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Sample records for chlorella pyrenoidosa efecto

  1. Algicidal Effect of Bromine and Chlorine on Chlorella pyrenoidosa

    PubMed Central

    Kott, Yehuda; Hershkovitz, Galila; Shemtob, A.; Sless, J. B.

    1966-01-01

    Chlorella pyrenoidosa was found to grow rapidly in tap water. Peak growth was reached after 2 to 3 days. Chlorine and bromine, added to such water, were shown to be effective inhibitors of algal growth. Bromine and bromamine were primarily algicidal, whereas chlorine and chloramines were mainly algistatic. It is assumed that the mechanisms of action of these halogens on Chlorella are not the same. PMID:5914499

  2. Separation, antitumor activities, and encapsulation of polypeptide from Chlorella pyrenoidosa.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiaoqin; Zhang, Xuewu

    2013-01-01

    Chlorella pyrenoidosa is a unicellular green algae and has been a popular foodstuff worldwide. However, no reports on the antitumor peptides from such a microalgae are available in the literature. In this study, using low-temperature high-pressure extraction, enzymatic hydrolysis, ion exchange, and gel filtration chromatography, we separated a polypeptide that exhibited inhibitory activity on human liver cancer HepG2 cells, and named the polypeptide CPAP (C. pyrenoidosa antitumor polypeptide). Furthermore, the micro- and nanoencapsulation of CPAP were investigated by using two methods: complex coacervation and ionotropic gelation. The in vitro release tests revealed that CPAP was well preserved against gastric enzymatic degradation after micro/nanoencapsulation and the slowly controlled release in the intestine could be potentially achieved. These results suggest that CPAP may be a useful ingredient in food, nutraceutical, and pharmaceutical applications. PMID:23606619

  3. Optimal extraction and hydrolysis of Chlorella pyrenoidosa proteins.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiaoqin; Zhang, Xuewu

    2012-12-01

    In this study, for the first time, the applications of two new methods, ionic liquid and low-temperature high-pressure cell breakage methods, to the extraction of whole proteins in Chlorella pyrenoidosa cells were explored. Meanwhile, the comparison with three traditional methods was also made. The results indicated that the extraction rate for ionic liquid is only at moderate level, but the new low-temperature high-pressure cell breakage method can obviously increase the protein extraction rate up to 2- to 15-fold. Subsequently, the hydrolysis of the extracted proteins was conducted with three enzymes (papain, trypsin and alcalase). The data presented that the degree of hydrolysis for each enzyme under the optimal conditions is in the order of: alcalase (18.31%)>papain (14.33%)>trypsin (8.47%), demonstrating the potential of C. pyrenoidosa protein hydrolysates obtained here in nutritional supplement and medical foods. PMID:23117187

  4. Interaction of organic solvents with the green alga Chlorella pyrenoidosa

    SciTech Connect

    Stratton, G.W.; Smith, T.M. )

    1988-06-01

    Solvents are often a component of bioassay systems when water-insoluble toxicants are being tested. These solvents must also be considered as xenobiotics and therefore, as potential toxicants in the bioassay. However, the effects of solvents on the organisms being tested and their possible interaction with the test compound are often overlooked by researchers. The purpose of the present study was to compare the inhibitory effects of six solvents commonly used in pesticide bioassays towards growth of the common green alga Chlorella pyrenoidosa, and to examine the occurrence of solvent-pesticide interactions with this organism.

  5. Removal and reductive dechlorination of triclosan by Chlorella pyrenoidosa.

    PubMed

    Wang, Shujuan; Wang, Xian; Poon, Karen; Wang, Yini; Li, Shangfu; Liu, Hongxia; Lin, Shuhai; Cai, Zongwei

    2013-09-01

    Triclosan that is widely used as antimicrobial agent has been detected as contaminant in various aquatic environments. In this work, removal and biodegradation of triclosan in water by using a ubiquitous green alga, Chlorella pyrenoidosa was investigated. When C. pyrenoidosa was exposed to a series concentration of triclosan from 100 to 800ngmL(-1), more than 50% of triclosan was eliminated by algal uptake from the culture medium during the first 1h exposure and reached equilibrium after the 6h treatment. In the biodegradation experiments, a removal percentage of 77.2% was obtained after C. pyrenoidosa was cultivated with 800ngmL(-1) triclosan for 96h. A major metabolite from the reductive dechlorination of triclosan was identified by using liquid chromatography coupled with electrospray ionization-mass spectrometry. The ultrastructural morphology of algal cells grown in the presence of triclosan was observed by using transmission electron microscopy and the growth of algal cells was detected. It was found that the trilcosan treatment resulted in the disruption of the chloroplast and the release of organic material into aquatic environment, which indicated that triclosan may affect membrane metabolism. PMID:23648333

  6. Effects of tetrabromobisphenol A on the green alga Chlorella pyrenoidosa.

    PubMed

    Liu, Hongling; Yu, Yang; Kong, Fanxiang; He, Luning; Yu, Hongxia; Giesy, John P; Wang, Xiaorong

    2008-09-01

    Flow cytometry (FC) was used to determine effects of tetrabromobisphenol A (TBBPA) on the green alga Chlorella pyrenoidosa (C. pyrenoidosa) by evaluating esterase activity, membrane integrity, concentrations of intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) and chlorophyll a (Chl-a) auto-fluorescence. TBBPA can inhibit esterase activity. Esterase activity was inversely proportional with TBBPA with a 24 h EC(50) value of 3.13 mg TBBPA/L. After 48 h of exposure to TBBPA intracellular ROS was significantly greater than in the unexposed cells. TBBPA inhibited Chl-a fluorescence after 168 h. Concentrations of ROS were directly proportional to both magnitude and duration of exposure and was inversely proportional to cellular Chl-a. FC was useful as an integrated, ecologically relevant, measure of a functional response of the algae. The possible action pathway of TBBPA in C. pyrenoidosa is that TBBPA can cause toxic effects on esterase activity. As concentrations and exposure time increased, TBBPA change the ROS level in the internal. The role of anti-oxidative action is marked and significant at the duration of 48 h exposure, compared to the control. This suggested there was a redox cycle. TBBPA changes physiological status of cells, further decreased Chl-a fluorescence indicating inhibition. PMID:18642150

  7. Aluminum bioavailability to the green alga Chlorella pyrenoidosa in acidified synthetic soft water

    SciTech Connect

    Parent, L.; Campbell, P.G.C. )

    1994-04-01

    A unicellular green alga, Chlorella pyrenoidosa, was exposed to inorganic Al under controlled experimental conditions to determine whether the biological response elicited by the dissolved metal could be predicted from the free-metal ion concentration, [Al[sup 3+

  8. Enantioselective toxic effects of cyproconazole enantiomers against Chlorella pyrenoidosa.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Wenjun; Cheng, Cheng; Chen, Li; Di, Shanshan; Liu, Chunxiao; Diao, Jinling; Zhou, Zhiqiang

    2016-09-01

    Enantioselectivity in ecotoxicity, digestion and uptake of chiral pesticide cyproconazole to Chlorella pyrenoidosa was studied. The 96h-EC50 values of rac- and the four enantiomers were 9.005, 6.616, 8.311, 4.290 and 9.410 mg/L, respectively. At the concentrations of 8 mg/L and 14 mg/L, the contents of pigments exposed in rac-, enantiomer-2 and 4 were higher than that exposed in enantiomer-1 and 3. The superoxide dismutase (SOD) and catalase (CAT) activity of algae exposed to enantiomer-1 and 3 was higher than that exposed to the rac-, enantiomer-2 and 4 at three levels. In addition, the malondialdehyde (MDA) concentrations in algae disposed with enantiomer-1 and 3 were increased remarkably at three levels. For the digestion experiment, the half-lives of four enantiomers in algae suspension were 28.06, 19.10, 21.13, 15.17 days, respectively. During the uptake experiment, the order of the concentrations of cyproconazole in algae cells was enantiomer-4, 2, 3 and 1. Based on these data, we concluded that ecotoxicity, digestion and uptake of chiral pesticide cyproconazole to C. pyrenoidosa were enantioselective, and such enantiomeric differences must be taken into consideration when assessing the risk of cyproconazole to environment. PMID:27268794

  9. Kinetics of phthalate ester biodegradation by Chlorella pyrenoidosa

    SciTech Connect

    Yan, H.; Ye, C.; Yin, C.

    1995-06-01

    Experimental results show that Chlorella pyrenoidosa has an ability to accumulate and biodegrade phthalate esters. Bioconcentration factors of dimethyl phthalate (DMP), diethyl phthalate (DEP), and dibutyl phthalate (DBP) reached their maxima of 162 at 24 h, 205 at 12 h, and 4,077 at 12 h. The average biodegradation rates of DMP, DEP, and DBP per day were found to be 13.4 mg/L, 7.3 mg/L, and 2.1 mg/L, respectively. Based on the experimental data, a second-order kinetic equation was formulated as {minus}dC/dt = KNr, with a factor r indicating the rate of algal growth. Calculation of this equation fits well with the observed data, and the standard deviations between calculated and observed values were 1.72 mg/L, 1.80 mg/L, and 0.26 mg/L for DMP, DEP, DBP, respectively.

  10. Preventing dyslipidemia by Chlorella pyrenoidosa in rats and hamsters after chronic high fat diet treatment.

    PubMed

    Cherng, Jong-Yuh; Shih, Mei-Fen

    2005-05-13

    The effects of Chlorella pyrenoidosa on serum lipid profiles, after concomitant long-term treatment of high-fat diet (HFD) in rats and hamsters was studied. Wistar rats and Syrian hamsters were fed with or without various concentrations of Chlorella pyrenoidosa contained high-fat diet (CHFD) for 2, 4 and 8 weeks prior to assay of serum lipids. Fasting triglycerides, total cholesterol, and LDL cholesterol as well as HDL cholesterol levels in high-fat diet treated rats and hamster were determined. Results showed that triglycerides, total cholesterol and LDL cholesterol levels in HFD treated rats and hamsters were increased from the normal rodent diet (NRD) treated controls after 2, 4, and 8-week treatments. However, the presence of Chlorella pyrenoidosa in high-fat diets significantly decreased the levels of triglycerides, total cholesterol and LDL cholesterol with comparison to HFD group in rats and hamsters. The total cholesterol/HDL ratios, an indication of occurrence of coronary heart disease, were decreased in all CHFD treated grouped rats and hamsters which suggests administration of Chlorella pyrenoidosa could lower the occurring risk of heart diseases. In conclusion, Chlorella pyrenoidosa has the ability to prevent dyslipidemia in chronic high-fat fed animals and could be potential in use to prevent intestinal absorption of redundant lipid from our daily intake and subsequently to prevent hyperlipidemia as well as atherosclerosis. PMID:15850594

  11. Photorespiration and Oxygen Inhibition of Photosynthesis in Chlorella pyrenoidosa.

    PubMed

    Shelp, B J; Canvin, D T

    1980-05-01

    The inhibition of photosynthesis by O(2) in air-grown Chlorella pyrenoidosa was investigated using three experimental techniques (artificial leaf, aqueous method, and O(2) electrode) to measure carbon assimilation. CO(2) response curves were determined under different O(2), pH, and temperature conditions. Regardless of the experimental technique and condition, O(2) inhibition was not evident until a concentration of 50% was reached; V(max) values were reduced whereas K(m) (CO(2)) values were unaffected by the increasing O(2) concentration. The response of photosynthesis to O(2) was independent of CO(2) and HCO(3) (-) concentrations as well as temperature. Relative rates of photosynthesis showed a 4 to 5% stimulation in 2% O(2), a 12% inhibition in 50% O(2), and a 24% inhibition in 100% O(2). The inhibition by 50% O(2) was still reversible after 20 minutes exposure whereas 100% O(2) caused irreversible inhibition after only 4 minutes.The O(2) inhibition is discussed in terms of the oxygenase reaction and a Mehler reaction supporting pseudocyclic electron flow. The results are inconsistent with the proposals that photorespiration exists in these algae and that a CO(2)-concentrating mechanism suppresses the O(2) inhibition of photosynthesis. PMID:16661282

  12. Photorespiration in Air and High CO(2)-Grown Chlorella pyrenoidosa.

    PubMed

    Shelp, B J; Canvin, D T

    1981-12-01

    Oxygen inhibition of photosynthesis and CO(2) evolution during photorespiration were compared in high CO(2)-grown and air-grown Chlorella pyrenoidosa, using the artificial leaf technique at pH 5.0. High CO(2) cells, in contrast to air-grown cells, exhibited a marked inhibition of photosynthesis by O(2), which appeared to be competitive and similar in magnitude to that in higher C(3) plants. With increasing time after transfer to air, the photosynthetic rate in high CO(2) cells increased while the O(2) effect declined. Photorespiration, measured as the difference between (14)CO(2) and (12)CO(2) uptake, was much greater and sensitive to O(2) in high CO(2) cells. Some CO(2) evolution was also present in air-grown algae; however, it did not appear to be sensitive to O(2). True photosynthesis was not affected by O(2) in either case. The data indicate that the difference between high CO(2) and air-grown algae could be attributed to the magnitude of CO(2) evolution. This conclusion is discussed with reference to the oxygenase reaction and the control of photorespiration in algae. PMID:16662134

  13. Gastrointestinal Elimination of Perfluorinated Compounds Using Cholestyramine and Chlorella pyrenoidosa

    PubMed Central

    Genuis, Stephen J.; Curtis, Luke; Birkholz, Detlef

    2013-01-01

    Background. While perfluorinated compounds (PFCs) are a family of commonly used synthetic compounds with many applications, some PFCs remain persistent within the human body due, in part, to enterohepatic recirculation and renal tubular reabsorption. With increasing recognition of potential harm to human health associated with PFC bioaccumulation, interventions to facilitate elimination of these toxicants are welcome in order to potentially preclude or overcome illness. Minimal research has been undertaken thus far on methods to accelerate human clearance of PFCs. Methods. To test for possible oral treatments to hasten PFC elimination, a group of individuals with elevated PFC levels was treated with cholestyramine (CSM) and, after a break, was subsequently treated with Chlorella pyrenoidosa (CP). Stool samples were collected from all participants (i) prior to any treatment, (ii) during treatment with CSM, and (iii) during treatment with CP. Results. With CSM treatment, significant levels of three distinct PFCs were found in all stools, while levels were mostly undetectable prior to treatment. Following treatment with oral CP, undetectable or very low levels of all PFCs were noted in each sample tested. Conclusion. CSM appears to facilitate elimination of some common PFCs and may have some role in the clinical management of patients with accrued PFCs. PMID:24106616

  14. Phycoremediation of textile wastewater by unicellular microalga Chlorella pyrenoidosa.

    PubMed

    Pathak, V V; Singh, D P; Kothari, R; Chopra, A K

    2014-01-01

    The potential application of microalga Chlorella pyrenoidosa was investigated for phycoremediation of textile wastewater. Two 15 days batch experiment containing autoclaved and unautoclaved textile wastewater were performed to measure the efficiency of alga to remediate the wastewater. Experiments were set at equivalent external conditions and pollutant load was measured on alternate of 5 days to determine the pollutant removal efficiency of alga. Alga was found to be more efficient in removal of pollutants load in autoclaved wastewater; agents of eutrophication such as nitrate and phosphate are reduced by 62% ±0.5 and 87% ±0.7 respectively while organic load in terms of BOD is reduced by 81% ±0.2 whereas, In unautoclaved wastewater in presence of algal-bacterial consortium, nitrate and phosphate were removed by 81% ±1 and 36% ±2.2 while BOD is reduced by 73% ±1.6 only. Another time dependent experiment of dye removal was also performed to measure the adsorption potential of selected dried algal biomass. An equal amount of dried algal biomass was introduced to various range of textile wastewater simulated with methylene blue (MB) dye. The maximum colour removal was observed afterduration of 30 minutes by dry algal biomass. PMID:25535710

  15. Two stage treatment of dairy effluent using immobilized Chlorella pyrenoidosa

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Dairy effluents contains high organic load and unscrupulous discharge of these effluents into aquatic bodies is a matter of serious concern besides deteriorating their water quality. Whilst physico-chemical treatment is the common mode of treatment, immobilized microalgae can be potentially employed to treat high organic content which offer numerous benefits along with waste water treatment. Methods A novel low cost two stage treatment was employed for the complete treatment of dairy effluent. The first stage consists of treating the diary effluent in a photobioreactor (1 L) using immobilized Chlorella pyrenoidosa while the second stage involves a two column sand bed filtration technique. Results Whilst NH4+-N was completely removed, a 98% removal of PO43--P was achieved within 96 h of two stage purification processes. The filtrate was tested for toxicity and no mortality was observed in the zebra fish which was used as a model at the end of 96 h bioassay. Moreover, a significant decrease in biological oxygen demand and chemical oxygen demand was achieved by this novel method. Also the biomass separated was tested as a biofertilizer to the rice seeds and a 30% increase in terms of length of root and shoot was observed after the addition of biomass to the rice plants. Conclusions We conclude that the two stage treatment of dairy effluent is highly effective in removal of BOD and COD besides nutrients like nitrates and phosphates. The treatment also helps in discharging treated waste water safely into the receiving water bodies since it is non toxic for aquatic life. Further, the algal biomass separated after first stage of treatment was highly capable of increasing the growth of rice plants because of nitrogen fixation ability of the green alga and offers a great potential as a biofertilizer. PMID:24355316

  16. Heterotrophic Growth and Production of Xanthophylls by Chlorella pyrenoidosa

    PubMed Central

    Theriault, Robert J.

    1965-01-01

    The growth and level of xanthophylls of several representative species of green algae were investigated as a possible source of pigmentation for the egg yolk and broiler markets. Chlorella pyrenoidosa 7-11-05 was selected for fermentation studies because of its high level of xanthophylls and wide temperature range for growth. The heterotrophic metabolism was preferred because of the ease of adaptability to present fermentation equipment. When used as the sole carbon source, glucose was the only sugar, among many tested, that gave appreciable growth in illuminated shaken flasks. A dry cell weight of 90 g per liter and total xanthophylls of 450 mg per liter were obtained from 190 g per liter of glucose monohydrate in 168-hr illuminated shaken flasks. Higher levels of glucose decreased yields. In combination with glucose, monosaccharides, such as fructose and galactose, were readily assimilated. The 7-11-05 strain was adapted to galactose as the sole carbon source after six vegetative passages. Light of the proper intensity and duration stimulated total xanthophylls approximately 35%. The effect on dry cell weight and total xanthophylls of seven antibiotics added at various levels in shaken flasks was studied. Erythromycin was essentially stable throughout the fermentation and nontoxic up to 25 μg/ml, with only slight toxicity at higher levels. Both erythromycin and ristocetin were effective in controlling a high incidence of bacterial contamination in 30-liter fermentors. With the higher agitation and aeration rates possible in 30-liter fermentors, dry cell weights in excess of 100 g per liter and total xanthophylls of 467 to 512 mg per liter were readily obtained from 230 to 260 g per liter of glucose in 162-hr illuminated batch-type fermentations. Continuous-feed runs yielded a dry cell weight of 302 g per liter and total xanthophylls of 650 mg per liter from 520 g per liter of glucose. The type of Chlorella cell produced was an important consideration with

  17. [Study on the Chlorella pyrenoidosa cultivation technology based on the excess sludge utilization].

    PubMed

    Ji, Wen-Wen; Xia, Hui-Long; Fang, Zhi-Guo; Liu, Hui-Jun

    2013-02-01

    Microalgae cultivation based on the waste water or other reused waste can not only make rational use of the waste, but also provide cheap materials for microalgae production. In the present study, Chlorella pyrenoidosa was used to develop a new way for microalgae cultivation based on the mix culture media with different ratio of sludge extracts and SE (selenite enrichment). Results showed that after 14 d cultivation under the same cultivating condition, the absorbency of C. pyrenoidosa at 680 nm was 0. 858 and 0. 845, respectively, when the ratio between culture medium of SE and sludge extracts was 1:9 and 2:8, and the absorbency at 680 nm was 0.247 and 0.571, respectively, when the ratio between culture medium of SE and sludge extracts was 0:10 and 10:0. Our results also demonstrated that highest content of chlororphyll, beta-carotene and protein was achieved in C. pyrenoidosa cultivated in the mix medium between SE and sludge extracts with the ratio of 2: 8. Therefore, sludge extracts can be used as a good medium to cultivate C. pyrenoidosa, and the C. pyrenoidosa grew much better in this mix medium than in SE medium. In this study, the best condition for C. pyrenoidosa cultivation was achieved in the mix medium with 80% sludge extracts, and C. pyrenoidosa grew very well and the content of chlororphyll and protein was also high in the microalgae cell in this mixture medium. PMID:23668132

  18. Acute and chronic toxic effects of bisphenol A on Chlorella pyrenoidosa and Scenedesmus obliquus.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Wei; Xiong, Bang; Sun, Wen-Fang; An, Shuai; Lin, Kuang-Fei; Guo, Mei-Jin; Cui, Xin-Hong

    2014-06-01

    The acute and chronic toxic effects of Bisphenol A (BPA) on Chlorella pyrenoidosa (C. pyrenoidosa) and Scenedesmus obliquus (S. obliquus) were not well understood. The indoor experiments were carried out to observe and analyze the BPA-induced changes. Results of the observations showed that in acute tests BPA could significantly inhibit the growth of both algae, whereas chronic exposure hardly displayed similar trend. Superoxide dismutase (SOD) and Catalase (CAT) activities of both algae were promoted in all the treatments. Chlorophyll a synthesis of the two algae exhibited similar inhibitory trend in short-term treatments, and in chronic tests C. pyrenoidosa hardly resulted in visible influence, whereas in contrast, dose-dependent inhibitory effects of S. obliquus could be clearly observed. The experimental results indicated that the growth and Chlorophyll a syntheses of S.obliquus were more sensitive in response to BPA than that of C. pyrenoidosa, whereas for SOD andCAT activities, C. pyrenoidosa was more susceptible. This research provides a basic understanding of BPA toxicity to aquatic organisms. PMID:22887798

  19. Two Novel Algicidal Isolates Kill Chlorella pyrenoidosa by Inhibiting their Host Antioxidase Activities.

    PubMed

    Liao, Chunli; Liu, Xiaobo; Liu, Ruifang; Shan, Linna

    2015-09-01

    In the biocontrol of harmful algal blooms, there has been considerable interest about the role of algicidal bacteria in algicidal activity. In this experiment, two novel algicidal bacteria (strains NP23 and AM11) against Chlorella pyrenoidosa were isolated from the Baiguishan reservoir in China. Phylogenetic analysis based on 16S rRNA gene sequences revealed that strains NP23 and AM11 belonged to Enterobacter cloacae and Gibberella moniliformis, respectively. To further understand the algicidal activities, five parameters including the chlorophyll a content, cell survival rate, superoxide dismutase (SOD) peroxide dismutase (POD), and catalase (CAT) were tested in the C. pyrenoidosa cells after inoculation with the algicidal bacteria Enterobacter cloacae NP23 and Gibberella moniliformis AM11. As a result, the growth of the treated C. pyrenoidosa was significantly restrained with a great decline of chlorophyll a content. Meanwhile, three antioxidase activities of the treated C. pyrenoidosa were initially stimulated from day 1 to day 3 but then dramatically inhibited at low level. These results induced that the oxidative imbalance (i.e., inhibition of antioxidase activities) caused by algicidal bacteria could be the killing agent of the C. pyrenoidosa cells. PMID:26194712

  20. Hydrothermal liquefaction of Chlorella pyrenoidosa for bio-oil production over Ce/HZSM-5.

    PubMed

    Xu, Yufu; Zheng, Xiaojing; Yu, Huiqiang; Hu, Xianguo

    2014-03-01

    This paper investigated a novel hydrothermal liquefaction process of Chlorella pyrenoidosa catalyzed by Ce/HZSM-5. The chemical groups and components of the residues of C. pyrenoidosa were analyzed by Fourier transform infrared spectrometry and Gas Chromatograph-Mass Spectrometer. The crystal structure and micro surface topography of C. pyrenoidosa before and after catalytic liquefaction were characterized by X-ray diffraction and Scanning electron microscopy, respectively. The experimental results showed that the catalytic cracking effects of Ce/HZSM-5 were superior to that of HZSM-5 as a liquefaction catalyst of C. pyrenoidosa. Compared with HZSM-5, Ce/HZSM-5 has a significantly enhanced Lewis acid active center, smaller particle size, larger specific surface, and highly dispersed Ce4O7 with trivalent and tetravalent cerium in the zeolite skeleton channel that accelerate the catalytic liquefaction of C. pyrenoidosa. The rare earth modified zeolite Ce/HZSM-5 exhibits good potential and a beneficial nature for the preparation of bio-oil from microalgae with high efficiency. PMID:24472700

  1. [Optimization of Chlorella pyrenoidosa-15 photoheterotrophic culture and its use in wastewater treatment].

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiu-jin; Li, Zhao-sheng; Xing, Guan-lan; Li, Zhuo-ning; Yuan, Hong-li; Yang, Jin-shui

    2012-08-01

    To improve the biomass and lipid productivity of the microalgae Chlorella pyrenoidosa-15, the carbon and nitrogen sources were screened to culture it heterotrophically. The best carbon and nitrogen sources were glucose and soy peptone, respectively. The carbon and nitrogen concentrations were optimized with the help of response surface design. The maximum biomass productivity was predicted to be 0.62 g x (L x d)(-1) with glucose and soy peptone concentrations of 17.53 g x L(-1) and 8.67 g x L(-1), respectively. The results of response surface design were validated with biomass productivity of 0.63 g x (L x d)(-1) and lipid content of 19.25%. The lipid productivity reached 121.3 mg x (L x d)(-1). In the research of Chlorella pyrenoidosa-15 cultured in non-autoclaved Beijing urban wastewater, the maximum algae biomass dry weight of 1.00 g x L(-1) was achieved with a lipid content of 24.12%. Results also showed that the treatment using Chlorella pyrenoidosa-15 effectively reduced the COD values and total nitrogen content in the wastewater, with a COD degradation rate of 80.9%, and a 69% decrease in total nitrogen content. PMID:23213898

  2. Ultrasound-Enhanced Subcritical CO2 Extraction of Lutein from Chlorella pyrenoidosa.

    PubMed

    Fan, Xiao-Dan; Hou, Yan; Huang, Xing-Xin; Qiu, Tai-Qiu; Jiang, Jian-Guo

    2015-05-13

    Lutein is an important pigment of Chlorella pyrenoidosa with many beneficial functions in human health. The main purpose of this study was to extract lutein from C. pyrenoidosa using ultrasound-enhanced subcritical CO2 extraction (USCCE). Effects of operating conditions on the extraction, including extraction pretreatment, temperature, pressure, time, CO2 flow rate, and ultrasonic power, were investigated, and an orthogonal experiment was designed to study the effects of extraction pressure, temperature, cosolvent amount, and time on the extraction yields. The USCCE method was compared with other extraction methods in terms of the yields of lutein and the microstructure of C. pyrenoidosa powder by scanning electron microscopy. A maximal extraction yield of 124.01 mg lutein/100 g crude material was achieved under optimal conditions of extraction temperature at 27 °C, extraction pressure at 21 MPa, cosolvent amount at 1.5 mL/g ethanol, and ultrasound power at 1000 W. Compared to other methods, USCCE could significantly increase the lutein extraction yield at lower extraction temperature and pressure. Furthermore, the kinetic models of USCCE and subcritical CO2 extraction (SCCE) of lutein from C. pyrenoidosa were set as E = 130.64 × (1 - e(-0.6599t)) and E = 101.82 × (1 - e(-0.5683t)), respectively. The differences of parameters in the kinetic models indicate that ultrasound was able to enhance the extraction process of SCCE. PMID:25837869

  3. Antioxidant activities of polysaccharides obtained from Chlorella pyrenoidosa via different ethanol concentrations.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yi-Xuan; Liu, Xiao-Yan; Xiao, Zheng; Huang, Yi-Fan; Liu, Bin

    2016-10-01

    An ultrasonic-assisted extraction of Chlorella pyrenoidosa polysaccharides (CPP) was carried out using different concentrations of ethanol for precipitation, and named as CPP60, CPP70 and CPP85, respectively. The monosaccharide composition of each polysaccharide (CPP) was determined using gas chromatography (GC) and the antioxidant activity of each was investigated via the reducing power and scavenging activity of hydroxyl radicals, 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) radicals and superoxide anion radicals, respectively. All of the polysaccharides examined possessed antioxidant activity in vitro. CPP70 exhibited stronger scavenging activity against superoxide, DPPH and hydroxyl radicals, when compared with CPP60 and CPP85. This suggests that polysaccharides from C. pyrenoidosa precipitated by a final ethanol concentration of 70%, have the potential to be developed as natural antioxidants for use in food and pharmaceuticals. PMID:27235730

  4. Inhibitory effects of terpene alcohols and aldehydes on growth of green alga Chlorella pyrenoidosa

    SciTech Connect

    Ikawa, Miyoshi; Mosley, S.P.; Barbero, L.J. )

    1992-10-01

    The growth of the green alga Chlorella pyrenoidosa was inhibited by terpene alcohols and the terpene aldehyde citral. The strongest activity was shown by citral. Nerol, geraniol, and citronellol also showed pronounced activity. Strong inhibition was linked to acyclic terpenes containing a primary alcohol or aldehyde function. Inhibition appeared to be taking place through the vapor phase rather than by diffusion through the agar medium from the terpene-treated paper disks used in the system. Inhibition through agar diffusion was shown by certain aged samples of terpene hydrocarbons but not by recently purchased samples.

  5. Chlorella pyrenoidosa cultivation in outdoors using the diluted anaerobically digested activated sludge.

    PubMed

    Tan, Xiao-Bo; Yang, Li-Bin; Zhang, Ya-Lei; Zhao, Fang-Chao; Chu, Hua-Qiang; Guo, Jun

    2015-12-01

    A freshwater green algae Chlorella pyrenoidosa (C. pyrenoidosa) was cultured in outdoors using the diluted anaerobically digested activated sludge (ADAS). The outdoors batch culture in every season showed that C. pyrenoidosa can grow normally under natural conditions in the diluted ADAS (STE/ADAS=1.5/1, 3/1 and 5/1, v/v). Seasonal changes of environmental conditions significantly affected biomass growth and nutrient removal. Optimal biomass growth and nutrient removal was achieved at STE/ADAS=1.5/1 during summer culture, harvesting a maximum biomass concentration of 1.97 ± 0.21 g/L, average biomass productivity of 291.52 ± 33.74 g/m(3)/day (maximum value of 573.10 ± 41.82) and average lipids productivity of 37.49 ± 5.26 g/m(3)/day (maximum value of 73.70 ± 9.75); simultaneously, the microalgae growth effectively removed nutrients from the wastewater, including 105.6 ± 17.1 mg CODCr/L/day, 36.8 ± 6.1mg N/L/day and 6.1 ± 1.1 mg P/L/day. PMID:26407348

  6. Effects of various organic carbon sources on the growth and biochemical composition of Chlorella pyrenoidosa.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Weiguo; Zhang, Peiliang; Sun, Hao; Chen, Maozhen; Lu, Shan; Li, Pengfu

    2014-12-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of various organic carbon sources (glucose, galactose, fructose, sucrose, maltose, lactose and starch) on the growth and biochemical composition of Chlorella pyrenoidosa. Monosaccharides were found to exert stronger stimulative effects on the algal growth than disaccharides and starch. After 10-day culture, addition of 0.5-5.0 g L(-1) glucose and galactose significantly reduced the cellular protein contents by 27.7-63.7% and 22.6-60.5%, respectively, and significantly increased the carbohydrate contents by 103.2-266.5% and 91.9-240.0%, respectively. However, addition of 0.5-5.0 g L(-1) disaccharides and starch did not significantly affect the contents of lipid, protein and carbohydrate. Similar to the normal nitrogen condition, the cellular biochemical composition was not significantly affected by addition of 3.0 g L(-1) disaccharides and starch under the low nitrogen condition. Finally, the significance of this work in the biotechnological application of mixotrophic cultivation of C. pyrenoidosa was further discussed. PMID:25285759

  7. Chlorella pyrenoidosa cultivation using anaerobic digested starch processing wastewater in an airlift circulation photobioreactor.

    PubMed

    Tan, Xiaobo; Chu, Huaqiang; Zhang, Yalei; Yang, Libin; Zhao, Fangchao; Zhou, Xuefei

    2014-10-01

    To explore the integration of microalgae cultivation and anaerobic processing for wastewater treatment, we utilized an airlift circulation photobioreactor and a dynamic membrane reactor for microalgae cultivation in combination with an upflow anaerobic sludge bed (UASB) reactor for starch processing wastewater (SPW) treatment. Chlorella pyrenoidosa completely adapted to the digested SPW without any chemical additives, and it grew normally under a wide temperature range in different seasons. C. pyrenoidosa was always the dominant microorganism in the photobioreactors although bacteria and some wild type microalgae were observed. Optimal biomass growth and pollutants removal was achieved at temperatures between 35 and 38°C in summer, removing 65.99% of COD, 83.06% of TN, 96.97% of TP and a biomass productivity of 0.37gL(-1)d(-1). Temperature fluctuation significantly influenced lipid contents and FAMEs compositions in biomass. The results demonstrate the successful integration of microalgae biomass production and anaerobic processing for wastewater treatment. PMID:25164347

  8. Interactions of CuO nanoparticles with the algae Chlorella pyrenoidosa: adhesion, uptake, and toxicity.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Jian; Cao, Xuesong; Liu, Xiaoyu; Wang, Zhenyu; Zhang, Chenchen; White, Jason C; Xing, Baoshan

    2016-11-01

    The potential adverse effects of CuO nanoparticles (NPs) have increasingly attracted attention. Combining electron microscopic and toxicological investigations, we determined the adhesion, uptake, and toxicity of CuO NPs to eukaryotic alga Chlorella pyrenoidosa. CuO NPs were toxic to C. pyrenoidosa, with a 72 h EC50 of 45.7 mg/L. Scanning electron microscopy showed that CuO NPs were attached onto the surface of the algal cells and interacted with extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) excreted by the organisms. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) showed that EPS layer of algae was thickened by nearly 4-fold after CuO NPs exposure, suggesting a possible protective mechanism. In spite of the thickening of EPS layer, CuO NPs were still internalized by endocytosis and were stored in algal vacuoles. TEM and electron diffraction analysis confirmed that the internalized CuO NPs were transformed to Cu2O NPs (d-spacing, ∼0.213 nm) with an average size approximately 5 nm. The toxicity investigation demonstrated that severe membrane damage was observed after attachment of CuO NPs with algae. Reactive oxygen species generation and mitochondrial depolarization were also noted upon exposure to CuO NPs. This work provides useful information on understanding the role of NPs-algae physical interactions in nanotoxicity. PMID:27345461

  9. Toxic effects of 1,4-dichlorobenzene on photosynthesis in Chlorella pyrenoidosa.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jinhua; Wang, Jie; Feng, Jia; Lv, Junping; Cai, Jin; Liu, Qi; Xie, Shulian

    2016-09-01

    1,4-Dichlorobenzene (1,4-DCB) is a common organic contaminant in water. To determine the effects of this contaminant on photosynthesis in the freshwater alga Chlorella pyrenoidosa, algal cells were treated with 1,4-DCB at different concentrations for various times, and their photosynthetic pigment contents and chlorophyll fluorescence traits were analyzed. The results showed that 1,4-DCB exerted toxic effects on photosynthesis in C. pyrenoidosa, especially at concentrations exceeding 10 mg/L. The inhibitory effects of 1,4-DCB were time- and concentration-dependent. After treatment with 1,4-DCB (≥10 mg/L), the contents of photosynthetic pigments decreased significantly, the photosystem II reaction center was irreversibly damaged, and the quantum yield of photosystem II decreased significantly. Also, there were sharp decreases in the efficiency of photosynthetic electron transport and energy conversion. Photosystem II became overloaded as the amount of excitation energy distributed to it increased. All of these events weakened the photochemical reaction, and ultimately led to serious inhibition of photosynthesis. PMID:27542668

  10. Characterization of aqueous phase from the hydrothermal liquefaction of Chlorella pyrenoidosa.

    PubMed

    Gai, Chao; Zhang, Yuanhui; Chen, Wan-Ting; Zhou, Yan; Schideman, Lance; Zhang, Peng; Tommaso, Giovana; Kuo, Chih-Ting; Dong, Yuping

    2015-05-01

    This study investigated the characteristics of aqueous phase from hydrothermal liquefaction of low-lipid microalgae Chlorella pyrenoidosa. The interactions of operating conditions, including reaction temperature, retention time and total solid ratio were evaluated by response surface methodology. The chemical oxygen demand, total nitrogen and total phosphorus were selected as indicators of the property of AP. Results indicated that total solid ratio was found to be the dominant factor affecting the nutrient recovery efficiencies of AP. Based on energy recovery, GC-MS indicated that the AP at two optimized operating conditions (280 °C, 60 min, 35 wt.% and 300 °C, 60 min, 25 wt.%) were observed to have a higher concentration of organic acids (10.35% and 8.34%) while the sample (260 °C, 30 min, 35 wt.%) was observed to have the highest concentration of N&O-heterocyclic compounds (36.16%). PMID:25466993

  11. Kinetic modeling of growth and lipid body induction in Chlorella pyrenoidosa under heterotrophic conditions.

    PubMed

    Sachdeva, Neha; Kumar, G Dinesh; Gupta, Ravi Prakash; Mathur, Anshu Shankar; Manikandan, B; Basu, Biswajit; Tuli, Deepak Kumar

    2016-10-01

    The aim of the present work was to develop a mathematical model to describe the biomass and (total) lipid productivity of Chlorella pyrenoidosa NCIM 2738 under heterotrophic conditions. Biomass growth rate was predicted by Droop's cell quota model, while changes observed in cell quota (utilization) under carbon excess conditions were used for the modeling and predicting the lipid accumulation rate. The model was simulated under non-limiting (excess) carbon and limiting nitrate concentration and validated with experimental data for the culture grown in batch (flask) mode under different nitrate concentrations. The present model incorporated two modes (growth and stressed) for the prediction of endogenous lipid synthesis/induction and aimed to predict the effect and response of the microalgae under nutrient starvation (stressed) conditions. MATLAB and Genetic Algorithm were employed for the prediction and validation of the model parameters. PMID:27450124

  12. Evidence for cyclic electron flow around photosystem II in Chlorella pyrenoidosa

    SciTech Connect

    Falkowski, P.G.; Fujita, Y.; Ley, A.; Mauzerall, D.

    1986-05-01

    Electron flow around photosystem II was investigated in Chlorella pyrenoidosa. Using a bare platinum O/sub 2/ electrode, simultaneous measurements were made of steady-state photosynthesis in continuous light, the yield of oxygen (Yo/sub 2/) produced by a superimposed saturating xenon flash, and the change in fluorescence yield of a weak flash triggered before and 70 microseconds after the saturating flash. Throughout most of the continuous photosynthesis-irradiance curve, normalized O/sub 2/ flash yields (Yo/sub 2//Yo/sub 2//sub max/) and normalized variable fluorescence yields ..delta..omega/..delta..omega' were linearly correlated with a slope of 1.0. As photosynthetic rates reached light saturation, however, the variable fluorescence yields remained relatively constant while O/sub 2/ flash yields decreased. These results strongly suggest that there is a cyclic electron flow around photosystem II in unpoisoned intact cells at light saturation and supraoptimal light intensities.

  13. Study of physical chemistry on biosorption of zinc by using Chlorella pyrenoidosa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rezaei, Hassan; Kulkarni, Satish D.; Saptarshi, Praveen G.

    2012-08-01

    Discharge of heavy metals from metal processing industries is known to have adverse effects on the environment. Biosorption of heavy metals by metabolically inactive biomass of microbial organisms is an innovative and alternative technology for removal of these pollutants from aqueous solution. Presence of heavy metals in the aquatic system is posing serious problems. Zinc has been used in many industries and removal of Zn ions from waste water is significant. Biosorption is one of the economic methods used for removal of heavy metals. In the present study, the biomass obtained from the dried Chlorella pyrenoidosa was used for evaluating the biosorption characteristics of Zn ions in aqueous solutions. Batch adsorption experiments were performed with this material and it was found that the amount of metal ions adsorbed increased with the increase in the initial metal ion concentration. In this study effect of agitation time, initial metal ion concentration, temperature, pH and biomass dosage were studied. Maximum metal uptake ( q max) observed at pH 5 was 101.11 mg/g. The biosorption followed both Langmuir and Freundlich isotherm model. The adsorption equilibrium was reached in about 1 h. The kinetic of biosorption followed the second-border rate. The biomass could be regenerated using 0.1 M HNO3. A positive value of Δ H° indicated the endothermic nature of the process. A negative value of the free energy (Δ G°) indicated the spontaneous nature of the adsorption process. A positive value of Δ S° showed increased randomness at solid-liquid interface during the adsorption of heavy metals, it also suggests some structural changes in the adsorbate and the adsorbent. FTIR Spectrums of Chlorella pyrenoidosa revealed the presence of hydroxyl, amino, carboxylic and carbonyl groups. The scanning electron micrograph clearly revealed the surface texture and morphology of the biosorbent.

