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Sample records for childhood leukemia relapse

  1. Late relapsing childhood lymphoblastic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Vora, A; Frost, L; Goodeve, A; Wilson, G; Ireland, R M; Lilleyman, J; Eden, T; Peake, I; Richards, S

    1998-10-01

    Childhood lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) is usually assumed to have been permanently eradicated in patients in long-term remission, but occasionally can recur after many years. To learn more about the problem, we studied a group of children whose leukemia had been in remission for 10 or more years before relapse and tried to determine whether they had true recurrences or second malignancies. We studied children treated on Medical Research Council ALL protocols between 1970 and 1984 and followed up by the Clinical Trial Service Unit in Oxford. Detailed clinical and laboratory data was collected from the centers concerned on all who were reported to have had a recurrence of their leukemia after 10 or more years from the time of achieving first complete remission (CR1). To prove that the relapse was a true recurrence rather than a second or secondary leukemia, DNA extracted from archived marrow smears was subjected to polymerase chain reaction (PCR) analysis for the presence of an identical Ig heavy chain (IgH) or T-cell receptor (TCR) gene rearrangement at initial diagnosis and subsequent relapse. A total of 1,134 of 2,746 children had survived 10 years or more (range, 10 to 24 years) in CR1 and of those, 12 (approximately 1%) had subsequently relapsed. Relapse blast cells were shown to express the common ALL antigen (CD 10) in all cases and an identical clonal IgH or TCR gene rearrangement was found on PCR analysis of DNA from diagnosis and relapse in all eight cases where DNA extraction was successful. A further program of therapy was successful in inducing a second CR in all patients, four of whom have succumbed to a second relapse after 12 to 27 months. The remaining eight are in continuing CR2 at a follow-up of 12 to 108 months (median, 52) from relapse. Although the risk of relapse of childhood ALL after 10 years in remission appears to be small (around 1%), it persists. This raises questions about how blasts can survive quiescent for so long and when we can

  2. Outcome following late marrow relapse in childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia

    SciTech Connect

    Chessells, J.; Leiper, A.; Rogers, D.

    1984-10-01

    Thirty-four children with acute lymphoblastic leukemia, who developed bone marrow relapse after treatment was electively stopped, received reinduction, consolidation, continuing therapy, and intrathecal (IT) methotrexate (MTX). Sixteen children who relapsed within six months of stopping treatment had a median second-remission duration of 26 weeks; all next relapses occurred in the bone marrow. In 18 children who relapsed later, the median duration of second remission was in excess of two years, but after a minimum of four years follow-up, 16 patients have so far relapsed again (six in the CNS). CNS relapse occurred as a next event in four of 17 children who received five IT MTX injections only and in two of 14 children who received additional regular IT MTX. Although children with late marrow relapses may achieve long second remissions, their long-term out-look is poor, and regular IT MTX does not afford adequate CNS prophylaxis. It remains to be seen whether more intensive chemotherapy, including high-dose chemoradiotherapy and bone marrow transplantation, will improve the prognosis in this group of patients.

  3. Minimal residual disease analysis by eight-color flow cytometry in relapsed childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Karawajew, Leonid; Dworzak, Michael; Ratei, Richard; Rhein, Peter; Gaipa, Giuseppe; Buldini, Barbara; Basso, Giuseppe; Hrusak, Ondrej; Ludwig, Wolf-Dieter; Henze, Günter; Seeger, Karl; von Stackelberg, Arend; Mejstrikova, Ester; Eckert, Cornelia

    2015-01-01

    Multiparametric flow cytometry is an alternative approach to the polymerase chain reaction method for evaluating minimal residual disease in treatment protocols for primary acute lymphoblastic leukemia. Given considerable differences between primary and relapsed acute lymphoblastic leukemia treatment regimens, flow cytometric assessment of minimal residual disease in relapsed leukemia requires an independent comprehensive investigation. In the present study we addressed evaluation of minimal residual disease by flow cytometry in the clinical trial for childhood relapsed acute lymphoblastic leukemia using eight-color flow cytometry. The major challenge of the study was to reliably identify low amounts of residual leukemic cells against the complex background of regeneration, characteristic of follow-up samples during relapse treatment. In a prospective study of 263 follow-up bone marrow samples from 122 patients with B-cell precursor acute lymphoblastic leukemia, we tested various B-cell markers, adapted the antibody panel to the treatment protocol, and evaluated its performance by a blinded parallel comparison with the polymerase chain reaction data. The resulting eight-color single-tube panel showed a consistently high overall concordance (P<0.001) and, under optimal conditions, sensitivity similar to that of the reference polymerase chain reaction method. Overall, evaluation of minimal residual disease by flow cytometry can be successfully integrated into the clinical management of relapsed childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia either as complementary to the polymerase chain reaction or as an independent risk stratification tool. ALL-REZ BFM 2002 clinical trial information: NCT00114348 PMID:26001791

  4. Deletion analysis of p16(INKa) and p15(INKb) in relapsed childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Graf Einsiedel, Hagen; Taube, Tillmann; Hartmann, Reinhard; Wellmann, Sven; Seifert, Georg; Henze, Günter; Seeger, Karl

    2002-06-15

    This study aimed at determining the prevalence of INK4 deletions and their impact on outcome in 125 children with acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) at first relapse using real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction. Patients were enrolled into relapse trials ALL-REZ BFM (ALL-Relapse Berlin-Frankfurt-Münster) 90 and 96. The prevalence of p16(INK4a) and p15(INK4b) homozygous deletions was 35% (44 of 125) and 30% (38 of 125), respectively. A highly significant association of both gene deletions was found with the 2 major adverse prognostic factors known for relapsed childhood ALL: T-cell immunophenotype and first remission duration. There was no correlation between INK4 deletions and probability of event-free survival. These findings argue against an independent prognostic role of INK4 deletions in relapsed childhood ALL. PMID:12036898

  5. Childhood Leukemia

    MedlinePlus

    Leukemia is cancer of the white blood cells. It is the most common type of childhood cancer. ... blood cells help your body fight infection. In leukemia, the bone marrow produces abnormal white blood cells. ...

  6. KRAS and CREBBP mutations: a relapse-linked malicious liaison in childhood high hyperdiploid acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Malinowska-Ozdowy, K; Frech, C; Schönegger, A; Eckert, C; Cazzaniga, G; Stanulla, M; zur Stadt, U; Mecklenbräuker, A; Schuster, M; Kneidinger, D; von Stackelberg, A; Locatelli, F; Schrappe, M; Horstmann, M A; Attarbaschi, A; Bock, C; Mann, G; Haas, O A; Panzer-Grümayer, R

    2015-08-01

    High hyperdiploidy defines the largest genetic entity of childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL). Despite its relatively low recurrence risk, this subgroup generates a high proportion of relapses. The cause and origin of these relapses remains obscure. We therefore explored the mutational landscape in high hyperdiploid (HD) ALL with whole-exome (n=19) and subsequent targeted deep sequencing of 60 genes in 100 relapsing and 51 non-relapsing cases. We identified multiple clones at diagnosis that were primarily defined by a variety of mutations in receptor tyrosine kinase (RTK)/Ras pathway and chromatin-modifying genes. The relapse clones consisted of reappearing as well as new mutations, and overall contained more mutations. Although RTK/Ras pathway mutations were similarly frequent between diagnosis and relapse, both intergenic and intragenic heterogeneity was essentially lost at relapse. CREBBP mutations, however, increased from initially 18-30% at relapse, then commonly co-occurred with KRAS mutations (P<0.001) and these relapses appeared primarily early (P=0.012). Our results confirm the exceptional susceptibility of HD ALL to RTK/Ras pathway and CREBBP mutations, but, more importantly, suggest that mutant KRAS and CREBBP might cooperate and equip cells with the necessary capacity to evolve into a relapse-generating clone. PMID:25917266

  7. KRAS and CREBBP mutations: a relapse-linked malicious liaison in childhood high hyperdiploid acute lymphoblastic leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Malinowska-Ozdowy, K; Frech, C; Schönegger, A; Eckert, C; Cazzaniga, G; Stanulla, M; zur Stadt, U; Mecklenbräuker, A; Schuster, M; Kneidinger, D; von Stackelberg, A; Locatelli, F; Schrappe, M; Horstmann, M A; Attarbaschi, A; Bock, C; Mann, G; Haas, O A; Panzer-Grümayer, R

    2015-01-01

    High hyperdiploidy defines the largest genetic entity of childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL). Despite its relatively low recurrence risk, this subgroup generates a high proportion of relapses. The cause and origin of these relapses remains obscure. We therefore explored the mutational landscape in high hyperdiploid (HD) ALL with whole-exome (n=19) and subsequent targeted deep sequencing of 60 genes in 100 relapsing and 51 non-relapsing cases. We identified multiple clones at diagnosis that were primarily defined by a variety of mutations in receptor tyrosine kinase (RTK)/Ras pathway and chromatin-modifying genes. The relapse clones consisted of reappearing as well as new mutations, and overall contained more mutations. Although RTK/Ras pathway mutations were similarly frequent between diagnosis and relapse, both intergenic and intragenic heterogeneity was essentially lost at relapse. CREBBP mutations, however, increased from initially 18–30% at relapse, then commonly co-occurred with KRAS mutations (P<0.001) and these relapses appeared primarily early (P=0.012). Our results confirm the exceptional susceptibility of HD ALL to RTK/Ras pathway and CREBBP mutations, but, more importantly, suggest that mutant KRAS and CREBBP might cooperate and equip cells with the necessary capacity to evolve into a relapse-generating clone. PMID:25917266

  8. Childhood Leukemia

    MedlinePlus

    ... acute types. Symptoms include Infections Fever Loss of appetite Tiredness Easy bruising or bleeding Swollen lymph nodes Night sweats Shortness of breath Pain in the bones or joints Risk factors for childhood leukemia include having a brother ...

  9. Clofarabine-based combination chemotherapy for relapse and refractory childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Arakawa, Yuki; Koh, Katsuyoshi; Aoki, Takahiro; Kubota, Yasuo; Oyama, Ryo; Mori, Makiko; Hayashi, Mayumi; Hanada, Ryoji

    2014-11-01

    Clofarabine, one of the key treatment agents for refractory and relapsed acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL), achieves a remission rate of approximately 30% with single-agent clofarabine induction chemotherapy. However, a remission rate of approximately 50% was reported with a combination chemotherapy regimen consisting of clofarabine, etoposide, and cyclophosphamide. We treated two cases with refractory and relapsed ALL with combination chemotherapy including clofarabine; one was an induction failure but the other achieved remission. Both cases developed an infectious complication (NCI-CTCAE grade 3) and body pain with infusion. Prophylactic antibiotic and opioid infusions facilitated avoiding septic shock and pain. Further investigation of such cases is required. PMID:25501414

  10. What Is Childhood Leukemia?

    MedlinePlus

    ... key statistics for childhood leukemia? What is childhood leukemia? Cancer starts when cells start to grow out ... start making antibodies to fight them. Types of leukemia in children Leukemia is often described as being ...

  11. Decitabine in Treating Children With Relapsed or Refractory Acute Myeloid Leukemia or Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-01-22

    Childhood Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Childhood Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia (M3); Recurrent Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  12. Inherited GATA3 variants are associated with Ph-like childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia and risk of relapse

    PubMed Central

    Perez-Andreu, Virginia; Roberts, Kathryn G.; Harvey, Richard C.; Yang, Wenjian; Cheng, Cheng; Pei, Deqing; Xu, Heng; Gastier-Foster, Julie; Shuyu, E; Yew-Suang Lim, Joshua; Chen, I-Ming; Fan, Yiping; Devidsa, Meenakshi; Borowitz, Michael J.; Smith, Colton; Neale, Geoffrey; Burchard, Esteban G.; Torgerson, Dara G.; Klussmann, Federico Antillon; Villagran, Cesar Rolando Najera; Winick, Naomi J.; Camitta, Bruce M.; Raetz, Elizabeth; Wood, Brent; Yue, Feng; Carroll, William L.; Larsen, Eric; Bowman, W. Paul; Loh, Mignon L.; Dean, Michael; Bhojwani, Deepa; Pui, Ching-Hon; Evans, William E.; Relling, Mary V.; Hunger, Stephen P.; Willman, Cheryl L.; Mullighan, Charles G.; Yang, Jun J.

    2014-01-01

    Recent genomic profiling of childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) identified a novel high-risk subtype with a gene expression signature resembling Philadelphia chromosome-positive ALL and a poor prognosis (Ph-like ALL). However, the role of inherited genetic variation in Ph-like ALL pathogenesis remains unknown. In a genome-wide association study (GWAS) of 511 ALL cases and 6,661 non-ALL controls, we identified a single susceptibility locus for Ph-like ALL (GATA3, rs3824662, P=2.17×10−14, odds ratio [OR]=3.85, for Ph-like ALL vs. non-ALL; P=1.05×10−8, OR=3.25, for Ph-like ALL vs. non-Ph-like ALL) that was independently validated. The rs3824662 risk allele was associated with somatic lesions underlying Ph-like ALL (i.e., CRLF2 rearrangement, JAK mutation, and IKZF1 deletion) and directly influenced GATA3 transcription. Finally, GATA3 SNP genotype was also associated with early treatment response and the risk of ALL relapse. Our results provide insights into interactions between host and tumor genomes and their importance in ALL pathogenesis and prognosis. PMID:24141364

  13. CD7 aberrant expression led to a lineage switch at relapsed childhood acute pre-B lymphoblastic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Fallah Azad, Vahid; Hedayati Asl, Amir Abbas; Tashvighi, Maryam; Niktoreh Mofrad, Naghmeh; Haghighi, Mansoureh; Mehrvar, Azim

    2016-03-01

    Immunophenotypic changes and lineage switch between diagnosis and relapse in acute lymphoblastic leukemia are uncommon and accompanied by poor outcomes. In this report, a 12-year-old boy with diagnosis of pre-B ALL with an aberrant expression of CD 7 is described. Patient was treated with the ALL-BFM 2000 protocol and suffered an episode of relapse with a lineage switch from pre-B ALL to T cell ALL. This report concludes that presence of aberrant expression of CD7 at diagnosis of pre-B ALL can have prognostic value of lineage switch to T cell ALL at relapse. PMID:26242204

  14. Immunophenotype of adult and childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia: changes at first relapse and clinico-prognostic implications.

    PubMed

    Guglielmi, C; Cordone, I; Boecklin, F; Masi, S; Valentini, T; Vegna, M L; Ferrari, A; Testi, A M; Foa, R

    1997-09-01

    The immunologic features of leukemic cells at the time of 1st hematologic relapse were compared to those obtained at initial diagnosis in 128 patients (69 children and 59 adults) with acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) treated at a single institution. An immunophenotypic change was observed in 59 cases (46%), more frequently in T (20/25) than in B (39/103) lineage ALL (80 vs 38%, P=0.0008), but with a similar incidence in adults and children. Of these cases, 34 (24 B- and 10 T-ALL) changed at relapse their intralineage subgroup affiliation, although no complete shift from B to T lineage ALL, or vice versa, was observed. The myeloid antigens CD13 and/or CD33 were frequently lost (2/5 cases) or acquired (12/123 cases) at relapse. In 21 cases, the immunophenotype at relapse was more undifferentiated than at diagnosis, while it was more differentiated in 13 cases. Initial treatment intensity or preceding treatment with teniposide did not affect the phenotypic profile at relapse. Complete response (CR) rate to salvage therapy and event-free survival were not influenced by the immunophenotypic shifts, nor by the presence, at relapse, of leukemic cells expressing the myeloid antigens CD13 and/or CD33. Univariate analysis suggested that prognosis after relapse was dependent on the duration of 1st CR, patients' age and immunophenotype at the time of diagnosis, with a worse outcome for patients with T lineage ALL and for patients with the less differentiated subgroup of B lineage ALL (CD19+ and CD10-). Multivariate analysis showed that only two factors, duration of 1st CR and grade of immunologic differentiation at diagnosis, have independent prognostic value in relapsed ALL. PMID:9305605

  15. Genetically Modified T-cell Immunotherapy in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-08-10

    Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission; Donor; Early Relapse of Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Late Relapse of Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  16. Obatoclax Mesylate, Vincristine Sulfate, Doxorubicin Hydrochloride, and Dexrazoxane Hydrochloride in Treating Young Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Solid Tumors, Lymphoma, or Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-04-30

    Acute Leukemias of Ambiguous Lineage; Acute Undifferentiated Leukemia; Angioimmunoblastic T-cell Lymphoma; Blastic Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Childhood Burkitt Lymphoma; Childhood Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Childhood Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Childhood Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Childhood Nasal Type Extranodal NK/T-cell Lymphoma; Cutaneous B-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Hepatosplenic T-cell Lymphoma; Intraocular Lymphoma; Noncutaneous Extranodal Lymphoma; Peripheral T-cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Childhood Grade III Lymphomatoid Granulomatosis; Recurrent Childhood Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Childhood Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Recurrent Childhood Small Noncleaved Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Cutaneous T-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Mycosis Fungoides/Sezary Syndrome; Recurrent/Refractory Childhood Hodgkin Lymphoma; Refractory Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Refractory Hairy Cell Leukemia; Relapsing Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Small Intestine Lymphoma; Unspecified Childhood Solid Tumor, Protocol Specific

  17. Combination Chemotherapy and Imatinib Mesylate in Treating Children With Relapsed Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-10-07

    L1 Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; L2 Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Non-T, Non-B Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; T-cell Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

  18. Integration of genetic and clinical risk factors improves prognostication in relapsed childhood B-cell precursor acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Irving, Julie A E; Enshaei, Amir; Parker, Catriona A; Sutton, Rosemary; Kuiper, Roland P; Erhorn, Amy; Minto, Lynne; Venn, Nicola C; Law, Tamara; Yu, Jiangyan; Schwab, Claire; Davies, Rosanna; Matheson, Elizabeth; Davies, Alysia; Sonneveld, Edwin; den Boer, Monique L; Love, Sharon B; Harrison, Christine J; Hoogerbrugge, Peter M; Revesz, Tamas; Saha, Vaskar; Moorman, Anthony V

    2016-08-18

    Somatic genetic abnormalities are initiators and drivers of disease and have proven clinical utility at initial diagnosis. However, the genetic landscape and its clinical utility at relapse are less well understood and have not been studied comprehensively. We analyzed cytogenetic data from 427 children with relapsed B-cell precursor ALL treated on the international trial, ALLR3. Also we screened 238 patients with a marrow relapse for selected copy number alterations (CNAs) and mutations. Cytogenetic risk groups were predictive of outcome postrelapse and survival rates at 5 years for patients with good, intermediate-, and high-risk cytogenetics were 68%, 47%, and 26%, respectively (P < .001). TP53 alterations and NR3C1/BTG1 deletions were associated with a higher risk of progression: hazard ratio 2.36 (95% confidence interval, 1.51-3.70, P < .001) and 2.15 (1.32-3.48, P = .002). NRAS mutations were associated with an increased risk of progression among standard-risk patients with high hyperdiploidy: 3.17 (1.15-8.71, P = .026). Patients classified clinically as standard and high risk had distinct genetic profiles. The outcome of clinical standard-risk patients with high-risk cytogenetics was equivalent to clinical high-risk patients. Screening patients at relapse for key genetic abnormalities will enable the integration of genetic and clinical risk factors to improve patient stratification and outcome. This study is registered at www.clinicaltrials.org as #ISCRTN45724312. PMID:27229005

  19. Immunotoxin Therapy for Relapsed Hairy Cell Leukemia

    Cancer.gov

    In this trial, patients with hairy cell leukemia who have relapsed multiple times or not responded to prior chemotherapy will be treated with an experimental immunotoxin called moxetumomab pasudotox given intravenously on days 1, 3, and 5 of 28-day cycles

  20. Novel Therapies for Relapsed Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Fullmer, Amber; O’Brien, Susan; Kantarjian, Hagop; Jabbour, Elias

    2015-01-01

    The outcome of salvage therapy for relapsed acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) remains poor. Salvage therapy mimics regimens with activity in newly diagnosed ALL. Novel strategies under investigation as monotherapy or in combination with chemotherapy improve the treatment of relapsed disease. For some ALL subsets, specific therapies are indicated. The addition of targeted therapy in Philadelphia chromosome–positive ALL has improved responses in relapsed patients without resistance to available tyrosine kinase inhibitors. Nelarabine demonstrates activity as monotherapy in T-cell ALL and is approved by the US Food and Drug Administration. Clofarabine, a second-generation purine analogue approved in pediatric leukemia, has shown activity in adult acute leukemias including ALL and acute myeloid leukemia. The role of pegaspargase in adult ALL requires further investigation. The benefit of matched related-donor allogeneic stem cell transplantation is significant for standard-risk ALL but not for high-risk ALL. Development of new drugs and agents tailored to subset-specific cytogenetic-molecular characteristics remains vital to success in treating adult ALL. PMID:20425428

  1. 8-Chloro-Adenosine in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-05-11

    Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Relapsed Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Acute Myeloid Leukemia Arising From Previous Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Acute Myeloid Leukemia Arising From Previous Myeloproliferative Disorder

  2. Flavopiridol and Vorinostat in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Acute Leukemia or Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia or Refractory Anemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-04-01

    Blastic Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Refractory Anemia With Excess Blasts; Relapsing Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  3. Nilotinib and Imatinib Mesylate After Donor Stem Cell Transplant in Treating Patients With Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia or Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-12-09

    Accelerated Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia in Remission; Blastic Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia in Remission; Childhood Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia, BCR-ABL1 Positive; Chronic Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Philadelphia Chromosome Positive Adult Precursor Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Philadelphia Chromosome Positive Childhood Precursor Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Relapsing Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Untreated Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

  4. Developmental Outcome of Childhood Leukemia.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Coniglio, Susan J.; Blackman, James A.

    1995-01-01

    Literature on developmental and psychosocial outcomes of childhood leukemia is reviewed, focusing on preschool-age children. Studies are categorized in terms of outcome measures: intelligence/achievement, neuropsychological, memory/attention, and psychosocial tests. Evidence suggests that preschool children with leukemia are at high risk for…

  5. 17-N-Allylamino-17-Demethoxygeldanamycin in Treating Young Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Solid Tumors or Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-06-03

    Acute Undifferentiated Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Unspecified Childhood Solid Tumor, Protocol Specific

  6. Ancestry and pharmacogenomics of relapse in acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Yang, Jun J; Cheng, Cheng; Devidas, Meenakshi; Cao, Xueyuan; Fan, Yiping; Campana, Dario; Yang, Wenjian; Neale, Geoff; Cox, Nancy J; Scheet, Paul; Borowitz, Michael J; Winick, Naomi J; Martin, Paul L; Willman, Cheryl L; Bowman, W Paul; Camitta, Bruce M; Carroll, Andrew; Reaman, Gregory H; Carroll, William L; Loh, Mignon; Hunger, Stephen P; Pui, Ching-Hon; Evans, William E; Relling, Mary V

    2011-03-01

    Although five-year survival rates for childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) are now over 80% in most industrialized countries, not all children have benefited equally from this progress. Ethnic differences in survival after childhood ALL have been reported in many clinical studies, with poorer survival observed among African Americans or those with Hispanic ethnicity when compared with European Americans or Asians. The causes of ethnic differences remain uncertain, although both genetic and non-genetic factors are likely important. Interrogating genome-wide germline SNP genotypes in an unselected large cohort of children with ALL, we observed that the component of genomic variation that co-segregated with Native American ancestry was associated with risk of relapse (P = 0.0029) even after adjusting for known prognostic factors (P = 0.017). Ancestry-related differences in relapse risk were abrogated by the addition of a single extra phase of chemotherapy, indicating that modifications to therapy can mitigate the ancestry-related risk of relapse. PMID:21297632

  7. High Throughput Drug Sensitivity Assay and Genomics- Guided Treatment of Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Acute Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-05-19

    Acute Leukemia of Ambiguous Lineage; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Refractory Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Refractory Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

  8. Signs and Symptoms of Childhood Leukemia

    MedlinePlus

    ... early? Next Topic How is childhood leukemia diagnosed? Signs and symptoms of childhood leukemia Many of the ... blood cells do. Fever is often the main sign of infection. But some children might have a ...

  9. Gemtuzumab Ozogamicin in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Acute Myeloid Leukemia or Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-07-27

    Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Adult Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia (M3); Childhood Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia (M3); Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  10. Nivolumab and Dasatinib in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Philadelphia Chromosome Positive Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-06-28

    B Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia With t(9;22)(q34;q11.2); BCR-ABL1; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Refractory Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Refractory Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

  11. The Childhood Leukemia International Consortium

    PubMed Central

    Metayer, Catherine; Milne, Elizabeth; Clavel, Jacqueline; Infante-Rivard, Claire; Petridou, Eleni; Taylor, Malcolm; Schüz, Joachim; Spector, Logan G.; Dockerty, John D.; Magnani, Corrado; Pombo-de-Oliveira, Maria S.; Sinnett, Daniel; Murphy, Michael; Roman, Eve; Monge, Patricia; Ezzat, Sameera; Mueller, Beth A.; Scheurer, Michael E.; Armstrong, Bruce K.; Birch, Jill; Kaatsch, Peter; Koifman, Sergio; Lightfoot, Tracy; Bhatti, Parveen; Bondy, Melissa L.; Rudant, Jérémie; O’Neill, Kate; Miligi, Lucia; Dessypris, Nick; Kang, Alice Y.; Buffler, Patricia A.

    2013-01-01

    Background Acute leukemia is the most common cancer in children under 15 years of age; 80% are acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) and 17% are acute myeloid leukemia (AML). Childhood leukemia shows further diversity based on cytogenetic and molecular characteristics, which may relate to distinct etiologies. Case–control studies conducted worldwide, particularly of ALL, have collected a wealth of data on potential risk factors and in some studies, biospecimens. There is growing evidence for the role of infectious/immunologic factors, fetal growth, and several environmental factors in the etiology of childhood ALL. The risk of childhood leukemia, like other complex diseases, is likely to be influenced both by independent and interactive effects of genes and environmental exposures. While some studies have analyzed the role of genetic variants, few have been sufficiently powered to investigate gene–environment interactions. Objectives The Childhood Leukemia International Consortium (CLIC) was established in 2007 to promote investigations of rarer exposures, gene–environment interactions and subtype-specific associations through the pooling of data from independent studies. Methods By September 2012, CLIC included 22 studies (recruitment period: 1962–present) from 12 countries, totaling approximately 31 000 cases and 50 000 controls. Of these, 19 case–control studies have collected detailed epidemiologic data, and DNA samples have been collected from children and child–parent trios in 15 and 13 of these studies, respectively. Two registry-based studies and one study comprising hospital records routinely obtained at birth and/or diagnosis have limited interview data or biospecimens. Conclusions CLIC provides a unique opportunity to fill gaps in knowledge about the role of environmental and genetic risk factors, critical windows of exposure, the effects of gene–environment interactions and associations among specific leukemia subtypes in different ethnic

  12. Clinical and In Vitro Studies on Impact of High-Dose Etoposide Pharmacokinetics Prior Allogeneic Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation for Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia on the Risk of Post-Transplant Leukemia Relapse.

    PubMed

    Sobiak, Joanna; Kazimierczak, Urszula; Kowalczyk, Dariusz W; Chrzanowska, Maria; Styczyński, Jan; Wysocki, Mariusz; Szpecht, Dawid; Wachowiak, Jacek

    2015-10-01

    The impact of etoposide (VP-16) plasma concentrations on the day of allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (allo-HSCT) on leukemia-free survival in children with acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) was studied. In addition, the in vitro effects of VP-16 on the lymphocytes proliferation, cytotoxic activity and on Th1/Th2 cytokine responses were assessed. In 31 children undergoing allo-HSCT, VP-16 plasma concentrations were determined up to 120 h after the infusion using the HPLC-UV method. For mentioned in vitro studies, VP-16 plasma concentrations observed on allo-HSCT day were used. In 84 % of children, VP-16 plasma concentrations (0.1-1.5 μg/mL) were quantifiable 72 h after the end of the drug infusion, i.e. when allo-HSCT should be performed. In 20 (65 %) children allo-HSCT was performed 4 days after the end of the drug infusion, and VP-16 was still detectable (0.1-0.9 μg/mL) in plasma of 12 (39 %) of them. Post-transplant ALL relapse occurred in four children, in all of them VP-16 was detectable in plasma (0.1-0.8 μg/mL) on allo-HSCT day, while there was no relapse in children with undetectable VP-16. In in vitro studies, VP-16 demonstrated impact on the proliferation activity of stimulated lymphocytes depending on its concentration and exposition time. The presence of VP-16 in plasma on allo-HSCT day may demonstrate an adverse effect on graft-versus-leukemia (GvL) reaction and increase the risk of post-transplant ALL relapse. Therefore, if 72 h after VP-16 administration its plasma concentration is still above 0.1 μg/mL then the postponement of transplantation for next 24 h should be considered to protect GvL effector cells from transplant material. PMID:26040247

  13. Bortezomib and Combination Chemotherapy in Treating Young Patients With Relapsed Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia or Lymphoblastic Lymphoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-09-30

    B-cell Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; B-cell Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Recurrent Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; T-cell Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; T-cell Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

  14. 5T4 oncofetal antigen is expressed in high risk of relapse childhood pre-B acute lymphoblastic leukemia and is associated with a more invasive and chemotactic phenotype.

    PubMed

    Castro, F V; McGinn, O J; Krishnan, S; Marinov, G; Li, J; Rutkowski, A J; Elkord, E; Burt, D J; Holland, M; Vaghjiani, R; Gallego, A; Saha, V; Stern, P L

    2012-07-01

    Although the overall prognosis in childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) is good, outcome after relapse is poor. Recurrence is frequently characterized by the occurrence of disease at extramedullary sites, such as the central nervous system and testes. Subpopulations of blasts able to migrate to such areas may have a survival advantage and give rise to disease recurrence. Gene expression profiling of 85 diagnostic pre-B-ALL bone marrow samples revealed higher 5T4 oncofetal antigen transcript levels in cytogenetic high-risk subgroups of patients (P<0.001). Flow cytometric analysis determined that bone marrow from relapse patients have a significantly higher percentage of 5T4-positive leukemic blasts than healthy donors (P=0.005). The high-risk Sup-B15 pre-B-ALL line showed heterogeneity in 5T4 expression, and the derived, 5T4(+) (Sup5T4) and 5T4(-) (Sup) subline cells, displayed differential spread to the omentum and ovaries following intraperitoneal inoculation of immunocompromised mice. Consistent with this, Sup5T4 compared with Sup cells show increased invasion in vitro concordant with increased LFA-1 and VLA-4 integrin expression, adhesion to extracellular matrix and secretion of matrix metalloproteases (MMP-2/-9). We also show that 5T4-positive Sup-B15 cells are susceptible to 5T4-specific superantigen antibody-dependent cellular toxicity providing support for targeted immunotherapy in high-risk pre-B-ALL. PMID:22266911

  15. Phase I Trial of the Selective Inhibitor of Nuclear Export, KPT-330, in Relapsed Childhood ALL and AML

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-08-03

    Relapsed Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia (ALL); Refractory Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia (ALL); Relapsed Acute Myelogenous Leukemia (AML); Refractory Acute Myelogenous Leukemia (AML); Relapsed Mixed Lineage Leukemia; Refractory Mixed Lineage Leukemia; Relapsed Biphenotypic Leukemia; Refractory Biphenotypic Leukemia; Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia (CML) in Blast Crisis

  16. Treating Multiply Relapsed or Refractory Hairy Cell Leukemia

    Cancer.gov

    In this trial, patients with hairy cell leukemia who have not responded or relapsed after initial chemotherapy will be randomly assigned to receive rituximab combined with either pentostatin or bendamustine.

  17. General Information about Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    MedlinePlus

    ... Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia Treatment (PDQ®)–Patient Version General Information About Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia Go to Health ... the PDQ Pediatric Treatment Editorial Board . Clinical Trial Information A clinical trial is a study to answer ...

  18. Fludarabine Phosphate and Total-Body Irradiation Followed by Donor Peripheral Blood Stem Cell Transplant in Treating Patients With Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia or Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia That Has Responded to Treatment With Imatinib Mesylate, Dasatinib, or Nilotinib

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-07-18

    Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia in Remission; Blastic Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia in Remission; Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia, BCR-ABL1 Positive; Chronic Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Philadelphia Chromosome Positive Adult Precursor Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Philadelphia Chromosome Positive Childhood Precursor Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Relapsing Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia

  19. Treatment Option Overview (Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia)

    MedlinePlus

    ... recovery) and treatment options. Childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) is a type of cancer in which the ... genetic conditions affect the risk of having childhood ALL. Anything that increases your risk of getting a ...

  20. Risk Groups for Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    MedlinePlus

    ... recovery) and treatment options. Childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) is a type of cancer in which the ... genetic conditions affect the risk of having childhood ALL. Anything that increases your risk of getting a ...

  1. Treatment Options for Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    MedlinePlus

    ... recovery) and treatment options. Childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) is a type of cancer in which the ... genetic conditions affect the risk of having childhood ALL. Anything that increases your risk of getting a ...

  2. Maternal immunoglobulin E and childhood leukemia.

    PubMed

    Chang, Jeffrey S; Buffler, Patricia A; Metayer, Catherine; Chokkalingam, Anand P; Patoka, Joe; Kronish, Daniel; Wiemels, Joseph L

    2009-08-01

    Childhood leukemia, particularly acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL), has long been hypothesized to be affected by abnormal immune responses to microbial challenges stemming from a lack of immune modulation in early childhood. Studies of allergies suggest that a child's immune development may be modulated by maternal immune status. We conducted a study to explore the relationship between maternal immunoglobulin E (IgE) and childhood leukemia and to investigate whether maternal immune status can influence childhood leukemia risk. Serum total and specific IgE (respiratory and food) were measured in biological mothers of 352 children (193 healthy controls and 159 leukemia cases, including 139 ALL cases) ages <8 years who were enrolled in the Northern California Childhood Leukemia Study. Odds ratios associated with maternal IgE were calculated using unconditional logistic regression adjusted for child's age, sex, race/ethnicity, and annual household income. A positive association between childhood leukemia or ALL and elevated levels of maternal serum total IgE was observed, especially among Hispanics. In addition, a positive association was observed between childhood leukemia or ALL and maternal respiratory or food IgE status. These results suggest that maternal immune function may play a crucial role in the etiology of childhood leukemia, although additional studies need to be conducted to confirm the results of this study and provide a perspective on mechanisms. PMID:19622720

  3. FR901228 in Treating Children With Refractory or Recurrent Solid Tumors or Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-01-15

    Blastic Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Childhood Central Nervous System Germ Cell Tumor; Childhood Choroid Plexus Tumor; Childhood Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Childhood Craniopharyngioma; Childhood Grade I Meningioma; Childhood Grade II Meningioma; Childhood Grade III Meningioma; Childhood High-grade Cerebral Astrocytoma; Childhood Infratentorial Ependymoma; Childhood Low-grade Cerebral Astrocytoma; Childhood Spinal Cord Neoplasm; Childhood Supratentorial Ependymoma; Recurrent Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Brain Stem Glioma; Recurrent Childhood Cerebellar Astrocytoma; Recurrent Childhood Cerebral Astrocytoma; Recurrent Childhood Ependymoma; Recurrent Childhood Medulloblastoma; Recurrent Childhood Supratentorial Primitive Neuroectodermal Tumor; Recurrent Childhood Visual Pathway and Hypothalamic Glioma; Refractory Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Relapsing Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Unspecified Childhood Solid Tumor, Protocol Specific

  4. Genomic characterization of childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Mullighan, Charles G

    2013-10-01

    Acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) is the most common childhood malignancy and a leading case of childhood cancer death. The last decade has witnessed a transformation in our understanding of the genetic basis of ALL due to detailed integrative genomic profiling of large cohorts of childhood ALL. Initially using microarray based approaches, and more recently with next-generation sequencing, these studies have enabled more precise subclassification of ALL, and have shown that each ALL entity is characterized by constellations of structural and sequence mutations that typically perturb key cellular pathways including lymphoid development, cell cycle regulation, tumor suppression, Ras- and tyrosine kinase-driven signaling, and epigenetic regulation. Importantly, several of the newly identified genetic alterations have entered the clinic to improve diagnosis and risk stratification, and are being pursued as new targets for therapeutic intervention. Studies of ALL have also led the way in dissecting the subclonal heterogeneity of cancer, and have shown that individual patients commonly harbor multiple related but genetically distinct subclones, and that this genetically determined clonal heterogeneity is an important determinant of relapse. In addition, genome-wide profiling has identified inherited genetic variants that influence ALL risk. Ongoing studies are deploying detailed integrative genetic transcriptomic and epigenetic sequencing to comprehensively define the genomic landscape of ALL. This review describes the recent advances in our understanding of the genetics of ALL, with an emphasis on those alterations of key pathogenic or therapeutic importance. PMID:24246699

  5. Genomic characterization of childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Mullighan, Charles G.

    2013-01-01

    Acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) is the most common childhood malignancy and a leading case of childhood cancer death. The last decade has witnessed a transformation in our understanding of the genetic basis of ALL due to detailed integrative genomic profiling of large cohorts of childhood ALL. Initially using microarray based approaches, and more recently with next-generation sequencing, these studies have enabled more precise sub-classification of ALL, and have shown that each ALL entity is characterized by constellations of structural and sequence mutations that typically perturb key cellular pathways including lymphoid development, cell cycle regulation, tumor suppression, Ras- and tyrosine kinase driven signaling, and epigenetic regulation. Importantly, several of the newly identified genetic alterations have entered the clinic to improve diagnosis and risk stratification, and are being pursued as new targets for therapeutic intervention. Studies of ALL have also led the way in dissecting the subclonal heterogeneity of cancer, and have shown that individual patients commonly harbor multiple related but genetically distinct subclones, and that this genetically determined clonal heterogeneity is an important determinant of relapse. In addition, genome-wide profiling has identified inherited genetic variants that influence ALL risk. Ongoing studies are deploying detailed integrative genetic transcriptomic and epigenetic sequencing to comprehensively define the genomic landscape of ALL. This review describes the recent advances in our understanding of the genetics of ALL, with an emphasis on those alterations of key pathogenic or therapeutic importance. PMID:24246699

  6. BMS-214662 in Treating Patients With Acute Leukemia, Myelodysplastic Syndrome, or Chronic Myeloid Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-01-22

    Adult Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia (M3); Blastic Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Childhood Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Refractory Anemia With Excess Blasts; Refractory Anemia With Excess Blasts in Transformation; Relapsing Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia

  7. What Are the Key Statistics for Childhood Leukemia?

    MedlinePlus

    ... factors for childhood leukemia? What are the key statistics for childhood leukemia? Leukemia is the most common ... about 2. Visit the American Cancer Society’s Cancer Statistics Center for more key statistics. Survival statistics for ...

