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Sample records for chiral vibrational spectroscopy

  1. Chiral Vibrational Structures of Proteins at Interfaces Probed by Sum Frequency Generation Spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Fu, Li; Wang, Zhuguang; Yan, Elsa C.Y.

    2011-01-01

    We review the recent development of chiral sum frequency generation (SFG) spectroscopy and its applications to study chiral vibrational structures at interfaces. This review summarizes observations of chiral SFG signals from various molecular systems and describes the molecular origins of chiral SFG response. It focuses on the chiral vibrational structures of proteins and presents the chiral SFG spectra of proteins at interfaces in the C-H stretch, amide I, and N-H stretch regions. In particular, a combination of chiral amide I and N-H stretches of the peptide backbone provides highly characteristic vibrational signatures, unique to various secondary structures, which demonstrate the capacity of chiral SFG spectroscopy to distinguish protein secondary structures at interfaces. On the basis of these recent developments, we further discuss the advantages of chiral SFG spectroscopy and its potential application in various fields of science and technology. We conclude that chiral SFG spectroscopy can be a new approach to probe chiral vibrational structures of protein at interfaces, providing structural and dynamic information to study in situ and in real time protein structures and dynamics at interfaces. PMID:22272140

  2. Quantitative Surface Chirality Detection with Sum Frequency Generation Vibrational Spectroscopy: Twin Polarization Angle Approach

    SciTech Connect

    Wei, Feng; Xu, Yanyan; Guo, Yuan; Liu, Shi-lin; Wang, Hongfei

    2009-12-27

    Here we report a novel twin polarization angle (TPA) approach in the quantitative chirality detection with the surface sum-frequency generation vibrational spectroscopy (SFG-VS). Generally, the achiral contribution dominates the surface SFG-VS signal, and the pure chiral signal is usually two or three orders of magnitude smaller. Therefore, it has been difficult to make quantitative detection and analysis of the chiral contributions to the surface SFG- VS signal. In the TPA method, by varying together the polarization angles of the incoming visible light and the sum frequency signal at fixed s or p polarization of the incoming infrared beam, the polarization dependent SFG signal can give not only direct signature of the chiral contribution in the total SFG-VS signal, but also the accurate measurement of the chiral and achiral components in the surface SFG signal. The general description of the TPA method is presented and the experiment test of the TPA approach is also presented for the SFG-VS from the S- and R-limonene chiral liquid surfaces. The most accurate degree of chiral excess values thus obtained for the 2878 cm⁻¹ spectral peak of the S- and R-limonene liquid surfaces are (23.7±0.4)% and ({25.4±1.3)%, respectively.

  3. Intrinsic Chirality and Prochirality at Air/R-(+)- and S-(-)-Limonene Interfaces: Spectral Signatures with Interference Chiral Sum-Frequency Generation Vibrational Spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Fu, Li; Zhang, Yun; Wei, Zhehao; Wang, Hongfei

    2014-06-04

    We report in this work detailed measurements on the chiral and achiral sum-frequency vibrational spectra in the C-H stretching vibration region (2800-3050cm-1) of the air/liquid interfaces of R-limonene and S-limonene, using the recently developed high-resolution broadband sum-frequency generation vibrational spectroscopy (HR-BB-SFG-VS). The achiral SFG spectra of R-limonene and S-limonene, as well as the equal amount (50/50) racemic mixture show that the enantiomers are with the same interfacial orientations. The interference chiral SFG spectra of the limonene enantiomers exhibit spectral signature from chiral response of the Cα-H stretching mode, and spectral signature from prochiral response of the CH2 asymmetric stretching mode, respectively. The chiral spectral feature of the Cα-H stretching mode changes sign from R-limonene to S-limonene, and disappears for the 50/50 racemic mixture. While the prochiral spectral feature of the CH2 asymmetric stretching mode is the same for R-limonene and S-limonene, and also surprisingly remains the same for the 50/50 racemic mixture. These results provided detail information in understanding the structure and chirality of molecular interfaces, and demonstrated the sensitivity and potential of SFG-VS as unique spectroscopic tool for chirality characterization and chiral recognition at the molecular interface.

  4. Absolute configuration and predominant conformations of a chiral crown ether-based colorimetric sensor: a vibrational circular dichroism spectroscopy and DFT study of chiral recognition.

    PubMed

    Merten, Christian; Hyun, Myung Ho; Xu, Yunjie

    2013-05-01

    In the present work, we report a comprehensive vibrational circular dichroism (VCD) spectroscopic study of a chiral crown ether which features an axial chiral 3.3'-diphenyl-1,1'-binaphthyl group as chiral moiety. By comparing the experimental and calculated VCD spectra, we show that the presumably very flexible crown ether preferably adopts only one ring conformation. Conformational flexibility is observed in the 2,4-dinitrophenyl-diazophenol group, which was previously introduced for colorimetric detection of primary amines and amino alcohols (Cho et al., Chirality 2011;23:349-353). The VCD spectra of the host-guest complexes with phenyl glycinol (PG) and phenyl alaninol have been studied as well. Based on the spectra calculated, it is shown that the diastereomeric complexes in general can be differentiated using VCD spectroscopy. Furthermore, the experimental VCD spectra of the complexes of the host molecule with PG support the above finding. PMID:23620265

  5. Chiral recognition between lactic acid derivatives and an aromatic alcohol in a supersonic expansion: electronic and vibrational spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Seurre, N; Le Barbu-Debus, K; Lahmani, F; Zehnacker, A; Borho, N; Suhm, M A

    2006-02-28

    Jet-cooled diastereoisomeric complexes formed between a chiral probe, (+/-)-2-naphthyl-1-ethanol, and chiral lactic acid derivatives have been characterised by laser-induced fluorescence and IR fluorescence-dip spectroscopy. Complexes with non chiral alpha-hydroxyesters and chiral beta-hydroxyesters have also been studied for the sake of comparison. DFT calculations have been performed to assist in the analysis of the vibrational spectra and the determination of the structures. The observed 1 : 1 complexes correspond to the addition of the hydroxy group of the chromophore on the oxygen atom of the hydroxy in alpha-position relative to the ester function. Moreover, (+/-)-methyl lactate and (+/-)-ethyl lactate complexes with (+/-)-2-naphthyl-1-ethanol show an enantioselectivity in the size of the formed adducts: while fluorescent 1 : 1 complexes are the most abundant species observed when mixing (S)-2-naphthyl-1-ethanol with (R)-methyl or ethyl lactate, they are absent in the case of the SS mixture, which only shows 1 : 2 adducts. This property has been related to steric hindrance brought by the methyl group on the hydroxy-bearing carbon atom. PMID:16482344

  6. Determination of the absolute configuration of pentacoordinate chiral phosphorus compounds in solution by using vibrational circular dichroism spectroscopy and density functional theory.

    PubMed

    Yang, Guochun; Xu, Yunjie; Hou, Jianbo; Zhang, Hui; Zhao, Yufen

    2010-02-22

    Vibrational circular dichroism (VCD) spectroscopic measurements and density functional theory (DFT) calculations have been used to obtain the absolute structural information about four sets of diastereomers of pentacoordinate spirophosphoranes derived separately from l- (or d-) valine and l- (or d-) leucine for the first time. Each compound contains three stereogenic centers: one at the phosphorus center and two at the amino acid ligands. Extensive conformational searches for the compounds have been carried out and their vibrational absorption (VA) and VCD spectra have been simulated at the B3LYP/6-311++G** level. Although both VA and VCD spectra are highly sensitive to the structural variation of the apical axis, that is, the O-P-O or N-P-O arrangement, the rotamers generated by the aliphatic amino side chains show little effect on both. The dominant experimental VCD features in the 1100-1500 cm(-1) region were found to be controlled by the chirality at the phosphorus center, whereas those at the C=O stretching region are determined by the chirality of the amino acid ligands. The good agreement between the experimental VA and VCD spectra in CDCl(3) solution and the simulated ones allows us to assign the absolute configurations of these pentacoordinate phosphorus compounds with high confidence. This study shows that the VCD spectroscopy complemented with DFT calculations is a powerful and reliable method for determining the absolute configurations and dominating conformers of synthetic phosphorus coordination complexes in solution. PMID:20077536

  7. Vibrational evidence for chiral recognition phenomena in vacuo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suhm, Martin A.

    2007-06-01

    Molecules and molecular conformations which cannot be superimposed on their mirror image are chiral. Chirality or handedness plays an important role throughout the life sciences. When two molecules interact, they can sense their relative handedness, giving rise to spectroscopic signatures of chiral recognition. This is often mediated by hydrogen bonds, most versatile and directional intermolecular interactions. If the distinction between the homo- and heteroconfigurational pairs of molecules is large enough, chiral discrimination, i.e. differences in abundance may occur. The contact between two flexible, transiently chiral molecules may induce a matching of their handedness, i.e. chirality synchronization. Such phenomena are best studied at low temperatures in vacuum isolation, without perturbing interactions [1]. Structural information on the isolated molecular complexes can be obtained by rotational spectroscopy [2], if there is a sufficient dipole moment. Vibrational spectroscopy [3] provides a more universal, but also more coarse-grained access to these phenomena. Our group has reported the first spectroscopic example of chiral recognition between constitutionally identical molecules in the gas phase [4]. We have found a case of chiral discrimination in tetrameric aggregates of methyl lactate, where the relative configuration controls the hydrogen bond topology [5]. In the case of alcohols, we have observed different degrees of chirality synchronization up to a quantitative chirality matching in dimers of trifluoroethanol [6]. These discoveries became possible through the use of a powerful combination of FTIR spectroscopy and high-throughput, pulsed supersonic nozzle expansions into large vacuum chambers [7]. The isolated and elementary character of the investigated molecular assemblies is favourable for quantum chemical treatments [8]. Valuable benchmarks for the modeling of more complex chiral recognition phenomena are thus established. [1] A. Al-Rabaa, E. Br

  8. 2008 Vibrational Spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Philip J. Reid

    2009-09-21

    The conference focuses on using vibrational spectroscopy to probe structure and dynamics of molecules in gases, liquids, and interfaces. The goal is to bring together a collection of researchers who share common interests and who will gain from discussing work at the forefront of several connected areas. The intent is to emphasize the insights and understanding that studies of vibrations provide about a variety of systems.

  9. Communication: The influence of vibrational parity in chiral photoionization dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Powis, Ivan

    2014-03-21

    A pronounced vibrational state dependence of photoelectron angular distributions observed in chiral photoionization experiments is explored using a simple, yet realistic, theoretical model based upon the transiently chiral molecule H{sub 2}O{sub 2}. The adiabatic approximation is used to separate vibrational and electronic wavefunctions. The full ionization matrix elements are obtained as an average of the electronic dipole matrix elements over the vibrational coordinate, weighted by the product of neutral and ion state vibrational wavefunctions. It is found that the parity of the vibrational Hermite polynomials influences not just the amplitude, but also the phase of the transition matrix elements, and the latter is sufficient, even in the absence of resonant enhancements, to account for enhanced vibrational dependencies in the chiral photoionization dynamics.

  10. Optimized interferometric setup for chiral and achiral ultrafast IR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Dutta, Biplab; Helbing, Jan

    2015-06-15

    We report an actively stabilized interferometer-based set-up for the detection of vibrational circular dichroism (VCD) and optical rotatory dispersion (VORD) with femtosecond laser pulses. Our approach combines and improves elements of several previous measurement strategies, including signal amplification in a crossed polarizer configuration, precise control and modulation of polarization, phase stability, tight focusing, broad-band detection and spectral interferometry. Their importance for static and transient measurements is motivated by a signal analysis based on Jones matrices and response theory. Only depending on the pump-beam polarization, the set-up can selectively detect transient VCD and VORD or transient linear birefringence (LB) and linear dichroism (LD), which usually constitute the dominant artifacts in the chiral measurements. For illustration we present transient LB and LD data of an achiral Rhenium carbonyl complex, detected simultaneously by spectral interferometry, and we analyze residual background signals in the experimental configuration for transient chiral spectroscopy. PMID:26193616

  11. Vibrational spectroscopy of resveratrol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Billes, Ferenc; Mohammed-Ziegler, Ildikó; Mikosch, Hans; Tyihák, Ernő

    2007-11-01

    In this article the authors deal with the experimental and theoretical interpretation of the vibrational spectra of trans-resveratrol (3,5,4'-trihydroxy- trans-stilbene) of diverse beneficial biological activity. Infrared and Raman spectra of the compound were recorded; density functional calculations were carried out resulting in the optimized geometry and several properties of the molecule. Based on the calculated force constants, a normal coordinate analysis yielded the character of the vibrational modes and the assignment of the measured spectral bands.

  12. Chiral Molecules Revisited by Broadband Microwave Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schnell, Melanie

    2014-06-01

    Chiral molecules have fascinated chemists for more than 150 years. While their physical properties are to a very good approximation identical, the two enantiomers of a chiral molecule can have completely different (bio)chemical activities. For example, the right-handed enantiomer of carvone smells of spearmint while the left-handed one smells of caraway. In addition, the active components of many drugs are of one specific handedness, such as in the case of ibuprofen. However, in nature as well as in pharmaceutical applications, chiral molecules often exist in mixtures with other chiral molecules. The analysis of these complex mixtures to identify the molecular components, to determine which enantiomers are present, and to measure the enantiomeric excesses (ee) remains a challenging task for analytical chemistry, despite its importance for modern drug development. We present here a new method of differentiating enantiomers of chiral molecules in the gas phase based on broadband rotational spectroscopy. The phase of the acquired signal bares the signature of the enantiomer, as it depends upon the combined quantity, μ_a μ_b μ_c, which is of opposite sign between enantiomers. It thus also provides information on the absolute configuration of the particular enantiomer. Furthermore, the signal amplitude is proportional to the ee. A significant advantage of our technique is its inherent mixture compatibility due to the fingerprint-like character of rotational spectra. In this contribution, we will introduce the technique and present our latest results on chiral molecule spectroscopy and enantiomer differentiation. D. Patterson, M. Schnell, J.M. Doyle, Nature 497 (2013) 475-477 V.A. Shubert, D. Schmitz, D. Patterson, J.M. Doyle, M. Schnell, Angewandte Chemie International Edition 53 (2014) 1152-1155

  13. Coherence specific signal detection via chiral pump-probe spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Holdaway, David I H; Collini, Elisabetta; Olaya-Castro, Alexandra

    2016-05-21

    We examine transient circular dichroism (TRCD) spectroscopy as a technique to investigate signatures of exciton coherence dynamics under the influence of structured vibrational environments. We consider a pump-probe configuration with a linearly polarized pump and a circularly polarized probe, with a variable angle θ between the two directions of propagation. In our theoretical formalism the signal is decomposed in chiral and achiral doorway and window functions. Using this formalism, we show that the chiral doorway component, which beats during the population time, can be isolated by comparing signals with different values of θ. As in the majority of time-resolved pump-probe spectroscopy, the overall TRCD response shows signatures of both excited and ground state dynamics. However, we demonstrate that the chiral doorway function has only a weak ground state contribution, which can generally be neglected if an impulsive pump pulse is used. These findings suggest that the pump-probe configuration of optical TRCD in the impulsive limit has the potential to unambiguously probe quantum coherence beating in the excited state. We present numerical results for theoretical signals in an example dimer system. PMID:27208941

  14. TIME-RESOLVED VIBRATIONAL SPECTROSCOPY

    SciTech Connect

    Andrei Tokmakoff, MIT; Paul Champion, Northeastern University; Edwin J. Heilweil, NIST; Keith A. Nelson, MIT; Larry Ziegler, Boston University

    2009-05-14

    This document contains the Proceedings from the 14th International Conference on Time-Resolved Vibrational Spectroscopy, which was held in Meredith, NH from May 9-14, 2009. The study of molecular dynamics in chemical reaction and biological processes using time-resolved spectroscopy plays an important role in our understanding of energy conversion, storage, and utilization problems. Fundamental studies of chemical reactivity, molecular rearrangements, and charge transport are broadly supported by the DOE’s Office of Science because of their role in the development of alternative energy sources, the understanding of biological energy conversion processes, the efficient utilization of existing energy resources, and the mitigation of reactive intermediates in radiation chemistry. In addition, time-resolved spectroscopy is central to all five of DOE’s grand challenges for fundamental energy science. The Time-Resolved Vibrational Spectroscopy conference is organized biennially to bring the leaders in this field from around the globe together with young scientists to discuss the most recent scientific and technological advances. The latest technology in ultrafast infrared, Raman, and terahertz spectroscopy and the scientific advances that these methods enable were covered. Particular emphasis was placed on new experimental methods used to probe molecular dynamics in liquids, solids, interfaces, nanostructured materials, and biomolecules.

  15. Soil chemical insights provided through vibrational spectroscopy

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Vibrational spectroscopy techniques provide a powerful approach to study environmental materials and processes. These multifunctional analysis tools can be used to probe molecular vibrations of solid, liquid, and gaseous samples for characterizing materials, elucidating reaction mechanisms, and exam...

  16. Vibrational spectroscopy of photosystem I.

    PubMed

    Hastings, Gary

    2015-01-01

    to that used in time-resolved step-scan FTIR measurements. In this article the latest work that has been undertaken using both visible and infrared time resolved spectroscopies on the same sample will be described. Finally, vibrational spectroscopic data that has been obtained for phylloquinone in the A1 binding site in photosystem I is compared to corresponding data for ubiquinone in the QA binding site in purple bacterial reaction centers. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Vibrational spectroscopies and bioenergetic systems. PMID:25086273

  17. Chirality transfer from gold nanocluster to adsorbate evidenced by vibrational circular dichroism

    PubMed Central

    Dolamic, Igor; Varnholt, Birte; Bürgi, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    The transfer of chirality from one set of molecules to another is fundamental for applications in chiral technology and has likely played a crucial role for establishing homochirality on earth. Here we show that an intrinsically chiral gold cluster can transfer its handedness to an achiral molecule adsorbed on its surface. Solutions of chiral Au38(2-PET)24 (2-PET=2-phenylethylthiolate) cluster enantiomers show strong vibrational circular dichroism (VCD) signals in vibrations of the achiral adsorbate. Density functional theory (DFT) calculations reveal that 2-PET molecules adopt a chiral conformation. Chirality transfer from the cluster to the achiral adsorbate is responsible for the preference of one of the two mirror images. Intermolecular interactions between the adsorbed molecules on the crowded cluster surface seem to play a dominant role for the phenomena. Such chirality transfer from metals to adsorbates likely plays an important role in heterogeneous enantioselective catalysis. PMID:25960309

  18. Vibrational spectroscopy of water interfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Du, Q.

    1994-12-01

    The second order nonlinear optical processes of second harmonic generation and sum frequency generation are powerful and versatile tools for studying all kinds of surfaces. They possess unusual surface sensitivity due to the symmetry properties of the second order nonlinear susceptibility. The technique of infrared-visible sum frequency generation (SFG) is particularly attractive because it offers a viable way to do vibrational spectroscopy on any surfaces accessible to light with submonolayer sensitivity. In this thesis, the author applies SFG to study a number of important water interfaces. At the air/water interface, hydrophobic solid/water and liquid/water interfaces, it was found that approximately 25% of surface water molecules have one of their hydrogen pointing away from the liquid water. The large number of unsatisfied hydrogen bonds contributes significantly to the large interfacial energy of the hydrophobic surfaces. At the hydrophilic fused quartz/water interface and a fatty acid monolayer covered water surface, the structure and orientation of surface water molecules are controlled by the hydrogen bonding of water molecules with the surface OH groups and the electrostatic interaction with the surface field from the ionization of surface groups. A change of pH value in the bulk water can significantly change the relative importance of the two interactions and cause a drastic change in orientation of the surface water molecules. SFG has also been applied to study the tribological response of some model lubricant films. Monolayers of Langmuir-Blodgett films were found to disorder orientationaly under mildly high pressure and recover promptly upon removal of the applied pressure.

  19. Probing vibrational anisotropy with nuclear resonance vibrational spectroscopy.

    SciTech Connect

    Pavlik, J. W.; Barabanschikov, A.; Oliver, A. G.; Alp, E. E.; Sturhahn, W.; Zhao, J.; Sage, J. T.; Scheidt, W. R.

    2010-06-14

    A NRVS single-crystal study (NRVS=nuclear resonance vibrational spectroscopy) has provided detailed information on the in-plane modes of nitrosyl iron porphyrinate [Fe(oep)(NO)] (see picture; oep=octaethylporphyrin). The axial nitrosyl ligand controls the direction of the in-plane iron motion.

  20. Vibrational spectroscopy of polar molecules with superradiance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Guin-Dar; Yelin, Susanne F.

    2013-07-01

    We investigate cooperative phenomena and superradiance for vibrational transitions in polar molecule spectroscopy of high optical-depth samples. Such cooperativity comes from the build-up of inter-particle coherence through dipole-dipole interactions and leads to speed-up of decay processes. We compare our calculation to recent work and find very good agreement, suggesting that superradiant effects need to be taken into account in a wide variety of ultracold molecule experiments, including vibrational and rotational states.

  1. Vibrational spectroscopy in high temperature dense fluids

    SciTech Connect

    Moore, D.S.; Schmidt, S.C.

    1992-01-01

    Coherent anti-Stokes Raman spectroscopy (CARS) in conjunction with a two-stage light-gas gun has been used to obtain vibrational spectra of shock-compressed liquid N{sub 2}, O{sub 2}, CO, and their mixtures, as well as liquid N{sub 2}O. The experimental spectra are compared to spectra calculated using a semiclassical model for CARS intensities to obtain vibrational frequencies, peak Raman susceptibilities, and linewidths. The derived spectroscopic parameters suggest thermal equilibrium of the vibrational populations is established in less than a few nanoseconds after shock passage. Vibrational temperatures obtained are compared to those derived from equation-of-state calculations. The variation of the vibrational frequency shift at pressure with species concentration in mixtures is investigated.

  2. Two-dimensional vibrational-electronic spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Courtney, Trevor L.; Fox, Zachary W.; Slenkamp, Karla M.; Khalil, Munira

    2015-10-01

    Two-dimensional vibrational-electronic (2D VE) spectroscopy is a femtosecond Fourier transform (FT) third-order nonlinear technique that creates a link between existing 2D FT spectroscopies in the vibrational and electronic regions of the spectrum. 2D VE spectroscopy enables a direct measurement of infrared (IR) and electronic dipole moment cross terms by utilizing mid-IR pump and optical probe fields that are resonant with vibrational and electronic transitions, respectively, in a sample of interest. We detail this newly developed 2D VE spectroscopy experiment and outline the information contained in a 2D VE spectrum. We then use this technique and its single-pump counterpart (1D VE) to probe the vibrational-electronic couplings between high frequency cyanide stretching vibrations (νCN) and either a ligand-to-metal charge transfer transition ([FeIII(CN)6]3- dissolved in formamide) or a metal-to-metal charge transfer (MMCT) transition ([(CN)5FeIICNRuIII(NH3)5]- dissolved in formamide). The 2D VE spectra of both molecules reveal peaks resulting from coupled high- and low-frequency vibrational modes to the charge transfer transition. The time-evolving amplitudes and positions of the peaks in the 2D VE spectra report on coherent and incoherent vibrational energy transfer dynamics among the coupled vibrational modes and the charge transfer transition. The selectivity of 2D VE spectroscopy to vibronic processes is evidenced from the selective coupling of specific νCN modes to the MMCT transition in the mixed valence complex. The lineshapes in 2D VE spectra report on the correlation of the frequency fluctuations between the coupled vibrational and electronic frequencies in the mixed valence complex which has a time scale of 1 ps. The details and results of this study confirm the versatility of 2D VE spectroscopy and its applicability to probe how vibrations modulate charge and energy transfer in a wide range of complex molecular, material, and biological systems.

  3. Two-dimensional vibrational-electronic spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Courtney, Trevor L.; Fox, Zachary W.; Slenkamp, Karla M.; Khalil, Munira

    2015-10-21

    Two-dimensional vibrational-electronic (2D VE) spectroscopy is a femtosecond Fourier transform (FT) third-order nonlinear technique that creates a link between existing 2D FT spectroscopies in the vibrational and electronic regions of the spectrum. 2D VE spectroscopy enables a direct measurement of infrared (IR) and electronic dipole moment cross terms by utilizing mid-IR pump and optical probe fields that are resonant with vibrational and electronic transitions, respectively, in a sample of interest. We detail this newly developed 2D VE spectroscopy experiment and outline the information contained in a 2D VE spectrum. We then use this technique and its single-pump counterpart (1D VE) to probe the vibrational-electronic couplings between high frequency cyanide stretching vibrations (ν{sub CN}) and either a ligand-to-metal charge transfer transition ([Fe{sup III}(CN){sub 6}]{sup 3−} dissolved in formamide) or a metal-to-metal charge transfer (MMCT) transition ([(CN){sub 5}Fe{sup II}CNRu{sup III}(NH{sub 3}){sub 5}]{sup −} dissolved in formamide). The 2D VE spectra of both molecules reveal peaks resulting from coupled high- and low-frequency vibrational modes to the charge transfer transition. The time-evolving amplitudes and positions of the peaks in the 2D VE spectra report on coherent and incoherent vibrational energy transfer dynamics among the coupled vibrational modes and the charge transfer transition. The selectivity of 2D VE spectroscopy to vibronic processes is evidenced from the selective coupling of specific ν{sub CN} modes to the MMCT transition in the mixed valence complex. The lineshapes in 2D VE spectra report on the correlation of the frequency fluctuations between the coupled vibrational and electronic frequencies in the mixed valence complex which has a time scale of 1 ps. The details and results of this study confirm the versatility of 2D VE spectroscopy and its applicability to probe how vibrations modulate charge and energy transfer in a

  4. Vibrational Spectroscopy of Chromatographic Interfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Jeanne E. Pemberton

    2011-03-10

    Chromatographic separations play a central role in DOE-supported fundamental research related to energy, biological systems, the environment, and nuclear science. The overall portfolio of research activities in the Separations and Analysis Program within the DOE Office of Basic Energy Sciences includes support for activities designed to develop a molecular-level understanding of the chemical processes that underlie separations for both large-scale and analytical-scale purposes. The research effort funded by this grant award was a continuation of DOE-supported research to develop vibrational spectroscopic methods to characterize the interfacial details of separations processes at a molecular level.

  5. Vibrational Spectroscopy on Trapped Cold Molecular Ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khanyile, Ncamiso B.; Brown, Kenneth R.

    2014-06-01

    We perform vibrational spectroscopy on the V0←10 overtone of a trapped and sympathetically cooled CaH+ molecular ion using a resonance enhanced two photon dissociation scheme. Our experiments are motivated by theoretical work that proposes comparing the vibrational overtones of CaH^+ with electronic transitions in atoms to detect possible time variation of in the mass ratio of the proton to electron. Due to the nonexistence of experimental data of the transition, we start the search with a broadband femtosecond Ti:Saph laser guided by theoretical calculations. Once the vibrational transition has been identified, we will move to CW lasers to perform rotationally resolved spectroscopy. M. Kajita and Y. Moriwaki, J. Phys. B. At. Mol. Opt.Phys., 42,154022(2009) Private communication

  6. Anharmonic Theoretical Vibrational Spectroscopy of Polypeptides.

    PubMed

    Panek, Paweł T; Jacob, Christoph R

    2016-08-18

    Because of the size of polypeptides and proteins, the quantum-chemical prediction of their vibrational spectra presents an exceptionally challenging task. Here, we address one of these challenges, namely, the inclusion of anharmonicities. By performing the expansion of the potential energy surface in localized-mode coordinates instead of the normal-mode coordinates, it becomes possible to calculate anharmonic vibrational spectra of polypeptides efficiently and reliably. We apply this approach to calculate the infrared, Raman, and Raman optical activity spectra of helical alanine polypeptides consisting of up to 20 amino acids. We find that while anharmonicities do not alter the band shapes, simple scaling procedures cannot account for the different shifts found for the individual bands. This closes an important gap in theoretical vibrational spectroscopy by making it possible to quantify the anharmonic contributions and opens the door to a first-principles calculation of multidimensional vibrational spectra. PMID:27472016

  7. Chirality-sensitive microwave spectroscopy - application to terpene molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schnell, Melanie

    Most molecules of biochemical relevance are chiral. Even though the physical properties of two enantiomers are nearly identical, they might exhibit completely different biochemical effects, such as different odor in the case of carvone. In nature and as products of chemical syntheses, chiral molecules often exist in mixtures with other chiral molecules. The analysis of these complex mixtures to identify the molecular components, to determine which enantiomers are present, and to measure the enantiomeric excesses (ee) is still one of the challenging and very important tasks of analytical chemistry. We recently experimentally demonstrated a new method of differentiating enantiomeric pairs of chiral molecules in the gas phase. It is based on broadband rotational spectroscopy and is a three-wave mixing process that involves a closed cycle of three rotational transitions. The phase of the acquired signal bares the signature of the enantiomer, as it depends upon the product of the transition dipole moments. Furthermore, because the signal amplitude is proportional to the ee, this technique allows not only for determining which enantiomer is in excess, but also by how much. A unique advantage of our technique is that it can also be applied to mixtures of chiral molecules, even when the molecules are very similar. In my lecture, I will introduce the technique and give an update on the recent developments.

  8. Electron Energy Loss Spectroscopy of a Chiral Plasmonic Structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paterson, G. W.; Karimullah, A.; Williamson, SDR; Kadodwala, M.; MacLaren, D. A.

    2015-10-01

    A detailed analysis of the plasmonic excitations within a nanopatterned gold chiral biosensor element, measured by scanning transmission electron microscopy electron energy loss spectroscopy, is presented. We discuss aspects of data acquisition, processing, analysis and simulation. The localised surface plasmonic resonance modes in the structure are extracted using non-negative matrix factorisation and we use simulations to correlate notable deviations from the idealised spectrum to nanometric fabrication imperfections. The methodology presented has wide applicability to a variety of metamaterials.

  9. Vibrational spectroscopy in shock-compressed liquids

    SciTech Connect

    Schmidt, S.C.; Moore, D.S.

    1992-01-01

    Coherent anti-Stokes Raman spectroscopy is being used to study the structure and energy transfer in simple molecular liquids at the high pressures and temperatures characteristic of explosive detonation. Dense fluids to several thousand degrees temperature and several hundred kilobars pressure are obtained using the shock-compression technique. Vibrational frequencies, third-order susceptibility ratios, and linewidths have been measured for N{sub 2}, O{sub 2}, CO, mixtures of N{sub 2}, O{sub 2}, and CO, and N{sub 2}O. Frequencies are found to increase with pressure. The transition intensity and line-width data suggest that thermal equilibrium of the vibrational levels is attained in less than a few nanoseconds at these high pressures and temperatures. Vibrational temperatures obtained are compared to those derived from equation-of-state calculations.

  10. Vibrational spectroscopy in shock-compressed liquids

    SciTech Connect

    Schmidt, S.C.; Moore, D.S.

    1992-03-01

    Coherent anti-Stokes Raman spectroscopy is being used to study the structure and energy transfer in simple molecular liquids at the high pressures and temperatures characteristic of explosive detonation. Dense fluids to several thousand degrees temperature and several hundred kilobars pressure are obtained using the shock-compression technique. Vibrational frequencies, third-order susceptibility ratios, and linewidths have been measured for N{sub 2}, O{sub 2}, CO, mixtures of N{sub 2}, O{sub 2}, and CO, and N{sub 2}O. Frequencies are found to increase with pressure. The transition intensity and line-width data suggest that thermal equilibrium of the vibrational levels is attained in less than a few nanoseconds at these high pressures and temperatures. Vibrational temperatures obtained are compared to those derived from equation-of-state calculations.

  11. Modeling, calculating, and analyzing multidimensional vibrational spectroscopies.

    PubMed

    Tanimura, Yoshitaka; Ishizaki, Akihito

    2009-09-15

    Spectral line shapes in a condensed phase contain information from various dynamic processes that modulate the transition energy, such as microscopic dynamics, inter- and intramolecular couplings, and solvent dynamics. Because nonlinear response functions are sensitive to the complex dynamics of chemical processes, multidimensional vibrational spectroscopies can separate these processes. In multidimensional vibrational spectroscopy, the nonlinear response functions of a molecular dipole or polarizability are measured using ultrashort pulses to monitor inter- and intramolecular vibrational motions. Because a complex profile of such signals depends on the many dynamic and structural aspects of a molecular system, researchers would like to have a theoretical understanding of these phenomena. In this Account, we explore and describe the roles of different physical phenomena that arise from the peculiarities of the system-bath coupling in multidimensional spectra. We also present simple analytical expressions for a weakly coupled multimode Brownian system, which we use to analyze the results obtained by the experiments and simulations. To calculate the nonlinear optical response, researchers commonly use a particular form of a system Hamiltonian fit to the experimental results. The optical responses of molecular vibrational motions have been studied in either an oscillator model or a vibration energy state model. In principle, both models should give the same results as long as the energy states are chosen to be the eigenstates of the oscillator model. The energy state model can provide a simple description of nonlinear optical processes because the diagrammatic Liouville space theory that developed in the electronically resonant spectroscopies can easily handle three or four energy states involved in high-frequency vibrations. However, the energy state model breaks down if we include the thermal excitation and relaxation processes in the dynamics to put the system in a

  12. Anharmonic Vibrational Spectroscopy on Metal Transition Complexes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Latouche, Camille; Bloino, Julien; Barone, Vincenzo

    2014-06-01

    Advances in hardware performance and the availability of efficient and reliable computational models have made possible the application of computational spectroscopy to ever larger molecular systems. The systematic interpretation of experimental data and the full characterization of complex molecules can then be facilitated. Focusing on vibrational spectroscopy, several approaches have been proposed to simulate spectra beyond the double harmonic approximation, so that more details become available. However, a routine use of such tools requires the preliminary definition of a valid protocol with the most appropriate combination of electronic structure and nuclear calculation models. Several benchmark of anharmonic calculations frequency have been realized on organic molecules. Nevertheless, benchmarks of organometallics or inorganic metal complexes at this level are strongly lacking despite the interest of these systems due to their strong emission and vibrational properties. Herein we report the benchmark study realized with anharmonic calculations on simple metal complexes, along with some pilot applications on systems of direct technological or biological interest.

  13. Vibrational Spectroscopy and Dynamics of Water.

    PubMed

    Perakis, Fivos; Marco, Luigi De; Shalit, Andrey; Tang, Fujie; Kann, Zachary R; Kühne, Thomas D; Torre, Renato; Bonn, Mischa; Nagata, Yuki

    2016-07-13

    We present an overview of recent static and time-resolved vibrational spectroscopic studies of liquid water from ambient conditions to the supercooled state, as well as of crystalline and amorphous ice forms. The structure and dynamics of the complex hydrogen-bond network formed by water molecules in the bulk and interphases are discussed, as well as the dissipation mechanism of vibrational energy throughout this network. A broad range of water investigations are addressed, from conventional infrared and Raman spectroscopy to femtosecond pump-probe, photon-echo, optical Kerr effect, sum-frequency generation, and two-dimensional infrared spectroscopic studies. Additionally, we discuss novel approaches, such as two-dimensional sum-frequency generation, three-dimensional infrared, and two-dimensional Raman terahertz spectroscopy. By comparison of the complementary aspects probed by various linear and nonlinear spectroscopic techniques, a coherent picture of water dynamics and energetics emerges. Furthermore, we outline future perspectives of vibrational spectroscopy for water researches. PMID:27096701

  14. Molecular Chirality: Enantiomer Differentiation by High-Resolution Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirota, Eizi

    2014-06-01

    I have demonstrated that triple resonance performed on a three-rotational-level system of a chiral molecule of C1 symmetry exhibits signals opposite in phase for different enantiomers, thereby making enantiomer differentiation possible by microwave spectroscopy This prediction was realized by Patterson et al. on 1,2-propanediol and 1,3-butanediol. We thus now add a powerful method: microwave spectroscopy to the study of chiral molecules, for which hitherto only the measurement of optical rotation has been employed. Although microwave spectroscopy is applied to molecules in the gaseous phase, it is unprecedentedly superior to the traditional method: polarimeter in resolution, accuracy, sensitivity, and so on, and I anticipate a new fascinating research area to be opened in the field of molecular chirality. More versatile and efficient systems should be invented and developed for microwave spectroscopy, in order to cope well with new applications expected for this method For C2 and Cn (n ≥ 3)chiral molecules, the three-rotational-level systems treated above for C1 molecules are no more available within one vibronic state. It should, however, be pointed out that, if we take into account an excited vibronic state in addition to the ground state, for example, we may encounter many three-level systems. Namely, either one rotational transition in the ground state is combined with two vibronic transitions, or such a rotational transition in an excited state may be connected through two vibronic transitions to a rotational level in the ground state manifold. The racemization obviously plays a crucial role in the study of molecular chirality. However, like many other terms employed in chemistry, this important process has been "defined" only in a vague way, in other words, it includes many kinds of processes, which are not well classified on a molecular basis. I shall mention an attempt to obviate these shortcomings in the definition of racemization and also to clarify the

  15. Heterodyne-Detected Dispersed Vibrational Echo Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, Kevin C.; Ganim, Ziad; Tokmakoff, Andrei

    2009-11-01

    We develop heterodyned dispersed vibrational echo spectroscopy (HDVE) and demonstrate the new capabilities in biophysical applications. HDVE is a robust ultrafast technique that provides a characterization of the real and imaginary components of third-order nonlinear signals with high sensitivity and single-laser-shot capability and can be used to extract dispersed pump-probe and dispersed vibrational echo spectra. Four methods for acquiring HDVE phase and amplitude spectra were compared: Fourier transform spectral interferometry, a new phase modulation spectral interferometry technique, and combination schemes. These extraction techniques were demonstrated in the context of protein amide I spectroscopy. Experimental HDVE and heterodyned free induction decay amide I spectra were explicitly compared to conventional dispersed pump-probe, dispersed vibrational echo, and absorption spectra. The new capabilities of HDVE were demonstrated by acquiring single-shot spectra and melting curves of ubiquitin and concentration-dependent spectra of insulin suitable for extracting the binding constant for dimerization. The introduced techniques will prove particularly useful in transient experiments, studying irreversible reactions, and micromolar concentration studies of small proteins.

