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1

Chiropractic Research  

MedlinePLUS

... et al. (2013), Journal of the American Medical Association “[Chiropractic Manipulative Therapy] in conjunction with [standard medical care] ... Neck Pain In a study funded by NIH’s National Center for Complementary ... of chiropractic (DC), pain medication (over-the-counter pain relievers, ...

2

What Is Chiropractic?  

MedlinePLUS

What is Chiropractic? Chiropractic is a health care profession that focuses on disorders of the musculoskeletal system and the nervous system, and the effects of these disorders on general health. Chiropractic care is used most often to treat neuromusculoskeletal ...

3

Chiropractic Handbook.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The laws, rules and regulations of the State Education Department governing chiropractic practice in New York State are provided in this handbook. Requirements and procedures are also highlighted, and the forms for obtaining a license and first registration as a chiropractor are provided. The booklet is divided into the following sections:…

New York State Education Dept., Albany. Office of the Professions.

4

Chiropractic Handbook.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This reference guide contains laws, regulations, and licensing requirements and procedures governing chiropractic practice in New York State. Following a general introduction to professional regulation in New York State, licensure requirements are spelled out in detail, including general requirements, education requirements, examination…

New York State Education Dept., Albany. Office of the Professions.

5

Chiropractic: A Critical Evaluation  

Microsoft Academic Search

Chiropractic was defined by D.D. Palmer as “a science of healing without drugs.” About 60,000 chiropractors currently practice in North America, and, worldwide, billions are spent each year for their services. This article attempts to critically evaluate chiropractic. The specific topics include the history of chiropractic; the internal conflicts within the profession; the concepts of chiropractic, particularly those of subluxation

Edzard Ernst

2008-01-01

6

Mainstreaming chiropractic: tracing the American Chiropractic Association.  

PubMed

The American Chiropractic Association (ACA) as it is known today was formed by a series of amalgamations. Starting with the Universal Chiropractic Association (UCA) of 1906 and the original American Chiropractic Association (ACA) of 1922, the two associations merged to form the National Chiropractic Association (NCA) in 1930. This Association merged with the New American Chiropractic Association (ACA) formed by non-NCA Association members and a splinter group from the International Chiropractors Association (ICA) in 1963. The total merger including all of NCA's assets, facilities, resources, personnel and membership was completed by 1964. PMID:11613375

Plamondon, R L

1993-12-01

7

Chiropractic: An Introduction  

MedlinePLUS

... called “like cures like”). . Top If You Are Thinking About Seeking Chiropractic Care Ask about the chiropractor’s ... 137(12):965–973. Ernst E. Chiropractic: a critical evaluation. Journal of Pain and Symptom Management . 2008; ...

8

Educational Standards for Chiropractic Colleges.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The policy of accreditation for the chiropractic profession and educational standards for chiropractic colleges are presented. The following types are historical development of chiropractic accreditation; the structure and function of the Council on Chiropractic Education; and eligibility, procedures, and classifications for status as an…

Council on Chiropractic Education, Des Moines, IA.

9

History of Chiropractic Care  

MedlinePLUS

... is "doctor" as they are considered physicians under Medicare and in the overwhelming majority of states. The professional credentials abbreviation " D.C." means doctor of chiropractic. ACA also advocates in its Policies on Public Health that DCs may be referred to as (chiropractic) ...

10

Find a Doctor of Chiropractic  

MedlinePLUS

... is provided as a service of the American Chiropractic Association (ACA) and is intended to provide visitors with valuable material concerning the ACA and the chiropractic profession. All information provided is intended to be ...

11

Educational Standards for Chiropractic Colleges.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Contents include: background information on the historical development, purpose, structure, and function of chiropractic accreditation; accreditation policy (eligibility, procedures, classifications, commission actions, and reports); standards for chiropractic colleges (organization, administration, scholastic regulations curriculum, faculty,…

Council on Chiropractic Education, Des Moines, IA.

12

Chiropractic and the clinical art  

Microsoft Academic Search

Chiropractic is the largest 'unorthodox' health profession in the U.S.A. It is licensed in all 50 states and its services are covered by governmental and private health insurance. Yet chiropractic remains, in the opinion of medical commentators, an unscientific healing cult. Chiropractic holds that much illness is caused, directly or indirectly, by derangements in homeostasis that result from subtle vertebral

John L. Coulehan

1985-01-01

13

Chiropractic’s unique evolution and its future status  

PubMed Central

Chiropractic’s demise was regularly predicted but the AMA’s campaign to “contain and then eliminate” it did not succeed. Nor did chiropractic follow osteopathy toward fusion with medicine. D.D. and B.J. Palmer were charismatic outsiders who emphasized the differences between medicine and chiropractic. Chiropractic’s unique evolution and survival owed a lot to BJ’s activity in publishing books and brochures and in part, to motivating his followers to fight for separate and distinct licensure. This paper proposes that in the twenty-first century chiropractic is most likely to become well established as an independent limited medical profession like dentistry, podiatry, optometry, and psychology.

Wardwell, Walter I

1996-01-01

14

Chiropractic. New York State.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

A reference guide to laws, rules, and regulations that govern the chiropractic practice in New York State is presented. After an overview of professional regulation in the state, licensing requirements/procedures for chiropractors are described. Provisions of Title VIII, Articles 130 and 132, of the Education Law are also covered, along with…

New York State Education Dept., Albany. Office of the Professions.

15

American Chiropractic Association  

MedlinePLUS

... ACA is working for greater patient access to chiropractic and new opportunities for DCs to assist in meeting America's health care needs. Reimbursement ACA offers members a wide array of information to help improve insurance reimbursement and resolve claims issues. Publications and More ...

16

Department of Defense Chiropractic Internships  

PubMed Central

Objective: Department of Defense (DoD) chiropractic internships first began in July of 2001. At the time of this study, 30 New York Chiropractic College student interns had completed part of their clinical education within chiropractic clinics at either the National Naval Medical Center or Naval Hospital Camp Lejeune. The purpose of this study was to evaluate and compare the careers of DoD chiropractic internship participants with comparable nonparticipants in terms of demographics, professional activities, income, and satisfaction. Methods: Survey research was employed to gather data from DoD chiropractic internship participants and comparable nonparticipants. Statistical analysis was carried out to determine significant differences with a nominal significance level set as.05. Results: There were no statistically significant differences in demographics, professional activities, income, or career satisfaction between the 21 DoD chiropractic internship participants (70% response rate) and 35 internship nonparticipants (35% response rate). Conclusions: This study utilized practice parameters as a form of feedback for a comparative analysis of DoD chiropractic internship participants and nonparticipants and found no significant differences between these groups. Limitations of the study may have influenced the results. Opportunities for chiropractic students to train within these settings remains limited and should be further explored, as should additional research into this component of chiropractic clinical education. PMID:18483629

Dunn, Andrew S.

2006-01-01

17

Chiropractic. State of the Art.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The review covers: (1) the discipline (description, scientific theories and principles, its practice, contributions to the health field, and history); (2) the profession (a doctor profile, patients, students, and the American Chiropractic Association); (3) chiropractic education (colleges, career opportunities, standard basic curriculum,…

Schafer, R. C., Ed.

18

Early chiropractic education in Oregon  

PubMed Central

Chiropractic education in the northwestern United States has its origins in the Marsh School & Cure in 1904. Most of the early schools were located in Portland, Oregon, including the D.D. Palmer College of Chiropractic (1908-1910), and several of these had merged by 1912 or 1913 to form the Pacific Chiropractic College, forerunner of today's Western States College. The latter was organized as a non-profit institution during the Great Depression, and struggled not only to survive but to create a higher standard. The early broad-scope of chiropractic training in the state probably encouraged the liberal scope of practice enjoyed in Oregon to this day. ImagesFigure 2Figure 3Figure 4Figure 6Figure 7Figure 8Figure 9Figure 11Figure 12Figure 13Figure 14Figure 15Figure 16Figure 18Figure 19Figure 20Figure 21Figure 22Figure 24

Keating, Joseph C

2002-01-01

19

Dr. Tom Lawrence: a life in chiropractic  

PubMed Central

He dwelt within the chiropractic orbit from the cradle to the grave. Second-generation chiropractor Tom Lawrence was a successful professional and family man who followed in his father’s footsteps and fought the good fight to improve chiropractic within his state and nation. His passing closes a chapter of living memory of the middle years of the first chiropractic century. PMID:17549212

Keating, Joseph C

2005-01-01

20

Chiropractic utilization in Taekwondo athletes  

PubMed Central

The purpose of the present study was to examine chiropractic utilization following a sport-related injury among National Team members and other high level Taekwondo athletes. Methods Retrospective surveys were conducted among Canadian male and female Taekwondo athletes (Group A, n = 60) competing in a national tournament and National Taekwondo team athletes (Group B, n = 16) at a training camp. Results A response rate of 46.7% (Group A) and 100% (Group B) was achieved. Twenty five percent (n = 4) of Group A athletes reported never seen a doctor of chiropractic (DC) regarding their injuries. Over 12% (n = 2) reported visiting a DC often, while just over 6% (n = 1) reported that they usually visited the DC following an injury. When injured, over 36% (n = 7) of the National Team members visit their family physician, over 15% (n = 3) visit a chiropractor or physiotherapist and the remaining athletes (n = 6) equally visit osteopaths, massage therapists, or athletic therapist following an injury. Conclusion There is a lack of information surrounding chiropractic utilization in the majority of sports and minimal research published regarding the health care utilization of Taekwondo athletes. Chiropractors, and particularly those with extensive athlete contact, should endeavour to further utilization studies. PMID:18516286

Kazemi, Mohsen; Shearer, Heather

2008-01-01

21

Chiropractic patients in Denmark: A short description of basic characteristics  

Microsoft Academic Search

Background: The vast majority of information on chiropractic and chiropractic patients originates from English-speaking countries. Lately, however, reports describing chiropractic patients and practice in other European countries have emerged.Objective: To describe basic characteristics of Danish chiropractic patients.Design: Survey questionnaire. All chiropractic clinics in Denmark were asked to collect information on new patients during 1 randomly assigned week in 1999.Setting: Private

Jan Hartvigsen; Line P. Sorensen; Kristian Graesborg; Niels Grunnet-Nilsson

2002-01-01

22

Chiropractic and CAM Utilization: A Descriptive Review  

PubMed Central

Objective To conduct a descriptive review of the scientific literature examining use rates of modalities and procedures used by CAM clinicians to manage chronic LBP and other conditions Data Sources A literature of PubMed and MANTIS was performed using the key terms Chiropractic; Low Back Pain; Utilization Rate; Use Rate; Complementary and Alternative Medicine; and Health Services in various combinations. Data Selection A total of 137 papers were selected, based upon including information about chiropractic utilization, CAM utilization and low back pain and other conditions. Data Synthesis Information was extracted from each paper addressing use of chiropractic and CAM, and is summarized in tabular form. Results Thematic analysis of the paper topics indicated that there were 5 functional areas covered by the literature: back pain papers, general chiropractic papers, insurance-related papers, general CAM-related papers; and worker's compensation papers. Conclusion Studies looking at chiropractic utilization demonstrate that the rates vary, but generally fall into a range from around 6% to 12% of the population, most of whom seek chiropractic care for low back pain and not for organic disease or visceral dysfunction. CAM is itself used by people suffering from a variety of conditions, though it is often used not as a primary intervention, but rather as an additional form of care. CAM and chiropractic often offer lower costs for comparable results compared to conventional medicine. PMID:17241465

Lawrence, Dana J; Meeker, William C

2007-01-01

23

Constructing a philosophy of chiropractic: evolving worldviews and premodern roots?  

PubMed Central

Objective The philosophy of chiropractic can be framed as an attempt to correct the problems inherited from the Western Enlightenment. Its origins can be found in the long tradition of Western philosophy. The purpose of this article is to describe in a broad context chiropractic’s roots in premodernity and establish the structural and hermeneutical differences between chiropractic’s original philosophical ideas and those of premodern philosophers. Discussion The worldview or cultural mindset the philosophy arose from must be situated in the context of its time, the birth of the unique postmodern worldview, aperspectival consciousness, and the modern sense of self. This is accomplished by exploring several metatheories about the development of the self through history, with an emphasis on the premodern roots to the chiropractic terms; Universal Intelligence and Innate Intelligence. By contextualizing the philosophy of chiropractic in terms of a structural genealogy of the self and of ideas, a new approach to philosophy in chiropractic emerges. Conclusion Without accounting for chiropractic’s origins as a reflection of the unique time, place, and culture, in terms of the evolution of worldviews through history, any approach to construct or reconstruct a philosophy of chiropractic will potentially miss the seminal feature of chiropractic’s emergence. PMID:22693478

Senzon, Simon A.

2011-01-01

24

Chiropractic treatment of coccygodynia via instrumental adjusting procedures using activator methods chiropractic technique  

Microsoft Academic Search

Objective: To discuss a case of coccygodynia that responded favorably to conservative chiropractic adjusting procedures with the Activator Methods Chiropractic Technique (AMCT) and the Activator II Adjusting Instrument (AAI II). Clinical Features: A 29-year-old woman had unremitting coccygeal pain of 3 weeks' duration. The problem began after she had moved heavy boxes while at work. The pain was characterized by

Bradley S. Polkinghorn; Christopher J. Colloca

1999-01-01

25

The evolution of chiropractic orthopedists: a bootstrapping of clinical skills.  

PubMed

Spanning half of the chiropractic century, the development of the American Board of Chiropractic Orthopedists (ABCO) is a story of an educational bootstrapping that originated from the concerns of practicing field chirporactors. In the post World War II era, a need was determined to develop various principles and procedures of orthopedics in relation to chiropractic practice. Innovative chiropractors sought to promote greater levels of diagnostic precision within the profession by creating a post graduate program to teach advanced methods of physical and neuromusculoskeletal examination and treatment. Various specialty societies emerging after the 1947 creation of the professionally owned, non-profit Los Angeles College of Chiropractic provided a humble beginning for the task. Eventually, with its roots in the National Chiropractic Association, the ABCO and its predecessors were successful in enhancing the education of practicing doctors, instituting similar programs in chiropractic college curricula, contributing papers to chiropractic literature and providing groundwork for early chiropractic research pertaining to musculoskeletal disorders. PMID:11613406

Wentz, D S; Green, B N

1995-12-01

26

Development of the Murdoch Chiropractic Graduate Pledge  

PubMed Central

Purpose: This paper reviews the origins of the learned professions, the foundational concepts of professionalism, and the common elements within various healer's oaths. It then reveals the development of the Murdoch Chiropractic Graduate Pledge. Methods: A committee comprised of three Murdoch academics performed literature searches on the topic of professionalism and healer's oaths and utilized the Quaker consensus process to develop the Murdoch Chiropractic Graduate Pledge. Results: The committee in its deliberations utilized over 200 relevant papers and textbooks to formulate the Murdoch Chiropractic Graduate Pledge that was administered to the 2010 Murdoch School of Chiropractic and Sports Science graduates. The School of Chiropractic and Sports Science included professionalism as one of its strategic goals and began the process of curriculum review to align it with the goal of providing a curriculum that recognizes and emphasizes the development of professionalism. Conclusions: The reciting of a healer's oath such as the Hippocratic Oath is widely considered to be the first step in a new doctor's career. It is seen as the affirmation that a newly trained health care provider will use his or her newfound knowledge and skill exclusively for the benefit of mankind in an ethical manner. Born from the very meaning of the word profession, the tradition of recitation of a healer's oath is resurgent in health care. It is important for health care instructors to understand that the curriculum must be such that it contributes positively to the students' professional development. PMID:21048880

Simpson, J. Keith; Losco, Barrett; Young, Kenneth J.

2010-01-01

27

Should the chiropractic profession embrace the doctrine of informed consent?  

PubMed

This commentary provides a narrative review of the literature focusing on the use of a health care informed consent process in the United States. This article reviews the current positions of the World Medical Association, American Medical Association, American Chiropractic Association, Wisconsin and New Jersey State Courts, US Federal Government Office of Health Policy and Clinical Outcomes, and 1 college of chiropractic regarding the doctrine of informed consent. The authors recommend that the chiropractic profession embrace the doctrine of informed consent and promulgate it as a standard of care. The implementation of this doctrine by chiropractic physicians promotes and improves the safety of chiropractic interventions. PMID:19646372

Lehman, James J; Conwell, Timothy D; Sherman, Paul R

2008-09-01

28

Chiropractic as spine care: a model for the profession  

PubMed Central

Background More than 100 years after its inception the chiropractic profession has failed to define itself in a way that is understandable, credible and scientifically coherent. This failure has prevented the profession from establishing its cultural authority over any specific domain of health care. Objective To present a model for the chiropractic profession to establish cultural authority and increase market share of the public seeking chiropractic care. Discussion The continued failure by the chiropractic profession to remedy this state of affairs will pose a distinct threat to the future viability of the profession. Three specific characteristics of the profession are identified as impediments to the creation of a credible definition of chiropractic: Departures from accepted standards of professional ethics; reliance upon obsolete principles of chiropractic philosophy; and the promotion of chiropractors as primary care providers. A chiropractic professional identity should be based on spinal care as the defining clinical purpose of chiropractic, chiropractic as an integrated part of the healthcare mainstream, the rigorous implementation of accepted standards of professional ethics, chiropractors as portal-of-entry providers, the acceptance and promotion of evidence-based health care, and a conservative clinical approach. Conclusion This paper presents the spine care model as a means of developing chiropractic cultural authority and relevancy. The model is based on principles that would help integrate chiropractic care into the mainstream delivery system while still retaining self-identity for the profession. PMID:16000175

Nelson, Craig F; Lawrence, Dana J; Triano, John J; Bronfort, Gert; Perle, Stephen M; Metz, R Douglas; Hegetschweiler, Kurt; LaBrot, Thomas

2005-01-01

29

Risk of Vertebrobasilar Stroke and Chiropractic Care  

Microsoft Academic Search

\\u000a Study Design  Population-based, case-control and case-crossover study.\\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a Objective  To investigate associations between chiropractic visits and vertebrobasilar artery (VBA) stroke and to contrast this with\\u000a primary care physician (PCP) visits and VBA stroke.\\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a Summary of Background Data  Chiropractic care is popular for neck pain and headache, but may increase the risk for VBA dissection and stroke. Neck pain\\u000a and headache are common symptoms of

J. David Cassidy; Eleanor Boyle; Pierre Côté; Yaohua He; Sheilah Hogg-Johnson; Frank L. Silver; Susan J. Bondy

2008-01-01

30

Chiropractic Colleges Seek Legitimacy amid Financial Woes  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Many of the nation's chiropractic colleges, like other small colleges that rely heavily on tuition, are struggling to stay in business. At the same time that they are working to improve their stature in higher education and broadening their missions to increase their appeal, a number of the colleges are seeing enrollments plummet--and revenues are…

Fuller, Andrea

2012-01-01

31

Chiropractic treatment of chronic ‘whiplash’ injuries  

Microsoft Academic Search

Forty-three per cent of patients will suffer long-term symptoms following ‘whiplash’ injury, for which no conventional treatment has proven to be effective. A retrospective study was undertaken to determine the effects of chiropractic in a group of 28 patients who had been referred with chronic ‘whiplash’ syndrome. The severity of patients' symptoms was assessed before and after treatment using the

M. N. Woodward; J. C. H. Cook; M. F. Gargan; G. C. Bannister

1996-01-01

32

Chiropractic and CAM Utilization: A Descriptive Review  

Microsoft Academic Search

OBJECTIVE: To conduct a descriptive review of the scientific literature examining use rates of modalities and procedures used by CAM clinicians to manage chronic LBP and other conditions DATA SOURCES: A literature of PubMed and MANTIS was performed using the key terms Chiropractic; Low Back Pain; Utilization Rate; Use Rate; Complementary and Alternative Medicine; and Health Services in various combinations.

Dana J Lawrence; William C Meeker

2007-01-01

33

Pregnancy and chiropractic: a narrative review of the literature  

PubMed Central

Abstract Objective The purpose of this article is to review the literature on the topic of chiropractic care during pregnancy. Methods A PubMed search was performed using the terms pregnancy and chiropractic. Sources were cross-referenced to obtain further articles and research information after reviewing the articles obtained through the search. Results Thirty-three references were used for this review. The current literature reports favorable results on the use of chiropractic care throughout pregnancy. Conclusions Chiropractic evaluation and treatment during pregnancy may be considered a safe and effective means of treating common musculoskeletal symptoms that affect pregnant patients. The scarcity of published literature warrants further research. PMID:19674697

Borggren, Cara L.

2007-01-01

34

Chiropractic management of a patient with persistent headache  

PubMed Central

Objective The purpose of this case report is to describe chiropractic care of a patient with persistent headache treated using chiropractic manipulative therapy and adjunct treatments. Clinical features A 54-year-old multiparous woman had chronic debilitating headaches for 11 months. Previous care from a variety of specialties had brought no appreciable relief. Intervention and outcome The patient was managed with chiropractic manipulative therapy, injections, and electromagnetic therapy. Five treatments over 6 weeks brought resolution of the headaches. Conclusion This patient with persistent headache responded favorably to a course of chiropractic and adjunctive care. PMID:24396331

West, Jason; Phillips, Reed B.

2013-01-01

35

PRE-CHIROPRACTIC Undergraduate Credit Required: 90 hours or Bachelor's degree*  

E-print Network

PRE-CHIROPRACTIC Undergraduate Credit Required: 90 hours or Bachelor's degree* Entrance Exam: None Professional Schooling Required: 3-4 years; Doctor of Chiropractic degree Local Professional Schools: None of Chiropractic Colleges) REQUIRED AND SUGGESTED COURSES Specific admission requirements vary per chiropractic

Logan, David

36

PRE-CHIROPRACTIC MEDICINE College of Liberal Arts & Sciences Advising Center  

E-print Network

PRE-CHIROPRACTIC MEDICINE College of Liberal Arts & Sciences Advising Center 387 Cramer Hall, (503) 725-3822, askclas@pdx.edu PORTLAND STATE UNIVERSITY Chiropractic practice is based on the concept Chiropractic College (WSCC) in Portland, Oregon. Students admitted to a chiropractic college such as WSCC earn

37

Iowa Chiropractic Students Outlook for Practitioners and Need for State-Funded Assistance.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This state-mandated study examined the needs of Iowa chiropractic students and the Iowa demand for chiropractic health care in order to determine the feasibility of establishing a chiropractic forgivable loan program. The project used financial aid data and repayment rate data to evaluate the need for financial aid for chiropractic students;…

Greiner, Keith

38

Cleveland chiropractic: the early years, 1917-1933.  

PubMed

Although the Cleveland family is well known in the profession for the two colleges that carry its name, relatively few of the details of the early activities of these chiropractic pioneers are recalled. This paper traces the early lives and careers of Ruth Ashworth and Carl S. Cleveland, Sr. from their education and marriage at the Palmer School in 1917 through their college operations and national professional activities before the start of the National Chiropractic Association's educational reform initiatives in the mid-1930s. The pair was active in Missouri chiropractors' struggles for licensure in the 1920s and fought to prevent the enactment of basic science legislation later on. The Clevelands remained allied to B. J. Palmer and the Chiropractic Health Bureau (today's International Chiropractors' Association) after the introduction of the neurocalometer (NCM) in 1924. However, they followed a less strident and less extreme course within straight chiropractic than did their Davenport mentor. The Cleveland College perpetuated a full-spine approach to chiropractic technique and always included diagnostic instruction. In the late 1920s and early 1930s, Carl Cleveland's more moderate stance found favor within the unification efforts centered in the International Chiropractic Congress, and he served during 1931-1933 as president of the Congress' division of school leaders. The Cleveland Chiropractic College's battle for economic survival during the lean days of the nation's economic depression is a testimony to its founders' vision and commitment to chiropractic education. PMID:8792322

Keating, J C; Cleveland, C S

1996-06-01

39

Diversity in the chiropractic profession: preparing for 2050.  

PubMed

As the diversity of the United States (US) population continues to change, concerns about minority health and health disparities grow. Health professions must evolve to meet the needs of the population. The purpose of this editorial is to review current trends in the diversity of chiropractic students, faculty, and practitioners in the United States. This editorial was informed by a search of the literature, to include PubMed, using the terms chiropractic and diversity, minority, and cultural competency. Demographic information for the chiropractic profession was obtained from the National Board of Chiropractic Examiners and The Chronicle of Higher Education. These data were compared to diversity data for medical doctors and the national and state populations from the American Association of Medical Colleges and the US Census, respectively. Surprisingly little has been published in the peer-reviewed literature on the topic of diversity in the chiropractic profession. For the variables available (sex and race), the data show that proportions in the US chiropractic profession do not match the population. State comparisons to associated chiropractic colleges show similar relationships. No reliable data were found on other diversity characteristics, such as gender identity, religion, and socioeconomic status. The chiropractic profession in the United States currently does not represent the national population with regard to sex and race. Leaders in the profession should develop a strategy to better meet the changing demographics of the US population. More attention to recruiting and retaining students, such as underrepresented minorities and women, and establishing improved cultural competency is needed. PMID:22778525

Johnson, Claire D; Green, Bart N

2012-01-01

40

Rating specific chiropractic technique procedures for common low back conditions  

Microsoft Academic Search

Objective: To rate specific chiropractic technique procedures used in the treatment of common low back conditions.Design and Methods: A panel of chiropractors rated specific chiropractic technique procedures for their effectiveness in the treatment of common low back conditions, based on the quality of supporting evidence after systematic literature reviews and expert clinical opinion. Statements related to the rating process and

Meridel I. Gatterman; Robert Cooperstein; Charles Lantz; Stephen M. Perle; Michael J. Schneider

2001-01-01

41

National Board Scores versus Student GPA's in Chiropractic Education.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The relationship between student GPAs and scores on the National Board of Chiropractic Examiners tests was investigated in an effort to determine if the chiropractic curriculum was properly preparing students to be licensed. The study found that there was a significant correlation between GPAs and board scores. (Author/MLW)

Kalthoff, Theodore J.

1985-01-01

42

Patient satisfaction with chiropractic physicians in an independent physicians' association  

Microsoft Academic Search

Background: Satisfaction with care is one of the variables that can be used in determining the results of medical care. Patient satisfaction surveys allow managed care plans to determine how well their providers meet certain standards. Objective: To determine the level of satisfaction with chiropractic care in a random sample of patients seen by physician members of a chiropractic independent

Hugh A. Gemmell; Brad M. Hayes

2001-01-01

43

Expectations of chiropractic patients: The construction of a questionnaire  

Microsoft Academic Search

Background: Because chiropractic has increasingly been incorporated into the National Health Services and insurance company policies, it is important to evaluate treatment outcome and patient satisfaction. There are conflicting views about whether expectation plays a role in patient satisfaction.Objective: To design a questionnaire that can be used to identify patients' expectations of chiropractic management.Methods: A series of 5 questionnaires relating

Håkan Sigrell

2001-01-01

44

Chiropractic Use by Urban and Rural Residents with Insurance Coverage  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Purpose: To describe the use of chiropractic care by urban and rural residents in Washington state with musculoskeletal diagnoses, all of whom have insurance coverage for this care. The analyses investigate whether restricting the analyses to insured individuals attenuates previously reported differences in the prevalence of chiropractic use…

Lind, Bonnie K.; Diehr, Paula K.; Grembowski, David E.; Lafferty, William E.

2009-01-01

45

Status of Activator Methods Chiropractic Technique, Theory, and Practice  

Microsoft Academic Search

Objective: To provide an historical overview, description, synthesis, and critique of the Activator Adjusting Instrument (AAI) and Activator Methods Chiropractic Technique of clinical assessment. Methods: Online resources were searched including Index to Chiropractic Literature, EBSCO Online, MANTIS, CHIROLARS, CINAHL, eJournals, Ovid, MDConsult, Lane Catalog, SU Catalog, and Pubmed. Relevant peer-reviewed studies, commentaries, and reviews were selected. Studies fell into 2

Arlan W. Fuhr; J. Michael Menke

2005-01-01

46

78 FR 48904 - United States v. Chiropractic Associates, Ltd. of South Dakota; Public Comment and Response on...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

...Antitrust Division United States v. Chiropractic Associates, Ltd. of South Dakota...Final Judgment in United States v. Chiropractic Associates, Ltd. of South Dakota...STATES OF AMERICA, Plaintiff, v. CHIROPRACTIC ASSOCIATES, LTD. OF SOUTH...

2013-08-12

47

Chiropractic management of chronic idiopathic meralgia paresthetica: a case study  

PubMed Central

Objectives This report describes the case of a patient with chronic idiopathic meralgia paresthetica associated with bilateral sacroiliac joint dysfunction who was managed with chiropractic care. Clinical Features A 35-year-old white woman presented to a private chiropractic clinic with a complaint of numbness in the right anterolateral thigh region. Neurological assessment revealed a diminution of sensibility and discrimination on the right lateral femoral cutaneous nerve territory. Pain was rated as 8.5 on a numeric pain scale of 0 to 10. Musculoskeletal examination of the pelvic region disclosed bilateral sacroiliac joint dysfunction. Intervention and Outcomes Chiropractic management included pelvic mobilizations, myofascial therapy, transverse friction massage, and stretching exercises. After 3 visits (2 weeks later), result of neurological evaluation was normal, with no residual numbness over the lateral thigh. Conclusion In the present case, chiropractic management with standard and applied kinesiology techniques resulted in recovery of meralgia paresthetica symptoms for this patient. PMID:22942840

Houle, Sébastien

2012-01-01

48

Prevalence of cardiac arrhythmias in a community based chiropractic practice  

PubMed Central

Introduction: The prevalence of arrhythmias in chiropractic practice (the proportion of current patients who currently have arrhythmias) is unknown, but thought to be increasing. As arrhythmias influence management of chiropractic patients, the objective of this study was to determine the feasibility of screening for cardiac arrhythmias in a chiropractic clinic. Methods: With a convenience sample from one clinic, ECG data were recorded and analyzed to identify arrhythmias. Results: Seventy-six of ninety contacted patients participated in this study. Only 8 (?26%) of 31 patients with known or suspected cardiovascular abnormalities demonstrated arrhythmias versus 7 (?16%) of 45 subjects who were not previously aware of having an arrhythmia. Conclusion: The screening of patients for cardiac arrhythmias in a community based chiropractic clinic is feasible. A 3-minute recording of ECG activity at rest is not a highly sensitive method of identifying patients with previously recognized arrhythmias, but is capable of identifying previously undiagnosed arrhythmias. PMID:25202151

Padhi, Suzanne; Patel, Nasreen; Driscoll, Darcy; Budgell, Brian

2014-01-01

49

Birth of the "chiropractic angel": a Caduceus counterpoint.  

PubMed

Use of the winged angel with raised hands as a chiropractic emblem began circa 1928. Although often attributed to the National Chiropractic Association (NCA), the emblem was created prior to the NCA's formation, and was initially "copyrighted ... for the exclusive use of members of the American Society of Chiropractors." The emblem appeared as part of the ASC's advertising in popular national magazines, including American Legion Monthly, Cosmopolitan, Liberty, and Physical Culture. First use of the chiropractic angel to represent the NCA and its ally, the Internatonal Chiropractic Congress (ICC), took place at the NCA and ICC joint national convention in Denver in 1933. The emblem was formally adopted by the NCA at its 1934 convention in Pittsburgh. This paper reviews some of the early history of the emblem and its use by the ASC and the NCA. PMID:11613374

Nash, J; Keating, J C

1993-12-01

50

The role of chiropractic care in older adults  

PubMed Central

There are a rising number of older adults; in the US alone nearly 20% of the population will be 65 or older by 2030. Chiropractic is one of the most frequently utilized types of complementary and alternative care by older adults, used by an estimated 5% of older adults in the U.S. annually. Chiropractic care involves many different types of interventions, including preventive strategies. This commentary by experts in the field of geriatrics, discusses the evidence for the use of spinal manipulative therapy, acupuncture, nutritional counseling and fall prevention strategies as delivered by doctors of chiropractic. Given the utilization of chiropractic services by the older adult, it is imperative that providers be familiar with the evidence for and the prudent use of different management strategies for older adults. PMID:22348431

2012-01-01

51

Chiropractic management of breast-feeding difficulties: a case report  

PubMed Central

Objective The purpose of this study is to discuss a chiropractic case of management and resolution of breast-feeding difficulties. Clinical Features The case involves an 8-day-old baby unable to breast-feed since 4 days old. Initial examination revealed cervical, cranial, and sacral restrictions. She was diagnosed with craniocervical syndrome by a doctor of chiropractic. Intervention and Outcome Following history and examination, the infant received gentle chiropractic manipulation based on clinical findings. Immediate improvement and complete resolution of the nursing problems were observed after 3 treatments over 14 days. Conclusion The results of this case suggest that neuromusculoskeletal dysfunction may influence the ability of an infant to suckle successfully and that intervention via chiropractic adjustments may result in improving the infant's ability to suckle efficiently. PMID:22014911

Holleman, Annique C.; Nee, John; Knaap, Simone F.C.

2011-01-01

52

Legislative approaches to the regulation of the chiropractic profession.  

PubMed

Traditional and complementary health care services have a growing and significant role in both developed and developing countries. In the United Kingdom the British Medical Association (BMA) has identified five complementary approaches to health care that should now be regarded as "discrete clinical disciplines" because they have "established foundations of training and have the potential for greatest use alongside orthodox medical care". These are acupuncture, chiropractic, herbalism, homeopathy and osteopathy. The BMA recommended that there should be legislation to regulate these disciplines and the Chiropractors' Act enacted in the U.K in 1994. The chiropractic profession was founded in the United States in 1895, and the practice of chiropractic has been regulated in the United States and Canada since the 1920s, in Australia since the late 1940s, in New Zealand and South Africa since the 1960s, and more recently in Asia, Europe, Latin America and elsewhere. Figure 1 lists the countries which currently recognize and regulate the chiropractic profession. Many countries, such as Japan with approximately 10,000 chiropractors with different levels of education, and Trinidad & Tobago with 5 chiropractors who are graduates of accredited chiropractic colleges in North America, are considering legislation. Croatia, with 3 chiropractors, is preparing legislation. Cyprus, with 6 chiropractors, has legislation. Even in countries such as these, where the profession is small, there are compelling public interest arguments for regulation. This is especially true in the 1990s. One reason is the growing incentive for lay healers and others without formal training to use the title "chiropractor" as chiropractic practice gains increasing acceptance. The majority of chiropractic practice involves patients with non- specific or mechanical back and neck pain. The chiropractic approach to management, which includes spinal adjustment or manipulation, other physical treatments, postural advice, rehabilitative exercises and early return to activities, formally only had empirical evidence of success. Now there is firm scientific support. Recent national, evidence- based, multi-disciplinary guidelines in Canada (neck pain), the United Kingdom (back pain), and the United States (back pain) support these methods as a first line of management for most patients. Another reason for regulation is that international standards of chiropractic education and scope of practice have been established by appropriate chiropractic organizations, including the World Federation of Chiropractic which represents national associations of chiropractors in 63 countries. This paper now reviews current legislation worldwide. PMID:9409129

Chapman-Smith, D A

1997-01-01

53

The origins and early history of the National Chiropractic Association  

PubMed Central

Early organization in chiropractic was prompted by the profession’s need to promote itself and to defend against the onslaught of political medicine and organized osteopathy. The first priorities were legal defense against prosecution for unlicensed practice and malpractice insurance. The Universal Chiropractors’ Association (UCA), organized at the Palmer School of Chiropractic (PSC) in 1906, sought to meet these needs by insuring its members and by developing a legal department under the supervision of attorney Tom Morris, one time lieutenant governor of Wisconsin. The public relations and marketing needs of chiropractors were largely served by the PSC and its legendary leader. However, as chiropractors increasingly sought to avoid prosecution by passage of chiropractic laws, Palmer’s efforts to direct this legislation so as to limit chiropractors’ scope of practice increasingly alienated many in the profession. The American Chiropractic Association (ACA) was founded in 1922 to provide a broadscope alternative to BJ’s UCA. With Palmer’s departure from the UCA following the neurocalometer debacle, ACA and UCA sought amalgamation. Simultaneously, organized medicine renewed its attack on the profession by introducing basic science legislation, which prompted chiropractors to try to upgrade and standardize chiropractic education. Early efforts to bring about the needed consensus were centered in the International Chiropractic Congress (ICC), particularly its division of state examining boards. In 1930 the ACA and UCA combined to form the National Chiropractic Association (NCA), and by 1934 the ICC had merged with the NCA to form part of its council structure. With this modicum of solidarity the NCA began the process of educational boot-strapping at its 1935 convention in Los Angeles, when its Committee on Education, a forerunner of today’s Council on Chiropractic Education, was proposed by C.O. Watkins of Montana. ImagesFigure 2Figure 3Figure 4Figure 5Figure 6Figure 7Figure 9

Keating, Joseph C; Rehm, William S

1993-01-01

54

Attitudes toward vaccination: a survey of Canadian chiropractic students  

Microsoft Academic Search

Background: Although the Canadian Chiropractic Association and the Canadian Memorial Chiropractic College (CMCC) endorse vaccination, the prevalence of anti-vaccination attitudes among Canadian chiropractors is unknown. This study describes the prevalence of anti-vaccination attitudes among Canadian chiro- practic students. Methods: An 11-item questionnaire about attitudes toward vaccination was distrib- uted to students enrolled at CMCC during the 1999\\/2000 academic year. The

Jason W. Busse; Abhaya V. Kulkarni; James B. Campbell; H. Stephen Injeyan

55

A History of The Journal of Chiropractic Education  

PubMed Central

Purpose: The Journal of Chiropractic Education celebrates its 25th anniversary in the year 2011. The purpose of this article is to chronicle the history of the journal, which is unreported at this time. Methods: The entire collection of the journal was reviewed and information pertaining to important events and changes in the format, personnel, and processes of the journal were extracted. This information was used to create a chronology of the journal. The chronology was complemented with information obtained from people who were involved in the evolution of the journal and the Association of Chiropractic Colleges Educational Conferences. Results: Starting as a humble newsletter in 1987 and produced for a small cadre of readers primarily from the United States, the journal is now a full-sized and bound peer-reviewed international journal. Initially cataloged by the Index to Chiropractic Literature and MANTIS, the indexing expanded to interdisciplinary indexing systems such as CINAHL and ultimately PubMed. The journal has grown to serve the needs of chiropractic educators from around the world with representatives on the editorial board from 39 colleges and universities from 15 different countries. The journal has grown in tandem with the profession’s leading education and research conference and has been the primary repository for the scholarship of chiropractic education. Conclusion: The history of the journal represents a significant milestone in the development of the chiropractic profession, particularly the discipline of chiropractic education. The journal has had an interesting history and the future promises to bring more opportunities and challenges to the field of chiropractic education and to the journal. PMID:22069342

Green, Bart N.; Jacobs, Grace E.; Johnson, Claire D.; Phillips, Reed B.

2011-01-01

56

Helping address the national research and research capacity needs of Australian chiropractic: introducing the Australian Chiropractic Research Network (ACORN) project.  

PubMed

Chiropractic is a popular health care choice in Australia and yet major gaps in our empirical understanding of this area of practice remain. Furthermore, while some research excellence exists, a largely uncoordinated approach to research activity and development has in effect led to silos of interest and a lack of strategic 'big-picture' planning essential to producing a sustainable research culture and capacity for the profession. This commentary identifies the significance of a number of key features - including a national, coordinated focus, and a rich engagement with the practitioner and patient base amongst others - arguably important to the future development of research and research capacity within Australian chiropractic. The design features and phases of the Australian Chiropractic Research Network (ACORN) project are also outlined. ACORN is one contemporary initiative specifically developed to address chiropractic's research and research capacity building needs and help grow a broad evidence-base to inform safe, effective patient care. PMID:25834727

Adams, Jon; Steel, Amie; Chang, Sungwon; Sibbritt, David

2015-01-01

57

Plastination: a modern approach to chiropractic teaching  

PubMed Central

Plastination is a unique method for the preservation of biological material for teaching and research. The plastinated specimens are dry, odorless, non-toxic and durable. They can be manipulated by teachers and students without protective equipment like gloves. Invented in 1978 by Doctor Gunther von Hagens from the University of Heidelberg, this technique, that involves the replacement of water by a curable polymer, has spread rapidly all around the world and is actually used in over 250 universities and colleges. To our knowledge, the Université du Québec à Trois-Rivières, is the first institution to use plastinated specimens for teaching anatomy, neuroanatomy, pathology and radiology to students in chiropractic. This paper describes the various steps of the method (fixation, dehydration, impregnation and curing) and presents some examples of the utilization of plastinated specimens. ImagesFigure 1Figure 2Figure 3Figure 4Figure 5Figure 6

Grondin, Gilles

1998-01-01

58

Chiropractic goes to Washington: with Dr. Emmett J. Murphy, 1938-1964.  

PubMed

Articulate, urbane, naturally companionable, and always prepared, Dr. Emmett J. Murphy was perfectly suited to the office he created as chiropractic's first full-time national lobbyist. As labor relations director of the National Chiropractic Association from 1938 to 1964, he worked diligently to increase awareness of chiropractic among legislators, the federal bureaucracy, veterans organizations, labor and other groups equally concerned about the affairs of government. Many of his accomplishments, especially for chiropractic students, were pioneering efforts. PMID:11613384

Rehm, W S; Fay, L E; Keating, J C

1994-12-01

59

Major in Anything and be Pre-Chiropractic at NEBRASKA! Pre-Chiropractic is one of fifteen advising categories in Pre-Health indicating your interest in pursuing coursework to prepare for and  

E-print Network

PRE-HEALTH Major in Anything and be Pre-Chiropractic at NEBRASKA! Pre-Chiropractic is one for and apply to chiropractic school. The great part is you can major in anything and pursue these paths. You for Pre-Chiropractic? The University of Nebraska-Lincoln has graduated more health professionals than any

Logan, David

60

Chiropractic: a profession at the crossroads of mainstream and alternative medicine  

Microsoft Academic Search

Chiropractic is a large and well-established health care profession in the United States. In this overview, we briefly examine the development of chiropractic from humble and contentious beginnings to its current state at the crossroads of alternative and mainstream medicine. Chiropractic has taken on many of the attributes of an established profession, improving its educational and licensing systems and substantially

William C. Meeker; Scott Haldeman

2002-01-01

61

The Effects of Chiropractic Treatment on Students With Learning and Behavioral Impairments Due to Neurological Dysfunction.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The effects of chiropractic treatment on children with learning and behavioral problems was investigated with 24 elementary and secondary level students, 12 receiving regular chiropractic treatment and 12 receiving medication. Results indicated that chiropractic treatment was more effective for the wide range symptoms common in the neurological…

Walton, E. V.; Brzozowski, Walter T.

62

Preliminary study of the effects of a placebo chiropractic treatment with sham adjustments  

Microsoft Academic Search

Objective: To identify aspects of the delivery of placebo chiropractic treatments by using sham adjustments that may cause a treatment effect and that may affect the success of blinding. Design and Setting: Two-period crossover design in a chiropractic college research clinic. Subjects: Eighteen volunteer staff, students, and faculty of the chiropractic college who reported low-back pain within the last 6

Cheryl Hawk; Ayla Azad; Chutima Phongphua; Cynthia R. Long

1999-01-01

63

Economic case for the integration of chiropractic services into the health care system  

Microsoft Academic Search

The role and position of chiropractic care in the health care system must be transformed from being alternative and separate to alternative and mainstream. This transformation requires that chiropractic services become integrated in the many health care delivery organizations that collectively constitute the health care system. There is solid and impressive economic and related justification for the desired integration. Chiropractic

Pran Manga

2000-01-01

64

An investigation into the demographics and motivations of students studying for a chiropractic degree  

PubMed Central

Objective This research aimed to investigate motivations for studying chiropractic, and to determine what students look for in a course/college and potential barriers to studying chiropractic. Methods The study design was a cross-sectional survey. Following IRB/Ethical approval, a paper-based questionnaire was distributed to students at McTimoney College of Chiropractic. Demographic data were compared to another chiropractic college in the United Kingdom. Results The questionnaire response rate was 70.8% (n = 121). Motivating factors for studying chiropractic included a desire to help others (54.5%, n = 66), with 44.6% (n = 54) attracted by chiropractic's holistic, drugless approach to health. Previous help from chiropractic influenced 55.4% (n = 67) and 22.3% (n = 27) felt chiropractic had “changed their life.” Just over half of the respondents (55.4%, n = 67) viewed the ability to work while studying as extremely important and 73.6% (n = 89) said they could not have studied chiropractic without this. Conclusion Previous help from chiropractic care was a common motivation for studying chiropractic. The ability to work while studying was seen as vital by many students and, without it, the vast majority felt they could not have studied chiropractic. PMID:23957323

Yalden, Philip; Cunliffe, Christina; Hunnisett, Adrian

2013-01-01

65

Curriculum mapping within an Australian master of chiropractic program: Congruence between published evidence for chiropractic and student assessment tasks  

PubMed Central

Objective This study sought to determine congruence between student assessment tasks within the master of chiropractic curriculum at Macquarie University and 2 separate but related domains: (1) disorders commonly presenting to chiropractors and (2) musculoskeletal conditions for which there is published evidence that chiropractic treatment is effective. Methods A literature review was undertaken to determine which musculoskeletal disorders commonly present to chiropractors and the conditions for which there is published evidence that chiropractic treatment is effective. These 2 domains were then mapped to the assessment tasks within the curriculum and analyzed. The proportion of time allocated to theory versus skill acquisition was also determined. Results Assessment tasks within the curriculum specifically focus on low back pain, neck pain, lower extremity pain, thoracic pain, and adhesive capsulitis. This curriculum mapping demonstrates congruence between the student assessment tasks and published evidence for chiropractic. The assessments also contain an appropriate balance between theory and skills acquisition. Conclusion There is congruence between the assessment tasks within the curriculum and the 2 domains against which it was mapped. Thus, completion of the curriculum provides training relevant to conditions that commonly present to chiropractors and musculoskeletal conditions for which chiropractic treatment is effective. PMID:25162981

Gorrell, Lindsay; Beirman, Robyn L.; Vemulpad, Subramanyam R.

2015-01-01

66

Chiropractic care: is it substitution care or add-on care in corporate medical plans?  