  14. Nutrients removal and lipids production by Chlorella pyrenoidosa cultivation using anaerobic digested starch wastewater and alcohol wastewater.

    PubMed

    Yang, Libin; Tan, Xiaobo; Li, Deyi; Chu, Huaqiang; Zhou, Xuefei; Zhang, Yalei; Yu, Hong

    2015-04-01

    The cultivation of microalgae Chlorella pyrenoidosa (C. pyrenoidosa) using anaerobic digested starch wastewater (ADSW) and alcohol wastewater (AW) was evaluated in this study. Different proportions of mixed wastewater (AW/ADSW=0.176:1, 0.053:1, 0.026:1, v/v) and pure ADSW, AW were used for C. pyrenoidosa cultivation. The different proportions between ADSW and AW significantly influenced biomass growth, lipids production and pollutants removal. The best performance was achieved using mixed wastewater (AW/ADSW=0.053:1, v/v), leading to a maximal total biomass of 3.01±0.15 g/L (dry weight), lipids productivity of 127.71±6.31 mg/L/d and pollutants removal of COD=75.78±3.76%, TN=91.64±4.58% and TP=90.74±4.62%. PMID:25638404

  15. Dewatering of Chlorella pyrenoidosa using diatomite dynamic membrane: filtration performance, membrane fouling and cake behavior.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yalei; Zhao, Yangying; Chu, Huaqiang; Zhou, Xuefei; Dong, Bingzhi

    2014-01-01

    The diatomite dynamic membrane (DDM) was utilized to dewater Chlorella pyrenoidosa of 2 g dry weight/L under continuous-flow mode, whose ultimate algae concentration ranged from 43 g to 22 g dry weight/L of different culture time. The stable flux of DDM could reach 30 L/m(2) h over a 24 h operation time without backwash. Influences of extracellular organic matters (EOM) on filtration behavior and membrane fouling were studied. The DDM was divided into three sub-layers, the slime layer, the algae layer and the diatomite layer from the outside to the inside of the cake layer based on components and morphologies. It was found that EOM caused membrane fouling by accumulating in the slime and algae layers. The DDM intercepted polysaccharides, protein-like substances, humic-like substances and some low-MW organics. Proteins were indicated the major membrane foulants with increased protein/polysaccharide ratio from the slime layer to the diatomite layer as culture time increased. This method could be applied to subsequent treatment of microalgae coupling technology of wastewater treatment or microalgae harvesting for producing biofuel. PMID:24148755

  16. Direct Biodiesel Production from Wet Microalgae Biomass of Chlorella pyrenoidosa through In Situ Transesterification

    PubMed Central

    Cao, Hechun; Zhang, Zhiling; Wu, Xuwen; Miao, Xiaoling

    2013-01-01

    A one-step process was applied to directly converting wet oil-bearing microalgae biomass of Chlorella pyrenoidosa containing about 90% of water into biodiesel. In order to investigate the effects of water content on biodiesel production, distilled water was added to dried microalgae biomass to form wet biomass used to produce biodiesel. The results showed that at lower temperature of 90°C, water had a negative effect on biodiesel production. The biodiesel yield decreased from 91.4% to 10.3% as water content increased from 0% to 90%. Higher temperature could compensate the negative effect. When temperature reached 150°C, there was no negative effect, and biodiesel yield was over 100%. Based on the above research, wet microalgae biomass was directly applied to biodiesel production, and the optimal conditions were investigated. Under the optimal conditions of 100 mg dry weight equivalent wet microalgae biomass, 4 mL methanol, 8 mL n-hexane, 0.5 M H2SO4, 120°C, and 180 min reaction time, the biodiesel yield reached as high as 92.5% and the FAME content was 93.2%. The results suggested that biodiesel could be effectively produced directly from wet microalgae biomass and this effort may offer the benefits of energy requirements for biodiesel production. PMID:24195081

  17. Experimental and kinetic studies for phycoremediation and dye removal by Chlorella pyrenoidosa from textile wastewater.

    PubMed

    Pathak, Vinayak V; Kothari, Richa; Chopra, A K; Singh, D P

    2015-11-01

    Potential of Chlorella pyrenoidosa was experimentally investigated for phycoremediation and dye removal from textile wastewater (TWW) in batch cultures. Growth of alga was observed at various concentration of textile wastewater (25%, 50%, 75% and 100%) and was found in a range of 8.1-14 μg ml(-1) day(-1). Growth study revealed that alga potentially grows up to 75% concentrated textile wastewater and reduces phosphate, nitrate and BOD by 87%, 82% and 63% respectively. Methylene blue dye (MB) removal was also observed by using dry and wet algal biomass harvested after phycoremediation. Adsorption isotherms (Langmuir and Freundlich) and kinetic models (pseudo first and second order) were applied on adsorption process. Dry algal biomass (DAB) was found more efficient biosorbent with large surface area and showed high binding affinity for MB dye in compare to wet algal biomass (WAB). The RL value for both biosorbent showed feasible adsorption process as the obtained value was between 0 and 1. Pseudo second order kinetic model with high degree of correlation coefficient and low sum of error squares (SSE %) value was found more suitable for representation of adsorption process in case of both biosorbents, however pseudo first order also showed high degree of correlation for both biosorbents. PMID:26349408

  18. Metabolic control of urea catabolism in Chlamydomonas reinhardi and Chlorella pyrenoidosa.

    PubMed

    Hodson, R C; Williams, S K; Davidson, W R

    1975-03-01

    In the unicellular green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardi (strain y-1), synthesis of the enzymes required for urea hydrolysis is under substrate induction control by urea and under end product repression control by ammonia. Hydrolysis of urea if effected by the sequential action of the discrete enzymes urea carboxylase and allophanate lyase, collectively called urea amidolyase. The carboxylase converts urea to allophanate in a reaction requiring biotin, adenosine 5'-triphosphate, and Mg2+. The lyase hydrolzyes allophanate to ammonium ions and bicarbonate. Neither activity is present in more than trace amounts when cultures are grown with ammonia or urea plus ammonia, or when they are starved for nitrogen for 8 h. Urea in the absence of ammonia induces both activities 10 to 100 times the basal levels. Addition of ammonia to an induced culture causes complete cessation of carboxylase accumulation and an 80% depression of lyase accumulation. Ammonia does not reduce urea uptake by repressed cells, so it does not prevent induction by the mechanism of inducer exclusion. The unicellular green alga Chlorella pyrenoidosa (strain 3 Emerson) also has discrete carboxylase and lyase enzymes, but only the carboxylase exhibits metabolic control. PMID:1116994

  19. Bioconcentration kinetics of hydrophobic chemicals in different densities of Chlorella pyrenoidosa

    SciTech Connect

    Sijm, D.T.H.M.; Broersen, K.W.; Roode, D.F. de; Mayer, P.

    1998-09-01

    Algal density-dependent bioconcentration factors and rate constants were determined for a series of hydrophobic compounds in Chlorella pyrenoidosa. The apparent uptake rate constants of the hydrophobic compounds in algae varied between 200 and 710,000 L/kg/d, slightly increased with hydrophobicity within an experiment, were relatively constant for each algal density, and fitted fairly within existing allometric relationships. The bioavailability of the hydrophobic test compounds was significantly reduced by sorption by algal exudates. The sorption coefficients of the hydrophobic compounds to the algal exudates were between 80 and 1,200 L/kg, and were for most algal densities in the same order of magnitude as the apparent bioconcentration factors to the algae, that is, between 80 and 60,200 L/kg. In typical field situations, however, no significant reduction in bioavailability due to exudates is expected. The apparent elimination rate constants of the hydrophobic compounds were high and fairly constant for each algal density and varied between 2 and 190/d. Because the apparent elimination rate constants were higher than the growth rate constant, and were independent of hydrophobicity, the authors speculated that other factors dominate excretion, such as exudate excretion-enhanced elimination. Bioconcentration factors increased less than proportional with hydrophobicity, i.e., the octanol-water partition coefficient [K{sub ow}]. The role of algal composition in bioconcentration is evaluated. Bioconcentrations (kinetics) of hydrophobic compounds that are determined at high algal densities should be applied with caution to field situations.

  20. Improved high performance liquid chromatographic method for determination of carotenoids in the microalga Chlorella pyrenoidosa.

    PubMed

    Inbaraj, B Stephen; Chien, J T; Chen, B H

    2006-01-13

    Microalgae have become an important commercial source of carotenoids and microalgae-derived functional foods are consumed by people worldwide. Therefore, an HPLC method was developed to discern the variety and content of carotenoids in the microalga Chlorella pyrenoidosa. The microalga sample was powdered, extracted, saponified and subjected to HPLC analysis. A mobile phase of methanol-acetonitrile-water (84:14:2, v/v/v) (A) and methylene chloride (100%) (B) with the following gradient elution was developed: 100% A and 0% B in the beginning, maintained for 14 min, decreased to 95% A in 25 min, 75% A in 30 min, 74% A in 35 min, 45% A in 50 min and returned to 100% A in 55 min. A total of 32 carotenoids were resolved within 49 min by using a C30 column with flow rate at 1 mL/min and detection at 450 nm. An internal standard beta-apo-8'-carotenal was used to quantify all the carotenoids. All-trans-lutein was present in exceptionally large amount (125034.4 microg/g), followed by cis isomers of lutein (27975.3 microg/g), all-trans-alpha-carotene (2465.8 microg/g), zeaxanthin (2170.3 microg/g), cis isomers of beta-carotene (2159.3 microg/g), all-trans-beta-carotene (2155.0 microg/g), cis isomers of alpha-carotene (1766.7 microg/g), beta-cryptoxanthin (334.9 microg/g), neoxanthin and its cis isomers (199.7 microg/g), neochrome (65.2 microg/g), auroxanthin (38.5 microg/g) and violaxanthin and its cis isomers (38.1 microg/g). PMID:16298378

  1. In Situ Biodiesel Production from Fast-Growing and High Oil Content Chlorella pyrenoidosa in Rice Straw Hydrolysate

    PubMed Central

    Li, Penglin; Miao, Xiaoling; Li, Rongxiu; Zhong, Jianjiang

    2011-01-01

    Rice straw hydrolysate was used as lignocellulose-based carbon source for Chlorella pyrenoidosa cultivation and the feasibility of in situ biodiesel production was investigated. 13.7 g/L sugar was obtained by enzymatic hydrolyzation of rice straw. Chlorella pyrenoidosa showed a rapid growth in the rice straw hydrolysate medium, the maximum biomass concentration of 2.83 g/L was obtained in only 48 hours. The lipid content of the cells reached as high as 56.3%. In situ transesterification was performed for biodiesel production. The optimized condition was 1 g algal powder, 6 mL n-hexane, and 4 mL methanol with 0.5 M sulfuric acid at the temperature of 90°C in 2-hour reaction time, under which over 99% methyl ester content and about 95% biodiesel yield were obtained. The results suggested that the method has great potential in the production of biofuels with lignocellulose as an alternative carbon source for microalgae cultivation. PMID:21318171

  2. Growth and Metabolism of the Green Alga, Chlorella Pyrenoidosa, in Simulated Microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mills, W. Ronald

    2003-01-01

    The effect of microgravity on living organisms during space flight has been a topic of interest for some time, and a substantial body of knowledge on the subject has accumulated. Despite this, comparatively little information is available regarding the influence of microgravity on algae, even though it has been suggested for long duration flight or occupancy in space that plant growth systems, including both higher plants and algae, are likely to be necessary for bioregenerative life support systems. High-Aspect-Ratio Rotating-Wall Vessel or HARV bioreactors developed at Johnson Space Center provide a laboratory-based approach to investigating the effects of microgravity on cellular reactions. In this study, the HARV bioreactor was used to examine the influence of simulated microgravity on the growth and metabolism of the green alga, Chlorella pyrenoidosa. After the first 2 days of culture, cell numbers increased more slowly in simulated microgravity than in the HARV gravity control; after 7 days, growth in simulated microgravity was just over half (58%) that of the gravity control and at 14 days it was less than half (42%). Chlorophyll and protein were also followed as indices of cell competence and function; as with growth, after 2-3 days, protein and chlorophyll levels were reduced in modeled microgravity compared to gravity controls. Photosynthesis is a sensitive biochemical index of the fitness of photosynthetic organisms; thus, CO2-dependent O2 evolution was tested as a measure of photosynthetic capacity of cells grown in simulated microgravity. When data were expressed with respect to cell number, modeled microgravity appeared to have little effect on CO2 fixation. Thus, even though the overall growth rate was lower for cells cultured in microgravity, the photosynthetic capacity of the cells appears to be unaffected. Cells grown in simulated microgravity formed loose clumps or aggregates within about 2 days of culture, with aggregation increasing over time

  3. Lipid accumulation and biosynthesis genes response of the oleaginous Chlorella pyrenoidosa under three nutrition stressors

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Microalgae can accumulate considerable amounts of lipids under different nutrient-deficient conditions, making them as one of the most promising sustainable sources for biofuel production. These inducible processes provide a powerful experimental basis for fully understanding the mechanisms of physiological acclimation, lipid hyperaccumulation and gene expression in algae. In this study, three nutrient-deficiency strategies, viz nitrogen-, phosphorus- and iron-deficiency were applied to trigger the lipid hyperaccumulation in an oleaginous Chlorella pyrenoidosa. Regular patterns of growth characteristics, lipid accumulation, physiological parameters, as well as the expression patterns of lipid biosynthesis-related genes were fully analyzed and compared. Results Our results showed that all the nutrient stress conditions could enhance the lipid content considerably compared with the control. The total lipid and neutral lipid contents exhibit the most marked increment under nitrogen deficiency, achieving 50.32% and 34.29% of dry cell weight at the end of cultivation, respectively. Both photosynthesis indicators and reactive oxygen species parameters reveal that physiological stress turned up when exposed to nutrient depletions. Time-course transcript patterns of lipid biosynthesis-related genes showed that diverse expression dynamics probably contributes to the different lipidic phenotypes under stress conditions. By analyzing the correlation between lipid content and gene expression level, we pinpoint several genes viz. rbsL, me g6562, accA, accD, dgat g2354, dgat g3280 and dgat g7063, which encode corresponding enzymes or subunits of malic enzyme, ACCase and diacylglycerol acyltransferase in the de novo TAG biosynthesis pathway, are highly related to lipid accumulation and might be exploited as target genes for genetic modification. Conclusion This study provided us not only a comprehensive picture of adaptive mechanisms from physiological perspective, but

  4. Effects of various amino acids as organic nitrogen sources on the growth and biochemical composition of Chlorella pyrenoidosa.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Weiguo; Zhang, Zhenhua; Yan, Shaohua

    2015-12-01

    This study investigated the effects of eighteen l-amino acids on the growth and biochemical composition of Chlorella pyrenoidosa. Under the nitrate deficiency condition, ten l-amino acids were found to exert stronger stimulative effects on the algal growth than the other amino acids. After 10-day culture, addition of 0.5gL(-1) the above mentioned ten amino acids significantly increased the cellular protein contents by 441.3-110.8%, respectively, and significantly decreased the carbohydrate contents by 60.7-16.2%, respectively. Under the normal nitrate condition, the cellular biochemical composition was not significantly affected by addition of serine, leucine, proline, aspartic acid, asparagine, and glycine, whereas addition of aspartic acid and arginine increased the algal biomass by 110.2% and 62.8% compared with the control. Finally, the significance of this work in the biotechnological application of culturing C. pyrenoidosa in organic wastewater rich in amino acids was further discussed. PMID:26356118

  5. Herbicidal effects of harmaline from Peganum harmala on photosynthesis of Chlorella pyrenoidosa: probed by chlorophyll fluorescence and thermoluminescence.

    PubMed

    Deng, Chunnuan; Shao, Hua; Pan, Xiangliang; Wang, Shuzhi; Zhang, Daoyong

    2014-10-01

    The herbicidal effects of harmaline extracted from Peganum harmala seed on cell growth and photosynthesis of green algae Chlorella pyrenoidosa were investigated using chlorophyll a fluorescence and thermoluminescence techniques. Exposure to harmaline inhibited cell growth, pigments contents and oxygen evolution of C. pyrenoidosa. Oxygen evolution was more sensitive to harmaline toxicity than cell growth or the whole photosystem II (PSII) activity, maybe it was the first target site of harmaline. The JIP-test parameters showed that harmaline inhibited the donor side of PSII. Harmaline decreased photochemical efficiency and electron transport flow of PSII but increased the energy dissipation. The charge recombination was also affected by harmaline. Amplitude of the fast phase decreased and the slow phase increased at the highest level of harmaline. Electron transfer from QA(-) to QB was inhibited and backward electron transport flow from QA(-) to oxygen evolution complex was enhanced at 10 μg mL(-1) harmaline. Exposure to 10 μg mL(-1) harmaline caused appearance of C band in thermoluminescence. Exposure to 5 μg mL(-1) harmaline inhibited the formation of proton gradient. The highest concentration of harmaline treatment inhibited S3QB(-) charge recombination but promoted formation of QA(-)YD(+) charge pairs. P. harmala harmaline may be a promising herbicide because of its inhibition of cell growth, pigments synthesis, oxygen evolution and PSII activities. PMID:25307462

  6. Effect of temperature on extracellular organic matter (EOM) of Chlorella pyrenoidosa and effect of EOM on irreversible membrane fouling.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Fangchao; Su, Yiming; Tan, Xiaobo; Chu, Huaqiang; Zhang, Yalei; Yang, Libin; Zhou, Xuefei

    2015-12-01

    Extracellular organic matter (EOM) can cause serious membrane fouling during the algae harvesting process. In this study, the secretion of EOM, including bound-EOM (bEOM) and dissolved-EOM (dEOM), by Chlorella pyrenoidosa (C. pyrenoidosa) at different culturing temperatures, and their influences on membrane filtration, have been investigated. The secretion of EOM was markedly reduced at high temperatures. The specific EOM secretion rate (SEOM) reached 831.1 ± 55.3mg/g at the lowest temperatures of 15 °C; in contrast, the SEOM decreased to only 370-442 and 356-406 mg/g with temperature rising above 20-25 and 30-35 °C, respectively. Based on membrane filtration experiments, the influence of EOM on irreversible membrane fouling was studied. In a critical flux experiment, low critical flux (24 L/m(2)h) was observed in a system with a high EOM concentration. The fouled membranes were rinsed by water and then used for continuous filtration, scanning electron microscope (SEM) analysis and fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) analysis. The results revealed that there was irreversible membrane fouling caused by EOM, and irreversible membrane fouling can be more serious when an algae solution contains high EOM levels. PMID:26440759

  7. Hydrogen evolution as a consumption mode of reducing equivalents in green algal fermentation. [Chlamydomonas reinhardii; Chlorella pyrenoidosa; Chlorococcum minutum

    SciTech Connect

    Ohta, S.; Miyamoto, K.; Miura, Y.

    1987-04-01

    Dark anaerobic fermentation in the green algae Chlamydomonas MGA 161, Chlamydomonas reinhardtii, Chlorella pyrenoidosa, and Chlorococcum minutum was studied. Their isolate, Chlamydomonas MGA 161, was unusual in having high H/sub 2/ but almost no formate. The fermentation pattern in Chlamydomonas MGA 161 was altered by changes in the NaCl or NH/sub 4/Cl concentration. Glycerol formation increased at low (0.1%) and high (7%) NaCl concentrations starch degradation, and formation of ethanol, H/sub 2/, and CO/sub 2/ increased with the addition of NH/sub 4/Cl to above 5 millimolar in N-deficient cells. C. reinhardtii and C.pyrenoidosa exhibited a very similar anaerobic metabolism, forming formate, acetate and ethanol in a ratio of about 2:2:1. C. minimum was also unusual in forming acetate, glycerol, and CO/sub 2/ as its main products, with H/sub 2/, formate, and ethanol being formed in negligible amounts. In the presence of CO, ethanol formation increased twofold in Chlamydomonas MGA 161 and C. reinhardtii, but the fermentation pattern in C. minimum did not change. An experiment with hypophosphite addition showed that dark H/sub 2/ evolution of the Escherichia coli type could be ruled out in Chlamydomonas MGA 161 and C. reinhardtii. Among the green algae investigated, three fermentation types were identified by the distribution pattern of the end products, which reflected the consumption model of reducing equivalents in the cells.

  8. Cultivation of Chlorella pyrenoidosa in outdoor open raceway pond using domestic wastewater as medium in arid desert region.

    PubMed

    Dahmani, Siham; Zerrouki, Djamal; Ramanna, Luveshan; Rawat, Ismail; Bux, Faizal

    2016-11-01

    Chlorella pyrenoidosa was cultivated in secondary wastewater effluent to assess its nutrient removal capabilities. Wastewaters were obtained from a wastewater treatment plant located in Ouargla, Algeria. The experiments were conducted in winter under natural sunlight in an outdoor open raceway pond situated in the desert area. The highest biomass of the microalgae was found to be 1.71±0.04g/L. Temperatures ranged between 18 and 31°C. The average annual insolation was no less than 3500h with an annual solar irradiance of more than 2000kWh/m(2). Analyses of different parameters including COD, NH4(+)-N and TP were conducted throughout the cultivation period. Their average removal efficiencies were 78%, 95% and 81% respectively. The results demonstrated the potential of nutrient removal by microalgae grown on secondary wastewater in arid areas. PMID:27528269

  9. Effects of paraquat on photosynthetic pigments, antioxidant enzymes, and gene expression in Chlorella pyrenoidosa under mixotrophic compared with autotrophic conditions.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Weiguo; Liu, Min; Zhang, Peiliang; Yu, Fugen; Lu, Shan; Li, Pengfu; Zhou, Junying

    2014-11-01

    Only limited information is available on herbicide toxicity to algae under mixotrophic conditions. In the present study, we studied the effects of the herbicide paraquat on growth, photosynthetic pigments, antioxidant enzymes, and gene expression in Chlorella pyrenoidosa under mixotrophic compared with autotrophic conditions. The mean measured exposure concentrations of paraquat under mixotrophic and autotrophic conditions were in the range of 0.3-3.4 and 0.6-3.6 μM, respectively. Exposure to paraquat for 72 h under both autotrophic and mixotrophic conditions induced decreased growth and chlorophyll (Chl) content, increased superoxide dismutase and peroxidase activities, and decreased transcript abundances of three photosynthesis-related genes (light-independent protochlorophyllide reductase subunit, photosystem II protein D1, and ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase large subunit [rbcL]). Compared with autotrophic conditions, the inhibition percentage of growth rate under mixotrophic conditions was lower at 0.8 μM paraquat, whereas it was greater at 1.8 and 3.4 μM paraquat. With exposure to 0.8-3.4 μM paraquat, the inhibition rates of Chl a and b content under mixotrophic conditions (43.1-52.4% and 54.6-59.7%, respectively) were greater compared with autotrophic conditions, whereas the inhibition rate of rbcL gene transcription under mixotrophic conditions (35.7-44.0%) was lower. These data showed that similar to autotrophic conditions, paraquat affected the activities of antioxidant enzymes and decreased Chl synthesis and transcription of photosynthesis-related genes in C. pyrenoidosa under mixotrophic conditions, but a differential susceptibility to paraquat toxicity occurred between autotrophically versus mixotrophically grown cells. PMID:25038722

  10. A Comprehensive Study on Chlorella pyrenoidosa for Phenol Degradation and its Potential Applicability as Biodiesel Feedstock and Animal Feed.

    PubMed

    Das, Bhaskar; Mandal, Tapas K; Patra, Sanjukta

    2015-07-01

    The present work evaluates the phenol degradative performance of microalgae Chlorella pyrenoidosa. High-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) analysis showed that C. pyrenoidosa degrades phenol completely up to 200 mg/l. It could also metabolize phenol in refinery wastewater. Biokinetic parameters obtained are the following: growth kinetics, μ max (media) > μ max (refinery wastewater), K s(media) < K s(refinery wastewater), K I(media) > K I(refinery wastewater); degradation kinetics, q max (media) > q max (refinery wastewater), K s(media) < K s(refinery wastewater), K I(media) > K I(refinery wastewater). The microalgae could cometabolize the alkane components present in refinery wastewater. Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) fingerprinting of biomass indicates intercellular phenol uptake and breakdown into its intermediates. Phenol was metabolized as an organic carbon source leading to higher specific growth rate of biomass. Phenol degradation pathway was elucidated using HPLC, liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS) and ultraviolet-visible (UV-visible) spectrophotometry. It involved both ortho- and meta-pathway with prominence of ortho-pathway. SEM analysis shows that cell membrane gets wrinkled on phenol exposure. Phenol degradation was growth and photodependent. Infrared analysis shows increased intracellular accumulation of neutral lipids opening possibility for utilization of spent biomass as biodiesel feedstock. The biomass after lipid extraction could be used as protein supplement in animal feed owing to enhanced protein content. The phenol remediation ability coupled with potential applicability of the spent biomass as biofuel feedstock and animal feed makes it a potential candidate for an environmentally sustainable process. PMID:25951780

  11. Application of light-emitting diodes in bioreactors: flashing light effects and energy economy in algal culture (Chlorella pyrenoidosa).

    PubMed

    Matthijs, H C; Balke, H; van Hes, U M; Kroon, B M; Mur, L R; Binot, R A

    1996-04-01

    Light-emitting diodes (LEDs) were used as the sole light source in continuous culture of the green alga Chlorella pyrenoidosa. The LEDs applied show a peak emission at 659 nm with a half-power bandwidth of 30 nm. Selection of this wavelength range, which is optimal for excitation of chlorophylls a and b in their "red" absorption bands makes all photons emitted potentially suitable for photosynthesis. No need for additional supply of blue light was found. A standardized panel with 2 LEDs cm(-2) fully covered one side of the culture vessel. At standard voltage in continuous operation the light output of the diode panel appeared more than sufficient to reach maximal growth. Flash operation (5-mus pulse duration) enables potential use of higher operating voltages which may render up to three times more light output. Flat airlift fermentor-type continuous culture devices were used to estimate steady state growth rates of Chlorella pyrenoidosa as a function of the light flux (micromol photons x m(-2) x s(-1)) and the flashing frequency of the light-emitting diodes (which determines the duration of the dark "off" time between the 5-micros "on" pulses). At the fixed voltage and turbidostat setting applied a 20-kHz frequency, which equals dark periods of 45 mus, still permitted the maximum growth rate to become nearly reached. Lower frequencies fell short of sustaining the maximal growth rate. However, the light flux decrease resulting from lowering of the flash frequency appeared to reduce the observed growth rates less than in the case of a similar flux decrease with light originating from LEDs in continuous operation. Flash application also showed reduction of the quantum requirement for oxygen evolution at defined frequencies. The frequency domain of interest was between 2 and 14 kHz. LEDs may open interesting new perspectives for studies on optimization of mixing in mass algal culture via the possibility of separation of interests in the role of modulation on light

  12. Growth kinetics and yield study on Chlorella pyrenoidosa in chemically defined media

    SciTech Connect

    Joung, J.J.; Akin, C.

    1983-01-01

    A Chlorella culture free from heterotrophic bacteria was obtained by eliminating the bacteria with successive use of antibiotics and agar plants. The purified Chlorella was cultured in chemically defined media. Under a photon flux (16.7 mw/cmS) similar to insolation, both heterotrophic and mixotrophic cultures were luxurious but the growth rates of autotrophic cultures were reduced substantially. The Chlorella culture grew most rapidly at 30 C in the absence of heterotrophic bacteria, and the highest specific growth rates were 1.43 x 10 h and 0.46 x 10 h for mixotrophic and autotrophic cultures, respectively. The highest photosynthetic efficiency over its growth period was 2.9% for autotrophic cultures. Elimination of heterotrophic bacteria from Chlorella cultures improved the algal growth rate as well as biomass yield significantly. A parasite of 0.1- m size was identified. The motile microorganism played an important role in the growth of the Chlorella and appeared to be common to green algae. 16 references, 2 tables.

  13. Optimization of phenol degradation by the microalga Chlorella pyrenoidosa using Plackett-Burman Design and Response Surface Methodology.

    PubMed

    Dayana Priyadharshini, S; Bakthavatsalam, A K

    2016-05-01

    Statistical optimization designs were used to optimize the phenol degradation using Chlorella pyrenoidosa. The important factor influencing phenol degradation was identified by two-level Plackett-Burman Design (PBD) with five factors. PBD determined the following three factors as significant for phenol degradation viz. algal concentration, phenol concentration and reaction time. CCD and RSM were applied to optimize the significant factors identified from PBD. The results obtained from CCD indicated that the interaction between the concentration of algae and phenol, phenol concentration and reaction time and algal concentration and reaction time affect the phenol degradation (response) significantly. The predicted results showed that maximum phenol degradation of 97% could be achieved with algal concentration of 4g/L, phenol concentration of 0.8g/L and reaction time of 4days. The predicted values were in agreement with experimental values with coefficient of determination (R(2)) of 0.9973. The model was validated by subsequent experimentations at the optimized conditions. PMID:26878360

  14. Effects of cadmium on the activities of photosystems of Chlorella pyrenoidosa and the protective role of cyclic electron flow.

    PubMed

    Wang, Shuzhi; Zhang, Daoyong; Pan, Xiangliang

    2013-09-01

    Cadmium (Cd) shows high toxicity to aquatic microalgae. Many studies showed that Cd inhibited activities of photosystem II (PSII) but the effects of heavy metals on photosystem I (PSI) and cyclic electron flow (CEF) were still controversial and unclear. The effects of CdCl2 on the activities of PSI, PSII and CEF in Chlorella pyrenoidosa was measured simultaneously in the present study. In presence of 200μM of Cd, ultrastructure of some cells was strongly modified. Cd exposure led to decrease of the activities of photosynthetic oxygen evolution and respiration. PSII was more sensitive to Cd treatment than PSI. Cd treatment showed significant inhibition on the photochemical quantum yield and electron transport rate of PSII. Cd increased the quantum yield of non-light-induced non-photochemical fluorescence quenching, indicating the damage of PSII. The activity of PSI showed tolerance to Cd treatment with concentration less than 100μM in the experiment. Linear electron flow (LEF) made significant contribution to the photochemical quantum yield of PSI of the untreated cells, but decreased with increasing Cd concentration. The contribution of CEF to the yield of PSI increased with increasing Cd concentration. The activation of CEF after exposure to Cd played an essential role for the protection of PSI. PMID:23726885

  15. Self-sustainable Chlorella pyrenoidosa strain NCIM 2738 based photobioreactor for removal of Direct Red-31 dye along with other industrial pollutants to improve the water-quality.

    PubMed

    Sinha, Surbhi; Singh, Rachana; Chaurasia, Akhilesh K; Nigam, Subhasha

    2016-04-01

    The genotoxic and carcinogenic effects of diazo dyes from industrial effluents pose a serious environmental threat by contaminating aquatic ecosystem and consequently impact human health. The potential of a diazo dye resistant, self-sustainable photosynthetic green alga Chlorella pyrenoidosa NCIM 2738 provides a viable green technology for an efficient biodegradation of diazo dye Direct Red-31 (DR-31) and overall improvement of water quality. Herein, we for the first time report the degradation of DR-31 using C. pyrenoidosa. Batch experiments were performed to optimize the effect of initial pH, contact time and toxicity-range of DR-31 in order to achieve the optimal conditions for maximum decolourization in continuous cyclic photobioreactor. In batch culture, C. pyrenoidosa exhibited 96% decolourization with 40mgL(-1) dye at pH3. The equilibrium was attained within 30min and the maximum uptake of 30.53mgg(-1) algal biomass was observed during this period. This was found to be fitted well with Langmuir and Freundlich adsorption isotherm. The FT-IR spectra showed a change from -N=N- to N-H suggesting the possible involvement of the azoreductase enzyme. The application of C. pyrenoidosa not only degraded the DR-31 but also improved the quality of water by reducing COD (82.73%), BOD (56.44%), sulphate (54.54%), phosphate (19.88%), and TDS (84.18%) which was further enhanced in continuous cyclic bioreactor treatment. The results clearly showed that C. pyrenoidosa provides an efficient, self-sustainable green technology for decolourization of DR-31 and improved the water quality. PMID:26826964

  16. Nutritional Supplementation with Chlorella pyrenoidosa Lowers Serum Methylmalonic Acid in Vegans and Vegetarians with a Suspected Vitamin B₁₂ Deficiency.

    PubMed

    Merchant, Randall Edward; Phillips, Todd W; Udani, Jay

    2015-12-01

    Since vitamin B12 occurs in substantial amounts only in foods derived from animals, vegetarians and particularly vegans are at risk of developing deficiencies of this essential vitamin. The chlorella used for this study is a commercially available whole-food supplement, which is believed to contain the physiologically active form of the vitamin. This exploratory open-label study was performed to determine if adding 9 g of Chlorella pyrenoidosa daily could help mitigate a vitamin B12 deficiency in vegetarians and vegans. Seventeen vegan or vegetarian adults (26-57 years of age) with a known vitamin B12 deficiency, as evidenced by a baseline serum methylmalonic acid (MMA) level above 270 nmol/L at screening, but who otherwise appeared healthy were enrolled in the study. Each participant added 9 g of C. pyrenoidosa to their daily diet for 60 ± 5 days and their serum MMA, vitamin B12, homocysteine (Hcy) levels as well as mean corpuscular volume (MCV), hemoglobin (Hgb), and hematocrit (Hct) were measured at 30 and 60 days from baseline. After 30 and 60 days, the serum MMA level fell significantly (P < .05) by an average ∼34%. Fifteen of the 17 (88%) subjects showed at least a 10% drop in MMA. At the same time, Hcy trended downward and serum vitamin B12 trended upward, while MCV, Hgb, and Hct appeared unchanged. The results of this work suggest that the vitamin B12 in chlorella is bioavailable and such dietary supplementation is a natural way for vegetarians and vegans to get the vitamin B12 they need. PMID:26485478

  17. Glycolate metabolism in low and high CO sub 2 -grown chlorella pyrenoidosa and Pavlova lutheri as determined by sup 18 O-labeling

    SciTech Connect

    de Veau, E.J.; Burris, J.E. )

    1989-11-01

    Photorespiration in Chlorella pyrenoidosa Chick. was assayed by measuring {sup 18}O-labeled intermediates of the glycolate pathway. Glycolate, glycine, serine, and excreted glycolate were isolated and analyzed on a gas chromatograph/mass spectrometer to determine isotopic enrichment. Rates of glycolate synthesis were determined from {sup 18}O-labeling kinetics of the intermediates, pool sizes, derived rate equations, and nonlinear regression techniques. Glycolate synthesis was higher in high CO{sub 2}-grown cells than in air-grown cells when both were assayed under the same O{sub 2} and CO{sub 2} concentrations. Synthesis of glycolate, for both types of cells, was stimulated by high O{sub 2} levels and inhibited by high CO{sub 2} levels. Glycolate synthesis in 1.5% CO{sub 2}-grown Chlorella, when exposed to a 0.035% CO{sub 2} atmosphere, increased from about 41 to 86 nanomoles per milligram chlorophyll per minute when the O{sub 2} concentration was increased from 21 to 40%. Glycolate synthesis in air-grown cells increased from 2 to 6 nanomoles per milligram chlorophyll per minute under the same gas levels. Synthesis was undetectable when either the O{sub 2} concentration was lowered to 2% or the CO{sub 2}-concentration was raised to 1.5%. Glycolate excretion was also sensitive to O{sub 2} and CO{sub 2} concentrations in 1.5% CO{sub 2}-grown cells and the glycolate that was excreted was {sup 18}O-labeled. Air-grown cells did not excrete glycolate under any experimental condition. Indirect evidence indicated that glycolate may be excreted as a lactone in Chlorella. Photorespiratory {sup 18}O-labeling kinetics were determined for Pavlova lutheri, which unlike Chlorella and higher plants did not directly synthesize glycine and serine from glycolate. This alga did excrete a significant proportion of newly synthesized glycolate into the media.

  18. Effects of light-emitting diodes under capped daily energy consumption with combinations of electric power and photoperiod on cultivation of Chlorella pyrenoidosa.

    PubMed

    Li, Jinhao; Bin, Hui; Lin, Jian; Chen, Feng; Miao, Xiaoling

    2016-04-01

    Effects of white light-emitting diodes (LEDs) with different light intensities at photoperiod of 18:6h on Chlorella pyrenoidosa growth were investigated. The microalgae exhibited the highest growth rate 89.0mgL(-1)d(-1) and growth efficiency 97.8mgL(-1)KWh(-1) at 110 and 90μmolm(-2)s(-1), respectively. Based on the discovery of this asynchronous phenomenon between growth rate and growth efficiency, influences of LEDs (red, blue and white) under capped daily energy consumption (0.80KWh d(-1)) with combinations of electric power (33.3, 44.4 and 66.6w) and photoperiod (24:0, 18:6 and 12:12h) were further investigated. The highest growth efficiency 106.4mgL(-1)KWh(-1) and growth rate 85.1mgL(-1)d(-1) were both obtained under white-33.3w-24h. Growth efficiency and growth rate were simultaneously improved 1.1 times through this method above. The order of growth efficiency under different LEDs were white>blue>red. PMID:26826572

  19. Outdoor cultures of Chlorella pyrenoidosa in the effluent of anaerobically digested activated sludge: The effects of pH and free ammonia.

    PubMed

    Tan, Xiao-Bo; Zhang, Ya-Lei; Yang, Li-Bin; Chu, Hua-Qiang; Guo, Jun

    2016-01-01

    A freshwater algae Chlorella pyrenoidosa was cultured outdoors using anaerobically digested activated sludge effluent. The effects of pH variations were evaluated. The coupled pH variations and free ammonia toxicity significantly affected the algal growth, lipids accumulation and contamination control during every season. The free ammonia toxicity at high pH levels actually inhibited the algal growth. Compared to an optimal algal growth at a pH of 5.7-6.5, biomass productivity at a high pH of 8.3-8.8 was reduced by 67.15±6.98%, 54.39±6.42% and 83.63±5.71% in the spring, fall and summer, respectively. When the pH rose above 9.1-9.6, algae were unable to grow in the wastewater. However, high pH levels reduced contamination (e.g., bacteria and microalgae grazers) and triggered lipids accumulation in algal cells. These findings suggest that pH control strategies are essential for this type of algal wastewater system, where ammonia is the dominant nitrogen source. PMID:26547810

  20. Modulation of PSI and PSII Organization During Loss and Repair of Photosynthetic Activity in a Temperature Sensitive Mutant of Chlorella pyrenoidosa1

    PubMed Central

    Lavintman, Nelly; Galling, Gottfried; Ohad, Itzhak

    1981-01-01

    Photosynthetic activity and organization of chlorophyll(Chl)-protein complexes in a temperature sensitive mutant of Chlorella pyrenoidosa have been investigated. The mutant is practically indistinguishable from wild type cells when grown at 25 C. However, mutant cells grown at 33 C do not synthesize Chl and lose their ability to evolve O2. O2 evolution and Chl synthesis are restored upon incubation of the 33 C grown cells at 25 C in absence of cell division (repair). Based on polarographic measurements of photosynthetic activities, variable fluorescence, 77 K fluorescence emission, excitation spectra, analysis of Chl-protein complexes, membrane polypeptide pattern and radioactive labeling using sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis techniques during growth at 33 C and/or under repair conditions, it is concluded that: a, polypeptides of chloroplastic translation required for H2O-splitting activity are absent from membranes of 33 C grown cells. Their synthesis and/or assembly during the repair process is light-dependent. b, Polypeptides required for the formation of photosystem II and photosytem I reaction centers continue to be formed during growth at 33 C in absence of Chl synthesis. These can be assembled into functional units following Chl synthesis and energization of the membranes during the repair process. c, The Chl-protein complex serving as an antenna of photosystem I is disorganized, and the Chl is used for the formation of functional reaction centers of photosystem I during growth at 33 C. These results show that Chl-protein complexes can be dissociated in vivo and reassembled in a different way; and formation of Chl-protein complexes can occur stepwise from previously synthesized and newly formed components including both polypeptides and Chl. Images PMID:16662090

  1. Extraction procedure optimization and the characteristics of dissolved extracellular organic matter (dEOM) and bound extracellular organic matter (bEOM) from Chlorella pyrenoidosa.

