weekly intervention integrated rhythmic and group counseling activities to build skills, such as emotion management, focus and listening. The Teacher's Report Form was used to assess each of 101 participants (n = 54 experimental, n = 47 control, 90% Latino, 53.5% female, mean age 10.5 years, range 10–12 years). There was 100% retention. ANOVA testing showed that intervention classrooms improved significantly compared to the control group in broad-band scales (total problems (P < .01), internalizing problems (P < .02)), narrow-band syndrome scales (withdrawn/depression (P < .02), attention problems (P < .01), inattention subscale (P < .001)), Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders-oriented scales (anxiety problems (P < .01), attention deficit/hyperactivity problems (P < .01), inattention subscale (P < .001), oppositional defiant problems (P < .03)), and other scales (post-traumatic stress problems (P < .01), sluggish cognitive tempo (P < .001)). Participation in group drumming led to significant improvements in multiple domains of social-emotional behavior. This sustainable intervention can foster positive youth development and increase student-counselor interaction. These findings underscore the potential value of the arts as a therapeutic tool. PMID:21660091

Ho, Ping; Tsao, Jennie C. I.; Bloch, Lian; Zeltzer, Lonnie K.

2011-01-01

454

Stress reactivity in war-exposed young children with and without posttraumatic stress disorder: relations to maternal stress hormones, parenting, and child emotionality and regulation.  

PubMed

The current study examined biomarkers of stress in war-exposed young children and addressed maternal and child factors that may correlate with children's stress response. Participants were 232 Israeli children aged 1.5-5 years, including 148 children exposed to continuous war. Similarly, 56 were diagnosed with posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and 92 were defined as exposed-no-PTSD. Child cortisol (CT) and salivary alpha amylase (sAA), biomarkers of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal and sympathetic-adrenal-medullary arms of the stress response, were measured at baseline, following challenge, and at recovery. Maternal CT and sAA, PTSD symptoms, and reciprocal parenting, and child negative emotionality and regulatory strategies were assessed. Differences between war-exposed children and controls emerged, but these were related to child PTSD status. Children with PTSD exhibited consistently low CT and sAA, exposed-no-PTSD displayed consistently high CT and sAA, and controls showed increase in CT following challenge and decrease at recovery and low sAA. Exposed children showed higher negative emotionality; however, whereas exposed-no-PTSD children employed comfort-seeking strategies, children with PTSD used withdrawal. Predictors of child CT included maternal CT, PTSD symptoms, low reciprocity, and negative emotionality. Findings suggest that high physiological arousal combined with approach strategies may be associated with greater resilience in the context of early trauma. PMID:24229541

Feldman, Ruth; Vengrober, Adva; Eidelman-Rothman, Moranne; Zagoory-Sharon, Orna

2013-11-01

455

Opportunities for Student Learners Learning objectives at campus child care centers include  

E-print Network

Development & Assessment · Social/Emotional Development · Physical Development · Cognitive Development be set up with a director · Observation Techniques including monitoring children's development and progress in ECE · Compare child's development with normative development Administration · Budget

Sheridan, Jennifer

456

Typology of Emotional and Behavioral Adjustment for Low-Income Children: A Child-Centered Approach  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

An empirical typology of classroom emotional and behavioral adjustment was developed for preschool children living in urban poverty. Multistage hierarchical cluster analyses were applied to identify six distinct and reliable subtypes of classroom adjustment, differentiated by high and low levels of behavioral (aggressive, inattentive,…

Bulotsky-Shearer, Rebecca J.; Fantuzzo, John W.; McDermott, Paul A.

2010-01-01

457

Mothers' Emotions and Behavioral Support during Interactions with Toddlers: The Role of Child Temperament  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This article examines mothers' support for children's interests and, specifically, emotional processes in mothers that may explain why they display different levels of support with children of different temperaments. We observed 114 mothers and their 14-27 month-old children during a laboratory interaction. Mothers rated children on three…

Bryan, Amy E.; Dix, Theodore

2009-01-01

458

Child ADHD and Personality/Temperament Traits of Reactive and Effortful Control, Resiliency, and Emotionality  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Background: Models of attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) suggest developmental influences may feed into components of the disorder separately from associated disruptive behavior problems. We investigated this in terms of key personality/temperament traits of Reactive and Effortful Control, Resiliency, and Emotionality. Methods: A…

Martel, Michelle M.; Nigg, Joel T.

