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Sample records for chloride chemical reduction

  1. Chemical Reduction of SIM MOX in Molten Lithium Chloride Using Lithium Metal Reductant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kato, Tetsuya; Usami, Tsuyoshi; Kurata, Masaki; Inoue, Tadashi; Sims, Howard E.; Jenkins, Jan A.

    2007-09-01

    A simulated spent oxide fuel in a sintered pellet form, which contained the twelve elements U, Pu, Am, Np, Cm, Ce, Nd, Sm, Ba, Zr,Mo, and Pd, was reduced with Li metal in a molten LiCl bath at 923 K. More than 90% of U and Pu were reduced to metal to form a porous alloy without significant change in the Pu/U ratio. Small fractions of Pu were also combined with Pd to form stable alloys. In the gap of the porous U-Pu alloy, the aggregation of the rare-earth (RE) oxide was observed. Some amount of the RE elements and the actinoides leached from the pellet. The leaching ratio of Am to the initially loaded amount was only several percent, which was far from about 80% obtained in the previous ones on simple MOX including U, Pu, and Am. The difference suggests that a large part of Am existed in the RE oxide rather than in the U-Pu alloy. The detection of the RE elements and actinoides in the molten LiCl bath seemed to indicate that they dissolved into the molten LiCl bath containing the oxide ion, which is the by-product of the reduction, as solubility of RE elements was measured in the molten LiCl-Li2O previously.

  2. Direct chemical reduction of neptunium oxide to neptunium metal using calcium and calcium chloride

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Squires, Leah N.; Lessing, Paul

    2016-04-01

    A process of direct reduction of neptunium oxide to neptunium metal using calcium metal as the reducing agent is discussed. After reduction of the oxide to metal, the metal is separated by density from the other components of the reaction mixture and can be easily removed upon cooling. The direct reduction technique consistently produces high purity (98%-99% pure) neptunium metal.

  3. Quantitative Determination of Paraquat in Meconium by Sodium Borohydride-Nickel Chloride Chemical Reduction and Gas Chromatography/Mass Spectrometry (GC/MS)

    PubMed Central

    Posecion, Norberto C.; Ostrea, Enrique M.; Bielawski, Dawn M.

    2008-01-01

    The objective of this study was to develop a procedure for the GC/MS assay of paraquat in meconium as a biomarker of fetal exposure to paraquat. The method involved a sodium borohydride-nickel chloride reduction procedure, liquid-liquid extraction of the perhydrogenated product, concentration, and GC/MS assay. The method demonstrated good overall recovery (102.56 %) with %CV (inter-assay) of less than 13%, and a limit of detection of 0.0156 μg/g. Analysis of meconium samples from a study population in the Philippines (n = 70) showed a 2.8% prevalence of fetal exposure to paraquat. PMID:18037033

  4. Microbial reductive dehalogenation of vinyl chloride

    DOEpatents

    Spormann, Alfred M [Stanford, CA; Muller, Jochen A [Baltimore, MD; Rosner, Bettina M [Berlin, DE; Von Abendroth, Gregory [Mannheim, DE; Meshulam-Simon, Galit [Los Angeles, CA; McCarty, Perry L [Stanford, CA

    2014-02-11

    Compositions and methods are provided that relate to the bioremediation of chlorinated ethenes, particularly the bioremediation of vinyl chloride by Dehalococcoides-like organisms. An isolated strain of bacteria, Dehalococcoides sp. strain VS, that metabolizes vinyl chloride is provided; the genetic sequence of the enzyme responsible for vinyl chloride dehalogenation; methods of assessing the capability of endogenous organisms at an environmental site to metabolize vinyl chloride; and a method of using the strains of the invention for bioremediation.

  5. Microbial reductive dehalogenation of vinyl chloride

    DOEpatents

    Spormann, Alfred M.; Muller, Jochen A.; Rosner, Bettina M.; Von Abendroth, Gregory; Meshulam-Simon, Galit; McCarty, Perry L

    2011-11-22

    Compositions and methods are provided that relate to the bioremediation of chlorinated ethenes, particularly the bioremediation of vinyl chloride by Dehalococcoides-like organisms. An isolated strain of bacteria, Dehalococcoides sp. strain VS, that metabolizes vinyl chloride is provided; the genetic sequence of the enzyme responsible for vinyl chloride dehalogenation; methods of assessing the capability of endogenous organisms at an environmental site to metabolize vinyl chloride; and a method of using the strains of the invention for bioremediation.

  6. Reduction of vinyl chloride in metallic iron-water systems

    SciTech Connect

    Deng, B. . Dept. of Mineral and Environmental Engineering); Burris, D.R. ); Campbell, T.J. )

    1999-08-01

    Batch experiments examining the kinetics and mechanism of vinyl chloride (VC) reduction by metallic iron in aqueous systems were performed. The effects of various iron loadings, VC concentrations, pH conditions, temperatures, and Fe(II)/Fe(III) chelating agents (1,10-phenanthroline, 2,2[prime]-dipyridyl, and nitrilotriacetic acid) on reduction kinetics were examined. Ethylene was the major carbon-containing product of VC reduction under all conditions examined, indicating hydrogenolysis. The reaction was pseudo-first-order with respect to aqueous VC concentration. The amount of VC adsorption on iron surfaces was estimated from the rapid initial loss of VC from solution, and the resultant sorption isotherm was linear over the concentration range examined. The first-order kinetics and the linear sorption for VC suggest that the portion of VC sorption to surface reactive sites relative to nonreactive sorption sites is constant, unlike the behavior observed for the higher chlorinated ethenes. The activation energy of the reaction was measured to be 41.6 [+-] 2.0 kJ/mol, sufficiently large to indicate that the chemical reaction at the surface, rather than aqueous phase diffusion to the surface, controls the overall rate of the reaction. Experiments with the chelating agents suggest that the effect of available Fe(II) on VC reduction is not significant.

  7. Reduction of chemical reaction models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frenklach, Michael

    1991-01-01

    An attempt is made to reconcile the different terminologies pertaining to reduction of chemical reaction models. The approaches considered include global modeling, response modeling, detailed reduction, chemical lumping, and statistical lumping. The advantages and drawbacks of each of these methods are pointed out.

  8. Source reduction for prevention of methylene chloride hazards: cases from four industrial sectors

    PubMed Central

    Roelofs, Cora R; Ellenbecker, Michael J

    2003-01-01

    Background Source reduction, defined as chemical, equipment and process changes that intervene in an industrial process to eliminate or reduce hazards, has not figured as a front-line strategy for the protection of workers' health. Such initiatives are popular for environmental protection, but their feasibility and effectiveness as an industrial hygiene approach have not been well described. Methods We investigated four cases of source reduction as a hazard prevention strategy in Massachusetts companies that had used methylene chloride, an occupational carcinogen, for cleaning and adhesive thinning. Three cases were retrospective and one was prospective, where the researchers assisted with the source reduction process change. Data were collected using qualitative research methods, including in-depth interviews and site visits. Results Motivated by environmental restrictions, a new worker health standard, and opportunity for productivity improvements, three companies eliminated their use of methylene chloride by utilizing available technologies and drop-in substitutes. Aided by technical assistance from the investigators, a fourth case dramatically reduced its use of methylene chloride via process and chemistry changes. While the companies' evaluations of potential work environment impacts of substitutes were not extensive, and in two cases new potential hazards were introduced, the overall impact of the source reduction strategy was deemed beneficial, both from a worker health and a production standpoint. Conclusion The findings from these four cases suggest that source reduction should be considered potentially feasible and effective for reducing or eliminating the potential hazards of methylene chloride exposure. Especially when faced with a hazard that is both an environmental and worker health concern, companies may chose to change their processes rather than rely on local exhaust ventilation equipment or personal protective equipment that might not be as

  9. Chloride chemical form in various types of fly ash.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Fenfen; Takaoka, Masaki; Shiota, Kenji; Oshita, Kazuyuki; Kitajima, Yoshinori

    2008-06-01

    Chloride content is a critical problem for the reuse of fly ash as a raw material in cement, and the method used by recyclers to reduce the fly ash chloride content depends on the chemical form of the chlorides. However, limited information is available on the quantitative distribution of chlorides and the identity of some chlorides such as Friedel's salt. We examined chloride forms and percentages using X-ray absorption near edge structure and X-ray diffraction analyses, as well as corresponding washing experiments. Approximately 15% of the chlorine in raw fly ash was estimated to be in the form of NaCI, 10% in KCl, 50% in CaCl2, and the remainder in the form of Friedel's salt. Fly ash collected in a bag filter with the injection of calcium hydroxide for acid gas removal (CaFA) contained 35% chlorine as NaCl, 11% as KCI, 37% as CaCl2, 13% as Friedel's salt, and the remaining 4% as CaClOH. In fly ash collected in a bag filter with the injection of sodium bicarbonate for acid gas removal (NaFA), approximately 79% of chlorine was in NaCl, 12% was in KCl, and 9% was in Friedel's salt. PMID:18589947

  10. Chloride chemical form in various types of fly ash

    SciTech Connect

    Fenfen Zhu; Masaki Takaoka; Kenji Shiota; Kazuyuki Oshita; Yoshinori Kitajima

    2008-06-01

    Chloride content is a critical problem for the reuse of fly ash as a raw material in cement, and the method used by recyclers to reduce the fly ash chloride content depends on the chemical form of the chlorides. However, limited information is available on the quantitative distribution of chlorides and the identity of some chlorides such as Friedel's salt. We examined chloride forms and percentages using X-ray absorption near edge structure and X-ray diffraction analyses, as well as corresponding washing experiments. Approximately 15% of the chlorine in raw fly ash was estimated to be in the form of NaCl, 10% in KCl, 50% in CaCl{sub 2}, and the remainder in the form of Friedel's salt. Fly ash collected in a bag filter with the injection of calcium hydroxide for acid gas removal (CaFA) contained 35% chlorine as NaCl, 11% as KCl, 37% as CaCl{sub 2}, 13% as Friedel's salt, and the remaining 4% as CaClOH. In fly ash collected in a bag filter with the injection of sodium bicarbonate for acid gas removal (NaFA), approximately 79% of chlorine was in NaCl, 12% was in KCl, and 9% was in Friedel's salt. 25 refs., 4 figs., 4 tabs.

  11. Photonic crystal fiber based chloride chemical sensors for corrosion monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Heming; Tao, Chuanyi; Krishnaswamy, Sridhar

    2016-04-01

    Corrosion of steel is one of the most important durability issues in reinforced concrete (RC) structures because aggressive ions such as chloride ions permeate concrete and corrode steel, consequently accelerating the destruction of structures, especially in marine environments. There are many practical methods for corrosion monitoring in RC structures, mostly focusing on electrochemical-based sensors for monitoring the chloride ion which is thought as one of the most important factors resulting in steel corrosion. In this work, we report a fiber-optic chloride chemical sensor based on long period gratings inscribed in a photonic crystal fiber (PCF) with a chloride sensitive thin film. Numerical simulation is performed to determine the characteristics and resonance spectral response versus the refractive indices of the analyte solution flowing through into the holes in the PCF. The effective refractive index of the cladding mode of the LPGs changes with variations of the analyte solution concentration, resulting in a shift of the resonance wavelength, hence providing the sensor signal. This fiber-optic chemical sensor has a fast response, is easy to prepare and is not susceptible to electromagnetic environment, and can therefore be of use for structural health monitoring of RC structures subjected to such aggressive environments.