PubMed

An analysis of claims data from a managed care health plan was performed to evaluate whether patients use chiropractic care as a substitution for medical care or in addition to medical care. Rates of neuromusculoskeletal complaints in 9e diagnostic categories were compared between groups with and without chiropractic coverage. For the 4-year study period, there were 3,129,752 insured member years in the groups with chiropractic coverage and 5,197,686 insured member years in the groups without chiropractic coverage. Expressed in terms of unique patients with neuromusculoskeletal complaints, the cohort with chiropractic coverage experienced a rate of 162.0 complaints per 1000 member years compared with 171.3 complaints in the cohort without chiropractic coverage. These results indicate that patients use chiropractic care as a direct substitution for medical care. PMID:15300137

Metz, R Douglas; Nelson, Craig F; LaBrot, Thomas; Pelletier, Kenneth R

2004-08-01

67

Chiropractic as spine care: a model for the profession  

Microsoft Academic Search

Background  More than 100 years after its inception the chiropractic profession has failed to define itself in a way that is understandable,\\u000a credible and scientifically coherent. This failure has prevented the profession from establishing its cultural authority over\\u000a any specific domain of health care.\\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a Objective  To present a model for the chiropractic profession to establish cultural authority and increase market share of

Craig F Nelson; Dana J Lawrence; John J Triano; Gert Bronfort; Stephen M Perle; R Douglas Metz; Kurt Hegetschweiler; Thomas LaBrot

2005-01-01

68

Contemporary chiropractic practice in the UK: a field study of a chiropractor and his patients in a suburban chiropractic clinic  

PubMed Central

Background Two recent surveys of chiropractors in Great Britain suggest that there are discrepancies between chiropractic practice as defined in regulatory guidelines and day-to-day chiropractic clinical practice and there is in general a paucity of information regarding the characteristics of contemporary chiropractic practice in the United Kingdom. This field study describes the daily practice of a contemporary British UK-trained chiropractor. Methods The fieldwork took place during the spring and summer of 2008 when the author spent one day per week observing consultations and interviewing patients in a chiropractic clinic. The chiropractor was subjected to interviews on two occasions. The author also registered as a patient. Field notes were taken by the author, interviews were recorded and the transcripts were corrected and analysed by the author. Results A total of 25 patients took part in the study. The interaction that took place between patients and staff in reception could be considered as a prelude to consultation facilitating the transformation from individual to patient and back to individual. Coupled with the continuous physical contact between the chiropractor and each patient there was a substantial amount of verbal and non-verbal communication throughout treatment visits. The patients presented with predominantly musculo-skeletal pain and the majority had consulted the chiropractor as a result of recommendations from others in their close social environment. The majority of the interviewed patients had either an inaccurate or at best rudimentary understanding of the mechanisms of chiropractic treatment. A few of the interviewed patients indicated that they had at first experienced concerns about the nature of chiropractic treatment or getting undressed. The author was able to gain some insight into how the chiropractor's experiences, opinions and beliefs had shaped his approach to chiropractic treatment and how this formed the basis of his clinical modus operandi. Conclusion Although no robust conclusions should be drawn from this small scale field study it does show that the clinical chiropractic practice as carried out by this UK trained British chiropractor contains a number of elements described in earlier qualitative studies in the United States, Canada, and Australia. PMID:23927011

2013-01-01

69

The Early Years of Organized Chiropractic Orthopedics, 1954–1973: A Social History  

PubMed Central

Objective: This paper presents the origins and development of the organized chiropractic orthopedics movement in the United States from 1954–1973. Methods: Hand searches of early periodicals were performed and information was organized chronologically to create a timeline. Context for the timeline was provided by extracting pertinent information from audio recordings of interviews. Relevant background information was located using the cumulative index of the journal Chiropractic History and searching the MANTIS database. Historical Features: After World War I, The advent of third party reimbursement for health care created a new environment for health care practitioners. For doctors of chiropractic, this event provided the impetus to begin the postgraduate chiropractic orthopedics program over 50 years ago. In 1954, Alvin A. Hancock, DC and F. Maynard Lipe, DC successfully launched an active orthopedics movement after several earlier attempts failed during the 1940s and early 1950s. The movement generated from the desire to train and certify chiropractors to manage personal injury and workers’ compensation low back injuries. In addition to developing interdisciplinary educational programs, the chiropractic orthopedics group was responsible for producing a research agenda, some of the profession’s early orthopedic-focused research, and for starting the National Council on Chiropractic Orthopedics of the National Chiropractic Association, which later became the American Chiropractic Association Council on Orthopedics. These organizations produced thousands of specialists in chiropractic orthopedics, later known as Diplomates of the American Board of Chiropractic Orthopedists. Conclusion: Several orthopedics interest groups were formed and credentialing processes were created to qualify doctors as recognized chiropractic orthopedics specialists. The popularity of this movement resulted in the inclusion of orthopedics into core chiropractic college curricula and the production of various research studies before the development of the modern science of chiropractic. PMID:19488411

Green, Bart N.; Johnson, Claire D.

2009-01-01

70

Chiropractic management of postpartum pubic symphysis diastasis: A case report.  

PubMed

This case report describes the chiropractic management of a 30-year-old female patient with severe postpartum pelvic pain secondary to pubic symphysis diastasis. No literature was found on the chiropractic management of postpartum symphysis pubis diastasis. The existing literature concerning chiropractic care for symphysis pubis dysfunction during pregnancy is limited and indicates a potential benefit. Separation of the pubic symphysis may include ligamentous injury to the sacroiliac joints and may lead to chronic pain. Pubic symphysis separation of 17 millimeters was present on digital radiograph. Management consisted of chiropractic adjustments, trigger point release, electrical stimulation, moist heat, sacroiliac belt, and specific stabilizing exercises. The patient's pain improved immediately following treatment on the initial visit. Pain was reduced from 8/10 VAS at the first visit to 2/10 at the fourth visit. She was able to resume normal activities and reached a final pain level of 1/10. The diastasis was reduced by 7 millimeters at 14-weeks post radiograph for a final separation of just under 10 millimeters. Collaboration between obstetricians, midwives and chiropractors may be warranted. PMID:25729083

Henry, Lucian

2015-03-01

71

Chiropractic spinal manipulation for neck pain: a systematic review  

Microsoft Academic Search

Chiropractic spinal manipulation (CSM) is often used as a treatment for neck pain. However, its effectiveness is unclear. The aim of this article was to evaluate systematically and critically the effectiveness of CSM for neck pain. Six electronic databases were searched for all relevant randomized clinical trials. Strict inclusion\\/exclusion criteria had been predefined. Key data were validated and extracted. Methodologic

Edzard Ernst

2003-01-01

72

Chiropractic patients in the Netherlands: A descriptive study  

Microsoft Academic Search

Background: Despite the worldwide popularity of chiropractic, there is still relatively little known about the patients who visit chiropractors in the Netherlands and other European countries. Objective: To describe in-depth the patient population of new patients to chiropractors in the Netherlands. Design: Study population consisted of 10 consecutive new patients per participating chiropractor. A retrospective-type questionnaire was used. Setting: Private

Sidney Rubinstein; Charles E. Pfeifle; Maurits W. van Tulder; Willem J. J. Assendelft

2000-01-01

73

ASSOCIATION OF INTERNAL CAROTID ARTERY DISSECTION AND CHIROPRACTIC MANIPULATION  

Microsoft Academic Search

BACKGROUND- To determine the relationship between chiropractic manipulative therapy (CMT) and internal carotid artery dissection (ICAD), a MEDLINE literature search was performed for the years 1966 through 2000 using the terms internal carotid dissection. Literature that included information concerning causation of ICAD, as well as all case studies and series, was selected for review. REVIEW SUMMARY- In reviewing the cases

Michael T. Haneline; Arthur C. Croft; Benjamin M. Frishberg

2003-01-01

74

Chiropractic management of postpartum pubic symphysis diastasis: A case report  

PubMed Central

This case report describes the chiropractic management of a 30-year-old female patient with severe postpartum pelvic pain secondary to pubic symphysis diastasis. No literature was found on the chiropractic management of postpartum symphysis pubis diastasis. The existing literature concerning chiropractic care for symphysis pubis dysfunction during pregnancy is limited and indicates a potential benefit. Separation of the pubic symphysis may include ligamentous injury to the sacroiliac joints and may lead to chronic pain. Pubic symphysis separation of 17 millimeters was present on digital radiograph. Management consisted of chiropractic adjustments, trigger point release, electrical stimulation, moist heat, sacroiliac belt, and specific stabilizing exercises. The patient’s pain improved immediately following treatment on the initial visit. Pain was reduced from 8/10 VAS at the first visit to 2/10 at the fourth visit. She was able to resume normal activities and reached a final pain level of 1/10. The diastasis was reduced by 7 millimeters at 14-weeks post radiograph for a final separation of just under 10 millimeters. Collaboration between obstetricians, midwives and chiropractors may be warranted. PMID:25729083

Henry, Lucian

2015-01-01

75

Limits to medical dominance: The case of chiropractic  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper describes and analyzes the social history of chiropractic in Canada to partially test a thesis regarding changes in the dominance of the medical profession. We earlier sketched the rise of medicine to dominance by World War I, its consolidation until after World War II, and signs of the start of a decline in dominance signalled by the 1962

David Coburn; C. Lesley Biggs

1986-01-01

76

THE EFFECT OF CHIROPRACTIC MANIPULATION ON SALIVARY CORTISOL LEVELS  

Microsoft Academic Search

Background: The stress response in humans is a healthy response and is necessary for life. The effects of chiropractic manipulation (CM), if any, on stress are ill-defined. Cortisol has been used as an accurate measure of the stress response system in humans. Salivary cortisol is a noninvasive technique to accurately quantify biologically active cortisol. Objective: To determine whether basal salivary

Tara L. Whelan; J. Donald Dishman; Jean Burke; Seymour Levine; Veronica Sciotti

77

The effect of chiropractic manipulation on salivary cortisol levels  

Microsoft Academic Search

Background: The stress response in humans is a healthy response and is necessary for life. The effects of chiropractic manipulation (CM), if any, on stress are ill-defined. Cortisol has been used as an accurate measure of the stress response system in humans. Salivary cortisol is a noninvasive technique to accurately quantify biologically active cortisol. Objective: To determine whether basal salivary

Tara L. Whelan; J. Donald Dishman; Jean Burke; Seymour Levine; Veronica Sciotti

2002-01-01

78

Chiropractic Health Care: A National Study of Cost of Education, Service Utilization, Number of Practicing Doctors of Chiropractic, and Other Key Policy Issues. Volumes I-II.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Results from the first federally sponsored study of the chiropractic health care profession are presented, and a broad range of facts and issues of concern to policy-makers, the profession, and the public are described. The two-year project included three national surveys of: service providers (doctors of chiropractic in practice more than two…

von Kuster, Thomas, Jr.

79

The effect of chiropractic care on jet lag of finnish junior elite athletes  

Microsoft Academic Search

Objective: To determine the effect of chiro-practic care on jet lag in Finnish junior elite athletes.Subjects: Fifteen Finnish junior elite athletes.Methods: Through use of a table of random numbers, each athlete was assigned by sex to one of 3 groups: chiropractic adjustment,sham adjustment, or control. As needed,the chiropractic adjustment group athletes (n = 5) were adjusted on a daily basis

William F. Straub; Michael P. Spino; Medhat M. Alattar; Bruce Pfleger; John W. Downes; Marco A. Belizaire; Olli J. Heinonen; Tommi Vasankari

2001-01-01

80

Prevalence of nonmusculoskeletal complaints in chiropractic practice: Report from a practice based research program  

Microsoft Academic Search

Objective: To identify patient and practice characteristics that might contribute to people's seeking chiropractic care for nonmusculoskeletal complaints.Design: This was a cross-sectional study conducted through the methods of practice-based research.Setting: Data were collected in 1998-1999 in chiropractic offices in the United States, Canada, and Australia; data were managed by a practice-based research office operating in a chiropractic research center.Population: The

Cheryl Hawk; Cynthia R. Long; Karen T. Boulanger

2001-01-01

81

Low back pain of mechanical origin: randomised comparison of chiropractic and hospital outpatient treatment  

Microsoft Academic Search

OBJECTIVE--To compare chiropractic and hospital outpatient treatment for managing low back pain of mechanical origin. DESIGN--Randomised controlled trial. Allocation to chiropractic or hospital management by minimisation to establish groups for analysis of results according to initial referral clinic, length of current episode, history, and severity of back pain. Patients were followed up for up two years. SETTING--Chiropractic and hospital outpatient

T W Meade; S Dyer; W Browne; J Townsend; A O Frank

1990-01-01

82

Australian chiropractic sports medicine: half way there or living on a prayer?  

PubMed Central

Sports chiropractic within Australia has a chequered historical background of unorthodox individualistic displays of egocentric treatment approaches that emphasise specific technique preference and individual prowess rather than standardised evidence based management. This situation has changed in recent years with the acceptance of many within sports chiropractic to operate under an evidence informed banner and to embrace a research culture. Despite recent developments within the sports chiropractic movement, the profession is still plagued by a minority of practitioners continuing to espouse certain marginal and outlandish technique systems that beleaguer the mainstream core of sports chiropractic as a cohesive and homogeneous group. Modern chiropractic management is frequently multimodal in nature and incorporates components of passive and active care. Such management typically incorporates spinal and peripheral manipulation, mobilisation, soft tissue techniques, rehabilitation and therapeutic exercises. Externally, sports chiropractic has faced hurdles too, with a lack of recognition and acceptance by organized and orthodox sports medical groups. Whilst some arguments against the inclusion of chiropractic may be legitimate due to its historical baggage, much of the argument appears to be anti-competitive, insecure and driven by a closed-shop mentality.sequently, chiropractic as a profession still remains a pariah to the organised sports medicine world. Add to this an uncertain continuing education system, a lack of protection for the title 'sports chiropractor', a lack of a recognized specialist status and a lack of support from traditional chiropractic, the challenges for the growth and acceptance of the sports chiropractor are considerable. This article outlines the historical and current challenges, both internal and external, faced by sports chiropractic within Australia and proposes positive changes that will assist in recognition and inclusion of sports chiropractic in both chiropractic and multi-disciplinary sports medicine alike. PMID:17880724

Pollard, Henry; Hoskins, Wayne; McHardy, Andrew; Bonello, Rod; Garbutt, Peter; Swain, Mike; Dragasevic, George; Pribicevic, Mario; Vitiello, Andrew

2007-01-01

83

Chiropractic Use and Changes in Health among Older Medicare Beneficiaries: A Comparative Effectiveness Observational Study  

PubMed Central

Objective The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of chiropractic on five outcomes among Medicare beneficiaries: increased difficulties performing Activities of Daily Living (ADLs), Instrumental ADLs (IADLs), and Lower Body Functions, as well as lower self-rated health and increased depressive symptoms. Methods Among all beneficiaries, we estimated the effect of chiropractic use on changes in health outcomes among those who used chiropractic compared to those who did not, and among beneficiaries with back conditions we estimated the effect of chiropractic use relative to medical care, both over a 2–15 year period. Two analytic approaches were used—one assumed no selection bias, while the other adjusted for potential selection bias using propensity score methods. Results Among all beneficiaries, propensity score analyses indicated that chiropractic use led to comparable outcomes for ADLs, IADLs, and depressive symptoms, although there were increased risks associated with chiropractic for declines in lower body function and self-rated health. Propensity score analyses among beneficiaries with back conditions indicated that chiropractic use led to comparable outcomes for ADLs, IADLs, lower body function, and depressive symptoms, although there was an increased risk associated with chiropractic use for declines in self-rated health. Conclusion The evidence in this study suggests that chiropractic treatment has comparable effects on functional outcomes when compared to medical treatment for all Medicare beneficiaries, but increased risk for declines in self-rated health among beneficiaries with back conditions. PMID:24144425

Weigel, Paula Anne; Hockenberry, Jason; Bentler, Suzanne; Wolinsky, Fredric D.

2013-01-01

84

Chiropractic and concussion in sport: a narrative review of the literature  

PubMed Central

Objective Concussion is a common sporting injury that may be seen by doctors of chiropractic and should be managed following current practice guidelines. The purpose of this abstract is to present a literature review on chiropractic management of concussion in sport and to discuss current guidelines. Methods A review of the literature was performed using the PubMed search engine. MeSH terms included chiropractic and concussion. Search dates were the beginning of the record through July 30, 2013. All languages and article types were included in the search. Articles found were retrieved and evaluated for the relevance of chiropractic management of concussion in sport. Results Five articles were found (1 prospective study, 1 survey, 3 literature reviews) ranging in publication years from 1993 to 2012. No articles reported a position statement, and none provided a review of current concussion management practices related to chiropractic practice. No articles reported adverse outcomes of chiropractic management of an athlete with concussion. Conclusion Research related to the chiropractic management of concussion in sport is a nascent area of investigation. Although there are few published articles, the articles in this review showed that doctors of chiropractic encounter concussed athletes at events and in clinical practice. It is essential for doctors of chiropractic to understand the importance of using standardized concussion assessment tools and current concussion guidelines. PMID:24396325

Johnson, Claire D.; Green, Bart N.; Nelson, Robert C.; Moreau, Bill; Nabhan, Dustin

2013-01-01

85

Constructing a philosophy of chiropractic: evolving worldviews and modern foundation?  

PubMed Central

Objective The purpose of this article is to trace the foundations of DD Palmer's sense of self and philosophy of chiropractic to its sources in modern Western philosophy as well as current metatheories about modernity. Discussion DD Palmer's sense of self was indicative of a modern self. A modern self is characterized as a self that developed after the Western Enlightenment and must come to terms with the insights of modernity such as Cartesian dualism, Spinoza's substance, Rousseau's expressivism, and Kant's critiques. It is argued that Palmer's philosophy can be viewed as part of the this tradition alongside his involvement in the 19th century American metaphysical religious culture, which was itself a response to these challenges of the modern self of modernity. Conclusion Palmer's development of chiropractic and its philosophy was a reaction to the challenges and promises of modernity. PMID:22693479

Senzon, Simon A.

2011-01-01

86

Morris Fishbein, M.D.: the "medical Mussolini" and chiropractic.  

PubMed

Morris Fishbein, M.D. is the most important non-chiropractor to influence the chiropractic profession. From his post as editor and secretary of the American Medical Association, his anti-chiropractic writings, speeches and political activities had a profound effect on the profession's development. Because he was not only the foremost medical politician of the time, but also perceived as a multi-faceted author on public health issues, his credibility was high across large sections of the population and in most social institutions. His tactics and stature undoubtedly helped keep the profession limited to caring for a small percentage of the population. Because of him, chiropractors devised survival strategies that continue to influence the profession even today. PMID:11619004

Donahue, J H

1996-06-01

87

Bilateral diaphragmatic paralysis due to cervical chiropractic manipulation.  

PubMed

Neck pain from cervical spinal disease is a common problem with significant disability, and chiropractic manipulation has emerged as one of the leading forms of alternative treatment for such spinal symptoms. However, more experience with these forms of treatment has revealed associated complications that are far from benign. Complications range from mild symptoms, such as local neck tenderness or stiffness, to more severe injuries involving the spinal cord, peripheral nerve roots, and arteries within the neck. Phrenic nerve injury causing diaphragmatic palsy is a rare complication of cervical chiropractic manipulation. We report a case of bilateral diaphragmatic paralysis in a healthy gentleman who underwent cervical manipulation. Physicians must be aware of this complication and should be cautious when recommending spinal manipulation for the treatment of neck pain, especially in the presence of preexisting degenerative disease of the cervical spine. PMID:25692510

John, Seby; Tavee, Jinny

2015-02-01

88

Chiropractic in the United States: trends and issues.  

PubMed

Chiropractic is the best established of the alternative health care professions. Although marginalized for much of the 20th century, it has entered the mainstream of health care, gaining both legitimacy and access to third-party payers. However, the profession's efforts to validate the effectiveness of spinal manipulative therapy, its principal modality, have yielded only modest and often contrary results. At the same time, reimbursement is shrinking, the number of practitioners is growing, and competition from other healing professions is increasing. The profession's efforts to establish a role in primary care are meeting resistance, and its attempts to broaden its activities in alternative medicine have inherent limitations. Although patients express a high level of satisfaction with chiropractic treatment and politicians are sympathetic to it, this may not be enough as our nation grapples to define the health care system that it can afford. PMID:12669653

Cooper, Richard A; McKee, Heather J

2003-01-01

89

Chiropractic management of elbow tendinopathy following a sports related trauma  

PubMed Central

Objective: This report describes chiropractic management of a case of sub-acute elbow pain and swelling with Active Release Technique® and acupuncture. Case presentation: A 41-year-old male presented to a chiropractic clinic with a primary complaint of elbow pain and swelling following a fall while playing basketball five weeks prior. Intervention and Outcome: Treatment consisted of two sessions of needle acupuncture and one treatment of Active Release Techniques® (ART) applied to the left elbow region. Conclusions: The patient’s outcomes indicated a quick resolution of subjective complaints and objective findings with the chosen treatment. Further research is needed to demonstrate safety, clinical effectiveness, and cost effectiveness when compared to other treatments. PMID:24587497

Gliedt, Jordan A.; Daniels, Clinton J.

2014-01-01

90

SYMPTOMATIC OUTCOMES AND PERCEIVED SATISFACTION LEVELS OF CHIROPRACTIC PATIENTS WITH A PRIMARY DIAGNOSIS INVOLVING ACUTE NECK PAIN  

Microsoft Academic Search

Objective: The aim of this study was to determine the extent to which a group of patients with acute neck pain managed with chiropractic manipulative therapy benefited from chiropractic care and the degree to which they were subsequently satisfied. Methods: A two-part retrospective survey, each composed of 14 questions. One part was completed by practicing doctors of chiropractic concerning various

Michael T. Haneline

91

Preliminary study of the reliability of assessment procedures for indications for chiropractic adjustments of the lumbar spine  

Microsoft Academic Search

Objective: To assess the intraexaminer and interexaminer reliability of clinicians trained in flexion-distraction technique to determine the need for chiropractic adjustment of each segment of the lumbar spine. Design: This was an intraexaminer and interexaminer reliability study of commonly used chiropractic assessment procedures, including static and motion palpation and visual observation. Setting: Chiropractic college; by four licensed chiropractors trained in

Cheryl Hawk; Chutima Phongphua; James Bleecker; Larry Swank; Dennis Lopez; Todd Rubley

1999-01-01

92

Stroke following chiropractic manipulation of the cervical spine  

Microsoft Academic Search

We analyzed the clinical course and neuroradiological findings of ten patients aged 27–46 years, with ischemic stroke secondary\\u000a to vertebral artery dissection (VAD; n = 8) or internal carotid artery dissection (CAD; n = 2), all following chiropractic manipulation of the cervical spine. The following observations were made: (a) All patients\\u000a had uneventful medical histories, no or only mild vascular

Andreas Hufnagel; Alexander Hammers; Paul-Walter Schönle; Klaus-Dieter Böhm; Georg Leonhardt

1999-01-01

93

Chiropractic management of pediatric plantar fasciitis: a case report  

PubMed Central

Objective The purpose of this report is to present the case of a 10-year-old football player with bilateral plantar fasciitis who improved with a multimodal conservative approach using chiropractic treatment. Clinical Features The patient presented with bilateral plantar heel pain at the origin of the plantar fascia with a duration of 3 weeks. Intervention and Outcome Treatment was provided for 6 visits over a 6-week period. Chiropractic care consisted of manipulative therapy, soft tissue therapy, and home rehabilitation exercises. The soft tissue technique (Graston Technique) was performed to the origin of the plantar fascia and the triceps surae bilaterally. High-velocity, low-amplitude manipulation was applied to the restricted ankle mortise joint. After 6 treatments, the patient reported resolution of foot pain bilaterally and improvements in activities of daily livings. Three months later, the patient reported no further complications and the absence of pain. Conclusion This patient with bilateral plantar fasciitis improved after a course of a multimodal treatment approach using chiropractic manipulation and soft tissue therapy in addition to exercise and stretching therapies. PMID:22942843

Daniels, Clinton J.; Morrell, Adam P.

2012-01-01

94

Chiropractic Care for Nonmusculoskeletal Conditions: A Systematic Review with Implications for Whole Systems Research  

Microsoft Academic Search

ABSTRACT Objectives: (1) To evaluate the evidence on the effect of chiropractic care, rather than spinal manipulation only, on patients with nonmusculoskeletal conditions; and (2) to identify shortcomings in the evidence base on this topic, from a Whole Systems Research perspective. Design: Systematic review. Methods: Databases included were PubMed, Ovid, Mantis, Index to Chiropractic Literature, and CINAHL. Search restrictions were

Cheryl Hawk; Raheleh Khorsan; Anthony J. Lisi; Randy J. Ferrance; Marion Willard Evans

2007-01-01

95

Concurrent utilization of chiropractic, prescription medicines, nonprescription medicines and alternative health care  

Microsoft Academic Search

This study examines the use of chiropractic, prescription medicines, nonprescription medicines and alternative health care for two independent samples representative of the population of Edmonton, Alberta, Canada in 1979 (n = 439) and again in 1988 (n = 464). While the usage of prescription medicines was unchanged from 1979 to 1988, utilization of nonprescription medicines, chiropractic and alternative health care

Herbert C. Northcott; John A. Bachynsky

1993-01-01

96

Vertigo as Manifestation of Vertebral Artery Dissection after Chiropractic Neck Manipulations  

Microsoft Academic Search

We recently observed a case of vertebral artery (VA) dissection following chiropractic neck manipulations. The first manifestation was unusual; in the form of vertigo. Therefore, the patient was referred to the otoneurologist. A VA dissection should be suspected in a case of vertigo following chiropractic neck manipulations, and vestibular tests should be done carefully, avoiding Rose’s positions. In our case,

Dominique Vibert; Josette Rohr-Le Floch; Gèrard Gauthier

1993-01-01

97

Maintenance care: Health promotion services administered to US chiropractic patients aged 65 and older, part II  

Microsoft Academic Search

Objective: Health promotion and prevetion services provided by the chiropractic profession historically have been referred to as maintenance care (MC). The primary objective of this investigation was to obtain information regarding multiple health issues of patients age 65 years and over who have had a long-term regimen of chiropractic health promotion and preventive care. The study also sought to explore

Ronald L Rupert; Donna Manello; Ruth Sandefur

2000-01-01

98

Randomised controlled trial of infantile colic treated with chiropractic spinal manipulation  

Microsoft Academic Search

AIMSTo investigate the efficacy of chiropractic spinal manipulation in the management of infantile colic.METHODSOne hundred infants with typical colicky pain were recruited to a randomised, blinded, placebo controlled clinical trial.RESULTSNine infants were excluded because inclusion criteria were not met, and five dropped out, leaving 86 who completed the study. There was no significant effect of chiropractic spinal manipulation. Thirty two

E Olafsdottir; S Forshei; G Fluge; T Markestad

2001-01-01

99

Practice patterns of doctors of chiropractic with a pediatric diplomate: a cross-sectional survey  

Microsoft Academic Search

BACKGROUND: Complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) is growing in popularity, especially within the pediatric population. Research on CAM practitioners and their specialties, such as pediatrics, is lacking. Within the chiropractic profession, pediatrics is one of the most recently established post-graduate specialty programs. This paper describes the demographic and practice characteristics of doctors of chiropractic with a pediatric diplomate. METHODS: 218

Katherine A Pohlman; Maria A Hondras; Cynthia R Long; Andrea G Haan

2010-01-01

100

Straight chiropractic philosophy as a barrier to Medicare compliance: a discussion of 5 incongruent issues  

PubMed Central

Objective The purpose of this commentary is to discuss potential 5 factors within straight chiropractic philosophy and practice that may prevent Medicare compliance. Discussion The national Medicare Benefit Policy Manual and the Florida Local Coverage Determination were reviewed to identify documentation and conceptual issues regarding chiropractic practice. Five Medicare positions were contrasted with tenets of straight chiropractic philosophy. Based on Medicare’s documentation requirements, Medicare defines subluxation and chiropractic practice from the perspective of treating spinal pain and related functional disability. In contrast, traditional straight chiropractic philosophy is not based on the treatment of spinal pain and disability or other symptomatic presentations. In this context, 5 potential areas of conflict are discussed. Conclusion The Medicare version of chiropractic practice is not consistent with traditional straight chiropractic philosophy, which may play a role in preventing Medicare compliance. The chiropractic profession may need to consider the fashion in which “philosophy” as it relates to technique and practice is presented to students and doctors to facilitate compliance with the documentation requirements of Medicare. PMID:25067928

Seaman, David R.; Soltys, Jonathan R.

2013-01-01

101

Chiropractic at the crossroads or are we just going around in circles?  

PubMed Central

Background Chiropractic in Australia has seen many changes over the past 30 years. Some of these changes have advanced the professional status of chiropractic, improved undergraduate training and paved the way for a research culture. Unfortunately, other changes or lack of changes, have hindered the growth, public utilisation and professional standing of chiropractic in Australia. This article explores what influences have impacted on the credibility, advancement and public utilisation of chiropractic in Australia. Discussion The 1970's and 1980's saw a dramatic change within the chiropractic profession in Australia. With the advent of government regulation, came government funded teaching institutions, quality research and increased public acceptance and utilisation of chiropractic services. However, since that time the profession appears to have taken a backward step, which in the author's opinion, is directly linked to a shift by sections of the profession to the fundamentalist approach to chiropractic and the vertebral subluxation complex. The abandonment, by some groups, of a scientific and evidenced based approach to practice for one founded on ideological dogma is beginning to take its toll. Summary The future of chiropractic in Australia is at a crossroads. For the profession to move forward it must base its future on science and not ideological dogma. The push by some for it to become a unique and all encompassing alternative system of healthcare is both misguided and irrational. PMID:21599991

2011-01-01

102

Attitudes towards fibromyalgia: A survey of Canadian chiropractic, naturopathic, physical therapy and occupational therapy students  

Microsoft Academic Search

BACKGROUND: The frequent use of chiropractic, naturopathic, and physical and occupational therapy by patients with fibromyalgia has been emphasized repeatedly, but little is known about the attitudes of these therapists towards this challenging condition. METHODS: We administered a cross-sectional survey to 385 senior Canadian chiropractic, naturopathic, physical and occupational therapy students in their final year of studies, that inquired about

Jason W Busse; Abhaya V Kulkarni; Parminder Badwall; Gordon H Guyatt

2008-01-01

103

Australian chiropractic sports medicine: half way there or living on a prayer?  

Microsoft Academic Search

Sports chiropractic within Australia has a chequered historical background of unorthodox individualistic displays of egocentric treatment approaches that emphasise specific technique preference and individual prowess rather than standardised evidence based management. This situation has changed in recent years with the acceptance of many within sports chiropractic to operate under an evidence informed banner and to embrace a research culture. Despite

Henry Pollard; Wayne Hoskins; Andrew McHardy; Rod Bonello; Peter Garbutt; Mike Swain; George Dragasevic; Mario Pribicevic; Andrew Vitiello

2007-01-01

104

Attitudes of clinicians at the Canadian Memorial Chiropractic College towards the chiropractic management of non-musculoskeletal conditions  

PubMed Central

Objective: The objective of this study was to determine the attitudes of clinical faculty during the 2009–2010 academic year at the Canadian Memorial Chiropractic College towards the treatment of various non-musculoskeletal disorders. Methods: A confidential survey was distributed to the clinical faculty via email. It consisted of several questions polling the demographic of the respondent such as years in clinical practice, and a list of 29 non-musculoskeletal conditions. Clinicians were asked to indicate their opinions on each condition on rating scale ranging from strongly agree to strongly disagree. Results: Twenty of 22 clinicians responded. The conditions garnering the greatest positive ratings include: asthma, constipation, chronic pelvic pain, dysmenorrhea, infantile colic, and vertigo. The options regarding vertigo and asthma, while demonstrating an overall positive attitude towards the benefits of chiropractic care, were stratified amongst clinicians with varying years in clinical practice. Conclusion: This study suggests clinicians at this college are moderately open towards the chiropractic treatment of some non-musculoskeletal disorders. PMID:21629463

Parkinson, Jodi; Lau, Jennifer; Kalirah, Sandeep; Gleberzon, Brian J.

2011-01-01

105

The Five Eras of Chiropractic & the future of chiropractic as seen through the eyes of a participant observer  

PubMed Central

Chiropractic has endured a turbulent history, marked by tremendous advances in areas such as education and licensing while marred by interprofessional conflict and a poor public image. The prolonged interprofessional conflict was instrumental in shaping the culture of chiropractic. These obstacles have long-since been removed although there are lingering effects from them. This article examines the chiropractic profession's history by dividing it into five Eras and suggests that there are three options available for the future of the profession. One: maintaining the status quo. Two: uniting under an evidence based scientific approach as partners in the health care delivery system that has buried the "one-cause, one-cure" sacred cow. The steps required to achieve this outcome are outlined. Three: openly dividing the profession into evidence based practitioners and subluxation based practitioners. Adopting this option would allow each branch of the profession to move forward in the health care delivery system unhindered by the other. It is unclear which option the profession will choose and whether the profession is mature enough to follow option two remains to be seen. What is evident is that the time to act is now. PMID:22260381

2012-01-01

106

Beyond spinal manipulation: should Medicare expand coverage for chiropractic services? A review and commentary on the challenges for policy makers  

PubMed Central

Objectives Private insurance plans typically reimburse doctors of chiropractic for a range of clinical services, but Medicare reimbursements are restricted to spinal manipulation procedures. Medicare pays for evaluations performed by medical and osteopathic physicians, nurse practitioners, physician assistants, podiatrists, physical therapists, and occupational therapists; however, it does not reimburse the same services provided by chiropractic physicians. Advocates for expanded coverage of chiropractic services under Medicare cite clinical effectiveness and patient satisfaction, whereas critics point to unnecessary services, inadequate clinical documentation, and projected cost increases. To further inform this debate, the purpose of this commentary is to address the following questions: (1) What are the barriers to expand coverage for chiropractic services? (2) What could potentially be done to address these issues? (3) Is there a rationale for Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services to expand coverage for chiropractic services? Methods A literature search was conducted of Google and PubMed for peer-reviewed articles and US government reports relevant to the provision of chiropractic care under Medicare. We reviewed relevant articles and reports to identify key issues concerning the expansion of coverage for chiropractic under Medicare, including identification of barriers and rationale for expanded coverage. Results The literature search yielded 29 peer-reviewed articles and 7 federal government reports. Our review of these documents revealed 3 key barriers to full coverage of chiropractic services under Medicare: inadequate documentation of chiropractic claims, possible provision of unnecessary preventive care services, and the uncertain costs of expanded coverage. Our recommendations to address these barriers include the following: individual chiropractic physicians, as well as state and national chiropractic organizations, should continue to strengthen efforts to improve claims and documentation practices; and additional rigorous efficacy/effectiveness research and clinical studies for chiropractic services need to be performed. Research of chiropractic services should target the triple aim of high-quality care, affordability, and improved health. Conclusions The barriers that were identified in this study can be addressed. To overcome these barriers, the chiropractic profession and individual physicians must assume responsibility for correcting deficiencies in compliance and documentation; further research needs to be done to evaluate chiropractic services; and effectiveness of extended episodes of preventive chiropractic care should be rigorously evaluated. Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services policies related to chiropractic reimbursement should be reexamined using the same standards applicable to other health care providers. The integration of chiropractic physicians as fully engaged Medicare providers has the potential to enhance the capacity of the Medicare workforce to care for the growing population. We recommend that Medicare policy makers consider limited expansion of Medicare coverage to include, at a minimum, reimbursement for evaluation and management services by chiropractic physicians. PMID:25067927

Whedon, James M.; Goertz, Christine M.; Lurie, Jon D.; Stason, William B.

2013-01-01

107

Jurisprudence and business management course content taught at accredited chiropractic colleges: A comparative audit  

PubMed Central

Introduction: the purpose of this study was to conduct a comparative audit of the jurisprudence and business management courses offered at a number of different accredited chiropractic colleges. Methods: Faculty members responsible for teaching students jurisprudence and/or business management courses at a number of accredited colleges were contacted and asked to electronically submit their course outlines for review. Results: Of the 62 different topics delivered at the 11 chiropractic colleges surveyed, not one topic was taught at all of them. The following topics were taught at 10 of the 11 respondent chiropractic colleges: business plan development; ethics and codes of conduct and; office staff/employees. Several topics were only taught at one accredited chiropractic college. Conclusion: While most chiropractic colleges provide some education in the areas of jurisprudence and business management, it would appear that there is no consensus opinion or ‘model curriculum’ on these topics towards which chiropractic programs may align themselves. Based on a literature search, this study is the first of its kind. A more extensive study is required, as well as a Delphi process to determine what should be taught to chiropractic students with respect to jurisprudence and business management in order to protect the public interest. PMID:20195426

Gleberzon, Brian J.

2010-01-01

108

Chiropractic and social justice: a view from the perspective of Beauchamp's principles.  

PubMed

Social justice in public health involves the process and product of a community acting to fairly distribute advantages and burdens to improve the health of its population and to reasonably take care of the disadvantaged. Although publications are available about chiropractic public health history, programs, and policy, the potential role of chiropractic in social justice has received little attention. This article discusses Beauchamp's 4 principles of social justice and suggests actions that the chiropractic profession may consider to participate in the practice of social justice in the field of public health. PMID:20732576

Green, Bart N; Johnson, Claire

2010-01-01

109

Philosophy of chiropractic: lessons from the past — guidance for the future 1  

PubMed Central

In this paper, the argument will be made that present day “chiropractic philosophy” must be rejected as a professional obstacle. It is an unscientific relic of D.D. Palmer’s personal religious beliefs. A philosophy of chiropractic can only emerge from the application of philosophy of science to our scientific and clinical practices. This new philosophy should incorporate the general healing perspective of the ancient Coan tradition which will be described. This perspective can be made distinctively chiropractic by a synthesis with D.D. Palmer’s principle of Tone. Discussion will focus on how our philosophy can be developed to guide us into the 21st century.

Donahue, Joseph

1990-01-01

110

Chiropractic care and public health: answering difficult questions about safety, care through the lifespan, and community action.  

PubMed

The purpose of this collaborative summary is to document current chiropractic involvement in the public health movement, reflect on social ecological levels of influence as a profession, and summarize the relationship of chiropractic to the current public health topics of: safety, health issues through the lifespan, and effective participation in community health issues. The questions that are addressed include: Is spinal manipulative therapy for neck and low-back pain a public health problem? What is the role of chiropractic care in prevention or reduction of musculoskeletal injuries in children? What ways can doctors of chiropractic stay updated on evidence-based information about vaccines and immunization throughout the lifespan? Can smoking cessation be a prevention strategy for back pain? Does chiropractic have relevance within the VA Health Care System for chronic pain and comorbid disorders? How can chiropractic use cognitive behavioral therapy to address chronic low back pain as a public health problem? What opportunities exist for doctors of chiropractic to more effectively serve the aging population? What is the role of ethics and the contribution of the chiropractic profession to public health? What public health roles can chiropractic interns perform for underserved communities in a collaborative environment? Can the chiropractic profession contribute to community health? What opportunities do doctors of chiropractic have to be involved in health care reform in the areas of prevention and public health? What role do citizen-doctors of chiropractic have in organizing community action on health-related matters? How can our future chiropractic graduates become socially responsible agents of change? PMID:23069244

Johnson, Claire; Rubinstein, Sidney M; Côté, Pierre; Hestbaek, Lise; Injeyan, H Stephen; Puhl, Aaron; Green, Bart; Napuli, Jason G; Dunn, Andrew S; Dougherty, Paul; Killinger, Lisa Zaynab; Page, Stacey A; Stites, John S; Ramcharan, Michael; Leach, Robert A; Byrd, Lori D; Redwood, Daniel; Kopansky-Giles, Deborah R

2012-09-01

111

Teaching, leadership, scholarly productivity, and level of activity in the chiropractic profession: a study of graduates of the Los Angeles College of Chiropractic radiology residency program  

PubMed Central

Objective The purpose of this study was to track the graduates of the Los Angeles College of Chiropractic (LACC) radiology residency program, review their scholarly productivity, and report those involved in teaching and leadership positions. Methods Former LACC residents’ career information was identified through publicly available electronic documents including Web sites and social media. PubMed and the Index to Chiropractic Literature databases were searched for chiropractic graduate job surveys, and proportional comparisons were made between the career paths of LACC radiology residency graduates and those of non–residency-trained chiropractors. Results Of 47 former LACC residents, 28 (60%) have or previously had careers in tertiary (chiropractic) education; and 12 (26%) have attained a department chair position or higher at tertiary teaching institutions. Twenty-two (47%) have or previously had private radiology practices, whereas 11 (23%) have or previously had clinical chiropractic practices. Often, residency graduates hold or have held 2 of these positions at once; and one, all 3. Chapters or books were authored by 13 (28%). Conclusion Radiology residency LACC graduates are professionally active, particularly in education, and demonstrate scholarly productivity. PMID:23966885

Young, Kenneth J.; Siordia, Lawrence

2012-01-01

112

Roots of the NCMIC: Loran M. Rogers and the National Chiropractic Association, 1930-1946.  

PubMed

Today's National Chiropractic Mutual Insurance Company (NCMIC) evolved from the legal protective services offered initially by the Universal Chiropractors' Association, and subsequently, by the National Chiropractic Association (NCA). At first these services focused on the criminal defence of chiropractors charged with unlicensed practice. However, as an increasing number of jurisdictions enacted chiropractic statutes, the NCA's legal program became ever more involved in civil litigation: suits for malpractice and negligence. Steering the NCA throughout its tumultuous voyage was its longtime secretary-treasurer, Loran M. Rogers, D.C. When the NCA spun off its legal services division in 1946, forming the National Chiropractic Insurance Company (predecessor of the NCMIC), Rogers continued his work as executive secretary-treasurer of the malpractice insurer. PMID:15049321

Keatin, J C

2000-06-01

113

Functional neuroimaging: a brief overview and feasibility for use in chiropractic research  

PubMed Central

There is a need to further our understanding of the neurophysiological effects of chiropractic spinal manipulation on brain activity as it pertains to both musculoskeletal and non-musculoskeletal complaints. This paper aims to provide a basic overview of the most commonly utilised techniques in the neurosciences for functional imaging the brain (positron emission tomography, single-photon emission computerised tomography, functional magnetic resonance imaging, electroencephalography, and magnetoencephalography), and discuss their applicability in future chiropractic research. Functional neuroimaging modalities are used in a wide range of different research and clinical settings, and are powerful tools in the investigation of neuronal activity in the human brain. There are many potential applications for functional neuroimaging in future chiropractic research, but there are some feasibility issues, mainly pertaining to access and funding. We strongly encourage the use of functional neuroimaging in future investigations of the effects of chiropractic spinal manipulation on brain function. PMID:19421353

Lystad, Reidar P; Pollard, Henry

2009-01-01

114

Chiropractic treatment and the enhancement of sport performance: a narrative literature review  

PubMed Central

A literature search and narrative review was carried out with the intent of determining the current level of knowledge regarding the chiropractic treatment of athletes for the purpose of sport performance enhancement. Of the fifty-nine relevant articles retrieved, only 7 articles of variable quality were obtained which specifically investigated/discussed chiropractic treatment and its involvement in sport performance enhancement. The role of the chiropractor in sport, unsubstantiated claims of performance enhancement, theories of how chiropractic treatment may influence sport performance, and the available evidence for the benefit of chiropractic treatment on sport performance are reviewed and discussed. Areas and directions for future studies are postulated. At this time there is insufficient evidence to convincingly support the notion that treatment provided by chiropractors can directly improve sport performance. PMID:21120012

Miners, Andrew L.

2010-01-01

115

Financial attitudes, knowledge, and habits of chiropractic students: A descriptive survey  

PubMed Central

Objective: Our purpose was to describe the financial knowledge, habits and attitudes of chiropractic students. Methods: We designed a cross-sectional survey to measure basic financial knowledge, current financial habits, risk tolerance, and beliefs about future income among 250 students enrolled in business courses at one US chiropractic college. Descriptive statistical analyses were performed. Results: We received 57 questionnaires (23% response rate). Most respondents would accumulate over $125,000 in student loan debt by graduation. Financial knowledge was low (mean 77%). Most respondents (72%) scored as average financial risk takers. Chiropractic students reported recommended short-term habits such as having checking accounts (90%) and health insurance (63%) or paying monthly bills (88%) and credit cards (60%). Few saved money for unplanned expenses (39%) or long-term goals (26%), kept written budgets (32%), or had retirement accounts (19%). Conclusion: These chiropractic students demonstrated inadequate financial literacy and did not engage in many recommended financial habits. PMID:24587498

Lorence, Julie; Lawrence, Dana J.; Salsbury, Stacie A.; Goertz, Christine M.

2014-01-01

116

Quantitative corpus-based analysis of the chiropractic literature – a pilot study  

PubMed Central

In this pilot study, a collection of peer-reviewed articles from the Journal of the Canadian Chiropractic Association was analyzed by computer to identify the more commonly occurring words and phrases. The results were compared to a reference collection of general English in order to identify the vocabulary which is distinctive of chiropractic. From texts with a combined word count in excess of 280,000, it was possible to identify almost 2,500 words which were over-represented in the chiropractic literature and therefore likely to hold special importance within this domain. Additionally, readability statistics were calculated and suggest that the peer-reviewed chiropractic literature is approximately as challenging to read as that of nursing, public health and midwifery. Certain words widely considered to be of importance to the profession, for example “subluxation and adjustment,” were not particularly prevalent in the literature surveyed. PMID:21403783

Millar, Neil; Budgell, Brian S.; Kwong, Alice

2011-01-01

117

Chiropractic care of interstitial cystitis/painful bladder syndrome associated with pelvic lumbar spine dysfunction: a case series  

PubMed Central

Objective The purpose of this case series is to describe findings for patients with bladder pain syndrome (BPS) or interstitial cystitis (IC) who responded positively under chiropractic care. Clinical Features Eight cases were selected retrospectively reviewed from 2 independent chiropractic clinics in Scotland. Cases were selected if patients reported bladder dysfunction problems and responded positively to chiropractic care. The cases in this report describe the range of patients affected by this condition. Each patient was treated using chiropractic methods that were specific to the individual case. Intervention and Outcomes The patients selected for this case series showed positive response to chiropractic care over various lengths of time and numbers of treatments. Some of the chiropractic patients who had chronic spinal conditions had reoccurrence of bladder symptoms during an exacerbation of mechanical spinal problems. Conclusion This case series highlights that bladder and urinary problems may be associated with spinal dysfunction for some patients. PMID:23843758

Cashley, Mark A.P.; Cashley, Marie A.

