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1

Chiropractic: An Introduction  

MedlinePLUS

... Credentialing complementary and alternative medical providers. Annals of Internal Medicine . 2002;137(12):965–973. Ernst E. Chiropractic: ... DM. Chiropractic: origins, controversies, and contributions. Archives of Internal Medicine . 1998;158(20):2215–2224. Meeker WC, Haldeman S. ...

2

Educational Standards for Chiropractic Colleges.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Contents include: background information on the historical development, purpose, structure, and function of chiropractic accreditation; accreditation policy (eligibility, procedures, classifications, commission actions, and reports); standards for chiropractic colleges (organization, administration, scholastic regulations curriculum, faculty,…

Council on Chiropractic Education, Des Moines, IA.

3

American Chiropractic Association  

MedlinePLUS

... employees; search for or sell equipment and more Health Care Reform Video Update The ACA Government Relations Team provides the latest legislative news...(6/11/14) Chiropractic: Why choose conservative care ... to health care makes sense. Advocacy and Legislation ACA is ...

4

Department of Defense Chiropractic Internships  

PubMed Central

Objective: Department of Defense (DoD) chiropractic internships first began in July of 2001. At the time of this study, 30 New York Chiropractic College student interns had completed part of their clinical education within chiropractic clinics at either the National Naval Medical Center or Naval Hospital Camp Lejeune. The purpose of this study was to evaluate and compare the careers of DoD chiropractic internship participants with comparable nonparticipants in terms of demographics, professional activities, income, and satisfaction. Methods: Survey research was employed to gather data from DoD chiropractic internship participants and comparable nonparticipants. Statistical analysis was carried out to determine significant differences with a nominal significance level set as.05. Results: There were no statistically significant differences in demographics, professional activities, income, or career satisfaction between the 21 DoD chiropractic internship participants (70% response rate) and 35 internship nonparticipants (35% response rate). Conclusions: This study utilized practice parameters as a form of feedback for a comparative analysis of DoD chiropractic internship participants and nonparticipants and found no significant differences between these groups. Limitations of the study may have influenced the results. Opportunities for chiropractic students to train within these settings remains limited and should be further explored, as should additional research into this component of chiropractic clinical education.

Dunn, Andrew S.

2006-01-01

5

Medical-chiropractic correspondence *  

PubMed Central

The authors are engaged in a multidisciplinary practice setting and have accumulated years of experience in medical-chiropractic co-operation. This paper outlines the importance of effective communication between disciplines in day-to-day clinical practice. It is important to know when and how to write letters of referral and chart notes. The proper development of these skills will foster greater interdisciplinary co-operation, better practice management skills, and an increased number of patient referrals.

Cassidy, J. David; Mierau, Dale R.; Nykoliation, Jim W.; Arthur, Brian

1985-01-01

6

Chiropractic. State of the Art.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The review covers: (1) the discipline (description, scientific theories and principles, its practice, contributions to the health field, and history); (2) the profession (a doctor profile, patients, students, and the American Chiropractic Association); (3) chiropractic education (colleges, career opportunities, standard basic curriculum,…

Schafer, R. C., Ed.

7

Chiropractic manipulation: reasons for concern?  

PubMed

Chiropractic's popularity is rising among the general population. Moreover, few studies have been conducted to properly evaluate its safety. We report three cases of serious neurological adverse events in patients treated with chiropractic manipulation. The first case is a 41 years old woman who developed a vertebro-basilar stroke 48 h after cervical manipulation. The second case represents a 68 years old woman who presented a neuropraxic injury of both radial nerves after three sessions of spinal manipulation. The last case is a 34 years old man who developed a cervical epidural haematoma after a chiropractic treatment for neck pain. In all three cases there were criteria to consider a causality relation between the neurological adverse events and the chiropractic manipulation. The described serious adverse events promptly recommend the implementation of a risk alert system. PMID:17904731

Gouveia, Liliana Olim; Castanho, Pedro; Ferreira, Joaquim J; Guedes, Miguel Moura; Falcão, Filipa; e Melo, Teresa Pinho

2007-12-01

8

Who uses Australian chiropractic services?  

PubMed Central

Background The use of chiropractic services is widespread, however, little is known about the characteristics of people who seek chiropractic care in Australia. This study compared the characteristics of users and non-users of chiropractic services from a cohort of patients sourced from general medical practice in Victoria, Australia. Methods This is a secondary analysis of baseline screening data from a prospective adult cohort study beginning in 2005. Thirty randomly selected Australian general medical practices mailed out surveys to 17,780 of their patients. Differences were examined between chiropractic users and others, and between chiropractic users who reported a back problem to those who did not. Results Of 7,519 respondents, 15% indicated they had visited a chiropractor in the last 12 months. Chiropractic users were more likely to have their GP located in a rural location and to be born in Australia; they were less likely to be in the older age group (55–76), to be unemployed or to have a pension/benefit as their main source of income. Chiropractic users were more likely to: have a back problem; use complementary or alternative medication; visit another type of complementary health practitioner or a physiotherapist. They were less likely to take medication for certain health problems (e.g. for high blood pressure, high cholesterol or asthma). No important differences were seen between chiropractic users and non-users for other health problems. People who visited a chiropractor and reported a back problem were more likely to: be a current smoker; have a number of other chronic conditions, including arthritis, hypertension, chronic sinusitis, asthma, dermatitis, depression and anxiety; report taking medications, including antidepressants, analgesics (painkillers and arthritis medication) and complementary or alternative medications. Conclusions This large cross-sectional study of general medical practice attendees suggests that chiropractors are the most commonly consulted complementary health profession. Chiropractors should ensure they are aware of their patients’ health conditions other than musculoskeletal problems and should ensure they are appropriately managed.

2013-01-01

9

Chiropractic and CAM Utilization: A Descriptive Review  

PubMed Central

Objective To conduct a descriptive review of the scientific literature examining use rates of modalities and procedures used by CAM clinicians to manage chronic LBP and other conditions Data Sources A literature of PubMed and MANTIS was performed using the key terms Chiropractic; Low Back Pain; Utilization Rate; Use Rate; Complementary and Alternative Medicine; and Health Services in various combinations. Data Selection A total of 137 papers were selected, based upon including information about chiropractic utilization, CAM utilization and low back pain and other conditions. Data Synthesis Information was extracted from each paper addressing use of chiropractic and CAM, and is summarized in tabular form. Results Thematic analysis of the paper topics indicated that there were 5 functional areas covered by the literature: back pain papers, general chiropractic papers, insurance-related papers, general CAM-related papers; and worker's compensation papers. Conclusion Studies looking at chiropractic utilization demonstrate that the rates vary, but generally fall into a range from around 6% to 12% of the population, most of whom seek chiropractic care for low back pain and not for organic disease or visceral dysfunction. CAM is itself used by people suffering from a variety of conditions, though it is often used not as a primary intervention, but rather as an additional form of care. CAM and chiropractic often offer lower costs for comparable results compared to conventional medicine.

Lawrence, Dana J; Meeker, William C

2007-01-01

10

Constructing a philosophy of chiropractic: evolving worldviews and premodern roots?  

PubMed Central

Objective The philosophy of chiropractic can be framed as an attempt to correct the problems inherited from the Western Enlightenment. Its origins can be found in the long tradition of Western philosophy. The purpose of this article is to describe in a broad context chiropractic’s roots in premodernity and establish the structural and hermeneutical differences between chiropractic’s original philosophical ideas and those of premodern philosophers. Discussion The worldview or cultural mindset the philosophy arose from must be situated in the context of its time, the birth of the unique postmodern worldview, aperspectival consciousness, and the modern sense of self. This is accomplished by exploring several metatheories about the development of the self through history, with an emphasis on the premodern roots to the chiropractic terms; Universal Intelligence and Innate Intelligence. By contextualizing the philosophy of chiropractic in terms of a structural genealogy of the self and of ideas, a new approach to philosophy in chiropractic emerges. Conclusion Without accounting for chiropractic’s origins as a reflection of the unique time, place, and culture, in terms of the evolution of worldviews through history, any approach to construct or reconstruct a philosophy of chiropractic will potentially miss the seminal feature of chiropractic’s emergence.

Senzon, Simon A.

2011-01-01

11

Development of the Murdoch Chiropractic Graduate Pledge  

PubMed Central

Purpose: This paper reviews the origins of the learned professions, the foundational concepts of professionalism, and the common elements within various healer's oaths. It then reveals the development of the Murdoch Chiropractic Graduate Pledge. Methods: A committee comprised of three Murdoch academics performed literature searches on the topic of professionalism and healer's oaths and utilized the Quaker consensus process to develop the Murdoch Chiropractic Graduate Pledge. Results: The committee in its deliberations utilized over 200 relevant papers and textbooks to formulate the Murdoch Chiropractic Graduate Pledge that was administered to the 2010 Murdoch School of Chiropractic and Sports Science graduates. The School of Chiropractic and Sports Science included professionalism as one of its strategic goals and began the process of curriculum review to align it with the goal of providing a curriculum that recognizes and emphasizes the development of professionalism. Conclusions: The reciting of a healer's oath such as the Hippocratic Oath is widely considered to be the first step in a new doctor's career. It is seen as the affirmation that a newly trained health care provider will use his or her newfound knowledge and skill exclusively for the benefit of mankind in an ethical manner. Born from the very meaning of the word profession, the tradition of recitation of a healer's oath is resurgent in health care. It is important for health care instructors to understand that the curriculum must be such that it contributes positively to the students' professional development.

Simpson, J. Keith; Losco, Barrett; Young, Kenneth J.

2010-01-01

12

Should the chiropractic profession embrace the doctrine of informed consent?  

PubMed

This commentary provides a narrative review of the literature focusing on the use of a health care informed consent process in the United States. This article reviews the current positions of the World Medical Association, American Medical Association, American Chiropractic Association, Wisconsin and New Jersey State Courts, US Federal Government Office of Health Policy and Clinical Outcomes, and 1 college of chiropractic regarding the doctrine of informed consent. The authors recommend that the chiropractic profession embrace the doctrine of informed consent and promulgate it as a standard of care. The implementation of this doctrine by chiropractic physicians promotes and improves the safety of chiropractic interventions. PMID:19646372

Lehman, James J; Conwell, Timothy D; Sherman, Paul R

2008-09-01

13

Lasers and their therapeutic application in chiropractic  

PubMed Central

The purpose of this paper is to review some of the applications of laser therapy and its reported effects on tissue healing, pain relief and other effects. Several musculoskeletal and low back pain studies are highlighted to show the efficacy of laser therapy and its' applicability as an adjunct to chiropractic treatment. Information is also presented which highlights the necessary information the clinician should be aware of in order to develop specific protocols for musculoskeletal pathologies. The parameters, which are now available on lasers, include power, frequency, duty cycle and cadence. When these are manipulated, different effects are achieved on tissues, which may enhance chiropractic treatment. Imagesp34-a

Fitz-Ritson, Don

2001-01-01

14

Chiropractic Colleges Seek Legitimacy amid Financial Woes  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Many of the nation's chiropractic colleges, like other small colleges that rely heavily on tuition, are struggling to stay in business. At the same time that they are working to improve their stature in higher education and broadening their missions to increase their appeal, a number of the colleges are seeing enrollments plummet--and revenues are…

Fuller, Andrea

2012-01-01

15

Chiropractic management of a patient with persistent headache  

PubMed Central

Objective The purpose of this case report is to describe chiropractic care of a patient with persistent headache treated using chiropractic manipulative therapy and adjunct treatments. Clinical features A 54-year-old multiparous woman had chronic debilitating headaches for 11 months. Previous care from a variety of specialties had brought no appreciable relief. Intervention and outcome The patient was managed with chiropractic manipulative therapy, injections, and electromagnetic therapy. Five treatments over 6 weeks brought resolution of the headaches. Conclusion This patient with persistent headache responded favorably to a course of chiropractic and adjunctive care.

West, Jason; Phillips, Reed B.

2013-01-01

16

The journal 'chiropractic & osteopathy' changes its title to 'chiropractic & manual therapies'. a new name, a new era  

PubMed Central

Chiropractic & Osteopathy changes its title to Chiropractic & Manual Therapies in January 2011. This change reflects the expanding base of submissions from clinical scientists interested in the discipline of manual therapy. It is also in accord with the findings of a review of the journal content and a joint venture between the original parent organisation the Chiropractic and Osteopathic College of Australasia and a new partner the European Academy of Chiropractic, which is a subsidiary body of the European Chiropractors' Union. The title change should encourage submissions from all professionals interested in manual therapy including chiropractors, osteopaths, physiotherapists, medical doctors and scientists interested in this field.

2011-01-01

17

Journal publications by Australian chiropractic academics: are they enough?  

Microsoft Academic Search

PURPOSE: To document the number of journal publications attributed to the academic faculty of Australian chiropractic tertiary institutions. To provide a discussion of the significance of this output and to relate this to the difficulty the profession appears to be experiencing in the uptake of evidence based healthcare outcomes and cultures. METHODS: The departmental websites for the three Australian chiropractic

Wayne Hoskins; Henry Pollard; John Reggars; Andrew Vitiello; Rod Bonello

2006-01-01

18

Chiropractic services in a staff model HMO: utilization and satisfaction.  

PubMed

Utilization of chiropractic services was assessed in the continuously enrolled, non-Medicaid membership of Group Health Cooperative of South Central Wisconsin in 1993 and 1994. In addition, a random sample of 500 members using chiropractic services in the last quarter of 1994 was surveyed about satisfaction with the services. A total of 5.1% and 5.3% of members used the services in 1993 and 1994, respectively. Highest utilization occurred among women aged 35 to 49, with rates of 9.5% and 9.9%. Satisfaction levels were high in all areas; 95.8% indicated overall satisfaction with chiropractic care and services. PMID:10165554

Hansen, J P; Futch, D B

1997-03-01

19

Use of the term subluxation in publications during the formative years of the chiropractic profession  

PubMed Central

The term subluxation has come to have different meanings for different health care professions in the United States for over the past century. This controversy has resulted in some contention both internal and external to the chiropractic profession. Some current factions within the chiropractic profession hold the term subluxation to be synonymous with the identity of chiropractic itself; however, this term was not solely used by chiropractic during its formative years. The purpose of this article is to look at uses of the term by various professions (osteopathy, medicine, and chiropractic) at the turn of the century, a time in which the chiropractic profession was developing.

Johnson, Claire

2011-01-01

20

Chiropractic management of breast-feeding difficulties: a case report  

PubMed Central

Objective The purpose of this study is to discuss a chiropractic case of management and resolution of breast-feeding difficulties. Clinical Features The case involves an 8-day-old baby unable to breast-feed since 4 days old. Initial examination revealed cervical, cranial, and sacral restrictions. She was diagnosed with craniocervical syndrome by a doctor of chiropractic. Intervention and Outcome Following history and examination, the infant received gentle chiropractic manipulation based on clinical findings. Immediate improvement and complete resolution of the nursing problems were observed after 3 treatments over 14 days. Conclusion The results of this case suggest that neuromusculoskeletal dysfunction may influence the ability of an infant to suckle successfully and that intervention via chiropractic adjustments may result in improving the infant's ability to suckle efficiently.

Holleman, Annique C.; Nee, John; Knaap, Simone F.C.

2011-01-01

21

Chiropractic in the United States: Training, Practice, and Research.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

This research report was developed under grant No. HS 07915 by the Center for Health Studies, Group Health Cooperative of Puget Sound (Seattle, Washington). In view of the growing popularity of chiropractic care, it is important that health care providers...

D. C. Cherkin R. B. Phillips R. D. Mootz

1997-01-01

22

The role of chiropractic care in older adults.  

PubMed

There are a rising number of older adults; in the US alone nearly 20% of the population will be 65 or older by 2030. Chiropractic is one of the most frequently utilized types of complementary and alternative care by older adults, used by an estimated 5% of older adults in the U.S. annually. Chiropractic care involves many different types of interventions, including preventive strategies. This commentary by experts in the field of geriatrics, discusses the evidence for the use of spinal manipulative therapy, acupuncture, nutritional counseling and fall prevention strategies as delivered by doctors of chiropractic. Given the utilization of chiropractic services by the older adult, it is imperative that providers be familiar with the evidence for and the prudent use of different management strategies for older adults. PMID:22348431

Dougherty, Paul E; Hawk, Cheryl; Weiner, Debra K; Gleberzon, Brian; Andrew, Kari; Killinger, Lisa

2012-01-01

23

An investigation into the demographics and motivations of students studying for a chiropractic degree  

PubMed Central

Objective This research aimed to investigate motivations for studying chiropractic, and to determine what students look for in a course/college and potential barriers to studying chiropractic. Methods The study design was a cross-sectional survey. Following IRB/Ethical approval, a paper-based questionnaire was distributed to students at McTimoney College of Chiropractic. Demographic data were compared to another chiropractic college in the United Kingdom. Results The questionnaire response rate was 70.8% (n = 121). Motivating factors for studying chiropractic included a desire to help others (54.5%, n = 66), with 44.6% (n = 54) attracted by chiropractic's holistic, drugless approach to health. Previous help from chiropractic influenced 55.4% (n = 67) and 22.3% (n = 27) felt chiropractic had “changed their life.” Just over half of the respondents (55.4%, n = 67) viewed the ability to work while studying as extremely important and 73.6% (n = 89) said they could not have studied chiropractic without this. Conclusion Previous help from chiropractic care was a common motivation for studying chiropractic. The ability to work while studying was seen as vital by many students and, without it, the vast majority felt they could not have studied chiropractic.

Yalden, Philip; Cunliffe, Christina; Hunnisett, Adrian

2013-01-01

24

Chiropractic: a profession at the crossroads of mainstream and alternative medicine  

Microsoft Academic Search

Chiropractic is a large and well-established health care profession in the United States. In this overview, we briefly examine the development of chiropractic from humble and contentious beginnings to its current state at the crossroads of alternative and mainstream medicine. Chiropractic has taken on many of the attributes of an established profession, improving its educational and licensing systems and substantially

William C. Meeker; Scott Haldeman

2002-01-01

25

How can chiropractic become a respected mainstream profession? The example of podiatry  

Microsoft Academic Search

BACKGROUND: The chiropractic profession has succeeded to remain in existence for over 110 years despite the fact that many other professions which had their start at around the same time as chiropractic have disappeared. Despite chiropractic's longevity, the profession has not succeeded in establishing cultural authority and respect within mainstream society, and its market share is dwindling. In the meantime,

Donald R Murphy; Michael J Schneider; David R Seaman; Stephen M Perle; Craig F Nelson

2008-01-01

26

Chiropractic management of essential tremor and migraine: a case report  

PubMed Central

Objective The purpose of this case report is to describe the chiropractic management of a 39-year-old woman with essential tremors and migraine headaches. Clinical Features A 39-year-old woman presented with essential tremors and migraine headaches, which occurred 2 to 3 times per week. The essential tremor was diagnosed in 2000, and migraine headaches with aura were diagnosed when she was 10. Both diagnoses were made by her general medical practitioner. Previous treatments for migraine included propranolol, isometheptene, dichloralphenazone, acetaminophen, sumatriptan, and over-the-counter pain relievers. Intervention and Outcome The patient received high-velocity, low-amplitude chiropractic spinal manipulation to her upper cervical spine using the Blair Upper Cervical chiropractic technique protocol. There was improvement in her tremors and migraine headaches following her initial chiropractic treatment, with a sustained improvement after 4 months of care. Conclusion This case study demonstrated improvement in a woman with essential tremors and migraine headaches. This suggests the need for more research to examine how upper cervical specific chiropractic care may help mitigate tremors and migraine headaches.

Hubbard, Todd A.; Kane, Janice D.

2012-01-01

27

Chiropractic treatment of a pregnant patient with lumbar radiculopathy  

PubMed Central

Abstract Objective The purpose of this report is to describe chiropractic treatment of lower back and unilateral leg pain in a pregnant patient. Clinical Features A 26-year-old woman in her second trimester of pregnancy had severe pain in her lower back that radiated to her hips bilaterally and to her right leg. She reported tingling down her right lower leg to the dorsum of her foot. Although no diagnostic imaging was performed, her differential diagnoses included lumbalgia with associated radiculopathy. Intervention and Outcome Treatment consisted of manual traction in the side-lying position using a specialized chiropractic table and treatment technique (Cox flexion-distraction decompression) modified for pregnancy. Relief was noted after the first treatment, and complete resolution of her subjective and objective findings occurred after 8 visits. Conclusion When modified, this chiropractic technique appears to be an effective method for treating lower back pain with radiation to the leg in a pregnant patient who cannot lie prone.

Kruse, Ralph A.; Gudavalli, Sharina; Cambron, Jerrilyn

2007-01-01

28

Essential literature for the chiropractic profession: a survey of chiropractic research leaders  

PubMed Central

Background Evidence-based clinical practice (EBCP) is an accepted practice for informed clinical decision making in mainstream health care professions. EBCP augments clinical experience and can have far reaching effects in education, policy, reimbursement and clinical management. The proliferation of published research can be overwhelming—finding a mechanism to identify literature that is essential for practitioners and students is desirable. The purpose of this study was to survey leaders in the chiropractic profession on their opinions of essential literature for doctors of chiropractic, faculty, and students to read or reference. Methods Deployment of an IRB exempted survey occurred with 68 academic and research leaders using SurveyMonkey®. Individuals were solicited via e-mail in August of 2011; the study closed in October of 2011. Collected data were checked for citation accuracy and compiled to determine multiple responses. A secondary analysis assessed the scholarly impact and Internet accessibility of the recommended literature. Results Forty-three (43) individuals consented to participate; seventeen (17) contributed at least one article of importance. A total of 41 unique articles were reported. Of the six articles contributed more than once, one article was reported 6 times, and 5 were reported twice. Conclusions A manageable list of relevant literature was created. Shortcomings of methods were identified, and improvements for continued implementation are suggested. A wide variety of articles were reported as “essential” knowledge; annual or bi-annual surveys would be helpful for the profession.

2013-01-01

29

Chiropractic quality assurance: standards and guidelines  

PubMed Central

Chiropractic quality assurance involves development of both clinical guidelines and standards. Confusion generated by poor differentiation of guidelines from standards contributes to mistrust of the guideline development process. Guidelines are considered to be recommendations that allow for flexibility and individual patient differences. Standards are more binding and require a high level of supporting evidence. While guidelines serve as educational tools to improve the quality of practice, standards that outline minimum competency are used more as administrative tools on which to base policy. Barriers to development of clinical guidelines and standards include fear that they will create prescriptive “cookbook” practice, and the distrust that guidelines are developed primarily for cost containment. Clinicians also criticize guidelines developed by academics that don't relate to practice, and those based on evidence that lacks clinical relevance. Conflicting guidelines perceived to be based on strong bias or conflict of interest are also suspect. To reduce barriers to acceptance and implementation, guidelines should be inclusive, patient-centered, and based on a variety of evidence and clinical experience.

Gatterman, Meridel I; Dobson, Thomas P; LeFevbre, Ron

2001-01-01

30

The Canadian Chiropractic Examination Board results: a statistical evaluation  

PubMed Central

This paper presents a statistical analysis of the Canadian Chiropractic Examining Board results for the years 1977, 1978 and 1979. The examinations, of which there are 10, together with the overall result are examined from the point of view of the student’s college of graduation, the year in which the examinations were written and (for CMCC students only) prior non-chiropractic education. Finally the correlation between individual subjects and the final percent is discussed. It was found that both chiropractic college of graduation and the year in which the examinations were written were strongly related to an individual’s standing. Since it is quite possible that these results are an artifact of the examinations, arguments are put forward that the graduate population did indeed vary from year to year, and that systematic differences do exist among the graduates of the various colleges. On the other hand, however, it was found that prior non-chiropractic education had little bearing on how well a graduate did on the examinations. Although there were very strong correlations between the examinations and the final percent, four of these examinations — Neurology, Pathology, Physiology and Principles — together accounted for over 90% of the variance in the final grade.

Coulter, ID; Delgrande, JP

1979-01-01

31

A review of the literature on chiropractic and insomnia  

PubMed Central

Objective The purpose of this literature review is to critically review the evidence for chiropractic as a treatment of primary insomnia. Methods A search of the following databases up to October 2006 was conducted: PubMed, PEDro, MANTIS, CINAHL, and the specialized register of the Cochrane review group. We also performed hand searching of relevant journals. Randomized clinical trials, clinical trials, and case studies of chiropractic treatment of insomnia were included. It was required that each study used at least one form of standard patient outcome measure. Treatment strategies included manual therapy such as spinal manipulative therapy or muscle relaxation techniques. The review focused on articles published in indexed, peer-reviewed journals. Results Fifteen studies met the selection criteria. There were no randomized clinical trials specific to chiropractic and insomnia. One study was a survey of opinion for treatment regimens for insomnia, which had low methodological scores. Another study assessed osteopathic cranial manipulation for insomnia, which appeared to have positive effects. Four studies identified physiotherapy treatment and manual therapy. A further 9 studies related to mind-body medical therapies and impaired health status, sleep disorders, and pain in the craniomandibular and cervical spinal regions. Conclusion Some studies have noted improvement in insomnia following manual therapy; however, based on clinical trials, there is minimal evidence of support for chiropractic in insomnia. Further studies with high methodological scores need to be conducted.

Kingston, Jana; Raggio, Claire; Spencer, Kim; Stalaker, Karl; Tuchin, Peter J.

2010-01-01

32

Osteoarthritis, chiropractic, and nutrition: osteoarthritis considered as a natural part of a three stage subluxation complex: its reversibility: its relevance and treatability by chiropractic and nutritional correlates.  

PubMed

It is proposed that chiropractic and nutritional treatment contribute to the amelioration and perhaps reversal of osteoarthritis (OA). It is further proposed that the chiropractic manipulative thrust, is in effect, treating dysfunctional bio-mechanics of joints, affecting positive cartilaginous change. The pathophysiology and multi-factorial causes of OA are reviewed. New interpretations of the literature surrounding OA are discussed which offer arguments for OA's treatment and reversal through chiropractic manipulation and nutrutional support. Presented is a new model of the chiropractic concept of subluxation (abnormal joint complex resulting in fixation or decrease in normal range of motion) and the chiropractic manipulative thrust. The associated histologic correlates are also discussed. A review of the literature of anti-inflammatory and muscle/joint complex supportive nutrients appropriate for OA is presented. Finally, a complete treatment protocol for OA is summarized. PMID:1809855

Berkson, D L

1991-12-01

33

Australian chiropractic sports medicine: half way there or living on a prayer?  

PubMed

Sports chiropractic within Australia has a chequered historical background of unorthodox individualistic displays of egocentric treatment approaches that emphasise specific technique preference and individual prowess rather than standardised evidence based management. This situation has changed in recent years with the acceptance of many within sports chiropractic to operate under an evidence informed banner and to embrace a research culture. Despite recent developments within the sports chiropractic movement, the profession is still plagued by a minority of practitioners continuing to espouse certain marginal and outlandish technique systems that beleaguer the mainstream core of sports chiropractic as a cohesive and homogeneous group. Modern chiropractic management is frequently multimodal in nature and incorporates components of passive and active care. Such management typically incorporates spinal and peripheral manipulation, mobilisation, soft tissue techniques, rehabilitation and therapeutic exercises. Externally, sports chiropractic has faced hurdles too, with a lack of recognition and acceptance by organized and orthodox sports medical groups. Whilst some arguments against the inclusion of chiropractic may be legitimate due to its historical baggage, much of the argument appears to be anti-competitive, insecure and driven by a closed-shop mentality.sequently, chiropractic as a profession still remains a pariah to the organised sports medicine world. Add to this an uncertain continuing education system, a lack of protection for the title 'sports chiropractor', a lack of a recognized specialist status and a lack of support from traditional chiropractic, the challenges for the growth and acceptance of the sports chiropractor are considerable. This article outlines the historical and current challenges, both internal and external, faced by sports chiropractic within Australia and proposes positive changes that will assist in recognition and inclusion of sports chiropractic in both chiropractic and multi-disciplinary sports medicine alike. PMID:17880724

Pollard, Henry; Hoskins, Wayne; McHardy, Andrew; Bonello, Rod; Garbutt, Peter; Swain, Mike; Dragasevic, George; Pribicevic, Mario; Vitiello, Andrew

2007-01-01

34

The establishment and development of chiropractic in Tennessee, 1910-1994.  

PubMed

Tennessee was to see the first practitioners of the new alternative school of chiropractic within the second decade of chiropractic. This paper deals with the earliest recorded roots of the profession by individual chiropractors and the major legislative issues and organizational evolution in the state. Consideration is given to the influence of the Nashville College of Chiropractic, the longest continuous early school in the South (1936-1947). PMID:11613389

Lensgraf, A G

1995-06-01

35

GPs opinions and perceptions of chiropractic in Sweden and Norway: a descriptive survey  

PubMed Central

Background In Sweden, chiropractic is not included in mainstream health care. In Norway chiropractic is a recognized health care profession. The aim of this study was to explore the perceptions of chiropractic among Swedish and Norwegian General Practitioners (GPs). Methods Eight hundred surveys in each country were distributed randomly by post to Swedish and Norwegian GPs offices. The survey contained two main sections: Experiences and opinions about chiropractic and referral patterns. The data were then described and compared between the countries. Results In Sweden the response rate was 44.8% and in Norway 45.3%. More than half of the Swedish GPs participating in this study stated that they had poor knowledge about chiropractic, while just a tenth of Norwegian GPs stated the same. Nearly all Norwegian GPs had some experience of chiropractic treatment whilst a fairly large number of the Swedish GPs said that they had no experience at all of chiropractic. It was twice as common for GPs in Norway to refer patients to a chiropractor as compared to Sweden. However, Swedish and Norwegian GPs agreed that chiropractors were competent to treat musculo-skeletal conditions with an adequate education to be part of mainstream medicine. Conclusions Swedish and Norwegian GPs agree that chiropractors are competent to treat musculoskeletal conditions. However, there are many differences in GPs perceptions of chiropractic between the two countries and the overall picture indicates that chiropractic is more accepted and recognised as a health care profession in Norway.

2013-01-01

36

Chiropractic and concussion in sport: a narrative review of the literature  

PubMed Central

Objective Concussion is a common sporting injury that may be seen by doctors of chiropractic and should be managed following current practice guidelines. The purpose of this abstract is to present a literature review on chiropractic management of concussion in sport and to discuss current guidelines. Methods A review of the literature was performed using the PubMed search engine. MeSH terms included chiropractic and concussion. Search dates were the beginning of the record through July 30, 2013. All languages and article types were included in the search. Articles found were retrieved and evaluated for the relevance of chiropractic management of concussion in sport. Results Five articles were found (1 prospective study, 1 survey, 3 literature reviews) ranging in publication years from 1993 to 2012. No articles reported a position statement, and none provided a review of current concussion management practices related to chiropractic practice. No articles reported adverse outcomes of chiropractic management of an athlete with concussion. Conclusion Research related to the chiropractic management of concussion in sport is a nascent area of investigation. Although there are few published articles, the articles in this review showed that doctors of chiropractic encounter concussed athletes at events and in clinical practice. It is essential for doctors of chiropractic to understand the importance of using standardized concussion assessment tools and current concussion guidelines.

Johnson, Claire D.; Green, Bart N.; Nelson, Robert C.; Moreau, Bill; Nabhan, Dustin

2013-01-01

37

Differential performance on the Canadian Chiropractic Examining Board Examinations: an eight year longitudinal study  

PubMed Central

Performance data from the Canadian Chiropractic Examining Board (CCEB) examinations for an eight year period, 1987-1994, were analyzed. These exams sample nine content areas: anatomy, chemistry, chiropractic practice, diagnosis and symptomatology, microbiology and public health, neurology, pathology, physiology, and x-ray interpretation and physics. Candidates from more than 15 chiropractic colleges have written the CCEB exams over this eight year period. The results indicate that there are substantial differences on mean performance by graduates of the various chiropractic colleges that wrote the CCEB during the study period. Factors possibly contributing to these differences are proposed. The implications for educational program evaluation and curricular revisions are discussed.

Lawson, Douglas; Violato, Claudio; Marini, Anthony; McEwen, Murray

1995-01-01

38

Chiropractic management of elbow tendinopathy following a sports related trauma  

PubMed Central

Objective: This report describes chiropractic management of a case of sub-acute elbow pain and swelling with Active Release Technique® and acupuncture. Case presentation: A 41-year-old male presented to a chiropractic clinic with a primary complaint of elbow pain and swelling following a fall while playing basketball five weeks prior. Intervention and Outcome: Treatment consisted of two sessions of needle acupuncture and one treatment of Active Release Techniques® (ART) applied to the left elbow region. Conclusions: The patient’s outcomes indicated a quick resolution of subjective complaints and objective findings with the chosen treatment. Further research is needed to demonstrate safety, clinical effectiveness, and cost effectiveness when compared to other treatments.

Gliedt, Jordan A.; Daniels, Clinton J.

2014-01-01

39

Radiograph utilization and demographics in a chiropractic college teaching clinic  

PubMed Central

Objective The purpose of this study is to present radiograph utilization at a chiropractic college teaching clinic, the associated patient demographics, and the utilization rates by body region. Methods Data for outpatient services over a 3-year period were extracted from a college clinic administrative software program. Radiographic data were matched with patient demographic information providing the age, sex, and financial class for all patients. Results The overall radiograph utilization rate was 8%, with the highest frequency occurring in the spine in the order of lumbar, cervical, and then thoracic regions. Spinal radiographs made up 66% of the total radiographs taken. The utilization rate increased as the age of the patients increased. The average patient age was 46, and 48% were female. Conclusion The radiograph utilization rate at this teaching clinic was lower than previous studies. This study provides new information regarding overall and regional radiography rates and associated patient demographics from an American chiropractic college.

Lew, Makani; Snow, Gregory J.

2012-01-01

40

Constructing a philosophy of chiropractic: evolving worldviews and modern foundation?  

PubMed Central

Objective The purpose of this article is to trace the foundations of DD Palmer's sense of self and philosophy of chiropractic to its sources in modern Western philosophy as well as current metatheories about modernity. Discussion DD Palmer's sense of self was indicative of a modern self. A modern self is characterized as a self that developed after the Western Enlightenment and must come to terms with the insights of modernity such as Cartesian dualism, Spinoza's substance, Rousseau's expressivism, and Kant's critiques. It is argued that Palmer's philosophy can be viewed as part of the this tradition alongside his involvement in the 19th century American metaphysical religious culture, which was itself a response to these challenges of the modern self of modernity. Conclusion Palmer's development of chiropractic and its philosophy was a reaction to the challenges and promises of modernity.

Senzon, Simon A.

2011-01-01

41

Student Mental Health in a Chiropractic University Setting  

Microsoft Academic Search

Objective: This report is an attempt to frame the types of emotional challenges seen at a university counseling center with a unique population of chiropractic students compared with the normative college population. Methods:Thepsychologicalcomplaintsofstudentswere examined todetermine the populationthathas utilized psychologicalcounseling over the last 2 years at this institution.Results:The following issues were identified as the top three presenting concerns for individuals pursuing

Lisa E. Rubin

42

Collaborative Care for Older Adults (COCOA), Palmer College of Chiropractic.  

PubMed

Integrative medicine (IM) is a subset of interprofessional health care that seeks to join the knowledge and practices of various allopathic and complementary and alternative medicine disciplines in an attempt to offer cost-effective and clinically significant healthcare options for persons with acute or chronic illnesses. Although touted as a means for improving health outcomes and patient satisfaction while possibly lowering costs, further scientific evidence regarding the utility of IM approaches to health services delivery is needed. Collaborative Care for Older Adults (COCOA) is a chiropractic demonstration project that brings together an interdisciplinary team of researchers and clinicians from the Palmer Center for Chiropractic Research, Genesis Quad Cities Family Practice Residency, The University of Iowa, and Thomas Jefferson University to study the impact of a model of interprofessional education on geriatric health care. The Health Resources and Services Administration funded COCOA in 2009 to further develop and assess a patient-centered care model for the treatment of low back pain in older adults that uses a team-based approach between medical doctors and doctors of chiropractic. PMID:21174032

Goertz, Christine; Lyons, Stacie Salsbury; Andresen, Andrew; Hondras, Maria; Jones, Mark; Killinger, Lisa Zaynab; Long, Cynthia; Lyons, Kevin; Mulhausen, Paul; Vining, Robert

2010-01-01

43

Demographic survey of pediatric patients presenting to a chiropractic teaching clinic  

Microsoft Academic Search

BACKGROUND: Considering the increasing use of alternative therapies for children, it is appropriate to determine the demographic profile of pediatric patients entering a chiropractic clinic. METHODS: Collection of demographic data including age, gender, condition at presentation, previous clinicians consulted and medical referral rates of pediatric patients presenting to a chiropractic teaching clinic between 2006 and 2010. RESULTS: Over-all, 20.5% of

Joyce Miller

2010-01-01

44

Chiropractic at the crossroads or are we just going around in circles?  

PubMed Central

Background Chiropractic in Australia has seen many changes over the past 30 years. Some of these changes have advanced the professional status of chiropractic, improved undergraduate training and paved the way for a research culture. Unfortunately, other changes or lack of changes, have hindered the growth, public utilisation and professional standing of chiropractic in Australia. This article explores what influences have impacted on the credibility, advancement and public utilisation of chiropractic in Australia. Discussion The 1970's and 1980's saw a dramatic change within the chiropractic profession in Australia. With the advent of government regulation, came government funded teaching institutions, quality research and increased public acceptance and utilisation of chiropractic services. However, since that time the profession appears to have taken a backward step, which in the author's opinion, is directly linked to a shift by sections of the profession to the fundamentalist approach to chiropractic and the vertebral subluxation complex. The abandonment, by some groups, of a scientific and evidenced based approach to practice for one founded on ideological dogma is beginning to take its toll. Summary The future of chiropractic in Australia is at a crossroads. For the profession to move forward it must base its future on science and not ideological dogma. The push by some for it to become a unique and all encompassing alternative system of healthcare is both misguided and irrational.

2011-01-01

45

Attitudes towards fibromyalgia: A survey of Canadian chiropractic, naturopathic, physical therapy and occupational therapy students  

Microsoft Academic Search

BACKGROUND: The frequent use of chiropractic, naturopathic, and physical and occupational therapy by patients with fibromyalgia has been emphasized repeatedly, but little is known about the attitudes of these therapists towards this challenging condition. METHODS: We administered a cross-sectional survey to 385 senior Canadian chiropractic, naturopathic, physical and occupational therapy students in their final year of studies, that inquired about

Jason W Busse; Abhaya V Kulkarni; Parminder Badwall; Gordon H Guyatt

2008-01-01

46

COMPARISON OF BIOENERGETIC SYNCHRONIZATION TECHNIQUE AND CUSTOMARY CHIROPRACTIC CARE FOR OLDER ADULTS WITH CHRONIC MUSCULOSKELETAL PAIN  

Microsoft Academic Search

Objective: The aim of the study was to compare the clinical outcomes of 2 approaches to chiropractic care for patients with chronic musculoskeletal pain. Included were the approach most commonly used by doctors of chiropractic (diversified technique spinal manipulation) and a nonmanipulative mind-body approach (Bioenergetic Synchronization Technique). This clinical experiment tested the null hypothesis that there is no clinically or

Cheryl Hawk; Ronald L. Rupert; Stephanie Halld

47

Towards a 21st Century Paradigm of Chiropractic: Stage 1, Redesigning Clinical Learning  

PubMed Central

Objective: To describe a formal process designed to determine the nature and extent of change that may enhance the depth of student learning in the pre-professional, clinical chiropractic environment. Methods: Project teams in the Royal Melbourne Institute of Technology (RMIT) School of Health Sciences and the Division of Chiropractic explored questions of clinical assessment in several health care disciplines of the School and the issue of implementing change in a manner that would be embraced by the clinicians who supervise student-learning in the clinical environment. The teams applied to RMIT for grant funding within the Learning and Teaching Investment Fund to support two proposed studies. Results: Both research proposals were fully funded and are in process. Discussion: The genesis of this work is the discovery that the predominant management plan in the chiropractic teaching clinics is based on diagnostic reductionism. It is felt this is counter-productive to the holistic dimensions of chiropractic practice taught in the classroom and non-supportive of chiropractic's paradigm shift towards wellness. A need is seen to improve processes around student assessment in the contemporary work-integrated learning that is a prime element of learning within the clinical disciplines of the School of Health Sciences, including chiropractic. Conclusion: Any improvements in the manner of clinical assessment within the chiropractic discipline will need to be accompanied by improvement in the training and development of the clinicians responsible for managing the provision of quality patient care by Registered Chiropractic Students

Ebrall, Phillip; Draper, Barry; Repka, Adrian

2008-01-01

48

The Five Eras of Chiropractic & the future of chiropractic as seen through the eyes of a participant observer  

PubMed Central

Chiropractic has endured a turbulent history, marked by tremendous advances in areas such as education and licensing while marred by interprofessional conflict and a poor public image. The prolonged interprofessional conflict was instrumental in shaping the culture of chiropractic. These obstacles have long-since been removed although there are lingering effects from them. This article examines the chiropractic profession's history by dividing it into five Eras and suggests that there are three options available for the future of the profession. One: maintaining the status quo. Two: uniting under an evidence based scientific approach as partners in the health care delivery system that has buried the "one-cause, one-cure" sacred cow. The steps required to achieve this outcome are outlined. Three: openly dividing the profession into evidence based practitioners and subluxation based practitioners. Adopting this option would allow each branch of the profession to move forward in the health care delivery system unhindered by the other. It is unclear which option the profession will choose and whether the profession is mature enough to follow option two remains to be seen. What is evident is that the time to act is now.

2012-01-01

49

Journal publications by Australian chiropractic academics: are they enough?  

PubMed Central

Purpose To document the number of journal publications attributed to the academic faculty of Australian chiropractic tertiary institutions. To provide a discussion of the significance of this output and to relate this to the difficulty the profession appears to be experiencing in the uptake of evidence based healthcare outcomes and cultures. Methods The departmental websites for the three Australian chiropractic tertiary institutions were accessed and a list of academic faculty compiled. It was noted whether each academic held a chiropractic qualification or research Doctoral (not professional) degree qualification A review of the literature was conducted using the names of the academics and cross-referencing to publications listed independently in the PubMed and Index to Chiropractic Literature (ICL) databases (from inception to February 27 2006). Publications were excluded that were duplicates, corrected reprints, conference abstracts/proceedings, books, monographs, letters to the editor/comments or editorials. Using this information an annual and recent publication rate was constructed. Results For the 41 academics there was a total of 155 PubMed listed publications (mean 3.8, annual rate per academic 0.31) and 415 ICL listed publications (mean 10.1, annual rate 0.62). Over the last five years there have been 50 PubMed listed publications (mean 1.2, annual rate 0.24) and 97 ICL listed publications (mean 2.4, annual rate 0.47). Chiropractor academics (n = 31) had 29 PubMed listed publications (mean 2.5, annual rate 0.27) and 265 ICL listed publications (mean 8.5, annual rate 0.57). Academics with a doctoral degree (n = 13) had 134 PubMed listed publications (mean 10.3, annual rate 0.70) and 311 ICL listed publications (mean 23.9, annual rate 1.44). Academics without a Doctoral degree (n = 28) had 21 PubMed listed publications (mean 0.8, annual rate 0.13) and 104 ICL listed publications (mean 3.7, annual rate 0.24). Conclusion While several academics have compiled an impressive list of publications, overall there is a significant paucity of published research authored by the majority of academics, with a trend for a falling recent publication rate and not having a doctoral degree being a risk factor for poor publication productivity. It is suggested that there is an urgent necessity to facilitate the acquisition of research skills in academic staff particularly in research methods and publication skills. Only when undergraduate students are exposed to an institutional environment conducive to and fostering research will concepts of evidence based healthcare really be appreciated and implemented by the profession.

Hoskins, Wayne; Pollard, Henry; Reggars, John; Vitiello, Andrew; Bonello, Rod

2006-01-01

50

A proposed protocol for hand and table sanitizing in chiropractic clinics and education institutions  

PubMed Central

Abstract Objective By nature, chiropractic is a hands-on profession using manipulation applied to the joints with direct skin-to-skin contacts. Chiropractic tables are designed with a face piece to accommodate the prone patient's head in a neutral position and hand rests to allow for relaxed shoulders and upper spine so treatment is facilitated. The purpose of this article is to present a proposed guideline for hand and treatment table surface sanitizing for the chiropractic profession that is evidence-based and can easily be adopted by teaching institutions and doctors in the field. Methods A review of the chiropractic literature demonstrated that pathogenic microbes are present on treatment tables in teaching clinics at multiple facilities, yet no standardized protocols exist in the United States regarding table sanitizing and hand hygiene in chiropractic clinics or education institutions. This article reviews the scientific literature on the subject by using several search engines, databases, and specific reviews of documents pertaining to the topic including existing general guidelines. Results The literature has several existing guidelines that the authors used to develop a proposed protocol for hand and table sanitizing specific to the chiropractic profession. Recommendations were developed and are presented on hand hygiene and table sanitizing procedures that could lower the risk of infection for both clinical personnel and patients in chiropractic facilities. Conclusion This article offers a protocol for hand and table sanitizing in chiropractic clinics and education institutions. The chiropractic profession should consider adoption of these or similar measures and disseminate them to teaching clinics, institutions, and private practitioners.

Evans, Marion Willard; Ramcharan, Michael; Floyd, Rod; Globe, Gary; Ndetan, Harrison; Williams, Ronald; Ivie, Ronald

2009-01-01

51

Chiropractic management of a patient with low back pain and Castellvi type II lumbosacral transitional vertebrae  

PubMed Central

Objective The purpose of this study is to report the chiropractic management of a patient with low back pain and Castellvi type II lumbosacral transitional vertebrae (LSTV). Clinical Features A patient with previously undiagnosed LSTV presented with moderate low back pain. Interventions and Outcome Manual therapy, soft tissue therapy, and exercise/stretching were included in the initial treatment plan. Following a short course of treatment, the presenting symptoms resolved; however, they returned after 3 symptom-free months. At that time, radiographs were ordered and the LSTV were identified. Following another course of chiropractic care, the patient's symptoms resolved. Conclusions Chiropractic management resulted in resolution of symptoms for this patient with LSTV.

Muir, Jeffrey M.

2012-01-01

52

Chiropractic and social justice: a view from the perspective of Beauchamp's principles.  

PubMed

Social justice in public health involves the process and product of a community acting to fairly distribute advantages and burdens to improve the health of its population and to reasonably take care of the disadvantaged. Although publications are available about chiropractic public health history, programs, and policy, the potential role of chiropractic in social justice has received little attention. This article discusses Beauchamp's 4 principles of social justice and suggests actions that the chiropractic profession may consider to participate in the practice of social justice in the field of public health. PMID:20732576

Green, Bart N; Johnson, Claire

2010-01-01

53

Knowledge of accurate blood pressure measurement procedures in chiropractic students  

PubMed Central

Objective Blood pressure measurement is a basic clinical procedure. However, studies have shown that many errors are made when health care providers acquire blood pressure readings. Our study assessed knowledge of blood pressure measurement procedures in chiropractic students. Methods This was an observational, descriptive study. A questionnaire based on one created by the American Heart Association was given to 1st, 2nd, 3rd, and final year students (n = 186). A one way ANOVA was used to analyze the data. Results Of the students 80% were confident that their knowledge of this clinical skill was adequate or better. However, the overall score on the knowledge test of blood pressure–taking skills was 52% (range, 24%–88%). The only significant difference in the mean scores was between the 1st and 2nd year students compared to the 3rd and 4th year students (p < .005). Of the 16 questions given, the following mean scores were: 1st year 10.45, 2nd year 9.75, 3rd year 7.93, and 4th year 8.33. Of the 16 areas tested, 10 were of major concern (test item score <70%), showing the need for frequent retraining of chiropractic students. Conclusion Consistent with studies in other health care disciplines, our research found the knowledge of blood pressure skills to be deficient in our sample. There is a need for subsequent training in our teaching program.

Crosley, Angela M.; Rose, James R. La

2013-01-01

54

Teaching, leadership, scholarly productivity, and level of activity in the chiropractic profession: a study of graduates of the Los Angeles College of Chiropractic radiology residency program  

PubMed Central

Objective The purpose of this study was to track the graduates of the Los Angeles College of Chiropractic (LACC) radiology residency program, review their scholarly productivity, and report those involved in teaching and leadership positions. Methods Former LACC residents’ career information was identified through publicly available electronic documents including Web sites and social media. PubMed and the Index to Chiropractic Literature databases were searched for chiropractic graduate job surveys, and proportional comparisons were made between the career paths of LACC radiology residency graduates and those of non–residency-trained chiropractors. Results Of 47 former LACC residents, 28 (60%) have or previously had careers in tertiary (chiropractic) education; and 12 (26%) have attained a department chair position or higher at tertiary teaching institutions. Twenty-two (47%) have or previously had private radiology practices, whereas 11 (23%) have or previously had clinical chiropractic practices. Often, residency graduates hold or have held 2 of these positions at once; and one, all 3. Chapters or books were authored by 13 (28%). Conclusion Radiology residency LACC graduates are professionally active, particularly in education, and demonstrate scholarly productivity.

Young, Kenneth J.; Siordia, Lawrence

2012-01-01

55

Financial attitudes, knowledge, and habits of chiropractic students: A descriptive survey  

PubMed Central

Objective: Our purpose was to describe the financial knowledge, habits and attitudes of chiropractic students. Methods: We designed a cross-sectional survey to measure basic financial knowledge, current financial habits, risk tolerance, and beliefs about future income among 250 students enrolled in business courses at one US chiropractic college. Descriptive statistical analyses were performed. Results: We received 57 questionnaires (23% response rate). Most respondents would accumulate over $125,000 in student loan debt by graduation. Financial knowledge was low (mean 77%). Most respondents (72%) scored as average financial risk takers. Chiropractic students reported recommended short-term habits such as having checking accounts (90%) and health insurance (63%) or paying monthly bills (88%) and credit cards (60%). Few saved money for unplanned expenses (39%) or long-term goals (26%), kept written budgets (32%), or had retirement accounts (19%). Conclusion: These chiropractic students demonstrated inadequate financial literacy and did not engage in many recommended financial habits.

Lorence, Julie; Lawrence, Dana J.; Salsbury, Stacie A.; Goertz, Christine M.

2014-01-01

56

Buckeye chiropractic: turbulence in a limited branch of medicine, 1915-1975.  

PubMed

In Ohio in 1915, the Platt-Ellis Law was enacted, a compromise between medical and chiropractic forces that defined chiropractic as a "limited branch of medicine or surgery." Practitioners of chiropractic, naprapathy, spondylotherapy, mechanotherapy, magnetic healing, and other "minor" healing arts excluding osteopathy and midwifery were all examined by the State Medical Board. The two disparate definitions created six decades of turmoil for chiropractic in Ohio. The 1920's were marked by the civil disobedience employed successfully in other states, with hundreds of unlicensed chiropractors choosing jail over fines. Multiple state organizations were formed, representing "straights, mixers, straight-mixers, mixing straights, minglers" and every other possible combination. The public accepted licensed and unlicensed practitioners, and doctors included their licensing status in their advertisements. PMID:11613404

Callender, A

1995-12-01

57

78 FR 22901 - United States v. Chiropractic Associates, Ltd. of South Dakota Proposed Final Judgment and...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...negotiating contracts on behalf of its members increased prices for chiropractic services in South Dakota. Antitrust law treats naked agreements among competitors that set prices as per se illegal.\\2\\ Where competitors economically integrate in a joint...

2013-04-17

58

Research Highlights: Changing Views of Chiropractic ... and a National Reappraisal of Nontraditional Health Care.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

For half a century, the American Medical Association waged war against chiropractic, an intervention that relies on spinal adjustments to treat health problems. Chiropractors were regarded as the modern-day equivalent of snake-oil salesmen. Today, chiropr...

2001-01-01

59

Chiropractic treatment and the enhancement of sport performance: a narrative literature review  

PubMed Central

A literature search and narrative review was carried out with the intent of determining the current level of knowledge regarding the chiropractic treatment of athletes for the purpose of sport performance enhancement. Of the fifty-nine relevant articles retrieved, only 7 articles of variable quality were obtained which specifically investigated/discussed chiropractic treatment and its involvement in sport performance enhancement. The role of the chiropractor in sport, unsubstantiated claims of performance enhancement, theories of how chiropractic treatment may influence sport performance, and the available evidence for the benefit of chiropractic treatment on sport performance are reviewed and discussed. Areas and directions for future studies are postulated. At this time there is insufficient evidence to convincingly support the notion that treatment provided by chiropractors can directly improve sport performance.

Miners, Andrew L.

