Science.gov

Sample records for children including children

  1. Visual disabilities in children including childhood blindness.

    PubMed

    Khandekar, Rajiv

    2008-07-01

    We should address visual disabilities in children instead of only the childhood blindness. Diseases related to nutritional, communicable diseases should be addressed through strategies for achieving 'Millennium Development Goals'. Facilities in African countries and countries with populations like India and China must be strengthened to address curable/preventable visual disabilities in children. Even though all efforts are done to strengthen, we will have 0.93 million blind children by 2020. Role of family physicians and paediatricians in trans-disciplinary approach to address visual disabilities in children is very crucial. If rational distribution of skilled human resource is not planned visual disabilities will not reduce effectively. Rehabilitation of visually disabled children should be integral part of addressing childhood blindness. All stakeholders including parents of children with visual disabilities should work together to achieve the goals. PMID:21369469

  2. Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Headley, Clea; Campbell, Marilyn A.

    2013-01-01

    This study examined primary school teachers' knowledge of anxiety and excessive anxiety symptoms in children. Three hundred and fifteen primary school teachers completed a questionnaire exploring their definitions of anxiety and the indications they associated with excessive anxiety in primary school children. Results showed that teachers had…

  3. Including Children with Cochlear Implants in General Education Elementary Classrooms

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stith, Joanna L.; Drasgow, Erik

    2005-01-01

    Cochlear implants can provide partial hearing to individuals with substantial hearing loss. Because of improvements in early identification and intervention, more children with cochlear implants will be included in elementary school general education classrooms. Thus, general education teachers should be prepared for teaching children with…

  4. Including Children with Hearing Loss in Early Childhood Programs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Katz, Laurie; Schery, Teris K.

    2006-01-01

    These are typical scenarios of children with hearing loss who are being included increasingly in early childhood settings. Recent federal legislation encourages states to develop programs to screen the hearing of all infants before they leave the hospital, and currently 39 states have adopted newborn infant hearing screening mandates (ASHA 2005).…

  5. Including Children with Mental Retardation in the Religious Community.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Collins, Belva C.; Epstein, Ann; Reiss, Toni; Lowe, Verna

    2001-01-01

    This article describes practical strategies for promoting inclusion in religious programs. Strategies are provided for including children with mental disabilities, mild mental retardation, moderate mental retardation, and severe to profound mental retardation, and older students with mental retardation. Strategies are also provided for preparing

  6. The Director's Toolbox for Including Children with Special Needs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barker, Linda; Goldberg, Roberta

    2012-01-01

    Directors of early childhood programs are the "frontline" for parents seeking admission for their children with identified special needs. In addition, developmental and behavioral issues that emerge after a child is enrolled in a program quickly come to the director's attention. Determining who can be included at a site, how to prepare the…

  7. Including Children with Chronic Health Conditions: Nebulizers in the Classroom.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goldberg, Ellie

    1994-01-01

    Describes the Transition-to-Kindergarten program in Brookline, Massachusetts, in which two children with asthma and potentially life-threatening food allergies were helped to stay healthy and fit into the classroom. (BB)

  8. Early Childhood Teachers' Ideas about Including Children with Disabilities in Programmes Designed for Typically Developing Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Huang, Hsin-Hui; Diamond, Karen E.

    2009-01-01

    This study examined the influence of information about children's disabilities on preschool teachers' responses toward integrating children with disabilities in their classroom. Of particular interest was whether the severity of the child's educational needs and information about diagnosis were related to teachers' responses. Data were collected…

  9. Including Children with Autism in General Physical Education: Eight Possible Solutions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zhang, Jiabei; Griffin, Ann J.

    2007-01-01

    The number of children diagnosed with autism is on the rise, and teachers are seldom prepared to teach children with autism in their classes. However, it is possible to successfully include children with autism in general physical education settings by understanding inclusive physical education, individualizing instruction, targeting…

  10. Kids Included through Technology Are Enriched: A Guidebook for Teachers of Young Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carlson, Brenda; Samels, Karen

    This guidebook is designed to provide information on technology to teachers and service providers who work with children with special needs. It may also be helpful for parents and caregivers of young children. Topics include: (1) the definition of assistive technology; (2) the philosophy of using technology with young children and a rationale that…

  11. An Initial Look at the Quality of Life of Malaysian Families That Include Children with Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clark, M.; Brown, R.; Karrapaya, R.

    2012-01-01

    Background: While there is a growing body of literature in the quality of life of families that include children with disabilities, the majority of research has been conducted in western countries. The present study provides an initial exploration of the quality of life of Malaysian families that include children with developmental/intellectual

  12. An Initial Look at the Quality of Life of Malaysian Families That Include Children with Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clark, M.; Brown, R.; Karrapaya, R.

    2012-01-01

    Background: While there is a growing body of literature in the quality of life of families that include children with disabilities, the majority of research has been conducted in western countries. The present study provides an initial exploration of the quality of life of Malaysian families that include children with developmental/intellectual…

  13. Educators' Challenges of Including Children with Autism Spectrum Disorder in Mainstream Classrooms

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lindsay, Sally; Proulx, Meghann; Thomson, Nicole; Scott, Helen

    2013-01-01

    Although children with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) are increasingly being placed within mainstream classes, little is known about the challenges that teachers encounter with including them as full participants in the class. This qualitative study draws on a purposive sample of 13 educators who have experience teaching children with ASD within…

  14. Child Care Teachers' Perspectives on Including Children with Challenging Behavior in Child Care Settings

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Quesenberry, Amanda C.; Hemmeter, Mary Louise; Ostrosky, Michaelene M.; Hamann, Kira

    2014-01-01

    In this study, 9 teachers from 5 child care centers were interviewed to examine their perceptions on including children with challenging behavior in their classrooms. The findings provide a firsthand view into how child care teachers support children's social and emotional development and address challenging behavior. Results confirm previous…

  15. Young Children's Decisions to Include Peers with Physical Disabilities in Play

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Diamond, Karen E.; Hong, Soo-Young

    2010-01-01

    The authors examined factors related to preschool children's reasoning about including a hypothetical peer with a physical disability in different play activities. They hypothesized that children's inclusion decisions would be influenced by features of the physical environment, attention to issues of fairness and equity, and individual child…

  16. Including Young Children With "New" Chronic Illnesses in an Early Childhood Education Setting.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fauvre, Mary

    1988-01-01

    Presents suggestions for successfully including young children with "new" life-threatening, chronic illnesses -- various types of cancer, heart, liver, and kidney diseases -- in early childhood education classes. (BB)

  17. Mansonella, including a Potential New Species, as Common Parasites in Children in Gabon

    PubMed Central

    Mourembou, Gaël; Fenollar, Florence; Lekana-Douki, Jean Bernard; Ndjoyi Mbiguino, Angelique; Maghendji Nzondo, Sydney; Matsiegui, Pierre Blaise; Zoleko Manego, Rella; Ehounoud, Cyrille Herve Bile; Bittar, Fadi; Raoult, Didier; Mediannikov, Oleg

    2015-01-01

    Background Like other tropical African countries, Gabon is afflicted by many parasitic diseases, including filariases such as loiasis and mansonellosis. This study aimed to assess the prevalence of these two filarial diseases in febrile and afebrile children using quantitative real-time PCR and standard PCR assays coupled with sequencing. Methodology/Principal Findings DNA from blood specimens of 1,418 Gabonese children (1,258 febrile and 160 afebrile) were analyzed. Overall, filarial DNA was detected in 95 (6.7%) children, including 67 positive for M. perstans (4.7%), which was the most common. M. perstans was detected in 61/1,258 febrile children (4.8%) and 6/160 afebrile children (3.8%, P = 0.6). Its prevalence increased statistically with age: 3.5%, 7.7% and 10.6% in children aged ≤5, 6–10 and 11–15 years, respectively. M. perstans prevalence was significantly higher in Koulamoutou and Lastourville (12% and 10.5%, respectively) than in Franceville and Fougamou (2.6% and 2.4%, respectively). Loa loa was detected in seven febrile children including one co-infection with M. perstans. Finally, 21 filarial DNA positive were negative for M. perstans and Loa loa, but ITS sequencing could be performed for 12 and allowed the identification of a potential new species of Mansonella provisionally called “DEUX”. Mansonella sp. “DEUX” was detected only in febrile children. Conclusions/Significance Further study should be performed to characterize Mansonella sp. “DEUX” and evaluate the clinical significance of mansonellosis in humans. PMID:26484866

  18. Children's Health

    MedlinePlus

    Your child's health includes physical, mental and social well-being. Most parents know the basics of keeping children healthy, like offering ... for children to get regular checkups with their health care provider. These visits are a chance to ...

  19. Nutritional status changes in HIV-infected children receiving combined antiretroviral therapy including protease inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Fiore, P; Donelli, E; Boni, S; Pontali, E; Tramalloni, R; Bassetti, D

    2000-11-01

    Maintaining linear growth and weight gain in HIV-infected children is often difficult. Nutritional evaluation and support are recognised as important factors to improve their quality of life. Combination antiretroviral therapy including protease inhibitors (HAART) reduces HIV-viral load and improves survival, quality of life and nutritional status. Our study aimed to determine changes in nutrional status based on body weight, height and nutritional habits, of HIV-infected children receiving HAART. Possible side effects of lipid metabolism were also studied. Twenty five children, 13 treated with HAART (group B) were followed up for 12 months. We did not observe statistically significant differences in nutritional status over that time or between groups A and B. Inadequate energy intake was more common in patients with advanced HIV-disease. Hyperlipidemia was found in 70% of children receiving ritonavir and in approximately 50% of children receiving nelfinavir. We observed an important although not statistically significative modification in the height of those in group B. PMID:11091066

  20. Including children with autism in general education classrooms. A review of effective strategies.

    PubMed

    Harrower, J K; Dunlap, G

    2001-10-01

    Children with autism can benefit from participation in inclusive classroom environments, and many experts assert that inclusion is a civil right and is responsible for nurturing appropriate social development. However, most children with autism require specialized supports to experience success in these educational contexts. This article provides a review of the empirical research that has addressed procedures for promoting successful inclusion of students with autism. Strategies reviewed include antecedent manipulations, delayed contingencies, self-management, peer-mediated interventions, and other approaches that have been demonstrated in the literature to be useful. The article concludes with a discussion of future research needs. PMID:11573339

  1. [The comparative effectiveness of framycetin included in combined therapy of adenoiditis in the children].

    PubMed

    Soldatskiĭ, Iu L; Denisova, O A; Ivanenko, A M

    2014-01-01

    The objective of the present study was to evaluate the effectiveness of framycetin included in combined therapy of adenoiditis in the children. The study involved 67 children at the mean age of 6.9±2.7 years. Group 1 was comprised of 35 children given framycetin as topical therapy, the patients of group 2 were treated by the endonasal administration of a 2% silver proteinate solution. It was shown that the use of framycetin as a component of combined therapy of adenoiditis enhances the effectiveness of the treatment and compliance to therapy in comparison with the same parameters in the case of the application of traditional topical antibacterial preparations. PMID:25588492

  2. Widening the Circle: Including Children with Disabilities in Preschool Programs. Early Childhood Education Series.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Odom, Samuel L., Ed.

    Based on a groundbreaking 5-year research study conducted by the Early Childhood Research Institute on Inclusion, this book explores the barriers to and influences on inclusive education settings for young children. Topics covered include individualized instruction, family perceptions of inclusion, and cultural and linguistic diversity. The…

  3. Four Stories, Four Children, One Special Need: To Be Warmly Included.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Soriano-Nagurski, Lisa; Bakley, Sue; Kulak, Alisa; Blasi, Mary Jane; Priestley, Lori

    1998-01-01

    Contains four articles: (1) "And the Walls Came Tumbling Down: Including Children Who Are Differently Abled in Typical Early Childhood Educational Settings"; (2) "On Teasing, Taunting, and 'I Can Do It by Myself'"; (3) "A Teacher's Responsibility--To Be Enthusiastic about Teaching Fast and Slow Learners Alike"; (4) "A Child with Severe Hearing…

  4. Including Children with Selective Mutism in Mainstream Schools and Kindergartens: Problems and Possibilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Omdal, Heidi

    2008-01-01

    There is little research on inclusion of children with selective mutism in school/kindergarten. Moreover, few studies have tried to understand selectively mute children's interactions in the natural surroundings of their home and school/kindergarten. Five children meeting the DSM-IV criteria for selective mutism were video-observed in social…

  5. Children Helping Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brougher, Jean

    2006-01-01

    In a summer program for school-agers 6 to 12 years old, the children devise a meaningful, real-life experience to alleviate the midsummer doldrums and hope to "make the world a better place." They collect, repair, and paint old children's bicycles to present, along with new helmets, to children at a nearby homeless shelter. In this article, the…

  6. [Mitochondrial diseases in children including Leigh syndrome--biochemical and molecular background].

    PubMed

    Pronicka, Ewa; Piekutowska-Abramczuk, Dorota; Pronicki, Maciej

    2008-01-01

    Mitochondrial diseases in children are more frequently caused by mutations in nuclear DNA then in mtDNA. Special clinical phenotypes are associated with the mutations in SURF1 gene, in SCO2 gene and with mtDNA depletion syndromes. Leigh syndrome is the most common clinical presentation of various mitochondrial disorders during childhood. Elevation of lactate in blood, cerebrospinal fluid and urine is a simple biochemical marker of mitochondrial disorders but its specificity and sensitivity are low. Biochemical investigation of muscle biopsy and search for mitochondrial mutations remain a gold standard in the diagnosis. The standarized diagnostic criteria to establish level of diagnostic certainty (possible, probable, definite) are proposed to be used in practice; these include clinical features, neuroimaging and muscle biopsy investigations. Further research directions to improve our understanding of mitochondrial pathologies in children are suggested. PMID:18807927

  7. Designing and recruiting to UK autism spectrum disorder research databases: do they include representative children with valid ASD diagnoses?

    PubMed Central

    Warnell, F; George, B; McConachie, H; Johnson, M; Hardy, R; Parr, J R

    2015-01-01

    Objectives (1) Describe how the Autism Spectrum Database-UK (ASD-UK) was established; (2) investigate the representativeness of the first 1000 children and families who participated, compared to those who chose not to; (3) investigate the reliability of the parent-reported Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD) diagnoses, and present evidence about the validity of diagnoses, that is, whether children recruited actually have an ASD; (4) present evidence about the representativeness of the ASD-UK children and families, by comparing their characteristics with the first 1000 children and families from the regional Database of children with ASD living in the North East (Daslne), and children and families identified from epidemiological studies. Setting Recruitment through a network of 50 UK child health teams and self-referral. Patients Parents/carers with a child with ASD, aged 2–16 years, completed questionnaires about ASD and some gave professionals’ reports about their children. Results 1000 families registered with ASD-UK in 30 months. Children of families who participated, and of the 208 who chose not to, were found to be very similar on: gender ratio, year of birth, ASD diagnosis and social deprivation score. The reliability of parent-reported ASD diagnoses of children was very high when compared with clinical reports (over 96%); no database child without ASD was identified. A comparison of gender, ASD diagnosis, age at diagnosis, school placement, learning disability, and deprivation score of children and families from ASD-UK with 1084 children and families from Daslne, and families from population studies, showed that ASD-UK families are representative of families of children with ASD overall. Conclusions ASD-UK includes families providing parent-reported data about their child and family, who appear to be broadly representative of UK children with ASD. Families continue to join the databases and more than 3000 families can now be contacted by researchers about UK autism research. PMID:26341584

  8. Including Children with Special Educational Needs in Physical Education: Has Entitlement and Accessibility Been Realised?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vickerman, Philip

    2012-01-01

    The return of the Labour government to power in 1997 brought an increased focus upon inclusive education for children with special educational needs (SEN). Alongside this there has been a desire to enhance the opportunities young people have to access physical education (PE) and school sport. Previous research has shown that children with SEN

  9. Including Children with Autism in Social and Imaginary Play with Typical Peers: Integrated Play Groups Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wolfberg, Pamela; Bottema-Beutel, Kristen; DeWitt, Mila

    2012-01-01

    Peer-play experiences are a vital part of children's socialization, development, and culture. Children with autism face distinct challenges in social and imaginary play, which place them at high risk for being excluded by peers. Without explicit support, they are likely to remain isolated from peers and the consistent interactive play that…

  10. Parents' Adoption of Social Communication Intervention Strategies: Families Including Children with Autism Spectrum Disorder Who are Minimally Verbal.

    PubMed

    Shire, Stephanie Y; Goods, Kelly; Shih, Wendy; Distefano, Charlotte; Kaiser, Ann; Wright, Courtney; Mathy, Pamela; Landa, Rebecca; Kasari, Connie

    2015-06-01

    Notably absent from the intervention literature are parent training programs targeting school-aged children with autism who have limited communication skills (Tager-Flusberg and Kasari in Autism Res 6:468-478, 2013). Sixty-one children with autism age 5-8 with minimal spontaneous communication received a 6-month social communication intervention including parent training. Parent-child play interactions were coded for parents' strategy implementation and children's time jointly engaged (Adamson et al. in J Autism Dev Disord 39:84-96, 2009). Parents mastered an average of 70% of the strategies. Further analyses indicated some gains in implementation occurred from mere observation of sessions, while the greatest gains occurred in the first month of active coaching and workshops. Children's joint engagement was associated with parents' implementation success across time demonstrating parents' implementation was relevant to children's social engagement. PMID:25475363

  11. Implementing Randomized Controlled Trials in Preschool Settings That Include Young Children with Disabilities: Considering the Context of Strain and Bovey

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Snyder, Patricia

    2011-01-01

    In this commentary, developments related to conducting randomized controlled trials in authentic preschool settings that include young children with disabilities are discussed in relation to the Strain and Bovey study.

  12. The Impact of Disability on the Lives of Children; Cross-Sectional Data Including 8,900 Children with Disabilities and 898,834 Children without Disabilities across 30 Countries

    PubMed Central

    Kuper, Hannah; Monteath-van Dok, Adrienne; Wing, Kevin; Danquah, Lisa; Evans, Jenny; Zuurmond, Maria; Gallinetti, Jacqueline

    2014-01-01

    Background Children with disabilities are widely believed to be less likely to attend school or access health care, and more vulnerable to poverty. There is currently little large-scale or internationally comparable evidence to support these claims. The aim of this study was to investigate the impact of disability on the lives of children sponsored by Plan International across 30 countries. Methods and Findings We conducted a cross-sectional survey including 907,734 children aged 0–17 participating in the Plan International Sponsorship Programme across 30 countries in 2012. Parents/guardians were interviewed using standardised questionnaires including information on: age, sex, health, education, poverty, and water and sanitation facilities. Disability was assessed through a single question and information was collected on type of impairment. The dataset included 8,900 children with reported disabilities across 30 countries. The prevalence of disability ranged from 0.4%–3.0% and was higher in boys than girls in 22 of the 30 countries assessed – generally in the range of 1.3–1.4 fold higher. Children with disabilities were much less likely to attend formal education in comparison to children without disabilities in each of the 30 countries, with age-sex adjusted odds ratios exceeding 10 for nearly half of the countries. This relationship varied by impairment type. Among those attending school, children with disabilities were at a lower level of schooling for their age compared to children without disabilities. Children with disabilities were more likely to report experiencing a serious illness in the last 12 months, except in Niger. There was no clear relationship between disability and poverty. Conclusions Children with disabilities are at risk of not fulfilling their educational potential and are more vulnerable to serious illness. This exclusion is likely to have a long-term deleterious impact on their lives unless services are adapted to promote their inclusion. PMID:25202999

  13. Children and adolescents' internal models of food-sharing behavior include complex evaluations of contextual factors.

    PubMed

    Markovits, Henry; Benenson, Joyce F; Kramer, Donald L

    2003-01-01

    This study examined internal representations of food sharing in 589 children and adolescents (8-19 years of age). Questionnaires, depicting a variety of contexts in which one person was asked to share a resource with another, were used to examine participants' expectations of food-sharing behavior. Factors that were varied included the value of the resource, the relation between the two depicted actors, the quality of this relation, and gender. Results indicate that internal models of food-sharing behavior showed systematic patterns of variation, demonstrating that individuals have complex contextually based internal models at all ages, including the youngest. Examination of developmental changes in use of individual patterns is consistent with the idea that internal models reflect age-specific patterns of interactions while undergoing a process of progressive consolidation. PMID:14669890

  14. Lifestyle Interventions Including Nutrition, Exercise, and Supplements for Nonalcoholic Fatty Liver Disease in Children.

    PubMed

    Africa, Jonathan A; Newton, Kimberly P; Schwimmer, Jeffrey B

    2016-05-01

    Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is the most common cause of liver disease among children. Lifestyle interventions, such as diet and exercise, are frequently recommended. Children with NAFLD have a distinct physiology that is different from obesity alone and has the potential to influence lifestyle treatments. Studies of diet alone in the treatment of pediatric NAFLD have focused on sugar and carbohydrate, but did not indicate any one dietary approach that was superior to another. For children who are obese and have NAFLD, weight loss may have a beneficial effect regardless of the diet used. Exercise is widely believed to improve NAFLD because a sedentary lifestyle, poor aerobic fitness, and low muscle mass are all risk factors for NAFLD. However, there have been no randomized controlled trials of exercise as a treatment for children with NAFLD. Studies of the combination of diet and exercise suggest a potential for improvement in serum alanine aminotransferase activity and/or magnetic resonance imaging liver fat fraction with intervention. There is also enthusiasm for the use of dietary supplements; however, studies in children have shown inconsistent effects of vitamin E, fish oil, and probiotics. This review presents the available data from studies of lifestyle intervention and dietary supplements published to date and highlights challenges that must be addressed in order to advance the evidence base for the treatment of pediatric NAFLD. PMID:27041377

  15. Should singing activities be included in speech and voice therapy for prepubertal children?

    PubMed

    Rinta, Tiija; Welch, Graham F

    2008-01-01

    Customarily, speaking and singing have tended to be regarded as two completely separate sets of behaviors in clinical and educational settings. The treatment of speech and voice disorders has focused on the client's speaking ability, as this is perceived to be the main vocal behavior of concern. However, according to a broader voice-science perspective, given that the same vocal structure is used for speaking and singing, it may be possible to include singing in speech and voice therapy. In this article, a theoretical framework is proposed that indicates possible benefits from the inclusion of singing in such therapeutic settings. Based on a literature review, it is demonstrated theoretically why singing activities can potentially be exploited in the treatment of prepubertal children suffering from speech and voice disorders. Based on this theoretical framework, implications for further empirical research and practice are suggested. PMID:16968664

  16. Spatial distribution of soil-transmitted helminths, including Strongyloides stercoralis, among children in Zanzibar.

    PubMed

    Knopp, Stefanie; Mohammed, Khalfan A; Simba Khamis, I; Mgeni, Ali F; Stothard, J Russell; Rollinson, David; Marti, Hanspeter; Utzinger, Jürg

    2008-11-01

    A programme periodically distributing anthelminthic drugs to school-aged children for the control of soiltransmitted helminthiasis was launched in Zanzibar in the early 1990s. We investigated the spatial distribution of soiltransmitted helminth infections, including Strongyloides stercoralis, in 336 children from six districts in Unguja, Zanzibar, in 2007. One stool sample per child was examined with the Kato-Katz, Koga agar plate and Baermann methods. The point prevalence of the different helminth infections was compared to the geological characteristics of the study sites. The observed prevalences for Trichuris trichiura, Ascaris lumbricoides, hookworm and S. stercoralis were 35.5%, 12.2%, 11.9% and 2.2%, respectively, with considerable spatial heterogeneity. Whilst T. trichiura and hookworm infections were found in all six districts, no A. lumbricoides infections were recorded in the urban setting and only a low prevalence (2.2%) was observed in the South district. S. stercoralis infections were found in four districts with the highest prevalence (4.0%) in the West district. The prevalence of infection with any soil-transmitted helminth was highest in the North A district (69.6%) and lowest in the urban setting (22.4%). A. lumbricoides, hookworm and, with the exception of the North B district, S. stercoralis infections were observed to be more prevalent in the settings north of Zanzibar Town, which are characterized by alluvial clayey soils, moist forest regions and a higher precipitation. After a decade of large-scale administration of anthelminthic drugs, the prevalence of soil-transmitted helminth infections across Unguja is still considerable. Hence, additional measures, such as improving access to adequate sanitation and clean water and continued health education, are warranted to successfully control soil-transmitted helminthiasis in Zanzibar. PMID:19021108

  17. One-Year Change in Repetitive Behaviours in Young Children with Communication Disorders Including Autism

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Honey, Emma; McConachie, Helen; Randle, Val; Shearer, Heather; Le Couteur, Ann S.

    2008-01-01

    Repetitive behaviours are a relatively neglected area of study in autism. Previous research has concluded that repetitive behaviour is inversely related to ability and that it tends to increase over the preschool years. One-hundred and four children ages 24-48 months, with autism, autism spectrum disorder (ASD) or other disorders, were followed…

  18. Maintaining the Thread: Including Young Children with Chronic Illness in the Primary Classroom

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shiu, Shiona

    2004-01-01

    Young children with chronic illness who attend our early childhood facilities and schools have very special needs. They are more likely to encounter academic challenges and to have peer and emotional difficulties than are their healthy peers. As well, their families are frequently undergoing intense stress. The challenge to educators is to ensure…

  19. Including Children with Special Needs: Are You and Your Early Childhood Program Ready?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Watson, Amy; McCathren, Rebecca

    2009-01-01

    The authors present a checklist designed to help preschool and kindergarten administrators and teachers build confidence in their ability to be inclusive and to increase their awareness of the needs of children with disabilities. Teachers can use the checklist to prepare for the inclusion of a child with a disability. "Identifying potential

  20. Liver transplantation, including the concept of reduced-size liver transplants in children.

    PubMed Central

    Broelsch, C E; Emond, J C; Thistlethwaite, J R; Whitington, P F; Zucker, A R; Baker, A L; Aran, P F; Rouch, D A; Lichtor, J L

    1988-01-01

    Since the establishment of a clinical program in liver transplantation in 1984, 162 liver transplants have been performed in 131 patients (78 adults, 53 children). The patient mortality rate while waiting for a suitable organ has been 8% for adults and only 4% for children (25-46% reported in the literature). The low pediatric mortality is a result of the use of reduced-size liver transplants. A total of 14 procedures have been performed in recipients whose clinical condition was deteriorating and for whom no full-size graft could be located. Of 14 children, 13 were less than 3 years of age. Patient survival is 50%, comparable to survival of high-risk recipients of full-size livers. Using reduced-size liver grafting in a transplant program can lower mortality for children awaiting a transplant by overcoming size disparity. Reduced-size liver grafting will allow more effective use of donor resources and provide a potential avenue of research for organ splitting and living related donation. PMID:3052326

  1. Including Exceptional Children in a Christian Learning Community: New Narratives in Special Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tangunan Camota Contreras, Jennifer

    2013-01-01

    Research Topic: The majority of Christian schools in the United States exclude children who have disabilities from their learning communities. This study examines the practices of 11 Christian schools throughout the United States, through conversations with a top leader in each school, that provide access to and/or inclusion in their schools.

  2. Including Children with Disabilities in Early Childhood Education Programs: Individualizing Developmentally Appropriate Practices

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Filler, John; Xu, Yaoying

    2006-01-01

    Early childhood educators are facing the challenge of creating quality educational programs for young children from an increasingly diverse mix of racial and cultural backgrounds. Programs that, in the past, have largely ignored the diversity of their participants must re-examine approaches that emphasize the universality of linear lists of…

  3. Including Exceptional Children in a Christian Learning Community: New Narratives in Special Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tangunan Camota Contreras, Jennifer

    2013-01-01

    Research Topic: The majority of Christian schools in the United States exclude children who have disabilities from their learning communities. This study examines the practices of 11 Christian schools throughout the United States, through conversations with a top leader in each school, that provide access to and/or inclusion in their schools.…

  4. Comparison of Behavioral Profiles for Anxiety-Related Comorbidities including ADHD and Selective Mutism in Children

    PubMed Central

    Levin-Decanini, Tal; Connolly, Sucheta D.; Simpson, David; Suarez, Liza; Jacob, Suma

    2013-01-01

    Background Elucidating differences in social-behavioral profiles of children with comorbid presentations, utilizing caregiver as well as teacher reports, will refine our understanding of how contextual symptoms vary across anxiety-related disorders. Methods In our pediatric anxiety clinic, the most frequent diagnoses and comorbidities were mixed anxiety (MA; ? 1 anxiety disorder; N = 155), anxiety with comorbid attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder (MA/ADHD, N = 47) and selective mutism (SM, N = 48). Behavioral measures (CPRS, CTRS) were analyzed using multiple one-way multivariate analyses of covariance tests. Differences between the three diagnostic groups were examined using completed parent and teacher reports (N = 135, 46 and 48 for MA, MA/ADHD and SM groups, respectively). Results Comparisons across the MA, MA/ADHD and SM groups indicate a significant multivariate main effect of group for caregiver and teacher responses (p < 0.01). Caregivers reported that children with SM are similar in profile to those with MA, and both groups were significantly different from the MA/ADHD group. Teachers reported that children with SM had more problem social behaviors than either the MA or MA/ADHD groups. Further comparison indicates a significant main effect of group (p < 0.001), such that children with SM have the greatest differences in behavior observed by teachers versus caregivers. Conclusions Clinical profiles between MA/ADHD, MA and SM groups varied, illustrating the importance of multi-rater assessment scales to capture subtle distinctions and to inform treatment planning given that comorbidities occur frequently in children who present with anxiety. PMID:23526795

  5. Children Teaching Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Williams, Pia

    2007-01-01

    This study describes children's awareness of what it means to teach a game to a peer where the act of teaching becomes expression of the child's possible awareness. Awareness is defined as the attention to different aspects of the teaching process shown by the teaching child, sometimes through their own verbal reflection. This implies an…

  6. Raising Our Children's Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Doucette-Dudman, Deborah; LaCure, Jeffrey R.

    There are 3.2 million children in the United States living with their grandparents or other kin, a 40 percent increase since 1980. This exploding sociological trend with far-reaching implications for our future spans every segment of our society--rich and poor, black and white, Asian and Hispanic, urban and suburban. Based on interviews with…

  7. Children Teaching Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Williams, Pia

    2007-01-01

    This study describes children's awareness of what it means to teach a game to a peer where the act of teaching becomes expression of the child's possible awareness. Awareness is defined as the attention to different aspects of the teaching process shown by the teaching child, sometimes through their own verbal reflection. This implies an

  8. Children Solve Problems.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    De Bono, Edward

    A group of children were presented with several tasks, including the invention of a sleep machine and a machine to weigh elephants. The tasks were chosen to involve the children in coping with problems of a distinct character. A study of the children's drawings and interpretations shows that children's thinking ability is not very different from…

  9. Study protocol: rehabilitation including social and physical activity and education in children and teenagers with cancer (RESPECT)

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background During cancer treatment children have reduced contact with their social network of friends, and have limited participation in education, sports, and leisure activities. During and following cancer treatment, children describe school related problems, reduced physical fitness, and problems related to interaction with peers. Methods/design The RESPECT study is a nationwide population-based prospective, controlled, mixed-methods intervention study looking at children aged 6-18 years newly diagnosed with cancer in eastern Denmark (n = 120) and a matched control group in western Denmark (n = 120). RESPECT includes Danish-speaking children diagnosed with cancer and treated at pediatric oncology units in Denmark. Primary endpoints are the level of educational achievement one year after the cessation of first-line cancer therapy, and the value of VO2max one year after the cessation of first-line cancer therapy. Secondary endpoints are quality of life measured by validated questionnaires and interviews, and physical performance. RESPECT includes a multimodal intervention program, including ambassador-facilitated educational, physical, and social interventions. The educational intervention includes an educational program aimed at the child with cancer, the child’s schoolteachers and classmates, and the child’s parents. Children with cancer will each have two ambassadors assigned from their class. The ambassadors visit the child with cancer at the hospital at alternating 2-week intervals and participate in the intervention program. The physical and social intervention examines the effect of early, structured, individualized, and continuous physical activity from diagnosis throughout the treatment period. The patients are tested at diagnosis, at 3 and 6 months after diagnosis, and one year after the cessation of treatment. The study is powered to quantify the impact of the combined educational, physical, and social intervention programs. Discussion RESPECT is the first population-based study to examine the effect of early rehabilitation for children with cancer, and to use healthy classmates as ambassadors to facilitate the normalization of social life in the hospital. For children with cancer, RESPECT contributes to expanding knowledge on rehabilitation that can also facilitate rehabilitation of other children undergoing hospitalization for long-term illness. Trial registration Clinical Trials.gov: file. NCT01772849 and NCT01772862 PMID:24229362

  10. Children's Space

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ross, Nicola J.

    2005-01-01

    Evidence of the ways in which children utilise neighbourhood spaces for play and socalising is presented here. Findings are based on research conducted on the social and environmental geographies of children in middle childhood in Fife, Scotland. Photographs and maps produced by the children are used to illustrate their active, emotional and

  11. Urinary tract infection - children

    MedlinePlus

    UTI - children; Cystitis - children; Bladder infection - children; Kidney infection - children; Pyelonephritis - children ... They may occur often around age 3, as children begin toilet training. Boys who are not circumcised ...

