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Sample records for chimeric alphavirus vaccine

  1. CHIMERIC ALPHAVIRUS VACCINE CANDIDATES FOR CHIKUNGUNYA

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Eryu; Volkova, Eugenia; Adams, A. Paige; Forrester, Naomi; Xiao, Shu-Yuan; Frolov, Ilya; Weaver, Scott C.

    2008-01-01

    Chikungunya virus (CHIKV) is an emerging alphavirus that has caused major epidemics in India and islands off the east coast of Africa since 2005. Importations into Europe and the Americas, including one that led to epidemic transmission in Italy during 2007, underscore the risk of endemic establishment elsewhere. Because there is no licensed human vaccine, and an attenuated Investigational New Drug product developed by the U.S. Army causes mild arthritis in some vaccinees, we developed chimeric alphavirus vaccine candidates using either Venezuelan equine encephalitis attenuated vaccine strain TC-83, a naturally attenuated strain of eastern equine encephalitis virus (EEEV), or Sindbis virus as a backbone and the structural protein genes of CHIKV. All vaccine candidates replicated efficiently in cell cultures, and were highly attenuated in mice. All of the chimeras also produced robust neutralizing antibody responses, although the TC-83 and EEEV backbones appeared to offer greater immunogenicity. Vaccinated mice were fully protected against disease and viremia after CHIKV challenge. PMID:18692107

  2. Chimeric Alphavirus Vaccine Candidates Protect Mice from Intranasal Challenge with Western Equine Encephalitis Virus

    PubMed Central

    Atasheva, Svetlana; Wang, Eryu; Adams, A. Paige; Plante, Kenneth S.; Ni, Sai; Taylor, Katherine; Miller, Mary E.; Frolov, Ilya; Weaver, Scott C.

    2011-01-01

    We developed two types of chimeric Sindbis virus (SINV)/western equine encephalitis virus (WEEV) alphaviruses to investigate their potential use as live virus vaccines against WEE. The first-generation vaccine candidate, SIN/CO92, was derived from structural protein genes of WEEV strain CO92-1356, and two second-generation candidates were derived from WEEV strain McMillan. For both first- and second-generation vaccine candidates, the nonstructural protein genes were derived from SINV strain AR339. Second-generation vaccine candidates SIN/SIN/McM and SIN/EEE/McM included the envelope glycoprotein genes from WEEV strain McMillan; however, the amino-terminal half of the capsid, which encodes the RNA-binding domain, was derived from either SINV or eastern equine encephalitis virus (EEEV) strain FL93-939. All chimeric viruses replicated efficiently in mammalian and mosquito cell cultures and were highly attenuated in 6-week-old mice. Vaccinated mice developed little or no detectable disease and showed little or no evidence of challenge virus replication; however, all developed high titers of neutralizing antibodies. Upon intranasal challenge with high doses of virulent WEEV strains, mice vaccinated with ≥105 PFU of SIN/CO92 or ≥104 PFU of SIN/SIN/McM or SIN/EEE/McM were completely protected from disease. These findings support the potential use of these live-attenuated vaccine candidates as safe and effective vaccines against WEE. PMID:19446595

  3. Lack of interference with immunogenicity of a chimeric alphavirus replicon particle-based influenza vaccine by preexisting antivector immunity.

    PubMed

    Uematsu, Yasushi; Vajdy, Michael; Lian, Ying; Perri, Silvia; Greer, Catherine E; Legg, Harold S; Galli, Grazia; Saletti, Giulietta; Otten, Gillis R; Rappuoli, Rino; Barnett, Susan W; Polo, John M

    2012-07-01

    Antivector immunity has been recognized as a potential caveat of using virus-based vaccines. In the present study, an alphavirus-based replicon particle vaccine platform, which has demonstrated robust immunogenicity in animal models, was tested for effects of antivector immunity on immunogenicity against hemagglutinin of influenza virus as a target antigen and efficacy for protection against lethal challenge with the virus. Chimeric alphavirus-based replicon particles, comprising Venezuelan equine encephalitis virus nonstructural and Sindbis virus structural components, induced efficient protective antibody responses, which were not adversely influenced after multiple immunizations with the same vector expressing various antigens. PMID:22623651

  4. Alphavirus-Based Vaccines

    PubMed Central

    Lundstrom, Kenneth

    2014-01-01

    Alphavirus vectors have demonstrated high levels of transient heterologous gene expression both in vitro and in vivo and, therefore, possess attractive features for vaccine development. The most commonly used delivery vectors are based on three single-stranded encapsulated alphaviruses, namely Semliki Forest virus, Sindbis virus and Venezuelan equine encephalitis virus. Alphavirus vectors have been applied as replication-deficient recombinant viral particles and, more recently, as replication-proficient particles. Moreover, in vitro transcribed RNA, as well as layered DNA vectors have been applied for immunization. A large number of highly immunogenic viral structural proteins expressed from alphavirus vectors have elicited strong neutralizing antibody responses in multispecies animal models. Furthermore, immunization studies have demonstrated robust protection against challenges with lethal doses of virus in rodents and primates. Similarly, vaccination with alphavirus vectors expressing tumor antigens resulted in prophylactic protection against challenges with tumor-inducing cancerous cells. As certain alphaviruses, such as Chikungunya virus, have been associated with epidemics in animals and humans, attention has also been paid to the development of vaccines against alphaviruses themselves. Recent progress in alphavirus vector development and vaccine technology has allowed conducting clinical trials in humans. PMID:24937089

  5. Chimeric Pestivirus Experimental Vaccines.

    PubMed

    Reimann, Ilona; Blome, Sandra; Beer, Martin

    2016-01-01

    Chimeric pestiviruses have shown great potential as marker vaccine candidates against pestiviral infections. Exemplarily, we describe here the construction and testing of the most promising classical swine fever vaccine candidate "CP7_E2alf" in detail. The description is focused on classical cloning technologies in combination with reverse genetics. PMID:26458840

  6. Current Strategic Thinking for the Development of a Trivalent Alphavirus Vaccine for Human Use

    PubMed Central

    Wolfe, Daniel N.; Heppner, D. Gray; Gardner, Shea N.; Jaing, Crystal; Dupuy, Lesley C.; Schmaljohn, Connie S.; Carlton, Kevin

    2014-01-01

    Vaccinations against the encephalitic alphaviruses (western, eastern, and Venezuelan equine encephalitis virus) are of significant interest to biological defense, public health, and agricultural communities alike. Although vaccines licensed for veterinary applications are used in the Western Hemisphere and attenuated or inactivated viruses have been used under Investigational New Drug status to protect at-risk personnel, there are currently no licensed vaccines for use in humans. Here, we will discuss the need for a trivalent vaccine that can protect humans against all three viruses, recent progress to such a vaccine, and a strategy to continue development to Food and Drug Administration licensure. PMID:24842880

  7. Vaccination against pancreas disease in Atlantic salmon, Salmo salar L., reduces shedding of salmonid alphavirus.

    PubMed

    Skjold, Pål; Sommerset, Ingunn; Frost, Petter; Villoing, Stephane

    2016-01-01

    Salmon pancreas disease virus, often referred to as salmonid alphavirus (SAV), causes pancreas disease (PD) in European salmonids. SAV transmits horizontally from fish shedding virus into the water and ocean currents are believed to be a main contributor of viral spread between marine farms. Vaccination against PD is previously shown to reduce mortality and severity of clinical PD. In this study, we demonstrate that vaccination against PD significantly reduces viral shedding from infected individuals. The results suggest that PD vaccination can be an important tool to reduce the infection pressure, a known key risk for PD outbreaks at neighbouring farms. PMID:27496170

  8. Salmonid alphavirus replication in mosquito cells: towards a novel vaccine production system

    PubMed Central

    Hikke, Mia C; Verest, Marjan; Vlak, Just M; Pijlman, Gorben P

    2014-01-01

    Salmonid alphavirus (SAV) causes pancreas disease and sleeping disease in Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar) and rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) and confers a major burden to the aquaculture industry. A commercial inactivated whole virus vaccine propagated in a salmon cell line at low temperature provides effective protection against SAV infections. Alphaviruses (family Togaviridae) are generally transmitted between vertebrate hosts via blood-sucking arthropod vectors, typically mosquitoes. SAV is unique in this respect because it can be transmitted directly from fish to fish and has no known invertebrate vector. Here, we show for the first time that SAV is able to complete a full infectious cycle within arthropod cells derived from the Asian tiger mosquito Aedes albopictus. Progeny virus is produced in C6/36 and U4.4. cells in a temperature-dependent manner (at 15°C but not at 18°C), can be serially passaged and remains infectious to salmonid Chinook salmon embryo cells. This suggests that SAV is not a vertebrate-restricted alphavirus after all and may have the potential to replicate in invertebrates. The current study also shows the ability of SAV to be propagated in mosquito cells, thereby possibly providing an alternative SAV production system for vaccine applications. PMID:24418177

  9. A chimeric Sindbis-based vaccine protects cynomolgus macaques against a lethal aerosol challenge of eastern equine encephalitis virus

    PubMed Central

    Roy, Chad J.; Adams, A. Paige; Wang, Eryu; Leal, Grace; Seymour, Robert L.; Sivasubramani, Satheesh K.; Mega, William; Frolov, Ilya; Didier, Peter J.; Weaver, Scott C.

    2013-01-01

    Eastern equine encephalitis virus (EEEV) is a mosquito-borne alphavirus that causes sporadic, often fatal disease outbreaks in humans and equids, and is also a biological threat agent. Two chimeric vaccine candidates were constructed using a cDNA clone with a Sindbis virus (SINV) backbone and structural protein genes from either a North (SIN/NAEEEV) or South American (SIN/SAEEEV) strain of EEEV. The vaccine candidates were tested in a nonhuman primate (NHP) model of eastern equine encephalitis (EEE). Cynomolgus macaques were either sham-vaccinated, or vaccinated with a single dose of either SIN/NAEEEV or SIN/SAEEEV. After vaccination, animals were challenged by aerosol with a virulent North American strain of EEEV (NA EEEV). The SIN/NAEEEV vaccine provided significant protection, and most vaccinated animals survived EEEV challenge (82%) with little evidence of disease, whereas most SIN/SAEEEV-vaccinated (83%) and control (100%) animals died. Protected animals exhibited minimal changes in temperature and cardiovascular rhythm, whereas unprotected animals showed profound hyperthermia and changes in heart rate post-exposure. Acute inflammation and neuronal necrosis were consistent with EEEV-induced encephalitis in unprotected animals, whereas no encephalitis-related histopathologic changes were observed in the SIN/NAEEEV-vaccinated animals. These results demonstrate that the chimeric SIN/NAEEEV vaccine candidate protects against an aerosol EEEV exposure. PMID:23333212

  10. Development of a nanoparticle-based oral vaccine for Atlantic salmon against ISAV using an alphavirus replicon as adjuvant.

    PubMed

    Rivas-Aravena, Andrea; Fuentes, Yazmin; Cartagena, Julio; Brito, Tania; Poggio, Verónica; La Torre, José; Mendoza, Hegaly; Gonzalez-Nilo, Fernando; Sandino, Ana María; Spencer, Eugenio

    2015-07-01

    Adjuvants used in vaccine aquaculture are frequently harmful for the fish, causing melanosis, granulomas and kidney damage. Along with that, vaccines are mostly administered by injection, causing pain and stress to the fish. We used the DNA coding for the replicase of alphavirus as adjuvant (Ad) of a vaccine against ISAV. The Ad and an inactivated ISAV (V) were loaded in chitosan nanoparticles (NPs) to be administered orally to Atlantic salmon. NP-Ad was able to deliver the DNA ex vivo and in vivo. Oral administration of the NPs stimulated the expression of immune molecules, but did not stimulate the humoral response. Although the vaccination with NP-V results in a modest protection of fish against ISAV, NP-V administered together with NP-Ad caused a protection of 77%. Therefore, the DNA coding for the replicase of alphavirus could be administered orally and can potentiate the immuneprotection of a virine against infection. PMID:25862072

  11. Identifying the Role of E2 Domains on Alphavirus Neutralization and Protective Immune Responses

    PubMed Central

    Weger-Lucarelli, James; Aliota, Matthew T.; Kamlangdee, Attapon; Osorio, Jorge E.

    2015-01-01

    Background Chikungunya virus (CHIKV) and other alphaviruses are the etiologic agents of numerous diseases in both humans and animals. Despite this, the viral mediators of protective immunity against alphaviruses are poorly understood, highlighted by the lack of a licensed human vaccine for any member of this virus genus. The alphavirus E2, the receptor-binding envelope protein, is considered to be the predominant target of the protective host immune response. Although envelope protein domains have been studied for vaccine and neutralization in flaviviruses, their role in alphaviruses is less characterized. Here, we describe the role of the alphavirus E2 domains in neutralization and protection through the use of chimeric viruses. Methodology/Principal Findings Four chimeric viruses were constructed in which individual E2 domains of CHIKV were replaced with the corresponding domain from Semliki Forest virus (SFV) (ΔDomA/ΔDomB/ΔDomC/ ΔDomA+B). Vaccination studies in mice (both live and inactivated virus) revealed that domain B was the primary determinant of neutralization. Neutralization studies with CHIKV immune serum from humans were consistent with mouse studies, as ΔDomB was poorly neutralized. Conclusions/Significance Using chimeric viruses, it was determined that the alphavirus E2 domain B was the critical target of neutralizing antibodies in both mice and humans. Therefore, chimeric viruses may have more relevance for vaccine discovery than peptide-based approaches, which only detect linear epitopes. This study provides new insight into the role of alphavirus E2 domains on neutralization determinants and may be useful for the design of novel therapeutic technologies. PMID:26473963

  12. Immunogenicity of candidate chimeric DNA vaccine against tuberculosis and leishmaniasis.

    PubMed

    Dey, Ayan; Kumar, Umesh; Sharma, Pawan; Singh, Sarman

    2009-08-13

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis and Leishmania donovani are important intracellular pathogens, especially in Indian context. In India and other South East Asian countries, both these infections are highly endemic and in about 20% cases co-infection of these pathogens is reported. For both these pathogens cell mediated immunity plays most important role. The available treatment of these infections is either prolonged or cumbersome or it is ineffective in controlling the outbreaks and spread. Therefore, potentiation of a common host defense mechanism can be used to prevent both the infections simultaneously. In this study we have developed a novel chimeric DNA vaccine candidate comprising the esat-6 gene of M. tuberculosis and kinesin motor domain gene of L. donovani. After developing this novel chimera, its immunogenicity was studied in mouse model. The immune response was compared with individual constructs of esat-6 and kinesin motor domain. The results showed that immunization with chimeric DNA vaccine construct resulted in stronger IFN-gamma and IL-2 response against kinesin (3012+/-102 and 367.5+/-8.92pg/ml) and ESAT-6 (1334+/-46.5 and 245.1+/-7.72pg/ml) in comparison to the individual vaccine constructs. The reciprocal immune response (IFN-gamma and IL-2) against individual construct was lower (kinesin motor domain: 1788+/-36.48 and 341.8+/-9.801pg/ml and ESAT-6: 867.0+/-47.23 and 170.8+/-4.578pg/ml, respectively). The results also suggest that using the chimeric construct both proteins yielded a reciprocal adjuvant affect over each other as the IFN-gamma production against chimera vaccination is statistically significant (p<0.0001) than individual construct vaccination. From this pilot study we could envisage that the chimeric DNA vaccine construct may offer an attractive strategy in controlling co-infection of leishmaniasis and tuberculosis and have important implication in future vaccine design. PMID:19559111

  13. Protective and immunological behavior of chimeric yellow fever dengue vaccine.

    PubMed

    Halstead, Scott B; Russell, Philip K

    2016-03-29

    Clinical observations from the third year of the Sanofi Pasteur chimeric yellow fever dengue tetravalent vaccine (CYD) trials document both protection and vaccination-enhanced dengue disease among vaccine recipients. Children who were 5 years-old or younger when vaccinated experienced a DENV disease resulting in hospitalization at 5 times the rate of controls. On closer inspection, hospitalized cases among vaccinated seropositives, those at highest risk to hospitalized disease accompanying a dengue virus (DENV) infection, were greatly reduced by vaccination. But, seronegative individuals of all ages after being vaccinated were only modestly protected from mild to moderate disease throughout the entire observation period despite developing neutralizing antibodies at high rates. Applying a simple epidemiological model to the data, vaccinated seronegative individuals of all ages were at increased risk of developing hospitalized disease during a subsequent wild type DENV infection. The etiology of disease in placebo and vaccinated children resulting in hospitalization during a DENV infection, while clinically similar are of different origin. The implications of the observed mixture of DENV protection and enhanced disease in CYD vaccinees are discussed. PMID:26873054

  14. Alphavirus capsid proteins self-assemble into core-like particles in insect cells: A promising platform for nanoparticle vaccine development.

    PubMed

    Hikke, Mia C; Geertsema, Corinne; Wu, Vincen; Metz, Stefan W; van Lent, Jan W; Vlak, Just M; Pijlman, Gorben P

    2016-02-01

    The mosquito-borne chikungunya virus (CHIKV) causes arthritic diseases in humans, whereas the aquatic salmonid alphavirus (SAV) is associated with high mortality in aquaculture of salmon and trout. Using modern biotechnological approaches, promising vaccine candidates based upon highly immunogenic, enveloped virus-like particles (eVLPs) have been developed. However, the eVLP structure (core, lipid membrane, surface glycoproteins) is more complex than that of non-enveloped, protein-only VLPs, which are structurally and morphologically 'simple'. In order to develop an alternative to alphavirus eVLPs, in this paper we engineered recombinant baculovirus vectors to produce high levels of alphavirus core-like particles (CLPs) in insect cells by expression of the CHIKV and SAV capsid proteins. The CLPs localize in dense nuclear bodies within the infected cell nucleus and are purified through a rapid and scalable protocol involving cell lysis, sonication and low-speed centrifugation steps. Furthermore, an immunogenic epitope from the alphavirus E2 glycoprotein can be successfully fused to the N-terminus of the capsid protein without disrupting the CLP self-assembling properties. We propose that immunogenic epitope-tagged alphavirus CLPs produced in insect cells present a simple and perhaps more stable alternative to alphavirus eVLPs. PMID:26287127

  15. Molecular Smallpox Vaccine Delivered by Alphavirus Replicons Elicits Protective Immunity in Mice and Non-human Primates

    PubMed Central

    Hooper, Jay W.; Ferro, Anthony M.; Golden, Joseph W.; Silvera, Peter; Dudek, Jeanne; Alterson, Kim; Custer, Max; Rivers, Bryan; Morris, John; Owens, Gary; Smith, Jonathan F.; Kamrud, Kurt I.

    2009-01-01

    Naturally occurring smallpox was eradicated as a result of successful vaccination campaigns during the 1960s and 70s. Because of its highly contagious nature and high mortality rate, smallpox has significant potential as a biological weapon. Unfortunately, the current vaccine for orthopoxviruses is contraindicated for large portions of the population. Thus, there is a need for new, safe, and effective orthopoxvirus vaccines. Alphavirus replicon vectors, derived from strains of Venezuelan equine encephalitis virus, are being used to develop alternatives to the current smallpox vaccine. Here, we demonstrated that virus-like replicon particles (VRP) expressing the vaccinia virus A33R, B5R, A27L, and L1R genes elicited protective immunity in mice comparable to vaccination with live-vaccinia virus. Furthermore, cynomolgus macaques vaccinated with a combination of the four poxvirus VRPs (4pox-VRP) developed antibody responses to each antigen. These antibody responses were able to neutralize and inhibit the spread of both vaccinia virus and monkeypox virus. Macaques vaccinated with 4pox-VRP, flu HA VRP (negative control), or live-vaccinia virus (positive control) were challenged intravenously with 5 × 106 PFU of monkeypox virus 1 month after the second VRP vaccination. Four of the six negative control animals succumbed to monkeypox and the remaining two animals demonstrated either severe or grave disease. Importantly, all 10 macaques vaccinated with the 4pox-VRP vaccine survived without developing severe disease. These findings revealed that a single-boost VRP smallpox vaccine shows promise as a safe alternative to the currently licensed live-vaccinia virus smallpox vaccine. PMID:19833247

  16. CHIMERIC SINDBIS/EASTERN EQUINE ENCEPHALITIS VACCINE CANDIDATES ARE HIGHLY ATTENUATED AND IMMUNOGENIC IN MICE

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Eryu; Petrakova, Olga; Adams, A. Paige; Aguilar, Patricia V.; Kang, Wenli; Paessler, Slobodan; Volk, Sara M.; Frolov, Ilya; Weaver, Scott C.

    2007-01-01

    We developed chimeric Sindbis (SINV)/Eastern equine encephalitis (EEEV) viruses and investigated their potential for use as live virus vaccines against EEEV. One vaccine candidate contained structural protein genes from a typical North American EEEV strain, while the other had structural proteins from a naturally attenuated Brazilian isolate. Both chimeric viruses replicated efficiently in mammalian and mosquito cell cultures and were highly attenuated in mice. Vaccinated mice did not develop detectable disease or viremia, but developed high titers of neutralizing antibodies. Upon challenge with EEEV, mice vaccinated with >104PFU of the chimeric viruses were completely protected from disease. These findings support the potential use of these SIN/EEEV chimeras as safe and effective vaccines. PMID:17904699

  17. ENCEPHALITIC ALPHAVIRUSES

    PubMed Central

    Zacks, Michele A.; Paessler, Slobodan

    2009-01-01

    SHORT SUMMARY This review will cover zoonotic, encephalitic alphaviruses in the family Togaviridae. Encephalitic alphaviruses, i.e. western- (WEEV), eastern- (EEEV), Venezuelan equine encephalitis virus (VEEV) and, more rarely, Ross River virus, Chikungunya virus and Highlands J virus (HJV), are neuroinvasive and may cause neurological symptoms ranging from mild (e.g., febrile illness) to severe (e.g., encephalitis) in humans and equines. Among the naturally occurring alphaviruses, WEEV, EEEV and VEEV have widespread distributions in North, Central and South America. WEEV has found spanning the U.S. from the mid-West (Michigan and Illinois) to the West coast and extending to Canada with human cases reported in 21 states. EEEV is found along the Gulf (Texas to Florida) and Atlantic Coast (Georgia to New Hampshire), as well as in the mid-West (Wisconsin, Illinois and Michigan) and in Canada, with human cases reported in 19 states. In contrast, transmission of VEEV occurs predominantly in Central and South America. As with their geographical distribution, equine encephalitis viruses differ in their main mosquito vector species and their zoonotic potential. PMID:19775836

  18. Custom-engineered chimeric foot-and-mouth disease vaccine elicits protective immune responses in pigs

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Chimeric foot-and-mouth disease viruses (FMDV) of which the antigenic properties can be readily manipulated is a potentially powerful approach in the control of foot-and-mouth disease (FMD) in sub-Saharan Africa. FMD vaccine application is complicated by the extensive variability of the South Africa...

  19. Japanese encephalitis virus vaccine candidates generated by chimerization with dengue virus type 4.

    PubMed

    Gromowski, Gregory D; Firestone, Cai-Yen; Hanson, Christopher T; Whitehead, Stephen S

    2014-05-23

    Japanese encephalitis virus (JEV) is a leading cause of viral encephalitis worldwide and vaccination is one of the most effective ways to prevent disease. A suitable live-attenuated JEV vaccine could be formulated with a live-attenuated tetravalent dengue vaccine for the control of these viruses in endemic areas. Toward this goal, we generated chimeric virus vaccine candidates by replacing the precursor membrane (prM) and envelope (E) protein structural genes of recombinant dengue virus type 4 (rDEN4) or attenuated vaccine candidate rDEN4Δ30 with those of wild-type JEV strain India/78. Mutations were engineered in E, NS3 and NS4B protein genes to improve replication in Vero cells. The chimeric viruses were attenuated in mice and some elicited modest but protective levels of immunity after a single dose. One particular chimeric virus, bearing E protein mutation Q264H, replicated to higher titer in tissue culture and was significantly more immunogenic in mice. The results are compared with live-attenuated JEV vaccine strain SA14-14-2. PMID:24699473

  20. Dissecting the Role of E2 Protein Domains in Alphavirus Pathogenicity

    PubMed Central

    Weger-Lucarelli, James; Aliota, Matthew T.; Wlodarchak, Nathan; Kamlangdee, Attapon; Swanson, Ryan

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Alphaviruses represent a diverse set of arboviruses, many of which are important pathogens. Chikungunya virus (CHIKV), an arthritis-inducing alphavirus, is the cause of a massive ongoing outbreak in the Caribbean and South America. In contrast to CHIKV, other related alphaviruses, such as Venezuelan equine encephalitis virus (VEEV) and Semliki Forest virus (SFV), can cause encephalitic disease. E2, the receptor binding protein, has been implicated as a determinant in cell tropism, host range, pathogenicity, and immunogenicity. Previous reports also have demonstrated that E2 contains residues important for host range expansions and monoclonal antibody binding; however, little is known about what role each protein domain (e.g., A, B, and C) of E2 plays on these factors. Therefore, we constructed chimeric cDNA clones between CHIKV and VEEV or SFV to probe the effect of each domain on pathogenicity in vitro and in vivo. CHIKV chimeras containing each of the domains of the E2 (ΔDomA, ΔDomB, and ΔDomC) from SFV, but not VEEV, were successfully rescued. Interestingly, while all chimeric viruses were attenuated compared to CHIKV in mice, ΔDomB virus showed similar rates of infection and dissemination in Aedes aegypti mosquitoes, suggesting differing roles for the E2 protein in different hosts. In contrast to CHIKV; ΔDomB, and to a lesser extent ΔDomA, caused neuron degeneration and demyelination in mice infected intracranially, suggesting a shift toward a phenotype similar to SFV. Thus, chimeric CHIKV/SFV provide insights on the role the alphavirus E2 protein plays on pathogenesis. IMPORTANCE Chikungunya virus (CHIKV) has caused large outbreaks of acute and chronic arthritis throughout Africa and Southeast Asia and has now become a massive public health threat in the Americas, causing an estimated 1.2 million human cases in just over a year. No approved vaccines or antivirals exist for human use against CHIKV or any other alphavirus. Despite the threat

  1. Cryo-electron Microscopy Structures of Chimeric Hemagglutinin Displayed on a Universal Influenza Vaccine Candidate

    PubMed Central

    Tran, Erin E. H.; Podolsky, Kira A.; Bartesaghi, Alberto; Kuybeda, Oleg; Grandinetti, Giovanna; Wohlbold, Teddy John; Tan, Gene S.; Nachbagauer, Raffael; Palese, Peter; Krammer, Florian

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Influenza viruses expressing chimeric hemagglutinins (HAs) are important tools in the quest for a universal vaccine. Using cryo-electron tomography, we have determined the structures of a chimeric HA variant that comprises an H1 stalk and an H5 globular head domain (cH5/1 HA) in native and antibody-bound states. We show that cH5/1 HA is structurally different from native HA, displaying a 60° rotation between the stalk and head groups, leading to a novel and unexpected “open” arrangement of HA trimers. cH5/1N1 viruses also display higher glycoprotein density than pH1N1 or H5N1 viruses, but despite these differences, antibodies that target either the stalk or head domains of hemagglutinins still bind to cH5/1 HA with the same consequences as those observed with native H1 or H5 HA. Our results show that a large range of structural plasticity can be tolerated in the chimeric spike scaffold without disrupting structural and geometric aspects of antibody binding. Importance Chimeric hemagglutinin proteins are set to undergo human clinical trials as a universal influenza vaccine candidate, yet no structural information for these proteins is available. Using cryo-electron tomography, we report the first three-dimensional (3D) visualization of chimeric hemagglutinin proteins displayed on the surface of the influenza virus. We show that, unexpectedly, the chimeric hemagglutinin structure differs from those of naturally occurring hemagglutinins by displaying a more open head domain and a dramatically twisted head/stalk arrangement. Despite this unusual spatial relationship between head and stalk regions, virus preparations expressing the chimeric hemagglutinin are fully infectious and display a high glycoprotein density, which likely helps induction of a broadly protective immune response. PMID:27006464

  2. Nonmucosal Alphavirus Vaccination Stimulates a Mucosal Inductive Environment in the Peripheral Draining Lymph Node1

    PubMed Central

    Thompson, Joseph M.; Nicholson, Michael G.; Whitmore, Alan C.; Zamora, Melodie; West, Ande; Iwasaki, Akiko; Staats, Herman F.; Johnston, Robert E.

    2009-01-01

    The strongest mucosal immune responses are induced following mucosal Ag delivery and processing in the mucosal lymphoid tissues, and much is known regarding the immunological parameters which regulate immune induction via this pathway. Recently, experimental systems have been identified in which mucosal immune responses are induced following nonmucosal Ag delivery. One such system, footpad delivery of Venezuelan equine encephalitis virus replicon particles (VRP), led to the local production of IgA Abs directed against both expressed and codelivered Ags at multiple mucosal surfaces in mice. In contrast to the mucosal delivery pathway, little is known regarding the lymphoid structures and immunological components that are responsible for mucosal immune induction following nonmucosal delivery. In this study, we have used footpad delivery of VRP to probe the constituents of this alternative pathway for mucosal immune induction. Following nonmucosal VRP delivery, J chain-containing, polymeric IgA Abs were detected in the peripheral draining lymph node (DLN), at a time before IgA detection at mucosal surfaces. Further analysis of the VRP DLN revealed up-regulated α4β7 integrin expression on DLN B cells, expression of mucosal addressin cell adhesion molecule 1 on the DLN high endothelia venules, and production of IL-6 and CC chemokines, all characteristics of mucosal lymphoid tissues. Taken together, these results implicate the peripheral DLN as an integral component of an alternative pathway for mucosal immune induction. A further understanding of the critical immunological and viral components of this pathway may significantly improve both our knowledge of viral-induced immunity and the efficacy of viral-based vaccines. PMID:18566424

  3. A Novel Self-Replicating Chimeric Lentivirus-Like Particle

    PubMed Central

    Young, Kelly R.; Madden, Victoria J.; Johnson, Philip R.; Johnston, Robert E.

    2012-01-01

    Successful live attenuated vaccines mimic natural exposure to pathogens without causing disease and have been successful against several viruses. However, safety concerns prevent the development of attenuated human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) as a vaccine candidate. If a safe, replicating virus vaccine could be developed, it might have the potential to offer significant protection against HIV infection and disease. Described here is the development of a novel self-replicating chimeric virus vaccine candidate that is designed to provide natural exposure to a lentivirus-like particle and to incorporate the properties of a live attenuated virus vaccine without the inherent safety issues associated with attenuated lentiviruses. The genome from the alphavirus Venezuelan equine encephalitis virus (VEE) was modified to express SHIV89.6P genes encoding the structural proteins Gag and Env. Expression of Gag and Env from VEE RNA in primate cells led to the assembly of particles that morphologically and functionally resembled lentivirus virions and that incorporated alphavirus RNA. Infection of CD4+ cells with chimeric lentivirus-like particles was specific and productive, resulting in RNA replication, expression of Gag and Env, and generation of progeny chimeric particles. Further genome modifications designed to enhance encapsidation of the chimeric virus genome and to express an attenuated simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV) protease for particle maturation improved the ability of chimeric lentivirus-like particles to propagate in cell culture. This study provides proof of concept for the feasibility of creating chimeric virus genomes that express lentivirus structural proteins and assemble into infectious particles for presentation of lentivirus immunogens in their native and functional conformation. PMID:22013035

  4. Dose-dependent protection against or exacerbation of disease by a polylactide glycolide microparticle-adsorbed, alphavirus-based measles virus DNA vaccine in rhesus macaques.

    PubMed

    Pan, Chien-Hsiung; Nair, Nitya; Adams, Robert J; Zink, M Christine; Lee, Eun-Young; Polack, Fernando P; Singh, Manmohan; O'Hagan, Derek T; Griffin, Diane E

    2008-04-01

    Measles remains an important cause of vaccine-preventable child mortality. Development of a low-cost, heat-stable vaccine for infants under the age of 6 months could improve measles control by facilitating delivery at the time of other vaccines and by closing a window of susceptibility prior to immunization at 9 months of age. DNA vaccines hold promise for development, but achieving protective levels of antibody has been difficult and there is an incomplete understanding of protective immunity. In the current study, we evaluated the use of a layered alphavirus DNA/RNA vector encoding measles virus H (SINCP-H) adsorbed onto polylactide glycolide (PLG) microparticles. In mice, antibody and T-cell responses to PLG-formulated DNA were substantially improved compared to those to naked DNA. Rhesus macaques received two doses of PLG/SINCP-H delivered either intramuscularly (0.5 mg) or intradermally (0.5 or 0.1 mg). Antibody and T-cell responses were induced but not sustained. On challenge, the intramuscularly vaccinated monkeys did not develop rashes and had lower viremias than vector-treated control monkeys. Monkeys vaccinated with the same dose intradermally developed rashes and viremia. Monkeys vaccinated intradermally with the low dose developed more severe rashes, with histopathologic evidence of syncytia and intense dermal and epidermal inflammation, eosinophilia, and higher viremia compared to vector-treated control monkeys. Protection after challenge correlated with gamma interferon-producing T cells and with early production of high-avidity antibody that bound wild-type H protein. We conclude that PLG/SINCP-H is most efficacious when delivered intramuscularly but does not provide an advantage over standard DNA vaccines for protection against measles. PMID:18287579

  5. Chimeric Epitope Vaccine from Multistage Antigens for Lymphatic Filariasis.

    PubMed

    Anugraha, G; Madhumathi, J; Prince, P R; Prita, P J Jeya; Khatri, V K; Amdare, N P; Reddy, M V R; Kaliraj, P

    2015-10-01

    Lymphatic filariasis, a mosquito-borne parasitic disease, affects more than 120 million people worldwide. Vaccination for filariasis by targeting different stages of the parasite will be a boon to the existing MDA efforts of WHO which required repeated administration of the drug to reduce the infection level and sustained transmission. Onset of a filaria-specific immune response achieved through antigen vaccines can act synergistically with these drugs to enhance the parasite killing. Multi-epitope vaccine approach has been proved to be successful against several parasitic diseases as it overcomes the limitations associated with the whole antigen vaccines. Earlier results from our group suggested the protective efficacy of multi-epitope vaccine comprising two immunodominant epitopes from Brugia malayi antioxidant thioredoxin (TRX), several epitopes from transglutaminase (TGA) and abundant larval transcript-2 (ALT-2). In this study, the prophylactic efficacy of the filarial epitope protein (FEP), a chimera of selective epitopes identified from our earlier study, was tested in a murine model (jird) of filariasis with L3 larvae. FEP conferred a significantly (P < 0.0001) high protection (69.5%) over the control in jirds. We also observed that the multi-epitope recombinant construct (FEP) induces multiple types of protective immune responses, thus ensuring the successful elimination of the parasite; this poses FEP as a potential vaccine candidate. PMID:26179420

  6. Protective efficacy of the chimeric Staphylococcus aureus vaccine candidate IC in sepsis and pneumonia models

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Liuyang; Cai, Changzhi; Feng, Qiang; Shi, Yun; Zuo, Qianfei; Yang, Huijie; Jing, Haiming; Wei, Chao; Zhuang, Yuan; Zou, Quanming; Zeng, Hao

    2016-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus causes serious sepsis and necrotic pneumonia worldwide. Due to the spread of multidrug-resistant strains, developing an effective vaccine is the most promising method for combating S. aureus infection. In this study, based on the immune-dominant areas of the iron surface determinant B (IsdB) and clumping factor A (ClfA), we designed the novel chimeric vaccine IsdB151-277ClfA33-213 (IC). IC formulated with the AlPO4 adjuvant induced higher protection in an S. aureus sepsis model compared with the single components alone and showed broad immune protection against several clinical S. aureus isolates. Immunisation with IC induced strong antibody responses. The protective effect of antibodies was demonstrated through the opsonophagocytic assay (OPA) and passive immunisation experiment. Moreover, this new chimeric vaccine induced Th1/Th17-skewed cellular immune responses based on cytokine profiles and CD4+ T cell stimulation tests. Neutralisation of IL-17A alone (but not IFN-γ) resulted in a significant decrease in vaccine immune protection. Finally, we found that IC showed protective efficacy in a pneumonia model. Taken together, these data provide evidence that IC is a potentially promising vaccine candidate for combating S. aureus sepsis and pneumonia. PMID:26865417

  7. Chimeric Foot-and-Mouth Disease Viruses: Evaluation of Their Efficacy as Potential Marker Vaccines in Cattle

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Previous work in swine has demonstrated that full protection against Foot-and-Mouth Disease (FMD) can be achieved following vaccination with chimeric Foot-and-Mouth Disease Virus (FMDV) vaccines, whereby the VP1 G-H loop has been substituted with a non-homologous alternative. If proven to be effect...

  8. A recombinant chimeric protein containing B chains of ricin and abrin is an effective vaccine candidate

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Junhong; Gao, Shan; Zhang, Tao; Kang, Lin; Cao, Wuchun; Xu, Na; Liu, Wensen; Wang, Jinglin

    2014-01-01

    Both ricin toxin (RT) and abrin toxin (AT) are 2 important toxin agents as potantial bioweapons. A dual subunit vaccine against RT and AT exposure is a promising option for developing prophylactic vaccination. In this study, we constructed a dual vaccine with RT B chain and AT B chain named RTB-ATB. The RTB-ATB chimeric protein was expressed in Escherichia coli (E. coli), and the purified protein was used to evaluate the immune response by a 2 × 2 × 2 × 2 factorial design. The main effects included dose of RTB-ATB, route of immunization injection, immunization time interval, and dose of native toxins challenge. For 2 × LD50 challenge of RT or AT, 100% of the RTB-ATB immunized mice survived and regained or exceeded their initial weights within 10 days. For 4 × LD50 challenge, different routes of immunization injection caused significant difference (P < 0.05), intraperitoneal (i.p.) administration of immunogen protected mice better than the subcutaneous (s.c.) administration. In conclusion, when administered i.p. to mice with 25 μg per mouse and immunization time interval Π in the absence of adjuvant, the chimeric protein elicited a stronger immune response and protected the animals from a dose of native toxins which was 4 times higher than their LD50 in unvaccinated mice. Besides, the RTB-ATB chimeric protein could induce specific neutralizing antibodies against these 2 toxins. We anticipate that this study will open new possibilities in the preparation of RTB-ATB dual subunit vaccine against the exposure to deadly RT and AT. PMID:24509607

  9. Dual-Function Vaccine for Pseudomonas aeruginosa: Characterization of Chimeric Exotoxin A-Pilin Protein

    PubMed Central

    Hertle, Ralf; Mrsny, Randall; Fitzgerald, David J.

    2001-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is the major infectious agent of concern for cystic fibrosis patients. Strategies to prevent colonization by this bacterium and/or neutralize its virulence factors are clearly needed. Here we characterize a dual-function vaccine designed to generate antibodies to reduce bacterial adherence and to neutralize the cytotoxic activity of exotoxin A. To construct the vaccine, key sequences from type IV pilin were inserted into a vector encoding a nontoxic (active-site deletion) version of exotoxin A. The chimeric protein, termed PE64Δ553pil, was expressed in Escherichia coli, refolded to a near-native conformation, and then characterized by various biochemical and immunological assays. PE64Δ553pil bound specifically to asialo-GM1, and, when injected into rabbits, produced antibodies that reduced bacterial adherence and neutralized the cell-killing activity of exotoxin A. Results support further evaluation of this chimeric protein as a vaccine to prevent Pseudomonas colonization in susceptible individuals. PMID:11598071

  10. A Prime-Boost Vaccination Strategy in Cattle to Prevent Foot-and-Mouth Disease Using a “Single-Cycle” Alphavirus Vector and Empty Capsid Particles

    PubMed Central

    Gullberg, Maria; Lohse, Louise; Bøtner, Anette; McInerney, Gerald M.; Burman, Alison; Jackson, Terry; Polacek, Charlotta

    2016-01-01

    Foot-and-mouth disease (FMD) remains one of the most economically important infectious diseases of production animals globally. Vaccination can successfully control this disease, however, current vaccines are imperfect. They are made using chemically inactivated FMD virus (FMDV) that is produced in large-scale mammalian cell culture under high containment conditions. Here, we have expressed the FMDV capsid protein precursor (P1-2A) of strain O1 Manisa alone or with the FMDV 3C protease (3Cpro) using a “single cycle” packaged alphavirus self-replicating RNA based on Semliki Forest virus (SFV). When the FMDV P1-2A was expressed with 3Cpro then processing of the FMDV capsid precursor protein is observed within cells and the proteins assemble into empty capsid particles. The products interact with anti-FMDV antibodies in an ELISA and bind to the integrin αvβ6 (a cellular receptor for FMDV). In cattle vaccinated with these rSFV-FMDV vectors alone, anti-FMDV antibodies were elicited but the immune response was insufficient to give protection against FMDV challenge. However, the prior vaccination with these vectors resulted in a much stronger immune response against FMDV post-challenge and the viremia observed was decreased in level and duration. In subsequent experiments, cattle were sequentially vaccinated with a rSFV-FMDV followed by recombinant FMDV empty capsid particles, or vice versa, prior to challenge. Animals given a primary vaccination with the rSFV-FMDV vector and then boosted with FMDV empty capsids showed a strong anti-FMDV antibody response prior to challenge, they were protected against disease and no FMDV RNA was detected in their sera post-challenge. Initial inoculation with empty capsids followed by the rSFV-FMDV was much less effective at combating the FMDV challenge and a large post-challenge boost to the level of anti-FMDV antibodies was observed. This prime-boost system, using reagents that can be generated outside of high

  11. A Prime-Boost Vaccination Strategy in Cattle to Prevent Foot-and-Mouth Disease Using a "Single-Cycle" Alphavirus Vector and Empty Capsid Particles.