  8. Prognostic Factors in Childhood Leukemia (ALL or AML)

    MedlinePlus

    ... for childhood leukemias Prognostic factors in childhood leukemia (ALL or AML) Certain factors that can affect a ... myelogenous leukemia (AML). Prognostic factors for children with ALL Children with ALL are often divided into risk ...

  9. Aggressive chemotherapy for acute leukemia relapsed after transplantation.

    PubMed

    Sica, S; Salutari, P; Di Mario, A; D'Onofrio, G; Etuk, B; Leone, G

    1994-09-01

    Bone marrow transplantation procedure has emerged as an effective treatment for hematological malignancies. However, recurrence of leukemia is still the major cause of treatment failure. Subsequent treatment in this category of patients, generally considered incurable, has not been yet standardized. At our institution, 13 patients, 7 with acute non lymphoid leukemia (ANLL) and 6 with acute lymphoid leukemia (ALL), were treated at relapse after bone marrow transplantation either autologous or allogeneic (AuBMT 8, ABMT 4) performed in complete remission (CR). The interval between BMT and relapse was less than 9 months in 6 patients (2 ABMT and 4 AuBMT) and more than 9 months in 7 patients. Early relapsed patients showed no response to treatment and died at a median of 5.5 months (range 1-13) after relapse. Late relapse after BMT was characterized by a high percentage of response (5 CR and 1 PR), particularly after intensive chemotherapy and by a longer survival (median 14 months; range 2-36). Chemotherapy after transplantation should be carefully evaluated in patients relapsed after BMT in order to select a population that can achieve long term disease free survival. PMID:7858490

  10. RALLE pilot: response-guided therapy for marrow relapse in acute lymphoblastic leukemia in children.

    PubMed

    Saarinen-Pihkala, Ulla M; Parto, Katriina; Riikonen, Pekka; Lähteenmäki, Päivi M; Békàssy, Albert N; Glomstein, Anders; Möttönen, Merja

    2012-05-01

    Despite improved treatment results of childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL), 20% to 30% have a relapse, and then the outcome is very poor. We studied 40 children with ALL marrow relapse piloting an ALL relapse protocol with well-known drugs and drug combinations by using a concept of response-guided design. We also measured response in logarithmic fashion. Our primary end points were achievement of M1 marrow status, minimal residual disease status below 10, and second remission. The remission induction rate was 90% with 10% induction mortality. After the A blocks (dexamethasone, vincristine, idarubicin and pegylated L-asparaginase), 85% had M1 status, 39% had minimal residual disease ≤1×10, and 66% had 2 to 3 log response. After B1 block (cyclo, VP-16) the figures were 92%, 58%, and 83%, respectively. Twenty-five of 40 patients received allogeneic stem cell transplantation. Three-year event-free survival of the whole cohort was 37%, and the relapse rate was 38%. Three-year event-free survival by risk group was 53% for late, 34% for early, and 21% for very early relapses. An ALL marrow relapse nonresponsive to steroids, vincristine, asparaginase, anthracyclines, and alkylating agents is uncommon, and these classic drugs can still be advocated for induction of ALL relapse. The problems lie in creating a consolidation capable of preventing particularly posttransplant relapses. PMID:22246158

  11. Comprehensive mutational analysis of primary and relapse acute promyelocytic leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Madan, V; Shyamsunder, P; Han, L; Mayakonda, A; Nagata, Y; Sundaresan, J; Kanojia, D; Yoshida, K; Ganesan, S; Hattori, N; Fulton, N; Tan, K-T; Alpermann, T; Kuo, M-C; Rostami, S; Matthews, J; Sanada, M; Liu, L-Z; Shiraishi, Y; Miyano, S; Chendamarai, E; Hou, H-A; Malnassy, G; Ma, T; Garg, M; Ding, L-W; Sun, Q-Y; Chien, W; Ikezoe, T; Lill, M; Biondi, A; Larson, R A; Powell, B L; Lübbert, M; Chng, W J; Tien, H-F; Heuser, M; Ganser, A; Koren-Michowitz, M; Kornblau, S M; Kantarjian, H M; Nowak, D; Hofmann, W-K; Yang, H; Stock, W; Ghavamzadeh, A; Alimoghaddam, K; Haferlach, T; Ogawa, S; Shih, L-Y; Mathews, V; Koeffler, H P

    2016-01-01

    Acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL) is a subtype of myeloid leukemia characterized by differentiation block at the promyelocyte stage. Besides the presence of chromosomal rearrangement t(15;17), leading to the formation of PML-RARA (promyelocytic leukemia-retinoic acid receptor alpha) fusion, other genetic alterations have also been implicated in APL. Here, we performed comprehensive mutational analysis of primary and relapse APL to identify somatic alterations, which cooperate with PML-RARA in the pathogenesis of APL. We explored the mutational landscape using whole-exome (n=12) and subsequent targeted sequencing of 398 genes in 153 primary and 69 relapse APL. Both primary and relapse APL harbored an average of eight non-silent somatic mutations per exome. We observed recurrent alterations of FLT3, WT1, NRAS and KRAS in the newly diagnosed APL, whereas mutations in other genes commonly mutated in myeloid leukemia were rarely detected. The molecular signature of APL relapse was characterized by emergence of frequent mutations in PML and RARA genes. Our sequencing data also demonstrates incidence of loss-of-function mutations in previously unidentified genes, ARID1B and ARID1A, both of which encode for key components of the SWI/SNF complex. We show that knockdown of ARID1B in APL cell line, NB4, results in large-scale activation of gene expression and reduced in vitro differentiation potential. PMID:27063598

  12. Comprehensive mutational analysis of primary and relapse acute promyelocytic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Madan, V; Shyamsunder, P; Han, L; Mayakonda, A; Nagata, Y; Sundaresan, J; Kanojia, D; Yoshida, K; Ganesan, S; Hattori, N; Fulton, N; Tan, K-T; Alpermann, T; Kuo, M-C; Rostami, S; Matthews, J; Sanada, M; Liu, L-Z; Shiraishi, Y; Miyano, S; Chendamarai, E; Hou, H-A; Malnassy, G; Ma, T; Garg, M; Ding, L-W; Sun, Q-Y; Chien, W; Ikezoe, T; Lill, M; Biondi, A; Larson, R A; Powell, B L; Lübbert, M; Chng, W J; Tien, H-F; Heuser, M; Ganser, A; Koren-Michowitz, M; Kornblau, S M; Kantarjian, H M; Nowak, D; Hofmann, W-K; Yang, H; Stock, W; Ghavamzadeh, A; Alimoghaddam, K; Haferlach, T; Ogawa, S; Shih, L-Y; Mathews, V; Koeffler, H P

    2016-08-01

    Acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL) is a subtype of myeloid leukemia characterized by differentiation block at the promyelocyte stage. Besides the presence of chromosomal rearrangement t(15;17), leading to the formation of PML-RARA (promyelocytic leukemia-retinoic acid receptor alpha) fusion, other genetic alterations have also been implicated in APL. Here, we performed comprehensive mutational analysis of primary and relapse APL to identify somatic alterations, which cooperate with PML-RARA in the pathogenesis of APL. We explored the mutational landscape using whole-exome (n=12) and subsequent targeted sequencing of 398 genes in 153 primary and 69 relapse APL. Both primary and relapse APL harbored an average of eight non-silent somatic mutations per exome. We observed recurrent alterations of FLT3, WT1, NRAS and KRAS in the newly diagnosed APL, whereas mutations in other genes commonly mutated in myeloid leukemia were rarely detected. The molecular signature of APL relapse was characterized by emergence of frequent mutations in PML and RARA genes. Our sequencing data also demonstrates incidence of loss-of-function mutations in previously unidentified genes, ARID1B and ARID1A, both of which encode for key components of the SWI/SNF complex. We show that knockdown of ARID1B in APL cell line, NB4, results in large-scale activation of gene expression and reduced in vitro differentiation potential. PMID:27063598

  13. Vorinostat and Idarubicin in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Leukemia or Myelodysplastic Syndromes

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-09-27

    Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Multilineage Dysplasia Following Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Adult Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia (M3); Blastic Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Myelodysplastic/Myeloproliferative Neoplasm, Unclassifiable; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Relapsing Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Myelodysplastic Syndromes

  14. Global Characteristics of Childhood Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, L; Samad, A; Pombo-de-Oliveira, MS; Scelo, G; Smith, MT; Feusner, J; Wiemels, JL; Metayer, C

    2014-01-01

    Acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL) comprises approximately 5–10% of childhood acute myeloid leukemia (AML) cases in the US. While variation in this percentage among other populations was noted previously, global patterns of childhood APL have not been thoroughly characterized. In this comprehensive review of childhood APL, we examined its geographic pattern and the potential contribution of environmental factors to observed variation. In 142 studies (spanning >60 countries) identified, variation was apparent—de novo APL represented from 2% (Switzerland) to >50% (Nicaragua) of childhood AML in different geographic regions. Because a limited number of previous studies addressed specific environmental exposures that potentially underlie childhood APL development, we gathered 28 childhood cases of therapy-related APL, which exemplified associations between prior exposures to chemotherapeutic drugs/radiation and APL diagnosis. Future population-based studies examining childhood APL patterns and the potential association with specific environmental exposures and other risk factors are needed. PMID:25445717

  15. Tanespimycin and Cytarabine in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Acute Myeloid Leukemia, Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia, Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia, Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia, or Myelodysplastic Syndromes

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-09-27

    Accelerated Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Adult Acute Basophilic Leukemia; Adult Acute Eosinophilic Leukemia; Adult Acute Megakaryoblastic Leukemia (M7); Adult Acute Minimally Differentiated Myeloid Leukemia (M0); Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Adult Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Adult Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); Adult Erythroleukemia (M6a); Adult Pure Erythroid Leukemia (M6b); Blastic Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia; de Novo Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Refractory Anemia With Excess Blasts in Transformation; Relapsing Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Myelodysplastic Syndromes

  16. Perspectives on the Causes of Childhood Leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Wiemels, Joseph

    2013-01-01

    Acute leukemia is the most common cancer in children but the causes of the disease in the majority of cases are not known. About 80% are precursor-B cell in origin (CD19+, CD10+), and this immunophenotype has increased in incidence over the past several decades in the Western world. Part of this increase may be due to the introduction of new chemical exposures into the child's environment including parental smoking, pesticides, traffic fumes, paint and household chemicals. However, much of the increase in leukemia rates is likely linked to altered patterns of infection during early childhood development, mirroring causal pathways responsible for a similarly increased incidence of other childhood-diagnosed immune-related illnesses including allergy, asthma, and type 1 diabetes. Factors linked to childhood leukemia that are likely surrogates for immune stimulation include exposure to childcare settings, parity status and birth order, vaccination history, and population mixing. In case-control studies, acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) is consistently inversely associated with greater exposure to infections, via daycare and later birth order. New evidence suggests also that children who contract leukemia may harbor a congenital defect in immune responder status, as indicated by lower levels of the immunosuppressive cytokine IL-10 at birth in children who grow up to contract leukemia, as well as higher need for clinical care for infections within the first year of life despite having lower levels of exposure to infections. One manifestation of this phenomenon may be leukemia clusters which tend to appear as a leukemia “outbreak” among populations with low herd immunity to a new infection. Critical answers to the etiology of childhood leukemia will require incorporating new tools into traditional epidemiologic approaches – including the classification of leukemia at a molecular scale, better exposure assessments at all points in a child's life, a comprehensive

  17. Rebeccamycin Analog in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Acute Myeloid Leukemia, Myelodysplastic Syndrome, Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia, or Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-01-22

    Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Blastic Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia; de Novo Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Refractory Anemia With Excess Blasts; Refractory Anemia With Excess Blasts in Transformation; Relapsing Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Myelodysplastic Syndromes

  18. CCI-779 in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Acute Myeloid Leukemia, Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia, Myelodysplastic Syndromes, or Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia in Blastic Phase

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-01-22

    Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Blastic Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia; de Novo Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Refractory Anemia With Excess Blasts; Refractory Anemia With Excess Blasts in Transformation; Relapsing Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Secondary Myelodysplastic Syndromes

  19. A Case of T-cell Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia Relapsed As Myeloid Acute Leukemia.

    PubMed

    Paganin, Maddalena; Buldini, Barbara; Germano, Giuseppe; Seganfreddo, Elena; Meglio, Annamaria di; Magrin, Elisa; Grillo, Francesca; Pigazzi, Martina; Rizzari, Carmelo; Cazzaniga, Giovanni; Khiabanian, Hossein; Palomero, Teresa; Rabadan, Raul; Ferrando, Adolfo A; Basso, Giuseppe

    2016-09-01

    A 4-year-old male with the diagnosis of T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (T-ALL) relapsed after 19 months with an acute myeloid leukemia (AML). Immunoglobulin and T-cell receptor gene rearrangements analyses reveal that both leukemias were rearranged with a clonal relationship between them. Comparative genomic hybridization (Array-CGH) and whole-exome sequencing analyses of both samples suggest that this leukemia may have originated from a common T/myeloid progenitor. The presence of homozygous deletion of p16/INK4A, p14/ARF, p15/INK4B, and heterozygous deletion of WT1 locus remained stable in the leukemia throughout phenotypic switch, revealing that this AML can be genetically associated to T-ALL. PMID:27149388

  20. Mutations in epigenetic regulators are involved in acute lymphoblastic leukemia relapse following allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Lai, Xiaoyu; Li, Caihua; Shi, Jimin; Tan, Yamin; Fu, Shan; Wang, Yebo; Zhu, Ni; He, Jingsong; Zheng, Weiyan; Yu, Xiaohong; Cai, Zhen; Huang, He

    2016-01-01

    Although steady improvements to chemotherapeutic treatments has helped cure 80% of childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) cases, chemotherapy has proven to be less effective in treating the majority of adult patients, leaving allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (allo-HSCT) as the primary adult treatment option. Nevertheless relapse are the leading cause of death following allo-HSCT. The genetic pathogenesis of relapse following allo-HSCT in Philadelphia chromosome- negative ALL (Ph− ALL) remains unexplored. We performed longitudinal whole-exome sequencing analysis in three adult patients with Ph− B-cell ALL (Ph− B-ALL) on samples collected from diagnosis to relapse after allo-HSCT. Based on these data, we performed target gene sequencing on 23 selected genes in 58 adult patients undergoing allo-HSCT with Ph− B-ALL. Our results revealed a significant enrichment of mutations in epigenetic regulators from relapsed samples, with recurrent somatic mutations in SETD2, CREBBP, KDM6A and NR3C1. The relapsed samples were also enriched in signaling factor mutations, including KRAS, PTPN21, MYC and USP54. Furthermore, we are the first to reveal the clonal evolution patterns during leukemia relapse after allo-HSCT. Cells present in relapsed specimens were genetically related to the diagnosed tumor, these cells therefore arose from either an existing subclone that was not eradicated by allo-HSCT therapy, or from the same progenitor that acquired new mutations. In some cases, however, it is possible that leukemia recurrence following allo-HSCT could result from a secondary malignancy with a distinct set of mutations. We identified novel genetic causes of leukemia relapse after allo-HSCT using the largest generated data set to date from adult patients with Ph− B-ALL. PMID:26527318

  1. Dasatinib in Treating Young Patients With Recurrent or Refractory Solid Tumors or Philadelphia Chromosome-Positive Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia or Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia That Did Not Respond to Imatinib Mesylate

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-02-04

    Accelerated Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Blastic Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Childhood Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia, BCR-ABL1 Positive; Meningeal Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Relapsing Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Unspecified Childhood Solid Tumor, Protocol Specific

  2. Vorinostat With or Without Isotretinoin in Treating Young Patients With Recurrent or Refractory Solid Tumors, Lymphoma, or Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-06-16

    Childhood Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia (M3); Childhood Atypical Teratoid/Rhabdoid Tumor; Childhood Burkitt Lymphoma; Childhood Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Childhood Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Childhood Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Juvenile Myelomonocytic Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Grade III Lymphomatoid Granulomatosis; Recurrent Childhood Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Childhood Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Recurrent Childhood Medulloblastoma; Recurrent Childhood Small Noncleaved Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Childhood Supratentorial Primitive Neuroectodermal Tumor; Recurrent Neuroblastoma; Recurrent/Refractory Childhood Hodgkin Lymphoma; Relapsing Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Unspecified Childhood Solid Tumor, Protocol Specific

  3. How Is Childhood Leukemia Classified?

    MedlinePlus

    ... in immature forms of cells that make platelets. World Health Organization (WHO) classification of AML The FAB ... phases, but a common system (proposed by the World Health Organization) is described below. If the leukemia ...

  4. Negative feedback-defective PRPS1 mutants drive thiopurine resistance in relapsed childhood ALL.

    PubMed

    Li, Benshang; Li, Hui; Bai, Yun; Kirschner-Schwabe, Renate; Yang, Jun J; Chen, Yao; Lu, Gang; Tzoneva, Gannie; Ma, Xiaotu; Wu, Tongmin; Li, Wenjing; Lu, Haisong; Ding, Lixia; Liang, Huanhuan; Huang, Xiaohang; Yang, Minjun; Jin, Lei; Kang, Hui; Chen, Shuting; Du, Alicia; Shen, Shuhong; Ding, Jianping; Chen, Hongzhuan; Chen, Jing; von Stackelberg, Arend; Gu, Longjun; Zhang, Jinghui; Ferrando, Adolfo; Tang, Jingyan; Wang, Shengyue; Zhou, Bin-Bing S

    2015-06-01

    Relapse is the leading cause of mortality in children with acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL). Among chemotherapeutics, thiopurines are key drugs in ALL combination therapy. Using whole-exome sequencing, we identified relapse-specific mutations in the phosphoribosyl pyrophosphate synthetase 1 gene (PRPS1), which encodes a rate-limiting purine biosynthesis enzyme, in 24/358 (6.7%) relapsed childhood B cell ALL (B-ALL) cases. All individuals who harbored PRPS1 mutations relapsed early during treatment, and mutated ALL clones expanded exponentially before clinical relapse. Our functional analyses of PRPS1 mutants uncovered a new chemotherapy-resistance mechanism involving reduced feedback inhibition of de novo purine biosynthesis and competitive inhibition of thiopurine activation. Notably, the de novo purine synthesis inhibitor lometrexol effectively abrogated PRPS1 mutant-driven drug resistance. These results highlight the importance of constitutive activation of the de novo purine synthesis pathway in thiopurine resistance, and they offer therapeutic strategies for the treatment of relapsed and thiopurine-resistant ALL. PMID:25962120

  5. GTI-2040 in Treating Patients With Relapsed, Refractory, or High-Risk Acute Leukemia, High-Grade Myelodysplastic Syndromes, or Refractory or Blastic Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-12-03

    Acute Undifferentiated Leukemia; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Blastic Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; de Novo Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Relapsing Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Untreated Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  6. A revised definition for cure of childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Pui, C H; Pei, D; Campana, D; Cheng, C; Sandlund, J T; Bowman, W P; Hudson, M M; Ribeiro, R C; Raimondi, S C; Jeha, S; Howard, S C; Bhojwani, D; Inaba, H; Rubnitz, J E; Metzger, M L; Gruber, T A; Coustan-Smith, E; Downing, J R; Leung, W H; Relling, M V; Evans, W E

    2014-12-01

    With improved contemporary therapy, we reassess long-term outcome in patients completing treatment for childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) to determine when cure can be declared with a high degree of confidence. In six successive clinical trials between 1984 and 2007, 1291 (84.5%) patients completed all therapies in continuous complete remission. The post-therapy cumulative risk of relapse or development of a second neoplasm and the event-free survival rate and overall survival were analyzed according to the presenting features and the three treatment periods defined by relative outcome. Over the three treatment periods, there has been progressive increase in the rate of event-free survival (65.2% vs 74.8% vs 85.1% (P<0.001)) and overall survival (76.5% vs 81.1% vs 91.7% (P<0.001)) at 10 years. The most important predictor of outcome after completion of therapy was the type of treatment. In the most recent treatment period, which omitted the use of prophylactic cranial irradiation, the post-treatment cumulative risk of relapse was 6.4%, death in remission 1.5% and development of a second neoplasm 2.3% at 10 years, with all relapses except one occurring within 4 years of therapy. None of the 106 patients with the t(9;22)/BCR-ABL1, t(1;19)/TCF3-PBX1 or t(4;11)/MLL-AFF1 had relapsed after 2 years from completion of therapy. These findings demonstrate that with contemporary effective therapy that excludes cranial irradiation, approximately 6% of children with ALL may relapse after completion of treatment, and those who remain in remission at 4 years post treatment may be considered cured (that is, less than 1% chance of relapse). PMID:24781017

  7. Early childhood leukemia incidence trends in Brazil.

    PubMed

    Reis, Rejane de Souza; Santos, Marceli de Oliveira; de Camargo, Beatriz; Oliveira, Julio Fernando Pinto; Thuler, Luiz Claudio Santos; Pombo-de-Oliveira, Maria S

    2016-03-01

    Incidence rates of childhood leukemia vary between different regions of the world. The objective of this study was to test possible trends in incidence rate of early childhood leukemia (children <5 years old at the diagnosis) in Brazil. Data from 18 population-based cancer registries (PBCRs) were analyzed (period 1999-2010). The analysis consisted of frequencies, age-adjusted incidence rates, and joinpoint regression results, including annual average percent change (AAPC) in incidence rates and 95% confidence intervals (CIs). The median age-adjusted incidence rate (AAIR) of overall early childhood leukemia was 61 per million. The AAIR for acute lymphoid leukemia (ALL) was 44 per million and nonlymphoid acute leukemia (NLAL) was 14 per million. The median ALL/NLAL ratio was 3.0, suggesting higher incidence rate of NLAL in these settings. The joinpoint analysis demonstrated increased leukemia incidence rate in João Pessoa (AAPC = 20; 95% CI: 3.5, 39.4) and Salvador (AAPC = 8.68; 95% CI: 1.0, 16.9), respectively, whereas incidence rate in São Paulo PBCR decreased (AAPC = -4.02%; 95% CI: -6.1%, -1.9%). Correlation between ALL AAIR and selected variables of socioeconomic (SES) factors was not observed. Increased AAIR regionally overtime was observed. However, the interpretation for such phenomenon should be cautious because it might reflect the access to health care, diagnosis procedures, and improvement of PBCR´s quality. The observed trend supports the necessity of further ecological studies. PMID:26925506

  8. Epidemiology of childhood acute myelogenous leukemia.

    PubMed

    Bhatia, S; Neglia, J P

    1995-05-01

    Acute myelogenous leukemia (AML) is the second most common leukemia in children, with approximately 400 new cases occurring annually in the United States. Worldwide, the highest rates of childhood AML occur in Asia and the lowest rates are reported from India and South America. Numerous genetic risk factors for childhood AML have been defined, including Down syndrome, neurofibromatosis, and Fanconi anemia. Research into environmental risk factors has been limited by the rarity of this disease; however, studies of AML in adults have implicated ionizing radiation, solvents, and petroleum products as potential etiologic agents. The largest analytic study of childhood AML found that occupational exposures of either parent to pesticides, paternal exposure to petroleum products, and postnatal exposures to pesticides are increased in children with AML. In addition, maternal use of marijuana during pregnancy was associated with an increased risk of AML, especially the monocytic subtypes. Further study of childhood AML, including occurrence of the disease as a second malignancy, is needed in order to confirm these findings and to increase our understanding of this leukemia. PMID:7749772

  9. Aggressive chemotherapy for acute leukemia relapsed after bone marrow transplantation: a second chance?

    PubMed

    Sica, S; Di Mario, A; Pagano, L; Etuk, B; Salutari, P; Leone, G

    1992-01-01

    Eight patients, 5 with acute non lymphoid leukemia and 3 with lymphoid leukemia, were treated at relapse after bone marrow transplantation (BMT; 4 autologous BMT and 4 allogeneic BMT). Of these, 2 relapsed within 3 months after BMT (2 allogeneic BMT) and 6 (2 allogeneic and 4 autologous BMT) after more than 9 months after BMT. The 2 patients relapsing early showed no response to treatment and died. Five out of 6 patients relapsing late achieved complete remission (4 of them with intensive chemotherapy). Four patients are currently alive. Aggressive combination chemotherapy can produce long-term survival in selected patients relapsed after BMT. PMID:1519431

  10. Temsirolimus, Dexamethasone, Mitoxantrone Hydrochloride, Vincristine Sulfate, and Pegaspargase in Treating Young Patients With Relapsed Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia or Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-07-09

    Childhood B Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Childhood T Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Mature T-Cell and NK-Cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Lymphoblastic Lymphoma

  11. Arsenic trioxide-based therapy of relapsed acute promyelocytic leukemia: registry results from the European LeukemiaNet.

    PubMed

    Lengfelder, E; Lo-Coco, F; Ades, L; Montesinos, P; Grimwade, D; Kishore, B; Ramadan, S M; Pagoni, M; Breccia, M; Huerta, A J G; Nloga, A M; González-Sanmiguel, J D; Schmidt, A; Lambert, J-F; Lehmann, S; Di Bona, E; Cassinat, B; Hofmann, W-K; Görlich, D; Sauerland, M-C; Fenaux, P; Sanz, M

    2015-05-01

    In 2008, a European registry of relapsed acute promyelocytic leukemia was established by the European LeukemiaNet. Outcome data were available for 155 patients treated with arsenic trioxide in first relapse. In hematological relapse (n=104), 91% of the patients entered complete hematological remission (CR), 7% had induction death and 2% resistance, 27% developed differentiation syndrome and 39% leukocytosis, whereas no death or side effects occurred in patients treated in molecular relapse (n=40). The rate of molecular (m)CR was 74% in hematological and 62% in molecular relapse (P=0.3). All patients with extramedullary relapse (n=11) entered clinical and mCR. After 3.2 years median follow-up, the 3-year overall survival (OS) and cumulative incidence of second relapse were 68% and 41% in hematological relapse, 66% and 48% in molecular relapse and 90 and 11% in extramedullary relapse, respectively. After allogeneic or autologous transplantation in second CR (n=93), the 3-year OS was 80% compared with 59% without transplantation (n=55) (P=0.03). Multivariable analysis demonstrated the favorable prognostic impact of first remission duration ⩾1.5 years, achievement of mCR and allogeneic or autologous transplantation on OS of patients alive after induction (P=0.03, P=0.01, P=0.01) and on leukemia-free survival (P=0.006, P<0.0001, P=0.003), respectively. PMID:25627637

  12. Cauda equina involvement in acute myeloid leukemia relapse.

    PubMed

    Buakhao, Jitsuda; Tansawet, Amarate

    2011-10-01

    Although central nervous system (CNS) involvement in acute myeloid leukemia has been described in about 2 to 4%, it still represents a major therapeutic problem, particularly cauda eqina involvement that is clinically significant and unusual. Here, a 22-year-old man, with underlying AML (M2-Subtype, FAB classification) and cytogenetic analysis resulted in 45, x, -y, t(8;21) (q22;q22)[15] whose presenting symptoms of low back pain and incontinence, 10 months after first remission, was reported. This was followed by peripheral and bone marrow relapse. The magnetic resonance image (MRI) findings revealed leukemic infiltration at S1-S5 of the spinal cord canal with associated soft tissue component at presacral area encasing bilateral S1-S5 exiting root with heterogeneous enhancement in bone marrow of S2-S4. The therapeutic and prognosis implications of spinal cord involvement by leukemia were discussed. Because of severe morbidity, the patient developed bone marrow failure and died from sepsis. PMID:22145515

  13. Minimal Residual Disease Evaluation in Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia: A Clinical Evidence Review

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Background Leukemia accounts for nearly a third of childhood cancers in Canada, with acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) comprising nearly 80% of cases. Identification of prognostic factors that allow risk stratification and tailored treatment have improved overall survival. However, nearly a quarter of patients considered standard risk on the basis of conventional prognostic factors still relapse, and relapse is associated with increased morbidity and mortality. Relapse is thought to result from extremely low levels of leukemic cells left over once complete remission is reached, termed minimal residual disease (MRD). Poor event-free survival (EFS) as well as overall survival for those who are classified as MRD-positive have been substantiated in seminal studies demonstrating the prognostic value of MRD for EFS in the past few decades. This review sought to further elucidate the relationship between MRD and EFS by looking at relapse, the primary determinant of EFS and the biological mechanism through which MRD is thought to act. This evidence review aimed to ascertain whether MRD is an independent prognostic factor for relapse and to assess the effect of MRD-directed treatment on patient-important outcomes in childhood ALL. Methods Large prospective cohort studies with a priori multivariable analysis that includes potential confounders are required to draw confirmatory conclusions about the independence of a prognostic factor. Data on the prognostic value of MRD for relapse measured by molecular methods (polymerase chain reaction [PCR] of immunoglobulin or T-cell receptor rearrangements) or flow cytometry for leukemia-associated immunophenotypes or difference-from-normal approach were abstracted from included studies. Relevant data on relapse, EFS, and overall survival were abstracted from randomized controlled trials (RCTs) evaluating the effect of MRD-directed treatment. Results A total of 2,832 citations were reviewed, of which 12 studies were included in this

  14. Survival and risk of relapse of acute lymphoblastic leukemia in a Mexican population is affected by dihydrofolate reductase gene polymorphisms

    PubMed Central

    GÓMEZ-GÓMEZ, YAZMÍN; ORGANISTA-NAVA, JORGE; SAAVEDRA-HERRERA, MÓNICA VIRGINIA; RIVERA-RAMÍREZ, ANA BERTHA; TERÁN-PORCAYO, MARCO ANTONIO; DEL CARMEN ALARCÓN-ROMERO, LUZ; ILLADES-AGUIAR, BERENICE; LEYVA-VÁZQUEZ, MARCO ANTONIO

    2012-01-01

    Dihydrofolate reductase (DHFR) is the major target of methotrexate, a key component in childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) treatment. Polymorphisms in the gene coding for DHFR have been associated with adverse event treatment. This study evaluated the effect of the -A317G and C829T polymorphisms in the DHFR gene on survival and risk of relapse of ALL. Seventy patients with ALL and 100 healthy individuals were genotyped by the polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism method. An association between the polymorphisms and the risk of relapse was found (p<0.05); patients with the -317G/G genotype were found to have an 8.55 (95% CI 1.84–39.70) higher chance of relapse and carriers of the 829T/T genotype had a 14.0 (95% CI 1.13–172.63) higher chance of relapse. Other variables, such as age and leukocyte count, were associated (p<0.05) with the risk of relapse of the disease. Individuals with the G/G and T/T genotype of the -A317G and C829T polymorphisms had poorer survival compared to other genotype groups (log-rank test; p<0.05). Although preliminary, these data seem to suggest a role for the DHFR polymorphisms in the risk of relapse of ALL and the mortality risk in these patients. PMID:22969948

  15. Residential Traffic Density and Childhood Leukemia Risk

    PubMed Central

    Von Behren, Julie; Reynolds, Peggy; Gunier, Robert B.; Rull, Rudolph P.; Hertz, Andrew; Urayama, Kevin Y.; Kronish, Daniel; Buffler, Patricia A.

    2009-01-01

    Background Exposures to carcinogenic compounds from vehicle exhaust may increase childhood leukemia risk, and the timing of this exposure may be important. Methods We examined the association between traffic density and childhood leukemia risk for three time periods: birth, time of diagnosis, and lifetime average, based on complete residential history in a case-control study. Cases were rapidly ascertained from participating hospitals in northern and central California between 1995 and 2002. Controls were selected from birth records, individually matched on age, sex, race, and Hispanic ethnicity. Traffic density was calculated by estimating total vehicle miles traveled per square mile within a 500-foot (152 meter) radius area around each address. We used conditional logistic regression analyses to account for matching factors and to adjust for household income. Results We included 310 cases of acute lymphocytic leukemias (ALL) and 396 controls in our analysis. The odds ratio for ALL and residential traffic density above the 75th percentile, compared with subjects with zero traffic density, was 1.17 [95% confidence interval (95% CI), 0.76–1.81) for residence at diagnosis and 1.11 (95% CI, 0.70–1.78) for the residence at birth. For average lifetime traffic density, the odds ratio was 1.24 (95% CI, 0.74–2.08) for the highest exposure category. Conclusions Living in areas of high traffic density during any of the exposure time periods was not associated with increased risk of childhood ALL in this study. PMID:18768496

  16. Idelalisib and Rituximab in Relapsed Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Cheson, Bruce D.; Pagel, John M.; Hillmen, Peter; Barrientos, Jacqueline C.; Zelenetz, Andrew D.; Kipps, Thomas J.; Flinn, Ian; Ghia, Paolo; Eradat, Herbert; Ervin, Thomas; Lamanna, Nicole; Coiffier, Bertrand; Pettitt, Andrew R.; Ma, Shuo; Stilgenbauer, Stephan; Cramer, Paula; Aiello, Maria; Johnson, Dave M.; Miller, Langdon L.; Li, Daniel; Jahn, Thomas M.; Dansey, Roger D.; Hallek, Michael; O’Brien, Susan M.

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND Patients with relapsed chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) who have clinically significant coexisting medical conditions are less able to undergo standard chemo-therapy. Effective therapies with acceptable side-effect profiles are needed for this patient population. METHODS In this multicenter, randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, phase 3 study, we assessed the efficacy and safety of idelalisib, an oral inhibitor of the delta iso-form of phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase, in combination with rituximab versus rituximab plus placebo. We randomly assigned 220 patients with decreased renal function, previous therapy-induced myelosuppression, or major coexisting illnesses to receive rituximab and either idelalisib (at a dose of 150 mg) or placebo twice daily. The primary end point was progression-free survival. At the first prespecified interim analysis, the study was stopped early on the recommendation of the data and safety monitoring board owing to overwhelming efficacy. RESULTS The median progression-free survival was 5.5 months in the placebo group and was not reached in the idelalisib group (hazard ratio for progression or death in the idelalisib group, 0.15; P<0.001). Patients receiving idelalisib versus those receiving placebo had improved rates of overall response (81% vs. 13%; odds ratio, 29.92; P<0.001) and overall survival at 12 months (92% vs. 80%; hazard ratio for death, 0.28; P = 0.02). Serious adverse events occurred in 40% of the patients receiving idelalisib and rituximab and in 35% of those receiving placebo and rituximab. CONCLUSIONS The combination of idelalisib and rituximab, as compared with placebo and rituximab, significantly improved progression-free survival, response rate, and overall survival among patients with relapsed CLL who were less able to undergo chemo-therapy. (Funded by Gilead; ClinicalTrials.gov number, NCT01539512.) PMID:24450857

  17. Targeted Therapy in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia or Acute Myelogenous Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-07-28

    Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia; Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Recurrent Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Myelodysplasia-Related Changes; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Refractory Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

  18. Pediatric T-cell lymphoblastic leukemia evolves into relapse by clonal selection, acquisition of mutations and promoter hypomethylation.

    PubMed

    Kunz, Joachim B; Rausch, Tobias; Bandapalli, Obul R; Eilers, Juliane; Pechanska, Paulina; Schuessele, Stephanie; Assenov, Yassen; Stütz, Adrian M; Kirschner-Schwabe, Renate; Hof, Jana; Eckert, Cornelia; von Stackelberg, Arend; Schrappe, Martin; Stanulla, Martin; Koehler, Rolf; Avigad, Smadar; Elitzur, Sarah; Handgretinger, Rupert; Benes, Vladimir; Weischenfeldt, Joachim; Korbel, Jan O; Muckenthaler, Martina U; Kulozik, Andreas E

    2015-11-01

    Relapsed precursor T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia is characterized by resistance against chemotherapy and is frequently fatal. We aimed at understanding the molecular mechanisms resulting in relapse of T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia and analyzed 13 patients at first diagnosis, remission and relapse by whole exome sequencing, targeted ultra-deep sequencing, multiplex ligation dependent probe amplification and DNA methylation array. Compared to primary T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia, in relapse the number of single nucleotide variants and small insertions and deletions approximately doubled from 11.5 to 26. Targeted ultra-deep sequencing sensitively detected subclones that were selected for in relapse. The mutational pattern defined two types of relapses. While both are characterized by selection of subclones and acquisition of novel mutations, 'type 1' relapse derives from the primary leukemia whereas 'type 2' relapse originates from a common pre-leukemic ancestor. Relapse-specific changes included activation of the nucleotidase NT5C2 resulting in resistance to chemotherapy and mutations of epigenetic modulators, exemplified by SUZ12, WHSC1 and SMARCA4. While mutations present in primary leukemia and in relapse were enriched for known drivers of leukemia, relapse-specific changes revealed an association with general cancer-promoting mechanisms. This study thus identifies mechanisms that drive progression of pediatric T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia to relapse and may explain the characteristic treatment resistance of this condition. PMID:26294725

  19. Pediatric T-cell lymphoblastic leukemia evolves into relapse by clonal selection, acquisition of mutations and promoter hypomethylation

    PubMed Central

    Kunz, Joachim B.; Rausch, Tobias; Bandapalli, Obul R.; Eilers, Juliane; Pechanska, Paulina; Schuessele, Stephanie; Assenov, Yassen; Stütz, Adrian M.; Kirschner-Schwabe, Renate; Hof, Jana; Eckert, Cornelia; von Stackelberg, Arend; Schrappe, Martin; Stanulla, Martin; Koehler, Rolf; Avigad, Smadar; Elitzur, Sarah; Handgretinger, Rupert; Benes, Vladimir; Weischenfeldt, Joachim; Korbel, Jan O.; Muckenthaler, Martina U.; Kulozik, Andreas E.