2012-01-01

118

Clinical considerations in the chiropractic management of the patient with Marfan syndrome  

Microsoft Academic Search

Objective: To describe the chiropractic management of a patient with whiplash-associated disorder and a covert, concomitant dissecting aneurysm of the thoracic aorta caused by Marfan syndrome or a related variant. Clinical Features: A 25-year-old man was referred by his family physician for chiropractic assessment and treatment of neck injuries received in a motor vehicle accident. After history, physical examination, and

Jeffrey R. Tuling; Edward T. Crowther; Phyllis McCord

2000-01-01

119

Chiropractic Care for Older Adults: Effects on Balance, Dizziness, and Chronic Pain  

Microsoft Academic Search

ObjectiveThis study is part of an avenue of research exploring the effect of chiropractic care on balance in older adults. The purpose of this study was to (1) assess the use of the 7-item version of the Berg Balance Scale, (2) explore possible effects of an 8-week course of chiropractic care on balance as measured by the 7-item Short-Form Berg

Cheryl Hawk; Jerrilyn Cambron

2009-01-01

120

Multiple views to address diversity issues: an initial dialog to advance the chiropractic profession  

PubMed Central

The purpose of this article is to provide expert viewpoints on the topic of diversity in the chiropractic profession, including cultural competency, diversity in the profession, educational and clinical practice strategies for addressing diversity, and workforce issues. Over the next decades, changing demographics in North America will alter how the chiropractic profession functions on many levels. As the population increases in diversity, we will need to prepare our workforce to meet the needs of future patients and society. PMID:23966884

Johnson, Claire; Killinger, Lisa Zaynab; Christensen, Mark G.; Hyland, John K.; Mrozek, John P.; Zuker, R. Fred; Kizhakkeveettil, Anupama; Perle, Stephen M.; Oyelowo, Tolu

2012-01-01

121

Dose-response for chiropractic care of chronic low back pain  

Microsoft Academic Search

Abstract,BACKGROUND CONTEXT: There have been no trials of optimal chiropractic care in terms of number,of office visits for spinal manipulation and other therapeutic modalities. PURPOSE: To conduct a pilot study to make,preliminary identification of the effects of number of chiropractic treatment visits for manipulation,with and without physical modalities (PM) on chronic low back pain and disability. STUDY DESIGN\\/SETTING: Randomized,controlled trial

Mitchell Haas; Elyse Groupp; Dale F. Kraemer

2004-01-01

122

Are chiropractic tests for the lumbo-pelvic spine reliable and valid? A systematic critical literature review  

Microsoft Academic Search

Objective: To systematically review the peer-reviewed literature about the reliability and validity of chiropractic tests used to determine the need for spinal manipulative therapy of the lumbo-pelvic spine, taking into account the quality of the studies.Data Sources: The CHIROLARS database was searched for the years 1976 to 1995 with the following index terms: “chiropractic tests,” “chiropractic adjusting technique,” “motion palpation,”

Lise Hestbœk; Charlotte Leboeuf-Yde

2000-01-01

123

Assessing the change in attitudes, knowledge, and perspectives of medical students towards chiropractic after an educational intervention*  

PubMed Central

Objective We assessed the change in attitudes, knowledge, and perspectives of medical students towards chiropractic after a 1-hour educational intervention. Methods A mixed-methods approach was used with a 52-item cross-sectional paper survey and 1 focus group of third-year medical students. The views of these medical students towards chiropractic were assessed previously in their second-year of medical school. ANOVA and the Wilcoxon rank-sum test were used to assess between-group differences between the medical students' views before and after the educational intervention. The constant comparative method for analyzing qualitative data was used to identify emergent themes from the focus group transcript. Results Of 112 third-year medical students, 58 completed the survey (51.7% response rate). The focus group consisted of 6 medical students. Self-reported understanding of chiropractic and number of attitude-positive responses were significantly higher in the group after the educational session. The average number of correct responses assessing knowledge on chiropractic also was significantly higher. Focus group themes were that medical students wanted exposure to chiropractic in clinical settings, had negative attitudes towards chiropractic formed from hidden curriculum, had concerns regarding evidence and safety of chiropractic, and thought that timing of the session on chiropractic was too late in the curriculum. Conclusions The attitudes and knowledge of medical students towards chiropractic improved immediately after a 1-hour educational intervention. Formally educating medical students on chiropractic may help minimize hidden curriculum issues regarding chiropractic, as identified by the medical students, and facilitate collaboration between medical and chiropractic providers. PMID:25237768

Wong, Jessica J.; Di Loreto, Luciano; Kara, Alim; Yu, Kavan; Mattia, Alicia; Soave, David; Weyman, Karen; Kopansky-Giles, Deborah

2014-01-01

124

Canadian Chiropractic Resources Databank (CCRD): a profile of Canadian chiropractors  

PubMed Central

Objective: To establish a data bank which will serve as a comprehensive inventory of data and document practical information on Canada’s licensed chiropractors and to produce a summary report of this information. Design: A national census mail survey. Setting: Canada. The survey administration timeline during which information was collected was the period of August 1995 to July 1996. Participants: All chiropractors licensed to practice chiropractic in Canada, excluding chiropractors practising in the Yukon and Northwest Territories. A total of 4,246 questionnaires were mailed, of which 121 were ineligible. There were 2,905 valid responses (response rate 70.4%). Main outcome measures: Background information (demographics), professional activity, educational, training and affiliations, practice characteristics, finances and income. Results: Background information: 82.8% of all respondents were male. On January 1, 1997, the mean age of all respondents was 41.9 years. 88.6% of all respondents were born in Canada and 74.8% graduated from the Canadian Memorial Chiropractic College. The mean number of years in practice by all respondents was 13.7 years. 17.5% of all respondents had more than one practice location. Professional activity: A total of 96.2% of the respondents were active chiropractors (a chiropractor in active practice was one whose level of activity was self-described as full-time, part-time or semi-retired and who was in practice at least 10 hours per week). 85% reported being in full-time practice, 8.7% in part-time practice and 2.5% reported being semi-retired. Full-time chiropractors reported working on average 41.3 hours per week, 49.1 weeks per year and receiving 158.6 total patient visits per week. Active chiropractors reported spending on average 75.1% of their work time on direct patient care. 39.6% of active chiropractors reported that their practice had decreased over the last three years (in terms of number of patient visits). Education, training and affiliations: 42.1% of all respondents had obtained a baccalaureate degree prior to attending chiropractic college. 3.7% of all respondents held a CCA recognized specialty certification. 15.5% of all respondents held a certification or were registered to practice naturopathy, homeopathy, acupuncture, massage therapy or other related discipline. Practice Characteristics: 69.1% of active chiropractors reported being in sole proprietorship, and 85.3% reported working in a private chiropractic office. On an aggregate basis, active chiropractors reported using diversified techniques on 77.3% of their patients. Chiropractors in active practice reported treating on average 86.3% of their patients for primary conditions of a neuromusculoskeletal nature. Active chiropractors reported that their current patients were their greatest source of patient referrals, accounting for on average 58.5% of all their patients. Finances and Income: In provinces with public insurance for chiropractic services (Ontario, Manitoba, Saskatchewan, Alberta, British Columbia) active chiropractors reported deriving on average 39.7% of their practice income from the provincial plan, 44.7% directly from the patient, 9.6% from a third party payer and 6.1% from workers’ compensation boards. 56.2% of active chiropractors reported a gross annual practice income of less than $150,000 whereas 14.1% reported earning $250,000 or more. 49.5% of active chiropractors reported a net annual practice income of less than $60,000 whereas 21.4% reported earning $100,000 or more. In aggregate, active chiropractors reported that 37.3% of their patients exhausted their public insurance coverage for chiropractic care (in provinces where public insurance is available), and of those patients 35.3% discontinued care. Conclusions: This report is a first attempt to document a statistical portrait of Canada’s chiropractors. The report has been prepared by using data derived from the Canadian Chiropractic Resource Databank (CCRD), a data bank (housed at the CCA) which now holds a comprehensive inv

Kopansky-Giles, Deborah; Papadopoulos, Costa

1997-01-01

125

Chiropractic care of the older person: developing an evidence-based approach  

PubMed Central

Geriatric care has assumed a more dominant position in the health care delivery system. This article discusses the results of a literature search on geriatric chiropractic care with the ultimate goal of promoting a“best practice” approach. Fifty nine articles were found that discussed geriatric chiropractic education (N = 3), demographic and epidemiological studies (N = 9), case studies (N = 25), clinical trials (N = 4) and clinical guidelines (N = 18). The literature revealed that chiropractic pedagogy has recognized the importance of geriatric education, and epidemiological studies reported an increase in utilization rates of chiropractic care by older persons, along with greater acceptance within the medical community. Most older persons sought out chiropractic care for neuromusculoskeletal (NMS) conditions, with several studies reporting the successful resolution of these conditions with spinal manipulative therapy as well as an eclectic group of other treatment interventions. Many older persons enter a maintenance care program, which they believe to be important to their health. Although the results of this article are encouraging, it underscores the need for continued research, especially in the areas of chiropractic maintenance care and the management of non-NMS conditions.

Gleberzon, Brian J.

2001-01-01

126

Toftness system of chiropractic adjusting on pain syndromes: a pilot study in a multicenter setting?  

PubMed Central

Abstract Objective This pilot project investigates the effectiveness of the Toftness system of chiropractic adjusting on subjects with pain syndromes. Methods Patients were recruited from 13 doctors' offices. All subjects received Toftness chiropractic adjustments. The visual analog scale (VAS) and Oswestry low back pain questionnaire were used for all subjects before and after chiropractic adjustments. Results A total of 42 patients were recruited. Twenty-eight patients had acute or chronic back pain and 14 experienced other types of pain (eg, neck pain, knee pain, shoulder pain, etc). The average age of the patient population (18 male, 24 female) was 53 ± 16 years. After 6 to 8 weeks of chiropractic adjustments, pain as analyzed using the visual analog scale was reduced significantly from 73.6 ± 12.790 to 17.0 ± 13.363 (P < .001). The Oswestry score decreased significantly from 69.3 ± 18.525 to 12.4 ± 10.504 (P < .001). There were no adverse treatment effects reported by the participating patients. Conclusion The Toftness system of chiropractic adjusting reduced low back and other pain syndromes in the subjects studied. It suggests that the Toftness system of chiropractic adjusting was safe and effective to use in low back pain and other pain-related conditions. PMID:19674689

Snyder, Brian J.; Zhang, John

2007-01-01

127

Constructing a philosophy of chiropractic: evolving worldviews and postmodern core?  

PubMed Central

Objective The purpose of this article is to explore the postmodern, postrational, and postconventional core of DD Palmer's self-sense and philosophy. Discussion DD Palmer's self and philosophy can be viewed as a reaction to the self of modernity and its challenges of a fracture between mind and body, spirit, and nature. It is argued that Palmer's solution to these vexing problems facing the modern self was to use postrational and postconventional logic to overcome the dualisms. His philosophy resonates with similar postrational approaches, most notably, the German idealist Schelling. Conclusion It is argued that Palmer was one of the first postrational individuals in America and that chiropractic was an attempt at the first postrational health profession. PMID:22693480

Senzon, Simon A.

2011-01-01

128

Chiropractic leadership in the eradication of sexual abuse  

PubMed Central

Health practitioners work under fiduciary constraint, and are obligated to favour patient needs over all others and in particular their own. The principles of professionalism demand that professionals take great care to ensure that boundaries are maintained safely to provide an optimal setting in facilitating patient care. Boundary violations cause serious harm to the patient. Any romantic or sexual activity between parties is the most serious form of boundary violation. The chiropractic profession is included in the list of disciplines which are at an increased risk for boundary violations. The authors propose a four stage protocol which is designed to offer all parties maximal protection beginning with undergraduate professional education and then mandatory continuing education for registrants in professional practice. The protocol would affect all aspects of professional life including training in boundaries and jurisdictional regulation. PMID:22457543

Kinsinger, F. Stuart; Sutton, Wendy

2012-01-01

129

Chiropractic Legislation: The Constitution and Rules of Natural Justice *  

PubMed Central

In April of 1982 Canada received its Constitution and Charter of Rights. Except for those unfortunate individuals who become entangled in the administration of justice dealing with criminal law, few of us are affected on a day to day basis with the rights as enunciated in the Charter. While this would appear to be the case, it is not so. As professionals, whether lawyers or doctors of chiropractic, we are governed by those rights and obligations as set out in the Charter. A professional must be congnizant of the changes which will evolve as a result of the enactment and the rights of the professional licencing bodies in dealing with the professional. This article is concerned with the Charter of Rights and the impact of same on professionals. It is also concerned with the actions of the licencing bodies in exercising their power over professionals.

Freedman, Allan M.

1983-01-01

130

Dual Degree Program with Palmer College of Chiropractic (PCC) Beginning with the first semester of the 2013-2014 Truman State University academic year, a  

E-print Network

Dual Degree Program with Palmer College of Chiropractic (PCC) Beginning with the first semester in Health Sciences or Exercise Science from Truman State University and a Doctor of Chiropractic degree from Palmer College of Chiropractic (PCC) will be available to qualified students. Agreements have been

Gering, Jon C.

131

A survey of interprofessional education in chiropractic continuing education in the United States.  

PubMed

Objective : The purpose of this study is to describe the state of chiropractic continuing education vis-à-vis interprofessional education (IPE) with medical doctors (MD) in a survey of a sample of US doctors of chiropractic (DC) and through a review of policies. Methods : Forty-five chiropractors with experience in interprofessional settings completed an electronic survey of their experiences and perceptions regarding DC-MD IPE in chiropractic continuing education (CE). The licensing bodies of the 50 US states and the District of Columbia were queried to assess the applicability of continuing medical education (CME) to chiropractic relicensure. Results : The majority (89.1%) of survey respondents who attend CE-only events reported that they rarely to never experienced MD-IPE at these activities. Survey respondents commonly attended CME-only events, and 84.5% stated that they commonly to very commonly experienced MD-IPE at these activities. More than half (26 of 51) of the licensing bodies did not provide sufficient information to determine if CME was applicable to DC relicensure. Thirteen jurisdictions (25.5%) do not, and 12 jurisdictions (23.5%) do accept CME credits for chiropractic relicensure. Conclusion : The majority of integrated practice DCs we surveyed reported little to no IPE occurring at CE-only events, yet significant IPE occurring at CME events. However, we found only 23.5% of chiropractic licensing bodies allow CME credit to apply to chiropractic relicensure. These factors may hinder DC-MD IPE in continuing education. PMID:24918483

Bednarz, Edward M; Lisi, Anthony J

2014-10-01

132

A survey of interprofessional education in chiropractic continuing education in the United States  

PubMed Central

Objective The purpose of this study is to describe the state of chiropractic continuing education vis-à-vis interprofessional education (IPE) with medical doctors (MD) in a survey of a sample of US doctors of chiropractic (DC) and through a review of policies. Methods Forty-five chiropractors with experience in interprofessional settings completed an electronic survey of their experiences and perceptions regarding DC-MD IPE in chiropractic continuing education (CE). The licensing bodies of the 50 US states and the District of Columbia were queried to assess the applicability of continuing medical education (CME) to chiropractic relicensure. Results The majority (89.1%) of survey respondents who attend CE-only events reported that they rarely to never experienced MD-IPE at these activities. Survey respondents commonly attended CME-only events, and 84.5% stated that they commonly to very commonly experienced MD-IPE at these activities. More than half (26 of 51) of the licensing bodies did not provide sufficient information to determine if CME was applicable to DC relicensure. Thirteen jurisdictions (25.5%) do not, and 12 jurisdictions (23.5%) do accept CME credits for chiropractic relicensure. Conclusion The majority of integrated practice DCs we surveyed reported little to no IPE occurring at CE-only events, yet significant IPE occurring at CME events. However, we found only 23.5% of chiropractic licensing bodies allow CME credit to apply to chiropractic relicensure. These factors may hinder DC-MD IPE in continuing education. PMID:24918483

Bednarz, Edward M.; Lisi, Anthony J.

2014-01-01

133

Assessment and risk reduction of infectious pathogens on chiropractic treatment tables  

PubMed Central

Background To investigate the presence of pathogenic microbes on chiropractic treatment tables in one outpatient teaching clinic. Additional aims were to test inexpensive disinfectants on tables that may kill microbes and suggest infection control measures for chiropractic offices, clinics and classrooms. The aim of the study was to assess the presence of pathogenic microbes on treatment tables in one outpatient teaching clinic and determine a simple behavioral model for infection control including table disinfection and accepted hand washing and sanitizing protocols. Methods 10 treatment tables were selected and sampled for possible microbial flora on face and hand pieces. Samples were cultured on MacConky's agar and mannitol salt agar, labeled and incubated for up to 48 hours. Confirmatory testing of microbes to determine if drug resistant flora were present was performed. Among tables tested, 5 were selected to test disinfectants. One-half of the face piece and 1 hand piece were treated with two different wipes and then post-tested for microbes. Results Pathogenic microbes were present on chiropractic treatment tables including methicillin-resistant Staph aureus. Simple disinfectants neutralized the pathogens. A rudimentary disinfection procedure and infection control measures are suggested based on the findings. Conclusion Pathogenic microbes may be present on chiropractic treatment tables and can be effectively killed with proper disinfecting. Hand washing/sanitizing is an important measure in infection control as is table disinfecting. Rudimentary behavioral changes to improve chiropractic clinic infection control are needed. More comprehensive behavioral models are needed. All teaching clinics and private chiropractic offices should adopt infection control practices including routine table disinfecting and hand sanitizing. Effective measures can be put in place at minimal costs. Accrediting bodies of chiropractic institutions should mandate an infection control plan for member institutions immediately. PMID:17555579

Evans, Marion Willard; Breshears, Jennell; Campbell, Alan; Husbands, Chris; Rupert, Ronald

2007-01-01

134

Effect of chiropractic intervention on small scoliotic curves in younger subjects: A time-series cohort design  

Microsoft Academic Search

Background: Chiropractors have long claimed to affect scoliotic curves, and case studies abound reporting on successful outcomes. No clinical trials exist, however, that evaluate chiropractic's effectiveness in the management of scoliotic curves. Objective: To assess the effectiveness of chiropractic intervention in the management of adolescent idiopathic scoliosis in curves less than 20°. Design: Cohort time-series trial with all subjects electing

Charles A. Lantz; Jasper Chen

2001-01-01

135

Can patient reactions to the first chiropractic treatment predict early favorable treatment outcome in persistent low back pain?  

Microsoft Academic Search

Objective: To investigate whether 3 distinct patterns of reactions to chiropractic care predict early favorable treatment outcome in patients with persistent low back pain. Design and Setting: Multicenter, clinic-based prospective outcome study with standardized interview questionnaires conducted in private chiropractic practices in Sweden. Study Subjects: Previously compliant chiropractors were invited to participate in the study. A maximum of 20 consecutive

Iben Axén; Annika Rosenbaum; Robert Röbech; Thomas Wren; Charlotte Leboeuf-Yde

2002-01-01

136

Before Nugent took charge: early efforts to reform chiropractic education, 1919-1941  

PubMed Central

John J. Nugent, D.C. is remembered by many as either the “Abraham Flexner of Chiropractic” or the “anti-Christ of Chiropractic.” From 1941 until his forced retirement in 1959, the Irish-born Palmer graduate was one of the most important factors in the profession's educational reforms. Yet Nugent's work as the National Chiropractic Association's (NCA's) director of research was not the beginning of the campaign to upgrade chiropractic education. This paper looks at earlier influences and events which set the stage for Nugent's campaign. Among these were the introduction of licensure for chiropractors, the self-defeating actions of B.J. Palmer, the introduction of basic science legislation, the lethargy of the schools, and the struggle for control of education between the schools, on the one hand, and the NCA and the Council of State Chiropractic Examining Boards on the other ImagesFigure 1Figure 3Figure 4Figure 5Figure 6Figure 7Figure 9Figure 10Figure 11Figure 12Figure 13Figure 14Figure 15Figure 16Figure 17Figure 18Figure 19Figure 20Figure 21Figure 22Figure 23Figure 24Figure 25Figure 26Figure 28Figure 29Figure 30Figure 31Figure 32Figure 33Figure 34Figure 35Figure 36Figure 37Figure 38

Keating, Joseph C

2003-01-01

137

A narrative review of the published chiropractic literature regarding older patients from 2001–2010  

PubMed Central

Introduction: The purpose of this article was to perform a narrative review of the chiropractic literature regarding older patients between 2001 and 2010. Methods: A three step search strategy of the literature involved electronic searching, hand searching and reference tracking. Results: One hundred and eighty eight articles germane to chiropractic geriatric practice and education were retrieved. Discussion: Compared to the review of the literature conducted prior to 2000, the number of references on chiropractic geriatric education increased from 3 to 11, the number of demographic studies increased from 9 to 18, the number of case reports increased from 25 to 83, the number of clinical trials increased from 4 to 21 (only two RCTs found) and the number of references on clinical guidelines and general clinical information increased from 18 to 55. Conclusion: This review found 188 retrievable articles available to practitioners to effectively care plan for their older patients, a better than three fold increase in the number of references found during a similar review conducted at the end of the previous decade. However, there is clearly a gap in the evidence base of chiropractic geriatric care, particularly the under-representation of clinical trials of all kinds involving older chiropractic patients. PMID:21629461

Gleberzon, Brian J.

2011-01-01

138

Importance of Building Confidence in Patient Communication and Clinical Skills Among Chiropractic Students  

PubMed Central

Purpose: One important objective of chiropractic education is to foster student professional confidence and competence in patient communication and clinical skills. Therefore, the aim of this article is to review the extant literature on this topic, stressing the significance of building students' confidence for effective practice and the need for more research in this area. Methods: The authors reviewed MEDLINE and ERIC from 1980 through 2008 using several key words pertinent to confidence and health care. Three distinct, but interrelated, bodies of literature were assessed, including professional confidence in health care research, the nature and development of confidence in educational psychology research, and fostering professional confidence in chiropractic education. Results: It was apparent through the review that chiropractic education has developed educational methods and opportunities that may help develop and build student confidence in patient communication and clinical skills. However, there has not been sufficient research to provide empirical evidence of the impact. Conclusion: Fostering chiropractic students' development of confidence in what they say and do is of paramount importance not only to them as new practitioners but more importantly to the patient. There is no doubt that a better understanding of how confidence can be developed and consolidated during tertiary study should be a major goal of chiropractic education PMID:19826543

Hecimovich, Mark D.; Volet, Simone E.

2009-01-01

139

The learning style preferences of chiropractic students: A cross-sectional study  

PubMed Central

Objective The aims of our study were to measure the learning style preferences of chiropractic students and to assess whether they differ across the 5 years of chiropractic study. Methods A total of 407 (41.4% females) full-degree, undergraduate, and postgraduate students enrolled in an Australian chiropractic program agreed to participate in a cross-sectional survey comprised of basic demographic information and the Visual, Aural, Read/Write, Kinesthetic (VARK) questionnaire, which identifies learning preferences on four different subscales: visual, aural, reading/writing, and kinesthetic. Multivariate analysis of variance and the ?2 test were used to check for differences in continuous (VARK scores) and categorical (VARK category preference) outcome variables. Results The majority of chiropractic students (56.0%) were found to be multimodal learners. Compared to the other learning styles preferences, kinesthetic learning was preferred by a significantly greater proportion of students (65.4%, p < .001) and received a significantly greater mean VARK score (5.66 ± 2.47, p < .001). Conclusions To the best of our knowledge, this is the first time chiropractic students have been shown to be largely multimodal learners with a preference for kinesthetic learning. While this knowledge may be beneficial in the structuring of future curricula, more thorough research must be conducted to show any beneficial relationship between learning style preferences and teaching methods. PMID:24350945

Whillier, Stephney; Lystad, Reidar P.; Abi-Arrage, David; McPhie, Christopher; Johnston, Samara; Williams, Christopher; Rice, Mark

2014-01-01

140

The chiropractic college admission test: a proposal for its development and use  

PubMed Central

A cardinal characteristic of any profession is self-regulation. It is argued in the present paper that chiropractic has now reached a level of professional maturity that indicates the need for the final aspect of self-regulation: a standardized selection approach into professional schools or colleges. Quality control of membership can then begin at the entry point into the profession. An admission test - the Chiropractic College Admission Test (CCAT) - is proposed and outlined for use for the selection of candidates into chiropractic colleges. Such a test would be beneficial for students applying to the colleges, regulatory and licensing boards, to the profession as a whole, to the chiropractic colleges, to other professions, and to government as well as the general public. The proposed CCAT contains elements that are general to many health professions such as knowledge of the biological and physical sciences, verbal and linguistic reasoning and visual perceptual ability. The test, however, is proposed to have elements that are unique to chiropractic. Based on the performance of other admission tests (e.g. Dental Admission Test, Medical College Admission Test), it is argued that the CCAT could be constructed and used to have the highest technical properties of validity and reliability. Such a test would become an integral tool in maintaining quality assurance, beginning at the earliest point of the profession.

Violato, Claudio; Marini, Anthony; Nixdorf, Don; Lawson, Douglas

1996-01-01

141

"Research" and "science" in the first half of the chiropractic century.  

PubMed

In the first 50 years of the chiropractic profession, a variety of unorthodox meanings for the terms "research," "science" and related words were in evidence. In harmony with popular conceptions of the day, science was constructed as a relatively static body of knowledge and was thought to reflect the will of God. Research was an ill-defined activity, and acquisition of new knowledge did not involve the experimental methodology that increasingly took hold in biology and medicine in the twentieth century. Chiropractors often viewed science and research as marketing strategies. Clinical data collection, when it occurred at all, was not described in sufficient detail to permit replication. Results were enthusiastically interpreted as indisputable proof of investigators' a priori assumptions about the effectiveness of chiropractic methods. A few in the profession recognized the general lack of understanding of the scientific method and sought reform from within. However, the colleges were unwilling to introduce coursework in research methods. At the end of World War II, the broad-scope national association of chiropractors in the United States established a nonprofit foundation for the purpose of raising funds for chiropractic research and education. Research plans were poorly conceived and grandiose: the first major initiative of the Chiropractic Research Foundation involved a nationwide publicity and fund-raising campaign modeled after the March of Dimes. When these efforts failed and the possibility of establishing free-standing research centers collapsed, the Foundation sought to shift responsibility for research to the schools. The poverty-stricken chiropractic colleges lacked the research sophistication for this task. Several more decades would pass before a sustained research effort and interest in clinical experimentation would become evident in chiropractic. PMID:7595110

Keating, J C; Green, B N; Johnson, C D

1995-01-01

142

The Comparative Effect of Episodes of Chiropractic and Medical Treatment on the Health of Older Adults  

PubMed Central

Objectives The comparative effect of chiropractic vs. medical care on health, as used in everyday practice settings by older adults, is not well understood. The purpose of this study is to examine how chiropractic compares to medical treatment in episodes of care for uncomplicated back conditions. Episode of care patterns between treatment groups are described, and effects on health outcomes among an older group of Medicare beneficiaries over a two-year period are estimated. Methods Survey data from the nationally representative Survey on Assets and Health Dynamics among the Oldest Old (AHEAD) were linked to participants' Medicare Part B claims under a restricted Data Use Agreement with the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services. Logistic regression was used to model the effect of chiropractic use in an episode of care relative to medical treatment on declines in function and well-being among a clinically homogenous older adult population. Two analytic approaches were used, the first assumed no selection bias and the second using propensity score analyses to adjust for selection effects in the outcome models. Results Episodes of care between treatment groups varied in duration and provider visit pattern. Among the unadjusted models there was no significant difference between chiropractic and medical episodes of care. The propensity score results indicate a significant protective effect of chiropractic against declines in activities of daily living, instrumental activities of daily living, and self-rated health (AOR 0.49, AOR 0.62, and AOR 0.59, respectively). There was no difference between treatment types on declines in lower body function or depressive symptoms. Conclusion The findings from this study suggest that chiropractic use in episodes of care for uncomplicated back conditions has protective effects against declines in activities of daily living, instrumental activities of daily living, and self-rated health for older Medicare beneficiaries over a two-year period. PMID:24636108

Weigel, Paula A; Hockenberry, Jason; Bentler, Suzanne E.; Wolinsky, Fredric D.

2014-01-01

143

The effect of low force chiropractic adjustments on body surface electromagnetic field  

PubMed Central

Objective The purpose of this study was to investigate the body surface electromagnetic field (EMF) changes using a sensitive magnetometer before and after a specific Toftness chiropractic adjustment in asymptomatic human subjects. Method Forty-four subjects were randomly assigned into control (20 subjects) and experimental groups (24 subjects) in a pre and post-test design. The Triaxial Fluxgate Magnetometer FGM-5DTAA (Walker Scientific, Worcester, Massachusetts) with five digit display and resolution of 1 nanotesla (nT) was used for EMF detection. The EMF in the research room and on the adjustment table was monitored and recorded. The subjects’ body surface (cervical, thoracic, lumbar and sacral areas) EMF was determined in the prone position before and after the chiropractic adjustment. A low force Toftness chiropractic adjustment was applied to the cervical, thoracic, lumbar and sacral areas as determined by the practitioner. Results The EMF in the research room was recorded as 41611 nT at the Z axis (earth field), 13761 nT at the X axis and 7438 nT at the Y axis. The EMF on the adjusting table changed minimally during the 15 minute observation period. The EMF on the subjects’ body surface decreased at 4 spinal locations after chiropractic adjustment. The EMF (mean ± SD in nT) decreased significantly at the cervical region from 42449 ± 907 to 41643 ± 1165 (p < 0.01) and at the sacral regions from 43206 ± 760 to 42713 ± 552 (p < 0.01). The EMF at the lumbar and thoracic regions decreased but did not reach a statistically significant level. No significant changes of the body surface EMF were found in the control group. Conclusion A low force Toftness chiropractic adjustment in the cervical and sacral areas resulted in a significant reduction of the cervical and sacral surface EMF. No significant body surface EMF changes were observed in the lumbar and thoracic regions. The mechanisms of the EMF reduction after chiropractic adjustment are not known. PMID:17549217

Zhang, John; Snyder, Brian J; Vernor, Lori

2004-01-01

144

Resolution of cervical radiculopathy in a woman after chiropractic manipulation  

PubMed Central

Abstract Objective To describe a case regarding a woman with 2-level cervical disk herniation with radicular symptoms conservatively treated with chiropractic care including high-velocity, low-amplitude (HVLA) manipulation with complete resolution of her symptoms. Clinical Features A 40-year-old woman developed right finger paresthesia and neck pain. Results of electrodiagnostics were normal, but clinical examination revealed subtle findings of cervical radiculopathy. A subsequent magnetic resonance imaging revealed a large right posterolateral disk protrusion and spur impinging on the right hemicord with moderate to severe central canal and right neuroforaminal stenosis at C5-6 and C6-7. She was treated with HVLA manipulation to the cervical spine, as well as soft tissue techniques, traction, nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, and exercise. Intervention and Outcome Her clinical findings and symptoms resolved within 90 days of initiating care and did not return in 1 year. There were no untoward effects, including transient ones. Conclusion This case describes the clinical presentation and course of a patient with multilevel large herniated disks and associated radiculopathy who was treated with HVLA manipulation and other conservative approaches and appeared to have good outcomes. PMID:19674715

Whalen, Wayne M.

2008-01-01

145

Characterization of side effects sustained by chiropractic students during their undergraduate training in technique class at a chiropractic college: a preliminary retrospective study  

PubMed Central

Introduction The purpose of this study was to characterize the type, nature and frequency of injuries sustained by chiropractic students during their undergraduate training. Methods Chiropractic students in their second, third and fourth year of study at a chiropractic college were asked to complete a questionnaire that chronicled and described the occurrence of any side effects they may have sustained at the hands of their peers during technique class. Students were also asked to record their anthropomorphic characteristic. Results Of 450 questionnaires distributed, 292 were completed and returned to the authors. Of the 292 respondents, 127 reported to have experienced an injury, although the total number of injuries was 161. The most common site of injury was the lumbopelvic region. Students reported that it was during their second year of study that they experienced the highest number of injuries. Symptoms occurred the same day as the event in 85% of cases. The most common characteristic of symptoms reported was pain, followed by local stiffness, headache, dizziness, fatigue, diffuse stiffness and cramps. Two thirds of students described the extent of their injuries from ‘light’ to ‘a fair bit’. Three quarters of injuries resolved within the first 72 hours of the event. No treatment was sought by 89 (55%) of the respondents. More than half of students reported that their activities of daily living were either ‘not’ or ‘somewhat’ affected. There were three reports of long-term complaints. No statistically significant differences were found between the group of students reporting to be injured compared to those students not injured with respect to their age, gender, weight or height. Conclusion Chiropractic students experience side effects during their undergraduate training that are very similar to those experienced by patients under clinical care. PMID:17549151

Macanuel, Kim; Deconinck, Amy; Sloma, Katie; LeDoux, Monique; Gleberzon, Brian J

2005-01-01

146

An Investigation into the Faculty Development Practices in Chiropractic Education Programs  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

A descriptive case study design using a cross-sectional quantitative survey method was used to investigate the impact of faculty development programs on teaching effectiveness perceived by faculty teaching at chiropractic colleges in the United States. The availability of faculty development programs related to teaching and student learning was…

Scaringe, John G.

2010-01-01

147

Faculty of Medicine Canadian Chiropractic Research Foundation Professorship in Epidemiology/Biomechanics  

E-print Network

Faculty of Medicine Canadian Chiropractic Research Foundation Professorship in Epidemiology level in the Discipline of Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, Memorial University of Newfoundland, St. John of Medicine is the largest clinical discipline in the Faculty of Medicine and encompasses areas of Internal

deYoung, Brad

148

Self-Regulation of a Chiropractic Association through Participatory Action Research  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Participatory action research (PAR) can be used in the health professions to redefine their roles. This study investigated a small health professional group, the members of The Chiropractic Association Singapore (TCAS), by using a PAR method; researchers and participants gained insights into the self-regulation of a health profession. A…

Sheppard, Lorraine A.; Jorgensen, Anna Maria S.; Crowe, Michael J.

2012-01-01

149

Pregnant Students in the Gross Anatomy Laboratory: Policies and Practices at Chiropractic Colleges  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Chiropractic and medical colleges have experienced a significant increase in the number of female applicants in recent years, a percentage of whom are pregnant or become pregnant following admission. It is therefore important to ask the question: How do institutions that educate future health care providers address the issue of pregnancy and the…

Duray, Stephen M.; Mekow, Craig L.

2011-01-01

150

Chiropractic management of mechanical neck and low-back pain: A retrospective, outcome-based analysis  

Microsoft Academic Search

Background: Evidence suggests that spinal manipulation is an effective treatment for mechanical neck and low-back pain (LBP). Treatment efficacy is important to establish for these symptoms because combined they account for a considerable amount of disability and substantial associated direct and indirect costs to society.Objective: The purpose of this study was to examine the outcome of patients undergoing chiropractic treatment

Gordon McMorland; Esther Suter

2000-01-01

151

A randomized controlled trial of chiropractic spinal manipulative therapy for migraine  

Microsoft Academic Search

Objective: To assess the efficacy of chiropractic spinal manipulative therapy (SMT) in the treatment of migraine.Design: A randomized controlled trial of 6 months' duration. The trial consisted of 3 stages: 2 months of data collection (before treatment), 2 months of treatment, and a further 2 months of data collection (after treatment). Comparison of outcomes to the initial baseline factors was

Peter J Tuchin; Henry Pollard; Rod Bonello

2000-01-01

152

Chiropractic technique procedures for specific low back conditions: Characterizing the literature  

Microsoft Academic Search

Background: Many original clinical trials and several review papers have come to the conclusion that manipulation is safe and effective for the treatment of low back pain. However, it is necessary to determine which specific types of manipulation and nonmanipulative types of chiropractic adjustive care are most effective for particular types of low back pain across both tissue-specific and functional

Robert Cooperstein; Stephen M. Perle; Meridel I. Gatterman; Charles Lantz; Michael J. Schneider

2001-01-01

153

Texas Chiropractic College Practice Management Education: The Patient's Point of View.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

A survey was conducted to determine the patient's perception of treatment received from clinicians at the Texas Chiropractic College Clinic in Pasadena, Texas. A questionnaire designed to assess various aspects of the school's clinical and dispensary services was administered to 79 patients who had completed their treatment prescriptions. The…

Waigandt, Alex; And Others

154

Chronic pediatric asthma and chiropractic spinal manipulation: A prospective clinical series and randomized clinical pilot study  

Microsoft Academic Search

Objectives: The first objective was to determine if chiropractic spinal manipulative therapy (SMT) in addition to optimal medical management resulted in clinically important changes in asthma-related outcomes in children. The second objective was to assess the feasibility of conducting a full-scale, randomized clinical trial in terms of recruitment, evaluation, treatment, and ability to deliver a sham SMT procedure. Study Design:

Gert Bronfort; Roni L. Evans; Paul Kubic; Patty Filkin

2001-01-01

155

The Types and Frequencies of Improved Nonmuskuloskeletal Symptoms Reported After Chiropractic Spinal Manipulative Therapy  

Microsoft Academic Search

Objective: To investigate the frequency and types of improved nonmuskuloskeletal symp- toms reported after chiropractic spinal ma- nipulative therapy. Design: Retrospective information obtained by chiropractors through standardized inter- view of patients on return visit within 2 weeks of previous treatment. Setting: The private practice of 87 Swedish chi- ropractors (response rate 81%). Subjects: Twenty consecutive (presumably naïve) patients per chiropractor

Charlotte Leboeuf-Yde; Gregers Ahlefeldt; Annika Rosenbaum; Thomas Thurnherr

1999-01-01

156

Evidence-based medicine and its implications for the profession of chiropractic  

Microsoft Academic Search

Evidence-based medicine (EBM) has grown in popularity and prominence in the world of orthodox medicine since the 1980s. The focus of this article is on the process of developing practice guidelines (one type of EBM) and its effects upon chiropractic, a profession with a “philosophy, science and art” that is constructed upon divergent epistemological and methodological tenets (namely, the idea

Yvonne Villanueva-Russell

2005-01-01

157

Upper cervical chiropractic management of a patient with Parkinson's disease: A case report  

Microsoft Academic Search

Objective: To discuss the use of upper cervical chiropractic management in managing a single patient with Parkinson's disease and to describe the clinical picture of the disease. Clinical Features: A 60-year-old man was diagnosed with Parkinson's disease at age 53 after a twitch developed in his left fifth finger. He later developed rigidity in his left leg, body tremor, slurring

Erin L. Elster

2000-01-01

158

Chiropractic care of a patient with temporomandibular disorder and atlas subluxation  

Microsoft Academic Search

Objective: To describe the chiropractic care of a patient with cervical subluxation and complaints associated with temporomandibular disorder. Clinical Features: A 41-year-old woman had bilateral ear pain, tinnitus, vertigo, altered or decreased hearing acuity, and headaches. She had a history of ear infections, which had been treated with prescription antibiotics. Her complaints were attributed to a diagnosis of temporomandibular joint

Joel Alcantara; Gregory Plaugher; Darrel D. Klemp; Chris Salem

2002-01-01

159

Correlations Between Chiropractic National Board (Part I) Scores and Basic Science Course Grades and Related Data.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

A study at one institution found significant correlations between students' scores on the National Board of Chiropractic Examiners test and academic achievement data. Results indicate that it is not always course subject matter that influences the relationship between course grade and board scores, but may instead be the ability to assimilate…

Wolfenberger, Virginia

1999-01-01

160

Chiropractic management of Bell palsy with low level laser and manipulation: a case report  

PubMed Central

Objective The purpose of this case report is to describe chiropractic management including the use of cold laser and chiropractic manipulation in the treatment of a patient with Bell palsy. Clinical features A 40-year-old male patient had a 10-day history of facial paralysis on his left side, including the inability to close his left eye, which also had tearing and a burning sensation. The patient had trouble lifting his left lip and complained of drooling while brushing his teeth. There was no previous history of similar symptoms or a recent infection. Prior treatment had included oral steroids. Intervention and outcome The patient was treated with low-level laser therapy and chiropractic manipulation 2 times in 4 days. The laser was applied along the course of the facial nerve for 30 seconds at each point and for 1 minute at the stylomastoid foramen. The laser used was a GaAs class 4 laser with a wavelength of 910 nm. The patient perceived a 70% to 80% improvement of facial movement after the first treatment. After the second treatment, the patient reported full control of his facial movements. Conclusion A patient with acute facial paralysis appeared to have complete resolution of his symptoms following the application of low-level laser therapy and chiropractic manipulation. PMID:24396332

Rubis, Lisa M.

2013-01-01

161

Chiropractic Management of Pubic Symphysis Shear Dysfunction in a Patient With Overactive Bladder  

PubMed Central

Objective The purpose of this case report is to describe chiropractic management of a patient with overactive bladder (OAB) and to describe an hypothetical anatomical basis for a somato-vesical reflex and possible clinical link between pelvic and symphysis pubis dysfunction to OAB. Clinical features A 24-year-old nulliparous female with idiopathic OAB, with a primary complaint of nocturia presented for chiropractic care. Her sleep was limited to 2 consecutive hours due to bladder urgency. Pubic symphysis shear dysfunction was observed on physical examination. Intervention and outcomes The primary treatment modality used was chiropractic side-posture drop-table manipulation designed to reduce pubic shear dysfunction. After 8 treatments in 1 month, the pubic shear gradually reduced while nocturia diminished and consecutive sleep hours increased from 2 to 7. At 1-year follow-up, the nocturia remained resolved. Conclusion The patient reported in this case responded favorably to chiropractic care, which resulted in reduced nocturia and increased sleep continuity. PMID:25685115

Cooperstein, Robert; Lisi, Anthony; Burd, Andrew

2014-01-01

162

AN EVALUATION OF MEDICAL AND CHIROPRACTIC PROVIDER UTILIZATION AND COSTS: TREATING INJURED WORKERS IN NORTH CAROLINA  

Microsoft Academic Search

Objective: To examine utilization, treatment costs, lost workdays, and compensation paid workers with musculoskeletal injuries treated by medical doctors (MDs) and doctors of chiropractic (DCs). Design: Retrospective review of 96,627 claims between 1975 and 1994. Results: Average cost of treatment, hospitalization, and compensation payments were higher for patients treated by MDs than for patients treated by DCs. Average number of

Shawn P. Phelan; Richard C. Armstrong; David G. Knox; Michael J. Hubka; Dennis A. Ainbinder

163

Utilizing doctors' attitudes toward staff training to inform a chiropractic technology curriculum  

PubMed Central

Objective The purpose of this study is to determine attitudes of doctors of chiropractic regarding the importance of staff training in specific skill areas to inform the curriculum management process of a chiropractic technology program. Methods A survey was distributed to registrants of a chiropractic homecoming event. On a 5-point Likert scale, respondents were asked to rate the degree of importance that staff members be trained in specific skills. Descriptive statistics were derived, and a 1-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) was used to test differences between groups based on years in practice and level of staff training. Results Doctors place a high level of importance on oral communication skills and low importance on nutrition and physical examinations. Comparing groups based on years in practice revealed differences in the areas of passive physiotherapies (F = 3.61, p = .015), legal issues/regulations (F = 3.01, p = .032), occupational safety and health regulation (F = 4.27, p = .006), and marketing (F = 2.67, p = .049). Comparing groups based on level of staff training revealed differences in the areas of occupational safety and health regulations (F = 4.56, p = .005) and cardiopulmonary resuscitation (F = 4.91, p = .003). Conclusion With regard to their assistants, doctors of chiropractic tend to place high importance on office skills requiring effective communication and place less importance on clinical skills such as physical examinations and physiotherapy. PMID:24837884

Eberhart, Catherine A.; Martel, Stacie S.

2015-01-01

164

Extending ICPC-2 PLUS terminology to develop a classification system specific for the study of chiropractic encounters  

PubMed Central

Background Typically a large amount of information is collected during healthcare research and this information needs to be organised in a way that will make it manageable and to facilitate clear reporting. The Chiropractic Observation and Analysis STudy (COAST) was a cross sectional observational study that described the clinical practices of chiropractors in Victoria, Australia. To code chiropractic encounters COAST used the International Classification of Primary Care (ICPC-2) with the PLUS general practice clinical terminology to code chiropractic encounters. This paper describes the process by which a chiropractic-profession specific terminology was developed for use in research by expanding the current ICPC-2 PLUS system. Methods The coder referred to the ICPC-2 PLUS system when coding chiropractor recorded encounter details (reasons for encounter, diagnoses/problems and processes of care). The coder used rules and conventions supplied by the Family Medicine Research Unit at the University of Sydney, the developers of the PLUS system. New chiropractic specific terms and codes were created when a relevant term was not available in ICPC-2 PLUS. Results Information was collected from 52 chiropractors who documented 4,464 chiropractor-patient encounters. During the study, 6,225 reasons for encounter and 6,491 diagnoses/problems were documented, coded and analysed; 169 new chiropractic specific terms were added to the ICPC-2 PLUS terminology list. Most new terms were allocated to diagnoses/problems, with reasons for encounter generally well covered in the original ICPC 2 PLUS terminology: 3,074 of the 6,491 (47%) diagnoses/problems and 274 of the 6,225 (4%) reasons for encounter recorded during encounters were coded to a new term. Twenty nine new terms (17%) represented chiropractic processes of care. Conclusion While existing ICPC-2 PLUS terminology could not fully represent chiropractic practice, adding terms specific to chiropractic enabled coding of a large number of chiropractic encounters at the desired level. Further, the new system attempted to record the diversity among chiropractic encounters while enabling generalisation for reporting where required. COAST is ongoing, and as such, any further encounters received from chiropractors will enable addition and refinement of ICPC-2 PLUS (Chiro). More research is needed into the diagnosis/problem descriptions used by chiropractors. PMID:23311664

2013-01-01

165

Horner’s syndrome and dissection of the internal carotid artery after chiropractic manipulation of the neck  

Microsoft Academic Search

PURPOSE: To report a case of Horner’s syndrome and dissection of the internal carotid artery after chiropractic manipulation of the neck.METHODS: Case report. A 44-year-old woman with no prior ocular or vascular history presented with severe right-sided head and neck pain, ptosis, and miosis following chiropractic treatment for a strained right shoulder muscle.RESULTS: Magnetic resonance angiography of the neck and

Bobbie L. Parwar; Amani A. Fawzi; Anthony C. Arnold; Steven D. Schwartz

2001-01-01

166

Emphasis on various subtopics in the anatomy curriculum for chiropractic training: An international survey of chiropractors and anatomists  

PubMed Central

Objective The aim of this study was to conduct an international survey of the perceived optimal level of anatomy teaching from anatomy academics and practicing chiropractors. We hypothesized that the optimum level of anatomical understanding for chiropractic students does not differ between the anatomists teaching the students and practicing chiropractors. Methods The opinion of anatomists teaching in a chiropractic course (n = 16) was compared to practicing chiropractors (n = 589). The students' level of understanding was based on the revised Bloom's taxonomy for 16 different curriculum areas. Anatomists were recruited by contacting the accredited chiropractic courses worldwide. Snowball sampling was used for the practicing chiropractors. Independent-samples Mann-Whitney U tests were used to compare the results of anatomists and chiropractors. Results Opinions differed between anatomists and chiropractors on 9 out of the 16 questions. Where opinions differed, chiropractors recommended a higher standard of anatomical knowledge. The level suggested by chiropractors for these curriculum areas is equal to the “evaluating” level where chiropractic students can remember, understand, apply, and analyze anatomical knowledge to be able to justify a clinical decision. Conclusion Compared to anatomists working in chiropractic programs, chiropractors suggest a higher standard of anatomy be taught to undergraduates. Collaboration between chiropractors and anatomists would likely be beneficial in creating or modifying anatomy curricula for chiropractic students. PMID:25517738

Chapman, Peter D.; Meyer, Amanda; Young, Kenneth; Wibowo, Daniel; Walker, Bruce

2015-01-01

167

Reflex control of the spine and posture: a review of the literature from a chiropractic perspective  

PubMed Central

Objective This review details the anatomy and interactions of the postural and somatosensory reflexes. We attempt to identify the important role the nervous system plays in maintaining reflex control of the spine and posture. We also review, illustrate, and discuss how the human vertebral column develops, functions, and adapts to Earth's gravity in an upright position. We identify functional characteristics of the postural reflexes by reporting previous observations of subjects during periods of microgravity or weightlessness. Background Historically, chiropractic has centered around the concept that the nervous system controls and regulates all other bodily systems; and that disruption to normal nervous system function can contribute to a wide variety of common ailments. Surprisingly, the chiropractic literature has paid relatively little attention to the importance of neurological regulation of static upright human posture. With so much information available on how posture may affect health and function, we felt it important to review the neuroanatomical structures and pathways responsible for maintaining the spine and posture. Maintenance of static upright posture is regulated by the nervous system through the various postural reflexes. Hence, from a chiropractic standpoint, it is clinically beneficial to understand how the individual postural reflexes work, as it may explain some of the clinical presentations seen in chiropractic practice. Method We performed a manual search for available relevant textbooks, and a computer search of the MEDLINE, MANTIS, and Index to Chiropractic Literature databases from 1970 to present, using the following key words and phrases: "posture," "ocular," "vestibular," "cervical facet joint," "afferent," "vestibulocollic," "cervicocollic," "postural reflexes," "spaceflight," "microgravity," "weightlessness," "gravity," "posture," and "postural." Studies were selected if they specifically tested any or all of the postural reflexes either in Earth's gravity or in microgravitational environments. Studies testing the function of each postural component, as well as those discussing postural reflex interactions, were also included in this review. Discussion It is quite apparent from the indexed literature we searched that posture is largely maintained by reflexive, involuntary control. While reflexive components for postural control are found in skin and joint receptors, somatic graviceptors, and baroreceptors throughout the body, much of the reflexive postural control mechanisms are housed, or occur, within the head and neck region primarily. We suggest that the postural reflexes may function in a hierarchical fashion. This hierarchy may well be based on the gravity-dependent or gravity-independent nature of each postural reflex. Some or all of these postural reflexes may contribute to the development of a postural body scheme, a conceptual internal representation of the external environment under normal gravity. This model may be the framework through which the postural reflexes anticipate and adapt to new gravitational environments. Conclusion Visual and vestibular input, as well as joint and soft tissue mechanoreceptors, are major players in the regulation of static upright posture. Each of these input sources detects and responds to specific types of postural stimulus and perturbations, and each region has specific pathways by which it communicates with other postural reflexes, as well as higher central nervous system structures. This review of the postural reflex structures and mechanisms adds to the growing body of posture rehabilitation literature relating specifically to chiropractic treatment. Chiropractic interest in these reflexes may enhance the ability of chiropractic physicians to treat and correct global spine and posture disorders. With the knowledge and understanding of these postural reflexes, chiropractors can evaluate spinal configurations not only from a segmental perspective, but can also determine how spinal dysfunction may be the ultimate consequence of maintaining an u

Morningstar, Mark W; Pettibon, Burl R; Schlappi, Heidi; Schlappi, Mark; Ireland, Trevor V

2005-01-01

168

Radial neck fracture presenting to a Chiropractic clinic: a case report and literature review  

PubMed Central

Objective The purpose of this case report is to describe a patient that presented with a Mason type II radial neck fracture approximately three weeks following a traumatic injury. Clinical features A 59-year old female presented to a chiropractic practice with complaints of left lateral elbow pain distal to the lateral epicondyle of the humerus and pain provocation with pronation, supination and weight bearing. The complaint originated three weeks prior following a fall on her left elbow while hiking. Intervention and outcome Plain film radiographs of the left elbow and forearm revealed a transverse fracture of the radial neck with 2mm displacement--classified as a Mason Type II fracture. The patient was referred for medical follow-up with an orthopedist. Conclusion This report discusses triage of an elbow fracture presenting to a chiropractic clinic. This case study demonstrates the thorough clinical examination, imaging and decision making that assisted in appropriate patient diagnosis and management. PMID:24685056

2014-01-01

169

Chiropractic Management of an 81-Year-Old Man With Parkinson Disease Signs and Symptoms  

PubMed Central

Objective The purpose of this case report is to describe the chiropractic management of a patient with Parkinson disease. Clinical features An 81-year-old male with a 12-year history of Parkinson disease sought chiropractic care. He had a stooped posture and a shuffling gait. He was not able to ambulate comfortably without the guidance of his walker. The patient had a resting tremor, most notably in his right hand. Outcome measures were documented using the Parkinson’s Disease Questionaire-39 (PDQ-39) and patient subjective reports. Intervention and outcome The patient was treated with blue-lensed glasses, vibration stimulation therapy, spinal manipulation, and eye-movement exercises. Within the first week of treatment, there was a reduction in symptoms, improvement in ambulation, and tremor. Conclusion For this particular patient, the use of alternative treatment procedures appeared to help his Parkinson disease signs and symptoms. PMID:25685120

Bova, Joesph; Sergent, Adam

2014-01-01

170

The West Family Chiropractic Dynasty: celebrating a century of accomplishment in Canada  

PubMed Central

This historical treatise documents the unbroken legacy of the West family of chiropractors which has flourished in Canada for over 100 years. Part I, unearths the origins, development and careers of Archibald West, the founder of this dynasty, his son Samuel and grandson Stephen. Part II, not yet ready for publication, will delve into the lives of Archibald’s brother Samson and his chiropractic progeny, as well as a nephew of Stephen and another relative of Frederick West. PMID:20808618

Brown, Douglas M.