2010-01-01

60

Chiropractic care of interstitial cystitis/painful bladder syndrome associated with pelvic lumbar spine dysfunction: a case series  

PubMed Central

Objective The purpose of this case series is to describe findings for patients with bladder pain syndrome (BPS) or interstitial cystitis (IC) who responded positively under chiropractic care. Clinical Features Eight cases were selected retrospectively reviewed from 2 independent chiropractic clinics in Scotland. Cases were selected if patients reported bladder dysfunction problems and responded positively to chiropractic care. The cases in this report describe the range of patients affected by this condition. Each patient was treated using chiropractic methods that were specific to the individual case. Intervention and Outcomes The patients selected for this case series showed positive response to chiropractic care over various lengths of time and numbers of treatments. Some of the chiropractic patients who had chronic spinal conditions had reoccurrence of bladder symptoms during an exacerbation of mechanical spinal problems. Conclusion This case series highlights that bladder and urinary problems may be associated with spinal dysfunction for some patients.

Cashley, Mark A.P.; Cashley, Marie A.

2012-01-01

61

Multiple views to address diversity issues: an initial dialog to advance the chiropractic profession  

PubMed Central

The purpose of this article is to provide expert viewpoints on the topic of diversity in the chiropractic profession, including cultural competency, diversity in the profession, educational and clinical practice strategies for addressing diversity, and workforce issues. Over the next decades, changing demographics in North America will alter how the chiropractic profession functions on many levels. As the population increases in diversity, we will need to prepare our workforce to meet the needs of future patients and society.

Johnson, Claire; Killinger, Lisa Zaynab; Christensen, Mark G.; Hyland, John K.; Mrozek, John P.; Zuker, R. Fred; Kizhakkeveettil, Anupama; Perle, Stephen M.; Oyelowo, Tolu

2012-01-01

62

Are chiropractic tests for the lumbo-pelvic spine reliable and valid? A systematic critical literature review  

Microsoft Academic Search

Objective: To systematically review the peer-reviewed literature about the reliability and validity of chiropractic tests used to determine the need for spinal manipulative therapy of the lumbo-pelvic spine, taking into account the quality of the studies.Data Sources: The CHIROLARS database was searched for the years 1976 to 1995 with the following index terms: “chiropractic tests,” “chiropractic adjusting technique,” “motion palpation,”

Lise Hestbœk; Charlotte Leboeuf-Yde

2000-01-01

63

Toftness system of chiropractic adjusting on pain syndromes: a pilot study in a multicenter setting?  

PubMed Central

Abstract Objective This pilot project investigates the effectiveness of the Toftness system of chiropractic adjusting on subjects with pain syndromes. Methods Patients were recruited from 13 doctors' offices. All subjects received Toftness chiropractic adjustments. The visual analog scale (VAS) and Oswestry low back pain questionnaire were used for all subjects before and after chiropractic adjustments. Results A total of 42 patients were recruited. Twenty-eight patients had acute or chronic back pain and 14 experienced other types of pain (eg, neck pain, knee pain, shoulder pain, etc). The average age of the patient population (18 male, 24 female) was 53 ± 16 years. After 6 to 8 weeks of chiropractic adjustments, pain as analyzed using the visual analog scale was reduced significantly from 73.6 ± 12.790 to 17.0 ± 13.363 (P < .001). The Oswestry score decreased significantly from 69.3 ± 18.525 to 12.4 ± 10.504 (P < .001). There were no adverse treatment effects reported by the participating patients. Conclusion The Toftness system of chiropractic adjusting reduced low back and other pain syndromes in the subjects studied. It suggests that the Toftness system of chiropractic adjusting was safe and effective to use in low back pain and other pain-related conditions.

Snyder, Brian J.; Zhang, John

2007-01-01

64

Assessing the attitudes, knowledge and perspectives of medical students to chiropractic  

PubMed Central

Objective: To assess second-year medical students’ views on chiropractic. Methods: A three-step triangulation approach was designed, comprising a 53-item survey, nine key informant interviews and one focus group of 8 subjects. ANOVA was used to assess attitude-response survey totals over grouping variables. Constant comparison method and NVivo was used for thematic analysis. Results: 112 medical students completed the survey (50% response rate). Subjects reporting no previous chiropractic experience/exposure or interest in learning about chiropractic were significantly more attitude-negative towards chiropractic. Thematically, medical students viewed chiropractic as an increasingly evidence-based complementary therapy for low back/chronic pain, but based views on indirect sources. Within formal curriculum, they wanted to learn about clinical conditions and benefits/risks related to treatment, as greater understanding was needed for future patient referrals. Conclusion: The results highlight the importance of exposure to chiropractic within the formal medical curriculum to help foster future collaboration between these two professions.

Wong, Jessica J.; Di Loreto, Luciano; Kara, Alim; Yu, Kavan; Mattia, Alicia; Soave, David; Weyman, Karen; Kopansky-Giles, Deborah

2013-01-01

65

Patient perceptions in New Mexico about doctors of chiropractic functioning as primary care providers with limited prescriptive authority  

PubMed Central

Objectives The purpose of this study was to determine chiropractic patients' perceptions of chiropractors serving as primary care providers and having a limited prescriptive authority. Methods Four doctors of chiropractic in Albuquerque and Santa Fe, NM, participated in surveying their patients during the summer of 2008. The chiropractors distributed the questionnaires consecutively to chiropractic patients. Patients answered questions regarding their perceptions of their chiropractors, use of chiropractic care, and medications for pain. The participating chiropractors collected the completed patient questionnaires and mailed them to the primary investigator. Results The chiropractic providers collected 275 chiropractic patient questionnaires. The number of patient questionnaires collected by each of the 4 participating chiropractors ranged from 35 to 100. The patients primarily sought care for the management and treatment of pain (98.5%), and 57.5% considered that their chiropractors were “primary care providers.” Eighty-five percent preferred that their chiropractor be qualified to prescribe medications and provide hands-on treatment, whereas 97.5% perceived their chiropractors to be chiropractic physicians. Conclusions This small group of chiropractic patients from 4 offices in New Mexico perceived that their doctors of chiropractic were physicians and primary care providers, and 85% preferred that their chiropractor treat patients with limited prescriptive authority when appropriately trained.

Lehman, James J.; Suozzi, Paul J.; Simmons, George R.; Jegtvig, Shereen K.

2011-01-01

66

Constructing a philosophy of chiropractic: evolving worldviews and postmodern core?  

PubMed Central

Objective The purpose of this article is to explore the postmodern, postrational, and postconventional core of DD Palmer's self-sense and philosophy. Discussion DD Palmer's self and philosophy can be viewed as a reaction to the self of modernity and its challenges of a fracture between mind and body, spirit, and nature. It is argued that Palmer's solution to these vexing problems facing the modern self was to use postrational and postconventional logic to overcome the dualisms. His philosophy resonates with similar postrational approaches, most notably, the German idealist Schelling. Conclusion It is argued that Palmer was one of the first postrational individuals in America and that chiropractic was an attempt at the first postrational health profession.

Senzon, Simon A.

2011-01-01

67

Manikin-Based Clinical Simulation in Chiropractic Education  

PubMed Central

Objective: The purpose of this pilot investigation was to describe the development and implementation of simulation exercises and investigate the feasibility, satisfaction, and relative effectiveness of a manikin-based simulation program in chiropractic undergraduate education. Methods: This investigation consisted of (1) a qualitative review of other simulation environments and evaluation of related simulation literature to develop the educational processes to be used, (2) implementation of simulation scenarios for 95 student interns and their 11 supervising clinicians, and (3) implementation of simulation scenarios in a random sample of 35 1st-year and 24 2nd-year chiropractic students. Assessment of success was based on results from satisfaction and usability questionnaires and perceived achievement of learning outcomes. Anxiety scores were measured for all participants via a visual analog scale. The level of successful integration of 2nd-year basic science material was assessed using a t test comparing test results between students who participated in the pilot and those who did not. Results: Implementation methods were developed on the basis of qualitative investigation. Simulation program feedback from all participants indicated high levels of satisfaction, usability, and perceived achievement of learning outcomes. Anxiety levels among interns differed according to role chosen (F = 8.07, p =.00). Mean difference in course examination scores of students who participated in simulations versus those who did not was 3.25% favoring students who participated (t = 1.28, p =.10). Conclusions: High levels of student satisfaction and perceived achievement of learning outcomes were consistently achieved. A trend to successful integration of basic science knowledge provides reason for cautious optimism. More research is recommended.

McGregor, Marion; Giuliano, Dominic

2012-01-01

68

Assessment and risk reduction of infectious pathogens on chiropractic treatment tables  

PubMed Central

Background To investigate the presence of pathogenic microbes on chiropractic treatment tables in one outpatient teaching clinic. Additional aims were to test inexpensive disinfectants on tables that may kill microbes and suggest infection control measures for chiropractic offices, clinics and classrooms. The aim of the study was to assess the presence of pathogenic microbes on treatment tables in one outpatient teaching clinic and determine a simple behavioral model for infection control including table disinfection and accepted hand washing and sanitizing protocols. Methods 10 treatment tables were selected and sampled for possible microbial flora on face and hand pieces. Samples were cultured on MacConky's agar and mannitol salt agar, labeled and incubated for up to 48 hours. Confirmatory testing of microbes to determine if drug resistant flora were present was performed. Among tables tested, 5 were selected to test disinfectants. One-half of the face piece and 1 hand piece were treated with two different wipes and then post-tested for microbes. Results Pathogenic microbes were present on chiropractic treatment tables including methicillin-resistant Staph aureus. Simple disinfectants neutralized the pathogens. A rudimentary disinfection procedure and infection control measures are suggested based on the findings. Conclusion Pathogenic microbes may be present on chiropractic treatment tables and can be effectively killed with proper disinfecting. Hand washing/sanitizing is an important measure in infection control as is table disinfecting. Rudimentary behavioral changes to improve chiropractic clinic infection control are needed. More comprehensive behavioral models are needed. All teaching clinics and private chiropractic offices should adopt infection control practices including routine table disinfecting and hand sanitizing. Effective measures can be put in place at minimal costs. Accrediting bodies of chiropractic institutions should mandate an infection control plan for member institutions immediately.

Evans, Marion Willard; Breshears, Jennell; Campbell, Alan; Husbands, Chris; Rupert, Ronald

2007-01-01

69

Assessment of Chiropractic Treatment for Low Back Pain, Military Readiness and Smoking Cessation in Military Active Duty Personnel.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

This study is comprised of three trials, referred to as the Assessment of Chiropractic Treatment (or ACT). The most significant work during the last reporting period has occurred in the ACT 1 (RCT which is chiropractic for low back pain and smoking cessat...

C. Goertz I. Coulter J. Walters

2013-01-01

70

The learning style preferences of chiropractic students: A cross-sectional study.  

PubMed

Objective : The aims of our study were to measure the learning style preferences of chiropractic students and to assess whether they differ across the 5 years of chiropractic study. Methods : A total of 407 (41.4% females) full-degree, undergraduate, and postgraduate students enrolled in an Australian chiropractic program agreed to participate in a cross-sectional survey comprised of basic demographic information and the Visual, Aural, Read/Write, Kinesthetic (VARK) questionnaire, which identifies learning preferences on four different subscales: visual, aural, reading/writing, and kinesthetic. Multivariate analysis of variance and the ?(2) test were used to check for differences in continuous (VARK scores) and categorical (VARK category preference) outcome variables. Results : The majority of chiropractic students (56.0%) were found to be multimodal learners. Compared to the other learning styles preferences, kinesthetic learning was preferred by a significantly greater proportion of students (65.4%, p < .001) and received a significantly greater mean VARK score (5.66 ± 2.47, p < .001). Conclusions : To the best of our knowledge, this is the first time chiropractic students have been shown to be largely multimodal learners with a preference for kinesthetic learning. While this knowledge may be beneficial in the structuring of future curricula, more thorough research must be conducted to show any beneficial relationship between learning style preferences and teaching methods. PMID:24350945

Whillier, Stephney; Lystad, Reidar P; Abi-Arrage, David; McPhie, Christopher; Johnston, Samara; Williams, Christopher; Rice, Mark

2014-01-01

71

The learning style preferences of chiropractic students: A cross-sectional study  

PubMed Central

Objective The aims of our study were to measure the learning style preferences of chiropractic students and to assess whether they differ across the 5 years of chiropractic study. Methods A total of 407 (41.4% females) full-degree, undergraduate, and postgraduate students enrolled in an Australian chiropractic program agreed to participate in a cross-sectional survey comprised of basic demographic information and the Visual, Aural, Read/Write, Kinesthetic (VARK) questionnaire, which identifies learning preferences on four different subscales: visual, aural, reading/writing, and kinesthetic. Multivariate analysis of variance and the ?2 test were used to check for differences in continuous (VARK scores) and categorical (VARK category preference) outcome variables. Results The majority of chiropractic students (56.0%) were found to be multimodal learners. Compared to the other learning styles preferences, kinesthetic learning was preferred by a significantly greater proportion of students (65.4%, p < .001) and received a significantly greater mean VARK score (5.66 ± 2.47, p < .001). Conclusions To the best of our knowledge, this is the first time chiropractic students have been shown to be largely multimodal learners with a preference for kinesthetic learning. While this knowledge may be beneficial in the structuring of future curricula, more thorough research must be conducted to show any beneficial relationship between learning style preferences and teaching methods.

Whillier, Stephney; Lystad, Reidar P.; Abi-Arrage, David; McPhie, Christopher; Johnston, Samara; Williams, Christopher; Rice, Mark

2014-01-01

72

Importance of Building Confidence in Patient Communication and Clinical Skills Among Chiropractic Students  

PubMed Central

Purpose: One important objective of chiropractic education is to foster student professional confidence and competence in patient communication and clinical skills. Therefore, the aim of this article is to review the extant literature on this topic, stressing the significance of building students' confidence for effective practice and the need for more research in this area. Methods: The authors reviewed MEDLINE and ERIC from 1980 through 2008 using several key words pertinent to confidence and health care. Three distinct, but interrelated, bodies of literature were assessed, including professional confidence in health care research, the nature and development of confidence in educational psychology research, and fostering professional confidence in chiropractic education. Results: It was apparent through the review that chiropractic education has developed educational methods and opportunities that may help develop and build student confidence in patient communication and clinical skills. However, there has not been sufficient research to provide empirical evidence of the impact. Conclusion: Fostering chiropractic students' development of confidence in what they say and do is of paramount importance not only to them as new practitioners but more importantly to the patient. There is no doubt that a better understanding of how confidence can be developed and consolidated during tertiary study should be a major goal of chiropractic education

Hecimovich, Mark D.; Volet, Simone E.

2009-01-01

73

A narrative review of the published chiropractic literature regarding older patients from 2001-2010  

PubMed Central

Introduction: The purpose of this article was to perform a narrative review of the chiropractic literature regarding older patients between 2001 and 2010. Methods: A three step search strategy of the literature involved electronic searching, hand searching and reference tracking. Results: One hundred and eighty eight articles germane to chiropractic geriatric practice and education were retrieved. Discussion: Compared to the review of the literature conducted prior to 2000, the number of references on chiropractic geriatric education increased from 3 to 11, the number of demographic studies increased from 9 to 18, the number of case reports increased from 25 to 83, the number of clinical trials increased from 4 to 21 (only two RCTs found) and the number of references on clinical guidelines and general clinical information increased from 18 to 55. Conclusion: This review found 188 retrievable articles available to practitioners to effectively care plan for their older patients, a better than three fold increase in the number of references found during a similar review conducted at the end of the previous decade. However, there is clearly a gap in the evidence base of chiropractic geriatric care, particularly the under-representation of clinical trials of all kinds involving older chiropractic patients.

Gleberzon, Brian J.

2011-01-01

74

Medicare Part B Claims for Chiropractic Spinal Manipulation, 1998-2004  

PubMed Central

Objective The objective of this study was to examine the volume and rate of Medicare part B claims for chiropractic spinal manipulation longitudinally from 1998 to 2004. Methods A descriptive retrospective analysis was performed on Medicare part B claims from 1998 to 2004 using the Medicare Part B Standard Analytical Variable Length File. Using a 5% random sample of Medicare part B claims, the total number of claims were determined for chiropractic spinal manipulation procedures, and the rate of chiropractic spinal manipulation procedures per 1,000 beneficiaries. Results From 1998 through 2003 the number of CSM claims increased by 38% (from 824,249 total claims in 1998 to 1,133,872 in 2003) followed by a 24% decline from 2003 to 2004. The rate of total chiropractic spinal manipulation claims rose 29% from 649 claims per 1,000 beneficiaries per year in 1998 to a high of 839 claims per 1,000 beneficiaries per year in 2003 and then declined by 25% to 632 claims per 1,000 beneficiaries per year in 2004. Conclusion Medicare part B claims for chiropractic spinal manipulation increased significantly from 1998 to 2003 and then abruptly declined from 2003 to 2004. Estimates for 2004 are at variance with earlier published estimates.

Whedon, James M.; Davis, Matthew A.

2010-01-01

75

Gloom or boom for chiropractic in its second century? A comparison of the demise of alternative healing professions.  

PubMed

As Americans suffered through the heroic medicine of the 1800s, many medical alternatives, known as sects, evolved in the United States. Examination of the developments and problems encountered of medical sects, namely Thomsonism, homeopathy, osteopathy, naturopathy and chiropractic, reveals many similarities among them. While some sects have either dissolved or been absorbed by other professions, chiropractic has survived as a separate and distinct healing art. As chiropractic approaches its centennial celebration, it continues to demonstrate specific sectarian characteristics that may hinder progression into the future. This paper examines parallels among the developments of chiropractic and other alternatives. A review of some historic and contemporary scholars' predictions for the future of chiropractic is presented as well as potential solutions. PMID:11613383

Green, B N

1994-12-01

76

On Vaccination & Chiropractic: when ideology, history, perception, politics and jurisprudence collide  

PubMed Central

The Palmers espoused anti-vaccination opinions in the early part of the 20th century, rejecting the germ theory of disease in favor of a worldview that a subluxation-free spine, achieved by spinal adjustments, would result in an unfettered innate intelligence; this, along with other healthful lifestyle choices, would allow a person to thwart disease by marshaling the body’s natural recuperative abilities. Some chiropractors continue to staunchly champion the Palmer postulates, while others do not. At the national level, advocacy organizations publish conflicting position statements. We explore how this divisiveness has impacted chiropractic ideology, perceptions among students and practitioners, politics and issues of jurisprudence as reflected by the evolution of a standard of chiropractic practice in at least one Canadian province (Ontario). We opine that the chiropractic profession should champion a health promotion and disease prevention approach to vaccination, which would allow it to align itself with the broader healthcare community while not abandoning its traditional tenets.

Gleberzon, Brian; Lameris, Marlee; Schmidt, Catherine; Ogrady, Jillian

2013-01-01

77

Burnout among chiropractic practitioners: real or imagined an exploratory study protocol  

PubMed Central

Burnout is a psychological syndrome of emotional exhaustion, depersonalization and reduced personal accomplishment that has been found to exist in a significant number of healthcare and helping professionals. It imposes a significant societal burden by shortened practitioner lifespan, decreased efficiency, negative health outcomes and poorer levels of patient care. Theoretical models suggest that it appears to be the result of a complex interaction between job resources and job demands. It may be reasonable to conclude that Chiropractic professionals experience similar vocational demands and thus experience significant levels of occupational stress and subsequent burnout. However the data on burnout within the chiropractic profession is limited. It is possible that this results in significant negative outcomes on chiropractors and their patients. Therefore, the objective of this paper is to demonstrate the need to explore burnout in chiropractic practice and offer a research protocol for a potential study.

2012-01-01

78

Randomised controlled trial of infantile colic treated with chiropractic spinal manipulation  

PubMed Central

AIMS—To investigate the efficacy of chiropractic spinal manipulation in the management of infantile colic.?METHODS—One hundred infants with typical colicky pain were recruited to a randomised, blinded, placebo controlled clinical trial.?RESULTS—Nine infants were excluded because inclusion criteria were not met, and five dropped out, leaving 86 who completed the study. There was no significant effect of chiropractic spinal manipulation. Thirty two of 46 infants in the treatment group (69.9%), and 24of 40 in the control group (60.0%), showed some degree of improvement.?CONCLUSION—Chiropractic spinal manipulation is no more effective than placebo in the treatment of infantile colic. This study emphasises the need for placebo controlled and blinded studies when investigating alternative methods to treat unpredictable conditions such as infantile colic.??

Olafsdottir, E; Forshei, S; Fluge, G; Markestad, T

2001-01-01

79

Outcomes of usual chiropractic, harm & efficacy, the ouch study: study protocol for a randomized controlled trial  

PubMed Central

Background Previous studies have demonstrated that adverse events occur during chiropractic treatment. However, because of these studies design we do not know the frequency and extent of these events when compared to sham treatment. The principal aims of this study are to establish the frequency and severity of adverse effects from short term usual chiropractic treatment of the spine when compared to a sham treatment group. The secondary aim of this study is to establish the efficacy of usual short term chiropractic care for spinal pain when compared to a sham intervention. Methods One hundred and eighty participants will be randomly allocated to either usual chiropractic care or a sham intervention group. To be considered for inclusion the participants must have experienced non-specific spinal pain for at least one week. The study will be conducted at the clinics of registered chiropractors in Western Australia. Participants in each group will receive two treatments at intervals no less than one week. For the usual chiropractic care group, the selection of therapeutic techniques will be left to the chiropractors' discretion. For the sham intervention group, de-tuned ultrasound and de-tuned activator treatment will be applied by the chiropractors to the regions where spinal pain is experienced. Adverse events will be assessed two days after each appointment using a questionnaire developed for this study. The efficacy of short term chiropractic care for spinal pain will be examined at two week follow-up by assessing pain, physical function, minimum acceptable outcome, and satisfaction with care, with the use of the following outcome measures: Numerical Rating Scale, Functional Rating Index, Neck Disability Index, Minimum Acceptable Outcome Questionnaire, Oswestry Disability Index, and a global measure of treatment satisfaction. The statistician, outcome assessor, and participants will be blinded to treatment allocation. Trial registration Australia and New Zealand Clinical Trials Register (ANZCTR): ACTRN12611000542998

2011-01-01

80

The effect of low force chiropractic adjustments on body surface electromagnetic field  

PubMed Central

Objective The purpose of this study was to investigate the body surface electromagnetic field (EMF) changes using a sensitive magnetometer before and after a specific Toftness chiropractic adjustment in asymptomatic human subjects. Method Forty-four subjects were randomly assigned into control (20 subjects) and experimental groups (24 subjects) in a pre and post-test design. The Triaxial Fluxgate Magnetometer FGM-5DTAA (Walker Scientific, Worcester, Massachusetts) with five digit display and resolution of 1 nanotesla (nT) was used for EMF detection. The EMF in the research room and on the adjustment table was monitored and recorded. The subjects’ body surface (cervical, thoracic, lumbar and sacral areas) EMF was determined in the prone position before and after the chiropractic adjustment. A low force Toftness chiropractic adjustment was applied to the cervical, thoracic, lumbar and sacral areas as determined by the practitioner. Results The EMF in the research room was recorded as 41611 nT at the Z axis (earth field), 13761 nT at the X axis and 7438 nT at the Y axis. The EMF on the adjusting table changed minimally during the 15 minute observation period. The EMF on the subjects’ body surface decreased at 4 spinal locations after chiropractic adjustment. The EMF (mean ± SD in nT) decreased significantly at the cervical region from 42449 ± 907 to 41643 ± 1165 (p < 0.01) and at the sacral regions from 43206 ± 760 to 42713 ± 552 (p < 0.01). The EMF at the lumbar and thoracic regions decreased but did not reach a statistically significant level. No significant changes of the body surface EMF were found in the control group. Conclusion A low force Toftness chiropractic adjustment in the cervical and sacral areas resulted in a significant reduction of the cervical and sacral surface EMF. No significant body surface EMF changes were observed in the lumbar and thoracic regions. The mechanisms of the EMF reduction after chiropractic adjustment are not known.

Zhang, John; Snyder, Brian J; Vernor, Lori

2004-01-01

81

Test anxiety and academic performance in chiropractic students*  

PubMed Central

Objective We assessed the level of students' test anxiety, and the relationship between test anxiety and academic performance. Methods We recruited 166 third-quarter students. The Test Anxiety Inventory (TAI) was administered to all participants. Total scores from written examinations and objective structured clinical examinations (OSCEs) were used as response variables. Results Multiple regression analysis shows that there was a modest, but statistically significant negative correlation between TAI scores and written exam scores, but not OSCE scores. Worry and emotionality were the best predictive models for written exam scores. Mean total anxiety and emotionality scores for females were significantly higher than those for males, but not worry scores. Conclusion Moderate-to-high test anxiety was observed in 85% of the chiropractic students examined. However, total test anxiety, as measured by the TAI score, was a very weak predictive model for written exam performance. Multiple regression analysis demonstrated that replacing total anxiety (TAI) with worry and emotionality (TAI subscales) produces a much more effective predictive model of written exam performance. Sex, age, highest current academic degree, and ethnicity contributed little additional predictive power in either regression model. Moreover, TAI scores were not found to be statistically significant predictors of physical exam skill performance, as measured by OSCEs.

Zhang, Niu; Henderson, Charles N. R.

2014-01-01

82

Characterization of side effects sustained by chiropractic students during their undergraduate training in technique class at a chiropractic college: a preliminary retrospective study  

PubMed Central

Introduction The purpose of this study was to characterize the type, nature and frequency of injuries sustained by chiropractic students during their undergraduate training. Methods Chiropractic students in their second, third and fourth year of study at a chiropractic college were asked to complete a questionnaire that chronicled and described the occurrence of any side effects they may have sustained at the hands of their peers during technique class. Students were also asked to record their anthropomorphic characteristic. Results Of 450 questionnaires distributed, 292 were completed and returned to the authors. Of the 292 respondents, 127 reported to have experienced an injury, although the total number of injuries was 161. The most common site of injury was the lumbopelvic region. Students reported that it was during their second year of study that they experienced the highest number of injuries. Symptoms occurred the same day as the event in 85% of cases. The most common characteristic of symptoms reported was pain, followed by local stiffness, headache, dizziness, fatigue, diffuse stiffness and cramps. Two thirds of students described the extent of their injuries from ‘light’ to ‘a fair bit’. Three quarters of injuries resolved within the first 72 hours of the event. No treatment was sought by 89 (55%) of the respondents. More than half of students reported that their activities of daily living were either ‘not’ or ‘somewhat’ affected. There were three reports of long-term complaints. No statistically significant differences were found between the group of students reporting to be injured compared to those students not injured with respect to their age, gender, weight or height. Conclusion Chiropractic students experience side effects during their undergraduate training that are very similar to those experienced by patients under clinical care.

Macanuel, Kim; Deconinck, Amy; Sloma, Katie; LeDoux, Monique; Gleberzon, Brian J

2005-01-01

83

Evidence-Based Health Care in Medical and Chiropractic Education A Literature Review  

Microsoft Academic Search

Objective: The purpose of this article is to review educational and patient outcomes of teaching and utilizing evidence-based health care (EBHC) in medical and chiropractic education, and to discuss future directions for research. Methodology: Literature search identified 190 EBHC studies and 21 of these were reviewed and categorized into the following areas: educational and patient outcomes after EBHC medical training,

Charles E. Fernandez; Paul M. Delaney

2004-01-01

84

Chronic pediatric asthma and chiropractic spinal manipulation: A prospective clinical series and randomized clinical pilot study  

Microsoft Academic Search

Objectives: The first objective was to determine if chiropractic spinal manipulative therapy (SMT) in addition to optimal medical management resulted in clinically important changes in asthma-related outcomes in children. The second objective was to assess the feasibility of conducting a full-scale, randomized clinical trial in terms of recruitment, evaluation, treatment, and ability to deliver a sham SMT procedure. Study Design:

Gert Bronfort; Roni L. Evans; Paul Kubic; Patty Filkin

2001-01-01

85

Chiropractic management of Bell palsy with low level laser and manipulation: a case report  

PubMed Central

Objective The purpose of this case report is to describe chiropractic management including the use of cold laser and chiropractic manipulation in the treatment of a patient with Bell palsy. Clinical features A 40-year-old male patient had a 10-day history of facial paralysis on his left side, including the inability to close his left eye, which also had tearing and a burning sensation. The patient had trouble lifting his left lip and complained of drooling while brushing his teeth. There was no previous history of similar symptoms or a recent infection. Prior treatment had included oral steroids. Intervention and outcome The patient was treated with low-level laser therapy and chiropractic manipulation 2 times in 4 days. The laser was applied along the course of the facial nerve for 30 seconds at each point and for 1 minute at the stylomastoid foramen. The laser used was a GaAs class 4 laser with a wavelength of 910 nm. The patient perceived a 70% to 80% improvement of facial movement after the first treatment. After the second treatment, the patient reported full control of his facial movements. Conclusion A patient with acute facial paralysis appeared to have complete resolution of his symptoms following the application of low-level laser therapy and chiropractic manipulation.

Rubis, Lisa M.

2013-01-01

86

Lyman C. Johnston, DC, FICC, FCCS(C): Canadian chiropractic's postural research pioneer and inventive entrepreneur  

PubMed Central

This paper profiles Dr. Lyman Johnston and his contributions in the field of chiropractic research. Postural concepts, diagnostic instruments, therapeutic devices and treatment protocols are reviewed. Set out and briefly discussed are the Posturometer, Pyramidal Man, anterior-posterior gravity line, Postural Spinal Index, tension master, Spine Power Belt and the Mini-Gym. ImagesFigure 1

Brown, Douglas M.

2001-01-01

87

Practice patterns of doctors of chiropractic with a pediatric diplomate: a cross-sectional survey  

PubMed Central

Background Complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) is growing in popularity, especially within the pediatric population. Research on CAM practitioners and their specialties, such as pediatrics, is lacking. Within the chiropractic profession, pediatrics is one of the most recently established post-graduate specialty programs. This paper describes the demographic and practice characteristics of doctors of chiropractic with a pediatric diplomate. Methods 218 chiropractors with a pediatric diplomate were invited to complete our survey using either web-based or mailed paper survey methods. Practitioner demographics, practice characteristics, treatment procedures, referral patterns, and patient characteristics were queried with a survey created with the online survey tool, SurveyMonkey©®. Results A total of 135 chiropractors responded (62.2% response rate); they were predominantly female (74%) and white (93%). Techniques most commonly used were Diversified, Activator ®, and Thompson with the addition of cranial and extremity manipulation to their chiropractic treatments. Adjunctive therapies commonly provided to patients included recommendations for activities of daily living, corrective or therapeutic exercise, ice pack\\cryotherapy, and nutritional counseling. Thirty eight percent of respondents' patients were private pay and 23% had private insurance that was not managed care. Pediatrics represented 31% of the survey respondents' patients. Chiropractors also reported 63% of their work time devoted to direct patient care. Health conditions reportedly treated within the pediatric population included back or neck pain, asthma, birth trauma, colic, constipation, ear infection, head or chest cold, and upper respiratory infections. Referrals made to or from these chiropractors were uncommon. Conclusions This mixed mode survey identified similarities and differences between doctors of chiropractic with a pediatric diplomate to other surveys of doctors of chiropractic, CAM professionals, and pediatric healthcare providers. The pediatric diplomate certificate was established in 1993 and provides didactic education over a 2 to 3 year span. The results of this study can be used for historical information as this specialty continues to grow.

2010-01-01

88

Use and Costs of Chiropractic Care in a Community-Based Sample of the United States. Executive Summary.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

This thesis analyzes data from the RAND Health Insurance Experiment (HIE) to answer significant research questions about chiropractic health services. The HIE was a population-based, randomized controlled trial that tracked the use of medical services and...

P. Shekelle

1994-01-01

89

Extending ICPC-2 PLUS terminology to develop a classification system specific for the study of chiropractic encounters  

PubMed Central

Background Typically a large amount of information is collected during healthcare research and this information needs to be organised in a way that will make it manageable and to facilitate clear reporting. The Chiropractic Observation and Analysis STudy (COAST) was a cross sectional observational study that described the clinical practices of chiropractors in Victoria, Australia. To code chiropractic encounters COAST used the International Classification of Primary Care (ICPC-2) with the PLUS general practice clinical terminology to code chiropractic encounters. This paper describes the process by which a chiropractic-profession specific terminology was developed for use in research by expanding the current ICPC-2 PLUS system. Methods The coder referred to the ICPC-2 PLUS system when coding chiropractor recorded encounter details (reasons for encounter, diagnoses/problems and processes of care). The coder used rules and conventions supplied by the Family Medicine Research Unit at the University of Sydney, the developers of the PLUS system. New chiropractic specific terms and codes were created when a relevant term was not available in ICPC-2 PLUS. Results Information was collected from 52 chiropractors who documented 4,464 chiropractor-patient encounters. During the study, 6,225 reasons for encounter and 6,491 diagnoses/problems were documented, coded and analysed; 169 new chiropractic specific terms were added to the ICPC-2 PLUS terminology list. Most new terms were allocated to diagnoses/problems, with reasons for encounter generally well covered in the original ICPC 2 PLUS terminology: 3,074 of the 6,491 (47%) diagnoses/problems and 274 of the 6,225 (4%) reasons for encounter recorded during encounters were coded to a new term. Twenty nine new terms (17%) represented chiropractic processes of care. Conclusion While existing ICPC-2 PLUS terminology could not fully represent chiropractic practice, adding terms specific to chiropractic enabled coding of a large number of chiropractic encounters at the desired level. Further, the new system attempted to record the diversity among chiropractic encounters while enabling generalisation for reporting where required. COAST is ongoing, and as such, any further encounters received from chiropractors will enable addition and refinement of ICPC-2 PLUS (Chiro). More research is needed into the diagnosis/problem descriptions used by chiropractors.

2013-01-01

90

Outcome measures and their everyday use in chiropractic practice  

PubMed Central

Objectives: To describe the extent to which chiropractors utilize standardized outcome and various clinical measures to systematically document patients’ baseline health status and responses to treatment, with particular consideration being given towards quantifiable outcome instruments. Study design: Cross-sectional mailed survey. Participants: Registered chiropractors in the province of Saskatchewan. Methods: A survey was mailed to all registrants of the Chiropractors’ Association of Saskatchewan. Respondents graded their frequency of using various standardized pencil-and-paper instruments and functional chiropractic, orthopaedic and neurological tests in the contexts of both the initial intake assessment (‘always,’ ‘commonly,’ ‘occasionally,’ or ‘never’) and the course of subsequent treatment (after ‘each visit,’ after ‘9–12 visits,’ ‘annually,’ when patient ‘not responding,’ on ‘dismissal/discharge,’ ‘never’ or for some ‘other’ reason). Data were tabulated for all item and response category combinations as frequencies and percentages using the total sample size as the denominator. Results: Of 164 registered chiropractors, 62 (38%) returned a completed questionnaire. A pain diagram was the most commonly used subjective outcome measure and was administered routinely (either “always” or “commonly”) by 75% of respondents, at either the initial consultation or during a subsequent visit. Numerical rating and visual analogue scales were less popular (routinely used by 59% and 42% respectively). The majority of respondents (80%) seldom (“occasionally” or “never”) used spine pain-specific disability indices such as the Low Back Revised Oswestry, Neck Disability Index or the Roland-Morris Questionnaire. As well, they did not use standardized psychosocial instruments such as the Beck Depression Index, or general health assessment measures such as the SF-36 or SF-12 questionnaire. Neurological testing was the most commonly used objective outcome measure. Most respondents (84% to 95%) indicated that they continually monitored neurological status through dermatomal, manual muscle strength and deep tendon reflex testing. Ranges of motion were routinely measured by 95% of respondents, usually visually (96%) rather than goniometrically or by some other specialized device (7%). Conclusions: Our findings suggest that the majority of chiropractors do not use psychosocial questionnaires or condition-specific disability indices to document baseline or subsequent changes in health status. Chiropractors are more likely to rely on medical history taking and pain drawings during an initial intake assessment, as well as neurological and visually estimated range of motion testing during both initial intake and subsequent treatment visits.

Hinton, Paul M.; McLeod, Randall; Broker, Blaine; MacLellan, C. Elizabeth

2010-01-01

91

Attitudes toward evidence-based clinical practice among doctors of chiropractic with diplomate-level training in orthopedics  

PubMed Central

Background Evidence-based clinical practice (EBCP) is a practice model gaining prominence within healthcare, including the chiropractic profession. The status of EBCP has been evaluated in a variety of healthcare disciplines, but little is known regarding the attitudes doctors of chiropractic (DCs) hold toward this model of healthcare. This project examines the attitudes toward EBCP within a specialty discipline of DCs. Methods We identified a survey questionnaire previously used to evaluate EBCP among non-chiropractic complementary and alternative practitioners. We adapted this questionnaire for use among DCs and pretested it in 5 chiropractic college faculty. The final version was administered to DCs with diplomate-level training in orthopedics. The survey was emailed to 299 potential participants; descriptive results were calculated. Results 144 surveys were returned, resulting in a 48% response rate. The majority of respondents perceived EBCP as an important aspect of chiropractic practice. Respondents also believed themselves to have an above average skill level in EBCP, reported that training originated from their diplomate education, and based the majority of their practice on clinical research. Conclusion Doctors of chiropractic with an orthopedic diplomate appear to have favorable attitudes toward EBCP. Further study will help understand EBCP perceptions among general field DCs. A logical next step includes validation of this questionnaire.

2013-01-01

92

Reflex control of the spine and posture: a review of the literature from a chiropractic perspective  

PubMed Central

Objective This review details the anatomy and interactions of the postural and somatosensory reflexes. We attempt to identify the important role the nervous system plays in maintaining reflex control of the spine and posture. We also review, illustrate, and discuss how the human vertebral column develops, functions, and adapts to Earth's gravity in an upright position. We identify functional characteristics of the postural reflexes by reporting previous observations of subjects during periods of microgravity or weightlessness. Background Historically, chiropractic has centered around the concept that the nervous system controls and regulates all other bodily systems; and that disruption to normal nervous system function can contribute to a wide variety of common ailments. Surprisingly, the chiropractic literature has paid relatively little attention to the importance of neurological regulation of static upright human posture. With so much information available on how posture may affect health and function, we felt it important to review the neuroanatomical structures and pathways responsible for maintaining the spine and posture. Maintenance of static upright posture is regulated by the nervous system through the various postural reflexes. Hence, from a chiropractic standpoint, it is clinically beneficial to understand how the individual postural reflexes work, as it may explain some of the clinical presentations seen in chiropractic practice. Method We performed a manual search for available relevant textbooks, and a computer search of the MEDLINE, MANTIS, and Index to Chiropractic Literature databases from 1970 to present, using the following key words and phrases: "posture," "ocular," "vestibular," "cervical facet joint," "afferent," "vestibulocollic," "cervicocollic," "postural reflexes," "spaceflight," "microgravity," "weightlessness," "gravity," "posture," and "postural." Studies were selected if they specifically tested any or all of the postural reflexes either in Earth's gravity or in microgravitational environments. Studies testing the function of each postural component, as well as those discussing postural reflex interactions, were also included in this review. Discussion It is quite apparent from the indexed literature we searched that posture is largely maintained by reflexive, involuntary control. While reflexive components for postural control are found in skin and joint receptors, somatic graviceptors, and baroreceptors throughout the body, much of the reflexive postural control mechanisms are housed, or occur, within the head and neck region primarily. We suggest that the postural reflexes may function in a hierarchical fashion. This hierarchy may well be based on the gravity-dependent or gravity-independent nature of each postural reflex. Some or all of these postural reflexes may contribute to the development of a postural body scheme, a conceptual internal representation of the external environment under normal gravity. This model may be the framework through which the postural reflexes anticipate and adapt to new gravitational environments. Conclusion Visual and vestibular input, as well as joint and soft tissue mechanoreceptors, are major players in the regulation of static upright posture. Each of these input sources detects and responds to specific types of postural stimulus and perturbations, and each region has specific pathways by which it communicates with other postural reflexes, as well as higher central nervous system structures. This review of the postural reflex structures and mechanisms adds to the growing body of posture rehabilitation literature relating specifically to chiropractic treatment. Chiropractic interest in these reflexes may enhance the ability of chiropractic physicians to treat and correct global spine and posture disorders. With the knowledge and understanding of these postural reflexes, chiropractors can evaluate spinal configurations not only from a segmental perspective, but can also determine how spinal dysfunction may be the ultimate consequence of maintaining an u

Morningstar, Mark W; Pettibon, Burl R; Schlappi, Heidi; Schlappi, Mark; Ireland, Trevor V

2005-01-01

93

Radial neck fracture presenting to a Chiropractic clinic: a case report and literature review  

PubMed Central

Objective The purpose of this case report is to describe a patient that presented with a Mason type II radial neck fracture approximately three weeks following a traumatic injury. Clinical features A 59-year old female presented to a chiropractic practice with complaints of left lateral elbow pain distal to the lateral epicondyle of the humerus and pain provocation with pronation, supination and weight bearing. The complaint originated three weeks prior following a fall on her left elbow while hiking. Intervention and outcome Plain film radiographs of the left elbow and forearm revealed a transverse fracture of the radial neck with 2mm displacement--classified as a Mason Type II fracture. The patient was referred for medical follow-up with an orthopedist. Conclusion This report discusses triage of an elbow fracture presenting to a chiropractic clinic. This case study demonstrates the thorough clinical examination, imaging and decision making that assisted in appropriate patient diagnosis and management.

2014-01-01

94

The West Family Chiropractic Dynasty: celebrating a century of accomplishment in Canada  

PubMed Central

This historical treatise documents the unbroken legacy of the West family of chiropractors which has flourished in Canada for over 100 years. Part I, unearths the origins, development and careers of Archibald West, the founder of this dynasty, his son Samuel and grandson Stephen. Part II, not yet ready for publication, will delve into the lives of Archibald’s brother Samson and his chiropractic progeny, as well as a nephew of Stephen and another relative of Frederick West.

Brown, Douglas M.

2010-01-01

95

Attitudes towards fibromyalgia: A survey of Canadian chiropractic, naturopathic, physical therapy and occupational therapy students  

PubMed Central

Background The frequent use of chiropractic, naturopathic, and physical and occupational therapy by patients with fibromyalgia has been emphasized repeatedly, but little is known about the attitudes of these therapists towards this challenging condition. Methods We administered a cross-sectional survey to 385 senior Canadian chiropractic, naturopathic, physical and occupational therapy students in their final year of studies, that inquired about attitudes towards the diagnosis and management of fibromyalgia. Results 336 students completed the survey (response rate 87%). While they disagreed about the etiology (primarily psychological 28%, physiological 23%, psychological and physiological 15%, unsure 34%), the majority (58%) reported that fibromyalgia was difficult to manage. Respondants were also conflicted in whether treatment should prioritize symptom relief (65%) or functional gains (85%), with the majority (58%) wanting to do both. The majority of respondents (57%) agreed that there was effective treatment for fibromyalgia and that they possessed the required clinical skills to manage patients (55%). Chiropractic students were most skeptical in regards to fibromyalgia as a useful diagnostic entity, and most likely to endorse a psychological etiology. In our regression model, only training in naturopathic medicine (unstandardized regression coefficient = 0.33; 95% confidence interval = 0.11 to 0.56) and the belief that effective therapies existed (unstandardized regression coefficient = 0.42; 95% confidence interval = 0.30 to 0.54) were associated with greater confidence in managing patients with fibromyalgia. Conclusion The majority of senior Canadian chiropractic, naturopathic, physical and occupational therapy students, and in particular those with naturopathic training, believe that effective treatment for fibromyalgia exists and that they possess the clinical skillset to effectively manage this disorder. The majority place high priority on both symptom relief and functional gains when treating fibromyalgia.

Busse, Jason W; Kulkarni, Abhaya V; Badwall, Parminder; Guyatt, Gordon H

2008-01-01

96

Chiropractic management of low back pain in a patient with a transfemoral amputation  

PubMed Central

Objective The purpose of this case report is to describe the chiropractic management of a patient with a unilateral transfemoral amputation and low back pain (LBP). Clinical Features A 20-year-old woman with right transfemoral amputation and a right upper extremity amputation due to amniotic band syndrome had approximately 40 different prosthetic lower extremities in the prior 20 years. She presented for chiropractic care for LBP (5/10 numeric pain scale) that she experienced after receiving a new right prosthetic leg. The pain increased with walking, attempts to exercise, and lying supine. Physical evaluation revealed asymmetrical leg length (long right limb); restricted left ankle dorsiflexion; restricted lumbopelvic motion; and hypertonicity of the left triceps surae muscle complex as well as the gluteus maximus, quadratus lumborum, and erector spinae bilaterally. Gait examination revealed a right Trendelenberg gait as well as a pattern of left vaulting. The working diagnosis was sacroiliac joint dysfunction, with lumbar facet syndrome secondary to a leg length inequality causing alteration in gait. Intervention and Outcome Chiropractic management included manipulative therapy to the lumbar spine and pelvis, trigger point therapy of hypertonic musculature, and strengthening of pelvic musculature. In addition, the patient's prosthetist shortened her new prosthetic device. After 18 treatments, LBP severity was resolved (0/10); and there was an overall improvement with gait biomechanics. Conclusion This case illustrates the importance of considering leg length inequality in patients with amputations as a possible cause of lower back pain, and that proper management may include adjusting the length of the prosthetic device and strengthening of the hip flexors and abductors, in addition to trigger point therapy and chiropractic manipulation.

Illes, Jennifer D.; Maola, Chad J.

2012-01-01

97

Conservative chiropractic management of urinary incontinence using applied kinesiology: a retrospective case-series report  

PubMed Central

Objective The purpose of this case series is to describe the chiropractic management of 21 patients with daily stress and occasional total urinary incontinence (UI). Clinical Features Twenty-one case files of patients 13 to 90 years of age with UI from a chiropractic clinic were reviewed. The patients had a 4-month to 49-year history of UI and associated muscle dysfunction and low back and/or pelvic pain. Eighteen wore an incontinence pad throughout the day and night at the time of their appointments because of unpredictable UI. Intervention and Outcome Patients were evaluated for muscle impairments in the lumbar spine, pelvis, and pelvic floor and low back and/or hip pain. Positive manual muscle test results of the pelvis, lumbar spine muscles, and pelvic floor muscles were the most common findings. Lumbosacral dysfunction was found in 13 of the cases with pain provocation tests (applied kinesiology sensorimotor challenge); in 8 cases, this sensorimotor challenge was absent. Chiropractic manipulative therapy and soft tissue treatment addressed the soft tissue and articular dysfunctions. Chiropractic manipulative therapy involved high-velocity, low-amplitude manipulation; Cox flexion distraction manipulation; and/or use of a percussion instrument for the treatment of myofascial trigger points. Urinary incontinence symptoms resolved in 10 patients, considerably improved in 7 cases, and slightly improved in 4 cases. Periodic follow-up examinations for the past 6 years, and no less than 2 years, indicate that for each participant in this case-series report, the improvements of UI remained stable. Conclusion The patients reported in this retrospective case series showed improvement in UI symptoms that persisted over time.

Cuthbert, Scott C.; Rosner, Anthony L.

2012-01-01

98

Development of the 2012 American Chiropractic Board of Sports Physicians position statement on concussion in athletics  

PubMed Central

Objective The purpose of this article is to provide a summary of the development of the American Chiropractic Board of Sports Physicians (ACBSP) Position Statement on Concussion in Athletics regarding the management of concussion in sport and to offer suggestions to qualifying doctors of chiropractic (DCs) to make return-to-play decisions and clarify common concepts pertaining to evaluating and managing concussion in sport. Methods A literature review of position statements from sports medicine organizations was performed. The authors reviewed each statement for content. Key issues in the management of concussion in sport were identified with special consideration to concussion management by DCs. A position statement on the management of concussion in sport was drafted by the authors and submitted to the Board of Directors of the ACBSP for review. The Board of Directors called for minor revision; and after all revisions were made, the document was resubmitted. The Board of Directors of the ACBSP accepted the document for publication and presentation. The document was presented and disseminated to certificants by the ACBSP at the 2011 Chiropractic Sports Sciences Symposium. Results The 2012 ACBSP Position Statement on Concussion in Athletics was accepted by the ACBSP Board of Directors. Conclusion The Position Statement on Concussion in Athletics has been accepted by the ACBSP. This document offers guidance on the management of concussion in sport and provides qualifying DCs information to make return-to-play decisions.

Moreau, William J.; Nabhan, Dustin C.

2013-01-01

99

A theoretical basis for maintenance spinal manipulative therapy for the chiropractic profession  

PubMed Central

Object The purpose of this article is to discuss a theoretical basis for wellness chiropractic manipulative care and to develop a hypothesis for further investigation. Methods A search of PubMed and of the Manual, Alternative, and Natural Therapy Index System was performed with a combination of key words: chiropractic, maintenance and wellness care, maintenance manipulative care, preventive spinal manipulation, hypomobility, immobility, adhesions, joint degeneration, and neuronal degeneration. Articles were collected, and trends were identified. Results The search revealed surveys of doctors and patients, an initial clinical pilot study, randomized control trials, and laboratory studies that provided correlative information to provide a framework for development of a hypothesis for the basis of maintenance spinal manipulative therapy. Maintenance care optimizes the levels of function and provides a process of achieving the best possible health. It is proposed that this may be accomplished by including chiropractic manipulative therapy in addition to exercise therapy, diet and nutritional counseling, and lifestyle coaching. Conclusions It is hypothesized that because spinal manipulative therapy brings a joint to the end of the paraphysiological joint space to encourage normal range of motion, routine manipulation of asymptomatic patients may retard the progression of joint degeneration, neuronal changes, changes in muscular strength, and recruitment patterns, which may result in improved function, decreased episodes of injuries, and improved sense of well-being.

Taylor, David N.

2011-01-01

100

Predictors of performance of students in biochemistry in a doctor of chiropractic curriculum  

PubMed Central

Objective This study investigated the effect of completion of course prerequisites, undergraduate grade point average (GPA), undergraduate degree, and study habits on the performance of students in the biochemistry course at Palmer College of Chiropractic Florida. Methods Students self-reported information regarding academic preparation at the beginning of the semester using a questionnaire. Final exam grade and final course grade were noted and used as measures of performance. Multivariate analysis of variance was used to determine if number of prerequisites completed, undergraduate GPA, undergraduate degree, hours spent studying in undergraduate study, and hours spent studying in the first quarter of the chiropractic program were associated significantly with the biochemistry final exam grade or the final grade for the biochemistry course. Results The number of prerequisites completed, undergraduate degree, hours spent studying in undergraduate study, and hours spent studying in the first quarter of the chiropractic program did not significantly affect the biochemistry final exam grade or the final grade for the biochemistry course, but undergraduate GPA did. Subsequent univariate analysis and Tukey's post hoc comparisons revealed that students with an undergraduate GPA in the 3.5 to 3.99 range earned significantly higher final course grades than students with an undergraduate GPA in the 2.5 to 2.99 range. Conclusion No single variable was determined to be a factor that determines student success in biochemistry. The interrelationship between the factors examined warrants further investigation to understand fully how to predict the success of a student in the biochemistry course.

Shaw, Kathy; Rabatsky, Ali; Dishman, Veronica; Meseke, Christopher

2014-01-01

101

Predictors of performance on the National Board of Chiropractic Examiners Parts I and II*  

PubMed Central

Objective The purpose of this study was to examine predictors for success on Parts I and II of the National Board of Chiropractic Examiners (NBCE) written examinations. Methods Two validity studies were conducted to examine the criterion validity of Logan College assessments for Part I and II NBCE scores. Both studies consisted of a longitudinal design to examine the validity of entrance grade point average (GPA), in-program chiropractic course content GPA, and an institutional practice exam on Parts I and II of the NBCE. Results Analyses revealed that Part I GPA and practice exam scores combined accounted for 72% of the variance within Part I NBCE scores. Furthermore, every subtest of the Part I NBCE could be reliably predicted by course performance. In the 2nd study, Part I GPA, Part I NBCE score, and Part II GPA accounted for 75% of the variance within Part II NBCE scores. Conclusions Internal training and educational assessments (eg, course grades and practice exams) proved to be strong determinants of NBCE performance above and beyond initial levels of preparedness, thus validating the impact of the chiropractic curriculum on NBCE test achievement.

McCall, Angela R.; Harvey, Richard D.

2014-01-01

102

Chiropractic management of a medial meniscus tear in a patient with tibiofemoral degeneration: a case report  

PubMed Central

Objective The purpose of this case report is to describe and discuss the clinical diagnosis of a medial meniscus tear in an older patient using a multimodal management approach provided by a chiropractor. Clinical Features A 60-year-old woman reported to a chiropractic clinic with left knee pain and swelling. The history and physical examination findings suggested a medial meniscus tear, which was confirmed with magnetic resonance imaging. Intervention and Outcome Treatment consisted of therapeutic ultrasound; rest, ice, compression, and elevation protocol; soft tissue therapy using effleurage and lymphatic drainage; chiropractic mechanically assisted adjusting techniques to the left knee using a handheld mechanical thrusting instrument; sports taping applied to assist facilitation of the vastus medialis obliquus; and a specific rehabilitation program aimed at strengthening this musculature. The patient's pain was assessed using a quadruple numeric pain scale. Function of the left knee was examined using McMurray, Apley, and a variation of Helfet orthopedic tests, as well as joint line tenderness. Monitoring was done at the initial consultation and at the sixth and 12th treatments. The patient reported being able to walk, swim, and ride a bicycle asymptomatically. Her pain score at the concluding visit was 16.7%, indicating low-intensity pain. Conclusion This case indicated that conservative management of a meniscus tear through a chiropractic multimodal treatment approach provided an alternative or adjunctive therapy to routine orthopedic surgery for this patient.