2006-01-01

459

Child\\/Adolescent Behavioral and Emotional Problems: Implications of Cross-Informant Correlations for Situational Specificity  

Microsoft Academic Search

Our purpose in this article was to determine the degree of consistency between different informants’ reports of the behavioral\\/emotional problems of subjects aged from 1½ to 19 years. We found 269 samples in 119 studies for meta-analyses of Pearson r s between ratings by parents, teachers, mental health workers, observers, peers, and the subjects themselves. The mean r s between

Thomas M. Achenbach; Stephanie H. McConaughy; Catherine T. Howell

1987-01-01

460

Design of Learning Spaces: Emotional and Cognitive Effects of Learning Environments in Relation to Child Development  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The design of learning spaces is rightly gaining more and more pedagogical attention, as they influence the learning climate and learning results in multiple ways. General structural characteristics influence the willingness to learn through emotional well-being and a sense of security. Specific structural characteristics influence cognitive…

Arndt, Petra A.

2012-01-01

461

Explicating the Social Mechanisms Linking Alcohol Use Behaviors and Ecology to Child Maltreatment  

PubMed Central

This paper begins to describe and explicate the specific mechanisms by which alcohol use and the alcohol use environment contribute to specific types of child maltreatment. These mechanisms relating alcohol outlet densities to child maltreatment described here include effects on social disorganization, parent’s drinking behaviors, and parental supervision. By investigating potential mechanisms, new information could be obtained on the importance and role of alcohol and their availability in the etiology of child maltreatment. This knowledge can be used to further tailor interventions to those conditions most likely to prevent and reduce maltreatment. PMID:25284922

Freisthler, Bridget; Holmes, Megan R.

2013-01-01

462

Emotion Dysregulation in Generalized Anxiety Disorder: A Comparison with Social Anxiety Disorder  

Microsoft Academic Search

From an emotion regulation framework, generalized anxiety disorder (GAD) can be conceptualized as a syndrome involving heightened intensity of subjective emotional experience, poor understanding of emotion, negative reactivity to emotional experience, and the use of maladaptive emotion management strategies (including over-reliance on cognitive control strategies such as worry). The current study sought to replicate previous findings of emotion dysregulation among

Cynthia L. Turk; Richard G. Heimberg; Jane A. Luterek; Douglas S. Mennin; David M. Fresco

2005-01-01

463

Interprofessional social and emotional intelligence skills training: study findings and key lessons.  

PubMed

Frequently changing demands in health care systems have focused attention on the need for emotional competence (EC) - social and emotional intelligence skills, to adapt efficiently, responsively and productively. This paper reports on findings from a workshop that introduced practical EC skills to nearly 1000 participants in education, medicine, mental health and substance abuse counseling. The holistic EC presentations were designed to teach concepts and principles providing each participant with the opportunity for individualized learning. Ninety percent of the participants rated these presentations as valuable and useful. Following this positive response, the approach was adapted to train health professionals serving diverse populations. This report shares our experience teaching various professionals and describes preliminarily testing of the adapted EC training program on a small group of health professionals, whose responsibilities included teamwork, program design, teaching clients and patients EC basics to support healthy practices and self-care. Their positive response supports the need for expanded study and further investigation. PMID:24164409

Flowers, Loma Kaye; Thomas-Squance, Ruth; Brainin-Rodriguez, Jo Ellen; Yancey, Antronette K

2014-03-01

464

Recognising "Social" and "Non-Social" Emotions in Self and Others: A Study of Autism  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Studies of emotion processing in autism have produced mixed results, with fewer studies observing autism-specific deficits than might be imagined. In the current study, 21 individuals with autism and 21 age- and ability-matched, learning disabled comparison participants were tested for their ability to (a) recognise, "in others", expressions of…

