These are representative sample records from Science.gov related to your search topic.
For comprehensive and current results, perform a real-time search at Science.gov.
1

Chiropractic: An Introduction  

MedlinePLUS

... called “like cures like”). . Top If You Are Thinking About Seeking Chiropractic Care Ask about the chiropractor’s ... 137(12):965–973. Ernst E. Chiropractic: a critical evaluation. Journal of Pain and Symptom Management . 2008; ...

2

Chiropractic Students and Research  

PubMed Central

Purpose: To continue positive professional growth and boost research endeavors, chiropractic institutions need to develop a research-oriented foundation and produce a larger body of researchers. The purpose of this study was to provide a current analysis of the research culture among students at Palmer College of Chiropractic Florida. This study will gain insight toward the research contributions of the next generation of chiropractors and identify the difficulties toward participation. This will help modify current academic programs to better foster research and ensure a promising, credible future for the chiropractic profession. Methods: Participants were students at Palmer College of Chiropractic Florida enrolled in quarters 1 through 12 during the 2008 summer term. To evaluate the research culture, participants were asked to complete a 33-item web-based survey. Results: A total of 303 students completed the survey. Forty-four percent were female, and the mean age was 26 (SD = 4.2). Ninety-nine percent of respondents agreed that research was necessary for positive growth within the chiropractic profession. A majority of students reported having research experience, and 58% planned to participate in research activities prior to graduation. Technical writing was reported as the most challenging aspect of research, and heavy academic workload was reported as the greatest deterrent to participation. Conclusion: This study expresses possibilities for building a strong research culture at the college. Students were aware of the necessity for research and were openly interested in conducting research. Modification of current academic policies will allow for greater student research opportunities and the development of tomorrow's researchers. PMID:20480013

Weber II, Kenneth A.; He, Xiaohua

2010-01-01

3

The Public's Image of Chiropractic Services  

Microsoft Academic Search

This study is exploratory in nature, and addresses several aspects of chiropractic service including attitude toward chiropractors as members of the medical profession, a profile of chiropractic users, sources for information involved in the search for a specific chiropractor, and customer satisfaction with specific elements of a chiropractic service.The sample of 120 respondents overwhelmingly agreed that chiropractors were members of

Robert Stevens; Phylis Mansfield; David Loudon

2005-01-01

4

Osteopathic vs. chiropractic education: a student perspective.  

PubMed

This study compares nationwide survey results from 506 second year students of 11 osteopathic schools and 881 students from the first and second academic year (third term/fourth quarter) of eight chiropractic colleges. Each student was given a questionnaire regarding his/her perspective on the education he/she was receiving. Both populations were questioned about whether or not they came from an osteopathic/chiropractic family, their application process, the efficacy of osteopathic manipulative therapy (OMT)/chiropractic adjustments, their first year attitude concerning the efficacy of OMT/chiropractic adjustments, the integration of osteopathic/chiropractic principles into the curriculum and the justification for separate health care professions. Osteopathic and chiropractic students entered their respective professions from nonosteopathic/non-chiropractic families. Although both populations selected their profession as a first and primary choice, chiropractic students were more substantially represented. Upon entering their program, osteopathic students were not convinced, but had an open mind concerning the effectiveness of osteopathic manipulative therapy (OMT), and were divided as to whether there is enough of a distinction between DOs and MDs to justify separate professions. Chiropractic students, on the other hand, entered their program convinced that chiropractic adjustments are effective, and saw a clear distinction between the roles of chiropractic physicians and medical doctors. PMID:1940675

McNamee, K P; Magarian, K; Phillips, R B; Greenman, P E

1991-09-01

5

Depressive Symptoms in Chiropractic Students  

PubMed Central

Background: The intensive training associated with health care education has been suggested to have unintended negative consequences on students’ mental or emotional health that may interfere with the development of qualities deemed essential for proficient health care professionals. This longitudinal study examined the prevalence and severity of depressive symptoms among students at a chiropractic educational institution. Methods: Chiropractic students at all levels of training were surveyed at Canadian Memorial Chiropractic College during the academic years of 2000/2001, 2001/2002, and 2002/2003. The measurement tool employed was the Beck Depression Inventory, 2nd edition (BDI-II). Previously established BDI-II cutoff scores were used to assess the severity of reported depression symptoms, and these were compared by sex and year of training. Results: The survey was completed by 1303 students (70%) over the 3 years of the study. The prevalence of depressive symptoms was nearly 25%, with 13.7% of respondents indicating a rating of mild depression, 7.1% indicating moderate depressive symptoms, and 2.8% indicating severe symptoms. Significant differences were found between years of training, with 2nd-year students having the highest prevalence of depressive symptoms, and sex, with females having a higher rate of symptoms. Conclusions: Chiropractic students surveyed at Canadian Memorial Chiropractic College had high rates of depression similar to those measured in other health care profession students. Chiropractic educational institutions should be aware of this situation and are encouraged to emphasize students’ awareness of their own personal health and well-being and their access to appropriate care, in addition to the same concerns for their future patients. PMID:22069339

Kinsinger, Stuart; Puhl, Aaron Anthony; Reinhart, Christine J.

2011-01-01

6

Who uses Australian chiropractic services?  

PubMed Central

Background The use of chiropractic services is widespread, however, little is known about the characteristics of people who seek chiropractic care in Australia. This study compared the characteristics of users and non-users of chiropractic services from a cohort of patients sourced from general medical practice in Victoria, Australia. Methods This is a secondary analysis of baseline screening data from a prospective adult cohort study beginning in 2005. Thirty randomly selected Australian general medical practices mailed out surveys to 17,780 of their patients. Differences were examined between chiropractic users and others, and between chiropractic users who reported a back problem to those who did not. Results Of 7,519 respondents, 15% indicated they had visited a chiropractor in the last 12 months. Chiropractic users were more likely to have their GP located in a rural location and to be born in Australia; they were less likely to be in the older age group (55–76), to be unemployed or to have a pension/benefit as their main source of income. Chiropractic users were more likely to: have a back problem; use complementary or alternative medication; visit another type of complementary health practitioner or a physiotherapist. They were less likely to take medication for certain health problems (e.g. for high blood pressure, high cholesterol or asthma). No important differences were seen between chiropractic users and non-users for other health problems. People who visited a chiropractor and reported a back problem were more likely to: be a current smoker; have a number of other chronic conditions, including arthritis, hypertension, chronic sinusitis, asthma, dermatitis, depression and anxiety; report taking medications, including antidepressants, analgesics (painkillers and arthritis medication) and complementary or alternative medications. Conclusions This large cross-sectional study of general medical practice attendees suggests that chiropractors are the most commonly consulted complementary health profession. Chiropractors should ensure they are aware of their patients’ health conditions other than musculoskeletal problems and should ensure they are appropriately managed. PMID:24295295

2013-01-01

7

Evidence-Based Practice and Chiropractic Care  

PubMed Central

Evidence-based practice has had a growing impact on chiropractic education and the delivery of chiropractic care. For evidence-based practice to penetrate and transform a profession, the penetration must occur at 2 levels. One level is the degree to which individual practitioners possess the willingness and basic skills to search and assess the literature. Chiropractic education received a significant boost in this realm in 2005 when the National Center for Complementary and Alternative Medicine awarded 4 chiropractic institutions R25 education grants to strengthen their research/evidence-based practice curricula. The second level relates to whether the therapeutic interventions commonly employed by a particular health care discipline are supported by clinical research. A growing body of randomized controlled trials provides evidence of the effectiveness and safety of manual therapies. PMID:23875117

LeFebvre, Ron; Peterson, David; Haas, Mitchell

2013-01-01

8

Constructing a philosophy of chiropractic: evolving worldviews and premodern roots?  

PubMed Central

Objective The philosophy of chiropractic can be framed as an attempt to correct the problems inherited from the Western Enlightenment. Its origins can be found in the long tradition of Western philosophy. The purpose of this article is to describe in a broad context chiropractic’s roots in premodernity and establish the structural and hermeneutical differences between chiropractic’s original philosophical ideas and those of premodern philosophers. Discussion The worldview or cultural mindset the philosophy arose from must be situated in the context of its time, the birth of the unique postmodern worldview, aperspectival consciousness, and the modern sense of self. This is accomplished by exploring several metatheories about the development of the self through history, with an emphasis on the premodern roots to the chiropractic terms; Universal Intelligence and Innate Intelligence. By contextualizing the philosophy of chiropractic in terms of a structural genealogy of the self and of ideas, a new approach to philosophy in chiropractic emerges. Conclusion Without accounting for chiropractic’s origins as a reflection of the unique time, place, and culture, in terms of the evolution of worldviews through history, any approach to construct or reconstruct a philosophy of chiropractic will potentially miss the seminal feature of chiropractic’s emergence. PMID:22693478

Senzon, Simon A.

2011-01-01

9

Chiropractic approach to the management of children  

PubMed Central

Background Chiropractic (Greek: done by hand) is a health care profession concerned with the diagnosis, treatment and prevention of disorders of the neuromusculoskeletal system and the effects of these disorders on general health. There is an emphasis on manual techniques, including joint adjustment and/or manipulation, with a particular focus on joint subluxation (World Health Organization 2005) or mechanical lesion and restoring function. The chiropractor's role in wellness care, prevention and treatment of injury or illness is based on education in anatomy and physiology, nutrition, exercise and healthy lifestyle counseling as well as referral to other health practitioners. Depending on education, geographic location, scope of practice, as well as consumer preference, chiropractors may assume the role of primary care for families who are pursuing a more natural and holistic approach to health care for their families. Objective To present a perspective on current management of the paediatric patient by members of the chiropractic profession and to make recommendations as to how the profession can safely and effectively manage the paediatric patient. Discussion The chiropractic profession holds the responsibility of ethical and safe practice and requires the cultivation and mastery of both an academic foundation and clinical expertise that distinguishes chiropractic from other disciplines. Research into the effectiveness of chiropractic care for paediatric patients has lagged behind that of adult care, but this is being addressed through educational programs where research is now being incorporated into academic tracks to attain advanced chiropractic degrees. Conclusion Studies in the United States show that over the last several decades, chiropractors are the most common complementary and alternative medicine providers visited by children and adolescents. Chiropractors continue to seek integration with other healthcare providers to provide the most appropriate care for their paediatric patients. In the interest of what is best for the paediatric population in the future, collaborative efforts for research into the effectiveness and safety of chiropractic care as an alternative healthcare approach for children should be negotiated and are welcomed. PMID:20525200

2010-01-01

10

Development of the Murdoch Chiropractic Graduate Pledge  

PubMed Central

Purpose: This paper reviews the origins of the learned professions, the foundational concepts of professionalism, and the common elements within various healer's oaths. It then reveals the development of the Murdoch Chiropractic Graduate Pledge. Methods: A committee comprised of three Murdoch academics performed literature searches on the topic of professionalism and healer's oaths and utilized the Quaker consensus process to develop the Murdoch Chiropractic Graduate Pledge. Results: The committee in its deliberations utilized over 200 relevant papers and textbooks to formulate the Murdoch Chiropractic Graduate Pledge that was administered to the 2010 Murdoch School of Chiropractic and Sports Science graduates. The School of Chiropractic and Sports Science included professionalism as one of its strategic goals and began the process of curriculum review to align it with the goal of providing a curriculum that recognizes and emphasizes the development of professionalism. Conclusions: The reciting of a healer's oath such as the Hippocratic Oath is widely considered to be the first step in a new doctor's career. It is seen as the affirmation that a newly trained health care provider will use his or her newfound knowledge and skill exclusively for the benefit of mankind in an ethical manner. Born from the very meaning of the word profession, the tradition of recitation of a healer's oath is resurgent in health care. It is important for health care instructors to understand that the curriculum must be such that it contributes positively to the students' professional development. PMID:21048880

Simpson, J. Keith; Losco, Barrett; Young, Kenneth J.

2010-01-01

11

Reflecting on 115 years: the chiropractic profession's philosophical path  

PubMed Central

The chiropractic profession struggled with survival and identity in its first decades. In addition to internal struggles between chiropractic leaders and colleges, much of our profession's formative years were stamped with reactions to persecution from external forces. The argument that chiropractic should be recognized as a distinct profession, and the rhetoric that this medicolegal strategy included, helped to develop chiropractic identity during this period of persecution in the early 20th century. This article questions if the chiropractic profession is mature and wise enough to be comfortable in being proud of its past but still capable of continued philosophical growth. PMID:22693471

Johnson, Claire

2010-01-01

12

Should the chiropractic profession embrace the doctrine of informed consent?  

PubMed

This commentary provides a narrative review of the literature focusing on the use of a health care informed consent process in the United States. This article reviews the current positions of the World Medical Association, American Medical Association, American Chiropractic Association, Wisconsin and New Jersey State Courts, US Federal Government Office of Health Policy and Clinical Outcomes, and 1 college of chiropractic regarding the doctrine of informed consent. The authors recommend that the chiropractic profession embrace the doctrine of informed consent and promulgate it as a standard of care. The implementation of this doctrine by chiropractic physicians promotes and improves the safety of chiropractic interventions. PMID:19646372

Lehman, James J; Conwell, Timothy D; Sherman, Paul R

2008-09-01

13

Lasers and their therapeutic application in chiropractic  

PubMed Central

The purpose of this paper is to review some of the applications of laser therapy and its reported effects on tissue healing, pain relief and other effects. Several musculoskeletal and low back pain studies are highlighted to show the efficacy of laser therapy and its' applicability as an adjunct to chiropractic treatment. Information is also presented which highlights the necessary information the clinician should be aware of in order to develop specific protocols for musculoskeletal pathologies. The parameters, which are now available on lasers, include power, frequency, duty cycle and cadence. When these are manipulated, different effects are achieved on tissues, which may enhance chiropractic treatment. Imagesp34-a

Fitz-Ritson, Don

2001-01-01

14

Chiropractic and CAM Utilization: A Descriptive Review  

Microsoft Academic Search

OBJECTIVE: To conduct a descriptive review of the scientific literature examining use rates of modalities and procedures used by CAM clinicians to manage chronic LBP and other conditions DATA SOURCES: A literature of PubMed and MANTIS was performed using the key terms Chiropractic; Low Back Pain; Utilization Rate; Use Rate; Complementary and Alternative Medicine; and Health Services in various combinations.

Dana J Lawrence; William C Meeker

2007-01-01

15

Chiropractic complaints and disciplinary cases in Canada  

PubMed Central

This paper retrospectively reviews various complaints and disciplinary cases that have appeared before chiropractic provincial regulatory boards throughout Canada, and have resulted in a significant outcome. This information was compiled by the Disciplinary Records Committee of the Canadian Federation of Chiropractic Regulatory Boards. Annually, the committee recorded the following; jurisdiction, year of disciplinary decision, nature of charge/allegation, specific mitigating factors, findings/outcome, penalties imposed, costs related to proceedings, who costs were attributed to, formal or informal proceeding(s). A total of 99 complaints are reviewed. In addition to demographic analysis of the data, a series of descriptive cases are included. This information is provided for the purpose of examining any parallels that might exist when chiropractic regulatory boards evaluate cases so they might arrive at conclusions in a fair and reasonable manner. Consistency in the application of rules and sanctions is a desirable objective of all chiropractic regulatory boards. While this paper is disseminated for informative purposes, ultimately each provincial regulatory board must exhibit good judgement with respect to case-specific issues.

Toth, E Audrey; Lawson, Douglas M; Nykoliation, Jim W

1998-01-01

16

Chiropractic management of a patient with persistent headache  

PubMed Central

Objective The purpose of this case report is to describe chiropractic care of a patient with persistent headache treated using chiropractic manipulative therapy and adjunct treatments. Clinical features A 54-year-old multiparous woman had chronic debilitating headaches for 11 months. Previous care from a variety of specialties had brought no appreciable relief. Intervention and outcome The patient was managed with chiropractic manipulative therapy, injections, and electromagnetic therapy. Five treatments over 6 weeks brought resolution of the headaches. Conclusion This patient with persistent headache responded favorably to a course of chiropractic and adjunctive care. PMID:24396331

West, Jason; Phillips, Reed B.

2013-01-01

17

The journal 'chiropractic & osteopathy' changes its title to 'chiropractic & manual therapies'. a new name, a new era.  

PubMed

Chiropractic & Osteopathy changes its title to Chiropractic & Manual Therapies in January 2011. This change reflects the expanding base of submissions from clinical scientists interested in the discipline of manual therapy. It is also in accord with the findings of a review of the journal content and a joint venture between the original parent organisation the Chiropractic and Osteopathic College of Australasia and a new partner the European Academy of Chiropractic, which is a subsidiary body of the European Chiropractors' Union. The title change should encourage submissions from all professionals interested in manual therapy including chiropractors, osteopaths, physiotherapists, medical doctors and scientists interested in this field. PMID:21247414

Walker, Bruce F; French, Simon D; Cameron, Melanie; Perle, Stephen M; Lebouef-Yde, Charlotte; Rubinstein, Sidney M

2011-01-01

18

The journal 'chiropractic & osteopathy' changes its title to 'chiropractic & manual therapies'. a new name, a new era  

PubMed Central

Chiropractic & Osteopathy changes its title to Chiropractic & Manual Therapies in January 2011. This change reflects the expanding base of submissions from clinical scientists interested in the discipline of manual therapy. It is also in accord with the findings of a review of the journal content and a joint venture between the original parent organisation the Chiropractic and Osteopathic College of Australasia and a new partner the European Academy of Chiropractic, which is a subsidiary body of the European Chiropractors' Union. The title change should encourage submissions from all professionals interested in manual therapy including chiropractors, osteopaths, physiotherapists, medical doctors and scientists interested in this field. PMID:21247414

2011-01-01

19

Danish chiropractic patients then and now—a comparison between 1962 and 1999  

Microsoft Academic Search

Background: Little is known about changes in the chiropractic patient population over time. Objective: To compare 2 surveys describing the Danish chiropractic patient population. Design: Data concerning location of primary complaint and its duration for patients in Danish chiropractic offices between 1962 and 1999 were compared. Setting: Private chiropractic practice and nonprofit research institution. Outcome Measures: Location of primary diagnosis\\/complaint,

Jan Hartvigsen; Ole Bolding-Jensen; Henning Hviid; Niels Grunnet-Nilsson

2003-01-01

20

Patient satisfaction with chiropractic physicians in an independent physicians' association  

Microsoft Academic Search

Background: Satisfaction with care is one of the variables that can be used in determining the results of medical care. Patient satisfaction surveys allow managed care plans to determine how well their providers meet certain standards. Objective: To determine the level of satisfaction with chiropractic care in a random sample of patients seen by physician members of a chiropractic independent

Hugh A. Gemmell; Brad M. Hayes

2001-01-01

21

Triage and case presentations in a chiropractic pediatric clinic  

Microsoft Academic Search

ObjectiveThe use of triage in a chiropractic practice is to determine whether or not a patient who has presented to an office is in need of a referral to another health care provider. The objective of this article is to illustrate the use of triage skills in a primary care, chiropractic pediatric practice. This is examined both in the new

Drew Rubin

2007-01-01

22

Use of the term subluxation in publications during the formative years of the chiropractic profession  

PubMed Central

The term subluxation has come to have different meanings for different health care professions in the United States for over the past century. This controversy has resulted in some contention both internal and external to the chiropractic profession. Some current factions within the chiropractic profession hold the term subluxation to be synonymous with the identity of chiropractic itself; however, this term was not solely used by chiropractic during its formative years. The purpose of this article is to look at uses of the term by various professions (osteopathy, medicine, and chiropractic) at the turn of the century, a time in which the chiropractic profession was developing. PMID:22693477

Johnson, Claire

2011-01-01

23

Chiropractic and Neck Pain: Conservative Care of Cervical Pain, Injury  

MedlinePLUS

... or neck in any direction and the resulting “rebound” in the opposite direction is known as whiplash. ... treatment plan may include mobilization, massage or rehabilitative exercises, or something else. Research Supporting Chiropractic Care One ...

24

Suggested Courses: Majors for Pre-Chiropractic Students  

E-print Network

chiropractors to have completed the bachelor's degree if they plan to practice in Wisconsin, Therefore, students;PRE-CHIROPRACTIC Career Outlook Chiropractors diagnose and treat patients with health problems related

Saldin, Dilano

25

The role of chiropractic care in older adults  

PubMed Central

There are a rising number of older adults; in the US alone nearly 20% of the population will be 65 or older by 2030. Chiropractic is one of the most frequently utilized types of complementary and alternative care by older adults, used by an estimated 5% of older adults in the U.S. annually. Chiropractic care involves many different types of interventions, including preventive strategies. This commentary by experts in the field of geriatrics, discusses the evidence for the use of spinal manipulative therapy, acupuncture, nutritional counseling and fall prevention strategies as delivered by doctors of chiropractic. Given the utilization of chiropractic services by the older adult, it is imperative that providers be familiar with the evidence for and the prudent use of different management strategies for older adults. PMID:22348431

2012-01-01

26

Chiropractic management of chronic idiopathic meralgia paresthetica: a case study  

PubMed Central

Objectives This report describes the case of a patient with chronic idiopathic meralgia paresthetica associated with bilateral sacroiliac joint dysfunction who was managed with chiropractic care. Clinical Features A 35-year-old white woman presented to a private chiropractic clinic with a complaint of numbness in the right anterolateral thigh region. Neurological assessment revealed a diminution of sensibility and discrimination on the right lateral femoral cutaneous nerve territory. Pain was rated as 8.5 on a numeric pain scale of 0 to 10. Musculoskeletal examination of the pelvic region disclosed bilateral sacroiliac joint dysfunction. Intervention and Outcomes Chiropractic management included pelvic mobilizations, myofascial therapy, transverse friction massage, and stretching exercises. After 3 visits (2 weeks later), result of neurological evaluation was normal, with no residual numbness over the lateral thigh. Conclusion In the present case, chiropractic management with standard and applied kinesiology techniques resulted in recovery of meralgia paresthetica symptoms for this patient. PMID:22942840

Houle, Sebastien

2012-01-01

27

Prevalence of cardiac arrhythmias in a community based chiropractic practice  

PubMed Central

Introduction: The prevalence of arrhythmias in chiropractic practice (the proportion of current patients who currently have arrhythmias) is unknown, but thought to be increasing. As arrhythmias influence management of chiropractic patients, the objective of this study was to determine the feasibility of screening for cardiac arrhythmias in a chiropractic clinic. Methods: With a convenience sample from one clinic, ECG data were recorded and analyzed to identify arrhythmias. Results: Seventy-six of ninety contacted patients participated in this study. Only 8 (?26%) of 31 patients with known or suspected cardiovascular abnormalities demonstrated arrhythmias versus 7 (?16%) of 45 subjects who were not previously aware of having an arrhythmia. Conclusion: The screening of patients for cardiac arrhythmias in a community based chiropractic clinic is feasible. A 3-minute recording of ECG activity at rest is not a highly sensitive method of identifying patients with previously recognized arrhythmias, but is capable of identifying previously undiagnosed arrhythmias.

Padhi, Suzanne; Patel, Nasreen; Driscoll, Darcy; Budgell, Brian

2014-01-01

28

The origins and early history of the National Chiropractic Association  

PubMed Central

Early organization in chiropractic was prompted by the profession’s need to promote itself and to defend against the onslaught of political medicine and organized osteopathy. The first priorities were legal defense against prosecution for unlicensed practice and malpractice insurance. The Universal Chiropractors’ Association (UCA), organized at the Palmer School of Chiropractic (PSC) in 1906, sought to meet these needs by insuring its members and by developing a legal department under the supervision of attorney Tom Morris, one time lieutenant governor of Wisconsin. The public relations and marketing needs of chiropractors were largely served by the PSC and its legendary leader. However, as chiropractors increasingly sought to avoid prosecution by passage of chiropractic laws, Palmer’s efforts to direct this legislation so as to limit chiropractors’ scope of practice increasingly alienated many in the profession. The American Chiropractic Association (ACA) was founded in 1922 to provide a broadscope alternative to BJ’s UCA. With Palmer’s departure from the UCA following the neurocalometer debacle, ACA and UCA sought amalgamation. Simultaneously, organized medicine renewed its attack on the profession by introducing basic science legislation, which prompted chiropractors to try to upgrade and standardize chiropractic education. Early efforts to bring about the needed consensus were centered in the International Chiropractic Congress (ICC), particularly its division of state examining boards. In 1930 the ACA and UCA combined to form the National Chiropractic Association (NCA), and by 1934 the ICC had merged with the NCA to form part of its council structure. With this modicum of solidarity the NCA began the process of educational boot-strapping at its 1935 convention in Los Angeles, when its Committee on Education, a forerunner of today’s Council on Chiropractic Education, was proposed by C.O. Watkins of Montana. ImagesFigure 2Figure 3Figure 4Figure 5Figure 6Figure 7Figure 9

Keating, Joseph C; Rehm, William S

1993-01-01

29

Potential unique causes of burnout for chiropractic professionals  

PubMed Central

Objective The objective of this narrative review is to discuss the potential for burnout in chiropractic practitioners. This discussion is grounded in the job demands-resource model, the conservation of resources model, the unique profession-specific stressors experienced by chiropractors, and information from similar health care professions. Methods A search using both the indexed (PubMed and PsychLit) and nonindexed psychosocial literature was used. Other resources included the Cochrane Library, articles from governing bodies of the chiropractic profession, trade magazines, and research conferences and symposium proceedings. Articles were analyzed following the grounded theory principles: open coding and memos for conceptual labeling, axial coding and memos for category building, and selective coding for model building. Results Potential stressors unique to doctors of chiropractic include factors associated with physical workload, role stress, and mental and emotional demands. Conclusions There are unique chiropractic-specific occupational characteristics that possibly contribute to burnout in the chiropractic professionals. These findings emphasize the need for assessing and measuring burnout and attrition within the chiropractic profession. PMID:22693483

Williams, Shawn

2011-01-01

30

Chiropractic: from rejection to acceptance 1900-1980  

PubMed Central

This paper presents some of the significant milestones that were reached in the long struggle from rejection to acceptance. While it does not attempt to include all of the historical events which contributed to this evolutionary process, it does identify some of the key elements in the laying of a sound foundation upon which the profession could continue to build. It is hoped that other papers will be written to add to our understanding of this important era in chiropractic’s early development. The years from 1917-1958 deal mainly with medicine’s intransigent opposition; then the tide began to turn in chiropractic’s favour. Governments appointed commissions of enquiry to bring some order into the health care field. Our profession’s brief to the Royal Commission on Health Services was described by the Minister of National Health and Welfare as “a very powerful document”. The government enquiries, in addition to identifying professional weaknesses, also made favourable recommendations which encouraged the further growth and development of chiropractic. Commenting on his work as a Royal Commissioner, Mr. Justice Gerard Lacroix said that the medical opposition to chiropractic was: “... based on bias and prejudice, ignorance and refusal to learn about chiropraxy. I thought it safer to know and understand before judging” (p. 13).8

Sutherland, Donald C

1998-01-01

31

Plastination: a modern approach to chiropractic teaching  

PubMed Central

Plastination is a unique method for the preservation of biological material for teaching and research. The plastinated specimens are dry, odorless, non-toxic and durable. They can be manipulated by teachers and students without protective equipment like gloves. Invented in 1978 by Doctor Gunther von Hagens from the University of Heidelberg, this technique, that involves the replacement of water by a curable polymer, has spread rapidly all around the world and is actually used in over 250 universities and colleges. To our knowledge, the Université du Québec à Trois-Rivières, is the first institution to use plastinated specimens for teaching anatomy, neuroanatomy, pathology and radiology to students in chiropractic. This paper describes the various steps of the method (fixation, dehydration, impregnation and curing) and presents some examples of the utilization of plastinated specimens. ImagesFigure 1Figure 2Figure 3Figure 4Figure 5Figure 6

Grondin, Gilles

1998-01-01

32

How can chiropractic become a respected mainstream profession? The example of podiatry  

Microsoft Academic Search

BACKGROUND: The chiropractic profession has succeeded to remain in existence for over 110 years despite the fact that many other professions which had their start at around the same time as chiropractic have disappeared. Despite chiropractic's longevity, the profession has not succeeded in establishing cultural authority and respect within mainstream society, and its market share is dwindling. In the meantime,

Donald R Murphy; Michael J Schneider; David R Seaman; Stephen M Perle; Craig F Nelson

2008-01-01

33

An investigation into the demographics and motivations of students studying for a chiropractic degree  

PubMed Central

Objective This research aimed to investigate motivations for studying chiropractic, and to determine what students look for in a course/college and potential barriers to studying chiropractic. Methods The study design was a cross-sectional survey. Following IRB/Ethical approval, a paper-based questionnaire was distributed to students at McTimoney College of Chiropractic. Demographic data were compared to another chiropractic college in the United Kingdom. Results The questionnaire response rate was 70.8% (n = 121). Motivating factors for studying chiropractic included a desire to help others (54.5%, n = 66), with 44.6% (n = 54) attracted by chiropractic's holistic, drugless approach to health. Previous help from chiropractic influenced 55.4% (n = 67) and 22.3% (n = 27) felt chiropractic had “changed their life.” Just over half of the respondents (55.4%, n = 67) viewed the ability to work while studying as extremely important and 73.6% (n = 89) said they could not have studied chiropractic without this. Conclusion Previous help from chiropractic care was a common motivation for studying chiropractic. The ability to work while studying was seen as vital by many students and, without it, the vast majority felt they could not have studied chiropractic. PMID:23957323

Yalden, Philip; Cunliffe, Christina; Hunnisett, Adrian

2013-01-01

34

The Resolution of Chronic Colitis with Chiropractic Care Leading to Increased Fertility  

Microsoft Academic Search

Introduction: A 32-year-old female presented at my office for chiropractic care of her chronic colitis and did not disclose her condition of infertility during the course of care at this office. There appears to be some relationship between chiropractic care and relief of some visceral conditions relating to the colon and female reproductive organs. Methods: Chiropractic care and specifically Sacro

Charles L. Blum

35

Characteristics of Veterans Health Administration chiropractors and chiropractic clinics.  

PubMed

Chiropractic services have been delivered on station at select Veterans Health Administration (VHA) medical facilities since late 2004. No published data describing the characteristics of VHA chiropractic physicians (chiropractors) and chiropractic clinics exist at a national level. This study was designed to examine elements of the structures of chiropractic services in VHA settings. Web-based survey methods were used to question all chiropractors in VHA facilities (N = 36). Data were obtained from 33 providers, yielding a 91.6% response rate. Most respondents were full-time VHA employees, while others were part-time employees or contractors. Differences were found in prior training, integrated practice, and academic or research experience. Of the respondents, 88% ranked low back pain as the most common patient complaint seen in practice and 79% ranked cervical pain the second most common complaint. Of the new patient consultations, 67.6% originated from primary care, 9.4% from pain management, and 6.2% from physiatry. Most respondents were similar in their reported use of diagnostic and therapeutic procedures, but their reported rates of participation in various facility activities were different. Further work is needed for researchers and policy makers to more fully understand the integration and delivery of chiropractic services in VHA settings. PMID:20157856

Lisi, Anthony J; Goertz, Christine; Lawrence, Dana J; Satyanarayana, Preeti

2009-01-01

36

Essential literature for the chiropractic profession: a survey of chiropractic research leaders  

PubMed Central

Background Evidence-based clinical practice (EBCP) is an accepted practice for informed clinical decision making in mainstream health care professions. EBCP augments clinical experience and can have far reaching effects in education, policy, reimbursement and clinical management. The proliferation of published research can be overwhelming—finding a mechanism to identify literature that is essential for practitioners and students is desirable. The purpose of this study was to survey leaders in the chiropractic profession on their opinions of essential literature for doctors of chiropractic, faculty, and students to read or reference. Methods Deployment of an IRB exempted survey occurred with 68 academic and research leaders using SurveyMonkey®. Individuals were solicited via e-mail in August of 2011; the study closed in October of 2011. Collected data were checked for citation accuracy and compiled to determine multiple responses. A secondary analysis assessed the scholarly impact and Internet accessibility of the recommended literature. Results Forty-three (43) individuals consented to participate; seventeen (17) contributed at least one article of importance. A total of 41 unique articles were reported. Of the six articles contributed more than once, one article was reported 6 times, and 5 were reported twice. Conclusions A manageable list of relevant literature was created. Shortcomings of methods were identified, and improvements for continued implementation are suggested. A wide variety of articles were reported as “essential” knowledge; annual or bi-annual surveys would be helpful for the profession. PMID:24289298

2013-01-01

37

The chiropractic heritage of Paul Caster: magnetic healer.  

PubMed

Magnetic healers were a phenomenon in America's heartland, from Iowa, Kansas, Missouri in Illinois in the late 1860s. Three noted magnetics in this region were Paul Caster, Andrew Still and Daniel Palmer; the first and third would have a chiropractic legacy, while Dr. Andrew Taylor Still would found osteopathy. This is the story of the chiropractic heritage from Paul Caster via his son, Jacob, to his grandson, Charles E. Caster, D.C. Magnetic healing in this family was considered by Paul to be a divine gift, while Still and Palmer would be rejected by the clergy and believed their skills could be learned, thus passed on. PMID:11619056

Jackson, R B

1996-12-01

38

Contemporary chiropractic practice in the UK: a field study of a chiropractor and his patients in a suburban chiropractic clinic  

PubMed Central

Background Two recent surveys of chiropractors in Great Britain suggest that there are discrepancies between chiropractic practice as defined in regulatory guidelines and day-to-day chiropractic clinical practice and there is in general a paucity of information regarding the characteristics of contemporary chiropractic practice in the United Kingdom. This field study describes the daily practice of a contemporary British UK-trained chiropractor. Methods The fieldwork took place during the spring and summer of 2008 when the author spent one day per week observing consultations and interviewing patients in a chiropractic clinic. The chiropractor was subjected to interviews on two occasions. The author also registered as a patient. Field notes were taken by the author, interviews were recorded and the transcripts were corrected and analysed by the author. Results A total of 25 patients took part in the study. The interaction that took place between patients and staff in reception could be considered as a prelude to consultation facilitating the transformation from individual to patient and back to individual. Coupled with the continuous physical contact between the chiropractor and each patient there was a substantial amount of verbal and non-verbal communication throughout treatment visits. The patients presented with predominantly musculo-skeletal pain and the majority had consulted the chiropractor as a result of recommendations from others in their close social environment. The majority of the interviewed patients had either an inaccurate or at best rudimentary understanding of the mechanisms of chiropractic treatment. A few of the interviewed patients indicated that they had at first experienced concerns about the nature of chiropractic treatment or getting undressed. The author was able to gain some insight into how the chiropractor's experiences, opinions and beliefs had shaped his approach to chiropractic treatment and how this formed the basis of his clinical modus operandi. Conclusion Although no robust conclusions should be drawn from this small scale field study it does show that the clinical chiropractic practice as carried out by this UK trained British chiropractor contains a number of elements described in earlier qualitative studies in the United States, Canada, and Australia. PMID:23927011

2013-01-01

39

Medicolegal corner: Quadriplegia following chiropractic manipulation.  

PubMed

A 45 year old male with multiple comorbidities presented to his internist with a 2 week history of right sided neck pain and tenderness, accompanied by tingling in the hand. The internists' neurological examination was normal, except for decreased range of motion of the right arm. He referred the patient to a chiropractor; he performed plain X rays which revealed mild spasm, but never ordered a magnetic resonance imaging study. The chiropractor manipulated the patient's neck on two successive days. By the morning of the third visit, the patient reported extreme pain and difficulty walking. Without performing a new neurological examination or obtaining an MR scan, the chiropractor again manipulated the patient's neck. He immediately became quadriplegic. Despite undergoing an emergency C5 C6 anterior cervical diskectomy/fusion to address a massive disc found on the MR scan (CT was negative), the patient remained quadriplegic (e.g., C4 sensory, C6 motor levels). A major point of negligence in this case was the failure of both the referring internist and chiropractor to order an MR of the cervical spine prior to the chiropractic manipulation. The internist claimed that there was no known report of permanent quadriplegia resulting from neck manipulation in any medical journal, article or book, or in any literature of any kind or on the internet and that the risk of this injury must be vanishingly small given the large numbers of manipulations performed annually. The total amount of the verdict was $14,596,000.00 the internist's liability was 5% ($759,181.65). PMID:23878767

Epstein, Nancy E; Forte Esq, Carol L

2013-01-01

40

Attitudes towards vaccination among chiropractic and naturopathic students  

Microsoft Academic Search

We have investigated the attitudes towards vaccination of undergraduate chiropractic and naturopathic students in the two major complementary and alternative medicine colleges in Canada. While the majority of the students were not averse to vaccination, we found in both colleges that anti-vaccination attitudes were more prevalent in the later years of the programs. Reasons for this are discussed, and we

Jason W. Busse; Kumanan Wilson; James B. Campbell

2008-01-01

41

Chiropractic and a new taxonomy of primary care activities  

Microsoft Academic Search

Objective: To specify the procedural and cognitive content of primary care and to discuss potential chiropractic primary care roles. Data Collection: Data were collected through use of two expert panels and a consensus process to create a list of primary care activities. The first panel was an interdisciplinary mix of physicians, mainly allopathic ones; most of the members of the

Gary L. Gaumer; Allison Walker; Sabrina Su

2001-01-01

42

Chiropractic and concussion in sport: a narrative review of the literature  

PubMed Central

Objective Concussion is a common sporting injury that may be seen by doctors of chiropractic and should be managed following current practice guidelines. The purpose of this abstract is to present a literature review on chiropractic management of concussion in sport and to discuss current guidelines. Methods A review of the literature was performed using the PubMed search engine. MeSH terms included chiropractic and concussion. Search dates were the beginning of the record through July 30, 2013. All languages and article types were included in the search. Articles found were retrieved and evaluated for the relevance of chiropractic management of concussion in sport. Results Five articles were found (1 prospective study, 1 survey, 3 literature reviews) ranging in publication years from 1993 to 2012. No articles reported a position statement, and none provided a review of current concussion management practices related to chiropractic practice. No articles reported adverse outcomes of chiropractic management of an athlete with concussion. Conclusion Research related to the chiropractic management of concussion in sport is a nascent area of investigation. Although there are few published articles, the articles in this review showed that doctors of chiropractic encounter concussed athletes at events and in clinical practice. It is essential for doctors of chiropractic to understand the importance of using standardized concussion assessment tools and current concussion guidelines. PMID:24396325

Johnson, Claire D.; Green, Bart N.; Nelson, Robert C.; Moreau, Bill; Nabhan, Dustin

2013-01-01

43

Chiropractic Use and Changes in Health among Older Medicare Beneficiaries: A Comparative Effectiveness Observational Study  

PubMed Central

Objective The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of chiropractic on five outcomes among Medicare beneficiaries: increased difficulties performing Activities of Daily Living (ADLs), Instrumental ADLs (IADLs), and Lower Body Functions, as well as lower self-rated health and increased depressive symptoms. Methods Among all beneficiaries, we estimated the effect of chiropractic use on changes in health outcomes among those who used chiropractic compared to those who did not, and among beneficiaries with back conditions we estimated the effect of chiropractic use relative to medical care, both over a 2–15 year period. Two analytic approaches were used—one assumed no selection bias, while the other adjusted for potential selection bias using propensity score methods. Results Among all beneficiaries, propensity score analyses indicated that chiropractic use led to comparable outcomes for ADLs, IADLs, and depressive symptoms, although there were increased risks associated with chiropractic for declines in lower body function and self-rated health. Propensity score analyses among beneficiaries with back conditions indicated that chiropractic use led to comparable outcomes for ADLs, IADLs, lower body function, and depressive symptoms, although there was an increased risk associated with chiropractic use for declines in self-rated health. Conclusion The evidence in this study suggests that chiropractic treatment has comparable effects on functional outcomes when compared to medical treatment for all Medicare beneficiaries, but increased risk for declines in self-rated health among beneficiaries with back conditions. PMID:24144425

Weigel, Paula Anne; Hockenberry, Jason; Bentler, Suzanne; Wolinsky, Fredric D.

2013-01-01

44

GPs opinions and perceptions of chiropractic in Sweden and Norway: a descriptive survey  

PubMed Central

Background In Sweden, chiropractic is not included in mainstream health care. In Norway chiropractic is a recognized health care profession. The aim of this study was to explore the perceptions of chiropractic among Swedish and Norwegian General Practitioners (GPs). Methods Eight hundred surveys in each country were distributed randomly by post to Swedish and Norwegian GPs offices. The survey contained two main sections: Experiences and opinions about chiropractic and referral patterns. The data were then described and compared between the countries. Results In Sweden the response rate was 44.8% and in Norway 45.3%. More than half of the Swedish GPs participating in this study stated that they had poor knowledge about chiropractic, while just a tenth of Norwegian GPs stated the same. Nearly all Norwegian GPs had some experience of chiropractic treatment whilst a fairly large number of the Swedish GPs said that they had no experience at all of chiropractic. It was twice as common for GPs in Norway to refer patients to a chiropractor as compared to Sweden. However, Swedish and Norwegian GPs agreed that chiropractors were competent to treat musculo-skeletal conditions with an adequate education to be part of mainstream medicine. Conclusions Swedish and Norwegian GPs agree that chiropractors are competent to treat musculoskeletal conditions. However, there are many differences in GPs perceptions of chiropractic between the two countries and the overall picture indicates that chiropractic is more accepted and recognised as a health care profession in Norway. PMID:24128386

2013-01-01

45

Constructing a philosophy of chiropractic: evolving worldviews and modern foundation?  

PubMed Central

Objective The purpose of this article is to trace the foundations of DD Palmer's sense of self and philosophy of chiropractic to its sources in modern Western philosophy as well as current metatheories about modernity. Discussion DD Palmer's sense of self was indicative of a modern self. A modern self is characterized as a self that developed after the Western Enlightenment and must come to terms with the insights of modernity such as Cartesian dualism, Spinoza's substance, Rousseau's expressivism, and Kant's critiques. It is argued that Palmer's philosophy can be viewed as part of the this tradition alongside his involvement in the 19th century American metaphysical religious culture, which was itself a response to these challenges of the modern self of modernity. Conclusion Palmer's development of chiropractic and its philosophy was a reaction to the challenges and promises of modernity. PMID:22693479

Senzon, Simon A.

2011-01-01

46

Intractable migraine headaches during pregnancy under chiropractic care.  

PubMed

The absence of hormone fluctuations and/or the analgesic effects of increased beta-endorphins are thought to confer improvements in headache symptoms during pregnancy. However, for a number of pregnant patients, they continue to suffer or have worsening headache symptoms. The use of pharmacotherapy for palliative care is a concern for both the mother and the developing fetus and alternative/complementary care options are sought. We present a 24-year-old gravid female with chronic migraine headaches since age 12years. Previous unsuccessful care included osteopathy, physical therapy, massage and medication. Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory medication with codeine provided minor and temporary relief. Chiropractic care involving spinal manipulative therapy (SMT) and adjunctive therapies resulted in symptom improvement and independence from medication. This document provides supporting evidence on the safety and possible effectiveness of chiropractic care for patients with headaches during pregnancy. PMID:19880080

Alcantara, Joel; Cossette, Martine

2009-11-01

47

Chiropractic management of elbow tendinopathy following a sports related trauma  

PubMed Central

Objective: This report describes chiropractic management of a case of sub-acute elbow pain and swelling with Active Release Technique® and acupuncture. Case presentation: A 41-year-old male presented to a chiropractic clinic with a primary complaint of elbow pain and swelling following a fall while playing basketball five weeks prior. Intervention and Outcome: Treatment consisted of two sessions of needle acupuncture and one treatment of Active Release Techniques® (ART) applied to the left elbow region. Conclusions: The patient’s outcomes indicated a quick resolution of subjective complaints and objective findings with the chosen treatment. Further research is needed to demonstrate safety, clinical effectiveness, and cost effectiveness when compared to other treatments. PMID:24587497

Gliedt, Jordan A.; Daniels, Clinton J.

2014-01-01

48

Student Mental Health in a Chiropractic University Setting  

Microsoft Academic Search

Objective: This report is an attempt to frame the types of emotional challenges seen at a university counseling center with a unique population of chiropractic students compared with the normative college population. Methods:Thepsychologicalcomplaintsofstudentswere examined todetermine the populationthathas utilized psychologicalcounseling over the last 2 years at this institution.Results:The following issues were identified as the top three presenting concerns for individuals pursuing

Lisa E. Rubin

49

A brief history of historical scholarship in chiropractic  

PubMed Central

This paper provides a cursory overview of attempts to discover, preserve and disseminate the history of the chiropractic profession, up to and including the organization of the Association for the History of Chiropractic (AHC). A surprisingly wide range of materials have been available for many decades, but sustained efforts at historical scholarship are more recent (past quarter century). The quality of these works has been uneven, but has improved with the emergence of chiropractic scholarly periodicals and interest from non-chiropractor investigators. Affiliates of the American-based AHC are located in Australia and Canada; organized historical scholarship in other regions of the world has yet to develop. Several substantial archival resources for historical investigations are available, and merit greater scrutiny and support within the profession. ImagesFigure 2Figure 3Figure 4Figure 5Figure 6Figure 7Figure 8Figure 9Figure 10Figure 11Figure 12Figure 13Figure 14Figure 15Figure 16Figure 17Figure 18Figure 19Figure 20Figure 21Figure 22Figure 23Figure 24Figure 25p136-ap136-bp136-cp136-dp136-e

Keating, Joseph C

2001-01-01

50

Chiropractic management of pediatric plantar fasciitis: a case report  

PubMed Central

Objective The purpose of this report is to present the case of a 10-year-old football player with bilateral plantar fasciitis who improved with a multimodal conservative approach using chiropractic treatment. Clinical Features The patient presented with bilateral plantar heel pain at the origin of the plantar fascia with a duration of 3 weeks. Intervention and Outcome Treatment was provided for 6 visits over a 6-week period. Chiropractic care consisted of manipulative therapy, soft tissue therapy, and home rehabilitation exercises. The soft tissue technique (Graston Technique) was performed to the origin of the plantar fascia and the triceps surae bilaterally. High-velocity, low-amplitude manipulation was applied to the restricted ankle mortise joint. After 6 treatments, the patient reported resolution of foot pain bilaterally and improvements in activities of daily livings. Three months later, the patient reported no further complications and the absence of pain. Conclusion This patient with bilateral plantar fasciitis improved after a course of a multimodal treatment approach using chiropractic manipulation and soft tissue therapy in addition to exercise and stretching therapies. PMID:22942843

Daniels, Clinton J.; Morrell, Adam P.

2012-01-01

51

Straight chiropractic philosophy as a barrier to Medicare compliance: a discussion of 5 incongruent issues  

PubMed Central

Objective The purpose of this commentary is to discuss potential 5 factors within straight chiropractic philosophy and practice that may prevent Medicare compliance. Discussion The national Medicare Benefit Policy Manual and the Florida Local Coverage Determination were reviewed to identify documentation and conceptual issues regarding chiropractic practice. Five Medicare positions were contrasted with tenets of straight chiropractic philosophy. Based on Medicare’s documentation requirements, Medicare defines subluxation and chiropractic practice from the perspective of treating spinal pain and related functional disability. In contrast, traditional straight chiropractic philosophy is not based on the treatment of spinal pain and disability or other symptomatic presentations. In this context, 5 potential areas of conflict are discussed. Conclusion The Medicare version of chiropractic practice is not consistent with traditional straight chiropractic philosophy, which may play a role in preventing Medicare compliance. The chiropractic profession may need to consider the fashion in which “philosophy” as it relates to technique and practice is presented to students and doctors to facilitate compliance with the documentation requirements of Medicare. PMID:25067928

Seaman, David R.; Soltys, Jonathan R.

2013-01-01

52

Chiropractic diagnosis and management of non-musculoskeletal conditions in children and adolescents  

Microsoft Academic Search

BACKGROUND: A great deal has been published in the chiropractic literature regarding the response, or lack thereof, of various common pediatric conditions to chiropractic care. The majority of that literature is of low scientific value (that is, case reports or case series). The purpose of this review is to summarize the literature from the point of view of clinicians, rather

Randy J Ferrance; Joyce Miller

2010-01-01

53

Chiropractic at the crossroads or are we just going around in circles?  