  12. Kinetics of gas phase reduction of nickel chloride in preparation for nickel nanoparticles

    SciTech Connect

    Suh, Yong Jae; Jang, Hee Dong . E-mail: hdjang@kigam.re.kr; Chang, Han Kwon; Hwang, Dae Won; Kim, Heon Chang

    2005-12-08

    We investigated the chemical kinetics of NiCl{sub 2} reduction to apply to the synthesis of nickel nanoparticles in a tubular furnace reactor. The conversion of NiCl{sub 2} increased monotonically with reaction temperature up to 99% at 950 deg. C, and in turn, the rate constant of the reaction increased from 78 to 286 with an increase in the temperature from 800 to 950 deg. C. The reaction rate was estimated to be the first order with respect to chloride concentration, and the rate constant obeyed the Arrhenius law, of which the activation energy and pre-exponential factor were 103.79 kJ/mol and 7.34 x 10{sup 6} min{sup -1}, respectively. Taking advantage of the kinetics, we synthesized crystalline nickel nanoparticles with average primary particle size ranging from 31 to 106 nm by systematically controlling the reactor temperature and chloride concentration.

  13. Mechanism of sodium chloride in promoting reduction of high-magnesium low-nickel oxide ore

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Shiwei; Wei, Yonggang; Li, Bo; Wang, Hua; Ma, Baozhong; Wang, Chengyan

    2016-01-01

    Sodium chloride has been proved that it is an effective promoter for the reduction of high-magnesium, low-nickel oxide ore. The aim of current work is to clarify the promotion behavior of sodium chloride in the roasting reduction process. The influence of moisture on the reduction of ore in the presence of sodium chloride is studied to get clear comprehension of promotion process. In the presence of moisture, the HCl is produced by pyrohydrolysis of sodium chloride for chlorinating nickel and iron oxides, moreover, interactions between metallic oxides and sodium chloride are also a way for chlorination at high temperature (>802 °C); subsequently, the metal chloride would be reduced by reductant. In the absence of moisture, the magnetic separation results show that the recoveries of iron and nickel have a significant increase; moreover, olivine structure would be destroyed gradually with the increase of roasting temperature in the action of sodium chloride, and the sodium chloride existed in high-magnesium, low-nickel oxide ore could make the NiO isolate from NiO-bearing minerals. The NiO reacts with Fe2O3 at high temperature to form NiFe2O4, which is conductive to the formation of Ni-Fe alloy during the reduction process. PMID:27374991

  14. Mechanism of sodium chloride in promoting reduction of high-magnesium low-nickel oxide ore.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Shiwei; Wei, Yonggang; Li, Bo; Wang, Hua; Ma, Baozhong; Wang, Chengyan

    2016-01-01

    Sodium chloride has been proved that it is an effective promoter for the reduction of high-magnesium, low-nickel oxide ore. The aim of current work is to clarify the promotion behavior of sodium chloride in the roasting reduction process. The influence of moisture on the reduction of ore in the presence of sodium chloride is studied to get clear comprehension of promotion process. In the presence of moisture, the HCl is produced by pyrohydrolysis of sodium chloride for chlorinating nickel and iron oxides, moreover, interactions between metallic oxides and sodium chloride are also a way for chlorination at high temperature (>802 °C); subsequently, the metal chloride would be reduced by reductant. In the absence of moisture, the magnetic separation results show that the recoveries of iron and nickel have a significant increase; moreover, olivine structure would be destroyed gradually with the increase of roasting temperature in the action of sodium chloride, and the sodium chloride existed in high-magnesium, low-nickel oxide ore could make the NiO isolate from NiO-bearing minerals. The NiO reacts with Fe2O3 at high temperature to form NiFe2O4, which is conductive to the formation of Ni-Fe alloy during the reduction process. PMID:27374991

  15. Mechanism of sodium chloride in promoting reduction of high-magnesium low-nickel oxide ore

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Shiwei; Wei, Yonggang; Li, Bo; Wang, Hua; Ma, Baozhong; Wang, Chengyan

    2016-07-01

    Sodium chloride has been proved that it is an effective promoter for the reduction of high-magnesium, low-nickel oxide ore. The aim of current work is to clarify the promotion behavior of sodium chloride in the roasting reduction process. The influence of moisture on the reduction of ore in the presence of sodium chloride is studied to get clear comprehension of promotion process. In the presence of moisture, the HCl is produced by pyrohydrolysis of sodium chloride for chlorinating nickel and iron oxides, moreover, interactions between metallic oxides and sodium chloride are also a way for chlorination at high temperature (>802 °C) subsequently, the metal chloride would be reduced by reductant. In the absence of moisture, the magnetic separation results show that the recoveries of iron and nickel have a significant increase; moreover, olivine structure would be destroyed gradually with the increase of roasting temperature in the action of sodium chloride, and the sodium chloride existed in high-magnesium, low-nickel oxide ore could make the NiO isolate from NiO-bearing minerals. The NiO reacts with Fe2O3 at high temperature to form NiFe2O4, which is conductive to the formation of Ni-Fe alloy during the reduction process.

  16. Conversion of waste polyvinyl chloride (PVC) to useful chemicals

    SciTech Connect

    Kamo, T.; Yamamoto, Y.; Miki, K.; Sato, Y.

    1995-12-31

    Developments of recycling technologies are expected one of the most important keys for saving energy and resources, and minimization impact for environment. For instance, combustion of waste for power generation and conversion of plastics into liquid fuels have been studying for thermal energy recycling. However, PVC has been excepted from the most of these experiments. Because, heat of combustion of PVC is almost a half of other plastics, hydrogen chloride, which is produced at low temperature, corrodes the combustion chamber, and PVC causes coking reaction during pyrolysis of plastics. Numerous investigations have been conducted on degradation of PVC. However, most of these experiments were done to improve heat resistance of PVC or to study reaction mechanism of PVC degradation. Pyrolysis of PVC into liquid products have been studying since 1960`s from a view of environmental protection. Recently, Y. Maezawa et al. reported PVC was converted into oil at 600 T with sodium hydroxide. However, more than 50 % of hydrocarbon fraction of PVC was converted to residue and gas in their experiment. We are going to develop a new technology to convert of PVC into useful chemicals or liquid fuels at high efficiency by using hydrogen donor solvent.

  17. Raman spectroscopic studies of chemical speciation in calcium chloride melts

    SciTech Connect

    Windisch, Charles F.; Lavender, Curt A.

    2005-02-01

    Raman spectroscopy was applied to CaCl2 melts at 900 degrees C under both non-electrolyzed and electrolyzed conditions. The later used titania cathodes supplied by TIMET, Inc. and graphite anodes. Use of pulse-gating to collect the Raman spectra successfully eliminated any interference from black-body radiation and other stray light. The spectrum of molten CaCl2 exhibited no distinct, resolvable bands that could be correlated with a calcium chloride complex similar to MgCl42- in MgCl2 melts. Rather, the low frequency region of the spectrum was dominated by a broad “tail” arising from collective oscillations of both charge and mass in the molten salt “network.” Additions of both CaO and Ca at concentrations of a percent or two resulted in no new features in the spectra. Addition of CO2, both chemically and via electrolysis at concentrations dictated by stability and solubility at 900 degrees C and 1 bar pressure, also produced no new bands that could be correlated with either dissolved CO2 or the carbonate ion. These results indicated that Raman spectroscopy, at least under the conditions evaluated in the research, was not well suited for following the reactions and coordination chemistry of calcium ions, nor species such as dissolved metallic Ca and CO2 that are suspected to impact current efficiency in titanium electrolysis cells using molten CaCl2. Raman spectra of TIMET titania electrodes were successfully obtained as a function of temperature up to 900 degrees C, both in air and in-situ in CaCl2 melts. However, spectra of these electrodes could only be obtained when the material was in the unreduced state. When reduced, either with hydrogen or within an electrolysis cell, the resulting electrodes exhibited no measurable Raman bands under the conditions used in this work.

  18. Conversion of waste polyvinyl chloride (PVC) to useful chemicals

    SciTech Connect

    Kamo, T.; Yamamoto, Y.; Miki, K.; Sato, Y.

    1995-12-01

    Combustion and pyrolysis of plastics have been studyed for thermal energy recycling. In this study, hydrogen chloride was removed from PVC, then liquefied the chloried free PVC in hydrogen donor solvent.

  19. EXPOSURE TO CHEMICAL ADDITIVES FROM POLYVINYL CHLORIDE POLYMER EXTRUSION PROCESSING

    EPA Science Inventory

    This report presents a model to predict worker inhalation exposure due to off-gassing of additives during polyvinyl chloride (PVC) extrusion processing. ata on off-gassing of additives were reviewed in the literature, the off-gassing at normal PVC processing temperatures was stud...

  20. Subsurface injection of dissolved ferric chloride to form a chemical barrier: Laboratory investigations

    SciTech Connect

    Morrison, S.J.; Spangler, R.R.; Morris, S.A.

    1996-01-01

    A chemical barrier is a permeable zone of reactive materials emplaced in the subsurface to remove ground-water contaminants while allowing clean ground water to pass through. Because dissolved ferric chloride hydrolyzes to amorphous ferric oxyhydroxide when it contacts calcite (CaCO{sub 3}), it may be viable to emplace a zone of amorphous ferric oxyhydroxide (an absorbent for U, Mo, and other inorganic contaminants) into calcite-bearing geologic units by injecting ferric chloride through wells. For a chemical barrier to be successful, it must remain permeable and must be immobile. This investigation monitored chemical compositions, hydraulic conductivity, and iron mobility in laboratory columns and in a two-dimensional tank to determine the viability of injecting ferric chloride to form an amorphous ferric oxyhydroxide chemical barrier. The authors introduced a ferric chloride solution (1,345 mg/1[0.024 m] Fe) to calcite-bearing alluvial gravel to form a chemical barrier of amorphous ferric oxyhydroxide, followed by solutions contaminated with U and Mo. The simulated chemical barriers decreased U and Mo concentrations to less than 0.05 mg/l (2.1 {times} 10{sup {minus}7} m) and 0.01 (1.0 {times} 10{sup {minus}7} m), respectively; however, the breakthrough front is spread out with concentrations increasing to more than regulatory guideline values sooner than predicted. The hydraulic conductivity of calcite-bearing alluvial gravel decreased substantially during ferric chloride introduction because of the formation of carbon dioxide but increased to within factors of 1 to 5 of the original value as synthetic ground water flowed through the system. Amorphous ferric oxyhydroxide that formed in these experiments remained immobile at flow rates exceeding those typical of ground water. These laboratory results, in conjunction with site-specific characterization data, can be used to design chemical barriers emplaced by injection of ferric chloride.

  1. Exposure to chemical additives from polyvinyl chloride polymer extrusion processing

    SciTech Connect

    Lamb, C.S.