  16. Dissipative vibrational model for chiral recognition in olfaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tirandaz, Arash; Taher Ghahramani, Farhad; Shafiee, Afshin

    2015-09-01

    We examine the olfactory discrimination of left- and right-handed enantiomers of chiral odorants based on the odorant-mediated electron transport from a donor to an acceptor of the olfactory receptors embodied in a biological environment. The chiral odorant is effectively described by an asymmetric double-well potential whose minima are associated to the left- and right-handed enantiomers. The introduced asymmetry is considered an overall measure of chiral interactions. The biological environment is conveniently modeled as a bath of harmonic oscillators. The resulting spin-boson model is adapted by a polaron transformation to derive the corresponding Born-Markov master equation with which we obtain the elastic and inelastic electron tunneling rates. We show that the inelastic tunneling through left- and right-handed enantiomers occurs with different rates. The discrimination mechanism depends on the ratio of tunneling frequency to localization frequency.

  17. Dissipative vibrational model for chiral recognition in olfaction.

    PubMed

    Tirandaz, Arash; Taher Ghahramani, Farhad; Shafiee, Afshin

    2015-09-01

    We examine the olfactory discrimination of left- and right-handed enantiomers of chiral odorants based on the odorant-mediated electron transport from a donor to an acceptor of the olfactory receptors embodied in a biological environment. The chiral odorant is effectively described by an asymmetric double-well potential whose minima are associated to the left- and right-handed enantiomers. The introduced asymmetry is considered an overall measure of chiral interactions. The biological environment is conveniently modeled as a bath of harmonic oscillators. The resulting spin-boson model is adapted by a polaron transformation to derive the corresponding Born-Markov master equation with which we obtain the elastic and inelastic electron tunneling rates. We show that the inelastic tunneling through left- and right-handed enantiomers occurs with different rates. The discrimination mechanism depends on the ratio of tunneling frequency to localization frequency. PMID:26465515

  18. Threshold photoelectron spectroscopy of vibrationally excited nitrogen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Innocenti, Fabrizio; Eypper, Marie; Stranges, Stefano; West, John B.; King, George C.; Dyke, John M.

    2013-02-01

    Threshold photoelectron spectroscopy (TPES) has been used to study flowing nitrogen subjected to a microwave discharge. The first three photoelectron (PE) bands of nitrogen corresponding to the ionizations N2+ (X2Σ+g) v+ ← N2 (X1Σ+g) v″, N2+ (A2Πu) v+ ← N2 (X1Σ+g) v″ and N2 + (B2Σ+u) v+ ← N2 (X1Σ+g) v″ were investigated. An analysis of the vibrationally resolved threshold photoelectron (TPE) spectra shows evidence of population of the vibrational levels v″ = 0-5 in the N2 X1Σ+g neutral state. By a comparison with the PE spectrum recorded under the same conditions, use of computed Franck-Condon factors for each ionization and evidence from vacuum ultraviolet absorption spectroscopy, the relative intensities of vibrational components in a TPE band can be qualitatively explained using the Franck-Condon factors for each ionization as well as the gain in intensity from autoionization from Rydberg states that are degenerate with an ionization threshold or lie just above a threshold. The enhancement in intensity obtained in the TPE spectra, relative to the intensity in a PE spectrum recorded under the same conditions, was estimated as at least one order of magnitude. The first band of atomic nitrogen was also observed in the discharge-on TPE spectra. The experimental resolution was sufficiently good to allow the three ionizations N+(3P0,1,2) ← N(4S3/2) to be resolved and their relative component intensities were measured as 1: 0.95 ± 0.10: 0.70 ± 0.10. The complementary nature of the TPES and PES techniques has been outlined and the extra information obtained from studying a vibrationally excited small molecule such as N2 with these methods has been demonstrated.

  19. Enantiomer Identification in Chiral Mixtures with Broadband Microwave Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shubert, V. Alvin; Schmitz, David; Medcraft, Chris; Patterson, David; Doyle, John M.; Schnell, Melanie

    2014-06-01

    In nature and as products of chemical syntheses, chiral molecules often exist in mixtures with other chiral molecules. The analysis of these complex mixtures to identify the components, determine which enantiomers are present, and to measure the enantiomeric excesses (ee) is still one of the challenging but very important tasks of analytical chemistry. These analyses are required at every step of modern drug development, from candidate searches to production and regulation. We present here a new method of identifying individual enantiomers in mixtures of chiral molecules in the gas phase. It is based on broadband rotational spectroscopy and employs a sum or difference frequency generation three-wave mixing process that involves a closed cycle of three rotational transitions. The phase of the acquired signal bares the signature of the enantiomer (see figure), as it depends upon the combined quantity, μaμbμc, which is of opposite sign between members of an enantiomeric pair. Furthermore, because the signal amplitude is proportional to the ee, this technique allows for both determining which enantiomer is in excess and by how much. The high resolution of our technique allows us to perform molecule specific measurements of mixtures of chiral molecules with μaμbμc ≠ 0, even when the molecules are very similar (e.g. conformational isomers). We introduce the technique and present results on the analysis of mixtures of the terpenes, carvone, menthone, and carvomenthenol. D. Patterson, M. Schnell, J. M. Doyle, Nature. 497, 475-477, 2013 V. A. Shubert, D. Schmitz, D. Patterson, J. M. Doyle, M. Schnell, Ang. Chem. Int. Ed. 53, 1152-1155,2014

  20. Determination of the Absolute Configurations of Chiral Drugs Using Chiroptical Spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Polavarapu, Prasad L

    2016-01-01

    Chiroptical spectroscopy has emerged as a promising tool for the determination of absolute configurations and predominant conformations of chiral molecules in academic laboratories. This promise has led to the adaption of chiroptical spectroscopic methods as valuable tools in chiral drug discovery research programs of the pharmaceutical industry. Most major pharmaceutical companies have invested in in-house chiroptical spectroscopy applications and reported successful outcomes. In the context of continuously increasing applications of chiroptical spectroscopy for chiral molecular structure determination, a review of recent developments and applications for chiral drugs is presented in this manuscript. PMID:27529201

  1. Theory of Linear and Nonlinear Surface-Enhanced Vibrational Spectroscopies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chulhai, Dhabih V.; Hu, Zhongwei; Moore, Justin E.; Chen, Xing; Jensen, Lasse

    2016-05-01

    The vibrational spectroscopy of molecules adsorbed on metal nanoparticles can be enhanced by many orders of magnitude so that the detection and identification of single molecules are possible. The enhancement of most linear and nonlinear vibrational spectroscopies has been demonstrated. In this review, we discuss theoretical approaches to understanding linear and nonlinear surface-enhanced vibrational spectroscopies. A unified description of enhancement mechanisms classified as either electromagnetic or chemical in nature is presented. Emphasis is placed on understanding the spectral changes necessary for interpretation of linear and nonlinear surface-enhanced vibrational spectroscopies.

  2. Theory of Linear and Nonlinear Surface-Enhanced Vibrational Spectroscopies.

    PubMed

    Chulhai, Dhabih V; Hu, Zhongwei; Moore, Justin E; Chen, Xing; Jensen, Lasse

    2016-05-27

    The vibrational spectroscopy of molecules adsorbed on metal nanoparticles can be enhanced by many orders of magnitude so that the detection and identification of single molecules are possible. The enhancement of most linear and nonlinear vibrational spectroscopies has been demonstrated. In this review, we discuss theoretical approaches to understanding linear and nonlinear surface-enhanced vibrational spectroscopies. A unified description of enhancement mechanisms classified as either electromagnetic or chemical in nature is presented. Emphasis is placed on understanding the spectral changes necessary for interpretation of linear and nonlinear surface-enhanced vibrational spectroscopies. PMID:27090843

  3. Vibrational spectroscopy of water at interfaces.

    PubMed

    Skinner, J L; Pieniazek, P A; Gruenbaum, S M

    2012-01-17

    Understanding liquid water's behavior at the molecular level is essential to progress in fields as disparate as biology and atmospheric sciences. Moreover, the properties of water in bulk and water at interfaces can be very different, making the study of the hydrogen-bonding networks therein very important. With recent experimental advances in vibrational spectroscopy, such as ultrafast pulses and heterodyne detection, it is now possible to probe the structure and dynamics of bulk and interfacial water in unprecedented detail. We consider here three aqueous interfaces: the water liquid-vapor interface, the interface between water and the surfactant headgroups of reverse micelles, and the interface between water and the lipid headgroups of aligned multi-bilayers. In the first case, sum-frequency spectroscopy is used to probe the interface. In the second and third cases, the confined water pools are sufficiently small that techniques of bulk spectroscopy (such as FTIR, pump-probe, two-dimensional IR, and the like) can be used to probe the interfacial water. In this Account, we discuss our attempts to model these three systems and interpret the existing experiments. For the water liquid-vapor interface, we find that three-body interactions are essential for reproducing the experimental sum-frequency spectrum, and presumably for the structure of the interface as well. The observed spectrum is interpreted as arising from overlapping and canceling positive and negative contributions from molecules in different hydrogen-bonding environments. For the reverse micelles, our theoretical models confirm that the experimentally observed blue shift of the water OD stretch (for dilute HOD in H(2)O) arises from weaker hydrogen bonding to sulfonate oxygens. We interpret the observed slow-down in water rotational dynamics as arising from curvature-induced frustration. For the water confined between lipid bilayers, our theoretical models confirm that the experimentally observed red

  4. Optimization of chiral lattice based metastructures for broadband vibration suppression using genetic algorithms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdeljaber, Osama; Avci, Onur; Inman, Daniel J.

    2016-05-01

    One of the major challenges in civil, mechanical, and aerospace engineering is to develop vibration suppression systems with high efficiency and low cost. Recent studies have shown that high damping performance at broadband frequencies can be achieved by incorporating periodic inserts with tunable dynamic properties as internal resonators in structural systems. Structures featuring these kinds of inserts are referred to as metamaterials inspired structures or metastructures. Chiral lattice inserts exhibit unique characteristics such as frequency bandgaps which can be tuned by varying the parameters that define the lattice topology. Recent analytical and experimental investigations have shown that broadband vibration attenuation can be achieved by including chiral lattices as internal resonators in beam-like structures. However, these studies have suggested that the performance of chiral lattice inserts can be maximized by utilizing an efficient optimization technique to obtain the optimal topology of the inserted lattice. In this study, an automated optimization procedure based on a genetic algorithm is applied to obtain the optimal set of parameters that will result in chiral lattice inserts tuned properly to reduce the global vibration levels of a finite-sized beam. Genetic algorithms are considered in this study due to their capability of dealing with complex and insufficiently understood optimization problems. In the optimization process, the basic parameters that govern the geometry of periodic chiral lattices including the number of circular nodes, the thickness of the ligaments, and the characteristic angle are considered. Additionally, a new set of parameters is introduced to enable the optimization process to explore non-periodic chiral designs. Numerical simulations are carried out to demonstrate the efficiency of the optimization process.

  5. Multidimensional Time-Resolved Spectroscopy of Vibrational Coherence in Biopolyenes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buckup, Tiago; Motzkus, Marcus

    2014-04-01

    Multidimensional femtosecond time-resolved vibrational coherence spectroscopy allows one to investigate the evolution of vibrational coherence in electronic excited states. Methods such as pump-degenerate four-wave mixing and pump-impulsive vibrational spectroscopy combine an initial ultrashort laser pulse with a nonlinear probing sequence to reinduce vibrational coherence exclusively in the excited states. By carefully exploiting specific electronic resonances, one can detect vibrational coherence from 0 cm-1 to over 2,000 cm-1 and map its evolution. This review focuses on the observation and mapping of high-frequency vibrational coherence for all-trans biological polyenes such as β-carotene, lycopene, retinal, and retinal Schiff base. We discuss the role of molecular symmetry in vibrational coherence activity in the S1 electronic state and the interplay of coupling between electronic states and vibrational coherence.

  6. Surface-Bulk Vibrational Correlation Spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Roy, Sandra; Covert, Paul A; Jarisz, Tasha A; Chan, Chantelle; Hore, Dennis K

    2016-05-01

    Homo- and heterospectral correlation analysis are powerful methods for investigating the effects of external influences on the spectra acquired using distinct and complementary techniques. Nonlinear vibrational spectroscopy is a selective and sensitive probe of surface structure changes, as bulk molecules are excluded on the basis of symmetry. However, as a result of this exquisite specificity, it is blind to changes that may be occurring in the solution. We demonstrate that correlation analysis between surface-specific techniques and bulk probes such as infrared absorption or Raman scattering may be used to reveal additional details of the adsorption process. Using the adsorption of water and ethanol binary mixtures as an example, we illustrate that this provides support for a competitive binding model and adds new insight into a dimer-to-bilayer transition proposed from previous experiments and simulations. PMID:27058265

  7. Zwitterionic phosphorylated quinines as chiral solvating agents for NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Rudzińska-Szostak, Ewa; Górecki, Łukasz; Berlicki, Łukasz; Ślepokura, Katarzyna; Mucha, Artur

    2015-10-01

    Because of their unique 3D arrangement, naturally occurring Cinchona alkaloids and their synthetic derivatives have found wide-ranging applications in chiral recognition. Recently, we determined the enantioselective properties of C-9-phosphate mixed triesters of quinine as versatile chiral solvating agents in nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy. In the current study, we introduce new zwitterionic members of this class of molecules containing a negatively charged phosphate moiety (i.e., ethyl, n-butyl and phenyl hydrogen quininyl phosphate). An efficient approach for synthesizing these compounds is elaborated, and full characterization, including conformational and autoaggregation phenomena studies, was performed. Therefore, their ability to induce NMR anisochrony of selected enantiomeric substrates (i.e., primarily N-DNB-protected amino acids and their methyl esters) was analyzed compared to uncharged diphenyl quininyl phosphate and its positively charged quaternary ammonium hydrochloride salt. In addition, (1) H and (13) C NMR experiments revealed their enantiodiscrimination potential toward novel analytes, such as secondary amines and nonprotected amino acids. PMID:26415853

  8. Vibrational spectroscopy in stem cell characterisation: is there a niche?

    PubMed

    Sulé-Suso, J; Forsyth, N R; Untereiner, V; Sockalingum, G D

    2014-05-01

    Vibrational spectroscopy using both infrared and Raman spectroscopies has been used in recent years with the aim to aid clinicians in disease diagnosis. More recently, these techniques have been applied to study stem cell differentiation and to determine stem cell presence in tissues. These studies have demonstrated the potential of these techniques in better characterising stem cell differentiation phenotypes with potential applications in tissue engineering strategies. However, before the translation of vibrational spectroscopy into clinical practice becomes a reality, several issues still need to be addressed. We describe here an overview of the work carried out so far and the problems that might be encountered when using vibrational spectroscopy. PMID:24703620

  9. Multireflection sum frequency generation vibrational spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Chi; Jasensky, Joshua; Chen, Zhan

    2015-08-18

    We developed a multireflection data collection method in order to improve the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) and sensitivity of sum frequency generation (SFG) spectroscopy, which we refer to as multireflection SFG, or MRSFG for short. To achieve MRSFG, a collinear laser beam propagation geometry was adopted and trapezoidal Dove prisms were used as sample substrates. An in-depth discussion on the signal and SNR in MRSFG was performed. We showed experimentally, with "m" total internal reflections in a Dove prism, MRSFG signal is ∼m times that of conventional SFG; SNR of the SFG signal-to-background is improved by a factor of >m(1/2) and vibrational signals. Surface molecular structures of adsorbed ethanol molecules, polymer films, and a lipid monolayer were characterized using both MRSFG and conventional SFG. Molecular orientation information on lipid molecules with a 9% composition in a mixed monolayer was measured using MRSFG, which showed a good agreement with that derived from 100% lipid surface coverage using conventional SFG. MRSFG can both improve the spectral quality and detection limit of SFG spectroscopy and is expected to have important applications in surface science for studying structures of molecules with a low surface coverage or less ordered molecular moieties. PMID:26176565

  10. Vibrational spectroscopy in biomedical science: bone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gamsjäger, Sonja; Zoehrer, R.; Roschger, P.; Fratzl, P.; Klaushofer, K.; Mendelsohn, R.; Paschalis, E. P.

    2009-02-01

    Fourier transform infrared imaging (FTIR) and Raman Microspectroscopy are powerful tools for characterizing the distribution of different chemical moieties in heterogeneous materials. FTIR and Raman measurements have been adapted to assess the maturity of the mineral and the quality of the organic component (collagen and non-collagenous proteins) of the mineralized tissue in bone. Unique to the FTIRI analysis is the capability to provide the spatial distribution of two of the major collagen cross-links (pyridinoline, and dehydro-dihydroxylysinonorleucine) and through the study of normal and diseased bone, relate them to bone strength. These FTIR parameters have been validated based on analysis of model compounds. It is widely accepted that bone strength is determined by bone mass and bone quality. The latter is a multifactorial term encompassing the material and structural properties of bone, and one important aspect of the bone material properties is the organic matrix. The bone material properties can be defined by parameters of mineral and collagen, as determined by FTIR and Raman analysis. Considerably less attention has been directed at collagen, although there are several publications in the literature reporting altered collagen properties associated with fragile bone, in both animals and humans. Since bone is a heterogeneous tissue due to the remodeling process, microscopic areas may be carefully selected based on quantitative Backscattered Electron Imaging or histological staining, thus ensuring comparison of areas with similar metabolic activity and mineral content. In conclusion, FTIRI and Raman vibrational spectroscopy are proving to be powerful tools in bone-related medical research.

  11. 2010 GRC VIBRATIONAL SPECTROSCOPY AUGUST 1 - AUGUST 6, 2010

    SciTech Connect

    Brooks Pate

    2010-08-06

    The Vibrational Spectroscopy conference focuses on using vibrational spectroscopy to probe structure and dynamics of molecules in gases, liquids, and at interfaces. The conference explores the wide range of state-of-the-art techniques based on vibrational motion. These techniques span the fields of time-domain, high-resolution frequency-domain, spatially-resolved, nonlinear and multidimensional spectroscopies. The conference highlights the application of these techniques in chemistry, materials, biology, and medicine. The theory of molecular vibrational motion and its connection to spectroscopic signatures and chemical reaction dynamics is the third major theme of the meeting. The goal is to bring together a collection of researchers who share common interests and who will gain from discussing work at the forefront of several connected areas. The intent is to emphasize the insights and understanding that studies of vibrations provide about a variety of molecular systems ranging from small polyatomic molecules to large biomolecules and nanomaterials.

  12. Thymine Dimer Formation probed by Time-Resolved Vibrational Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schreier, Wolfgang J.; Schrader, Tobias E.; Roller, Florian O.; Gilch, Peter; Zinth, Wolfgang; Kohler, Bern

    Cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers are the major photoproducts formed when DNA is exposed to UV light. Femtosecond time-resolved vibrational spectroscopy reveals that thymine dimers are formed in thymidine oligonucleotides in an ultrafast photoreaction.

  13. Chiral detection in high-performance liquid chromatography by vibrational circular dichroism.

    PubMed

    Tran, C D; Grishko, V I; Huang, G

    1994-09-01

    A novel chiral detector for high-performance liquid chromatography has been developed. This detector is based on the measurement of circular dichroism of chiral effluents in the infrared region, i.e., vibrational circular dichroism (VCD). In this instrument, a solid-state spectral tunable (from 2.4 to 3.5 microns) F-center laser was used as the light source. The linearly polarized laser beam was converted into left circularly polarized light (LCPL) and right circularly polarized light (RCPL) at 42 kHz by means of a photoelastic modulator. The intensity of the LCPL and RCPL transmitted through the sample was measured by a liquid nitrogen cooled indium antimonide detector. Double modulation was employed to reduce the noise associated with the laser beam. Specifically, the linearly polarized laser beam, prior to being converted to CPL, was modulated at 85 Hz by a mechanical chopper. Demodulation and amplification were accomplished with the use of two lock-in amplifiers. In its present configuration, the instrument can be used to measure the VCD of O-H groups. Its sensitivity is so high that it was able, for the first time, to detect chirally (with limits of detection of micrograms) (R)- and (S)-2,2,2-trifluoro-1-(9- anthryl)ethanol and (R)- and (S)-benzoin when these compounds were chromatographically separated from the corresponding racemic mixtures by a Chiralcel-OD column. The main advantage of this chiral detector is, however, its universality; i.e., it can be used to virtually detect any chiral compounds which has O-H group (e.g, aliphatic alcohols such as 2-octanol). PMID:7943734

  14. The Clusters-in-a-Liquid Approach for Solvation: New Insights from the Conformer Specific Gas Phase Spectroscopy and Vibrational Optical Activity Spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Perera, Angelo S.; Thomas, Javix; Poopari, Mohammad R.; Xu, Yunjie

    2016-01-01

    Vibrational optical activity spectroscopies, namely vibrational circular dichroism (VCD) and Raman optical activity (ROA), have been emerged in the past decade as powerful spectroscopic tools for stereochemical information of a wide range of chiral compounds in solution directly. More recently, their applications in unveiling solvent effects, especially those associated with water solvent, have been explored. In this review article, we first select a few examples to demonstrate the unique sensitivity of VCD spectral signatures to both bulk solvent effects and explicit hydrogen-bonding interactions in solution. Second, we discuss the induced solvent chirality, or chiral transfer, VCD spectral features observed in the water bending band region in detail. From these chirality transfer spectral data, the related conformer specific gas phase spectroscopic studies of small chiral hydration clusters, and the associated matrix isolation VCD experiments of hydrogen-bonded complexes in cold rare gas matrices, a general picture of solvation in aqueous solution emerges. In such an aqueous solution, some small chiral hydration clusters, rather than the chiral solutes themselves, are the dominant species and are the ones that contribute mainly to the experimentally observed VCD features. We then review a series of VCD studies of amino acids and their derivatives in aqueous solution under different pHs to emphasize the importance of the inclusion of the bulk solvent effects. These experimental data and the associated theoretical analyses are the foundation for the proposed “clusters-in-a-liquid” approach to account for solvent effects effectively. We present several approaches to identify and build such representative chiral hydration clusters. Recent studies which applied molecular dynamics simulations and the subsequent snapshot averaging approach to generate the ROA, VCD, electronic CD, and optical rotatory dispersion spectra are also reviewed. Challenges associated with

  15. The clusters-in-a-liquid approach for solvation: New insights from the conformer specific gas phase spectroscopy and vibrational optical activity spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Yunjie; Perera, Angelo; Thomas, Javix; Poopari, Mohammad

    2016-02-01

    Vibrational optical activity spectroscopies, namely vibrational circular dichroism (VCD) and Raman optical activity (ROA), have been emerged in the past decade as a powerful spectroscopic tool for stereochemical information of a wide range of chiral compounds in solution directly. More recently, their applications in unveiling solvent effects, especially those associated with water solvent, have been explored. In this review article, we first select a few examples to demonstrate the unique sensitivity of VCD spectral signatures to both bulk solvent effects and explicit hydrogen-bonding interactions in solution. Second, we discuss the induced solvent chirality, or chiral transfer, VCD spectral features observed at the water bending band region in detail. From these chirality transfer spectral data, the related conformer specific gas phase spectroscopic studies of small chiral hydration clusters, and the associated matrix isolation VCD experiments of hydrogen-bonded complexes in cold rare gas matrices, a general picture of solvation in aqueous solution emerges. In such an aqueous solution, some small chiral hydration clusters, rather than the chiral solutes themselves, are the dominant species and are the ones who contribute mainly to the experimentally observed VCD features. We then review a series of VCD studies of amino acids and their derivatives in aqueous solution under different pHs to emphasize the importance of the inclusion of the bulk solvent effects. These experimental data and the associated theoretical analyses are the foundation for the proposed “clusters-in-a-liquid” approach to account for solvent effects effectively. We present several approaches to identify and build such representative chiral hydration clusters. Recent studies which applied molecular dynamics simulations and the subsequent snapshot averaging approach to generate the ROA, electronic CD, and optical rotatory dispersion spectra are also reviewed. Challenges associated with the

  16. The Clusters-in-a-Liquid Approach for Solvation: New Insights from the Conformer Specific Gas Phase Spectroscopy and Vibrational Optical Activity Spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Perera, Angelo S; Thomas, Javix; Poopari, Mohammad R; Xu, Yunjie

    2016-01-01

    Vibrational optical activity spectroscopies, namely vibrational circular dichroism (VCD) and Raman optical activity (ROA), have been emerged in the past decade as powerful spectroscopic tools for stereochemical information of a wide range of chiral compounds in solution directly. More recently, their applications in unveiling solvent effects, especially those associated with water solvent, have been explored. In this review article, we first select a few examples to demonstrate the unique sensitivity of VCD spectral signatures to both bulk solvent effects and explicit hydrogen-bonding interactions in solution. Second, we discuss the induced solvent chirality, or chiral transfer, VCD spectral features observed in the water bending band region in detail. From these chirality transfer spectral data, the related conformer specific gas phase spectroscopic studies of small chiral hydration clusters, and the associated matrix isolation VCD experiments of hydrogen-bonded complexes in cold rare gas matrices, a general picture of solvation in aqueous solution emerges. In such an aqueous solution, some small chiral hydration clusters, rather than the chiral solutes themselves, are the dominant species and are the ones that contribute mainly to the experimentally observed VCD features. We then review a series of VCD studies of amino acids and their derivatives in aqueous solution under different pHs to emphasize the importance of the inclusion of the bulk solvent effects. These experimental data and the associated theoretical analyses are the foundation for the proposed "clusters-in-a-liquid" approach to account for solvent effects effectively. We present several approaches to identify and build such representative chiral hydration clusters. Recent studies which applied molecular dynamics simulations and the subsequent snapshot averaging approach to generate the ROA, VCD, electronic CD, and optical rotatory dispersion spectra are also reviewed. Challenges associated with the

  17. Transient Two-Dimensional Infrared Spectroscopy in a Vibrational Ladder.

    PubMed

    Kemlin, Vincent; Bonvalet, Adeline; Daniault, Louis; Joffre, Manuel

    2016-09-01

    We report on transient 2D Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (2DIR) after vibrational ladder climbing induced in the CO-moiety longitudinal stretch of carboxyhemoglobin. The population distribution, spreading up to seven vibrational levels, results in a nonequilibrium 2DIR spectrum evidencing a large number of peaks that can be easily attributed to individual transitions thanks to the anharmonicity of the vibrational potential. We discuss the physical origin of the observed peaks as well as the qualitative behavior of the subsequent dynamics governed by population relaxation in the vibrational ladder. PMID:27508408

  18. Robust Self-Referencing Method for Chiral Sum Frequency Generation Spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    McDermott, M Luke; Petersen, Poul B

    2015-09-24

    Chiral sum frequency generation spectroscopy (SFG) is of great interest for studying biological systems, among others. Whereas the chiral response in circular dichroism is about 0.1% of the achiral response, the chiral SFG response can be the same order of magnitude as the achiral SFG signal. However, chiral SFG is limited by the attainable signal-to-noise of the weak nonlinear signals and therefore extremely sensitive to proper alignment. We present a robust method for chiral SFG and demonstrate the use on solid-air surfaces with achiral and chiral molecules. We simultaneously measure two orthogonal polarizations-either the interference chiral SFG (±45° polarized) or the pure chiral and achiral SFG-using a waveplate and beam displacer. Both optics are placed in the detection arm and can be easily incorporated into any SFG setup. Furthermore, we employ self-referencing to calibrate alignment for each sample individually using a polarizer in the detection arm. These methods greatly increase the reliability and quality of chiral SFG measurements. PMID:26322867

  19. Vibrationally mediated photodissociation of t-butyl hydroperoxide: Vibrational overtone spectroscopy and photodissociation dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Likar, M.D.; Baggott, J.E.; Crim, F.F.

    1989-06-01

    Vibrationally mediated photodissociation is a two-photon technique for studying the spectroscopy and photodissociation dynamics of highly vibrationally excited molecules. In these experiments, a highly vibrationally excited t-butyl hydroperoxide (t-BuOOH) molecule, prepared by excitation in the region of the third overtone of the O--H stretching vibration (4..nu../sub OH/), absorbs a second photon to dissociate to OH and t-butoxy fragments, and laser induced fluorescence determines the quantum state populations of the OH fragment. Vibrational overtone excitation spectra, obtained by varying the vibrational overtone excitation wavelength while monitoring a single OH rotational state, are nearly identical to photoacoustic spectra. We fit the coarse structure in the vibrational overtone excitation spectrum in the region of the 4..nu../sub OH/ transition and the photoacoustic spectra in the regions of the 5..nu../sub OH/ and 6..nu../sub OH/ transitions using a spectroscopic model of the interaction of the O--H bond stretching vibration with the torsional vibration about the O--O bond. This analysis determines the barrier to internal rotation of the O--H and t-butoxy groups through the trans configuration and its variation with vibrational excitation. The trans barrier in the ground vibrational state is 275 cm/sup -1/ and increases with vibrational excitation to 425, 575, and 680 cm/sup -1/ for t-BuOOH molecules with four, five, and six quanta of O--H stretching excitation, respectively.

  20. Spectroscopy and reactions of vibrationally excited transient molecules

    SciTech Connect

    Dai, H.L.

    1993-12-01

    Spectroscopy, energy transfer and reactions of vibrationally excited transient molecules are studied through a combination of laser-based excitation techniques and efficient detection of emission from the energized molecules with frequency and time resolution. Specifically, a Time-resolved Fourier Transform Emission Spectroscopy technique has been developed for detecting dispersed laser-induced fluorescence in the IR, visible and UV regions. The structure and spectroscopy of the excited vibrational levels in the electronic ground state, as well as energy relaxation and reactions induced by specific vibronic excitations of a transient molecule can be characterized from time-resolved dispersed fluorescence in the visible and UV region. IR emissions from highly vibrational excited levels, on the other hand, reveal the pathways and rates of collision induced vibrational energy transfer.

  1. Translating vibrational spectroscopy into clinical applications - vision or reality?

    PubMed

    Petrich, Wolfgang

    2016-06-23

    The Faraday Discussion meeting "Advanced Vibrational Spectroscopy for Biomedical Applications" provided an excellent opportunity to share and discuss recent research and applications on a highly interdisciplinary level. Spectral pathology, single cell analysis, data handling, clinical spectroscopy, and the spectral analysis of biofluids were among the topics covered during the meeting. The focus on discussion rather than "merely" presentation was highly appreciated and fruitful discussions evolved around the interpretation of the amide-bands, optical resolution, the role of diffraction and data analysis procedure, to name a few. The meeting made clear that the spectroscopy of molecular vibrations in biomolecules has evolved from a purely academic research tool to a technology used in clinical practice in some cases. In this sense, biomedical vibrational spectroscopy has reached a pivotal point at which questions like diagnostic value, therapeutic consequence and financial viability are gaining more and more importance. PMID:27250100

  2. Chiral Enhanced Phonon Excitations in Inelastic Electron Tunneling Spectroscopy of Graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Natterer, Fabian Donat

    2015-03-01

    In graphene, phonons are important agents for a wide range of phenomena; they mediate relaxation rates for hot carriers, they lead to van-Hove singularities, and they induce a renormalization of the Fermi velocity due to electron-phonon coupling and many-body interactions. The previous observations of phonons by inelastic electron tunneling spectroscopy (IETS) have been expandable in terms of detail and resolution, due to weak signals and other spectral features which inhibit a clear distinction between phonons and miscellaneous excitations. We find that utilizing a back gated graphene device, where the graphene charge carrier density can be varied in magnitude and sign, allows all the critical point graphene phonons with large density of states to be sampled by IETS with the scanning tunneling microscope, and in good agreement with density functional calculations. In addition, a strong overtone excitation at 360 meV is observed. Quite surprisingly, we observe all the graphene excitations are resonantly enhanced when the charge carrier type is switched, indicating that this amplification occurs whenever the inelastic transition allows a change in the graphene chirality. The chiral enhancement is observed to follow a linear trend with energy and reaches almost an order of magnitude for the highest transition. Our averaging technique suppresses charge carrier dependent excitations, while it improves the signal for inelastic transitions. This approach can be employed as a guide in advanced studies that are relying on gate tunable graphene devices, such as for the detection of spin, vibrational, or rotational excitations in adsorbates. Collaborators: Y. Zhao* , J. Wyrick* , W. Y. Ruan** , Y-H. Chan** , M-Y. Chou** , N. B. Zhitenev* , J. A. Stroscio* : * NIST/CNST, ** Georgia Tech, FDN appreciates funding from the SNF foundation under Project No. 148891.

  3. Vibrational Spectroscopy of Halogen Substituted Benzene Derivatives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dwivedi, Y.; Rai, S. B.

    2008-11-01

    The absorption spectra of halogen substituted benzenes have been studied in its pure form in the 400-20000 cm-1 region. Large number of bands involving fundamental, C-H overtones and combination bands has been observed. Vibrational frequencies, anharmonicity constants and dissociation energies, for the C-H stretch vibrations have been determined using local mode model. The frequencies obtained are compared with the frequencies obtained theoretically using B3LYP/6-311G* method. Effect of hydrogen atom substitution by chlorine and bromine atoms has been studied by measuring changes in the vibrational frequency and bond length of the C-H bond. Frequency changes have been well correlated with the change in charge density on the carbon as well as chlorine atoms.

  4. Dynamic localization of electronic excitation in photosynthetic complexes revealed with chiral two-dimensional spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fidler, Andrew F.; Singh, Ved P.; Long, Phillip D.; Dahlberg, Peter D.; Engel, Gregory S.

    2014-02-01

    Time-resolved ultrafast optical probes of chiral dynamics provide a new window allowing us to explore how interactions with such structured environments drive electronic dynamics. Incorporating optical activity into time-resolved spectroscopies has proven challenging because of the small signal and large achiral background. Here we demonstrate that two-dimensional electronic spectroscopy can be adapted to detect chiral signals and that these signals reveal how excitations delocalize and contract following excitation. We dynamically probe the evolution of chiral electronic structure in the light-harvesting complex 2 of purple bacteria following photoexcitation by creating a chiral two-dimensional mapping. The dynamics of the chiral two-dimensional signal directly reports on changes in the degree of delocalization of the excitonic states following photoexcitation. The mechanism of energy transfer in this system may enhance transfer probability because of the coherent coupling among chromophores while suppressing fluorescence that arises from populating delocalized states. This generally applicable spectroscopy will provide an incisive tool to probe ultrafast transient molecular fluctuations that are obscured in non-chiral experiments.

  5. Broadband infrared vibrational nano-spectroscopy using thermal blackbody radiation.

    PubMed

    O'Callahan, Brian T; Lewis, William E; Möbius, Silke; Stanley, Jared C; Muller, Eric A; Raschke, Markus B

    2015-12-14

    Infrared vibrational nano-spectroscopy based on scattering scanning near-field optical microscopy (s-SNOM) provides intrinsic chemical specificity with nanometer spatial resolution. Here we use incoherent infrared radiation from a 1400 K thermal blackbody emitter for broadband infrared (IR) nano-spectroscopy. With optimized interferometric heterodyne signal amplification we achieve few-monolayer sensitivity in phonon polariton spectroscopy and attomolar molecular vibrational spectroscopy. Near-field localization and nanoscale spatial resolution is demonstrated in imaging flakes of hexagonal boron nitride (hBN) and determination of its phonon polariton dispersion relation. The signal-to-noise ratio calculations and analysis for different samples and illumination sources provide a reference for irradiance requirements and the attainable near-field signal levels in s-SNOM in general. The use of a thermal emitter as an IR source thus opens s-SNOM for routine chemical FTIR nano-spectroscopy. PMID:26698997

  6. Seventh international conference on time-resolved vibrational spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Dyer, R.B.; Martinez, M.A.D.; Shreve, A.; Woodruff, W.H.

    1997-04-01

    The International Conference on Time-Resolved Vibrational Spectroscopy (TRVS) is widely recognized as the major international forum for the discussion of advances in this rapidly growing field. The 1995 conference was the seventh in a series that began at Lake Placid, New York, 1982. Santa Fe, New Mexico, was the site of the Seventh International Conference on Time-Resolved Vibrational Spectroscopy, held from June 11 to 16, 1995. TRVS-7 was attended by 157 participants from 16 countries and 85 institutions, and research ranging across the full breadth of the field of time-resolved vibrational spectroscopy was presented. Advances in both experimental capabilities for time-resolved vibrational measurements and in theoretical descriptions of time-resolved vibrational methods continue to occur, and several sessions of the conference were devoted to discussion of these advances and the associated new directions in TRVS. Continuing the interdisciplinary tradition of the TRVS meetings, applications of time-resolved vibrational methods to problems in physics, biology, materials science, and chemistry comprised a large portion of the papers presented at the conference.