  12. Obliging children.

    PubMed

    Lyons, Barry

    2011-01-01

    Children may sometimes undergo healthcare procedures that are not intended to improve their health status. Such interventions might include the use of young children as bone marrow donors or their enrolment in non-therapeutic research. One of the justifications used to legitimise these interventions is the premise that children have obligations to others; to their family in the case of related bone marrow transplantation, and to wider society in the case of non-therapeutic research. However, this 'obligation model' (the notion that children possess positive obligations to advance the health status of others) fails as a justificatory paradigm because it is based upon a confusion, identified by Hart, between two notions; that of 'being under an obligation to do something' and that of 'being obliged to do something'. Instead the 'obligation model' is a device employed to put a justificatory gloss upon a consequentialist decision-making process; removing the legitimising gloss allows for a more transparent look at the conflict between parental rights and an individual child's right to bodily integrity. PMID:21289034

  13. Children Worldwide, 1992.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lejeune, Genevieve, Ed.

    1992-01-01

    Each of the three journal issues comprising volume 19 (1992) of "Children Worldwide" focuses on a specific theme. Issue 1 contains six articles about refugee children, including essays about a community self-help approach in Pakistan, unaccompanied minors in Hong Kong, and refugee families raising children in a new culture; guidelines for working…

  14. Hispanic Children in Poverty.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burke, Vee; And Others

    This report compares Hispanic children with non-Hispanic white and black children in regard to income and several factors related to the poverty of children, including: education of parents; age of parents; family size; and hours of work. Based on Census Bureau data, the report consists of six chapters which present the following: (1)

  15. Children for Health.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hawes, Hugh, Ed.; Scotchmer, Christine, Ed.

    This book is designed for those who work with children and who believe that children, in schools and as family members, need to be considered partners in spreading health messages as well as benefiting from them. It contains the messages included in "Facts for Life," a handbook that presents practical, low-cost ways of protecting children's lives…

  16. Parents' Adoption of Social Communication Intervention Strategies: Families Including Children with Autism Spectrum Disorder Who Are Minimally Verbal

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shire, Stephanie Y.; Goods, Kelly; Shih, Wendy; Distefano, Charlotte; Kaiser, Ann; Wright, Courtney; Mathy, Pamela; Landa, Rebecca; Kasari, Connie

    2015-01-01

    Notably absent from the intervention literature are parent training programs targeting school-aged children with autism who have limited communication skills (Tager-Flusberg and Kasari in "Autism Res" 6:468-478, 2013). Sixty-one children with autism age 5-8 with minimal spontaneous communication received a 6-month social communication

  17. Parents' Adoption of Social Communication Intervention Strategies: Families Including Children with Autism Spectrum Disorder Who Are Minimally Verbal

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shire, Stephanie Y.; Goods, Kelly; Shih, Wendy; Distefano, Charlotte; Kaiser, Ann; Wright, Courtney; Mathy, Pamela; Landa, Rebecca; Kasari, Connie

    2015-01-01

    Notably absent from the intervention literature are parent training programs targeting school-aged children with autism who have limited communication skills (Tager-Flusberg and Kasari in "Autism Res" 6:468-478, 2013). Sixty-one children with autism age 5-8 with minimal spontaneous communication received a 6-month social communication…

  18. Including Children with ASD in Regular Kindergarten and First Grade Classrooms: Teacher Attitudes, Child Progress and Classroom Quality

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McKeating, Eileen

    2013-01-01

    The enrollment of children with ASD in public school settings has escalated in conjunction with the increased incidence of the diagnosis (Yeargin-Allsopp et al., 2003). Characteristics associated with ASD can present unique challenges for both children and teachers in the classroom. According to many researchers, positive teacher attitudes are one…

  19. A Tool to Record and Support the Early Development of Children Including Those with Special Educational Needs or Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mengoni, Silvana E.; Oates, John

    2014-01-01

    Early intervention is key for children with special educational needs or disabilities (SEND), and therefore early assessment is crucial. Information from parents about children's current ability and their developmental history can make valid and useful contributions to developmental assessments. Parental input is also important in early…

  20. Exploring the Social Impact of Being a Typical Peer Model for Included Children with Autism Spectrum Disorder

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Locke, Jill; Rotheram-Fuller, Erin; Kasari, Connie

    2012-01-01

    This study examined the social impact of being a typical peer model as part of a social skills intervention for children with autism spectrum disorder (ASD). Participants were drawn from a randomized-controlled-treatment trial that examined the effects of targeted interventions on the social networks of 60 elementary-aged children with ASD.…

  1. 32 CFR Appendix B to Part 80 - Procedures for Special Educational Programs (Including Related Services) for Preschool Children...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... transfers from a school operated by the DoD in accordance with 32 CFR part 1 or from a Section 6 School... of a parent of each preschool child or child, evaluate all preschool children or children who are... arts, and mathematics, to determine whether a preschool child or child may be in need of...

  2. 32 CFR Appendix B to Part 80 - Procedures for Special Educational Programs (Including Related Services) for Preschool Children...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... transfers from a school operated by the DoD in accordance with 32 CFR part 1 or from a Section 6 School... of a parent of each preschool child or child, evaluate all preschool children or children who are... arts, and mathematics, to determine whether a preschool child or child may be in need of...

  3. 32 CFR Appendix B to Part 80 - Procedures for Special Educational Programs (Including Related Services) for Preschool Children...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... transfers from a school operated by the DoD in accordance with 32 CFR part 1 or from a Section 6 School... of a parent of each preschool child or child, evaluate all preschool children or children who are... arts, and mathematics, to determine whether a preschool child or child may be in need of...

  4. 32 CFR Appendix B to Part 80 - Procedures for Special Educational Programs (Including Related Services) for Preschool Children...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... education and related services. b. Analyze school health data for those preschool children and children who... special education and related services. The preschool child's or child's parents shall be invited to the... her IEP. 4. If specially designed physical education services are prescribed in the IEP of a...

  5. A Tool to Record and Support the Early Development of Children Including Those with Special Educational Needs or Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mengoni, Silvana E.; Oates, John

    2014-01-01

    Early intervention is key for children with special educational needs or disabilities (SEND), and therefore early assessment is crucial. Information from parents about children's current ability and their developmental history can make valid and useful contributions to developmental assessments. Parental input is also important in early

  6. "All children can and should have the opportunity to learn": general education teachers' perspectives on including children with autism spectrum disorder who require AAC.

    PubMed

    Finke, Erinn H; McNaughton, David B; Drager, Kathryn D R

    2009-06-01

    A qualitative online focus group methodology was used to investigate the experiences of five elementary school teachers (grades K-5) who had included in their general education classrooms children with autism spectrum disorders (ASD) who required augmentative and alternative communication (AAC). Information was obtained from the participants in the following areas: (a) the benefits of educational inclusion, (b) the negative impacts of educational inclusion, (c) the challenges of educational inclusion, (d) the supports for educational inclusion, and (e) recommendations for other teachers and individuals involved in the inclusion process. Participants primarily chose to focus on inclusion as a beneficial practice for all involved, but did describe a few barriers and challenges of inclusion. The results are discussed as they relate to these themes and with reference to published literature. Recommendations for future directions are also presented. PMID:19444682

  7. Including Families of Children with Special Needs. A How-To-Do-It Manual for Librarians. How-To-Do-It Manuals for Librarians, Number 88.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Feinberg, Sandra; Jordan, Barbara; Deerr, Kathleen; Langa, Michelle

    This publication is a guide to assist librarians in taking a proactive stance to include families of children with special needs in programs and services. The focus is on families with children up to age five, and covers the basic principles underlying inclusion, family-centered service, resource-based practice, and the provision of library

  8. Children & Race.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Milner, David

    The major aims of this book are to provide an account of racial attitude development in young children and to describe the effects of racism on the development of black children, specifically in the United Kingdom. The book draws freely on American and British research in an effort to illuminate the British experience. The first two chapters…

  9. Snowflake Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Child & Youth Services, 2007

    2007-01-01

    Taking account of the needs and views of children is problematic, particularly in Ireland where children have been "owned" by their parents and social policy has been directed at the family rather than the individual child. The 1980s and 1990s may be said to be the decades where abuse, in its many forms, reared its head and Irish society was

  10. Snowflake Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Child & Youth Services, 2007

    2007-01-01

    Taking account of the needs and views of children is problematic, particularly in Ireland where children have been "owned" by their parents and social policy has been directed at the family rather than the individual child. The 1980s and 1990s may be said to be the decades where abuse, in its many forms, reared its head and Irish society was…

  11. "Borderline" Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gualtieri, C. Thomas C.; And Others

    1983-01-01

    The use of the diagnosis "borderline" was evaluated with 16 children (6 to 13 years old) who were referred for comprehensive evaluation. None met DSM III criteria for borderline personality disorder. The borderline label had a negative impact on some children and was not helpful for treatment planning or disposition. (Author/SEW)

  12. Children and Grief

    MedlinePlus

    ... Pets: Talking to Children Stepfamily Problems Sleep Problems School Refusal Parents with Cancer: Tips for Talking to Kids Moving: Helping Children Cope Foster Care Disaster: Helping Children Cope Depression in Children and Teens Chronic Illness and Children ...

  13. Brain tumor - children

    MedlinePlus

    ... children; Neuroglioma - children; Oligodendroglioma - children; Meningioma - children; Cancer - brain tumor (children) ... The cause of primary brain tumors is unknown. Primary brain tumors may ... (spread to nearby areas) Cancerous (malignant) Brain tumors ...

  14. Bereaved children.

    PubMed Central

    Schultz, K.

    1999-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To describe the unique aspects of childhood grief. To provide a framework for family physicians to use in assisting children to grieve. QUALITY OF EVIDENCE: A MEDLINE search from 1966 to 1999 using the key words children, childhood, grief, mourning, and bereavement revealed mainly expert opinion articles, some non-randomized observational studies, and retrospective case-control studies. MAIN MESSAGE: Although children are influenced by similar factors and need to work through the same tasks of grief as adults, their unique psychological defences and evolving cognitive and emotional development make their grieving different from adults'. Understanding these unique childhood features will allow family physicians to more effectively help children through the tasks of acknowledging a death, working through the pain of that death, and accommodating it. CONCLUSIONS: With a framework for grief counseling that incorporates unique features of children's mourning, family physicians will be in a better position to assist their young bereaved patients. PMID:10626057

  15. Romania's forgotten children.

    PubMed

    SoRelle, R

    1998-03-01

    The problem of orphaned and abandoned children with AIDS living in Romania is examined. The threadbare existence of these children is depicted in descriptions and pictures. Romania is home to more than one-half of the children with AIDS in Europe and charitable donations and efforts are decreasing. The history of how this occurred is outlined, including Nicolae Ceausescu's attempt to make a perfect Romanian race in part by placing impure children into orphanages. Post-Ceausescu era policies and programs are shown to have not appreciably ameliorated the disaster. Individual efforts and new initiatives to help lessen the negative impact on these children's lives are highlighted. PMID:11365179

  16. [Street children].

    PubMed

    Roncević, Nevenka; Stojadinović, Aleksandra; Batrnek-Antonić, Daliborka

    2013-01-01

    According to UNICEF, street child is any child under the age of 18 for whom the street has become home and/or source of income and which is not adequately protected or supervised by adult, responsible person. It has been estimated that there are between 100 and 150 million street children worldwide. Life and work on the street have long term and far-reaching consequences for development and health of these children. By living and working in the street, these children face the highest level of risk. Street children more often suffer from the acute illness, injuries, infection, especially gastrointestinal, acute respiratory infections and sexually transmitted diseases, inadequate nutrition, mental disorders, and drug abuse. They are more often victims of abuse, sexual exploitation, trafficking; they have higher rate of adolescent pregnancy than their peers from poor families. Street children and youth have higher rates of hospitalization and longer hospital stay due to seriousness of illness and delayed health care. Street children/youth are reluctant to seek health care, and when they try, they face many barriers. Street children are invisible to the state and their number in Serbia is unknown. Recently, some non-governmental organizations from Belgrade, Novi Sad and Nis have recognized this problem and tried to offer some help to street children, by opening drop-in centers, but this is not enough. To solve this problem, an engagement of the state and the whole community is necessary, and primary responsibility lies in health, social and educational sector. The best interests of the child must serve as a basic guideline in all activities aimed at improving health, quality of life and rights of children involved in the life and work in the street. PMID:24502109

  17. Exploring the social impact of being a typical peer model for included children with autism spectrum disorder.

    PubMed

    Locke, Jill; Rotheram-Fuller, Erin; Kasari, Connie

    2012-09-01

    This study examined the social impact of being a typical peer model as part of a social skills intervention for children with autism spectrum disorder (ASD). Participants were drawn from a randomized-controlled-treatment trial that examined the effects of targeted interventions on the social networks of 60 elementary-aged children with ASD. Results demonstrated that typical peer models had higher social network centrality, received friendships, friendship quality, and less loneliness than non-peer models. Peer models were also more likely to be connected with children with ASD than non-peer models at baseline and exit. These results suggest that typical peers can be socially connected to children with ASD, as well as other classmates, and maintain a strong and positive role within the classroom. PMID:22215436

  18. Acute myelogenous leukemia (AML) - children

    MedlinePlus

    Acute myelogenous leukemia - children; AML; Acute myeloid leukemia - children; Acute granulocytic leukemia - children; Acute myeloblastic leukemia - children; Acute non-lymphocytic leukemia (ANLL) - children

  19. Hand-arm bimanual intensive therapy including lower extremities (HABIT-ILE) for children with cerebral palsy.

    PubMed

    Bleyenheuft, Yannick; Gordon, Andrew M

    2014-11-01

    Hand-arm bimanual intensive therapy and constrained-induced movement therapy have shown evidence of effectiveness in improvement of upper extremity use in children with unilateral spastic cerebral palsy (CP). The effectiveness of interventions that are based on intensive practice of activities that combine UE and LE functions has not been reported. We propose that bimanual UE activities that simultaneously require trunk and LE postural adaptations uniquely address motor control limitations of children with unilateral spastic CP. The aim of this perspective is to present such an approach Hand Arm Bimanual Intensive Therapy Including Lower Extremities (HABIT-ILE). HABIT-ILE is unique in selection of tasks and activities that require simultaneous control and coordination of UE and LE movements. It is a motor-learning-based approach using problem solving and highly structured practice. During the intervention, activities and tasks are progressively graded toward more complex bimanual coordination for the UE and increasing demands of the LE. HABIT-ILE is provided in small groups for 90 hr using a camp model. Future research (randomized controlled trial) is needed to determine the effectiveness of HABIT-ILE. PMID:25271469

  20. Effective Government Structures for Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hodgkin, Rachel

    1997-01-01

    Argues that government structures are not effective for children. Suggests that a Minister and Children's Unit be responsible for four tasks, including developing government strategy for children, presenting research on children to provide a full view of the child's situation to government, coordinating government departments, and consulting…

  1. The Future of Children's Rights.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Freeman, Michael

    2000-01-01

    Discusses the role and definition of children's rights since the 1989 United Nations Convention on the Rights of the Child. Suggests ways to build upon the Convention by concentrating on: neglected groups of children, including disabled, gay, minority, and girl children; reforming the rights of children; and strengthening the implementation…

  2. Gifted Children and Divorce

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dudley, John; Karnes, Frances A.

    2011-01-01

    Divorce is often a contentious process with multiple issues to decide, especially in cases in which there are children involved. Divorce raises several legal issues when considering the well-being of children, including those who are gifted. In this article, the authors discuss these issues which include school choice, child support, and custody

  3. Gifted Children and Divorce

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dudley, John; Karnes, Frances A.

    2011-01-01

    Divorce is often a contentious process with multiple issues to decide, especially in cases in which there are children involved. Divorce raises several legal issues when considering the well-being of children, including those who are gifted. In this article, the authors discuss these issues which include school choice, child support, and custody…

  4. Children and media.

    PubMed

    Patankar, M

    1989-01-01

    Program developers in India's mass media are turning to the discipline of child development to increase their sensitivity to the special needs and capacities of child audiences. Children are particularly susceptible to having their thoughts, feelings, values, and behavior influenced by media programming. In India, radio is the medium with the greatest opportunity to communicate with children and programming for young people includes educational material, variety programs, quiz shows, drama, and live programs in which children participate. The 1st Children's Film Festival was held in India in 1952 and India participates in the International Center of Films for Children and Young People. Television enjoys popularity among children, illiterates, and the poor, but its potential to create social awareness, change behaviors, and raise the standard of living of the Indian people has not been fully realized. Drama is less able to reach large numbers of children, but offers children the opportunity to participate directly in the portrayal of different characters and emotions. Recently, the tradition of puppetry has been rivived and integrated into India's school curriculum. Finally, India is taking steps to expand the number of books available to children and the Government has established 2 trusts to support the publication of children's literature. Regardless of the form of media, it is important for parents to play a role in ensuring the appropriateness of the programming for the child and processing its content. PMID:12342719

  5. Analysis of 1973 Participation of Handicapped Children in Local Education Programs (Including appendixes).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ford, Nelson

    Analyzed is the impact of regional, racial or ethnic, and socioeconomic factors on handicapped students' participation during 1973 in special education programs in more than 37,000 schools within 2,500 local U.S. school districts. Included are data on American Indian, black, Spanish surnamed, Asian American, and nonminority pupils enrolled in

  6. Retarded Children at Camp with Normal Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Flax, Norman; Peters, Edward N.

    1969-01-01

    Statistical analysis of data from written forms and scales (designed to measure children's behavior in groups), observations, and interviews indicated that many educalble mentally retarded children can participate successfully in camp activities with normal children. (DR)

  7. Chronic Pancreatitis in Children

    MedlinePlus

    ... Children/Pediatric > Chronic Pancreatitis in Children test Chronic Pancreatitis in Children What symptoms would my child have? ... will develop diabetes in adolescence. Who gets chronic pancreatitis? Those at risk for chronic pancreatitis are children ...

  8. Home Alone Children

    MedlinePlus

    ... e.g. medical emergencies, fire, alcohol, drugs, strangers, guns, etc.) When and how to answer the phone ... Children Internet Use in Children Movies and Children Firearms and Children If you find Facts for Families © ...

  9. Endocrine and metabolic emergencies in children: hypocalcemia, hypoglycemia, adrenal insufficiency, and metabolic acidosis including diabetic ketoacidosis.

    PubMed

    Kim, Se Young

    2015-12-01

    It is important to fast diagnosis and management of the pediatric patients of the endocrine metabolic emergencies because the signs and symptoms of these disorders are nonspecific. Delayed diagnosis and treatment may lead to serious consequences of the pediatric patients, for example, cerebral dysfunction leading to coma or death of the patients with hypoglycemia, hypocalcemia, adrenal insufficiency, or diabetic ketoacidosis. The index of suspicion of the endocrine metabolic emergencies should be preceded prior to the starting nonspecific treatment. Importantly, proper diagnosis depends on the collection of blood and urine specimen before nonspecific therapy (intravenous hydration, electrolytes, glucose or calcium injection). At the same time, the taking of precise history and searching for pathognomonic physical findings should be performed. This review was described for fast diagnosis and proper management of hypoglycemic emergencies, hypocalcemia, adrenal insufficiency, and metabolic acidosis including diabetic ketoacidosis. PMID:26817004

  10. Endocrine and metabolic emergencies in children: hypocalcemia, hypoglycemia, adrenal insufficiency, and metabolic acidosis including diabetic ketoacidosis

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    It is important to fast diagnosis and management of the pediatric patients of the endocrine metabolic emergencies because the signs and symptoms of these disorders are nonspecific. Delayed diagnosis and treatment may lead to serious consequences of the pediatric patients, for example, cerebral dysfunction leading to coma or death of the patients with hypoglycemia, hypocalcemia, adrenal insufficiency, or diabetic ketoacidosis. The index of suspicion of the endocrine metabolic emergencies should be preceded prior to the starting nonspecific treatment. Importantly, proper diagnosis depends on the collection of blood and urine specimen before nonspecific therapy (intravenous hydration, electrolytes, glucose or calcium injection). At the same time, the taking of precise history and searching for pathognomonic physical findings should be performed. This review was described for fast diagnosis and proper management of hypoglycemic emergencies, hypocalcemia, adrenal insufficiency, and metabolic acidosis including diabetic ketoacidosis. PMID:26817004

  11. Integrating Music and Children's Literature.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Calogero, Joanna M.

    2002-01-01

    Focuses on why and how to integrate music education with children's literature. Discusses the use of the thematic approach. Describes a unit on animals, focusing on books to include in the unit. Includes a bibliography of children's books. (CMK)

  12. Dietary habits of Aboriginal children.

    PubMed

    Langlois, Kellie A; Findlay, Leanne C; Kohen, Dafna E

    2013-04-01

    Based on the results of Statistics Canada's 2006 Aboriginal Children's Survey, this article presents an overview of how often First Nations children living off reserve, Métis children and Inuit children aged 2 to 5 consume various types of food, including foods considered traditional or country among Aboriginal people. The frequency with which First Nations children living off reserve and Métis children consumed items from major food groups tended to be similar. While lower percentages of Inuit children were reported to regularly consume items from these food groups, relatively high percentages of Inuit children consumed traditional or country foods. Around two-thirds of all Aboriginal children ate fast food and processed foods at least once a week, and just over half had salty snacks, sweets and desserts at least once a day. Consumption patterns varied, depending on whether children lived in a Census Metropolitan Area/Census Agglomeration. PMID:24258058

  13. Interprofessional Collaboration as a Means of Including Children at Risk: An Analysis of Norwegian Educational Policy Documents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hesjedal, Elisabeth; Hetland, Hilde; Iversen, Anette Christine; Manger, Terje

    2015-01-01

    Issues concerning interprofessional collaboration (IPC) for children at risk have become a priority globally as well as in Norway. By international standards, the Norwegian educational system is regarded as inclusive and collaborative in terms of the external services that support schools and pupils. However, a debate continues on how to best…

  14. The Questions Children Ask.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Landau, Erika

    1987-01-01

    Fifty children (ages 9-15, N=30 with high intelligence) participating in a course on creative thinking were invited to construct questions about mankind's future. Gifted children displayed a high degree of anxiety and a greater, somewhat pessimistic, long-range outlook. Interests included quality of life, faith in human potential, and individual

  15. Skin problems in children.

    PubMed

    Verbov, J L

    1976-09-01

    Common skin problems in 340 children routinely seen during a winter period, included napkin rashes in infants, atopic eczema throughout childrhood, and acne vulgaris in late childhood. Skin infections and psoriasis were also commonly seen. If possible, when topical steroid preparations more potent than hydrocortisone cream BPC are used in children, they should be used sparingly and for short periods only. PMID:135974

  16. The Punishment of Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maslova, T. F.; Smagina, M. V.

    2012-01-01

    The causes of punishment including violence are perceived, first and foremost, as in the nature of family relations. The authors' survey focused on children's interaction with their parents, and the risk of violence is clearly present. Russian sociological research on violence against children within families shows a lack of consensus on what…

  17. Licensing of Children's Services.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Terpstra, Jake

    The purpose of licensing is to provide protection in circumstances in which people are vulnerable and to mandate that positive services will be provided. The common denominator of human vulnerability in licensed children's services is the fact that the children are in the care of someone other than their families. Licensed services include family

  18. SCHOOLS FOR MIGRANT CHILDREN.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    MCLAUGHLEN, HUGH W.

    THE HISTORY OF SUMMER SCHOOLS FOR MIGRANT CHILDREN IN NEW JERSEY IS BRIEFLY PRESENTED. DURING 16 YEARS OF OPERATION, THE SCHOOLS HAVE BEEN CONDUCTED FOR OVER 2,000 CHILDREN. SPECIAL SERVICES INCLUDE CARE OF PUPILS FROM 2 TO 15 YEARS OF AGE, HOT LUNCHES, DENTAL CARE, HEALTH SERVICES, AND A NURSE ON DUTY AT ALL TIMES. ALL TEACHERS, FULLY CERTIFIED,…

  19. High IQ Minority Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brazziel, William F.

    More and more minority children are making higher test scores, generally, due to a variety of factors. The high IQ minority child, therefore, might be better understood than previously. Most data in this area has been collected on black children and youth although other cultural groups in America are now being studied more closely. These include

  20. Mapping with Young Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sunal, Cynthia Szymanski; Warash, Bobbi Gibson

    Techniques for encouraging young children to discover the purpose and use of maps are discussed. Motor activity and topological studies form a base from which the teacher and children can build a mapping program of progressive sophistication. Concepts important to mapping include boundaries, regions, exteriors, interiors, holes, order, point of…

  1. Sexuality and Young Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Honig, Alice Sterling

    2000-01-01

    Describes normal aspects of sexuality during the early years, including masturbation and children's fanciful sexual ideas. Presents inappropriately mature sexual knowledge as a danger sign of abuse. Discusses whether and what teachers/caregivers should tell children about sexuality, and notes the importance of teaching staff about sexual identity…

  2. The Punishment of Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maslova, T. F.; Smagina, M. V.

    2012-01-01

    The causes of punishment including violence are perceived, first and foremost, as in the nature of family relations. The authors' survey focused on children's interaction with their parents, and the risk of violence is clearly present. Russian sociological research on violence against children within families shows a lack of consensus on what

  3. Alaska's Children, 1997.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Douglas, Dorothy, Ed.

    1997-01-01

    These four issues of the "Alaska's Children" provide information on the activities of the Alaska Head Start State Collaboration Project and other Head Start activities. Legal and policy changes affecting the education of young children in Alaska are also discussed. The Spring 1997 issue includes articles on brain development and the "I Am Your…

  4. Nutrition and Young Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Frank, Mary, Ed.; And Others

    1978-01-01

    The special issue of the journal contains 12 articles on nutrition and young children. The following titles and authors are included: "Overview--Nutritional Needs of Young Children" (M. Scialabba); "Nurturance--Mutually Created--Mother and Child" (M. McFarland); "Feeding the Special Needs Child" (E. Croup); "Maternal and Neonatal Nutrition--Long…

  5. Assertiveness with 'Special' Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rosenberg, Shelley K.; Stillman-Powell, Patricia

    The author examines issues related to adult assertiveness in controlling and setting limits for handicapped children. Reasons for adults not wishing to be in charge include feelings of guilt, lack of consistency in enforcing rules, and a sense of sympathy for special children. Assertiveness is distinguished from aggressiveness, and suggestions for

  6. Lead Poisoning in Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boeckx, Roger L.

    1986-01-01

    Urban children are exposed to lead through the air they breathe, the water they drink, and the food and nonfood substances they ingest. The history, diagnosis, and treatment of lead poisoning in these children are discussed. Includes information on the toxicology of lead and the various risk classes. (JN)

  7. Development and Internal Validation of a Predictive Model Including Pulse Oximetry for Hospitalization of Under-Five Children in Bangladesh

    PubMed Central

    Raihana, Shahreen; Dunsmuir, Dustin; Huda, Tanvir; Zhou, Guohai; Rahman, Qazi Sadeq-ur; Garde, Ainara; Moinuddin, Md; Karlen, Walter; Dumont, Guy A.; Kissoon, Niranjan; El Arifeen, Shams; Larson, Charles; Ansermino, J. Mark

    2015-01-01

    Background The reduction in the deaths of millions of children who die from infectious diseases requires early initiation of treatment and improved access to care available in health facilities. A major challenge is the lack of objective evidence to guide front line health workers in the community to recognize critical illness in children earlier in their course. Methods We undertook a prospective observational study of children less than 5 years of age presenting at the outpatient or emergency department of a rural tertiary care hospital between October 2012 and April 2013. Study physicians collected clinical signs and symptoms from the facility records, and with a mobile application performed recordings of oxygen saturation, heart rate and respiratory rate. Facility physicians decided the need for hospital admission without knowledge of the oxygen saturation. Multiple logistic predictive models were tested. Findings Twenty-five percent of the 3374 assessed children, with a median (interquartile range) age of 1.02 (0.42–2.24), were admitted to hospital. We were unable to contact 20% of subjects after their visit. A logistic regression model using continuous oxygen saturation, respiratory rate, temperature and age combined with dichotomous signs of chest indrawing, lethargy, irritability and symptoms of cough, diarrhea and fast or difficult breathing predicted admission to hospital with an area under the receiver operating characteristic curve of 0.89 (95% confidence interval -CI: 0.87 to 0.90). At a risk threshold of 25% for admission, the sensitivity was 77% (95% CI: 74% to 80%), specificity was 87% (95% CI: 86% to 88%), positive predictive value was 70% (95% CI: 67% to 73%) and negative predictive value was 91% (95% CI: 90% to 92%). Conclusion A model using oxygen saturation, respiratory rate and temperature in combination with readily obtained clinical signs and symptoms predicted the need for hospitalization of critically ill children. External validation of this model in a community setting will be required before adoption into clinical practice. PMID:26580403

  8. Invisible children.

    PubMed

    Goodpasture, Meggan; Everett, V Denise; Gagliano, Martha; Narayan, Aditee P; Sinal, Sara

    2013-01-01

    A series of severe child abuse cases in the state, all involving children who were reportedly homeschooled, are cause for concern. We review 4 such cases and the regulations regarding homeschooling in the state of North Carolina, exploring potential deficits in the system and suggesting ways of addressing them. PMID:23530395

  9. Wild Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Trotman, Helen

    2010-01-01

    In this article, the author, a Forest School Leader with Shropshire Wildlife Trust, shows how nature is the best teacher. She describes a new approach to out-of-classroom learning during which qualified leaders use simple challenges and achievable tasks to encourage child-initiated learning in the great outdoors. At Forest School, children are

  10. Wild Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Trotman, Helen

    2010-01-01

    In this article, the author, a Forest School Leader with Shropshire Wildlife Trust, shows how nature is the best teacher. She describes a new approach to out-of-classroom learning during which qualified leaders use simple challenges and achievable tasks to encourage child-initiated learning in the great outdoors. At Forest School, children are…

  11. Gestures in Prelinguistic Turkish Children with Autism, Down Syndrome, and Typically Developing Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Toret, Gokhan; Acarlar, Funda

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine gesture use in Turkish children with autism, Down syndrome, and typically developing children. Participants included 30 children in three groups: Ten children with Down syndrome, ten children with autism between 24-60 months of age, and ten typically developing children between 12-18 months of age.…

  12. [Violence against children].

    PubMed

    Daher, Michel

    2007-01-01

    The Convention of Human Rights defines violence as "all forms of physical or mental violence, injury and abuse, neglect or negligent treatment, maltreatment or exploitation, including sexual abuse". Violence against children cuts across boundaries of geography, race, class, religion and culture. It occurs in homes, schools and streets ; in places of work and entertainment, and in care and detention centers. Perpetrators include parents, family members, teachers, caretakers, law enforcement authorities and other children. Some children are particularly vulnerable because of gender, race, ethnic origin, disability or social status. And no country is immune, whether rich or poor. Although the consequences of violence for children may vary according to its nature and severity, the short- and long-term repercussions are very often grave and damaging. Violence may result in greater susceptibility to lifelong social, emotional, and cognitive impairments and to health-risk behaviors, such as substance abuse and early initiation of sexual behavior. Governments are ultimately responsible for the protection of children. It is therefore up to governments to act now, to fulfill their human rights obligations and other commitments, to ensure the protection of children from all forms of violence. Violence against children is never justifiable. Nor is it inevitable. After providing a global picture of violence against children, we propose recommendations to prevent and respond to this issue. PMID:17966730

  13. Introducing Young Children to Logo.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yelland, Nicola

    1993-01-01

    Argues that young children learn LOGO programing language more effectively through guided discovery using games and techniques that encourage exploration of the software. Specific examples of games, drawings and accomplishments of Australian children are included. (EA)

  14. Diet Quality and Adequacy of Nutrients in Preschool Children: Should Rice Fortified with Micronutrients Be Included in School Meals?

    PubMed

    Della Lucia, Ceres M; Rodrigues, Kellen Cristina C; Rodrigues, Vivian Cristina C; Santos, Laura Luiza M; Cardoso, Leandro M; Martino, Hércia S D; Franceschini, Sylvia C C; Pinheiro-Sant'Ana, Helena Maria

    2016-01-01

    Feeding is indicative of the nutritional status of children, however micronutrient deficiency is common in this age group. We evaluated the impact of inclusion of rice (Ultra Rice(®) (UR(®))) fortified with iron, zinc, thiamin and folic acid on laboratory measurements and the nutrient intake of children. Ninety-nine preschoolers (2-6 years; 42.6% male) from two preschools participated, one of which received UR(®) added to polished rice as part of school meals (test preschool) and the other received only polished rice (control preschool). Biochemical evaluations were performed before and after four months of intervention. Feeding was assessed by direct weighing of food, complemented by 24-h recalls, and the diet was assessed by the Healthy Eating Index (HEI) adapted to the Brazilian reality. The fortified rice improved the levels of zinc (p < 0.001), thiamine (p < 0.001), folic acid (p = 0.003), mean corpuscular hemoglobin (p < 0.001) and mean corpuscular hemoglobin concentration (p < 0.001). The inadequacy percentages of thiamine, folic acid and iron were lower among preschoolers from the test preschool. This study demonstrated the effectiveness of using UR(®) on laboratory measurements of children. The inadequate intake of thiamine, folic acid and iron was also reduced, making the fortified rice an interesting strategy in school feeding programs. PMID:27187464

  15. Diet Quality and Adequacy of Nutrients in Preschool Children: Should Rice Fortified with Micronutrients Be Included in School Meals?