Jarosz, Brett S.; Ames, Rick A.

2010-01-01

103

Chiropractic management of a 30-year-old patient with Parsonage-Turner syndrome  

PubMed Central

Objectives The purpose of this case report is to describe the chiropractic management of a patient presenting with right arm paralysis and a diagnosis of Parsonage-Turner syndrome. Clinical Features After receiving nerve entrapment release surgery, a 30-year-old man presented with a right arm contracture, atrophy, and weakness with general paralysis of the forearm and index finger of 6 weeks' duration. Intervention and Outcome The patient was provided chiropractic care that included high-velocity/low-amplitude spinal manipulation based upon applied kinesiology manual muscle testing, soft tissue trigger point therapy, exercises, and stretches. The patient demonstrated improvement in range of motion after the first treatment session. By the eighth treatment, he was able to fully straighten his arm. Three years later, the patient reported that he was able to do mountain climbing and that his arm was fully functional and pain-free. Conclusion For this patient, chiropractic care seemed to be successful in relieving his right arm paralysis and restoring normal arm movement.

Charles, Eugene

2011-01-01

104

Embedding chiropractic in Indigenous Health Care Organisations: applying the normalisation process model  

PubMed Central

Background Improving the health of Indigenous Australians remains a major challenge. A chiropractic service was established to evaluate this treatment option for musculoskeletal illness in rural Indigenous communities, based on the philosophy of keeping the community involved in all the phases of development, implementation, and evaluation. The development and integration of this service has experienced many difficulties with referrals, funding and building sustainability. Evaluation of the program was a key aspect of its implementation, requiring an appropriate process to identify specific problems and formulate solutions to improve the service. Methods We used the normalisation process model (May 2006) to order the data collected in consultation meetings and to inform our strategy and actions. The normalisation process model provided us with a structure for organising consultation meeting data and helped prioritise tasks. Our data was analysed as it applied to each dimension of the model, noting aspects that the model did not encompass. During this process we reworded the dimensions into more everyday terminology. The final analysis focused on to what extent the model helped us to prioritise and systematise our tasks and plans. Results We used the model to consider ways to promote the chiropractic service, to enhance relationships and interactions between clinicians and procedures within the health service, and to avoid disruption of the existing service. We identified ways in which chiropractors can become trusted team members who have acceptable and recognised knowledge and skills. We also developed strategies that should result in chiropractic practitioners finding a place within a complex occupational web, by being seen as similar to well-known occupations such as physiotherapy. Interestingly, one dimension identified by our data, which we have labelled ‘emancipatory’, was absent from the model. Conclusions The normalisation process model has resulted in a number of new insights and questions. We have now established thriving weekly chiropractic clinics staffed by a team of volunteer chiropractors. We identified an ‘emancipatory’ dimension that requires further study. We provide a worked example of using this model to establish, integrate and evaluate a chiropractic service in an Indigenous Australian community.

2012-01-01

105

Creating European guidelines for Chiropractic Incident Reporting and Learning Systems (CIRLS): relevance and structure  

PubMed Central

Background In 2009, the heads of the Executive Council of the European Chiropractors' Union (ECU) and the European Academy of Chiropractic (EAC) involved in the European Committee for Standardization (CEN) process for the chiropractic profession, set out to establish European guidelines for the reporting of adverse reactions to chiropractic treatment. There were a number of reasons for this: first, to improve the overall quality of patient care by aiming to reduce the application of potentially harmful interventions and to facilitate the treatment of patients within the context of achieving maximum benefit with a minimum risk of harm; second, to inform the training objectives for the Graduate Education and Continuing Professional Development programmes of all 19 ECU member nations, regarding knowledge and skills to be acquired for maximising patient safety; and third, to develop a guideline on patient safety incident reporting as it is likely to be part of future CEN standards for ECU member nations. Objective To introduce patient safety incident reporting within the context of chiropractic practice in Europe and to help individual countries and their national professional associations to develop or improve reporting and learning systems. Discussion Providing health care of any kind, including the provision of chiropractic treatment, can be a complex and, at times, a risky activity. Safety in healthcare cannot be guaranteed, it can only be improved. One of the most important aspects of any learning and reporting system lies in the appropriate use of the data and information it gathers. Reporting should not just be seen as a vehicle for obtaining information on patient safety issues, but also be utilised as a tool to facilitate learning, advance quality improvement and to ultimately minimise the rate of the occurrence of errors linked to patient care. Conclusions Before a reporting and learning system can be established it has to be clear what the objectives of the system are, what resources will be required and whether the implementing organisation has the capacity to operate the system to its full advantage. Responding to adverse event reports requires the availability of experts to analyse the incidents and to provide feedback in a timely fashion. A comprehensive strategy for national implementation must be in place including, but not limited to, presentations at national meetings, the provision of written information to all practitioners and the running of workshops, so that all stakeholders fully understand the purposes of adverse event reporting. Unless this is achieved, any system runs the risk of failure, or at the very least, limited usefulness.

2011-01-01

106

Chiropractic management of work-related upper limb disorder complicated by intraosseous ganglion cysts: a case report  

PubMed Central

Objective Work-related upper limb disorder (WRULD) encompasses a broad array of occupational upper limb injuries, the most common being carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS). Carpal tunnel syndrome occasionally presents with concomitant ganglion cysts. The purpose of this case report is to describe the chiropractic management of a patient with bilateral WRULD complicated by ganglion cysts. Clinical Features The patient was diagnosed previously with bilateral CTS and presented with common CTS symptoms that were nonresponsive to several previous courses of care. Magnetic resonance imaging revealed bilateral ganglion cysts, and electrodiagnostic studies found left CTS and bilateral radial neuralgia. Right limb findings appeared more consistent with nonspecific arm pain. Intervention and Outcome Chiropractic manipulative therapy, soft-tissue approaches, and physiotherapy modalities were applied to the arms and wrists over a 3-month period. Home care included exercises using elastic tubing and a gyroscopic handheld device. Chiropractic manipulative therapy and other conservative approaches resulted in subjective improvements of decreased hand paresthesias and muscle weakness and objective improvements in range of motion and neurologic deficits. Although the patient's symptoms and function improved, she remained with a level of permanent impairment. Conclusion This case demonstrates successful chiropractic management of a patient with WRULD complicated by ganglion cysts. Further larger-scale studies are recommended to determine if chiropractic management demonstrates positive outcomes for this condition.

Crafts, Glenn J.; Snow, Gregory J.; Ngoc, Kim Hong

2011-01-01

107

Current understanding of the relationship between cervical manipulation and stroke: what does it mean for the chiropractic profession?  

PubMed Central

The understanding of the relationship between cervical manipulative therapy (CMT) and vertebral artery dissection and stroke (VADS) has evolved considerably over the years. In the beginning the relationship was seen as simple cause-effect, in which CMT was seen to cause VADS in certain susceptible individuals. This was perceived as extremely rare by chiropractic physicians, but as far more common by neurologists and others. Recent evidence has clarified the relationship considerably, and suggests that the relationship is not causal, but that patients with VADS often have initial symptoms which cause them to seek care from a chiropractic physician and have a stroke some time after, independent of the chiropractic visit. This new understanding has shifted the focus for the chiropractic physician from one of attempting to "screen" for "risk of complication to manipulation" to one of recognizing the patient who may be having VADS so that early diagnosis and intervention can be pursued. In addition, this new understanding presents the chiropractic profession with an opportunity to change the conversation about CMT and VADS by taking a proactive, public health approach to this uncommon but potentially devastating disorder.

2010-01-01

108

Clinical presentation and chiropractic treatment of Tietze syndrome: A 34-year-old female with left-sided chest pain  

PubMed Central

Objective The purpose of this case report is to describe the clinical presentation and chiropractic management of Tietze syndrome. Clinical Features A 34-year-old woman presented with unexplained left-sided chest pain. Electrocardiogram and radiographs were taken at a medical emergency department to rule out cardiovascular and pulmonary causes, and pain medication did not relieve her pain. Physical examination showed tenderness on palpation and swelling of the second and third chondrosternal joints, as well as thoracic joint dysfunction. Heart and lung pathology was ruled out, and chondrosternal joint swelling was present, Tietze syndrome was diagnosed. Intervention and Outcome A treatment plan aimed at restoring normal thoracic and rib joint movement and decreasing inflammation of the chondrosternal joints resulted in lower pain levels. Treatment consisted of diversified high-velocity, low-amplitude chiropractic manipulation; activator technique; and cryotherapy. Conclusion Chiropractic management of Tietze syndrome was successful in reducing pain levels in this patient's case.

Gijsbers, Eefje; Knaap, Simone F.C.

2011-01-01

109

Symptomatic improvement in function and disease activity in a patient with ankylosing spondylitis utilizing a course of chiropractic therapy: a prospective case study  

PubMed Central

Background There is limited outcome measure support for chiropractic manipulative therapy in the management of ankylosing spondylitis. An improvement in specific indices for both function and disease activity during chiropractic therapy for ankylosing spondylitis has not previously been reported. Objective To measure changes in function and disease activity in a patient with ankylosing spondylitis during a course of chiropractic therapy. The clinical management of ankylosing spondylitis, including chiropractic manipulative therapy and the implications of this case study are discussed. Clinical Features A 34-year-old male with a 10 year diagnosis of ankylosing spondylitis sought chiropractic treatment for spinal pain and stiffness. His advanced radiographic signs included an increased atlantodental interspace and cervical vertebral ankylosis. Intervention and outcome The Bath Ankylosing Spondylitis Functional Index (BASFI), Bath Ankylosing Spondylitis Disease Activity Index (BASDAI), finger-tip-to-floor distance and chest expansion were assessed during an 18 week course of chiropractic spinal manipulation and mobilization therapy. There was a 90% improvement in the disease activity index and an 85% improvement in the functional index from the pre-treatment baseline, as measured by the BASDAI and BASFI respectively. Spinal flexibility and chest expansion also improved. Conclusion To the authors knowledge this is the first study to incorporate ankylosing spondylitis specific indices, for both disease activity and function, to objectively support the use of chiropractic manipulative therapy in the management of ankylosing spondylitis. More intensive research is suggested.

Rutherford, Susan M; Nicolson, Cameron F; Crowther, Edward R

2005-01-01

110

The West family chiropractic dynasty: celebrating a century of accomplishment in Canada  

PubMed Central

This historical paper documents the unbroken legacy of the West family of chiropractors which has flourished in Canada for over 100 years. Part I, unearthed the origins, development and careers of Archibald West, the founder of this dynasty, his son Samuel and grandson Stephen. Part II, delves into the life of Archie’s brother Samson, and Samson’s chiropractic progeny: grandsons David and Neil, and great granddaughter Megan. Then it goes back to look at Stephen West’s nephew, R. Ian Buchanan and ends with a descendant of another branch of the family tree, James L. West.

Brown, Douglas M.

2011-01-01

111

Chiropractic management of episodic tension-type headache: a survey of clinical specialists  

PubMed Central

Tension-type headache (TTH) is a highly prevalent condition experienced annually by 30-70% of the population. As a chief complaint, it occupies 5-8% of chiropractors’ caseloads, but is probably more prevalent in multiple complaint cases. While numerous clinical descriptions exist in the literature of the management of TTH by chiropractors, and while there is a small body of clinical trials of the treatment of non-migrainous headache by spinal manipulation, there is no systematic survey of the approaches to its treatment by chiropractors. The goals of this study were to determine the test-retest reliability of a questionnaire designed to identify the most commonly used treatments for TTH and to report on any consistent findings as a potential profile of typical practice approach. The respondents consisted of a group of Canadian chiropractic clinical specialists. Respondents were asked to complete a survey which consisted of a comprehensive list of chiropractic treatment procedures including standard manual manipulations and mobilisations, soft tissue therapies, modalities, exercises, behavioral therapies, acupuncture, nutrition and four “systems” techniques. The respondents were asked to rate their frequency of use of these procedures on a 4-point scale ranging from “always” to “never”. The surveys were completed twice within a two day interval. The response rate was 18/25 (72%). Eighty-seven percent (87%) of the items were rated identically on both surveys. All but one of the items achieved a statistically significant reliability coefficient. The highest rated items were “upper cervical manipulations”, “upper cervical soft tissue therapy” and “neck stretching exercises”. The items which received the lowest endorsement were: chiropractic procedures to the dorso-lumbo-pelvic spine, most therapy modalities and the “systems” techniques which were included in the survey. Years in practice appeared to have very little effect on the use of the various procedures. With very minor exceptions, this group of respondents provided reliable and consistent responses which were also consistent with the clinical trial literature on the treatment of headache by spinal manipulation. We interpret this to indicate that the survey instrument has an acceptable level of reliability and validity for use in any larger study of field practitioners’ approaches to the treatment of TTH. The set of procedures endorsed by this group of specialists is presented as a possible set of “best-evidence practices” in the chiropractic management of tension-type headache.

Vernon, Howard; McDermaid, Cameron

1998-01-01

112

Complementary and alternative treatment for neck pain: chiropractic, acupuncture, TENS, massage, yoga, Tai Chi, and Feldenkrais.  

PubMed

Of the multitude of treatment options for the management of neck pain, no obvious single treatment modality has been shown to be most efficacious. As such, the clinician should consider alternative treatment modalities if a modality is engaging, available, financially feasible, potentially efficacious, and is low risk for the patient. As evidence-based medicine for neck pain develops, the clinician is faced with the challenge of which treatments to encourage patients to pursue. Treatment modalities explored in this article, including chiropractic, acupuncture, TENS, massage, yoga, Tai Chi, and Feldenkrais, represent reasonable complementary and alternative medicine methods for patients with neck pain. PMID:21824591

Plastaras, Christopher T; Schran, Seth; Kim, Natasha; Sorosky, Susan; Darr, Deborah; Chen, Mary Susan; Lansky, Rebecca

2011-08-01

113

The evidence base for chiropractic treatment of musculoskeletal conditions in children and adolescents: The emperor's new suit?  

Microsoft Academic Search

Five to ten percent of chiropractic patients are children and adolescents. Most of these consult because of spinal pain, or other musculoskeletal complaints. These musculoskeletal disorders in early life not only affect the quality of children's lives, but also seem to have an impact on adult musculoskeletal health. Thus, this is an important part of the chiropractors' scope of practice,

Lise Hestbaek; Mette Jensen Stochkendahl

2010-01-01

114

Assessment of Chiropractic Treatment for Low Back Pain, Military Readiness and Smoking Cessation in Military Active Duty Personnel.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

This study is comprised of three trials, referred to as the Assessment of Chiropractic Treatment (or ACT). the most significant work during the last reporting period was the finalization of the protocol for ACT1 (RCT for low back pain and nested smoking c...

I. Coulter

2012-01-01

115

Correlation between academic performance and NBCE part I scores at a chiropractic college  

PubMed Central

Objective This study investigates the association between pre-National Board assessments and National Board Part 1 scores (NBCE) at a chiropractic college. Methods A convenience sample of 24 students enrolled in the doctor of chiropractic degree program was recruited for the study. These were 6th and 7th quarter students who had registered to take NBCE in March 2011. Each student's class scores were computed and average numeric means score derived. Subject clusters that make up testable subject categories in NBCE also were computed to obtain a single numeric mean score. Pretests were administered in all areas tested in NBCE. Results were compared to the student's scores in NBCE using correlation and multiple linear regression for 14 predictors and one response variable (NBCE). Results Among the 14 correlations for 19 students (due to missing data when running the correlation matrix), six were moderate-to-strong and statistically significant. Two predictors qualified for multiple linear regression (where n = 22): mean anatomy and mean chemistry, both of which revealed similar regression coefficients. Conclusion Mean anatomy and mean chemistry scores were shown to be the best predictors of NBCE Part 1 results in this sample.

Kenya, Amilliah W.M.; Kenya, Hope M.; Hart, John

2013-01-01

116

Application of lead-acrylic compensating filters in chiropractic full spine radiography: a technical report  

SciTech Connect

X-raying the entire spinal column in the standing position in a single exposure (mainly the AP projection) is an often-used chiropractic radiography procedure which has also found some application in medical scoliosis screening program. Aside from any controversy of clinical objectives or medical necessity, the primary agreed-upon requisite for such procedure is twofold; achieving the best possible film image quality with the least amount of radiation exposure to the patient. A popular method of accomplishing this objective is by the use of collimator-attached devices designed to selectively filter the primary x-ray beam in accordance with regional variations of body thickness and/or density. This study was conducted to evaluate the use of a new lead-acrylic filter system under specialized chiropractic conditions. In comparison to other available systems, it was concluded that this new system; a) is generally equivalent in its radiation dose reduction capabilities; b) is capable of producing full spine radiographs with good to above average image quality; and c) is appreciably easier to use.

Buehler, M.T.; Hrejsa, A.F.

1985-09-01

117

Attitudes toward vaccination: A cross-sectional survey of students at the Canadian Memorial Chiropractic College  

PubMed Central

Introduction: The purpose of this study was to conduct an online survey of chiropractic students in the 2011/12 academic year at CMCC in order to determine their attitudes toward vaccination, their history of vaccination and their opinions towards their level of preparedness and confidence to discuss vaccination with patients. Method: All students enrolled in the program at CMCC were eligible to participate in this anonymous survey modeled after a similar survey administered in 1999/2000. Results: The response rate was 43%. Over 90% of all students reported they had been vaccinated. Roughly half of students felt they were well prepared to discuss vaccination with their patients and two-thirds felt they were confident to do so. Between 83.9% and 90% of students in various years of the program expressed a positive attitude toward vaccination. Discussion: Separate Welsh t-test for each year of study indicated statistically significant differences between our survey and the survey published in 1999/2000, with students in our study expressing a more positive attitude toward vaccination. Conclusion: Students enrolled in the chiropractic program at CMCC in the 2011/12 expressed a positive attitude toward vaccination.

Lameris, Marlee; Schmidt, Catherine; Gleberzon, Brian; Ogrady, Jillian

2013-01-01

118

Chiropractic wellness on the web: the content and quality of information related to wellness and primary prevention on the Internet  

PubMed Central

Background The Internet has become a common source of information for patients wishing to learn about health information. Previous studies found information related to back pain poor and often contradictory to current guidelines. Wellness has become a common topic in the field of chiropractic and accrediting agencies have standards on delivery of wellness-based content in college curricula as well as directives for clinical applications. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the quality of the information on the Internet using the terms "chiropractic wellness," or "wellness chiropractic". Methods Five commonly used search engines were selected and the first 10 sites found using the strategy above were evaluated by two raters. Demographic assessments of the sites were made along with whether they were Health on the Net Foundation (HON) certified, contained standard wellness content, mentioned any Healthy People Focus Areas, and other chiropractic topics. Kappa statistics compared inter-rater agreement. Results Potential patients appeared to be the audience 87% of the time and a private doctor of chiropractic appeared to be the typical site owner. The sites usually promoted the provider. No sites displayed HON certification logo nor did any appear to meet the HON certification criteria. Twenty-six sites (55%) promoted regular physical activity in some manner and 18 (38%) had information on health risks of tobacco. Four (9%) had mental health or stress-reduction content but none had information supportive of vaccination. Some had information contradictory to common public health measures. Conclusions Patients searching the Internet for chiropractic wellness information will often find useless information that will not help them maintain health or become well. Most simply market the chiropractic practice or allow for a patients to provide personal information in exchange for more 'wellness' information. More research should be done on how providers determine site content, pay any attention to the details on their sites, or agree with content as some appear to be prefabricated sites. Website content could be enhanced by sharing of information from reputable sources like US Centers for Disease Control, the National Institutes of Health and other authoritative sources. HON certification should also be sought.

2011-01-01

119

A comparative analysis of chiropractic and general practitioner patients in North America: Findings from the joint Canada\\/United States survey of health, 2002–03  

Microsoft Academic Search

BACKGROUND: Scientifically rigorous general population-based studies comparing chiropractic with primary-care medical patients within and between countries have not been published. The objective of this study is to compare care seekers of doctors of chiropractic (DCs) and general practitioners (GPs) in the United States and Canada on a comprehensive set of sociodemographic, quality of life, and health-related variables. METHODS: Data are

Eric L Hurwitz; Lu-May Chiang

2006-01-01

120

A narrative review of medical, chiropractic, and alternative health practices in the treatment of primary dysmenorrhea  

PubMed Central

Abstract Objective Primary dysmenorrhea and related issues are discussed as they influence the gynecological and social health of females during adolescence, adulthood, and senior maturity. Health practitioners are exposed to multiple approaches towards the management of menstrual pain. Clinical and social viewpoints target the causation, development, diagnosis, manifestation and management of primary dysmenorrhea. This narrative review includes the topic of the doctor-patient relationship in efforts of cultivating effectively communicative health practitioners. Controversial topics related to primary dysmenorrhea and the quality of life for women are addressed. Data Sources A search for literature reviews, case studies, laboratory research, and clinical trials from 1985–2004 was performed using the MEDLINE database. Sources of additional information included textbooks, national organizational literature and contemporary articles. Discussion Menstrual pain is a prevalent experience yet it is socially taboo for conversation; as such, it poses a hindrance to its management. The communication between the doctor and patient is a critical barrier point between establishing a diagnosis and determining an appropriate treatment plan. A multi-disciple treatment plan varies as much as patients themselves vary in personal experiences, needs, and preferences. Conclusions Medicinal prophylactics, physical therapeutics, non-acidic diets, herbal supplements, eastern therapies and the chiropractic manual adjustments of the spine are effective methods for the management of primary dysmenorrhea. The non-invasive management of primary dysmenorrhea includes the chiropractic adjustment with complimentary modalities, and other alternative health care practices. Medicinal prophylactics are invasive and pose a higher risk to long-term chemical exposure, side effects or irreversible conditions.

Spears, Lolita G.

2005-01-01

121

Effectiveness of an evidence-based chiropractic continuing education workshop on participant knowledge of evidence-based health care  

Microsoft Academic Search

BACKGROUND: Chiropractors must continue to learn, develop themselves professionally throughout their careers, and become self-directed and lifelong learners. Using an evidence-based approach increases the probability of optimal patient outcomes. But most chiropractors lack knowledge and interest in evidence-based approaches. The purpose of this study was to develop and measure the effectiveness of evidence-based training for chiropractic practitioners in a continuing

Ronald J Feise; Jaroslaw P Grod; Anne Taylor-Vaisey

2006-01-01

122

The modulation of upper extremity musculoskeletal disorders for a knowledge worker with chiropractic care and applied ergonomics: a case study  

PubMed Central

Objective This report describes the case management of musculoskeletal disorders for an employee in a college work environment using both chiropractic care and applied ergonomics. Clinical Findings A 54-year-old male office worker presented with decreased motor function in both wrists; intermittent moderate-to-severe headaches; and pain or discomfort in the neck, both shoulders, left hand and wrist, and lumbosacral region resulting from injuries sustained during recreational soccer and from excessive forces and awkward postures when interacting with his home and office computer workstations. Intervention and Results Ergonomic training, surveillance, retrofitted equipment with new furniture, and an emphasis on adopting healthy work-style behaviors were applied in combination with regular chiropractic care. Baseline ergonomic job task analysis identified risk factors and delineated appropriate control measures to improve the subject's interface with his office workstation. Serial reevaluations at 3-month, 1-year, and 2-year periods recorded changes to the participant's pain, discomfort, and work-style behaviors. At end of study and relative to baseline, pain scale improved from 4/10 to 2/10; general disability improved from 4 to 0; and hand grip strength (pounds) increased from 20 to 105 (left) and 45 to 100 (right). Healthy work habits and postures adopted in the 3-month to 1-year period regressed to baseline exposures for 3 of 6 risk priorities identified in the ergonomic job task analysis. Conclusion The patient responded positively to the intervention of chiropractic care and applied ergonomics.

Sherrod, Charles W.; Casey, George; Dubro, Robert E.; Johnson, Dale F.

2013-01-01

123

English language proficiency and the accommodations for language non-concordance amongst patients utilizing chiropractic college teaching clinics  

PubMed Central

Background The number of households in the United States that are not proficient in the English language is growing and presenting a challenge to the health care system. Over nineteen percent of the US population speak a language other than English in the home. This increase in language discordance generates a greater need to find and implement accommodations in the clinical setting to insure accurate and efficient diagnosis and treatment as well as provide for patient safety. Aim: The purpose of this study is to determine the percentage of patients accessing the chiropractic college teaching clinics who are not proficient in the English language and to what extent the colleges provide accommodations for that language disparity. Methods The clinic directors and deans of the Association of Chiropractic Colleges were surveyed via an on-line survey engine. The survey queried the percentage of the patient population that is not English language proficient, the accommodations the college currently has in place, if the college has a language specific consent to treat document and if the college has a written policy concerning patients without English proficiency. Results Fifty percent of the contacted chiropractic colleges responded to the survey. In the respondent college clinics 16.5% of the patient population is not proficient in English, with over 75% speaking Spanish. All but one of the respondents provide some level of accommodation for the language non-concordance. Forty five percent of the responding colleges employ a language specific consent to treat form. The implementation of accommodations and the use of a language specific consent to treat form is more prevalent at colleges with a higher percentage of non-English speaking patients. Conclusions The percentage of patients with limited English proficiency accessing services at the teaching clinics of the chiropractic colleges mirrors the numbers in the general population. There is a wide disparity in the accommodations that the individual colleges make to address this language discordance. There is a need to further develop accurate and meaningful accommodations to address language disparity in the chiropractic teaching clinics.

2013-01-01

124

Separate and Distinct: A Comparison of Scholarly Productivity, Teaching Load, and Compensation of Chiropractic Teaching Faculty to Other Sectors of Higher Education  

PubMed Central

Background: Faculty scholarship, teaching load, and compensation can be indicators of institutional health and can impact curricular quality. Periodic data are published by the US Department of Education for all sectors of higher education, but do not list chiropractic colleges as a separate category. Objective: To report on the scholarly output, teaching load, and compensation of the full-time faculty at one chiropractic college, and to compare those data to national and local norms. Methods: Data on chiropractic faculty were collected from within the institution. External data were collected from the US Department of Education and US Bureau of Labor Statistics. Results: The chiropractic faculty assessed create about one-tenth the scholarly output, carried 2.7 times the course load of external doctoral faculty and 1.4 times the course load typical of 2-year (community) college faculty, received two-thirds the salary typical for all segments of education, and one-half the typical retirement benefits. Conclusion: Results are suggestive of significant deficiencies within chiropractic education that pose risk to the future of the profession.

Ward, Robert W.

2007-01-01

125

Chiropractic clinical practice guideline: evidence-based treatment of adult neck pain not due to whiplash  

PubMed Central

OBJECTIVE To provide an evidence-based clinical practice guideline for the chiropractic cervical treatment of adults with acute or chronic neck pain not due to whiplash. This is a considerable health concern considered to be a priority by stakeholders, and about which the scientific information was poorly organized. OPTIONS Cervical treatments: manipulation, mobilization, ischemic pressure, clinic- and home-based exercise, traction, education, low-power laser, massage, transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation, pillows, pulsed electromagnetic therapy, and ultrasound. OUTCOMES The primary outcomes considered were improved (reduced and less intrusive) pain and improved (increased and easier) ranges of motion (ROM) of the adult cervical spine. EVIDENCE An “extraction” team recorded evidence from articles found by literature search teams using 4 separate literature searches, and rated it using a Table adapted from the Oxford Centre for Evidence-based Medicine. The searches were 1) Treatment; August, 2003, using MEDLINE, CINAHL, AMED, MANTIS, ICL, The Cochrane Library (includes CENTRAL), and EBSCO, identified 182 articles. 2) Risk management (adverse events); October, 2004, identified 230 articles and 2 texts. 3) Risk management (dissection); September, 2003, identified 79 articles. 4) Treatment update; a repeat of the treatment search for articles published between September, 2003 and November, 2004 inclusive identified 121 articles. VALUES To enable the search of the literature, the authors (Guidelines Development Committee [GDC]) regarded chiropractic treatment as including elements of “conservative” care in the search strategies, but not in the consideration of the range of chiropractic practice. Also, knowledge based only on clinical experience was considered less valid and reliable than good-caliber evidence, but where the caliber of the relevant evidence was low or it was non-existent, unpublished clinical experience was considered to be equivalent to, or better than the published evidence. REPORTED BENEFITS, HARMS AND COSTS The expected benefits from the recommendations include more rapid recovery from pain, impairment and disability (improved pain and ROM). The GDC identified evidence-based pain benefits from 10 unimodal treatments and more than 7 multimodal treatments. There were no pain benefits from magnets in necklaces, education or relaxation alone, occipital release alone, or head retraction-extension exercise combinations alone. The specificity of the studied treatments meant few studies could be generalized to more than a minority of patients. Adverse events were not addressed in most studies, but where they were, there were none or they were minor. The theoretic harm of vertebral artery dissection (VAD) was not reported, but an analysis suggested that 1 VAD may occur subsequent to 1 million cervical manipulations. Costs were not analyzed in this guideline, but it is the understanding of the GDC that recommendations limiting ineffective care and promoting a more rapid return of patients to full functional capacity will reduce patient costs, as well as increase patient safety and satisfaction. For simplicity, this version of the guideline includes primarily data synthesized across studies (evidence syntheses), whereas the technical and the interactive versions of this guideline (http://ccachiro.org/cpg) also include relevant data from individual studies (evidence extractions). RECOMMENDATIONS The GDC developed treatment, risk-management and research recommendations using the available evidence. Treatment recommendations addressing 13 treatment modalities revolved around a decision algorithm comprising diagnosis (or assessment leading to diagnosis), treatment and reassessment. Several specific variations of modalities of treatment were not recommended. For adverse events not associated with a treatment modality, but that occur in the clinical setting, there was evidence to recommend reconsideration of treatment options or referral to the appropriate health services. For adverse eve

Anderson-Peacock, Elizabeth; Blouin, Jean-Sebastien; Bryans, Roland; Danis, Normand; Furlan, Andrea; Marcoux, Henri; Potter, Brock; Ruegg, Rick; Gross Stein, Janice; White, Eleanor

2005-01-01

126

A pilot mixed methods study of patient satisfaction with chiropractic care for back pain  

PubMed Central

Objective Patient satisfaction is important to payers, clinicians, and patients. The concept of satisfaction is multifactorial and measurement is challenging. Our objective was to explore use of a mixed-methods design to examine patient satisfaction with chiropractic care for low back pain. Methods Patients were treated 3 times per week for 3 weeks. Outcomes were collected at Week 3 and Week 4. Qualitative interviews were conducted by the treating clinician and a non-treating staff member. Outcome Measures were the Roland Morris Questionnaire (RMQ), the Visual Analog Scale (VAS), and the Patient Satisfaction Scale (PSS). Interviews were recorded and transcribed, and analyzed for themes and constructs of satisfaction. We compared qualitative interview data with quantitative outcomes, and qualitative data from 2 different interviewers. Results All patients reported high levels of satisfaction. Clinical outcomes were unremarkable with little change noted on VAS and RMQ scores. We categorized patient comments into the same constructs of satisfaction as those identified for the PSS: Quality of Care, Information, Effectiveness, and Caring. An additional construct (Quality of Care) and additional subcategories were identified. Satisfaction with care is not explained by outcome alone. The qualitative data collected from 2 different interviewers had few differences. Conclusion The results of this study suggest that it is feasible to use a mixed-method design to examine patient satisfaction. We were able to refine data collection and analysis procedures for the outcome measures and qualitative interview data. We identified limitations and offer recommendations for the next step: the implementation of a larger study.

Polipnick, Judith

2008-01-01

127

A health care system in transformation: making the case for chiropractic  

PubMed Central

There are a number of factors that have conspired to create a crisis in healthcare. In part, the successes of medical science and technologies have been to blame, for they have led to survival where lives would previously have been cut short. An informed public, aware of these technological advances, is demanding access to the best that healthcare has to offer. At the same time the burden of chronic disease in an increasing elderly population has created a marked growth in the need for long term care. Current estimates for expenditure predict a rapid escalation of healthcare costs as a proportion of the GDP of developed nations, yet at the same time a global economic crisis has necessitated dramatic cuts in health budgets. This unsustainable position has led to calls for an urgent transformation in healthcare systems. This commentary explores the present day healthcare crisis and looks at the opportunities for chiropractors as pressure intensifies on politicians and leaders in healthcare to seek innovative solutions to a failing model. Amidst these opportunities, it questions whether the chiropractic profession is ready to accept the challenges that integration into mainstream healthcare will bring and identifies both pathways and potential obstacles to acceptance.

2012-01-01

128

Is there a chilly climate? An educational environmental mixed method study in a chiropractic training institution  

PubMed Central

Objective The attitude towards gender in an educational environment has a significant impact on a student's behavior, sense of well-being, and academic performance. Our study aimed to explore the presence and extent of gender-related issues in a chiropractic undergraduate learning environment, which has been a scarcely researched topic in the literature. Methods The Perceived Chilly Climate Scale (PCCS) was used as the initial tool for screening the gender issues among undergraduates. The issues identified were explored further with a series of focus group interviews. Results The PCCS had an 83% response rate. The PCCS score (105/196) indicated the nonexistence of alarming gender-related issues. However, the PCCS score was significantly higher among female than male subjects, immigrants than nonimmigrants, and minorities than majority ethnic groups. Despite high ratings on the questionnaire quantitative findings, the focus groups indicated a good sense of equality, oppression-free environment, and no obvious signs of discrimination. Conclusion The educational environment of the institution concerned was conducive to equality. However, subtle but important gender-, ethnic-, and minority-related issues could be addressed to provide an enhanced educational environment to learners.

Palmgren, Per J.; Chandratilake, Madawa; Nilsson, Gunnar H.; Laksov, Klara Bolander

2013-01-01

129

Paraplegia in a chiropractic patient secondary to atraumatic dural arteriovenous fistula with perimedullary hypertension: case report  

PubMed Central

Intracranial dural arteriovenous fistulas are abnormal communications between higher-pressure arterial circulation and lower-pressure venous circulation. This abnormal communication can result in important and frequently misdiagnosed neurological abnormalities. A case of rapid onset paraplegia following cervical chiropractic manipulation is reviewed. The patient’s generalized spinal cord edema, lower extremity paraplegia and upper extremity weakness, were initially believed to be a complication of the cervical spinal manipulation that had occurred earlier on the day of admission. Subsequent diagnostic testing determined the patient suffered from impaired circulation of the cervical spinal cord produced by a Type V intracranial arteriovenous fistula and resultant venous hypertension in the pontomesencephalic and anterior spinal veins. The clinical and imaging findings of an intracranial dural arteriovenous fistula with pontomesencephalic venous congestion and paraplegia are reviewed. This case report emphasizes the importance of thorough and serial diagnostic imaging in the presence of sudden onset paraplegia and the potential for error when concluding atypical neurological presentations are the result of therapeutic misadventure.

2013-01-01

130

How far can complementary and alternative medicine go? The case of chiropractic and homeopathy.  

PubMed

This paper examines the efforts of two complementary and alternative occupations, chiropractors and homeopaths, to move from the margins to the mainstream in health care in the province of Ontario. We use a variety of theoretical perspectives to understand how health occupations professionalize: the trait functionalist framework, social closure, the system of professions, and the concept of countervailing powers. The research traces the strategies that the leaders of the two groups are employing, as well as the resources they are able to marshal. These are analyzed within the context of the larger institutional and cultural environment. The data are derived from in-person interviews with 16 leaders (10 chiropractic and 6 homeopathic) identified through professional associations, teaching institutions and informants from the groups. The responses were analyzed with qualitative content analysis. We also used archival materials to document what the leaders were telling us. The data revealed four main strategies: (1) improving the quality of educational programs, (2) elevating standards of practice, (3) developing more peer reviewed research, and (4) increasing group cohesion. Although both groups identified similar strategies, the chiropractors were bolstered by more resources as well as state sanctioned regulation. The efforts of the homeopaths were constrained by scarce resources and the absence of self-regulation. In both cases the lack of strong structural support from government and the established health professions played an important role in limiting what was possible. In the future, it may be to the state's advantage to modify the overall shape of health care to include alternative paradigms of healing along with conventional medical care. Such a shift would put complementary and alternative medicine occupations in a better position to advance professionally and become formal elements of the established health care system. PMID:16926065

Kelner, Merrijoy; Wellman, Beverly; Welsh, Sandy; Boon, Heather

2006-11-01

131

Upper extremity deep vein thrombosis presenting to a chiropractic clinic: a description of 2 cases  

PubMed Central

Objective The purpose of this case series is to describe the presentation of 2 patients who presented to a chiropractic teaching clinic with Paget-Schroetter syndrome (PSS) and to discuss the potential role for conservative therapy in the management of symptoms. Clinical Features Two patients presented with a vascular and muscular findings suggesting activity-related upper extremity deep vein thrombosis. One patient presented with recent onset of symptoms (pain in the neck with a “pinched nerve sensation” in the left upper trapezius); and the other presented with chronic, low-grade neck pain of 1 year's duration. Intervention and Outcome The initial treatment approach for the patient with acute symptoms included soft tissue therapy. During the second appointment, he was immediately referred for medical evaluation and management because of worsening symptoms. He was diagnosed with thrombus in the left brachial vein, started immediately on a thrombolytic agent, and referred to a thrombosis clinic. Treatment for the second patient with chronic symptoms included soft tissue therapy, spinal manipulative therapy, and active care. Two months after 3 treatments, she reported improved symptoms. She remains under supportive care and has reported continued relief of her symptoms. Conclusion Although a rare condition, PSS has the potential to result in significant morbidity and potentially fatal complications; thus, it is critical that practitioners recognize the signs and symptoms to facilitate appropriate and timely referrals. Clinicians should be aware of the presentation and proposed pathogenesis of PSS, and consider this diagnosis in patients with unilateral upper limb and/or neck pain.

Stainsby, Brynne E.; Muir, Bradley J.; Miners, Andrew L.

2012-01-01

132

Mixed-Methods Research in a Complex Multisite VA Health Services Study: Variations in the Implementation and Characteristics of Chiropractic Services in VA.  

PubMed

Maximizing the quality and benefits of newly established chiropractic services represents an important policy and practice goal for the US Department of Veterans Affairs' healthcare system. Understanding the implementation process and characteristics of new chiropractic clinics and the determinants and consequences of these processes and characteristics is a critical first step in guiding quality improvement. This paper reports insights and lessons learned regarding the successful application of mixed methods research approaches-insights derived from a study of chiropractic clinic implementation and characteristics, Variations in the Implementation and Characteristics of Chiropractic Services in VA (VICCS). Challenges and solutions are presented in areas ranging from selection and recruitment of sites and participants to the collection and analysis of varied data sources. The VICCS study illustrates the importance of several factors in successful mixed-methods approaches, including (1) the importance of a formal, fully developed logic model to identify and link data sources, variables, and outcomes of interest to the study's analysis plan and its data collection instruments and codebook and (2) ensuring that data collection methods, including mixed-methods, match study aims. Overall, successful application of a mixed-methods approach requires careful planning, frequent trade-offs, and complex coding and analysis. PMID:24489589

Khorsan, Raheleh; Cohen, Angela B; Lisi, Anthony J; Smith, Monica M; Delevan, Deborah; Armstrong, Courtney; Mittman, Brian S

2013-01-01

133

Chiropractic care for patients with acute neck pain: results of a pragmatic practice-based feasibility study?  

PubMed Central

Abstract Objective The purpose of this study was to determine the feasibility of a chiropractic practice-based research network to investigate the treatment of acute neck pain (ANP) and to report resulting findings. Methods Participating chiropractors recruited sequentially presenting ANP patients on their initial visit to the office. Patients were treated by the chiropractors using their usual methods. Data were prospectively collected by having patients complete the Neck Disability Index, Characteristic Pain Intensity score, and a patient satisfaction questionnaire. Questionnaires were completed during routine office visits at baseline and then at weeks 1, 2, 4, 8, and 26, either in the office or by mail. Results Ten chiropractors supplied data on 99 patients. The number of cases contributed by each of the participating chiropractors ranged from 1 to 54, with a mean (SD) of 9.2 (10.5). Mean (SD) Neck Disability Index scores were 36 (17.9) at baseline and 9.8 (12.2) at the final evaluation; the Characteristic Pain Intensity scores were initially 55.3 (20.4) and were 24.5 (21.5) at the final evaluation. Transient minimal adverse effects were reported by chiropractors for only 7 (7.8%) patients. No serious adverse reactions were reported. Conclusion The practice-based research methodology used in this study appears to be a feasible way to investigate chiropractic care for ANP, and its methodologies could be used to plan future research.

Haneline, Michael T.; Cooperstein, Robert

2009-01-01

134

Faculty Perception of and Resistance to Online Education in the Fields of Acupuncture, Chiropractic, and Massage Therapy  

PubMed Central

This paper reports findings of a research study undertaken to determine the attitudes and perceptions of acupuncture, chiropractic, and massage therapy faculty with regard to online learning within their respective disciplines, and to determine how they might be persuaded to teach online. The study surveyed faculty teaching at schools in these three fields and followed up with additional interviews. The study results indicate that, in general, acupuncture, chiropractic, and massage therapy faculty lack awareness of the capabilities of online education and the elements of good online learning. There is also a perception that what they teach cannot be taught online because of its kinesthetic requirements. The faculty hold this perception in spite of the success of medical science and related health care fields in the online environment, and they do not seem to separate the kinesthetic from the didactic. The present study indicates that faculty opinions about online instruction in this alternative type of education range from being willing to look at the potential of online education to outright dismissing it.

Schwartz, Jan

2010-01-01

135

Knowledge and application of correct car seat head restraint usage among chiropractic college interns: a cross-sectional study  

PubMed Central

Summary of background data Cervical spine injuries sustained in rear-end crashes cost at least $7 billion in insurance claims annually in the United States alone. When positioned correctly, head restraint systems have been proven effective in reducing the risk of whiplash associated disorders. Chiropractors should be knowledgeable about the correct use of head restraint systems to educate their patients and thereby prevent or minimize such injuries. Objectives The primary objective of this study was to determine the prevalence of correct positioning of car seat head restraints among the interns at our institution. The secondary objective was to determine the same chiropractic interns’ knowledge of the correct positioning of car seat head restraints. It was hypothesized that 100 percent of interns would have their head restraint correctly positioned within an acceptable range and that all interns would possess the knowledge to instruct patients in the correct positioning of head restraints. Study Design Cross-sectional study of a convenient sample of 30 chiropractic interns from one institution. Methods Interns driving into the parking lot of our health center were asked to volunteer to have measurements taken and to complete a survey. Vertical and horizontal positions of the head restraint were measured using a beam compass. A survey was administered to determine knowledge of correct head restraint position. The results were recorded, entered into a spreadsheet, and analyzed. Results 13.3 percent of subjects knew the recommended vertical distance and only 20 percent of subjects knew the recommended horizontal distance. Chi Square analyses substantiated that the majority of subjects were unaware of guidelines set forth by the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA) for the correct positioning of the head restraint (?2vertical = 16.13, ?2horizontal = 10.80, p <.05). Only 6.7 percent of the subjects positioned their head restraint at the vertical distance of 6 cm or less (p <.05). However, 60 percent of the subjects positioned their head restraint at the recommended horizontal distance of 7 cm or less, but this was no different than could be expected by chance alone (p >.05). Interestingly, the 13.3 percent of the subjects who were aware of the vertical plane recommendations did not correctly position their own head restraint in the vertical plane. Similarly, only half of the subjects who were aware of the horizontal plane recommendations correctly positioned their head restraint in the horizontal plane. The data suggest that chance alone could account for the correct positioning of the head restraint in our subjects. Conclusions The results of this cross-sectional study raise concerns about chiropractic intern knowledge and application of correct head restraint positioning. The importance of chiropractors informing patients of the correct head restraint position should be emphasized in chiropractic education to help minimize or prevent injury in patients involved in motor vehicle collisions.

Taylor, John AM; Burke, Jeanmarie; Gavencak, John; Panwar, Pervinder

2005-01-01

136

Annotated bibliography of the biomedical literature pertaining to chiropractic, pediatrics and manipulation in relation to the treatment of health conditions  

PubMed Central

Biomedical literature retrieval, both indexed and non-indexed, with respect to the application of manipulative therapy with therapeutic intent and pediatric health conditions (ages 0 to 17 years) yielded 66 discrete documents which met specified inclusion and exclusion criteria. There was one experimental study (RCT’s), 3 observational (cohort, case control) studies and 62 descriptive studies (case series, case reports, surveys, literature reviews). An independent rating panel determined consistency with a modified quality of evidence scale adopted from procedure ratings system 1 of Clinical Guidelines for Chiropractic Practice in Canada. Results indicate minimal Class 1 and Class 2 and some Class 3 evidence for a variety of pediatric conditions utilizing the application of manipulation with therapeutic intent.

Gotlib, Allan C; Beingessner, Melanie

1995-01-01

137

Physical injury assessment of male versus female chiropractic students when learning and performing various adjustive techniques: a preliminary investigative study  

PubMed Central

Background Reports of musculoskeletal injuries that some chiropractic students experienced while in the role of adjustor became increasingly evident and developed into the basis of this study. The main objective of this study was to survey a select student population and identify, by gender, the specific types of musculoskeletal injuries they experienced when learning adjustive techniques in the classroom, and performing them in the clinical setting. Methods A survey was developed to record musculoskeletal injuries that students reported to have sustained while practicing chiropractic adjustment set-ups and while delivering adjustments. The survey was modeled from similar instruments used in the university's clinic as well as those used in professional practice. Stratified sampling was used to obtain participants for the study. Data reported the anatomical areas of injury, adjustive technique utilized, the type of injury received, and the recovery time from sustained injuries. The survey also inquired as to the type and area of any past physical injuries as well as the mechanism(s) of injury. Results Data obtained from the study identified injuries of the shoulder, wrist, elbow, neck, low back, and mid-back. The low back was the most common injury site reported by females, and the neck was the most common site reported by males. The reported wrist injuries in both genders were 1% male complaints and 17% female complaints. A total of 13% of female respondents reported shoulder injuries, whereas less than 1% of male respondents indicated similar complaints. Conclusion The data collected from the project indicated that obtaining further information on the subject would be worthwhile, and could provide an integral step toward developing methods of behavior modification in an attempt to reduce and/or prevent the incidence of musculoskeletal injuries.

Bisiacchi, Debra W; Huber, Laura L

2006-01-01

138

Degree of Vertical Integration Between the Undergraduate Program and Clinical Internship With Respect to Cervical and Cranial Diagnostic and Therapeutic Procedures Taught at the Canadian Memorial Chiropractic College  

PubMed Central

Objective: The purpose of this study was to determine if diagnostic and therapeutic procedures for the cervical and cranial spine taught to students during the undergraduate program at Canadian Memorial Chiropractic College are required to be used during their internship by their supervising clinicians and, if so, to what extent these procedures are used. Methods: Course manuals and course syllabi from the Applied Chiropractic and Clinical Diagnosis faculty of the undergraduate chiropractic program for the academic year 2009–2010 were consulted and a list of all diagnostic and therapeutic procedures for the cranial and cervical spine was compiled. This survey asked clinicians to indicate if they themselves used or if they required the students they were supervising to use each procedure listed and, if so, to what extent each procedure was used. Demographic information of each clinician was also obtained. Results: In general, most diagnostic procedures of the head and neck were seldom used, with the exception of postural observation and palpation. By contrast, most cervical orthopaedic tests were often used, with the exception of tests for vertigo. Most therapeutic procedures were used frequently with the exception of prone cervical and “muscle” adjustments. Conclusion: There was a low degree of vertical integration for cranial procedures as compared to a much higher degree of vertical integration for cervical procedures between the undergraduate and clinical internship programs taught. Vertical integration is an important element of curricular planning and these results may be helpful to aid educators to more appropriately allocate classroom instruction

Leppington, Charmody; Gleberzon, Brian; Fortunato, Lisa; Doucet, Nicolea; Vandervalk, Kyle

2012-01-01

139

Publication rates of abstracts presented at the Association of Chiropractic Colleges Educational Conference/Research Agenda Conference from 2002 to 2008.  

PubMed

Objective : The purposes of this study were to investigate the overall publication rates of presentations at the Association of Chiropractic Colleges Educational Conference/Research Agenda Conference (ACC/RAC) meetings (2002-2008), differences in the publication rates of platform vs poster presentations, and the consistency of the meeting abstract compared to the full-length journal article. Methods : Abstracts were obtained from proceedings published in the Journal of Chiropractic Education. Literature searches using PubMed and the Index to the Chiropractic Literature (ICL) were performed to locate peer-reviewed journal articles based upon those abstracts. Whether the article was based upon a poster or platform presentation, and the congruence of the information in the abstract and article were recorded. Results : We identified 776 proceeding abstracts, 249 of which eventually were published between 2002 and 2012. The overall publication rate was 32.2%. A total of 42.7% of platform presentations eventually were published vs 20.3% of posters. Congruency showed that 43.2% had the same title as the meeting abstract, 59.7% had the same authorship, and 88.8% had the same methods. Conclusion : Publication rates of abstracts from spine and orthopedic surgery national meetings range from 34% to 59%. The ACC/RAC meetings have similar publication rates. More platform than poster presentations reach full publication. The congruency of ACC/RAC abstracts to published articles is higher than national meetings in other fields. PMID:24295363

Bakkum, Barclay W; Chapman, Cynthia; Johnson, Claire

2014-01-01

140

Publication rates of abstracts presented at the Association of Chiropractic Colleges Educational Conference/Research Agenda Conference from 2002 to 2008  

PubMed Central

Objective The purposes of this study were to investigate the overall publication rates of presentations at the Association of Chiropractic Colleges Educational Conference/Research Agenda Conference (ACC/RAC) meetings (2002–2008), differences in the publication rates of platform vs poster presentations, and the consistency of the meeting abstract compared to the full-length journal article. Methods Abstracts were obtained from proceedings published in the Journal of Chiropractic Education. Literature searches using PubMed and the Index to the Chiropractic Literature (ICL) were performed to locate peer-reviewed journal articles based upon those abstracts. Whether the article was based upon a poster or platform presentation, and the congruence of the information in the abstract and article were recorded. Results We identified 776 proceeding abstracts, 249 of which eventually were published between 2002 and 2012. The overall publication rate was 32.2%. A total of 42.7% of platform presentations eventually were published vs 20.3% of posters. Congruency showed that 43.2% had the same title as the meeting abstract, 59.7% had the same authorship, and 88.8% had the same methods. Conclusion Publication rates of abstracts from spine and orthopedic surgery national meetings range from 34% to 59%. The ACC/RAC meetings have similar publication rates. More platform than poster presentations reach full publication. The congruency of ACC/RAC abstracts to published articles is higher than national meetings in other fields.

Bakkum, Barclay W.; Chapman, Cynthia; Johnson, Claire

2014-01-01

141

Collaborative Care for Older Adults with low back pain by family medicine physicians and doctors of chiropractic (COCOA): study protocol for a randomized controlled trial  

PubMed Central

Background Low back pain is a prevalent and debilitating condition that affects the health and quality of life of older adults. Older people often consult primary care physicians about back pain, with many also receiving concurrent care from complementary and alternative medicine providers, most commonly doctors of chiropractic. However, a collaborative model of treatment coordination between these two provider groups has yet to be tested. The primary aim of the Collaborative Care for Older Adults Clinical Trial is to develop and evaluate the clinical effectiveness and feasibility of a patient-centered, collaborative care model with family medicine physicians and doctors of chiropractic for the treatment of low back pain in older adults. Methods/design This pragmatic, pilot randomized controlled trial will enroll 120 participants, age 65 years or older with subacute or chronic low back pain lasting at least one month, from a community-based sample in the Quad-Cities, Iowa/Illinois, USA. Eligible participants are allocated in a 1:1:1 ratio to receive 12 weeks of medical care, concurrent medical and chiropractic care, or collaborative medical and chiropractic care. Primary outcomes are self-rated back pain and disability. Secondary outcomes include general and functional health status, symptom bothersomeness, expectations for treatment effectiveness and improvement, fear avoidance behaviors, depression, anxiety, satisfaction, medication use and health care utilization. Treatment safety and adverse events also are monitored. Participant-rated outcome measures are collected via self-reported questionnaires and computer-assisted telephone interviews at baseline, and at 4, 8, 12, 24, 36 and 52 weeks post-randomization. Provider-rated expectations for treatment effectiveness and participant improvement also are evaluated. Process outcomes are assessed through qualitative interviews with study participants and research clinicians, chart audits of progress notes and content analysis of clinical trial notes. Discussion This pragmatic, pilot randomized controlled trial uses a mixed method approach to evaluate the clinical effectiveness, feasibility, and participant and provider perceptions of collaborative care between medical doctors and doctors of chiropractic in the treatment of older adults with low back pain. Trial registration This trial registered in ClinicalTrials.gov on 04 March 2011 with the ID number of NCT01312233.