2010-01-01

171

Conservative chiropractic management of urinary incontinence using applied kinesiology: a retrospective case-series report  

PubMed Central

Objective The purpose of this case series is to describe the chiropractic management of 21 patients with daily stress and occasional total urinary incontinence (UI). Clinical Features Twenty-one case files of patients 13 to 90 years of age with UI from a chiropractic clinic were reviewed. The patients had a 4-month to 49-year history of UI and associated muscle dysfunction and low back and/or pelvic pain. Eighteen wore an incontinence pad throughout the day and night at the time of their appointments because of unpredictable UI. Intervention and Outcome Patients were evaluated for muscle impairments in the lumbar spine, pelvis, and pelvic floor and low back and/or hip pain. Positive manual muscle test results of the pelvis, lumbar spine muscles, and pelvic floor muscles were the most common findings. Lumbosacral dysfunction was found in 13 of the cases with pain provocation tests (applied kinesiology sensorimotor challenge); in 8 cases, this sensorimotor challenge was absent. Chiropractic manipulative therapy and soft tissue treatment addressed the soft tissue and articular dysfunctions. Chiropractic manipulative therapy involved high-velocity, low-amplitude manipulation; Cox flexion distraction manipulation; and/or use of a percussion instrument for the treatment of myofascial trigger points. Urinary incontinence symptoms resolved in 10 patients, considerably improved in 7 cases, and slightly improved in 4 cases. Periodic follow-up examinations for the past 6 years, and no less than 2 years, indicate that for each participant in this case-series report, the improvements of UI remained stable. Conclusion The patients reported in this retrospective case series showed improvement in UI symptoms that persisted over time. PMID:22942842

Cuthbert, Scott C.; Rosner, Anthony L.

2012-01-01

172

A Collaborative Approach Between Chiropractic and Dentistry to Address Temporomandibular Dysfunction: A Case Report  

PubMed Central

Objective The purpose of this case report is to describe the chiropractic and dental comanagement of a patient with temporomandibular dysfunction, headaches, and myalgia. Clinical features A 38-year-old black female patient presented for chiropractic care with a chief concern of jaw pain, tinnitus, headaches, and neck and shoulder soreness of 8 months’ duration. The patient rated the pain a 6/10. The patient had a maximum mouth opening of 42 mm, graphed evidence of disk displacement, loss of translation on opening of the right temporomandibular joint viewed on the lateral radiograph, and numerous areas of point tenderness on the Kinnie-Funt Chief Complaint Visual Index. She had decreased lateral cervical flexion. Intervention and outcome Dental treatment consisted of an anterior repositioning splint. Chiropractic care consisted of Activator treatment to the pelvis and the thoracic and cervical spine. Manual manipulation of the temporomandibular joint was performed along with a soft tissue technique intraorally on the lateral pterygoid. Postisometric relaxation in the head and neck region was also done. The patient was treated 6 times over 3 weeks. At the end of treatment, the patient had a pain rating of 0/10, maximum mouth opening of 49 mm, no tender points on the follow-up Kinnie-Funt, and increased cervical range of motion. Conclusion The patient demonstrated increased mouth opening, decreased pain rating, improved Kinnie-Funt visual index, and an increased cervical lateral flexion range of motion after 3 weeks of a combination of chiropractic and dental care. PMID:24711786

Rubis, Lisa M.; Rubis, David; Winchester, Brett

2014-01-01

173

Brown-Sequard Syndrome of the Cervical Spinal Cord after Chiropractic Manipulation  

Microsoft Academic Search

Summary: We report a case of increased signal in the left hemicord at the C4 level on T2-weighted MR images after chiropractic manipulation, consistent with contusion. The patient displayed clinical features of Brown-Sequard syn- drome, which stabilized with immobilization and steroids. Follow-up imaging showed decreased cord swelling with persistent increased signal. After physical therapy, the pa- tient regained strength on

Maurice H. Lipper; Jonas H. Goldstein; Huy M. Do

174

Attitudes towards fibromyalgia: A survey of Canadian chiropractic, naturopathic, physical therapy and occupational therapy students  

PubMed Central

Background The frequent use of chiropractic, naturopathic, and physical and occupational therapy by patients with fibromyalgia has been emphasized repeatedly, but little is known about the attitudes of these therapists towards this challenging condition. Methods We administered a cross-sectional survey to 385 senior Canadian chiropractic, naturopathic, physical and occupational therapy students in their final year of studies, that inquired about attitudes towards the diagnosis and management of fibromyalgia. Results 336 students completed the survey (response rate 87%). While they disagreed about the etiology (primarily psychological 28%, physiological 23%, psychological and physiological 15%, unsure 34%), the majority (58%) reported that fibromyalgia was difficult to manage. Respondants were also conflicted in whether treatment should prioritize symptom relief (65%) or functional gains (85%), with the majority (58%) wanting to do both. The majority of respondents (57%) agreed that there was effective treatment for fibromyalgia and that they possessed the required clinical skills to manage patients (55%). Chiropractic students were most skeptical in regards to fibromyalgia as a useful diagnostic entity, and most likely to endorse a psychological etiology. In our regression model, only training in naturopathic medicine (unstandardized regression coefficient = 0.33; 95% confidence interval = 0.11 to 0.56) and the belief that effective therapies existed (unstandardized regression coefficient = 0.42; 95% confidence interval = 0.30 to 0.54) were associated with greater confidence in managing patients with fibromyalgia. Conclusion The majority of senior Canadian chiropractic, naturopathic, physical and occupational therapy students, and in particular those with naturopathic training, believe that effective treatment for fibromyalgia exists and that they possess the clinical skillset to effectively manage this disorder. The majority place high priority on both symptom relief and functional gains when treating fibromyalgia. PMID:18513441

Busse, Jason W; Kulkarni, Abhaya V; Badwall, Parminder; Guyatt, Gordon H

2008-01-01

175

The origin and early history of the Canadian Chiropractic Examining Board, 1954 to 1985  

PubMed Central

This paper undertook to review the history of the Canadian Chiropractic Examining Board (CCEB) during the period from 1954 up to 1985. The issues of onset, purpose, and structure are outlined and an attempt to determine its effectiveness and examination validity are recounted. The contributions made by James and Lorraine Langford to the process and history are discussed and acknowledged. Imagesp245-ap247-ap251-a

Brown, Douglas M

1998-01-01

176

Clinical detection of abdominal aortic aneurysm in a 74-year-old man in chiropractic practice  

PubMed Central

Objective The purpose of this article is to present a case of abdominal aortic aneurysm to illustrate its clinical detection through history and physical examination and the importance of this condition to the chiropractic clinical setting. Clinical Features A 74-year-old retired man consulted a doctor of chiropractic for chronic low back pain. The history and physical examination confirmed chronic sacroiliac and a lumbar facet dysfunction. After 5 weeks, the patient stated he had stomach cramps. After this, a more thorough abdominal examination was done. The doctor of chiropractic detected an enlarged pulsatile mass upon abdominal palpation. Intervention and outcome The patient was sent to the cardiologist and had successful surgery within weeks. Conclusion An abdominal aortic aneurysm has specific symptoms and associated risk factors. If known risk factors are present, a clinical examination needs to be carried out, even though sensitivity of the clinical examination may be low. It should be a differential diagnosis in every male patient older than 50 years with low back pain. In case of suspicion, the patient should be referred for advanced imaging. PMID:21629398

de Boer, Nathan J.; Knaap, Simone F.C.; de Zoete, Annemarie

2010-01-01

177

Cox decompression chiropractic manipulation of a patient with postsurgical lumbar fusion: a case report  

PubMed Central

Objective The purpose of this case report is to describe a patient with an L5/S1 posterior surgical fusion who presented to a chiropractic clinic with subsequent low back and leg pain and was treated with Cox decompression manipulation. Clinical Features A 55-year-old male postal clerk presented to a private chiropractic practice with complaints of pain and spasms in his low back radiating down the right buttock and leg. His pain was a 5 of 10, and Oswestry Disability Index score was 18%. The patient reported a previous surgical fusion at L5/S1 for a grade 2 spondylolytic spondylolisthesis. Radiographs revealed surgical hardware extending through the pedicles of L5 and S1, fusing the posterior arches. Intervention and Outcome Treatment consisted of ultrasound, electric stimulation, and Cox decompression manipulation (flexion distraction) to the low back. After 13 treatments, the patient had a complete resolution of his symptoms with a pain score of 0 of 10 and an Oswestry score of 2%. A 2-year follow-up revealed continued resolution of the patient's symptoms. Conclusions Cox chiropractic decompression manipulation may be an option for patients with back pain subsequent to spinal fusion. More research is needed to verify these results. PMID:22654683

Kruse, Ralph A.; Cambron, Jerrilyn A.

2011-01-01

178

Chiropractic management of a 47-year–old firefighter with lumbar disk extrusion  

PubMed Central

Abstract Objective This case report describes the effect of exercise-based chiropractic treatment on chronic and intractable low back pain complicated by lumbar disk extrusion. Clinical Features A 47-year–old male firefighter experienced chronic, unresponsive low back pain. Pre- and posttreatment outcome analysis was performed on numeric (0-10) pain scale, functional rating index, and the low back pain Oswestry data. Secondary outcome assessments included a 1-rep maximum leg press, balancing times, push-ups and sit-ups the patient performed in 60 seconds, and radiographic analysis. Intervention and Outcome The patient was treated with Pettibon manipulative and rehabilitative techniques. At 4 weeks, spinal decompression therapy was incorporated. After 12 weeks of treatment, the patient's self-reported numeric pain scale had reduced from 6 to 1. There was also overall improvement in muscular strength, balance times, self-rated functional status, low back Oswestry scores, and lumbar lordosis using pre- and posttreatment radiographic information. Conclusion Comprehensive, exercise-based chiropractic management may contribute to an improvement of physical fitness and to restoration of function, and may be a protective factor for low back injury. This case suggests promising interventions with otherwise intractable low back pain using a multimodal chiropractic approach that includes isometric strengthening, neuromuscular reeducation, and lumbar spinal decompression therapy. PMID:19646377

Schwab, Matthew J.

2008-01-01

179

Chiropractic Treatment of Lateral Epicondylitis: A Case Report Utilizing Active Release Techniques  

PubMed Central

Objective The purpose of this report is to describe the chiropractic management of a case of lateral epicondylitis with active release techniques (ART). Clinical features A 48-year-old white man presented to a chiropractic clinic with a complaint of left lateral elbow pain that began 2 years previous with insidious onset. The patient reported an inability to play 18 consecutive holes of golf due to the pain. Intervention and outcome Treatment consisted of 5 sessions of ART (a soft tissue technique that is applied to muscles, fascia, tendons, ligaments, and nerves) applied to the left elbow soft tissue over a duration of 3 weeks. The patient reported an absence of pain and ability to consistently play 18 consecutive holes of golf up to 3 times per week at 4 and 8 weeks post-treatment. Conclusion This patient with lateral epicondylitis responded favorably to chiropractic treatment using the application of ART, as demonstrated by reduced pain and increased functional outcomes. PMID:25685118

Gliedt, Jordan A.; Daniels, Clinton J.

2014-01-01

180

Development of the 2012 American Chiropractic Board of Sports Physicians position statement on concussion in athletics  

PubMed Central

Objective The purpose of this article is to provide a summary of the development of the American Chiropractic Board of Sports Physicians (ACBSP) Position Statement on Concussion in Athletics regarding the management of concussion in sport and to offer suggestions to qualifying doctors of chiropractic (DCs) to make return-to-play decisions and clarify common concepts pertaining to evaluating and managing concussion in sport. Methods A literature review of position statements from sports medicine organizations was performed. The authors reviewed each statement for content. Key issues in the management of concussion in sport were identified with special consideration to concussion management by DCs. A position statement on the management of concussion in sport was drafted by the authors and submitted to the Board of Directors of the ACBSP for review. The Board of Directors called for minor revision; and after all revisions were made, the document was resubmitted. The Board of Directors of the ACBSP accepted the document for publication and presentation. The document was presented and disseminated to certificants by the ACBSP at the 2011 Chiropractic Sports Sciences Symposium. Results The 2012 ACBSP Position Statement on Concussion in Athletics was accepted by the ACBSP Board of Directors. Conclusion The Position Statement on Concussion in Athletics has been accepted by the ACBSP. This document offers guidance on the management of concussion in sport and provides qualifying DCs information to make return-to-play decisions. PMID:24396329

Moreau, William J.; Nabhan, Dustin C.

2013-01-01

181

On Vaccination & Chiropractic: when ideology, history, perception, politics and jurisprudence collide  

PubMed Central

The Palmers espoused anti-vaccination opinions in the early part of the 20th century, rejecting the germ theory of disease in favor of a worldview that a subluxation-free spine, achieved by spinal adjustments, would result in an unfettered innate intelligence; this, along with other healthful lifestyle choices, would allow a person to thwart disease by marshaling the body’s natural recuperative abilities. Some chiropractors continue to staunchly champion the Palmer postulates, while others do not. At the national level, advocacy organizations publish conflicting position statements. We explore how this divisiveness has impacted chiropractic ideology, perceptions among students and practitioners, politics and issues of jurisprudence as reflected by the evolution of a standard of chiropractic practice in at least one Canadian province (Ontario). We opine that the chiropractic profession should champion a health promotion and disease prevention approach to vaccination, which would allow it to align itself with the broader healthcare community while not abandoning its traditional tenets. PMID:23997246

Gleberzon, Brian; Lameris, Marlee; Schmidt, Catherine; Ogrady, Jillian

2013-01-01

182

The clinical laboratory in chiropractic practice: what tests to order and why?  

PubMed Central

Access to the clinical laboratory by chiropractors is an important issue in the context of the role of the chiropractor as a primary health care provider and the public’s right to optimal health care in the most efficient and cost-effective manner possible. In its efforts to gain the right to do so in Canada, the profession will have to identify and be able to justify the use of tests that would enhance the ability of its constituents to participate in the delivery of health care more effectively. In this article we have presented a set of tests which was originally developed as part of a presentation on laboratory services restructuring to the Ontario Ministry of Health by a joint committee of the College of Chiropractors of Ontario, the Ontario Chiropractic Association, and the Canadian Memorial Chiropractic College in 1996. A rationale for the use of each test in the context of chiropractic practice is presented. It is argued that the list of tests could be more, or less extensive than presented, but that it is necessary for the profession to engage in constructive debate and identify its needs more precisely in the interest of more effectively fulfilling its mandate as a primary health care profession.

Injeyan, H Stephen; Gotlib, Allan C; Crawford, John P

1997-01-01

183

Chiropractic management of postoperative spine pain: a report of 3 cases  

PubMed Central

Objective The purpose of this case series is to describe chiropractic care including spinal manipulation for 3 patients with postsurgical spine pain. Clinical features Three patients with postsurgical spine pain (1 cervical fusion, 1 lumbar discectomy, and 1 lumbar laminectomy) presented for chiropractic treatment at a major US medical center. Treatment included spinal manipulation and/or flexion-distraction mobilization based on patient response to joint loading strategies. Intervention and outcomes Two patients were treated with high-velocity, low-amplitude spinal manipulation; and 1 patient was treated with flexion-distraction mobilization. Treatment frequency and duration were 4 treatments over 4 weeks for case 1, 17 treatments over 7 years for case 2, and 5 treatments over 5 weeks for case 3. Subjective improvement was noted using numeric pain scores and functional changes; and upon completion, the patients reported being “satisfied” with their overall outcome. One episode of transient benign soreness was noted by 1 patient. No additional adverse events or effects were noted. Conclusion In these 3 cases, patients with postsurgical spine pain responded positively to chiropractic care. Spinal manipulation/mobilization was tolerated without significant adverse effects. PMID:24396317

Coulis, Christopher M.; Lisi, Anthony J.

2013-01-01

184

Chiropractic management of a patient with ulnar nerve compression symptoms: a case report  

PubMed Central

Objective The purpose of this case report is to describe chiropractic management of a patient with arm and hand numbness and who was suspected to have ulnar nerve compression. Clinical Features A 41-year-old woman presented with hand weakness and numbness along the medial aspect of her right forearm and the 3 most medial fingers. The onset of symptoms presented suddenly, 3 weeks prior, when she woke up in the morning and assumed she had “slept wrong.” The patient’s posture showed protracted shoulders and moderate forward head carriage. Orthopedic assessment revealed symptomatic right elevated arm stress test, grip strength asymmetry, and a Tinel sign at the right cubital tunnel. Intervention and Outcome The patient was treated using chiropractic care, which consisted of manipulative therapy, myofascial therapy, and elastic therapeutic taping. Active home care included performing postural exercises and education about workstation ergonomics. She demonstrated immediate subjective improvement of her numbness and weakness after the first treatment. Over a series of 11 treatments, her symptoms resolved completely; and she was able to perform work tasks without dysfunction. Conclusion Chiropractic treatment consisting of manipulation, soft tissue mobilizations, exercise, and education of workstation ergonomics appeared to reduce the symptoms of ulnar nerve compression symptoms for this patient. PMID:24294148

Illes, Jennifer D.; Johnson, Theodore L.

2013-01-01

185

Joseph W. Howe, D.C., D.A.C.B.R. and the development of modern chiropractic radiology.  

PubMed

Born in Galeton, Pennsylvania, on 27 May 1930, Joseph W. Howe has been extremely influential raising the educational standards for radiology in chiropractic. After receiving his D.C. from Palmer in 1952, he worked in private practice in Pennsylvania until being drafted into the Army, where he worked as a radiologic technician. After returning to civilian life and his practice, he attended many seminars and lectures on the subject, including one in 1958, taught by Roland Kissinger, D.C. at the National College of Chiropractic (NCC), the first postgraduate course in chiropractic roentgenology ever administered by a college. Howe then took and passed the second exam given by the American Board of Chiropractic Roentgenologists and was awarded certificate number eight in 1959. He helped to form the American Chiropractic College of Radiology and became its first Radiological Health Consultant. In 1968, he joined the Associates Diagnostic and Research Center (ADRC) in Tallmadge, Ohio, where he was able to concentrate on research and establish an off-campus facility for radiology residents of NCC. During this time Howe also lent his expertise to the Houston Conference on Spinal Manipulation. However, financial difficulties with the Center led Howe to leave, and accept a full time position teaching at NCC. Howe ultimately found himself too involved with administrative duties and not enough with the radiology that he loved, so he moved his family across the country in order to accept the radiology department chair at Los Angeles College of Chiropractic (LACC) in 1978. There he was given freedom to build the department to his high standards, and it retains the strongest residency in the profession, with up to six residents at any one time and links to prestigious radiologists like Donald Resnick, M.D. and Steve Rothman, M.D. Officially, Howe retired in 1998, but he still occasionally teaches residents and the Westwood-based radiology practice that he donated to LACC continues, run by the radiology faculty. PMID:11624125

Young, K J

1999-12-01

186

Predictors of performance of students in biochemistry in a doctor of chiropractic curriculum.  

PubMed

Objective : This study investigated the effect of completion of course prerequisites, undergraduate grade point average (GPA), undergraduate degree, and study habits on the performance of students in the biochemistry course at Palmer College of Chiropractic Florida. Methods : Students self-reported information regarding academic preparation at the beginning of the semester using a questionnaire. Final exam grade and final course grade were noted and used as measures of performance. Multivariate analysis of variance was used to determine if number of prerequisites completed, undergraduate GPA, undergraduate degree, hours spent studying in undergraduate study, and hours spent studying in the first quarter of the chiropractic program were associated significantly with the biochemistry final exam grade or the final grade for the biochemistry course. Results : The number of prerequisites completed, undergraduate degree, hours spent studying in undergraduate study, and hours spent studying in the first quarter of the chiropractic program did not significantly affect the biochemistry final exam grade or the final grade for the biochemistry course, but undergraduate GPA did. Subsequent univariate analysis and Tukey's post hoc comparisons revealed that students with an undergraduate GPA in the 3.5 to 3.99 range earned significantly higher final course grades than students with an undergraduate GPA in the 2.5 to 2.99 range. Conclusion : No single variable was determined to be a factor that determines student success in biochemistry. The interrelationship between the factors examined warrants further investigation to understand fully how to predict the success of a student in the biochemistry course. PMID:24295362

Shaw, Kathy; Rabatsky, Ali; Dishman, Veronica; Meseke, Christopher

2014-01-01

187

Perception of Educational Environment Among Undergraduate Students in a Chiropractic Training Institution  

PubMed Central

Purpose: The impact of the educational environment in student learning is well documented. However, there is a scarcity in the literature exploring the educational environment in chiropractic training institutions. This study aimed to identify the perceived educational environment in a chiropractic training institution and the possible perceptual differences among different demographic groups. Methods: The perceived educational environment was surveyed using Dundee Ready Education Environment (DREEM), which is a validated, self-administered, and Likert-type inventory. DREEM items focus on subdomains related to learning, teachers, self-confidence, academic atmosphere, and social environment. The results were analyzed and interpreted in relation to standard norms of DREEM and demographic variables. Results: The survey was completed by 124 chiropractic undergraduate students (response rate 83%). Statistically, the inventory items showed high correlation and the subdomains showed a close relationship. Overall the DREEM score was very high: 156.1/200 (78%). The subdomain scores were also at very high levels. However, the scoring of four items by students was consistently poor: lack of a support system for stressed students, 1.8 (SD 1.1); authoritarian teachers, 1.8 (SD 1.2); inadequate school time-tabling, 2.0 (SD 1.1); and overemphasis on factual learning, 2.0 (SD 1.0). There were no statistically significant differences in DREEM scores between gender, age, minority, and ethnicity groups. Conclusions: In general, students perceived that a sound educational environment is fostered by the institution and its educational program for all students despite their demographic variations. However, certain specific elements of the educational process may need to be addressed to improve the educational experience. PMID:22069340

Palmgren, Per J.; Chandratilake, Madawa

2011-01-01

188

The West family chiropractic dynasty: celebrating a century of accomplishment in Canada  

PubMed Central

This historical paper documents the unbroken legacy of the West family of chiropractors which has flourished in Canada for over 100 years. Part I, unearthed the origins, development and careers of Archibald West, the founder of this dynasty, his son Samuel and grandson Stephen. Part II, delves into the life of Archie’s brother Samson, and Samson’s chiropractic progeny: grandsons David and Neil, and great granddaughter Megan. Then it goes back to look at Stephen West’s nephew, R. Ian Buchanan and ends with a descendant of another branch of the family tree, James L. West. PMID:21629465

Brown, Douglas M.

2011-01-01

189

The academic legitimization of chiropractic: the case of CMCC and York University  

PubMed Central

Despite the fact that chiropractic has been accepted by more and more Canadians and Americans, it has yet to gain a foothold on a large American or Canadian university campus. In Canada, the primary chiropractic educational institution, the Canadian Memorial Chiropractic College (CMCC), has attempted to affiliate with many universities including the University of Victoria, Brock University, the University of Waterloo, and, most recently, York University. The benefits of association with a university include eligibility for many research grants and academic legitimacy for the profession. While chiropractic has been denied university affiliation, other “subordinate” health occupations, such as nursing and midwifery, are currently taught in Ontario universities. The objective of the current research is to analyse the reasons for the failure of the CMCC to affiliate with York University. The major focus of the investigation is whether CMCC's lack of success can be viewed as a manifestation of the dominance of a medical model at York or whether arguments similar to those raised against CMCC are common in mergers in higher education. The first possibility is consistent with closure theory in general in which professions attempt to limit competition for scarce resources (in this case patients and status), and to the notions of medical dominance and medical sovereignty that are related to closure theory. The second explanation is consistent with “mutual-growth merger theory” in which it is postulated that mergers in higher education are successful when they are of benefit to both parties and a series of steps have been taken ranging from institutional self-assessment, that may involve conducting surveys of the university community, to post-merger consolidation and community building. Overall, it will be argued that the failure of the proposed affiliation is best explained by reference to closure theory, as manifested in medical dominance and medical sovereignty. Because of medical dominance and sovereignty. Because of medical dominance and sovereignty, even if steps consistent with mutual growth merger theory had been followed at York, it is questionable that affiliation would have been successful.

Grayson, J Paul

2002-01-01

190

Sixty Patients With Chronic Vertigo Undergoing Upper Cervical Chiropractic Care to Correct Vertebral Subluxation: A Retrospective Analysis  

Microsoft Academic Search

Objective: The objective of this article is threefold: to examine the role of head and neck trauma as a contributing factor to the onset of vertigo disorders; to explore the diagnosis and treatment of trauma-induced injury to the upper cervical spine through the use of protocol developed by the International Upper Cervical Chiropractic Association (IUCCA); and to investigate the potential

Erin Elster

191

Simultaneous bilateral internal carotid and vertebral artery dissection following chiropractic manipulation: case report and review of the literature  

Microsoft Academic Search

Single-vessel cervical arterial dissections typically occur in young adults and are a common cause of cerebral ischemia and stroke. Although the pathogenesis of multivessel dissection is unclear, it is thought to be a consequence of underlying collagen vascular disease. We present a 34-year-old previously healthy man who developed bilateral internal carotid and vertebral artery dissection following chiropractic manipulation.

R. N. Nadgir; L. A. Loevner; T. Ahmed; G. Moonis; J. Chalela; K. Slawek; S. Imbesi

2003-01-01

192

A feasibility study of chiropractic spinal manipulation versus sham spinal manipulation for chronic otitis media with effusion in children  

Microsoft Academic Search

Background: Pediatric otitis media with effusion is a common and costly condition. Although chiropractors have anecdotally claimed success in treating otitis media, there is little research to support their claims. Objective: A pilot study was undertaken for the purpose of assessing the feasibility of conducting a full-scale randomized clinical trial investigating the efficacy of chiropractic spinal manipulative therapy (SMT) for

Charles E. Sawyer; Roni L. Evans; Patrick D. Boline; Richard Branson; Anne Spicer

1999-01-01

193

Unsubstantiated claims in patient brochures from the largest state, provincial, and national chiropractic associations and research agencies  

Microsoft Academic Search

Objective: To determine the presence or absence of claims for the clinical art of chiropractic that are not currently justified by available scientific evidence or are intrinsically untestable. Design: A survey of patient education and promotional material produced by national, state, and provincial societies and research agencies in Canada and the United States. Method: Patient brochures were solicited from the

Jaroslaw P. Grod; David Sikorski; Joseph C. Keating

2001-01-01

194

The evidence base for chiropractic treatment of musculoskeletal conditions in children and adolescents: The emperor's new suit?  

Microsoft Academic Search

Five to ten percent of chiropractic patients are children and adolescents. Most of these consult because of spinal pain, or other musculoskeletal complaints. These musculoskeletal disorders in early life not only affect the quality of children's lives, but also seem to have an impact on adult musculoskeletal health. Thus, this is an important part of the chiropractors' scope of practice,

Lise Hestbaek; Mette Jensen Stochkendahl

2010-01-01

195

Recovery pattern of patients treated with chiropractic spinal manipulative therapy for long-lasting or recurrent low back pain  

Microsoft Academic Search

Objective: To investigate the recovery pattern in chiropractic patients being treated for long-lasting or recurrent low back pain; in particular, to identify the minimum number of required treatments and the minimum number of days from the beginning of treatment to the occurrence of improvement. Design: Prospective, uncontrolled multicenter study. Setting: Private practice. Participants: Each of 19 selected Norwegian chiropractors provided

Lars-Christian Stig; Øyvind Nilsson; Charlotte Leboeuf-Yde

2001-01-01

196

Current understanding of the relationship between cervical manipulation and stroke: what does it mean for the chiropractic profession?  

Microsoft Academic Search

The understanding of the relationship between cervical manipulative therapy (CMT) and vertebral artery dissection and stroke (VADS) has evolved considerably over the years. In the beginning the relationship was seen as simple cause-effect, in which CMT was seen to cause VADS in certain susceptible individuals. This was perceived as extremely rare by chiropractic physicians, but as far more common by

Donald R Murphy

2010-01-01

197

Upper Cervical Chiropractic Care for a Patient with Chronic Migraine Headaches with an Appendix Summarizing an Additional 100 Headache Cases  

Microsoft Academic Search

Objective: To review the effectiveness of chiropractic care us- ing an upper cervical technique in the case of a 35-year-old female who presented with chronic daily tension and migraine headaches, and to summarize, in an Appendix, the examination findings and results for 100 additional chronic headache cases. Clinical Features: At age 23, the patient, a professional ice skater, sustained a

Erin L. Elster

2003-01-01

198

Evaluation of Publicly Available Documents to Trace Chiropractic Technique Systems That Advocate Radiography for Subluxation Analysis: A Proposed Genealogy  

PubMed Central

Objective The purpose of this study was to evaluate publicly available information of chiropractic technique systems that advocate radiography for subluxation detection to identify links between chiropractic technique systems and to describe claims made of the health effects of the osseous misalignment component of the chiropractic subluxation and radiographic paradigms. Methods The Internet and publicly available documents were searched for information representing chiropractic technique systems that advocate radiography for subluxation detection. Key phrases including chiropractic, x-ray, radiography, and technique were identified from a Google search between April 2013 and March 2014. Phrases in Web sites and public documents were examined for any information about origins and potential links between these techniques, including the type of connection to BJ Palmer, who was the first chiropractor to advocate radiography for subluxation detection. Quotes were gathered to identify claims of health effects from osseous misalignment (subluxation) and paradigms of radiography. Techniques were grouped by region of the spine and how they could be traced back to B.J Palmer. A genealogy model and summary table of information on each technique were created. Patterns in year of origination and radiographic paradigms were noted, and percentages were calculated on elements of the techniques’ characteristics in comparison to the entire group. Results Twenty-three techniques were identified on the Internet: 6 full spine, 17 upper cervical, and 2 techniques generating other lineage. Most of the upper cervical techniques (14/16) traced their origins to a time when the Palmer School was teaching upper cervical technique, and all the full spine techniques (6/6) originated before or after this phase. All the technique systems’ documents attributed broad health effects to their methods. Many (21/23) of the techniques used spinal realignment on radiographs as one of their outcome measures. Conclusion Chiropractic technique systems in this study (ie, those that advocate for radiography for subluxation misalignment detection) seem to be closely related by descent, their claims of a variety of health effects associated with chiropractic subluxation, and their radiographic paradigms. PMID:25431540

Young, Kenneth J.

2014-01-01

199

Carpal tunnel syndrome and the "double crush" hypothesis: a review and implications for chiropractic  

PubMed Central

Upton and McComas claimed that most patients with carpal tunnel syndrome not only have compressive lesions at the wrist, but also show evidence of damage to cervical nerve roots. This "double crush" hypothesis has gained some popularity among chiropractors because it seems to provide a rationale for adjusting the cervical spine in treating carpal tunnel syndrome. Here I examine use of the concept by chiropractors, summarize findings from the literature, and critique several studies aimed at supporting or refuting the hypothesis. Although the hypothesis also has been applied to nerve compressions other than those leading to carpal tunnel syndrome, this discussion mainly examines the original application – "double crush" involving both cervical spinal nerve roots and the carpal tunnel. I consider several categories: experiments to create double crush syndrome in animals, case reports, literature reviews, and alternatives to the original hypothesis. A significant percentage of patients with carpal tunnel syndrome also have neck pain or cervical nerve root compression, but the relationship has not been definitively explained. The original hypothesis remains controversial and is probably not valid, at least for sensory disturbances, in carpal tunnel syndrome. However, even if the original hypothesis is importantly flawed, evaluation of multiple sites still may be valuable. The chiropractic profession should develop theoretical models to relate cervical dysfunction to carpal tunnel syndrome, and might incorporate some alternatives to the original hypothesis. I intend this review as a starting point for practitioners, educators, and students wishing to advance chiropractic concepts in this area. PMID:18426564

Russell, Brent S

2008-01-01

200

Restructuring of the jurisprudence course taught at the Canadian Memorial Chiropractic College  

PubMed Central

Introduction: The process by which the jurisprudence course was restructured at the Canadian Memorial Chiropractic College is chronicled. Method: A Delphi process used to restructure the course is described, and the results of a student satisfaction survey are presented. Results: When asked “I think this material was clinically relevant,” over 81% of the 76 students who respondents strongly agreed or agreed with this statement; 100% of students agreed or strongly agreed that scope of practice; marketing, advertising and internal office promotion; record keeping; fee schedules; malpractice issues and; professional malpractice issues and negligence was clinically relevant. When asked “I think this material was taught well,” a minimum of 89% of students agreed or strongly agreed with this statement. Discussion: This is the first article published that described the process by which a jurisprudence course was developed and assessed by student survey. Summary: Based on a survey of student perceptions, restructuring of the jurisprudence course was successful in providing students with clinically relevant information in an appropriate manner. This course may serve as an important first step in development a ‘model curriculum’ for chiropractic practice and the law courses in terms of content, format and assessment strategies. PMID:20195427

Gleberzon, Brian J.

2010-01-01

201

The move towards research in the health professions: A comparison of Chiropractic and Physiotherapy  

PubMed Central

This paper compares the efforts of physiotherapy and chiropractic to move towards the development of a scientific body of knowledge through research. The history of both professions is discussed with particular reference to the education of the clinical practitioners and the educational faculty. Four cited factors contributing to the paucity of research in chiropractic, namely anti-scientific elements in philosophy, lack of suitable role-models, lack of funds and a lack of understanding of research methodology are also seen as barriers to physiotherapy research. These obstacles are discussed in the light of the strategies being employed by both professions to deal with this issue and their success or otherwise. It is stressed that research by members of both professions is fundamental to ensure professional survival. Solutions are principally concerned with increasing the research output from those institutions which educate future professionals. This new generation will likely ensure that the professions are soundly based on scientific principles. The paper considers, therefore, the pre-professional curriculum primarily, although not exclusively, from a Canadian perspective.

Wall, James C; Turnbull, George I; Vernon, Howard

1988-01-01

202

An Overview of the Identification and Management of the Metabolic Syndrome in Chiropractic Practice  

PubMed Central

Objective This article presents an overview of metabolic syndrome (MetS), which is a collection of risk factors that can lead to diabetes, stroke, and heart disease. The purposes of this article are to describe the current literature on the etiology and pathophysiology of insulin resistance as it relates to MetS and to suggest strategies for dietary and supplemental management in chiropractic practice. Methods The literature was searched in PubMed, Google Scholar, and the Web site of the American Heart Association, from the earliest date possible to May 2014. Review articles were identified that outlined pathophysiology of MetS and type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) and relationships among diet, supplements, and glycemic regulation, MetS, T2DM, and musculoskeletal pain. Results Metabolic syndrome has been linked to increased risk of developing T2DM and cardiovascular disease and increased risk of stroke and myocardial infarction. Insulin resistance is linked to musculoskeletal complaints both through chronic inflammation and the effects of advanced glycosylation end products. Although diabetes and cardiovascular disease are the most well-known diseases that can result from MetS, an emerging body of evidence demonstrates that common musculoskeletal pain syndromes can be caused by MetS. Conclusions This article provides an overview of lifestyle management of MetS that can be undertaken by doctors of chiropractic by means of dietary modification and nutritional support to promote blood sugar regulation. PMID:25225471

Seaman, David R.; Palombo, Adam D.

2014-01-01

203

The short life & enduring influence of the American Chiropractic Association, 1922-1930.  

PubMed

The American Chiropractic Association (ACA) of the 1920s is an ancestor of today's ACA. Established in 1922 as an alternative to B.J. Palmer's protective society, the Universal Chiropractors' Association (UCA), the ACA floundered under its first administration, but found its way when Frank R. Margetts, D.D., LL.D., D.C. was elected its second president in 1923. A skilled orator, Margetts toured the nation to rally support for the new society's policies and programs: independence from any school, higher educational standards, opposition to basic science legislation, national publicity, a clinical research program, and malpractice insurance and legal aid for its members. The ACA accepted straight and mixing chiropractors, but rejected applicants with only correspondence school diplomas. The ranks of the ACA grew after Palmer's 1924 introduction of the neurocalometer and the consequent decline in UCA membership. Following BJ's ouster from the UCA, the two societies commenced the lengthy negotiations for amalgamation which produced the National Chiropractic Association (NCA) in 1930. The NCA became today's ACA in 1963; the enduring influences of the 1920s ACA upon the present day ACA are considered. PMID:11619005

Keating, J C

1996-06-01

204

Application of lead-acrylic compensating filters in chiropractic full spine radiography: a technical report  

SciTech Connect

X-raying the entire spinal column in the standing position in a single exposure (mainly the AP projection) is an often-used chiropractic radiography procedure which has also found some application in medical scoliosis screening program. Aside from any controversy of clinical objectives or medical necessity, the primary agreed-upon requisite for such procedure is twofold; achieving the best possible film image quality with the least amount of radiation exposure to the patient. A popular method of accomplishing this objective is by the use of collimator-attached devices designed to selectively filter the primary x-ray beam in accordance with regional variations of body thickness and/or density. This study was conducted to evaluate the use of a new lead-acrylic filter system under specialized chiropractic conditions. In comparison to other available systems, it was concluded that this new system; a) is generally equivalent in its radiation dose reduction capabilities; b) is capable of producing full spine radiographs with good to above average image quality; and c) is appreciably easier to use.

Buehler, M.T.; Hrejsa, A.F.

1985-09-01

205

A comparative analysis of chiropractic and general practitioner patients in North America: Findings from the joint Canada\\/United States survey of health, 2002–03  

Microsoft Academic Search

BACKGROUND: Scientifically rigorous general population-based studies comparing chiropractic with primary-care medical patients within and between countries have not been published. The objective of this study is to compare care seekers of doctors of chiropractic (DCs) and general practitioners (GPs) in the United States and Canada on a comprehensive set of sociodemographic, quality of life, and health-related variables. METHODS: Data are

Eric L Hurwitz; Lu-May Chiang

2006-01-01

206

Low Back Pain in Primary Care: A Description of 1250 Patients with Low Back Pain in Danish General and Chiropractic Practice  

PubMed Central

Study Design. Baseline description of a multicenter cohort study. Objective. To describe patients with low back pain (LBP) in both chiropractic and general practice in Denmark. Background. To optimize standards of care in the primary healthcare sector, detailed knowledge of the patient populations in different settings is needed. In Denmark, most LBP-patients access primary healthcare through chiropractic or general practice. Methods. Chiropractors and general practitioners recruited adult patients seeking care for LBP. Extensive baseline questionnaires were obtained and descriptive analyses presented separately for general and chiropractic practice patients, Mann-Whitney rank sum test and Pearson's chi-square test, were used to test for differences between the two populations. Results. Questionnaires were returned from 934 patients in chiropractic practice and 319 patients from general practice. Four out of five patients had had previous episodes, one-fourth were on sick leave, and the LBP considerably limited daily activities. The general practice patients were slightly older and less educated, more often females, and generally worse on all disease-related parameters than chiropractic patients. All differences were statistically significant. Conclusions. LBP in primary care was recurrent, causing sick leave and activity limitations. There were clear differences between the chiropractic and general practice populations in this study. PMID:25436149

Munck, Anders; Jarbøl, Dorte Ejg; Søndergaard, Jens

2014-01-01

207

Chiropractic management of patients post-disc arthroplasty: eight case reports  

PubMed Central

Background When conservative therapies for low back pain (LBP) are not effective, elective surgery may be proposed to these patients. Over the last 20 years, a new technology, disc replacement, has become increasingly popular because it is believed to maintain or restore the integrity of spinal movement and minimize the side-effects compared to fusion. Although disc replacement may relieve a patient from pain and related disability, soreness and stiffness of the lumbopelvic region seem to be common aftermaths of the surgery. This prospective case series was undertaken to identify and describe potential adverse events of lumbar spinal manipulation, a common therapy for low back pain, in a group of patients with symptoms after disc prostheses. Cases presentation Eight patients who underwent lumbar spine total disc replacement were referred by an orthopaedic surgeon for chiropractic treatments. These patients had 1 or 2 total lumbar disc replacements and were considered stable according to the surgical protocol but presented persistent, post-surgical, non-specific LBP or pelvic pain. They were treated with lumbar spine side posture manipulations only and received 8 to 10 chiropractic treatments based on the clinical evolution and the chiropractor's judgment. Outcome measures included benign, self-limiting, and serious adverse events after low back spinal manipulative therapy. The Oswestry Disability Index, a pain scale and the fear avoidance belief questionnaire were administered to respectively assess disability, pain and fear avoidance belief about work and physical activity. This prospective case series comprised 8 patients who all had at least 1 total disc replacement at the L4/L5 or L5/S1 level and described persistent post-surgical LBP interfering with their daily activities. Commonly-reported side-effects of a benign nature included increased pain and/or stiffness of short duration in nearly half of the chiropractic treatment period. No major or irreversible complication was noted. Conclusions During the short treatment period, no major complication was encountered by the patients. Moreover, the benign side-effects reported after lumbar spine manipulation were similar in nature and duration to those frequently experienced by the general population. PMID:20409327

2010-01-01

208

A comparison of quality and satisfaction experiences of patients attending chiropractic and physician offices in Ontario  

PubMed Central

Introduction: Improving the quality of healthcare is a common goal of consumers, providers, payer groups, and governments. There is evidence that patient satisfaction influences the perceptions of the quality of care received. Methods: This exploratory, qualitative study described and analyzed, the similarities and differences in satisfaction and dissatisfaction experiences of patients attending physicians (social justice) and chiropractors (market justice) for healthcare services in Niagara Region, Ontario. Using inductive content analysis the satisfaction and dissatisfaction experiences were themed to develop groups, categories, and sub-categories of quality judgments of care experiences. Results: Study participants experienced both satisfying and dissatisfying critical incidents in the areas of standards of practice, professional and practice attributes, time management, and treatment outcomes. Cost was not a marked source of satisfaction or dissatisfaction. Conclusion: Patients may be more capable of generating quality judgments on the technical aspects of medical and chiropractic care, particularly treatment outcomes and standards of practice, than previously thought. PMID:24587494

Crowther, Edward R.

2014-01-01

209

The reliability and potential value of a specific ècentre of pressure locatoré in chiropractic practice  

PubMed Central

This study assessed the reliability and potential value of a specific Centre of Pressure Locator (COPL) for the initial diagnosis of spinal mal-alignments and for the measurement of change in weight distribution resulting from clinical intervention. Basic validation of the equipment with standard weights showed it to be very precise, reliable and accurate at noting changes in the position of the centre of pressure. Control subjects were used to develop interim norms for COP position and sway. R-L COP position among both controls and patients was found to be too variable to be a useful tool for diagnosis or for the measurement of the effects of intervention. However, the equipment shows promise for the measurement of A-P and R-L postural sway; potentially important variables to consider within chiropractic practice.

De Camillis, David; Carr, Robin

2000-01-01

210

A narrative review of medical, chiropractic, and alternative health practices in the treatment of primary dysmenorrhea  

PubMed Central

Abstract Objective Primary dysmenorrhea and related issues are discussed as they influence the gynecological and social health of females during adolescence, adulthood, and senior maturity. Health practitioners are exposed to multiple approaches towards the management of menstrual pain. Clinical and social viewpoints target the causation, development, diagnosis, manifestation and management of primary dysmenorrhea. This narrative review includes the topic of the doctor-patient relationship in efforts of cultivating effectively communicative health practitioners. Controversial topics related to primary dysmenorrhea and the quality of life for women are addressed. Data Sources A search for literature reviews, case studies, laboratory research, and clinical trials from 1985–2004 was performed using the MEDLINE database. Sources of additional information included textbooks, national organizational literature and contemporary articles. Discussion Menstrual pain is a prevalent experience yet it is socially taboo for conversation; as such, it poses a hindrance to its management. The communication between the doctor and patient is a critical barrier point between establishing a diagnosis and determining an appropriate treatment plan. A multi-disciple treatment plan varies as much as patients themselves vary in personal experiences, needs, and preferences. Conclusions Medicinal prophylactics, physical therapeutics, non-acidic diets, herbal supplements, eastern therapies and the chiropractic manual adjustments of the spine are effective methods for the management of primary dysmenorrhea. The non-invasive management of primary dysmenorrhea includes the chiropractic adjustment with complimentary modalities, and other alternative health care practices. Medicinal prophylactics are invasive and pose a higher risk to long-term chemical exposure, side effects or irreversible conditions. PMID:19674650

Spears, Lolita G.