    PubMed Central

    Della Lucia, Ceres M.; Rodrigues, Kellen Cristina C.; Rodrigues, Vivian Cristina C.; Santos, Laura Luiza M.; Cardoso, Leandro M.; Martino, Hércia S. D.; Franceschini, Sylvia C. C.; Pinheiro-Sant’Ana, Helena Maria

    2016-01-01

    Feeding is indicative of the nutritional status of children, however micronutrient deficiency is common in this age group. We evaluated the impact of inclusion of rice (Ultra Rice® (UR®)) fortified with iron, zinc, thiamin and folic acid on laboratory measurements and the nutrient intake of children. Ninety-nine preschoolers (2–6 years; 42.6% male) from two preschools participated, one of which received UR® added to polished rice as part of school meals (test preschool) and the other received only polished rice (control preschool). Biochemical evaluations were performed before and after four months of intervention. Feeding was assessed by direct weighing of food, complemented by 24-h recalls, and the diet was assessed by the Healthy Eating Index (HEI) adapted to the Brazilian reality. The fortified rice improved the levels of zinc (p < 0.001), thiamine (p < 0.001), folic acid (p = 0.003), mean corpuscular hemoglobin (p < 0.001) and mean corpuscular hemoglobin concentration (p < 0.001). The inadequacy percentages of thiamine, folic acid and iron were lower among preschoolers from the test preschool. This study demonstrated the effectiveness of using UR® on laboratory measurements of children. The inadequate intake of thiamine, folic acid and iron was also reduced, making the fortified rice an interesting strategy in school feeding programs. PMID:27187464

  16. Children's Television Programmes in a Qualitative Perspective.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hake, Karin

    When there is something we want to know, we usually ask experts, but rarely do we ask children about their own childhood. This paper looks at children's perceptions and responses in relation to programming on children's television. Topics include: (1) what are children's programs?; (2) when do children become adults?; (3) criteria for quality; (4)…

  17. Afghanistan Children in Crisis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Save the Children, Westport, CT.

    This report provides information on the well-being of children in Afghanistan, details the work of the Save the Children organization in helping Afghan children and families, and discusses what is currently needed to meet the urgent health and safety needs of Afghan children. It is noted that 25 percent of children die before their fifth birthday,…

  18. When Children Kill Children: The Search for Justice.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Asquith, Stewart

    1996-01-01

    Examines issues posed by cases involving murder of children by children, including the Bulger case in England and the Redergard case in Norway, which, though not typical, articulate how changes in notions of childhood mesh with change in major social institutions. Addresses concerns about pursuit of justice for children and analyzes relationships…

  19. Carpentry for Young Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brandhofer, Marijane

    1971-01-01

    The author presents practical, specific suggestions for hepling young children have successful carpentry experiences. Selection of tools and materials as well as guides for their use and care are included. (Author/WY)

  20. Children with Brittle Bones.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alston, Jean

    1982-01-01

    Special help given to children with Osteogenesis Imperfecta (brittle bone disease) is described, including adapted equipment to allow for writing and use of a classroom assistant to aid participation in a regular classroom. (CL)

  1. Physical Activity and Children

    MedlinePlus

    ... of diabetes and some kinds of cancer improved psychological well-being, including gaining more self-confidence and higher ... may be particularly helpful for the physical and psychological well-being of children with a weight problem. AHA ...

  2. Continuing Spanish in Grade Four: MLA Teacher's Guide. A Course of Study Including Methods, Materials, and Aids for Teaching Conversational Spanish to Fourth-Grade Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thompson, Mary P.; And Others

    This is the second volume in a series of texts in a conversational Spanish course for elementary school children. Fourteen basic units present introductory linguistic patterns and cultural insights into the lives of the Spanish people. They include: (1) Review Unit 1, (2) Review Unit 2, (3) Special Unit A--"Cristobal Colon," (4) Review Unit 3, (5)…

  3. Preservice Early Childhood Educators' and Elementary Teachers' Perspectives on Including Young Children with Developmental Disabilities: A Mixed Methods Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Frankel, Elaine B.; Hutchinson, Nancy L.; Burbidge, Julie; Minnes, Patricia

    2014-01-01

    This mixed methods study reports on the perspectives of 143 preservice early childhood educators (ECE) and 208 elementary teacher candidates (TC) on teaching children with developmental disabilities and delays (DDD) in inclusive classrooms. A questionnaire was administered which included items on demographic characteristics, experience, knowledge,…

  4. Continuing Spanish in Grade Five: MLA Teacher's Guide. A Course of Study Including Methods, Materials, and Aids for Teaching Conversational Spanish to Fifth-Grade Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thompson, Mary P.; And Others

    This is the third volume in a series of texts in a conversational Spanish course for elementary school children. Nine basic units present introductory linguistic patterns and cultural insights into the lives of the Spanish people. They include: (1) Review Unit 1, ("Cristobal Colon"), (2) Review Unit 2, (3) "Un Accidente,""La Navidad," and…

  5. The Impact of Including Children with Intellectual Disability in General Education Classrooms on the Academic Achievement of Their Low-, Average-, and High-Achieving Peers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sermier Dessemontet, Rachel; Bless, Gerard

    2013-01-01

    Background: This study aimed at assessing the impact of including children with intellectual disability (ID) in general education classrooms with support on the academic achievement of their low-, average-, and high-achieving peers without disability. Method: A quasi-experimental study was conducted with an experimental group of 202 pupils from…

  6. Re-injecting Spontaneity and Balance in Family Life: Parents Perspectives on Recreation in Families that Include Children with Developmental Disability

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mactavish, J. B.; Schleien, S. J.

    2004-01-01

    Grounded in the naturalistic paradigm, a mixed-method research design (survey questionnaire, n=65; and interview, n=16) was used to explore the nature and benefits of, and constraints to, family recreation in families that included children with developmental disability. Statistical analyses were conducted on the quantitative data, while key theme…

  7. Beginning German in Grade Three: MLA Teacher's Guide. A Course of Study Including Methods, Materials, and Aids for Teaching Conversational German to Third-Grade Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wittman, Nora E.; And Others

    This guide is planned to help the FLES teacher develop pleasurable language learning experiences in spoken German for children at the third-grade level. Experiences included in this guide present German in life situations, as well as insight into German culture. The guide offers suggestions for classroom procedures, and detailed directions are…

  8. Beginning Spanish in Grade Three: MLA Teacher's Guide. A Course of Study Including Methods, Materials, and Aids for Teaching Conversational Spanish to Third-Grade Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thompson, Mary P.; And Others

    This is the first in a series of texts in a conversational Spanish course for elementary school children. Fifteen basic units present introductory linguistic patterns and cultural insights into the lives of Spaniards. They include: (1) Greetings, Identifications, and Farewells, (2) Some Classroom Objects and Instructions, (3) Colors, (4) More…

  9. The Immigrant Children of Katrina

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reyes, Augustina H.

    2010-01-01

    In August 2005, Hurricane Katrina displaced the largest number of public school children ever affected by any disaster. Approximately 370,000 children, including 15,000 Latino/Hispanic children from Louisiana, were scattered throughout the 48 U.S. states (Landrieu, 2010; Louisiana Department of Education, 2004). Although much of the media…

  10. Traffic Safety Facts, 2001: Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (DOT), Washington, DC.

    This document provides statistical information on the incidence of U.S. motor vehicle-related accidents and fatalities involving children. Data include: (1) total traffic fatalities among children 0-14 years old, by age group, 1991-2001; (2) total pedestrian fatalities among children 0-14 years old, by age group, 1991-2001; (3) total pedalcyclist…

  11. Children's (Pediatric) Nuclear Medicine

    MedlinePlus

    ... Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Children's (Pediatric) Nuclear Medicine Children’s (pediatric) nuclear medicine imaging uses small ... of Children's Nuclear Medicine? What is Children's (Pediatric) Nuclear Medicine? Nuclear medicine is a branch of medical ...

  12. Asthma in Children

    MedlinePlus

    ... have asthma. Nearly 9 million of them are children. Children have smaller airways than adults, which makes asthma especially serious for them. Children with asthma may experience wheezing, coughing, chest tightness, ...

  13. Hepatitis A - children

    MedlinePlus

    ... hepatitis A. Children can get hepatitis A at day care center from other children or from child care ... treatment with immunoglobulin therapy. If your child attends day care: Make sure the children and staff at the ...

  14. Children and Divorce

    MedlinePlus

    ... them. Children often believe they have caused the conflict between their parents. Many children assume the responsibility ... to deal constructively with the resolution of parental conflict. Talking to children about a divorce is difficult. ...

  15. Problematic lesions in children.

    PubMed

    Moscarella, Elvira; Piccolo, Vincenzo; Argenziano, Giuseppe; Lallas, Aimilios; Longo, Caterina; Castagnetti, Fabio; Pizzigoni, Stefania; Zalaudek, Iris

    2013-10-01

    Melanoma in childhood is rare, and appears more commonly either in association with a preexisting (congenital) nevus, or with spitzoid features than de novo. Thus, problematic melanocytic lesions in children are essentially represented by congenital nevi and Spitz nevi that can be regarded as melanoma precursors and melanoma simulators, respectively. As a consequence, clinical and dermoscopic features of melanoma in children differ from those in an adult population. Herein we describe common clinical and dermoscopic features of problematic lesions in children, focusing on congenital and Spitz/Reed nevi, and including other problematic lesions, such as atypical, blue, acral, and scalp nevi. PMID:24075543

  16. Clinical and functional characterisation of rheumatic mitral regurgitation in children and adolescents including the brain natriuretic peptide.

    PubMed

    Ribeiro, Maria C V; Markman Filho, Brivaldo; Santos, Cleusa C L; Mello, Cristina P Q

    2010-02-01

    Rheumatic fever is a public health problem of universal distribution, predominantly affecting individuals in developing countries. In individuals less than 20 years of age, pure mitral regurgitation is the most commonly found condition in chronic rheumatic valve disease. In the present study, rheumatic mitral regurgitation was assessed in children and adolescents, addressing its clinical (duration of the disease, symptoms, use of benzathine penicillin, and number of outbreaks of the acute phase of rheumatic fever), electrocardiographic (left atrium abnormality and/or left ventricle hypertrophy) and echocardiographic characteristics (left atrium and ventricle measurements, ejection fraction and pulmonary artery pressure), as well as plasma dose of N-terminal portion of the brain natriuretic peptide through electrochemiluminescence immunoassay. Fifty-three patients were studied. The patients had moderate (41.5%) or severe (58.5%) rheumatic mitral regurgitation; had not undergone surgery; were not in the acute phase of the disease; and were being treated at a paediatric cardiology reference hospital in Northeastern Brazil. Mean patient age was 10.6 years (minimum of 3 and maximum of 19 years). With the exception of the ejection fraction, the echocardiographic variables had a significant correlation to the natriuretic peptide, demonstrating that this hormone reflects the haemodynamic consequences of mitral regurgitation. It was concluded that cardiac remodelling that occurs in rheumatic mitral regurgitation in children and adolescents leads to the production of the brain natriuretic peptide, which could be used as a complementary diagnostic tool in the follow-up of such patients. PMID:20178681

  17. Health supervision and anticipatory guidance for children with genetic disorders (including specific recommendations for trisomy 21, trisomy 18, and neurofibromatosis I).

    PubMed

    Carey, J C

    1992-02-01

    A new model for care of children with genetic disorders has emerged from the pediatric and genetic communities in the last decade. This strategy incorporates the basic principles of well-child care, including ongoing psychological support for families, health screening, and prevention, into health supervision visits for children with these conditions. The same types of guidelines that have been developed for well children can also be applied to the routine follow-up and screening of children with these special health care needs. A number of general issues are applicable in the discussion of health supervision guidelines: correct diagnosis, analysis of the natural history of the condition, critical review of screening modalities and interventions, ongoing psychological support, and genetic counseling. With these points in mind and after a thorough review of the natural history of a disorder, guidelines can be developed and often applied to the primary care setting. Down syndrome is an ideal condition to which one can apply such a model because most children are cared for by primary care pediatricians, and the natural history is relatively well studied. Discussion of health provision in Down syndrome brings out some of the controversies regarding routine screening and review of interventions. Discussion of the natural history and uncertainties evident in the care of infants with trisomy 18 exemplifies the important issue of ongoing psychological support. Review of the natural history of neurofibromatosis emphasizes all of the principles involved in providing this model as a framework for health supervision. One of the key identified but unresolved issues is the decision as to when a primary care pediatrician can orchestrate the care on his or her own versus referral to a multidisciplinary team of specialists. In some conditions such as Down syndrome, it seems obvious that the primary care pediatrician can manage most of the care with periodic and appropriate referral to the necessary specialists. On the other hand, children with cystic fibrosis, meningomyelocele, and craniofacial syndromes almost always need referral to the specialist team because of the rarity of the disorder and the complex number of specialists involved in management. A condition such as NF-1 falls somewhere in between. Most children can be cared for in their childhood years by the pediatrician with referral when a symptom or sign emerges, but others would argue that all children with NF-1 need to be seen by a multidisciplinary team.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 400 WORDS) PMID:1531255

  18. Anti-reflux surgery - children - discharge

    MedlinePlus

    Fundoplication - children - discharge; Nissen fundoplication - children - discharge; Belsey (Mark IV) fundoplication - children - discharge; Toupet fundoplication - children - discharge; Thal fundoplication - ...

  19. Intramedullary tumors in children

    PubMed Central

    Chatterjee, Sandip; Chatterjee, Uttara

    2011-01-01

    Intramedullary tumors of the spinal cord account for 35-40% of intraspinal tumors in children. The biological behavior of these tumors is of slow progression, and hence aggressive surgery has been advocated. Surgical adjuncts include use of intraoperative neurophysiological monitoring, preoperative ultrasound, microsurgical techniques and ultrasonic suction devices. Osteoplastic laminoplasty approaches avoid post-laminectomy deformities in younger children. Postoperative radiotherapy and more recently chemotherapy regimes have been proposed for incompletely resected tumors. PMID:22069435

  20. City Children in African Children's Literature.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kuntz, Patricia S.

    A descriptive study identified titles and features of children's books set in an African city. Data were collected from various reviews of children's literature for titles published since 1980. In addition, the Cooperative Children's Book Center's log list of acquired titles for Africa from 1990 to 1996 was reviewed. Results showed that authors…

  1. The Children's Ombudsman: A Spokesman for Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carlsson, Bo

    The office of the Ombudsman for Swedish children, established within Radda Barnen (The Swedish Save the Children Fund) is occupied by five persons. Three of the staff are children's ombudsmen, one is an immigrant consultant, and one is a refugee consultant. The work of the ombudsman has six core aspects. First, attempts are made to strengthen the…

  2. Uveitis in Children

    PubMed Central

    Kazdan, Jerome J.; McCulloch, J. Clement; Crawford, John S.

    1967-01-01

    Endogenous uveitis in 117 children aged 15 years or under was investigated at The Hospital for Sick Children, Toronto, in a 12-year period from 1953 to 1964. This group included 55 children with anterior uveitis, 59 with posterior uveitis, and three with diffuse uveitis. An etiologic diagnosis could be made or the uveitis recognized as part of a definite clinical syndrome in approximately 47% of the 117 children. The commonest cause of posterior uveitis was toxoplasmosis and the commonest associated finding in anterior uveitis was juvenile rheumatoid arthritis. Chronic cyclitis of unknown etiology was a relatively common disease. ImagesFig. 1Fig. 2Fig. 3Fig. 4Fig. 5Fig. 6Fig. 7 PMID:6066889

  3. Pilot evaluation of physical and psychological effects of a physical trek programme including a dog sledding expedition in children and teenagers with cancer

    PubMed Central

    Vallet, Clothilde; André, Nicolas; Gentet, Jean-Claude; Verschuur, Arnauld; Michel, Gérard; Sotteau, Frédéric; Martha, Cécile; Grélot, Laurent

    2015-01-01

    Aim of the study To evaluate the feasibility and to measure the effects of a six-week-long adapted physical activity programme (APAP), including 5 days of intense dog sledding, on the physical and psychological health of children and adolescents treated for cancer. Methods Eleven children and teenagers (4 girls, 7 boys; mean age 14.3 ± 2.9 years) participated in this monocentric pilot programme of adapted physical activities from February 2013 to March 2013. Seven were still on treatment. The programme lasted 6 weeks. A series of physical tests and psychological questionnaires were carried out before and after the programme. Results All children and teenagers completed the full programme. An improvement in all physical and psychological parameters was observed. Statistically significant differences were observed for global self-esteem (6.2 ± 2.1 to 7.7 ± 1.8; p = 0.02), perceived sport competence (5.3 ± 3.2 to 7.4 ± 2; p = 0.02) and perceived physical strength (5.6 ± 2.5 to 7.1 ± 1.8; p = 0.001). Regarding physical tests, the physical training led to statistically significant improvement for sit-ups (13.8 ± 2.6 to 21.75 ± 5.4; p = 0.01), muscle tone (76 ± 23.7 to 100 ± 22.9; p = 0.01), and resting heart rate (96.1 ± 3.2 to 91.6 ± 4.5; p = 0.03). Conclusion This programme is feasible in children and adolescents even during their oncologic treatment. During the 6-week programme, children and adolescents improved their physical and psychological health, and the putative benefits of the APAP are discussed. A larger randomised trial started in 2014. PMID:26284122

  4. Understanding Children's Drawings.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Malchiodi, Cathy A.

    Children's art not only provides a window to children's problems, it also gives them another language with which to share feelings and ideas. This book provides an overview of the multidimensional aspects of children's drawings, and is intended to assist therapists in working with children and their drawings. Chapter 1 discusses projective tests…

  5. A Children's Agenda, 1988.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Voices for Illinois Children, Chicago.

    This position paper by Voices for Illinois Children describes alarming problems faced by Illinois children and proposes legislative and programmatic interventions. It is noted that the well-being of children in Illinois has deteriorated dramatically in the past 10 years, and that significant improvements in policies and programs for children are…

  6. Children and the Earth.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dighe, Judith

    1993-01-01

    Describes ways to involve young children in early childhood programs in environmental issues. Focuses on three approaches: the "love approach," which fosters children's appreciation for the natural world; the "know approach," which helps children become knowledgeable about the environment; and the "do approach," which leads children to conserve…

  7. Children's Suicidal Behavior.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Patros, Philip G.; Shamoo, Tonia K.

    Children's suicidal behavior is surrounded by controversy with no single theory to explain or assess vulnerable children. Since accidents are the leading cause of death among children it is possible that some of these deaths are suicides. Beliefs by parents and professionals that children are not capable of suicidal behavior are being disproved as…

  8. Children of Incarcerated Parents.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gabel, Katherine, Ed.; Johnston, Denise, Ed.

    The arrest and imprisonment of a parent is significant trauma for children, and children of incarcerated parents are at high risk for juvenile delinquency. This book for social workers, psychologists, and others who work with children whose parents are incarcerated examines parental incarceration, its impact on children, care and placement of…

  9. Facilitating Children's Grief

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Riely, Marsha

    2003-01-01

    A program of education and support is essential for children and their parent or adult caregivers when the children have experienced the death of a significant person. Children need guidance on how to deal with their profound feelings of grief. The purpose of this article is to give school nurses the ability to help children face the strange new…

  10. Architecture and Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Taylor, Anne; Campbell, Leslie

    1988-01-01

    Describes "Architecture and Children," a traveling exhibition which visually involves children in architectural principles and historic styles. States that it teaches children about architecture, and through architecture it instills the basis for aesthetic judgment. Argues that "children learn best by concrete examples of ideas, not just from…

  11. Children's Programs in Iowa.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Milobar, Dianne; Corkery, Marg

    This report provides general information and statistics about the State of Iowa's children and current children's programs administered by state agencies. Indicating the need for children's programs, the report lists statistical evidence for child abuse, foster care, deaths of children, disabilities and special education, delinquency, substance…

  12. Children with Health Issues

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schuster, Mark A.; Chung, Paul J.; Vestal, Katherine D.

    2011-01-01

    All children, even the healthiest, have preventive and acute health care needs. Moreover, a growing number of children are chronically ill, with preventive, acute, and ongoing care needs that may be much more demanding than those for healthy children. Because children are unable to care for themselves, their parents are expected to provide a range…

  13. Children's Books in Australia.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Horn, Vida

    This report, given at a special meeting held in Tehran, describes children's literature in Australia, discussing specifically the background of this literature (the country and early children's books); various influences on the literature, such as the Children's Book Council and children's and school libraries; present-day publishing, including…

  14. Children at War.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hickson, Joyce

    1992-01-01

    Describes experiences of children and adolescents in South Africa who have been subjected to the violence of the apartheid state. Discusses detention of children and torture and assault of detained children. Against this backdrop, explores the effects of violence on children, psychological trauma, counseling interventions, and applications of…

  15. Handedness in autistic children.

    PubMed

    Colby, K M; Parkison, C

    1977-03-01

    A test of handedness in a sample of 20 autistic children and 25 normal children revealed marked differences. The frequency of non-right-handedness in normal children was 12%, whereas it was 65% in autistic children. The significance of this difference for the etiology of autism is discussed. PMID:576603

  16. Vietnam in Childrens' Books.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    United Nations Children's Fund, New York, NY. United States Committee.

    Twenty-five nonfiction and 18 fiction and folklore listings are included in this bulletin on Vietnam in childrens' books. Slides, filmstrips, and film listings are also included. Each listing is accompanied by a brief annotation. Subjects include customs and culture, the country and the people, Ho Chi Min, the Vietnamese revolution, Vietnamese…

  17. Children in large families.

    PubMed

    1995-01-01

    A summary was provided of issues presented by Dr. Cynthia Lloyd in her chapter on investing in children from the 1994 volume "Population and Development: Old Debates, New Conclusions." Children in large families may miss the opportunities offered in a modernizing society. The possibilities for adverse consequences because of a large size of families include a smaller share of resources (time, income, and/or nutrition) among family members, limited access to public resources (health care and education), unequal distribution of resources among family members, and gender defined roles. Dr. Lloyd's review of the literature exposed the lack of emphasis on the impact of opportunity, equity, and intergenerational transfers on child welfare. Children's smaller share of resources had less impact on child welfare. Later-born and unwanted children were particularly vulnerable in large families. Unwanted children were usually later born or girls. The lack of investments in girl's education not only affected the limited earning power and opportunity to escape from gender restricting roles but also contributed to the perpetuation of the cycle of high fertility and gender discrimination. Family decisions about fertility and investments in children's education and nutrition can not be separated from the social context of culture, class, social custom, and level of socioeconomic development. Disadvantage is not assured in large families, but statistically more probable. Fewer children are more likely to be wanted and to receive better care. Societies should provide high quality family planning services, safe abortion services, and enforcement of primary school education requirements. Measures need to be adopted for promotion of schooling for girls that is sensitive to cultural norms. Laws must protect children's rights to economic support from both biological parents. Gender discrimination against women must be eliminated. PMID:12288919

  18. Uganda: stolen children, stolen lives.

    PubMed

    Omona, G; Matheson, K E

    1998-02-01

    This news article discusses conditions in Uganda due to the 12-year war that jeopardize the health and well-being of children. Since 1995 the rebel Sudan-backed Lord's Resistance Army (LRA) has secured new recruits to add to their diminishing numbers by abducting children. As many as 8000 children, ages 11 years and older, have been appropriated in the war effort. The children are abducted, trained as soldiers, and forced to commit brutal crimes and murders. Abducted girls are held as sex slaves and forced to marry. Those children who manage to escape need special psychological and medical interventions during their integration back into normal life. World Vision Uganda and Gulu Support the Children Organization (GUSCO) have set up psychosocial counseling programs to help these children overcome their traumatic experiences. The programs offer the children vocational training, trauma counseling, and reintegration into their families. Children return to their families within 3-6 weeks. The large number of children in need has resulted in difficult follow-up and lack of long-term support. The GUSCO reception center houses about 100 children, 15% of whom are girls. The philosophy of recovery is based on the view that 1) the children are survivors with individual resources and not sick victims; and 2) most of the children will experience a healing process when given protection and understanding. GUSCO uses a community participatory approach that includes children in decision-making and relies on local traditions. The psychosocial supportive environment helps children re-establish self-esteem, trust with other people, and a civilian identity. GUSCO works with families, local groups, teachers, and authorities. Reintegration follow-up occurs after 3 weeks, 3 months, 6 months, and 1 year. The international community should put pressure on Sudan to end its support of the LRA. PMID:9482324

  19. Torture in children.

    PubMed

    Quiroga, Jose

    2009-01-01

    This is a review article that studies the problem of torture in children. Torture in children is a significant worldwide problem, but there are no official or reliable independent statistics to measure the magnitude of the problem. The definition of torture in the Convention against Torture and Other Cruel, Inhuman or Degrading Treatment or Punishment applies to adults and children. The Convention on the Rights of the Child defines children as "every human being below the age of eighteen years". Torture in children happens during peace times and during political violence and war conflicts. The majority of torture victims happen during peace times. The high-risk groups are impoverished children living in the street, children deprived of parental care, children in conflict with the law, and children in detention. During political violence and war the high risk children are the children detained during political violence, child soldiers, children internally displaced in refugee camps, detained children during the war against terrorism and children tortured by peacekeeping forces. The perpetrators of torture in children are the members of the same forces that torture adults, generally the police, civil police, security guards trained by police, prison guards, and military forces. The paper identifies some preventive measure and develops recommendations for action at the local, national and international level. PMID:19920326

  20. The fecal virome of South and Central American children with diarrhea includes small circular DNA viral genomes of unknown origin.

    PubMed

    Phan, Tung Gia; da Costa, Antonio Charlys; Del Valle Mendoza, Juana; Bucardo-Rivera, Filemon; Nordgren, Johan; O'Ryan, Miguel; Deng, Xutao; Delwart, Eric

    2016-04-01

    Viral metagenomics of feces collected from 58 Peruvian children with unexplained diarrhea revealed several small circular ssDNA genomes. Two genomes related to sequences previously reported in feces from chimpanzees and other mammals and recently named smacoviruses were characterized and then detected by PCR in 1.7 % (1/58) and 19 % (11/58) of diarrheal samples, respectively. Another three genomes from a distinct small circular ssDNA viral group provisionally called pecoviruses encoded Cap and Rep proteins with <35 % identity to those in related genomes reported in human, seal, porcine and dromedary feces. Pecovirus DNA was detected in 15.5 % (9/58), 5.9 % (3/51) and 3 % (3/100) of fecal samples from unexplained diarrhea in Peru, Nicaragua and Chile, respectively. Feces containing these ssDNA genomes also contained known human enteric viral pathogens. The cellular origins of these circular ssDNA viruses, whether human cells, ingested plants, animals or fungal foods, or residents of the gut microbiome, are currently unknown. PMID:26780893

  1. Young Children. IDRA Focus.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    IDRA Newsletter, 1998

    1998-01-01

    This theme issue includes five articles that focus on educational, cognitive, and brain research with implications for early childhood educators, including those who work with limited-English-proficient, minority, and economically disadvantaged children. "Coming to Grips with Reading Instruction at the Early Grades" (Christie L. Goodman) reports…

  2. Germ Smart: Children's Activities in Disease Prevention.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Scheer, Judith K.

    This booklet is part of the "Children's Activity Series," a set of four supplemental teaching resources that promote awareness about health, family life, and cultural diversity for children in kindergarten through third grade. Nine activities are included in this booklet to help children be "germ smart" help children in kindergarten through third

  3. Illinois Association for Gifted Children Journal, 2000.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smutney, Joan Franklin, Ed.

    2000-01-01

    This issue of the Illinois Association for Gifted Children (IAGC) Journal focuses on teaching gifted children in the regular education classroom. Featured articles include: (1) "Educating All Gifted Children for the 21st Century: Proposal for Training Regular Classroom Teachers" (Maurice D. Fisher and Michael E. Walters); (2) "Gifted Children in…

  4. Experiences of Daycare Children of Divorce

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Storksen, Ingunn; Thorsen, Arlene Arstad; Overland, Klara; Brown, Steven R.

    2012-01-01

    Research shows that children of divorce are at risk of adjustment problems and school problems. In previous studies of young children of divorce, most often parents or teachers have supplied data. In this study, we explore the children's own feelings and experiences through Q methodology with visual images. The study includes 17 children of

  5. Germ Smart: Children's Activities in Disease Prevention.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Scheer, Judith K.

    This booklet is part of the "Children's Activity Series," a set of four supplemental teaching resources that promote awareness about health, family life, and cultural diversity for children in kindergarten through third grade. Nine activities are included in this booklet to help children be "germ smart" help children in kindergarten through third…

  6. Agenda for Children: 2006 Year in Review

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Agenda for Children, 2010

    2010-01-01

    The mission of Agenda for Children is to make Louisiana a state in which all children can thrive. This means that the basic needs of children and families must be met--including an adequate family income, safe housing, nutritious food, and accessible health care. It also means that children must be nurtured, well taught, and protected from harm,…

  7. Experiences of Daycare Children of Divorce

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Storksen, Ingunn; Thorsen, Arlene Arstad; Overland, Klara; Brown, Steven R.

    2012-01-01

    Research shows that children of divorce are at risk of adjustment problems and school problems. In previous studies of young children of divorce, most often parents or teachers have supplied data. In this study, we explore the children's own feelings and experiences through Q methodology with visual images. The study includes 17 children of…

  8. Helping children talk.

    PubMed

    Day, L

    1998-01-01

    Many children and young people living in London are affected by HIV. Most such children come from families from sub-Saharan Africa. Some HIV-positive parents have died, some are ill, and some are well. Some older children know that their parents are infected with HIV, but most children are unaware. To help these children understand their situations, children with a parent or parents who have died or are very sick are invited to 6 half-days of storytelling and play, led by a family counselor and someone who uses drama. Trained volunteers come from local AIDS organizations. The sessions vary depending upon what the children choose to discuss. The adults' role is to help the children begin to reflect upon their feelings in a way which is easy for them to express. Sessions usually begin with the creation of a story using a toy animal, after which children subsequently act out the imaginary family in different ways. PMID:12294833

  9. Environmental health of children.

    PubMed

    Dunn, Ardys M; Burns, Cathie; Sattler, Barbara

    2003-01-01

    Pediatric primary health care providers are responsible for providing comprehensive care to children. This includes assessing for and identifying the effect of environmental hazards on children's health and managing conditions that may result from exposure to environmental toxins. This article begins by reviewing the unique developmental, biologic, and behavioral characteristics of children and age-specific issues that make them particularly vulnerable to toxins. It then provides the reader with general assessment and management strategies related to environmental toxins, including an assessment tool that can be used in a pediatric primary care office. The qualities of selected toxins that have been implicated in childhood illnesses are discussed. Routes of exposure, signs and symptoms of toxicity, and assessment and management approaches are presented specifically for lead, mercury, environmental tobacco smoke, particulate matter, asbestos, radon, molds, and pesticides. Because prevention is the best intervention in environmental health, the article emphasizes ways pediatric providers can work with caregivers to prevent or minimize exposure. PMID:14576626

  10. Sexual Abuse Of Children

    PubMed Central

    Herbert, Carol P.

    1982-01-01

    Increasing emphasis is being placed on the identification and management of sexual abuse in children. Family physicians have a role to play in identifying and treating these children. Some common myths about sexual abuse are that assaults are made mostly by strangers, that sexual abuse is rare, and that there's nothing wrong with sex between adults and children. Indicators in the child may be physical or behavioral. In the family, indicators include fathers with low self-esteem, poor relationships with wives, tendency to be domineering and restrictive, and mothers who are passive. Immediate and longterm intervention includes legal, protective and treatment components. The essential factors in successful intervention are belief in the child's disclosure; communication of that belief to the child; and immediate protection of the child and siblings. PMID:21286177

  11. Social and Cognitive Correlates of Childrens Lying Behavior

    PubMed Central

    Talwar, Victoria; Lee, Kang

    2012-01-01

    The relation between childrens lie-telling and their social and cognitive development was examined. Children (3 - 8 years) were told not to peek at a toy. Most children peeked and later lied about peeking. Childrens subsequent verbal statements were not always consistent with their initial denial and leaked critical information revealing their deceit. Childrens conceptual moral understanding of lies, executive functioning, and theory-of-mind understanding were also assessed. Childrens initial false denials were related to their first-order belief understanding and their inhibitory control. Childrens ability to maintain their lies was related to their second-order belief understanding. Childrens lying was related to their moral evaluations. These finding suggest that social and cognitive factors may play an important role in childrens lie-telling abilities. PMID:18717895

  12. Mapping Numerical Processing, Reading, and Executive Functions in the Developing Brain: An fMRI Meta-Analysis of 52 Studies Including 842 Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Houde, Olivier; Rossi, Sandrine; Lubin, Amelie; Joliot, Marc

    2010-01-01

    Tracing the connections from brain functions to children's cognitive development and education is a major goal of modern neuroscience. We performed the first meta-analysis of functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) data obtained over the past decade (1999-2008) on more than 800 children and adolescents in three core systems of cognitive…

  13. Mapping Numerical Processing, Reading, and Executive Functions in the Developing Brain: An fMRI Meta-Analysis of 52 Studies Including 842 Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Houde, Olivier; Rossi, Sandrine; Lubin, Amelie; Joliot, Marc

    2010-01-01

    Tracing the connections from brain functions to children's cognitive development and education is a major goal of modern neuroscience. We performed the first meta-analysis of functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) data obtained over the past decade (1999-2008) on more than 800 children and adolescents in three core systems of cognitive

  14. Directory of Regional Centers and Educational Programs Providing Services to Deaf/Blind Children and Youth in the United States (Including Puerto Rico and the Virgin Islands).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alonso, Lou, Comp.