    2015-01-01

    Relapsed precursor T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia is characterized by resistance against chemotherapy and is frequently fatal. We aimed at understanding the molecular mechanisms resulting in relapse of T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia and analyzed 13 patients at first diagnosis, remission and relapse by whole exome sequencing, targeted ultra-deep sequencing, multiplex ligation dependent probe amplification and DNA methylation array. Compared to primary T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia, in relapse the number of single nucleotide variants and small insertions and deletions approximately doubled from 11.5 to 26. Targeted ultra-deep sequencing sensitively detected subclones that were selected for in relapse. The mutational pattern defined two types of relapses. While both are characterized by selection of subclones and acquisition of novel mutations, ‘type 1’ relapse derives from the primary leukemia whereas ‘type 2’ relapse originates from a common pre-leukemic ancestor. Relapse-specific changes included activation of the nucleotidase NT5C2 resulting in resistance to chemotherapy and mutations of epigenetic modulators, exemplified by SUZ12, WHSC1 and SMARCA4. While mutations present in primary leukemia and in relapse were enriched for known drivers of leukemia, relapse-specific changes revealed an association with general cancer-promoting mechanisms. This study thus identifies mechanisms that drive progression of pediatric T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia to relapse and may explain the characteristic treatment resistance of this condition. PMID:26294725

  20. Genomic Profiling of Pediatric Acute Myeloid Leukemia Reveals a Changing Mutational Landscape from Disease Diagnosis to Relapse.

    PubMed

    Farrar, Jason E; Schuback, Heather L; Ries, Rhonda E; Wai, Daniel; Hampton, Oliver A; Trevino, Lisa R; Alonzo, Todd A; Guidry Auvil, Jaime M; Davidsen, Tanja M; Gesuwan, Patee; Hermida, Leandro; Muzny, Donna M; Dewal, Ninad; Rustagi, Navin; Lewis, Lora R; Gamis, Alan S; Wheeler, David A; Smith, Malcolm A; Gerhard, Daniela S; Meshinchi, Soheil

    2016-04-15

    The genomic and clinical information used to develop and implement therapeutic approaches for acute myelogenous leukemia (AML) originated primarily from adult patients and has been generalized to patients with pediatric AML. However, age-specific molecular alterations are becoming more evident and may signify the need to age-stratify treatment regimens. The NCI/COG TARGET-AML initiative used whole exome capture sequencing (WXS) to interrogate the genomic landscape of matched trios representing specimens collected upon diagnosis, remission, and relapse from 20 cases of de novo childhood AML. One hundred forty-five somatic variants at diagnosis (median 6 mutations/patient) and 149 variants at relapse (median 6.5 mutations) were identified and verified by orthogonal methodologies. Recurrent somatic variants [in (greater than or equal to) 2 patients] were identified for 10 genes (FLT3, NRAS, PTPN11, WT1, TET2, DHX15, DHX30, KIT, ETV6, KRAS), with variable persistence at relapse. The variant allele fraction (VAF), used to measure the prevalence of somatic mutations, varied widely at diagnosis. Mutations that persisted from diagnosis to relapse had a significantly higher diagnostic VAF compared with those that resolved at relapse (median VAF 0.43 vs. 0.24, P < 0.001). Further analysis revealed that 90% of the diagnostic variants with VAF >0.4 persisted to relapse compared with 28% with VAF <0.2 (P < 0.001). This study demonstrates significant variability in the mutational profile and clonal evolution of pediatric AML from diagnosis to relapse. Furthermore, mutations with high VAF at diagnosis, representing variants shared across a leukemic clonal structure, may constrain the genomic landscape at relapse and help to define key pathways for therapeutic targeting. Cancer Res; 76(8); 2197-205. ©2016 AACR. PMID:26941285

  1. Risk factors for relapse after allogeneic transplantation in acute myeloid leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Ossenkoppele, Gert J.; Janssen, Jeroen J.W.M.; van de Loosdrecht, Arjan A.

    2016-01-01

    Acute myeloid leukemia is a clonal neoplasm derived from myeloid progenitor cells with a varying outcome. The initial goal of treatment is the achievement of complete remission, defined for over 40 years by morphology. However, without additional post-remission treatment the majority of patients relapse. In many cases of acute myeloid leukemia, allogeneic stem cell transplantation offers the best prospects of cure. In 2013, 5608 stem cell transplantations in acute myeloid leukemia were performed in Europe (5228 allogeneic and 380 autologous stem cell transplantations). Most stem cell transplantations are performed in first complete remission. However, despite a considerable reduction in the chance of relapse, in most studies, overall survival benefit of allogeneic stem cell transplantation is modest due to substantial non-relapse mortality. Here we discuss the many factors related to the risk of relapse after allogeneic stem cell transplantation. PMID:26721801

  2. Prognosis of patients with core binding factor acute myeloid leukemia after first relapse

    PubMed Central

    Kurosawa, Saiko; Miyawaki, Shuichi; Yamaguchi, Takuhiro; Kanamori, Heiwa; Sakura, Toru; Moriuchi, Yukiyoshi; Sano, Fumiaki; Kobayashi, Takeshi; Yasumoto, Atsushi; Hatanaka, Kazuo; Yanada, Masamitsu; Nawa, Yuichiro; Takeuchi, Jin; Nakamura, Yukinori; Fujisawa, Shin; Shibayama, Hirohiko; Miura, Ikuo; Fukuda, Takahiro

    2013-01-01

    Core binding factor acute myeloid leukemia is known to have a favorable prognosis, however, there have been no detailed analyses on prognostic factors after first relapse. Using a nationwide database, we retrospectively analyzed core binding factor acute myeloid leukemia patients who relapsed after being treated with chemotherapy alone during their first complete remission. Of a total of 397 patients who were diagnosed with core binding factor acute myeloid leukemia, 208 experienced a first relapse, and analyses were performed in 139 patients for whom additional data were available. In the entire cohort, the overall survival rate after relapse was 48% at 3 years. By multivariate analysis, younger age at diagnosis, a longer interval before relapse, and inv(16) were shown to be independently associated with better survival after relapse. Although there was no significant difference in survival after relapse between patients who underwent allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation and those who did not in the overall series of relapsed patients, we found that transplantation significantly improved survival among patients who had t(8;21) (54% versus 26% at 3 years, P=0.002). In addition, among patients with t(8;21), those who had different cytogenetics at relapse had a significantly improved survival after transplantation, while those who had same cytogenetics did not. We showed that the prognosis differs significantly and optimal treatment strategies may vary between groups of patients with core binding factor acute myeloid leukemia with different cytogenetic profiles at relapse. These findings may help to guide therapeutic decisions after first relapse. PMID:23716553

  3. The contributions of the European Medicines Agency and its pediatric committee to the fight against childhood leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Rose, Klaus; Walson, Philip D

    2015-01-01

    Background Although the diagnosis of childhood leukemia is no longer a death sentence, too many patients still die, more with acute myeloid leukemia than with acute lymphoblastic leukemia. The European Union pediatric legislation was introduced to improve pharmaceutical treatment of children, but some question whether the European Medicines Agency (EMA) approach is helping children with leukemia. Some have even suggested that the decisions of EMA pediatric committee (PDCO) are counterproductive. This study was designed to investigate the impact of PDCO-issued pediatric investigation plans (PIPs) for leukemia drugs. Methods All PIPs listed under “oncology” were downloaded from the EMA website. Non-leukemia decisions including misclassifications, waivers (no PIP), and solid tumors were discarded. The leukemia decisions were analyzed, compared to pediatric leukemia trials in the database http://www.clinicaltrials.gov, and discussed in the light of current literature. Results The PDCO leukemia decisions demand clinical trials in pediatric leukemia for all new adult drugs without prioritization. However, because leukemia in children is different and much rarer than in adults, these decisions have resulted in proposed studies that are scientifically and ethically questionable. They are also unnecessary, since once promising new compounds are approved for adults, more appropriate, prioritized pediatric leukemia trials are initiated worldwide without PDCO involvement. Conclusion EMA/PDCO leukemia PIPs do little to advance the treatment of childhood leukemia. The unintended negative effects of the flawed EMA/PDCO’s standardized requesting of non-prioritized testing of every new adult leukemia drug in children with relapsed or refractory disease expose these children to questionable trials, and could undermine public trust in pediatric clinical research. Institutions, investigators, and ethics committees/institutional review boards need to be skeptical of trials

  4. Improving Access To Novel Agents For Childhood Leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Weili; Gaynon, Paul S.; Sposto, Richard; Wayne, Alan S.

    2015-01-01

    Leukemia is the most common pediatric cancer. Despite great progress in the development of curative therapy, leukemia remains a leading cause of death from disease in childhood and survivors are at life-long risk of complications of treatment. New agents are needed to further increase cure rates and decrease treatment-associated toxicities. The complex biology and aggressive nature of childhood leukemia, coupled with the relatively small patient population available for study, pose specific challenges to the development of new therapies. In this review, we discuss strategies and initiatives designed to improve access to new agents in the treatment of pediatric leukemia. PMID:25678105

  5. Concurrent hypopituitarism and leukemic retinopathy in a child with B-precursor acute lymphoblastic leukemia and isolated central nervous system relapse

    PubMed Central

    Wu, K.H.; Wu, H.P.; Lin, H.J.; Wang, C.H.; Chen, H.Y.; Weng, T.; Peng, C.T.; Chao, Y.H.

    2016-01-01

    Hypopituitarism in leukemia is very rare. In addition, central nervous system (cns) relapse and leukemic retinopathy in childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia (all) have declined with the use of modern systemic chemotherapy that includes cns prophylaxis. Here, we report the case of a 4-year-old girl who received chemotherapy and intrathecal therapy without cns radiation after a diagnosis of B-precursor all without cns involvement. Three months after chemotherapy completion, she presented with lower-extremity weakness and was diagnosed with an isolated cns relapse. Concurrent hypopituitarism and leukemic retinopathy were also found. After receiving craniospinal radiotherapy and systemic chemotherapy, her retinopathy and vision improved. She is now in complete remission, and she is still on chemotherapy according to the guideline from the Pediatric Oncology Group. Although rare, hypopituitarism and leukemic retinopathy should be taken into consideration in patients with cns involvement by leukemia. PMID:27536191

  6. Biological Therapy in Treating Patients With Advanced Myelodysplastic Syndrome, Acute or Chronic Myeloid Leukemia, or Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia Who Are Undergoing Stem Cell Transplantation

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-07-03

    Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); B-cell Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; B-cell Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Childhood Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Childhood Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia; Essential Thrombocythemia; Polycythemia Vera; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Refractory Anemia With Excess Blasts; Refractory Anemia With Excess Blasts in Transformation; Relapsing Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; T-cell Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; T-cell Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

  7. MK2206 in Treating Younger Patients With Recurrent or Refractory Solid Tumors or Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-04-28

    Accelerated Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Acute Leukemias of Ambiguous Lineage; Acute Myeloid Leukemia/Transient Myeloproliferative Disorder; Acute Undifferentiated Leukemia; Aggressive NK-cell Leukemia; Atypical Chronic Myeloid Leukemia, BCR-ABL1 Negative; Blastic Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Blastic Plasmacytoid Dendritic Cell Neoplasm; Childhood Burkitt Lymphoma; Childhood Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Childhood Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Childhood Grade III Lymphomatoid Granulomatosis; Childhood Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Childhood Nasal Type Extranodal NK/T-cell Lymphoma; Chronic Eosinophilic Leukemia; Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia; Chronic Neutrophilic Leukemia; Chronic Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Intraocular Lymphoma; Juvenile Myelomonocytic Leukemia; Mast Cell Leukemia; Myeloid/NK-cell Acute Leukemia; Noncutaneous Extranodal Lymphoma; Post-transplant Lymphoproliferative Disorder; Primary Central Nervous System Hodgkin Lymphoma; Primary Central Nervous System Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Progressive Hairy Cell Leukemia, Initial Treatment; Prolymphocytic Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Childhood Grade III Lymphomatoid Granulomatosis; Recurrent Childhood Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Childhood Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Recurrent Childhood Small Noncleaved Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Recurrent Mycosis Fungoides/Sezary Syndrome; Recurrent Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Recurrent/Refractory Childhood Hodgkin Lymphoma; Refractory Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Refractory Hairy Cell Leukemia; Relapsing Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Small Intestine Lymphoma; Splenic Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Unspecified Childhood

  8. 7-Hydroxystaurosporine and Perifosine in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Acute Leukemia, Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia or High Risk Myelodysplastic Syndromes

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-09-27

    Accelerated Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Adult Acute Megakaryoblastic Leukemia (M7); Adult Acute Minimally Differentiated Myeloid Leukemia (M0); Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Adult Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Adult Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); Adult Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia (M3); Adult Erythroleukemia (M6a); Adult Pure Erythroid Leukemia (M6b); Blastic Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Myelodysplastic/Myeloproliferative Neoplasms; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Relapsing Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; T-cell Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  9. Longitudinal pancreaticojejunostomy in chronic relapsing pancreatitis with onset in childhood.

    PubMed Central

    Scott, H W; Neblett, W W; O'Neill, J A; Sawyers, J L; Avant, G S; Starnes, V A

    1984-01-01

    Despite the rarity of chronic relapsing pancreatitis in children, in the last 15 years at Vanderbilt University Medical Center and its Children's Hospital we have used longitudinal pancreaticojejunostomy in treatment of eight patients whose symptoms began in childhood. Duration of symptoms ranged from 2 to 36 years. Seven of the eight patients had hereditary pancreatitis. Recurrent epigastric pain was characteristic and serum amylase was elevated in all patients on admission or shortly thereafter. Demonstration of an obstructed dilated pancreatic duct in all and stones in seven of eight patients by operative pancreatography in three early patients and by endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP) in five others established the therapeutic problem and facilitated treatment by removal of stones and longitudinal pancreaticojejunostomy. Results were uniformly excellent, both in the early postoperative period and in long-range follow-ups. Early diagnosis and early surgical drainage of the obstructed pancreatic duct by longitudinal pancreaticojejunostomy are desirable objectives in chronic relapsing pancreatitis with onset in childhood. Images Fig. 6. Fig. 7. Fig. 8. PMID:6721610

  10. Molecular relapse in chronic myelogenous leukemia patients after bone marrow transplantation detected by polymerase chain reaction

    SciTech Connect

    Sawyers, C.L.; Timson, L.; Clark, S.S.; Witte, O.N.; Champlin, R. ); Kawasaki, E.S. )

    1990-01-01

    Relapse of chronic myelogenous leukemia after bone marrow transplantation can be detected by using clinical, cytogenetic, or molecular tools. A modification of the polymerase chain reaction can be used in patients to detect low levels of the BCR-ABL-encoded mRNA transcript, a specific marker for chronic myelogenous leukemia. Early detection of relapse after bone marrow transplantation could potentially alter treatment decisions. The authors prospectively evaluated 19 patients for evidence of molecular relapse, cytogenetic relapse, and clinical relapse after bone marrow transplantation. They used the polymerase chain reaction to detect residual BCR-ABL mRNA in patients followed up to 45 months after treatment and found 4 patients with BCR-ABL mRNA expression following bone marrow transplantation. Fifteen patients did not express detectable BCR-ABL mRNA. All 19 patients remain in clinical remission. In this prospective study of chronic myelogenous leukemia patients treated with bone marrow transplantation, molecular relapse preceded cytogenetic relapse in those patients who persistently express BCR-ABL mRNA. They recommend using standard clinical and cytogenetic testing to make patient care decisions until further follow-up determines the clinical outcome of those patients with residual BCR-ABL mRNA transcripts detected by polymerase chain reaction.

  11. Therapeutic Autologous Lymphocytes and Aldesleukin in Treating Patients With High-Risk or Recurrent Myeloid Leukemia After Undergoing Donor Stem Cell Transplant

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2011-07-12

    Accelerated Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Multilineage Dysplasia Following Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Blastic Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Childhood Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Childhood Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Relapsing Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  12. Impact of childhood trauma on risk of relapse requiring psychiatric hospital admission for psychosis.

    PubMed

    Petros, N; Foglia, E; Klamerus, E; Beards, S; Murray, R M; Bhattacharyya, S

    2016-08-01

    Relapse in psychosis typically necessitates admission to hospital placing a significant financial burden on the health service. Exposure to childhood trauma is associated with an increased risk of psychosis, however, the extent to which this influences relapse is unclear. This report summarises current research investigating the influence of childhood trauma on relapse requiring psychiatric hospital admission for psychosis. Seven studies were included; two revealed a positive association between childhood trauma and relapse admission, two studies found a negative relationship and three found no significant difference. Inconsistent current evidence suggests a need for further research in this area. PMID:27151070

  13. [Molecular remission induced by gemtuzumab ozogamicin in an elderly patient with relapsed acute promyelocytic leukemia].

    PubMed

    Yago, Kazuhiro; Aono, Maki; Shimada, Hideto

    2010-04-01

    A 79-year-old female with acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL) presented with second hematological relapse. She had been treated previously with modified AIDA protocol as the front-line therapy and had achieved complete remission. During ATRA maintenance therapy, the first hematological relapse occurred and she was treated with arsenic trioxide (ATO), achieving the second complete remission. After four courses of consolidation therapy of ATO, the second hematological relapse occurred. At this time, except for a transient effect of tamibarotene, neither arsenic trioxide nor combination chemotherapy was effective. The patient was then treated with two courses of gemtuzumab ozogamicin (GO) and achieved the third complete remission. At present, she is maintaining molecular remission more than one year after GO treatment. GO is considered to be a promising agent for elderly patients with relapsed acute promyelocytic leukemia resistant to arsenic trioxide. PMID:20467227

  14. Childhood Leukemia--A Look at the Past, the Present and the Future.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Findeisen, Regina; Barber, William H.

    1997-01-01

    Provides an overview of childhood leukemia. The causes, the survival period, different types (acute lymphocytic leukemia, acute myeloid leukemia, chronic lymphocytic leukemia, chronic myeloid leukemia, and hairy cell leukemia), symptoms, treatment, side effects of treatment (including learning problems), and the expected future direction of…

  15. Sorafenib in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Acute Myeloid Leukemia, Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia, or Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-01-08

    Adult Acute Basophilic Leukemia; Adult Acute Eosinophilic Leukemia; Adult Acute Megakaryoblastic Leukemia (M7); Adult Acute Minimally Differentiated Myeloid Leukemia (M0); Adult Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Adult Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); Adult Erythroleukemia (M6a); Adult Pure Erythroid Leukemia (M6b); Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  16. Evaluation of D-dimer and lactate dehydrogenase plasma levels in patients with relapsed acute leukemia

    PubMed Central

    HU, WANGQIANG; WANG, XIAOXIA; YANG, RONGRONG

    2016-01-01

    Despite the outstanding advances made over the past decade regarding our knowledge of acute leukemia (AL), relapsed AL remains to be associated with a dismal prognosis. A better understanding of AL relapse and monitoring of the D-dimer and lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) plasma levels following chemotherapy may aid clinicians in determining whether relapse may occur in the subsequent phases of the disease. The present study evaluated D-dimer and LDH levels in 204 patients with relapsed AL. Data were collected at the initial onset of AL, at complete remission (CR) and in patients with relapsed AL. D-dimer plasma levels were significantly increased in patients with initial AL and in patients with relapsed AL (P=0.005 and P=0.007, respectively) but not in those with CR. LDH levels were significantly increased in AL patients at the initial onset of disease and at relapse compared with patients achieving CR, irrespective of cell type. Plasma prothrombin time, activated partial thromboplastin time and fibrinogen levels were not significantly different across patients (with the exception of acute promyelocytic leukemia patients) at the initial onset, relapsed AL or CR. Routine hematological parameters (white blood cell count, hemoglobin, platelet count) were significantly different at the initial onset of AL (P=0.002, P<0.001 and P=0.001, respectively) and during relapsed AL (P=0.009, P=0.003 and P<0.001, respectively) compared with patients achieving CR, suggesting an association between D-dimer, LDH and relapsed AL. These results also indicate that determination of D-dimer and LDH levels may be useful for predicting the probability of relapse during chemotherapy, but should also be combined with routine hematological parameters. PMID:27347185

  17. Laboratory-Treated T Cells in Treating Patients With High-Risk Relapsed Acute Myeloid Leukemia, Myelodysplastic Syndrome, or Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia Previously Treated With Donor Stem Cell Transplant

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-08-08

    Acute Myeloid Leukemia Arising From Previous Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Adult Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Childhood Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Recurrent Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia, BCR-ABL1 Positive; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Therapy-Related Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  18. Trends in Childhood Leukemia in Basrah, Iraq, 1993–2007

    PubMed Central

    Lafta, Riyadh; Hassan, Jenan; Davis, Scott; Mirick, Dana; Takaro, Tim

    2010-01-01

    Objectives. Through a sister-university relationship between the University of Basrah and the University of Washington, we analyzed Ibn Ghazwan Hospital's leukemia registry data to evaluate trends in childhood leukemia since 1993. Methods. We documented leukemia cases among children aged 0 to 14 years for each of the last 15 years. Population data were obtained from a 1997 census and various subsequent estimates to calculate rates. Results. We observed 698 cases of childhood leukemia between 1993 and 2007, ranging between 15 cases (2.6 per 100 000 annual rate) in the first year and 56 cases (6.9 per 100 000 annual rate) in the final year, reaching a peak of 97 cases in 2006 (12.2 per 100 000 annual rate). Conclusions. Childhood leukemia rates in Basrah more than doubled over a 15-year period. The test for trend was significant (P = .03). Basrah's childhood leukemia rate compared unfavorably with neighboring Kuwait and nearby Oman, as well as the United States, the European Union, and other countries. PMID:20167894

  19. Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia and Indicators of Early Immune Stimulation: A Childhood Leukemia International Consortium Study

    PubMed Central

    Rudant, Jérémie; Lightfoot, Tracy; Urayama, Kevin Y.; Petridou, Eleni; Dockerty, John D.; Magnani, Corrado; Milne, Elizabeth; Spector, Logan G.; Ashton, Lesley J.; Dessypris, Nikolaos; Kang, Alice Y.; Miller, Margaret; Rondelli, Roberto; Simpson, Jill; Stiakaki, Eftichia; Orsi, Laurent; Roman, Eve; Metayer, Catherine; Infante-Rivard, Claire; Clavel, Jacqueline

    2015-01-01

    The associations between childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) and several proxies of early stimulation of the immune system, that is, day-care center attendance, birth order, maternally reported common infections in infancy, and breastfeeding, were investigated by using data from 11 case-control studies participating in the Childhood Leukemia International Consortium (enrollment period: 1980–2010). The sample included 7,399 ALL cases and 11,181 controls aged 2–14 years. The data were collected by questionnaires administered to the parents. Pooled odds ratios and 95% confidence intervals were estimated by unconditional logistic regression adjusted for age, sex, study, maternal education, and maternal age. Day-care center attendance in the first year of life was associated with a reduced risk of ALL (odds ratio = 0.77, 95% confidence interval: 0.71, 0.84), with a marked inverse trend with earlier age at start (P < 0.0001). An inverse association was also observed with breastfeeding duration of 6 months or more (odds ratio = 0.86, 95% confidence interval: 0.79, 0.94). No significant relationship with a history of common infections in infancy was observed even though the odds ratio was less than 1 for more than 3 infections. The findings of this large pooled analysis reinforce the hypothesis that day-care center attendance in infancy and prolonged breastfeeding are associated with a decreased risk of ALL. PMID:25731888

  20. Risk for childhood leukemia associated with maternal and paternal age.

    PubMed

    Sergentanis, Theodoros N; Thomopoulos, Thomas P; Gialamas, Spyros P; Karalexi, Maria A; Biniaris-Georgallis, Stylianos-Iason; Kontogeorgi, Evangelia; Papathoma, Paraskevi; Tsilimidos, Gerasimos; Skalkidou, Alkistis; Iliadou, Anastasia N; Petridou, Eleni T

    2015-12-01

    The role of reproductive factors, such as parental age, in the pathogenesis of childhood leukemias is being intensively examined; the results of individual studies are controversial. This meta-analysis aims to quantitatively synthesize the published data on the association between parental age and risk of two major distinct childhood leukemia types in the offspring. Eligible studies were identified and pooled relative risk (RR) estimates were calculated using random-effects models, separately for childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) and acute myeloid leukemia (AML). Subgroup analyses were performed by study design, geographical region, adjustment factors; sensitivity analyses and meta-regression analyses were also undertaken. 77 studies (69 case-control and eight cohort) were deemed eligible. Older maternal and paternal age were associated with increased risk for childhood ALL (pooled RR = 1.05, 95 % CI 1.01-1.10; pooled RR = 1.04, 95 % CI 1.00-1.08, per 5 year increments, respectively). The association between maternal age and risk of childhood AML showed a U-shaped pattern, with symmetrically associated increased risk in the oldest (pooled RR = 1.23, 95 % CI 1.06-1.43) and the youngest (pooled RR = 1.23, 95 % CI 1.07-1.40) extremes. Lastly, only younger fathers were at increased risk of having a child with AML (pooled RR = 1.28, 95 % CI 1.04-1.59). In conclusion, maternal and paternal age represents a meaningful risk factor for childhood leukemia, albeit of different effect size by leukemia subtype. Genetic and socio-economic factors may underlie the observed associations. Well-adjusted studies, scheduled by large consortia, are anticipated to satisfactorily address methodological issues, whereas the potential underlying genetic mechanisms should be elucidated by basic research studies. PMID:26537708

  1. Socioeconomic Status and Childhood Leukemia Incidence in Switzerland

    PubMed Central

    Adam, Martin; Kuehni, Claudia E.; Spoerri, Adrian; Schmidlin, Kurt; Gumy-Pause, Fabienne; Brazzola, Pierluigi; Probst-Hensch, Nicole; Zwahlen, Marcel

    2015-01-01

    Socioeconomic status (SES) discrepancies exist for child and adult cancer morbidity and are a major public health concern. In this Swiss population-based matched case–control study on the etiology of childhood leukemia, we selected the cases from the Swiss Childhood Cancer Registry diagnosed since 1991 and the controls randomly from census. We assigned eight controls per case from the 1990 and 2000 census and matched them by the year of birth and gender. SES information for both cases and controls was obtained from census records by probabilistic record linkage. We investigated the association of SES with childhood leukemia in Switzerland, and explored whether it varied with different definitions of socioeconomic status (parental education, living condition, area-based SES), time period, and age. In conditional logistic regression analyses of 565 leukemia cases and 4433 controls, we found no consistent evidence for an association between SES and childhood leukemia. The odds ratio comparing the highest with the lowest SES category ranged from 0.95 (95% CI: 0.71–1.26; Ptrend = 0.73) for paternal education to 1.37 (1.00–1.89; Ptrend = 0.064) for maternal education. No effect modification was found for time period and age at diagnosis. Based on this population-based study, which avoided participation and reporting bias, we assume the potential association of socioeconomic status and childhood leukemia if existing to be small. This study did not find evidence that socioeconomic status, of Switzerland or comparable countries, is a relevant risk factor or strong confounder in etiological investigations on childhood leukemia. PMID:26175964

  2. Gamma-Secretase Inhibitor RO4929097 in Treating Young Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Solid Tumors, CNS Tumors, Lymphoma, or T-Cell Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-11-04

    Childhood Atypical Teratoid/Rhabdoid Tumor; Childhood Central Nervous System Choriocarcinoma; Childhood Central Nervous System Germinoma; Childhood Central Nervous System Mixed Germ Cell Tumor; Childhood Central Nervous System Teratoma; Childhood Central Nervous System Yolk Sac Tumor; Childhood Choroid Plexus Tumor; Childhood Craniopharyngioma; Childhood Ependymoblastoma; Childhood Grade I Meningioma; Childhood Grade II Meningioma; Childhood Grade III Meningioma; Childhood Infratentorial Ependymoma; Childhood Medulloepithelioma; Childhood Mixed Glioma; Childhood Oligodendroglioma; Childhood Supratentorial Ependymoma; Gonadotroph Adenoma; Pituitary Basophilic Adenoma; Pituitary Chromophobe Adenoma; Pituitary Eosinophilic Adenoma; Prolactin Secreting Adenoma; Recurrent Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Childhood Brain Stem Glioma; Recurrent Childhood Central Nervous System Embryonal Tumor; Recurrent Childhood Cerebellar Astrocytoma; Recurrent Childhood Cerebral Astrocytoma; Recurrent Childhood Ependymoma; Recurrent Childhood Grade III Lymphomatoid Granulomatosis; Recurrent Childhood Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Childhood Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Recurrent Childhood Medulloblastoma; Recurrent Childhood Pineoblastoma; Recurrent Childhood Small Noncleaved Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Childhood Spinal Cord Neoplasm; Recurrent Childhood Subependymal Giant Cell Astrocytoma; Recurrent Childhood Supratentorial Primitive Neuroectodermal Tumor; Recurrent Childhood Visual Pathway and Hypothalamic Glioma; Recurrent Childhood Visual Pathway Glioma; Recurrent Pituitary Tumor; Recurrent/Refractory Childhood Hodgkin Lymphoma; T-cell Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; T-cell Large Granular Lymphocyte Leukemia; TSH Secreting Adenoma; Unspecified Childhood Solid Tumor, Protocol Specific

  3. Microbiome interaction with sugar plays an important role in relapse of childhood caries.

    PubMed

    Tian, Jing; Qin, Man; Ma, Wenli; Xia, Bin; Xu, He; Zhang, Qian; Chen, Feng

    Childhood caries have a high relapse rate after full mouth therapy. This study aimed to elucidate the relationship between the microbiome, sugar, and the relapse of childhood caries after therapy. A total of 24 children aged 2-4 years who underwent one caries treatment session participated in this study. Supragingival plaque was collected before therapy and 1 and 7 months after therapy, then sequenced using the 16S rRNA high-throughput approach. We found 11 phyla, 140 genera, and 444 species in 72 samples. The children were divided into relapse-free (n = 13) and relapse (n = 11) groups according to whether they relapsed 7 months after therapy. The bacterial community richness, diversity, structure, and relative abundance of bacterial taxa were significantly different between the two groups 7 months after therapy. The two groups also differed in the relative abundance of bacterial taxa, both before and 1 month after therapy. Bacterial community richness and diversity were lower in the relapse-free group 1 month after therapy. Using different operational taxonomic units between the relapse-free and relapse groups 1 month after therapy, a relapse-risk assessment model was built with 75% accuracy, 0.1905 out-of-bag error, and 66.67% validation accuracy. Patients in the relapse group had higher sugar intake frequencies than those in the relapse-free group during follow-up. Interactions between the microbiome and sugar intake frequency were found through co-occurrence networks. We conclude that the microbiome is significantly different between the relapse-free and relapse groups at the time of relapse. Supragingival plaque collected immediately after therapy can be used to predict the risk of relapse. Furthermore, the correlation between sugar intake frequency and microbiome is associated with the relapse. PMID:26505801

  4. Molecular epidemiology of childhood leukemia with emphasis on chemical exposures

    SciTech Connect

    Buffler, P.A.; Smith, M.T.; Wood, S.; Reynolds, P.

    1996-12-31

    Developing markets in the Pacific Basin depend heavily on the production and export of consumer goods. The generation of hazardous waste as a by-product of industrial production can be linked to adverse health outcomes, such as childhood leukemia, in ways that are presently unknown. In California, exposures resulting from hazardous waste disposal are of concern in the etiology of childhood cancer. Approximately 63% of the 57 hazardous waste sites that the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA) included in the national priority list under the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation and Liability Act (CERCLA) statute were in the six-county San Francisco Bay area. This area includes California`s Silicon Valley, where a disproportionate majority of these sites are located. Although only one study links hazardous waste disposal to childhood leukemia evidence is accumulating that in utero and maternal pesticide exposures as well as chemical exposures during childhood are important in the etiology of childhood leukemia. This study investigates whether children with leukemia have common genetic changes, whether children with genetic changes experience common chemical exposures, and whether the occurrences of these genetic changes correspond to the same temporal sequence as exposure. The purpose of this paper is to describe the study design and report on the status of research activity. 10 refs., 1 fig., 3 tabs.

  5. Leukemia after therapy with alkylating agents for childhood cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Tucker, M.A.; Meadows, A.T.; Boice, J.D. Jr.; Stovall, M.; Oberlin, O.; Stone, B.J.; Birch, J.; Voute, P.A.; Hoover, R.N.; Fraumeni, J.F. Jr.

    1987-03-01

    The risk of leukemia was evaluated in 9,170 2-or-more-year survivors of childhood cancer in the 13 institutions of the Late Effects Study Group. Secondary leukemia occurred in 22 nonreferred individuals compared to 1.52 expected, based on general population rates (relative risk (RR) = 14; 95% confidence interval (CI), 9-22). The influence of therapy for the first cancer on subsequent leukemia risk was determined by a case-control study conducted on 25 cases and 90 matched controls. Treatment with alkylating agents was associated with a significantly elevated risk of leukemia (RR = 4.8; 95% CI, 1.2-18.9). A strong dose-response relationship was also observed between leukemia risk and total dose of alkylating agents, estimated by an alkylator score. The RR of leukemia reached 23 in the highest dose category. Radiation therapy, however, did not increase risk. Although doxorubicin was also identified as a possible risk factor, the excess risk of leukemia following treatment for childhood cancer appears almost entirely due to alkylating agents.

  6. Breastfeeding, Other Early Life Exposures and Childhood Leukemia and Lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Amitay, Efrat Lev; Dubnov Raz, Gal; Keinan-Boker, Lital

    2016-01-01

    Childhood cancer incidence increases and although rare, it is a leading cause of mortality. Leukemia and lymphoma comprise 40% of all cancers in children but little is known of their etiology. In this study, we examined the associations of breastfeeding and other early life exposures with childhood leukemia and lymphoma. A population-based case-control study carried out in 2011-2013 comprised mothers of 190 incidents (2005-2013) of leukemia/lymphoma cases aged 1-19 yr at diagnosis and 384 population-based controls. Interviews based on a computerized structured questionnaire were conducted with the mothers. Multivariate logistic regression models adjusted for potential confounders assessed the association between breastfeeding patterns and childhood leukemia/lymphoma. Ever breastfeeding category was associated with a 64% decreased risk for childhood leukemia/lymphoma lsqb;odds ratio (OR) = 0.36, 95% confidence interval (CI): 0.22, 0.60lrqb; and similar trends, with a dose-response effect, were observed for any breastfeeding (exclusive and/or partial) category for 6, 12, and 18+ mo. Other infant exposures associated with cancer risk were child iron supplementation (OR = 0.39, 95% CI: 0.26, 0.59), pet ownership (OR = 0.50, 95% CI: 0.33, 0.78), paternal smoking (OR = 1.93, 95% CI: 1.18, 3.15), and having older siblings (OR = 1.18, 95% CI: 1.05, 1.33). Breastfeeding-a controllable and modifiable exposure-is inversely associated with risk for childhood leukemia and lymphoma with a dose-response effect. PMID:27352124

  7. Bone mineral density in survivors of childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Athanassiadou, Fani; Tragiannidis, Athanassios; Rousso, Israel; Katsos, Georgios; Sidi, Vassiliki; Papageorgiou, Theodotis; Papastergiou, Christos; Tsituridis, Ioannis; Koliouskas, Dimitrios

    2006-01-01

    The aim of our study was to evaluate bone metabolism with measurement of bone mineral density (BMD) after management (chemo-, radiotherapy) for childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL). Bone mineral density (g/cm2) of lumbar spine was measured by dual energy X-ray absorptiometry (Norland bone densitometer) in 18 children with ALL and a median of 34 months' post-diagnosis with no history of relapse, secondary malignancy, or transplantation. In addition, patients' BMDs were correlated with particular attention to age, sex and time (years) from completion of chemotherapy. The results were compared with healthy age- and sex-matched controls of the same population and expressed as standard deviation scores (SDS). Mean age of children was 9.8 +/- 3.7 years. Of 18 children (10 boys and 8 girls), 13 were grouped as standard and 5 as high-risk, respectively. Based on z-score values, 9 were classified as normal (z-score <1 SD), 7 as osteopenic (z-score 1-2.5 SD) and 2 as osteoporotic (z-score >2.5 SD). Children with ALL had reduced lumbar BMDs (z score -0.99) in comparison to healthy controls (z score -0.14) (p=0.011), which is indicative of relative osteopenia. Moreover, the reduced BMD was associated with patient age (z score -0.14 and -1.52 for ages <10 and >10 years, respectively, p=0.016). Reduced BMD was not correlated with time from completion of chemotherapy (p=0.33), risk group (p=0.9) and sex (p=0.3). We conclude that children's BMDs are reduced after completion of chemotherapy for ALL. The causes are multifactorial and mainly related to antineoplastic treatments, such as corticosteroids and methotrexate, physical inactivity and cranial irradiation. We suggest that further studies are needed to evaluate the long-term effect on BMD in these children and to prevent pathological fractures later in life. PMID:16848106

  8. Strategies to Reduce Relapse after Allogeneic Hematopoietic Cell Transplantation in Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Mawad, Raya; Lionberger, Jack M.; Pagel, John M.