2013-01-01

142

Symptomatic reactions, clinical outcomes and patient satisfaction associated with upper cervical chiropractic care: A prospective, multicenter, cohort study  

PubMed Central

Background Observational studies have previously shown that adverse events following manipulation to the neck and/or back are relatively common, although these reactions tend to be mild in intensity and self-limiting. However, no prospective study has examined the incidence of adverse reactions following spinal adjustments using upper cervical techniques, and the impact of this care on clinical outcomes. Methods Consecutive new patients from the offices of 83 chiropractors were recruited for this practice-based study. Clinical outcome measures included 1) Neck pain disability index (100-point scale), 2) Oswestry back pain index (100-point scale), 3) 11-point numerical rating scale (NRS) for neck, headache, midback, and low back pain, 4) treatment satisfaction, and 5) Symptomatic Reactions (SR). Data were collected at baseline, and after approximately 2 weeks of care. A patient reaching sub-clinical status for pain and disability was defined as a follow-up score <3 NRS and <10%, respectively. A SR is defined as a new complaint not present at baseline or a worsening of the presenting complaint by >30% based on an 11-point numeric rating scale occurring <24 hours after any upper cervical procedure. Results A total of 1,090 patients completed the study having 4,920 (4.5 per patient) office visits requiring 2,653 (2.4 per patient) upper cervical adjustments over 17 days. Three hundred thirty- eight (31.0%) patients had SRs meeting the accepted definition. Intense SR (NRS ?8) occurred in 56 patients (5.1%). Outcome assessments were significantly improved for neck pain and disability, headache, mid-back pain, as well as lower back pain and disability (p <0.001) following care with a high level (mean = 9.1/10) of patient satisfaction. The 83 chiropractors administered >5 million career upper cervical adjustments without a reported incidence of serious adverse event. Conclusions Upper cervical chiropractic care may have a fairly common occurrence of mild intensity SRs short in duration (<24 hours), and rarely severe in intensity; however, outcome assessments were significantly improved with less than 3 weeks of care with a high level of patient satisfaction. Although our findings need to be confirmed in subsequent randomized studies for definitive risk-benefit assessment, the preliminary data shows that the benefits of upper cervical chiropractic care may outweigh the potential risks.

2011-01-01

143

Rehabilitation -- a valuable consideration in acute and chronic neck and low back pain in addition to standard chiropractic management: a case study  

PubMed Central

A case of chronic neck and low back pain, resistant to standard chiropractic management of manipulation/adjustment and verbal exercise instruction is presented. Identification of psychosocial factors and deconditioning, with a subsequent three month program of in-office rehabilitation including supervised progressive/resistance exercises and behavioural therapy was administered in conjunction with spinal manipulation/adjustment and passive modalities. The program proved effective in reducing the patient’s neck and low back pain. The beneficial effect of supervised exercises and behavioural therapy in patient management is illustrated.

Mizel, Dennis H

1999-01-01

144

The effect of a sports chiropractic manual therapy intervention on the prevention of back pain, hamstring and lower limb injuries in semi-elite Australian Rules footballers: a randomized controlled trial  

Microsoft Academic Search

BACKGROUND: Hamstring injuries are the most common injury in Australian Rules football. It was the aims to investigate whether a sports chiropractic manual therapy intervention protocol provided in addition to the current best practice management could prevent the occurrence of and weeks missed due to hamstring and other lower-limb injuries at the semi-elite level of Australian football. METHODS: Sixty male

Wayne Hoskins; Henry Pollard

2010-01-01

145

Chiropractic management using a brain-based model of care for a 15-year-old adolescent boy with migraine headaches and behavioral and learning difficulties: a case report  

PubMed Central

Objective The purpose of this report is to describe chiropractic management, using a brain-based model of care, of a teen who had migraine headaches and several social and learning difficulties. Clinical features A 15-year-old adolescent boy with a chronic history of migraines and more than 10 years of learning and behavioral difficulties, including attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder, obsessive compulsive disorder, and Tourette syndrome, presented for chiropractic care. Intervention and outcome The patient received spinal manipulation and was given home physical coordination activities that were contralateral to the side of the involved basal ganglia and ipsilateral to the involved cerebellum, along with interactive metronome training. Quantitative changes were noted in neurological soft signs, tests of variables of attention Conners’ Parent Rating Scale, the California Achievement Test, grade point, and reduction of medications. The patient reported qualitative improvements in tics, attention, reading, vision, health, relationships with his peers and his family, and self-esteem. Conclusion The patient with migraine headaches and learning difficulties responded well to the course of chiropractic care. This study suggests that there may be value in a brain-based model of care in the chiropractic management of conditions that are beyond musculoskeletal in nature.

Kuhn, Kurt W.; Cambron, Jerrilyn

2013-01-01

146

Outcomes of pregnant patients with low back pain undergoing chiropractic treatment: a prospective cohort study with short term, medium term and 1 year follow-up  

PubMed Central

Background Low back pain in pregnancy is common and research evidence on the response to chiropractic treatment is limited. The purposes of this study are 1) to report outcomes in pregnant patients receiving chiropractic treatment; 2) to compare outcomes from subgroups; 3) to assess predictors of outcome. Methods Pregnant patients with low back or pelvic pain, no contraindications to manipulative therapy and no manual therapy in the prior 3 months were recruited. Baseline numerical rating scale (NRS) and Oswestry questionnaire data were collected. Duration of complaint, number of previous LBP episodes, LBP during a previous pregnancy, and category of pain location were recorded. The patient’s global impression of change (PGIC) (primary outcome), NRS, and Oswestry data (secondary outcomes) were collected at 1 week, 1 and 3 months after the first treatment. At 6 months and 1 year the PGIC and NRS scores were collected. PGIC responses of ‘better’ or ‘much better’ were categorized as ‘improved’. The proportion of patients ‘improved’ at each time point was calculated. Chi-squared test compared subgroups with ‘improvement’. Baseline and follow-up NRS and Oswestry scores were compared using the paired t-test. The unpaired t-test compared NRS and Oswestry scores in patients with and without a history of LBP and with and without LBP during a previous pregnancy. Anova compared baseline and follow-up NRS and Oswestry scores by pain location category and category of number of previous LBP episodes. Logistic regression analysis also was also performed. Results 52% of 115 recruited patients ‘improved’ at 1 week, 70% at 1 month, 85% at 3 months, 90% at 6 months and 88% at 1 year. There were significant reductions in NRS and Oswestry scores (p?chiropractic treatment reported clinically relevant improvement at all time points. No single variable was strongly predictive of, improvement’ in the logistic regression model.

2014-01-01

147

The rationale for primary spine care employing biopsychosocial, stratified and diagnosis-based care-pathways at a chiropractic college public clinic: a literature review  

PubMed Central

Current management practices for low back pain have led to rising costs without evidence of improvement in the quality of care. Low back pain remains a diagnostic and management challenge for practitioners of many types and is now thought to be a leading global cause of disability. Beyond many published clinical practice guidelines, there are emerging, evidence-based care-pathways including stratification according to the patient's prognosis, classification-based management, diagnosis-based clinical decision guides and biopsychosocial models of care. A proposed solution for successfully addressing low back pain is to train residents at a chiropractic college public clinic to function as primary spine care practitioners, employing evidence-based care-pathways. The rationale for such is described with expected benefits to patient care, improved financial health of medical delivery systems and the training of chiropractors to successfully fill a niche in the healthcare system.

2013-01-01

148

Brief screening questions for depression in chiropractic patients with low back pain: identification of potentially useful questions and test of their predictive capacity  

PubMed Central

Background Depression is an important prognostic factor in low back pain (LBP) that appears to be infrequent in chiropractic populations. Identification of depression in few patients would consequently implicate screening of many. It is therefore desirable to have brief screening tools for depression. The objective of this study was to investigate if one or two items from the Major Depression Inventory (MDI) could be a reasonable substitute for the complete scale. Methods The MDI was completed by 925 patients consulting a chiropractor due to a new episode of LBP. Outcome measures were LBP intensity and activity limitation at 3-months and 12-months follow-up. Single items on the MDI that correlated strongest and explained most variance in the total score were tested for associations with outcome. Finally, the predictive capacity was compared between the total scale and the items that showed the strongest associations with outcome measures. Results In this cohort 9% had signs of depression. The total MDI was significantly associated with outcome but explained very little of the variance in outcome. Four single items performed comparable to the total scale as prognostic factors. Items 1 and 3 explained the most variance in all outcome measures, and their predictive accuracies in terms of area under the curve were at least as high as for the categorised complete scale. Conclusions Baseline depression measured by the MDI was associated with a worse outcome in chiropractic patients with LBP. A single item (no. 1 or 3) was a reasonable substitute for the entire scale when screening for depression as a prognostic factor.

2014-01-01

149

Perspectives of older adults on co-management of low back pain by doctors of chiropractic and family medicine physicians: a focus group study  

PubMed Central

Background While older adults may seek care for low back pain (LBP) from both medical doctors (MDs) and doctors of chiropractic (DCs), co-management between these providers is uncommon. The purposes of this study were to describe the preferences of older adults for LBP co-management by MDs and DCs and to identify their concerns for receiving care under such a treatment model. Methods We conducted 10 focus groups with 48 older adults who received LBP care in the past year. Interviews explored participants’ care seeking experiences, co-management preferences, and perceived challenges to successful implementation of a MD-DC co-management model. We analyzed the qualitative data using thematic content analysis. Results Older adults considered LBP co-management by MDs and DCs a positive approach as the professions have complementary strengths. Participants wanted providers who worked in a co-management model to talk openly and honestly about LBP, offer clear and consistent recommendations about treatment, and provide individualized care. Facilitators of MD-DC co-management included collegial relationships between providers, arrangements between doctors to support interdisciplinary referral, computer systems that allowed exchange of health information between clinics, and practice settings where providers worked in one location. Perceived barriers to the co-management of LBP included the financial costs associated with receiving care from multiple providers concurrently, duplication of tests or imaging, scheduling and transportation problems, and potential side effects of medication and chiropractic care. A few participants expressed concern that some providers would not support a patient-preferred co-managed care model. Conclusions Older adults are interested in receiving LBP treatment co-managed by MDs and DCs. Older adults considered patient-centered communication, collegial interdisciplinary interactions between these providers, and administrative supports such as scheduling systems and health record sharing as key components for successful LBP co-management.

2013-01-01

150

Sports chiropractic management of concussions using the Sport Concussion Assessment Tool 2 symptom scoring, serial examinations, and graded return to play protocol: a retrospective case series  

PubMed Central

Objective The purpose of this case series is to report how the symptom section of the Sport Concussion Assessment Tool 2 (SCAT2) was used to manage athletes with concussions in a high school training room setting and to address the need for SCAT2 baseline measurements. Clinical features During a 4-month period, 3 doctors of chiropractic with certification from the American Chiropractic Board of Sports Physicians managed 15 high school athletes with concussions in a multidisciplinary setting. Fourteen athletes were male American football players, and one was a female volleyball player. Intervention and outcome Of the 15 athletes, 3 athletes had baseline SCAT2 documentation. Athletes were evaluated and returned to play with a graded return to play protocol using the SCAT2 symptoms and serial physical examinations. Once participants were asymptomatic, they began a graded return to play process. A total of 47 SCAT2 tests were performed on the 15 athletes, averaging 3.13 SCAT2 evaluations per patient. Of the 15 athletes evaluated, 6 were managed and cleared for return to play; 2 of the athletes sustained concussions in the last week of the season, thus ending their season; and 3 athletes were cleared by medical doctors. None of the athletes under care reported an adverse event. Conclusion The utilization of the SCAT2 with serial physical examinations provided objective measures for athlete’s injuries, allowing the practitioners to evaluate concussions. More efforts are needed to collect baseline SCAT2 to compare these scores with subsequent SCAT2 scores following athletic injuries.

Shane, Eric R.; Pierce, Kevin M.; Gonzalez, Jannet K.; Campbell, Nathan J.

2013-01-01

151

Your First Chiropractic Visit  

MedlinePLUS

... muscle stimulation, ice and heat, traction, soft-tissue massage, and rehabilitative exercises, may also be used. The ... achieve substantial progress. Many factors can affect the healing process. Are you suffering from a chronic problem ...

152

Prevalence of pain-free weeks in chiropractic subjects with low back pain - a longitudinal study using data gathered with text messages  

PubMed Central

Introduction The use of automated text messages has made it possible to identify different courses of low back pain (LBP), and it has been observed that pain often fluctuates and that absolute recovery is rather rare. The purpose of this study was to describe the prevalence of pain-free weeks and pain-free periods in subjects with non-specific LBP treated by chiropractors, and to compare subjects from two different countries in these aspects. Methods Data were obtained from two practice-based multicentre prospective outcome studies, one Danish and one Swedish, involving subjects being treated by chiropractors for non-specific LBP. Over 18 weeks, subjects answered a weekly automated text message question on the number of days in the past week that they had experienced bothersome LBP, i.e. a number between 0 and 7. The number of weeks in a row without any LBP at all ("zero weeks") as well as the maximum number of zero weeks in a row was determined for each individual. Comparisons were made between the two study samples. Estimates are presented as percentages with 95% confidence intervals. Results In the Danish and the Swedish populations respectively, 93/110 (85%) and 233/262 (89%) of the subjects were eligible for analysis. In both groups, zero weeks were rather rare and were most commonly (in 40% of the zero weeks) reported as a single isolated week. The prevalence of pain free periods, i.e. reporting a maximum of 0, 1 or 2, or 3-6 zero weeks in a row, were similar in the two populations (20-31%). Smaller percentages were reported for ? 7 zero weeks in a row. There were no significant differences between the two study groups. Conclusion It was uncommon that chiropractic subjects treated for non-specific LBP experienced an entire week without any LBP at all over 18 weeks. When this occurred, it was most commonly reported for brief periods only. Hence, recovery in the sense that patients become absolutely pain free is rare, even in a primary care population.

2011-01-01

153

Chiropractic: A Safe Treatment Option  

MedlinePLUS

... therapies available for the treatment of back pain, neck pain, joint pain of the arms or legs, headaches, ... pain than a variety of medications. Neck Adjustments Neck pain and some types of headaches are treated through ...

154

Stability: from biomechanical concept to chiropractic practice  

PubMed Central

This paper formalizes stability in a clinician-friendly way and then discusses ways for chiropractors to ensure stability of spinal joints that may have their stability compromized from manipulation. ImagesFigure 1Figure 4Figure 5Figure 6Figure 7

McGill, Stuart M

1999-01-01

155

Chiropractic manipulation in pediatric health conditions - an updated systematic review  

PubMed Central

Objective Our purpose was to review the biomedical literature from January 2004 to June 2007 inclusive to determine the extent of new evidence related to the therapeutic application of manipulation for pediatric health conditions. This updates a previous systematic review published in 2005. No critical appraisal of the evidence is undertaken. Data Sources We searched both the indexed and non-indexed biomedical manual therapy literature. This included PubMed, MANTIS, CINAHL, ICL, as well as reference tracking. Other resources included the Cochrane Library, CCOHTA, PEDro, WHO ICTRP, AMED, EMBASE and AHRQ databases, as well as research conferences and symposium proceedings. Results The search identified 1275 citations of which 57 discrete citations met the eligibility criteria determined by three reviewers who then determined by consensus, each citation's appropriate level on the strength of evidence scale. The new evidence from the relevant time period was 1 systematic review, 1 RCT, 2 observational studies, 36 descriptive case studies and 17 conference abstracts. When this additional evidence is combined with the previous systematic review undertaken up to 2003, there are now in total, 2 systematic reviews, 10 RCT's, 3 observational studies, 177 descriptive studies, and 31 conference abstracts defining this body of knowledge. Summary There has been no substantive shift in this body of knowledge during the past 3 1/2 years. The health claims made by chiropractors with respect to the application of manipulation as a health care intervention for pediatric health conditions continue to be supported by only low levels of scientific evidence. Chiropractors continue to treat a wide variety of pediatric health conditions. The evidence rests primarily with clinical experience, descriptive case studies and very few observational and experimental studies. The health interests of pediatric patients would be advanced if more rigorous scientific inquiry was undertaken to examine the value of manipulative therapy in the treatment of pediatric conditions.

Gotlib, Allan; Rupert, Ron

2008-01-01

156

Chiropractic and Neck Pain: Conservative Care of Cervical Pain, Injury  

MedlinePLUS

... head, normal aging, and everyday wear and tear. Neck pain can be very bothersome, and it can have ... are some of the most typical causes of neck pain: Injury and Accidents: A sudden forced movement of ...

157

The chiropractic management of two cases of cervical spondylotic radiculopathy  

PubMed Central

Cervical spondylotic radiculopathy (CSR) is one of the potential sources of radiculopathy, particularly in patients aged 40 to 60 years. The hallmark sign of cervical-brachial pain presents in the majority of the cases, however a definitive clinical diagnosis is often difficult in the absence of reliable and valid diagnostic tests. Two cases of presumed CSR illustrate the usefulness of applying a comprehensive mechanical assessment that guides the patient's rehabilitation regardless of the traditional anatomical diagnosis. A brief overview of the epidemiology, clinical presentation, and management of CSR is also presented.

Dufton, John A.; Giantomaso, Tony

2003-01-01

158

Manipulative therapy (Feldenkrais, massage, chiropractic manipulation) for neck pain.  

PubMed

Neck pain is an extremely common symptom with many possible etiologies. A substantial number of patients are turning to complementary and alternative medicine (CAM). Low-quality evidence supports the beneficial effects of CAM. Feldenkrais, massage therapy, and spinal manipulation are discussed in detail. Complications are generally benign and self-limited, although occasional catastrophic consequences have been documented. Despite the favorable opinion many rheumatologists have of some CAM therapy, many patients are not disclosing CAM use to their medical providers. By expressing interest, asking questions, and taking a shared-decision-making approach, providers can encourage disclosure and provide valuable input. PMID:23666468

Plastaras, Christopher; Schran, Seth; Kim, Natasha; Darr, Deborah; Chen, Mary Susan

2013-07-01

159

Colin A. Greenshields, DC: the Canadian Memorial Chiropractic College's first graduate  

PubMed Central

This biographical study investigates the complex tribulations and impressive accomplishments of Dr. Colin Greenshields. Part I (the Formative Years) goes back to his ancestors in Great Britain and forward to his graduation from CMCC in 1948. Part II (the Professional Years) begins with the opening of Colin’s office in St. Catharines, ON, and proceeds through his professional career and multiple leadership roles to his retirement in 1986.

Brown, Douglas M.

2012-01-01

160

Reflex control of the spine and posture: a review of the literature from a chiropractic perspective  

Microsoft Academic Search

OBJECTIVE: This review details the anatomy and interactions of the postural and somatosensory reflexes. We attempt to identify the important role the nervous system plays in maintaining reflex control of the spine and posture. We also review, illustrate, and discuss how the human vertebral column develops, functions, and adapts to Earth's gravity in an upright position. We identify functional characteristics

Mark W Morningstar; Burl R Pettibon; Heidi Schlappi; Mark Schlappi; Trevor V Ireland

2005-01-01

161

Gross Anatomy Instruction in Chiropractic Colleges: A Local and Global Perspective  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This resource is part of the AAA Education and Teaching Session. In particular this resource is a pdf of the presentation from the AAA 2012 Anatomical Education for Allied Health Care Professionals Seminar.

Jennette Ball (New York Chiropractic College Department of Basic Sciences)

2012-04-21

162

Comparison of chiropractic student scores before and after utilizing active learning techniques in a classroom setting  

PubMed Central

Objective We report the differences in final examination scores achieved by students at the culmination of two different teaching strategies in an introductory skills course. Methods Multiple choice examination scores from six consecutive academic calendar sessions over 18 months (n = 503) were compared. Two groups were used: Cohort A (n = 290) represented students who were enrolled in the course 3 consecutive academic sessions before an instructional change and Cohort B (n = 213) included students who were enrolled in 3 consecutive academic sessions following the instructional change, which included a more active learning format. Statistical analyses used were 2-tailed independent t-test, one-way ANOVA, Tukey's honestly significant difference (HSD), and effect size. Results The 2-tailed independent t-test revealed a significant difference between the two groups (t = ?3.71, p < .001; 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.29–4.20). Significant difference was found in the highest performing subgroup compared to the lowest performing subgroup in Cohort A (F = 3.343, p = .037). For Cohort A subgroups 1 and 2, Tukey's HSD was p < .028. In Cohort B, no difference was found among subgroups (F = 1.912, p = .150, HSD p > .105). Conclusion Compared to previous versions of the same course taught by the same instructor, the students in the new course design performed better, suggesting that using active learning techniques helps improve student achievement.

Guagliardo, Joseph G.; Hoiriis, Kathryn T.

2013-01-01

163

Herbal and nutrient supplementation practices of chiropractic patients: an Australian case study  

Microsoft Academic Search

BackgroundEscalating interest in alternative health care has resulted in increased use of nutritional supplements and herbs by consumers. A number of these neutraceuticals interact with prescription drugs and may have adverse effects.

Jennifer R. Jamison

2003-01-01

164

The Impact Of Subluxation Correction On Mental Health: Reduction Of Anxiety In A Female Patient Under Chiropractic Care  

Microsoft Academic Search

Objective: This case report reviews the application of chiro- practic care for the purpose of subluxation correction in a 19 year old female diagnosed with a mental health disorder, Gen- eral Anxiety Disorder (GAD). Clinical Features: In November 1999 the patient first expe- rienced symptoms of dizziness, trembling, sweating, heart pal- pitations, sleep deprivation, poor concentration, depersonal- ization, and headaches.

Madeline Behrendt; Nathan Olsen

165

Evaluation of the steps for implementation of electronic health records for a small chiropractic practice in Northern Michigan  

PubMed Central

Objective The purpose of this article is to use the steps described by Genson and Chun for implementation of electronic health records to determine the plausibility of implementation in a small private practice in northern Michigan. Discussion A step by step approach was applied as described by Genson and Chun, which included discovery, planning, procurement, implementation, and support. Several challenges and obstacles were identified. Conclusion Electronic health records will eventually be a necessity, but they may not have matured enough to easily replace paper charts or to justify the expense for a single-doctor practice at this time. Each doctor should evaluate the needs of his or her practice for implementing electronic health records and weigh benefits and drawbacks prior to considering implementation.

McGregor, Daniel M.

2010-01-01

166

78 FR 48904 - United States v. Chiropractic Associates, Ltd. of South Dakota; Public Comment and Response on...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...this case and issue substantial monetary penalties for the illegal action by CASD, its owners and associates. I maintain my anonymity because of potential retaliation from the owner(s) of CASD. [FR Doc. 2013-19384 Filed 8-9-13; 8:45 am]...

2013-08-12

167

Increasing research capacity in the chiropractic profession: A case study and evaluation of an innovative research program in Norway  

PubMed Central

Objective The subject of research methods is not commonly covered in continuing professional development (CPD) courses in spite of its emphasis in undergraduate education. This initiative aimed to develop postgraduate research competency and recruit chiropractors to musculoskeletal research. Methods The program was delivered as a university-based program with 20 credits over seven contact weekends covering topics of evidence-based practice, research methods, statistics, ethics, resources, and funding. Students were assessed through assignments showing competency in critical literature review, case report writing, and production of a research protocol as the final assessment. Non-student participation for CPD points was possible. A student evaluation survey was completed after the end of the academic year. Results There were 26 participants: 16 as students handing in assignments, 10 as non-student participants for up to 94 CPD points. Three submitted a final protocol and two registered at a university PhD program. A network of research clinics was established for data collection for future multicenter studies. Conclusions The program was well received by the participants and gave them the tools and resources to perform research. The two-level attendance system afforded a basis for setting up a network of research clinics with a fundamental understanding of optimal data collection. This initiative has shown that research skills can be revisited through CPD programs as part of evidence-based lifelong learning.

Lothe, Lise R.; Bolton, Jennifer E.

2013-01-01

168

Fostering critical thinking skills: a strategy for enhancing evidence based wellness care  

Microsoft Academic Search

Chiropractic has traditionally regarded itself a wellness profession. As wellness care is postulated to play a central role in the future growth of chiropractic, the development of a wellness ethos acceptable within conventional health care is desirable. This paper describes a unit which prepares chiropractic students for the role of \\

Jennifer R Jamison

2005-01-01

169

Correlation Between Student Performances on Course Level Integrated Clinical Skills Examinations and Objective Structured Clinical Examinations in a Chiropractic College Program  

PubMed Central

Purpose: This retrospective study measured correlation of student performance between 2 objective structured clinical examinations (OSCEs) and an introductory integrated clinical skills course that preceded the OSCEs. The hypothesis was that there would be a strong, positive correlation between the earlier level examinations and the upper level OSCE, high enough that earlier examinations could be viewed as predictors of upper level OSCE performance. Methods: Using student scores for 5 academic terms of upper level OSCEs for 2008–2009 (n = 208) and respective earlier scores, correlation coefficients were calculated for the upper level OSCE and Clinical Skills course, and upper and lower level OSCEs. Multiple linear regression analysis was used to evaluate how well the lower level OSCE and clinical skills scores, both as lone and combined independent variables, predicted the upper level OSCE scores. Results: There was at least a moderate correlation between both sets of scores: r = .51 (p < .001) between upper level OSCE and clinical skills course, r = .54 (p < .001) between the upper and lower level OSCEs. A combination of clinical skills and lower level OSCE scores suggested a moderate prediction of upper level OSCE scores (R2 = .38.) Conclusions: Correlations were found to be of at least a moderate level. According to linear regression analysis, a combination of the earlier scores was moderately predictive for the upper level OSCE. More research could be done to determine additional components of student performance.

Russell, Brent S.; Hoiriis, Kathryn T.; Guagliardo, Joseph

2012-01-01

170

A descriptive report of management strategies used by chiropractors, as reviewed by a single independent chiropractic consultant in the Australian workers compensation system  

Microsoft Academic Search

BACKGROUND: In New South Wales, Australia, an injured worker enters the workers compensation system with the case often managed by a pre-determined insurer. The goal of the treating practitioner is to facilitate the claimant to return to suitable duties and progress to their pre-injury status, job and quality of life. Currently, there is very little documentation on the management of

Henry Pollard; Katie de Luca

2009-01-01

171

INCREASING THE CERVICAL LORDOSIS WITH CHIROPRACTIC BIOPHYSICS SEATED COMBINED EXTENSION-COMPRESSION AND TRANSVERSE LOAD CERVICAL TRACTION WITH CERVICAL MANIPULATION: NONRANDOMIZED CLINICAL CONTROL TRIAL  

Microsoft Academic Search

Background: Cervical lordosis has been shown to be an important outcome of care; however, few conservative methods of rehabilitating sagittal cervical alignment have been reported. Objective: To study whether a seated, retracted, extended, and compressed position would cause tension in the anterior cervical ligament, anterior disk, and muscle structures, and thereby restore cervical lordosis or increase the curvature in patients

Deed E. Harrison; Donald D. Harrison; Joeseph J. Betz; Tadeusz J. Janik; Burt Holland; Christopher J. Colloca; Jason W. Haas

172

A Randomized Trial of Chiropractic Manipulation and Mobilization for Patients With Neck Pain: Clinical Outcomes From the UCLA Neck-Pain Study  

PubMed Central

Objectives. This study compared the relative effectiveness of cervical spine manipulation and mobilization for neck pain. Methods. Neck-pain patients were randomized to the following conditions: manipulation with or without heat, manipulation with or without electrical muscle stimulation, mobilization with or without heat, and mobilization with or without electrical muscle stimulation. Results. Of 960 eligible patients, 336 enrolled in the study. Mean reductions in pain and disability were similar in the manipulation and mobilization groups through 6 months. Conclusions. Cervical spine manipulation and mobilization yield comparable clinical outcomes.

Hurwitz, Eric L.; Morgenstern, Hal; Harber, Philip; Kominski, Gerald F.; Yu, Fei; Adams, Alan H.

2002-01-01

173

Suggested guidelines for rating cardiac disability in workers' compensation. Medical and Chiropractic Advisory Committee to the Administrative Director of the California Division of Industrial Accidents.  

PubMed Central

Cardiac disability ratings in workers' compensation cases currently lack any consistent scientific basis, with varying medical evidence used by different examiners in the same case. Opinions about the extent of disability may differ with the same patient, delaying resolution and the delivery of benefits. We describe guidelines for determining cardiac impairment and suggest a schedule for rating disability based on evidence. Our experience is in California, but arriving at equitable ratings for disability purposes is a nationwide challenge. Exercise stress testing provides the best reproducible data to test the heart's ability to do work. When exercise stress testing is not possible or adequate, alternative or supplemental testing is necessary. Certain conditions, such as hypertension, arrhythmias, coronary artery spasm, and a history of coronary artery operations or myocardial infarction, may affect "cardiac disability" but may not necessarily be reflected in exercise testing.

Clark, W L; Alpern, H L; Breall, W S; Hyman, R M; Markovitz, A; O'Brien, J B; Starke, R D

1993-01-01

174

The Implementation of Virtual Instruction in Relation to X-ray Anatomy and Positioning in a Chiropractic Degree Program: A Descriptive Paper  

PubMed Central

This article provides information regarding the introduction of virtual education into classroom instruction, wherein a method of classroom instruction was developed with the use of a computer, digital camera, and various software programs. This approach simplified testing procedures, thus reducing institutional costs substantially by easing the demand for manpower, and seemed to improve average grade performance. Organized files with hundreds of digital pictures have created a range of instructor resources. Much of the new course materials were organized onto compact disks to complement course notes. Customizing presentations with digital technology holds potential benefits for students, instructors and the institution

Rush, Perry O.; Boone, William R.

2009-01-01

175

The Homewood influence in Canada and beyond  

PubMed Central

If there is any one individual who stands out in the saga of the early growth and development of the Canadian Memorial Chiropractic College, it must be Albert Earl Homewood (1916–1990). His contributions included steering the institution through the lean 1950s, coping with the metropolitan transit authorities’ devastating incursion upon the first campus, and arranging the construction and financing of the school’s second campus. Along the way, this feisty gentleman and respected instructor, “chiropractic’s Mr. Chips,” raised the standard for scholarship among DCs and assisted in the administration of several additional chiropractic colleges (Lincoln and Los Angeles).

Keating, Joseph C

2006-01-01

176

The effects of metronome breathing on the variability of autonomic activity measurements  

Microsoft Academic Search

Background: Many chiropractors hypothesize that spinal manipulation affects the autonomic nervous system (ANS). However, the ANS responses to chiropractic manipulative therapy are not well documented, and more research is needed to support this hypothesis. This study represents a step toward the development of a reliable method by which to document that chiropractic manipulative therapy does affect the ANS by exploring

Darcy Driscoll; Guy DiCicco

2000-01-01

177

How Much Health Promotion and Disease Prevention Is Enough?  

PubMed Central

Introduction: Although family violence has been identified as a major public health issue, it has received little attention in the chiropractic literature. Accordingly, this article provides a conceptual overview on family violence, discusses the role of chiropractors in its detection, and raises several issues germane to chiropractic education that deserve further attention in future chiropractic publications. Methods: A selective review of the empirical literature on family violence was conducted with a focus on issues relevant to chiropractic training and professional identity. Results: Extrapolating from the research, several models for medical training and continuing education have been proposed that emphasize a multidisciplinary, developmental approach to infusing knowledge, skill building, and mentored practice experiences into professional education experiences. Conclusion: As chiropractors become more mainstream portal-of-entry providers, there is a clear need to translate the didactics of family violence into the clinical setting. Clinical education may provide students the opportunity to master basic competencies for managing challenging family violence problems. The clinical environment may be appropriate for inculcating skills commensurate with those of other primary care providers. Yet, the extent to which training priorities and approaches extrapolated from other health care disciplines should be accepted wholesale by the chiropractic profession merits further discussion, including issues around the professional identity of chiropractic, the impact of accreditation standards and practice guidelines on actual professional practice behaviors, and the possible limits and unintended consequences associated with expanding the traditional chiropractic scope of practice from a specialty to a primary care profession.

Terre, Lisa; Globe, Gary; Pfefer, Mark T.

2006-01-01

178

29 CFR 1904.30 - OMB control numbers under the Paperwork Reduction Act.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...simple means; (L) Using finger guards; (M) Using massages (physical therapy or chiropractic treatment areconsidered...injury to a reproductive organ could be described as âlower abdominal injury.â (10) What must I do to protect employee...

2001-07-01

179

Alternative Therapies  

MedlinePLUS

... classes, or trained individuals. Bodywork includes myofascial release (Smith, 1997) , various types of massage, craniosacral therapy, chiropractic ... 1987) ; therapeutic touch, developed in nursing (Gerber, 1988; Smith, 1997) ; and reiki and polarity (Goldberg, 1995) . All ...

180

78 FR 7787 - Loan Repayment Program for Repayment of Health Professions Educational Loans  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...optometry, pharmacy, psychology, public health, social work, marriage and family therapy, chiropractic medicine...Psy.D. (d) Counseling Psychology: Ph.D. (e) Social Work: Masters level only. (f) Chemical Dependency...

2013-02-04

181

75 FR 4655 - National Practitioner Data Bank for Adverse Information on Physicians and Other Health Care...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...National Council of State Boards of Nursing, Federation of Chiropractic Licensing Boards, American Association of State Social Work Boards, Federation of State Medical Boards and the Association of State and Provincial Psychology Boards....

2010-01-28

182

77 FR 3269 - Loan Repayment Program for Repayment of Health Professions Educational Loans; Announcement Type...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...optometry, pharmacy, psychology, public health, social work, marriage and family therapy, chiropractic medicine...Psy.D. (d) Counseling Psychology: Ph.D. (e) Social Work: Masters level only. (f) Chemical Dependency...

2012-01-23

183

76 FR 8748 - Loan Repayment Program for Repayment of Health Professions Educational Loans  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...optometry, pharmacy, psychology, public health, social work, marriage and family therapy, chiropractic medicine...Clinical Psychology: Ph.D. and Psy.D. (d) Social Work: Masters level only. (e) Chemical Dependency...

2011-02-15

184

78 FR 15559 - Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act; Establishment of the Multi-State Plan Program for the...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...medical nutrition therapy, pediatric services, and chiropractic...plans, may lack coverage for pediatric oral services, pediatric...representing medical, surgical, pediatric, mental health, and allied...health care needs of a diverse patient population. We...

2013-03-11

185

42 CFR 60.11 - Terms of repayment.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...Council on Pharmaceutical Education. (vii) Council on Education for Public Health. (viii...Council on Chiropractic Education. (b) Length of repayment...Approved by the Office of Management and Budget under control...

2012-10-01

186

49 CFR 390.103 - Eligibility requirements for medical examiner certification.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...regulations to perform physical examinations. The applicant must be an advanced practice nurse, doctor of chiropractic, doctor of medicine, doctor of osteopathy, physician assistant, or other medical professional authorized by applicable...

2013-10-01

187

32 CFR 935.152 - Activities for which permit is required.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...sold for human consumption (except for personal or family use). (b) The practice of any medical profession, including dentistry, surgery, osteopathy, and chiropractic. (c) The erection of any structure or sign, including a major alteration...

2013-07-01

188

42 CFR 75.2 - Definitions.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...interacts with atoms to produce ion pairs in matter. Licensed practitioner means a licensed doctor of medicine, osteopathy, dentistry, podiatry, or chiropractic. Licensure means the process by which an agency of State government grants permission...

2013-10-01

189

42 CFR 411.12 - Charges imposed by an immediate relative or member of the beneficiary's household.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...completely owned by one or more physicians and is operated for the purpose of conducting the practice of medicine, osteopathy dentistry, podiatry, optometry, or chiropractic, or is owned by other health care professionals as authorized by State law....

2013-10-01

190

Back Pain Facts and Statistics  

MedlinePLUS

... as 80% of the population will experience a back problem at some time in our lives. 4 What ... or bone loss . Manipulation as a Treatment for Back Problems Used primarily by Doctors of Chiropractic (DCs) for ...

191

32 CFR 732.15 - Unauthorized care.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...732.15 Unauthorized care. The following are not authorized by this part: (a) Chiropractic services. (b) Vasectomies. (c) Tubal ligations. (d) Breast augmentations or reductions. (e) Psychiatric care, beyond the initial...

2013-07-01

192

32 CFR 732.15 - Unauthorized care.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...732.15 Unauthorized care. The following are not authorized by this part: (a) Chiropractic services. (b) Vasectomies. (c) Tubal ligations. (d) Breast augmentations or reductions. (e) Psychiatric care, beyond the initial...

2010-07-01

193

32 CFR 732.15 - Unauthorized care.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...732.15 Unauthorized care. The following are not authorized by this part: (a) Chiropractic services. (b) Vasectomies. (c) Tubal ligations. (d) Breast augmentations or reductions. (e) Psychiatric care, beyond the initial...

2009-07-01

194

78 FR 52779 - Merchant Mariner Medical Advisory Committee  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Burton. (4) Review of Last Full Committee Meeting's Minutes. (5) Public Comments. (6) Presentation from the American Epilepsy Society. (7) Presentation from American Chiropractic Association MEDMAC Discussion/Recommendation (8) Working...

2013-08-26

195

Commission for the Accreditation of Birth Centers  

MedlinePLUS

... therapy Massage or therapeutic touch Sterile water papules Heat or cold therapy Supplemental chiropractic care Herbal and ... plan for transferring to a hospital, including the transfer of records and care. In 98% of transfers ...

196

78 FR 12427 - Medicare Program; Medical Loss Ratio Requirements for the Medicare Advantage and the Medicare...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...2), for example, if an MA organization, contracts with a behavioral health, chiropractic network, or high technology radiology vendor, or if an MA organization or Part D sponsor contracts with a pharmacy benefit manager, and the vendor...

2013-02-22

197

Special Section: Complementary and Alternative Medicine (CAM):Quiz on Complementary and Alternative Medicine  

MedlinePLUS

... Special Section CAM Quiz on Complementary and Alternative Medicine Past Issues / Winter 2009 Table of Contents For ... low back pain. True False Complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) includes: Meditation Chiropractic Use of natural products, ...

198

Occupational hazards at the work place  

PubMed Central

Industrial accidents and injuries are prevalent amongst the industrialised world. Accident related research has long attempted to find common denominators among the human and environmental antecedents of occupational hazards. Chemical substances can adversely effect one or several of the body systems, with resulting symptoms which may not fit in a specific disease pattern. While occupational health physicians will be familiar with hazards of particular industries, general physicians or chiropractic clinicians may easily overlook industrial poisoning as a cause of symptoms because of its relative rarity. Even though awareness of chiropractic and use of chiropractic care has been increasing, there are still millions of Canadians who know little or nothing about chiropractic and are not part of its utilization profile.

Dhami, MSI; Vernon, H

1985-01-01

199

75 FR 16136 - Agency Information Collection Activities: Proposed Collection: Comment Request  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...pharmacy, public health, allied health, or chiropractic, and graduate students in health administration or clinical psychology through September 30, 1998. Eligible lenders, such as banks, savings and loan associations, credit unions, pension...

2010-03-31

200

42 CFR 60.50 - Which schools are eligible to be HEAL schools?  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...Graduate or equivalent degree in Public Health Doctor of Chiropractic or equivalent degree Doctoral degree of Clinical Psychology Masters or doctoral degree in Health Administration For the purposes of this section, the term âStateâ...

2013-10-01

201

42 CFR 60.10 - How much can be borrowed?  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...or a graduate program in health administration, clinical psychology, or allied health may borrow up to $50,000 under this...health, chiropractic, health administration, or clinical psychology may borrow up to $50,000 under this part including...

2013-10-01

202

78 FR 35286 - Agency Information Collection Activities; Submission to OMB for Review and Approval; Public...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...pharmacy, public health, allied health, or chiropractic, and graduate students in health administration or clinical psychology through September 30, 1998. Eligible lenders, such as banks, savings and loan associations, credit unions, pension...

2013-06-12

203

75 FR 30407 - Agency Information Collection Activities: Proposed Collection: Comment Request  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...pharmacy, public health, allied health, or chiropractic, and graduate students in health administration or clinical psychology through September 30, 1998. Eligible lenders, such as banks, savings and loan associations, credit unions, pension...

2010-06-01

204

42 CFR 60.10 - How much can be borrowed?  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...or a graduate program in health administration, clinical psychology, or allied health may borrow up to $50,000 under this...health, chiropractic, health administration, or clinical psychology may borrow up to $50,000 under this part including...

2012-10-01

205

42 CFR 60.5 - Who is an eligible student borrower?  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...Graduate or equivalent degree in Public Health Doctor of Chiropractic or equivalent degree Doctoral degree in Clinical Psychology Masters or doctoral degree in Health Administration (c) He or she must be carrying or plan to carry, during...

2013-10-01

206

Interexaminer reliability of the palpation of trigger points in the trunk and lower limb muscles  

Microsoft Academic Search

Objectives: To determine the interexaminer reliability of palpation of three characteristics of trigger points (taut band, local twitch response, and referred pain) in patients with subacute low back pain, to determine whether training in palpation would improve reliability, and whether there was a difference between the physiatric and chiropractic physicians.Design: Reliability study.Setting: Whittier Health Campus. Los Angeles College of Chiropractic.Participants:

Chang-Yu J. Hsieh; Chang-Zern Hong; Alan H. Adams; Katherine J. Platt; Clark D. Danielson; Fred K. Hoehler; Jerome S. Tobis

2000-01-01

207

Patient characteristics, practice activities, and one-month outcomes for chronic, recurrent low-back pain treated by chiropractors and family medicine physicians: A practice-based feasibility study  

Microsoft Academic Search

Background: Chronic low-back pain is a significant public health problem for which few therapies are supported by predictable outcomes. In this report, practice activities and 1-month outcomes data are presented for 93 chiropractic patients and 45 medical patients with chronic, recurrent low-back pain.Design: A prospective, observational, community-based feasibility study involving chiropractors and family medicine physicians.Setting: Forty private chiropractic clinics, the

Joanne Nyiendo; Mitchell Haas; Peter Goodwin

2000-01-01

208

The Webster Technique in a 28 Year Old Woman with Breech Presentation & Subluxation  

Microsoft Academic Search

Objective: To explore the effectiveness of chiropractic care using the Webster intrauterine constraint technique in the case of a 28-year-old female who presented 34 weeks pregnant with a breech presentation. Clinical Features: A 28-year-old women with a previous history of carrying a breech presented fetus returned to chiropractic care after a 1-month hiatus in care for headaches and sacroiliac pain.

John Cameron Thomas

209

Vioxx(R): What should we tell our patients?  

PubMed Central

In order to provide better care to patients, doctors of chiropractic should be informed about adverse affects of certain drugs. Presently, questions are being raised about cardiovascular risks, such as increased deaths due to stroke or myocardial infarction, which may be caused from drugs in the same class as Vioxx®.1 Therefore, it is important for doctors of chiropractic to stay apprised of information that may affect the health of their patients, such as COX-2 inhibitor usage.

Johnson, Claire

2004-01-01

210

Evidence-based protocol for structural rehabilitation of the spine and posture: review of clinical biomechanics of posture (CBP®) publications  

PubMed Central

BACKGROUND Although practice protocols exist for SMT and functional rehabilitation, no practice protocols exist for structural rehabilitation. Traditional chiropractic practice guidelines have been limited to acute and chronic pain treatment, with limited inclusion of functional and exclusion of structural rehabilitation procedures. OBJECTIVE (1) To derive an evidence-based practice protocol for structural rehabilitation from publications on Clinical Biomechanics of Posture (CBP®) methods, and (2) to compare the evidence for Diversified, SMT, and CBP®. METHODS Clinical control trials utilizing CBP® methods and spinal manipulative therapy (SMT) were obtained from searches in Mantis, CINAHL, and Index Medicus. Using data from SMT review articles, evidence for Diversified Technique (as taught in chiropractic colleges), SMT, and CBP® were rated and compared. RESULTS From the evidence from Clinical Control Trials on SMT and CBP®, there is very little evidence support for Diversified (our rating = 18), as taught in chiropractic colleges, for the treatment of pain subjects, while CBP® (our rating = 46) and SMT for neck pain (rating = 58) and low back pain (our rating = 202) have evidence-based support. CONCLUSIONS While CBP® Technique has approximately as much evidence-based support as SMT for neck pain, CBP® has more evidence to support its methods than the Diversified technique taught in chiropractic colleges, but not as much as SMT for low back pain. The evolution of chiropractic specialization has occurred, and doctors providing structural-based chiropractic care require protocol guidelines for patient quality assurance and standardization. A structural rehabilitation protocol was developed based on evidence from CBP® publications.

Oakley, Paul A.; Harrison, Donald D.; Harrison, Deed E.; Haas, Jason W.

2005-01-01

211

William D. Harper, Jr, MS, DC: Anything Can Cause Anything  

PubMed Central

Trained as an engineer and a chiropractor, William D. Harper, Jr. made his career in the healing arts as instructor, writer and president of the Texas Chiropractic College (TCC). A native of Texas who grew up in various locales in the Lone Star State, in Mexico and in the Boston area, he took his bachelor’s and master’s degree in engineering in 1933 and 1934 from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, and his chiropractic degree at TCC in 1942. Dissatisfied with the “foot-on-the-hose” concept of subluxation syndrome (D.D. Palmer’s second theory), Dr. Harper studied and wrote about aberrant neural irritation as an alternative explanation for disease and for the broad clinical value he perceived in the chiropractic art. In this he paralleled much of D.D. Palmer’s third theory of chiropractic. His often reprinted textbook, Anything Can Cause Anything, brought together much of what he had lectured and written about in numerous published articles. He was well prepared for the defense of chiropractic that he offered in 1965 in the trial of the England case in federal district court in Louisiana. The case was lost when the court ruled that the legislature rather than the judiciary should decide whether to permit chiropractors to practice, but Harper’s performance was considered excellent. He went on to guide the TCC as president from 1965 through 1976, its first 11 years after relocating from San Antonio to Pasadena, Texas. Harper built the school – its faculty, staff and facilities – from very meager beginnings to a small but financially viable institution when he departed. Along the way he found fault with both chiropractic political camps that vied for federal recognition as the accrediting agency for chiropractic colleges in the United States. Dr. Bill Harper was a maverick determined to do things his way, and in many respects he was successful. He left a mark on the profession that merits critical analysis.

Keating, Joseph C.

2008-01-01

212

Community-acquired methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus: a potential diagnosis for a 16-year-old athlete with knee pain  

PubMed Central

Objective This case report aims to raise awareness in chiropractic physicians of the prevalence of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) in adolescents who participate in sports activities and to alert the chiropractic physician of the necessity to consider potential diagnoses that are not within their typical clinical heuristic. Clinical Features A 16-year-old adolescent girl entered the clinic with a complaint of left knee pain that had an insidious onset during her involvement in sports activities. Later that same day, her knee became enlarged, red, and had pustular formations with a discharge. She was taken to an urgent care facility and subsequently diagnosed with MRSA. Her history included treatment of a left knee musculoskeletal condition 6 weeks prior to which she had responded favorably. Interventions and Outcomes She was treated medically with an aggressive course of antibiotic therapy and excision of the furuncle. The chiropractic physician played a role in patient education and notifying local school authorities of the case. Conclusion Doctors of chiropractic must prepare themselves for the unexpected and remain open to diagnostic possibilities outside of the normal scope of practice. Knee pain or cellulitis of any type may require additional diagnostic and patient care protocols to make the correct diagnosis. With the incidence of community-acquired MRSA increasing at an alarming rate, it is certainly a diagnosis doctors of chiropractic should be aware of when treating patients, especially those involved in sports activities.

Larkin-Thier, Susan M.; Barber, Virginia A.; Harvey, Phyllis; Livdans-Forret, Anna B.

2010-01-01

213

Standards of care: what do they mean to chiropractors, and which organizations should develop them  

PubMed Central

This article is a follow-up on our previous work examining Canadian chiropractors’ attitudes towards chiropractic philosophy and scope of practice and their implications for the implementation of clinical practice guidelines. In this current study, we examined Canadian chiropractors’ attitudes toward standards of care, the organizations developing them and their relationship to the philosophy index. The findings indicated that there was no agreement about the definition of standards of care among chiropractors, although there was strong support for the concept. Most chiropractors preferred that chiropractic organizations set standards of care - the strongest support was for the Canadian Chiropractic Association. Finally, we found differences among chiropractors’ attitudes toward standards of care and the organizations developing them with respect to philosophy. Empirically oriented chiropractors supported only a narrow definition of standards of care limited to issues surrounding safety and diagnosis. In addition, empirically oriented chiropractors would only support the development of standards of care by an expert panel of chiropractors. Rationalist and moderates supported the development of standards of care by a broader range of chiropractic organizations. We concluded that successful implementation of standards of care could occur if the CCA, in consultation with other chiropractic organizations, was actively committed to this initiative. Imagesp257-ap257-bp257-cp257-dp257-e

Biggs, Lesley; Hay, David; Mierau, Dale

1999-01-01

214

Adhesive capsulitis: a case report  

PubMed Central

Adhesive capsulitis or frozen shoulder is an uncommon entity in athletes. However, it is a common cause of shoulder pain and disability in the general population. Although it is a self limiting ailment, its rather long, restrictive and painful course forces the affected person to seek treatment. Conservative management remains the mainstay treatment of adhesive capsulitis. This includes chiropractic manipulation of the shoulder, therapeutic modalities, mobilization, exercise, soft tissue therapy, nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, and steroid injections. Manipulation under anesthesia is advocated when the conservative treatment fails. A case of secondary adhesive capsulitis in a forty-seven-year-old female recreational squash player is presented to illustrate clinical presentation, diagnosis, radiographic assessment and conservative chiropractic management. The patient’s shoulder range of motion was full and pain free with four months of conservative chiropractic care. ImagesFigure 1Figure 2Figure 3

Kazemi, Mohsen

2000-01-01

215

James F. McGinnis, D.C., N.D., C.P. (1873-1947): spinographer, educator, marketer and bloodless surgeon.  

PubMed

Perhaps best remembered for his contributions to B.J. Palmer's earliest developments in spinography, James F. McGinnis also pioneered in marketing methods while a straight chiropractic practitioner in Iowa. His advertising brought him to the attention of organized medicine, which sought his prosecution. Relocating to California in the early 1920s, he broadened his scope of practice and earned a naturopathic doctorate. In the 1930s he became one of the best known of several chiropractic bloodless surgeons and traveled around the nation to teach his methods. Although initially a passionate member of the Universal Chiropractors Association and receptive to Palmer's introduction of the neurocalometer, McGinnis eventually changed his political allegiance and became an active member of the National Chiropractic Association. He died in 1947 while on a teaching tour of Claifornia's San Joaquin Valley. PMID:11623684

Keating, J C

1998-12-01

216

Post-traumatic upper cervical subluxation visualized by MRI: a case report  

PubMed Central

Background This paper describes MRI findings of upper cervical subluxation due to alar ligament disruption following a vehicular collision. Incidental findings included the presence of a myodural bridge and a spinal cord syrinx. Chiropractic management of the patient is discussed. Case presentation A 21-year old female presented with complaints of acute, debilitating upper neck pain with unremitting sub-occipital headache and dizziness following a vehicular collision. Initial emergency department and neurologic investigations included x-ray and CT evaluation of the head and neck. Due to persistent pain, the patient sought chiropractic care. MRI of the upper cervical spine revealed previously unrecognized clinical entities. Conclusion This case highlights the identification of upper cervical ligamentous injury that produced vertebral subluxation following a traumatic incident. MRI evaluation provided visualization of previously undetected injury. The patient experienced improvement through chiropractic care.

Demetrious, James

2007-01-01

217

Canadian Chiropractors are not alone: external advocacy in Ontario, 1902-2012  

PubMed Central

This article focuses primarily on Ontario, identifying a number of the profession’s allies and their advocacy effectiveness, under two main headings: The Ontario Chiropractic Association; and the Canadian Memorial Chiropractic College during the period of 1902 to 2012. While part of our success in gaining recognition has been attributed to intense lobbying by the profession, here the public support of several labour unions is reviewed. The part played by various politicians, educators, entrepreneurs, legal counsel, academic administrators and historians is also discussed.

Brown, Douglas M.

2013-01-01

218

Integrating Naturopathy: Can We Move Forward?  

PubMed Central

Although acupuncture and chiropractic care have achieved some measure of acceptance within mainstream medicine, the integrative role for naturopathy has yet to be well specified. This essay provides a discussion of the potential benefits of naturopathic medicine, as well as an overview of current obstacles to its integration. Action steps toward improving communication between allopathic and naturopathic physicians are suggested.

Elder, Charles R

2013-01-01

219

34 CFR 668.2 - General definitions.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...Mathematics Access to Retain Talent Grant (National SMART...requirements for beginning practice in a given profession...Veterinary Medicine (D.V.M.), Chiropractic...third-party servicer; and (v) Is not a third-party...Mathematics Access to Retain Talent (SMART) Grant...