    PubMed

    Chu, Huaqiang; Yu, Hong; Tan, Xiaobo; Zhang, Yalei; Zhou, Xuefei; Yang, Libin; Li, Deyi

    2015-01-01

    The influence of extracellular organic matter (EOM) on membrane fouling is important for algae cultivation and harvest. Therefore, a deep understanding of EOM and a systematic extraction process are necessary. In this study, EOM from Chlorella pyrenoidosa was thoroughly studied by using different methods to stratify it into dEOM and bEOM. Among these methods, the centrifugation method was optimized for dEOM extraction, and the heating and NaOH methods were optimized for bEOM extraction. In addition, dEOM and bEOM were compared by using analytical methods to obtain their protein and polysaccharide contents, dissolved organic carbon (DOC) contents, specific UV absorbances (SUVA), zeta potentials, FTIR spectra, EEM fluorescence spectra, hydrophobicities and molecular weights. The dEOM and bEOM both primarily consisted of proteins and polysaccharides and carried negative charges with relatively low SUVAs. The protein/polysaccharide ratios in the bEOM were 6.35 (control), 12.54 (heating) and 7.54 (NaOH) mg mg(-1), which were greater than the ratio of the dEOM (2.93 mg mg(-1)). Furthermore, the hydrophobicity analysis indicated that the bEOM had higher hydrophobic fraction content than the dEOM. However, both types of EOM were more hydrophilic in terms of the DOC. Finally, size fraction analysis indicated that high-MW (>100 kDa) and low-MW fractions (<1 kDa) were the primary components in EOMs. Specifically, a greater high-MW fraction was observed in the bEOM, which primarily consisted of DOC and proteins. In contrast with the proteins, the polysaccharides of the dEOM and bEOM were primarily distributed in the hydrophilic and low-MW fractions. Using comparative analysis, centrifugation at 10,000×g for 10 min was chosen as the best method for extracting dEOM. In contrast, heating at 70°C for 20 min was the best method for extracting bEOM. PMID:25559611

  2. Changes of ribulose bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase content, ribulose bisphosphate concentration, and photosynthetic activity during adaptation of high-CO/sub 2/ grown cells to low-CO/sub 2/ conditions in Chlorella pyrenoidosa

    SciTech Connect

    Yokota, A.; Canvin, D.T.

    1986-02-01

    Changes of some photosynthetic properties of high-CO/sub 2/ grown cells of Chlorella pyrenoidosa during adaptation to low-CO/sub 2/ conditions have been investigated. The K/sub m/ value of photosynthesis of the high-CO/sub 2/ grown cells for dissolved inorganic carbon was 3.3 millimolar and decreased to 25 to 30 micromolar within 4 hours after transferring to air. In the presence of saturating CO/sub 2/ concentrations the photosynthetic activity of the high-CO/sub 2/ grown cells was 1.5 times as high as that of the low-CO/sub 2/ grown cells. There was a significant rise of the photosynthetic activity during adaptation of the high-CO/sub 2/ grown cells to air, followed by a steady decrease. The activity of ribulose 1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase in both the high and low-CO/sub 2/ grown cells was close to the photosynthetic activity of the cells. The concentration of ribulose 1,5-bisphosphate (RuBP) was higher in the low-CO/sub 2/ adapting and low-CO/sub 2/ grown celsl than in the high-CO/sub 2/ grown cells regardless of the photosynthetic rate. This seems to be due to an increased RuBP regeneration activity during adaptation followed by maintenance of the new higher concentration. The RuBP level always exceeded the concentration of ribulose 1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase RuBP binding sites in both the high- and low-CO/sub 2/ grown cells at any dissolved inorganic carbon concentration.

  3. PS II model-based simulations of single turnover flash-induced transients of fluorescence yield monitored within the time domain of 100 ns-10 s on dark-adapted Chlorella pyrenoidosa cells.

    PubMed

    Belyaeva, N E; Schmitt, F-J; Steffen, R; Paschenko, V Z; Riznichenko, G Yu; Chemeris, Yu K; Renger, G; Rubin, A B

    2008-01-01

    The set up described in Steffen et al. (Biochemistry 40:173-180, 2001) was used to monitor in the time domain from 100 ns to 10 s single turnover flash-induced transients of the normalized fluorescence yield (SFITFY) on dark-adapted cells of the thermophilic algae Chlorella pyrenoidosa Chick. Perfect data fit was achieved within the framework of a previously proposed model for the PS II reaction pattern (Lebedeva et al., Biophysics 47:968-980, 2002; Belyaeva et al., Biophysics 51:860-872, 2006) after its modification by taking into account nonradiative decay processes including nonphotochemical quenching due to time-dependent populations of P680(+*) and (3)Car. On the basis of data reported in the literature, a consistent set of rate constants was obtained for electron transfer at the donor and acceptor sides of PS II, pH in lumen and stroma, the initial redox state of plastoquinone pool and the rate of plastoquinone oxidation. The evaluation of the rate constant values of dissipative processes due to quenching by carotenoid triplets in antennae and P680(+*)Q(A)(-*) recombination as well as the initial state populations after excitation with a single laser flash are close to that outlined in (Steffen et al., Biochemistry 44:3123-3133, 2005a). The simulations based on the model of the PS II reaction pattern provide information on the time courses of population probabilities of different PS II states. We analyzed the maximum (F(m)(STF)) and minimum (F(0)) of the normalized FL yield dependence on the rate of the recombination processes (radiative and dissipative nonradiative) and of P680(+*) reduction. The developed PS II model provides a basis for theoretical comparative analyses of time-dependent fluorescence signals, observed at different photosynthetic samples under various conditions (e.g. presence of herbicides, other stress conditions, excitation with actinic pulses of different intensity, and duration). PMID:18937044

  4. Glutamic Acid Decarboxylation in Chlorella12

    PubMed Central

    Lane, T. R.; Stiller, Mary

    1970-01-01

    The decarboxylation of endogenous free glutamic acid by Chlorella pyrenoidosa, Marburg strain, was induced by a variety of metabolic poisons, by anaerobic conditions, and by freezing and thawing the cells. The rate of decarboxylation was proportional to the concentration of inhibitor present. Possible mechanisms which relate the effects of the various conditions on glutamate decarboxylation and oxygen consumption by Chlorella are discussed. Images PMID:5429350

  5. Modeling of the redox state dynamics in photosystem II of Chlorella pyrenoidosa Chick cells and leaves of spinach and Arabidopsis thaliana from single flash-induced fluorescence quantum yield changes on the 100 ns-10 s time scale.

    PubMed

    Belyaeva, N E; Schmitt, F-J; Paschenko, V Z; Riznichenko, G Yu; Rubin, A B

    2015-08-01

    The time courses of the photosystem II (PSII) redox states were analyzed with a model scheme supposing a fraction of 11-25 % semiquinone (with reduced [Formula: see text]) RCs in the dark. Patterns of single flash-induced transient fluorescence yield (SFITFY) measured for leaves (spinach and Arabidopsis (A.) thaliana) and the thermophilic alga Chlorella (C.) pyrenoidosa Chick (Steffen et al. Biochemistry 44:3123-3132, 2005; Belyaeva et al. Photosynth Res 98:105-119, 2008, Plant Physiol Biochem 77:49-59, 2014) were fitted with the PSII model. The simulations show that at high-light conditions the flash generated triplet carotenoid (3)Car(t) population is the main NPQ regulator decaying in the time interval of 6-8 μs. So the SFITFY increase up to the maximum level [Formula: see text]/F 0 (at ~50 μs) depends mainly on the flash energy. Transient electron redistributions on the RC redox cofactors were displayed to explain the SFITFY measured by weak light pulses during the PSII relaxation by electron transfer (ET) steps and coupled proton transfer on both the donor and the acceptor side of the PSII. The contribution of non-radiative charge recombination was taken into account. Analytical expressions for the laser flash, the (3)Car(t) decay and the work of the water-oxidizing complex (WOC) were used to improve the modeled P680(+) reduction by YZ in the state S 1 of the WOC. All parameter values were compared between spinach, A. thaliana leaves and C. pyrenoidosa alga cells and at different laser flash energies. ET from [Formula: see text] slower in alga as compared to leaf samples was elucidated by the dynamics of [Formula: see text] fractions to fit SFITFY data. Low membrane energization after the 10 ns single turnover flash was modeled: the ∆Ψ(t) amplitude (20 mV) is found to be about 5-fold smaller than under the continuous light induction; the time-independent lumen pHL, stroma pHS are fitted close to dark estimates. Depending on the flash energy used at 1

  6. [Research status and prospect on hot water extract of Chlorella: the high value-added bioactive substance from Chlorella].

    PubMed

    Zhuang, Xiuyuan; Huang, Yingming; Zhang, Daojing; Tao, Liming; Li, Yuanguang

    2015-01-01

    Chlorella is nutritious and has been used as a functional food much earlier than the other microalgae. C. pyrenoidosa, the potential microalgae which is currently cultured and developed for the new strategic industry of biofuels production and biological CO2 fixation, is a new resource food announced by the Ministry of Health of the People's Republic of China late 2012. Accumulation of high value-added substances in C. pyrenoidosa during the cultivation for lipid makes it possible to reduce the costs for C. pyrenoidosa-based biofuels production. Among these potential substances, hot water extract of Chlorella (CE), commercially known as "Chlorella growth factor", is the unique one that makes Chlorella more precious than the other algae, and the market price of CE is high. It is believed that CE is effective in growth promotion and immunoregulation. However, there is no systematic analysis on the research status of CE and its bioactivity. The present report summarized recent research progress of CE and its bioactivity. Generally, besides the main effect on immunoregulation and tumor inhibition, CE was efficient in improving metabolic syndrome, scavenging for free radicals, protecting against ultraviolet damage, chelating heavy metals, and protecting liver and bowel. Several major challenges in CE research as well as its prospects were also analysed in the present report. PMID:26021077

  7. CHLORELLA VIRUSES

    PubMed Central

    Yamada, Takashi; Onimatsu, Hideki; Van Etten, James L.

    2007-01-01

    Chlorella viruses or chloroviruses are large, icosahedral, plaque‐forming, double‐stranded‐DNA—containing viruses that replicate in certain strains of the unicellular green alga Chlorella. DNA sequence analysis of the 330‐kbp genome of Paramecium bursaria chlorella virus 1 (PBCV‐1), the prototype of this virus family (Phycodnaviridae), predict ∼366 protein‐encoding genes and 11 tRNA genes. The predicted gene products of ∼50% of these genes resemble proteins of known function, including many that are completely unexpected for a virus. In addition, the chlorella viruses have several features and encode many gene products that distinguish them from most viruses. These products include: (1) multiple DNA methyltransferases and DNA site‐specific endonucleases, (2) the enzymes required to glycosylate their proteins and synthesize polysaccharides such as hyaluronan and chitin, (3) a virus‐encoded K+ channel (called Kcv) located in the internal membrane of the virions, (4) a SET domain containing protein (referred to as vSET) that dimethylates Lys27 in histone 3, and (5) PBCV‐1 has three types of introns; a self‐splicing intron, a spliceosomal processed intron, and a small tRNA intron. Accumulating evidence indicates that the chlorella viruses have a very long evolutionary history. This review mainly deals with research on the virion structure, genome rearrangements, gene expression, cell wall degradation, polysaccharide synthesis, and evolution of PBCV‐1 as well as other related viruses. PMID:16877063

  8. Catalytic conversion of Chlorella pyrenoidosa to biofuels in supercritical alcohols over zeolites.

    PubMed

    Yang, Le; Ma, Rui; Ma, Zewei; Li, Yongdan

    2016-06-01

    Microalgae have been considered as the feedstock for the third generation biofuels production, given its high lipid content and fast productivity. Herein, a catalytic approach for microalgae liquefaction to biocrude is examined in a temperature range of 250-300°C in methanol and ethanol over zeolites. Higher biocrude yield was achieved in ethanol and at lower temperatures, while better quality biocrude with higher light biocrude ratio and lower average molecular weight (Mw) was favored in methanol and at higher temperatures. Application of zeolites improves the biocrude quality significantly. Among the catalysts, HY shows the strongest acidity and performs the best to produce high quality biocrude. Solid residues have been extensively explored with thermal gravity analysis and elemental analysis. It is reported for the first time that up to 99wt.% of sulfur is deposited in the solid residue at 250°C for both solvents. PMID:26990399

  9. Mutate Chlorella sp. by nuclear irradiation to fix high concentrations of CO2.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Jun; Huang, Yun; Feng, Jia; Sun, Jing; Zhou, Junhu; Cen, Kefa

    2013-05-01

    To improve biomass productivity and CO2 fixation of microalgae under 15% (v/v) CO2 of flue gas, Chlorella species were mutated by nuclear irradiation and domesticated with high concentrations of CO2. The biomass yield of Chlorella pyrenoidosa mutated using 500 Gy of (60)Co γ irradiation increased by 53.1% (to 1.12 g L(-1)) under air bubbling. The mutants were domesticated with gradually increased high concentrations of CO2 [from 0.038% (v/v) to 15% (v/v)], which increased the biomass yield to 2.41 g L(-1). When light transmission and culture mixing in photo-bioreactors were enhanced at 15% (v/v) CO2, the peak growth rate of the domesticated mutant (named Chlorella PY-ZU1) was increased to 0.68 g L(-1) d(-1). When the ratio of gas flow rate (L min(-1)) to 1L of microalgae culture was 0.011, the peak CO2 fixation rate and the efficiency of Chlorella PY-ZU1 were 1.54 g L(-1) d(-1) and 32.7%, respectively. PMID:23567722

  10. Inhibition of lipase and inflammatory mediators by Chlorella lipid extracts for antiacne treatment

    PubMed Central

    Sibi, G.

    2015-01-01

    Acne vulgaris is a chronic inflammatory disease, and its treatment is challenging due to the multifactorial etiology and emergence of antibiotic-resistant Propionibacterium acnes strains. This study was focused to reduce antibiotics usage and find an alternate therapeutic source for treating acne. Lipid extracts of six Chlorella species were tested for inhibition of lipase, reactive oxygen species (ROS) production, cytokine production using P. acnes (Microbial Type Culture Collection 1951). Lipase inhibitory assay was determined by dimercaprol Tributyrate - 5, 5'- dithiobis 2-nitrobenzoic acid method and ROS production assay was performed using nitro-blue tetrazolium test. The anti-inflammatory activity of algal lipid extracts was determined by in vitro screening method based on inhibition of pro-inflammatory cytokines, tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α) produced by human peripheral blood mononuclear cells. Minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) values of lipid extracts were determined by microdilution method, and the fatty acid methyl esters (FAME) were analyzed by gas chromatography-mass spectroscopy. Chlorella ellipsoidea has the highest lipase inhibitory activity with 61.73% inhibition, followed by Chlorella vulgaris (60.31%) and Chlorella protothecoides (58.9%). Lipid extracts from C. protothecoides and C. ellipsoidea has significantly reduced the ROS production by 61.27% and 58.34% respectively. Inhibition of pro-inflammatory cytokines TNF-α showed the inhibition ranging from 58.39% to 78.67%. C. vulgaris has exhibited the MICvalue of 10 μg/ml followed by C. ellipsoidea, C. protothecoides and Chlorella pyrenoidosa (20 μg/ml). FAME analysis detected 19 fatty acids of which 5 were saturated fatty acids, and 14 were unsaturated fatty acids ranging from C14 to C24. The results suggest that lipid extracts of Chlorella species has significant inhibitory activity on P. acnes by inhibiting lipase activity. Further, anti-inflammatory reaction caused by the

  11. Impacts of CO2 concentration on growth, lipid accumulation, and carbon-concentrating-mechanism-related gene expression in oleaginous Chlorella.

    PubMed

    Fan, Jianhua; Xu, Hui; Luo, Yuanchan; Wan, Minxi; Huang, Jianke; Wang, Weiliang; Li, Yuanguang

    2015-03-01

    Biodiesel production by microalgae with photosynthetic CO2 biofixation is thought to be a feasible way in the field of bioenergy and carbon emission reduction. Knowledge of the carbon-concentrating mechanism plays an important role in improving microalgae carbon fixation efficiency. However, little information is available regarding the dramatic changes of cells suffered upon different environmental factors, such as CO2 concentration. The aim of this study was to investigate the growth, lipid accumulation, carbon fixation rate, and carbon metabolism gene expression under different CO2 concentrations in oleaginous Chlorella. It was found that Chlorella pyrenoidosa grew well under CO2 concentrations ranging from 1 to 20 %. The highest biomass and lipid productivity were 4.3 g/L and 107 mg/L/day under 5 % CO2 condition. Switch from high (5 %) to low (0.03 %, air) CO2 concentration showed significant inhibitory effect on growth and CO2 fixation rate. The amount of the saturated fatty acids was increased obviously along with the transition. Low CO2 concentration (0.03 %) was suitable for the accumulation of saturated fatty acids. Reducing the CO2 concentration could significantly decrease the polyunsaturated degree in fatty acids. Moreover, the carbon-concentrating mechanism-related gene expression revealed that most of them, especially CAH2, LCIB, and HLA3, had remarkable change after 1, 4, and 24 h of the transition, which suggests that Chlorella has similar carbon-concentrating mechanism with Chlamydomonas reinhardtii. The findings of the present study revealed that C. pyrenoidosa is an ideal candidate for mitigating CO2 and biodiesel production and is appropriate as a model for mechanism research of carbon sequestration. PMID:25620370

  12. Influence of extractive solvents on lipid and fatty acids content of edible freshwater algal and seaweed products, the green Microalga Chlorella kessleri and the Cyanobacterium Spirulina platensis.

    PubMed

    Ambrozova, Jarmila Vavra; Misurcova, Ladislava; Vicha, Robert; Machu, Ludmila; Samek, Dusan; Baron, Mojmir; Mlcek, Jiri; Sochor, Jiri; Jurikova, Tunde

    2014-01-01

    Total lipid contents of green (Chlorella pyrenoidosa, C), red (Porphyra tenera, N; Palmaria palmata, D), and brown (Laminaria japonica, K; Eisenia bicyclis, A; Undaria pinnatifida, W, WI; Hizikia fusiformis, H) commercial edible algal and cyanobacterial (Spirulina platensis, S) products, and autotrophically cultivated samples of the green microalga Chlorella kessleri (CK) and the cyanobacterium Spirulina platensis (SP) were determined using a solvent mixture of methanol/chloroform/water (1:2:1, v/v/v, solvent I) and n-hexane (solvent II). Total lipid contents ranged from 0.64% (II) to 18.02% (I) by dry weight and the highest total lipid content was observed in the autotrophically cultivated cyanobacterium Spirulina platensis. Solvent mixture I was found to be more effective than solvent II. Fatty acids were determined by gas chromatography of their methyl esters (% of total FAMEs). Generally, the predominant fatty acids (all results for extractions with solvent mixture I) were saturated palmitic acid (C16:0; 24.64%-65.49%), monounsaturated oleic acid (C18:1(n-9); 2.79%-26.45%), polyunsaturated linoleic acid (C18:2(n-6); 0.71%-36.38%), α-linolenic acid (C18:3(n-3); 0.00%-21.29%), γ-linolenic acid (C18:3(n-6); 1.94%-17.36%), and arachidonic acid (C20:4(n-6); 0.00%-15.37%). The highest content of ω-3 fatty acids (21.29%) was determined in Chlorella pyrenoidosa using solvent I, while conversely, the highest content of ω-6 fatty acids (41.42%) was observed in Chlorella kessleri using the same solvent. PMID:24566307

  13. Genomic Foundation of Starch-to-Lipid Switch in Oleaginous Chlorella spp.

    PubMed

    Fan, Jianhua; Ning, Kang; Zeng, Xiaowei; Luo, Yuanchan; Wang, Dongmei; Hu, Jianqiang; Li, Jing; Xu, Hui; Huang, Jianke; Wan, Minxi; Wang, Weiliang; Zhang, Daojing; Shen, Guomin; Run, Conglin; Liao, Junjie; Fang, Lei; Huang, Shi; Jing, Xiaoyan; Su, Xiaoquan; Wang, Anhui; Bai, Lili; Hu, Zanmin; Xu, Jian; Li, Yuanguang

    2015-12-01

    The ability to rapidly switch the intracellular energy storage form from starch to lipids is an advantageous trait for microalgae feedstock. To probe this mechanism, we sequenced the 56.8-Mbp genome of Chlorella pyrenoidosa FACHB-9, an industrial production strain for protein, starch, and lipids. The genome exhibits positive selection and gene family expansion in lipid and carbohydrate metabolism and genes related to cell cycle and stress response. Moreover, 10 lipid metabolism genes might be originated from bacteria via horizontal gene transfer. Transcriptomic dynamics tracked via messenger RNA sequencing over six time points during metabolic switch from starch-rich heterotrophy to lipid-rich photoautotrophy revealed that under heterotrophy, genes most strongly expressed were from the tricarboxylic acid cycle, respiratory chain, oxidative phosphorylation, gluconeogenesis, glyoxylate cycle, and amino acid metabolisms, whereas those most down-regulated were from fatty acid and oxidative pentose phosphate metabolism. The shift from heterotrophy into photoautotrophy highlights up-regulation of genes from carbon fixation, photosynthesis, fatty acid biosynthesis, the oxidative pentose phosphate pathway, and starch catabolism, which resulted in a marked redirection of metabolism, where the primary carbon source of glycine is no longer supplied to cell building blocks by the tricarboxylic acid cycle and gluconeogenesis, whereas carbon skeletons from photosynthesis and starch degradation may be directly channeled into fatty acid and protein biosynthesis. By establishing the first genetic transformation in industrial oleaginous C. pyrenoidosa, we further showed that overexpression of an NAD(H) kinase from Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) increased cellular lipid content by 110.4%, yet without reducing growth rate. These findings provide a foundation for exploiting the metabolic switch in microalgae for improved photosynthetic production of food and fuels. PMID:26486592

  14. Chlorella viruses isolated in China

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Y.; Burbank, D.E.; Van Etten, J.L. )

    1988-09-01

    Plaque-forming viruses of the unicellular, eukaryotic, exsymbiotic, Chlorella-like green algae strain NC64A, which are common in the United States, were also present in fresh water collected in the People's Republic of China. Seven of the Chinese viruses were examined in detail and compared with the Chlorella viruses previously isolated in the United States. Like the American viruses, the Chinese viruses were large polyhedra and sensitive to chloroform. They contained numerous structural proteins and large double-stranded DNA genomes of at least 300 kilobase pairs. Each of the DNAs from the Chinese viruses contained 5-methyldeoxycytosine, which varied from 12.6 to 46.7% of the deoxycytosine, and N{sup 6}-methyldeoxyadenosine, which varied from 2.2 to 28.3% of the deoxyadenosine. Four of the Chinese virus DNAs hybridized extensively with {sup 32}P-labeled DNA from the American virus PBCV-1, and three hybridized poorly.

  15. Effect of light state transitions on the apparent absorption cross section of Photosystem II in Chlorella

    SciTech Connect

    Falkowski, P.G.; Fujita, Yoshihiko

    1986-01-01

    The distribution of excitation energy between photosystems may profoundly affect the quantum yield of photosynthetic oxygen evolution. Excitation energy absorbed by pigment molecules is transferred to reaction centers, where it may potentially drive a photochemical event. To balance the photochemical events in PSII with those in PSI, excitation energy may be transferred between PSII and PSI. This type of energy transfer has been inferred primarily in the steady state quantum yield of oxygen evolution and/or fluorescence with changes in excitation wavelength. These so called ''state transitions'' have been attributed to changes in either the absorption cross section of PSII or ''spillover'' of excitation energy between the two photosystems. We report here on measurements of relative absorption cross sections of PSII under state I and state II light conditions. We simultaneously followed the yields of O/sub 2/ and the change in fluorescence yields, ..delta.. phi, as a function of flash energy using single turnover xenon flashes. Our data suggest that the effective absorption cross section of PSII does not change within +- 10% under physiological conditions in unpoisoned Chlorella pyrenoidosa. 13 refs., 3 figs.

  16. Chlorella: 125 years of the green survivalist.

    PubMed

    Krienitz, Lothar; Huss, Volker A R; Bock, Christina

    2015-02-01

    Chlorella, the archetype of unicellular green algae, is a high-performance primary producer in aquatic and terrestrial ecosystems. Under the simple spherical morphology of Chlorella, many other 'green balls' unfolded as independent phylogenetic lineages as a result of convergent evolution. By contrast, green algae with strikingly different phenotypes were unmasked as close relatives of Chlorella by modern molecular techniques. Here, we point to the increasing impact of these diverse protists on ecology, evolution, and biotechnology in the light of integrative taxonomy. PMID:25500553

  17. [Studies on chemical compounds of Chlorella sorokiniana].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ling; Liu, Ping-huai; Wu, Jiao-na; Yang, Guo-fu; Suo, Yang-yang; Luo, Ning; Chen, Chen

    2015-04-01

    Chemical constituents of Chlorella sorokiniana were isolated and purified by repeated column chromatographies, over silicagel and Sephadex LH-20. Their structures were identified on the basis of physicochemical properties and spectroscopic data analysis. Five compounds were obtained from the petroleum ether extract of Chlorella sorokiniana, and their structures were identified as (22E, 24R)-5alpha, 3beta-epidioxiergosta-6, 22-dien-3beta-ol(1),(24S)-ergosta-7-en-3beta-ol(2), loliolide(3), stigmasta-7,22-dien-3beta,5alpha,6alpha-triol(4), and 3beta-hydroxy-5alpha,6alpha-epoxy-7-megastigmen-9-one(5). The main liposoluble fractions from Chlorella sorokiniana maiuly contain fatty acids, alkyl acids and olefine acids. Components 1-5 were isolated from the genus Chlorella for the first time. PMID:26281556

  18. Biology and Industrial Applications of Chlorella: Advances and Prospects.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jin; Chen, Feng

    2016-01-01

    Chlorella represents a group of eukaryotic green microalgae that has been receiving increasing scientific and commercial interest. It possesses high photosynthetic ability and is capable of growing robustly under mixotrophic and heterotrophic conditions as well. Chlorella has long been considered as a source of protein and is now industrially produced for human food and animal feed. Chlorella is also rich in oil, an ideal feedstock for biofuels. The exploration of biofuel production by Chlorella is underway. Chlorella has the ability to fix carbon dioxide efficiently and to remove nutrients of nitrogen and phosphorous, making it a good candidate for greenhouse gas biomitigation and wastewater bioremediation. In addition, Chlorella shows potential as an alternative expression host for recombinant protein production, though challenges remain to be addressed. Currently, omics analyses of certain Chlorella strains are being performed, which will help to unravel the biological implications of Chlorella and facilitate the future exploration of industrial applications. PMID:25537445

  19. Substitution of stable isotopes in Chlorella

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Flaumenhaft, E.; Katz, J. J.; Uphaus, R. A.

    1969-01-01

    Replacement of biologically important isotopes in the alga Chlorella by corresponding heavier stable isotopes produces increasingly greater deviations from the normal cell size and changes the quality and distribution of certain cellular components. The usefulness of isotopically altered organisms increases interest in the study of such permuted organisms.

  20. Effect of aniline on Chlorella vulgaris

    SciTech Connect

    Amman, H.M.; Terry, b.

    1985-08-01

    A direct correlation between concentration of waste effluent, including aniline, released by a dye company into a waterway in Eastern North Carolina, and the rise and fall of populations of Chlorella, was demonstrated previously. The present study establishes threshold concentrations of aniline which affect growth of these algae, but also shows that physiologic parameters within the organism, such as the rate of photosynthesis, were decreased as sub-threshold concentrations of toxicant.

  1. Effect of Chlorella intake on Cadmium metabolism in rats.

    PubMed

    Shim, Jee Ae; Son, Young Ae; Park, Ji Min; Kim, Mi Kyung

    2009-01-01

    This study was performed to investigate the effect of chlorella on cadmium (Cd) toxicity in Cd- administered rats. Sixty male Sprague-Dawley rats (14 week-old) were blocked into 6 groups. Cadmium chloride was given at levels of 0 or 325 mg (Cd: 0, 160 ppm), and chlorella powder at levels of 0, 3 and 5%. Cadmium was accumulated in blood and tissues (liver, kidney and small intestine) in the Cd-exposed groups, while the accumulation of Cd was decreased in the Cd-exposed chlorella groups. Fecal and urinary Cd excretions were remarkably increased in Cd-exposed chlorella groups. Thus, cadmium retention ratio and absorption rate were decreased in the Cd exposed chlorella groups. Urinary and serum creatinine, and creatinine clearance were not changed in experimental animals. In addition, metallothionein (MT) synthesis in tissues was increased by Cd administration. The Cd-exposed chlorella groups indicated lower MT concentration compared to the Cd-exposed groups. Moreover, glomerular filtration rate (GFR) was not changed by dietary chlorella and Cd administration. According to the results above, this study could suggest that Cd toxicity can be alleviated by increasing Cd excretion through feces. Therefore, when exposed to Cd, chlorella is an appropriate source which counteracts heavy metal poisoning, to decrease the damage of tissues by decreasing cadmium absorption. PMID:20016697

  2. Metabolism of urea by Chlorella vulgaris.

    PubMed

    Hodson, R C; Thompson, J F

    1969-05-01

    Urea metabolism was studied with nitrogen-starved cells of Chlorella vulgaris Beijerinck var. viridis (Chodat), a green alga which apparently lacks urease. Incorporation of radioactivity from urea-(14)C into the alcohol-soluble fraction was virtually eliminated in cell suspensions flushed with 10% CO(2) in air. This same result was obtained when expected acceptors of urea carbon were replenished by adding ornithine and glucose with the urea. Several carbamyl compounds, which might be early products of urea metabolism and a source of the (14)CO(2), were not appreciably labeled. If cells were treated with cyanide at a concentration which inhibited ammonia uptake completely and urea uptake only slightly, more than half of the urea nitrogen taken up was found in the medium as ammonia. Cells under nitrogen gas in the dark were unable to take up urea or ammonia, but the normal rate of uptake was resumed in light. Since 3-(3,4-dichlorophenyl)-1,1-dimethylurea did not selectively inhibit this uptake, an active respiration supported by light-dependent oxygen evolution in these cells was ruled out. A tentative scheme for urea metabolism is proposed to consist of an initial energy-dependent splitting of urea into carbon dioxide and ammonia. This reaction in Chlorella is thought to differ from a typical urease-catalyzed reaction by the apparent requirement of a high energy compound, possibly adenosine triphosphate. PMID:5783973

  3. Controlled introduction of selenium into Chlorella cells.

    PubMed

    de Alcantara, S; Lopes, C C; Wagener, K

    1998-12-01

    Selenium (Se) is an important element in the antioxidant system of the human body, and Chlorella, well-known for its therapeutic effects, is the ideal carrier to offer it in the wanted organic form. The kinetics of Se absorption by growing algal cells and its distribution in the cells are studied using radioactive 75Se labelled solutions. There is a rapid Se absorption within the first few minutes at the cell surfaces where it is irreversibly fixed and cannot be absorbed by the human body. In the final state, reached after 24-48 hr, about 40% of the total fixed Se is inside the cells in the wanted organic-bound form. PMID:10093514

  4. Coagulation-membrane filtration of Chlorella vulgaris.

    PubMed

    Lee, Duu-Jong; Liao, Guan-Yu; Chang, Yin-Ru; Chang, Jo-Shu

    2012-03-01

    Filtration-based separation of Chlorella vulgaris, a species with excellent potential for CO(2) capture and lipid production, was investigated using a surface-modified hydrophilic polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) membrane. Coagulation using polyaluminum chloride (PACl) attained maximum turbidity removal at 200 mg L(-1) as Al(2)O(3). The membrane filtration flux at 1 bar increased as the PACl dose increased, regardless of overdosing in the coagulation stage. The filtered cake at the end of filtration tests peaked in solid content at 10 mg L(-1) as Al(2)O(3), reaching 34% w/w, roughly two times that of the original suspension. Differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) tests demonstrate that the cake with minimum water-solid binding strength produced the driest filter cake. Coagulation using 10 mg L(-1) PACl as Al(2)O(3), followed by PTFE membrane filtration at 1 bar, is an effective process for harvesting C. vulgaris from algal froth. PMID:22261659

  5. Pyrroline-5-Carboxylate Reductase in Chlorella autotrophica and Chlorella saccharophila in Relation to Osmoregulation 1

    PubMed Central

    Laliberté, Gilles; Hellebust, Johan A.

    1989-01-01

    Pyrroline-5-carboxylate (P5C) reductase (EC 1.5.1.2), which catalyzes the reduction of P5C to proline, was partially purified from two Chlorella species; Chlorella autotrophica, a euryhaline marine alga that responds to increases in salinity by accumulating proline and ions, and Chlorella saccharophila, which does not accumulate proline for osmoregulation. From the elution profile of this enzyme from an anion exchange column in Tris-HCl buffer (pH 7.6), containing sorbitol and glycine betaine, it was shown that P5C reductase from C. autotrophica was a neutral protein whereas the enzyme from C. saccharophila was negatively charged. The kinetic mechanisms of the reductase was characteristic of a ping-pong mechanism with double competitive substrate inhibition. Both enzymes showed high specificity for NADH as cofactor. The affinities of the reductases for their substrates did not change when the cells were grown at different salinities. In both algae, the apparent Km values of the reductase for P5C and NADH were 0.17 and 0.10 millimolar, respectively. A fourfold increase in maximal velocity of the reductase was observed when C. autotrophica was transferred from 50 to 150% artificial sea water. Even though the reductase was inhibited by NaCl, KCl, and proline, it still showed appreciable activity in the presence of these compounds at molar concentrations. A possible role for the regulation of proline synthesis at the step catalyzed by P5C reductase is discussed in relation to the specificity of P5C reductase for NADH and its responses to salt treatments. PMID:16667157

  6. Antioxidant and antiproliferative activities of Spirulina and Chlorella water extracts.

    PubMed

    Wu, Li-chen; Ho, Ja-an Annie; Shieh, Ming-Chen; Lu, In-Wei

    2005-05-18

    Liver fibrosis is a chronic liver disease that will further develop to cirrhosis if severe damage continues to form. A potential treatment for liver fibrosis is to inhibit activated hepatic stellate cell (HSC) proliferation and, subsequently, to induce HSC apoptosis. It has been reported that antioxidants are able to inhibit the proliferation of HSCs. In this study, the aqueous extract of spirulina was chosen as the source of antioxidant to investigate the inhibitory effect on the proliferation of HSC. The growth inhibitory effects of aqueous spirulina and chlorella extract on human liver cancer cells, HepG2, were also studied and compared in pairs. Results indicated that the total phenol content of spirulina was almost five times greater than that of chlorella (6.86 +/- 0.58 vs 1.44 +/- 0.04 mg tannic acid equivalent/g of algae powder, respectively). The antioxidant activity of spirulina determined by the ABTS*+ method was higher than chlorella (EC50: 72.44 +/- 0.24 micromol of trolox equivalent/g of spirulina extract vs 56.09 +/- 1.99 micromol of trolox equivalent/g of chlorella extract). Results of DPPH* assay also showed a similar trend as the ABTS*+ assay (EC50: 19.39 +/- 0.65 micromol of ascorbic acid equivalent/g of spirulina extract vs 14.04 +/- 1.06 micromol of ascorbic acid equivalent/g of chlorella extract). The aqueous extracts of these two algae both showed antiproliferative effects on HSC and HepG2, but spirulina was a stronger inhibitor than chlorella. Annexin-V staining showed that aqueous extract of spirulina induced apoptosis of HSC after 12 h of treatment. In addition, the aqueous extract of spirulina triggered a cell cycle arrest of HSC at the G2/M phase. PMID:15884862

  7. Culture of microalgae Chlorella minutissima for biodiesel feedstock production.

    PubMed

    Tang, Haiying; Chen, Meng; Garcia, M E D; Abunasser, Nadia; Ng, K Y Simon; Salley, Steven O

    2011-10-01

    Microalgae are among the most promising of non-food based biomass fuel feedstock alternatives. Algal biofuels production is challenged by limited oil content, growth rate, and economical cultivation. To develop the optimum cultivation conditions for increasing biofuels feedstock production, the effect of light source, light intensity, photoperiod, and nitrogen starvation on the growth rate, cell density, and lipid content of Chlorella minutissima were studied. The fatty acid content and composition of Chlorella minutissima were also investigated under the above conditions. Fluorescent lights were more effective than red or white light-emitting diodes for algal growth. Increasing light intensity resulted in more rapid algal growth, while increasing the period of light also significantly increased biomass productivity. Our results showed that the lipid and triacylglycerol content were increased under N starvation conditions. Thus, a two-phase strategy with an initial nutrient-sufficient reactor followed by a nutrient deprivation strategy could likely balance the desire for rapid and high biomass generation (124 mg/L) with a high oil content (50%) of Chlorella minutissima to maximize the total amount of oil produced for biodiesel production. Moreover, methyl palmitate (C16:0), methyl oleate (C18:1), methyl linoleate (C18:2), and methyl linolenate (C18:3) are the major components of Chlorella minutissima derived FAME, and choice of light source, intensity, and N starvation impacted the FAME composition of Chlorella minutissima. The optimized cultivation conditions resulted in higher growth rate, cell density, and oil content, making Chlorella minutissima a potentially suitable organism for biodiesel feedstock production. PMID:21495011

  8. Ozone inhibition of photosynthesis in Chlorella sorokiniana

    SciTech Connect

    Heath, R.L.; Frederick, P.E.; Chimiklis, P.E.

    1982-01-01

    Exposure of Chlorella sorokiniana (07-11-05) to ozone inhibits photosynthesis. In this study, the effects of ozone on O/sub 2/ evolution and fluorescence yields are used to characterize this inhibition. At an ozone dose of about 3 micromoles delivered to 2 x 10/sup 9/ cells, the photosynthetic rate of the cells is inhibited 50%, as indicated by a decrease in bicarbonate-stimulated O/sub 2/ evolution (control rate, 1.4 +- 0.3 x 10/sup -15/ moles per cell per minute). Normal patterns of chlorophyll fluorescence are also altered. Upon continuous exposure to ozone (3.5 x 10/sup -7/ moles O/sub 3/ per minute), three stages of change in relative fluorescence yields are observed: (a) a rise in variable yield with no corresponding change in nonvariable yield (after 1-2 minutes), which was interpreted to be a shift in the energy flow pathway; (b) a decline in variable yield with a slight rise in nonvariable yield (requiring 3-5 minutes), interpreted to be a blockage in the CO/sub 2/ fixation pathways; and (c) complete blockage of variable yield with a concurrent decline in nonvariable yield (8-10 minutes), interpreted to be a destruction of the pigment system. The timing of each stage depended upon the ozone concentration and its delivery rate to the cell suspension. These results are compared with ozone-induced decline in photosynthesis and leaf water potential changes reported for other plant systems. Evidence is also presented to suggest that ozone effects on the photosynthetic processes are attributable to ionic imbalances brought about by ozone interaction with the plasmalemma rather than a direct effect on the chloroplast. 25 references, 6 figures, 2 tables.

  9. Screening and characterization of oleaginous Chlorella strains and exploration of photoautotrophic Chlorella protothecoides for oil production.