  7. Vibrational spectroscopy used in milk products analysis: A review.

    PubMed

    Bunaciu, Andrei A; Aboul-Enein, Hassan Y; Hoang, Vu Dang

    2016-04-01

    Milk is a fluid containing several substances, and its composition depends on several factors. Vibrational spectroscopy is a powerful tool to determine the constituent concentrations and qualitative characteristics of dairy products. Vibrational spectrometry covers a series of well-established analytical methodologies suitable to be employed for both qualitative and quantitative purposes. In the first part of this review, theoretical aspects on vibrational techniques are presented; in the second part, the most important papers, published during the period 2009-2015, related to milk analysis are discussed. PMID:26593568

  8. Vibrational spectroscopy of shock-compressed liquid CO

    SciTech Connect

    Moore, D.S.; Schmidt, S.C.; Shaw, M.S.; Johnson, J.D.

    1991-01-01

    Single-pulse, multiplex, coherent anti-Stokes Raman spectroscopy (CARS) was used to observe the vibrational spectra of liquid CO shock compressed to several pressures and temperatures up to 9.9 GPa and 2010 K. The experimental spectra were compared to synthetic spectra calculated using a semiclassical model for CARS intensities and estimated vibrational frequencies, peak Raman susceptibilities and Raman line widths. A comparison of these data with result in the isoelectronic and materially very similar N{sub 2} show a significant difference in vibrational frequency shift with pressure. 21 refs., 2 figs.

  9. Surface vibrational spectroscopy of pure liquids

    SciTech Connect

    Superfine, R.; Huang, J.Y.; Du, Q.; Shen, Y.R.

    1991-03-01

    We report the use of infrared visible sum frequency generation (SFG) to obtain the surface vibrational spectra of pure liquid methanol and water. These are the first surface vibrational spectra ever obtained for pure liquids. We have also deduced from the SFG results the absolute orientations of molecules at the pure liquid/vapor interface. The surface methanol molecules appear to have their CH{sub 3} groups projecting out of the liquid in agreement with the theoretical prediction. For the orientation of surface water molecules, however, different calculations have yielded very different predictions. Our SFG measurement provides clear evidence that the molecules are oriented with an unbonded hydrogen projecting out of the liquid. 9 refs., 3 figs.

  10. Theoretical determination of parity-violating vibrational frequency differences between the enantiomers of chiral molecules.

    PubMed

    Viglione, Rosario G

    2004-11-22

    A perturbation treatment has been used to compute the leading first- and second-order parity-violating corrections to the vibrational energy levels of a chiral molecule. Assuming the molecular equilibrium geometry as expansion point of both parity-violating and parity-conserving potential-energy surfaces, it is shown that these corrections, i.e., harmonic and anharmonic contributions, are of the same order of magnitude and that none of them can be neglected for a realistic determination of vibrational frequency differences. Numerical tests based on ab initio MP2 force fields and quantum-relativistic calculations of the parity-violating potential for each normal mode of PHBrF and AsHBrF molecules confirm this conclusion. In particular, it is shown that a normal mode of AsHBrF is characterized by one of the largest vibrational frequency difference ever found--the prediction is approximately 0.1 Hz--only one order of magnitude less than the presumed resolution limit of current experimental investigations. PMID:15549870

  11. Visualizing the chiral anomaly in Dirac and Weyl semimetals with photoemission spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Behrends, Jan; Grushin, Adolfo G.; Ojanen, Teemu; Bardarson, Jens H.

    2016-02-01

    Quantum anomalies are the breaking of a classical symmetry by quantum fluctuations. They dictate how physical systems of diverse nature, ranging from fundamental particles to crystalline materials, respond topologically to external perturbations, insensitive to local details. The anomaly paradigm was triggered by the discovery of the chiral anomaly that contributes to the decay of pions into photons and influences the motion of superfluid vortices in 3He-A. In the solid state, it also fundamentally affects the properties of topological Weyl and Dirac semimetals, recently realized experimentally. In this work we propose that the most identifying consequence of the chiral anomaly, the charge density imbalance between fermions of different chirality induced by nonorthogonal electric and magnetic fields, can be directly observed in these materials with the existing technology of photoemission spectroscopy. With angle resolution, the chiral anomaly is identified by a characteristic note-shaped pattern of the emission spectra, originating from the imbalanced occupation of the bulk states and a previously unreported momentum dependent energy shift of the surface state Fermi arcs. We further demonstrate that the chiral anomaly likewise leaves an imprint in angle averaged emission spectra, facilitating its experimental detection. Thereby, our work provides essential theoretical input to foster the direct visualization of the chiral anomaly in condensed matter, in contrast to transport properties, such as negative magnetoresistance, which can also be obtained in the absence of a chiral anomaly.

  12. Examining surface and bulk structures using combined nonlinear vibrational spectroscopies.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Chi; Wang, Jie; Khmaladze, Alexander; Liu, Yuwei; Ding, Bei; Jasensky, Joshua; Chen, Zhan

    2011-06-15

    We combined sum-frequency generation (SFG) vibrational spectroscopy with coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS) spectroscopy in one system to examine both surface and bulk structures of materials with the same geometry and without the need to move the sample. Poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) and polystyrene (PS) thin films were tested before and after plasma treatment. The sensitivities of SFG and CARS were tested by varying polymer film thickness and using a lipid monolayer. PMID:21685990

  13. Vibrational photodetachment spectroscopy near the electron affinity of S2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barrick, J. B.; Yukich, J. N.

    2016-02-01

    We have conducted laser photodetachment spectroscopy near the detachment threshold of the electron affinity of S2 in a 1.8-T field. The ions are prepared by dissociative electron attachment to carbonyl sulfide. The experiment is conducted in a Penning ion trap and with a narrow-band, tunable, Ti:sapphire laser. A hybrid model for photodetachment in an ion trap is fit to the data using the appropriate Franck-Condon factors. The observations reveal detachment from and to the first few vibrational levels of the anion and the neutral molecule, respectively. Evaporative cooling of the anion ensemble condenses the thermal distribution to the lowest initial vibrational states. The subsequent detachment spectroscopy yields results consistent with a vibrationally cooled anion population.

  14. Spectroscopy, reaction, and photodissociation in highly vibrationally excited molecules

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-01-01

    Highly vibrationally excited molecules often control the course of chemical reactions in the atmosphere, combustion, plasmas, and many other environments. The research described in this Progress Report uses laser excitation and interrogation techniques to study and control the dynamics of highly vibrationally excited molecules. In particular, they show that it is possible to unravel the details and influence the course of photodissociation and bimolecular reaction. The experiments use laser excitation of overtone vibrations to prepare highly vibrationally excited molecules, frequently with single quantum state resolution, and laser spectroscopy to monitor the subsequent behavior of the excited molecule. We have studied the vibrationally mediated photodissociation and the bond- and state-selected bimolecular reaction of highly vibrationally excited molecules. In the first process, one photon creates a highly excited molecule, a second photon from another laser dissociates it, and light from a third laser detects the population of individual product quantum states. This approach allows us to explore otherwise inaccessible regions of the ground and excited state potential energy surface and, by exciting to the proper regions of the surface, to control the breaking of a selected chemical bond. In the second process, the highly vibrationally excited molecule reacts with an atom formed either in a microwave discharge or by photolysis and another laser interrogates the products. We have used this approach to demonstrate mode- and bond-selected bimolecular reactions in which the initial excitation controls the subsequent chemistry. 30 refs., 8 figs.

  15. Configurational and conformational analysis of chiral molecules using IR and VCD spectroscopies: spiropentylcarboxylic acid methyl ester and spiropentyl acetate.

    PubMed

    Devlin, F J; Stephens, P J; Osterle, C; Wiberg, K B; Cheeseman, J R; Frisch, M J

    2002-11-15

    The chiral monosubstituted derivatives of spiropentane, spiropentylcarboxylic acid methyl ester, 1, and spiropentyl acetate, 2, have been synthesized in optically active form. Configurational and conformational analysis of 1 and 2 has been carried out using infrared (IR) and vibrational circular dichroism (VCD) spectroscopies. Analysis of the experimental IR and VCD spectra has been carried out using ab initio density functional theory (DFT). For both 1 and 2, DFT predicts two populated conformations. Comparison to experiment of the conformationally averaged IR and VCD spectra of 1 and 2, predicted using DFT, provides unequivocal evidence of the predicted conformations and yields the absolute configurations R(-)/S(+) for 1 and R(+)/S(-) for 2. These absolute configurations are consistent with the R(-)/S(+) absolute configuration of spiropentylcarboxylic acid, assigned previously via X-ray crystallography of its alpha-phenylethylammonium salt. PMID:12423137

  16. Chiral Recognition Studies of α-(Nonafluoro-tert-butoxy)carboxylic Acids by NMR Spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Nemes, Anikó; Csóka, Tamás; Béni, Szabolcs; Farkas, Viktor; Rábai, József; Szabó, Dénes

    2015-06-19

    Three chiral α-(nonafluoro-tert-butoxy)carboxylic acids (R)-1, (RS)-2, (R)-3 were synthesized to examine their application as chiral solvating agents with amines. As a model compound, first (S)- and/or (RS)-α-phenylethylamine was used, and their diastereomeric salts were investigated by (1)H and (19)F NMR and ECD spectroscopy. The NMR spectroscopic studies were carried out at room temperature using the slightly polar CDCl3 and apolar C6D6 as solvents in 5 mM and 54 mM concentrations. The difference of the chemical shifts (Δδ) in the diastereomeric complexes is comparable with other, well-known chiral derivatizing and solvating agents (e.g., Mosher's acid, Pirkle's alcohol). Diastereomeric salts of racemic acids (RS)-1 and (RS)-2 with biologically active amines (1R,2S)-ephedrine and (S)-dapoxetine were also investigated by (19)F NMR spectroscopy. PMID:26024423

  17. Determining the static electronic and vibrational energy correlations via two-dimensional electronic-vibrational spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dong, Hui; Lewis, Nicholas H. C.; Oliver, Thomas A. A.; Fleming, Graham R.

    2015-05-01

    Changes in the electronic structure of pigments in protein environments and of polar molecules in solution inevitably induce a re-adaption of molecular nuclear structure. Both changes of electronic and vibrational energies can be probed with visible or infrared lasers, such as two-dimensional electronic spectroscopy or vibrational spectroscopy. The extent to which the two changes are correlated remains elusive. The recent demonstration of two-dimensional electronic-vibrational (2DEV) spectroscopy potentially enables a direct measurement of this correlation experimentally. However, it has hitherto been unclear how to characterize the correlation from the spectra. In this paper, we present a theoretical formalism to demonstrate the slope of the nodal line between the excited state absorption and ground state bleach peaks in the spectra as a characterization of the correlation between electronic and vibrational transition energies. We also show the dynamics of the nodal line slope is correlated to the vibrational spectral dynamics. Additionally, we demonstrate the fundamental 2DEV spectral line-shape of a monomer with newly developed response functions.

  18. Determining the static electronic and vibrational energy correlations via two-dimensional electronic-vibrational spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Dong, Hui; Lewis, Nicholas H. C.; Oliver, Thomas A. A.; Fleming, Graham R.

    2015-05-07

    Changes in the electronic structure of pigments in protein environments and of polar molecules in solution inevitably induce a re-adaption of molecular nuclear structure. Both changes of electronic and vibrational energies can be probed with visible or infrared lasers, such as two-dimensional electronic spectroscopy or vibrational spectroscopy. The extent to which the two changes are correlated remains elusive. The recent demonstration of two-dimensional electronic-vibrational (2DEV) spectroscopy potentially enables a direct measurement of this correlation experimentally. However, it has hitherto been unclear how to characterize the correlation from the spectra. In this paper, we present a theoretical formalism to demonstrate the slope of the nodal line between the excited state absorption and ground state bleach peaks in the spectra as a characterization of the correlation between electronic and vibrational transition energies. We also show the dynamics of the nodal line slope is correlated to the vibrational spectral dynamics. Additionally, we demonstrate the fundamental 2DEV spectral line-shape of a monomer with newly developed response functions.

  19. Determining the static electronic and vibrational energy correlations via two-dimensional electronic-vibrational spectroscopy

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Dong, Hui; Lewis, Nicholas H. C.; Oliver, Thomas A. A.; Fleming, Graham R.

    2015-05-07

    Changes in the electronic structure of pigments in protein environments and of polar molecules in solution inevitably induce a re-adaption of molecular nuclear structure. Both changes of electronic and vibrational energies can be probed with visible or infrared lasers, such as two-dimensional electronic spectroscopy or vibrational spectroscopy. The extent to which the two changes are correlated remains elusive. The recent demonstration of two-dimensional electronic-vibrational (2DEV) spectroscopy potentially enables a direct measurement of this correlation experimentally. However, it has hitherto been unclear how to characterize the correlation from the spectra. In this report, we present a theoretical formalism to demonstrate themore » slope of the nodal line between the excited state absorption and ground state bleach peaks in the spectra as a characterization of the correlation between electronic and vibrational transition energies. In conclusion, we also show the dynamics of the nodal line slope is correlated to the vibrational spectral dynamics. Additionally, we demonstrate the fundamental 2DEV spectral line-shape of a monomer with newly developed response functions« less

  20. Determining the static electronic and vibrational energy correlations via two-dimensional electronic-vibrational spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Dong, Hui; Lewis, Nicholas H. C.; Oliver, Thomas A. A.; Fleming, Graham R.

    2015-05-07

    Changes in the electronic structure of pigments in protein environments and of polar molecules in solution inevitably induce a re-adaption of molecular nuclear structure. Both changes of electronic and vibrational energies can be probed with visible or infrared lasers, such as two-dimensional electronic spectroscopy or vibrational spectroscopy. The extent to which the two changes are correlated remains elusive. The recent demonstration of two-dimensional electronic-vibrational (2DEV) spectroscopy potentially enables a direct measurement of this correlation experimentally. However, it has hitherto been unclear how to characterize the correlation from the spectra. In this report, we present a theoretical formalism to demonstrate the slope of the nodal line between the excited state absorption and ground state bleach peaks in the spectra as a characterization of the correlation between electronic and vibrational transition energies. In conclusion, we also show the dynamics of the nodal line slope is correlated to the vibrational spectral dynamics. Additionally, we demonstrate the fundamental 2DEV spectral line-shape of a monomer with newly developed response functions

  1. Finite element analysis of effective mechanical properties, vibration and acoustic performance of auxetic chiral core sandwich structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joshi, Hrishikesh Ravindra

    Honeycomb cellular materials are widely used in engineering applications due to their high strength to weight ratio and controllable effective mechanical properties. The effective properties are controlled by varying the geometry of the repetitive unit cells of honeycomb structure. Sandwich panels made of honeycomb cores are beneficial in many applications including vibration isolation and sound transmission reduction. Sandwich panels with standard honeycomb core configurations have previously been studied with regards to sound transmission behavior. It has been established that the auxetic honeycomb cores, having negative in-plane Poisson's ratio, exhibit higher sound transmission loss as compared to regular honeycomb cores. In this study, the vibration and sound transmission response of novel auxetic chiral honeycomb structures (both hexa-chiral and anti-tetra chiral), have been investigated in detail using finite element analysis with two-dimensional plane elasticity elements. Chiral honeycomb structures are made up of a linear tessellation of periodic unit cell, which consists of circular nodes of radius ' r ' connected to each other by tangent ligaments of length ' L '. The distance between two adjacent circular nodes is ' R '. These geometric parameters are tailored to obtain the chiral structure with desired effective mechanical properties of in-plane Poisson's ratio, Young's modulus and shear modulus. Results show that, for both the hexa-chiral and anti-tetra-chiral configurations with same thickness, structures with smaller node radius 'r' have higher in-plane negative Poisson's ratio, effective Young's modulus, and shear modulus. The Poisson's ratio of anti-tetra-chiral structure with small node radius and thickness is found to approach the limit of -1. A steady state dynamic response of the chiral honeycomb sandwich panel subjected to uniform pressure load on the bottom face-sheet is also investigated over a frequency range of 1 Hz to 2000 Hz. It is

  2. Vibration-rotation spectroscopy of molecules trapped inside C60.

    PubMed

    Cross, R James

    2008-08-01

    A simple model is developed to treat the energy levels and spectroscopy of diatomic molecules inside C 60. The C 60 cage is treated as spherically symmetric, and the coupling to the C 60 vibrations is ignored. The remaining six degrees of freedom correspond to the vibrations and rotations of the diatomic molecule and the rattling vibration of the molecule inside the cage. By using conservation of angular momentum, we can remove two of these motions and simplify the calculations. The resulting energy levels are simple and can be labeled by a set of quantum numbers. The IR and Raman spectra look like those of gas-phase diatomic molecules at low temperatures. At higher temperatures, hot bands due to the low-frequency rattling mode appear, and the spectrum becomes congested, looking like a solution spectrum. PMID:18598014

  3. Vibrational characterization of pheomelanin and trichochrome F by Raman spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galván, Ismael; Jorge, Alberto; Solano, Francisco; Wakamatsu, Kazumasa

    2013-06-01

    We characterize for the first time the vibrational state of natural pheomelanin using Raman spectroscopy and model pigment synthesized from 5-S-cysteinyldopa. The shape of the Raman spectrum was very different from that of eumelanin. Four Raman bands were visible in the 500-2000 cm-1 wavenumber region about 500, 1150, 1490 and 2000 cm-1, which we assigned to the out-of-plane deformation and the stretching vibration of the phenyl rings, to the stretching vibration of C-N bonds or the stretching and wagging vibration of CH2, and to overtone or combination bands. Interestingly, we also show that the Raman spectrum of synthetic trichochrome F, a pigment that may be produced along with pheomelanin during pheomelanogenesis, is different from that of pheomelanin and similar to the spectrum of eumelanin. We could detect Raman signal of both eumelanin and pheomelanin in feathers and hairs where both pigments simultaneously occur without the need of isolating the pigment. This indicates that Raman spectroscopy represents a non-invasive method to detect pheomelanin and distinguish it from other pigments. This may be especially relevant to detect pheomelanin in animal skin including humans, where it has been associated with animal appearance and classification, human phototypes, prevention of skin diseases and cancer risk.

  4. Vibrational characterization of pheomelanin and trichochrome F by Raman spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Galván, Ismael; Jorge, Alberto; Solano, Francisco; Wakamatsu, Kazumasa

    2013-06-01

    We characterize for the first time the vibrational state of natural pheomelanin using Raman spectroscopy and model pigment synthesized from 5-S-cysteinyldopa. The shape of the Raman spectrum was very different from that of eumelanin. Four Raman bands were visible in the 500-2000 cm(-1) wavenumber region about 500, 1150, 1490 and 2000 cm(-1), which we assigned to the out-of-plane deformation and the stretching vibration of the phenyl rings, to the stretching vibration of C-N bonds or the stretching and wagging vibration of CH2, and to overtone or combination bands. Interestingly, we also show that the Raman spectrum of synthetic trichochrome F, a pigment that may be produced along with pheomelanin during pheomelanogenesis, is different from that of pheomelanin and similar to the spectrum of eumelanin. We could detect Raman signal of both eumelanin and pheomelanin in feathers and hairs where both pigments simultaneously occur without the need of isolating the pigment. This indicates that Raman spectroscopy represents a non-invasive method to detect pheomelanin and distinguish it from other pigments. This may be especially relevant to detect pheomelanin in animal skin including humans, where it has been associated with animal appearance and classification, human phototypes, prevention of skin diseases and cancer risk. PMID:23563634

  5. Detailed spectroscopy of the chiral-twin candidate bands in {sup 136}Pm

    SciTech Connect

    Hartley, D. J.; Riedinger, L. L.; Riley, M. A.; Balabanski, D. L.; Kondev, F. G.; Laird, R. W.; Pfohl, J.; Archer, D. E.; Brown, T. B.; Clark, R. M.

    2001-09-01

    The chiral-twin candidate bands recently observed in {sup 136}Pm have been extended to high spins [I=(21)] using the Gammasphere {gamma}-ray spectrometer and the Microball charged-particle detector array. A more-detailed spectroscopy of the bands was possible, where the rotational alignments and B(M1)/B(E2) ratios confirm that both sequences have the {pi}h{sub 11/2}{nu}h{sub 11/2} configuration. Particle-rotor calculations of intraband and interband transition strength ratios of the chiral-twin bands are compared with experimental values for the first time. Good agreement was found between the predicted transition strength ratios and the experimental values, thus supporting the possible chiral nature of the {pi}h{sub 11/2}{nu}h{sub 11/2} configuration in {sup 136}Pm.

  6. Enantiomeric 4-Acylamino-6-alkyloxy-2 Alkylthiopyrimidines As Potential A3 Adenosine Receptor Antagonists: HPLC Chiral Resolution and Absolute Configuration Assignment by a Full Set of Chiroptical Spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Rossi, Daniela; Nasti, Rita; Marra, Annamaria; Meneghini, Silvia; Mazzeo, Giuseppe; Longhi, Giovanna; Memo, Maurizio; Cosimelli, Barbara; Greco, Giovanni; Novellino, Ettore; Da Settimo, Federico; Martini, Claudia; Taliani, Sabrina; Abbate, Sergio; Collina, Simona

    2016-05-01

    The chiral separation of enantiomeric couples of three potential A3 adenosine receptor antagonists: (R/S)-N-(6-(1-phenylethoxy)-2-(propylthio)pyrimidin-4-yl)acetamide (), (R/S)-N-(2-(1-phenylethylthio)-6-propoxypyrimidin-4-yl)acetamide (), and (R/S)-N-(2-(benzylthio)-6-sec-butoxypyrimidin-4-yl)acetamide () was achieved by high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). Three types of chiroptical spectroscopies, namely, optical rotatory dispersion (ORD), electronic circular dichroism (ECD), and vibrational circular dichroism (VCD), were applied to enantiomeric compounds. Through comparison with Density Functional Theory (DFT) calculations, encompassing extensive conformational analysis, full assignment of the absolute configuration (AC) for the three sets of compounds was obtained. Chirality 28:434-440, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:27095007

  7. Coherent Multidimensional Vibrational Spectroscopy of Biomolecules; Concepts, Simulations and Challenges

    PubMed Central

    Zhuang, Wei; Hayashi, Tomoyuki; Mukamel, Shaul

    2009-01-01

    The response of complex molecules to sequences of femtosecond infrared pulses provides a unique window into their structure, dynamics and fluctuating environments, as projected into the vibrational degrees of freedom. In this review we survey the basic principles of these novel two dimensional infrared (2DIR) analogues of multidimensional NMR. The perturbative approach for computing the nonlinear optical response of coupled localized chromophores is introduced and applied to the amide backbone transitions of protein, liquid water, membrane lipids, and amyloid fibrils. The signals are analyzed using classical MD simulations combined with an effective fluctuating Hamiltonian for coupled localized anharmonic vibrations whose dependence on the local electrostatic environment is parameterized by an ab initio map. Several simulation protocols. Including the Cumulant expansion of Gaussian Fluctuation (CGF), a quasiparticle scattering approach (NEE), the Stochastic Liouville Equations (SLE), and Direct Numerical Propagation are surveyed. These are implemented in a code SPECTRON that interfaces with standard electronic structure and molecular mechanisms MD codes. Chirality-induced techniques which dramatically enhance the resolution are demonstrated. Signatures of conformational and hydrogen bonding fluctuations, protein folding, and chemical exchange processes are discussed. PMID:19415637

  8. Vibrational optical activity of chiral carbon nanoclusters treated by a generalized π-electron method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagy, Péter R.; Surján, Péter R.; Szabados, Ágnes

    2014-01-01

    Cross sections of inelastic light scattering accompanied by vibronic excitation in large conjugated carbon structures is assessed at the π-electron level. Intensities of Raman and vibrational Raman optical activity (VROA) spectra of fullerenes are computed, relying on a single electron per atom. When considering only first neighbor terms in the Hamiltonian (a tight-binding (TB) type or Hückel-model), Raman intensities are captured remarkably well, based on comparison with frequency-dependent linear response of the self-consistent field (SCF) method. Resorting to π-electron levels when computing spectral intensities brings a beneficial reduction in computational cost as compared to linear response SCF. At difference with total intensities, the first neighbor TB model is found inadequate for giving the left and right circularly polarized components of the scattered light, especially when the molecular surface is highly curved. To step beyond first neighbor approximation, an effective π-electron Hamiltonian, including interaction of all sites is derived from the all-electron Fockian, in the spirit of the Bloch-equation. Chiroptical cross-sections computed by this novel π-electron method improve upon first-neighbor TB considerably, with no increase in computational cost. Computed VROA spectra of chiral fullerenes, such as C76 and C28, are reported for the first time, both by conventional linear response SCF and effective π-electron models.

  9. Enhanced Vibrational Spectroscopies as Tools for Small Molecule Biosensing

    PubMed Central

    Boujday, Souhir; Lamy de la Chapelle, Marc; Srajer, Johannes; Knoll, Wolfgang

    2015-01-01

    In this short summary we summarize some of the latest developments in vibrational spectroscopic tools applied for the sensing of (small) molecules and biomolecules in a label-free mode of operation. We first introduce various concepts for the enhancement of InfraRed spectroscopic techniques, including the principles of Attenuated Total Reflection InfraRed (ATR-IR), (phase-modulated) InfraRed Reflection Absorption Spectroscopy (IRRAS/PM-IRRAS), and Surface Enhanced Infrared Reflection Absorption Spectroscopy (SEIRAS). Particular attention is put on the use of novel nanostructured substrates that allow for the excitation of propagating and localized surface plasmon modes aimed at operating additional enhancement mechanisms. This is then be complemented by the description of the latest development in Surface- and Tip-Enhanced Raman Spectroscopies, again with an emphasis on the detection of small molecules or bioanalytes. PMID:26343666

  10. Enhanced Vibrational Spectroscopies as Tools for Small Molecule Biosensing.

    PubMed

    Boujday, Souhir; de la Chapelle, Marc Lamy; Srajer, Johannes; Knoll, Wolfgang

    2015-01-01

    In this short summary we summarize some of the latest developments in vibrational spectroscopic tools applied for the sensing of (small) molecules and biomolecules in a label-free mode of operation. We first introduce various concepts for the enhancement of InfraRed spectroscopic techniques, including the principles of Attenuated Total Reflection InfraRed (ATR-IR), (phase-modulated) InfraRed Reflection Absorption Spectroscopy (IRRAS/PM-IRRAS), and Surface Enhanced Infrared Reflection Absorption Spectroscopy (SEIRAS). Particular attention is put on the use of novel nanostructured substrates that allow for the excitation of propagating and localized surface plasmon modes aimed at operating additional enhancement mechanisms. This is then be complemented by the description of the latest development in Surface- and Tip-Enhanced Raman Spectroscopies, again with an emphasis on the detection of small molecules or bioanalytes. PMID:26343666

  11. Computational Vibrational Spectroscopy of HDO in Osmolyte-Water Solutions.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hochan; Choi, Jun-Ho; Verma, Pramod Kumar; Cho, Minhaeng

    2016-07-28

    The IR absorption and time-resolved IR spectroscopy of the OD stretch mode of HDO in water was successfully used to study osmolyte effects on water H-bonding network. Protecting osmolytes such as sorbitol and trimethylglycine (TMG) make the vibrational OD stretch band red-shifted, whereas urea affects the OD band marginally. Furthermore, we recently showed that, even though sorbitol and TMG cause a slow-down of HDO rotation in their aqueous solutions, urea does not induce any change in the rotational relaxation of HDO in aqueous urea solutions even at high concentrations. To clarify the underlying osmolyte effects on water H-bonding structure and dynamics, we performed molecular dynamics (MD) simulations of a variety of aqueous osmolyte solutions. Using the vibrational solvatochromism model for the OD stretch mode and taking into account the vibrational non-Condon and polarization effects on the OD transition dipole moment, we then calculated the IR absorption spectra and rotational anisotropy decay of the OD stretch mode of HDO for the sake of direct comparisons with our experimental results. The simulation results on the OD stretch IR absorption spectra and the rotational relaxation rate of HDO in osmolyte solutions are found to be in quantitative agreement with experimental data, which confirms the validity of the MD simulation and vibrational solvatochromism approaches. As a result, it becomes clear that the protecting osmolytes like sorbitol and TMG significantly modulate water H-bonding network structure, while urea perturbs water structure little. We anticipate that the computational approach discussed here will serve as an interpretive method with atomic-level chemical accuracy of current linear and nonlinear time-resolved IR spectroscopy of structure and dynamics of water near the surfaces of membranes and proteins under crowded environments. PMID:27341918

  12. Vibrational Spectroscopy of HD{sup +} with 2-ppb Accuracy

    SciTech Connect

    Koelemeij, J. C. J.; Roth, B.; Wicht, A.; Ernsting, I.; Schiller, S.

    2007-04-27

    By measurement of the frequency of a vibrational overtone transition in the molecular hydrogen ion HD{sup +}, we demonstrate the first optical spectroscopy of trapped molecular ions with submegahertz accuracy. We use a diode laser, locked to a stable frequency comb, to perform resonance-enhanced multiphoton dissociation spectroscopy on sympathetically cooled HD{sup +} ions at 50 mK. The achieved 2-ppb relative accuracy is a factor of 150 higher than previous results for HD{sup +}, and the measured transition frequency agrees well with recent high-accuracy ab initio calculations, which include high-order quantum electrodynamic effects. We also show that our method bears potential for achieving considerably higher accuracy and may, if combined with slightly improved theoretical calculations, lead to a new and improved determination of the electron-proton mass ratio.

  13. Chemometrics applied to vibrational spectroscopy: overview, challenges and pitfalls

    SciTech Connect

    Haaland, D.M.

    1996-10-01

    Chemometric multivariate calibration methods are rapidly impacting quantitative infrared spectroscopy in many positive ways. The combination of vibrational spectroscopy and chemometrics has been used by industry for quality control and process monitoring. The growth of these methods has been phenomenal in the past decade. Yet, as with any new technology, there are growing pains. The methods are so powerful at finding correlations in the data, that when used without great care they can readily yield results that are not valid for the analysis of future unknown samples. In this paper, the power of the multivariate calibration methods is discussed while pointing out common pitfalls and some remaining challenges that may slow the implementation of chemometrics in research and industry.

  14. Structural dynamics in complex liquids studied with multidimensional vibrational spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Tokmakoff, Andrei

    2013-08-31

    The development of new sustainable energy sources is linked to our understanding of the molecular properties of water and aqueous solutions. Energy conversion, storage, and transduction processes, particularly those that occur in biology, fuel cells, and batteries, make use of water for the purpose of moving energy in the form of charges and mediating the redox chemistry that allows this energy to be stored as and released from chemical bonds. To build our fundamental knowledge in this area, this project supports work in the Tokmakoff group to investigate the molecular dynamics of water’s hydrogen bond network, and how these dynamics influence its solutes and the mechanism of proton transport in water. To reach the goals of this grant, we developed experiments to observe molecular dynamics in water as directly as possible, using ultrafast multidimensional vibrational spectroscopy. We excite and probe broad vibrational resonances of water, molecular solutes, and protons in water. By correlating how molecules evolve from an initial excitation frequency to a final frequency, we can describe the underlying molecular dynamics. Theoretical modeling of the data with the help of computational spectroscopy coupled with molecular dynamics simulations provided the atomistic insight in these studies.

  15. Chirality changes in carbon nanotubes studied with near-field Raman spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Anderson, Neil; Hartschuh, Achim; Novotny, Lukas

    2007-03-01

    We report on the direct visualization of chirality changes in carbon nanotubes by mapping local changes in resonant RBM phonon frequencies with an optical resolution of 40 nm using near-field Raman spectroscopy. We observe the transition from semiconducting-to-metal and metal-to-metal chiralities at the single nanotube level. Our experimental findings, based on detecting changes in resonant RBM frequencies, are complemented by measuring changes in the G-band frequency and line shape. In addition, we observe increased Raman scattering due to local defects associated with the structural transition. From our results, we determine the spatial extent of the transition region to be Ltrans approximately 40-100 nm. PMID:17324000

  16. Vibrational Assignments of Six-Coordinate Ferrous Heme Nitrosyls: New Insight From Nuclear Resonance Vibrational Spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Paulat, F.; Berto, T.C.; George, S.DeBeer; Goodrich, L.; Praneeth, V.K.K.; Sulok, C.D.; Lehnert, N.

    2009-05-21

    This Communication addresses a long-standing problem: the exact vibrational assignments of the low-energy modes of the Fe-N-O subunit in six-coordinate ferrous heme nitrosyl model complexes. This problem is addressed using nuclear resonance vibrational spectroscopy (NRVS) coupled to {sup 15}N{sup 18}O isotope labeling and detailed simulations of the obtained data. Two isotope-sensitive features are identified at 437 and 563 cm{sup -1}. Normal coordinate analysis shows that the 437 cm{sup -1} mode corresponds to the Fe-NO stretch, whereas the 563 cm{sup -1} band is identified with the Fe-N-O bend. The relative NRVS intensities of these features determine the degree of vibrational mixing between the stretch and the bend. The implications of these results are discussed with respect to the trans effect of imidazole on the bound NO. In addition, a comparison to myoglobin-NO (Mb-NO) is made to determine the effect of the Mb active site pocket on the bound NO.

  17. Transient absorption spectroscopy detection of sensitized delayed fluorescence in chiral benzophenone/naphthalene systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonancía, Paula; Jiménez, M. Consuelo; Miranda, Miguel A.

    2011-10-01

    Transient absorption spectroscopy has proven to be a powerful tool to investigate the formation and decay of excited singlet states upon triplet-triplet annihilation, following T-T energy transfer from a selectively excited sensitizer. Thus, upon selective excitation of benzophenone (BZP) by laser flash photolysis (LFP) at λ = 355 nm in the presence of naphthalene (NPT), a negative band centered at 340 nm has been detected, with growth and decay in the microsecond timescale. It has been assigned to the P-type NPT delayed-fluorescence. In the case of chiral BZP/NPT systems, stereodifferentiation has been observed in the kinetics of the involved photophysical processes.

  18. Cryogenic Ion Vibrational Spectroscopy of - CH Activation Intermediates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marsh, Brett; Garand, Etienne

    2013-06-01

    Despite the rather simple composition of alkanes the strength of their C-C and C-H bonds has made controlled, selective reaction of these compounds an unrealized goal of synthetic chemistry. The field was pioneered by Shilov and coworkers in 1969 when they observed the exchange of H and D in methane that was bubbled into an acidic solution of K_2PtCl_4. The Shilov reaction has since been extended to induce oxidation of methane selectively to methanol and has become the standard bearer of CH activation despite its limitations. The mechanism for the reaction, while inferred from kinetics studies, is still largely uncharacterized. Here, we present our work towards applying cryogenic ion vibrational spectroscopy (CIVS) to capture the intermediate species of this reaction with a focus on the σ-CH adduct formed between methane and Pt(II) complexes that is believed to be crucial to the selectivity and rate of this reaction.

  19. Neutron Vibrational Spectroscopy and modeling of polymer/dopant interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moule, Adam; Harrelson, Thomas; Cheng, Yongqiang; Ramirez-Cuesta, Anibal; Faller, Roland; Huang, David

    Neutron vibrational spectroscopy (VISION and ORNL) is a powerful technique to determine the configurations of organic species in amorphous samples. We apply this technique to samples of the semiconducting polymer regio-regular P3HT to determine the molecular configurations outside of the crystalline domains, which have never been investigated. Application of density functional theory modeling using crystal field theory and for the single molecule approach yield a variety of configurations of the polymer backbone and side chains. These results demonstrate that only 1% of the volume corresponds to the assumed crystal structure solved using x-ray diffraction. In addition we investigate the configurations of P3HT doped with the molecular dopant F4TCNQ and determine that the charging of the polymer backbone leads to increased side chain stiffness. These results have significant implications for design of organic electronic devices based on thiophenes.

  20. Vibrational Spectroscopy of Sympathetically Cooled CaH^+ Molecular Ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khanyile, Ncamiso B.; Goeders, James E.; Brown, Kenneth R.

    2013-06-01

    The search for time variation in the fundamental constants of nature such as the fine structure constant(α) and the proton/electron mass ratio(μ), is an area of active research. Comparing the vibrational overtones of CaH^+ with electronic transitions in atoms has been proposed as a means to detect possible time variation of μ Before these precision measurements can be realized, the survey spectroscopy needs to be performed. We describe our experiments using a Coulomb crystal of sympathetically cooled CaH^+ and laser-cooled Ca^+ ions to measure the vibrational overtones by resonance-enhanced multiphoton photo-dissociation (REMPD) in a linear Paul trap. The dissociation of CaH^+ is detected by observing the change in the crystal composition by monitoring the Ca^+ fluorescence. Future single ion experiments for the precision measurement are also discussed. J. Uzan, Rev. Mod. Phys. 75, 403 (2003). M. Kajita and Y. Moriwaki, J. Phys. B: At. Mol. Opt. Phys. 42, 154022(2009).

  1. Liquid Space Lubricants Examined by Vibrational Micro-Spectroscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Street, Kenneth W., Jr.

    2008-01-01

    Considerable effort has been expended to develop liquid lubricants for satellites and space exploration vehicles. These lubricants must often perform under a range of harsh conditions such as vacuum, radiation, and temperature extremes while in orbit or in transit and in extremely dusty environments at destinations such as the Moon and Mars. Historically, oil development was guided by terrestrial application, which did not provide adequate space lubricants. Novel fluids such as the perfluorinated polyethers provided some relief but are far from ideal. With each new fluid proposed to solve one problem, other problems have arisen. Much of the work performed at the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Glenn Research Center (GRC) in elucidating the mechanisms by which chemical degradation of space oils occur has been done by vibrational micro-spectroscopic techniques such as infrared and Raman, which this review details. Presented are fundamental lubrication studies as well as actual case studies in which vibrational spectroscopy has led to millions of dollars in savings and potentially prevented loss of mission.