    PubMed

    Gullberg, Maria; Lohse, Louise; Bøtner, Anette; McInerney, Gerald M; Burman, Alison; Jackson, Terry; Polacek, Charlotta; Belsham, Graham J

    2016-01-01

    Foot-and-mouth disease (FMD) remains one of the most economically important infectious diseases of production animals globally. Vaccination can successfully control this disease, however, current vaccines are imperfect. They are made using chemically inactivated FMD virus (FMDV) that is produced in large-scale mammalian cell culture under high containment conditions. Here, we have expressed the FMDV capsid protein precursor (P1-2A) of strain O1 Manisa alone or with the FMDV 3C protease (3Cpro) using a "single cycle" packaged alphavirus self-replicating RNA based on Semliki Forest virus (SFV). When the FMDV P1-2A was expressed with 3Cpro then processing of the FMDV capsid precursor protein is observed within cells and the proteins assemble into empty capsid particles. The products interact with anti-FMDV antibodies in an ELISA and bind to the integrin αvβ6 (a cellular receptor for FMDV). In cattle vaccinated with these rSFV-FMDV vectors alone, anti-FMDV antibodies were elicited but the immune response was insufficient to give protection against FMDV challenge. However, the prior vaccination with these vectors resulted in a much stronger immune response against FMDV post-challenge and the viremia observed was decreased in level and duration. In subsequent experiments, cattle were sequentially vaccinated with a rSFV-FMDV followed by recombinant FMDV empty capsid particles, or vice versa, prior to challenge. Animals given a primary vaccination with the rSFV-FMDV vector and then boosted with FMDV empty capsids showed a strong anti-FMDV antibody response prior to challenge, they were protected against disease and no FMDV RNA was detected in their sera post-challenge. Initial inoculation with empty capsids followed by the rSFV-FMDV was much less effective at combating the FMDV challenge and a large post-challenge boost to the level of anti-FMDV antibodies was observed. This prime-boost system, using reagents that can be generated outside of high-containment facilities

  12. A recombinant, chimeric tetravalent dengue vaccine candidate based on a dengue virus serotype 2 backbone.

    PubMed

    Osorio, Jorge E; Wallace, Derek; Stinchcomb, Dan T

    2016-04-01

    Dengue fever is caused by infection with one of four dengue virus (DENV) serotypes (DENV-1-4), necessitating tetravalent dengue vaccines that can induce protection against all four DENV. Takeda's live attenuated tetravalent dengue vaccine candidate (TDV) comprises an attenuated DENV-2 strain plus chimeric viruses containing the prM and E genes of DENV-1, -3 and -4 cloned into the attenuated DENV-2 'backbone'. In Phase 1 and 2 studies, TDV was well tolerated by children and adults aged 1.5-45 years, irrespective of prior dengue exposure; mild injection-site symptoms were the most common adverse events. TDV induced neutralizing antibody responses and seroconversion to all four DENV as well as cross-reactive T cell-mediated responses that may be necessary for broad protection against dengue fever. PMID:26635182

  13. Enhanced protective efficacy of a chimeric form of the schistosomiasis vaccine antigen Sm-TSP-2.

    PubMed

    Pearson, Mark S; Pickering, Darren A; McSorley, Henry J; Bethony, Jeffrey M; Tribolet, Leon; Dougall, Annette M; Hotez, Peter J; Loukas, Alex

    2012-01-01

    The large extracellular loop of the Schistosoma mansoni tetraspanin, Sm-TSP-2, when fused to a thioredoxin partner and formulated with Freund's adjuvants, has been shown to be an efficacious vaccine against murine schistosomiasis. Moreover, Sm-TSP-2 is uniquely recognised by IgG(1) and IgG(3) from putatively resistant individuals resident in S. mansoni endemic areas in Brazil. In the present study, we expressed Sm-TSP-2 at high yield and in soluble form in E. coli without the need for a solubility enhancing fusion partner. We also expressed in E. coli a chimera called Sm-TSP-2/5B, which consisted of Sm-TSP-2 fused to the immunogenic 5B region of the hookworm aspartic protease and vaccine antigen, Na-APR-1. Sm-TSP-2 formulated with alum/CpG showed significant reductions in adult worm and liver egg burdens in two separate murine schistosomiasis challenge studies. Sm-TSP-2/5B afforded significantly greater protection than Sm-TSP-2 alone when both antigens were formulated with alum/CpG. The enhanced protection obtained with the chimeric fusion protein was associated with increased production of anti-Sm-TSP-2 antibodies and IL-4, IL-10 and IFN-γ from spleen cells of vaccinated animals. Sera from 666 individuals from Brazil who were infected with S. mansoni were screened for potentially deleterious IgE responses to Sm-TSP-2. Anti-Sm-TSP-2 IgE to this protein was not detected (also shown previously for Na-APR-1), suggesting that the chimeric antigen Sm-TSP-2/5B could be used to safely and effectively vaccinate people in areas where schistosomes and hookworms are endemic. PMID:22428079

  14. A tetravalent alphavirus-vector based dengue vaccine provides effective immunity in an early life mouse model.

    PubMed

    Khalil, Syed Muaz; Tonkin, Daniel R; Mattocks, Melissa D; Snead, Andrew T; Johnston, Robert E; White, Laura J

    2014-07-01

    Dengue viruses (DENV1-4) cause 390 million clinical infections every year, several hundred thousand of which progress to severe hemorrhagic and shock syndromes. Preexisting immunity resulting from a previous DENV infection is the major risk factor for severe dengue during secondary heterologous infections. During primary infections in infants, maternal antibodies pose an analogous risk. At the same time, maternal antibodies are likely to prevent induction of endogenous anti-DENV antibodies in response to current live, attenuated virus (LAV) vaccine candidates. Any effective early life dengue vaccine has to overcome maternal antibody interference (leading to ineffective vaccination) and poor induction of antibody responses (increasing the risk of severe dengue disease upon primary infection). In a previous study, we demonstrated that a non-propagating Venezuelan equine encephalitis virus replicon expression vector (VRP), expressing the ectodomain of DENV E protein (E85), overcomes maternal interference in a BALB/c mouse model. We report here that a single immunization with a tetravalent VRP vaccine induced NAb and T-cell responses to each serotype at a level equivalent to the monovalent vaccine components, suggesting that this vaccine modality can overcome serotype interference. Furthermore, neonatal immunization was durable and could be boosted later in life to further increase NAb and T-cell responses. Although the neonatal immune response was lower in magnitude than responses in adult BALB/c mice, we demonstrate that VRP vaccines generated protective immunity from a lethal challenge after a single neonatal immunization. In summary, VRP vaccines expressing DENV antigens were immunogenic and protective in neonates, and hence are promising candidates for safe and effective vaccination in early life. PMID:24882043

  15. CHIMERIC WEST NILE/DENGUE VIRUS VACCINE CANDIDATE: PRECLINICAL EVALUATION IN MICE, GEESE, AND MONKEYS FOR SAFETY AND IMMUNOGENICITY

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A live attenuated virus vaccine is being developed to protect against West Nile virus (WN) disease in humans. Previously, it was found that chimeric West Nile/dengue viruses (WN/DEN4 and WN/DEN4-delta-30) bearing the membrane precursor and envelope protein genes of WN on a backbone of dengue type 4 ...

  16. Ag85A/ESAT-6 chimeric DNA vaccine induces an adverse response in tuberculosis-infected mice.

    PubMed

    Liang, Yan; Bai, Xuejuang; Zhang, Junxian; Song, Jingying; Yang, Yourong; Yu, Qi; Li, Ning; Wu, Xueqiong

    2016-08-01

    The Mycobacterium tuberculosis (M. tb) antigens encoded by the 6 kDa early secretory antigenic target (esat-6) and antigen 85A (ag85a) genes are known to exert protective effects against tuberculosis in animal models. In addition, these antigens represent vaccine components that were tested in early human clinical trials. In the present study, a chimeric DNA vaccine was constructed that contained two copies of the esat‑6 gene inserted into the ag85a gene from M. tb. BALB/c mice were treated with this chimeric vaccine following infection with either M. tb H37Rv or a clinical multi-drug-resistant tuberculosis isolate. Treatment of both groups of mice with the chimeric vaccine resulted in accelerated mortality. These findings are in contrast with previous results, which indicated that DNA vaccines expressing the individual antigens were either beneficial or at least not harmful. The results of the present study suggested that the ESAT-6 antigen is not suitable for inclusion in therapeutic vaccines. PMID:27279275

  17. Ag85A/ESAT-6 chimeric DNA vaccine induces an adverse response in tuberculosis-infected mice

    PubMed Central

    Liang, Yan; Bai, Xuejuang; Zhang, Junxian; Song, Jingying; Yang, Yourong; Yu, Qi; Li, Ning; Wu, Xueqiong

    2016-01-01

    The Mycobacterium tuberculosis (M. tb) antigens encoded by the 6 kDa early secretory antigenic target (esat-6) and antigen 85A (ag85a) genes are known to exert protective effects against tuberculosis in animal models. In addition, these antigens represent vaccine components that were tested in early human clinical trials. In the present study, a chimeric DNA vaccine was constructed that contained two copies of the esat-6 gene inserted into the ag85a gene from M. tb. BALB/c mice were treated with this chimeric vaccine following infection with either M. tb H37Rv or a clinical multi drug resistant tuberculosis isolate. Treatment of both groups of mice with the chimeric vaccine resulted in accelerated mortality. These findings are in contrast with previous results, which indicated that DNA vaccines expressing the individual antigens were either beneficial or at least not harmful. The results of the present study suggested that the ESAT-6 antigen is not suitable for inclusion in therapeutic vaccines. PMID:27279275

  18. An Alphavirus Replicon-Based Human Metapneumovirus Vaccine Is Immunogenic and Protective in Mice and Cotton Rats▿

    PubMed Central

    Mok, Hoyin; Tollefson, Sharon J.; Podsiad, Amy B.; Shepherd, Bryan E.; Polosukhin, Vasiliy V.; Johnston, Robert E.; Williams, John V.; Crowe, James E.

    2008-01-01

    Human metapneumovirus (hMPV) is a recently discovered paramyxovirus that causes upper and lower respiratory tract infections in infants, the elderly, and immunocompromised individuals worldwide. Here, we developed Venezuelan equine encephalitis virus replicon particles (VRPs) encoding hMPV fusion (F) or attachment (G) glycoproteins and evaluated the immunogenicity and protective efficacy of these vaccine candidates in mice and cotton rats. VRPs encoding hMPV F protein, when administered intranasally, induced F-specific virus-neutralizing antibodies in serum and immunoglobulin A (IgA) antibodies in secretions at the respiratory mucosa. Challenge virus replication was reduced significantly in both the upper and lower respiratory tracts following intranasal hMPV challenge in these animals. However, vaccination with hMPV G protein VRPs did not induce neutralizing antibodies or protect animals from hMPV challenge. Close examination of the histopathology of the lungs of VRP-MPV F-vaccinated animals following hMPV challenge revealed no enhancement of inflammation or mucus production. Aberrant cytokine gene expression was not detected in these animals. Together, these results represent an important first step toward the use of VRPs encoding hMPV F proteins as a prophylactic vaccine for hMPV. PMID:18786987

  19. Novel in-ovo chimeric recombinant Newcastle disease vaccine protects against both Newcastle disease and infectious bursal disease.

    PubMed

    Ge, Jinying; Wang, Xijun; Tian, Meijie; Wen, Zhiyuan; Feng, Qiulin; Qi, Xiaole; Gao, Honglei; Wang, Xiaomei; Bu, Zhigao

    2014-03-14

    Development of a safe and efficient in-ovo vaccine against Newcastle disease (NDV) and very virulent infectious bursal disease virus (vvIBDV) is of great importance. In this study, a chimeric NDV LaSota virus with the L gene of Clone-30 (rLaC30L) was used to generate a recombinant chimeric virus expressing the VP2 protein of vvIBDV (rLaC30L-VP2). The safety and efficacy of rLaC30L-VP2 in-ovo vaccination was then evaluated in 18-day-old special pathogen free (SPF) chicken embryos and commercial broiler embryos for prevention of NDV and vvIBDV. Hatchability and global survival rate of the hatched birds was not affected by in-ovo rLaC30L-VP2 vaccination. However, rLaC30L-VP2 in-ovo vaccination induced significant anti-IBDV and anti-NDV antibodies in SPF birds and commercial broilers, and 100% of vaccinated chickens were protected against a lethal NDV challenge. In-ovo rLaC30L-VP2 vaccination also provided resistance against vvIBDV challenge in a significant amount of animals. These results suggest that rLaC30L-VP2 is a safe and efficient bivalent live in-ovo vaccine against NDV and vvIBDV. PMID:24486349

  20. Efficacy of a Tetravalent Chimeric Dengue Vaccine (DENVax) in Cynomolgus Macaques

    PubMed Central

    Osorio, Jorge E.; Brewoo, Joseph N.; Silengo, Shawn J.; Arguello, John; Moldovan, Ioana R.; Tary-Lehmann, Magdalena; Powell, Tim D.; Livengood, Jill A.; Kinney, Richard M.; Huang, Claire Y.-H.; Stinchcomb, Dan T.

    2011-01-01

    Three tetravalent formulations of chimeric dengue (DENVax) viruses containing the pre-membrane and envelope genes of serotypes 1–4 expressed by the attenuated DENV-2 PDK-53 genome were tested for safety, immunogenicity, and efficacy in cynomolgus macaques (Macaca fascicularis). Subcutaneous injection of the DENVax formulations was well-tolerated. Low levels of viremia of only one of the four vaccine viruses were detected yet virus neutralizing antibody titers were induced against all four dengue virus serotypes after one or two administrations of vaccine. All animals immunized with the high-dose formulation were protected from viremia, and all immunized animals were completely protected from DENV-3 and DENV-4 challenge. A lower dose of DENVax formulation partially protected animals from DENV-1 or DENV-2 challenge. In contrast, all control animals developed high levels of viremia for multiple days after challenge with DENV 1–4. This study highlights the immunogenicity and efficacy of the tetravalent DENVax formulations in nonhuman primates. PMID:21633037

  1. Vaccine Adjuvants in Fish Vaccines Make a Difference: Comparing Three Adjuvants (Montanide ISA763A Oil, CpG/Poly I:C Combo and VHSV Glycoprotein) Alone or in Combination Formulated with an Inactivated Whole Salmonid Alphavirus Antigen.

    PubMed

    Thim, Hanna L; Villoing, Stéphane; McLoughlin, Marian; Christie, Karen Elina; Grove, Søren; Frost, Petter; Jørgensen, Jorunn B

    2014-01-01

    Most commercial vaccines offered to the aquaculture industry include inactivated antigens (Ag) formulated in oil adjuvants. Safety concerns are related to the use of oil adjuvants in multivalent vaccines for fish, since adverse side effects (e.g., adhesions) can appear. Therefore, there is a request for vaccine formulations for which protection will be maintained or improved, while the risk of side effects is reduced. Here, by using an inactivated salmonid alphavirus (SAV) as the test Ag, the combined use of two Toll-like receptor (TLR) ligand adjuvants, CpG oligonucleotides (ODNs) and poly I:C, as well as a genetic adjuvant consisting of a DNA plasmid vector expressing the viral haemorrhagic septicaemia virus (VHSV) glycoprotein (G) was explored. VHSV-G DNA vaccine was intramuscularly injected in combination with intraperitoneal injection of either SAV Ag alone or combined with the oil adjuvant, Montanide ISA763, or the CpG/polyI:C combo. Adjuvant formulations were evaluated for their ability to boost immune responses and induce protection against SAV in Atlantic salmon, following cohabitation challenge. It was observed that CpG/polyI:C-based formulations generated the highest neutralizing antibody titres (nAbs) before challenge, which endured post challenge. nAb responses for VHSV G-DNA- and oil-adjuvanted formulations were marginal compared to the CpG/poly I:C treatment. Interestingly, heat-inactivated sera showed reduced nAb titres compared to their non-heated counterparts, which suggests a role of complement-mediated neutralization against SAV. Consistently elevated levels of innate antiviral immune genes in the CpG/polyI:C injected groups suggested a role of IFN-mediated responses. Co-delivery of the VHSV-G DNA construct with either CpG/polyI:C or oil-adjuvanted SAV vaccine generated higher CD4 responses in head kidney at 48 h compared to injection of this vector or SAV Ag alone. The results demonstrate that a combination of pattern recognizing receptor (PRR

  2. Establishment of a novel method without sequence modification for developing NoV P particle-based chimeric vaccines.

    PubMed

    Li, Yingnan; Fu, Lu; Hu, Yue; Jin, Hao; Zheng, Yayuan; Yin, Yuhe; Wu, Hui; Yu, Xianghui; Kong, Wei

    2016-05-01

    The Norovirus (NoV) P particle (PP) is a subviral particle formed by 24 copies of the protruding (P) domain of the capsid protein. Each P domain has three surface loops that can be used for foreign antigen presentation. Hence, PPs have been demonstrated to be an excellent platform for vaccine development against many pathogens. However, current processes for preparing those chimeric PP vaccines vary and would change the original sequence of the PP. A detailed strategy also has not been reported for inserting a foreign antigen into all three loops. In order to develop a novel method for preparing distinct types of PP-based protein vaccines, we created two restriction enzyme sites (EagI and KpnI) in the P domain by site-directed mutagenesis without changing its original sequence. A synthesized gene with three copies of the Alzheimer's disease (AD) immunogen Aβ1-6 was then incorporated in loop2 of the P domain. Additionally, a synthesized gene with one copy of Aβ1-6 was inserted into each loop of the P domain. Furthermore, two recombinant proteins PP-3 copy-Aβ1-6-loop2 and PP-1 copy-Aβ1-6-loop123 were successfully purified without affecting PP formation. Particle size analysis and TEM observations demonstrated that the two chimeric P particles were still able to form 24-mer nanoparticles. Moreover, the two chimeric PP-based AD vaccines could both efficiently elicit strong immune responses in the mouse model. In conclusion, we have successfully established a novel method for preparing vaccines based on the NoV PP which would not affect PP sequence and function. PMID:26773744

  3. Chimeric hepatitis B virus (HBV)/hepatitis C virus (HCV) subviral envelope particles induce efficient anti-HCV antibody production in animals pre-immunized with HBV vaccine.

    PubMed

    Beaumont, Elodie; Roingeard, Philippe

    2015-02-18

    The development of an effective, affordable prophylactic vaccine against hepatitis C virus (HCV) remains a medical priority. The recently described chimeric HBV-HCV subviral envelope particles could potentially be used for this purpose, as they could be produced by industrial procedures adapted from those established for the hepatitis B virus (HBV) vaccine. We show here, in an animal model, that pre-existing immunity acquired through HBV vaccination does not influence the immunogenicity of the HCV E2 protein presented by these chimeric particles. Thus, these chimeric HBV-HCV subviral envelope particles could potentially be used as a booster in individuals previously vaccinated against HBV, to induce protective immunity to HCV. PMID:25596457

  4. Experimental Infection of Aedes sollicitans and Aedes taeniorhynchus with Two Chimeric Sindbis/Eastern Equine Encephalitis Virus Vaccine Candidates

    PubMed Central

    Arrigo, Nicole C.; Watts, Douglas M.; Frolov, Ilya; Weaver, Scott C.

    2008-01-01

    Two chimeric vaccine candidates for Eastern equine encephalitis virus (EEEV) were developed by inserting the structural protein genes of either a North American (NA) or South American (SA) EEEV into a Sindbis virus (SINV) backbone. To assess the effect of chimerization on mosquito infectivity, experimental infections of two potential North American bridge vectors of EEEV, Aedes sollicitans and Ae. taeniorhynchus, were attempted. Both species were susceptible to oral infection with all viruses after ingestion of high titer blood meals of ca. 7.0 log10 plaque-forming units/mL. Dissemination rates for SIN/NAEEEV (0 of 56) and SIN/SAEEEV (1 of 54) were low in Ae. taeniorhynchus and no evidence of transmission potential was observed. In contrast, the chimeras disseminated more efficiently in Ae. sollicitans (19 of 68 and 13 of 57, respectively) and were occasionally detected in the saliva of this species. These results indicate that chimerization of the vaccine candidates reduces infectivity. However, its impact on dissemination and potential transmission is mosquito species-specific. PMID:18187790

  5. Evaluation of a chimeric multi-epitope-based DNA vaccine against subgroup J avian leukosis virus in chickens.

    PubMed

    Xu, Qingqing; Cui, Ning; Ma, Xingjiang; Wang, Fangkun; Li, Hongmei; Shen, Zhiqiang; Zhao, Xiaomin

    2016-07-19

    The prokaryotic expressed recombinant chimeric multi-epitope protein X (rCMEPX) had been evaluated with good immunogenicity and protective efficacy against subgroup J avian leukosis virus (ALV-J) in our previous study. In the present research, we cloned the chimeric multi-epitope gene X into the eukaryotic expression vector pVAX1 to evaluate its potency as a DNA vaccine. The purified recombinant gp85 protein and rCMEPX were used as positive controls and a DNA prime-protein boost strategy was also studied. Six experimental groups of 7-day-old chickens (20 per group) were immunized intramuscularly three times at 2weeks interval with PBS, gp85, rCMEPX, pVAX1, pVAX-X and pVAX-X+rCMEPX respectively. The antibody titers and cellular immune responses were assayed after immunization. The efficacy of immunoprotection against the challenge of ALV-J NX0101 strain was also examined. The results showed that the DNA vaccine could elicit both neutralizing antibodies and cellular responses. Immune-challenge experiments showed good protection efficacy against ALV-J infection. Particularly, the regimen involving one priming pVAX-X and twice recombinant rCMEPX boosting, induced the highest antibody titers in all immunized groups. Our results suggest that the constructed chimeric multi-epitope DNA has potential for a candidate vaccine against ALV-J when used in proper prime-boost combinations. The data presented here may provide an alternative strategy for vaccine design in chicken ALV-J prevention. PMID:27318415

  6. Alphavirus RNA synthesis and non-structural protein functions

    PubMed Central

    Rupp, Jonathan C.; Sokoloski, Kevin J.; Gebhart, Natasha N.

    2015-01-01

    The members of the genus Alphavirus are positive-sense RNA viruses, which are predominantly transmitted to vertebrates by a mosquito vector. Alphavirus disease in humans can be severely debilitating, and depending on the particular viral species, infection may result in encephalitis and possibly death. In recent years, alphaviruses have received significant attention from public health authorities as a consequence of the dramatic emergence of chikungunya virus in the Indian Ocean islands and the Caribbean. Currently, no safe, approved or effective vaccine or antiviral intervention exists for human alphavirus infection. The molecular biology of alphavirus RNA synthesis has been well studied in a few species of the genus and represents a general target for antiviral drug development. This review describes what is currently understood about the regulation of alphavirus RNA synthesis, the roles of the viral non-structural proteins in this process and the functions of cis-acting RNA elements in replication, and points to open questions within the field. PMID:26219641

  7. Preclinical and Clinical Development of a YFV 17 D-Based Chimeric Vaccine against West Nile Virus

    PubMed Central

    Dayan, Gustavo H.; Pugachev, Konstantin; Bevilacqua, Joan; Lang, Jean; Monath, Thomas P.

    2013-01-01

    Substantial success has been achieved in the development and implementation of West Nile (WN) vaccines for horses; however, no human WN vaccines are approved. This review focuses on the construction, pre-clinical and clinical characterization of ChimeriVax-WN02 for humans, a live chimeric vaccine composed of a yellow fever (YF) 17D virus in which the prM-E envelope protein genes are replaced with the corresponding genes of the WN NY99 virus. Pre-clinical studies demonstrated that ChimeriVax-WN02 was significantly less neurovirulent than YF 17D in mice and rhesus and cynomolgus monkeys. The vaccine elicited neutralizing antibody titers after inoculation in hamsters and monkeys and protected immunized animals from lethal challenge including intracerebral inoculation of high dose of WN NY99 virus. Safety, viremia and immunogenicity of ChimeriVax-WN02 were assessed in one phase I study and in two phase II clinical trials. No safety signals were detected in the three clinical trials with no remarkable differences in incidence of adverse events (AEs) between vaccine and placebo recipients. Viremia was transient and the mean viremia levels were low. The vaccine elicited strong and durable neutralizing antibody and cytotoxic T cell responses. WN epidemiology impedes a classical licensure pathway; therefore, innovative licensure strategies should be explored. PMID:24351795

  8. Application of bluetongue Disabled Infectious Single Animal (DISA) vaccine for different serotypes by VP2 exchange or incorporation of chimeric VP2.

    PubMed

    Feenstra, Femke; Pap, Janny S; van Rijn, Piet A

    2015-02-01

    Bluetongue is a disease of ruminants caused by the bluetongue virus (BTV). Bluetongue outbreaks can be controlled by vaccination, however, currently available vaccines have several drawbacks. Further, there are at least 26 BTV serotypes, with low cross protection. A next-generation vaccine based on live-attenuated BTV without expression of non-structural proteins NS3/NS3a, named Disabled Infectious Single Animal (DISA) vaccine, was recently developed for serotype 8 by exchange of the serotype determining outer capsid protein VP2. DISA vaccines are replicating vaccines but do not cause detectable viremia, and induce serotype specific protection. Here, we exchanged VP2 of laboratory strain BTV1 for VP2 of European serotypes 2, 4, 8 and 9 using reverse genetics, without observing large effects on virus growth. Exchange of VP2 from serotype 16 and 25 was however not possible. Therefore, chimeric VP2 proteins of BTV1 containing possible immunogenic regions of these serotypes were studied. BTV1, expressing 1/16 chimeric VP2 proteins was functional in virus replication in vitro and contained neutralizing epitopes of both serotype 1 and 16. For serotype 25 this approach failed. We combined VP2 exchange with the NS3/NS3a negative phenotype in BTV1 as previously described for serotype 8 DISA vaccine. DISA vaccine with 1/16 chimeric VP2 containing amino acid region 249-398 of serotype 16 raised antibodies in sheep neutralizing both BTV1 and BTV16. This suggests that DISA vaccine could be protective for both parental serotypes present in chimeric VP2. We here demonstrate the application of the BT DISA vaccine platform for several serotypes and further extend the application for serotypes that are unsuccessful in single VP2 exchange. PMID:25510389

  9. Vaccination of dogs with six different candidate leishmaniasis vaccines composed of a chimerical recombinant protein containing ribosomal and histone protein epitopes in combination with different adjuvants.

    PubMed

    Poot, J; Janssen, L H M; van Kasteren-Westerneng, T J; van der Heijden-Liefkens, K H A; Schijns, V E J C; Heckeroth, A

    2009-07-16

    Chimerical protein "Q", composed of antigenic ribosomal and histone sequences, in combination with live BCG is a promising canine leishmaniasis vaccine candidate; one of the few vaccine candidates that have been tested successfully in dogs. Unfortunately, live BCG is not an appropriate adjuvant for commercial application due to safety problems in dogs. In order to find a safe adjuvant with similar efficacy to live BCG, muramyl dipeptide, aluminium hydroxide, Matrix C and killed Propionibacterium acnes in combination with either E. coli- or baculovirus-produced recombinant JPCM5_Q protein were tested. Groups of five or seven dogs were vaccinated with six different adjuvant-antigen combinations and challenged with a high dose intravenous injection of Leishmania infantum JPC strain promastigotes. All candidate vaccines proved to be safe, and both humoral and cellular responses to the recombinant proteins were detected at the end of the prime-boost vaccination scheme. However, clinical and parasitological data obtained during the 10 month follow-up period indicated that protection was not induced by either of the six candidate vaccines. Although no direct evidence was obtained, our data suggest that live BCG may have a significant protective effect against challenge with L. infantum in dogs. PMID:19500553

  10. Attenuation of porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus strain MN184 using chimeric construction with vaccine sequence.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yue; Liang, Yajie; Han, Jun; Burkhart, Kelly M; Vaughn, Eric M; Roof, Michael B; Faaberg, Kay S

    2008-02-20

    Two genetically distinct infectious recombinant virus clones (pMLV, constructed from Ingelvac PRRS MLV and pMN184, constructed from virulent strain MN184) were developed to study attenuation of contemporary porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV) strain MN184. Two reciprocal chimeric clones (pMLVORF1/MN184 and pMN184ORF1/MLV) were then constructed, such that the 5'UTR/ORF1 of one genotype was linked to ORF2-7/3'UTR from the other genotype. In vitro studies demonstrated that the rescued chimeric viruses possessed intermediate growth properties compared to recombinant rMLV and rMN184. Swine inoculation with rMN184 and rMLV verified that these viruses fully mimicked the respective parent virus. In addition, earlier and higher antibody responses were detected in animals infected with rMN184 in contrast to those infected with rMLV. Chimeric virus treatment groups showed similar antibody responses as seen with these parent viruses, but much less severe pathogenesis when compared to the rMN184 group. These data suggested that genetic aspects of Ingelvac PRRS MLV 5'UTR/ORF1 replicase region and/or the structural proteins/3'UTR can serve to attenuate virulent strain MN184. The data also indicated that designed PRRSV vaccines could be developed, keeping the known 5'UTR/replicase region of an early vaccine strain such as Ingelvac PRRS MLV intact, but replacing the structural protein/3'UTR domain with that of an emerging virulent virus. PMID:17976680

  11. Construction and analysis of variants of a polyvalent Lyme disease vaccine: approaches for improving the immune response to chimeric vaccinogens.

    PubMed

    Earnhart, Christopher G; Marconi, Richard T

    2007-04-30

    There is currently no Lyme disease vaccine commercially available for use in humans. Outer surface protein C (OspC) of the Borrelia has been widely investigated as a potential vaccinogen. At least 38 OspC types have been defined. While the antibody response to OspC is protective, the range of protection is narrow due to the localization of protective epitopes within OspC type-specific domains. To develop a broadly protective vaccine, we previously constructed a tetravalent chimeric vaccinogen containing epitopes from OspC types A, B, K, and D. While this construct elicited bactericidal antibody against strains bearing each of the four OspC types, its solubility was low, and decreasing IgG titer to epitopes near the C-terminus of the construct was observed. In this report, construct solubility and immunogenicity were increased by dialysis against an Arg/Glu buffer. We also demonstrate the immunogenicity of the construct in alum. To further optimize epitope-specific immune responses, several constructs were generated with differing epitope organization or with putative C-terminal protective motifs. Analyses of murine antibody titers and isotype profiles induced by these constructs revealed that while the C-terminal tags did not enhance antibody titer, specific epitope reorganization and reiteration did. These analyses provide important information that can be exploited in the development of chimeric vaccinogens in general. PMID:17239505

  12. Exploiting chimeric human antibodies to characterize a protective epitope of Neisseria adhesin A, one of the Bexsero vaccine components.

    PubMed

    Bertoldi, Isabella; Faleri, Agnese; Galli, Barbara; Lo Surdo, Paola; Liguori, Alessia; Norais, Nathalie; Santini, Laura; Masignani, Vega; Pizza, Mariagrazia; Giuliani, Marzia Monica

    2016-01-01

    Neisseria adhesin A (NadA) is one of the antigens of Bexsero, the recently licensed multicomponent vaccine against serogroup B Neisseria meningitidis (MenB). NadA belongs to the class of oligomeric coiled-coil adhesins and is able to mediate adhesion and invasion of human epithelial cells. As a vaccine antigen, NadA has been shown to induce high levels of bactericidal antibodies; however, the domains important for protective response are still unknown. In order to further investigate its immunogenic properties, we have characterized the murine IgG1 mAb (6E3) that was able to recognize the 2 main antigenic variants of NadA on the surface of MenB strains. The epitope targeted by mAb 6E3 was mapped by hydrogen-deuterium exchange mass spectrometry and shown to be located on the coiled-coil stalk region of NadA (aa 206-249). Although no serum bactericidal activity was observed for murine IgG1 mAb 6E3, functional activity was restored when using chimeric antibodies in which the variable regions of the murine mAb 6E3 were fused to human IgG3 constant regions, thus confirming the protective nature of the mAb 6E3 epitope. The use of chimeric antibody molecules will enable future investigations of complement-mediated antibody functionality independently of the Fc-mediated differences in complement activation. PMID:26304221

  13. Immunoprotective activity of a Salmonid Alphavirus Vaccine: comparison of the immune responses induced by inactivated whole virus antigen formulations based on CpG class B oligonucleotides and poly I:C alone or combined with an oil adjuvant.

    PubMed

    Thim, Hanna L; Iliev, Dimitar B; Christie, Karen E; Villoing, Stéphane; McLoughlin, Marian F; Strandskog, Guro; Jørgensen, Jorunn B

    2012-07-01

    CpG oligonucleotides and polyinosinic:polycytidylic acid (poly I:C) are toll-like receptor (TLR) agonists that mimic the immunostimulatory properties of bacterial DNA and double-stranded viral RNA respectively, and which have exhibited potential to serve as vaccine adjuvants in previous experiments. Here, a combination of CpGs and poly I:C together with water- or oil-formulated Salmonid Alphavirus (SAV) antigen preparations has been used for a vaccine in Atlantic salmon and tested for protection in SAV challenge trial. The results demonstrate that vaccination with a high dose of the SAV antigen induced protection against challenge with SAV which correlated with production of neutralizing antibodies (NAbs). As the high antigen dose alone induced full protection, no beneficial effect from the addition of CpG and poly I:C could be observed. Nevertheless, these TLR ligands significantly enhanced the levels of NAbs in serum of vaccinated fish. Interestingly, gene expression analysis demonstrated that while addition of oil suppressed the CpG/poly I:C-induced expression of IFN-γ, the upregulation of IFNa1 was substantially enhanced. A low dose of the SAV antigen combined with oil did not induce any detectable levels of NAbs either with or without TLR ligands present, however the addition of CpG and poly I:C to the low SAV antigen dose formulation significantly enhanced the protection against SAV suggesting that CpG/poly I:C may have enhanced a cytotoxic response - a process which is dependent on the up-regulation of type I IFN. These results highlight the immunostimulatory properties of the tested TLR ligands and will serve as a ground for further, more detailed studies aimed to investigate their capacity to serve as adjuvants in vaccine formulations for Atlantic salmon. PMID:22634299

  14. Chimeric DNA vaccines encoding Eimeria acervulina macrophage migration inhibitory factor (E.MIF) induce partial protection against experimental Eimeria infection.

    PubMed

    Song, Xiaokai; Zhang, Ruirui; Xu, Lixin; Yan, Ruofeng; Li, Xiangrui

    2015-09-01

    Chimeric DNA vaccines co-expressing Eimeria acervulina macrophage migration inhibitory factor (E.MIF) and chicken IL-2 (IL-2) or interferon-γ (IFN-γ) were constructed and their efficacies against E. acervulina were evaluated. The open reading frame (ORF) of E.MIF was cloned from E. acervulina merozoites and subcloned into the eukaryotic expression vector pVAX1 with chicken cytokine gene IFN-γ or IL-2 to construct the DNA vaccines pVAX-E.MIF-IFN-γ, pVAX-E.MIF-IL-2 and pVAX-E.MIF. The in vivo transfection of the target genes was detected by use of reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and Western blot. Immunizations were carried out by vaccinating chickens twice with a dose rate of 100 μg intramuscularly. Seven days post second immunization, all chickens except the unchallenged control group were challenged orally with 1 × 105 sporulated oocysts of E. acervulina. Seven days later, the duodenum was collected. The results showed that the target genes were expressed effectively in vivo. DNA vaccines and the recombinant E.MIF protein could alleviate body weight loss and duodenal lesions significantly compared to the control groups. Furthermore, pVAX-E.MIF-IL-2 and pVAX-E.MIF-IFN-γ induced anticoccidial indexs (ACIs) of 179.12 and 170, respectively, which were significantly higher than that of pVAX-E.MIF (ACI = 162.31). Our results demonstrated that E.MIF is a potential vaccine candidate against E. acervulina and chicken IFN-γ or IL- 2 may be used as genetic adjuvants to improve the efficacies of DNA vaccines against avian coccidiosis. PMID:26204190

  15. SAT Type Foot-and-Mouth Disease (FMD) Chimeric Vaccine Elicits Protection in Pigs

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The recent development of infectious cDNA clone technology for foot-and-mouth disease (FMD), Southern African Territories (SAT) viruses has provided a valuable tool for genetic and biological characterization of field and laboratory strains. Recombinant chimeric viruses, containing the capsid-coding...

  16. Boosting BCG-primed mice with chimeric DNA vaccine HG856A induces potent multifunctional T cell responses and enhanced protection against Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Ji, Ping; Hu, Zhi-Dong; Kang, Han; Yuan, Qin; Ma, Hui; Wen, Han-Li; Wu, Juan; Li, Zhong-Ming; Lowrie, Douglas B; Fan, Xiao-Yong

    2016-02-01

    The tuberculosis pandemic continues to rampage despite widespread use of the current Bacillus Calmette-Guerin (BCG) vaccine. Because DNA vaccines can elicit effective antigen-specific immune responses, including potent T cell-mediated immunity, they are promising vehicles for antigen delivery. In a prime-boost approach, they can supplement the inadequate anti-TB immunological memory induced by BCG. Based on this, a chimeric DNA vaccine HG856A encoding Mycobacterium tuberculosis (M. tuberculosis) immunodominant antigen Ag85A plus two copies of ESAT-6 was constructed. Potent humoral immune responses, as well as therapeutic effects induced by this DNA vaccine, were observed previously in M. tuberculosis-infected mice. In this study, we further evaluated the antigen-specific T cell immune responses and showed that repeated immunization with HG856A gave modest protection against M. tuberculosis challenge infection and significantly boosted the immune protection primed by BCG vaccination. Enhanced protection was accompanied by increased multifunctional Th1 CD4(+) T cell responses, most notably by an elevated frequency of M. tuberculosis antigen-specific IL-2-producing CD4(+) T cells post-vaccination. These data confirm the potential of chimeric DNA vaccine HG856A as an anti-TB vaccine candidate. PMID:26111521

  17. Development of DENVax: A chimeric dengue-2 PDK-53-based tetravalent vaccine for protection against dengue fever

    PubMed Central

    Osorio, Jorge E.; Huang, Claire Y.-H.; Kinney, Richard M.; Stinchcomb, Dan T.

    2015-01-01

    Dengue. virus infection is the leading arboviral cause of disease worldwide. A vaccine is being developed based on the attenuated DEN-2 virus, DEN-2 PDK-53. In this review, we summarize the characteristics of the parent DEN-2 PDK-53 strain as well as the chimeric viruses containing the prM and E genes of DEN-1, DEN-3 or DEN-4 virus in the genetic backbone of the DEN-2 PDK-53 virus (termed DENVax). Tetravalent DENVax formulations containing cloned, fully sequenced isolates of the DEN-2 PDK-53 virus and the three chimeras have been evaluated for safety and efficacy in preclinical animal models. Based on the safety, immunogenicity and efficacy in preclinical studies, Phase 1 clinical testing of DENVax has been initiated. PMID:21777638

  18. Development of a chimeric Plasmodium berghei strain expressing the repeat region of the P. vivax circumsporozoite protein for in vivo evaluation of vaccine efficacy.

    PubMed

    Espinosa, Diego A; Yadava, Anjali; Angov, Evelina; Maurizio, Paul L; Ockenhouse, Christian F; Zavala, Fidel

    2013-08-01

    The development of vaccine candidates against Plasmodium vivax-the most geographically widespread human malaria species-is challenged by technical difficulties, such as the lack of in vitro culture systems and availability of animal models. Chimeric rodent Plasmodium parasites are safe and useful tools for the preclinical evaluation of new vaccine formulations. We report the successful development and characterization of chimeric Plasmodium berghei parasites bearing the type I repeat region of P. vivax circumsporozoite protein (CSP). The P. berghei-P. vivax chimeric strain develops normally in mosquitoes and produces highly infectious sporozoites that produce patent infection in mice that are exposed to the bites of as few as 3 P. berghei-P. vivax-infected mosquitoes. Using this transgenic parasite, we demonstrate that monoclonal and polyclonal antibodies against P. vivax CSP strongly inhibit parasite infection and thus support the notion that these antibodies play an important role in protective immunity. The chimeric parasites we developed represent a robust model for evaluating protective immune responses against P. vivax vaccines based on CSP. PMID:23716612

  19. An Alphavirus Vector-Based Tetravalent Dengue Vaccine Induces a Rapid and Protective Immune Response in Macaques That Differs Qualitatively from Immunity Induced by Live Virus Infection

    PubMed Central

    Sariol, Carlos A.; Mattocks, Melissa D.; Wahala M. P. B., Wahala; Yingsiwaphat, Vorraphun; Collier, Martha L.; Whitley, Jill; Mikkelsen, Rochelle; Rodriguez, Idia V.; Martinez, Melween I.; de Silva, Aravinda; Johnston, Robert E.

    2013-01-01

    Despite many years of research, a dengue vaccine is not available, and the more advanced live attenuated vaccine candidate in clinical trials requires multiple immunizations with long interdose periods and provides low protective efficacy. Here, we report important contributions to the development of a second-generation dengue vaccine. First, we demonstrate that a nonpropagating vaccine vector based on Venezuelan equine encephalitis virus replicon particles (VRP) expressing two configurations of dengue virus E antigen (subviral particles [prME] and soluble E dimers [E85]) successfully immunized and protected macaques against dengue virus, while antivector antibodies did not interfere with a booster immunization. Second, compared to prME-VRP, E85-VRP induced neutralizing antibodies faster, to higher titers, and with improved protective efficacy. Third, this study is the first to map antigenic domains and specificities targeted by vaccination versus natural infection, revealing that, unlike prME-VRP and live virus, E85-VRP induced only serotype-specific antibodies, which predominantly targeted EDIII, suggesting a protective mechanism different from that induced by live virus and possibly live attenuated vaccines. Fourth, a tetravalent E85-VRP dengue vaccine induced a simultaneous and protective response to all 4 serotypes after 2 doses given 6 weeks apart. Balanced responses and protection in macaques provided further support for exploring the immunogenicity and safety of this vaccine candidate in humans. PMID:23302884

  20. Optimization of influenza A vaccine virus by reverse genetic using chimeric HA and NA genes with an extended PR8 backbone.

    PubMed

    Medina, Julie; Boukhebza, Houda; De Saint Jean, Amélie; Sodoyer, Régis; Legastelois, Isabelle; Moste, Catherine

    2015-08-20

    The yield of influenza antigen production may significantly vary between vaccine strains; for example the A/California/07/09 (H1N1)-X179A vaccine virus, prepared during 2009 influenza pandemic, presented a low antigen yield in eggs compared to other seasonal H1N1 reassortants. In this study a bi-chimeric virus expressing HA and NA genes with A/Puerto Rico/8/34 (H1N1) (PR8) and X179A domains was rescued by reverse genetics using a mixture of Vero/CHOK1 cell lines (Medina et al. [7]). The bi-chimeric virus obtained demonstrated to yield much larger amounts of HA than X179A in eggs as measured by single-radial-immunodiffusion (SRID), the reference method to quantify HA protein in influenza vaccine. Such kind of optimized virus using PR8 backbone derived chimeric glycoproteins could be used as improved seed viruses for vaccine production. PMID:26206270

  1. Chimeric Bivalent Virus-Like Particle Vaccine for H5N1 HPAI and ND Confers Protection against a Lethal Challenge in Chickens and Allows a Strategy of Differentiating Infected from Vaccinated Animals (DIVA).