2005-01-01

211

A pilot study of a chiropractic intervention for management of chronic myofascial temporomandibular disorder  

PubMed Central

Background Temporomandibular pain has multiple etiologies and a range of therapeutic options. In this pilot study, the authors assessed the feasibility of conducting a larger trial to evaluate chiropractic treatment of temporomandibular disorders (TMDs). Methods The authors assigned 80 participants randomly into one of the following four groups, all of which included a comprehensive self-care program: reversible interocclusal splint therapy (RIST), Activator Method Chiropractic Technique (AMCT) (Activator Methods International, Phoenix), sham AMCT and self-care only. They made assessments at baseline and at month 2 and month 6, including use of the Research Diagnostic Criteria for Temporomandibular Disorders. Results The authors screened 721 potential participants and enrolled 80 people; 52 participants completed the six-month assessment. The adjusted mean change in current pain over six months, as assessed on the 11-point numerical rating scale, was 2.0 (95 percent confidence interval, 1.1-3.0) for RIST, 1.7 (0.9-2.5) for self-care only, 1.5 (0.7-2.4) for AMCT and 1.6 (0.7-2.5) for sham AMCT. The authors also assessed bothersomeness and functionality. Conclusions The authors found the study design and methodology to be manageable. They gained substantial knowledge to aid in conducting a larger study. AMCT, RIST and self-care should be evaluated in a future comparative effectiveness study. Practical Implications. This pilot study was a necessary step to prepare for a larger study that will provide clinicians with information that should be helpful when discussing treatment options for patients with TMD. PMID:24080932

DeVocht, James W.; Goertz, Christine M.; Hondras, Maria A.; Long, Cynthia R.; Schaeffer, Wally; Thomann, Lauren; Spector, Michael; Stanford, Clark M.

2014-01-01

212

Feasibility of using a standardized patient encounter for training chiropractic students in tobacco cessation counseling  

PubMed Central

Objective Although tobacco cessation training is included in many health profession programs, it is not yet routinely incorporated into chiropractic education. The purpose of this study was to assess the feasibility of incorporating a problem-based learning tobacco cessation activity into a lecture course for chiropractic students. Methods Seventy-two students were assigned to participate in two 1-hour lectures on health promotion counseling and tobacco cessation followed by an experiential student-driven lab session using standardized patients at various stages of dependency and willingness to quit. The intervention was based on the transtheoretic model and the “5 A's” of counseling (ask, advise, assess, assist, arrange). Outcomes were assessed via (1) questionnaires completed by the standardized patients regarding the students' use of the 5A's, and (2) questionnaires completed by the students using a 5-point Likert scale of “strongly disagree” to “strongly agree” on the acceptability of this method of learning. Descriptive statistics were computed. Results Sixty-eight students (94%) completed the activity, spending a median of 2.5 minutes with patients. Over 90% addressed 4 of the 5A's: 99% asked patients if they were smokers; 97% advised them to quit; 90% assessed if they were willing to quit; and 99% offered assistance in quitting. Only 79% arranged a follow-up visit. Overall, students expressed a positive response to the experience; 81% said it increased their confidence in being able to advise patients, and 77% felt it would be valuable for use in their future practice. Conclusion This active learning exercise appeared to be a feasible way to introduce tobacco counseling into the curriculum. PMID:23957322

Hawk, Cheryl; Kaeser, Martha A.; Beavers, David V.

2013-01-01

213

Multimodal Chiropractic Care of Pain and Disability for a Patient Diagnosed With Benign Joint Hypermobility Syndrome: A Case Report  

PubMed Central

Objective The purpose of this case report is to describe multimodal chiropractic care of a female patient diagnosed with benign joint hypermobility syndrome (BJHS) and a history of chronic spine pain. Clinical features A 23-year-old white female presented for chiropractic care with chronic low back pain, neck pain, and headaches. The patient was diagnosed with BJHS, including joint hypermobility of her thumbs, elbows, right knee, and lumbopelvic region. A 6-year history of low back pain and varicose veins in her posterior thighs and knees were additional significant diagnostic findings of BJHS. Interventions and outcomes The treatment consisted of spinal and extremity manipulation, Graston technique, and postisometric relaxation combined with sensory motor stimulation and scapular stabilization exercises. The patient was seen 15 times over an 18-week period. After 18 weeks of care, the Revised Oswestry Low Back Questionnaire and Headache Disability Index demonstrated clinically important improvements with her low back pain and headache; but little change was noted in her neck pain as measured by the Neck Disability Index. Conclusion This patient with BJHS who had decreased disability and spine pain improved after a course of multimodal chiropractic care. PMID:24711783

Strunk, Richard G.; Pfefer, Mark T.; Dube, Derrick

2014-01-01

214

Name techniques in Canada: current trends in utilization rates and recommendations for their inclusion at the Canadian Memorial Chiropractic College  

PubMed Central

Since its establishment in 1945, the Canadian Memorial Chiropractic College (CMCC) has predominately adhered to a Diversified model of chiropractic technique in the core curriculum; however, many students and graduates have voiced a desire for greater exposure to chiropractic techniques other than Diversified at CMCC. A course structure is presented that both exposes students to a plethora of different “Name techniques” and provides students with a forum to appraise them critically. The results of a student survey suggested that both of these learning objectives have been successfully met. In addition, an assignment was designed that enabled students to recommend which, if any, “Name techniques” should be included in the curriculum of the College. The recommendations from these assignments were compiled since the 1996/97 academic year. The results indicated an overwhelming demand for the inclusion of Thompson Terminal Point, Gonstead, Activator Methods, Palmer HIO and Active Release Therapy techniques either as part of the core curriculum or in an elective program. These recommendations parallel the practice activities of Canadian chiropractors. Imagesp168-ap168-bp168-cp168-dp168-e

Gleberzon, Brian J.

2000-01-01

215

Treatment of a patient with posterior cortical atrophy (PCA) with chiropractic manipulation and Dynamic Neuromuscular Stabilization (DNS): A case report  

PubMed Central

Objective: Posterior cortical atrophy (PCA) is a rare progressive neurodegenerative syndrome which unusual symptoms include deficits of balance, bodily orientation, chronic pain syndrome and dysfunctional motor patterns. Current research provides minimal guidance on support, education and recommended evidence-based patient care. This case reports the utilization of chiropractic spinal manipulation, dynamic neuromuscular stabilization (DNS), and other adjunctive procedures along with medical treatment of PCA. Clinical features: A 54-year-old male presented to a chiropractic clinic with non-specific back pain associated with visual disturbances, slight memory loss, and inappropriate cognitive motor control. After physical examination, brain MRI and PET scan, the diagnosis of PCA was recognized. Intervention and Outcome: Chiropractic spinal manipulation and dynamic neuromuscular stabilization were utilized as adjunctive care to conservative pharmacological treatment of PCA. Outcome measurements showed a 60% improvement in the patient’s perception of health with restored functional neuromuscular pattern, improvements in locomotion, posture, pain control, mood, tolerance to activities of daily living (ADLs) and overall satisfactory progress in quality of life. Yet, no changes on memory loss progression, visual space orientation, and speech were observed. Conclusion: PCA is a progressive and debilitating condition. Because of poor awareness of PCA by physicians, patients usually receive incomplete care. Additional efforts must be centered on the musculoskeletal features of PCA, aiming enhancement in quality of life and functional improvements (FI). Adjunctive rehabilitative treatment is considered essential for individuals with cognitive and motor disturbances, and manual medicine procedures may be consider a viable option. PMID:25729084

Francio, Vinicius T.; Boesch, Ron; Tunning, Michael

2015-01-01

216

Chiropractic clinical practice guideline: evidence-based treatment of adult neck pain not due to whiplash  

PubMed Central

OBJECTIVE To provide an evidence-based clinical practice guideline for the chiropractic cervical treatment of adults with acute or chronic neck pain not due to whiplash. This is a considerable health concern considered to be a priority by stakeholders, and about which the scientific information was poorly organized. OPTIONS Cervical treatments: manipulation, mobilization, ischemic pressure, clinic- and home-based exercise, traction, education, low-power laser, massage, transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation, pillows, pulsed electromagnetic therapy, and ultrasound. OUTCOMES The primary outcomes considered were improved (reduced and less intrusive) pain and improved (increased and easier) ranges of motion (ROM) of the adult cervical spine. EVIDENCE An “extraction” team recorded evidence from articles found by literature search teams using 4 separate literature searches, and rated it using a Table adapted from the Oxford Centre for Evidence-based Medicine. The searches were 1) Treatment; August, 2003, using MEDLINE, CINAHL, AMED, MANTIS, ICL, The Cochrane Library (includes CENTRAL), and EBSCO, identified 182 articles. 2) Risk management (adverse events); October, 2004, identified 230 articles and 2 texts. 3) Risk management (dissection); September, 2003, identified 79 articles. 4) Treatment update; a repeat of the treatment search for articles published between September, 2003 and November, 2004 inclusive identified 121 articles. VALUES To enable the search of the literature, the authors (Guidelines Development Committee [GDC]) regarded chiropractic treatment as including elements of “conservative” care in the search strategies, but not in the consideration of the range of chiropractic practice. Also, knowledge based only on clinical experience was considered less valid and reliable than good-caliber evidence, but where the caliber of the relevant evidence was low or it was non-existent, unpublished clinical experience was considered to be equivalent to, or better than the published evidence. REPORTED BENEFITS, HARMS AND COSTS The expected benefits from the recommendations include more rapid recovery from pain, impairment and disability (improved pain and ROM). The GDC identified evidence-based pain benefits from 10 unimodal treatments and more than 7 multimodal treatments. There were no pain benefits from magnets in necklaces, education or relaxation alone, occipital release alone, or head retraction-extension exercise combinations alone. The specificity of the studied treatments meant few studies could be generalized to more than a minority of patients. Adverse events were not addressed in most studies, but where they were, there were none or they were minor. The theoretic harm of vertebral artery dissection (VAD) was not reported, but an analysis suggested that 1 VAD may occur subsequent to 1 million cervical manipulations. Costs were not analyzed in this guideline, but it is the understanding of the GDC that recommendations limiting ineffective care and promoting a more rapid return of patients to full functional capacity will reduce patient costs, as well as increase patient safety and satisfaction. For simplicity, this version of the guideline includes primarily data synthesized across studies (evidence syntheses), whereas the technical and the interactive versions of this guideline (http://ccachiro.org/cpg) also include relevant data from individual studies (evidence extractions). RECOMMENDATIONS The GDC developed treatment, risk-management and research recommendations using the available evidence. Treatment recommendations addressing 13 treatment modalities revolved around a decision algorithm comprising diagnosis (or assessment leading to diagnosis), treatment and reassessment. Several specific variations of modalities of treatment were not recommended. For adverse events not associated with a treatment modality, but that occur in the clinical setting, there was evidence to recommend reconsideration of treatment options or referral to the appropriate health services. For adverse eve

Anderson-Peacock, Elizabeth; Blouin, Jean-Sébastien; Bryans, Roland; Danis, Normand; Furlan, Andrea; Marcoux, Henri; Potter, Brock; Ruegg, Rick; Gross Stein, Janice; White, Eleanor

2005-01-01

217

A health care system in transformation: making the case for chiropractic.  

PubMed

There are a number of factors that have conspired to create a crisis in healthcare. In part, the successes of medical science and technologies have been to blame, for they have led to survival where lives would previously have been cut short. An informed public, aware of these technological advances, is demanding access to the best that healthcare has to offer. At the same time the burden of chronic disease in an increasing elderly population has created a marked growth in the need for long term care. Current estimates for expenditure predict a rapid escalation of healthcare costs as a proportion of the GDP of developed nations, yet at the same time a global economic crisis has necessitated dramatic cuts in health budgets. This unsustainable position has led to calls for an urgent transformation in healthcare systems.This commentary explores the present day healthcare crisis and looks at the opportunities for chiropractors as pressure intensifies on politicians and leaders in healthcare to seek innovative solutions to a failing model. Amidst these opportunities, it questions whether the chiropractic profession is ready to accept the challenges that integration into mainstream healthcare will bring and identifies both pathways and potential obstacles to acceptance. PMID:23216921

Brown, Richard

2012-01-01

218

A health care system in transformation: making the case for chiropractic  

PubMed Central

There are a number of factors that have conspired to create a crisis in healthcare. In part, the successes of medical science and technologies have been to blame, for they have led to survival where lives would previously have been cut short. An informed public, aware of these technological advances, is demanding access to the best that healthcare has to offer. At the same time the burden of chronic disease in an increasing elderly population has created a marked growth in the need for long term care. Current estimates for expenditure predict a rapid escalation of healthcare costs as a proportion of the GDP of developed nations, yet at the same time a global economic crisis has necessitated dramatic cuts in health budgets. This unsustainable position has led to calls for an urgent transformation in healthcare systems. This commentary explores the present day healthcare crisis and looks at the opportunities for chiropractors as pressure intensifies on politicians and leaders in healthcare to seek innovative solutions to a failing model. Amidst these opportunities, it questions whether the chiropractic profession is ready to accept the challenges that integration into mainstream healthcare will bring and identifies both pathways and potential obstacles to acceptance. PMID:23216921

2012-01-01

219

Chiropractic utilization in BMX athletes at the UCI World Championships: a retrospective study  

PubMed Central

Objective To examine paramedical (chiropractic, physiotherapy and massage therapy) utilization among high-level BMX athletes following sport-related injury at the 2007 UCI World Championships. Methods Retrospective analysis was conducted on a dataset from international male and female BMX athletes (n = 110) who sustained injury in training and competition at the 2007 BMX World Championships. Results Fifty percent of individuals aged 8–17 presented to a chiropractor versus 32% to physiotherapists and 18% to massage therapists. There was a significant difference in paramedical practitioner choice when comparing the sample across the different locations of injury. Specifically, the proportion of individuals presenting for treatment to chiropractors (84%) was much higher than to physiotherapists/massage therapists (16%) for spine or torso complaints. Conclusion Utilization of chiropractors by BMX athletes may be higher than utilization of other paramedical professionals as suggested by this study. Chiropractors appear to be the paramedical practitioner of choice in regards to spine and torso related complaints. PMID:21120016

Konczak, Clark Ryan

2010-01-01

220

Audit and feedback intervention: An examination of differences in chiropractic record-keeping compliance.  

PubMed

Objective : The objective of this study was to investigate the association of a clinical documentation quality improvement program using audit-feedback with clinical compliance to indicators of quality chart documentation. Methods : This was an analysis of differences between adherence to quality indicators of chiropractic record documentation and audit-feedback intervention (feedback report only vs. feedback report with one-on-one educational consultation) at different campuses. Comparisons among groups were analyzed using analysis of variance (ANOVA), Tukey or Dunnett post hoc tests, and Cohen's d effect size estimates. Results : There was a significant increase in the mean percentile compliance in 2 of 5 compliance areas and 1 of 11 compliance objectives. Campus B demonstrated significantly higher levels of compliance relative to campus A and/or campus C in 5 of 5 compliance areas and 7 of 11 compliance objectives. Across-campus comparisons indicated that the compliance area Review (Non-Medicare) Treatment Plan [F(2,18) = 17.537, p < .001] and compliance objective Treatment Plan Goals [F(2,26) = 5.653, p < .001] exhibited the highest practical importance for clinical compliance practice. Conclusions : Feedback of performance improved compliance to indicators of quality health record documentation, especially when baseline adherence is relatively low. Required educational consultations with clinicians combined with audit-feedback were no more effective at increasing compliance to indicators of quality health record documentation than audit-feedback alone. PMID:24804561

Homb, Nicole M; Sheybani, Shayan; Derby, Dustin; Wood, Kurt

2014-10-01

221

Physical therapy and chiropractic use among childhood cancer survivors with chronic disease: impact on health-related quality of life  

Microsoft Academic Search

Introduction  The use of rehabilitation services to address musculoskeletal, neurological and cardiovascular late effects among childhood\\u000a cancer survivors could improve physical function and health-related quality-of-life (HRQL). We describe physical therapy (PT)\\u000a and chiropractic utilization among childhood cancer survivors and their association with HRQL.\\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a Methods  The sample included 5+ year survivors from the Childhood Cancer Survivor Study (N?=?9,289). Questions addressing use of PT

Michele Montgomery; Sujuan Huang; Cheryl L. Cox; Wendy M. Leisenring; Kevin C. Oeffinger; Melissa M. Hudson; Jill Ginsberg; Gregory T. Armstrong; Leslie L. Robison; Kirsten K. Ness

2011-01-01

222

Upper extremity deep vein thrombosis presenting to a chiropractic clinic: a description of 2 cases  

PubMed Central

Objective The purpose of this case series is to describe the presentation of 2 patients who presented to a chiropractic teaching clinic with Paget-Schroetter syndrome (PSS) and to discuss the potential role for conservative therapy in the management of symptoms. Clinical Features Two patients presented with a vascular and muscular findings suggesting activity-related upper extremity deep vein thrombosis. One patient presented with recent onset of symptoms (pain in the neck with a “pinched nerve sensation” in the left upper trapezius); and the other presented with chronic, low-grade neck pain of 1 year's duration. Intervention and Outcome The initial treatment approach for the patient with acute symptoms included soft tissue therapy. During the second appointment, he was immediately referred for medical evaluation and management because of worsening symptoms. He was diagnosed with thrombus in the left brachial vein, started immediately on a thrombolytic agent, and referred to a thrombosis clinic. Treatment for the second patient with chronic symptoms included soft tissue therapy, spinal manipulative therapy, and active care. Two months after 3 treatments, she reported improved symptoms. She remains under supportive care and has reported continued relief of her symptoms. Conclusion Although a rare condition, PSS has the potential to result in significant morbidity and potentially fatal complications; thus, it is critical that practitioners recognize the signs and symptoms to facilitate appropriate and timely referrals. Clinicians should be aware of the presentation and proposed pathogenesis of PSS, and consider this diagnosis in patients with unilateral upper limb and/or neck pain. PMID:23843762

Stainsby, Brynne E.; Muir, Bradley J.; Miners, Andrew L.

2012-01-01

223

Patient characteristics and physicians' practice activities for patients with chronic low back pain: A practice-based study of primary care and chiropractic physicians  

Microsoft Academic Search

Background: Chronic low back pain sufferers are among those who account for the greatest usage of health care resources. Primary care medical (MD) physicians and chiropractic (DC) physicians treat most of these patients. Objectives: To study patient characteristics and physician practice activities for patients with chronic low back pain treated by DC physicians and MD physicians. Methods: A longitudinal, practice-based

Joanne Nyiendo; Mitchell Haas; Bruce Goldberg; Gary Sexton

2001-01-01

224

Predictive factors for 1-year outcome of low-back and neck pain in patients treated in primary care: comparison between the treatment strategies chiropractic and physiotherapy  

Microsoft Academic Search

The inability to predict outcome in patients with low back\\/neck pain leads to inappropriate or unnecessary treatment. The aims of the study were to identify prognostic factors for disability at 1-year follow-up in patients with back pain visiting primary care, and to compare the effect of these in two treatment strategies – chiropractic and physiotherapy. Data were taken from a

Elisabeth I Skargren; Birgitta E. Öberg

1998-01-01

225

An exploratory mixed-method study to determine factors that may affect satisfaction levels of athletes receiving chiropractic care in a nonclinic setting?  

PubMed Central

Abstract Objectives The objectives of this study were to determine factors that may affect satisfaction levels of participants in a nonclinic (sport) setting through participant observation and participation. Factors associated with general satisfaction (observed) were determined along with a participant demographic profile, participant knowledge about chiropractic, and satisfaction with treatment received from a chiropractic student. Thereafter, the relationships between the demographic factors, participant knowledge, and participant general satisfaction were determined. Lastly, factors affecting satisfaction levels were compared between the participants and the observers. Methods An exploratory mixed-method observational study that compared results reported by 30 participants and 2 observers, regarding the treatment process, by completion of a self-administered questionnaire. Statistical significance was set at P less than or equal to .05. Results Of the 30 participants, 83.3% were South African, 90% were white, and 63.3% were male, with a mean age of 35.6 years, who reported they were very satisfied with chiropractic care (P = .229). The only factor to produce a significant difference between participants and observers was communication (P = .082 with Spearman = .332). Conclusion In this study, communication had the greatest impact; therefore, it is suggested that positive verbal and nonverbal communication be emphasized in the training of future chiropractic professionals. PMID:19646388

Talmage, Grant; Korporaal, Charmaine; Brantingham, James W.

2009-01-01

226

Mixed-Methods Research in a Complex Multisite VA Health Services Study: Variations in the Implementation and Characteristics of Chiropractic Services in VA  

PubMed Central

Maximizing the quality and benefits of newly established chiropractic services represents an important policy and practice goal for the US Department of Veterans Affairs' healthcare system. Understanding the implementation process and characteristics of new chiropractic clinics and the determinants and consequences of these processes and characteristics is a critical first step in guiding quality improvement. This paper reports insights and lessons learned regarding the successful application of mixed methods research approaches—insights derived from a study of chiropractic clinic implementation and characteristics, Variations in the Implementation and Characteristics of Chiropractic Services in VA (VICCS). Challenges and solutions are presented in areas ranging from selection and recruitment of sites and participants to the collection and analysis of varied data sources. The VICCS study illustrates the importance of several factors in successful mixed-methods approaches, including (1) the importance of a formal, fully developed logic model to identify and link data sources, variables, and outcomes of interest to the study's analysis plan and its data collection instruments and codebook and (2) ensuring that data collection methods, including mixed-methods, match study aims. Overall, successful application of a mixed-methods approach requires careful planning, frequent trade-offs, and complex coding and analysis. PMID:24489589

Cohen, Angela B.; Lisi, Anthony J.; Smith, Monica M.; Delevan, Deborah; Armstrong, Courtney; Mittman, Brian S.

2013-01-01

227

Feasibility of Using the Patient-Reported Outcomes Measurement Information System in Academic Health Centers: Case Series Design on Pain Reduction After Chiropractic Care  

PubMed Central

Objective The purpose of this study was to test the utility of Patient-Reported Outcomes Measurement Information System (PROMIS) as a resource for collecting data on patient-reported outcomes (PRO) within academic health centers at a chiropractic college; and, to describe changes in PRO following pragmatic chiropractic care incorporating instrument-assisted soft tissue mobilization (IASTM) on pain symptoms. Methods This was a pre-post intervention design without a control group (case series) involving 25 patients (14 females and 11 males; 40.5 ± 16.39 years, range 20-70 years) who completed their chiropractic care and their baseline and post-treatment pain assessments. The pragmatic chiropractic care intervention included both spinal manipulation and IASTM to treat pain symptoms. PRO’s were collected using PROMIS to measure pain behavior, pain interference and pain intensity. Results The average pre-post assessment interval was 33 ± 22.5 days (95% CI, 23-42 days). The durations of treatments ranged from one week to 10 weeks. The median number of IASTM treatments was six. Pre-post decreases in T-scores for pain behavior and pain interference were 55.5 to 48.4 and 57.7 to 48.4, respectively (P < .05). Only 12 patients had a baseline T-score for pain intensity greater than 50. The pre-post decrease in pain intensity T-scores for these 12 patients was from 53.4 to 40.9. Conclusion Within the limitations of a case series design, these data provide initial evidence on the utility of PROMIS instruments for clinical and research outcomes in chiropractic patients. PMID:25225465

Burke, Jeanmarie R.

2014-01-01

228

A Practice-Based Study of Patients with Acute and Chronic Low Back Pain Attending Primary Care and Chiropractic Physicians: Two-Week to 48Month Follow-Up  

Microsoft Academic Search

ObjectiveThis study reports pain and disability outcomes up to 4 years for chiropractic and medical patients with low back pain (LBP) and assesses the influence of doctor type and pain duration on clinical outcomes.

Mitchell Haas; Bruce Goldberg; Mikel Aickin; Bonnie Ganger; Michael Attwood

2004-01-01

229

Annotated bibliography of the biomedical literature pertaining to chiropractic, pediatrics and manipulation in relation to the treatment of health conditions  

PubMed Central

Biomedical literature retrieval, both indexed and non-indexed, with respect to the application of manipulative therapy with therapeutic intent and pediatric health conditions (ages 0 to 17 years) yielded 66 discrete documents which met specified inclusion and exclusion criteria. There was one experimental study (RCT’s), 3 observational (cohort, case control) studies and 62 descriptive studies (case series, case reports, surveys, literature reviews). An independent rating panel determined consistency with a modified quality of evidence scale adopted from procedure ratings system 1 of Clinical Guidelines for Chiropractic Practice in Canada. Results indicate minimal Class 1 and Class 2 and some Class 3 evidence for a variety of pediatric conditions utilizing the application of manipulation with therapeutic intent.

Gotlib, Allan C; Beingessner, Melanie

1995-01-01

230

Chiropractic management of a veteran with lower back pain associated with diffuse idiopathic skeletal hypertrophy and degenerative disk disease  

PubMed Central

Objective The purpose of this article is to report the response of chiropractic care of a geriatric veteran with degenerative disk disease and diffuse idiopathic skeletal hyperostosis. Clinical Features A 74-year-old man presented with low back pain (LBP) and loss of feeling in his lower extremities for 3 months. The LBP was of insidious onset with a 10/10 pain rating on the numeric pain scale (NPS) and history of degenerative disk disease and diffuse idiopathic skeletal hypertrophy. Oswestry questionnaire was 44% and health status questionnaire was 52%, which were below average for his age. The patient presented with antalgia and severe difficulty with ambulation and thus used a walker. Intervention and Outcome Chiropractic care included Activator Methods protocol. Two weeks into treatment, he reported no back pain; and after 4 treatments, he was able to walk with a cane instead of a walker. The NPS decreased from a 10/10 to a 0/10, and his Revised Oswestry score decreased from 44/100 to 13.3/100. His Health Status Questionnaire score increased 25 points to 77/100, bringing him from below average for his age to above average for his age. Follow-up with the patient at approximately 1 year and 9 months showed an Oswestry score of 10/100 and a Health Status Questionnaire score of 67/100, still above average for his age. Conclusion The findings in this case study showed that Activator-assisted spinal manipulative therapy had positive subjective and objective results for LBP and ambulation in a geriatric veteran with degenerative disk disease and diffuse idiopathic skeletal hyperostosis. PMID:23843763

Roberts, Jan A.; Wolfe, Tristy M.

2012-01-01

231

Differentiating intraprofessional attitudes toward paradigms in health care delivery among chiropractic factions: results from a randomly sampled survey  

PubMed Central

Background As health care has increased in complexity and health care teams have been offered as a solution, so too is there an increased need for stronger interprofessional collaboration. However the intraprofessional factions that exist within every profession challenge interprofessional communication through contrary paradigms. As a contender in the conservative spinal health care market, factions within chiropractic that result in unorthodox practice behaviours may compromise interprofessional relations and that profession’s progress toward institutionalization. The purpose of this investigation was to quantify the professional stratification among Canadian chiropractic practitioners and evaluate the practice perceptions of those factions. Methods A stratified random sample of 740 Canadian chiropractors was surveyed to determine faction membership and how professional stratification could be related to views that could be considered unorthodox to current evidence-based care and guidelines. Stratification in practice behaviours is a stated concern of mainstream medicine when considering interprofessional referrals. Results Of 740 deliverable questionnaires, 503 were returned for a response rate of 68%. Less than 20% of chiropractors (18.8%) were aligned with a predefined unorthodox perspective of the conditions they treat. Prediction models suggest that unorthodox perceptions of health practice related to treatment choices, x-ray use and vaccinations were strongly associated with unorthodox group membership (X2 =13.4, p?=?0.0002). Conclusion Chiropractors holding unorthodox views may be identified based on response to specific beliefs that appear to align with unorthodox health practices. Despite continued concerns by mainstream medicine, only a minority of the profession has retained a perspective in contrast to current scientific paradigms. Understanding the profession’s factions is important to the anticipation of care delivery when considering interprofessional referral. PMID:24512507

2014-01-01

232

Pain, disability, and satisfation outcomes and predictors of outcomes: A practice-based study of chronic low back pain patients attending primary care and chiropractic physicians  

Microsoft Academic Search

Background: Few studies exist on the prognostic value of demographic, clinical, or psychosocial factors on long-term outcomes for patients with chronic low back pain.Objective: This study reports on long-term pain and disability outcomes for patients with chronic low back pain, evaluates predictors of long-term outcomes, and assesses the influence of doctor type on clinical outcome.Methods: Sixty chiropractic (DC) and 111

Joanne Nyiendo; Mitchell Haas; Bruce Goldberg; Gary Sexton

2001-01-01

233

Trends in Articles Published Over the Past 20 Years in The Journal of Chiropractic Education: Country of Origin, Academic Affiliation, and Data Versus Nondata Studies  

PubMed Central

Purpose: To review trends in articles published during the first 20 years of The Journal of Chiropractic Education (JCE), which is the primary periodical that publishes chiropractic educational research. This study focused on article type, country of origin, contributions by institutions, use of references, and use of structured abstracts. Methods: All volumes of the JCE were retrieved (1987–2006). Only full articles were included in this study; abstracts from proceedings and ephemera were excluded from this analysis. Articles that presented no data (eg, commentary, narrative descriptions) were classified as nondata articles. Articles that reported data (eg, experimental studies, survey research, etc) were classified as data articles. Each article was reviewed by hand for the type of study (data vs nondata), geographic region of origin, college of origin, use of references, and the presence of a structured or unstructured abstract. Results: After applying the inclusion and exclusion criteria, 153 papers were assessed. Published articles came from 5 countries and represented 23 chiropractic colleges. A majority (80.2%) of papers were from the United States. Of all articles, 101 articles (66%) were nondata in nature. Consistent use of references and structured abstracts increased over time. Conclusion: During its first 20 years, the JCE has published more nondata than data studies and the number of data papers published per year has remained constant. The journal has reached a consistent level of quality in its publication of manuscripts containing structured abstracts and references, and articles have been authored primarily by US authors. It is recommended that more efforts and resources are dedicated to data-driven studies and that greater geographic diversity is obtained to better represent the worldwide distribution of the chiropractic profession's educational institutions PMID:18483588

Johnson, Claire D.; Green, Bart N.

2008-01-01

234

Rehabilitation - a valuable consideration in acute and chronic neck and low back pain in addition to standard chiropractic management: a case study  

Microsoft Academic Search

A case of chronic neck and low back pain, resistant to standard chiropractic management of manipulation\\/ adjustment and verbal exercise instruction is presented. Identification of psychosocial factors and deconditioning, with a subsequent three month program of in-office rehabilitation including supervised progressive\\/resistance exercises and behavioural therapy was administered in conjunction with spinal manipulation\\/adjustment and passive modalities. The program proved effective in

Dennis H Mizel

1999-01-01

235

Publication rates of abstracts presented at the Association of Chiropractic Colleges Educational Conference/Research Agenda Conference from 2002 to 2008.  

PubMed

Objective : The purposes of this study were to investigate the overall publication rates of presentations at the Association of Chiropractic Colleges Educational Conference/Research Agenda Conference (ACC/RAC) meetings (2002-2008), differences in the publication rates of platform vs poster presentations, and the consistency of the meeting abstract compared to the full-length journal article. Methods : Abstracts were obtained from proceedings published in the Journal of Chiropractic Education. Literature searches using PubMed and the Index to the Chiropractic Literature (ICL) were performed to locate peer-reviewed journal articles based upon those abstracts. Whether the article was based upon a poster or platform presentation, and the congruence of the information in the abstract and article were recorded. Results : We identified 776 proceeding abstracts, 249 of which eventually were published between 2002 and 2012. The overall publication rate was 32.2%. A total of 42.7% of platform presentations eventually were published vs 20.3% of posters. Congruency showed that 43.2% had the same title as the meeting abstract, 59.7% had the same authorship, and 88.8% had the same methods. Conclusion : Publication rates of abstracts from spine and orthopedic surgery national meetings range from 34% to 59%. The ACC/RAC meetings have similar publication rates. More platform than poster presentations reach full publication. The congruency of ACC/RAC abstracts to published articles is higher than national meetings in other fields. PMID:24295363

Bakkum, Barclay W; Chapman, Cynthia; Johnson, Claire

2014-01-01

236

Bladder and Bowel Symptoms Among Adults Presenting With Low Back Pain to an Academic Chiropractic Clinic: Results of a Preliminary Study  

PubMed Central

Objective The purposes of this study were to estimate the 1-month point prevalence of bowel and bladder symptoms (BBS) among adult chiropractic patients and to evaluate associations between these symptoms and low back pain (LBP). Methods Patients 18 years or older presenting to a chiropractic college academic health clinic between March 25 and April 25, 2013, were asked to complete a symptom screening questionnaire. Descriptive statistics, binary logistic regression, Fisher exact test, and P values were calculated from the sample. Results The sample included 140 of 1300 patients who visited the clinic during the survey period (11%). Mean age was 47.5 (range 18-79) years. LBP was the primary chief complaint in 42%. The 1-month point prevalence of any bladder symptoms was 75%, while the rate for bowel symptoms was 62%; 55% reported both BBS. Binary logistic regression analyses showed no statistically significant association between a chief complaint of LBP and combined BBS (OR = 1.67, P = .164). Conclusion The prevalence of bowel and bladder symptoms in chiropractic patients was high. There was no statistically significant association between these symptoms and LBP in this group of patients seeking care for LBP. PMID:25225466

Walden, Anna L.; Salsbury, Stacie A.; Reed, William R.; Lawrence, Dana J.

2014-01-01

237

Chiropractic Care for Headaches and Dizziness of a 34-Year-Old Woman Previously Diagnosed With Arnold-Chiari Malformation Type 1  

PubMed Central

Objective The purpose of this case study is to describe the chiropractic care of a patient with headaches and dizziness. Clinical Features A 34-year-old woman with a history of headaches, dizziness, photophobia, and temporary loss of vision aggravated by postural positions while bending forward sought conservative care for her symptoms. She reported a prior diagnosis of Arnold-Chiari malformation (ACM) type 1 by magnetic resonance imaging in 2005 that revealed descending cerebellar tonsils measured at 5 mm with an impression of ACM type 1. A new magnetic resonance image taken in 2013 indicated the cerebellar tonsils measured at 3 mm and did not project through the plane of the foramen magnum. The diagnosis of ACM type 1 was no longer applicable; however, the signs and symptoms of ACM type 1 persisted. Intervention and Outcome She was treated using cervical chiropractic manipulation using diversified technique. The dizziness and headache were resolved after 3 visits. At her 3-month follow-up, she continued to be symptom-free. Conclusion A patient with headaches and dizziness and a previous diagnosis of ACM type 1 responded positively to chiropractic care. PMID:25225468

Sergent, Adam W.; Cofano, Gregory P.

2014-01-01

238

Symptomatic reactions, clinical outcomes and patient satisfaction associated with upper cervical chiropractic care: A prospective, multicenter, cohort study  

PubMed Central

Background Observational studies have previously shown that adverse events following manipulation to the neck and/or back are relatively common, although these reactions tend to be mild in intensity and self-limiting. However, no prospective study has examined the incidence of adverse reactions following spinal adjustments using upper cervical techniques, and the impact of this care on clinical outcomes. Methods Consecutive new patients from the offices of 83 chiropractors were recruited for this practice-based study. Clinical outcome measures included 1) Neck pain disability index (100-point scale), 2) Oswestry back pain index (100-point scale), 3) 11-point numerical rating scale (NRS) for neck, headache, midback, and low back pain, 4) treatment satisfaction, and 5) Symptomatic Reactions (SR). Data were collected at baseline, and after approximately 2 weeks of care. A patient reaching sub-clinical status for pain and disability was defined as a follow-up score <3 NRS and <10%, respectively. A SR is defined as a new complaint not present at baseline or a worsening of the presenting complaint by >30% based on an 11-point numeric rating scale occurring <24 hours after any upper cervical procedure. Results A total of 1,090 patients completed the study having 4,920 (4.5 per patient) office visits requiring 2,653 (2.4 per patient) upper cervical adjustments over 17 days. Three hundred thirty- eight (31.0%) patients had SRs meeting the accepted definition. Intense SR (NRS ?8) occurred in 56 patients (5.1%). Outcome assessments were significantly improved for neck pain and disability, headache, mid-back pain, as well as lower back pain and disability (p <0.001) following care with a high level (mean = 9.1/10) of patient satisfaction. The 83 chiropractors administered >5 million career upper cervical adjustments without a reported incidence of serious adverse event. Conclusions Upper cervical chiropractic care may have a fairly common occurrence of mild intensity SRs short in duration (<24 hours), and rarely severe in intensity; however, outcome assessments were significantly improved with less than 3 weeks of care with a high level of patient satisfaction. Although our findings need to be confirmed in subsequent randomized studies for definitive risk-benefit assessment, the preliminary data shows that the benefits of upper cervical chiropractic care may outweigh the potential risks. PMID:21974915

2011-01-01

239

Sympathetic and parasympathetic responses to specific diversified adjustments to chiropractic vertebral subluxations of the cervical and thoracic spine  

PubMed Central

Abstract Objective The aims of this study were to investigate the response of the autonomic nervous system based upon the area of the spine adjusted and to determine if a cervical adjustment elicits a parasympathetic response and if a thoracic adjustment elicits a sympathetic response. Methods Forty patients (25-55 years old) met inclusion criteria that consisted of normal blood pressure, no history of heart disease, and being asymptomatic. Patients were evaluated pre– and post–chiropractic adjustment for the following autonomic responses: blood pressure and pulse rate. Seven patients were measured for heart rate variability. The subjects received either a diversified cervical segment adjustment or a diversified thoracic segment adjustment. Results Diastolic pressure (indicating a sympathetic response) dropped significantly postadjustment among those receiving cervical adjustments, accompanied by a moderate clinical effect (0.50). Pulse pressure increased significantly among those receiving cervical adjustments, accompanied by a large effect size (0.82). Although the decrease in pulse pressure for those receiving thoracic adjustments was not statistically significant, the decrease was accompanied by a moderate effect size (0.66). Conclusion It is preliminarily suggested that cervical adjustments may result in parasympathetic responses, whereas thoracic adjustments result in sympathetic responses. Furthermore, it appears that these responses may demonstrate the relationship of autonomic responses in association to the particular segment(s) adjusted. PMID:19646369

Welch, Arlene; Boone, Ralph

2008-01-01

240

Rehabilitation — a valuable consideration in acute and chronic neck and low back pain in addition to standard chiropractic management: a case study  

PubMed Central

A case of chronic neck and low back pain, resistant to standard chiropractic management of manipulation/adjustment and verbal exercise instruction is presented. Identification of psychosocial factors and deconditioning, with a subsequent three month program of in-office rehabilitation including supervised progressive/resistance exercises and behavioural therapy was administered in conjunction with spinal manipulation/adjustment and passive modalities. The program proved effective in reducing the patient’s neck and low back pain. The beneficial effect of supervised exercises and behavioural therapy in patient management is illustrated.

Mizel, Dennis H

1999-01-01

241

Training and certification of doctors of chiropractic in delivering manual cervical traction forces: Results of a longitudinal observational study  

PubMed Central

Objective Doctors of chiropractic (DCs) use manual cervical distraction to treat patients with neck pain. Previous research demonstrates variability in traction forces generated by different DCs. This article reports on a training protocol and monthly certification process using bioengineering technology to standardize cervical traction force delivery among clinicians. Methods This longitudinal observational study evaluated a training and certification process for DCs who provided force-based manual cervical distraction during a randomized clinical trial. The DCs completed a 7-week initial training that included instructional lectures, observation, and guided practice by a clinical expert, followed by 3 hours of weekly practice sessions delivering the technique to asymptomatic volunteers who served as simulated patients. An instrument-modified table and computer software provided the DCs with real-time audible and visual feedback on the traction forces they generated and graphical displays of the magnitude of traction forces as a function of time immediately after the delivery of the treatment. The DCs completed monthly certifications on traction force delivery throughout the trial. Descriptive accounts of certification attempts are provided. Results Two DCs achieved certification in traction force delivery over 10 consecutive months. No certification required more than 3 attempts at C5 and occiput contacts for 3 force ranges (0–20 N, 21–50 N, and 51–100 N). Conclusions This study demonstrates the feasibility of a training protocol and certification process using bioengineering technology for training DCs to deliver manual cervical distraction within specified traction force ranges over a 10-month period. PMID:25237767

Gudavalli, Maruti Ram; Vining, Robert D.; Salsbury, Stacie A.; Goertz, Christine M.

2014-01-01

242

Training and certification of doctors of chiropractic in delivering manual cervical traction forces: Results of a longitudinal observational study.  

PubMed

Objective : Doctors of chiropractic (DCs) use manual cervical distraction to treat patients with neck pain. Previous research demonstrates variability in traction forces generated by different DCs. This article reports on a training protocol and monthly certification process using bioengineering technology to standardize cervical traction force delivery among clinicians. Methods : This longitudinal observational study evaluated a training and certification process for DCs who provided force-based manual cervical distraction during a randomized clinical trial. The DCs completed a 7-week initial training that included instructional lectures, observation, and guided practice by a clinical expert, followed by 3 hours of weekly practice sessions delivering the technique to asymptomatic volunteers who served as simulated patients. An instrument-modified table and computer software provided the DCs with real-time audible and visual feedback on the traction forces they generated and graphical displays of the magnitude of traction forces as a function of time immediately after the delivery of the treatment. The DCs completed monthly certifications on traction force delivery throughout the trial. Descriptive accounts of certification attempts are provided. Results : Two DCs achieved certification in traction force delivery over 10 consecutive months. No certification required more than 3 attempts at C5 and occiput contacts for 3 force ranges (0-20 N, 21-50 N, and 51-100 N). Conclusions : This study demonstrates the feasibility of a training protocol and certification process using bioengineering technology for training DCs to deliver manual cervical distraction within specified traction force ranges over a 10-month period. PMID:25237767

Gudavalli, Maruti Ram; Vining, Robert D; Salsbury, Stacie A; Goertz, Christine M

2014-10-01

243

Cost of Care for Common Back Pain Conditions Initiated With Chiropractic Doctor vs Medical Doctor\\/Doctor of Osteopathy as First Physician: Experience of One Tennessee-Based General Health Insurer  

Microsoft Academic Search

ObjectiveThe primary aim of this study was to determine if there are differences in the cost of low back pain care when a patient is able to choose a course of treatment with a medical doctor (MD) versus a doctor of chiropractic (DC), given that his\\/her insurance provides equal access to both provider types.

Richard L. Liliedahl; Michael D. Finch; David V. Axene; Christine M. Goertz

2010-01-01

244

Chiropractic management using a brain-based model of care for a 15-year-old adolescent boy with migraine headaches and behavioral and learning difficulties: a case report  

PubMed Central

Objective The purpose of this report is to describe chiropractic management, using a brain-based model of care, of a teen who had migraine headaches and several social and learning difficulties. Clinical features A 15-year-old adolescent boy with a chronic history of migraines and more than 10 years of learning and behavioral difficulties, including attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder, obsessive compulsive disorder, and Tourette syndrome, presented for chiropractic care. Intervention and outcome The patient received spinal manipulation and was given home physical coordination activities that were contralateral to the side of the involved basal ganglia and ipsilateral to the involved cerebellum, along with interactive metronome training. Quantitative changes were noted in neurological soft signs, tests of variables of attention Conners’ Parent Rating Scale, the California Achievement Test, grade point, and reduction of medications. The patient reported qualitative improvements in tics, attention, reading, vision, health, relationships with his peers and his family, and self-esteem. Conclusion The patient with migraine headaches and learning difficulties responded well to the course of chiropractic care. This study suggests that there may be value in a brain-based model of care in the chiropractic management of conditions that are beyond musculoskeletal in nature. PMID:24396330

Kuhn, Kurt W.; Cambron, Jerrilyn

2013-01-01

245

Chiropractic physicians: an analysis of select issues for the use of electronic medical records and the patient-practitioner relationship within the society-culture-personality model  

PubMed Central

Objective The purpose of this article is to explain how new systems of medical technology, specifically electronic medical records, are playing an increasingly crucial role in the modern health care system. By examining these new developments associated with electronic medical technology and the society-culture-personality model, these aforementioned theoretical frameworks might assist chiropractors in the diagnosis, treatment, and prognosis of their patients. Discussion The society-culture-personality model can be used as an organizational instrument for assisting chiropractors in developing a better understanding and appreciation of the interrelationships between electronic medical records technology and the society-culture-personality model. The socially meaningful interaction established through electronic medical records technology may enhance communication between the health care professionals and the patient and thereby could improve the quality of care. Conclusion It is essential that future and current chiropractic physicians be aware of the ramifications and changes brought about by electronic medical records technology so that they can integrate, synthesize, and actualize the results to deliver care that involves the ingredients of quality, affordability, availability, accessibility, and continuity for their patients. If these outcomes are examined consistently and well, future chiropractic physicians will be able to transfer the traditions of excellence, dedication, and creativity of the health care profession. PMID:22693462

Fredericks, Marcel; Lyons, Luke; Kondellas, Bill; Ross, Michael W.V.; Hang, Lam; Fredericks, Janet

2010-01-01

246

A survey of Fellows in the College of Chiropractic Sports Sciences (Canada): their intervention practices and intended therapeutic outcomes when treating athletes  

PubMed Central

Objective To compile baseline data regarding the treatment practices and therapeutic outcomes that fellows of the College of Chiropractic Sports Sciences Canada (CCSS(C)) strive for when treating athletes. Design Cross-sectional self-report mail out survey of CCSS(C) fellows. Participants Current registered fellows of the CCSS(C) as determined by the College at the time of survey distribution. Results The majority of questioned fellows believe that they can cause direct and specific improvements in an athlete’s sport performance. The most commonly utilized therapeutic intervention was spinal joint manipulation/mobilization. The most anticipated outcomes following the treatment of athletes with the goal of affecting athletic performance were “changing or improving aberrant body mechanics,” “restoring or improving aberrant muscle function,” and “improving joint function or reducing joint dysfunction.” Conclusion The majority of respondent fellows of the CCSS(C) believe their therapy to be effective in enhancing an athlete’s sport performance. PMID:21120021

Miners, Andrew L.; deGraauw, Christopher

2010-01-01

247

The provision of chiropractic, physiotherapy and osteopathic services within the Australian private health-care system: a report of recent trends  

PubMed Central

Background Chiropractors, physiotherapists, and osteopaths receive training in the diagnosis and management of musculoskeletal conditions. As a result there is considerable overlap in the types of conditions that are encountered clinically by these practitioners. In Australia, the majority of benefits paid for these services come from the private sector. The purpose of this article is to quantify and describe the development in service utilization and the cost of benefits paid to users of these healthcare services by private health insurers. An exploration of the factors that may have influenced the observed trends is also presented. Methods A review of data from the Australian Bureau of Statistics, Australian Health Practitioner Regulation Agency, and the Australian Government Private Health Insurance Administration Council was conducted. An analysis of chiropractic, physiotherapy and osteopathic service utilisation and cost of service utilisation trend was performed along with the level of benefits and services over time. Results In 2012, the number of physiotherapists working in the private sector was 2.9 times larger than that of chiropractic, and 7.8 times that of the osteopathic profession. The total number of services provided by chiropractors, physiotherapists, and osteopaths increased steadily over the past 15 years. For the majority of this period, chiropractors provided more services than the other two professions. The average number of services provided by chiropractors was approximately two and a half times that of physiotherapists and four and a half times that of osteopaths. Conclusions This study highlights a clear disparity in the average number of services provided by chiropractors, physiotherapists, and osteopaths in the private sector in Australia over the last 15 years. Further research is required to explain these observed differences and to determine whether a similar trend exists in patients who do not have private health insurance cover. PMID:24428934

2014-01-01

248

Perspectives of older adults on co-management of low back pain by doctors of chiropractic and family medicine physicians: a focus group study  

PubMed Central

Background While older adults may seek care for low back pain (LBP) from both medical doctors (MDs) and doctors of chiropractic (DCs), co-management between these providers is uncommon. The purposes of this study were to describe the preferences of older adults for LBP co-management by MDs and DCs and to identify their concerns for receiving care under such a treatment model. Methods We conducted 10 focus groups with 48 older adults who received LBP care in the past year. Interviews explored participants’ care seeking experiences, co-management preferences, and perceived challenges to successful implementation of a MD-DC co-management model. We analyzed the qualitative data using thematic content analysis. Results Older adults considered LBP co-management by MDs and DCs a positive approach as the professions have complementary strengths. Participants wanted providers who worked in a co-management model to talk openly and honestly about LBP, offer clear and consistent recommendations about treatment, and provide individualized care. Facilitators of MD-DC co-management included collegial relationships between providers, arrangements between doctors to support interdisciplinary referral, computer systems that allowed exchange of health information between clinics, and practice settings where providers worked in one location. Perceived barriers to the co-management of LBP included the financial costs associated with receiving care from multiple providers concurrently, duplication of tests or imaging, scheduling and transportation problems, and potential side effects of medication and chiropractic care. A few participants expressed concern that some providers would not support a patient-preferred co-managed care model. Conclusions Older adults are interested in receiving LBP treatment co-managed by MDs and DCs. Older adults considered patient-centered communication, collegial interdisciplinary interactions between these providers, and administrative supports such as scheduling systems and health record sharing as key components for successful LBP co-management. PMID:24040970

2013-01-01

249

Your First Chiropractic Visit  

MedlinePLUS

... Bone disorders such as osteoporosis • Implants like pacemakers, artificial joints, cosmetic implants, etc. • Circulatory problems • Dizziness or blurred vision • Heart conditions such as hypertension • Nausea • Injuries, such ...