    1989-12-01

    The report presents a model to predict worker inhalation exposure due to off-gassing of additives during polyvinyl chloride (PVC) extrusion processing. Data on off-gassing of additives were reviewed in the literature, the off-gassing at normal PVC processing temperatures was studied in the laboratory, process variables were estimated from an equipment manufacturer survey, and worker-activities and possible exposure sources were observed in an industrial survey. The purpose of the study was to develop a theoretical model to predict worker inhalation exposure to additives used during PVC extrusion processing. A model to estimate the generation rate of the additive from the polymer extrudate was derived from the mass transport equations governing diffusion. The mass flow rate, initial additive volatile weight fraction, off-gassing time, diffusivity, and slab thickness are required to determine the generation rate from the model.

  2. Temporal Stability of Metal-Chloride-Doped Chemical-Vapour-Deposited Graphene.

    PubMed

    Kang, Moon H; Milne, William I; Cole, Matthew T

    2016-08-18

    Graphene has proven to be a promising material for transparent flexible electronics. In this study, we report the development of a transfer and doping scheme of large-area chemical vapour deposited (CVD) graphene. A technique to transfer the as-grown material onto mechanically flexible and optically transparent polymeric substrates using an ultraviolet adhesive (UVA) is outlined, along with the temporal stability of the sheet resistance and optical transparency following chemical doping with various metal chlorides (Mx Cly The sheet resistance (RS ) and 550 nm optical transparency (%T550 ) of the transferred un-doped graphene was 3.5 kΩ sq(-1) (±0.2 kΩ sq(-1) ) and 84.1 % (±2.9 %), respectively. Doping with AuCl3 showed a notable reduction in RS by some 71.4 % (to 0.93 kΩ sq(-1) ) with a corresponding %T550 of 77.0 %. After 200 h exposure to air at standard temperature and pressure, the increase in RS was found to be negligible (ΔRS AuCl3 =0.06 kΩ sq(-1) ), indicating that, of the considered Mx Cly species, AuCl3 doping offered the highest degree of time stability under ambient conditions. There appears a tendency of increasing RS with time for the remaining metal chlorides studied. We attribute the observed temporal shift to desorption of molecular dopants. We find that desorption was most significant in RhCl3 -doped samples whereas, in contrast, after 200 h in ambient conditions, AuCl3 -doped graphene showed only marginal desorption. The results of this study demonstrate that chemical doping of UVA-transferred graphene is a promising means for enhancing large-area CVD graphene in order to realise a viable platform for next-generation optically transparent and mechanically flexible electronics. PMID:27165783

  3. Main chemical species and molecular structure of deep eutectic solvent studied by experiments with DFT calculation: a case of choline chloride and magnesium chloride hexahydrate.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Chao; Jia, Yongzhong; Jing, Yan; Wang, Huaiyou; Hong, Kai

    2014-08-01

    The infrared spectrum of deep eutectic solvent of choline chloride and magnesium chloride hexahydrate was measured by the FTIR spectroscopy and analyzed with the aid of DFT calculations. The main chemical species and molecular structure in deep eutectic solvent of [MgClm(H2O)6-m]2-m and [ChxCly]x+y complexes were mainly identified and the active ion of magnesium complex during the electrochemical process was obtained. The mechanism of the electrochemical process of deep eutectic solvent of choline chloride and magnesium chloride hexahydrate was well explained by combination theoretical calculations and experimental. Besides, based on our results we proposed a new system for the dehydration study of magnesium chloride hexahydrate. PMID:25031082

  4. Compressive strength, chloride permeability, and freeze-thaw resistance of MWNT concretes under different chemical treatments.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xingang; Rhee, Inkyu; Wang, Yao; Xi, Yunping

    2014-01-01

    This study investigated compressive strength, chloride penetration, and freeze-thaw resistance of multiwalled carbon nanotube (MWNT) concrete. More than 100 cylindrical specimens were used to assess test variables during sensitivity observations, including water-cement ratios (0.75, 0.5, and 0.4) and exposure to chemical agents (including gum arabic, propanol, ethanol, sodium polyacrylate, methylcellulose, sodium dodecyl sulfate, and silane). To determine the adequate sonication time for MWNT dispersal in water, the compressive strengths of MWNT concrete cylinders were measured after sonication times ranging from 2 to 24 minutes. The results demonstrated that the addition of MWNT can increase the compressive strength of concrete by up to 108%. However, without chemical treatment, MWNT concretes tend to have poor freeze-thaw resistance. Among the different chemical treatments, MWNT concrete treated with sodium polyacrylate has the best compressive strength, chloride resistance, and freeze-thaw durability. PMID:25140336

  5. Compressive Strength, Chloride Permeability, and Freeze-Thaw Resistance of MWNT Concretes under Different Chemical Treatments

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xingang; Wang, Yao; Xi, Yunping

    2014-01-01

    This study investigated compressive strength, chloride penetration, and freeze-thaw resistance of multiwalled carbon nanotube (MWNT) concrete. More than 100 cylindrical specimens were used to assess test variables during sensitivity observations, including water-cement ratios (0.75, 0.5, and 0.4) and exposure to chemical agents (including gum arabic, propanol, ethanol, sodium polyacrylate, methylcellulose, sodium dodecyl sulfate, and silane). To determine the adequate sonication time for MWNT dispersal in water, the compressive strengths of MWNT concrete cylinders were measured after sonication times ranging from 2 to 24 minutes. The results demonstrated that the addition of MWNT can increase the compressive strength of concrete by up to 108%. However, without chemical treatment, MWNT concretes tend to have poor freeze-thaw resistance. Among the different chemical treatments, MWNT concrete treated with sodium polyacrylate has the best compressive strength, chloride resistance, and freeze-thaw durability. PMID:25140336

  6. Study on kinetics of cathodic reduction of dissolved oxygen in 3.5% sodium chloride solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yongjuan; Zhang, Dun; Wu, Jiajia

    2010-09-01

    Electrochemical reduction of dissolved oxygen in seawater on metals is of great importance for corrosion studies. The present paper studied cathodic reduction of dissolved oxygen on Q235 carbon steel in 3.5% sodium chloride (NaCl) solutions by cyclic voltammetry (CV), electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS), rotating disk electrode (RDE) and rotating ring-disk electrode (RRDE). The cyclic voltammetric results demonstrated the cathodic process on Q235 carbon steel in O2-saturated 3.5% NaCl solution contains three reactions: dissolved oxygen reduction, iron oxides reduction and hydrogen evolution. The peak potential of oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) is -0.85 V vs Ag/AgCl, 3 molL-1 KCl. The EIS results indicated that the ORR occurring on Q235 carbon steel is a 4-electron process and that no finite diffusion is caused by the intermediate of H2O2 produced by ORR. The RDE and RRDE voltammograms confirmed the EIS results and it was found that the number of transferred electrons for ORR was nearly 4, i.e., dissolved oxygen reduced to water.

  7. Quantum Chemical Insight into the Interactions and Thermodynamics Present in Choline Chloride Based Deep Eutectic Solvents.

    PubMed

    Wagle, Durgesh V; Deakyne, Carol A; Baker, Gary A

    2016-07-14

    We report quantum chemical calculations performed on three popular deep eutectic solvents (DESs) in order to elucidate the molecular interactions, charge transfer interactions, and thermodynamics associated with these systems. The DESs studied comprise 1:2 choline chloride/urea (reline), 1:2 choline chloride/ethylene glycol (ethaline), and 1:1 choline chloride/malonic acid (maloline). The excellent correlation between calculated and experimental vibrational spectra allowed for identification of dominant interactions in the DES systems. The DESs were found to be stabilized by both conventional hydrogen bonds and C-H···O/C-H···π interactions between the components. The hydrogen-bonding network established in the DES is clearly distinct from that which exists within the neat hydrogen-bond donor dimer. Charge decomposition analysis indicates significant charge transfer from choline and chloride to the hydrogen-bond donor with a higher contribution from the cation, and a density of states analysis confirms the direction of the charge transfer. Consequently, the sum of the bond orders of the choline-Cl(-) interactions in the DESs correlates directly with the melting temperatures of the DESs, a correlation that offers insight into the effect of the tuning of the choline-Cl(-) interactions by the hydrogen-bond donors on the physical properties of the DESs. Finally, the differences in the vibrational entropy changes upon DES formation are consistent with the trend in the overall entropy changes upon DES formation. PMID:27268431

  8. Nickel-Catalyzed Reductive Cross-Coupling of Benzyl Chlorides with Aryl Chlorides/Fluorides: A One-Pot Synthesis of Diarylmethanes.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jie; Lu, Gusheng; Xu, Jin; Sun, Hongmei; Shen, Qi

    2016-06-17

    The first nickel-catalyzed, magnesium-mediated reductive cross-coupling between benzyl chlorides and aryl chlorides or fluorides is reported. A variety of diarylmethanes can be prepared in good to excellent yields in a one-pot manner using easy-to-access mixed PPh3/NHC Ni(II) complexes of Ni(PPh3)(NHC)Br2 (NHC = 1,3-bis(2,6-diisopropylphenyl)imidazol-2-ylidene, IPr, 1a; 1,3-di-tert-butylimidazol-2-ylidene, ItBu, 1b) as catalyst precursors. Activation of polychloroarenes or chemoselective cross-coupling based on the difference in catalytic activity between 1a and 1b is used to construct oligo-diarylmethane motifs. PMID:27268781

  9. Speciation, conductivities, diffusivities, and electrochemical reduction as a function of water content in mixtures of hydrated chromium chloride/choline chloride.

    PubMed

    McCalman, Dorrell C; Sun, Liyuan; Zhang, Yong; Brennecke, Joan F; Maginn, Edward J; Schneider, William F

    2015-05-14

    We report experiments and simulations to understand the factors that control chromium (Cr(3+)) electrodeposition from ionic liquid solutions. Speciation, conductivities and diffusivities in mixtures of trivalent chromium chloride, water and choline chloride (CrCl3/xH2O/yChCl) were computed from molecular dynamics simulations and compared to measured ultraviolet-visible spectra, conductivities from electrical impedance spectroscopy, and cyclic voltammograms. Computed changes in Cr(3+) first solvation shell and conductivity with solution composition qualitatively agree with experimental observations. The Cr(3+) first solvation shell contains predominantly H2O and Cl(-) and the proportion of the two ligands changes with the relative bulk concentrations of each. Conductivities and diffusivities are observed to be functions of these composition variables. Variations in observed reduction current are primarily determined by dynamical properties and are less influenced by speciation. PMID:25903143

  10. Stabilization of Platinum Nanoparticle Electrocatalysts for Oxygen Reduction Using Poly(diallyldimethylammonium chloride)

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Sheng; Shao, Yuyan; Yin, Geping; Lin, Yuehe

    2009-10-29

    A long-chain polyelectrolyte, poly(diallyldimethylammonium chloride) (PDDA), has been employed to stabilize platinum nanoparticles for oxygen reduction in polymer electrolyte membrane (PEM) fuel cells. Pt nanoparticles were synthesized by reducing H2PtCl6 with NaBH4 in the presence of PDDA and then deposited on carbon support (PDDA-Pt/C). Transmission electron microscope images showed that Pt nanoparticles of PDDA-Pt/C are uniformly dispersed on carbon support with a mean size of about 2.2 nm (2.1 nm for commercial Etek-Pt/C). PDDA-Pt/C exhibited a higher activity towards oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) than Etek-Pt/C. The durability of PDDA-Pt/C was improved by a factor of 2 as compared with Etek-Pt/C. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy characterization of PDDA-Pt/C revealed the interaction between Pt nanoparticles and PDDA, which increased Pt oxidation potential. PDDA-Nafion ionic crosslinking "entraps" Pt nanoparticles and prevents Pt nanoparticles from migrating/agglomerating on or detaching from carbon support. This provides a promising strategy to improve both the durability and activity of electrocatalysts for fuel cells.