2010-07-01

220

Management of chest pain: exploring the views and experiences of chiropractors and medical practitioners in a focus group interview  

Microsoft Academic Search

BACKGROUND: We report on a multidisciplinary focus group project related to the appropriate care of chiropractic patients who present with chest pain. The prevalence and clinical management, both diagnosis and treatment, of musculoskeletal chest pain in ambulatory medical settings, was explored as the second dimension of the focus group project reported here. METHODS: This project collected observational data from a

Monica Smith; Dana J Lawrence; Robert M Rowell

2005-01-01

221

Effects of Gender and Age on Students' Performance in Adjustive Technique Classes  

Microsoft Academic Search

Physical manipulation in the form of spinal adjustments is the primary form of treatment offered by chiropractors. Entry requirements and teaching methods outlined by the Anglo-European College of Chiropractic (AECC) have to ensure that students are selected and trained in a way that will allow them to eventually leave the college as a group of competently skilled practitioners. If significant

Anne Rampacher; Cynthia Peterson

222

Community Attitudes about Economic Impacts of Colleges: A Case Study. AIR 1996 Annual Forum Paper.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This study examined attitudes of people about benefits of the economic impacts of two local colleges (Palmer College of Chiropractic and Scott Community College) in the metropolitan Quad Cities area of Rock Island County (Illinois) and Scott County (Iowa). The study compared impacts considered important by the community with those estimated by the…

Stout, Robert J.

223

The Comprehensive Health Assessment.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This report contains information from a fall 1991 health occupations assessment of 1,021 health-related employers in Eastern Iowa and the Illinois Quad Cities area. Twelve chapters present comprehensive results of all surveys; results of 10 labor market survey instruments developed for chiropractic offices, dentists' offices, emergency medical…

Eastern Iowa Community Coll. District, Davenport.

224

Wm. Lloyd Stackhouse & Robert E. Kinsman: A tale of two chiropractors  

PubMed Central

This paper reviews the story of two childhood friends, Dr. Wm. Lloyd Stackhouse and Dr. Robert E. Kinsman, who attended the Canadian Memorial Chiropractic College (CMCC) together, graduated in 1953 to form an enduring partnership that included their immediate relatives, and to this day persists as a supportive tribe.

Brown, Douglas M.

2013-01-01

225

Common errors and clinical guidelines for manual muscle testing: \\  

Microsoft Academic Search

BACKGROUND: The manual muscle test (MMT) has been offered as a chiropractic assessment tool that may help diagnose neuromusculoskeletal dysfunction. We contend that due to the number of manipulative practitioners using this test as part of the assessment of patients, clinical guidelines for the MMT are required to heighten the accuracy in the use of this tool. OBJECTIVE: To present

Walter H Schmitt Jr; Scott C Cuthbert

2008-01-01

226

A Review of the Incorporation of Complementary and Alternative Medicine by Mainstream Physicians  

Microsoft Academic Search

of the surveyed physicians believed in the efficacy of acu- puncture (51%), chiropractic (53%), and massage (48%), while fewer believed in the value of homeopathy (26%) and herbal approaches (13%). Conclusions: This review suggests that large numbers of physicians are either referring to or practicing some of the more prominent and well-known forms of CAM and that many physicians believe

John A. Astin; Ariane Marie; Kenneth R. Pelletier; Erik Hansen; William L. Haskell

1998-01-01

227

Complementary and Alternative Medicine Use Among Elderly Persons: One-Year Analysis of a Blue Shield Medicare Supplement  

Microsoft Academic Search

Background. Large scale surveys in the United States and abroad suggest that 35-60% of adults have used some form of complementary\\/alternative medicine (CAM). However, no studies to date have focused on predictors and patterns of CAM use among elderly persons. Methods. The population surveyed were Calilbrnians enrolled in a Medicare risk product that offers coverage for acu- puncture and chiropractic

John A. Astin; Kenneth R. Pelletier; Ariane Marie; William L. Haskell

2000-01-01

228

Improving College Faculty Instruction in the Basic and Allied Health Sciences.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

A project to improve college instruction in the basic and allied health sciences at New York Chiropractic College and the New York Institute of Technology is described. Attention was directed to: the kinds of resources colleges and professional schools provide to improve instruction; motivation of faculty to explore innovative or strategic…

Washton, Nathan S.

229

A multi-modal treatment approach for the shoulder: A 4 patient case series  

Microsoft Academic Search

BACKGROUND: This paper describes the clinical management of four cases of shoulder impingement syndrome using a conservative multimodal treatment approach. CLINICAL FEATURES: Four patients presented to a chiropractic clinic with chronic shoulder pain, tenderness in the shoulder region and a limited range of motion with pain and catching. After physical and orthopaedic examination a clinical diagnosis of shoulder impingement syndrome

Mario Pribicevic; Henry Pollard

2005-01-01

230

Impact of massage therapy in the treatment of linked pathologies: Scoliosis, costovertebral dysfunction, and thoracic outlet syndrome  

Microsoft Academic Search

Summary Objectives: To investigate the efficacy of massage therapy in the concurrent treatment of three related, but discrete, disorders: scoliosis, costovertebral dysfunction, and thoracic outlet syndrome. Methods: A 34-year-old female subject reported steadily increasing pain in the right shoulder over the previous 8 months. Chiropractic diagnosis and assessment by the author's clinical supervisor had identified these three conditions. Massage therapy

Michael Hamm

2006-01-01

231

Cervical stenosis in a professional rugby league football player: a case report  

Microsoft Academic Search

BACKGROUND: This paper describes a case of C7 radiculopathy in a professional rugby league player after repeated cervical spine trauma. The report outlines the management of the patient following an acute cervical hyperflexion injury with chiropractic manipulation and soft tissue therapies. It also presents a change in approach to include distractive techniques on presentation of a neurological deficit following re-injury.

Henry Pollard; Lotte Hansen; Wayne Hoskins

2005-01-01

232

Appropriateness of Spinal Manipulation for Low-Back Pain: Project Overview and Literature Review.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The report presents results from one part of the RAND Appropriateness of Spinal Manipulation for Low-Back-Pain Study. The study is designed to ascertain the clinical criteria for the appropriate use of spinal manipulation for low-back pain from chiropract...

P. G. Shekelle A. H. Adams M. R. Chassin E. L. Hurwitz R. B. Phillips

1993-01-01

233

Phenomenology: a resource pack for chiropractors  

Microsoft Academic Search

Chiropractic is being challenged to produce research to back up its claims of therapeutic effect. This paper presents an argument for using a qualitative approach for some of this research, namely the research methodology of phenomenology.The aim of the paper is to provide the basis for the chiropractor to embark on a research project using a phenomenological methodology. It should

Peter J Miller

2004-01-01

234

Bodywork Abstracts. 1989 Edition.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This comprehensive bibliography of research and writings on massage therapy for chronic illness, disabilities, and general health, is addressed to students of therapeutic bodywork, massage therapists, osteopathic and chiropractic physicians, as well as schools and research centers for health professionals. The work draws its citations from…

van Why, Richard P., Comp.

235

Where We Stand--CMA Position Papers: o Abortion o Acupuncture o Chiropractic o Confidentiality o Cost of Care o Drug Abuse o Environmental Health o Health Education for the Public o Health in the United States o Health Quackery o Health Maintenance Organizations and Prepaid Health Plans o Health Manpower o National Health Insurance o Physician's Assistants o Physician Unions o Professional Standards Review Organizations o Quality Medical Care  

PubMed Central

To serve the interests of members and to function in the public interest, the California Medical Association must set policies and take positions on current issues affecting the health care of Californians. These policies then guide the activities of the Association in fulfilling its leadership role and its responsibility to the public. Delegates, elected by the membership of CMA's component medical societies, meet annually to deliberate and determine the policies and courses of action for the Association. Between meetings of these Delegates, the CMA Councilors, elected by their district membership, implement the directives of the Delegates and set interim policies. By this democratic process, the membership governs the CMA. Association members must be informed if they are to participate effectively in the affairs of their medical organizations. To disseminate better understanding of CMA's activities, position papers on current issues have been developed. They are based on House of Delegates resolutions and Council actions. Entitled “Where We Stand on Medical and Health Issues,” these papers represent the current policy positions of CMA. Each paper is annotated to give the reference source of the policy actions. As with any organization, CMA policies are subject to timely revision. When policies are amended or new policies are adopted, new papers will be developed.

1973-01-01

236

Joshua N Haldeman, DC: the Canadian Years, 1926-1950  

PubMed Central

Born in 1902 to the earliest chiropractor known to practice in Canada, Joshua Norman Haldeman would develop national and international stature as a political economist, provincial and national professional leader, and sportsman/adventurer. A 1926 graduate of the Palmer School of Chiropractic, he would maintain a lifelong friendship with B.J. Palmer, and served in the late 1940s as Canada’s representative to the Board of Control of the International Chiropractors’ Association. Yet, he would also maintain strong alliances with broad-scope leaders in Canada and the United States, including the administrators of the National and Lincoln chiropractic schools. Haldeman, who would practice chiropractic in Regina for at least 15 years, was instrumental in obtaining, and is credited with composing the wording of, Saskatchewan’s 1943 Chiropractic Act. He served on the province’s first board of examiners and the provincial society’s first executive board. The following year Dr. Haldeman represented Saskatchewan in the deliberations organized by Walter Sturdy, D.C. that gave rise to the Dominion Council of Canadian Chiropractors, forerunner of today’s Canadian Chiropractic Association. As a member of the Dominion Council he fought for inclusion of chiropractors as commissioned officers during World War II, and participated in the formation of the Canadian Memorial Chiropractic College, which he subsequently served as a member of the first board of directors. Dr. Haldeman also earned a place in the political history of Canada, owing to his service as research director for Technocracy, Inc. of Canada, his national chairmanship of the Social Credit Party during the second world war, and his unsuccessful bid for the national parliament. His vocal opposition to Communism during the war briefly landed him in jail. His 1950 relocation of his family and practice to Pretoria, South Africa would open a new page in his career: once again as professional pioneer, but also as aviator and explorer. Although he died in 1974, the values he instilled in his son, Scott Haldeman, D.C., Ph.D., M.D. continue to influence the profession. ImagesFigure 1Figure 2Figure 2Figure 3Figure 4Figure 5Figure 6Figure 7Figure 8Figure 9Figure 10

Keating, Joseph C; Haldeman, Scott

1995-01-01

237

Attitudes of non-practicing chiropractors: a pilot survey concerning factors related to attrition  

PubMed Central

Background Research into attitudes about chiropractors who are no longer engaged in active clinical practice is non-existent. Yet non-practicing chiropractors (NPCs) represent a valid sub-group worthy of study. Aim The purpose of this research was to assess attrition attitudes of NPCs about the chiropractic profession and develop a scale to assess such attitudes. Methods A 48 item survey was developed using the PsychData software. This survey included 35 Likert-style items assessing various aspects of the profession namely financial, educational, psychosocial and political. An internet discussion site where NPCs may be members was accessed for recruitment purposes. Results A total of 70 valid responses were received for analysis. A majority of respondents were male with 66% being in non-practice status for 3 to 5 years and less with 43% indicating that they had graduated since the year 2000. Most respondents were employed either in other healthcare professions and non-chiropractic education. A majority of NPCs believed that business ethics in chiropractic were questionable and that overhead expense and student loans were factors in practice success. A majority of NPCs were in associate practice at one time with many believing that associates were encouraged to prolong the care of patients and that associate salaries were not fair. Most NPCs surveyed believed that chiropractic was not a good career choice and would not recommend someone to become a chiropractor. From this survey, a 12 item scale was developed called the "chiropractor attrition attitude scale" for future research. Reliability analysis of this novel scale demonstrated a coefficient alpha of 0.90. Conclusion The low response rate indicates that findings cannot be generalized to the NPC population. This study nonetheless demonstrates that NPCs attrition attitudes can be assessed. The lack of a central database of NPCs is a challenge to future research. Appropriate investigation of attrition within the chiropractic profession would be helpful in the analysis of attitudes regarding both chiropractic education and practice. Further research is needed in this area.

2010-01-01

238

Ian Douglass Coulter, PhD  

PubMed Central

This paper focuses on Dr. Ian Coulter’s accomplishments from the time he became Executive Vice-President of CMCC in 1981, until he ended his presidency with a year’s administrative leave in 1990. Annual planning initiatives, pedagogy, scholarship, conflicts, and the quest for university affiliation are discussed as well as his legacy to the College and the chiropractic profession. The term “adventurous” was first attributed to Coulter by Oswald Hall, PhD, Professor Emeritus, University of Toronto who had worked closely with Coulter in a major investigation of the chiropractic profession from 1976 to 1979. Throughout this article the author tries to capture the spirit of daring, innovation and intellect that permeated Coulter’s presidency, enthralling his advocates and confounding his detractors.

Brown, Douglas M

2004-01-01

239

The origin, and application of somatosensory evoked potentials as a neurophysiological technique to investigate neuroplasticity.  

PubMed

Somatosensory evoked potentionals (SEPs) can be used to elucidate differences in cortical activity associated with a spinal manipulation (SM) intervention. The purpose of this narrative review is to overview the origin and application of SEPs, a neurophysiological technique to investigate neuroplasticity. Summaries of: 1) parameters for SEP generation and waveform recording; 2) SEP peak nomenclature, interpretation and generators; 3) peaks pertaining to tactile information processing (relevant to both chiropractic and other manual therapies); 4) utilization and application of SEPs; 5) SEPs concurrent with an experimental task and at baseline/control/pretest; 6) SEPs pain studies; and 7) SEPs design (pre/post) and neural reorganization/neuroplasticity; and 8) SEPs and future chiropractic research are all reviewed. Understanding what SEPs are, and their application allows chiropractors, educators, and other manual therapists interested in SM to understand the context, and importance of research findings from SM studies that involve SEPs. PMID:24932021

Passmore, Steven R; Murphy, Bernadette; Lee, Timothy D

2014-06-01

240

Real-time force feedback during flexion-distraction procedure for low back pain: A pilot study  

PubMed Central

A form of chiropractic procedure known as Cox flexion-distraction is used by chiropractors to treat low back pain. Patient lies face down on a specially designed table having a stationery thoracic support and a moveable caudal support for the legs. The Doctor of Chiropractic (DC) holds a manual contact applying forces over the posterior lumbar spine and press down on the moving leg support to create traction effects in the lumbar spine. This paper reports on the development of real-time feedback on the applied forces during the application of the flexion-distraction procedure. In this pilot study we measured the forces applied by experienced DCs as well as novice DCs in using this procedure. After a brief training with real-time feedback novice DCs have improved on the magnitude of the applied forces. This real-time feedback technology is promising to do systematic studies in training DCs during the application of this procedure.

Gudavalli, Maruti Ram; Cox, James M.

2014-01-01

241

Multiple Myeloma presenting as sacroiliac joint pain: a case report.  

PubMed

Multiple Myeloma (MM) is the most common primary cancer of bone in adults. The clinical presentation of MM is varied and depends on the sites and extent of involvement. Most importantly for chiropractors, the leading clinical symptoms of MM are related to bone neoplasm and may mimic pain of musculoskeletal origin. The following is the case of a 56 year old male chiropractic patient presenting with a 6 month history of sacroiliac joint pain previously diagnosed and managed unsuccessfully as a hematoma by multiple providers. Physical examination, imaging, and laboratory investigations confirmed a diagnosis of MM. The case report describes relevant pathophysiology, clinical presentation, imaging, and management for MM, while illustrating key issues in patient management as they relate to chiropractic practice and the recognition of pathology in the context of musculoskeletal pain. PMID:22675222

Southerst, Danielle; Dufton, John; Stern, Paula

2012-06-01

242

Multiple Myeloma presenting as sacroiliac joint pain: a case report  

PubMed Central

Multiple Myeloma (MM) is the most common primary cancer of bone in adults. The clinical presentation of MM is varied and depends on the sites and extent of involvement. Most importantly for chiropractors, the leading clinical symptoms of MM are related to bone neoplasm and may mimic pain of musculoskeletal origin. The following is the case of a 56 year old male chiropractic patient presenting with a 6 month history of sacroiliac joint pain previously diagnosed and managed unsuccessfully as a hematoma by multiple providers. Physical examination, imaging, and laboratory investigations confirmed a diagnosis of MM. The case report describes relevant pathophysiology, clinical presentation, imaging, and management for MM, while illustrating key issues in patient management as they relate to chiropractic practice and the recognition of pathology in the context of musculoskeletal pain.

Southerst, Danielle; Dufton, John; Stern, Paula

2012-01-01

243

Report to the profession  

PubMed Central

The Canadian Chiropractic Examining Board (CCEB) is now in its fortieth year of providing quality measurement and evaluation services to the chiropractic profession in Canada. Dr. James Langford and his wife Lorraine are to be acknowledged for their significant contribution in the early days of the organization. The CCEB now provides both written knowledge and clinical skills examinations. External consultants are utilized on both examinations to ensure that the examinations are of high quality and to provide guidance to the CCEB and its Board of Governors. The CCEB is committed to expert consulting, research and publication, and external accreditation. The following is a description of the current measurement and evaluation practices, future advancements to the examinations, changes in the corporate structure and governance model, and sustainability of the examination processes. Imagesp201-ap203-ap203-bp203-cp203-dp203-ep203-fp203-g

Lawson, Douglas M

2002-01-01

244

The origin, and application of somatosensory evoked potentials as a neurophysiological technique to investigate neuroplasticity  

PubMed Central

Somatosensory evoked potentionals (SEPs) can be used to elucidate differences in cortical activity associated with a spinal manipulation (SM) intervention. The purpose of this narrative review is to overview the origin and application of SEPs, a neurophysiological technique to investigate neuroplasticity. Summaries of: 1) parameters for SEP generation and waveform recording; 2) SEP peak nomenclature, interpretation and generators; 3) peaks pertaining to tactile information processing (relevant to both chiropractic and other manual therapies); 4) utilization and application of SEPs; 5) SEPs concurrent with an experimental task and at baseline/control/pretest; 6) SEPs pain studies; and 7) SEPs design (pre/post) and neural reorganization/neuroplasticity; and 8) SEPs and future chiropractic research are all reviewed. Understanding what SEPs are, and their application allows chiropractors, educators, and other manual therapists interested in SM to understand the context, and importance of research findings from SM studies that involve SEPs.

Passmore, Steven R.; Murphy, Bernadette; Lee, Timothy D.

2014-01-01

245

Chiropractors as Primary Spine Care Providers: precedents and essential measures.  

PubMed

Chiropractors have the potential to address a substantial portion of spinal disorders; however the utilization rate of chiropractic services has remained low and largely unchanged for decades. Other health care professions such as podiatry/chiropody, physiotherapy and naturopathy have successfully gained public and professional trust, increases in scope of practice and distinct niche positions within mainstream health care. Due to the overwhelming burden of spine care upon the health care system, the establishment of a 'primary spine care provider' may be a worthwhile niche position to create for society's needs. Chiropractors could fulfill this role, but not without first reviewing and improving its approach to the management of spinal disorders. Such changes have already been achieved by the chiropractic profession in Switzerland, Denmark, and New Mexico, whose examples may serve as important templates for renewal here in Canada. PMID:24302774

Erwin, W Mark; Korpela, A Pauliina; Jones, Robert C

2013-12-01

246

Chiropractors as Primary Spine Care Providers: precedents and essential measures  

PubMed Central

Chiropractors have the potential to address a substantial portion of spinal disorders; however the utilization rate of chiropractic services has remained low and largely unchanged for decades. Other health care professions such as podiatry/chiropody, physiotherapy and naturopathy have successfully gained public and professional trust, increases in scope of practice and distinct niche positions within mainstream health care. Due to the overwhelming burden of spine care upon the health care system, the establishment of a ‘primary spine care provider’ may be a worthwhile niche position to create for society’s needs. Chiropractors could fulfill this role, but not without first reviewing and improving its approach to the management of spinal disorders. Such changes have already been achieved by the chiropractic profession in Switzerland, Denmark, and New Mexico, whose examples may serve as important templates for renewal here in Canada.

Erwin, W. Mark; Korpela, A. Pauliina; Jones, Robert C.

2013-01-01

247

Organizational commitment of a health profession faculty: dimensions, correlates and conditions.  

PubMed

Health professions depend on their faculties to prepare new practitioners, conduct research and provide essential services. Organizational commitment is an important aspect of faculty effectiveness and job performance, and may impact on turnover, absenteeism and interpersonal trust. A survey of organizational commitment, including faculty demographics and workplace variables, was conducted. Respondents were full- and part-time chiropractic faculty working in the United States and Canada. More than 54% of the study population (n = 609) completed and returned the instrument. A large majority of the respondents were male (68.4%) and employed full-time (81.6%). Almost half (47.5%) of the respondents were assigned to the area of patient care at their institutions. This study provides an initial assessment of organizational commitment among chiropractic faculty. Tenure in higher education, gender and age were found to be the most important predictors of organizational commitment. PMID:15203850

Marchiori, Dennis M; Henkin, Alan B

2004-06-01

248

Diagnosis and management of "an apparent mechanical" femoral mononeuropathy: a case study  

PubMed Central

This report describes an apparent case of femoral nerve mononeuropathy in a 58-year-old equestrian due to mechanical stress. A woman presented at a chiropractic office complaining of right buttock pain radiating to the right groin and knee. A treatment plan, consisting of chiropractic adjustments in addition to stretching and myofascial therapy, was initiated. The goal was to reduce pain and inflammation in the sacroiliac articulation by restoring normal biomechanical function. A rehabilitation program to alleviate tension in the musculature was initiated to reduce mechanical stresses exerted on the femoral nerve. The patient received five treatments over a period of three weeks and became asymptomatic. Even though peripheral nerve entrapment is an uncommon condition, clinicians must not overlook the possibility of a femoral mononeuropathy as it can produce a complex presentation and lead to ineffective patient management.

Desmarais, Ariane; Descarreaux, Martin

2007-01-01

249

Isodense cerebellar hematoma.  

PubMed

One week after chiropractic manipulations, a 60-year-old normotensive man suffered acute onset of vertigo, ataxia, and dysarthria. CT disclosed an isodense mass of the posterior fossa. Vertebral arteriography showed that the avascular mass arose from the right cerebellar hemisphere. Hydrocephalus developed, and suboccipital craniotomy revealed a large cerebellar hematoma due to a small arteriovenous malformation. A similar episode occurred 2 months later. CT isodense cerebellar hematomas should be considered before giving anticoagulant therapy. PMID:6684255

Jacome, D E

1983-09-01

250

Pain Research in Complementary and Alternative Medicine in Australia: A Critical Review  

PubMed Central

Abstract Background Sixty percent (60%) to 80% of patients who visit chiropractic, osteopathic, or Chinese medicine practitioners are seeking pain relief. Objectives This article aimed to identify the amount, quality, and type of complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) pain research in Australia by systematically and critically reviewing the literature. Methods PubMed, Scopus, Australasian Medical Index, and Cochrane library were searched from their inception to July 2009. Australian and New Zealand Clinical Trial Registration and National Health and Medical Research Council databases were searched for human studies yet to be completed. Predefined search terms and selection criteria were used for data identification. Results Of 204 studies selected, 54% were on chiropractic, 27% on Chinese medicine, 15% about multitherapy, and 4% on osteopathy. Chronic spinal pain was the most studied condition, with visceral pain being the least studied. Half of the articles in Chinese medicine or multitherapy were systematic reviews or randomized control trials. In comparison, only 5% of chiropractic and none of osteopathy studies were in these categories. Government funding was rare, and most studies were self-funded or internally funded. All chiropractic, osteopathic, and Chinese herbal medicine studies were conducted by the researchers of the professions. In contrast, half of the acupuncture studies and all t'ai chi studies were conducted by medical doctors or physiotherapists. Multidisciplinary collaboration was uncommon. Conclusions The quantity and the quality of CAM pain research in Australia are inconsistent with the high utilization of the relevant CAM therapies by Australians. A substantial increase in government funding is required. Collaborative research examining the multimodality or multidisciplinary approach is needed.

Xue, Charlie C.L.

2013-01-01

251

Post-surgical sacroiliac syndrome: a case study  

PubMed Central

Sacroiliac syndrome is characterized by buttock and lower limb pain that is associated with decreased mobility and tenderness of the sacroiliac joints. It can occur concomitantly with disorders of the lumbar spine and may go unrecognized until these other conditions are successfully treated. It may sometimes be associated with post-surgical immobilization of the spine and pelvis. A case is presented illustrating successful treatment by chiropractic manipulation. ImagesFigure 2Figure 3

Diakow, Peter R.P.; Cassidy, J. David; DeKorompay, Victor L.

1983-01-01

252

Use of non-orthodox and conventional health care in Great Britain  

Microsoft Academic Search

OBJECTIVE--To describe the characteristics of patients using non-orthodox health care and their pattern of use of conventional health care with respect to a particular problem. DESIGN--Postal survey of all 2152 practitioners of acupuncture, chiropractic, homeopathy, naturopathy, and osteopathy identified from 11 national professional association registers. Patients attending a representative sample of 101 responding practitioners completed questionnaires covering demographic characteristics, presenting

K J Thomas; J Carr; L Westlake; B T Williams

1991-01-01

253

Human Direct Actions May Alter Animal Welfare, a Study on Horses (Equus caballus)  

Microsoft Academic Search

BackgroundBack pain is the cause of bad welfare in humans and animals. Although vertebral problems are regularly reported on riding horses, these problems are not always identified nor noticed enough to prevent these horses to be used for work.Methodology\\/Principal FindingsNineteen horses from two riding centres were submitted to chiropractic examinations performed by an experienced chiropractor and both horses' and riders'

Clémence Lesimple; Carole Fureix; Hervé Menguy; Martine Hausberger; Georges Chapouthier

2010-01-01

254

Learning Spinal Manipulation  

PubMed Central

Purpose: The goal of the present study was to quantify the high-velocity, low-amplitude spinal manipulation biomechanical parameters in two cohorts of students from different teaching institutions. The first cohort of students was taught chiropractic techniques in a patient–doctor positioning practice setting, while the second cohort of students was taught in a “complete practice” manipulation setting, thus performing spinal manipulation skills on fellow student colleagues. It was hypothesized that the students exposed to complete practice would perform the standardized spinal manipulation with better biomechanical parameters. Methods: Participants (n = 88) were students enrolled in two distinct chiropractic programs. Thoracic spine manipulation skills were assessed using an instrumented manikin, which allowed the measurement of applied force. Dependent variables included peak force, time to peak force, rate of force production, peak force variability, and global coordination. Results: The results revealed that students exposed to complete practice demonstrated lower time to peak force values, higher peak force, and a steeper rate of force production compared with students in the patient–doctor positioning scenario. A significant group by gender interaction was also noted for the time to peak force and rate of force production variables. Conclusion: The results of the present study confirm the importance of chiropractic technique curriculum and perhaps gender in spinal manipulation skill learning. It also stresses the importance of integrating spinal manipulation skills practice early in training to maximize the number and the quality of significant learner–instructor interactions.

Harvey, Marie-Pierre; Wynd, Shari; Richardson, Lance; Dugas, Claude; Descarreaux, Martin

2011-01-01

255

Beyond the Didactic Classroom: Educational Models to Encourage Active Student Involvement in Learning  

PubMed Central

In a chiropractic college that utilizes a hybrid curriculum model composed of adult-based learning strategies along with traditional lecture-based course delivery, a literature search for educational delivery methods that would integrate the affective domain and the cognitive domain of learning provided some insights into the use of problem-based learning (PBL), experiential learning theory (ELT), and the emerging use of appreciative inquiry (AI) to enhance the learning experience. The purpose of this literature review is to provide a brief overview of key components of PBL, ELT, and AI in educational methodology and to discuss how these might be used within the chiropractic curriculum to supplement traditional didactic lecture courses. A growing body of literature describes the use of PBL and ELT in educational settings across many disciplines, both at the undergraduate and graduate levels. The use of appreciative inquiry as an instructional methodology presents a new area for exploration and study in the academic environment. Educational research in the chiropractic classroom incorporating ELT and appreciative inquiry might provide some valuable insights for future curriculum development.

Shreeve, Michael W.

2008-01-01

256

The great subluxation debate: a centrist's perspective  

PubMed Central

Objective This commentary describes the debate and some of the associated issues involving the subluxation construct. Discussion The long-standing debate regarding the chiropractic subluxation has created substantial controversy within the profession. Currently, this phenomenon can be compared with a country with a 2-party system that has a large silent majority sitting between the 2 factions. It is argued that the position held by those in the middle (the centrists) may be the most rational view when considering all of the available evidence. It is also suggested that the subluxation construct is similar to the Santa Claus construct in that both have a factual basis as well as social utility. Ultimately, the centrists must become proactive if they want to protect the profession and further advance the evidence in regard to the subluxation. They must not only engage in the debate, but fund the research that will investigate various aspects of the subluxation and then help disseminate this evidence to fellow doctors of chiropractic, other practitioners, health care policy makers, and society at large. Conclusion The role of subluxation in chiropractic practice, the progression of this debate, and the future of the profession will be directly determined by the role that centrists choose to play.

Good, Christopher J.

2010-01-01

257

Could chiropractors screen for adverse drug events in the community? Survey of US chiropractors  

PubMed Central

Background The "Put Prevention into Practice" campaign of the US Public Health Service (USPHS) was launched with the dissemination of the Clinician's Handbook of Preventive Services that recommended standards of clinical care for various prevention activities, including preventive clinical strategies to reduce the risk of adverse drug events. We explored whether nonprescribing clinicians such as chiropractors may contribute to advancing drug safety initiatives by identifying potential adverse drug events in their chiropractic patients, and by bringing suspected adverse drug events to the attention of the prescribing clinicians. Methods Mail survey of US chiropractors about their detection of potential adverse drug events in their chiropractic patients. Results Over half of responding chiropractors (62%) reported having identified a suspected adverse drug event occurring in one of their chiropractic patients. The severity of suspected drug-related events detected ranged from mild to severe. Conclusions Chiropractors or other nonprescribing clinicians may be in a position to detect potential adverse drug events in the community. These detection and reporting mechanisms should be standardized and policies related to clinical case management of suspected adverse drug events occurring in their patients should be developed.

2010-01-01

258

Occult osteoid osteoma presenting as shoulder pain: a case report  

PubMed Central

Objective The purpose of this case study is to describe the clinical course and treatment of a patient with recalcitrant shoulder pain and osteoid osteoma. Clinical Features A 28-year-old man had a 2-year history of progressively worsening shoulder and midscapular pain. Intervention and Outcome Before chiropractic consultation, he had been evaluated and treated by his family physician, an orthopedic surgeon, a neurologist, and a pain management specialist. The patient underwent arthroscopy with examination under anesthesia and debridement of a posterior labral tear and cervical spine epidural injections, but neither procedure relieved his symptoms. After seeking chiropractic care, presenting symptoms were reproducible during direct clinical examination; and an initial working diagnosis of secondary right glenohumeral impingement syndrome with coexisting scapulothoracic dyskinesis was made. After 2 weeks of chiropractic rehabilitation, therapy was stopped because of no change in symptoms. The patient was referred for orthopedic consultation. Another series of plain films were ordered, and follow-up magnetic resonance imaging revealed an osseous mass at the medial aspect of the proximal metadiaphyseal region of the right humerus, with a diagnosis of osteoid osteoma. The patient underwent radiofrequency thermoablation of the tumor nidus, which was unsuccessful and resulted in open surgical resection. Resolution of symptoms with minimal pain was reported 3 weeks after the surgery. Four years later, the patient's shoulder remains asymptomatic. Conclusion This case demonstrates that osteoid osteoma may present with clinical features that mimic common functional musculoskeletal conditions of the shoulder. Information from the patient history and diagnostic imaging are important for diagnosis and appropriate management.

Zoboski, Robert J.

2012-01-01

259

Manual therapy as a conservative treatment for adolescent idiopathic scoliosis: a systematic review  

PubMed Central

Background The treatment of adolescent idiopathic scoliosis is contingent upon many variables. Simple observation is enough for less serious curvatures, but for very serious cases surgical intervention could be proposed. Between these there is a wide range of different treatments. Manual therapy is commonly used: the aim of this paper is to verify the data existing in the literature on the efficacy of this approach. Methods A systematic review of the scientific literature published internationally has been performed. We have included in the term manual therapy all the manipulative and generally passive techniques performed by an external operator. In a more specific meaning, osteopathic, chiropractic and massage techniques have been considered as manipulative therapeutic methods. We performed our systematic research in Medline, Embase, Cinhal, Cochrane Library, Pedro with the following terms: idiopathic scoliosis combined with chiropractic; manipulation; mobilization; manual therapy; massage; osteopathy; and therapeutic manipulation. The criteria for inclusion were as follows: Any kind of research; diagnosis of adolescent idiopathic scoliosis; patients treated exclusively by one of the procedures established as a standard for this review (chiropractic manipulation, osteopathic techniques, massage); and outcome in Cobb degrees. Results We founded 145 texts, but only three papers were relevant to our study. However, no one of the three satisfied all the required inclusion criteria because they were characterized by a combination of manual techniques and other therapeutic approaches. Conclusion The lack of any kind of serious scientific data does not allow us to draw any conclusion on the efficacy of manual therapy as an efficacious technique for the treatment of Adolescent idiopathic scoliosis.

Romano, Michele; Negrini, Stefano

2008-01-01

260

The treatment experience of patients with low back pain during pregnancy and their chiropractors: a qualitative study  

PubMed Central

Background Chiropractors regularly treat pregnant patients for low back pain during their pregnancy. An increasing amount of literature on this topic supports this form of treatment; however the experience of the pregnant patient with low back pain and their chiropractor has not yet been explored. The objective of this study is to explore the experience of chiropractic treatment for pregnant women with low back pain, and their chiropractors. Methods This qualitative study employed semi-structured interviews of pregnant patients in their second or third trimester, with low back pain during their pregnancy, and their treating chiropractors in separate interviews. Participants consisted of 11 patients and 12 chiropractors. The interviews consisted of 10 open-ended questions for patients, and eight open-ended questions for chiropractors, asking about their treatment experience or impressions of treating pregnant patients with LBP, respectively. All interviews were audio-recorded, transcribed verbatim, and reviewed independently by the investigators to develop codes, super-codes and themes. Thematic saturation was reached after the eleventh chiropractor and ninth patient interviews. All interviews were analyzed using the qualitative analysis software N-Vivo 9. Results Five themes emerged out of the chiropractor and patient interviews. The themes consisted of Treatment and Effectiveness; Chiropractor-Patient Communication; Pregnant Patient Presentation and the Chiropractic Approach to Pregnancy Care; Safety Considerations; and Self-Care. Conclusions Chiropractors approach pregnant patients with low back pain from a patient-centered standpoint, and the pregnant patients interviewed in this study who sought chiropractic care appeared to find this approach helpful for managing their back pain symptoms.

2012-01-01

261

Association between heart rate variability and manual pulse rate  

PubMed Central

Introduction: One model for neurological assessment in chiropractic pertains to autonomic variability, tested commonly with heart rate variability (HRV). Since HRV may not be convenient to use on all patient visits, more user-friendly methods may help fill-in the gaps. Accordingly, this study tests the association between manual pulse rate and heart rate variability. The manual rates were also compared to the heart rate derived from HRV. Methods: Forty-eight chiropractic students were examined with heart rate variability (SDNN and mean heart rate) and two manual radial pulse rate measurements. Inclusion criteria consisted of participants being chiropractic students. Exclusion criteria for 46 of the participants consisted of a body mass index being greater than 30, age greater than 35, and history of: a) dizziness upon standing, b) treatment of psychiatric disorders, and c) diabetes. No exclusion criteria were applied to the remaining two participants who were also convenience sample volunteers. Linear associations between the manual pulse rate methods and the two heart rate variability measures (SDNN and mean heart) were tested with Pearson’s correlation and simple linear regression. Results: Moderate strength inverse (expected) correlations were observed between both manual pulse rate methods and SDNN (r = ?0.640, 95% CI ?0.781, ?0.435; r = ?0.632, 95% CI ?0.776, ?0.425). Strong direct (expected) relationships were observed between the manual pulse rate methods and heart rate derived from HRV technology (r = 0.934, 95% CI 0.885, 0.962; r = 0.941, 95% CI 0.897, 0.966). Conclusion: Manual pulse rates may be a useful option for assessing autonomic variability. Furthermore, this study showed a strong relationship between manual pulse rates and heart rate derived from HRV technology.

Hart, John

2013-01-01

262

Femoral neck stress fracture in a female athlete: a case report  

PubMed Central

Objective The purpose of this case report is to describe chiropractic rehabilitation of a master's-level athlete with proximal femoral stress fracture and provide a brief discussion of stress fracture pathology. Clinical Features A 41-year-old female master's-level endurance athlete presented with chronic groin pain later diagnosed and confirmed by magnetic resonance imaging as a stress fracture of the femoral neck. After diagnosis, the patient was referred to a doctor of chiropractic at week 1 of the non–weight-bearing physical rehabilitation process. At that time, the patient presented with sharp and constant groin pain rated 6/10 on a numeric rating scale. Intervention and Outcome This patient avoided weight-bearing activity for 8 weeks while cross-training and was able to return to her sport after this period. The patient was progressed through a series of non–weight-bearing strengthening exercises for the lower extremity. Myofascial release therapy was performed on the gluteal, hip flexor, and groin muscle groups to improve range of motion. Motion palpation testing the lumbar and sacroiliac joints was performed during each session, and manipulative therapy was performed when necessary. The patient was seen once a week for 8 weeks. Reevaluation was performed at week 8; at that time, the patient reported no groin pain (0/10). The patient was discharged from care and referred back to the supervising physician for clearance to return to sporting activities. One month after discharge, she reported that she was pain free and had fully returned to sport activities. Conclusion This case report demonstrates the importance of a through clinical history, physical examination, and magnetic resonance imaging in the accurate diagnosis of a patient with chronic groin pain and that chiropractic care can contribute to rehabilitation programs for these injuries.

Avrahami, Daniel; Pajaczkowski, Jason A.

2012-01-01

263

Growth Restart/Recovery Lines involving the vertebral body: a rare, incidental finding and diagnostic challenge in two patients  

PubMed Central

Objective To present the phenomenon of growth restart lines and create awareness of the possible differential diagnoses. Clinical Features Two case reports outlining the presentation of growth restart lines found in the vertebrae of trampolinists. Emphasis in each case is placed on correlating the patient history with radiographic findings. Intervention and Outcome In both cases a conservative chiropractic treatment plan was initiated once the differential diagnoses could be ruled out. Conclusion Although the range of etiologies of growth restart lines is extensive, these case reports illustrate the importance of a comprehensive case history when presented with the radiographic finding of growth restart lines.

Sajko, Sandy; Stuber, Kent; Wessely, Michelle

2011-01-01

264

Rehabilitation of a patient with a rare multi-level isthmic spondylolisthesis: a case report  

PubMed Central

A rare multi–level isthmic spondylolisthesis was discovered in a young male patient following an acute onset of low back pain. The prevalence of spondylolisthesis in the adult population is low and it is believed that the prevalence of multiple level spondylolisthesis is even rarer. A combination of onset of ambulation, hereditary factors, and sports involving hyper-extension of the spine are predisposing factors. Conservative treatment such as chiropractic manipulation and rehabilitation of the spine are first treatment options before surgical intervention is considered. The clinical presentations, radiographic features, treatment options including rehabilitation methods are discussed.

Wong, Leong C

2004-01-01

265

Tuberculous Spondylitis: a case report  

PubMed Central

A 21 year old oriental male presented with a one month history of neck pain associated with neck stiffness and dysphagia. A five week course of chiropractic treatment relieved most of his symptoms. Due to persistent tenderness in the suboccipital region and substantial weight loss, he was subsequently hospitalized. Further investigations revealed tuberculous osteomyelitis affecting the left lateral mass of C1 and likely the C2 vertebra. Tuberculous spondylitis accounts for more than 50% of all cases of skeletal tuberculosis and is the most common cause of vertebral infection, particularly in young people. ImagesFigure 1Figure 2Figure 3Figure 4Figure 5Figure 6

Thiel, Haymo; Gotlib, Allan

1986-01-01

266

Assessment of balance and risk for falls in a sample of community-dwelling adults aged 65 and older  

PubMed Central

Background Falls are a major health concern for older adults and their impact is a significant public health problem. The chief modifiable risk factors for falls in community-dwellers are psychotropic drugs, polypharmacy, environmental hazards, poor vision, lower extremity impairments, and balance impairments. This study focused on balance impairments. Its purpose was to assess the feasibility of recruiting older adults with possible balance problems for research conducted at a chiropractic research center, and to explore the utility of several widely used balance instruments for future studies of the effect of chiropractic care on balance in older adults. Methods This descriptive study was conducted from September through December 2004. Participants were recruited through a variety of outreach methods, and all were provided with an educational intervention. Data were collected at each of two visits through questionnaires, interviews, and physical examinations. Balance was assessed on both visits using the Activities-specific Balance Confidence Scale (ABCS), the Berg Balance Scale (BBS), and the One Leg Standing Test (OLST). Results A total of 101 participants enrolled in the study. Advertising in the local senior newspaper was the most effective method of recruitment (46%). The majority of our participants were white (86%) females (67%). About one third (32%) of participants had a baseline BBS score below 46, the cut-off point for predicting risk of falling. A mean improvement in BBS scores of 1.7 points was observed on the second visit. For the subgroup with baseline scores below 46, the mean change was 4.5 points, but the group mean remained below 46 (42.5). Conclusion Recruitment of community-dwelling seniors for fall-related research conducted at a chiropractic research center appears feasible, and the most successful recruitment strategies for this center appeared to be a combination of targeted newspaper ads and personal contact through senior centers. The BBS and OLST appear to be promising screening and assessment instruments, which might have utility in future investigations of the possible effects of chiropractic care on balance.

Hawk, Cheryl; Hyland, John K; Rupert, Ronald; Colonvega, Makasha; Hall, Stephanie

2006-01-01

267

Pediatric Vaccination and Vaccine-Preventable Disease Acquisition: Associations with Care by Complementary and Alternative Medicine Providers  

Microsoft Academic Search

This study investigated provider-based complementary\\/alternative medicine use and its association with receipt of recommended\\u000a vaccinations by children aged 1–2 years and with acquisition of vaccine-preventable disease by children aged 1–17 years. Results\\u000a were based on logistic regression analysis of insurance claims for pediatric enrollees covered by two insurance companies\\u000a in Washington State during 2000–2003. Primary exposures were use of chiropractic,

Lois Downey; Patrick T. Tyree; Colleen E. Huebner; William E. Lafferty

2010-01-01

268

Pancreatic cancer and chronic thoracic back pain: a case report  

PubMed Central

A male with persistent thoracic spine pain and clinical symptoms suggesting a more grave condition than mechanical back pain is presented. The patient had previously been attended to by a medical doctor and a chiropractor. The symptom picture and the ineffectiveness of previously administered chiropractic care suggests a medical referral with further investigation. The importance of history taking is emphasized. An accurate diagnosis and administration of the appropriate treatment is paramount because the prognosis of detected pancreatic cancer is poor. ImagesFigure 1Figure 2

Yurkiw, Dennis J

1995-01-01

269

Use of McKenzie cervical protocol in the treatment of radicular neck pain in a machine operator  

PubMed Central

A case of mechanical neck pain with radiation into the upper extremity in a 53-year-old man is presented. The use of standard chiropractic manipulative therapy was not an option due to patient apprehension. A reduction of symptoms was reported with certain spinal movements. This made the patient a candidate for the use of spinal loading strategies as described by McKenzie. The application of McKenzie cervical therapy resulted in improved symptoms and function in this individual. The McKenzie protocol, and its use in the management of neck pain, is discussed. ImagesFigure 1Figure 2Figure 3

Rathore, Sundeep

2003-01-01

270

Subluxation: dogma or science?  

PubMed Central

Subluxation syndrome is a legitimate, potentially testable, theoretical construct for which there is little experimental evidence. Acceptable as hypothesis, the widespread assertion of the clinical meaningfulness of this notion brings ridicule from the scientific and health care communities and confusion within the chiropractic profession. We believe that an evidence-orientation among chiropractors requires that we distinguish between subluxation dogma vs. subluxation as the potential focus of clinical research. We lament efforts to generate unity within the profession through consensus statements concerning subluxation dogma, and believe that cultural authority will continue to elude us so long as we assert dogma as though it were validated clinical theory.

Keating, Joseph C; Charlton, Keith H; Grod, Jaroslaw P; Perle, Stephen M; Sikorski, David; Winterstein, James F

2005-01-01

271

Post-surgical care of a professional ballet dancer following calcaneal exostectomy and debridement with re-attachment of the left Achilles tendon  

PubMed Central

The extraordinary physical demands placed upon ballet dancers are only now being appreciated as comparable to that of other highly competitive athletic pursuits. The professional ballet dancer presents with an array of injuries associated with their physically vigorous performance requirements. In keeping with evidence-based practice, we describe the chiropractic care of a professional ballet dancer following surgical calcaneal exostectomy and debridement with re-attachment of the left Achilles tendon. The care provided involves an array of modalities from exercise and rehabilitation to spinal manipulative therapy.

Kobsar, Bradley; Alcantara, Joel

2009-01-01

272

Alternative methods of conservative treatment of idiopathic scoliosis.  

PubMed

Scoliosis is a deformity of the spine known since Hippocrates times. The value of certain methods of conservative treatment remains controversial. Some of them have only a psychological value both for the physician and his or her caregivers. Based on current literature and the Scoliosis Research Society Report of Alternative Methods of Treatment of Idiopathic Scoliosis, we describe the effectiveness of various alternative methods, such as exercise, Dobosiewicz technique, Karski method, SEAS 02, acupuncture, Alexander technique, aromatherapy, ayurveda, ASCO treatment, biofeedback, chiropractic, Yoga, Feldenkrais method, Pilates method, massage therapy, rolfing, magnet therapy, surface electrical stimulation, PNF, Copes system, and bracing. PMID:19920282

Zarzycka, Maja; Rozek, Karina; Zarzycki, Micha?

2009-01-01

273

Undiagnosed Brodie abscess in a gymnast after surgical fixation of a tibial fracture  

PubMed Central

Abstract Objective This study presents a case of a posttraumatic subacute osteomyelitis in a child with leg pain. Clinical Features A 10-year-old female gymnast with leg pain presented to a chiropractic clinic after having been treated over the previous year for a leg fracture. The patient had leg pain associated with prolonged use of her right leg, restlessness at night, and tenderness over the right tibia. The history did not suggest a mechanical cause of the patient's pain. All available radiographs were reviewed by the chiropractor; a diffuse lytic lesion with bone thickening and sclerosis was clearly visible in the area of the patient's chief complaint, representing a Brodie abscess. Intervention and Outcome The doctor of chiropractic sent the patient back to the hospital. She was treated first with oral antibiotics, which were not successful. She underwent surgery and recovered well. Conclusion Subacute osteomyelitis may have a diagnostic delay; thus, it is possible for a chiropractor to see this condition in the office. A good case history, examination, and radiographs are important for the diagnosis and to make a proper referral.

Knaap, Simone F.C.

2007-01-01

274

Pilot study of the impact that bilateral sacroiliac joint manipulation using a drop table technique has on gait parameters in asymptomatic individuals with a leg length inequality.  

PubMed Central

Purpose: The purpose of this study was to pilot test our study procedures and estimate parameters for sample size calculations for a randomized controlled trial to determine if bilateral sacroiliac (SI) joint manipulation affects specific gait parameters in asymptomatic individuals with a leg length inequality (LLI). Methods: Twenty-one asymptomatic chiropractic students engaged in a baseline 90-second walking kinematic analysis using infrared Vicon® cameras. Following this, participants underwent a functional LLI test. Upon examination participants were classified as: left short leg, right short leg, or no short leg. Half of the participants in each short leg group were then randomized to receive bilateral corrective SI joint chiropractic manipulative therapy (CMT). All participants then underwent another 90-second gait analysis. Pre- versus post-intervention gait data were then analyzed within treatment groups by an individual who was blinded to participant group status. For the primary analysis, all p-values were corrected for multiple comparisons using the Bonferroni method. Results: Within groups, no differences in measured gait parameters were statistically significant after correcting for multiple comparisons. Conclusions: The protocol of this study was acceptable to all subjects who were invited to participate. No participants refused randomization. Based on the data collected, we estimated that a larger main study would require 34 participants in each comparison group to detect a moderate effect size.

Ward, John; Sorrels, Ken; Coats, Jesse; Pourmoghaddam, Amir; DeLeon, Carlos; Daigneault, Paige

2014-01-01

275

The use of spinal manipulative therapy for pediatric health conditions: a systematic review of the literature  

PubMed Central

Introduction This study had two purposes. These were: (i) to conduct a search of the literature between 2007 and 2011 investigating the use of spinal manipulative therapy (SMT) for pediatric health conditions and (ii) to perform a systematic review of eligible retrieved clinical trials. Methods The Index of Chiropractic Literature and PubMed were electronically searched using appropriate search words and MeSH terms, respectively, as well as reference tracking of previous reviews. Studies that met the inclusion criteria were evaluated using an instrument that assessed their methodological quality. Results Sixteen clinical trials were found that met the inclusion criteria and were scored. Discussion Six clinical trials investigated the effectiveness of SMT on colic, two each on asthma and enuresis, and one each on hip extension, otitis media, suboptimal breastfeeding, autism, idiopathic scoliosis and jet lag. None investigated the effectiveness of SMT on spinal pain. Conclusion Studies that monitored both subjective and objective outcome measures of relevance to both patients and parents tended to report the most favorable response to SMT, especially among children with asthma. Many studies reviewed suffered from several methodological limitations. Further research is clearly required in this area of chiropractic health care, especially with respect to the clinical effectiveness of SMT on pediatric back pain.

Gleberzon, Brian J.; Arts, Jenna; Mei, Amanda; McManus, Emily L.

2012-01-01

276

Conducting practice-based projects among chiropractors: a manual  

PubMed Central

Introduction Practice-based research is a challenge as clinicians are busy with their patients and any participation in research activities will be secondary to the needs of the patients and the clinic. As a result, it is difficult to obtain high compliance among clinicians. A method to enhance compliance in multicentre practice-based research has been developed and refined for use in the chiropractic setting and possibly also by other researchers in different settings. Method This manual provides a stringent step-by-step approach for conducting clinic-based research. It describes the competencies and requirements of an effective working group, how to recruit participating clinicians and how to empower, encourage and support these clinicians to obtain good compliance. Discussion The main advantage of the method is the high compliance of participating clinicians compared to many other clinical studies. Difficulties with the method are described and suggestions for solutions are presented. Conclusions This manual is a description of a method that may be of use for clinical researchers in the chiropractic setting.

2013-01-01

277

Improvement in chronic low back pain in an aviation crash survivor with adjacent segment disease following flexion distraction therapy: a case study  

PubMed Central

Objective The purpose of this case study is to describe the chiropractic management of chronic low back pain in a patient with adjacent segment disease. Clinical Features The patient was a 30-year-old man with a 3-year history of chronic nonspecific low back pain following a lumbar disk herniation. Two years before this incident, he had severe lumbar fractures and cauda equina injury due to an aviation accident that required multilevel lumbar fusion surgery, vertebrectomy, and cage reconstruction. Intervention and Outcome The patient received chiropractic management using Cox Flexion Distraction over a 4-week period. A complete reduction of symptoms to 0/10 on a verbal numerical rating scale was achieved within 4 weeks. At 3 months, the patient was able to work 8 to 9 hours per day in his dental practice with no pain. At 9 months, the patient continued to report a complete reduction of symptoms. Conclusions This report describes the successful management of a patient with chronic low back pain associated with adjacent segment disease using Cox Flexion Distraction protocols.

Greenwood, Dean M.

2012-01-01

278

Combination of acupuncture and spinal manipulative therapy: management of a 32-year-old patient with chronic tension-type headache and migraine  

PubMed Central

Objective The purpose of this case study is to describe the treatment using acupuncture and spinal manipulation for a patient with a chronic tension-type headache and episodic migraines. Clinical Features A 32-year-old woman presented with headaches of 5 months' duration. She had a history of episodic migraine that began in her teens and had been controlled with medication. She had stopped taking the prescription medications because of gastrointestinal symptoms. A neurologist diagnosed her with mixed headaches, some migrainous and some tension type. Her headaches were chronic, were daily, and fit the International Classification of Headache Disorders criteria of a chronic tension-type headache superimposed with migraine. Intervention and Outcome After 5 treatments over a 2-week period (the first using acupuncture only, the next 3 using acupuncture and chiropractic spinal manipulative therapy), her headaches resolved. The patient had no recurrences of headaches in her 1-year follow-up. Conclusion The combination of acupuncture with chiropractic spinal manipulative therapy was a reasonable alternative in treating this patient's chronic tension-type headaches superimposed with migraine.

Ohlsen, Bahia A.

2012-01-01

279

Pregnancy-related symphysis pubis dysfunction management and postpartum rehabilitation: two case reports  

PubMed Central

Objective Two case reports review the chiropractic treatment and rehabilitation management of Symphysis Pubis Dysfunction (SPD). Clinical features Patient 1: a 35-year-old female presented at 30 weeks pregnant with severe left sided Symphysis Pubis Dysfunction and low back pain. Patient 2: a 33-year-old female also 30 weeks pregnant, presented with right sided Symphysis Pubis Dysfunction and sacroiliac pain. Intervention and Outcome Treatment included soft tissue therapy, pregnancy support belt, side-lying mobilizations, pelvic blocks and instrument-assisted pubic symphysis adjustments. Home advice included: ice, staying active, moving as a unit, stretching, use of a pillow between the knees while sleeping, regular breaks from sitting and pelvic floor (Kegel) exercises. Both patients reported some relief with treatment and home care. Post-partum, rehabilitation exercises were prescribed to restore muscular endurance, control and pelvic stability. On long-term follow-up patient 1 reported no pubic symphysis pain, but some low back pain secondary to a subsequent knee injury. Patient 2 reported being mostly pain free with a rare re-exacerbation of pubic symphysis pain. Summary Conservative chiropractic management appears to reduce pain and improve mobility and function for SPD. Post partum rehabilitation of the associated lumbo-pelvic musculature with specific stabilization exercises is recommended to reduce pain, improve long term outcomes and prevent chronicity.