    2013-01-01

    The incidence of acute myeloid leukemia (AML) is expected to increase in conjunction with our ageing population. Although it is proving to be a heterogeneous disease process, the only treatment with proven survival benefit for poor risk AML remains allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplant. Although this is presumed to be a curative strategy, many patients relapse after transplant, prompting us to examine various ways that we can improve outcomes. These efforts involve every step of AML diagnostics and therapy, including the intricate processes of conditioning, graft manipulation and immunomodulation. The hope is that improvement in these steps will ultimately improve survival and decrease relapse rates for AML patients after transplant. PMID:23456518

  9. Hematologic Response to Vorinostat Treatment in Relapsed Myeloid Leukemia of Down Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Scheer, Carina; Kratz, Christian; Witt, Olaf; Creutzig, Ursula; Reinhardt, Dirk; Klusmann, Jan-Henning

    2016-09-01

    Children with Down syndrome are at high risk to develop myeloid leukemia (ML-DS). Despite their excellent prognosis, children with ML-DS particularly suffer from severe therapy-related toxicities and for relapsed ML-DS the cure rates are very poor. Here we report the clinical course of one child with ML-DS treated with the histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitor vorinostat (suberoylanilide hydroxamic acid) after second relapse. The child had previously received conventional chemotherapy and stem cell transplantation, yet showed a remarkable clinical and hematologic response. Thus, HDAC inhibitor may represent an effective class of drugs for the treatment of ML-DS. PMID:27191354

  10. Childhood leukemia and residential proximity to industrial and urban sites

    SciTech Connect

    García-Pérez, Javier; López-Abente, Gonzalo; Gómez-Barroso, Diana; Morales-Piga, Antonio; Pardo Romaguera, Elena; Tamayo, Ibon; Fernández-Navarro, Pablo; and others

    2015-07-15

    Background: Few risk factors for the childhood leukemia are well established. While a small fraction of cases of childhood leukemia might be partially attributable to some diseases or ionizing radiation exposure, the role of industrial and urban pollution also needs to be assessed. Objectives: To ascertain the possible effect of residential proximity to both industrial and urban areas on childhood leukemia, taking into account industrial groups and toxic substances released. Methods: We conducted a population-based case–control study of childhood leukemia in Spain, covering 638 incident cases gathered from the Spanish Registry of Childhood Tumors and for those Autonomous Regions with 100% coverage (period 1990-2011), and 13,188 controls, individually matched by year of birth, sex, and autonomous region of residence. Distances were computed from the respective subject’s residences to the 1068 industries and the 157 urban areas with ≥10,000 inhabitants, located in the study area. Using logistic regression, odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (95%CIs) for categories of distance to industrial and urban pollution sources were calculated, with adjustment for matching variables. Results: Excess risk of childhood leukemia was observed for children living near (≤2.5 km) industries (OR=1.31; 95%CI=1.03–1.67) – particularly glass and mineral fibers (OR=2.42; 95%CI=1.49–3.92), surface treatment using organic solvents (OR=1.87; 95%CI=1.24–2.83), galvanization (OR=1.86; 95%CI=1.07–3.21), production and processing of metals (OR=1.69; 95%CI=1.22–2.34), and surface treatment of metals (OR=1.62; 95%CI=1.22–2.15) – , and urban areas (OR=1.36; 95%CI=1.02–1.80). Conclusions: Our study furnishes some evidence that living in the proximity of industrial and urban sites may be a risk factor for childhood leukemia. - Highlights: • We studied proximity to both industrial and urban sites on childhood leukemia. • We conducted a case–control study in

  11. The association of glutathione S-transferase gene mutations (including GSTT1 and GSTM1) with the prognostic factors and relapse in acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Zareifar, Soheila; Monabati, Ahmad; Saeed, Amir; Fakhraee, Farzaneh; Cohan, Nader

    2013-09-01

    Acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) is the most common malignancy in children. It accounts for one fourth of all childhood cancers and approximately 75% of all childhood leukemias. Some prognostic factors determine the outcome of therapy [e.g. age, sex, initial white blood cell count (WBC), etc.]; however, it is believed that other mechanisms such as glutathione S-transferase (GST) gene mutation, the expression of lung resistance protein (LRP), and multidrug resistance-associated protein (MRP) also plays a role in treatment failure. In this study, GST gene mutations including GSTM1 and GSTT1 were evaluated in patients with leukemia. Thirty newly diagnosed ALL patients younger than 15 years of age participated in the present study. Bone marrow aspiration and biopsy were evaluated for immune phenotyping and DNA was extracted for GST genotyping. All data plus sex, age, initial WBC count, central nervous system (CNS) or testicular involvement, immune phenotype, and outcome (relapse or not) were analyzed statistically. Genotyping showed that 46% were double null, 50% were M1 null and 93.3% were T1 null for GST mutations. There was no statistically significant relationship between GSTT1 and GSTM1 mutations, or between double null status, prognostic factors and relapse (P > .05). So, although the results of GST mutations were consistent, it seems that these mutations are not statistically significant. PMID:23444902

  12. Negative feedback-defective PRPS1 mutants drive thiopurine resistance in relapsed childhood ALL

    PubMed Central

    Li, Benshang; Li, Hui; Bai, Yun; Kirschner-Schwabe, Renate; Yang, Jun J; Chen, Yao; Lu, Gang; Tzoneva, Gannie; Ma, Xiaotu; Wu, Tongmin; Li, Wenjing; Lu, Haisong; Ding, Lixia; Liang, Huanhuan; Huang, Xiaohang; Yang, Minjun; Jin, Lei; Kang, Hui; Chen, Shuting; Du, Alicia; Shen, Shuhong; Ding, Jianping; Chen, Hongzhuan; Chen, Jing; von Stackelberg, Arend; Gu, Longjun; Zhang, Jinghui; Ferrando, Adolfo; Tang, Jingyan; Wang, Shengyue; Zhou, Bin-Bing S.

    2015-01-01

    Relapse is the leading cause of mortality in children with acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL). Among chemotherapeutics, thiopurines are key drugs in the backbone of ALL combination therapy. Using whole-exome sequencing, we identified relapse-specific mutations in phosphoribosyl pyrophosphate synthetase 1 (PRPS1), a rate-limiting purine biosynthesis enzyme, in 24/358 (6.7%) relapse B-ALL cases. All individuals who harbored PRPS1 mutations relapsed early on-treatment, and mutated ALL clones expanded exponentially prior to clinical relapse. Our functional analyses of PRPS1 mutants uncovered a new chemotherapy resistance mechanism involving reduced feedback inhibition of de novo purine biosynthesis and competitive inhibition of thiopurine activation. Notably, the de novo purine synthesis inhibitor lometrexol can effectively abrogate PRPS1 mutant-driven drug resistance. Overall these results highlight the importance of constitutive activation of de novo purine pathway in thiopurine resistance, and offer therapeutic strategies for the treatment of relapsed and resistant ALL. PMID:25962120

  13. Use of arsenic trioxide in a hemodialysis-dependent patient with relapsed acute promyelocytic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Perreault, Sarah; Moeller, Julie; Patel, Kejal; Eyler, Rachel; Pham, Trinh; Russell, Kerry; Podoltsev, Nikolai

    2016-08-01

    Arsenic trioxide has been established for use in both relapsed and front-line treatment of acute promyelocytic leukemia. Dose adjustments are recommended to be considered in severe renal impairment although dosage reduction guidelines are not provided. In addition, toxicities of arsenic are significant. The use of arsenic trioxide has not been well studied in dialysis patients and there is a paucity of data in the literature to support the use in such a situation. We describe an 81-year-old relapsed acute promyelocytic leukemia hemodialysis-dependent patient with a pre-existing cardiac condition who was treated with 10 mg arsenic trioxide three times weekly after dialysis. These findings provide support along with the marginal amount of currently published data for an arsenic trioxide dosing regimen in hemodialysis patients. PMID:25972392

  14. Hematopoietic Stem-Cell Transplantation for Acute Leukemia in Relapse or Primary Induction Failure

    PubMed Central

    Duval, Michel; Klein, John P.; He, Wensheng; Cahn, Jean-Yves; Cairo, Mitchell; Camitta, Bruce M.; Kamble, Rammurti; Copelan, Edward; de Lima, Marcos; Gupta, Vikas; Keating, Armand; Lazarus, Hillard M.; Litzow, Mark R.; Marks, David I.; Maziarz, Richard T.; Rizzieri, David A.; Schiller, Gary; Schultz, Kirk R.; Tallman, Martin S.; Weisdorf, Daniel

    2010-01-01

    Purpose Patients with acute leukemia refractory to induction or reinduction chemotherapy have poor prognoses if they do not undergo hematopoietic stem-cell transplantation (HSCT). However, HSCT when a patient is not in complete remission (CR) is of uncertain benefit. We hypothesized that pretransplantation variables may define subgroups that have a better prognosis. Patients and Methods Overall, 2,255 patients who underwent transplantation for acute leukemia in relapse or with primary induction failure after myeloablative conditioning regimen between 1995 and 2004 were reported to the Center for International Blood and Marrow Transplant Research. The median follow-up of survivors was 61 months. We performed multivariate analysis of pretransplantation variables and developed a predictive scoring system for survival. Results The 3-year overall survival (OS) rates were 19% for acute myeloid leukemia (AML) and 16% for acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL). For AML, five adverse pretransplantation variables significantly influenced survival: first CR duration less than 6 months, circulating blasts, donor other than HLA-identical sibling, Karnofsky or Lansky score less than 90, and poor-risk cytogenetics. For ALL, survival was worse with the following: first refractory or second or greater relapse, ≥ 25% marrow blasts, cytomegalovirus-seropositive donor, and age of 10 years or older. Patients with AML who had a predictive score of 0 had 42% OS at 3 years, whereas OS was 6% for a score ≥ 3. Patients with ALL who had a score of 0 or 1 had 46% 3-year OS but only 10% OS rate for a score ≥ 3. Conclusion Pretransplantation variables delineate subgroups with different outcomes. HSCT during relapse can achieve long-term survival in selected patients with acute leukemia. PMID:20625136

  15. Mechanisms of clonal evolution in childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Park, Eugene; Papaemmanuil, Elli; Ford, Anthony; Kweon, Soo-Mi; Trageser, Daniel; Hasselfeld, Brian; Henke, Nadine; Mooster, Jana; Geng, Huimin; Schwarz, Klaus; Kogan, Scott C.; Casellas, Rafael; Schatz, David G.; Lieber, Michael R; Greaves, Mel F.; Müschen, Markus

    2015-01-01

    Childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia can often be retraced to a pre-leukemic clone carrying a prenatal genetic lesion. Postnatally acquired mutations then drive clonal evolution towards overt leukemia. RAG1-RAG2 and AID enzymes, the diversifiers of immunoglobulin genes, are strictly segregated to early and late stages of B-lymphopoiesis, respectively. Here, we identified small pre-BII cells as a natural subset of increased genetic vulnerability owing to concurrent activation of these enzymes. Consistent with epidemiological findings on childhood ALL etiology, susceptibility to genetic lesions during B-lymphopoiesis at the large to small pre-BII transition is exacerbated by abnormal cytokine signaling and repetitive inflammatory stimuli. We demonstrate that AID and RAG1-RAG2 drive leukemic clonal evolution with repeated exposure to inflammatory stimuli, paralleling chronic infections in childhood. PMID:25985233

  16. Allogeneic hemopoietic stem cell transplants for patients with relapsed acute leukemia: long-term outcome.

    PubMed

    Bacigalupo, A; Lamparelli, T; Gualandi, F; Occhini, D; Bregante, S; Raiola, A M; Ibatici, A; di Grazia, C; Dominietto, A; Piaggio, G; Podesta, M; Bruno, B; Lombardi, A; Frassoni, F; Viscoli, C; Sacchi, N; Van Lint, M T

    2007-03-01

    We assessed the long-term outcome of patients with relapsed acute myeloid (n=86) or acute lymphoid leukemia (n=66), undergoing an allogeneic hemopoietic stem cell transplantation in our unit. The median blast count in the marrow was 30%. Conditioning regimen included total body irradiation (TBI) (10-12 Gy) in 115 patients. The donor was a matched donor (n=132) or a family mismatched donor (n=20). Twenty-two patients (15%) survive disease free, with a median follow-up of 14 years: 18 are off medications. The cumulative incidence of transplant related mortality is 40% and the cumulative incidence of relapse related death (RRD) is 45%. In multivariate analysis of survival, favorable predictors were chronic graft-versus-host disease (GvHD) (P=0.0003), donor other than family mismatched (P=0.02), donor age less than 34 years (P=0.02) and blast count less than 30% (P=0.07). Patients with all four favorable predictors had a 54% survival. In multivariate analysis of relapse, protective variables were the use of TBI (P=0.005) and cGvHD (P=0.01). This study confirms that a fraction of relapsed leukemias is cured with an allogeneic transplant: selection of patients with a blast count <30%, identification of young, human leukocyte antigen-matched donors and the use of total body radiation may significantly improve the outcome. PMID:17277788

  17. Chronic myeloid leukemia relapsing ten years after allogenic bone marrow transplantation.

    PubMed

    Hino, Yutaro; Doki, Noriko; Yamamoto, Keita; Senoo, Yasushi; Sasajima, Satoshi; Sakaguchi, Masahiro; Hattori, Keiichiro; Kaito, Satoshi; Kurosawa, Shuhei; Harada, Kaito; Ikegawa, Shuntaro; Watanabe, Daisuke; Hagino, Takeshi; Yoshioka, Kosuke; Watakabe, Kyoko; Igarashi, Aiko; Najima, Yuho; Kobayashi, Takeshi; Kakihana, Kazuhiko; Sakamaki, Hisashi; Ohashi, Kazuteru

    2016-05-01

    A 58-year-old female was diagnosed with Philadelphia chromosome positive chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) in blast crisis (BC) in 2004. The patient received imatinib, which quickly induced molecular remission, and subsequently underwent bone marrow transplantation (BMT) from an unrelated human leukocyte antigen (HLA)-identical donor. The post-transplant clinical course was essentially uneventful. In 2014, ten years after the BMT, the patient was admitted to our hospital complaining of lymphadenopathy, and blasts were observed in peripheral blood. The patient was diagnosed as having a CML relapse in myeloid BC, with leukemic infiltration in lymph nodes, and was treated with dasatinib. Subsequently, pleural effusion developed and nilotinib was administered, which induced normal blood counts without blasts and partial cytogenetic remission, one month after administration. Six months after the relapse, this patient underwent a second BMT from an HLA-matched unrelated donor. Recent studies have demonstrated the cumulative incidence of CML relapse more than five years after allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (allo-HSCT) to be higher than in acute myeloid leukemia. Although rare, the possibility of late relapse should be considered in patients diagnosed with CML after allo-HSCT. PMID:27263786

  18. Childhood leukemia: electric and magnetic fields as possible risk factors.

    PubMed Central

    Brain, Joseph D; Kavet, Robert; McCormick, David L; Poole, Charles; Silverman, Lewis B; Smith, Thomas J; Valberg, Peter A; Van Etten, R A; Weaver, James C

    2003-01-01

    Numerous epidemiologic studies have reported associations between measures of power-line electric or magnetic fields (EMFs) and childhood leukemia. The basis for such associations remains unexplained. In children, acute lymphoblastic leukemia represents approximately three-quarters of all U.S. leukemia types. Some risk factors for childhood leukemia have been established, and others are suspected. Pathogenesis, as investigated in animal models, is consistent with the multistep model of acute leukemia development. Studies of carcinogenicity in animals, however, are overwhelmingly negative and do not support the hypothesis that EMF exposure is a significant risk factor for hematopoietic neoplasia. We may fail to observe effects from EMFs because, from a mechanistic perspective, the effects of EMFs on biology are very weak. Cells and organs function despite many sources of chemical "noise" (e.g., stochastic, temperature, concentration, mechanical, and electrical noise), which exceed the induced EMF "signal" by a large factor. However, the inability to detect EMF effects in bioassay systems may be caused by the choice made for "EMF exposure." "Contact currents" or "contact voltages" have been proposed as a novel exposure metric, because their magnitude is related to measured power-line magnetic fields. A contact current occurs when a person touches two conductive surfaces at different voltages. Modeled analyses support contact currents as a plausible metric because of correlations with residential magnetic fields and opportunity for exposure. The possible role of contact currents as an explanatory variable in the reported associations between EMFs and childhood leukemia will need to be clarified by further measurements, biophysical analyses, bioassay studies, and epidemiology. PMID:12782499

  19. Childhood leukemia and fallout from the Nevada nuclear tests

    SciTech Connect

    Land, C.E.; McKay, F.W.; Machado, S.G.

    1984-01-13

    Cancer mortality data from the National Center for Health Statistics, covering the period 1950 through 1978, were used to test a reported association between childhood leukemia and exposure to radioactive fallout from nuclear weapons tests in Nevada between 1951 and 1958. No pattern of temporal and geographic variation in risk supportive of the reported association was found. Comparison of these results with those presented in support of an association of risk with fallout suggests that the purported association merely reflects an anomalously low leukemia rate in southern Utah during the period 1944 to 1949. 14 references, 4 figures, 7 tables.

  20. Vorinostat, Cytarabine, and Etoposide in Treating Patients With Relapsed and/or Refractory Acute Leukemia or Myelodysplastic Syndromes or Myeloproliferative Disorders

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-05-01

    Accelerated Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Adult Acute Basophilic Leukemia; Adult Acute Eosinophilic Leukemia; Adult Acute Megakaryoblastic Leukemia (M7); Adult Acute Minimally Differentiated Myeloid Leukemia (M0); Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Adult Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Adult Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); Adult Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia (M3); Adult Erythroleukemia (M6a); Adult Pure Erythroid Leukemia (M6b); Atypical Chronic Myeloid Leukemia, BCR-ABL1 Negative; Blastic Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Chronic Eosinophilic Leukemia; Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia; Chronic Neutrophilic Leukemia; de Novo Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Essential Thrombocythemia; Myelodysplastic/Myeloproliferative Neoplasm, Unclassifiable; Polycythemia Vera; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Primary Myelofibrosis; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Relapsing Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Myelodysplastic Syndromes

  1. [Ocular findings in leukemia in childhood].

    PubMed

    Rochels, R; Heiland, I

    1987-11-01

    Primary and therapy-induced ocular manifestations of leukemia in 25 of 103 children suffering from the disease (60 patients with ALL, eight with AML, two with CML, 33 with NHL) were kept under observation for an average period of five years. The lens was involved in 10%, the retina in 9%, the optic nerve in 7%, and the orbit in 4% of these cases. The present authors' findings concurred with those published in the literature to date, in that they could not find a pathognomonic combination or a specific frequency of ocular symptoms related to one of the four types of leukemia. PMID:3481001

  2. Nanoparticle targeted therapy against childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Satake, Noriko; Lee, Joyce; Xiao, Kai; Luo, Juntao; Sarangi, Susmita; Chang, Astra; McLaughlin, Bridget; Zhou, Ping; Kenney, Elaina; Kraynov, Liliya; Arnott, Sarah; McGee, Jeannine; Nolta, Jan; Lam, Kit

    2011-06-01

    The goal of our project is to develop a unique ligand-conjugated nanoparticle (NP) therapy against childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL). LLP2A, discovered by Dr. Kit Lam, is a high-affinity and high-specificity peptidomimetic ligand against an activated α4β1 integrin. Our study using 11 fresh primary ALL samples (10 precursor B ALL and 1 T ALL) showed that childhood ALL cells expressed activated α4β1 integrin and bound to LLP2A. Normal hematopoietic cells such as activated lymphocytes and monocytes expressed activated α4β1 integrin; however, normal hematopoietic stem cells showed low expression of α4β1 integrin. Therefore, we believe that LLP2A can be used as a targeted therapy for childhood ALL. The Lam lab has developed novel telodendrimer-based nanoparticles (NPs) which can carry drugs efficiently. We have also developed a human leukemia mouse model using immunodeficient NOD/SCID/IL2Rγ null mice engrafted with primary childhood ALL cells from our patients. LLP2A-conjugated NPs will be evaluated both in vitro and in vivo using primary leukemia cells and this mouse model. NPs will be loaded first with DiD near infra-red dye, and then with the chemotherapeutic agents daunorubicin or vincristine. Both drugs are mainstays of current chemotherapy for childhood ALL. Targeting properties of LLP2A-conjugated NPs will be evaluated by fluorescent microscopy, flow cytometry, MTS assay, and mouse survival after treatment. We expect that LLP2A-conjugated NPs will be preferentially delivered and endocytosed to leukemia cells as an effective targeted therapy.

  3. ABL kinase mutation and relapse in 4 pediatric Philadelphia chromosome-positive acute lymphoblastic leukemia cases.

    PubMed

    Aoe, Michinori; Shimada, Akira; Muraoka, Michiko; Washio, Kana; Nakamura, Yoshimi; Takahashi, Takahide; Imada, Masahide; Watanabe, Toshiyuki; Okada, Ken; Nishiuchi, Ritsuo; Miyamura, Takako; Chayama, Kosuke; Shibakura, Misako; Oda, Megumi; Morishima, Tsuneo

    2014-01-01

    The tyrosine kinase inhibitor (TKI) imatinib mesylate (IM) revolutionized the treatment of Philadelphia chromosome-positive acute lymphoblastic leukemia (Ph-ALL), which had showed poor prognosis before the dawn of IM treatment. However, if Ph-ALL patients showed IM resistance due to ABL kinase mutation, second-generation TKI, dasatinib or nilotinib, was recommended. We treated 4 pediatric Ph-ALL patients with both IM and bone marrow transplantation (BMT); however, 3 relapsed. We retrospectively examined the existence of ABL kinase mutation using PCR and direct sequencing methods, but there was no such mutation in all 4 diagnostic samples. Interestingly, two relapsed samples from patients who were not treated with IM before relapse did not show ABL kinase mutation and IM was still effective even after relapse. On the other hand, one patient who showed resistance to 3 TKI acquired dual ABL kinase mutations, F359C at the IM-resistant phase and F317I at the dasatinib-resistant phase, simultaneously. In summary, Ph-ALL patients relapsed with or without ABL kinase mutation. Furthermore, ABL kinase mutation was only found after IM treatment, so an IM-resistant clone might have been selected during the IM treatment and intensive chemotherapy. The appropriate combination of TKI and BMT must be discussed to cure Ph-ALL patients. PMID:24652384

  4. Profiling of somatic mutations in acute myeloid leukemia with FLT3-ITD at diagnosis and relapse.

    PubMed

    Garg, Manoj; Nagata, Yasunobu; Kanojia, Deepika; Mayakonda, Anand; Yoshida, Kenichi; Haridas Keloth, Sreya; Zang, Zhi Jiang; Okuno, Yusuke; Shiraishi, Yuichi; Chiba, Kenichi; Tanaka, Hiroko; Miyano, Satoru; Ding, Ling-Wen; Alpermann, Tamara; Sun, Qiao-Yang; Lin, De-Chen; Chien, Wenwen; Madan, Vikas; Liu, Li-Zhen; Tan, Kar-Tong; Sampath, Abhishek; Venkatesan, Subhashree; Inokuchi, Koiti; Wakita, Satoshi; Yamaguchi, Hiroki; Chng, Wee Joo; Kham, Shirley-Kow Yin; Yeoh, Allen Eng-Juh; Sanada, Masashi; Schiller, Joanna; Kreuzer, Karl-Anton; Kornblau, Steven M; Kantarjian, Hagop M; Haferlach, Torsten; Lill, Michael; Kuo, Ming-Chung; Shih, Lee-Yung; Blau, Igor-Wolfgang; Blau, Olga; Yang, Henry; Ogawa, Seishi; Koeffler, H Phillip

    2015-11-26

    Acute myeloid leukemia (AML) with an FLT3 internal tandem duplication (FLT3-ITD) mutation is an aggressive hematologic malignancy with a grave prognosis. To identify the mutational spectrum associated with relapse, whole-exome sequencing was performed on 13 matched diagnosis, relapse, and remission trios followed by targeted sequencing of 299 genes in 67 FLT3-ITD patients. The FLT3-ITD genome has an average of 13 mutations per sample, similar to other AML subtypes, which is a low mutation rate compared with that in solid tumors. Recurrent mutations occur in genes related to DNA methylation, chromatin, histone methylation, myeloid transcription factors, signaling, adhesion, cohesin complex, and the spliceosome. Their pattern of mutual exclusivity and cooperation among mutated genes suggests that these genes have a strong biological relationship. In addition, we identified mutations in previously unappreciated genes such as MLL3, NSD1, FAT1, FAT4, and IDH3B. Mutations in 9 genes were observed in the relapse-specific phase. DNMT3A mutations are the most stable mutations, and this DNMT3A-transformed clone can be present even in morphologic complete remissions. Of note, all AML matched trio samples shared at least 1 genomic alteration at diagnosis and relapse, suggesting common ancestral clones. Two types of clonal evolution occur at relapse: either the founder clone recurs or a subclone of the founder clone escapes from induction chemotherapy and expands at relapse by acquiring new mutations. Relapse-specific mutations displayed an increase in transversions. Functional assays demonstrated that both MLL3 and FAT1 exert tumor-suppressor activity in the FLT3-ITD subtype. An inhibitor of XPO1 synergized with standard AML induction chemotherapy to inhibit FLT3-ITD growth. This study clearly shows that FLT3-ITD AML requires additional driver genetic alterations in addition to FLT3-ITD alone. PMID:26438511

  5. Neuropsychological Functioning in Survivors of Childhood Leukemia.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reeb, Roger N.; Regan, Judith M.

    1998-01-01

    Examined neuropsychological functioning of survivors of acute lymphoblastic leukemia who underwent central-nervous-system prophylactic treatment. Findings replicated past research in showing survivors perform poorly on visual-motor integration tasks and develop a Nonverbal Learning Disability. Findings offer recommendations for future research and…

  6. No involvement of bovine leukemia virus in childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia and non-Hodgkin's lymphoma

    SciTech Connect

    Bender, A.P.; Robison, L.L.; Kashmiri, S.V.; McClain, K.L.; Woods, W.G.; Smithson, W.A.; Heyn, R.; Finlay, J.; Schuman, L.M.; Renier, C.

    1988-05-15

    Bovine leukemia virus (BLV) is the causative agent of enzootic bovine lymphosarcoma. Much speculation continues to be directed at the role of BLV in human leukemia. To test this hypothesis rigorously, a case-control study of childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia and non-Hodgkin's lymphoma was conducted between December 1983 and February 1986. Cases (less than or equal to 16 years at diagnosis) derived from patients diagnosed at the primary institutions and affiliated hospitals were matched (age, sex, and race) with regional population controls. DNA samples from bone marrow or peripheral blood from 157 cases (131 acute lymphoblastic leukemia, 26 non-Hodgkin's lymphoma) and peripheral blood from 136 controls were analyzed by Southern blot technique, under highly stringent conditions, using cloned BLV DNA as a probe. None of the 157 case or 136 control DNA samples hybridized with the probe. The high statistical power and specificity of this study provide the best evidence to date that genomic integration of BLV is not a factor in childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia/non-Hodgkin's lymphoma.

  7. Childhood acute leukemias are frequent in Mexico City: descriptive epidemiology

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Worldwide, acute leukemia is the most common type of childhood cancer. It is particularly common in the Hispanic populations residing in the United States, Costa Rica, and Mexico City. The objective of this study was to determine the incidence of acute leukemia in children who were diagnosed and treated in public hospitals in Mexico City. Methods Included in this study were those children, under 15 years of age and residents of Mexico City, who were diagnosed in 2006 and 2007 with leukemia, as determined by using the International Classification of Childhood Cancer. The average annual incidence rates (AAIR), and the standardized average annual incidence rates (SAAIR) per million children were calculated. We calculated crude, age- and sex-specific incidence rates and adjusted for age by the direct method with the world population as standard. We determined if there were a correlation between the incidence of acute leukemias in the various boroughs of Mexico City and either the number of agricultural hectares, the average number of persons per household, or the municipal human development index for Mexico (used as a reference of socio-economic level). Results Although a total of 610 new cases of leukemia were registered during 2006-2007, only 228 fit the criteria for inclusion in this study. The overall SAAIR was 57.6 per million children (95% CI, 46.9-68.3); acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) was the most frequent type of leukemia, constituting 85.1% of the cases (SAAIR: 49.5 per million), followed by acute myeloblastic leukemia at 12.3% (SAAIR: 6.9 per million), and chronic myeloid leukemia at 1.7% (SAAIR: 0.9 per million). The 1-4 years age group had the highest SAAIR for ALL (77.7 per million). For cases of ALL, 73.2% had precursor B-cell immunophenotype (SAAIR: 35.8 per million) and 12.4% had T-cell immunophenotype (SAAIR 6.3 per million). The peak ages for ALL were 2-6 years and 8-10 years. More than half the children (58.8%) were classified as high

  8. Whole-exome sequencing in relapsing chronic lymphocytic leukemia: clinical impact of recurrent RPS15 mutations

    PubMed Central

    Ljungström, Viktor; Cortese, Diego; Young, Emma; Pandzic, Tatjana; Mansouri, Larry; Plevova, Karla; Ntoufa, Stavroula; Baliakas, Panagiotis; Clifford, Ruth; Sutton, Lesley-Ann; Blakemore, Stuart J.; Stavroyianni, Niki; Agathangelidis, Andreas; Rossi, Davide; Höglund, Martin; Kotaskova, Jana; Juliusson, Gunnar; Belessi, Chrysoula; Chiorazzi, Nicholas; Panagiotidis, Panagiotis; Langerak, Anton W.; Smedby, Karin E.; Oscier, David; Gaidano, Gianluca; Schuh, Anna; Davi, Frederic; Pott, Christiane; Strefford, Jonathan C.; Trentin, Livio; Pospisilova, Sarka; Ghia, Paolo; Stamatopoulos, Kostas; Sjöblom, Tobias

    2016-01-01

    Fludarabine, cyclophosphamide, and rituximab (FCR) is first-line treatment of medically fit chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) patients; however, despite good response rates, many patients eventually relapse. Although recent high-throughput studies have identified novel recurrent genetic lesions in adverse prognostic CLL, the mechanisms leading to relapse after FCR therapy are not completely understood. To gain insight into this issue, we performed whole-exome sequencing of sequential samples from 41 CLL patients who were uniformly treated with FCR but relapsed after a median of 2 years. In addition to mutations with known adverse-prognostic impact (TP53, NOTCH1, ATM, SF3B1, NFKBIE, and BIRC3), a large proportion of cases (19.5%) harbored mutations in RPS15, a gene encoding a component of the 40S ribosomal subunit. Extended screening, totaling 1119 patients, supported a role for RPS15 mutations in aggressive CLL, with one-third of RPS15-mutant cases also carrying TP53 aberrations. In most cases, selection of dominant, relapse-specific subclones was observed over time. However, RPS15 mutations were clonal before treatment and remained stable at relapse. Notably, all RPS15 mutations represented somatic missense variants and resided within a 7 amino-acid, evolutionarily conserved region. We confirmed the recently postulated direct interaction between RPS15 and MDM2/MDMX and transient expression of mutant RPS15 revealed defective regulation of endogenous p53 compared with wild-type RPS15. In summary, we provide novel insights into the heterogeneous genetic landscape of CLL relapsing after FCR treatment and highlight a novel mechanism underlying clinical aggressiveness involving a mutated ribosomal protein, potentially representing an early genetic lesion in CLL pathobiology. PMID:26675346

  9. Whole-exome sequencing in relapsing chronic lymphocytic leukemia: clinical impact of recurrent RPS15 mutations.

    PubMed

    Ljungström, Viktor; Cortese, Diego; Young, Emma; Pandzic, Tatjana; Mansouri, Larry; Plevova, Karla; Ntoufa, Stavroula; Baliakas, Panagiotis; Clifford, Ruth; Sutton, Lesley-Ann; Blakemore, Stuart J; Stavroyianni, Niki; Agathangelidis, Andreas; Rossi, Davide; Höglund, Martin; Kotaskova, Jana; Juliusson, Gunnar; Belessi, Chrysoula; Chiorazzi, Nicholas; Panagiotidis, Panagiotis; Langerak, Anton W; Smedby, Karin E; Oscier, David; Gaidano, Gianluca; Schuh, Anna; Davi, Frederic; Pott, Christiane; Strefford, Jonathan C; Trentin, Livio; Pospisilova, Sarka; Ghia, Paolo; Stamatopoulos, Kostas; Sjöblom, Tobias; Rosenquist, Richard

    2016-02-25

    Fludarabine, cyclophosphamide, and rituximab (FCR) is first-line treatment of medically fit chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) patients; however, despite good response rates, many patients eventually relapse. Although recent high-throughput studies have identified novel recurrent genetic lesions in adverse prognostic CLL, the mechanisms leading to relapse after FCR therapy are not completely understood. To gain insight into this issue, we performed whole-exome sequencing of sequential samples from 41 CLL patients who were uniformly treated with FCR but relapsed after a median of 2 years. In addition to mutations with known adverse-prognostic impact (TP53, NOTCH1, ATM, SF3B1, NFKBIE, and BIRC3), a large proportion of cases (19.5%) harbored mutations in RPS15, a gene encoding a component of the 40S ribosomal subunit. Extended screening, totaling 1119 patients, supported a role for RPS15 mutations in aggressive CLL, with one-third of RPS15-mutant cases also carrying TP53 aberrations. In most cases, selection of dominant, relapse-specific subclones was observed over time. However, RPS15 mutations were clonal before treatment and remained stable at relapse. Notably, all RPS15 mutations represented somatic missense variants and resided within a 7 amino-acid, evolutionarily conserved region. We confirmed the recently postulated direct interaction between RPS15 and MDM2/MDMX and transient expression of mutant RPS15 revealed defective regulation of endogenous p53 compared with wild-type RPS15. In summary, we provide novel insights into the heterogeneous genetic landscape of CLL relapsing after FCR treatment and highlight a novel mechanism underlying clinical aggressiveness involving a mutated ribosomal protein, potentially representing an early genetic lesion in CLL pathobiology. PMID:26675346

  10. Targeting Mutant BRAF with Vemurafenib in Relapsed or Refractory Hairy Cell Leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Tiacci, Enrico; Park, Jae H.; De Carolis, Luca; Chung, Stephen S.; Broccoli, Alessandro; Scott, Sasinya; Zaja, Francesco; Devlin, Sean; Pulsoni, Alessandro; Chung, Young Rock; Cimminiello, Michele; Kim, Eunhee; Rossi, Davide; Stone, Richard M.; Motta, Giovanna; Saven, Alan; Varettoni, Marzia; Altman, Jessica K.; Anastasia, Antonella; Grever, Michael R.; Ambrosetti, Achille; Rai, Kanti R.; Fraticelli, Vincenzo; Lacouture, Mario E.; Carella, Angelo Michele; Levine, Ross L.; Leoni, Pietro; Rambaldi, Alessandro; Falzetti, Franca; Ascani, Stefano; Capponi, Monia; Martelli, Maria Paola; Park, Christopher Y.; Pileri, Stefano Aldo; Rosen, Neal; Foà, Robin; Berger, Michael F.; Zinzani, Pier Luigi; Abdel-Wahab, Omar; Falini, Brunangelo; Tallman, Martin S.

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND BRAF-V600E is the genetic lesion underlying hairy cell leukemia. We assessed the safety and activity of the oral BRAF inhibitor vemurafenib in patients with hairy cell leukemia who relapsed after or were refractory to purine analogues. METHODS We conducted in Italy and USA two phase-2 single-arm multicenter studies of vemurafenib (960 mg twice daily) given for a median of 16 and 18 weeks, respectively. Primary endpoints were complete remission rate and overall response rate. Patient enrollment was completed (n=28) in the Italian trial in April 2013 and is still open (n=26/36) in the American trial. RESULTS Drug-related adverse events were usually of grade 1-2, and those most frequently requiring dose reductions were rash and arthralgia/arthritis; secondary cutaneous tumors (treated with simple excision) developed in 6/50 patients. Overall response rates were 96% (25/26 evaluable Italian patients) and 100% (24/24 evaluable American patients), obtained after a median of 8 weeks and 12 weeks, respectively. Complete response rates were 34.6% (9/26) and 41.7% (10/24), respectively. In the Italian trial, after a median follow-up of 23 months, the median relapse-free and treatment-free survivals were respectively 19 and 25 months in complete responders, and 6 and 18 months in partial responders. In the American trial, 1-year progression-free and overall survival were 73% and 91%, respectively. Frequent persistence of phospho-ERK+ bone marrow leukemic cells at the end of treatment suggests bypass MEK-ERK reactivation as a resistance mechanism. CONCLUSIONS A short oral course of vemurafenib proved safe and highly effective in relapsed/refractory hairy cell leukemia patients (Funded by AIRC, ERC, Roche/Genentech and others; EudractCT number: 2011-005487-13, ClinicalTrials.gov number NCT01711632). PMID:26352686

  11. Temporal bone metastasis as a sign of relapsing chronic lymphocytic leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Aljafar, Hadeel M.; Alsuhibani, Sari S.; Alahmari, Mohammad S.; Alzahrani, Musaed A.