  11. Selective Reduction Using Intravascular Potassium Chloride Injection after Laser Surgery for Twin-Twin Transfusion Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Chmait, Ramen H; Kontopoulos, Eftichia V; Jackson, Marc; Horenstein, Janet; Timor-Tritsch, Ilan; Quintero, Rubén A

    2016-01-01

    Selective reduction (SR) via intravascular potassium chloride (KCl) injection is contraindicated in monochorionic twins due to the presence of placental vascular communications, which may serve as a conduit for inter-twin passage of KCl or allow exsanguination of the living twin into the demised twin. After successful selective laser photocoagulation of communicating vessels (SLPCV) for twin-twin transfusion syndrome (TTTS), the twins' circulatory systems are rendered independent. Theoretically, intravascular KCl injection into one twin after successful SLPCV should not result in passage of the feticidal agent nor cause hemodynamic alterations in the co-twin. We describe 3 cases of 1,069 patients (0.3%) that underwent SLPCV for TTTS between 2003 and 2013 and subsequent SR. SLPCV was successfully completed at 180, 226, and 230 weeks' gestational age for Quintero stages III, IV, and III TTTS, respectively. SR via intravascular KCl injection was later performed at maternal request due to the risk of neurological compromise in one twin at 226, 254, and 236 weeks' gestational age. All co-twins survived after SR, and no neurological sequelae were suspected after birth. Further study is necessary before SR can be routinely considered after laser surgery for TTTS. PMID:26067899

  12. Electrodialysis field test for selective chloride removal from the chemical recovery cycle of a kraft pulp mill

    SciTech Connect

    Rapp, H.J.; Pfromm, P.H.

    1998-12-01

    Chloride accumulation is a serious issue in the kraft pulping process. Chloride can be selectively removed from dissolved electrostatic precipitator dust (ESP dust) in the kraft chemical recovery cycle by electrodialysis with monovalent-selective anion-exchange membranes. In a pilot-scale field test, this process was investigated (total run time, 750 h). The test was performed at about 3.5% of full scale. The process showed outstanding performance and no significant membrane fouling. In feed-and-bleed operation, chloride removal levels of 94% and 61% were tested. The energy consumption for electrodialysis is low (120 kWh per metric ton of chloride removed at a 63% chloride removal level). The process performed very well even with no feed pretreatment, polarity reversal, or membrane cleaning.

  13. Dietary Impact of Adding Potassium Chloride to Foods as a Sodium Reduction Technique

    PubMed Central

    van Buren, Leo; Dötsch-Klerk, Mariska; Seewi, Gila; Newson, Rachel S.

    2016-01-01

    Potassium chloride is a leading reformulation technology for reducing sodium in food products. As, globally, sodium intake exceeds guidelines, this technology is beneficial; however, its potential impact on potassium intake is unknown. Therefore, a modeling study was conducted using Dutch National Food Survey data to examine the dietary impact of reformulation (n = 2106). Product-specific sodium criteria, to enable a maximum daily sodium chloride intake of 5 grams/day, were applied to all foods consumed in the survey. The impact of replacing 20%, 50% and 100% of sodium chloride from each product with potassium chloride was modeled. At baseline median, potassium intake was 3334 mg/day. An increase in the median intake of potassium of 453 mg/day was seen when a 20% replacement was applied, 674 mg/day with a 50% replacement scenario and 733 mg/day with a 100% replacement scenario. Reformulation had the largest impact on: bread, processed fruit and vegetables, snacks and processed meat. Replacement of sodium chloride by potassium chloride, particularly in key contributing product groups, would result in better compliance to potassium intake guidelines (3510 mg/day). Moreover, it could be considered safe for the general adult population, as intake remains compliant with EFSA guidelines. Based on current modeling potassium chloride presents as a valuable, safe replacer for sodium chloride in food products. PMID:27110818

  14. Dietary Impact of Adding Potassium Chloride to Foods as a Sodium Reduction Technique.

    PubMed

    van Buren, Leo; Dötsch-Klerk, Mariska; Seewi, Gila; Newson, Rachel S

    2016-01-01

    Potassium chloride is a leading reformulation technology for reducing sodium in food products. As, globally, sodium intake exceeds guidelines, this technology is beneficial; however, its potential impact on potassium intake is unknown. Therefore, a modeling study was conducted using Dutch National Food Survey data to examine the dietary impact of reformulation (n = 2106). Product-specific sodium criteria, to enable a maximum daily sodium chloride intake of 5 grams/day, were applied to all foods consumed in the survey. The impact of replacing 20%, 50% and 100% of sodium chloride from each product with potassium chloride was modeled. At baseline median, potassium intake was 3334 mg/day. An increase in the median intake of potassium of 453 mg/day was seen when a 20% replacement was applied, 674 mg/day with a 50% replacement scenario and 733 mg/day with a 100% replacement scenario. Reformulation had the largest impact on: bread, processed fruit and vegetables, snacks and processed meat. Replacement of sodium chloride by potassium chloride, particularly in key contributing product groups, would result in better compliance to potassium intake guidelines (3510 mg/day). Moreover, it could be considered safe for the general adult population, as intake remains compliant with EFSA guidelines. Based on current modeling potassium chloride presents as a valuable, safe replacer for sodium chloride in food products. PMID:27110818

  15. Chemical stability and adsorption of succinylcholine chloride injections in disposable plastic syringes.

    PubMed

    Pramar, Y V; Moniz, D; Hobbs, D

    1994-06-01

    The purpose of these investigations was to determine the stability and adsorption behaviour of succinylcholine chloride (SCC) when stored in plastic syringes. Drug degradation was monitored using the USP high-pressure liquid chromatography method. Solutions containing 20 mg/ml of SCC in 5% dextrose, and in normal saline, were studied at 5, 25 and 40 degrees C. The hydrolysis of SCC in i.v. fluids followed apparent zero-order kinetics. The manufacturer's recommended expiry period was found to be too conservative. If protected from light, storage at room temperature for up to 3 months can be safely recommended, without significant loss of chemical stability. However, microbiological quality assurance will need to be implemented and an appropriate shelf-life assigned on the basis of both microbiological and chemical stability data. PMID:7962223

  16. New Potentiometric Wireless Chloride Sensors Provide High Resolution Information on Chemical Transport Processes in Streams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smettem, Keith; Harris, Nick; Cranny, Andy; Klaus, Julian; Pfister, Laurent

    2016-04-01

    Quantifying the travel times, pathways and dispersion of solutes moving through stream environments is critical for understanding the biogeochemical cycling processes that control ecosystem functioning. Validation of stream solute transport and exchange process models requires data obtained from in-stream measurement of chemical concentration changes through time. This can be expensive and time consuming, leading to a need for cheap distributed sensor arrays that respond instantly and record chemical transport at points of interest on timescales of seconds. To meet this need we apply new, low-cost (in the order of a euro per sensor) potentiometric chloride sensors used in a distributed array to obtain data with high spatial and temporal resolution. The application here is to monitoring in-stream hydrodynamic transport and dispersive mixing of an injected chemical, in this case NaCl. We present data obtained from the distributed sensor array under baseflow conditions for three stream reaches in Luxembourg. Sensor results are comparable to data obtained from more expensive electrical conductivity meters and allow spatial resolution of hydrodynamic mixing processes and identification of chemical 'dead zones' in the study reaches.

  17. Alkyl substituent effect on density, viscosity and chemical behavior of 1-alkyl-3-methylimidazolium chloride.

    PubMed

    Olmo, Lourdes del; Lage-Estebanez, Isabel; López, Rafael; García de la Vega, José M

    2014-09-01

    Molecular structure of the conformers of 1-C n -3-methylimidazolium chloride (n = 1 to 4) ionic liquids has been explored and the relationships with density and viscosity have been studied using COSMO related methodologies. Effects of the number of conformers, ionic character, anion-cation relative positions and the alkyl chain length of the cation on predictions of properties have been analyzed. The quality of the predictions has been tested by comparing with experimental results. Moreover, COSMO polarization charge densities, σ-profiles and σ-potentials of the conformers have been analyzed. Predictions on the chemical behavior based on the values of these properties in the conformers have been used to elucidate the affinity for electrophilic and nucleophilic reagents of ionic liquids. PMID:25149437

  18. Physical and chemical basics of modification of poly(vinyl chloride) by means of polyisocyanate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Islamov, Anvar; Fakhrutdinova, Venera; Abdrakhmanova, Lyailya

    2016-01-01

    This research presents data relating to polyvinyl chloride (PVC) modification by means of reactive oligomer and measures technological, physical and mechanical properties of the modified composites. Polyisocyanate (PIC) has been chosen as the modifying reactive oligomer. It has been shown that insertion of the oligomer has a double effect on PVC. Primarily, PIC produces a plasticizing effect on PVC and in particular leads to an increase in thermal stability and melt flow index at the stage of processing. In addition, the molded PVC composites possess higher strength properties and lower deformability when exposed to temperature because of chemical transformations of PIC in polymer matrix and, as the result, the formation of cross-linked systems takes place. In this case, semi-interpenetrating structures are formed based on cross-linked products of PIC chemical transformations homogeneously distributed in the PVC matrix. It has been determined by means of IR-spectroscopy that the basic products of PIC curing are compounds with urea and biuret groups which leads to modifying effect on PVC especially: increase in strength, thermal and mechanical properties, and chemical resistance.

  19. Chemical modification of polyvinyl chloride and silicone elastomer in inhibiting adhesion of Aeromonas hydrophila.

    PubMed

    Kregiel, Dorota; Berlowska, Joanna; Mizerska, Urszula; Fortuniak, Witold; Chojnowski, Julian; Ambroziak, Wojciech

    2013-07-01

    Disease-causing bacteria of the genus Aeromonas are able to adhere to pipe materials, colonizing the surfaces and forming biofilms in water distribution systems. The aim of our research was to study how the modification of materials used commonly in the water industry can reduce bacterial cell attachment. Polyvinyl chloride and silicone elastomer surfaces were activated and modified with reactive organo-silanes by coupling or co-crosslinking silanes with the native material. Both the native and modified surfaces were tested using the bacterial strain Aeromonas hydrophila, which was isolated from the Polish water distribution system. The surface tension of both the native and modified surfaces was measured. To determine cell viability and bacterial adhesion two methods were used, namely plate count and luminometry. Results were expressed in colony-forming units (c.f.u.) and in relative light units (RLU) per cm(2). Almost all the chemically modified surfaces exhibited higher anti-adhesive and anti-microbial properties in comparison to the native surfaces. Among the modifying agents examined, poly[dimethylsiloxane-co-(N,N-dimethyl-N-n-octylammoniopropyl chloride) methylsiloxane)] terminated with hydroxydimethylsilyl groups (20 %) in silicone elastomer gave the most desirable results. The surface tension of this modifier, was comparable to the non-polar native surface. However, almost half of this value was due to the result of polar forces. In this case, in an adhesion analysis, only 1 RLU cm(-2) and less than 1 c.f.u. cm(-2) were noted. For the native gumosil, the results were 9,375 RLU cm(-2) and 2.5 × 10(8) c.f.u. cm(-2), respectively. The antibacterial activity of active organo-silanes was associated only with the carrier surface because no antibacterial compounds were detected in liquid culture media, in concentrations that were able to inhibit cell growth. PMID:23397109

  20. Reduction of the spent nuclear fuel of a VVER-1000 reactor by lithium in a lithium chloride melt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bychkov, A. V.; Ishunin, V. S.; Kormilitsyn, M. V.