    PubMed

    Sun, Zheng; Zhou, Zhi-gang; Gerken, Henri; Chen, Feng; Liu, Jin

    2015-05-01

    The growth and oil production of nine Chlorella strains were comparatively assessed and Chlorellaprotothecoides CS-41 demonstrated the greatest lipid production potential. The effects of different nitrogen forms and concentrations, phosphorus concentrations and light intensities on growth and oil production were studied in laboratory columns. C. protothecoides CS-41 accumulated lipids up to 55% of dry weight, with triacylglycerol and oleic acid being 71% of total lipids and 59% of total fatty acids, respectively. High biomass and lipid productivities were achieved in outdoor panel PBRs, up to 1.25 and 0.59 g L(-1) day(-1), or 44. 1 and 16.1 g m(-2) day(-1), respectively. A two-stage cultivation strategy was proposed to enhance the algal biomass and lipid production. This is the first comprehensive investigation of both indoor and outdoor photoautotrophic C. protothecoides cultures for oil production, and C. protothecoides CS-41 represents a promising biofuel feedstock worthy of further exploration. PMID:25266686

  10. Chlorella vulgaris: A Multifunctional Dietary Supplement with Diverse Medicinal Properties.

    PubMed

    Panahi, Yunes; Darvishi, Behrad; Jowzi, Narges; Beiraghdar, Fatemeh; Sahebkar, Amirhossein

    2016-01-01

    Chlorella vulgaris is a green unicellular microalgae with biological and pharmacological properties important for human health. C. vulgaris has a long history of use as a food source and contains a unique and diverse composition of functional macro- and micro-nutrients including proteinsChlorella vulgaris is a green unicellular microalgae with biological and pharmacological properties important for human health. C. vulgaris has a long history of use as a food source and contains a unique and diverse composition of functional macro- and micro-nutrients including proteins, omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids, polysaccharides, vitamins and minerals. Clinical trials have suggested that supplementation with C. vulgaris can ameliorate amelioration hyperlipidemia and hyperglycemia, and protect against oxidative stress, cancer and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. In this review, we summarize the findings on the health benefits of Chlorella supplementation and the molecular mechanisms underlying these effects., omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids, polysaccharides, vitamins and minerals. Clinical trials have suggested that supplementation with C. vulgaris can ameliorate amelioration hyperlipidemia and hyperglycemia, and protect against oxidative stress, cancer and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. In this review, we summarize the findings on the health benefits of Chlorella supplementation and the molecular mechanisms underlying these effects. PMID:26561078

  11. Functional expression of the Chlorella hexose transporter in Schizosaccharomyces pombe.

    PubMed Central

    Sauer, N; Caspari, T; Klebl, F; Tanner, W

    1990-01-01

    Schizosaccharomyces pombe cells were transformed with an S. pombe expression vector containing a full-length cDNA of the Chlorella hexose transporter. The transformed cells accumulated 3-O-methylglucose up to 10-fold, whereas wild-type S. pombe and control transformants could only equilibrate this sugar analogue. In a pH-jump experiment, in which extracellular pH was lowered by 1.9 units, the accumulation ratio was increased in transformed cells but not in control cells. This result indicates that the gene product, Chlorella H+/glucose-symporter protein, and a pH gradient suffice for active sugar uptake. Km values for glucose, 6-deoxyglucose, and 3-O-methylglucose of 1.5 x 10(-5) M, 2.7 x 10(-4) M, and 1.0 x 10(-3) M, respectively, were identical in Chlorella and in S. pombe cells transformed with Chlorella cDNA and approximately 100-fold lower than those of the endogenous transport system of S. pombe. Images PMID:11607110

  12. Utilization of papaya waste and oil production by Chlorella protothecoides

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Algae derived oils have outstanding potential for use in biodiesel production. Chlorella protothecoides has been shown to accumulate lipid up to 60% of its cellular dry weight with glucose supplementation under heterotrophic growth conditions. To reduce production costs, alternative carbon feedstock...

  13. Vitreoscilla hemoglobin gene ( vgb) improves lutein production in Chlorella vulgaris

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Ruijuan; Lin, Xiangzhi

    2014-03-01

    Vitreoscilla hemoglobin is an oxygen-binding protein that promotes oxygen delivery and reduces oxygen consumption under low oxygen conditions to increase the efficiency of cell respiration and metabolism. In this study, we introduced a Vitreoscilla hemoglobin gene ( vgb) into Chlorella vulgaris by Agrobacterium tumefaciens -mediated transformation (ATMT). PCR analysis confirmed that the vgb gene was successfully integrated into the Chlorella vulgaris genome. Analysis of biomass obtained in shake flasks revealed transformant biomass concentrations as high as 3.28 g/L, which was 38.81% higher than that of the wild-type strain. Lutein content of transformants also increased slightly. Further experiments recovered a maximum lutein yield of 2.91 mg/L from the transformants, which was 36.77% higher than that of the wild-type strain. The above results suggest that integrated expression of the vgb gene may improve cell growth and lutein yield in Chlorella vulgaris, with applications to lutein production from Chlorella during fermentation.

  14. Uptake and bioaccumulation of three PCBs by Chlorella fusca

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, K.; Rott, B.; Korte, F.

    1982-01-01

    This paper reports the bioaccumulation of three PCBs (2,4'-dichlorobiphenyl, 2,4,6,2'-tetrachlorobiphenyl and 2,4,6,2',4'-pentachlorobiphenyl) by the green alga Chlorella fusca under various conditions. A probable pattern of the bioconcentration mechanism is suggested. No metabolites were extracted from algae or water 6 days after incubation with PCBs.

  15. Evaluation of Chlorella as a Decorporation Agent to Enhance the Elimination of Radioactive Strontium from Body

    PubMed Central

    Ogawa, Kazuma; Fukuda, Tadahisa; Han, Jaegab; Kitamura, Yoji; Shiba, Kazuhiro; Odani, Akira

    2016-01-01

    Background Release of radionuclides, such as 137Cs and 90Sr, into the atmosphere and the ocean presents an important problem because internal exposure to 137Cs and 90Sr could be very harmful to humans. Chlorella has been reported to be effective in enhancing the excretion of heavy metals; thus, we hypothesized that Chlorella could also enhance the elimination of 137Cs or 90Sr from the body. We evaluated the potential of Chlorella as a decorporation agent in vitro and in vivo, using 85Sr instead of 90Sr. Methods In vitro experiments of adsorption of 137Cs and 85Sr to Chlorella were performed under wide pH conditions. The maximum sorption capacity of Chlorella to strontium was estimated using the Langmuir model. A 85Sr solution was orally administrated to mice pretreated with Chlorella. At 48 h after 85Sr administration, the biodistribution of radioactivity was determined. Results In the in vitro experiments, although 85Sr barely adsorbed to Chlorella at low pH, the 85Sr adsorption ratio to Chlorella increased with increasing pH. The maximum sorption capacity of Chlorella to strontium was 9.06 mg / g. 137Cs barely adsorbed to Chlorella under any pH conditions. In the biodistribution experiments, bone accumulation of radioactivity after 85Sr administration was significantly decreased in the Chlorella pretreatment group compared with the non-treatment control group. Conclusions In conclusion, these results indicated that Chlorella could inhibit the absorption of 90Sr into the blood and enhance the elimination of 90Sr from the body through adsorption in intestine. Further studies are required to elucidate the mechanism and the components of Chlorella needed for adsorption to strontium and could promote the development of more effective decorporation agents. PMID:26828430

  16. Photosynthetic Shutdown in Chlorella NC64A Associated with the Infection Cycle of Paramecium bursaria Chlorella Virus-1.

    PubMed Central

    Seaton, GGR.; Lee, K.; Rohozinski, J.

    1995-01-01

    The effects of the algal virus Paramecium bursaria Chlorella virus-1 on the photosynthetic physiology of its host, Chlorella NC64A, was studied by observing changes in Chl fluorescence quenching and O2 exchange. Metabolic changes were calibrated against electron microscopic analysis of the morphological changes that occur during the infection cycle. It takes approximately 10 h from attachment of the virus to final lysis of the host cell, so a complete infection cycle can be observed continuously in one experiment. During the early stages of the infection cycle many rapid changes occurred in the host cell's metabolism and these were reflected in changes of photosynthetic and respiratory rates. The dramatic inhibition of photosynthesis in Chlorella NC64A cells by P. bursaria Chlorella virus-1 has facilitated the use of fluorescence quenching as an accurate measure of the first phase of viral infection (attachment and penetration of the host cell) and the extent to which a population of host cells is infected. Effects of temperature and cation requirement of the infection cycle are described. The relevance of our observations to the events observed during viral infection of higher plants is discussed. PMID:12228553

  17. The optimal hyperspectral quantitative models for chlorophyll-a of chlorella vulgaris

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Qian; Wu, Xiuju

    2009-09-01

    Chlorophyll-a of Chlorella vulgaris had been related with spectrum. Based on hyperspectral measurement for Chlorella vulgaris, the hyperspectral characteristics of Chlorella vulgaris and their optimal hyperspectral quantitative models of chlorophyll-a (Chla) estimation were researched in situ experiment. The results showed that the optimal hyperspectral quantitative model of Chlorella vulgaris was Chla=180.5+1125787(R700)'+2.4 *109[(R700)']2 (P0<.01), and the suitability order of corresponding methods was spectral ratioChlorella vulgaris, two reflectance crests were around 540 nm and 700 nm and their locations moved right while Chl-a concentration increased. The reflectance of Chlorella vulgaris decreases with Cha concentration increase in 540 nm, but on the contrary in 700nm.

  18. Growth of Chlorella sorokiniana at hyperbaric oxygen pressures.

    PubMed

    Richardson, B; Wagner, F W; Welch, B E

    1969-01-01

    The growth rate of Chlorella sorokiniana decreased in a linear fashion as the partial pressure of oxygen was increased from 711 to 1,478 mm of Hg. Under two atmospheres of oxygen pressure, growth ceased after 10 to 12 hr. This cessation of growth was not due to any permanent injury, as growth resumed when oxygen partial pressure was reduced to ambient levels. The inhibition occurred under both autotrophic and heterotrophic growth conditions and was not accompanied by an increase in cell size. The results indicated that the tolerance of Chlorella cells to elevated oxygen pressures was not an absolute immunity, and that inhibition of growth at very high oxygen pressures cannot be accounted for by an inhibition of photosynthesis alone. PMID:5774753

  19. Water Permeability of Chlorella Cell Membranes by Nuclear Magnetic Resonance

    PubMed Central

    Stout, Darryl G.; Steponkus, Peter L.; Bustard, Larry D.; Cotts, Robert M.

    1978-01-01

    Measurement by two nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) techniques of the mean residence time τa of water molecules inside Chlorella vulgaris (Beijerinck) var. “viridis” (Chodot) is reported. The first is the Conlon and Outhred (1972 Biochim Biophys Acta 288: 354-361) technique in which extracellular water is doped with paramagnetic Mn2+ ions. Some complications in application of this technique are identified as being caused by the affinity of Chlorella cell walls for Mn2+ ions which shortens the NMR relaxation times of intra- and extracellular water. The second is based upon observations of effects of diffusion on the spin echo of intra- and extracellular water. Echo attenuation of intracellular water is distinguished from that of extracellular water by the extent to which diffusive motion is restricted. Intracellular water, being restricted to the cell volume, suffers less echo attenuation. From the dependence of echo amplitude upon gradient strength at several values of echo time, the mean residence time of intracellular water can be determined. From the mean residence time of intracellular water, the diffusional water permeability coefficient of the Chlorella membrane is calculated to be 2.1 ± 0.4 × 10−3 cm sec−1. PMID:16660456

  20. Dietary effects of lutein-fortified chlorella on milk components of Holstein cows.

    PubMed

    Jeon, Jin-Young; Park, Keun-Kyu; Lee, Kyung-Woo; Jang, Seung-Wan; Moon, Byung-Hern; An, Byoung-Ki

    2016-01-01

    This study was conducted to investigate the dietary effect of conventional or lutein-fortified chlorella on milk production and lutein incorporation in milk. Fifteen Holstein cows in mid-lactation were used in a 3 × 3 Latin square design each with a 21-day period. Cows were top-dressed daily with 30 g of conventional or lutein-fortified chlorella for 3 weeks. Cows without chlorella served as the control. The feed intake and milk yield were not affected by dietary treatments. The concentrations of milk protein and solids non-fat in groups fed diets containing both conventional and lutein-fortified chlorella were significantly higher than those of the control group (P < 0.001). There was no significant difference in content of milk fat among groups. The levels of plasma glutamic oxaloacetic transaminase, glutamic pyruvic transaminase, interferon-gamma and interleukin-2 were not influenced by the dietary treatments. Lutein content in milk was significantly increased in groups fed lutein-fortified chlorella as compared with those of conventional chlorella and control, respectively (P < 0.01). These results imply that conventional and lutein-fortified chlorella has positive effects on milk components and the use of lutein-fortified chlorella in a dairy diet is effective in the production of milk enriched with lutein. PMID:27386352

  1. Generic concept in Chlorella-related coccoid green algae (Chlorophyta, Trebouxiophyceae).

    PubMed

    Luo, W; Pröschold, T; Bock, C; Krienitz, L

    2010-05-01

    Using a combined set of sequences of SSU and ITS regions of nuclear-encoded ribosomal DNA, the concept of the experimental algal genus Chlorella was evaluated. Conventionally in the genus Chlorella, only coccoid, solitary algae with spherical morphology that do not possess any mucilaginous envelope were included. All Chlorella species reproduce asexually by autospores. However, phylogenetic analyses showed that within the clade of 'true'Chlorella species (Chlorella vulgaris, C. lobophora, and C. sorokiniana), taxa with a mucilaginous envelope and colonial lifeform have also evolved. These algae, formerly designated as Dictyosphaerium, are considered as members of the genus Chlorella. In close relationship to Chlorella, five different genera were supported by the phylogenetic analyses: Micractinium (spherical cells, colonial, with bristles), Didymogenes (ellipsoidal cells, two-celled coenobia, with or without two spines per cell), Actinastrum (ellipsoidal cells within star-shaped coenobia), Meyerella (spherical cells, solitary, without pyrenoids), and Hegewaldia (spherical cells, colonial, with or without bristles, oogamous propagation). Based on the secondary structures of SSU and ITS rDNA sequences, molecular signatures are provided for each genus of the Chlorella clade. PMID:20522192

  2. Ecological role of algobacterial cenosis links (chlorella - associated microflora or associated bacteria)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pechurkin, N. S.

    The problems of interrelation of microalgae and bacteria in the "autotroph - heterotroph" aquatic biotic cycle are discussed. The cause and mechanisms of algobacterial cenosis formation still have been explained contradictorily. This work views the results of experimental and theoretical study of algobacterial cenosis functioning by the example of microalga Chlorella vulgaris and associated microflora. The representatives of Pseudomonas mainly predominate in the Chlorella microbial complex. The experiment at non-sterile batch cultivation of Chlorella on Tamya medium showed that the biomass of microorganisms increases simultaneously with the increase of microalgal biomass. Microflora of Chlorella can use organic materials evolved by Chlorella after photosynthesis for reproduction. Moreover, microorganisms can use dying cells of Chlorella, i.e. form the "producer - reducer" biocycle. To understand the cenosis-forming role of microalgae the mathematical model of the "autotroph - heterotroph" aquatic biotic cycle was constructed taking into consideration the opportunities for microorganisms of using Chlorella photosynthates, dying cells and contribution of links to the nitrogen cycle. The theoretical investigation showed that the biomass of associated bacteria growing on glucose and detritus exceeds the biomass of bacteria using only microalgal photosynthates, which is comparable with experimental data.

  3. Chlorella is an effective dietary source of lutein for human erythrocytes.

    PubMed

    Miyazawa, Taiki; Nakagawa, Kiyotaka; Kimura, Fumiko; Nakashima, Yuya; Maruyama, Isao; Higuchi, Ohki; Miyazawa, Teruo

    2013-01-01

    Chlorella contains a high amount of carotenoids, especially lutein, and has received attention as a possible dietary source for improving carotenoid levels in human blood. In the present study, we performed a 2-month single arm human study, and investigated the efficacy of Chlorella supplementation (9 g Chlorella/day; equivalent to 32 mg lutein/day) on lutein and other carotenoid concentrations in plasma as well as erythrocytes of 12 healthy subjects. Following Chlorella supplementation, lutein was the predominant carotenoid in erythrocytes, showing a 4-fold increase (from 14 to 54 pmol/mL packed cells). After the one month without Chlorella ingestion, erythrocyte lutein then decreased to a basal level (17 pmol/mL packed cells). Erythrocyte carotenoid (lutein, zeaxanthin, α-carotene, and β-carotene) levels were proportional to plasma carotenoid levels. The results suggest the transfer of Chlorella carotenoids, especially lutein, from plasma lipoprotein particles to the erythrocyte membrane. Chlorella intake would be effective for improving and maintaining lutein concentrations in human erythrocytes. PMID:24088514

  4. The inactivation of Chlorella spp. with dielectric barrier discharge in gas-liquid mixture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Dan; Sun, Bing; Zhu, Xiaomei; Yan, Zhiyu; Liu, Hui; Liu, Yongjun

    2013-03-01

    The inactivation of Chlorella spp. with high voltage and frequency pulsed dielectric barrier discharge in hybrid gas-liquid reactor with a suspension electrode was studied experimentally. In the hybrid gas-liquid reactor, a steel plate was used as high voltage electrode while a quartz plate as a dielectric layer, another steel plate placing in the aqueous solution worked as a whole ground electrode. A suspension electrode is installed near the surface of solution between high voltage and ground electrode to make the dielectric barrier discharge uniform and stable, the discharge gap was between the quartz plate and the surface of the water. The effect of peak voltage, treatment time, the initial concentration of Chlorella spp. and conductivity of solution on the inactivation rate of Chlorella spp. was investigated, and the inactivation mechanism of Chlorella spp. preliminarily was studied. Utilizing this system inactivation of Chlorella spp., the inactivation rate increased with increasing of peak voltage, treatment time and electric conductivity. It was found that the inactivation rate of Chlorella spp. arrived at 100% when the initial concentration was 4 × 106 cells mL-1, and the optimum operation condition required a peak voltage of 20 kV, a treatment time of 10 min and a frequency of 7 kHz. Though the increasing of initial concentration of the Chlorella spp. contributed to the addition of interaction probability between the Chlorella spp. and O3, H2O2, high-energy electrons, UV radiation and other active substances, the total inactivation number raise, but the inactivation rate of the Chlorella spp. decreased.

  5. Stability and loading properties of curcumin encapsulated in Chlorella vulgaris.

    PubMed

    Jafari, Yaser; Sabahi, Hossein; Rahaie, Mahdi

    2016-11-15

    Curcumin (Cur), a polyphenols with pharmacological function, was successfully encapsulated in algae (Alg) cell (Chlorella vulgaris) as confirmed by fluorescence microscopy, thermogravimetric analysis (TGA), differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and Fourier transform-infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR). Fluorescence micrographs, TGA, DSC and FTIR spectra suggested the hypothesis inclusion Cur in Nano-empty spaces inside cell wall of Alg. The TGA analysis showed that the thermal stability of Alg and Cur at algae/curcumin complex was 3.8% and 33% higher than their free forms at 0-300°C and 300-600°C ranges, respectively. After encapsulation in Alg cells, the photostability of Cur was enhanced by about 2.5-fold. Adsorption isotherm of Cur into Alg was fitted with the Freundlich isotherm. The microcapsules were loaded with Cur up to about 55% w/w which is much higher than other reported bio-carriers. In conclusion, the data proved that Chlorella vulgaris cell can be used as a new stable carrier for Cur. PMID:27283686

  6. Screening of Natural Waters for Viruses Which Infect Chlorella Cells

    PubMed Central

    Yamada, Takashi; Higashiyama, Takanobu; Fukuda, Takao

    1991-01-01

    By using a plaque assay with the unicellular green alga Chlorella sp. strain NC64A as a host, viruses were screened from natural pond waters collected in Kyoto and Higashi-Hiroshima, Japan. From some samples tested, two kinds of plaques, large (φ = 6 to 10 mm) and small (φ = 2 to 3 mm), were detected with various frequencies. The frequency of plaques in each of the water sources was seasonal; generally, it reached a peak value (8,000 PFU/ml) in May and gradually decreased to the limit of detection (<1) in November before increasing again in early spring. Electron microscopy revealed that the purified and negatively stained viruses were very large (125 to 200 nm) icosahedral particles. The genome isolated from these particles was always a linear double-stranded DNA of 340 to 370 kbp. Electrophoresis patterns of the DNA fragments produced by digestion with restriction enzymes differed considerably from plaque to plaque, even for plaques from the same water source. However, Southern hybridization showed strong homology among all of the virus DNAs tested, indicating relatedness of those viruses. A possible use of the Chlorella virus assay system to monitor the natural population of algal cells and water quality is discussed. Images PMID:16348596

  7. Safety evaluation of Whole Algalin Protein (WAP) from Chlorella protothecoides.

    PubMed

    Szabo, Nancy J; Matulka, Ray A; Chan, Teresa

    2013-09-01

    Microalgae such as Chlorella spp., were once consumed as traditional human foods; now they are being developed as ingredients for modern diets. Whole Algalin Protein (WAP) from dried milled Chlorella protothecoides was evaluated for dietary safety in a 13-week feeding trial in rodents with genotoxic potential evaluated using in vitro and in vivo assays and the likelihood of food allergy potential evaluated via human repeat-insult patch test (HRIPT). In the subchronic study, rats consumed feed containing 0, 25,000, 50,000 or 100,000 ppm WAP for 92-93 days. No treatment-related mortalities or effects in general condition, body weight, food consumption, ophthalmology, urinalysis, hematology, clinical chemistry, gross pathology, organ weights, and histopathology occurred. Several endpoints exhibited statistically significant effects, but none was dose-related. The no-observed-adverse-effect level (NOAEL) was based on the highest WAP concentration consumed by the rats and was equivalent to 4805 mg/kg/day in males and 5518 mg/kg/day in females. No mutagenicity occurred in Salmonella typhimurium or Escherichia coli tester strains (≤5000 μg/plate WAP) with or without mutagenic activation. No clastogenic response occurred in bone marrow from mice administered a single oral dose (2000 mg/kg WAP). Skin sensitization was not induced by WAP via HRIPT, indicating little potential for food allergy. PMID:23733102

  8. Evidence for a plasma-membrane-bound nitrate reductase involved in nitrate uptake of Chlorella sorokiniana

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tischner, R.; Ward, M. R.; Huffaker, R. C.

    1989-01-01

    Anti-nitrate-reductase (NR) immunoglobulin-G (IgG) fragments inhibited nitrate uptake into Chlorella cells but had no affect on nitrate uptake. Intact anti-NR serum and preimmune IgG fragments had no affect on nitrate uptake. Membrane-associated NR was detected in plasma-membrane (PM) fractions isolated by aqueous two-phase partitioning. The PM-associated NR was not removed by sonicating PM vesicles in 500 mM NaCl and 1 mM ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid and represented up to 0.8% of the total Chlorella NR activity. The PM NR was solubilized by Triton X-100 and inactivated by Chlorella NR antiserum. Plasma-membrane NR was present in ammonium-grown Chlorella cells that completely lacked soluble NR activity. The subunit sizes of the PM and soluble NRs were 60 and 95 kDa, respectively, as determined by sodium-dodecyl-sulfate electrophoresis and western blotting.

  9. Optical Manipulation of Symbiotic Chlorella in Paramecium Bursaria Using a Fiber Axicon Microlens

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taguchi, K.; Hirota, S.; Nakayama, H.; Kunugihara, D.; Mihara, Y.

    2012-03-01

    In this paper, chemically etched axicon fiber was proposed for laser trapping of symbiotic chlorella from paramecium bursaria. We fabricated axicon micro lenses on a single-mode bare optical fiber by selective chemical etching technique. The laser beam from fiber axicon microlens was strongly focused and optical forces were sufficient to move a symbiotic chlorella. From experimental results, it was found that our proposed fiber axicon microlens was a promising tool for cell trapping without physical contact.

  10. Bioinspired, cytocompatible mineralization of silica-titania composites: thermoprotective nanoshell formation for individual chlorella cells.

    PubMed

    Ko, Eun Hyea; Yoon, Yeonjung; Park, Ji Hun; Yang, Sung Ho; Hong, Daewha; Lee, Kyung-Bok; Shon, Hyun Kyong; Lee, Tae Geol; Choi, Insung S

    2013-11-18

    Hard-shell case: Using a (RKK)4 D8 peptide allows mineralization to occur under cytocompatible conditions. Thus individual Chlorella cells could be encapsulated within a SiO2 -TiO2 nanoshell with high cell viability (87 %). The encapsulated Chlorella showed an almost threefold increase in their thermo-tolerance after 2 h at 45 °C. PMID:24115679

  11. Widespread green algae Chlorella and Stichococcus exhibit polar-temperate and tropical-temperate biogeography.

    PubMed

    Hodač, Ladislav; Hallmann, Christine; Spitzer, Karolin; Elster, Josef; Faßhauer, Fabian; Brinkmann, Nicole; Lepka, Daniela; Diwan, Vaibhav; Friedl, Thomas

    2016-08-01

    Chlorella and Stichococcus are morphologically simple airborne microalgae, omnipresent in terrestrial and aquatic habitats. The minute cell size and resistance against environmental stress facilitate their long-distance dispersal. However, the actual distribution of Chlorella- and Stichococcus-like species has so far been inferred only from ambiguous morphology-based evidence. Here we contribute a phylogenetic analysis of an expanded SSU and ITS2 rDNA sequence dataset representing Chlorella- and Stichococcus-like species from terrestrial habitats of polar, temperate and tropical regions. We aim to uncover biogeographical patterns at low taxonomic levels. We found that psychrotolerant strains of Chlorella and Stichococcus are closely related with strains originating from the temperate zone. Species closely related to Chlorella vulgaris and Muriella terrestris, and recovered from extreme terrestrial environments of polar regions and hot deserts, are particularly widespread. Stichococcus strains from the temperate zone, with their closest relatives in the tropics, differ from strains with the closest relatives being from the polar regions. Our data suggest that terrestrial Chlorella and Stichococcus might be capable of intercontinental dispersal; however, their actual distributions exhibit biogeographical patterns. PMID:27279416

  12. Effect of maternal Chlorella supplementation on carotenoid concentration in breast milk at early lactation.

    PubMed

    Nagayama, Junya; Noda, Kiyoshi; Uchikawa, Takuya; Maruyama, Isao; Shimomura, Hiroshi; Miyahara, Michiyoshi

    2014-08-01

    Breast milk carotenoids provide neonates with a source of vitamin A and potentially, oxidative stress protection and other health benefits. Chlorella, which has high levels of carotenoids such as lutein, zeaxanthin and β-carotene, is an effective dietary source of carotenoids for humans. In this study, the effect of maternal supplementation with Chlorella on carotenoid levels in breast milk at early lactation was investigated. Ten healthy, pregnant women received 6 g of Chlorella daily from gestational week 16-20 until the day of delivery (Chlorella group); ten others did not (control group). Among the carotenoids detected in breast milk, lutein, zeaxanthin and β-carotene concentrations in the Chlorella group were 2.6-fold (p = 0.001), 2.7-fold (p = 0.001) and 1.7-fold (p = 0.049) higher, respectively, than those in the control group. Our study shows that Chlorella intake during pregnancy is effective in improving the carotenoid status of breast milk at early lactation. PMID:24635025

  13. Carbon dioxide sequestration from industrial flue gas by Chlorella sorokiniana.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Kanhaiya; Banerjee, Debopam; Das, Debabrata

    2014-01-01

    The present study investigated the feasibility of using Chlorella sorokiniana for CO2 sequestration from industrial flue gas. The flue gas emitted from the oil producing industry contains mostly CO2 and H2S (15.6% (v/v) and 120 mg L(-1), respectively) along with nitrogen, methane, and other hydrocarbons. The high concentration of CO2 and H2S had an inhibitory effect on the growth of C. sorokiniana. Some efforts were made for the maximization of the algal biomass production using different techniques such as diluted flue gas, flue gas after passing through the scrubber, flue gas passing through serially connected photobioreactors and two different reactors. The highest reduction in the CO2 content of inlet flue gas was 4.1% (v/v). Some new pigments were observed in the flue gas sequestered biomass. Fatty acid composition in the total lipid was determined to evaluate its suitability for food, feed, and biofuel. PMID:24292202

  14. Enhancing methane production of Chlorella vulgaris via thermochemical pretreatments.

    PubMed

    Mendez, Lara; Mahdy, Ahmed; Timmers, Rudolphus A; Ballesteros, Mercedes; González-Fernández, Cristina

    2013-12-01

    To enhance the anaerobic digestion of Chlorella vulgaris, thermochemical pretreatments were conducted. All pretreatments markedly improved solubilisation of carbohydrates. Thermal treatments and thermal treatments combined with alkali resulted in 5-fold increase of soluble carbohydrates while thermal treatment with acid addition enhanced by 7-fold. On the other hand, proteins were only solubilized with thermo-alkaline conditions applied. Likewise, all the pretreatments tested improved methane production. Highest anaerobic digestion was accomplished by thermal treatment at 120°C for 40 min without any chemical addition. As a matter of fact, hydrolysis constant rate was doubled under this condition. According to the energetic analysis, energy input was higher than the extra energy gain at the solid concentration employed. Nevertheless, higher biomass organic load pretreatment may be an option to achieve positive energetic balances. PMID:24096280

  15. Removal and biodegradation of nonylphenol by immobilized Chlorella vulgaris.

    PubMed

    Gao, Q T; Wong, Y S; Tam, N F Y

    2011-11-01

    The removal and biodegradation of nonylphenol (NP) by alginate-immobilized cells of Chlorella vulgaris were compared with their respective free cultures. The effects of four cell densities of 10(4) per algal bead were investigated, as were the four algal bead concentrations, with regard to the removal and biodegradation of NP. Although immobilization significantly decreased the growth rate and NP's biodegradation efficiency of C. vulgaris, NP removal over a short period was enhanced. The NP removal mechanism by immobilized cells was similar to that by free cells, including adsorption onto alginate matrix and algal cells, absorption within cells and cellular biodegradation. The optimal cell density and bead concentration for the removal and biodegradation of NP was 50-100×10(4) cells algal bead(-1) and 2-4 beads ml(-1) of wastewater, respectively. These results demonstrated that immobilized C. vulgaris cells under optimal biomass and photoautotrophic conditions are effective in removing NP from contaminated water. PMID:21944284

  16. Attenuation of monochromatic and polychromatic lights in Chlorella vulgaris suspensions.

    PubMed

    Yun, Y S; Park, J M

    2001-06-01

    A quantitative description of light attenuation in microalgal suspensions is a prerequisite for kinetic modeling of microalgal photosynthesis and/or growth activity depending upon the light distribution inside photobioreactors. In this study, the light attenuation coefficients in Chlorella vulgaris suspensions were theoretically calculated from light absorption spectra and spectral irradiances of various light sources. By using this method, errors occurring in the direct measurement of the attenuation coefficients can be avoided. The obtained light attenuation coefficients were used for evaluating light attenuation models such as the Beer-Lambert, Cornet, and hyperbolic models. Furthermore, advantages and disadvantages of these models are discussed with respect to prediction of performance, mechanistic background, and usefulness for further application to calculation of the light distribution inside photobioreactors. PMID:11525626

  17. Characterization of Iron Uptake from Ferrioxamine B by Chlorella vulgaris

    PubMed Central

    Allnutt, F. C. Thomas; Bonner, Walter D.

    1987-01-01

    Iron uptake from two Fe3+-hydroxamate siderophores, ferrioxamine B and Fe3+-rhodotorulate, by iron-stressed Chlorella vulgaris (ATCC strain 11468) was evaluated with some comparison to iron uptake from synthetic and organic acid ferric chelates. Iron-stress induced iron uptake from ferrioxamine B. Dissipation of the electrochemical gradient, via uncouplers, inhibited iron uptake. Respiratory inhibitors gave variable results, an indication that a direct link to respiration was not apparent. Vanadate inhibition of iron uptake indicated that an ATPase or phosphate intermediate could be involved in the uptake mechanism. Divalent cations manifested variable effects dependent on the cation and chelator used. These data confirm that C. vulgaris has an inducible iron-uptake system for Fe3+-hydroxamic acid siderophores which may involve a different mechanism than that observed for other chelates. PMID:16665771

  18. Bioaccessibility of carotenoids from Chlorella vulgaris and Chlamydomonas reinhardtii.

    PubMed

    Gille, Andrea; Trautmann, Andreas; Posten, Clemens; Briviba, Karlis

    2015-08-01

    Microalgae can contribute to a balanced diet because of their composition. Beside numerous essential nutrients, carotenoids are in the focus for food applications. The bioavailability of carotenoids from photoautotrophic-cultivated Chlorella vulgaris (C. vulgaris) and Chlamydomonas reinhardtii (C. reinhardtii) was compared. An in vitro digestion model was used to investigate carotenoid bioaccessibility. Furthermore, the effect of sonication on bioaccessibility was assessed. Lutein was the main carotenoid in both species. C. reinhardtii showed higher amounts of lutein and β-carotene than C. vulgaris. In contrast to C. reinhardtii, no β-carotene and only 7% of lutein were bioaccessible in nonsonicated C. vulgaris. Sonication increased the bioaccessibility of carotenoids from C. vulgaris to a level comparable with C. reinhardtii (β-carotene: ≥ 10%; lutein: ≥ 15%). Thus, C. reinhardtii represents a good carotenoid source for potential use in foods without processing, while the application of processing methods, like sonication, is necessary for C. vulgaris. PMID:27146695

  19. Thermogravimetric analysis of the gasification of microalgae Chlorella vulgaris.

    PubMed

    Figueira, Camila Emilia; Moreira, Paulo Firmino; Giudici, Reinaldo

    2015-12-01

    The gasification of microalgae Chlorella vulgaris under an atmosphere of argon and water vapor was investigated by thermogravimetric analysis. The data were interpreted by using conventional isoconversional methods and also by the independent parallel reaction (IPR) model, in which the degradation is considered to happen individually to each pseudo-component of biomass (lipid, carbohydrate and protein). The IPR model allows obtaining the kinetic parameters of the degradation reaction of each component. Three main stages were observed during the gasification process and the differential thermogravimetric curve was satisfactorily fitted by the IPR model considering three pseudocomponents. The comparison of the activation energy values obtained by the methods and those found in the literature for other microalgae was satisfactory. Quantification of reaction products was performed using online gas chromatography. The major products detected were H2, CO and CH4, indicating the potential for producing fuel gas and syngas from microalgae. PMID:26447558

  20. Selection of microalgae for high CO2 fixation efficiency and lipid accumulation from ten Chlorella strains using municipal wastewater.

    PubMed

    Hu, Xia; Zhou, Jiti; Liu, Guangfei; Gui, Bing

    2016-08-01

    As significant differences in cellular physiology, metabolic potential and genetics occur among strains with morphological similarity, the screening of appropriate microalgae species for effective CO2 fixation and biodiesel production is extremely critical. In this study, ten strains of Chlorella were cultivated in municipal wastewater influent (MWI) and their tolerance for MWI, CO2 fixation efficiency and lipid productivity were assessed. The results showed that the biomass concentrations of four strains (Chlorella vulgaris, Chlorella 64.01, Chlorella regularis var. minima and Chlorella sp.) were significantly higher than other strains. When the cultivation systems were aerated with 10% CO2, Chlorella sp. showed the highest CO2 fixation efficiency (35.51%), while the highest lipid accumulation (58.48%) was observed with C. vulgaris. Scanning electron microscopy images revealed that the cells of both Chlorella sp. and C. vulgaris kept their normal morphologies after 15day batch culture. These findings indicated that Chlorella sp. and C. vulgaris have fairly good tolerance for MWI, and moreover, Chlorella sp. was appropriate for CO2 fixation while C. vulgaris represented the highest potential for producing biodiesel. PMID:27521939

  1. Effects of Pb(Ⅱ) exposure on Chlorella protothecoides and Chlorella vulgaris growth, malondialdehyde, and photosynthesis-related gene transcription.

    PubMed

    Xiong, Bang; Zhang, Wei; Chen, Lin; Lin, Kuang-Fei; Guo, Mei-Jin; Wang, Wei-Liang; Cui, Xin-Hong; Bi, Hua-Song; Wang, Bin

    2014-11-01

    Greater exposure to Pb(Ⅱ) increases the likelihood of harmful effects in the environment. In this study, the aquatic unicellular alga Chlorella protothecoides (C. protothecoides) and Chlorella vulgaris (C. vulgaris) were chosen to assess the acute and chronic toxicity of Pb(Ⅱ) exposure. Results of the observations show dose-response relationships could be clearly observed between Pb(Ⅱ) concentration and percentage inhibition (PI). Exposure to Pb(Ⅱ) increased malondialdehyde (MDA) content by up to 4.22 times compared with the control, suggesting that there was some oxidative damage. ANOVA analysis shows that Pb(Ⅱ) decreased chlorophyll (chl) content, indicating marked concentration-dependent relationships, and the lowest levels of chl a, chl b, and total-chl were 14.53, 18.80, and 17.95% of the controls, respectively. A real-time PCR assay suggests the changes in transcript abundances of three photosynthetic-related genes. After 120 h exposure Pb(Ⅱ) reduced the transcript abundance of rbcL, psaB, and psbC, and the relative abundances of the three genes of C. protothecoides and C. vulgaris in response to Pb(Ⅱ) were 54.66-98.59, 51.68-95.59, 37.89-95.48, 36.04-94.94, 41.19-91.20, and 58.75-96.80% of those of the controls, respectively. As for 28 d treatments, the three genes displayed similar inhibitory trend. This research provides a basic understanding of Pb(Ⅱ) toxicity to aquatic organisms. PMID:23613127

  2. The culture of Chlorella vulgaris with human urine in multibiological life support system experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Ming; Liu, Hong; Tong, Ling; Fu, Yuming; He, Wenting; Hu, Enzhu; Hu, Dawei

    The Integrative Experimental System (IES) was established as a tool to evaluate the rela-tionship of the subsystems in Bioregenerative Life Support System, and Multibiological Life Support System Experiments (MLSSE) have been conducted in the IES. The IES consists of a higher plant chamber, an animal chamber and a plate photo bioreactor (PPB) which cultivated lettuce (Lactuca sativa L.), silkworm (Bombyx Mori L.) and microalgae (Chlorella vulgaris), respectively. In MLSSE, four volunteers took turns breathing the system air through a tube connected with the animal chamber periodically. According to the CO2 concentration in the IES, the automotive control system of the PPB changed the light intensity regulating the photosynthesis of Chlorella vulgaris to make CO2 /O2 in the system maintain at stable levels. Chlorella vulgaris grew with human urine by carrying certain amount of alga liquid out of the bioreactor every day with synthetic urine replenished into the system, and O2 was regenerated, at the same time human urine was purified. Results showed that this IES worked stably and Chlorella vulgaris grew well; The culture of Chlorella vulgaris could be used to keep the balance of CO2 and O2 , and the change of light intensity could control the gas composition in the IES; Microalgae culture could be used in emergency in the system, the culture of Chlorella vulgaris could recover to original state in 5 days; 15.6 ml of condensation water was obtained every day by the culture of Chlorella vulgaris; The removal efficiencies of N, P in human urine could reach to 98.2% and 99.5%.

  3. Plastid and mitochondrion genomic sequences from Arctic Chlorella sp. ArM0029B

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Chorella is the representative taxon of Chlorellales in Trebouxiophyceae, and its chloroplast (cp) genomic information has been thought to depend only on studies concerning Chlorella vulgaris and GenBank information of C. variablis. Mitochondrial (mt) genomic information regarding Chlorella is currently unavailable. To elucidate the evolution of organelle genomes and genetic information of Chlorella, we have sequenced and characterized the cp and mt genomes of Arctic Chlorella sp. ArM0029B. Results The 119,989-bp cp genome lacking inverted repeats and 65,049-bp mt genome were sequenced. The ArM0029B cp genome contains 114 conserved genes, including 32 tRNA genes, 3 rRNA genes, and 79 genes encoding proteins. Chlorella cp genomes are highly rearranged except for a Chlorella-specific six-gene cluster, and the ArM0029B plastid resembles that of Chlorella variabilis except for a 15-kb gene cluster inversion. In the mt genome, 62 conserved genes, including 27 tRNA genes, 3 rRNA genes, and 32 genes encoding proteins were determined. The mt genome of ArM0029B is similar to that of the non-photosynthetic species Prototheca and Heicosporidium. The ArM0029B mt genome contains a group I intron, with an ORF containing two LAGLIDADG motifs, in cox1. The intronic ORF is shared by C. vulgaris and Prototheca. The phylogeny of the plastid genome reveals that ArM0029B showed a close relationship of Chlorella to Parachlorella and Oocystis within Chlorellales. The distribution of the cox1 intron at 721 support membership in the order Chlorellales. Mitochondrial phylogenomic analyses, however, indicated that ArM0029B shows a greater affinity to MX-AZ01 and Coccomyxa than to the Helicosporidium-Prototheca clade, although the detailed phylogenetic relationships among the three taxa remain to be resolved. Conclusions The plastid genome of ArM0029B is similar to that of C. variabilis. The mt sequence of ArM0029B is the first genome to be reported for Chlorella. Chloroplast

  4. [Using Excess Activated Sludge Treated 4-Chlorophenol Contained Waste Water to Cultivate Chlorella vulgaris].