    PubMed

    Noh, Jin-Yong; Park, Jae-Keun; Lee, Dong-Hun; Yuk, Seong-Su; Kwon, Jung-Hoon; Lee, Sang-Won; Lee, Joong-Bok; Park, Seung-Yong; Choi, In-Soo; Song, Chang-Seon

    2016-01-01

    Highly pathogenic avian influenza (HPAI) and Newcastle disease (ND) are considered as the most devastating poultry infections, owing to their worldwide distribution and economical threat. Vaccines have been widely used to control these diseases in the poultry industry in endemic countries. However, vaccination policy without differentiating infected animals from vaccinated animals (DIVA) makes the virus surveillance difficult. In this study, we developed a bivalent virus-like particle (VLP) vaccine that is composed of the hemagglutinin (HA) and matrix 1 (M1) proteins of the H5N1 HPAI virus (HPAIV) and a chimeric protein containing the ectodomain of the ND virus (NDV) fusion (F) protein fused with the cytoplasmic and transmembrane domains of the HPAIV HA protein. A single immunization of chickens with the chimeric VLP vaccine induced high levels of hemagglutination inhibition (HI) antibody titers against H5N1 HPAI virus and anti-NDV antibody detected in ELISA and protected chickens against subsequent lethal HPAIV and NDV infections. Furthermore, we could easily perform DIVA test using the commercial NP-cELISA tests against HPAIV and HI assay against NDV. These results strongly suggest that utilization of chimeric VLP vaccine in poultry species would be a promising strategy for the better control of HPAI and ND simultaneously. PMID:27626934

  2. Safety and immunogenicity of a live attenuated Japanese encephalitis chimeric virus vaccine (IMOJEV®) in children.

    PubMed

    Chokephaibulkit, K; Houillon, G; Feroldi, E; Bouckenooghe, A

    2016-01-01

    JE-CV (IMOJEV®, Sanofi Pasteur, France) is a live attenuated virus vaccine constructed by inserting coding sequences of the prM and E structural proteins of the Japanese encephalitis SA14-14-2 virus into the genome of yellow fever 17D virus. Primary immunization with JE-CV requires a single dose of the vaccine. This article reviews clinical trials of JE-CV in children aged up to 6 years conducted in countries across South-East Asia. Strong and persistent antibody responses were observed after single primary and booster doses, with 97% of children seroprotected up to five years after booster vaccination. Models of long-term antibody persistence predict a median duration of protection of approximately 30 years after a booster dose. The safety and reactogenicity profiles of JE-CV primary and booster doses are comparable to other widely used childhood vaccines. PMID:26588242

  3. Generation of New M2e-HA2 Fusion Chimeric Peptide to Development of a Recombinant Fusion Protein Vaccine

    PubMed Central

    Ameghi, Ali; Baradaran, Behzad; Aghaiypour, Khosrow; Barzegar, Abolfazl; Pilehvar-Soltanahmadi, Yones; Moghadampour, Masood; Taghizadeh, Morteza; Zarghami, Nosratollah

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose was to design a new construction containing influenza virus (H1N1) M2e gene and HA2 gene by bioinformatics approach, cloning the construct in to Escherichia coli and produce M2e-HA2 peptide. Methods: The procedure was done by virus cultivation in SPF eggs, hemagglutination assay (HA), RNA isolation, RT-PCR, primers designed (DNAMAN 4 and Oligo7), virtual fusion construction translation (ExPASy), N-Glycosylated sites prediction (Ensemblegly-Iowa), complete open reading frame (ORF), stop codon studied (NCBI ORF Finder), rare codon determination (GenScript), Solvent accessibility of epitopes (Swiss-PdbViewer), antigenic sites prediction (Protean), fusion PCR of M2e-HA2 gene, sequence analysis, nested PCR, gel electrophoresis, double digestion of pET22b(+) plasmid and the fusion construct, ligation of them, transformation of the ligated vector (pET22b-M2e-HA2) to E.coli (BL21), mass culture the cloned bacterium ,induction the expression by isopropyl-beta-D-thiogalactopyranoside (IPTG), sodium dodecyl sulphate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE), purification the fusion peptide by Ni-NTA column, western blot to verify the purification. Results: In this study we developed a new approach for fusion of Influenza virus M2e (96 nucleotides) and HA2 (663 nucleotides) genes based on fusion PCR strategy and produced a fused fragment with 793 nucleotides. The construct was successfully cloned and expressed. Conclusion: This construct is a 261 amino acid chimeric fusion peptide with about 30 KD molecular weight. According on the latest information; this is the first case of expression and purification M2e-HA2 fusion chimeric peptide, which could be used for development of a recombinant M2e-HA2 fusion protein vaccine. PMID:26793615

  4. Eliciting neutralizing antibodies against the membrane proximal external region of HIV-1 Env by chimeric live attenuated influenza A virus vaccines.

    PubMed

    Zang, Yang; Du, Dongchuan; Li, Na; Su, Weiheng; Liu, Xintao; Zhang, Yan; Nie, Jianhui; Wang, Youchun; Kong, Wei; Jiang, Chunlai

    2015-07-31

    Despite significant efforts directed toward research on HIV-1 vaccines, a truly effective immunogen has not been achieved. However, the broadly neutralizing antibodies (BnAbs) 2F5 and 4E10, targeting the highly conserved membrane proximal external region (MPER) of HIV-1, are two promising tools for vaccine development. Here we engrafted the MPER into the linker domain between the trimeric core structure and the transmembrane domain of influenza A virus HA2 to investigate the potential of such chimeric viruses to elicit HIV-1 neutralizing antibodies. In the context of proliferating attenuated influenza A viruses, these HIV-1 neutralizing antibody epitopes could be continuously expressed and mimicked their native conformation to induce humoral immune responses. While MPER-specific antibodies could be detected in serum of guinea pigs vaccinated with the chimeric viruses, they exhibited only weakly neutralizing activities. These antisera from vaccinated animals neutralized viruses of clades B and BC (tier 1), but not of clades AE (tier 1) and C (tier 2). These results suggest that influenza A virus can be used as a vehicle for displaying MPER and inducing BnAbs, but it provides limited protection against HIV-1 infection. In the future development of HIV-1 vaccines by rational design, a more effective live virus vector or multiple antigens should be chosen to facilitate the process of neutralizing antibody maturation. PMID:26126669

  5. A Chimeric Dengue Virus Vaccine using Japanese Encephalitis Virus Vaccine Strain SA14-14-2 as Backbone Is Immunogenic and Protective against Either Parental Virus in Mice and Nonhuman Primates

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xiao-Feng; Deng, Yong-Qiang; Yang, Hui-Qiang; Zhao, Hui; Jiang, Tao; Yu, Xue-Dong; Li, Shi-Hua; Ye, Qing; Zhu, Shun-Ya; Wang, Hong-Jiang; Zhang, Yu; Ma, Jie; Yu, Yong-Xin; Liu, Zhong-Yu; Qin, E-De; Shi, Pei-Yong

    2013-01-01

    The development of a safe and efficient dengue vaccine represents a global challenge in public health. Chimeric dengue viruses (DENV) based on an attenuated flavivirus have been well developed as vaccine candidates by using reverse genetics. In this study, based on the full-length infectious cDNA clone of the well-known Japanese encephalitis virus live vaccine strain SA14-14-2 as a backbone, a novel chimeric dengue virus (named ChinDENV) was rationally designed and constructed by replacement with the premembrane and envelope genes of dengue 2 virus. The recovered chimeric virus showed growth and plaque properties similar to those of the parental DENV in mammalian and mosquito cells. ChinDENV was highly attenuated in mice, and no viremia was induced in rhesus monkeys upon subcutaneous inoculation. ChinDENV retained its genetic stability and attenuation phenotype after serial 15 passages in cultured cells. A single immunization with various doses of ChinDENV elicited strong neutralizing antibodies in a dose-dependent manner. When vaccinated monkeys were challenged with wild-type DENV, all animals except one that received the lower dose were protected against the development of viremia. Furthermore, immunization with ChinDENV conferred efficient cross protection against lethal JEV challenge in mice in association with robust cellular immunity induced by the replicating nonstructural proteins. Taken together, the results of this preclinical study well demonstrate the great potential of ChinDENV for further development as a dengue vaccine candidate, and this kind of chimeric flavivirus based on JE vaccine virus represents a powerful tool to deliver foreign antigens. PMID:24109223

  6. Packaging signals in alphaviruses.

    PubMed

    Frolova, E; Frolov, I; Schlesinger, S

    1997-01-01

    Alphaviruses synthesize large amounts of both genomic and subgenomic RNA in infected cells, but usually only the genomic RNA is packaged. This implies the existence of an encapsidation or packaging signal which would be responsible for selectivity. Previously, we had identified a region of the Sindbis virus genome that interacts specifically with the viral capsid protein. This 132-nucleotide (nt) fragment lies within the coding region of the nsP1 gene (nt 945 to 1076). We proposed that the 132-mer is important for capsid recognition and initiates the formation of the viral nucleocapsid. To study the encapsidation of Sindbis virus RNAs in infected cells, we designed a new assay that uses the self-replicating Sindbis virus genomes (replicons) which lack the viral structural protein genes and contain heterologous sequences under the control of the subgenomic RNA promoter. These replicons can be packaged into viral particles by using defective helper RNAs that contain the structural protein genes (P. Bredenbeek, I. Frolov, C. M. Rice, and S. Schlesinger, J. Virol. 67:6439-6446, 1993). Insertion of the 132-mer into the subgenomic RNA significantly increased the packaging of this RNA into viral particles. We have used this assay and defective helpers that contain the structural protein genes of Ross River virus (RRV) to investigate the location of the encapsidation signal in the RRV genome. Our results show that there are several fragments that could act as packaging signals. They are all located in a different region of the genome than the signal for the Sindbis virus genome. For RRV, the strongest packaging signal lies between nt 2761 and 3062 in the nsP2 gene. This is the same region that was proposed to contain the packaging signal for Semliki Forest virus genomic RNA. PMID:8985344

  7. Production and evaluation of a recombinant chimeric vaccine against clostridium botulinum neurotoxin types C and D.

    PubMed

    Gil, Luciana A F; da Cunha, Carlos Eduardo P; Moreira, Gustavo M S G; Salvarani, Felipe M; Assis, Ronnie A; Lobato, Francisco Carlos F; Mendonça, Marcelo; Dellagostin, Odir A; Conceição, Fabricio R

    2013-01-01

    Bovine botulism is a fatal disease that is caused by botulinum neurotoxins (BoNTs) produced by Clostridium botulinum serotypes C and D and that causes great economic losses, with nearly 100% lethality during outbreaks. It has also been considered a potential source of human food-borne illness in many countries. Vaccination has been reported to be the most effective way to control bovine botulism. However, the commercially available toxoid-based vaccines are difficult and hazardous to produce. Neutralizing antibodies targeted against the C-terminal fragment of the BoNT heavy chain (HC) are known to confer efficient protection against lethal doses of BoNTs. In this study, a novel recombinant chimera, consisting of Escherichia coli heat-labile enterotoxin B subunit (LTB), a strong adjuvant of the humoral immune response, fused to the HC of BoNT serotypes C and D, was produced in E. coli. Mice vaccinated with the chimera containing LTB and an equivalent molar ratio of the chimera without LTB plus aluminum hydroxide (Al(OH)3) developed 2 IU/mL of antitoxins for both serotypes. Guinea pigs immunized with the recombinant chimera with LTB plus Al(OH)3 developed a protective immune response against both BoNT/C (5 IU/mL) and BoNT/D (10 IU/mL), as determined by a mouse neutralization bioassay with pooled sera. The results achieved with guinea pig sera fulfilled the requirements of commercial vaccines for prevention of botulism, as determined by the Brazilian Ministry of Agriculture, Livestock and Food, Supply. The presence of LTB was essential for the development of a strong humoral immune response, as it acted in synergism with Al(OH)3. Thus, the vaccine described in this study is a strong candidate for the control of botulism in cattle. PMID:23936080

  8. Production and Evaluation of a Recombinant Chimeric Vaccine against Clostridium botulinum Neurotoxin Types C and D

    PubMed Central

    Gil, Luciana A. F.; da Cunha, Carlos Eduardo P.; Moreira, Gustavo M. S. G.; Salvarani, Felipe M.; Assis, Ronnie A.; Lobato, Francisco Carlos F.; Mendonça, Marcelo; Dellagostin, Odir A.; Conceição, Fabricio R.

    2013-01-01

    Bovine botulism is a fatal disease that is caused by botulinum neurotoxins (BoNTs) produced by Clostridium botulinum serotypes C and D and that causes great economic losses, with nearly 100% lethality during outbreaks. It has also been considered a potential source of human food-borne illness in many countries. Vaccination has been reported to be the most effective way to control bovine botulism. However, the commercially available toxoid-based vaccines are difficult and hazardous to produce. Neutralizing antibodies targeted against the C-terminal fragment of the BoNT heavy chain (HC) are known to confer efficient protection against lethal doses of BoNTs. In this study, a novel recombinant chimera, consisting of Escherichia coli heat-labile enterotoxin B subunit (LTB), a strong adjuvant of the humoral immune response, fused to the HC of BoNT serotypes C and D, was produced in E. coli. Mice vaccinated with the chimera containing LTB and an equivalent molar ratio of the chimera without LTB plus aluminum hydroxide (Al(OH)3) developed 2 IU/mL of antitoxins for both serotypes. Guinea pigs immunized with the recombinant chimera with LTB plus Al(OH)3 developed a protective immune response against both BoNT/C (5 IU/mL) and BoNT/D (10 IU/mL), as determined by a mouse neutralization bioassay with pooled sera. The results achieved with guinea pig sera fulfilled the requirements of commercial vaccines for prevention of botulism, as determined by the Brazilian Ministry of Agriculture, Livestock and Food, Supply. The presence of LTB was essential for the development of a strong humoral immune response, as it acted in synergism with Al(OH)3. Thus, the vaccine described in this study is a strong candidate for the control of botulism in cattle. PMID:23936080

  9. A vaccinia virus recombinant transcribing an alphavirus replicon and expressing alphavirus structural proteins leads to packaging of alphavirus infectious single cycle particles.

    PubMed

    Sánchez-Puig, Juana M; Lorenzo, María M; Blasco, Rafael

    2013-01-01

    Poxviruses and Alphaviruses constitute two promising viral vectors that have been used extensively as expression systems, or as vehicles for vaccine purposes. Poxviruses, like vaccinia virus (VV) are well-established vaccine vectors having large insertion capacity, excellent stability, and ease of administration. In turn, replicons derived from Alphaviruses like Semliki Forest virus (SFV) are potent protein expression and immunization vectors but stocks are difficult to produce and maintain. In an attempt to demonstrate the use of a Poxvirus as a means for the delivery of small vaccine vectors, we have constructed and characterized VV/SFV hybrid vectors. A SFV replicon cDNA was inserted in the VV genome and placed under the control of a VV early promoter. The replicon, transcribed from the VV genome as an early transcript, was functional, and thus capable of initiating its own replication and transcription. Further, we constructed a VV recombinant additionally expressing the SFV structural proteins under the control of a vaccinia synthetic early/late promoter. Infection with this recombinant produced concurrent transcription of the replicon and expression of SFV structural proteins, and led to the generation of replicon-containing SFV particles that were released to the medium and were able to infect additional cells. This combined VV/SFV system in a single virus allows the use of VV as a SFV delivery vehicle in vivo. The combination of two vectors, and the possibility of generating in vivo single-cycle, replicon containing alphavirus particles, may open new strategies in vaccine development or in the design of oncolytic viruses. PMID:24130722

  10. Chimeric Vaccine Stimulation of Human Dendritic Cell Indoleamine 2, 3-Dioxygenase Occurs via the Non-Canonical NF-κB Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Nan-Sun; Mbongue, Jacques C.; Nicholas, Dequina A.; Esebanmen, Grace E.; Unternaehrer, Juli J.; Firek, Anthony F.; Langridge, William H. R.

    2016-01-01

    A chimeric protein vaccine composed of the cholera toxin B subunit fused to proinsulin (CTB-INS) was shown to suppress type 1 diabetes onset in NOD mice and upregulate biosynthesis of the tryptophan catabolic enzyme indoleamine 2, 3-dioxygenase (IDO1) in human dendritic cells (DCs). Here we demonstrate siRNA inhibition of the NF-κB-inducing kinase (NIK) suppresses vaccine-induced IDO1 biosynthesis as well as IKKα phosphorylation. Chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) analysis of CTB-INS inoculated DCs showed that RelB bound to NF-κB consensus sequences in the IDO1 promoter, suggesting vaccine stimulation of the non-canonical NF-κB pathway activates IDO1 expression in vivo. The addition of Tumor Necrosis Factor Associated Factors (TRAF) TRAF 2, 3 and TRAF6 blocking peptides to vaccine inoculated DCs was shown to inhibit IDO1 biosynthesis. This experimental outcome suggests vaccine activation of the TNFR super-family receptor pathway leads to upregulation of IDO1 biosynthesis in CTB-INS inoculated dendritic cells. Together, our experimental data suggest the CTB-INS vaccine uses a TNFR-dependent signaling pathway of the non-canonical NF-κB signaling pathway resulting in suppression of dendritic cell mediated type 1 diabetes autoimmunity. PMID:26881431

  11. Chimeric Vaccine Stimulation of Human Dendritic Cell Indoleamine 2, 3-Dioxygenase Occurs via the Non-Canonical NF-κB Pathway.

    PubMed

    Kim, Nan-Sun; Mbongue, Jacques C; Nicholas, Dequina A; Esebanmen, Grace E; Unternaehrer, Juli J; Firek, Anthony F; Langridge, William H R

    2016-01-01

    A chimeric protein vaccine composed of the cholera toxin B subunit fused to proinsulin (CTB-INS) was shown to suppress type 1 diabetes onset in NOD mice and upregulate biosynthesis of the tryptophan catabolic enzyme indoleamine 2, 3-dioxygenase (IDO1) in human dendritic cells (DCs). Here we demonstrate siRNA inhibition of the NF-κB-inducing kinase (NIK) suppresses vaccine-induced IDO1 biosynthesis as well as IKKα phosphorylation. Chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) analysis of CTB-INS inoculated DCs showed that RelB bound to NF-κB consensus sequences in the IDO1 promoter, suggesting vaccine stimulation of the non-canonical NF-κB pathway activates IDO1 expression in vivo. The addition of Tumor Necrosis Factor Associated Factors (TRAF) TRAF 2, 3 and TRAF6 blocking peptides to vaccine inoculated DCs was shown to inhibit IDO1 biosynthesis. This experimental outcome suggests vaccine activation of the TNFR super-family receptor pathway leads to upregulation of IDO1 biosynthesis in CTB-INS inoculated dendritic cells. Together, our experimental data suggest the CTB-INS vaccine uses a TNFR-dependent signaling pathway of the non-canonical NF-κB signaling pathway resulting in suppression of dendritic cell mediated type 1 diabetes autoimmunity. PMID:26881431

  12. Antigen 43/Fcε3 chimeric protein expressed by a novel bacterial surface expression system as an effective asthma vaccine

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Feng-Ying; Wang, Cai-Chun; Huang, Yong-Hao; Zhao, Huan-Ge; Guo, Jun-Li; Zhou, Song-Lin; Wang, Hua; Lin, Ying-Ying; Tan, Guang-Hong

    2014-01-01

    The IgE Fcε3 domain is an active immunotherapeutic target for asthma and other allergic diseases. However, previous methods for preparing IgE fusion protein vaccines are complex. Antigen 43 (Ag43) is a surface protein found in Escherichia coli that contains α and β subunits (the α subunit contains multiple T epitopes). Here we constructed a novel Ag43 surface display system (Ag43 system) to express Ag43 chimeric proteins to disrupt immune tolerance against IgE. The Ag43 system was constructed from the E. coli strain Tan109, in which the Ag43 gene was deleted and a recombinant plasmid (pETAg43) expressing a partial Ag43 gene was introduced. The Fcε3 domain of the IgE gene was then subcloned into plasmid pETAg43, resulting in a recombinant plasmid pETAg43/Fcε3, which was used to transform Tan109 for Ag43/Fcε3 surface expression. Thereafter, Ag43/Fcε3 was investigated as an asthma vaccine in a mouse model. Ag43/Fcε3 was expressed on and could be separated from the bacterial surface by heating to 60° while retaining activity. Ag43/Fcε3, as a protein vaccine, produced neutralizing autoantibodies to murine IgE, induced significant anti-asthma effects, and regulated IgE and T helper cytokines in a murine asthma model. Data show that Ag43/Fcε3 chimeric protein is a potential model vaccine for asthma treatment, and that the Ag43 system may be an effective tool for novel vaccine preparation to break immune tolerance to other self-molecules. PMID:24750112

  13. Control of tick infestations and pathogen prevalence in cattle and sheep farms vaccinated with the recombinant Subolesin-Major Surface Protein 1a chimeric antigen

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Despite the use of chemical acaricides, tick infestations continue to affect animal health and production worldwide. Tick vaccines have been proposed as a cost-effective and environmentally friendly alternative for tick control. Vaccination with the candidate tick protective antigen, Subolesin (SUB), has been shown experimentally to be effective in controlling vector infestations and pathogen infection. Furthermore, Escherichia coli membranes containing the chimeric antigen composed of SUB fused to Anaplasma marginale Major Surface Protein 1a (MSP1a) (SUB-MSP1a) were produced using a simple low-cost process and proved to be effective for the control of cattle tick, Rhipicephalus (Boophilus) microplus and R. annulatus infestations in pen trials. In this research, field trials were conducted to characterize the effect of vaccination with SUB-MSP1a on tick infestations and the prevalence of tick-borne pathogens in a randomized controlled prospective study. Methods Two cattle and two sheep farms with similar geographical locations and production characteristics were randomly assigned to control and vaccinated groups. Ticks were collected, counted, weighed and classified and the prevalence of tick-borne pathogens at the DNA and serological levels were followed for one year prior to and 9 months after vaccination. Results Both cattle and sheep developed antibodies against SUB in response to vaccination. The main effect of the vaccine in cattle was the 8-fold reduction in the percent of infested animals while vaccination in sheep reduced tick infestations by 63%. Female tick weight was 32-55% lower in ticks collected from both vaccinated cattle and sheep when compared to controls. The seroprevalence of Babesia bigemina was lower by 30% in vaccinated cattle, suggesting a possible role for the vaccine in decreasing the prevalence of this tick-borne pathogen. The effect of the vaccine in reducing the frequency of one A. marginale msp4 genotype probably reflected

  14. Reduction of porcine circovirus type 2 (PCV2) viremia by a reformulated inactivated chimeric PCV1-2 vaccine-induced humoral and cellular immunity after experimental PCV2 challenge

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The objective of the present study was to elucidate the humoral and cellular immune response mechanisms by which a reformulated inactivated chimeric PCV1-2 vaccine reduces the PCV2 viremia. Forty PCV2 seronegative 3-week-old pigs were randomly divided into the following four groups: vaccinated challenged (T01), vaccinated non-challenged (T02), non-vaccinated challenged (T03), and non-vaccinated non-challenged (T04) animals. The pigs in groups T01 and T02 were immunized with a reformulated inactivated chimeric PCV1-2 vaccine (Fostera™ PCV; Pfizer Animal Health) administered as a 2.0 ml dose at 21 days of age. At 35 days of age (0 days post-challenge), the pigs in groups T01 and T03 were inoculated intranasally with 2 ml each of PCV2b. Results A reduction of PCV2 viremia coincided with the appearance of both PCV2-specific neutralizing antibodies (NA) and interferon-γ-secreting cells (IFN-γ-SCs) in the vaccinated animals. However, the presence of anti-PCV2 IgG antibodies did not correlate with the reduction of PCV2 viremia. Lymphocyte subset analysis indicated that the numbers of CD3+ and CD4+ cells increased in vaccinated animals but the numbers of CD4+ cells decreased transiently in non-vaccinated animals. The observation of a delayed type hypersensitivity response in only the vaccinated animals also supports a CD4+ cell-associated protective cellular immune response induced by the reformulated inactivated chimeric PCV1-2 vaccine. Conclusions The induction of PCV2-specific NA and IFN-γ-SCs, and CD4+ cells by the reformulated inactivated chimeric PCV1-2 vaccine is the important protective immune response leading to reduction of the PCV2 viremia and control of the PCV2 infection. To our knowledge this is the first demonstration of protective humoral and cellular immunity induced by the reformulated inactivated chimeric PCV1-2 vaccine and its effect on reduction of PCV2 viremia by vaccination. PMID:23078878

  15. In vitro and in vivo characterization of chimeric duck Tembusu virus based on Japanese encephalitis live vaccine strain SA14-14-2.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hong-Jiang; Liu, Long; Li, Xiao-Feng; Ye, Qing; Deng, Yong-Qiang; Qin, E-De; Qin, Cheng-Feng

    2016-07-01

    Duck Tembusu virus (DTMUV), a newly identified flavivirus, has rapidly spread to China, Malaysia and Thailand. The potential threats to public health have been well-highlighted; however its virulence and pathogenesis remain largely unknown. Here, by using reverse genetics, a recombinant chimeric DTMUV based on Japanese encephalitis live vaccine strain SA14-14-2 was obtained by substituting the corresponding prM and E genes (named ChinDTMUV). In vitro characterization demonstrated that ChinDTMUV replicated efficiently in mammalian cells with small-plaque phenotype in comparison with its parental viruses. Mouse tests showed ChinDTMUV exhibited avirulent phenotype in terms of neuroinvasiveness, while it retained neurovirulence from its parental virus DTMUV. Furthermore, immunization with ChinDTMUV was evidenced to elicit robust IgG and neutralizing antibody responses in mice. Overall, we successfully developed a viable chimeric DTMUV, and these results provide a useful platform for further investigation of the pathogenesis of DTMUV and development of a live attenuated DTMUV vaccine candidate. PMID:27100268

  16. Control of alphavirus-based gene expression using engineered riboswitches.

    PubMed

    Bell, Christie L; Yu, Dong; Smolke, Christina D; Geall, Andrew J; Beard, Clayton W; Mason, Peter W

    2015-09-01

    Alphavirus-based replicons are a promising nucleic acid vaccine platform characterized by robust gene expression and immune responses. To further explore their use in vaccination, replicons were engineered to allow conditional control over their gene expression. Riboswitches, comprising a ribozyme actuator and RNA aptamer sensor, were engineered into the replicon 3' UTR. Binding of ligand to aptamer modulates ribozyme activity and, therefore, gene expression. Expression from DNA-launched and VRP-packaged replicons containing riboswitches was successfully regulated, achieving a 47-fold change in expression and modulation of the resulting type I interferon response. Moreover, we developed a novel control architecture where riboswitches were integrated into the 3' and 5' UTR of the subgenomic RNA region of the TC-83 virus, leading to an 1160-fold regulation of viral replication. Our studies demonstrate that the use of riboswitches for control of RNA replicon expression and viral replication holds promise for development of novel and safer vaccination strategies. PMID:26005949

  17. Dendritic cells primed with a chimeric plasmid containing HIV-1-gag associated with lysosomal-associated protein-1 (LAMP/gag) is a potential therapeutic vaccine against HIV.

    PubMed

    Lucas, Carolina G D O; Matassoli, Flavio L; Peçanha, Ligia M T; Santillo, Bruna Tereso; Oliveira, Luanda Mara da Silva; Oshiro, Telma Miyuki; Marques, Ernesto T D A; Oxenius, Annette; de Arruda, Luciana B

    2016-08-01

    The decline in number and function of T cells is a hallmark of HIV infection, and preservation or restoration of HIV-specific cellular immune response is a major goal of AIDS treatment. Dendritic cells (DCs) play a key role in the initiation and maintenance of the immune response, and their use as a vaccine vehicle is a promising strategy for enhancing vaccine efficacy. We evaluated the potential of DC-mediated immunization with a DNA vaccine consisting of HIV-1-p55gag (gag, group-specific antigen) associated to lysosomal associated protein (LAMP) sequence (LAMP/gag vaccine). Immunization of mice with mouse DCs transfected with LAMP/gag (Lg-mDCs) stimulated more potent B- and T-cell responses than naked DNA or DCs pulsed with inactivated HIV. Anti-Gag antibody levels were sustained for at least 3 mo after immunization, and recall T-cell responses were also strongly detected at this time point. Human DCs transfected with LAMP/gag (Lg-hDCs) were also activated and able to stimulate greater T-cell response than native gag-transfected DCs. Coculture between Lg-hDCs and T lymphocytes obtained from patients with HIV resulted in upregulation of CD38, CD69, HLA-DR, and granzyme B by CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cells, and increased IFN-γ and TNF-α production. These results indicate that the use of LAMP/gag-DC may be an efficient strategy for enhancing immune function in patients with HIV.-Lucas, C. G. D. O., Matassoli, F. L., Peçanha, L. M. T., Santillo, B. T., Oliveira, L. M. D. S., Oshiro, T. M., Marques, E. T. D. A., Jr., Oxenius, A., de Arruda, L. B. Dendritic cells primed with a chimeric plasmid containing HIV-1-gag associated with lysosomal-associated protein-1 (LAMP/gag) is a potential therapeutic vaccine against HIV. PMID:27199296

  18. The efficacy of chimeric vaccines constructed with PEP-1 and Ii-Key linking to a hybrid epitope from heterologous viruses.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xue-lan; Shan, Wen-jie; Xu, Shan-shan; Zhang, Jin-jing; Xu, Fa-zhi; Xia, Sheng-lin; Dai, Yin

    2015-09-01

    The heterologous epitope-peptide from different viruses may represent an attractive candidate vaccine. In order to evaluate the role of cell-permeable peptide (PEP-1) and Ii-Key moiety from the invariant chain (Ii) of MHC on the heterologous peptide chimeras, we linked the two vehicles to hybrid epitopes on the VP2 protein (aa197-209) of the infectious bursal disease virus and HN protein (aa345-353) of the Newcastle disease virus. The chimeric vaccines were prepared and injected into mice. The immune effects were measured by indirect ELISA. The results showed that the vehicle(s) could significantly boost immune effects against the heterologous epitope peptide. The Ii-Key-only carrier induced more effective immunological responses, compared with the PEP-1 and Ii-Key hybrid vehicle. The carrier-peptide hybrids all showed strong colocalization with major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class II molecules compared with the epitope-peptide (weakly-binding) after co-transfection into 293T cells. Together, our results lay the groundwork for designing new hybrid vaccines based on Ii-Key and/or PEP-1 peptides. PMID:26153399

  19. A Chimeric 18L1-45RG1 Virus-Like Particle Vaccine Cross-Protects against Oncogenic Alpha-7 Human Papillomavirus Types

    PubMed Central

    Huber, Bettina; Schellenbacher, Christina; Jindra, Christoph; Fink, Dieter; Shafti-Keramat, Saeed; Kirnbauer, Reinhard

    2015-01-01

    Persistent infection with oncogenic human papillomaviruses (HPV) types causes all cervical and a subset of other anogenital and oropharyngeal carcinomas. Four high-risk (hr) mucosal types HPV16, 18, 45, or 59 cause almost all cervical adenocarcinomas (AC), a subset of cervical cancer (CxC). Although the incidence of cervical squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) has dramatically decreased following introduction of Papanicolaou (PAP) screening, the proportion of AC has relatively increased. Cervical SCC arise mainly from the ectocervix, whereas AC originate primarily from the endocervical canal, which is less accessible to obtain viable PAP smears. Licensed (bivalent and quadrivalent) HPV vaccines comprise virus-like particles (VLP) of the most important hr HPV16 and 18, self-assembled from the major capsid protein L1. Due to mainly type-restricted efficacy, both vaccines do not target 13 additional hr mucosal types causing 30% of CxC. The papillomavirus genus alpha species 7 (α7) includes a group of hr types of which HPV18, 45, 59 are proportionally overrepresented in cervical AC and only partially (HPV18) targeted by current vaccines. To target these types, we generated a chimeric vaccine antigen that consists of a cross-neutralizing epitope (homologue of HPV16 RG1) of the L2 minor capsid protein of HPV45 genetically inserted into a surface loop of HPV18 L1 VLP (18L1-45RG1). Vaccination of NZW rabbits with 18L1-45RG1 VLP plus alum-MPL adjuvant induced high-titer neutralizing antibodies against homologous HPV18, that cross-neutralized non-cognate hr α7 types HPV39, 45, 68, but not HPV59, and low risk HPV70 in vitro, and induced a robust L1-specific cellular immune response. Passive immunization protected mice against experimental vaginal challenge with pseudovirions of HPV18, 39, 45 and 68, but not HPV59 or the distantly related α9 type HPV16. 18L1-45RG1 VLP might be combined with our previously described 16L1-16RG1 VLP to develop a second generation bivalent vaccine

  20. Efficacy of chimeric DNA vaccines encoding Eimeria tenella 5401 and chicken IFN-γ or IL-2 against coccidiosis in chickens.

    PubMed

    Song, Xiaokai; Huang, Xinmei; Yan, Ruofeng; Xu, Lixin; Li, Xiangrui

    2015-09-01

    Chimeric DNA vaccines encoding Eimeria tenella (E. tenella) surface antigen 5401 were constructed and their efficacies against E. tenella challenge were studied. The open reading frame (ORF) of 5401 was cloned into the prokaryotic expression vector pGEX-4T2 to express the recombinant protein and the expressed recombinant protein was identified by Western blot. The ORF of 5401 and chicken cytokine gene IFN-γ or IL-2 were cloned into the eukaryotic expression vector pVAX1 consecutively to construct DNA vaccines pVAX-5401-IFN-γ, pVAX-5401-IL-2 and pVAX-5401. The expression of aim genes in vivo was detected by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction and Western blot. Fourteen-day-old chickens were inoculated twice at an interval of 7 days with 100 µg of plasmids pVAX-5401, pVAX-5401-IFN-γ and pVAX-5401-IL-2 or 200 µg of recombinant 5401 protein by leg intramuscular injection, respectively. Seven days after the second inoculation, all chickens except the unchallenged control group were challenged orally with 5 × 10(4) sporulated oocysts of E. tenella. Seven days after challenge, all chickens were weighted and slaughtered to determine the effects of immunization. The results showed the recombinant protein was about 90 kDa and reacted with antiserum against soluble sporozoites. The animal experiment showed that all the DNA vaccines pVAX-5401, pVAX-5401-IFN-γ or pVAX-5401-IL-2 and the recombinant 5401 protein could obviously alleviate body weight loss and cecal lesions as compared with non-vaccinated challenged control and empty vector pVAX1control. Furthermore, pVAX-5401-IFN-γ or pVAX-5401-IL-2 induced anti-coccidial index (ACI) of 180.01 or 177.24 which were significantly higher than that of pVAX-5401. The results suggested that 5401 was an effective candidate antigen for vaccine. This finding also suggested that chicken IFN-γ or IL-2 could effectively improve the efficacies of DNA vaccines against avian coccidiosis. PMID:26008611

  1. Alphavirus Restriction by IFITM Proteins.

    PubMed

    Weston, Stuart; Czieso, Stephanie; White, Ian J; Smith, Sarah E; Wash, Rachael S; Diaz-Soria, Carmen; Kellam, Paul; Marsh, Mark

    2016-09-01

    Interferon inducible transmembrane proteins (IFITMs) are broad-spectrum antiviral factors. In cell culture the entry of many enveloped viruses, including orthomyxo-, flavi-, and filoviruses, is inhibited by IFITMs, though the mechanism(s) involved remain unclear and may vary between viruses. We demonstrate that Sindbis and Semliki Forest virus (SFV), which both use endocytosis and acid-induced membrane fusion in early endosomes to infect cells, are restricted by the early endosomal IFITM3. The late endosomal IFITM2 is less restrictive and the plasma membrane IFITM1 does not inhibit normal infection by either virus. IFITM3 inhibits release of the SFV capsid into the cytosol, without inhibiting binding, internalization, trafficking to endosomes or low pH-induced conformational changes in the envelope glycoprotein. Infection by SFV fusion at the cell surface was inhibited by IFITM1, but was equally inhibited by IFITM3. Furthermore, an IFITM3 mutant (Y20A) that is localized to the plasma membrane inhibited infection by cell surface fusion more potently than IFITM1. Together, these results indicate that IFITMs, in particular IFITM3, can restrict alphavirus infection by inhibiting viral fusion with cellular membranes. That IFITM3 can restrict SFV infection by fusion at the cell surface equivalently to IFITM1 suggests that IFITM3 has greater antiviral potency against SFV. PMID:27219333

  2. The alphaviruses: gene expression, replication, and evolution.

    PubMed Central

    Strauss, J H; Strauss, E G

    1994-01-01

    The alphaviruses are a genus of 26 enveloped viruses that cause disease in humans and domestic animals. Mosquitoes or other hematophagous arthropods serve as vectors for these viruses. The complete sequences of the +/- 11.7-kb plus-strand RNA genomes of eight alphaviruses have been determined, and partial sequences are known for several others; this has made possible evolutionary comparisons between different alphaviruses as well as comparisons of this group of viruses with other animal and plant viruses. Full-length cDNA clones from which infectious RNA can be recovered have been constructed for four alphaviruses; these clones have facilitated many molecular genetic studies as well as the development of these viruses as expression vectors. From these and studies involving biochemical approaches, many details of the replication cycle of the alphaviruses are known. The interactions of the viruses with host cells and host organisms have been exclusively studied, and the molecular basis of virulence and recovery from viral infection have been addressed in a large number of recent papers. The structure of the viruses has been determined to about 2.5 nm, making them the best-characterized enveloped virus to date. Because of the wealth of data that has appeared, these viruses represent a well-characterized system that tell us much about the evolution of RNA viruses, their replication, and their interactions with their hosts. This review summarizes our current knowledge of this group of viruses. Images PMID:7968923

  3. Evaluation of different heterologous prime-boost immunization strategies against Babesia bovis using viral vectored and protein-adjuvant vaccines based on a chimeric multi-antigen.

    PubMed

    Jaramillo Ortiz, José Manuel; Molinari, María Paula; Gravisaco, María José; Paoletta, Martina Soledad; Montenegro, Valeria Noely; Wilkowsky, Silvina Elizabeth

    2016-07-19

    Protection against the intraerythrocytic bovine parasite Babesia bovis requires both humoral and cellular immune responses. Therefore, tailored combinations of immunogens targeted at both arms of the immune system are strategies of choice to pursue sterilizing immunity. In this study, different heterologous prime-boost vaccination schemes were evaluated in mice to compare the immunogenicity induced by a recombinant adenovirus, a modified vaccinia Ankara vector or a subunit vaccine all expressing a chimeric multi-antigen. This multi-antigen includes the immunodominant B and T cell epitopes of three B. bovis proteins: Merozoite Surface Antigen - 2c (MSA-2c), Rhoptry Associated Protein - 1 (RAP-1) and Heat Shock Protein 20 (HSP20). Both priming with the adenovirus or recombinant multi-antigen and boosting with the modified vaccinia Ankara vector achieved a high degree of activation of TNFα and IFNγ-secreting CD4(+) and CD8(+) specific T cells 60days after the first immunization. High titers of specific IgG antibodies were also detected at the same time point and lasted up to day 120 of the first immunization. Only the adenovirus - MVA combination triggered a marked isotype skew for the IgG2a antibody subclass meanwhile for the other immune traits analyzed here, both vaccination schemes showed similar performances. The immunological characterization in the murine model of these rationally designed immunogens led us to propose that adenoviruses as well as the bacterially expressed multi-antigen are highly reliable primer candidates to be considered in future experiments in cattle to test protection against bovine babesiosis. PMID:27269058

  4. Chimerically fused antigen rich of overlapped epitopes from latent membrane protein 2 (LMP2) of Epstein-Barr virus as a potential vaccine and diagnostic agent.

    PubMed

    Lin, Xiaoyun; Chen, Shao; Xue, Xiangyang; Lu, Lijun; Zhu, Shanli; Li, Wenshu; Chen, Xiangmin; Zhong, Xiaozhi; Jiang, Pengfei; Sename, Torsoo Sophia; Zheng, Yi; Zhang, Lifang

    2016-07-01

    Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) is prevalent throughout the world and is associated with several malignant diseases in humans. Latent membrane protein 2 (LMP2) of EBV plays a crucial role in the pathogenesis of EBV-associated tumors; therefore, LMP2 has been considered to be a potential immunodiagnostic and immunotherapeutic target. A multi-epitope-based antigen is a promising option for therapeutic vaccines and diagnoses of such malignancies. In this study, we systematically screened cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL), helper T cell (Th) and B-cell epitopes within EBV-LMP2 using bioinformatics. Based on the screen, two peptides rich in overlapping epitopes of both T cells and B cells were selected to construct a plasmid containing the sequence for a chimeric multi-epitope protein referred to as EBV-LMP2m, which is composed of LMP2aa195∼232 and LMP2aa419∼436. The EBV-LMP2m protein was expressed in E. coli BL21 (DE3) after prokaryotic codon optimization. Inoculation of the purified chimeric antigen in BALB/c mice induced not only high levels of specific IgG in the serum and secretory IgA in the vaginal mucus but also a specific CTL response. By using purified EBV-LMP2m as an antigen, the presence of specific IgG in the serum specimens of 202 nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC) patients was effectively detected with 52.84% sensitivity and 95.40% specificity, which represents an improvement over the traditional detection method based on VCA-IgA (60.53% sensitivity and 76.86% specificity). The above results indicate that EBV-LMP2m may be used not only as a potential target antigen for EBV-associated tumors but also a diagnostic agent for NPC patients. PMID:25864917

  5. Chimerically fused antigen rich of overlapped epitopes from latent membrane protein 2 (LMP2) of Epstein–Barr virus as a potential vaccine and diagnostic agent

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Xiaoyun; Chen, Shao; Xue, Xiangyang; Lu, Lijun; Zhu, Shanli; Li, Wenshu; Chen, Xiangmin; Zhong, Xiaozhi; Jiang, Pengfei; Sename, Torsoo Sophia; Zheng, Yi; Zhang, Lifang

    2016-01-01

    Epstein–Barr virus (EBV) is prevalent throughout the world and is associated with several malignant diseases in humans. Latent membrane protein 2 (LMP2) of EBV plays a crucial role in the pathogenesis of EBV-associated tumors; therefore, LMP2 has been considered to be a potential immunodiagnostic and immunotherapeutic target. A multi-epitope-based antigen is a promising option for therapeutic vaccines and diagnoses of such malignancies. In this study, we systematically screened cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL), helper T cell (Th) and B-cell epitopes within EBV-LMP2 using bioinformatics. Based on the screen, two peptides rich in overlapping epitopes of both T cells and B cells were selected to construct a plasmid containing the sequence for a chimeric multi-epitope protein referred to as EBV-LMP2m, which is composed of LMP2aa195∼232 and LMP2aa419∼436. The EBV-LMP2m protein was expressed in E. coli BL21 (DE3) after prokaryotic codon optimization. Inoculation of the purified chimeric antigen in BALB/c mice induced not only high levels of specific IgG in the serum and secretory IgA in the vaginal mucus but also a specific CTL response. By using purified EBV-LMP2m as an antigen, the presence of specific IgG in the serum specimens of 202 nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC) patients was effectively detected with 52.84% sensitivity and 95.40% specificity, which represents an improvement over the traditional detection method based on VCA-IgA (60.53% sensitivity and 76.86% specificity). The above results indicate that EBV-LMP2m may be used not only as a potential target antigen for EBV-associated tumors but also a diagnostic agent for NPC patients. PMID:25864917

  6. A live-attenuated chimeric PCV2 vaccine based on subtype 2b is transmitted to contact pigs but is not upregulated by concurrent infection with PPV and PRRSV and is efficacious in a triple challenge co-infection model

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The objective of this study was to determine the safety and efficacy of a new live-attenuated chimeric PCV1/2b vaccine. Forty-six, 21-day-old, PCV2-naïve pigs were randomly assigned to one of six groups (Negative controls, positive controls, Vac-0, Vac-0-PCV2, Contact-PCV2, Vac-28-PCV2). All pigs we...

  7. Alphaviruses: Population genetics and determinants of emergence

    PubMed Central

    Weaver, Scott C.; Winegar, Richard; Manger, Ian D.; Forrester, Naomi L.