Howell, Emily R.

2012-01-01

280

Multimodal and interdisciplinary management of an isolated partial tear of the posterior cruciate ligament: a case report  

PubMed Central

Objective The purpose of this case report is to describe the evaluation and conservative management of an isolated posterior cruciate ligament (PCL) tear. Clinical Features A 32-year-old man with a traumatic right knee injury after tripping was initially diagnosed with medial patellar retinaculum tear at a multidisciplinary clinic. The patient received physiotherapy but reinjured the knee after returning to the sports field 3 weeks later. Subsequent clinical testing and magnetic resonance imaging confirmed a grade II isolated PCL tear. Intervention and Outcome Following the PCL tear diagnosis, a multimodal treatment approach over the course of 8 weeks consisting of chiropractic lumbopelvic manipulation, physiotherapy, and an exercise program emphasizing eccentric muscle action was implemented. Lunges, 1-leg squats, and trunk stabilization exercises were extensively used. Three months postinjury, the patient successfully returned to sports activity with no further complications. Conclusion The patient in this case report demonstrated successful return to preinjury functional status. This case highlights a multidisciplinary approach through the utilization of chiropractic, physiotherapy, and exercise therapies.

Fernandez, Matthew; Pugh, David

2012-01-01

281

High hamstring tendinopathy in 3 female long distance runners  

PubMed Central

Objective The purpose of this case report is to describe and discuss the clinical presentation, diagnosis, and management of 3 female long distance runners with high hamstring tendinopathy. Clinical Features Three female runners presented to a chiropractic office with proximal hamstring pain that was aggravated by running. Increasing mileage, hills, and/or interval training preceded the onset of symptoms in each case. The subjects all displayed weakness of the hip abductors, pelvic joint dysfunction, hamstring tightness, and ischial tuberosity tenderness. Other clinical findings included overpronation, proprioceptive weakness, and lumbar dysfunction. Intervention and Outcome All 3 patients were treated with Graston Instrument Assisted Soft Tissue Mobilization, lumbopelvic manipulation, and electrical muscle stimulation with ultrasound. Active exercise focused on hamstring stretching and strengthening, gluteal strengthening, and proprioceptive training. The 3 runners seen in this clinic had resolution of hamstring pain in an average of 13 treatments and were able to continue competing without restriction. Conclusion Runners with high hamstring tendinopathy may respond favorably to conservative chiropractic treatment and active rehabilitation with minimal time off of training.

White, Kristin E.

2011-01-01

282

The recognition of mechanically induced pelvic pain and organic dysfunction in the low back pain patient.  

PubMed

Mechanical disorders of the lumbar spine have been identified as a cause of pelvic pain and organic dysfunction (PPOD). Categorically, the clinical features indicative of mechanically induced PPOD fall into three areas: the history of the development or onset of pelvic symptomatology attributable to lower sacral nerve root compression (LSNRC), identification of related symptomatology on presentation, and the recognition of clinical findings indicative of mechanically induced PPOD on examination. Characteristic features of each category are presented. The clinical signs that most reliably indicate the presence of PPOD secondary to a mechanical lesion of the low back are of a sensory nature, and the disappearance or lack of improvement of these signs closely parallels the patient's overall response to manipulative treatment. Without a thorough understanding of the salient features of mechanically induced PPOD, the practitioner is likely to overlook this as a diagnostic possibility. As a result, efforts to document chiropractic spinal manipulative therapy in relieving disorders of pelvic organic function may be hampered. The empirical efficacy of chiropractic spinal manipulative therapy for treating disorders of pelvic organic function would be enhanced if more chiropractors were apprised of the salient features indicating the presence of mechanically induced PPOD. PMID:2532677

Browning, J E

1989-10-01

283

Prevention of low back pain: effect, cost-effectiveness, and cost-utility of maintenance care - study protocol for a randomized clinical trial  

PubMed Central

Background Low back pain (LBP) is a prevalent condition and a socioeconomic problem in many countries. Due to its recurrent nature, the prevention of further episodes (secondary prevention), seems logical. Furthermore, when the condition is persistent, the minimization of symptoms and prevention of deterioration (tertiary prevention), is equally important. Research has largely focused on treatment methods for symptomatic episodes, and little is known about preventive treatment strategies. Methods/Design This study protocol describes a randomized controlled clinical trial in a multicenter setting investigating the effect and cost-effectiveness of preventive manual care (chiropractic maintenance care) in a population of patients with recurrent or persistent LBP. Four hundred consecutive study subjects with recurrent or persistent LBP will be recruited from chiropractic clinics in Sweden. The primary outcome is the number of days with bothersome pain over 12 months. Secondary measures are self-rated health (EQ-5D), function (the Roland Morris Disability Questionnaire), psychological profile (the Multidimensional Pain Inventory), pain intensity (the Numeric Rating Scale), and work absence. The primary utility measure of the study is quality-adjusted life years and will be calculated using the EQ-5D questionnaire. Direct medical costs as well as indirect costs will be considered. Subjects are randomly allocated into two treatment arms: 1) Symptom-guided treatment (patient controlled), receiving care when patients feel a need. 2) Preventive treatment (clinician controlled), receiving care on a regular basis. Eligibility screening takes place in two phases: first, when assessing the primary inclusion/exclusion criteria, and then to only include fast responders, i.e., subjects who respond well to initial treatment. Data are collected at baseline and at follow-up as well as weekly, using SMS text messages. Discussion This study investigates a manual strategy (chiropractic maintenance care) for recurrent and persistent LBP and aims to answer questions regarding the effect and cost-effectiveness of this preventive approach. Strict inclusion criteria should ensure a suitable target group and the use of frequent data collection should provide an accurate outcome measurement. The study utilizes normal clinical procedures, which should aid the transferability of the results. Trial registration Clinical trials.gov; NCT01539863, February 22, 2012. The first patient was randomized into the study on April 13th 2012.

2014-01-01

284

Survey based investigation into general practitioner referral patterns for spinal manipulative therapy  

PubMed Central

Background In the UK Physiotherapy, Chiropractic and Osteopathy are all statutory regulated professions. Though guidelines have supported the use of Spinal Manipulative Therapy (SMT) for low back pain (LBP), General Practitioners (GP) referral patterns to the 3 registered professions that perform SMT are generally unknown. Method A short questionnaire was designed and piloted. Demographic information, patient referral to SMT and the GPs own personal utilisation of SMT were obtained. 385 GP’s were contacted representing approximately 20% of the GP’s in Wales Autumn 2007. Results and discussion 182 (50.8%) completed questionnaires were returned. Profile characteristics: 2/3 of respondents were male, 79% were 40 years old or older (statistically reflective of the total population of GPs in Wales at that time) and 62% had 20 years or less in practise. Personal use of SMT by GP’s: 48 respondents had sought SMT treatment and a further 56% of those that had not previously sought SMT indicated that they would consider doing so. Patient referral to SMT by GP’s: 131 respondents (72%) had referred patients to SMT and of those who had not a further 13% would consider referring. The general referral pattern and utilisation pattern was Physiotherapy: Osteopathy: Chiropractic. 21% who had never referred patients neither had, nor would consider it for themselves. A small subgroup appeared to manage personal choice differently from patient referral: 5 individuals who had not referred patients either had or would consider it for themselves and 23 of the group that would refer patients neither had nor would seek it for themselves. Conclusions This limited investigation indicates that GP’s do practise consistently with guidelines on back pain and utilise SMT as a care option. Although the main option for referral was physiotherapy, slightly over 40% of respondents who expressed a preference would refer to either osteopathy or chiropractic, or both in preference to physiotherapy. There was a small proportion that did not and would not refer patients for SMT regardless of personal use of SMT; these suggested use of acupuncture. Further investigation is needed to determine the alternatives to SMT offered to patients and the decision-making criteria for patient referral to subtypes of SMT practitioner.

2013-01-01

285

The clinical aspects of the acute facet syndrome: results from a structured discussion among European chiropractors  

PubMed Central

Background The term 'acute facet syndrome' is widely used and accepted amongst chiropractors, but poorly described in the literature, as most of the present literature relates to chronic facet joint pain. Therefore, research into the degree of consensus on the subject amongst a large group of chiropractic practitioners was seen to be a useful contribution. Methods During the annual congress of The European Chiropractors Union (ECU) in 2008, the authors conducted a workshop involving volunteer chiropractors. Topics were decided upon in advance, and the participants were asked to form into groups of four or five. The groups were asked to reach consensus on several topics relating to a basic case of a forty-year old man, where an assumption was made that his pain originated from the facet joints. First, the participants were asked to agree on a maximum of three keywords on each of four topics relating to the presentation of pain: 1. location, 2. severity, 3. aggravating factors, and 4. relieving factors. Second, the groups were asked to agree on three orthopaedic and three chiropractic tests that would aid in diagnosing pain from the facet joints. Finally, they were asked to agree on the number, frequency and duration of chiropractic treatment. Results Thirty-four chiropractors from nine European countries participated. They described the characteristics of an acute, uncomplicated facet syndrome as follows: local, ipsilateral pain, occasionally extending into the thigh with pain and decreased range of motion in extension and rotation both standing and sitting. They thought that the pain could be relieved by walking, lying with knees bent, using ice packs and taking non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, and aggravated by prolonged standing or resting. They also stated that there would be no signs of neurologic involvement or antalgic posture and no aggravation of pain from sitting, flexion or coughing/sneezing. Conclusion The chiropractors attending the workshop described the characteristics of an acute, uncomplicated lumbar facet syndrome in much the same way as chronic pain from the facet joints has been described in the literature. Furthermore, the acute, uncomplicated facet syndrome was considered to have an uncomplicated clinical course, responding quickly to spinal manipulative therapy.

Hestbaek, Lise; Kongsted, Alice; Jensen, Tue Secher; Leboeuf-Yde, Charlotte

2009-01-01

286

A review of the literature pertaining to the efficacy, safety, educational requirements, uses and usage of mechanical adjusting devices  

PubMed Central

Over the past decade, mechanical adjusting devices (MADs) were a major source of debate within the Chiropractors’ Association of Saskatchewan (CAS). Since Saskatchewan was the only jurisdiction in North America to prohibit the use of MADs, the CAS established a committee in 2001 to review the literature on MADs. The committee evaluated the literature on the efficacy, safety, and uses of moving stylus instruments within chiropractic practice, and the educational requirements for chiropractic practice. Following the rating criteria for the evaluation of evidence, as outlined in the Clinical Guidelines for Chiropractic Practice in Canada (1994), the committee reviewed 55 articles – all of which pertained to the Activator. Of the 55 articles, 13 were eliminated from the final study. Of the 42 remaining articles, 6 were rated as class 1 evidence; 11 were rated as class 2 evidence and 25 were rated as class 3 evidence. In this article – the second in a series of two – we review the results of uses and usage, safety and educational requirements. Of the 30 articles designated under the category of usage, 3 were rated as Class 1 evidence; 9 studies were classified as Class 2 evidence and 18 were rated as Class 3 evidence. Overall the committee reached consensus that in clinical practice, there is broad application of these procedures. A minority report was written arguing that the reviewer was unable to reach a conclusion about the use of the Activator Instrument other than it is used as a clinical and research tool. Of the 16 studies that dealt either explicitly or implicitly with safety, 4 were Class 1 evidence; 3 were Class 2 evidence and 9 were Class 3 evidence. Overall the committee reached consensus that the evidence supports that the Activator instrument is safe and has no more relative risk than do manual HVLA procedures. A minority report was written arguing that there is no evidence either to support or refute the view that MAD is safe. Of the 5 studies that dealt with educational requirements, all were Class 3 evidence. Overall the committee reached consensus that there was no evidence in the literature with respect to educational requirements to form any conclusions. A minority report was written offering opinion that there is evidence with respect to educational requirements.

Taylor, Shane H; Arnold, Nicole D; Biggs, Lesley; Colloca, Christopher J; Mierau, Dale R; Symons, Bruce P; Triano, John J

2004-01-01

287

Sports related concussion and spinal injuries: the need for changing spearing rules at the National Capital Amateur Football Association (NCAFA).  

PubMed Central

Introduction Returning an athlete to play following a spinal or concussive injury remains a challenge for the health practitioner making the decision. Among the possible mechanisms responsible for such injuries in amateur football, the concept of “spearing” has attracted a great deal of attention in sport medicine. Objective The purpose of this paper is to present a review of the diagnosis and treatment of the potentially catastrophic neck and head injuries caused by spearing in Canadian amateur football and to suggest the role the chiropractic profession can have in their prevention. It proposes to follow the recommendations advocated by the National Capital Amateur Football Association (NCAFA) athletic trainers group, led by a chiropractor. Methods Information regarding the concepts and prevention of “spearing”, concussion and spinal injuries at the amateur football level in both the United States and Canada was obtained using the following computerized search methods: PubMed – MeSH (via the National Center for Biotechnology Information (NCBI); The Index to Chiropractic Literature (ICL); Google Scholar Beta. Recent (2005) information on sports related spinal injuries and concussion were obtained by attendance at the 2005 Sports Related Concussion and Spine Injury Conference. Foxborough, Massachusetts. From a total of 698 references, 63 were retained. Conclusion Literature search yields very little information regarding Canadian statistics for amateur football neck and head injuries. The author encourages such injury data collecting and proposes that original Canadian studies and statistical analyses be carried out, such as those from diverse sports groups in the United States and abroad.1, 2, 3 The NCAFA group of trainers recommends a changing of the rules for “spearing” within the league and advocates gathering of Canadian based sports injury statistics. It also recognizes the need for public presentations (of concussion/spinal injuries).5 This paper describes the different interpretations of spearing rules at American and Canadian football associations, both at the amateur and professional levels; it further shows that injury prevention in sports is an absolute necessity and that the chiropractic profession should play a role in its application. It is suggested that chiropractors, who often attend to athletes who sustained sport related neck and head injuries, ought to contribute in their prevention and treatment.

Pelletier, Jacques C

2006-01-01

288

A survey of Australian chiropractors' attitudes and beliefs about evidence-based practice and their use of research literature and clinical practice guidelines  

PubMed Central

Background Research into chiropractors’ use of evidence in clinical practice appears limited to a single small qualitative study. The paucity of research in this area suggests that it is timely to undertake a more extensive study to build a more detailed understanding of the factors that influence chiropractors’ adoption of evidence-based practice (EBP) principles. This study aimed to identify Australian chiropractors’ attitudes and beliefs towards EBP in clinical practice, and also examine their use of research literature and clinical practice guidelines. Methods We used an online questionnaire about attitudes, beliefs and behaviours towards the use of EBP in clinical practice that had been developed to survey physiotherapists and modified it to ensure that it was relevant to chiropractic practice. We endeavoured to survey all registered Australian chiropractors (n?=?4378) via email invitation distributed by Australian chiropractic professional organisations and the Chiropractic Board of Australia. Logistic regression analyses were conducted to examine univariate associations between responses to items measuring attitudes and beliefs with items measuring: age; years since registration; attention to literature; and use of clinical practice guidelines. Results Questionnaires were returned by 584 respondents (response rate approximately 13%). The respondents’ perceptions of EBP were generally positive: most agreed that the application of EBP is necessary (77.9%), literature and research findings are useful (80.2%), EBP helps them make decisions about patient care (66.5%), and expressed an interest in learning or improving EBP skills (74.9%). Almost half of the respondents (45.1%) read between two to five articles a month. Close to half of the respondents (44.7%) used literature in the process of clinical decision making two to five times each month. About half of the respondents (52.4%) agreed that they used clinical practice guidelines, and around half (54.4%) agreed that they were able to incorporate patient preferences with clinical practice guidelines. The most common factor associated with increased research uptake was the perception that EBP helps make decisions about patient care. Conclusions Most Australian chiropractors hold positive attitudes towards EBP, thought EBP was useful, and were interested in improving EBP skills. However, despite the favourable inclination towards EBP, many Australian chiropractors did not use clinical practice guidelines. Our findings should be interpreted cautiously due to the low response rate.

2013-01-01

289

Parkinson's disease without tremor masquerading as mechanical back pain; a case report  

PubMed Central

The clinical features of a 67-year-old female suffering recurrent low back pain (LBP) who developed Parkinson’s disease (PD) are presented. PD is a progressive, age-specific neuro-degenerative disorder characterized by a combination of bradykinesia (slowness of movement), rest tremor (initially unilaterally and usually of the hands), rigidity or stiffness of the arms, legs or neck, and/or postural instability. Other non-motor and cognitive symptoms may accompany these features. Tremor, at rest, is usually the earliest and most prominent cardinal symptom of PD, but is absent in approximately 30% of patients. Considering mechanical back pain commonly presents with slowed movement and gait disturbance due to pain avoidance behavior, and considering Canada’s population is aging and living longer will inevitably cause the number of Parkinson’s patients to increase, it is important for chiropractic doctors to maintain an awareness of the condition to facilitate its early referral, diagnosis and management.

Burton, Robert R.

2008-01-01

290

The Tampa Scale of Kinesiophobia and neck pain, disability and range of motion: a narrative review of the literature  

PubMed Central

Background: The Tampa Scale of Kinesiophobia (TSK) that was developed in 1990 is a 17 item scale originally developed to measure the fear of movement related to chronic lower back pain. Objective: To review the literature regarding TSK and neck pain, perceived disability and range of motion of the cervical spine. Methods: Medline, MANTIS, Index to Chiropractic Literature and CINAHL were searched. Results: A total of 16 related articles were found and divided into four categories: TSK and Neck Pain; TSK, Neck Pain and Disability; TSK, Neck Pain, Disability and Strength; and TSK, Neck Pain and Surface Electromyography. Conclusion: The fear avoidance model can be applied to neck pain sufferers and there is value from a psychometric perspective in using the TSK to assess kinesiophobia. Future research should investigate if, and to what extent, other measureable factors commonly associated with neck pain, such as decreased range of motion, correlate with kinesiophobia.

Hudes, Karen

2011-01-01

291

Evidence Informed Practice as the Catalyst for Culture Change in CAM  

PubMed Central

The NIH National Center for Complementary and Alternative Medicine (NCCAM) has funded two rounds of R25 education grants. The first set of R25 grants were awarded to conventional schools and focused on integrating CAM content into health professions education programs. Grants were awarded to medical and nursing schools predominantly, with one grant going to the American Medical Student Association and one grant being awarded to an institution integrating CAM into nursing, medicine and pharmacy. The second round of R25 grants were awarded to CAM institutions and focused on introducing evidence-based practice into curricula of CAM schools including schools of chiropractic, naturopathic, and acupuncture and Oriental medicine. Although not an explicit objective of the grant program, one of the most significant and enduring outcomes reported by investigators has been culture change. This article describes individual and organizational culture changes that occurred at Northwestern Health Sciences University. — Mary Jo Kreitzer and Vic Sierpina

Evans, Roni; Maiers, Michele; Delagran, Louise; Jo Kreitzer, Mary; Sierpina, Victor

2012-01-01

292

Active and passive characteristics of muscle tone and their relationship to models of subluxation/joint dysfunction  

PubMed Central

The relationship of muscles to the causes and effects of the pathophysiologic entity referred to as chiropractic subluxation or joint dysfunction is critical. Part I of this paper reviewed the complexities of skeletal muscle in regards to anatomy, active and passive tone, detection of muscle tone, neurophysiology, and how muscle function fits into a variety of subluxation/joint dysfunction models. The concluding part of the review culminates in a hypothesis to describe and explain varying degrees of muscle tone that may be encountered clinically. It is hoped that knowledge of the differing levels of muscle tone and their causes will help the clinician to better determine the underlying cause of a neuromusculoskeletal problem allowing application of necessary and proper intervention.

Knutson, Gary A.; Owens, Edward F.

2003-01-01

293

The musculoskeletal effects of diabetes mellitus  

PubMed Central

Diabetes mellitus (DM) is a multi-system disease characterized by persistent hyperglycemia that has both acute and chronic biochemical and anatomical sequelae, with Type-2 DM representing the most common form of the disease. Neuromusculoskeletal sequelae of DM are common and the practicing chiropractor should be alert to these conditions, as some are manageable in a chiropractic office, while others are life and/or limb threatening. This paper reviews the effects of DM on the musculoskeletal system so as assist the chiropractor in making appropriate clinical decisions regarding therapy, understanding contraindications to therapy, referring patients to medical physicians when appropriate and understanding the impact that DM may have on the prognosis for their patients suffering from the myriad musculoskeletal conditions associated with this disease.

Wyatt, Lawrence H; Ferrance, Randy J

2006-01-01

294

Alternative headache treatments: nutraceuticals, behavioral and physical treatments.  

PubMed

There is a growing body of evidence supporting the efficacy of various complementary and alternative medicine approaches in the management of headache disorders. These treatment modalities include nutraceutical, physical and behavioral therapies. Nutraceutical options comprise vitamins and supplements (magnesium, riboflavin, coenzyme Q(10), and alpha lipoic acid) and herbal preparations (feverfew, and butterbur). Although controversial, there are some reports demonstrating the benefit of recreational drugs such as marijuana, lysergic acid diethylamide and psilocybin in headache treatment. Behavioral treatments generally refer to cognitive behavioral therapy and biobehavioral training (biofeedback, relaxation training). Physical treatments in headache management are not as well defined but usually include acupuncture, oxygen therapy, transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation, occlusal adjustment, cervical manipulation, physical therapy, massage, chiropractic therapy, and osteopathic manipulation. In this review, the available evidence for all these treatments will be discussed. PMID:21352222

Sun-Edelstein, Christina; Mauskop, Alexander

2011-03-01

295

Predictors of complementary and alternative medicine use among older Mexican Americans.  

PubMed

To determine predictors of complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) use, we used a cohort of 1445 non-institutionalized Mexican Americans aged 65 and older from the first wave (1993-1994) of the Hispanic Established Population for the Epidemiologic Study of the Elderly, followed until 2000-2001. The main outcome was use of any CAM (herbal medicine, chiropractic, acupuncture, massage therapy, relaxation techniques or spiritual healing) in the past 12 months and was assessed at 7 years of follow-up. Potential predictors of CAM use at baseline included sociodemographics, acculturation factors, and medical conditions. The overall rate of CAM use among older Mexican Americans was 31.6%. Independent predictors of higher CAM use were female gender, being on Medicaid, frequent church attendance and higher number of medical conditions. In contrast, subjects who were born in US and spoke either Spanish or English at interview had lower CAM use compared with subjects who were born in Mexico. PMID:17950177

Loera, Jose A; Reyes-Ortiz, Carlos; Kuo, Yong-Fang

2007-11-01

296

Transformational learning: an immersion course on the big island of Hawaii.  

PubMed

Content on integrative healthcare and complementary and alternative medicine is being taught in hundreds of educational programs across the country. Nursing, medical, osteopathic, chiropractic, acupuncture, naturopathic, and other programs are finding creative and innovative ways to include these approaches in new models of education and practice. This column spotlights such innovations in integrative healthcare and CAM education and presents readers with specific educational interventions they can adapt into new or ongoing educational efforts at their institution or programs. We invite readers to submit brief descriptions of efforts in their institutions that reflect the creativity, diversity, and interdisciplinary nature of the field. Please submit to Dr Sierpina at vssierpi@utmb.edu or Dr Kreitzer at kreit003@umn.edu. Submissions should be no more than 500 to 1,500 words. Please include any Web site or other resource that is relevant, as well as contact information. PMID:18775406

Kreitzer, Mary Jo; Sierpina, Victor S; Traub, Michael; Riff, Ken

2008-01-01

297

Manual therapy and ear pain: a report of four cases  

PubMed Central

Purpose: To report and discuss four cases of ear pain which were treated successfully with manual therapy. Methods: Report of four cases. Results: Four patients with ear pain were referred for chiropractic consult. They were all treated with a combination of manual therapy and exercise with resolution of their ear symptoms. Conclusions: The mechanism of idiopathic ear pain that may be amenable to manual therapy is not fully known. Further research is needed to investigate the etiology of this disorder and to determine whether manual therapy and exercise are viable options in some patients with idiopathic ear pain. In the meantime, it may be advantageous for otolaryngologists to seek input from physicians skilled in assessment and treatment of the musculoskeletal system in cases ear pain for which an otolarygologic etiology cannot be found.

Murphy, Donald R.; Gay, Charles W.

2011-01-01

298

Introducing the Neurocalometer: a view from the Fountain Head  

PubMed Central

A review and analysis of the 1924 introduction of the neurocalometer (NCM), a heat-sensing instrument purported to detect “nerve interference” (subluxation), is presented. Included are the origins of the device, the terms and expense of B.J. Palmer’s leasing program for the NCM, the role of the NCM as centrepiece in a “back to straight chiropractic” movement, the development of competitive instruments and BJ’s method of dealing with “infringers”, claims made for the clinical value of the NCM and the profession’s response to the NCM-movement. It is suggested that the NCM’s introduction provides a model of unethical promotions in health care. ImagesFigure 1

Keating, Joseph C

1991-01-01

299

Results of an International Survey of Practice Patterns for Establishing Prognosis in Neck Pain: The ICON Project  

PubMed Central

Results of an international survey of health care providers for neck pain are reported. The survey specifically collected self-reported practice patterns for establishing a prognosis in neck pain. Over 440 responses from 27 countries were collected. Descriptive results indicate that respondents assigned large prognostic impact to factors including mechanism of injury and psychological or behavioral constructs. Range of motion, age and sex were routinely collected despite relatively moderate impact on prognosis. A comparison between chiropractic and manual/physical therapy groups showed differences in practice patterns that were unlikely to affect prognostic accuracy. The results suggest a gap exists between current best-evidence and actual practice when the goal is to establish a prognosis in neck pain.

Walton, David M; MacDermid, Joy C; Santaguida, P. Lina; Gross, Anita; Carlesso, Lisa

2013-01-01

300

Piriformis syndrome: an annotated bibliography  

PubMed Central

Objective: To review the literature on Piriformis Syndrome, including signs, symptoms, diagnosis, differential diagnosis, treatment and management. Design: An annotated bibliography. Methods: A literature search of MEDLINE from January 1987 to November 1996, MANTIS from 1990 to 1997, EMBASE from January 1986 to December 1996, and Index to Chiropractic Literature from 1985 to 1994. The key words utilized in the search were Piriformis, Piriformis Syndrome, and Piriformis Muscle. Only English language articles were selected. Results: This annotated bibliography identifies twelve case reports, four case series, nine commentaries, and one quasi experiment. Twenty of the articles were published in peer-reviewed journals. Conclusions: Future research should address diagnostic criteria, treatment protocols, and effectiveness of therapeutic options.

Caldwell, Sylvia G; Hurwitz, Eric L; Adams, Alan

1999-01-01

301

Prevalence of use of complementary/alternative medicine: a systematic review.  

PubMed Central

Reported are the results of a systematic review of the prevalence of use of complementary/alternative medicine. Computerized literature searches were carried out in four databases. Twelve surveys thus found were selected because they dealt with the utilization of complementary/alternative medicine in random or representative samples of the general population. Data were extracted in a predefined, standardized way. Prevalence of use of complementary/alternative medicine ranged from 9% to 65%. Even for a given form of treatment such as chiropractic, as used in the USA, considerable discrepancies emerged. The data suggest that complementary/alternative therapies are used frequently and increasingly. Prevalence of use seemed to depend critically on factors that were poorly controlled in surveys of complementary/alternative medicine. The true prevalence of use of complementary/alternative medicine in the general population remains uncertain.

Ernst, E.

2000-01-01

302

An evidence-based diagnostic classification system for low back pain  

PubMed Central

Introduction: While clinicians generally accept that musculoskeletal low back pain (LBP) can arise from specific tissues, it remains difficult to confirm specific sources. Methods: Based on evidence supported by diagnostic utility studies, doctors of chiropractic functioning as members of a research clinic created a diagnostic classification system, corresponding exam and checklist based on strength of evidence, and in-office efficiency. Results: The diagnostic classification system contains one screening category, two pain categories: Nociceptive, Neuropathic, one functional evaluation category, and one category for unknown or poorly defined diagnoses. Nociceptive and neuropathic pain categories are each divided into 4 subcategories. Conclusion: This article describes and discusses the strength of evidence surrounding diagnostic categories for an in-office, clinical exam and checklist tool for LBP diagnosis. The use of a standardized tool for diagnosing low back pain in clinical and research settings is encouraged.

Vining, Robert; Potocki, Eric; Seidman, Michael; Morgenthal, A. Paige

2013-01-01

303

Pulmonary embolism in a female collegiate cross-country runner presenting as nonspecific back pain  

PubMed Central

Objective The purpose of this case report is to describe a female athlete with back and right scapular pain due to pulmonary embolism. Clinical Features A 20-year-old female collegiate cross-country runner presented to a chiropractic clinic with pain in the right scapular area that was severe, stabbing, and worsened with respiration. She had a cough and experienced difficulty lying on her right side. She had an elevated d-dimer. Chest radiograph demonstrated pleural effusion, prompting a thoracic computed tomographic angiogram that showed a large right lower lobe embolus and pulmonary infarct. Intervention and Outcome The patient was hospitalized, prescribed anticoagulant therapy, and monitored for 6 months. She was able to return to competitive running 8 months later. Conclusion This case raises awareness of the occurrence of birth control medication for the purpose of enhanced performance in female athletes and the associated risks of using this medication for enhanced performance.

Landesberg, Warren H.

2012-01-01

304

Utilizing Molecular Details of the Pain System to Illustrate Biochemical Principles  

PubMed Central

To capture student interest and show clinical relevance, molecular details from the pain system can be used as supplemental examples to basic biochemistry lectures. Lecture topics include glutamate, substance P, calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II, synaptic proteases, calcitonin gene-related peptide, and neuronal protein synthesis. These topics are utilized to illustrate basic biochemical issues and are linked to pain-related topics such as pain transmission, synaptic plasticity, long-term potentiation, and central sensitization. For analysis, a brief survey was administered to evaluate student attitudes toward a representative lecture segment. Survey results support the premise that utilizing the pain system is an effective tool to engage chiropractic students during basic biochemistry lectures.

Boal, Robert; Gillette, Richard G.; Borman, William H.

2010-01-01

305

Neuromusculoskeletal disorders following SARS: a case series  

PubMed Central

Objective: To detail the presentation of three health care workers diagnosed with sudden acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) who later presented to a CMCC teaching clinic with neuromusculoskeletal sequelae and underwent conservative treatments. This case series aims to inform practitioners of the potential pathogenesis of these neuromuscular complaints and describes their treatment in a chiropractic practice. Clinical Features: Three patients presented with a variety of neurological, muscular and joint findings. Conservative treatment was aimed at decreasing hypertonic muscles, increasing joint mobility, and improving ability to perform activities of daily living. Intervention and Outcome: The conservative treatment approach utilized in these cases involved spinal manipulative therapy, soft tissue therapy, modalities, and rehabilitation. Outcome measures included subjective pain ratings, disability indices, and return to work. Conclusion: Three patients previously diagnosed with SARS presented with neuromusculoskeletal complaints and subjectively experienced intermittent relief of pain and improvement in disability status after conservative treatments.

Stainsby, Brynne; Howitt, Scott; Porr, Jason

2011-01-01

306

Oral squamous cell carcinoma: an atypical presentation mimicking temporomandibular joint disorder  

PubMed Central

A 50-year-old female presented to a chiropractic clinic with left jaw pain consistent with temporomandibular joint disorder. Examination revealed a large ulcerated mass on the posterolateral margin of the tongue which was later diagnosed as squamous cell carcinoma. Squamous cell carcinoma is the most common of the oral cancers. These cancers are often detected late making treatment more complicated and reducing the chance of survival. In the early stages squamous cell carcinoma can be asymptomatic. Symptoms can be similar to that of temporomandibular joint disorder making examination of the patient’s mouth important to rule out oral cancers. Oral cancers should be considered when patients present to a chiropractor with pain in the area of the temporomandibular joint. Risk factors such as chronic tobacco and alcohol use should raise concern in these patients. Suspicious lesions should be referred immediately for further investigation.

Jensen, Andrea; Nolet, Paul S; Diwan, Murtaza A

2004-01-01

307

Peroneal neuropathy misdiagnosed as L5 radiculopathy: a case report  

PubMed Central

Objective The purpose of this case report is to describe a patient who presented with a case of peroneal neuropathy that was originally diagnosed and treated as a L5 radiculopathy. Clinical features A 53-year old female registered nurse presented to a private chiropractic practice with complaints of left lateral leg pain. Three months earlier she underwent elective left L5 decompression surgery without relief of symptoms. Intervention and outcome Lumbar spine MRI seven months prior to lumbar decompression surgery revealed left neural foraminal stenosis at L5-S1. The patient symptoms resolved after she stopped crossing her legs. Conclusion This report discusses a case of undiagnosed peroneal neuropathy that underwent lumbar decompression surgery for a L5 radiculopathy. This case study demonstrates the importance of a thorough clinical examination and decision making that ensures proper patient diagnosis and management.

2013-01-01

308

Where the United States Spends its Spine Dollars: Expenditures on different ambulatory services for the management of back and neck conditions  

PubMed Central

Study Design Serial, cross-sectional, nationally representative surveys of non-institutionalized adults. Objective To examine expenditures on common ambulatory health services for the management of back and neck conditions. Summary of Background Data Although it is well recognized that national costs associated with back and neck conditions have grown considerably in recent years, little is known about the costs of care for specific ambulatory health services that are used to manage this population. Methods We used the Medical Expenditure Panel Survey (MEPS) to examine adult (age ? 18 years) respondents from 1999 to 2008 who sought ambulatory health services for the management of back and neck conditions. We used complex survey design methods to make national estimates of mean inflation-adjusted annual expenditures on medical care, chiropractic care, and physical therapy per user for back and neck conditions. Results Approximately 6% of US adults reported an ambulatory visit for a primary diagnosis of a back or neck condition (13.6 million in 2008). Between 1999 and 2008, the mean inflation-adjusted annual expenditures on medical care for these patients increased by 95% (from $487 to $950); most of the increase was accounted for by increased costs for medical specialists, as opposed to primary care physicians. Over the study period, the mean inflation-adjusted annual expenditures on chiropractic care were relatively stable; while physical therapy was the most costly service overall, in recent years those costs have contracted. Conclusion Although this study did not explore the relative effectiveness of different ambulatory services, recent increasing costs associated with providing medical care for back and neck conditions (particularly subspecialty care) are contributing to the growing economic burden of managing these conditions.

Davis, Matthew A.

2012-01-01

309

Changes in primary care physician's management of low back pain in a model of interprofessional collaborative care: an uncontrolled before-after study  

PubMed Central

Background Tracking how clinicians treat patients provides an opportunity to explore how the clinical management of common musculoskeletal disorders evolves over time. We present an uncontrolled before-after study of a primary care physician’s management of low back pain and describe how his involvement in an interprofessional collaborative practice was associated with a change in the management of patients with low back pain. Method Data from the electronic medical record of one primary care physician who participated in a study of a model of chiropractic-medical collaboration were retrospectively collected. Records of a sample of consecutive patients prior to the start (i.e. pre-study, n = 51) and at the end of the collaborative study (i.e. study, n = 49) were collected. Results Demographics were similar in both groups but median number of physician visits (2.5 and 1.0), average prescriptions per patients (1.24 and 0.47), and total number of narcotic prescriptions (14 and 6) differed between pre-study and study groups, respectively. Separate analysis of only the records of low back pain study patients revealed that 61% were referred for chiropractic care during the study period. Patients who were not referred had more neurological deficits and leg pain but back pain severity and average number of prescriptions was about the same. Referred patients in the study group had about 25% fewer physician visits and imaging requests. Conclusion Based on this study of a single primary care physician, we hypothesize that doctors may change their prescribing behaviours and consultation rate for patients with low back pain when engaged in interprofessional collaborative care. Further research is required to test this observation in the population.

2013-01-01

310

The effect of spinal manipulative therapy (SMT) on pain reduction and range of motion in patients with acute unilateral neck pain: a pilot study  

PubMed Central

Objective: This experiment evaluated the response of acute neck pain patients to an intervention utilizing a single manipulation to either a) the same side of pain (ipsilateral) or b) opposite side (contralateral) and compared the results to a placebo group. Design: In this pre-test — post-test study, 36 subjects were randomly allocated to one of the three groups: (1) SMT applied to the same side as the pain (ipsilateral) (2) SMT applied to the side opposite the pain (contralateral) (3) A placebo group receiving only detuned ultrasound therapy Subjects: In a private chiropractic office, patients with acute unilateral neck pain and stiffness were studied. Inclusion criteria included the presence of acute unilateral neck pain, no prior similar history, no history of trauma, and no neurological deficit. Subjects had no previous chiropractic treatment of the cervical spine. Intervention: Patients in the two manipulation groups received a single cervical manipulation. Patients in the placebo group received detuned ultrasound therapy over the area of pain. Main Outcome Measures: There were two outcome measures. Pain intensity was rated on the 100 mm. visual analog scale (VAS) prior to and immediately following the intervention. Pre and Post test measurements of cervical spine range of motion utilizing the CROM instrument were also taken. Results: Degrees of ipsilateral lateral flexion, contralateral flexion, and VAS improved when ipsilateral versus contralateral spinal manipulative therapy was applied. Conclusions: Immediately following a single manipulation to acute neck pain patients there is less pain intensity and a greater range of motion when spinal manipulative therapy is applied to the side of neck pain versus manipulation on the side opposite the pain or to a placebo group.

Pikula, John R

1999-01-01

311

CAM therapies among primary care patients using opioid therapy for chronic pain  

PubMed Central

Background Complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) is an increasingly common therapy used to treat chronic pain syndromes. However; there is limited information on the utilization and efficacy of CAM therapy in primary care patients receiving long-term opioid therapy. Method A survey of CAM therapy was conducted with a systematic sample of 908 primary care patients receiving opioids as a primary treatment method for chronic pain. Subjects completed a questionnaire designed to assess utilization, efficacy and costs of CAM therapies in this population. Results Patients were treated for a variety of pain problems including low back pain (38.4%), headaches (9.9%), and knee pain (6.5%); the average duration of pain was 16 years. The median morphine equivalent opioid dose was 41 mg/day, and the mean dose was 92 mg/day. Forty-four percent of the sample reported CAM therapy use in the past 12 months. Therapies utilized included massage therapy (27.3%, n = 248), chiropractic treatment (17.8%, n = 162), acupuncture (7.6%, n = 69), yoga (6.1%, n = 55), herbs and supplements (6.8%, n = 62), and prolotherapy (5.9%, n = 54). CAM utilization was significantly related to age female gender, pain severity income pain diagnosis of neck and upper back pain, and illicit drug use. Medical insurance covered chiropractic treatment (81.8%) and prolotherapy (87.7%), whereas patients primarily paid for other CAM therapies. Over half the sample reported that one or more of the CAM therapies were helpful. Conclusion This study suggests CAM therapy is widely used by patients receiving opioids for chronic pain. Whether opioids can be reduced by introducing such therapies remains to be studied.

Fleming, Sara; Rabago, David P; Mundt, Marlon P; Fleming, Michael F

2007-01-01

312

Quantification of Cavitation and Gapping of Lumbar Zygapophyseal Joints during Spinal Manipulative Therapy  

PubMed Central

Objectives The purpose of this study was to use previously validated methods to quantify and relate 2 phenomena associated with chiropractic spinal manipulative therapy (SMT): 1) cavitation and 2) the simultaneous gapping (separation) of the lumbar zygapophyseal (Z) joint spaces. Methods This was a randomized, controlled, mechanistic clinical trial with blinding. Forty healthy subjects (18 to 30 years of age) without a history of low back pain participated. Seven accelerometers were affixed to the skin overlying the spinous processes of L1-L5 and the S1 and S2 sacral tubercles. Two additional accelerometers were positioned 3 cm left and right lateral to the L4/L5 inter-spinous space. Subjects were randomized into: Group 1–side-posture SMT (n=30) or Group 2–side-posture positioning (SPP, n=10). Cavitations were determined by accelerometer recordings during SMT and SPP (left-side=up-side for both groups); gapping (gapping difference) was determined by the difference between pre- and post-intervention MRI joint space measurements. Results of mean gapping differences were compared. Results Up-side SMT and SPP joints gapped more than down-side joints (0.69 vs. ?0.17mm, p<0.0001). SMT up-side joints gapped more than SPP up-side joints (0.75 vs. 0.52mm, p=0.03). SMT up-side joints gapped more in males than females (1.01 vs. 0.49mm, p<0.002). Overall, joints that cavitated gapped more than those that did not (0.56vs. 0.22mm, p=0.01). No relationship was found between the occurrence of cavitation and gapping with up-side joints alone (p=0.43). Conclusions Z joints receiving chiropractic SMT gapped more than those receiving side-posture positioning alone, Z joints of males gapped more than those of females, and cavitation indicated that a joint had gapped, but not how much a joint had gapped.

Cramer, Gregory D.; Ross, Kim; Raju, P.K.; Cambron, Jerrilyn; Cantu, Joe A.; Bora, Preetam; Dexheimer, Jennifer; McKinnis, Ray; Habeck, Adam R.; Selby, Scott; Pocius, Judith D.; Gregerson, Douglas

2012-01-01

313

Chiropractors & Osteopaths Musculo-Skeletal Interest Group (COMSIG)  

PubMed Central

The Chiropractors & Osteopaths Musculo-Skeletal Interest Group evolved from regular clinical meetings at Ringwood Clinic, a multi-disciplinary clinic in Melbourne In 1987 the Directors of the clinic Bruce F. Walker D.C. and Alison Hogg MB.BS. (Hons), FRACGP. Decided to invite a range of guest speakers (on musculo-skeletal topics) to give an address every 6 weeks Local practitioners of all persuasions were invited to attend these meetings. Although all groups were represented, by far the greatest interest shown by the chiropractors and osteopaths In 1989 Peter D. Werth B.App.Sc.(Chiro) joined the team and together with the writer formulated a plan to broaden the list of invited guests to all registered chiropractors and osteopaths in Melbourne Naturally, this required a larger venue and organisation. After several successful meetings attracting groups of 60 to 70 practitioners we formalised the COMSIG organisation and gained the invaluable assistance of David de l Harpe B.Sc., B.App.Sc.(Chiro), MB.,BS., Shane Carter B.App.Sc.(Chiro) and Simon Clement D.O. on our committee. More recently Shane Carter left for overseas and was ably replaced by Miriam Bourke B.App.Sc.(Chiro) This year COMSIG incorporated under the name of the long established Chiropractic & Osteopathic College of Australasia So, what is COMSIG and what are it’s objectives? COMSIG is a special interest group of the Chiropractic & Osteopathic College of Australasia. More specifically, it is an affiliation of Chiropractors and Osteopaths with interests pertaining to the musculo-skeletal system The objectives for which COMSIG was established are: to promote knowledge of disorders of the musculo-skeletal system.to provide a forum for the interchange of ideas related to such disorders.to educate chiropractors, osteopaths and other health professionals about the diagnosis and management of such disorders.to encourage the diagnosis and management of musculo-skeletal disorders in a scientific and ethical manner.to conduct, promote, and arrange meetings, seminars, symposia, conferences, and lectures on musculo-skeletal disorders.to foster research into musculo-skeletal disorders. Importantly, COMSIG is not a political organisation but rather an academic organisation arising from the practitioner ranks of the professions We encourage all those with an interest in musculo-skeletal disorders to join COMSIG and participate in its development. An application form is enclosed, or available from the Secretary…

Walker, Bruce F.

1992-01-01

314

Anterior interosseous nerve paralysis: cubital tunnel (Kiloh-Nevin) syndrome.  

PubMed

Paralysis of the anterior interosseous nerve may occur for a variety of reasons. It has been suggested that such a malady presents clinically more often than is recognized. Some authors attribute this to a general misunderstanding or ignorance of the precise anatomical distribution and motor function of this branch of the median nerve. The neuropathy produces a clinical scenario with a characteristic disturbance of the "pinch grip." Spontaneous recovery has been reported, but is said to be delayed and incomplete. Surgical exploration of the nerve may reveal a biomechanical basis for irritation, and decompression maneuvers may result in rapid and complete recovery. It is important to recognize, however, the value of conservative measures, including mobilization and adjustive procedures, which may be specifically directed to the elbow joint and other regions of the upper extremity. Such techniques may assist in reducing restrictive influences comprising the nerve and associated tissues. The benefits of electrotherapy may prove invaluable and, perhaps, should be considered prior to more radical procedures. Therefore, the practitioner should be wary of the potential to approach such a condition from the chiropractic perspective of treatment and management, which may yield rewarding sequellae. PMID:3392477

Crawford, J P; Noble, W J

1988-06-01

315

How to Write a Scholarly Book Review for Publication in a Peer-Reviewed Journal  

PubMed Central

Purpose: To describe and discuss the processes used to write scholarly book reviews for publication in peer-reviewed journals and to provide a recommended strategy and book appraisal worksheet to use when conducting book reviews. Methods: A literature search of MEDLINE, EMBASE, CINAHL, and the Index to Chiropractic Literature was conducted in June 2009 using a combination of controlled vocabulary and truncated text words to capture articles relevant to writing scholarly book reviews for publication in peer-reviewed journals. Results: The initial search identified 839 citations. Following the removal of duplicates and the application of selection criteria, a total of 78 articles were included in this review including narrative commentaries (n = 26), editorials or journal announcements (n = 25), original research (n = 18), and journal correspondence pieces (n = 9). Discussion: Recommendations for planning and writing an objective and quality book review are presented based on the evidence gleaned from the articles reviewed and from the authors' experiences. A worksheet for conducting a book review is provided. Conclusions: The scholarly book review serves many purposes and has the potential to be an influential literary form. The process of publishing a successful scholarly book review requires the reviewer to appreciate the book review publication process and to be aware of the skills and strategies involved in writing a successful review.

Lee, Alexander D.; Green, Bart N.; Johnson, Claire D.; Nyquist, Julie

2010-01-01

316

Excessive pronation: a major biomechanical determinant in the development of chondromalacia and pelvic lists.  

PubMed

Based on statistical analysis of 97 chronic low back patients, a pelvic list model has been proposed explaining the correlation between leg length discrepancies (LLD) and sciatica. This model suggests that asymmetrical pronation patterns (one pedal arch dropping more than the contralateral pedal arch) initiates a forward downward rotation within the sacroiliac joint. Entrapment of the sciatic nerve between the piriformis muscle and sacrospinous ligament occurs. Clinically, paresis is observed: numbness, weakness and eventually paralysis of the affected limb. Based on this work, the authors have comprised a classification dividing LLD into two main categories: functional and anatomical. Functional LLD have been subdivided into two types of lists: static and dynamic. Treatment based on a combination of chiropractic and podiatric therapy is presented with a 6-month follow-up. Analysis of the success in this tandem approach is very promising. Concurrently, a chondromalacia model is proposed explaining the pathomechanical events associated with oblique tracking patellar syndrome. The authors suggest that excessive pronation is the causative factor directing asynchronous rotation between the shank and femur. This forces the patella out of its normal tracking groove, which, in turn, generates erosion between the inferior margin of the patella and femoral epicondyles. PMID:2976805

Rothbart, B A; Estabrook, L

1988-10-01

317

Breech repositioning unresponsive to Webster technique: coexistence of oligohydramnios  

PubMed Central

Objective The purpose of this report is to describe the results of a pregnant woman demonstrating breech fetal presentation who was managed with Webster technique in the presence of oligohydramnios. Clinical Features A 23-year-old primigravida woman sought chiropractic care for the management of breech presentation and bilateral sacroiliac arthralgia at 34 weeks’ gestation. Intervention and Outcome Sacral manipulation and abdominal effleurage (Webster Technique) was used to address breech presentation and sacroiliac arthralgia for a total of 7 treatments over a 3 1/2-week duration. The patient’s sacroiliac pain reduced from 8/10 to 3/10. However, breech presentation was unchanged at each treatment. At a scheduled prenatal surveillance during the 37th week of gestation, the midwife detected vaginal bleeding and reduced fundal height, which resulted in hospitalization, diagnosis of oligohydramnios, and an emergency cesarean delivery. Conclusion For this particular patient, the breech presentation was not corrected using the Webster technique. Clinicians who use the Webster technique to manage breech fetal presentation should be aware of undiagnosed comorbidities as a complicating factor in clinical presentation. Screening for previously undiagnosed comorbidities, such as oligohydramnios, must be considered.

Roecker, Christopher B.

2013-01-01

318

Talocalcaneal coalition in a 15 year old female basketball player  

PubMed Central

This case reports an adolescent athlete with activity related chronic bilateral dorsal foot pain and stiffness. A 15 year old competitive female basketball player presented to a chiropractor subsequent to an unsuccessful course of conservative treatment for posterior tibial dysfunction. The patient’s plain films were incorrectly read as normal and a CT scan obtained by the radiologist called the findings bilateral osteoarthritis. The patient was awaiting a referral to a rheumatologist at the time of initial consultation with the chiropractor. Examination revealed limited subtalar mobility and review of the images revealed bilateral non-osseous talocalcaneal coalition. The patient was subsequently directed to a pediatric orthopedic surgeon and is scheduled for a resection of the coalition. Primary care practitioners should be aware of this uncommon, but not rare, variable clinical presentation as misdiagnosis and mismanagement could lead to suboptimal patient outcomes. To our knowledge this is the first case report of a patient with tarsal coalition published in chiropractic literature. In addition, this case is the first to report radiographic evidence of chronic mechanical stress to the second metatarsal associated with tarsal coalition.

Schenkel, David; deGraauw, Jennifer; deGraauw, Christopher

2010-01-01

319

Disentangling manual muscle testing and Applied Kinesiology: critique and reinterpretation of a literature review.  

PubMed

Cuthbert and Goodheart recently published a narrative review on the reliability and validity of manual muscle testing (MMT) in the Journal. The authors should be recognized for their effort to synthesize this vast body of literature. However, the review contains critical errors in the search methods, inclusion criteria, quality assessment, validity definitions, study interpretation, literature synthesis, generalizability of study findings, and conclusion formulation that merit a reconsideration of the authors' findings. Most importantly, a misunderstanding of the review could easily arise because the authors did not distinguish the general use of muscle strength testing from the specific applications that distinguish the Applied Kinesiology (AK) chiropractic technique. The article makes the fundamental error of implying that the reliability and validity of manual muscle testing lends some degree of credibility to the unique diagnostic procedures of AK. The purpose of this commentary is to provide a critical appraisal of the review, suggest conclusions consistent with the literature both reviewed and omitted, and extricate conclusions that can be made about AK in particular from those that can be made about MMT. When AK is disentangled from standard orthopedic muscle testing, the few studies evaluating unique AK procedures either refute or cannot support the validity of AK procedures as diagnostic tests. The evidence to date does not support the use of MMT for the diagnosis of organic disease or pre/subclinical conditions. PMID:17716373

Haas, Mitchell; Cooperstein, Robert; Peterson, David

2007-01-01

320

Complementary and Alternative Medicine: A Survey of Its Use in Pediatric Oncology  

PubMed Central

Background. The use of complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) is high among children and youths with chronic illnesses, including cancer. The objective of this study was to assess prevalence and patterns of CAM use among pediatric oncology outpatients in two academic clinics in Canada. Procedure. A survey was developed to ask patients (or their parents/guardians) presenting to oncology clinics at the Stollery Children's Hospital in Edmonton and the Children's Hospital of Eastern Ontario (CHEO) in Ottawa about current or previous use of CAM products and practices. Results. Of the 137 families approached, 129 completed the survey. Overall CAM use was 60.5% and was not significantly different between the two hospitals. The most commonly reported reason for not using CAM was lack of knowledge about it. The most common CAM products ever used were multivitamins (86.5%), vitamin C (43.2%), cold remedies (28.4%), teething remedies (27.5%), and calcium (23.0%). The most common CAM practices ever used were faith healing (51.0%), massage (46.8%), chiropractic (27.7%), and relaxation (25.5%). Many patients (40.8%) used CAM products at the same time as prescription drugs. Conclusion. CAM use was high among patients at two academic pediatric oncology clinics. Although most respondents felt that their CAM use was helpful, many were not discussing it with their physicians.