    Listed in the directory are over 200 educational programs and services for deaf blind children in the United States and U. S. territories. It is noted that the 10 coordinators of regional centers for services to deaf blind children have aided in compilation of the directory. Listings are arranged by state within the New England, Mid-Atlantic…

  15. Trichotillomania in Children

    PubMed Central

    Chandran, Nisha Suyien; Novak, Jeroen; Iorizzo, Matilde; Grimalt, Ramon; Oranje, Arnold P.

    2015-01-01

    Background Trichotillomania is an often underdiagnosed condition. Little is known about trichotillomania in childhood. We aimed to analyze the characteristics of children with trichotillomania to increase information on this condition. Methods A retrospective study of an electronic database was performed in a tertiary children's hospital. Information from patients with trichotillomania was systematically classified under the categories ‘who’, ‘what’, ‘when’, ‘where’, ‘why’, and ‘how’. Results A total of 33 patients had a diagnosis of trichotillomania (28 females, 5 males; peak age between 3 and 4 years). Scalp involvement was most common and nail biting was observed in 5 patients. Only 51.5% of patients had parents who noticed their child's hairpulling. Hair on or under the bed was the most common clue suggesting that hairpulling occurred. Triggering factors identified in 16 children included physical appearance, family-related issues, school-related issues, and concurrent illness. The noninvasive hair pull test was negative in all children. There was a high non-follow-up rate, and treatment outcomes varied. Conclusion A set of 6 specific questions, based on the ‘5Ws and 1H’ principle, facilitates the gathering of important information on children with unexplained nonscarring hair loss and helps clinicians be cognizant of possible outcomes of trichotillomania. This will be especially useful to clinicians who are not familiar with this elusive condition. PMID:27172263

  16. Educating Young Gifted Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Snowden, Peggy L.

    1995-01-01

    National trends and issues that concern gifted education are considered, focusing on the relationships among regular education, early childhood education, and education of young children who are gifted. Specific topics include: whole language and emergent literacy, whole group instruction and flexible grouping, cooperative learning, and…

  17. Children in the Junkyard.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Haas, Malka

    1996-01-01

    Examines the role of playgrounds that use discarded items or "junk" as an integral part of kindergarten classes in an Israeli kibbutz. Suggests that play in the junkyard, by including the whole person--muscles and senses, emotion and intellect, individual growth and social interaction--can offer the experiential foundations on which children can

  18. Children in the Junkyard.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Haas, Malka

    1996-01-01

    Examines the role of playgrounds that use discarded items or "junk" as an integral part of kindergarten classes in an Israeli kibbutz. Suggests that play in the junkyard, by including the whole person--muscles and senses, emotion and intellect, individual growth and social interaction--can offer the experiential foundations on which children can…

  19. A Curriculum for Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Frazier, Alexander, Ed.

    This publication contains seven papers, six of which were presented at a 1968 conference sponsored by the Elementary Education Advisory Council of the ASCD in cooperation with the Department of Elementary-Kindergarten-Nursery Education of the NEA. Topics covered include elements and issues in curriculum-making for children, present trends in…

  20. Notable Canadian Children's Books.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Aubrey, Irene E.

    This annotated bibliography dealing with Canadian children's books aims to show the historical development of the literature. Included within the bibliography are: (1) notable Canadian books from the eighteenth century to the modern period, (2) lists of books which were awarded a bronze medal for the years 1947-1975, and (3) a list of fiction for…

  1. Action for Children's Television.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ranly, Donald P.

    The origins, development, and effectiveness of Action for Children's Television (ACT) are examined in this pamphlet. The strategies used by ACT to obtain change at the congressional level and within television stations and networks include the following: a "tuneout" day when people are urged to turn off their television sets, a boycott of certain…

  2. Valuing Children's Voices

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barksdale, Mary Alice; Triplett, Cheri F.

    2010-01-01

    This paper explores the voices of elementary children in public schools. Three databases were used including (a) interviews with 25 elementary students, (b) drawings and writings created by 225 third through sixth-grade students about their high stakes testing experiences, and (c) observations in two first-grade classrooms. The data demonstrate…

  3. Sports Injuries in Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Taft, Timothy N.

    1991-01-01

    A literature review revealed an absence of well-controlled studies concerning the prevention of sports injuries in children. A checklist outlines some causes of the overuse syndrome, including (1) training errors; (2) the nature of playing surfaces; (3) muscle imbalance; (4) anatomic malalignments; (5) construction of shoes; and (6) various

  4. Books for Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hildebrand, Joan M.

    1993-01-01

    This annotated bibliography includes 27 children's books, 15 of which are fiction, and 12 nonfiction. Of the nonfiction books, three discuss historical topics and nine cover nature-related topics such as rainforests, the ocean floor, snakes and other animals, and rural farm life. (SM)

  5. Media Violence and Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Groebel, Jo

    1998-01-01

    Presents the results of the UNESCO global study on media violence and children which was conducted between 1996 and 1997. Highlights include the role of the media, media heroes as role models, media violence and aggression, differences by gender, rural versus urban environments, the pervasiveness of television, and recommendations. (Author/LRW)

  6. Children's Books on Africa.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zekiros, Astair; Mensah, Kofi

    The document lists and critically annotates 155 children's books about Africa published from 1958-1978 as part of an evaluation project of the collection in the public library in Madison, Wisconsin. Books include fiction, picture books, history, folklore, travel accounts, biography, and geography. Annotations indicate type of book, possible uses,…

  7. Children and Drama.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McCaslin, Nellie, Ed.

    This book collects the current thinking of fourteen of the leading practitioners in the field of children in theatre. Evident throughout the book is the theme that it is the creativity of the individual teacher or leader that makes for exciting results in drama by and for young people. Included are reminiscences, philosophies, teaching hints, and…

  8. Assessing Minority Group Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Phillips, Beeman N., Ed.

    Contents of this book include the following collection of articles: "Assessing Minority Group Children: Challenges for School Psychologists," Thomas Oakland; "The NEA Testing Moratorium," Boyd Bosma; "Cultural Myopia: The Need for a Corrective Lens," Martin H. Gerry; "Assumptions Underlying Psychological Testing," T. Ernest Newland;…

  9. Children's Books. Book Reviews.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moulton, Kate

    1994-01-01

    Reviews 10 children's books, published or reissued 1988-93, about daily life, traditional culture, and schooling among Taos Pueblo, Zuni Pueblo, Navajo, Inuit, Guatemalan, and other Native peoples, as well as tales from Native American oral tradition, the life of a buffalo, and Cherokee and Athapascan historical fiction. Includes grade range and…

  10. Developing Children's Literary Resources

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Peng, Chew Fong

    2012-01-01

    The Malay literary materials and resources for early childhood in Malaysia are still in the infant stage and have not been expanded to include the main references or developed into big book form. The children literature in our market is not published based on educational philosophy and research, but it is produced based on profit. The process of

  11. Children's Books on Africa.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zekiros, Astair; Mensah, Kofi

    The document lists and critically annotates 155 children's books about Africa published from 1958-1978 as part of an evaluation project of the collection in the public library in Madison, Wisconsin. Books include fiction, picture books, history, folklore, travel accounts, biography, and geography. Annotations indicate type of book, possible uses,

  12. Children's Literature Web Sites.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yokota, Junko; Cai, Mingshui

    2002-01-01

    Presents annotations of approximately 80 web sites that range in coverage from idiosyncratic and focused to diverse and comprehensive metasites. Notes categories of sites include: children's literature web guides; trade book publisher web sites; author/illustrator sites (metasites and individual); book review sources and teaching ideas; web sites…

  13. Children's Classics. Fifth Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jordan, Alice M.

    "Children's Classics," a 1947 article by Alice M. Jordan reprinted from "The Horn Book Magazine," examines the dynamics and appeal of some of the most famous books for young readers, including "Alice in Wonderland,""The Wind in the Willows,""Robinson Crusoe," and "Andersen's Fairy Tales." Paul Hein's annotated bibliography, a revision of Jordan's…

  14. Children's Programming Guidelines.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cumberland County Public Library and Information Center, Fayetteville, NC.

    Suggestions for establishing children's library programs in the Cumberland County, North Carolina, library system include descriptions of types of audiences, types of programs, and elements of programs. Selection guidelines for topics and materials cover the following areas: (1) art projects; (2) costumes; (3) creative dramatics; (4) drawing; (5)…

  15. Developing Children's Literary Resources

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Peng, Chew Fong

    2012-01-01

    The Malay literary materials and resources for early childhood in Malaysia are still in the infant stage and have not been expanded to include the main references or developed into big book form. The children literature in our market is not published based on educational philosophy and research, but it is produced based on profit. The process of…

  16. Gastrointestinal Motility Disorders in Children

    PubMed Central

    Ambartsumyan, Lusine

    2014-01-01

    The most common and challenging gastrointestinal motility disorders in children include gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD), esophageal achalasia, gastroparesis, chronic intestinal pseudo-obstruction, and constipation. GERD is the most common gastrointestinal motility disorder affecting children and is diagnosed clinically and treated primarily with acid secretion blockade. Esophageal achalasia, a less common disorder in the pediatric patient population, is characterized by dysphagia and treated with pneumatic balloon dilation and/or esophagomyotomy. Gastroparesis and chronic intestinal pseudo-obstruction are poorly characterized in children and are associated with significant morbidity. Constipation is among the most common complaints in children and is associated with significant morbidity as well as poor quality of life. Data on epidemiology and outcomes, clinical trials, and evaluation of new diagnostic techniques are needed to better diagnose and treat gastrointestinal motility disorders in children. We present a review of the conditions and challenges related to these common gastrointestinal motility disorders in children. PMID:24799835

  17. Dietary fat and children

    MedlinePlus

    Children and fat-free diets; Fat-free diet and children ... Some fat in the diet is needed for normal growth and development. However, many conditions such as obesity, heart disease, and diabetes are linked to ...

  18. Acetaminophen dosing for children

    MedlinePlus

    Taking acetaminophen (Tylenol) can help children with colds and fever feel better. As with all drugs, it is important to give children the correct dose. Acetaminophen is safe when taken as directed. But taking ...

  19. Children of Alcoholics

    MedlinePlus

    ... problems than children whose parents are not alcoholics. Alcoholism runs in families, and children of alcoholics are ... situation. Although the child tries to keep the alcoholism a secret, teachers, relatives, other adults, or friends ...

  20. Medicine safety and children

    MedlinePlus

    ... medicine is made to look and taste like candy. Children are curious and attracted to medicine. Most ... like you. DO NOT call medicine or vitamins candy. Children like candy and will get into medicine ...

  1. Cough in Children

    MedlinePlus

    ... Library ▸ Allergy Library ▸ Cough in children TTR Share | Cough in Children This article has been reviewed by ... MD, FAAAAI As a parent, hearing your child cough may make you feel uneasy. Yet an occasional ...

  2. Physical Activity and Children

    MedlinePlus

    ... a Healthy Heart Healthy Kids Our Kids Programs Childhood Obesity What is childhood obesity? Overweight in Children BMI in Children Is Childhood Obesity an Issue in Your Home? Addressing your Child's ...

  3. Medicines and Children

    MedlinePlus

    ... medication has been studied for its effects on children. It also tells you what ages have been ... counter products haven't actually been studied in children for effectiveness, safety, or dosing. When you give ...

  4. Tonsillectomies and children

    MedlinePlus

    Children and tonsillectomies ... many parents wonder if it is wise for children to have the tonsils taken out. Tonsillectomy may be recommended if your child has any of the following: Difficulty swallowing Obstructed ...

  5. Ibuprofen dosing for children

    MedlinePlus

    Taking ibuprofen can help children feel better when they have colds or minor injuries. As with all drugs, it is important to give children the correct dose. Ibuprofen is safe when taken as directed. But taking ...

  6. Children and TV Violence

    MedlinePlus

    ... behavior. Unfortunately, much of today's television programming is violent. Hundreds of studies of the effects of TV ... children causes greater aggressiveness. Sometimes, watching a single violent program can increase aggressiveness. Children who view shows ...

  7. Cancer immunotherapy in children

    Cancer.gov

    More often than not, cancer immunotherapies that work in adults are used in modified ways in children. Seldom are new therapies developed just for children, primarily because of the small number of pediatric patients relative to the adult cancer patient

  8. Children and Firearms

    MedlinePlus

    ... AACAP Facts for Families Guide Skip breadcrumb navigation Firearms and Children Quick Links Facts For Families Guide ... large numbers of children and adolescents killed by firearms. In order to prevent further deaths, it is ...

  9. Children and Sexuality.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Corbett, Susan Miller

    1991-01-01

    Presents a newsletter that discusses methods parents can use to handle sexual questions or behavior in young children. An accompanying letter to parents addresses young children's sexual behavior and ways parents can respond to this behavior. (GH)

  10. Written for Children: An Outline of English Children's Literature.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Townsend, John Rowe

    Children's prose literature in Britain is surveyed from the 17th century to the present. The main stream of this development is exemplified by an examination of the lives and works of such authors as (1) John Newbery, whose books for children include "Goody Two-Shoes" (1766), (2) Mrs. Sherwood, whose didactic books contain a moral lesson in every…

  11. Central Corneal Thickness in Children

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Objective To report the central corneal thickness (CCT) in healthy white, African-American, and Hispanic children from birth to 17 years of age. Design Prospective observational multicenter study. Central corneal thickness was measured with a hand-held contact pachymeter. Results Two thousand seventy-nine children were included in the study, with ages ranging from day of birth to 17 years. Included were 807 white, 494 Hispanic, and 474 African-American individuals, in addition to Asian, unknown and mixed race individuals. African-American children had thinner corneas on average than that of both white (p< .001) and Hispanic children (p< .001) by approximately 20 micrometers. Thicker median CCT was observed with each successive year of age from age 1 to 11 years, with year-to-year differences steadily decreasing and reaching a plateau after age 11 at 573 micrometers in white and Hispanic children and 551 micrometers in African-American children. For every 100 micrometers of thicker CCT measured, the intraocular pressure was 1.5 mmHg higher on average (p< 0.001). For every diopter of increased myopic refractive error (p< 0.001) CCT was 1 micrometer thinner on average. Conclusions Median CCT increases with age from 1 to 11 years with the greatest increase present in the youngest age groups. African-American children on average have thinner central corneas than white and Hispanic children, while white and Hispanic children demonstrate similar central corneal thickness. PMID:21911662

  12. Children Teaching Children. [CD-ROM].

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    California State Dept. of Education, Sacramento. Office of School Improvement.

    Developed at Roosevelt Elementary School in Long Beach Unified School District (California), this CD-ROM presents Children Teaching Children (CTC), a literacy project intended to assist students to read, write, and publish their original work. It is part of the Program Improvement Initiative, an educational reform effort initiated by the…

  13. Children Teaching Children II. [CD-ROM].

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    California State Dept. of Education, Sacramento. Office of School Improvement.

    Children Teaching Children (CTC): Collection II is a CD-ROM created at 6 elementary schools in the West Contra Costa Unified School District (California) as part of the Coaching Odyssey for school improvement. CTC II, published by the California Department of Education, is an effective early literacy intervention that integrates the development of…

  14. Children of Alcoholics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Krois, Deborah Helen

    Although alcoholism has long been considered a serious problem, the impact of parental alcoholism on children has only recently begun to receive attention from researchers and clinicians. A review of the empirical literature on children of alcoholics was conducted and it was concluded that children raised in an alcoholic family are at increased…

  15. Children Writing Stories

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Armstrong, Michael

    2006-01-01

    In this book, the author reveals the creative force of children's narrative imagination and shows how this develops through childhood. He provides a new and powerful understanding of the significance of narrative for children's intellectual growth and for learning and teaching. The book explores a series of real stories written by children between…

  16. Children's Productive Phonological Recoding.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moustafa, Margaret

    1995-01-01

    Finds that an onset/rime analogy explanation accounted for the children's correct recodings of pseudowords better than a phoneme blending explanation, that the number of pseudowords children recoded correlated with the number of conventional words they recoded, and that children who were better able to conserve parts and wholes recoded more…

  17. Children's Online Privacy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Aidman, Amy

    2000-01-01

    The first federal Internet privacy law (the Children's Online Privacy Protection Act) provides safeguards for children by regulating collection of their personal information. Unfortunately, teens are not protected. Legislation is pending to protect children from online marketers such as ZapMe! Interactive technologies require constant vigilance.

  18. Fantasy and Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Feshbach, Seymour

    Because fantasy has a special role in the lives of children, the meaning and consequences of fantasy experiences in children's lives are central psychological questions. Although the scientific study of fantasy is in its infancy, it does seem to be the case that children with rich fantasy lives have better self-control and are less likely to be

  19. Children's Stress Index.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sherman, Dianne, Ed.

    1993-01-01

    This double issue of the "ZPG Reporter" focuses on the theme of ZPG's Children's Stress Index", the first national survey of children's well-being based on population- related pressures. Using an extensive list of social, economic, and environmental factors that affect the lives of children, the index ranks 828 cities, counties, and metropolitan

  20. Children's Theories of Motivation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gurland, Suzanne T.; Glowacky, Victoria C.

    2011-01-01

    To investigate children's theories of motivation, we asked 166 children (8-12 years of age) to rate the effect of various motivational strategies on task interest, over the short and long terms, in activities described as appealing or unappealing. Children viewed the rewards strategy as resulting in greatest interest except when implemented over…

  1. Bereavement Support for Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Auman, Mary Jo

    2007-01-01

    The death of a parent is one of the most significant and stressful events children can encounter. Surviving children may experience psychiatric problems and social dysfunction during their childhood and possibly throughout their adult lives. Children surviving a sibling's death may develop behavioral problems, because no one can fill the emptiness…

  2. Cow's milk and children

    MedlinePlus

    Milk and children; Cow’s milk allergy - children; Lactose intolerance - children ... You may have heard that cow's milk should not be given to babies younger than 1 year old. This is because cow's milk doesn't provide enough of certain ...

  3. Writing in Preliterate Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gombert, Jean Emile; Fayol, Michel

    1992-01-01

    Dictated words and pictures by 48 young French children, aged 3 to 6 years, demonstrated that young children have the capacity to produce graphics that exhibit some of the characteristics of writing. Developmental stages in children's recognition that their own efforts were not true writing were identified. (SLD)

  4. Colorado Children's Budget 2013

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Buck, Beverly; Baker, Robin

    2013-01-01

    The "Colorado Children's Budget" presents and analyzes investments and spending trends during the past five state fiscal years on services that benefit children. The "Children's Budget" focuses mainly on state investment and spending, with some analysis of federal investments and spending to provide broader context of state…

  5. Colorado Children's Budget 2005

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Colorado Children's Campaign, 2005

    2005-01-01

    The Children's Budget is a comprehensive report on funding for children's services in Colorado. This report provides a six- year funding history for more than 50 programs funded with state, local, and federal dollars. The Colorado Children's Budget analyzes reductions in programs and services during the economic downturn. The data in the…

  6. Children's Theories of Motivation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gurland, Suzanne T.; Glowacky, Victoria C.

    2011-01-01

    To investigate children's theories of motivation, we asked 166 children (8-12 years of age) to rate the effect of various motivational strategies on task interest, over the short and long terms, in activities described as appealing or unappealing. Children viewed the rewards strategy as resulting in greatest interest except when implemented over

  7. Literature for Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Salomone, Ronald E., Ed.

    1985-01-01

    The 15 articles in this journal issue deal with children's literature. Among the topics and titles discussed are (1) Virginia Hamilton's books, (2) the new realism in children's literature, (3) gender bias in children's books, (4) teaching "Where the Wild Things Are" to adults, (5) language use in "Alice in Wonderland," (6) "Mom, the Wolf Man and…

  8. Transitions: Third Culture Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ebbeck, Marjory; Reus, Valerie

    2005-01-01

    This paper reports on a small-scale research study conducted in Singapore, where some 16,000 children are enrolled in "foreign schools". Such children, often termed Third Culture Children, are neither raised entirely in their parents' home country nor as a member of the country where they now live. Pollock and Van Reken (2001) state that the…

  9. Children, Technology, and Flowers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Druin, Allison

    2003-01-01

    Suggests that as technology becomes more pervasive, it is important to ask why it can be important for children, discussing: how today's technologies offer new ways for children to socialize, how technology can empower children, and how new technologies create learning opportunities that support the "messiness" of being a child, the interactive…

  10. TEACHING BILINGUAL CHILDREN.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fresno County Schools, CA.

    THE PROBLEM INVOLVED WITH TEACHING BILINGUAL CHILDREN IS THEIR POSITION IN TWO WORLDS, THOSE OF ENGLISH AND SPANISH. TO HELP THESE CHILDREN, ACTIVITIES AND METHODS ARE PRESENTED, INTENDED FOR USE WITH CHILDREN FROM KINDERGARTEN THROUGH EIGHTH GRADE. IN KINDERGARTEN, ONE OF THE PRACTICES THAT THE TEACHER OF THE ENGLISH-SPEAKING CLASS SHOULD PUT…

  11. Children and Welfare Reform.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Behrman, Richard E., Ed.

    2002-01-01

    This issue of "The Future of Children" examines whether programs implemented by the federal welfare reform law accomplished the goal of reducing the number of children growing up in poor, single-parent families and whether these programs benefited children. This examination coincides with debates in Congress on the reauthorization of the Personal…

  12. Bad Air For Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kane, Dorothy Noyes

    1976-01-01

    Children are especially sensitive to air pollution and consequences to them maybe of longer duration than to adults. The effects of low-level pollution on children are the concern of this article. The need for research on the threat of air pollution to childrens' health is emphasized. (BT)

  13. Children and Divorce.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    West, Suzanne E.

    Some basic principles are discussed that can help divorcing parents understand the feelings and behaviors of their children, and guidelines are suggested for parents wanting to help their children adjust to the divorce-induced changes in their lives. The process of divorce is discussed in terms of children's experience, cause and effect, and time.

  14. Leadership in Children's Services

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Booker, Roger

    2012-01-01

    This paper examines the different contexts for leadership in children's services with a particular focus on integrated working. It reviews contemporary theories that appear to offer relevant frameworks for thinking about children's service leadership. It is argued that children's services require leadership at all levels to enable a dynamic,…

  15. Integrating Refugee Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vershok, Anna

    2003-01-01

    Notes that the Moscow Center for the Integration and Education of Refugee Children attempts to provide real schooling for refugee children displaced from the Chechen Republic. Suggests main task was to prepare the children for regular school, and to help them adapt to both their new school and their new home, Moscow. Hopes this experience may help…

  16. Ptosis - infants and children

    MedlinePlus

    Blepharoptosis-children; Congenital ptosis; Eyelid drooping-children; Eyelid drooping-amblyopia; Eyelid drooping-astigmatism ... Ptosis in infants and children is often due to a problem with the muscle that raises the eyelid. A nerve problem in the eyelid can ...

  17. Children's Understanding of Machines.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brandes, Aaron

    This study, which examined children's understanding of machines, focused on how children decide which objects are machines and which are not, and how they group machines as similar or different. Brainstorming sessions involving two groups of four kindergarten children and one class each from the second, fourth, and fifth grade, were conducted.…

  18. Creative Philosophizing with Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Calvert, Kristina

    2007-01-01

    In his influential book "Dialogues with Children" (1984), Gareth Matthews presents strong evidence that children as young as six can and should engage in philosophical discourse. His findings form the basis of this article, a theoretical and practical guide for parents and teachers seeking respectful and creative ways to encourage children to…

  19. Bone Health in Children

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Parents and caregivers have many concerns about their childrens physical and emotional well-being when they are trying to raise healthy children. Parental concern for the potential development of osteoporosis when their children become elderly is probably not a priority during childhood. Yet, just a...

  20. Children's Rights: Monitoring Issues.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Verhellen, Eugeen, Ed.; Spiesschaert, Frans, Ed.

    A number of research seminars were organized to clarify the fundamental principles underlying local, regional, and international efforts to establish a structure for monitoring and promoting children's rights. This book contains papers presented at these seminars by experts on child advocacy, promotion of children's interests by children, and…

  1. Children's Literature. Volume 3.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Butler, Francelia, Ed.; Brockman, Bennett A., Ed.

    This volume applies critical literary standards to the field of children's literature in a long-range effort to improve its quality and teaching. Contributors and editors represent international scholarship in all of the humanities, as well as in the specific area of children's literature. Articles span topics from European children's literature…

  2. Children's Stress Index.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sherman, Dianne, Ed.

    1993-01-01

    This double issue of the "ZPG Reporter" focuses on the theme of ZPG's Children's Stress Index", the first national survey of children's well-being based on population- related pressures. Using an extensive list of social, economic, and environmental factors that affect the lives of children, the index ranks 828 cities, counties, and metropolitan…

  3. Children Talking about Books.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Borders, Sarah G.; Naylor, Alice Phoebe

    In an effort to demonstrate how quality literature can engage children in reflective thinking about stories, themselves, and the world, this book suggests children's literature worthy of discussion, shows how interactions work, and encourages adults to bond with children. The book begins with a chapter on how to use the book and a chapter on the

  4. On Japanese Children's Books.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Watanare, Shigeo

    This report, given at a special meeting held in Tehran, presents data and facts concerning yearly publications (books, magazines, and textbooks), translations, and illustrations of Japanese children's literature. The report then discusses at length recent trends in children's literature and library activities for children in the past, present, and…

  5. Children and the Nintendo.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Keller, Suzanne M.

    The four reports contained in this document examine the effects of the Nintendo Entertainment System (NES), which entered the lives of many children in the United States in 1986. The first report discusses a study of children's interaction with the game hardware. The study of fourth- and fifth-grade students indicated that children's interaction

  6. Children and the Nintendo.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Keller, Suzanne M.

    The four reports contained in this document examine the effects of the Nintendo Entertainment System (NES), which entered the lives of many children in the United States in 1986. The first report discusses a study of children's interaction with the game hardware. The study of fourth- and fifth-grade students indicated that children's interaction…

  7. Parental Smoking Affects Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Science News, 1978

    1978-01-01

    Research done by workers at Harvard Medical School suggests that passive exposure to cigarette smoke can impair breathing in children ages five through nine. Lung flow rates (breathing ability) decreased for children with smoking parents, and significantly if the children also smoke. (MA)

  8. Social Policies for Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Garfinkel, Irwin, Ed.; And Others

    Noting that successful social policies for children are critical to our nation's future, this book discusses the status of children in America and suggests that the nation's current policies may not be serving them well. Proposals for seven new social policies are discussed that deal with the following domains affecting children from birth through…

  9. Children Experience Literature.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lonsdale, Bernard J.; Mackintosh, Helen K.

    This book is intended (1) as a supplementary text in college courses in children's literature, (2) as a source of information for educators involved in curriculum development programs in the field of children's literature, (3) as a reference guide for schools and community libraries, and (4) as an aid to parents in guiding their children's…

  10. Children's Online Privacy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Aidman, Amy

    2000-01-01

    The first federal Internet privacy law (the Children's Online Privacy Protection Act) provides safeguards for children by regulating collection of their personal information. Unfortunately, teens are not protected. Legislation is pending to protect children from online marketers such as ZapMe! Interactive technologies require constant vigilance.…

  11. Children Talking about Books.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Borders, Sarah G.; Naylor, Alice Phoebe

    In an effort to demonstrate how quality literature can engage children in reflective thinking about stories, themselves, and the world, this book suggests children's literature worthy of discussion, shows how interactions work, and encourages adults to bond with children. The book begins with a chapter on how to use the book and a chapter on the…

  12. Children in the States, 2001.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Judge, Amy, Comp.

    This data book provides statistics on a range of indicators that measure critical aspects of children's lives in each of the 50 states and the District of Columbia. Statistics are provided in the following categories: (1) child health, including uninsured children, low birth weight babies, infant deaths, and immunizations; (2) child care and early…

  13. Children of Alcoholics/Addicts.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Towers, Richard L.

    The purpose of this booklet is to raise the awareness of teachers and other school personnel about the needs and characteristics of the children of alcoholics and addicts and to explain what schools can do to help. The booklet discusses: (1) risk factors for children of alcoholics and substance abusers, including the psychological, emotional, and…

  14. Exploring Fractal Geometry with Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vacc, Nancy Nesbitt

    1999-01-01

    Heightens the awareness of elementary school teachers, teacher educators, and teacher-education researchers of possible applications of fractal geometry with children and, subsequently, initiates discussion about the appropriateness of including this new mathematics in the elementary curriculum. Presents activities for exploring children's

  15. KIDMONEY: Children as Big Business.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reese, Shelly

    1996-01-01

    Discusses how marketers are targeting children as a consumer segment. Highlights include advertising budgets and media, how children spend their money, the more influential role of the child in the family, in-school marketing, controversial advertising on Channel One, marketing on the Internet, and parental control. (AEF)

  16. Specific Language Impairments in Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Watkins, Ruth V., Ed.; Rice, Mabel L., Ed.

    The fourth volume in a series on communication and language intervention focuses on specific language impairments in children, and contains papers presented at a 1992 conference. Papers include the following: "Specific Language Impairments in Children: An Introduction" (Ruth V. Watkins); "Studies of Genetics of Specific Language Impairment" (J.…

  17. School Adaptation of Roma Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gerganov, Encho; Varbanova, Silvia; Kyuchukov, Hristo

    2005-01-01

    This paper examines the degree of school adaptation among Roma children who were included in a program for the desegregation of Roma schools in Bulgaria. More specifically, the program requires Roma children to attend mixed classes with Bulgarian students and Roma teacher assistants to work with them. The Bulgarian version of the Questionnaire on…

  18. Children in the States, 2000.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Andrejack, Kate, Comp.; Judge, Amy, Comp.; Simons, Janet, Comp.

    This data book provides statistics on a range of indicators that measure critical aspects of children's lives in each of the 50 states and the District of Columbia. Statistics are provided in the following categories: (1) national rankings in population and family characteristics; (2) health and disabilities (including children lacking health…

  19. Children's Experience of Public Space

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Elsley, Susan

    2004-01-01

    Children and young people regard the external physical environment as important for their needs. Their use of space varies according to age and circumstance and includes designated play and leisure facilities as well as other informal areas within their neighbourhoods. However, children have little influence over the development of public space as…

  20. TAMPA ASTHMATIC CHILDREN'S STUDY (TACS)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Tampa Asthmatic Children's Study (TACS) was a pilot research study to assess methodologies and research instruments needed for including asthma as a health outcome in the National Children's Study (NCS). This was one of a series of pilot studies focusing on (a) simple, cos...

  1. Exploring Fractal Geometry with Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vacc, Nancy Nesbitt

    1999-01-01

    Heightens the awareness of elementary school teachers, teacher educators, and teacher-education researchers of possible applications of fractal geometry with children and, subsequently, initiates discussion about the appropriateness of including this new mathematics in the elementary curriculum. Presents activities for exploring children's…

  2. Children in the States, 1999.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Children's Defense Fund, Washington, DC.