    PubMed

    Wang, Lu; Chen, Xiu-rong; Yan, Long; He, Yi-xuan; Shi, Zhen-dong

    2015-04-01

    Using different rations of sludge extracts and supernate from 4-Chlorophenol (4-CP) simulated wastewater's excess sludge after centrifugation to cultivate the Chlorella vulgaris to achieve the goal of excess sludge utilization together with chlorella cultivating. The experiments were performed in 500 mL flasks with different rations of sludge extracts & BG-11 and supernate & BG-11 in a light growth chamber respectively. Number of algal cells, Chlorophyll, enzyme activity, oil and water total nitrogen (TN), total phosphorus (TP), total organic carbon (TOC), toxicity index were investigated. Result showed that the nutrition supplies and toxicity in the excess sludge were removed efficiently via Chlorella vulgaris, the removal rates of TN and TP were at least 40% and 90% respectively; After 10 days cultivation, the density growth of 50% sludge extracts was 20 times higher of the beginning while its chlorophyll content was lower than that of the blank group. Sludge extracts could promote the proliferation of algae, but were not conducive to the synthesis of chlorophyll. The quantity of SOD in per cell showed Chlorella vulgaris gave a positive response via stimulation from toxicant in sludge extracts and supernate. The best time for collecting chlorella vulgaris was the fifth day of cultivation, taking neutral oil accumulation as the evaluating indicator for its utilization combined with the removal of supplies and toxicity. PMID:26164919

  5. Chlorella Virus Encoded Deoxyuridine triphosphatases Exhibit different Temperature Optima

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang,Y.; Moriyama, H.; Homma, K.; Van Etten, J.

    2005-01-01

    A putative deoxyuridine triphosphatase (dUTPase) gene from chlorella virus PBCV-1 was cloned, and the recombinant protein was expressed in Escherichia coli. The recombinant protein has dUTPase activity and requires Mg{sup 2+} for optimal activity, while it retains some activity in the presence of other divalent cations. Kinetic studies of the enzyme revealed a K{sub m} of 11.7 {mu}M, a turnover k{sub cat} of 6.8 s{sup -1}, and a catalytic efficiency of k{sub cat}/K{sub m} = 5.8 x 105 M{sup -1} s{sup -1}. dUTPase genes were cloned and expressed from two other chlorella viruses IL-3A and SH-6A. The two dUTPases have similar properties to PBCV-1 dUTPase except that IL-3A dUTPase has a lower temperature optimum (37{sup o}C) than PBCV-1 dUTPase (50{sup o}C). The IL-3A dUTPase differs from the PBCV-1 enzyme by nine amino acids, including two amino acid substitutions, Glu81{yields}Ser81 and Thr84{yields}Arg84, in the highly conserved motif III of the proteins. To investigate the difference in temperature optima between the two enzymes, homology modeling and docking simulations were conducted. The results of the simulation and comparisons of amino acid sequence suggest that adjacent amino acids are important in the temperature optima. To confirm this suggestion, three site-directed amino acid substitutions were made in the IL-3A enzyme: Thr84{yields}Arg84, Glu81{yields}Ser81, and Glu81{yields}Ser81 plus Thr84{yields}Arg84. The single substitutions affected the optimal temperature for enzyme activity. The temperature optimum increased from 37 to 55{sup o}C for the enzyme containing the two amino acid substitutions. We postulate that the change in temperature optimum is due to reduction in charge and balkiness in the active cavity that allows more movement of the ligand and protein before the enzyme and substrate complex is formed.

  6. Novel highly active recombinant glutaredoxin from Chlorella sorokiniana T-89.

    PubMed

    Chuang, Hsu-Han; Cheng, Chu-Ying; Chen, Yu-Ting; Shaw, Jei-Fu

    2014-01-29

    Glutaredoxin (Grx) is a thiol/disulfide oxidoreductase that maintains the cellular thiol/disulfide ratio. A 321 bp cDNA fragment encoding a putative Grx (named CsT-89Grx) was cloned from heat-tolerant Chlorella sorokiniana T-89 and expressed in an Escherichia coli system. The sequence analysis of CsT-89Grx and site-directed mutations showed that the putative active site within the CPYC motif belonged to the dithiol superfamily. The biochemical property analyses showed that the optimal pH and temperature of CsT-89Grx are pH 8.5 and 50 °C, respectively. The activity of CsT-89Grx showed high thermal stability (retained 70% activity at 80 °C for 30 min) and broad pH stability (retained over 70% activity for 1 h) ranging from pH 3 to 11. The kinetic parameter kcat/Km was 20,982 min(-1) mM(-1), which suggested that CsT-89Grx exhibited the highest catalytic efficiency in reducing the disulfide bond among all the Grx reported in the related literature and is therefore potentially useful for industrial applications. PMID:24377422

  7. Use of diluted urine for cultivation of Chlorella vulgaris.

    PubMed

    Jaatinen, Sanna; Lakaniemi, Aino-Maija; Rintala, Jukka

    2016-05-01

    Our aim was to study the biomass growth of microalga Chlorella vulgaris using diluted human urine as a sole nutrient source. Batch cultivations (21 days) were conducted in five different urine dilutions (1:25-1:300), in 1:100-diluted urine as such and with added trace elements, and as a reference, in artificial growth medium. The highest biomass density was obtained in 1:100-diluted urine with and without additional trace elements (0.73 and 0.60 g L(-1), respectively). Similar biomass growth trends and densities were obtained with 1:25- and 1:300-diluted urine (0.52 vs. 0.48 gVSS L(-1)) indicating that urine at dilution 1:25 can be used to cultivate microalgal based biomass. Interestingly, even 1:300-diluted urine contained sufficiently nutrients and trace elements to support biomass growth. Biomass production was similar despite pH-variation from < 5 to 9 in different incubations indicating robustness of the biomass growth. Ammonium formation did not inhibit overall biomass growth. At the beginning of cultivation, the majority of the biomass consisted of living algal cells, while towards the end, their share decreased and the estimated share of bacteria and cell debris increased. PMID:26508358

  8. Growth of Chlorella vulgaris and associated bacteria in photobioreactors

    PubMed Central

    Lakaniemi, Aino‐Maija; Intihar, Veera M.; Tuovinen, Olli H.; Puhakka, Jaakko A.

    2012-01-01

    Summary The aim of this study was to test three flat plate photobioreactor configurations for growth of Chlorella vulgaris under non‐axenic conditions and to characterize and quantify associated bacterial communities. The photobioreactor cultivations were conducted using tap water‐based media to introduce background bacterial population. Growth of algae was monitored over time with three independent methods. Additionally, the quantity and quality of eukaryotes and bacteria were analysed using culture‐independent molecular tools based on denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (PCR‐DGGE) and quantitative polymerase chain reaction (QPCR). Static mixers used in the flat plate photobioreactors did not generally enhance the growth at the low light intensities used. The maximum biomass concentration and maximum specific growth rate were 1.0 g l−1 and 2.0 day−1 respectively. Bacterial growth as determined by QPCR was associated with the growth of C. vulgaris. Based on PCR‐DGGE, bacteria in the cultures mainly originated from the tap water. Bacterial community profiles were diverse but reproducible in all flat plate cultures. Most prominent bacteria in the C. vulgaris cultures belonged to the class Alphaproteobacteria and especially to the genus Sphingomonas. Analysis of the diversity of non‐photosynthetic microorganisms in algal mass cultures can provide useful information on the public health aspects and unravel community interactions. PMID:21936882

  9. A functional calcium-transporting ATPase encoded by chlorella viruses.

    PubMed

    Bonza, Maria Cristina; Martin, Holger; Kang, Ming; Lewis, Gentry; Greiner, Timo; Giacometti, Sonia; Van Etten, James L; De Michelis, Maria Ida; Thiel, Gerhard; Moroni, Anna

    2010-10-01

    Calcium-transporting ATPases (Ca(2+) pumps) are major players in maintaining calcium homeostasis in the cell and have been detected in all cellular organisms. Here, we report the identification of two putative Ca(2+) pumps, M535L and C785L, encoded by chlorella viruses MT325 and AR158, respectively, and the functional characterization of M535L. Phylogenetic and sequence analyses place the viral proteins in group IIB of P-type ATPases even though they lack a typical feature of this class, a calmodulin-binding domain. A Ca(2+) pump gene is present in 45 of 47 viruses tested and is transcribed during virus infection. Complementation analysis of the triple yeast mutant K616 confirmed that M535L transports calcium ions and, unusually for group IIB pumps, also manganese ions. In vitro assays show basal ATPase activity. This activity is inhibited by vanadate, but, unlike that of other Ca(2+) pumps, is not significantly stimulated by either calcium or manganese. The enzyme forms a (32)P-phosphorylated intermediate, which is inhibited by vanadate and not stimulated by the transported substrate Ca(2+), thus confirming the peculiar properties of this viral pump. To our knowledge this is the first report of a functional P-type Ca(2+)-transporting ATPase encoded by a virus. PMID:20573858

  10. Photosynthetic and cellular toxicity of cadmium in Chlorella vulgaris.

    PubMed

    Ou-Yang, Hui-Ling; Kong, Xiang-Zhen; Lavoie, Michel; He, Wei; Qin, Ning; He, Qi-Shuang; Yang, Bin; Wang, Rong; Xu, Fu-Liu

    2013-12-01

    The toxic effects of cadmium (Cd) on the green alga Chlorella vulgaris were investigated by following the response to Cd of various toxicity endpoints (cell growth, cell size, photochemical efficiency of PSII in the light or Φ(PSII), maximal photochemical efficiency or Fv/Fm, chlorophyll a fluorescence, esterase activity, and cell viability). These toxicity endpoints were studied in laboratory batch cultures of C. vulgaris over a long-term 96-h exposure to different Cd concentrations using flow cytometry and pulse amplitude modulated fluorometry. The sequence of sensitivity of these toxicity endpoints was: cell yield > Φ(PSII) ≈ esterase activity > Fv/Fm > chlorophyll a fluorescence ≈ cell viability. It is shown that cell apoptosis or cell death only accounted for a minor part of the reduction in cell yield even at very high algistatic free Cd²⁺ concentrations, and other mechanisms such as blocked cell divisions are major contributors to cell yield inhibition. Furthermore, cadmium may affect both the electron donors and acceptors of the electron transport chain at high free Cd²⁺ concentration. Finally, the resistance of cells to cell death was size-dependent; medium-sized cells had the highest toxicity threshold. The present study brings new insights into the toxicity mechanisms of Cd in C. vulgaris and provides a detailed comparison of the sensitivity of various Cd toxicity endpoints. PMID:23966280

  11. Toxicological Responses of Chlorella vulgaris to Dichloromethane and Dichloroethane

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Shijin; Zhang, Huaxing; Yu, Xiang; Qiu, Lequan

    2014-01-01

    Abstract The aim of this study was to evaluate the acute toxicity effects of dichloromethane and dichloroethane on Chlorella vulgaris at the physiological and molecular level. Data showed that the cell number, chlorophyll a, and total protein content gradually decreased with increasing dichloromethane and dichloroethane concentrations over a 96-h exposure. Lower doses of two organic solvents had stimulatory effects on catalase and superoxide dismutase activity. Malondialdehyde showed a concentration-dependent increase in response to dichloromethane and dichloroethane exposure. Electron microscopy also showed that there were some chloroplast abnormalities in response to different concentrations of dichloromethane and dichloroethane exposure. Real-time polymerase chain reaction assay demonstrated that dichloromethane and dichloroethane reduced the transcript abundance of psaB, whereas that of psbC changed depending on the toxicant after 24 h of exposure. Dichloromethane and dichloroethane affected the activity of antioxidant enzymes, disrupted the chloroplast ultrastructure, and reduced transcription of photosynthesis-related genes in C. vulgaris, leading to metabolic disruption and cell death. PMID:24550665

  12. Physiological and biochemical responses of Chlorella vulgaris to Congo red.

    PubMed

    Hernández-Zamora, Miriam; Perales-Vela, Hugo Virgilio; Flores-Ortíz, César Mateo; Cañizares-Villanueva, Rosa Olivia

    2014-10-01

    Extensive use of synthetic dyes in many industrial applications releases large volumes of wastewater. Wastewaters from dying industries are considered hazardous and require careful treatment prior to discharge into receiving water bodies. Dyes can affect photosynthetic activities of aquatic flora and decrease dissolved oxygen in water. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of Congo red on growth and metabolic activity of Chlorella vulgaris after 96h exposure. Exposure of the microalga to Congo red reduced growth rate, photosynthesis and respiration. Analysis of chlorophyll a fluorescence emission showed that the donor side of photosystem II was affected at high concentrations of Congo red. The quantum yield for electron transport (φEo), the electron transport rate (ETR) and the performance index (PI) also decreased. The reduction in the ability to absorb and use the quantum energy increased non-photochemical (NPQ) mechanisms for thermal dissipation. Overall, Congo red affects growth and metabolic activity in photosynthetic organisms in aquatic environments. PMID:25042247

  13. Ammonium reduces chromium toxicity in the freshwater alga Chlorella vulgaris.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jingqing; Sun, Zhengqi; Lavoie, Michel; Fan, Xiaoji; Bai, Xiaocui; Qian, Haifeng

    2015-04-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the protective effect of ammonium (NH4 (+)) on Cr toxicity to the freshwater alga Chlorella vulgaris. We followed an array of cellular functions and biomolecules in C. vulgaris cells exposed to 50 or 100 μM Cr at three different initial NH4 (+) concentrations (0.5, 3, and 10 mM). The results showed that Cr strongly inhibited cell yield of C. vulgaris, but 10 mM NH4 (+) could decrease by more than two-fold Cr toxicity on cell yield compared to exposure to 0.5 mM NH4 (+). Cr toxicity on gene transcripts and cellular substructure was also much lower at high than at low NH4 (+). Our results suggest that this protecting effect of NH4 (+) on intracellular Cr toxicity could be due to several factors, such as enhance uptake of phosphorus, increase in C and N assimilation efficiency, and increase transcription of photosynthesis-related genes. PMID:25421561

  14. Enhancement of hydrolysis of Chlorella vulgaris by hydrochloric acid.

    PubMed

    Park, Charnho; Lee, Ja Hyun; Yang, Xiaoguang; Yoo, Hah Young; Lee, Ju Hun; Lee, Soo Kweon; Kim, Seung Wook

    2016-06-01

    Chlorella vulgaris is considered as one of the potential sources of biomass for bio-based products because it consists of large amounts of carbohydrates. In this study, hydrothermal acid hydrolysis with five different acids (hydrochloric acid, nitric acid, peracetic acid, phosphoric acid, and sulfuric acid) was carried out to produce fermentable sugars (glucose, galactose). The hydrothermal acid hydrolysis by hydrochloric acid showed the highest sugar production. C. vulgaris was hydrolyzed with various concentrations of hydrochloric acid [0.5-10 % (w/w)] and microalgal biomass [20-140 g/L (w/v)] at 121 °C for 20 min. Among the concentrations examined, 2 % hydrochloric acid with 100 g/L biomass yielded the highest conversion of carbohydrates (92.5 %) into reducing sugars. The hydrolysate thus produced from C. vulgaris was fermented using the yeast Brettanomyces custersii H1-603 and obtained bioethanol yield of 0.37 g/g of algal sugars. PMID:26899601

  15. Photosynthetic Apparatus Formation during the Cell Cycle of Chlorella

    PubMed Central

    Venediktov, Pavel S.; Chemeris, Yuree K.; Grishina, Natalia A.

    1981-01-01

    Synchronous cell division in cultures of Chlorella vulgaris Beijerinck was induced by intermittent illumination: 9 hours light, 6 hours darkness. The rate of photosynthetic O2 evolution per cell increases 4-fold in a one-step manner at the beginning of the light period, to the same extent as the increase in cell number. Over the division cycle, the following accumulation times during the light period were found: chlorophyll a, between 2 and 8 hours, chlorophyll b, between 5 and 8 hours, reaction centers of photosystems I and II, between 2 and 6 hours; and cytochrome f, between 2.5 and 5 hours. Cytochrome f accumulation is closely followed by an increase in amplitude of the rapid phase in light-induced absorption increase at 520 nanometers and in intensity of the delayed light emission. Enhancement of the delayed fluorescence yield per flash under continuous illumination (caused by the establishment of the pH difference across the thylakoid membrane) is maximal by the first hour of the light period. These findings, and others described in the text, suggested that the 4-fold growth of photosynthetic apparatus in the course of the cell cycle cannot be the result of gradual rise of electron-transport chain number. Rather, it is the result of a series of successive syntheses of its individual components. The rate-limiting step of electron transport is probably located between plastoquinone and cytochrome f. PMID:16661795

  16. Paramecium bursaria Chlorella Virus 1 Encodes a Polyamine Acetyltransferase*

    PubMed Central

    Charlop-Powers, Zachary; Jakoncic, Jean; Gurnon, James R.; Van Etten, James L.; Zhou, Ming-Ming

    2012-01-01

    Paramecium bursaria chlorella virus 1 (PBCV-1), a large DNA virus that infects green algae, encodes a histone H3 lysine 27-specific methyltransferase that functions in global transcriptional silencing of the host. PBCV-1 has another gene a654l that encodes a protein with sequence similarity to the GCN5 family histone acetyltransferases. In this study, we report a 1.5 Å crystal structure of PBCV-1 A654L in a complex with coenzyme A. The structure reveals a unique feature of A654L that precludes its acetylation of histone peptide substrates. We demonstrate that A654L, hence named viral polyamine acetyltransferase (vPAT), acetylates polyamines such as putrescine, spermidine, cadaverine, and homospermidine present in both PBCV-1 and its host through a reaction dependent upon a conserved glutamate 27. Our study suggests that as the first virally encoded polyamine acetyltransferase, vPAT plays a possible key role in the regulation of polyamine catabolism in the host during viral replication. PMID:22277659

  17. Photon up-conversion increases biomass yield in Chlorella vulgaris.

    PubMed

    Menon, Kavya R; Jose, Steffi; Suraishkumar, Gadi K

    2014-12-01

    Photon up-conversion, a process whereby lower energy radiations are converted to higher energy levels via the use of appropriate phosphor systems, was employed as a novel strategy for improving microalgal growth and lipid productivity. Photon up-conversion enables the utilization of regions of the solar spectrum, beyond the typical photosynthetically active radiation, that are usually wasted or are damaging to the algae. The effects of up-conversion of red light by two distinct sets of up-conversion phosphors were studied in the model microalgae Chlorella vulgaris. Up-conversion by set 1 phosphors led to a 2.85 fold increase in biomass concentration and a 3.2 fold increase in specific growth rate of the microalgae. While up-conversion by set 2 phosphors resulted in a 30% increase in biomass and 12% increase in specific intracellular neutral lipid, while the specific growth rates were comparable to that of the control. Furthermore, up-conversion resulted in higher levels of specific intracellular reactive oxygen species in C. vulgaris. Up-conversion of red light (654 nm) was shown to improve biomass yields in C. vulgaris. In principle, up-conversion can be used to increase the utilization range of the electromagnetic spectrum for improved cultivation of photosynthetic systems such as plants, algae, and microalgae. PMID:25155721

  18. Effects of nickel and pH on the growth of Chlorella vulgaris

    SciTech Connect

    Lustigman, B.; Lee, L.H.; Khalil, A.

    1995-07-01

    Chlorella is a spherical, unicellular, eukaryotic green algae. It is an obligate photoautotrophy containing chlorophylls a and b. It is a frequent symbiont of many other organisms such as paramecium, hydra and sponges and is important in fresh and marine environments, as well as in the soil. For these reasons, it has been suggested that Chlorella be used for metabolic studies as an indicator of environmental pollution. Ability of microorganisms to grow in environments containing high levels of toxic metals is frequently due to the organisms` capacity for adsorption of these ions and the role that they may play as essential cofactors in metalloenzymes as is the case for nickel. The purpose of this study was to determine the effect of nickel on the growth of Chlorella vulgaris. 19 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  19. Peculiarities of the submicroscopic organization of chlorella cells cultivated on a solid medium in microgravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sytnik, K. M.; Popova, A. F.; Nechitailo, G. S.; Mashinsky, A. L.

    The submicroscopic organization of Chlorella vulgaris cells (strain LARG-1) growing over 30 days on a solid agarized medium aboard the orbital station ``Mir'' was studied. A number of differences in the ultrastructure of cells of the experimental population compared to the control has been revealed. Thus, changes in the membrane system of plastids, in particular, appearance of numerous vesicles of different diameter and outgrowths of the plastids and their contact with the plasmalemma as well as a considerable decrease of reserve polysaccharide number in the plastids. Moreover, an increase in the size of mitochondria, their cristae and lipid drops in cytoplasm, the formation of more complicated configuration folding of plasmalemma and appearance of small-granular material of mean electron density in the periplasmic space of Chlorella cells grown during space flight, are demonstrated. Comparative cytological analysis has revealed general regularities of rearrangements of the submicroscopic organization in Chlorella cells cultivated on both solid and semiliquid agarized nutrient media.

  20. Cell-wall disruption and lipid/astaxanthin extraction from microalgae: Chlorella and Haematococcus.

    PubMed

    Kim, Dong-Yeon; Vijayan, Durairaj; Praveenkumar, Ramasamy; Han, Jong-In; Lee, Kyubock; Park, Ji-Yeon; Chang, Won-Seok; Lee, Jin-Suk; Oh, You-Kwan

    2016-01-01

    Recently, biofuels and nutraceuticals produced from microalgae have emerged as major interests, resulting in intensive research of the microalgal biorefinery process. In this paper, recent developments in cell-wall disruption and extraction methods are reviewed, focusing on lipid and astaxanthin production from the biotechnologically important microalgae Chlorella and Haematococcus, respectively. As a common, critical bottleneck for recovery of intracellular components such as lipid and astaxanthin from these microalgae, the composition and structure of rigid, thick cell-walls were analyzed. Various chemical, physical, physico-chemical, and biological methods applied for cell-wall breakage and lipid/astaxanthin extraction from Chlorella and Haematococcus are discussed in detail and compared based on efficiency, energy consumption, type and dosage of solvent, biomass concentration and status (wet/dried), toxicity, scalability, and synergistic combinations. This report could serve as a useful guide to the implementation of practical downstream processes for recovery of valuable products from microalgae including Chlorella and Haematococcus. PMID:26342788

  1. Changes in salivary flow rate following Chlorella-derived multicomponent supplementation

    PubMed Central

    Otsuki, Takeshi; Shimizu, Kazuhiro; Zempo-Miyaki, Asako; Maeda, Seiji

    2016-01-01

    Decreases in saliva secretion compromise food mastication and swallowing, reduce mucosal immune function, and increase the risk for oral diseases like dental caries. Chlorella is a green alga that contains a variety of nutrients including amino acids, vitamins, and minerals. In our previous study, Chlorella-derived multicomponent supplementation did not affect salivary flow rates in healthy young individuals, but Chlorella-derived supplementation attenuated a decrease in saliva secretion that was observed during a kendo training camp. Hence, we hypothesized that Chlorella-derived supplementation increases saliva secretion in individuals with lower rates of saliva flow. Sixty-four subjects took Chlorella-derived tablets for four weeks. Before and after supplementation, saliva samples were collected by chewing cotton. In the complete study group, there was no difference in saliva production before and after supplementation (1.91 ± 0.11 ml/min before vs 2.01 ± 0.12 ml/min after). Analysis of subgroups based on saliva production before supplementation found an increase in saliva secretion in the lower saliva flow group (1.18 ± 0.06 vs 1.38 ± 0.08 ml/min), but no change in the higher saliva flow group (2.63 ± 0.11 vs 2.64 ± 0.15 ml/min). These results suggest that Chlorella-derived multicomponent supplementation increases saliva production in individuals with lower levels of saliva secretion. PMID:27499578

  2. Changes in salivary flow rate following Chlorella-derived multicomponent supplementation.

    PubMed

    Otsuki, Takeshi; Shimizu, Kazuhiro; Zempo-Miyaki, Asako; Maeda, Seiji

    2016-07-01

    Decreases in saliva secretion compromise food mastication and swallowing, reduce mucosal immune function, and increase the risk for oral diseases like dental caries. Chlorella is a green alga that contains a variety of nutrients including amino acids, vitamins, and minerals. In our previous study, Chlorella-derived multicomponent supplementation did not affect salivary flow rates in healthy young individuals, but Chlorella-derived supplementation attenuated a decrease in saliva secretion that was observed during a kendo training camp. Hence, we hypothesized that Chlorella-derived supplementation increases saliva secretion in individuals with lower rates of saliva flow. Sixty-four subjects took Chlorella-derived tablets for four weeks. Before and after supplementation, saliva samples were collected by chewing cotton. In the complete study group, there was no difference in saliva production before and after supplementation (1.91 ± 0.11 ml/min before vs 2.01 ± 0.12 ml/min after). Analysis of subgroups based on saliva production before supplementation found an increase in saliva secretion in the lower saliva flow group (1.18 ± 0.06 vs 1.38 ± 0.08 ml/min), but no change in the higher saliva flow group (2.63 ± 0.11 vs 2.64 ± 0.15 ml/min). These results suggest that Chlorella-derived multicomponent supplementation increases saliva production in individuals with lower levels of saliva secretion. PMID:27499578

  3. Effect of Chlorella vulgaris intake on cadmium detoxification in rats fed cadmium

    PubMed Central

    Kim, You Jin; Kwon, Sanghee

    2009-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate if dietary Chlorella vulgaris (chlorella) intake would be effective on cadmium (Cd) detoxification in rats fed dietary Cd. Fourteen-week old male Sprague-Dawley (SD) rats weighing 415.0 ± 1.6 g were randomly divided into two groups and fed slightly modified American Institute of Nutrition-93 Growing (AIN-93G) diet without (n=10) or with (n=40) dietary Cd (200 ppm) for 8 weeks. To confirm alteration by dietary Cd intake, twenty rats fed AIN-93G diet without (n=10) and with (n=10) dietary Cd were sacrificed and compared. Other thirty rats were randomly blocked into three groups and fed slightly modified AIN-93G diets replacing 0 (n=10), 5 (n=10) or 10% (n=10) chlorella of total kg diet for 4 weeks. Daily food intake, body weight change, body weight gain/calorie intake, organ weight (liver, spleen, and kidney), perirenal fat pad and epididymal fat pad weights were measured. To examine Cd detoxification, urinary Cd excretion and metallothonein (MT) concentrations in kidney and intestine were measured. Food intake, calorie intake, body weight change, body weight gain/calorie intake, organ weight and fat pad weights were decreased by dietary Cd intake. Urinary Cd excretion and MT concentrations in kidney and small intestine were increased by dietary Cd. After given Cd containing diet, food intake, calorie intake, body weight change, body weight gain/calorie intake, organ weights and fat pad weights were not influenced by dietary chlorella intake. Renal MT synthesis tended to be higher in a dose-dependent manner, but not significantly. And chlorella intake did not significantly facilitate renal and intestinal MT synthesis and urinary Cd excretion. These findings suggest that, after stopping cadmium supply, chlorella supplementation, regardless of its percentage, might not improve cadmium detoxification from the body in growing rats. PMID:20016707

  4. Complete genome sequence of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) of Chlorella sorokiniana.

    PubMed

    Orsini, Massimiliano; Costelli, Cristina; Malavasi, Veronica; Cusano, Roberto; Concas, Alessandro; Angius, Andrea; Cao, Giacomo

    2016-01-01

    The complete sequence of mitochondrial genome of the Chlorella sorokiniana strain (SAG 111-8 k) is presented in this work. Within the Chlorella genus, it represents the second species with a complete sequenced and annotated mitochondrial genome (GenBank accession no. KM241869). The genome consists of circular chromosomes of 52,528 bp and encodes a total of 31 protein coding genes, 3 rRNAs and 26 tRNAs. The overall AT contents of the C. sorokiniana mtDNA is 70.89%, while the coding sequence is of 97.4%. PMID:25186028

  5. The Tissue Distribution of Lutein in Laying Hens Fed Lutein Fortified Chlorella and Production of Chicken Eggs Enriched with Lutein.

    PubMed

    An, Byoung-Ki; Jeon, Jin-Young; Kang, Chang-Won; Kim, Jin-Man; Hwang, Jae-Kwan

    2014-01-01

    Two experiments were conducted to investigate the dietary effects of conventional or lutein fortified chlorella on lutein absorptions, the tissue distributions and the changes in lutein content of eggs in laying hens. In Exp 1, a total of one hundred and fifty, 70 wk-old Hy-Line brown layers were divided into three groups with five replicates and fed with each experiment diet (control diet, diet with 1% conventional chlorella or lutein fortified chlorella) for 2 wk, respectively. The egg production in groups fed diets containing both chlorella powders were higher than that of the control group (p<0.01). With chlorella supplementations, the yolk color significantly increased, although there were no significant differences in the eggshell qualities. The lutein contents of serum, liver and growing oocytes were greatly increased by feeding conventional or lutein fortified chlorella (p<0.01). In Exp. 2, a total of ninety 60 wk-old Hy-Line brown layers were assigned into three groups with three replicates per group (10 birds per replicate). The birds were fed with one of three experimental diets (0, 0.1 or 0.2% lutein fortified chlorella) for 2 wk, respectively. The egg production was not affected by dietary treatments. The egg weight in the group fed with diet containing 0.2% of lutein fortified chlorella was higher than that of the control (p<0.05). As the dietary chlorella levels increased, the daily egg mass linearly increased, although not significantly. The yolk colors in groups fed diets containing lutein fortified chlorella were dramatically increased as compared to the control (p<0.001). The lutein in chicken eggs significantly increased when fed with 0.2% of lutein fortified chlorella (p<0.01). These results suggested that the dietary lutein derived from chlorella was readily absorbed into the serum and absorbed by the liver with growing oocyte for commercial laying hens. Particularly, the lutein fortified chlorella was a valuable natural source for the

  6. [Isolation, Identification and Characteristic Analysis of an Oil-producing Chlorella sp. Tolerant to High-strength Anaerobic Digestion Effluent].

    PubMed

    Yang, Chuang; Wang, Wen-guo; Ma, Dan-wei; Tang, Xiao-yu; Hu, Qi-chun

    2015-07-01

    A Chlorella strain tolerant to high-strength anaerobic digestion effluent was isolated from the anaerobic digestion effluent with a long-term exposure to air. The strain was identified as a Chlorella by morphological and molecular biological methods, and named Chlorella sp. BWY-1, The anaerobic digestion effluent used in this study was from a biogas plant with the raw materials of swine wastewater after solid-liquid separation. The Chlorella regularis (FACHB-729) was used as the control strain. The comparative study showed that Chlorella sp, BWY-Ihad relatively higher growth rate, biomass accumulation capacity and pollutants removal rate in BG11. and different concentrations of anaerobic digestion effluent. Chlorella sp. BWY-1 had the highest growth rate and biomass productivity (324.40 mg.L-1) in BG11, but its lipid productivity and lipid content increased with the increase of anaerobic digestion effluent concentration, In undiluted anaerobic digestion effluent, the lipid productivity and lipid content of Chlorella sp. BWY-1 were up to 44. 43% and 108. 70 mg.L-1, respectively. Those results showed that the isolated algal strain bad some potential applications in livestock wastewater treatment and bioenergy production, it could be combined with a solid-liquid separation, anaerobic fermentation and other techniques for processing livestock wastewater and producing biodiesel. PMID:26489344

  7. The acclimation of Chlorella to high-level nitrite for potential application in biological NOx removal from industrial flue gases.

    PubMed

    Li, Tianpei; Xu, Gang; Rong, Junfeng; Chen, Hui; He, Chenliu; Giordano, Mario; Wang, Qiang

    2016-05-20

    Nitrogen oxides (NOx) are the components of fossil flue gas that give rise to the greatest environmental concerns. This study evaluated the ability of the green algae Chlorella to acclimate to high level of NOx and the potential utilization of Chlorella strains in biological NOx removal (DeNOx) from industrial flue gases. Fifteen Chlorella strains were subject to high-level of nitrite (HN, 176.5 mmolL(-1) nitrite) to simulate exposure to high NOx. These strains were subsequently divided into four groups with respect to their ability to tolerate nitrite (excellent, good, fair, and poor). One strain from each group was selected to evaluate their photosynthetic response to HN condition, and the nitrite adaptability of the four Chlorella strains were further identified by using chlorophyll fluorescence. The outcome of our experiments shows that, although high concentrations of nitrite overall negatively affect growth and photosynthesis of Chlorella strains, the degree of nitrite tolerance is a strain-specific feature. Some Chlorella strains have an appreciably higher ability to acclimate to high-level of nitrite. Acclimation is achieved through a three-step process of restrict, acclimate, and thriving. Notably, Chlorella sp. C2 was found to have a high tolerance and to rapidly acclimate to high concentrations of nitrite; it is therefore a promising candidate for microalgae-based biological NOx removal. PMID:27010349

  8. Characterization of iron uptake from hydroxamate siderophores by Chlorella vulgaris

    SciTech Connect

    Allnutt, F.C.T.

    1985-01-01

    Iron uptake by Chlorella vulgaris from ferric-hydroxamate siderophores and the possible production of siderophores by these algae was investigated. No production of siderophores or organic acids was observed. Iron from the two hydroxamate siderophores tested, ferrioximine B (Fe/sup 3 +/-DFOB) and ferric-rhodotorulate (Fe/sup 3 +/-RA), was taken up at the same rate as iron chelated by citrate or caffeate. Two synthetic chelates, Fe/sup 3 +/-EDTA and Fe/sup 3 +/-EDDHA, provided iron at a slower rate. Iron uptake was inhibited by 50 ..mu..M CCCP or 1 mM vanadate. Cyanide (100 ..mu..M KCN) or 25 ..mu..M antimycin A failed to demonstrate a link between uptake and respiration. Labeled iron (/sup 55/Fe) was taken up while labeled ligands ((/sup 14/C) citrate or RA) were not accumulated. Cation competition from Ni/sup 2 +/ and Co/sup 2 +/ observed using Fe/sup 3 +/-DFOB and Fe/sup 3 +/-RA while iron uptake from Fe/sup 3 +/-citrate was stimulated. Iron-stress induced iron uptake from the hydroxamate siderophores. Ferric reduction from the ferric-siderophores was investigated with electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) and bathophenathroline disulfonate (BPDS). Ferric reduction was induced by iron-stress and inhibited by CCCP. A close correlation between iron uptake and ferric reduction was measured by the EPR method. Ferric reduction measured by the BPDS method was greater than that measure by EPR. BPDS reduction was interpreted to indicate a potential for reduction while EPR measures the physiological rate of reduction. BPDS inhibition of iron uptake and ferricyanide interference with reduction indicate that reduction and uptake occur exposed to the external medium. Presumptive evidence using a binding dose response curve for Fe/sup 3 +/-DFOB indicated that a receptor may be involved in this mechanism.

  9. Production of Chlorella biomass enriched by selenium and its use in animal nutrition: a review.

    PubMed

    Doucha, Jirí; Lívanský, Karel; Kotrbácek, Václav; Zachleder, Vilém

    2009-07-01

    Feedstuffs are routinely supplemented with various selenium sources, where organic forms of Se are more bio-available and less toxic than the inorganic forms (selenites, selenates). When the algae are exposed to environmental Se in the form of selenite, they are able as other microorganisms to incorporate the element to different levels, depending on the algae species. Technology of heterotrophic fed-batch cultivation of the microalga Chlorella enriched by organically bound Se was developed, where the cultivation proceeds in fermentors on aerated and mixed nutrient solution with urea as a nitrogen and glucose as a carbon and energy source. High volumetric productivity and high cell concentrations (about 70-100 g Chlorella dry mass l(-1)) can be attained if nutrients and oxygen are adequately supplied. Addition of a small quantity of a new selenoprotein source-spray-dried Se-Chlorella biomass to the diet of farm animals had better effects on specific physiological and physical parameters of animals than selenite salt and was comparable with Se yeast added to the diet. This review introduces the importance of selenium for humans and animals, methods of Se determination, heterotrophic production of selenium-enriched Chlorella biomass in a fed-batch culture regime on organic carbon, and use of the biomass in animal nutrition. PMID:19533119

  10. The Use of Chlorella Vulgaris in a Simple Demonstration of Heavy Metal Toxicity.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gipps, J. F.; Biro, P.

    1978-01-01

    An experimental system, suitable for secondary schools, uses Chlorella vulgaris to demonstrate the effects of mercury and cadmium. Very low concentrations of mercury or cadmium decrease growth, whereas lead or arsenic have little effect. Further experiments show additive interactions between mercury and cadmium and antagonistic interactions…

  11. The influence of hypergravity on the Paramecium bursaria-Chlorella sp. symbiotic association.

    PubMed

    Bator, Tomasz; Pado, Ryszard

    2009-01-01

    The aim of the research was to determine the influence of strong hypergravity on the Paramecium bursaria-Chlorella sp. symbiotic association, which is considered to be a model example of symbiosis between a heterotroph and an autotroph. The paramecia cells were exposed to 1073 x g, 4293 x g, and 9658 x g hypergravity for 15 min. Then they were incubated for 21 d on a standard lettuce medium. The experiments were conducted in parallel under constant white light and in the dark. The changes in the number of paramecia cells during incubation were determined. Measurements of the number of Chlorella sp. endosymbionts inside host cells were also made. The results showed that a 15-min exposure to hypergravity attenuates the subsequent growth of Paramecium bursaria in the dark, but it may stimulate the growth of paramecia under constant light. Moreover, it causes an increase in the number of algae inside the paramecia cells. Presumably, the influence of hypergravity on the studied symbiotic complex is connected with its effect on the endosymbiotic Chlorella sp. cells. This subject requires further research, focused on the influence of hypergravity on the physiology and growth of the Chlorella sp. endosymbionts living inside the Paramecium bursaria cells. PMID:19957445

  12. Detection of herbicides in water and their interactions with chlorella kessleri

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Vries, Thorsten; Duling, Viviane; Anders, Angelika

    1999-09-01

    For the first time the herbicides ethidimuron, amizol and methabenzthiazuron were detected in water by means of time resolved laser fluorescence spectroscopy. The suitability of the algae chlorella kessleri as a biological indicator was tested. By using time resolved LIF, the herbicides' absorption spectra and their effects on the fluorescence properties of the algae it was possible to distinguish between the three herbicides.

  13. Vitmin A, nutrition, and health values of algea: spirulina, chlorella, and dunaliella

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Spirulina, chlorella, and dunalliella are unicellular algae that are commercially produced worldwide. These algae are concentrated sources of carotenoids (especially provitamin A carotenoids) and other nutrients, such as vitamin B12. Their health benefits as a complementary dietary source for macro ...

  14. Sources of mycosporine-like amino acids in planktonic Chlorella-bearing ciliates (Ciliophora)

    PubMed Central

    SONNTAG, BETTINA; SUMMERER, MONIKA; SOMMARUGA, RUBEN

    2007-01-01

    Mycosporine-like amino acids (MAAs) are a family of secondary metabolites known to protect organisms exposed to solar UV radiation. We tested their distribution among several planktonic ciliates bearing Chlorella isolated from an oligo-mesotrophic lake in Tyrol, Austria. In order to test the origin of these compounds, the MAAs were assessed by high performance liquid chromatography in both the ciliates and their symbiotic algae. Considering all Chlorella-bearing ciliates, we found: (i) seven different MAAs (mycosporine-glycine, palythine, asterina-330, shinorine, porphyra-334, usujirene, palythene); (ii) one to several MAAs per species and (iii) qualitative and quantitative seasonal changes in the MAAs (e.g. in Pelagodileptus trachelioides). In all species tested, concentrations of MAAs were always <1% of ciliate dry weight. Several MAAs were also identified in the Chlorella isolated from the ciliates, thus providing initial evidence for their symbiotic origin. In Uroleptus sp., however, we found evidence for a dietary source of MAAs. Our results suggest that accumulation of MAAs in Chlorella-bearing ciliates represents an additional benefit of this symbiosis and an adaptation for survival in sunlit, UV-exposed waters.

  15. [Study of the compatibility of certain higher plants and chlorella used as a bioregenerative human life support system].

    PubMed

    Shaĭdorov, Iu I; Shebalin, B N; Meleshko, G I

    1980-01-01

    The phototrophic component of a bioregenerative life support system should be of a multispecies structure. It should incorporate not only higher plants but also different algae. The paper discusses the studies concerning mutual effects of Chlorella and higher plants cultivated together in a closed atmosphere. It can be inferred from the studies that gaseous products of Chlorella did not exert a significant effect on the carbon dioxide consumption by wheat and radish plants or on their biomass increment. In turn, gaseous products of higher plants did not influence Chlorella growth. It can, therefore, be concluded that Chlorella and the above higher plants, when cultivated in a common atmosphere, do not inhibit each other and can be regarded as biologically compatible constituents of the photoautotrophic component of future bioregenerative life support systems. PMID:6104747

  16. Effect of dried Chlorella vulgaris and Chlorella growth factor on growth performance, meat qualities and humoral immune responses in broiler chickens.