PubMed Central

Background Chiropractic in Australia has seen many changes over the past 30 years. Some of these changes have advanced the professional status of chiropractic, improved undergraduate training and paved the way for a research culture. Unfortunately, other changes or lack of changes, have hindered the growth, public utilisation and professional standing of chiropractic in Australia. This article explores what influences have impacted on the credibility, advancement and public utilisation of chiropractic in Australia. Discussion The 1970's and 1980's saw a dramatic change within the chiropractic profession in Australia. With the advent of government regulation, came government funded teaching institutions, quality research and increased public acceptance and utilisation of chiropractic services. However, since that time the profession appears to have taken a backward step, which in the author's opinion, is directly linked to a shift by sections of the profession to the fundamentalist approach to chiropractic and the vertebral subluxation complex. The abandonment, by some groups, of a scientific and evidenced based approach to practice for one founded on ideological dogma is beginning to take its toll. Summary The future of chiropractic in Australia is at a crossroads. For the profession to move forward it must base its future on science and not ideological dogma. The push by some for it to become a unique and all encompassing alternative system of healthcare is both misguided and irrational. PMID:21599991

2011-01-01

54

Assessment and risk reduction of infectious pathogens on chiropractic treatment tables  

Microsoft Academic Search

BACKGROUND: To investigate the presence of pathogenic microbes on chiropractic treatment tables in one outpatient teaching clinic. Additional aims were to test inexpensive disinfectants on tables that may kill microbes and suggest infection control measures for chiropractic offices, clinics and classrooms. The aim of the study was to assess the presence of pathogenic microbes on treatment tables in one outpatient

Marion Willard Evans; Jennell Breshears; Alan Campbell; Chris Husbands; Ronald Rupert

2007-01-01

55

Australian chiropractic sports medicine: half way there or living on a prayer?  

Microsoft Academic Search

Sports chiropractic within Australia has a chequered historical background of unorthodox individualistic displays of egocentric treatment approaches that emphasise specific technique preference and individual prowess rather than standardised evidence based management. This situation has changed in recent years with the acceptance of many within sports chiropractic to operate under an evidence informed banner and to embrace a research culture. Despite

Henry Pollard; Wayne Hoskins; Andrew McHardy; Rod Bonello; Peter Garbutt; Mike Swain; George Dragasevic; Mario Pribicevic; Andrew Vitiello

2007-01-01

56

Calibration and electrical safety status of therapeutic ultrasound used by chiropractic physicians  

Microsoft Academic Search

BackgroundUltrasound therapy is a commonly used therapeutic modality within the chiropractic profession. Previous calibration studies of ultrasound units within the physical therapy communities in Scotland and Canada have shown that approximately two thirds of units tested did not conform to minimum calibration standards. Similar failure rates may exist in the chiropractic profession and need to be addressed.

Dwain M Daniel; Ronald L Rupert

2003-01-01

57

Beyond spinal manipulation: should Medicare expand coverage for chiropractic services? A review and commentary on the challenges for policy makers  

PubMed Central

Objectives Private insurance plans typically reimburse doctors of chiropractic for a range of clinical services, but Medicare reimbursements are restricted to spinal manipulation procedures. Medicare pays for evaluations performed by medical and osteopathic physicians, nurse practitioners, physician assistants, podiatrists, physical therapists, and occupational therapists; however, it does not reimburse the same services provided by chiropractic physicians. Advocates for expanded coverage of chiropractic services under Medicare cite clinical effectiveness and patient satisfaction, whereas critics point to unnecessary services, inadequate clinical documentation, and projected cost increases. To further inform this debate, the purpose of this commentary is to address the following questions: (1) What are the barriers to expand coverage for chiropractic services? (2) What could potentially be done to address these issues? (3) Is there a rationale for Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services to expand coverage for chiropractic services? Methods A literature search was conducted of Google and PubMed for peer-reviewed articles and US government reports relevant to the provision of chiropractic care under Medicare. We reviewed relevant articles and reports to identify key issues concerning the expansion of coverage for chiropractic under Medicare, including identification of barriers and rationale for expanded coverage. Results The literature search yielded 29 peer-reviewed articles and 7 federal government reports. Our review of these documents revealed 3 key barriers to full coverage of chiropractic services under Medicare: inadequate documentation of chiropractic claims, possible provision of unnecessary preventive care services, and the uncertain costs of expanded coverage. Our recommendations to address these barriers include the following: individual chiropractic physicians, as well as state and national chiropractic organizations, should continue to strengthen efforts to improve claims and documentation practices; and additional rigorous efficacy/effectiveness research and clinical studies for chiropractic services need to be performed. Research of chiropractic services should target the triple aim of high-quality care, affordability, and improved health. Conclusions The barriers that were identified in this study can be addressed. To overcome these barriers, the chiropractic profession and individual physicians must assume responsibility for correcting deficiencies in compliance and documentation; further research needs to be done to evaluate chiropractic services; and effectiveness of extended episodes of preventive chiropractic care should be rigorously evaluated. Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services policies related to chiropractic reimbursement should be reexamined using the same standards applicable to other health care providers. The integration of chiropractic physicians as fully engaged Medicare providers has the potential to enhance the capacity of the Medicare workforce to care for the growing population. We recommend that Medicare policy makers consider limited expansion of Medicare coverage to include, at a minimum, reimbursement for evaluation and management services by chiropractic physicians. PMID:25067927

Whedon, James M.; Goertz, Christine M.; Lurie, Jon D.; Stason, William B.

2013-01-01

58

The life and contribution of Dr. Ronald Gitelman: a pioneer of modern chiropractic science  

PubMed Central

Objective: The life and contribution to chiropractic science of Dr. Ronald Gitelman is reviewed. Methods: Sources for this article included review of the notes prepared by Dr. Joseph Keating in his “biography” of the Canadian Memorial Chiropractic College (CMCC); review of the important articles published by Dr. Gitelman; review of the important projects undertaken by him along with various colleagues; notes from reminiscences obtained from many of these colleagues and discussions with his family. Discussion: Dr. Gitelman’s academic career spanned from 1963 to the late 1980’s. During that time, he made foundational contributions to the development of chiropractic science including: developing the Archives (1974), the first collection of scientific articles supporting chiropractic science (which was subsequently published as the Chiropractic Archives Research Collection (CRAC)); delivering one of the few chiropractic papers at the seminal NINCDS conference (1975) and, developing the collaboration between CMCC and Dr. Kirkaldy-Willis at the University of Saskatoon (1976). He practiced in Toronto from 1961 to 2007. Summary: Dr. Gitelman was a pioneer in the development of chiropractic science. He died on October 7, 2012. PMID:23482630

Vernon, Howard

2013-01-01

59

A proposed protocol for hand and table sanitizing in chiropractic clinics and education institutions  

PubMed Central

Abstract Objective By nature, chiropractic is a hands-on profession using manipulation applied to the joints with direct skin-to-skin contacts. Chiropractic tables are designed with a face piece to accommodate the prone patient's head in a neutral position and hand rests to allow for relaxed shoulders and upper spine so treatment is facilitated. The purpose of this article is to present a proposed guideline for hand and treatment table surface sanitizing for the chiropractic profession that is evidence-based and can easily be adopted by teaching institutions and doctors in the field. Methods A review of the chiropractic literature demonstrated that pathogenic microbes are present on treatment tables in teaching clinics at multiple facilities, yet no standardized protocols exist in the United States regarding table sanitizing and hand hygiene in chiropractic clinics or education institutions. This article reviews the scientific literature on the subject by using several search engines, databases, and specific reviews of documents pertaining to the topic including existing general guidelines. Results The literature has several existing guidelines that the authors used to develop a proposed protocol for hand and table sanitizing specific to the chiropractic profession. Recommendations were developed and are presented on hand hygiene and table sanitizing procedures that could lower the risk of infection for both clinical personnel and patients in chiropractic facilities. Conclusion This article offers a protocol for hand and table sanitizing in chiropractic clinics and education institutions. The chiropractic profession should consider adoption of these or similar measures and disseminate them to teaching clinics, institutions, and private practitioners. PMID:19646384

Evans, Marion Willard; Ramcharan, Michael; Floyd, Rod; Globe, Gary; Ndetan, Harrison; Williams, Ronald; Ivie, Ronald

2009-01-01

60

Chiropractic and social justice: a view from the perspective of Beauchamp's principles.  

PubMed

Social justice in public health involves the process and product of a community acting to fairly distribute advantages and burdens to improve the health of its population and to reasonably take care of the disadvantaged. Although publications are available about chiropractic public health history, programs, and policy, the potential role of chiropractic in social justice has received little attention. This article discusses Beauchamp's 4 principles of social justice and suggests actions that the chiropractic profession may consider to participate in the practice of social justice in the field of public health. PMID:20732576

Green, Bart N; Johnson, Claire

2010-01-01

61

Laboratory Pre-Participation Screening Examination in a Chiropractic College  

PubMed Central

Introduction: Chiropractic students often serve as subjects in laboratories where they and their classmates practice examinations, various soft tissue techniques, physiological therapeutic modalities, and active rehabilitation. There are contraindications and risks associated with these procedures. This article describes how a procedure was developed to identify potential health concerns and risks that students may face while serving as subjects or performing procedures in clinical skills laboratories. Methods: Screening questions and examination procedures were developed through a consensus process. Findings from the screening process determine whether students may engage in full participation or limited participation (precautions) or are prohibited from receiving certain procedures (contraindications). Skills laboratory students and their instructors are informed of any identifiable precautions or contraindications to participation. Results: Since its implementation, precautions regarding delivery of manual therapies were found in 4% of those examined and precautions regarding receiving manual therapies in 11.5%. Contraindications to receiving specified manual therapies were found in 8%, and 4% had contraindications to certain physiological therapeutic modalities. Discussion: Further work is necessary to improve compliance with follow-up regarding diagnosis of conditions revealed or suspected. Future efforts should address how well students adhered to precautions and contraindications, the nature and frequency of injuries sustained within the laboratories, and what specific measures were taken by faculty to help students with special needs. Conclusion: This chiropractic college now has a method to describe potential risks, explain rules of laboratory participation, and obtain consent from each student. PMID:21677869

Funk, Matthew F.; Cantito, Albert A.

2011-01-01

62

Teaching, leadership, scholarly productivity, and level of activity in the chiropractic profession: a study of graduates of the Los Angeles College of Chiropractic radiology residency program  

PubMed Central

Objective The purpose of this study was to track the graduates of the Los Angeles College of Chiropractic (LACC) radiology residency program, review their scholarly productivity, and report those involved in teaching and leadership positions. Methods Former LACC residents’ career information was identified through publicly available electronic documents including Web sites and social media. PubMed and the Index to Chiropractic Literature databases were searched for chiropractic graduate job surveys, and proportional comparisons were made between the career paths of LACC radiology residency graduates and those of non–residency-trained chiropractors. Results Of 47 former LACC residents, 28 (60%) have or previously had careers in tertiary (chiropractic) education; and 12 (26%) have attained a department chair position or higher at tertiary teaching institutions. Twenty-two (47%) have or previously had private radiology practices, whereas 11 (23%) have or previously had clinical chiropractic practices. Often, residency graduates hold or have held 2 of these positions at once; and one, all 3. Chapters or books were authored by 13 (28%). Conclusion Radiology residency LACC graduates are professionally active, particularly in education, and demonstrate scholarly productivity. PMID:23966885

Young, Kenneth J.; Siordia, Lawrence

2012-01-01

63

Chiropractic treatment and the enhancement of sport performance: a narrative literature review  

PubMed Central

A literature search and narrative review was carried out with the intent of determining the current level of knowledge regarding the chiropractic treatment of athletes for the purpose of sport performance enhancement. Of the fifty-nine relevant articles retrieved, only 7 articles of variable quality were obtained which specifically investigated/discussed chiropractic treatment and its involvement in sport performance enhancement. The role of the chiropractor in sport, unsubstantiated claims of performance enhancement, theories of how chiropractic treatment may influence sport performance, and the available evidence for the benefit of chiropractic treatment on sport performance are reviewed and discussed. Areas and directions for future studies are postulated. At this time there is insufficient evidence to convincingly support the notion that treatment provided by chiropractors can directly improve sport performance. PMID:21120012

Miners, Andrew L.

2010-01-01

64

Canadian Chiropractic Resources Databank (CCRD): a profile of Canadian chiropractors  

PubMed Central

Objective: To establish a data bank which will serve as a comprehensive inventory of data and document practical information on Canada’s licensed chiropractors and to produce a summary report of this information. Design: A national census mail survey. Setting: Canada. The survey administration timeline during which information was collected was the period of August 1995 to July 1996. Participants: All chiropractors licensed to practice chiropractic in Canada, excluding chiropractors practising in the Yukon and Northwest Territories. A total of 4,246 questionnaires were mailed, of which 121 were ineligible. There were 2,905 valid responses (response rate 70.4%). Main outcome measures: Background information (demographics), professional activity, educational, training and affiliations, practice characteristics, finances and income. Results: Background information: 82.8% of all respondents were male. On January 1, 1997, the mean age of all respondents was 41.9 years. 88.6% of all respondents were born in Canada and 74.8% graduated from the Canadian Memorial Chiropractic College. The mean number of years in practice by all respondents was 13.7 years. 17.5% of all respondents had more than one practice location. Professional activity: A total of 96.2% of the respondents were active chiropractors (a chiropractor in active practice was one whose level of activity was self-described as full-time, part-time or semi-retired and who was in practice at least 10 hours per week). 85% reported being in full-time practice, 8.7% in part-time practice and 2.5% reported being semi-retired. Full-time chiropractors reported working on average 41.3 hours per week, 49.1 weeks per year and receiving 158.6 total patient visits per week. Active chiropractors reported spending on average 75.1% of their work time on direct patient care. 39.6% of active chiropractors reported that their practice had decreased over the last three years (in terms of number of patient visits). Education, training and affiliations: 42.1% of all respondents had obtained a baccalaureate degree prior to attending chiropractic college. 3.7% of all respondents held a CCA recognized specialty certification. 15.5% of all respondents held a certification or were registered to practice naturopathy, homeopathy, acupuncture, massage therapy or other related discipline. Practice Characteristics: 69.1% of active chiropractors reported being in sole proprietorship, and 85.3% reported working in a private chiropractic office. On an aggregate basis, active chiropractors reported using diversified techniques on 77.3% of their patients. Chiropractors in active practice reported treating on average 86.3% of their patients for primary conditions of a neuromusculoskeletal nature. Active chiropractors reported that their current patients were their greatest source of patient referrals, accounting for on average 58.5% of all their patients. Finances and Income: In provinces with public insurance for chiropractic services (Ontario, Manitoba, Saskatchewan, Alberta, British Columbia) active chiropractors reported deriving on average 39.7% of their practice income from the provincial plan, 44.7% directly from the patient, 9.6% from a third party payer and 6.1% from workers’ compensation boards. 56.2% of active chiropractors reported a gross annual practice income of less than $150,000 whereas 14.1% reported earning $250,000 or more. 49.5% of active chiropractors reported a net annual practice income of less than $60,000 whereas 21.4% reported earning $100,000 or more. In aggregate, active chiropractors reported that 37.3% of their patients exhausted their public insurance coverage for chiropractic care (in provinces where public insurance is available), and of those patients 35.3% discontinued care. Conclusions: This report is a first attempt to document a statistical portrait of Canada’s chiropractors. The report has been prepared by using data derived from the Canadian Chiropractic Resource Databank (CCRD), a data bank (housed at the CCA) which now holds a comprehensive inv

Kopansky-Giles, Deborah; Papadopoulos, Costa

1997-01-01

65

Chiropractic care of interstitial cystitis/painful bladder syndrome associated with pelvic lumbar spine dysfunction: a case series  

PubMed Central

Objective The purpose of this case series is to describe findings for patients with bladder pain syndrome (BPS) or interstitial cystitis (IC) who responded positively under chiropractic care. Clinical Features Eight cases were selected retrospectively reviewed from 2 independent chiropractic clinics in Scotland. Cases were selected if patients reported bladder dysfunction problems and responded positively to chiropractic care. The cases in this report describe the range of patients affected by this condition. Each patient was treated using chiropractic methods that were specific to the individual case. Intervention and Outcomes The patients selected for this case series showed positive response to chiropractic care over various lengths of time and numbers of treatments. Some of the chiropractic patients who had chronic spinal conditions had reoccurrence of bladder symptoms during an exacerbation of mechanical spinal problems. Conclusion This case series highlights that bladder and urinary problems may be associated with spinal dysfunction for some patients. PMID:23843758

Cashley, Mark A.P.; Cashley, Marie A.

2012-01-01

66

A proposed protocol for hand and table sanitizing in chiropractic clinics and education institutions  

Microsoft Academic Search

ObjectiveBy nature, chiropractic is a hands-on profession using manipulation applied to the joints with direct skin-to-skin contacts. Chiropractic tables are designed with a face piece to accommodate the prone patient's head in a neutral position and hand rests to allow for relaxed shoulders and upper spine so treatment is facilitated. The purpose of this article is to present a proposed

Marion Willard Evans Jr.; Michael Ramcharan; Rod Floyd; Gary Globe; Harrison Ndetan; Ronald Williams; Ronald Ivie

2009-01-01

67

Multiple views to address diversity issues: an initial dialog to advance the chiropractic profession  

PubMed Central

The purpose of this article is to provide expert viewpoints on the topic of diversity in the chiropractic profession, including cultural competency, diversity in the profession, educational and clinical practice strategies for addressing diversity, and workforce issues. Over the next decades, changing demographics in North America will alter how the chiropractic profession functions on many levels. As the population increases in diversity, we will need to prepare our workforce to meet the needs of future patients and society. PMID:23966884

Johnson, Claire; Killinger, Lisa Zaynab; Christensen, Mark G.; Hyland, John K.; Mrozek, John P.; Zuker, R. Fred; Kizhakkeveettil, Anupama; Perle, Stephen M.; Oyelowo, Tolu

2012-01-01

68

Assessing the attitudes, knowledge and perspectives of medical students to chiropractic  

PubMed Central

Objective: To assess second-year medical students’ views on chiropractic. Methods: A three-step triangulation approach was designed, comprising a 53-item survey, nine key informant interviews and one focus group of 8 subjects. ANOVA was used to assess attitude-response survey totals over grouping variables. Constant comparison method and NVivo was used for thematic analysis. Results: 112 medical students completed the survey (50% response rate). Subjects reporting no previous chiropractic experience/exposure or interest in learning about chiropractic were significantly more attitude-negative towards chiropractic. Thematically, medical students viewed chiropractic as an increasingly evidence-based complementary therapy for low back/chronic pain, but based views on indirect sources. Within formal curriculum, they wanted to learn about clinical conditions and benefits/risks related to treatment, as greater understanding was needed for future patient referrals. Conclusion: The results highlight the importance of exposure to chiropractic within the formal medical curriculum to help foster future collaboration between these two professions. PMID:23482682

Wong, Jessica J.; Di Loreto, Luciano; Kara, Alim; Yu, Kavan; Mattia, Alicia; Soave, David; Weyman, Karen; Kopansky-Giles, Deborah

2013-01-01

69

Chiropractic care of the older person: developing an evidence-based approach  

PubMed Central

Geriatric care has assumed a more dominant position in the health care delivery system. This article discusses the results of a literature search on geriatric chiropractic care with the ultimate goal of promoting a“best practice” approach. Fifty nine articles were found that discussed geriatric chiropractic education (N = 3), demographic and epidemiological studies (N = 9), case studies (N = 25), clinical trials (N = 4) and clinical guidelines (N = 18). The literature revealed that chiropractic pedagogy has recognized the importance of geriatric education, and epidemiological studies reported an increase in utilization rates of chiropractic care by older persons, along with greater acceptance within the medical community. Most older persons sought out chiropractic care for neuromusculoskeletal (NMS) conditions, with several studies reporting the successful resolution of these conditions with spinal manipulative therapy as well as an eclectic group of other treatment interventions. Many older persons enter a maintenance care program, which they believe to be important to their health. Although the results of this article are encouraging, it underscores the need for continued research, especially in the areas of chiropractic maintenance care and the management of non-NMS conditions.

Gleberzon, Brian J.

2001-01-01

70

Toftness system of chiropractic adjusting on pain syndromes: a pilot study in a multicenter setting?  

PubMed Central

Abstract Objective This pilot project investigates the effectiveness of the Toftness system of chiropractic adjusting on subjects with pain syndromes. Methods Patients were recruited from 13 doctors' offices. All subjects received Toftness chiropractic adjustments. The visual analog scale (VAS) and Oswestry low back pain questionnaire were used for all subjects before and after chiropractic adjustments. Results A total of 42 patients were recruited. Twenty-eight patients had acute or chronic back pain and 14 experienced other types of pain (eg, neck pain, knee pain, shoulder pain, etc). The average age of the patient population (18 male, 24 female) was 53 ± 16 years. After 6 to 8 weeks of chiropractic adjustments, pain as analyzed using the visual analog scale was reduced significantly from 73.6 ± 12.790 to 17.0 ± 13.363 (P < .001). The Oswestry score decreased significantly from 69.3 ± 18.525 to 12.4 ± 10.504 (P < .001). There were no adverse treatment effects reported by the participating patients. Conclusion The Toftness system of chiropractic adjusting reduced low back and other pain syndromes in the subjects studied. It suggests that the Toftness system of chiropractic adjusting was safe and effective to use in low back pain and other pain-related conditions. PMID:19674689

Snyder, Brian J.; Zhang, John

2007-01-01

71

Assessing the change in attitudes, knowledge, and perspectives of medical students towards chiropractic after an educational intervention*  

PubMed Central

Objective We assessed the change in attitudes, knowledge, and perspectives of medical students towards chiropractic after a 1-hour educational intervention. Methods A mixed-methods approach was used with a 52-item cross-sectional paper survey and 1 focus group of third-year medical students. The views of these medical students towards chiropractic were assessed previously in their second-year of medical school. ANOVA and the Wilcoxon rank-sum test were used to assess between-group differences between the medical students' views before and after the educational intervention. The constant comparative method for analyzing qualitative data was used to identify emergent themes from the focus group transcript. Results Of 112 third-year medical students, 58 completed the survey (51.7% response rate). The focus group consisted of 6 medical students. Self-reported understanding of chiropractic and number of attitude-positive responses were significantly higher in the group after the educational session. The average number of correct responses assessing knowledge on chiropractic also was significantly higher. Focus group themes were that medical students wanted exposure to chiropractic in clinical settings, had negative attitudes towards chiropractic formed from hidden curriculum, had concerns regarding evidence and safety of chiropractic, and thought that timing of the session on chiropractic was too late in the curriculum. Conclusions The attitudes and knowledge of medical students towards chiropractic improved immediately after a 1-hour educational intervention. Formally educating medical students on chiropractic may help minimize hidden curriculum issues regarding chiropractic, as identified by the medical students, and facilitate collaboration between medical and chiropractic providers. PMID:25237768

Wong, Jessica J.; Di Loreto, Luciano; Kara, Alim; Yu, Kavan; Mattia, Alicia; Soave, David; Weyman, Karen; Kopansky-Giles, Deborah

2014-01-01

72

Student Mental Health in a Chiropractic University Setting  

PubMed Central

Objective: This report is an attempt to frame the types of emotional challenges seen at a university counseling center with a unique population of chiropractic students compared with the normative college population. Methods: The psychological complaints of students were examined to determine the population that has utilized psychological counseling over the last 2 years at this institution. Results: The following issues were identified as the top three presenting concerns for individuals pursuing psychological counseling: mood disorders, relationships, and substance-related disorders. Conclusion: The counseling center's top three issues pursued for counseling are consistent with the research of mental health issues on college campuses. Counseling services at a university are an integral part of the institution, as evidenced by statistics from undergraduate and graduate college settings PMID:18483587

Rubin, Lisa E.

2008-01-01

73

A survey of interprofessional education in chiropractic continuing education in the United States.  

PubMed

Objective : The purpose of this study is to describe the state of chiropractic continuing education vis-à-vis interprofessional education (IPE) with medical doctors (MD) in a survey of a sample of US doctors of chiropractic (DC) and through a review of policies. Methods : Forty-five chiropractors with experience in interprofessional settings completed an electronic survey of their experiences and perceptions regarding DC-MD IPE in chiropractic continuing education (CE). The licensing bodies of the 50 US states and the District of Columbia were queried to assess the applicability of continuing medical education (CME) to chiropractic relicensure. Results : The majority (89.1%) of survey respondents who attend CE-only events reported that they rarely to never experienced MD-IPE at these activities. Survey respondents commonly attended CME-only events, and 84.5% stated that they commonly to very commonly experienced MD-IPE at these activities. More than half (26 of 51) of the licensing bodies did not provide sufficient information to determine if CME was applicable to DC relicensure. Thirteen jurisdictions (25.5%) do not, and 12 jurisdictions (23.5%) do accept CME credits for chiropractic relicensure. Conclusion : The majority of integrated practice DCs we surveyed reported little to no IPE occurring at CE-only events, yet significant IPE occurring at CME events. However, we found only 23.5% of chiropractic licensing bodies allow CME credit to apply to chiropractic relicensure. These factors may hinder DC-MD IPE in continuing education. PMID:24918483

Bednarz, Edward M; Lisi, Anthony J

2014-10-01

74

A survey of interprofessional education in chiropractic continuing education in the United States  

PubMed Central

Objective The purpose of this study is to describe the state of chiropractic continuing education vis-à-vis interprofessional education (IPE) with medical doctors (MD) in a survey of a sample of US doctors of chiropractic (DC) and through a review of policies. Methods Forty-five chiropractors with experience in interprofessional settings completed an electronic survey of their experiences and perceptions regarding DC-MD IPE in chiropractic continuing education (CE). The licensing bodies of the 50 US states and the District of Columbia were queried to assess the applicability of continuing medical education (CME) to chiropractic relicensure. Results The majority (89.1%) of survey respondents who attend CE-only events reported that they rarely to never experienced MD-IPE at these activities. Survey respondents commonly attended CME-only events, and 84.5% stated that they commonly to very commonly experienced MD-IPE at these activities. More than half (26 of 51) of the licensing bodies did not provide sufficient information to determine if CME was applicable to DC relicensure. Thirteen jurisdictions (25.5%) do not, and 12 jurisdictions (23.5%) do accept CME credits for chiropractic relicensure. Conclusion The majority of integrated practice DCs we surveyed reported little to no IPE occurring at CE-only events, yet significant IPE occurring at CME events. However, we found only 23.5% of chiropractic licensing bodies allow CME credit to apply to chiropractic relicensure. These factors may hinder DC-MD IPE in continuing education. PMID:24918483

Bednarz, Edward M.; Lisi, Anthony J.

2014-01-01

75

Assessment and risk reduction of infectious pathogens on chiropractic treatment tables  

PubMed Central

Background To investigate the presence of pathogenic microbes on chiropractic treatment tables in one outpatient teaching clinic. Additional aims were to test inexpensive disinfectants on tables that may kill microbes and suggest infection control measures for chiropractic offices, clinics and classrooms. The aim of the study was to assess the presence of pathogenic microbes on treatment tables in one outpatient teaching clinic and determine a simple behavioral model for infection control including table disinfection and accepted hand washing and sanitizing protocols. Methods 10 treatment tables were selected and sampled for possible microbial flora on face and hand pieces. Samples were cultured on MacConky's agar and mannitol salt agar, labeled and incubated for up to 48 hours. Confirmatory testing of microbes to determine if drug resistant flora were present was performed. Among tables tested, 5 were selected to test disinfectants. One-half of the face piece and 1 hand piece were treated with two different wipes and then post-tested for microbes. Results Pathogenic microbes were present on chiropractic treatment tables including methicillin-resistant Staph aureus. Simple disinfectants neutralized the pathogens. A rudimentary disinfection procedure and infection control measures are suggested based on the findings. Conclusion Pathogenic microbes may be present on chiropractic treatment tables and can be effectively killed with proper disinfecting. Hand washing/sanitizing is an important measure in infection control as is table disinfecting. Rudimentary behavioral changes to improve chiropractic clinic infection control are needed. More comprehensive behavioral models are needed. All teaching clinics and private chiropractic offices should adopt infection control practices including routine table disinfecting and hand sanitizing. Effective measures can be put in place at minimal costs. Accrediting bodies of chiropractic institutions should mandate an infection control plan for member institutions immediately. PMID:17555579

Evans, Marion Willard; Breshears, Jennell; Campbell, Alan; Husbands, Chris; Rupert, Ronald

2007-01-01

76

Supervision of chiropractors: A summary of results from two surveys involving chiropractic supervisors and graduates in England and Sweden  

Microsoft Academic Search

Background: Supervision of newly graduated health care practitioners takes place in many clinical settings, such as in different types of hospital departments, in general practice, and now also within the chiropractic profession. The author conducted an initial study to determine the most important issues regarding the supervision of chiropractic graduates in Sweden. Because it is important to define and discuss

Håkan Sigrell

1999-01-01

77

The learning style preferences of chiropractic students: A cross-sectional study  

PubMed Central

Objective The aims of our study were to measure the learning style preferences of chiropractic students and to assess whether they differ across the 5 years of chiropractic study. Methods A total of 407 (41.4% females) full-degree, undergraduate, and postgraduate students enrolled in an Australian chiropractic program agreed to participate in a cross-sectional survey comprised of basic demographic information and the Visual, Aural, Read/Write, Kinesthetic (VARK) questionnaire, which identifies learning preferences on four different subscales: visual, aural, reading/writing, and kinesthetic. Multivariate analysis of variance and the ?2 test were used to check for differences in continuous (VARK scores) and categorical (VARK category preference) outcome variables. Results The majority of chiropractic students (56.0%) were found to be multimodal learners. Compared to the other learning styles preferences, kinesthetic learning was preferred by a significantly greater proportion of students (65.4%, p < .001) and received a significantly greater mean VARK score (5.66 ± 2.47, p < .001). Conclusions To the best of our knowledge, this is the first time chiropractic students have been shown to be largely multimodal learners with a preference for kinesthetic learning. While this knowledge may be beneficial in the structuring of future curricula, more thorough research must be conducted to show any beneficial relationship between learning style preferences and teaching methods. PMID:24350945

Whillier, Stephney; Lystad, Reidar P.; Abi-Arrage, David; McPhie, Christopher; Johnston, Samara; Williams, Christopher; Rice, Mark

2014-01-01

78

Importance of Building Confidence in Patient Communication and Clinical Skills Among Chiropractic Students  

PubMed Central

Purpose: One important objective of chiropractic education is to foster student professional confidence and competence in patient communication and clinical skills. Therefore, the aim of this article is to review the extant literature on this topic, stressing the significance of building students' confidence for effective practice and the need for more research in this area. Methods: The authors reviewed MEDLINE and ERIC from 1980 through 2008 using several key words pertinent to confidence and health care. Three distinct, but interrelated, bodies of literature were assessed, including professional confidence in health care research, the nature and development of confidence in educational psychology research, and fostering professional confidence in chiropractic education. Results: It was apparent through the review that chiropractic education has developed educational methods and opportunities that may help develop and build student confidence in patient communication and clinical skills. However, there has not been sufficient research to provide empirical evidence of the impact. Conclusion: Fostering chiropractic students' development of confidence in what they say and do is of paramount importance not only to them as new practitioners but more importantly to the patient. There is no doubt that a better understanding of how confidence can be developed and consolidated during tertiary study should be a major goal of chiropractic education PMID:19826543

Hecimovich, Mark D.; Volet, Simone E.

2009-01-01

79

A case of central retinal artery occlusion after chiropractic manipulation of the neck.  

PubMed

Here we report a case of central retinal artery occlusion after chiropractic manipulation on the neck. A 49-year old man presented at the hospital because of sudden visual loss in his right eye after chiropractic neck manipulation. He had received chiropractic manipulation of the neck by a chiropractor eight days prior. When he first visited us, his best corrected visual acuity in his right eye was hand motion. A full ophthalmic examination was performed. There was cherry-red spot in the macula in his right eye. We performed a fluorescein angiogram and cervical color Doppler. The arterio-venous transit time in the fluorescein angiogram was delayed, and we detected stenosis of the right internal carotid artery with diffuse atherosclerotic plaques in the right common carotid artery. We prescribed ginko biloba extract (Tanamin). Three years after his first visit, the best corrected visual acuity of his right eye was 20 / 200. PMID:22511840

Jang, Young-Jun; Chun, Jun-Woo; Lee, Seung-Woo; Kim, Ho-Chang

2012-04-01

80

On Vaccination & Chiropractic: when ideology, history, perception, politics and jurisprudence collide.  

PubMed

The Palmers espoused anti-vaccination opinions in the early part of the 20(th) century, rejecting the germ theory of disease in favor of a worldview that a subluxation-free spine, achieved by spinal adjustments, would result in an unfettered innate intelligence; this, along with other healthful lifestyle choices, would allow a person to thwart disease by marshaling the body's natural recuperative abilities. Some chiropractors continue to staunchly champion the Palmer postulates, while others do not. At the national level, advocacy organizations publish conflicting position statements. We explore how this divisiveness has impacted chiropractic ideology, perceptions among students and practitioners, politics and issues of jurisprudence as reflected by the evolution of a standard of chiropractic practice in at least one Canadian province (Ontario). We opine that the chiropractic profession should champion a health promotion and disease prevention approach to vaccination, which would allow it to align itself with the broader healthcare community while not abandoning its traditional tenets. PMID:23997246

Gleberzon, Brian; Lameris, Marlee; Schmidt, Catherine; Ogrady, Jillian

2013-09-01

81

The effect of low force chiropractic adjustments on body surface electromagnetic field  

PubMed Central

Objective The purpose of this study was to investigate the body surface electromagnetic field (EMF) changes using a sensitive magnetometer before and after a specific Toftness chiropractic adjustment in asymptomatic human subjects. Method Forty-four subjects were randomly assigned into control (20 subjects) and experimental groups (24 subjects) in a pre and post-test design. The Triaxial Fluxgate Magnetometer FGM-5DTAA (Walker Scientific, Worcester, Massachusetts) with five digit display and resolution of 1 nanotesla (nT) was used for EMF detection. The EMF in the research room and on the adjustment table was monitored and recorded. The subjects’ body surface (cervical, thoracic, lumbar and sacral areas) EMF was determined in the prone position before and after the chiropractic adjustment. A low force Toftness chiropractic adjustment was applied to the cervical, thoracic, lumbar and sacral areas as determined by the practitioner. Results The EMF in the research room was recorded as 41611 nT at the Z axis (earth field), 13761 nT at the X axis and 7438 nT at the Y axis. The EMF on the adjusting table changed minimally during the 15 minute observation period. The EMF on the subjects’ body surface decreased at 4 spinal locations after chiropractic adjustment. The EMF (mean ± SD in nT) decreased significantly at the cervical region from 42449 ± 907 to 41643 ± 1165 (p < 0.01) and at the sacral regions from 43206 ± 760 to 42713 ± 552 (p < 0.01). The EMF at the lumbar and thoracic regions decreased but did not reach a statistically significant level. No significant changes of the body surface EMF were found in the control group. Conclusion A low force Toftness chiropractic adjustment in the cervical and sacral areas resulted in a significant reduction of the cervical and sacral surface EMF. No significant body surface EMF changes were observed in the lumbar and thoracic regions. The mechanisms of the EMF reduction after chiropractic adjustment are not known. PMID:17549217

Zhang, John; Snyder, Brian J; Vernor, Lori

2004-01-01

82

Conventional Microscopy vs. Computer Imagery in Chiropractic Education  

PubMed Central

Purpose: As human tissue pathology slides become increasingly difficult to obtain, other methods of teaching microscopy in educational laboratories must be considered. The purpose of this study was to evaluate our students' satisfaction with newly implemented computer imagery based laboratory instruction and to obtain input from their perspective on the advantages and disadvantages of computerized vs. traditional microscope laboratories. Methods: This undertaking involved the creation of a new computer laboratory. Robbins and Cotran Pathologic Basis of Disease, 7th ed, was chosen as the required text which gave students access to the Robbins Pathology website, including complete content of text, Interactive Case Study Companion, and Virtual Microscope. Students had experience with traditional microscopes in their histology and microbiology laboratory courses. Student satisfaction with computer based learning was assessed using a 28 question survey which was administered to three successive trimesters of pathology students (n=193) using the computer survey website Zoomerang. Answers were given on a scale of 1-5 and statistically analyzed using weighted averages. Results: The survey data indicated that students were satisfied with computer based learning activities during pathology laboratory instruction. The most favorable aspect to computer imagery was 24–7 availability (weighted avg. 4.16), followed by clarification offered by accompanying text and captions (weighted avg. 4.08). Conclusion: Although advantages and disadvantages exist in using conventional microscopy and computer imagery, current pathology teaching environments warrant investigation of replacing traditional microscope exercises with computer applications. Chiropractic students supported the adoption of computer-assisted instruction in pathology laboratories PMID:19043534

Cunningham, Christine M.; Larzelere, Elizabeth D.; Arar, Ilija

2008-01-01

83

Chiropractic management of Bell palsy with low level laser and manipulation: a case report  

PubMed Central

Objective The purpose of this case report is to describe chiropractic management including the use of cold laser and chiropractic manipulation in the treatment of a patient with Bell palsy. Clinical features A 40-year-old male patient had a 10-day history of facial paralysis on his left side, including the inability to close his left eye, which also had tearing and a burning sensation. The patient had trouble lifting his left lip and complained of drooling while brushing his teeth. There was no previous history of similar symptoms or a recent infection. Prior treatment had included oral steroids. Intervention and outcome The patient was treated with low-level laser therapy and chiropractic manipulation 2 times in 4 days. The laser was applied along the course of the facial nerve for 30 seconds at each point and for 1 minute at the stylomastoid foramen. The laser used was a GaAs class 4 laser with a wavelength of 910 nm. The patient perceived a 70% to 80% improvement of facial movement after the first treatment. After the second treatment, the patient reported full control of his facial movements. Conclusion A patient with acute facial paralysis appeared to have complete resolution of his symptoms following the application of low-level laser therapy and chiropractic manipulation. PMID:24396332

Rubis, Lisa M.

2013-01-01

84

Faculty of Medicine Canadian Chiropractic Research Foundation Professorship in Epidemiology/Biomechanics  

E-print Network

Faculty of Medicine Canadian Chiropractic Research Foundation Professorship in Epidemiology level in the Discipline of Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, Memorial University of Newfoundland, St. John of Medicine is the largest clinical discipline in the Faculty of Medicine and encompasses areas of Internal

deYoung, Brad

85

Lyman C. Johnston, DC, FICC, FCCS(C): Canadian chiropractic's postural research pioneer and inventive entrepreneur  

PubMed Central

This paper profiles Dr. Lyman Johnston and his contributions in the field of chiropractic research. Postural concepts, diagnostic instruments, therapeutic devices and treatment protocols are reviewed. Set out and briefly discussed are the Posturometer, Pyramidal Man, anterior-posterior gravity line, Postural Spinal Index, tension master, Spine Power Belt and the Mini-Gym. ImagesFigure 1

Brown, Douglas M.

2001-01-01

86

Outcomes for adult scoliosis patients receiving chiropractic rehabilitation: a 24-month retrospective analysis  

PubMed Central

Objectives The purpose of this study was to retrospectively report the results of patients who completed an exercise-based chiropractic program and its potential to alter the natural progression of adult scoliosis at 24 months after the clinic portion of treatment was concluded. Methods A retrospective chart review was conducted at 2 spine clinics in Michigan, USA. Each clinic uses the same chiropractic rehabilitation program to treat patients with adult scoliosis. Multidimensional patient outcomes included radiographic, respiratory, disability, and pain parameters. Outcomes were measured at baseline, at end of active treatment, and at long-term follow-up. Results A total of 28 patients fit the inclusion criteria for the study. The average beginning primary Cobb angle was 44° ± 6°. Patients received the same chiropractic rehabilitation program for approximately 6 months. At the end of active treatment, improvements were recorded in Cobb angle, pain scores, spirometry, and disability rating. All radiographic findings were maintained at 24-month follow-up. Conclusion This report is among the first to demonstrate sustained radiographic, self-rated, and physiologic benefits after treatment ceased. After completion of a multimodal chiropractic rehabilitation treatment, a retrospective cohort of 28 adult scoliosis patients reported improvements in pain, Cobb angle, and disability immediately following the conclusion of treatment and 24 months later. PMID:22014907

Morningstar, Mark W.

2011-01-01

87

The Role of Chiropractic in Traumatic Brain Injury: A Case Study  

Microsoft Academic Search

Objective: To demonstrate the importance of chiropractic care as an integral part of the healing process of a patient with a Traumatic Brain Injury (TBI). Clinical Features: A 55 year old female patient presented to the office with a history of two automobile accidents which had both caused a number of physical symptoms including whiplash, loss of range of motion

Andrea B. Ryan

2007-01-01

88

Familiarity with and Advocacy of Healthy People 2010 Goals by Mississippi Chiropractic Association Members  

Microsoft Academic Search

Objective: The purpose of this study was to determine the familiarity with and stated advocacy of Healthy People 2010 objectives by member doctors of the Mississippi Chiropractic Association (MCA).Methods: Peer experts established face validity of a questionnaire regarding the Leading Health Indicators. This survey was distributed to 157 MCA members in 2009 during a conference and a follow up by

Robert A. Leach; Ronald E. Cossman; Joyce M. Yates

89

Slipped capital femoral epiphysis (SCFE) detected in a chiropractic office: a case report  

Microsoft Academic Search

Objective: To report on a case of slipped capital femoral epiphysis (SCFE), which is a somewhat rare condition but one that can present in a chiropractic clinic, particularly one with a musculoskeletal scope of practice. Case: This is a single case report of a 16-year-old adolescent male patient who presented with an 18-month history of hip pain. Radiographs originally ordered

Peter Emary

2009-01-01

90

Practice patterns of doctors of chiropractic with a pediatric diplomate: a cross-sectional survey  

PubMed Central

Background Complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) is growing in popularity, especially within the pediatric population. Research on CAM practitioners and their specialties, such as pediatrics, is lacking. Within the chiropractic profession, pediatrics is one of the most recently established post-graduate specialty programs. This paper describes the demographic and practice characteristics of doctors of chiropractic with a pediatric diplomate. Methods 218 chiropractors with a pediatric diplomate were invited to complete our survey using either web-based or mailed paper survey methods. Practitioner demographics, practice characteristics, treatment procedures, referral patterns, and patient characteristics were queried with a survey created with the online survey tool, SurveyMonkey©®. Results A total of 135 chiropractors responded (62.2% response rate); they were predominantly female (74%) and white (93%). Techniques most commonly used were Diversified, Activator ®, and Thompson with the addition of cranial and extremity manipulation to their chiropractic treatments. Adjunctive therapies commonly provided to patients included recommendations for activities of daily living, corrective or therapeutic exercise, ice pack\\cryotherapy, and nutritional counseling. Thirty eight percent of respondents' patients were private pay and 23% had private insurance that was not managed care. Pediatrics represented 31% of the survey respondents' patients. Chiropractors also reported 63% of their work time devoted to direct patient care. Health conditions reportedly treated within the pediatric population included back or neck pain, asthma, birth trauma, colic, constipation, ear infection, head or chest cold, and upper respiratory infections. Referrals made to or from these chiropractors were uncommon. Conclusions This mixed mode survey identified similarities and differences between doctors of chiropractic with a pediatric diplomate to other surveys of doctors of chiropractic, CAM professionals, and pediatric healthcare providers. The pediatric diplomate certificate was established in 1993 and provides didactic education over a 2 to 3 year span. The results of this study can be used for historical information as this specialty continues to grow. PMID:20546582

2010-01-01

91

Hangman’s fracture presenting to chiropractic clinic as benign neck pain: a case report  

PubMed Central

Objective The purpose of this study is to report a patient who presented to a chiropractic clinic with benign neck and upper back pain; however, the patient also had a recent hangman’s fracture due to a drunken fall. Clinical features A 40-year-old established patient with neck and upper back pain presented to a chiropractic clinic for care. When questioned about the character and etiology of his pain, he reported that it was no different compared to past presentations, saying “it’s the same as always.” The patient was not questioned about recent trauma and did not report his fall while intoxicated several days prior. After history and examination, the working diagnosis was a low-grade cervical sprain strain with imaging considerations if improvement did not occur quickly as was observed with similar previous presentations. Treatment included chiropractic mobilization of the cervical spine. The following day, the patient reported no improvement. Upon additional questioning, a history of trauma was revealed; and plain radiographic imaging showed a C2 vertebral body fracture. Intervention and outcome Immediate referral and evaluation at a local emergency center revealed not only an unstable C2 fracture but a coronal fracture of the left frontal bone extending into the left temporal bone with an associated right subdural hemorrhage along the right hemisphere and tentorium. The patient was placed in a sterno-occipital-mandibular immobilizer brace and discharged 2 days later. Conclusion Historical experience with similar clinical presentations in established patients can influence health care providers to assume a benign causation of symptoms. Conscious effort must be exerted to treat established patients with typical presentations with the same diligence as those of new patients to a chiropractic clinic. This case illustrates that an unstable fracture and hematoma can present to a chiropractic clinic as a seemingly benign problem. PMID:24396322

Fogeltanz, Kay A.; Ditty, Marc D.; Pursel, Kevin J.

2013-01-01

92

The Nordic maintenance care program – case management of chiropractic patients with low back pain: A survey of Swedish chiropractors  

Microsoft Academic Search

BACKGROUND: Chiropractic treatment for low back pain (LBP) can often be divided into two phases: Initial treatment of the problem to attempt to remove pain and bring it back into its pre-clinical or maximum improvement status, and \\

Iben Axén; Annika Rosenbaum; Andreas Eklund; Laszlo Halasz; Kristian Jørgensen; Peter W Lövgren; Fredrik Lange; Charlotte Leboeuf-Yde

2008-01-01

93

The Perspectives and Practices of Alberta Chiropractors Regarding the Sale of Health Care Products in Chiropractic Offices  

Microsoft Academic Search

ObjectiveThe purpose of this study is to describe the practices and perspectives of doctors of chiropractic in Alberta, Canada, regarding the sale of health products. This practice is considered in terms of ethical principles and professional practice standards.