    2015-01-01

    Otologic manifestations in chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) are common presentations. However, temporal bone metastasis is rarely described as a sign of relapsing CLL. A 65-year-old male diabetic patient known to have CLL on remission presented to the outpatient otolaryngology clinic with a one month history of progressive bilateral otalgia and right otorrhea, despite multiple courses of antibiotics. He was admitted with suspicion of malignant otitis externa. Left ear showed large hemorrhagic bullae on the posterior segment of tympanic membrane. Left sided facial paralysis developed on the third day of admission. Full recovery of facial paralysis is achieved by 10 days course of corticotherapy. Histological examination of middle ear tissue biopsy showed infiltration by monotonous small lymphoid cells, showing round nuclei, condensed chromatin suggestive of CLL. Although rare, unusual otologic manifestations should raise the suspicion of a temporal bone metastasis as a sign of relapsing CLL. PMID:26446337

  12. Laboratory-Treated Donor Cord Blood Cell Infusion Following Combination Chemotherapy in Treating Younger Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-03-30

    Acute Leukemia of Ambiguous Lineage; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13.1q22); CBFB-MYH11; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13.1;q22); CBFB-MYH11; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); RUNX1-RUNX1T1; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(9;11)(p22;q23); MLLT3-MLL; Adult Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); PML-RARA; Alkylating Agent-Related Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  13. Road Traffic and Childhood Leukemia: The ESCALE Study (SFCE)

    PubMed Central

    Amigou, Alicia; Sermage-Faure, Claire; Orsi, Laurent; Leverger, Guy; Baruchel, André; Bertrand, Yves; Nelken, Brigitte; Robert, Alain; Michel, Gérard; Margueritte, Geneviève; Perel, Yves; Mechinaud, Françoise; Bordigoni, Pierre; Hémon, Denis; Clavel, Jacqueline

    2011-01-01

    Background Traffic is a source of environmental exposures, including benzene, which may be related to childhood leukemia. Objectives A national registry–based case–control study [ESCALE (Etude Sur les Cancers et les Leucémies de l’Enfant, Study on Environmental and Genetic Risk Factors of Childhood Cancers and Leukemia)] carried out in France was used to assess the effect of exposure to road traffic exhaust fumes on the risk of childhood leukemia. Methods Over the study period, 2003–2004, 763 cases and 1,681 controls < 15 years old were included, and the controls were frequency matched with the cases on age and sex. The ESCALE data were collected by a standardized telephone interview of the mothers. Various indicators of exposure to traffic and pollution were determined using the geocoded addresses at the time of diagnosis for the cases and of interview for the controls. Indicators of the distance from, and density of, main roads and traffic nitrogen dioxide (NO2) concentrations derived from traffic emission data were used. Odds ratios (ORs) were estimated using unconditional regression models adjusted for potential confounders. Results Acute leukemia (AL) was significantly associated with estimates of traffic NO2 concentration at the place of residence > 27.7 μg/m3 compared with NO2 concentration < 21.9 μg/m3 [OR = 1.2; confidence interval (CI), 1.0–1.5] and with the presence of a heavy-traffic road within 500 m compared with the absence of a heavy-traffic road in the same area (OR = 2.0; 95% CI, 1.0–3.6). There was a significant association between AL and a high density of heavy-traffic roads within 500 m compared with the reference category with no heavy-traffic road within 500 m (OR = 2.2; 95% CI, 1.1–4.2), with a significant positive linear trend of the association of AL with the total length of heavy-traffic road within 500m. Conclusion This study supports the hypothesis that living close to heavy-traffic roads may increase the risk of

  14. Blinatumomab: Bridging the Gap in Adult Relapsed/Refractory B-Cell Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia.

    PubMed

    Folan, Stephanie A; Rexwinkle, Amber; Autry, Jane; Bryan, Jeffrey C

    2016-08-01

    Adult patients with acute lymphoblastic leukemia who relapse after frontline therapy have extremely poor outcomes despite advances in chemotherapy and hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. Blinatumomab is a first-in-class bispecific T-cell engager that links T cells to tumor cells leading to T-cell activation and tumor cell lysis. In December 2014, the Food and Drug Administration approved blinatumomab for treatment of relapsed or refractory Philadelphia chromosome-negative precursor B-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia. In a phase II trial, blinatumomab produced response rates of 43%, and 40% of patients achieving a complete remission proceeded to hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. Early use of blinatumomab was complicated with adverse effects, including cytokine release syndrome and neurotoxicity. Management strategies, including dexamethasone premedication and 2-step dose escalation during the first cycle of blinatumomab, have decreased the incidence and severity of these adverse effects. Blinatumomab currently is being studied for other B-cell malignancies and has the potential to benefit many patients with CD19+ malignancies in the future. PMID:27521320

  15. A case of central nervous system relapse in acute promyelocytic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Hasuike, Yuhei; Yamaguchi, Hiroshi; Mitsui, Hideki; Nishikawa, Yoshiro; Sugai, Fuminobu

    2016-04-28

    A 70-year-old woman who have achieved complete remission (CR) of acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL) with all-trans retinoic acid and chemotherapy presented with abnormal sensation in the right lateral thigh and the bilateral legs. In addition, neurological examination revealed weakness of the left shoulder abduction, the right hand, and the bilateral lower limbs. Atypical promyelocytes were detected in the cerebrospinal fluid, in spite of normal finding in the peripheral blood smear. Magnetic resonance imaging showed gadolinium-enhanced multiple intradural/extramedullary lesions in the whole spine. Nerve conduction studies of the right limbs revealed sensorimotor conduction abnormalities, conspicuously in the posterior tibial and sural nerves. As a result, she was diagnosed as having intrathecal relapse of APL, associated with multiple mononeuropathy. The neurological symptoms were completely disappeared by intrathecal chemotherapy and whole-spine radiotherapy, suggesting that the neuropathy was possibly caused by meningeal infiltration affecting multiple spinal nerve roots. Since extramedullary or intrathecal relapse is extremely rare in APL compared with other types of leukemia, precise neurological evaluations and suitable treatment should be performed immediately, when APL patients with CR manifest some neurological symptoms. PMID:27025992

  16. Diffuse leukoencephalopathy and brain edema: unusual presentations of CNS relapse of acute myeloid leukemia.

    PubMed

    Schumann, Michael; Kiewe, Philipp; Hartlieb, Sissel; Neumann, Martin; Schilling, Andreas; Koch, Hans-Christian; Thiel, Eckhard; Korfel, Agnieszka

    2010-04-01

    An isolated CNS relapse is rarely seen in acute myeloid leukemia. However, it has a potentially fatal clinical outcome. We herein present the case of a 39-year-old man, who presented to our emergency room with horizontal diplopic images, vertigo, bilateral deafness, and progressing somnolence. Cerebral imaging revealed cerebral and cerebellar edema and a diffuse leukoencephalopathy. With the one-year-old history of an initially successfully treated FAB-M0 acute myeloid leukemia (AML) in mind, a lumbar puncture was carried out that showed a vast number of myeloid blasts in the morphologic analysis of the cerebrospinal fluid. In conjunction with normal findings in the peripheral blood-count with differential and the bone marrow examination a diagnosis of an isolated CNS relapse of the AML was made. Cytarabine chemotherapy was initiated and the symptoms resolved rapidly. To our surprise, cerebral imaging in the course of the treatment not only showed a resolution of the brain edema but also of the leukoencephalopathy, pointing to a direct infiltration of brain parenchyma by leukemic blasts. The case highlights the relevance of the CNS as a pharmacologic "sanctuary" for tumor cells in patients that on prior treatments have not received intrathecal chemotherapy or chemotherapeutics that cross the blood-brain barrier. PMID:18826442

  17. Laryngotracheal stenosis requiring emergency tracheostomy as the first manifestation of childhood-relapsing polychondritis.

    PubMed

    Buscatti, Izabel M; Giacomin, Maria Fernanda A; Silva, Marco Felipe C; Campos, Lúcia M A; Sallum, Adriana M E; Silva, Clovis A

    2013-01-01

    Relapsing polychondritis is a rare childhood disorder of unknown etiology, characterized by inflammatory, recurrent and destructive cartilage lesions. The chondritis could be widespread and involves generally laryngeal and auricular hyaline cartilages. We described a 9 years and 4 months old girl, who presented recurrent acute laryngotracheitis and laryngotracheal stenosis, which were the first manifestations of relapsing polychondritis, and was submitted to emergency tracheostomy. She also had ear condritis and arthritis, being treated with prednisolone and methotrexate. In conclusion, we reported a rare case of relapsing polychondritis that presented a life-threatening laryngo-tracheo-bronchial disorder requiring tracheostomy. We suggest that the diagnosis of relapsing polychondritis should be considered for patients who present recurrent acute laryngotracheitis with other types of condritis, as well as musculoskeletal manifestations. PMID:24149019

  18. Evolution of a FLT3-TKD mutated subclone at meningeal relapse in acute promyelocytic leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Bochtler, Tilmann; Fröhling, Stefan; Weichert, Wilko; Endris, Volker; Thiede, Christian; Hutter, Barbara; Hundemer, Michael; Ho, Anthony D.; Krämer, Alwin

    2016-01-01

    Here, we report the case of an acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL) patient who—although negative for FLT3 mutations at diagnosis—developed isolated FLT3 tyrosine kinase II domain (FLT3-TKD)-positive meningeal relapse, which, in retrospect, could be traced back to a minute bone marrow subclone present at first diagnosis. Initially, the 48-yr-old female diagnosed with high-risk APL had achieved complete molecular remission after standard treatment with all-trans retinoic acid (ATRA) and chemotherapy according to the AIDA (ATRA plus idarubicin) protocol. Thirteen months after the start of ATRA maintenance, the patient suffered clinically overt meningeal relapse along with minute molecular traces of PML/RARA (promyelocytic leukemia/retinoic acid receptor alpha) in the bone marrow. Following treatment with arsenic trioxide and ATRA in combination with intrathecal cytarabine and methotrexate, the patient achieved a complete molecular remission in both cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) and bone marrow, which currently lasts for 2 yr after completion of therapy. Whole-exome sequencing and subsequent ultradeep targeted resequencing revealed a heterozygous FLT3-TKD mutation in CSF leukemic cells (p.D835Y, c.2503G>T, 1000/1961 reads [51%]), which was undetectable in the concurrent bone marrow sample. Interestingly, the FLT3-TKD mutated meningeal clone originated from a small bone marrow subclone present in a variant allele frequency of 0.4% (6/1553 reads) at initial diagnosis. This case highlights the concept of clonal evolution with a subclone harboring an additional mutation being selected as the “fittest” and leading to meningeal relapse. It also further supports earlier suggestions that FLT3 mutations may play a role for migration and clonal expansion in the CSF sanctuary site. PMID:27626069

  19. Naive Donor NK Cell Repertoires Associated with Less Leukemia Relapse after Allogeneic Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation.

    PubMed

    Björklund, Andreas T; Clancy, Trevor; Goodridge, Jodie P; Béziat, Vivien; Schaffer, Marie; Hovig, Eivind; Ljunggren, Hans-Gustaf; Ljungman, Per T; Malmberg, Karl-Johan

    2016-02-01

    Acute and latent human CMV cause profound changes in the NK cell repertoire, with expansion and differentiation of educated NK cells expressing self-specific inhibitory killer cell Ig-like receptors. In this study, we addressed whether such CMV-induced imprints on the donor NK cell repertoire influenced the outcome of allogeneic stem cell transplantation. Hierarchical clustering of high-resolution immunophenotyping data covering key NK cell parameters, including frequencies of CD56(bright), NKG2A(+), NKG2C(+), and CD57(+) NK cell subsets, as well as the size of the educated NK cell subset, was linked to clinical outcomes. Clusters defining naive (NKG2A(+)CD57(-)NKG2C(-)) NK cell repertoires in the donor were associated with decreased risk for relapse in recipients with acute myeloid leukemia and myelodysplastic syndrome (hazard ratio [HR], 0.09; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.03-0.27; p < 0.001). Furthermore, recipients with naive repertoires at 9-12 mo after hematopoietic stem cell transplantation had increased disease-free survival (HR, 7.2; 95% CI: 1.6-33; p = 0.01) and increased overall survival (HR, 9.3; 95% CI: 1.1-77, p = 0.04). Conversely, patients with a relative increase in differentiated NK cells at 9-12 mo displayed a higher rate of late relapses (HR, 8.41; 95% CI: 6.7-11; p = 0.02), reduced disease-free survival (HR, 0.12; 95% CI: 0.12-0.74; p = 0.02), and reduced overall survival (HR, 0.07; 95% CI: 0.01-0.69; p = 0.02). Thus, our data suggest that naive donor NK cell repertoires are associated with protection against leukemia relapse after allogeneic HSCT. PMID:26746188

  20. Evolution of a FLT3-TKD mutated subclone at meningeal relapse in acute promyelocytic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Bochtler, Tilmann; Fröhling, Stefan; Weichert, Wilko; Endris, Volker; Thiede, Christian; Hutter, Barbara; Hundemer, Michael; Ho, Anthony D; Krämer, Alwin

    2016-09-01

    Here, we report the case of an acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL) patient who-although negative for FLT3 mutations at diagnosis-developed isolated FLT3 tyrosine kinase II domain (FLT3-TKD)-positive meningeal relapse, which, in retrospect, could be traced back to a minute bone marrow subclone present at first diagnosis. Initially, the 48-yr-old female diagnosed with high-risk APL had achieved complete molecular remission after standard treatment with all-trans retinoic acid (ATRA) and chemotherapy according to the AIDA (ATRA plus idarubicin) protocol. Thirteen months after the start of ATRA maintenance, the patient suffered clinically overt meningeal relapse along with minute molecular traces of PML/RARA (promyelocytic leukemia/retinoic acid receptor alpha) in the bone marrow. Following treatment with arsenic trioxide and ATRA in combination with intrathecal cytarabine and methotrexate, the patient achieved a complete molecular remission in both cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) and bone marrow, which currently lasts for 2 yr after completion of therapy. Whole-exome sequencing and subsequent ultradeep targeted resequencing revealed a heterozygous FLT3-TKD mutation in CSF leukemic cells (p.D835Y, c.2503G>T, 1000/1961 reads [51%]), which was undetectable in the concurrent bone marrow sample. Interestingly, the FLT3-TKD mutated meningeal clone originated from a small bone marrow subclone present in a variant allele frequency of 0.4% (6/1553 reads) at initial diagnosis. This case highlights the concept of clonal evolution with a subclone harboring an additional mutation being selected as the "fittest" and leading to meningeal relapse. It also further supports earlier suggestions that FLT3 mutations may play a role for migration and clonal expansion in the CSF sanctuary site. PMID:27626069

  1. Advances in the treatment of relapsed/refractory acute lymphoblastic leukemia: a case study compendium.

    PubMed

    Roboz, Gail J; Jabbour, Elias J; Faderl, Stefan; Douer, Dan

    2014-12-01

    Acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) is a heterogeneous hematologic malignancy characterized by proliferation of immature lymphoid cells throughout the bone marrow and peripheral blood. Most cases are diagnosed before the age of 20 years. Adults have a worse prognosis than children. Approximately half of adult ALL patients relapse after their initial treatment. There is no standard treatment for ALL; strategies vary according to the patient’s age, comorbidities, and Philadelphia chromosome status. Regimens used in pediatric patients are being adapted for use in adults. Frontline management can include hyperfractionated cyclophosphamide, vincristine, doxorubicin, and dexamethasone alternating with cycles of high-dose methotrexate and cytarabine (hyper-CVAD) and the Berlin-Frankfurt-Münster regimen. Relapsed/refractory patients have several options, including a regimen consisting of fludarabine, high-dose cytarabine, and granulocyte colony–stimulating factor (FLAG); tyrosine kinase inhibitors; and chemotherapy. The US Food and Drug Administration recently approved 3 therapies for these patients: clofarabine, nelarabine, and vincristine sulfate liposome injection, a modified formulation of vincristine that allows the drug to be administered at a higher dosage. Several novel strategies are currently under investigation, including the monoclonal antibody blinatumomab, a bispecific T-cell engager that targets the B-cell–specific antigen CD19 and activates T cells to exert cytotoxic activity against the target B cell. This clinical roundtable monograph features case studies that illustrate important points in the management of adult patients with relapsed/refractory ALL. PMID:25768269

  2. [IDA-FLAG regimen in treatment of patients with refractory or relapsed acute leukemia].

    PubMed

    Qian, Si-Xuan; Li, Jian-Yong; Wu, Han-Xin; Zhang, Run; Hong, Ming; Xu, Wei; Qiu, Hong-Xia

    2009-04-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the efficacy and toxicity of the fludarabine combination with high-dose cytarabine (Ara C), idarubicin and granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) (IDA-FLAG regimen) in treatment of refractory/relapsed acute leukemia (AL) patients. 4 patients were male aged from 32 to 44 years, consisted of 3 cases of acute myeloid leukaemia (AML) and 1 cases of acute lymphocytic leukaemia (ALL). All the patients were treated with idarubicin (10 - 12 mg/m(2)/d, days 1 to 3), fludarabine (50 mg/d, days 1 to 5), cytarabine (2 g/m(2)/d, days 1 to 5) and granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF, 300 microg/d, days 0 to 5). The results showed that after one course of induction therapy, 4 patients all achieved complete remission (CR), in which 2 patients were in continuous CR after a follow-up of 3 and 4 months; 1 patient relapsed after 10 months and another one patient died of thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura at 4 months after allogeneic peripheral blood stem cell transplantation. Myelosuppression and infections due to neutropenia were the most frequent adverse effects, severe nonhematologic toxicity and the early death were not observed in these patients. In conclusion, the IDA-FLAG regimen is effective in treatment of patients with refractory and relapsed AL, the adverse effects from this regimen were well tolerated by patients, which gains time for further treatment. PMID:19379589

  3. Maternal and perinatal risk factors for childhood leukemia

    SciTech Connect

    Zack, M.; Adami, H.O.; Ericson, A. )

    1991-07-15

    This report describes an exploratory population-based study of maternal and perinatal risk factors for childhood leukemia in Sweden. The Swedish National Cancer Registry ascertained 411 cases in successive birth cohorts from 1973 through 1984 recorded in the Swedish Medical Birth Registry. Using the latter, we matched five controls without cancer to each case by sex and month and year of birth. Mothers of children with leukemia were more likely to have been exposed to nitrous oxide anesthesia during delivery than mothers of controls (odds ratio (OR) = 1.3; 95% confidence interval (CI) = 1.0, 1.6). Children with leukemia were more likely than controls to have Down's syndrome (OR = 32.5; 95% CI = 7.3, 144.0) or cleft lip or cleft palate (OR = 5.0; 95% CI = 1.0, 24.8); to have had a diagnosis associated with difficult labor but unspecified complications (OR = 4.5; 95% CI = 1.1, 18.2) or with other conditions of the fetus or newborn (OR = 1.5; 95% CI = 1.1, 2.1), specifically, uncomplicated physiological jaundice (OR = 1.9; 95% CI = 1.2, 2.9); or to have received supplemental oxygen (OR = 2.6; 95% CI = 1.3, 1.3, 4.9). Because multiple potential risk factors were analyzed in this study, future studies need to check these findings. The authors did not confirm the previously reported higher risks for childhood leukemia associated with being male, having a high birth weight, or being born to a woman of advanced maternal age.

  4. Beyond CD19: Opportunities for Future Development of Targeted Immunotherapy in Pediatric Relapsed-Refractory Acute Leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Shalabi, Haneen; Angiolillo, Anne; Fry, Terry J.

    2015-01-01

    Chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) T cell therapy has been used as a targeted approach in cancer therapy. Relapsed and refractory acute leukemia in pediatrics has been difficult to treat with conventional therapy due to dose-limiting toxicities. With the recent success of CD 19 CAR in pediatric patients with B cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL), this mode of therapy has become a very attractive option for these patients with high-risk disease. In this review, we will discuss current treatment paradigms of pediatric acute leukemia and potential therapeutic targets for additional high-risk populations, including T cell ALL, AML, and infant ALL. PMID:26484338

  5. Clinical activity of azacitidine in patients who relapse after allogeneic stem cell transplantation for acute myeloid leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Craddock, Charles; Labopin, Myriam; Robin, Marie; Finke, Juergen; Chevallier, Patrice; Yakoub-Agha, Ibrahim; Bourhis, Jean Henri; Sengelov, Henrik; Blaise, Didier; Luft, Thomas; Hallek, Michael; Kröger, Nicolaus; Nagler, Arnon; Mohty, Mohamad

    2016-01-01

    Disease relapse is the most common cause of treatment failure after allogeneic stem cell transplantation for acute myeloid leukemia and myelodysplastic syndromes, yet treatment options for such patients remain extremely limited. Azacitidine is an important new therapy in high-risk myelodysplastic syndromes and acute myeloid leukemia but its role in patients who relapse post allograft has not been defined. We studied the tolerability and activity of azacitidine in 181 patients who relapsed after an allograft for acute myeloid leukemia (n=116) or myelodysplastic syndromes (n=65). Sixty-nine patients received additional donor lymphocyte infusions. Forty-six of 157 (25%) assessable patients responded to azacitidine therapy: 24 (15%) achieved a complete remission and 22 a partial remission. Response rates were higher in patients transplanted in complete remission (P=0.04) and those transplanted for myelodysplastic syndromes (P=0.023). In patients who achieved a complete remission, the 2-year overall survival was 48% versus 12% for the whole population. Overall survival was determined by time to relapse post transplant more than six months (P=0.001) and percentage of blasts in the bone marrow at time of relapse (P=0.01). The concurrent administration of donor lymphocyte infusion did not improve either response rates or overall survival in patients treated with azacitidine. An azacitidine relapse prognostic score was developed which predicted 2-year overall survival ranging from 3%–37% (P=0.00001). We conclude that azacitidine represents an important new therapy in selected patients with acute myeloid leukemia/myelodysplastic syndromes who relapse after allogeneic stem cell transplantation. Prospective studies to confirm optimal treatment options in this challenging patient population are required. PMID:27081178

  6. PD-1hiTIM-3+ T cells associate with and predict leukemia relapse in AML patients post allogeneic stem cell transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Kong, Y; Zhang, J; Claxton, D F; Ehmann, W C; Rybka, W B; Zhu, L; Zeng, H; Schell, T D; Zheng, H

    2015-01-01

    Prognosis of leukemia relapse post allogeneic stem cell transplantation (alloSCT) is poor and effective new treatments are urgently needed. T cells are pivotal in eradicating leukemia through a graft versus leukemia (GVL) effect and leukemia relapse is considered a failure of GVL. T-cell exhaustion is a state of T-cell dysfunction mediated by inhibitory molecules including programmed cell death protein 1 (PD-1) and T-cell immunoglobulin domain and mucin domain 3 (TIM-3). To evaluate whether T-cell exhaustion and inhibitory pathways are involved in leukemia relapse post alloSCT, we performed phenotypic and functional studies on T cells from peripheral blood of acute myeloid leukemia patients receiving alloSCT. Here we report that PD-1hiTIM-3+ cells are strongly associated with leukemia relapse post transplantation. Consistent with exhaustion, PD-1hiTIM-3+ T cells are functionally deficient manifested by reduced production of interleukin 2 (IL-2), tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) and interferon-γ (IFN-γ). In addition, these cells demonstrate a phenotype consistent with exhausted antigen-experienced T cells by losing TN and TEMRA subsets. Importantly, increase of PD-1hiTIM-3+ cells occurs before clinical diagnosis of leukemia relapse, suggesting their predictive value. Results of our study provide an early diagnostic approach and a therapeutic target for leukemia relapse post transplantation. PMID:26230954

  7. PD-1(hi)TIM-3(+) T cells associate with and predict leukemia relapse in AML patients post allogeneic stem cell transplantation.

    PubMed

    Kong, Y; Zhang, J; Claxton, D F; Ehmann, W C; Rybka, W B; Zhu, L; Zeng, H; Schell, T D; Zheng, H

    2015-01-01

    Prognosis of leukemia relapse post allogeneic stem cell transplantation (alloSCT) is poor and effective new treatments are urgently needed. T cells are pivotal in eradicating leukemia through a graft versus leukemia (GVL) effect and leukemia relapse is considered a failure of GVL. T-cell exhaustion is a state of T-cell dysfunction mediated by inhibitory molecules including programmed cell death protein 1 (PD-1) and T-cell immunoglobulin domain and mucin domain 3 (TIM-3). To evaluate whether T-cell exhaustion and inhibitory pathways are involved in leukemia relapse post alloSCT, we performed phenotypic and functional studies on T cells from peripheral blood of acute myeloid leukemia patients receiving alloSCT. Here we report that PD-1(hi)TIM-3(+) cells are strongly associated with leukemia relapse post transplantation. Consistent with exhaustion, PD-1(hi)TIM-3(+) T cells are functionally deficient manifested by reduced production of interleukin 2 (IL-2), tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) and interferon-γ (IFN-γ). In addition, these cells demonstrate a phenotype consistent with exhausted antigen-experienced T cells by losing TN and TEMRA subsets. Importantly, increase of PD-1(hi)TIM-3(+) cells occurs before clinical diagnosis of leukemia relapse, suggesting their predictive value. Results of our study provide an early diagnostic approach and a therapeutic target for leukemia relapse post transplantation. PMID:26230954

  8. The role of blinatumomab in patients with relapsed/refractory acute lymphoblastic leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Benjamin, Jonathan E.; Stein, Anthony S.

    2016-01-01

    Adults with relapsed/refractory B-acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) have a complete remission (CR) rate of 20–45% and median overall survival of 3–9 months, depending on the duration of the first remission and number of lines of salvage therapy. Allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (alloHSCT) is the only curative option for adult patients with relapsed/refractory ALL, and achievement of CR is a crucial step before alloHSCT. Blinatumomab is a bispecific T-cell engager (BiTE®) antibody construct with dual specificity for CD19 and CD3, simultaneously binding CD3-positive cytotoxic T cells and CD19-positive B cells, resulting in T-cell-mediated serial lysis of normal and malignant B cells. It recently gained accelerated approval by the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for the treatment of relapsed/refractory Philadelphia chromosome-negative ALL, based on a large phase II trial of 189 adults with relapsed/refractory B-ALL, which showed a CR/CRh (CR with partial hematologic recovery) of 43% after two cycles of treatment. Toxicities include cytokine-release syndrome (CRS) and neurologic events (encephalopathy, aphasia, and seizure). CRS can be alleviated by step-up dosing and dexamethasone, without affecting the cytotoxic effect of blinatumomab. The cause of neurologic toxicity is unclear but is also observed with other T-cell therapies and may relate to variable expression of CD19 within the brain. This review encompasses the preclinical rationale of using the BITE® class of compounds (blinatumomab being the only one that is FDA approved), with clinical data using blinatumomab in the relapsed/refractory setting (pediatrics and adults), the minimal residual disease setting (adults), as well as Philadelphia chromosome-positive ALL. The review also examines the main adverse events: their prevention, recognition, and management; possible mechanisms of resistance; causes of relapse. It also summarizes future trials evaluating the drug earlier in the

  9. The role of blinatumomab in patients with relapsed/refractory acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Benjamin, Jonathan E; Stein, Anthony S

    2016-06-01

    Adults with relapsed/refractory B-acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) have a complete remission (CR) rate of 20-45% and median overall survival of 3-9 months, depending on the duration of the first remission and number of lines of salvage therapy. Allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (alloHSCT) is the only curative option for adult patients with relapsed/refractory ALL, and achievement of CR is a crucial step before alloHSCT. Blinatumomab is a bispecific T-cell engager (BiTE®) antibody construct with dual specificity for CD19 and CD3, simultaneously binding CD3-positive cytotoxic T cells and CD19-positive B cells, resulting in T-cell-mediated serial lysis of normal and malignant B cells. It recently gained accelerated approval by the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for the treatment of relapsed/refractory Philadelphia chromosome-negative ALL, based on a large phase II trial of 189 adults with relapsed/refractory B-ALL, which showed a CR/CRh (CR with partial hematologic recovery) of 43% after two cycles of treatment. Toxicities include cytokine-release syndrome (CRS) and neurologic events (encephalopathy, aphasia, and seizure). CRS can be alleviated by step-up dosing and dexamethasone, without affecting the cytotoxic effect of blinatumomab. The cause of neurologic toxicity is unclear but is also observed with other T-cell therapies and may relate to variable expression of CD19 within the brain. This review encompasses the preclinical rationale of using the BITE® class of compounds (blinatumomab being the only one that is FDA approved), with clinical data using blinatumomab in the relapsed/refractory setting (pediatrics and adults), the minimal residual disease setting (adults), as well as Philadelphia chromosome-positive ALL. The review also examines the main adverse events: their prevention, recognition, and management; possible mechanisms of resistance; causes of relapse. It also summarizes future trials evaluating the drug earlier in the

  10. The prognostic significance of early treatment response in pediatric relapsed acute myeloid leukemia: results of the international study Relapsed AML 2001/01

    PubMed Central

    Creutzig, Ursula; Zimmermann, Martin; Dworzak, Michael N.; Gibson, Brenda; Tamminga, Rienk; Abrahamsson, Jonas; Ha, Shau-Yin; Hasle, Henrik; Maschan, Alexey; Bertrand, Yves; Leverger, Guy; von Neuhoff, Christine; Razzouk, Bassem; Rizzari, Carmelo; Smisek, Petr; Smith, Owen P.; Stark, Batia; Reinhardt, Dirk; Kaspers, Gertjan L.

    2014-01-01

    The prognostic significance of early response to treatment has not been reported in relapsed pediatric acute myeloid leukemia. In order to identify an early and easily applicable prognostic factor allowing subsequent treatment modifications, we assessed leukemic blast counts in the bone marrow by morphology on days 15 and 28 after first reinduction in 338 patients of the international Relapsed-AML2001/01 trial. Both day 15 and day 28 status was classified as good (≤20% leukemic blasts) in 77% of patients. The correlation between day 15 and 28 blast percentages was significant, but not strong (Spearman correlation coefficient = 0.49, P<0.001). Survival probability decreased in a stepwise fashion along with rising blast counts at day 28. Patients with bone marrow blast counts at this time-point of ≤5%, 6–10%, 11–20% and >20% had 4-year probabilities of survival of 52%±3% versus 36%±10% versus 21%±9% versus 14%±4%, respectively, P<0.0001; this trend was not seen for day 15 results. Multivariate analysis showed that early treatment response at day 28 had the strongest prognostic significance, superseding even time to relapse (< or ≥12 months). In conclusion, an early response to treatment, measured on day 28, is a strong and independent prognostic factor potentially useful for treatment stratification in pediatric relapsed acute myeloid leukemia. This study was registered with ISRCTN code: 94206677. PMID:24763401

  11. Current Strategies for the Detection of Minimal Residual Disease in Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia.

    PubMed

    Rocha, Juliana Maria Camargos; Xavier, Sandra Guerra; de Lima Souza, Marcelo Eduardo; Assumpção, Juliana Godoy; Murao, Mitiko; de Oliveira, Benigna Maria

    2016-01-01

    Acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) is the most common cancer in children. Current treatment strategies for childhood ALL result in long-term remission for approximately 90% of patients. However, the therapeutic response is worse among those who relapse. Several risk stratification approaches based on clinical and biological aspects have been proposed to intensify treatment in patients with high risk of relapse and reduce toxicity on those with a greater probability of cure. The detection of residual leukemic cells (minimal residual disease, MRD) is the most important prognostic factor to identify high-risk patients, allowing redefinition of chemotherapy. In the last decades, several standardized research protocols evaluated MRD using immunophenotyping by flow cytometry and/or real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction at different time points during treatment. Both methods are highly sensitive (10(-3) a 10(-5)), but expensive, complex, and, because of that, require qualified staff and frequently are restricted to reference centers. The aim of this article was to review technical aspects of immunophenotyping by flow cytometry and real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction to evaluate MRD in ALL. PMID:27158437

  12. Current Strategies for the Detection of Minimal Residual Disease in Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Rocha, Juliana Maria Camargos; Xavier, Sandra Guerra; de Lima Souza, Marcelo Eduardo; Assumpção, Juliana Godoy; Murao, Mitiko; de Oliveira, Benigna Maria

    2016-01-01

    Acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) is the most common cancer in children. Current treatment strategies for childhood ALL result in long-term remission for approximately 90% of patients. However, the therapeutic response is worse among those who relapse. Several risk stratification approaches based on clinical and biological aspects have been proposed to intensify treatment in patients with high risk of relapse and reduce toxicity on those with a greater probability of cure. The detection of residual leukemic cells (minimal residual disease, MRD) is the most important prognostic factor to identify high-risk patients, allowing redefinition of chemotherapy. In the last decades, several standardized research protocols evaluated MRD using immunophenotyping by flow cytometry and/or real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction at different time points during treatment. Both methods are highly sensitive (10−3 a 10−5), but expensive, complex, and, because of that, require qualified staff and frequently are restricted to reference centers. The aim of this article was to review technical aspects of immunophenotyping by flow cytometry and real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction to evaluate MRD in ALL. PMID:27158437

  13. Parental Tobacco Smoking and Acute Myeloid Leukemia: The Childhood Leukemia International Consortium.

    PubMed

    Metayer, Catherine; Petridou, Eleni; Aranguré, Juan Manuel Mejía; Roman, Eve; Schüz, Joachim; Magnani, Corrado; Mora, Ana Maria; Mueller, Beth A; de Oliveira, Maria S Pombo; Dockerty, John D; McCauley, Kathryn; Lightfoot, Tracy; Hatzipantelis, Emmanouel; Rudant, Jérémie; Flores-Lujano, Janet; Kaatsch, Peter; Miligi, Lucia; Wesseling, Catharina; Doody, David R; Moschovi, Maria; Orsi, Laurent; Mattioli, Stefano; Selvin, Steve; Kang, Alice Y; Clavel, Jacqueline

    2016-08-15

    The association between tobacco smoke and acute myeloid leukemia (AML) is well established in adults but not in children. Individual-level data on parental cigarette smoking were obtained from 12 case-control studies from the Childhood Leukemia International Consortium (CLIC, 1974-2012), including 1,330 AML cases diagnosed at age <15 years and 13,169 controls. We conducted pooled analyses of CLIC studies, as well as meta-analyses of CLIC and non-CLIC studies. Overall, maternal smoking before, during, or after pregnancy was not associated with childhood AML; there was a suggestion, however, that smoking during pregnancy was associated with an increased risk in Hispanics (odds ratio = 2.08, 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.20, 3.61) but not in other ethnic groups. By contrast, the odds ratios for paternal lifetime smoking were 1.34 (95% CI: 1.11, 1.62) and 1.18 (95% CI: 0.92, 1.51) in pooled and meta-analyses, respectively. Overall, increased risks from 1.2- to 1.3-fold were observed for pre- and postnatal smoking (P < 0.05), with higher risks reported for heavy smokers. Associations with paternal smoking varied by histological type. Our analyses suggest an association between paternal smoking and childhood AML. The association with maternal smoking appears limited to Hispanic children, raising questions about ethnic differences in tobacco-related exposures and biological mechanisms, as well as study-specific biases. PMID:27492895

  14. Sorafenib in Treating Patients With Refractory or Relapsed Acute Leukemia, Myelodysplastic Syndromes, or Blastic Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-04-27

    Adult Acute Basophilic Leukemia; Adult Acute Eosinophilic Leukemia; Adult Acute Megakaryoblastic Leukemia; Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia; Adult Acute Monocytic Leukemia; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13.1q22); CBFB-MYH11; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Maturation; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Minimal Differentiation; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13.1;q22); CBFB-MYH11; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); RUNX1-RUNX1T1; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(9;11)(p22;q23); MLLT3-MLL; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia Without Maturation; Adult Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia; Adult Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); PML-RARA; Adult Erythroleukemia; Adult Pure Erythroid Leukemia; Alkylating Agent-Related Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Blastic Phase; de Novo Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Myelodysplastic Syndrome

  15. Disseminated intravascular coagulation observed following treatment with gemtuzumab ozogamicin for relapsed/refractory acute promyelocytic leukemia

    PubMed Central

    AZUMA, YOSHIKO; NAKAYA, AYA; HOTTA, MASAAKI; FUJITA, SHINYA; TSUBOKURA, YUKIE; YOSHIMURA, HIDEAKI; SATAKE, ATSUSHI; ISHII, KAZUYOSHI; ITO, TOMOKI; NOMURA, SHOSAKU

    2016-01-01

    Gemtuzumab ozogamicin (GO) is a recombinant humanized immunoglobulin G4 anti-cluster of differentiation (CD)33 monoclonal antibody conjugated to N-acetyl-γ calicheamicin dimethylhydrazide, a naturally potent antibiotic. It has been introduced for the treatment of acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL), since large quantities of CD33 are commonly expressed on the surface of APL cells. The present study reported two cases with prominent disseminated intravascular coagulation (DIC), which was transiently observed following treatment with GO with relapsed/refractory APL. Very limited information exists regarding DIC occurring following GO, and its mechanism remains to be elucidated. In the present study, recombinant human soluble thrombomodulin was used for DIC treatment, and the patients recovered promptly. Since DIC is the most serious adverse event associated with GO treatment, elucidation of its mechanism and establishment of a treatment strategy are warranted. PMID:27330760

  16. 5-Azacytidine treatment for relapsed or refractory acute myeloid leukemia after intensive chemotherapy.