  2. Vibrationally resolved anion photoelectron spectroscopy of metal clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, Stephen R.

    Vibrationally resolved anion photoelectron spectroscopy of metal clusters Vibrationally resolved anion photoelectron spectroscopy (APES) and density functional theory (DFT) are applied to the study of structure and reactivity in small metal containing molecules. The studies described fall into two general categories: the study of bare metal clusters and the study of metal/organic ligand reactions. The current lack of spectroscopic data for small, bare gas-phase metal compounds makes the experimental study of such compounds important for understanding structure and bonding in open-shell metallic species. The heteronuclear diatomic anions MCu- (M = Cr, Mo) were prepared in a flowing afterglow ion-molecule reactor, and studied experimentally with APES. Anion and neutral vibrational frequencies and MCu electron affinities were obtained for both systems. The experiments were supplemented by DFT calculations. The combined use of experiment and theory allows for the assignment of both photoelectron spectra, including a reassignment of the CrCu ground state reported in the literature. Similarly, DFT was used to assign the anionic/neutral electronic states observed in the photoelectron spectra of Al3- and Al3O-. The study of partially ligated organometallic complexes offers a means of examining the interactions between metal atoms and individual ligand molecules. DFT was used to assign electronic states observed in the photoelectron spectra of NbC2H2-, NbC4H4 -NbC6H6- and VC6H 6-. Comparison of the NbnHn - (n = 2, 4, 6) spectra (obtained through the reaction of C2 H4 and Nb) with DFT results provides the first direct spectroscopic evidence of the conversion of ethylene to benzene by a gas phase metal atom. Experiments were used to probe the reactivity of Y with C2H 4 in an effort to examine the generality of the metal induced C 2H4 dehydrogenation/cyclization reactions. Some of the key products in the Y reactions were YC2H-, YC 2H2-, and YC6H5 -. However, the results

  3. Monitoring surface processes during heterogeneous asymmetric hydrogenation of ketones on a chirally modified platinum catalyst by operando spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Meemken, Fabian; Hungerbühler, Konrad; Baiker, Alfons

    2014-08-11

    Surface processes occurring at the catalytic chiral surface of a cinchona-modified Pt catalyst during the asymmetric hydrogenation of activated ketones have been monitored for the first time using operando ATR-IR spectroscopy. Fundamental information about this catalytic system could be gained, including the chiral modification process of the catalyst, the surface interaction of reactant ketone with preadsorbed chiral modifier, the role of hydrogen as well as the influence of the product enantiomers in the catalytic cycle. The formation of a diastereomeric transient surface complex between ketone and chiral modifier was found to be related to the ketone consumption. Among the studied activated ketones, a correlation between stereoselection and the strength of the intermolecular hydrogen bond was identified. Dissociated hydrogen from the catalytic surface is found to play a crucial role in the formation of the diastereomeric surface complex. PMID:24777839

  4. Chiral-index resolved length mapping of carbon nanotubes in solution using electric-field induced differential absorption spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Wenshan; Hennrich, Frank; Flavel, Benjamin S.; Kappes, Manfred M.; Krupke, Ralph

    2016-09-01

    The length of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) is an important metric for the integration of SWCNTs into devices and for the performance of SWCNT-based electronic or optoelectronic applications. In this work we propose a rather simple method based on electric-field induced differential absorption spectroscopy to measure the chiral-index-resolved average length of SWCNTs in dispersions. The method takes advantage of the electric-field induced length-dependent dipole moment of nanotubes and has been verified and calibrated by atomic force microscopy. This method not only provides a low cost, in situ approach for length measurements of SWCNTs in dispersion, but due to the sensitivity of the method to the SWCNT chiral index, the chiral index dependent average length of fractions obtained by chromatographic sorting can also be derived. Also, the determination of the chiral-index resolved length distribution seems to be possible using this method.

  5. Observation of terahertz vibrations in Pyrococcus furiosus rubredoxin via impulsive coherent vibrational spectroscopy and nuclear resonance vibrational spectroscopy--interpretation by molecular mechanics.

    PubMed

    Tan, Ming-Liang; Bizzarri, Anna Rita; Xiao, Yuming; Cannistraro, Salvatore; Ichiye, Toshiko; Manzoni, Cristian; Cerullo, Giulio; Adams, Michael W W; Jenney, Francis E; Cramer, Stephen P

    2007-03-01

    We have used impulsive coherent vibrational spectroscopy (ICVS) to study the Fe(S-Cys)(4) site in oxidized rubredoxin (Rd) from Pyrococcus furiosus (Pf). In this experiment, a 15 fs visible laser pulse is used to coherently pump the sample to an excited electronic state, and a second <10 fs pulse is used to probe the change in transmission as a function of the time delay. PfRd was observed to relax to the ground state by a single exponential decay with time constants of approximately 255-275 fs. Superimposed on this relaxation are oscillations caused by coherent excitation of vibrational modes in both excited and ground electronic states. Fourier transformation reveals the frequencies of these modes. The strongest ICV mode with 570 nm excitation is the symmetric Fe-S stretching mode near 310 cm(-1), compared to 313 cm(-1) in the low temperature resonance Raman. If the rubredoxin is pumped at 520 nm, a set of strong bands occurs between 20 and 110 cm(-1). Finally, there is a mode at approximately 500 cm(-1) which is similar to features near 508 cm(-1) in blue Cu proteins that have been attributed to excited state vibrations. Normal mode analysis using 488 protein atoms and 558 waters gave calculated spectra that are in good agreement with previous nuclear resonance vibrational spectra (NRVS) results. The lowest frequency normal modes are identified as collective motions of the entire protein or large segments of polypeptide. Motion in these modes may affect the polar environment of the redox site and thus tune the electron transfer functions in rubredoxins. PMID:17204331

  6. Molecular vibrational dynamics in polyvinyl alcohol studied by femtosecond coherent anti-stokes Raman spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kozai, T.; Yamashita, S.; Hirochi, K.; Miyagawa, H.; Tsurumachi, N.; Koshiba, S.; Nakanishi, S.; Itoh, H.

    2012-11-01

    We have performed femtosecond time-resolved coherent anti-stokes Raman spectroscopy (CARS) to study the vibrational dynamics in polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) film. We observed femtosecond coherent vibrational relaxation and CARS signal beats in PVA at room temperature. We found that the coherent vibrational relaxation of anti-symmetric CH2 stretching modes in PVA is faster than that of symmetric modes, probably due to faster vibrational energy transfer. The coherent vibrational relaxation of OH stretching modes was observed to be slower than that of CH2 modes, because OH stretching modes have less resonant energy transfer rate compared to CH2 modes.

  7. Multidimensional vibrational spectroscopy for tunneling processes in a dissipative environment.

    PubMed

    Ishizaki, Akihito; Tanimura, Yoshitaka

    2005-07-01

    Simulating tunneling processes as well as their observation are challenging problems for many areas. In this study, we consider a double-well potential system coupled to a heat bath with a linear-linear (LL) and square-linear (SL) system-bath interactions. The LL interaction leads to longitudinal (T1) and transversal (T2) homogeneous relaxations, whereas the SL interaction leads to the inhomogeneous dephasing (T2*) relaxation in the white noise limit with a rotating wave approximation. We discuss the dynamics of the double-well system under infrared (IR) laser excitations from a Gaussian-Markovian quantum Fokker-Planck equation approach, which was developed by generalizing Kubo's stochastic Liouville equation. Analytical expression of the Green function is obtained for a case of two-state-jump modulation by performing the Fourier-Laplace transformation. We then calculate a two-dimensional infrared signal, which is defined by the four-body correlation function of optical dipole, for various noise correlation time, system-bath coupling parameters, and temperatures. It is shown that the bath-induced vibrational excitation and relaxation dynamics between the tunneling splitting levels can be detected as the isolated off-diagonal peaks in the third-order two-dimensional infrared (2D-IR) spectroscopy for a specific phase matching condition. Furthermore, this spectroscopy also allows us to directly evaluate the rate constants for tunneling reactions, which relates to the coherence between the splitting levels; it can be regarded as a novel technique for measuring chemical reaction rates. We depict the change of reaction rates as a function of system-bath coupling strength and a temperature through the 2D-IR signal. PMID:16035851

  8. Investigating buried polymer interfaces using sum frequency generation vibrational spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Zhan

    2010-01-01

    This paper reviews recent progress in the studies of buried polymer interfaces using sum frequency generation (SFG) vibrational spectroscopy. Both buried solid/liquid and solid/solid interfaces involving polymeric materials are discussed. SFG studies of polymer/water interfaces show that different polymers exhibit varied surface restructuring behavior in water, indicating the importance of probing polymer/water interfaces in situ. SFG has also been applied to the investigation of interfaces between polymers and other liquids. It has been found that molecular interactions at such polymer/liquid interfaces dictate interfacial polymer structures. The molecular structures of silane molecules, which are widely used as adhesion promoters, have been investigated using SFG at buried polymer/silane and polymer/polymer interfaces, providing molecular-level understanding of polymer adhesion promotion. The molecular structures of polymer/solid interfaces have been examined using SFG with several different experimental geometries. These results have provided molecular-level information about polymer friction, adhesion, interfacial chemical reactions, interfacial electronic properties, and the structure of layer-by-layer deposited polymers. Such research has demonstrated that SFG is a powerful tool to probe buried interfaces involving polymeric materials, which are difficult to study by conventional surface sensitive analytical techniques. PMID:21113334

  9. Molecular Structure and Chirality Determination from Pulsed-Jet Fourier Transform Microwave Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lobsiger, Simon; Perez, Cristobal; Evangelisti, Luca; Seifert, Nathan A.; Pate, Brooks; Lehmann, Kevin

    2014-06-01

    Fourier transform microwave (FTMW) spectroscopy has been used for many years as one of the most accurate methods to determine gas-phase structures of molecules and small molecular clusters. In the last years two pioneering works ushered in a new era applications. First, by exploiting the reduced measurement time and the high sensitivity, the development of chirped-pulse CP-FTMW spectrometers enabled the full structural determination of molecules of increasing size as well as molecular clusters. Second, and more recently, Patterson et al. showed that rotational spectroscopy can also be used for enantiomer-specific detection. Here we present an experimental approach that combines both in a single spectrometer. This set-up is capable to rapidly obtain the full heavy-atom substitution structure using the CP-FTMW features. The inclusion of an extra set of broadband horns allows for a chirality-sensitive measurement of the sample. The measurement we implement is a three-wave mixing experiment that uses time-separated pulses to optimally create the chiral coherence - an approach that was proposed recently. Using samples of R-, S- and racemic Solketal, the physical properties of the three-wave mixing experiment were studied. This involved the measurement of the corresponding nutation curves (molecular signal intensity vs excitation pulse duration) to demonstrate the optimal pulse sequence. The phase stability of the chiral signal, required to assign the absolute stereochemistry, has been studied as a function of the measurement signal-to-noise ratio using a "phasogram" method. G. G. Brown, B. C. Dian, K. O. Douglass, S. M. Geyer, S. T. Shipman, B. H. Pate, Rev. Sci. Instrum. 2008, 79, 053103. D. Patterson, M. Schnell, J. M. Doyle, Nature 2013, 497, 475-477. D. Patterson, J. M. Doyle, Phys. Rev. Lett. 2013, 111, 023008. V. A. Shubert, D. Schmitz, D. Patterson, J. M. Doyle, M. Schnell, Angew. Chem. Int. Ed. 2014, 53, 1152-1155. J.-U. Grabow, Angew. Chem. 2013, 125, 11914

  10. Spectroscopy, reaction, and photodissociation of highly vibrationally excited molecules

    SciTech Connect

    Crim, F.F.

    1990-01-01

    This research is designed to determine the nature of highly vibrationally excited molecules, probe unimolecular reactions at the level of individual quantum states, and study the dynamics of electronic photodissociation from highly vibrationally excited states. In our experiments, pulsed laser excitation of a vibrational overtone transition prepares a highly vibrationally excited molecule and time-resolved spectroscopic detection of products monitors their subsequent decomposition. We have used this scheme to follow unimolecular reactions of large and small molecules in both room temperature gases and supersonic expansions and to investigate the role that vibrational excitation plays in electronic photodissociation dynamics. Most recently we have used the localized nature of the highly vibrationally excited states we create to selectively break bonds in photodissociation and biomolecular reactions.

  11. Characterizing Anharmonic Vibrational Modes of Quinones with Two-Dimensional Infrared Spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Cyran, Jenée D; Nite, Jacob M; Krummel, Amber T

    2015-07-23

    Two-dimensional infrared (2D IR) spectroscopy was used to study the vibrational modes of three quinones--benzoquinone, naphthoquinone, and anthraquinone. The vibrations of interest were in the spectral range of 1560-1710 cm(-1), corresponding to the in-plane carbonyl and ring stretching vibrations. Coupling between the vibrational modes is indicated by the cross peaks in the 2D IR spectra. The diagonal and off-diagonal anharmonicities range from 4.6 to 17.4 cm(-1) for the quinone series. In addition, there is significant vibrational coupling between the in-plane carbonyl and ring stretching vibrations. The diagonal anharmonicity, off-diagonal anharmonicity, and vibrational coupling constants are reported for benzoquinone, naphthoquinone, and anthraquinone. PMID:25697689

  12. Coherent multidimensional vibrational spectroscopy of representative N-alkanes.

    PubMed

    Mathew, Nathan A; Rickard, Mark A; Kornau, Kathryn M; Pakoulev, Andrei V; Block, Stephen B; Yurs, Lena A; Wright, John C

    2009-09-10

    Mixed frequency/time domain, two color triply vibrationally enhanced (TRIVE) four wave mixing (FWM) spectroscopy is used to study the methyl and methylene modes in octane and dotriacontane. The experiments involve scanning different combinations of the two excitation frequencies, the monochromator frequency, and the two time delays between the three excitation pulses while the remaining variables are fixed. Two dimensional spectra of the methyl and methylene stretching region have weak, asymmetrical diagonal- and cross-peaks when the excitation pulses are temporally overlapped. As the time delays change, the spectra change as new peaks appear and their peak intensity and position change. Combined two-dimensional scans of the excitation frequency and time delay show the changes are caused by relaxation of the initially excited populations to other states that are coupled to the methyl and methylene stretching modes. Two dimensional time delay scans show that the coherence dephasing rates are very fast so fully coherent TRIVE FWM pathways involving multiple quantum coherences are not possible without shorter excitation pulses. Similar experiments involving the methyl and methylene bend and stretching modes identify cross-peaks between these modes and population transfer processes that create cross-peaks. The asymmetric methylene stretch/Fermi resonance band is observed to contain unresolved states that couple differently with the symmetric methylene stretching and scissor modes as well as with lower lying quantum states that are fed by population transfer. The TRIVE FWM data show that the multidimensional spectra are dominated by rapid population transfer within the methyl and methylene stretching modes and to lower quantum states that are coupled to the stretching modes. PMID:19725584

  13. Fundamental Study on Vibration in Edge Face of Piezoelectric Chiral Polymer Film

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takarada, Jun; Kataoka, Takuya; Yamamoto, Ken; Nakiri, Takuo; Kato, Atsuko; Yoshida, Tetsuo; Tajitsu, Yoshiro

    2013-09-01

    We evaluate the vibration in the edge face of a poly(L-lactic acid) (PLLA) film from the propagated signal of an ultrasonic wave generated by the excitation force of the edge. Although the excitation area is too small to drive the edge face, the vibration can be measured only using the fixing method that does not suppress the resonance and the equipment with a high signal-to-noise ratio. This is considered to be due to the fact that the theoretically calculated force of the PLLA film is more than 10 times larger than that of a well-known ferroelectric polymer film, poly(vinylidene fluoride). We confirm that the film functions as a resonator and can be applied to a resonated transducer. In spite of the vibration in the edge face of the polymer film, we observe compliant responses to excitations by burst or rectangular waves. The practicality of a resonator can be suggested.

  14. Localized surface plasmon resonances in nanostructures to enhance nonlinear vibrational spectroscopies: towards an astonishing molecular sensitivity

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Summary Vibrational transitions contain some of the richest fingerprints of molecules and materials, providing considerable physicochemical information. Vibrational transitions can be characterized by different spectroscopies, and alternatively by several imaging techniques enabling to reach sub-microscopic spatial resolution. In a quest to always push forward the detection limit and to lower the number of needed vibrational oscillators to get a reliable signal or imaging contrast, surface plasmon resonances (SPR) are extensively used to increase the local field close to the oscillators. Another approach is based on maximizing the collective response of the excited vibrational oscillators through molecular coherence. Both features are often naturally combined in vibrational nonlinear optical techniques. In this frame, this paper reviews the main achievements of the two most common vibrational nonlinear optical spectroscopies, namely surface-enhanced sum-frequency generation (SE-SFG) and surface-enhanced coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (SE-CARS). They can be considered as the nonlinear counterpart and/or combination of the linear surface-enhanced infrared absorption (SEIRA) and surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) techniques, respectively, which are themselves a branching of the conventional IR and spontaneous Raman spectroscopies. Compared to their linear equivalent, those nonlinear vibrational spectroscopies have proved to reach higher sensitivity down to the single molecule level, opening the way to astonishing perspectives for molecular analysis. PMID:25551056

  15. Vibrational Cooling in A Cold Ion Trap: Vibrationally Resolved Photoelectron Spectroscopy of Cold C60- Anions

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Xue B.; Woo, Hin-koon; Wang, Lai S.

    2005-08-01

    We demonstrate vibrational cooling of anions via collisions with a background gas in an ion trap attached to a cryogenically controlled cold head (10 ? 400 K). Photoelectron spectra of vibrationally cold C60- anions, produced by electrospray ionization and cooled in the cold ion trap, have been obtained. Relative to spectra taken at room temperature, vibrational hot bands are completely eliminated, yielding well resolved vibrational structures and a more accurate electron affinity for neutral C60. The electron affinity of C60 is measured to be 2.683 ? 0.008 eV. The cold spectra reveal complicated vibrational structures for the transition to the C60 ground state due to the Jahn-Teller effect in the ground state of C60-. Vibrational excitations in the two Ag modes and eight Hg modes are observed, providing ideal data to assess the vibronic couplings in C60-.

  16. Sum-Frequency Generation from Chiral Media and Interfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Ji, Na

    2006-02-13

    Sum frequency generation (SFG), a second-order nonlinear optical process, is electric-dipole forbidden in systems with inversion symmetry. As a result, it has been used to study chiral media and interfaces, systems intrinsically lacking inversion symmetry. This thesis describes recent progresses in the applications of and new insights into SFG from chiral media and interfaces. SFG from solutions of chiral amino acids is investigated, and a theoretical model explaining the origin and the strength of the chiral signal in electronic-resonance SFG spectroscopy is discussed. An interference scheme that allows us to distinguish enantiomers by measuring both the magnitude and the phase of the chiral SFG response is described, as well as a chiral SFG microscope producing chirality-sensitive images with sub-micron resolution. Exploiting atomic and molecular parity nonconservation, the SFG process is also used to solve the Ozma problems. Sum frequency vibrational spectroscopy is used to obtain the adsorption behavior of leucine molecules at air-water interfaces. With poly(tetrafluoroethylene) as a model system, we extend the application of this surface-sensitive vibrational spectroscopy to fluorine-containing polymers.

  17. Vibrational dynamics of aqueous hydroxide solutions probed using broadband 2DIR spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Mandal, Aritra; Tokmakoff, Andrei

    2015-11-21

    We employed ultrafast transient absorption and broadband 2DIR spectroscopy to study the vibrational dynamics of aqueous hydroxide solutions by exciting the O–H stretch vibrations of the strongly hydrogen-bonded hydroxide solvation shell water and probing the continuum absorption of the solvated ion between 1500 and 3800 cm{sup −1}. We observe rapid vibrational relaxation processes on 150–250 fs time scales across the entire probed spectral region as well as slower vibrational dynamics on 1–2 ps time scales. Furthermore, the O–H stretch excitation loses its frequency memory in 180 fs, and vibrational energy exchange between bulk-like water vibrations and hydroxide-associated water vibrations occurs in ∼200 fs. The fast dynamics in this system originate in strong nonlinear coupling between intra- and intermolecular vibrations and are explained in terms of non-adiabatic vibrational relaxation. These measurements indicate that the vibrational dynamics of the aqueous hydroxide complex are faster than the time scales reported for long-range transport of protons in aqueous hydroxide solutions.

  18. Vibrational dynamics of aqueous hydroxide solutions probed using broadband 2DIR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Mandal, Aritra; Tokmakoff, Andrei

    2015-11-21

    We employed ultrafast transient absorption and broadband 2DIR spectroscopy to study the vibrational dynamics of aqueous hydroxide solutions by exciting the O-H stretch vibrations of the strongly hydrogen-bonded hydroxide solvation shell water and probing the continuum absorption of the solvated ion between 1500 and 3800 cm(-1). We observe rapid vibrational relaxation processes on 150-250 fs time scales across the entire probed spectral region as well as slower vibrational dynamics on 1-2 ps time scales. Furthermore, the O-H stretch excitation loses its frequency memory in 180 fs, and vibrational energy exchange between bulk-like water vibrations and hydroxide-associated water vibrations occurs in ∼200 fs. The fast dynamics in this system originate in strong nonlinear coupling between intra- and intermolecular vibrations and are explained in terms of non-adiabatic vibrational relaxation. These measurements indicate that the vibrational dynamics of the aqueous hydroxide complex are faster than the time scales reported for long-range transport of protons in aqueous hydroxide solutions. PMID:26590536

  19. Vibrational dynamics of aqueous hydroxide solutions probed using broadband 2DIR spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mandal, Aritra; Tokmakoff, Andrei

    2015-11-01

    We employed ultrafast transient absorption and broadband 2DIR spectroscopy to study the vibrational dynamics of aqueous hydroxide solutions by exciting the O-H stretch vibrations of the strongly hydrogen-bonded hydroxide solvation shell water and probing the continuum absorption of the solvated ion between 1500 and 3800 cm-1. We observe rapid vibrational relaxation processes on 150-250 fs time scales across the entire probed spectral region as well as slower vibrational dynamics on 1-2 ps time scales. Furthermore, the O-H stretch excitation loses its frequency memory in 180 fs, and vibrational energy exchange between bulk-like water vibrations and hydroxide-associated water vibrations occurs in ˜200 fs. The fast dynamics in this system originate in strong nonlinear coupling between intra- and intermolecular vibrations and are explained in terms of non-adiabatic vibrational relaxation. These measurements indicate that the vibrational dynamics of the aqueous hydroxide complex are faster than the time scales reported for long-range transport of protons in aqueous hydroxide solutions.

  20. 2012 VIBRATIONAL SPECTROSCOPY GORDON RESEARCH CONFERENCE, AUGUST 5-10, 2012

    SciTech Connect

    Geiger, Franz

    2012-08-10

    The Vibrational Spectroscopy conference brings together experimentalists and theoreticians working at the frontiers of modern vibrational spectroscopy, with a special emphasis on spectroscopies that probe the structure and dynamics of molecules in gases, liquids, and at interfaces. The conference explores the wide range of state-of-the-art techniques based on vibrational motion. These techniques span the fields of time-domain, high-resolution frequency-domain, spatially-resolved, nonlinear, and multidimensional spectroscopies. The conference highlights both the application of these techniques in chemistry, materials, biology, the environment, and medicine as well as the development of theoretical models that enable one to connect spectroscopic signatures to underlying molecular motions including chemical reaction dynamics. The conference goal is to advance the field of vibrational spectroscopy by bringing together a collection of researchers who share common interests and who will gain from discussing work at the forefront of several connected areas. The intent is to emphasize the insights and understanding that studies of vibrations provide about a variety of molecular systems ranging from small polyatomic molecules to large biomolecules, nanomaterials, and environmental systems.

  1. Measuring correlated electronic and vibrational spectral dynamics using line shapes in two-dimensional electronic-vibrational spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Lewis, Nicholas H. C.; Dong, Hui; Oliver, Thomas A. A.; Fleming, Graham R.

    2015-05-07

    Two-dimensional electronic-vibrational (2DEV) spectroscopy is an experimental technique that shows great promise in its ability to provide detailed information concerning the interactions between the electronic and vibrational degrees of freedom in molecular systems. The physical quantities 2DEV is particularly suited for measuring have not yet been fully determined, nor how these effects manifest in the spectra. In this work, we investigate the use of the center line slope of a peak in a 2DEV spectrum as a measure of both the dynamic and static correlations between the electronic and vibrational states of a dye molecule in solution. We show how this center line slope is directly related to the solvation correlation function for the vibrational degrees of freedom. We also demonstrate how the strength with which the vibration on the electronic excited state couples to its bath can be extracted from a set of 2DEV spectra. These analytical techniques are then applied to experimental data from the laser dye 3,3′-diethylthiatricarbocyanine iodide in deuterated chloroform, where we determine the lifetime of the correlation between the electronic transition frequency and the transition frequency for the backbone C = C stretch mode to be ∼1.7 ps. Furthermore, we find that on the electronic excited state, this mode couples to the bath ∼1.5 times more strongly than on the electronic ground state.

  2. Measuring correlated electronic and vibrational spectral dynamics using line shapes in two-dimensional electronic-vibrational spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lewis, Nicholas H. C.; Dong, Hui; Oliver, Thomas A. A.; Fleming, Graham R.

    2015-05-01

    Two-dimensional electronic-vibrational (2DEV) spectroscopy is an experimental technique that shows great promise in its ability to provide detailed information concerning the interactions between the electronic and vibrational degrees of freedom in molecular systems. The physical quantities 2DEV is particularly suited for measuring have not yet been fully determined, nor how these effects manifest in the spectra. In this work, we investigate the use of the center line slope of a peak in a 2DEV spectrum as a measure of both the dynamic and static correlations between the electronic and vibrational states of a dye molecule in solution. We show how this center line slope is directly related to the solvation correlation function for the vibrational degrees of freedom. We also demonstrate how the strength with which the vibration on the electronic excited state couples to its bath can be extracted from a set of 2DEV spectra. These analytical techniques are then applied to experimental data from the laser dye 3,3'-diethylthiatricarbocyanine iodide in deuterated chloroform, where we determine the lifetime of the correlation between the electronic transition frequency and the transition frequency for the backbone C = C stretch mode to be ˜1.7 ps. Furthermore, we find that on the electronic excited state, this mode couples to the bath ˜1.5 times more strongly than on the electronic ground state.

  3. Measuring correlated electronic and vibrational spectral dynamics using line shapes in two-dimensional electronic-vibrational spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Lewis, Nicholas H C; Dong, Hui; Oliver, Thomas A A; Fleming, Graham R

    2015-05-01

    Two-dimensional electronic-vibrational (2DEV) spectroscopy is an experimental technique that shows great promise in its ability to provide detailed information concerning the interactions between the electronic and vibrational degrees of freedom in molecular systems. The physical quantities 2DEV is particularly suited for measuring have not yet been fully determined, nor how these effects manifest in the spectra. In this work, we investigate the use of the center line slope of a peak in a 2DEV spectrum as a measure of both the dynamic and static correlations between the electronic and vibrational states of a dye molecule in solution. We show how this center line slope is directly related to the solvation correlation function for the vibrational degrees of freedom. We also demonstrate how the strength with which the vibration on the electronic excited state couples to its bath can be extracted from a set of 2DEV spectra. These analytical techniques are then applied to experimental data from the laser dye 3,3'-diethylthiatricarbocyanine iodide in deuterated chloroform, where we determine the lifetime of the correlation between the electronic transition frequency and the transition frequency for the backbone C = C stretch mode to be ∼1.7 ps. Furthermore, we find that on the electronic excited state, this mode couples to the bath ∼1.5 times more strongly than on the electronic ground state. PMID:25956093

  4. ULTRAFAST CHEMISTRY: Using Time-Resolved Vibrational Spectroscopy for Interrogation of Structural Dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nibbering, Erik T. J.; Fidder, Henk; Pines, Ehud

    2005-05-01

    Time-resolved infrared (IR) and Raman spectroscopy elucidates molecular structure evolution during ultrafast chemical reactions. Following vibrational marker modes in real time provides direct insight into the structural dynamics, as is evidenced in studies on intramolecular hydrogen transfer, bimolecular proton transfer, electron transfer, hydrogen bonding during solvation dynamics, bond fission in organometallic compounds and heme proteins, cis-trans isomerization in retinal proteins, and transformations in photochromic switch pairs. Femtosecond IR spectroscopy monitors the site-specific interactions in hydrogen bonds. Conversion between excited electronic states can be followed for intramolecular electron transfer by inspection of the fingerprint IR- or Raman-active vibrations in conjunction with quantum chemical calculations. Excess internal vibrational energy, generated either by optical excitation or by internal conversion from the electronic excited state to the ground state, is observable through transient frequency shifts of IR-active vibrations and through nonequilibrium populations as deduced by Raman resonances.

  5. Intermolecular Interactions of a Chiral Amine Borane Adduct Revealed by VCD Spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Osowski, Tobias; Golbek, Julia; Merz, Klaus; Merten, Christian

    2016-06-23

    Amine boranes feature strong hydrogen bonding acceptor and donor moieties in close proximity, leading, for instance, to dihydrogen bonding driven self-aggregation. In this work, the infrared (IR) and vibrational circular dichroism (VCD) spectra of the bulky bis(α-phenylethyl)amine borane 1 in chloroform and acetonitrile solution are reported. By comparison with calculated spectra, the VCD spectral features observed in chloroform solution can clearly be associated with the presence of monomeric species. A shift of the conformational preferences occurs when changing the solvent to acetonitrile, which can only be deduced from the VCD spectral signatures but not from the IR spectrum. Using variable-temperature IR and VCD spectroscopy, the dihydrogen bonded dimeric species is characterized experimentally at -50 °C and theoretically by means of density functional theory calculations. PMID:27253203

  6. A Practical Guide for Nuclear Resonance Vibrational Spectroscopy (NRVS) of Biochemical Samples and Model Compounds

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Hongxin; Alp, Ercan; Yoda, Yoshitaka; Cramer, Stephen P.

    2016-01-01

    Summary Nuclear resonance vibrational spectroscopy (NRVS) has been used by physicists for many years. However, it is still a relatively new technique for bioinorganic users. This technique yields a vibrational spectrum for a specific element, which can be easily interpreted. Furthermore, isotopic labeling allows for site-specific experiments. In this chapter we discuss how to access specific beamlines, what kind of equipment is used in NRVS and how the sample should be prepared and the data collected and analyzed. PMID:24639257

  7. In Situ Assembly of Octahedral Fe(II) Complexes for the Enantiomeric Excess Determination of Chiral Amines Using CD spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Dragna, Justin; Pescitelli, Gennaro; Tran, Lee; Lynch, Vincent M.; Anslyn, Eric V.; Di Bari, Lorenzo

    2012-01-01

    A method for discriminating between α-chiral primary amine enantiomers is reported. The method utilizes circular dichroism spectroscopy and a sensing ensemble composed of 2-formyl-3-hydroxyl pyridine (4) and Fe(II)(TfO)2. Aldehyde 4 reacts rapidly with chiral amines to form chiral imines, which complex Fe(II) to form a series of diastereomeric octahedral complexes that are CD active in both the UV and visible spectrum. NMR studies showed that, for enantiomerically pure imine complexes, the Δ-fac isomer is preferred. A statistical analysis of the distribution of stereoisomers accurately models the calibration curves for enantiomeric excess. CD signals appearing in the UV region were bisignate, and the null of the CD signals were coincident with maxima in the UV spectrum, consistent with exciton coupling. TTDFT and semi-empirical calculations confirmed that the CD signals in the UV region arise from coupling of the π-π* transitions in the imine chromophores, and can be used to accurately describe the sign and magnitudes of the curves. The CD signals in the visible region arise from metal-to-ligand charge transfer bands, and these signals can be used to determine the ee values of chiral amines with an average absolute error of ±5%. Overall, the strategy presented herein represents a facile in situ assembly that uses commercially available simple reagents to create large optical signals indicative of ee values. PMID:22272943

  8. Vibrational spectroscopy and theoretical studies on 2,4-dinitrophenylhydrazine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chiş, V.; Filip, S.; Miclăuş, V.; Pîrnău, A.; Tănăselia, C.; Almăşan, V.; Vasilescu, M.

    2005-06-01

    In this work, we will report a combined experimental and theoretical study on molecular and vibrational structure of 2,4-dinitrophenylhydrazine. FT-IR, FT-IR/ATR and Raman spectra of normal and deuterated DNPH have been recorded and analyzed in order to get new insights into molecular structure and properties of this molecule, with particular emphasize on its intra- and intermolecular hydrogen bonds (HB's). For computational purposes we used density functional theory (DFT) methods, with B3LYP and BLYP exchange-correlation functionals, in conjunction with 6-31G(d) basis set. All experimental vibrational bands have been discussed and assigned to normal modes on the basis of DFT calculations and isotopic shifts and by comparison to other dinitro- substituted compounds [V. Chiş, Chem. Phys., 300 (2004) 1]. To aid in mode assignments, we based on the direct comparison between experimental and calculated spectra by considering both the frequency sequence and the intensity pattern of the experimental and computed vibrational bands. It is also shown that semiempirical AM1 method predicts geometrical parameters and vibrational frequencies related to the HB in a pleasant agreement with experiment, being surprisingly accurate from this perspective.

  9. Time-resolving Attosecond Chiral Dynamics in Molecules with High Harmonic Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smirnova, O.; Cireasa, R.; Boguslavskiy, A.; Pons, B.; Wong, M. C. H.; Descamps, D.; Petit, S.; Ruf, H.; Thire, N.; Ferre, A.; Suarez, J.; Schmidt, B. E.; Higuet, J.; Alharbi, A. F.; Legare, F.; Blanchet, V.; Fabre, B.; Patchkovskii, S.; Mairesse, Y.; Bhardwaj, R.

    2015-05-01

    We demonstrate extreme chiral sensitivity of high harmonic generation from randomly oriented ensemble of chiral molecules in elliptical mid-infrared fields, and explain the physical mechanism underlying this very strong chiro-optical response. We also use the high harmonic spectra to follow the electronic chiral response with 0.1 femtosecond resolution. We studied two chiral molecules, epoxypropane and fenchone in 1.8 μm, 50 fs, mid-1013 W/cm2 pulses. Very small ellipticity of the incident light, about 1% in the field, is sufficient to induce several percent difference between the high harmonic response of left and right enantiomers. The origin of this effect lies in chiral-sensitive dynamics of the hole created by strong field ionization. Small differences in this dynamics between ionization and recombination are recorded and amplified by several orders of magnitude in high harmonic spectra. Using time-energy mapping we reconstruct sub-femtosecond chiral dynamics and show that the standard measure of the chiral signal is directly proportional to the recombination amplitude to the chiral-sensitive component of the hole wave-packet.

  10. Inversion vibration of PH3+(X~ 2A2'') studied by zero kinetic energy photoelectron spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Jie; Li, Juan; Hao, Yusong; Zhou, Chang; Mo, Yuxiang

    2006-08-01

    We report the first rotationally resolved spectroscopic studies on PH3+(X˜A2″2) using zero kinetic energy photoelectron spectroscopy and coherent VUV radiation. The spectra about 8000cm-1 above the ground vibrational state of PH3+(X˜A2″2) have been recorded. We observed the vibrational energy level splittings of PH3+(X˜A2″2) due to the tunneling effect in the inversion (symmetric bending) vibration (ν2+). The energy splitting for the first inversion vibrational state (0+/0-) is 5.8cm-1. The inversion vibrational energy levels, rotational constants, and adiabatic ionization energies (IEs) for ν2+=0-16 have been determined. The bond angles between the neighboring P-H bonds and the P-H bond lengths are also obtained using the experimentally determined rotational constants. With the increasing of the inversion vibrational excitations (ν2+), the bond lengths (P-H) increase a little and the bond angles (H-P-H) decrease a lot. The inversion vibrational energy levels have also been calculated by using one dimensional potential model and the results are in good agreement with the experimental data for the first several vibrational levels. In addition to inversion vibration, we also observed firstly the other two vibrational modes: the symmetric P-H stretching vibration (ν1+) and the degenerate bending vibration (ν4+). The fundamental frequencies for ν1+ and ν4+ are 2461.6 (±2) and 1043.9 (±2)cm-1, respectively. The first IE for PH3 was determined as 79670.9 (±1)cm-1.

  11. Separation of overlapping vibrational peaks in terahertz spectra using two-dimensional correlation spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoshina, Hiromichi; Ishii, Shinya; Otani, Chiko

    2014-07-01

    In this study, the terahertz (THz) absorption spectra of poly(3-hydroxybutyrate) (PHB) were measured during isothermal crystallization at 90-120 °C. The temporal changes in the absorption spectra were analyzed using two-dimensional correlation spectroscopy (2DCOS). In the asynchronous plot, cross peaks were observed around 2.4 THz, suggesting that two vibrational modes overlap in the raw spectrum. By comparing this to the peak at 2.9 THz corresponding to the stretching mode of the helical structure of PHB and the assignment obtained using polarization spectroscopy, we concluded that the high-frequency band could be attributed to the vibration of the helical structure and the low-frequency band to the vibration between the helical structures. The exact frequencies of the overlapping vibrational bands and their assignments provide a new means to inspect the thermal behavior of the intermolecular vibrational modes. The large red-shift of the interhelix vibrational mode suggests a large anharmonicity in the vibrational potential.