    This data book provides statistics on a range of indicators that measure critical aspects of children's lives in each of the 50 states and the District of Columbia. Statistics are provided in the following categories: (1) population and family characteristics (including number of children under age 18 and age 5, percentage of population under age…

  3. Sex Stereotypes in Children's Literature.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Craft, Julia

    The problem of sex stereotyping in children's literature has been around for as long as the genre itself, but it was brought to the forefront because of the women's movement in the 1970s. From the 1700s, critics were aware of the problems that arose from children's literature and its portrayal of characters and ideas, including "Cinderella" and…

  4. Children in an Information Age.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sendov, Blagovest

    1988-01-01

    Summarizes the main themes and presents recommendations of the international conference, "Children in an Information Age: Tomorrow's Problems Today," that was held in Bulgaria in 1985. Topics discussed include computer training for children; the need for well designed research; the teacher-computer relationship; artificial intelligence; and reform…

  5. Dynamic Digital Libraries for Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Theng, Yin Leng; Mohd-Nasir, Norliza; Buchanan, George; Fields, Bob; Thimbleby, Harold; Cassidy, Noel

    The design of systems, including digital libraries, is often inspired by what technology makes possible. In user-centered design, design emphasizes users, their tasks and needs. The majority of current digital libraries are not designed for children. For digital libraries to be popular with children, they need to be fun and easy-to-use. This paper…

  6. Children's health and social mobility.

    PubMed

    Case, Anne; Paxson, Christina

    2006-01-01

    Children from low-income families are more likely than other children to have serious health problems. And, as Anne Case and Christina Paxson show, childhood health problems can prevent poor children from achieving economic success as adults. Income-related disparities in childhood health are evident at birth or even before, and the disparities grow more pronounced as children grow older. Not only do poor children have more severe health problems than wealthier children, but they fare less well than wealthier children who have the same problems. They also receive less and lower-quality medical care for their problems. And poor families may be less well equipped to manage their children's health problems, which could worsen their effects. The available U.S. data sets do not allow researchers to track individuals' health and economic well-being from birth into adulthood, but three British data sets are producing growing evidence that health in childhood is a determinant of educational attainment, which in turn affects adults' employment opportunities and wages. Children in poor health are also more likely to have poor health as adults, and their health as adults adversely affects their economic status. Case and Paxson note that eliminating income-related disparities in health problems in childhood would do little to reduce earnings disparities between richer and poorer adults. However, they emphasize that, for children in poor health, improvement in physical condition in childhood would lead to substantial improvement in economic circumstances. The authors cite several areas, including expanded prenatal care, maternal smoking cessation programs, and nutrition programs, as deserving particular attention. They contend that increased access to health care is not sufficient to improve children's health. The next wave of policies should focus on improving the quality of health care and strengthening the ability of parents to manage their children's health problems. PMID:17036550

  7. Do Integrated Children's Services Improve Children's Outcomes?: Evidence from England's Children's Trust Pathfinders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    O'Brien, Margaret; Bachmann, Max O.; Jones, Natalia R.; Reading, Richard; Thoburn, June; Husbands, Chris; Shreeve, Ann; Watson, Jacqueline

    2009-01-01

    Thirty-five children's trust pathfinders, local cross-sector partnerships, were introduced across England in 2003 to promote greater integration in children's services. Using administrative performance data, this paper tracks yearly trends in child service outputs and child well-being outcomes from 1997 to 2004 in these local areas, including the

  8. [ALLERGEN IMMUNOTHERAPY IN CHILDREN].

    PubMed

    Fujisawa, Takao

    2015-06-01

    Children are thought to have high plasticity in the immune system. Thus, it is expected that allergen immunotherapy for children may have higher efficacy than adults and has real disease-modifying potential to allergic diseases. For clinical efficacy in ameliorating allergic symptoms, however, current systematic reviews have not shown any superior effect in children, partly because of less number of studies in this age group. On the other hand, preventive effects against asthma inception in children with allergic rhinitis and sensitization "spreading" to new allergens have been reported, implicating that allergen immunotherapy has a potential to stop "allergy march" in children. To make the therapy more effective, it is preferable to start it as early as possible, hopefully in infancy. But it is still difficult at present because of relatively frequent adverse events and invasive manner of administering allergen extracts for young children. We need safer and more effective methods in performing immunotherapy for children. PMID:26380908

  9. Children's "euthanasia" in Nazi Germany.

    PubMed

    Benedict, Susan; Shields, Linda; O'Donnell, Alison J

    2009-12-01

    Children with disabilities were killed during the Nazi era, often by nurses. Some nurses killed children, saying that they were under orders. Propaganda about the need for "racial purity" was all pervasive and influenced much of the population, including nurses. The German people accepted the "mercy" killing of children with disabilities. We describe the children's "euthanasia" program, explore the influence of propaganda, ask why it was acceptable to kill children, and provide historical context demonstrating "slippery slopes" which can lead to abrogation of ethical principles. Discussion of such history is essential as the ethical principles which were breached are still the cornerstone of nursing practice today. Only by openly discussing past wrongs can we attempt to ensure that they do not happen again. Archival documents from Germany and Israel, including trial depositions and transcripts, provided material, supplemented by secondary classic sources. PMID:19931148

  10. Severe asthma in children

    PubMed Central

    Guilbert, TW; Bacharier, LB; Fitzpatrick, AM

    2015-01-01

    Severe asthma in children is characterized by sustained symptoms despite treatment with high doses of ICS or oral corticosteroids. Children with severe asthma may fall into two categories, difficult-to-treat asthma or severe therapy-resistant asthma. Difficult-to-treat asthma is defined as poor control due to an incorrect diagnosis or comorbidities, poor adherence due to adverse psychological or environmental factors. In contrast, treatment-resistant is defined as difficult asthma despite management of these factors. It is increasingly recognized that severe asthma is a highly heterogeneous disorder associated with a number of clinical and inflammatory phenotypes that have been described in children with severe asthma. Guideline based drug therapy of severe childhood asthma is based primarily on extrapolated data from adult studies. The recommendation is that children with severe asthma be treated with higher-dose inhaled or oral corticosteroids combined with long-acting beta-agonists and other add on therapies such as antileukotrienes and methylxanthines. It is important to identify and address the influences that make asthma difficult to control including reviewing the diagnosis and the removal of causal or aggravating factors. Better definition of the phenotypes and better targeting of therapy based upon individual patient phenotypes is likely to improve asthma treatment in the future. PMID:25213041

  11. Farm accidents in children.

    PubMed Central

    Cameron, D.; Bishop, C.; Sibert, J. R.

    1992-01-01

    OBJECTIVE--To examine the problem of accidental injury to children on farms. DESIGN--Prospective county based study of children presenting to accident and emergency departments over 12 months with injuries sustained in a farm setting and nationwide review of fatal childhood farm accidents over the four years April 1986 to March 1990. SETTING--Accident and emergency departments in Aberystwyth, Carmarthen, Haverfordwest, and Llanelli and fatal accidents in England, Scotland, and Wales notified to the Health and Safety Executive register. SUBJECTS--Children aged under 16. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURE--Death or injury after farm related accidents. RESULTS--65 accidents were recorded, including 18 fractures. Nine accidents necessitated admission to hospital for a mean of two (range one to four) days. 13 incidents were related to tractors and other machinery; 24 were due to falls. None of these incidents were reported under the statutory notification scheme. 33 deaths were notified, eight related to tractors and allied machinery and 10 related to falling objects. CONCLUSIONS--Although safety is improving, the farm remains a dangerous environment for children. Enforcement of existing safety legislation with significant penalties and targeting of safety education will help reduce accident rates further. PMID:1638192

  12. [Pharmacovigilance in children].

    PubMed

    Autret-Leca, E; Marchand, M-S; Cissoko, H; Beau-Salinas, F; Jonville-Bra, A-P

    2012-08-01

    Drug safety in children must take into account the frequency of off label prescriptions, children's growth dynamics, and possible long-term consequences (growth, neurodevelopment). The pharmacovigilance methodology is based on spontaneous notification and pharmacoepidemiology studies usually included the in risk management plan. Despite an increased drug risk (pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic specificities), drug safety is better in children than in adults. The incidence of drug side effects depends on the country, the type of study (in or out of the hospital), and age. Antibiotics, central nervous, respiratory and dermatologic drug systems are most often involved. The target organs are gastrointestinal and neurologic. In neonates, the most frequent side effects are due to pregnancy exposure to psychotropic drugs, beta-blockers, and antiepileptics. Some studies have shown an increased risk of off-label prescriptions in children. During the last 6 years in France, pediatric alerts (desmopressin, metoclopramide, bronchial mucolytic drugs, first-generation anti-H1, Uvesterol D(), and Uvesterol A.D.E.C(), rotavirus vaccines, growth hormone, cisapride) have been less frequent than in adults. PMID:22748689

  13. When children sexually abuse other children.

    PubMed

    Worley, Karen B; Church, Janice K

    2007-02-01

    Sexual behaviors in preschool and school age children range from developmentally expected behaviors to those that may be classified as abusive to other children. This article discusses Arkansas statistics on the incidence of children with problematic sexual behaviors, proposed typologies for these behaviors, and the relationship of sexual acting out to sexual victimization. We also address assessment and treatment referral options for the child with sexual behavior problems as well as physician responsibilities for reporting to the Child Abuse Hotline and managing suspected sexual abuse victimization. PMID:17436833

  14. Sexual abuse in children - what to know

    MedlinePlus

    Sexual abuse - children ... abused before they turn 18. Sexual abuse of children is any activity that the abuser does to get sexually aroused, including: Touching a child's genitals Rubbing the abuser's genitals against a child's ...

  15. The Social Cognitions of Socially Withdrawn Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wichmann, Cherami; Coplan, Robert J.; Daniels, Tina

    2004-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the social cognitions of peer-identified socially withdrawn children. Participants included 457 children from grades four, five and six (54% females, 46% males). Children completed a selection of self- and peer-report measures including: (1) peer-rated behavioral nominations; (2) hostile intent biases and…

  16. The Social Cognitions of Socially Withdrawn Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wichmann, Cherami; Coplan, Robert J.; Daniels, Tina

    2004-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the social cognitions of peer-identified socially withdrawn children. Participants included 457 children from grades four, five and six (54% females, 46% males). Children completed a selection of self- and peer-report measures including: (1) peer-rated behavioral nominations; (2) hostile intent biases and

  17. Children with health issues.

    PubMed

    Schuster, Mark A; Chung, Paul J; Vestal, Katherine D

    2011-01-01

    All children, even the healthiest, have preventive and acute health care needs. Moreover, a growing number of children are chronically ill, with preventive, acute, and ongoing care needs that may be much more demanding than those for healthy children. Because children are unable to care for themselves, their parents are expected to provide a range of health care services without which the current health care system for children would not function. Under this "shadow health care system," parents or parent surrogates often need to be with the child, a requirement that can create difficulties for working parents, particularly for those whose children are chronically ill. How federal, state, and employer policies and practices mesh with the child health care needs of families is therefore a central issue in any discussion about work and family balance. In this article Mark Schuster, Paul Chung, and Katherine Vestal describe the health care needs of children; the essential health care responsibilities of parents; the perspective of employers; and the existing network of federal, state, and local family leave benefits that employed parents can access. They also identify current gaps in policies that leave unmet the needs of both parents and their employers. The authors suggest the outlines of a national family leave policy that would protect the interests of parents and employers. In essence, such a policy would build on the federal Family and Medical Leave Act, which gives some workers time off with no advance notice required and no loss of job or health insurance. But it would also include elements of California's Paid Family Leave Insurance, which expands coverage to more workers and provides partial pay during leave. Employers could be given some financial protections as well as protections against employee fraud and abuse. Such a policy, the authors conclude, would help to provide security to parents, minimize effects on employers, raise societal expectations for family-friendly work environments, and help maintain the parental shadow system of care on which health care professionals depend. PMID:22013630

  18. [Kidney transplantation in children].

    PubMed

    Coppo, R; Amore, A; Peruzzi, L; Conti, G; Roasio, L; Amoroso, A

    2005-01-01

    Indications, procedures, complications, pharmacokinetics and outcomes of renal transplantation are different in children and in adults. Subjects <18 yrs old, are often included in a unique list as in Italy, benefiting from donors <15 yrs old, and the waiting time is reduced to <12 months in 71% of cases. The risk of thrombosis limits the use of donors <2 yrs and trans-plantation in infants <1 yr. The age at kidney transplantation is <5 yrs in 20-30% of children. In Italy living-related trans-plantation (LRT) is performed in 7% of cases, while in the USA it is more common (57%) and is often pre-emptive before entering dialysis (24%). Current therapy tends to reduce steroid treatment doses and, optimizing induction therapy with IL-2R inhibitors, using tacrolimus or mycophenolate or sirolimus. Transplanted patient survival is better in children than in adults (94-98% at 5 yrs). Infections, cardiovascular diseases and neoplasia induce 34, 15 and 12% of deaths, respectively, at 10 yrs; morbidity for infections and lymphoproliferative disease is increasing. Acute rejections declined from 70% in 1987 to 31% in 2002 in cadaveric transplantation (CT) and renal survival at 3 yrs increased from 50% in 1985 to 82% for CT and up to 92% in LRT. In adolescents (11-17 yrs old) renal survival is lower than in infants and in adults <65 yrs old. Renal losses are due to chronic transplant nephropathy (32%), vascular thrombosis (13%) and the recurrence of the original nephropathy (focal glomerulosclerosis up to 50%, membrano-proliferative glomerulonephritis up to 30%, and primary hyperoxaluria up to 90% if combined kidney-liver transplantation is not performed). Growth improves after transplantation particularly in children <5 yrs, while it is not completely satisfactory in adolescents. Overall, results indicate that kidney transplantation in children has very much improved and will offer in the near future even more favorable outcomes. PMID:16267794

  19. Children's Graphical Representations and Emergent Writing: Evidence from Children's Drawings

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wu, Li-Yuan

    2009-01-01

    Previous research on children's drawing and writing focused on children's drawing and symbolization with syllabic languages, providing little information regarding young children's symbolization in drawing with a logo language. This study investigated children's emergent writing by examining qualitatively how children's writing takes place as…

  20. Kids Speaking Up for Kids: Advocacy by Children, for Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zygmunt-Fillwalk, Eva; Staley, Lynn; Kumar, Rashmi; Lin, Cecilia Lingfen; Moore, Catherine; Salakaya, Manana; Szecsi, Tunde

    2007-01-01

    This article describes a project called "Kids Speaking Up for Kids: Advocacy by Children, for Children". The project was simple in scope. The authors sought to collect stories of child advocacy--ways in which children were working on behalf of other children. They also sought to collect and profile children's voices and vision and so they issued a…

  1. Rehabilitation of children with cataracts.

    PubMed Central

    Hiatt, R L

    1998-01-01

    Over a period of 10 years, 160 children with cataracts underwent operation at the University of Tennessee Medical Center, Memphis. The surgical, optical, and psychosocial rehabilitation of these patients was analyzed and studied. The optical rehabilitation included patients with glasses, intraocular lens implants, epikeratophakia, and contact lenses. Seventy three of these patients were chosen at random and reevaluated as to visual outcome, and 46 were subjected to a psychosocial test to evaluate their quality of life and their rehabilitation. Eighteen of these were also given a psychosocial test to evaluate the quality of life enjoyed by these children at an older age following treatment for the cataract. Surgical, optical, and psychosocial rehabilitation of such children is also discussed. This is the first report of the psychological evaluation of such children. The further needs of these children as they approach adulthood are discussed in detail. PMID:10360302

  2. CHILDREN'S BOOKS.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    WAXMAN, SINAI M.

    BOOKS INCLUDING NEGRO CHARACTERS ARE LISTED. THE MATERIAL COMMITTEE OF THE GREENBURGH SCHOOL DISTRICT CONTINUES TO SEARCH FOR BOOKS OF THIS TYPE. A LIST OF PROFESSIONAL BOOKS RELATED TO THE NEGRO PEOPLE IN THE UNITED STATES IS ALSO INCLUDED.

  3. Bullying Involvement of Korean Children in Germany and in Korea

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bae, Hwa-ok

    2016-01-01

    This study compared bullying involvement of Korean or Korean-German children living in Germany with children in Korea, and examined children's perceptions of school environment associated with bullying involvement of the children. This study included 105 Korean or Korean-German children living in the Bayern State of Germany as the study sample and…

  4. Children's Voices: Reactions to a Criminal Justice Issue Picture Book

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oslick, Mary Ellen

    2013-01-01

    This article examines the issue of children with incarcerated parents within the broader topic of criminal justice in multicultural children's literature. The sheer magnitude of culture of children with incarcerated parents makes it necessary for their stories to be included in children's literature. Children with an incarcerated parent need to…

  5. Bullying Involvement of Korean Children in Germany and in Korea

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bae, Hwa-ok

    2016-01-01

    This study compared bullying involvement of Korean or Korean-German children living in Germany with children in Korea, and examined children's perceptions of school environment associated with bullying involvement of the children. This study included 105 Korean or Korean-German children living in the Bayern State of Germany as the study sample and

  6. Key Facts about Children in Utah. Children and Families at Risk: A Status Report of Our Children, 1994.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Utah Children, Salt Lake City.

    The Utah KIDS COUNT program provides information about child well-being to enhance discussions on securing better futures for children. Indicators of children's quality of life are chosen to reflect a range of influences on children, conditions across developmental stages, and comparisons across time. Ten indicators examined included: (1) low…

  7. Preparing "Normal" Children for Mainstreaming.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Melton, Gary B.

    1980-01-01

    Approaches to helping nondisabled elementary students examine their feelings in preparation for mainstreaming handicapped children are described, including simulations, activities to provide familiarity with braces and prostheses, use of handicapped adults as guest speakers, and discussions about handicaps. (CL)

  8. Clinical trials in children

    PubMed Central

    Joseph, Pathma D; Craig, Jonathan C; Caldwell, Patrina HY

    2015-01-01

    Safety and efficacy data on many medicines used in children are surprisingly scarce. As a result children are sometimes given ineffective medicines or medicines with unknown harmful side effects. Better and more relevant clinical trials in children are needed to increase our knowledge of the effects of medicines and to prevent the delayed or non-use of beneficial therapies. Clinical trials provide reliable evidence of treatment effects by rigorous controlled testing of interventions on human subjects. Paediatric trials are more challenging to conduct than trials in adults because of the paucity of funding, uniqueness of children and particular ethical concerns. Although current regulations and initiatives are improving the scope, quantity and quality of trials in children, there are still deficiencies that need to be addressed to accelerate radically equitable access to evidence-based therapies in children. PMID:24325152

  9. Children's understanding of reputations.

    PubMed

    Hill, Valerie; Pillow, Bradford H

    2006-06-01

    In the present study, the authors investigated age differences in children's understanding (a) that a person's behavior may contribute to the formation of a shared opinion within the peer group and (b) that origins of a reputation can be direct or indirect. The authors read stories in which a target character engaged in either prosocial or antisocial interactions with peers to children in kindergarten, 2nd, and 4th grade. They then asked the children to judge how various peers viewed the target character. Children's explanations indicated that children in all of those age groups understood that firsthand experience influenced peers' opinions, and by 2nd grade, children understood that indirect experience or gossip also might have contributed to an individual's reputation. PMID:16910207

  10. Safeguarding vulnerable children.

    PubMed

    McDougall, Tim

    2008-04-01

    Some of the following children and young people are particularly vulnerable and require additional safeguarding: those in local authority care ('looked after' children), those who have disabilities, those who are in custody, and those who are affected by domestic violence. Recent reviews of the nursing contribution to safeguarding vulnerable children in all four countries of the UK were intended to improve the capacity and capability of the nursing workforce to safeguard and promote the welfare of children. Extensive statutory and non-statutory guidance exists to help ensure that staff in all healthcare settings understand their role in safeguarding and have the skills and competence to protect and promote the welfare of children and young people. Despite these developments, strong strategic and inspirational clinical leadership is still required to bring about the significant cultural change required to ensure that safeguarding children becomes part of everyday nursing practice. PMID:18500135

  11. Bereavement support for children.

    PubMed

    Auman, Mary Jo

    2007-02-01

    The death of a parent is one of the most significant and stressful events children can encounter. Surviving children may experience psychiatric problems and social dysfunction during their childhood and possibly throughout their adult lives. Children surviving a sibling's death may develop behavioral problems, because no one can fill the emptiness that remains in their lives, especially if their relationship was close. It is vital to recognize the trauma experienced by children who have suffered the loss of a loved one. Adults need to know when a grieving child needs help. Literature supports the need for education and counseling for grieving children. School nurses can be instrumental in meeting these needs for school-age children by performing early, comprehensive assessments, educating school administration regarding the benefits of bereavement support, initiating appropriate referrals, and providing bereavement support. PMID:17253893

  12. Philippines: street children, children at risk.

    PubMed

    Tantoco, F G

    1993-01-01

    Almost 2 million of Manila's 2.5 million children younger than 15 years old live on or below the poverty line. 75,000 of these children live on the streets after having run away from home or being abandoned. They beg, steal, scavenge for food, and sell newspapers, cigarettes, and leis. About 20,000 of the street children prostitute themselves. It is these latter children and adolescents who are at particular risk of HIV infection. Studies in the Philippines indicate that 91% of reported HIV infections are among individuals aged 15-44, the male/female infection ratio is one to one, the transmission rate is 45%, and the most common mode of transmission is through heterosexual intercourse. The high incidence of child sexual abuse and child prostitution in the Philippines would suggest that there are a significant number of children and adolescents under age 15 who are infected with HIV. Caritas Manila has developed an information, education, and communication program for HIV/AIDS prevention focusing upon individuals who have direct influence upon and are in direct contact with people: clergy, religious and civic associations, educators, and social and health workers. Caritas has also to a limited extent reached out directly to populations at risk, while collaborating with human rights advocacy groups and networking with other children-oriented agencies in the interest of providing resources to street children. Efforts must be made to protect the rights of children and provide them with an environment conducive to their growth and development. The author notes how off-duty policemen in Manila help real estate developers forcibly eject the poor from their shelters to clear the way for the construction of new infrastructure without concern for the legal processes and requirements in the humane and peaceful relocation of the homeless poor. Many women and children are hurt and killed in the process. It has also been reported that off-duty policemen in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, are assassinating street children. PMID:12179307

  13. Social Information Processing in Elementary-School Aged Children with ADHD: Medication Effects and Comparisons with Typical Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    King, Sara; Waschbusch, Daniel A.; Pelham, William E., Jr.; Frankland, Bradley W.; Andrade, Brendan F.; Jacques, Sophie; Corkum, Penny V.

    2009-01-01

    Examined social information processing (SIP) in medicated and unmedicated children with ADHD and in controls. Participants were 75 children (56 boys, 19 girls) aged 6-12 years, including 41 children with ADHD and 34 controls. Children were randomized into medication conditions such that 20 children with ADHD participated after receiving placebo…

  14. Social Information Processing in Elementary-School Aged Children with ADHD: Medication Effects and Comparisons with Typical Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    King, Sara; Waschbusch, Daniel A.; Pelham, William E., Jr.; Frankland, Bradley W.; Andrade, Brendan F.; Jacques, Sophie; Corkum, Penny V.

    2009-01-01

    Examined social information processing (SIP) in medicated and unmedicated children with ADHD and in controls. Participants were 75 children (56 boys, 19 girls) aged 6-12 years, including 41 children with ADHD and 34 controls. Children were randomized into medication conditions such that 20 children with ADHD participated after receiving placebo

  15. Parenting the Internet: Resources for Parents and Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bushong, Sara

    2002-01-01

    Presents general statistical findings of Internet use by children, discusses the recent Children's Online Privacy Protection Act (COPPA), and summarizes online child safety considerations. Considers filtering and includes current resources for parents and children. (Author/LRW)

  16. The children of Chernobyl.

    PubMed

    Kidd, M R

    During the past twelve months much media attention has been focused on the plight of the children affected by the Chernobyl nuclear disaster in the Soviet Union. The visit to Australia by several groups of these children during 1991 has heightened community interest in the innocent victims of the world's worst nuclear accident. As medical adviser for one of these visits, I saw how some of the children of Chernobyl benefited from their holiday away from radioactivity. PMID:1745168

  17. Intussusception - children

    MedlinePlus

    ... sign of intussusception is very often sudden, loud crying caused by abdominal pain . The pain is colicky ... may draw the knees to the chest while crying. Other symptoms include: Bloody, mucus-like bowel movement, ...

  18. [Prescribing spectacles to children].

    PubMed

    Ehrt, O

    2011-04-01

    Refractive errors are the most common visual problem in children apart from squinting. Indications for spectacles include amblyopia prophylaxis and treatment, strabismus, myopia and reading disorders. Objective refraction by retinoscopy is the central part of prescribing spectacles to children. A slight under correction (maximum of 0.5 dpt in cases with and 1.0 dpt without squint) can be considered in hyperopia only. Myopia, astigmatism and anisometropia must be fully corrected. Any prescription must mention "MA=PD" and "plastic lenses" as well as "high bifocal" if needed. Information to the parents is essential for good compliance of spectacle wear. Step-by-step instructions and a list of possible errors will be given. PMID:21468658

  19. Visual Perception and Recall of School-Age Navajo, Hopi, Jicarilla Apache, and Caucasian Children of the Southwest including Results from a Pilot Study Among Eskimos and Athabascan School-Age Children of North Alaska. Monograph #5.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bland, Laurel LeMieux

    The study determined if a significant difference was demonstrated between American Indians and Caucasians on visual perception and recall tasks associated with cognitive function. It was hypothesized that a significant difference existed between scores obtained by Indian children enrolled in reservation schools and that of Caucasian children…

  20. [Acute fever in children].

    PubMed

    Gras-Le Guen, Christle; Launay, lise

    2015-05-01

    Fever in children is a very common symptom associated most of the time with a viral infection. However, in 7% of children, fever without source is the first symptom of a serious bacterial infection such as pneumonia, meningitis, pyelonephritis or bacteremia. The key point in clinical examination of these children is the early identification of toxic signs. Because SBI prevalence is higher in very young children (1-3 month-aged), they required a specific management with some systematic complementary investigations and a broad indication of probabilistic antibiotherapy treatment. PMID:26165100

  1. [Acute fever in children].

    TOXLINE Toxicology Bibliographic Information

    Gras-Le Guen C; Launay

    2015-05-01

    Fever in children is a very common symptom associated most of the time with a viral infection. However, in 7% of children, fever without source is the first symptom of a serious bacterial infection such as pneumonia, meningitis, pyelonephritis or bacteremia. The key point in clinical examination of these children is the early identification of toxic signs. Because SBI prevalence is higher in very young children (1-3 month-aged), they required a specific management with some systematic complementary investigations and a broad indication of probabilistic antibiotherapy treatment.

  2. Tornadoes, Hurricanes and Children

    MedlinePlus

    ... Cart JOIN APA About APA Topics Publications & Databases Psychology Help Center News & Events Science Education Careers Membership Home // Psychology Help Center // Tornadoes, hurricanes and children EMAIL PRINT ...

  3. Language disorder - children

    MedlinePlus

    ... These conditions are sometimes misdiagnosed as developmental disorders. Language disorders may occur in children with other developmental problems, autistic spectrum disorder, hearing loss, and learning disabilities. A ...

  4. Acute myocarditis in children.

    PubMed

    Simpson, Kathleen E; Canter, Charles E

    2011-06-01

    Myocarditis is an uncommon but significant disease in children. Diagnosis requires a high index of suspicion and understanding of the clinical presentation of this disease. The understanding of the mechanisms of disease-host immune response and host response has improved, but is not completely known. Therapy remains mainly supportive, while the use of immunotherapy in children is still controversial. The majority of children will improve; however, a substantial portion of children will die or develop persistent dilated cardiomyopathy leading to necessary heart transplantation. PMID:21714608

  5. Headaches in Children

    MedlinePlus

    ... headaches, trauma, sinus disease, and eye problems. Certain foods with nitrate preservatives and MSG (monosodium glutamate) can trigger headaches. Brain tumors in children as a cause for headaches ...

  6. Families, Managed Care, & Children's Mental Health.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McManus, Marilyn C., Ed.

    1996-01-01

    This theme issue of a bulletin on family support and children's mental health focuses on managed care and the impact on children who are in need of mental health services. Articles include: "Private Sector Managed Care and Children's Mental Health" (Ira S. Lourie and others); "Just What Is Managed Care?" (Chris Koyanagi); "Managed Behavioral…

  7. Administration for Children and Families: Head Start

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    US Department of Health and Human Services, 2010

    2010-01-01

    This paper presents an overview of the Head Start program. Under the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (Recovery Act), $1 billion will be provided to the Office of Head Start to promote the school readiness of low-income children, including children on federally-recognized reservations and children of migratory farm workers, by enhancing…

  8. A Manual for Parents of Gifted Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    New York State Education Dept., Albany. Div. of Education for the Gifted and Talented.

    The manual is intended to help parents identify early characteristics and encourage learning in their gifted children. An introduction covers myths and facts about gifted children, citing the diversity among gifted students. Characteristics of gifted children recognized by parents are listed, including keen observation and curiosity, broad and…

  9. Raising Literate Children: Tips for Parents.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Woods, Carol S.

    1998-01-01

    Presents suggestions for parents to stimulate children's language development. Suggestions include appreciating children's effort rather than correcting language, creating an environment that invites exploration, engaging in conversation frequently, playing with language and words, reading aloud daily to children, providing a variety of quality…

  10. Young Children in Poverty: A Statistical Update.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Li, Jiali; Bennett, Neil

    This report provides statistical information about young children and their families living in poverty. It includes the following data: (1) from 1987 to 1992, the number of poor children under age 6 rose from 5 to 6 million; (2) from 1972 through 1992, the poverty rates have increased dramatically for children under age 6; (3) in 1992, 55 percent…

  11. Take Our Children to Work Day

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2008-01-01

    Hundreds of children participated in the annual Take Our Children to Work Day at Stennis Space Center on July 29. During the day, children of Stennis employees received a tour of facilities and took part in various activities, including demonstrations in cryogenics and robotics.

  12. Children and Their Concepts of Death.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Faivre, Milton I.

    Included in this booklet is an account of children's concepts of death at various ages. Specifically, the discussion examines the "average" or "normal" reaction of children from birth through 2 years; 3 through 5 years; 5 through 8 years; 9 through 10 years; and at 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, and 16 years. Children's reactions to the death of a pet and…

  13. Interactivity in Prosodic Representations in Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goffman, Lisa; Westover, Stefanie

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine, using speech error and articulatory analyses, whether the binary distinction between iambs and trochees should be extended to include additional prosodic subcategories. Adults, children who are normally developing, and children with specific language impairment (SLI) participated. Children with SLI were…

  14. Echoic Response Inventory for Children (ERIC).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stern, Carolyn

    The Echoic Response Inventory for Children (ERIC) is part of a test battery which includes the Expressive Vocabulary Inventory (EVI) and the Children's Auditory Discrimination Inventory (CADI), designed to assess language skills of disadvantaged children. These tests also seek to provide data that can help determine what changes in language…

  15. Mental Models of School for Preschool Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kildan, A. Oguzhan; Kurnaz, Mehmet Altan; Ahi, Berat

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine mental models of 334 pre-school children concerning school. Children in the city center of Kastamonu in the Western Black Sea region of Turkey were included. Content analysis was conducted on pictures drawn by the children, and the models were split into two groups, scientific and nonscientific. The…

  16. Issues in Children's Mental Health. Special Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nimmo, Margaret L.

    This Kids Count report examines issues related to children's mental health in Virginia. The report discusses the effects of children's mental illness, presents risk and protective factors, and describes the incidence of children's mental health problems. Information specific to Virginia is presented, including the prevalence of youth suicide,…

  17. The Paradox of Children and Life Satisfaction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Becchetti, Leonardo; Ricca, Elena Giachin; Pelloni, Alessandra

    2013-01-01

    Empirical analyses of the determinants of life satisfaction routinely include the number of children as one of the socio demographic controls, without explicitly considering that, for a given household income, more children imply a lower level of income per family member. The variable "number of children" then often attracts a negative or…

  18. Obstructive sleep apnea in children.

    PubMed

    Chan, James; Edman, Jennifer C; Koltai, Peter J

    2004-03-01

    Obstructive sleep-disordered breathing is common in children. From 3 percent to 12 percent of children snore, while obstructive sleep apnea syndrome affects 1 percent to 10 percent of children. The majority of these children have mild symptoms, and many outgrow the condition. Consequences of untreated obstructive sleep apnea include failure to thrive, enuresis, attention-deficit disorder, behavior problems, poor academic performance, and cardiopulmonary disease. The most common etiology of obstructive sleep apnea is adenotonsillar hypertrophy. Clinical diagnosis of obstructive sleep apnea is reliable; however, the gold standard evaluation is overnight polysomnography. Treatment includes the use of continuous positive airway pressure and weight loss in obese children. These alternatives are tolerated poorly in children and rarely are considered primary therapy. Adenotonsillectomy is curative in most patients. Children with craniofacial syndromes, neuromuscular diseases, medical comorbidities, or severe obstructive sleep apnea, and those younger than three years are at increased risk of developing postoperative complications and should be monitored overnight in the hospital. PMID:15023015

  19. Children's media policy.

    PubMed

    Jordan, Amy B

    2008-01-01

    Amy Jordan addresses the need to balance the media industry's potentially important contributions to the healthy development of America's children against the consequences of excessive and age-inappropriate media exposure. Much of the philosophical tension regarding how much say the government should have about media content and delivery stems from the U.S. Constitution's First Amendment protection against government interference in free speech, including commercial speech. Courts, Jordan says, have repeatedly had to weigh the rights of commercial entities to say what they please against the need to protect vulnerable citizens such as children. This balancing act is complicated even further, she says, because many government regulations apply only to broadcast television and not to non-broadcast media such as the Internet or cable television, though Congress has addressed the need to protect children's privacy online. The need to protect both free speech and children has given rise to a fluid media policy mix of federal mandates and industry self-regulation. Jordan describes the role of the three branches of the federal government in formulating and implementing media policy. She also notes the jockeying for influence in policymaking by industry lobbies, child advocacy groups, and academic researchers. The media industry itself, says Jordan, is spurred to self-regulation when public disapproval grows severe enough to raise the possibility of new government action. Jordan surveys a range of government and industry actions, from legislatively required parental monitoring tools, such as the V-Chip blocking device on television sets, to the voluntary industry ratings systems governing television, movies, and video games, to voluntary social website disclosures to outright government bans, such as indecency and child privacy information collection. She considers the success of these efforts in limiting children's exposure to damaging content and in improving parents' ability to supervise their children's media use. Jordan concludes by considering the relevance and efficacy of today's media policy given the increasingly rapid pace of technological change. The need for research in informing and evaluating media policy, she says, has never been greater. PMID:21338012

  20. Phase 1 trial and pharmacokinetic study of the oral platinum analog satraplatin in children and young adults with refractory solid tumors including brain tumors

    PubMed Central

    Akshintala, Srivandana; Marcus, Leigh; Warren, Katherine E.; Murphy, Robert F.; Sissung, Tristan M.; Srivastava, Anjali; Goodspeed, Wendy J.; Goodwin, Anne; Brewer, Carmen C.; Zalewski, Christopher; King, Kelly A.; Kim, AeRang; Figg, William D.; Widemann, Brigitte C.