    2010-08-01

    Researchers at FGUP GNTs RF NIIAR performed a series of experiments on the lithium reduction of the spent nuclear fuel (SNF) of a VVER-1000 reactor to a metal in a lithium chloride melt. The depletion of the nuclear fuel taken before experiments is about 30000 (MW day)/t, and the cooling time is 5 years. The experiments are performed on 5.8-kg samples of a prepared SNF powder. Data are obtained on a decrease in the heat release, the specific activity of the processed powder, and the distribution of actinides and the main fission products between a salt phase and a reduced SNF powder.

  1. Cell adhesive and antifouling polyvinyl chloride surfaces via wet chemical modification.

    PubMed

    Gabriel, Matthias; Strand, Dennis; Vahl, Christian-Friedrich

    2012-09-01

    Polyvinyl chloride (PVC) is one of the most frequently used polymers for the manufacturing of medical devices. Limitations for its usage are based upon unfavorable surface properties of the polymer including its hydrophobicity and lack of functionalities in order to increase its versatility. To address this issue, wet chemical modification of PVC was performed through surface amination using the bifunctional compound ethylene diamine. The reaction was conducted in order to achieve maximum surface amination while leaving the bulk material unaffected. The initial activation step was characterized by means of various methods including contact angle measurements, colorimetric amine quantification, infrared spectroscopy, and gel permeation chromatography. Depth profiles were obtained by a confocal microscopic method using fluorescence labeling. Exclusive surface modification was thus confirmed. To demonstrate biological applications of the presented technique, two examples were chosen: The covalent immobilization of the cell adhesive Asp-Gly-Asp-Ser-peptide (RGD) onto PVC samples yielded a surface that strongly supported cellular adhesion and proliferation of fibroblasts. In contrast, the decoration of PVC with the hydrophilic polymer polyethylene glycol prevented cellular adhesion to a large extent. The impact of these modifications was demonstrated by cell culture experiments. PMID:22747750

  2. Reductive splitting of cellulose in the ionic liquid 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium chloride.

    PubMed

    Ignatyev, Igor A; Van Doorslaer, Charlie; Mertens, Pascal G N; Binnemans, Koen; De Vos, Dirk E

    2010-01-01

    The depolymerization of cellulose is carried out in the ionic liquid 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium chloride in the presence of hydrogen gas. First, the ketal 1,1-diethoxycyclohexane and cellobiose were used as model substrates. For the depolymerization of cellulose itself, the combination of a heterogeneous metal catalyst and a homogeneous ruthenium catalyst proved effective. One of the possible roles of the ruthenium compound is to enhance the transfer of hydrogen to the metallic surface. The cellulose is fully converted under relatively mild conditions, with sorbitol as the dominant product in 51-74% yield. PMID:20049766

  3. The effect of chemical treatment on reduction of aflatoxins and ochratoxin A in black and white pepper during washing.

    PubMed

    Jalili, M; Jinap, S; Son, R

    2011-04-01

    The effect of 18 different chemicals, which included acidic compounds (sulfuric acid, chloridric acid, phosphoric acid, benzoic acid, citric acid, acetic acid), alkaline compounds (ammonia, sodium bicarbonate, sodium hydroxide, potassium hydroxide, calcium hydroxide), salts (acetate ammonium, sodium bisulfite, sodium hydrosulfite, sodium chloride, sodium sulfate) and oxidising agents (hydrogen peroxide, sodium hypochlorite), on the reduction of aflatoxins B(1), B(2), G(1) and G(2) and ochratoxin A (OTA) was investigated in black and white pepper. OTA and aflatoxins were determined using HPLC after immunoaffinity column clean-up. Almost all of the applied chemicals showed a significant degree of reduction on mycotoxins (p < 0.05). The lowest and highest reduction of aflatoxin B(1), which is the most dangerous aflatoxin, was 20.5% ± 2.7% using benzoic acid and 54.5% ± 2.7% using sodium hydroxide. There was no significant difference between black and white peppers (p < 0.05). PMID:21416415

  4. Chemical characterization of a potassium hydroxyapatite prepared by soaking in potassium chloride and carbonate solutions.

    PubMed

    Nordström, E G; Karlsson, K H

    1992-01-01

    A potassium-doped synthetic apatite was prepared by soaking hydroxyapatite in potassium carbonate and potassium chloride solutions. The hydroxyapatite was prepared by firing slip cast ceramic bodies in vacuum at 1100 degrees C. The conical ceramic samples and a crushed material of this were soaked in carbonate and chloride solutions for 2, 4, 6, and 8 weeks. Potassium, calcium, and phosphate were determined by direct current plasma emission spectroscopy. The carbonate content was determined by thermogravimetric analysis and chloride titrimetrically. After 2 weeks, one potassium ion substituted one calcium ion when soaked in a carbonate solution. When soaked in the chloride solution substitution occurred to the same extent. At phosphate sites the substitution of phosphate for carbonate occurred at one sixth of the sites after 2 weeks. Chloride incorporated one half of the OH-sites after 2 weeks. After 4 weeks about one chloride ion was found in the apatite, and after 6 weeks one and a half of the OH-sites were occupied by chloride ions. PMID:1483120

  5. Source reduction from chemical plants using on-line optimization

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Z.; Pike, R.W.; Hertwig, T.A.

    1995-12-01

    An effective approach for source reduction in chemical plants has been demonstrated using on-line optimization with flowsheeting (ASPEN PLUS) for process optimization and parameter estimation and the Tjao-Biegler algorithm implemented in a mathematical programming language (GAMS/MINOS) for data reconciliation and gross error detection. Results for a Monsanto sulfuric acid plant with a Bailey distributed control system showed a 25% reduction in the sulfur dioxide emissions and a 17% improvement in the profit over the current operating conditions. Details of the methods used are described.

  6. Chemical and Biological Mechanisms of Pathogen Reduction Technologies

    PubMed Central

    Mundt, Janna M; Rouse, Lindsay; Van den Bossche, Jeroen; Goodrich, Raymond P

    2014-01-01

    Within the last decade new technologies have been developed and implemented which employ light, often in the presence of a photosensitizer, to inactivate pathogens that reside in human blood products for the purpose of transfusion. These pathogen reduction technologies attempt to find the proper balance between pathogen kill and cell quality. Each system utilizes various chemistries that not only impact which pathogens they can inactivate and how, but also how the treatments affect the plasma and cellular proteins and to what degree. This paper aims to present the various chemical mechanisms for pathogen reduction in transfusion medicine that are currently practiced or in development. PMID:25041351

  7. Selective Reduction of Active Metal Chlorides from Molten LiCl-KCl using Lithium Drawdown

    SciTech Connect

    Michael F. Simpson; Daniel LaBrier; Michael Lineberry; Tae-Sic Yoo

    2012-10-01

    In support of optimizing electrorefining technology for treating spent nuclear fuel, lithium drawdown has been investigated for separating actinides from molten salt electrolyte. Drawdown reaction selectivity is a major issue that needs to be investigated, since the goal is to remove actinides while leaving the fission products in the salt. A series of lithium drawdown tests with surrogate fission product chlorides was run to obtain selectivity data with non-radioactive salts, develop a predictive model, and draw conclusions about the viability of using this process with actinide-loadd salt. Results of tests with CsCl, LaCl3, CeCl3, and NdCl3 are reported here. An equilibrium model has been formulated and fit to the experimental data. Excellent fits to the data were achieved. Based on analysis and results obtained to date, it is concluded that clean separation between minor actinides and lanthanides will be difficult to achieve using lithium drawdown.

  8. Anti-Diarrheal Mechanism of the Traditional Remedy Uzara via Reduction of Active Chloride Secretion

    PubMed Central

    Fromm, Anja; Günzel, Dorothee

    2011-01-01

    Background and Purpose The root extract of the African Uzara plant is used in traditional medicine as anti-diarrheal drug. It is known to act via inhibition of intestinal motility, but malabsorptive or antisecretory mechanisms are unknown yet. Experimental Approach HT-29/B6 cells and human colonic biopsies were studied in Ussing experiments in vitro. Uzara was tested on basal as well as on forskolin- or cholera toxin-induced Cl− secretion by measuring short-circuit current (ISC) and tracer fluxes of 22Na+ and 36Cl−. Para- and transcellular resistances were determined by two-path impedance spectroscopy. Enzymatic activity of the Na+/K+-ATPase and intracellular cAMP levels (ELISA) were measured. Key Results In HT-29/B6 cells, Uzara inhibited forskolin- as well as cholera toxin-induced ISC within 60 minutes indicating reduced active chloride secretion. Similar results were obtained in human colonic biopsies pre-stimulated with forskolin. In HT-29/B6, the effect of Uzara on the forskolin-induced ISC was time- and dose-dependent. Analyses of the cellular mechanisms of this Uzara effect revealed inhibition of the Na+/K+-ATPase, a decrease in forskolin-induced cAMP production and a decrease in paracellular resistance. Tracer flux experiments indicate that the dominant effect is the inhibition of the Na+/K+-ATPase. Conclusion and Implications Uzara exerts anti-diarrheal effects via inhibition of active chloride secretion. This inhibition is mainly due to an inhibition of the Na+/K+-ATPase and to a lesser extent to a decrease in intracellular cAMP responses and paracellular resistance. The results imply that Uzara is suitable for treating acute secretory diarrhea. PMID:21479205

  9. Chemical processes in sea-salt chloride depletion observed at a Canadian rural coastal site

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yao, Xiaohong; Zhang, Leiming

    2012-01-01

    Chloride depletion in sea-salt aerosols was studied using size-segregated inorganic ions data collected at a Canadian rural coastal site during a summer (June 29-July 15, 2002) and a fall campaign (October 25 - November 15, 2002). Three samples collected in the fall campaign had high concentrations of sea-salt and ammoniated sulfate and nitrate aerosols and were used to study the relative importance of different chemical reactions contributing to the depletion. The percentage depletion (Cl -depletion(%)) increased substantially with decreasing particle size (up to 86% for particles in the size range of 1.0-3.1 μm). For particles >6.2 μm, the observed NO 3- was responsible for all the depleted Cl -; but less than a quarter of the depletion was explained by the HCl-released reaction between NaCl and HNO 3; the rest of the depletion was likely due to the non-HCl-released reactions, e.g., between NaCl and N 2O 5. For particles in the size range of 3.1-6.2 μm, the NO 3- was responsible for nearly 80-90% of all the depleted Cl - via HCl-released and/or non-HCl-released reactions; the remaining depletion was likely due to the reactions releasing Cl 2, HOCl, etc. Particles >3.1 μm were mostly neutral acidity while a portion of particles at 1.0-3.1 μm was acidic. SO 42- was only responsible for Cl -depletion(%) in acidic particles at 1.0-3.1 μm and the highest Cl -depletion(%) was observed in acidic particles of this size range.