  12. Quantitative Sum-Frequency Generation Vibrational Spectroscopy of Molecular Surfaces and Interfaces: Lineshape, Polarization and Orientation

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Hongfei; Velarde, Luis; Gan, Wei; Fu, Li

    2015-04-01

    Sum-frequency generation vibrational spectroscopy (SFG) can provide detailed information and understanding of molecular vibrational spectroscopy, orientational and conformational structure, and interactions of molecular surfaces and interfaces, through quantitative measurement and analysis. In this review, we present the current status and discuss the main developments on the measurement of intrinsic SFG spectral lineshape, formulations for polarization measurement and orientation analysis of the SFG-VS spectra. The main focus is to present a coherent formulation and discuss the main concepts or issues that can help to make SFG-VS a quantitative analytical and research tool in revealing the chemistry and physics of complex molecular surface and interface.

  13. Multidimensional infrared spectroscopy reveals the vibrational and solvation dynamics of isoniazid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shaw, Daniel J.; Adamczyk, Katrin; Frederix, Pim W. J. M.; Simpson, Niall; Robb, Kirsty; Greetham, Gregory M.; Towrie, Michael; Parker, Anthony W.; Hoskisson, Paul A.; Hunt, Neil T.

    2015-06-01

    The results of infrared spectroscopic investigations into the band assignments, vibrational relaxation, and solvation dynamics of the common anti-tuberculosis treatment Isoniazid (INH) are reported. INH is known to inhibit InhA, a 2-trans-enoyl-acyl carrier protein reductase enzyme responsible for the maintenance of cell walls in Mycobacterium tuberculosis but as new drug-resistant strains of the bacterium appear, next-generation therapeutics will be essential to combat the rise of the disease. Small molecules such as INH offer the potential for use as a biomolecular marker through which ultrafast multidimensional spectroscopies can probe drug binding and so inform design strategies but a complete characterization of the spectroscopy and dynamics of INH in solution is required to inform such activity. Infrared absorption spectroscopy, in combination with density functional theory calculations, is used to assign the vibrational modes of INH in the 1400-1700 cm-1 region of the infrared spectrum while ultrafast multidimensional spectroscopy measurements determine the vibrational relaxation dynamics and the effects of solvation via spectral diffusion of the carbonyl stretching vibrational mode. These results are discussed in the context of previous linear spectroscopy studies on solid-phase INH and its usefulness as a biomolecular probe.

  14. Multidimensional infrared spectroscopy reveals the vibrational and solvation dynamics of isoniazid.

    PubMed

    Shaw, Daniel J; Adamczyk, Katrin; Frederix, Pim W J M; Simpson, Niall; Robb, Kirsty; Greetham, Gregory M; Towrie, Michael; Parker, Anthony W; Hoskisson, Paul A; Hunt, Neil T

    2015-06-01

    The results of infrared spectroscopic investigations into the band assignments, vibrational relaxation, and solvation dynamics of the common anti-tuberculosis treatment Isoniazid (INH) are reported. INH is known to inhibit InhA, a 2-trans-enoyl-acyl carrier protein reductase enzyme responsible for the maintenance of cell walls in Mycobacterium tuberculosis but as new drug-resistant strains of the bacterium appear, next-generation therapeutics will be essential to combat the rise of the disease. Small molecules such as INH offer the potential for use as a biomolecular marker through which ultrafast multidimensional spectroscopies can probe drug binding and so inform design strategies but a complete characterization of the spectroscopy and dynamics of INH in solution is required to inform such activity. Infrared absorption spectroscopy, in combination with density functional theory calculations, is used to assign the vibrational modes of INH in the 1400-1700 cm(-1) region of the infrared spectrum while ultrafast multidimensional spectroscopy measurements determine the vibrational relaxation dynamics and the effects of solvation via spectral diffusion of the carbonyl stretching vibrational mode. These results are discussed in the context of previous linear spectroscopy studies on solid-phase INH and its usefulness as a biomolecular probe. PMID:26049421

  15. Microwave spectroscopy of furfural in vibrationally excited states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Motiyenko, R. A.; Alekseev, E. A.; Dyubko, S. F.

    2007-07-01

    The results of microwave spectrum investigation of the excited vibrational states of furfural in the frequency range between 49 and 149 GHz are reported. In total 15 excited vibrational states (9 for trans-furfural and 6 for cis-furfural) were assigned and analyzed. Six of the 15 investigated states were assigned for the first time. Accurate values of rigid rotor and quartic centrifugal distortion constants of asymmetric top Hamiltonian have been determined for 13 excited states. Also for some states several sextic and octic level constants were needed in order to fit the data within experimental accuracy. The vt = 3 and vs = 1, va = 1 states of trans-furfural were found to be strongly perturbed and only rotational transitions with low Ka values can be reliably identified in this study.

  16. Vibrational energy flow in photoactive yellow protein revealed by infrared pump-visible probe spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Nakamura, Ryosuke; Hamada, Norio

    2015-05-14

    Vibrational energy flow in the electronic ground state of photoactive yellow protein (PYP) is studied by ultrafast infrared (IR) pump-visible probe spectroscopy. Vibrational modes of the chromophore and the surrounding protein are excited with a femtosecond IR pump pulse, and the subsequent vibrational dynamics in the chromophore are selectively probed with a visible probe pulse through changes in the absorption spectrum of the chromophore. We thus obtain the vibrational energy flow with four characteristic time constants. The vibrational excitation with an IR pulse at 1340, 1420, 1500, or 1670 cm(-1) results in ultrafast intramolecular vibrational redistribution (IVR) with a time constant of 0.2 ps. The vibrational modes excited through the IVR process relax to the initial ground state with a time constant of 6-8 ps in parallel with vibrational cooling with a time constant of 14 ps. In addition, upon excitation with an IR pulse at 1670 cm(-1), we observe the energy flow from the protein backbone to the chromophore that occurs with a time constant of 4.2 ps. PMID:25896223

  17. Fine structures in vibrational circular dichroism spectra of chiral molecules with rotatable hydroxyl groups and their application in the analysis of local intermolecular interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Konno, Kohzo; Shiina, Isamu; Yui, Hiroharu

    2013-03-01

    The effect of hydroxyl group on vibrational circular dichroism is addressed. (-)-Menthol is investigated as a representative chiral molecule which has been widely used as a chiral starting material. Free rotation of the hydroxyl group in (-)-menthol allows it to exist in various conformations in solution. The variety of conformations inevitably affects local intermolecular interactions and the resultant efficiency of asymmetric syntheses. However, the precise relationship between the conformations and intermolecular interactions arising from rotation of the hydroxyl group has remained an unsolved issue despite the molecule's importance. Here, the conformations and interactions are investigated using vibrational circular dichroism (VCD). VCD is quite sensitive to slight differences in the conformation of chiral molecules and their local environment. We examined various conformers in (-)-menthol and compared the VCD spectrum with that of (-)-menthone. It revealed the rotation of the polar hydroxyl group sensitively affects the VCD activity, resulting in the emergence of various patterns in the corresponding VCD spectra, especially in the wavenumber regions at around 1064 cm-1 and 1254 cm-1. Among these regions, the latter one is further investigated to examine the feasibility of applying the sensitive response to the analysis on the local intermolecular environment. It includes solute-solvent interactions via hydroxyl groups, which is important for biomacromolecule structural stability and efficient stereoselective syntheses. As a consequence, distinctive fine structures in the VCD spectra, including an unpredicted band, are observed when varying temperature and concentration. Their possible assignment is also discussed.

  18. A vibrational spectroscopy study on anserine and its aqueous solutions.

    PubMed

    Akkaya, Y; Balci, K; Goren, Y; Akyuz, S; Stricker, M C; Stover, D D; Ritzhaupt, G; Collier, W B

    2015-10-01

    In this study based on vibrational spectroscopic measurements and Density Functional Theory (DFT), we aimed for a reliable interpretation of the IR and Raman spectra recorded for anserine in the solid phase and water (H2O) and heavy water (D2O) solutions. Initial DFT calculations at the B3LYP/6-31G(d) searched possible conformers of the anserine zwitterion using a systematic conformational search. The corresponding equilibrium geometrical parameters and vibrational spectral data were determined for each of the stable conformers (in water) by the geometry optimization and hessian calculations performed at the same level of theory using the polarized continuum model (PCM). The same calculations were repeated to determine the most energetically preferred dimer structure for the molecule and the associated geometry, force field and vibrational spectral data. The harmonic force constants obtained from these calculations were scaled by the Scaled Quantum Mechanical Force Field (SQM) method and then used in the calculation of the refined wavenumbers, potential energy distributions, IR and Raman intensities. These refined theoretical data, which confirm the zwitterion structure for anserine in the solid phase or aqueous solvents, revealed the remarkable effects of intermolecular hydrogen bonding on the structural properties and observed IR and Raman spectra of this molecule. PMID:25997178

  19. Structure Study of the Chiral Lactide Molecules by Chirped-Pulse Ftmw Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zaleski, Daniel P.; Neill, Justin L.; Pate, Brooks H.; Bialkowska-Jaworska, Ewa; Kisiel, Zbigniew

    2011-06-01

    Lactide is a six member cyclic diester with two chiral centers that forms from lactic acid in the presence of heat and an acid catalyst. It can form either a homo-chiral (RR) structure with both methyl groups equatorial or a hetero-chiral (RS) structure where one methyl group is equatorial and the other methyl group is axial. Structurally lactide is similar to lactic acid dimer; however, the kinked ring is covalently bonded and two waters are lost. And unlike lactic acid dimer, which has a very small dipole moment, the dipole moment of lactide is on the order of 3 Debye. Here the microwave spectra of the highly rigid homo- and hetero-chiral lactides are presented, which were first assigned in a heated lactic acid spectrum where the chemistry took place in the reservoir nozzles. Further isotopic information from a commercial sample of predominately homo-chiral lactide was obtained leading to a Kraitchman substitution structure of the homo-chiral lactide. Preliminary results of the cluster of homo-chiral lactide with one water molecule attached are also presented.

  20. Vibrational Spectroscopy of the CCl[subscript 4] v[subscript 1] Mode: Theoretical Prediction of Isotopic Effects

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gaynor, James D.; Wetterer, Anna M.; Cochran, Rea M.; Valente, Edward J.; Mayer, Steven G.

    2015-01-01

    Raman spectroscopy is a powerful experimental technique, yet it is often missing from the undergraduate physical chemistry laboratory curriculum. Tetrachloromethane (CCl[subscript 4]) is the ideal molecule for an introductory vibrational spectroscopy experiment and the symmetric stretch vibration contains fine structure due to isotopic variations…

  1. Synthesis of a Chiral Crystal Form of MOF-5, CMOF-5, by Chiral Induction.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Shi-Yuan; Li, Dan; Guo, Dong; Zhang, Hui; Shi, Wei; Cheng, Peng; Wojtas, Lukasz; Zaworotko, Michael J

    2015-12-16

    Chiral variants of the prototypal metal-organic framework MOF-5, Λ-CMOF-5 and Δ-CMOF-5, have been synthesized by preparing MOF-5 in the presence of L-proline or D-proline, respectively. CMOF-5 crystallizes in chiral space group P213 instead of Fm3̅m as exhibited by MOF-5. The phase purity of CMOF-5 was validated by single-crystal and powder X-ray diffraction, infrared spectroscopy, thermogravimetric analysis, N2 adsorption, microanalysis, and solid-state vibrational circular dichroism. CMOF-5 undergoes a reversible single crystal-to-single crystal phase change to MOF-5 when immersed in a variety of organic solvents, although N-methyl-2-pyrrolidone (NMP) does not induce loss of chirality. Indeed, MOF-5 undergoes chiral induction when immersed in NMP, affording racemic CMOF-5. PMID:26606156

  2. Damage-free vibrational spectroscopy of biological materials in the electron microscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rez, Peter; Aoki, Toshihiro; March, Katia; Gur, Dvir; Krivanek, Ondrej L.; Dellby, Niklas; Lovejoy, Tracy C.; Wolf, Sharon G.; Cohen, Hagai

    2016-03-01

    Vibrational spectroscopy in the electron microscope would be transformative in the study of biological samples, provided that radiation damage could be prevented. However, electron beams typically create high-energy excitations that severely accelerate sample degradation. Here this major difficulty is overcome using an `aloof' electron beam, positioned tens of nanometres away from the sample: high-energy excitations are suppressed, while vibrational modes of energies <1 eV can be `safely' investigated. To demonstrate the potential of aloof spectroscopy, we record electron energy loss spectra from biogenic guanine crystals in their native state, resolving their characteristic C-H, N-H and C=O vibrational signatures with no observable radiation damage. The technique opens up the possibility of non-damaging compositional analyses of organic functional groups, including non-crystalline biological materials, at a spatial resolution of ~10 nm, simultaneously combined with imaging in the electron microscope.

  3. Expanded Choices for Vibration-Rotation Spectroscopy in the Physical Chemistry Teaching Laboratory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmitz, Joel R.; Dolson, David A.

    2015-06-01

    Many third-year physical chemistry laboratory students in the US analyze the vibration-rotation spectrum of HCl in support of lecture concepts in quantum theory and molecular spectroscopy. Contemporary students in physical chemistry teaching laboratories increasingly have access to FTIR spectrometers with 1/8th wn resolution, which allows for expanded choices of molecules for vibration-rotation spectroscopy. Here we present the case for choosing HBr/DBr for such a study, where the 1/8th wn resolution enables the bromine isotopic lines to be resolved. Vibration-rotation lines from the fundamental and first-overtone bands of four hydrogen bromide isotopomers are combined in a global analysis to determine molecular spectroscopic constants. Sample production, spectral appearance, analysis and results will be presented for various resolutions commonly available in teaching laboratories.

  4. Damage-free vibrational spectroscopy of biological materials in the electron microscope

    PubMed Central

    Rez, Peter; Aoki, Toshihiro; March, Katia; Gur, Dvir; Krivanek, Ondrej L.; Dellby, Niklas; Lovejoy, Tracy C.; Wolf, Sharon G.; Cohen, Hagai

    2016-01-01

    Vibrational spectroscopy in the electron microscope would be transformative in the study of biological samples, provided that radiation damage could be prevented. However, electron beams typically create high-energy excitations that severely accelerate sample degradation. Here this major difficulty is overcome using an ‘aloof' electron beam, positioned tens of nanometres away from the sample: high-energy excitations are suppressed, while vibrational modes of energies <1 eV can be ‘safely' investigated. To demonstrate the potential of aloof spectroscopy, we record electron energy loss spectra from biogenic guanine crystals in their native state, resolving their characteristic C–H, N–H and C=O vibrational signatures with no observable radiation damage. The technique opens up the possibility of non-damaging compositional analyses of organic functional groups, including non-crystalline biological materials, at a spatial resolution of ∼10 nm, simultaneously combined with imaging in the electron microscope. PMID:26961578

  5. Molecular vibrational dynamics in water studied by femtosecond coherent anti-Stokes Raman spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Yang; Zhang, Sheng; Zhou, Boyang; Dong, Zhiwei; Chen, Deying; Zhang, Zhonghua; Xia, Yuanqin

    2014-10-01

    We utilized femtosecond time-resolved coherent anti-Stokes Raman spectroscopy (CARS) to study the ultrafast vibrational dynamics in distilled water at room temperature. The CARS signals from the broad OH-stretching modes between 3100 cm-1 and 3700 cm-1 were obtained and analyzed. The dephasing times of four Raman modes in water were detected and compared.

  6. Spectroscopy, reaction, and photodissociation in highly vibrationally excited molecules. Technical progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-12-31

    Highly vibrationally excited molecules often control the course of chemical reactions in the atmosphere, combustion, plasmas, and many other environments. The research described in this Progress Report uses laser excitation and interrogation techniques to study and control the dynamics of highly vibrationally excited molecules. In particular, they show that it is possible to unravel the details and influence the course of photodissociation and bimolecular reaction. The experiments use laser excitation of overtone vibrations to prepare highly vibrationally excited molecules, frequently with single quantum state resolution, and laser spectroscopy to monitor the subsequent behavior of the excited molecule. We have studied the vibrationally mediated photodissociation and the bond- and state-selected bimolecular reaction of highly vibrationally excited molecules. In the first process, one photon creates a highly excited molecule, a second photon from another laser dissociates it, and light from a third laser detects the population of individual product quantum states. This approach allows us to explore otherwise inaccessible regions of the ground and excited state potential energy surface and, by exciting to the proper regions of the surface, to control the breaking of a selected chemical bond. In the second process, the highly vibrationally excited molecule reacts with an atom formed either in a microwave discharge or by photolysis and another laser interrogates the products. We have used this approach to demonstrate mode- and bond-selected bimolecular reactions in which the initial excitation controls the subsequent chemistry. 30 refs., 8 figs.

  7. Vibrational spectroscopy and intramolecular energy transfer in isocyanic acid (HNCO)

    SciTech Connect

    Coffey, M.J.; Berghout, H.L.; Woods, E. III; Crim, F.F.

    1999-06-01

    Room temperature photoacoustic spectra in the region of the first through the fourth overtones (2{nu}{sub 1} to 5{nu}{sub 1}) and free-jet action spectra of the second through the fourth overtones (3{nu}{sub 1} to 5{nu}{sub 1}) of the N{endash}H stretching vibration permit analysis of the vibrational and rotational structure of HNCO. The analysis identifies the strong intramolecular couplings that control the early stages of intramolecular vibrational energy redistribution (IVR) and gives the interaction matrix elements between the zero-order N{endash}H stretching states and the other zero-order states with which they interact. The experimentally determined couplings and zero-order state separations are consistent with {ital ab initio} calculations of East, Johnson, and Allen [J. Chem. Phys. {bold 98}, 1299 (1993)], and comparison with the calculation identifies the coupled states and likely interactions. The states most strongly coupled to the pure N{endash}H stretching zero-order states are ones with a quantum of N{endash}H stretching excitation ({nu}{sub 1}) replaced by different combinations of N{endash}C{endash}O asymmetric or symmetric stretching excitation ({nu}{sub 2} or {nu}{sub 3}) and {ital trans}-bending excitation ({nu}{sub 4}). The two strongest couplings of the n{nu}{sub 1} state are to the states (n{minus}1){nu}{sub 1}+{nu}{sub 2}+{nu}{sub 4} and (n{minus}1){nu}{sub 1}+{nu}{sub 3}+2{nu}{sub 4}, and sequential couplings through a series of low order resonances potentially play a role. The analysis shows that if the pure N{endash}H stretch zero-order state were excited, energy would initially flow out of that mode into the strongly coupled mode in 100 fs to 700 fs, depending on the level of initial excitation. {copyright} {ital 1999 American Institute of Physics.}

  8. Vibrational spectroscopy of the sulphate mineral sturmanite from Kuruman manganese deposits, South Africa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frost, Ray L.; Scholz, Ricardo; López, Andrés; Xi, Yunfei; Lana, Cristiano

    2014-12-01

    The mineral sturmanite is a hydrated calcium iron aluminium manganese sulphate tetrahydroxoborate hydroxide of formula Ca6(Fe, Al, Mn)2(SO4)2(B(OH)4)(OH)12·26H2O. We have studied the mineral sturmanite using a number of techniques, including SEM with EPMA and vibrational spectroscopy. Chemical analysis shows a homogeneous phase, composed by Ca, Fe, Mn, S, Al and Si. B is not determined in this EPMA technique. An intense Raman band at 990 cm-1 is assigned to the SO42- symmetric stretching mode. Raman spectroscopy identifies multiple sulphate symmetric stretching modes in line with the three sulphate crystallographically different sites. Raman spectroscopy also identifies a band at 1069 cm-1 which may be attributed to a carbonate symmetric stretching mode, indicating the presence of thaumasite. Infrared spectra display two bands at 1080 and 1107 cm-1 assigned to the SO42- antisymmetric stretching modes. The observation of multiple bands in this ν4 spectral region offers evidence for the reduction in symmetry of the sulphate anion from Td to C2v or even lower symmetry. The Raman band at 3622 cm-1 is assigned to the OH unit stretching vibration and the broad feature at around 3479 cm-1 to water stretching bands. Infrared spectroscopy shows a set of broad overlapping bands in the OH stretching region. Vibrational spectroscopy enables an assessment of the molecular structure of sturmanite to be made.

  9. Vibrational spectroscopy of the sulphate mineral sturmanite from Kuruman manganese deposits, South Africa.

    PubMed

    Frost, Ray L; Scholz, Ricardo; López, Andrés; Xi, Yunfei; Lana, Cristiano

    2014-12-10

    The mineral sturmanite is a hydrated calcium iron aluminium manganese sulphate tetrahydroxoborate hydroxide of formula Ca6(Fe, Al, Mn)2(SO4)2(B(OH)4)(OH)12·26H2O. We have studied the mineral sturmanite using a number of techniques, including SEM with EPMA and vibrational spectroscopy. Chemical analysis shows a homogeneous phase, composed by Ca, Fe, Mn, S, Al and Si. B is not determined in this EPMA technique. An intense Raman band at 990cm(-1) is assigned to the SO4(2-) symmetric stretching mode. Raman spectroscopy identifies multiple sulphate symmetric stretching modes in line with the three sulphate crystallographically different sites. Raman spectroscopy also identifies a band at 1069cm(-1) which may be attributed to a carbonate symmetric stretching mode, indicating the presence of thaumasite. Infrared spectra display two bands at 1080 and 1107cm(-1) assigned to the SO4(2-) antisymmetric stretching modes. The observation of multiple bands in this ν4 spectral region offers evidence for the reduction in symmetry of the sulphate anion from Td to C2v or even lower symmetry. The Raman band at 3622cm(-1) is assigned to the OH unit stretching vibration and the broad feature at around 3479cm(-1) to water stretching bands. Infrared spectroscopy shows a set of broad overlapping bands in the OH stretching region. Vibrational spectroscopy enables an assessment of the molecular structure of sturmanite to be made. PMID:24929311

  10. Cation Far Infrared Vibrational Spectroscopy of Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kong, W.; Zhang, J.; Han, F.

    2009-06-01

    The far infrared (FIR) region is crucial for spectroscopic investigations because of the existence of skeletal modes of moderately sized molecules. However, our knowledge of FIR modes is significantly lacking, largely due to the limited availability of light sources and detectors in this spectral region. The technique "pulsed field ionization zero kinetic energy electron spectroscopy" (PFI-ZEKE) is ideal for studies of FIR spectroscopy. This is because the low internal energy of the cation associated with the skeletal modes is particularly beneficial for the stability of the corresponding Rydberg states. In this work, we report our effort in studies of FIR spectroscopy of cationic polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH). Using laser desorption, we can vaporize the non-volatile PAH for gas phase spectroscopy. To ensure the particle density and therefore the critical ion density in prolonging the lifetime of Rydberg electrons, we have used a "chamber-in-a-chamber" design and significantly shortened the distance between the desorption region and the detection region. From our studies of catacondensed PAHs, we have observed the emergence of the flexible waving modes with the increasing length of the molecular ribbon. Pericondensed PAHs, on the other hand, have shown significant out of plane IR active transitions. The planarity of the molecular frame is therefore a question of debate. The FIR modes are also interesting for another reason: they are also telltales of the precision of modern computational packages. The combination of experimental and theoretical studies will help with the identification of the chemical composition of the interstellar medium. This effort therefore directly serves the missions of the Spitzer Space Observatory and more importantly, the missions of the Herschel Space Observatory.

  11. Correlating the motion of electrons and nuclei with two-dimensional electronic-vibrational spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Oliver, Thomas A A; Lewis, Nicholas H C; Fleming, Graham R

    2014-07-15

    Multidimensional nonlinear spectroscopy, in the electronic and vibrational regimes, has reached maturity. To date, no experimental technique has combined the advantages of 2D electronic spectroscopy and 2D infrared spectroscopy, monitoring the evolution of the electronic and nuclear degrees of freedom simultaneously. The interplay and coupling between the electronic state and vibrational manifold is fundamental to understanding ensuing nonradiative pathways, especially those that involve conical intersections. We have developed a new experimental technique that is capable of correlating the electronic and vibrational degrees of freedom: 2D electronic-vibrational spectroscopy (2D-EV). We apply this new technique to the study of the 4-(di-cyanomethylene)-2-methyl-6-p-(dimethylamino)styryl-4H-pyran (DCM) laser dye in deuterated dimethyl sulfoxide and its excited state relaxation pathways. From 2D-EV spectra, we elucidate a ballistic mechanism on the excited state potential energy surface whereby molecules are almost instantaneously projected uphill in energy toward a transition state between locally excited and charge-transfer states, as evidenced by a rapid blue shift on the electronic axis of our 2D-EV spectra. The change in minimum energy structure in this excited state nonradiative crossing is evident as the central frequency of a specific vibrational mode changes on a many-picoseconds timescale. The underlying electronic dynamics, which occur on the hundreds of femtoseconds timescale, drive the far slower ensuing nuclear motions on the excited state potential surface, and serve as a excellent illustration for the unprecedented detail that 2D-EV will afford to photochemical reaction dynamics. PMID:24927586

  12. Correlating the motion of electrons and nuclei with two-dimensional electronic–vibrational spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Oliver, Thomas A. A.; Lewis, Nicholas H. C.; Fleming, Graham R.

    2014-01-01

    Multidimensional nonlinear spectroscopy, in the electronic and vibrational regimes, has reached maturity. To date, no experimental technique has combined the advantages of 2D electronic spectroscopy and 2D infrared spectroscopy, monitoring the evolution of the electronic and nuclear degrees of freedom simultaneously. The interplay and coupling between the electronic state and vibrational manifold is fundamental to understanding ensuing nonradiative pathways, especially those that involve conical intersections. We have developed a new experimental technique that is capable of correlating the electronic and vibrational degrees of freedom: 2D electronic–vibrational spectroscopy (2D-EV). We apply this new technique to the study of the 4-(di-cyanomethylene)-2-methyl-6-p-(dimethylamino)styryl-4H-pyran (DCM) laser dye in deuterated dimethyl sulfoxide and its excited state relaxation pathways. From 2D-EV spectra, we elucidate a ballistic mechanism on the excited state potential energy surface whereby molecules are almost instantaneously projected uphill in energy toward a transition state between locally excited and charge-transfer states, as evidenced by a rapid blue shift on the electronic axis of our 2D-EV spectra. The change in minimum energy structure in this excited state nonradiative crossing is evident as the central frequency of a specific vibrational mode changes on a many-picoseconds timescale. The underlying electronic dynamics, which occur on the hundreds of femtoseconds timescale, drive the far slower ensuing nuclear motions on the excited state potential surface, and serve as a excellent illustration for the unprecedented detail that 2D-EV will afford to photochemical reaction dynamics. PMID:24927586

  13. Edge chlorination of hexa-peri-hexabenzocoronene investigated by density functional theory and vibrational spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Maghsoumi, Ali; Narita, Akimitsu; Dong, Renhao; Feng, Xinliang; Castiglioni, Chiara; Müllen, Klaus; Tommasini, Matteo

    2016-04-28

    We investigate the molecular structure and vibrational properties of perchlorinated hexa-peri-hexabenzocoronene (HBC-Cl) by density functional theory (DFT) calculations and IR and Raman spectroscopy, in comparison to the parent HBC. The theoretical and experimental IR and Raman spectra demonstrated very good agreement, elucidating a number of vibrational modes corresponding to the observed peaks. Compared with the parent HBC, the edge chlorination significantly alters the planarity of the molecule. Nevertheless, the results indicated that such structural distortion does not significantly impair the π-conjugation of such polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons. PMID:26912311

  14. Gas Phase Spectra and Structural Determination of Glucose 6 Phosphate Using Cryogenic Ion Vibrational Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kregel, Steven J.; Voss, Jonathan; Marsh, Brett; Garand, Etienne

    2014-06-01

    Glucose-6-Phosphate (G6P) is one member of a class of simple phosphorylated sugars that are relevant in biological processes. We have acquired a gas phase infrared spectrum of G6P- using cryogenic ion vibrational spectroscopy (CIVS) in a home-built spectrometer. The experimental spectrum was compared with calculated vibrational spectra from a systematic conformer search. For both of the α and β anomers, results show that only the lowest energy conformers are present in the gas phase. If spectral signatures for similar sugars could be cataloged, it would allow for conformer-specific determination of mixture composition, for example, for glycolyzation processes.

  15. Vibrational spectroscopy for online monitoring of extraction solvent degradation products

    SciTech Connect

    Peterson, J.; Robinson, T.; Bryan, S.A.; Levitskaia, T.G.

    2013-07-01

    In our research, we are exploring the potential of online monitoring of the organic solvents for the flowsheets relevant to the used nuclear fuel reprocessing and tributyl phosphate (TBP)- based extraction processes in particular. Utilization of vibrational spectroscopic techniques permits the discrimination of the degradation products from the primary constituents of the loaded extraction solvent. Multivariate analysis of the spectral data facilitates development of the regression models for their quantification in real time and potentially enables online implementation of a monitoring system. Raman and FTIR spectral databases were created and used to develop the regression partial least squares (PLS) chemometric models for the quantitative prediction of HDBP (dibutyl phosphoric acid) degradation product, TBP, and UO{sub 2}{sup 2+} extraction organic product phase. It was demonstrated that both these spectroscopic techniques are suitable for the quantification of the Purex solvent components in the presence of UO{sub 2}(NO{sub 3}){sub 2}. Developed PLS models successfully predicted HDBP and TBP organic concentrations in simulated Purex solutions.

  16. Vibrational neutron spectroscopy of collagen and model polypeptides.

    PubMed Central

    Middendorf, H D; Hayward, R L; Parker, S F; Bradshaw, J; Miller, A

    1995-01-01

    A pulsed source neutron spectrometer has been used to measure vibrational spectra (20-4000 cm-1) of dry and hydrated type I collagen fibers, and of two model polypeptides, polyproline II and (prolyl-prolyl-glycine)10, at temperatures of 30 and 120 K. the collagen spectra provide the first high resolution neutron views of the proton-dominated modes of a protein over a wide energy range from the low frequency phonon region to the rich spectrum of localized high frequency modes. Several bands show a level of fine structure approaching that of optical data. The principal features of the spectra are assigned. A difference spectrum is obtained for protein associated water, which displays an acoustic peak similar to pure ice and a librational band shifted to lower frequency by the influence of the protein. Hydrogen-weighted densities of states are extracted for collagen and the model polypeptides, and compared with published calculations. Proton mean-square displacements are calculated from Debye-Waller factors measured in parallel quasi-elastic neutron-scattering experiments. Combined with the collagen density of states function, these yield an effective mass of 14.5 a.m.u. for the low frequency harmonic oscillators, indicating that the extended atom approximation, which simplifies analyses of low frequency protein dynamics, is appropriate. PMID:8527680

  17. Thermochromism in polyalkylthiophenes: Molecular aspects from vibrational spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zerbi, G.; Chierichetti, B.; Ingänas, O.

    1991-03-01

    It is known that polyalkylthiophenes show reversible thermochromism within a well-defined temperature range. The vibrational infrared and Raman spectra are used as structural probes for understanding the structures of polyhexyl and polyoctyl thiophenes at room temperature and their evolution with temperature during the thermochromic process. The seemingly sample IR and Raman spectra of these materials are explained in terms of the theory of the effective conjugation coordinate which also accounts for the observed ``dispersion'' of the Raman spectrum with exciting wavelength or from solid to solution states in terms of changes of effective conjugation length. A detailed description of the structure of the system is reached. At room T the sample consists mainly of two phases: (i) an ordered phase with the alkyl side chains in the transplanar structure and the main chain in a quasicoplanar or coplanar conformation and (ii) a disordered phase with the alkyl residue fully conformationally coiled and the main chain conformationally twisted with the torsional angle of ˜ 30°. Upon heating, the relative concentration of the disordered phase increases. The temperature dependence of the side chain and the main chain conformations are similar, thus showing that the coiling of the side chain drives the twisting of the main chain. The thermochromism is thus accounted for.

  18. Application of Infrared Multiphoton Dissociation Spectroscopy for the Study of Chiral Recognition in the Protonated Serine Clusters: Part II

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sunahori, Fumie X.; Kitova, Elena N.; Klassen, John S.; Xu, Yunjie; Yang, Guochun

    2011-06-01

    Serine is an amino acid which has long been known to form the magic-number serine octamer [Ser_8 + H]^+. It has been shown that the serine octamer exhibits strong preference for homochirality. Although a few possible structures for the homochiral serine octamer have been proposed, no definite conclusion has so far been drawn. Last year at this conference, we reported on the study of the protonated serine octamer and dimer as well as the chiral recognition in these clusters using infrared multiphoton dissociation (IRMPD) spectroscopic technique coupled with a Fourier transform ion cyclotron (FTICR) mass spectrometer. Here we present our latest results on the search for the infrared signatures of chiral recognition in the serine octamer and the dimer using a mixture of the deuterated 2,3,3-d_3-L-serine and normal D-serine solution. Using the isotopic labeled species, we could isolate the heterochiral species and obtain their IRMPD spectra which can be directly compared with those of the homochiral species. As an aid to interpret the observed spectra, molecular structures and vibrational frequencies of both homochiral and heterochiral octamer and dimer have been predicted by ab initio calculations. New insights into the hitherto undetermined structure of the serine octamer will be discussed. S. C. Nanita and R. G. Cooks Angew. Chem. Int. Ed. 45, (554), 2006.

  19. Clathrate hydrates studied by diffraction and vibrational spectroscopy.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jenkins, Timothy; Hemley, Russell; Mao, Wendy; Mao, Ho-Kwang; Militzer, Burkhard; Struzhkin, Viktor

    2007-03-01

    Clathrate hydrate structures are a potentially viable method for hydrogen storage (Mao and Mao 2004). For simple hydrogen-water clathrates, low temperatures (<150 K) or high pressures (>2 kbar) are needed for stability. We investigated, using inelastic neutron spectroscopy, the hydrogen storage character of a clathrate of hydrogen with the addition of tetrahydrofuran as a promoter molecule. The addition of tetrahydrofuran allows the formation of the clathrate structure at elevated temperature and decreased pressure as compared to the hydrogen clathrate (Lee, et al. 2005). In addition we have examined the higher pressure clathrate forms at lower temperatures. High pressure diamond anvil work has allowed Raman and x-ray spectroscopy on novel clathrate environments. Analysis these model compounds will assist in future investigations to additional clathrate compounds. Lee, Huen, et al. ``Tuning Clathrate Hydrates for Hydrogen Storage.'' Nature 434 (April 2005): 743-746. Mao, Wendy, and Ho-kwang Mao. ``Hydrogen Storage in Molecular Compounds.'' Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences 101, no. 3 (2004): 708-710.

  20. Two-photon vibrational spectroscopy for biosciences based on surface-enhanced hyper-Raman scattering

    PubMed Central

    Kneipp, Janina; Kneipp, Harald; Kneipp, Katrin

    2006-01-01

    Two-photon excitation is gaining rapidly in interest and significance in spectroscopy and microscopy. Here we introduce a new approach that suggests versatile optical labels suitable for both one- and two-photon excitation and also two-photon-excited ultrasensitive, nondestructive chemical probing. The underlying spectroscopic effect is the incoherent inelastic scattering of two photons on the vibrational quantum states called hyper-Raman scattering (HRS). The rather weak effect can be strengthened greatly if HRS takes place in the local optical fields of gold and silver nanostructures. This so-called surface-enhanced HRS (SEHRS) is the two-photon analogue to surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS). SEHRS provides structurally sensitive vibrational information complementary to those obtained by SERS. SEHRS combines the advantages of two-photon spectroscopy with the structural information of vibrational spectroscopy and the high-sensitivity and nanometer-scale local confinement of plasmonics-based spectroscopy. We infer effective two-photon cross-sections for SEHRS on the order of 10−46 to 10−45 cm4·s, similar to or higher than the best “action” cross-sections (product of the two-photon absorption cross-section and fluorescence quantum yield) for two-photon fluorescence, and we demonstrate HRS on biological structures such as single cells after incubation with gold nanoparticles. PMID:17088534

  1. High-resolution spectroscopy of the chiral metal complex [CpRe(CH₃)(CO)(NO)]: a potential candidate for probing parity violation.

    PubMed

    Medcraft, Chris; Wolf, Robert; Schnell, Melanie

    2014-10-20

    Heavy-metal containing chiral compounds have been suggested as promising candidates for studying parity-violation effects. We report herein the broadband rotational spectroscopy study of the chiral complex [CpRe(CH3)(CO)(NO)] in the gas phase. The spectra obtained are very rich due to the two rhenium isotopologues ((185)Re and (187)Re), hyperfine structure arising from the rhenium and nitrogen nuclei, and the asymmetry of the chiral complex. Since rhenium is located very close to the molecular center of mass, the rotational constants for the two rhenium isotopologues are very similar. However they can be differentiated by their characteristic nuclear quadrupole hyperfine splitting patterns. Comparison with calculated nuclear quadrupole coupling constants shows that all-electron relativistic basis sets are necessary for a correct description of the rhenium atom in this type of complex. The present study is an important step towards future precision studies on chiral molecules. PMID:25195666

  2. Analysis of the major chiral compounds of Artemisia herba-alba essential oils (EOs) using reconstructed vibrational circular dichroism (VCD) spectra: En route to a VCD chiral signature of EOs.