    PubMed

    Ivanoff, Sarah; Gruson, Berengere; Chantepie, Sylvain P; Lemasle, Emilie; Merlusca, Lavinia; Harrivel, Veronique; Charbonnier, Amandine; Votte, Patrick; Royer, Bruno; Marolleau, Jean-Pierre

    2013-07-01

    Despite progress in the understanding of leukemia pathophysiology, the treatment of acute myeloid leukemia (AML) remains challenging. In patients with refractory or relapsed (R/R) AML, the prognosis is still poor and this group is targeted for new drug development. We reviewed the outcome of 47 patients, with R/R AML after at least one course of intensive chemotherapy, treated with 5-azacytidine in three different French institutions. The overall response rate was 38% including complete remission in 21%, partial remission in 11%, and hematological improvement in 6% of cases. Median time to relapse was 6 (range, 1-39) months. Median overall survival was 9 months (not reached by responders vs. 4.5 months for nonresponders patients, P = 0.0001). Univariate analysis identified the absence of peripheral blood blasts and <20% bone marrow blasts as prognostic factors for both overall response and survival, but not age, ECOG/PS, type of AML, cytogenetic, status of the disease, number of previous lines of therapy, previous hematological stem cell transplantation, or white blood cells count. Bone marrow blasts percentage <20% was the only independent prognostic factor identified by multivariate analysis for overall response (P = 0.0013) and survival (P = 0.0324). Six patients in remission could proceed to an allogenic hematological stem cell transplantation. The drug-related grade 3/4 adverse events were hematopoietic toxicities (38%) and infection (32%). In conclusion, this study suggests that a salvage therapy with 5-azacytidine is an interesting option for patients with R/R AML after intensive chemotherapy. Prospective randomized studies are needed to demonstrate a superiority of this approach over others strategies. PMID:23619977

  17. S1312, Inotuzumab Ozogamicin and Combination Chemotherapy in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Acute Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-04-14

    Acute Leukemias of Ambiguous Lineage; B-cell Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Philadelphia Chromosome Positive Adult Precursor Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Burkitt Lymphoma

  18. Eltrombopag Olamine in Treating Patients With Relapsed/Refractory Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-04-04

    Adult Acute Basophilic Leukemia; Adult Acute Eosinophilic Leukemia; Adult Acute Megakaryoblastic Leukemia (M7); Adult Acute Minimally Differentiated Myeloid Leukemia (M0); Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Adult Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Adult Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); Adult Erythroleukemia (M6a); Adult Pure Erythroid Leukemia (M6b); Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  19. Clofarabine, Cytarabine, and G-CSF in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-05-05

    Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Adult Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia (M3); Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  20. Selinexor and Chemotherapy in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-12-15

    Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  1. Polymorphisms of the vincristine pathway and response to treatment in children with childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Ceppi, Francesco; Langlois-Pelletier, Chloé; Gagné, Vincent; Rousseau, Julie; Ciolino, Claire; Lorenzo, Samanta De; Kevin, Kojok M; Cijov, Diana; Sallan, Stephen E; Silverman, Lewis B; Neuberg, Donna; Kutok, Jeffery L; Sinnett, Daniel; Laverdière, Caroline; Krajinovic, Maja

    2015-01-01

    Background Vincristine (VCR) is a standard component in the treatment of childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL). VCR cytotoxicity is primarily due to its ability to disrupt the formation of microtubules of the mitotic spindle. Patients & methods A total of 17 polymorphisms in regulatory and coding regions of genes controlling VCR targets (TUBB1, MAP4, ACTG1 and CAPG) or potentially influencing VCR levels (ABCB1 and CYP3A5) were investigated for an association with peripheral neuropathy and outcome in childhood ALL patients. Results High-grade neurotoxicity was more frequent in carriers of the A allele of synonymous (Ala310) G to A (rs1135989) variation in the ACTG1 gene. Substitution (rs4728709) in the promoter of the ABCB1 gene had a protective effect against lower grade neurotoxicity and C to A variation (rs3770102) located 17 nucleotides upstream from the transcription start site had a protective effect against high-grade neurotoxicity. Patients with the ABCB1 3435TT genotype had lower event-free survival; the association with event-free survival was not supported by the analysis in the replication patient set. Conclusion The polymorphisms in the ACTG1, CAPG and ABCB1 genes may modulate VCR-related neurotoxicity, whereas the risk of relapse seems not to be affected by the genes of the VCR pathway. PMID:25084203

  2. Intracellular Signaling Pathways Involved in Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Molecular Targets.

    PubMed

    Layton Tovar, Cristian Fabián; Mendieta Zerón, Hugo

    2016-06-01

    Acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) is a malignant disease characterized by an uncontrolled proliferation of immature lymphoid cells. ALL is the most common hematologic malignancy in early childhood, and it reaches peak incidence between the ages of 2 and 3 years. The prognosis of ALL is associated with aberrant gene expression, in addition to the presence of numerical or structural chromosomal alterations, age, race, and immunophenotype. The Relapse rate with regard to pharmacological treatment rises in childhood; thus, the expression of biomarkers associated with the activation of cell signaling pathways is crucial to establish the disease prognosis. Intracellular pathways involved in ALL are diverse, including Janus kinase/Signal transducers and transcription activators (JAK-STAT), Phosphoinositide-3-kinase-protein kinase B (PI3K-AKT), Ras mitogen-activated protein kinase (Ras-MAPK), Glycogen synthase kinase-3β (GSK-3β), Nuclear factor-kappa beta (NF-κB), and Hypoxia-inducible transcription factor 1α (HIF-1α), among others. In this review, we present several therapeutic targets, intracellular pathways, and molecular markers that are being studied extensively at present. PMID:27065575

  3. The role of idelalisib in the treatment of relapsed and refractory chronic lymphocytic leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Nair, Kruti Sheth; Cheson, Bruce

    2016-01-01

    Idelalisib is a first in class, delta isoform specific, PI3-kinase inhibitor. Based on its high level of efficacy and acceptable safety profile, this oral drug has been approved by the US Food and Drug Administration as a single agent for the treatment of relapsed or refractory small lymphocytic lymphoma, and follicular non-Hodgkin lymphoma, and in combination with rituximab for patients with chronic lymphocytic leukemia. Adverse effects of particular concern include diarrhea, pneumonitis, and transient elevations of hepatic transaminase levels. Efforts to improve on the activity of this drug have included combinations with standard chemotherapy agents, such as bendamustine, and other targeted therapies, including checkpoint inhibitors. However, other combinations have been associated with life-threatening and fatal toxicities. Thus, the development of such regimens should be conducted carefully in the context of a clinical research study. Idelalisib has a vital role as second-line therapy for chronic lymphocytic leukemia, especially for patients with high-risk disease and multiple comorbidities, and studies are exploring the use of this agent as front-line therapy to improve the outcome of patients with indolent B-cell malignancies. PMID:27054023

  4. The role of idelalisib in the treatment of relapsed and refractory chronic lymphocytic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Nair, Kruti Sheth; Cheson, Bruce

    2016-04-01

    Idelalisib is a first in class, delta isoform specific, PI3-kinase inhibitor. Based on its high level of efficacy and acceptable safety profile, this oral drug has been approved by the US Food and Drug Administration as a single agent for the treatment of relapsed or refractory small lymphocytic lymphoma, and follicular non-Hodgkin lymphoma, and in combination with rituximab for patients with chronic lymphocytic leukemia. Adverse effects of particular concern include diarrhea, pneumonitis, and transient elevations of hepatic transaminase levels. Efforts to improve on the activity of this drug have included combinations with standard chemotherapy agents, such as bendamustine, and other targeted therapies, including checkpoint inhibitors. However, other combinations have been associated with life-threatening and fatal toxicities. Thus, the development of such regimens should be conducted carefully in the context of a clinical research study. Idelalisib has a vital role as second-line therapy for chronic lymphocytic leukemia, especially for patients with high-risk disease and multiple comorbidities, and studies are exploring the use of this agent as front-line therapy to improve the outcome of patients with indolent B-cell malignancies. PMID:27054023

  5. Combined Molecular and Clinical Prognostic Index for Relapse and Survival in Cytogenetically Normal Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Pastore, Friederike; Dufour, Annika; Benthaus, Tobias; Metzeler, Klaus H.; Maharry, Kati S.; Schneider, Stephanie; Ksienzyk, Bianka; Mellert, Gudrun; Zellmeier, Evelyn; Kakadia, Purvi M.; Unterhalt, Michael; Feuring-Buske, Michaela; Buske, Christian; Braess, Jan; Sauerland, Maria Cristina; Heinecke, Achim; Krug, Utz; Berdel, Wolfgang E.; Buechner, Thomas; Woermann, Bernhard; Hiddemann, Wolfgang; Bohlander, Stefan K.; Marcucci, Guido; Spiekermann, Karsten; Bloomfield, Clara D.; Hoster, Eva

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Cytogenetically normal (CN) acute myeloid leukemia (AML) is the largest and most heterogeneous cytogenetic AML subgroup. For the practicing clinician, it is difficult to summarize the prognostic information of the growing number of clinical and molecular markers. Our purpose was to develop a widely applicable prognostic model by combining well-established pretreatment patient and disease characteristics. Patients and Methods Two prognostic indices for CN-AML (PINA), one regarding overall survival (OS; PINAOS) and the other regarding relapse-free survival (RFS; PINARFS), were derived from data of 572 patients with CN-AML treated within the AML Cooperative Group 99 study (www.aml-score.org). Results On the basis of age (median, 60 years; range, 17 to 85 years), performance status, WBC count, and mutation status of NPM1, CEBPA, and FLT3-internal tandem duplication, patients were classified into the following three risk groups according to PINAOS and PINARFS: 29% of all patients and 32% of 381 responding patients had low-risk disease (5-year OS, 74%; 5-year RFS, 55%); 56% of all patients and 39% of responding patients had intermediate-risk disease (5-year OS, 28%; 5-year RFS, 27%), and 15% of all patients and 29% of responding patients had high-risk disease (5-year OS, 3%; 5-year RFS, 5%), respectively. PINAOS and PINARFS stratified outcome within European LeukemiaNet genetic groups. Both indices were confirmed on independent data from Cancer and Leukemia Group B/Alliance trials. Conclusion We have developed and validated, to our knowledge, the first prognostic indices specifically designed for adult patients of all ages with CN-AML that combine well-established molecular and clinical variables and that are easily applicable in routine clinical care. The integration of both clinical and molecular markers could provide a basis for individualized patient care through risk-adapted therapy of CN-AML. PMID:24711548

  6. Development and perspective of current Brazilian studies on the epidemiology of childhood leukemia.

    PubMed

    Pombo de Oliveira, Maria S; Koifman, Sergio; Vasconcelos, Gisele M; Emerenciano, Mariana; de Oliveira Novaes, Cristiane

    2009-01-01

    In this concise report, we describe the history and evolution of childhood acute leukemia studies in Brazil, and the application if key biomarkers for clinical trials and epidemiological studies over the past 8 years. Highlights of each ongoing study are summarized. A Brazilian network integrating hospitals and scientific institutions from all country regions has been established. This organization is made possible through informatics and computer networking, and the standardization of pathological reviews including immunophenotyping and molecular characterization of childhood leukemias. The unique characteristics of the Brazilian population combined with a large clinical and epidemiologic framework for patient ascertainment has enabled large-scale epidemiological studies on childhood leukemia in Brazil. PMID:19064327

  7. Parental occupational paint exposure and risk of childhood leukemia in the offspring: Findings from the Childhood Leukemia International Consortium

    PubMed Central

    Bailey, Helen D; Fritschi, Lin; Metayer, Catherine; Infante-Rivard, Claire; Magnani, Corrado; Petridou, Eleni; Roman, Eve; Spector, Logan G; Kaatsch, Peter; Clavel, Jacqueline; Milne, Elizabeth; Dockerty, John D; Glass, Deborah C; Lightfoot, Tracy; Miligi, Lucia; Rudant, Jérémie; Baka, Margarita; Rondelli, Roberto; Amigou, Alicia; Simpson, Jill; Kang, Alice; Moschovi, Maria; Schüz, Joachim

    2014-01-01

    Purpose It has been suggested that parental occupational paint exposure around the time of conception or pregnancy increases the risk of childhood leukemia in the offspring. Methods We obtained individual level data from 13 case-control studies participating in the Childhood Leukemia International Consortium (CLIC). Occupational data were harmonized to a compatible format. Meta-analyses of study-specific odds ratios (ORs) were undertaken, as well as pooled analyses of individual data using unconditional logistic regression. Results Using individual data from fathers of 8,185 cases and 14,210 controls, the pooled OR for paternal exposure around conception and risk of acute lymphoblastic leukaemia (ALL) was 0.93 (95% confidence interval (CI) 0.76, 1.14). Analysis of data from 8,156 ALL case mothers and 14,568 control mothers produced a pooled OR of 0.81 (95% CI 0.39, 1.68) for exposure during pregnancy. For acute myeloid leukaemia (AML), the pooled ORs for paternal and maternal exposure were 0.96 (95% CI 0.65, 1.41) and 1.31 (95% CI 0.38, 4.47) respectively, based on data from 1,231 case and 11,392 control fathers and 1,329 case and 12,141 control mothers. Heterogeneity among the individual studies ranged from low to modest. Conclusions Null findings for paternal exposure for both ALL and AML are consistent with previous reports. Despite the large sample size, results for maternal exposure to paints in pregnancy were based on small numbers of exposed. Overall, we found no evidence that parental occupational exposure to paints increases the risk of leukemia in the offspring, but further data on home exposure are needed. PMID:25088805

  8. Phase I Combination of Midostaurin, Bortezomib, and Chemo in Relapsed/Refractory Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-04-05

    Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Multilineage Dysplasia Following; Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  9. A 50-Year Journey to Cure Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Pui, Ching-Hon; Evans, William E.

    2013-01-01

    The 50th anniversary of Seminars in Hematology coincides with the 50th of St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital, and both milestones are inexorably linked to studies contributing to the cure of childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL). We thought it fitting, therefore, to mark these events by traveling back in time to point out some of the achievements, institutions, study groups and individuals that have made cure of childhood ALL a reality. In many instances, progress was driven by new ideas, while in others it was driven by new experimental tools that allowed more precise assessment of the biology of leukemic blasts and their utility in selecting therapy. We also discuss a number of contemporary advances that point the way to exciting future directions. Whatever pathways are taken, a clear challenge will be to use emerging genome-based or immunologic-based treatment options in ways that will enhance, rather than duplicate or compromise, recent gains in outcome with classic cytotoxic chemotherapy. The theme of this journey serves as a reminder of the chief ingredient of any research directed to a catastrophic disease such as ALL. It is the audacity of a small group of investigators who confronted a childhood cancer with the goal of cure, not palliation, as their mindset. PMID:23953334

  10. Association between body mass index at diagnosis and pediatric leukemia mortality and relapse: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Amankwah, Ernest K; Saenz, Ashleigh M; Hale, Gregory A; Brown, Patrick A

    2016-05-01

    Obesity is a risk factor for mortality and relapse of certain cancers. However, existing evidence for pediatric leukemia is inconsistent. The aim of this systematic review and meta-analysis was to evaluate the association between obesity at diagnosis and pediatric acute leukemia mortality and relapse. This study systematically searched MEDLINE and EMBASE from inception to February 5, 2015. Random-effect models were used to generate pooled estimates of study-specific hazard ratios (HR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI). Eleven studies were included. An increased risk of mortality with a high BMI at diagnosis was observed (overall survival: HR = 1.30, 95% CI = 1.16-1.46 and event-free survival: HR = 1.46, 95% CI = 1.29-1.64). Only two studies reported HR for relapse; one reported a reduced risk, while the other reported an increased risk. A high BMI at diagnosis is associated with poor overall and event-free survival among pediatric acute leukemia patients. Targeted therapeutic approaches for obese pediatric leukemia patients may potentially improve survival outcomes. PMID:26453440

  11. Flavopiridol, Cytarabine, and Mitoxantrone in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Acute Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-09-27

    Adult Acute Megakaryoblastic Leukemia (M7); Adult Acute Minimally Differentiated Myeloid Leukemia (M0); Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Adult Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Adult Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); Adult Erythroleukemia (M6a); Adult Pure Erythroid Leukemia (M6b); Malignant Neoplasm; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  12. Ixazomib in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-06-24

    Adult Acute Megakaryoblastic Leukemia (M7); Adult Acute Minimally Differentiated Myeloid Leukemia (M0); Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Adult Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Adult Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); Adult Erythroleukemia (M6a); Adult Pure Erythroid Leukemia (M6b); Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  13. Cytarabine With or Without SCH 900776 in Treating Adult Patients With Relapsed Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-07-20

    Adult Acute Megakaryoblastic Leukemia; Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia; Adult Acute Monocytic Leukemia; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13.1q22); CBFB-MYH11; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Maturation; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Minimal Differentiation; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13.1;q22); CBFB-MYH11; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); RUNX1-RUNX1T1; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(9;11)(p22;q23); MLLT3-MLL; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia Without Maturation; Adult Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia; Adult Erythroleukemia; Adult Pure Erythroid Leukemia; Alkylating Agent-Related Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  14. Arsenic Trioxide in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-09-13

    Adult Acute Megakaryoblastic Leukemia (M7); Adult Acute Minimally Differentiated Myeloid Leukemia (M0); Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Adult Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Adult Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); Adult Erythroleukemia (M6a); Adult Pure Erythroid Leukemia (M6b); Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  15. CPX-351 in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Acute Myeloid Leukemia or Myelodysplastic Syndrome

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-04-25

    Adult Acute Erythroid Leukemia (M6); Adult Acute Megakaryoblastic Leukemia (M7); Adult Acute Minimally Differentiated Myeloid Leukemia (M0); Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia and Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Adult Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); de Novo Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Myelodysplastic Syndromes

  16. AKT Inhibitor MK-2206 in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-12-23

    Adult Acute Megakaryoblastic Leukemia (M7); Adult Acute Minimally Differentiated Myeloid Leukemia (M0); Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Adult Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Adult Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); Adult Erythroleukemia (M6a); Adult Pure Erythroid Leukemia (M6b); Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  17. Commentary on "Childhood Leukemia Survivors and Their Return to School: A Literature Review, Case Study, and Recommendations"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schmitt, Ara

    2011-01-01

    This commentary pertains to the article, "Childhood Leukemia Survivors and Their Return to School: A Literature Review, Case Study, and Recommendations" by D. Scott Hermann, Jill R. Thurber, Kenneth Miles, and Gloria Gilbert in this issue (2011) regarding pediatric leukemia. The authors present a literature review regarding leukemia in childhood,…

  18. Parental occupational pesticide exposure and the risk of childhood leukemia in the offspring: Findings from the Childhood Leukemia International Consortium

    PubMed Central

    Bailey, Helen D; Fritschi, Lin; Infante-Rivard, Claire; Glass, Deborah C; Miligi, Lucia; Dockerty, John D; Lightfoot, Tracy; Clavel, Jacqueline; Roman, Eve; Spector, Logan G; Kaatsch, Peter; Metayer, Catherine; Magnani, Corrado; Milne, Elizabeth; Polychronopoulou, Sophia; Simpson, Jill; Rudant, Jérémie; Sidi, Vasiliki; Rondelli, Roberto; Orsi, Laurent; Kang, Alice; Petridou, Eleni; Schüz, Joachim

    2014-01-01

    Maternal occupational pesticide exposure during pregnancy and/or paternal occupational pesticide exposure around conception have been suggested to increase risk of leukemia in the offspring. With a view to providing insight in this area we pooled individual level data from 13 case-control studies participating in the Childhood Leukemia International Consortium (CLIC). Occupational data were harmonized to a compatible format. Pooled individual analyses were undertaken using unconditional logistic regression. Using exposure data from mothers of 8,236 cases, and 14,850 controls, and from fathers of 8,169 cases and 14,201 controls the odds ratio (OR) for maternal exposure during pregnancy and the risk of acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) was 1.01 (95% confidence interval (CI) 0.78, 1.30) and for paternal exposure around conception 1.20 (95% 1.06, 1.38). For acute myeloid leukemia (AML), the OR for maternal exposure during pregnancy was 1.94 (CI 1.19, 3.18) and for paternal exposure around conception 0.91 (CI 0.66, 1.24.) based on data from 1,329 case and 12,141 control mothers, and 1,231 case and 11,383 control fathers. Our finding of a significantly increased risk of AML in the offspring with maternal exposure to pesticides during pregnancy is consistent with previous reports. We also found a slight increase in risk of ALL with paternal exposure around conception which appeared to be more evident in children diagnosed at the age of five years or more and those with T cell ALL which raises interesting questions on possible mechanisms. PMID:24700406

  19. CPI-613, Cytarabine, and Mitoxantrone Hydrochloride in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-06-23

    Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  20. Lenalidomide and Cytarabine in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-04-01

    Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  1. Mammalian Target of Rapamycin (mTOR) Activity Dependent Phospho-Protein Expression in Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia (ALL)

    PubMed Central

    Márk, Ágnes; Hajdu, Melinda; Kenessey, István; Sticz, Tamás; Nagy, Eszter; Barna, Gábor; Váradi, Zsófia; Kovács, Gábor; Kopper, László; Csóka, Monika

    2013-01-01

    Modern treatment strategies have improved the prognosis of childhood ALL; however, treatment still fails in 25–30% of patients. Further improvement of treatment may depend on the development of targeted therapies. mTOR kinase, a central mediator of several signaling pathways, has recently attracted remarkable attention as a potential target in pediatric ALL. However, limited data exists about the activity of mTOR. In the present study, the amount of mTOR activity dependent phospho-proteins was characterized by ELISA in human leukemia cell lines and in lymphoblasts from childhood ALL patients (n = 49). Expression was measured before and during chemotherapy and at relapses. Leukemia cell lines exhibited increased mTOR activity, indicated by phospho-S6 ribosomal protein (p-S6) and phosphorylated eukaryotic initiation factor 4E binding protein (p-4EBP1). Elevated p-4EBP1 protein levels were detected in ALL samples at diagnosis; efficacy of chemotherapy was followed by the decrease of mTOR activity dependent protein phosphorylation. Optical density (OD) for p-4EBP1 (ELISA) was significantly higher in patients with poor prognosis at diagnosis, and in the samples of relapsed patients. Our results suggest that measuring mTOR activity related phospho-proteins such as p-4EBP1 by ELISA may help to identify patients with poor prognosis before treatment, and to detect early relapses. Determining mTOR activity in leukemic cells may also be a useful tool for selecting patients who may benefit from future mTOR inhibitor treatments. PMID:23573198

  2. Lithium Carbonate and Tretinoin in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-10-19

    Adult Acute Megakaryoblastic Leukemia (M7); Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Adult Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Adult Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); Adult Erythroleukemia (M6a); Adult Pure Erythroid Leukemia (M6b); Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  3. General Information about Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia and Other Myeloid Malignancies

    MedlinePlus

    ... Other Myeloid Malignancies Treatment (PDQ®)–Patient Version General Information About Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia and Other Myeloid ... the PDQ Pediatric Treatment Editorial Board . Clinical Trial Information A clinical trial is a study to answer ...

  4. Maternal Exposure to Occupational Solvents and Childhood Leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Infante-Rivard, Claire; Siemiatycki, Jack; Lakhani, Ramzan; Nadon, Louise

    2005-01-01

    Many organic solvents are considered probable carcinogens. We carried out a population-based case–control study including 790 incident cases of childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia and as many healthy controls, matched on age and sex. Maternal occupational exposure to solvents before and during pregnancy was estimated using the expert method, which involves chemists coding each individual’s job for specific contaminants. Home exposure to solvents was also evaluated. The frequency of exposure to specific agents or mixtures was generally low. Results were generally similar for the period ranging from 2 years before pregnancy up to birth and for the pregnancy period alone. For the former period, the odds ratio (OR), adjusted for maternal age and sex, for any exposure to all solvents together was 1.11 [95% confidence interval (CI), 0.88–1.40]. Increased risks were observed for specific exposures, such as to 1,1,1-trichloroethane (OR = 7.55; 95% CI, 0.92–61.97), toluene (OR = 1.88; 95% CI, 1.01–3.47), and mineral spirits (OR = 1.82; 95% CI, 1.05–3.14). There were stronger indications of moderately increased risks associated with exposure to alkanes (C5–C17; OR = 1.78; 95% CI, 1.11–2.86) and mononuclear aromatic hydrocarbons (OR = 1.64; 95% CI, 1.12–2.41). Risk did not increase with increasing exposure, except for alkanes, where a significant trend (p = 0.04) was observed. Home exposure was not associated with increased risk. Using an elaborate exposure coding method, this study shows that maternal exposure to solvents in the workplace does not seem to play a major role in childhood leukemia. PMID:15929905

  5. Decitabine, Vorinostat, and Cytarabine in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-12-19

    Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13.1q22); CBFB-MYH11; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13.1;q22); CBFB-MYH11; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); RUNX1-RUNX1T1; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(9;11)(p22;q23); MLLT3-MLL; Adult Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); PML-RARA; Alkylating Agent-Related Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  6. [Cytomegalovirus reactivation after allogeneic stem cell transplantation reduces the risk of relapse in patients with acute myeloid leukemia].

    PubMed

    Takenaka, Katsuto

    2015-07-01

    Cytomegalovirus (CMV) infection is still a major infectious complication after allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT). Recently, CMV reactivation was reported to be associated with a decreased risk of relapse in patients with acute myeloid leukemia (AML). We herein retrospectively evaluated the impact of early CMV reactivation on the incidence of disease relapse after allo-HCT using the database of the Transplant Registry Unified Management Program (TRUMP) at the JSHCT. Patients who underwent their first allo-HCT from HLA-matched related or unrelated donors between 2000 and 2009, and who survived without disease relapse until day 100 after transplantation, were analyzed. CMV reactivation was associated with a decreased cumulative incidence of relapse among patients with AML, but not in patients with other hematological malignancies in our study. However, this benefit was nullified by the increased rate of non-relapse mortality. The underlying mechanism is unclear, but the immunological reaction against CMV reactivation plays an essential role in this association. Thus, immune augmentation treatment options including vaccination and adoptive T-cell transfer might be useful for taking advantage of the efficacy of CMV reactivation while minimizing the increase in non-relapse mortality. PMID:26251145

  7. Preferentially Expressed Antigen of Melanoma (PRAME) and Wilms’ Tumor 1 (WT 1) Genes Expression in Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia, Prognostic Role and Correlation with Survival

    PubMed Central

    Khateeb, Engy El; Morgan, Dalia

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Acute lymphocytic leukemia (ALL) is the most common hematologic malignancy in children. In young children it is also largely curable, with more than 90% of afflicted children achieving long-term remission. PRAME (Preferentially expressed antigen of melanoma) gene belongs to Group 3 class I HLA-restricted widely expressed antigens in which genes encoding widely expressed tumor antigens have been detected in many normal tissues as well as in histologically different types of tumors with no preferential expression on a certain type of cancer. It has been found to be expressed in a variety of cancer cells as leukemia & lymphoma. PRAME monitoring can be useful for detection of minimal residual disease and subsequent relapses particularly those leukemias in which specific tumor markers are unavailable. Wilms’ tumor1 (WT1) gene was identified as a gene that plays an important role in normal kidney development and inactivation of its function was shown to result in the development of Wilms’ tumors in paediatric patients. Disruption of WT1 function has been implicated in the formation of many different tumor types. AIM: to study how PRAME & WT 1 genes expression patterns influence cancer susceptibility & prognosis. PATIENTS & METHODS: 50 patients with denovo childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia, as well as 50 age and sex matched apparently healthy volunteers were genotyped for PRAME and WT1 genes expression by reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). RESULTS: PRAME gene was expressed in 34 of the patients (68%) and WT1 gene was expressed in 26 of the patients (52%). Expression of both genes was significantly higher compared to controls (P < 0.0001). Analysis of relapse free survival among our patients revealed that patients expressing PRAME gene or WT1 gene had better relapse free survival (p value=0.02 and 0.01 respectively). Relapse free survival increased significantly among patients coexpressing PRAME and WT 1(p value =0

  8. Phase I study of azacitidine and bortezomib in adults with relapsed or refractory acute myeloid leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Walker, Alison R.; Klisovic, Rebecca B.; Garzon, Ramiro; Schaaf, Larry J.; Humphries, Kristina; Devine, Steven M.; Byrd, John C.; Grever, Michael R.; Marcucci, Guido; Blum, William

    2013-01-01

    We previously reported that bortezomib indirectly modulates transcription of DNA methyltransferase 1 (DNMT). We designed a phase I study of azacitidine (a direct DNMT inhibitor) plus bortezomib in acute myeloid leukemia (AML) to determine safety and tolerability. Twenty-three adults with relapsed/refractory AML received azacitidine 75mg/m2 daily on days 1-7. Bortezomib was dose escalated from 0.7mg/m2 on days 2 and 5 to 1.3mg/m2 on days 2, 5, 9, and 12. The target dose was reached without dose limiting toxicities. Infection and/or febrile neutropenia were frequent. Patients received a median of 2 cycles of therapy (range, 1-12+). Five of 23 patients achieved remission including two with morphologic and cytogenetic complete response (CR) and three with CR and incomplete count recovery (CRi). Of CR/CRi responders with cytogenetic abnormalities at baseline, three of four achieved cytogenetic CR. The combination of azacitidine and bortezomib was tolerable and active in this cohort of poor-risk previously-treated AML patients. PMID:23952243

  9. Midostaurin, bortezomib and MEC in relapsed/refractory acute myeloid leukemia.

    PubMed

    Walker, Alison R; Wang, Hongyan; Walsh, Katherine; Bhatnagar, Bhavana; Vasu, Sumithira; Garzon, Ramiro; Canning, Renee; Geyer, Susan; Wu, Yue-Zhong; Devine, Steven M; Klisovic, Rebecca; Blum, William; Marcucci, Guido

    2016-09-01

    Targeting aberrant tyrosine kinase activity may impact clinical outcome in acute myeloid leukemia (AML). We conducted a phase I study of the tyrosine kinase inhibitor midostaurin with bortezomib alone and in combination with chemotherapy in patients with AML. Patients on dose levels 1 and 2 (DL1 & 2) received midostaurin 50 mg bid and escalating doses of bortezomib (1 to 1.3 mg/m2). Patients on DL3 or higher received midostaurin and bortezomib following chemotherapy with mitoxantrone, etoposide, cytarabine (MEC). None of the patients enrolled to DL1 & 2 had dose-limiting toxicities (DLTs) or a clinical response. Among patients enrolled to DL3 or higher, DLTs were peripheral neuropathy, decrease in ejection fraction and diarrhea. A 56.5% CR rate and 82.5% overall response rate (CR + CR with incomplete neutrophil or platelet count recovery) were observed. The midostaurin/bortezomib/MEC combination is active in refractory/relapsed AML, but is associated with expected drug-related toxicities (NCT01174888). PMID:26784138

  10. ABCG2, Cytogenetics, and Age Predict Relapse after Allogeneic Stem Cell Transplantation for Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Complete Remission.

    PubMed

    Damiani, Daniela; Tiribelli, Mario; Geromin, Antonella; Cerno, Michela; Zanini, Francesca; Michelutti, Angela; Fanin, Renato

    2016-09-01

    Recent studies have shown that ABGG2 protein overexpression in acute myeloid leukemia (AML) may be associated with poor response to therapy and increased relapse risk. Few data are available in patients with AML undergoing allogeneic stem cell transplantation (SCT), particularly when in complete remission (CR). We analyzed 105 patients with AML who underwent allogeneic SCT in CR evaluating the role of ABCG2 and other pretransplantation features on subsequent transplantation outcomes. Factors negatively associated with leukemia-free survival (LFS) were unfavorable cytogenetics (3-year LFS 48% versus 80%, P = .0035) and ABCG2 positivity (65% versus 80%, P = .045). Three-year cumulative incidence of relapse (CIR) in the whole population was 20%; a higher incidence of relapse was associated with adverse cytogenetics (41% versus 16%, P = .018), ABCG2 overexpression (29% versus 15%, P = .04), and, marginally, age > 50 years (30% versus 14%, P = .06). We grouped patients according to the combination of these 3 risk factors: no patient relapsed within 3 years from SCT in the group without risk factors, whereas the 3-year CIR was 12% (95% confidence interval [CI], 2% to 25%) in the group with 1 risk factor and 47% (95% CI, 31% to 70%) in patients with 2 or 3 risk factors (P = .00005). In conclusion, allogeneic SCT does not seem to abrogate the negative prognosis associated with ABCG2 overexpression at diagnosis, specifically in terms of a higher relapse risk. ABCG2, age, and cytogenetics can predict AML relapse after SCT in patients who undergo transplantation while in CR. PMID:27178373

  11. Childhood Leukemia Survivors and Their Return to School: A Literature Review, Case Study, and Recommendations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Herrmann, D. Scott; Thurber, Jill R.; Miles, Kenneth; Gilbert, Gloria

    2011-01-01

    Leukemias (blood cell cancers) and central nervous system tumors are the most frequently occurring types of cancer in children. Mortality rates from all childhood cancers have decreased over the past 2 decades. As a result, many childhood cancer survivors are now returning to their schools after having been successfully treated. Although most of…

  12. Rationale for an international consortium to study inherited genetic susceptibility to childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Sherborne, Amy L.; Hemminki, Kari; Kumar, Rajiv; Bartram, Claus R.; Stanulla, Martin; Schrappe, Martin; Petridou, Eleni; Semsei, Ágnes F.; Szalai, Csaba; Sinnett, Daniel; Krajinovic, Maja; Healy, Jasmine; Lanciotti, Marina; Dufour, Carlo; Indaco, Stefania; El-Ghouroury, Eman A; Sawangpanich, Ruchchadol; Hongeng, Suradej; Pakakasama, Samart; Gonzalez-Neira, Anna; Ugarte, Evelia L.; Leal, Valeria P.; Espinoza, Juan P.M.; Kamel, Azza M.; Ebid, Gamal T.A.; Radwan, Eman R.; Yalin, Serap; Yalin, Erdinc; Berkoz, Mehmet; Simpson, Jill; Roman, Eve; Lightfoot, Tracy; Hosking, Fay J.; Vijayakrishnan, Jayaram; Greaves, Mel; Houlston, Richard S.

    2011-01-01

    Acute lymphoblastic leukemia is the major pediatric cancer in developed countries. To date most association studies of acute lymphoblastic leukemia have been based on the candidate gene approach and have evaluated a restricted number of polymorphisms. Such studies have served to highlight difficulties in conducting statistically and methodologically rigorous investigations into acute lymphoblastic leukemia risk. Recent genome-wide association studies of childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia have provided robust evidence that common variation at four genetic loci confers a modest increase in risk. The accumulated experience to date and relative lack of success of initial efforts to identify novel acute lymphoblastic leukemia predisposition loci emphasize the need for alternative study designs and methods. The International Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukaemia Genetics Consortium includes 12 research groups in Europe, Asia, the Middle East and the Americas engaged in studying the genetics of acute lymphoblastic leukemia. The initial goal of this consortium is to identify and characterize low-penetrance susceptibility variants for acute lymphoblastic leukemia through association-based analyses. Efforts to develop genome-wide association studies of acute lymphoblastic leukemia, in terms of both sample size and single nucleotide polymorphism coverage, and to increase the number of single nucleotide polymorphisms taken forward to large-scale replication should lead to the identification of additional novel risk variants for acute lymphoblastic leukemia. Ethnic differences in the risk of acute lymphoblastic leukemia are well recognized and thus in assessing the interplay between inherited and non-genetic risk factors, analyses using different population cohorts with different incidence rates are likely to be highly informative. Given that the frequency of many acute lymphoblastic leukemia subgroups is small, identifying differential effects will realistically only be

  13. Stromal cell-mediated mitochondrial redox adaptation regulates drug resistance in childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Jizhong; Masurekar, Ashish; Johnson, Suzanne; Chakraborty, Sohini; Griffiths, John; Smith, Duncan; Alexander, Seema; Dempsey, Clare; Parker, Catriona; Harrison, Stephanie; Li, Yaoyong; Miller, Crispin; Di, Yujun; Ghosh, Zhumur; Krishnan, Shekhar; Saha, Vaskar

    2015-01-01

    Despite the high cure rates in childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL), relapsed ALL remains a significant clinical problem. Genetic heterogeneity does not adequately explain variations in response to therapy. The chemoprotective tumor microenvironment may additionally contribute to disease recurrence. This study identifies metabolic reprogramming of leukemic cells by bone marrow stromal cells (BMSC) as a putative mechanism of drug resistance. In a BMSC-extracellular matrix culture model, BMSC produced chemoprotective soluble factors and facilitated the emergence of a reversible multidrug resistant phenotype in ALL cells. BMSC environment induced a mitochondrial calcium influx leading to increased reactive oxygen species (ROS) levels in ALL cells. In response to this oxidative stress, drug resistant cells underwent a redox adaptation process, characterized by a decrease in ROS levels and mitochondrial membrane potential with an upregulation of antioxidant production and MCL-1 expression. Similar expanded subpopulations of low ROS expressing and drug resistant cells were identified in pre-treatment bone marrow samples from ALL patients with slower response to therapy. This suggests that the bone marrow microenvironment induces a redox adaptation in ALL subclones that protects against cytotoxic stress and potentially gives rise to minimal residual disease. Targeting metabolic remodeling by inhibiting antioxidant production and antiapoptosis was able to overcome drug resistance. Thus metabolic plasticity in leukemic cell response to environmental factors contributes to chemoresistance and disease recurrence. Adjunctive strategies targeting such processes have the potential to overcome therapeutic failure in ALL. PMID:26474278

  14. Stromal cell-mediated mitochondrial redox adaptation regulates drug resistance in childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jizhong; Masurekar, Ashish; Johnson, Suzanne; Chakraborty, Sohini; Griffiths, John; Smith, Duncan; Alexander, Seema; Dempsey, Clare; Parker, Catriona; Harrison, Stephanie; Li, Yaoyong; Miller, Crispin; Di, Yujun; Ghosh, Zhumur; Krishnan, Shekhar; Saha, Vaskar

    2015-12-15

    Despite the high cure rates in childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL), relapsed ALL remains a significant clinical problem. Genetic heterogeneity does not adequately explain variations in response to therapy. The chemoprotective tumor microenvironment may additionally contribute to disease recurrence. This study identifies metabolic reprogramming of leukemic cells by bone marrow stromal cells (BMSC) as a putative mechanism of drug resistance. In a BMSC-extracellular matrix culture model, BMSC produced chemoprotective soluble factors and facilitated the emergence of a reversible multidrug resistant phenotype in ALL cells. BMSC environment induced a mitochondrial calcium influx leading to increased reactive oxygen species (ROS) levels in ALL cells. In response to this oxidative stress, drug resistant cells underwent a redox adaptation process, characterized by a decrease in ROS levels and mitochondrial membrane potential with an upregulation of antioxidant production and MCL-1 expression. Similar expanded subpopulations of low ROS expressing and drug resistant cells were identified in pre-treatment bone marrow samples from ALL patients with slower response to therapy. This suggests that the bone marrow microenvironment induces a redox adaptation in ALL subclones that protects against cytotoxic stress and potentially gives rise to minimal residual disease. Targeting metabolic remodeling by inhibiting antioxidant production and antiapoptosis was able to overcome drug resistance. Thus metabolic plasticity in leukemic cell response to environmental factors contributes to chemoresistance and disease recurrence. Adjunctive strategies targeting such processes have the potential to overcome therapeutic failure in ALL. PMID:26474278

  15. The Progression of Bone Mineral Density Abnormalities After Chemotherapy for Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia.