Stacey A. Page; Jaroslaw P. Grod; D. Gordon McMorland

2011-01-01

94

Outcome measures and their everyday use in chiropractic practice  

PubMed Central

Objectives: To describe the extent to which chiropractors utilize standardized outcome and various clinical measures to systematically document patients’ baseline health status and responses to treatment, with particular consideration being given towards quantifiable outcome instruments. Study design: Cross-sectional mailed survey. Participants: Registered chiropractors in the province of Saskatchewan. Methods: A survey was mailed to all registrants of the Chiropractors’ Association of Saskatchewan. Respondents graded their frequency of using various standardized pencil-and-paper instruments and functional chiropractic, orthopaedic and neurological tests in the contexts of both the initial intake assessment (‘always,’ ‘commonly,’ ‘occasionally,’ or ‘never’) and the course of subsequent treatment (after ‘each visit,’ after ‘9–12 visits,’ ‘annually,’ when patient ‘not responding,’ on ‘dismissal/discharge,’ ‘never’ or for some ‘other’ reason). Data were tabulated for all item and response category combinations as frequencies and percentages using the total sample size as the denominator. Results: Of 164 registered chiropractors, 62 (38%) returned a completed questionnaire. A pain diagram was the most commonly used subjective outcome measure and was administered routinely (either “always” or “commonly”) by 75% of respondents, at either the initial consultation or during a subsequent visit. Numerical rating and visual analogue scales were less popular (routinely used by 59% and 42% respectively). The majority of respondents (80%) seldom (“occasionally” or “never”) used spine pain-specific disability indices such as the Low Back Revised Oswestry, Neck Disability Index or the Roland-Morris Questionnaire. As well, they did not use standardized psychosocial instruments such as the Beck Depression Index, or general health assessment measures such as the SF-36 or SF-12 questionnaire. Neurological testing was the most commonly used objective outcome measure. Most respondents (84% to 95%) indicated that they continually monitored neurological status through dermatomal, manual muscle strength and deep tendon reflex testing. Ranges of motion were routinely measured by 95% of respondents, usually visually (96%) rather than goniometrically or by some other specialized device (7%). Conclusions: Our findings suggest that the majority of chiropractors do not use psychosocial questionnaires or condition-specific disability indices to document baseline or subsequent changes in health status. Chiropractors are more likely to rely on medical history taking and pain drawings during an initial intake assessment, as well as neurological and visually estimated range of motion testing during both initial intake and subsequent treatment visits. PMID:20520756

Hinton, Paul M.; McLeod, Randall; Broker, Blaine; MacLellan, C. Elizabeth

2010-01-01

95

Extending ICPC-2 PLUS terminology to develop a classification system specific for the study of chiropractic encounters  

PubMed Central

Background Typically a large amount of information is collected during healthcare research and this information needs to be organised in a way that will make it manageable and to facilitate clear reporting. The Chiropractic Observation and Analysis STudy (COAST) was a cross sectional observational study that described the clinical practices of chiropractors in Victoria, Australia. To code chiropractic encounters COAST used the International Classification of Primary Care (ICPC-2) with the PLUS general practice clinical terminology to code chiropractic encounters. This paper describes the process by which a chiropractic-profession specific terminology was developed for use in research by expanding the current ICPC-2 PLUS system. Methods The coder referred to the ICPC-2 PLUS system when coding chiropractor recorded encounter details (reasons for encounter, diagnoses/problems and processes of care). The coder used rules and conventions supplied by the Family Medicine Research Unit at the University of Sydney, the developers of the PLUS system. New chiropractic specific terms and codes were created when a relevant term was not available in ICPC-2 PLUS. Results Information was collected from 52 chiropractors who documented 4,464 chiropractor-patient encounters. During the study, 6,225 reasons for encounter and 6,491 diagnoses/problems were documented, coded and analysed; 169 new chiropractic specific terms were added to the ICPC-2 PLUS terminology list. Most new terms were allocated to diagnoses/problems, with reasons for encounter generally well covered in the original ICPC 2 PLUS terminology: 3,074 of the 6,491 (47%) diagnoses/problems and 274 of the 6,225 (4%) reasons for encounter recorded during encounters were coded to a new term. Twenty nine new terms (17%) represented chiropractic processes of care. Conclusion While existing ICPC-2 PLUS terminology could not fully represent chiropractic practice, adding terms specific to chiropractic enabled coding of a large number of chiropractic encounters at the desired level. Further, the new system attempted to record the diversity among chiropractic encounters while enabling generalisation for reporting where required. COAST is ongoing, and as such, any further encounters received from chiropractors will enable addition and refinement of ICPC-2 PLUS (Chiro). More research is needed into the diagnosis/problem descriptions used by chiropractors. PMID:23311664

2013-01-01

96

Reflex control of the spine and posture: a review of the literature from a chiropractic perspective  

PubMed Central

Objective This review details the anatomy and interactions of the postural and somatosensory reflexes. We attempt to identify the important role the nervous system plays in maintaining reflex control of the spine and posture. We also review, illustrate, and discuss how the human vertebral column develops, functions, and adapts to Earth's gravity in an upright position. We identify functional characteristics of the postural reflexes by reporting previous observations of subjects during periods of microgravity or weightlessness. Background Historically, chiropractic has centered around the concept that the nervous system controls and regulates all other bodily systems; and that disruption to normal nervous system function can contribute to a wide variety of common ailments. Surprisingly, the chiropractic literature has paid relatively little attention to the importance of neurological regulation of static upright human posture. With so much information available on how posture may affect health and function, we felt it important to review the neuroanatomical structures and pathways responsible for maintaining the spine and posture. Maintenance of static upright posture is regulated by the nervous system through the various postural reflexes. Hence, from a chiropractic standpoint, it is clinically beneficial to understand how the individual postural reflexes work, as it may explain some of the clinical presentations seen in chiropractic practice. Method We performed a manual search for available relevant textbooks, and a computer search of the MEDLINE, MANTIS, and Index to Chiropractic Literature databases from 1970 to present, using the following key words and phrases: "posture," "ocular," "vestibular," "cervical facet joint," "afferent," "vestibulocollic," "cervicocollic," "postural reflexes," "spaceflight," "microgravity," "weightlessness," "gravity," "posture," and "postural." Studies were selected if they specifically tested any or all of the postural reflexes either in Earth's gravity or in microgravitational environments. Studies testing the function of each postural component, as well as those discussing postural reflex interactions, were also included in this review. Discussion It is quite apparent from the indexed literature we searched that posture is largely maintained by reflexive, involuntary control. While reflexive components for postural control are found in skin and joint receptors, somatic graviceptors, and baroreceptors throughout the body, much of the reflexive postural control mechanisms are housed, or occur, within the head and neck region primarily. We suggest that the postural reflexes may function in a hierarchical fashion. This hierarchy may well be based on the gravity-dependent or gravity-independent nature of each postural reflex. Some or all of these postural reflexes may contribute to the development of a postural body scheme, a conceptual internal representation of the external environment under normal gravity. This model may be the framework through which the postural reflexes anticipate and adapt to new gravitational environments. Conclusion Visual and vestibular input, as well as joint and soft tissue mechanoreceptors, are major players in the regulation of static upright posture. Each of these input sources detects and responds to specific types of postural stimulus and perturbations, and each region has specific pathways by which it communicates with other postural reflexes, as well as higher central nervous system structures. This review of the postural reflex structures and mechanisms adds to the growing body of posture rehabilitation literature relating specifically to chiropractic treatment. Chiropractic interest in these reflexes may enhance the ability of chiropractic physicians to treat and correct global spine and posture disorders. With the knowledge and understanding of these postural reflexes, chiropractors can evaluate spinal configurations not only from a segmental perspective, but can also determine how spinal dysfunction may be the ultimate consequence of maintaining an u

Morningstar, Mark W; Pettibon, Burl R; Schlappi, Heidi; Schlappi, Mark; Ireland, Trevor V

2005-01-01

97

Attitudes towards fibromyalgia: A survey of Canadian chiropractic, naturopathic, physical therapy and occupational therapy students  

PubMed Central

Background The frequent use of chiropractic, naturopathic, and physical and occupational therapy by patients with fibromyalgia has been emphasized repeatedly, but little is known about the attitudes of these therapists towards this challenging condition. Methods We administered a cross-sectional survey to 385 senior Canadian chiropractic, naturopathic, physical and occupational therapy students in their final year of studies, that inquired about attitudes towards the diagnosis and management of fibromyalgia. Results 336 students completed the survey (response rate 87%). While they disagreed about the etiology (primarily psychological 28%, physiological 23%, psychological and physiological 15%, unsure 34%), the majority (58%) reported that fibromyalgia was difficult to manage. Respondants were also conflicted in whether treatment should prioritize symptom relief (65%) or functional gains (85%), with the majority (58%) wanting to do both. The majority of respondents (57%) agreed that there was effective treatment for fibromyalgia and that they possessed the required clinical skills to manage patients (55%). Chiropractic students were most skeptical in regards to fibromyalgia as a useful diagnostic entity, and most likely to endorse a psychological etiology. In our regression model, only training in naturopathic medicine (unstandardized regression coefficient = 0.33; 95% confidence interval = 0.11 to 0.56) and the belief that effective therapies existed (unstandardized regression coefficient = 0.42; 95% confidence interval = 0.30 to 0.54) were associated with greater confidence in managing patients with fibromyalgia. Conclusion The majority of senior Canadian chiropractic, naturopathic, physical and occupational therapy students, and in particular those with naturopathic training, believe that effective treatment for fibromyalgia exists and that they possess the clinical skillset to effectively manage this disorder. The majority place high priority on both symptom relief and functional gains when treating fibromyalgia. PMID:18513441

Busse, Jason W; Kulkarni, Abhaya V; Badwall, Parminder; Guyatt, Gordon H

2008-01-01

98

A Collaborative Approach Between Chiropractic and Dentistry to Address Temporomandibular Dysfunction: A Case Report  

PubMed Central

Objective The purpose of this case report is to describe the chiropractic and dental comanagement of a patient with temporomandibular dysfunction, headaches, and myalgia. Clinical features A 38-year-old black female patient presented for chiropractic care with a chief concern of jaw pain, tinnitus, headaches, and neck and shoulder soreness of 8 months’ duration. The patient rated the pain a 6/10. The patient had a maximum mouth opening of 42 mm, graphed evidence of disk displacement, loss of translation on opening of the right temporomandibular joint viewed on the lateral radiograph, and numerous areas of point tenderness on the Kinnie-Funt Chief Complaint Visual Index. She had decreased lateral cervical flexion. Intervention and outcome Dental treatment consisted of an anterior repositioning splint. Chiropractic care consisted of Activator treatment to the pelvis and the thoracic and cervical spine. Manual manipulation of the temporomandibular joint was performed along with a soft tissue technique intraorally on the lateral pterygoid. Postisometric relaxation in the head and neck region was also done. The patient was treated 6 times over 3 weeks. At the end of treatment, the patient had a pain rating of 0/10, maximum mouth opening of 49 mm, no tender points on the follow-up Kinnie-Funt, and increased cervical range of motion. Conclusion The patient demonstrated increased mouth opening, decreased pain rating, improved Kinnie-Funt visual index, and an increased cervical lateral flexion range of motion after 3 weeks of a combination of chiropractic and dental care. PMID:24711786

Rubis, Lisa M.; Rubis, David; Winchester, Brett

2014-01-01

99

Conservative chiropractic management of urinary incontinence using applied kinesiology: a retrospective case-series report  

PubMed Central

Objective The purpose of this case series is to describe the chiropractic management of 21 patients with daily stress and occasional total urinary incontinence (UI). Clinical Features Twenty-one case files of patients 13 to 90 years of age with UI from a chiropractic clinic were reviewed. The patients had a 4-month to 49-year history of UI and associated muscle dysfunction and low back and/or pelvic pain. Eighteen wore an incontinence pad throughout the day and night at the time of their appointments because of unpredictable UI. Intervention and Outcome Patients were evaluated for muscle impairments in the lumbar spine, pelvis, and pelvic floor and low back and/or hip pain. Positive manual muscle test results of the pelvis, lumbar spine muscles, and pelvic floor muscles were the most common findings. Lumbosacral dysfunction was found in 13 of the cases with pain provocation tests (applied kinesiology sensorimotor challenge); in 8 cases, this sensorimotor challenge was absent. Chiropractic manipulative therapy and soft tissue treatment addressed the soft tissue and articular dysfunctions. Chiropractic manipulative therapy involved high-velocity, low-amplitude manipulation; Cox flexion distraction manipulation; and/or use of a percussion instrument for the treatment of myofascial trigger points. Urinary incontinence symptoms resolved in 10 patients, considerably improved in 7 cases, and slightly improved in 4 cases. Periodic follow-up examinations for the past 6 years, and no less than 2 years, indicate that for each participant in this case-series report, the improvements of UI remained stable. Conclusion The patients reported in this retrospective case series showed improvement in UI symptoms that persisted over time. PMID:22942842

Cuthbert, Scott C.; Rosner, Anthony L.

2012-01-01

100

Chiropractic treatment of postsurgical neck syndrome with mechanical force, manually assisted short-lever spinal adjustments  

Microsoft Academic Search

Objective: To describe a case of postsurgical neck pain, after multiple spinal surgeries, that was successfully treated by chiropractic intervention with instrumental adjustment of the cervical spine. Clinical Features: A 35-year-old woman had chronic neck pain for over 5 years after two separate surgeries of the cervical spine: a diskectomy at C3\\/4 and a fusion at C5\\/6. Surgeries were performed

Bradley S. Polkinghorn; Christopher J. Colloca

2001-01-01

101

Resolution of suckling intolerance in a 6-month-old chiropractic patient  

Microsoft Academic Search

Objective: To discuss the management and resolution of suckling intolerance in a 6-month-old infant. Clinical Features: A 6-month-old boy with a 412-month history of aversion to suckling was evaluated in a chiropractic office. Static and motion palpation and observation detected an abnormal inward dishing at the occipitoparietal junction, as well as upper cervical (C1-C2) asymmetry and fixation. These indicated the

David P. Holtrop

2000-01-01

102

Chiropractic management of a medial meniscus tear in a patient with tibiofemoral degeneration: a case report  

PubMed Central

Objective The purpose of this case report is to describe and discuss the clinical diagnosis of a medial meniscus tear in an older patient using a multimodal management approach provided by a chiropractor. Clinical Features A 60-year-old woman reported to a chiropractic clinic with left knee pain and swelling. The history and physical examination findings suggested a medial meniscus tear, which was confirmed with magnetic resonance imaging. Intervention and Outcome Treatment consisted of therapeutic ultrasound; rest, ice, compression, and elevation protocol; soft tissue therapy using effleurage and lymphatic drainage; chiropractic mechanically assisted adjusting techniques to the left knee using a handheld mechanical thrusting instrument; sports taping applied to assist facilitation of the vastus medialis obliquus; and a specific rehabilitation program aimed at strengthening this musculature. The patient's pain was assessed using a quadruple numeric pain scale. Function of the left knee was examined using McMurray, Apley, and a variation of Helfet orthopedic tests, as well as joint line tenderness. Monitoring was done at the initial consultation and at the sixth and 12th treatments. The patient reported being able to walk, swim, and ride a bicycle asymptomatically. Her pain score at the concluding visit was 16.7%, indicating low-intensity pain. Conclusion This case indicated that conservative management of a meniscus tear through a chiropractic multimodal treatment approach provided an alternative or adjunctive therapy to routine orthopedic surgery for this patient. PMID:22027113

Jarosz, Brett S.; Ames, Rick A.

2010-01-01

103

Chiropractic management of postoperative spine pain: a report of 3 cases  

PubMed Central

Objective The purpose of this case series is to describe chiropractic care including spinal manipulation for 3 patients with postsurgical spine pain. Clinical features Three patients with postsurgical spine pain (1 cervical fusion, 1 lumbar discectomy, and 1 lumbar laminectomy) presented for chiropractic treatment at a major US medical center. Treatment included spinal manipulation and/or flexion-distraction mobilization based on patient response to joint loading strategies. Intervention and outcomes Two patients were treated with high-velocity, low-amplitude spinal manipulation; and 1 patient was treated with flexion-distraction mobilization. Treatment frequency and duration were 4 treatments over 4 weeks for case 1, 17 treatments over 7 years for case 2, and 5 treatments over 5 weeks for case 3. Subjective improvement was noted using numeric pain scores and functional changes; and upon completion, the patients reported being “satisfied” with their overall outcome. One episode of transient benign soreness was noted by 1 patient. No additional adverse events or effects were noted. Conclusion In these 3 cases, patients with postsurgical spine pain responded positively to chiropractic care. Spinal manipulation/mobilization was tolerated without significant adverse effects. PMID:24396317

Coulis, Christopher M.; Lisi, Anthony J.

2013-01-01

104

Chiropractic management of a 47-year-old firefighter with lumbar disk extrusion  

PubMed Central

Abstract Objective This case report describes the effect of exercise-based chiropractic treatment on chronic and intractable low back pain complicated by lumbar disk extrusion. Clinical Features A 47-year–old male firefighter experienced chronic, unresponsive low back pain. Pre- and posttreatment outcome analysis was performed on numeric (0-10) pain scale, functional rating index, and the low back pain Oswestry data. Secondary outcome assessments included a 1-rep maximum leg press, balancing times, push-ups and sit-ups the patient performed in 60 seconds, and radiographic analysis. Intervention and Outcome The patient was treated with Pettibon manipulative and rehabilitative techniques. At 4 weeks, spinal decompression therapy was incorporated. After 12 weeks of treatment, the patient's self-reported numeric pain scale had reduced from 6 to 1. There was also overall improvement in muscular strength, balance times, self-rated functional status, low back Oswestry scores, and lumbar lordosis using pre- and posttreatment radiographic information. Conclusion Comprehensive, exercise-based chiropractic management may contribute to an improvement of physical fitness and to restoration of function, and may be a protective factor for low back injury. This case suggests promising interventions with otherwise intractable low back pain using a multimodal chiropractic approach that includes isometric strengthening, neuromuscular reeducation, and lumbar spinal decompression therapy. PMID:19646377

Schwab, Matthew J.

2008-01-01

105

Development of the 2012 American Chiropractic Board of Sports Physicians position statement on concussion in athletics  

PubMed Central

Objective The purpose of this article is to provide a summary of the development of the American Chiropractic Board of Sports Physicians (ACBSP) Position Statement on Concussion in Athletics regarding the management of concussion in sport and to offer suggestions to qualifying doctors of chiropractic (DCs) to make return-to-play decisions and clarify common concepts pertaining to evaluating and managing concussion in sport. Methods A literature review of position statements from sports medicine organizations was performed. The authors reviewed each statement for content. Key issues in the management of concussion in sport were identified with special consideration to concussion management by DCs. A position statement on the management of concussion in sport was drafted by the authors and submitted to the Board of Directors of the ACBSP for review. The Board of Directors called for minor revision; and after all revisions were made, the document was resubmitted. The Board of Directors of the ACBSP accepted the document for publication and presentation. The document was presented and disseminated to certificants by the ACBSP at the 2011 Chiropractic Sports Sciences Symposium. Results The 2012 ACBSP Position Statement on Concussion in Athletics was accepted by the ACBSP Board of Directors. Conclusion The Position Statement on Concussion in Athletics has been accepted by the ACBSP. This document offers guidance on the management of concussion in sport and provides qualifying DCs information to make return-to-play decisions. PMID:24396329

Moreau, William J.; Nabhan, Dustin C.

2013-01-01

106

Factors Associated with Changes in Knowledge and Attitude towards Public Health Concepts among Chiropractic College Students Enrolled in a Community Health Class  

Microsoft Academic Search

Purpose: This survey was conducted to identify factors that may be associated with changes in knowledge and attitudes towards basic health promotion and public health concepts among chiropractic students enrolled in a course in community health. Methods: Anonymous surveys were conducted of students before and after a second-year chiropractic college course in community health. Results were analyzed using percentages and

Kevin A. Rose; Samir Ayad

2008-01-01

107

Predictors of performance of students in biochemistry in a doctor of chiropractic curriculum.  

PubMed

Objective : This study investigated the effect of completion of course prerequisites, undergraduate grade point average (GPA), undergraduate degree, and study habits on the performance of students in the biochemistry course at Palmer College of Chiropractic Florida. Methods : Students self-reported information regarding academic preparation at the beginning of the semester using a questionnaire. Final exam grade and final course grade were noted and used as measures of performance. Multivariate analysis of variance was used to determine if number of prerequisites completed, undergraduate GPA, undergraduate degree, hours spent studying in undergraduate study, and hours spent studying in the first quarter of the chiropractic program were associated significantly with the biochemistry final exam grade or the final grade for the biochemistry course. Results : The number of prerequisites completed, undergraduate degree, hours spent studying in undergraduate study, and hours spent studying in the first quarter of the chiropractic program did not significantly affect the biochemistry final exam grade or the final grade for the biochemistry course, but undergraduate GPA did. Subsequent univariate analysis and Tukey's post hoc comparisons revealed that students with an undergraduate GPA in the 3.5 to 3.99 range earned significantly higher final course grades than students with an undergraduate GPA in the 2.5 to 2.99 range. Conclusion : No single variable was determined to be a factor that determines student success in biochemistry. The interrelationship between the factors examined warrants further investigation to understand fully how to predict the success of a student in the biochemistry course. PMID:24295362

Shaw, Kathy; Rabatsky, Ali; Dishman, Veronica; Meseke, Christopher

2014-01-01

108

Perception of Educational Environment Among Undergraduate Students in a Chiropractic Training Institution  

PubMed Central

Purpose: The impact of the educational environment in student learning is well documented. However, there is a scarcity in the literature exploring the educational environment in chiropractic training institutions. This study aimed to identify the perceived educational environment in a chiropractic training institution and the possible perceptual differences among different demographic groups. Methods: The perceived educational environment was surveyed using Dundee Ready Education Environment (DREEM), which is a validated, self-administered, and Likert-type inventory. DREEM items focus on subdomains related to learning, teachers, self-confidence, academic atmosphere, and social environment. The results were analyzed and interpreted in relation to standard norms of DREEM and demographic variables. Results: The survey was completed by 124 chiropractic undergraduate students (response rate 83%). Statistically, the inventory items showed high correlation and the subdomains showed a close relationship. Overall the DREEM score was very high: 156.1/200 (78%). The subdomain scores were also at very high levels. However, the scoring of four items by students was consistently poor: lack of a support system for stressed students, 1.8 (SD 1.1); authoritarian teachers, 1.8 (SD 1.2); inadequate school time-tabling, 2.0 (SD 1.1); and overemphasis on factual learning, 2.0 (SD 1.0). There were no statistically significant differences in DREEM scores between gender, age, minority, and ethnicity groups. Conclusions: In general, students perceived that a sound educational environment is fostered by the institution and its educational program for all students despite their demographic variations. However, certain specific elements of the educational process may need to be addressed to improve the educational experience. PMID:22069340

Palmgren, Per J.; Chandratilake, Madawa

2011-01-01

109

The academic legitimization of chiropractic: the case of CMCC and York University  

PubMed Central

Despite the fact that chiropractic has been accepted by more and more Canadians and Americans, it has yet to gain a foothold on a large American or Canadian university campus. In Canada, the primary chiropractic educational institution, the Canadian Memorial Chiropractic College (CMCC), has attempted to affiliate with many universities including the University of Victoria, Brock University, the University of Waterloo, and, most recently, York University. The benefits of association with a university include eligibility for many research grants and academic legitimacy for the profession. While chiropractic has been denied university affiliation, other “subordinate” health occupations, such as nursing and midwifery, are currently taught in Ontario universities. The objective of the current research is to analyse the reasons for the failure of the CMCC to affiliate with York University. The major focus of the investigation is whether CMCC's lack of success can be viewed as a manifestation of the dominance of a medical model at York or whether arguments similar to those raised against CMCC are common in mergers in higher education. The first possibility is consistent with closure theory in general in which professions attempt to limit competition for scarce resources (in this case patients and status), and to the notions of medical dominance and medical sovereignty that are related to closure theory. The second explanation is consistent with “mutual-growth merger theory” in which it is postulated that mergers in higher education are successful when they are of benefit to both parties and a series of steps have been taken ranging from institutional self-assessment, that may involve conducting surveys of the university community, to post-merger consolidation and community building. Overall, it will be argued that the failure of the proposed affiliation is best explained by reference to closure theory, as manifested in medical dominance and medical sovereignty. Because of medical dominance and sovereignty. Because of medical dominance and sovereignty, even if steps consistent with mutual growth merger theory had been followed at York, it is questionable that affiliation would have been successful.

Grayson, J Paul

2002-01-01

110

Complementary and alternative treatment for neck pain: chiropractic, acupuncture, TENS, massage, yoga, Tai Chi, and Feldenkrais.  

PubMed

Of the multitude of treatment options for the management of neck pain, no obvious single treatment modality has been shown to be most efficacious. As such, the clinician should consider alternative treatment modalities if a modality is engaging, available, financially feasible, potentially efficacious, and is low risk for the patient. As evidence-based medicine for neck pain develops, the clinician is faced with the challenge of which treatments to encourage patients to pursue. Treatment modalities explored in this article, including chiropractic, acupuncture, TENS, massage, yoga, Tai Chi, and Feldenkrais, represent reasonable complementary and alternative medicine methods for patients with neck pain. PMID:21824591

Plastaras, Christopher T; Schran, Seth; Kim, Natasha; Sorosky, Susan; Darr, Deborah; Chen, Mary Susan; Lansky, Rebecca

2011-08-01

111

Inappropriate use of the title 'chiropractor' and term 'chiropractic manipulation' in the peer-reviewed biomedical literature  

PubMed Central

Background The misuse of the title 'chiropractor' and term 'chiropractic manipulation', in relation to injury associated with cervical spine manipulation, have previously been reported in the peer-reviewed literature. The objectives of this study were to - 1) Prospectively monitor the peer-reviewed literature for papers reporting an association between chiropractic, or chiropractic manipulation, and injury; 2) Contact lead authors of papers that report such an association in order to determine the basis upon which the title 'chiropractor' and/or term 'chiropractic manipulation' was used; 3) Document the outcome of submission of letters to the editors of journals wherein the title 'chiropractor', and/or term 'chiropractic manipulation', had been misused and resulted in the over-reporting of chiropractic induced injury. Methods One electronic database (PubMed) was monitored prospectively, via monthly PubMed searches, during a 12 month period (June 2003 to May 2004). Once relevant papers were located, they were reviewed. If the qualifications and/or profession of the care provider/s were not apparent, an attempt was made to confirm them via direct e-mail communication with the principal researcher of each respective paper. A letter was then sent to the editor of each involved journal. Results A total of twenty four different cases, spread across six separate publications, were located via the monthly PubMed searches. All twenty four cases took place in one of two European countries. The six publications consisted of four case reports, each containing one patient, one case series, involving twenty relevant cases, and a secondary report that pertained to one of the four case reports. In each of the six publications the authors suggest the care provider was a chiropractor and that each patient received chiropractic manipulation of the cervical spine prior to developing symptoms suggestive of traumatic injury. In two of the four case reports contact with the principal researcher revealed that the care provider was not a chiropractor, as defined by the World Federation of Chiropractic. The authors of the other two case reports did not respond to my communications. In the case series, which involved twenty relevant cases, the principal researcher conceded that the term chiropractor had been inappropriately used and that his case series did not relate to chiropractors who had undergone appropriate formal training. The author of the secondary report, a British Medical Journal editor, conceded that he had misused the title chiropractor. Letters to editors were accepted and published by all four journals to which they were sent. To date one of the four journals has published a correction. Conclusion The results of this year-long prospective review suggests that the words 'chiropractor' and 'chiropractic manipulation' are often used inappropriately by European biomedical researchers when reporting apparent associations between cervical spine manipulation and symptoms suggestive of traumatic injury. Furthermore, in those cases reported here, the spurious use of terminology seems to have passed through the peer-review process without correction. Additionally, these findings provide further preliminary evidence, beyond that already provided by Terrett, that the inappropriate use of the title 'chiropractor' and term 'chiropractic manipulation' may be a significant source of over-reporting of the link between the care provided by chiropractors and injury. Finally, editors of peer-reviewed journals were amenable to publishing 'letters to editors', and to a lesser extent 'corrections', when authors had inappropriately used the title 'chiropractor' and/or term 'chiropractic manipulation'. PMID:16925822

Wenban, Adrian B

2006-01-01

112

Hand Hygiene and Treatment Table Sanitizing in Chiropractic Teaching Institutions: Results of an Education Intervention to Increase Compliance  

Microsoft Academic Search

ObjectiveThe purpose of this study was to test an educational intervention designed to increase hand and treatment table sanitizing on 3 chiropractic college campuses using a theory-based intervention. The second purpose is to see if an increase in observed hand hygiene would be noted as a result of the intervention.

Marion W. Evans Jr.; Michael Ramcharan; Harrison Ndetan; Rod Floyd; Gary Globe; Mark Pfefer; James Brantingham

2009-01-01

113

Chiropractic outcomes managing radiculopathy in a hospital setting: a retrospective review of 162 patients  

PubMed Central

Abstract Objective The objective of this study was to gather descriptive information concerning the clinical outcomes of patients with cervical and lumbar radiculopathy treated with a nonsurgical, chiropractic treatment protocol in combination with other interventions. Methods This is a retrospective review of 162 patients with a working diagnosis of radiculopathy who met the inclusion criteria (312 consecutive patients were screened to obtain the 162 cases). Data reviewed were collected initially, during, and at the end of active treatment. The treatment protocol included chiropractic manipulation, neuromobilization, and exercise stabilization. Pain intensity was measured using the numerical pain rating scale. Results Of the 162 cases reviewed, 85.5% had resolution of their primary subjective radicular complaints. The treatment trial was 9 (mean) treatment sessions. The number of days between the first treatment date and the first symptom improvement was 4.2 days (mean). The change in numeric pain scale between initial and final score was 4.2 (median). There were 10 unresolved cases referred for epidural steroid injection, 10 unresolved cases referred for further medication management, and 3 cases referred for and underwent surgery. Conclusion The conservative management strategy we reviewed in our sample produced favorable outcomes for most of the patients with radiculopathy. The strategy appears to be safe. Randomized clinical trials are needed to separate treatment effectiveness from the natural history of radiculopathy. PMID:19646373

Christensen, Kim D.; Buswell, Kirsten

2008-01-01

114

Carpal tunnel syndrome and the "double crush" hypothesis: a review and implications for chiropractic  

PubMed Central

Upton and McComas claimed that most patients with carpal tunnel syndrome not only have compressive lesions at the wrist, but also show evidence of damage to cervical nerve roots. This "double crush" hypothesis has gained some popularity among chiropractors because it seems to provide a rationale for adjusting the cervical spine in treating carpal tunnel syndrome. Here I examine use of the concept by chiropractors, summarize findings from the literature, and critique several studies aimed at supporting or refuting the hypothesis. Although the hypothesis also has been applied to nerve compressions other than those leading to carpal tunnel syndrome, this discussion mainly examines the original application – "double crush" involving both cervical spinal nerve roots and the carpal tunnel. I consider several categories: experiments to create double crush syndrome in animals, case reports, literature reviews, and alternatives to the original hypothesis. A significant percentage of patients with carpal tunnel syndrome also have neck pain or cervical nerve root compression, but the relationship has not been definitively explained. The original hypothesis remains controversial and is probably not valid, at least for sensory disturbances, in carpal tunnel syndrome. However, even if the original hypothesis is importantly flawed, evaluation of multiple sites still may be valuable. The chiropractic profession should develop theoretical models to relate cervical dysfunction to carpal tunnel syndrome, and might incorporate some alternatives to the original hypothesis. I intend this review as a starting point for practitioners, educators, and students wishing to advance chiropractic concepts in this area. PMID:18426564

Russell, Brent S

2008-01-01

115

A comparative analysis of chiropractic and general practitioner patients in North America: Findings from the joint Canada\\/United States survey of health, 2002–03  

Microsoft Academic Search

BACKGROUND: Scientifically rigorous general population-based studies comparing chiropractic with primary-care medical patients within and between countries have not been published. The objective of this study is to compare care seekers of doctors of chiropractic (DCs) and general practitioners (GPs) in the United States and Canada on a comprehensive set of sociodemographic, quality of life, and health-related variables. METHODS: Data are

Eric L Hurwitz; Lu-May Chiang

2006-01-01

116

The reliability and potential value of a specific ?centre of pressure locator? in chiropractic practice  

PubMed Central

This study assessed the reliability and potential value of a specific Centre of Pressure Locator (COPL) for the initial diagnosis of spinal mal-alignments and for the measurement of change in weight distribution resulting from clinical intervention. Basic validation of the equipment with standard weights showed it to be very precise, reliable and accurate at noting changes in the position of the centre of pressure. Control subjects were used to develop interim norms for COP position and sway. R-L COP position among both controls and patients was found to be too variable to be a useful tool for diagnosis or for the measurement of the effects of intervention. However, the equipment shows promise for the measurement of A-P and R-L postural sway; potentially important variables to consider within chiropractic practice.

De Camillis, David; Carr, Robin

2000-01-01

117

A comparison of quality and satisfaction experiences of patients attending chiropractic and physician offices in Ontario  

PubMed Central

Introduction: Improving the quality of healthcare is a common goal of consumers, providers, payer groups, and governments. There is evidence that patient satisfaction influences the perceptions of the quality of care received. Methods: This exploratory, qualitative study described and analyzed, the similarities and differences in satisfaction and dissatisfaction experiences of patients attending physicians (social justice) and chiropractors (market justice) for healthcare services in Niagara Region, Ontario. Using inductive content analysis the satisfaction and dissatisfaction experiences were themed to develop groups, categories, and sub-categories of quality judgments of care experiences. Results: Study participants experienced both satisfying and dissatisfying critical incidents in the areas of standards of practice, professional and practice attributes, time management, and treatment outcomes. Cost was not a marked source of satisfaction or dissatisfaction. Conclusion: Patients may be more capable of generating quality judgments on the technical aspects of medical and chiropractic care, particularly treatment outcomes and standards of practice, than previously thought. PMID:24587494

Crowther, Edward R.

2014-01-01

118

A narrative review of medical, chiropractic, and alternative health practices in the treatment of primary dysmenorrhea  

PubMed Central

Abstract Objective Primary dysmenorrhea and related issues are discussed as they influence the gynecological and social health of females during adolescence, adulthood, and senior maturity. Health practitioners are exposed to multiple approaches towards the management of menstrual pain. Clinical and social viewpoints target the causation, development, diagnosis, manifestation and management of primary dysmenorrhea. This narrative review includes the topic of the doctor-patient relationship in efforts of cultivating effectively communicative health practitioners. Controversial topics related to primary dysmenorrhea and the quality of life for women are addressed. Data Sources A search for literature reviews, case studies, laboratory research, and clinical trials from 1985–2004 was performed using the MEDLINE database. Sources of additional information included textbooks, national organizational literature and contemporary articles. Discussion Menstrual pain is a prevalent experience yet it is socially taboo for conversation; as such, it poses a hindrance to its management. The communication between the doctor and patient is a critical barrier point between establishing a diagnosis and determining an appropriate treatment plan. A multi-disciple treatment plan varies as much as patients themselves vary in personal experiences, needs, and preferences. Conclusions Medicinal prophylactics, physical therapeutics, non-acidic diets, herbal supplements, eastern therapies and the chiropractic manual adjustments of the spine are effective methods for the management of primary dysmenorrhea. The non-invasive management of primary dysmenorrhea includes the chiropractic adjustment with complimentary modalities, and other alternative health care practices. Medicinal prophylactics are invasive and pose a higher risk to long-term chemical exposure, side effects or irreversible conditions. PMID:19674650

Spears, Lolita G.

2005-01-01

119

Feasibility of using a standardized patient encounter for training chiropractic students in tobacco cessation counseling  

PubMed Central

Objective Although tobacco cessation training is included in many health profession programs, it is not yet routinely incorporated into chiropractic education. The purpose of this study was to assess the feasibility of incorporating a problem-based learning tobacco cessation activity into a lecture course for chiropractic students. Methods Seventy-two students were assigned to participate in two 1-hour lectures on health promotion counseling and tobacco cessation followed by an experiential student-driven lab session using standardized patients at various stages of dependency and willingness to quit. The intervention was based on the transtheoretic model and the “5 A's” of counseling (ask, advise, assess, assist, arrange). Outcomes were assessed via (1) questionnaires completed by the standardized patients regarding the students' use of the 5A's, and (2) questionnaires completed by the students using a 5-point Likert scale of “strongly disagree” to “strongly agree” on the acceptability of this method of learning. Descriptive statistics were computed. Results Sixty-eight students (94%) completed the activity, spending a median of 2.5 minutes with patients. Over 90% addressed 4 of the 5A's: 99% asked patients if they were smokers; 97% advised them to quit; 90% assessed if they were willing to quit; and 99% offered assistance in quitting. Only 79% arranged a follow-up visit. Overall, students expressed a positive response to the experience; 81% said it increased their confidence in being able to advise patients, and 77% felt it would be valuable for use in their future practice. Conclusion This active learning exercise appeared to be a feasible way to introduce tobacco counseling into the curriculum. PMID:23957322

Hawk, Cheryl; Kaeser, Martha A.; Beavers, David V.

2013-01-01

120

A pilot study of a chiropractic intervention for management of chronic myofascial temporomandibular disorder  

PubMed Central

Background Temporomandibular pain has multiple etiologies and a range of therapeutic options. In this pilot study, the authors assessed the feasibility of conducting a larger trial to evaluate chiropractic treatment of temporomandibular disorders (TMDs). Methods The authors assigned 80 participants randomly into one of the following four groups, all of which included a comprehensive self-care program: reversible interocclusal splint therapy (RIST), Activator Method Chiropractic Technique (AMCT) (Activator Methods International, Phoenix), sham AMCT and self-care only. They made assessments at baseline and at month 2 and month 6, including use of the Research Diagnostic Criteria for Temporomandibular Disorders. Results The authors screened 721 potential participants and enrolled 80 people; 52 participants completed the six-month assessment. The adjusted mean change in current pain over six months, as assessed on the 11-point numerical rating scale, was 2.0 (95 percent confidence interval, 1.1-3.0) for RIST, 1.7 (0.9-2.5) for self-care only, 1.5 (0.7-2.4) for AMCT and 1.6 (0.7-2.5) for sham AMCT. The authors also assessed bothersomeness and functionality. Conclusions The authors found the study design and methodology to be manageable. They gained substantial knowledge to aid in conducting a larger study. AMCT, RIST and self-care should be evaluated in a future comparative effectiveness study. Practical Implications. This pilot study was a necessary step to prepare for a larger study that will provide clinicians with information that should be helpful when discussing treatment options for patients with TMD. PMID:24080932

DeVocht, James W.; Goertz, Christine M.; Hondras, Maria A.; Long, Cynthia R.; Schaeffer, Wally; Thomann, Lauren; Spector, Michael; Stanford, Clark M.

2014-01-01

121

Chiropractic management of a patient with postoperative lateral retinacular release using a multimodal approach: a case report  

PubMed Central

Objective The purpose of this case report is to describe a chiropractic rehabilitation program for a patient with postsurgical lateral retinaculum release. Clinical Features A 26-year-old male ice hockey goalie presented 1 month after having lateral retinaculum release surgery for his left knee with residual mild discomfort and edema in his left knee. Intervention and Outcome The patient was treated using a multimodal approach of both passive and active chiropractic care focusing on the restoration of full range of motion, increased proprioception, balance, strength, and endurance to return the patient to competitive ice hockey. Conclusion This case study demonstrated that, after 14 weeks of care, the patient was able to return to ice hockey training with no residual symptoms. PMID:22942841

Solecki, Thomas J.; Hostnik, Kurt D.

2012-01-01

122

Presentation of an 85-Year-Old Woman With Musculoskeletal Pain to a Chiropractic Clinic: A Case of Ischemic Stroke  

PubMed Central

Objective The purpose of this case is to describe a patient who had a stroke preceding a chiropractic appointment and was unaware that the cerebrovascular event had occurred. Clinical features An 85-year-old established patient presented for chiropractic treatment of pain in the left side of the neck, hip, and low back associated with known advanced degenerative spinal disease and lumbar stenosis. On the day of presentation, the patient reported morning nausea, double vision, and right-sided vision loss; she related that she had collided into a car while driving to the appointment. Review of her medical history divulged residual neurological deficits related to a previous subdural hematoma, resulting in craniotomy. Examination revealed a right inferior quadrantanopia in the right eye and right nasal hemianopia in the left eye. Nystagmus was present in the left eye with saccadic intrusion on pursuit right to left. Intervention and outcome The patient was transported immediately to an emergency room,where diagnosis of an Acute infarct in the left cerebrum at the junction of the left occipital, parietal and temporal lobes in the watershed area was confirmed. Conclusion Patients with signs and symptoms of stroke in progress may occasionally present for chiropractic care. It is imperative to complete a thorough history and examination prior to care. PMID:24711785

Liebich, Julia M.; Reinke, Tari S.

2014-01-01

123

Multimodal Chiropractic Care of Pain and Disability for a Patient Diagnosed With Benign Joint Hypermobility Syndrome: A Case Report  

PubMed Central

Objective The purpose of this case report is to describe multimodal chiropractic care of a female patient diagnosed with benign joint hypermobility syndrome (BJHS) and a history of chronic spine pain. Clinical features A 23-year-old white female presented for chiropractic care with chronic low back pain, neck pain, and headaches. The patient was diagnosed with BJHS, including joint hypermobility of her thumbs, elbows, right knee, and lumbopelvic region. A 6-year history of low back pain and varicose veins in her posterior thighs and knees were additional significant diagnostic findings of BJHS. Interventions and outcomes The treatment consisted of spinal and extremity manipulation, Graston technique, and postisometric relaxation combined with sensory motor stimulation and scapular stabilization exercises. The patient was seen 15 times over an 18-week period. After 18 weeks of care, the Revised Oswestry Low Back Questionnaire and Headache Disability Index demonstrated clinically important improvements with her low back pain and headache; but little change was noted in her neck pain as measured by the Neck Disability Index. Conclusion This patient with BJHS who had decreased disability and spine pain improved after a course of multimodal chiropractic care. PMID:24711783

Strunk, Richard G.; Pfefer, Mark T.; Dube, Derrick

2014-01-01

124

Chiropractic management of a postoperative complete anterior cruciate ligament rupture using a multimodal approach: a case report  

PubMed Central

Objective The purpose of this case report is to describe the chiropractic management of a patient who had postoperative reconstructive surgery for an anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) tear. Clinical Features A 25-year-old man experienced a rupture of his left ACL, as well as a bucket-handle tear of the medial meniscus and full-thickness tear within the posterior horn of the lateral meniscus, following direct-contact trauma while playing basketball. Intervention and Outcome Postoperative care included a 12-week functional chiropractic rehabilitation program along with Active Release Technique, Graston Technique, and Kinesio Taping. Following treatment, the patient recorded a 0/10 on the Numeric Pain Scale, recorded improvement on the Patient Specific Functional and Pain Scales, returned to play with no complications, and had complete restoration of range of motion and lower extremity muscle strength. At 1-year follow-up, the patient reported no pain and was fully functional. Conclusion A multimodal approach to the treatment of a postsurgical ACL repair was successful in restoring functional ability, as well as complete subjective pain relief. Chiropractic care may be a beneficial addition to the care of postoperative patients. PMID:22027208

Solecki, Thomas J.; Herbst, Elizabeth M.

2011-01-01

125

Inclusion of chiropractic care in multidisciplinary management of a child with Prader-Willi syndrome: a case report?  

PubMed Central

Abstract Objective The purpose of this paper is to present a case of a child with Prader-Willi syndrome and the observed improvement in the degree of scoliosis, immune function, and behavior documented during the course of her treatment. Clinical Features A 7-year-old girl presented to Kentuckiana Children's Center with a 15° lumbar levoscoliosis and diagnosis of Prader-Willi syndrome. Intervention and Outcome The treatment plan consisted of chiropractic adjustments, craniosacral therapy, movement therapy, and nutritional therapy. Over the course of treatment, her muscle strength, tone, and motor activity increased. She improved in coordination of gait and balance. Over the course of 3 years, her scoliosis decreased to 4° to 5°. Improvements in immune function and a reduction in anxiety type behaviors were documented by the parents and doctor of chiropractic over the course of 5 years. Conclusions This case report describes the improvements and progression of one female child with Prader-Willi syndrome under chiropractic and multidisciplinary care. PMID:19948310

Wittman, Rebekah A.; Vallone, Sharon A.

2009-01-01

126

Self-regulation in a small professional group is an important step toward professionalization: the Chiropractic Association in Singapore  

PubMed Central

Objective The chiropractic profession is immersed in the process of professionalization with particular consideration of self-regulation as an avenue toward state recognition in Singapore. The purpose of this article is to discuss the emergence of chiropractic as a profession in Singapore and the Chiropractic Association (Singapore). Discussion The concept of professionalization is varied and context based, and the institutionalization of formal knowledge plays an important role in the socialization of how a profession forms a unifying identity. The difference in institutional socialization of the professions plays a role in the way a profession is perceived in the hierarchy of societal power. Continuing professional development is an essential part of professionalism and is best done within the realm of self-regulation and autonomous control of the profession itself. Conclusion The social process of professionalization can be a process of internal conflict and external battles almost from the profession's inception with university training only entering late in its development, rather than being a linear development. A sequential progress ensued as with other professions, with the seeking of legal protection and a code of ethics as the final areas reached toward becoming an acknowledged member of the health care system. PMID:22693465

Jorgensen, Anna Maria S.; Sheppard, Lorraine A.

2010-01-01

127

Chiropractic Name techniques in Canada: a continued look at demographic trends and their impact on issues of jurisprudence  

PubMed Central

In a previous article, the author reported on the recommendations gathered from student projects between 1996 and 1999 investigating their preferences for including certain chiropractic Name technique systems into the curriculum at the Canadian Memorial Chiropractic College (CMCC). These results were found to be congruent with the professional treatment technique used by Canadian chiropractors. This article reports on the data obtained during the 2000 and 2001 academic years, comparing these results to those previously gathered. In addition, because of the implementation of a new curriculum during this time period, there was unique opportunity to observe whether or not student perceptions differed between those students in the `old' curricular program, and those students in the `new' curricular program. The results gathered indicate that students in both curricular programs show an interest in learning Thompson Terminal Point, Activator Methods, Gonstead, and Active Release Therapy techniques in the core curriculum, as an elective, or during continuing educational programs provided by the college. Students continue to show less interest in learning CranioSacral Therapy, SacroOccipital Technique, Logan Basic, Applied Kinesiology and Chiropractic BioPhysics. Over time, student interest has moved away from Palmer HIO and other upper cervical techniques, and students show a declining interest in being offered instruction in either Network Spinal Analysis or Torque Release Techniques. Since these findings reflect the practice activities of Canadian chiropractors they may have implications not only towards pedagogical decision-making processes at CMCC, but they may also influence professional standards of care.

Gleberzon, Brain J

2002-01-01

128

Name techniques in Canada: current trends in utilization rates and recommendations for their inclusion at the Canadian Memorial Chiropractic College  

PubMed Central

Since its establishment in 1945, the Canadian Memorial Chiropractic College (CMCC) has predominately adhered to a Diversified model of chiropractic technique in the core curriculum; however, many students and graduates have voiced a desire for greater exposure to chiropractic techniques other than Diversified at CMCC. A course structure is presented that both exposes students to a plethora of different “Name techniques” and provides students with a forum to appraise them critically. The results of a student survey suggested that both of these learning objectives have been successfully met. In addition, an assignment was designed that enabled students to recommend which, if any, “Name techniques” should be included in the curriculum of the College. The recommendations from these assignments were compiled since the 1996/97 academic year. The results indicated an overwhelming demand for the inclusion of Thompson Terminal Point, Gonstead, Activator Methods, Palmer HIO and Active Release Therapy techniques either as part of the core curriculum or in an elective program. These recommendations parallel the practice activities of Canadian chiropractors. Imagesp168-ap168-bp168-cp168-dp168-e

Gleberzon, Brian J.

2000-01-01

129

Chiropractic clinical practice guideline: evidence-based treatment of adult neck pain not due to whiplash  

PubMed Central

OBJECTIVE To provide an evidence-based clinical practice guideline for the chiropractic cervical treatment of adults with acute or chronic neck pain not due to whiplash. This is a considerable health concern considered to be a priority by stakeholders, and about which the scientific information was poorly organized. OPTIONS Cervical treatments: manipulation, mobilization, ischemic pressure, clinic- and home-based exercise, traction, education, low-power laser, massage, transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation, pillows, pulsed electromagnetic therapy, and ultrasound. OUTCOMES The primary outcomes considered were improved (reduced and less intrusive) pain and improved (increased and easier) ranges of motion (ROM) of the adult cervical spine. EVIDENCE An “extraction” team recorded evidence from articles found by literature search teams using 4 separate literature searches, and rated it using a Table adapted from the Oxford Centre for Evidence-based Medicine. The searches were 1) Treatment; August, 2003, using MEDLINE, CINAHL, AMED, MANTIS, ICL, The Cochrane Library (includes CENTRAL), and EBSCO, identified 182 articles. 2) Risk management (adverse events); October, 2004, identified 230 articles and 2 texts. 3) Risk management (dissection); September, 2003, identified 79 articles. 4) Treatment update; a repeat of the treatment search for articles published between September, 2003 and November, 2004 inclusive identified 121 articles. VALUES To enable the search of the literature, the authors (Guidelines Development Committee [GDC]) regarded chiropractic treatment as including elements of “conservative” care in the search strategies, but not in the consideration of the range of chiropractic practice. Also, knowledge based only on clinical experience was considered less valid and reliable than good-caliber evidence, but where the caliber of the relevant evidence was low or it was non-existent, unpublished clinical experience was considered to be equivalent to, or better than the published evidence. REPORTED BENEFITS, HARMS AND COSTS The expected benefits from the recommendations include more rapid recovery from pain, impairment and disability (improved pain and ROM). The GDC identified evidence-based pain benefits from 10 unimodal treatments and more than 7 multimodal treatments. There were no pain benefits from magnets in necklaces, education or relaxation alone, occipital release alone, or head retraction-extension exercise combinations alone. The specificity of the studied treatments meant few studies could be generalized to more than a minority of patients. Adverse events were not addressed in most studies, but where they were, there were none or they were minor. The theoretic harm of vertebral artery dissection (VAD) was not reported, but an analysis suggested that 1 VAD may occur subsequent to 1 million cervical manipulations. Costs were not analyzed in this guideline, but it is the understanding of the GDC that recommendations limiting ineffective care and promoting a more rapid return of patients to full functional capacity will reduce patient costs, as well as increase patient safety and satisfaction. For simplicity, this version of the guideline includes primarily data synthesized across studies (evidence syntheses), whereas the technical and the interactive versions of this guideline (http://ccachiro.org/cpg) also include relevant data from individual studies (evidence extractions). RECOMMENDATIONS The GDC developed treatment, risk-management and research recommendations using the available evidence. Treatment recommendations addressing 13 treatment modalities revolved around a decision algorithm comprising diagnosis (or assessment leading to diagnosis), treatment and reassessment. Several specific variations of modalities of treatment were not recommended. For adverse events not associated with a treatment modality, but that occur in the clinical setting, there was evidence to recommend reconsideration of treatment options or referral to the appropriate health services. For adverse eve

Anderson-Peacock, Elizabeth; Blouin, Jean-Sebastien; Bryans, Roland; Danis, Normand; Furlan, Andrea; Marcoux, Henri; Potter, Brock; Ruegg, Rick; Gross Stein, Janice; White, Eleanor

2005-01-01

130

Separate and Distinct: A Comparison of Scholarly Productivity, Teaching Load, and Compensation of Chiropractic Teaching Faculty to Other Sectors of Higher Education  

PubMed Central

Background: Faculty scholarship, teaching load, and compensation can be indicators of institutional health and can impact curricular quality. Periodic data are published by the US Department of Education for all sectors of higher education, but do not list chiropractic colleges as a separate category. Objective: To report on the scholarly output, teaching load, and compensation of the full-time faculty at one chiropractic college, and to compare those data to national and local norms. Methods: Data on chiropractic faculty were collected from within the institution. External data were collected from the US Department of Education and US Bureau of Labor Statistics. Results: The chiropractic faculty assessed create about one-tenth the scholarly output, carried 2.7 times the course load of external doctoral faculty and 1.4 times the course load typical of 2-year (community) college faculty, received two-thirds the salary typical for all segments of education, and one-half the typical retirement benefits. Conclusion: Results are suggestive of significant deficiencies within chiropractic education that pose risk to the future of the profession.