Williams, David; Happe, Francesca

2010-01-01

465

Nonresident fathers parenting and child and adolescent development  

Microsoft Academic Search

This study investigated the statistical relations between nonresident father involvement and various child outcomes over time. Specifically, the present study examined specific aspects of nonresident father involvement that included (a) paternal warmth, (b) emotional closeness, and (c) involvement in school related activities. The particular child outcomes under investigation included positive behaviors including self-esteem, social competence and self-control. The problem behaviors

Hema Oshoone Mason

2011-01-01

466

Religious and Non-religious Activity Engagement as Assets in Promoting Social Ties Throughout University: The Role of Emotion Regulation.  

PubMed

Emerging adulthood is a time of many changes. For example, one change that occurs for a subset of emerging adults is leaving home and starting university. Importantly, the creation of social ties can aid in promoting positive adjustment during university. This study investigated whether involvement in religious activities promotes social ties among university students directly and/or indirectly through emotion regulation. Importantly, involvement in religious activities may promote self-regulatory skills, and the ability to effectively regulate emotions can aid in navigating social interactions. To rule out potentially important confounding variables, spirituality and involvement in non-religious clubs were statistically controlled in all analyses. The participants included 1,132 university students (70.5 % female) from a university in Ontario, Canada who were surveyed each year over a period of 3 years. The results indicated that involvement in religious activities indirectly predicted more social ties over time through emotion regulation. Spirituality did not predict social ties or emotion regulation. Furthermore, non-religious clubs directly predicted more social ties over time. Thus, although involvement in religious and non-religious activities both predicted more social ties in a university setting over time, the mechanism by which these activities promote social ties differed. PMID:25323829

Semplonius, Thalia; Good, Marie; Willoughby, Teena

2014-10-17

467

Visual and Oral Feedback to Promote Appropriate Social Behavior for a Student with Emotional and Behavioral Disorders  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

On a routine basis, educators collect data on their students' academic and social performance to make informed decisions regarding curricular and social instruction. The authors conducted a case study for a student with emotional and behavioral disorders. The student's teacher provided oral and visual feedback during reading instruction. Data…

Lingo, Amy S.; Jolivette, Kristine; Barton-Arwood, Sally M.

2009-01-01

468

Emotion Knowledge and Self-Regulation as Predictors of Preschoolers' Cognitive Ability, Classroom Behavior, and Social Competence  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The development of children's cognitive and social skills is a topic of considerable importance and interest in education and educational psychology. The current study examines whether emotion knowledge and self-regulation predict cognitive competence, social competence, and classroom behavior problems among a sample of 74 preschoolers (40 boys).…

Garner, Pamela W.; Waajid, Badiyyah

2012-01-01

469

Social Exclusion and the Deconstructed State: Time Perception, Meaninglessness, Lethargy, Lack of Emotion, and Self-Awareness  

Microsoft Academic Search

The authors hypothesize that socially excluded individuals enter a defensive state of cognitive deconstruction that avoids meaningful thought, emotion, and self-awareness, and is characterized by lethargy and altered time flow. Social rejection led to an overestimation of time intervals, a focus on the present rather than the future, and a failure to delay gratification (Experiment 1). Rejected participants were more

Jean M. Twenge; Kathleen R. Catanese; Roy F. Baumeister

2003-01-01

470

Modelling the Interplay of Emotions, Beliefs and Intentions within Collective Decision Making Based on Insights from Social Neuroscience  

E-print Network

on Insights from Social Neuroscience Mark Hoogendoorn, Jan Treur, C. Natalie van der Wal, Arlette van Wissen developments in Social Neuroscience have revealed neural mechanisms by which such mutual adaptation can neuroscience, mirroring, belief, emotion, intention 1 Introduction When it comes to group decision making

Treur, Jan

471

Social Skills Intervention for Students with Emotional/Behavioral Disorders: A Literature Review from the American Perspective  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This paper presents a part of a research report from a study conducted to investigate the social skills competence of students with emotional/behavioral disorders (E/BD) by the author (Chen, 2004). The purpose of this paper is to review literature published from 1970 through 2004 that are associated with social skills training for students with…