250

The effect of a sports chiropractic manual therapy intervention on the prevention of back pain, hamstring and lower limb injuries in semi-elite Australian Rules footballers: a randomized controlled trial  

PubMed Central

Background Hamstring injuries are the most common injury in Australian Rules football. It was the aims to investigate whether a sports chiropractic manual therapy intervention protocol provided in addition to the current best practice management could prevent the occurrence of and weeks missed due to hamstring and other lower-limb injuries at the semi-elite level of Australian football. Methods Sixty male subjects were assessed for eligibility with 59 meeting entry requirements and randomly allocated to an intervention (n = 29) or control group (n = 30), being matched for age and hamstring injury history. Twenty-eight intervention and 29 control group participants completed the trial. Both groups received the current best practice medical and sports science management, which acted as the control. Additionally, the intervention group received a sports chiropractic intervention. Treatment for the intervention group was individually determined and could involve manipulation/mobilization and/or soft tissue therapies to the spine and extremity. Minimum scheduling was: 1 treatment per week for 6 weeks, 1 treatment per fortnight for 3 months, 1 treatment per month for the remainder of the season (3 months). The main outcome measure was an injury surveillance with a missed match injury definition. Results After 24 matches there was no statistical significant difference between the groups for the incidence of hamstring injury (OR:0.116, 95% CI:0.013-1.019, p = 0.051) and primary non-contact knee injury (OR:0.116, 95% CI:0.013-1.019, p = 0.051). The difference for primary lower-limb muscle strains was significant (OR:0.097, 95%CI:0.011-0.839, p = 0.025). There was no significant difference for weeks missed due to hamstring injury (4 v14, ?2:1.12, p = 0.29) and lower-limb muscle strains (4 v 21, ?2:2.66, p = 0.10). A significant difference in weeks missed due to non-contact knee injury was noted (1 v 24, ?2:6.70, p = 0.01). Conclusions This study demonstrated a trend towards lower limb injury prevention with a significant reduction in primary lower limb muscle strains and weeks missed due to non-contact knee injuries through the addition of a sports chiropractic intervention to the current best practice management. Trial registration The study was registered with the Australian and New Zealand Clinical Trials Registry (ACTRN12608000533392). PMID:20374662

2010-01-01

251

The psychometric profile of chiropractic patients in Norway and England: using and comparing the generic versions of the STarT Back 5-item screening tool and the Bournemouth Questionnaire  

PubMed Central

Background Musculoskeletal pain and low back pain (LBP) in particular is one of the more costly health challenges to society. The STarT Back Tool (SBT) has been developed in the UK with a view to identifying subgroups of LBP patients in order to guide more cost effective care decisions. The Bournemouth Questionnaire (BQ) is a validated multidimensional patient reported outcome measure (PROM) that is widely used in routine clinical practice settings. This study sets out to describe and compare SBT and BQ scores within and between populations of patients presenting for chiropractic care in Norway and Great Britain. Methods Patient demographics, BQ and the 5-item generic condition SBT data were collected from patients presenting with musculoskeletal pain to 18 Norwegian and 12 English chiropractors. Analysis of correlation between groups was achieved using a 1-way Chi2 approximation (p < 0.05). Results Eleven percent of Norwegian LBP patients (n = 214) and 24% of English LBP patients (n = 186) were “distressed by their condition” (SBT > 4). By comparison, Norwegian chiropractic patients are: somewhat younger, have lower BQ scores, are less distressed by the condition and score significantly lower on items relating to catastrophisation and depression than English patients. There was an apparent association between total BQ and SBT scores (correlation 0.59, p < .0001) and patients who scored higher than 45 (IQR 39–58) on BQ were more likely to respond “distressed by condition” (>4) on SBT. Furthermore, patients in “distressed by condition” SBT category who had marked the “low mood” question on SBT also had a high score on the “depression” question of BQ (>6 (IQR 4–8), correlation 0.54, p < .0001). Conclusion The BQ and SBT appear to identify the same subgroups in some, but not all of the measured items. It appears that unknown factors result in variations between patients seeking chiropractic care for comparable complaints in primary care in England vs Norway. Comparison of populations from Norway and UK demonstrate that extrapolating and pooling of data in relation to different populations should be done with caution, in regard to these stratification tools. PMID:24268179

2013-01-01

252

Frequently Asked Questions about Chiropractic  

MedlinePLUS

... ACA ACA Vision & Mission Public Policies Internal Documents Leadership Directory ACA Corporate Members Related Organizations Specialty Councils ... SACA Login SACA Member Benefits Join SACA SACA Leadership Guide New Member Orientation SACA Programs Scholarship Program ...

253

Chiropractic care for back pain  

MedlinePLUS

... Society Low Back Pain Guideline Panel. Interventional therapies, surgery, and interdisciplinary rehabilitation for low back pain: an evidence-based clinical practice guideline from the American Pain Society. ...

254

Approach to low back pain. Chiropractic.  

PubMed

Case study. A man aged 42 years, who works as a police officer, presented with severe lower back pain, which he had experienced for 24 hours after spending the previous day helping his brother to move house. He had difficulty ambulating and most movements aggravated the pain. There were no lower limb symptoms and no red flags present on history or examination. He was otherwise well and was not taking any regular medications. PMID:24563894

French, Simon; Werth, Peter; Walker, Bruce

2014-01-01

255

Chiropractic management of greater occipital neuralgia  

Microsoft Academic Search

Greater occipital neuralgia (GON) is the term used to describe signs and symptoms of irritation to the greater occipital nerve. Neuralgic pain is characteristically sharp and shooting in nature and distributed over the area of the nerve affected. In the case of GON, pain is typically located in the sub-occipital region and radiates superiorly to the posterior aspect of the

L Comley

2003-01-01

256

Stability: from biomechanical concept to chiropractic practice  

PubMed Central

This paper formalizes stability in a clinician-friendly way and then discusses ways for chiropractors to ensure stability of spinal joints that may have their stability compromized from manipulation. ImagesFigure 1Figure 4Figure 5Figure 6Figure 7

McGill, Stuart M

1999-01-01

257

Useful Websites Useful Websites  

E-print Network

for the Health Professions NAAHP Main Page Chiropractic American Chiropractic Association Chiropractic: Educational Agencies and Schools Student Canadian Chiropractic Association Home Page Federation of Chiropractic Licensing Boards FCLB: Acronyms for Chiropractic Organizations Graduate School Directories

Fernandez, Eduardo

258

Vertebral Artery Injuries Following Chiropractic Cervical Spine Manipulation —Case Reports  

Microsoft Academic Search

Four patients undergoing cervical spinal manipulations for nonneurologic diseases and with no previous neurologic signs or symptoms all developed significant neurologic deficits, one fatal, following manipulations of the cervical spine. Both the literature and the authors' series show that a number of patients have a prodrome prior to the onset of neurologic changes. There is no established therapy for the

Robert Raskind; Charles M. North

1990-01-01

259

Maintenance care in chiropractic – what do we know?  

Microsoft Academic Search

BACKGROUND: Back problems are often recurring or chronic. It is therefore not surprising that chiropractors wish to prevent their return or reduce their impact. This is often attempted with a long-term treatment strategy, commonly called maintenance care. However, some aspects of maintenance care are considered controversial. It is therefore relevant to investigate the scientific evidence forming the basis for its

Charlotte Leboeuf-Yde; Lise Hestbæk

2008-01-01

260

Chiropractic and pilates therapy for the treatment of adult scoliosis  

Microsoft Academic Search

Objective: To describe the use of Pilates therapy and sacro-occipital technique in the management of a 39-year-old woman with scoliosis who had undergone spinal fusion many years earlier. Clinical Features: The patient had progressive severe low back pain that had worsened over the years after her surgery and had prevented her from activities such as carrying her son or equipment

Charles L. Blum

2002-01-01

261

Vertebral and carotid artery dissection following chiropractic cervical manipulation  

Microsoft Academic Search

A 50-year-old woman presented a sudden left occipital headache and a posterior circulation stroke after cervical manipulation\\u000a for neck pain. Magnetic resonance imaging documented a left intracranial vertebral artery occlusive dissection associated\\u000a with an ipsilateral internal carotid artery dissection with vessel stenosis in its prepetrous tract. This is the first reported\\u000a case showing an associate vertebral and carotid artery dissection

Giuliano Parenti; Giovanni Orlandi; Mariacristina Bianchi; Maria Renna; Antonio Martini; Luigi Murri

1999-01-01

262

Chiropractic and Neck Pain: Conservative Care of Cervical Pain, Injury  

MedlinePLUS

... this flexibility makes the neck very susceptible to pain and injury. The neck’s susceptibility to injury is ... normal aging, and everyday wear and tear. Neck pain can be very bothersome, and it can have ...

263

Suggested Courses: Majors for Pre-Chiropractic Students  

E-print Network

in Biomechanics or Exercise Physiology. Physics requirement may vary. · One year of General Chemistry with lab & Physiology with Lab (Bio Sci 202 /203). Biology requirement may vary. · One year of Physics with lab (Physics, physiology, or biochemistry · Statistics Advising Students who identify themselves as pre

Saldin, Dilano

264

Medical Plans Summary and Comparison Effective January 1 December 31, 2014  

E-print Network

Acupuncture Acupuncture, Chiropractic, and Medical Massage treatments have a combined maximum benefit of $2 Chiropractic Acupuncture, Chiropractic, and Medical Massage treatments have a combined maximum benefit of $2

265

The Place of Chiropractic Care in the Treatment of Low Back Pain  

Microsoft Academic Search

\\u000a Indeed, the societal burden of musculoskeletal disorders transcends countries and cultures [17] and has paved the way for\\u000a cooperative multidisciplinary efforts in the utilization of healthcare resources in search of the best management. To this\\u000a extent, low back pain (LBP) is one of the most common musculoskeletal conditions in western society [80]. In the United States,\\u000a 25 billion is spent

Christopher J. Colloca

266

Comparison of chiropractic student scores before and after utilizing active learning techniques in a classroom setting  

PubMed Central

Objective We report the differences in final examination scores achieved by students at the culmination of two different teaching strategies in an introductory skills course. Methods Multiple choice examination scores from six consecutive academic calendar sessions over 18 months (n = 503) were compared. Two groups were used: Cohort A (n = 290) represented students who were enrolled in the course 3 consecutive academic sessions before an instructional change and Cohort B (n = 213) included students who were enrolled in 3 consecutive academic sessions following the instructional change, which included a more active learning format. Statistical analyses used were 2-tailed independent t-test, one-way ANOVA, Tukey's honestly significant difference (HSD), and effect size. Results The 2-tailed independent t-test revealed a significant difference between the two groups (t = ?3.71, p < .001; 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.29–4.20). Significant difference was found in the highest performing subgroup compared to the lowest performing subgroup in Cohort A (F = 3.343, p = .037). For Cohort A subgroups 1 and 2, Tukey's HSD was p < .028. In Cohort B, no difference was found among subgroups (F = 1.912, p = .150, HSD p > .105). Conclusion Compared to previous versions of the same course taught by the same instructor, the students in the new course design performed better, suggesting that using active learning techniques helps improve student achievement. PMID:23964739

Guagliardo, Joseph G.; Hoiriis, Kathryn T.

2013-01-01

267

TREATMENT OF BIPOLAR, SEIZURE, AND SLEEP DISORDERS AND MIGRAINE HEADACHES UTILIZING A CHIROPRACTIC TECHNIQUE  

Microsoft Academic Search

Objective: To discuss the use of an upper cervical technique in the case of a 23-year-old male patient with rapid-cycling bipolar disorder, sleep disorder, seizure disorder, neck and back pain, and migraine headaches. Clinical Features: The patient participated in a high school track meet at age 17, landing on his head from a height of 10 ft while attempting a

Erin L. Elster

268

Cervical radiculopathy treated with chiropractic flexion distraction manipulation: a retrospective study in a private practice setting  

Microsoft Academic Search

BackgroundAlthough flexion distraction performed to the lumbar spine is commonly utilized and documented as effective, flexion distraction manipulation performed to the cervical spine has not been adequately studied.

Jason S Schliesser; Ralph Kruse; L. Fleming Fallon

2003-01-01

269

Colin A. Greenshields, DC: the Canadian Memorial Chiropractic College’s first graduate  

PubMed Central

This biographical study investigates the complex tribulations and impressive accomplishments of Dr. Colin Greenshields. Part I (the Formative Years) goes back to his ancestors in Great Britain and forward to his graduation from CMCC in 1948. Part II (the Professional Years) begins with the opening of Colin’s office in St. Catharines, ON, and proceeds through his professional career and multiple leadership roles to his retirement in 1986. PMID:22675227

Brown, Douglas M.

2012-01-01

270

Chiropractic management of shoulder pain and dysfunction of myofascial origin using ischemic compression techniques  

PubMed Central

Shoulder pain and dysfunction is a chief complaint commonly presenting to a chiropractor's office. The purpose of this article is to review the most common etiologies of shoulder pain, focusing on those conditions of a myofascial origin. In addition to a review of the literature, the author draws upon his own clinical experience to describe a method to diagnose and manage, patients with shoulder pain of myofascial origin using ischemic compression techniques. This hands-on therapeutic approach conveys several benefits including: positive therapeutic outcomes; a favorable safety profile and; it is minimally strenuous on the doctor and well tolerated by the patient. ImagesFigure 7

Hains, Guy

2002-01-01

271

Tuberculosis of the neuromusculoskeletal system: a review of two cases presenting as chiropractic patients.  

PubMed

Tuberculosis caused by Mycobacterium tuberculosis is a major public heath problem world-wide, particularly in low-income countries. Increased number of immunocompromised patients and immigration from countries where tuberculosis is endemic has resulted in increased number of cases in high-income countries. Tuberculosis can affect any organ system, but is of particular interest to chiropractors when it affects the neuromusculoskeletal system. Patients with tuberculosis of the neuromusculoskeletal system can present with mechanical low back pain or with complex neurologic deficits. The aim of this paper is to highlight the importance of considering a diagnosis of tuberculosis in susceptible populations and the devastating consequences of the disease. The epidemiology, clinical features and management of tuberculosis will also be presented to facilitate early diagnosis, appropriate referral and multidisciplinary care of these patients. PMID:25729081

Kanga, Ismat; Taylor, John A; Jacobs, Craig; Outerbridge, Geoff

2015-03-01

272

Naturopathy in Canada: Changing relationships to medicine, chiropractic and the state  

Microsoft Academic Search

It is said that we can learn as much about social processes from so-called 'deviant' institutions than from the more legitimate. 'Deviant' medical occupations have not attracted much attention from social scientists. Naturopathy is one of these nonconventional health occupations. It emerged in the 18th and 19th centuries and moved to Canada from the United States and Europe early in

Elaine H. Gort; David Coburn

1988-01-01

273

The Emotional Impact of Being Recently Diagnosed with Dyslexia from the Perspective of Chiropractic Students  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Increased awareness and improved tests have contributed to the identification of rising numbers of dyslexic students entering higher education in the United Kingdom. Nearly half of these students are not diagnosed until they start their HE courses. Studies of experiences of dyslexic students diagnosed as children exist; however, there is little…

Kong, Shelley Young

2012-01-01

274

Communication in a chiropractic clinic: How A D.C. treats his patients  

Microsoft Academic Search

This study of a chiropractor and his patients represents the first interaction analysis of an alternative practitioner. Relationships between the types and quantities of communications in clinical exchanges and patient satisfaction with treatment are examined using both quantitative and qualitative analysis of verbal dialogue and clinical observations. Findings suggest that patient satisfaction is enhanced by a practitionerpatient relationship characterized by

Kathryn Oths

1994-01-01

275

Patient characteristics upon initial presentation to chiropractic teaching clinics: A descriptive study conducted at one university  

PubMed Central

Objective The purpose of this study was to compare demographics and chief complaints of the new patient population at our institution's fee-for-service clinics to the patient population of practicing chiropractors in the United States. We also compared the prevalence of obesity and hypertension to reference standards for the adult population. Methods Patient data were obtained from the electronic health records. All records identified as new patients during October 2013 were included. Variables of interest were clinic site, patient demographics, blood pressure, body mass index (BMI), chief complaint, and ICD-9 codes. Descriptive statistics were computed and compared to reference standards from previous reports. Results During October 2013, there were 224 new patients that entered the clinics. The average patient was a 31- to 50-year-old white male. Our clinic patients differed from those seen by US chiropractors in the distribution of all demographic variables. For adult patients, 31.4% were overweight, 29% were obese, and 8% stage 1 or 2 hypertension. Conclusion New patients in the fee-for-service teaching clinics appear to be dissimilar to those of US practicing chiropractors in several important demographics, characteristics, and types of complaints. The new patients had lower levels of overweight, obesity, and hypertension compared to US reference standards. PMID:25162982

Kaeser, Martha A.; Hawk, Cheryl; Anderson, Michelle

2014-01-01

276

Gross Anatomy Instruction in Chiropractic Colleges: A Local and Global Perspective  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This resource is part of the AAA Education and Teaching Session. In particular this resource is a pdf of the presentation from the AAA 2012 Anatomical Education for Allied Health Care Professionals Seminar.

Jennette Ball (New York Chiropractic College Department of Basic Sciences)

2012-04-21

277

Reflex control of the spine and posture: a review of the literature from a chiropractic perspective  

Microsoft Academic Search

OBJECTIVE: This review details the anatomy and interactions of the postural and somatosensory reflexes. We attempt to identify the important role the nervous system plays in maintaining reflex control of the spine and posture. We also review, illustrate, and discuss how the human vertebral column develops, functions, and adapts to Earth's gravity in an upright position. We identify functional characteristics

Mark W Morningstar; Burl R Pettibon; Heidi Schlappi; Mark Schlappi; Trevor V Ireland

2005-01-01

278

Chiropractic management of patients post-disc arthroplasty: eight case reports  

Microsoft Academic Search

BACKGROUND: When conservative therapies for low back pain (LBP) are not effective, elective surgery may be proposed to these patients. Over the last 20 years, a new technology, disc replacement, has become increasingly popular because it is believed to maintain or restore the integrity of spinal movement and minimize the side-effects compared to fusion. Although disc replacement may relieve a

Julie O'Shaughnessy; Marc Drolet; Jean-François Roy; Martin Descarreaux

2010-01-01

279

78 FR 22901 - United States v. Chiropractic Associates, Ltd. of South Dakota Proposed Final Judgment and...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

...conspiracy consisted of an understanding and concert of action among CASD and its members that...persons acting or claiming to act in active concert or participation with one or more of them...including any Physician, in active concert or participation with Defendant,...

2013-04-17

280

Tuberculosis of the neuromusculoskeletal system: a review of two cases presenting as chiropractic patients  

PubMed Central

Tuberculosis caused by Mycobacterium tuberculosis is a major public heath problem world-wide, particularly in low-income countries. Increased number of immunocompromised patients and immigration from countries where tuberculosis is endemic has resulted in increased number of cases in high-income countries. Tuberculosis can affect any organ system, but is of particular interest to chiropractors when it affects the neuromusculoskeletal system. Patients with tuberculosis of the neuromusculoskeletal system can present with mechanical low back pain or with complex neurologic deficits. The aim of this paper is to highlight the importance of considering a diagnosis of tuberculosis in susceptible populations and the devastating consequences of the disease. The epidemiology, clinical features and management of tuberculosis will also be presented to facilitate early diagnosis, appropriate referral and multidisciplinary care of these patients. PMID:25729081

Kanga, Ismat; Taylor, John A.; Jacobs, Craig; Outerbridge, Geoff

2015-01-01

281

Chiropractic care for paediatric and adolescent Attention-Deficit\\/Hyperactivity Disorder: A systematic review  

Microsoft Academic Search

BACKGROUND: Psychostimulants are first line of therapy for paediatric and adolescent AD\\/HD. The evidence suggests that up to 30% of those prescribed stimulant medications do not show clinically significant outcomes. In addition, many children and adolescents experience side-effects from these medications. As a result, parents are seeking alternate interventions for their children. Complementary and alternative medicine therapies for behavioural disorders

Fay Karpouzis; Rod Bonello; Henry Pollard

2010-01-01

282

New Hampshire PPO Providers COUNTY SPECIALTYNAME ADDRESS CITY ST ZIP PHONE  

E-print Network

-528-8555 Chiropractic MedicineEisenberg, Charles D Dc E 169 Daniel Webster Hwy MEREDITH NH 03253 603-279-6250 Chiropractic MedicineFink, Charles R Dc F 783 Elm St Fink Chiropractic Ctr LACONIA NH 03246 603-524-4555 Chiropractic MedicineGuild, Stephen G Dc G 84 Hayes Rd LACONIA NH 03246 603-366-7337 Chiropractic Medicine

New Hampshire, University of

283

Health Professions Advisory Program Page 165Sonoma State University 2008-2010 Catalog health professions advisory program  

E-print Network

medicine, podiatry, optometry, pharmacy, physical therapy, physician assistant, and chiropractic medicine, and chiropractic medicine may require fewer units and courses for admission. The following outline of courses

Ravikumar, B.

284

2013-2014 UPlan Medical (Out-of-Pocket Charges for In-Network Providers)  

E-print Network

to Chiropractic, Acupuncture, Physical, Occupational, and Speech Therapy, and Mental Health/Substance Abuse to Chiropractic, Acupuncture, Physical, Occupational, and Speech Therapy, and Mental Health/Substance Abuse

Blanchette, Robert A.

285

Summary of Compensation, Benefits and Pension Contribution Changes for Senior Research Associates and Research Associates (Limited Term)  

E-print Network

Benefits a) Chiropractic / Physiotherapy / Registered Massage Therapy Benefit: Move from the current to a combined Chiropractic / Physiotherapy / Registered Massage Therapy benefit at $500 / person / year

Sun, Yu

286

LEED Study Session Session #3: Buildings  

E-print Network

#12;Certification! #12;Sustainable Sites #12;Life Expression Chiropractic Center #12;Life Expression Chiropractic Center #12;University of Washington, Merrill Hall #12;University of Washington, Merrill Hall #12

Zaferatos, Nicholas C.

287

Vaccine 21 (2003) 10441047 MMR vaccination advice over the Internet  

E-print Network

- munisation as an important preventive procedure [11]. The chiropractic profession has also repeatedly philosophy of these approaches to healthcare. The early chiropractic philoso- phy considered most diseases

Colquhoun, David

288

Health Professions Advisory Program Page 157Sonoma State University 2011-2012 Catalog Darwin Hall 200  

E-print Network

, veterinary medicine, podiatry, optometry, pharmacy, physi- cal therapy, physician assistant, and chiropractic, and chiropractic medicine may require fewer units and courses for admission. The following outline of courses

Ravikumar, B.

289

Life University  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Life University offers professional degrees in chiropractic, and undergraduate and graduate degrees in health related fields. Information is provided about the college, the chiropractic profession and research.

1997-01-01

290

PRECHIROPRACTIC INFORMATION SUMMARY Preprofessional Advisors: John Nilsson (Ujnilsson@uc.utah.eduU)  

E-print Network

University of Utah, 5815744 HUwww.ppa.utah.eduU A doctor of chiropractic help meet the health needs aspects of the body in a noninvasive manner. Preparation for chiropractic school involves curricular with chiropractic. Any major is appropriate. For general information about Chiropractic, visit www

Tipple, Brett

291

Summary of Health Plan Benefits GatorGradCare August 16, 2014  

E-print Network

Outpatient Therapies Facility 10% 20% after BYD 30% after BYD Therapy maximum is inclusive of Chiropractic Services Combined Therapy 75-Visit Limit Per Benefit Period* Chiropractic Services $30 copay $30 copay 30% after BYD Chiropractic Limit is included in overall Therapy maximum Chiropractic 26-Visit Limit Per

Pilyugin, Sergei S.

292

PRECHIROPRACTIC INFORMATION SUMMARY Preprofessional Advisors: Mayumi Kasai (mkasai@uc.utah.edu)  

E-print Network

University of Utah, 5815744 www.ppa.utah.edu A doctor of chiropractic helps meet the health needs aspects of the body in a noninvasive manner. Preparation for chiropractic school involves curricular with chiropractic. Any major is appropriate. For general information about Chiropractic, visit www

293

Matthew A. Davis Updated January, 2014  

E-print Network

Chiropractic College, Seneca Falls, NY, 2004 · Summa cum laude · Area of Study: Chiropractic Care BA, Colby Public Health Association, 2011 to present AcademyHealth, 2011 to present National Board of Chiropractic Examiners, 2004 to present Vermont Board of Chiropractic Regulation, 2004 to present Research Funding

Myers, Lawrence C.

294

TENNESSEE WORKERS' COMPENSATION INSURANCE Employers: The law requires this notice to be conspicuously posted at the employer's place of business so all  

E-print Network

), one of whom must be a doctor of chiropractic. If a doctor of chiropractic is chosen, chiropractor to such doctor of chiropractic must be specifically approved by the employer or insurance carrier. The provisions for chiropractic care shall not apply to workers' compensation self insurer pools established pursuant to Section

Cui, Yan

295

Active Listening Reading Comprehension  

E-print Network

-PROFESSIONAL PROGRAM... Please note: Chiropractic is NOT a UPB major. Students pursing this career MUST declare Chiropractic Colleges recommend a major in Biology. Chiropractic is a health care profession that focuses on general health. Chiropractic care is used most often to treat neuromusculoskeletal complaints, including

Jiang, Huiqiang

296

Reliability of chiropractic methods commonly used to detect manipulable lesions in patients with chronic low-back pain  

Microsoft Academic Search

Objective: To assess the intraexaminer and interexaminer reliability of a multidimensional spinal diagnostic method commonly used by chiropractors.Design: An intraexaminer and interexaminer Latin square, repeated measures reliability study. The techniques of diagnosis under investigation included visual postural analysis, pain description by the patient, plain static erect x-ray film of the lumbar spine, leg length discrepancy, neurologic tests, motion palpation, static

Simon D. French; Sally Green; Andrew Forbes

2000-01-01

297

Spinal manipulation for low-back pain: a treatment package agreed by the UK chiropractic, osteopathy and physiotherapy professional associations  

Microsoft Academic Search

Trials of manipulative treatment have been compromised by, amongst other things, different definitions of the therapeutic procedures involved. This paper describes a spinal manipulation package agreed by the UK professional bodies that represent chiropractors, osteopaths and physiotherapists. It was devised for use in the UK Back pain Exercise And Manipulation (UK BEAM) trial—a national study of physical treatments in primary

E. Harvey; A. K. Burton; J. K. Moffett; A. Breen

2003-01-01

298

Chiropractic and exercise for seniors with low back pain or neck pain: the design of two randomized clinical trials  

Microsoft Academic Search

BACKGROUND: Low back pain (LBP) and neck pain (NP) are common conditions in old age, leading to impaired functional ability and decreased independence. Manual and exercise therapies are common and effective therapies for the general LBP and NP populations. However, these treatments have not been adequately researched in older LBP and NP sufferers. The primary aim of these studies is

Michele J Maiers; Jan Hartvigsen; Craig Schulz; Karen Schulz; Roni L Evans; Gert Bronfort

2007-01-01

299

Chiropractic and exercise for seniors with low back pain or neck pain: the design of two randomized clinical trials  

PubMed Central

Background Low back pain (LBP) and neck pain (NP) are common conditions in old age, leading to impaired functional ability and decreased independence. Manual and exercise therapies are common and effective therapies for the general LBP and NP populations. However, these treatments have not been adequately researched in older LBP and NP sufferers. The primary aim of these studies is to assess the relative clinical effectiveness of 1) manual treatment plus home exercise, 2) supervised rehabilitative exercise plus home exercise, and 3) home exercise alone, in terms of patient-rated pain, for senior LBP and NP patients. Secondary aims are to compare the three treatment approaches in regards to patient-rated disability, general health status, satisfaction, improvement and medication use, as well as objective outcomes of spinal motion, trunk strength and endurance, and functional ability. Cost-effectiveness and cost-utility will also be assessed. Finally, using qualitative methods, older LBP and NP patient's perceptions of treatment will be explored and described. Methods/Design This paper describes the design of two multi-methods clinical studies focusing on elderly patients with non-acute LBP and NP. Each study includes a randomized clinical trial (RCT), a cost-effectiveness study alongside the RCT, and a qualitative study. Four hundred and eighty participants (240 per study), ages 65 and older, will be recruited and randomized to one of three, 12-week treatment programs. Patient-rated outcome measures are collected via self-report questionnaires at baseline and at 4, 12, 26, and 52 weeks post-randomization. Objective outcomes are assessed by examiners masked to treatment assignment at baseline and 12 weeks. Health care cost data is collected through standardized clinician forms, monthly phone interviews, and self-report questionnaires throughout the study. Qualitative interviews using a semi-structured format are conducted at the end of the 12 week treatment period. Discussion To our knowledge, these are the first randomized clinical trials to comprehensively address clinical effectiveness, cost-effectiveness, and patients' perceptions of commonly used treatments for elderly LBP and NP sufferers. Trial Registration NCT00269321 and NCT00269308 PMID:17877825

Maiers, Michele J; Hartvigsen, Jan; Schulz, Craig; Schulz, Karen; Evans, Roni L; Bronfort, Gert

2007-01-01

300

A RANDOMIZED CONTROLLED TRIAL OF THE EFFECTS OF INSTRUMENT-APPLIED CHIROPRACTIC MANIPULATIVE THERAPY ON MYOFASCIAL TRIGGER POINTS  

Microsoft Academic Search

Introduction: Myofascial trigger points (MTrPs) are characterized as discrete, focal, hypersensitive spots in a taut band of muscle that are painful to palpation and reproduce the patient's local and referred pain symptoms. (Borg-Stein & Simons, 2002) Other features may include \\

Rodger Tepe; John Zhang

301

2013 Alternative Entry Pathways for School Entry Awards and Media Portfolio Entry  

E-print Network

will be offered by the Deans of the following Schools at Murdoch; Business, Chiropractic and Sports Science requirements. What courses offer this? Courses within the areas of Business, Chiropractic and Sports Science

302

2011 Entry and Media Portfolio Awards Murdoch University offers a number of Entry Awards as well as Media Portfolio a  

E-print Network

Entry Award and · Dean of Chiropractic Entry Award · Dean of Education Entry Award · Dean of Engineering or individual merit. Award and Scholarship Dean of Chiropractic Entry Award Dean of Education Entry Award Dean

303

Doctor Recommendations 2011 Page 1 of 10  

E-print Network

Ershow Chiropractic Center Dr. Leonard Ershow 915 Commons Way (609)921-7071 2 Princeton, NJ Montgomery Family Dr. Jay Hororwiitz Route 206, Suite 11 (609) 638-1700 1 Chiropractic Skillman NJ 08558 Dental

304

Travel Aches and Strains Can Be a Pain in Your Back  

MedlinePLUS

... support the head of the infant or child. Chiropractic Care Can Help... "If you follow these simple ... pain and stress on your back, doctors of chiropractic are trained and licensed to diagnose and treat ...

305

Pre-Health Professions Program Page 317Sonoma State University 2006-2008 Catalog Sonoma State University provides preparation for continuing study  

E-print Network

assistant, and chiropractic medicine. Students interested in entering the health professions will select, and chiropractic medicine may require fewer units and courses for admission. The following outline of courses

Ravikumar, B.

306

Science 150: Introduction To Careers In The Health Professions Guest Lecture Series*  

E-print Network

October 3 Chiropractic Medicine; Admissions and Application Process - Bill Riley Palmer College of Chiropractic October 10 Osteopathic Medicine - Russell Brunet, D.O.M. Salinas Valley PrimeCare Medical Group

Ravikumar, B.

307

A Note on Complementary Medicines  

MedlinePLUS

... turn Javascript on. Photo: iStock Herbal supplements, meditation, chiropractic manipulation, and acupuncture are types of complementary and ... useful to include acupuncture along with standard care. Chiropractic provides some benefit for low back pain, however ...

308

Health Professions Advisory Program Page 159Sonoma State University 2014-2015 Catalog HEALTH PROFESSIONS ADVISORY PROGRAM  

E-print Network

, and chiropractic medicine. Please note that advising for physical therapy and nursing are done by the Departments, and chiropractic medicine may require fewer units and courses for admission. The following outline of courses

Ravikumar, B.

309

MURALI PILLAI, PhD. Professor of Biology and Chair of the Health Professions Advisory Committee, Sonoma State University. Introductory Meeting  

E-print Network

of California, San Francisco. Pharmacy NOVEMBER 01 MARY FLANNERY, DC. Life Chiropractic College West. Chiropractic Medicine NOVEMBER 08 DAVID TRAN, DPM. California School of Podiatric Medicine at Samuel Merritt

Ravikumar, B.

310

Page 156 Health Professions Advisory Program Sonoma State University 2012-2013 Catalog HEALTH PROFESSIONS ADVISORY PROGRAM  

E-print Network

assistant, and chiropractic medicine. Please note that advising for physical therapy and nursing are done, physician assis- tant, and chiropractic medicine may require fewer units and courses for admission

Ravikumar, B.

311

Complementary Therapies in Medicine (2014) 22, 409--418 Available online at www.sciencedirect.com  

E-print Network

-PLANTS, CHIROPRACTIC-AND-LOW-BACK-PAIN, ACUPUNCTURE- AND-PAIN, CELL-PROCESSES-AND-DISEASES, LIPID as chiropractic, ayurveda, homeopathy and naturopathy).1 On the other hand, Integrative Medicine incorporates

Granada, Universidad de

312

river dolphins Investigating dolphin deaths in WA  

E-print Network

Autumn 2010 Helping India Chiropractic, Nursing and Pharmacy Schools making a difference Fossil fuel, Chiropractic and Sports Science, Nursing and Midwifery, are doing their bit to make the world a better place

313

Back Pain Facts and Statistics  

MedlinePLUS

... for Back Problems Used primarily by Doctors of Chiropractic (DCs) for the last century, manipulation has been ... cost effectiveness , manipulation is receiving more widespread attention. Chiropractic spinal manipulation is a safe and effective spine ...

314

Manual Healing and Physical Touch  

MedlinePLUS

... seeds of Ricinus communis, an herb native to Africa and India. Chiropractic Chiropractic is a health care ... Symptoms of Cancer Treatments & Side Effects Cancer Facts & Statistics News About Cancer Expert Voices Blog Programs & Services ...

315

The knowledge of our knowledge?  

PubMed Central

This classic article was published in the first volume and issue of Philosophical Constructs for the Chiropractic Profession. In this paper, Dr. McAndrews reviews the use of the term “philosophy” in chiropractic and urges the chiropractic profession to consider the use and misuse of this term. Reprinted with permission from McAndrews JF. The Knowledge of Our Knowledge. Philosophical Constructs for the Chiropractic Profession. 1991;1:14-17. PMID:23966887

McAndrews, Jerome F.

2012-01-01

316

General Information: Chiropractors provide a valuable health care service to the general public. These health care  

E-print Network

. Different chiropractic colleges emphasize different approaches. As such, students must determine which specific chiropractic colleges and determine which one(s) provide the type of education they desire. Links curriculum for Chiropractic College is fairly uniform for accredited schools. Courses required

Walker, Lawrence R.

317

Wichita State University Fairmount College of Liberal Arts and Sciences 2014 -2015 Preparation for a Profession as a Chiropractor  

E-print Network

for a Profession as a Chiropractor A bachelor's degree is required for admissions into most chiropractic schools. Many states, including Kansas, require a bachelor's degree along with a Doctor of Chiropractic degree the prerequisite core courses in math and sciences. Chiropractic schools expect candidates to demonstrate

318

Last Updated: January 2014 1 For more information visit www.uwinnipeg.ca or contact a student recruitment officer at  

E-print Network

Course Calendar and this fact sheet differ, the current Calendar takes precedence. Pre-Chiropractic gain admission to chiropractic school. Come to The University of Winnipeg for your pre's medical library, chiropractic clinics, major hospitals, research centres, and labs such as the National

Martin, Jeff

319

Wichita State University Fairmount College of Liberal Arts and Sciences 2013 -2014 Preparation for a Profession as a Chiropractor  

E-print Network

for a Profession as a Chiropractor A bachelor's degree is required for admissions into most chiropractic schools. Many states, including Kansas, require a bachelor's degree along with a Doctor of Chiropractic degree the prerequisite core courses in math and sciences. Chiropractic schools expect candidates to demonstrate

320

NATURE PHYSICS | VOL 8 | JUNE 2012 | www.nature.com/naturephysics 437 A new parliamentary session began  

E-print Network

Simon Singh was sued by the British Chiropractic Association over an article in The Guardian newspaper. In the article, Singh had criticized the association for claiming chiropractic to be an effective treatment of Appeal decided Singh's article was legally permissible fair comment. Days later, the British Chiropractic

Loss, Daniel

321

Adjustment, the hands and healing  

Microsoft Academic Search

Chiropractic is the largest “unorthodox” health profession in the United States. It is licensed in all 50 states and its services covered by governmental and private health insurance. Yet chiropractic remains, in the opinion of medical commentators, an unscientific healing cult. Chiropractic holds that much illness is caused, directly or indirectly, by derangements in homeostasis that result from subtle vertebral

John L. Coulehan

1985-01-01

322

Fostering critical thinking skills: a strategy for enhancing evidence based wellness care  

Microsoft Academic Search

Chiropractic has traditionally regarded itself a wellness profession. As wellness care is postulated to play a central role in the future growth of chiropractic, the development of a wellness ethos acceptable within conventional health care is desirable. This paper describes a unit which prepares chiropractic students for the role of \\

Jennifer R Jamison

2005-01-01

323

INCREASING THE CERVICAL LORDOSIS WITH CHIROPRACTIC BIOPHYSICS SEATED COMBINED EXTENSION-COMPRESSION AND TRANSVERSE LOAD CERVICAL TRACTION WITH CERVICAL MANIPULATION: NONRANDOMIZED CLINICAL CONTROL TRIAL  

Microsoft Academic Search

Background: Cervical lordosis has been shown to be an important outcome of care; however, few conservative methods of rehabilitating sagittal cervical alignment have been reported. Objective: To study whether a seated, retracted, extended, and compressed position would cause tension in the anterior cervical ligament, anterior disk, and muscle structures, and thereby restore cervical lordosis or increase the curvature in patients

Deed E. Harrison; Donald D. Harrison; Joeseph J. Betz; Tadeusz J. Janik; Burt Holland; Christopher J. Colloca; Jason W. Haas

324

Individualized chiropractic and integrative care for low back pain: the design of a randomized clinical trial using a mixed-methods approach  

Microsoft Academic Search

BACKGROUND: Low back pain (LBP) is a prevalent and costly condition in the United States. Evidence suggests there is no one treatment which is best for all patients, but instead several viable treatment options. Additionally, multidisciplinary management of LBP may be more effective than monodisciplinary care. An integrative model that includes both complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) and conventional therapies,

Kristine K Westrom; Michele J Maiers; Roni L Evans; Gert Bronfort

2010-01-01

325

Delineating inflammatory and mechanical sub-types of low back pain: a pilot survey of fifty low back pain patients in a chiropractic setting  

Microsoft Academic Search

Background  An instrument known as the Mechanical and Inflammatory Low Back Pain (MAIL) Scale was drafted using the results of a previous\\u000a expert opinion study. A pilot survey was conducted to test the feasibility of a larger study designed to determine the MAIL\\u000a Scale's ability to distinguish two potential subgroups of low back pain: inflammatory and mechanical.\\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a Methods  Patients with a primary

Janine S Riksman; Owen D Williamson; Bruce F Walker

2011-01-01

326

A descriptive report of management strategies used by chiropractors, as reviewed by a single independent chiropractic consultant in the Australian workers compensation system  

Microsoft Academic Search

BACKGROUND: In New South Wales, Australia, an injured worker enters the workers compensation system with the case often managed by a pre-determined insurer. The goal of the treating practitioner is to facilitate the claimant to return to suitable duties and progress to their pre-injury status, job and quality of life. Currently, there is very little documentation on the management of

Henry Pollard; Katie de Luca

2009-01-01

327

Pelvic girdle pain in three pregnant women choosing chiropractic management: a pilot study using a respondent-generated instrument and chiropractor's assessment tool  

Microsoft Academic Search

Pelvic girdle pain (PGP), as experienced by pregnant women, is poorly defined and understood. Despite an increasing body of research, there is still little in the literature that is accessible to healthcare practitioners regarding the management and treatment of this condition. There is also a lack of information about the use of specific tools to help define the problem, or

C. G. Andrew; N. Eaton; G. Dorey

328

The American Council of Women Chiropractors from 1935 to 1960.  

PubMed

Equal rights for women have been a never ending battle in the professional world. Even though many women influenced the chiropractic profession, these same battles could not be avoided. For this reason, several students from the Lincoln Chiropractic College worked to form the American Council of Women Chiropractors (ACWC), a council of the American Chiropractic Association (ACA). From 1935 to 1960, the organization was represented in the House of Counselors of the NCA, had a monthly section in the Journal of the National Chiropractic Association to publish information about the council along with scholarly work by their members, and formed a Scholarship Foundation for Women Chiropractic Students. Perhaps one of the most important roles the ACWC played was in its support of women chiropractors. Through annual meetings and personal contacts, the members were able to endure many difficulties that existed both inside and outside chiropractic. PMID:11620295

Tuck, N R

1998-06-01

329

Recent advances in lumbar mechanics with relevance to clinicians  

PubMed Central

Perhaps the singular, most important impediment to universal recognition of chiropractic as a legitimate and mature health care alternative is the absence of a developed mechanical knowledge of chiropractic techniques. The purpose of this review paper was to describe, and to some extent critique, some recent research pertaining to mechanics of the lumbar spine and to illustrate the relevance to clinical chiropractic. Specific contentious issues addressed include discussion of the mechanical relationship of intra-abdominal pressure, the lumbodorsal fascia, muscle-ligament interplay and the abdominal musculature with the lumbar spine. Directions or future research are proposed given the pressing need to provide a rationale for, and explanation of, specific chiropractic treatment.

McGill, Stuart M

1989-01-01

330

The Homewood influence in Canada and beyond  

PubMed Central

If there is any one individual who stands out in the saga of the early growth and development of the Canadian Memorial Chiropractic College, it must be Albert Earl Homewood (1916–1990). His contributions included steering the institution through the lean 1950s, coping with the metropolitan transit authorities’ devastating incursion upon the first campus, and arranging the construction and financing of the school’s second campus. Along the way, this feisty gentleman and respected instructor, “chiropractic’s Mr. Chips,” raised the standard for scholarship among DCs and assisted in the administration of several additional chiropractic colleges (Lincoln and Los Angeles). PMID:17549169

Keating, Joseph C

2006-01-01

331

76 FR 14417 - ``Low Income Levels'' Used for Various Health Professions and Nursing Programs Included in Titles...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

...funding determinations generally make awards to: Accredited schools of medicine, osteopathic medicine, public health, dentistry, veterinary medicine, optometry, pharmacy, allied health podiatric medicine, nursing, chiropractic, public or...

2011-03-16

332

INCOLLABORATIONWITHWESTCHESTERUNIVERSITY M I L L E R S V I L L E  

E-print Network

Assistant, Chiropractic, Podiatry, Nursing, or Medicine. Earning a dual credential not only increases job · Letters of recommendation from certified athletic trainers, physicians, or coaches and teachers may

Hardy, Christopher R.

333

(Buffalo Grove, IL). A case study authored by Alain M.J. Desaulniers credits regular chiropractic care with helping a 46-year old man overcome his major depression and increase his quality of life  

Microsoft Academic Search

More than 15 million American adults are diagnosed with mood disorders every year, which include major depression, Dysthymia and Bipolar Disorder. The disease is usually treated with antidepressants, according to the study, but the quality of life of people who are clinically depressed is subdued by the medications' many unwanted side effects.

Gregg Stern

334

Allan M. Freedman, LLB: a lawyer’s gift to Canadian chiropractors  

PubMed Central

This paper reviews the leadership role, contributions, accolades, and impact of Professor Allan Freedman through a 30 year history of service to CMCC and the chiropractic profession in Canada. Professor Freedman has served as an educator, philanthropist and also as legal counsel. His influence on chiropractic organizations and chiropractors during this significant period in the profession is discussed. PMID:18060008

Brown, Douglas M.