    2013-01-01

    Alphaviruses are responsible for several medically important emerging diseases and are also significant veterinary pathogens. Due to the aerosol infectivity of some alphaviruses and their ability to cause severe, sometimes fatal neurologic diseases, they are also of biodefense importance. This review discusses the ecology, epidemiology and molecular virology of the alphaviruses, then focuses on three of the most important members of the genus: Venezuelan and eastern equine encephalitis and chikungunya viruses, with emphasis on their genetics and emergence mechanisms, and how current knowledge as well as gaps influence our ability to detect and determine the source of both natural outbreaks and potential use for bioterrorism. This article is one of a series in Antiviral Research on the genetic diversity of emerging viruses. PMID:22522323

  8. A randomized study of the immunogenicity and safety of Japanese Encephalitis Chimeric Virus Vaccine (JE-CV) in comparison with SA14-14-2 Vaccine in children in the Republic of Korea

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Dong Soo; Houillon, Guy; Jang, Gwang Cheon; Cha, Sung-Ho; Choi, Soo-Han; Lee, Jin; Kim, Hwang Min; Kim, Ji Hong; Kang, Jin Han; Kim, Jong-Hyun; Kim, Ki Hwan; Kim, Hee Soo; Bang, Joon; Naimi, Zulaikha; Bosch-Castells, Valérie; Boaz, Mark; Bouckenooghe, Alain

    2014-01-01

    A new live attenuated Japanese encephalitis chimeric virus vaccine (JE-CV) has been developed based on innovative technology to give protection against JE with an improved immunogenicity and safety profile. In this phase 3, observer-blind study, 274 children aged 12−24 months were randomized 1:1 to receive one dose of JE-CV (Group JE-CV) or the SA14–14–2 vaccine currently used to vaccinate against JE in the Republic of Korea (Group SA14–14–2). JE neutralizing antibody titers were assessed using PRNT50 before and 28 days after vaccination. The primary endpoint of non-inferiority of seroconversion rates on D28 was demonstrated in the Per Protocol analysis set as the difference between Group JE-CV and Group SA14–14–2 was 0.9 percentage points (95% confidence interval [CI]: −2.35; 4.68), which was above the required −10%. Seroconversion and seroprotection rates 28 days after administration of a single vaccine dose were 100% in Group JE-CV and 99.1% in Group SA14–14–2; all children except one (Group SA14–14–2) were seroprotected. Geometric mean titers (GMTs) increased in both groups from D0 to D28; GM of titer ratios were slightly higher in Group JE-CV (182 [95% CI: 131; 251]) than Group SA14–14–2 (116 [95% CI: 85.5, 157]). A single dose of JE-CV was well tolerated and no safety concerns were identified. In conclusion, a single dose of JE-CV or SA14–14–2 vaccine elicited a comparable immune response with a good safety profile. Results obtained in healthy Korean children aged 12−24 months vaccinated with JE-CV are consistent with those obtained in previous studies conducted with JE-CV in toddlers. PMID:25483480

  9. Development and evaluation of a Salmonella typhimurium flagellin based chimeric DNA vaccine against infectious bursal disease of poultry.

    PubMed

    Deb, Rajib; Dey, Sohini; Madhan Mohan, C; Gaikwad, Satish; Kamble, Nitin; Khulape, Sagar A; Gupta, Shishir Kumar; Maity, Hemanta Kumar; Pathak, Dinesh Chandra

    2015-10-01

    Infectious bursal disease (IBD) is an acute immunosuppressive disease of young chicks, caused by a double-stranded RNA virus. VP2 being the major capsid protein of the virus is an ideal vaccine candidate possessing the neutralizing epitopes. The present study involves the use of flagellin (fliC) as a genetic adjuvant to improve the immune response of VP2 based DNA vaccine against IBD. Our findings revealed that birds immunized with plasmid pCIVP2fliC showed robust immune response than pCIVP2 immunized groups. Further, challenge study proved that genetic fusion of fliC and VP2 can provide a comparatively higher level of protection against vvIBDV challenge in chickens than VP2 alone. These results thus indicate that Salmonella flagellin could enhance the immune responses and protection efficacy of a DNA vaccine candidate against IBDV infection in chickens, highlighting the potential of flagellin as a genetic adjuvant in the prevention of vvIBDV infection. PMID:26412511

  10. Mucosal and systemic adjuvant activity of alphavirus replicon particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thompson, Joseph M.; Whitmore, Alan C.; Konopka, Jennifer L.; Collier, Martha L.; Richmond, Erin M. B.; Davis, Nancy L.; Staats, Herman F.; Johnston, Robert E.

    2006-03-01

    Vaccination represents the most effective control measure in the fight against infectious diseases. Local mucosal immune responses are critical for protection from, and resolution of, infection by numerous mucosal pathogens. Antigen processing across mucosal surfaces is the natural route by which mucosal immunity is generated, as peripheral antigen delivery typically fails to induce mucosal immune responses. However, we demonstrate in this article that mucosal immune responses are evident at multiple mucosal surfaces after parenteral delivery of Venezuelan equine encephalitis virus replicon particles (VRP). Moreover, coinoculation of null VRP (not expressing any transgene) with inactivated influenza virions, or ovalbumin, resulted in a significant increase in antigen-specific systemic IgG and fecal IgA antibodies, compared with antigen alone. Pretreatment of VRP with UV light largely abrogated this adjuvant effect. These results demonstrate that alphavirus replicon particles possess intrinsic systemic and mucosal adjuvant activity and suggest that VRP RNA replication is the trigger for this activity. We feel that these observations and the continued experimentation they stimulate will ultimately define the specific components of an alternative pathway for the induction of mucosal immunity, and if the activity is evident in humans, will enable new possibilities for safe and inexpensive subunit and inactivated vaccines. vaccine vector | Venezuelan equine encephalitis virus | viral immunology | RNA virus

  11. A live-attenuated and an inactivated chimeric porcine circovirus (PCV)1-2 vaccine are both effective at inducing a humoral immune response and reducing PCV2 viremia and intrauterine infection in female swine of breeding age

    PubMed Central

    Hemann, Michelle; Beach, Nathan M.; Meng, Xiang-Jin; Wang, Chong; Halbur, Patrick G.; Opriessnig, Tanja

    2014-01-01

    The objective of this pilot study was to determine the efficacy of inactivated (1 or 2 dose) and live-attenuated chimeric porcine circovirus (PCV)1-2 vaccines in sows using the PCV2-spiked semen model. Thirty-five sows were randomly divided into 6 groups: negative and positive controls, 1 dose inactivated PCV1-2 vaccine challenged (1-VAC-PCV2), 2 dose inactivated PCV1-2 vaccine challenged (2-VAC-PCV2), 1 dose live-attenuated PCV1-2 vaccine unchallenged (1-LIVE-VAC), and 1 dose live-attenuated PCV1-2 vaccine challenged (1-LIVE-VAC-PCV2). The inactivated PCV1-2 vaccine induced higher levels of PCV2-specific antibodies in dams. All vaccination strategies provided good protection against PCV2 viremia in dams, whereas the majority of the unvaccinated sows were viremic. Four of the 35 dams became pregnant: a negative control, a positive control, a 2-VAC-PCV2 sow, and a 1-LIVE-VAC-PCV2 sow. The PCV2 DNA was detected in 100%, 67%, and 29% of the fetuses obtained from the positive control, inactivated vaccinated, or live-attenuated vaccinated dams, respectively. The PCV2 antigen in hearts was only detectable in the positive control litter (23% of the fetuses). The PCV1-2 DNA was detected in 29% of the fetuses in the litter from the 1-LIVE-VAC-PCV2 dam. Under the conditions of this pilot study, both vaccines protected against PCV2 viremia in breeding age animals; however, vertical transmission was not prevented. PMID:24396175

  12. IFIT1 Differentially Interferes with Translation and Replication of Alphavirus Genomes and Promotes Induction of Type I Interferon

    PubMed Central

    Atasheva, Svetlana; Rasalouskaya, Aliaksandra; White, James P.; Diamond, Michael S.; Weaver, Scott C.; Frolova, Elena I.; Frolov, Ilya

    2015-01-01

    Alphaviruses are a group of widely distributed human and animal pathogens. It is well established that their replication is sensitive to type I IFN treatment, but the mechanism of IFN inhibitory function remains poorly understood. Using a new experimental system, we demonstrate that in the presence of IFN-β, activation of interferon-stimulated genes (ISGs) does not interfere with either attachment of alphavirus virions to the cells, or their entry and nucleocapsid disassembly. However, it strongly affects translation of the virion-delivered virus-specific RNAs. One of the ISG products, IFIT1 protein, plays a major role in this translation block, although an IFIT1-independent mechanism is also involved. The 5’UTRs of the alphavirus genomes were found to differ significantly in their ability to drive translation in the presence of increased concentration of IFIT1. Prior studies have shown that adaptation of naturally circulating alphaviruses to replication in tissue culture results in accumulation of mutations in the 5’UTR, which increase the efficiency of the promoter located in the 5’end of the genome. Here, we show that these mutations also decrease resistance of viral RNA to IFIT1-induced translation inhibition. In the presence of higher levels of IFIT1, alphaviruses with wt 5’UTRs became potent inducers of type I IFN, suggesting a new mechanism of type I IFN induction. We applied this knowledge of IFIT1 interaction with alphaviruses to develop new attenuated variants of Venezuelan equine encephalitis and chikungunya viruses that are more sensitive to the antiviral effects of IFIT1, and thus could serve as novel vaccine candidates. PMID:25927359

  13. Neurological Sequelae Resulting from Encephalitic Alphavirus Infection

    PubMed Central

    Ronca, Shannon E.; Dineley, Kelly T.; Paessler, Slobodan

    2016-01-01

    The recent surge in viral clinical cases and associated neurological deficits have reminded us that viral infections can lead to detrimental, long-term effects, termed sequelae, in survivors. Alphaviruses are enveloped, single-stranded positive-sense RNA viruses in the Togaviridae family. Transmission of alphaviruses between and within species occurs mainly via the bite of an infected mosquito bite, giving alphaviruses a place among arboviruses, or arthropod-borne viruses. Alphaviruses are found throughout the world and typically cause arthralgic or encephalitic disease in infected humans. Originally detected in the 1930s, today the major encephalitic viruses include Venezuelan, Western, and Eastern equine encephalitis viruses (VEEV, WEEV, and EEEV, respectively). VEEV, WEEV, and EEEV are endemic to the Americas and are important human pathogens, leading to thousands of human infections each year. Despite awareness of these viruses for nearly 100 years, we possess little mechanistic understanding regarding the complications (sequelae) that emerge after resolution of acute infection. Neurological sequelae are those complications involving damage to the central nervous system that results in cognitive, sensory, or motor deficits that may also manifest as emotional instability and seizures in the most severe cases. This article serves to provide an overview of clinical cases documented in the past century as well as a summary of the reported neurological sequelae due to VEEV, WEEV, and EEEV infection. We conclude with a treatise on the utility of, and practical considerations for animal models applied to the problem of neurological sequelae of viral encephalopathies in order to decipher mechanisms and interventional strategies. PMID:27379085

  14. Functional Characterization of the Alphavirus TF Protein

    PubMed Central

    Snyder, Jonathan E.; Kulcsar, Kirsten A.; Schultz, Kimberly L. W.; Riley, Catherine P.; Neary, Jacob T.; Marr, Scott; Jose, Joyce; Griffin, Diane E.

    2013-01-01

    Alphavirus dogma has long dictated the production of a discrete set of structural proteins during infection of a cell: capsid, pE2, 6K, and E1. However, bioinformatic analyses of alphavirus genomes (A. E. Firth, B. Y. Chung, M. N. Fleeton, and J. F. Atkins, Virol. J. 5:108, 2008) suggested that a ribosomal frameshifting event occurs during translation of the alphavirus structural polyprotein. Specifically, a frameshift event is suggested to occur during translation of the 6K gene, yielding production of a novel protein, termed transframe (TF), comprised of a C-terminal extension of the 6K protein in the −1 open reading frame (ORF). Here, we validate the findings of Firth and colleagues with respect to the production of the TF protein and begin to characterize the function of TF. Using a mass spectrometry-based approach, we identified TF in purified preparations of both Sindbis and Chikungunya virus particles. We next constructed a panel of Sindbis virus mutants with mutations which alter the production, size, or sequence of TF. We demonstrate that TF is not absolutely required in culture, although disrupting TF production leads to a decrease in virus particle release in both mammalian and insect cells. In a mouse neuropathogenesis model, mortality was <15% in animals infected with the TF mutants, whereas mortality was 95% in animals infected with the wild-type virus. Using a variety of additional assays, we demonstrate that TF retains ion-channel activity analogous to that of 6K and that lack of production of TF does not affect genome replication, particle infectivity, or envelope protein transit to the cell surface. The TF protein therefore represents a previously uncharacterized factor important for alphavirus assembly. PMID:23720714

  15. Replication of Alphaviruses: A Review on the Entry Process of Alphaviruses into Cells

    PubMed Central

    Leung, Jason Yat-Sing; Ng, Mary Mah-Lee; Chu, Justin Jang Hann

    2011-01-01

    Alphaviruses are small, enveloped viruses, ~70 nm in diameter, containing a single-stranded, positive-sense, RNA genome. Viruses belonging to this genus are predominantly arthropod-borne viruses, known to cause disease in humans. Their potential threat to human health was most recently exemplified by the 2005 Chikungunya virus outbreak in La Reunion, highlighting the necessity to understand events in the life-cycle of these medically important human pathogens. The replication and propagation of viruses is dependent on entry into permissive cells. Viral entry is initiated by attachment of virions to cells, leading to internalization, and uncoating to release genetic material for replication and propagation. Studies on alphaviruses have revealed entry via a receptor-mediated, endocytic pathway. In this paper, the different stages of alphavirus entry are examined, with examples from Semliki Forest virus, Sindbis virus, Chikungunya virus, and Venezuelan equine encephalitis virus described. PMID:22312336

  16. Crystal Structures of Yeast-Produced Enterovirus 71 and Enterovirus 71/Coxsackievirus A16 Chimeric Virus-Like Particles Provide the Structural Basis for Novel Vaccine Design against Hand-Foot-and-Mouth Disease

    PubMed Central

    Lyu, Ke; He, Ya-Ling; Li, Hao-Yang

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Human enterovirus 71 (EV71) and coxsackievirus A16 (CVA16) are the two major causative agents for hand-foot-and-mouth disease (HFMD). Previously, we demonstrated that a virus-like particle (VLP) for EV71 produced from Saccharomyces cerevisiae is a potential vaccine candidate against EV71 infection, and an EV71/CVA16 chimeric VLP can elicit protective immune responses against both virus infections. Here, we presented the crystal structures of both VLPs, showing that both the linear and conformational neutralization epitopes identified in EV71 are mostly preserved on both VLPs. The replacement of only 4 residues in the VP1 GH loop converted strongly negatively charged surface patches formed by portions of the SP70 epitope in EV71 VLP into a relatively neutral surface in the chimeric VLP, which likely accounted for the additional neutralization capability of the chimeric VLP against CVA16 infection. Such local variations in the amino acid sequences and the surface charge potential are also present in different types of polioviruses. In comparison to EV71 VLP, the chimeric VLP exhibits structural changes at the local site of amino acid replacement and the surface loops of all capsid proteins. This is consistent with the observation that the VP1 GH loop located near the pseudo-3-fold junction is involved in extensive interactions with other capsid regions. Furthermore, portions of VP0 and VP1 in EV71 VLP are at least transiently exposed, revealing the structural flexibility of the VLP. Together, our structural analysis provided insights into the structural basis of enterovirus neutralization and novel vaccine design against HFMD and other enterovirus-associated diseases. IMPORTANCE Our previous studies demonstrated that the enterovirus 71 (EV71) virus-like particle (VLP) produced from yeast is a vaccine candidate against EV71 infection and that a chimeric EV71/coxsackievirus A16 (CVA16) VLP with the replacement of 4 amino acids in the VP1 GH loop can confer

  17. Broadly Neutralizing Alphavirus Antibodies Bind an Epitope on E2 and Inhibit Entry and Egress.

    PubMed

    Fox, Julie M; Long, Feng; Edeling, Melissa A; Lin, Hueylie; van Duijl-Richter, Mareike K S; Fong, Rachel H; Kahle, Kristen M; Smit, Jolanda M; Jin, Jing; Simmons, Graham; Doranz, Benjamin J; Crowe, James E; Fremont, Daved H; Rossmann, Michael G; Diamond, Michael S

    2015-11-19

    We screened a panel of mouse and human monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) against chikungunya virus and identified several with inhibitory activity against multiple alphaviruses. Passive transfer of broadly neutralizing MAbs protected mice against infection by chikungunya, Mayaro, and O'nyong'nyong alphaviruses. Using alanine-scanning mutagenesis, loss-of-function recombinant proteins and viruses, and multiple functional assays, we determined that broadly neutralizing MAbs block multiple steps in the viral lifecycle, including entry and egress, and bind to a conserved epitope on the B domain of the E2 glycoprotein. A 16 Å resolution cryo-electron microscopy structure of a Fab fragment bound to CHIKV E2 B domain provided an explanation for its neutralizing activity. Binding to the B domain was associated with repositioning of the A domain of E2 that enabled cross-linking of neighboring spikes. Our results suggest that B domain antigenic determinants could be targeted for vaccine or antibody therapeutic development against multiple alphaviruses of global concern. PMID:26553503

  18. The Alphavirus E3 Glycoprotein Functions in a Clade-Specific Manner

    PubMed Central

    Snyder, Anthony J.

    2012-01-01

    The 80 trimeric, glycoprotein spikes that cover the surface of alphavirus particles are required for mediating viral entry into a host cell. Spike assembly is a regulated process that requires interactions between five structural proteins, E3, E2, 6K and its translational frameshift product TF, and E1. E3 is a small, ∼65-amino-acid glycoprotein that has two known functions: E3 serves as the signal sequence for translocation of the E3-E2-6K-E1 polyprotein into the endoplasmic reticulum (ER), and cleavage of E3 from E2 is essential for virus maturation. Nonetheless, when E3 is replaced with an ER signal sequence, spikes do not form and infectious particles are not assembled, suggesting an additional role(s) for E3 in the viral life cycle. To further investigate the role of E3 in spike assembly, we made chimeric viruses in which E3 from one alphavirus species is replaced with E3 from another species. Our results demonstrate that when E3 is interchanged between alphavirus species that belong to the same virus clade, viral titers and particle morphologies and compositions are similar to what are observed for the parental virus. In contrast, for chimeras in which E3 is derived from a different clade than the parental virus, we observed reduced titers and the formation of particles with atypical morphologies and protein compositions. We further characterized the E3 chimeras using a combination of structure-function and revertant analyses. This work revealed two specific interactions between E3 and its cognate E2 glycoprotein that are important for regulating spike assembly. PMID:23035234

  19. Molecular determinants of alphavirus neuropathogenesis in mice.

    PubMed

    Atkins, Gregory J; Sheahan, Brian J

    2016-06-01

    Alphaviruses are enveloped viruses with a positive-stranded RNA genome, of the family Togaviridae. In mammals and birds they are mosquito-transmitted and are of veterinary and medical importance. They cause primarily two types of disease: encephalitis and polyarthritis. Here we review attempts to understand the molecular basis of encephalitis and virulence for the central nervous system (CNS) in mouse models. Sindbis virus (SINV) was the first virus to be studied in this way. Other viruses analysed are Semliki Forest virus (SFV), Venezuelan equine encephalitis virus, Eastern equine encephalitis virus and Western equine encephalitis virus. Neurovirulence was found to be associated with damage to neurons in the CNS. It mapped mainly to the E2 region of the genome, and to the nsP3 gene. Also, avirulent natural isolates of both SINV and SFV have been found to have more rapid cleavage of nonstructural proteins due to mutations in the nsP1-nsP2 cleavage site. Immune-mediated demyelination for avirulent SFV has been shown to be associated with infection of oligodendrocytes. For Chikungunya virus, an emerging alphavirus that uncommonly causes encephalitis, analysis of the molecular basis of CNS pathogenicity is beginning. Experiments on SINV and SFV have indicated that virulence may be related to the resistance of virulent virus to interferon action. Although the E2 protein may be involved in tropism for neurons and passage across the blood-brain barrier, the role of the nsP3 protein during infection of neurons is unknown. More information in these areas may help to further explain the neurovirulence of alphaviruses. PMID:27028153

  20. A novel recombinant 6Aβ15-THc-C chimeric vaccine (rCV02) mitigates Alzheimer's disease-like pathology, cognitive decline and synaptic loss in aged 3 × Tg-AD mice.

    PubMed

    Yu, Yun-Zhou; Liu, Si; Wang, Hai-Chao; Shi, Dan-Yang; Xu, Qing; Zhou, Xiao-Wei; Sun, Zhi-Wei; Huang, Pei-Tang

    2016-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a neurodegenerative disorder that impairs memory and cognition. Targeting amyloid-β (Aβ) may be currently the most promising immunotherapeutic strategy for AD. In this study, a recombinant chimeric 6Aβ15-THc-C immunogen was formulated with alum adjuvant as a novel Aβ B-cell epitope candidate vaccine (rCV02) for AD. We examined its efficacy in preventing the cognitive deficit and synaptic impairment in 3 × Tg-AD mice. Using a toxin-derived carrier protein, the rCV02 vaccine elicited robust Aβ-specific antibodies that markedly reduced AD-like pathology and improved behavioral performance in 3 × Tg-AD mice. Along with the behavioral improvement in aged 3 × Tg-AD mice, rCV02 significantly decreased calpain activation concurrent with reduced soluble Aβ or oligomeric forms of Aβ, probably by preventing dynamin 1 and PSD-95 degradation. Our data support the hypothesis that reducing Aβ levels in rCV02-immunized AD mice increases the levels of presynaptic dynamin 1 and postsynaptic PSD-95 allowing functional recovery of cognition. In conclusion, this novel and highly immunogenic rCV02 shows promise as a new candidate prophylactic vaccine for AD and may be useful for generating rapid and strong Aβ-specific antibodies in AD patients with pre-existing memory Th cells generated after immunization with conventional tetanus toxoid vaccine. PMID:27255752

  1. A novel recombinant 6Aβ15-THc-C chimeric vaccine (rCV02) mitigates Alzheimer’s disease-like pathology, cognitive decline and synaptic loss in aged 3 × Tg-AD mice

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Yun-Zhou; Liu, Si; Wang, Hai-Chao; Shi, Dan-Yang; Xu, Qing; Zhou, Xiao-Wei; Sun, Zhi-Wei; Huang, Pei-Tang

    2016-01-01

    Alzheimer’s disease (AD) is a neurodegenerative disorder that impairs memory and cognition. Targeting amyloid-β (Aβ) may be currently the most promising immunotherapeutic strategy for AD. In this study, a recombinant chimeric 6Aβ15-THc-C immunogen was formulated with alum adjuvant as a novel Aβ B-cell epitope candidate vaccine (rCV02) for AD. We examined its efficacy in preventing the cognitive deficit and synaptic impairment in 3 × Tg-AD mice. Using a toxin-derived carrier protein, the rCV02 vaccine elicited robust Aβ-specific antibodies that markedly reduced AD-like pathology and improved behavioral performance in 3 × Tg-AD mice. Along with the behavioral improvement in aged 3 × Tg-AD mice, rCV02 significantly decreased calpain activation concurrent with reduced soluble Aβ or oligomeric forms of Aβ, probably by preventing dynamin 1 and PSD-95 degradation. Our data support the hypothesis that reducing Aβ levels in rCV02-immunized AD mice increases the levels of presynaptic dynamin 1 and postsynaptic PSD-95 allowing functional recovery of cognition. In conclusion, this novel and highly immunogenic rCV02 shows promise as a new candidate prophylactic vaccine for AD and may be useful for generating rapid and strong Aβ-specific antibodies in AD patients with pre-existing memory Th cells generated after immunization with conventional tetanus toxoid vaccine. PMID:27255752

  2. Global emergence of Alphaviruses that cause arthritis in humans

    PubMed Central

    Lwande, Olivia Wesula; Obanda, Vincent; Bucht, Göran; Mosomtai, Gladys; Otieno, Viola; Ahlm, Clas; Evander, Magnus

    2015-01-01

    Arthropod-borne viruses (arboviruses) may cause severe emerging and re-emerging infectious diseases, which pose a significant threat to human and animal health in the world today. These infectious diseases range from mild febrile illnesses, arthritis, and encephalitis to haemorrhagic fevers. It is postulated that certain environmental factors, vector competence, and host susceptibility have a major impact on the ecology of arboviral diseases. Presently, there is a great interest in the emergence of Alphaviruses because these viruses, including Chikungunya virus, O'nyong'nyong virus, Sindbis virus, Ross River virus, and Mayaro virus, have caused outbreaks in Africa, Asia, Australia, Europe, and America. Some of these viruses are more common in the tropics, whereas others are also found in temperate regions, but the actual factors driving Alphavirus emergence and re-emergence remain unresolved. Furthermore, little is known about the transmission dynamics, pathophysiology, genetic diversity, and evolution of circulating viral strains. In addition, the clinical presentation of Alphaviruses may be similar to other diseases such as dengue, malaria, and typhoid, hence leading to misdiagnosis. However, the typical presence of arthritis may distinguish between Alphaviruses and other differential diagnoses. The absence of validated diagnostic kits for Alphaviruses makes even routine surveillance less feasible. For that purpose, this review describes the occurrence, genetic diversity, clinical characteristics, and the mechanisms involving Alphaviruses causing arthritis in humans. This information may serve as a basis for better awareness and detection of Alphavirus-caused diseases during outbreaks and in establishing appropriate prevention and control measures. PMID:26689654

  3. Chimeric classical swine fever (CSF)-Japanese encephalitis (JE) viral particles as a non-transmissible bivalent marker vaccine candidate against CSF and JE infections

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A trans-complemented CSF- JE chimeric viral replicon was constructed using an infectious cDNA clone of the CSF virus (CSFV) Alfort/187 strain. The E2 gene of CSFV Alfort/187 strain was deleted and the resultant plasmid pA187delE2 was inserted by a fragment containing the region coding for a truncate...

  4. Evolutionary genetics and vector adaptation of recombinant viruses of the western equine encephalitis antigenic complex provides new insights into alphavirus diversity and host switching

    PubMed Central

    Allison, Andrew B.; Stallknecht, David E.; Holmes, Edward C.

    2014-01-01

    Western equine encephalitis virus (WEEV), Highlands J virus (HJV), and Fort Morgan virus (FMV) are the sole representatives of the WEE antigenic complex of the genus Alphavirus, family Togaviridae, that are endemic to North America. All three viruses have their ancestry in a recombination event involving eastern equine encephalitis virus (EEEV) and a Sindbis (SIN)-like virus that gave rise to a chimeric alphavirus that subsequently diversified into the present-day WEEV, HJV, and FMV. Here, we present a comparative analysis of the genetic, ecological, and evolutionary relationships among these recombinant-origin viruses, including the description of a nsP4 polymerase mutation in FMV that allows it to circumvent the host range barrier to Asian tiger mosquito cells, a vector species that is normally refractory to infection. Notably, we also provide evidence that the recombination event that gave rise to these three WEEV antigenic complex viruses may have occurred in North America. PMID:25463613

  5. Alphavirus vectors as tools in neuroscience and gene therapy.

    PubMed

    Lundstrom, Kenneth

    2016-05-01

    Alphavirus-based vectors have been engineered for in vitro and in vivo expression of heterelogous genes. The rapid and easy generation of replication-deficient recombinant particles and the broad range of host cell infection have made alphaviruses attractive vehicles for applications in neuroscience and gene therapy. Efficient delivery to primary neurons and hippocampal slices has allowed localization studies of gene expression and electrophysiological recordings of ion channels. Alphavirus vectors have also been applied for in vivo delivery to rodent brain. Due to the strong local transient expression provided by alphavirus vectors a number of immunization and gene therapy approaches have demonstrated both therapeutic and prophylactic efficacy in various animal models. PMID:26307195

  6. Vaccinations

    MedlinePlus

    ... vaccinated? For many years, a set of annual vaccinations was considered normal and necessary for dogs and ... to protect for a full year. Consequently, one vaccination schedule will not work well for all pets. ...

  7. Chimeric vapA/groEL2 DNA vaccines enhance clearance of Rhodococcus equi in aerosol challenged C3H/He mice.

    PubMed

    Phumoonna, Tongted; Barton, Mary D; Vanniasinkam, Thiru; Heuzenroeder, Michael W

    2008-05-12

    Rhodococcus equi remains a significant bacterial pathogen, causing severe pyogranulomatous pneumonia in foals aged 1-3 months. There is no effective vaccine currently available for the prevention of R. equi pneumonia. DNA vaccines are known to offer specific advantages over conventional vaccines. The aim of this study was to demonstrate efficacy of our recombinant DNA vaccine candidates, namely pcDNA3-Re1, pcDNA3-Re3 and pcDNA3-Re5 by combining a heat shock protein GroEL2 to a virulence-associated protein A (VapA) from R. equi to protect C3H/He mice against the R. equi infection. VapA was shown to be strongly recognised by sera from pneumonic foals. All vaccines elicited at least a doubling of the IgG2a/IgG1 ratio in comparison to the controls, indicating a bias to the Th1 response, which is postulated to be crucial for bacterial clearance and protective immunity against intracellular pathogens including R. equi. In addition, the immunised mice showed a significant reduction in R. equi in their lungs at 7 days after the aerosol challenge in comparison to PBS treated mice. However, examination of lung pathology 14 days after the challenge showed no gross differences in pathological changes between the unvaccinated and vaccinated animals. The lack of significant pathological changes suggests that the precise level of protection against R. equi pneumonia in the murine model of infection may not represent a true effectiveness of the potential vaccine candidates, indicating the mouse may not be the ideal non-equine model for vaccine studies and (or) the incomplete immunogenic antigen of vapA-based DNA vaccine constructs that mount an inadequate cell-mediated immune response against the R. equi infection. PMID:18423949

  8. Low temperature-dependent salmonid alphavirus glycoprotein processing and recombinant virus-like particle formation.

    PubMed

    Metz, Stefan W; Feenstra, Femke; Villoing, Stephane; van Hulten, Marielle C; van Lent, Jan W; Koumans, Joseph; Vlak, Just M; Pijlman, Gorben P

    2011-01-01

    Pancreas disease (PD) and sleeping disease (SD) are important viral scourges in aquaculture of Atlantic salmon and rainbow trout. The etiological agent of PD and SD is salmonid alphavirus (SAV), an unusual member of the Togaviridae (genus Alphavirus). SAV replicates at lower temperatures in fish. Outbreaks of SAV are associated with large economic losses of ~17 to 50 million $/year. Current control strategies rely on vaccination with inactivated virus formulations that are cumbersome to obtain and have intrinsic safety risks. In this research we were able to obtain non-infectious virus-like particles (VLPs) of SAV via expression of recombinant baculoviruses encoding SAV capsid protein and two major immunodominant viral glycoproteins, E1 and E2 in Spodoptera frugiperda Sf9 insect cells. However, this was only achieved when a temperature shift from 27°C to lower temperatures was applied. At 27°C, precursor E2 (PE2) was misfolded and not processed by host furin into mature E2. Hence, E2 was detected neither on the surface of infected cells nor as VLPs in the culture fluid. However, when temperatures during protein expression were lowered, PE2 was processed into mature E2 in a temperature-dependent manner and VLPs were abundantly produced. So, temperature shift-down during synthesis is a prerequisite for correct SAV glycoprotein processing and recombinant VLP production. PMID:21991361

  9. Low Temperature-Dependent Salmonid Alphavirus Glycoprotein Processing and Recombinant Virus-Like Particle Formation

    PubMed Central

    Villoing, Stephane; van Hulten, Marielle C.; van Lent, Jan W.; Koumans, Joseph; Vlak, Just M.; Pijlman, Gorben P.

    2011-01-01

    Pancreas disease (PD) and sleeping disease (SD) are important viral scourges in aquaculture of Atlantic salmon and rainbow trout. The etiological agent of PD and SD is salmonid alphavirus (SAV), an unusual member of the Togaviridae (genus Alphavirus). SAV replicates at lower temperatures in fish. Outbreaks of SAV are associated with large economic losses of ∼17 to 50 million $/year. Current control strategies rely on vaccination with inactivated virus formulations that are cumbersome to obtain and have intrinsic safety risks. In this research we were able to obtain non-infectious virus-like particles (VLPs) of SAV via expression of recombinant baculoviruses encoding SAV capsid protein and two major immunodominant viral glycoproteins, E1 and E2 in Spodoptera frugiperda Sf9 insect cells. However, this was only achieved when a temperature shift from 27°C to lower temperatures was applied. At 27°C, precursor E2 (PE2) was misfolded and not processed by host furin into mature E2. Hence, E2 was detected neither on the surface of infected cells nor as VLPs in the culture fluid. However, when temperatures during protein expression were lowered, PE2 was processed into mature E2 in a temperature-dependent manner and VLPs were abundantly produced. So, temperature shift-down during synthesis is a prerequisite for correct SAV glycoprotein processing and recombinant VLP production. PMID:21991361

  10. Discovery of Anthranilamides as a Novel Class of Inhibitors of Neurotropic Alphavirus Replication

    PubMed Central

    Barraza, Scott J.; Delekta, Philip C.; Sindac, Janice A.; Dobry, Craig J.; Xiang, Jianming; Keep, Richard F.; Miller, David J.; Larsen, Scott D.

    2015-01-01

    Neurotropic alphaviruses are debilitating pathogens that infect the central nervous system (CNS) and are transmitted to humans via mosquitoes. There exist no effective human vaccines against these viruses, underlining the need for effective antivirals, but no antiviral drugs are available for treating infection once the viruses have invaded the CNS. Previously, we reported the development of novel indole-2-carboxamide-based inhibitors of alphavirus replication that demonstrate significant reduction of viral titer and achieve measurable brain permeation in a pharmacokinetic mouse model. Herein we report our continued efforts to improve physicochemical properties predictive of in vivo blood-brain barrier (BBB) permeability through reduction of overall molecular weight, replacing the indole core with a variety of aromatic and non-aromatic monocyclics. These studies culminated in the identification of simple anthranilamides that retain excellent potency with improved metabolic stability and significantly greater aqueous solubility. Furthermore, in a live virus study, we showed that two new compounds were capable of reducing viral titer by two orders of magnitude and that these compounds likely exert their effects through a mechanism similar to that of our indole-2-carboxamide inhibitors. PMID:25740634

  11. [Exotic viral arthritis: role of alphavirus].

    PubMed

    Jeandel, P; Josse, R; Durand, J P

    2004-01-01

    Only six of the many alphavirus known to affect humans can cause articular manifestations. They are the Ross River and Barmah Forest viruses from the South Pacific, the Chikungunya, O'Nyong Nyong and Sindbis viruses from tropical Africa, and the Mayaro virus from South America. In most cases, articular manifestations involve arthralgia or transient arthritis and are usually minor. However in some cases especially involving Ross River virus acute polyarthritis may be the most prominent clinical feature and even develop before fever. Although these joint symptoms may be severe and persist for weeks or months in a subacute mode with slightly inflammatory episodes that can be relieved using analgesics, they never cause permanent damage. Differential diagnosis of alphavirsus-related polyarthritis is simple to diagnosis especially in epidemic outbreaks as is frequently the case for Ross River virus epidemics in Australia. Imported cases should be suspected in patients presenting acute or subacute polyarthritis after a recent stay of any length of time in a tropical country and can be confirmed by ordering serology from a specialized reference laboratory. PMID:15224565

  12. Antibody-Mediated Clearance of Alphavirus Infection from Neurons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levine, Beth; Hardwick, J. Marie; Trapp, Bruce D.; Crawford, Thomas O.; Bollinger, Robert C.; Griffin, Diane E.

    1991-11-01

    Humoral immunity is important for protection against viral infection and neutralization of extracellular virus, but clearance of virus from infected tissues is thought to be mediated solely by cellular immunity. However, in a SCID mouse model of persistent alphavirus encephalomyelitis, adoptive transfer of hyperimmune serum resulted in clearance of infectious virus and viral RNA from the nervous system, whereas adoptive transfer of sensitized T lymphocytes had no effect on viral replication. Three monoclonal antibodies to two different epitopes on the E2 envelope glycoprotein mediated viral clearance. Treatment of alphavirus-infected primary cultured rat neurons with these monoclonal antibodies to E2 resulted in decreased viral protein synthesis, followed by gradual termination of mature infectious virion production. Thus, antibody can mediate clearance of alphavirus infection from neurons by restricting viral gene expression.

  13. Vaccines

    MedlinePlus Videos and Cool Tools

    Vaccinations are injections of antigens into the body. Once the antigens enter the blood, they circulate along ... suppressor T cells stop the attack. After a vaccination, the body will have a memory of an ...

  14. Virus-specific thermostability and heat inactivation profiles of alphaviruses.

    PubMed

    Park, So Lee; Huang, Yan-Jang S; Hsu, Wei-Wen; Hettenbach, Susan M; Higgs, Stephen; Vanlandingham, Dana L

    2016-08-01

    Serological diagnosis is a critical component for disease surveillance and is important to address the increase in incidence and disease burden of alphaviruses, such as the chikungunya (CHIKV) and Ross River (RRV) viruses. The gold standard for serological diagnosis is the plaque reduction neutralization test (PRNT), which demonstrates the neutralizing capacity of serum samples after the removal of complement activity and adventitious viruses. This procedure is normally performed following inactivation of the virus at 56°C for 30min. Although this protocol has been widely accepted for the inactivation of envelope RNA viruses, recent studies have demonstrated that prolonged heat inactivation is required to completely inactivate two alphaviruses, Western equine encephalitis virus and CHIKV. Incomplete inactivation of viruses poses a laboratory biosafety risk and can also lead to spurious test results. Despite its importance in ensuring the safety of laboratory personnel as well as test integrity, systematic investigation on the thermostability of alphaviruses has not been performed. In this study, the temperature tolerance and heat inactivation profiles of RRV, Barmah Forest, and o'nyong-nyong viruses were determined. Variations in thermostability were observed within the Semliki forest serocomplex. Therefore, evidence-based heat inactivation procedures for alphaviruses are recommended. PMID:27079828

  15. Chimeric infectious bursal disease virus-like particles as potent vaccines for eradication of established HPV-16 E7-dependent tumors.

    PubMed

    Martin Caballero, Juan; Garzón, Ana; González-Cintado, Leticia; Kowalczyk, Wioleta; Jimenez Torres, Ignacio; Calderita, Gloria; Rodriguez, Margarita; Gondar, Virgínia; Bernal, Juan Jose; Ardavín, Carlos; Andreu, David; Zürcher, Thomas; von Kobbe, Cayetano

    2012-01-01

    Cervical cancer is caused by persistent high-risk human papillomavirus (HR-HPV) infection and represents the second most frequent gynecological malignancy in the world. The HPV-16 type accounts for up to 55% of all cervical cancers. The HPV-16 oncoproteins E6 and E7 are necessary for induction and maintenance of malignant transformation and represent tumor-specific antigens for targeted cytotoxic T lymphocyte-mediated immunotherapy. Therapeutic cancer vaccines have become a challenging area of oncology research in recent decades. Among current cancer immunotherapy strategies, virus-like particle (VLP)-based vaccines have emerged as a potent and safe approach. We generated a vaccine (VLP-E7) incorporating a long C-terminal fragment of HPV-16 E7 protein into the infectious bursal disease virus VLP and tested its therapeutic potential in HLA-A2 humanized transgenic mice grafted with TC1/A2 tumor cells. We performed a series of tumor challenge experiments demonstrating a strong immune response against already-formed tumors (complete eradication). Remarkably, therapeutic efficacy was obtained with a single dose without adjuvant and against two injections of tumor cells, indicating a potent and long-lasting immune response. PMID:23300838

  16. Rainbow Trout Sleeping Disease Virus Is an Atypical Alphavirus

    PubMed Central

    Villoing, Stéphane; Béarzotti, Monique; Chilmonczyk, Stefan; Castric, Jeannette; Brémont, Michel

    2000-01-01

    Sleeping disease (SD) is currently a matter of concern for salmonid fish farmers in most parts of the world. A viral etiology of SD has recently been suspected, since virus-like particles have been observed in infected rainbow trout cells. In salmonid-derived cell lines, the maximal rate of virus production was observed at 10°C, while little virus was produced at 14°C. Through biochemical, physicochemical, and morphological studies, SD virus (SDV) was shown to be an enveloped virus of roughly 60 nm in diameter. The genome consists of 12 kb of RNA, with the appearance of a 26S subgenomic RNA during the time course of SDV replication. The screening of a random-primed cDNA library constructed from the genomic RNA of semipurified virions facilitated the identification of a specific SDV cDNA clone having an open reading frame related to the alphavirus E2 glycoproteins. To extend the comparison between SDV structural proteins and the alphavirus protein counterparts, the nucleotide sequence of the total 4.1-kb subgenomic RNA has been determined. The 26S RNA encodes a 1,324-amino-acid polyprotein exhibiting typical alphavirus structural protein organization. SDV structural proteins showed several remarkable features compared to other alphaviruses: (i) unusually large individual proteins, (ii) very low homology (ranging from 30 to 34%) (iii) an unglycosylated E3 protein, and (iv) and E1 fusion domain sharing mutations implicated in the pH threshold. Although phylogenetically related to the Semliki Forest virus group of alphaviruses, SDV should be considered an atypical member, able to naturally replicate in lower vertebrates. PMID:10590104

  17. Chimeric Yellow Fever Virus 17D-Japanese Encephalitis Virus Vaccine: Dose-Response Effectiveness and Extended Safety Testing in Rhesus Monkeys

    PubMed Central

    Monath, T. P.; Levenbook, I.; Soike, K.; Zhang, Z.-X.; Ratterree, M.; Draper, K.; Barrett, A. D. T.; Nichols, R.; Weltzin, R.; Arroyo, J.; Guirakhoo, F.

    2000-01-01

    ChimeriVax-JE is a live, attenuated recombinant virus prepared by replacing the genes encoding two structural proteins (prM and E) of yellow fever 17D virus with the corresponding genes of an attenuated strain of Japanese encephalitis virus (JE), SA14-14-2 (T. J. Chambers et al., J. Virol. 73:3095–3101, 1999). Since the prM and E proteins contain antigens conferring protective humoral and cellular immunity, the immune response to vaccination is directed principally at JE. The prM-E genome sequence of the ChimeriVax-JE in diploid fetal rhesus lung cells (FRhL, a substrate acceptable for human vaccines) was identical to that of JE SA14-14-2 vaccine and differed from sequences of virulent wild-type strains (SA14 and Nakayama) at six amino acid residues in the envelope gene (E107, E138, E176, E279, E315, and E439). ChimeriVax-JE was fully attenuated for weaned mice inoculated by the intracerebral (i.c.) route, whereas commercial yellow fever 17D vaccine (YF-Vax) caused lethal encephalitis with a 50% lethal dose of 1.67 log10 PFU. Groups of four rhesus monkeys were inoculated by the subcutaneous route with 2.0, 3.0, 4.0, and 5.0 log10 PFU of ChimeriVax-JE. All 16 monkeys developed low viremias (mean peak viremia, 1.7 to 2.1 log10 PFU/ml; mean duration, 1.8 to 2.3 days). Neutralizing antibodies appeared between days 6 and 10; by day 30, neutralizing antibody responses were similar across dose groups. Neutralizing antibody titers to the homologous (vaccine) strain were higher than to the heterologous wild-type JE strains. All immunized monkeys and sham-immunized controls were challenged i.c. on day 54 with 5.2 log10 PFU of wild-type JE. None of the immunized monkeys developed viremia or illness and had mild residual brain lesions, whereas controls developed viremia, clinical encephalitis, and severe histopathologic lesions. Immunized monkeys developed significant (≥4-fold) increases in serum and cerebrospinal fluid neutralizing antibodies after i.c. challenge. In a

  18. Display of neutralizing epitopes of Canine parvovirus and a T-cell epitope of the fusion protein of Canine distemper virus on chimeric tymovirus-like particles and its use as a vaccine candidate both against Canine parvo and Canine distemper.