Ward, Robert W.

2007-01-01

131

A health care system in transformation: making the case for chiropractic  

PubMed Central

There are a number of factors that have conspired to create a crisis in healthcare. In part, the successes of medical science and technologies have been to blame, for they have led to survival where lives would previously have been cut short. An informed public, aware of these technological advances, is demanding access to the best that healthcare has to offer. At the same time the burden of chronic disease in an increasing elderly population has created a marked growth in the need for long term care. Current estimates for expenditure predict a rapid escalation of healthcare costs as a proportion of the GDP of developed nations, yet at the same time a global economic crisis has necessitated dramatic cuts in health budgets. This unsustainable position has led to calls for an urgent transformation in healthcare systems. This commentary explores the present day healthcare crisis and looks at the opportunities for chiropractors as pressure intensifies on politicians and leaders in healthcare to seek innovative solutions to a failing model. Amidst these opportunities, it questions whether the chiropractic profession is ready to accept the challenges that integration into mainstream healthcare will bring and identifies both pathways and potential obstacles to acceptance. PMID:23216921

2012-01-01

132

Audit and feedback intervention: An examination of differences in chiropractic record-keeping compliance  

PubMed Central

Objective The objective of this study was to investigate the association of a clinical documentation quality improvement program using audit–feedback with clinical compliance to indicators of quality chart documentation. Methods This was an analysis of differences between adherence to quality indicators of chiropractic record documentation and audit–feedback intervention (feedback report only vs. feedback report with one-on-one educational consultation) at different campuses. Comparisons among groups were analyzed using analysis of variance (ANOVA), Tukey or Dunnett post hoc tests, and Cohen's d effect size estimates. Results There was a significant increase in the mean percentile compliance in 2 of 5 compliance areas and 1 of 11 compliance objectives. Campus B demonstrated significantly higher levels of compliance relative to campus A and/or campus C in 5 of 5 compliance areas and 7 of 11 compliance objectives. Across-campus comparisons indicated that the compliance area Review (Non-Medicare) Treatment Plan [F(2,18) = 17.537, p < .001] and compliance objective Treatment Plan Goals [F(2,26) = 5.653, p < .001] exhibited the highest practical importance for clinical compliance practice. Conclusions Feedback of performance improved compliance to indicators of quality health record documentation, especially when baseline adherence is relatively low. Required educational consultations with clinicians combined with audit–feedback were no more effective at increasing compliance to indicators of quality health record documentation than audit–feedback alone. PMID:24804561

Homb, Nicole M.; Sheybani, Shayan; Derby, Dustin; Wood, Kurt

2014-01-01

133

Audit and feedback intervention: An examination of differences in chiropractic record-keeping compliance.  

PubMed

Objective : The objective of this study was to investigate the association of a clinical documentation quality improvement program using audit-feedback with clinical compliance to indicators of quality chart documentation. Methods : This was an analysis of differences between adherence to quality indicators of chiropractic record documentation and audit-feedback intervention (feedback report only vs. feedback report with one-on-one educational consultation) at different campuses. Comparisons among groups were analyzed using analysis of variance (ANOVA), Tukey or Dunnett post hoc tests, and Cohen's d effect size estimates. Results : There was a significant increase in the mean percentile compliance in 2 of 5 compliance areas and 1 of 11 compliance objectives. Campus B demonstrated significantly higher levels of compliance relative to campus A and/or campus C in 5 of 5 compliance areas and 7 of 11 compliance objectives. Across-campus comparisons indicated that the compliance area Review (Non-Medicare) Treatment Plan [F(2,18) = 17.537, p < .001] and compliance objective Treatment Plan Goals [F(2,26) = 5.653, p < .001] exhibited the highest practical importance for clinical compliance practice. Conclusions : Feedback of performance improved compliance to indicators of quality health record documentation, especially when baseline adherence is relatively low. Required educational consultations with clinicians combined with audit-feedback were no more effective at increasing compliance to indicators of quality health record documentation than audit-feedback alone. PMID:24804561

Homb, Nicole M; Sheybani, Shayan; Derby, Dustin; Wood, Kurt

2014-10-01

134

Public health advocacy and chiropractic: a guide to helping your community reach its health objectives  

PubMed Central

Abstract Objective Doctors of chiropractic (DCs) provide health educational and promotion efforts in the communities they serve by counseling patients at the individual level. This article outlines a method and model in which DCs can effectively serve as public health advocates within their community. Discussion The social ecological model of health education and health promotion serves as an excellent template for taking into account every antecedent to disease within a community and how to prevent it through health promotion. A step-by-step guide to getting the DC involved in the community can be centered on this model, with the DC serving as a health advocate for his or her community. Resources are provided to assist in this process. Conclusion The DC can and should engage his or her community in areas that are conducive to health through involvement and advocacy roles where these are suitable. A community's health can be enhanced with greater health care provider involvement, and DCs need to consider themselves a part of this process. PMID:19674723

Evans, Marion W.; Williams, Ronald D.; Perko, Michael

2008-01-01

135

Development and Psychometric Evaluation of an Evidence-Based Practice Questionnaire for a Chiropractic Curriculum  

PubMed Central

Objective The purpose of this study was to describe the questionnaire development process for evaluating important elements of an evidence-based practice (EBP) curriculum and to report on initial reliability and validity testing for the primary component of the questionnaire, an EBP knowledge exam. Methods The EBP knowledge test was evaluated with students enrolled in a doctor of chiropractic program. The initial version was tested with a sample of 374 and a revised version with a sample of 196 students. Item performance and reliability were assessed using item difficulty, item discrimination, and internal consistency. An expert panel assessed face and content validity. Results The first version of the knowledge exam demonstrated a low internal consistency (KR20=0.55) and a few items had poor item difficulty and discrimination. This resulted in an expansion in the number of items from 20 to 40, as well as a revision of the poorly performing items from the initial version. The KR20 of the second version was 0.68; 32 items had item difficulties of between 0.20 and 0.80 and 26 items had item discrimination values of 0.20 or greater. Conclusions A questionnaire for evaluating a revised EBP integrated curriculum was developed and evaluated. Psychometric testing of the EBP knowledge component provided some initial evidence for acceptable reliability and validity. PMID:23206964

Leo, Michael; Peterson, David; Haas, Mitchell; LeFebvre, Ron; Bhalerao, Shireesh

2013-01-01

136

Is there a chilly climate? An educational environmental mixed method study in a chiropractic training institution  

PubMed Central

Objective The attitude towards gender in an educational environment has a significant impact on a student's behavior, sense of well-being, and academic performance. Our study aimed to explore the presence and extent of gender-related issues in a chiropractic undergraduate learning environment, which has been a scarcely researched topic in the literature. Methods The Perceived Chilly Climate Scale (PCCS) was used as the initial tool for screening the gender issues among undergraduates. The issues identified were explored further with a series of focus group interviews. Results The PCCS had an 83% response rate. The PCCS score (105/196) indicated the nonexistence of alarming gender-related issues. However, the PCCS score was significantly higher among female than male subjects, immigrants than nonimmigrants, and minorities than majority ethnic groups. Despite high ratings on the questionnaire quantitative findings, the focus groups indicated a good sense of equality, oppression-free environment, and no obvious signs of discrimination. Conclusion The educational environment of the institution concerned was conducive to equality. However, subtle but important gender-, ethnic-, and minority-related issues could be addressed to provide an enhanced educational environment to learners. PMID:23518905

Palmgren, Per J.; Chandratilake, Madawa; Nilsson, Gunnar H.; Laksov, Klara Bolander

2013-01-01

137

Paraplegia in a chiropractic patient secondary to atraumatic dural arteriovenous fistula with perimedullary hypertension: case report  

PubMed Central

Intracranial dural arteriovenous fistulas are abnormal communications between higher-pressure arterial circulation and lower-pressure venous circulation. This abnormal communication can result in important and frequently misdiagnosed neurological abnormalities. A case of rapid onset paraplegia following cervical chiropractic manipulation is reviewed. The patient’s generalized spinal cord edema, lower extremity paraplegia and upper extremity weakness, were initially believed to be a complication of the cervical spinal manipulation that had occurred earlier on the day of admission. Subsequent diagnostic testing determined the patient suffered from impaired circulation of the cervical spinal cord produced by a Type V intracranial arteriovenous fistula and resultant venous hypertension in the pontomesencephalic and anterior spinal veins. The clinical and imaging findings of an intracranial dural arteriovenous fistula with pontomesencephalic venous congestion and paraplegia are reviewed. This case report emphasizes the importance of thorough and serial diagnostic imaging in the presence of sudden onset paraplegia and the potential for error when concluding atypical neurological presentations are the result of therapeutic misadventure. PMID:23830411

2013-01-01

138

Stress in chiropractic education: a student survey of a five-year course.  

PubMed

Objective : Stress encompasses academic issues, such as time management, increased work load, and new subject matter, but cannot be separated from stressors, such as social adjustment and financial pressure. Our study investigated whether perceived level of academic or practical attainment and the method of study were associated with the amount of perceived stress during students" studies. Methods : A semi-structured self-administered questionnaire was piloted and distributed to 134 students at a chiropractic college at the end of a lecture. Results : The survey had a response rate of 81%. Students in their fourth year consistently reported the highest perceived levels of stress, with 81% feeling that their ability to study was affected by their financial situation and 56% felt overwhelmed at their ability to cope with their college workload. All year groups were stressed during their course of studies, but the stressor varies depending on the year of study. Conclusions : Year 4 consistently demonstrated the highest levels of stress. All students, regardless of year group, experienced varying degrees of stress while studying and the central stressor changed depending on the time position within the course. PMID:23957319

Hester, Hilary; Cunliffe, Christina; Hunnisett, Adrian

2013-01-01

139

Upper extremity deep vein thrombosis presenting to a chiropractic clinic: a description of 2 cases  

PubMed Central

Objective The purpose of this case series is to describe the presentation of 2 patients who presented to a chiropractic teaching clinic with Paget-Schroetter syndrome (PSS) and to discuss the potential role for conservative therapy in the management of symptoms. Clinical Features Two patients presented with a vascular and muscular findings suggesting activity-related upper extremity deep vein thrombosis. One patient presented with recent onset of symptoms (pain in the neck with a “pinched nerve sensation” in the left upper trapezius); and the other presented with chronic, low-grade neck pain of 1 year's duration. Intervention and Outcome The initial treatment approach for the patient with acute symptoms included soft tissue therapy. During the second appointment, he was immediately referred for medical evaluation and management because of worsening symptoms. He was diagnosed with thrombus in the left brachial vein, started immediately on a thrombolytic agent, and referred to a thrombosis clinic. Treatment for the second patient with chronic symptoms included soft tissue therapy, spinal manipulative therapy, and active care. Two months after 3 treatments, she reported improved symptoms. She remains under supportive care and has reported continued relief of her symptoms. Conclusion Although a rare condition, PSS has the potential to result in significant morbidity and potentially fatal complications; thus, it is critical that practitioners recognize the signs and symptoms to facilitate appropriate and timely referrals. Clinicians should be aware of the presentation and proposed pathogenesis of PSS, and consider this diagnosis in patients with unilateral upper limb and/or neck pain. PMID:23843762

Stainsby, Brynne E.; Muir, Bradley J.; Miners, Andrew L.

2012-01-01

140

Second prizeThe effectiveness of physical modalities among patients with low back pain randomized to chiropractic care: Findings from the UCLA Low Back Pain Study  

Microsoft Academic Search

Background: Although chiropractors often use physical modalities with spinal manipulation, evidence that modalities yield additional benefits over spinal manipulation alone is lacking. Objective: The purpose of the study was to estimate the net effect of physical modalities on low back pain (LBP) outcomes among chiropractic patients in a managed-care setting. Methods: Fifty percent of the 681 patients participating in a

Eric L. Hurwitz; Hal Morgenstern; Philip Harber; Gerald F. Kominski; Thomas R. Belin; Fei Yu; Alan H. Adams

2002-01-01

141

Expectations of chiropractic treatment: What are the expectations of new patients consulting a chiropractor, and do chiropractors and patients have similar expectations?  

Microsoft Academic Search

Background: There are conflicting views about whether expectation plays a role in patient satisfaction. No studies regarding the importance of patient expectations have been done in the chiropractic field. Objective: To investigate the expectations of new patients consulting a chiropractor and to evaluate differences and similarities in expectations between chiropractors and patients. Design: A questionnaire survey. Study participants: Thirty chiropractors

Håkan Sigrell

2002-01-01

142

Mixed-Methods Research in a Complex Multisite VA Health Services Study: Variations in the Implementation and Characteristics of Chiropractic Services in VA.  

PubMed

Maximizing the quality and benefits of newly established chiropractic services represents an important policy and practice goal for the US Department of Veterans Affairs' healthcare system. Understanding the implementation process and characteristics of new chiropractic clinics and the determinants and consequences of these processes and characteristics is a critical first step in guiding quality improvement. This paper reports insights and lessons learned regarding the successful application of mixed methods research approaches-insights derived from a study of chiropractic clinic implementation and characteristics, Variations in the Implementation and Characteristics of Chiropractic Services in VA (VICCS). Challenges and solutions are presented in areas ranging from selection and recruitment of sites and participants to the collection and analysis of varied data sources. The VICCS study illustrates the importance of several factors in successful mixed-methods approaches, including (1) the importance of a formal, fully developed logic model to identify and link data sources, variables, and outcomes of interest to the study's analysis plan and its data collection instruments and codebook and (2) ensuring that data collection methods, including mixed-methods, match study aims. Overall, successful application of a mixed-methods approach requires careful planning, frequent trade-offs, and complex coding and analysis. PMID:24489589

Khorsan, Raheleh; Cohen, Angela B; Lisi, Anthony J; Smith, Monica M; Delevan, Deborah; Armstrong, Courtney; Mittman, Brian S

2013-01-01

143

Resolution of low back and radicular pain in a 40-year-old male United States Navy Petty Officer after collaborative medical and chiropractic care  

Microsoft Academic Search

ObjectiveThe aim of this study is to describe the interdisciplinary care, including chiropractic services, in a military health care facility of an active duty member of the United States Navy with low back pain, leg pain, and foot numbness.

Gregory R. Lillie

2010-01-01

144

Faculty Perception of and Resistance to Online Education in the Fields of Acupuncture, Chiropractic, and Massage Therapy  

PubMed Central

This paper reports findings of a research study undertaken to determine the attitudes and perceptions of acupuncture, chiropractic, and massage therapy faculty with regard to online learning within their respective disciplines, and to determine how they might be persuaded to teach online. The study surveyed faculty teaching at schools in these three fields and followed up with additional interviews. The study results indicate that, in general, acupuncture, chiropractic, and massage therapy faculty lack awareness of the capabilities of online education and the elements of good online learning. There is also a perception that what they teach cannot be taught online because of its kinesthetic requirements. The faculty hold this perception in spite of the success of medical science and related health care fields in the online environment, and they do not seem to separate the kinesthetic from the didactic. The present study indicates that faculty opinions about online instruction in this alternative type of education range from being willing to look at the potential of online education to outright dismissing it. PMID:21589712

Schwartz, Jan

2010-01-01

145

Acupuncture and chiropractic care for chronic pain in an integrated health plan: a mixed methods study  

PubMed Central

Background Substantial recent research examines the efficacy of many types of complementary and alternative (CAM) therapies. However, outcomes associated with the "real-world" use of CAM has been largely overlooked, despite calls for CAM therapies to be studied in the manner in which they are practiced. Americans seek CAM treatments far more often for chronic musculoskeletal pain (CMP) than for any other condition. Among CAM treatments for CMP, acupuncture and chiropractic (A/C) care are among those with the highest acceptance by physician groups and the best evidence to support their use. Further, recent alarming increases in delivery of opioid treatment and surgical interventions for chronic pain--despite their high costs, potential adverse effects, and modest efficacy--suggests the need to evaluate real world outcomes associated with promising non-pharmacological/non-surgical CAM treatments for CMP, which are often well accepted by patients and increasingly used in the community. Methods/Design This multi-phase, mixed methods study will: (1) conduct a retrospective study using information from electronic medical records (EMRs) of a large HMO to identify unique clusters of patients with CMP (e.g., those with differing demographics, histories of pain condition, use of allopathic and CAM health services, and comorbidity profiles) that may be associated with different propensities for A/C utilization and/or differential outcomes associated with such care; (2) use qualitative interviews to explore allopathic providers' recommendations for A/C and patients' decisions to pursue and retain CAM care; and (3) prospectively evaluate health services/costs and broader clinical and functional outcomes associated with the receipt of A/C relative to carefully matched comparison participants receiving traditional CMP services. Sensitivity analyses will compare methods relying solely on EMR-derived data versus analyses supplementing EMR data with conventionally collected patient and clinician data. Discussion Successful completion of these aggregate aims will provide an evaluation of outcomes associated with the real-world use of A/C services. The trio of retrospective, qualitative, and prospective study will also provide a clearer understanding of the decision-making processes behind the use of A/C for CMP and a transportable methodology that can be applied to other health care settings, CAM treatments, and clinical populations. Trial registration ClinicalTrials.gov: NCT01345409 PMID:22118061

2011-01-01

146

Annotated bibliography of the biomedical literature pertaining to chiropractic, pediatrics and manipulation in relation to the treatment of health conditions  

PubMed Central

Biomedical literature retrieval, both indexed and non-indexed, with respect to the application of manipulative therapy with therapeutic intent and pediatric health conditions (ages 0 to 17 years) yielded 66 discrete documents which met specified inclusion and exclusion criteria. There was one experimental study (RCT’s), 3 observational (cohort, case control) studies and 62 descriptive studies (case series, case reports, surveys, literature reviews). An independent rating panel determined consistency with a modified quality of evidence scale adopted from procedure ratings system 1 of Clinical Guidelines for Chiropractic Practice in Canada. Results indicate minimal Class 1 and Class 2 and some Class 3 evidence for a variety of pediatric conditions utilizing the application of manipulation with therapeutic intent.

Gotlib, Allan C; Beingessner, Melanie

1995-01-01

147

Knowledge and application of correct car seat head restraint usage among chiropractic college interns: a cross-sectional study  

PubMed Central

Summary of background data Cervical spine injuries sustained in rear-end crashes cost at least $7 billion in insurance claims annually in the United States alone. When positioned correctly, head restraint systems have been proven effective in reducing the risk of whiplash associated disorders. Chiropractors should be knowledgeable about the correct use of head restraint systems to educate their patients and thereby prevent or minimize such injuries. Objectives The primary objective of this study was to determine the prevalence of correct positioning of car seat head restraints among the interns at our institution. The secondary objective was to determine the same chiropractic interns’ knowledge of the correct positioning of car seat head restraints. It was hypothesized that 100 percent of interns would have their head restraint correctly positioned within an acceptable range and that all interns would possess the knowledge to instruct patients in the correct positioning of head restraints. Study Design Cross-sectional study of a convenient sample of 30 chiropractic interns from one institution. Methods Interns driving into the parking lot of our health center were asked to volunteer to have measurements taken and to complete a survey. Vertical and horizontal positions of the head restraint were measured using a beam compass. A survey was administered to determine knowledge of correct head restraint position. The results were recorded, entered into a spreadsheet, and analyzed. Results 13.3 percent of subjects knew the recommended vertical distance and only 20 percent of subjects knew the recommended horizontal distance. Chi Square analyses substantiated that the majority of subjects were unaware of guidelines set forth by the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA) for the correct positioning of the head restraint (?2vertical = 16.13, ?2horizontal = 10.80, p <.05). Only 6.7 percent of the subjects positioned their head restraint at the vertical distance of 6 cm or less (p <.05). However, 60 percent of the subjects positioned their head restraint at the recommended horizontal distance of 7 cm or less, but this was no different than could be expected by chance alone (p >.05). Interestingly, the 13.3 percent of the subjects who were aware of the vertical plane recommendations did not correctly position their own head restraint in the vertical plane. Similarly, only half of the subjects who were aware of the horizontal plane recommendations correctly positioned their head restraint in the horizontal plane. The data suggest that chance alone could account for the correct positioning of the head restraint in our subjects. Conclusions The results of this cross-sectional study raise concerns about chiropractic intern knowledge and application of correct head restraint positioning. The importance of chiropractors informing patients of the correct head restraint position should be emphasized in chiropractic education to help minimize or prevent injury in patients involved in motor vehicle collisions. PMID:17549149

Taylor, John AM; Burke, Jeanmarie; Gavencak, John; Panwar, Pervinder

2005-01-01

148

Differentiating intraprofessional attitudes toward paradigms in health care delivery among chiropractic factions: results from a randomly sampled survey  

PubMed Central

Background As health care has increased in complexity and health care teams have been offered as a solution, so too is there an increased need for stronger interprofessional collaboration. However the intraprofessional factions that exist within every profession challenge interprofessional communication through contrary paradigms. As a contender in the conservative spinal health care market, factions within chiropractic that result in unorthodox practice behaviours may compromise interprofessional relations and that profession’s progress toward institutionalization. The purpose of this investigation was to quantify the professional stratification among Canadian chiropractic practitioners and evaluate the practice perceptions of those factions. Methods A stratified random sample of 740 Canadian chiropractors was surveyed to determine faction membership and how professional stratification could be related to views that could be considered unorthodox to current evidence-based care and guidelines. Stratification in practice behaviours is a stated concern of mainstream medicine when considering interprofessional referrals. Results Of 740 deliverable questionnaires, 503 were returned for a response rate of 68%. Less than 20% of chiropractors (18.8%) were aligned with a predefined unorthodox perspective of the conditions they treat. Prediction models suggest that unorthodox perceptions of health practice related to treatment choices, x-ray use and vaccinations were strongly associated with unorthodox group membership (X2 =13.4, p?=?0.0002). Conclusion Chiropractors holding unorthodox views may be identified based on response to specific beliefs that appear to align with unorthodox health practices. Despite continued concerns by mainstream medicine, only a minority of the profession has retained a perspective in contrast to current scientific paradigms. Understanding the profession’s factions is important to the anticipation of care delivery when considering interprofessional referral. PMID:24512507

2014-01-01

149

Effects of chiropractic care on dizziness, neck pain, and balance: a single-group, preexperimental, feasibility study?  

PubMed Central

Abstract Objective This feasibility study was conducted to further the development of a line of investigation into the potential effects of spinal manipulation/manual therapy on cervicogenic dizziness, balance, and neck pain in adults. Methods A single-group, preexperimental, feasibility study was conducted at a chiropractic college health center and a senior fitness center with a target sample size of 20 patients (40 years or older). Patients were treated by either a clinician or a chiropractic student intern for 8 weeks. The Dizziness Handicap Inventory was the primary outcome measurement, with the Short Form Berg Balance Scale (SF-BBS) and the Neck Disability Index used as secondary outcome measurements. Results Twenty-seven patients were recruited over a period of 13 months. Twenty-one patients enrolled in the study; but because of 2 dropouts, 19 patients completed the treatment. A median Dizziness Handicap Inventory change score of +7 points was calculated for those dizziness patients, with 3 patients improving by at least 18 points, indicating a clinically meaningful change. Seven of the 15 patients who performed the SF-BBS attained at least a 4-point improvement with an effect size of 1.2. A median Neck Disability Index change score of +1 was calculated for those patients with neck pain. Twelve minor adverse reactions were reported by 8 patients, with 3 of those reactions lasting longer than 24 hours. Conclusion A large effect size was calculated for the SF-BBS. Most patients demonstrated improved balance, and some showed reduced dizziness and neck pain. Involving interns in care proved feasible. Further studies with comparison groups and larger samples are needed to explore the promising results of this study before any cause and effect relationship can be determined. PMID:19948306

Strunk, Richard G.; Hawk, Cheryl

2009-01-01

150

Effectiveness of an evidence-based chiropractic continuing education workshop on participant knowledge of evidence-based health care  

PubMed Central

Background Chiropractors must continue to learn, develop themselves professionally throughout their careers, and become self-directed and lifelong learners. Using an evidence-based approach increases the probability of optimal patient outcomes. But most chiropractors lack knowledge and interest in evidence-based approaches. The purpose of this study was to develop and measure the effectiveness of evidence-based training for chiropractic practitioners in a continuing education setting. Methods We developed and evaluated a continuing education workshop on evidence-based principles and methods for chiropractic practitioners. Forty-seven chiropractors participated in the training and testing. The course consisted of 12.5 hours of training in which practitioners learned to develop focused questions, search electronic data bases, critically review articles and apply information from the literature to specific clinical questions. Following the workshop, we assessed the program performance through the use of knowledge testing and anonymous presentation quality surveys. Results Eighty-five percent of the participants completed all of the test, survey and data collection items. Pretest knowledge scores (15-item test) were low (47%). Post intervention scores (15-item test) improved with an effect size of 2.0. A 59-item knowledge posttest yielded very good results (mean score 88%). The quality of presentation was rated very good, and most participants (90%) would "definitely recommend" or "recommend" the workshop to a colleague. Conclusion The results of the study suggest that the continuing education course was effective in enhancing knowledge in the evidence-based approach and that the presentation was well accepted. PMID:16930482

Feise, Ronald J; Grod, Jaroslaw P; Taylor-Vaisey, Anne

2006-01-01

151

Rehabilitation - a valuable consideration in acute and chronic neck and low back pain in addition to standard chiropractic management: a case study  

Microsoft Academic Search

A case of chronic neck and low back pain, resistant to standard chiropractic management of manipulation\\/ adjustment and verbal exercise instruction is presented. Identification of psychosocial factors and deconditioning, with a subsequent three month program of in-office rehabilitation including supervised progressive\\/resistance exercises and behavioural therapy was administered in conjunction with spinal manipulation\\/adjustment and passive modalities. The program proved effective in

Dennis H Mizel

1999-01-01

152

Degree of Vertical Integration Between the Undergraduate Program and Clinical Internship With Respect to Cervical and Cranial Diagnostic and Therapeutic Procedures Taught at the Canadian Memorial Chiropractic College  

PubMed Central

Objective: The purpose of this study was to determine if diagnostic and therapeutic procedures for the cervical and cranial spine taught to students during the undergraduate program at Canadian Memorial Chiropractic College are required to be used during their internship by their supervising clinicians and, if so, to what extent these procedures are used. Methods: Course manuals and course syllabi from the Applied Chiropractic and Clinical Diagnosis faculty of the undergraduate chiropractic program for the academic year 2009–2010 were consulted and a list of all diagnostic and therapeutic procedures for the cranial and cervical spine was compiled. This survey asked clinicians to indicate if they themselves used or if they required the students they were supervising to use each procedure listed and, if so, to what extent each procedure was used. Demographic information of each clinician was also obtained. Results: In general, most diagnostic procedures of the head and neck were seldom used, with the exception of postural observation and palpation. By contrast, most cervical orthopaedic tests were often used, with the exception of tests for vertigo. Most therapeutic procedures were used frequently with the exception of prone cervical and “muscle” adjustments. Conclusion: There was a low degree of vertical integration for cranial procedures as compared to a much higher degree of vertical integration for cervical procedures between the undergraduate and clinical internship programs taught. Vertical integration is an important element of curricular planning and these results may be helpful to aid educators to more appropriately allocate classroom instruction PMID:22778531

Leppington, Charmody; Gleberzon, Brian; Fortunato, Lisa; Doucet, Nicolea; Vandervalk, Kyle

2012-01-01

153

Publication rates of abstracts presented at the Association of Chiropractic Colleges Educational Conference/Research Agenda Conference from 2002 to 2008.  

PubMed

Objective : The purposes of this study were to investigate the overall publication rates of presentations at the Association of Chiropractic Colleges Educational Conference/Research Agenda Conference (ACC/RAC) meetings (2002-2008), differences in the publication rates of platform vs poster presentations, and the consistency of the meeting abstract compared to the full-length journal article. Methods : Abstracts were obtained from proceedings published in the Journal of Chiropractic Education. Literature searches using PubMed and the Index to the Chiropractic Literature (ICL) were performed to locate peer-reviewed journal articles based upon those abstracts. Whether the article was based upon a poster or platform presentation, and the congruence of the information in the abstract and article were recorded. Results : We identified 776 proceeding abstracts, 249 of which eventually were published between 2002 and 2012. The overall publication rate was 32.2%. A total of 42.7% of platform presentations eventually were published vs 20.3% of posters. Congruency showed that 43.2% had the same title as the meeting abstract, 59.7% had the same authorship, and 88.8% had the same methods. Conclusion : Publication rates of abstracts from spine and orthopedic surgery national meetings range from 34% to 59%. The ACC/RAC meetings have similar publication rates. More platform than poster presentations reach full publication. The congruency of ACC/RAC abstracts to published articles is higher than national meetings in other fields. PMID:24295363

Bakkum, Barclay W; Chapman, Cynthia; Johnson, Claire

2014-01-01

154

Collaborative Care for Older Adults with low back pain by family medicine physicians and doctors of chiropractic (COCOA): study protocol for a randomized controlled trial  

PubMed Central

Background Low back pain is a prevalent and debilitating condition that affects the health and quality of life of older adults. Older people often consult primary care physicians about back pain, with many also receiving concurrent care from complementary and alternative medicine providers, most commonly doctors of chiropractic. However, a collaborative model of treatment coordination between these two provider groups has yet to be tested. The primary aim of the Collaborative Care for Older Adults Clinical Trial is to develop and evaluate the clinical effectiveness and feasibility of a patient-centered, collaborative care model with family medicine physicians and doctors of chiropractic for the treatment of low back pain in older adults. Methods/design This pragmatic, pilot randomized controlled trial will enroll 120 participants, age 65 years or older with subacute or chronic low back pain lasting at least one month, from a community-based sample in the Quad-Cities, Iowa/Illinois, USA. Eligible participants are allocated in a 1:1:1 ratio to receive 12 weeks of medical care, concurrent medical and chiropractic care, or collaborative medical and chiropractic care. Primary outcomes are self-rated back pain and disability. Secondary outcomes include general and functional health status, symptom bothersomeness, expectations for treatment effectiveness and improvement, fear avoidance behaviors, depression, anxiety, satisfaction, medication use and health care utilization. Treatment safety and adverse events also are monitored. Participant-rated outcome measures are collected via self-reported questionnaires and computer-assisted telephone interviews at baseline, and at 4, 8, 12, 24, 36 and 52 weeks post-randomization. Provider-rated expectations for treatment effectiveness and participant improvement also are evaluated. Process outcomes are assessed through qualitative interviews with study participants and research clinicians, chart audits of progress notes and content analysis of clinical trial notes. Discussion This pragmatic, pilot randomized controlled trial uses a mixed method approach to evaluate the clinical effectiveness, feasibility, and participant and provider perceptions of collaborative care between medical doctors and doctors of chiropractic in the treatment of older adults with low back pain. Trial registration This trial registered in ClinicalTrials.gov on 04 March 2011 with the ID number of NCT01312233. PMID:23324133

2013-01-01

155

Chiropractic spinal manipulative therapy for a geriatric patient with low back pain and comorbidities of cancer, compression fractures, and osteoporosis  

PubMed Central

Objective The purpose of this report is to describe the response of a geriatric patient with low back pain and a history of leukemia, multiple compression fractures, osteoporosis, and degenerative joint disease using Activator chiropractic technique. Case Report An 83-year-old man who is the primary caretaker for his disabled wife had low back pain after lifting her into a truck. The patient had a history of leukemia, multiple compression fractures, osteoporosis, and degenerative joint disease. His Revised Oswestry Low Back Pain Disability Questionnaire was 26%, with a 10/10 pain rating at its worst on the Numeric Pain Scale. The patient presented with a left head tilt, right high shoulder, and right high ilium with anterior translation and flexion of the torso and spasm and tenderness from the lower thoracic spine to lumbar spine. Intervention and Outcome The patient was cared for using Activator Methods protocol. After 8 treatments, the patient was stable and remained stable for 4 months without spasm or tenderness in his spine. His Revised Oswestry score dropped to 6%, with a 4/10 Numeric Pain Scale pain rating when at its worst; and the patient reported being able to take care of his wife. Conclusion The findings of this case suggest that Activator-assisted spinal manipulative therapy had a positive effect on low back pain and function in an elderly patient with a complex clinical history. PMID:22942837

Roberts, Jan A.; Wolfe, Tristy M.

2012-01-01

156

Training and certification of doctors of chiropractic in delivering manual cervical traction forces: Results of a longitudinal observational study  

PubMed Central

Objective Doctors of chiropractic (DCs) use manual cervical distraction to treat patients with neck pain. Previous research demonstrates variability in traction forces generated by different DCs. This article reports on a training protocol and monthly certification process using bioengineering technology to standardize cervical traction force delivery among clinicians. Methods This longitudinal observational study evaluated a training and certification process for DCs who provided force-based manual cervical distraction during a randomized clinical trial. The DCs completed a 7-week initial training that included instructional lectures, observation, and guided practice by a clinical expert, followed by 3 hours of weekly practice sessions delivering the technique to asymptomatic volunteers who served as simulated patients. An instrument-modified table and computer software provided the DCs with real-time audible and visual feedback on the traction forces they generated and graphical displays of the magnitude of traction forces as a function of time immediately after the delivery of the treatment. The DCs completed monthly certifications on traction force delivery throughout the trial. Descriptive accounts of certification attempts are provided. Results Two DCs achieved certification in traction force delivery over 10 consecutive months. No certification required more than 3 attempts at C5 and occiput contacts for 3 force ranges (0–20 N, 21–50 N, and 51–100 N). Conclusions This study demonstrates the feasibility of a training protocol and certification process using bioengineering technology for training DCs to deliver manual cervical distraction within specified traction force ranges over a 10-month period. PMID:25237767

Gudavalli, Maruti Ram; Vining, Robert D.; Salsbury, Stacie A.; Goertz, Christine M.

2014-01-01

157

Chiropractic management using a brain-based model of care for a 15-year-old adolescent boy with migraine headaches and behavioral and learning difficulties: a case report  

PubMed Central

Objective The purpose of this report is to describe chiropractic management, using a brain-based model of care, of a teen who had migraine headaches and several social and learning difficulties. Clinical features A 15-year-old adolescent boy with a chronic history of migraines and more than 10 years of learning and behavioral difficulties, including attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder, obsessive compulsive disorder, and Tourette syndrome, presented for chiropractic care. Intervention and outcome The patient received spinal manipulation and was given home physical coordination activities that were contralateral to the side of the involved basal ganglia and ipsilateral to the involved cerebellum, along with interactive metronome training. Quantitative changes were noted in neurological soft signs, tests of variables of attention Conners’ Parent Rating Scale, the California Achievement Test, grade point, and reduction of medications. The patient reported qualitative improvements in tics, attention, reading, vision, health, relationships with his peers and his family, and self-esteem. Conclusion The patient with migraine headaches and learning difficulties responded well to the course of chiropractic care. This study suggests that there may be value in a brain-based model of care in the chiropractic management of conditions that are beyond musculoskeletal in nature. PMID:24396330

Kuhn, Kurt W.; Cambron, Jerrilyn

2013-01-01

158

Chiropractic management using Cox cervical flexion-distraction technique for a disk herniation with left foraminal narrowing in a 64-year-old man  

PubMed Central

Objective The purpose of this case report is to describe chiropractic management of a patient with a C6/C7 left posteromedial disk herniation with foraminal narrowing and concomitant neurological compromise in the form of left upper extremity radiating pain and hypoesthesia/anesthesia using Cox flexion-distraction technique. Clinical Features A 64-year-old man presented to a chiropractic clinic with complaints of neck/left shoulder pain and hypoesthesia/anesthesia into the palmar side of his left hand. Magnetic resonance images of the cervical spine revealed a left posteromedial C6/C7 disk herniation along with foraminal narrowing. In addition, there were other levels of degeneration, most noted at the C3/C4 spinal level, which also had significant left-sided foraminal narrowing. Intervention and Outcome Treatment included Cox flexion-distraction protocols aimed to reduce nerve root compression along with supportive physiological therapeutic interventions to aid with pain reduction and functional improvement. The patient was treated a total of 10 times over a course of 4 weeks. The patient reported being pain-free and fully functional 8 months following the conclusion of care. Conclusion This case study demonstrated the use of Cox flexion-distraction for treatment of a patient with a cervical disk herniation, foraminal narrowing, and associated radiating pain and radiculopathy in the left upper extremity. PMID:22654692

Manison, Allen M.

2011-01-01

159

The rationale for primary spine care employing biopsychosocial, stratified and diagnosis-based care-pathways at a chiropractic college public clinic: a literature review  

PubMed Central

Current management practices for low back pain have led to rising costs without evidence of improvement in the quality of care. Low back pain remains a diagnostic and management challenge for practitioners of many types and is now thought to be a leading global cause of disability. Beyond many published clinical practice guidelines, there are emerging, evidence-based care-pathways including stratification according to the patient's prognosis, classification-based management, diagnosis-based clinical decision guides and biopsychosocial models of care. A proposed solution for successfully addressing low back pain is to train residents at a chiropractic college public clinic to function as primary spine care practitioners, employing evidence-based care-pathways. The rationale for such is described with expected benefits to patient care, improved financial health of medical delivery systems and the training of chiropractors to successfully fill a niche in the healthcare system. PMID:23758900

2013-01-01

160

A survey of Fellows in the College of Chiropractic Sports Sciences (Canada): their intervention practices and intended therapeutic outcomes when treating athletes  

PubMed Central

Objective To compile baseline data regarding the treatment practices and therapeutic outcomes that fellows of the College of Chiropractic Sports Sciences Canada (CCSS(C)) strive for when treating athletes. Design Cross-sectional self-report mail out survey of CCSS(C) fellows. Participants Current registered fellows of the CCSS(C) as determined by the College at the time of survey distribution. Results The majority of questioned fellows believe that they can cause direct and specific improvements in an athlete’s sport performance. The most commonly utilized therapeutic intervention was spinal joint manipulation/mobilization. The most anticipated outcomes following the treatment of athletes with the goal of affecting athletic performance were “changing or improving aberrant body mechanics,” “restoring or improving aberrant muscle function,” and “improving joint function or reducing joint dysfunction.” Conclusion The majority of respondent fellows of the CCSS(C) believe their therapy to be effective in enhancing an athlete’s sport performance. PMID:21120021

Miners, Andrew L.; deGraauw, Christopher

2010-01-01

161

The provision of chiropractic, physiotherapy and osteopathic services within the Australian private health-care system: a report of recent trends  

PubMed Central

Background Chiropractors, physiotherapists, and osteopaths receive training in the diagnosis and management of musculoskeletal conditions. As a result there is considerable overlap in the types of conditions that are encountered clinically by these practitioners. In Australia, the majority of benefits paid for these services come from the private sector. The purpose of this article is to quantify and describe the development in service utilization and the cost of benefits paid to users of these healthcare services by private health insurers. An exploration of the factors that may have influenced the observed trends is also presented. Methods A review of data from the Australian Bureau of Statistics, Australian Health Practitioner Regulation Agency, and the Australian Government Private Health Insurance Administration Council was conducted. An analysis of chiropractic, physiotherapy and osteopathic service utilisation and cost of service utilisation trend was performed along with the level of benefits and services over time. Results In 2012, the number of physiotherapists working in the private sector was 2.9 times larger than that of chiropractic, and 7.8 times that of the osteopathic profession. The total number of services provided by chiropractors, physiotherapists, and osteopaths increased steadily over the past 15 years. For the majority of this period, chiropractors provided more services than the other two professions. The average number of services provided by chiropractors was approximately two and a half times that of physiotherapists and four and a half times that of osteopaths. Conclusions This study highlights a clear disparity in the average number of services provided by chiropractors, physiotherapists, and osteopaths in the private sector in Australia over the last 15 years. Further research is required to explain these observed differences and to determine whether a similar trend exists in patients who do not have private health insurance cover. PMID:24428934

2014-01-01

162

Perspectives of older adults on co-management of low back pain by doctors of chiropractic and family medicine physicians: a focus group study  

PubMed Central

Background While older adults may seek care for low back pain (LBP) from both medical doctors (MDs) and doctors of chiropractic (DCs), co-management between these providers is uncommon. The purposes of this study were to describe the preferences of older adults for LBP co-management by MDs and DCs and to identify their concerns for receiving care under such a treatment model. Methods We conducted 10 focus groups with 48 older adults who received LBP care in the past year. Interviews explored participants’ care seeking experiences, co-management preferences, and perceived challenges to successful implementation of a MD-DC co-management model. We analyzed the qualitative data using thematic content analysis. Results Older adults considered LBP co-management by MDs and DCs a positive approach as the professions have complementary strengths. Participants wanted providers who worked in a co-management model to talk openly and honestly about LBP, offer clear and consistent recommendations about treatment, and provide individualized care. Facilitators of MD-DC co-management included collegial relationships between providers, arrangements between doctors to support interdisciplinary referral, computer systems that allowed exchange of health information between clinics, and practice settings where providers worked in one location. Perceived barriers to the co-management of LBP included the financial costs associated with receiving care from multiple providers concurrently, duplication of tests or imaging, scheduling and transportation problems, and potential side effects of medication and chiropractic care. A few participants expressed concern that some providers would not support a patient-preferred co-managed care model. Conclusions Older adults are interested in receiving LBP treatment co-managed by MDs and DCs. Older adults considered patient-centered communication, collegial interdisciplinary interactions between these providers, and administrative supports such as scheduling systems and health record sharing as key components for successful LBP co-management. PMID:24040970

2013-01-01

163

Brief screening questions for depression in chiropractic patients with low back pain: identification of potentially useful questions and test of their predictive capacity  

PubMed Central

Background Depression is an important prognostic factor in low back pain (LBP) that appears to be infrequent in chiropractic populations. Identification of depression in few patients would consequently implicate screening of many. It is therefore desirable to have brief screening tools for depression. The objective of this study was to investigate if one or two items from the Major Depression Inventory (MDI) could be a reasonable substitute for the complete scale. Methods The MDI was completed by 925 patients consulting a chiropractor due to a new episode of LBP. Outcome measures were LBP intensity and activity limitation at 3-months and 12-months follow-up. Single items on the MDI that correlated strongest and explained most variance in the total score were tested for associations with outcome. Finally, the predictive capacity was compared between the total scale and the items that showed the strongest associations with outcome measures. Results In this cohort 9% had signs of depression. The total MDI was significantly associated with outcome but explained very little of the variance in outcome. Four single items performed comparable to the total scale as prognostic factors. Items 1 and 3 explained the most variance in all outcome measures, and their predictive accuracies in terms of area under the curve were at least as high as for the categorised complete scale. Conclusions Baseline depression measured by the MDI was associated with a worse outcome in chiropractic patients with LBP. A single item (no. 1 or 3) was a reasonable substitute for the entire scale when screening for depression as a prognostic factor. PMID:24438448

2014-01-01

164

Your First Chiropractic Visit  

MedlinePLUS

... be asked to provide family medical history, any pre-existing medical conditions or prior injuries, and previous ... including therapeutic ultrasound, electrical muscle stimulation, ice and heat, traction, soft-tissue massage, and rehabilitative exercises, may ...

165

Degree of Vertical Integration Between the Undergraduate Program and Clinical Internship with Respect to Lumbopelvic Diagnostic and Therapeutic Procedures Taught at the Canadian Memorial Chiropractic College  

PubMed Central

Purpose: The objective of this study was to determine to what extent the diagnostic and therapeutic procedures taught in the undergraduate program used for patients with lumbopelvic conditions are expected to be utilized by students during their clinical internship program at Canadian Memorial Chiropractic College or are being used by the clinical faculty. Methods: A confidential survey was distributed to clinical faculty at the college. It consisted of a list of diagnostic and therapeutic procedures used for lumbopelvic conditions taught at that college. Clinicians were asked to indicate the frequency with which they performed or they required students to perform each item. Results: Seventeen of 23 clinicians responded. The following procedures were most likely required to be performed by clinicians: posture; ranges of motion; lower limb sensory, motor, and reflex testing; and core orthopedic tests. The following were less likely to be required to be performed: Waddell testing, Schober's test, Gillet tests, and abdominal palpation. Students were expected to perform (or clinicians performed) most of the mobilization (in particular, iliocostal, iliotransverse, and iliofemoral) and spinal manipulative therapies (in particular, the procedures referred to as the lumbar roll, lumbar pull/hook, and upper sacroiliac) taught at the college. Conclusion: This study suggests that there was considerable, but not complete, vertical integration between the undergraduate and clinical education program at this college. PMID:20480014

Vermet, Shannon; McGinnis, Karen; Boodham, Melissa; Gleberzon, Brian J.

2010-01-01

166

Individualized chiropractic and integrative care for low back pain: the design of a randomized clinical trial using a mixed-methods approach  

PubMed Central

Background Low back pain (LBP) is a prevalent and costly condition in the United States. Evidence suggests there is no one treatment which is best for all patients, but instead several viable treatment options. Additionally, multidisciplinary management of LBP may be more effective than monodisciplinary care. An integrative model that includes both complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) and conventional therapies, while also incorporating patient choice, has yet to be tested for chronic LBP. The primary aim of this study is to determine the relative clinical effectiveness of 1) monodisciplinary chiropractic care and 2) multidisciplinary integrative care in 200 adults with non-acute LBP, in both the short-term (after 12 weeks) and long-term (after 52 weeks). The primary outcome measure is patient-rated back pain. Secondary aims compare the treatment approaches in terms of frequency of symptoms, low back disability, fear avoidance, self-efficacy, general health status, improvement, satisfaction, work loss, medication use, lumbar dynamic motion, and torso muscle endurance. Patients' and providers' perceptions of treatment will be described using qualitative methods, and cost-effectiveness and cost utility will be assessed. Methods and Design This paper describes the design of a randomized clinical trial (RCT), with cost-effectiveness and qualitative studies conducted alongside the RCT. Two hundred participants ages 18 and older are being recruited and randomized to one of two 12-week treatment interventions. Patient-rated outcome measures are collected via self-report questionnaires at baseline, and at 4, 12, 26, and 52 weeks post-randomization. Objective outcome measures are assessed at baseline and 12 weeks by examiners blinded to treatment assignment. Health care cost data is collected by self-report questionnaires and treatment records during the intervention phase and by monthly phone interviews thereafter. Qualitative interviews, using a semi-structured format, are conducted with patients at the end of the 12-week treatment period and also with providers at the end of the trial. Discussion This mixed-methods randomized clinical trial assesses clinical effectiveness, cost-effectiveness, and patients' and providers' perceptions of care, in treating non-acute LBP through evidence-based individualized care delivered by monodisciplinary or multidisciplinary care teams. Trial registration ClinicalTrials.gov NCT00567333 PMID:20210996

2010-01-01

167

The psychometric profile of chiropractic patients in Norway and England: using and comparing the generic versions of the STarT Back 5-item screening tool and the Bournemouth Questionnaire  

PubMed Central

Background Musculoskeletal pain and low back pain (LBP) in particular is one of the more costly health challenges to society. The STarT Back Tool (SBT) has been developed in the UK with a view to identifying subgroups of LBP patients in order to guide more cost effective care decisions. The Bournemouth Questionnaire (BQ) is a validated multidimensional patient reported outcome measure (PROM) that is widely used in routine clinical practice settings. This study sets out to describe and compare SBT and BQ scores within and between populations of patients presenting for chiropractic care in Norway and Great Britain. Methods Patient demographics, BQ and the 5-item generic condition SBT data were collected from patients presenting with musculoskeletal pain to 18 Norwegian and 12 English chiropractors. Analysis of correlation between groups was achieved using a 1-way Chi2 approximation (p < 0.05). Results Eleven percent of Norwegian LBP patients (n = 214) and 24% of English LBP patients (n = 186) were “distressed by their condition” (SBT > 4). By comparison, Norwegian chiropractic patients are: somewhat younger, have lower BQ scores, are less distressed by the condition and score significantly lower on items relating to catastrophisation and depression than English patients. There was an apparent association between total BQ and SBT scores (correlation 0.59, p < .0001) and patients who scored higher than 45 (IQR 39–58) on BQ were more likely to respond “distressed by condition” (>4) on SBT. Furthermore, patients in “distressed by condition” SBT category who had marked the “low mood” question on SBT also had a high score on the “depression” question of BQ (>6 (IQR 4–8), correlation 0.54, p < .0001). Conclusion The BQ and SBT appear to identify the same subgroups in some, but not all of the measured items. It appears that unknown factors result in variations between patients seeking chiropractic care for comparable complaints in primary care in England vs Norway. Comparison of populations from Norway and UK demonstrate that extrapolating and pooling of data in relation to different populations should be done with caution, in regard to these stratification tools. PMID:24268179

2013-01-01

168

Frequently Asked Questions about Chiropractic  

MedlinePLUS

... remarkably safe procedure. Some reports have associated high-velocity upper neck manipulation with a certain rare kind ... the incidence of artery injuries associated with high-velocity upper neck manipulation is extremely rare—about one ...