    2014-01-01

    Background Based on pre-clinical and clinical activity in adult refractory tumors, and absence of significant neuro-, nephro-, or oto-toxicity, we conducted a pediatric phase 1 trial to determine the toxicities, maximum tolerated dose (MTD), and pharmacokinetics of satraplatin, an oral platinum analogue, in children and young adults with refractory solid tumors. Procedure Satraplatin was administered orally once daily on days 1–5 of a 28-day cycle at dose level (DL) 1 (60 mg/m2/dose), and DL2 (80 mg/m2/dose). Toxicities, responses, satraplatin pharmacokinetics, and pharmacogenomic expression of specific DNA repair genes were evaluated. Results Nine patients received 1–15 cycles (median=2). The MTD was exceeded at DL2 with delayed prolonged myelosuppression as dose-limiting toxicity (DLT) in 2/4 patients. At DL1, 0/5 patients had DLTs. Common non-DLTs included myelosuppression, gastrointestinal toxicities, fatigue, headache, liver enzyme elevation, and electrolyte abnormalities. No significant neuro-, nephro-, or oto-toxicity was observed. No objective responses were observed but 2 patients experienced prolonged disease stabilization (6–15 cycles). Satraplatin exposure (day 1 plasma ultrafiltrate area under the curve) was similar at DL1 and DL2. A strong correlation between estimated creatinine clearance and satraplatin pharmacokinetic parameters (clearance, area under the curve, and peak concentration) was observed. Conclusions The MTD of oral satraplatin in children with solid tumors was 60 mg/m2/dose daily × 5 days every 28 days, which is lower than the adult recommended dose of 80–120 mg/m2/dose. The toxicity profile was similar to adults and delayed myelosuppression was the DLT. No significant neuro-, nephro- or oto-toxicity was observed. PMID:25556988

  1. Understanding Traumatic Stress in Children

    MedlinePlus

    ... here Home 22 Apr 2013 Report Understanding Traumatic Stress in Children Supporting Children and Families After Traumatic ... affiliate of AIR, developed a resource, Understanding Traumatic Stress in Children , to help. This guide describes the ...

  2. Examining Children's Models of Seed.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jewell, Natalie

    2002-01-01

    Reports research that examines children's models of seed. Explores the conceptions held by children (N=75) of germination and seed formation. Concludes that children hold a restricted meaning for the term 'seed'. (DDR)

  3. Children's Story Drawings: Reinventing Worlds.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilson, Brent; Wilson, Marjorie

    1979-01-01

    The authors describe how children draw stories, not pictures. They suggest that by encouraging children to draw, and to bring to school drawings that have been done at home, art teachers can help children to create fantastic worlds. (KC)

  4. Television and children's executive function.

    PubMed

    Lillard, Angeline S; Li, Hui; Boguszewski, Katie

    2015-01-01

    Children spend a lot of time watching television on its many platforms: directly, online, and via videos and DVDs. Many researchers are concerned that some types of television content appear to negatively influence children's executive function. Because (1) executive function predicts key developmental outcomes, (2) executive function appears to be influenced by some television content, and (3) American children watch large quantities of television (including the content of concern), the issues discussed here comprise a crucial public health issue. Further research is needed to reveal exactly what television content is implicated, what underlies television's effect on executive function, how long the effect lasts, and who is affected. PMID:25735946

  5. Psychiatric Morbidity Among Street Children in Duhok

    PubMed Central

    Taib, Nezar Ismet; Ahmad, Abdulbaghi

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND Due, in part, to family constraints in dealing with the economical burden of raising a family, a wave of street children is sweeping the developing world. Such children are prone to both somatic and mental illnesses. This is the first ever study that has been conducted to explore the psychopathology among street children in the Duhok Governorate. METHODS The study was conducted between March 2004 and May 2005 in Duhok City among street children who attended the Zewa Center—the only center for street children in the region at the time of the study. Among a total of 107 eligible children, 100 agreed to participate (93% response rate). A modified family map (genogram) was used to obtain demographic data from the children and their caregivers through semi-structured interviews. In addition, the Mini International Neuropsychiatric Interview for Children and Adolescents (MINI-KID) structured interviews were conducted with the children. RESULTS The study found that 98% of children worked on the street because of the economic need and pressure on their families. There was high rate of parental illiteracy (90% of fathers and 95% of mothers), and 61% of respondents were shown to have at least one psychiatric disorder. A high percentage (57%) of these children suffered from anxiety disorders including posttraumatic stress disorders (29%). Ten percent had depression, and 5% had attention deficit hyperactivity disorder. CONCLUSION Street children in Duhok seem to be working children due to their families’ needs. PMID:24653656

  6. Azithromycin anaphylaxis in children.

    PubMed

    Mori, F; Pecorari, L; Pantano, S; Rossi, M E; Pucci, N; De Martino, M; Novembre, E

    2014-01-01

    Allergic reactions associated to the use of macrolides are uncommon; in particular only two cases of anaphylaxis with erithromycin and clarithromycin have been reported to date. The aim of this study was to investigate macrolide-induced anaphylaxis. Between December 2007 and December 2011, 136 consecutive children were referred to the Allergy Unit of A. Meyer Children's Hospital because of a past history of reactions to macrolides. Allergy work-ups were carried out according to the European Network for Drug Allergy protocol. Anaphylaxis was diagnosed according to the clinical criteria proposed by Sampson et al. and graded according to Brown SGA et al. Sixty-six out of 136 patients completed the allergologic work-up and among them we investigated three cases of anaphylaxis due to azithromycin which included one child with anaphylaxis to both clarithromycin and azithromycin. In two of the children with anaphylaxis, the diagnosis was only confirmed with the skin prick test, the third was positive to the Intradermal Test. The azithromycin allergy shows a surprisingly high sensitivity to the in-vivo tests. Moreover, this study shows that cross-reactivity may occur between different macrolidic molecules; it has even been suggested that macrolide allergies are unlikely to be class allergies. PMID:24674687

  7. Cough in children.

    PubMed

    Lamas, Adelaida; Ruiz de Valbuena, Marta; Máiz, Luis

    2014-07-01

    Cough during childhood is very common, and is one of the most frequent reasons for consultation in daily pediatric practice. The causes differ from those in adults, and specific pediatric guidelines should be followed for correct diagnosis and treatment. The most common cause of cough in children is viral infection producing "normal cough", but all children with persistent cough, i.e. a cough lasting more than 4-8weeks or "chronic cough", must be carefully evaluated in other to rule out specific causes that may include the entire pediatric pulmonology spectrum. The treatment of cough should be based on the etiology. Around 80% of cases can be diagnosed using an optimal approach, and treatment will be effective in 90% of them. In some cases of "nonspecific chronic cough", in which no underlying condition can be found, empirical treatment based on the cough characteristics may be useful. There is no scientific evidence to justify the use of over-the-counter cough remedies (anti-tussives, mucolytics and/or antihistamines), as they could have potentially serious side effects, and thus should not be prescribed in children. PMID:24507905

  8. Dental Health Evaluation of Children in Kosovo

    PubMed Central

    Begzati, Agim; Meqa, Kastriot; Siegenthaler, David; Berisha, Merita; Mautsch, Walter

    2011-01-01

    Objectives: The aim of this study was to assess caries prevalence of preschool and school children in Kosovo. Methods: The assessment, which was carried out between 2002 and 2005, included measurements of early childhood caries, deft and DMFT. Results: In total, 1,237 preschool and 2,556 school children were examined. The mean deft of preschool children was 5.9, and the mean DMFT of school children aged 12 was 5.8. The caries prevalence for 2- to 6-year-old preschool children was 91.2%, and the prevalence for 7- to 14-year-old school children was 94.4%. The prevalence of early childhood caries was 17.6%, with a mean deft of 10.6. Conclusions: All data assessed showed the very poor oral health status of children in Kosovo. Interviews with children and teachers indicated poor knowledge regarding oral health. Significant measures must be taken to improve this situation. PMID:21228954

  9. Acute hepatic failure among hospitalized Thai children.

    PubMed

    Poovorawan, Yong; Chongsrisawat, Voranush; Shafi, Fakrudeen; Boudville, Irving; Liu, Yanfang; Hutagalung, Yanee; Bock, Hans L

    2013-01-01

    We conducted a hospital-based study from June 2002 to December 2006 of Thai children aged 1-15 years with acute hepatic failure (AHF) to determine the causes and outcomes. Eleven children were included in the study. Hepatitis B virus was the cause of AHF in one child, infection-associated hemophagocytic syndrome was the cause in 1 child, Wilson's disease was the cause in 1 child and dengue fever was suspected to be the cause in 2 children. In 6 children the cause of AHF was unknown. Jaundice was reported in 9 of 11 children. Ten of 11 children had mild to moderate encephalopathy on admission. Five of 11 children died due to AHF. No liver transplantations were performed among the children in this study. Further studies into the relationship between dengue infection and AHF are needed. PMID:23682437

  10. The Effectiveness of Combining Tangible Symbols with the Picture Exchange Communication System to Teach Requesting Skills to Children with Multiple Disabilities Including Visual Impairment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ali, Emad

    2009-01-01

    The Picture Exchange Communication System (PECS) is an augmentative and alternative communication program (Frost & Bondy, 2002). Although PECS has been effectively used to teach functional requesting skills for children with autism, mental retardation, visual impairment, and physical disabilities (e.g., Anderson, Moore, & Bourne, 2007; Chambers &…

  11. National TEEM Outreach: Successfully Including Young Children in Kindergarten and Subsequent General Education Classrooms. Final Report, October 1, 1998-Septemper 30, 2001.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vermont Univ., Burlington. Center on Disability and Community Inclusion.

    This final report describes activities and accomplishments of National TEEM Outreach, a 3-year project designed to support the inclusion of young children with disabilities in kindergarten and subsequent general education classrooms in 12 school districts located in 5 states. The project focused on disseminating and replicating the previously…

  12. Children's Literature Reviews Online.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Entler, Deron; White, Maureen

    1999-01-01

    Presents "favorite" children's literature review sites selected according to criteria of authority, quality of reviews, Web design, usefulness, and navigatability. Describes the sites in terms of the criteria as well as special features and suggested search strategies. Sites are categorized as: Children's Literature Journals Online; Multiple…

  13. Children's Responses to Differences

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ramsey, Patricia G.

    2008-01-01

    Early childhood multicultural education presents teachers with the challenge of how to engage young children in exploring issues of diversity and inequality in meaningful, authentic, and hopeful ways. To support these efforts, this review summarizes past and current research on children's understandings and feelings related to race, social class,…

  14. Children of Alcoholics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Prevention Forum, 1990

    1990-01-01

    The theme of this issue of a journal designed to focus on the prevention of various kinds of substance abuse is "children of alcoholics" (CoAs). The lead article, "Children of Chemical Dependency: Respecting Complexities and Building on Strengths," by Pamela Woll, examines chemically dependent family systems. The article begins by offering two…

  15. Reframing Children's Spaces

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Duncan, Sandra

    2011-01-01

    Like professional photographers, early childhood teachers can reframe their perspectives to create innovative and inspiring spaces for young children by concentrating on reframing two design elements: color and texture. When thinking about designing spaces for young children, one of the first considerations is the equipment and its arrangement.…

  16. Foster Children with Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Waldman, H. Barry; Perlman, Steven P.; Lederman, Cindy S.

    2007-01-01

    Children and youth in foster care are a vulnerable population. They are at risk for abuse, neglect, and permanent separation from birth parents and have a greater incidence of emotional and behavioral difficulties. This is not surprising because these children are abused, neglected, or abandoned by the very people who are supposed to love and care

  17. Responding to Children's Drawings

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Watts, Robert

    2010-01-01

    This article aims to explore the issues that face primary school teachers when responding to children's drawings. Assessment in art and design is an ongoing concern for teachers with limited experience and confidence in the area and, although children's drawings continue to be a focus of much research, the question of what it is that teachers say…

  18. Children, Pesticides and Cancer.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    White, Alison

    1998-01-01

    Young children receive higher doses of pesticides than any other age group. The younger a child is the more difficulty the body will have in coping with toxins in general. Maximum Residue Limits (MRL) do not adequately protect children. Evidence of harm from a pesticide often has to be overwhelmingly strong before anything is done about it.…

  19. Promoting Resilience in Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rolfe, Sharne A.

    2002-01-01

    This booklet invites reflection on ways in which childhood resilience can be promoted, thereby helping children to adapt effectively in the face of adversity. The attributes of resilient children are described, as is the importance of protective factors in building or promoting resilience. The booklet discusses the complex interplay between risk…

  20. Researching Australian Children's Literature

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Saxby, Maurice

    2004-01-01

    When in 1962 the author began to research the history of Australian children's literature, access to the primary sources was limited and difficult. From a catalogue drawer in the Mitchell Library of hand-written cards marked "Children's books" he could call up from the stacks, in alphabetical order, piles of early publications. His notes about the

  1. Japanese Children's Books.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    New York Public Library, NY.

    This annotated list of picture books and stories for young children is a catalogue of Japanese children's books exhibited at the New York Public Library in 1972. Part I consists of fifty distinguished books selected from those published before 1969. Part II is a selection of more recent titles and is less selective than Part I. The title of each

  2. Culture and Children's Cosmology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Siegal, Michael; Butterworth, George; Newcombe, Peter A.

    2004-01-01

    In this investigation, we examined children's knowledge of cosmology in relation to the shape of the earth and the day-night cycle. Using explicit questioning involving a choice of alternative answers and 3D models, we carried out a comparison of children aged 4-9 years living in Australia and England. Though Australia and England have a close

  3. The Children's Advertising Battle.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    MacKie, Alexander

    A number of relevant issues surround the arguments of both opponents and proponents of the Federal Trade Commission's proposals to ban or control certain advertising during children's television programs. Groups against regulatory action point out that parents, not children, are the consumers and have a right to free choice in their purchases.

  4. Literature and Young Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cullinan, Bernice E., Ed.; Carmichael, Carolyn W., Ed.

    This collection of articles about children's literature contains the following articles: "Books in the Life of the Young Child" and "Traditional Literature: Children's Legacy" by Bernice E. Cullinan, "Encouraging Language Growth" by John Warren Stewig, "Promoting Language and Concept Development" by Dorothy S. Strickland, "Fostering Understanding

  5. Seeing Children's Ideas

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Curtis, Deb

    2012-01-01

    A group of toddlers was offered long, colorful, translucent tubes to enjoy and explore. As always, they amazed adults with the many ideas they used to investigate and learn with them. The tubes are long and the children marveled at how they could easily lift these objects up taller than their bodies. At the center of the children's explorations

  6. World of Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McHale, Magda Cordell; And Others

    1979-01-01

    This bulletin takes a broad view of children in history, their current problems and needs throughout the world, and directions to be taken for fulfilling those needs. The world population of children under age 15 is projected to increase by 500 million to 1.9 billion in the year 2000. Despite the bonds created by global communications, large

  7. Children's Books about Religion.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dole, Patricia Pearl

    Created to promote a mutual understanding and acceptance among various faiths and cultures throughout the world, this book is an annotated bibliography of religious children's books. It has almost 700 critical evaluations of books with distinct religious themes for children from preschool to middle school. Chapters are: (1) "Religion"; (2) "God";…

  8. Colorado Children's Budget 2010

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Colorado Children's Campaign, 2010

    2010-01-01

    The "Children's Budget 2010" is intended to be a resource guide for policymakers and advocates who are interested in better understanding how Colorado funds children's programs and services. It attempts to clarify often confusing budget information and describe where the state's investment trends are and where those trends will lead the state if…

  9. Children's Participation in Research

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brostrom, Stig

    2012-01-01

    In (post) modern society children are seen as active subjects and participants who have a legitimate basis in the United Nations Convention of the Rights of the Child. As a consequence of this, children are able to play an active role in the planning of/and participation in both education and research in their own preschool settings. This article…

  10. Seeing Children's Ideas

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Curtis, Deb

    2012-01-01

    A group of toddlers was offered long, colorful, translucent tubes to enjoy and explore. As always, they amazed adults with the many ideas they used to investigate and learn with them. The tubes are long and the children marveled at how they could easily lift these objects up taller than their bodies. At the center of the children's explorations…

  11. Child Development: Preschool Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chiam, Heng Keng, Ed.

    This book reports some of the results of an extensive study of the physical, cognitive, language, social, and emotional development of Malaysian children. Chapter 1 of the book describes the demographics of the sample. Subjects were 3,099 preschool children in the state of Selangor and the federal district of Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia. Data is

  12. Children after Perestroika.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brendtro, Larry; Van Bockern, Steve

    1993-01-01

    Discusses problems facing children and adolescents in the former Soviet Union. Describes efforts of Bureau for Youth Welfare which has networked with various organizations to create projects in all the Russian Republics. Briefly describes international conference on Modern Society and the Psychosocial Problems of Children held in Moscow in May…

  13. Bipolar Disorder in Children

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Although bipolar disorder historically was thought to only occur rarely in children and adolescents, there has been a significant increase in children and adolescents who are receiving this diagnosis more recently (Carlson, 2005). Nonetheless, the applicability of the current bipolar disorder diagnostic criteria for children, particularly preschool children, remains unclear, even though much work has been focused on this area. As a result, more work needs to be done to further the understanding of bipolar symptoms in children. It is hoped that this paper can assist psychologists and other health service providers in gleaning a snapshot of the literature in this area so that they can gain an understanding of the diagnostic criteria and other behaviors that may be relevant and be informed about potential approaches for assessment and treatment with children who meet bipolar disorder criteria. First, the history of bipolar symptoms and current diagnostic criteria will be discussed. Next, assessment strategies that may prove helpful for identifying bipolar disorder will be discussed. Then, treatments that may have relevance to children and their families will be discussed. Finally, conclusions regarding work with children who may have a bipolar disorder diagnosis will be offered. PMID:24800202

  14. Reframing Children's Spaces

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Duncan, Sandra

    2011-01-01

    Like professional photographers, early childhood teachers can reframe their perspectives to create innovative and inspiring spaces for young children by concentrating on reframing two design elements: color and texture. When thinking about designing spaces for young children, one of the first considerations is the equipment and its arrangement.

  15. Children and Books.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sampson, Delores

    1983-01-01

    Activities and teaching methods for involving children (especially young children) in literature are presented in order to establish positive attitudes towards reading. Ideas are provided for use with wordless books, patterned or repetitive books, books organized around a theme, and picture books. The activities, each related to specific…

  16. In Defense of Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Verma, Suman

    1995-01-01

    Examines possible solutions for improving the status of children in India. Suggests that there is a need to focus on child rights issues related to public awareness, attitudinal change, political commitment, mass sensitization, and outreach. Suggests an appropriate strategy for the restoration of the rights of children in India. (AA)

  17. Our Children at Risk.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Organisation for Economic Cooperation and Development, Paris (France). Centre for Educational Research and Innovation.

    This report is concerned with at risk children and youth. Synthesizing data based on country reports and case studies from 17 countries and 3 foundations, the report covers issues relating to the preschool, school age, and transition to work periods. At risk children and youth have become key issues not only from claims of social justice, but also…

  18. Problems of Indian Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Linton, Marigold

    Previous approaches to the learning problems of American Indian children are viewed as inadequate. An alternative is suggested which emphasizes the problem solution strategies which these children bring to the school situation. Solutions were analyzed in terms of: (1) their probability; (2) their efficiency at permitting a present problem to be…

  19. The Kindness of Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Paley, Vivian Gussin

    This narrative details the responses of children and adults to a story about young children welcoming a boy with severe disabilities into their own story telling and re-enactment. Linking the act of story telling to the practice of the Hasidim, who would teach people to think about goodness by telling stories about holy men performing good works,…

  20. Educating Migrant Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mattera, Gloria; And Others

    To help provide the best kind of learning environment for migrant children is the intent of this handbook. Historical, economical, and environmental information that is essential to understanding and working effectively with these children is presented. Suggestions for initiating, conducting, and evaluating a summer program are offered, as well as…

  1. Monitoring asthma in children.

    PubMed

    Pijnenburg, Mariëlle W; Baraldi, Eugenio; Brand, Paul L P; Carlsen, Kai-Håkon; Eber, Ernst; Frischer, Thomas; Hedlin, Gunilla; Kulkarni, Neeta; Lex, Christiane; Mäkelä, Mika J; Mantzouranis, Eva; Moeller, Alexander; Pavord, Ian; Piacentini, Giorgio; Price, David; Rottier, Bart L; Saglani, Sejal; Sly, Peter D; Szefler, Stanley J; Tonia, Thomy; Turner, Steve; Wooler, Edwina; Lødrup Carlsen, Karin C

    2015-04-01

    The goal of asthma treatment is to obtain clinical control and reduce future risks to the patient. To reach this goal in children with asthma, ongoing monitoring is essential. While all components of asthma, such as symptoms, lung function, bronchial hyperresponsiveness and inflammation, may exist in various combinations in different individuals, to date there is limited evidence on how to integrate these for optimal monitoring of children with asthma. The aims of this ERS Task Force were to describe the current practise and give an overview of the best available evidence on how to monitor children with asthma. 22 clinical and research experts reviewed the literature. A modified Delphi method and four Task Force meetings were used to reach a consensus. This statement summarises the literature on monitoring children with asthma. Available tools for monitoring children with asthma, such as clinical tools, lung function, bronchial responsiveness and inflammatory markers, are described as are the ways in which they may be used in children with asthma. Management-related issues, comorbidities and environmental factors are summarised. Despite considerable interest in monitoring asthma in children, for many aspects of monitoring asthma in children there is a substantial lack of evidence. PMID:25745042

  2. Champions of Children. Administrators . . .

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chaffee, John; Olds, H. Robert

    Today, in an era of taxpayer revolts, lack of clarity in values, and changing family structure, children need advocates in the political arena as well as in the schools. This pamphlet suggests that administrators are in an excellent position to defend the rights of children on all fronts. It focuses on what administrators have done and specific…

  3. Urinary Incontinence in Children

    MedlinePlus

    ... can appear as a constant dribbling of urine. Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder Children with ADHD are three times more likely ... KR. Prevalence of enuresis and its association with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder among U.S. children: results from a nationally representative ...

  4. Children's Advertising Guidelines.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Council of Better Business Bureaus, Inc., New York, NY.

    These guidelines have been developed for the use of advertisers and advertising agencies and for the self-regulatory mechanism which these groups have established, the National Advertising Division, to help ensure that advertising directed to children is truthful, accurate, and fair to children's perceptions. Preliminary sections set forth basic…

  5. Encouraging Friendships among Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lawhon, Tommie

    1997-01-01

    Discusses the role of friendships in children's development. Examines the meaning of the term friendship; the roots of friendship development; the role of parents, teachers, and siblings; and concerns about children's choices. Suggests that positive attitudes, when established early in life, can affect physical and mental health and the quality of…

  6. Educating Children with Autism.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Academy of Sciences - National Research Council, Washington, DC.

    The National Research Council formed a Committee on Educational Interventions for Children with Autism and charged the committee with integrating the scientific, theoretical, and policy literature and creating a framework for evaluating the scientific evidence concerning the effects and features of educational interventions for young children with

  7. Investigating Children's Mathematics Readiness

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lee, Joohi; Autry, Mary Murray; Fox, Jill; Williams, Cynthia

    2008-01-01

    A sample of 244 children (average age: 61 months) and their parents from the Dallas and Fort Worth (DFW) metroplex area in Texas were surveyed to investigate children's mathematics readiness. This study was conducted as part of a project funded by a local child care council, composed of business, civic, and education leaders in the community. The…

  8. Children and Home Fires

    MedlinePlus

    CHILDREN AND HOME FIRES Fast Facts Children under the age of five are twice as likely to die in a home fire than the rest of the population, and child-playing fires are the leading cause of fire deaths among ...

  9. Immigrants' Children at School.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Organisation for Economic Cooperation and Development, Paris (France). Centre for Educational Research and Innovation.

    Statistical evidence produced by a 4-year study of policies for educating immigrants' children in seven Western European countries, Canada and Australia shows that such children are disadvantaged under the present arrangements. This report considers how policies have been working and whether there is a case for some new directions and emphases. It…

  10. Transforming Children into Storytellers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Millstone, David H.

    1997-01-01

    Using work done with Homer's "Odyssey" with fifth graders, illustrates children's proficiency as listeners, creators, and presenters of stories. Shares techniques and anecdotes about this disciplined approach to preparing children as storytellers. Describes such aspects as having a variety of storytelling models, evaluating storytellers, reading…

  11. Raising Respectful Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brokenleg, Martin

    2005-01-01

    Children are not born responsible but must learn this from persons with greater maturity and wisdom. Unfortunately, contemporary culture is one in which many adults and youth are blatantly disrespectful toward one another. Disrespect toward children is so commonplace. As such, large numbers of youth are disconnected from adults. In this article,…

  12. Colorado Children's Budget 2012

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Buck, Beverly; Cuciti, Peggy L.; Baker, Robin

    2012-01-01

    The "Colorado Children's Budget 2012" examines the state's commitment to investing in the well-being of children. It tallies up Colorado's actual and planned investment during the past five years (Fiscal Year (FY) 2008-2009 through FY 2012-2013) on programs and services in four areas: Early Childhood Learning and Development, K-12 Education,…

  13. SPEECH HANDICAPPED SCHOOL CHILDREN.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    JOHNSON, WENDELL; AND OTHERS

    THIS BOOK IS DESIGNED PRIMARILY FOR STUDENTS WHO ARE BEING TRAINED TO WORK WITH SPEECH HANDICAPPED SCHOOL CHILDREN, EITHER AS SPEECH CORRECTIONISTS OR AS CLASSROOM TEACHERS. THE BOOK DEALS WITH FOUR MAJOR QUESTIONS--(1) WHAT KINDS OF SPEECH DISORDERS ARE FOUND AMONG SCHOOL CHILDREN, (2) WHAT ARE THE PHYSICAL, PSYCHOLOGICAL AND SOCIAL CONDITIONS,…

  14. How Safe Are Children?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Benke, Mary Schaefer

    1988-01-01

    Debates whether children are more susceptible to asbestos-related disease than adults. Addresses the issue of low-level exposure and disease. Discusses the regulatory measures taken by the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and Congress to protect children from the potential threat of asbestos exposure. (CW)

  15. Children as Art Teachers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Szekely, George

    2011-01-01

    A goal of art learning is always independence, for everyone to become their own art teacher. Teaching for artistic independence can never start too early. As art teachers, children acquire confidence in their art, and in coming to school as artists. Children should be considered artists in residence and visiting artists in schools. It makes sense…

  16. CHILDREN'S HEALTH MONTH 2006

    EPA Science Inventory

    Protecting the health of children from environmental risks is fundamental to the mission of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). As a part of the Agency's efforts to address children's health issues, EPA's Office of Research and Development, a leader in the area of hum...

  17. Aplauso! Hispanic Children's Theater.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rosenberg, Joe, Ed.

    This collection contains eight children's plays in English, Spanish, and bilingual formats. Intended participants and audiences range from preschool children to young adults; most scripts encourage audience participation. Most authors are Americans of Latin American descent or birth, and characters in the plays come from Mexican, Puerto Rican, and

  18. Aplauso! Hispanic Children's Theater.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rosenberg, Joe, Ed.

    This collection contains eight children's plays in English, Spanish, and bilingual formats. Intended participants and audiences range from preschool children to young adults; most scripts encourage audience participation. Most authors are Americans of Latin American descent or birth, and characters in the plays come from Mexican, Puerto Rican, and…

  19. Art for Young Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Seefeldt, Carol

    Responding to children's natural interest in creating art, early childhood educators have historically given the visual arts an honored place in the curriculum. Even in the 1980s and 1990s, as the push for earlier academic skill development increased, art continued its centrality in programs for young children. This chapter offers teachers theory

  20. Children as Authors Handbook.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hawaii State Dept. of Education, Honolulu. Office of Instructional Services.

    Intended for teachers, librarians, and administrators, this handbook explores the possibilities of implementing a "Children as Authors" project by using collaborative and integrative teaching strategies to motivate elementary school children to write. After describing the project and explaining its benefits, the handbook explores ways teachers and…

  1. Foster Children with Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Waldman, H. Barry; Perlman, Steven P.; Lederman, Cindy S.

    2007-01-01

    Children and youth in foster care are a vulnerable population. They are at risk for abuse, neglect, and permanent separation from birth parents and have a greater incidence of emotional and behavioral difficulties. This is not surprising because these children are abused, neglected, or abandoned by the very people who are supposed to love and care…

  2. Divorce and Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kittleson, Mark J.

    The traumatic effect of divorce on young children is discussed, noting the typical changes in behavior evidenced by children in such a situation. Suggestions are made on ways parents can cope with the child's emotional reactions and alleviate the stress that is natural when a marriage dissolves. (JD)

  3. Raising Children Who Care.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kohn, Alfie

    2000-01-01

    Presents excerpt from Kohn's 1990 book, asserting that parents are most important to children and need to project a positive view of life. Argues that caring, the absence of physical punishment, guiding and explaining, cooperating, and taking children seriously are required to offset the pressure and negative values that a competitive culture…

  4. Assessing Children's Silent Reading

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yule, Valerie

    1987-01-01

    Less is known about how children read connected text in silent reading, and the range of reading strategies used in an ordinary primary school classroom, than about the reading of single words, oral reading and reading by skilled adults. This paper describes and evaluates a method of testing children's silent reading in which they are their own…

  5. Families for All Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shoultz, Bonnie, Ed.; Kalyanpur, Maya, Ed.

    This bulletin reflects the commitment of Syracuse University's Center on Human Policy to the idea that children belong with families. The bulletin contains a policy statement which recommends; that all children, regardless of disability, belong with families and need enduring relationships with adults; that families with severely disabled children…

  6. Teaching Our Homeless Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sheldon, George H.

    2011-01-01

    This paper discusses some of the major concerns associated with the instructional process of our homeless children. The reader is provided with a brief overview of the prevalence of this population. According to the National Center on Family Homelessness the number of school children who are homeless is growing rapidly with 1.4 to 1.5 million…

  7. Children's Natural Processes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Madell, Rob

    1985-01-01

    The author argues that children not only can but should create their own computational algorithms and that the teacher's role is "merely" to help. How children in grades K-3 add and subtract is the focus of this article. Grouping, directionality, and exchange are highlighted. (MNS)

  8. Researching Australian Children's Literature

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Saxby, Maurice

    2004-01-01

    When in 1962 the author began to research the history of Australian children's literature, access to the primary sources was limited and difficult. From a catalogue drawer in the Mitchell Library of hand-written cards marked "Children's books" he could call up from the stacks, in alphabetical order, piles of early publications. His notes about the…

  9. Teaching Educationally Handicapped Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Arena, John I., Ed.; And Others

    Describing methods for helping children with normal intelligence who manifest learning, perceptual, and/or behavior disorders as a result of minimal neurological or brain dysfunction, the compilation contains 22 papers. Articles are grouped into six categories: identifying the children, motor development, basic considerations, adapting the…

  10. Culture and Children's Cosmology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Siegal, Michael; Butterworth, George; Newcombe, Peter A.

    2004-01-01

    In this investigation, we examined children's knowledge of cosmology in relation to the shape of the earth and the day-night cycle. Using explicit questioning involving a choice of alternative answers and 3D models, we carried out a comparison of children aged 4-9 years living in Australia and England. Though Australia and England have a close…

  11. Child Development: Preschool Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chiam, Heng Keng, Ed.

    This book reports some of the results of an extensive study of the physical, cognitive, language, social, and emotional development of Malaysian children. Chapter 1 of the book describes the demographics of the sample. Subjects were 3,099 preschool children in the state of Selangor and the federal district of Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia. Data is…

  12. Childhood: Our Children's Voices.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kochan, Frances K.

    1996-01-01

    Educators design school restructuring efforts based on their beliefs about the changing global society; pressures of the business world, community, and parents; and perceived societal needs. A recent survey shows that school children's greatest concerns are divorce, money and finances, and family discord and violence. Children's voices, not…

  13. Repeated Infections in Children

    MedlinePlus

    ... cause of an infection, such as being in day-care centers. Children in day-care centers give infections to each other. They drool ... winter, you could move your child out of day care, where so many other children would have colds. ...