    PubMed

    An, Byoung-Ki; Kim, Kwan-Eung; Jeon, Jin-Young; Lee, Kyung Woo

    2016-01-01

    This experiment was carried out to investigate the effects of dried chlorella powder (Chlorella vulgaris; DCP) and chlorella growth factor (CGF) on growth performance, serum characteristics, meat qualities and humoral immune responses in broiler chicks. A total of 1050 day-old Ross male broiler chicks were randomly divided into 35 pens (30 chicks/pen) and subjected to one of seven dietary treatments. A non-medicated corn-soybean meal base diet was considered as negative control (NC) and added with either antibiotic (PC), three levels of DCP (NC diets added with 0.05, 0.15 or 0.5 % DCP) or two levels of CGF (NC diets added with 0.05 or 0.15 % CGF). The final body weight and daily weight gain in PC and groups fed diets with 0.15 or 0.5 % DCP were heavier (p < 0.001) than those of NC and CGF-treated groups. Serum total lipid concentrations were lower (p = 0.001) in groups fed diets with 0.5 % DCP and 0.05 or 0.15 % CGF compared with PC group. The levels of serum IgG (p = 0.050) and IgM (p = 0.010) were elevated in chicks fed diets with DCP and CGF compared with the PC or NC group. Meat qualities such as cooking loss, meat color, and pH, of edible meats were not altered by dietary treatments. Collectively, these results indicate that dietary DCP, but not CGF, exerted growth-promoting effect, and both DCP and CGF affected humoral immune response in broiler chicks. PMID:27375987

  17. Utilization of carbon dioxide in industrial flue gases for the cultivation of microalga Chlorella sp.

    PubMed

    Kao, Chien-Ya; Chen, Tsai-Yu; Chang, Yu-Bin; Chiu, Tzai-Wen; Lin, Hsiun-Yu; Chen, Chun-Da; Chang, Jo-Shu; Lin, Chih-Sheng

    2014-08-01

    The biomass and lipid productivity of Chlorella sp. MTF-15 cultivated using aeration with flue gases from a coke oven, hot stove or power plant in a steel plant of the China Steel Corporation in Taiwan were investigated. Using the flue gas from the coke oven, hot stove or power plant for cultivation, the microalgal strain obtained a maximum specific growth rate and lipid production of (0.827 d(-1), 0.688 g L(-1)), (0.762 d(-1), 0.961 g L(-1)), and (0.728 d(-1), 0.792 g L(-1)), respectively. This study demonstrated that Chlorella sp. MTF-15 could efficiently utilize the CO₂, NOX and SO₂ present in the different flue gases. The results also showed that the growth potential, lipid production and fatty acid composition of the microalgal strain were dependent on the composition of the flue gas and on the operating strategy deployed. PMID:24950094

  18. Biomass and lipid production of a local isolate Chlorella sorokiniana under mixotrophic growth conditions.

    PubMed

    Juntila, D J; Bautista, M A; Monotilla, W

    2015-09-01

    A local Chlorella sp. isolate with 97% rbcL sequence identity to Chlorella sorokiniana was evaluated in terms of its biomass and lipid production under mixotrophic growth conditions. Glucose-supplemented cultures exhibited increasing growth rate and biomass yield with increasing glucose concentration. Highest growth rate and biomass yield of 1.602 day(-1) and 687.5 mg L(-1), respectively, were achieved under 2 g L(-1) glucose. Nitrogen starvation up to 75% in the 1.0 g L(-1) glucose-supplemented culture was done to induce lipid accumulation and did not significantly affect the growth. Lipid content ranges from 20% to 27% dry weight. Nile Red staining showed more prominent neutral lipid bodies in starved mixotrophic cultures. C. sorokiniana exhibited enhanced biomass production under mixotrophy and more prominent neutral lipid accumulation under nitrogen starvation with no significant decrease in growth; hence, this isolate could be further studied to establish its potential for biodiesel production. PMID:25847795

  19. Comparative toxicity and structure-activity in Chlorella and Tetrahymena: Monosubstituted phenols

    SciTech Connect

    Jaworska, J.S.; Schultz, T.W. )

    1991-07-01

    The relative toxicity of selected monosubstituted phenols has been assessed by Kramer and Truemper in the Chlorella vulgaris assay. The authors examined population growth inhibition of this simple green algae under short-term static conditions for 33 derivatives. However, efforts to develop a strong predictive quantitative structure-activity relationship (QSAR) met with limited success because they modeled across modes of toxic action or segregated derivatives such as positional isomers (i.e., ortho-, meta-, para-). In an effort to further their understanding of the relationships of ecotoxic effects of phenols, the authors have evaluated the same derivatives reported by Kramer and Truemper in the Tetrahymena pyriformis population growth assay, compared the responses in both systems and developed QSARs for the Chlorella vulgaris data based on mechanisms of action.

  20. Nitrogen balancing and xylose addition enhances growth capacity and protein content in Chlorella minutissima cultures.

    PubMed

    Freitas, B C B; Esquível, M G; Matos, R G; Arraiano, C M; Morais, M G; Costa, J A V

    2016-10-01

    This study aimed to examine the metabolic changes in Chlorella minutissima cells grown under nitrogen-deficient conditions and with the addition of xylose. The cell density, maximum photochemical efficiency, and chlorophyll and lipid levels were measured. The expression of two photosynthetic proteins, ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase (Rubisco) and the beta subunit (AtpB) of adenosine triphosphate synthase, were measured. Comparison of cells grown in medium with a 50% reduction in the nitrogen concentration versus the traditional medium solution revealed that the cells grown under nitrogen-deficient conditions exhibited an increased growth rate, higher maximum cell density (12.7×10(6)cellsmL(-1)), optimal PSII efficiency (0.69) and decreased lipid level (25.08%). This study has taken the first steps toward protein detection in Chlorella minutissima, and the results can be used to optimize the culturing of other microalgae. PMID:27359061

  1. Population of Vibrational State of Carotenoid Molecules in Living Cells of Chlorella

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kinoshita, Shuichi; Hirata, Kuniko; Kushida, Takashi

    1980-07-01

    Stokes and anti-Stokes Raman spectra have been measured in living cells of Chlorella vulgaris as well as in chloroform, toluene, benzene and β-carotene. Population in the vibrational state has been determined by taking account of resonance Raman effect. The result shows that this population is well explained by thermal distribution even in the case of living biological cells, contrary to recently reported observation of some population enhancement. Possible experimental artifacts are discussed.

  2. Physicochemical effects on sulfite transformation in a lipid-rich Chlorella sp. strain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, Fang; Wen, Xiaobin; Luo, Liming; Geng, Yahong; Li, Yeguang

    2014-11-01

    SO2 is very rapidly hydrated to sulfurous acid in water solution at pH value above 6.0, whereby sulfite is yielded from the disassociation of protons. We aimed to improve the sulfite transformation efficiency and provide a basis for the direct utilization of SO2 from flue gas by a microalgal suspension. Chlorella sp. XQ-20044 was cultured in a medium with 20 mmol/L sodium sulfite under different physicochemical conditions. Under light conditions, sulfite concentration in the algal suspension reduced linearly over time, and was completely converted into sulfate within 8 h. The highest sulfite transformation rate (3.25 mmol/(L·h)) was obtained under the following conditions: 35°C, light intensity of 300 μmol/(m2·s), NaHCO3 concentration of 6 g/L, initial cell density (OD540) of 0.8 and pH of 9-10. There was a positive correlation between sulfite transformation rate and the growth of Chlorella, with the conditions favorable to algal growth giving better sulfite transformation. Although oxygen in the air plays a role in the transformation of SO2- 3 to SO2- 4, the transformation is mainly dependent on the metabolic activity of algal cells. Chlorella sp. XQ-20044 is capable of tolerating high sulfite concentration, and can utilize sulfite as the sole sulfur source for maintaining healthy growth. We found that sulfite ≤20 mmol/L had no obvious effect on the total lipid content and fatty acid profiles of the algae. Thus, the results suggest it is feasible to use flue gas for the mass production of feedstock for biodiesel using Chlorella sp. XQ-20044, without preliminary removal of SO2, assuming there is adequate control of the pH.

  3. Nitrogen starvation induced oxidative stress in an oil-producing green alga Chlorella sorokiniana C3.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yun-Ming; Chen, Hui; He, Chen-Liu; Wang, Qiang

    2013-01-01

    Microalgal lipid is one of the most promising feedstocks for biodiesel production. Chlorella appears to be a particularly good option, and nitrogen (N) starvation is an efficient environmental pressure used to increase lipid accumulation in Chlorella cells. The effects of N starvation of an oil-producing wild microalga, Chlorella sorokiniana C3, on lipid accumulation were investigated using thin layer chromatography (TLC), confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM) and flow cytometry (FCM). The results showed that N starvation resulted in lipid accumulation in C. sorokiniana C3 cells, oil droplet (OD) formation and significant lipid accumulation in cells were detected after 2 d and 8 d of N starvation, respectively. During OD formation, reduced photosynthetic rate, respiration rate and photochemistry efficiency accompanied by increased damage to PSII were observed, demonstrated by chlorophyll (Chl) fluorescence, 77K fluorescence and oxygen evolution tests. In the mean time the rate of cyclic electron transportation increased correspondingly to produce more ATP for triacylglycerols (TAGs) synthesis. And 0.5 d was found to be the turning point for the early stress response and acclimation of cells to N starvation. Increased level of membrane peroxidation was also observed during OD formation, and superoxide dismutase (SOD), peroxide dismutase (POD) and catalase (CAT) enzyme activity assays suggested impaired reactive oxygen species (ROS) scavenging ability. Significant neutral lipid accumulation was also observed by artificial oxidative stress induced by H2O2 treatment. These results suggested coupled neutral lipid accumulation and oxidative stress during N starvation in C. sorokiniana C3. PMID:23874918

  4. Sequential accumulation of starch and lipid induced by sulfur deficiency in Chlorella and Parachlorella species.

    PubMed

    Mizuno, Yusuke; Sato, Atsushi; Watanabe, Koichi; Hirata, Aiko; Takeshita, Tsuyoshi; Ota, Shuhei; Sato, Norihiro; Zachleder, Vilém; Tsuzuki, Mikio; Kawano, Shigeyuki

    2013-02-01

    The influence of sulfur deficiency on biomass production was analyzed in the four Chlorellaceae species, Chlorella vulgaris, Chlorella sorokiniana, Chlorella lobophora, and Parachlorella kessleri. Culturing under sulfur-deficient conditions promoted transient accumulation of starch followed by a steady increase in lipid storage. Transmission electron microscopy indicated an increase and decrease in starch granules and subsequent enlargement of lipid droplets under sulfur-deficient conditions. Chlorellaceae spp. accumulated 1.5-2.7-fold higher amounts of starch and 1.5-2.4-fold higher amounts of lipid under sulfur-deficient conditions than under sulfur-sufficient conditions. More than 75% of the fatty acids that accumulated in Chlorellaceae spp. under the sulfur-sufficient condition were unsaturated and culturing under sulfur-deficient conditions increased the saturated fatty acid content from 24.3% to 59.7% only in P. kessleri. These results indicate that the sequential accumulation of starch and lipid is a response to the sulfur depletion that commonly occurs in Chlorellaceae spp. PMID:23238344

  5. Effect of selenate on viability and selenomethionine accumulation of Chlorella sorokiniana grown in batch culture.

    PubMed

    Gojkovic, Živan; Vílchez, Carlos; Torronteras, Rafael; Vigara, Javier; Gómez-Jacinto, Veronica; Janzer, Nora; Gómez-Ariza, José-Luis; Márová, Ivana; Garbayo, Ines

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this work was to study the effect of Se(+VI) on viability, cell morphology, and selenomethionine accumulation of the green alga Chlorella sorokiniana grown in batch cultures. Culture exposed to sublethal Se concentrations of 40 mg · L(-1) (212 μM) decreased growth rates for about 25% compared to control. A selenate EC50 value of 45 mg · L(-1) (238.2 μM) was determined. Results showed that chlorophyll and carotenoids contents were not affected by Se exposure, while oxygen evolution decreased by half. Ultrastructural studies revealed granular stroma, fingerprint-like appearance of thylakoids which did not compromise cell activity. Unlike control cultures, SDS PAGE electrophoresis of crude extracts from selenate-exposed cell cultures revealed appearance of a protein band identified as 53 kDa Rubisco large subunit of Chlorella sorokiniana, suggesting that selenate affects expression of the corresponding chloroplast gene as this subunit is encoded in the chloroplast DNA. Results revealed that the microalga was able to accumulate up to 140 mg · kg(-1) of SeMet in 120 h of cultivation. This paper shows that Chlorella sorokiniana biomass can be enriched in the high value aminoacid SeMet in batch cultures, while keeping photochemical viability and carbon dioxide fixation activity intact, if exposed to suitable sublethal concentrations of Se. PMID:24688385

  6. Nitrogen Starvation Induced Oxidative Stress in an Oil-Producing Green Alga Chlorella sorokiniana C3

    PubMed Central

    He, Chen-Liu; Wang, Qiang

    2013-01-01

    Microalgal lipid is one of the most promising feedstocks for biodiesel production. Chlorella appears to be a particularly good option, and nitrogen (N) starvation is an efficient environmental pressure used to increase lipid accumulation in Chlorella cells. The effects of N starvation of an oil-producing wild microalga, Chlorella sorokiniana C3, on lipid accumulation were investigated using thin layer chromatography (TLC), confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM) and flow cytometry (FCM). The results showed that N starvation resulted in lipid accumulation in C. sorokiniana C3 cells, oil droplet (OD) formation and significant lipid accumulation in cells were detected after 2 d and 8 d of N starvation, respectively. During OD formation, reduced photosynthetic rate, respiration rate and photochemistry efficiency accompanied by increased damage to PSII were observed, demonstrated by chlorophyll (Chl) fluorescence, 77K fluorescence and oxygen evolution tests. In the mean time the rate of cyclic electron transportation increased correspondingly to produce more ATP for triacylglycerols (TAGs) synthesis. And 0.5 d was found to be the turning point for the early stress response and acclimation of cells to N starvation. Increased level of membrane peroxidation was also observed during OD formation, and superoxide dismutase (SOD), peroxide dismutase (POD) and catalase (CAT) enzyme activity assays suggested impaired reactive oxygen species (ROS) scavenging ability. Significant neutral lipid accumulation was also observed by artificial oxidative stress induced by H2O2 treatment. These results suggested coupled neutral lipid accumulation and oxidative stress during N starvation in C. sorokiniana C3. PMID:23874918

  7. Effect of Selenate on Viability and Selenomethionine Accumulation of Chlorella sorokiniana Grown in Batch Culture

    PubMed Central

    Vílchez, Carlos; Torronteras, Rafael; Vigara, Javier; Gómez-Jacinto, Veronica; Janzer, Nora; Gómez-Ariza, José-Luis; Márová, Ivana

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this work was to study the effect of Se(+VI) on viability, cell morphology, and selenomethionine accumulation of the green alga Chlorella sorokiniana grown in batch cultures. Culture exposed to sublethal Se concentrations of 40 mg·L−1 (212 μM) decreased growth rates for about 25% compared to control. A selenate EC50 value of 45 mg·L−1 (238.2 μM) was determined. Results showed that chlorophyll and carotenoids contents were not affected by Se exposure, while oxygen evolution decreased by half. Ultrastructural studies revealed granular stroma, fingerprint-like appearance of thylakoids which did not compromise cell activity. Unlike control cultures, SDS PAGE electrophoresis of crude extracts from selenate-exposed cell cultures revealed appearance of a protein band identified as 53 kDa Rubisco large subunit of Chlorella sorokiniana, suggesting that selenate affects expression of the corresponding chloroplast gene as this subunit is encoded in the chloroplast DNA. Results revealed that the microalga was able to accumulate up to 140 mg·kg−1 of SeMet in 120 h of cultivation. This paper shows that Chlorella sorokiniana biomass can be enriched in the high value aminoacid SeMet in batch cultures, while keeping photochemical viability and carbon dioxide fixation activity intact, if exposed to suitable sublethal concentrations of Se. PMID:24688385

  8. Isolation and partial characterization of mutants with elevated lipid content in Chlorella sorokiniana and Scenedesmus obliquus.

    PubMed

    Vigeolas, Hélène; Duby, Francéline; Kaymak, Esra; Niessen, Guillaume; Motte, Patrick; Franck, Fabrice; Remacle, Claire

    2012-11-30

    This paper describes the isolation and partial biomass characterization of high triacylglycerol (TAG) mutants of Chlorella sorokiniana and Scenedesmus obliquus, two algal species considered as potential source of biodiesel. Following UV mutagenesis, 2000 Chlorella and 2800 Scenedesmus colonies were screened with a method based on Nile Red fluorescence. Several mutants with high Nile Red fluorescence were selected by this high-throughput method in both species. Growth and biomass parameters of the strongest mutants were analyzed in detail. All of the four Chlorella mutants showed no significant changes in growth rate, cell weight, cell size, protein and chlorophyll contents on a per cell basis. Whereas all contained elevated total lipid and TAG content per unit of dry weight, two of them were also affected for starch metabolism, suggesting a change in biomass/storage carbohydrate composition. Two Scenedesmus mutants showed a 1.5 and 2-fold increased cell weight and larger cells compared to the wild type, which led to a general increase of biomass including total lipid and TAG content on a per cell basis. Such mutants could subsequently be used as commercial oleaginous algae and serve as an alternative to conventional petrol. PMID:22480533

  9. Bioremoval of the azo dye Congo Red by the microalga Chlorella vulgaris.

    PubMed

    Hernández-Zamora, Miriam; Cristiani-Urbina, Eliseo; Martínez-Jerónimo, Fernando; Perales-Vela, Hugo Virgilio; Ponce-Noyola, Teresa; Montes-Horcasitas, María del Carmen; Cañizares-Villanueva, Rosa Olivia

    2015-07-01

    Discharge of dye-containing wastewater by the textile industry can adversely affect aquatic ecosystems and human health. Bioremoval is an alternative to industrial processes for detoxifying water contaminated with dyes. In this work, active and inactive biomass of the microalga Chlorella vulgaris was assayed for the ability to remove Congo Red (CR) dye from aqueous solutions. Through biosorption and biodegradation processes, Chlorella vulgaris was able to remove 83 and 58 % of dye at concentrations of 5 and 25 mg L(-1), respectively. The maximum adsorption capacity at equilibrium was 200 mg g(-1). The Langmuir model best described the experimental equilibrium data. The acute toxicity test (48 h) with two species of cladocerans indicated that the toxicity of the dye in the effluent was significantly decreased compared to the initial concentrations in the influent. Daphnia magna was the species less sensitive to dye (EC50 = 17.0 mg L(-1)), followed by Ceriodaphnia dubia (EC50 = 3.32 mg L(-1)). These results show that Chlorella vulgaris significantly reduced the dye concentration and toxicity. Therefore, this method may be a viable option for the treatment of this type of effluent. PMID:25772869

  10. Optimization of simultaneous biomass production and nutrient removal by mixotrophic Chlorella sp. using response surface methodology.

    PubMed

    Lee, Yu-Ru; Chen, Jen-Jeng

    2016-01-01

    The bioprospecting of potentially mixotrophic microalgae in a constructed wetland was conducted. A locally isolated microalga, Chlorella sp., was grown to determine the effect of temperature, aeration rate, and cultivation time on simultaneous biomass production and nutrient removal from piggery wastewater using central composite design (CCD). The most important variable for the biomass productivity of Chlorella sp. was aeration rate, while that for lipid content and nutrient removal efficiency was cultivation time. Total nitrogen (TN) and total phosphorus (TP) removal efficiencies were higher than that of chemical oxygen demand (COD) from piggery wastewater. The CCD results indicate that the highest biomass productivity (79.2 mg L(-1) d(-1)) and simultaneous nutrient removal efficiency (TN 80.9%, TP 99.2%, COD 74.5%) were obtained with a cultivation temperature of 25 °C, a cultivation time of 5 days, and an air aeration rate of 1.6 L L(-1) min(-1). Palmitic acid (C16:0) and linoleic acid (C18:2) were both abundant in Chlorella sp. cells under mixotrophic cultivation with piggery wastewater. PMID:27054723

  11. A new inducible expression system in a transformed green alga, Chlorella vulgaris.

    PubMed

    Niu, Y F; Zhang, M H; Xie, W H; Li, J N; Gao, Y F; Yang, W D; Liu, J S; Li, H Y

    2011-01-01

    Genetic transformation is useful for basic research and applied biotechnology. However, genetic transformation of microalgae is usually quite difficult due to the technical limitations of existing methods. We cloned the promoter and terminator of the nitrate reductase gene from the microalga Phaeodactylum tricornutum and used them for optimization of a transformation system of the microalga Chlorella vulgaris. This species has been used for food production and is a promising candidate as a bioreactor for large-scale production of value-added proteins. A construct was made containing the CAT (chloramphenicol acetyltransferase) reporter gene driven by the nitrate reductase promoter. This construct was transferred into the C. vulgaris genome by electroporation. Expression of CAT in transgenic Chlorella conferred resistance to the antibiotic chloramphenicol and enabled growth in selective media. Overall efficiency for the transformation was estimated to be approximately 0.03%, which is relatively high compared with other available Chlorella transformation systems. Expression of CAT was induced in the presence of nitrate and inhibited in the presence of ammonium as a sole nitrogen source. This study presented an inducible recombinant gene expression system, also providing more gene regulation elements with potential for biotechnological applications. PMID:22033900

  12. Enzymatic cell wall degradation of Chlorella vulgaris and other microalgae for biofuels production.

    PubMed

    Gerken, Henri G; Donohoe, Bryon; Knoshaug, Eric P

    2013-01-01

    Cell walls of microalgae consist of a polysaccharide and glycoprotein matrix providing the cells with a formidable defense against its environment. We characterized enzymes that can digest the cell wall and weaken this defense for the purpose of protoplasting or lipid extraction. A growth inhibition screen demonstrated that chitinase, lysozyme, pectinase, sulfatase, β-glucuronidase, and laminarinase had the broadest effect across the various Chlorella strains tested and also inhibited Nannochloropsis and Nannochloris strains. Chlorella is typically most sensitive to chitinases and lysozymes, both enzymes that degrade polymers containing N-acetylglucosamine. Using a fluorescent DNA stain, we developed rapid methodology to quantify changes in permeability in response to enzyme digestion and found that treatment with lysozyme in conjunction with other enzymes has a drastic effect on cell permeability. Transmission electron microscopy of enzymatically treated Chlorella vulgaris indicates that lysozyme degrades the outer surface of the cell wall and removes hair-like fibers protruding from the surface, which differs from the activity of chitinase. This action on the outer surface of the cell causes visible protuberances on the cell surface and presumably leads to the increased settling rate when cells are treated with lysozyme. We demonstrate radical ultrastructural changes to the cell wall in response to treatment with various enzyme combinations which, in some cases, causes a greater than twofold increase in the thickness of the cell wall. The enzymes characterized in this study should prove useful in the engineering and extraction of oils from microalgae. PMID:23011569

  13. Cultivation of Chlorella on brewery wastewater and nano-particle biosynthesis by its biomass.

    PubMed

    Subramaniyam, Vidhyasri; Subashchandrabose, Suresh Ramraj; Ganeshkumar, Vimalkumar; Thavamani, Palanisami; Chen, Zuliang; Naidu, Ravi; Megharaj, Mallavarapu

    2016-07-01

    This study investigated an integrated and sustainable approach for iron nanoparticles synthesis using Chlorella sp. MM3 biomass produced from the remediation of brewery wastewater. The algal growth characteristics, biomass production, nutrient removal, and nanoparticle synthesis including its characterisation were studied to prove the above approach. The growth curve of Chlorella depicted lag and exponential phase characteristics during the first 4days in a brewery wastewater collected from a single batch of brewing process (single water sample) indicating the growth of algae in brewery wastewater. The pollutants such as total nitrogen, total phosphorus and total organic carbon in single water sample were completely utilised by Chlorella for its growth. The X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy spectra showed peaks at 706.56eV, 727.02eV, 289.84eV and 535.73eV which corresponded to the zero-valent iron, iron oxides, carbon and oxygen respectively, confirming the formation of iron nanoparticle capped with algal biomolecules. Scanning electron microscopy and particle size analysis confirmed the presence of spherical shaped iron nanoparticles of size ranging from 5 to 50nm. To our knowledge, this is the first report on nanoparticle synthesis using the biomass generated from phycoremediation of brewery wastewater. PMID:27060245

  14. Boron bioremoval by a newly isolated Chlorella sp. and its stimulation by growth stimulators.

    PubMed

    Taştan, Burcu Ertit; Duygu, Ergin; Dönmez, Gönül

    2012-01-01

    It has been well documented that excess concentrations of boron (B) causes toxic effects on many of the environmental systems. Although Chlorella sp. has been studied to remove pollutants from water, its capacity to remove B has not been investigated yet. Boron removal levels of newly isolated Chlorella sp. were investigated in BG 11 media with stimulators as triacontanol (TRIA) and/or sodium bicarbonate (NaHCO(3)) and without them, to test if they could increase the removal efficiency by increasing biomass. The assays were performed to determine the effect of different medial compositions, B concentrations, pH and biomass concentrations onto removal efficiency. Boron removal was investigated at 5-10 mg/L range at pH 8 in different medial compositions and maximum removal yield was found as 32.95% at 5.45 mg/L B in media with TRIA and NaHCO(3). The effect of different pH values on the maximum removal yield was investigated at pH 5-9, and the optimum pH was found again 8. The interactive effect of biomass concentration and B removal yield was also investigated at 0.386-1.061 g wet weight/L biomass. The highest removal yield was found as 38.03% at the highest biomass range. This study highlights the importance of using new isolate Chlorella sp. as a new biomaterial for B removal process of waters containing B. PMID:22078227

  15. Culture of a high-chlorophyll-producing and halotolerant Chlorella vulgaris.

    PubMed

    Nakanishi, Koichi; Deuchi, Keiji

    2014-05-01

    In order to increase the value of freshwater algae as raw ingredients for health foods and feed for seawater-based farmed fish, we sought to breed high-chlorophyll halotolerant Chlorella with the objective of generating strains with both high chlorophyll concentrations (≥ 5%) and halotolerance (up to 1% NaCl). We used the Chlorella vulgaris K strain in our research institute culture collection and induced mutations with UV irradiation and acriflavine which is known to effect mutations of mitochondrial DNA that are associated with chlorophyll production. Screenings were conducted on seawater-based "For Chlorella spp." (FC) agar medium, and dark-green-colored colonies were visually selected by macroscopic inspection. We obtained a high-chlorophyll halotolerant strain (designated C. vulgaris M-207A7) that had a chlorophyll concentration of 6.7% (d.m.), a level at least three-fold higher than that of K strain. This isolate also exhibited a greater survival rate in seawater that of K strain. PMID:24331982

  16. Nitrogen and phosphorus removal from municipal wastewater by the green alga Chlorella sp.

    PubMed

    Wang, Changfu; Yu, Xiaoqing; Lv, Hong; Yang, Jun

    2013-04-01

    The potential of microalgae as a source of renewable energy based on wastewater has received increasing interest worldwide in recent decades. A freshwater microalga Chlorella sp. was investigated for its ability to remove both nitrogen and phosphorus from influent and effluent wastewaters which were diluted in four different proportions (namely, 100%, 75%, 50% and 25%). Chlorella sp. grew fastest under 50% influent and effluent wastewaters culture conditions, and showed an maximum cell density (4.25 x 10(9) ind 1(-1) for influent wastewater and 3.54 x 109 ind l(-1) for effluent wastewater), indicating the levels of nitrogen and phosphorus greatly influenced algal growth. High removal efficiency for total nitrogen (17.04-58.85%) and total phosphorus (62.43-97.08%) was achieved. Further, more than 83% NH4-N in 75%, 50%, 25% influent wastewater, 88% NOx-N in effluent wastewater and 90% PO4-P in all treatments were eliminated after 24 days of incubation. Chlorella sp. grew well when PO4-P concentration was very low, indicating that this might be not the limiting factor to algal growth. Our results suggest the potential importance of integrating nutrient removal from wastewater by microalgae cultivation as biofuel production feedstock. PMID:24620613

  17. Analysis of Autophagy Genes in Microalgae: Chlorella as a Potential Model to Study Mechanism of Autophagy

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Qiao; Zhao, Li; Dai, Junbiao; Wu, Qingyu

    2012-01-01

    Background Microalgae, with the ability to mitigate CO2 emission and produce carbohydrates and lipids, are considered one of the most promising resources for producing bioenergy. Recently, we discovered that autophagy plays a critical role in the metabolism of photosynthetic system and lipids production. So far, more than 30-autophagy related (ATG) genes in all subtypes of autophagy have been identified. However, compared with yeast and mammals, in silico and experimental research of autophagy pathways in microalgae remained limited and fragmentary. Principal Findings In this article, we performed a genome-wide analysis of ATG genes in 7 microalgae species and explored their distributions, domain structures and evolution. Eighteen “core autophagy machinery” proteins, four mammalian-specific ATG proteins and more than 30 additional proteins (including “receptor-adaptor” complexes) in all subtypes of autophagy were analyzed. Data revealed that receptor proteins in cytoplasm-to-vacuole targeting and mitophagy seem to be absent in microalgae. However, most of the “core autophagy machinery” and mammalian-specific proteins are conserved among microalgae, except for the ATG9-cycling system in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii and the second ubiquitin-like protein conjugation complex in several algal species. The catalytic and binding residues in ATG3, ATG5, ATG7, ATG8, ATG10 and ATG12 are also conserved and the phylogenetic tree of ATG8 coincides well with the phylogenies. Chlorella contains the entire set of the core autophagy machinery. In addition, RT-PCR analysis verified that all crucial ATG genes tested are expressed during autophagy in both Chlorella and Chlamydomonas reinhardtii. Finally, we discovered that addition of 3-Methyladenine (a PI3K specific inhibitor) could suppress the formation of autophagic vacuoles in Chlorella. Conclusions Taken together, Chlorella may represent a potential model organism to investigate autophagy pathways in photosynthetic

  18. Changes in arterial stiffness and nitric oxide production with Chlorella-derived multicomponent supplementation in middle-aged and older individuals

    PubMed Central

    Otsuki, Takeshi; Shimizu, Kazuhiro; Maeda, Seiji

    2015-01-01

    Chlorella is a unicellular green alga, which contains a variety of nutrients including amino acids, dietary fibers, n-3 unsaturated fatty acid, vitamins, and minerals. We previously demonstrated that Chlorella-derived multicomponent supplementation decreases arterial stiffness in young men. However, mechanisms underlying the reduction in arterial stiffness by Chlorella-derived supplementation and the effect in middle-aged and older individuals have remained unexplored. This study tested our hypothesis that Chlorella-derived supplementation improves arterial stiffness via an increase in nitric oxide (NO, a endothelium-derived relaxing factor) production in middle-aged and older individuals. Thirty-two subjects between 45 and 75 years of age assigned to placebo and Chlorella groups in a double-blinded manner and took respective tablets for 4 weeks. Before and after the supplementations, brachial-ankle pulse wave velocity (baPWV, an index of arterial stiffness) and plasma nitrite/nitrate (NOx, end product of NO) concentration were measured. There was no difference in baPWV between before and after the placebo intake, but baPWV decreased after the Chlorella supplementation. Changes in baPWV with the Chlorella supplementation were correlated with those in plasma NOx concentration. We concluded that Chlorella-derived multicomponent supplementation decreases arterial stiffness in middle-aged and older individuals. It may be associated with increase in NO production by vascular endothelium. PMID:26566309

  19. Changes in arterial stiffness and nitric oxide production with Chlorella-derived multicomponent supplementation in middle-aged and older individuals.

    PubMed

    Otsuki, Takeshi; Shimizu, Kazuhiro; Maeda, Seiji

    2015-11-01

    Chlorella is a unicellular green alga, which contains a variety of nutrients including amino acids, dietary fibers, n-3 unsaturated fatty acid, vitamins, and minerals. We previously demonstrated that Chlorella-derived multicomponent supplementation decreases arterial stiffness in young men. However, mechanisms underlying the reduction in arterial stiffness by Chlorella-derived supplementation and the effect in middle-aged and older individuals have remained unexplored. This study tested our hypothesis that Chlorella-derived supplementation improves arterial stiffness via an increase in nitric oxide (NO, a endothelium-derived relaxing factor) production in middle-aged and older individuals. Thirty-two subjects between 45 and 75 years of age assigned to placebo and Chlorella groups in a double-blinded manner and took respective tablets for 4 weeks. Before and after the supplementations, brachial-ankle pulse wave velocity (baPWV, an index of arterial stiffness) and plasma nitrite/nitrate (NOx, end product of NO) concentration were measured. There was no difference in baPWV between before and after the placebo intake, but baPWV decreased after the Chlorella supplementation. Changes in baPWV with the Chlorella supplementation were correlated with those in plasma NOx concentration. We concluded that Chlorella-derived multicomponent supplementation decreases arterial stiffness in middle-aged and older individuals. It may be associated with increase in NO production by vascular endothelium. PMID:26566309

  20. Chlorella Protein Hydrolysate Attenuates Glucose Metabolic Disorder and Fatty Liver in High-fat Diet-induced Obese Mice.

    PubMed

    Noguchi, Naoto; Yanagita, Teruyoshi; Rahman, Shaikh Mizanoor; Ando, Yotaro

    2016-07-01

    Chlorella (Parachlorella beijerinckii) powder is reported to show a preventive effect against metabolic syndromes such as arteriosclerosis, hyperlipidemia, and hypertension. Approximately 60% of the chlorella content is protein. In order to understand the role of chlorella protein, we prepared a chlorella protein hydrolysate (CPH) by protease treatment. Male C57BL/6 mice were divided into three groups: a normal diet group, high-fat diet (HFD) group, and high-fat diet supplemented with CPH (HFD+CPH) group. The CPH administration improved glucose intolerance, insulin sensitivity, and adipose tissue hypertrophy in the high-fat diet-fed mice. In addition, the HFD+CPH group had significantly decreased liver total cholesterol and triglyceride levels compared with those in the HFD group. Furthermore, the HFD+CPH group had a decreased level of monocyte chemotactic protein-1 (MCP-1) in serum and a lower MCP-1 mRNA expression level in adipose tissue compared with the HFD group. The present study suggests that chlorella protein hydrolysate can prevent a high-fat diet-induced glucose disorder and fatty liver by inhibiting adipocyte hypertrophy and reducing the MCP-1 protein and gene expression. PMID:27321121

  1. Symbiotic ciliates receive protection against UV damage from their algae: a test with Paramecium bursaria and Chlorella.

    PubMed

    Summerer, Monika; Sonntag, Bettina; Hörtnagl, Paul; Sommaruga, Ruben

    2009-05-01

    We assessed the photoprotective role of symbiotic Chlorella in the ciliate Paramecium bursaria by comparing their sensitivity to UV radiation (UVR) with Chlorella-reduced and Chlorella-free (aposymbiotic) cell lines of the same species. Aposymbiotic P. bursaria had significantly higher mortality than the symbiotic cell lines when exposed to UVR. To elucidate the protection mechanism, we assessed the algal distribution within the ciliate using thin-sections and transmission electron microscopy and estimated the screening factor by Chlorella based on an optical model. These analyses evidenced a substantial screening factor ranging, from 59.2% to 93.2% (320nm) for regular algal distribution. This screening efficiency reached up to approximately 100% when Chlorella algae were dislocated to the posterior region of the ciliate. The dislocation was observed in symbiotic ciliates only under exposure to UV plus photosynthetically active radiation (PAR) or to high PAR levels. Moreover, under exposure to UVB radiation and high PAR, symbiotic P. bursaria aggregated into dense spots. This behavior could represent an efficient avoidance strategy not yet described for ciliates. Analyses of the intact symbiosis and their algal symbionts for UV-screening compounds (mycosporine-like amino acids and sporopollenin) proved negative. Overall, our results show that photoprotection in this ciliate symbiosis represents an additional advantage to the hitherto postulated nutritional benefits. PMID:19195930

  2. Cultivation of Monoraphidium sp., Chlorella sp. and Scenedesmus sp. algae in Batch culture using Nile tilapia effluent.

    PubMed

    Guerrero-Cabrera, Luis; Rueda, José A; García-Lozano, Hiram; Navarro, A Karin

    2014-06-01

    Monoraphidium sp., Chlorella sp. and Scenedesmus sp. algae were cultured in three volumes of Tilapia Effluent Medium (TEM) in comparison with the Bold Basal Medium (BBM) (Nichols and Bold, 1965). Specific growth rate (μ'), biomass dry productivity (Q), volumetric productivity (Qv) as well as lipid and protein content were measured. Then, volumetric productivities for both lipids and proteins were calculated (QVL and QVP). In Scenedesmus sp., BBM produced higher μ' and Qv than TEM in 1.5L volume. Chlorella sp. showed a higher QVL for BBM than TEM. Any observed difference in protein or lipid productivities among volumes was in favor of a greater productivity for 1.5L volume. Even when TEM had a larger protein content in Chlorella sp. than BBM, QVP was not different. Current results imply that TEM can be used as an alternative growth medium for algae when using Batch cultures, yet productivity is reduced. PMID:24736090

  3. Treatment of African catfish, Clarias gariepinus wastewater utilizing phytoremediation of microalgae, Chlorella sp. with Aspergillus niger bio-harvesting.

    PubMed

    Nasir, Nurfarahana Mohd; Bakar, Nur Syuhada Abu; Lananan, Fathurrahman; Abdul Hamid, Siti Hajar; Lam, Su Shiung; Jusoh, Ahmad

    2015-08-01

    This study focuses on the evaluation of the performance of Chlorella sp. in removing nutrient in aquaculture wastewater and its correlation with the kinetic growth of Chlorella sp. The treatment was applied with various Chlorella sp. inoculation dosage ranging from 0% to 60% (v/v) of wastewater. The optimum inoculation dosage was recorded at 30% (v/v) with effluent concentration of ammonia and orthophosphate recording at 0.012mgL(-1) and 0.647mgL(-1), respectively on Day 11. The optimum dosage for bio-flocculation process was obtained at 30mgL(-1) of Aspergillus niger with a harvesting efficiency of 97%. This type of development of phytoremediation with continuous bio-harvesting could promote the use of sustainable green technology for effective wastewater treatment. PMID:25791330

  4. Symbiosis between hydra and chlorella: molecular phylogenetic analysis and experimental study provide insight into its origin and evolution.

    PubMed

    Kawaida, Hitomi; Ohba, Kohki; Koutake, Yuhki; Shimizu, Hiroshi; Tachida, Hidenori; Kobayakawa, Yoshitaka

    2013-03-01

    Although many physiological studies have been reported on the symbiosis between hydra and green algae, very little information from a molecular phylogenetic aspect of symbiosis is available. In order to understand the origin and evolution of symbiosis between the two organisms, we compared the phylogenetic relationships among symbiotic green algae with the phylogenetic relationships among host hydra strains. To do so, we reconstructed molecular phylogenetic trees of several strains of symbiotic chlorella harbored in the endodermal epithelial cells of viridissima group hydra strains and investigated their congruence with the molecular phylogenetic trees of the host hydra strains. To examine the species specificity between the host and the symbiont with respect to the genetic distance, we also tried to introduce chlorella strains into two aposymbiotic strains of viridissima group hydra in which symbiotic chlorella had been eliminated in advance. We discussed the origin and history of symbiosis between hydra and green algae based on the analysis. PMID:23219706

  5. Evaluation of higher plant virus resistance genes in the green alga, Chlorella variabilis NC64A, during the early phase of infection with Paramecium bursaria chlorella virus-1.

    PubMed

    Rowe, Janet M; Dunigan, David D; Blanc, Guillaume; Gurnon, James R; Xia, Yuannan; Van Etten, James L

    2013-08-01

    With growing industrial interest in algae plus their critical roles in aquatic systems, the need to understand the effects of algal pathogens is increasing. We examined a model algal host-virus system, Chlorella variabilis NC64A and virus, PBCV-1. C. variabilis encodes 375 homologs to genes involved in RNA silencing and in response to virus infection in higher plants. Illumina RNA-Seq data showed that 325 of these homologs were expressed in healthy and early PBCV-1 infected (≤60min) cells. For each of the RNA silencing genes to which homologs were found, mRNA transcripts were detected in healthy and infected cells. C. variabilis, like higher plants, may employ certain RNA silencing pathways to defend itself against virus infection. To our knowledge this is the first examination of RNA silencing genes in algae beyond core proteins, and the first analysis of their transcription during virus infection. PMID:23701839

  6. Evaluation of higher plant virus resistance genes in the green alga, Chlorella variabilis NC64A, during the early phase of infection with Paramecium bursaria chlorella virus-1

    PubMed Central

    Rowe, Janet M.; Dunigan, David D.; Blanc, Guillaume; Gurnon, James R.; Xia, Yuannan; Van Etten, James L.