169

Chiropractic: A Safe Treatment Option  

MedlinePLUS

... procedure. While some reports have associated upper high-velocity neck manipulation with a certain kind of stroke, ... the incidence of artery injuries associated with high-velocity upper neck manipulation is extremely rare – about 1 ...

170

Frequency of use of diagnostic and manual therapeutic procedures of the spine taught at the Canadian Memorial Chiropractic College: A preliminary survey of Ontario chiropractors. Part 1 - practice characteristics and demographic profiles  

PubMed Central

Background: Students learn a plethora of physical examination and manual therapy procedures over the course of their chiropractic education. However, it is uncertain to what extent they continue to use these procedures in practice after graduation. Objective: The purpose of this study was to determine which diagnostic and therapeutic procedures of the spine are most commonly utilized by chiropractors practicing in Ontario. In Part 1 of this study (presented here), the demographics and practice patterns of the respondents are presented. Part 2 of this study will present the results of the utilization rates of diagnostic and therapeutic procedures used by respondents. Methods: The study consisted of a paper-based survey that was sent to 500 pseudo-randomly selected Ontario chiropractors who responded confidentially. Survey questions inquired into demographic and practice style characteristics. Results: There were 108 respondents to the survey, giving a response rate of 22.4%. Many chiropractors self-identified themselves with more than one practice style characteristic such as 72.4% of the self-described pain-based chiropractors who also described themselves as evidence-based, compared with 51.9% of subluxation-based chiropractors who also described themselves as evidence-based. Diversified technique was the most commonly employed technique used by 90.7% of respondents, followed by trigger point therapy indicated by 57.4% of respondents. Conclusions: Despite a low response rate, respondents reported practice characteristics in this study that were similar to practice characteristics previously published, particularly in terms of professional demographics and techniques employed. While Diversified was the most commonly used technique, respondents reported higher levels of use of proprietary soft tissue techniques systems and upper cervical techniques than have been previously reported. PMID:23482716

Gleberzon, Brian; Stuber, Kent

2013-01-01

171

Stability: from biomechanical concept to chiropractic practice  

PubMed Central

This paper formalizes stability in a clinician-friendly way and then discusses ways for chiropractors to ensure stability of spinal joints that may have their stability compromized from manipulation. ImagesFigure 1Figure 4Figure 5Figure 6Figure 7

McGill, Stuart M

1999-01-01

172

Approach to low back pain. Chiropractic.  

PubMed

Case study. A man aged 42 years, who works as a police officer, presented with severe lower back pain, which he had experienced for 24 hours after spending the previous day helping his brother to move house. He had difficulty ambulating and most movements aggravated the pain. There were no lower limb symptoms and no red flags present on history or examination. He was otherwise well and was not taking any regular medications. PMID:24563894

French, Simon; Werth, Peter; Walker, Bruce

2014-01-01

173

Ross E. Baker, DC: A Canadian chiropractic survivor.  

PubMed

This paper is an historical biography of a fortunate man. It begins with a glimpse of Ross E. Baker's origins in south-western Ontario, watches him going to school and working in Hamilton before joining the Canadian Army and shipping off to Europe to fight in the Second World War. At War's end, the article picks up Dr. Baker as he comes home, starts a family, becomes a chiropractor and sustains a viable practice. Now in the twilight of life, the good doctor is last seen content with his retirement, spending days at his cottage property, reviewing his memoirs and reflecting on the tumult, terror and eventual triumph of the D-Day landing at Normandy. PMID:24587499

Brown, Douglas M

2014-03-01

174

Ross E. Baker, DC: A Canadian chiropractic survivor  

PubMed Central

This paper is an historical biography of a fortunate man. It begins with a glimpse of Ross E. Baker’s origins in south-western Ontario, watches him going to school and working in Hamilton before joining the Canadian Army and shipping off to Europe to fight in the Second World War. At War’s end, the article picks up Dr. Baker as he comes home, starts a family, becomes a chiropractor and sustains a viable practice. Now in the twilight of life, the good doctor is last seen content with his retirement, spending days at his cottage property, reviewing his memoirs and reflecting on the tumult, terror and eventual triumph of the D-Day landing at Normandy. PMID:24587499

Brown, Douglas M.

2014-01-01

175

Useful Websites Useful Websites  

E-print Network

resources for Pre ­Health Profession students. The Pre-Health Professions Office continually adds for the Health Professions NAAHP Main Page Chiropractic American Chiropractic Association Chiropractic: Educational Agencies and Schools Student Canadian Chiropractic Association Home Page Federation

Fernandez, Eduardo

176

Chiropractic management of shoulder pain and dysfunction of myofascial origin using ischemic compression techniques  

PubMed Central

Shoulder pain and dysfunction is a chief complaint commonly presenting to a chiropractor's office. The purpose of this article is to review the most common etiologies of shoulder pain, focusing on those conditions of a myofascial origin. In addition to a review of the literature, the author draws upon his own clinical experience to describe a method to diagnose and manage, patients with shoulder pain of myofascial origin using ischemic compression techniques. This hands-on therapeutic approach conveys several benefits including: positive therapeutic outcomes; a favorable safety profile and; it is minimally strenuous on the doctor and well tolerated by the patient. ImagesFigure 7

Hains, Guy

2002-01-01

177

Barriers to expanding primary care roles for chiropractors: The role of chiropractic as primary care gatekeeper  

Microsoft Academic Search

Objective: To examine the feasibility of broader and more frequent primary care roles for chiropractors. Data Collection: Literature review and analysis of existing databases. Six types of barriers were examined, including legal, financial, professional, accessibility or geographic location, consumer preference, and self-imposed barriers. Results: Although research into the barriers of an expanded primary care role for chiropractors is inconclusive, several

Gary Gaumer; Annette Koren; Eric Gemmen

2002-01-01

178

PRE-CHIROPRACTIC Undergraduate Credit Required: 90 hours or Bachelor's degree*  

E-print Network

, is listed below. *Some States require a Bachelor's degree in order to be a licensed chiropractor. Math, shadowing chiropractors and involvement with the Pre-Health Club will help students learn more about

Logan, David

179

PRE-CHIROPRACTIC MEDICINE College of Liberal Arts & Sciences Advising Center  

E-print Network

by the relationships among the skeletal system, muscles, and nerves. The major therapeutic tool used by chiropractors of the nervous system. Chiropractors are adept in the treatment of back pain and headaches. They emphasize

180

The role of chiropractic in primary care: Findings of four community studies  

Microsoft Academic Search

Objective: To assess, through qualitative studies of 4 medically underserved communities, the receptivity of chiropractors, other health care providers, and consumers to the idea of chiropractors' assuming a focal role in primary care. Method: Visits by a team of 2 researchers to 4 medically underserved communities: (1) rural towns in eastern Oregon; (2) rural towns in Iowa; (3) underserved areas

Michele Teitelbaum

2000-01-01

181

Chiropractic management of patients post-disc arthroplasty: eight case reports  

Microsoft Academic Search

BACKGROUND: When conservative therapies for low back pain (LBP) are not effective, elective surgery may be proposed to these patients. Over the last 20 years, a new technology, disc replacement, has become increasingly popular because it is believed to maintain or restore the integrity of spinal movement and minimize the side-effects compared to fusion. Although disc replacement may relieve a

Julie O'Shaughnessy; Marc Drolet; Jean-François Roy; Martin Descarreaux

2010-01-01

182

Comparison of chiropractic student scores before and after utilizing active learning techniques in a classroom setting  

PubMed Central

Objective We report the differences in final examination scores achieved by students at the culmination of two different teaching strategies in an introductory skills course. Methods Multiple choice examination scores from six consecutive academic calendar sessions over 18 months (n = 503) were compared. Two groups were used: Cohort A (n = 290) represented students who were enrolled in the course 3 consecutive academic sessions before an instructional change and Cohort B (n = 213) included students who were enrolled in 3 consecutive academic sessions following the instructional change, which included a more active learning format. Statistical analyses used were 2-tailed independent t-test, one-way ANOVA, Tukey's honestly significant difference (HSD), and effect size. Results The 2-tailed independent t-test revealed a significant difference between the two groups (t = ?3.71, p < .001; 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.29–4.20). Significant difference was found in the highest performing subgroup compared to the lowest performing subgroup in Cohort A (F = 3.343, p = .037). For Cohort A subgroups 1 and 2, Tukey's HSD was p < .028. In Cohort B, no difference was found among subgroups (F = 1.912, p = .150, HSD p > .105). Conclusion Compared to previous versions of the same course taught by the same instructor, the students in the new course design performed better, suggesting that using active learning techniques helps improve student achievement. PMID:23964739

Guagliardo, Joseph G.; Hoiriis, Kathryn T.

2013-01-01

183

The Place of Chiropractic Care in the Treatment of Low Back Pain  

Microsoft Academic Search

\\u000a Indeed, the societal burden of musculoskeletal disorders transcends countries and cultures [17] and has paved the way for\\u000a cooperative multidisciplinary efforts in the utilization of healthcare resources in search of the best management. To this\\u000a extent, low back pain (LBP) is one of the most common musculoskeletal conditions in western society [80]. In the United States,\\u000a 25 billion is spent

Christopher J. Colloca

184

Chiropractic care for paediatric and adolescent Attention-Deficit\\/Hyperactivity Disorder: A systematic review  

Microsoft Academic Search

BACKGROUND: Psychostimulants are first line of therapy for paediatric and adolescent AD\\/HD. The evidence suggests that up to 30% of those prescribed stimulant medications do not show clinically significant outcomes. In addition, many children and adolescents experience side-effects from these medications. As a result, parents are seeking alternate interventions for their children. Complementary and alternative medicine therapies for behavioural disorders

Fay Karpouzis; Rod Bonello; Henry Pollard

2010-01-01

185

Patient characteristics upon initial presentation to chiropractic teaching clinics: A descriptive study conducted at one university  

PubMed Central

Objective The purpose of this study was to compare demographics and chief complaints of the new patient population at our institution's fee-for-service clinics to the patient population of practicing chiropractors in the United States. We also compared the prevalence of obesity and hypertension to reference standards for the adult population. Methods Patient data were obtained from the electronic health records. All records identified as new patients during October 2013 were included. Variables of interest were clinic site, patient demographics, blood pressure, body mass index (BMI), chief complaint, and ICD-9 codes. Descriptive statistics were computed and compared to reference standards from previous reports. Results During October 2013, there were 224 new patients that entered the clinics. The average patient was a 31- to 50-year-old white male. Our clinic patients differed from those seen by US chiropractors in the distribution of all demographic variables. For adult patients, 31.4% were overweight, 29% were obese, and 8% stage 1 or 2 hypertension. Conclusion New patients in the fee-for-service teaching clinics appear to be dissimilar to those of US practicing chiropractors in several important demographics, characteristics, and types of complaints. The new patients had lower levels of overweight, obesity, and hypertension compared to US reference standards. PMID:25162982

Kaeser, Martha A.; Hawk, Cheryl; Anderson, Michelle

2014-01-01

186

Reflex control of the spine and posture: a review of the literature from a chiropractic perspective  

Microsoft Academic Search

OBJECTIVE: This review details the anatomy and interactions of the postural and somatosensory reflexes. We attempt to identify the important role the nervous system plays in maintaining reflex control of the spine and posture. We also review, illustrate, and discuss how the human vertebral column develops, functions, and adapts to Earth's gravity in an upright position. We identify functional characteristics

Mark W Morningstar; Burl R Pettibon; Heidi Schlappi; Mark Schlappi; Trevor V Ireland

2005-01-01

187

Patient characteristics upon initial presentation to chiropractic teaching clinics: A descriptive study conducted at one university.  

PubMed

Objective : The purpose of this study was to compare demographics and chief complaints of the new patient population at our institution's fee-for-service clinics to the patient population of practicing chiropractors in the United States. We also compared the prevalence of obesity and hypertension to reference standards for the adult population. Methods : Patient data were obtained from the electronic health records. All records identified as new patients during October 2013 were included. Variables of interest were clinic site, patient demographics, blood pressure, body mass index (BMI), chief complaint, and ICD-9 codes. Descriptive statistics were computed and compared to reference standards from previous reports. Results : During October 2013, there were 224 new patients that entered the clinics. The average patient was a 31- to 50-year-old white male. Our clinic patients differed from those seen by US chiropractors in the distribution of all demographic variables. For adult patients, 31.4% were overweight, 29% were obese, and 8% stage 1 or 2 hypertension. Conclusion : New patients in the fee-for-service teaching clinics appear to be dissimilar to those of US practicing chiropractors in several important demographics, characteristics, and types of complaints. The new patients had lower levels of overweight, obesity, and hypertension compared to US reference standards. PMID:25162982

Kaeser, Martha A; Hawk, Cheryl; Anderson, Michelle

2014-10-01

188

Gross Anatomy Instruction in Chiropractic Colleges: A Local and Global Perspective  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This resource is part of the AAA Education and Teaching Session. In particular this resource is a pdf of the presentation from the AAA 2012 Anatomical Education for Allied Health Care Professionals Seminar.

Jennette Ball (New York Chiropractic College Department of Basic Sciences)

2012-04-21

189

Colin A. Greenshields, DC: the Canadian Memorial Chiropractic College's first graduate.  

PubMed

This biographical study investigates the complex tribulations and impressive accomplishments of Dr. Colin Greenshields. Part I (the Formative Years) goes back to his ancestors in Great Britain and forward to his graduation from CMCC in 1948. Part II (the Professional Years) begins with the opening of Colin's office in St. Catharines, ON, and proceeds through his professional career and multiple leadership roles to his retirement in 1986. PMID:22675227

Brown, Douglas M

2012-06-01

190

2013-2014 UPlan Medical (Out-of-Pocket Charges for In-Network Providers)  

E-print Network

to Chiropractic, Acupuncture, Physical, Occupational, and Speech Therapy, and Mental Health/Substance Abuse to Chiropractic, Acupuncture, Physical, Occupational, and Speech Therapy, and Mental Health/Substance Abuse

Blanchette, Robert A.

191

A study to explore the perceptions that South African chiropractors have regarding the perceived role and impact of research within the profession.  

E-print Network

??Dissertation submitted in partial compliance with the requirements for the Master’s Degree in Technology: Chiropractic, Durban University of Technology, 2012. The Chiropractic profession has made… (more)

Gordon, Julani

2012-01-01

192

Chiropractic and self-care for back-related leg pain: design of a randomized clinical trial  

Microsoft Academic Search

Background  Back-related leg pain (BRLP) is a common variation of low back pain (LBP), with lifetime prevalence estimates as high as 40%.\\u000a Often disabling, BRLP accounts for greater work loss, recurrences, and higher costs than uncomplicated LBP and more often\\u000a leads to surgery with a lifetime incidence of 10% for those with severe BRLP, compared to 1-2% for those with LBP.

Craig A Schulz; Maria A Hondras; Roni L Evans; Maruti R Gudavalli; Cynthia R Long; Edward F Owens; David G Wilder; Gert Bronfort

2011-01-01

193

42 CFR 60.10 - How much can be borrowed?  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...chiropractic, or a graduate program in health administration, clinical psychology, or allied health may borrow up to $50,000 under...public health, chiropractic, health administration, or clinical psychology may borrow up to $50,000...

2013-10-01

194

42 CFR 60.10 - How much can be borrowed?  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...chiropractic, or a graduate program in health administration, clinical psychology, or allied health may borrow up to $50,000 under...public health, chiropractic, health administration, or clinical psychology may borrow up to $50,000...

2010-10-01

195

42 CFR 60.10 - How much can be borrowed?  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...chiropractic, or a graduate program in health administration, clinical psychology, or allied health may borrow up to $50,000 under...public health, chiropractic, health administration, or clinical psychology may borrow up to $50,000...

2011-10-01

196

42 CFR 60.10 - How much can be borrowed?  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...chiropractic, or a graduate program in health administration, clinical psychology, or allied health may borrow up to $50,000 under...public health, chiropractic, health administration, or clinical psychology may borrow up to $50,000...

2012-10-01

197

American Pregnancy Association  

MedlinePLUS

... Chiropractic Care During Pregnancy Chiropractic care is health maintenance of the spinal column, discs, related nerves and bone geometry without drugs or surgery. It involves the art and science of adjusting ...

198

State of Wisconsin EMPLOYEE'S WORK University Of Wisconsin System INJURY AND ILLNESS REPORT  

E-print Network

and chiropractic providers to release all medical, mental health and chiropractic records to the State of Wisconsin, University Of Wisconsin System, Office of Safety and Loss Prevention, Worker's Compensation Department

Balser, Teri C.

199

Pelvic girdle pain in three pregnant women choosing chiropractic management: a pilot study using a respondent-generated instrument and chiropractor's assessment tool  

Microsoft Academic Search

Pelvic girdle pain (PGP), as experienced by pregnant women, is poorly defined and understood. Despite an increasing body of research, there is still little in the literature that is accessible to healthcare practitioners regarding the management and treatment of this condition. There is also a lack of information about the use of specific tools to help define the problem, or

C. G. Andrew; N. Eaton; G. Dorey

200

The Implementation of Virtual Instruction in Relation to X-ray Anatomy and Positioning in a Chiropractic Degree Program: A Descriptive Paper  

PubMed Central

This article provides information regarding the introduction of virtual education into classroom instruction, wherein a method of classroom instruction was developed with the use of a computer, digital camera, and various software programs. This approach simplified testing procedures, thus reducing institutional costs substantially by easing the demand for manpower, and seemed to improve average grade performance. Organized files with hundreds of digital pictures have created a range of instructor resources. Much of the new course materials were organized onto compact disks to complement course notes. Customizing presentations with digital technology holds potential benefits for students, instructors and the institution PMID:19390682

Rush, Perry O.; Boone, William R.

2009-01-01

201

Behavioral and Learning Changes Secondary to Chiropractic Care to Reduce Subluxations in a Child with Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder: A Case Study  

Microsoft Academic Search

Objective: Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) is extremely subjective in both diagnosis and treatment. No single cause has yet been determined for this disorder nor has there been a single treatment plan that is effective in a majority of cases. This paper proposes a possible etiology for some cases of ADHD with respect to concentration and hyperactivity along with a

Lisa Lovett DC; Charles L. Blum

202

Lumbosacral transitional segments: Classification, prevalence, and effect on disk height  

Microsoft Academic Search

Objective: To determine the rate of lumbosacral transitional segments among chiropractic practice settings and to determine if this anomaly would affect the height of the lumbosacral disk. Study Design: Retrospective review of radiographs. Setting: Los Angeles College of Chiropractic outpatient clinic and a private chiropractic office. Samples: A total of 20 lumbar series with lumbosacral transitional segments from a private

Chang-Yu J. Hsieh; Jason D. Vanderford; Susan R. Moreau; Tzerlin Prong

2000-01-01

203

Prevention and Health Promotion by Chiropractors  

Microsoft Academic Search

Chiropractic care includes a variety of minimally invasive approaches, with both treatment and prevention as essential elements of clinical practice. Although chiropractic adjustment (manipulation) is the signature therapy and best-known identifier of the profession, the practice of chiropractic involves more than manual therapeutics. In general, chiropractors seek to bring a holistic worldview to the doctor—patient encounter, seeking not only to

Daniel Redwood; Gary Globe

2008-01-01

204

TENNESSEE WORKERS' COMPENSATION INSURANCE Employers: The law requires this notice to be conspicuously posted at the employer's place of business so all  

E-print Network

to be conspicuously posted at the employer's place of business so all employees have access to it. WHO IS REQUIRED), one of whom must be a doctor of chiropractic. If a doctor of chiropractic is chosen, chiropractor to such doctor of chiropractic must be specifically approved by the employer or insurance carrier. The provisions

Cui, Yan

205

Medical Plans Summary and Comparison Effective January 1 December 31, 2014  

E-print Network

University Office of Human Resources Page 1 of 6 Medical Plans Summary and Comparison Revised 10 Acupuncture Acupuncture, Chiropractic, and Medical Massage treatments have a combined maximum benefit of $2 Chiropractic Acupuncture, Chiropractic, and Medical Massage treatments have a combined maximum benefit of $2

206

The effect of Kinesioª tape on quadriceps muscle power output, length/tension, and hip and knee range of motion in asymptomatic cyclists.  

E-print Network

??Dissertation submitted in partial compliance with the requirements for the Master’s Degree in Technology: Chiropractic, Durban University of Technology, 2011. Background: As Kinesio® tape may… (more)

Nelson, Dani Keren

2011-01-01

207

A study to determine the international federations' perception and utilization of chiropractors and other sports medical personnel.  

E-print Network

??Dissertation submitted in partial compliance with the requirements for the Master’s Degree in Technology: Chiropractic at Durban University of Technology, 2008. Objectives: To investigate the… (more)

Cloete, Kirsten Leigh

2008-01-01

208

77 FR 16244 - Request for Comments on the Update of the Scholarships for Disadvantaged Students Program  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...baccalaureate, and graduate degree); public health; chiropractic; allied health (baccalaureate and graduate degree...therapy); mental and behavioral health (graduate degree programs in clinical psychology, clinical social work,...

2012-03-20

209

Michigan Tech has made arrangements with Aflac to offer their valuable, cash indemnity plans through the convenience of a direct bank draft and still receive the group (premium)  

E-print Network

, chiropractic visits, physical therapy, CT Scans, MRIs, crutches, hospital confinement, travel & lodging as hospital confinement and continuing care benefits to include travel & lodging for: Heart attack & Coronary

210

Executive Corporate Visitors Cover is a packaged option for visitors on working  

E-print Network

, optical, physiotherapy and more. What is covered? inpatient hospital costsO , including accommodation by Medicare, including dental, optical, physiotherapy and chiropractic. With Executive Corporate Visitors

211

Matthew A. Davis Updated January, 2014  

E-print Network

, NH USA Professional Experience Biochemist, Sigma Aldrich Co., St. Louis, MO, 2000 to 2002 Medical for chiropractic spinal manipulation,1998- 2004. Journal of Manipulative and Physiological Therapeutics 2010

Myers, Lawrence C.

212

Courses: Science (SCI) Page 375Sonoma State University 2011-2012 Catalog Science (SCI)  

E-print Network

medicine, optometry, pharmacy, physician assistant, podiatry, chiropractic medicine, genetic counseling for sponsorship. Special forms for this purpose are available in the department office. Prerequisite: graduate

Ravikumar, B.

213

APPLICATION FOR SCHOLARSHIPS Health Science Studies, Pre-Professional Studies, and Environmental & Occupational Health  

E-print Network

Studies Optometry Chiropractics Pharmacy Clinical Laboratory Science Physical Therapy Dental Hygiene program as listed above. I authorize the Financial Aid Office to release, upon request, information

Barrash, Warren

214

Frequency of use of diagnostic and manual therapeutic procedures of the spine currently taught at the Canadian Memorial Chiropractic College: A preliminary survey of Ontario chiropractors. Part 2 - procedure usage rates  

PubMed Central

Objective: The purpose of this study was to determine which diagnostic and therapeutic procedures of the spine are most commonly utilized by chiropractors practicing in Ontario, based on a list of currently taught procedures at CMCC. In Part 1 of this study (published previously), the demographics and practice patterns of the respondents were presented. Part 2 of this study (presented here) reports on the utilization rates of spinal diagnostic and therapeutic procedures by the respondents. Methods: The study consisted of a paper-based survey that was sent to 500 randomly selected Ontario chiropractors who responded confidentially. Survey questions inquired into demographic and practice style characteristics as well as the frequency with which spinal diagnostic and therapeutic procedures were performed. Results: There were 108 respondents to the survey, giving a response rate of 22.4%. Frequency of use of diagnostic procedures fell into three broad categories: (i) those tests that are almost always performed, (ii) those tests that are almost always performed by two-thirds to one-half of patients, and (iii) those tests that are virtually never used. By comparison, respondents utilized the same therapeutic procedures for patients care less consistently. Conclusions: Despite a low response rate, respondents reported mostly relying on static and motion palpation, joint play, neurological tests, and ranges of motion when assessing their patients. Due to a low response rate, the results of this study may not be generalizable to all Ontario chiropractors. PMID:23754862

Gleberzon, Brian; Stuber, Kent

2013-01-01

215

Assessment of vertebrobasilar artery insufficiency: a clinical audit and literature review  

Microsoft Academic Search

As cerebrovascular accidents are now increasingly documented in the literature and represent perhaps the most serious side effect of chiropractic upper cervical manipulation, this study was designed to audit the risk assessment process in patients prior to manipulation in a group chiropractic practice. A questionnaire was devised to evaluate the performance of provocational tests and the recording of risk factors.

Deborah Le Roux

1999-01-01

216

The use of botulinum neurotoxin type A (Botox) for headaches: a case review  

Microsoft Academic Search

Chiropractic care is a common treatment sought by patients with headaches. As some patients may not benefit from this care, chiropractors must be aware of alternative management options. Botox has more recently become a common treatment for headaches. A case of a 45-year-old female with chronic headaches and neck pain is presented. After lengthy trials of chiropractic manipulation, trigger point

Mia Oliver; Joanna MacDonald; Moez Rajwani

217

A Population-Based Case-Series of Ontario Patients Who Develop a Vertebrobasilar Artery Stroke After Seeing a Chiropractor  

Microsoft Academic Search

PurposeThe current evidence suggests that association between chiropractic care and vertebrobasilar artery (VBA) stroke is not causal. Rather, recent epidemiological studies suggest that it is coincidental and reflects the natural history of the disorder. Because neck pain and headaches are symptoms that commonly precede the onset of a VBA stroke, these patients might seek chiropractic care while their stroke is

Stephanie Choi; Eleanor Boyle; Pierre Côté; J. David Cassidy

2011-01-01

218

The use of chiropractors by older adults in the United States  

Microsoft Academic Search

BACKGROUND: In a nationally representative sample of United States Medicare beneficiaries, we examined the extent of chiropractic use, factors associated with seeing a chiropractor, and predictors of the volume of chiropractic use among those having seen one. METHODS: We performed secondary analyses of baseline interview data on 4,310 self-respondents who were 70 years old or older when they first participated

Fredric D Wolinsky; Li Liu; Thomas R Miller; John F Geweke; Elizabeth A Cook; Barry R Greene; Kara B Wright; Elizabeth A Chrischilles; Claire E Pavlik; Hyonggin An; Robert L Ohsfeldt; Kelly K Richardson; Gary E Rosenthal; Robert B Wallace

2007-01-01

219

Chiropractors in Finland – a demographic survey  

Microsoft Academic Search

BACKGROUND: The Finnish chiropractic profession is young and not fully accepted by Finnish healthcare authorities. The demographic profile and style of practice has not been described to date. However, as the profession seems to be under rapid development, it would be of interest to stakeholders, both chiropractic and political, to obtain a baseline description of this profession with a view

Stefan Malmqvist; Charlotte Leboeuf-Yde

2008-01-01

220

The use and role of sport chiropractors in the National Football League: A short report  

Microsoft Academic Search

Objective: To analyze chiropractic utilization on National Football League (NFL) medical teams and the role played by chiropractors. Design: Postal survey of head athletic trainers of the 36 teams. Survey questions were developed from responses to a questionnaire submitted to a pilot group of 30 sport chiropractors and a panel of 20 postdoctoral faculty of the sport chiropractic program of

John L. Stump; Daniel Redwood

2002-01-01

221

chiropractors as folk devils: published and unpublished news coverage of a moral panic  

Microsoft Academic Search

This research provides empirical support for an existing processual model, documenting the social context, development, and growth of a moral panic surrounding stroke risk from chiropractic neck manipulation. This case highlights the importance of both published and unpublished news stories regarding the nature of claims that evolve over time and in specific stages of a moral panic. Chiropractic's status as

Yvonne Villanueva-Russell

2009-01-01

222

Chiropractors and Vaccination: A Historical Perspective  

Microsoft Academic Search

Although there is overwhelming evidence to show that vaccination is a highly effective method of controlling infectious diseases, a vocal element of the chiropractic profession maintains a strongly antivaccina- tion bias. Reasons for this are examined. The basis seems to lie in early chiropractic philosophy, which, eschewing both the germ theory of infectious disease and vaccina- tion, considered disease the

James B. Campbell; Jason W. Busse; H. Stephen Injeyan

223

continued > Contact Information  

E-print Network

if admitted) $100 $100 (waived if admitted) Routine Eye Exams $0 $40 $40 Physical Therapy/ Chiropractic Physical therapy: $0 Chiropractic: up to 12 visits per year, at a $50 reimbursement per visit $40 (reviewed Imaging (MRI, CAT, PET) $0 $100 2014 Faculty, Post Doctoral Associates & Fellows, and Managerial

224

Summary of Compensation, Benefits and Pension Contribution Changes for Senior Research Associates and Research Associates (Limited Term)  

E-print Network

Benefits a) Chiropractic / Physiotherapy / Registered Massage Therapy Benefit: Move from the current provisions of Registered Massage Therapy up to $500 / person / year and Physiotherapy at $12.20 / visit to a combined Chiropractic / Physiotherapy / Registered Massage Therapy benefit at $500 / person / year

Sun, Yu

225

Alternative Therapies Authors Kamran Amwar, Nicholas S.Y. Jim, Kath Huckbody and Ian Hughes  

E-print Network

science at all. The main topics are acupuncture, aromatherapy, chiropractic, herbalism, homeopathy nothing to the subject of the program. In the cases of chiropractic and homeopathy (though to assess your knowledge of homeopathy, acupuncture etc. In order to do well on these tests you have

Colquhoun, David

226

How to select a chiropractor for the management of athletic conditions  

Microsoft Academic Search

BACKGROUND: Chiropractors are an integral part of the management of musculoskeletal injuries. A considerable communication gap between the chiropractic and medical professions exists. Subsequently referring allopathic practitioners lack confidence in picking a chiropractic practitioner with appropriate management strategies to adequately resolve sporting injuries. Subsequently, the question is often raised: \\

Wayne Hoskins; Henry Pollard; Peter Garbutt

2009-01-01

227

river dolphins Investigating dolphin deaths in WA  

E-print Network

Autumn 2010 Helping India Chiropractic, Nursing and Pharmacy Schools making a difference Fossil fuel, Chiropractic and Sports Science, Nursing and Midwifery, are doing their bit to make the world a better place University. Intouch is produced by Murdoch University's Corporate Communications and Public Relations Office

228

WELL REWARDS MEMBER DISCOUNTS  

E-print Network

. COMPLEMENTARY HEALTH CARE Acupuncture, Chiropractic, Massage and Nutrition Counseling Save on acupuncture, chiropractic, nutrition counseling and massage therapy services. Receive 50 percent off the provider's usual Networks) at 1-877-335-2746. Then call the provider you choose and schedule an appointment. At your office

Burke, Peter

229

The chart below represents a general overview of the Yale University Medical Plan options. Benefits & Services  

E-print Network

Not covered Office Visit: PCP/Mental Health Specialist $0 $25 $40 30% $5 30% Routine Eye Exams $0 $40 30% $5 Surgical $0 10% 30% $0 30% Inpatient Hospital Services $0 10% 30% $0 30% Physical Therapy/ Chiropractic PhysicalTherapy: $0 Chiropractic: Up to 12 visits per year, $50 max reimbursement per visit $40 30% $5 30

230

Important Phone Numbers and Websites Group Number Phone Address Website  

E-print Network

, Chiropractic, Massage and Nutrition Counseling 1-877-335-2746 Kaiser Permanente (HMO) 102607 800-464-4000 P Specialty Health Networks (ASH Networks) discounts on Acupuncture, Chiropractic, Massage and Nutrition-722-2667 6191 North State Highway 161, Suite 400 www.conexis.com Irving, TX 75038 UC Office of the President

Gleeson, Joseph G.

231

A Pediatric Patient Presenting with Asthma, Subluxations and Scoliosis: A Case Study  

Microsoft Academic Search

Objective: The purpose of this case study is to discuss a case study involving a pediatric female presenting to a chiropractic office with asthma, vertebral subluxations, and scoliosis. Possible mechanisms of how chiropractic adjustments may influence the symptoms of asthma are discussed. Design: A case study. Setting: Private practice. Patient: An eleven-year-old female. Results: The resolution of asthmatic symptoms, cessation

Raelynn M. Cancel

232

 

PubMed Central

Ethical concerns about informed consent encompass the legal functions of protection of patients through self-determination, but also considers other ways of respecting patients through seeking their benefit and their autonomy. The influence of traditional medicine on patient expectations, and use of consent forms often renders consent a difficult issue in the relative safety and non-invasiveness of chiropractic practice. The ethical concern with consent, however, focuses attention on patient participation in health care decisions. Chiropractic relationships are often quite conclusive to this sharing of health care decisions after education. Exceptions to informed consent are not typically relevant to chiropractic patients who are conscious, competent and not in need of emergency treatment. It is therefore important that patients are aware of non-chiropractic alternatives and very rare risks of a serious nature. Rather than an impediment, ethical concerns about consent encourage a relationship of education and shared responsibility which encourages chiropractic patients to accept responsibility for their health.

Burgess, Michael M

1990-01-01

233

Programs and services to enhance your health and wellness From acupuncture to natural supplements. From aerobic classes to a therapeutic  

E-print Network

® Alternative Medicine Acupuncture Chiropractic Care Massage Therapy Mind/Body Healthy Roads Mind/Body Program Yoga Journal SpaFinderTM Fitness Fitness Club Memberships Just Walk 10,000 Steps-a-DayTM Vitamins

Hutcheon, James M.

234

Programs and services to enhance your health and wellness From acupuncture to natural supplements. From aerobic classes to a therapeutic  

E-print Network

Programs and services to enhance your health and wellness From acupuncture to natural supplements Acupuncture Chiropractic Care Massage Therapy Mind/Body HealthyroadsTM Mind/Body Program Fitness Fitness Club

Nelson, Tim

235

Nebraska Health Manpower Reports: Chiropractors 1978.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

This statistical report of Nebraska Chiropractic Manpower was compiled from questionnaires mailed to all Chiropractors licensed by the State of Nebraska as of September 1, 1978. Such surveys and reports are produced annually for thirteen health profession...

1978-01-01

236

Chiropractor Handbook.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

A chiropractor handbook is presented as supporting documentation for an evaluation of the Medicaid Management Information System of the Nebraska Department of Public Welfare (SHR-0001031). Chiropractic services are briefly examined, and discussions of the...

1975-01-01

237

42 CFR 60.5 - Who is an eligible student borrower?  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...AND HUMAN SERVICES GRANTS HEALTH EDUCATION ASSISTANCE LOAN PROGRAM...equivalent degree in Public Health Doctor of Chiropractic or...Doctoral degree in Clinical Psychology Masters or doctoral degree in Health Administration...

2010-10-01

238

42 CFR 60.5 - Who is an eligible student borrower?  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...AND HUMAN SERVICES GRANTS HEALTH EDUCATION ASSISTANCE LOAN PROGRAM...equivalent degree in Public Health Doctor of Chiropractic or...Doctoral degree in Clinical Psychology Masters or doctoral degree in Health Administration...

2012-10-01

239

42 CFR 60.1 - What is the HEAL program?  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

... What is the HEAL program? (a) The Health Education Assistance Loan (HEAL...podiatric medicine, pharmacy, public health, chiropractic, health administration and clinical psychology. The basic purpose of the...

2010-10-01

240

78 FR 35286 - Agency Information Collection Activities; Submission to OMB for Review and Approval; Public...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...veterinary medicine, optometry, podiatric medicine, pharmacy, public health, allied health, or chiropractic, and graduate students in health administration or clinical psychology through September 30, 1998. Eligible lenders, such as...

2013-06-12

241

42 CFR 60.50 - Which schools are eligible to be HEAL schools?  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...AND HUMAN SERVICES GRANTS HEALTH EDUCATION ASSISTANCE LOAN PROGRAM...equivalent degree in Public Health Doctor of Chiropractic or...Doctoral degree of Clinical Psychology Masters or doctoral degree in Health Administration For...

2010-10-01

242

78 FR 18988 - Agency Information Collection Activities; Proposed Collection; Comment Request  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...veterinary medicine, optometry, podiatric medicine, pharmacy, public health, allied health, or chiropractic, and graduate students in health administration or clinical psychology through September 30, 1998. Eligible lenders, such as...

2013-03-28

243

42 CFR 60.5 - Who is an eligible student borrower?  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...AND HUMAN SERVICES GRANTS HEALTH EDUCATION ASSISTANCE LOAN PROGRAM...equivalent degree in Public Health Doctor of Chiropractic or...Doctoral degree in Clinical Psychology Masters or doctoral degree in Health Administration...

2011-10-01

244

42 CFR 60.50 - Which schools are eligible to be HEAL schools?  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...AND HUMAN SERVICES GRANTS HEALTH EDUCATION ASSISTANCE LOAN PROGRAM...equivalent degree in Public Health Doctor of Chiropractic or...Doctoral degree of Clinical Psychology Masters or doctoral degree in Health Administration For...

2012-10-01

245

75 FR 17938 - Advisory Committee on Interdisciplinary, Community-Based Linkages; Notice for Request for...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...awards from the following programs: Allied Health; Area Health Education Centers; Chiropractic Demonstration...Physicians, Dentists, and Behavioral and Mental Health Professionals; Graduate Psychology Education; and Preventive and Primary...

2010-04-08

246

42 CFR 60.1 - What is the HEAL program?  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

... What is the HEAL program? (a) The Health Education Assistance Loan (HEAL...podiatric medicine, pharmacy, public health, chiropractic, health administration and clinical psychology. The basic purpose of the...

2012-10-01

247

42 CFR 60.1 - What is the HEAL program?  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

... What is the HEAL program? (a) The Health Education Assistance Loan (HEAL...podiatric medicine, pharmacy, public health, chiropractic, health administration and clinical psychology. The basic purpose of the...

2013-10-01

248

76 FR 11492 - Notice for Request for Nominations  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Health Resources...Disciplines and Expertise Allied health Chiropractic medicine Clinical...social work Graduate clinical psychology Podiatric medicine (preventive...Stakeholder Organizations [cir] Health professions...

2011-03-02

249

77 FR 30536 - Final Notice Regarding Updates and Clarifications of the Implementation of the Scholarships for...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...behavioral and mental health discipline (clinical psychology, clinical social work...chiropractic; allied health (baccalaureate and...mental and behavioral health (graduate degree programs in clinical psychology, clinical social...

2012-05-23

250

42 CFR 60.50 - Which schools are eligible to be HEAL schools?  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...AND HUMAN SERVICES GRANTS HEALTH EDUCATION ASSISTANCE LOAN PROGRAM...equivalent degree in Public Health Doctor of Chiropractic or...Doctoral degree of Clinical Psychology Masters or doctoral degree in Health Administration For...

2013-10-01

251

42 CFR 60.1 - What is the HEAL program?  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

... What is the HEAL program? (a) The Health Education Assistance Loan (HEAL...podiatric medicine, pharmacy, public health, chiropractic, health administration and clinical psychology. The basic purpose of the...

2011-10-01

252

42 CFR 60.5 - Who is an eligible student borrower?  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...AND HUMAN SERVICES GRANTS HEALTH EDUCATION ASSISTANCE LOAN PROGRAM...equivalent degree in Public Health Doctor of Chiropractic or...Doctoral degree in Clinical Psychology Masters or doctoral degree in Health Administration...

2013-10-01

253

42 CFR 60.50 - Which schools are eligible to be HEAL schools?  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...AND HUMAN SERVICES GRANTS HEALTH EDUCATION ASSISTANCE LOAN PROGRAM...equivalent degree in Public Health Doctor of Chiropractic or...Doctoral degree of Clinical Psychology Masters or doctoral degree in Health Administration For...

2011-10-01

254

75 FR 16136 - Agency Information Collection Activities: Proposed Collection: Comment Request  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...veterinary medicine, optometry, podiatric medicine, pharmacy, public health, allied health, or chiropractic, and graduate students in health administration or clinical psychology through September 30, 1998. Eligible lenders, such as...

2010-03-31

255

75 FR 30407 - Agency Information Collection Activities: Proposed Collection: Comment Request  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...veterinary medicine, optometry, podiatric medicine, pharmacy, public health, allied health, or chiropractic, and graduate students in health administration or clinical psychology through September 30, 1998. Eligible lenders, such as...

2010-06-01

256

Symptomatic Arnold-Chiari Malformation and Cranial Nerve Dysfunction: a Case Study of Applied Kinesiology Cranial Evaluation and Treatment  

Microsoft Academic Search

ObjectiveTo present an overview of possible effects of Arnold-Chiari malformation (ACM) and to offer chiropractic approaches and theories for treatment of a patient with severe visual dysfunction complicated by ACM.

Scott Cuthbert; Charles Blum

2005-01-01

257

Insurance Resources for Patients  

MedlinePLUS

... the health and safety of their employees. The ACA has developed resources to assist patients in advocating ... employee benefits. Resources to Educate Others about Chiropractic ACA has a number of resources available to educate ...

258

Corporate Extras is a premium level of cover. It helps you with the cost of services not always covered by Medicare, including dental, optical,  

E-print Network

covered by Medicare, including dental, optical, physiotherapy and chiropractic. With Corporate Extras your Physiotherapy Initial attendance $52.40 subsequent attendance $45.60 Year 1 $600 Year 4 $960 Year 2 $720 Year 5

259

Special Section: Complementary and Alternative Medicine (CAM):Quiz on Complementary and Alternative Medicine  

MedlinePLUS

... True False Complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) includes: Meditation Chiropractic Use of natural products, such as herbs ... According to the 2007 National Health Interview Survey, meditation is the CAM therapy most commonly used by ...

260

Cancer Alternative Therapies  

MedlinePLUS

You have many choices to make about your cancer treatment. One choice you might be thinking about ... are acupuncture, chiropractic, and herbal medicines. People with cancer may use CAM to Help cope with the ...

261

Course Descriptions Page 373Sonoma State University 2008-2010 Catalog Science (SCI)  

E-print Network

, and physical or occupational therapy, etc. Cr/NC only. SCi 308 knOWledGe And VAlueS in SCienCe (3) pSy 599A, dentistry, veterinary medicine, optometry, pharmacy, physician assistant, podiatry, chiropractic medicine

Ravikumar, B.

262

Page 388 Courses: Science (SCI) Sonoma State University 2013-2014 Catalog Science (SCI)  

E-print Network

, physical or occupational therapy, etc. Cr/NC only. SCi 308 knoWLedge And VALueS in SCienCe (3) pSy 595 Spe, dentistry, veterinary medicine, optometry, pharmacy, physician assistant, podiatry, chiropractic medicine

Ravikumar, B.

263

Symptom Management  

MedlinePLUS

... relieve damaging stresses. Apitherapy The therapeutic use of bee venom to help alleviate pain and various conditions. ... massage, and acupressure are then added for treatments. Bee Sting Therapy See Apitherapy Chiropractic - A technique of ...

264

INTERNATIONAL STUDENT UNDERGRADUATE APPLICATION  

E-print Network

French Geology Geophysics German Graphics Design History of Art & Visual Culture Illustration Management International Business Management Marketing Networking & Telecommunications Operations Management Nursing (2 year & 4 year) Pre-Chiropractic Pre-Clinical Laboratory Science/Medical Technology Pre

Barrash, Warren

265

29 CFR 1904.7 - General recording criteria.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...foreign material from areas other than the eye by irrigation, tweezers, cotton swabs or other simple means; (L) Using finger guards; (M) Using massages (physical therapy or chiropractic treatment are considered medical treatment for...

2010-07-01

266

UT Dallas Career Center Career Expo Days All Majors (non-STEM) March 21, 2013 Be sure to review the Employer Profile to see that you qualify before approaching the employer.  

E-print Network

Aeropostale 32 Harmony Public Schools 63 Six Flags Over Texas / Hurricane Harbor 2 Alliance Office Systems 33 InTouch Credit Union 64 Spectrum Financial Group 3 ACT Dallas 34 jcpenney 65 Texas Chiropractic

O'Toole, Alice J.

267

South Street 90 South Street, Murdoch, WA 6150  

E-print Network

AND FACILITIES MANAGEMENT OFFICE AMENITIES BUILDING LONERAGAN BUILDING VETERINARY BIOLOGICAL SCIENCES BUILDING CHIROPRACTIC TECHNIQUES LABORATORY SABC TRANSPORTABLE Algae Research and Development Centre TAVERN Office and lost property is located at the Campus and Facilities Management Office (building 385). · Call

268

2013 83/84 Retiree Health Plan Design Pre & Post 65 (Medicare eligible retirees Medicare is always primary for health)  

E-print Network

,000/$12,000 InPatient Hospitalization/Surgery 10% after deductible 30% after deductible Office Visit 35% 35 Therapy 35% 35% after deductible Chiropractic 35% 40% after deductible Massage Therapy 35% 40% after

269

CHEIBA TRUST Health Insurance  

E-print Network

.................................................................................................................1-800-542-9402 Provider Directories Health and Dental www.anthem.com HMO Chiropractic Landmark ...................................................................................................................303-832-9550 or 1-800-759-7372 Employer-Provided Plans (see Human Resources/Benefits Office) Voluntary

270

Employer Registrations as of March 12: Aeropostale  

E-print Network

Employer Registrations as of March 12: ACT Dallas Aeropostale Alliance Office Systems American-Williams Signazon Six Flags Over Texas/Hurricane Harbor Arlington Spectrum Financial Group Texas Chiropractic

O'Toole, Alice J.

271

East Tennessee State University Pre-Health Living-Learning Community (PHLLC) Application  

E-print Network

Tennessee State University Box 70723 Johnson City, TN 37614 Office 423-439-4446 | Fax 423-439-4690 Full Name: (please circle all that apply) Pre-Chiropractic Medicine Pre-Clinical Nutrition Pre-Dental Hygiene Pre

Karsai, Istvan

272

This information is updated annually by member(s) of the community. Questions or comments regarding this information can be directed to  

E-print Network

this information can be directed to: The Office of Rural & Regional Health, 2-115 Edmonton Clinic Health Academy, Chiropractic services Leisure Attractions&Events Visitor Information Events Calendar Museums Art Gallery

MacMillan, Andrew

273

CALIFORNIA STATE UNIVERSITY, LONG BEACH VENDOR DATA RECORD STD 204  

E-print Network

DEPARTMENT/OFFICE CSULB - ACCOUNTS PAYABLE DEPARTMENT DEPARTMENT/OFFICE CSULB FOUNDATION - ACCOUNTS PAYABLE, chiropractic, etc.) PARTNERSHIP EXEMPT CORPORATION (Non-profit) Please attach a copy of 501C and California

Sorin, Eric J.

274

TRAINING TOMORROW'S 02MESSAGE FROM DEVELOPMENT AND  

E-print Network

an investigator exploring the treatment of chronic respiratory maladies. The Canadian Chiropractic Research OF MEDICINE COMMUNICATIONS OFFICE 3640 DE LA MONTAGNE ST. ROOM 102 MONTREAL, QUEBEC, CANADA H3G 2A8 TELEPHONE

Barthelat, Francois

275

Religious Studies Science Social Science Page 331Sonoma State University 2006-2008 Catalog Religious Studies  

E-print Network

contact the Health Professional Advising Office Darwin Hall 200 (707) 664-2535 or 2981 Science Course (SCI, chiropractic medicine, genetic counseling, hospital administration, public health, clinical laboratory science

Ravikumar, B.