Chen, Kaili

2006-01-01

472

When the Social Mirror Breaks: Deficits in Automatic, but Not Voluntary, Mimicry of Emotional Facial Expressions in Autism  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Humans, infants and adults alike, automatically mimic a variety of behaviors. Such mimicry facilitates social functioning, including establishment of interpersonal rapport and understanding of other minds. This fundamental social process may thus be impaired in disorders such as autism characterized by socio-emotional and communicative deficits.…

McIntosh, Daniel N.; Reichmann-Decker, Aimee; Winkielman, Piotr; Wilbarger, Julia L.

2006-01-01

473

The Social Lives of Children with Emotional and Behavioral Disorders in Self-Contained Classrooms: A Descriptive Analysis.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Social lives of 14 children with emotional and behavioral disorders (E/BD) in segregated elementary school classrooms were compared with 14 typical students in general classrooms. Children with E/BD had little opportunity to engage in integrated school activities and their school social networks were dominated by individuals affiliated with…

Panacek, Luanne J.; Dunlap, Glen

2003-01-01

474

Community Violence and Psychological Distress: The Protective Effects of Emotional Social Support and Sense of Personal Control among Older Adolescents  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This empirical study investigated three mechanisms of protection (preventive, compensatory, buffering) for two factors (emotional social support, sense of personal control) in the relationship between exposure to community violence and psychological distress among 947 diverse, older adolescents. Findings indicate that social support and sense of…

Rosenthal, Beth Spenciner; Wilson, W. Cody

2008-01-01

475

Achieving Standards in the English Language Arts (and More) Using The RULER Approach to Social and Emotional Learning  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This article introduces The RULER Approach ("RULER") to social and emotional learning, with a particular focus on its Feeling Words Curriculum. Through this curriculum, RULER contributes to the ultimate goals of an English language arts education--preparing students to achieve personal, social, and academic goals and to be engaged and contributing…

Rivers, Susan E.; Brackett, Marc A.

2011-01-01

476

Length of Institutionalization, Contact with Relatives and Previous Hospitalizations as Predictors of Social and Emotional Behavior in Young Ugandan Orphans  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The objectives of this study were to describe the socially based emotions and behaviors of 33 orphans in Uganda and to examine social history correlates of variability in the outcome measures. The toddlers were generally not very aggressive or prosocially oriented, and they displayed rather limited affect. More time was spent alone than with…

Nielsen, Ashley; Coleman, Priscilla K.; Guinn, Matthew; Robb, Clifford

2004-01-01

477

When the social mirror breaks: deficits in automatic, but not voluntary, mimicry of emotional facial expressions in autism.  

PubMed

Humans, infants and adults alike, automatically mimic a variety of behaviors. Such mimicry facilitates social functioning, including establishment of interpersonal rapport and understanding of other minds. This fundamental social process may thus be impaired in disorders such as autism characterized by socio-emotional and communicative deficits. We examined automatic and voluntary mimicry of emotional facial expression among adolescents and adults with autistic spectrum disorders (ASD) and a typical sample matched on age, gender and verbal intelligence. Participants viewed pictures of happy and angry expressions while the activity over their cheek and brow muscle region was monitored with electromyography (EMG). ASD participants did not automatically mimic facial expressions whereas the typically developing participants did. However, both groups showed evidence of successful voluntary mimicry. The data suggest that autism is associated with an impairment of a basic automatic social-emotion process. Results have implications for understanding typical and atypical social cognition. PMID:16669800

McIntosh, Daniel N; Reichmann-Decker, Aimee; Winkielman, Piotr; Wilbarger, Julia L

2006-05-01

478

[Social and hygienic conditions of family creation and birth of the first child].  