    PubMed

    Vitanza, Nicholas A; Hogan, Laura E; Zhang, Guangxiang; Parker, Robert I

    2015-07-01

    Although reduced bone mineral density in survivors of childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) is well documented, the degree of demineralization and relation to age are not well described. This is a retrospective chart analysis of 58 patients consecutively treated for ALL without relapse, cranial irradiation, or transplantation. Bone mineral densities were measured by dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry and patients were divided by sex and age (≤5, 6 to 10, and >10 y) at diagnosis. Serial scans for 6 years after therapy were analyzed as Z-scores. Over 6 years after therapy, 93.1% of patients exhibited a decreased Z-score in at least 1 anatomic site. The difference in Z-score among the age cohorts was significant at both the lumbar spine and femoral neck. Patients older than 10 years at diagnosis had the lowest Z-scores: -2.78 and -2.87 for boys and -2.39 and -2.91 for girls at the lumbar spine and femoral neck, respectively. Children after ALL therapy exhibit a significant bone mineral deficit shortly after completion of therapy that persists for at least 6 years. The degree of bone demineralization can be followed up by a dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry scan and is most severe in patients older than 10 years at the initiation of therapy. PMID:25222061

  16. Relapse After Methylprednisolone Oral Minipulse Therapy in Childhood Vitiligo: A 12-Month Follow-Up Study

    PubMed Central

    Majid, Imran; Imran, Saher

    2013-01-01

    Background: Oral minipulse (OMP) therapy with methylprednisolone is presently one of the most common oral treatments used for progressive vitiligo in children. The treatment is usually given for a period of 6 months during which majority of patients are reported to go into remission. However, there are no follow-up studies to comment upon what happens to the disease after OMP therapy is withdrawn. Aim of the study: To document the incidence of relapse over a period of 1 year after OMP therapy is stopped in children with vitiligo. Materials and Methods: The study was conducted in 180 patients of childhood vitiligo (<15 years of age) who had been on OMP therapy with oral methylprednisolone for at least 6 months and who had achieved a complete remission of their disease during the treatment period. The enrolled patients were followed up for a period of 1 year and examined clinically for any sign of reactivation of their disease over either the old lesions or at any new area of the body. Results: Forty-two patients were lost and could not complete the follow-up period of 1 year. Out of the 138 patients available at the end of 1 year, relapse was observed in 48 patients (34.8%). Rest of 90 patients remained in remission over the follow-up period of 1 year. Relapse was more common in patients below 10 years of age (47.4%) as compared with older children (25.9%). Conclusion: Relapse after using methylprednisolone OMP therapy in children with vitiligo is quite common especially in younger age groups. Studies are needed to see whether these relapses could be avoided by giving the treatment for a period longer than 6 months. PMID:23716799

  17. RNA sequencing unravels the genetics of refractory/relapsed T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia. Prognostic and therapeutic implications.

    PubMed

    Gianfelici, Valentina; Chiaretti, Sabina; Demeyer, Sofie; Di Giacomo, Filomena; Messina, Monica; La Starza, Roberta; Peragine, Nadia; Paoloni, Francesca; Geerdens, Ellen; Pierini, Valentina; Elia, Loredana; Mancini, Marco; De Propris, Maria Stefania; Apicella, Valerio; Gaidano, Gianluca; Testi, Anna Maria; Vitale, Antonella; Vignetti, Marco; Mecucci, Cristina; Guarini, Anna; Cools, Jan; Foà, Robin

    2016-08-01

    Despite therapeutic improvements, a sizable number of patients with T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia still have a poor outcome. To unravel the genomic background associated with refractoriness, we evaluated the transcriptome of 19 cases of refractory/early relapsed T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (discovery cohort) by performing RNA-sequencing on diagnostic material. The incidence and prognostic impact of the most frequently mutated pathways were validated by Sanger sequencing on genomic DNA from diagnostic samples of an independent cohort of 49 cases (validation cohort), including refractory, relapsed and responsive cases. Combined gene expression and fusion transcript analyses in the discovery cohort revealed the presence of known oncogenes and identified novel rearrangements inducing overexpression, as well as inactivation of tumor suppressor genes. Mutation analysis identified JAK/STAT and RAS/PTEN as the most commonly disrupted pathways in patients with chemorefractory disease or early relapse, frequently in association with NOTCH1/FBXW7 mutations. The analysis on the validation cohort documented a significantly higher risk of relapse, inferior overall survival, disease-free survival and event-free survival in patients with JAK/STAT or RAS/PTEN alterations. Conversely, a significantly better survival was observed in patients harboring only NOTCH1/FBXW7 mutations: this favorable prognostic effect was abrogated by the presence of concomitant mutations. Preliminary in vitro assays on primary cells demonstrated sensitivity to specific inhibitors. These data document the negative prognostic impact of JAK/STAT and RAS/PTEN mutations in T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia and suggest the potential clinical application of JAK and PI3K/mTOR inhibitors in patients harboring mutations in these pathways. PMID:27151993

  18. RNA sequencing unravels the genetics of refractory/relapsed T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia. Prognostic and therapeutic implications

    PubMed Central

    Gianfelici, Valentina; Chiaretti, Sabina; Demeyer, Sofie; Di Giacomo, Filomena; Messina, Monica; La Starza, Roberta; Peragine, Nadia; Paoloni, Francesca; Geerdens, Ellen; Pierini, Valentina; Elia, Loredana; Mancini, Marco; De Propris, Maria Stefania; Apicella, Valerio; Gaidano, Gianluca; Testi, Anna Maria; Vitale, Antonella; Vignetti, Marco; Mecucci, Cristina; Guarini, Anna; Cools, Jan; Foà, Robin

    2016-01-01

    Despite therapeutic improvements, a sizable number of patients with T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia still have a poor outcome. To unravel the genomic background associated with refractoriness, we evaluated the transcriptome of 19 cases of refractory/early relapsed T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (discovery cohort) by performing RNA-sequencing on diagnostic material. The incidence and prognostic impact of the most frequently mutated pathways were validated by Sanger sequencing on genomic DNA from diagnostic samples of an independent cohort of 49 cases (validation cohort), including refractory, relapsed and responsive cases. Combined gene expression and fusion transcript analyses in the discovery cohort revealed the presence of known oncogenes and identified novel rearrangements inducing overexpression, as well as inactivation of tumor suppressor genes. Mutation analysis identified JAK/STAT and RAS/PTEN as the most commonly disrupted pathways in patients with chemorefractory disease or early relapse, frequently in association with NOTCH1/FBXW7 mutations. The analysis on the validation cohort documented a significantly higher risk of relapse, inferior overall survival, disease-free survival and event-free survival in patients with JAK/STAT or RAS/PTEN alterations. Conversely, a significantly better survival was observed in patients harboring only NOTCH1/FBXW7 mutations: this favorable prognostic effect was abrogated by the presence of concomitant mutations. Preliminary in vitro assays on primary cells demonstrated sensitivity to specific inhibitors. These data document the negative prognostic impact of JAK/STAT and RAS/PTEN mutations in T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia and suggest the potential clinical application of JAK and PI3K/mTOR inhibitors in patients harboring mutations in these pathways. PMID:27151993

  19. High-Dose Vincristine Sulfate Liposome Injection for Advanced, Relapsed, and Refractory Adult Philadelphia Chromosome–Negative Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    PubMed Central

    O'Brien, Susan; Schiller, Gary; Lister, John; Damon, Lloyd; Goldberg, Stuart; Aulitzky, Walter; Ben-Yehuda, Dina; Stock, Wendy; Coutre, Steven; Douer, Dan; Heffner, Leonard T.; Larson, Melissa; Seiter, Karen; Smith, Scott; Assouline, Sarit; Kuriakose, Philip; Maness, Lori; Nagler, Arnon; Rowe, Jacob; Schaich, Markus; Shpilberg, Ofer; Yee, Karen; Schmieder, Guenter; Silverman, Jeffrey A.; Thomas, Deborah; Deitcher, Steven R.; Kantarjian, Hagop

    2013-01-01

    Purpose Relapsed adult acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) is associated with high reinduction mortality, chemotherapy resistance, and rapid progression leading to death. Vincristine sulfate liposome injection (VSLI), sphingomyelin and cholesterol nanoparticle vincristine (VCR), facilitates VCR dose-intensification and densification plus enhances target tissue delivery. We evaluated high-dose VSLI monotherapy in adults with Philadelphia chromosome (Ph) –negative ALL that was multiply relapsed, relapsed and refractory to reinduction, and/or relapsed after hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT). Patients and Methods Sixty-five adults with Ph-negative ALL in second or greater relapse or whose disease had progressed following two or more leukemia therapies were treated in this pivotal phase II, multinational trial. Intravenous VSLI 2.25 mg/m2, without dose capping, was administered once per week until response, progression, toxicity, or pursuit of HCT. The primary end point was achievement of complete response (CR) or CR with incomplete hematologic recovery (CRi). Results The CR/CRi rate was 20% and overall response rate was 35%. VSLI monotherapy was effective as third-, fourth-, and fifth-line therapy and in patients refractory to other single- and multiagent reinduction therapies. Median CR/CRi duration was 23 weeks (range, 5 to 66 weeks); 12 patients bridged to a post-VSLI HCT, and five patients were long-term survivors. VSLI was generally well tolerated and associated with a low 30-day mortality rate (12%). Conclusion High-dose VSLI monotherapy resulted in meaningful clinical outcomes including durable responses and bridging to HCT in advanced ALL settings. The toxicity profile of VSLI was predictable, manageable, and comparable to standard VCR despite the delivery of large, normally unachievable, individual and cumulative doses of VCR. PMID:23169518

  20. Biomarkers in Bone Marrow Samples From Pediatric Patients With High-Risk Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-05-17

    Childhood Acute Basophilic Leukemia; Childhood Acute Eosinophilic Leukemia; Childhood Acute Erythroleukemia (M6); Childhood Acute Megakaryocytic Leukemia (M7); Childhood Acute Minimally Differentiated Myeloid Leukemia (M0); Childhood Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Childhood Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Childhood Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Childhood Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Childhood Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); Recurrent Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Untreated Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia and Other Myeloid Malignancies

  1. Meningosis prophylaxis with intrathecal /sup 198/Au-colloid and methotrexate in childhood acute lymphocytic leukemia

    SciTech Connect

    Metz, O.; Stoll, W.; Plenert, W.

    1982-01-15

    Since 1972, telecobalt irradiation plus intrathecal methotrexate (ITMTX) has been successfully replaced in Jena by intrathecal colloidal radioactive gold (/sup 198/Au) plus ITMTX for meningosis prophylaxis in leukemia. Seventy-three children with acute lymphocytic leukemia (ALL) were given 1.24-4.89 mCi (45.8-181 MBq) of colloidal 198Au IT after successful initiation of remission. During cytostatic therapy, the following relapses occurred: meningosis leucaemica, five patients (6.8%); bone-marrow relapse and the meningosis leucaemica, one patient; and bone-marrow relapse, 20 patients (27.4%). In 18 children, combination chemotherapy was terminated after two and a half or three years of treatment. After that time, one meningeal relapse and six bone-marrow relapses occurred. Within the first 24 hours after application of radioactive gold, headaches, vomiting, and fever occurred in less than 10% of the children. An apathy syndrome, leukecephalopathy, or severe infections, were not observed in a single case. Radioactive gold spreads in the subarachnoid space and is phagocytized by the arachnoidea. The tumoricide effect extends selectively over the space of distribution of the latent meningosis leucaemia. The cerebral parenchyma remains unaffected by radiation. Thus, radioactive gold may be preferable to telecobalt irradiation in preventing central nervous system leukemia.

  2. T-cell receptor excision circle levels after allogeneic stem cell transplantation are predictive of relapse in patients with acute myeloid leukemia and myelodysplastic syndrome.

    PubMed

    Uzunel, Mehmet; Sairafi, Darius; Remberger, Mats; Mattsson, Jonas; Uhlin, Michael

    2014-07-15

    In this retrospective study, 209 patients with malignant disease were analyzed for levels of T-cell receptor excision circles (TRECs) for the first 24 months after allogeneic stem cell transplantation. CD3(+) cells were separated by direct antibody-coupled magnetic beads, followed by DNA extraction according to a standard protocol. The δRec-ψJα signal joint TREC was measured with real-time quantitative PCR. Patients were grouped based on malignant disease: chronic myeloid leukemia, chronic lymphatic leukemia, acute myeloid leukemia (AML), acute lymphocytic leukemia (ALL), and myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS). Patients were further subdivided based on TREC levels below (low-TREC) or above (high-TREC) median at each time point. TREC levels were then correlated to relapse incidence and relapse-free survival (RFS). For patients with AML, low TREC levels 2 months post-transplantation were correlated to high relapse incidence at 5 years (P<0.05). In patients with chronic leukemia, high TREC levels were correlated with improved RFS (P<0.05). For patients with MDS, high TREC levels at 9 months post-transplantation were associated with higher RFS at 5 years (P<0.02) and lower relapse incidence (P<0.02). This study shows the potential use of TREC measurement in blood to predict relapse in patients with AML and MDS after allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. PMID:24617310

  3. Entinostat and Clofarabine in Treating Patients With Newly Diagnosed, Relapsed, or Refractory Poor-Risk Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia or Bilineage/Biphenotypic Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-07-16

    Acute Leukemias of Ambiguous Lineage; Philadelphia Chromosome Negative Adult Precursor Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

  4. Absolute quantification of the pretreatment PML-RARA transcript defines the relapse risk in acute promyelocytic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Albano, Francesco; Zagaria, Antonella; Anelli, Luisa; Coccaro, Nicoletta; Tota, Giuseppina; Brunetti, Claudia; Minervini, Crescenzio Francesco; Impera, Luciana; Minervini, Angela; Cellamare, Angelo; Orsini, Paola; Cumbo, Cosimo; Casieri, Paola; Specchia, Giorgina

    2015-05-30

    In this study we performed absolute quantification of the PML-RARA transcript by droplet digital polymerase chain reaction (ddPCR) in 76 newly diagnosed acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL) cases to verify the prognostic impact of the PML-RARA initial molecular burden. ddPCR analysis revealed that the amount of PML-RARA transcript at diagnosis in the group of patients who relapsed was higher than in that with continuous complete remission (CCR) (272 vs 89.2 PML-RARA copies/ng, p = 0.0004, respectively). Receiver operating characteristic analysis detected the optimal PML-RARA concentration threshold as 209.6 PML-RARA/ng (AUC 0.78; p < 0.0001) for discriminating between outcomes (CCR versus relapse). Among the 67 APL cases who achieved complete remission after the induction treatment, those with >209.6 PML-RARA/ng had a worse relapse-free survival (p = 0.0006). At 5-year follow-up, patients with >209.6 PML-RARA/ng had a cumulative incidence of relapse of 50.3% whereas 7.5% of the patients with suffered a relapse (p < 0.0001). Multivariate analysis identified the amount of PML-RARA before induction treatment as the sole independent prognostic factor for APL relapse.Our results show that the pretreatment PML-RARA molecular burden could therefore be used to improve risk stratification in order to develop more individualized treatment regimens for high-risk APL cases. PMID:25944686

  5. Development of secondary skull sarcoma after treatment for childhood acute myeloid leukemia.

    PubMed

    Ohno, Makoto; Narita, Yoshitaka; Miyakita, Yasuji; Okita, Yoshiko; Kayama, Takamasa; Shibui, Soichiro

    2012-12-01

    Secondary cancer is a serious late complication in childhood leukemia survivors. Here, we report a case of secondary skull sarcoma developing after treatment for childhood acute myeloid leukemia, including bone marrow transplantation (BMT). This patient had breast cancer 1 year before treatment for the skull sarcoma. The patient underwent macroscopic total removal of the skull tumor with bone margin with postoperative radiation therapy and did not develop tumor recurrence for 25 months. Our patient's experience suggests that survivors of childhood leukemia are at risk of developing skull sarcoma and that multi-agent chemotherapy, including anthracycline, TBI used as conditioning for BMT, and development of GVHD, are possible risk factors. Considering the possibility of multiple secondary malignancies in such patients, careful long-term follow up is mandatory. PMID:22897987

  6. Adoptive T-cell therapies for refractory/relapsed leukemia and lymphoma: current strategies and recent advances

    PubMed Central

    McLaughlin, Lauren; Cruz, C. Russell; Bollard, Catherine M.

    2015-01-01

    Despite significant advancements in the treatment and outcome of hematologic malignancies, prognosis remains poor for patients who have relapsed or refractory disease. Adoptive T-cell immunotherapy offers novel therapeutics that attempt to utilize the noted graft versus leukemia effect. While CD19 chimeric antigen receptor (CAR)-modified T cells have thus far been the most clinically successful application of adoptive T immunotherapy, further work with antigen specific T cells and CARs that recognize other targets have helped diversify the field to treat a broad spectrum of hematologic malignancies. This article will focus primarily on therapies currently in the clinical trial phase as well as current downfalls or limitations. PMID:26622998

  7. Adoptive T-cell therapies for refractory/relapsed leukemia and lymphoma: current strategies and recent advances.

    PubMed

    McLaughlin, Lauren; Cruz, C Russell; Bollard, Catherine M

    2015-12-01

    Despite significant advancements in the treatment and outcome of hematologic malignancies, prognosis remains poor for patients who have relapsed or refractory disease. Adoptive T-cell immunotherapy offers novel therapeutics that attempt to utilize the noted graft versus leukemia effect. While CD19 chimeric antigen receptor (CAR)-modified T cells have thus far been the most clinically successful application of adoptive T immunotherapy, further work with antigen specific T cells and CARs that recognize other targets have helped diversify the field to treat a broad spectrum of hematologic malignancies. This article will focus primarily on therapies currently in the clinical trial phase as well as current downfalls or limitations. PMID:26622998

  8. Residential Pesticides and Childhood Leukemia: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Turner, Michelle C.; Wigle, Donald T.; Krewski, Daniel

    2010-01-01

    Objective We conducted a systematic review and meta-analysis of previous observational epidemiologic studies examining the relationship between residential pesticide exposures during critical exposure time windows (preconception, pregnancy, and childhood) and childhood leukemia. Data sources Searches of MEDLINE and other electronic databases were performed (1950–2009). Reports were included if they were original epidemiologic studies of childhood leukemia, followed a case–control or cohort design, and assessed at least one index of residential/household pesticide exposure/use. No language criteria were applied. Data extraction Study selection, data abstraction, and quality assessment were performed by two independent reviewers. Random effects models were used to obtain summary odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs). Data synthesis Of the 17 identified studies, 15 were included in the meta-analysis. Exposures during pregnancy to unspecified residential pesticides (summary OR = 1.54; 95% CI, 1.13–2.11; I2 = 66%), insecticides (OR = 2.05; 95% CI, 1.80–2.32; I2 = 0%), and herbicides (OR = 1.61; 95% CI, 1.20–2.16; I2 = 0%) were positively associated with childhood leukemia. Exposures during childhood to unspecified residential pesticides (OR = 1.38; 95% CI, 1.12–1.70; I2 = 4%) and insecticides (OR = 1.61; 95% CI, 1.33–1.95; I2 = 0%) were also positively associated with childhood leukemia, but there was no association with herbicides. Conclusions Positive associations were observed between childhood leukemia and residential pesticide exposures. Further work is needed to confirm previous findings based on self-report, to examine potential exposure–response relationships, and to assess specific pesticides and toxicologically related subgroups of pesticides in more detail. PMID:20056585

  9. Extramedullary relapse in lumbar spine of patient with acute promyelocytic leukemia after remission for 16 years: a case report and literature review

    PubMed Central

    He, Zhengmei; Tao, Shandong; Deng, Yuan; Chen, Yue; Song, Lixiao; Ding, Banghe; Chen, Kankan; Yu, Liang; Wang, Chunling

    2015-01-01

    Acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL) is a common myeloid leukemia. At the newly diagnosed stage, it can be fatal because of the serious complication-disseminated intravascular coagulation. With the advent and early application of all-trans retinoic acid, most APL patients can achieve a long-term survival, and only a minority of patients will develop extramedullary relapse after remission. The most common site of extramedullary relapse is central nervous system, while other sites are relatively rare. Here, we report a particularly rare APL patient who experienced extramedullary relapse with lumbar spine as the isolated site after a rather long time of remission for 16 years. At the time of relapse, the main clinical manifestations of the patient are obvious low back pain, weakness in lower limbs and limitation of activity. After treatment of local radiotherapy combined with ATRA and arsenic trioxide, the patient achieved and maintained a second complete remission by now. PMID:26885224

  10. Apolizumab in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia or Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-07-15

    Noncontiguous Stage II Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Recurrent Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Refractory Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Stage III Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Stage IV Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma

  11. Methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR) polymorphisms and risk of molecularly defined subtypes of childhood acute leukemia.

    PubMed

    Wiemels, J L; Smith, R N; Taylor, G M; Eden, O B; Alexander, F E; Greaves, M F

    2001-03-27

    Low folate intake as well as alterations in folate metabolism as a result of polymorphisms in the enzyme methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR) have been associated with an increased incidence of neural tube defects, vascular disease, and some cancers. Polymorphic variants of MTHFR lead to enhanced thymidine pools and better quality DNA synthesis that could afford some protection from the development of leukemias, particularly those with translocations. We now report associations of MTHFR polymorphisms in three subgroups of pediatric leukemias: infant lymphoblastic or myeloblastic leukemias with MLL rearrangements and childhood lymphoblastic leukemias with either TEL-AML1 fusions or hyperdiploid karyotypes. Pediatric leukemia patients (n = 253 total) and healthy newborn controls (n = 200) were genotyped for MTHFR polymorphisms at nucleotides 677 (C-->T) and 1,298 (A-->C). A significant association for carriers of C677T was demonstrated for leukemias with MLL translocations (MLL+, n = 37) when compared with controls [adjusted odd ratios (OR) = 0.36 with a 95% confidence interval (CI) of 0.15-0.85; P = 0.017]. This protective effect was not evident for A1298C alleles (OR = 1.14). In contrast, associations for A1298C homozygotes (CC; OR = 0.26 with a 95% CI of 0.07--0.81) and C677T homozygotes (TT; OR = 0.49 with a 95% CI of 0.20--1.17) were observed for hyperdiploid leukemias (n = 138). No significant associations were evident for either polymorphism with TEL-AML1+ leukemias (n = 78). These differences in allelic associations may point to discrete attributes of the two alleles in their ability to alter folate and one-carbon metabolite pools and impact after DNA synthesis and methylation pathways, but should be viewed cautiously pending larger follow-up studies. The data provide evidence that molecularly defined subgroups of pediatric leukemias have different etiologies and also suggest a role of folate in the development of childhood leukemia. PMID:11274424

  12. Control of relapsed or refractory acute myeloid leukemia by clofarabine in preparation for allogeneic stem cell transplant.

    PubMed

    Loeffler, Claudia; Kapp, Markus; Grigoleit, Goetz-Ulrich; Mielke, Stephan; Loeffler, Jürgen; Heuschmann, Peter U; Malzahn, Uwe; Hupp, Elke; Einsele, Hermann; Stuhler, Gernot

    2015-01-01

    Allogeneic stem cell transplant is indicated for patients with refractory or relapsed acute myeloid leukemia (AML). Since elimination of the leukemic load is thought to be a prerequisite for treatment success, we here investigate toxicity and anti-leukemic activity of a clofarabine-AraC salvage protocol preceding transplant. In this retrospective analysis, we observed induction of objective remissions in 86% of patients receiving clofarabine-AraC as compared to 83% with sequential high dose AraC/mitoxantrone (S-HAM) and 50% after mitoxantrone/topotecane/AraC (MTC) salvage strategies. In addition, clofarabine conferred anti-leukemic activity to some patients who failed initial MTC or S-HAM therapy. For overall and leukemia-free survival, we identified cytogenetically defined adverse risk markers but not response to therapy to be a strong predictor. In summary, the clofarabine-AraC salvage strategy combines pronounced anti-leukemic activity with an acceptable toxicity profile and allows the majority of patients with relapsed or refractory AML to proceed to allo-SCT, even in cytogenetically defined high risk situations. PMID:26014275

  13. The combination effects of bendamustine with antimetabolites against childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia cells.

    PubMed

    Goto, Shoko; Goto, Hiroaki; Yokosuka, Tomoko

    2016-05-01

    Bendamustine combined with other drugs is clinically efficacious for some adult lymphoid malignancies, but to date there are no reports of the use of such combinatorial approaches in pediatric patients. We investigated the in vitro activity of bendamustine combined with other antimetabolite drugs on B cell precursor acute lymphoblastic leukemia (BCP-ALL) cell lines established from pediatric patients with refractory or relapsed ALL. We also developed a mathematically drown improved isobologram method to assess the data objectively. Three BCP-ALL cell lines; YCUB-2, YCUB-5, and YCUB-6, were simultaneously exposed to various concentrations of bendamustine and cladribine, cytarabine, fludarabine, or clofarabine. Cell growth inhibition was determined using the WST-8 assay. Combinatorial effects were estimated using our improved isobologram method with IC80 (drug concentration corresponding to 80 % of maximum inhibition). Bendamustine alone inhibited ALL cell growth with mean IC80 values of 11.30-18.90 μg/ml. Combinations of bendamustine with other drugs produced the following effects: (1) cladribine; synergistic-to-additive on all cell lines; (2) cytarabine; synergistic-to-additive on YCUB-5 and YCUB-6, and synergistic-to-antagonistic on YCUB-2; (3) fludarabine; additive-to-antagonistic on YCUB-5, and synergistic-to-antagonistic on YCUB-2 and YCUB-6; (4) clofarabine; additive-to-antagonistic on all cell lines. Flow cytometric analysis also showed the combination effects of bendamustine and cladribine. Bendamustine/cladribine or bendamustine/cytarabine may thus represent a promising combination for salvage treatment in childhood ALL. PMID:26886449

  14. Endocrinological and Cardiological Late Effects Among Survivors of Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Karakaya, Pakize; Yılmaz, Şebnem; Tüfekçi, Özlem; Kır, Mustafa; Böber, Ece; İrken, Gülersu; Ören, Hale

    2013-01-01

    Objective: Survival rates for childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) have significantly improved and late effects of therapy have been important in the follow-up of survivors. The objective of this study is to identify the endocrinological and cardiological late effects of ALL patients treated in our pediatric hematology unit. Materials and Methods: Patients treated for ALL with BFM protocols after at least 5 years of diagnosis and not relapsed were included in the study. Endocrinological late effects (growth failure, obesity, insulin resistance, dyslipidemia, thyroid gland disorders, osteopenia/osteoporosis, and pubertal disorders) and cardiological late effects were evaluated. The study group was evaluated with anthropometric measurements, body mass index, and laboratory testing of fasting glucose, insulin, serum lipids, thyroid functions, and bone mineral densities. Echocardiography and pulsed wave Doppler imaging were performed for analysis of cardiac functions. Results: Of the 38 ALL survivors, at least 1 adverse event occurred in 23 (60%), with 8 of them (21%) having multiple problems. Six (16%) of the survivors were obese and 8 (21%) of them were overweight. Subjects who were overweight or obese at the time of diagnosis were more likely to be overweight or obese at last follow-up. Obesity was more frequently determined in patients who were younger than 6 years of age at the time of diagnosis. Insulin resistance was observed in 8 (21%) subjects. Insulin resistance was more frequently seen in subjects who had family history of type 2 diabetes mellitus. Hyperlipidemia was detected in 8 (21%) patients. Hypothyroidism or premature thelarche were detected in 2 children. Two survivors had osteopenia. Cardiovascular abnormalities occurred in one of the subjects with hypertension and cardiac diastolic dysfunction. Conclusion: We point out the necessity of follow-up of these patients for endocrinological and cardiological late effects, since at least one adverse

  15. Arsenic Trioxide in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Lymphoma or Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-01-31

    Extranodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma of Mucosa-associated Lymphoid Tissue; Nodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma; Prolymphocytic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Recurrent Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Refractory Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Splenic Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Waldenström Macroglobulinemia

  16. Allogeneic Hematopoietic Cell Transplantation for Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia: Relapse-Free Survival is Determined by Karyotype and Comorbidities

    PubMed Central

    Eissa, Hesham; Gooley, Ted A.; Sorror, Mohamed L.; Nguyen, Franchesca; Scott, Bart L.; Doney, Kristine; Loeb, Keith R.; Martin, Paul J.; Pagel, John M.; Radich, Jerry P.; Sandmaier, Brenda M.; Warren, E. Houston; Storb, Rainer; Appelbaum, Frederick R.; Deeg, H. Joachim

    2011-01-01

    Hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT) offers potentially curative therapy for Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia (CMML). We evaluated HCT outcomes in 85 patients with CMML, 1.0–69.1 (median 51.7) years of age, with follow-up extending to 19 years. CMML was considered de novo in 71 and secondary in 14 patients. Conditioning regimens were of various intensities. Thirty-eight patients had related (34 HLA identical), and 47 (39 HLA matched) unrelated donors. The source of stem cells was marrow in 32 and peripheral blood progenitor cells in 53 patients. Acute GVHD grades II–IV occurred in 72% and chronic GVHD in 26% of patients. Relapse incidence was 27% at 10 years. Relapse correlated with increasing scores by the MD Anderson prognostic score (p=0.01). The major causes of death were relapse and infections ±GVHD. Progression-free survival was 38% at 10 years. Mortality was negatively correlated with pre-HCT hematocrit (p=0.007), and increased with high-risk cytogenetics (p=0.02), higher HCT Comorbidity Index (p=0.0008), and increased age (p=.02). WHO classification did not statistically significantly affect outcome. Thus, a proportion of patients with CMML have lasting remissions following allogeneic HCT and appear to be cured of their disease. PMID:20932924

  17. Allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation for chronic myelomonocytic leukemia: relapse-free survival is determined by karyotype and comorbidities.

    PubMed

    Eissa, Hesham; Gooley, Ted A; Sorror, Mohamed L; Nguyen, Franchesca; Scott, Bart L; Doney, Kristine; Loeb, Keith R; Martin, Paul J; Pagel, John M; Radich, Jerry P; Sandmaier, Brenda M; Warren, E Houston; Storb, Rainer; Appelbaum, Frederick R; Deeg, H Joachim

    2011-06-01

    Hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT) offers potentially curative therapy for chronic myelomonocytic leukemia (CMML). We evaluated HCT outcomes in 85 patients with CMML, 1.0-69.1 (median 51.7) years of age, with follow-up extending to 19 years. CMML was considered de novo in 71 and secondary in 14 patients. Conditioning regimens were of various intensities. Thirty-eight patients had related (34 HLA identical), and 47 (39 HLA matched) unrelated donors. The source of stem cells was marrow in 32 and peripheral blood progenitor cells in 53 patients. Acute graft-versus-host disease (aGVHD) grades II-IV occurred in 72% and chronic GVHD (cGVHD) in 26% of patients. Relapse incidence was 27% at 10 years. Relapse correlated with increasing scores by the MD Anderson prognostic score (P = .01). The major causes of death were relapse and infections ±GVHD. Progression-free survival (PFS) was 38% at 10 years. Mortality was negatively correlated with pre-HCT hematocrit (P = .007), and increased with high-risk cytogenetics (P = .02), higher HCT Comorbidity Index (P = .0008), and increased age (P = .02). WHO classification did not statistically significantly affect outcome. Thus, a proportion of patients with CMML have lasting remissions following allogeneic HCT and appear to be cured of their disease. PMID:20932924

  18. High hyperdiploid childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia: Chromosomal gains as the main driver event

    PubMed Central

    Paulsson, Kajsa

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT High hyperdiploid childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia is characterized by multiple chromosomal gains. Recent results show that this subtype harbors relatively few genetic abnormalities besides the extra chromosomes, which appear to arise early and are likely the main driver event. Secondary hits primarily target genes in the rat sarcoma (RAS) signaling pathway and histone modifiers. PMID:27308574

  19. High hyperdiploid childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia: Chromosomal gains as the main driver event.

    PubMed

    Paulsson, Kajsa

    2016-01-01

    High hyperdiploid childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia is characterized by multiple chromosomal gains. Recent results show that this subtype harbors relatively few genetic abnormalities besides the extra chromosomes, which appear to arise early and are likely the main driver event. Secondary hits primarily target genes in the rat sarcoma (RAS) signaling pathway and histone modifiers. PMID:27308574

  20. Impact of cytomegalovirus reactivation on relapse and survival in patients with acute leukemia who received allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation in first remission.

    PubMed

    Yoon, Jae-Ho; Lee, Seok; Kim, Hee-Je; Jeon, Young-Woo; Lee, Sung-Eun; Cho, Byung-Sik; Lee, Dong-Gun; Eom, Ki-Seong; Kim, Yoo-Jin; Min, Chang-Ki; Cho, Seok-Goo; Min, Woo-Sung; Lee, Jong Wook

    2016-03-29

    Cytomegalovirus (CMV)-reactivation is associated with graft-vs-leukemia (GVL) effect by stimulating natural-killer or T-cells, which showed leukemia relapse prevention after hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT). We enrolled patients with acute myeloid leukemia (n = 197) and acute lymphoid leukemia (n = 192) who underwent allogeneic-HSCT in first remission. We measured RQ-PCR weekly to detect CMV-reactivation and preemptively used ganciclovir (GCV) when the titer increased twice consecutively, but GCV was sometimes delayed in patients without significant graft-vs-host disease (GVHD) by reducing immunosuppressive agents. In the entire group, CMV-reactivation showed poor overall survival (OS). To evaluate subsequent effects of CMV-reactivation, we excluded early relapse and deaths within 100 days, during which most of the CMV-reactivation occurred. Untreated CMV-reactivated group (n = 173) showed superior OS (83.8% vs. 61.7% vs. 74.0%, p < 0.001) with lower relapse rate (10.1% vs 22.1% vs. 25.5%, p = 0.004) compared to GCV-treated CMV-reactivated group (n = 122) and CMV-undetected group (n = 42). After excluding chronic GVHD, untreated CMV-reactivated group still showed lower relapse rate (9.4% vs. 24.1% vs. 30.2%, p = 0.006). Multivariate analysis showed adverse-risk karyotype and patients in other than untreated CMV-reactivated group were independent factors for relapse prediction. Our data showed possible GVL effect of CMV-reactivation and minimizing antiviral therapy may benefit for relapse prevention in acute leukemia. PMID:26883100

  1. Impact of cytomegalovirus reactivation on relapse and survival in patients with acute leukemia who received allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation in first remission

    PubMed Central

    Yoon, Jae-Ho; Lee, Seok; Kim, Hee-Je; Jeon, Young-Woo; Lee, Sung-Eun; Cho, Byung-Sik; Lee, Dong-Gun; Eom, Ki-Seong; Kim, Yoo-Jin; Min, Chang-Ki; Cho, Seok-Goo; Min, Woo-Sung; Lee, Jong Wook

    2016-01-01

    Cytomegalovirus (CMV)-reactivation is associated with graft-vs-leukemia (GVL) effect by stimulating natural-killer or T-cells, which showed leukemia relapse prevention after hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT). We enrolled patients with acute myeloid leukemia (n = 197) and acute lymphoid leukemia (n = 192) who underwent allogeneic-HSCT in first remission. We measured RQ-PCR weekly to detect CMV-reactivation and preemptively used ganciclovir (GCV) when the titer increased twice consecutively, but GCV was sometimes delayed in patients without significant graft-vs-host disease (GVHD) by reducing immunosuppressive agents. In the entire group, CMV-reactivation showed poor overall survival (OS). To evaluate subsequent effects of CMV-reactivation, we excluded early relapse and deaths within 100 days, during which most of the CMV-reactivation occurred. Untreated CMV-reactivated group (n = 173) showed superior OS (83.8% vs. 61.7% vs. 74.0%, p < 0.001) with lower relapse rate (10.1% vs 22.1% vs. 25.5%, p = 0.004) compared to GCV-treated CMV-reactivated group (n = 122) and CMV-undetected group (n = 42). After excluding chronic GVHD, untreated CMV-reactivated group still showed lower relapse rate (9.4% vs. 24.1% vs. 30.2%, p = 0.006). Multivariate analysis showed adverse-risk karyotype and patients in other than untreated CMV-reactivated group were independent factors for relapse prediction. Our data showed possible GVL effect of CMV-reactivation and minimizing antiviral therapy may benefit for relapse prevention in acute leukemia. PMID:26883100

  2. High-Dose Busulfan and High-Dose Cyclophosphamide Followed By Donor Bone Marrow Transplant in Treating Patients With Leukemia, Myelodysplastic Syndrome, Multiple Myeloma, or Recurrent Hodgkin or Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2010-08-05

    Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Grade III Lymphomatoid Granulomatosis; Recurrent Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult T-cell Leukemia/Lymphoma; Recurrent Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Recurrent Cutaneous T-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Recurrent Mycosis Fungoides/Sezary Syndrome; Recurrent Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Refractory Multiple Myeloma; Relapsing Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Secondary Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Small Intestine Lymphoma; Splenic Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Testicular Lymphoma; Waldenstrom Macroglobulinemia

  3. Vorinostat and Decitabine in Treating Patients With Advanced Solid Tumors or Relapsed or Refractory Non-Hodgkin's Lymphoma, Acute Myeloid Leukemia, Acute Lymphocytic Leukemia, or Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-08-26

    Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Blastic Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Extranodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma of Mucosa-associated Lymphoid Tissue; Nodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Recurrent Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Splenic Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Stage III Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage III Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage III Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage III Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Stage III Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Stage IV Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage IV Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage IV Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage IV Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Marginal Zone Lymphoma

  4. Genomic, immunophenotypic, and NPM1/FLT3 mutational studies on 17 patients with normal karyotype acute myeloid leukemia (AML) followed by aberrant karyotype AML at relapse.

    PubMed

    Wang, Eunice S; Sait, Sheila N J; Gold, David; Mashtare, Terry; Starostik, Petr; Ford, Laurie Ann; Wetzler, Meir; Nowak, Norma J; Deeb, George

    2010-10-15

    Normal karyotype (NK) is the most common cytogenetic group in acute myeloid leukemia (AML) diagnosis; however, up to 50% of these patients at relapse will have aberrant karyotype (AK) AML. To determine the etiology of relapsed AK AML cells, we evaluated cytogenetic, immunophenotypic, and molecular results of 17 patients with diagnostic NK AML and relapsed AK AML at our institute. AK AML karyotype was diverse, involving no favorable and largely (8 of 17) complex cytogenetics. Despite clear cytogenetic differences, immunophenotype and NPM1/FLT3 gene mutation status did not change between presentation and relapse in 83% (10 of 12) and 94% (15 of 16) cases, respectively. High-resolution array-based comparative genomic hybridization (aCGH) performed via paired aCGH on NK AML and AK AML samples from the same patient confirmed cytogenetic aberrations only in the relapse sample. Analysis of 16 additional diagnostic NK AML samples revealed no evidence of submicroscopic aberrations undetected by conventional cytogenetics in any case. These results favor evolution of NK AML leukemia cells with acquisition of novel genetic changes as the most common etiology of AK AML relapse as opposed to secondary leukemogenesis. Additional studies are needed to confirm whether AK AML cells represent selection of rare preexisting clones below aCGH detection and to further characterize the molecular lesions found at time of AK AML relapse. PMID:20875872

  5. Leukemia

    MedlinePlus

    ... version of this page please turn Javascript on. Leukemia What Is Leukemia? Leukemia is a cancer of the blood cells. ... diagnosed with leukemia are over 50 years old. Leukemia Starts in Bone Marrow Click for more information ...