    2014-01-01

    With growing industrial interest in algae plus their critical roles in aquatic systems, the need to understand the effects of algal pathogens is increasing. We examined a model algal host–virus system, Chlorella variabilis NC64A and virus, PBCV-1. C. variabilis encodes 375 homologs to genes involved in RNA silencing and in response to virus infection in higher plants. Illumina RNA-Seq data showed that 325 of these homologs were expressed in healthy and early PBCV-1 infected (≤60 min) cells. For each of the RNA silencing genes to which homologs were found, mRNA transcripts were detected in healthy and infected cells. C. variabilis, like higher plants, may employ certain RNA silencing pathways to defend itself against virus infection. To our knowledge this is the first examination of RNA silencing genes in algae beyond core proteins, and the first analysis of their transcription during virus infection. PMID:23701839

  7. Sulfur Deprivation Results in Oxidative Perturbation in Chlorella sorokiniana (211/8k).

    PubMed

    Salbitani, Giovanna; Vona, Vincenza; Bottone, Claudia; Petriccione, Milena; Carfagna, Simona

    2015-05-01

    Sulfur deficiency in plant cells has not been considered as a potential abiotic factor that can induce oxidative stress. We studied the antioxidant defense system of Chlorella sorokiniana cultured under sulfur (S) deficiency, imposed for a maximum period of 24 h, to evaluate the effect of an S shortage on oxidative stress. S deprivation induced an immediate (30 min) but transient increase in the intracellular H2O2 content, which suggests that S limitation can lead to a temporary redox disturbance. After 24 h, S deficiency in Chlorella cells decreased the glutathione content to <10% of the value measured in cells that were not subjected to S deprivation. Consequently, we assumed that the cellular antioxidative mechanisms could be altered by a decrease in the total glutathione content. The total ascorbate pool increased within 2 h after the initiation of S depletion, and remained high until 6 h; however, ascorbate regeneration was inhibited under limited S conditions, indicated by a significant decrease in the ascorbate/dehydroascorbate (AsA/DHA) ratios. Furthermore, ascorbate peroxidase (APX) and superoxide dismutase (SOD) were activated under S deficiency, but we assumed that these enzymes were involved in maintaining the cellular H2O2 balance for at least 4 h after the initiation of S starvation. We concluded that S deprivation triggers redox changes and induces antioxidant enzyme activities in Chlorella cells. The accumulation of total ascorbate, changes in the reduced glutathione/oxidized glutathione (GSH/GSSG) ratios and an increase in the activity of SOD and APX enzymes indicate that oxidative perturbation occurs during S deprivation. PMID:25647328

  8. Suppression Subtractive Hybridization Reveals Transcript Profiling of Chlorella under Heterotrophy to Photoautotrophy Transition

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Jianke; Wang, Weiliang; Yin, Weibo; Hu, Zanmin; Li, Yuanguang

    2012-01-01

    Background Microalgae have been extensively investigated and exploited because of their competitive nutritive bioproducts and biofuel production ability. Chlorella are green algae that can grow well heterotrophically and photoautotrophically. Previous studies proved that shifting from heterotrophy to photoautotrophy in light-induced environments causes photooxidative damage as well as distinct physiologic features that lead to dynamic changes in Chlorella intracellular components, which have great potential in algal health food and biofuel production. However, the molecular mechanisms underlying the trophic transition remain unclear. Methodology/Principal Findings In this study, suppression subtractive hybridization strategy was employed to screen and characterize genes that are differentially expressed in response to the light-induced shift from heterotrophy to photoautotrophy. Expressed sequence tags (ESTs) were obtained from 770 and 803 randomly selected clones among the forward and reverse libraries, respectively. Sequence analysis identified 544 unique genes in the two libraries. The functional annotation of the assembled unigenes demonstrated that 164 (63.1%) from the forward library and 62 (21.8%) from the reverse showed significant similarities with the sequences in the NCBI non-redundant database. The time-course expression patterns of 38 selected differentially expressed genes further confirmed their responsiveness to a diverse trophic status. The majority of the genes enriched in the subtracted libraries were associated with energy metabolism, amino acid metabolism, protein synthesis, carbohydrate metabolism, and stress defense. Conclusions/Significance The data presented here offer the first insights into the molecular foundation underlying the diverse microalgal trophic niche. In addition, the results can be used as a reference for unraveling candidate genes associated with the transition of Chlorella from heterotrophy to photoautotrophy, which holds

  9. Using oxidized liquid and solid human waste as nutrients for Chlorella vulgaris and cyanobacterium Oscillatoria deflexa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trifonov, Sergey V.; Kalacheva, Galina; Tirranen, Lyalya; Gribovskaya, Iliada

    At stationary terrestrial and space stations with closed and partially closed substance exchange not only plants, but also algae can regenerate atmosphere. Their biomass can be used for feeding Daphnia and Moina species, which, in their turn, serve as food for fish. In addition, it is possible to use algae for production of biological fuel. We suggested two methods of human waste mineralization: dry (evaporation with subsequent incineration in a muffle furnace) and wet (oxidation in a reactor using hydrogen peroxide). The research task was to prepare nutrient media for green alga Chlorella vulgaris and cyanobacterium Oscillatoria deflexa using liquid human waste mineralized by dry method, and to prepare media for chlorella on the basis of 1) liquid and 2) liquid and solid human waste mineralized by wet method. The algae were grown in batch culture in a climate chamber with the following parameters: illumination 7 klx, temperature 27-30 (°) C, culture density 1-2 g/l of dry weight. The control for chlorella was Tamiya medium, pH-5, and for oscillstoria — Zarrouk medium, pH-10. Maximum permissible concentrations of NaCl, Cl, urea (NH _{2}) _{2}CO, and native urine were established for algae. Missing ingredients (such as salts and acids) for experimental nutrient media were determined: their addition made it possible to obtain the biomass production not less than that in the control. The estimation was given of the mineral and biochemical composition of algae grown on experimental media. Microbiological test revealed absence of foreign microbial flora in experimental cultures.

  10. Adaptability of growth and nutrient uptake potential of Chlorella sorokiniana with variable nutrient loading.

    PubMed

    Shriwastav, Amritanshu; Gupta, Sanjay Kumar; Ansari, Faiz Ahmad; Rawat, Ismail; Bux, Faizal

    2014-12-01

    Chlorella sorokiniana can sustain growth in conditions hostile to other species, and possesses good nutrient removal and lipid accumulation potentials. However, the effects of variable nutrient levels (N and P) in wastewaters on growth, productivity, and nutrient uptake by C. sorokiniana have not been studied in detail. This study demonstrates the ability of this alga to sustain uniform growth and productivity, while regulating the relative nutrient uptake in accordance to their availability in the bulk medium. These results highlight the potential of C. sorokiniana as a suitable candidate for fulfilling the coupled objectives of nutrient removal and biomass production for bio-fuel with wastewaters having great variability in nutrient levels. PMID:25463782

  11. Complete genome sequence of chloroplast DNA (cpDNA) of Chlorella sorokiniana.

    PubMed

    Orsini, Massimiliano; Cusano, Roberto; Costelli, Cristina; Malavasi, Veronica; Concas, Alessandro; Angius, Andrea; Cao, Giacomo

    2016-01-01

    The complete chloroplast genome sequence of Chlorella sorokiniana strain (SAG 111-8 k) is presented in this study. The genome consists of circular chromosomes of 109,811 bp, which encode a total of 109 genes, including 74 proteins, 3 rRNAs and 31 tRNAs. Moreover, introns are not detected and all genes are present in single copy. The overall AT contents of the C. sorokiniana cpDNA is 65.9%, the coding sequence is 59.1% and a large inverted repeat (IR) is not observed. PMID:24865923

  12. Nitric oxide inhibitory activity of monogalactosylmonoacylglycerols from a freshwater microalgae Chlorella sorokiniana.

    PubMed

    Banskota, Arjun H; Stefanova, Roumiana; Gallant, Pamela; Osborne, Jane A; Melanson, Ronald; O'Leary, Stephen J B

    2013-01-01

    Chemical investigation of the freshwater microalgae Chlorella sorokiniana led to the isolation of a new monogalactosylmonoacylglycerol, namely, (2S)-1-O-(7Z,10Z-hexadecadienoyl)-3-O-β-D-galactopyranosylglycerol (1) together with a known glycolipid (2S)-1-O-(7Z,10Z,13Z-hexadecatrienoyl)-3-O-β-D-galactopyranosylglycerol (2). Both monogalactosylmonoacylglycerols showed dose-dependent nitric oxide (NO) inhibitory activity against lipopolysaccharide-induced NO production in RAW264.7 macrophage cells suggesting their possible use as anti-inflammatory agents. PMID:22703524

  13. A Novel Treatment Protects Chlorella at Commercial Scale from the Predatory Bacterium Vampirovibrio chlorellavorus

    PubMed Central

    Ganuza, Eneko; Sellers, Charles E.; Bennett, Braden W.; Lyons, Eric M.; Carney, Laura T.

    2016-01-01

    The predatory bacterium, Vampirovibrio chlorellavorus, can destroy a Chlorella culture in just a few days, rendering an otherwise robust algal crop into a discolored suspension of empty cell walls. Chlorella is used as a benchmark for open pond cultivation due to its fast growth. In nature, V. chlorellavorus plays an ecological role by controlling this widespread terrestrial and freshwater microalga, but it can have a devastating effect when it attacks large commercial ponds. We discovered that V. chlorellavorus was associated with the collapse of four pilot commercial-scale (130,000 L volume) open-pond reactors. Routine microscopy revealed the distinctive pattern of V. chlorellavorus attachment to the algal cells, followed by algal cell clumping, culture discoloration and ultimately, growth decline. The “crash” of the algal culture coincided with increasing proportions of 16s rRNA sequencing reads assigned to V. chlorellavorus. We designed a qPCR assay to predict an impending culture crash and developed a novel treatment to control the bacterium. We found that (1) Chlorella growth was not affected by a 15 min exposure to pH 3.5 in the presence of 0.5 g/L acetate, when titrated with hydrochloric acid and (2) this treatment had a bactericidal effect on the culture (2-log decrease in aerobic counts). Therefore, when qPCR results indicated a rise in V. chlorellavorus amplicons, we found that the pH-shock treatment prevented the culture crash and doubled the productive longevity of the culture. Furthermore, the treatment could be repeatedly applied to the same culture, at the beginning of at least two sequential batch cycles. In this case, the treatment was applied preventively, further increasing the longevity of the open pond culture. In summary, the treatment reversed the infection of V. chlorellavorus as confirmed by observations of bacterial attachment to Chlorella cells and by detection of V. chlorellavorus by 16s rRNA sequencing and qPCR assay. The p

  14. [Study of the growth and development of Chlorella on "Kosmos-1887"].

    PubMed

    Sychev, V N; Levinskikh, M A; Livanskaia, O G

    1989-01-01

    The growth, development and population characteristics of Chlorella cells flown for 13 days in space were investigated during their postflight cultivation. The growth rate of flown algae did not differ from that of ground-based controls in terms of increases in the cell number and biomass. All basic parameters of the specimens (generation time, number of developing autospores, time ratio of developmental phases) were ontogentically normal. Exposure of the algae to space flight as a component of the algobacterial cenosis--fish autotrophic-heterotrophic system produced no significant effect of the population or individual specimens during their postflight cultivation. PMID:2593605

  15. Characterization of a single cell of Chlorella in a microfluidic channel using amperometric electrode arrays.

    PubMed

    Song, Young Seok; Bai, Seoung Jai

    2014-11-01

    Electrochemical characteristics of O2 and/or mediators secreted by a single cell of Chlorella fusea were analyzed by using amperometric measurements on microelectrodes embedded in a microfluidic device. A single cell was trapped in a microfluidic channel, which simplifies the mass transfer phenomenon, i.e., one-dimensional distribution of solutes in the channel. Such amperometric measurements allowed us to obtain more refined data in a localized space and to understand photosynthetic behavior of algae at the single cell level. In addition, the concentration of a photosynthetic mediator, p-benzoquinone, was numerically calculated by using the finite element method. PMID:24966046

  16. Biodiesel Production from Chlorella protothecoides Oil by Microwave-Assisted Transesterification

    PubMed Central

    Gülyurt, Mustafa Ömer; Özçimen, Didem; İnan, Benan

    2016-01-01

    In this study, biodiesel production from microalgal oil by microwave-assisted transesterification was carried out to investigate its efficiency. Transesterification reactions were performed by using Chlorella protothecoides oil as feedstock, methanol, and potassium hydroxide as the catalyst. Methanol:oil ratio, reaction time and catalyst:oil ratio were investigated as process parameters affected methyl ester yield. 9:1 methanol/oil molar ratio, 1.5% KOH catalyst/oil ratio and 10 min were optimum values for the highest fatty acid methyl ester yield. PMID:27110772

  17. A Novel Treatment Protects Chlorella at Commercial Scale from the Predatory Bacterium Vampirovibrio chlorellavorus.

    PubMed

    Ganuza, Eneko; Sellers, Charles E; Bennett, Braden W; Lyons, Eric M; Carney, Laura T

    2016-01-01

    The predatory bacterium, Vampirovibrio chlorellavorus, can destroy a Chlorella culture in just a few days, rendering an otherwise robust algal crop into a discolored suspension of empty cell walls. Chlorella is used as a benchmark for open pond cultivation due to its fast growth. In nature, V. chlorellavorus plays an ecological role by controlling this widespread terrestrial and freshwater microalga, but it can have a devastating effect when it attacks large commercial ponds. We discovered that V. chlorellavorus was associated with the collapse of four pilot commercial-scale (130,000 L volume) open-pond reactors. Routine microscopy revealed the distinctive pattern of V. chlorellavorus attachment to the algal cells, followed by algal cell clumping, culture discoloration and ultimately, growth decline. The "crash" of the algal culture coincided with increasing proportions of 16s rRNA sequencing reads assigned to V. chlorellavorus. We designed a qPCR assay to predict an impending culture crash and developed a novel treatment to control the bacterium. We found that (1) Chlorella growth was not affected by a 15 min exposure to pH 3.5 in the presence of 0.5 g/L acetate, when titrated with hydrochloric acid and (2) this treatment had a bactericidal effect on the culture (2-log decrease in aerobic counts). Therefore, when qPCR results indicated a rise in V. chlorellavorus amplicons, we found that the pH-shock treatment prevented the culture crash and doubled the productive longevity of the culture. Furthermore, the treatment could be repeatedly applied to the same culture, at the beginning of at least two sequential batch cycles. In this case, the treatment was applied preventively, further increasing the longevity of the open pond culture. In summary, the treatment reversed the infection of V. chlorellavorus as confirmed by observations of bacterial attachment to Chlorella cells and by detection of V. chlorellavorus by 16s rRNA sequencing and qPCR assay. The p

  18. The mutation process in a chlorella population under the combined action of radionuclides and chemical mutagens

    SciTech Connect

    Ptitsyna, S.N.; Sergeeva, S.A.; Shevchenko, V.A.; Shvobene, R.Y.

    1985-09-01

    This paper investigates the dynamics of the mutation process under the combined chronic action of radionuclides (/sup 144/Ce, /sup 90/Sr) and inhibitors of repair, acriflavine and caffeine, as well as under the joint action of ethyleneimine and acriflavine, in a Chlorella population. It is shown that the modifying effect of acriflavine is more pronounced under the action of /sup 144/Ce, which is evidently due to its stronger genetic effect, in comparison with /sup 90/Sr. Experiments with inhibitors confirm the participation of the repair systems in the establishment of the visible picture of the mutation process induced by radionuclides and by ethyleneimine (EI).

  19. Synthesis and degradation of nitrate reductase during the cell cycle of Chlorella sorokiniana

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Velasco, P. J.; Tischner, R.; Huffaker, R. C.; Whitaker, J. R.

    1989-01-01

    Studies on the diurnal variations of nitrate reductase (NR) activity during the life cycle of synchronized Chlorella sorokiniana cells grown with a 7:5 light-dark cycle showed that the NADH:NR activity, as well as the NR partial activities NADH:cytochrome c reductase and reduced methyl viologen:NR, closely paralleled the appearance and disappearance of NR protein as shown by sodium dodecyl sulfate gel electrophoresis and immunoblots. Results of pulse-labeling experiments with [35S]methionine further confirmed that diurnal variations of the enzyme activities can be entirely accounted for by the concomitant synthesis and degradation of the NR protein.

  20. Anti-inflammatory and immunomodulatory activities of polysaccharide from Chlorella stigmatophora and Phaeodactylum tricornutum.

    PubMed

    Guzmán, S; Gato, A; Lamela, M; Freire-Garabal, M; Calleja, J M

    2003-06-01

    Crude polysaccharide extracts were obtained from aqueous extracts of the microalgae Chlorella stigmatophora and Phaeodactylum tricornutum. The crude extracts were fractionated by ion-exchange chromatography on DEAE-cellulose columns. The molecular weights of the polysaccharides in each fraction were estimated by gel filtration on Sephacryl columns. The crude polysaccharide extracts of both microalgae showed anti-inflammatory activity in the carrageenan-induced paw edema test. In assays of effects on the delayed hyper-sensitivity response, and on phagocytic activity assayed in vivo and in vitro, the C. stigmatophora extract showed immunosuppressant effects, while the P. tricornutum extract showed immunostimulatory effects. PMID:12820237

  1. Biodiesel Production from Chlorella protothecoides Oil by Microwave-Assisted Transesterification.

    PubMed

    Gülyurt, Mustafa Ömer; Özçimen, Didem; İnan, Benan

    2016-01-01

    In this study, biodiesel production from microalgal oil by microwave-assisted transesterification was carried out to investigate its efficiency. Transesterification reactions were performed by using Chlorella protothecoides oil as feedstock, methanol, and potassium hydroxide as the catalyst. Methanol:oil ratio, reaction time and catalyst:oil ratio were investigated as process parameters affected methyl ester yield. 9:1 methanol/oil molar ratio, 1.5% KOH catalyst/oil ratio and 10 min were optimum values for the highest fatty acid methyl ester yield. PMID:27110772

  2. Chlorella Induces Stomatal Closure via NADPH Oxidase-Dependent ROS Production and Its Effects on Instantaneous Water Use Efficiency in Vicia faba

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yan; Xu, Shan-Shan; Gao, Jing; Pan, Sha; Wang, Gen-Xuan

    2014-01-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) have been established to participate in stomatal closure induced by live microbes and microbe-associated molecular patterns (MAMPs). Chlorella as a beneficial microorganism can be expected to trigger stomatal closure via ROS production. Here, we reported that Chlorella induced stomatal closure in a dose-and time-dependent manner in epidermal peels of Vicia faba. Using pharmacological methods in this work, we found that the Chlorella-induced stomatal closure was almost completely abolished by a hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) scavenger, catalase (CAT), significantly suppressed by an NADPH oxidase inhibitor, diphenylene iodonium chloride (DPI), and slightly affected by a peroxidase inhibitor, salicylhydroxamic acid (SHAM), suggesting that ROS production involved in Chlorella-induced stomatal closure is mainly mediated by DPI-sensitive NADPH oxidase. Additionally, Exogenous application of optimal concentrations of Chlorella suspension improved instantaneous water use efficiency (WUEi) in Vicia faba via a reduction in leaf transpiration rate (E) without a parallel reduction in net photosynthetic rate (Pn) assessed by gas-exchange measurements. The chlorophyll fluorescence and content analysis further demonstrated that short-term use of Chlorella did not influence plant photosynthetic reactions center. These results preliminarily reveal that Chlorella can trigger stomatal closure via NADPH oxidase-dependent ROS production in epidermal strips and improve WUEi in leave levels. PMID:24687099

  3. Use of De Novo Transcriptome Libraries to Characterize a Novel Oleaginous Marine Chlorella Species during the Accumulation of Triacylglycerols.

    PubMed

    Mansfeldt, Cresten B; Richter, Lubna V; Ahner, Beth A; Cochlan, William P; Richardson, Ruth E

    2016-01-01

    Marine chlorophytes of the genus Chlorella are unicellular algae capable of accumulating a high proportion of cellular lipids that can be used for biodiesel production. In this study, we examined the broad physiological capabilities of a subtropical strain (C596) of Chlorella sp. "SAG-211-18" including its heterotrophic growth and tolerance to low salt. We found that the alga replicates more slowly at diluted salt concentrations and can grow on a wide range of carbon substrates in the dark. We then sequenced the RNA of Chlorella strain C596 to elucidate key metabolic genes and investigate the transcriptomic response of the organism when transitioning from a nutrient-replete to a nutrient-deficient condition when neutral lipids accumulate. Specific transcripts encoding for enzymes involved in both starch and lipid biosynthesis, among others, were up-regulated as the cultures transitioned into a lipid-accumulating state whereas photosynthesis-related genes were down-regulated. Transcripts encoding for two of the up-regulated enzymes-a galactoglycerolipid lipase and a diacylglyceride acyltransferase-were also monitored by reverse transcription quantitative polymerase chain reaction assays. The results of these assays confirmed the transcriptome-sequencing data. The present transcriptomic study will assist in the greater understanding, more effective application, and efficient design of Chlorella-based biofuel production systems. PMID:26840425

  4. Use of De Novo Transcriptome Libraries to Characterize a Novel Oleaginous Marine Chlorella Species during the Accumulation of Triacylglycerols

    PubMed Central

    Ahner, Beth A.; Cochlan, William P.; Richardson, Ruth E.

    2016-01-01

    Marine chlorophytes of the genus Chlorella are unicellular algae capable of accumulating a high proportion of cellular lipids that can be used for biodiesel production. In this study, we examined the broad physiological capabilities of a subtropical strain (C596) of Chlorella sp. “SAG-211-18” including its heterotrophic growth and tolerance to low salt. We found that the alga replicates more slowly at diluted salt concentrations and can grow on a wide range of carbon substrates in the dark. We then sequenced the RNA of Chlorella strain C596 to elucidate key metabolic genes and investigate the transcriptomic response of the organism when transitioning from a nutrient-replete to a nutrient-deficient condition when neutral lipids accumulate. Specific transcripts encoding for enzymes involved in both starch and lipid biosynthesis, among others, were up-regulated as the cultures transitioned into a lipid-accumulating state whereas photosynthesis-related genes were down-regulated. Transcripts encoding for two of the up-regulated enzymes—a galactoglycerolipid lipase and a diacylglyceride acyltransferase—were also monitored by reverse transcription quantitative polymerase chain reaction assays. The results of these assays confirmed the transcriptome-sequencing data. The present transcriptomic study will assist in the greater understanding, more effective application, and efficient design of Chlorella-based biofuel production systems. PMID:26840425

  5. The Chlorella variabilis NC64A Genome Reveals Adaptation to Photosymbiosis, Coevolution with Viruses, and Cryptic Sex

    SciTech Connect

    Blanc, Guillaume; Duncan, Garry A.; Agarakova, Irina; Borodovsky, Mark; Gurnon, James; Kuo, Alan; Lindquist, Erika; Lucas, Susan; Pangailinan, Jasmyn; Polle, Juergen; Salamov, Asaf; Terry, Astrid; Yamada, Takashi; Dunigan, David D.; Grigoriev, Igor V.; Claverie, Jean-Michel; Etten, James L. Van

    2010-05-06

    Chlorella variabilis NC64A, a unicellular photosynthetic green alga (Trebouxiophyceae), is an intracellular photobiont of Paramecium bursaria and a model system for studying virus/algal interactions. We sequenced its 46-Mb nuclear genome, revealing an expansion of protein families that could have participated in adaptation to symbiosis. NC64A exhibits variations in GC content across its genome that correlate with global expression level, average intron size, and codon usage bias. Although Chlorella species have been assumed to be asexual and nonmotile, the NC64A genome encodes all the known meiosis-specific proteins and a subset of proteins found in flagella. We hypothesize that Chlorella might have retained a flagella-derived structure that could be involved in sexual reproduction. Furthermore, a survey of phytohormone pathways in chlorophyte algae identified algal orthologs of Arabidopsis thaliana genes involved in hormone biosynthesis and signaling, suggesting that these functions were established prior to the evolution of land plants. We show that the ability of Chlorella to produce chitinous cell walls likely resulted from the capture of metabolic genes by horizontal gene transfer from algal viruses, prokaryotes, or fungi. Analysis of the NC64A genome substantially advances our understanding of the green lineage evolution, including the genomic interplay with viruses and symbiosis between eukaryotes.

  6. The Chlorella variabilis NC64A Genome Reveals Adaptation to Photosymbiosis, Coevolution with Viruses, and Cryptic Sex[C][W

    PubMed Central

    Blanc, Guillaume; Duncan, Garry; Agarkova, Irina; Borodovsky, Mark; Gurnon, James; Kuo, Alan; Lindquist, Erika; Lucas, Susan; Pangilinan, Jasmyn; Polle, Juergen; Salamov, Asaf; Terry, Astrid; Yamada, Takashi; Dunigan, David D.; Grigoriev, Igor V.; Claverie, Jean-Michel; Van Etten, James L.

    2010-01-01

    Chlorella variabilis NC64A, a unicellular photosynthetic green alga (Trebouxiophyceae), is an intracellular photobiont of Paramecium bursaria and a model system for studying virus/algal interactions. We sequenced its 46-Mb nuclear genome, revealing an expansion of protein families that could have participated in adaptation to symbiosis. NC64A exhibits variations in GC content across its genome that correlate with global expression level, average intron size, and codon usage bias. Although Chlorella species have been assumed to be asexual and nonmotile, the NC64A genome encodes all the known meiosis-specific proteins and a subset of proteins found in flagella. We hypothesize that Chlorella might have retained a flagella-derived structure that could be involved in sexual reproduction. Furthermore, a survey of phytohormone pathways in chlorophyte algae identified algal orthologs of Arabidopsis thaliana genes involved in hormone biosynthesis and signaling, suggesting that these functions were established prior to the evolution of land plants. We show that the ability of Chlorella to produce chitinous cell walls likely resulted from the capture of metabolic genes by horizontal gene transfer from algal viruses, prokaryotes, or fungi. Analysis of the NC64A genome substantially advances our understanding of the green lineage evolution, including the genomic interplay with viruses and symbiosis between eukaryotes. PMID:20852019

  7. Use of De Novo transcriptome libraries to characterize a novel oleaginous marine Chlorella species during the accumulation of triacylglycerols

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Mansfeldt, Cresten B.; Richter, Lubna V.; Ahner, Beth A.; Cochlan, William P.; Richardson, Ruth E.; Chen, Shilin

    2016-02-03

    Here, marine chlorophytes of the genus Chlorella are unicellular algae capable of accumulating a high proportion of cellular lipids that can be used for biodiesel production. In this study, we examined the broad physiological capabilities of a subtropical strain (C596) of Chlorella sp. “SAG-211-18” including its heterotrophic growth and tolerance to low salt.We found that the alga replicates more slowly at diluted salt concentrations and can grow on a wide range of carbon substrates in the dark.We then sequenced the RNA of Chlorella strain C596 to elucidate key metabolic genes and investigate the transcriptomic response of the organism when transitioningmore » from a nutrient-replete to a nutrient-deficient condition when neutral lipids accumulate. Specific transcripts encoding for enzymes involved in both starch and lipid biosynthesis, among others, were up-regulated as the cultures transitioned into a lipid-accumulating state whereas photosynthesis-related genes were down-regulated. Transcripts encoding for two of the up-regulated enzymes—a galactoglycerolipid lipase and a diacylglyceride acyltransferase—were also monitored by reverse transcription quantitative polymerase chain reaction assays. The results of these assays confirmed the transcriptome-sequencing data. The present transcriptomic study will assist in the greater understanding, more effective application, and efficient design of Chlorella-based biofuel production systems.« less

  8. Quantification of nutrient-replete growth rates in five-ion hyperspace for Chlorella vulgaris (Trebouxiophyceae) and Peridinium cinctum (Dinophyceae).

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The effects of five ions, NO3-, PO43-, K+, Na+ and Cl- on growth rates and cell densities were quantified for Chlorella vulgaris (Chlorophycea) and Peridinium cinctum (Dinophycea) in batch cultures. A five dimensional experimental design, the five component mixture design projected across a total i...

  9. Effects of DDT and BHC on amino acid content and its varieties in Chlorella vulgaris Beij. and Cladophora sp.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Yixiong

    1991-03-01

    In Chlorella vulgaris Beij. and Cladophora sp. treated with different concentrations of r-BHC and p, p-DDT, the protein and free amino acid content in both were higher than those in the controls, and the free amino acid content was even higher than the protein amino acid content.

  10. Lipid Production of Heterotrophic Chlorella sp. from Hydrolysate Mixtures of Lipid-Extracted Microalgal Biomass Residues and Molasses.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Hongli; Ma, Xiaochen; Gao, Zhen; Wan, Yiqin; Min, Min; Zhou, Wenguang; Li, Yun; Liu, Yuhuan; Huang, He; Chen, Paul; Ruan, Roger

    2015-10-01

    This study investigated the feasibility of lipid production of Chlorella sp. from waste materials. Lipid-extracted microalgal biomass residues (LMBRs) and molasses were hydrolyzed, and their hydrolysates were analyzed. Five different hydrolysate mixture ratios (w/w) of LMBRs/molasses (1/0, 1/1, 1/4, 1/9, and 0/1) were used to cultivate Chlorella sp. The results showed that carbohydrate and protein were the two main compounds in the LMBRs, and carbohydrate was the main compound in the molasses. The highest biomass concentration of 5.58 g/L, Y biomass/sugars of 0.59 g/g, lipid productivity of 335 mg/L/day, and Y lipids/sugars of 0.25 g/g were obtained at the hydrolysate mixture ratio of LMBRs/molasses of 1/4. High C/N ratio promoted the conversion of sugars into lipids. The lipids extracted from Chlorella sp. shared similar lipid profile of soybean oil and is therefore a potential viable biodiesel feedstock. These results showed that Chlorella sp. can utilize mixed sugars and amino acids from LMBRs and molasses to accumulate lipids efficiently, thus reducing the cost of microalgal biodiesel production and improving its economic viability. PMID:26234438

  11. Physiological and morphological responses of Lead or Cadmium exposed Chlorella sorokiniana 211-8K (Chlorophyceae).

    PubMed

    Carfagna, Simona; Lanza, Nicola; Salbitani, Giovanna; Basile, Adriana; Sorbo, Sergio; Vona, Vincenza

    2013-12-01

    The heavy metal pollution in soils and aquatic environments is a serious ecological problem. In the green-microalga Chlorella sorokiniana 211-8K (Chlorophyceae) exposed to ions of lead (Pb) and cadmium (Cd) we studied the metabolic responses to the toxicity of these two heavy metals. Our data indicate that both the pollutants alter the alga cell ultrastructure and its physiological characteristics (growth, photosynthesis, respiration, enzyme activities). The toxic effects of the two metals resulted time-dependent to the exposure. After 24 h of treatment with 250 μM Pb or Cd, photosynthesis was inhibited until to 77 and 86%, however respiration was strongly enhanced up to 300 and 350%, respectively. In the algal cells Pb or Cd exposure induced a reduction in the content of the total chlorophylls and a decrease of the soluble protein levels, significantly compromising the growth, particularly in cultures cadmium-treated. We report data on ultrastructural changes induced by the two heavy metals; they affected overall chloroplast ultrastructure of the alga. Most importantly, the O-acetyl-L-serine(thiol)lyase (OASTL) activity was appreciably increased after only 2 h of Cd exposure, indicating the existence of a link between the metal contamination and cysteine synthesis. Then, Chlorella sorokiniana cells seem to better tolerate high concentrations of Pb while appear to be more sensitive to Cd ions. These results provide some additional information that can lead to better understand consequences of heavy metal poisoning in microalgae. PMID:23641320

  12. Chlorella stigmatophora for urban wastewater nutrient removal and CO2 abatement.

    PubMed

    Arbib, Zouhayr; Ruiz, Jesus; Alvarez, Pablo; Garrido, Carmen; Barragan, Jesus; Perales, Jose Antonio

    2012-08-01

    Batch experiments were performed to study biomass growth rate, nutrient removal and carbon dioxide bio-fixation of the marine microalgae Chlorella stigmatophora. Four different cultures at different salinities were tested: wastewater (WW), synthetic wastewater (SWW), seawater (SW) and diluted seawater (DSW). Experimental results showed that Chlorella stigmatophora grew satisfactorily in all culture media, except in SWW where inhibition occurred. In all cases, biomass experimental data were fitted to the Verlhust Logistic model (R2 > 0.982, p < or = 0.05). Maximum biomass productivity (P(bmax)) and CO2 biofixation (P(vCO2)) were reached in the WW medium, 1.146g SSL(-1)day(-1) and 2.324g CO2L(-1)day(-1) respectively. The order of maximum specific growth rates (micro max) was WW >DSW>SW. In order to compare nitrogen and phosphorous removal kinetics, an estimation of the time required to reach the most restrictive concentration of total N and P in effluents as defined in the Directive 98/1565/CE (10 mg sigmaNL(-1) (T10(N)) and 1 mg sigmaPL(-1) (T1(p)) was performed. In the WW test T10(N) and T1(p) needed were of 45.15 and 32.27 hours respectively and at the end of the experimental the removal was in both 100%. PMID:22908639

  13. Cultivation of Chlorella vulgaris in Column Photobioreactor for Biomass Production and Lipid Accumulation.

    PubMed

    Wong, Y K; Ho, K C; Tsang, Y F; Wang, L; Yung, K K L

    2016-01-01

    Microalgae have been used as energy resources in recent decades to mitigate the global energy crisis. As the demand for pure microalgae strains for commercial use increases, designing an effective photobioreactor (PBR) for mass cultivation is important. Chlorella vulgaris, a local freshwater microalga, was used to study the algal biomass cultivation and lipid production using various PBR configurations (bubbling, air-lift, porous air-lift). The results show that a bubbling column design is a better choice for the cultivation of Chlorella vulgaris than an air-lift one. The highest biomass concentration in the bubbling PBR was 0.78 g/L while the air-lift PBR had a value of 0.09 g/L. Key operating parameters, including draft-tube length and bubbling flowrate, were then optimized based on biomass production and lipid yield. The highest lipid content was in the porous air-lift PBR and the air-lift PBR with shorter draft tube (35 cm) was also better than a longer one (50 cm) for algal cultivation, but the microalgae attachment on the inner tube of PBR always occurred. The highest biomass concentration could be produced under the highest gas flowrate of 2.7 L/min, whereas the lowest dry cell mass was under the lowest gas flowrate of 0.2 L/min. PMID:26803025

  14. Mechanistic characterization of omega-3 desaturation in the green alga Chlorella vulgaris.

    PubMed

    Daligault, Franck; Reed, Darwin W; Savile, Christopher K; Nugier-Chauvin, Caroline; Patin, Henri; Covello, Patrick S; Buist, Peter H

    2003-08-01

    alpha-Linolenic acid (ALA, 9(Z),12(Z),15(Z)-octadecatrienoic acid) derivatives are important plant lipids which play a critical key role in cold tolerance. The final steps of ALA biosynthesis feature a series of regio- and stereoselective dehydrogenation reactions which are catalyzed by a set of enzymes known as fatty acid desaturases. In conjunction with ongoing research into the structural biology of these remarkable catalysts, we have examined the mechanism of double bond introduction at C15,16 as it occurs in a model photosynthetic organism, Chlorella vulgaris. The individual deuterium kinetic isotope effects associated with the C-H bond cleavages at C-15 and C-16 of a thialinoleoyl analogue were measured via competition experiments using appropriately deuterium-labelled 7-thia substrates. A large kinetic isotope effect (KIE) (k(H)/k(D)=10.2+/-2.8) was observed for the C-H bond-breaking step at C-15 while the C-H bond cleavage at C-16 was found to be relatively insensitive to deuterium substitution (k(H)/k(D)=0.8+/-0.2). These results point to C-15 as the site of initial oxidation in omega-3 desaturation and imply that the Chlorella and corresponding plant systems share a common active site architecture. PMID:12877913

  15. Improved Productivity of Neutral Lipids in Chlorella sp. A2 by Minimal Nitrogen Supply

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Junying; Chen, Weixian; Chen, Hui; Zhang, Xin; He, Chenliu; Rong, Junfeng; Wang, Qiang

    2016-01-01

    Nitrogen starvation is an efficient environmental pressure for increasing lipid accumulation in microalgae, but it could also significantly lower the biomass productivity, resulting in lower lipid productivity. In this study, green alga Chlorella sp. A2 was cultivated by using a minimal nitrogen supply strategy under both laboratory and outdoor cultivation conditions to evaluate biomass accumulation and lipid production. Results showed that minimal nitrogen supply could promote neutral lipid accumulation of Chlorella sp. A2 without a significant negative effect on cell growth. In laboratory cultivation mode, alga cells cultured with 18 mg L−1 d−1 urea addition could generate 74 and 416% (w/w) more neutral lipid productivity than cells cultured with regular BG11 and nitrogen starvation media, respectively. In outdoor cultivation mode, lipid productivity of cells cultured with 18 mg L−1 d−1 urea addition is approximately 10 and 88% higher than the one with regular BG11 and nitrogen starvation media, respectively. Notably, the results of photosynthetic analysis clarified that minimal nitrogen supply reduced the loss of photosynthetic capacity to keep CO2 fixation during photosynthesis for biomass production. The minimal nitrogen supply strategy for microalgae cultivation could promote neutral lipid accumulation without a significant negative effect on cell growth, resulting in a significant improvement in the lipid productivity. PMID:27148237

  16. Streptomycin affects the growth and photochemical activity of the alga Chlorella vulgaris.

    PubMed

    Perales-Vela, Hugo Virgilio; García, Roberto Velasco; Gómez-Juárez, Evelyn Alicia; Salcedo-Álvarez, Martha Ofelia; Cañizares-Villanueva, Rosa Olivia

    2016-10-01

    Antibiotics are increasingly being used in human and veterinary medicine, as well as pest control in agriculture. Recently, their emergence in the aquatic environment has become a global concern. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of streptomycin on growth and photosynthetic activity of Chlorella vulgaris after 72h exposure. We found that growth, photosynthetic activity and the content of the D1 protein of photosystem II decreased. Analysis of chlorophyll a fluorescence emission shows a reduction in the energy transfer between the antenna complex and reaction center. Also the activity of the oxygen evolution complex and electron flow between QA and QB were significantly reduced; in contrast, we found an increase in the reduction rate of the acceptor side of photosystem I. The foregoing can be attributed to the inhibition of the synthesis of the D1 protein and perhaps other coded chloroplast proteins that are part of the electron transport chain which are essential for the transformation of solar energy in the photosystems. We conclude that micromolar concentrations of streptomycin can affect growth and photosynthetic activity of Chlorella vulgaris. The accumulation of antibiotics in the environment can become an ecological problem for primary producers in the aquatic environment. PMID:27344399

  17. Investigation of mixotrophic, heterotrophic, and autotrophic growth of Chlorella vulgaris under agricultural waste medium.