276

PREPROFESSIONAL STUDENT HANDBOOK  

E-print Network

Information Office JULY 2013 #12; 2 ~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~~*~ PREPROFESSIONAL STUDENT HANDBOOK College of Science Health Professions Information Office Southern Illinois ............................................................................................................. 6 Requirements: Chiropractic, Dentistry, Medicine, Occupational Therapy, Optometry

Nickrent, Daniel L.

277

Allegiance-Managed Care_: MUS Summary of Benefits and Coverage: What this Plan Covers & What it Costs Coverage Period: 7/1/2013-6/30/2014  

E-print Network

care provider's office or clinic Primary care visit to treat an injury or illness $15 copayment 35% Specialist visit $15 copayment 35% Other practitioner visit acupuncture/naturopathic chiropractic Up to $25

Lawrence, Rick L.

278

QUEENS COLLEGE DIDACTIC PROGRAM in DIETETICS  

E-print Network

-4152, No appointment is necessary though students must come in during office hours. For office hours contact on a career in medicine, dentistry, optometry, podiatry, chiropractic, physical therapy, nursing

Engel, Robert

279

Faculty of Science Biochemistry  

E-print Network

for professional schools in medicine, dentistry, pharmacy, veterinary and chiropractic Admission Requirements Our--where they are from, what they believe and how they think--will expand your mind. Student Recruitment Office

280

House Staff Medical Plan Comparison Chart Services PPO with HIA Kaiser  

E-print Network

required or $300/ admission penalty applies (waived if emergency admission) 90% after deductible Office% Outpatient Surgery No charge 80% after deductible 60% after deductible 90% after deductible Chiropractic Care

Kay, Mark A.

281

Physiology and Developmental Biology James P. Porter, Chair  

E-print Network

of Biology and Agriculture Office of Academic Advisement 379 WIDB, (801) 422-3042 Admission to Degree Program, dentistry, optometry, podiatry, chiropractic, or pharmacy. Students who have aspirations of doing health

Hart, Gus

282

University of Pittsburgh Office of Admissions and Financial Aid  

E-print Network

University of Pittsburgh Office of Admissions and Financial Aid 4227 Fifth Avenue, Alumni Hall the resources you need to become a successful candidate for a professional school of chiropractic medicine

Sibille, Etienne

283

STUDENT HEALTH SERVICES AND COUNSELING SERVICES UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA, DAVIS 2011 Original: Insurance Services Copy: Student  

E-print Network

Cross* When Service is Provided by Anthem Blue Cross PPO Provider · Office visit $20 co-pay per visit · Acupuncture, Chiropractic & Osteopathic Manipulation $20 co-pay per visit; 20 visits per benefit year for all

Todd, Brian

284

Intracranial Hypotension Causing Headache and Neck Pain: A Case Study  

Microsoft Academic Search

ObjectiveThe purpose of this study is to discuss the presentation, examination, diagnosis, and treatment of a case of intracranial hypotension presenting to a chiropractic office as acute severe headache and neck pain.

Gary A. Knutson

2006-01-01

285

Faculty of Science Biology and Biotechnology  

E-print Network

preparation for medicine, dentistry, pharmacy, veterinary, chiropractic and other health-based areas--where they are from, what they believe and how they think--will expand your mind. Student Recruitment Office

286

Faculty of Science Biology is one of the Life Sciences,  

E-print Network

and chiropractic Admission Requirements Minimum admission average of 70% (plus 70% secondary average). ENG4U, MHF4U--where they are from, what they believe and how they think--will expand your mind. Student Recruitment Office

287

Patient characteristics, practice activities, and one-month outcomes for chronic, recurrent low-back pain treated by chiropractors and family medicine physicians: A practice-based feasibility study  

Microsoft Academic Search

Background: Chronic low-back pain is a significant public health problem for which few therapies are supported by predictable outcomes. In this report, practice activities and 1-month outcomes data are presented for 93 chiropractic patients and 45 medical patients with chronic, recurrent low-back pain.Design: A prospective, observational, community-based feasibility study involving chiropractors and family medicine physicians.Setting: Forty private chiropractic clinics, the

Joanne Nyiendo; Mitchell Haas; Peter Goodwin

2000-01-01

288

William D. Harper, Jr, MS, DC: anything can cause anything.  

PubMed

Trained as an engineer and a chiropractor, William D. Harper, Jr. made his career in the healing arts as instructor, writer and president of the Texas Chiropractic College (TCC). A native of Texas who grew up in various locales in the Lone Star State, in Mexico and in the Boston area, he took his bachelor's and master's degree in engineering in 1933 and 1934 from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, and his chiropractic degree at TCC in 1942. Dissatisfied with the "foot-on-the-hose" concept of subluxation syndrome (D.D. Palmer's second theory), Dr. Harper studied and wrote about aberrant neural irritation as an alternative explanation for disease and for the broad clinical value he perceived in the chiropractic art. In this he paralleled much of D.D. Palmer's third theory of chiropractic. His often reprinted textbook, Anything Can Cause Anything, brought together much of what he had lectured and written about in numerous published articles. He was well prepared for the defense of chiropractic that he offered in 1965 in the trial of the England case in federal district court in Louisiana. The case was lost when the court ruled that the legislature rather than the judiciary should decide whether to permit chiropractors to practice, but Harper's performance was considered excellent. He went on to guide the TCC as president from 1965 through 1976, its first 11 years after relocating from San Antonio to Pasadena, Texas. Harper built the school - its faculty, staff and facilities - from very meager beginnings to a small but financially viable institution when he departed. Along the way he found fault with both chiropractic political camps that vied for federal recognition as the accrediting agency for chiropractic colleges in the United States. Dr. Bill Harper was a maverick determined to do things his way, and in many respects he was successful. He left a mark on the profession that merits critical analysis. PMID:18327301

Keating, Joseph C

2008-03-01

289

William D. Harper, Jr, MS, DC: Anything Can Cause Anything  

PubMed Central

Trained as an engineer and a chiropractor, William D. Harper, Jr. made his career in the healing arts as instructor, writer and president of the Texas Chiropractic College (TCC). A native of Texas who grew up in various locales in the Lone Star State, in Mexico and in the Boston area, he took his bachelor’s and master’s degree in engineering in 1933 and 1934 from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, and his chiropractic degree at TCC in 1942. Dissatisfied with the “foot-on-the-hose” concept of subluxation syndrome (D.D. Palmer’s second theory), Dr. Harper studied and wrote about aberrant neural irritation as an alternative explanation for disease and for the broad clinical value he perceived in the chiropractic art. In this he paralleled much of D.D. Palmer’s third theory of chiropractic. His often reprinted textbook, Anything Can Cause Anything, brought together much of what he had lectured and written about in numerous published articles. He was well prepared for the defense of chiropractic that he offered in 1965 in the trial of the England case in federal district court in Louisiana. The case was lost when the court ruled that the legislature rather than the judiciary should decide whether to permit chiropractors to practice, but Harper’s performance was considered excellent. He went on to guide the TCC as president from 1965 through 1976, its first 11 years after relocating from San Antonio to Pasadena, Texas. Harper built the school – its faculty, staff and facilities – from very meager beginnings to a small but financially viable institution when he departed. Along the way he found fault with both chiropractic political camps that vied for federal recognition as the accrediting agency for chiropractic colleges in the United States. Dr. Bill Harper was a maverick determined to do things his way, and in many respects he was successful. He left a mark on the profession that merits critical analysis. PMID:18327301

Keating, Joseph C.

2008-01-01

290

Interprofessional Collaboration and Turf Wars How Prevalent Are Hidden Attitudes?*  

PubMed Central

Purpose: Interprofessional collaboration in health care is believed to enhance patient outcomes. However, where professions have overlapping scopes of practice (eg, chiropractors and physical therapists), "turf wars" can hinder effective collaboration. Deep-rooted beliefs, identified as implicit attitudes, provide a potential explanation. Even with positive explicit attitudes toward a social group, negative stereotypes may be influential. Previous studies on interprofessional attitudes have mostly used qualitative research methodologies. This study used quantitative methods to evaluate explicit and implicit attitudes of physical therapy students toward chiropractic. Methods: A paper-and-pencil instrument was developed and administered to 49 individuals (students and faculty) associated with a Canadian University master's entry-level physical therapy program after approval by the Research Ethics Board. The instrument evaluated explicit and implicit attitudes toward the chiropractic profession. Implicit attitudes were determined by comparing response times of chiropractic paired with positive versus negative descriptors. Results: Mean time to complete a word association task was significantly longer (t = 4.75, p =.00) when chiropractic was associated with positive rather than negative words. Explicit and implicit attitudes were not correlated (r = 0.13, p =.38). Conclusions: While little explicit bias existed, individuals associated with a master's entry-level physical therapy program appeared to have a significant negative implicit bias toward chiropractic PMID:22778528

Chung, Chadwick L. R.; Manga, Jasmin; McGregor, Marion; Michailidis, Christos; Stavros, Demetrios; Woodhouse, Linda J.

2012-01-01

291

Commentary on a framework for multicultural education.  

PubMed

Today's changing demographics require that multicultural factors be considered in the delivery of quality patient-centred health care in chiropractic. Yet minimal training in cultural competency in chiropractic education leaves graduates ill-equipped to treat a diverse population. This commentary examines cultural competency training in current literature, demonstrates frameworks for curriculum integration, and suggests how cultural competency might be included in a chiropractic college curriculum. A database search yielded little evidence that cultural competency is integrated into curricula of chiropractic schools. Some journal articles note that promoting multicultural education and cultural sensitivity is an important goal. However, they provide no mechanisms as to how this can be achieved within training programs. Thus, although an undeniable need exists for all healthcare practitioners to develop cultural competency in the face of an increasingly diverse population, cultural competency education has not kept pace. Chiropractic schools must review their curricula to develop the cultural competencies of their graduates and a basic framework is suggested. PMID:25202156

Hammerich, Karin F

2014-09-01

292

Community-acquired methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus: a potential diagnosis for a 16-year-old athlete with knee pain  

PubMed Central

Objective This case report aims to raise awareness in chiropractic physicians of the prevalence of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) in adolescents who participate in sports activities and to alert the chiropractic physician of the necessity to consider potential diagnoses that are not within their typical clinical heuristic. Clinical Features A 16-year-old adolescent girl entered the clinic with a complaint of left knee pain that had an insidious onset during her involvement in sports activities. Later that same day, her knee became enlarged, red, and had pustular formations with a discharge. She was taken to an urgent care facility and subsequently diagnosed with MRSA. Her history included treatment of a left knee musculoskeletal condition 6 weeks prior to which she had responded favorably. Interventions and Outcomes She was treated medically with an aggressive course of antibiotic therapy and excision of the furuncle. The chiropractic physician played a role in patient education and notifying local school authorities of the case. Conclusion Doctors of chiropractic must prepare themselves for the unexpected and remain open to diagnostic possibilities outside of the normal scope of practice. Knee pain or cellulitis of any type may require additional diagnostic and patient care protocols to make the correct diagnosis. With the incidence of community-acquired MRSA increasing at an alarming rate, it is certainly a diagnosis doctors of chiropractic should be aware of when treating patients, especially those involved in sports activities. PMID:21629397

Larkin-Thier, Susan M.; Barber, Virginia A.; Harvey, Phyllis; Livdans-Forret, Anna B.

2010-01-01

293

Training the Evidence-Based Practitioner  

PubMed Central

An important goal of chiropractic clinical education should be to teach specific evidence-based practice (EBP) skills to chiropractic students, interns, and doctors. Using a nominal group process, the authors produced a document similar to the Council of Chiropractic Education standards for clinical competencies that can be used to drive an EBP curriculum. Standard texts and journal articles were consulted to create the standards for this program and each standard and corresponding learning objective was discussed in detail and was then graded by the committee in terms of importance and the level of competency that should be attained. Six standards and 31 learning objectives were generated with the learning objectives being further divided into lists of specific competencies. It is the hope of these authors that by sharing this document it can serve as a comprehensive and detailed seed document for other institutions. PMID:21677870

LeFebvre, Ronald P.; Peterson, David H.; Haas, Mitchell; Gillette, Richard G.; Novak, Charles W.; Tapper, Janet; Muench, John P.

2011-01-01

294

Adhesive capsulitis: a case report  

PubMed Central

Adhesive capsulitis or frozen shoulder is an uncommon entity in athletes. However, it is a common cause of shoulder pain and disability in the general population. Although it is a self limiting ailment, its rather long, restrictive and painful course forces the affected person to seek treatment. Conservative management remains the mainstay treatment of adhesive capsulitis. This includes chiropractic manipulation of the shoulder, therapeutic modalities, mobilization, exercise, soft tissue therapy, nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, and steroid injections. Manipulation under anesthesia is advocated when the conservative treatment fails. A case of secondary adhesive capsulitis in a forty-seven-year-old female recreational squash player is presented to illustrate clinical presentation, diagnosis, radiographic assessment and conservative chiropractic management. The patient’s shoulder range of motion was full and pain free with four months of conservative chiropractic care. ImagesFigure 1Figure 2Figure 3

Kazemi, Mohsen

2000-01-01

295

An unusual presentation and outcome of complex regional pain syndrome: a case report  

PubMed Central

A 44 year-old woman presented to a chiropractic clinic with swelling and point tenderness over the right metacarpals and right shoulder and elbow pain of insidious onset. Examination revealed right wrist and hand swelling, diminished grip strength, and reduced wrist and cervical ranges of motion. A bone scan, radiographs, and clinical examination led to the diagnosis of complex regional pain syndrome (CRPS). Following chiropractic care, the patient had improved grip strength, functional abilities, and pain reduction. The primary characteristics of CRPS include motor, trophic and sensory changes, usually in a peripheral limb following some form of trauma. Due to the varied symptom presentation, it may be unclear which conservative therapies will be most beneficial in the treatment of CRPS. A multidisciplinary approach to treatment should be pursued with these patients. More investigation of therapies such as chiropractic care as it relates to the pathophysiology of CRPS is needed. PMID:17549166

Shearer, Heather M; Trim, Astrid

2006-01-01

296

The use of botulinum neurotoxin type A (Botox) for headaches: a case review.  

PubMed

Chiropractic care is a common treatment sought by patients with headaches. As some patients may not benefit from this care, chiropractors must be aware of alternative management options. Botox has more recently become a common treatment for headaches. A case of a 45-year-old female with chronic headaches and neck pain is presented. After lengthy trials of chiropractic manipulation, trigger point therapy, and acupuncture, the patient was treated with Botox-A. She experienced pain relief following the initial treatment that lasted up to 3-4 months and has since undergone subsequent trials of Botox with the same results. No side effects were experienced. As more health care practitioners are recommending Botox, the need for a better understanding of the evidence and criteria for referral for Botox treatment is required. As such, chiropractors should consider this alternative approach to managing headaches when chiropractic management is unsuccessful. PMID:17549187

Oliver, Mia; MacDonald, Joanna; Rajwani, Moez

2006-12-01

297

Evidence-based protocol for structural rehabilitation of the spine and posture: review of clinical biomechanics of posture (CBP®) publications  

PubMed Central

BACKGROUND Although practice protocols exist for SMT and functional rehabilitation, no practice protocols exist for structural rehabilitation. Traditional chiropractic practice guidelines have been limited to acute and chronic pain treatment, with limited inclusion of functional and exclusion of structural rehabilitation procedures. OBJECTIVE (1) To derive an evidence-based practice protocol for structural rehabilitation from publications on Clinical Biomechanics of Posture (CBP®) methods, and (2) to compare the evidence for Diversified, SMT, and CBP®. METHODS Clinical control trials utilizing CBP® methods and spinal manipulative therapy (SMT) were obtained from searches in Mantis, CINAHL, and Index Medicus. Using data from SMT review articles, evidence for Diversified Technique (as taught in chiropractic colleges), SMT, and CBP® were rated and compared. RESULTS From the evidence from Clinical Control Trials on SMT and CBP®, there is very little evidence support for Diversified (our rating = 18), as taught in chiropractic colleges, for the treatment of pain subjects, while CBP® (our rating = 46) and SMT for neck pain (rating = 58) and low back pain (our rating = 202) have evidence-based support. CONCLUSIONS While CBP® Technique has approximately as much evidence-based support as SMT for neck pain, CBP® has more evidence to support its methods than the Diversified technique taught in chiropractic colleges, but not as much as SMT for low back pain. The evolution of chiropractic specialization has occurred, and doctors providing structural-based chiropractic care require protocol guidelines for patient quality assurance and standardization. A structural rehabilitation protocol was developed based on evidence from CBP® publications. PMID:17549209

Oakley, Paul A.; Harrison, Donald D.; Harrison, Deed E.; Haas, Jason W.

2005-01-01

298

In the eye of the storm: Dossa Dixon Evins and the neurocalometer debacle.  

PubMed

Dossa Dixon Evins, one of the lesser known figures in chiropractic history, played a prominent role in the 1920s, yet we know little about him. He was a vaudeville entertainer with his wife Billie, an inventor, electrical engineer, and a radio operator for the Secret Service during World War I. He is also the person who best weathered the hurricane which his most famous invention stirred in the chiropractic profession. What sort of man was he? The author seeks to answer that question in this paper as well as delving into the Neurocalometer Incident. PMID:11613387

Nash, J

1995-06-01

299

Canadian Chiropractors are not alone: external advocacy in Ontario, 1902-2012.  

PubMed

This article focuses primarily on Ontario, identifying a number of the profession's allies and their advocacy effectiveness, under two main headings: The Ontario Chiropractic Association; and the Canadian Memorial Chiropractic College during the period of 1902 to 2012. While part of our success in gaining recognition has been attributed to intense lobbying by the profession, here the public support of several labour unions is reviewed. The part played by various politicians, educators, entrepreneurs, legal counsel, academic administrators and historians is also discussed. PMID:23482916

Brown, Douglas M

2013-03-01

300

Student Health and Counseling Services University of California, Davis Davis SHIP PHYSICAL THERAPY AND ACUPUNCTURE  

E-print Network

THERAPY AND ACUPUNCTURE Benefits Checklist 2013/14 Patient Name) is the primary provider for Physical Therapy and Acupuncture services. Ã? A referral by an SHCS provider must Acupuncture, Chiropractic Care & Osteopathic Manipulation: all covered at 80% in-network after $300 deductible

Ullrich, Paul

301

Phenomenology: a resource pack for chiropractors  

Microsoft Academic Search

Chiropractic is being challenged to produce research to back up its claims of therapeutic effect. This paper presents an argument for using a qualitative approach for some of this research, namely the research methodology of phenomenology.The aim of the paper is to provide the basis for the chiropractor to embark on a research project using a phenomenological methodology. It should

Peter J Miller

2004-01-01

302

Last Updated: January 2014 1 For more information visit www.uwinnipeg.ca or contact a student recruitment officer at  

E-print Network

-Chiropractic Chiropractors help individuals achieve a comfortable state of functioning. They assess conditions related to the spine, nervous system, and joints, and treat them primarily by mechanical adjustment. Some chiropractors disorders. You have the vision, determination, and passion to become a chiropractor, and you're looking

Martin, Jeff

303

Chiropractors' use of X-rays  

Microsoft Academic Search

Computerized literature searches were used raphy studies were permitted in 100%, 98%, 96%, (Medline and Embase, 1966-1997) to access stud- 36% and 56% of the boards, respectively. ies of the use of X-rays within the chiropractic A survey of all members of The Netherlands profession. The bibliographies of all studies and Chiropractors' Association showed that 80% of reviews located were

E ERNST

304

Communication between general practitioners and chiropractors  

Microsoft Academic Search

Objective: Good communication between health care professionals has proved to be important in ensuring high standards of care. Patients have shown an increased use of complementary medicine (eg, chiropractic) in addition to conventional medicine. However, this does not automatically guarantee good cooperation and communication between complementary practitioners and conventional practitioners. The objective of this study was to assess the nature

William J. Brussee; Willem J. J. Assendelft; Alan C. Breen

2001-01-01

305

The Nordic Subpopulation Research Programme: prediction of treatment outcome in patients with low back pain treated by chiropractors - does the psychological profile matter?  

Microsoft Academic Search

BACKGROUND: It is clinically important to be able to select patients suitable for treatment and to be able to predict with some certainty the outcome for patients treated for low back pain (LBP). It is not known to what degree outcome among chiropractic patients is affected by psychological factors. OBJECTIVES: To investigate if some demographic, psychological, and clinical variables can

Charlotte Leboeuf-Yde; Annika Rosenbaum; Iben Axén; Peter W Lövgren; Kristian Jørgensen; Laszlo Halasz; Andreas Eklund; Niels Wedderkopp

2009-01-01

306

A survey of practice patterns and the health promotion and prevention attitudes of US chiropractors, maintenance care: Part I  

Microsoft Academic Search

Objective: To investigate the primary care, health promotion activities associated with what has historically been called “maintenance care” (MC) as used in the practice of chiropractic in the United States. This includes issues such as investigating the purpose of MC, what conditions and patient populations it best serves, how frequently it is required, what therapeutic interventions constitute MC, how often

Ronald L Rupert

2000-01-01

307

An online survey of chiropractors' opinions of continuing education  

Microsoft Academic Search

BACKGROUND: Continuing Education (CE) for chiropractors is mandatory for licensure in most North American jurisdictions. Numerous chiropractic colleges have begun collaborating with universities to offer master's degree programs. Distance education master's degree programs may be desirable to allow full-time practicing doctors to further their post-graduate education. The present survey sought to answer three questions. First, what is the level of

Kent J Stuber; Jaroslaw P Grod; Dean L Smith; Paul Powers

2005-01-01

308

Canadian Chiropractors' Perception of Educational Preparation to Counsel Patients on Immunization  

Microsoft Academic Search

ObjectiveThis study describes the prevalence and correlates of perceptions of Canadian doctors of chiropractic regarding the adequacy of their undergraduate (UG) and postgraduate (PG) educational preparation to counsel patients about immunization\\/vaccination and explores their preferences for continuing education (CE) in this area.

H. Stephen Injeyan; Margaret L. Russell; Marja J. Verhoef; Donatus Mutasingwa

2006-01-01

309

Referral patterns and attitudes of Primary Care Physicians towards chiropractors  

Microsoft Academic Search

BACKGROUND: Despite the increasing usage and popularity of chiropractic care, there has been limited research conducted to examine the professional relationships between conventional trained primary care physicians (PCPs) and chiropractors (DCs). The objectives of our study were to contrast the intra-professional referral patterns among PCPs with referral patterns to DCs, and to identify predictors of PCP referral to DCs. METHODS:

Barry R Greene; Monica Smith; Veerasathpurush Allareddy; Mitchell Haas

2006-01-01

310

The clinical aspects of the acute facet syndrome: results from a structured discussion among European chiropractors  

Microsoft Academic Search

BACKGROUND: The term 'acute facet syndrome' is widely used and accepted amongst chiropractors, but poorly described in the literature, as most of the present literature relates to chronic facet joint pain. Therefore, research into the degree of consensus on the subject amongst a large group of chiropractic practitioners was seen to be a useful contribution. METHODS: During the annual congress

Lise Hestbaek; Alice Kongsted; Tue Secher Jensen; Charlotte Leboeuf-Yde

2009-01-01

311

Testing the effectiveness of an innovative information package on practitioner reported behaviour and beliefs: The UK Chiropractors, Osteopaths and Musculoskeletal Physiotherapists Low back pain ManagemENT (COMPLeMENT) trial [ISRCTN77245761  

Microsoft Academic Search

BACKGROUND: Low back pain (LBP) is a common and costly problem. Initiatives designed to assist practitioner and patient decisions about appropriate healthcare for LBP include printed evidence-based clinical guidelines. The three professional groups of chiropractic, osteopathy and musculoskeletal physiotherapy in the UK share common ground with their approaches to managing LBP and are amongst those targeted by LBP guidelines. Even

David W Evans; Nadine E Foster; Martin Underwood; Steven Vogel; Alan C Breen; Tamar Pincus

2005-01-01

312

Survey of US Chiropractor Attitudes and Behaviors about Subluxation  

Microsoft Academic Search

Objectives: This paper provides new information that describes chiropractors' professional identity relative to their concept of subluxation in chiropractic practice and education. Methods: We performed a pragmatic, descriptive, cross-sectional survey of state- board licensed chiropractors in the US during 2002-03 to assess their attitudes and behaviors about their use of \\

Monica Smith; Lynn A. Carber

2008-01-01

313

Health Professions Advisory Program Page 159Sonoma State University 2014-2015 Catalog HEALTH PROFESSIONS ADVISORY PROGRAM  

E-print Network

medicine, dentistry, veterinary medicine, podiatry, optometry, pharmacy, physi- cian assistant, and chiropractic medicine. Please note that advising for physical therapy and nursing are done by the Departments BIOL 123* Molecular and Cell Biology 4 BIOL 328 Vertebrate Evolutionary Morphology 4 BIOL 349 Animal

Ravikumar, B.

314

Page 156 Health Professions Advisory Program Sonoma State University 2012-2013 Catalog HEALTH PROFESSIONS ADVISORY PROGRAM  

E-print Network

assistant, and chiropractic medicine. Please note that advising for physical therapy and nursing are done medicine, dentistry, veterinary medicine, podiatry, optometry, pharmacy, physi- cal therapy, physician BIOL 123* Molecular and Cell Biology 4 BIOL 328 Vertebrate Evolutionary Morphology 4 BIOL 349 Animal

Ravikumar, B.

315

Complementary and alternative medical therapies for chronic low back pain: What treatments are patients willing to try?  

Microsoft Academic Search

BACKGROUND: Although back pain is the most common reason patients use complementary and alternative medical (CAM) therapies, little is known about the willingness of primary care back pain patients to try these therapies. As part of an effort to refine recruitment strategies for clinical trials, we sought to determine if back pain patients are willing to try acupuncture, chiropractic, massage,

Karen J Sherman; Daniel C Cherkin; Maureen T Connelly; Janet Erro; Jacqueline B Savetsky; Roger B Davis; David M Eisenberg

2004-01-01

316

Health Professions Advisory Program Page 165Sonoma State University 2008-2010 Catalog health professions advisory program  

E-print Network

medicine, podiatry, optometry, pharmacy, physical therapy, physician assistant, and chiropractic medicine. Please note that advising for Physical Therapy and Nursing are done by the Departments of Kinesiology 446 Biochemistry 3-3 PHYS 210AB* and 209AB* General Physics and Lab 8 ENGL 101 and 214 Expository

Ravikumar, B.

317

A sporting life Connecting through sport  

E-print Network

a brand new performance lab. New sports fields for Murdoch A deal made with the Western Australian Cricket1 A sporting life Connecting through sport Spring 2011 alumni magazine #12;2 10 12 20 18 17 22 24 Vice Chancellor. New state-of-the-art facilities The School of Chiropractic and Sports Science have

318

Nutritional intervention for cancer minimization  

PubMed Central

Diet has been linked to the pathogenesis of one in three cancers. Cancer remains a leading cause of death in contemporary society. Alteration to dietary habits may be helpful in reducing an individual’s risk of neoplasia. This paper examines how nutritional advice may be used as a cancer preventive measure in chiropractic clinics.

Jamison, Jennifer R

1987-01-01

319

The Virtual Haptic Back for Palpatory Training Robert L. Williams II, Ph.D.  

E-print Network

, plus related training applications in physical therapy, massage therapy, chiropractic therapy computer games that use a force-reflecting joystick. Haptics has been applied recently to education, most interface has been adapted to serve as "the next generation education system" (Cai et al., 1997), although

Williams II, Robert L.

320

Which adviser do I see? Major Advisers*  

E-print Network

-Dental Hygiene** Pre-Occupational Therapy** Pre-Optometry** Pre-Pharmacy** Pre-Physical Therapy** Pre-Medicine** Pre-Physician Assistant** Pre-Chiropractic** Pre-Naturopathic** Laura Marsh Pre-Nursing Pre-Veterinary Medicine** Pre-Radiation Therapy** Pre-Clinical Lab. Science** **Paloma Harrison Sees all prospective (not

Daescu, Dacian N.

321

Courses: Science (SCI) Page 375Sonoma State University 2012-2013 Catalog Science (SCI)  

E-print Network

, physical or occupational therapy, etc. Cr/NC only. SCI 308 Knowledge and ValueS In SCIenCe (3) PSY 560, dentistry, veterinary medicine, optometry, pharmacy, physician assistant, podiatry, chiropractic medicine 583 graduate reSearCH aSSIStant (1-4) Students learn advanced research methods and practical research

Ravikumar, B.

322

Departmental Advisers Martha Dyson  

E-print Network

-Physician Assistant Pre-Radiation Therapy Joan Jagodnik Pre-Medicine Pre-Dentistry Pre-Physical Therapy Pre-Veterinary Medicine Laura Marsh Pre-Nursing Pre-Clinical Lab. Science Pre-Dental Hygiene Pre-Occupational Therapy Pre-Chiropractic Pre-Naturopathic (Pre-Physician Assistant)* Kimberly Felipe Pre Medicine Pre-Nursing Pre

Lafferriere, Gerardo

323

Common Data Set 2011-2012 Full-time Part-time  

E-print Network

-Hispanic; American Indian or Alaska Native; Asian, Native Hawaiian or other Pacific Islander, or Hispanic. Doctorate (DDS or DMD), medicine (MD), optometry (OD), osteopathic medicine (DO), pharmacy (DPharm or BPharm), podiatric medicine (DPM), veterinary medicine (DVM), chiropractic (DC or DCM), or law (JD). Terminal degree

Heller, Barbara

324

Common Data Set 2010-11 CDS-I Page 1  

E-print Network

-Hispanic; American Indian or Alaska Native; Asian, Native Hawaiian or other Pacific Islander, or Hispanic. Doctorate (DDS or DMD), medicine (MD), optometry (OD), osteopathic medicine (DO), pharmacy (DPharm or BPharm), podiatric medicine (DPM), veterinary medicine (DVM), chiropractic (DC or DCM), or law (JD). Terminal degree

Heller, Barbara

325

Common Data Set 2012-2013 Full-time Part-time  

E-print Network

faculty: includes faculty who designate themselves as Black, non-Hispanic; American Indian or Alaska), medicine (MD), optometry (OD), osteopathic medicine (DO), pharmacy (DPharm or BPharm), podiatric medicine (DPM), veterinary medicine (DVM), chiropractic (DC or DCM), or law (JD). Terminal degree: the highest

Memphis, University of

326

In response to "The Knowledge of Our Knowledge": a reflection on McAndrews' view of epistemology.  

PubMed

This commentary considers one of the articles published in the first volume of this journal and reflects on the status of research and knowledge at that time. The chiropractic profession has witnessed advancement in the use of the scientific method in the past several decades, and scholarly journals have helped support this substantial growth. PMID:23966889

Winterstein, James

2012-12-01

327

The UT Dallas Career Center Presents: Abilene Christian University Graduate Admissions  

E-print Network

Sciences Texas Tech University HSC Texas Tech University of Health Sciences Center School of Pharmacy Texas Chiropractic College Texas Health and Science University Texas Tech University Texas Tech University Health Science Center School of Nursing Texas Tech University Health Sciences Center - School of Allied Health

O'Toole, Alice J.

328

Amount of health care and self-care following a randomized clinical trial comparing flexion-distraction with exercise program for chronic low back pain  

Microsoft Academic Search

BACKGROUND: Previous clinical trials have assessed the percentage of participants who utilized further health care after a period of conservative care for low back pain, however no chiropractic clinical trial has determined the total amount of care during this time and any differences based on assigned treatment group. The objective of this clinical trial follow-up was to assess if there

Jerrilyn A Cambron; M Ram Gudavalli; Marion McGregor; James Jedlicka; Michael Keenum; Alexander J Ghanayem; Avinash G Patwardhan; Sylvia E Furner

2006-01-01

329

UNIVERSITY OF SOUTH FLORIDA -2002/2003 UNDERGRADUATE CATALOG About USF 9  

E-print Network

, Anyplace" Learning 64 Applying for Admission 13 ARCHITECTURE AND COMMUNITY DESIGN 70 Army Reserve Officer Engineering, Certificate in 163 BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION, COLLEGE OF 128 BUSINESS AND OFFICE EDUCA- TION 137 C, Department of 139 Chiropractic School, Specific Re- quirements for 79 CIVIL AND ENVIRONMENTAL ENGINEERING 153

Lajeunesse, Marc J.

330

Covered Services Tufts Value HMO (6) Tufts Premium HMO In-Network Benefit Out-of-Network (after deductible) (1)  

E-print Network

in full 20% coinsurance Doctor Office Visits $20 / visit $15 / visit $20 / visit 20% coinsurance / visit $75 / visit $75 / visit $75 / visit Chiropractic Care None None $20 / visit, up to 12 visits per-registration Penalty. Please refer to the Certificate of Insurance for additional information. 8. This office visit

Fraden, Seth

331

NMSU DSU Customer Service: 1-866-369-NMSU (6678) NMSU Carveout Plan  

E-print Network

Urgent Care Center/Office -0- 20% 20% Ambulance Ambulance (ground/air) -0- 20% 20% 2 Chiropractic Assignment Not Accepted Services Not Covered by Medicare PHYSICIAN SERVICES Outpatient & Office ­ Medical/Surgical Office visits, including allergy testing & treatment, surgery, radiologist, pathology -0- 20% 20

Nishiguchi, Michele

332

First Year -FIND IT Join us on Facebook at  

E-print Network

in to Uni life, feel free to email, call or drop in to our office located around the campus (just look SCIENCE PHYSICAL SCIENCES SCIENCE AND COMPUTING ECONOMICS COMMERCE AND LAW OFFICE OF COMMERCIAL SERVICES ASIAN FOODS CHIROPRACTIC TECHNIQUES LABORATORY SABC TRANSPORTABLE TAVERN TRANSPORTABLES ENGINEERING MBS

333

Form Deadline: March 3, 2014 (New students-within 3 weeks of your offer of admission)  

E-print Network

entirety Return to: Financial Aid Office, UC Davis Health System, 4610 X Street, Sacramento CA 95817 or fax 1 of 3 OFFICE USE CRA ____________________ Complete _______________ EDE load________________ #12 institution (e.g., nursing, dental, chiropractic, veterinary medicine)? _____YES _____NO If YES, complete next

Leistikow, Bruce N.

334

Benefit Summary The NYSHIP Student Employee Health Plan (SEHP) is a health insurance program  

E-print Network

for medical services, such as office visits, surgery and diagnostic testing under the network and non-network programs. Coverage for chiropractic care and physical therapy is provided through the Managed Physical University Benefits Office. For more detailed benefit information call the insurance carriers at the numbers

Brinkmann, Peter

335

2013 Health Comparison Chart Medical Plan Coverage  

E-print Network

deductible 30% after deductible Office Visit 35% 35% after deductible 35% after deductible 35% after deductible 35% after deductible 35% after deductible Chiropractic 35% 35% after deductible 35% after 25, 2013 VISION COVERAGE (through EyeMed) In-Network Out-of-Network $2 per person/month office visit

336

2013-14 (RN) UC Davis Student Health Insurance Plan (Davis SHIP): Benefit Highlights  

E-print Network

are covered at 100%, including all x-rays, lab and other test given in connection with the exam. Office Visit Outside SHCS: 80% in-network / 60% out-of-network1 Other Therapy Expense · Chiropractic Care · Speech

Todd, Brian

337

MEMORANDUM OF UNDERSTANDING MICHIGAN STATE UNIVERSITY  

E-print Network

$ 100 B. Effective July 1, 2002, office visits for chiropractic services shall be covered under the Community Blue plan with office visit co-pays consistent with other physician office visit co-pays. C program: · cover minimal office visits · cover flu serum with no co-pay if within network · cover

Liu, Taosheng

338

2014 Health Comparison Chart Children may be covered until they reach the age of 26. Coverage will end on the last day of the month a child turns 26.  

E-print Network

deductible 30% after deductible Office Visit 35% 35% after deductible 35% after deductible 35% after deductible 35% after deductible 35% after deductible Chiropractic 35% 35% after deductible 35% after $2 per person/month EyeMed Vision in-network benefits shown office visit $10 copay ­ once every 12

339

Entry Award Nomination Form MD7618/08-12  

E-print Network

Entry Award Dean of Chiropractic and Sports Science Entry Award Dean of Education Entry Award Dean Nomination closing date - Friday 19 October 2012 Office Use Only Rec date Callista Input Stats Course CodeCommonwealthDepartmentofEducation,ScienceandTraining · Pleaseticktheboxesandprovideanswersforeachofthefollowingquestions 1. Are you of Aboriginal or Torres Strait Islander Descent? Tickasappropriate Office Use Only

340

What you need to know about insurance at UC Berkeley  

E-print Network

and mental health office visits, emergency room and urgent care visits are covered with a co-pay Great Plan;· Acupuncture and Chiropractic Visits ­ $15 copay per visit with an in network provider ­ No limit on number as the secondary insurance, an authorization from the Student Health Insurance Office is still required. · Aetna

Jacobs, Lucia

341

MEMORANDUM OF UNDERSTANDING MICHIGAN STATE UNIVERSITY  

E-print Network

for chiropractic services shall be covered under the Community Blue plan with office visit co-pays consistent $20 $40 Non-Formulary $40 $80 Bio-tech $50 $100 B. Effective July 1, 2002, office visits with other physician office visit co-pays. C. Effective July 1, 2002 and subject to COBRA rights

Liu, Taosheng

342

2013 Retiree Health Plan Design Pre & Post 65 (Medicare eligible retirees Medicare is always primary for health)  

E-print Network

% after deductible Office Visit 35% 35% after deductible 35% 35% after deductible Lab & X-Ray 10% 30 deductible Physical Therapy 35% 35% after deductible 35% 35% after deductible Chiropractic 35% 40% after Dollar Maximum $1,500 per person per year $1,500 per person per year VISION COVERAGE office visit $10

343

http://www.uhs.berkeley.edu/students/insurance/ucship.shtml All UC Students are required to have a major  

E-print Network

,000) · Increased coverage for acupuncture, chiropractic, and podiatry services · In-Network medical and mental health office visits, emergency room & urgent care visits have co-pays that are not subject Provider · $15 for each primary care office visit, deductible waived · $20 for each specialty care office

Doudna, Jennifer A.

344

PacificSource Managed Care : MUS Summary of Benefits and Coverage: What this Plan Covers & What it Costs  

E-print Network

/naturopath Chiropractic office visit/manipulation Up to $25 a visit $15 copayment Up to $25 a visit 35% You pay all cost If you visit a health care provider's office or clinic Primary care visit to treat an injury or illness

Lawrence, Rick L.

345

LEGAL BUSINESS NAME AND DBA NAME (as applicable) PERSON OR SOLE PROPRIETOR -ENTER FULL NAME HERE (Last, First) (REQUIRED) PERMANENT BUSINESS Address-(number & Street or P.O. Box) (REQUIRED) PERMANENT REMITTANCE Address (if different from Business Address)  

E-print Network

. Dentistry, Podiatry, Psychotherapy, Optometry, Chiropractic) ALL OTHER CORPORATIONS SOLE PROPRIETOR EMPLOYEE be required for foreign visitors. Contact UCSC Payroll Office at 831-459-4203 for additional information. TAX: UCSC - Accounting Office, 1156 High St., Santa Cruz, CA 95064 or Fax: (831)459-3747 Questions: Call

California at Santa Cruz, University of

346

Medical Plan Detail Document for Funded Graduate Students  

E-print Network

of Privacy Practices Fiscal Year 2004 ­ 2005 Office of Human Resources Benefits Services Archer House 2130 (Mental) Health Services Chemotherapy Chiropractic Care Dental Services Emergency Care Extended Care and Surgical Supplies Newborn Care Nutritional Services OB/GYN Examinations Occupational Therapy Office Visits

347

A combined approach for the treatment of cervical vertigo  

Microsoft Academic Search

Background: Cervical vertigo is a diagnosis commonly made at both otorhinolaringologist and chiropractic offices. Hypothesized nonvascular mechanisms are reviewed. Therapeutic approaches have been suggested in the literature, ranging from cervical immobilization to vertebral manipulation.Objective: To characterize the patient population with cervical vertigo and observe therapeutic results of a treatment protocol by using distinct conservative modalities.Methods: Fifteen subjects with cervical vertigo

Eduardo S. B Bracher; Clemente I. R Almeida; Roberta A Almeida; André C Duprat; Cheri B. B Bracher

2000-01-01

348

STATE OF CALIFORNIA-DEPARTMENT OF FINANCE PAYEE DATA RECORD  

E-print Network

on this form. Sign, date, and return to the State agency (department/office) address shown at the bottom, chiropractic, etc.) LEGAL (e.g., attorney services) EXEMPT (nonprofit) ALL OTHERS PAYEE ENTITY TYPE CHECK ONE or Print) TITLE SIGNATURE DATE TELEPHONE ( ) Please return completed form to: Department/Office: Unit

349

Faculty of Science Biochemistry  

E-print Network

D) � Professional schools in medicine, dentistry, pharmacy, veterinary and chiropractic � Biopharmaceutical--will expand your mind. Student Recruitment Office University of Windsor Windsor, Ontario N9B 3P4 Phone: 519-973-7098 Email: chembio@uwindsor.ca Visit Us PAC7306 Produced by the Office of Public Affairs and Communications

350

Blue Cross Blue Shield-Managed Care: MUS Summary of Benefits and Coverage: What this Plan Covers & What it Costs Coverage Period: 7/1/2013-6/30/2014  

E-print Network

/naturopath Chiropractic office visit/manipulation Up to $25 a visit $15 copayment Up to $25 a visit 35% You pay all cost If you visit a health care provider's office or clinic Primary care visit to treat an injury or illness

Dyer, Bill

351

Entry Award Nomination Form Entry Award Nomination Form  

E-print Network

Entry Award and Scholarship Dean of Chiropractic Entry Award Dean of Education Entry Award Dean(nextpage)arenotrequiredifyouhaveappliedvia TISC Nomination closing date - Friday 21 October 2011 Office Use Only Rec date Callista Input StatsCommonwealthDepartmentofEducation,ScienceandTraining · Pleaseticktheboxesandprovideanswersforeachofthefollowingquestions 1. Are you of Aboriginal or Torres Strait Islander Descent? Tickasappropriate Office Use Only

352

UNIVERSITY OF SOUTH FLORIDA -2003/2004 UNDERGRADUATE CATALOG ABOUT USF 9  

E-print Network

ARCHITECTURE AND COMMU- NITY DESIGN 68 Army Reserve Officer's Training Corps (ROTC) 179 ART (ART) 184 ADMINISTRATION FACULTY 131 BUSINESS AND OFFICE EDUCA- TION 134 C CAMPUS CONTACTS FOR STUDENT DISABILITY SERVICES ENGINEERING 152 CHEMISTRY (CHS/CHM) 85 Childhood/Language Arts/Reading Education 136 Chiropractic School

Lajeunesse, Marc J.

353

Mentee Registration Box 70592 ~ Johnson City, TN 37614 ~ Office 423/439-5602 ~ Fax 423-439-4840 ~ mpamentoring@etsu.edu  

E-print Network

Mentee Registration Box 70592 ~ Johnson City, TN 37614 ~ Office 423/439-5602 ~ Fax 423 Advisement (MPA) Office on the 2nd floor of the Culp Center inside the ARC. With this form, you of Study: Chiropractic (PCHI) Dentistry (PDNT) Medicine (PMED) Optometry (POPT) Osteopathic Medicine (POPM

Karsai, Istvan

354

The chart below represents a general overview of the Yale University Medical Plan options. Clerical & Technical, Service & Maintenance and Security Staff  

E-print Network

Preventive Care $0 $0 $0 Not covered Office Visit: Primary Care Provider (PCP) Mental Health $0 $10 $10 30% Office Visit: Specialist (including Urgent Care5 ) $0 $15 $15 30% Routine Eye Exams $0 $15 $15 30 $0 30% Inpatient Hospital Services $0 $0 $0 30% Physical Therapy/ Chiropractic PhysicalTherapy: $0

355

UC Davis Health System Supplemental Application for Financial Aid  

E-print Network

be completed in its entirety. Return to: Financial Aid Office, UC Davis Health System, 4610 X Street.) $ $ List source(s) and amount $ $ Page 1 of 3 OFFICE USE CRA Complete FAFSA load #12;7. To qualify institution (e.g., nursing, dental, chiropractic, veterinary medicine)? _____YES _____NO If YES, complete next

Leistikow, Bruce N.

356

Return this completed form to the Office of MPA, inside the ARC, located on the 2nd floor of the Culp Center.  

E-print Network

Return this completed form to the Office of MPA, inside the ARC, located on the 2nd floor of the Culp Center. PO Box 70592 ~ Johnson City, TN 37614 ~ Office 423/439-5602 ~ Fax 423: ___________ Circle your Pre-professional Program of Study: Chiropractic (PCHI) Dentistry (PDNT) Medicine (PMED

Karsai, Istvan

357

Entry Award Nomination Form Entry Award Nomination Form  

E-print Network

Dean of Business Entry Award and Scholarship Dean of Chiropractic Entry Award Dean of Education Entry(nextpage)arenotrequiredifyouhaveappliedvia TISC Nomination closing date - Friday 22 October 2010 Office Use Only Rec date Callista Input StatsCommonwealthDepartmentofEducation,ScienceandTraining · Pleaseticktheboxesandprovideanswersforeachofthefollowingquestions 1. Are you of Aboriginal or Torres Strait Islander Descent? Tickasappropriate Office Use Only

358

The medical coverage is designed to help protect you and your covered dependents against financial loss. The chart below summarizes the key features of the medical plan options available to you and your covered dependents.  

E-print Network

Physician office visit $20 copay $20 copay 40% Specialist office visit $35 copay $35 copay Hospital, occupational, speech therapy & chiropractic care $20 copay (physician); $35 copay (specialist) 20% Preventive auth.) Pregnancy & Maternity Care Office visits $20 copay (initial visit); thereafter no copay $20

Kay, Mark A.

359

StaffFest 2012 Prize Recipient  

E-print Network

Benson Retiree 60 min Swedish massage Dolce Vita Salon and Day Spa Deb Benson President's Office Camera NIU golf balls President's office Sue Burton Building Services Global new beginnings carryall bag William Crase Physical Plant Healthy Life Chiropractic Trigger wheel Operating Staff Council Jody Crocker

Karonis, Nicholas T.

360

Office/Department/Major Box # Area or Concentration Advisor Last Name Location Phone Email Adult, Commuter and Transfer Services  

E-print Network

Office/Department/Major Box # Area or Concentration Advisor Last Name Location Phone Email Adult Medical Professions includes: Pre-Medical, Pre-Pharmacy, Pre-Chiropractic, Pre-Osteopathic Medicine, Pre ARC, Culp Center 65248 corbitt@etsu.edu #12;Office/Department/Major Box # Area or Concentration

Karsai, Istvan

361

ATTACHMENT B Payee Data Record Form  

E-print Network

-2003) INSTRUCTIONS: Complete all information on this form. Sign, date, and return to the State agency (department/office.g., dentistry, psychotherapy, chiropractic, etc.) LEGAL (e.g., attorney services) EXEMPT (nonprofit) ALL OTHERS form to: Department/Office: Unit/Section: Mailing Address: City/State/Zip: Telephone: ( ) Fax: ( ) E

362

Use of Complementary Medicine in Older Americans: Results from the Health and Retirement Study  

PubMed Central

Purpose The correlates of Complementary and Alternative Medicine (CAM) utilization among elders have not been fully investigated. This study was designed to identify such correlates in a large sample of older adults, thus generating new data relevant to consumer education, medical training and health practice and policy. Design and Methods A subsample from the 2000 wave of the Health and Retirement Study (n=1099) aged 52 or older were surveyed regarding use of CAM (chiropractic, alternative practitioners, dietary and herbal supplements, and personal practices). Results 88% of respondents over 65 years used CAM, with dietary supplements and chiropractic most commonly reported (65% and 46%, respectively). Users of alternate practitioners and dietary supplements reported having more out-of-pocket expenses on health than non-users of these modalities. Age correlated positively with use of dietary supplements and personal practices and inversely with alternative practitioner use. Men reported less CAM use than women, except for chiropractic and personal practices. Blacks and Hispanics used less chiropractic and dietary supplements, but reported more personal practices than Caucasians. Advanced education correlated with fewer chiropractic visits and more dietary and herbal supplement and personal practices use. Higher income, functional impairment, alcohol use and frequent physician visits correlated with more alternative practitioner use. There was no association between CAM and number of chronic diseases. Implications The magnitude and patterns of CAM use among elders lend considerable importance to this field in public health policy-making and suggest a need for further epidemiological research and ongoing awareness efforts for both patients and providers. PMID:16051914

Ness, Jose; Cirillo, Dominic J.; Weir, David R.; Nisly, Nicole L.; Wallace, Robert B.