  6. Background radiation and childhood leukemia: A nationwide register-based case-control study.

    PubMed

    Nikkilä, Atte; Erme, Sini; Arvela, Hannu; Holmgren, Olli; Raitanen, Jani; Lohi, Olli; Auvinen, Anssi

    2016-11-01

    High doses of ionizing radiation are an established cause of childhood leukemia. However, substantial uncertainty remains about the effect of low doses of radiation, including background radiation and potential differences between genetic subgroups of leukemia have rarely been explored. We investigated the effect of the background gamma radiation on childhood leukemia using a nationwide register-based case-control study. For each of the 1,093 cases, three age- and gender matched controls were selected (N = 3,279). Conditional logistic regression analyses were adjusted for confounding by Down syndrome, birth weight (large for gestational age), and maternal smoking. Complete residential histories and previously collected survey data of the background gamma radiation in Finland were used to assess the exposure of the study subjects to indoor and outdoor gamma radiation. Overall, background gamma radiation showed a non-significant association with the OR of childhood leukemia (OR 1.01, 95% CI 0.97, 1.05 for 10 nSv/h increase in average equivalent dose rate to red bone marrow). In subgroup analyses, age group 2-<7 years displayed a larger effect (OR 1.27, 95% CI 1.01, 1.60 for 1 mSv increase in equivalent cumulative dose to red bone marrow). Suggestive difference in OR by genetic subtype was found. Our results provide further support to the notion that low doses of ionizing radiation increase the risk for childhood leukemia, particularly at age 2-<7 years. Our findings suggest a larger effect of radiation on leukemia with high hyperpdiploidy than other subgroups, but this result requires further confirmation. PMID:27405274

  7. DIGE-based proteomic analysis identifies nucleophosmin/B23 and nucleolin C23 as over-expressed proteins in relapsed/refractory acute leukemia.

    PubMed

    Hu, Jianda; Lin, Minhui; Liu, Tingbo; Li, Jing; Chen, Buyuan; Chen, Yingyu

    2011-08-01

    Drug resistance is a challenge in treatment of acute leukemia. To investigate novel protein changes involved in resistance, protein expression profiles between leukemia cell line HL-60 and adriamycin-resistant HL-60 (HL-60/ADR) were compared based on a proteomic approach-2D-DIGE followed by MALDI-TOF/MS. 13 protein spots were identified as up-regulated and 3 down-regulated in HL-60/ADR. Nucleophosmin/B23 (NPM B23) and nucleolin C23 (C23) were selected and verified by western blot, which showed an obvious up-regulation in leukemia cells, especially in 3 resistant leukemia cell lines and in relapsed/refractory patients. To a conclusion, B23 and C23 may be involved in drug resistance and be useful in assessing the prognosis of leukemia. PMID:21310483

  8. miR expression profiling at diagnosis predicts relapse in pediatric precursor B-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Avigad, Smadar; Verly, Iedan R N; Lebel, Asaf; Kordi, Oshrit; Shichrur, Keren; Ohali, Anat; Hameiri-Grossman, Michal; Kaspers, Gertjan J L; Cloos, Jacqueline; Fronkova, Eva; Trka, Jan; Luria, Drorit; Kodman, Yona; Mirsky, Hadar; Gaash, Dafna; Jeison, Marta; Avrahami, Galia; Elitzur, Sarah; Gilad, Gil; Stark, Batia; Yaniv, Isaac

    2016-04-01

    Our aim was to identify miRNAs that can predict risk of relapse in pediatric patients with acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL). Following high-throughput miRNA expression analysis (48 samples), five miRs were selected for further confirmation performed by real time quantitative PCR on a cohort of precursor B-cell ALL patients (n = 138). The results were correlated with clinical parameters and outcome. Low expression of miR-151-5p, and miR-451, and high expression of miR-1290 or a combination of all three predicted inferior relapse free survival (P = 0.007, 0.042, 0.025, and <0.0001, respectively). Cox regression analysis identified aberrant expression of the three miRs as an independent prognostic marker with a 10.5-fold increased risk of relapse (P = 0.041) in PCR-MRD non-high risk patients. Furthermore, following exclusion of patients harboring IKZF1 deletion, the aberrant expression of all three miRs could identify patients with a 24.5-fold increased risk to relapse (P < 0.0001). The prognostic relevance of the three miRNAs was evaluated in a non-BFM treated precursor B-cell ALL cohort (n = 33). A significant correlation between an aberrant expression of at least one of the three miRs and poor outcome was maintained (P < 0.0001). Our results identify an expression profile of miR-151-5p, miR-451, and miR-1290 as a novel biomarker for outcome in pediatric precursor B-cell ALL patients, regardless of treatment protocol. The use of these markers may lead to improved risk stratification at diagnosis and allow early therapeutic interventions in an attempt to improve survival of high risk patients. PMID:26684414

  9. Role of hematopoietic stem cell transplantation for relapsed acute promyelocytic leukemia: a retrospective analysis of JALSG-APL97.

    PubMed

    Fujita, Hiroyuki; Asou, Norio; Iwanaga, Masako; Hyo, Rie; Nomura, Shosaku; Kiyoi, Hitoshi; Okada, Masaya; Inaguma, Youko; Matsuda, Mitsuhiro; Yamauchi, Takahiro; Ohtake, Shigeki; Izumi, Tohru; Nakaseko, Chiaki; Ishigatsubo, Yoshiaki; Shinagawa, Katsuji; Takeshita, Akihiro; Miyazaki, Yasushi; Ohnishi, Kazunori; Miyawaki, Shuichi; Naoe, Tomoki

    2013-10-01

    For patients with relapsed acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL), all-trans retinoic acid-based salvage regimens can achieve second complete remission (CR2), but the optimal post-remission strategy for APL patients after CR2 remains unclear. Hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) during CR2 might be effective, but data on the role of HSCT for APL patients after CR2 are limited in Japan. We retrospectively analyzed outcomes for 57 relapsed APL patients who achieved CR2 in the JALSG APL97 study. Of those, six received autologous (auto)-HSCT, 21 received allogeneic (allo)-HSCT, and 30 received various regimens other than HSCT. The 5-year event-free survival (EFS) rate, overall survival (OS) rate and cumulative incidence of relapse (CIR) were 50.7%, 77.4% and 51.0% in the non-HSCT group, 41.7%, 83.3% and 58.3% in the auto-HSCT group and 71.1%, 76.2% and 9.8% in the allo-HSCT group, respectively. Both the EFS rate and CIR were significantly better in the allo-HSCT group than in other groups. Allo-HSCT appears effective in APL patients in CR2, with a low relapse rate beyond a relatively early transplantation-related mortality (19%). Among older patients (age ≥40 years), the 5-year OS was significantly better in the non-HSCT group than in the HSCT group (78.0% vs 40.5%; P = 0.04). Further prospective studies with larger patient numbers are required to confirm the impact of HSCT alone and in combination with arsenic trioxide on outcomes for patients with APL in CR2. PMID:23837667

  10. Clinical characteristics and outcome of isolated extramedullary relapse in acute leukemia after allogeneic stem cell transplantation: a single-center analysis.

    PubMed

    Shi, Ji-Min; Meng, Xiao-Jian; Luo, Yi; Tan, Ya-Min; Zhu, Xiao-Li; Zheng, Gao-Feng; He, Jing-Song; Zheng, Wei-Yan; Xie, Wan-Zhuo; Li, Li; Ye, Xiu-Jin; Zhang, Jie; Cai, Zhen; Lin, Mao-Fang; Huang, He

    2013-04-01

    Isolated extramedullary relapse (EMR) of acute leukemia (AL) is a rare occurrence. However, it appears to be more common after allogeneic stem cell transplantation (allo-SCT). To characterize what has been observed in isolated EMR, we investigated 287 consecutive AL patients (144 acute myeloid leukemia; 138 acute lymphocytic leukemia; 5 acute mixed-lineage leukemia) who underwent allo-SCT. Twelve cases experienced relapse at extramedullary sites without concomitant involvement of the bone marrow (BM). The onset to relapse after allo-SCT was longer in extramedullary sites than in the BM (median, 10 months versus 5.5 months). EMR sites varied widely and included the central nervous system, skin, bone, pelvis and breasts. Univariate analysis demonstrated that cytogenetic abnormalities were correlated significantly with the onset of isolated EMR (P=0.001). The prognosis for patients who develop EMR remained poor but was relatively better than that after BM relapse (overall survival, 10 versus 18 months). Compared with local or single therapy, patients treated with systemic treatment in combination with local treatment could yield a favorable prognosis. In conclusion, we observed a significant number of isolated cases of EMR in AL patients after allo-SCT, cytogenetic abnormalities were correlated significantly with the onset of isolated EMR. We found that intensive approaches combining local and systemic therapy could produce favorable responses which may cure a proportion of these patients. PMID:23347901

  11. Adoptive transfer of T cells transduced with a chimeric antigen receptor to treat relapsed or refractory acute leukemia: efficacy and feasibility of immunotherapy approaches.

    PubMed

    Ding, Guoliang; Chen, Hu

    2016-07-01

    Treatment outcomes of acute leukemia (AL) have not improved over the past several decades and relapse rates remain high despite the availability of aggressive therapies. Conventional relapsed leukemia treatment includes second allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (allo-HSCT) and donor lymphocyte infusion (DLI), which in most cases mediate, at best, a modest graft-versus-leukemia effect, although their clinical efficacy is still limited. Although allo-HSCT following myeloablative conditioning is a curative treatment option for younger patients with acute myeloid leukemia (AML) in a first complete remission (CR), allo-HSCT as a clinical treatment is usually limited because of treatment-related toxicity. The overall DLI remission rate is only 15%-42% and 2-year overall survival (OS) is approximately 15%-20%, with a high (40%-60%) incidence of DLI-related graft-versus-host disease (GVHD). Therefore, development of new, targeted treatment strategies for relapsed and refractory AL patients is ongoing. Adoptive transfer of T cells with genetically engineered chimeric antigen receptors (CARs) is an encouraging approach for treating hematological malignancies. These T cells are capable of selectively recognizing tumor-associated antigens and may overcome many limitations of conventional therapies, inducing remission in patients with chemotherapy-refractory or relapsed AL. In this review, we aimed to highlight the current understanding of this promising treatment modality, discussing its adverse effects and efficacy. PMID:27142351

  12. Monitoring mixed lineage leukemia expression may help identify patients with mixed lineage leukemia--rearranged acute leukemia who are at high risk of relapse after allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jing; Wang, Yu; Xu, Lan-Ping; Liu, Dai-Hong; Qin, Ya-Zhen; Chang, Ying-Jun; Liu, Kai-Yan; Huang, Xiao-Jun

    2014-07-01

    To evaluate the prognostic value of the expression of the mixed lineage leukemia (MLL) gene for predicting the relapse of patients with MLL-rearranged acute leukemia (AL) after allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (allo-HSCT), the levels of MLL transcripts in bone marrow (BM) specimens were monitored serially by real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction (RQ-PCR) at predetermined time points in 40 patients with MLL-rearranged AL who were treated with allo-HSCT. These patients were followed for a median of 24.5 months (range, 8 to 60 months). A total of 236 BM samples were collected and analyzed. Of these, 230 were monitored concurrently for minimal residual disease (MRD) by flow cytometry (FCM) for leukemia-associated aberrant immune phenotypes and by RQ-PCR for the expression of the Wilms tumor (WT1) gene. The 3-year cumulative incidence of relapse in patients who experienced MLL-positive patients (MLL > .0000%) (n = 9) after HSCT was 93.5% (95% confidence interval [CI], 87% to 100%) compared with 12.5% (95% CI, 5.6% to 19.4%) for MLL-negative patients (n = 31) (P < .001). For these 2 patient groups, the 3-year overall survival (OS) was 12.5% (95% CI, .8% to 24.2%) and 77.8% (95% CI, 68.4% to 87.2%) (P < .001), respectively, and the 3-year leukemia-free survival (LFS) was 0% and 72.2% (95% CI, 61.1% to 83.3%), respectively (P < .001). MLL positivity was associated with a higher rate of relapse (hazard ratio [HR], 18.643; 95% CI, 3.449 to 57.025; P = .001), lower LFS (HR, 7.267; 95% CI, 2.038 to 25.916; P = .002), and lower OS (HR, 8.259; 95% CI, 2.109 to 32.336; P = .002), as determined by Cox multivariate analysis. The expression of the MLL gene had a higher specificity and sensitivity than WT1 or MRD monitored by FCM for predicting the relapse of the patients with MLL + AL. Our results suggest that monitoring the expression of the MLL gene may help to identify patients with MLL + AL who are at high risk of relapse after allo-HSCT and may

  13. Immunotherapy for Pediatric Leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Shah, Nirali N.; Dave, Hema; Wayne, Alan S.

    2013-01-01

    Substantial progress has been made in the treatment of leukemia in childhood. Despite this, leukemia remains a leading cause of pediatric cancer-related mortality and the prognosis is guarded for individuals with relapsed or refractory disease. Standard therapies are associated with a wide array of acute and long-term toxicities and further treatment intensification may not be tolerable or beneficial. The curative potential of allogeneic stem cell transplantation is due in part to the graft-versus-leukemia effect, which provides evidence for the therapeutic capacity of immune-based therapies. In recent years there have been significant advances in the development and application of immunotherapy in the treatment of leukemias, including the demonstration of activity in chemotherapy-resistant cases. This review summarizes immunotherapeutic approaches in the treatment of pediatric leukemia including current results and future directions. PMID:23847759

  14. Studying Biomarkers in Samples From Younger Patients With Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-05-17

    Childhood Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Childhood Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Childhood Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia/Other Myeloid Malignancies; Childhood Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4)

  15. Ipilimumab in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory High-Risk Myelodysplastic Syndrome or Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-06-27

    Acute Myeloid Leukemia Arising From Previous Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Myelodysplastic Syndrome

  16. A Systematic Review and Meta-analysis of Childhood Leukemia and Parental Occupational Pesticide Exposure

    PubMed Central

    Wigle, Donald T.; Turner, Michelle C.; Krewski, Daniel

    2009-01-01

    Objectives We conducted a systematic review and meta-analysis of childhood leukemia and parental occupational pesticide exposure. Data sources Searches of MEDLINE (1950–2009) and other electronic databases yielded 31 included studies. Data extraction Two authors independently abstracted data and assessed the quality of each study. Data synthesis Random effects models were used to obtain summary odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs). There was no overall association between childhood leukemia and any paternal occupational pesticide exposure (OR = 1.09; 95% CI, 0.88–1.34); there were slightly elevated risks in subgroups of studies with low total-quality scores (OR = 1.39; 95% CI, 0.99–1.95), ill-defined exposure time windows (OR = 1.36; 95% CI, 1.00–1.85), and exposure information collected after offspring leukemia diagnosis (OR = 1.34; 95% CI, 1.05–1.70). Childhood leukemia was associated with prenatal maternal occupational pesticide exposure (OR = 2.09; 95% CI, 1.51–2.88); this association was slightly stronger for studies with high exposure-measurement-quality scores (OR = 2.45; 95% CI, 1.68–3.58), higher confounder control scores (OR = 2.38; 95% CI, 1.56–3.62), and farm-related exposures (OR = 2.44; 95% CI, 1.53–3.89). Childhood leukemia risk was also elevated for prenatal maternal occupational exposure to insecticides (OR = 2.72; 95% CI, 1.47–5.04) and herbicides (OR = 3.62; 95% CI, 1.28–10.3). Conclusions Childhood leukemia was associated with prenatal maternal occupational pesticide exposure in analyses of all studies combined and in several subgroups. Associations with paternal occupational pesticide exposure were weaker and less consistent. Research needs include improved pesticide exposure indices, continued follow-up of existing cohorts, genetic susceptibility assessment, and basic research on childhood leukemia initiation and progression. PMID:20019898

  17. A review and meta-analysis of outdoor air pollution and risk of childhood leukemia.

    PubMed

    Filippini, Tommaso; Heck, Julia E; Malagoli, Carlotta; Del Giovane, Cinzia; Vinceti, Marco

    2015-01-01

    Leukemia is the most frequent malignant disease affecting children. To date, the etiology of childhood leukemia remains largely unknown. Few risk factors (genetic susceptibility, infections, ionizing radiation, etc.) have been clearly identified, but they appear to explain only a small proportion of cases. Considerably more uncertain is the role of other environmental risk factors, such as indoor and outdoor air pollution. We sought to summarize and quantify the association between traffic-related air pollution and risk of childhood leukemia, and further examined results according to method of exposure assessment, study quality, leukemia subtype, time period, and continent where studies took place. After a literature search yielded 6 ecologic and 20 case-control studies, we scored the studies based on the Newcastle-Ottawa Scale. The studies assessed residential exposure to pollutants from motorized traffic by computing traffic density in the neighboring roads or vicinity to petrol stations, or by using measured or modeled nitrogen dioxide and benzene outdoor air levels. Because heterogeneity across studies was observed, random-effects summary odds ratios (OR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) were reported. Whenever possible we additionally conducted stratified analyses comparing acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) and acute myeloid leukemia (AML). Limiting the analysis to high-quality studies (Newcastle-Ottawa Scale ≥ 7), those using traffic density as the exposure assessment metric showed an increase in childhood leukemia risk in the highest exposure category (OR = 1.07, 95% CI 0.93-1.24). However, we observed evidence of publication bias. Results for NO2 exposure and benzene showed an OR of 1.21 (95% CI 0.97-1.52) and 1.64 (95% CI 0.91-2.95) respectively. When stratifying by leukemia type, the results based upon NO2 were 1.21 (95% CI 1.04-1.41) for ALL and 1.06 (95% CI 0.51-2.21) for AML; based upon benzene were 1.09 (95% CI 0.67-1.77) for ALL and 2.28 (95% CI

  18. A Review and Meta-Analysis of Outdoor Air Pollution and Risk of Childhood Leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Filippini, Tommaso; E. Heck, Julia; Malagoli, Carlotta; Del Giovane, Cinzia; Vinceti, Marco

    2015-01-01

    Leukemia is the most frequent malignant disease affecting children. To date, the etiology of childhood leukemia remains largely unknown. Few risk factors (genetic susceptibility, infections, ionizing radiation, etc.) have been clearly identified, but they appear to explain only a small proportion of cases. Considerably more uncertain is the role of other environmental risk factors, such as indoor and outdoor air pollution. We sought to summarize and quantify the association between traffic-related air pollution and risk of childhood leukemia, and further examined results according to method of exposure assessment, study quality, leukemia subtype, time period and continent where studies took place. After a literature search yielded 6 ecologic and 20 case-control studies, we scored the studies based upon the Newcastle-Ottawa Scale. The studies assessed residential exposure to pollutants from motorized traffic by computing traffic density in the neighboring roads or vicinity to petrol stations, or by using measured or modeled nitrogen dioxide and benzene outdoor air levels. Because heterogeneity across studies was observed, random-effects summary odds ratios (OR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) were reported. Whenever possible we additionally conducted stratified analyses comparing acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) and acute myeloid leukemia (AML). Limiting the analysis to high-quality studies (Newcastle-Ottawa Scale ≥ 7), those using traffic density as the exposure assessment metric showed an increase in childhood leukemia risk in the highest exposure category (OR=1.07, 95% CI 0.93 – 1.24). However, we observed evidence of publication bias. Results for NO2 exposure and benzene showed an OR of 1.21 (95% CI 0.97 – 1.52) and 1.64 (95% CI 0.91 – 2.95) respectively. When stratifying by leukemia type, the results based upon NO2 were 1.21 (95% CI 1.04 – 1.41) for ALL and 1.06 (95% CI 0.51 – 2.21) for AML; based upon benzene were 1.09 (95% CI 0.67 – 1

  19. RUNX1 amplification in lineage conversion of childhood B-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia to acute myelogenous leukemia.

    PubMed

    Podgornik, Helena; Debeljak, Marusa; Zontar, Darja; Cernelc, Peter; Prestor, Veronika Velensek; Jazbec, Janez

    2007-10-01

    Amplification of RUNX1 (alias AML1) is a recurrent karyotypic abnormality in childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) that is generally associated with a poor outcome. It does not occur with other primary chromosomal abnormalities in acute ALL. AML1 amplification in acute myelogenous leukemia (AML) is a rare secondary event described mainly in therapy-related cases. AML1 amplification was found in a 13-year-old patient with AML M4/M5 leukemia that occurred 5 years after she had been diagnosed with common B-cell ALL. Conventional cytogenetic, fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH), and polymerase chain reaction methods revealed no other chromosomal change expected to occur in a disease that we assumed to be a secondary leukemia. Due to the lack of cytogenetic data from the diagnostic sample, we developed a new approach to analyze the archived bone marrow smear, which had been stained previously with May-Grünwald-Geimsa by the FISH method. This analysis confirmed that in addition to t(12;21), AML1 amplification and overexpression existed already at the time the diagnosis was made. The chromosomal changes, however, were found in different clones of bone marrow cells. While the first course of chemotherapy successfully eradicated the cell line with the t(12;21), the second cell line with AML1 amplification remained latent during the time of complete remission and reappeared with a different immunophenotype. PMID:17889714

  20. Phase I Dose-Escalation Trial of Clofarabine Followed by Escalating Doses of Fractionated Cyclophosphamide in Children With Relapsed or Refractory Acute Leukemias

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2010-09-21

    Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Myeloproliferative Disorders; Acute Lymphocytic Leukemia; Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia; Acute Leukemia; Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Myelofibrosis; Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia; Juvenile Myelomonocytic Leukemia

  1. Outcome after relapse of acute lymphoblastic leukemia in adult patients included in four consecutive risk-adapted trials by the PETHEMA Study Group

    PubMed Central

    Oriol, Albert; Vives, Susana; Hernández-Rivas, Jesús-María; Tormo, Mar; Heras, Inmaculada; Rivas, Concepción; Bethencourt, Concepción; Moscardó, Federico; Bueno, Javier; Grande, Carlos; del Potro, Eloy; Guardia, Ramon; Brunet, Salut; Bergua, Juan; Bernal, Teresa; Moreno, Maria-José; Calvo, Carlota; Bastida, Pilar; Feliu, Evarist; Ribera, Josep-Maria

    2010-01-01

    Background About one half of adults with acute lymphoblastic leukemia are not cured of the disease and ultimately die. The objective of this study was to explore the factors influencing the outcome of adult patients with relapsed acute lymphoblastic leukemia. Design and Methods We analyzed the characteristics, the outcome and the prognostic factors for survival after first relapse in a series of 263 adult patients with acute lymphoblastic leukemia (excluding those with mature B-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia) prospectively enrolled in four consecutive risk-adapted PETHEMA trials. Results The median overall survival after relapse was 4.5 months (95% CI, 4–5 months) with a 5-year overall survival of 10% (95% CI, 8%–12%); 45% of patients receiving intensive second-line treatment achieved a second complete remission and 22% (95% CI, 14%–30%) of them remained disease free at 5 years. Factors predicting a good outcome after rescue therapy were age less than 30 years (2-year overall survival of 21% versus 10% for those over 30 years old; P<0.022) and a first remission lasting more than 2 years (2-year overall survival of 36% versus 17% among those with a shorter first remission; P<0.001). Patients under 30 years old whose first complete remission lasted longer than 2 years had a 5-year overall survival of 38% (95% CI, 23%–53%) and a 5-year disease-free survival of 53% (95% CI, 34%–72%). Conclusions The prognosis of adult patients with acute lymphoblastic leukemia who relapse is poor. Those aged less than 30 years with a first complete remission lasting longer than 2 years have reasonable possibilities of becoming long-term survivors while patients over this age or those who relapse early cannot be successfully rescued using the therapies currently available. PMID:20145276

  2. Hypertension and Life-Threatening Bleeding in Children with Relapsed Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Treated with FLT3 Inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Yılmaz Karapınar, Deniz; Karadaş, Nihal; Önder Siviş, Zühal; Balkan, Can; Kavaklı, Kaan; Aydınok, Yeşim

    2015-09-01

    Experiences with new multikinase inhibitors are limited, especially in children. In this report we summarize our experience with 2 patients with relapsed acute myeloblastic leukemia (AML), one with FMS-like tyrosine kinase-3-internal tandem duplication mutation and the other with a single base mutation (D835Y). Both patients received sorafenib, one for 19 days and the other for 42 days, with clofarabine-including chemotherapy. One additionally received sunitinib for a total of 20 days. Both patients developed severe pancytopenia, hypertension, life-threatening bleedings from the gastrointestinal system, and, finally, intrapulmonary hemorrhage. Although both reached severe aplasia of the bone marrow without blastic infiltration, death occurred with neutropenic sepsis. PMID:25912283

  3. Central nervous system involvement at first relapse in patients with acute promyelocytic leukemia treated with all-trans retinoic acid and anthracycline monochemotherapy without intrathecal prophylaxis

    PubMed Central

    Montesinos, Pau; Díaz-Mediavilla, Joaquín; Debén, Guillermo; Prates, Virginia; Tormo, Mar; Rubio, Vicente; Pérez, Inmaculada; Fernández, Isolda; Viguria, Maricruz; Rayón, Chelo; González, José; de la Serna, Javier; Esteve, Jordi; Bergua, Juan M.; Rivas, Concha; González, Marcos; González, Jose D.; Negri, Silvia; Brunet, Salut; Lowenberg, Bob; Sanz, Miguel A.

    2009-01-01

    Background The prevalence of and risk factors for central nervous system recurrence in patients with acute promyelocytic leukemia are not well established and remain a controversial matter. Design and Methods Between 1996 and 2005, 739 patients with newly diagnosed acute promyelocytic leukemia enrolled in two consecutive trials (PETHEMA LPA96 and LPA99) received induction therapy with all-trans retinoic acid and idarubicin. Consolidation therapy comprised three courses of anthracycline monochemotherapy (LPA96), with all-trans retinoic acid and reinforced doses of idarubicin in patients with an intermediate or high risk of relapse (LPA99). Central nervous system prophylaxis was not given. Results Central nervous system relapse was documented in 11 patients. The 5-year cumulative incidence of central nervous system relapse was 1.7% (LPA96 3.2% and LPA99 1.2%; p=0.09). The cumulative incidence was 0%, 0.8%, and 5.5% in low-, intermediate-, and high-risk patients, respectively. Relapse risk score (p=0.0001) and the occurrence of central nervous system hemorrhage during induction (5-year cumulative incidence 18.7%, p=0.006) were independent risk factors for central nervous system relapse. Conclusions This study shows a low incidence of central nervous system relapse in patients with acute promyelocytic leukemia following therapy with all-trans retinoic acid and anthracycline without specific central nervous system prophylaxis. Central nervous system relapse was significantly associated with high white blood cell counts and prior central nervous system hemorrhage, which emerged as independent prognostic factors. PMID:19608685

  4. Decitabine, Donor Natural Killer Cells, and Aldesleukin in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-01-07

    Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  5. Low efficacy and high mortality associated with clofarabine treatment of relapsed/refractory acute myeloid leukemia and myelodysplastic syndromes.

    PubMed

    Roberts, Daniel A; Wadleigh, Martha; McDonnell, Anne M; DeAngelo, Daniel J; Stone, Richard M; Steensma, David P

    2015-02-01

    Clofarabine, a second-generation nucleoside analog, has clinical activity in relapsed or refractory acute myelogenous leukemia (AML) and higher-risk myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS). However, there are few data evaluating performance of clofarabine in populations of patients not enrolled in clinical trials. We reviewed outcomes for 84 patients treated with clofarabine for relapsed or refractory AML or MDS, either with clofarabine as monotherapy (n=19) or in combination with cytarabine (n=65). Using International Working Group (IWG) response criteria, the overall response rate (ORR) of all treated patients was 21%, with a complete response rate with either complete or incomplete hematopoietic recovery (CRR=CR+CRi) of 14%. For combination therapy, ORR was 22% with CRR of 18%, and monotherapy patients had an ORR of 21% with CRR of 11%. Although limited by small numbers, subgroup analysis did not reveal variation in response rates when comparing different risk factors. The 30-day mortality was 21% and median survival was 3 months; a subset of 12 patients who were able to go to transplant had an 18-month median survival. Clofarabine's efficacy in a "real-world" setting appears to be less than has been reported in clinical trials, and treatment is associated with a high early mortality rate. PMID:25554239

  6. Phase II Study of Lenalidomide and Rituximab As Salvage Therapy for Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Badoux, Xavier C.; Keating, Michael J.; Wen, Sijin; Wierda, William G.; O'Brien, Susan M.; Faderl, Stefan; Sargent, Rachel; Burger, Jan A.; Ferrajoli, Alessandra

    2013-01-01

    Purpose Lenalidomide is an immunomodulatory drug active as salvage therapy for chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL). We combined lenalidomide with rituximab to improve response rates in patients with relapsed or refractory CLL. Patients and Methods Fifty-nine adult patients (age 42 to 82 years) with relapsed or refractory CLL were enrolled onto a phase II study of lenalidomide and rituximab. Patients had received prior fludarabine-based therapy or chemoimmunotherapy. Rituximab (375 mg/m2 intravenously) was administered weekly during cycle one and on day 1 of cycles three to 12. Lenalidomide was started on day 9 of cycle one at 10 mg orally and administered daily continuously. Each cycle was 28 days. Rituximab was administered for 12 cycles; lenalidomide could continue indefinitely if patients benefitted clinically. Results The overall response rate was 66%, including 12% complete responses and 12% nodular partial remissions. Time to treatment failure was 17.4 months. Median overall survival has not been reached; estimated survival at 36 months is 71%. The most common grade 3 or 4 toxicity was neutropenia (73% of patients). Fourteen patients (24%) experienced a grade 3 to 4 infection or febrile episode. There was one episode of grade 3 tumor lysis; one patient experienced renal failure during the first cycle of therapy, and one venous thromboembolic event occurred during the study. Conclusion The combination of lenalidomide and rituximab is active in patients with recurrent CLL and warrants further investigation. PMID:23270003

  7. Phase 1 study of clofarabine in pediatric patients with relapsed/refractory acute lymphoblastic leukemia in Japan.

    PubMed

    Koh, Katsuyoshi; Ogawa, Chitose; Okamoto, Yasuhiro; Kudo, Kazuko; Inagaki, Jiro; Morimoto, Tsuyoshi; Mizukami, Hideya; Ecstein-Fraisse, Evelyne; Kikuta, Atsushi

    2016-08-01

    A phase 1 study was conducted to evaluate the safety, pharmacokinetics (PK), efficacy and pharmacogenetic characteristics of clofarabine in seven Japanese pediatric patients with relapsed/refractory acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL). Patients in Cohort 1 received clofarabine 30 mg/m(2)/day for 5 days, followed by 52 mg/m(2)/day for 5 days in subsequent cycles. Cohort 2 patients were consistently treated with 52 mg/m(2)/day for 5 days. No more than six cycles were performed. Every patient had at least one ≥Grade 3 adverse event (AE). AEs (≥Grade 3) related to clofarabine were anaemia, neutropenia, febrile neutropenia, thrombocytopenia, alanine aminotransferase increased, aspartate aminotransferase increased, haemoglobin decreased, and platelet (PLT) count decreased. C max and AUC of clofarabine increased in a dose-dependent fashion, but its elimination half-life (T 1/2) did not appear to be dependent on dose or duration of treatment. Clofarabine at 52 mg/m(2)/day shows similarly tolerable safety and PK profiles compared to those in previous studies. No complete remission (CR), CR without PLT recovery, or partial remission was observed. Since clofarabine is already used as a key drug for relapsed/refractory ALL patients in many countries, the efficacy of clofarabine in Japanese pediatric patients should be evaluated in larger study including more patients, such as by post-marketing surveillance. PMID:27086352

  8. Outcome of older patients with acute myeloid leukemia in first relapse.

    PubMed

    Sarkozy, Clémentine; Gardin, Claude; Gachard, Nathalie; Merabet, Fathia; Turlure, Pascal; Malfuson, Jean-Valère; Pautas, Cécile; Micol, Jean-Baptiste; Thomas, Xavier; Quesnel, Bruno; Celli-Lebras, Karine; Preudhomme, Claude; Terré, Christine; Fenaux, Pierre; Chevret, Sylvie; Castaigne, Sylvie; Dombret, Hervé

    2013-09-01

    To provide data for future drug evaluation, we analyzed the outcome of 393 patients aged 50 years or older (median, 64 years) with AML in first relapse after treatment in recent ALFA trials. Salvage options were retrospectively classified as follows: best supportive care (BSC), low-dose cytarabine (LDAC), gemtuzumab ozogamicin (GO), intensive chemotherapy (ICT), or ICT combined with GO. Second complete remission (CR2) rate was 31% and median post-relapse survival was 6.8 months (0, 17, 42.5, 53, and 80% and 3.2, 5.6, 8.9, 9, and 19.8 months in BSC, LDAC, GO, ICT, and ICT + GO subsets, respectively). Age, performance status, WBC, CR1 duration, and favorable AML karyotype, but not other cytogenetic or molecular features, influenced post-relapse outcome. Multivariate adjustment and propensity score matching showed that intensive salvage (ICT/ICT+GO/GO versus LDAC/BSC) was associated with longer post-relapse survival, at least in patients with CR1 duration ≥12 months (P = 0.001 and 0.0005, respectively). Of interest, GO appeared to be as effective as standard ICT, and ICT + GO combination more effective than standard ICT. In conclusion, older patients with CR1 duration ≥12 months appeared to benefit from intensive salvage and results observed with GO-containing salvage suggest that GO combination studies should be actively pursued in this setting. PMID:23749683

  9. Randomized controlled trials in relapsed/refractory chronic lymphocytic leukemia: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Police, Rachel L; Trask, Peter C; Wang, Jianmin; Olivares, Robert; Khan, Shahnaz; Abbe, Adeline; Colosia, Ann; Njue, Annete; Sherrill, Beth; Ruiz-Soto, Rodrigo; Kaye, James A; Hamadani, Mehdi

    2015-04-01

    This systematic literature review with meta-analysis was conducted on the clinical efficacy and safety of interventions used in the treatment of chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL). We systematically searched databases (PubMed, Cochrane Library, and Embase; 1997 to August 2, 2012), conference abstracts, bibliographic reference lists, recent reviews, and Clinicaltrials.gov. Primary efficacy outcomes were objective response rate, progression-free survival, and overall survival. Safety end points were Grade 3/4 toxicities, serious adverse events, withdrawals because of toxicity, and deaths due to toxicity. Studies were selected if they were randomized controlled trials (RCTs) reporting on the efficacy or safety of relapsed or refractory CLL and if outcomes for CLL were reported separately from trials that included other lymphoid neoplasms. We used the Bucher method for conducting adjusted indirect comparisons within a meta-analysis. We identified 6 RCTs of pharmacologic treatment for relapsed/refractory CLL. The most common drugs investigated (alone or in combination) were fludarabine and cyclophosphamide. When reported, median overall survival ranged from 27.3 to 52.9 months, and overall response rate from 58% to 82%. Although meta-analysis of efficacy results was considered, details are not presented because only 3 studies qualified and the common comparator treatment was not clinically relevant. The relatively small number of RCTs, few overlapping treatment arms, and variability in end points studied make it difficult to formally compare therapies for relapsed/refractory CLL. Significant variability in RCT features presents a further challenge to meaningful comparisons. Additional well-designed RCTs are needed to fully understand the relative efficacy and safety of older and more recently developed therapies. PMID:25445467

  10. Five years of experience with rituximab plus high-dose dexamethasone for relapsed/refractory chronic lymphocytic leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Šimkovič, Martin; Motyčková, Monika; Belada, David; Vodárek, Pavel; Kapoor, Rahul; Jaffar, Hamna; Vrbacký, Filip; Žák, Pavel

    2015-01-01

    Introduction High-dose methylprednisolone (HDMP) in combination with rituximab is active in the treatment of relapsed/refractory chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL), but serious infections are frequent. Recently published data suggested that high-dose dexamethasone might be equally effective as HDMP despite a lower cumulative dose. Material and methods We performed retrospective analysis of 60 patients with relapsed/refractory CLL (median age: 66 years; range: 37–86) treated with rituximab plus dexamethasone (R-dex) at a single tertiary center between September 2008 and October 2012. The schedule of R-dex consisted of rituximab 500 mg/m2 i.v. day 1 (375 mg/m2 in cycle 1) and dexamethasone 40 mg orally on days 1-4 and 10-13 repeated every 3 weeks for a maximum of 8 cycles. Unfavorable prognostic features were frequent (Rai stages III/IV in 67%, unmutated IgVH 82%, del 11q 43%, TP53 mutation/deletion 23%, bulky lymphadenopathy 58% of patients). Results Overall response (OR)/complete remission (CR) was achieved in 75/3%. At the median follow-up of 21 months, median progression-free survival (PFS) was 8 months, median time to next treatment 12.9 months and median overall survival 25.5 months. Refractoriness to fludarabine (p = 0.04) and age ≥ 65 years (p = 0.03) were significant predictors of shorter PFS. R-dex was successfully used for debulking before allogenic stem cell transplantation in 7 patients (12%). Serious (CTCAE grade III/IV) infections occurred in 27% of patients; 20% of patients developed steroid diabetes requiring temporary short-acting insulin. Conclusions Our results show that R-dex is an active and well-tolerated regimen for patients with relapsed/refractory CLL; however, major infections remain frequent despite combined antimicrobial prophylaxis.