  10. Reduction of chemical reaction networks through delay distributions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barrio, Manuel; Leier, André; Marquez-Lago, Tatiana T.

    2013-03-01

    Accurate modelling and simulation of dynamic cellular events require two main ingredients: an adequate description of key chemical reactions and simulation of such chemical events in reasonable time spans. Quite logically, posing the right model is a crucial step for any endeavour in Computational Biology. However, more often than not, it is the associated computational costs which actually limit our capabilities of representing complex cellular behaviour. In this paper, we propose a methodology aimed at representing chains of chemical reactions by much simpler, reduced models. The abridgement is achieved by generation of model-specific delay distribution functions, consecutively fed to a delay stochastic simulation algorithm. We show how such delay distributions can be analytically described whenever the system is solely composed of consecutive first-order reactions, with or without additional "backward" bypass reactions, yielding an exact reduction. For models including other types of monomolecular reactions (constitutive synthesis, degradation, or "forward" bypass reactions), we discuss why one must adopt a numerical approach for its accurate stochastic representation, and propose two alternatives for this. In these cases, the accuracy depends on the respective numerical sample size. Our model reduction methodology yields significantly lower computational costs while retaining accuracy. Quite naturally, computational costs increase alongside network size and separation of time scales. Thus, we expect our model reduction methodologies to significantly decrease computational costs in these instances. We anticipate the use of delays in model reduction will greatly alleviate some of the current restrictions in simulating large sets of chemical reactions, largely applicable in pharmaceutical and biological research.

  11. Reduction of hazards from copper(I) chloride in a Cu-Cl thermochemical hydrogen production plant.

    PubMed

    Ghandehariun, Samane; Wang, Zhaolin; Rosen, Marc A; Naterer, Greg F

    2012-08-30

    The copper-chlorine cycle of thermochemical water splitting, using various heat sources, is a promising technology for hydrogen production. The chemical hazards accompanying the new technology affect significantly the industrialization of the cycle, but have scarcely been examined. This paper addresses this need by examining the copper(I) chloride (CuCl) hazards that may be generated in the cycle. Regardless of the variations of Cu-Cl cycle, copper(I) chloride is always present, serving as an intermediate compound that may cause health concerns. In this paper, the CuCl hazards are quantified for each process from the generation source of the hazards along with the paths where the CuCl may be present. The processes of greatest relevance include oxygen production, heat recovery, solidification, and dissolution. The options for reducing the CuCl hazards in a Cu-Cl thermochemical hydrogen production plant are evaluated from the perspectives of variations of the Cu-Cl cycle, process integration, heat recovery, and equipment design. It is concluded that using the intake reactant Cu(2)OCl(2) for the oxygen production step to absorb CuCl vapor is the most preferable option compared with other alternatives such as absorbing CuCl vapor with water or CuCl(2), building additional structures inside the oxygen production reactor, and cooling the exiting gas at the outlet of the oxygen reactor. PMID:22749124

  12. Phosphonium chloride for thermal storage

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sutton, J. G.; Heimlich, P. F.; Tepper, E. H.

    1972-01-01

    Development of systems for storage of thermal energy is discussed. Application of phosphonium chloride for heat storage through reversible dissociation is described. Chemical, physical, and thermodynamic properties of phosphonium chloride are analyzed and dangers in using phosphonium chloride are explained.

  13. Fermentation, fractionation and purification of streptokinase by chemical reduction method

    PubMed Central

    Karimi, Z; Babashamsi, M; Asgarani, E; Niakan, M; Salimi, A

    2011-01-01

    Background and Objectives Streptokinase is used clinically as an intravenous thrombolytic agent for the treatment of acute myocardial infarction and is commonly prepared from cultures of Streptococcus equisimilis strain H46A. The objective of the present study was the production of streptokinase from strain H46A and purification by chemical reduction method. Materials and Methods The rate of streptokinase production evaluated under the effect of changes on some fermentation factors. Moreover, due to the specific structure of streptokinase, a chemical reduction method employed for the purification of streptokinase from the fermentation broth. The H46A strain of group C streptococcus, was grown in a fermentor. The proper pH adjusted with NaOH under glucose feeding in an optimum temperature. The supernatant of the fermentation product was sterilized by filtration and concentrated by ultrafiltration. The pH of the concentrate was adjusted, cooled, and precipitated by methanol. Protein solution was reduced with dithiothreitol (DTT). Impurities settled down by aldrithiol-2 and the biological activity of supernatant containing streptokinase was determined. Results In the fed –batch culture, the rate of streptokinase production increased over two times as compared with the batch culture and the impurities were effectively separated from streptokinase by reduction method. Conclusion Improvements in SK production are due to a decrease in lag phase period and increase in the growth rate of logarithmic phase. The methods of purification often result in unacceptable losses of streptokinase, but the chemical reduction method give high yield of streptokinase and is easy to perform it. PMID:22347582

  14. Development of nanoporous structure in carbons by chemical activation with zinc chloride.

    PubMed

    Rajbhandari, Rinita; Shrestha, Lok Kumar; Pokharel, Bhadra Prasad; Pradhananga, Raja Ram

    2013-04-01

    Series of activated carbons (ACs) have been prepared from Lapsi (Choerospondias axillaris) seed powder (LSP) by chemical activation with zinc chloride (ZnCI2) and the effects of ZnCl2 impregnation ratio, carbonization time, and precursor sources on the structure and properties of ACs have been systematically investigated. Carbonization was carried out at 400 degrees C and the ratio of LSP and ZnCI2 was varied from LSP:ZnCl2 = 1:0.25 (AC-0.25), 1:0.50 (AC-0.50) 1:1 (AC-1), 1:2 (AC-2), and 1:4 (AC-4). The ACs were characterized by Fourier transform-infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy, Raman scattering, X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Surface properties (effective surface areas, pore volumes, and pore size distributions) were studied by nitrogen adsorption-desorption measurements. The electrochemical and vapor sensing properties were investigated by cyclic voltammetry, and quartz crystal microbalance (QCM) method, respectively. All the ACs are amorphous materials containing oxygenated surface functional groups and having nanoporous (microporous and mesoporous) structures. We found that surface properties depend on the LSP:ZnCI2 ratio, carbonization time, and also on the precursor type. The effective surface area increased significantly with increasing LSP:ZnCI2 ratio from 1:0.25 to 1:0.5 and then remain apparently constant. However, total pore volume increased continuously with ZnCI2 ratio. Increase in the carbonization time above 4 h decreased both the surface area and pore volume. ACs prepared from bamboo and coconut shell showed better surface properties compared to AC prepared from sugarcane; surface area and pore volume of the former systems are nearly double of the later system. AC derived from LSP (AC-4) showed excellent electrochemical performance giving specific capacitance value of 328 F/g in 1 M H2SO4 solution demonstrating the potential use of this material for supercapacitor electrodes. Our

  15. NITRATE REDUCTION BY ZEROVALENT IRON: EFFECTS OF FORMATE, OXALATE, CITRATE, CHLORIDE, SULFATE, BORATE, AND PHOSPHATE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Recent studies have shown that zerovalent iron (Fe0) may potentially be used as a chemical medium in permeable reactive barriers (PRBs) for nitrate remediation in groundwater; however, the effects of commonly found organic and inorganic ligands in soil and sediments on nitrate re...

  16. Chemical oxygen demand analysis of wastewater using trivalent manganese oxidant with chloride removal by sodium bismuthate pretreatment.

    PubMed

    Miller, D G; Brayton, S V; Boyles, W T

    2001-01-01

    Current chemical oxygen demand (COD) analyses generate wastes containing hexavalent and trivalent chromium, mercury, and silver. Waste disposal is difficult, expensive, and poses environmental hazards. A new COD test is proposed that eliminates these metals and shortens analysis time, where trivalent manganese oxidant replaces hexavalent chromium (dichromate). A silver catalyst is not required. Optional pretreatment removes chloride via oxidation to chlorine using sodium bismuthate, eliminating the need for mercury. Sample aqueous and solid components are separated for chloride removal, then recombined for total COD measurement. Soluble and nonsoluble COD can be determined separately. Digestion at 150 degrees C is complete in 1 hour. Results are determined by titration or by spectrophotometric reading. Test wastes contain none of the metals regulated for disposal under the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act. Results are shown for selected organic compounds and various wastewaters. Statistical comparisons are made with dichromate COD and biochemical oxygen demand (BOD5) test values. PMID:11558305

  17. Spontaneous Growth and Chemical Reduction Ability of Ge Nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Jun; Liang, Changhao; Tian, Zhenfei; Zhang, Shuyuan; Shao, Guosheng

    2013-01-01

    Forming colloidal solutions containing semiconductor quantum-sized nanoparticles (NPs) with clean surface has been a long-standing scientific challenge. In this contribution, we report a “top-down” method for the fabrication of Ge NPs by laser ablation of a Ge target in deionized water without adding any stabilizing reagents. The initial Ge NPs in amorphous structure showed spontaneous growth behavior by aging Ge colloids in deionized water under ambient temperature, which gradually evolved into a metastable tetragonal structure as an intermediate phase and then transformed into the stable cubic structure, being consistent with the Ostwald's rule of stages for the growth in a metastable system. The laser-induced initial Ge NPs demonstrate a unique and prominent size-dependent chemical reductive ability, which is evidenced by the rapid degradation of organic molecules such as chlorinated aromatic compounds, organic dyes, and reduction of heavy metal Cr(VI) ions.

  18. The enzymatic and chemical reduction of extended biliverdins.

    PubMed

    Frydman, R B; Bari, S; Tomaro, M L; Frydman, B

    1990-08-31

    The substrate specificity of rat liver biliverdin reductase was probed using helical and extended biliverdins. The former were the ZZZ-all-syn biliverdins IX alpha and IX gamma, and the latter were the 5Z-syn, 10Z-syn, 15Z-anti; 5Z-anti, 10E-anti, 15E-anti biliverdins. It was found that the reduction rates of the biliverdins increased with the progressive stretching of their conformations. The most extended biliverdin was reduced at a higher rate than biliverdin IX alpha. The chemical reduction rates to bilirubins followed a similar pattern. Nucleophilic addition of 2-mercaptoethanol to the C10 methine was also favored in the extended biliverdins. PMID:2393401

  19. Copper removal from water by chemical reduction with sodium borohydride

    SciTech Connect

    Gomez-Lahoz, C.; Garcia-Herruzo, F.; Rodriguez-Maroto, J.M.; Rodriguez, J.J. )

    1992-09-01

    The use of NaBH{sub 4} as a chemical reductant to precipitate copper from water has been studied. Initial Cu{sup 2+} concentrations of 25 and 40 mg have been checked, and complete removal can be achieved. When solid NaBH{sub 4} is fed, BH{sub 4}{sup {minus}} to Cu{sup 2+} molar ratios higher than 2 were needed. This can be substantially improved by using NaBH{sub 4} as a stabilized alkaline solution. A kinetic model is proposed which gives information about the relative rates of the two competitive reactions involved (Cu{sup 2+} and water reduction with BH{sub 4}{sup {minus}}) and allows the operating conditions leading to minimum BH{sub 4}{sup {minus}} consumption to be established.