PubMed

Discusses the problems of public health reformation using the so-called new social contract, put forward in Russia by J. Rice, heading the ZdravReform program. Based on analysis of the socio-hygienic conditions of family creation and birth of the first child, the authors propose the following assumption: creation of a family and appearance of the first child is one factor occupying a special place within the framework of the new social contract and validate this assumption by the data of their sociomedical research. PMID:9629005

Grinina, O V; Kicha, D I; Vazhnova, T V

1998-01-01

479

Paired Maternal and Paternal Parenting Styles, Child Custody and Children's Emotional Adjustment to Divorce  

Microsoft Academic Search

Parenting styles have been found to be associated with child development outcomes and these relationships are consistent across different family structures, including nondivorced, divorced, and remarried families. This research is often criticized because it has been conducted primarily with mothers, despite the recognition of fathers' important role in children's development. The current study was conducted to explore the combined contribution

Kathryn L. Campana; Sandra Henderson; Arnold L. Stolberg; Lisa Schum

2008-01-01

480

Compliance and Noncompliance in Anxious, Aggressive, and Socially Competent Children: The Impact of the Child's Game on Child and Maternal Behavior  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The present study examined the impact of the Child's Game parenting intervention (Forehand & McMahon, 1981; McMahon & Forehand, 2003) on child compliance, noncompliance, and aversive behavior in 3 groups of 20 nonreferred preschool children identified as high on dimensions of anxiety/withdrawal, anger/aggression, or social competence. The impact…

Kotler, Julie S.; McMahon, Robert J.

2004-01-01

481

Parent-Child and Teacher-Child Relationships in Chinese Preschoolers: The Moderating Role of Preschool Experiences and the Mediating Role of Social Competence  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Based on two samples of Chinese preschoolers (Study 1: N = 443; Study 2: N = 118) and their parents and teachers, the present research examined the associations between parent-child and teacher-child relationships, and how the associations were moderated by children's preschool experiences and mediated by their social competence. Using a…

Zhang, Xiao

2011-01-01

482

Prevalence of Neurobehavioral, Social, and Emotional Dysfunction in Patients Treated for Childhood Craniopharyngioma: A Systematic Literature Review  

PubMed Central

Background Craniopharyngiomas (CP) are locally invasive and frequently recurring neoplasms often resulting in neurological and endocrinological dysfunction in children. In addition, social-behavioral impairment is commonly reported following treatment for childhood CP, yet remains to be fully understood. The authors aimed to further characterize the prevalence of neurobehavioral, social, and emotional dysfunction in survivors of childhood craniopharyngiomas. Materials and Methods A systematic literature review was conducted in PubMed to identify studies formally assessing neurobehavioral, social, and emotional outcomes in patients treated for CP prior to 18 years of age. Studies published between the years 1990-2012 that reported the primary outcome (prevalence of neurobehavioral, social, emotional/affective dysfunction, and/or impaired quality of life (QoL)) in ?10 patients were included. Results Of the 471 studies screened, 11 met inclusion criteria. Overall neurobehavioral dysfunction was reported in 51 of 90 patients (57%) with available data. Social impairment (i.e. withdrawal, internalizing behavior) was reported in 91 of 222 cases (41%). School dysfunction was reported in 48 of 136 patients (35%). Emotional/affective dysfunction was reported in 58 of 146 patients (40%), primarily consisting of depressive symptoms. Health related quality of life was affected in 49 of 95 patients (52%). Common descriptors of behavior in affected children included irritability, impulsivity, aggressiveness, and emotional outbursts. Conclusions Neurobehavioral, social, and emotional impairment is highly prevalent in survivors of childhood craniopharyngioma, and often affects quality of life. Thorough neurobehavioral/emotional screening and appropriate counseling is recommended in this population. Additional research is warranted to identify risk factors and treatment strategies for these disorders. PMID:24223703

Zada, Gabriel; Kintz, Natalie; Pulido, Mario; Amezcua, Lilyana

2013-01-01

483

Child Fatality Review Teams: A Content Analysis of Social Policy  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Child fatality review teams (CFRTs) have existed since the 1970s; yet, a comprehensive understanding of their procedures, practices, and outcomes is lacking. This article addresses that gap in this study of CFRT state statutes. Findings indicate CFRT laws address nine areas of practice, from team composition, to purpose, to outcomes. Results also…

Douglas, Emily M.; McCarthy, Sean C.