Valji, Rafiaa; Adams, Denise; Dagenais, Simon; Baydala, Lola; King, W. James

2013-01-01

321

Human Direct Actions May Alter Animal Welfare, a Study on Horses (Equus caballus)  

PubMed Central

Background Back pain is the cause of bad welfare in humans and animals. Although vertebral problems are regularly reported on riding horses, these problems are not always identified nor noticed enough to prevent these horses to be used for work. Methodology/Principal Findings Nineteen horses from two riding centres were submitted to chiropractic examinations performed by an experienced chiropractor and both horses' and riders' postures were observed during a riding lesson. The results show that 74% of horses were severely affected by vertebral problems, while only 26% were mildly or not affected. The degree of vertebral problems identified at rest was statistically correlated with horses' attitudes at work (neck height and curve), and horses' attitudes at work were clearly correlated with riders' positions. Clear differences appeared between schools concerning both riders' and horses' postures, and the analysis of the teachers' speech content and duration highlighted differences in the attention devoted to the riders' position. Conclusion/Significance These findings are to our knowledge the first to underline the impact of riding on horses' back problems and the importance of teaching proper balance to beginner riders in order to increase animals' welfare.

Lesimple, Clemence; Fureix, Carole; Menguy, Herve; Hausberger, Martine

2010-01-01

322

Weight gain as a consequence of living a modern lifestyle: a discussion of barriers to effective weight control and how to overcome them  

PubMed Central

Objective The purpose of this commentary is to discuss modern lifestyle factors that promote weight gain and to suggest methods for clinicians to more effectively educate patients about weight management. Discussion Most adults in the United States are overweight or obese. Multiple factors related to the modern lifestyle appear to play causal roles. In general, the population maintains sedentary lives and overconsumes calorie-dense foods. In particular, refined carbohydrates negatively impact metabolism and stimulate neural addiction mechanisms, which facilitate weight gain. As adipose tissue mass accumulates, satiation centers in the hypothalamus become resistant to insulin and leptin, which leads to increased caloric consumption. Several behavior issues further augment weight gain, such as eating too quickly, a lack of sleep, high stress levels, and a lack of exercise. Finally, adipose tissue accumulation alters the body weight set point, which leads to metabolic changes that function to resist weight loss efforts. Each of these factors may work together to augment weight gain and promote obesity. Health care providers, such as chiropractic physicians, who educate patients on wellness, prevention, and lifestyle changes are well positioned to address these issues. Conclusion People need to be educated about the modern lifestyle factors that prevent effective weight management. Without this knowledge and the associated practical application of lifestyle choices that prevent weight gain, becoming overweight or obese appears to be an unavoidable consequence of living a modern lifestyle.

Seaman, David R.

2013-01-01

323

Upper gastrointestinal hemorrhage after nonresponsive thoracic spine pain: a case report  

PubMed Central

Abstract Objective This case study reports the findings of an upper gastrointestinal hemorrhage in a patient with thoracic spine pain reporting to a chiropractic clinic. The purpose of this article is to highlight the importance of identifying a patient's medication history as well as reviewing the signs and symptoms of gastrointestinal bleeding from a nonvariceal lesion. Clinical Features A 61-year–old woman presented with worsening middle thoracic spine pain of 3 months' duration along with recent abdominal pain. Medications, physical therapy, and spinal manipulation did not provide considerable improvement. The patient was taking ibuprofen daily to cope with her back pain. Intervention and Outcome The initial physical examination demonstrated mild increased tissue tension in the thoracic paraspinal muscles with mild restriction of thoracic spine range of motion secondary to the patient's pain. There was pain on palpation of the T4-5 and T7-8 spinal segments. The physical examination findings did not correlate to the patient's pain presentation, and she was referred back to her primary care physician. Two days after the initial examination, the patient experienced an upper gastrointestinal hemorrhage and underwent emergency surgery. It was determined postoperatively that she had a medication-induced duodenal ulcer that subsequently ruptured. Conclusion An upper gastrointestinal bleed should be considered in the differential diagnosis of a patient with a history of prolonged aspirin or nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug use with nonspecific abdominal symptoms.

George, James W.; Skaggs, Clayton D.

2009-01-01

324

Spinal manipulative therapy versus Graston Technique in the treatment of non-specific thoracic spine pain: Design of a randomised controlled trial  

PubMed Central

Background The one year prevalence of thoracic back pain has been estimated as 17% compared to 64% for neck pain and 67% for low back pain. At present only one randomised controlled trial has been performed assessing the efficacy of spinal manipulative therapy (SMT) for thoracic spine pain. In addition no high quality trials have been performed to test the efficacy and effectiveness of Graston Technique® (GT), a soft tissue massage therapy using hand-held stainless steel instruments. The objective of this trial is to determine the efficacy of SMT and GT compared to a placebo for the treatment of non specific thoracic spine pain. Methods Eighty four eligible people with non specific thoracic pain mid back pain of six weeks or more will be randomised to one of three groups, either SMT, GT, or a placebo (de-tuned ultrasound). Each group will receive up to 10 supervised treatment sessions at the Murdoch University Chiropractic student clinic over a 4-week period. Treatment outcomes will be measured at baseline, one week after their first treatment, upon completion of the 4-week intervention period and at three, six and twelve months post randomisation. Outcome measures will include the Oswestry Back Pain Disability Index and the Visual Analogue Scale (VAS). Intention to treat analysis will be utilised in the statistical analysis of any group treatment effects. Trial Registration This trial was registered with the Australia and New Zealand Clinical Trials Registry on the 7th February 2008. Trial number: ACTRN12608000070336

Crothers, Amy; Walker, Bruce; French, Simon D

2008-01-01

325

Spontaneous resolution of symptoms associated with a facet synovial cyst in an adult female - a case report  

PubMed Central

Background: Facet cysts are implicated in neural compression in the lumbar spine. Surgery is the definitive treatment for symptomatic facet cysts since the failure rate for conservative treatment is quite high; however, the role of physical/manual medicine practitioners in the management of symptomatic facet cysts has not been well explored. This case report will add to the body of evidence of spontaneous resolution of symptoms associated with facet cysts in the chiropractic literature. Case: A 58 year old female presented with acute low back and right leg pain which she attributed to a series of exercise classes that involved frequent foot stomping. Physical examination did not elicit any objective evidence of radiculopathy but MRI and CT scans revealed a facet cyst impinging on the right L5 nerve root. Injections and surgery were recommended; however, the patient’s radicular symptoms completely resolved after three months without surgical intervention. Summary: There is currently a paucity of data in the literature regarding the chiropractor’s role in the management of symptomatic facet cysts. The case presented here has added to this literature and possible areas for future research have been explored.

Ngo, Trung; Decina, Philip; Hsu, William

2013-01-01

326

Management of neck pain in Royal Australian Air Force fast jet aircrew.  

PubMed

To examine the type and effectiveness of various strategies used by Royal Australian Air Force (RAAF) fast jet (FJ) aircrew in self-referral and management of flight-related neck pain, a 6-section, 18-question survey tool was distributed to 86 eligible RAAF aircrew. Selective results from the sections evaluating aircrew demographics, incidence of flight-related neck pain, and the self-referral strategies of aircrew to manage these injuries are presented here. Eighty-two RAAF FJ aircrew responded to the survey. Ninety-five percent of the respondents experienced flight-related neck pain. The most commonly sought treatment modalities were on-base medical and physiotherapy services. Many respondents reported that currently provided on-base treatment and ancillary services such as chiropractic therapy are the most effective in alleviating symptoms. Further investigation into the effectiveness and safety of these ancillary therapies needs to be performed to allow appropriate consideration of their place in the management of neck pain in FJ aircrew. PMID:21305970

Netto, Kevin; Hampson, Gregory; Oppermann, Brett; Carstairs, Greg; Aisbett, Brad

2011-01-01

327

Chronic pelvic pain.  

PubMed

Though there are myriad etiologies of CPP, common therapeutic targets include inflammation, somatic dysfunction, and psychological disturbances. Inflammation may be addressed not only with dietary changes including nutritional and botanical supplements but also with mind-body therapies. Somatic dysfunction may respond to manipulative therapies provided by osteopaths, naturopaths, chiropractors, and some physical therapists. Therapists may also offer visceral, craniosacral, myofascial, and other whole-body therapies, as can highly trained massage therapists and bodyworkers. Mental health care may be key in many cases. Integrative medicine heralds the return to a sense of the human being's intrinsic capacity for healing, incorporating the vitalism of many of the therapies' origins (traditional Chinese medicine, indigenous medicine, ayurveda, osteopathy, chiropractic, etc) with the gains made by a more reductionistic tradition. Given the complexity and wide variation of etiologies and symptoms of CPP, using an integrative approach may offer expanded therapeutic solutions. We must expand our capacity to listen to each patient-with ears, eyes, mind, heart, and hands. Each treatment plan may then be tailored to the unique history and perspective that lie within the individual. Doing so requires the essential elements of time, skill, and love. PMID:20085175

Herbert, Bettina

2010-01-01

328

Daily activity patterns of an adult experiencing lower back pain undergoing electro-acupuncture: a case study.  

PubMed

In the United States, adults experiencing lower back pain (LBP) have reported using alternative health care to manage symptoms. Chiropractic techniques, relaxation, and massage have been cited as the most commonly used alternative therapies. Electro-acupuncture (EA), along with conventional health care, has been found to be a useful complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) modality in alleviating the disability associated with LBP. The purpose of this single-subject case study was to evaluate the daily activity pattern effects of EA and CAM modality usage on pain intensity levels and functional status of an adult experiencing LBP. Activity patterns and pain intensity ratings were recorded for two consecutive weeks through the use of a daily pain diary in natural environments. Results from the data analyses revealed daily LBP intensity ratings ranging from slight to moderate pain. On average, the participant reported using approximately ten CAM modalities per day. The participant reported decreases in pain intensity levels, increases in energy levels, and feeling better after EA and acupuncture treatments, maintaining an exercise and weight loss regimen, taking megavitamins, drinking teas, praying, singing, and using humor, distraction, and relaxation techniques. Use of herbs and too much exercise were the least effective. Findings suggest that for this patient, EA and certain CAM modalities were effective interventions that promoted well-being and self-healing. In addition, the daily pain diary was found to provide rich research and assessment data. PMID:19944374

Koski, Bonnie L; Dunn, Karen S; Shebuski, Mark R

2009-12-01

329

Using computer-assisted learning to engage diverse learning styles in understanding business management principles.  

PubMed

Objective : Changes in small business and insurance present challenges for newly graduated chiropractors. Technology that reaches identified, diverse learning styles may assist the chiropractic student in business classes to meet course outcomes better. Thus, the purpose of our study is to determine if the use of technology-based instructional aids enhance students' mastery of course learning outcomes. Methods : Using convenience sampling, 86 students completed a survey assessing course learning outcomes, learning style, and the helpfulness of lecture and computer-assisted learning related to content mastery. Quantitative analyses occurred. Results : Although respondents reported not finding the computer-assisted learning as helpful as the lecture, significant relationships were found between pre- and post-assisted learning measures of the learning outcomes 1 and 2 for the visual and kinesthetic groups. Surprisingly, however, all learning style groups exhibited significant pre- and post-assisted learning appraisal relationships with learning outcomes 3 and 4. Conclusion : While evidence exists within the current study of a relationship between students' learning of the course content corollary to the use of technologic instructional aids, the exact nature of the relationship remains unclear. PMID:24087903

Frost, Mary E; Derby, Dustin C; Haan, Andrea G

2013-01-01

330

Conservative therapy for plantar fasciitis: a narrative review of randomized controlled trials  

PubMed Central

A narrative literature review of RCTs only, was conducted to ascertain which conservative treatments provide the best results for plantar fasciitis patients. Stretching, prefabricated and custom-made orthotics and night splints have all been scrutinized in numerous studies with mixed results. Chiropractic manipulative therapy has been examined in one study, with favorable results. Therapeutic ultrasound and low intensity laser therapy have been examined in one study apiece with unsatisfactory results. Based on the trials reviewed a trial of therapy beginning with low-cost, patient-centered treatments is recommended, particularly stretching, over-the-counter orthotics, and patient education. Several (but not all) of the reviewed articles indicated that custom-made orthoses are more beneficial for plantar fasciitis than over-the-counter orthotics. In the event these treatments do not provide satisfactory results, use of night splints should be considered. Based on this review, there is no support for the use of magnetic insoles for plantar fasciitis. Most of the studies were found to have at least one methodological flaw, including inadequate sample sizes, high drop-out rates, comparing multiple interventions to multiple interventions (thus making it difficult to determine the effect of each individual intervention) and lack of long-term follow-up. Outcome measure use between studies was inconsistent.

Stuber, Kent; Kristmanson, Kevyn

2006-01-01

331

Intradiscal Pressure Changes during Manual Cervical Distraction: A Cadaveric Study  

PubMed Central

The objective of this study was to measure intradiscal pressure (IDP) changes in the lower cervical spine during a manual cervical distraction (MCD) procedure. Incisions were made anteriorly, and pressure transducers were inserted into each nucleus at lower cervical discs. Four skilled doctors of chiropractic (DCs) performed MCD procedure on nine specimens in prone position with contacts at C5 or at C6 vertebrae with the headpiece in different positions. IDP changes, traction forces, and manually applied posterior-to-anterior forces were analyzed using descriptive statistics. IDP decreases were observed during MCD procedure at all lower cervical levels C4-C5, C5-C6, and C6-C7. The mean IDP decreases were as high as 168.7 KPa. Mean traction forces were as high as 119.2 N. Posterior-to-anterior forces applied during manual traction were as high as 82.6 N. Intraclinician reliability for IDP decrease was high for all four DCs. While two DCs had high intraclinician reliability for applied traction force, the other two DCs demonstrated only moderate reliability. IDP decreases were greatest during moving flexion and traction. They were progressevely less pronouced with neutral traction, fixed flexion and traction, and generalized traction.

Gudavalli, M. R.; Potluri, T.; Carandang, G.; Havey, R. M.; Voronov, L. I.; Cox, J. M.; Rowell, R. M.; Kruse, R. A.; Joachim, G. C.; Patwardhan, A. G.; Henderson, C. N. R.; Goertz, C.

2013-01-01

332

Complementary and alternative medicine: a survey of its use in pediatric oncology.  

PubMed

Background. The use of complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) is high among children and youths with chronic illnesses, including cancer. The objective of this study was to assess prevalence and patterns of CAM use among pediatric oncology outpatients in two academic clinics in Canada. Procedure. A survey was developed to ask patients (or their parents/guardians) presenting to oncology clinics at the Stollery Children's Hospital in Edmonton and the Children's Hospital of Eastern Ontario (CHEO) in Ottawa about current or previous use of CAM products and practices. Results. Of the 137 families approached, 129 completed the survey. Overall CAM use was 60.5% and was not significantly different between the two hospitals. The most commonly reported reason for not using CAM was lack of knowledge about it. The most common CAM products ever used were multivitamins (86.5%), vitamin C (43.2%), cold remedies (28.4%), teething remedies (27.5%), and calcium (23.0%). The most common CAM practices ever used were faith healing (51.0%), massage (46.8%), chiropractic (27.7%), and relaxation (25.5%). Many patients (40.8%) used CAM products at the same time as prescription drugs. Conclusion. CAM use was high among patients at two academic pediatric oncology clinics. Although most respondents felt that their CAM use was helpful, many were not discussing it with their physicians. PMID:24307910

Valji, Rafiaa; Adams, Denise; Dagenais, Simon; Clifford, Tammy; Baydala, Lola; King, W James; Vohra, Sunita

2013-01-01

333

Individualized multi-modal management of osteitis pubis in an Australian Rules footballer  

PubMed Central

Objective The purpose of this case report is to describe and discuss the successful management of osteitis pubis in a semi-elite Australian Rules football player through the utilization of an individualized multi-modal treatment approach provided by a chiropractor. Clinical Features A 20-year-old male semi-elite Australian Rules football player presented to a chiropractic clinic with groin pain of eight months duration. A clinical diagnosis of osteitis pubis was made through synthesis of the patient history and physical examination. Intervention and Outcome Treatment consisted of high velocity low amplitude spinal manipulative therapy, mechanically assisted adjusting techniques utilizing a hand-held mechanical thrusting instrument and drop piece table, myofascial release and active release soft tissue techniques, proprioceptive neuromuscular facilitation stretching, and an individually designed rehabilitation program. Resolution of signs and symptoms occurred over four weeks. No recurrence of injury was reported over a six-month period. Conclusions This case suggests that the implementation of an individualized multi-modal management approach directed specifically toward an athlete's deficiencies and requirements, may lead to a more rapid recovery from osteitis pubis.

Jarosz, Brett S.

2011-01-01

334

Quantification de la palpation dynamique : une ?tude de fid?lit? pour la rotation cervicale  

PubMed Central

BACKGROUND Motion palpation has been used as a diagnostic tool for vertebral subluxation, even though its reliability is questionable. Standardisation of palpation has proven substantially more reliable. A scale of assessment of a standardized palpation has not yet been tested for reliability. OBJECTIVE The measure of intraexaminer and interexaminer reliability of a scale of assessment for the standardized palpation of cervical rotation. DESIGN Intraexaminer study: Twelve chiropractic students were assessed by a blindfolded experienced clinician. Interexaminer study: Twelve regular patients with a history of neck problem were assessed by two chiropractors in a clinical setting. RESULTS Data analysis shows fair to strong reliability (k = 0.34 and 0.65) for the scale of assessment that was used. The results are comparable to other assessment scales used currently in practice. CONCLUSION The utilisation of a scale of assessment for standardised motion palpation may prove a useful clinical tool, as other common testing measures (tendon reflex, muscle tone, muscle strength) which use similar scale of assessment.

Marcotte, Justin

2005-01-01

335

Relative efficacy for radiation reducing methods in scoliotic patients  

SciTech Connect

Radiation dosages to sensitive organs in full spine radiography have in recent years been a concern of physicians as well as the general public. The spine is the prime target for exposure in scoliosis radiography, though the exposure usually necessitates irradiation of several radio-sensitive organs. In recent studies, various protection techniques have been used including various lead and aluminum filtration systems, altered patient positioning and varied tube-film distances. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the efficiency for radiation dosage reduction of three filtration systems used frequently in the chiropractic profession. The systems tested were the Nolan Multiple X-ray Filters, the Clear-Pb system and the Sportelli Wedge system. These systems were tested in seven configurations varying breast shielding, distance and patient positioning. All systems tested demonstrated significant radiation reductions to organs, especially breast tissue. The Clear-Pb system appeared to be the most effective for all organs except the breast, and the Sportelli Wedge system demonstrated the greatest reduction to breast tissue.

Aikenhead, J.; Triano, J.; Baker, J. (National College of Chiropractic, Lombard, IL (USA))

1989-08-01

336

Interexaminer reliability of the electromagnetic radiation receiver for determining lumbar spinal joint dysfunction in subjects with low back pain  

SciTech Connect

Twenty subjects (6 male, 14 female) with low back pain were examined by two experienced and licensed chiropractic doctors (E1 and E2). Both examiners examined the patients using a Toftness Electromagnetic Radiation Receiver (EMRR) and by manual palpation (MP) of the spinous processes. Interexaminer reliability was calculated at three sites (L3, L4, L5) for the following combinations: (a) E1,MP--E2,MP; (b) E1,EMRR--E2,EMRR; (c) E1,MP--E2,EMRR; and (d) E2,MP--E1,EMRR, and intraexaminer reliability was calculated for the following variables: (e) E1,MP--E1,EMRR; and (f) E2,MP--E2,EMRR. Results of a Kappa coefficient analysis for interexaminer reliability of the stated combinations and at the specific sites were: (a) -0.071, 0.400, 0.200; (b) -0.013, 0.100, -0.120; (c) 0.286, 0.300, 0.200; (d) -0.081, 0.000, 0.048. These results predominantly indicate a poor to fair interexaminer reliability. The results of a Kappa coefficient analysis for intraexaminer reliability of the stated combinations were: (e) 0.111, 0.400, 0.737; (f) 0.000, 0.100, 0.368. These results indicate a poor to fair reliability. It was concluded that in subjects with low back pain the EMRR may not be a reliable indicator of spinal joint dysfunction.

Gemmell, H.A.; Jacobson, B.H.; Edwards, S.W.; Heng, B.J.

1990-03-01

337

The state of systemic threat surveillance in some Australian health organisations.  

PubMed

Crises are preceded by the emission of a series of early warning signals. If detected, these act like triggers for organisational action in anticipation of a known or unknown threat. It is vitally important to detect these signals to enable proactive, preventative actions that limit the impact of ensuing damage. The extent of threat surveillance (signal detection) in health organisations is an unknown, so a cross-sectional survey was conducted to assess the degree to which signal detection mechanisms are used. The focus of signal detection mechanisms and their degree of organisational integration was also assessed, as were organisational attitudes to whistle-blowers. Participants were executives in hospitals, medical centres, aged care homes, pharmacies, dental clinics and physiotherapy, chiropractic and podiatry practices. The results show that health organisations have inadequate signal detection mechanisms focusing on a limited selection of threats. Organisations often fail to integrate and disperse their mechanisms and focus almost entirely on internal signals. A majority of the surveyed organisations failed to reward bearers of bad news. In conclusion, the health organisations surveyed lacked systematic and systemic threat surveillance processes and mechanisms that are essential if they are to become better prepared for crises. PMID:23315245

Canyon, Deon V

338

The state of risk prevention in a sample of Australian hospitals, medical centres and allied health services.  

PubMed

This paper reports on an investigation into five risk prevention factors (technology, people, organisational structure, culture and top management psychology) to inform organisational preparedness planning and to update managers on the state of health care services. Data were collected by means of a 10-question, cross-sectional survey of key decision-making executives in eight different types of 75 health care organisations. Many organisations were found to have deficient risk prevention practices and allied health organisations were considerably worse than health organisations. Forty per cent of hospitals and chiropractic practices had out-dated or poor technology. Results on organisational culture and structure found that many executives associate these factors with risk prevention, but none of them appreciate the relationship between these factors and crisis causation. Gaps and areas for improvement are identified and a change in top management attitude is recommended to address resource allocation and implement appropriate risk prevention systems and mechanisms. Reactive managers need to increase their awareness of risks in order to become capable of preventing them. Proactive managers are those who invest in risk prevention. PMID:22950809

Canyon, Deon V

2013-01-01

339

"Ostrich sign" indicates bilateral vertebral artery dissection.  

PubMed

Vertebral artery dissections (VADs) comprise about 2% of ischemic strokes and can be associated with trauma, chiropractic manipulation, motor vehicle collisions, whiplash, amusement park rides, golfing, and other motion-induced injuries to the neck. We present a case of bilateral extracranial VAD as a complication of conducting an orchestra. To our knowledge, this has not been documented in the literature. Conceivably, vigorous neck twisting in an inexperienced, amateur conductor may place excessive rotational forces upon mobile portions of the verterbral arteries, tear the intima, deposit subintimal blood that extends longitudinally, and cause neck pain and/or posterior fossa ischemic symptoms. Magnetic resonance angiography examinations of axially oriented slices of bilateral VADs resemble the face of an ostrich. This observation is similar to the "puppy sign," in which bilateral internal carotid artery dissections resemble the face of a dog. Craniocervical dissections of either the carotid or vertebral arteries have the potential to form an aneurysm, cause artery-to-artery embolism, or completely occlude the parent artery, resulting in an ischemic stroke. Because bilateral VADs in axial magnetic resonance angiographic sections stand out like the eyes of an ostrich, and because the fast identification of VADs is so critical, we eponymize this image the "ostrich sign." PMID:21440457

Rose, David Z; Husain, M Rizwan

2012-11-01

340

Acromial apophysitis in a 13-year-old adolescent boy: a common condition in an uncommon location  

PubMed Central

Objective Traction apophysitis is a common condition in physically active and skeletally immature adolescents. This case study describes the clinical presentation and plain film imaging of traction apophysitis of the acromion process of the scapula. Clinical Features A physically active 13-year-old adolescent boy presented to a chiropractic physician with an acute onset of moderate shoulder pain. Plain film radiographs of the shoulder were performed that revealed fragmentation, sclerosis, and irregularity of the left acromial apophysis. Intervention and Outcome The patient was treated with conservative therapy for 10 weeks, with complete resolution of symptoms. Follow-up radiographs 9 weeks later revealed no radiographic change in the appearance of the apophysis; however, clinical symptoms were absent. The apophyseal growth cartilage is the most vulnerable site in the muscle-tendon unit in the skeletally immature patient and is more susceptible to very small avulsion fractures. Repetitive microtrauma following chronic overuse at a tendon insertion site in a skeletally immature patient may result in traction apophysitis. Conclusions Acromial apophysitis should be included in the differential diagnosis when presented with a young active patient with shoulder pain. Early treatment with restriction of activities is important in the prevention of permanent injury to the acromial cartilaginous growth plate. This case demonstrates that a prompt diagnosis can be made with a careful history, physical examination, and conventional imaging.

Quinlan, Erin; Bogar, William C.

2012-01-01

341

The scholarship of critical review: improving quality and relevance  

PubMed Central

Objective To describe the process of scientific peer review as it is used in the manuscript submission process, assess threats and challenges to the peer review process, and to offer suggestions for enhancing its effectiveness. Discussion Peer review is often seen as one of the hallmarks of scientific publication. The primary goal of peer review is to improve the science within papers that are ultimately published, by helping an editor better understand the strengths and weaknesses of a given paper. This process, while fairly well studied within the medical field, has received almost no attention at all within chiropractic. This paper provides guidance to reviewers and potential reviewers which can help them to understand both the scientific and the human aspects of peer review. This is designed to elevate this function to one trusted by the profession rather than seen as simply another hurdle to overcome. Several future directions are offered, including unblinding the review process for transparency, conducting rigorous studies looking at peer review, and developing formal training programs for potential reviewers. Conclusion Peer review is likely to remain in force as a means to provide guidance to authors and editors about the rigor of submitted papers. However, the nature of peer review may be changing and editors and authors need to stay aware of the implications of these changes. Recommendations to open the process, study it and develop training programs are designed to ensure that the process remains as impartial as possible.

Lawrence, Dana; Ebrall, Phillip

2008-01-01

342

A research synthesis of therapeutic interventions for whiplash-associated disorder (WAD): Part 3 - interventions for subacute WAD  

PubMed Central

Whiplash-associated disorder (WAD) represents a significant public health problem, resulting in substantial social and economic costs throughout the industrialized world. While many treatments have been advocated for patients with WAD, scientific evidence supporting their effectiveness is often lacking. A systematic review was conducted to evaluate the strength of evidence associated with various WAD therapies. Multiple databases (including Web of Science, EMBASE and PubMed) were searched to identify all studies published from January 1980 through March 2009 that evaluated the effectiveness of any clearly defined treatment for acute (less than two weeks), subacute (two to 12 weeks) or chronic (longer than 12 weeks) WAD. The present article, the third in a five-part series, evaluates the evidence for interventions initiated during the subacute phase of WAD. Thirteen studies that met the inclusion criteria were identified, six of which were randomized controlled trials with ‘good’ overall methodology (median Physiotherapy Evidence Database score of 6). Although some evidence was identified to support the use of interdisciplinary interventions and chiropractic manipulation, the evidence was not strong for any of the evaluated treatments. There is a clear need for further research to evaluate interventions aimed at treating patients with subacute WAD because there are currently no interventions satisfactorily supported by the research literature.

Teasell, Robert W; McClure, J Andrew; Walton, David; Pretty, Jason; Salter, Katherine; Meyer, Matthew; Sequeira, Keith; Death, Barry

2010-01-01

343

Conservative management of a 31 year old male with left sided low back and leg pain: a case report  

PubMed Central

Objective: This case study reported the conservative management of a patient presenting with left sided low back and leg pain diagnosed as a left sided L5-S1 disc prolapse/herniation. Clinical features: A 31-year-old male recreational worker presented with left sided low back and leg pain for the previous 3–4 months that was exacerbated by prolonged sitting. Intervention and Outcome: The plan of management included interferential current, soft tissue trigger point and myofascial therapy, lateral recumbent manual low velocity, low amplitude traction mobilizations and pelvic blocking as necessary. Home care included heat, icing, neural mobilizations, repeated extension exercises, stretching, core muscle strengthening, as well as the avoidance of prolonged sitting and using a low back support in his work chair. The patient responded well after the first visit and his leg and back pain were almost completely resolved by the third visit. Summary: Conservative chiropractic care appears to reduce pain and improve mobility in this case of a L5-S1 disc herniation. Active rehabilitative treatment strategies are recommended before surgical referral.

Howell, Emily R.

2012-01-01

344

Complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) use by african american (AA) and caucasian american (CA) older adults in a rural setting: a descriptive, comparative study  

PubMed Central

Background The use of CAM is at an all time high. There is very little research that compares the use of CAM in elders by ethnicity in rural settings. The purpose of the study was to determine if there was a difference between African American and Caucasian American rural elders on use of CAM and self-reported satisfaction with CAM. Methods The design was a descriptive, comparative study of 183 elders who reported the number of CAM used and satisfaction with CAM. A convenience sample was recruited through community service organizations in the state of Mississippi. The availability of elders through the support groups, sampling bias, subject effect, and self-report were limitations of the study. Results The commonest examples of CAM used by rural elders were prayer, vitamins, exercise, meditation, herbs, chiropractic medicine, glucosamine, and music therapy. Significant findings on SES and marital status were calculated. Differences on ethnicity and demographic variables were significant for age, education, and the use of glucosamine. Conclusions Health care providers must be aware that elders are using CAM and are satisfied with their use. Identifying different uses of CAM by ethnicity is important for health care practitioners, impacting how health care is provided.

Cuellar, Norma; Aycock, Teresa; Cahill, Bridgett; Ford, Julie

2003-01-01

345

"C3, 4, 5 Keeps the Diaphragm Alive." Is phrenic nerve palsy part of the pathophysiological mechanism in strangulation and hanging? Should diaphragm paralysis be excluded in survived cases?: A review of the literature.  

PubMed

The phrenic nerve arises in the neck. It is formed from C3, C4, and C5 nerve fibers and descends along the anterior surface of the scalenus anterior muscle before entering the thorax to supply motor and sensory input to the diaphragm. Its anatomic location in the neck leaves the nerve vulnerable to traumatic injury. Phrenic nerve injury can arise as a result of transection, stretching or compression of the nerve, and may result in paralysis of the diaphragm. Consequences of diaphragm paralysis include respiratory compromise, gastrointestinal obstruction, and cardiac arrhythmias. There may be serious morbidity and onset of symptoms may be delayed. Cases of diaphragm paralysis occurring as a consequence of neck trauma are documented in the literature. In some cases, the forces involved are relatively minor and include whiplash injury, occurring in minor motor vehicle collisions, chiropractic manipulation, and compression of neck structures, including a case involving external neck compression by industrial machinery. It is concluded that phrenic nerve palsy might be part of the pathophysiological mechanism in strangulation and hanging, and clinical investigation to exclude diaphragm paralysis in survived cases should be considered. PMID:19935388

Davies, Susan J

2010-03-01

346

Classification of complementary and alternative medical practices: Family physicians' ratings of effectiveness.  

PubMed

ABSTRACTOBJECTIVETo develop a classification of complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) practices widely available in Canada based on physicians' effectiveness ratings of the therapies.DESIGNA self-administered postal questionnaire asking family physicians to rate their "belief in the degree of therapeutic effectiveness" of 15 CAM therapies.SETTINGProvince of Alberta.PARTICIPANTSA total of 875 family physicians.MAIN OUTCOME MEASURESDescriptive statistics of physicians' awareness of and effectiveness ratings for each of the therapies; factor analysis was applied to the ratings of the 15 therapies in order to explore whether or not the data support the proposed classification of CAM practices into categories of accepted and rejected.RESULTSPhysicians believed that acupuncture, massage therapy, chiropractic care, relaxation therapy, biofeedback, and spiritual or religious healing were effective when used in conjunction with biomedicine to treat chronic or psychosomatic indications. Physicians attributed little effectiveness to homeopathy or naturopathy, Feldenkrais or Alexander technique, Rolfing, herbal medicine, traditional Chinese medicine, and reflexology. The factor analysis revealed an underlying dimensionality to physicians' effectiveness ratings of the CAM therapies that supports the classification of these practices as either accepted or rejected.CONCLUSIONThis study provides Canadian family physicians with information concerning which CAM therapies are generally accepted by their peers as effective and which are not. PMID:19005130

Fries, Christopher J

2008-11-01

347

A 14-year-old competitive, high-level athlete with unilateral low back pain: case report  

PubMed Central

Objective: To detail the presentation of a male adolescent competitive high-level soccer player with left sided low back pain that occurred while playing soccer. This case will outline the importance of early detection, risk of progression and management of active spondylolysis in adolescent athletes. Clinical Features: The patient initially presented to a chiropractic sport specialist with left sided low back pain (9/10 on numeric pain scale rating) while kicking soccer balls with his left leg of one month duration. He was initially diagnosed with mechanical low back pain and successfully treated for acute pain management including removal from sport specific training and competition, soft tissue therapy and advice to rest. The chief complaint returned however, when the athlete resumed training and competition. A plain film imaging report suggested only postural alterations in an otherwise normal study of the lumbar spine. Computed tomography images taken three months later revealed a fracture at the left L5 pars interarticularis. Summary: The early detection of spondylolysis combined with an effective plan of management including rest and conservative therapy with a progressive return to play may allow competitive athletes to resume participation at an elite level.

Piper, Steven; DeGraauw, Christopher

2012-01-01

348

Disentangling manual muscle testing and Applied Kinesiology: critique and reinterpretation of a literature review  

PubMed Central

Cuthbert and Goodheart recently published a narrative review on the reliability and validity of manual muscle testing (MMT) in the Journal. The authors should be recognized for their effort to synthesize this vast body of literature. However, the review contains critical errors in the search methods, inclusion criteria, quality assessment, validity definitions, study interpretation, literature synthesis, generalizability of study findings, and conclusion formulation that merit a reconsideration of the authors' findings. Most importantly, a misunderstanding of the review could easily arise because the authors did not distinguish the general use of muscle strength testing from the specific applications that distinguish the Applied Kinesiology (AK) chiropractic technique. The article makes the fundamental error of implying that the reliability and validity of manual muscle testing lends some degree of credibility to the unique diagnostic procedures of AK. The purpose of this commentary is to provide a critical appraisal of the review, suggest conclusions consistent with the literature both reviewed and omitted, and extricate conclusions that can be made about AK in particular from those that can be made about MMT. When AK is disentangled from standard orthopedic muscle testing, the few studies evaluating unique AK procedures either refute or cannot support the validity of AK procedures as diagnostic tests. The evidence to date does not support the use of MMT for the diagnosis of organic disease or pre/subclinical conditions.

Haas, Mitchell; Cooperstein, Robert; Peterson, David

2007-01-01

349

Slipping Rib Syndrome in a Collegiate Swimmer: A Case Report  

PubMed Central

Objective: To present the unique case of a collegiate swimmer who experienced nearly 9 months of unresolved rib pain. Background: A 20-year-old collegiate swimmer was jumping up and down, warming up before a race, when she experienced pain in the area of her left lower rib cage. She completed the event and 2 additional events that day with moderate discomfort. The athlete was evaluated by a certified athletic trainer 3 days postinjury and followed up over the next 9 months with the team physician, a chiropractor, a nonsurgical sports medicine physician, and a thoracic surgeon. Differential Diagnosis: Intercostal strain, oblique strain, fractured rib, somatic dysfunction, hepatosplenic conditions, pleuritic chest pain, slipping rib syndrome. Treatment: The athlete underwent 4 months of conservative treatment (eg, activity modification, ice, ultrasound, hot packs, nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs) after the injury, independently sought chiropractic intervention (12 treatments) 4 to 6 months postinjury, was referred to physical therapy (10 visits) by a nonsurgical sports medicine physician 6 to 8 months postinjury, and finally underwent surgical intervention 9 months after the onset of the initial symptoms. Uniqueness: Slipping rib syndrome was first described in 1919. However, many health care professionals who are involved with diagnosing and treating athletes and active individuals (eg, athletic trainers, physicians) are relatively unfamiliar with this musculoskeletal condition. Conclusions: It is important for clinicians and team physicians to familiarize themselves with and consider the diagnosis of slipping rib syndrome when assessing and managing individuals with persistent abdominal and/or thoracic pain.

Udermann, Brian E; Cavanaugh, Daniel G; Gibson, Mark H; Doberstein, Scott T; Mayer, John M; Murray, Steven R

2005-01-01

350

Ankylosing spondylitis: recent breakthroughs in diagnosis and treatment  

PubMed Central

Ankylosing spondylitis (AS) is generally easy to diagnose when the characteristic findings of the “bamboo” spine and fused sacroiliac joints are present on radiographs. Unfortunately, these changes are usually seen late in the disease after tremendous suffering has been incurred by the patient. Diagnostic delay averages seven to ten years. Historically, once the diagnosis was made, the treatment options were often inadequate or poorly tolerated in many individuals. This condition most often starts in early adulthood when people are typically in the earlier stages of their careers, resulting in diminished workforce participation and decreased quality of life. If an individual has a family physician, this might be the first encounter with a healthcare provider. Quite often, the initial practitioner is sought at a public walk-in clinic or chiropractic office. In recent years, there have been two major developments in the management of AS that make earlier diagnosis possible and offer the hope of alleviating pain and preventing structural changes that result in loss of function. These developments include the use of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) to visualize the inflammatory changes in the sacroiliac joint and the axial spine, and the demonstration that tumor necrosis factor (TNF) blocking agents are highly efficacious in reducing spinal inflammation and possibly in slowing radiographic progression. This review outlines diagnostic strategies that can help identify AS in its earlier stages. Special attention is focused on treatment advances, including the use of anti-TNF agents, and how these medications have been incorporated into clinical recommendations for daily use.

Shaikh, Saeed A.

2007-01-01

351

Use of a multimodal conservative management protocol for the treatment of a patient with cervical radiculopathy  

PubMed Central

Objective The purpose of this study is to describe and discuss the treatment of a cervical disk herniation using a sequential multimodal conservative management approach. Clinical Features A 40-year-old man had complaints of headache and severe sharp neck pain radiating to his left shoulder down to his arm, forearm, and hand. Results of electromyography/nerve conduction studies were abnormal. Magnetic resonance imaging revealed a large disk protrusion at C5-C6 with indentation of the thecal sac and a spur at the posterior margin. Moderate left neural foraminal narrowing was present at C5-C6 with narrowed intervertebral disk space at C5-C6 and C6-C7. Intervention and Outcome High-velocity, low-amplitude chiropractic manipulation; electrotherapy; ice; and exercise were used for treatment. The Neck Disability Index was used as a primary and electromyography/nerve conduction studies as a secondary outcome measurement. Based on the Neck Disability Index, there was an overall 89.65% symptoms improvement from the baseline. Conclusions This case study demonstrated possible beneficial effects of the multimodal treatment approach in a patient with cervical radiculopathy.

Radpasand, Mohsen

2011-01-01

352

Effect of Pulsing in Low-Level Light Therapy  

PubMed Central

Background and Objective Low level light (or laser) therapy (LLLT) is a rapidly growing modality used in physical therapy, chiropractic, sports medicine and increasingly in mainstream medicine. LLLT is used to increase wound healing and tissue regeneration, to relieve pain and inflammation, to prevent tissue death, to mitigate degeneration in many neurological indications. While some agreement has emerged on the best wavelengths of light and a range of acceptable dosages to be used (irradiance and fluence), there is no agreement on whether continuous wave or pulsed light is best and on what factors govern the pulse parameters to be chosen. Study Design/Materials and Methods The published peer-reviewed literature was reviewed between 1970 and 2010. Results The basic molecular and cellular mechanisms of LLLT are discussed. The type of pulsed light sources available and the parameters that govern their pulse structure are outlined. Studies that have compared continuous wave and pulsed light in both animals and patients are reviewed. Frequencies used in other pulsed modalities used in physical therapy and biomedicine are compared to those used in LLLT. Conclusion There is some evidence that pulsed light does have effects that are different from those of continuous wave light. However further work is needed to define these effects for different disease conditions and pulse structures.

Hashmi, Javad T.; Huang, Ying-Ying; Sharma, Sulbha K.; Kurup, Divya Balachandran; De Taboada, Luis; Carroll, James D.; Hamblin, Michael R.

2010-01-01

353

Nine year longitudinal retrospective study of Taekwondo injuries  

PubMed Central

This retrospective longitudinal study aims to describe reported Taekwondo injuries and to examine associations between competitor experience level, age and gender, and the type, location, and mechanism of injury sustained. Additionally, we examined whether recent rule changes concerning increased point value of head shots in adult Taekwondo competition had affected injury incidence. This study was a summation of 9 years of data of competition injury reports, which included 904 injury reports spanning 58 individual competitions. The data was collected on standardized injury reports at time of injury during competition. Care was provided to the athletes, but the type of care provided was not included in the study. Participants included athletes injured during competition who sought care by the health care team, and for whom an injury report was filled out. The data analysis was performed at the Canadian Memorial Chiropractic College. The three most common locations of presenting injury were the head (19%), foot (16%), and thigh (9%). The most common mechanism of presenting injury was found to be a defensive kick (44%), followed by an offensive kick (35%). The most commonly diagnosed injuries were contusions (36%), sprains (19%), and strains (15%). Coloured belts had a higher incidence of contusions, while black belts sustained more joint irritation injuries. Black belts were more likely to suffer multiple injuries. Colored belts suffered more injuries while receiving a kick, while black belts had a larger influence of past history of injury. We found no significant difference in location or type of injury when comparing pre versus post rule change. The most common locations of injury are head, foot, and thigh respectively, and are areas for concern when considering preventative measures. Colour belt competitors are more likely to sustain contusions, which the authors believe is due to more aggressive tactics and lack of control. Those more likely to be injured tend to be younger than 18 years. Recent rule changes have no significant effect on head injuries.

Kazemi, Mohsen; Chudolinski, Artur; Turgeon, Matt; Simon, Aaron; Ho, Eric; Coombe, Lianne

2009-01-01

354

Use and Acceptance of Complementary and Alternative Medicine Among the General Population and Medical Personnel: A Systematic Review  

PubMed Central

Background The interest in complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) has increased during the past decade and the attitude of the general public is mainly positive, but the debate about the clinical effectiveness of these therapies remains controversial among many medical professionals. Methods We conducted a systematic search of the existing literature utilizing different databases, including PubMed/Medline, PSYNDEX, and PsycLit, to research the use and acceptance of CAM among the general population and medical personnel. A special focus on CAM-referring literature was set by limiting the PubMed search to “Complementary Medicine” and adding two other search engines: CAMbase (www.cambase.de) and CAMRESEARCH (www.camresearch.net). These engines were used to reveal publications that at the time of the review were not indexed in PubMed. Results A total of 16 papers met the scope criteria. Prevalence rates of CAM in each of the included studies were between 5% and 74.8%. We found a higher utilization of homeopathy and acupuncture in German-speaking countries. Excluding any form of spiritual prayer, the data demonstrate that chiropractic manipulation, herbal medicine, massage, and homeopathy were the therapies most commonly used by the general population. We identified sex, age, and education as predictors of CAM utilization: More users were women, middle aged, and more educated. The ailments most often associated with CAM utilization included back pain or pathology, depression, insomnia, severe headache or migraine, and stomach or intestinal illnesses. Medical students were the most critical toward CAM. Compared to students of other professions (ie, nursing students: 44.7%, pharmacy students: 18.2%), medical students reported the least consultation with a CAM practitioner (10%). Conclusions The present data demonstrate an increase of CAM usage from 1990 through 2006 in all countries investigated. We found geographical differences, as well as differences between the general population and medical personnel.

Frass, Michael; Strassl, Robert Paul; Friehs, Helmut; Mullner, Michael; Kundi, Michael; Kaye, Alan D.

2012-01-01

355

P05.07. Chronic Fatigue, Depression, and Sleep Disturbances in a 20-year-old Male Collegiate Basketball Player: A Case Report  

PubMed Central

Focus Areas: Integrative Approaches to Care, Mental Health Chronic fatigue and depression are 2 symptoms that are increasing in frequency in the offices of physicians. Many of these individuals need obvious dietary and lifestyle changes as primary management. In contrast, this case report illustrates a 20-year-old male collegiate basketball player suffering from chronic fatigue, depression, and abnormal sleep patterns. This patient was being treated by a specialty physician group with the diagnoses of chronic fatigue syndrome and overtraining syndrome. The patient was under the care of the same physician group at the time of his initial visit to a chiropractic physician that specialized in functional medicine. Adrenal stress panel showed that the patient was in second-stage adrenal syndrome. Pathological gastrointestinal testing revealed Helicobacter pylori, Giardia, Entamoeba histolytica, and Cryptosporidium parvum infections. Heavy metal toxicity of lead and mercury also were present in this individual. Abnormal amino acid levels were seen when evaluating organic cation transporter (OCT2) status. In addition to changing to an ancestral diet and recommending a core multivitamin, antioxidant, and essential fatty acid supplementation, other personalized recommendations were given to the patient according to the results of the functional labs. The patient was given recommended specific dosages of DHEA, licorice root, pregnenlone to reduce adrenal syndrome; botanical antimicrobial and antiparasitic supplementation; additional nutrients and silymarin to reduce heavy metal toxicity; and a protocols of 5-HTP and tyrosine to restore proper OCT2 function to presynaptic nerves. After treatment, the patient experienced restoration of normal sleep patterns and elimination of his depression and chronic fatigue and was able to exercise and maintain a normal lifestyle. This case showed that uncommon patient populations can suffer from chronic fatigue secondary to subclinical infections regardless of apparent health status and also that functional analysis of the organ systems of adrenal, gastrointestinal, and detoxification can assist in complex cases.

2013-01-01

356

Pediatric Vaccination and Vaccine-Preventable Disease Acquisition: Associations with Care by Complementary and Alternative Medicine Providers  

PubMed Central

This study investigated provider-based complementary/alternative medicine use and its association with receipt of recommended vaccinations by children aged 1–2 years and with acquisition of vaccine-preventable disease by children aged 1–17 years. Results were based on logistic regression analysis of insurance claims for pediatric enrollees covered by two insurance companies in Washington State during 2000–2003. Primary exposures were use of chiropractic, naturopathy, acupuncture, or massage practitioner services by pediatric enrollees or members of their immediate families. Outcomes included receipt by children aged 1–2 years of four vaccine combinations (or their component vaccines) covering seven diseases, and acquisition of vaccine-preventable diseases by enrollees aged 1–17 years. Children were significantly less likely to receive each of the four recommended vaccinations if they saw a naturopathic physician. Children who saw chiropractors were significantly less likely to receive each of three of the recommended vaccinations. Children aged 1–17 years were significantly more likely to be diagnosed with a vaccine-preventable disease if they received naturopathic care. Use of provider-based complementary/alternative medicine by other family members was not independently associated with early childhood vaccination status or disease acquisition. Pediatric use of complementary/alternative medicine in Washington State was significantly associated with reduced adherence to recommended pediatric vaccination schedules and with acquisition of vaccine-preventable disease. Interventions enlisting the participation of complementary/alternative medicine providers in immunization awareness and promotional activities could improve adherence rates and assist in efforts to improve public health.

Tyree, Patrick T.; Huebner, Colleen E.; Lafferty, William E.

2010-01-01

357

CAM Use in Pediatric Neurology: An Exploration of Concurrent Use with Conventional Medicine  

PubMed Central

Background Previous studies have found that up to 60% of children with neurologic conditions have tried complementary and alternative medicine (CAM). Objective To assess the use of CAM among patients presenting to neurology clinics at two academic centers in Canada. Methods A survey instrument was developed to inquire about use of CAM products and therapies, including reasons for use, perceived helpfulness, and concurrent use with conventional medicine, and administered to patients or their parents/guardians at the Stollery Children's Hospital in Edmonton and the Children's Hospital of Eastern Ontario (CHEO) in Ottawa. Results Overall CAM use at the Stollery was 78%, compared to 48% at CHEO. The most common CAM products used were multi-vitamins (84%), vitamin C (37%), homeopathic remedies (24%), and fish oil/omega 3 s (22%). The most common CAM practices used were massage (47%), chiropractic (37%), faith healing (18%), aromatherapy (16%), homeopathy (16%), and relaxation (16%). Many patients used CAM products at the same time as conventional medicine but just over half (57%) discussed this concurrent use with their physician. Conclusion CAM use is common in pediatric neurology patients and most respondents felt that it was helpful, with few or no harms associated. However, this use is often undisclosed, increasing possibility of interactions with conventional drugs. We urge clinicians to inquire about CAM use during routine history taking at every patient visit. Parents would clearly like more information about CAM from their specialty clinics; such information would be easier to share if more primary data were available about the safety and effectiveness of commonly used therapies.

Galicia-Connolly, Elaine; Adams, Denise; Bateman, Justin; Dagenais, Simon; Clifford, Tammy; Baydala, Lola; King, W. James; Vohra, Sunita

2014-01-01

358

Thoracolumbar spinal manipulation and the immediate impact on exercise performance  

PubMed Central

Objective The purpose of this study was to determine if thoracolumbar chiropractic manipulative therapy (CMT) had an immediate impact on exercise performance by measuring blood lactate concentration, exercise heart rate, and rating of perceived exertion during a treadmill-based graded exercise test (GXT). Methods Ten healthy, asymptomatic male and 10 female college students (age = 27.5 ± 3.7 years, height = 1.68 ± 0.09 m, body mass = 71.3 ± 11.6 kg: mean ± SD) were equally randomized into an AB:BA crossover study design. Ten participants were in the AB group, and 10 were in the BA group. The study involved 1 week of rest in between each of the 2 conditions: A (prone Diversified T12-L1 CMT) vs B (no CMT). Participants engaged in a treadmill GXT 5 minutes after each week's condition (A or B). Outcome measures were blood lactate concentration, exercise heart rate, and rating of perceived exertion monitored at the conclusion of each 3-minute stage of the GXT. The exercise test continued until the participant achieved greater than 8 mmol/L blood lactate, which correlates with maximal to near-maximal exercise effort. A dependent-samples t test was used to make comparisons between A and B conditions related to exercise performance. Results No statistically significant difference was shown among any exercise response dependent variables in this study. Conclusions The results of this research preliminarily suggest that CMT to T12-L1 does not immediately impact exercise performance during a treadmill-based GXT using healthy college students.

Ward, John S.; Coats, Jesse; Ramcharan, Michael; Humphries, Kelley; Tong, Tammy; Chu, Cheuk

2012-01-01

359

Demographic and Clinical Characteristics of New Patients Presenting to a Community Teaching Clinic  

PubMed Central

Purpose: We compare patient populations attending chiropractors in the field to those in teaching clinics to allow educational institutions to determine if students are exposed to a similar case mix. The purpose of our study was to describe and compare descriptively the clinical case mix of a recently opened community-based teaching clinic to previously published practice data. Methods: A retrospective descriptive cross-sectional study was conducted using new patient records completed at a clinic. Data were extracted using a specifically designed abstraction form. Results: We manually abstracted 649 files. A total of 580 new patient files was included in the analysis, among which 57.7% included female patients with a mean age of 43 years (SD 18), and 42.1% presented with a chief complaint of more than one year in duration. The vast majority of patients complained of spinal pain (81.4%), most commonly low back pain. Almost 92% of the diagnoses were classified as simple (sprain/strain). The average number of visits per patient was 7.4 (SD 11.3); 54.7% received spinal manipulation on their first visit. The majority of patients were referred by the treating intern (64.8%) and about 24% of patients were local residents. Conclusions: Our study contributed to the few studies detailing patients attending chiropractic academic teaching clinics. It provided benchmark demographic and clinical data that may be used for operational planning. Our study suggested that the case mix of this teaching clinic provides interns with appropriate learning opportunities to achieve entry to practice competencies.

Lishchyna, Natalia; Mior, Silvano

2012-01-01

360

Prevalence of facet joint pain in chronic spinal pain of cervical, thoracic, and lumbar regions  

PubMed Central

Background Facet joints are a clinically important source of chronic cervical, thoracic, and lumbar spine pain. The purpose of this study was to systematically evaluate the prevalence of facet joint pain by spinal region in patients with chronic spine pain referred to an interventional pain management practice. Methods Five hundred consecutive patients with chronic, non-specific spine pain were evaluated. The prevalence of facet joint pain was determined using controlled comparative local anesthetic blocks (1% lidocaine or 1% lidocaine followed by 0.25% bupivacaine), in accordance with the criteria established by the International Association for the Study of Pain (IASP). The study was performed in the United States in a non-university based ambulatory interventional pain management setting. Results The prevalence of facet joint pain in patients with chronic cervical spine pain was 55% 5(95% CI, 49% – 61%), with thoracic spine pain was 42% (95% CI, 30% – 53%), and in with lumbar spine pain was 31% (95% CI, 27% – 36%). The false-positive rate with single blocks with lidocaine was 63% (95% CI, 54% – 72%) in the cervical spine, 55% (95% CI, 39% – 78%) in the thoracic spine, and 27% (95% CI, 22% – 32%) in the lumbar spine. Conclusion This study demonstrated that in an interventional pain management setting, facet joints are clinically important spinal pain generators in a significant proportion of patients with chronic spinal pain. Because these patients typically have failed conservative management, including physical therapy, chiropractic treatment and analgesics, they may benefit from specific interventions designed to manage facet joint pain.