2006-01-01

363

Management of chest pain: exploring the views and experiences of chiropractors and medical practitioners in a focus group interview  

PubMed Central

Background We report on a multidisciplinary focus group project related to the appropriate care of chiropractic patients who present with chest pain. The prevalence and clinical management, both diagnosis and treatment, of musculoskeletal chest pain in ambulatory medical settings, was explored as the second dimension of the focus group project reported here. Methods This project collected observational data from a multidisciplinary focus group composed of both chiropractic and medical professionals. The goals of the focus group were to explore the attitudes and experiences of medical and chiropractic clinicians regarding their patients with chest pain who receive care from both medical and chiropractic providers, to identify important clinical or research questions that may inform the development of 'best practices' for coordinating or managing care of chest pain patients between medical and chiropractic providers, to identify important clinical or research questions regarding the diagnosis and treatment of chest pain of musculoskeletal origin, to explore various methods that might be used to answer those questions, and to discuss the feasibility of conducting or coordinating a multidisciplinary research effort along this line of inquiry. The convenience-sample of five focus group participants included two chiropractors, two medical cardiologists, and one dual-degreed chiropractor/medical physician. The focus group was audiotaped and transcripts were prepared of the focus group interaction. Content analysis of the focus group transcripts were performed to identify key themes and concepts, using categories of narratives. Results Six key themes emerged from the analysis of the focus group interaction, including issues surrounding (1) Diagnosis; (2) Treatment and prognosis; (3) Chest pain as a chronic, multifactorial, or comorbid condition; (4) Inter-professional coordination of care; (5) Best practices and standardization of care; and (6) Training and education. Conclusion This study carries implications for chiropractic clinical training relative to enhancing diagnostic competencies in chest pain, as well as the need to ascertain and improve those skills, competencies, and standards for referrals and sharing of clinical information that may improve cross-disciplinary coordination of care for chest pain patients. PMID:16138920

Smith, Monica; Lawrence, Dana J; Rowell, Robert M

2005-01-01

364

Chiropractors as Primary Spine Care Providers: precedents and essential measures  

PubMed Central

Chiropractors have the potential to address a substantial portion of spinal disorders; however the utilization rate of chiropractic services has remained low and largely unchanged for decades. Other health care professions such as podiatry/chiropody, physiotherapy and naturopathy have successfully gained public and professional trust, increases in scope of practice and distinct niche positions within mainstream health care. Due to the overwhelming burden of spine care upon the health care system, the establishment of a ‘primary spine care provider’ may be a worthwhile niche position to create for society’s needs. Chiropractors could fulfill this role, but not without first reviewing and improving its approach to the management of spinal disorders. Such changes have already been achieved by the chiropractic profession in Switzerland, Denmark, and New Mexico, whose examples may serve as important templates for renewal here in Canada. PMID:24302774

Erwin, W. Mark; Korpela, A. Pauliina; Jones, Robert C.

2013-01-01

365

Chiropractors as Primary Spine Care Providers: precedents and essential measures.  

PubMed

Chiropractors have the potential to address a substantial portion of spinal disorders; however the utilization rate of chiropractic services has remained low and largely unchanged for decades. Other health care professions such as podiatry/chiropody, physiotherapy and naturopathy have successfully gained public and professional trust, increases in scope of practice and distinct niche positions within mainstream health care. Due to the overwhelming burden of spine care upon the health care system, the establishment of a 'primary spine care provider' may be a worthwhile niche position to create for society's needs. Chiropractors could fulfill this role, but not without first reviewing and improving its approach to the management of spinal disorders. Such changes have already been achieved by the chiropractic profession in Switzerland, Denmark, and New Mexico, whose examples may serve as important templates for renewal here in Canada. PMID:24302774

Erwin, W Mark; Korpela, A Pauliina; Jones, Robert C

2013-12-01

366

The origin, and application of somatosensory evoked potentials as a neurophysiological technique to investigate neuroplasticity  

PubMed Central

Somatosensory evoked potentionals (SEPs) can be used to elucidate differences in cortical activity associated with a spinal manipulation (SM) intervention. The purpose of this narrative review is to overview the origin and application of SEPs, a neurophysiological technique to investigate neuroplasticity. Summaries of: 1) parameters for SEP generation and waveform recording; 2) SEP peak nomenclature, interpretation and generators; 3) peaks pertaining to tactile information processing (relevant to both chiropractic and other manual therapies); 4) utilization and application of SEPs; 5) SEPs concurrent with an experimental task and at baseline/control/pretest; 6) SEPs pain studies; and 7) SEPs design (pre/post) and neural reorganization/neuroplasticity; and 8) SEPs and future chiropractic research are all reviewed. Understanding what SEPs are, and their application allows chiropractors, educators, and other manual therapists interested in SM to understand the context, and importance of research findings from SM studies that involve SEPs. PMID:24932021

Passmore, Steven R.; Murphy, Bernadette; Lee, Timothy D.

2014-01-01

367

Defining Quackery: An examination of the Manitoba Medical Profession and the early development of professional unity  

PubMed Central

In the early 1920s, the Manitoba medical profession reached a pinnacle in its opposition to alternative medicine, waging an aggressive four-year campaign against chiropractic and osteopathy to “protect” the public from the dangers of alternative forms of healing and prevent “irregulars” from establishing their practices. It was during these same years that the Manitoba medical profession was able to successfully overcome many internal problems of consensus and external problems of legitimacy. Examining the years leading up to, during, and following the campaign, this paper demonstrates how the Manitoba medical profession’s militant reaction to osteopathy and chiropractic during these years helped strengthen and differentiate orthodox practitioners as a group, thus reinforcing their authority within the public realm. PMID:17549158

Scalena, Adam

2006-01-01

368

Ian Douglass Coulter, PhD  

PubMed Central

This paper focuses on Dr. Ian Coulter’s accomplishments from the time he became Executive Vice-President of CMCC in 1981, until he ended his presidency with a year’s administrative leave in 1990. Annual planning initiatives, pedagogy, scholarship, conflicts, and the quest for university affiliation are discussed as well as his legacy to the College and the chiropractic profession. The term “adventurous” was first attributed to Coulter by Oswald Hall, PhD, Professor Emeritus, University of Toronto who had worked closely with Coulter in a major investigation of the chiropractic profession from 1976 to 1979. Throughout this article the author tries to capture the spirit of daring, innovation and intellect that permeated Coulter’s presidency, enthralling his advocates and confounding his detractors. PMID:17549218

Brown, Douglas M

2004-01-01

369

Successful management of acute-onset torticollis in a giraffe (Giraffa camelopardalis reticulata).  

PubMed

A 2-yr-old male reticulated giraffe (Giraffa camelopardalis reticulata) presented with severe midcervical segmental torticollis upon arrival as an incoming shipment. Despite initial medical management, the giraffe developed marked neck sensitivity, focal muscle spasms, and decreased cervical range of motion. Using operant conditioning to assist patient positioning and tolerance to cervical manipulation, a series of manually applied chiropractic treatments were applied to the affected cervical vertebrae in an effort to restore normal cervical mobility. Laser therapy and cervical range of motion exercises were also used to reduce cervical muscle hypertonicity. The combined application of these nontraditional therapies produced marked clinical improvement. This case highlights the potential benefits of combining traditional medical management with chiropractic treatment and physical therapy techniques for management of severe acute-onset torticollis in a giraffe. PMID:23505724

Dadone, Liza I; Haussler, Kevin K; Brown, Greg; Marsden, Melanie; Gaynor, James; Johnston, Matthew S; Garelle, Della

2013-03-01

370

A case study of chronic headaches.  

PubMed

The following paper is a case study of a patient with a history of chronic headaches (originally diagnosed as migraine without aura) who was being treaded at the Macquarie University Chiropractic Outpatients Clinic for cervical spine dysfunction. The treatments successfully reduced the upper neck and thoracic pain that the patient was experiencing and for which they had initially presented at the clinic. During the treatments, the patient also showed a significant subjective reduction in prevalence and intensity of headaches over a four month period. Analysis of the outcome is complicated by the fact that it is not clear whether the patient's headaches were initially misdiagnosed as common migraine when in fact, they were cervicogenic. There may be some overlap between the two conditions, and a possible causative relationship between cervical spine dysfunction and common migraine. Furthermore, this case study discusses the validity of chiropractic treatment of organic disorders such as chronic headache or migraine. PMID:17987139

Tuchin, P J; Brookes, M J; Swaffer, T

1996-07-01

371

Diagnosis and management of "an apparent mechanical" femoral mononeuropathy: a case study.  

PubMed

This report describes an apparent case of femoral nerve mononeuropathy in a 58-year-old equestrian due to mechanical stress. A woman presented at a chiropractic office complaining of right buttock pain radiating to the right groin and knee. A treatment plan, consisting of chiropractic adjustments in addition to stretching and myofascial therapy, was initiated. The goal was to reduce pain and inflammation in the sacroiliac articulation by restoring normal biomechanical function. A rehabilitation program to alleviate tension in the musculature was initiated to reduce mechanical stresses exerted on the femoral nerve. The patient received five treatments over a period of three weeks and became asymptomatic. Even though peripheral nerve entrapment is an uncommon condition, clinicians must not overlook the possibility of a femoral mononeuropathy as it can produce a complex presentation and lead to ineffective patient management. PMID:18060007

Desmarais, Ariane; Descarreaux, Martin

2007-12-01

372

Long-term effectiveness of bone-setting, light exercise therapy, and physiotherapy for prolonged back pain: A randomized controlled trial  

Microsoft Academic Search

Background: Chiropractic manipulation and strenuous exercise therapy have been shown effective in the treatment of nonspecific back pain. Bone-setting, the predecessor of modern manual therapies, still survives in some parts of Finland and was compared with a light exercise therapy and nonmanipulative, pragmatic physiotherapy in a year-long randomized controlled trial on patients with long-term back pain. Methods: One hundred fourteen

Heikki M. Hemmilä; Sirkka M. Keinänen-Kiukaanniemi; Sinikka Levoska; Pekka Puska

2002-01-01

373

Provision of Nutrition Counseling, Referrals to Registered Dietitians, and Sources of Nutrition Information Among Practicing Chiropractors in the United States  

Microsoft Academic Search

Objective To investigate US chiropractors’ provision of nutrition counseling and referrals to registered dietitians and sources of nutrition information. Chiropractors’ perceptions of the minimum educational requirement for registered dietitians and nutrition training received in chiropractic school were also examined.Design A descriptive study was conducted by use of a nationwide, mailed survey.Subjects\\/setting Surveys were sent to 1,590 practicing chiropractors in the

BRENT H WALKER; MILDRED K MATTFELDT-BEMAN; TERRY J TOMAZIC; MARJORIE A SAWICKI

2000-01-01

374

Intra-professional and inter-professional referral patterns of chiropractors  

Microsoft Academic Search

BACKGROUND: With the increasing popularity of chiropractic care in the United States, inter-professional relationships between conventional trained physicians (MDs and DOs) and chiropractors (DCs) will have an expanding impact on patient care. The objectives of this study are to describe the intra-professional referral patterns amongst DCs, describe the inter-professional referral patterns between DCs and conventional trained medical primary care physicians

Monica Smith; Barry R Greene; Mitchell Haas; Veerasathpurush Allareddy

2006-01-01

375

Practice characteristics of chiropractors in The Netherlands  

Microsoft Academic Search

The last published survey of practice characteristics in The Netherlands was undertaken over 10 years ago. Since then, there has been a near threefold increase in the number of registered chiropractors in The Netherlands. A postal survey of all 161 SCN-registered chiropractors in The Netherlands was undertaken to re-evaluate and update the knowledge-base regarding chiropractic practice in this part of

Natalie Imbos; Jennifer Langworthy; Francis Wilson; Gerritje Regelink

2005-01-01

376

Mechanical force spinal manipulation increases trunk muscle strength assessed by electromyography: A comparative clinical trial  

Microsoft Academic Search

Objective: The objective of this study was to determine whether mechanical force, manually-assisted (MFMA) spinal manipulative therapy (SMT) affects paraspinal muscle strength as assessed through use of surface electromyography (sEMG). Design: Prospective clinical trial comparing sEMG output in 1 active treatment group and 2 control groups. Setting: Outpatient chiropractic clinic, Phoenix, AZ. Subjects: Forty subjects with low back pain (LBP)

Tony S. Keller; Christopher J. Colloca

2000-01-01

377

Complementary and Alternative Medicine: What's It All About?  

Microsoft Academic Search

A number of health-related interventions—from widespread therapies such as acupuncture, herbal medicine, homeopathy and yoga, to less well-known modalities such as Feldenkrais, iridology, reflexology and reiki—have increasingly come under the general heading of complementary and alternative medicine (CAM). A few, such as biofeedback, chiropractic and physical therapy, are considered conventional by some, alternative by others. Several national surveys estimate that

Bruce Barrett

2001-01-01

378

Legal and Ethical Issues in Integrative Pain Management  

Microsoft Academic Search

Use of complementary and alternative medical (CAM) therapies (such as acupuncture and traditional oriental medicine, chiropractic,\\u000a herbal medicine, massage therapy, and mind-body therapies such as hypnotherapy and guided imagery) may be more common in pain\\u000a management as compared with other clinical specialties, because of medical recognition that pain has psychological (and perhaps\\u000a even spiritual) and physical dimensions. Nonetheless, the integration

Michael H. Cohen

379

Use of non-orthodox and conventional health care in Great Britain  

Microsoft Academic Search

OBJECTIVE--To describe the characteristics of patients using non-orthodox health care and their pattern of use of conventional health care with respect to a particular problem. DESIGN--Postal survey of all 2152 practitioners of acupuncture, chiropractic, homeopathy, naturopathy, and osteopathy identified from 11 national professional association registers. Patients attending a representative sample of 101 responding practitioners completed questionnaires covering demographic characteristics, presenting

K J Thomas; J Carr; L Westlake; B T Williams

1991-01-01

380

Association between Use of Complementary\\/Alternative Medicine and Health-Related Behaviors among Health Fair Participants  

Microsoft Academic Search

Background. The relationship between complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) and standard preventive care is not well defined.Methods. We surveyed 1,593 health fair participants on their use of CAM and determined odds ratios for standard preventive care and healthy behaviors among users of provider-based CAM (e.g., chiropractic) and users of herbs or supplements.Results. Users of provider-based CAM were no less likely

Andrew R. Robinson; Lori A. Crane; Arthur J. Davidson; John F. Steiner

2002-01-01

381

Immediate changes in the quadriceps femoris angle after insertion of an orthotic device  

Microsoft Academic Search

Objective: To measure changes in the quadriceps femoris angle (Q-angle) after the insertion of full-length flexible orthotics. Setting: Outpatient health center of Logan College of Chiropractic. Subjects: A total of 40 male subjects were included in the study population. The selected population all demonstrated bilateral pes planus or hyperpronation syndrome. Design: Before-after trial. Method: A cohort demonstrating bilateral hyperpronation was

D. Robert Kuhn; Terry R. Yochum; Anton R. Cherry; Sean S. Rodgers

2002-01-01

382

Interexaminer reliability of activator method's relative leg-length evaluation in the prone extended position  

Microsoft Academic Search

Objective: To investigate the interexaminer reliability of the prone extended relative leg-length check as described by Activator Methods, Inc. Subjects: Thirty-four subjects were selected from a pool of 52 consecutive patients visiting a private chiropractic office. Methods: Exclusion criteria included congenital or acquired conditions known to affect lower extremity length and inability to lie prone for a 10-minute period. Two

Hang T. Nguyen; Diane N. Resnick; Sylvia G. Caldwell; Ernest W. Elston; Bart B. Bishop; Joseph B. Steinhouser; Terry J. Gimmillaro; Joseph C. Keating

1999-01-01

383

Case study: acceleration\\/deceleration injury with angular kyphosis  

Microsoft Academic Search

Objective: To discuss the case of a patient who received upper cervical chiropractic care after trauma-induced arcual kyphosis in the cervical spine. A practical application of conservative management for posttrauma cervical spine injury in the private office setting is described.Clinical Features: A 17-year-old female patient suffered an unstable C3\\/C4 motor segment after a lateral-impact motor vehicle collision. Additional symptoms on

Robert C. Kessinger; Dessy V. Boneva

2000-01-01

384

Practice-based research: The Oregon experience  

Microsoft Academic Search

Background: Practice-based research links community-based physicians and their patients with investigators at academic institutions. In 1992, Western States Chiropractic College developed an infrastructure, the Center for Outcomes Studies, to support practice-based research. The Low Back Pain Study, undertaken in collaboration with Oregon Health Sciences University, 111 medical physicians, and 60 chiropractors, relied on the Center for Outcomes Studies infrastructure for

Joanne Nyiendo; Carol Lloyd; Mitchell Haas

2001-01-01

385

Dear Graduate Assistants and Graduate Fellows, We are pleased to provide you with this overview of the University of Connecticut's GA-Student Health Insurance Plan (SHIP). The GA-  

E-print Network

Inpatient Hospital Expense (Pre-certification requirements apply) 90% of PA 70% of R&C Physician's Office Visit $25 co-pay per visit, then paid at 100% of PA 70% of R&C Mental Health Office Visit $25 co-pay per to deductible) 90% of PA 70% of R&C Physical/Chiropractic//Occupational Therapy $25 co-pay per visit, then paid

Oliver, Douglas L.

386

Use of Provider-Based Complementary and Alternative Medicine by Adult Smokers in the United States: Comparison From the 2002 and 2007 NHIS Survey.  

PubMed

Abstract Purpose . To provide a snapshot of provider-based complementary and alternative medicine (pbCAM) use among adult smokers and assess the opportunity for these providers to deliver tobacco cessation interventions. Design . Cross-sectional analysis of data from the 2002 and 2007 National Health Interview Surveys. Setting . Nationally representative sample. Subjects . A total of 54,437 (31,044 from 2002; 23,393 from 2007) adults 18 years and older. Measures . The analysis focuses on 10 types of pbCAM, including acupuncture, Ayurveda, biofeedback, chelation therapy, chiropractic care, energy therapy, folk medicine, hypnosis, massage, and naturopathy. Analysis . The proportions of current smokers using any pbCAM as well as specific types of pbCAM in 2002 and 2007 are compared using SAS SURVEYLOGISTIC. Results . Between 2002 and 2007, the percentage of recent users of any pbCAM therapy increased from 12.5% to 15.4% (p = .001). The largest increases occurred in massage, chiropractic, and acupuncture. Despite a decrease in the national average of current smokers (22.0% to 19.4%; p = .001), proportions of smokers within specific pbCAM disciplines remained consistent. Conclusion . Complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) practitioners, particularly those in chiropractic, acupuncture, and massage, represent new cohorts in the health care community to promote tobacco cessation. There is an opportunity to provide brief tobacco intervention training to CAM practitioners and engage them in public health efforts to reduce the burden of tobacco use in the United States. PMID:24359177

Hamm, Eric; Muramoto, Myra L; Howerter, Amy; Floden, Lysbeth; Govindarajan, Lubna

2014-01-01

387

Beyond the didactic classroom: educational models to encourage active student involvement in learning.  

PubMed

In a chiropractic college that utilizes a hybrid curriculum model composed of adult-based learning strategies along with traditional lecture-based course delivery, a literature search for educational delivery methods that would integrate the affective domain and the cognitive domain of learning provided some insights into the use of problem-based learning (PBL), experiential learning theory (ELT), and the emerging use of appreciative inquiry (AI) to enhance the learning experience. The purpose of this literature review is to provide a brief overview of key components of PBL, ELT, and AI in educational methodology and to discuss how these might be used within the chiropractic curriculum to supplement traditional didactic lecture courses. A growing body of literature describes the use of PBL and ELT in educational settings across many disciplines, both at the undergraduate and graduate levels. The use of appreciative inquiry as an instructional methodology presents a new area for exploration and study in the academic environment. Educational research in the chiropractic classroom incorporating ELT and appreciative inquiry might provide some valuable insights for future curriculum development. PMID:18483586

Shreeve, Michael W

2008-01-01

388

Prevalence of adverse effects among students taking technique classes: A retrospective study.  

PubMed

Objective : The main objective of this study was to determine characteristics of injuries experienced by students while learning chiropractic procedures in the classroom. Methods : Injury was defined as any physical adverse effect such as pain, stiffness, headache, and muscle spasm. Survey questions included age, sex, role, anatomical areas of injury, adjustive technique utilized, types of injury, treatment (if any), and recovery time. The survey was administered among the students in the 5th, 6th, and 8th trimesters of our doctor of chiropractic program. Only students who had completed one or more chiropractic procedures courses at the institution were asked to participate in the study. Results : Female recipients had a higher prevalence of adverse effects as the recipient of the adjustment than did male recipients. The most common site for injury overall was the lower back. The relationship between recipient role and sacroiliac joint injury and the relationship between adjustor role and wrist/hand injury were statistically significant. Students were more likely to be injured in the beginning of their technique education. Conclusion : This study suggests that students in technique courses learning adjustive procedures experience minor adverse physical effects related to the physical skills being learned. Strategies for prevention need to be considered. PMID:24955948

Kizhakkeveettil, Anupama; Sikorski, David; Tobias, Gene; Korgan, Christos

2014-10-01

389

Spinal manipulation under anesthesia: a narrative review of the literature and commentary  

PubMed Central

As exhibited throughout the medical literature over many decades, there is a lack of uniformity in the manner in which spine pain patients have historically qualified for and received manipulation under anesthesia (MUA). Also, for different professions that treat the same types of spinal conditions via the same means, fundamental MUA decision points vary within the published protocols of different professional associations. The more recent chiropractic literature communicates that the evidence to support the efficacy of MUA of the spine remains largely anecdotal. In addition, it has been reported that the types of spinal conditions most suitable for MUA are without clear-cut consensus, with various indications for MUA of the low back resting wholly upon the opinions and experiences of MUA practitioners. This article will provide a narrative review of the MUA literature, followed by a commentary about the current lack of high quality research evidence, the anecdotal and consensus basis of existing clinical protocols, as well as related professional, ethical and legal concerns for the chiropractic practitioner. The limitations of the current medical literature related to MUA via conscious/deep sedation need to be recognized and used as a guide to clinical experience when giving consideration to this procedure. More research, in the form of controlled clinical trials, must be undertaken if this procedure is to remain a potential treatment option for chronic spine pain patients in the chiropractic clinical practice. PMID:23672974

2013-01-01

390

The attrition rate of licensed chiropractors in California: an exploratory ecological investigation of time-trend data  

PubMed Central

Background The authors hypothesized the attrition rate of licensed chiropractors in California has gradually increased over the past several decades. "Attrition" as determined for this study is defined as a loss of legal authority to practice chiropractic for any reason during the first 10 years after the license was issued. The percentage of license attrition after 10 years was determined for each group of graduates licensed in California each year between 1970 and 1998. The cost of tuition, the increase in the supply of licensed chiropractors and the ratio of licensed chiropractors to California residents were examined as possible influences on the rate of license attrition. Methods The attrition rate was determined by a retrospective analysis of license status data obtained from the California Department of Consumer Affairs. Other variables were determined from US Bureau of Census data, survey data from the American Chiropractic Association and catalogs from a US chiropractic college. Results The 10-year attrition rate rose from 10% for those graduates licensed in 1970 to a peak of 27.8% in 1991. The 10-year attrition rate has since remained between 20-25% for the doctors licensed between 1992-1998. Conclusions Available evidence supports the hypothesis that the attrition rate for licensed chiropractors in the first 10 years of practice has risen in the past several decades. PMID:20701811

2010-01-01

391

Prevalence of adverse effects among students taking technique classes: A retrospective study  

PubMed Central

Objective The main objective of this study was to determine characteristics of injuries experienced by students while learning chiropractic procedures in the classroom. Methods Injury was defined as any physical adverse effect such as pain, stiffness, headache, and muscle spasm. Survey questions included age, sex, role, anatomical areas of injury, adjustive technique utilized, types of injury, treatment (if any), and recovery time. The survey was administered among the students in the 5th, 6th, and 8th trimesters of our doctor of chiropractic program. Only students who had completed one or more chiropractic procedures courses at the institution were asked to participate in the study. Results Female recipients had a higher prevalence of adverse effects as the recipient of the adjustment than did male recipients. The most common site for injury overall was the lower back. The relationship between recipient role and sacroiliac joint injury and the relationship between adjustor role and wrist/hand injury were statistically significant. Students were more likely to be injured in the beginning of their technique education. Conclusion This study suggests that students in technique courses learning adjustive procedures experience minor adverse physical effects related to the physical skills being learned. Strategies for prevention need to be considered. PMID:24955948

Kizhakkeveettil, Anupama; Sikorski, David; Tobias, Gene; Korgan, Christos

2014-01-01

392

The treatment experience of patients with low back pain during pregnancy and their chiropractors: a qualitative study  

PubMed Central

Background Chiropractors regularly treat pregnant patients for low back pain during their pregnancy. An increasing amount of literature on this topic supports this form of treatment; however the experience of the pregnant patient with low back pain and their chiropractor has not yet been explored. The objective of this study is to explore the experience of chiropractic treatment for pregnant women with low back pain, and their chiropractors. Methods This qualitative study employed semi-structured interviews of pregnant patients in their second or third trimester, with low back pain during their pregnancy, and their treating chiropractors in separate interviews. Participants consisted of 11 patients and 12 chiropractors. The interviews consisted of 10 open-ended questions for patients, and eight open-ended questions for chiropractors, asking about their treatment experience or impressions of treating pregnant patients with LBP, respectively. All interviews were audio-recorded, transcribed verbatim, and reviewed independently by the investigators to develop codes, super-codes and themes. Thematic saturation was reached after the eleventh chiropractor and ninth patient interviews. All interviews were analyzed using the qualitative analysis software N-Vivo 9. Results Five themes emerged out of the chiropractor and patient interviews. The themes consisted of Treatment and Effectiveness; Chiropractor-Patient Communication; Pregnant Patient Presentation and the Chiropractic Approach to Pregnancy Care; Safety Considerations; and Self-Care. Conclusions Chiropractors approach pregnant patients with low back pain from a patient-centered standpoint, and the pregnant patients interviewed in this study who sought chiropractic care appeared to find this approach helpful for managing their back pain symptoms. PMID:23046615

2012-01-01

393

Occult osteoid osteoma presenting as shoulder pain: a case report  

PubMed Central

Objective The purpose of this case study is to describe the clinical course and treatment of a patient with recalcitrant shoulder pain and osteoid osteoma. Clinical Features A 28-year-old man had a 2-year history of progressively worsening shoulder and midscapular pain. Intervention and Outcome Before chiropractic consultation, he had been evaluated and treated by his family physician, an orthopedic surgeon, a neurologist, and a pain management specialist. The patient underwent arthroscopy with examination under anesthesia and debridement of a posterior labral tear and cervical spine epidural injections, but neither procedure relieved his symptoms. After seeking chiropractic care, presenting symptoms were reproducible during direct clinical examination; and an initial working diagnosis of secondary right glenohumeral impingement syndrome with coexisting scapulothoracic dyskinesis was made. After 2 weeks of chiropractic rehabilitation, therapy was stopped because of no change in symptoms. The patient was referred for orthopedic consultation. Another series of plain films were ordered, and follow-up magnetic resonance imaging revealed an osseous mass at the medial aspect of the proximal metadiaphyseal region of the right humerus, with a diagnosis of osteoid osteoma. The patient underwent radiofrequency thermoablation of the tumor nidus, which was unsuccessful and resulted in open surgical resection. Resolution of symptoms with minimal pain was reported 3 weeks after the surgery. Four years later, the patient's shoulder remains asymptomatic. Conclusion This case demonstrates that osteoid osteoma may present with clinical features that mimic common functional musculoskeletal conditions of the shoulder. Information from the patient history and diagnostic imaging are important for diagnosis and appropriate management. PMID:23450098

Zoboski, Robert J.

2012-01-01

394

Relationship between STarT Back Screening Tool and prognosis for low back pain patients receiving spinal manipulative therapy  

PubMed Central

Background Low back pain (LBP) is common and costly and few treatments have been shown to be markedly superior to any other. Effort has been focused on stratifying patients to better target treatment. Recently the STarT Back Screening Tool (SBT) has been developed for use in primary care to enable sub grouping of patients based on modifiable baseline characteristics and has been shown to be associated with differential outcomes. In the UK the SBT is being recommended to assist in care decisions for those presenting to general practitioners with LBP. In the light of growing recommendation for widespread use of this tool, generalisability to other LBP populations is important. However, studies to date have focused only on patients attending physiotherapy whereas LBP patients seeking other treatment have not been investigated. Aims This study aims to investigate the utility of the SBT to predict outcomes in LBP patients presenting for chiropractic management. Methods A total of 404 patients undergoing chiropractic care were asked to complete the SBT before initial treatment. Clinical outcomes were collected at 14, 30 and 90?days following this initial consultation. The clinical course was described comparing SBT categories and logistic regression analysis performed to examine the tool’s prognostic utility. Results Although the high-risk categories had greater pain at baseline this difference rapidly faded, with both change in composite outcome scores and pain scores being statistically insignificant between the risk groups at 30 and 90?days follow up. In addition, both univariate and adjusted analysis showed no prognostic utility of the SBT categorisations to differentiate clinical outcomes between risk groups. Conclusion Whilst the SBT appears useful in some back pain populations it does not appear to differentiate outcomes in LBP patients seeking chiropractic care. PMID:22691623

2012-01-01

395

Manual therapy as a conservative treatment for adolescent idiopathic scoliosis: a systematic review  

PubMed Central

Background The treatment of adolescent idiopathic scoliosis is contingent upon many variables. Simple observation is enough for less serious curvatures, but for very serious cases surgical intervention could be proposed. Between these there is a wide range of different treatments. Manual therapy is commonly used: the aim of this paper is to verify the data existing in the literature on the efficacy of this approach. Methods A systematic review of the scientific literature published internationally has been performed. We have included in the term manual therapy all the manipulative and generally passive techniques performed by an external operator. In a more specific meaning, osteopathic, chiropractic and massage techniques have been considered as manipulative therapeutic methods. We performed our systematic research in Medline, Embase, Cinhal, Cochrane Library, Pedro with the following terms: idiopathic scoliosis combined with chiropractic; manipulation; mobilization; manual therapy; massage; osteopathy; and therapeutic manipulation. The criteria for inclusion were as follows: Any kind of research; diagnosis of adolescent idiopathic scoliosis; patients treated exclusively by one of the procedures established as a standard for this review (chiropractic manipulation, osteopathic techniques, massage); and outcome in Cobb degrees. Results We founded 145 texts, but only three papers were relevant to our study. However, no one of the three satisfied all the required inclusion criteria because they were characterized by a combination of manual techniques and other therapeutic approaches. Conclusion The lack of any kind of serious scientific data does not allow us to draw any conclusion on the efficacy of manual therapy as an efficacious technique for the treatment of Adolescent idiopathic scoliosis. PMID:18211702

Romano, Michele; Negrini, Stefano

2008-01-01

396

Campuses of the LACC.  

PubMed

In its 94 years the Los Angeles College of Chiropractic (LACC) has occupied at least nine main campuses, exclusive of "satellite" facilities and the campuses of the dozen or more schools which have amalgamated with the LACC over the years. The longest serving of these properties have been in Glendale (1950-1981), Whittier (1981-present), and on Venice Boulevard in Los Angeles (1924-1950). This paper reviews these several locations and the efforts involved in acquiring and refurbishing them for College purposes. Additionally, we note two prospective campuses that never quite materialized: in Burbank, 1930 and in Los Gatos, 1975-76. PMID:17549200

Siordia, Lawrence; Keating, Joseph C

2005-06-01

397

Alternative medicine and the medical profession: views of medical students and general practitioners.  

PubMed

A survey was undertaken to explore the attitudes and practices of general practitioners and medical students in the United Arab Emirates with regards to forms of therapy not generally accepted by conventional medicine, including herbal medicine, acupuncture, homeopathy, spiritual therapy and osteopathy/chiropractic. The study found that alternative medicine is in common use to complement conventional medicine by a section of educated people within the health care system. Our observations lead us to appreciate its role in community health care and indicate a need to design culturally appropriate medical curricula which incorporate information about alternative medicine. PMID:11370337

Hasan, M Y; Das, M; Behjat, S

2000-01-01

398

 

PubMed Central

A case is presented with clinical, thermographic and radiographic evaluations of concurrent dorsalgia and abdominal symptoms. The radiographs demonstrated the presence of a duodenal ulcer, and the thermographs were interpreted as confirming the presence of thoracic and abdominal dysfunction. The patient’s chiropractic management is outlined. The possible inter-relationship between the visceral pathology and spinal dysfunction is discussed. The case allows exploration of the unresolved issues of the clinical significance of somatovisceral/viscerosomatic reflex pathways and of their assessment by thermography. ImagesFigure 2Figure 2

Kobrossi, T.; Steiman, I.

1990-01-01

399

Tuberculous Spondylitis: a case report  

PubMed Central

A 21 year old oriental male presented with a one month history of neck pain associated with neck stiffness and dysphagia. A five week course of chiropractic treatment relieved most of his symptoms. Due to persistent tenderness in the suboccipital region and substantial weight loss, he was subsequently hospitalized. Further investigations revealed tuberculous osteomyelitis affecting the left lateral mass of C1 and likely the C2 vertebra. Tuberculous spondylitis accounts for more than 50% of all cases of skeletal tuberculosis and is the most common cause of vertebral infection, particularly in young people. ImagesFigure 1Figure 2Figure 3Figure 4Figure 5Figure 6

Thiel, Haymo; Gotlib, Allan

1986-01-01

400

Campuses of the LACC  

PubMed Central

In its 94 years the Los Angeles College of Chiropractic (LACC) has occupied at least nine main campuses, exclusive of “satellite” facilities and the campuses of the dozen or more schools which have amalgamated with the LACC over the years. The longest serving of these properties have been in Glendale (1950–1981), Whittier (1981–present), and on Venice Boulevard in Los Angeles (1924–1950). This paper reviews these several locations and the efforts involved in acquiring and refurbishing them for College purposes. Additionally, we note two prospective campuses that never quite materialized: in Burbank, 1930 and in Los Gatos, 1975–76. PMID:17549200

Siordia, Lawrence; Keating, Joseph C

2005-01-01

401

Business Training and Education Needs of Chiropractors  

PubMed Central

Objective: This report is an examination of the perceived need for business skills among chiropractors. Methods: An online survey was completed by 64 chiropractors. They assessed the need for business skills and current levels of business skills. Using this information, gaps in business skills are identified. Results: The need for business skills is broad, encompassing all major business functions. Existing business skills are well below needed levels. Conclusion: The chiropractic profession needs significantly greater business and practice management skills. The existing gap between needed business skills and existing skills suggests that current training and education programs are not providing adequate business skills training PMID:19043535

Henson, Steve W; Pressley, Milton; Korfmann, Scott

2008-01-01

402

Post-surgical care of a professional ballet dancer following calcaneal exostectomy and debridement with re-attachment of the left Achilles tendon  

PubMed Central

The extraordinary physical demands placed upon ballet dancers are only now being appreciated as comparable to that of other highly competitive athletic pursuits. The professional ballet dancer presents with an array of injuries associated with their physically vigorous performance requirements. In keeping with evidence-based practice, we describe the chiropractic care of a professional ballet dancer following surgical calcaneal exostectomy and debridement with re-attachment of the left Achilles tendon. The care provided involves an array of modalities from exercise and rehabilitation to spinal manipulative therapy. PMID:19421349

Kobsar, Bradley; Alcantara, Joel

2009-01-01

403

Subtle radiographic presentation of a pleural effusion secondary to a cancer of unknown primary: a case study  

PubMed Central

Carcinoma of unknown primary sites is a clinical syndrome that represents many types of cancer. The mortality rate associate to this type of cancer is elevated and a rapid medical referral is required for patients presenting this condition. Pleural effusion may be the only visible sign. We report a case of pleural effusion secondary to a cancer of unknown primary site in a 60-year-old man that sought chiropractic care for radiating low back pain. The radiographic studies revealed a pleural effusion as one of the only significant finding. This article will address the clinical presentation, radiographic studies and a discussion on the radiographic detection of pleural effusion.

Blanchette, Marc-Andre; Grenier, Julie-Marthe

2014-01-01

404

Guidelines for the practice and performance of manipulation under anesthesia  

PubMed Central

Background There are currently no widely accepted guidelines on standards for the practice of chiropractic or manual therapy manipulation under anesthesia, and the evidence base for this practice is composed primarily of lower-level evidence. The purpose of this project was to develop evidence-informed and consensus-based guidelines on spinal manipulation under anesthesia to address the gaps in the literature with respect to patient selection and treatment protocols. Methods An expert consensus process was conducted from August-October 2013 using the Delphi method. Panelists were first provided with background literature, consisting of three review articles on manipulation under anesthesia. The Delphi rounds were conducted using the widely-used and well-established RAND-UCLA consensus process methodology to rate seed statements for their appropriateness. Consensus was determined to be reached if 80% of the 15 panelists rated a statement as appropriate. Consensus was reached on all 43 statements in two Delphi rounds. Results The Delphi process was conducted from August-October 2013. Consensus was reached on recommendations related to all aspects of manipulation under anesthesia, including patient selection; diagnosis and establishing medical necessity; treatment and follow-up procedures; evaluation of response to treatment; safety practices; appropriate compensation considerations; and facilities, anesthesia and nursing standards. Conclusions A high level of agreement was achieved in developing evidence-informed recommendations about the practice of chiropractic/manual therapy manipulation under anesthesia. PMID:24490957

2014-01-01

405

Pilot study of the impact that bilateral sacroiliac joint manipulation using a drop table technique has on gait parameters in asymptomatic individuals with a leg length inequality.  

PubMed Central

Purpose: The purpose of this study was to pilot test our study procedures and estimate parameters for sample size calculations for a randomized controlled trial to determine if bilateral sacroiliac (SI) joint manipulation affects specific gait parameters in asymptomatic individuals with a leg length inequality (LLI). Methods: Twenty-one asymptomatic chiropractic students engaged in a baseline 90-second walking kinematic analysis using infrared Vicon® cameras. Following this, participants underwent a functional LLI test. Upon examination participants were classified as: left short leg, right short leg, or no short leg. Half of the participants in each short leg group were then randomized to receive bilateral corrective SI joint chiropractic manipulative therapy (CMT). All participants then underwent another 90-second gait analysis. Pre- versus post-intervention gait data were then analyzed within treatment groups by an individual who was blinded to participant group status. For the primary analysis, all p-values were corrected for multiple comparisons using the Bonferroni method. Results: Within groups, no differences in measured gait parameters were statistically significant after correcting for multiple comparisons. Conclusions: The protocol of this study was acceptable to all subjects who were invited to participate. No participants refused randomization. Based on the data collected, we estimated that a larger main study would require 34 participants in each comparison group to detect a moderate effect size. PMID:24587501

Ward, John; Sorrels, Ken; Coats, Jesse; Pourmoghaddam, Amir; DeLeon, Carlos; Daigneault, Paige

2014-01-01

406

A multi-modal treatment approach for the shoulder: A 4 patient case series  

PubMed Central

Background This paper describes the clinical management of four cases of shoulder impingement syndrome using a conservative multimodal treatment approach. Clinical Features Four patients presented to a chiropractic clinic with chronic shoulder pain, tenderness in the shoulder region and a limited range of motion with pain and catching. After physical and orthopaedic examination a clinical diagnosis of shoulder impingement syndrome was reached. The four patients were admitted to a multi-modal treatment protocol including soft tissue therapy (ischaemic pressure and cross-friction massage), 7 minutes of phonophoresis (driving of medication into tissue with ultrasound) with 1% cortisone cream, diversified spinal and peripheral joint manipulation and rotator cuff and shoulder girdle muscle exercises. The outcome measures for the study were subjective/objective visual analogue pain scales (VAS), range of motion (goniometer) and return to normal daily, work and sporting activities. All four subjects at the end of the treatment protocol were symptom free with all outcome measures being normal. At 1 month follow up all patients continued to be symptom free with full range of motion and complete return to normal daily activities. Conclusion This case series demonstrates the potential benefit of a multimodal chiropractic protocol in resolving symptoms associated with a suspected clinical diagnosis of shoulder impingement syndrome. PMID:16168053

Pribicevic, Mario; Pollard, Henry

2005-01-01

407

Common errors and clinical guidelines for manual muscle testing: "the arm test" and other inaccurate procedures  

PubMed Central

Background The manual muscle test (MMT) has been offered as a chiropractic assessment tool that may help diagnose neuromusculoskeletal dysfunction. We contend that due to the number of manipulative practitioners using this test as part of the assessment of patients, clinical guidelines for the MMT are required to heighten the accuracy in the use of this tool. Objective To present essential operational definitions of the MMT for chiropractors and other clinicians that should improve the reliability of the MMT as a diagnostic test. Controversy about the usefulness and reliability of the MMT for chiropractic diagnosis is ongoing, and clinical guidelines about the MMT are needed to resolve confusion regarding the MMT as used in clinical practice as well as the evaluation of experimental evidence concerning its use. Discussion We expect that the resistance to accept the MMT as a reliable and valid diagnostic tool will continue within some portions of the manipulative professions if clinical guidelines for the use of MMT methods are not established and accepted. Unreliable assessments of this method of diagnosis will continue when non-standard MMT research papers are considered representative of the methods used by properly trained clinicians. Conclusion Practitioners who employ the MMT should use these clinical guidelines for improving their use of the MMT in their assessments of muscle dysfunction in patients with musculoskeletal pain. PMID:19099575

Schmitt, Walter H; Cuthbert, Scott C

2008-01-01

408

Ulnar nerve neuropraxia after extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy: a case report  

PubMed Central

A case is presented that illustrates and discusses the clinical presentation, diagnosis and chiropractic management of a 50-year-old male presenting with a case of ulnar neuropraxia following extracorporal shockwave lithotripsy. Onset is believed to be due to the patient’s arm position in full abduction and external rotation during the lithotripsy procedure. Motor abnormalities related to the ulnar nerve were noted in the absence of distinct sensory findings. Chiropractic treatment focused on relief of the patient’s pain during the course of the condition. Treatment may have helped in the rapid and complete resolution of his symptoms in this case. Poor patient positioning on hard surfaces, for extended periods may place pressure on superficial nerves resulting in nerve injury. In this case, the outcome was excellent, with complete resolution of symptoms less than one week later. The prognosis for this type of neuropraxia is usually good with conservative management. The patient history and chronological clinical course strongly suggest a causal association between the patient’s position during the procedure and the development of the ulnar neuropraxia. PMID:17549150

Konczak, Clark R

2005-01-01

409

Conducting practice-based projects among chiropractors: a manual  

PubMed Central

Introduction Practice-based research is a challenge as clinicians are busy with their patients and any participation in research activities will be secondary to the needs of the patients and the clinic. As a result, it is difficult to obtain high compliance among clinicians. A method to enhance compliance in multicentre practice-based research has been developed and refined for use in the chiropractic setting and possibly also by other researchers in different settings. Method This manual provides a stringent step-by-step approach for conducting clinic-based research. It describes the competencies and requirements of an effective working group, how to recruit participating clinicians and how to empower, encourage and support these clinicians to obtain good compliance. Discussion The main advantage of the method is the high compliance of participating clinicians compared to many other clinical studies. Difficulties with the method are described and suggestions for solutions are presented. Conclusions This manual is a description of a method that may be of use for clinical researchers in the chiropractic setting. PMID:23369259

2013-01-01

410

Multimodal and interdisciplinary management of an isolated partial tear of the posterior cruciate ligament: a case report  

PubMed Central

Objective The purpose of this case report is to describe the evaluation and conservative management of an isolated posterior cruciate ligament (PCL) tear. Clinical Features A 32-year-old man with a traumatic right knee injury after tripping was initially diagnosed with medial patellar retinaculum tear at a multidisciplinary clinic. The patient received physiotherapy but reinjured the knee after returning to the sports field 3 weeks later. Subsequent clinical testing and magnetic resonance imaging confirmed a grade II isolated PCL tear. Intervention and Outcome Following the PCL tear diagnosis, a multimodal treatment approach over the course of 8 weeks consisting of chiropractic lumbopelvic manipulation, physiotherapy, and an exercise program emphasizing eccentric muscle action was implemented. Lunges, 1-leg squats, and trunk stabilization exercises were extensively used. Three months postinjury, the patient successfully returned to sports activity with no further complications. Conclusion The patient in this case report demonstrated successful return to preinjury functional status. This case highlights a multidisciplinary approach through the utilization of chiropractic, physiotherapy, and exercise therapies. PMID:23204951

Fernandez, Matthew; Pugh, David

2012-01-01

411

Fluoroquinolone toxicity symptoms in a patient presenting with low back pain  

PubMed Central

Fluoroquinolone medications have been shown to contribute to tendinopathies, cardiotoxicity, and neurotoxicity. Low back pain is a common musculoskeletal condition for which chiropractic treatment is most often sought. This case report details a patient presenting with low back pain and a history of fluoroquinolone toxicity. The patient was initially treated with chiropractic manipulation, which increased her symptoms. She was then referred to an osteopathic physician who treated the patient with intravenous antioxidants and amino acids, an elimination diet, and probiotic supplementation. Within 4 months of therapy, the patient reported a decrease in pain, a resolution of her dizziness, shortness of breath, panic attacks, tachycardia, and blurred vision. After an additional 8 weeks of antioxidant therapy, she reported further reductions in pain and improved disability. People susceptible to fluoroquinolone toxicity may present with common musculoskeletal symptoms. A past medical history and medication history may help to identify this population of patients. People presenting with fluoroquinolone toxicity may have unidentified contributing factors that predispose them to this anomaly. This patient reported improvements in pain and disability following antioxidant amino acid therapy for a total of 6 months. The natural history of fluoroquinolone toxicity is unknown and may account for the observed improvements. PMID:24765486

Strauchman, Megan; Morningstar, Mark W.

2012-01-01

412

Radiographic disk height increase after a trial of multimodal spine rehabilitation and vibration traction: a retrospective case series  

PubMed Central

Abstract Objective Although spinal decompression therapy has been touted as an effective treatment of disk pathologies, there is little existing research that specifically uses disk parameters as an outcome measure after a course of spinal decompression therapy. Our study presents multidimensional outcomes after a structured protocol of multimodal chiropractic rehabilitation and uses a radiographic parameter of disk disease as an indication of the effects of a vibration traction decompression-type table. Clinical Features Patients selected for this retrospective cohort reported a medical history of lumbar herniated or bulging disk verified by previous magnetic resonance imaging/computed tomography, history of paresthesia in one or both lower extremities, pain level reported as a minimum of 8/10, and/or history of sciatica or other radicular pain finding. Intervention and Outcome A total of 6 patients' outcomes are reported in this study. All patients received a multimodal spinal rehabilitation treatment with vibration traction therapy. Positive and statistically significant outcomes were obtained in radiographic disk height, functional rating index, numeric pain rating, spirometry, and patient height. All patients achieved improved outcomes after treatment. Conclusion The multidimensional outcomes reported here were achieved after a structured protocol of multimodal chiropractic rehabilitation. It is unknown which, if any, of these procedures were responsible for the observed improvements. PMID:19646376

Horseman, Ian; Morningstar, Mark W.

2008-01-01

413

Manipulation under anesthesia for patients with failed back surgery: retrospective report of 3 cases with 1-year follow-up  

PubMed Central

Objective This report describes the treatment of 3 patients with previous spinal fusion surgery who had subsequently regressed to their previous levels of pain and disability. Clinical Features Three patients with chronic intractable pain presented to a private integrative medicine clinic for manipulation under anesthesia (MUA) evaluation. All 3 patients had previously had lumbar spine fusion surgery for intervertebral disk herniation. All surgeries were performed at least 2 years before clinical presentation. Patients had plateaued with other conservative pain management strategies before seeking MUA treatment. Intervention and Outcomes The patients were evaluated for MUA. The patients received a serial MUA over 3 consecutive days by trained chiropractic and osteopathic physicians. Outcome assessments used for each patient included a quadruple numerical pain rating scale and functional rating index. Patients completed a course of post-MUA physiotherapy and rehabilitation lasting 8 weeks immediately after the serial MUA. Clinical improvements were observed in all 3 outcome assessments after the MUA, the post-MUA therapy, and were essentially maintained 1 year after conclusion of treatment. Conclusion Three patients with failed back surgery were treated conservatively using MUA by trained chiropractic and osteopathic physicians followed by 8 weeks of post-MUA therapy. Pain and disability outcomes all improved immediately following treatment. PMID:22942839

Morningstar, Mark W.; Strauchman, Megan N.