2011-01-01

484

Do Social Workers Make Better Child Welfare Workers than Non-Social Workers?  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Objective: To empirically examine whether the educational background of child welfare workers in Florida impacts on performance evaluations of their work. Method: A proportionate, stratified random sample of supervisor and peer evaluations of child protective investigators and child protective service workers is conducted. ANOVA procedures are…

Perry, Robin E.

2006-01-01

485

Regulating Debilitating Emotions in the Context of Performance: Achievement Goal Orientations, Achievement-Elicited Emotions, and Socialization Contexts  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

A theoretical framework that incorporates emotional responses and emotion regulation into achievement goal theory is proposed as an alternative view to understanding the inconsistent pattern of findings linking achievement goal orientations to academic outcomes. In this critical review and synthesis, the relation of achievement goal orientations…

Tyson, Diana F.; Linnenbrink-Garcia, Lisa; Hill, Nancy E.

2009-01-01

486

Illusory Memories of Emotionally Charged Words in Autism Spectrum Disorder: Further Evidence for Atypical Emotion Processing outside the Social Domain  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Recent evidence suggests that individuals with ASD may not accumulate distinct representations of emotional information throughout development. On the basis of this observation we predicted that such individuals would not be any less likely to falsely remember emotionally significant as compared to neutral words when such "illusory memories" are…

Gaigg, Sebastian B.; Bowler, Dermot M.

2009-01-01

487

Below and beyond the recognition of emotional facial expressions in alcohol dependence: from basic perception to social cognition.  

PubMed

Studies that have carried out experimental evaluation of emotional skills in alcohol-dependence have, up to now, been mainly focused on the exploration of emotional facial expressions (EFE) decoding. In the present paper, we provide some complements to the recent systematic literature review published by Donadon and de Lima Osório on this crucial topic. We also suggest research avenues that must be, in our opinion, considered in the coming years. More precisely, we propose, first, that a battery integrating a set of emotional tasks relating to different processes should be developed to better systemize EFE decoding measures in alcohol-dependence. Second, we propose to go below EFE recognition deficits and to seek for the roots of those alterations, particularly by investigating the putative role played by early visual processing and vision-emotion interactions in the emotional impairment observed in alcohol-dependence. Third, we insist on the need to go beyond EFE recognition deficits by suggesting that they only constitute a part of wider emotional deficits in alcohol-dependence. Importantly, since the efficient decoding of emotions is a crucial ability for the development and maintenance of satisfactory interpersonal relationships, we suggest that disruption of this ability in alcohol-dependent individuals may have adverse consequences for their social integration. One way to achieve this research agenda would be to develop the field of affective and social neuroscience of alcohol-dependence, which could ultimately lead to major advances at both theoretical and therapeutic levels. PMID:25429220

D'Hondt, Fabien; Campanella, Salvatore; Kornreich, Charles; Philippot, Pierre; Maurage, Pierre

2014-01-01

488

Socialization of Early Prosocial Behavior: Parents’ Talk about Emotions is Associated with Sharing and Helping in Toddlers  

PubMed Central

What role does socialization play in the origins of prosocial behavior? We examined one potential socialization mechanism, parents’ discourse about others’ emotions with very young children in whom prosocial behavior is still nascent. Two studies are reported, one of sharing in 18- and 24-month-olds (n = 29), and one of instrumental and empathy-based helping in 18- and 30-month-olds (n = 62). In both studies, parents read age-appropriate picture books to their children and the content and structure of their emotion-related and internal state discourse were coded. Results showed that children who helped and shared more quickly and more often, especially in tasks that required more complex emotion understanding, had parents who more often asked them to label and explain the emotions depicted in the books. Moreover, it was parents’ elicitation of children’s talk about emotions rather than parents’ own production of emotion labels and explanations that explained children’s prosocial behavior, even after controlling for age. Thus, it is the quality, not the quantity, of parents’ talk about emotions with their toddlers that matters for early prosocial behavior. PMID:23264753

Brownell, Celia A.; Svetlova, Margarita; Anderson, Ranita; Nichols, Sara R.; Drummond, Jesse

2012-01-01

489

Maternal Depression, Locus of Control, and Emotion Regulatory Strategy as Predictors of Preschoolers' Internalizing Problems  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Childhood internalizing problems may occur as early as preschool, tend to be stable over time, and undermine social and academic functioning. Parent emotion regulatory behaviors may contribute to child internalizing problems and may be especially important during the preschool years when parents model emotion coping and regulation for their…

Coyne, Lisa W.; Thompson, Alysha D.