    PubMed

    Said, Mohammed El-Amin; Vanloot, Pierre; Bombarda, Isabelle; Naubron, Jean-Valère; Dahmane, El Montassir; Aamouche, Ahmed; Jean, Marion; Vanthuyne, Nicolas; Dupuy, Nathalie; Roussel, Christian

    2016-01-15

    An unprecedented methodology was developed to simultaneously assign the relative percentages of the major chiral compounds and their prevailing enantiomeric form in crude essential oils (EOs). In a first step the infrared (IR) and vibrational circular dichroism (VCD) spectra of the crude essential oils were recorded and in a second step they were modelized as a linear weighted combination of the IR and VCD spectra of the individual spectra of pure enantiomer of the major chiral compounds present in the EOs. The VCD spectra of enantiomer of known enantiomeric excess shall be recorded if they are not yet available in a library of VCD spectra. For IR, the spectra of pure enantiomer or racemic mixture can be used. The full spectra modelizations were performed using a well known and powerful mathematical model (least square estimation: LSE) which resulted in a weighting of each contributing compound. For VCD modelization, the absolute value of each weighting represented the percentage of the associate compound while the attached sign addressed the correctness of the enantiomeric form used to build the model. As an example, a model built with the non-prevailing enantiomer will show a negative sign of the weighting value. For IR spectra modelization, the absolute value of each weighting represented the percentage of the compounds without of course accounting for the chirality of the prevailing enantiomers. Comparison of the weighting values issuing from IR and VCD spectra modelizations is a valuable source of information: if they are identical, the EOs are composed of nearly pure enantiomers, if they are different the chiral compounds of the EOs are not in an optically pure form. The method was applied on four samples of essential oil of Artemisia herba-alba in which the three major compounds namely (-)-α-thujone, (+)-β-thujone and (-)-camphor were found in different proportions as determined by GC-MS and chiral HPLC using polarimetric detector. In order to validate the

  3. Excitonic and vibrational coherence in artificial photosynthetic systems studied by negative-time ultrafast laser spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Han, Dongjia; Xue, Bing; Du, Juan; Kobayashi, Takayoshi; Miyatake, Tomohiro; Tamiaki, Hitoshi; Xing, Xin; Yuan, Wei; Li, Yanyan; Leng, Yuxin

    2016-09-21

    Quantum coherences between excitonic states are believed to have a substantial impact on excitation energy transfer in photosynthetic systems. Here, the excitonic and vibrational coherence relaxation dynamics of artificially synthetic chlorosomes are studied by a sub 7 fs negative-time-delay laser spectroscopy at room temperature. The results provide direct evidence for the quantum coherence of the excitonic dephasing time of 23 ± 1 fs at physiologically relevant temperatures, which is significant in the initial step of energy transfer in chlorosome or chlorosome-like photosynthetic systems. Meanwhile, coherent molecular vibrations in the excited state are also detected without the effect of wave-packet motion in the ground state, which shows that the excited state wave-packet motion contributes greatly to the vibrational modes of ∼150 and ∼1340 cm(-1) in artificial chlorosome systems. PMID:27531576

  4. Communication: Vibrational and vibronic coherences in the two dimensional spectroscopy of coupled electron-nuclear motion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Albert, Julian; Falge, Mirjam; Gomez, Sandra; Sola, Ignacio R.; Hildenbrand, Heiko; Engel, Volker

    2015-07-01

    We theoretically investigate the photon-echo spectroscopy of coupled electron-nuclear quantum dynamics. Two situations are treated. In the first case, the Born-Oppenheimer (adiabatic) approximation holds. It is then possible to interpret the two-dimensional (2D) spectra in terms of vibrational motion taking place in different electronic states. In particular, pure vibrational coherences which are related to oscillations in the time-dependent third-order polarization can be identified. This concept fails in the second case, where strong non-adiabatic coupling leads to the breakdown of the Born-Oppenheimer-approximation. Then, the 2D-spectra reveal a complicated vibronic structure and vibrational coherences cannot be disentangled from the electronic motion.

  5. Communication: Vibrational and vibronic coherences in the two dimensional spectroscopy of coupled electron-nuclear motion

    SciTech Connect

    Albert, Julian; Falge, Mirjam; Hildenbrand, Heiko; Engel, Volker; Gomez, Sandra; Sola, Ignacio R.

    2015-07-28

    We theoretically investigate the photon-echo spectroscopy of coupled electron-nuclear quantum dynamics. Two situations are treated. In the first case, the Born-Oppenheimer (adiabatic) approximation holds. It is then possible to interpret the two-dimensional (2D) spectra in terms of vibrational motion taking place in different electronic states. In particular, pure vibrational coherences which are related to oscillations in the time-dependent third-order polarization can be identified. This concept fails in the second case, where strong non-adiabatic coupling leads to the breakdown of the Born-Oppenheimer-approximation. Then, the 2D-spectra reveal a complicated vibronic structure and vibrational coherences cannot be disentangled from the electronic motion.

  6. Vibrational Spectroscopy of Transient Dipolar Radicals via Autodetachment of Dipole-Bound States of Cold Anions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Dao-Ling; Liu, Hong-Tao; Dau, Phuong Diem; Wang, Lai-Sheng

    2014-06-01

    High-resolution vibrational spectroscopy of transient species is important for determining their molecular structures and understanding their chemical reactivity. However, the low abundance and high reactivity of molecular radicals pose major challenges to conventional absorption spectroscopic methods. The observation of dipole-bound states (DBS) in anions extend autodetachment spectroscopy to molecular anions whose corresponding neutral radicals possess a large enough dipole moment (>2.5 D).1,2 However, due to the difficulty of assigning the congested spectra at room temperature, there have been only a limited number of autodetachment spectra via DBS reported. Recently, we have built an improved version of a cold trap3 coupled with high-resolution photoelectron imaging.4 The first observation of mode-specific auotodetachment of DBS of cold phenoxide have shown that not only vibrational hot bands were completely suppressed, but also rotational profile was observed.5 The vibrational frequencies of the DBS were found to be the same as those of the neutral radical, suggesting that vibrational structures of dipolar radicals can be probed via DBS.5 More significantly, the DBS resonances allowed a number of vibrational modes with very weak Frank-Condon factors to be "lightened" up via vibrational autodetachment.5 Recently, our first high-resolution vibrational spectroscopy of the dehydrogenated uracil radical, with partial rotational resolution, via autodetachment from DBS of cold deprotonated uracil anions have been reported.6 Rich vibrational information is obtained for this important radical species. The resolved rotational profiles also allow us to characterize the rotational temperature of the trapped anions for the first time.6 1 K. R. Lykke, D. M. Neumark, T. Andersen, V. J. Trapa, and W. C. Lineberger, J. Chem. Phys. 87, 6842 (1987). 2 D. M. Wetzel, and J. I. Brauman, J. Chem. Phys. 90, 68 (1989). 3 P. D. Dau, H. T. Liu, D. L. Huang, and L. S. Wang, J. Chem. Phys

  7. Computational vibrational spectroscopy of peptides and proteins in one and two dimensions.

    PubMed

    Jeon, Jonggu; Yang, Seongeun; Choi, Jun-Ho; Cho, Minhaeng

    2009-09-15

    Vibrational spectroscopy provides direct information on molecular environment and motions but, its interpretation is often hampered by band broadening. Over the past decade, two-dimensional (2D) vibrational spectroscopy has emerged as a promising technique to overcome a number of difficulties associated with linear spectroscopy and provided significantly detailed information on the structure and dynamics of complex molecules in condensed phases. This Account reviews recently developed computational methods used to simulate 1D and 2D vibrational spectra. The central quantity to calculate in computational spectroscopy is the spectroscopic response function, which is the product of many contributing factors such as vibrational transition energies, transition moments, and their modulations by fluctuating local environment around a solute. Accurate calculations of such linear and nonlinear responses thus require a concerted effort employing a wide range of methods including electronic structure calculation (ESC) and molecular dynamics (MD) simulation. The electronic structure calculation can provide fundamental quantities such as normal-mode frequencies and transition multipole strengths. However, since the treatable system size is limited with this method, classical MD simulation has also been used to account for the dynamics of the solvent environment. To achieve chemical accuracy, these two results are combined to generate time series of fluctuating transition frequencies and transition moments with the distributed multipole analysis, and this particular approach has been known as the hybrid ESC/MD method. For coupled multichromophore systems, vibrational properties of each chromophore such as a peptide are individually calculated by electronic structure methods and the Hessian matrix reconstruction scheme was used to obtain local mode frequencies and couplings of constituting anharmonic oscillators. The spectra thus obtained, especially for biomolecules including

  8. Microwave Spectroscopy of the Excited Vibrational States of Methanol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pearson, John; Daly, Adam M.; Bermúdez, Celina

    2015-06-01

    Methanol is the simplest molecule with a three-fold internal rotation and the observation of its νb{8} band served the primary catalyst for the development of internal rotation theory(a,b). The 75 subsequent years of investigation into the νb{8} band region have yielded a large number assignments, numerous high precision energy levels and a great deal of insight into the coupling of νb{t}=3 & 4 with νb{8}, νb{7}, νb{11} and other nearby states(c). In spite of this progress numerous assignment mysteries persist, the origin of almost half the far infrared laser lines remain unknown and all attempts to model the region quantum mechanically have had very limited success. The C3V internal rotation Hamiltonian has successfully modeled the νb{t}=0,1 & 2 states of methanol and other internal rotors(d). However, successful modeling of the coupling between torsional bath states and excited small amplitude motion remains problematic and coupling of multiple interacting excited small amplitude vibrations featuring large amplitude motions remains almost completely unexplored. Before such modeling can be attempted, identifying the remaining low lying levels of νb{7} and νb{11} is necessary. We present an investigation into the microwave spectrum of νb{7}, νb{8} and νb{11} along with the underlying torsional bath states in νb{t}=3 and νb{t}= 4. (a) A. Borden, E.F. Barker J. Chem. Phys., 6, 553 (1938). (b) J. S. Koehler and D. M. Dennison, Phys. Rev. 57, 1006 (1940). (c) R. M. Lees, Li-Hong Xu, J. W. C. Johns, B. P. Winnewisser, and M. Lock, J. Mol. Spectrosc. 243, 168 (2007). (d) L.-H. Xu, J. Fisher, R.M. Lees, H.Y. Shi, J.T. Hougen, J.C. Pearson, B.J. Drouin, G.A. Blake, R. Braakman J. Mol. Spectrosc., 251, 305 (2008).

  9. Nuclear resonance vibrational spectroscopy (NRVS) of rubredoxin and MoFe protein crystals

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Yisong; Brecht, Eric; Aznavour, Kristen; Nix, Jay C.; Xiao, Yuming; Wang, Hongxin; George, Simon J.; Bau, Robert; Keable, Stephen; Peters, John W.; Adams, Michael W.W.; Jenney, Francis; Sturhahn, Wolfgang; Alp, Ercan E.; Zhao, Jiyong; Yoda, Yoshitaka; Cramer, Stephen P.

    2014-01-01

    We have applied 57Fe nuclear resonance vibrational spectroscopy (NRVS) for the first time to study the dynamics of Fe centers in Fe-S protein crystals, including oxidized wild type rubredoxin crystals from Pyrococcus furiosus, and the MoFe protein of nitrogenase from Azotobacter vinelandii. Thanks to the NRVS selection rule, selectively probed vibrational modes have been observed in both oriented rubredoxin and MoFe protein crystals. The NRVS work was complemented by extended X-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy (EXAFS) measurements on oxidized wild type rubredoxin crystals from Pyrococcus furiosus. The EXAFS spectra revealed the Fe-S bond length difference in oxidized Pf Rd protein, which is qualitatively consistent with the X-ray crystal structure. PMID:26052177

  10. Vibrational spectroscopy of the borate mineral kotoite Mg₃(BO₃)₂.

    PubMed

    Frost, Ray L; Xi, Yunfei

    2013-02-15

    Vibrational spectroscopy has been used to assess the structure of kotoite a borate mineral of magnesium which is isostructural with jimboite. The mineral is orthorhombic with point group: 2/m 2/m 2/m. The mineral has the potential as a new memory insulator material. The mineral has been characterised by a combination of Raman and infrared spectroscopy. The Raman spectrum is dominated by a very intense band at 835 cm(-1), assigned to the symmetric stretching mode of tetrahedral boron. Raman bands at 919, 985 and 1015 cm(-1) are attributed to the antisymmetric stretching modes of tetrahedral boron. Kotoite is strictly an hydrous borate mineral. An intense Raman band observed at 3559 cm(-1) is attributed to the stretching vibration of hydroxyl units, more likely to be associated with the borate mineral hydroxyborate. The lack of observation of water bending modes proves the absence of water in the kotoite structure. PMID:23257343

  11. Nuclear resonance vibrational spectroscopy (NRVS) of rubredoxin and MoFe protein crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Yisong; Brecht, Eric; Aznavour, Kristen; Nix, Jay C.; Xiao, Yuming; Wang, Hongxin; George, Simon J.; Bau, Robert; Keable, Stephen; Peters, John W.; Adams, Michael W. W.; , Francis E. Jenney, Jr.; Sturhahn, Wolfgang; Alp, Ercan E.; Zhao, Jiyong; Yoda, Yoshitaka; Cramer, Stephen P.

    2013-12-01

    We have applied 57Fe nuclear resonance vibrational spectroscopy (NRVS) for the first time to study the dynamics of Fe centers in Iron-sulfur protein crystals, including oxidized wild type rubredoxin crystals from Pyrococcus furiosus, and the MoFe protein of nitrogenase from Azotobacter vinelandii. Thanks to the NRVS selection rule, selectively probed vibrational modes have been observed in both oriented rubredoxin and MoFe protein crystals. The NRVS work was complemented by extended X-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy (EXAFS) measurements on oxidized wild type rubredoxin crystals from Pyrococcus furiosus. The EXAFS spectra revealed the Fe-S bond length difference in oxidized Pf Rd protein, which is qualitatively consistent with the crystal structure.

  12. Phthalocyanine adsorption to graphene on Ir(111): Evidence for decoupling from vibrational spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Endlich, M. Gozdzik, S.; Néel, N.; Kröger, J.; Rosa, A. L. da; Frauenheim, T.; Wehling, T. O.

    2014-11-14

    Phthalocyanine molecules have been adsorbed to Ir(111) and to graphene on Ir(111). From a comparison of scanning tunneling microscopy images of individual molecules adsorbed to the different surfaces alone it is difficult to discern potential differences in the molecular adsorption geometry. In contrast, vibrational spectroscopy using inelastic electron scattering unequivocally hints at strong molecule deformations on Ir(111) and at a planar adsorption geometry on graphene. The spectroscopic evidence for the different adsorption configurations is supported by density functional calculations.

  13. Vibrational Spectral Signatures of Crystalline Cellulose Using High Resolution Broadband Sum Frequency Generation Vibrational Spectroscopy (HR-BB-SFG-VS)

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Libing; Lu, Zhou; Velarde Ruiz Esparza, Luis A.; Fu, Li; Pu, Yunqiao; Ding, Shi-You; Ragauskas, Art J.; Wang, Hongfei; Yang, Bin

    2015-03-03

    Here we reported the first sub-wavenumber high-resolution broadband sum frequency generation vibrational spectroscopy (HR-BB-SFG-VS) study on both the C-H and O-H region spectra of crystalline cellulose. HR-BB-SFG-VS has about 10 times better resolution than the conventional scanning SFG-VS and is known to be able to measure the intrinsic spectral lineshape and to resolve much more spectral details. With HR-BB-SFG-VS, we found that in cellulose from different sources, including Avicel and cellulose crystals isolated from algae Valonia (Iα) and tunicates (Iβ), the spectral signatures in the OH regions were unique for different allomorphs, i.e. Iα and Iβ, while the spectral signatures in the C-H regions varied in all samples examined. Even though the origin of the different behaviors of the crystalline cellulose in the O-H and C-H vibrational frequency regions is yet to be correlated to the structure of cellulose, these results provided new spectroscopic methods and opportunities to classify and understand the basic crystalline structure, as well as variations, in polymorphism of the crystalline cellulose structure.

  14. Vibrational spectral signatures of crystalline cellulose using high resolution broadband sum frequency generation vibrational spectroscopy (HR-BB-SFG-VS)

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Libing; Lu, Zhou; Velarde, Luis; Fu, Li; Pu, Yunqiao; Ding, Shi-You; Ragauskas, Arthur; Wang, Hong-Fei; Yang, Bin

    2015-03-03

    Both the C–H and O–H region spectra of crystalline cellulose were studied using the sub-wavenumber high-resolution broadband sum frequency generation vibrational spectroscopy (HR-BB-SFG-VS) for the first time. The resolution of HR-BB-SFG-VS is about 10-times better than conventional scanning SFG-VS and has the capability of measuring the intrinsic spectral lineshape and revealing many more spectral details. With HR-BB-SFG-VS, we found that in cellulose samples from different sources, including Avicel and cellulose crystals isolated from algae Valonia (Iα) and tunicates (Iβ), the spectral signatures in the O–H region were unique for the two allomorphs, i.e. Iα and Iβ, while the spectral signatures in the C–H regions varied in all samples examined. Even though the origin of the different spectral signatures of the crystalline cellulose in the O–H and C–H vibrational frequency regions are yet to be correlated to the structure of cellulose, these results lead to new spectroscopic methods and opportunities to classify and to understand the basic crystalline structures, as well as variations in polymorphism of the crystalline cellulose.

  15. Vibrational spectral signatures of crystalline cellulose using high resolution broadband sum frequency generation vibrational spectroscopy (HR-BB-SFG-VS)

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Zhang, Libing; Lu, Zhou; Velarde, Luis; Fu, Li; Pu, Yunqiao; Ding, Shi-You; Ragauskas, Arthur; Wang, Hong-Fei; Yang, Bin

    2015-03-03

    Both the C–H and O–H region spectra of crystalline cellulose were studied using the sub-wavenumber high-resolution broadband sum frequency generation vibrational spectroscopy (HR-BB-SFG-VS) for the first time. The resolution of HR-BB-SFG-VS is about 10-times better than conventional scanning SFG-VS and has the capability of measuring the intrinsic spectral lineshape and revealing many more spectral details. With HR-BB-SFG-VS, we found that in cellulose samples from different sources, including Avicel and cellulose crystals isolated from algae Valonia (Iα) and tunicates (Iβ), the spectral signatures in the O–H region were unique for the two allomorphs, i.e. Iα and Iβ, while the spectral signaturesmore » in the C–H regions varied in all samples examined. Even though the origin of the different spectral signatures of the crystalline cellulose in the O–H and C–H vibrational frequency regions are yet to be correlated to the structure of cellulose, these results lead to new spectroscopic methods and opportunities to classify and to understand the basic crystalline structures, as well as variations in polymorphism of the crystalline cellulose.« less

  16. Exciton-vibrational coupling in the dynamics and spectroscopy of Frenkel excitons in molecular aggregates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schröter, M.; Ivanov, S. D.; Schulze, J.; Polyutov, S. P.; Yan, Y.; Pullerits, T.; Kühn, O.

    2015-03-01

    The influence of exciton-vibrational coupling on the optical and transport properties of molecular aggregates is an old problem that gained renewed interest in recent years. On the experimental side, various nonlinear spectroscopic techniques gave insight into the dynamics of systems as complex as photosynthetic antennae. Striking evidence was gathered that in these protein-pigment complexes quantum coherence is operative even at room temperature conditions. Investigations were triggered to understand the role of vibrational degrees of freedom, beyond that of a heat bath characterized by thermal fluctuations. This development was paralleled by theory, where efficient methods emerged, which could provide the proper frame to perform non-Markovian and non-perturbative simulations of exciton-vibrational dynamics and spectroscopy. This review summarizes the state of affairs of the theory of exciton-vibrational interaction in molecular aggregates and photosynthetic antenna complexes. The focus is put on the discussion of basic effects of exciton-vibrational interaction from the stationary and dynamics points of view. Here, the molecular dimer plays a prominent role as it permits a systematic investigation of absorption and emission spectra by numerical diagonalization of the exciton-vibrational Hamiltonian in a truncated Hilbert space. An extension to larger aggregates, having many coupled nuclear degrees of freedom, becomes possible with the Multi-Layer Multi-Configuration Time-Dependent Hartree (ML-MCTDH) method for wave packet propagation. In fact it will be shown that this method allows one to approach the limit of almost continuous spectral densities, which is usually the realm of density matrix theory. Real system-bath situations are introduced for two models, which differ in the way strongly coupled nuclear coordinates are treated, as a part of the relevant system or the bath. A rather detailed exposition of the Hierarchy Equations Of Motion (HEOM) method will be

  17. Submillimeter Wave Spectroscopy and ISM Search for a Chiral Molecule : 2-AMINOPROPANENITRILE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Margulès, L.; Motiyenko, R.; Mollendal, H.; Guillemin, J.-C.; Belloche, A.

    2010-06-01

    The detection of chiral compounds in the interstellar medium is a great challenge and could tell us the connection between the chemistry of the ISM and the origin of life on the primitive Earth. Chiral C-3 sugar, α-aminonitriles and cyanohydrins or the corresponding chloro-derivatives are intuitively the simplest chiral candidates consistent with the nature of the heteroatoms observed in the ISM. The aminoacetonitrile being observed in Sgr B2(N) but not the simplest cyanohydrins and chloacetonitrile, our study was devoted to the 2-aminopropanenitrile, the methyl derivative of aminoacetonitrile and the precursor of alanine (an amino acid) by hydrolysis. The measurements were made in Oslo and in Lille from 7 to 660 GHz. More than 2000 lines were assigned. The search in Sgr B2(N) has been unsuccessful so far. The upper limit currently derived on the column density is comparable to the column density of aminoacetonitrile. This work is supported by the french Programme National de Physique Chimie du Milieu Interstellaire A. Belloche, K. M. Menten, C. Comito, et al., Astron. Astrophys. 482, 179-196 (2008)

  18. 2D-IR spectroscopy of hydrogen-bond-mediated vibrational excitation transfer.

    PubMed

    Chuntonov, Lev

    2016-05-18

    Vibrational excitation transfer along the hydrogen-bond-mediated pathways in the complex of methyl acetate (MA) and 4-cyanophenol (4CP) was studied by dual-frequency femtosecond two-dimensional infrared spectroscopy. We excited the energy-donating ester carbonyl stretching vibrational mode and followed the transfer to the energy-accepting benzene ring and cyano stretching vibrations. The complexes with no, one, and two hydrogen-bonded 4CP molecules were studied. Vibrational relaxation of the carbonyl mode is more efficient in both hydrogen-bonded complexes as compared with free MA molecules. The inter-molecular transport in a hydrogen-bonded complex involving a single 4CP molecule is slower than that in a complex with two 4CP molecules. In the former, vibrational relaxation leads to local heating, as shown by the spectroscopy of the carbonyl mode, whereas the local heating is suppressed in the latter because the excitation redistribution is more efficient. At early times, the transfer to the benzene ring is governed by its direct coupling with the energy-donating carbonyl mode, whereas at later times intermediate states are involved. The transfer to a more distant site of the cyano group in 4CP involves intermediate states at all times, since no direct coupling between the energy-donating and accepting modes was observed. We anticipate that our findings will be of importance for spectroscopic studies of bio-molecular structures and dynamics, and inter- and intra-molecular signaling pathways, and for developing molecular networking applications. PMID:27145861

  19. Investigation of organometallic reaction mechanisms with one and two dimensional vibrational spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Cahoon, James Francis

    2008-12-01

    One and two dimensional time-resolved vibrational spectroscopy has been used to investigate the elementary reactions of several prototypical organometallic complexes in room temperature solution. The electron transfer and ligand substitution reactions of photogenerated 17-electron organometallic radicals CpW(CO)3 and CpFe(CO)2 have been examined with one dimensional spectroscopy on the picosecond through microsecond time-scales, revealing the importance of caging effects and odd-electron intermediates in these reactions. Similarly, an investigation of the photophysics of the simple Fischer carbene complex Cr(CO)5[CMe(OMe)] showed that this class of molecule undergoes an unusual molecular rearrangement on the picosecond time-scale, briefly forming a metal-ketene complex. Although time-resolved spectroscopy has long been used for these types of photoinitiated reactions, the advent of two dimensional vibrational spectroscopy (2D-IR) opens the possibility to examine the ultrafast dynamics of molecules under thermal equilibrium conditions. Using this method, the picosecond fluxional rearrangements of the model metal carbonyl Fe(CO)5 have been examined, revealing the mechanism, time-scale, and transition state of the fluxional reaction. The success of this experiment demonstrates that 2D-IR is a powerful technique to examine the thermally-driven, ultrafast rearrangements of organometallic molecules in solution.

  20. Double resonant absorption measurement of acetylene symmetric vibrational states probed with cavity ring down spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karhu, J.; Nauta, J.; Vainio, M.; Metsälä, M.; Hoekstra, S.; Halonen, L.

    2016-06-01

    A novel mid-infrared/near-infrared double resonant absorption setup for studying infrared-inactive vibrational states is presented. A strong vibrational transition in the mid-infrared region is excited using an idler beam from a singly resonant continuous-wave optical parametric oscillator, to populate an intermediate vibrational state. High output power of the optical parametric oscillator and the strength of the mid-infrared transition result in efficient population transfer to the intermediate state, which allows measuring secondary transitions from this state with a high signal-to-noise ratio. A secondary, near-infrared transition from the intermediate state is probed using cavity ring-down spectroscopy, which provides high sensitivity in this wavelength region. Due to the narrow linewidths of the excitation sources, the rovibrational lines of the secondary transition are measured with sub-Doppler resolution. The setup is used to access a previously unreported symmetric vibrational state of acetylene, ν 1 + ν 2 + ν 3 + ν4 1 + ν5 - 1 in the normal mode notation. Single-photon transitions to this state from the vibrational ground state are forbidden. Ten lines of the newly measured state are observed and fitted with the linear least-squares method to extract the band parameters. The vibrational term value was measured to be at 9775.0018(45) cm-1, the rotational parameter B was 1.162 222(37) cm-1, and the quartic centrifugal distortion parameter D was 3.998(62) × 10-6 cm-1, where the numbers in the parenthesis are one-standard errors in the least significant digits.

  1. Double resonant absorption measurement of acetylene symmetric vibrational states probed with cavity ring down spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Karhu, J; Nauta, J; Vainio, M; Metsälä, M; Hoekstra, S; Halonen, L

    2016-06-28

    A novel mid-infrared/near-infrared double resonant absorption setup for studying infrared-inactive vibrational states is presented. A strong vibrational transition in the mid-infrared region is excited using an idler beam from a singly resonant continuous-wave optical parametric oscillator, to populate an intermediate vibrational state. High output power of the optical parametric oscillator and the strength of the mid-infrared transition result in efficient population transfer to the intermediate state, which allows measuring secondary transitions from this state with a high signal-to-noise ratio. A secondary, near-infrared transition from the intermediate state is probed using cavity ring-down spectroscopy, which provides high sensitivity in this wavelength region. Due to the narrow linewidths of the excitation sources, the rovibrational lines of the secondary transition are measured with sub-Doppler resolution. The setup is used to access a previously unreported symmetric vibrational state of acetylene, ν1+ν2+ν3+ν4 (1)+ν5 (-1) in the normal mode notation. Single-photon transitions to this state from the vibrational ground state are forbidden. Ten lines of the newly measured state are observed and fitted with the linear least-squares method to extract the band parameters. The vibrational term value was measured to be at 9775.0018(45) cm(-1), the rotational parameter B was 1.162 222(37) cm(-1), and the quartic centrifugal distortion parameter D was 3.998(62) × 10(-6) cm(-1), where the numbers in the parenthesis are one-standard errors in the least significant digits. PMID:27369508

  2. Rotational spectroscopy and three-wave mixing of 4-carvomenthenol: A technical guide to measuring chirality in the microwave regime

    SciTech Connect

    Shubert, V. Alvin; Schmitz, David; Medcraft, Chris; Krin, Anna; Patterson, David; Doyle, John M.; Schnell, Melanie

    2015-06-07

    We apply chirality sensitive microwave three-wave mixing to 4-carvomenthenol, a molecule previously uncharacterized with rotational spectroscopy. We measure its rotational spectrum in the 2-8.5 GHz range and observe three molecular conformers. We describe our method in detail, from the initial step of spectral acquisition and assignment to the final step of determining absolute configuration and enantiomeric excess. Combining fitted rotational constants with dipole moment components derived from quantum chemical calculations, we identify candidate three-wave mixing cycles which were further tested using a double resonance method. Initial optimization of the three-wave mixing signal is done by varying the duration of the second excitation pulse. With known transition dipole matrix elements, absolute configuration can be directly determined from a single measurement.

  3. Protein Dynamics Studied with Ultrafast 2D IR Vibrational Echo Spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    THIELGES, MEGAN C.; FAYER, MICHAEL D.

    2012-01-01

    CONSPECTUS Proteins, enzymes, and other biological molecules undergo structural dynamics as an intrinsic part of their biological functions. While many biological processes occur on the millisecond, second, and even longer time scales, the fundamental structural dynamics that eventually give rise to such processes occur on much faster time scales. Many decades ago, chemical kineticists focused on the inverse of the reaction rate constant as the important time scale for a chemical reaction. However, through transition state theory and a vast amount of experimental evidence, we now know that the key events in a chemical reaction can involve structural fluctuations that take a system of reactants to its transitions state, the crossing of a barrier, and the eventual relaxation to product states. Such dynamics occur on very fast time scales. Today researchers would like to investigate the fast structural fluctuations of biological molecules to gain an understanding of how biological processes proceed from simple structural changes in biomolecules to the final, complex biological function. The study of the fast structural dynamics of biological molecules requires experiments that operate on the appropriate time scales, and in this Account, we discuss the application of ultrafast two-dimensional infrared (2D IR) vibrational echo spectroscopy to the study of dynamics. The 2D IR vibrational echo experiment is akin to 2D NMR, but it operates on time scales many orders of magnitude faster. In the experiments, a particular vibrational oscillator serves as a vibrational dynamics probe. As the structure of the protein evolves in time, the structural changes are manifested as time dependent changes in the frequency of the vibrational dynamics probe. The 2D IR vibrational echo experiments can track the vibrational frequency evolution, which we then relate to the time evolution of the protein structure. In particular, we measured protein substate interconversion for mutants of

  4. Damage-free vibrational spectroscopy of biological materials in the electron microscope

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Rez, Peter; Aoki, Toshihiro; March, Katia; Gur, Dvir; Krivanek, Ondrej L.; Dellby, Niklas; Lovejoy, Tracy C.; Wolf, Sharon G.; Cohen, Hagai

    2016-03-10

    Vibrational spectroscopy in the electron microscope would be transformative in the study of biological samples, provided that radiation damage could be prevented. However, electron beams typically create high-energy excitations that severely accelerate sample degradation. Here this major difficulty is overcome using an ‘aloof’ electron beam, positioned tens of nanometres away from the sample: high-energy excitations are suppressed, while vibrational modes of energies o1 eV can be ‘safely’ investigated. To demonstrate the potential of aloof spectroscopy, we record electron energy loss spectra from biogenic guanine crystals in their native state, resolving their characteristic C–H, N–H and C=O vibrational signatures with nomore » observable radiation damage. Furthermore, the technique opens up the possibility of non-damaging compositional analyses of organic functional groups, including non-crystalline biological materials, at a spatial resolution of ~10nm, simultaneously combined with imaging in the electron microscope.« less

  5. Femtosecond Broadband Stimulated Raman: A New Approach for High-Performance Vibrational Spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    McCAMANT, DAVID W.; KUKURA, PHILIPP; MATHIES, RICHARD A.

    2005-01-01

    Femtosecond stimulated Raman spectroscopy (FSRS) is a new technique that produces high-quality vibrational spectra free from background fluorescence. FSRS combines a narrow-bandwidth picosecond Raman pump pulse with an ∼80 fs continuum probe pulse to produce stimulated Raman spectra from the pump-induced gain in the probe spectrum. The high intensity of the Raman pump combined with the broad bandwidth of the probe produces high signal-to-noise vibrational spectra with very short data acquisition times. FSRS spectra of standard solutions and solvents such as aqueous Na2SO4, aqueous KNO3, methanol, isopropanol, and cyclohexane are collected in seconds. Furthermore, stimulated Raman spectra can be obtained using just a single pump–probe pulse pair that illuminates the sample for only ∼1 ps. Fluorescence rejection is demonstrated by collecting FSRS spectra of dyes (rhodamine 6G, chlorophyll a, and DTTCI) with varying degrees of fluorescence background and resonance enhancement. The high signal-to-noise, short data acquisition time, fluorescence rejection, and high spectral and temporal resolution of femtosecond stimulated Raman spectroscopy make it a valuable new vibrational spectroscopic technique. PMID:14658143

  6. Modeling vibrational dephasing and energy relaxation of intramolecular anharmonic modes for multidimensional infrared spectroscopies.

    PubMed

    Ishizaki, Akihito; Tanimura, Yoshitaka

    2006-08-28

    Starting from a system-bath Hamiltonian in a molecular coordinate representation, we examine an applicability of a stochastic multilevel model for vibrational dephasing and energy relaxation in multidimensional infrared spectroscopy. We consider an intramolecular anharmonic mode nonlinearly coupled to a colored noise bath at finite temperature. The system-bath interaction is assumed linear plus square in the system coordinate, but linear in the bath coordinates. The square-linear system-bath interaction leads to dephasing due to the frequency fluctuation of system vibration, while the linear-linear interaction contributes to energy relaxation and a part of dephasing arises from anharmonicity. To clarify the role and origin of vibrational dephasing and energy relaxation in the stochastic model, the system part is then transformed into an energy eigenstate representation without using the rotating wave approximation. Two-dimensional (2D) infrared spectra are then calculated by solving a low-temperature corrected quantum Fokker-Planck (LTC-QFP) equation for a colored noise bath and by the stochastic theory. In motional narrowing regime, the spectra from the stochastic model are quite different from those from the LTC-QFP. In spectral diffusion regime, however, the 2D line shapes from the stochastic model resemble those from the LTC-QFP besides the blueshifts caused by the dissipation from the colored noise bath. The preconditions for validity of the stochastic theory for molecular vibrational motion are also discussed. PMID:16965023

  7. Experimental and theoretical investigation on the vibrational spectroscopy of L-theanine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Yongjian; Xi, Gangqin; Chen, Rong; Li, Yongzeng; Feng, Shangyuan; Lei, Jinping; Lin, Hongxing

    2011-12-01

    In this work, experimental and theoretical investigations on vibrational spectroscopy of L-theanine were presented. FT-IR and Raman spectra of L-theanine powder sample were recorded and corresponding theoretical calculations were performed based on Density Functional Theory (DFT) at B3LYP level using 6-31++G(d,p) and 6-311++G(d,p) basis sets combined with the Polarized Continuum Model (PCM) with water as the solvent. The experimental vibrational bands were assigned based on the basis of calculations while the predicted geometric parameters were compared with those obtained in experiment, most of the bands measured were well reproduced in the calculations while the discrepancies are significant for the bands mainly related to the vibrations of protonated amino group ( NH3+) and ionized carboxyl group (COO -), which are affected by the intramolecular hydrogen bond interaction. Good agreements between the theoretical and experimental results confirm the feasibility of the DFT method combined with PCM in the study of the molecular structure and vibrational spectra of L-theanine.

  8. A theoretical study of the sum frequency vibrational spectroscopy of the carbon tetrachloride/water interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Green, Anthony J.; Perry, Angela; Moore, Preston B.; Space, Brian

    2012-03-01

    Theoretical approximations to the sum frequency vibrational spectroscopy (SFVS) of the carbon tetrachloride/water interface are constructed using the quantum-corrected time correlation functions (TCF) to aid in interpretation of experimental data and to predict novel vibrational modes. Instantaneous normal mode (INM) methods are used to characterize the observed modes leading to the TCF signal, thus providing molecular resolution of the vibrational lineshapes. Detailed comparisons of the theoretical signals are made with those obtained experimentally and show excellent agreement for the spectral peaks in the O-H stretching region of water. An intermolecular mode, unique to the interface, at 848 cm-1 is also identifiable, similar to the one seen for the water/vapor interface. INM analysis reveals the resonance is due to a wagging mode (hindered rotation) that was previously identified (Perry et al 2005 J. Chem. Phys. 123 144705) as localized on a single water molecule with both hydrogens displaced normal to the interface—generally it is found that the symmetry breaking at the interface leads to hindered translations and rotations at hydrophilic/hydrophobic interfaces that assume finite vibrational frequencies due to anchoring at the aqueous interface. Additionally, examination of the real and imaginary parts of the theoretical SFVS spectra reveal the spectroscopic species attributed the resonances and possible subspecies in the O-H region; these results are consistent with extant experimental data and associated analysis.

  9. Accurate Lineshapes from Sub-1 cm-1 Resolution Sum Frequency Generation Vibrational Spectroscopy of α-Pinene at Room Temperature

    SciTech Connect

    Mifflin, Amanda L.; Velarde Ruiz Esparza, Luis A.; Ho, Junming; Psciuk, Brian; Negre, Christian; Ebben, Carlena J.; Upshur, Mary Alice; Lu, Zhou; Strick, Benjamin; Thomson, Regan; Batista, Victor; Wang, Hongfei; Geiger, Franz M.

    2015-02-26

    Room temperature sub-wavenumber high-resolution broadband sum frequency generation (HR-BB-SFG) spectra of the common terpene (+)-α-pinene reveal ten peaks in the C–H stretching region. The spectral resolution exceeds that of Fourier transform infrared, femtosecond stimulated Raman, and traditional BB-SFG and scanning SFG spectroscopy of the same molecule. Experiment and simulation show the spectral lineshapes to be accurate. Homogeneous vibrational decoherence lifetimes of up to 1.7 psec are assigned to specific oscillators and compare favorably to lifetimes computed from density functional tight binding molecular dynamics calculations, while phase-resolved spectra yield orientation information for them. We propose the new spectroscopy as an attractive alternative to time-resolved vibrational spectroscopy or heterodyne-detection schemes for studying vibrational energy relaxation and vibrational coherences in molecules.