    PubMed

    Chandran, Dev; Shahana, Pallichera Vijayan; Rani, Gudavelli Sudha; Sugumar, Parthasarthy; Shankar, Chinchkar Ramchandra; Srinivasan, Villuppanoor Alwar

    2009-12-10

    Expression of Physalis mottle tymovirus coat protein in Escherichia coli was earlier shown to self-assemble into empty capsids that were nearly identical to the capsids formed in vivo. Amino acid substitutions were made at the N-terminus of wild-type Physalis mottle virus coat protein with neutralizing epitopes of Canine parvovirus containing the antigenic sites 1-2, 4 and 6-7 and T-cell epitope of the fusion protein of Canine distemper virus in various combinations to yield PhMV1, PhMV2, PhMV3, PhMV4 and PhMV5. These constructs were cloned and expressed in E. coli. The chimeric proteins self-assembled into chimeric tymovirus-like particles (TVLPs) as determined by electron microscopy. The TVLPs were purified by ultracentrifugation and injected into guinea pigs and dogs to determine their immunogenicity. Initial immunogenicity studies in guinea pigs indicated that PhMV3 gave a higher response in comparison to the other TVLPs for both CPV and CDV and hence all further experiments in dogs were done with PhMV3. HI was done against different isolates obtained from various parts of the country. Protective titres indicated the broad spectrum of the vaccine. In conclusion the study indicated that the above chimeric VLP based vaccine could be used in dogs to generate a protective immune response against diseases caused by both Canine parvo and Canine distemper virus. PMID:19818723

  19. Characterization of a Novel Human-Specific STING Agonist that Elicits Antiviral Activity Against Emerging Alphaviruses

    PubMed Central

    Sali, Tina M.; Pryke, Kara M.; Abraham, Jinu; Liu, Andrew; Archer, Iris; Broeckel, Rebecca; Staverosky, Julia A.; Smith, Jessica L.; Al-Shammari, Ahmed; Amsler, Lisi; Sheridan, Kayla; Nilsen, Aaron; Streblow, Daniel N.; DeFilippis, Victor R.

    2015-01-01

    Pharmacologic stimulation of innate immune processes represents an attractive strategy to achieve multiple therapeutic outcomes including inhibition of virus replication, boosting antitumor immunity, and enhancing vaccine immunogenicity. In light of this we sought to identify small molecules capable of activating the type I interferon (IFN) response by way of the transcription factor IFN regulatory factor 3 (IRF3). A high throughput in vitro screen yielded 4-(2-chloro-6-fluorobenzyl)-N-(furan-2-ylmethyl)-3-oxo-3,4-dihydro-2H-benzo[b][1,4]thiazine-6-carboxamide (referred to herein as G10), which was found to trigger IRF3/IFN-associated transcription in human fibroblasts. Further examination of the cellular response to this molecule revealed expression of multiple IRF3-dependent antiviral effector genes as well as type I and III IFN subtypes. This led to the establishment of a cellular state that prevented replication of emerging Alphavirus species including Chikungunya virus, Venezuelan Equine Encephalitis virus, and Sindbis virus. To define cellular proteins essential to elicitation of the antiviral activity by the compound we employed a reverse genetics approach that utilized genome editing via CRISPR/Cas9 technology. This allowed the identification of IRF3, the IRF3-activating adaptor molecule STING, and the IFN-associated transcription factor STAT1 as required for observed gene induction and antiviral effects. Biochemical analysis indicates that G10 does not bind to STING directly, however. Thus the compound may represent the first synthetic small molecule characterized as an indirect activator of human STING-dependent phenotypes. In vivo stimulation of STING-dependent activity by an unrelated small molecule in a mouse model of Chikungunya virus infection blocked viremia demonstrating that pharmacologic activation of this signaling pathway may represent a feasible strategy for combating emerging Alphaviruses. PMID:26646986

  20. Genome-Scale Phylogeny of the Alphavirus Genus Suggests a Marine Origin

    PubMed Central

    Palacios, G.; Tesh, R. B.; Savji, N.; Guzman, H.; Sherman, M.; Weaver, S. C.; Lipkin, W. I.

    2012-01-01

    The genus Alphavirus comprises a diverse group of viruses, including some that cause severe disease. Using full-length sequences of all known alphaviruses, we produced a robust and comprehensive phylogeny of the Alphavirus genus, presenting a more complete evolutionary history of these viruses compared to previous studies based on partial sequences. Our phylogeny suggests the origin of the alphaviruses occurred in the southern oceans and spread equally through the Old and New World. Since lice appear to be involved in aquatic alphavirus transmission, it is possible that we are missing a louse-borne branch of the alphaviruses. Complete genome sequencing of all members of the genus also revealed conserved residues forming the structural basis of the E1 and E2 protein dimers. PMID:22190718

  1. Genome-scale phylogeny of the alphavirus genus suggests a marine origin.

    PubMed

    Forrester, N L; Palacios, G; Tesh, R B; Savji, N; Guzman, H; Sherman, M; Weaver, S C; Lipkin, W I

    2012-03-01

    The genus Alphavirus comprises a diverse group of viruses, including some that cause severe disease. Using full-length sequences of all known alphaviruses, we produced a robust and comprehensive phylogeny of the Alphavirus genus, presenting a more complete evolutionary history of these viruses compared to previous studies based on partial sequences. Our phylogeny suggests the origin of the alphaviruses occurred in the southern oceans and spread equally through the Old and New World. Since lice appear to be involved in aquatic alphavirus transmission, it is possible that we are missing a louse-borne branch of the alphaviruses. Complete genome sequencing of all members of the genus also revealed conserved residues forming the structural basis of the E1 and E2 protein dimers. PMID:22190718

  2. Tests in mice of a dengue vaccine candidate made of chimeric Junin virus-like particles and conserved dengue virus envelope sequences.

    PubMed

    Mareze, Vania Aparecida; Borio, Cristina Silvia; Bilen, Marcos F; Fleith, Renata; Mirazo, Santiago; Mansur, Daniel Santos; Arbiza, Juan; Lozano, Mario Enrique; Bruña-Romero, Oscar

    2016-01-01

    Two new vaccine candidates against dengue virus (DENV) infection were generated by fusing the coding sequences of the self-budding Z protein from Junin virus (Z-JUNV) to those of two cryptic peptides (Z/DENV-P1 and Z/DENV-P2) conserved on the envelope protein of all serotypes of DENV. The capacity of these chimeras to generate virus-like particles (VLPs) and to induce virus-neutralizing antibodies in mice was determined. First, recombinant proteins that displayed reactivity with a Z-JUNV-specific serum by immunofluorescence were detected in HEK-293 cells transfected with each of the two plasmids and VLP formation was also observed by transmission electron microscopy. Next, we determined the presence of antibodies against the envelope peptides of DENV in the sera of immunized C57BL/6 mice. Results showed that those animals that received Z/DENV-P2 DNA coding sequences followed by a boost with DENV-P2 synthetic peptides elicited significant specific antibody titers (≥6.400). Finally, DENV plaque-reduction neutralization tests (PRNT) were performed. Although no significant protective effect was observed when using sera of Z/DENV-P1-immunized animals, antibodies raised against vaccine candidate Z/DENV-P2 (diluted 1:320) were able to reduce in over 50 % the number of viral plaques generated by infectious DENV particles. This reduction was comparable to that of the 4G2 DENV-specific monoclonal cross-reactive (all serotypes) neutralizing antibody. We conclude that Z-JUNV-VLP is a valid carrier to induce antibody-mediated immune responses in mice and that Z/DENV-P2 is not only immunogenic but also protective in vitro against infection of cells with DENV, deserving further studies. On the other side, DENV's fusion peptide-derived chimera Z/DENV-P1 did not display similar protective properties. PMID:26386688

  3. Dengue vaccine

    PubMed Central

    Jindal, Harashish; Bhatt, Bhumika; Malik, Jagbir Singh; SK, Shashikantha

    2014-01-01

    Dengue has emerged as one of the major global public health problems. The disease has broken out of its shell and has spread due to increased international travel and climatic changes. Globally, over 2.5 billion people accounting for >40% of the world's population are at risk from dengue. Since the 1940s, dengue vaccines have been under investigation. A live-attenuated tetravalent vaccine based on chimeric yellow fever-dengue virus (CYD-TDV) has progressed to phase III efficacy studies. Dengue vaccine has been found to be a cost-effective intervention to reduce morbidity and mortality. Current dengue vaccine candidates aim to protect against the 4 dengue serotypes, but the recent discovery of a fifth serotype could complicate vaccine development. In recent years, an urgent need has been felt for a vaccine to prevent the morbidity and mortality from this disease in a cost-effective way. PMID:25424928

  4. [VACCINES].

    PubMed

    Bellver Capella, Vincente

    2015-10-01

    Vaccines are an extraordinary instrument of immunization of the population against infectious diseases. Around them there are many ethical issues. One of the most debated is what to do with certain groups opposition to vaccination of their children. States have managed in different ways the conflict between the duty of vaccination and the refusal to use vaccines: some impose the vaccination and others simply promote it. In this article we deal with which of these two approaches is the most suitable from an ethical and legal point of view. We stand up for the second option, which is the current one in Spain, and we propose some measures which should be kept in mind to improve immunization programs. PMID:26685562

  5. Vaccines

    MedlinePlus Videos and Cool Tools

    ... help the body defend itself against foreign invaders. As the antigens invade the body's tissues, they attract ... the suppressor T cells stop the attack. After a vaccination, the body will have a memory of ...

  6. Electroejaculation of chimeric rats

    PubMed Central

    McCoy, Marina R.; Montonye, Daniel; Bryda, Elizabeth C.

    2014-01-01

    With the advent of genetic engineering of rodents came the need to assess fertility and germline competency, especially in chimeric rodents generated using embryonic stem cells. Traditional methods rely on natural mating and progeny testing, which is time- and cost-intensive. Electroejaculation is a faster method of collecting sperm for genetic analysis and offers the additional benefit of using fewer animals. This column describes a refined electroejaculation technique for chimeric rats using light gas anesthesia and a custom-made platform for sperm collection. PMID:23689457

  7. Electroejaculation of chimeric rats.

    PubMed

    McCoy, Marina R; Montonye, Daniel; Bryda, Elizabeth C

    2013-06-01

    With the advent of genetic engineering of rodents came the need to assess fertility and germline competency, especially in chimeric rodents generated using embryonic stem cells. Traditional methods rely on natural mating and progeny testing, which is time- and cost-intensive. Electroejaculation is a faster method of collecting sperm for genetic analysis and offers the additional benefit of using fewer animals. This column describes a refined electroejaculation technique for chimeric rats using light gas anesthesia and a custom-made platform for sperm collection. PMID:23689457

  8. Noncapped Alphavirus Genomic RNAs and Their Role during Infection

    PubMed Central

    Sokoloski, K. J.; Haist, K. C.; Morrison, T. E.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Alphaviruses are enveloped positive-sense RNA viruses that exhibit a wide host range consisting of vertebrate and invertebrate species. Previously we have reported that the infectivity of Sindbis virus (SINV), the model alphavirus, was largely a function of the cell line producing the viral particles. Mammalian-cell-derived SINV particles, on average, exhibit a higher particle-to-PFU ratio than mosquito cell-derived SINV particles. Nevertheless, the outcome of nonproductive infection, the molecular traits that determine particle infectivity and the biological importance of noninfectious particles were, prior to this study, unknown. Here, we report that the incoming genomic RNAs of noninfectious SINV particles undergo rapid degradation following infection. Moreover, these studies have led to the identification of the absence of the 5′ cap structure as a primary molecular determinant of particle infectivity. We show that the genomic RNAs of alphaviruses are not universally 5′ capped, with a significant number of noncapped genomic RNA produced early in infection. The production of noncapped viral genomic RNAs is important to the establishment and maintenance of alphaviral infection. IMPORTANCE This report is of importance to the field of virology for three reasons. First, these studies demonstrate that noncapped Sindbis virus particles are produced as a result of viral RNA synthesis. Second, this report is, to our knowledge, the first instance of the direct measurement of the half-life of an incoming genomic RNA from a positive-sense RNA virus. Third, these studies indicate that alphaviral infection is likely a concerted effort of infectious and noninfectious viral particles. PMID:25833042

  9. Alphavirus antiviral drug development: scientific gap analysis and prospective research areas.

    PubMed

    Reichert, Erin; Clase, Amanda; Bacetty, Ada; Larsen, Joseph

    2009-12-01

    The New World alphaviruses Venezuelan equine encephalitis virus (VEEV), eastern equine encephalitis virus (EEEV), and western equine encephalitis virus (WEEV) pose a significant threat to human health as the etiological agents of serious viral encephalitis through natural infection as well as through their potential use as a biological weapon. At present, there is no FDA-approved medical treatment for infection with these viruses. The Defense Threat Reduction Agency, Joint Science and Technology Office for Chemical and Biological Defense (DTRA/JSTO), is currently funding research aimed at developing antiviral drugs and vaccines against VEEV, EEEV, and WEEV. A review of antiviral drug discovery efforts for these viruses revealed significant gaps in the data, assays, and models required for successful drug development. This review provides a description of these gaps and highlights specific critical research areas for the development of a target-based drug discovery program for the VEEV, EEEV, and WEEV nonstructural proteins. These efforts will increase the probability of the successful development of a pharmaceutical intervention against these viral threat agents. PMID:20028250

  10. Structural changes of envelope proteins during alphavirus fusion

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Long; Jose, Joyce; Xiang, Ye; Kuhn, Richard J.; Rossmann, Michael G.

    2010-12-08

    Alphaviruses are enveloped RNA viruses that have a diameter of about 700 {angstrom} and can be lethal human pathogens. Entry of virus into host cells by endocytosis is controlled by two envelope glycoproteins, E1 and E2. The E2-E1 heterodimers form 80 trimeric spikes on the icosahedral virus surface, 60 with quasi-three-fold symmetry and 20 coincident with the icosahedral three-fold axes arranged with T = 4 quasi-symmetry. The E1 glycoprotein has a hydrophobic fusion loop at one end and is responsible for membrane fusion. The E2 protein is responsible for receptor binding and protects the fusion loop at neutral pH. The lower pH in the endosome induces the virions to undergo an irreversible conformational change in which E2 and E1 dissociate and E1 forms homotrimers, triggering fusion of the viral membrane with the endosomal membrane and then releasing the viral genome into the cytoplasm. Here we report the structure of an alphavirus spike, crystallized at low pH, representing an intermediate in the fusion process and clarifying the maturation process. The trimer of E2-E1 in the crystal structure is similar to the spikes in the neutral pH virus except that the E2 middle region is disordered, exposing the fusion loop. The amino- and carboxy-terminal domains of E2 each form immunoglobulin-like folds, consistent with the receptor attachment properties of E2.

  11. Peptide motif analysis predicts alphaviruses as triggers for rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Hogeboom, Charissa

    2015-12-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) develops in response to both genetic and environmental factors. The strongest genetic determinant is HLA-DR, where polymorphisms within the P4 and P6 binding pockets confer elevated risk. However, low disease concordance across monozygotic twin pairs underscores the importance of an environmental factor, probably infectious. The goal of this investigation was to predict the microorganism most likely to interact with HLA-DR to trigger RA under the molecular mimicry hypothesis. A set of 185 structural proteins from viruses or intracellular bacteria was scanned for regions of sequence homology with a collagen peptide that binds preferentially to DR4; candidates were then evaluated against a motif required for T cell cross-reactivity. The plausibility of the predicted agent was evaluated by comparison of microbial prevalence patterns to epidemiological characteristics of RA. Peptides from alphavirus capsid proteins provided the closest fit. Variations in the P6 position suggest that the HLA binding preference may vary by species, with Ross River virus, Chikungunya virus, and Mayaro virus peptides binding preferentially to DR4, and peptides from Sindbis/Ockelbo virus showing stronger affinity to DR1. The predicted HLA preference is supported by epidemiological studies of post-infection chronic arthralgia. Parallels between the cytokine profiles of RA and chronic alphavirus infection are discussed. PMID:26476978

  12. Genome-Wide RNAi Screen Identifies Novel Host Proteins Required for Alphavirus Entry

    PubMed Central

    Taylor, Gwen M.; Kielian, Margaret

    2013-01-01

    The enveloped alphaviruses include important and emerging human pathogens such as Chikungunya virus and Eastern equine encephalitis virus. Alphaviruses enter cells by clathrin-mediated endocytosis, and exit by budding from the plasma membrane. While there has been considerable progress in defining the structure and function of the viral proteins, relatively little is known about the host factors involved in alphavirus infection. We used a genome-wide siRNA screen to identify host factors that promote or inhibit alphavirus infection in human cells. Fuzzy homologue (FUZ), a protein with reported roles in planar cell polarity and cilia biogenesis, was required for the clathrin-dependent internalization of both alphaviruses and the classical endocytic ligand transferrin. The tetraspanin membrane protein TSPAN9 was critical for the efficient fusion of low pH-triggered virus with the endosome membrane. FUZ and TSPAN9 were broadly required for infection by the alphaviruses Sindbis virus, Semliki Forest virus, and Chikungunya virus, but were not required by the structurally-related flavivirus Dengue virus. Our results highlight the unanticipated functions of FUZ and TSPAN9 in distinct steps of alphavirus entry and suggest novel host proteins that may serve as targets for antiviral therapy. PMID:24367265

  13. Stable, high-level expression of reporter proteins from improved alphavirus expression vectors to track replication and dissemination during encephalitic and arthritogenic disease.

    PubMed

    Sun, Chengqun; Gardner, Christina L; Watson, Alan M; Ryman, Kate D; Klimstra, William B

    2014-02-01

    Engineered alphavirus vectors expressing reporters of infection have been used for a number of years due to their relatively low costs for analysis of virus replication and the capacity to utilize imaging systems for longitudinal measurements of growth within single animals. In general, these vectors have been derived from Old World alphaviruses using a second viral subgenomic promoter to express the transgenes, placed either immediately after the nonstructural proteins or at the 3' end of the viral coding sequences. However, the relevance of these vectors to natural infections is questionable, as they have not been rigorously tested for virulence in vivo in comparison with parental viruses or for the retention of the reporter during replication. Here, we report construction of new expression vectors for two Old World arthritogenic alphaviruses (Sindbis and Chikungunya viruses) and two New World encephalitic alphaviruses (eastern and Venezuelan equine encephalitis viruses) based upon either fusion of the reporter protein in frame within nonstructural protein 3 (nsP3) or insertion of the reporter as a cleavable element between the capsid and PE2 structural proteins. We have compared these with a traditional 3' double subgenomic promoter virus expressing either a large, firefly luciferase (fLuc; 1,650 nucleotides), or small, NanoLuc (nLuc; 513 nucleotides), luminescent reporter protein. Results indicate that the nLuc is substantially more stable than fLuc during repeated rounds of infection regardless of the transgene location. However, the capsid-PE2 insertion and nsP3 fusion viruses exhibit the most authentic mimicking of parental virus infection regardless of expressed protein. IMPORTANCE As more antiviral therapeutics and vaccines are developed, rapid and accurate in vivo modeling of their efficacy will be required. However, current alphavirus vectors expressing reporters of infection have not been extensively tested for accurate mimicking of the infection

  14. Salmonid alphavirus glycoprotein E2 requires low temperature and E1 for virion formation and induction of protective immunity.

    PubMed

    Hikke, Mia C; Braaen, Stine; Villoing, Stephane; Hodneland, Kjartan; Geertsema, Corinne; Verhagen, Lisa; Frost, Petter; Vlak, Just M; Rimstad, Espen; Pijlman, Gorben P

    2014-10-29

    Salmonid alphavirus (SAV; also known as Salmon pancreas disease virus; family Togaviridae) causes pancreas disease and sleeping disease in Atlantic salmon and rainbow trout, respectively, and poses a major burden to the aquaculture industry. SAV infection in vivo is temperature-restricted and progeny virus is only produced at low temperatures (10-15 °C). Using engineered SAV replicons we show that viral RNA replication is not temperature-restricted suggesting that the viral structural proteins determine low-temperature dependency. The processing/trafficking of SAV glycoproteins E1 and E2 as a function of temperature was investigated via baculovirus vectors in Sf9 insect cells and by transfection of CHSE-214 fish cells with DNA constructs expressing E1 and E2. We identified SAV E2 as the temperature determinant by demonstrating that membrane trafficking and surface expression of E2 occurs only at low temperature and only in the presence of E1. Finally, a vaccination-challenge model in Atlantic salmon demonstrates the biological significance of our findings and shows that SAV replicon DNA vaccines encoding E2 elicit protective immunity only when E1 is co-expressed. This is the first study that identifies E2 as the critical determinant of SAV low-temperature dependent virion formation and defines the prerequisites for induction of a potent immune response in Atlantic salmon by DNA vaccination. PMID:25269093

  15. A chimeric measles virus with a lentiviral envelope replicates exclusively in CD4+/CCR5+ cells

    SciTech Connect

    Mourez, Thomas; Mesel-Lemoine, Mariana; Combredet, Chantal; Najburg, Valerie; Cayet, Nadege; Tangy, Frederic

    2011-10-25

    We generated a replicating chimeric measles virus in which the hemagglutinin and fusion surface glycoproteins were replaced with the gp160 envelope glycoprotein of simian immunodeficiency virus (SIVmac239). Based on a previously cloned live-attenuated Schwarz vaccine strain of measles virus (MV), this chimera was rescued at high titers using reverse genetics in CD4+ target cells. Cytopathic effect consisted in the presence of large cell aggregates evolving to form syncytia, as observed during SIV infection. The morphology of the chimeric virus was identical to that of the parent MV particles. The presence of SIV gp160 as the only envelope protein on chimeric particles surface altered the cell tropism of the new virus from CD46+ to CD4+ cells. Used as an HIV candidate vaccine, this MV/SIVenv chimeric virus would mimic transient HIV-like infection, benefiting both from HIV-like tropism and the capacity of MV to replicate in dendritic cells, macrophages and lymphocytes.

  16. Recent vaccine technology in industrial animals.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hyunil; Lee, Yoo-Kyoung; Kang, Sang Chul; Han, Beom Ku; Choi, Ki Myung

    2016-01-01

    Various new technologies have been applied for developing vaccines against various animal diseases. Virus-like particle (VLP) vaccine technology was used for manufacturing the porcine circovirus type 2 and RNA particle vaccines based on an alphavirus vector for porcine epidemic diarrhea (PED). Although VLP is classified as a killed-virus vaccine, because its structure is similar to the original virus, it can induce long-term and cell-mediated immunity. The RNA particle vaccine used a Venezuela equine encephalitis (VEE) virus gene as a vector. The VEE virus partial gene can be substituted with the PED virus spike gene. Recombinant vaccines can be produced by substitution of the target gene in the VEE vector. Both of these new vaccine technologies made it possible to control the infectious disease efficiently in a relatively short time. PMID:26866019

  17. Recent vaccine technology in industrial animals

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Various new technologies have been applied for developing vaccines against various animal diseases. Virus-like particle (VLP) vaccine technology was used for manufacturing the porcine circovirus type 2 and RNA particle vaccines based on an alphavirus vector for porcine epidemic diarrhea (PED). Although VLP is classified as a killed-virus vaccine, because its structure is similar to the original virus, it can induce long-term and cell-mediated immunity. The RNA particle vaccine used a Venezuela equine encephalitis (VEE) virus gene as a vector. The VEE virus partial gene can be substituted with the PED virus spike gene. Recombinant vaccines can be produced by substitution of the target gene in the VEE vector. Both of these new vaccine technologies made it possible to control the infectious disease efficiently in a relatively short time. PMID:26866019

  18. Chimeric Lyssavirus Glycoproteins with Increased Immunological Potential

    PubMed Central

    Jallet, Corinne; Jacob, Yves; Bahloul, Chokri; Drings, Astrid; Desmezieres, Emmanuel; Tordo, Noël; Perrin, Pierre

    1999-01-01

    The rabies virus glycoprotein molecule (G) can be divided into two parts separated by a flexible hinge: the NH2 half (site II part) containing antigenic site II up to the linear region (amino acids [aa] 253 to 275 encompassing epitope VI [aa 264]) and the COOH half (site III part) containing antigenic site III and the transmembrane and cytoplasmic domains. The structural and immunological roles of each part were investigated by cell transfection and mouse DNA-based immunization with homogeneous and chimeric G genes formed by fusion of the site II part of one genotype (GT) with the site III part of the same or another GT. Various site II-site III combinations between G genes of PV (Pasteur virus strain) rabies (GT1), Mokola (GT3), and EBL1 (European bat lyssavirus 1 [GT5]) viruses were tested. Plasmids pGPV-PV, pGMok-Mok, pGMok-PV, and pGEBL1-PV induced transient expression of correctly transported and folded antigens in neuroblastoma cells and virus-neutralizing antibodies against parental viruses in mice, whereas, pG-PVIII (site III part only) and pGPV-Mok did not. The site III part of PV (GT1) was a strong inducer of T helper cells and was very effective at presenting the site II part of various GTs. Both parts are required for correct folding and transport of chimeric G proteins which have a strong potential value for immunological studies and development of multivalent vaccines. Chimeric plasmid pGEBL1-PV broadens the spectrum of protection against European lyssavirus genotypes (GT1, GT5, and GT6). PMID:9847325

  19. A Polyprotein-Expressing Salmonid Alphavirus Replicon Induces Modest Protection in Atlantic Salmon (Salmo Salar) Against Infectious Pancreatic Necrosis

    PubMed Central

    Abdullah, Azila; Olsen, Christel M.; Hodneland, Kjartan; Rimstad, Espen

    2015-01-01

    Vaccination is an important strategy for the control and prevention of infectious pancreatic necrosis (IPN) in farmed Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar) in the post-smolt stage in sea-water. In this study, a heterologous gene expression system, based on a replicon construct of salmonid alphavirus (SAV), was used for in vitro and in vivo expression of IPN virus proteins. The large open reading frame of segment A, encoding the polyprotein NH2-pVP2-VP4-VP3-COOH, as well as pVP2, were cloned and expressed by the SAV replicon in Chinook salmon embryo cells (CHSE-214) and epithelioma papulosum cyprini (EPC) cells. The replicon constructs pSAV/polyprotein (pSAV/PP) and pSAV/pVP2 were used to immunize Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar) by a single intramuscular injection and tested in a subsequent IPN virus (IPNV) challenge trial. A low to moderate protection against IPN was observed in fish immunized with the replicon vaccine that encoded the pSAV/PP, while the pSAV/pVP2 construct was not found to induce protection. PMID:25606973

  20. Conservation of a Packaging Signal and the Viral Genome RNA Packaging Mechanism in Alphavirus Evolution ▿

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Dal Young; Firth, Andrew E.; Atasheva, Svetlana; Frolova, Elena I.; Frolov, Ilya

    2011-01-01

    Alphaviruses are a group of small, enveloped viruses which are widely distributed on all continents. In infected cells, alphaviruses display remarkable specificity in RNA packaging by encapsidating only their genomic RNA while avoiding packaging of the more abundant viral subgenomic (SG), cellular messenger and transfer RNAs into released virions. In this work, we demonstrate that in spite of evolution in geographically isolated areas and accumulation of considerable diversity in the nonstructural and structural genes, many alphaviruses belonging to different serocomplexes harbor RNA packaging signals (PSs) which contain the same structural and functional elements. Their characteristic features are as follows. (i) Sindbis, eastern, western, and Venezuelan equine encephalitis and most likely many other alphaviruses, except those belonging to the Semliki Forest virus (SFV) clade, have PSs which can be recognized by the capsid proteins of heterologous alphaviruses. (ii) The PS consists of 4 to 6 stem-loop RNA structures bearing conserved GGG sequences located at the base of the loop. These short motifs are integral elements of the PS and can function even in the artificially designed PS. (iii) Mutagenesis of the entire PS or simply the GGG sequences has strong negative effects on viral genome packaging and leads to release of viral particles containing mostly SG RNAs. (iv) Packaging of RNA appears to be determined to some extent by the number of GGG-containing stem-loops, and more than one stem-loop is required for efficient RNA encapsidation. (v) Viruses of the SFV clade are the exception to the general rule. They contain PSs in the nsP2 gene, but their capsid protein retains the ability to use the nsP1-specific PS of other alphaviruses. These new discoveries regarding alphavirus PS structure and function provide an opportunity for the development of virus variants, which are irreversibly attenuated in terms of production of infectious virus but release high levels

  1. siRNA Screen Identifies Trafficking Host Factors that Modulate Alphavirus Infection.

    PubMed

    Radoshitzky, Sheli R; Pegoraro, Gianluca; Chī, Xi Olì; D Ng, Lián; Chiang, Chih-Yuan; Jozwick, Lucas; Clester, Jeremiah C; Cooper, Christopher L; Courier, Duane; Langan, David P; Underwood, Knashka; Kuehl, Kathleen A; Sun, Mei G; Caì, Yíngyún; Yú, Shu Qìng; Burk, Robin; Zamani, Rouzbeh; Kota, Krishna; Kuhn, Jens H; Bavari, Sina

    2016-03-01

    Little is known about the repertoire of cellular factors involved in the replication of pathogenic alphaviruses. To uncover molecular regulators of alphavirus infection, and to identify candidate drug targets, we performed a high-content imaging-based siRNA screen. We revealed an actin-remodeling pathway involving Rac1, PIP5K1- α, and Arp3, as essential for infection by pathogenic alphaviruses. Infection causes cellular actin rearrangements into large bundles of actin filaments termed actin foci. Actin foci are generated late in infection concomitantly with alphavirus envelope (E2) expression and are dependent on the activities of Rac1 and Arp3. E2 associates with actin in alphavirus-infected cells and co-localizes with Rac1-PIP5K1-α along actin filaments in the context of actin foci. Finally, Rac1, Arp3, and actin polymerization inhibitors interfere with E2 trafficking from the trans-Golgi network to the cell surface, suggesting a plausible model in which transport of E2 to the cell surface is mediated via Rac1- and Arp3-dependent actin remodeling. PMID:27031835

  2. Alphavirus production is inhibited in neurofibromin 1-deficient cells through activated RAS signalling

    SciTech Connect

    Kolokoltsova, Olga A. Domina, Aaron M. Kolokoltsov, Andrey A. Davey, Robert A. | Weaver, Scott C. || Watowich, Stanley J. ||

    2008-07-20

    Virus-host interactions essential for alphavirus pathogenesis are poorly understood. To address this shortcoming, we coupled retrovirus insertional mutagenesis and a cell survival selection strategy to generate clonal cell lines broadly resistant to Sindbis virus (SINV) and other alphaviruses. Resistant cells had significantly impaired SINV production relative to wild-type (WT) cells, although virus binding and fusion events were similar in both sets of cells. Analysis of the retroviral integration sites identified the neurofibromin 1 (NF1) gene as disrupted in alphavirus-resistant cell lines. Subsequent analysis indicated that expression of NF1 was significantly reduced in alphavirus-resistant cells. Importantly, independent down-regulation of NF1 expression in WT HEK 293 cells decreased virus production and increased cell viability during SINV infection, relative to infected WT cells. Additionally, we observed hyperactive RAS signalling in the resistant HEK 293 cells, which was anticipated because NF1 is a negative regulator of RAS. Expression of constitutively active RAS (HRAS-G12V) in a WT HEK 293 cell line resulted in a marked delay in virus production, compared with infected cells transfected with parental plasmid or dominant-negative RAS (HRAS-S17N). This work highlights novel host cell determinants required for alphavirus pathogenesis and suggests that RAS signalling may play an important role in neuronal susceptibility to SINV infection.

  3. Alphavirus Infection: Host Cell Shut-Off and Inhibition of Antiviral Responses.

    PubMed

    Fros, Jelke J; Pijlman, Gorben P

    2016-01-01

    Alphaviruses cause debilitating disease in humans and animals and are transmitted by blood-feeding arthropods, typically mosquitoes. With a traditional focus on two models, Sindbis virus and Semliki Forest virus, alphavirus research has significantly intensified in the last decade partly due to the re-emergence and dramatic expansion of chikungunya virus in Asia, Europe, and the Americas. As a consequence, alphavirus-host interactions are now understood in much more molecular detail, and important novel mechanisms have been elucidated. It has become clear that alphaviruses not only cause a general host shut-off in infected vertebrate cells, but also specifically suppress different host antiviral pathways using their viral nonstructural proteins, nsP2 and nsP3. Here we review the current state of the art of alphavirus host cell shut-off of viral transcription and translation, and describe recent insights in viral subversion of interferon induction and signaling, the unfolded protein response, and stress granule assembly. PMID:27294951

  4. siRNA Screen Identifies Trafficking Host Factors that Modulate Alphavirus Infection

    PubMed Central

    Radoshitzky, Sheli R.; Pegoraro, Gianluca; Chī, Xiǎolì; Dǒng, Lián; Chiang, Chih-Yuan; Jozwick, Lucas; Clester, Jeremiah C.; Cooper, Christopher L.; Courier, Duane; Langan, David P.; Underwood, Knashka; Kuehl, Kathleen A.; Sun, Mei G.; Caì, Yíngyún; Yú, Shuǐqìng; Burk, Robin; Zamani, Rouzbeh; Kota, Krishna; Kuhn, Jens H.; Bavari, Sina

    2016-01-01

    Little is known about the repertoire of cellular factors involved in the replication of pathogenic alphaviruses. To uncover molecular regulators of alphavirus infection, and to identify candidate drug targets, we performed a high-content imaging-based siRNA screen. We revealed an actin-remodeling pathway involving Rac1, PIP5K1- α, and Arp3, as essential for infection by pathogenic alphaviruses. Infection causes cellular actin rearrangements into large bundles of actin filaments termed actin foci. Actin foci are generated late in infection concomitantly with alphavirus envelope (E2) expression and are dependent on the activities of Rac1 and Arp3. E2 associates with actin in alphavirus-infected cells and co-localizes with Rac1–PIP5K1-α along actin filaments in the context of actin foci. Finally, Rac1, Arp3, and actin polymerization inhibitors interfere with E2 trafficking from the trans-Golgi network to the cell surface, suggesting a plausible model in which transport of E2 to the cell surface is mediated via Rac1- and Arp3-dependent actin remodeling. PMID:27031835

  5. Chimeric SV40 virus-like particles induce specific cytotoxicity and protective immunity against influenza A virus without the need of adjuvants

    SciTech Connect

    Kawano, Masaaki; Morikawa, Katsuma; Suda, Tatsuya; Ohno, Naohito; Matsushita, Sho; Akatsuka, Toshitaka; Handa, Hiroshi; Matsui, Masanori

    2014-01-05

    Virus-like particles (VLPs) are a promising vaccine platform due to the safety and efficiency. However, it is still unclear whether polyomavirus-based VLPs are useful for this purpose. Here, we attempted to evaluate the potential of polyomavirus VLPs for the antiviral vaccine using simian virus 40 (SV40). We constructed chimeric SV40-VLPs carrying an HLA-A{sup ⁎}02:01-restricted, cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL) epitope derived from influenza A virus. HLA-A{sup ⁎}02:01-transgenic mice were then immunized with the chimeric SV40-VLPs. The chimeric SV40-VLPs effectively induced influenza-specific CTLs and heterosubtypic protection against influenza A viruses without the need of adjuvants. Because DNase I treatment of the chimeric SV40-VLPs did not disrupt CTL induction, the intrinsic adjuvant property may not result from DNA contaminants in the VLP preparation. In addition, immunization with the chimeric SV40-VLPs generated long-lasting memory CTLs. We here propose that the chimeric SV40-VLPs harboring an epitope may be a promising CTL-based vaccine platform with self-adjuvant properties. - Highlights: • We constructed chimeric SV40-VLPs carrying an influenza virus-derived CTL epitope. • Chimeric SV40-VLPs induce influenza-specific CTLs in mice without adjuvants. • Chimeric SV40-VLPs induce heterosubtypic protection against influenza A viruses. • Chimeric SV40-VLPs induce long-lasting memory CTLs. • Chimeric SV40-VLPs is a promising vaccine platform with self-adjuvant properties.

  6. Chimeric enzymes with improved cellulase activities

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, Qi; Baker, John O; Himmel, Michael E

    2015-03-31

    Nucleic acid molecules encoding chimeric cellulase polypeptides that exhibit improved cellulase activities are disclosed herein. The chimeric cellulase polypeptides encoded by these nucleic acids and methods to produce the cellulases are also described, along with methods of using chimeric cellulases for the conversion of cellulose to sugars such as glucose.

  7. Generation and evaluation of a chimeric classical swine fever virus expressing a visible marker gene.

    PubMed

    Li, Yongfeng; Wang, Xiao; Sun, Yuan; Li, Lian-Feng; Zhang, Lingkai; Li, Su; Luo, Yuzi; Qiu, Hua-Ji

    2016-03-01

    Classical swine fever virus (CSFV) is a noncytopathogenic virus, and the incorporation of an enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP) tag into the viral genome provides a means of direct monitoring of viral infection without immunostaining. It is well established that the 3' untranslated region (3'-UTR) of the CSFV plays an important role in viral RNA replication. Although CSFV carrying a reporter gene and chimeric CSFV have been generated and evaluated, a chimeric CSFV with a visible marker has not yet been reported. Here, we generated and evaluated a chimeric virus containing the EGFP tag and the 3'-UTR from vaccine strain HCLV (C-strain) in the genetic background of the highly virulent CSFV Shimen strain. The chimeric marker CSFV was fluorescent and had an approximately 100-fold lower viral titer, lower replication level of viral genome, and weaker fluorescence intensity than the recombinant CSFV with only the EGFP tag or the parental virus. Furthermore, the marker chimera was avirulent and displayed no viremia in inoculated pigs, which were completely protected from lethal CSFV challenge as early as 15 days post-inoculation. The chimeric marker virus was visible in vitro and attenuated in vitro and in vivo, which suggests that CSFV can be engineered to produce attenuated variants with a visible marker to facilitate in vitro studies of CSFV infection and replication and to develop of novel vaccines against CSF. PMID:26614259

  8. Alphavirus Infection: Host Cell Shut-Off and Inhibition of Antiviral Responses

    PubMed Central

    Fros, Jelke J.; Pijlman, Gorben P.

    2016-01-01

    Alphaviruses cause debilitating disease in humans and animals and are transmitted by blood-feeding arthropods, typically mosquitoes. With a traditional focus on two models, Sindbis virus and Semliki Forest virus, alphavirus research has significantly intensified in the last decade partly due to the re-emergence and dramatic expansion of chikungunya virus in Asia, Europe, and the Americas. As a consequence, alphavirus–host interactions are now understood in much more molecular detail, and important novel mechanisms have been elucidated. It has become clear that alphaviruses not only cause a general host shut-off in infected vertebrate cells, but also specifically suppress different host antiviral pathways using their viral nonstructural proteins, nsP2 and nsP3. Here we review the current state of the art of alphavirus host cell shut-off of viral transcription and translation, and describe recent insights in viral subversion of interferon induction and signaling, the unfolded protein response, and stress granule assembly. PMID:27294951

  9. Sindbis and Middelburg Old World Alphaviruses Associated with Neurologic Disease in Horses, South Africa

    PubMed Central

    van Niekerk, Stephanie; Human, Stacey; Williams, June; van Wilpe, Erna; Pretorius, Marthi; Swanepoel, Robert

    2015-01-01

    Old World alphaviruses were identified in 52 of 623 horses with febrile or neurologic disease in South Africa. Five of 8 Sindbis virus infections were mild; 2 of 3 fatal cases involved co-infections. Of 44 Middelburg virus infections, 28 caused neurologic disease; 12 were fatal. Middelburg virus likely has zoonotic potential. PMID:26583836

  10. Current progress in dengue vaccines

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Dengue is one of the most important emerging vector-borne viral diseases. There are four serotypes of dengue viruses (DENV), each of which is capable of causing self-limited dengue fever (DF) or even life-threatening dengue hemorrhagic fever (DHF) and dengue shock syndrome (DSS). The major clinical manifestations of severe DENV disease are vascular leakage, thrombocytopenia, and hemorrhage, yet the detailed mechanisms are not fully resolved. Besides the direct effects of the virus, immunopathological aspects are also involved in the development of dengue symptoms. Although no licensed dengue vaccine is yet available, several vaccine candidates are under development, including live attenuated virus vaccines, live chimeric virus vaccines, inactivated virus vaccines, and live recombinant, DNA and subunit vaccines. The live attenuated virus vaccines and live chimeric virus vaccines are undergoing clinical evaluation. The other vaccine candidates have been evaluated in preclinical animal models or are being prepared for clinical trials. For the safety and efficacy of dengue vaccines, the immunopathogenic complications such as antibody-mediated enhancement and autoimmunity of dengue disease need to be considered. PMID:23758699

  11. Antigenic properties of a transport-competent influenza HA/HIV Env chimeric protein

    SciTech Connect

    Ye Ling; Sun Yuliang; Lin Jianguo; Bu Zhigao; Wu Qingyang; Jiang, Shibo; Steinhauer, David A.; Compans, Richard W.; Yang Chinglai . E-mail: chyang@emory.edu

    2006-08-15

    The transmembrane subunit (gp41) of the HIV Env glycoprotein contains conserved neutralizing epitopes which are not well-exposed in wild-type HIV Env proteins. To enhance the exposure of these epitopes, a chimeric protein, HA/gp41, in which the gp41 of HIV-1 89.6 envelope protein was fused to the C-terminus of the HA1 subunit of the influenza HA protein, was constructed. Characterization of protein expression showed that the HA/gp41 chimeric proteins were expressed on cell surfaces and formed trimeric oligomers, as found in the HIV Env as well as influenza HA proteins. In addition, the HA/gp41 chimeric protein expressed on the cell surface can also be cleaved into 2 subunits by trypsin treatment, similar to the influenza HA. Moreover, the HA/gp41 chimeric protein was found to maintain a pre-fusion conformation. Interestingly, the HA/gp41 chimeric proteins on cell surfaces exhibited increased reactivity to monoclonal antibodies against the HIV Env gp41 subunit compared with the HIV-1 envelope protein, including the two broadly neutralizing monoclonal antibodies 2F5 and 4E10. Immunization of mice with a DNA vaccine expressing the HA/gp41 chimeric protein induced antibodies against the HIV gp41 protein and these antibodies exhibit neutralizing activity against infection by an HIV SF162 pseudovirus. These results demonstrate that the construction of such chimeric proteins can provide enhanced exposure of conserved epitopes in the HIV Env gp41 and may represent a novel vaccine design strategy for inducing broadly neutralizing antibodies against HIV.