2011-01-01

490

Where Is the Child's Environment? A Group Socialization Theory of Development  

Microsoft Academic Search

Do parents have any important long-term effects on the development of their child's personality? This article examines the evidence and concludes that the answer is no. A new theory of development is proposed: that socialization is context-specific and that outside-the-home socialization takes place in the peer groups of childhood and adolescence. Intra- and intergroup processes, not dyadic relationships, are responsible

Judith Rich Harris

1995-01-01

491

Exploring the Relation of Harsh Parental Discipline with Child Emotional and Behavioral Problems by Using Multiple Informants. The Generation R Study  

PubMed Central

Parental harsh disciplining, like corporal punishment, has consistently been associated with adverse mental health outcomes in children. It remains a challenge to accurately assess the consequences of harsh discipline, as researchers and clinicians generally rely on parent report of young children's problem behaviors. If parents rate their parenting styles and their child's behavior this may bias results. The use of child self-report on problem behaviors is not common but may provide extra information about the relation of harsh parental discipline and problem behavior. We examined the independent contribution of young children's self-report above parental report of emotional and behavioral problems in a study of maternal and paternal harsh discipline in a birth cohort. Maternal and paternal harsh discipline predicted both parent reported behavioral and parent reported emotional problems, but only child reported behavioral problems. Associations were not explained by pre-existing behavioral problems at age 3. Importantly, the association with child reported outcomes was independent from parent reported problem behavior. These results suggest that young children's self-reports of behavioral problems provide unique information on the effects of harsh parental discipline. Inclusion of child self-reports can therefore help estimate the effects of harsh parental discipline more accurately. PMID:25120014

Mackenbach, Joreintje D.; Ringoot, Ank P.; van der Ende, Jan; Verhulst, Frank C.; Jaddoe, Vincent W. V.; Hofman, Albert; Jansen, Pauline W.; Tiemeier, Henning W.

2014-01-01

492

Child fatality review teams: a content analysis of social policy.  

PubMed

Child fatality review teams (CFRTs) have existed since the 1970s; yet, a comprehensive understanding of their procedures, practices, and outcomes is lacking. This article addresses that gap in this study of CFRT state statutes. Findings indicate CFRT laws address nine areas of practice, from team composition, to purpose, to outcomes. Results also indicate that laws address prevention three times as often as investigation, but that both areas are related to state crime rates. PMID:22403902

Douglas, Emily M; McCarthy, Sean C

2011-01-01

493

Socializing the Black Child to Cope in the 1980s.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Socialization strategies for black children should be designed to prepare them to function in a competent, comfortable, and culturally secure manner; there may be a need to reevaluate the ability of those advocates currently responsible for the welfare of black children. Strategies of socialization should be based upon the philosophy of…

Thomas, Shirley W.

494

Helping Your Child in Reading in the Social Studies.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

There are numerous ways in which parents can assist students in social studies. Parents can read aloud library books that deal with social studies; older peers can also read aloud, providing practice to the older student as well. Parents can relate current events to a nearby globe, locating places mentioned in newscasts. In addition, parents and…

Ediger, Marlow

495

Retention and Social Promotion for the Exceptional Child.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The theoretical and empirical support available for retention and social promotion, specifically for exceptional children, is reviewed. The impact of these procedures on academic performance, self esteem, and social development is discussed. It is concluded that these procedures are not effective interventions for children with school failure.…

Carstens, Andrea Andrews

1985-01-01

496

The Social Ecology of School-Age Child Care.  