  10. Dynamics of Functionalized Surface Molecular Monolayers Studied with Ultrafast Infrared Vibrational Spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Rosenfeld, Daniel E.; Nishida, Jun; Yan, Chang; Gengeliczki, Zsolt; Smith, Brian J.; Fayer, Michael D.

    2012-01-01

    The structural dynamics of thin films consisting of tricarbonyl (1,10-phenanthroline)rhenium chloride (RePhen(CO)3Cl) linked to an alkyl silane monolayer through a triazole linker synthesized on silica-on-calcium-fluoride substrates are investigated using ultrafast infrared (IR) techniques. Ultrafast 2D IR vibrational echo experiments and polarization selective heterodyne detected transient grating (HDTG) measurements, as well as polarization dependent FT-IR and AFM experiments are employed to study the samples. The vibrational echo experiments measure spectral diffusion, while the HDTG experiments measure the vibrational excited state population relaxation and investigate the vibrational transition dipole orientational anisotropy decay. To investigate the anticipated impact of vibrational excitation transfer, which can be caused by the high concentration of RePhen(CO)3Cl in the monolayer, a concentration dependence of the spectral diffusion is measured. To generate a range of concentrations, mixed monolayers consisting of both hydrogen terminated and triazole/RePhen(CO)3Cl terminated alkyl silanes are synthesized. It is found that the measured rate of spectral diffusion is independent of concentration, with all samples showing spectral diffusion of 37 ± 6 ps. To definitively test for vibrational excitation transfer, polarization selective HDTG experiments are conducted. Excitation transfer will cause anisotropy decay. Polarization resolved heterodyne detected transient grating spectroscopy is sensitive to anisotropy decay (depolarization) caused by excitation transfer and molecular reorientation. The HDTG experiments show no evidence of anisotropy decay on the appropriate time scale, demonstrating the absence of excitation transfer the RePhen(CO)3Cl. Therefore the influence of excitation transfer on spectral diffusion is inconsequential in these samples, and the vibrational echo measurements of spectral diffusion report solely on structural dynamics. A small

  11. Vibrational Spectra of Cryogenic Peptide Ions Using H_2 Predissociation Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leavitt, Christopher M.; Wolk, Arron B.; Kamrath, Michael Z.; Garand, Etienne; Johnson, Mark A.; Stipdonk, Michael J. Van

    2011-06-01

    H_2 predissociation spectroscopy was used to collect the vibrational spectra of the model protonated peptides, GlyGly, GlySar, SarGly and SarSar (Gly=glycine and Sar=sarcosine). H_2 molecules were condensed onto protonated peptide ions in a quadrupole ion trap cooled to approximately 10 K. The resulting spectra yielded clearly resolved vibrational transitions throughout the mid IR region, 600-4200 Cm-1, with linewidths of approximately 6 Cm-1. Protonation nominally occurred on the amino terminus giving rise to an intramolecular H-bond between the protonated amine and the neighboring amide oxygen. The sarcosine containing peptides incorporate a methyl group onto either the amino group or the amide nitrogen causing the peptide backbone to adopt a different structure, resulting in the shifts in the amide I and II bands and the N-H stretches.

  12. [UV spectroscopy coupled with partial least squares to determine the enantiomeric composition in chiral drugs].

    PubMed

    Li, Qian-qian; Wu, Li-jun; Liu, Wei; Cao, Jin-li; Duan, Jia; Huang, Yue; Min, Shun-geng

    2012-02-01

    In the present study, sucrose was used as a chiral selector to detect the molar fraction of R-metalaxyl and S-ibuprofen due to the UV spectral difference caused by the interaction of the R- and S-isomer with sucrose. The quantitative model of the molar fraction of R-metalaxyl was established by partial least squares (PLS) regression and the robustness of the models was evaluated by 6 independent validation samples. The determination coefficient R2 and the standard error of calibration set (SEC) was 99.98% and 0.003 respectively. The correlation coefficient of estimated value and specified value, the standard error and the relative standard deviation (RSD) of the independent validation samples was 0.999 8, 0.000 4 and 0.054% respectively. The quantitative models of the molar fraction of S-ibuprofen were established by PLS and the robustness of models was evaluated. The determination coefficient R2 and the standard error of calibration set (SEC) was 99.82% and 0.007 respectively. The correlation coefficient of estimated value and specified value of the independent validation samples was 0.998 1. The standard error of prediction (SEP) was 0.002 and the relative standard deviation (RSD) was 0.2%. The result demonstrates that sucrose is an ideal chiral selector for building a stable regression model to determine the enantiomeric composition. PMID:22512198

  13. Detection of simulants and degradation products of chemical warfare agents by vibrational spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruiz-Pesante, Orlando; Pacheco-Londoño, Leonardo C.; Primera-Pedrozo, Oliva M.; Ortiz, William; Soto-Feliciano, Yadira M.; Nieves, Deborah E.; Ramirez, Michael L.; Hernández-Rivera, Samuel P.

    2007-04-01

    This work was focused in the measurement of spectroscopic signatures of Chemical Warfare Agent Simulants (CWAS) and degradation products of chemical agents using vibrational spectroscopy for the generation of spectroscopic libraries. The chemicals studied were: DMMP, DIMP, 2-CEES, 2-BAET, 1,4-thioxane, thiodiglycol sulfoxide, dihexylamine, cyclohexylamine, among others. Raman microscopy experiments were performed at different excitation wavelengths that spanned from NIR at 1064 and 785 nm to the VIS at 532, 514.5 and 488 nm and even the deep ultraviolet region at 244 nm. For the compounds studied the optimum excitation lines were 488 nm and 532 nm with a laser power of 25 mW. Among the most prominent bands were at these incident wavelengths were located ca. 652 and 1444 cm-1. Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy in liquid and gas phase and Fiber Optics Coupled-Grazing Angle Probe-FTIR (FOCGAP- FTIR) were used to characterize the spectroscopic signature of target threat agents. The surface experiments were performed at detection levels of about 1 μg/cm2 suggest that limits of detection (LOD) achievable could be as low as nanograms/cm2. Remote sensing experiments were performed using a telescope coupled with a Raman spectrophotometer as a function of power and acquisition time. Characterization of compounds by vibrational spectroscopy and the early stages of the transition from the lab based experiments to remote detection experiments will be presented.

  14. Vibrational spectroscopy: a tool being developed for the noninvasive monitoring of wound healing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crane, Nicole J.; Elster, Eric A.

    2012-01-01

    Wound care and management accounted for over 1.8 million hospital discharges in 2009. The complex nature of wound physiology involves hundreds of overlapping processes that we have only begun to understand over the past three decades. The management of wounds remains a significant challenge for inexperienced clinicians. The ensuing inflammatory response ultimately dictates the pace of wound healing and tissue regeneration. Consequently, the eventual timing of wound closure or definitive coverage is often subjective. Some wounds fail to close, or dehisce, despite the use and application of novel wound-specific treatment modalities. An understanding of the molecular environment of acute and chronic wounds throughout the wound-healing process can provide valuable insight into the mechanisms associated with the patient's outcome. Pathologic alterations of wounds are accompanied by fundamental changes in the molecular environment that can be analyzed by vibrational spectroscopy. Vibrational spectroscopy, specifically Raman and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, offers the capability to accurately detect and identify the various molecules that compose the extracellular matrix during wound healing in their native state. The identified changes might provide the objective markers of wound healing, which can then be integrated with clinical characteristics to guide the management of wounds.

  15. Ion aggregation in high salt solutions. III. Computational vibrational spectroscopy of HDO in aqueous salt solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Choi, Jun-Ho; Lim, Sohee; Chon, Bonghwan; Cho, Minhaeng; Kim, Heejae; Kim, Seongheun

    2015-05-28

    The vibrational frequency, frequency fluctuation dynamics, and transition dipole moment of the O—D stretch mode of HDO molecule in aqueous solutions are strongly dependent on its local electrostatic environment and hydrogen-bond network structure. Therefore, the time-resolved vibrational spectroscopy the O—D stretch mode has been particularly used to investigate specific ion effects on water structure. Despite prolonged efforts to understand the interplay of O—D vibrational dynamics with local water hydrogen-bond network and ion aggregate structures in high salt solutions, still there exists a gap between theory and experiment due to a lack of quantitative model for accurately describing O—D stretch frequency in high salt solutions. To fill this gap, we have performed numerical simulations of Raman scattering and IR absorption spectra of the O—D stretch mode of HDO in highly concentrated NaCl and KSCN solutions and compared them with experimental results. Carrying out extensive quantum chemistry calculations on not only water clusters but also ion-water clusters, we first developed a distributed vibrational solvatochromic charge model for the O—D stretch mode in aqueous salt solutions. Furthermore, the non-Condon effect on the vibrational transition dipole moment of the O—D stretch mode was fully taken into consideration with the charge response kernel that is non-local polarizability density. From the fluctuating O—D stretch mode frequencies and transition dipole vectors obtained from the molecular dynamics simulations, the O—D stretch Raman scattering and IR absorption spectra of HDO in salt solutions could be calculated. The polarization effect on the transition dipole vector of the O—D stretch mode is shown to be important and the asymmetric line shapes of the O—D stretch Raman scattering and IR absorption spectra of HDO especially in highly concentrated NaCl and KSCN solutions are in quantitative agreement with experimental results. We

  16. Ion aggregation in high salt solutions. III. Computational vibrational spectroscopy of HDO in aqueous salt solutions.

    PubMed

    Choi, Jun-Ho; Kim, Heejae; Kim, Seongheun; Lim, Sohee; Chon, Bonghwan; Cho, Minhaeng

    2015-05-28

    The vibrational frequency, frequency fluctuation dynamics, and transition dipole moment of the O-D stretch mode of HDO molecule in aqueous solutions are strongly dependent on its local electrostatic environment and hydrogen-bond network structure. Therefore, the time-resolved vibrational spectroscopy the O-D stretch mode has been particularly used to investigate specific ion effects on water structure. Despite prolonged efforts to understand the interplay of O-D vibrational dynamics with local water hydrogen-bond network and ion aggregate structures in high salt solutions, still there exists a gap between theory and experiment due to a lack of quantitative model for accurately describing O-D stretch frequency in high salt solutions. To fill this gap, we have performed numerical simulations of Raman scattering and IR absorption spectra of the O-D stretch mode of HDO in highly concentrated NaCl and KSCN solutions and compared them with experimental results. Carrying out extensive quantum chemistry calculations on not only water clusters but also ion-water clusters, we first developed a distributed vibrational solvatochromic charge model for the O-D stretch mode in aqueous salt solutions. Furthermore, the non-Condon effect on the vibrational transition dipole moment of the O-D stretch mode was fully taken into consideration with the charge response kernel that is non-local polarizability density. From the fluctuating O-D stretch mode frequencies and transition dipole vectors obtained from the molecular dynamics simulations, the O-D stretch Raman scattering and IR absorption spectra of HDO in salt solutions could be calculated. The polarization effect on the transition dipole vector of the O-D stretch mode is shown to be important and the asymmetric line shapes of the O-D stretch Raman scattering and IR absorption spectra of HDO especially in highly concentrated NaCl and KSCN solutions are in quantitative agreement with experimental results. We anticipate that this

  17. Investigations of the Low Frequency Modes of Ferric Cytochrome c Using Vibrational Coherence Spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Femtosecond vibrational coherence spectroscopy is used to investigate the low frequency vibrational dynamics of the electron transfer heme protein, cytochrome c (cyt c). The vibrational coherence spectra of ferric cyt c have been measured as a function of excitation wavelength within the Soret band. Vibrational coherence spectra obtained with excitation between 412 and 421 nm display a strong mode at ∼44 cm–1 that has been assigned to have a significant contribution from heme ruffling motion in the electronic ground state. This assignment is based partially on the presence of a large heme ruffling distortion in the normal coordinate structural decomposition (NSD) analysis of the X-ray crystal structures. When the excitation wavelength is moved into the ∼421–435 nm region, the transient absorption increases along with the relative intensity of two modes near ∼55 and 30 cm–1. The intensity of the mode near 44 cm–1 appears to minimize in this region and then recover (but with an opposite phase compared to the blue excitation) when the laser is tuned to 443 nm. These observations are consistent with the superposition of both ground and excited state coherence in the 421–435 nm region due to the excitation of a weak porphyrin-to-iron charge transfer (CT) state, which has a lifetime long enough to observe vibrational coherence. The mode near 55 cm–1 is suggested to arise from ruffling in a transient CT state that has a less ruffled heme due to its iron d6 configuration. PMID:24823442

  18. Unveiling Microscopic Structures of Charged Water Interfaces by Surface-Specific Vibrational Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wen, Yu-Chieh; Zha, Shuai; Liu, Xing; Yang, Shanshan; Guo, Pan; Shi, Guosheng; Fang, Haiping; Shen, Y. Ron; Tian, Chuanshan

    2016-01-01

    A sum-frequency spectroscopy scheme is developed that allows the measurement of vibrational spectra of the interfacial molecular structure of charged water interfaces. The application of this scheme to a prototype lipid-aqueous interface as a demonstration reveals an interfacial hydrogen-bonding water layer structure that responds sensitively to the charge state of the lipid headgroup and its interaction with specific ions. This novel technique provides unique opportunities to search for better understanding of electrochemistry and biological aqueous interfaces at a deeper molecular level.

  19. Unveiling Microscopic Structures of Charged Water Interfaces by Surface-Specific Vibrational Spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Wen, Yu-Chieh; Zha, Shuai; Liu, Xing; Yang, Shanshan; Guo, Pan; Shi, Guosheng; Fang, Haiping; Shen, Y Ron; Tian, Chuanshan

    2016-01-01

    A sum-frequency spectroscopy scheme is developed that allows the measurement of vibrational spectra of the interfacial molecular structure of charged water interfaces. The application of this scheme to a prototype lipid-aqueous interface as a demonstration reveals an interfacial hydrogen-bonding water layer structure that responds sensitively to the charge state of the lipid headgroup and its interaction with specific ions. This novel technique provides unique opportunities to search for better understanding of electrochemistry and biological aqueous interfaces at a deeper molecular level. PMID:26799031

  20. Biomolecular interactions in HCV nucleocapsid-like particles as revealed by vibrational spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodríguez-Casado, Arantxa; Molina, Marina; Carmona, Pedro

    2007-05-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) occurs in the form of 55-65 nm spherical particles, but the structure of the virion remains to be clarified. Structural studies of HCV have been hampered by the lack of an appropriate cell culture system. However, structural analyses of HCV components can provide an essential framework for understanding of the molecular mechanism of virion assembly. This article reviews the potential of vibrational spectroscopy aimed at the knowledge of HCV structural biology, particularly regarding biomolecular interactions in nucleocapsid-like particles obtained in vitro.

  1. Orientation Determination of Protein Helical Secondary Structure Using Linear and Nonlinear Vibrational Spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, Khoi Tan; Le Clair, Stéphanie V.; Ye, Shuji; Chen, Zhan

    2009-01-01

    In this paper, we systematically presented the orientation determination of protein helical secondary structures using vibrational spectroscopic methods, particularly the nonlinear Sum Frequency Generation (SFG) vibrational spectroscopy, along with linear vibrational spectroscopic techniques such as infrared spectroscopy and Raman scattering. SFG amide I signals can be collected using different polarization combinations of the input laser beams and output signal beam to measure the second order nonlinear optical susceptibility components of the helical amide I modes, which are related to their molecular hyperpolarizability elements through the orientation distribution of these helices. The molecular hyperpolarizability elements of amide I modes of a helix can be calculated based on the infrared transition dipole moment and Raman polarizability tensor of the helix; these quantities are determined by using the bond additivity model to sum over the individual infrared dipole transition moments and Raman polarizability tensors, respectively, of the peptide units (or the amino acid residues). The computed overall infrared transition dipole moment and Raman polarizability tensor of a helix can be validated by experimental data using polarized infrared and polarized Raman spectroscopy on samples with well-aligned helical structures. From the deduced SFG hyperpolarizability elements and measured SFG second order nonlinear susceptibility components, orientation information regarding helical structures can be determined. Even though such orientation information can also be measured using polarized infrared or polarized Raman amide I signals, SFG has a much lower detection limit, which can be used to study the orientation of a helix when its surface coverage is much lower than a monolayer. In addition, the combination of different vibrational spectroscopic techniques, e.g., SFG and Attenuated Total Reflectance – Fourier Transform Infrared spectroscopy, provides more

  2. Low-energy vibrational modes in phenylene oligomers studied by THz time-domain spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnston, M. B.; Herz, L. M.; Khan, A. L. T.; Köhler, A.; Davies, A. G.; Linfield, E. H.

    2003-08-01

    Low-energy vibrational modes have been investigated in polycrystalline biphenyl, para-terphenyl, para-quaterphenyl and para-sexiphenyl using THz time-domain spectroscopy (THz-TDS). A number of both internal and external infrared-active modes were observed for wavenumbers ranging between 20 and 80 cm -1. The temperature dependence of these modes is consistent with structural phase transitions occurring in the molecular crystal, indicating that THz-TDS is a sensitive probe of the conformation of conjugated molecular systems.

  3. Vibrational frequencies of anti-diabetic drug studied by terahertz time-domain spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Du, S. Q.; Li, H.; Xie, L.; Chen, L.; Peng, Y.; Zhu, Y. M.; Li, H.; Dong, P.; Wang, J. T.

    2012-04-01

    By using terahertz time-domain spectroscopy, the absorption spectra of seven anti-diabetic pills have been investigated. For gliquidone, glipizide, gliclazide, and glimepiride, an obvious resonance peak is found at 1.37 THz. Furthermore, to overcome the limit of density functional theory that can analyze the normal mode frequencies of the ground state of organic material, we also present a method that relies on pharmacophore recognition, from which we can obtain the resonance peak at 1.37 THz can be attributed to the vibration of sulfonylurea group. The results indicate that the veracity of density functional theory can be increased by combining pharmacophore recognition.

  4. Vibrational spectroscopy in the monitoring of chilling injury in fruits and vegetables

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bertoluzza, Alessandro; Bottura, G.; Filippetti, P.; Tosi, M. R.; Vasina, M.

    1993-06-01

    Vegetable marrows (cv. Seme Bolognese) and peach fruits (cv. Suncrest) were stored at different chilling temperatures in order to evaluate, by vibrational spectroscopy, the unsaturation degree of the total lipidic component and other possible markers of chilling injuries. Capillary Gas Chromatography also has been applied to evaluate the unsaturation degree of the esterified fatty acids. Both methodologies indicate a general increase of the unsaturation degrees with storage time. This can be interpreted as a better adaptation capability of the fruits to low temperatures. Moreover, the FTIR-ATR methodology points out the onset of a hydrolysis reaction of the esteric phosphate group of phospholipids during storage.

  5. Vibrational spectroscopy of synthetic analogues of ankoleite, chernikovite and intermediate solid solution.

    PubMed

    Clavier, N; Crétaz, F; Szenknect, S; Mesbah, A; Poinssot, C; Descostes, M; Dacheux, N

    2016-03-01

    Ankoleite (K(UO2)PO4·nH2O), chernikovite (H3O(UO2)PO4·nH2O) and intermediate solid solutions are frequently encountered in the uranium ores that result from the alteration of uranium primary minerals. This paper reports a thorough FTIR and Raman study related to synthetic analogues for these minerals. First, the vibration bands associated to the UO2(2 +) uranyl ion were used to calculate the U = O bond length which appeared in good agreement with the data coming from PXRD. Then, the examination of the phosphate vibration modes in both sets of spectra confirmed the general formulation of the samples and ruled out the presence of hydrogenphosphate groups. Finally, the presence of H2O as well as protonated H3O(+) and/or H5O2(+) species was also pointed out, and could be used to clearly differentiate the various phases prepared. Vibrational spectroscopy then appeared as an efficient method for the investigation of such analogues of natural samples. It should be particularly relevant when identifying these phases in mineral ores or assemblies. PMID:26688205

  6. Vibrational spectroscopy of synthetic analogues of ankoleite, chernikovite and intermediate solid solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clavier, N.; Crétaz, F.; Szenknect, S.; Mesbah, A.; Poinssot, C.; Descostes, M.; Dacheux, N.

    2016-03-01

    Ankoleite (K(UO2)PO4·nH2O), chernikovite (H3O(UO2)PO4·nH2O) and intermediate solid solutions are frequently encountered in the uranium ores that result from the alteration of uranium primary minerals. This paper reports a thorough FTIR and Raman study related to synthetic analogues for these minerals. First, the vibration bands associated to the UO22 + uranyl ion were used to calculate the U = O bond length which appeared in good agreement with the data coming from PXRD. Then, the examination of the phosphate vibration modes in both sets of spectra confirmed the general formulation of the samples and ruled out the presence of hydrogenphosphate groups. Finally, the presence of H2O as well as protonated H3O+ and/or H5O2+ species was also pointed out, and could be used to clearly differentiate the various phases prepared. Vibrational spectroscopy then appeared as an efficient method for the investigation of such analogues of natural samples. It should be particularly relevant when identifying these phases in mineral ores or assemblies.

  7. Excited-State Vibrational Coherence in Perylene Bisimide Probed by Femtosecond Broadband Pump-Probe Spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Son, Minjung; Park, Kyu Hyung; Yoon, Min-Chul; Kim, Pyosang; Kim, Dongho

    2015-06-18

    Broadband laser pulses with ultrashort duration are capable of triggering impulsive excitation of the superposition of vibrational eigenstates, giving rise to quantum beating signals originating from coherent wave packet motions along the potential energy surface. In this work, coherent vibrational wave packet dynamics of an N,N'-bis(2,6-dimethylphenyl)perylene bisimide (DMP-PBI) were investigated by femtosecond broadband pump-probe spectroscopy which features fast and balanced data acquisition with a wide spectral coverage of >200 nm. Clear modulations were observed in the envelope of the stimulated emission decay profiles of DMP-PBI with the oscillation frequencies of 140 and 275 cm(-1). Fast Fourier transform analysis of each oscillatory mode revealed characteristic phase jumps near the maxima of the steady-state fluorescence, indicating that the observed vibrational coherence originates from an excited-state wave packet motion. Quantum calculations of the normal modes at the low-frequency region suggest that low-frequency C-C (C═C) stretching motions accompanied by deformation of the dimethylphenyl substituents are responsible for the manifestation of such coherent wave packet dynamics. PMID:25992707

  8. Metamaterial-enhanced vibrational absorption spectroscopy for the detection of protein molecules.

    PubMed

    Bui, Tung S; Dao, Thang D; Dang, Luu H; Vu, Lam D; Ohi, Akihiko; Nabatame, Toshihide; Lee, YoungPak; Nagao, Tadaaki; Hoang, Chung V

    2016-01-01

    From visible to mid-infrared frequencies, molecular sensing has been a major successful application of plasmonics because of the enormous enhancement of the surface electromagnetic nearfield associated with the induced collective motion of surface free carriers excited by the probe light. However, in the lower-energy terahertz (THz) region, sensing by detecting molecular vibrations is still challenging because of low sensitivity, complicated spectral features, and relatively little accumulated knowledge of molecules. Here, we report the use of a micron-scale thin-slab metamaterial (MM) architecture, which functions as an amplifier for enhancing the absorption signal of the THz vibration of an ultrathin adsorbed layer of large organic molecules. We examined bovine serum albumin (BSA) as a prototype large protein molecule and Rhodamine 6G (Rh6G) and 3,3'-diethylthiatricarbocyanine iodide (DTTCI) as examples of small molecules. Among them, our MM significantly magnified only the signal strength of bulky BSA. On the other hand, DTTCI and Rh6G are inactive, as they lack low-frequency vibrational modes in this frequency region. The results obtained here clearly demonstrate the promise of MM-enhanced absorption spectroscopy in the THz region for detection and structural monitoring of large biomolecules such as proteins or pathogenic enzymes. PMID:27555217

  9. Vibrational ladder-climbing in surface-enhanced, ultrafast infrared spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Kraack, Jan Philip; Hamm, Peter

    2016-06-28

    In a recent work (J. Phys. Chem. C 2016, 120, 3350-3359), we have introduced the concept of surface-enhanced, two-dimensional attenuated total reflectance (2D ATR IR) spectroscopy with modest enhancement factors (<50) using small plasmonic noble metal nanoparticles at solid-liquid interfaces. Here, we show that employment of almost continuous noble metal layers results in significantly stronger enhancement factors in 2D ATR IR signals (>450), which allows for multi-quantum IR excitation of adsorbed molecules, a process known as "vibrational ladder-climbing", even for weakly absorbing (ε < 200 M(-1) cm(-1)) nitrile IR labels. We show that it is possible to deposit up to four quanta of vibrational energy in the respective functional group. Based on these results, optical near-fields of plasmonic nanostructures may pave the way for future investigations involving ultrafast dynamics of highly excited vibrational states or surface-sensitive coherent control experiments of ground-state reactions at solid-liquid interfaces. PMID:27265518

  10. Metamaterial-enhanced vibrational absorption spectroscopy for the detection of protein molecules

    PubMed Central

    Bui, Tung S.; Dao, Thang D.; Dang, Luu H.; Vu, Lam D.; Ohi, Akihiko; Nabatame, Toshihide; Lee, YoungPak; Nagao, Tadaaki; Hoang, Chung V.

    2016-01-01

    From visible to mid-infrared frequencies, molecular sensing has been a major successful application of plasmonics because of the enormous enhancement of the surface electromagnetic nearfield associated with the induced collective motion of surface free carriers excited by the probe light. However, in the lower-energy terahertz (THz) region, sensing by detecting molecular vibrations is still challenging because of low sensitivity, complicated spectral features, and relatively little accumulated knowledge of molecules. Here, we report the use of a micron-scale thin-slab metamaterial (MM) architecture, which functions as an amplifier for enhancing the absorption signal of the THz vibration of an ultrathin adsorbed layer of large organic molecules. We examined bovine serum albumin (BSA) as a prototype large protein molecule and Rhodamine 6G (Rh6G) and 3,3′-diethylthiatricarbocyanine iodide (DTTCI) as examples of small molecules. Among them, our MM significantly magnified only the signal strength of bulky BSA. On the other hand, DTTCI and Rh6G are inactive, as they lack low-frequency vibrational modes in this frequency region. The results obtained here clearly demonstrate the promise of MM-enhanced absorption spectroscopy in the THz region for detection and structural monitoring of large biomolecules such as proteins or pathogenic enzymes. PMID:27555217

  11. SEM, EDX and vibrational spectroscopy of the phosphate mineral vauxite from Llallagua, Bolívia.

    PubMed

    Scholz, Ricardo; Frost, Ray L; Frota, Laura; Belotti, Fernanda Maria; López, Andrés

    2015-12-01

    We have undertaken a vibrational spectroscopic study of vauxite from Llallagua, Bolívia. This source is important source for rare and unusual secondary phosphate minerals and is the type locality for a number of rare phosphates such as vauxite, sigloite, metavauxite and for jeanbandyite. The chemical formula was determined as (Fe0.98 Mn0.01)∑0.99(Al2.00)(PO4)∑2.03(OH)1.98·5.95(H2O). The Raman spectrum is dominated by intense Raman bands at 978, 1000, 1009, 1027 cm(-1) assigned to the PO4(3-) and HPO4(2-) stretching modes. Low intensity Raman bands are found at 1046, 1059, 1070, 1105, 1122, 1134 and 1150 cm(-1) and are assigned to the PO4(3-) ν3 antisymmetric stretching vibrations. Raman bands of at 498, 502, 517, 523 and 535 cm(-1) are assigned to the ν4 PO4(3-) bending modes while the Raman bands at 418, 451, 461 and 470 cm(-1) are due to the ν2 PO4(3-) bending modes. The Raman spectral profile of vauxite in the hydroxyl stretching region is broad with component bands resolved at 2918, 3103, 3328, 3402, 3555 and 3648 cm(-1). Vibrational spectroscopy enables the assessment of the molecular structure of vauxite to be undertaken. PMID:26135535

  12. The dynamics of rotational isomerism in crystals as studied by vibrational spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strauss, Herbert L.

    1985-01-01

    Vibrational spectroscopy is uniquely capable of determining the structure and dynamics arising from the rotational degrees of freedom in molecular solids. Vibrational spectroscopy is sensitive to phenomena occurring on a time scale between the slow scale of magnetic, resonance methods and fast scale of diffraction methods; a time scale appropriate for both internal and overall rotation. Rotational motion of molecules in crystals provide examples of very simple reactions. Our understanding of the spectra of reacting molecules can thus be tested on these systems, and we conclude that Redfield equations can describe such spectra. A rich variety of motional effects are described: (1) The libration of the water of hydration in sodium perchlorate which illustrates a simple reacting system. (2) The libration of the adamantane molecule in both its ordered and disordered crystal phases which illustrates intermolecular interactions in organic crystals and the consequences of disorder. (3) The libration of the ammonium ion in crystals of ammonium salts which illustrated both change of orientational position by tunneling and the subtle orientating effects of isotopic substitution. (4) The internal rotation in n-alkane crystals which illustrates the ability to determine conformers and the relationship between the occurrence of disordered conformers and the occurrence of phase transitions.

  13. Far-field nanoscale infrared spectroscopy of vibrational fingerprints of molecules with graphene plasmons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Hai; Yang, Xiaoxia; Zhai, Feng; Hu, Debo; Liu, Ruina; Liu, Kaihui; Sun, Zhipei; Dai, Qing

    2016-07-01

    Infrared spectroscopy, especially for molecular vibrations in the fingerprint region between 600 and 1,500 cm-1, is a powerful characterization method for bulk materials. However, molecular fingerprinting at the nanoscale level still remains a significant challenge, due to weak light-matter interaction between micron-wavelengthed infrared light and nano-sized molecules. Here we demonstrate molecular fingerprinting at the nanoscale level using our specially designed graphene plasmonic structure on CaF2 nanofilm. This structure not only avoids the plasmon-phonon hybridization, but also provides in situ electrically-tunable graphene plasmon covering the entire molecular fingerprint region, which was previously unattainable. In addition, undisturbed and highly confined graphene plasmon offers simultaneous detection of in-plane and out-of-plane vibrational modes with ultrahigh detection sensitivity down to the sub-monolayer level, significantly pushing the current detection limit of far-field mid-infrared spectroscopies. Our results provide a platform, fulfilling the long-awaited expectation of high sensitivity and selectivity far-field fingerprint detection of nano-scale molecules for numerous applications.

  14. Dye aggregation identified by vibrational coupling using 2D IR spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Oudenhoven, Tracey A.; Laaser, Jennifer E.; Zanni, Martin T.; Joo, Yongho; Gopalan, Padma

    2015-06-07

    We report that a model dye, Re(CO){sub 3}(bypy)CO{sub 2}H, aggregates into clusters on TiO{sub 2} nanoparticles regardless of our preparation conditions. Using two-dimensional infrared (2D IR) spectroscopy, we have identified characteristic frequencies of monomers, dimers, and trimers. A comparison of 2D IR spectra in solution versus those deposited on TiO{sub 2} shows that the propensity to dimerize in solution leads to higher dimer formation on TiO{sub 2}, but that dimers are formed even if there are only monomers in solution. Aggregates cannot be washed off with standard protocols and are present even at submonolayer coverages. We observe cross peaks between aggregates of different sizes, primarily dimers and trimers, indicating that clusters consist of microdomains in close proximity. 2D IR spectroscopy is used to draw these conclusions from measurements of vibrational couplings, but if molecules are close enough to be vibrationally coupled, then they are also likely to be electronically coupled, which could alter charge transfer.

  15. Photo-vibrational spectroscopy of solid and liquid chemicals using laser Doppler vibrometer.

    PubMed

    Hu, Qi; Lim, Jacob Song Kiat; Liu, Huan; Fu, Yu

    2016-08-22

    Photoacoustic/photothermal spectroscopy is an established technique for trace detection of chemicals and explosives. However, prior sample preparation is required and the analysis is conducted in a sealed space with a high-sensitivity microphone or a piezo sensor coupled with a lock-in amplifier, limiting the technique to applications in a laboratory environment. Due to the aforementioned requirements, traditionally this technique may not be suitable for defense and security applications where the detection of explosives or hazardous chemicals is required in an open environment at a safe standoff distance. In this study, chemicals in various forms (membrane, powder and liquid) were excited by an intensity-modulated quantum cascade laser (QCL), while a laser Doppler vibrometer (LDV) based on the Mach-Zehnder interferometer was applied to detect the vibration signal resulting from the photocoustic/photothermal effect. The photo-vibrational spectrum obtained by scanning the QCL's wavelength in MIR range, coincides well with the corresponding spectrum obtained using typical FTIR equipment. The experiment demonstrated that the LDV is a capable sensor for applications in photoacoustic/photothermal spectroscopy, with potential to enable the detection of chemicals in open environment at safe standoff distance. PMID:27557194

  16. Vibrational Sum Frequency Generation Spectroscopy Study of Hydrous Species in Soda Lime Silica Float Glass.

    PubMed

    Luo, Jiawei; Banerjee, Joy; Pantano, Carlo G; Kim, Seong H

    2016-06-21

    It is generally accepted that the mechanical properties of soda lime silica (SLS) glass can be affected by the interaction between sodium ions and hydrous species (silanol groups and water molecules) in its surface region. While the amount of these hydrous species can be estimated from hydrogen profiles and infrared spectroscopy, their chemical environment in the glass network is still not well understood. This work employed vibrational sum frequency generation (SFG) spectroscopy to investigate the chemical environment of hydrous species in the surface region of SLS float glass. SLS float glass shows sharp peaks in the OH stretching vibration region in SFG spectra, while the OH stretch peaks of glasses that do not have leachable sodium ions and the OH peaks of water molecules in condensed phases are normally broad due to fast hydrogen bonding dynamics. The hydrous species responsible for the sharp SFG peaks for the SLS float glass were found to be thermodynamically more stable than physisorbed water molecules, did not exchange with D2O, and were associated with the sodium concentration gradient in the dealkalized subsurface region. These results suggested that the hydrous species reside in static solvation shells defined by the silicate network with relatively slow hydrogen bonding dynamics, compared to physisorbed water layers on top of the glass surface. A putative radial distribution of the hydrous species within the SLS glass network was estimated based on the OH SFG spectral features, which could be compared with theoretical distributions calculated from computational simulations. PMID:27254814

  17. Far-field nanoscale infrared spectroscopy of vibrational fingerprints of molecules with graphene plasmons

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Hai; Yang, Xiaoxia; Zhai, Feng; Hu, Debo; Liu, Ruina; Liu, Kaihui; Sun, Zhipei; Dai, Qing

    2016-01-01

    Infrared spectroscopy, especially for molecular vibrations in the fingerprint region between 600 and 1,500 cm−1, is a powerful characterization method for bulk materials. However, molecular fingerprinting at the nanoscale level still remains a significant challenge, due to weak light–matter interaction between micron-wavelengthed infrared light and nano-sized molecules. Here we demonstrate molecular fingerprinting at the nanoscale level using our specially designed graphene plasmonic structure on CaF2 nanofilm. This structure not only avoids the plasmon–phonon hybridization, but also provides in situ electrically-tunable graphene plasmon covering the entire molecular fingerprint region, which was previously unattainable. In addition, undisturbed and highly confined graphene plasmon offers simultaneous detection of in-plane and out-of-plane vibrational modes with ultrahigh detection sensitivity down to the sub-monolayer level, significantly pushing the current detection limit of far-field mid-infrared spectroscopies. Our results provide a platform, fulfilling the long-awaited expectation of high sensitivity and selectivity far-field fingerprint detection of nano-scale molecules for numerous applications. PMID:27460765

  18. Far-field nanoscale infrared spectroscopy of vibrational fingerprints of molecules with graphene plasmons.

    PubMed

    Hu, Hai; Yang, Xiaoxia; Zhai, Feng; Hu, Debo; Liu, Ruina; Liu, Kaihui; Sun, Zhipei; Dai, Qing

    2016-01-01

    Infrared spectroscopy, especially for molecular vibrations in the fingerprint region between 600 and 1,500 cm(-1), is a powerful characterization method for bulk materials. However, molecular fingerprinting at the nanoscale level still remains a significant challenge, due to weak light-matter interaction between micron-wavelengthed infrared light and nano-sized molecules. Here we demonstrate molecular fingerprinting at the nanoscale level using our specially designed graphene plasmonic structure on CaF2 nanofilm. This structure not only avoids the plasmon-phonon hybridization, but also provides in situ electrically-tunable graphene plasmon covering the entire molecular fingerprint region, which was previously unattainable. In addition, undisturbed and highly confined graphene plasmon offers simultaneous detection of in-plane and out-of-plane vibrational modes with ultrahigh detection sensitivity down to the sub-monolayer level, significantly pushing the current detection limit of far-field mid-infrared spectroscopies. Our results provide a platform, fulfilling the long-awaited expectation of high sensitivity and selectivity far-field fingerprint detection of nano-scale molecules for numerous applications. PMID:27460765

  19. Vibrational dynamics of azide-derivatized amino acids studied by nonlinear infrared spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okuda, Masaki; Ohta, Kaoru; Tominaga, Keisuke

    2015-06-01

    Recently, biomolecules which are labeled by azide or thiocyanate groups in solutions and proteins have been studied to examine microscopic environment around a solute by nonlinear infrared (IR) spectroscopy. In this study, we have performed two-dimensional infrared (2D-IR) spectroscopy to investigate the vibrational frequency fluctuations of two different azide-derivatized amino acids, Ala (N3-Ala) and Pro (N3-Pro), and N3- in water. From the 2D-IR experiments, it was found that the frequency-frequency time correlation function (FFTCF) of solute can be modeled by a delta function plus an exponential function and constant. FFTCF for each probe molecule has a decay component of about 1 ps, and this result suggests that the stretching mode of the covalently bonded azide group is sensitive to the fluctuations of hydrogen bond network system, as found in previous studies of N3- in water. In contrast to FFTCF of N3-, FFTCF of the azide-derivatized amino acids contains static component. This static component may reflect dynamics of water affected by the solutes or the structural fluctuations of the solute itself. We also performed the IR pump-probe measurements for the probe molecules in water in order to investigate vibrational energy relaxation (VER) and reorientational relaxation. It was revealed that the charge fluctuations in the azide group are significant for the VER of this mode in water, reflecting that the VER rate of N3- is faster than those of the azide-derivatized amino acids. While the behaviors of the anisotropy decay of N3-Ala and N3- are similar to each other, the anisotropy decay of N3-Pro contains much slower decaying component. By considering the structural difference around the vibrational probe between N3-Ala and N3-Pro, it is suggested that the structural freedom of the probe molecules can affect the reorientational processes.