  12. Enhanced protective immunity of the chimeric vector-based vaccine rAdV-SFV-E2 against classical swine fever in pigs by a Salmonella bacterial ghost adjuvant.

    PubMed

    Xia, Shui-Li; Lei, Jian-Lin; Du, Mingliang; Wang, Yimin; Cong, Xin; Xiang, Guang-Tao; Li, Lian-Feng; Yu, Shenye; Du, Enqi; Liu, Siguo; Sun, Yuan; Qiu, Hua-Ji

    2016-01-01

    Classical swine fever (CSF) is a highly contagious swine disease caused by classical swine fever virus (CSFV). Previously, we demonstrated that rAdV-SFV-E2, an adenovirus-delivered, Semliki Forest virus replicon-vectored marker vaccine against CSF, is able to protect pigs against lethal CSFV challenge. From an economical point of view, it will be beneficial to reduce the minimum effective dose of the vaccine. This study was designed to test the adjuvant effects of Salmonella enteritidis-derived bacterial ghosts (BG) to enhance the protective immunity of rAdV-SFV-E2 in pigs. Groups of 5-week-old pigs (n = 4) were immunized intramuscularly twice with 10(5) median tissue culture infective doses (TCID50) rAdV-SFV-E2 combined with 10(10) colony forming units (CFU) BG, 10(6) or 10(5) TCID50 rAdV-SFV-E2 alone or 10(10) CFU BG alone at an interval of 3 weeks, and challenged with the highly virulent CSFV Shimen strain at 1 week post-booster immunization. The results show that the pigs inoculated with 10(5) TCID50 rAdV-SFV-E2 plus BG or 10(6) TCID50 rAdV-SFV-E2 alone were completely protected from lethal CSFV challenge, in contrast with the pigs vaccinated with 10(5) TCID50 rAdV-SFV-E2 or BG alone, which displayed partial or no protection following virulent challenge. The data indicate that BG are a promising adjuvant to enhance the efficacy of rAdV-SFV-E2 and possibly other vaccines. PMID:27301745

  13. Status of research and development of vaccines for chikungunya.

    PubMed

    Smalley, Claire; Erasmus, Jesse H; Chesson, Charles B; Beasley, David W C

    2016-06-01

    Chikungunya virus (CHIKV) is an arthritogenic alphavirus that during the last decade has significantly expanded its geographical range and caused large outbreaks of human disease around the world. Although mortality rates associated with CHIKV outbreaks are low, acute and chronic illnesses caused by CHIKV represent a significant burden of disease largely affecting low and middle income countries. This report summarizes the current status of vaccine development for CHIKV. PMID:27026149

  14. Generation of Chimeric Rhesus Monkeys

    PubMed Central

    Tachibana, Masahito; Sparman, Michelle; Ramsey, Cathy; Ma, Hong; Lee, Hyo-Sang; Penedo, Maria Cecilia T.; Mitalipov, Shoukhrat

    2011-01-01

    Summary Totipotent cells in early embryos are progenitors of all stem cells and are capable of developing into a whole organism, including extraembryonic tissues such as placenta. Pluripotent cells in the inner cell mass (ICM) are the descendants of totipotent cells and can differentiate into any cell type of a body except extraembryonic tissues. The ability to contribute to chimeric animals upon reintroduction into host embryos is the key feature of murine totipotent and pluripotent cells. Here, we demonstrate that rhesus monkey embryonic stem cells (ESCs) and isolated ICMs fail to incorporate into host embryos and develop into chimeras. However, chimeric offspring were produced following aggregation of totipotent cells of the 4-cell embryos. These results provide insights into the species-specific nature of primate embryos and suggest that a chimera assay using pluripotent cells may not be feasible. PMID:22225614

  15. Vaccinations for Neuroinfectious Disease: A Global Health Priority.

    PubMed

    Leibovitch, Emily C; Jacobson, Steven

    2016-07-01

    Vaccines for neuroinfectious diseases are becoming an ever-increasing global health priority, as neurologic manifestations and sequelae from existing and emerging central nervous system infections account for significant worldwide morbidity and mortality. The prevention of neurotropic infections can be achieved through globally coordinated vaccination campaigns, which have successfully eradicated nonzoonotic agents such as the variola viruses and, hopefully soon, poliovirus. This review discusses vaccines that are currently available or under development for zoonotic flaviviruses and alphaviruses, including Japanese and tick-borne encephalitis, yellow fever, West Nile, dengue, Zika, encephalitic equine viruses, and chikungunya. Also discussed are nonzoonotic agents, including measles and human herpesviruses, as well as select bacterial, fungal, and protozoal pathogens. While therapeutic vaccines will be required to treat a multitude of ongoing infections of the nervous system, the ideal vaccination strategy is pre-exposure vaccination, with the ultimate goals of minimizing disease associated with zoonotic viruses and the total eradication of nonzoonotic agents. PMID:27365085

  16. Issues Related to Recent Dengue Vaccine Development

    PubMed Central

    Konishi, Eiji

    2011-01-01

    Dengue fever (DF) and dengue hemorrhagic fever (DHF) are mosquito-transmitted diseases of global importance. Despite significant research efforts, no approved vaccines or antiviral drugs against these diseases are currently available. This brief article reviews the status of dengue vaccine development, with particular emphasis on the vaccine strategies in more advanced stages of evaluation; these include traditional attenuation, chimerization and engineered attenuation. Several aspects of these vaccine design strategies, including concerns about vaccine candidates inducing infection-enhancing antibodies, are also presented. PMID:22500138

  17. Yellow Fever/Japanese Encephalitis Chimeric Viruses: Construction and Biological Properties

    PubMed Central

    Chambers, Thomas J.; Nestorowicz, Ann; Mason, Peter W.; Rice, Charles M.

    1999-01-01

    A system has been developed for generating chimeric yellow fever/Japanese encephalitis (YF/JE) viruses from cDNA templates encoding the structural proteins prM and E of JE virus within the backbone of a molecular clone of the YF17D strain. Chimeric viruses incorporating the proteins of two JE strains, SA14-14-2 (human vaccine strain) and JE Nakayama (JE-N [virulent mouse brain-passaged strain]), were studied in cell culture and laboratory mice. The JE envelope protein (E) retained antigenic and biological properties when expressed with its prM protein together with the YF capsid; however, viable chimeric viruses incorporating the entire JE structural region (C-prM-E) could not be obtained. YF/JE(prM-E) chimeric viruses grew efficiently in cells of vertebrate or mosquito origin compared to the parental viruses. The YF/JE SA14-14-2 virus was unable to kill young adult mice by intracerebral challenge, even at doses of 106 PFU. In contrast, the YF/JE-N virus was neurovirulent, but the phenotype resembled parental YF virus rather than JE-N. Ten predicted amino acid differences distinguish the JE E proteins of the two chimeric viruses, therefore implicating one or more residues as virus-specific determinants of mouse neurovirulence in this chimeric system. This study indicates the feasibility of expressing protective antigens of JE virus in the context of a live, attenuated flavivirus vaccine strain (YF17D) and also establishes a genetic system for investigating the molecular basis for neurovirulence determinants encoded within the JE E protein. PMID:10074160

  18. Zoonotic encephalitides caused by arboviruses: transmission and epidemiology of alphaviruses and flaviviruses.

    PubMed

    Go, Yun Young; Balasuriya, Udeni B R; Lee, Chong-Kyo

    2014-01-01

    In this review, we mainly focus on zoonotic encephalitides caused by arthropod-borne viruses (arboviruses) of the families Flaviviridae (genus Flavivirus) and Togaviridae (genus Alphavirus) that are important in both humans and domestic animals. Specifically, we will focus on alphaviruses (Eastern equine encephalitis virus, Western equine encephalitis virus, Venezuelan equine encephalitis virus) and flaviviruses (Japanese encephalitis virus and West Nile virus). Most of these viruses were originally found in tropical regions such as Africa and South America or in some regions in Asia. However, they have dispersed widely and currently cause diseases around the world. Global warming, increasing urbanization and population size in tropical regions, faster transportation and rapid spread of arthropod vectors contribute in continuous spreading of arboviruses into new geographic areas causing reemerging or resurging diseases. Most of the reemerging arboviruses also have emerged as zoonotic disease agents and created major public health issues and disease epidemics. PMID:24427764

  19. Zoonotic encephalitides caused by arboviruses: transmission and epidemiology of alphaviruses and flaviviruses

    PubMed Central

    Balasuriya, Udeni B. R.; Lee, Chong-kyo

    2014-01-01

    In this review, we mainly focus on zoonotic encephalitides caused by arthropod-borne viruses (arboviruses) of the families Flaviviridae (genus Flavivirus) and Togaviridae (genus Alphavirus) that are important in both humans and domestic animals. Specifically, we will focus on alphaviruses (Eastern equine encephalitis virus, Western equine encephalitis virus, Venezuelan equine encephalitis virus) and flaviviruses (Japanese encephalitis virus and West Nile virus). Most of these viruses were originally found in tropical regions such as Africa and South America or in some regions in Asia. However, they have dispersed widely and currently cause diseases around the world. Global warming, increasing urbanization and population size in tropical regions, faster transportation and rapid spread of arthropod vectors contribute in continuous spreading of arboviruses into new geographic areas causing reemerging or resurging diseases. Most of the reemerging arboviruses also have emerged as zoonotic disease agents and created major public health issues and disease epidemics. PMID:24427764

  20. Vaccines for the prevention of neglected diseases--dengue fever.

    PubMed

    Pang, Tikki

    2003-06-01

    Dengue and dengue hemorrhagic fever have spread to all tropical areas of the developing world, but still remain largely neglected diseases. Several promising vaccine candidates in the form of live attenuated and chimeric vaccines have been developed and are currently in human clinical trials. However, significant practical, logistic, and scientific challenges remain before these vaccines can widely and safely be applied to vulnerable populations. Vector control, community education and public health measures must be pursued in parallel with vaccine development. PMID:12849789

  1. An H1-H3 chimeric influenza virosome confers complete protection against lethal challenge with PR8 (H1N1) and X47 (H3N2) viruses in mice.

    PubMed

    Abdoli, Asghar; Soleimanjahi, Hoorieh; Tavassoti Kheiri, Masoumeh; Jamali, Abbas; Mazaheri, Vahideh; Abdollahpour Alitappeh, Meghdad

    2014-12-01

    Annual health threats and economic damages caused by influenza virus are still a main concern of the World Health Organization and other health departments all over the world. An influenza virosome is a highly efficient immunomodulating carrier mimicking the natural antigen presentation pathway and has shown an excellent tolerability profile due to its biocompatibility and purity. The major purpose of this study was to construct a new chimeric virosome influenza vaccine containing hemagglutinin (HA) and neuraminidase (NA) proteins derived from the A/PR/8/1934 (H1N1) (PR8) and A/X/47 (H3N2) (X47) viruses, and to evaluate its efficacy as a vaccine candidate in mice. A single intramuscular vaccination with the chimeric virosomes provided complete protection against lethal challenge with the PR8 and X47 viruses. The chimeric virosomes induced high IgG antibody responses as well as hemagglutination inhibition (HAI) titers. HAI titers following the chimeric virosome vaccination were at the same level as the whole inactivated influenza vaccine. Mice immunized with the chimeric virosomes displayed considerably less weight loss and exhibited significantly reduced viral load in their lungs compared with the controls. The chimeric virosomes can be used as an innovative vaccine formulation to confer protection against a broad range of influenza viruses. PMID:25066138

  2. Murine immune responses to a Plasmodium vivax-derived chimeric recombinant protein expressed in Brassica napus

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background To develop a plant-based vaccine against Plasmodium vivax, two P. vivax candidate proteins were chosen. First, the merozoite surface protein-1 (MSP-1), a major asexual blood stage antigen that is currently considered a strong vaccine candidate. Second, the circumsporozoite protein (CSP), a component of sporozoites that contains a B-cell epitope. Methods A synthetic chimeric recombinant 516 bp gene encoding containing PvMSP-1, a Pro-Gly linker motif, and PvCSP was synthesized; the gene, named MLC, encoded a total of 172 amino acids. The recombinant gene was modified with regard to codon usage to optimize gene expression in Brassica napus. The Ti plasmid inducible gene transfer system was used for MLC chimeric recombinant gene expression in B. napus. Gene expression was confirmed by polymerase chain reaction (PCR), beta-glucuronidase reporter gene (GUS) assay, and Western blot. Results The MLC chimeric recombinant protein expressed in B. napus had a molecular weight of approximately 25 kDa. It exhibited a clinical sensitivity of 84.21% (n = 38) and a clinical specificity of 100% (n = 24) as assessed by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Oral immunization of BALB/c mice with MLC chimeric recombinant protein successfully induced antigen-specific IgG1 production. Additionally, the Th1-related cytokines IL-12 (p40), TNF, and IFN-γ were significantly increased in the spleens of the BALB/c mice. Conclusions The chimeric MLC recombinant protein produced in B. napus has potential as both as an antigen for diagnosis and as a valuable vaccine candidate for oral immunization against vivax malaria. PMID:21529346

  3. The expression and genetic immunization of chimeric fragment of Hantaan virus M and S segments

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang Fanglin; Wu Xingan; Luo Wen; Bai Wentao; Liu Yong; Yan Yan; Wang Haitao; Xu Zhikai . E-mail: zhikaixu@fmmu.edu.cn

    2007-03-23

    Hemorrhagic fever with renal syndrome (HFRS), which is characterized by severe symptoms and high mortality, is caused by hantavirus. There are still no effective prophylactic vaccines directed to HFRS until now. In this research, we fused expressed G2 fragment of M segment and 0.7 kb fragment of S segment. We expect it could be a candidate vaccine. Chimeric gene G2S0.7 was first expressed in prokaryotic expression system pGEX-4T. After inducing expressed fusion proteins, GST-G2S0.7 was induced and its molecular weight was about 100 kDa. Meanwhile, the fusion protein kept the activity of its parental proteins. Further, BALB/c mice were vaccinated by the chimeric gene. ELISA, cell microculture neutralization test in vitro were used to detect the humoral immune response in immunized BALB/c mice. Lymphocyte proliferation assay was used to detect the cellular immune response. The results showed that the chimeric gene could simultaneously evoke specific antibody against nucleocapsid protein (NP) and glycoprotein (GP). And the immunized mice of every group elicited neutralizing antibodies with different titers. But the titers were low. Lymphocyte proliferation assay results showed that the stimulation indexes of splenocytes of chimeric gene to NP and GP were significantly higher than that of control. It suggested that the chimeric gene of Hantaan virus containing G2 fragment of M segment and 0.7 kb fragment of S segment could directly elicit specific anti-Hantaan virus humoral and cellular immune response in BALB/c mice.

  4. Molecular Mechanisms Involved in the Pathogenesis of Alphavirus-Induced Arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Assunção-Miranda, Iranaia; Da Poian, Andrea T.

    2013-01-01

    Arthritogenic alphaviruses, including Ross River virus (RRV), Chikungunya virus (CHIKV), Sindbis virus (SINV), Mayaro virus (MAYV), O'nyong-nyong virus (ONNV), and Barmah Forest virus (BFV), cause incapacitating and long lasting articular disease/myalgia. Outbreaks of viral arthritis and the global distribution of these diseases point to the emergence of arthritogenic alphaviruses as an important public health problem. This review discusses the molecular mechanisms involved in alphavirus-induced arthritis, exploring the recent data obtained with in vitro systems and in vivo studies using animal models and samples from patients. The factors associated to the extension and persistence of symptoms are highlighted, focusing on (a) virus replication in target cells, and tissues, including macrophages and muscle cells; (b) the inflammatory and immune responses with recruitment and activation of macrophage, NK cells and T lymphocytes to the lesion focus and the increase of inflammatory mediators levels; and (c) the persistence of virus or viral products in joint and muscle tissues. We also discuss the importance of the establishment of novel animal models to test new molecular targets and to develop more efficient and selective drugs to treat these diseases. PMID:24069610

  5. Development and evaluation of a replicon particle vaccine expressing the E2 glycoprotein of bovine viral diarrhea virus (BVDV) in cattle

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Bovine viral diarrhea virus is one of the most significant and costly viral pathogens of cattle worldwide. Alphavirus-derived replicon particles have been shown to be safe and highly effective vaccine vectors against a variety of human and veterinary pathogens. Replicon particles are non-propagating...

  6. In Silico Design of a Chimeric Protein Containing Antigenic Fragments of Helicobacter pylori; A Bioinformatic Approach

    PubMed Central

    Mohammad, Nazanin; Karsabet, Mehrnaz Taghipour; Amani, Jafar; Ardjmand, Abolfazl; Zadeh, Mohsen Razavi; Gholi, Mohammad Khalifeh; Saffari, Mahmood; Ghasemi, Amir

    2016-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori is a global health problem which has encouraged scientists to find new ways to diagnose, immunize and eradicate the H. pylori infection. In silico studies are a promising approach to design new chimeric antigen having the immunogenic potential of several antigens. In order to obtain such benefit in H. pylori vaccine study, a chimeric gene containing four fragments of FliD sequence (1-600 bp), UreB (327-334 bp),VacA (744-805 bp) and CagL(51-100 bp) which have a high density of B- and T-cell epitopes was designed. The secondary and tertiary structures of the chimeric protein and other properties such as stability, solubility and antigenicity were analyzed. The in silico results showed that after optimizing for the purpose of expression in Escherichia coli BL21, the solubility and antigenicity of the construct fragments were highly retained. Most regions of the chimeric protein were found to have a high antigenic propensity and surface accessibility. These results would be useful in animal model application and accounted for the development of an epitope-based vaccine against the H. pylori. PMID:27335622

  7. Emerging human papillomavirus vaccines

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Barbara; Maraj, Bharat; Tran, Nam Phuong; Knoff, Jayne; Chen, Alexander; Alvarez, Ronald D; Hung, Chien-Fu; Wu, T.-C.

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Identification of human papillomavirus (HPV) as the etiologic factor of cervical, anogenital, and a subset of head and neck cancers has stimulated the development of preventive and therapeutic HPV vaccines to control HPV-associated malignancies. Excitement has been generated by the commercialization of two preventive L1-based vaccines, which use HPV virus-like particles (VLPs) to generate capsid-specific neutralizing antibodies. However, factors such as high cost and requirement for cold chain have prevented widespread implementation where they are needed most. Areas covered Next generation preventive HPV vaccine candidates have focused on cost-effective stable alternatives and generating broader protection via targeting multivalent L1 VLPs, L2 capsid protein, and chimeric L1/L2 VLPs. Therapeutic HPV vaccine candidates have focused on enhancing T cell-mediated killing of HPV-transformed tumor cells, which constitutively express HPV-encoded proteins, E6 and E7. Several therapeutic HPV vaccines are in clinical trials. Expert opinion Although progress is being made, cost remains an issue inhibiting the use of preventive HPV vaccines in countries that carry the majority of the cervical cancer burden. In addition, progression of therapeutic HPV vaccines through clinical trials may require combination strategies employing different therapeutic modalities. As research in the development of HPV vaccines continues, we may generate effective strategies to control HPV-associated malignancies. PMID:23163511

  8. Low-Dose Adenovirus Vaccine Encoding Chimeric Hepatitis B Virus Surface Antigen-Human Papillomavirus Type 16 E7 Proteins Induces Enhanced E7-Specific Antibody and Cytotoxic T-Cell Responses

    PubMed Central

    Báez-Astúa, Andrés; Herráez-Hernández, Elsa; Garbi, Natalio; Pasolli, Hilda A.; Juárez, Victoria; zur Hausen, Harald; Cid-Arregui, Angel

    2005-01-01

    Induction of effective immune responses may help prevent cancer progression. Tumor-specific antigens, such as those of human papillomaviruses involved in cervical cancer, are targets with limited intrinsic immunogenicity. Here we show that immunization with low doses (106 infectious units/dose) of a recombinant human adenovirus type 5 encoding a fusion of the E7 oncoprotein of human papillomavirus type 16 to the carboxyl terminus of the surface antigen of hepatitis B virus (HBsAg) induces remarkable E7-specific humoral and cellular immune responses. The HBsAg/E7 fusion protein assembled efficiently into virus-like particles, which stimulated antibody responses against both carrier and foreign antigens, and evoked antigen-specific kill of an indicator cell population in vivo. Antibody and T-cell responses were significantly higher than those induced by a control adenovirus vector expressing wild-type E7. Such responses were not affected by preexisting immunity against either HBsAg or adenovirus. These data demonstrate that the presence of E7 on HBsAg particles does not interfere with particle secretion, as it occurs with bigger proteins fused to the C terminus of HBsAg, and results in enhancement of CD8+-mediated T-cell responses to E7. Thus, fusion to HBsAg is a convenient strategy for developing cervical cancer therapeutic vaccines, since it enhances the immunogenicity of E7 while turning it into an innocuous secreted fusion protein. PMID:16188983

  9. Anti-tumor effect of the alphavirus-based virus-like particle vector expressing prostate-specific antigen in a HLA-DR transgenic mouse model of prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Riabov, V; Tretyakova, I; Alexander, R B; Pushko, P; Klyushnenkova, E N

    2015-10-01

    The goal of this study was to determine if an alphavirus-based vaccine encoding human Prostate-Specific Antigen (PSA) could generate an effective anti-tumor immune response in a stringent mouse model of prostate cancer. DR2bxPSA F1 male mice expressing human PSA and HLA-DRB1(*)1501 transgenes were vaccinated with virus-like particle vector encoding PSA (VLPV-PSA) followed by the challenge with Transgenic Adenocarcinoma of Mouse Prostate cells engineered to express PSA (TRAMP-PSA). PSA-specific cellular and humoral immune responses were measured before and after tumor challenge. PSA and CD8 reactivity in the tumors was detected by immunohistochemistry. Tumor growth was compared in vaccinated and control groups. We found that VLPV-PSA could infect mouse dendritic cells in vitro and induce a robust PSA-specific immune response in vivo. A substantial proportion of splenic CD8 T cells (19.6 ± 7.4%) produced IFNγ in response to the immunodominant peptide PSA(65-73). In the blood of vaccinated mice, 18.4 ± 4.1% of CD8 T cells were PSA-specific as determined by the staining with H-2D(b)/PSA(65-73) dextramers. VLPV-PSA vaccination also strongly stimulated production of IgG2a/b anti-PSA antibodies. Tumors in vaccinated mice showed low levels of PSA expression and significant CD8+ T cell infiltration. Tumor growth in VLPV-PSA vaccinated mice was significantly delayed at early time points (p=0.002, Gehan-Breslow test). Our data suggest that TC-83-based VLPV-PSA vaccine can efficiently overcome immune tolerance to PSA, mediate rapid clearance of PSA-expressing tumor cells and delay tumor growth. The VLPV-PSA vaccine will undergo further testing for the immunotherapy of prostate cancer. PMID:26319744

  10. Japanese Encephalitis Vaccines

    PubMed Central

    McArthur, Monica A.; Holbrook, Michael R.

    2012-01-01

    Japanese encephalitis (JE) is a significant human health concern in Asia, Indonesia and parts of Australia with more than 3 billion people potentially at risk of infection with Japanese encephalitis virus (JEV), the causative agent of JE. Given the risk to human health and the theoretical potential for JEV use as a bioweapon, the development of safe and effective vaccines to prevent JEV infection is vital for preserving human health. The development of vaccines for JE began in the 1940s with formalin-inactivated mouse brain-derived vaccines. These vaccines have been shown to induce a protective immune response and to be very effective. Mouse brain-derived vaccines were still in use until May 2011 when the last lots of the BIKEN® JE-VAX® expired. Development of modern JE vaccines utilizes cell culture-derived viruses and improvements in manufacturing processes as well as removal of potential allergens or toxins have significantly improved vaccine safety. China has developed a live-attenuated vaccine that has proven to induce protective immunity following a single inoculation. In addition, a chimeric vaccine virus incorporating the prM and E structural proteins derived from the live-attenuated JE vaccine into the live-attenuated yellow fever 17D vaccine virus backbone is currently in clinical trials. In this article, we provide a summary of JE vaccine development and on-going clinical trials. We also discuss the potential risk of JEV as a bioweapon with a focus on virus sustainability if used as a weapon. PMID:23125946

  11. A Novel Live-Attenuated Vaccine Candidate for Mayaro Fever

    PubMed Central

    Weise, William J.; Hermance, Meghan E.; Forrester, Naomi; Adams, A. Paige; Langsjoen, Rose; Gorchakov, Rodion; Wang, Eryu; Alcorn, Maria D. H.; Tsetsarkin, Konstantin; Weaver, Scott C.

    2014-01-01

    Mayaro virus (MAYV) is an emerging, mosquito-borne alphavirus that causes a dengue-like illness in many regions of South America, and which has the potential to urbanize. Because no specific treatment or vaccine is available for MAYV infection, we capitalized on an IRES-based approach to develop a live-attenuated MAYV vaccine candidate. Testing in infant, immunocompetent as well as interferon receptor-deficient mice demonstrated a high degree of attenuation, strong induction of neutralizing antibodies, and efficacy against lethal challenge. This vaccine strain was also unable to infect mosquito cells, a major safety feature for a live vaccine derived from a mosquito-borne virus. Further preclinical development of this vaccine candidate is warranted to protect against this important emerging disease. PMID:25101995

  12. Inhibition of host extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) activation decreases new world alphavirus multiplication in infected cells

    SciTech Connect

    Voss, Kelsey; Amaya, Moushimi; Mueller, Claudius; Roberts, Brian; Kehn-Hall, Kylene; Bailey, Charles; Petricoin, Emanuel; Narayanan, Aarthi

    2014-11-15

    New World alphaviruses belonging to the family Togaviridae are classified as emerging infectious agents and Category B select agents. Our study is focused on the role of the host extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) in the infectious process of New World alphaviruses. Infection of human cells by Venezuelan equine encephalitis virus (VEEV) results in the activation of the ERK-signaling cascade. Inhibition of ERK1/2 by the small molecule inhibitor Ag-126 results in inhibition of viral multiplication. Ag-126-mediated inhibition of VEEV was due to potential effects on early and late stages of the infectious process. While expression of viral proteins was down-regulated in Ag-126 treated cells, we did not observe any influence of Ag-126 on the nuclear distribution of capsid. Finally, Ag-126 exerted a broad-spectrum inhibitory effect on New World alphavirus multiplication, thus indicating that the host kinase, ERK, is a broad-spectrum candidate for development of novel therapeutics against New World alphaviruses. - Highlights: • VEEV infection activated multiple components of the ERK signaling cascade. • Inhibition of ERK activation using Ag-126 inhibited VEEV multiplication. • Activation of ERK by Ceramide C6 increased infectious titers of TC-83. • Ag-126 inhibited virulent strains of all New World alphaviruses. • Ag-126 treatment increased percent survival of infected cells.

  13. Autoantibodies induced by chimeric cytokine - HIV envelope glycoprotein immunogens

    PubMed Central

    Isik, Gözde; van Montfort, Thijs; Chung, Nancy P.Y.; Moore, John P.; Sanders, Rogier W.

    2014-01-01

    Cytokines are often used as adjuvants to increase the immunogenicity of vaccines as they can improve the immune response and/or direct it into a desired direction. As an alternative to co-delivering antigens and cytokines separately they can be fused into a composite protein, with the advantage that both moieties act on the same immune cells. The HIV-1 envelope glycoprotein (Env) spike, located on the outside of virus particles and the only relevant protein for the induction of neutralizing antibodies (NAbs), is poorly immunogenic. The induction of anti-Env Abs can be improved by coupling Env proteins to co-stimulatory molecules such as a proliferation inducing ligand (APRIL). Here, we evaluated the immunogenicity of chimeric molecules containing uncleaved Env gp140 fused to the species-matched cytokines IL-21 or GM-CSF in rabbits and mice. Each cytokine was either fused to the C-terminus of Env or embedded within Env at the position of the variable loops 1 and 2 (V1V2). The cytokine components of the chimeric Env-GM-CSF and Env-IL-21 molecules were functional in vitro, but none of the Env-cytokine fusion proteins resulted in improved Ab responses in vivo. Both the Env-GM-CSF and the Env-IL-21 molecules induced strong anti-cytokine Ab responses, in both test species. These autoimmune responses were independent of the location of the cytokine in the chimeric Env molecules; in that they were induced by cytokines inserted within the V1V2 of Env or fused to its Ct. The induction of undesired autoimmune responses should be considered when using cytokines as co-stimulatory molecules in fusion proteins. PMID:24729614

  14. Dengue vaccine: hypotheses to understand CYD-TDV-induced protection.

    PubMed

    Guy, Bruno; Jackson, Nicholas

    2016-01-01

    Dengue virus (DENV) is a human pathogen with a large impact on public health. Although no vaccine against DENV is currently licensed, a recombinant vaccine - chimeric yellow fever virus-DENV tetravalent dengue vaccine (CYD-TDV) - has shown efficacy against symptomatic dengue disease in two recent Phase III clinical trials. Safety observations were also recently reported for these trials. In this Opinion article, we review the data from recent vaccine clinical trials and discuss the putative mechanisms behind the observed efficacy of the vaccine against different forms of the disease, focusing on the interactions between the infecting virus, pre-existing host immunity and vaccine-induced immune responses. PMID:26639777

  15. Efficient, trans-complementing packaging systems for chimeric, pseudoinfectious dengue 2/yellow fever viruses

    SciTech Connect

    Shustov, Alexandr V.

    2010-04-25

    In our previous studies, we have stated to build a new strategy for developing defective, pseudoinfectious flaviviruses (PIVs) and applying them as a new type of vaccine candidates. PIVs combined the efficiency of live vaccines with the safety of inactivated or subunit vaccines. The results of the present work demonstrate further development of chimeric PIVs encoding dengue virus 2 (DEN2V) glycoproteins and yellow fever virus (YFV)-derived replicative machinery as potential vaccine candidates. The newly designed PIVs have synergistically functioning mutations in the prM and NS2A proteins, which abolish processing of the latter proteins and make the defective viruses capable of producing either only noninfectious, immature and/or subviral DEN2V particles. The PIV genomes can be packaged to high titers into infectious virions in vitro using the NS1-deficient YFV helper RNAs, and both PIVs and helpers can then be passaged as two-component genome viruses at an escalating scale.

  16. [New vaccines against group B meningococcal diseases].

    PubMed

    Hietalahti, Jukka; Meri, Seppo

    2015-01-01

    There has been no efficient general vaccine against serogroup B meningococcus (MenB), since its polysialic acid capsule is of low immunogenicity and could potentially induce autoimmunity. Reverse vaccinology has revealed new promising protein candidates for vaccine development. One of them is factor H-binding protein (fHbp), which has the potential to curb the alternative pathway of human complement. As fHbp can elicit antibodies that promote complement-mediated lysis, a vaccine partly based on it has been introduced against MenB infections. FHbp has been the milestone protein for structural vaccinology to create optimal chimeric antigens for vaccine use. PMID:26237895

  17. Chimeric Antigen Receptor T Cell Therapy in Hematology.

    PubMed

    Ataca, Pınar; Arslan, Önder

    2015-12-01

    It is well demonstrated that the immune system can control and eliminate cancer cells. Immune-mediated elimination of tumor cells has been discovered and is the basis of both cancer vaccines and cellular therapies including hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. Adoptive T cell transfer has been improved to be more specific and potent and to cause less off-target toxicity. Currently, there are two forms of engineered T cells being tested in clinical trials: T cell receptor (TCR) and chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) modified T cells. On 1 July 2014, the United States Food and Drug Administration granted 'breakthrough therapy' designation to anti-CD19 CAR T cell therapy. Many studies were conducted to evaluate the benefits of this exciting and potent new treatment modality. This review summarizes the history of adoptive immunotherapy, adoptive immunotherapy using CARs, the CAR manufacturing process, preclinical and clinical studies, and the effectiveness and drawbacks of this strategy. PMID:26377367

  18. Chimeric Antigen Receptor T Cell Therapy in Hematology

    PubMed Central

    Ataca, Pınar; Arslan, Önder

    2015-01-01

    It is well demonstrated that the immune system can control and eliminate cancer cells. Immune-mediated elimination of tumor cells has been discovered and is the basis of both cancer vaccines and cellular therapies including hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. Adoptive T cell transfer has been improved to be more specific and potent and to cause less off-target toxicity. Currently, there are two forms of engineered T cells being tested in clinical trials: T cell receptor (TCR) and chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) modified T cells. On 1 July 2014, the United States Food and Drug Administration granted ‘breakthrough therapy’ designation to anti-CD19 CAR T cell therapy. Many studies were conducted to evaluate the benefits of this exciting and potent new treatment modality. This review summarizes the history of adoptive immunotherapy, adoptive immunotherapy using CARs, the CAR manufacturing process, preclinical and clinical studies, and the effectiveness and drawbacks of this strategy. PMID:26377367

  19. Chimeric porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus containing shuffled multiple envelope genes confers cross-protection in pigs.

    PubMed

    Tian, Debin; Ni, Yan-Yan; Zhou, Lei; Opriessnig, Tanja; Cao, Dianjun; Piñeyro, Pablo; Yugo, Danielle M; Overend, Christopher; Cao, Qian; Lynn Heffron, C; Halbur, Patrick G; Pearce, Douglas S; Calvert, Jay G; Meng, Xiang-Jin

    2015-11-01

    The extensive genetic diversity of porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV) strains is a major obstacle for vaccine development. We previously demonstrated that chimeric PRRSVs in which a single envelope gene (ORF3, ORF4, ORF5 or ORF6) was shuffled via DNA shuffling had an improved heterologous cross-neutralizing ability. In this study, we incorporate all of the individually-shuffled envelope genes together in different combinations into an infectious clone backbone of PRRSV MLV Fostera(®) PRRS. Five viable progeny chimeric viruses were rescued, and their growth characteristics were characterized in vitro. In a pilot pig study, two chimeric viruses (FV-SPDS-VR2,FV-SPDS-VR5) were found to induce cross-neutralizing antibodies against heterologous strains. A subsequent vaccination/challenge study in 72 pigs revealed that chimeric virus FV-SPDS-VR2 and parental virus conferred partial cross-protection when challenged with heterologous strains NADC20 or MN184B. The results have important implications for future development of an effective PRRSV vaccine that confers heterologous protection. PMID:26342466

  20. Chikungunya Vaccine Candidate Is Highly Attenuated and Protects Nonhuman Primates Against Telemetrically Monitored Disease Following a Single Dose

    PubMed Central

    Roy, Chad J.; Adams, A. Paige; Wang, Eryu; Plante, Kenneth; Gorchakov, Rodion; Seymour, Robert L.; Vinet-Oliphant, Heather; Weaver, Scott C.

    2014-01-01

    Chikungunya virus (CHIKV) is a mosquito-borne alphavirus that causes major epidemics of rash, fever, and debilitating arthritis. Currently, there are no vaccines or antivirals available for prevention or treatment. We therefore generated 2 live-attenuated vaccine candidates based on the insertion of a picornavirus internal ribosome entry site (IRES) sequence into the genome of CHIKV. Vaccination of cynomolgus macaques with a single dose of either vaccine produced no signs of disease but was highly immunogenic. After challenge with a subcutaneous inoculation of wild-type CHIKV, both vaccine candidates prevented the development of detectable viremia. Protected animals also exhibited no significant changes in core body temperature or cardiovascular rhythm, whereas sham-vaccinated animals showed hyperthermia, followed by sustained hypothermia, as well as significant changes in heart rate. These CHIKV/IRES vaccine candidates appear to be safe and efficacious, supporting their strong potential as human vaccines to protect against CHIKV infection and reduce transmission and further spread. PMID:24403555

  1. A Chimeric Pneumovirus Fusion Protein Carrying Neutralizing Epitopes of Both MPV and RSV

    PubMed Central

    Wen, Xiaolin; Pickens, Jennifer; Mousa, Jarrod J.; Leser, George P.; Lamb, Robert A.; Crowe, James E.; Jardetzky, Theodore S.

    2016-01-01

    Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) and human metapneumovirus (HMPV) are paramyxoviruses that are responsible for substantial human health burden, particularly in children and the elderly. The fusion (F) glycoproteins are major targets of the neutralizing antibody response and studies have mapped dominant antigenic sites in F. Here we grafted a major neutralizing site of RSV F, recognized by the prophylactic monoclonal antibody palivizumab, onto HMPV F, generating a chimeric protein displaying epitopes of both viruses. We demonstrate that the resulting chimeric protein (RPM-1) is recognized by both anti-RSV and anti-HMPV F neutralizing antibodies indicating that it can be used to map the epitope specificity of antibodies raised against both viruses. Mice immunized with the RPM-1 chimeric antigen generate robust neutralizing antibody responses to MPV but weak or no cross-reactive recognition of RSV F, suggesting that grafting of the single palivizumab epitope stimulates a comparatively limited antibody response. The RPM-1 protein provides a new tool for characterizing the immune responses resulting from RSV and HMPV infections and provides insights into the requirements for developing a chimeric subunit vaccine that could induce robust and balanced immunity to both virus infections. PMID:27224013

  2. Japanese encephalitis vaccines: moving away from the mouse brain.

    PubMed

    Zanin, Mark P; Webster, Diane E; Martin, Jenny L; Wesselingh, Steven L

    2003-06-01

    Japanese encephalitis (JE) is a severe disease that is widespread throughout Asia and is spreading beyond its traditional boundaries. Three vaccines are currently in use against JE but only one is available internationally, a mouse-brain-derived inactivated vaccine first used in the 1930s. Although this vaccine has been effective in reducing the incidence of JE, it is relatively expensive and has been linked to severe allergic and neurological reactions. Cell-culture-derived inactivated and attenuated vaccines have been developed but are only used in the People's Republic of China. Other vaccines currently in various stages of development are DNA vaccines, a chimeric yellow fever-JE viral vaccine, virus-like particle vaccines and poxvirus-based vaccines. Poxvirus-based vaccines and the chimeric yellow fever-JE vaccine have been tested in Phase I clinical trials. These new vaccines have the potential to significantly reduce the impact of JE in Asia, particularly if used in an oral vaccine delivery strategy. PMID:12903806

  3. Chimeric Rhinoviruses Displaying MPER Epitopes Elicit Anti-HIV Neutralizing Responses

    PubMed Central

    Yi, Guohua; Lapelosa, Mauro; Bradley, Rachel; Mariano, Thomas M.; Dietz, Denise Elsasser; Hughes, Scott; Wrin, Terri; Petropoulos, Chris; Gallicchio, Emilio; Levy, Ronald M.; Arnold, Eddy; Arnold, Gail Ferstandig

    2013-01-01

    Background The development of an effective AIDS vaccine has been a formidable task, but remains a critical necessity. The well conserved membrane-proximal external region (MPER) of the HIV-1 gp41 glycoprotein is one of the crucial targets for AIDS vaccine development, as it has the necessary attribute of being able to elicit antibodies capable of neutralizing diverse isolates of HIV. Methodology/Principle Findings Guided by X-ray crystallography, molecular modeling, combinatorial chemistry, and powerful selection techniques, we designed and produced six combinatorial libraries of chimeric human rhinoviruses (HRV) displaying the MPER epitopes corresponding to mAbs 2F5, 4E10, and/or Z13e1, connected to an immunogenic surface loop of HRV via linkers of varying lengths and sequences. Not all libraries led to viable chimeric viruses with the desired sequences, but the combinatorial approach allowed us to examine large numbers of MPER-displaying chimeras. Among the chimeras were five that elicited antibodies capable of significantly neutralizing HIV-1 pseudoviruses from at least three subtypes, in one case leading to neutralization of 10 pseudoviruses from all six subtypes tested. Conclusions Optimization of these chimeras or closely related chimeras could conceivably lead to useful components of an effective AIDS vaccine. While the MPER of HIV may not be immunodominant in natural infection by HIV-1, its presence in a vaccine cocktail could provide critical breadth of protection. PMID:24039745

  4. Genetic ablation of arginase 1 in macrophages and neutrophils enhances clearance of an arthritogenic alphavirus

    PubMed Central

    Stoermer, Kristina A.; Burrack, Adam; Oko, Lauren; Montgomery, Stephanie A.; Borst, Luke B.; Gill, Ronald G.; Morrison, Thomas E.

    2012-01-01

    Chikungunya virus (CHIKV) and Ross River virus (RRV) cause a debilitating, and often chronic, musculoskeletal inflammatory disease in humans. Macrophages constitute the major inflammatory infiltrates in musculoskeletal tissues during these infections. However, the precise macrophage effector functions that affect the pathogenesis of arthritogenic alphaviruses have not been defined. We hypothesized that the severe damage to musculoskeletal tissues observed in RRV or CHIKV-infected mice would promote a wound healing response characterized by M2-like macrophages. Indeed, we found that RRV and CHIKV-induced musculoskeletal inflammatory lesions, and macrophages present in these lesions, have a unique gene expression pattern characterized by high expression of arginase 1 and Ym1/Chi3l3 in the absence of FIZZ1/Relmα that is consistent with an M2-like activation phenotype. Strikingly, mice specifically deleted for Arg1 in neutrophils and macrophages had dramatically reduced viral loads and improved pathology in musculoskeletal tissues at late times post-RRV infection. These findings indicate that arthritogenic alphavirus infection drives a unique myeloid cell activation program in inflamed musculoskeletal tissues that inhibits virus clearance and impedes disease resolution in an Arg1-dependent manner. PMID:22972923

  5. Myeloid Cell Arg1 Inhibits Control of Arthritogenic Alphavirus Infection by Suppressing Antiviral T Cells

    PubMed Central

    Burrack, Kristina S.; Tan, Jeslin J. L.; McCarthy, Mary K.; Her, Zhisheng; Berger, Jennifer N.; Ng, Lisa F. P.; Morrison, Thomas E.