PubMed

The goal of this longitudinal study was to examine variations in school-age child care arrangements across the elementary school years as a function of child, family, and contextual factors. Pre-kindergarten family background measures were collected through parent questionnaires and interviews. Follow-up interviews with 466 parents provided information on children's care experiences in grades 1 through 5. Some care arrangements (e.g., self care) showed considerable continuity, whereas other arrangements (e.g., school programs) changed substantially from year-to-year. Increases in use were found for self-care, sibling care, neighbor care, and activity-based care; use of day care decreased across years. Children living with working and/or single mothers spent more time in non-parent care, as did boys with behavior problems. Time spent in specific care arrangements varied as a function of child sex, behavioral adjustment, ethnicity, family socio-economic status, mothers' employment, and parents' marital status. These findings underscore the importance of developmental and ecological-contextual factors in families' choices of care arrangements. PMID:20011230

Laird, Robert D; Pettit, Gregory S; Dodge, Kenneth A; Bates, John E

1998-01-01

497

Training approach-avoidance of smiling faces affects emotional vulnerability in socially anxious individuals  

PubMed Central

Previous research revealed an automatic behavioral bias in high socially anxious individuals (HSAs): although their explicit evaluations of smiling faces are positive, they show automatic avoidance of these faces. This is reflected by faster pushing than pulling of smiling faces in an Approach-Avoidance Task (AAT; Heuer et al., 2007). The current study addressed the causal role of this avoidance bias for social anxiety. To this end, we used the AAT to train HSAs, either to approach smiling faces or to avoid them. We examined whether such an AAT training could change HSAs' automatic avoidance tendencies, and if yes, whether AAT effects would generalize to a new approach task with new facial stimuli, and to mood and anxiety in a social threat situation (a video-recorded self-presentation). We found that HSAs trained to approach smiling faces did indeed approach female faces faster after the training than HSAs trained to avoid smiling faces. Moreover, approach-faces training reduced emotional vulnerability: it led to more positive mood and lower anxiety after the self-presentation than avoid-faces training. These results suggest that automatic approach-avoidance tendencies have a causal role in social anxiety, and that they can be modified by a simple computerized training. This may open new avenues in the therapy of social phobia. PMID:23970862

Rinck, Mike; Telli, Sibel; Kampmann, Isabel L.; Woud, Marcella L.; Kerstholt, Merel; te Velthuis, Sarai; Wittkowski, Matthias; Becker, Eni S.

2013-01-01

498

Adolescents' aggressive and prosocial behaviors: links with social information processing, negative emotionality, moral affect, and moral cognition.  

PubMed

The goal of this study was to examine whether moral affect, moral cognition, negative emotionality, and attribution biases independently predicted adolescents' prosocial and aggressive behavior in adolescence. A total of 148 adolescents completed self-report measures of prosocial and aggressive behavior, moral affect, moral cognition, negative emotionality, and attribution biases. Although in general all 3 factors (emotional, moral, and social cognitive) were correlated with adolescent social behavior, the most consistent independent predictors of adolescent social behavior were moral affect and cognition. These findings have important implications for intervention and suggest that programs that promote adolescent perspective taking, moral reasoning, and moral affect are needed to reduce aggressive behavior and promote prosocial behavior. PMID:25175531

Laible, Deborah J; Murphy, Tia Panfile; Augustine, Mairin

2014-01-01

499

Assessing the Organizational Social Context (OSC) of Child Welfare Systems: Implications for Research and Practice  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Objective: The study: (1) provides the first assessment of the a "priori" measurement model and psychometric properties of the Organizational Social Context (OSC) measurement system in a US nationwide probability sample of child welfare systems; (2) illustrates the use of the OSC in constructing norm-based organizational culture and climate…

Glisson, Charles; Green, Philip; Williams, Nathaniel J.

2012-01-01

500

Parent-Child Predictors of Social Competence with Peers in Children with and without Autism  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The current study investigated the relations among parent-child joint engagement, dyadic interactive behaviors, and children's subsequent social competence with peers. Participants were 40 children (20 children with autism, and 20 developmentally-matched typical children) between the ages of 2.75 and 6.5 years. Observational coding was conducted…

Meek, Shantel E.; Robinson, Lauren T.; Jahromi, Laudan B.

2012-01-01