2012-01-01

414

Fluoroquinolone toxicity symptoms in a patient presenting with low back pain.  

PubMed

Fluoroquinolone medications have been shown to contribute to tendinopathies, cardiotoxicity, and neurotoxicity. Low back pain is a common musculoskeletal condition for which chiropractic treatment is most often sought. This case report details a patient presenting with low back pain and a history of fluoroquinolone toxicity. The patient was initially treated with chiropractic manipulation, which increased her symptoms. She was then referred to an osteopathic physician who treated the patient with intravenous antioxidants and amino acids, an elimination diet, and probiotic supplementation. Within 4 months of therapy, the patient reported a decrease in pain, a resolution of her dizziness, shortness of breath, panic attacks, tachycardia, and blurred vision. After an additional 8 weeks of antioxidant therapy, she reported further reductions in pain and improved disability. People susceptible to fluoroquinolone toxicity may present with common musculoskeletal symptoms. A past medical history and medication history may help to identify this population of patients. People presenting with fluoroquinolone toxicity may have unidentified contributing factors that predispose them to this anomaly. This patient reported improvements in pain and disability following antioxidant amino acid therapy for a total of 6 months. The natural history of fluoroquinolone toxicity is unknown and may account for the observed improvements. PMID:24765486

Strauchman, Megan; Morningstar, Mark W

2012-10-12

415

 

PubMed Central

This study set out to determine whether healthy lifestyle attitudes are different for students in different years of the chiropractic education process. The results of the FANTASTIC Lifestyle Assessment Questionnaire administered to chiropractic students enrolled in first, second and fourth years of study are presented. Significant differences in scores attained were found between the three years of study in question. A minimum sample size (N) of 81 students was used. First year subjects were significantly different from both second year and fourth year subjects’ scores (p = .012 and p < 0.001, respectively). Mean scores decreased with every year of study. The variables ‘year of study’ and ‘age’ had the most pronounced effect on outcome of scores (p < 0.001 and p < 0.001, respectively). Analyses of variance were performed to determine effect of the variables involved. A two-tailed paired t-test was used to check first year students for changes after six months of school. It is still undetermined whether the significant difference in scores between each year of study are due to the year of study, to increasing average age of the classes, or to societal attitudes about wellness. Suggestions for future study are also presented.

Decina, Philip A; McGregor, Marion; Hagino, Carol

1990-01-01

416

Pregnancy-related symphysis pubis dysfunction management and postpartum rehabilitation: two case reports  

PubMed Central

Objective Two case reports review the chiropractic treatment and rehabilitation management of Symphysis Pubis Dysfunction (SPD). Clinical features Patient 1: a 35-year-old female presented at 30 weeks pregnant with severe left sided Symphysis Pubis Dysfunction and low back pain. Patient 2: a 33-year-old female also 30 weeks pregnant, presented with right sided Symphysis Pubis Dysfunction and sacroiliac pain. Intervention and Outcome Treatment included soft tissue therapy, pregnancy support belt, side-lying mobilizations, pelvic blocks and instrument-assisted pubic symphysis adjustments. Home advice included: ice, staying active, moving as a unit, stretching, use of a pillow between the knees while sleeping, regular breaks from sitting and pelvic floor (Kegel) exercises. Both patients reported some relief with treatment and home care. Post-partum, rehabilitation exercises were prescribed to restore muscular endurance, control and pelvic stability. On long-term follow-up patient 1 reported no pubic symphysis pain, but some low back pain secondary to a subsequent knee injury. Patient 2 reported being mostly pain free with a rare re-exacerbation of pubic symphysis pain. Summary Conservative chiropractic management appears to reduce pain and improve mobility and function for SPD. Post partum rehabilitation of the associated lumbo-pelvic musculature with specific stabilization exercises is recommended to reduce pain, improve long term outcomes and prevent chronicity. PMID:22675223

Howell, Emily R.

2012-01-01

417

A calcific pelvic mass in a woman with chronic spinal pain: a case of mature cystic teratoma  

PubMed Central

Objective The purpose of this case is to describe findings of a mature cystic teratoma and to further provide differential diagnoses for ovarian pelvic masses and calcifications. Clinical Features A 27-year-old woman presented to a chiropractic teaching clinic with a chief complaint of chronic multilevel spinal pain. During a full spine radiographic examination, radiopaque densities were incidentally identified in the pelvic bowl visualized through a gonad shield. Follow-up pelvic radiography revealed several radiopacities of uniform density localized in the pelvic bowl. Intervention/Outcomes Medical (gynecological) consultation led to ultrasonography of the pelvis that revealed a mature cystic teratoma. The patient underwent complete excision of the mass through a laparotomy procedure. The patient continued to receive chiropractic treatment of her original cervical and lumbar spine complaints, further suggesting that the pelvic mass was not a source of her musculoskeletal complaints. Conclusion This case demonstrates the detection and proper referral of a patient with a calcific mass. The presence of a pelvic mass, suspected of arising from the ovary, requires additional diagnostic imaging and careful clinical correlation. PMID:22654694

Kaeser, Martha A.; McDonald, Jennifer K.; Kettner, Norman W.

2011-01-01

418

Managed care and clinical autonomy in the workers' compensation market.  

PubMed

Despite increases in health care premiums, the effect of relaxing cost-containment mechanisms on health care utilization is not yet well understood at the microlevel. This study used a regulatory change in the California workers' compensation system to examine the effect of relaxing broad-based utilization management constraints and increasing clinical autonomy on methods of treatment and service intensity, and compared the responses of managed care network and fee-for-service providers. Between 1993 and 2000, the likelihood of a fee-for-service claim receiving a chiropractic treatment increased from 22% to 32%, the likelihood of receiving diagnostic radiology decreased from 24% to 15%, and the likelihood of receiving physical medicine with diagnostic services remained relatively stable. Treating fee-for-service claims with network care would have decreased the likelihood of receiving manipulations by 13 percentage points and physical medicine with diagnostic services by two percentage points. The likelihood of receiving office-visit-only treatment would have increased by 130% (14 percentage points), and the likelihood of receiving a diagnostic radiology treatment would have increased by 28% (4 percentage points). Treatment by network providers would have reduced the number of office visits by 18%, diagnostic radiology and ultrasound exams by 26%, passive physical medicine procedures by 40%, active physical medicine procedures by 43%, physical medicine assessments by 45%, and chiropractic treatments by 46%. PMID:17117597

Johnson, Tricia

2006-10-01

419

A survey of Australian chiropractors' attitudes and beliefs about evidence-based practice and their use of research literature and clinical practice guidelines  

PubMed Central

Background Research into chiropractors’ use of evidence in clinical practice appears limited to a single small qualitative study. The paucity of research in this area suggests that it is timely to undertake a more extensive study to build a more detailed understanding of the factors that influence chiropractors’ adoption of evidence-based practice (EBP) principles. This study aimed to identify Australian chiropractors’ attitudes and beliefs towards EBP in clinical practice, and also examine their use of research literature and clinical practice guidelines. Methods We used an online questionnaire about attitudes, beliefs and behaviours towards the use of EBP in clinical practice that had been developed to survey physiotherapists and modified it to ensure that it was relevant to chiropractic practice. We endeavoured to survey all registered Australian chiropractors (n?=?4378) via email invitation distributed by Australian chiropractic professional organisations and the Chiropractic Board of Australia. Logistic regression analyses were conducted to examine univariate associations between responses to items measuring attitudes and beliefs with items measuring: age; years since registration; attention to literature; and use of clinical practice guidelines. Results Questionnaires were returned by 584 respondents (response rate approximately 13%). The respondents’ perceptions of EBP were generally positive: most agreed that the application of EBP is necessary (77.9%), literature and research findings are useful (80.2%), EBP helps them make decisions about patient care (66.5%), and expressed an interest in learning or improving EBP skills (74.9%). Almost half of the respondents (45.1%) read between two to five articles a month. Close to half of the respondents (44.7%) used literature in the process of clinical decision making two to five times each month. About half of the respondents (52.4%) agreed that they used clinical practice guidelines, and around half (54.4%) agreed that they were able to incorporate patient preferences with clinical practice guidelines. The most common factor associated with increased research uptake was the perception that EBP helps make decisions about patient care. Conclusions Most Australian chiropractors hold positive attitudes towards EBP, thought EBP was useful, and were interested in improving EBP skills. However, despite the favourable inclination towards EBP, many Australian chiropractors did not use clinical practice guidelines. Our findings should be interpreted cautiously due to the low response rate. PMID:24345082

2013-01-01

420

An isolated long thoracic nerve injury in a Navy Airman.  

PubMed

A palsy of the long thoracic nerve of Bell is a cause of scapular winging that has been reported after trauma, surgery, infection, electrocution, chiropractic manipulation, exposure to toxins, and various sports-related injuries that include tennis, hockey, bowling, soccer, gymnastics, and weight lifting. Scapular winging can result from repetitive or sudden external biomechanical forces that may either exert compression or place extraordinary traction in the distribution of the long thoracic nerve. We describe an active duty Navy Airman who developed scapular winging secondary to traction to the long thoracic nerve injury while working on the flight line. A thorough history and physical is essential in determining the mechanism of injury. Treatment should initially include refraining from strenuous use of the involved extremity, avoidance of the precipitating activity, and physical therapy to focus on maintaining range of motion and strengthening associated muscles, with most cases resolving within 9 months. PMID:15495726

Oakes, Michael J; Sherwood, Daniel L

2004-09-01

421

Chronic recurrent multifocal osteomyelitis in a 13 year old female athlete: a case report  

PubMed Central

Chronic recurrent mutlifocal osteomyelitis (CRMO) is an extremely rare skeletal disorder in the younger population. It presents with multifocal bony lesions that often mimic more sinister diagnoses such as infection or neoplasm. The cause of this condition remains unknown and there is limited evidence on effective treatments. In this case, a 13-year-old female athlete presented to a sports chiropractic clinic with non-traumatic onset of right ankle pain. After failed conservative management, radiographs and MRI were obtained exhibiting a bony lesion of the distal tibia resembling osteomyelitis. The patient was non-responsive to antibiotics, which lead to the diagnosis of CRMO. CRMO should be considered as a differential diagnosis for chronic bone pain with affinity for the long bones of the lower extremity in children and adolescents. The role of the primary clinician in cases of CRMO is primarily that of recognition and referral for further diagnostic investigations. PMID:24302781

Ferguson, Brad; Gryfe, David; Hsu, William

2013-01-01

422

Humeral Lateral Epicondylitis Complicated by Hydroxyapatite Dihydrite Deposition Disease: A Case Report  

PubMed Central

Objective The aim of this case report is to differentiate the recovery timeline expected for patients with simple lateral epicondylitis from an abnormal recovery period, in which case an underlying condition should be suspected. Clinical features A 49-year-old woman presented to a chiropractic clinic with posterolateral right elbow pain. The history included chronic recurrent lateral elbow pain, followed by a traumatic event leading to sustained pain and disability. Intervention and outcomes Following a trial of conservative therapy including activity restrictions, soft tissue therapy, joint mobilizations, and therapeutic ultrasonography that led to no significant improvement, the patient was referred for diagnostic imaging that revealed hydroxyapatite dihydrite deposition disease. Conclusion This report describes a case for which lateral epicondylitis symptoms failed to resolve because of an underlying condition (hydroxyapatite dihydrite deposition disease). This case emphasizes that primary care practitioners treating lateral epicondylitis should consider referral for further investigations when positive results are not achieved. PMID:24711788

Marchand, Andree-Anne; O'Shaughnessy, Julie; Descarreaux, Martin

2014-01-01

423

Lateral epicondylosis: a case study of conservative care utilizing ART® and rehabilitation  

PubMed Central

Objective To present the diagnostic features of lateral epicondylosis and response to treatment by Active Release Technique® (ART), a promising treatment for lateral epicondylosis. Clinical Features The most important feature is pain at the lateral epicondyle of the humerus, most notably in actively extending or passively flexing the wrist. Intervention and Outcome Treatment involves eliminating any inflammation, reducing muscular pain and hypertonicity, correcting biomechanical dysfunction, and restricting/modifying the offending activity. ART® was successfully utilized in an attempt to remove adhesions and promote restoration of normal tissue texture. A sports specific rehabilitation protocol was employed to re-establish wrist extensor strength and interferential current and ice were used to control pain and residual inflammation. Conclusion A combination of soft tissue therapy, rehabilitation, and therapeutic modalities is a protocol that may be used by both allopathic and chiropractic practitioners alike, and allow for the athletic patient to return to play as quickly as possible. PMID:17549155

Howitt, Scott D

2006-01-01

424

A case of pseudo-angina pectoris from a pectoralis minor trigger point caused by cross-country skiing  

PubMed Central

Objective The aim of this article is to illustrate the pectoralis minor muscle as a possible pain source in patients with anterior chest pain, especially those who are known to be beginner cross-country skiers. Clinical Features A 58-year-old man presented with anterior chest pain and normal cardiac examination findings. Upon history taking and physical examination, the chest pain was determined to be caused by active trigger points in the pectoralis minor muscle. Intervention and Outcome The patient was treated with Graston Technique and cross-country skiing technique advice. The subject's symptoms improved significantly after 2 treatments and completely resolved after 4 treatments. Conclusion This case demonstrates the importance of differential diagnosis and mechanism of injury in regard to chest pain and that chiropractic management can be successful when addressing patients with chest wall pain of musculoskeletal origin. PMID:22014906

Lawson, Gordon E.; Hung, Laurie Y.; Ko, Gordon D.; Laframboise, Michelle A.

2011-01-01

425

An evidence-based diagnostic classification system for low back pain  

PubMed Central

Introduction: While clinicians generally accept that musculoskeletal low back pain (LBP) can arise from specific tissues, it remains difficult to confirm specific sources. Methods: Based on evidence supported by diagnostic utility studies, doctors of chiropractic functioning as members of a research clinic created a diagnostic classification system, corresponding exam and checklist based on strength of evidence, and in-office efficiency. Results: The diagnostic classification system contains one screening category, two pain categories: Nociceptive, Neuropathic, one functional evaluation category, and one category for unknown or poorly defined diagnoses. Nociceptive and neuropathic pain categories are each divided into 4 subcategories. Conclusion: This article describes and discusses the strength of evidence surrounding diagnostic categories for an in-office, clinical exam and checklist tool for LBP diagnosis. The use of a standardized tool for diagnosing low back pain in clinical and research settings is encouraged. PMID:23997245

Vining, Robert; Potocki, Eric; Seidman, Michael; Morgenthal, A. Paige

2013-01-01

426

Detection of syringomyelia in a pediatric patient with mild scoliosis: a case report  

PubMed Central

It can be challenging to detect syringomyelia in patients with scoliosis, as some cases are mildly symptomatic with little to no neurological deficits. However, a timely diagnosis of syringomyelia is needed to facilitate important treatment considerations. This case report details an 11-year-old female with mild scoliosis and a two-year history of spinal pain that had short-term symptomatic relief from chiropractic treatment. Subtle neurological signs were detected only at re-evaluation, which prompted further investigation with radiographs and subsequent magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). MRI revealed a non-expansile syrinx measuring 3 mm at its widest diameter that extended from C5 to the conus medullaris. The aim of this case is to heighten awareness of the potential diagnostic challenges in patients with syringomyelia and scoliosis. The incidence, pathogenesis, clinical presentation, and management of syringomyelia will be presented to help primary contact providers with appropriate referral and co-management of these patients. PMID:24587493

Kanga, Ismat; Wong, Jessica J.; Stern, Paula J.

2014-01-01

427

Complementary and alternative medicine practitioners' standard of care: responsibilities to patients and parents.  

PubMed

In this article we explain (1) the standard of care that health care providers must meet and (2) how these principles apply to complementary and alternative medicine practitioners. The scenario describes a 14-year-old boy who is experiencing back pain and whose chiropractor performed spinal manipulation but did not recognize or take steps to rule out serious underlying disease-in this case, testicular cancer--either initially or when the patient's condition continued to deteriorate despite treatment. We use chiropractic care for a patient with a sore back as an example, because back pain is such a common problem and chiropracty is a common treatment chosen by both adult and pediatric patients. The scenario illustrates the responsibilities that complementary and alternative medicine practitioners owe patients/parents, the potential for liability when deficient care harms patients, and the importance of ample formal pediatric training for practitioners who treat pediatric patients. PMID:22045864

Gilmour, Joan; Harrison, Christine; Asadi, Leyla; Cohen, Michael H; Vohra, Sunita

2011-11-01

428

Chiropractor perceptions and practices regarding interprofessional service delivery in the Danish primary care context.  

PubMed

For the past 20 years, chiropractors have enjoyed access to the Danish health care system and have been free to build integrated health care delivery partnerships. An electronic survey of chiropractic clinics around Denmark was conducted in order to observe interprofessional practice trends. From the available population of 252 practices, 166 responses were received. Ninety-six percent of respondents considered inter-disciplinary/interprofessional practice to be either "very" or "extremely" important in the context of modern Danish health care. Three occupational groups appear to be commonly involved in practice alongside chiropractors, these being massage therapists (82%), physiotherapists (58%) and acupuncturists (37%). Interestingly only 11% considered a medical practitioner to be an active participant in their current interprofessional service delivery. Danish chiropractors consider interprofessional practice to be important and as a group, perceive themselves to be offering such models of service provision. Medical practitioners are perceived as desirable, but under utilized partners. PMID:24156733

Myburgh, Corrie; Christensen, Henrik Wulff; Fogh-Schultz, Anders Lyck

2014-03-01

429

[Neckpain: additional investigations only when there is an indication--treatment is rarely necessary].  

PubMed

In this article, we describe the case of a 44-year-old secretary who developed neck pain. Without first having consulted her general practitioner, she visited a chiropractor who concluded that she had 'irritation of the nerves', which the patient interpreted as a herniation of a cervical disc. She believed an MRI to be necessary. She underwent a total body scan at a commercial facility which revealed degenerative changes of the cervical and lumbar spine and an arachnoid cyst in the brain. We could not reassure this patient; however, unnecessary investigations and treatment in a different patient could be prevented. Additional investigations for neck pain without neurological signs on examination are only necessary for a few patients. Chiropractic may have serious side effects. Confusing information about neck pain appearing on the Internet and in medical journals should be contested with information based on the solid, critical appraisal of studies. PMID:23369818

Vermeulen, M Rien

2013-01-01

430

Pulmonary embolism in a female collegiate cross-country runner presenting as nonspecific back pain  

PubMed Central

Objective The purpose of this case report is to describe a female athlete with back and right scapular pain due to pulmonary embolism. Clinical Features A 20-year-old female collegiate cross-country runner presented to a chiropractic clinic with pain in the right scapular area that was severe, stabbing, and worsened with respiration. She had a cough and experienced difficulty lying on her right side. She had an elevated d-dimer. Chest radiograph demonstrated pleural effusion, prompting a thoracic computed tomographic angiogram that showed a large right lower lobe embolus and pulmonary infarct. Intervention and Outcome The patient was hospitalized, prescribed anticoagulant therapy, and monitored for 6 months. She was able to return to competitive running 8 months later. Conclusion This case raises awareness of the occurrence of birth control medication for the purpose of enhanced performance in female athletes and the associated risks of using this medication for enhanced performance. PMID:23449383

Landesberg, Warren H.

2012-01-01

431

Peroneal neuropathy misdiagnosed as L5 radiculopathy: a case report  

PubMed Central

Objective The purpose of this case report is to describe a patient who presented with a case of peroneal neuropathy that was originally diagnosed and treated as a L5 radiculopathy. Clinical features A 53-year old female registered nurse presented to a private chiropractic practice with complaints of left lateral leg pain. Three months earlier she underwent elective left L5 decompression surgery without relief of symptoms. Intervention and outcome Lumbar spine MRI seven months prior to lumbar decompression surgery revealed left neural foraminal stenosis at L5-S1. The patient symptoms resolved after she stopped crossing her legs. Conclusion This report discusses a case of undiagnosed peroneal neuropathy that underwent lumbar decompression surgery for a L5 radiculopathy. This case study demonstrates the importance of a thorough clinical examination and decision making that ensures proper patient diagnosis and management. PMID:23618508

2013-01-01

432

Neuromusculoskeletal disorders following SARS: a case series  

PubMed Central

Objective: To detail the presentation of three health care workers diagnosed with sudden acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) who later presented to a CMCC teaching clinic with neuromusculoskeletal sequelae and underwent conservative treatments. This case series aims to inform practitioners of the potential pathogenesis of these neuromuscular complaints and describes their treatment in a chiropractic practice. Clinical Features: Three patients presented with a variety of neurological, muscular and joint findings. Conservative treatment was aimed at decreasing hypertonic muscles, increasing joint mobility, and improving ability to perform activities of daily living. Intervention and Outcome: The conservative treatment approach utilized in these cases involved spinal manipulative therapy, soft tissue therapy, modalities, and rehabilitation. Outcome measures included subjective pain ratings, disability indices, and return to work. Conclusion: Three patients previously diagnosed with SARS presented with neuromusculoskeletal complaints and subjectively experienced intermittent relief of pain and improvement in disability status after conservative treatments. PMID:21403780

Stainsby, Brynne; Howitt, Scott; Porr, Jason

2011-01-01

433

A History of Manipulative Therapy  

PubMed Central

Manipulative therapy has known a parallel development throughout many parts of the world. The earliest historical reference to the practice of manipulative therapy in Europe dates back to 400 BCE. Over the centuries, manipulative interventions have fallen in and out of favor with the medical profession. Manipulative therapy also was initially the mainstay of the two leading alternative health care systems, osteopathy and chiropractic, both founded in the latter part of the 19th century in response to shortcomings in allopathic medicine. With medical and osteopathic physicians initially instrumental in introducing manipulative therapy to the profession of physical therapy, physical therapists have since then provided strong contributions to the field, thereby solidifying the profession's claim to have manipulative therapy within in its legally regulated scope of practice. PMID:19066664

Pettman, Erland

2007-01-01

434

Piriformis syndrome: an annotated bibliography  

PubMed Central

Objective: To review the literature on Piriformis Syndrome, including signs, symptoms, diagnosis, differential diagnosis, treatment and management. Design: An annotated bibliography. Methods: A literature search of MEDLINE from January 1987 to November 1996, MANTIS from 1990 to 1997, EMBASE from January 1986 to December 1996, and Index to Chiropractic Literature from 1985 to 1994. The key words utilized in the search were Piriformis, Piriformis Syndrome, and Piriformis Muscle. Only English language articles were selected. Results: This annotated bibliography identifies twelve case reports, four case series, nine commentaries, and one quasi experiment. Twenty of the articles were published in peer-reviewed journals. Conclusions: Future research should address diagnostic criteria, treatment protocols, and effectiveness of therapeutic options.

Caldwell, Sylvia G; Hurwitz, Eric L; Adams, Alan

1999-01-01

435

In response to "The Knowledge of Our Knowledge": 2 decades and not much has changed  

PubMed Central

The chiropractic profession has struggled with how it is viewed and perceived by those within the profession and the powerful forces outside the profession. This commentary suggests that the vast majority of professional unrest is largely due to lines drawn upon philosophical boundaries and how we perceive what we know. For the profession to advance, it is imperative that unsubstantiated claims are eliminated from our justification for being and that we continue to test theories using scientific methods. Theories espoused must be able to be supported by valid research, and we must be ready to accept the results of these investigations and either build upon that body of research or accept the findings and move in alternative directions that science will take us. In doing so, we will contribute to the philosophy of health and perhaps help to change the health care paradigm from disease focused to wellness, which is based upon evidence and not emotion. PMID:23966888

DC, Louis Sportelli

2012-01-01

436

Introducing the Neurocalometer: a view from the Fountain Head  

PubMed Central

A review and analysis of the 1924 introduction of the neurocalometer (NCM), a heat-sensing instrument purported to detect “nerve interference” (subluxation), is presented. Included are the origins of the device, the terms and expense of B.J. Palmer’s leasing program for the NCM, the role of the NCM as centrepiece in a “back to straight chiropractic” movement, the development of competitive instruments and BJ’s method of dealing with “infringers”, claims made for the clinical value of the NCM and the profession’s response to the NCM-movement. It is suggested that the NCM’s introduction provides a model of unethical promotions in health care. ImagesFigure 1

Keating, Joseph C

1991-01-01

437

Rhabdomyolysis: a case study exploring the possible side effect of lipid lowering medication by a HIV positive patient taking a protease inhibitor  

PubMed Central

This case study explores the incidence of rhabdomyolysis in a HIV positive patient that was taking a lipid lowering drug and a protease inhibitor concurrently while under chiropractic treatment for generalized muscular soreness. Dyslipidemia is a very common problem both in the general and HIV population, with many patients being prescribed lipid lowering drugs. While extremely rare, adverse effects of lipid lowering drugs have been documented to include myopathy such as rhabdomyolysis. It is imperative that chiropractors are aware of the possible adverse side effect of lipid lowering drug therapy in their patients complaining of musculoskeletal pain. It is even more important that chiropractors treating the HIV population are aware of the potential interactions between these medications and protease inhibitors to cause myopathy. PMID:19066698

De Carvalho, Diana; Citro, Mark; Tibbles, Anthony

2008-01-01

438

Back pain and leg complaints that revealed non-small cell carcinoma: a case study  

PubMed Central

Objective The purpose of this case study is to describe the clinical presentation of a patient with a chief complaint of low back and leg pain with no prior diagnosis of lung cancer. Clinical Features A 48-year-old man with a history of back pain presented to a chiropractic office with a complaint of low back and left leg pain. Intervention and Outcome Abnormal examination and radiographic findings were discovered. The patient was immediately referred to the pulmonologist for co-management. Through the use of advanced imaging and biopsy, stage 4 lung cancer was diagnosed. Conclusion Low back pain recurrence in an established patient should constitute a reevaluation of the problem. The cause cannot be assumed to be musculoskeletal in origin even though this may have been the case with the initial complaint. Metastatic disease should be considered with any type of recurrent low back pain. PMID:22014908

Crisp, Casey A.; Pierce, Angela N.

2011-01-01

439

A case of cerebellar infarction caused by acute subclavian thrombus following minor trauma.  

PubMed

Subclavian steal syndrome caused by an acute thrombus is very rare. We present a case of cerebellar infarction with proximal subclavian artery thrombosis. A 56-year-old woman was admitted for sudden vertigo. One day prior to admission, she received a shoulder massage comprised of chiropractic manipulation. On examination, her left hand was pale and radial pulses were absent. Blood pressure was weak in the left arm. Downbeat nystagmus and a right falling tendency were observed. Brain MRI showed multiple acute infarctions in the left cerebellum. The findings of Doppler ultrasonography in the left vertebral artery were compatible with a partial subclavian artery steal phenomenon. Digital subtraction angiography demonstrated a large thrombus in the left subclavian artery. After heparin infusion, thrombus size markedly decreased. Cerebellar infarction caused by acute subclavian thrombosis following minor trauma is rare, but the thrombus can be successfully resolved with anticoagulation. PMID:24142663

Park, Hyeyoung; Kim, Hee-Jin; Cha, Myoung-Jin; Lee, Jong Yun; Koh, Im-Seok; Nam, Hyo Suk

2013-11-01

440

A Case of Cerebellar Infarction Caused by Acute Subclavian Thrombus Following Minor Trauma  

PubMed Central

Subclavian steal syndrome caused by an acute thrombus is very rare. We present a case of cerebellar infarction with proximal subclavian artery thrombosis. A 56-year-old woman was admitted for sudden vertigo. One day prior to admission, she received a shoulder massage comprised of chiropractic manipulation. On examination, her left hand was pale and radial pulses were absent. Blood pressure was weak in the left arm. Downbeat nystagmus and a right falling tendency were observed. Brain MRI showed multiple acute infarctions in the left cerebellum. The findings of Doppler ultrasonography in the left vertebral artery were compatible with a partial subclavian artery steal phenomenon. Digital subtraction angiography demonstrated a large thrombus in the left subclavian artery. After heparin infusion, thrombus size markedly decreased. Cerebellar infarction caused by acute subclavian thrombosis following minor trauma is rare, but the thrombus can be successfully resolved with anticoagulation. PMID:24142663

Park, Hyeyoung; Kim, Hee-Jin; Cha, Myoung-Jin; Lee, Jong Yun; Koh, Im-Seok

2013-01-01

441

The development of medical sects.  

PubMed

There exist a number of studies that demonstrate a parallel between secular and transcendental movements. A useful exercise is to look at the development of medicine and compare the origin and development of medical sects with sects that we would more normally associate with religious development. Thus, the struggle for a dominant ideology in medicine meant that Galenism as the New Systematists gave way to the emergence of a dominant medical orthodoxy. The dilemmas presented by new discoveries in medicine highlight this struggle for dominance. Running alongside medical sectarianism is the phenomenon of medical cults such as phrenology and mesmerism. Osteopathy, naturopathy, homeopathy, and chiropractic are significant examples of modern challenges to the monopoly of medical knowledge exhibited by sects. PMID:24306828

Jones, R K

1983-12-01

442

Results of an International Survey of Practice Patterns for Establishing Prognosis in Neck Pain: The ICON Project  

PubMed Central

Results of an international survey of health care providers for neck pain are reported. The survey specifically collected self-reported practice patterns for establishing a prognosis in neck pain. Over 440 responses from 27 countries were collected. Descriptive results indicate that respondents assigned large prognostic impact to factors including mechanism of injury and psychological or behavioral constructs. Range of motion, age and sex were routinely collected despite relatively moderate impact on prognosis. A comparison between chiropractic and manual/physical therapy groups showed differences in practice patterns that were unlikely to affect prognostic accuracy. The results suggest a gap exists between current best-evidence and actual practice when the goal is to establish a prognosis in neck pain. PMID:24115968

Walton, David M; MacDermid, Joy C; Santaguida, P. Lina; Gross, Anita; Carlesso, Lisa

2013-01-01

443

The musculoskeletal effects of diabetes mellitus.  

PubMed

Diabetes mellitus (DM) is a multi-system disease characterized by persistent hyperglycemia that has both acute and chronic biochemical and anatomical sequelae, with Type-2 DM representing the most common form of the disease. Neuromusculoskeletal sequelae of DM are common and the practicing chiropractor should be alert to these conditions, as some are manageable in a chiropractic office, while others are life and/or limb threatening. This paper reviews the effects of DM on the musculoskeletal system so as assist the chiropractor in making appropriate clinical decisions regarding therapy, understanding contraindications to therapy, referring patients to medical physicians when appropriate and understanding the impact that DM may have on the prognosis for their patients suffering from the myriad musculoskeletal conditions associated with this disease. PMID:17549168

Wyatt, Lawrence H; Ferrance, Randy J

2006-03-01

444

Giant Meckel diverticulum with enteroliths: a case report of a patient presenting with low back and episodic right lower quadrant pain  

PubMed Central

Objectives The purpose of this case report is to describe a patient who presented with low back pain and episodic right lower quadrant pain who had a long-standing giant Meckel diverticulum with enteroliths. Clinical features A 49-year-old woman presented to a chiropractic clinic with low back pain and history of intermittent right lower quadrant pain. Lumbar radiography demonstrated calcifications in the pelvic basin that changed position with changes in patient posture. The patient was referred to an abdominal surgeon for consultation and management. Intervention and outcome Computed tomography identified calcifications in the small bowel in the region of the ileocecal valve. The patient underwent prophylactic diverticulectomy with no complications. Gross pathology revealed a giant Meckel diverticulum measuring 24 inches (60.9 cm) containing 6 enteroliths. Conclusions A timely diagnosis resulted in a favorable surgical outcome for this patient with long-standing giant Meckel diverticulum and enteroliths. PMID:24396323

Yochum, Alicia M.; Bonic, Eve E.; Yochum, Terry R.; Kettner, Norman W.

2013-01-01

445

Effect of spinal manipulative therapy with stretching compared with stretching alone on full-swing performance of golf players: a randomized pilot trial?  

PubMed Central

Abstract Objective There has been a steady growth of chiropractic treatment using spinal manipulative therapy (SMT) that aims to increase the performance of athletes in various sports. This study evaluates the effect of SMT by chiropractors on the performance of golf players. Methods Golfers of 2 golf clubs in São Paulo, Brazil, participated in this study. They were randomized to 1 of 2 groups: Group I received a stretch program, and group II received a stretch program in addition to SMT. Participants in both groups performed the same standardized stretching program. Spinal manipulative therapy to dysfunctional spinal segments was performed on group II only. All golfers performed 3 full-swing maneuvers. Ball range was considered as the average distance for the 3 shots. Treatment was performed after the initial measurement, and the same maneuvers were performed afterward. Each participant repeated these procedures for a 4-week period. Student t test, Mann-Whitney nonparametric test, and 1-way analysis of variance for repeated measures with significance level of 5% were used to analyze the study. Results Forty-three golfers completed the protocol. Twenty participants were allocated to group I and 23 to group II. Average age, handicap, and initial swing were comparable. No improvement of full-swing performance was observed during the 4 sessions on group I (stretch only). An improvement was observed at the fourth session of group II (P = .005); when comparing the posttreatment, group II had statistical significance at all phases (P = .003). Conclusions Chiropractic SMT in association with muscle stretching may be associated with an improvement of full-swing performance when compared with muscle stretching alone. PMID:19948307

Costa, Soraya M.V.; Chibana, Yumi E.T.; Giavarotti, Leandro; Compagnoni, Debora S.; Shiono, Adriana H.; Satie, Janice; Bracher, Eduardo S.B.

2009-01-01

446

Where the United States Spends its Spine Dollars: Expenditures on different ambulatory services for the management of back and neck conditions  

PubMed Central

Study Design Serial, cross-sectional, nationally representative surveys of non-institutionalized adults. Objective To examine expenditures on common ambulatory health services for the management of back and neck conditions. Summary of Background Data Although it is well recognized that national costs associated with back and neck conditions have grown considerably in recent years, little is known about the costs of care for specific ambulatory health services that are used to manage this population. Methods We used the Medical Expenditure Panel Survey (MEPS) to examine adult (age ? 18 years) respondents from 1999 to 2008 who sought ambulatory health services for the management of back and neck conditions. We used complex survey design methods to make national estimates of mean inflation-adjusted annual expenditures on medical care, chiropractic care, and physical therapy per user for back and neck conditions. Results Approximately 6% of US adults reported an ambulatory visit for a primary diagnosis of a back or neck condition (13.6 million in 2008). Between 1999 and 2008, the mean inflation-adjusted annual expenditures on medical care for these patients increased by 95% (from $487 to $950); most of the increase was accounted for by increased costs for medical specialists, as opposed to primary care physicians. Over the study period, the mean inflation-adjusted annual expenditures on chiropractic care were relatively stable; while physical therapy was the most costly service overall, in recent years those costs have contracted. Conclusion Although this study did not explore the relative effectiveness of different ambulatory services, recent increasing costs associated with providing medical care for back and neck conditions (particularly subspecialty care) are contributing to the growing economic burden of managing these conditions. PMID:22433497

Davis, Matthew A.

2012-01-01

447

Immediate effects of lower cervical spine manipulation on handgrip strength and free-throw accuracy of asymptomatic basketball players: a pilot study  

PubMed Central

Objective The purpose of this pilot study was to collect preliminary information for a study to determine the immediate effects of a single unilateral chiropractic manipulation to the lower cervical spine on handgrip strength and free-throw accuracy in asymptomatic male recreational basketball players. Methods For this study, 24 asymptomatic male recreational right-handed basketball players (age = 26.3 ± 9.2 years, height = 1.81 ± 0.07 m, body mass = 82.6 ± 10.4 kg [mean ± SD]) underwent baseline dominant handgrip isometric strength and free-throw accuracy testing in an indoor basketball court. They were then equally randomized to receive either (1) diversified left lower cervical spine chiropractic manipulative therapy (CMT) at C5/C6 or (2) placebo CMT at C5/C6 using an Activator adjusting instrument on zero force setting. Participants then underwent posttesting of isometric handgrip strength and free-throw accuracy. A paired-samples t test was used to make within-group pre to post comparisons and between-group pre to post comparisons. Results No statistically significant difference was shown between either of the 2 basketball performance variables measured in either group. Isometric handgrip strength marginally improved by 0.7 kg (mean) in the CMT group (P = .710). Free-throw accuracy increased by 13.2% in the CMT group (P = .058). The placebo CMT group performed the same or more poorly during their second test session. Conclusions The results of this preliminary study showed that a single lower cervical spine manipulation did not significantly impact basketball performance for this group of healthy asymptomatic participants. A slight increase in free-throw percentage was seen, which deserves further investigation. This pilot study demonstrates that a larger study to evaluate if CMT affects handgrip strength and free-throw accuracy is feasible. PMID:24396315

Humphries, Kelley M.; Ward, John; Coats, Jesse; Nobert, Jeannique; Amonette, William; Dyess, Stephen

2013-01-01

448

Quantification of Cavitation and Gapping of Lumbar Zygapophyseal Joints during Spinal Manipulative Therapy  

PubMed Central

Objectives The purpose of this study was to use previously validated methods to quantify and relate 2 phenomena associated with chiropractic spinal manipulative therapy (SMT): 1) cavitation and 2) the simultaneous gapping (separation) of the lumbar zygapophyseal (Z) joint spaces. Methods This was a randomized, controlled, mechanistic clinical trial with blinding. Forty healthy subjects (18 to 30 years of age) without a history of low back pain participated. Seven accelerometers were affixed to the skin overlying the spinous processes of L1-L5 and the S1 and S2 sacral tubercles. Two additional accelerometers were positioned 3 cm left and right lateral to the L4/L5 inter-spinous space. Subjects were randomized into: Group 1–side-posture SMT (n=30) or Group 2–side-posture positioning (SPP, n=10). Cavitations were determined by accelerometer recordings during SMT and SPP (left-side=up-side for both groups); gapping (gapping difference) was determined by the difference between pre- and post-intervention MRI joint space measurements. Results of mean gapping differences were compared. Results Up-side SMT and SPP joints gapped more than down-side joints (0.69 vs. ?0.17mm, p<0.0001). SMT up-side joints gapped more than SPP up-side joints (0.75 vs. 0.52mm, p=0.03). SMT up-side joints gapped more in males than females (1.01 vs. 0.49mm, p<0.002). Overall, joints that cavitated gapped more than those that did not (0.56vs. 0.22mm, p=0.01). No relationship was found between the occurrence of cavitation and gapping with up-side joints alone (p=0.43). Conclusions Z joints receiving chiropractic SMT gapped more than those receiving side-posture positioning alone, Z joints of males gapped more than those of females, and cavitation indicated that a joint had gapped, but not how much a joint had gapped. PMID:22902194

Cramer, Gregory D.; Ross, Kim; Raju, P.K.; Cambron, Jerrilyn; Cantu, Joe A.; Bora, Preetam; Dexheimer, Jennifer; McKinnis, Ray; Habeck, Adam R.; Selby, Scott; Pocius, Judith D.; Gregerson, Douglas

2012-01-01

449

Individualized multi-modal management of osteitis pubis in an Australian Rules footballer  

PubMed Central

Objective The purpose of this case report is to describe and discuss the successful management of osteitis pubis in a semi-elite Australian Rules football player through the utilization of an individualized multi-modal treatment approach provided by a chiropractor. Clinical Features A 20-year-old male semi-elite Australian Rules football player presented to a chiropractic clinic with groin pain of eight months duration. A clinical diagnosis of osteitis pubis was made through synthesis of the patient history and physical examination. Intervention and Outcome Treatment consisted of high velocity low amplitude spinal manipulative therapy, mechanically assisted adjusting techniques utilizing a hand-held mechanical thrusting instrument and drop piece table, myofascial release and active release soft tissue techniques, proprioceptive neuromuscular facilitation stretching, and an individually designed rehabilitation program. Resolution of signs and symptoms occurred over four weeks. No recurrence of injury was reported over a six-month period. Conclusions This case suggests that the implementation of an individualized multi-modal management approach directed specifically toward an athlete's deficiencies and requirements, may lead to a more rapid recovery from osteitis pubis. PMID:22014865

Jarosz, Brett S.

2011-01-01

450

Spinal manipulative therapy versus Graston Technique in the treatment of non-specific thoracic spine pain: Design of a randomised controlled trial  

PubMed Central

Background The one year prevalence of thoracic back pain has been estimated as 17% compared to 64% for neck pain and 67% for low back pain. At present only one randomised controlled trial has been performed assessing the efficacy of spinal manipulative therapy (SMT) for thoracic spine pain. In addition no high quality trials have been performed to test the efficacy and effectiveness of Graston Technique® (GT), a soft tissue massage therapy using hand-held stainless steel instruments. The objective of this trial is to determine the efficacy of SMT and GT compared to a placebo for the treatment of non specific thoracic spine pain. Methods Eighty four eligible people with non specific thoracic pain mid back pain of six weeks or more will be randomised to one of three groups, either SMT, GT, or a placebo (de-tuned ultrasound). Each group will receive up to 10 supervised treatment sessions at the Murdoch University Chiropractic student clinic over a 4-week period. Treatment outcomes will be measured at baseline, one week after their first treatment, upon completion of the 4-week intervention period and at three, six and twelve months post randomisation. Outcome measures will include the Oswestry Back Pain Disability Index and the Visual Analogue Scale (VAS). Intention to treat analysis will be utilised in the statistical analysis of any group treatment effects. Trial Registration This trial was registered with the Australia and New Zealand Clinical Trials Registry on the 7th February 2008. Trial number: ACTRN12608000070336 PMID:18959807

Crothers, Amy; Walker, Bruce; French, Simon D

2008-01-01

451

A 14-year-old competitive, high-level athlete with unilateral low back pain: case report  

PubMed Central

Objective: To detail the presentation of a male adolescent competitive high-level soccer player with left sided low back pain that occurred while playing soccer. This case will outline the importance of early detection, risk of progression and management of active spondylolysis in adolescent athletes. Clinical Features: The patient initially presented to a chiropractic sport specialist with left sided low back pain (9/10 on numeric pain scale rating) while kicking soccer balls with his left leg of one month duration. He was initially diagnosed with mechanical low back pain and successfully treated for acute pain management including removal from sport specific training and competition, soft tissue therapy and advice to rest. The chief complaint returned however, when the athlete resumed training and competition. A plain film imaging report suggested only postural alterations in an otherwise normal study of the lumbar spine. Computed tomography images taken three months later revealed a fracture at the left L5 pars interarticularis. Summary: The early detection of spondylolysis combined with an effective plan of management including rest and conservative therapy with a progressive return to play may allow competitive athletes to resume participation at an elite level. PMID:23204572

Piper, Steven; DeGraauw, Christopher

2012-01-01

452

Subtle clinical signs of a meningioma in an adult: a case report  

PubMed Central

Background Meningiomas are the most common brain tumor in the adult population. This case report describes the epidemiology, the clinical presentation as well as the current treatment options for this condition. Case presentation A 49 year-old man attended a chiropractic clinic with non-specific chronic low back pain. Upon the history taking and the systems review, he reported a loss of both smell and taste for which investigations conducted by two different otolaryngologists did not yield a specific diagnosis. The patient was referred to a neurologist who ordered a computer tomography scan that eventually revealed a compression brain tumor. Brain tumors can produce a large variety of clinical presentations, such as upper motor neuron lesion symptoms, altered consciousness or vital functions which are easy to identify. However, subtle signs, such as those presented in this case, can be neglected. Conclusion Clinicians should be aware of uncommon clinical presentations including cranial nerve or neurological dysfunction and refer their patient to a specialist when detected. PMID:24490991

2014-01-01

453

Using computer-assisted learning to engage diverse learning styles in understanding business management principles.  

PubMed

Objective : Changes in small business and insurance present challenges for newly graduated chiropractors. Technology that reaches identified, diverse learning styles may assist the chiropractic student in business classes to meet course outcomes better. Thus, the purpose of our study is to determine if the use of technology-based instructional aids enhance students' mastery of course learning outcomes. Methods : Using convenience sampling, 86 students completed a survey assessing course learning outcomes, learning style, and the helpfulness of lecture and computer-assisted learning related to content mastery. Quantitative analyses occurred. Results : Although respondents reported not finding the computer-assisted learning as helpful as the lecture, significant relationships were found between pre- and post-assisted learning measures of the learning outcomes 1 and 2 for the visual and kinesthetic groups. Surprisingly, however, all learning style groups exhibited significant pre- and post-assisted learning appraisal relationships with learning outcomes 3 and 4. Conclusion : While evidence exists within the current study of a relationship between students' learning of the course content corollary to the use of technologic instructional aids, the exact nature of the relationship remains unclear. PMID:24087903

Frost, Mary E; Derby, Dustin C; Haan, Andrea G

2013-01-01

454

Use of and interest in alternative therapies among adult primary care clinicians and adult members in a large health maintenance organization.  

PubMed Central

During spring 1996, random samples of adult primary care physicians, obstetrics-gynecology physicians and nurse practitioners, and adult members of a large northern California group practice model health maintenance organization (HMO) were surveyed by mail to assess the use of alternative therapies and the extent of interest in having them incorporated into HMO-delivered care. Sixty-one percent (n = 624) of adult primary care physicians, 70% (n = 157) of obstetrics-gynecology clinicians, and 50% (2 surveys, n = 1,507 and n = 17,735) of adult HMO members responded. During the previous 12 months, 25% of adults reported using and nearly 90% of adult primary care physicians and obstetrics-gynecology clinicians reported recommending at least 1 alternative therapy, primarily for pain management. Chiropractic, acupuncture, massage, and behavioral medicine techniques such as meditation and relaxation training were most often cited. Obstetrics-gynecology clinicians used herbal and homeopathic medicines more often than adult primary care physicians, primarily for menopause and premenstrual syndrome. Two thirds of adult primary care physicians and three fourths of obstetrics-gynecology clinicians were at least moderately interested in using alternative therapies with patients, and nearly 70% of young and middle-aged adult and half of senior adult members were interested in having alternative therapies incorporated into their health care. Adult primary care physicians and members were more interested in having the HMO cover manipulative and behavioral medicine therapies than homeopathic or herbal medicines. PMID:9771154

Gordon, N P; Sobel, D S; Tarazona, E Z

1998-01-01

455

Complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) use by african american (AA) and caucasian american (CA) older adults in a rural setting: a descriptive, comparative study  

PubMed Central

Background The use of CAM is at an all time high. There is very little research that compares the use of CAM in elders by ethnicity in rural settings. The purpose of the study was to determine if there was a difference between African American and Caucasian American rural elders on use of CAM and self-reported satisfaction with CAM. Methods The design was a descriptive, comparative study of 183 elders who reported the number of CAM used and satisfaction with CAM. A convenience sample was recruited through community service organizations in the state of Mississippi. The availability of elders through the support groups, sampling bias, subject effect, and self-report were limitations of the study. Results The commonest examples of CAM used by rural elders were prayer, vitamins, exercise, meditation, herbs, chiropractic medicine, glucosamine, and music therapy. Significant findings on SES and marital status were calculated. Differences on ethnicity and demographic variables were significant for age, education, and the use of glucosamine. Conclusions Health care providers must be aware that elders are using CAM and are satisfied with their use. Identifying different uses of CAM by ethnicity is important for health care practitioners, impacting how health care is provided. PMID:14622445

Cuellar, Norma; Aycock, Teresa; Cahill, Bridgett; Ford, Julie

2003-01-01

456

Management of primary chronic headache in the general population: the Akershus study of chronic headache.  

PubMed

Primary chronic headaches cause more disability and necessitate high utilisation of health care. Our knowledge is based on selected populations, while information from the general population is largely lacking. An age and gender-stratified cross-sectional epidemiological survey included 30,000 persons aged 30-44 years. Respondents with self-reported chronic headache were interviewed by physicians. The International Classification of Headache Disorders was used. Of all primary chronic headache sufferers, 80% had consulted their general practitioner (GP), of these 19% had also consulted a neurologist and 4% had been hospitalised. Co-occurrence of migraine increased the probability of contact with a physician. A high Severity of Dependence Scale score increased the probability for contact with a physician. Complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) was used by 62%, most often physiotherapy, acupuncture and chiropractic. Contact with a physician increased the probability of use of CAM. Acute headache medications were taken by 87%, while only 3% used prophylactic medication. GPs manage the majority of those with primary chronic headache, 1/5 never consults a physician for their headache, while approximately 1/5 is referred to a neurologist or hospitalised. Acute headache medication was frequently overused, while prophylactic medication was ra