Manchikanti, Laxmaiah; Boswell, Mark V; Singh, Vijay; Pampati, Vidyasagar; Damron, Kim S; Beyer, Carla D

2004-01-01

361

Metastatic non-Hodgkin lymphoma presenting as low back pain and radiculopathy: a case report  

PubMed Central

Objective The purpose of this case report is to describe a case of metastatic non-Hodgkin lymphoma in the lumbar spine presenting as lumbar radiculopathy. Clinical Features A 46-year-old man sought care from his doctor of chiropractic for low back pain and right leg radiculopathy. The patient was referred for a magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scan to evaluate for a suspected disk herniation. The MRI scan revealed 2 lumbar pathologic compression fractures with cauda equina compression, and MRI short tau inversion recovery (STIR) sagittal image of the lumbar spine showed high signal in T12 and S2. Intervention and Outcome The patient was referred for an immediate consultation with his medical physician with the preliminary diagnosis of metastatic bone lesions or primary bone lesions of unknown etiology. The patient underwent bone biopsy, computed tomography, and positron emission tomography scanning and was diagnosed with small cell non-Hodgkin lymphoma with osseous metastasis. The patient underwent chemo- and radiation therapy, and the lymphoma is now in remission 18 months later. Conclusion This case describes the presentation of metastatic non-Hodgkin lymphoma as a possible contributing cause in a patient presenting with lumbar radiculopathy, a common musculoskeletal condition. As well, this case highlights the importance of STIR sequences as part of a routine lumbar spine MRI examination. Without the STIR sequences, the additional deposits in T12 and S1 would not have been readily appreciated. Although metastatic non-Hodgkin lymphoma of the spine is rare, it should be remembered in the differential diagnoses.

Roug, Inger K.; McCartney, Larry B.

2012-01-01

362

CAM and Cell Fate Targeting: Molecular and Energetic Insights into Cell Growth and Differentiation  

PubMed Central

Evidence-based medicine is switching from the analysis of single diseases at a time toward an integrated assessment of a diseased person. Complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) offers multiple holistic approaches, including osteopathy, homeopathy, chiropractic, acupuncture, herbal and energy medicine and meditation, all potentially impacting on major human diseases. It is now becoming evident that acupuncture can modify the expression of different endorphin genes and the expression of genes encoding for crucial transcription factors in cellular homeostasis. Extremely low frequency magnetic fields have been found to prime the commitment to a myocardial lineage in mouse embryonic stem cells, suggesting that magnetic energy may direct stem cell differentiation into specific cellular phenotypes without the aid of gene transfer technologies. This finding may pave the way to novel approaches in tissue engineering and regeneration. Different ginseng extracts have been shown to modulate growth and differentiation in pluripotent cells and to exert wound-healing and antitumor effects through opposing activities on the vascular system, prompting the hypothesis that ancient compounds may be the target for new logics in cell therapy. These observations and the subtle entanglement among different CAM systems suggest that CAM modalities may deeply affect both the signaling and transcriptional level of cellular homeostasis. Such a perception holds promises for a new era in CAM, prompting reproducible documentation of biological responses to CAM-related strategies and compounds. To this end, functional genomics and proteomics and the comprehension of the cell signaling networks may substantially contribute to the development of a molecular evidence–based CAM.

2005-01-01

363

Lateral and syndesmotic ankle sprain injuries: a narrative literature review  

PubMed Central

Objective The purpose of this article is to review the literature that discusses normal anatomy and biomechanics of the foot and ankle, mechanisms that may result in a lateral ankle sprain or syndesmotic sprain, and assessment and diagnostic procedures, and to present a treatment algorithm based on normal ligament healing principles. Methods Literature was searched for years 2000 to 2010 in PubMed and CINAHL. Key search terms were ankle sprain$, ankle injury and ankle injuries, inversion injury, proprioception, rehabilitation, physical therapy, anterior talofibular ligament, syndesmosis, syndesmotic injury, and ligament healing. Discussion Most ankle sprains respond favorably to nonsurgical treatment, such as those offered by physical therapists, doctors of chiropractic, and rehabilitation specialists. A comprehensive history and examination aid in diagnosing the severity and type of ankle sprain. Based on the diagnosis and an understanding of ligament healing properties, a progressive treatment regimen can be developed. During the acute inflammatory phase, the goal of care is to reduce inflammation and pain and to protect the ligament from further injury. During the reparative and remodeling phase, the goal is to progress the rehabilitation appropriately to facilitate healing and restore the mechanical strength and proprioception. Radiographic imaging techniques may need to be used to rule out fractures, complete ligament tears, or instability of the ankle mortise. A period of immobilization and ambulating with crutches in a nonweightbearing gait may be necessary to allow for proper ligament healing before commencing a more active treatment approach. Surgery should be considered in the case of grade 3 syndesmotic sprain injuries or those ankle sprains that are recalcitrant to conservative care. Conclusion An accurate diagnosis and prompt treatment can minimize an athlete's time lost from sport and prevent future reinjury. Most ankle sprains can be successfully managed using a nonsurgical approach.

Dubin, Joshua C.; Comeau, Doug; McClelland, Rebecca I.; Dubin, Rachel A.; Ferrel, Ernest

2011-01-01

364

Complementary and Alternative Medicine Use among Long-Term Survivors: A Pilot Study  

PubMed Central

No published survey has specifically addressed the beliefs, knowledge, and usage of complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) in long-term (5 to 20 years) lymphoma survivors alone. In this pilot project, 95 subjects were randomly selected from a population of 2,475 long-term lymphoma survivors and mailed a questionnaire. The median time from lymphoma diagnosis to completion of the questionnaire was 11 years (range 6-20). Overall, 68% (95% CI: 54-80%) of the long-term lymphoma survivors reported that they have used CAM, a rate higher than the estimated usage rate reported for the general population The most commonly used modalities were chiropractic (39%, 95% CI: 27-53%) and massage therapy (21%, 95% CI: 12-34%). Less than 10% used meditation (5%, 95% CI: 1-15%) and relaxation (7%, 95% CI: 2-17%). In terms of common herbal usage, 5% (95% CI: 1-15%) had used St. John’s Wort and 7% (95% CI: 2-17%) had used shark cartilage. While none of the patients reported that CAM usage was directed specifically towards treating their lymphoma, 4% (95% CI: 0-12%) of patients reported that CAM could cure cancer, and 14% (95% CI: 6-26%) reported that CAM could increase their feeling of control over their health. This pilot study suggests that long-term lymphoma survivors appear to use CAM at a rate higher than the general population. The use of potential agents of risk by the survivors and the lack of access to potentially beneficial modalities highlights the need for further study of CAM in this population.

Habermann, Thomas M.; Thompson, Carrie A; LaPlant, Betsy R.; Bauer, Brent A.; Janney, Carol A.; Clark, Matthew M.; Rummans, Teresa A.; Maurer, Matthew J.; Sloan, Jeff A.; Geyer, Susan M.; Cerhan, James R.

2011-01-01

365

Comparative effectiveness of open versus minimally invasive sacroiliac joint fusion  

PubMed Central

Background The mainstay of sacroiliac joint disruption/degenerative sacroiliitis therapy has been nonoperative management. This nonoperative management often includes a regimen of physical therapy, chiropractic treatment, therapeutic injections, and possibly radiofrequency ablation at the discretion of the treating physician. When these clinical treatments fail, sacroiliac joint fusion has been recommended as the standard treatment. Open and minimally invasive (MIS) surgical techniques are typical procedures. This study aims to compare the perioperative measures and Oswestry Disability Index (ODI) outcomes associated with each of these techniques. Methods A comparative retrospective chart review of patients with sacroiliac joint fusion and a minimum of 1 year of follow-up was performed. Perioperative measures and ODI scores were compared using the Fisher’s exact test and two nonparametric tests, ie, the Mann–Whitney U test and the Wilcoxon signed-rank test. The results are presented as percent or median with range, as appropriate. Results Forty-nine patients from two institutions underwent sacroiliac joint fusion between 2006 and 2012. Ten patients were excluded because of incomplete data, leaving 39 evaluable patients, of whom 22 underwent open and 17 underwent MIS sacroiliac joint fusion. The MIS group was significantly older (median age 66 [39–82] years) than the open group (median age 51 [34–74] years). Surgical time and hospital stay were significantly shorter in the MIS group than in the open group. Preoperative ODI was significantly greater in the open group (median 64 [44–78]) than in the MIS group (median 53 [14–84]). Postoperative improvement in ODI was statistically significant within and between groups, with MIS resulting in greater improvement. Conclusion The open and MIS sacroiliac joint fusion techniques resulted in statistically and clinically significant improvement for patients with degenerative sacroiliitis refractory to nonoperative management. However, the number of patients reaching the minimal clinically important difference and those showing overall improvement were greater in the MIS group.

Ledonio, Charles GT; Polly, David W; Swiontkowski, Marc F; Cummings, John T

2014-01-01

366

Prescriptive proprioceptive insoles and dental orthotics change the frontal plane position of the atlas (C1), mastoid, malar, temporal, and sphenoid bones: a preliminary study.  

PubMed

The purpose of this series of case studies was to determine if the frontal plane position of the cranial bones and atlas could be altered using dental orthotics, prescriptive insoles, or both concurrently. The cranial radiographs of four patients were reviewed for the study. Three of the patients were diagnosed as having a temporomandibular joint (TMJ) dysfunction and a preclinical clubfoot deformity. The fourth patient was diagnosed as having a TMJ dysfunction, a preclinical clubfoot deformity and a Catetgory II sacral occipital subluxation, as designated in the chiropractic's Sacro Occipital Technique (SOT). Each patient had a series of four cranial radiographs taken using a modified orthogonal protocol. In two patients, improvement towards orthogonal was achieved when using both prescriptive dental orthotics and prescriptive insoles concurrently. Improvement towards orthogonal was less apparent when using only the prescriptive dental orthotic. No improvement or a negative frontal plane shift was noted when using only the prescriptive proprioceptive insoles. In the third patient, the frontal plane position of the cranial bones and atlas increased (away from orthogonal) when using the generic proprioceptive insoles alone or in combination with a prescriptive dental orthotic. In the fourth patient, the frontal plane position of the cranial bones improved using the dental orthotic. However, the proprioceptive insoles, when used alone or in combination with the dental orthotic, increased the frontal plane position of the cranial bones and atlas. This study demonstrates that changes in the frontal plane position of the cranial and atlas bones can occur when using proprioceptive insoles and/or dental orthotics. PMID:24308104

Rothbart, Brian A

2013-10-01

367

The relationship between pelvic torsion and anatomical leg length inequality: a review of the literature?  

PubMed Central

Abstract Objective Although it is common to find assertions relating functional leg length inequality (LLI) to pelvic torsion and other states of subluxation, comments and/or data concerning anatomical LLI in this same context are uncommon. This review of the literature synthesizes the evidence on pelvic torsion in relation to anatomical LLI. Methods The literature was searched using the PubMed; Manual, Alternative, and Natural Therapy Index System; Allied and Complementary Medicine Database; Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health Literature; and Index to Chiropractic Literature databases for primary studies that related LLI, either artificially created or naturally occurring, to pelvic torsion. Extracted data included natural vs artificial LLI, method of creating or detecting LLI, subject selection, methodology for measuring pelvic torsion, and results. Results Nine English-language studies were retrieved published 1936-2004. Seven determined the impact of artificial, transient LLI on pelvic torsion, whereas 2 studied the effect of naturally occurring LLI. Conclusion Across varying methodologies for measuring LLI and pelvic torsion, a consistent, dose-related pattern was identified in which the innominate rotates anteriorly on the side of a shorter leg and posteriorly on the side of the longer leg. This finding was contrary to the common assertion that the ilium rotates posteriorly on the side of a short leg and vice versa. Practitioners of manual medicine who derive vectors for intervention based on leg checking procedures should consider the possibility that the direction of pelvic torsion may be variable depending on whether the LLI is of anatomical or functional origin.

Cooperstein, Robert; Lew, Makani

2009-01-01

368

CAM practitioners in the Australian health workforce: an underutilized resource  

PubMed Central

Background CAM practitioners are a valuable but underutilizes resource in Australian health care. Despite increasing public support for complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) little is known about the CAM workforce. Apart from the registered professions of chiropractic, osteopathy and Chinese medicine, accurate information about the number of CAM practitioners in the workforce has been difficult to obtain. It appears that many non-registered CAM practitioners, although highly qualified, are not working to their full capacity. Discussion Increasing public endorsement of CAM stands in contrast to the negative attitude toward the CAM workforce by some members of the medical and other health professions and by government policy makers. The marginalisation of the CAM workforce is evident in prejudicial attitudes held by some members of the medical and other health professions and its exclusion from government policy making. Inconsistent educational standards has meant that non-registered CAM practitioners, including highly qualified and competent ones, are frequently overlooked. Legitimising their contribution to the health workforce could alleviate workforce shortages and provide opportunities for redesigned job roles and new multidisciplinary teams. Priorities for better utilisation of the CAM workforce include establishing a guaranteed minimum education standard for more CAM occupation groups through national registration, providing interprofessional education that includes CAM practitioners, developing courses to upgrade CAM practitioners' professional skills in areas of indentified need, and increasing support for CAM research. Summary Marginalisation of the CAM workforce has disadvantaged those qualified and competent CAM practitioners who practise evidence-informed medicine on the basis of many years of university training. Legitimising and expanding the important contribution of CAM practitioners could alleviate projected health workforce shortages, particularly for the prevention and management of chronic health conditions and for health promotion.

2012-01-01

369

A within-subjects trial to test the equivalence of online and paper outcome measures: the Roland Morris Disability Questionnaire  

PubMed Central

Background Augmenting validated paper versions of existing outcome measures with an equivalent online version may offer substantial research advantages (cost, rapidity and reliability). However, equivalence of online and paper questionnaires cannot be assumed, nor can acceptability to respondents. The aim was to test whether online and written versions of the Roland Morris Disability Questionnaire (RMDQ), a standard measure of functional disability in back pain, are equivalent at both group and individual levels to establish whether they can be used interchangeably. Methods This is a within-participants equivalence study. 167 participants with back pain fully completed both the paper and online versions of the RMDQ in random order. Participants were recruited from a chiropractic clinic and patient support groups in Southern England. Limits of equivalence were pre-defined as 0.5 RMDQ points, the Bland-Altman range was calculated, and participants' comments were examined using content analysis. Results The mean score difference was 0.03 (SD = 1.43), with the 95% Confidence Interval falling entirely within our limits of equivalence (-0.19 to 0.25). The Bland-Altman range was -2.77 to 2.83 RMDQ points. Participants identified unique advantages and disadvantages associated with each version of the RMDQ. Conclusions The group and individual level data suggest that online and paper versions of the RMDQ are equivalent and can be used interchangeably. The Bland-Altman range appears to reflect the known measurement properties of the RMDQ. Furthermore, participants' comments confirmed the potential value to be had from offering them the choice of completing the RMDQ online or on paper.

2010-01-01

370

Delphi-derived development of a common core for measuring complementary and alternative medicine prevalence.  

PubMed

Assessing complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) use remains difficult due to many problems, not the least of which is defining therapies and modalities that should be considered as CAM. Members of the International Society for Complementary Medicine Research (ISCMR) participated in a Delphi process to identify a core listing of common CAM therapies presently in use in Western countries. Lists of practitioner-based and self-administered CAM were constructed based on previous population-based surveys and ranked by ISCMR researchers by perceived level of importance. A total of 64 (49%) ISCMR members responded to the first round of the Delphi process, and 39 of these (61%) responded during the second round. There was agreement across all geographic regions (United States, United Kingdom, Canada, and Western Europe) for the inclusion of herbal medicine, acupuncture, homeopathy, Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM), chiropractic, naturopathy, osteopathy, Ayurvedic medicine, and massage therapy in the core practitioner-based CAM list, and for homeopathy products, herbal supplements, TCM products, naturopathic products, and nutritional products in the self-administered list. This Delphi process, along with the existing literature, has demonstrated that (1) separate lists are required to measure practitioner-based and self-administered CAM; (2) timeframes should include both ever use and recent use; (3) researchers should measure and report prevalence estimates for each individual therapy so that direct comparisons can be made across studies, time, and populations; (4) the list of CAM therapies should include a core list and additionally those therapies appropriate to the geographic region, population, and the specific research questions addressed, and (5) intended populations and samples studied should be defined by the researcher so that the generalizability of findings can be assessed. Ultimately, it is important to find out what CAM modality people are using and if they are being helped by these interventions. PMID:19422299

Lachance, Laurie L; Hawthorne, Victor; Brien, Sarah; Hyland, Michael E; Lewith, George T; Verhoef, Marja J; Warber, Sara; Zick, Suzanna

2009-05-01

371

Scoliosis treatment using spinal manipulation and the Pettibon Weighting System(TM): a summary of 3 atypical presentations  

PubMed Central

Background Given the relative lack of treatment options for mild to moderate scoliosis, when the Cobb angle measurements fall below the 25–30° range, conservative manual therapies for scoliosis treatment have been increasingly investigated in recent years. In this case series, we present 3 specific cases of scoliosis. Case presentation Patient presentation, examination, intervention and outcomes are detailed for each case. The types of scoliosis presented here are left thoracic, idiopathic scoliosis after Harrington rod instrumentation, and a left thoracic scoliosis secondary to Scheuermann's Kyphosis. Each case carries its own clinical significance, in relation to clinical presentation. The first patient presented for chiropractic treatment with a 35° thoracic dextroscoliosis 18 years following Harrington Rod instrumentation and fusion. The second patient presented with a 22° thoracic levoscoliosis and concomitant Scheuermann's Disease. Finally, the third case summarizes the treatment of a patient with a primary 37° idiopathic thoracic levoscoliosis. Each patient was treated with a novel active rehabilitation program for varying lengths of time, including spinal manipulation and a patented external head and body weighting system. Following a course of treatment, consisting of clinic and home care treatments, post-treatment radiographs and examinations were conducted. Improvement in symptoms and daily function was obtained in all 3 cases. Concerning Cobb angle measurements, there was an apparent reduction in Cobb angle of 13°, 8°, and 16° over a maximum of 12 weeks of treatment. Conclusion Although mild to moderate reductions in Cobb angle measurements were achieved in these cases, these improvements may not be related to the symptomatic and functional improvements. The lack of a control also includes the possibility of a placebo effect. However, this study adds to the growing body of literature investigating methods by which mild to moderate cases of scoliosis can be treated conservatively. Further investigation is necessary to determine whether curve reduction and/or manipulation and/or placebo was responsible for the symptomatic and functional improvements noted in these cases.

Morningstar, Mark W; Joy, Timothy

2006-01-01

372

Machine-related occupational injuries in farm residents.  

PubMed

Farm machinery is an important contributor to the high rates of occupational injury in agriculture. As part of a population-based case-control study, we studied risk factors for machine-related farm injuries. Case patients were farm residents residing in a geographically defined area of central Wisconsin who experienced a farm injury associated with a tractor, farm implement, or other machine which required medical or chiropractic care from May 1990 through April 1992. Controls were selected from an ad hoc census of farm residents in the same area. Telephone interviews regarding demographic characteristics, safety behaviors, and farming practices were completed for 97.8% of 90 case patients and for 82.8% of 221 control subjects. Personal characteristics significantly associated with an increased risk of machine-related injury included the number of hours worked per week and working primarily as a farmer. Dairy farms, farms with nonresident workers, and large farms were associated with an increased risk of injury while farms with registered cows and farms where cows were fed in the barn even in summer experienced fewer injuries. Based on a logistic regression model, the independent risk factors for machine-related farm injury included hours worked per week (2% increased risk/nonresident workers on farm (odds ratio) (OR) = 2.32; 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.07 to 5.06), cows fed in barn in summer (OR = 0.28; 95% CI: 0.12 to 0.64), and registered cows on farm (OR = 0.36; 95% CI: 0.17 to 0.79). Farm safety practices did not appreciably influence the risk of machine-related farm injury. PMID:8680603

Layde, P M; Nordstrom, D L; Stueland, D; Brand, L; Olson, K A

1995-11-01

373

Complementary and alternative medicine: what's it all about?  

PubMed

A number of health-related interventions--from widespread therapies such as acupuncture, herbal medicine, homeopathy and yoga, to less well-known modalities such as Feldenkrais, iridology, reflexology and reiki--have increasingly come under the general heading of complementary and alternative medicine (CAM). A few, such as biofeedback, chiropractic and physical therapy, are considered conventional by some, alternative by others. Several national surveys estimate that around 40% of the US populace uses a CAM therapy in a given year. While a few people use CAM therapies instead of conventional medicine, the vast majority of CAM users continue to access the official health care system. Many, however, do not discuss their CAM use with their physician. Medical doctors, for their part, are sharply divided on their attitudes toward CAM, with strong advocates and vehement opponents writing and speaking about this issue. CAM therapists are even more diverse, spanning the spectrum from conventional-appearing registered and certified practitioners to iconoclasts promoting anomalous therapies in the place of conventional treatment. The majority, however, both respect and want to work with conventional medicine, as do their patients. Nearly everyone is calling for more and better evidence, and an ever-increasing number of randomized controlled trials and meta-analyses are now appearing in the literature. Over the past few years, a number of calls for "integrated medicine" have been made, and a few attempts at integrating CAM and conventional medicine have been launched. This article reviews these issues, citing our own interview-based work and the relevant literature. Whether the CAM phenomenon represents a short-lived social movement or the beginnings of a radical transformation of medicine has yet to be determined. PMID:11816777

Barrett, B

2001-01-01

374

Use of Complementary Therapies for Cancer Symptom Management: Results of the 2007 National Health Interview Survey  

PubMed Central

Abstract Objectives Complementary therapies are often used as adjuncts to conventional treatment by individuals with cancer. Patterns of use of these practices and products represent important data for health care providers in delivering adequate patient care. Design This study compared use of complementary therapies between the cancer and noncancer populations in the United States through secondary analyses of the 2007 National Health Interview Survey data. The analysis compared use by cancer survivors (those individuals self-reporting a diagnosis of cancer; n=1785) and individuals without cancer (n=21,585), as well as self-report of symptoms affecting health-related quality of life (HQoL). Results Data suggest similar patterns of use between cancer survivors and the general population; however, a greater percentage of cancer survivors use complementary modalities. Individuals with cancer reported a greater percentage of use of complementary therapies overall, with cancer status significantly associated with ever having used complementary and alternative medicine (p<0.001). The five most common complementary practices and products used by individuals with cancer and controls were vitamin/mineral supplements, prayer for self, intercessory prayer, chiropractic/osteopathic manipulation, and herbal therapies. Additionally, as might be expected, individuals with cancer experience greater frequency of deleterious symptoms associated with decreased HQoL. Individuals with cancer were more likely to sleep fewer than 7 hours (p=0.0108) or greater than 9 hours (p=0.0108), and have increased insomnia (p<0.001), excessive sleepiness (p<0.001), depression (p<0.001), and anxiety (p<0.001) versus those without cancer. Conclusions The current findings may inform health care providers about the use of complementary and integrative practices and products by patients with cancer in an effort to manage symptoms of the disease. Additionally, these results may also be used to promote research to define the merits of the use of such complementary and integrative practices and products.

Anderson, Joel G.

2012-01-01

375

Orthosis reduces breast pain and mechanical forces through natural and augmented breast tissue in women lying prone  

PubMed Central

Background Breast implant displacement or rupture can cause aesthetic problems and serious medical complications. Activities with prone positioning and loading of the anterior chest wall, such as massage, chiropractic or osteopathic therapies may increase the risk of implant failure and can also cause discomfort in women with natural breast tissue. Here we test the effectiveness of a newly developed orthosis on pain, mechanical pressure and displacement of breast tissue in women with cosmetic augmentation, post-mastectomy reconstruction, lactating or natural breast tissue. Methods Thirty-two females volunteers, aged 25–56 years with augmented, reconstructed, natural or lactating breast tissue and cup sizes B-F, participated in this open-label clinical trial. We measured pain perception, peak pressure, maximum force, and breast tissue displacement using different sizes of the orthosis compared to no orthosis. Different densities of the orthosis were also tested in a subgroup of women (n?=?7). Pain perception was rated using a validated 11-point visual-analogue scale. Peak pressure and maximum force were assessed using a bilateral set of capacitance-pliance® sensor strips whilst participants were load bearing in a prone position, and breast displacement was measured by magnetic-resonance-imaging. Results The orthosis significantly reduced pain, breast displacement and mechanical pressures in women with natural and augmented breast tissue in prone position. Greater relief of pain and greater reduction in mechanical forces were found with increased size and density of the orthosis. Use of the orthosis improved overall comfort by 64-100%, lowered peak pressure by up to 85% and maximum force by up to 96%. Medio-lateral displacement of breast tissue was reduced by 16%, resulting in a 51% desirable increase of breast tissue height. Conclusion Our study demonstrated that the newly developed orthosis significantly reduced pain, mechanical pressure and breast tissue displacement in women with augmented and natural breast tissue when lying prone. Our findings are of clinical significance, potentially reducing the risk of complication from prone activities in women with breast augmentation or reconstruction, as well as improving comfort whilst undergoing prone procedures. Trial registration Australia and New Zealand Clinical Trials Register, ACTRN12613000541707.

2014-01-01

376

Work-related musculoskeletal disorders in the automotive industry due to repetitive work - implications for rehabilitation  

PubMed Central

Background Musculoskeletal disorders (MSDs) due to repetitive work are common in manufacturing industries, such as the automotive industry. However, it's still unclear which MSDs of the upper limb are to be expected in the automotive industry in a first aid unit as well as in occupational precaution examinations. It is also unclear which examination method could be performed effectively for practical reasons and under rehabilitation aspects. Additionally, it was to discuss whether the conception of unspecific description for MSDs has advantages or disadvantages in contrast to a precise medical diagnosis. Methods We investigated the health status of two study populations working at two automotive plants in Germany. The first part included 67 consecutive patients who were seen for acute or chronic MSDs at the forearm over a 4-month period at the plants' medical services. Information about patients' working conditions and musculoskeletal symptoms was obtained during a standardized interview, which was followed by a standardized orthopedic-chiropractic physical examination. In the second part, 209 workers with daily exposure to video display terminals (VDT) completed a standardized questionnaire and were examined with function-oriented muscular tests on the occasion of their routine occupational precaution medical check-up. Results The majority of the 67 patients seen by the company's medical services were blue-collar works from the assembly lines and trainees rather than white-collar workers from offices. Rates of musculoskeletal complaints were disproportionately higher among experienced people performing new tasks and younger trainees. The most common MSD in this group were disorders of flexor tendons of the forearm. By contrast, among the 209 employees working at VDT disorders of the neck and shoulders were more common than discomfort in the forearm. A positive tendency between restricted rotation of the cervical vertebrae and years worked at VDT was observed. In addition, only less than 8% of unspecific disorders of the upper limb (esp. wrist and forearm) were found. Conclusions Functional tests for the upper limb seemed to be very helpful to give precise medical advice to the employees to prevent individual complaints. The results are also helpful for developing specific training programs before beginning new tasks as well as for rehabilitation reasons. There's no need to use uncertain terminology (such as RSI) as it may not be representative of the actual underlying disorders as diagnosed by more thorough physical examinations.

2010-01-01

377

THE ROLE OF PRISM GLASS AND POSTURAL RESTORATION IN MANAGING A COLLEGIATE BASEBALL PLAYER WITH BILATERAL SACROILIAC JOINT DYSFUNCTION: A CASE REPORT  

PubMed Central

Background and Purpose: Sacroiliac joint dysfunction (SIJD) is a condition affecting 15–30% of patients with low back pain seen in outpatient clinics. Currently there is no well?defined standard of care. The purpose of this case report is to discuss the multidisciplinary management between an athletic trainer and an optometrist for an athlete with bilateral SIJ dysfunction and a visual midline shift syndrome. Case Description: A 21?year?old collegiate baseball player reported to the athletic training room, presenting with low back pain of three day duration, with tenderness over both posterior superior iliac spines (PSIS) (left > right). His pain at its worse was a 7/10 on the Numeric Pain Scale (NPS). The pain increased to the point that it limited his activities of daily living (ADLs) including getting dressed, putting on his shoes, sleeping, and getting in and out of a car. Interventions: The athlete was initially treated using traditional muscle energy techniques (MET) based intervention to correct SIJD, and lumbar stabilization exercises directed by a licensed athletic trainer, as well as manipulation by a chiropractor. Three weeks of treatment did not prove to be beneficial with only a minimal (1 point on the NPRS) decrease in pain. The athlete was then referred to the head athletic trainer for consultation who prescribed orthotics, for bilateral rear?foot valgus, and Postural Restoration (PR) therapeutic exercises. After two weeks of orthotic use and PR exercises the athlete’s pain decreased one additional point on the NPRS. Due to lack of progress, an optometrist was then consulted. The neuro?optometrist prescribed 2 diopter base?down prisms to be worn two hours a day, for four weeks. After four weeks of prisms and new exercises, the athlete was asymptomatic and returned to full pain?free baseball participation without further complications. Outcomes: The Oswestry Disability Index Questionnaire (ODI) was 48% at initial (severe disability), 40% at five weeks and 0% at discharge. The Numeric Pain Scale (NPS) score went from 7/10 to 0/10. Discussion: The athlete demonstrated only minimal relief of symptoms following MET, therapeutic exercises, and chiropractic manipulation. Intervention using prism glasses and PR exercises, designed to optimize posture and correct his visual midline shift syndrome, led to complete resolution of his symptoms. Evidence Level: 3a

Boyle, Kyndall

2013-01-01

378

Development and psychometric evaluation of scales to measure professional confidence in manual medicine: a Rasch measurement approach  

PubMed Central

Background Health professionals in athletic training, chiropractic, osteopathy, and physiotherapy fields, require high-level knowledge and skills in their assessment and management of patients. This is important when communicating with patients and applying a range of manual procedures. Prior to embarking on professional practice, it is imperative to acquire optimal situation-specific levels of self-confidence for a beginner practitioner in these areas. In order to foster this professional self-confidence within the higher education context, it is necessary to have valid and reliable scales that can measure and track levels and how they change. This study reports on the development and psychometric analysis of two new scales, Patient Communication Confidence Scale (PCCS) and the Clinical Skills Confidence Scale (CSCS), to measure confidence in these two areas for students in manual medicine programs. The Rasch measurement model was used to guide the development of the scales and establish their psychometric properties. Methods The responses to 269 returned questionnaires over two occasions were submitted to psychometric analysis, with various aspects of the scales examined including: item thresholds; item fit; Differential Item Functioning; targeting; item locations; item dependencies; and reliability. To provide further evidence of validity, scores were correlated with two existing valid scales. Results Analyses showed that the scales provided valid and reliable measures of confidence for this sample of persons. High Person Separation Indices (0.96 for PCCS; 0.93 for SCSC) provided statistical evidence of reliability, meaning the scales are able to discriminate amongst persons with different levels of confidence. For the PCCS, item categories were operating as required, and for the CSCS only two items’ thresholds were slightly disordered. Three tests of fit revealed good fit to the model (indicating the internal consistency of both scales) and results of the correlations with two existing valid scales were consistent with expectations. Conclusions The importance of confidence cannot be overlooked in health education because students learning new information and skills, and dealing with challenging situations can be negatively impacted by a lack of confidence which can result in students disengaging from placements or leaving a program. Valid and reliable instruments are essential in tracking change in levels of confidence in specific skills over time and the examination of the degree of congruence between confidence and competence. Analysis of responses to the two confidence scales established that they are valid and reliable instruments.

2014-01-01

379

The Nordic Maintenance Care Program: Maintenance care - what happens during the consultation? Observations and patient questionnaires  

PubMed Central

Background Because maintenance care (MC) is frequently used by chiropractors in the management of patients with back pain, it is necessary to define the rationale, frequency and indications for MC consultations, and the contents of such consultations. The objectives of the two studies described in this article are: i) to determine the typical spacing between visits for MC patients and to compare MC and non-MC patients, ii) to describe the content of the MC consultation and to compare MC and non-MC patients and iii) to investigate the purposes of the MC program. Method In two studies, chiropractors who accepted the MC paradigm were invited to assist with the data collection. In study 1, patients seen by seven different chiropractors were observed by two chiropractic students. They noted the contents of the observed consultations. In study 2, ten chiropractors invited their MC patients to participate in an anonymous survey. Participants filled in a one page questionnaire containing questions on their view of the purposes and contents of their MC consultations. In addition, information was obtained on the duration between appointments in both studies. Results There were 178 valid records in study 1, and in study 2 the number of questionnaires received was 373. The time interval between MC visits was close to nine weeks and for non-MC consultations it was two weeks. The content of the consultations in study 1 was similar for MC and non-MC patients with treatment being the most time-consuming element followed by history taking/examination. MC consultations were slightly shorter than non-MC consultations. In study 2, the most common activities reported to have taken place were history taking and manipulative therapy. The most commonly reported purposes were to prevent recurring problems, to maintain best possible function and /or to stay as pain free as possible. Conclusions The results from these two studies indicate that MC consultations commonly take place with around two months intervals, and that history taking, examination and treatment are as important components in MC as in non-MC consultations. Further, the results demonstrate that most patients consider the goal to be secondary or tertiary prevention.

2012-01-01

380

Descriptive Epidemiology and Prior Healthcare Utilization of Patients in the Spine Patient Outcomes Research Trial's (SPORT) Three Observational Cohorts: Disc Herniation, Spinal Stenosis and Degenerative Spondylolisthesis  

PubMed Central

Study Design Prospective Observational Cohorts Objective To describe sociodemographic and clinical features, and non-operative (medical) resource utilization prior to enrollment, in patients who are candidates for surgical intervention for intervertebral disc herniation (IDH), spinal stenosis (SpS), and degenerative spondylolisthesis (DS) according to SPORT criteria. Summary of Background Data Intervertebral disc herniation, spinal stenosis, and degenerative spondylolisthesis with stenosis are the three most common diagnoses of low back and leg symptoms for which surgery is performed. There is a paucity of descriptive literature examining large patient cohorts for the relationships among baseline characteristics and medical resource utilization with these three diagnoses. Methods The Spine Patient Outcomes Research Trial (SPORT) conducts three randomized and three observational cohort studies of surgical and non-surgical treatments for patients with IDH, SPS, and DS. Baseline data include demographic information, prior treatments received, and functional status measured by SF-36 and the Oswestry Disability Index (ODI-AAOS/Modems version). The data presented represents all 1,417 patients (745 IDH, 368 SpS, 304 DS) enrolled in the SPORT observational cohorts. Multiple logistic regression was used to generate independent predictors of utilization adjusted for sociodemographic variables, diagnosis, and duration of symptoms. Results The average age was 41 years for the IDH group, 64 years for the SPS group, and 66 years for the DS group. At enrollment, IDH patients presented with the most pain as reported on the SF-36 (BP 26.2 vs 33 SPS and 33.7 DS) and were the most impaired (ODI 51 vs 42.3 SPS and 41.5 DS). IDH patients utilized more chiropractic treatment (42% vs 33% SPS and 26% DS); had more Emergency Department (ED) visits (21% vs 7 % SPS and 4% DS); and used more opiate analgesics (50% vs 29% SPS and 28% DS). After adjusting for age, gender, diagnosis, education, race, duration of symptoms, and compensation, Medicaid patients used significantly more opiate analgesics (58% Medicaid vs 41% no insurance, 42% employer, 33% Medicare, and 32% private) and had more ED visits compared to other insurance types. (31% Medicaid vs 22% no insurance, 16% employer, 3% Medicare, and 11% private). Conclusion IDH patients appear to have differences in sociodemographics, resource utilization, and functional impairment when compared to the SpS/DS patients. In addition, the differences in resource utilization for Medicaid patients may reflect differences in access to care. The data provided from these observational cohorts will serve as an important comparison to the SPORT randomized cohorts in the future.

Cummins, Justin; Lurie, Jon D.; Tosteson, Tor; Hanscom, Brett; Abdu, William A.; Birkmeyer, Nancy J. O.; Herkowitz, Harry; Weinstein, James

2009-01-01

381

Intra-oral myofascial therapy versus education and self-care in the treatment of chronic, myogenous temporomandibular disorder: a randomised, clinical trial  

PubMed Central

Background Myogenous temporomandibular disorders (TMD) are considered to be a common musculoskeletal condition. No studies exist comparing intra-oral myofascial therapies to education, self-care and exercise (ESC) for TMD. This study evaluated short-term differences in pain and mouth opening range between intra-oral myofascial therapy (IMT) and an ESC program. Methods Forty-six participants with chronic myogenous TMD (as assessed according to the Research Diagnostic Criteria Axis 1 procedure) were consecutively block randomised into either an IMT group or an ESC group. Each group received two sessions per week (for five weeks) of either IMT or short talks on the anatomy, physiology and biomechanics of the jaw plus instruction and supervision of self-care exercises. The sessions were conducted at the first author’s jaw pain and chiropractic clinic in Sydney, Australia. Primary outcome measures included pain at rest, upon opening and clenching, using an eleven point ordinal self reported pain scale. A secondary outcome measure consisted of maximum voluntary opening range in millimetres. Data were analysed using linear models for means and logistic regression for responder analysis. Results After adjusting for baseline, the IMT group had significantly lower average pain for all primary outcomes at 6 weeks compared to the ESC group (p?

2013-01-01

382

Neuro Emotional Technique for the treatment of trigger point sensitivity in chronic neck pain sufferers: A controlled clinical trial  

PubMed Central

Background Trigger points have been shown to be active in many myofascial pain syndromes. Treatment of trigger point pain and dysfunction may be explained through the mechanisms of central and peripheral paradigms. This study aimed to investigate whether the mind/body treatment of Neuro Emotional Technique (NET) could significantly relieve pain sensitivity of trigger points presenting in a cohort of chronic neck pain sufferers. Methods Sixty participants presenting to a private chiropractic clinic with chronic cervical pain as their primary complaint were sequentially allocated into treatment and control groups. Participants in the treatment group received a short course of Neuro Emotional Technique that consists of muscle testing, general semantics and Traditional Chinese Medicine. The control group received a sham NET protocol. Outcome measurements included pain assessment utilizing a visual analog scale and a pressure gauge algometer. Pain sensitivity was measured at four trigger point locations: suboccipital region (S); levator scapulae region (LS); sternocleidomastoid region (SCM) and temporomandibular region (TMJ). For each outcome measurement and each trigger point, we calculated the change in measurement between pre- and post- treatment. We then examined the relationships between these measurement changes and six independent variables (i.e. treatment group and the above five additional participant variables) using forward stepwise General Linear Model. Results The visual analog scale (0 to 10) had an improvement of 7.6 at S, 7.2 at LS, 7.5 at SCM and 7.1 at the TMJ in the treatment group compared with no improvement of at S, and an improvement of 0.04 at LS, 0.1 at SCM and 0.1 at the TMJ point in the control group, (P < 0.001). Conclusion After a short course of NET treatment, measurements of visual analog scale and pressure algometer recordings of four trigger point locations in a cohort of chronic neck pain sufferers were significantly improved when compared to a control group which received a sham protocol of NET. Chronic neck pain sufferers may benefit from NET treatment in the relief of trigger point sensitivity. Further research including long-term randomised controlled trials for the effect of NET on chronic neck pain, and other chronic pain syndromes are recommended. Trial Registration This trial has been registered and allocated the Australian Clinical Trials Registry (ACTR) number ACTRN012607000358448. The ACTR has met the requirements of the ICMJE's trials registration policy and is an ICMJE acceptable registry.

Bablis, Peter; Pollard, Henry; Bonello, Rod

2008-01-01

383

Access to complementary medicine via general practice.  

PubMed Central

BACKGROUND: The popularity of complementary medicine continues to be asserted by the professional associations and umbrella organisations of these therapies. Within conventional medicine there are also signs that attitudes towards some of the complementary therapies are changing. AIM: To describe the scale and scope of access to complementary therapies (acupuncture, chiropractic, homoeopathy, hypnotherapy, medical herbalism, and osteopathy) via general practice in England. DESIGN OF STUDY: A postal questionnaire sent to 1226 individual general practitioners (GPs) in a random cluster sample of GP partnerships in England. GPs received up to three reminders. SETTING: One in eight (1226) GP partnerships in England in 1995. METHOD: Postal questionnaire to assess estimates of the number of practices offering 'in-house' access to a range of complementary therapies or making National Health Service (NHS) referrals outside the practice; sources of funding for provision and variations by practice characteristics. RESULTS: A total of 964 GPs replied (78.6%). Of these, 760 provided detailed information. An estimated 39.5% (95% CI = 35%-43%) of GP partnerships in England provided access to some form of complementary therapy for their NHS patients. If all non-responding partnerships are assumed to be non-providers, the lowest possible estimate is 30.3%. An estimated 21.4% (95% CI = 19%-24%) were offering access via the provision of treatment by a member of the primary health care team, 6.1% (95% CI = 2%-10%) employed an 'independent' complementary therapist, and an estimated 24.6% of partnerships (95% CI = 21%-28%) had made NHS referrals for complementary therapies. The reported volume of provision within any individual service tended to be low. Acupuncture and homoeopathy were the most commonly available therapies. Patients made some payment for 25% of practice-based provision. Former fundholding practices were significantly more likely to offer complementary therapies than non-fundholding practices, (45% versus 36%, P = 0.02). Fundholding did not affect the range of therapies offered, and patients from former fundholding practices were no more likely to pay for treatment. CONCLUSION: Access to complementary health care for NHS patients was widespread in English general practices in 1995. This data suggests that a limited range of complementary therapies were acceptable to a large proportion of GPs. Fundholding clearly provided a mechanism for the provision of complementary therapies in primary care. Patterns of provision are likely to alter with the demise of fundholding and existing provision may significantly reduce unless the Primary Care Groups or Primary Care Trusts are prepared to support the 'levelling up' of some services.

Thomas, K J; Nicholl, J P; Fall, M

2001-01-01

384

Effectiveness of caudal epidural injections in discogram positive and negative chronic low back pain.  

PubMed

Epidural steroid injections are the most commonly used procedures to manage chronic low back pain in interventional pain management settings. The overall effectiveness of epidural steroid injections has been highly variable, and in the role has not been evaluated in patients discographically evaluated. One hundred consecutive patients, without evidence of disc herniation or radiculitis, who had failed to respond to conservative management with physical therapy, chiropractic and/or medical therapy, underwent discography utilizing strict criteria of concordant pain, and negative adjacent discs, after being judged to be negative for facet joint and/or sacroiliac joint pain utilizing comparative local anesthetic blocks. Any other type of response was considered negative. This study included 62 patients, who underwent caudal epidural steroid injections with Sarapin. They included Group I, comprised of 45 of 55 patients negative on provocative discography; and Group II, with 17 of 45 patients with positive provocative discography. Results showed that there was significant improvement in patients receiving caudal epidural injections, with a decrease in pain associated with improved physical, functional, and mental status; decreased narcotic intake, and increased return to work. The study showed that at 1 month, 100% of the patients evaluated showed significant improvement in both groups; this declined to 86% at 3 months in Group I, but remained at 100% in Group II, declining to 60% and 64% at 6 months in Group I and Group II, respectfully, with administration of one to three injections. Analysis with one to three injections, which included all (62) patients showed significant relief in 71% and 65% of the patients at 1 month, in 67% and 65% at 3 months, and in 47% and 41% at 6 months, in Group I and Group II, respectively. In conclusion, caudal epidural injections with or without steroids is an effective modality of treatment in managing chronic, persistent low back pain failing to respond to conservative modalities of treatments, in patients negative for facet joint and sacroiliac joint pain, whether positive or negative, on evaluation with provocative discography. PMID:16896354

Manchikanti, Laxmaiah; Singh, Vijay; Rivera, Jose J; Pampati, Vidyasagar; Beyer, Carla; Damron, Kim; Barnhill, Renee C

2002-01-01

385

Changes in anthropometric measurements, body composition, blood pressure, lipid profile, and testosterone in patients participating in a low-energy dietary intervention  

PubMed Central

Objective The purpose of this study was to describe changes in anthropometric measurements, body composition, blood pressure, lipid profile, and testosterone following a low–energy-density dietary intervention plus regimented supplementation program. Methods The study design was a pre-post intervention design without a control group. Normal participants were recruited from the faculty, staff, students, and community members from a chiropractic college to participate in a 21-day weight loss program. All participants (n = 49; 36 women, 13 men; 31 ± 10.3 years of age) received freshly prepared mostly vegan meals (breakfast, lunch, and dinner) that included 1200 to 1400 daily calories (5020.8 to 5857.6 J) for the women and 1600 to 1800 (6694.4 to 7531.2 J) daily calories for the men. Nutritional supplements containing enzymes that were intended to facilitate digestion, reduce cholesterol levels, increase metabolic rate, and mediate inflammatory processes were consumed 30 minutes before each meal. The regimented supplementation program included once-daily supplementation with a green drink that contained alfalfa, wheatgrass, apple cider vinegar, and fulvic acid throughout the study period. A cleanse supplementation containing magnesium, chia, flaxseed, lemon, camu camu, cat's claw, bentonite clay, tumeric, pau d'arco, chanca piedra, stevia, zeolite clay, slippery elm, garlic, ginger, peppermint, aloe, citrus bioflavonoids, and fulvic acid was added before each meal during week 2. During week 3, the cleanse supplementation was replaced with probiotic and prebiotic supplementation. Results Multiple paired t tests detected clinically meaningful reductions in weight (? 8.7 ± 5.54 lb) (? 3.9 ± 2.5 kg), total cholesterol (? 30.0 ± 29.77 mg/dL), and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (? 21.0 ± 25.20 mg/dL) (P < .05). There was a pre-post intervention increase in testosterone for men (111.0 ± 121.13 ng/dL, P < .05). Conclusions Weight loss and improvements in total cholesterol and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol levels occurred after a low–energy-density dietary intervention plus regimented supplementation program.

Balliett, Mary; Burke, Jeanmarie R.

2013-01-01

386

Translation and validation of the German version of the Bournemouth questionnaire for low back pain  

PubMed Central

Background Finding the best outcome measures for research and quality assurance purposes in terms of validity, sensitivity to change, length and ease of completion is crucial. The Bournemouth questionnaire for neck pain patients was recently translated and validated into German and found to be more sensitive to change than other commonly used questionnaires. However, the low back pain version is not yet available in German. Therefore the purpose of this study was to translate and validate the Bournemouth Questionnaire (BQ) for low back pain (LBP) into German. Methods The translation was done in 4 steps, translated and back-translated by two independent people and adapted and approved by an expert committee. Face validity was then done by 30 people who checked the questionnaire for comprehension. Test-retest reliability (reproducibility) was tested using 30 stable back pain patients. Internal consistency was tested using 108 low back patients. External construct validity, external longitudinal validity and responsiveness was tested against the German versions of the Oswestry Disability Index (ODI) and the SF-36 questionnaire using 108 patients from 5 different chiropractic clinics. Results The BQ showed high test-retest reliability (ICC?>?0.91) for all items and strong internal consistency (Cronbachs alpha?=?0.86 at baseline and 0.94 at 4 weeks). The BQ demonstrated good external construct and longitudinal construct validity with established measures. The effect sizes of the BQ were high and comparable with established measures. External construct validity and external longitudinal construct validity showed significant correlation for all 7 scales of the BQ with the relevant scales of the other questionnaires with one exception. External responsiveness results showed higher effect sizes for the BQ items and total score indicating better sensitivity to change than the compared measures. Conclusion The BQ for LBP was successfully translated and adapted into German. It was successfully tested for validity, consistency, and responsiveness against the German versions of the ODI and the SF-36. It is shorter, covers more domains than the ODI and is more sensitive to change than the other questionnaires.

2013-01-01

387

Review of methods used by chiropractors to determine the site for applying manipulation  

PubMed Central

Background With the development of increasing evidence for the use of manipulation in the management of musculoskeletal conditions, there is growing interest in identifying the appropriate indications for care. Recently, attempts have been made to develop clinical prediction rules, however the validity of these clinical prediction rules remains unclear and their impact on care delivery has yet to be established. The current study was designed to evaluate the literature on the validity and reliability of the more common methods used by doctors of chiropractic to inform the choice of the site at which to apply spinal manipulation. Methods Structured searches were conducted in Medline, PubMed, CINAHL and ICL, supported by hand searches of archives, to identify studies of the diagnostic reliability and validity of common methods used to identify the site of treatment application. To be included, studies were to present original data from studies of human subjects and be designed to address the region or location of care delivery. Only English language manuscripts from peer-reviewed journals were included. The quality of evidence was ranked using QUADAS for validity and QAREL for reliability, as appropriate. Data were extracted and synthesized, and were evaluated in terms of strength of evidence and the degree to which the evidence was favourable for clinical use of the method under investigation. Results A total of 2594 titles were screened from which 201 articles met all inclusion criteria. The spectrum of manuscript quality was quite broad, as was the degree to which the evidence favoured clinical application of the diagnostic methods reviewed. The most convincing favourable evidence was for methods which confirmed or provoked pain at a specific spinal segmental level or region. There was also high quality evidence supporting the use, with limitations, of static and motion palpation, and measures of leg length inequality. Evidence of mixed quality supported the use, with limitations, of postural evaluation. The evidence was unclear on the applicability of measures of stiffness and the use of spinal x-rays. The evidence was of mixed quality, but unfavourable for the use of manual muscle testing, skin conductance, surface electromyography and skin temperature measurement. Conclusions A considerable range of methods is in use for determining where in the spine to administer spinal manipulation. The currently published evidence falls across a spectrum ranging from strongly favourable to strongly unfavourable in regard to using these methods. In general, the stronger and more favourable evidence is for those procedures which take a direct measure of the presumptive site of care– methods involving pain provocation upon palpation or localized tissue examination. Procedures which involve some indirect assessment for identifying the manipulable lesion of the spine–such as skin conductance or thermography–tend not to be supported by the available evidence.

2013-01-01

388

Respiratory and allergic diseases: from upper respiratory tract infections to asthma.  

PubMed

Patients with asthma and allergic rhinitis may benefit from hydration and a diet low in sodium, omega-6 fatty acids, and transfatty acids, but high in omega-3 fatty acids (i.e., fish, almonds, walnuts, pumpkin, and flax seeds), onions, and fruits and vegetables (at least five servings a day). Physicians may need to be more cautious when prescribing antibiotics to children in their first year of life when they are born to families with a history of atopy. More research is needed to establish whether supplementation with probiotics (lactobacillus and bifidobacterium) during the first year of life or after antibiotic use decreases the risk of developing asthma and allergic rhinitis. Despite a theoretic basis for the use of vitamin C supplements in asthmatic patients, the evidence is still equivocal, and long-term studies are needed. The evidence is stronger for exercise-induced asthma, in which the use of vitamin C supplementation at a dosage of 1 to 2 g per day may be helpful. It is also possible that fish oil supplements, administered in a dosage of 1 to 1.2 g of EPA and DHA per day, also may be helpful to some patients with asthma. Long-term studies of fish oil and vitamin C are needed for more definite answers. For the patient interested in incorporating nutritional approaches, vitamin C and fish oils have a safe profile. However, aspirin-sensitive individuals should avoid fish oils, and red blood cell magnesium levels may help in making the decision whether to use additional magnesium supplements. Combination herbal formulas should be used in the treatment of asthma with medical supervision and in collaboration with an experienced herbalist or practitioner of TCM. Safe herbs, such as Boswellia and gingko, may be used singly as adjuncts to a comprehensive plan of care if the patient and practitioner have an interest in trying them while staying alert for drug-herb interactions. No data on the long-term use of these single herbs in asthma exist. For the motivated patient, mind-body interventions such as yoga, hypnosis, and biofeedback-assisted relaxation and breathing exercises are beneficial for stress reduction in general and may be helpful in further controlling asthma. Encouraging parents to learn how to massage their asthmatic children may appeal to some parents and provide benefits for parents and children alike. Acupuncture and chiropractic treatment cannot be recommended at this time, although some patients may derive benefit because of the placebo effect. For patients with allergic rhinitis, there are no good clinical research data on the use of quercetin and vitamin C. Similarly, freeze-dried stinging nettle leaves may be tried, but the applicable research evidence also is poor. Further studies are needed to assess the efficacy of these supplements and herbs. Homeopathic remedies based on extreme dilutions of the allergen may be beneficial in allergic rhinitis but require collaboration with an experienced homeopath. There are no research data on constitutional homeopathic approaches to asthma and allergic rhinitis. Patients with COPD are helped by exercise, pulmonary rehabilitation, and increased caloric protein and fat intake. Vitamin C and n-3 supplements are safe and reasonable; however, studies are needed to establish their efficacy in COPD. On the other hand, there are convincing data in favor of N-acetyl-cysteine supplementation for the patient with COPD at doses ranging between 400 and 1200 mg daily. Red blood cell magnesium levels may guide the use of magnesium replacement. The use of L-carnitine and coenzyme Q10 in patients with COPD needs further study. The addition of essential oils to the dietary regimen of patients with chronic bronchitis is worth exploring. Patients with upper respiratory tract infections can expect a shorter duration of symptoms by taking high doses of vitamin C (2 g) with zinc supplements, preferably the nasal zinc gel, at the onset of their symptoms. Adding an herb such as echinacea or Andrographis shortens the duration of the common cold. The one study on Elderberry's use for

Jaber, Raja

2002-06-01