    2015-01-01

    Arthritogenic alphaviruses, including Ross River virus (RRV) and chikungunya virus (CHIKV), are responsible for explosive epidemics involving millions of cases. These mosquito-transmitted viruses cause inflammation and injury in skeletal muscle and joint tissues that results in debilitating pain. We previously showed that arginase 1 (Arg1) was highly expressed in myeloid cells in the infected and inflamed musculoskeletal tissues of RRV- and CHIKV-infected mice, and specific deletion of Arg1 from myeloid cells resulted in enhanced viral control. Here, we show that Arg1, along with other genes associated with suppressive myeloid cells, is induced in PBMCs isolated from CHIKV-infected patients during the acute phase as well as the chronic phase, and that high Arg1 expression levels were associated with high viral loads and disease severity. Depletion of both CD4 and CD8 T cells from RRV-infected Arg1-deficient mice restored viral loads to levels detected in T cell-depleted wild-type mice. Moreover, Arg1-expressing myeloid cells inhibited virus-specific T cells in the inflamed and infected musculoskeletal tissues, but not lymphoid tissues, following RRV infection in mice, including suppression of interferon-γ and CD69 expression. Collectively, these data enhance our understanding of the immune response following arthritogenic alphavirus infection and suggest that immunosuppressive myeloid cells may contribute to the duration or severity of these debilitating infections. PMID:26436766

  6. Discovery of berberine, abamectin and ivermectin as antivirals against chikungunya and other alphaviruses.

    PubMed

    Varghese, Finny S; Kaukinen, Pasi; Gläsker, Sabine; Bespalov, Maxim; Hanski, Leena; Wennerberg, Krister; Kümmerer, Beate M; Ahola, Tero

    2016-02-01

    Chikungunya virus (CHIKV) is an arthritogenic arbovirus of the Alphavirus genus, which has infected millions of people after its re-emergence in the last decade. In this study, a BHK cell line containing a stable CHIKV replicon with a luciferase reporter was used in a high-throughput platform to screen approximately 3000 compounds. Following initial validation, 25 compounds were chosen as primary hits for secondary validation with wild type and reporter CHIKV infection, which identified three promising compounds. Abamectin (EC50 = 1.5 μM) and ivermectin (EC50 = 0.6 μM) are fermentation products generated by a soil dwelling actinomycete, Streptomyces avermitilis, whereas berberine (EC50 = 1.8 μM) is a plant-derived isoquinoline alkaloid. They inhibited CHIKV replication in a dose-dependent manner and had broad antiviral activity against other alphaviruses--Semliki Forest virus and Sindbis virus. Abamectin and ivermectin were also active against yellow fever virus, a flavivirus. These compounds caused reduced synthesis of CHIKV genomic and antigenomic viral RNA as well as downregulation of viral protein expression. Time of addition experiments also suggested that they act on the replication phase of the viral infectious cycle. PMID:26752081

  7. An alphavirus temperature-sensitive capsid mutant reveals stages of nucleocapsid assembly

    SciTech Connect

    Zheng, Yan Kielian, Margaret

    2015-10-15

    Alphaviruses have a nucleocapsid core composed of the RNA genome surrounded by an icosahedral lattice of capsid protein. An insertion after position 186 in the capsid protein produced a strongly temperature-sensitive growth phenotype. Even when the structural proteins were synthesized at the permissive temperature (28 °C), subsequent incubation of the cells at the non-permissive temperature (37 °C) dramatically decreased mutant capsid protein stability and particle assembly. Electron microscopy confirmed the presence of cytoplasmic nucleocapsids in mutant-infected cells cultured at the permissive temperature, but these nucleocapsids were not stable to sucrose gradient separation. In contrast, nucleocapsids isolated from mutant virus particles had similar stability to that of wildtype virus. Our data support a model in which cytoplasmic nucleocapsids go through a maturation step during packaging into virus particles. The insertion site lies in the interface between capsid proteins in the assembled nucleocapsid, suggesting the region where such a stabilizing transition occurs. - Highlights: • We characterize an alphavirus capsid insertion mutation. • These capsid mutants are highly temperature sensitive for growth. • The insertion affects nucleocapsid stability. • Results suggest that the nucleocapsid is stabilized during virus budding.

  8. Myeloid Cell Arg1 Inhibits Control of Arthritogenic Alphavirus Infection by Suppressing Antiviral T Cells.

    PubMed

    Burrack, Kristina S; Tan, Jeslin J L; McCarthy, Mary K; Her, Zhisheng; Berger, Jennifer N; Ng, Lisa F P; Morrison, Thomas E

    2015-10-01

    Arthritogenic alphaviruses, including Ross River virus (RRV) and chikungunya virus (CHIKV), are responsible for explosive epidemics involving millions of cases. These mosquito-transmitted viruses cause inflammation and injury in skeletal muscle and joint tissues that results in debilitating pain. We previously showed that arginase 1 (Arg1) was highly expressed in myeloid cells in the infected and inflamed musculoskeletal tissues of RRV- and CHIKV-infected mice, and specific deletion of Arg1 from myeloid cells resulted in enhanced viral control. Here, we show that Arg1, along with other genes associated with suppressive myeloid cells, is induced in PBMCs isolated from CHIKV-infected patients during the acute phase as well as the chronic phase, and that high Arg1 expression levels were associated with high viral loads and disease severity. Depletion of both CD4 and CD8 T cells from RRV-infected Arg1-deficient mice restored viral loads to levels detected in T cell-depleted wild-type mice. Moreover, Arg1-expressing myeloid cells inhibited virus-specific T cells in the inflamed and infected musculoskeletal tissues, but not lymphoid tissues, following RRV infection in mice, including suppression of interferon-γ and CD69 expression. Collectively, these data enhance our understanding of the immune response following arthritogenic alphavirus infection and suggest that immunosuppressive myeloid cells may contribute to the duration or severity of these debilitating infections. PMID:26436766

  9. DNA-launched live-attenuated vaccines for biodefense applications.

    PubMed

    Pushko, Peter; Lukashevich, Igor S; Weaver, Scott C; Tretyakova, Irina

    2016-09-01

    A novel vaccine platform uses DNA immunization to launch live-attenuated virus vaccines in vivo. This technology has been applied for vaccine development against positive-strand RNA viruses with global public health impact including alphaviruses and flaviviruses. The DNA-launched vaccine represents the recombinant plasmid that encodes the full-length genomic RNA of live-attenuated virus downstream from a eukaryotic promoter. When administered in vivo, the genomic RNA of live-attenuated virus is transcribed. The RNA initiates limited replication of a genetically defined, live-attenuated vaccine virus in the tissues of the vaccine recipient, thereby inducing a protective immune response. This platform combines the strengths of reverse genetics, DNA immunization and the advantages of live-attenuated vaccines, resulting in a reduced chance of genetic reversions, increased safety, and improved immunization. With this vaccine technology, the field of DNA vaccines is expanded from those that express subunit antigens to include a novel type of DNA vaccines that launch live-attenuated viruses. PMID:27055100

  10. Inhibition of host extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) activation decreases new world alphavirus multiplication in infected cells.

    PubMed

    Voss, Kelsey; Amaya, Moushimi; Mueller, Claudius; Roberts, Brian; Kehn-Hall, Kylene; Bailey, Charles; Petricoin, Emanuel; Narayanan, Aarthi

    2014-11-01

    New World alphaviruses belonging to the family Togaviridae are classified as emerging infectious agents and Category B select agents. Our study is focused on the role of the host extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) in the infectious process of New World alphaviruses. Infection of human cells by Venezuelan equine encephalitis virus (VEEV) results in the activation of the ERK-signaling cascade. Inhibition of ERK1/2 by the small molecule inhibitor Ag-126 results in inhibition of viral multiplication. Ag-126-mediated inhibition of VEEV was due to potential effects on early and late stages of the infectious process. While expression of viral proteins was down-regulated in Ag-126 treated cells, we did not observe any influence of Ag-126 on the nuclear distribution of capsid. Finally, Ag-126 exerted a broad-spectrum inhibitory effect on New World alphavirus multiplication, thus indicating that the host kinase, ERK, is a broad-spectrum candidate for development of novel therapeutics against New World alphaviruses. PMID:25261871

  11. Pentosan Polysulfate: a Novel Glycosaminoglycan-Like Molecule for Effective Treatment of Alphavirus-Induced Cartilage Destruction and Inflammatory Disease

    PubMed Central

    Foo, Suan-Sin; Sheng, Kuo-Ching; Chen, Weiqiang; Forwood, Mark R.; Bucala, Richard

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Arthritogenic alphaviruses such as Ross River virus (RRV) and chikungunya virus (CHIKV) cause large-scale epidemics of severe musculoskeletal disease and have been progressively expanding their global distribution. Since its introduction in July 2014, CHIKV now circulates in the United States. The hallmark of alphavirus disease is crippling pain and inflammation of the joints, a similar immunopathology to rheumatoid arthritis. The use of glycans as novel therapeutics is an area of research that has increased in recent years. Here, we describe the promising therapeutic potential of the glycosaminoglycan (GAG)-like molecule pentosan polysulfate (PPS) to alleviate virus-induced arthritis. Mouse models of RRV and CHIKV disease were used to characterize the extent of cartilage damage in infection and investigate the potential of PPS to treat disease. This was assessed using histological analysis, real-time PCR, and fluorescence-activated cell sorting (FACS). Alphaviral infection resulted in cartilage destruction, the severity of which was alleviated by PPS therapy during RRV and CHIKV clinical disease. The reduction in cartilage damage corresponded with a significant reduction in immune infiltrates. Using multiplex bead arrays, PPS treatment was found to have significantly increased the anti-inflammatory cytokine interleukin-10 and reduced proinflammatory cytokines, typically correlated with disease severity. Furthermore, we reveal that the severe RRV-induced joint pathology, including thinning of articular cartilage and loss of proteoglycans in the cartilage matrix, was diminished with treatment. PPS is a promising new therapy for alphavirus-induced arthritis, acting to preserve the cartilage matrix, which is damaged during alphavirus infection. Overall, the data demonstrate the potential of glycotherapeutics as a new class of treatment for infectious arthritis. IMPORTANCE The hallmark of alphavirus disease is crippling pain and joint arthritis, which often

  12. Recombinant chimeric Japanese encephalitis virus/tick-borne encephalitis virus is attenuated and protective in mice.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hong-Jiang; Li, Xiao-Feng; Ye, Qing; Li, Shi-Hua; Deng, Yong-Qiang; Zhao, Hui; Xu, Yan-Peng; Ma, Jie; Qin, E-De; Qin, Cheng-Feng

    2014-02-12

    Tick-borne encephalitis virus (TBEV) represents one of the most dangerous human pathogens circulating in Europe and East Asia. No effective treatment for TBEV infection currently exists, and vaccination is the primary preventive measure. Although several inactivated vaccines have been licensed, the development of novel vaccines against TBEV remains a high priority in disease-endemic countries. In the present study, a live chimeric recombinant TBEV (ChinTBEV) was created by substituting the major structural genes of TBEV for the corresponding regions of Japanese encephalitis virus (JEV) live vaccine strain SA14-14-2. The resulting chimera had a small-plaque phenotype, replicated efficiently in both mammalian and mosquito cells. The preliminary data from in vitro passaging indicated the potential for stability of ChinTBEV. ChinTBEV also exhibited significantly attenuated neuroinvasiveness in mice upon either intraperitoneal or subcutaneous inoculation in comparison with its parental TBEV. Importantly, a single immunisation with ChinTBEV elicited TBEV-specific IgG and neutralising antibody responses in a dose-dependent manner, providing significant protection against lethal TBEV challenge in mice. Taken together, the results of this proof-of-concept study indicate that ChinTBEV can be further developed as a potential vaccine candidate against TBEV infection. Moreover, the construction of this type of flavivirus chimera using a JEV vaccine strain as the genetic backbone represents a universal vaccine approach. PMID:24394443

  13. Blood chimerism in a dizygotic dichorionic pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Jang, Ja-Hyun; Jung, Haiyoung; Kim, Jong-Hwa; Park, Won-Soon; Kim, Sun-Hee

    2010-10-01

    Blood chimerism in twins is known to occur through the transfer of hematopoietic stem cells between the fetuses via a common placenta. We present a case of blood chimerism in a dizygotic dichorionic twin pregnancy. The female twin was delivered at 34 weeks of gestation, and the male twin was stillborn. Pathologic examination confirmed dichorionic diamniotic placentas. The karyotype of the female child was obtained using peripheral blood sample, and it revealed a mixture of 46,XX and 46,XY cells (chi 46,XY[13]/46,XX[7]). FISH analysis performed on the buccal cells by using CEP X/Y probe (Abbott Molecular Inc., USA) revealed 100% XX signals (nuc ish Xcen(DXZ1x2)[500]). Gross examination of the external genitalia and abdominal ultrasonography revealed no definitive abnormal findings in relation to sex differentiation. When XX/XY chimerism is present in blood lymphocytes, careful examination of external genitalia and reproductive organs and further studies are required to detect chimerism in non-hematopoetic tissues. This is a rare case of blood chimerism in dichorionic placentas, in contrast to those in monochorionic placentas. PMID:20890086

  14. Vaccines and immunization strategies for dengue prevention.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yang; Liu, Jianying; Cheng, Gong

    2016-01-01

    Dengue is currently the most significant arboviral disease afflicting tropical and sub-tropical countries worldwide. Dengue vaccines, such as the multivalent attenuated, chimeric, DNA and inactivated vaccines, have been developed to prevent dengue infection in humans, and they function predominantly by stimulating immune responses against the dengue virus (DENV) envelope (E) and nonstructural-1 proteins (NS1). Of these vaccines, a live attenuated chimeric tetravalent DENV vaccine developed by Sanofi Pasteur has been licensed in several countries. However, this vaccine renders only partial protection against the DENV2 infection and is associated with an unexplained increased incidence of hospitalization for severe dengue disease among children younger than nine years old. In addition to the virus-based vaccines, several mosquito-based dengue immunization strategies have been developed to interrupt the vector competence and effectively reduce the number of infected mosquito vectors, thus controlling the transmission of DENV in nature. Here we summarize the recent progress in the development of dengue vaccines and novel immunization strategies and propose some prospective vaccine strategies for disease prevention in the future. PMID:27436365

  15. Cloning, expression, and purification of a highly immunogenic recombinant gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) chimeric peptide.

    PubMed

    Xu, Jinshu; Zhu, Zheng; Duan, Peng; Li, Wenjia; Zhang, Yin; Wu, Jie; Hu, Zhuoyi; Roque, Rouel S; Liu, Jingjing

    2006-12-01

    To design an anti-gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) vaccine capable of eliciting strong immunogenicity, a gene fragment encoding a chimeric peptide was constructed using polymerase chain reaction and ligated into a novel expression vector for recombinant expression in a T7 RNA polymerase-based expression system. The chimeric peptide called GnRH3-hinge-MVP contained three linear repeats of GnRH (GnRH3), a fragment of the human IgG1 hinge region, and a T-cell epitope of measles virus protein (MVP). The expression plasmid contained the GnRH3-hinge-MVP construct ligated to its fusion partner (AnsB-C) via an unique acid labile Asp-Pro linker. The recombinant fusion protein was expressed in an inclusion body in Escherichia coli under IPTG or lactose induction and the target peptide was easily purified using washing of urea and ethanol precipitation. The target chimeric peptide was isolated from the fusion partner following acid hydrolysis and purified using DEAE-Sephacel chromatography. The purified GnRH3-hinge-MVP was determined to be highly homogeneous by IEF analysis and the N-terminal sequencing. Further, immunization of female mice with the recombinant chimeric peptide resulted in generation of high-titer antibodies specific for GnRH. The results showed that GnRH3-hinge-MVP could be considered as a candidate anti-GnRH vaccine. PMID:17064933

  16. Novel chimeric foot-and-mouth disease virus-like particles harboring serotype O VP1 protect guinea pigs against challenge.

    PubMed

    Li, Haitao; Li, Zhiyong; Xie, Yinli; Qin, Xiaodong; Qi, Xingcai; Sun, Peng; Bai, Xingwen; Ma, Youji; Zhang, Zhidong

    2016-02-01

    Foot-and-mouth disease is a highly contagious, acute viral disease of cloven-hoofed animal species causing severe economic losses worldwide. Among the seven serotypes of foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV), serotype O is predominant, but its viral capsid is more acid sensitive than other serotypes, making it more difficult to produce empty serotype O VLPs in the low pH insect hemolymph. Therefore, a novel chimeric virus-like particle (VLP)-based candidate vaccine for serotype O FMDV was developed and characterized in the present study. The chimeric VLPs were composed of antigenic VP1 from serotype O and segments of viral capsid proteins from serotype Asia1. These VLPs elicited significantly higher FMDV-specific antibody levels in immunized mice than did the inactivated vaccine. Furthermore, the chimeric VLPs protected guinea pigs from FMDV challenge with an efficacy similar to that of the inactivated vaccine. These results suggest that chimeric VLPs have the potential for use in vaccines against serotype O FMDV infection. PMID:26790940

  17. Alphavirus adsorption to mosquito cells as viewed by freeze fracture immunolabeling

    SciTech Connect

    Kononchik, Joseph P.; Vancini, Ricardo; Brown, Dennis T.

    2011-07-05

    Sindbis Virus (SV), the prototype alphavirus in the family togaviridae, infects both mammalian and insect cells. The ability of SV to infect cells possessing significantly different biochemical environments suggests that there may be a common mode of entry into each cell type. Previous studies show that up to 4 h post infection cells are permeable to small ions and alpha sarcin suggesting that the plasma membrane is compromised as infection takes place. Thin-section electron microscopy has also shown SV to bind to the plasma membrane and lose its electron dense core through a pore like structure developed upon interaction of the virus with the cell surface. Using freeze-fracture replicas, thin-sections and antibody labeling the data presented herein show virus associated with intramembrane particles on mosquito cells. These data suggest that the intramembrane particles associated with SV may be part of the pore structure consisting of virus proteins and cell receptor.

  18. Rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) muscle satellite cells are targets of salmonid alphavirus infection.

    PubMed

    Biacchesi, Stéphane; Jouvion, Grégory; Mérour, Emilie; Boukadiri, Abdelhak; Desdouits, Marion; Ozden, Simona; Huerre, Michel; Ceccaldi, Pierre-Emmanuel; Brémont, Michel

    2016-01-01

    Sleeping disease in rainbow trout is characterized by an abnormal swimming behaviour of the fish which stay on their side at the bottom of the tanks. This sign is due to extensive necrosis and atrophy of red skeletal muscle induced by the sleeping disease virus (SDV), also called salmonid alphavirus 2. Infections of humans with arthritogenic alphaviruses, such as Chikungunya virus (CHIKV), are global causes of debilitating musculoskeletal diseases. The mechanisms by which the virus causes these pathologies are poorly understood due to the restrictive availability of animal models capable of reproducing the full spectrum of the disease. Nevertheless, it has been shown that CHIKV exhibits a particular tropism for muscle stem cells also known as satellite cells. Thus, SDV and its host constitute a relevant model to study in details the virus-induced muscle atrophy, the pathophysiological consequences of the infection of a particular cell-type in the skeletal muscle, and the regeneration of the muscle tissue in survivors together with the possible virus persistence. To study a putative SDV tropism for that particular cell type, we established an in vivo and ex vivo rainbow trout model of SDV-induced atrophy of the skeletal muscle. This experimental model allows reproducing the full panel of clinical signs observed during a natural infection since the transmission of the virus is arthropod-borne independent. The virus tropism in the muscle tissue was studied by immunohistochemistry together with the kinetics of the muscle atrophy, and the muscle regeneration post-infection was observed. In parallel, an ex vivo model of SDV infection of rainbow trout satellite cells was developed and virus replication and persistence in that particular cell type was followed up to 73 days post-infection. These results constitute the first observation of a specific SDV tropism for the muscle satellite cells. PMID:26743565

  19. A PLGA-encapsulated chimeric protein protects against adherence and toxicity of enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Nazarian, Shahram; Gargari, Seyed Latif Mousavi; Rasooli, Iraj; Hasannia, Sadegh; Pirooznia, Nazanin

    2014-01-01

    Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) are the most common cause of diarrhea among children. Colonization factors and enterotoxins are the major ETEC candidate vaccines. Since protection against ETEC mostly occurs by induction of IgA antibodies, much effort is focused on the development of oral vaccines. In this study oral immunogenicity of a poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) encapsulated chimeric protein containing CfaB, CstH, CotA and LTB (Heat-labile B subunit) was investigated. The protein was encapsulated in PLGA by double emulsion method and nanoparticles were characterized physicochemically. Immunogenicity was assessed by evaluating IgG1, IgG2 and IgA titers after BALB/c mice vaccination. Non aggregated nanoparticles had a spherical shape with an average particle size of 252.7±23 nm and 91.96±4.4% of encapsulation efficiency. Western blotting showed maintenance of the molecular weight and antigenicity of the released protein. Oral immunization of mice induced serum IgG and fecal IgA antibody responses. Immunization induced protection against ETEC binding to Caco-2 cells. The effect of LT toxin on fluid accumulation in ileal loops was neutralized by inhibition of enterotoxin binding to GM1-ganglosides. Delivery of the chimeric protein in PLGA elicited both systemic and mucosal immune responses. The findings could be exploited to development of oral multi-component ETEC prophylactic measures. PMID:23906742

  20. A chimeric protein comprising the immunogenic domains of Mannheimia haemolytica leukotoxin and outer membrane protein PlpE induces antibodies against leukotoxin and PlpE.

    PubMed

    Batra, Sai Arun; Shanthalingam, Sudarvili; Donofrio, Gaetano; Srikumaran, Subramaniam

    2016-07-01

    Mannheimia haemolytica is a very important pathogen of pneumonia in ruminants. Bighorn sheep (BHS, Ovis canadensis) are highly susceptible to M. haemolytica-caused pneumonia which has significantly contributed to the drastic decline of bighorn sheep population in North America. Pneumonia outbreaks in wild BHS can cause mortality as high as 90%. Leukotoxin is the critical virulence factor of M. haemolytica. In a 'proof of concept' study, an experimental vaccine containing leukotoxin and surface antigens of M. haemolytica developed by us induced 100% protection of BHS, but required multiple booster injections. Vaccination of wild BHS is difficult. But they can be vaccinated at the time of transplantation into a new habitat. Administration of booster doses, however, is impossible. Therefore, a vaccine that does not require booster doses is necessary to immunize BHS against M. haemolytica pneumonia. Herpesviruses are ideal vectors for development of such a vaccine because of their ability to undergo latency with subsequent reactivation. As the first step towards developing a herpesvirus-vectored vaccine, we constructed a chimeric protein comprising the leukotoxin-neutralizing epitopes and the immuno-dominant epitopes of the outer membrane protein PlpE. The chimeric protein was efficiently expressed in primary BHS lung cells. The immunogenicity of the chimeric protein was evaluated in mice before inoculating BHS. Mice immunized with the chimeric protein developed antibodies against M. haemolytica leukotoxin and PlpE. More importantly, the anti-leukotoxin antibodies effectively neutralized leukotoxin-induced cytotoxicity. Taken together, these results represent the successful completion of the first step towards developing a herpesvirus-vectored vaccine for controlling M. haemolytica pneumonia in BHS, and possibly other ruminants. PMID:27269790

  1. Polio Vaccination

    MedlinePlus

    ... inactive polio vaccine OPV=oral polio vaccine Polio Vaccination Pronounced [PO-lee-oh] Recommend on Facebook Tweet ... handling and storage Related Pages Global Vaccines and Immunization Global Polio Also Known As & Abbreviations Polio=poliomyelitis ...

  2. Modulation of type I IFN induction by a virulence determinant within the alphavirus nsP1 protein.

    PubMed

    Cruz, Catherine C; Suthar, Mehul S; Montgomery, Stephanie A; Shabman, Reed; Simmons, Jason; Johnston, Robert E; Morrison, Thomas E; Heise, Mark T

    2010-03-30

    Alphaviruses are mosquito-borne viruses that cause serious human and animal diseases. Previous studies demonstrated that a determinant within the nsP1/nsP2 cleavage domain of the virulent Sindbis AR86 virus played a key role in regulating adult mouse virulence without adversely affecting viral replication. Additional characterization of this determinant demonstrated that a virus with the attenuating mutation induced more type I IFN production both in vivo and in vitro. Interestingly, this phenotype was not specific to the Sindbis AR86 virus, as a similar mutation in a distantly related alphavirus, Ross River Virus (RRV), also led to enhanced IFN induction. This effect was independent of virus-induced host shutoff, since IRF-3 phosphorylation, which occurs independently of de novo host transcription/translation, was induced more robustly in cells infected with the mutant viruses. Altogether, these results demonstrate that critical determinants within the nsP1/nsP2 cleavage domain play an important role in regulating alphavirus-induced IFN responses. PMID:20097400

  3. Characteristics of alpha/beta interferon induction after infection of murine fibroblasts with wild-type and mutant alphaviruses

    SciTech Connect

    Burke, Crystal W.; Gardner, Christina L.; Steffan, Joshua J.; Ryman, Kate D.; Klimstra, William B.

    2009-12-05

    We examined the characteristics of interferon alpha/beta (IFN-alpha/beta) induction after alphavirus or control Sendai virus (SeV) infection of murine fibroblasts (MEFs). As expected, SeV infection of wild-type (wt) MEFs resulted in strong dimerization of IRF3 and the production of high levels of IFN-alpha/beta. In contrast, infection of MEFs with multiple alphaviruses failed to elicit detectable IFN-alpha/beta. In more detailed studies, Sindbis virus (SINV) infection caused dimerization and nuclear migration of IRF3, but minimal IFN-beta promoter activity, although surprisingly, the infected cells were competent for IFN production by other stimuli early after infection. A SINV mutant defective in host macromolecular synthesis shutoff induced IFN-alpha/beta in the MEF cultures dependent upon the activities of the TBK1 IRF3 activating kinase and host pattern recognition receptors (PRRs) PKR and MDA5 but not RIG-I. These results suggest that wild-type alphaviruses antagonize IFN induction after IRF3 activation but also may avoid detection by host PRRs early after infection.

  4. Engineering of chimeric class II polyhydroxyalkanoate synthases.

    PubMed

    Niamsiri, Nuttawee; Delamarre, Soazig C; Kim, Young-Rok; Batt, Carl A

    2004-11-01

    PHA synthase is a key enzyme involved in the biosynthesis of polyhydroxyalkanoates (PHAs). Using a combinatorial genetic strategy to create unique chimeric class II PHA synthases, we have obtained a number of novel chimeras which display improved catalytic properties. To engineer the chimeric PHA synthases, we constructed a synthetic phaC gene from Pseudomonas oleovorans (phaC1Po) that was devoid of an internal 540-bp fragment. Randomly amplified PCR products (created with primers based on conserved phaC sequences flanking the deleted internal fragment) were generated using genomic DNA isolated from soil and were substituted for the 540-bp internal region. The chimeric genes were expressed in a PHA-negative strain of Ralstonia eutropha, PHB(-)4 (DSM 541). Out of 1,478 recombinant clones screened for PHA production, we obtained five different chimeric phaC1Po genes that produced more PHA than the native phaC1Po. Chimeras S1-71, S4-8, S5-58, S3-69, and S3-44 exhibited 1.3-, 1.4-, 2.0-, 2.1-, and 3.0-fold-increased levels of in vivo activity, respectively. All of the mutants mediated the synthesis of PHAs with a slightly increased molar fraction of 3-hydroxyoctanoate; however, the weight-average molecular weights (Mw) of the PHAs in all cases remained almost the same. Based upon DNA sequence analyses, the various phaC fragments appear to have originated from Pseudomonas fluorescens and Pseudomonas aureofaciens. The amino acid sequence analyses showed that the chimeric proteins had 17 to 20 amino acid differences from the wild-type phaC1Po, and these differences were clustered in the same positions in the five chimeric clones. A threading model of PhaC1Po, developed based on homology of the enzyme to the Burkholderia glumae lipase, suggested that the amino acid substitutions found in the active chimeras were located mostly on the protein model surface. Thus, our combinatorial genetic engineering strategy proved to be broadly useful for improving the catalytic

  5. Chimeric peptide constructs comprising linear B-cell epitopes: application to the serodiagnosis of infectious diseases

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Yudong; Li, Zhong; Teng, Huan; Xu, Hongke; Qi, Songnan; He, Jian’an; Gu, Dayong; Chen, Qijun; Ma, Hongwei

    2015-01-01

    Linear B-cell epitopes are ideal biomarkers for the serodiagnosis of infectious diseases. However, the long-predicted diagnostic value of epitopes has not been realized. Here, we demonstrated a method, diagnostic epitopes in four steps (DEIFS), that delivers a combination of epitopes for the serodiagnosis of infectious diseases with a high success rate. Using DEIFS for malaria, we identified 6 epitopes from 8 peptides and combined them into 3 chimeric peptide constructs. Along with 4 other peptides, we developed a rapid diagnostic test (RDT), which is able to differentiate Plasmodium falciparum (P. falciparum) from Plasmodium vivax (P. vivax) infections with 95.6% overall sensitivity and 99.1% overall specificity. In addition to applications in diagnosis, DEIFS could also be used in the diagnosis of virus and bacterium infections, discovery of vaccine candidates, evaluation of vaccine potency, and study of disease progression. PMID:26293607

  6. Chimeric peptide constructs comprising linear B-cell epitopes: application to the serodiagnosis of infectious diseases.

    PubMed

    Lu, Yudong; Li, Zhong; Teng, Huan; Xu, Hongke; Qi, Songnan; He, Jian'an; Gu, Dayong; Chen, Qijun; Ma, Hongwei

    2015-01-01

    Linear B-cell epitopes are ideal biomarkers for the serodiagnosis of infectious diseases. However, the long-predicted diagnostic value of epitopes has not been realized. Here, we demonstrated a method, diagnostic epitopes in four steps (DEIFS), that delivers a combination of epitopes for the serodiagnosis of infectious diseases with a high success rate. Using DEIFS for malaria, we identified 6 epitopes from 8 peptides and combined them into 3 chimeric peptide constructs. Along with 4 other peptides, we developed a rapid diagnostic test (RDT), which is able to differentiate Plasmodium falciparum (P. falciparum) from Plasmodium vivax (P. vivax) infections with 95.6% overall sensitivity and 99.1% overall specificity. In addition to applications in diagnosis, DEIFS could also be used in the diagnosis of virus and bacterium infections, discovery of vaccine candidates, evaluation of vaccine potency, and study of disease progression. PMID:26293607

  7. Vaccine hesitancy

    PubMed Central

    Dubé, Eve; Laberge, Caroline; Guay, Maryse; Bramadat, Paul; Roy, Réal; Bettinger, Julie A.

    2013-01-01

    Despite being recognized as one of the most successful public health measures, vaccination is perceived as unsafe and unnecessary by a growing number of individuals. Lack of confidence in vaccines is now considered a threat to the success of vaccination programs. Vaccine hesitancy is believed to be responsible for decreasing vaccine coverage and an increasing risk of vaccine-preventable disease outbreaks and epidemics. This review provides an overview of the phenomenon of vaccine hesitancy. First, we will characterize vaccine hesitancy and suggest the possible causes of the apparent increase in vaccine hesitancy in the developed world. Then we will look at determinants of individual decision-making about vaccination. PMID:23584253

  8. Development of chimeric laccases by directed evolution.

    PubMed

    Pardo, Isabel; Vicente, Ana Isabel; Mate, Diana M; Alcalde, Miguel; Camarero, Susana

    2012-12-01

    DNA recombination methods are useful tools to generate diversity in directed evolution protein engineering studies. We have designed an array of chimeric laccases with high-redox potential by in vitro and in vivo DNA recombination of two fungal laccases (from Pycnoporus cinnabarinus and PM1 basidiomycete), which were previously tailored by laboratory evolution for functional expression in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. The laccase fusion genes (including the evolved α-factor prepro-leaders for secretion in yeast) were subjected to a round of family shuffling to construct chimeric libraries and the best laccase hybrids were identified in dual high-throughput screening (HTS) assays. Using this approach, we identified chimeras with up to six crossover events in the whole sequence, and we obtained active hybrid laccases with combined characteristics in terms of pH activity and thermostability. PMID:22729887

  9. Cross-presentation of HCMV chimeric protein enables generation and measurement of polyclonal T cells.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Thi H O; Sullivan, Lucy C; Kotsimbos, Tom C; Schwarer, Anthony P; Mifsud, Nicole A

    2010-08-01

    CD8(+) T cell immunity has a critical function in controlling human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) infection. In immunocompromized individuals, HCMV reactivation or disease can lead to increased morbidity and mortality, particularly in transplant recipients. In this setting, adoptive transfer of HCMV-specific CD8(+) T cells is a promising vaccine strategy to restore viral immunity, with most clinical approaches focussing on the use of peptides for the generation of single epitope-specific CD8(+) T cells. We show that using an IE1-pp65 chimeric protein as the antigen source promotes effective cross-presentation, by monocyte-derived dendritic cells (MoDCs), to generate polyclonal CD8(+) T cell epitopes. By exploring human leukocyte antigen (HLA)-restricted immunodominance hierarchies both within and across two immunodominant proteins, we show that HLA-B7 epitopes elicit higher CD8(+) T cell responses compared with HLA-A1, -A2 or -B8. This study provides important evidence highlighting both the efficacy of the IE1-pp65 chimeric protein and the importance of immunodominance in designing future therapeutic vaccines. PMID:20195281

  10. Establishment and characterization of a chimeric infectious cDNA clone of classical swine fever virus.

    PubMed

    Zhao, T S; Xia, Y H

    2016-01-01

    Classical swine fever virus (CSFV) causes a highly contagious disease among swine that has an important economic impact worldwide. There are two important CSFV strains in China, Shimen and hog cholera lapinized virus (HCLV). Shimen strain is highly virulent while HCLV, also referred to as C-strain, is a live attenuated vaccine strain considered to be one of the most effective and safest live vaccines. In this study, a chimeric infectious cDNA clone of CSFV named pT7SM-c was engineered by replacing the Erns genomic region of an infectious clone of CSFV Shimen strain, pT7SM, with the same region obtained from HCLV. RNA transcripts of pT7SM-c containing an engineered EcoRI site that served as a genetic marker were directly infectious in PK15 cells. The rescued virus vT7SM-c showed similar growth kinetics and cytopathic effect with the parental virus vT7SM in the cells. The chimeric infectious cDNA clone can be used as a practical tool for further studying of the virulence, protein function and pathogenesis of CSFV through genetic manipulation. PMID:27265471

  11. Incorporation of chimeric HIV-SIV-Env and modified HIV-Env proteins into HIV pseudovirions

    SciTech Connect

    Devitt, Gerard; Emerson, Vanessa; Holtkotte, Denise; Pfeiffer, Tanya; Pisch, Thorsten; Bosch, Valerie . E-mail: v.bosch@dkfz.de

    2007-05-10

    Low level incorporation of the viral glycoprotein (Env) into human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) particles is a major drawback for vaccine strategies against HIV/AIDS in which HIV particles are used as immunogen. Within this study, we have examined two strategies aimed at achieving higher levels of Env incorporation into non-infectious pseudovirions (PVs). First, we have generated chimeric HIV/SIV Env proteins containing the truncated C-terminal tail region of simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV)mac239-Env767{sup stop}, which mediates strongly increased incorporation of SIV-Env into SIV particles. In a second strategy, we have employed a truncated HIV-Env protein (Env-Tr752{sup N750K}) which we have previously demonstrated to be incorporated into HIV virions, generated in infected T-cells, to a higher level than that of Wt-HIV-Env. Although the chimeric HIV/SIV Env proteins were expressed at the cell surface and induced increased levels of cell-cell fusion in comparison to Wt-HIV-Env, they did not exhibit increased incorporation into either HIV-PVs or SIV-PVs. Only Env-Tr752{sup N750K} exhibited significantly higher (threefold) levels of incorporation into HIV-PVs, an improvement, which, although not dramatic, is worthwhile for the large-scale preparation of non-infectious PVs for vaccine studies aimed at inducing Env humoral responses.

  12. Current status and future prospects of yellow fever vaccines.

    PubMed

    Beck, Andrew S; Barrett, Alan D T

    2015-11-01

    Yellow fever 17D vaccine is one of the oldest live-attenuated vaccines in current use that is recognized historically for its immunogenic and safe properties. These unique properties of 17D are presently exploited in rationally designed recombinant vaccines targeting not only flaviviral antigens but also other pathogens of public health concern. Several candidate vaccines based on 17D have advanced to human trials, and a chimeric recombinant Japanese encephalitis vaccine utilizing the 17D backbone has been licensed. The mechanism(s) of attenuation for 17D are poorly understood; however, recent insights from large in silico studies have indicated particular host genetic determinants contributing to the immune response to the vaccine, which presumably influences the considerable durability of protection, now in many cases considered to be lifelong. The very rare occurrence of severe adverse events for 17D is discussed, including a recent fatal case of vaccine-associated viscerotropic disease. PMID:26366673

  13. Liquid fat, a potential abiotic vector for horizontal transmission of salmonid alphavirus?

    PubMed

    Stene, A; Hellebø, A; Viljugrein, H; Solevåg, S E; Devold, M; Aspehaug, V

    2016-05-01

    Viral diseases represent serious challenge in marine farming of Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar L). Pancreas disease (PD) caused by a salmonid alphavirus (SAV) is by far the most serious in northern Europe. To control PD, it is necessary to identify virus transmission routes. One aspect to consider is whether the virus is transported as free particles or associated with potential vectors. Farmed salmonids have high lipid content in their tissue which may be released into the environment from decomposing dead fish. At the seawater surface, the effects of wind and ocean currents are most prominent. The aim of this study was primarily to identify whether the lipid fraction leaking from dead infected salmon contains SAV. Adipose tissue from dead SAV-infected fish from three farming sites was submerged in beakers with sea water in the laboratory and stored at different temperature and time conditions. SAV was identified by real-time RT-PCR in the lipid fractions accumulating at the water surface in the beakers. SAV-RNA was also present in the sea water. Lipid fractions were transferred to cell culture, and viable SAV was identified. Due to its hydrophobic nature, fat with infective pathogenic virus at the surface may contribute to long-distance transmission of SAV. PMID:25952607

  14. Mutating Conserved Cysteines in the Alphavirus E2 Glycoprotein Causes Virus-Specific Assembly Defects

    PubMed Central

    Snyder, Anthony J.; Sokoloski, Kevin J.

    2012-01-01

    There are 80 trimeric, glycoprotein spikes that cover the surface of an alphavirus particle. The spikes, which are composed of three E2 and E1 glycoprotein heterodimers, are responsible for receptor binding and mediating fusion between the viral and host-cell membranes during entry. In addition, the cytoplasmic domain of E2 interacts with the nucleocapsid core during the last stages of particle assembly, possibly to aid in particle stability. During assembly, the spikes are nonfusogenic until the E3 glycoprotein is cleaved from E2 in the trans-Golgi network. Thus, a mutation in E2 potentially has effects on virus entry, spike assembly, or spike maturation. E2 is a highly conserved, cysteine-rich transmembrane glycoprotein. We made single cysteine-to-serine mutations within two distinct regions of the E2 ectodomain in both Sindbis virus and Ross River virus. Each of the E2 Cys mutants produced fewer infectious particles than wild-type virus. Further characterization of the mutant viruses revealed differences in particle morphology, fusion activity, and polyprotein cleavage between Sindbis and Ross River virus mutants, despite the mutations being made at corresponding positions in E2. The nonconserved assembly defects suggest that E2 folding and function is species dependent, possibly due to interactions with a virus-specific chaperone. PMID:22238319

  15. Structural Differences Observed in Arboviruses of the Alphavirus and Flavivirus Genera

    PubMed Central

    Hernandez, Raquel; Brown, Dennis T.; Paredes, Angel

    2014-01-01

    Arthropod borne viruses have developed a complex life cycle adapted to alternate between insect and vertebrate hosts. These arthropod-borne viruses belong mainly to the families Togaviridae, Flaviviridae, and Bunyaviridae. This group of viruses contains many pathogens that cause febrile, hemorrhagic, and encephalitic disease or arthritic symptoms which can be persistent. It has been appreciated for many years that these viruses were evolutionarily adapted to function in the highly divergent cellular environments of both insect and mammalian phyla. These viruses are hybrid in nature, containing viral-encoded RNA and proteins which are glycosylated by the host and encapsulate viral nucleocapsids in the context of a host-derived membrane. From a structural perspective, these virus particles are macromolecular machines adapted in design to assemble into a packaging and delivery system for the virus genome and, only when associated with the conditions appropriate for a productive infection, to disassemble and deliver the RNA cargo. It was initially assumed that the structures of the virus from both hosts were equivalent. New evidence that alphaviruses and flaviviruses can exist in more than one conformation postenvelopment will be discussed in this review. The data are limited but should refocus the field of structural biology on the metastable nature of these viruses. PMID:25309597

  16. Synthesis of cellulose nanocrystals carrying tyrosine sulfate mimetic ligands and inhibition of alphavirus infection.

    PubMed

    Zoppe, Justin O; Ruottinen, Ville; Ruotsalainen, Janne; Rönkkö, Seppo; Johansson, Leena-Sisko; Hinkkanen, Ari; Järvinen, Kristiina; Seppälä, Jukka

    2014-04-14

    We present two facile approaches for introducing multivalent displays of tyrosine sulfate mimetic ligands on the surface of cellulose nanocrystals (CNCs) for application as viral inhibitors. We tested the efficacy of cellulose nanocrystals, prepared either from cotton fibers or Whatman filter paper, to inhibit alphavirus infectivity in Vero (B) cells. Cellulose nanocrystals were produced by sulfuric acid hydrolysis leading to nanocrystal surfaces decorated with anionic sulfate groups. When the fluorescent marker expressing Semliki Forest virus vector, VA7-EGFP, was incubated with CNCs, strong inhibition of virus infectivity was achieved, up to 100 and 88% for cotton and Whatman CNCs, respectively. When surface sulfate groups of CNCs were exchanged for tyrosine sulfate mimetic groups (i.e. phenyl sulfonates), improved viral inhibition was attained. Our observations suggest that the conjugation of target-specific functionalities to CNC surfaces provides a means to control their antiviral activity. Multivalent CNCs did not cause observable in vitro cytotoxicity to Vero (B) cells or human corneal epithelial (HCE-T) cells, even within the 100% virus-inhibitory concentrations. Based on the similar chemistry of known polyanionic inhibitors, our results suggest the potential application of CNCs as inhibitors of other viruses, such as human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and herpes simplex viruses. PMID:24628489

  17. In- silico exploration of thirty alphavirus genomes for analysis of the simple sequence repeats

    PubMed Central

    Alam, Chaudhary Mashhood; Singh, Avadhesh Kumar; Sharfuddin, Choudhary; Ali, Safdar

    2014-01-01

    The compilation of simple sequence repeats (SSRs) in viruses and its analysis with reference to incidence, distribution and variation would be instrumental in understanding the functional and evolutionary aspects of repeat sequences. Present study encompasses the analysis of SSRs across 30 species of alphaviruses. The full length genome sequences, assessed from NCBI were used for extraction and analysis of repeat sequences using IMEx software. The repeats of different motif sizes (mono- to penta-nucleotide) observed therein exhibited variable incidence across the species. Expectedly, mononucleotide A/T was the most prevalent followed by dinucleotide AG/GA and trinucleotide AAG/GAA in these genomes. The conversion of SSRs to imperfect microsatellite or compound microsatellite (cSSR) is low. cSSR, primarily constituted by variant motifs accounted for up to 12.5% of the SSRs. Interestingly, seven species lacked cSSR in their genomes. However, the SSR and cSSR are predominantly localized to the coding region ORFs for non structural protein and structural proteins. The relative frequencies of different classes of simple and compound microsatellites within and across genomes have been highlighted. PMID:25606453

  18. Detection of salmonid alphavirus RNA in Celtic and Irish Sea flatfish.

    PubMed

    McCleary, S; Giltrap, M; Henshilwood, K; Ruane, N M

    2014-04-23

    Pancreas disease (PD) caused by the salmonid alphavirus (SAV) has been the most significant cause of mortalities in Irish farmed salmon Salmo salar L. over the past decade. SAV is a single-strand positive-sense RNA virus, originally thought to be unique to salmonids, but has recently been detected using real-time RT-PCR in a number of wild non-salmonid fish. In the present report, 610 wild flatfish (common dab Limanda limanda, plaice Pleuronectes platessa and megrim Lepidorhombus whiffiagonis) were caught from the Irish and Celtic Seas and screened for SAV using real-time RT-PCR and sequencing. In general, a very low prevalence was recorded in common dab and plaice, except for 1 haul in Dublin Bay where 25% of common dab were SAV-positive. SAV sequence analysis supported the fact that real-time RT-PCR detections were specific and further characterised the detected viruses within SAV Subtype I, the predominant subtype found in farmed salmon in Ireland. PMID:24781791

  19. Neuroprotective interventions targeting detrimental host immune responses protect mice from fatal alphavirus encephalitis.