2007-01-01

335

The use of chiropractors by older adults in the United States  

Microsoft Academic Search

BACKGROUND: In a nationally representative sample of United States Medicare beneficiaries, we examined the extent of chiropractic use, factors associated with seeing a chiropractor, and predictors of the volume of chiropractic use among those having seen one. METHODS: We performed secondary analyses of baseline interview data on 4,310 self-respondents who were 70 years old or older when they first participated

Fredric D Wolinsky; Li Liu; Thomas R Miller; John F Geweke; Elizabeth A Cook; Barry R Greene; Kara B Wright; Elizabeth A Chrischilles; Claire E Pavlik; Hyonggin An; Robert L Ohsfeldt; Kelly K Richardson; Gary E Rosenthal; Robert B Wallace

2007-01-01

336

The use and role of sport chiropractors in the National Football League: A short report  

Microsoft Academic Search

Objective: To analyze chiropractic utilization on National Football League (NFL) medical teams and the role played by chiropractors. Design: Postal survey of head athletic trainers of the 36 teams. Survey questions were developed from responses to a questionnaire submitted to a pilot group of 30 sport chiropractors and a panel of 20 postdoctoral faculty of the sport chiropractic program of

John L. Stump; Daniel Redwood

2002-01-01

337

 

PubMed Central

Ethical concerns about informed consent encompass the legal functions of protection of patients through self-determination, but also considers other ways of respecting patients through seeking their benefit and their autonomy. The influence of traditional medicine on patient expectations, and use of consent forms often renders consent a difficult issue in the relative safety and non-invasiveness of chiropractic practice. The ethical concern with consent, however, focuses attention on patient participation in health care decisions. Chiropractic relationships are often quite conclusive to this sharing of health care decisions after education. Exceptions to informed consent are not typically relevant to chiropractic patients who are conscious, competent and not in need of emergency treatment. It is therefore important that patients are aware of non-chiropractic alternatives and very rare risks of a serious nature. Rather than an impediment, ethical concerns about consent encourage a relationship of education and shared responsibility which encourages chiropractic patients to accept responsibility for their health.

Burgess, Michael M

1990-01-01

338

How Much Health Promotion and Disease Prevention Is Enough?  

PubMed Central

Introduction: Although family violence has been identified as a major public health issue, it has received little attention in the chiropractic literature. Accordingly, this article provides a conceptual overview on family violence, discusses the role of chiropractors in its detection, and raises several issues germane to chiropractic education that deserve further attention in future chiropractic publications. Methods: A selective review of the empirical literature on family violence was conducted with a focus on issues relevant to chiropractic training and professional identity. Results: Extrapolating from the research, several models for medical training and continuing education have been proposed that emphasize a multidisciplinary, developmental approach to infusing knowledge, skill building, and mentored practice experiences into professional education experiences. Conclusion: As chiropractors become more mainstream portal-of-entry providers, there is a clear need to translate the didactics of family violence into the clinical setting. Clinical education may provide students the opportunity to master basic competencies for managing challenging family violence problems. The clinical environment may be appropriate for inculcating skills commensurate with those of other primary care providers. Yet, the extent to which training priorities and approaches extrapolated from other health care disciplines should be accepted wholesale by the chiropractic profession merits further discussion, including issues around the professional identity of chiropractic, the impact of accreditation standards and practice guidelines on actual professional practice behaviors, and the possible limits and unintended consequences associated with expanding the traditional chiropractic scope of practice from a specialty to a primary care profession. PMID:18483632

Terre, Lisa; Globe, Gary; Pfefer, Mark T.

2006-01-01

339

Questions about Neck Manipulation?  

MedlinePLUS

... therapies available for the treatment of back pain, neck pain, joint pain of the arms or legs, headaches, ... are visiting your doctor of chiropractic with upper-neck pain or headache, be very specific about your symptoms, ...

340

Programs and services to enhance your health and wellness From acupuncture to natural supplements. From aerobic classes to a therapeutic  

E-print Network

Programs and services to enhance your health and wellness From acupuncture to natural supplements® Alternative Medicine Acupuncture Chiropractic Care Massage Therapy Mind/Body Healthy Roads Mind/Body Program

Hutcheon, James M.

341

SCHOOL OF SCIENCE & TECHNOLOGY HEALTH PROFESSIONS ADVISORY PROGRAM  

E-print Network

SCHOOL OF SCIENCE & TECHNOLOGY HEALTH PROFESSIONS ADVISORY PROGRAM SCHEDULE FOR SSU STUDENTS medical, dental, veterinary medical, osteopathic medical, podiatry, chiropractic, pharmacy, physician (Dental Admission Test), GRE (Graduate Record Examination), OAT (Optometry Admission Test), PCAT (Pharmacy

Ravikumar, B.

342

Prospective Case Series on the Effects of Lumbosacral Manipulation on Dysmenorrhea  

Microsoft Academic Search

ObjectiveThe objective of this prospective case series was to collect preliminary data as to the effectiveness of a specific chiropractic technique, drop table method, in the treatment of primary dysmenorrhea.

Denise A. Holtzman; Kristina L. Petrocco-Napuli; Jeanmarie R. Burke

2008-01-01

343

75 FR 17938 - Advisory Committee on Interdisciplinary, Community-Based Linkages; Notice for Request for...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

...programs: Allied Health; Area Health Education Centers; Chiropractic...Dentists, and Behavioral and Mental Health Professionals; Graduate Psychology...and the legislation requires a fair balance between the health professions and members from...

2010-04-08

344

Special Section: Complementary and Alternative Medicine (CAM):Quiz on Complementary and Alternative Medicine  

MedlinePLUS

... Special Section CAM Quiz on Complementary and Alternative Medicine Past Issues / Winter 2009 Table of Contents For ... low back pain. True False Complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) includes: Meditation Chiropractic Use of natural products, ...

345

45 CFR 158.140 - Reimbursement for clinical services provided to enrollees.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...administrative fees, claims processing, and utilization management. For example, if an issuer contracts with a behavioral health, chiropractic network, or high technology radiology vendor, or a pharmacy benefit manager, and the vendor reimburses the...

2012-10-01

346

Teaching Biochemistry in a "Guided Discovery Curriculum".  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Describes the implementation of the innovative Guided Discovery Curriculum at the National College of Chiropractic. Emphasizes the relevance of biochemical principles to clinical practice through the selection of two clinical cases. (DDR)

Surlekar, Sheela

1998-01-01

347

16 CFR 255.4 - Endorsements by organizations.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...d) regarding the liability of endorsers.] Example: A mattress seller advertises that its product is endorsed by a chiropractic association. Because the association would be regarded as expert with respect to judging mattresses, its endorsement...

2011-01-01

348

32 CFR 732.15 - Unauthorized care.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...Dental Care From Nonnaval Sources § 732.15 Unauthorized care. The following are not authorized by this part: (a) Chiropractic services. (b) Vasectomies. (c) Tubal ligations. (d) Breast augmentations or reductions. (e)...

2010-07-01

349

16 CFR 255.4 - Endorsements by organizations.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...d) regarding the liability of endorsers.] Example: A mattress seller advertises that its product is endorsed by a chiropractic association. Because the association would be regarded as expert with respect to judging mattresses, its endorsement...

2012-01-01

350

16 CFR 255.4 - Endorsements by organizations.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...d) regarding the liability of endorsers.] Example: A mattress seller advertises that its product is endorsed by a chiropractic association. Because the association would be regarded as expert with respect to judging mattresses, its endorsement...

2013-01-01

351

32 CFR 732.15 - Unauthorized care.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...Dental Care From Nonnaval Sources § 732.15 Unauthorized care. The following are not authorized by this part: (a) Chiropractic services. (b) Vasectomies. (c) Tubal ligations. (d) Breast augmentations or reductions. (e)...

2013-07-01

352

45 CFR 158.140 - Reimbursement for clinical services provided to enrollees.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...administrative fees, claims processing, and utilization management. For example, if an issuer contracts with a behavioral health, chiropractic network, or high technology radiology vendor, or a pharmacy benefit manager, and the vendor reimburses the...

2011-10-01

353

16 CFR 255.4 - Endorsements by organizations.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...d) regarding the liability of endorsers.] Example: A mattress seller advertises that its product is endorsed by a chiropractic association. Because the association would be regarded as expert with respect to judging mattresses, its endorsement...

2010-01-01

354

16 CFR 255.4 - Endorsements by organizations.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

...d) regarding the liability of endorsers.] Example: A mattress seller advertises that its product is endorsed by a chiropractic association. Because the association would be regarded as expert with respect to judging mattresses, its endorsement...

2014-01-01

355

45 CFR 158.140 - Reimbursement for clinical services provided to enrollees.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

...administrative fees, claims processing, and utilization management. For example, if an issuer contracts with a behavioral health, chiropractic network, or high technology radiology vendor, or a pharmacy benefit manager, and the vendor reimburses the...

2014-10-01

356

The activity of Rubisco's molecular chaperone, Rubisco activase, in leaf extracts  

Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

Rubisco frequently undergoes unproductive interactions with its sugar-phosphate substrate that stabilize active sites in an inactive conformation. Restoring catalytic competence to these sites requires the “molecular chiropractic” activity of Rubisco activase (activase). To make the study of activas...

357

32 CFR 732.15 - Unauthorized care.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...Dental Care From Nonnaval Sources § 732.15 Unauthorized care. The following are not authorized by this part: (a) Chiropractic services. (b) Vasectomies. (c) Tubal ligations. (d) Breast augmentations or reductions. (e)...

2011-07-01

358

32 CFR 732.15 - Unauthorized care.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...Dental Care From Nonnaval Sources § 732.15 Unauthorized care. The following are not authorized by this part: (a) Chiropractic services. (b) Vasectomies. (c) Tubal ligations. (d) Breast augmentations or reductions. (e)...

2012-07-01

359

32 CFR 732.15 - Unauthorized care.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

...Dental Care From Nonnaval Sources § 732.15 Unauthorized care. The following are not authorized by this part: (a) Chiropractic services. (b) Vasectomies. (c) Tubal ligations. (d) Breast augmentations or reductions. (e)...

2014-07-01

360

Health and Pre-Med Health care is currently one of the world's fastest-growing and Canada's second-largest, service industry  

E-print Network

Nile virus, global warming, health care costs and family violence. www, occupational therapy, physical therapy, chiropractic, kinesiology and many other fields. Our undergraduate and includes courses in biochemistry, human kinetics, arts and science, environmental science, engineering

361

75 FR 43452 - Nondiscrimination on the Basis of Disability by State and Local Governments and Places of Public...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

...chairs include ophthalmology, optometry, podiatry, oncology, physical therapy, chiropractic, rehabilitation medicine, urology, and obstetrics and gynecology. If a person with a disability cannot get onto an examination table or chair and is thus...

2010-07-26

362

Cancer Alternative Therapies  

MedlinePLUS

You have many choices to make about your cancer treatment. One choice you might be thinking about ... are acupuncture, chiropractic, and herbal medicines. People with cancer may use CAM to Help cope with the ...

363

Chiropractors  

MedlinePLUS

... directly or through health insurance. Although most insurance plans now cover chiropractic services, the extent of such coverage varies among plans. Employment projections data for chiropractors, 2012-22 Occupational ...

364

Alternative Therapies  

MedlinePLUS

... classes, or trained individuals. Bodywork includes myofascial release (Smith, 1997) , various types of massage, craniosacral therapy, chiropractic ... 1987) ; therapeutic touch, developed in nursing (Gerber, 1988; Smith, 1997) ; and reiki and polarity (Goldberg, 1995) . All ...

365

32 CFR 935.152 - Activities for which permit is required.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...sold for human consumption (except for personal or family use). (b) The practice of any medical profession, including dentistry, surgery, osteopathy, and chiropractic. (c) The erection of any structure or sign, including a major alteration...

2011-07-01

366

75 FR 30407 - Agency Information Collection Activities: Proposed Collection: Comment Request  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

...HEAL) program provided federally-insured loans to students in schools of allopathic medicine, osteopathic medicine, dentistry, veterinary medicine, optometry, podiatric medicine, pharmacy, public health, allied health, or chiropractic,...

2010-06-01

367

32 CFR 935.152 - Activities for which permit is required.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...sold for human consumption (except for personal or family use). (b) The practice of any medical profession, including dentistry, surgery, osteopathy, and chiropractic. (c) The erection of any structure or sign, including a major alteration...

2010-07-01

368

42 CFR 60.1 - What is the HEAL program?  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

...is a program of Federal insurance of educational loans to graduate students in the fields of medicine, osteopathic medicine, dentistry, veterinary medicine, optometry, podiatric medicine, pharmacy, public health, chiropractic, health...

2014-10-01

369

42 CFR 60.1 - What is the HEAL program?  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...is a program of Federal insurance of educational loans to graduate students in the fields of medicine, osteopathic medicine, dentistry, veterinary medicine, optometry, podiatric medicine, pharmacy, public health, chiropractic, health...

2012-10-01

370

78 FR 35286 - Agency Information Collection Activities; Submission to OMB for Review and Approval; Public...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

...HEAL) program provided federally-insured loans to students in schools of allopathic medicine, osteopathic medicine, dentistry, veterinary medicine, optometry, podiatric medicine, pharmacy, public health, allied health, or chiropractic,...

2013-06-12

371

32 CFR 935.152 - Activities for which permit is required.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

...sold for human consumption (except for personal or family use). (b) The practice of any medical profession, including dentistry, surgery, osteopathy, and chiropractic. (c) The erection of any structure or sign, including a major alteration...

2014-07-01

372

42 CFR 60.1 - What is the HEAL program?  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...is a program of Federal insurance of educational loans to graduate students in the fields of medicine, osteopathic medicine, dentistry, veterinary medicine, optometry, podiatric medicine, pharmacy, public health, chiropractic, health...

2010-10-01

373

42 CFR 411.12 - Charges imposed by an immediate relative or member of the beneficiary's household.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...completely owned by one or more physicians and is operated for the purpose of conducting the practice of medicine, osteopathy dentistry, podiatry, optometry, or chiropractic, or is owned by other health care professionals as authorized by State law....

2012-10-01

374

75 FR 16136 - Agency Information Collection Activities: Proposed Collection: Comment Request  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

...HEAL) program provided federally-insured loans to students in schools of allopathic medicine, osteopathic medicine, dentistry, veterinary medicine, optometry, podiatric medicine, pharmacy, public health, allied health, or chiropractic,...

2010-03-31

375

42 CFR 75.2 - Definitions.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...interacts with atoms to produce ion pairs in matter. Licensed practitioner means a licensed doctor of medicine, osteopathy, dentistry, podiatry, or chiropractic. Licensure means the process by which an agency of State government grants permission...

2012-10-01

376

42 CFR 411.12 - Charges imposed by an immediate relative or member of the beneficiary's household.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...completely owned by one or more physicians and is operated for the purpose of conducting the practice of medicine, osteopathy dentistry, podiatry, optometry, or chiropractic, or is owned by other health care professionals as authorized by State law....

2011-10-01

377

42 CFR 60.1 - What is the HEAL program?  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...is a program of Federal insurance of educational loans to graduate students in the fields of medicine, osteopathic medicine, dentistry, veterinary medicine, optometry, podiatric medicine, pharmacy, public health, chiropractic, health...

2013-10-01

378

32 CFR 935.152 - Activities for which permit is required.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...sold for human consumption (except for personal or family use). (b) The practice of any medical profession, including dentistry, surgery, osteopathy, and chiropractic. (c) The erection of any structure or sign, including a major alteration...

2012-07-01

379

42 CFR 75.2 - Definitions.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...interacts with atoms to produce ion pairs in matter. Licensed practitioner means a licensed doctor of medicine, osteopathy, dentistry, podiatry, or chiropractic. Licensure means the process by which an agency of State government grants permission...

2011-10-01

380

42 CFR 75.2 - Definitions.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...interacts with atoms to produce ion pairs in matter. Licensed practitioner means a licensed doctor of medicine, osteopathy, dentistry, podiatry, or chiropractic. Licensure means the process by which an agency of State government grants permission...

2010-10-01

381

42 CFR 75.2 - Definitions.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

...interacts with atoms to produce ion pairs in matter. Licensed practitioner means a licensed doctor of medicine, osteopathy, dentistry, podiatry, or chiropractic. Licensure means the process by which an agency of State government grants permission...

2014-10-01

382

32 CFR 935.152 - Activities for which permit is required.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...sold for human consumption (except for personal or family use). (b) The practice of any medical profession, including dentistry, surgery, osteopathy, and chiropractic. (c) The erection of any structure or sign, including a major alteration...

2013-07-01

383

42 CFR 60.1 - What is the HEAL program?  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...is a program of Federal insurance of educational loans to graduate students in the fields of medicine, osteopathic medicine, dentistry, veterinary medicine, optometry, podiatric medicine, pharmacy, public health, chiropractic, health...

2011-10-01

384

42 CFR 75.2 - Definitions.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...interacts with atoms to produce ion pairs in matter. Licensed practitioner means a licensed doctor of medicine, osteopathy, dentistry, podiatry, or chiropractic. Licensure means the process by which an agency of State government grants permission...

2013-10-01

385

78 FR 18988 - Agency Information Collection Activities; Proposed Collection; Comment Request  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

...HEAL) program provided federally-insured loans to students in schools of allopathic medicine, osteopathic medicine, dentistry, veterinary medicine, optometry, podiatric medicine, pharmacy, public health, allied health, or chiropractic,...

2013-03-28

386

42 CFR 411.12 - Charges imposed by an immediate relative or member of the beneficiary's household.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...completely owned by one or more physicians and is operated for the purpose of conducting the practice of medicine, osteopathy dentistry, podiatry, optometry, or chiropractic, or is owned by other health care professionals as authorized by State law....

2010-10-01

387

42 CFR 411.12 - Charges imposed by an immediate relative or member of the beneficiary's household.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

...completely owned by one or more physicians and is operated for the purpose of conducting the practice of medicine, osteopathy dentistry, podiatry, optometry, or chiropractic, or is owned by other health care professionals as authorized by State law....

2014-10-01

388

42 CFR 411.12 - Charges imposed by an immediate relative or member of the beneficiary's household.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...completely owned by one or more physicians and is operated for the purpose of conducting the practice of medicine, osteopathy dentistry, podiatry, optometry, or chiropractic, or is owned by other health care professionals as authorized by State law....

2013-10-01

389

1st Choice Savings & Credit Union Edmonton Police Services 5th on 5th Youth Services EMCO Corporation  

E-print Network

Human Resources Institute of Alberta Alberta Institute PMAC Insurance Institute of Canada Alberta Centre Nexen Energy ULC Canadian Memorial Chiropractic College Paladin Security Canadian Natural Resources Ltd Quest Support Services Cargill RBC CBI Health Rehoboth Christian Ministries Cenovus Renfrew

Seldin, Jonathan P.

390

42 CFR 60.11 - Terms of repayment.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

...SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES GRANTS HEALTH EDUCATION ASSISTANCE...Education for Public Health. (viii) American...ix) Council on Chiropractic Education. (b...the Secretary's insurance liability...

2014-10-01

391

42 CFR 60.11 - Terms of repayment.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES GRANTS HEALTH EDUCATION ASSISTANCE...Education for Public Health. (viii) American...ix) Council on Chiropractic Education. (b...the Secretary's insurance liability...

2011-10-01

392

1st Choice Savings & Credit Union EMCO Corporation 5th on 5th Youth Services Enterprise Rent A Car  

E-print Network

Human Resources Institute of Alberta Alberta Human Services, Alberta Works Insurance Recruiting Centre RBC Canadian Memorial Chiropractic College Rehoboth Christian Ministries Ltd CBI Health Royal Canadian Mounted Police Chartered Professional Accountants

Seldin, Jonathan P.

393

42 CFR 60.11 - Terms of repayment.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES GRANTS HEALTH EDUCATION ASSISTANCE...Education for Public Health. (viii) American...ix) Council on Chiropractic Education. (b...the Secretary's insurance liability...

2013-10-01

394

42 CFR 60.11 - Terms of repayment.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES GRANTS HEALTH EDUCATION ASSISTANCE...Education for Public Health. (viii) American...ix) Council on Chiropractic Education. (b...the Secretary's insurance liability...

2012-10-01

395

42 CFR 60.11 - Terms of repayment.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES GRANTS HEALTH EDUCATION ASSISTANCE...Education for Public Health. (viii) American...ix) Council on Chiropractic Education. (b...the Secretary's insurance liability...

2010-10-01

396

Occupational hazards at the work place  

PubMed Central

Industrial accidents and injuries are prevalent amongst the industrialised world. Accident related research has long attempted to find common denominators among the human and environmental antecedents of occupational hazards. Chemical substances can adversely effect one or several of the body systems, with resulting symptoms which may not fit in a specific disease pattern. While occupational health physicians will be familiar with hazards of particular industries, general physicians or chiropractic clinicians may easily overlook industrial poisoning as a cause of symptoms because of its relative rarity. Even though awareness of chiropractic and use of chiropractic care has been increasing, there are still millions of Canadians who know little or nothing about chiropractic and are not part of its utilization profile.

Dhami, MSI; Vernon, H

1985-01-01

397

Prosthetic and Sensory Aids Service (PSAS)  

MedlinePLUS

... Blind Rehab Chiropractic Service Polytrauma/TBI Prosthetics & Sensory Aids Recreational Therapy More Health Care Veterans Health Administration ... and programs for medical rehabilitation, prosthetic and sensory aids services that promote the health, independence and quality ...

398

Connect with Your Enhanced ACSP Health & Dental Plan  

E-print Network

.santeetudiante.com during the Change-of-Coverage Period from Sept. 14 - Oct. 14, 2013. Combining Plans If you are covered of the Dental, Vision, Physiotherapy, and Chiropractic Networks. Find a health practitioner at www

Skorobogatiy, Maksim

399

Rural Viability Index: A Tool for Assessing Rural Communities  

E-print Network

to a lack of access to prenatal care. Infant mortality rate is also included in the federal definition of Medically Underserved Areas. Chiropractic care or other forms of alternative medicine Communities benefit when health care professionals... that specialize in chiropractic care or another form of alternative medicine are available to citizens because although such services may not be as critical as the others included in the survey they do contribute to overall health (Smith 2002). Furthermore...

Bearden, Christi; Cruz, Nelda; Heinsohn, Heidi; Kuzaro, Jami; Norton, Keller; Richardson, Willis; Wood, Meghan

2004-01-01

400

C. Sterling Cooley, D.C., F.I.C.C.: politician, innate fundamentalist and Palmer historian.  

PubMed

From the day he graduated from the Palmer-Gregory Chiropractic College in 1908 until his death in 1965, C. Sterling Cooley considered himself a student of D.D. Palmer. Friend to three generations of the Palmers, he nonetheless found his own path through the stormy politics of his era. Appointed to the first Board of Chiropractic Examiners in Oklahoma in 1921, he served for many years as president and secretary and, later, as a member of the state's basic science board. Cooley helped establish the International Chiropractic Congress in 1928 and was elected the third president of the broad-scope National Chiropractic Association (NCA) in 1935. The first serious steps in the NCA's educational reform efforts took place during his term on the society's executive board (1936-41). Concerned that both the NCA and the International Chiropractor's Association were ignoring the principles of chiropractic as set forth by Old Dad Chiro, Cooley devoted his final two decades to studying, speaking and writing about the life and teachings of the founder. His career epitomizes that segment of the profession which held that authority in defining and practicing chiropractic must derive from the principles of the "Old Master." PMID:11624042

Keating, J C; Foderaro, F

1999-06-01

401

William D. Harper, Jr, MS, DC: Anything Can Cause Anything  

PubMed Central

Trained as an engineer and a chiropractor, William D. Harper, Jr. made his career in the healing arts as instructor, writer and president of the Texas Chiropractic College (TCC). A native of Texas who grew up in various locales in the Lone Star State, in Mexico and in the Boston area, he took his bachelor’s and master’s degree in engineering in 1933 and 1934 from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, and his chiropractic degree at TCC in 1942. Dissatisfied with the “foot-on-the-hose” concept of subluxation syndrome (D.D. Palmer’s second theory), Dr. Harper studied and wrote about aberrant neural irritation as an alternative explanation for disease and for the broad clinical value he perceived in the chiropractic art. In this he paralleled much of D.D. Palmer’s third theory of chiropractic. His often reprinted textbook, Anything Can Cause Anything, brought together much of what he had lectured and written about in numerous published articles. He was well prepared for the defense of chiropractic that he offered in 1965 in the trial of the England case in federal district court in Louisiana. The case was lost when the court ruled that the legislature rather than the judiciary should decide whether to permit chiropractors to practice, but Harper’s performance was considered excellent. He went on to guide the TCC as president from 1965 through 1976, its first 11 years after relocating from San Antonio to Pasadena, Texas. Harper built the school – its faculty, staff and facilities – from very meager beginnings to a small but financially viable institution when he departed. Along the way he found fault with both chiropractic political camps that vied for federal recognition as the accrediting agency for chiropractic colleges in the United States. Dr. Bill Harper was a maverick determined to do things his way, and in many respects he was successful. He left a mark on the profession that merits critical analysis. PMID:18327301

Keating, Joseph C.

2008-01-01

402

Where We Stand—CMA Position Papers: • Abortion • Acupuncture • Chiropractic • Confidentiality • Cost of Care • Drug Abuse • Environmental Health • Health Education for the Public • Health in the United States • Health Quackery • Health Maintenance Organizations and Prepaid Health Plans • Health Manpower • National Health Insurance • Physician's Assistants • Physician Unions • Professional Standards Review Organizations • Quality Medical Care  

PubMed Central

To serve the interests of members and to function in the public interest, the California Medical Association must set policies and take positions on current issues affecting the health care of Californians. These policies then guide the activities of the Association in fulfilling its leadership role and its responsibility to the public. Delegates, elected by the membership of CMA's component medical societies, meet annually to deliberate and determine the policies and courses of action for the Association. Between meetings of these Delegates, the CMA Councilors, elected by their district membership, implement the directives of the Delegates and set interim policies. By this democratic process, the membership governs the CMA. Association members must be informed if they are to participate effectively in the affairs of their medical organizations. To disseminate better understanding of CMA's activities, position papers on current issues have been developed. They are based on House of Delegates resolutions and Council actions. Entitled “Where We Stand on Medical and Health Issues,” these papers represent the current policy positions of CMA. Each paper is annotated to give the reference source of the policy actions. As with any organization, CMA policies are subject to timely revision. When policies are amended or new policies are adopted, new papers will be developed. PMID:4148533

1973-01-01

403

Community-acquired methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus: a potential diagnosis for a 16-year-old athlete with knee pain  

PubMed Central

Objective This case report aims to raise awareness in chiropractic physicians of the prevalence of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) in adolescents who participate in sports activities and to alert the chiropractic physician of the necessity to consider potential diagnoses that are not within their typical clinical heuristic. Clinical Features A 16-year-old adolescent girl entered the clinic with a complaint of left knee pain that had an insidious onset during her involvement in sports activities. Later that same day, her knee became enlarged, red, and had pustular formations with a discharge. She was taken to an urgent care facility and subsequently diagnosed with MRSA. Her history included treatment of a left knee musculoskeletal condition 6 weeks prior to which she had responded favorably. Interventions and Outcomes She was treated medically with an aggressive course of antibiotic therapy and excision of the furuncle. The chiropractic physician played a role in patient education and notifying local school authorities of the case. Conclusion Doctors of chiropractic must prepare themselves for the unexpected and remain open to diagnostic possibilities outside of the normal scope of practice. Knee pain or cellulitis of any type may require additional diagnostic and patient care protocols to make the correct diagnosis. With the incidence of community-acquired MRSA increasing at an alarming rate, it is certainly a diagnosis doctors of chiropractic should be aware of when treating patients, especially those involved in sports activities. PMID:21629397

Larkin-Thier, Susan M.; Barber, Virginia A.; Harvey, Phyllis; Livdans-Forret, Anna B.

2010-01-01

404

Commentary on a framework for multicultural education  

PubMed Central

Today’s changing demographics require that multicultural factors be considered in the delivery of quality patient-centred health care in chiropractic. Yet minimal training in cultural competency in chiropractic education leaves graduates ill-equipped to treat a diverse population. This commentary examines cultural competency training in current literature, demonstrates frameworks for curriculum integration, and suggests how cultural competency might be included in a chiropractic college curriculum. A database search yielded little evidence that cultural competency is integrated into curricula of chiropractic schools. Some journal articles note that promoting multicultural education and cultural sensitivity is an important goal. However, they provide no mechanisms as to how this can be achieved within training programs. Thus, although an undeniable need exists for all healthcare practitioners to develop cultural competency in the face of an increasingly diverse population, cultural competency education has not kept pace. Chiropractic schools must review their curricula to develop the cultural competencies of their graduates and a basic framework is suggested. PMID:25202156

Hammerich, Karin F.

2014-01-01

405

Michael A. Giammarino, D.C., D.A.C.B.R.: student, teacher, leader.  

PubMed

Born in Brooklyn in 1909, Michael A. Giammarino was one of the first chiropractic radiologists. After receiving his D.C. from Palmer in 1932, he worked in private practice in Brooklyn for six years. However, chiropractic was not licensed in New York so he moved to Coatesville, Pennsylvania, where he ran a successful private practice until his retirement in 1985. During that time, he became interested in radiology and attended many seminars and lectures on the subject, including one in 1946, taught by Waldo G. Poehner, D.C., the first postgraduate course in chiropractic roentgenology ever given. Poehner surprised him at the next convention of the National Chiropractic Association by nominating him for the position of vice-president of the Council on Roentgenology. Giammarino then became involved in the creation of the certification program in roentgenology, which evolved into today's Diplomate of the American Chiropractic Board of Radiology. Giammarino is a past-president of the Board as well as the Pennsylvania Licensed Chiropractors' Association. In addition to these activities, he taught many courses in radiology and undertook an extensive radiographic study of scoliosis in identical twins. He still lives in Coatesville and is very active in the community. PMID:11623681

Young, K J

1998-12-01

406

James F. McGinnis, D.C., N.D., C.P. (1873-1947): spinographer, educator, marketer and bloodless surgeon.  

PubMed

Perhaps best remembered for his contributions to B.J. Palmer's earliest developments in spinography, James F. McGinnis also pioneered in marketing methods while a straight chiropractic practitioner in Iowa. His advertising brought him to the attention of organized medicine, which sought his prosecution. Relocating to California in the early 1920s, he broadened his scope of practice and earned a naturopathic doctorate. In the 1930s he became one of the best known of several chiropractic bloodless surgeons and traveled around the nation to teach his methods. Although initially a passionate member of the Universal Chiropractors Association and receptive to Palmer's introduction of the neurocalometer, McGinnis eventually changed his political allegiance and became an active member of the National Chiropractic Association. He died in 1947 while on a teaching tour of Claifornia's San Joaquin Valley. PMID:11623684

Keating, J C

1998-12-01

407

An unusual presentation and outcome of complex regional pain syndrome: a case report.  

PubMed

A 44 year-old woman presented to a chiropractic clinic with swelling and point tenderness over the right metacarpals and right shoulder and elbow pain of insidious onset. Examination revealed right wrist and hand swelling, diminished grip strength, and reduced wrist and cervical ranges of motion. A bone scan, radiographs, and clinical examination led to the diagnosis of complex regional pain syndrome (CRPS). Following chiropractic care, the patient had improved grip strength, functional abilities, and pain reduction. The primary characteristics of CRPS include motor, trophic and sensory changes, usually in a peripheral limb following some form of trauma. Due to the varied symptom presentation, it may be unclear which conservative therapies will be most beneficial in the treatment of CRPS. A multidisciplinary approach to treatment should be pursued with these patients. More investigation of therapies such as chiropractic care as it relates to the pathophysiology of CRPS is needed. PMID:17549166

Shearer, Heather M; Trim, Astrid

2006-03-01

408

Evidence-based protocol for structural rehabilitation of the spine and posture: review of clinical biomechanics of posture (CBP®) publications  

PubMed Central

BACKGROUND Although practice protocols exist for SMT and functional rehabilitation, no practice protocols exist for structural rehabilitation. Traditional chiropractic practice guidelines have been limited to acute and chronic pain treatment, with limited inclusion of functional and exclusion of structural rehabilitation procedures. OBJECTIVE (1) To derive an evidence-based practice protocol for structural rehabilitation from publications on Clinical Biomechanics of Posture (CBP®) methods, and (2) to compare the evidence for Diversified, SMT, and CBP®. METHODS Clinical control trials utilizing CBP® methods and spinal manipulative therapy (SMT) were obtained from searches in Mantis, CINAHL, and Index Medicus. Using data from SMT review articles, evidence for Diversified Technique (as taught in chiropractic colleges), SMT, and CBP® were rated and compared. RESULTS From the evidence from Clinical Control Trials on SMT and CBP®, there is very little evidence support for Diversified (our rating = 18), as taught in chiropractic colleges, for the treatment of pain subjects, while CBP® (our rating = 46) and SMT for neck pain (rating = 58) and low back pain (our rating = 202) have evidence-based support. CONCLUSIONS While CBP® Technique has approximately as much evidence-based support as SMT for neck pain, CBP® has more evidence to support its methods than the Diversified technique taught in chiropractic colleges, but not as much as SMT for low back pain. The evolution of chiropractic specialization has occurred, and doctors providing structural-based chiropractic care require protocol guidelines for patient quality assurance and standardization. A structural rehabilitation protocol was developed based on evidence from CBP® publications. PMID:17549209

Oakley, Paul A.; Harrison, Donald D.; Harrison, Deed E.; Haas, Jason W.

2005-01-01

409

Canadian Chiropractors are not alone: external advocacy in Ontario, 1902–2012  

PubMed Central

This article focuses primarily on Ontario, identifying a number of the profession’s allies and their advocacy effectiveness, under two main headings: The Ontario Chiropractic Association; and the Canadian Memorial Chiropractic College during the period of 1902 to 2012. While part of our success in gaining recognition has been attributed to intense lobbying by the profession, here the public support of several labour unions is reviewed. The part played by various politicians, educators, entrepreneurs, legal counsel, academic administrators and historians is also discussed. PMID:23482916

Brown, Douglas M.

2013-01-01

410

Examining Vertebrobasilar Artery Stroke in Two Canadian Provinces  

Microsoft Academic Search

\\u000a Study Design  Ecological study.\\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a Objectives  To determine the annual incidence of hospitalized vertebrobasilar artery (VBA) stroke and chiropractic utilization in Saskatchewan\\u000a and Ontario between 1993 and 2004. To determine whether at an ecological level, the incidence of VBA stroke parallels the\\u000a incidence of chiropractic utilization.\\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a Summary of Background Data  Little is known about the incidence and time trends of VBA stroke diagnoses in

Eleanor Boyle; Pierre Côté; Alexander R. Grier; J. David Cassidy

2008-01-01

411

Analysis of the joint crack by simultaneous recording of sound and tension.  

PubMed

In order to elucidate the significance of the noise often associated with a chiropractic adjustment, the joint crack has been analyzed using a simultaneous sound and tension recording system. It was found that, during the crack, which is a consistent double-peak wave, a drop in tension occurred immediately after the first sound wave, indicating separation of the articular surfaces (adjustment). The significance of the crack as an integral part of a chiropractic adjustment, where separation of the articular surfaces is desired, is then discussed. PMID:3772264

Méal, G M; Scott, R A

1986-09-01

412

Computed Tomography Fluoroscopic-guided Percutaneous Spinal Interventions in the Management of Spinal Pain  

Microsoft Academic Search

Local back pain and radiculopathy can be debilitating for sufferers of these conditions. There are a multitude of treatment modalities, ranging from conservative approaches such as bed rest, physical therapy and chiropractic manipulation, to more invasive options such as percutane- ous spinal intervention (PSI) and surgery. We present here the techniques employed in the use of minimally invasive, image-guided percutaneous

Lawrence HH Quek; Uei Pu; Gim Chuah Chu

2009-01-01

413

Referral patterns and attitudes of Primary Care Physicians towards chiropractors  

Microsoft Academic Search

BACKGROUND: Despite the increasing usage and popularity of chiropractic care, there has been limited research conducted to examine the professional relationships between conventional trained primary care physicians (PCPs) and chiropractors (DCs). The objectives of our study were to contrast the intra-professional referral patterns among PCPs with referral patterns to DCs, and to identify predictors of PCP referral to DCs. METHODS:

Barry R Greene; Monica Smith; Veerasathpurush Allareddy; Mitchell Haas

2006-01-01

414

Impact of massage therapy in the treatment of linked pathologies: Scoliosis, costovertebral dysfunction, and thoracic outlet syndrome  

Microsoft Academic Search

Summary Objectives: To investigate the efficacy of massage therapy in the concurrent treatment of three related, but discrete, disorders: scoliosis, costovertebral dysfunction, and thoracic outlet syndrome. Methods: A 34-year-old female subject reported steadily increasing pain in the right shoulder over the previous 8 months. Chiropractic diagnosis and assessment by the author's clinical supervisor had identified these three conditions. Massage therapy

Michael Hamm

2006-01-01

415

Complementary and alternative medical therapies for chronic low back pain: What treatments are patients willing to try?  

Microsoft Academic Search

BACKGROUND: Although back pain is the most common reason patients use complementary and alternative medical (CAM) therapies, little is known about the willingness of primary care back pain patients to try these therapies. As part of an effort to refine recruitment strategies for clinical trials, we sought to determine if back pain patients are willing to try acupuncture, chiropractic, massage,

Karen J Sherman; Daniel C Cherkin; Maureen T Connelly; Janet Erro; Jacqueline B Savetsky; Roger B Davis; David M Eisenberg

2004-01-01

416

A combined approach for the treatment of cervical vertigo  

Microsoft Academic Search

Background: Cervical vertigo is a diagnosis commonly made at both otorhinolaringologist and chiropractic offices. Hypothesized nonvascular mechanisms are reviewed. Therapeutic approaches have been suggested in the literature, ranging from cervical immobilization to vertebral manipulation.Objective: To characterize the patient population with cervical vertigo and observe therapeutic results of a treatment protocol by using distinct conservative modalities.Methods: Fifteen subjects with cervical vertigo

Eduardo S. B Bracher; Clemente I. R Almeida; Roberta A Almeida; André C Duprat; Cheri B. B Bracher

2000-01-01

417

The efficacy of adjusting the ankle in the treatment of subacute and chronic grade I and grade II ankle inversion sprains  

Microsoft Academic Search

Objective: The purpose of this study was to determine the efficacy of adjusting the ankle in the treatment of subacute and chronic grade I and grade II ankle inversion sprains. Design: A single-blind, comparative, controlled pilot study. Setting: Technikon Natal Chiropractic Day Clinic. Participants: Thirty patients with subacute and chronic grade I and grade II ankle inversion sprains. Patients were

Justin Edward Pellow; James W. Brantingham

2001-01-01

418

ARTS, CRAFTS, FOOD, and INFORMATION BOOTH DESCRIPTIONS  

E-print Network

their annual fair. embilla@gmail.com ALL CARE HEALTH & REHABILITATION: (Chiropractic/health information) offers, Atrium & Lower Lounge William Pitt Union, University of Pittsburgh 9 LUNAS: provides holistic health area including health, education, sports, finance, legal and entertainment as well as information about

Machery, Edouard

419

The UT Dallas Career Center Presents: Abilene Christian University Graduate Admissions  

E-print Network

University of Antigua College of Medicine, School of Nursing Boston University-Mental Health Counseling Science Center School of Nursing Texas Tech University Health Sciences Center - School of Allied Health Chiropractic College Texas Health and Science University Texas Tech University Texas Tech University Health

O'Toole, Alice J.

420

Scientific: Life Science Sem Cr Grade Essential Skills BIOL 100 Biology w/Lab or BIOL 107 Intro Biol I* 4  

E-print Network

(15 hours) OR BIOL 100 Biology with Lab* Physical Therapy, Medicine, Chiropractic, etc. PSYC 166 Biol I* 4 Sem Cr Grade Scientific: Physical Science Sem Cr Grade ENG 190 Writing as Critical Thinking 3 Statistics 3 JINS (Interdisciplinary WE Junior Seminar) 3 Personal Well Being Sem Cr Grade Intercultural

Gering, Jon C.

421

At Life U., an Omnipresent President Pushes the Institution and Its Specialty.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Describes development and expansion of Life University (Georgia) to an institution with 3,500 students offering the doctor of chiropractic degree, a master's degree in sport health science, and bachelor's degrees in 32 related areas. Notes the president's dominant role and critics' objections to high salaries for the president and his family…

Suggs, Welch

1999-01-01

422

Grades as Predictors of College and Career Success: The Case of a Health-Related Institution.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Examined relationship between grades, academic performance, and career success in case of nontraditional, health-related educational institution (Palmer College of Chiropractic). Found direct relationship between entering grade point average and subsequent college performance. Relationship between good grades in professional schools and career…

Tan, David L.

1991-01-01

423

Bodywork Abstracts. 1989 Edition.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This comprehensive bibliography of research and writings on massage therapy for chronic illness, disabilities, and general health, is addressed to students of therapeutic bodywork, massage therapists, osteopathic and chiropractic physicians, as well as schools and research centers for health professionals. The work draws its citations from…

van Why, Richard P., Comp.

424

Community Attitudes about Economic Impacts of Colleges: A Case Study. AIR 1996 Annual Forum Paper.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This study examined attitudes of people about benefits of the economic impacts of two local colleges (Palmer College of Chiropractic and Scott Community College) in the metropolitan Quad Cities area of Rock Island County (Illinois) and Scott County (Iowa). The study compared impacts considered important by the community with those estimated by the…

Stout, Robert J.

425

The Comprehensive Health Assessment.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This report contains information from a fall 1991 health occupations assessment of 1,021 health-related employers in Eastern Iowa and the Illinois Quad Cities area. Twelve chapters present comprehensive results of all surveys; results of 10 labor market survey instruments developed for chiropractic offices, dentists' offices, emergency medical…

Eastern Iowa Community Coll. District, Davenport.

426

Improving College Faculty Instruction in the Basic and Allied Health Sciences.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

A project to improve college instruction in the basic and allied health sciences at New York Chiropractic College and the New York Institute of Technology is described. Attention was directed to: the kinds of resources colleges and professional schools provide to improve instruction; motivation of faculty to explore innovative or strategic…

Washton, Nathan S.

427

Shades of Grey: An Exploration of the Student Learning Experience in Diagnostic Imaging Education  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Diagnostic radiology education is a specialty within healthcare education and encompasses education at both the undergraduate and resident level. There is little research regarding what constitutes effective radiology education. The broad purpose of this study was to investigate through the student perspective how chiropractic students learned…

Linaker, Kathleen Linda

2012-01-01

428

MEMORANDUM OF UNDERSTANDING MICHIGAN STATE UNIVERSITY  

E-print Network

Technical Union ofMSU; Fraternal Order of Police Sergeant's Division, Lodge 141; Fraternal Order of Police-pay structure: Up to 34-day 90-day Generic $ 10 $ 20 Formulary $ 20 $ 40 Non-Formulary $ 40 $ 80 Bio-tech $ 50 $ 100 B. Effective July 1, 2002, office visits for chiropractic services shall be covered under

Liu, Taosheng

429

The Virtual Haptic Back for Palpatory Training Robert L. Williams II, Ph.D.  

E-print Network

, plus related training applications in physical therapy, massage therapy, chiropractic therapy simulation is intended to add a measurable, repeatable component of science to the art of palpatory diagnosis goals are to: 1. Provide a novel tool for palpatory diagnosis training; and 2. Improve the state-of- the-art

Williams II, Robert L.

430

Health and Pre-Professional Health care is currently Canada's  

E-print Network

such as bioterrorism, obesity, emerging infectious diseases, global warming, health care costs and family violence. www, occupational therapy, physical therapy, and chiropractic. Our academic advisors are available to assist you, arts and science, environmental science, engineering, forensic science and medical physics, just

431

WELL REWARDS MEMBER DISCOUNTS  

E-print Network

, chiropractic, nutrition counseling and massage therapy services. Receive 50 percent off the provider's usual of medical errors, allergic reactions and medication interactions. With the family notification, your loved Magazine's #1 Children's Fitness Program, 2005-06) combines state-of-the-art facilities and innova

Burke, Peter

432

Importance of holographic light in the emerging field of mind-body healing  

Microsoft Academic Search

Healing with color has been researched and documented worldwide for centuries. Every single part of the brain and every cell in the body is effected by light. Chinese and Russian scientists demonstrated that the acupuncture meridians transmit light. Dr. Peter Mandel, German chiropractic physician and acupuncturist, states that the acupuncture points are especially sensitive to electromagnetic waves within the spectrum

Roberta Booth

2000-01-01

433

The clinical aspects of the acute facet syndrome: results from a structured discussion among European chiropractors  

Microsoft Academic Search

BACKGROUND: The term 'acute facet syndrome' is widely used and accepted amongst chiropractors, but poorly described in the literature, as most of the present literature relates to chronic facet joint pain. Therefore, research into the degree of consensus on the subject amongst a large group of chiropractic practitioners was seen to be a useful contribution. METHODS: During the annual congress

Lise Hestbaek; Alice Kongsted; Tue Secher Jensen; Charlotte Leboeuf-Yde

2009-01-01

434

Corporate Extras is a premium level of cover. It helps you with the cost of services not always covered by Medicare, including dental, optical,  

E-print Network

Combined Loyalty Maximums for Chiropractic/osteopathy, speech Therapy, Eye Therapy and occupational Therapy.00 subsequent attendance $22.00 Occupational Therapy Initial attendance $32.00 subsequent attendance $22 Year 1 $600 Year 4 $960 Year 2 $720 Year 5 $1080 Year 3 $840 Year 6+ $1200 Speech Therapy Initial

435

Health promotion is the science and art of helping people change their lifestyle to move toward a state of optimal health (O'Donnell, 1986, p.4). Optimal health is defined  

E-print Network

and Promotion Majors Health Education and Promotion What Can I Do With a Degree In... Preventative health Performance, Health Care Administration Professional Schools: Medicine (M.D. or O.D.), Chiropractics, Physical Health Association http://www.acha.org/ American College of Sports Medicine http://www.acsm.org American

Ghajar, Afshin J.

436

Wm. Lloyd Stackhouse & Robert E. Kinsman: A tale of two chiropractors  

PubMed Central

This paper reviews the story of two childhood friends, Dr. Wm. Lloyd Stackhouse and Dr. Robert E. Kinsman, who attended the Canadian Memorial Chiropractic College (CMCC) together, graduated in 1953 to form an enduring partnership that included their immediate relatives, and to this day persists as a supportive tribe. PMID:23997249

Brown, Douglas M.

2013-01-01

437

34 CFR 668.2 - General definitions.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

...licensure is also generally required. Examples of a professional degree include but are not limited to Pharmacy (Pharm.D.), Dentistry (D.D.S. or D.M.D.), Veterinary Medicine (D.V.M.), Chiropractic (D.C. or D.C.M.), Law...

2014-07-01

438

34 CFR 668.2 - General definitions.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...licensure is also generally required. Examples of a professional degree include but are not limited to Pharmacy (Pharm.D.), Dentistry (D.D.S. or D.M.D.), Veterinary Medicine (D.V.M.), Chiropractic (D.C. or D.C.M.), Law...

2011-07-01

439

34 CFR 668.2 - General definitions.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...licensure is also generally required. Examples of a professional degree include but are not limited to Pharmacy (Pharm.D.), Dentistry (D.D.S. or D.M.D.), Veterinary Medicine (D.V.M.), Chiropractic (D.C. or D.C.M.), Law...

2012-07-01

440

34 CFR 668.2 - General definitions.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...licensure is also generally required. Examples of a professional degree include but are not limited to Pharmacy (Pharm.D.), Dentistry (D.D.S. or D.M.D.), Veterinary Medicine (D.V.M.), Chiropractic (D.C. or D.C.M.), Law...

2013-07-01

441

34 CFR 668.2 - General definitions.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...licensure is also generally required. Examples of a professional degree include but are not limited to Pharmacy (Pharm.D.), Dentistry (D.D.S. or D.M.D.), Veterinary Medicine (D.V.M.), Chiropractic (D.C. or D.C.M.), Law...