  20. Vibrational spectroscopy and relaxation of an anharmonic oscillator coupled to harmonic bath.

    PubMed

    Joutsuka, Tatsuya; Ando, Koji

    2011-05-28

    The vibrational spectroscopy and relaxation of an anharmonic oscillator coupled to a harmonic bath are examined to assess the applicability of the time correlation function (TCF), the response function, and the semiclassical frequency modulation (SFM) model to the calculation of infrared (IR) spectra. These three approaches are often used in connection with the molecular dynamics simulations but have not been compared in detail. We also analyze the vibrational energy relaxation (VER), which determines the line shape and is itself a pivotal process in energy transport. The IR spectra and VER are calculated using the generalized Langevin equation (GLE), the Gaussian wavepacket (GWP) method, and the quantum master equation (QME). By calculating the vibrational frequency TCF, a detailed analysis of the frequency fluctuation and correlation time of the model is provided. The peak amplitude and width in the IR spectra calculated by the GLE with the harmonic quantum correction are shown to agree well with those by the QME though the vibrational frequency is generally overestimated. The GWP method improves the peak position by considering the zero-point energy and the anharmonicity although the red-shift slightly overshoots the QME reference. The GWP also yields an extra peak in the higher-frequency region than the fundamental transition arising from the difference frequency of the center and width oscillations of a wavepacket. The SFM approach underestimates the peak amplitude of the IR spectra but well reproduces the peak width. Further, the dependence of the VER rate on the strength of an excitation pulse is discussed. PMID:21639460

  1. Coherent Vibrational Dynamics and High-Resolution Nonlinear Spectroscopy: A Comparison with the Air/DMSO Liquid Interface

    SciTech Connect

    Velarde Ruiz Esparza, Luis A.; Lu, Zhou; Wang, Hongfei

    2013-12-27

    In this report we present a comparative study on the C-H stretching vibrations at air/DMSO (dimethyl sulfoxide) interface with both the free-induction decay (FID) coherent vibrational dynamics and sub-wavenumber high resolution sum-frequency generation vibrational spectroscopy measurements. In principle the frequency-domain and time-domain spectroscopic measurements should generate identical information for a given molecular system. However, when the molecular systems are with several coupled or overlapping vibrational modes, to obtain detailed spectroscopic and coherent dynamics information is not as straightforward and rather difficult from either the time-domain or the frequency domain measurements. For the case of air/DMSO interface that is with moderately complex vibrational spectra, we show that the frequency-domain measurement with sub-wavenumber high-resolution SFGVS is probably more advantageous than the time-domain measurement in obtaining quantitative understanding of the structure and coherent dynamics of the molecular interface.

  2. Conformational Heterogeneity in the Michaelis Complex of Lactate Dehydrogenase: An Analysis of Vibrational Spectroscopy Using Markov and Hidden Markov Models.

    PubMed

    Pan, Xiaoliang; Schwartz, Steven D

    2016-07-14

    Lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) catalyzes the interconversion of pyruvate and lactate. Recent isotope-edited IR spectroscopy suggests that conformational heterogeneity exists within the Michaelis complex of LDH, and this heterogeneity affects the propensity toward the on-enzyme chemical step for each Michaelis substate. By combining molecular dynamics simulations with Markov and hidden Markov models, we obtained a detailed kinetic network of the substates of the Michaelis complex of LDH. The ensemble-average electric fields exerted onto the vibrational probe were calculated to provide a direct comparison with the vibrational spectroscopy. Structural features of the Michaelis substates were also analyzed on atomistic scales. Our work not only clearly demonstrates the conformational heterogeneity in the Michaelis complex of LDH and its coupling to the reactivities of the substates, but it also suggests a methodology to simultaneously resolve kinetics and structures on atomistic scales, which can be directly compared with the vibrational spectroscopy. PMID:27347759

  3. Vibrational structure of the S 2 (1B u) excited state of diphenyloctatetraene observed by femtosecond stimulated Raman spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kukura, Philipp; McCamant, David W.; Davis, Paul H.; Mathies, Richard A.

    2003-11-01

    Femtosecond time-resolved stimulated Raman spectroscopy (FSRS) is used to study the vibrational structure and dynamics of the S 2 state of diphenyloctatetraene. Strong vibrational features at 1184, 1259 and 1578 cm -1 whose linewidths are determined by the S 2 electronic lifetime are observed at early times after photoexcitation at 397 nm. Kinetic analysis of the integrated Raman intensities as well as the transient absorption reveals an exponential decay of the S 2 state on the order of 100 fs. These results demonstrate the ability of FSRS to study the vibrational structure of excited state and chemical reaction dynamics on the femtosecond timescale.

  4. Chiral recognition of imperanene enantiomers by various cyclodextrins: a capillary electrophoresis and NMR spectroscopy study.

    PubMed

    Sohajda, Tamás; Szakács, Zoltán; Szente, Lajos; Noszál, Béla; Béni, Szabolcs

    2012-05-01

    The enantiomers of imperanene, a novel polyphenolic compound of Imperata cylindrica (L.), were separated via cyclodextrin-modified capillary electrophoresis. The anionic form of the analyte at pH 9.0 was subject to complexation and enantioseparation CE studies with neutral and charged cyclodextrins. As chiral selectors 27 CDs were applied differing in cavity size, sidechain, degree of substitution (DS) and charge. Three hydroxypropylated and three sulfoalkylated CD preparations provided enantioseparation and the migration order was successfully interpreted in each case in terms of complex mobilities and stability constants. The best enantioresolution (R(S)  = 1.26) was achieved using sulfobutyl-ether-γ-CD (DS ∼4), but it could be enhanced by extensive investigations on dual selector systems. After optimization (CD concentrations and pH) R(S)  = 4.47 was achieved using a 12.5 mM sulfobutyl-ether-γ-CD and 10 mM 6-monodeoxy-6-mono-(3-hydroxy)-propylamino-β-cyclodextrin dual system. The average stoichiometry of the complex was determined with Job's method using NMR-titration and resulted in a 1:1 complex for both (2-hydroxy)propyl-β- and sulfobutyl-ether-γ-CD. Further NMR experiments suggest that the coniferyl moiety of imperanene is involved in the host-guest interaction. PMID:22648815

  5. Circular dichroism in valence photoelectron spectroscopy of free unoriented chiral molecules: Camphor and bromocamphor

    SciTech Connect

    Lischke, T.; Boewering, N.; Schmidtke, B.; Mueller, N.; Khalil, T.; Heinzmann, U.

    2004-08-01

    The circular dichroism in the photoelectron angular distribution was investigated for valence photoionization of randomly oriented pure enantiomers of camphor and bromocamphor molecules using circularly polarized light in the vacuum ultraviolet. The forward-backward electron emission spectra were recorded simultaneously with two spectrometers at several opposite angles relative to the propagation direction of the photon beam and compared for each of the two substances. Measurements were also carried out for reversed light helicity and opposite molecular handedness. For the left- and right-handed enantiomers of both molecules we observed asymmetries of comparable magnitude up to several percent. The measured asymmetry parameters vary strongly for different orbital binding energies and also for the selected photon energies in the valence region. The results for both molecules are compared. They suggest a strong influence of the final states on the asymmetry, depending on the chiral geometry of the molecular electronic structure, as well as a significant dependence on the initial states involved. They also confirm theoretical predictions describing the effect in pure electric-dipole approximation.

  6. The Application of Vibrational Spectroscopy Techniques in the Qualitative Assessment of Material Traded as Ginseng.

    PubMed

    Sandasi, Maxleene; Vermaak, Ilze; Chen, Weiyang; Viljoen, Alvaro

    2016-01-01

    The name "ginseng" is collectively used to describe several plant species, including Panax ginseng (Asian/Oriental ginseng), P. quinquefolius (American ginseng), P. pseudoginseng (Pseudoginseng) and Eleutherococcus senticosus (Siberian ginseng), each with different applications in traditional medicine practices. The use of a generic name may lead to the interchangeable use or substitution of raw materials which poses quality control challenges. Quality control methods such as vibrational spectroscopy-based techniques are here proposed as fast, non-destructive methods for the distinction of four ginseng species and the identification of raw materials in commercial ginseng products. Certified ginseng reference material and commercial products were analysed using hyperspectral imaging (HSI), mid-infrared (MIR) and near-infrared (NIR) spectroscopy. Principal component analysis (PCA) and (orthogonal) partial least squares discriminant analysis models (OPLS-DA) were developed using multivariate analysis software. UHPLC-MS was used to analyse methanol extracts of the reference raw materials and commercial products. The holistic analysis of ginseng raw materials revealed distinct chemical differences using HSI, MIR and NIR. For all methods, Eleutherococcus senticosus displayed the greatest variation from the three Panax species that displayed closer chemical similarity. Good discrimination models with high R²X and Q² cum vales were developed. These models predicted that the majority of products contained either /P. ginseng or P. quinquefolius. Vibrational spectroscopy and HSI techniques in tandem with multivariate data analysis tools provide useful alternative methods in the authentication of ginseng raw materials and commercial products in a fast, easy, cost-effective and non-destructive manner. PMID:27077839

  7. Electronic transport in oligo-para-phenylene junctions attached to carbon nanotube electrodes: Transition-voltage spectroscopy and chirality

    SciTech Connect

    Brito Silva, C. A. Jr.; Silva, S. J. S. da; Leal, J. F. P.; Pinheiro, F. A.; Del Nero, J.

    2011-06-15

    We have investigated, by means of a nonequilibrium Green's function method coupled to density functional theory, the electronic transport properties of molecular junctions composed of oligo-para-phenylene (with two, three, four, and five phenyl rings) covalently bridging the gap between metallic carbon nanotubes electrodes. We have found that the current is strongly correlated to a purely geometrical chiral parameter, both on-resonance and off-resonance. The Fowler-Nordheim plot exhibits minima, V{sub min}, that occur whenever the tail of a resonant transmission peak enters in the bias window. This result corroborates the scenario in which the coherent transport model gives the correct interpretation to transition voltage spectroscopy (TVS). We have shown that V{sub min} corresponds to voltages where a negative differential resistance (NDR) occurs. The finding that V{sub min} corresponds to voltages that exhibit NDR, which can be explained only in single-molecule junctions within the coherent transport model, further confirms the applicability of such models to adequately interpret TVS. The fact that the electrodes are organic is at the origin of differences in the behavior of V{sub min} if compared to the case of molecular junctions with nonorganic contacts treated so far.

  8. Two-dimensional vibrational spectroscopy of the amide I band of crystalline acetanilide: Fermi resonance, conformational substates, or vibrational self-trapping?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Edler, J.; Hamm, P.

    2003-08-01

    Two-dimensional infrared (2D-IR) spectroscopy is applied to investigate acetanilide, a molecular crystal consisting of quasi-one-dimensional hydrogen bonded peptide units. The amide-I band exhibits a double peak structure, which has been attributed to different mechanisms including vibrational self-trapping, a Fermi resonance, or the existence of two conformational substates. The 2D-IR spectrum of crystalline acetanilide is compared with that of two different molecular systems: (i) benzoylchloride, which exhibits a strong symmetric Fermi resonance and (ii) N-methylacetamide dissolved in methanol which occurs in two spectroscopically distinguishable conformations. Both 2D-IR spectra differ significantly from that of crystalline acetanilide, proving that these two alternative mechanisms cannot account for the anomalous spectroscopy of crystalline acetanilide. On the other hand, vibrational self-trapping of the amide-I band can naturally explain the 2D-IR response.

  9. Vibrational dynamics in dendridic oligoarylamines by Raman spectroscopy and incoherent inelastic neutron scattering.

    PubMed

    Kulszewicz-Bajer, Irena; Louarn, Guy; Djurado, David; Skorka, Lukasz; Szymanski, Marek; Mevellec, Jean Yves; Rols, Stephane; Pron, Adam

    2014-05-15

    Vibrational dynamics in triarylamine dendrimers was studied in a complementary way by Raman and infrared (IR) spectroscopies and incoherent inelastic neutron scattering (IINS). Three molecules were investigated, namely, unsubstituted triarylamine dendrimer of the first generation and two dendrimers of the first and second generation, substituted in the crown with butyl groups. To facilitate the assignment of the observed IR and Raman modes as well as the IINS peaks, vibrational models, based on the general valence force field method (GVFF), were calculated for all three compounds studied. A perfect consistency between the calculated and experimental results was found. Moreover, an important complementarity of the vibrational spectroscopies and IINS was established for the investigated dendrimers. The IINS peaks originating mainly from the C-H motions were not restricted by particular selection rules and only dependent on the IINS cross section. To the contrary, Raman and IR bands were imposed by the selection rules and the local geometry of the dendrimers yielding mainly C-C and C-N deformation modes with those of C-H nature of much lower intensity. Raman spectroscopy was also applied to the studies of the oxidation of dendrimers to their cationic forms. A strong Raman resonance effect was observed, since the spectra of the studied compounds, registered at different levels of their oxidation, strongly depended on the position of the excitation line with respect to their electronic spectrum. In particular, the blue (458 nm) excitation line turned out to be insensitive toward the cationic forms yielding very limited spectral information. To the contrary, the use of the red (647 nm) and infrared (1064 nm) excitation lines allowed for an unambiguous monitoring of the spectral changes in dendrimers oxidized to nominally monocationic and tricationic states. The analysis of oxidation-induced spectral changes in the tricationic state indicated that the charge storage

  10. Sample presentation, sources of error and future perspectives on the application of vibrational spectroscopy in the wine industry.

    PubMed

    Cozzolino, Daniel

    2015-03-30

    Vibrational spectroscopy encompasses a number of techniques and methods including ultra-violet, visible, Fourier transform infrared or mid infrared, near infrared and Raman spectroscopy. The use and application of spectroscopy generates spectra containing hundreds of variables (absorbances at each wavenumbers or wavelengths), resulting in the production of large data sets representing the chemical and biochemical wine fingerprint. Multivariate data analysis techniques are then required to handle the large amount of data generated in order to interpret the spectra in a meaningful way in order to develop a specific application. This paper focuses on the developments of sample presentation and main sources of error when vibrational spectroscopy methods are applied in wine analysis. Recent and novel applications will be discussed as examples of these developments. PMID:24816857

  11. In situ assembly of octahedral Fe(II) complexes for the enantiomeric excess determination of chiral amines using circular dichroism spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Dragna, Justin M; Pescitelli, Gennaro; Tran, Lee; Lynch, Vincent M; Anslyn, Eric V; Di Bari, Lorenzo

    2012-03-01

    A method for discriminating between α-chiral primary amine enantiomers is reported. The method utilizes circular dichroism (CD) spectroscopy and a sensing ensemble composed of 2-formyl-3-hydroxypyridine (4) and Fe(II)(TfO)(2). Aldehyde 4 reacts rapidly with chiral amines to form chiral imines, which complex Fe(II) to form a series of diastereomeric octahedral complexes that are CD-active in both the UV and visible regions of the spectrum. NMR studies showed that for enantiomerically pure imine complexes, the Δ-fac isomer is preferred. A statistical analysis of the distribution of stereoisomers accurately modeled the calibration curves for enantiomeric excess (ee). CD signals appearing in the UV region were bisignate, and the nulls of the CD signals were coincident with maxima in the UV spectrum, consistent with exciton coupling. Time-dependent density functional theory and semiempirical calculations confirmed that the CD signals in the UV region arise from coupling of the π-π* transitions in the imine chromophores and that they can be used to describe the signs and magnitudes of the curves accurately. The CD signals in the visible region arise from metal-to-ligand charge-transfer bands, and these signals can be used to determine the ee values of chiral amines with an average absolute error of ±5%. Overall, the strategy presented herein represents a facile in situ assembly process that uses commercially available simple reagents to create large optical signals indicative of ee values. PMID:22272943

  12. Rotational-Vibrational Raman Spectroscopy for the Measurement of Thermochemistry in Nonisobaric Flames

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bayeh, Alexander; Cosse, Julia; Karpetis, Adonios

    2008-11-01

    The present work examines the feasibility of Raman line imaging spectroscopy for multiscalar measurements of thermochemistry in reacting flows under varying pressure. Line imaging of the rotational and vibrational Raman scattering was combined onto a single detector, thus allowing for a single-shot measurement of major species, pressure, and temperature in turbulent nonisobaric conditions. The diagnostic technique also allows for the calculation of two important derived quantities of interest, namely a conserved scalar and its dissipation rate. Additionally the present work introduces ``canonical'' flows that are optically accessible and involve high-speed, supersonic combustion with pressure variation. Small-scale, nonreacting supersonic underexpanded jets have been studied experimentally, using both a Schlieren system and the Raman line imaging technique, and computationally, using a method of characteristics approach.

  13. Theoretical study of sum-frequency vibrational spectroscopy on limonene surface

    SciTech Connect

    Zheng, Ren-Hui Liu, Hao; Jing, Yuan-Yuan; Wang, Bo-Yang; Shi, Qiang; Wei, Wen-Mei

    2014-03-14

    By combining molecule dynamics (MD) simulation and quantum chemistry computation, we calculate the surface sum-frequency vibrational spectroscopy (SFVS) of R-limonene molecules at the gas-liquid interface for SSP, PPP, and SPS polarization combinations. The distributions of the Euler angles are obtained using MD simulation, the ψ-distribution is between isotropic and Gaussian. Instead of the MD distributions, different analytical distributions such as the δ-function, Gaussian and isotropic distributions are applied to simulate surface SFVS. We find that different distributions significantly affect the absolute SFVS intensity and also influence on relative SFVS intensity, and the δ-function distribution should be used with caution when the orientation distribution is broad. Furthermore, the reason that the SPS signal is weak in reflected arrangement is discussed.

  14. Theoretical study of sum-frequency vibrational spectroscopy on limonene surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Ren-Hui; Wei, Wen-Mei; Liu, Hao; Jing, Yuan-Yuan; Wang, Bo-Yang; Shi, Qiang

    2014-03-01

    By combining molecule dynamics (MD) simulation and quantum chemistry computation, we calculate the surface sum-frequency vibrational spectroscopy (SFVS) of R-limonene molecules at the gas-liquid interface for SSP, PPP, and SPS polarization combinations. The distributions of the Euler angles are obtained using MD simulation, the ψ-distribution is between isotropic and Gaussian. Instead of the MD distributions, different analytical distributions such as the δ-function, Gaussian and isotropic distributions are applied to simulate surface SFVS. We find that different distributions significantly affect the absolute SFVS intensity and also influence on relative SFVS intensity, and the δ-function distribution should be used with caution when the orientation distribution is broad. Furthermore, the reason that the SPS signal is weak in reflected arrangement is discussed.

  15. Vibrational properties of epitaxial Bi4Te3 films as studied by Raman spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Hao; Song, Yuxin; Pan, Wenwu; Chen, Qimiao; Wu, Xiaoyan; Lu, Pengfei; Gong, Qian; Wang, Shumin

    2015-08-01

    Bi4Te3, as one of the phases of the binary Bi-Te system, shares many similarities with Bi2Te3, which is known as a topological insulator and thermoelectric material. We report the micro-Raman spectroscopy study of 50 nm Bi4Te3 films on Si substrates prepared by molecular beam epitaxy. Raman spectra of Bi4Te3 films completely resolve the six predicted Raman-active phonon modes for the first time. Structural features and Raman tensors of Bi4Te3 films are introduced. According to the wavenumbers and assignments of the six eigenpeaks in the Raman spectra of Bi4Te3 films, it is found that the Raman-active phonon oscillations in Bi4Te3 films exhibit the vibrational properties of those in both Bi and Bi2Te3 films.

  16. Two-dimensional ultrafast vibrational spectroscopy of azides in ionic liquids reveals solute-specific solvation.

    PubMed

    Dutta, Samrat; Ren, Zhe; Brinzer, Thomas; Garrett-Roe, Sean

    2015-10-28

    The stereochemistry and the reaction rates of bimolecular nucleophilic substitution reactions involving azides in ionic liquids are governed by solute-solvent interactions. Two-dimensional ultrafast vibrational spectroscopy (2D-IR) shows that the picosecond dynamics of inorganic azides are substantially slower than organic azides in a series of homologous imidazolium ionic liquids. In water, both organic and inorganic azides spectrally diffuse with a ∼2 ps time constant. In the aprotic solvent tetrahydrofuran, both kinds of azides spectrally diffuse on a timescale >5 ps. In ionic liquids, like 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium tetrafluoroborate ([BMIM][BF4]), organic azides spectrally diffuse with a 2-4 ps time constant, and inorganic azides spectrally diffuse with a >40 ps time constant. Such a striking difference suggests that neutral (organic) and charged (inorganic) azides are incorporated in the ionic liquids with different solvation structures. PMID:26193916

  17. Detection of water and its derivatives on individual nanoparticles using vibrational electron energy-loss spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Crozier, Peter A; Aoki, Toshihiro; Liu, Qianlang

    2016-10-01

    Understanding the role of water, hydrate and hydroxyl species on nanoparticle surfaces and interfaces is very important in both physical and life sciences. Detecting the presence of oxygen-hydrogen species with nanometer resolution is extremely challenging at present. Here we show that the recently developed vibrational electron energy-loss spectroscopy using subnanometer focused electron beams can be employed to spectroscopically identify the local presence and variation of OH species on nanoscale surfaces. The hydrogen-oxygen fingerprint can be correlated with highly localized structural and morphological information obtained from electron imaging. Moreover, the current approach exploits the aloof beam mode of spectral acquisition which does not require direct electron irradiation of the sample thus greatly reducing beam damage to the OH bond. These findings open the door for using electron microscopy to probe local hydroxyl and hydrate species on nanoscale organic and inorganic structures. PMID:27423795

  18. Microsecond kinetics of photocatalytic oxidation on Pt/TiO 2 traced by vibrational spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamakata, Akira; Ishibashi, Taka-aki; Onishi, Hiroshi

    2003-07-01

    2-Propanol oxidation to acetone was examined by time-resolved infrared spectroscopy on a Pt/TiO 2 photocatalyst in an aqueous solution. Holes generated by the band-gap excitation were found to attach to the adsorbed reactant within the first 0.5 μs. Subsequent rearrangement of atoms in the hole-attached reactant was observed on a series of time-resolved vibrational spectra. The CO stretching band of a reaction intermediate to be converted to acetone appeared at time delays of 0-20 μs. The observed wavenumber of the intermediate, 1640 cm -1, was compared with theoretically predicted CO stretching frequencies of possible species. An acceptable agreement was obtained with the anion radical of acetone adsorbed on the catalyst.

  19. Multiresonant coherent multidimensional vibrational spectroscopy of aromatic systems: pyridine, a model system.

    PubMed

    Kornau, Kathryn M; Rickard, Mark A; Mathew, Nathan A; Pakoulev, Andrei V; Wright, John C

    2011-04-28

    Multiresonant four wave mixing has been used to measure the coherent multidimensional spectroscopy (CMDS) of representative aromatic ring modes using pyridine as a model system. This work identifies the cross-peaks that appear between several modes and measures their coherent and incoherent dynamics. The work also explores the consequences of using multiresonant CMDS for molecules with transition moments that are typical of most vibrational modes. Typically, CMDS experiments rely on using transitions with exceptionally large transition moments. To observe cross-peaks, the pyridine concentration was raised until absorption effects became very important. These effects interfere with the parametric CMDS coherence pathways, but they do not make important contributions to the nonparametric pathways. PMID:21434678

  20. Polymer Adsorption on Graphite and CVD Graphene Surfaces Studied by Surface-Specific Vibrational Spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Su, Yudan; Han, Hui-Ling; Cai, Qun; Wu, Qiong; Xie, Mingxiu; Chen, Daoyong; Geng, Baisong; Zhang, Yuanbo; Wang, Feng; Shen, Y R; Tian, Chuanshan

    2015-10-14

    Sum-frequency vibrational spectroscopy was employed to probe polymer contaminants on chemical vapor deposition (CVD) graphene and to study alkane and polyethylene (PE) adsorption on graphite. In comparing the spectra from the two surfaces, it was found that the contaminants on CVD graphene must be long-chain alkane or PE-like molecules. PE adsorption from solution on the honeycomb surface results in a self-assembled ordered monolayer with the C-C skeleton plane perpendicular to the surface and an adsorption free energy of ∼42 kJ/mol for PE(H(CH2CH2)nH) with n ≈ 60. Such large adsorption energy is responsible for the easy contamination of CVD graphene by impurity in the polymer during standard transfer processes. Contamination can be minimized with the use of purified polymers free of PE-like impurities. PMID:26367247

  1. Laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy with laser irradiation resonant with vibrational transitions

    SciTech Connect

    Khachatrian, Ani; Dagdigian, Paul J.

    2010-05-01

    An investigation of laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) of polymers, both in bulk form and spin coated on Si wafers, with laser irradiation in the mid-infrared spectral region is presented. Of particular interest is whether the LIBS signals are enhanced when the laser wavelength is resonant with a fundamental vibrational transition of the polymer. Significant increases in the LIBS signals were observed for irradiation on hydride stretch fundamental transitions, and the magnitude of the enhancement showed a strong dependence on the mode excited. The role of the substrate was investigated by comparison of results for bulk and spin-coated samples. The polymers investigated were Nylon 12 and poly(vinyl alcohol-co-ethylene).

  2. Sum Frequency Generation Vibrational Spectroscopy of Pyridine Hydrogenation on Platinum Nanoparticles

    SciTech Connect

    Bratlie, Kaitlin M.; Komvopoulos, Kyriakos; Somorjai, Gabor A.

    2008-02-22

    Pyridine hydrogenation in the presence of a surface monolayer consisting of cubic Pt nanoparticles stabilized by tetradecyltrimethylammonium bromide (TTAB) was investigated by sum frequency generation (SFG) vibrational spectroscopy using total internal reflection (TIR) geometry. TIR-SFG spectra analysis revealed that a pyridinium cation (C{sub 5}H{sub 5}NH{sup +}) forms during pyridine hydrogenation on the Pt nanoparticle surface, and the NH group in the C{sub 5}H{sub 5}NH{sup +} cation becomes more hydrogen bound with the increase of the temperature. In addition, the surface coverage of the cation decreases with the increase of the temperature. An important contribution of this study is the in situ identification of reaction intermediates adsorbed on the Pt nanoparticle monolayer during pyridine hydrogenation.

  3. Vibrational Sum Frequency Spectroscopy on Polyelectrolyte Multilayers: Effect of Molecular Surface Structure on Macroscopic Wetting Properties.

    PubMed

    Gustafsson, Emil; Hedberg, Jonas; Larsson, Per A; Wågberg, Lars; Johnson, C Magnus

    2015-04-21

    Adsorption of a single layer of molecules on a surface, or even a reorientation of already present molecules, can significantly affect the surface properties of a material. In this study, vibrational sum frequency spectroscopy (VSFS) has been used to study the change in molecular structure at the solid-air interface following thermal curing of polyelectrolyte multilayers of poly(allylamine hydrochloride) and poly(acrylic acid). Significant changes in the VSF spectra were observed after curing. These changes were accompanied by a distinct increase in the static water contact angle, showing how the properties of the layer-by-layer molecular structure are controlled not just by the polyelectrolyte in the outermost layer but ultimately by the orientation of the chemical constituents in the outermost layers. PMID:25859709

  4. A new aromatic probe - The ring stretching vibration Raman spectroscopy frequency.

    PubMed

    Guo, Yan-Bo; Liu, Zi-Zhong; Liu, Hong-Xia; Zhang, Feng-Ying; Yin, Jun-Qing

    2016-07-01

    A new aromatic criterion is presented to determine the aromatic degree of the high symmetric molecules. Group theory is used to explain the correlation between the aromatic degree and the value of Ring Stretching Vibration Raman Spectroscopic Frequency (RSVRSF). The calculations of the geometrical optimization, nucleus-independent chemical shifts (NICS) and values of the Raman Spectroscopy for the aromatic molecules-LnHn (L=C, Si, Ge, n=3, 5-8) were performed using the Density Functional Theory (DFT) Method, as well as the correlations between the values of their RSVRSF and NICS values by Statistic Package for Social Science (SPSS17.0). There are high positive correlations between the theoretical calculated the NICS values and the value of the RSVRSF (A1g/A1') of the LnHn (L=C, Si, Ge, n=3, 5-8). The bigger the aromatic degree, the bigger the RSVRSF is. The value of the RSVRSF is a new probe of aromaticity. Expectedly, it is predicted that the experimental determination of the aromatic degree can be achieved by the determination of the ring stretching vibration (A1g/A1') Raman spectrum frequencies for the aromatic target molecules. PMID:27085169

  5. Vibrational spectroscopy and principal component analysis for conformational study of virus nucleic acids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dovbeshko, G. I.; Repnytska, O. P.; Pererva, T.; Miruta, A.; Kosenkov, D.

    2004-07-01

    Conformation analysis of mutated DNA-bacteriophages (PLys-23, P23-2, P47- the numbers have been assigned by T. Pererva) induced by MS2 virus incorporated in Ecoli AB 259 Hfr 3000 has been done. Surface enhanced infrared absorption (SEIRA) spectroscopy and principal component analysis has been applied for solving this problem. The nucleic acids isolated from the mutated phages had a form of double stranded DNA with different modifications. The nucleic acid from phage P47 was undergone the structural rearrangement in the most degree. The shape and position ofthe fine structure of the Phosphate asymmetrical band at 1071cm-1 as well as the stretching OH vibration at 3370-3390 cm-1 has indicated to the appearance ofadditional OH-groups. The Z-form feature has been found in the base vibration region (1694 cm-1) and the sugar region (932 cm-1). A supposition about modification of structure of DNA by Z-fragments for P47 phage has been proposed. The P23-2 and PLys-23 phages have showed the numerous minor structural changes also. On the basis of SEIRA spectra we have determined the characteristic parameters of the marker bands of nucleic acid used for construction of principal components. Contribution of different spectral parameters of nucleic acids to principal components has been estimated.

  6. A new aromatic probe - The ring stretching vibration Raman spectroscopy frequency

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Yan-bo; Liu, Zi-zhong; Liu, Hong-xia; Zhang, Feng-ying; Yin, Jun-qing

    2016-07-01

    A new aromatic criterion is presented to determine the aromatic degree of the high symmetric molecules. Group theory is used to explain the correlation between the aromatic degree and the value of Ring Stretching Vibration Raman Spectroscopic Frequency (RSVRSF). The calculations of the geometrical optimization, nucleus-independent chemical shifts (NICS) and values of the Raman Spectroscopy for the aromatic molecules-LnHn (L = C, Si, Ge, n = 3, 5-8) were performed using the Density Functional Theory (DFT) Method, as well as the correlations between the values of their RSVRSF and NICS values by Statistic Package for Social Science (SPSS17.0). There are high positive correlations between the theoretical calculated the NICS values and the value of the RSVRSF (A1g/A1‧) of the LnHn (L = C, Si, Ge, n = 3, 5-8). The bigger the aromatic degree, the bigger the RSVRSF is. The value of the RSVRSF is a new probe of aromaticity. Expectedly, it is predicted that the experimental determination of the aromatic degree can be achieved by the determination of the ring stretching vibration (A1g/A1‧) Raman spectrum frequencies for the aromatic target molecules.

  7. Metal-Catalyzed Chemical Reaction of Single Molecules Directly Probed by Vibrational Spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Choi, Han-Kyu; Park, Won-Hwa; Park, Chan-Gyu; Shin, Hyun-Hang; Lee, Kang Sup; Kim, Zee Hwan

    2016-04-01

    The study of heterogeneous catalytic reactions remains a major challenge because it involves a complex network of reaction steps with various intermediates. If the vibrational spectra of individual molecules could be monitored in real time, one could characterize the structures of the intermediates and the time scales of reaction steps without ensemble averaging. Surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) spectroscopy does provide vibrational spectra with single-molecule sensitivity, but typical single-molecule SERS signals exhibit spatial heterogeneities and temporal fluctuations, making them difficult to be used in single-molecule kinetics studies. Here we show that SERS can monitor the single-molecule catalytic reactions in real time. The surface-immobilized reactants placed at the junctions of well-defined nanoparticle-thin film structures produce time-resolved SERS spectra with discrete, step-transitions of photoproducts. We interpret that such SERS-steps correspond to the reaction events of individual molecules occurring at the SERS hotspot. The analyses of the yield, dynamics, and the magnitude of such SERS steps, along with the associated spectral characteristics, fully support our claim. In addition, a model that is based on plasmonic field enhancement and surface photochemistry reproduces the key features of experimental observation. Overall, the result demonstrates that it is possible, under well-controlled conditions, to differentiate the chemical and physical processes contributing to the single-molecule SERS signals, and thus shows the use of single-molecule SERS as a tool for studying the metal-catalyzed organic reactions. PMID:26964567

  8. Compact ultrahigh vacuum/high-pressure system for broadband infrared sum frequency generation vibrational spectroscopy studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Shuo; Liu, An-an; Zhang, Ruidan; Ren, Zefeng

    2016-04-01

    We have designed a compact ultrahigh vacuum/high-pressure system for in situ broadband infrared (IR) sum frequency generation vibrational spectroscopy (SFG-VS) studies. In this system, we have achieved a significant reduction in the distance between the sample and the optical window (<5 mm), which in turn considerably reduces the IR absorption from the gas phase under high pressure conditions. Moreover, with this new system, the IR transmission under high pressure conditions can be measured in situ for calibrating the SFG spectra. Therefore, this modified technique can allow us to study the vibrational spectra of adsorbates on single crystals or polycrystalline foils under high pressure. The preliminary results from SFG measurements of a model CH3OH/TiO2(110) system under both ultrahigh vacuum and high pressure conditions are reported here. These results suggest that this newly developed system is potentially a powerful tool for investigating adsorbate structures and surface reactions under both ultrahigh vacuum and real conditions.

  9. Compact ultrahigh vacuum/high-pressure system for broadband infrared sum frequency generation vibrational spectroscopy studies.

    PubMed

    Liu, Shuo; Liu, An-An; Zhang, Ruidan; Ren, Zefeng

    2016-04-01

    We have designed a compact ultrahigh vacuum/high-pressure system for in situ broadband infrared (IR) sum frequency generation vibrational spectroscopy (SFG-VS) studies. In this system, we have achieved a significant reduction in the distance between the sample and the optical window (<5 mm), which in turn considerably reduces the IR absorption from the gas phase under high pressure conditions. Moreover, with this new system, the IR transmission under high pressure conditions can be measured in situ for calibrating the SFG spectra. Therefore, this modified technique can allow us to study the vibrational spectra of adsorbates on single crystals or polycrystalline foils under high pressure. The preliminary results from SFG measurements of a model CH3OH/TiO2(110) system under both ultrahigh vacuum and high pressure conditions are reported here. These results suggest that this newly developed system is potentially a powerful tool for investigating adsorbate structures and surface reactions under both ultrahigh vacuum and real conditions. PMID:27131685

  10. Vibrational spectroscopy for the evaluation of molecular perturbations induced in fruit lipids by cold storage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bertoluzza, A.; Bottura, G.; Filippetti, P.; Tosi, M. R.; Vasina, M.; Pratella, G. C.; Folchi, A.; Gallerani, G.

    1994-07-01

    Vibrational spectroscopy (Raman, FT-IR-ATR) has been applied for the first time to the study of the mechanism of chilling stress and the monitoring of the best operative conditions for cold storage of fruit. In particular, this work deals with some results of the application of vibrational spectroscopy to the molecular characterization of lipidic extracts of fruits (apples and pears, pulp and peel) stored at low temperatures. The results have been obtained in a cooperative interdisciplinary research project performing experiments on fruits for one year cycles under different storage conditions of temperature (0°C, 8°C) and atmosphere (normal, controlled). The Raman spectra, useful for the evaluation of the transition temperature and the cooperative effect in the fruit membrane lipids, were masked by the strong resonance spectrum of carotenoids. The lipid unsaturation, the natural response to cold storage, was evaluated in the FT-IR-ATR spectra and expressed as the "total" unsaturation degree R = I{3012 cm -1}/{2858 cm -1}. The results on pulp and peel lipids have shown that the R value, higher in the pulps than peels, is dependent on the storage temperature and time. The increase in R is correlated with the higher fruit resistance to the chilling stress. Furthermore, the FT-IR spectra of the outer part of the fruits stored at 8°C show modifications of the carbonylic band at 1738 cm -1 (esteric group) such as the appearance of two other bands at 1715 and 1700 cm -1 increasing in intensity with storage time. These new components can be considered as molecular markers of the onset of a hydrolysis reaction and also of a partial peroxidation of the acylic unsaturated chains.