    PubMed

    Irani, David N; Prow, Natalie A

    2007-06-01

    Systemic treatment with the tetracycline derivative, minocycline, attenuates neurologic deficits in animal models of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, hypoxic-ischemic brain injury, and multiple sclerosis. Inhibition of microglial activation within the CNS is 1 mechanism proposed to underlie the beneficial effects of the drug in these systems. Given the widening scope of acute viral encephalitis caused by mosquito-borne pathogens, we investigated the therapeutic effects of minocycline in a murine model of fatal alphavirus encephalomyelitis in which widespread microglial activation is known to occur. We found that minocycline conferred significant protection against both paralysis and death, even when started after viral challenge and despite having no effect on CNS virus replication or spread. Further studies demonstrated that minocycline inhibited early virus-induced microglial activation and that diminished CNS production of the inflammatory mediator, interleukin (IL)-1beta, contributed to its protective effect. Therapeutic blockade of IL-1 receptors also conferred significant protection in our model, validating the importance of the IL-1 pathway in disease pathogenesis. We propose that interventions targeting detrimental host immune responses arising from activated microglia may be of benefit in humans with acute viral encephalitis caused by related mosquito-borne pathogens. Such treatments could conceivably act through neuroprotective rather than antiviral mechanisms to generate these clinical effects. PMID:17549013

  20. Polypeptide synthesis in alphavirus-infected Aedes albopictus cells during the establishment of persistent infection.

    PubMed

    Richardson, M A; Boulton, R W; Raghow, R S; Dalgarno, L

    1980-01-01

    Polypeptide synthesis was examined in mosquito cells during the establishment of a persistent infection with two alphaviruses, Ross River virus (RRV) and Semliki Forest virus (SFV), and in vertebrate cells cytopathically-infected with the same viruses. In Aedes albopictus cell, RRV reached peak titres at 34--48 hours p.i. At 12 hours 85 per cent of cells assayed as infected by infective centre assay; by 48 hours when persistence was established, virus production was reduced and less than 5 per cent of cells assayed as infected. There was no shut-down of host polypeptide synthesis during infection. Viral polypeptide synthesis was maximal between 10 and 24 hours p.i. The major viral polypeptides labelled were nucleocapsid protein and envelope protein(s). The precursor polypeptide p95 which was prominent in infected BHK cells was not detected in mosquito cells. Similar results were obtained on SFV infection. During the establishment of persistence there was a coordinate decline in the synthesis of RRV polypeptides, reaching undetectable levels by 72 hours p.i. Subculturing persitently-infected cells led to a small increase in viral polypeptide synthesis and virus titre. In contrast, during RRV growth in BHK celos host protein synthesis was severly inhibited and by 9--11 hours p.i. virus-specific polypeptide synthesis represented more than 90 per cent of total protein synthetic activity. PMID:7356398

  1. Pathogenesis of experimental salmonid alphavirus infection in vivo: an ultrastructural insight.

    PubMed

    Herath, Tharangani K; Ferguson, Hugh W; Weidmann, Manfred W; Bron, James E; Thompson, Kimberly D; Adams, Alexandra; Muir, Katherine F; Richards, Randolph H

    2016-01-01

    Salmonid alphavirus (SAV) is an enveloped, single-stranded, positive sense RNA virus belonging to the family Togaviridae. It causes economically devastating disease in cultured salmonids. The characteristic features of SAV infection include severe histopathological changes in the heart, pancreas and skeletal muscles of diseased fish. Although the presence of virus has been reported in a wider range of tissues, the mechanisms responsible for viral tissue tropism and for lesion development during the disease are not clearly described or understood. Previously, we have described membrane-dependent morphogenesis of SAV and associated apoptosis-mediated cell death in vitro. The aims of the present study were to explore ultrastructural changes associated with SAV infection in vivo. Cytolytic changes were observed in heart, but not in gill and head-kidney of virus-infected fish, although they still exhibited signs of SAV morphogenesis. Ultrastructural changes associated with virus replication were also noted in leukocytes in the head kidney of virus-infected fish. These results further describe the presence of degenerative lesions in the heart as expected, but not in the gills and in the kidney. PMID:26743442

  2. Detection and quantification of chimerism by droplet digital PCR.

    PubMed

    George, David; Czech, Juliann; John, Bobby; Yu, Min; Jennings, Lawrence J

    2013-01-01

    Accurate quantification of chimerism and microchimerism is proving to be increasingly valuable for hematopoietic cell transplantation as well as non-transplant conditions. However, methods that are available to quantify low-level chimerism lack accuracy. Therefore, we developed and validated a method for quantifying chimerism based on digital PCR technology. We demonstrate accurate quantification that far exceeds what is possible with analog qPCR down to 0.01% with the potential to go even lower. Also, this method is inherently more informative than qPCR. We expect the advantages of digital PCR will make it the preferred method for chimerism analysis. PMID:23974275

  3. Mixed chimerism to induce tolerance: lessons learned from nonhuman primates

    PubMed Central

    Murakami, Toru; Cosimi, A. Benedict; Kawai, Tatsuo

    2013-01-01

    The mixed chimerism approach has been demonstrated to be an effective means of inducing allograft tolerance. Based on our rodent studies on mixed chimerism, we previously developed a clinically relevant nonmyeloablative preparative regimen that permits the induction of mixed chimerism and renal allograft tolerance following donor bone marrow transplantation in major histocompatibility complex fully mismatched cynomolgus monkeys. This approach has been successfully extended to HLA matched or mismatched kidney transplant recipients. In the manuscript, we summarize some of the important conclusions made in our laboratories regarding induction of mixed chimerism and allograft tolerance in a nonhuman primate model. PMID:19027614

  4. Construction and Evaluation of a Maize Chimeric Promoter with Activity in Kernel Endosperm and Embryo

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Chimeric promoters contain DNA sequences from different promoters. Chimeric promoters are developed to increase the level of recombinant protein expression, precisely control transgene activity, or to escape homology-based gene silencing. Sets of chimeric promoters, each containing different lengt...

  5. Design and characterization of a chimeric multiepitope construct containing CfaB, heat-stable toxoid, CssA, CssB, and heat-labile toxin subunit B of enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli: a bioinformatic approach.

    PubMed

    Zeinalzadeh, Narges; Salmanian, Ali Hatef; Ahangari, Ghasem; Sadeghi, Mahdi; Amani, Jafar; Bathaie, S Zahra; Jafari, Mahyat

    2014-01-01

    Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) strains are the most common cause of bacterial diarrhea in children in developing countries and travelers to these areas. Enterotoxins and colonization factors (CFs) are two key virulence factors in ETEC pathogenesis, and the heterogeneity of the CFs is the bottleneck in reaching an effective vaccine. In this study, a candidate subunit vaccine, which is composed of CfaB, CssA and CssB, structural subunits of colonization factor antigen I and CS6 CFs, labile toxin subunit B, and the binding subunit of heat-labile and heat-stable toxoid, was designed to provide broad-spectrum protection against ETEC. The different features of chimeric gene, its mRNA stability, and chimeric protein properties were analyzed by using bioinformatic tools. The optimized chimeric gene was chemically synthesized and expressed successfully in a prokaryotic host. The purified protein was used for assessment of bioinformatic data by experimental methods. PMID:24372617

  6. Smallpox Vaccination

    MedlinePlus

    ... Newsletters Events Also Known As Smallpox = Vaccinia Smallpox Vaccination Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir The smallpox ... like many other vaccines. For that reason, the vaccination site must be cared for carefully to prevent ...

  7. Vaccine Safety

    MedlinePlus

    ... During Pregnancy Frequently Asked Questions about Vaccine Recalls Historical Vaccine Safety Concerns FAQs about GBS and Menactra ... CISA Resources for Healthcare Professionals Evaluation Current Studies Historical Background 2001-12 Publications Technical Reports Vaccine Safety ...

  8. HPV vaccine

    MedlinePlus

    Vaccine - HPV; Immunization - HPV; Gardasil; Cervarix; HPV2; HPV4; Vaccine to prevent cervical cancer ... and Gynecologists. Committee Opinion No. 588: Human Papillomavirus Vaccination. Obstet Gynecol . 2014;123(3):712-8. PMID: ...

  9. Immunization with Human Papillomavirus 16 L1+E2 Chimeric Capsomers Elicits Cellular Immune Response and Antitumor Activity in a Mouse Model.

    PubMed

    López-Toledo, Gabriela; Schädlich, Lysann; Alonso-Castro, Ángel Josabad; Monroy-García, Alberto; García-Rocha, Rosario; Guido, Miriam C; Gissmann, Lutz; García-Carrancá, Alejandro

    2016-06-01

    Development of cervical cancer is associated with persistent infections by high-risk human papillomavirus (HPV). Although current HPV L1-based prophylactic vaccines prevent infection, they do not help to eliminate prevalent infections or lesions. Our aims were (i) to generate a vaccine combining prophylactic and therapeutic properties by producing chimeric capsomers after fusion of the L1 protein to different fragments of E2 from HPV 16, and (ii) to evaluate their capacity to generate an antitumoral cellular response, while conserving L1 neutralizing epitopes. Chimeric proteins were produced in Escherichia coli and purified by glutathione S-transferase (GST)-affinity chromatography. Their structure was characterized using size exclusion chromatography, sucrose gradient centrifugation, electron microscopy, and anti-L1 enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. All chimeric proteins form capsomers and heterogeneous aggregates. One, containing part of the carboxy-terminal domain of E2 and its hinge region (L1Δ+E2H/NC, aa 206-307), conserved the neutralizing epitope H16.V5. We then evaluated the capacity of this chimeric protein to induce a cytotoxic T-cell response against HPV 16 E2. In (51)Cr release cytotoxicity assays, splenocytes from C57BL/6 immunized mice recognized and lysed TC-1/E2 cells, which express and present endogenously processed E2 peptides. Moreover, this E2-specific cytotoxic response inhibited the growth of tumors of TC-1/E2 cells in mice. Finally, we identified an epitope (aa 292-301) of E2 involved in this cytotoxic response. We conclude that the L1Δ+E2H/NC chimeric protein produced in bacteria can be an effective and economically interesting candidate for a combined prophylactic and therapeutic vaccine that could help eliminating HPV16-positive low-grade cervical lesions and persistent viral infections, thus preventing the development of lesions and, at the same time, the establishment of new infections. PMID:27058179

  10. Footrot vaccines and vaccination.

    PubMed

    Dhungyel, Om; Hunter, James; Whittington, Richard

    2014-05-30

    Research on footrot in small ruminants, which is caused by Dichelobacter nodosus, has led to development of vaccines and their application for control, treatment and eradication of the disease in sheep. Footrot vaccines have evolved over decades to contain monovalent whole cell, multivalent recombinant fimbrial, and finally mono or bivalent recombinant fimbrial antigens. Initially whole cell vaccines made against the few known serogroups of D. nodosus were found to be inefficient in control of the disease in the field, which was attributed to the presence of other unidentified serogroups and also the use of inefficient adjuvants. Fimbriae or pili, which are the basis for antigenic variation, were found to be the major protective and also curative antigens but they are not cross protective between the different serogroups. Multivalent vaccines incorporating all the known serogroups have been proven to be of limited efficacy due to the phenomenon of antigenic competition. Recent studies in Nepal, Bhutan and Australia have shown that outbreak-specific vaccination which involves targeting identified serogroups with mono- or bivalent recombinant fimbrial vaccines, can be very effective in sheep and goats. Where multiple serogroups are present in a flock, antigenic competition can be overcome by sequentially targeting the serogroups with different bivalent vaccines every 3 months. A common antigen which would confer immunity to all serogroups would be the ideal immunogen but the initial studies were not successful in this area. Until universal antigen/s are available, flock specific mono or bivalent fimbrial vaccines are likely to be the most effective tool for control and eradication of footrot in sheep and goats. Future research in footrot vaccines should be focused on improving the duration of prophylaxis by incorporating new and emerging immunomodulators or adjuvants with modified delivery vehicles, discovering a common antigen and understanding the mechanisms of

  11. Local and systemic immune responses induced by a recombinant chimeric protein containing Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae antigens fused to the B subunit of Escherichia coli heat-labile enterotoxin LTB.

    PubMed

    Marchioro, Silvana Beutinger; Fisch, Andressa; Gomes, Charles K; Jorge, Sérgio; Galli, Vanessa; Haesebrouck, Freddy; Maes, Dominiek; Dellagostin, Odir; Conceição, Fabricio R

    2014-09-17

    A multi-antigen chimera composed of three antigens of Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae (R1, P42, and NrdF) and the mucosal adjuvant Escherichia coli heat-labile enterotoxin B subunit (LTB) was constructed, and its antigenic and immunogenic properties were evaluated in mice and pigs. In addition, we compared the effect of the fusion and co-administration of these proteins in mice. Antibodies against each subunit recognized the chimeric protein. Intranasal and intramuscular immunization of mice with the chimeric protein significantly increased IgG and IgA levels in the serum and tracheobronchial lavages, respectively, against some of the antigens present in the chimeric. Swine immunized with the chimeric protein developed an immune response against all M. hyopneumoniae antigens present in the fusion with a statistically significant difference (P<0.05). The adjuvant rLTB enhanced the immune response in both fused and co-administered antigens; however, better results were obtained with the chimeric protein. This multi-antigen is a promising vaccine candidate that may help control M. hyopneumoniae infection. PMID:25091529

  12. Dephosphorylation of HuR Protein during Alphavirus Infection Is Associated with HuR Relocalization to the Cytoplasm*

    PubMed Central

    Dickson, Alexa M.; Anderson, John R.; Barnhart, Michael D.; Sokoloski, Kevin J.; Oko, Lauren; Opyrchal, Mateusz; Galanis, Evanthia; Wilusz, Carol J.; Morrison, Thomas E.; Wilusz, Jeffrey

    2012-01-01

    We have demonstrated previously that the cellular HuR protein binds U-rich elements in the 3′ untranslated region (UTR) of Sindbis virus RNA and relocalizes from the nucleus to the cytoplasm upon Sindbis virus infection in 293T cells. In this study, we show that two alphaviruses, Ross River virus and Chikungunya virus, lack the conserved high-affinity U-rich HuR binding element in their 3′ UTRs but still maintain the ability to interact with HuR with nanomolar affinities through alternative binding elements. The relocalization of HuR protein occurs during Sindbis infection of multiple mammalian cell types as well as during infections with three other alphaviruses. Interestingly, the relocalization of HuR is not a general cellular reaction to viral infection, as HuR protein remained largely nuclear during infections with dengue and measles virus. Relocalization of HuR in a Sindbis infection required viral gene expression, was independent of the presence of a high-affinity U-rich HuR binding site in the 3′ UTR of the virus, and was associated with an alteration in the phosphorylation state of HuR. Sindbis virus-induced HuR relocalization was mechanistically distinct from the movement of HuR observed during a cellular stress response, as there was no accumulation of caspase-mediated HuR cleavage products. Collectively, these data indicate that virus-induced HuR relocalization to the cytoplasm is specific to alphavirus infections and is associated with distinct posttranslational modifications of this RNA-binding protein. PMID:22915590

  13. A 6K-Deletion Variant of Salmonid Alphavirus Is Non-Viable but Can Be Rescued through RNA Recombination

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Tz-Chun; Johansson, Daniel X.; Haugland, Øyvind; Liljeström, Peter; Evensen, Øystein

    2014-01-01

    Pancreas disease (PD) of Atlantic salmon is an emerging disease caused by Salmonid alphavirus (SAV) which mainly affects salmonid aquaculture in Western Europe. Although genome structure of SAV has been characterized and each individual viral protein has been identified, the role of 6K protein in viral replication and infectivity remains undefined. The 6K protein of alphaviruses is a small and hydrophobic protein which is involved in membrane permeabilization, protein processing and virus budding. Because these common features are shared across many viral species, they have been named viroporins. In the present study, we applied reverse genetics to generate SAV3 6K-deleted (Δ6K) variant and investigate the role of 6K protein. Our findings show that the 6K-deletion variant of salmonid alphavirus is non-viable. Despite viral proteins of Δ6K variant are detected in the cytoplasm by immunostaining, they are not found on the cell surface. Further, analysis of viral proteins produced in Δ6K cDNA clone transfected cells using radioimmunoprecipitation (RIPA) and western blot showed a protein band of larger size than E2 of wild-type SAV3. When Δ6K cDNA was co-transfected with SAV3 helper cDNA encoding the whole structural genes including 6K, the infectivity was rescued. The development of CPE after co-transfection and resolved genome sequence of rescued virus confirmed full-length viral genome being generated through RNA recombination. The discovery of the important role of the 6K protein in virus production provides a new possibility for the development of antiviral intervention which is highly needed to control SAV infection in salmonids. PMID:25009976

  14. Vaccine Hesitancy.

    PubMed

    Jacobson, Robert M; St Sauver, Jennifer L; Finney Rutten, Lila J

    2015-11-01

    Vaccine refusal received a lot of press with the 2015 Disneyland measles outbreak, but vaccine refusal is only a fraction of a much larger problem of vaccine delay and hesitancy. Opposition to vaccination dates back to the 1800 s, Edward Jenner, and the first vaccine ever. It has never gone away despite the public's growing scientific sophistication. A variety of factors contribute to modern vaccine hesitancy, including the layperson's heuristic thinking when it comes to balancing risks and benefits as well as a number of other features of vaccination, including falling victim to its own success. Vaccine hesitancy is pervasive, affecting a quarter to a third of US parents. Clinicians report that they routinely receive requests to delay vaccines and that they routinely acquiesce. Vaccine rates vary by state and locale and by specific vaccine, and vaccine hesitancy results in personal risk and in the failure to achieve or sustain herd immunity to protect others who have contraindications to the vaccine or fail to generate immunity to the vaccine. Clinicians should adopt a variety of practices to combat vaccine hesitancy, including a variety of population health management approaches that go beyond the usual call to educate patients, clinicians, and the public. Strategies include using every visit to vaccinate, the creation of standing orders or nursing protocols to provide vaccination without clinical encounters, and adopting the practice of stating clear recommendations. Up-to-date, trusted resources exist to support clinicians' efforts in adopting these approaches to reduce vaccine hesitancy and its impact. PMID:26541249

  15. [Vaccination perspectives].

    PubMed

    Saliou, P; Plotkin, S

    1994-01-01

    The aim of vaccinology is to improve the available vaccines and to develop new ones in the light of progress in immunology, molecular biology and biotechnologies. But it must go beyond this, and aim to protect all populations and control diseases, even eradicate them where possible. New vaccine strategies must be developed taking into account the epidemiology of diseases and the inherent logistic problems of implementing these strategies under local conditions. There are three major thrusts to the progress of the discipline. The improvement of the vaccines available. One of the drives of vaccinology is not only to deliver vaccines of increasing safety (replacement of the current vaccine for whooping cough with an acellular vaccine for example), but also to improve vaccine efficacy and immunogenicity (in particular for flu, tuberculosis, cholera and rabies vaccines). The optimisation of vaccination programmes and strategies for vaccinations. The ideal is to protect against the greatest possible number of diseases with the smallest number of vaccinations. The development of combinations of vaccines is central to this goal. The objective for the year 2000 is a hexavalent vaccine DTPP Hib HB. The development of new vaccines. Classic techniques continue to be successfully used (inactivated hepatitis A vaccine; attenuated live vaccines for chicken pox and dengue fever; conjugated polyosidic bacterial vaccines for meningococci and Streptococcus pneumoniae). However, it will become possible to prepare vaccines against most transmissible diseases using genetic engineering techniques.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:7921696

  16. Group Size and Nest Spacing Affect Buggy Creek Virus (Togaviridae: Alphavirus) Infection in Nestling House Sparrows

    PubMed Central

    O'Brien, Valerie A.; Brown, Charles R.

    2011-01-01

    The transmission of parasites and pathogens among vertebrates often depends on host population size, host species diversity, and the extent of crowding among potential hosts, but little is known about how these variables apply to most vector-borne pathogens such as the arboviruses (arthropod-borne viruses). Buggy Creek virus (BCRV; Togaviridae: Alphavirus) is an RNA arbovirus transmitted by the swallow bug (Oeciacus vicarius) to the cliff swallow (Petrochelidon pyrrhonota) and the introduced house sparrow (Passer domesticus) that has recently invaded swallow nesting colonies. The virus has little impact on cliff swallows, but house sparrows are seriously affected by BCRV. For house sparrows occupying swallow nesting colonies in western Nebraska, USA, the prevalence of BCRV in nestling sparrows increased with sparrow colony size at a site but decreased with the number of cliff swallows present. If one nestling in a nest was infected with the virus, there was a greater likelihood that one or more of its nest-mates would also be infected than nestlings chosen at random. The closer a nest was to another nest containing infected nestlings, the greater the likelihood that some of the nestlings in the focal nest would be BCRV-positive. These results illustrate that BCRV represents a cost of coloniality for a vertebrate host (the house sparrow), perhaps the first such demonstration for an arbovirus, and that virus infection is spatially clustered within nests and within colonies. The decreased incidence of BCRV in sparrows as cliff swallows at a site increased reflects the “dilution effect,” in which virus transmission is reduced when a vector switches to feeding on a less competent vertebrate host. PMID:21966539

  17. An RNA trapping mechanism in Alphavirus mRNA promotes ribosome stalling and translation initiation

    PubMed Central

    Toribio, René; Díaz-López, Irene; Boskovic, Jasminka; Ventoso, Iván

    2016-01-01

    During translation initiation, eukaryotic initiation factor 2 (eIF2) delivers the Met-tRNA to the 40S ribosomal subunit to locate the initiation codon (AUGi) of mRNA during the scanning process. Stress-induced eIF2 phosphorylation leads to a general blockade of translation initiation and represents a key antiviral pathway in mammals. However, some viral mRNAs can initiate translation in the presence of phosphorylated eIF2 via stable RNA stem-loop structures (DLP; Downstream LooP) located in their coding sequence (CDS), which promote 43S preinitiation complex stalling on the initiation codon. We show here that during the scanning process, DLPs of Alphavirus mRNA become trapped in ES6S region (680–914 nt) of 18S rRNA that are projected from the solvent side of 40S subunit. This trapping can lock the progress of the 40S subunit on the mRNA in a way that places the upstream initiator AUGi on the P site of 40S subunit, obviating the participation of eIF2. Notably, the DLP structure is released from 18S rRNA upon 60S ribosomal subunit joining, suggesting conformational changes in ES6Ss during the initiation process. These novel findings illustrate how viral mRNA is threaded into the 40S subunit during the scanning process, exploiting the topology of the 40S subunit solvent side to enhance its translation in vertebrate hosts. PMID:26984530

  18. Hunting in the Rainforest and Mayaro Virus Infection: An emerging Alphavirus in Ecuador

    PubMed Central

    Izurieta, Ricardo O; Macaluso, Maurizio; Watts, Douglas M; Tesh, Robert B; Guerra, Bolivar; Cruz, Ligia M; Galwankar, Sagar; Vermund, Sten H

    2011-01-01

    Objectives: The objectives of this report were to document the potential presence of Mayaro virus infection in Ecuador and to examine potential risk factors for Mayaro virus infection among the personnel of a military garrison in the Amazonian rainforest. Materials and Methods: The study population consisted of the personnel of a garrison located in the Ecuadorian Amazonian rainforest. The cross-sectional study employed interviews and seroepidemiological methods. Humoral immune response to Mayaro virus infection was assessed by evaluating IgM- and IgG-specific antibodies using ELISA. Results: Of 338 subjects studied, 174 were from the Coastal zone of Ecuador, 73 from Andean zone, and 91 were native to the Amazonian rainforest. Seroprevalence of Mayaro virus infection was more than 20 times higher among Amazonian natives (46%) than among subjects born in other areas (2%). Conclusions: Age and hunting in the rainforest were significant predictors of Mayaro virus infection overall and among Amazonian natives. The results provide the first demonstration of the potential presence of Mayaro virus infection in Ecuador and a systematic evaluation of risk factors for the transmission of this alphavirus. The large difference in prevalence rates between Amazonian natives and other groups and between older and younger natives suggest that Mayaro virus is endemic and enzootic in the rainforest, with sporadic outbreaks that determine differences in risk between birth cohorts of natives. Deep forest hunting may selectively expose native men, descendants of the Shuar and Huaronai ethnic groups, to the arthropod vectors of Mayaro virus in areas close to primate reservoirs. PMID:22223990

  19. An RNA trapping mechanism in Alphavirus mRNA promotes ribosome stalling and translation initiation.

    PubMed

    Toribio, René; Díaz-López, Irene; Boskovic, Jasminka; Ventoso, Iván

    2016-05-19

    During translation initiation, eukaryotic initiation factor 2 (eIF2) delivers the Met-tRNA to the 40S ribosomal subunit to locate the initiation codon (AUGi) of mRNA during the scanning process. Stress-induced eIF2 phosphorylation leads to a general blockade of translation initiation and represents a key antiviral pathway in mammals. However, some viral mRNAs can initiate translation in the presence of phosphorylated eIF2 via stable RNA stem-loop structures (DLP; Downstream LooP) located in their coding sequence (CDS), which promote 43S preinitiation complex stalling on the initiation codon. We show here that during the scanning process, DLPs of Alphavirus mRNA become trapped in ES6S region (680-914 nt) of 18S rRNA that are projected from the solvent side of 40S subunit. This trapping can lock the progress of the 40S subunit on the mRNA in a way that places the upstream initiator AUGi on the P site of 40S subunit, obviating the participation of eIF2. Notably, the DLP structure is released from 18S rRNA upon 60S ribosomal subunit joining, suggesting conformational changes in ES6Ss during the initiation process. These novel findings illustrate how viral mRNA is threaded into the 40S subunit during the scanning process, exploiting the topology of the 40S subunit solvent side to enhance its translation in vertebrate hosts. PMID:26984530

  20. Dissociation between peripheral blood chimerism and tolerance to hindlimb composite tissue transplants: preferential localization of chimerism in donor bone

    PubMed Central

    Rahhal, Dina N.; Xu, Hong; Huang, Wei-Chao; Wu, Shengli; Wen, Yujie; Huang, Yiming; Ildstad, Suzanne T.

    2009-01-01

    Background Mixed chimerism induces donor-specific tolerance to composite tissue allotransplants (CTA). In the present studies, we used a nonmyeloablative conditioning approach to establish chimerism and promote CTA acceptance. Methods WF (RT1Au) rats were conditioned with 600-300 cGy total body irradiation (TBI, day-1), 100 × 106 T cell-depleted ACI (RT1Aabl) bone marrow cells were transplanted day 0, followed by a 11-day course of tacrolimus and one dose of anti-lymphocyte serum (day 10). Heterotopic osteomyocutaneous flap transplantation was performed 4-6 weeks after bone marrow transplantation. Results Mixed chimerism was initially achieved in almost all recipients, but long-term acceptance of CTA was only achieved in rats treated with 600 cGy TBI. When anti-αβ-TCR mAb (day-3) was added into the regimens, donor chimerism was similar to recipients preconditioned without anti-αβ-TCR mAb. However, the long-term CTA survival was significantly improved in chimeras receiving ≥ 300 cGy TBI plus anti-αβ-TCR mAb. Higher levels of donor chimerism were associated with CTA acceptance. The majority of flap-acceptors lost peripheral blood (PB) chimerism within 6 months. However, donor chimerism persisted in transplanted bone at significantly higher levels compared to other hematopoietic compartments. The compartment donor chimerism may be responsible for the maintenance of tolerance to CTA. Long-term acceptors were tolerant to a donor skin graft challenge even in the absence of PB chimerism. Conclusions Mixed chimerism established by nonmyeloablative conditioning induces long-term acceptance of CTA which is associated with persistent chimerism preferentially in transplanted donor bone. PMID:19920776

  1. Dengue vaccine: a valuable asset for the future.

    PubMed

    Jindal, Harashish; Bhatt, Bhumika; Malik, Jagbir Singh; S K, Shashikantha

    2014-01-01

    Dengue has emerged as one of the major global public health problems. The disease has broken out of its shell and has spread due to increased international travel and climatic changes. Globally, over 2.5 billion people accounting for >40% of the world's population are at risk from dengue. Since the 1940s, dengue vaccines have been under investigation. A live-attenuated tetravalent vaccine based on chimeric yellow fever-dengue virus (CYD-TDV) has progressed to phase III efficacy studies. Dengue vaccine has been found to be a cost-effective intervention to reduce morbidity and mortality. Current dengue vaccine candidates aim to protect against the 4 dengue serotypes, but the recent discovery of a fifth serotype could complicate vaccine development. In recent years, an urgent need has been felt for a vaccine to prevent the morbidity and mortality from this disease in a cost-effective way. PMID:25424928

  2. Construction and Immunogenicity Evaluation of Recombinant Influenza A Viruses Containing Chimeric Hemagglutinin Genes Derived from Genetically Divergent Influenza A H1N1 Subtype Viruses

    PubMed Central

    McCormick, Kara; Jiang, Zhiyong; Zhu, Longchao; Lawson, Steven R.; Langenhorst, Robert; Ransburgh, Russell; Brunick, Colin; Tracy, Miranda C.; Hurtig, Heather R.; Mabee, Leah M.; Mingo, Mark; Li, Yanhua; Webby, Richard J.

    2015-01-01

    Background and Objectives Influenza A viruses cause highly contagious diseases in a variety of hosts, including humans and pigs. To develop a vaccine that can be broadly effective against genetically divergent strains of the virus, in this study we employed molecular breeding (DNA shuffling) technology to create a panel of chimeric HA genes. Methods and Results Each chimeric HA gene contained genetic elements from parental swine influenza A viruses that had a history of zoonotic transmission, and also from a 2009 pandemic virus. Each parental virus represents a major phylogenetic clade of influenza A H1N1 viruses. Nine shuffled HA constructs were initially screened for immunogenicity in mice by DNA immunization, and one chimeric HA (HA-129) was expressed on both a A/Puerto Rico/8/34 backbone with mutations associated with a live, attenuated phenotype (PR8LAIV-129) and a A/swine/Texas/4199-2/98 backbone (TX98-129). When delivered to mice, the PR8LAIV-129 induced antibodies against all four parental viruses, which was similar to the breadth of immunity observed when HA-129 was delivered as a DNA vaccine. This chimeric HA was then tested as a candidate vaccine in a nursery pig model, using inactivated TX98-129 virus as the backbone. The results demonstrate that pigs immunized with HA-129 developed antibodies against all four parental viruses, as well as additional primary swine H1N1 influenza virus field isolates. Conclusion This study established a platform for creating novel genes of influenza viruses using a molecular breeding approach, which will have important applications toward future development of broadly protective influenza virus vaccines. PMID:26061265

  3. Dengue vaccine development: strategies and challenges.

    PubMed

    Ramakrishnan, Lakshmy; Pillai, Madhavan Radhakrishna; Nair, Radhakrishnan R

    2015-03-01

    Infection with dengue virus may result in dengue fever or a more severe outcome, such as dengue hemorrhagic syndrome/shock. Dengue virus infection poses a threat to endemic regions for four reasons: the presence of four serotypes, each with the ability to cause a similar disease outcome, including fatality; difficulties related to vector control; the lack of specific treatment; and the nonavailability of a suitable vaccine. Vaccine development is considered challenging due to the severity of the disease observed in individuals who have acquired dengue-specific immunity, either passively or actively. Therefore, the presence of vaccine-induced immunity against a particular serotype may prime an individual to severe disease on exposure to dengue virus. Vaccine development strategies include live attenuated vaccines, chimeric, DNA-based, subunit, and inactivated vaccines. Each of the candidates is in various stages of preclinical and clinical development. Issues pertaining to selection pressures, viral interaction, and safety still need to be evaluated in order to induce a complete protective immune response against all four serotypes. This review highlights the various strategies that have been employed in vaccine development, and identifies the obstacles to producing a safe and effective vaccine. PMID:25494228

  4. A transgenic plant cell-suspension system for expression of epitopes on chimeric Bamboo mosaic virus particles.

    PubMed

    Muthamilselvan, Thangarasu; Lee, Chin-Wei; Cho, Yu-Hsin; Wu, Feng-Chao; Hu, Chung-Chi; Liang, Yu-Chuan; Lin, Na-Sheng; Hsu, Yau-Heiu

    2016-01-01

    We describe a novel strategy to produce vaccine antigens using a plant cell-suspension culture system in lieu of the conventional bacterial or animal cell-culture systems. We generated transgenic cell-suspension cultures from Nicotiana benthamiana leaves carrying wild-type or chimeric Bamboo mosaic virus (BaMV) expression constructs encoding the viral protein 1 (VP1) epitope of foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV). Antigens accumulated to high levels in BdT38 and BdT19 transgenic cell lines co-expressing silencing suppressor protein P38 or P19. BaMV chimeric virus particles (CVPs) were subsequently purified from the respective cell lines (1.5 and 2.1 mg CVPs/20 g fresh weight of suspended biomass, respectively), and the resulting CVPs displayed VP1 epitope on the surfaces. Guinea pigs vaccinated with purified CVPs produced humoral antibodies. This study represents an important advance in the large-scale production of immunopeptide vaccines in a cost-effective manner using a plant cell-suspension culture system. PMID:25879277

  5. Japanese encephalitis and vaccines: past and future prospects.

    PubMed

    Paulke-Korinek, Maria; Kollaritsch, Herwig

    2008-01-01

    The Japanese encephalitis virus is the main cause of encephalitis in Asia. The vectors are mosquitoes. Every year 30,000 to 50,000 cases and 10,000 deaths from Japanese encephalitis are reported, and estimates go up to 100,000 cases. No effective antiviral therapy exists to treat this flavivirus infection. For prophylaxis vaccines are available. In Asia numerous vaccines are used regionally. The production of the only vaccine that was internationally licensed, JE-VAX, was ceased in 2005. Therefore a shortage of Japanese encephalitis vaccines might occur before new generation vaccines based on cell cultures will be available. An inactivated Vero cell-derived vaccine based on the Beijing-1 strain is developed in Japan by Biken and Kaketsuken. Another promising vaccine candidate is the inactivated whole-virus vaccine IC-51 (Strain SA14-14-2) by the Austrian company Intercell. The third interesting vaccine candidate being in the late stages of clinical trials is the genetically engineered, chimeric and live-attenuated vaccine ChimeriVaxtrade mark-JE by the UK/USA-based company Acambis. The new vaccines in the pipeline show promising results and market licensures are expected in the near future. Showing excellent tolerability, these vaccines will not only be used in the population living in endemic areas where the risk of infection is extremely high, but also for travellers and military personnel. PMID:19066766

  6. Novel recombinant chimeric virus-like particle is immunogenic and protective against both enterovirus 71 and coxsackievirus A16 in mice.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Hui; Li, Hao-Yang; Han, Jian-Feng; Deng, Yong-Qiang; Zhu, Shun-Ya; Li, Xiao-Feng; Yang, Hui-Qin; Li, Yue-Xiang; Zhang, Yu; Qin, E-De; Chen, Rong; Qin, Cheng-Feng

    2015-01-01

    Hand-foot-and-mouth disease (HFMD) has been recognized as an important global public health issue, which is predominantly caused by enterovirus 71 (EV-A71) and coxsackievirus A16 (CVA16). There is no available vaccine against HFMD. An ideal HFMD vaccine should be bivalent against both EV-A71 and CVA16. Here, a novel strategy to produce bivalent HFMD vaccine based on chimeric EV-A71 virus-like particles (ChiEV-A71 VLPs) was proposed and illustrated. The neutralizing epitope SP70 within the capsid protein VP1 of EV-A71 was replaced with that of CVA16 in ChiEV-A71 VLPs. Structural modeling revealed that the replaced CVA16-SP70 epitope is well exposed on the surface of ChiEV-A71 VLPs. These VLPs produced in Saccharomyces cerevisiae exhibited similarity in both protein composition and morphology as naive EV-A71 VLPs. Immunization with ChiEV-A71 VLPs in mice elicited robust Th1/Th2 dependent immune responses against EV-A71 and CVA16. Furthermore, passive immunization with anti-ChiEV-A71 VLPs sera conferred full protection against lethal challenge of both EV-A71 and CVA16 infection in neonatal mice. These results suggested that this chimeric vaccine, ChiEV-A71 might have the potential to be further developed as a bivalent HFMD vaccine in the near future. Such chimeric enterovirus VLPs provide an alternative platform for bivalent HFMD vaccine development. PMID:25597595

  7. Novel Inhibitors of Neurotropic Alphavirus Replication That Improve Host Survival in a Mouse Model of Acute Viral Encephalitis

    PubMed Central

    Sindac, Janice; Yestrepsky, Bryan D.; Barraza, Scott J.; Bolduc, Kyle L.; Blakely, Pennelope K.; Keep, Richard F.; Irani, David N.; Miller, David J.; Larsen, Scott D.

    2012-01-01

    Arboviral encephalitis is a potentially devastating human disease with no approved therapies that target virus replication. We previously discovered a novel class of thieno[3,2-b]pyrrole-based inhibitors active against neurotropic alphaviruses such as western equine encephalitis virus (WEEV) in cultured cells. In this report we describe initial development of these novel antiviral compounds, including bioisosteric replacement of the 4H-thieno[3,2-b]pyrrole core with indole to improve metabolic stability and the introduction of chirality to assess target enantioselectivity. Selected modifications enhanced antiviral activity while maintaining low cytotoxicity, increased stability to microsomal metabolism, and also revealed striking enantiospecific activity in cultured cells. Furthermore, we demonstrate improved outcomes (both symptoms and survival) following treatment with indole analog 9h (CCG-203926) in an in vivo mouse model of alphaviral encephalitis that closely correlate with the enantiospecific in vitro antiviral activity. These results represent a substantial advancement in the early preclinical development of a promising class of novel antiviral drugs against virulent neurotropic alphaviruses. PMID:22428985

  8. The 5' and 3' ends of alphavirus RNAs – non-coding is not non-functional

    PubMed Central

    Hyde, Jennifer L.; Chen, Rubing; Trobaugh, Derek W.; Diamond, Michael S.; Weaver, Scott C.; Klimstra, William B.; Wilusz, Jeffrey

    2015-01-01

    The non-coding regions found at the 5' and 3' ends of alphavirus genomes regulate viral gene expression, replication, translation and virus-host interactions, which have significant implications for viral evolution, host range, and pathogenesis. The functions of these non-coding regions are mediated by a combination of linear sequence and structural elements. The capped 5' untranslated region (UTR) contains promoter elements, translational regulatory sequences that modulate dependence on cellular translation factors, and structures that help to avoid innate immune defenses. The polyadenylated 3' UTR contains highly conserved sequence elements for viral replication, binding sites for cellular miRNAs that determine cell tropism, host range, and pathogenesis, and conserved binding regions for a cellular protein that influences viral RNA stability. Nonetheless, there are additional conserved elements in non-coding regions of the virus (e.g., the repeated sequence elements in the 3' UTR) whose function remains obscure. Thus, key questions remain as to the function of these short yet influential untranslated segments of alphavirus RNAs. PMID:25630058

  9. A novel dengue virus serotype 1 vaccine candidate based on Japanese encephalitis virus vaccine strain SA14-14-2 as the backbone.

    PubMed

    Yang, Huiqiang; Li, Zhushi; Lin, Hua; Wang, Wei; Yang, Jian; Liu, Lina; Zeng, Xianwu; Wu, Yonglin; Yu, Yongxin; Li, Yuhua

    2016-06-01

    To develop a potential dengue vaccine candidate, a full-length cDNA clone of a novel chimeric virus was constructed using recombinant DNA technology, with Japanese encephalitis virus (JEV) vaccine strain SA14-14-2 as the backbone, with its premembrane (prM) and envelope (E) genes substituted by their counterparts from dengue virus type 1 (DENV1). The chimeric virus (JEV/DENV1) was successfully recovered from primary hamster kidney (PHK) cells by transfection with the in vitro transcription products of JEV/DENV1 cDNA and was identified by complete genome sequencing and immunofluorescent staining. No neuroinvasiveness of this chimeric virus was observed in mice inoculated by the subcutaneous route (s.c.) or by the intraperitoneal route (i.p.), while some neurovirulence was displayed in mice that were inoculated directly by the intracerebral route (i.c.). The chimeric virus was able to stimulate high-titer production of antibodies against DENV1 and provided protection against lethal challenge with neuroadapted dengue virus in mice. These results suggest that the chimeric virus is a promising dengue vaccine candidate. PMID:26976137

  10. Design and Construction of Chimeric VP8-S2 Antigen for Bovine Rotavirus and Bovine Coronavirus

    PubMed Central

    Nasiri, Khadijeh; Nassiri, Mohammadreza; Tahmoorespur, Mojtaba; Haghparast, Alireza; Zibaee, Saeed

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: Bovine Rotavirus and Bovine Coronavirus are the most important causes of diarrhea in newborn calves and in some other species such as pigs and sheep. Rotavirus VP8 subunit is the major determinant of the viral infectivity and neutralization. Spike glycoprotein of coronavirus is responsible for induction of neutralizing antibody response. Methods: In the present study, several prediction programs were used to predict B and T-cells epitopes, secondary and tertiary structures, antigenicity ability and enzymatic degradation sites. Finally, a chimeric antigen was designed using computational techniques. The chimeric VP8-S2 antigen was constructed. It was cloned and sub-cloned into pGH and pET32a(+) expression vector. The recombinant pET32a(+)-VP8-S2 vector was transferred into E.oli BL21CodonPlus (DE3) as expression host. The recombinant VP8-S2 protein was purified by Ni-NTA chromatography column. Results: The results of colony PCR, enzyme digestion and sequencing showed that the VP8-S2 chimeric antigen has been successfully cloned and sub-cloned into pGH and pET32a(+).The results showed that E.coli was able to express VP8-S2 protein appropriately. This protein was expressed by induction of IPTG at concentration of 1mM and it was confirmed by Ni–NTA column, dot-blotting analysis and SDS-PAGE electrophoresis. Conclusion: The results of this study showed that E.coli can be used as an appropriate host to produce the recombinant VP8-S2 protein. This recombinant protein may be suitable to investigate to produce immunoglobulin, recombinant vaccine and diagnostic kit in future studies after it passes biological activity tests in vivo in animal model and or other suitable procedure. PMID:27123423