  14. Rhythmic Activities for Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Practical Pointers, 1977

    1977-01-01

    Focusing on the development of fundamental rhythm skills involved in music and movement activities, this teaching guide emphasizes activities that will help children express their feelings and communicate with others, develop perceptual and motor skills, and enhance sensory awareness. Suggestions for involving handicapped children and examples of…

  15. Violence and Young Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sauerwein, Kristina

    1995-01-01

    Schools must increasingly deal with children who brandish weapons and exhibit antisocial or violent behavior. Psychologists agree that young children are very susceptible to violence and that stored violent images can warp their interpretation of reality. To combat youth violence, many schools have adopted antiviolence curricula and conflict…

  16. Teaching Children of Catastrophe

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gay, Geneva

    2007-01-01

    Teaching children who are victims of Katrina is not a multicultural education issue per se. However, there are some intersections between the victims of Katrina and the educational responses to them, and some of the primary constituent groups and issues that multicultural education represents and intends to serve. These are children of color and…

  17. Children's Books: Current Trends.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nist, Joan Stidham

    A major trend in children's literature is the growing academic recognition of the field--indicated by the large number of new texts that have been published since 1975. Scholarly periodicals in the field have likewise grown since the 1970s. Library science, elementary education and English literature have fostered the development of children's…

  18. Japanese Children's Books.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    New York Public Library, NY.

    This annotated list of picture books and stories for young children is a catalogue of Japanese children's books exhibited at the New York Public Library in 1972. Part I consists of fifty distinguished books selected from those published before 1969. Part II is a selection of more recent titles and is less selective than Part I. The title of each…

  19. Wyoming Children's Factbook 1995.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wyoming P.A.R.E.N.T., Laramie.

    This Kids Count report details statewide trends in the well-being of Wyoming's children. The first section of the report describes the issues affecting Wyoming's families, health, and teens. The second section consists of a sampling of programs aimed at addressing problems in children's well-being in the areas of teen pregnancy, child abuse,

  20. Children and Violence.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reiss, David, Ed.; And Others

    This volume documents the rise in violence in our communities and explores its impact on children's physical, psychological, and social development. Focal themes are: the necessity for better information about the kinds of violence to which children are exposed, the necessity of beginning to build intervention strategies aimed at violence, and the…

  1. Ethical Research with Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Farrell, Ann

    2005-01-01

    Research with children is occurring within a climate of mounting international interest in listening to and consulting with children in ways that are respectful of them as competent informants of their own experience. This interest has occurred within "new times" of heightened accountability, regulation and surveillance of research. This climate…

  2. Ageism in Children's Books.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Interracial Books for Children Bulletin, 1976

    1976-01-01

    The five articles in this special issue of the bulletin deal with age discrimination in children's books. The first article is the first of two parts that deal with how older people are stereotyped; part 1 presents the statistical findings of the first major study of stereotypes based on age and ageism in children's literature, while part 2…

  3. The health of children.

    PubMed Central

    Szilagyi, P G; Schor, E L

    1998-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To summarize the concept of child health and the measurement of child health status in order to help guide the evaluation of the effectiveness of medical, social, and policy programs. CONCLUSIONS: Opportunities for research on children's health status and quality of care abound. Comprehensive and functional definitions create problems of measurement, but investigators are making progress in measuring children's health status both generically and for specific chronic health conditions. RECOMMENDATIONS: Measures of child health need to be developed, improved, tested, and made user-friendly for clinical and policy research. The relationship between health status and a variety of social programs for children and families needs study. The impact of changes in healthcare organization and financing must be investigated, especially for children from vulnerable subgroups. Determining the value and effectiveness of preventive services is a pressing issue. It is crucial to understand better the link among quality of care; other factors biological, family, and social; and children's health status. PMID:9776947

  4. Morphine sulphation in children.

    PubMed Central

    Choonara, I; Ekbom, Y; Lindström, B; Rane, A

    1990-01-01

    The metabolism of morphine was studied in nine children and seven preterm neonates receiving a continuous infusion of morphine. All the neonates and three children had detectable concentrations of morphine-3-sulphate (M3S) in urine. None of the neonates or the children had detectable concentrations of morphine-6-sulphate (M6S) in urine. None of the children had detectable concentrations of M3S in plasma. The M3S/morphine ratios were significantly higher in neonates than children (P less than 0.01), suggesting that morphine sulphation decreases after the neonatal period. The amount of M3S formed, even in neonates, is low suggesting that this is a minor metabolic pathway. PMID:2288836

  5. Recurrent wheezing in children

    PubMed Central

    Piazza, Michele; Piacentini, Giorgio

    2016-01-01

    Recurrent wheezing have a significant morbidity and it’s estimated that about one third of school-age children manifest the symptom during the first 5 years of life. Proper identification of children at risk of developing asthma at school age may predict long-term outcomes and improve treatment and preventive approach, but the possibility to identify these children at preschool age remains limited. For many years authors focused their studies to identify early children with recurrent wheezing at risk to develop asthma at school age. Different phenotypes have been proposed for a more precise characterization and a personalized plan of treatment. The main criticism concerns the inability to define stable phenotypes with the risk of overestimating or underestimating the characteristics of symptoms in these children. The aim of this review is to report the recent developments on the diagnosis and treatment of recurrent paediatric wheezing. PMID:26835404

  6. Children's Rights and Children's Voices in Contested Custody and Visitation Cases in Sweden and the US

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pranzo, Diane

    2013-01-01

    These research notes look at the differing ways in which the basis for including a criterion regarding children's opinions in disputed custody and visitation processes, in the US as compared with Sweden, impacts on the role and place that children's opinions and wishes will have on the process. Sweden's rationale for including children's…

  7. Status of Oregon's Children: 1998 County Data Book. Special Focus: Children's Health Care.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Children First for Oregon, Portland.

    This Kids Count report examines statewide trends in the well-being of Oregon's children, focusing on children's health care. The statistical portrait is based on indicators of well-being including: (1) children's insurance coverage; (2) health care access; (3) health outcomes, including immunization rates and early prenatal care; (4) juvenile…

  8. Children's learning of science through literature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Kelly, James B.

    This study examined the effects of picture books belonging to different literary genres on the learning of science by primary grade students. These genres included modern fantasy, fiction, and nonfiction. The students were exposed to two topics through books, butterflies and snails. The study focused on the effects of those books on children's expressions of (a) knowledge, (b) erroneous information, (c) creative ideas, and (d) the support required to elicit information and ideas from the children. Sixty-one children from three kindergarten and three second grade participated. Children were designated by their teachers as being high or low with respect to academic achievement. These categories allowed measurement of interactions between literary genres, grade levels, and academic achievement levels. Children first learned about butterflies, and then about snails. For each topic, children were interviewed about their knowledge and questions of the topic. Teachers engaged their classes with a book about the topic. The children were re-interviewed about their knowledge and questions about the topic. No class encountered the same genre of book twice. Comparisons of the children's prior knowledge of butterflies and snails indicated that the children possessed significantly more knowledge about butterflies than about snails. Literary genre had one significant effect on children's learning about snails. Contrary to expectations, children who encountered nonfiction produced significantly more creative expressions about snails than children who encountered faction or modern fantasy. No significant effects for literary genre were demonstrated with respect to children's learning about butterflies. The outcomes of the study indicated that nonfiction had its strongest impact on the learning of science when children have a relatively small fund of knowledge about a topic. This study has implications for future research. The inclusion of a larger number of students, classes, and interviewers as well as refinement of the interview protocol to allow for more production of divergent questions by children may reveal additional effects of literary genre on children's learning of science through literature.

  9. Nutritional Intake in Children with Disabilities Compared to Typical Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Raddish, Michele; And Others

    Using interviews with parents and guardians, and the child where appropriate, this study compared feeding problems of children with disabilities in Kentucky with a sample of typical children. Subjects were 50 children ages 3-5; 25 children were without disabilities. In addition to interviews, data were collected from case records, medical…

  10. Health Insurance for Children. The Future for Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Behrman, Richard E., Ed.

    2003-01-01

    This issue of "The Future of Children" focuses on efforts to provide publicly funded health insurance to low-income children in the United States through Medicaid and the State Children's Health Insurance Program (SCHIP). The articles summarize current knowledge and research about which children are uninsured and why, discuss ways to improve…

  11. As If Children Matter: Perspectives on Children, Rights and Disability.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roeher Inst., North York (Ontario).

    This collection of 16 papers attempts to provide a comprehensive overview of the state of children in the nations of the Americas. The collection's five sections examine children's rights, perspectives of five parents from five different nations, children with disabilities in the legal system, promoting the rights of children through social…

  12. Specificity of Dyspraxia in Children with Autism

    PubMed Central

    MacNeil, Lindsey K.; Mostofsky, Stewart H.

    2012-01-01

    Objective To explore the specificity of impaired praxis and postural knowledge to autism by examining three samples of children, including those with autism spectrum disorder (ASD), attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), and typically developing (TD) children. Method Twenty-four children with ASD, 24 children with ADHD, and 24 TD children, ages 8–13, completed measures assessing basic motor control (the Physical and Neurological Exam for Subtle Signs; PANESS), praxis (performance of skilled gestures to command, with imitation, and tool use) and the ability to recognize correct hand postures necessary to perform these skilled gestures (the Postural Knowledge Test; PKT). Results Children with ASD performed significantly worse than TD children on all three assessments. In contrast, children with ADHD performed significantly worse than TD controls on PANESS but not on the praxis examination or PKT. Furthermore, children with ASD performed significantly worse than children with ADHD on both the praxis examination and PKT, but not on the PANESS. Conclusions Whereas both children with ADHD and children with ASD show impairments in basic motor control, impairments in performance and recognition of skilled motor gestures, consistent with dyspraxia, appear to be specific to autism. The findings suggest that impaired formation of perceptual-motor action models necessary to development of skilled gestures and other goal directed behavior is specific to autism; whereas, impaired basic motor control may be a more generalized finding. PMID:22288405

  13. Salivary gland diseases in children

    PubMed Central

    Iro, Heinrich; Zenk, Johannes

    2014-01-01

    Salivary gland diseases in children are rare, apart from viral-induced diseases. Nevertheless, it is essential for the otolaryngologist to recognize these uncommon findings in children and adolescents and to diagnose and initiate the proper treatment. The present work provides an overview of the entire spectrum of congenital and acquired diseases of the salivary glands in childhood and adolescence. The current literature was reviewed and the results discussed and summarized. Besides congenital diseases of the salivary glands in children, the main etiologies of viral and bacterial infections, autoimmune diseases and tumors of the salivary glands were considered. In addition to the known facts, new developments in diagnostics, imaging and therapy, including sialendoscopy in obstructive diseases and chronic recurrent juvenile sialadenitis were taken into account. In addition, systemic causes of salivary gland swelling and the treatment of sialorrhoea were discussed. Although salivary gland diseases in children are usually included in the pathology of the adult, they differ in their incidence and some­times in their symptoms. Clinical diagnostics and especially the surgical treatment are influenced by a stringent indications and a less invasive strategy. Due to the rarity of tumors of the salivary glands in children, it is recommended to treat them in a specialized center with greater surgical experience. Altogether the knowledge of the differential diagnoses in salivary gland diseases in children is important for otolaryngologists, to indicate the proper therapeutic approach. PMID:25587366

  14. [Foreign body aspiration in children].

    PubMed

    Cohen, Shlomo; Goldberg, Shmuel; Springer, Chaim; Avital, Avraham; Picard, Elie

    2015-03-01

    Foreign body (FB) aspiration occurs mainly in children under 3 years of age and is one of the most frequent causes of accidental death under 12 months of age. The increased risk of FB aspiration in children is due to the different structure of the pharynx and the upper airways compared to adults. In addition, children have an immature swallowing mechanism and they most commonly aspirate food stuffs. FB aspiration is usually a sudden and dramatic event when the child feels that he is suffocating or choking. After the acute event, the clinical presentation widely ranges from severe respiratory distress to the most minimal symptoms. Bronchoscopy is the best diagnostic and therapeutic modality for FB inhalation. Prevention and rapid diagnosis can be lifesaving. In 2010, the American Academy of Pediatrics published a position paper on prevention of FB aspiration. The association calls for more proactive preventative measures to protect children from FB aspiration and to prevent mortality and morbidity. These include: 1. Raising awareness of parents and caregivers to supervise children and create a safe environment for them. 2. Promoting legislation and enforcing regulations that will prevent dangerous products being sold for children. 3. Changing the design of products, especially food products and toys, that will reduce the risks of choking. In this overview we will show the principles of diagnosis of FB aspiration and a flow chart including when flexible or rigid bronchoscopy is required. PMID:25962247

  15. Home Mechanical Ventilation in Children.

    PubMed

    Preutthipan, Aroonwan

    2015-09-01

    The number of children dependent on home mechanical ventilation has been reported to be increasing in many countries around the world. Home mechanical ventilation has been well accepted as a standard treatment of children with chronic respiratory failure. Some children may need mechanical ventilation as a lifelong therapy. To send mechanically ventilated children back home may be more difficult than adults. However, relatively better outcomes have been demonstrated in children. Children could be safely ventilated at home if they are selected and managed properly. Conditions requiring home ventilation include increased respiratory load from airway or lung pathologies, ventilatory muscle weakness and failure of neurologic control of ventilation. Home mechanical ventilation should be considered when the patient develops progressive respiratory failure or intractable failure to wean mechanical ventilation. Polysomnography or overnight pulse oximetry plus capnometry are used to detect nocturnal hypoventilation in early stage of respiratory failure. Ventilator strategy including non-invasive and invasive approach should be individualized for each patient. The author strongly believes that parents and family members are able to take care of their child at home if they are trained and educated effectively. A good team work with dedicated members is the key factor of success. PMID:26223874

  16. A cluster analysis of learning disabled children.

    PubMed

    Jorgenson, C B; Jorgenson, D E; Davis, W P

    1987-07-01

    Cluster analysis was employed with the intent of describing more homogeneous subgroups of learning disabled (LD) children. The parents and teachers of 29 children placed in special education as learning disabled completed questionnaires concerning demographic information regarding the families; birth, medical, and developmental histories regarding the children were also included. Variables for the analysis were those found, by means of discriminant analysis in an earlier study, to be significantly related to LD as opposed to regular education children. The presence of developmental delays (speaking or walking later than expected), birth order, and sex of the children were influential in the definition of the clusters. PMID:3623820

  17. Sleep Patterns in Children with Cystic Fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Meltzer, Lisa J.; Beck, Suzanne E.

    2013-01-01

    This study examined sleep patterns and the association between sleep and perceived health for children with and without CF. Ninety families (45 CF) completed questionnaires about the child’s sleep and health. Significant group differences were found for sleep patterns (bedtime, wake time, total sleep time), symptoms of sleep disordered breathing, and sleep disturbances. Poorer perceived health was associated with sleep disturbances among children with CF, but not for children without CF. This study highlights the importance of including sleep in the evaluation of children with CF, as both medical and behavioral interventions can improve the sleep of children with CF. PMID:24563574

  18. Subclinical hypothyroidism in children.

    PubMed

    Seshadri, Krishna G

    2012-12-01

    The prevalence of SH in the pediatric population is < 2%, the caveat being the limited number of studies addressing SCH in the pediatric population. congenital deveolopental anamolies. Mutations in the several proteins are important causes of this condition. Despite the limited data available, SCH in children and adolescents appears to be a benign and remitting disease with a low risk of evolution to OH. It appears that thyroid hormones appear to be functioning well despite elevated TSH. Predictors of progression include, goiter, celiac disease, and positive anti TPO. PMID:23565367

  19. Compulsive hoarding in children.

    PubMed

    Storch, Eric A; Rahman, Omar; Park, Jennifer M; Reid, Jeannette; Murphy, Tanya K; Lewin, Adam B

    2011-05-01

    This article discusses the nature and treatment of compulsive hoarding among children. We summarize the phenomenology of compulsive hoarding, including its clinical presentation, comorbidity with varied mental disorders, and associated impairment. The limited data on treatment outcome are presented along with a behavioral framework that we utilized to treat youth who hoard. Our approach is highlighted in the context of a case illustration of an 11-year-old girl suffering from compulsive hoarding and several comorbid mental health disorders. We conclude with recommendations for clinical work with this challenging and neglected population. PMID:21381027

  20. Homeless Children: Meeting the Educational Challenges. ERIC Digest.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goins, Brad; Cesarone, Bernard

    Difficulties faced by homeless children include depression, low self-esteem, lack of sleep and nutrition, and feelings of shame and embarrassment. Challenges faced by schools in providing education to homeless children include: (1) keeping children in one school despite frequent family moves; (2) ensuring that children's health records are…

  1. Correlates of Victimization in Hong Kong Children's Peer Groups

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tom, Shelley R.; Schwartz, David; Chang, Lei; Farver, Jo Ann M.; Xu, Yiyuan

    2010-01-01

    This study reports two separate cross-sectional investigations that focus on bully/victim problems among Hong Kong school children. Study 1 included 1361 children (670 boys, 691 girls; mean age = 12.6 years) and Study 2 included 288 children (153 boys, 135 girls; mean age = 9.6 years). Children's social and academic functioning was assessed with…

  2. Obesity in children & adolescents

    PubMed Central

    Raj, Manu; Kumar, R. Krishna

    2010-01-01

    Worldwide, obesity trends are causing serious public health concern and in many countries threatening the viability of basic health care delivery. It is an independent risk factor for cardiovascular diseases and significantly increases the risk of morbidity and mortality. The last two decades have witnessed an increase in health care costs due to obesity and related issues among children and adolescents. Childhood obesity is a global phenomenon affecting all socio-economic groups, irrespective of age, sex or ethnicity. Aetiopathogenesis of childhood obesity is multi-factorial and includes genetic, neuroendocrine, metabolic, psychological, environmental and socio-cultural factors. Many co-morbid conditions like metabolic, cardiovascular, psychological, orthopaedic, neurological, hepatic, pulmonary and renal disorders are seen in association with childhood obesity. The treatment of overweight and obesity in children and adolescents requires a multidisciplinary, multi-phase approach, which includes dietary management, physical activity enhancement, restriction of sedentary behaviour, pharmacotherapy and bariatric surgery. A holistic approach to tackle the childhood obesity epidemic needs a collection of activities including influencing policy makers and legislation, mobilizing communities, restructuring organizational practices, establishing coalitions and networks, empowering providers, imparting community education as well as enriching and reinforcing individual awareness and skills. The implications of this global phenomenon on future generations will be serious unless appropriate action is taken. PMID:21150012

  3. Obesity in children & adolescents.

    PubMed

    Raj, Manu; Kumar, R Krishna

    2010-11-01

    Worldwide, obesity trends are causing serious public health concern and in many countries threatening the viability of basic health care delivery. It is an independent risk factor for cardiovascular diseases and significantly increases the risk of morbidity and mortality. The last two decades have witnessed an increase in health care costs due to obesity and related issues among children and adolescents. Childhood obesity is a global phenomenon affecting all socio-economic groups, irrespective of age, sex or ethnicity. Aetiopathogenesis of childhood obesity is multi-factorial and includes genetic, neuroendocrine, metabolic, psychological, environmental and socio-cultural factors. Many co-morbid conditions like metabolic, cardiovascular, psychological, orthopaedic, neurological, hepatic, pulmonary and renal disorders are seen in association with childhood obesity. The treatment of overweight and obesity in children and adolescents requires a multidisciplinary, multi-phase approach, which includes dietary management, physical activity enhancement, restriction of sedentary behaviour, pharmacotherapy and bariatric surgery. A holistic approach to tackle the childhood obesity epidemic needs a collection of activities including influencing policy makers and legislation, mobilizing communities, restructuring organizational practices, establishing coalitions and networks, empowering providers, imparting community education as well as enriching and reinforcing individual awareness and skills. The implications of this global phenomenon on future generations will be serious unless appropriate action is taken. PMID:21150012

  4. Children's Superstitions: British and Canadian.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McLeish, John

    1984-01-01

    A 100-item test covering nine areas of superstitious belief administered with 10 control items to 1,749 Canadian and British children showed younger children and girls were more superstitious than older children and boys. Academically inclined children were less superstitious. Science-based education had little effect. Implications for Canadian…

  5. Age-Segregation of Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ellis, Shari; And Others

    The purpose of this paper was to explore the age-segregation of U.S. children in two situations--children's spontaneous groups and adult-organized activities--and to examine the developmental changes in children's companionship between infancy and adolescence. The companionship of 400 urban children ranging in age from 1 to 12 years was determined…

  6. Children's Death Concepts and Ethnicity.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wass, Hannelore; Towry, Betty J.

    1980-01-01

    Relationships between death concepts of Black and White children and their racial status were examined. Lower-middle-class elementary children completed a four-item questionnaire on death. Most children defined death as the end of living and listed physical causes as the explanation of death. In general, children's death concepts were similar.…

  7. Helping Children Develop Cognitive Skills.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilkerson, Deanna

    Designed to help family home care providers understand children's cognitive developmental stages, this manual provides practical suggestions for developing and evaluating children's cognitive skills. The manual is divided into four sections focusing respectively on infants, toddlers, preschool children, and school-aged children. Each section…

  8. Children's Judgments of Expected Value.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schlottmann, Anne; Anderson, Norman H.

    1994-01-01

    Expected value judgments of 5- through 10-year-olds were studied by having children view roulette-type games and make judgments of how happy a puppet playing the game would be. Even the youngest children showed some understanding of probability dependence, with children under eight using an additive integration rule and children eight and older…

  9. Seeing Children's Pleasure with Food

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Curtis, Deb

    2010-01-01

    Children's relationship with food in early childhood programs is often a complex topic. Families have concerns about "picky eaters" and teachers feel pressure to make sure that children eat enough while in their care. Children bring snacks that teachers describe as junk food and believe this negatively impacts children's behavior. Foods marketed…

  10. Environmental Design for Young Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Frank, Mary, Ed.

    1977-01-01

    The special issue of the journal, Children in Contemporary Society, contains 17 brief articles on environmental design for young handicapped and normal children. Articles have the following titles: "Introduction", "Environmental Design and Architecture", "Why Is Environmental Design Important to Young Children", "Children's Hospital National…

  11. Children's Explanations of Family Resemblances.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Horobin, Karen D.

    Four studies investigated children's explanations for family resemblance and species-typical characteristics, under different conditions of biological parentage and rearing environment. Participating were 226 children between 3 and 11 years. Children Children were presented with a number of different tasks, some involving people and some domestic…

  12. Using Art with Vulnerable Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cumming, Stevi; Visser, John

    2009-01-01

    Refugee children are often admitted into schools having experienced traumatic events. The impact of trauma on children has been well documented and these children frequently have complex needs. The Devon Behaviour Support Team (BST) has offered Art Workshops to schools to support children with social, emotional and behavioural difficulties and…

  13. Children and war.

    PubMed

    Pearn, J

    2003-04-01

    Children bear disproportionate consequences of armed conflict. The 21st century continues to see patterns of children enmeshed in international violence between opposing combatant forces, as victims of terrorist warfare, and, perhaps most tragically of all, as victims of civil wars. Innocent children so often are the victims of high-energy wounding from military ordinance. They sustain high-energy tissue damage and massive burns - injuries that are not commonly seen in civilian populations. Children have also been deliberately targeted victims in genocidal civil wars in Africa in the past decade, and hundreds of thousands have been killed and maimed in the context of close-quarter, hand-to-hand assaults of great ferocity. Paediatricians serve as uniformed military surgeons and as civilian doctors in both international and civil wars, and have a significant strategic role to play as advocates for the rights and welfare of children in the context of the evolving 'Laws of War'. One chronic legacy of contemporary warfare is blast injury to children from landmines. Such blasts leave children without feet or lower limbs, with genital injuries, blindness and deafness. This pattern of injury has become one of the post-civil war syndromes encountered by all intensivists and surgeons serving in four of the world's continents. The continued advocacy for the international ban on the manufacture, commerce and military use of antipersonnel landmines is a part of all paediatricians' obligation to promote the ethos of the Laws of War. Post-traumatic stress disorder remains an undertreated legacy of children who have been trapped in the shot and shell of battle as well as those displaced as refugees. An urgent, unfocused and unmet challenge has been the increase in, and plight of, child soldiers themselves. A new class of combatant comprises these children, who also become enmeshed in the triad of anarchic civil war, light-weight weaponry and drug or alcohol addiction. The International Criminal Court has outlawed as a War Crime, the conscription of children under 15 years of age. Nevertheless, there remain more than 300000 child soldiers active and enmeshed in psychopathic violence as part of both civil and international warfare. The typical profile of a child soldier is of a boy between the ages of 8 and 18 years, bonded into a group of armed peers, almost always an orphan, drug or alcohol addicted, amoral, merciless, illiterate and dangerous. Paediatricians have much to do to protect such war-enmeshed children, irrespective of the accident of their place of birth. Only by such vigorous and maintained advocacy can the world's children be better protected from the scourge of future wars. PMID:12654137

  14. Traumatic Glaucoma in Children

    PubMed Central

    Kaur, Savleen; Singh Pandav, Surinder

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Young patients are more prone to ocular trauma but most of the published studies describe complicated cataract as a result of trauma with its treatment modality. As a result, little is known about the different causes, common presenting signs and symptoms, visual outcomes, and most frequent management modalities of traumatic glaucoma in children. This review aims to study the demographical profile, presentation, management and outcome of traumatic glaucoma in children as well as the various factors associated with advanced glaucomatous changes. How to cite this article: Kaur S, Kaushik S, Pandav SS. Traumatic Glaucoma in Children. J Curr Glaucoma Pract 2014; 8(2):58-62.

  15. Television's impact on children.

    PubMed

    Zuckerman, D M; Zuckerman, B S

    1985-02-01

    Television has a major impact on children's knowledge, attitudes, and behavior. Research has demonstrated the association between television viewing and four areas: (1) children's aggressive behavior; (2) racial and sex-role stereotypes; (3) decreased interest in reading and school activities; and (4) poorer health habits and attitudes. Methodological limitations make it difficult to draw firm conclusions about a causal relationship between television viewing and children's behavior. Representative studies in these four areas are reviewed, important methodological concerns are pointed out, and conclusions from the research findings are drawn. The implications of the data for pediatricians and other health professionals are discussed. PMID:3881727

  16. Music and handicapped children

    PubMed Central

    Ricketts, Lesley

    1976-01-01

    Handicapped children may gain considerably from being introduced systematically to musical sounds. The benefit comes not only from enjoyment, but also from promoting intellectual, emotional, and social development. Some children who are severely handicapped intellectually may have great musical talent, such as perfect pitch, and if this is systematically cultivated a key can sometimes be found unlocking the barriers to the child's progress. Some examples are described. Several years' experience of working as a music therapist with children both normal and handicapped have convinced me that the use of music as an aid to learning is worth further study and research. PMID:966207

  17. Vulnerable Children; Three Studies of Children in Conflict: Accident Involved Children, Sexually Assualted Children and Children with Asthma.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burton, Lindy

    Three retrospective studies related children's socially inappropriate behavior to needs for approval and self assurance. Four girls and 16 boys (a sex difference of p=.006) involved in road accidents, aged 5 to 15, who were consecutively admitted to a hospital for arm and leg fractures were matched with controls. The accident children shared a…

  18. Identifying methamphetamine exposure in children

    PubMed Central

    Castaneto, Marisol S.; Barnes, Allan J.; Scheidweiler, Karl B.; Schaffer, Michael; Rogers, Kristen K.; Stewart, Deborah; Huestis, Marilyn A.

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Methamphetamine (MAMP) use, distribution and manufacture remain a serious public health and safety problem in the United States, and children environmentally exposed to MAMP face a myriad of developmental, social and health risks, including severe abuse and neglect necessitating child protection involvement. It is recommended that drug-endangered children receive medical evaluation and care with documentation of overall physical and mental conditions and have urine drug testing.1 The primary aim of this study was to determine the best biological matrix to detect MAMP, amphetamine (AMP), methylenedioxymethamphetamine (MDMA), methylenedioxyamphetamine (MDA) and methylenedioxyethylamphetamine (MDEA) in environmentally exposed children. Method 91 children, environmentally exposed to household MAMP intake, were medically evaluated at the Child and Adolescent Abuse Resource and Evaluation (CAARE) Diagnostic and Treatment Center at the University of California, Davis (UCD) Children's Hospital. MAMP, AMP, MDMA, MDA and MDEA were quantified in urine and oral fluid (OF) by gas chromatography mass spectrometry (GCMS) and in hair by liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry (LCMSMS). Results Overall drug detection rates in OF, urine and hair were 6.9%, 22.1% and 77.8%, respectively. Seventy children (79%) tested positive for 1 or more drugs in 1 or more matrices. MAMP was the primary analyte detected in all 3 biological matrices. All positive OF (n=5) and 18 of 19 positive urine specimens also had a positive hair test. Conclusion Hair analysis offered a more sensitive tool for identifying MAMP, AMP and MDMA environmental exposure in children than urine or OF testing. A negative urine, or hair test does not exclude the possibility of drug exposure, but hair testing provided the greatest sensitivity for identifying drug-exposed children. PMID:24263642

  19. Children's Literature on Neutron Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Struck, James

    Children's literature is simple discussion of complicated issues. Neutron stars are discussed in several children's books. Using libraries in Chicago, I will review children's books on neutron stars and compare the literature to literature from scientific discussions of neutron stars on sites like the Chandra site, Hubble Space Telescope site and NASA site. The result will be a discussion of problems and issues involved in discussion of neutron stars. Do children's books leave material out? Do children's books discuss recent observations? Do children's books discuss anything discredited or wrong? How many children's books are in resources like World Cat, the Library of Congress catalog, and the Chicago Public Library catalog? Could children's books be useful to present some of your findings or observations or projects? Children's books are useful for both children and scientist as they present simplified discussion of topics, although sometimes issues are simplified too much.

  20. Astronomy Outreach for Special Needs Children

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lubowich, D.

    2008-06-01

    While there are many outreach programs for the public and for children, there are few programs for special needs children. I describe a NASA-STScI-IDEAS funded outreach program I created for children using a telescope (including remote and robotic observations), hands-on astronomy demonstrations (often with edible ingredients). The target audience is seriously ill children with special medical needs and their families who are staying at the Long Island Ronald McDonald House in conjunction the children's surgery and medical treatments at local hospitals. These educational activities help children and their families learn about astronomy while providing a diversion to take their minds off their illness during a stressful time. A related program for hospitalized children has been started at the Hagedorn Pediatric Inpatient Center at Winthrop University Hospital.

  1. "Children are sexually innocent": Iranian parents' understanding of children's sexuality.