    PubMed

    Mohammad Mirzaie, M A; Kalbasi, M; Mousavi, S M; Ghobadian, B

    2016-01-01

    Growth of Chlorella vulgaris and its lipid production were investigated under autotrophic, heterotrophic, and mixotrophic conditions. Cheap agricultural waste molasses and corn steep liquor from industries were used as carbon and nitrogen sources, respectively. Chlorella vulgaris grew remarkably under this agricultural waste medium, which resulted in a reduction in the final cost of the biodiesel production. Maximum dry weight of 2.62 g L(-1) was obtained in mixotrophic growth with the highest lipid concentration of 0.86 g L(-1). These biomass and lipid concentrations were, respectively, 140% and 170% higher than autotrophic growth and 300% and 1200% higher than heterotrophic growth. In mixotrophic growth, independent or simultaneous occurrence of autotrophic and heterotrophic metabolisms was investigated. The growth of the microalgae was observed to take place first heterotrophically to a minimum substrate concentration with a little fraction in growth under autotrophic metabolism, and then the cells grew more autotrophically. It was found that mixotrophic growth was not a simple combination of heterotrophic and autotrophic growth. PMID:25807048

  18. CLONING AND EXPRESSING TRYPSIN MODULATING OOSTATIC FACTOR IN Chlorella desiccata TO CONTROL MOSQUITO LARVAE.

    PubMed

    Borovsky, Dov; Sterner, Andeas; Powell, Charles A

    2016-01-01

    The insect peptide hormone trypsin modulating oostatic factor (TMOF), a decapeptide that is synthesized by the mosquito ovary and controls the translation of the gut's trypsin mRNA was cloned and expressed in the marine alga Chlorella desiccata. To express Aedes aegypti TMOF gene (tmfA) in C. desiccata cells, two plasmids (pYES2/TMOF and pYDB4-tmfA) were engineered with pKYLX71 DNA (5 Kb) carrying the cauliflower mosaic virus (CaMV) promoter 35S(2) and the kanamycin resistant gene (neo), as well as, a 8 Kb nitrate reductase gene (nit) from Chlorella vulgaris. Transforming C. desiccata with pYES2/TMOF and pYDB4-tmfA show that the engineered algal cells express TMOF (20 ± 4 μg ± SEM and 17 ± 3 μg ± SEM, respectively in 3 × 10(8) cells) and feeding the cells to mosquito larvae kill 75 and 60% of Ae. aegypti larvae in 4 days, respectively. Southern and Northern blots analyses show that tmfA integrated into the genome of C. desiccata by homologous recombination using the yeast 2 μ circle of replication and the nit in pYES2/TMOF and pYDB4-tmfA, respectively, and the transformed algal cells express tmfA transcript. Using these algal cells it will be possible in the future to control mosquito larvae in the marsh. PMID:26440910

  19. Viruses of symbiotic Chlorella-like algae isolated from Paramecium bursaria and Hydra viridis

    PubMed Central

    Van Etten, James L.; Meints, Russel H.; Kuczmarski, Daniel; Burbank, Dwight E.; Lee, Kit

    1982-01-01

    We previously reported that isolation of symbiotic Chlorella-like algae from the Florida strain of Hydra viridis induced replication of a virus (designated HVCV-1) in the algae. We now report that isolation of symbiotic Chlorella-like algae from four other sources of green hydra and one source of the protozoan Paramecium bursaria also induced virus synthesis. Algae from one of these hydra contained a virus identical to HVCV-1 (based on its rate of sedimentation, buoyant density, reaction to HVCV-1 antiserum, and DNA restriction fragments) whereas algae from the other three hydra contained another similar, but distinct, virus (designated HVCV-2). The virus from the paramecium algae (designated PBCV-1) was distinct from both HVCV-1 and HVCV-2. The symbiotic algae in the hydra could also be distinguished ultrastructurally. Chloroplasts of both algae that produced HVCV-1 lacked a pyrenoid whereas chloroplasts of the other three symbiotic algae contained pyrenoids. Since all symbiotic eukaryotic algae we have examined have had virus, a potential viral role in symbiosis is suggested. Images PMID:16593198

  20. Formation of elemental sulfur by Chlorella fusca during growth on L-cysteine ethylester

    SciTech Connect

    Krauss, F.; Schafer, W.; Schmidt, A.

    1984-01-01

    During growth on L-cysteine ethylester, Chlorella fusca (211-8b) accumulated a substance which contained bound sulfide, which could be liberated by reduction with dithioerythritol (DTE) as inorganic sulfide. This substance was extracted with hot methanol and purified by thin layer chromatography. This substance liberated free sulfide when incubated with mono- and dithiols, and thiocyanate was formed after heating with KCN. The isolated substance cochromatographed with authentic sulfur flower using different solvent systems for thin layer chromatography, high pressure liquid chromatography, and the identical spectrum with a relative ..beta..max at 263 nm was found. The chemical structure was confirmed by mass spectrometry showing a molecular weight of 256 m/e for the S/sub 8/ configuration. No labeled elemental sulfur was detected when the cells were grown on (/sup 35/S)sulfate and L-cysteine ethylester. C. fusca seems to have enzymes for the metabolism of elemental sulfur, since it disappeared after prolonged growth into the stationary phase. Cysteine was formed from O-acetyl-L-serine and elemental sulfur in the presence of thiol groups and purified cysteine synthase from spinach or Chlorella.

  1. Removal of malachite green from aqueous solution using low-cost chlorella-based biomass.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Wen-Tien; Chen, Huei-Ru

    2010-03-15

    Chlorella-based biomass from the algae-manufacturing waste was used as a low-cost biosorbent for the biosorption of malachite green (MG) in an agitated batch experiments with respect to its kinetics as a function of agitation speed (i.e., 300-500 rpm), initial MG concentration (i.e., 2.0-20.0 mg dm(-3)), biosorbent loading (i.e., 0.5-2.0 g/2.0 dm(3)), initial pH (i.e., 3.0-11.0), and temperature (i.e., 278-318 K). The experimental data revealed that the rapid removal of cationic solute using the dead microalgae significantly depended on the initial MG concentration and algal loading. Furthermore, the biosorption kinetics well obeyed the pseudo-second-order rate equation, and could be elucidated by considering the electrostatic interactions. According to the biosorption behaviors of MG from aqueous solution using chlorella-based biomass in comparison with commercial activated carbon, this work also showed that the biosorbent can be effectively used as a low-cost biosorbent for the removal of MG from its aqueous solutions. PMID:19939553

  2. Chlorella 11-Peptide Inhibits the Production of Macrophage-Induced Adhesion Molecules and Reduces Endothelin-1 Expression and Endothelial Permeability

    PubMed Central

    Shih, Mei Fen; Chen, Lih Chi; Cherng, Jong Yuh

    2013-01-01

    The inflammation process in large vessels involves the up-regulation of vascular adhesion molecules such as endothelial cell selectin (E-selectin), intercellular cell adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1) and vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 (VCAM-1) which are also known as the markers of atherosclerosis. We have reported that Chlorella 11-peptide exhibited effective anti-inflammatory effects. This peptide with an amino sequence Val-Glu-Cys-Tyr-Gly-Pro-Asn-Arg-Pro-Gln-Phe was further examined for its potential in preventing atherosclerosis in this study. In particular, the roles of Chlorella 11-peptide in lowering the production of vascular adhesion molecules, monocyte chemoattractant protein (MCP-1) and expression of endothelin-1 (ET-1) from endothelia (SVEC4-10 cells) were studied. The production of E-selectin, ICAM-1, VCAM-1 and MCP-1 in SVEC4-10 cells was measured with ELISA. The mRNA expression of ET-1 was analyzed by RT-PCR and agarose gel. Results showed that Chlorella 11-peptide significantly suppressed the levels of E-selectin, ICAM, VCAM, MCP-1 as well as ET-1 gene expression. The inhibition of ICAM-1 and VCAM-1 production by Chlorella 11-peptide was reversed in the presence of protein kinase A inhibitor (H89) which suggests that the cAMP pathway was involved in the inhibitory cause of the peptide. In addition, this peptide was shown to reduce the extent of increased intercellular permeability induced by combination of 50% of lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-activated RAW 264.7 cells medium and 50% normal SEVC cell culture medium (referred to as 50% RAW-conditioned medium). These data demonstrate that Chlorella 11-peptide is a promising biomolecule in preventing chronic inflammatory-related vascular diseases. PMID:24129228

  3. The Effects of Physicochemical Factors and Cell Density on Nitrite Transformation in a Lipid-Rich Chlorella.

    PubMed

    Liang, Fang; Du, Kui; Wen, Xiaobin; Luo, Liming; Geng, Yahong; Li, Yeguang

    2015-12-28

    To understand the effects of physicochemical factors on nitrite transformation by microalgae, a lipid-rich Chlorella with high nitrite tolerance was cultured with 8 mmol/l sodium nitrite as sole nitrogen source under different conditions. The results showed that nitrite transformation was mainly dependent on the metabolic activities of algal cells rather than oxidation of nitrite by dissolved oxygen. Light intensity, temperature, pH, NaHCO3 concentrations, and initial cell densities had significant effects on the rate of nitrite transformation. Single-factor experiments revealed that the optimum conditions for nitrite transformation were light intensity: 300 μmol/m(2); temperature: 30°C; pH: 7-8; NaHCO3 concentration: 2.0 g/l; and initial cell density: 0.15 g/l; and the highest nitrite transformation rate of 1.36 mmol/l/d was achieved. There was a positive correlation between nitrite transformation rate and the growth of Chlorella. The relationship between nitrite transformation rate (mg/l/d) and biomass productivity (g/l/d) could be described by the regression equation y = 61.3x (R(2) = 0.9665), meaning that 61.3 mg N element was assimilated by 1.0 g dry biomass on average, which indicated that the nitrite transformation is a process of consuming nitrite as nitrogen source by Chlorella. The results demonstrated that the Chlorella suspension was able to assimilate nitrite efficiently, which implied the feasibility of using flue gas for mass production of Chlorella without preliminary removal of NOX. PMID:26323272

  4. Prediction of ecotoxicological behavior of chemicals: relationship between n-octanol/water partition coefficient and bioaccumulation of organic chemicals by alga Chlorella

    SciTech Connect

    Geyer, H.; Politzki, G.; Freitag, D.

    1984-01-01

    The bioaccumulation potential of organic chemicals by the green alga Chlorella fusca was determined. A quantitative relationship was found to exist between the lipophilicity (n-octanol/water partition coefficient) of the chemicals and the bioaccumulation factor.

  5. Interactive Effects of Temperature and UV Radiation on Photosynthesis of Chlorella Strains from Polar, Temperate and Tropical Environments: Differential Impacts on Damage and Repair

    PubMed Central

    Wong, Chiew-Yen; Teoh, Ming-Li; Phang, Siew-Moi; Lim, Phaik-Eem; Beardall, John

    2015-01-01

    Global warming and ozone depletion, and the resulting increase of ultraviolet radiation (UVR), have far-reaching impacts on biota, especially affecting the algae that form the basis of the food webs in aquatic ecosystems. The aim of the present study was to investigate the interactive effects of temperature and UVR by comparing the photosynthetic responses of similar taxa of Chlorella from Antarctic (Chlorella UMACC 237), temperate (Chlorella vulgaris UMACC 248) and tropical (Chlorella vulgaris UMACC 001) environments. The cultures were exposed to three different treatments: photosynthetically active radiation (PAR; 400–700 nm), PAR plus ultraviolet-A (320–400 nm) radiation (PAR + UV-A) and PAR plus UV-A and ultraviolet-B (280–320 nm) radiation (PAR + UV-A + UV-B) for one hour in incubators set at different temperatures. The Antarctic Chlorella was exposed to 4, 14 and 20°C. The temperate Chlorella was exposed to 11, 18 and 25°C while the tropical Chlorella was exposed to 24, 28 and 30°C. A pulse-amplitude modulated (PAM) fluorometer was used to assess the photosynthetic response of microalgae. Parameters such as the photoadaptive index (Ek) and light harvesting efficiency (α) were determined from rapid light curves. The damage (k) and repair (r) rates were calculated from the decrease in ΦPSIIeff over time during exposure response curves where cells were exposed to the various combinations of PAR and UVR, and fitting the data to the Kok model. The results showed that UV-A caused much lower inhibition than UV-B in photosynthesis in all Chlorella isolates. The three isolates of Chlorella from different regions showed different trends in their photosynthesis responses under the combined effects of UVR (PAR + UV-A + UV-B) and temperature. In accordance with the noted strain-specific characteristics, we can conclude that the repair (r) mechanisms at higher temperatures were not sufficient to overcome damage caused by UVR in the Antarctic Chlorella strain

  6. Interactive Effects of Temperature and UV Radiation on Photosynthesis of Chlorella Strains from Polar, Temperate and Tropical Environments: Differential Impacts on Damage and Repair.

    PubMed

    Wong, Chiew-Yen; Teoh, Ming-Li; Phang, Siew-Moi; Lim, Phaik-Eem; Beardall, John

    2015-01-01

    Global warming and ozone depletion, and the resulting increase of ultraviolet radiation (UVR), have far-reaching impacts on biota, especially affecting the algae that form the basis of the food webs in aquatic ecosystems. The aim of the present study was to investigate the interactive effects of temperature and UVR by comparing the photosynthetic responses of similar taxa of Chlorella from Antarctic (Chlorella UMACC 237), temperate (Chlorella vulgaris UMACC 248) and tropical (Chlorella vulgaris UMACC 001) environments. The cultures were exposed to three different treatments: photosynthetically active radiation (PAR; 400-700 nm), PAR plus ultraviolet-A (320-400 nm) radiation (PAR + UV-A) and PAR plus UV-A and ultraviolet-B (280-320 nm) radiation (PAR + UV-A + UV-B) for one hour in incubators set at different temperatures. The Antarctic Chlorella was exposed to 4, 14 and 20°C. The temperate Chlorella was exposed to 11, 18 and 25°C while the tropical Chlorella was exposed to 24, 28 and 30°C. A pulse-amplitude modulated (PAM) fluorometer was used to assess the photosynthetic response of microalgae. Parameters such as the photoadaptive index (Ek) and light harvesting efficiency (α) were determined from rapid light curves. The damage (k) and repair (r) rates were calculated from the decrease in ΦPSIIeff over time during exposure response curves where cells were exposed to the various combinations of PAR and UVR, and fitting the data to the Kok model. The results showed that UV-A caused much lower inhibition than UV-B in photosynthesis in all Chlorella isolates. The three isolates of Chlorella from different regions showed different trends in their photosynthesis responses under the combined effects of UVR (PAR + UV-A + UV-B) and temperature. In accordance with the noted strain-specific characteristics, we can conclude that the repair (r) mechanisms at higher temperatures were not sufficient to overcome damage caused by UVR in the Antarctic Chlorella strain

  7. Phylogenetic relationships and taxonomic position of Chlorella-like isolates from low pH environments (pH < 3.0)

    PubMed Central

    Huss, Volker AR; Ciniglia, Claudia; Cennamo, Paola; Cozzolino, Salvatore; Pinto, Gabriele; Pollio, Antonino

    2002-01-01

    Background Little is known about phytoplankton communities inhabiting low pH environments such as volcanic and geothermal sites or acidic waters. Only specialised organisms are able to tolerate such extreme conditions. There is, thus, low species diversity. We have characterised the previously isolated acid tolerant Chlorella-like microalgae Viridiella fridericiana and Chlorella protothecoides var. acidicola by microscopical and biomolecular methods in order to assess their phylogenetic relationships. Results Both isolates belong to the trebouxiophycean lineage of chlorophytes. 18S and ITS1 sequence data clearly confirm that Viridiella fridericiana constitutes a new genus apart from the morphologically similar and likewise acid tolerant microalga Chlorella saccharophila. Chlorella protothecoides var. acidicola on the other hand is not a variety of Chlorella protothecoides but falls within a heterogeneous cluster consisting of Nannochloris, "Chlorella" spec. Yanaqocha, and Koliella, and is most closely related to algae which were also isolated from extreme environments. Conclusions The distribution of acid tolerant strains in the 18S rRNA tree shows that acquisition of acid tolerance was unlikely a monophyletic event in green microalgae. We propose that different strains have independently adapted to extreme environments. Some of them have spread worldwide and were able to colonise other extreme habitats. Considering the problems of successfully isolating acid tolerant strains, acidic soils could represent an unsuspected source of biological diversity with high potential for biotechnological utilisations. PMID:12194702

  8. Identity and physiology of a new psychrophilic eukaryotic green alga, Chlorella sp., strain BI, isolated from a transitory pond near Bratina Island, Antarctica.

    PubMed

    Morgan-Kiss, Rachael M; Ivanov, Alexander G; Modla, Shannon; Czymmek, Kirk; Hüner, Norman P A; Priscu, John C; Lisle, John T; Hanson, Thomas E

    2008-09-01

    Permanently low temperature environments are one of the most abundant microbial habitats on earth. As in most ecosystems, photosynthetic organisms drive primary production in low temperature food webs. Many of these phototrophic microorganisms are psychrophilic; however, functioning of the photosynthetic processes of these enigmatic psychrophiles (the "photopsychrophiles") in cold environments is not well understood. Here we describe a new chlorophyte isolated from a low temperature pond, on the Ross Ice Shelf near Bratina Island, Antarctica. Phylogenetic and morphological analyses place this strain in the Chlorella clade, and we have named this new chlorophyte Chlorella BI. Chlorella BI is a psychrophilic species, exhibiting optimum temperature for growth at around 10 degrees C. However, psychrophily in the Antarctic Chlorella was not linked to high levels of membrane-associated poly-unsaturated fatty acids. Unlike the model Antarctic lake alga, Chlamydomonas raudensis UWO241, Chlorella BI has retained the ability for dynamic short term adjustment of light energy distribution between photosystem II (PS II) and photosystem I (PS I). In addition, Chlorella BI can grow under a variety of trophic modes, including heterotrophic growth in the dark. Thus, this newly isolated photopsychrophile has retained a higher versatility in response to environmental change than other well studied cold-adapted chlorophytes. PMID:18661097

  9. Identity and physiology of a new psychrophilic eukaryotic green alga, Chlorella sp., strain BI, isolated from a transitory pond near Bratina Island, Antarctica

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Morgan-Kiss, R. M.; Ivanov, A.G.; Modla, S.; Czymmek, K.; Huner, N.P.A.; Priscu, J.C.; Lisle, J.T.; Hanson, T.E.

    2008-01-01

    Permanently low temperature environments are one of the most abundant microbial habitats on earth. As in most ecosystems, photosynthetic organisms drive primary production in low temperature food webs. Many of these phototrophic microorganisms are psychrophilic; however, functioning of the photosynthetic processes of these enigmatic psychrophiles (the 'photopsychrophiles') in cold environments is not well understood. Here we describe a new chlorophyte isolated from a low temperature pond, on the Ross Ice Shelf near Bratina Island, Antarctica. Phylogenetic and morphological analyses place this strain in the Chlorella clade, and we have named this new chlorophyte Chlorella BI. Chlorella BI is a psychrophilic species, exhibiting optimum temperature for growth at around 10??C. However, psychrophily in the Antarctic Chlorella was not linked to high levels of membrane-associated poly-unsaturated fatty acids. Unlike the model Antarctic lake alga, Chlamydomonas raudensis UWO241, Chlorella BI has retained the ability for dynamic short term adjustment of light energy distribution between photosystem II (PS II) and photosystem I (PS I). In addition, Chlorella BI can grow under a variety of trophic modes, including heterotrophic growth in the dark. Thus, this newly isolated photopsychrophile has retained a higher versatility in response to environmental change than other well studied cold-adapted chlorophytes. ?? 2008 Springer.

  10. Nutrients and pharmaceuticals removal from wastewater by culture and harvesting of Chlorella sorokiniana.

    PubMed

    Escapa, C; Coimbra, R N; Paniagua, S; García, A I; Otero, M

    2015-06-01

    This work aimed to study both the removal of nutrients and pharmaceuticals, namely salicylic acid or paracetamol, from water by the culture of Chlorella sorokiniana. The removal of nutrients was nearly complete at the end of the batch culture; above 70% for nitrates and 89% for phosphates in the semicontinuous culture. The pharmaceuticals removal kinetics were 2.3 times greater for the salicylic acid than paracetamol, reaching volumetric efficiencies above 93% for salicylic acid in the semicontinuous culture. Finally, to separate the microalgae biomass from treated water, metal salts, synthetic polyelectrolytes and a biopolymer were tested as coagulants-flocculants. The best flocculation results were achieved with AlCl3 (95.23% with 200mgg(-1), 1min incubation time). However, given that resulting flocs had different characteristics, flocculants must be chosen on the basis of the subsequent use of the biomass. PMID:25780903

  11. Regulation of starch and lipid accumulation in a microalga Chlorella sorokiniana.

    PubMed

    Li, Tingting; Gargouri, Mahmoud; Feng, Jie; Park, Jeong-Jin; Gao, Difeng; Miao, Chao; Dong, Tao; Gang, David R; Chen, Shulin

    2015-03-01

    Microalgae have attracted growing attention due to their potential in biofuel feedstock production. However, current understanding of the regulatory mechanisms for lipid biosynthesis and storage in microalgae is still limited. This study revealed that the microalga Chlorella sorokiniana showed sequential accumulation of starch and lipids. When nitrogen was replete and/or depleted over a short period, starch was the predominant carbon storage form with basal levels of lipid accumulation. After prolonged nitrogen depletion, lipid accumulation increased considerably, which was partially due to starch degradation, as well as the turnover of primary metabolites. Lipid accumulation is also strongly dependent on the linear electron flow of photosynthesis, peaking at lower light intensities. Collectively, this study reveals a relatively clear regulation pattern of starch and lipid accumulation that is basically controlled by nitrogen levels. The mixotrophic growth of C. sorokiniana shows promise for biofuel production in terms of lipid accumulation in the final biomass. PMID:25616239

  12. Chitosan flocculation to aid the harvesting of the microalga Chlorella sorokiniana.

    PubMed

    Xu, Yanan; Purton, Saul; Baganz, Frank

    2013-02-01

    Microalgae are an attractive feedstock for biofuel production, however the harvesting of algal biomass from very large volumes of culture broth represents a major technological and economic challenge. One low cost strategy for addressing this challenge involves the use of flocculation as an initial dewatering step. In this study, flocculation of the green microalga Chlorella sorokiniana was explored in detail using the natural compound, chitosan as flocculant. Results show that clarification efficiency of the process can reach above 99% below pH 7. The optimal chitosan dosage (approximately 10 mg per gram algal dry weight) is determined primarily by cell concentration rather than cell age, lipid content or composition of the medium. Furthermore, the impact of flocculation on the subsequent dewatering process was determined and it was shown to reduce the volume to be processed by 20-50 folds, and significantly reduce energy input and material costs of centrifugation or filtration operations. PMID:23262003

  13. The combined effect of bacteria and Chlorella vulgaris on the treatment of municipal wastewaters.

    PubMed

    He, P J; Mao, B; Lü, F; Shao, L M; Lee, D J; Chang, J S

    2013-10-01

    Impacts of Chlorella vulgaris with or without co-existing bacteria on the removal of nitrogen, phosphorus and organic matter from wastewaters were studied by comparing the wastewater treatment effects between an algae-bacteria consortium and a stand-alone algae system. In the algae-bacteria system, C.vulgaris played a dominant role in the removal of nitrogen and phosphorus, while bacteria removed most of the organic matter from the wastewater. When treating unsterilized wastewater, bacteria were found to inhibit the growth of algae at >231 mg/L dissolved organic carbon (DOC). Using the algae-bacteria consortium resulted in the removal of 97% NH4(+), 98% phosphorus and 26% DOC at a total nitrogen (TN) level of 29-174 mg/L. The reaction rate constant (k) values in sterilized and unsterilized wastewaters were 2.17 and 1.92 mg NH4(+)-N/(mg algal cell ·d), respectively. PMID:23973976

  14. Pilot CELSS based on a maltose-excreting Chlorella: Concept and overview on the technological developments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brechignac, François; Schiller, Peter

    A typical ecosystem is composed of three compartments: photosynthetic producer (anabolizing processes), consumer and decomposer (catabolizing processes). It is still far too much complex, however, to form the basis on which establishing an engineered artificial ecosystem, dedicated to support life (of the consumer) in space. A simpler, two compartments, pilot model to start with has been selected. It is based on a symbiotic Chlorella (strain 241.80), which can be tuned, at low pH, to produce maltose. This feature prevents the accumulation of useless biomass, not readily edible by the consumer. Being excreted, maltose is easily recoverable, and constitutes a direct source of carbon suitable for many consumers. Since they will totally catabolize it back to CO2, the necessity for a decomposer compartment is avoided. The present status of the technological concept designed to support life of small consumers (animals, microorganisms) will be presented, taking into account the space compatibility of the technologies developed.

  15. Cultivation of Chlorella vulgaris in dairy wastewater pretreated by UV irradiation and sodium hypochlorite.

    PubMed

    Qin, Lei; Shu, Qing; Wang, Zhongming; Shang, Changhua; Zhu, Shunni; Xu, Jingliang; Li, Rongqing; Zhu, Liandong; Yuan, Zhenhong

    2014-01-01

    There is potential in the utilization of microalgae for the purification of wastewater as well as recycling the resource in the wastewater to produce biodiesel. The large-scale cultivation of microalgae requires pretreatment of the wastewater to eliminate bacteria and protozoa. This procedure is costly and complex. In this study, two methods of pretreatment, UV irradiation, and sodium hypochlorite (NaClO), in various doses and concentrations, were tested in the dairy wastewater. Combining the efficiency of biodiesel production, we proposed to treat the dairy wastewater with NaClO in the concentration of 30 ppm. In this condition, The highest biomass productivity and lipid productivity of Chlorella vulgaris reached 0.450 g L(-1) day(-1) and 51 mg L(-1) day(-1) after a 4-day cultivation in the dairy wastewater, respectively. PMID:24142385

  16. Some observations on the carbon dioxide burst in chlorella and chlamydomonas.

    PubMed

    Bunt, J S

    1970-02-01

    In the course of mass spectrometer studies with the algae Chlorella and Chlamydomonas, data were obtained which indicate that the CO(2) burst and gulp are sensitive to oxygen. Furthermore, the CO(2) burst was found to be strongly suppressed when wave lengths shorter than 460 nanometers were blocked at intensities adequate to saturate photosynthesis. Under appropriate conditions at 30 degrees , the CO(2) burst was interrupted by a brief CO(2) gulp and the post illumination gulp by a brief burst of CO(2). The post illumination gulp of CO(2) could be induced during illumination by interposition of a filter blocking wave lengths shorter than 460 nanometers. These data are discussed in relation to earlier reports of the phenomenon and briefly as they affect the detection of photorespiration. PMID:16657291

  17. Simultaneously concentrating and pretreating of microalgae Chlorella spp. by three-phase partitioning.

    PubMed

    Li, Zhubo; Jiang, Feifei; Li, Ya; Zhang, Xu; Tan, Tianwei

    2013-12-01

    In this study, a recent simple separation technique, three-phase partitioning (TPP), was used for concentrating microalgae Chlorella spp. for the first time. More than 91.7% of the biomass precipitated in the interlayer of the system in 10 min. Temperature, initial concentration and ratio of ethanol to dipotassium hydrogen phosphate (DKP) were observed to negatively correlate with concentration factor while pH showed no significant influences. Using this method, biomass could be concentrated with much lower energy consumption and concentrated biomass could be conveniently collected. Besides, together with concentrating, TPP concentrated microalgae cells showed 26.3% increase in lipid extraction yield. Additionally, similarities in fatty acid profile indicated the avoidance of influence on lipid quality from chemicals. This study demonstrated the feasibility of TPP for microalgae biodiesel production. PMID:24121370

  18. Mixotrophic cultivation of Chlorella vulgaris using industrial dairy waste as organic carbon source.

    PubMed

    Abreu, Ana P; Fernandes, Bruno; Vicente, António A; Teixeira, José; Dragone, Giuliano

    2012-08-01

    Growth parameters and biochemical composition of the green microalga Chlorella vulgaris cultivated under different mixotrophic conditions were determined and compared to those obtained from a photoautotrophic control culture. Mixotrophic microalgae showed higher specific growth rate, final biomass concentration and productivities of lipids, starch and proteins than microalgae cultivated under photoautotrophic conditions. Moreover, supplementation of the inorganic culture medium with hydrolyzed cheese whey powder solution led to a significant improvement in microalgal biomass production and carbohydrate utilization when compared with the culture enriched with a mixture of pure glucose and galactose, due to the presence of growth promoting nutrients in cheese whey. Mixotrophic cultivation of C. vulgaris using the main dairy industry by-product could be considered a feasible alternative to reduce the costs of microalgal biomass production, since it does not require the addition of expensive carbohydrates to the culture medium. PMID:22705507

  19. Influence of growth phase on harvesting of Chlorella zofingiensis by dissolved air flotation.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xuezhi; Amendola, Pasquale; Hewson, John C; Sommerfeld, Milton; Hu, Qiang

    2012-07-01

    The effects of changes in cellular characteristics and dissolved organic matter (DOM) on dissolved air flotation (DAF) harvesting of Chlorella zofingiensis at the different growth phases were studied. Harvesting efficiency increased with Al(3+) dosage and reached more than 90%, regardless of growth phases. In the absence of DOM, the ratio of Al(3+) dosage to surface functional group concentration determined the harvesting efficiency. DOM in the culture medium competed with algal cell surface functional groups for Al(3+), and more Al(3+) was required for cultures with DOM than for DOM-free cultures to achieve the same harvesting efficiency. As the culture aged, the increase of Al(3+) dosage due to increased DOM was less than the decrease of Al(3+) dosage associated with reduced cell surface functional groups, resulting in overall reduced demand for Al(3+). The interdependency of Al(3+) dosage and harvesting efficiency on concentrations of cell surface functional groups and DOM was successfully modeled. PMID:22541950

  20. Protease cell wall degradation of Chlorella vulgaris: effect on methane production.

    PubMed

    Mahdy, Ahmed; Mendez, Lara; Blanco, Saul; Ballesteros, Mercedes; González-Fernández, Cristina

    2014-11-01

    In order to optimize the enzymatic dosage and microalgae biomass loads subjected to enzymatic hydrolysis prior anaerobic digestion of Chlorella vulgaris, organic matter solubilisation and methane production were investigated. Experimental data using protease dosage of 0.585 AU g DW(-1) showed that increasing biomass loads up to 65 g L(-1) did not affect markedly the hydrolysis efficiency (51%). Enzymatically pretreated biomasses subjected to anaerobic digestion enhanced methane production by 50-70%. The attempt of decreasing the enzymatic dosages revealed diminished hydrolysis efficiency concomitantly with a decreased methane production enhancement. In agreement with the good results observed for organic matter conversion into biogas, total nitrogen mineralization was attained for enzymatically pretreated biomass. Despite the high protein content of the biomass and the biocatalyst used in the present study no ammonia inhibition was detected. PMID:25226058

  1. Evaluation of sample extraction methods for proteomics analysis of green algae Chlorella vulgaris.

    PubMed

    Gao, Yan; Lim, Teck Kwang; Lin, Qingsong; Li, Sam Fong Yau

    2016-05-01

    Many protein extraction methods have been developed for plant proteome analysis but information is limited on the optimal protein extraction method from algae species. This study evaluated four protein extraction methods, i.e. direct lysis buffer method, TCA-acetone method, phenol method, and phenol/TCA-acetone method, using green algae Chlorella vulgaris for proteome analysis. The data presented showed that phenol/TCA-acetone method was superior to the other three tested methods with regards to shotgun proteomics. Proteins identified using shotgun proteomics were validated using sequential window acquisition of all theoretical fragment-ion spectra (SWATH) technique. Additionally, SWATH provides protein quantitation information from different methods and protein abundance using different protein extraction methods was evaluated. These results highlight the importance of green algae protein extraction method for subsequent MS analysis and identification. PMID:26935773

  2. Biodiesel production from hydrolysate of Cyperus esculentus waste by Chlorella vulgaris.

    PubMed

    Wang, Wenrui; Zhou, Wenwen; Liu, Jing; Li, Yonghong; Zhang, Yongkui

    2013-05-01

    To reduce the cost of algal-based biodiesel, a waste material from oil industry, Cyperus esculentus waste, was used as the carbon source of the oleaginous microalgae Chlorella vulgaris. It demonstrated that C. vulgaris grew better in C. esculentus waste hydrolysate (CEWH(1)) than in glucose medium under the same reducing sugar concentration. CEWH concentration influenced the cell growth and lipid production significantly. The maximum lipid productivity 438.85 mg l(-1) d(-1) was achieved at 40 g l(-1). Fed-batch culture was performed to further enhance lipid production. The maximum biomass, lipid content and lipid productivity were 20.75 g l(-1), 36.52%, and 621.53 mg l(-1) d(-1), respectively. The produced biodiesel was analyzed by GC-MS and the results suggested that lipids produced from CEWH could be a potential feedstock for biodiesel production. PMID:23548401

  3. Metabolic changes of starch and lipid triggered by nitrogen starvation in the microalga Chlorella zofingiensis.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Shunni; Huang, Wei; Xu, Jin; Wang, Zhongming; Xu, Jingliang; Yuan, Zhenhong

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this research was to study the metabolic changes of starch and lipid biosynthesis in the microalga Chlorella zofingiensis under nitrogen starvation in comparison to nitrogen abundant condition. C. zonfingiensis showed a rapid growth and kept stable chlorophyll content when grown in nitrogen-replete medium, while a severe inhibition of cell growth and a sharp degradation of chlorophyll occurred under nitrogen depletion. Nitrogen-replete C. zonfingiensis cells possessed basal levels of starch and lipid. Upon nitrogen starvation, both starch and lipid increased greatly within cells, but starch synthesis preceded lipid accumulation. After 2 days of stress condition, starch was partially degraded, possibly to support lipid synthesis. It was speculated that starch accumulation acted as a quick response to environmental stress, whereas lipid served as long-term energy storage. Additionally, C. zonfingiensis tends to lower the degree of unsaturation in response to nitrogen starvation which is desirable for biodiesel production. PMID:24308944

  4. Influence of plaque-forming bacterium, Rhodobacteraceae sp. on the growth of Chlorella vulgaris.

    PubMed

    Chen, Zhangran; Zhang, Jingyan; Lei, Xueqian; Zhang, Bangzhou; Cai, Guanjing; Zhang, Huajun; Li, Yi; Zheng, Wei; Tian, Yun; Xu, Hong; Zheng, Tianling

    2014-10-01

    Experiments were conducted to find out the molecular features, infection process of a special alga plaque-forming microorganism and its potential influence on the biomass of Chlorella vulgaris during the infection process. Direct contact between the algal cell and the bacterium may be the primary steps needed for the bacterium to lyse the alga. Addition of C. vulgaris cells into f/2 medium allowed us obtain the object bacterium. The 16S rRNA gene sequence comparisons results showed that the plaque-forming bacterium kept the closest relationship with Labrenzia aggregata IAM 12614(T) at 98.90%. The existence of the bacterium could influence both the dry weight and lipid content of C. vulgaris. This study demonstrated that direct cell wall disruption of C. vulgaris by the bacterium would be a potentially effective method to utilize the biomass of microalgae. PMID:25086475

  5. Phosphorus plays an important role in enhancing biodiesel productivity of Chlorella vulgaris under nitrogen deficiency.

    PubMed

    Chu, Fei-Fei; Chu, Pei-Na; Cai, Pei-Jie; Li, Wen-Wei; Lam, Paul K S; Zeng, Raymond J

    2013-04-01

    To investigate the role of phosphorus in lipid production under nitrogen starvation conditions, five types of media possessing different nitrogen and phosphorus concentrations or their combination were prepared to culture Chlorella vulgaris. It was found that biomass production under nitrogen deficient condition with sufficient phosphorus supply was similar to that of the control (with sufficient nutrition), resulting in a maximum lipid productivity of 58.39 mg/L/day. Meanwhile, 31P NMR showed that phosphorus in the medium was transformed and accumulated as polyphosphate in cells. The uptake rate of phosphorus in cells was 3.8 times higher than the uptake rate of the control. This study demonstrates that phosphorus plays an important role in lipid production of C. vulgaris under nitrogen deficient conditions and implies a potential to combine phosphorus removal from wastewater with biodiesel production via microalgae. PMID:23517904

  6. Lipid accumulation from pinewood pyrolysates by Rhodosporidium diobovatum and Chlorella vulgaris for biodiesel production.

    PubMed

    Luque, Luis; Orr, Valerie C A; Chen, Sean; Westerhof, Roel; Oudenhoven, Stijn; Rossum, Guus van; Kersten, Sascha; Berruti, Franco; Rehmann, Lars

    2016-08-01

    This study evaluated the suitability of pinewood pyrolysates as a carbon source for lipid production and cultivation of the oleaginous yeast Rhodosporidium diobovatum and the microalgae Chlorella vulgaris. Thermal decomposition of pinewood and fractional condensation were used to obtain an oil rich in levoglucosan which was upgraded to glucose by acid hydrolysis. Blending of pyrolytic sugars with pure glucose in both nitrogen rich and nitrogen limited conditions was studied for R. diobovatum, and under nitrogen limited conditions for C. vulgaris. Glucose consumption rate decreased with increasing proportions of pyrolytic sugars increasing cultivation time. While R. diobovatum was capable of growth in 100% (v/v) pyrolytic sugars, C. vulgaris growth declined rapidly in blends greater than 20% (v/v) until no growth was detected in blends >40%. Finally, the effects of pyrolysis sugars on lipid composition was evaluated and biodiesel fuel properties were estimated based on the lipid profiles. PMID:27208736

  7. Highly charged cellulose-based nanocrystals as flocculants for harvesting Chlorella vulgaris.

    PubMed

    Vandamme, Dries; Eyley, Samuel; Van den Mooter, Guy; Muylaert, Koenraad; Thielemans, Wim

    2015-10-01

    This study presents a novel flocculant for harvesting Chlorella vulgaris as model species for freshwater microalgae based on cellulose nanocrystals (CNCs), thus synthesized from a renewable and biodegradable resource. Cationic pyridinium groups were grafted onto CNCs by two separate one-pot simultaneous esterification and nucleophilic substitution reactions. Both types of modified CNCs were positively charged in the pH range 4-11. Both reactions yielded CNCs with a high degree of substitution (up to 0.38). A maximum flocculation efficiency of 100% was achieved at a dosage of 0.1 g g(-1) biomass. In contrast to conventional polymer flocculants, cationic CNCs were relatively insensitive to inhibition of flocculation by algal organic matter. The present results highlight the potential of these new type of nanocellulose-based flocculants for microalgae harvesting. PMID:26210139

  8. Identification of Sporopollenin as the Outer Layer of Cell Wall in Microalga Chlorella protothecoides

    PubMed Central

    He, Xi; Dai, Junbiao; Wu, Qingyu

    2016-01-01

    Chlorella protothecoides has been put forth as a promising candidate for commercial biodiesel production. However, the cost of biodiesel remains much higher than diesel from fossil fuel sources, partially due to the high costs of oil extraction from algae. Here, we identified the presence of a sporopollenin layer outside the polysaccharide cell wall; this was evaluated using transmission electron microscopy, 2-aminoethanol treatment, acetolysis, and Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy. We also performed bioinformatics analysis of the genes of the C. protothecoides genome that are likely involved in sporopollenin synthesis, secretion, and translocation, and evaluated the expression of these genes via real-time PCR. We also found that that removal of this sporopollenin layer greatly improved the efficiency of oil extraction. PMID:27446068

  9. First evidence of bioflocculant from Shinella albus with flocculation activity on harvesting of Chlorella vulgaris biomass.

    PubMed

    Li, Yi; Xu, Yanting; Liu, Lei; Jiang, Xiaobing; Zhang, Kun; Zheng, Tianling; Wang, Hailei

    2016-10-01

    Bioflocculant from Shinella albus xn-1 could be used to harvest energy-producing microalga Chlorella vulgaris biomass for the first time. In this study, we investigated the flocculation activity and mode of strain xn-1, the characteristics of bioflocculant, the effect of flocculation conditions and optimized the flocculation efficiency. The results indicated that strain xn-1 exhibited flocculation activity through secreting bioflocculant; the bioflocculant with high thermal stability, pH stability and low molecular weight was proved to be not protein and polysaccharide, and flocculation active component was confirmed to contain triple bond and cumulated double bonds; algal pH, temperature and metal ions showed great impacts on the flocculation efficiency of bioflocculant; the maximum flocculation activity of bioflocculant reached 85.65% after the response surface optimization. According to the results, the bioflocculant from S. albus xn-1 could be a good potential in applications for high-efficiency harvesting of microalgae. PMID:27423548

  10. Effect of moderate static electric field on the growth and metabolism of Chlorella vulgaris.

    PubMed

    Nezammahalleh, Hassan; Ghanati, Faezeh; Adams, Thomas A; Nosrati, Mohsen; Shojaosadati, Seyed Abbas

    2016-10-01

    An electric field (EF) generator device was fabricated and applied to the treatment of Chlorella vulgaris ISC33 at three distinct concentrations before cultivation. The EF of moderate intensity (2.7kVcm(-1)) has a hormetic effect on algal growth. The highest growth stimulation of 51% was observed after 50min treatment of 0.4gL(-1) algal suspension. The influence of EF on the system was then studied from both theoretical and experimental perspectives. The growth rate increased with treatment time up to a maximum because of improved membrane permeability, and then declined afterwards due to peroxide accumulation in the medium. The contents of chlorophylls, carotenoids, soluble carbohydrates, lipids, and proteins were also measured to understand possible changes on algal metabolism. The EF treatment of algal suspension has no observable effect on the cell metabolism while both algal growth and metabolism was significantly affected by the inoculum size. PMID:27420157