  20. Model reduction for chemical kinetics: An optimization approach

    SciTech Connect

    Petzold, L.; Zhu, W.

    1999-04-01

    The kinetics of a detailed chemically reacting system can potentially be very complex. Although the chemist may be interested in only a few species, the reaction model almost always involves a much larger number of species. Some of those species are radicals, which are very reactive species and can be important intermediaries in the reaction scheme. A large number of elementary reactions can occur among the species; some of these reactions are fast and some are slow. The aim of simplified kinetics modeling is to derive the simplest reaction system which retains the essential features of the full system. An optimization-based method for reduction of the number of species and reactions in chemical kinetics model is described. Numerical results for several reaction mechanisms illustrate the potential of this approach.

  1. Vinyl chloride

    Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS)

    Vinyl chloride ; CASRN 75 - 01 - 4 Human health assessment information on a chemical substance is included in the IRIS database only after a comprehensive review of toxicity data , as outlined in the IRIS assessment development process . Sections I ( Health Hazard Assessments for Noncarcinogenic Eff

  2. Methyl chloride

    Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS)

    Methyl chloride ; CASRN 74 - 87 - 3 ( 07 / 17 / 2001 ) Human health assessment information on a chemical substance is included in the IRIS database only after a comprehensive review of toxicity data , as outlined in the IRIS assessment development process . Sections I ( Health Hazard Assessments for

  3. Ethyl chloride

    Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS)

    Ethyl chloride ; CASRN 75 - 00 - 3 Human health assessment information on a chemical substance is included in the IRIS database only after a comprehensive review of toxicity data , as outlined in the IRIS assessment development process . Sections I ( Health Hazard Assessments for Noncarcinogenic Eff

  4. Benzyl chloride

    Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS)

    Benzyl chloride ; CASRN 100 - 44 - 7 Human health assessment information on a chemical substance is included in the IRIS database only after a comprehensive review of toxicity data , as outlined in the IRIS assessment development process . Sections I ( Health Hazard Assessments for Noncarcinogenic E

  5. Hydrogen chloride

    Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS)

    Hydrogen chloride ; CASRN 7647 - 01 - 0 Human health assessment information on a chemical substance is included in the IRIS database only after a comprehensive review of toxicity data , as outlined in the IRIS assessment development process . Sections I ( Health Hazard Assessments for Noncarcinogeni

  6. Mepiquat chloride

    Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS)

    Mepiquat chloride ; CASRN 24307 - 26 - 4 Human health assessment information on a chemical substance is included in the IRIS database only after a comprehensive review of toxicity data , as outlined in the IRIS assessment development process . Sections I ( Health Hazard Assessments for Noncarcinogen

  7. Allyl chloride

    Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS)

    Allyl chloride ; CASRN 107 - 05 - 1 Human health assessment information on a chemical substance is included in the IRIS database only after a comprehensive review of toxicity data , as outlined in the IRIS assessment development process . Sections I ( Health Hazard Assessments for Noncarcinogenic Ef

  8. Acetyl chloride

    Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS)

    Acetyl chloride ; CASRN 75 - 36 - 5 Human health assessment information on a chemical substance is included in the IRIS database only after a comprehensive review of toxicity data , as outlined in the IRIS assessment development process . Sections I ( Health Hazard Assessments for Noncarcinogenic Ef

  9. Preparation of Ferrotitanium Alloy from Ilmenite by Electrochemical Reduction in Chloride Molten Salts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qi, Can-can; Hua, Yi-xin; Chen, Kong-hao; Jie, Ya-fei; Zhou, Zhong-ren; Ru, Juan-jian; Xiong, Li; Gong, Kai

    2016-02-01

    Ferrotitanium alloy is prepared by electrochemical reduction from ilmenite in LiCl-KCl and LiCl-KCl-CaCl2 molten salts, respectively. The products prepared are observed by x-ray diffraction (XRD). It is shown that Fe2Ti can be prepared from ilmenite in LiCl-KCl molten salt at 1073 K with a cell voltage of 3.2 V. Ilmenite can be electrochemically reduced to FeTi in LiCl-KCl-CaCl2 molten salt under the same condition. It is indicated that CaCl2 can promote the reaction and is favors the deoxidization of the FeTiO3.

  10. Chloridization and Reduction Roasting of High-Magnesium Low-Nickel Oxide Ore Followed by Magnetic Separation to Enrich Ferronickel Concentrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Shiwei; Wei, Yonggang; Li, Bo; Wang, Hua; Ma, Baozhong; Wang, Chengyan

    2016-02-01

    The chloridization and reduction roasting of high-magnesium, low-nickel oxide ore containing 0.82 pct Ni and 31.49 pct MgO were investigated in this study. Mineralogical investigation indicated that 84.6 pct of nickel was associated with silicates, and nickel was well distributed in mineral in the form of isomorphism. A series of chloridization tests with different added proportions of sodium chloride and coal along with different roasting temperatures and times was conducted. The results indicate that for a ferronickel content of 7.09 pct Ni, a nickel recovery of 98.31 pct could be obtained by chloridizing the laterite ore at 1473 K (1200 °C) for 20 minutes with the addition of 10 wt pct sodium chloride and 8 wt pct coal followed by the application of a 150-mT magnetic field. X-ray diffraction indicated that the nickel is mainly present in the form of ferronickel, which can also be detected by SEM-EDS. Compared with the roasted ore with no added chlorinating agent, the ore roasted in the presence of sodium chloride exhibited enhanced ferronickel particle growth.

  11. The effect of sodium reduction with and without potassium chloride on the survival of Listeria monocytogenes in Cheddar cheese.

    PubMed

    Hystead, E; Diez-Gonzalez, F; Schoenfuss, T C

    2013-10-01

    Sodium chloride (NaCl) in cheese contributes to flavor and texture directly and by its effect on microbial and enzymatic activity. The salt-to-moisture ratio (S/M) is used to gauge if conditions for producing good-quality cheese have been met. Reductions in salt that deviate from the ideal S/M range could result in changing culture acidification profiles during cheese making. Lactococcus lactis ssp. lactis or Lc. lactis ssp. cremoris are both used as cultures in Cheddar cheese manufacture, but Lc. lactis ssp. lactis has a higher salt and pH tolerance than Lc. lactis ssp. cremoris. Both salt and pH are used to control growth and survival of Listeria monocytogenes and salts such as KCl are commonly used to replace the effects of NaCl in food when NaCl is reduced. The objectives of this project were to determine the effects of sodium reduction, KCl use, and the subspecies of Lc. lactis used on L. monocytogenes survival in stirred-curd Cheddar cheese. Cheese was manufactured with either Lc. lactis ssp. lactis or Lc. lactis ssp. cremoris. At the salting step, curd was divided and salted with a concentration targeted to produce a final cheese with 600 mg of sodium/100 g (control), 25% reduced sodium (450 mg of sodium/100 g; both with and without KCl), and low sodium (53% sodium reduction or 280 mg of sodium/100 g; both with and without KCl). Potassium chloride was added on a molar equivalent to the NaCl it replaced to maintain an equivalent S/M. Cheese was inoculated with a 5-strain cocktail of L. monocytogenes at different times during aging to simulate postprocessing contamination, and counts were monitored over 27 or 50 d, depending on incubation temperature (12 or 5 °C, respectively). In cheese inoculated with 4 log₁₀ cfu of L. monocytogenes/g 2 wk after manufacture, viable counts declined by more than 3 log₁₀ cfu/g in all treatments over 60 d. When inoculated with 5 log₁₀ cfu/g at 3mo of cheese age, L. monocytogenes counts in Cheddar cheese were also

  12. Effect of chemical and physical doping with iodine on the optical and dielectric properties of poly(vinyl chloride)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El-Ghamaz, N. A.; Ghaly, H. A.

    2016-03-01

    Iodination of poly(vinyl chloride) (PVC) was prepared by addition of I2 or I- through physical adsorption and chemical modification techniques forming (PVC-I2) (composite I) and (PVC-I-) (composite II), respectively. Investigations were performed using TGA, DSC, FTIR, UV-vis absorbance analyses and ac conductivity measurements. The activation energy of decomposition, ΔEd, was found to be 215.15 kJ/mole and 43.1 kJ/mole for PVC and composite II, respectively. Both direct and indirect optical transitions near the absorption edge are observed. Addition of I2 or I- decreases the optical energy gap for PVC. The chemical replacement of Cl- ion in PVC matrix with I- ion in composite II increases the electrical conductivity by two orders. A possible conduction mechanisms are suggested.

  13. Hyperosmolar sodium chloride is toxic to cultured neurons and causes reduction of glucose metabolism and ATP levels, an increase in glutamate uptake, and a reduction in cytosolic calcium.

    PubMed

    Morland, Cecilie; Pettersen, Mi Nguyen; Hassel, Bjørnar

    2016-05-01

    Elevation of serum sodium, hypernatremia, which may occur during dehydration or treatment with sodium chloride, may cause brain dysfunction and damage, but toxic mechanisms are poorly understood. We found that exposure to excess NaCl, 10-100mmol/L, for 20h caused cell death in cultured cerebellar granule cells (neurons). Toxicity was due to Na(+), since substituting excess Na(+) with choline reduced cell death to control levels, whereas gluconate instead of excess Cl(-) did not. Prior to cell death from hyperosmolar NaCl, glucose consumption and lactate formation were reduced, and intracellular aspartate levels were elevated, consistent with reduced glycolysis or glucose uptake. Concomitantly, the level of ATP became reduced. Pyruvate, 10mmol/L, reduced NaCl-induced cell death. The extracellular levels of glutamate, taurine, and GABA were concentration-dependently reduced by excess NaCl; high-affinity glutamate uptake increased. High extracellular [Na(+)] caused reduction in intracellular free [Ca(2+)], but a similar effect was seen with mannitol, which was not neurotoxic. We suggest that inhibition of glucose metabolism with ensuing loss of ATP is a neurotoxic mechanism of hyperosmolar sodium, whereas increased uptake of extracellular neuroactive amino acids and reduced intracellular [Ca(2+)] may, if they occur in vivo, contribute to the cerebral dysfunction and delirium described in hypernatremia. PMID:26994581

  14. Chemical modification of poly (vinyl chloride) sheet with thiourea for cell study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Monika, Mishra, R. R.; Jaiswal, S.; Kapusetti, G.; Misra, N.

    2013-06-01

    Plasticized poly (vinyl chloride) has been used as biomaterial to make medical equipment. An appropriate reaction situation by temperature at 60-85°C for the surface modification of PVC sheet with sodium thiourea has been investigated. Although, the use of a phase-transfer catalyst (Tetra butyl ammonium hydrogen sulphate-TBHAS) makes it feasible for the nucleophilic substitution reaction to take place, the morphology of the film is changed by the reaction, leading to a loss in both surface smoothness and transparency of the film. According to this study, the reaction with sodium thiourea occurs consistently through the sheets, and modified surface have antibacterial capacity.

  15. Chemical oxygen demand reduction in coffee wastewater through chemical flocculation and advanced oxidation processes.