    PubMed

    Merghati-Khoei, Effat; Abolghasemi, Naria; Smith, Thomas G

    2014-04-01

    Sexuality education (SE) is hotly contested in the West and there is much abstinence-only education; however, it remains controversial in a variety of contexts, including in Iran. The lack of consensus about children's SE in Muslim societies obliges us to explore different aspects of this topic systematically. The qualitative research presented here was about how Iranian parents perceived children's sexuality. Data from parents of 26 children were collected during four focus group sessions. Informants were selected from Area 5 in West Tehran. This area included 72 primary schools for girls and 82 for boys. The sessions were facilitated by using a semi-structured focus group guide. Content analysis was adopted using combined free and analytical coding to reduce data, to extract meanings, and to categorize domains. One of the three main domains identified, family management of child sexuality, is comprised of the following: (1) understanding of child sexuality, (2) family rules, (3) parent-child interactions, and (4) opposite sex interactions. Parental misinformation, accumulated myths, and ignorance about children's sexual development were evident. Strict family rules and a lack of consistent policy and instruction for SE were also identified. Parents said they were neither well-prepared nor competent to educate their children about sexuality. In fact, a majority of mothers raised "incompetence" as an important determinant in their own parent-child interactions. Societal changes as well as children's socialization patterns have forced parents to accept their children's opposite sex friendships as a reality. Results suggest a community need for developing comprehensive and culturally sensitive SE for schools and parental use. PMID:24343162

  2. Hypothalamic obesity in children.

    PubMed

    Bereket, A; Kiess, W; Lustig, R H; Muller, H L; Goldstone, A P; Weiss, R; Yavuz, Y; Hochberg, Z

    2012-09-01

    Hypothalamic obesity is an intractable form of obesity syndrome that was initially described in patients with hypothalamic tumours and surgical damage. However, this definition is now expanded to include obesity developing after a variety of insults, including intracranial infections, infiltrations, trauma, vascular problems and hydrocephalus, in addition to acquired or congenital functional defects in central energy homeostasis in children with the so-called common obesity. The pathogenetic mechanisms underlying hypothalamic obesity are complex and multifactorial. Weight gain results from damage to the ventromedial hypothalamus, which leads, variously, to hyperphagia, a low-resting metabolic rate; autonomic imbalance; growth hormone-, gonadotropins and thyroid-stimulating hormone deficiency; hypomobility; and insomnia. Hypothalamic obesity did not receive enough attention, as evidenced by rarity of studies in this group of patients. A satellite symposium was held during the European Congress of Obesity in May 2011, in Istanbul, Turkey, to discuss recent developments and concepts regarding pathophysiology and management of hypothalamic obesity in children. An international group of leading researchers presented certain aspects of the problem. This paper summarizes the highlights of this symposium. Understanding the central role of the hypothalamus in the regulation of feeding and energy metabolism will help us gain insights into the pathogenesis and management of common obesity. PMID:22577758

  3. Coeliac disease in children.

    PubMed

    Paul, Siba Prosad; Kirkham, Emily Natasha; Pidgeon, Sarah; Sandmann, Sarah

    2015-08-01

    Coeliac disease is an immune-mediated systemic disorder caused by ingestion of gluten. The condition presents classically with gastrointestinal signs including diarrhoea, bloating, weight loss and abdominal pain, but presentations can include extra-intestinal symptoms such as iron-deficiency anaemia, faltering growth, delayed puberty and mouth ulcers. Some children are at higher risk of developing coeliac disease, for example those with a strong family history, certain genetic disorders and other autoimmune conditions. If coeliac disease is suspected, serological screening with anti-tissue transglutaminase titres should be performed and the diagnosis may be confirmed by small bowel biopsy while the child remains on a normal (gluten-containing) diet. Modified European guidelines recommend that symptomatic children with anti-tissue transglutaminase titres more than ten times the upper limit of normal, and positive human leucocyte antigen (HLA)-DQ2 or HLA-DQ8 status, do not require small bowel biopsy for diagnosis of coeliac disease. Management of the disease involves strict adherence to a lifelong gluten-free diet, which should lead to resolution of symptoms and prevention of long-term complications. Healthcare professionals should be aware of the varied presentations of coeliac disease to ensure timely screening and early initiation of a gluten-free diet. PMID:26243121

  4. Worm Infections in Children.

    PubMed

    Weatherhead, Jill E; Hotez, Peter J

    2015-08-01

    • On the basis of research evidence, worm infections are important global child health conditions causing chronic disability that lasts from childhood into adulthood (Table 1). (2)(3) Evidence Quality: B • On the basis of research evidence, the major worm infections found in developing countries include ascariasis, trichuriasis, hookworm infection, and schistosomiasis; toxocariasis, enterobiasis, and cysticercosis are also found in poor regions of North America and Europe. (4)(9)(13) Evidence Quality: B • On the basis of expert consensus, children and adolescents are often vulnerable to acquiring large numbers of worms, ie, high-intensity infections (Fig 1)(21)(22)(23) Evidence Quality: D • On the basis of expert consensus and research evidence, moderate and heavy worm burdens cause increased morbidity because of growth and intellectual stunting in children and adolescents. Many of these effects may result from helminth-induced malnutrition. (21)(22)(23) Evidence Quality: C • On the basis of expert consensus and research evidence, worm infections are also commonly associated with eosinophilia. (48) (49) Evidence Quality: B • On the basis of research evidence as well as consensus, helminthes can cause inflammation in the lung (asthma), gastrointestinal tract (enteritis and colitis), liver (hepatitis and fibrosis), and urogenital tract. (7)(21)(22)(23)(27)(28)(40)(41)(43) Evidence Quality: B • On the basis of research evidence, microscopy techniques for diagnosis of worm infections in children often exhibit suboptimal sensitivities and specificities, necessitating new or improved diagnostic modalities such as polymerase chain reaction. (54)(55) Evidence Quality: A • On the basis of research evidence and expert consensus, mass drug administration (“preventive chemotherapy”) has becomea standard practice for ministries of health in low- and middle-income countries to control intestinal helminth infections and schistosomiasis. (67)(68) Evidence Quality: B. PMID:26232464

  5. Families, children, migration and AIDS.

    PubMed

    Haour-Knipe, Mary

    2009-01-01

    Migration is very often a family affair, and often involves children, directly or indirectly. It may give rise to better quality of life for an entire family, or to bitter disappointment, and may also increase vulnerability to HIV and AIDS. This review, carried out for the Joint Learning Initiative on Children and AIDS, links the literature on "migration", on "HIV and AIDS" and on "families". Three themes are sketched: (1) As both HIV prevalence and circular migration increase, former migrant workers affected by AIDS may return to their families for care and support, especially at the end of life, often under crisis conditions. Families thus lose promising members, as well as sources of support. However, very little is known about the children of such migrants. (2) Following patterns of migration established for far different reasons, children may have to relocate to different places, sometimes over long distances, if their AIDS-affected parents can no longer care for them. They face the same adaptation challenges as other children who move, but complicated by loss of parent(s), AIDS stigma, and often poverty. (3) The issue of migrant families living with HIV has been studied to some extent, but mainly in developed countries with a long history of migration, and with little attention paid to the children in such families. Difficulties include involuntary separation from family members, isolation and lack of support, disclosure and planning for children's care should the parent(s) die and differences in treatment access within the same family. Numerous research and policy gaps are defined regarding the three themes, and a call is made for thinking about migration, families and AIDS to go beyond description to include resilience theory, and to go beyond prevention to include care. PMID:22380978

  6. How Children Learn To Write: Supporting and Developing Children's Writing in School.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Latham, Dorothy

    This book outlines the processes involved when children learn to write, and it shows how certain strategies can improve children's progress in writing. Dealing with the age range 3-13, the book addresses issues of the gender gap, children with English as an additional language, and left-handedness. It includes ideas for assessment of writing. It…

  7. Self-Esteem: A Comparison between Hong Kong Children and Newly Arrived Chinese Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chan, Yiu Man; Chan, Christine Mei-Sheung

    2004-01-01

    The Self-esteem Inventory developed by Coopersmith (1967) was used to measure the self-esteem of 387 Chinese children. The sample included newly arrived mainland Chinese children and Hong Kong children. The results showed significant statistical differences when measuring the self-esteem level associated with the length of their stay in Hong Kong…

  8. How Children Learn To Write: Supporting and Developing Children's Writing in School.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Latham, Dorothy

    This book outlines the processes involved when children learn to write, and it shows how certain strategies can improve children's progress in writing. Dealing with the age range 3-13, the book addresses issues of the gender gap, children with English as an additional language, and left-handedness. It includes ideas for assessment of writing. It

  9. Detecting Children's Lies: Are Parents Accurate Judges of Their Own Children's Lies?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Talwar, Victoria; Renaud, Sarah-Jane; Conway, Lauryn

    2015-01-01

    The current study investigated whether parents are accurate judges of their own children's lie-telling behavior. Participants included 250 mother-child dyads. Children were between three and 11 years of age. A temptation resistance paradigm was used to elicit a minor transgressive behavior from the children involving peeking at a forbidden toy and…

  10. Raising Our Voices for Children. Association for Children of New Jersey Annual Report, 2006

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Association for Children of New Jersey, 2006

    2006-01-01

    Through research and policy advocacy, the Association for Children of New Jersey (ACNJ) works to change state policies and improve programs for children, and advocates to bring together many more voices on behalf of children. The annual report reviews 2006 accomplishments, including: (1) More state funding for preschool ensure that more children…

  11. Self-Regulation during Pretend Play in Children with Intellectual Disability and in Normally Developing Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vieillevoye, Sandrine; Nader-Grosbois, Nathalie

    2008-01-01

    This study investigated the symbolic behavior and the self-regulation in dyads of children with intellectual disability and of normally developing children. Specifically, these processes were studied in link with the children's characteristics (mental age, linguistic level, individual pretend play level). The sample included 80 participants, 40…

  12. Nonoffending Parent Expectations of Sexually Abused Children: Predictive Factors and Influence on Children's Recovery

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kouyoumdjian, Haig; Perry, Andrea R.; Hansen, David J.

    2009-01-01

    This study examined the influence of parental expectations on the functioning of sexually abused children. Participants included 67 sexually abused youth and 63 of their nonoffending primary caregivers. Parental expectations about how sexual abuse will impact children were predictive of parents' ratings of children's behavior at pretreatment,…

  13. Healthy Environments for Children

    MedlinePlus

    ... THAT’S WHERE CHILDREN RUN THE RISK OF CONTRACTING DENGUE!!! PARASITES AND MOSQUITOS TRANSMIT SERIOUS DISEASES THAT CLAIM ... CAN REPRODUCE IN THESE PLACES AND THEN TRANSMIT DENGUE AND OTHER DISEASES WHEN THEY BITE PEOPLE! 13 ...

  14. Nuclear Fiction for Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brians, Paul

    1988-01-01

    Indicates that books with realistic views of both war and peace are still rare. Claims children cannot escape the subject of nuclear war so they deserve books that will confront their fears honestly and present reasonable solutions. (RT)

  15. Cushing's Syndrome in Children

    MedlinePlus

    ... obese children or adolescents with other medical or psychological problems. Salivary cortisol levels (collecting saliva in a tube at midnight and in the morning) are also used as a screen- ing test. Normally, the cortisol level in the body is ...

  16. Children's Mental Health

    MedlinePlus

    ... Share Compartir New Study The impact of having ADHD and other mental disorders on affected children. More ... emotions. Some examples of childhood mental disorders are: Attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) Behavior disorders Mood and anxiety disorders Substance ...

  17. Children's Tumor Foundation

    MedlinePlus

    ... Board members represent a wide spectrum of uniquely gifted individuals from all reaches of the country committed ... advances. Strategic Planning and Research Oversight Discover the Children's Tumor Foundation's plan to accelerate progress toward finding ...

  18. ADHD in Young Children

    MedlinePlus

    ... getting prior authorization and other policies that may affect ADHD treatment. http://bit.ly/1SQQfN0 Support scale ... Behind the Issue Vital Signs Issue details: ADHD in Young Children, Morbidity and ...

  19. Depression in Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Epstein, Michael H.; Cullinan, Douglas

    1986-01-01

    This article reviews research on the prevalence, classification, etiology, assessment, and treatment of childhood depression. Suggestions for school health personnel who directly or indirectly serve depressed children are given. (Author/MT)

  20. Traveling with children

    MedlinePlus

    ... of all medicines your child is taking. PLANES, TRAINS, BUSES Bring snacks and familiar foods with you. ... children. Check with them. Remember to ask airlines, train, or bus companies and hotels for guidance and ...

  1. Fecal Incontinence in Children

    MedlinePlus

    ... but in most cases it's because of chronic constipation. Potty-trained children often get constipated simply because ... and hardens. The next step is preventing future constipation. You will play a big role in this ...

  2. [Acute pancreatitis in children].

    PubMed

    Rottier, B L; Holl, R A; Draaisma, J M

    1998-02-21

    Acute pancreatitis is probably commoner in children than was previously thought. In children it is most commonly associated with trauma or viral infection. The presentation may be subtler than in adults, requiring a high index of suspicion in the clinician. In three children, two boys aged 4 and 10 and a girl of 15 years, acute pancreatitis was suspected because of the findings at ultrasonography and endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography performed when the disease recurred (the boy aged 4), apathy and immobility without dehydration or other obvious causes (the boy aged 10), and severe abdominal pain in combination with vomiting (the girl). All three patients had severely increased (urinary) amylase levels. Most often, acute pancreatitis in children tends to be a self-limiting disease which responds well to conservative treatment. PMID:9562770

  3. England's Clever Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Flack, Carol; Flack, Don

    1979-01-01

    The article describes the program for gifted children in English primary and infant schools. Attitudes toward early identification, both pro and con, are reported for several school administrators. (SBH)

  4. Children's Hypervideo Neurosis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ferullo, Robert J.

    1979-01-01

    Excessive television viewing in the formative years can complicate, if not paralyze, children's psychological development and educational achievement. It distorts their perceptions of reality and it causes them to be overactive, overanxious, and inattentive. (Author/SJL)

  5. Sexual Abuse of Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Csapo, Marg

    1988-01-01

    Canadian reports and legislation are reviewed to highlight the school's role in prevention and reporting of suspicions of child sexual abuse. The vulnerability of handicapped children and child pornography are two areas of victimization emphasized. (Author/DB)

  6. Epilepsy - children - discharge

    MedlinePlus

    ... children should only take showers. Put pads on sharp corners of furniture. Place a screen in front ... area. Clear the area of furniture or other sharp objects. Turn the child on their side to ...

  7. Antituberculosis drugs in children.

    PubMed

    Schaaf, H S; Garcia-Prats, A J; Donald, P R

    2015-09-01

    Tuberculosis (TB) remains a global threat to children, as it often goes undiagnosed and leads to high morbidity and mortality. Active contact tracing leading to initiation of preventive therapy and early diagnosis with immediate effective treatment, whether it is drug-susceptible or drug-resistant TB, could reduce mortality and morbidity. In order to achieve this it is necessary to understand the currently available drugs, their role in treatment, their doses, and adverse effects. However, there is still limited pharmacokinetic data on antituberculosis drugs in children, few child-friendly formulations, and knowledge gaps regarding their pharmacodynamics. A discussion of the available antituberculosis drugs is presented, with a focus on their pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics, to provide reasoning for the currently recommended doses for children. More pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamics studies, for both existing and novel drugs, are urgently needed to optimize dosing of antituberculosis drugs in children and for development of child-friendly formulations. PMID:26095192

  8. Children and Dietary Supplements

    MedlinePlus

    ... Dietary Supplements and Nutraceuticals (Endocrine Practice) [945KB PDF] Probiotics and Children (Journal of Pediatric Gastroenterology and Nutrition) [ ... Two Studies Explore the Potential Health Benefits of Probiotics (07/04/08) Traditional Chinese Herbs May Benefit ...

  9. Children and HIV

    MedlinePlus

    ... in Revised April 29, 2014 Select a Language: Fact Sheet 612 Children and HIV HOW SERIOUS IS HIV ... and most pregnant women are taking ARVs. See fact sheet 611 for more information on pregnancy and HIV. ...

  10. Children and Parasitic Diseases

    MedlinePlus

    ... can become infested with head lice (pediculosis) or scabies , both of which are spread by close person- ... toxocariasis , spread when children ingest soil contaminated with dog or cat feces containing the eggs of cat ...

  11. Children's Brain Tumor Foundation

    MedlinePlus

    ... CBTF Justin's Hope Fund Grant Recipients Grants Children’s Brain Tumor Foundation, A non-profit organization, was founded ... and the long term outlook for children with brain and spinal cord tumors through research, support, education, ...

  12. Obesity in children

    MedlinePlus

    Obesity means having too much body fat. It is not the same as overweight, which means a ... they develop more fat cells and may develop obesity. Normally, infants and young children respond to signals ...

  13. Diarrhea in children - diet

    MedlinePlus

    ... easy for a child with diarrhea to become dehydrated. Dehydration is a serious condition in babies and young ... through drinking for all but the most seriously dehydrated children, or those who can't keep fluids ...

  14. Exercise and children

    MedlinePlus

    ... or tag Swimming Playing organized sports (such as soccer, basketball, and football) Younger children have a shorter ... skiing, or biking. Others prefer group sports, like soccer, football, or basketball. Choose an exercise that works ...

  15. Protecting Children's Online Privacy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kresses, Mamie

    2001-01-01

    Discuss provisions of new federal Children's Online Privacy Protection Act that principals should know to protect student privacy on the Internet. Also discusses relevant provisions of the Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act. (PKP)

  16. Atrial Fibrillation in Children

    MedlinePlus

    ... visit your child’s healthcare provider if your child displays any of these symptoms: Weakness or fatigue; tiring ... ablation is rarely used in children. A small, flexible catheter (or tube) is inserted into a vein ...

  17. Children: the changing face of AIDS.

    PubMed

    Waring, B

    AIDS is a health crisis for children, not only for those infected, but also for those affected. Several initiatives in the past year have been initiated to help promote a more effective response to the needs and concerns of infected children and their families. The Joint United Nations Programme on HIV/AIDS (UNAIDS) developed a World AIDS Campaign to promote understanding the magnitude and diversity of the impact that HIV has on children and their families, and to press for stronger commitments and increased prevention to minimize the impact. The Children and AIDS International NGO Network (CAINN) aims to promote the rights and needs of children infected and affected by HIV/AIDS. CAINN developed the Convention of the Rights of the Child and other relevant documents and agreements, and is working to identify gaps in research related to children. The Canadian Working Group on AIDS Affected Children was formed in 1997 to insure that organizations representing children are included in all AIDS policy groups, to inform people about needs related specifically to children, and to secure funding. The Canadian Study on Psychosocial Issues for Families Living with HIV/AIDS has released several major studies based on in-depth interviews with caregivers of children living with HIV. The group has made several recommendations on how these children's needs can be met by governmental and NGO groups. Contact information and ordering information for the supplemental documents that the organizations have developed are provided. PMID:11365278

  18. [Accommodation insufficiency in children].

    PubMed

    Boschi, A; Bergmans, J; Moulaert, E; Spiritus, M

    1990-01-01

    Insufficiency of accommodation in children is often misdiagnosed, and particularly in preschool age. Subject if symptoms are unspecific, asthenopia, difficulties in nearwork, and for concentration. Differential diagnosis must be done between dyslexia, non refractive accommodative esotropia with high AC/A. In some cases we can't exclude the possibility of myasthenia even if this subject is still in discussion. The authors report two clinical cases of hypoaccommodation in children. PMID:2133535

  19. Portal hypertension in children.

    PubMed

    Grimaldi, Chiara; de Ville de Goyet, Jean; Nobili, Valerio

    2012-06-01

    The main causes of intrahepatic portal hypertension in children are cirrhosis and congenital hepatic fibrosis. Non cirrhotic portal hypertension in children is mostly due to extrahepatic portal vein obstruction. In half of cases, no underlying disorder is found. The meso-Rex bypass is the preferred treatment, when it is possible. The closest to the portal vein the obstruction, the highest the risk of esophagogastric varices. PMID:22521554

  20. Pharmacovigilance for children's sake.

    PubMed

    Star, Kristina; Edwards, I Ralph

    2014-02-01

    Child age-specific information on efficacy and risk of medicines can be limited for healthcare professionals and patients. It is therefore very important to make the best use of a risk planned approach to the pharmacological treatment of children. This means pharmacovigilance in the broadest sense of gaining the best data from the use of medicines in clinical practice. We consider issues that complicate safe medication use in paediatric care, as well as current progress and provide suggestions for building knowledge within paediatric pharmacovigilance to be used to minimise patient harm. The continuous development in children constitutes a challenge to prescribing and administering age-suitable doses for individual children. Children are not only different from adults but differ vastly within their own age group. Physical growth during childhood is apparent to the eye, but less obvious is the ongoing maturation of organ function important for drug disposition and action. Systematic issues such as medication errors, off-label use and the lack of age-suitable formulations are considerable obstacles for safe medication use in paediatrics. The recognition of emerging adverse drug reactions could be more challenging in developing children. Initiatives to improve the situation have been made by the WHO and regulators in the USA and EU. Age-specific changes in physiology, pharmacology and psychology, as well as systematic issues specific for children need to be considered in the work of assessing spontaneous reports in children. Pharmacovigilance needs to broaden its aims considerably beyond merely capturing new associations between drugs and events, and encompass careful collection on patient characteristics and circumstances around the reported adverse drug reaction to provide essential information that will give clues on how to prevent harm to children. PMID:24446277

  1. Children, adolescents, and advertising.

    PubMed

    Strasburger, Victor C

    2006-12-01

    Advertising is a pervasive influence on children and adolescents. Young people view more than 40,000 ads per year on television alone and increasingly are being exposed to advertising on the Internet, in magazines, and in schools. This exposure may contribute significantly to childhood and adolescent obesity, poor nutrition, and cigarette and alcohol use. Media education has been shown to be effective in mitigating some of the negative effects of advertising on children and adolescents. PMID:17142547

  2. Tuberculosis in Children

    PubMed Central

    Esposito, Susanna; Tagliabue, Claudia; Bosis, Samantha

    2013-01-01

    Tuberculosis (TB) in children is a neglected aspect of the TB epidemic despite it constituting 20% or more of all TB cases in many countries with high TB incidence. Childhood TB is a direct consequence of adult TB but remains overshadowed by adult TB because it is usually smear-negative. Infants and young children are more likely to develop life-threatening forms of TB than older children and adults due to their immature immune systems. Therefore, prompt diagnoses are extremely important although difficult since clinical and radiological signs of TB can be non-specific and variable in children. Despite undeniable advances in identifying definite, probable, or possible TB markers, pediatricians still face many problems when diagnosing TB diagnosis. Moreover, curing TB can be difficult when treatment is delayed and when multi-drug resistant (MDR) pathogens are the cause of the disease. In these cases, the prognosis in children is particularly poor because MDR-TB treatment and treatment duration remain unclear. New studies of diagnostic tests and optimal treatment in children are urgently needed with the final goal of developing an effective anti-TB vaccine. PMID:24363879

  3. Anogenital warts in children.

    PubMed

    Handley, J M; Maw, R D; Bingham, E A; Horner, T; Bharucha, H; Swann, A; Lawther, H; Dinsmore, W W

    1993-05-01

    Fourteen children presenting with anogenital (AG) warts and their close family members were studied; 28.6 and 8.3% of presenting children and other child household members, respectively, had non-genital cutaneous warts; 42.8% of children with AG warts had one or more adult household member with common hand warts. Fifty per cent of all mothers had subclinical cervical papilloma virus (PV) infection; only one male adult had subclinical PV infection of the penis without concurrent AG warts. Of the children with AG warts 42.8% had one or more adult household member with AG warts. Human papilloma virus (HPV) deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA), type 6/11 most frequently, was detected in 38.5% AG wart biopsies from children, and 67% AG wart biopsies from adults. HPV 31/33/35 was detected in 28.5% of cervical preneoplasias and type 6/11 in the one case of subclinical PV infection of the penile shaft. Detection of HPV types 6/11, 16/18, or 31/33/35 in AG warts in children was significantly associated with vertical (from an HPV-infected maternal birth canal during vaginal delivery) or sexual transmission of these warts (Fisher exact probability P = 0.031). PMID:8394232

  4. Parental schooling & children's health.

    PubMed Central

    Zill, N

    1996-01-01

    Nearly one in every four children in the United States is born to a mother who has not finished high school, and more than one in eight is reared by such a mother during the critical preschool period. Large-scale studies show that the health and welfare of children are linked to the education level of their parents, with parent education often being a stronger predictor of child well-being than family income, single parenthood, or family size. Higher parent education levels make it more likely that children will receive adequate medical care and that their daily environments will be protected and responsive to their needs. Average parent education levels have risen over the last 30 years, but progress has slowed because of high rates of immigration from countries with lower education standards and the tendency of more advantaged women to have children later than less advantaged women. The education system and community organizations must provide young people who are not doing well in school with positive alternatives to low- education, high-risk parenthood. Health care providers should be proactive, teaching parents with few resources how best to promote their children's growth and development. The changing global economy makes it more important than ever that current and future generations of children are reared by parents who have adequate skills and training to be competent members of society and effective and responsible parents. Images p34-a p35-a p36-a p39-a p41-a PMID:8610189

  5. Multimedia and children in Turkey.

    PubMed

    Tuncer, A M; Yalin, S S

    1999-01-01

    Multimedia will be regarded as essential tools for children to create their new world. The effects of television on young children's life have been well studied. Television differs, however, from other media, including the movies, in its pervasive impact on children. Children spend more time watching television than any other activity except sleeping. Overall 31% of children spent at least 4 hours a day watching television during weekday and 71.7% during weekend in Turkey. Television's influence on children is a function of the length of time they spend watching and the cumulative effect of what they see. Television may be a cause as well as a solution for many serious childhood problems. Excessive viewing of television has also been linked to aggressive behavior, violence, childhood obesity. On the other hand, television may act as a socializing agent and as a learning tool if the recommendations of American Academy of Pediatrics is learned by pediatricians, parents and broadcasters. The use of home personal computers in urban residence increased from 3.2% in 1993 to 6.5% by January 1998 in Turkey. Around 20% of computer households reported owing a modem. Internet has been using only for 5 years in Turkey. Nearly 40% of computer households also used CD-ROM equipment. The percentage of schools that have a computer laboratory is only 2.64%. On the other hand, multimedia allows students to move away from a uniform education for everyone to assert individual identity, liberalize education and management. It seems likely that, within the next few years, most of the countries with substantial internet infrastructure will use the internet as the major medium for disseminating information, including information on children. To prepare students for such a world demands that educational systems make the best possible use of all knowledge and technologies currently available. PMID:10770073

  6. Children, the Flu, and the Flu Vaccine

    MedlinePlus

    ... Vaccine Children and Flu Antiviral Drugs Caregivers of Young Children Children with Neurologic Conditions Health Care Workers Schools & Childcare Providers Guidance for School Administrators to ...

  7. Places for Women and Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wiens, Janet

    2002-01-01

    Profiles college programs and accompanying facilities that offer housing for single mothers with children, including College of St. Mary in Omaha, Nebraska; College of Misericordia in Dallas, Pennsylvania; and Baldwin-Wallace College in Berea, Ohio. Includes a sidebar on the University of Dayton's renovated child care center. (EV)

  8. Children's Books: Awards and Prizes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Colbert, Margaret, Comp.

    This document is a compilation of honors awarded in the children's book field by organizations, schools, universities, publishers, and newspapers. Major international and foreign awards of English speaking countries are included. The awards are arranged alphabetically. Each award entry includes a brief history of the award and a list of all…

  9. [Avian influenza in children].

    PubMed

    Bouscambert-Duchamp, M; Lina, B; Morfin, F

    2009-10-01

    The emerging A (H5N1) influenza virus is a clear pandemic threat. This avian virus is responsible for the largest epizootic event described so far. To date, 423 humans have been infected. In humans, this virus is responsible for a rapidly developing pneumonia, with an acute respiratory failure leading to death in 60% of the infected cases. The multi-organ failure seems to result from the cytokine storm. A (H5N1) infections are mainly reported in children and young adults. Different hypotheses have been proposed to explain this specific feature, including the lack of control of cytokine release during infection, or the presence of alternative cellular receptors. The specific susceptibility of children is more likely to be related with exposure to infected birds than to specific immune or physiological factors. The proper and efficient management of A (H5N1) infection is possible nowadays. Today, the pandemic threat is real and may be imminent because of the circulation of new A (H1N1). However, an active surveillance of A (H5N1) virus remains very important to monitor the genetic evolution of this changing and virulent virus. PMID:19836671

  10. Hydrocephalus in children.

    PubMed

    Kahle, Kristopher T; Kulkarni, Abhaya V; Limbrick, David D; Warf, Benjamin C

    2016-02-20

    Hydrocephalus is a common disorder of cerebral spinal fluid (CSF) physiology resulting in abnormal expansion of the cerebral ventricles. Infants commonly present with progressive macrocephaly whereas children older than 2 years generally present with signs and symptoms of intracranial hypertension. The classic understanding of hydrocephalus as the result of obstruction to bulk flow of CSF is evolving to models that incorporate dysfunctional cerebral pulsations, brain compliance, and newly characterised water-transport mechanisms. Hydrocephalus has many causes. Congenital hydrocephalus, most commonly involving aqueduct stenosis, has been linked to genes that regulate brain growth and development. Hydrocephalus can also be acquired, mostly from pathological processes that affect ventricular outflow, subarachnoid space function, or cerebral venous compliance. Treatment options include shunt and endoscopic approaches, which should be individualised to the child. The long-term outcome for children that have received treatment for hydrocephalus varies. Advances in brain imaging, technology, and understanding of the pathophysiology should ultimately lead to improved treatment of the disorder. PMID:26256071

  11. Gastroenteritis in children

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Introduction Acute gastroenteritis results from infection of the gastrointestinal tract, most commonly with a virus. It is characterised by rapid onset of diarrhoea with or without vomiting, nausea, fever, and abdominal pain. Diarrhoea is defined as the frequent passage of unformed, liquid stools. Regardless of the cause, the mainstay of management of acute gastroenteritis is provision of adequate fluids to prevent and treat dehydration. Methods and outcomes We conducted a systematic review and aimed to answer the following clinical questions: What are the effects of interventions to prevent acute gastroenteritis in children? What are the effects of treatments for acute gastroenteritis in children? We searched: Medline, Embase, The Cochrane Library, and other important databases up to March 2010 (Clinical Evidence reviews are updated periodically; please check our website for the most up-to-date version of this review). We included harms alerts from relevant organisations such as the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and the UK Medicines and Healthcare products Regulatory Agency (MHRA). Results We found 42 systematic reviews, RCTs, or observational studies that met our inclusion criteria. We performed a GRADE evaluation of the quality of evidence for interventions. Conclusions In this systematic review, we present information relating to the effectiveness and safety of: rotavirus vaccines for the prevention of gastroenteritis; enteral rehydration solutions (oral or gastric), lactose-free feeds, loperamide, probiotics, and zinc for the treatment of gastroenteritis; and ondansetron for the treatment of vomiting. PMID:21791124

  12. Verbs and Syntactic Frames in Childrens Elicited Actions: A Comparison of Tamil- and English-Speaking Children

    PubMed Central

    Laakso, Aarre; Smith, Linda B.

    2015-01-01

    We directly compare children learning argument expressing and argument dropping languages on the use of verb meaning and syntactic cues, by examining enactments of transitive and intransitive verbs given in transitive and intransitive syntactic frames. Our results show similarities in the childrens knowledge: (1) Children were somewhat less likely to perform an action when the core meaning of a verb was in conflict with the frame in which it was presented; (2) Children enacted the core meaning of the verb with considerable accuracy in all conditions; and (3) Children altered their actions to include or not include explicit objects appropriately to the frame. The results suggest that 3-year-olds learning languages that present them with very different structural cues still show similar knowledge about and sensitivity to the core meanings of transitive and intransitive verbs as well as the implications of the frames in which they appear. PMID:21499789

  13. Parental Communication of Trauma among Children of Holocaust Survivors.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sorscher, Nechama; Cohen, Lisa J.

    The effect of parental Holocaust trauma on children's Jewish identity and Holocaust-related ideation was investigated through comparison of children of survivors with children of American Jews. The role of possible mediating factors, (the quality of parental communication style) was also assessed. Subjects included 40 adult children of Jewish…

  14. Possibilities and Quandaries for Young Children's Active Citizenship

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Phillips, Louise

    2011-01-01

    Research Findings: Concepts of children's citizenship are highly contested. Contemporary policy and rhetoric increasingly includes the concept of citizenship in relation to children, yet there is considerable ambiguity as to what children's citizenship actually means. Unlike other marginalized groups, it is not children claiming citizenship rights…

  15. MRI and Motor Outcomes in Children with Cerebral Palsy.

    PubMed

    Gaebler-Spira, Deborah; McCormick, Kristen

    2015-08-01

    Investigators from University of Melbourne, Monash Children's Hospital, Royal Children's Hospital & Murdoch Children's Research Institute sought to identify correlation between magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) characteristics including white matter injury (WMI) in children with cerebral palsy (CP) and severity in motor outcomes later in life, irrespective of CP subtype. PMID:26933597

  16. Effects of Misleading Postevent Information on Children's Memory.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schwartz-Kenney, Beth M.; Buford, Katherine B.

    This study examined the influence of misleading information on children's memory of a real-life event. After participating in a play session, 10 three-year-old children and 10 six-year-old children heard a narrative that included inaccurate information about the play session. The children were then presented with items from the play session (event…

  17. Fathers and Young Children's Literacy Experiences in a Family Environment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Saracho, Olivia N.

    2007-01-01

    Research provides evidence that fathers can promote the development of their children's literacy skills, including reading books to them that are appropriate, engaging their children in discussions about books they read, recording in a notebook the books the children have read and encouraging their children to read more books. This review presents…

  18. Self Representation in Children with and without Autism Spectrum Disorders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carmody, Dennis P.; Lewis, Michael

    2012-01-01

    In order to examine the roles of mental age, social interaction, and communication in self-representation abilities, typically-developing children were compared with children with Autism Spectrum Disorders. Typically-developing children (TD, n = 66) and children with Autism Spectrum Disorders (ASD, n = 20), including subgroups of autistic disorder…

  19. Children's Voice. Volume 15, Number 5, September/October 2006

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boehm, Steven S., Ed.

    2006-01-01

    By publishing a diverse range of views on a wide array of topics, "Children's Voice" seeks to encourage public discussion and debate among those who are committed to helping children and families. "Children's Voice" is published bimonthly by the Child Welfare League of America. This issue of "Children's Voice" includes: (1) Defining Family:…

  20. Connecting Children's eCulture to Curriculum: Implications for Educators

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Laverick, Deanna M.

    2009-01-01

    This article discusses the benefits of including "children's eCulture" in school curricula. "Children's eCulture" is the culture of children as it relates to electronics and technology. Integrating children's eCulture into formal learning experiences allows teachers to promote multiple literacies in their students. The article will describe the…