2010-07-01

442

UT Dallas Career Center Career Expo Days All Majors (non-STEM) March 21, 2013 Be sure to review the Employer Profile to see that you qualify before approaching the employer.  

E-print Network

InTouch Credit Union 64 Spectrum Financial Group 3 ACT Dallas 34 jcpenney 65 Texas Chiropractic 41 McKinney ISD 72 Travelers Insurance 11 Broadsword Advantage 42 Michaels Stores 73 Tribridge Chapman, Hext, & Co 47 Panda Restaurant Group 78 UNT Health Science Center 17 Compass Professional Health

O'Toole, Alice J.

443

Important Phone Numbers and Websites Group Number Phone Address Website  

E-print Network

Specialty Health Networks (ASH Networks) discounts on Acupuncture, Chiropractic, Massage and Nutrition Road, Suite 500 http://health.ucsd.edu/careers/em ployees/benefits/ Insurance, Retirement+HRA Core (fee-for-service) Plus (point-of-service) American Specialty Health Networks (ASH Networks) 800

Gleeson, Joseph G.

444

Employer Registrations as of March 12: Aeropostale  

E-print Network

Connect CAR Financial Services Cbeyond Chapman, Hext, & Co. PC Compass Professional Health Services Copart-Williams Signazon Six Flags Over Texas/Hurricane Harbor Arlington Spectrum Financial Group Texas Chiropractic Travelers Insurance Tribridge Holdings U.S. Department of State, Bureau of Diplomatic Security U.S. Marine

O'Toole, Alice J.

445

SIU Student Health Initiative Working for quality and affordable student heath care at Southern.  

E-print Network

the Marine Corps was health insurance. Not necessarily for me but for my wife. This is one of the issues's health insurance. This school year I switched over to SIU's health insurance and when I tried to get and chiropractic care would not be covered for 12 months. Usually insurance offered by employers has a clause

Nickrent, Daniel L.

446

UAE, Saudi Arabia, Bahrain, Kuwait, Oman, Qatar Carnegie Mellon University  

E-print Network

Presentation 28th October 2014 #12;Cigna Global Health Benefits in the Middle East Part of the global Cigna Arabia Insurance Company (SAICO) Operations in Abu Dhabi (UAE), Bahrain, Riyadh (KSA) and Delaware (USA% Prescribed Physiotherapy, Osteopathy, Chiropractic and other complementary therapies Paid in Full 80%l

447

78 FR 17210 - Agency Information Collection Activities; Proposed Collection; Comment Request  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

...the premiums for this insurance plan vary by any of...for children, Mental health care, and Substance...dental care respectively Chiropractic care remains unchanged Is this a Grandfathered health plan as defined by the...not covered by health insurance. Did your...

2013-03-20

448

Services & Supplies EHP Network Provider  

E-print Network

combined) Individual $100 $100 Family $300 $300 Co-Insurance Out of Pocket Maximum Per PlanYear (all/ Radiation Therapy PhysicianVisit 100% 80% of R&C Physician Materials 80% 80% of R&C Chiropractic Care onset of emergency, then 80% of R&C Home Health Services (pre-authorization required) 100% for first 90

Niebur, Ernst

449

Medical Schedule of Benefits Johns Hopkins Student Health Program  

E-print Network

Medical Schedule of Benefits Johns Hopkins Student Health Program Effective July 1, 2014 Revised:6 (all options combined) Individual $100 $100 Family $300 $300 Co-Insurance Out of Pocket Maximum Per/ Radiation Therapy PhysicianVisit 100% 80% of R&C Physician Materials 80% 80% of R&C Chiropractic Care

Niebur, Ernst

450

MUN PENSIONERS ASSOCIATION NEWSLETTER Vol. 5, No. 4 April 2007 Evan Simpson, Editor  

E-print Network

to the renewal of benefits plans for the 2007-08 policy year. Major changes include insurance for dental claims paramedical services (chiropractic, massage, physiotherapy, etc.). Some ceilings apply. Additional costs will be paid through various means, including increased fees and surpluses in the health and dental plans. Full

deYoung, Brad

451

77 FR 76043 - Agency Information Collection Activities: Proposed Collection; Comment Request  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

...the premiums for this insurance plan vary by any of...for children, Mental health care, and Substance...care respectively. Chiropractic care remains unchanged...this a Grandfathered health plan as defined by the...not covered by health insurance. Did your...

2012-12-26

452

CAM and Cell Fate Targeting: Molecular and Energetic Insights into Cell Growth and Differentiation  

Microsoft Academic Search

Evidence-based medicine is switching from the analysis of single diseases at a time toward an integrated assessment of a diseased person. Complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) offers multiple hol- istic approaches, including osteopathy, homeopathy, chiropractic, acupuncture, herbal and energy medi- cine and meditation, all potentially impacting on major human diseases. It is now becoming evident that acupuncture can modify the

Carlo Ventura

2005-01-01

453

Use of conventional and alternative treatment strategies for a case of low back pain in a F\\/A-18 aviator  

Microsoft Academic Search

BACKGROUND: Low back pain can diminish jet pilot concentration and function during flight and be severe enough to ground pilots or cause decreased flying time. The objective of this case report is to present an example of the integration of chiropractic care with conventional treatments for the management of low back pain in a F\\/A-18 aviator. CASE PRESENTATION: The patient

Bart N Green; John Sims; Rachel Allen

2006-01-01

454

Allegiance-Managed Care_: MUS Summary of Benefits and Coverage: What this Plan Covers & What it Costs Coverage Period: 7/1/2013-6/30/2014  

E-print Network

it Costs Coverage Period: 7/1/2013-6/30/2014 Coverage for: Employee | Plan Type: PPO Questions: Call 1 & What it Costs Coverage Period: 7/1/2013-6/30/2014 Coverage for: Employee | Plan Type: PPO Questions% Specialist visit $15 copayment 35% Other practitioner visit acupuncture/naturopathic chiropractic Up to $25

Lawrence, Rick L.

455

Joshua N Haldeman, DC: the Canadian Years, 1926-1950  

PubMed Central

Born in 1902 to the earliest chiropractor known to practice in Canada, Joshua Norman Haldeman would develop national and international stature as a political economist, provincial and national professional leader, and sportsman/adventurer. A 1926 graduate of the Palmer School of Chiropractic, he would maintain a lifelong friendship with B.J. Palmer, and served in the late 1940s as Canada’s representative to the Board of Control of the International Chiropractors’ Association. Yet, he would also maintain strong alliances with broad-scope leaders in Canada and the United States, including the administrators of the National and Lincoln chiropractic schools. Haldeman, who would practice chiropractic in Regina for at least 15 years, was instrumental in obtaining, and is credited with composing the wording of, Saskatchewan’s 1943 Chiropractic Act. He served on the province’s first board of examiners and the provincial society’s first executive board. The following year Dr. Haldeman represented Saskatchewan in the deliberations organized by Walter Sturdy, D.C. that gave rise to the Dominion Council of Canadian Chiropractors, forerunner of today’s Canadian Chiropractic Association. As a member of the Dominion Council he fought for inclusion of chiropractors as commissioned officers during World War II, and participated in the formation of the Canadian Memorial Chiropractic College, which he subsequently served as a member of the first board of directors. Dr. Haldeman also earned a place in the political history of Canada, owing to his service as research director for Technocracy, Inc. of Canada, his national chairmanship of the Social Credit Party during the second world war, and his unsuccessful bid for the national parliament. His vocal opposition to Communism during the war briefly landed him in jail. His 1950 relocation of his family and practice to Pretoria, South Africa would open a new page in his career: once again as professional pioneer, but also as aviator and explorer. Although he died in 1974, the values he instilled in his son, Scott Haldeman, D.C., Ph.D., M.D. continue to influence the profession. ImagesFigure 1Figure 2Figure 2Figure 3Figure 4Figure 5Figure 6Figure 7Figure 8Figure 9Figure 10

Keating, Joseph C; Haldeman, Scott

1995-01-01

456

THE ROLE OF THE CHIROPRACTOR  

PubMed Central

Chiropractors in Australia face some challenges that are unique in their history. The value of their primary treatment modality is now widely recognised. The process of professionalisation of this occupation is well advanced. Yet the integration of chiropractic services within the mainstream Australian health care system remains problematic. It is contended in this paper that chiropractors' integration will be facilitated by two genuine and strategic moves by the medically minded segment of, or the entire, profession. One is to abandon metaphysical notions as part of the 'philosophy of chiropractic' and the other is to pursue limited prescription rights allowing chiropractors to play fully the role of the primary contact practitioners of neuromusculoskeletal medicine. This development is deemed to be beneficial and appropriate for the profession as well as the patients served by this profession. PMID:17987192

Azari, Michael

1999-01-01

457

Fluoridation referendum in La Crosse, Wisconsin: contributing factors to success.  

PubMed Central

Residents of La Crosse, Wisconsin approved a public referendum in favor of water fluoridation on April 5, 1988. The vote, 57 percent supportive, culminated a two-year community effort. Three public referenda had been defeated in the past. Contributing to the success of this recent campaign were: broad-based community support led by a 34-member Citizens for Better Dental Health in La Crosse Committee; American Dental Association/Wisconsin Division of Health/US Public Health Service consultation and support; knowledgeable and supportive press coverage; the timing of the ballot to coincide with the Wisconsin Presidential Primary; and local chiropractic support to offset chiropractic anti-fluoridation leadership. La Crosse, population 50,000, was the largest fluoride-deficient community in a nine-state upper Midwest area. PMID:2782512

Jones, R B; Mormann, D N; Durtsche, T B

1989-01-01

458

Beyond the spine: a new clinical research priority.  

PubMed

Over the past two decades, clinical research within the chiropractic profession has focused on the spine and spinal conditions, specifically neck and low back pain. However, there is now a small group of chiropractors with clinical research training that are shifting their focus away from traditional research pursuits towards new and innovative areas. Specifically, these researchers are now delving into areas such as brain injury, work disability prevention, undifferentiated chest pain, hip osteoarthritis, and prevention of pain in children and adolescents to name a few. In this paper, we highlight recent research in these new areas and discuss how clinical research efforts in musculoskeletal areas beyond the spine can benefit patient care and the future of the chiropractic profession. PMID:25729080

Donovan, James; Cassidy, J David; Cancelliere, Carol; Poulsen, Erik; Stochkendahl, Mette Jensen; Kilsgaard, Jørgen; Blanchette, Marc-André; Hartvigsen, Jan

2015-03-01

459

Real-time force feedback during flexion-distraction procedure for low back pain: A pilot study  

PubMed Central

A form of chiropractic procedure known as Cox flexion-distraction is used by chiropractors to treat low back pain. Patient lies face down on a specially designed table having a stationery thoracic support and a moveable caudal support for the legs. The Doctor of Chiropractic (DC) holds a manual contact applying forces over the posterior lumbar spine and press down on the moving leg support to create traction effects in the lumbar spine. This paper reports on the development of real-time feedback on the applied forces during the application of the flexion-distraction procedure. In this pilot study we measured the forces applied by experienced DCs as well as novice DCs in using this procedure. After a brief training with real-time feedback novice DCs have improved on the magnitude of the applied forces. This real-time feedback technology is promising to do systematic studies in training DCs during the application of this procedure. PMID:24932023

Gudavalli, Maruti Ram; Cox, James M.

2014-01-01

460

Successful management of acute-onset torticollis in a giraffe (Giraffa camelopardalis reticulata).  

PubMed

A 2-yr-old male reticulated giraffe (Giraffa camelopardalis reticulata) presented with severe midcervical segmental torticollis upon arrival as an incoming shipment. Despite initial medical management, the giraffe developed marked neck sensitivity, focal muscle spasms, and decreased cervical range of motion. Using operant conditioning to assist patient positioning and tolerance to cervical manipulation, a series of manually applied chiropractic treatments were applied to the affected cervical vertebrae in an effort to restore normal cervical mobility. Laser therapy and cervical range of motion exercises were also used to reduce cervical muscle hypertonicity. The combined application of these nontraditional therapies produced marked clinical improvement. This case highlights the potential benefits of combining traditional medical management with chiropractic treatment and physical therapy techniques for management of severe acute-onset torticollis in a giraffe. PMID:23505724

Dadone, Liza I; Haussler, Kevin K; Brown, Greg; Marsden, Melanie; Gaynor, James; Johnston, Matthew S; Garelle, Della

2013-03-01

461

The origin, and application of somatosensory evoked potentials as a neurophysiological technique to investigate neuroplasticity  

PubMed Central

Somatosensory evoked potentionals (SEPs) can be used to elucidate differences in cortical activity associated with a spinal manipulation (SM) intervention. The purpose of this narrative review is to overview the origin and application of SEPs, a neurophysiological technique to investigate neuroplasticity. Summaries of: 1) parameters for SEP generation and waveform recording; 2) SEP peak nomenclature, interpretation and generators; 3) peaks pertaining to tactile information processing (relevant to both chiropractic and other manual therapies); 4) utilization and application of SEPs; 5) SEPs concurrent with an experimental task and at baseline/control/pretest; 6) SEPs pain studies; and 7) SEPs design (pre/post) and neural reorganization/neuroplasticity; and 8) SEPs and future chiropractic research are all reviewed. Understanding what SEPs are, and their application allows chiropractors, educators, and other manual therapists interested in SM to understand the context, and importance of research findings from SM studies that involve SEPs. PMID:24932021

Passmore, Steven R.; Murphy, Bernadette; Lee, Timothy D.

2014-01-01

462

Beyond the Spine: A New Clinical Research Priority  

PubMed Central

Over the past two decades, clinical research within the chiropractic profession has focused on the spine and spinal conditions, specifically neck and low back pain. However, there is now a small group of chiropractors with clinical research training that are shifting their focus away from traditional research pursuits towards new and innovative areas. Specifically, these researchers are now delving into areas such as brain injury, work disability prevention, undifferentiated chest pain, hip osteoarthritis, and prevention of pain in children and adolescents to name a few. In this paper, we highlight recent research in these new areas and discuss how clinical research efforts in musculoskeletal areas beyond the spine can benefit patient care and the future of the chiropractic profession. PMID:25729080

Donovan, James; Cassidy, J. David; Cancelliere, Carol; Poulsen, Erik; Stochkendahl, Mette Jensen; Kilsgaard, Jørgen; Blanchette, Marc-André; Hartvigsen, Jan

2015-01-01

463

Real-time force feedback during flexion-distraction procedure for low back pain: A pilot study.  

PubMed

A form of chiropractic procedure known as Cox flexion-distraction is used by chiropractors to treat low back pain. Patient lies face down on a specially designed table having a stationery thoracic support and a moveable caudal support for the legs. The Doctor of Chiropractic (DC) holds a manual contact applying forces over the posterior lumbar spine and press down on the moving leg support to create traction effects in the lumbar spine. This paper reports on the development of real-time feedback on the applied forces during the application of the flexion-distraction procedure. In this pilot study we measured the forces applied by experienced DCs as well as novice DCs in using this procedure. After a brief training with real-time feedback novice DCs have improved on the magnitude of the applied forces. This real-time feedback technology is promising to do systematic studies in training DCs during the application of this procedure. PMID:24932023

Gudavalli, Maruti Ram; Cox, James M

2014-06-01

464

Chiropractors as Primary Spine Care Providers: precedents and essential measures  

PubMed Central

Chiropractors have the potential to address a substantial portion of spinal disorders; however the utilization rate of chiropractic services has remained low and largely unchanged for decades. Other health care professions such as podiatry/chiropody, physiotherapy and naturopathy have successfully gained public and professional trust, increases in scope of practice and distinct niche positions within mainstream health care. Due to the overwhelming burden of spine care upon the health care system, the establishment of a ‘primary spine care provider’ may be a worthwhile niche position to create for society’s needs. Chiropractors could fulfill this role, but not without first reviewing and improving its approach to the management of spinal disorders. Such changes have already been achieved by the chiropractic profession in Switzerland, Denmark, and New Mexico, whose examples may serve as important templates for renewal here in Canada. PMID:24302774

Erwin, W. Mark; Korpela, A. Pauliina; Jones, Robert C.

2013-01-01

465

Ian Douglass Coulter, PhD  

PubMed Central

This paper focuses on Dr. Ian Coulter’s accomplishments from the time he became Executive Vice-President of CMCC in 1981, until he ended his presidency with a year’s administrative leave in 1990. Annual planning initiatives, pedagogy, scholarship, conflicts, and the quest for university affiliation are discussed as well as his legacy to the College and the chiropractic profession. The term “adventurous” was first attributed to Coulter by Oswald Hall, PhD, Professor Emeritus, University of Toronto who had worked closely with Coulter in a major investigation of the chiropractic profession from 1976 to 1979. Throughout this article the author tries to capture the spirit of daring, innovation and intellect that permeated Coulter’s presidency, enthralling his advocates and confounding his detractors. PMID:17549218

Brown, Douglas M

2004-01-01

466

Intra-professional and inter-professional referral patterns of chiropractors  

Microsoft Academic Search

BACKGROUND: With the increasing popularity of chiropractic care in the United States, inter-professional relationships between conventional trained physicians (MDs and DOs) and chiropractors (DCs) will have an expanding impact on patient care. The objectives of this study are to describe the intra-professional referral patterns amongst DCs, describe the inter-professional referral patterns between DCs and conventional trained medical primary care physicians

Monica Smith; Barry R Greene; Mitchell Haas; Veerasathpurush Allareddy

2006-01-01

467

A randomized clinical trial and subgroup analysis to compare flexion–distraction with active exercise for chronic low back pain  

Microsoft Academic Search

Many clinical trials on chiropractic management of low back pain have neglected to include specific forms of care. This study compared two well-defined treatment protocols. The objective was to compare the outcome of flexion–distraction (FD) procedures performed by chiropractors with an active trunk exercise protocol (ATEP) performed by physical therapists. A randomized clinical trial study design was used. Subjects, 18 years

Maruti Ram Gudavalli; Jerrilyn A. Cambron; Marion McGregor; James Jedlicka; Michael Keenum; Alexander J. Ghanayem; Avinash G. Patwardhan

2006-01-01

468

Alternative medicine: Implications for the surgeon  

Microsoft Academic Search

Practitioners of traditional medicine should be aware of what patients do to improve their health and sense of health. Consider, for example, a 55-year-old woman who delayed seeking traditional medical evaluation while undergoing 3 months of chiropractic manipulation for chronic neck pain. When she eventually sought the advice of her family physician, a 3.2 cm mass was discovered in her

Richard M. Bell

1999-01-01

469

Association between Use of Complementary\\/Alternative Medicine and Health-Related Behaviors among Health Fair Participants  

Microsoft Academic Search

Background. The relationship between complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) and standard preventive care is not well defined.Methods. We surveyed 1,593 health fair participants on their use of CAM and determined odds ratios for standard preventive care and healthy behaviors among users of provider-based CAM (e.g., chiropractic) and users of herbs or supplements.Results. Users of provider-based CAM were no less likely

Andrew R. Robinson; Lori A. Crane; Arthur J. Davidson; John F. Steiner

2002-01-01

470

Factors influencing student performance on the carpal bone test as a preliminary evaluation of anatomical knowledge retention.  

PubMed

It has been demonstrated that a positive correlation exists between clinical knowledge and retained concepts in basic sciences. Studies have demonstrated a modest attrition of anatomy knowledge over time, which may be influenced by students' perceived importance of the basic sciences and the learning styles adopted. The aims of this study were to: (1) conduct a cross-sectional evaluation of the retention of anatomical knowledge in preclinical (second-year) and clinical (fifth-year) chiropractic students at Murdoch University; and (2) examine students' perceptions of factors that may influence their anatomy knowledge retention. Second- and fifth-year chiropractic students at Murdoch University were invited to participate in the study. Ninety-one students voluntarily participated. The Carpal Bone Test, previously utilized to determine the retention of anatomical knowledge, was utilized to determine the extent to which participants retained gross anatomy knowledge. Participants also completed a questionnaire specifically designed to identify the factors that may have influenced their retention of gross anatomy knowledge. A two-sided Pearson chi-square test of association was used to ascertain statistically significant differences in carpal bone retention and students' responses between the two cohorts. Seventy percent of the fifth-year (clinical) chiropractic students correctly identified all eight carpal bones compared to only six percent of second-year chiropractic students. The majority of participants in both cohorts believed that gross anatomy knowledge is of clinical importance. The use of mnemonics and the clinical application of anatomy knowledge were identified as factors that significantly influenced participants' gross anatomy knowledge retention within this study. Anat Sci Educ 8: 133-139. © 2014 American Association of Anatomists. PMID:24838440

Meyer, Amanda J; Armson, Anthony; Losco, C Dominique; Losco, Barrett; Walker, Bruce F

2015-03-01

471

News and Views: Where at a supermassive black hole do gamma-rays come from? Keep libel laws out of science  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Radio observations of galaxy M87 at the time of a massive gamma-ray flare have established that the gamma-ray emission arises close to the central black hole, in the inner jet. Writer Simon Singh is being sued for libel by the British Chiropractic Association because he wrote a newspaper article about the evidence for the effectiveness of spinal manipulation as a treatment for childhood illnesses. Why should scientists care about this action, asks Sue Bowler?

2009-08-01

472

Post-surgical sacroiliac syndrome: a case study  

PubMed Central

Sacroiliac syndrome is characterized by buttock and lower limb pain that is associated with decreased mobility and tenderness of the sacroiliac joints. It can occur concomitantly with disorders of the lumbar spine and may go unrecognized until these other conditions are successfully treated. It may sometimes be associated with post-surgical immobilization of the spine and pelvis. A case is presented illustrating successful treatment by chiropractic manipulation. ImagesFigure 2Figure 3

Diakow, Peter R.P.; Cassidy, J. David; DeKorompay, Victor L.

1983-01-01

473

Outcomes After a Prone Lumbar Traction Protocol for Patients With Activity-Limiting Low Back Pain: A Prospective Case Series Study  

Microsoft Academic Search

Beattie PF, Nelson RM, Michener LA, Cammarata J, Donley J. Outcomes after a prone lumbar traction protocol for patients with activity-limiting low back pain: a prospective, case series study. Arch Phys Med Rehabil 2008; 89:269-74. Objective: To determine outcomes after administration of a prone lumbar traction protocol. Design: Prospective, longitudinal, case series. Setting: Suburban, chiropractic practice. Participants: A total of

Paul F. Beattie; Roger M. Nelson; Lori A. Michener; Joseph Cammarata; Jonathan Donley

474

Pain Research in Complementary and Alternative Medicine in Australia: A Critical Review  

PubMed Central

Abstract Background Sixty percent (60%) to 80% of patients who visit chiropractic, osteopathic, or Chinese medicine practitioners are seeking pain relief. Objectives This article aimed to identify the amount, quality, and type of complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) pain research in Australia by systematically and critically reviewing the literature. Methods PubMed, Scopus, Australasian Medical Index, and Cochrane library were searched from their inception to July 2009. Australian and New Zealand Clinical Trial Registration and National Health and Medical Research Council databases were searched for human studies yet to be completed. Predefined search terms and selection criteria were used for data identification. Results Of 204 studies selected, 54% were on chiropractic, 27% on Chinese medicine, 15% about multitherapy, and 4% on osteopathy. Chronic spinal pain was the most studied condition, with visceral pain being the least studied. Half of the articles in Chinese medicine or multitherapy were systematic reviews or randomized control trials. In comparison, only 5% of chiropractic and none of osteopathy studies were in these categories. Government funding was rare, and most studies were self-funded or internally funded. All chiropractic, osteopathic, and Chinese herbal medicine studies were conducted by the researchers of the professions. In contrast, half of the acupuncture studies and all t'ai chi studies were conducted by medical doctors or physiotherapists. Multidisciplinary collaboration was uncommon. Conclusions The quantity and the quality of CAM pain research in Australia are inconsistent with the high utilization of the relevant CAM therapies by Australians. A substantial increase in government funding is required. Collaborative research examining the multimodality or multidisciplinary approach is needed. PMID:22891634

Xue, Charlie C.L.

2013-01-01

475

Billing and coding for osteopathic manipulative treatment.  

PubMed

Some osteopathic physicians are not properly reimbursed by insurance companies after providing osteopathic manipulative treatment (OMT) to their patients. Common problems associated with lack of reimbursements include insurers bundling OMT with the standard evaluation and management service and confusing OMT with chiropractic manipulative treatment or physical therapy services. The authors suggest methods of appeal for denied reimbursement claims that will also prevent future payment denials. PMID:19706830

Snider, Karen T; Jorgensen, Douglas J

2009-08-01

476

Use of non-orthodox and conventional health care in Great Britain  

Microsoft Academic Search

OBJECTIVE--To describe the characteristics of patients using non-orthodox health care and their pattern of use of conventional health care with respect to a particular problem. DESIGN--Postal survey of all 2152 practitioners of acupuncture, chiropractic, homeopathy, naturopathy, and osteopathy identified from 11 national professional association registers. Patients attending a representative sample of 101 responding practitioners completed questionnaires covering demographic characteristics, presenting

K J Thomas; J Carr; L Westlake; B T Williams

1991-01-01

477

Legal and Risk Management Issues in Complementary and Alternative Medicne  

Microsoft Academic Search

The integration of complementary and alternative medical (CAM) therapies such as acupuncture and Traditional Chinese Medicine,\\u000a chiropractic, herbal medicine, massage therapy, and “mind—body” therapies into conventional health care raises important legal\\u000a and risk management issues for physicians. These include day-to-day questions about how to respond to patient requests for\\u000a CAM therapies, especially when clinicians disagree with patients on the safety

Michael H. Cohen

478

Prevalence of adverse effects among students taking technique classes: A retrospective study  

PubMed Central

Objective The main objective of this study was to determine characteristics of injuries experienced by students while learning chiropractic procedures in the classroom. Methods Injury was defined as any physical adverse effect such as pain, stiffness, headache, and muscle spasm. Survey questions included age, sex, role, anatomical areas of injury, adjustive technique utilized, types of injury, treatment (if any), and recovery time. The survey was administered among the students in the 5th, 6th, and 8th trimesters of our doctor of chiropractic program. Only students who had completed one or more chiropractic procedures courses at the institution were asked to participate in the study. Results Female recipients had a higher prevalence of adverse effects as the recipient of the adjustment than did male recipients. The most common site for injury overall was the lower back. The relationship between recipient role and sacroiliac joint injury and the relationship between adjustor role and wrist/hand injury were statistically significant. Students were more likely to be injured in the beginning of their technique education. Conclusion This study suggests that students in technique courses learning adjustive procedures experience minor adverse physical effects related to the physical skills being learned. Strategies for prevention need to be considered. PMID:24955948

Kizhakkeveettil, Anupama; Sikorski, David; Tobias, Gene; Korgan, Christos

2014-01-01

479

Could chiropractors screen for adverse drug events in the community? Survey of US chiropractors  

PubMed Central

Background The "Put Prevention into Practice" campaign of the US Public Health Service (USPHS) was launched with the dissemination of the Clinician's Handbook of Preventive Services that recommended standards of clinical care for various prevention activities, including preventive clinical strategies to reduce the risk of adverse drug events. We explored whether nonprescribing clinicians such as chiropractors may contribute to advancing drug safety initiatives by identifying potential adverse drug events in their chiropractic patients, and by bringing suspected adverse drug events to the attention of the prescribing clinicians. Methods Mail survey of US chiropractors about their detection of potential adverse drug events in their chiropractic patients. Results Over half of responding chiropractors (62%) reported having identified a suspected adverse drug event occurring in one of their chiropractic patients. The severity of suspected drug-related events detected ranged from mild to severe. Conclusions Chiropractors or other nonprescribing clinicians may be in a position to detect potential adverse drug events in the community. These detection and reporting mechanisms should be standardized and policies related to clinical case management of suspected adverse drug events occurring in their patients should be developed. PMID:21083911

2010-01-01

480

Introduction, development, and evaluation of the miniclinical evaluation exercise in postgraduate education of chiropractors  

PubMed Central

Objective To determine if the clinical evaluation exercise (CEX) format is reliable, applicable and useful for evaluating clinical competency in the postgraduate chiropractic program as formative feedback. Methods Twelve mini-CEX clinical encounters were evaluated by 2 assessors per clinical encounter (7 assessors per session) in 23 chiropractic residents over a 12-month period. Two different rating scales (9 point and 5 point) were used, and the 2 assessors completed the forms independently. Individual competencies assessed consisted of history taking, physical examination, organization/efficiency, clinical judgment, professionalism/communication, counseling, and overall clinical performance. Interassessor reliability was calculated using ? and intraclass correlation coefficient statistics. Cronbach ? assessed internal consistency of the mini-CEX. Spearman correlation coefficient evaluated correlation between the various competencies. The Mann-Whitney U test evaluated differences between the assessors' median numerical scores. Results The ? value for the 9-point rating scale was 0.31 (fair) and for the 5-point scale was 0.42 (moderate) with statistically significant intraclass correlation values (p < .05) for 4 of the 6 competencies. High correlation coefficients (p = .0001) were found when comparing the various competencies at each clinical encounter. There were no significant differences between the 2 assessors per clinical encounter for the scores awarded to the residents. Conclusions The mini-CEX is a reliable and useful tool to provide valuable formative feedback to postgraduate chiropractic residents. The 5-point grading scale was more user-friendly with better reliability. PMID:25408995

Paravicini, Inga; Peterson, Cynthia K.

2015-01-01

481

Spinal manipulation under anesthesia: a narrative review of the literature and commentary  

PubMed Central

As exhibited throughout the medical literature over many decades, there is a lack of uniformity in the manner in which spine pain patients have historically qualified for and received manipulation under anesthesia (MUA). Also, for different professions that treat the same types of spinal conditions via the same means, fundamental MUA decision points vary within the published protocols of different professional associations. The more recent chiropractic literature communicates that the evidence to support the efficacy of MUA of the spine remains largely anecdotal. In addition, it has been reported that the types of spinal conditions most suitable for MUA are without clear-cut consensus, with various indications for MUA of the low back resting wholly upon the opinions and experiences of MUA practitioners. This article will provide a narrative review of the MUA literature, followed by a commentary about the current lack of high quality research evidence, the anecdotal and consensus basis of existing clinical protocols, as well as related professional, ethical and legal concerns for the chiropractic practitioner. The limitations of the current medical literature related to MUA via conscious/deep sedation need to be recognized and used as a guide to clinical experience when giving consideration to this procedure. More research, in the form of controlled clinical trials, must be undertaken if this procedure is to remain a potential treatment option for chronic spine pain patients in the chiropractic clinical practice. PMID:23672974

2013-01-01

482

Complementary and alternative medical therapies for chronic low back pain: What treatments are patients willing to try?  

PubMed Central

Background Although back pain is the most common reason patients use complementary and alternative medical (CAM) therapies, little is known about the willingness of primary care back pain patients to try these therapies. As part of an effort to refine recruitment strategies for clinical trials, we sought to determine if back pain patients are willing to try acupuncture, chiropractic, massage, meditation, and t'ai chi and to learn about their knowledge of, experience with, and perceptions about each of these therapies. Methods We identified English-speaking patients with diagnoses consistent with chronic low back pain using automated visit data from one health care organization in Boston and another in Seattle. We were able to confirm the eligibility status (i.e., current low back pain that had lasted at least 3 months) of 70% of the patients with such diagnoses and all eligible respondents were interviewed. Results Except for chiropractic, knowledge about these therapies was low. Chiropractic and massage had been used by the largest fractions of respondents (54% and 38%, respectively), mostly for back pain (45% and 24%, respectively). Among prior users of specific CAM therapies for back pain, massage was rated most helpful. Users of chiropractic reported treatment-related "significant discomfort, pain or harm" more often (23%) than users of other therapies (5–16%). Respondents expected massage would be most helpful (median of 7 on a 0 to 10 scale) and meditation least helpful (median of 3) in relieving their current pain. Most respondents indicated they would be "very likely" to try acupuncture, massage, or chiropractic for their back pain if they did not have to pay out of pocket and their physician thought it was a reasonable treatment option. Conclusions Most patients with chronic back pain in our sample were interested in trying therapeutic options that lie outside the conventional medical spectrum. This highlights the need for additional studies evaluating their effectiveness and suggests that researchers conducting clinical trials of these therapies may not have difficulties recruiting patients. PMID:15260884

Sherman, Karen J; Cherkin, Daniel C; Connelly, Maureen T; Erro, Janet; Savetsky, Jacqueline B; Davis, Roger B; Eisenberg, David M

2004-01-01

483

Femoral neck stress fracture in a female athlete: a case report  

PubMed Central

Objective The purpose of this case report is to describe chiropractic rehabilitation of a master's-level athlete with proximal femoral stress fracture and provide a brief discussion of stress fracture pathology. Clinical Features A 41-year-old female master's-level endurance athlete presented with chronic groin pain later diagnosed and confirmed by magnetic resonance imaging as a stress fracture of the femoral neck. After diagnosis, the patient was referred to a doctor of chiropractic at week 1 of the non–weight-bearing physical rehabilitation process. At that time, the patient presented with sharp and constant groin pain rated 6/10 on a numeric rating scale. Intervention and Outcome This patient avoided weight-bearing activity for 8 weeks while cross-training and was able to return to her sport after this period. The patient was progressed through a series of non–weight-bearing strengthening exercises for the lower extremity. Myofascial release therapy was performed on the gluteal, hip flexor, and groin muscle groups to improve range of motion. Motion palpation testing the lumbar and sacroiliac joints was performed during each session, and manipulative therapy was performed when necessary. The patient was seen once a week for 8 weeks. Reevaluation was performed at week 8; at that time, the patient reported no groin pain (0/10). The patient was discharged from care and referred back to the supervising physician for clearance to return to sporting activities. One month after discharge, she reported that she was pain free and had fully returned to sport activities. Conclusion This case report demonstrates the importance of a through clinical history, physical examination, and magnetic resonance imaging in the accurate diagnosis of a patient with chronic groin pain and that chiropractic care can contribute to rehabilitation programs for these injuries. PMID:23843760

Avrahami, Daniel; Pajaczkowski, Jason A.

2012-01-01

484

Outcomes from the UWS Evidence-Based Practice R25 Grant: Knowledge, Attitudes, Skills, and Behaviors  

PubMed Central

Objective The purpose of this paper is to describe an evidence-based practice (EBP) curriculum incorporated throughout a chiropractic doctoral program and the study used to evaluate the effects of the curriculum on EBP knowledge, attitudes, and self-assessed skills and behaviors in chiropractic students. Methods In a prospective cohort design, students from the last entering class under an old curriculum were compared to students in the first 2 entering classes under a new EBP curriculum at the University of Western States. The assessment instruments for evaluating study outcomes were developed for this study and included knowledge exam, behavior and skills self-appraisal, and practice attitudes. ANOVA was performed using a 3-cohort × 2-quarter repeated cross-sectional factorial design to assess the effect of successive entering classes and stage of the students’ education. Results There was a statistically significant cohort effect with each succeeding cohort for the knowledge exam (P < .001). A similar pattern in cohort and quarter effects was found with behavior self-appraisal for greater time accessing databases such as PubMed. Student self-appraisal of their skills was higher in the 11th quarter compared to the 9th quarter. All cohorts rejected a set of sentinel misconceptions about application of scientific literature (practice attitudes). Conclusions An evidence-based practice curriculum can be successfully implemented in a chiropractic-training program. The implementation of the EBP curriculum at this institution resulted in acquisition of knowledge necessary to access and interpret scientific literature, the retention and improvement of skills over time, and the enhancement of self-reported behaviors favoring utilization of quality online resources. PMID:23206965

Haas, Mitchell; Leo, Michael; Peterson, David; LeFebvre, Ron; Vavrek, Darcy

2012-01-01

485

Recruitment and Enrollment for the Simultaneous Conduct of 2 Randomized Controlled Trials for Patients with Subacute and Chronic Low Back Pain at a CAM Research Center  

PubMed Central

Abstract Objective To describe recruitment and enrollment experiences of 2 low back pain (LBP) randomized controlled trials (RCTs). Design Descriptive report. Setting Chiropractic research center in the midwest United States that is not a fee-for-service clinic. Participants Both trials enrolled participants with subacute or chronic LBP without neurologic signs who had not received spinal manipulative care during the previous month. For study 1 we screened 1940 potential participants to enroll 192 participants (89 women and 103 men), mean age 40.0 ± 9.4 years (range, 21–54 years). For study 2 we screened 1849 potential participants to enroll 240 participants (105 women and 135 men) at least 55 years old (mean, 63.1 ± 6.7 years). Interventions Study 1 randomly assigned participants to 2 weeks of 2 different chiropractic techniques or a wait list control group. Study 2 randomly assigned participants to 6 weeks of 2 different chiropractic techniques or medical care consisting of 3 provider visits for medications. Outcome measures Recruitment source costs and yield, and baseline characteristics of enrolled versus nonparticipants were recorded. Results We conducted 3789 telephone screens for both trials to enroll 432 (11%) participants, at a cost in excess of $156,000 for recruitment efforts. The cost per call for all callers averaged $41, ranging from $4 to $300 based on recruitment method; for enrolled participants, the cost per call was $361, ranging from $33 to $750. Direct mail efforts accounted for 62% of all callers, 57% for enrolled participants, and had the second lowest cost per call for recruitment efforts. Conclusions It is important that complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) research can be successfully conducted at CAM institutions. However, the costs associated with recruitment efforts for studies conducted at CAM institutions may be higher than expected and many self-identified participants are users of the CAM therapy. Therefore, strategies for efficient recruitment methods and targeting nonusers of CAM therapies should be developed early for CAM trials. PMID:18990046

Long, Cynthia R.; Haan, Andrea G.; Spencer, Lori Byrd; Meeker, William C.

2008-01-01

486

Occult osteoid osteoma presenting as shoulder pain: a case report  

PubMed Central

Objective The purpose of this case study is to describe the clinical course and treatment of a patient with recalcitrant shoulder pain and osteoid osteoma. Clinical Features A 28-year-old man had a 2-year history of progressively worsening shoulder and midscapular pain. Intervention and Outcome Before chiropractic consultation, he had been evaluated and treated by his family physician, an orthopedic surgeon, a neurologist, and a pain management specialist. The patient underwent arthroscopy with examination under anesthesia and debridement of a posterior labral tear and cervical spine epidural injections, but neither procedure relieved his symptoms. After seeking chiropractic care, presenting symptoms were reproducible during direct clinical examination; and an initial working diagnosis of secondary right glenohumeral impingement syndrome with coexisting scapulothoracic dyskinesis was made. After 2 weeks of chiropractic rehabilitation, therapy was stopped because of no change in symptoms. The patient was referred for orthopedic consultation. Another series of plain films were ordered, and follow-up magnetic resonance imaging revealed an osseous mass at the medial aspect of the proximal metadiaphyseal region of the right humerus, with a diagnosis of osteoid osteoma. The patient underwent radiofrequency thermoablation of the tumor nidus, which was unsuccessful and resulted in open surgical resection. Resolution of symptoms with minimal pain was reported 3 weeks after the surgery. Four years later, the patient's shoulder remains asymptomatic. Conclusion This case demonstrates that osteoid osteoma may present with clinical features that mimic common functional musculoskeletal conditions of the shoulder. Information from the patient history and diagnostic imaging are important for diagnosis and appropriate management. PMID:23450098

Zoboski, Robert J.

2012-01-01

487

Complementary health care services: a survey of general practitioners' views.  

PubMed Central

OBJECTIVE: To determine the referral practices, perceived usefulness, knowledge, prior training and desire for training of general practitioners (GPs) in Quebec with regard to complementary health care services such as acupuncture, chiropractic and hypnosis. DESIGN: Cross-sectional mail survey. SETTING: Province of Quebec. PARTICIPANTS: Random sample of 200 GPs. Of the 146 who responded, 25 were excluded because they were no longer in practice; this left 121 (83%). OUTCOME MEASURES: Self-reported referral practices for complementary health care services, perceived usefulness and self-assessed knowledge of such services, and prior training and desire for training in these services. RESULTS: Sixty percent (72/121) of the GPs knew at least one practitioner of a complementary health care service for referral; 59% (70/119) reported referring patients to physicians who practise such services and 68% (80/118) to nonmedical practitioners. At least one of the three services studied were regarded as having some use by 83% (101/121). Overall, self-reported knowledge was poor: the proportions of GPs who reported knowing a lot about acupuncture, chiropractic and hypnosis were 11% (13/121), 10% (12/121) and 8% (10/121) respectively. Prior training was also lacking: only 8% (9/118) of the GPs had received previous training in acupuncture, 2% (2/111) in chiropractic and 3% (3/103) in hypnosis. In all, 48% (57/118) indicated that they would like further training in at least one of the services studied, and 13% (16/121) indicated that they currently provided one service. CONCLUSIONS: Referral of patients by GPs to practitioners of complementary health care services is common in Quebec. Although self-assessed knowledge about such services is relatively poor, interest in learning more about them is high. These findings identify a demand for future educational initiatives. PMID:7796373

Goldszmidt, M; Levitt, C; Duarte-Franco, E; Kaczorowski, J

1995-01-01

488

Odontoid agenesis with atlanto-axial luxation  

PubMed Central

Atlanto-axial luxation was first described in 1830 and since that time over 200 cases have been reported in the world literature. All of these patients are at risk, either from minor trauma or from progressive cord myelopathy. Symptoms vary greatly and range from neck pains and stiffness to transient quadriparesis. Specific chiropractic adjustment was successfully employed in this instance, however, grave consequences could result if manipulative procedures were attempted without adequate x-ray studies. ImagesFigure 1Figure 2Figure 3Figure 4

Thurlow, Robert D

1986-01-01

489

 

PubMed Central

A case is presented with clinical, thermographic and radiographic evaluations of concurrent dorsalgia and abdominal symptoms. The radiographs demonstrated the presence of a duodenal ulcer, and the thermographs were interpreted as confirming the presence of thoracic and abdominal dysfunction. The patient’s chiropractic management is outlined. The possible inter-relationship between the visceral pathology and spinal dysfunction is discussed. The case allows exploration of the unresolved issues of the clinical significance of somatovisceral/viscerosomatic reflex pathways and of their assessment by thermography. ImagesFigure 2Figure 2

Kobrossi, T.; Steiman, I.

1990-01-01

490

Subluxation: dogma or science?  

PubMed Central

Subluxation syndrome is a legitimate, potentially testable, theoretical construct for which there is little experimental evidence. Acceptable as hypothesis, the widespread assertion of the clinical meaningfulness of this notion brings ridicule from the scientific and health care communities and confusion within the chiropractic profession. We believe that an evidence-orientation among chiropractors requires that we distinguish between subluxation dogma vs. subluxation as the potential focus of clinical research. We lament efforts to generate unity within the profession through consensus statements concerning subluxation dogma, and believe that cultural authority will continue to elude us so long as we assert dogma as though it were validated clinical theory. PMID:16092955

Keating, Joseph C; Charlton, Keith H; Grod, Jaroslaw P; Perle, Stephen M; Sikorski, David; Winterstein, James F

2005-01-01

491

Demographic and practice characteristics of chiropractors.  

PubMed

The purpose of this study was to determine the demographic and practice characteristics of chiropractors. A four-part survey questionnaire was developed and mailed to a national stratified (by state) random sample of chiropractors. The analysis of data revealed that most chiropractors hold an undergraduate degree, practice in an urban area, are licensed to practice in only one state, belong to their state's chiropractic association, and are active in continuing education. Other data analyzed related to income, sources of new patients and average fees charged. PMID:3385345

Baffi, C R; Redican, K J; Morris, L; Schroeder, K K; Olsen, L K

1988-04-01

492

Subtle radiographic presentation of a pleural effusion secondary to a cancer of unknown primary: a case study  

PubMed Central

Carcinoma of unknown primary sites is a clinical syndrome that represents many types of cancer. The mortality rate associate to this type of cancer is elevated and a rapid medical referral is required for patients presenting this condition. Pleural effusion may be the only visible sign. We report a case of pleural effusion secondary to a cancer of unknown primary site in a 60-year-old man that sought chiropractic care for radiating low back pain. The radiographic studies revealed a pleural effusion as one of the only significant finding. This article will address the clinical presentation, radiographic studies and a discussion on the radiographic detection of pleural effusion. PMID:25202155

Blanchette, Marc-André; Grenier, Julie-Marthe

2014-01-01

493

Post-surgical care of a professional ballet dancer following calcaneal exostectomy and debridement with re-attachment of the left Achilles tendon  

PubMed Central

The extraordinary physical demands placed upon ballet dancers are only now being appreciated as comparable to that of other highly competitive athletic pursuits. The professional ballet dancer presents with an array of injuries associated with their physically vigorous performance requirements. In keeping with evidence-based practice, we describe the chiropractic care of a professional ballet dancer following surgical calcaneal exostectomy and debridement with re-attachment of the left Achilles tendon. The care provided involves an array of modalities from exercise and rehabilitation to spinal manipulative therapy. PMID:19421349

Kobsar, Bradley; Alcantara, Joel

2009-01-01

494

Subtle radiographic presentation of a pleural effusion secondary to a cancer of unknown primary: a case study.  

PubMed

Carcinoma of unknown primary sites is a clinical syndrome that represents many types of cancer. The mortality rate associate to this type of cancer is elevated and a rapid medical referral is required for patients presenting this condition. Pleural effusion may be the only visible sign. We report a case of pleural effusion secondary to a cancer of unknown primary site in a 60-year-old man that sought chiropractic care for radiating low back pain. The radiographic studies revealed a pleural effusion as one of the only significant finding. This article will address the clinical presentation, radiographic studies and a discussion on the radiographic detection of pleural effusion. PMID:25202155

Blanchette, Marc-André; Grenier, Julie-Marthe

2014-09-01

495

Reimbursement for complimentary/alternative medicine by California HMOs.  

PubMed

Beginning in the 1990s, researchers indicate a growing acceptance of complementary/alternative medicine in America. In this 1999 study, we surveyed California HMOs to determine the extent they reimburse for the following complementary/alternative therapies: nutrition counseling, chiropractic, acupuncture, massage and herbal medicine, as well as whether they require these providers to be licensed or otherwise credentialed. As hypothesized, California HMOs are more likely to reimburse for each of these therapies vs. an aggregate of 13 western U.S. states of which California is one. California's huge and competitive HMO market may be a factor. PMID:11813452

Hughes, A; Penner, M

2001-01-01

496

The Perils of Complementary Alternative Medicine  

PubMed Central

More than 11,000 articles lauding alternative medicine appear in the PubMed database, but there are only a few articles describing the complications of such care. Two patients suffering from complications of alternative medicine were treated in our hospital: one patient developed necrotizing fasciitis after acupuncture, and the second developed an epidural hematoma after chiropractic manipulation. These complications serve as a clarion call to the Israeli Health Ministry, as well as to health ministries around the world, to include complementary medicine under its inspection and legislative authority. PMID:25120919

Bayme, Michael J.; Geftler, Alex; Netz, Uri; Kirshtein, Boris; Glazer, Yair; Atias, Shahar; Perry, Zvi

2014-01-01

497

Pediatric Vaccination and Vaccine-Preventable Disease Acquisition: Associations with Care by Complementary and Alternative Medicine Providers  

Microsoft Academic Search

This study investigated provider-based complementary\\/alternative medicine use and its association with receipt of recommended\\u000a vaccinations by children aged 1–2 years and with acquisition of vaccine-preventable disease by children aged 1–17 years. Results\\u000a were based on logistic regression analysis of insurance claims for pediatric enrollees covered by tw