    PubMed

    Zayas Pérez, Teresa; Geissler, Gunther; Hernandez, Fernando

    2007-01-01

    The removal of the natural organic matter present in coffee processing wastewater through chemical coagulation-flocculation and advanced oxidation processes (AOP) had been studied. The effectiveness of the removal of natural organic matter using commercial flocculants and UV/H2O2, UV/O3 and UV/H2O2/O3 processes was determined under acidic conditions. For each of these processes, different operational conditions were explored to optimize the treatment efficiency of the coffee wastewater. Coffee wastewater is characterized by a high chemical oxygen demand (COD) and low total suspended solids. The outcomes of coffee wastewater treatment using coagulation-flocculation and photodegradation processes were assessed in terms of reduction of COD, color, and turbidity. It was found that a reduction in COD of 67% could be realized when the coffee wastewater was treated by chemical coagulation-flocculation with lime and coagulant T-1. When coffee wastewater was treated by coagulation-flocculation in combination with UV/H2O2, a COD reduction of 86% was achieved, although only after prolonged UV irradiation. Of the three advanced oxidation processes considered, UV/H2O2, UV/O3 and UV/H2O2/O3, we found that the treatment with UV/H2O2/O3 was the most effective, with an efficiency of color, turbidity and further COD removal of 87%, when applied to the flocculated coffee wastewater. PMID:17918591

  16. Formation and chemical evolution of magnesium chloride brines by evaporite dissolution processes—Implications for evaporite geochemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krupp, Ralf E.

    2005-09-01

    The evolution of magnesium chloride brines with high bromide contents via a multistage reaction and dissolution process has been studied in brine seeps of a German potash mine. The observed chemical trends and phase equilibria can be modeled and interpreted in terms of a NaCl solution (cap rock brine) infiltrating into a potash zone characterized by the metamorphic mineral assemblage kieserite + sylvite + halite + anhydrite. Establishment of a persistent, stable equilibrium assemblage and constant fluid composition in the invariant point IP1 of the six component (Na-K-Mg-Ca-Cl-SO 4-H 2O) system of oceanic salts is prevented by the perpetually renewed input of NaCl-brine and by the intermittent exposure of incompatible kieserite. Instead, the solutions develop towards the metastable invariant point IP1(gy), with the mineral assemblage carnallite + polyhalite + sylvite + halite + gypsum, where gypsum takes the place of anhydrite (stage I). The temporary exposure of kieserite and the ensuing formation of polyhalite effectively buffer the solutions along the metastable polyhalite phase boundary during stages II and III. Eventually, in stage IV, polyhalite becomes depleted and admixture of more NaCl brine leads to low sulfate solution compositions, which are now only constrained by carnallite + sylvite + halite, and the once hexary system degenerates to a quaternary one (Na-K-Mg-Cl-H 2O) in point E. Bromide in brines shows equilibrium partitioning with respect to the wall rock minerals. The pattern of evolving brine compositions may serve as a model for similar brine occurrences, which in some cases may have been misinterpreted as remains of fossil, highly concentrated and chemically modified seawater. Similar magnesium chloride brines of salt lakes (e.g., Dead Sea, Dabusun Lake) show subtle differences and are constrained by fewer mineral equilibria (more degrees of freedom), and their low sulfate contents are due to gypsum precipitation, driven by calcium chloride

  17. Comparison of four chemical uncouplers for excess sludge reduction.

    PubMed

    Aragón, C; Quiroga, J M; Coello, M D

    2009-06-01

    A substantial part of the operating costs of wastewater treatment plants (WWTP) is associated with the management and treatment of the excess sludge generated during the treatment process. Different strategies have been applied for excess sludge reduction, such as the oxic-settling-anaerobic process, the high dissolved oxygen process, the uncoupler-containing activated sludge process, the ozonation-combined activated sludge process, control of sludge retention time and biodegradation of sludge in a membrane-assisted reactor. Chemical uncouplers have been shown to reduce excess sludge production, disassociating the energy coupling between catabolism and anabolism. These metabolic uncouplers may be organic compounds, such as 2,4-dinitrophenol (2,4-DNP) or 3,3',4',5-tetrachlorosalicylanilide (TCS), or heavy metals. In this paper, four different chemicals (2,4-DNP, TCS, copper (Cu) and zinc (Zn)) were chosen for short-term tests for studying their ability to reduce sludge yield (Y(x/s)) and, consequently, their potential for reducing excess sludge production. According to the results obtained, only TCS seems to be very effective in reducing sludge production from the activated sludge process. Compared with the control test, Y(x/s) can be reduced by over 30% at 0.8 mg/l TCS. It was also found that the substrate removal capability was not adversely affected by the presence of TCS. Furthermore, an increase in the microbial activity of the system was observed. PMID:19705608

  18. Methyl chloride via oxyhydrochlorination of methane: A building block for chemicals and fuels from natural gas

    SciTech Connect

    Benson, R.L.; Brown, S.S.D.; Ferguson, S.P.; Jarvis, R.F. Jr.

    1995-12-31

    The objectives of this program are to (a) develop a process for converting natural gas to methyl chloride via an oxyhydrochlorination route using highly selective, stable catalysts in a fixed-bed, (b) design a reactor capable of removing the large amount of heat generated in the process so as to control the reaction, (c) develop a recovery system capable of removing the methyl chloride from the product stream and (d) determine the economics and commercial viability of the process. The general approach has been as follows: (a) design and build a laboratory scale reactor, (b) define and synthesize suitable OHC catalysts for evaluation, (c) select first generation OHC catalyst for Process Development Unit (PDU) trials, (d) design, construct and startup PDU, (e) evaluate packed bed reactor design, (f) optimize process, in particular, product recovery operations, (g) determine economics of process, (h) complete preliminary engineering design for Phase II and (i) make scale-up decision and formulate business plan for Phase II. Conclusions regarding process development and catalyst development are presented.

  19. [On the problem of the study of the chemical air pollution with chlororganic hydrocarbons at productions of polyvinyl chloride and epichlorohydrin].

    PubMed

    Taranenko, N A; Meshakova, N M; Zhurba, O M; Telezhkin, V V

    2014-01-01

    Hygienic assessment of working conditions at the chemical productions of polyvinyl chloride (PVC) and epichlorohydrin (EPCH) in East Siberia has shown that the employees are exposed to the chlororganic hydrocarbons of hazard category 1-2, out of them there were found to be more toxical pollutants such as vinyl chloride, 1.2-dicloroethane in the production of polyvinyl chloride; allyl chloride and epichlorohydrin in the production of epichlorohydrin. Multistageness of the technological processes, the absence of the isolation of main stages of the technological processes as well as the heating microclimate contribute to the chemical pollution of the air environment. In spite of the significant improvement of the hygienic situation at the productions mentioned in the recent 10 years according to the chemical factor due to the introduction of the complex of curative measures, the working conditions of the employees still belonged to the harmful category. According to the content of the harmful chemical substances in the air of the working zone and the parameters of microclimate, the working conditions of the employees working at the production of epichlorohydrin and in the shop of vinyl chloride production must be qualified as the harmful ones of the first category of the hazard and danger (Class 3.1), in the production shop for PVC- as the harmful ones which correspond to the second category of the hazard and danger (Class 3.2). PMID:25842495

  20. A Review on Mutagenicity Testing for Hazard Classification of Chemicals at Work: Focusing on in vivo Micronucleus Test for Allyl Chloride

    PubMed Central

    Rim, Kyung-Taek; Kim, Soo-Jin

    2015-01-01

    Chemical mutagenicity is a major hazard that is important to workers' health. Despite the use of large amounts of allyl chloride, the available mutagenicity data for this chemical remains controversial. To clarify the mutagenicity of allyl chloride and because a micronucleus (MN) test had not yet been conducted, we screened for MN induction by using male ICR mice bone marrow cells. The test results indicated that this chemical is not mutagenic under the test conditions. In this paper, the regulatory test battery and several assay combinations used to determine the genotoxic potential of chemicals in the workplace have been described. Further application of these assays may prove useful in future development strategies of hazard evaluations of industrial chemicals. This study also should help to improve the testing of this chemical by commonly used mutagenicity testing methods and investigations on the underlying mechanisms and could be applicable for workers' health. PMID:26929826

  1. A Review on Mutagenicity Testing for Hazard Classification of Chemicals at Work: Focusing on in vivo Micronucleus Test for Allyl Chloride.

    PubMed

    Rim, Kyung-Taek; Kim, Soo-Jin

    2015-09-01

    Chemical mutagenicity is a major hazard that is important to workers' health. Despite the use of large amounts of allyl chloride, the available mutagenicity data for this chemical remains controversial. To clarify the mutagenicity of allyl chloride and because a micronucleus (MN) test had not yet been conducted, we screened for MN induction by using male ICR mice bone marrow cells. The test results indicated that this chemical is not mutagenic under the test conditions. In this paper, the regulatory test battery and several assay combinations used to determine the genotoxic potential of chemicals in the workplace have been described. Further application of these assays may prove useful in future development strategies of hazard evaluations of industrial chemicals. This study also should help to improve the testing of this chemical by commonly used mutagenicity testing methods and investigations on the underlying mechanisms and could be applicable for workers' health. PMID:26929826

  2. Magnetite Fe3O4 nanoparticles synthesis by wet chemical reduction and their characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chaki, S. H.; Malek, Tasmira J.; Chaudhary, M. D.; Tailor, J. P.; Deshpande, M. P.

    2015-09-01

    The authors report the synthesis of Fe3O4 nanoparticles by wet chemical reduction technique at ambient temperature and its characterization. Ferric chloride hexa-hydrate (FeCl3 · 6H2O) and sodium boro-hydrate (NaBH4) were used for synthesis of Fe3O4 nanoparticles at ambient temperature. The elemental composition of the synthesized Fe3O4 nanoparticles was determined by energy dispersive analysis of x-rays technique. The x-ray diffraction (XRD) technique was used for structural characterization of the nanoparticles. The crystallite size of the nanoparticles was determined using XRD data employing Scherrer’s formula and Hall-Williamson’s plot. Surface morphology of as-synthesized Fe3O4 nanoparticles was studied by scanning electron microscopy. High resolution transmission electron microscopy analysis of the as-synthesized Fe3O4 nanoparticles showed narrow range of particles size distribution. The optical absorption of the synthesized Fe3O4 nanoparticles was studied by UV-vis-NIR spectroscopy. The as-synthesized nanoparticles were analyzed by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy technique for absorption band study in the infrared region. The magnetic properties of the as-synthesized Fe3O4 nanoparticles were evaluated by vibrating sample magnetometer technique. The thermal stability of the as-synthesized Fe3O4 nanoparticles was studied by thermogravimetric technique. The obtained results are elaborated and discussed in details in this paper.

  3. Alkaline earth chloride hydrates: chlorine quadrupolar and chemical shift tensors by solid-state NMR spectroscopy and plane wave pseudopotential calculations.

    PubMed

    Bryce, David L; Bultz, Elijah B

    2007-01-01

    A series of alkaline earth chloride hydrates has been studied by solid-state (35/37)Cl NMR spectroscopy in order to characterize the chlorine electric field gradient (EFG) and chemical shift (CS) tensors and to relate these observables to the structure around the chloride ions. Chlorine-35/37 NMR spectra of solid powdered samples of pseudopolymorphs (hydrates) of magnesium chloride (MgCl(2).6H(2)O), calcium chloride (CaCl(2).2H(2)O), strontium chloride (SrCl(2), SrCl(2).2H(2)O, and SrCl(2).6H(2)O), and barium chloride (BaCl(2).2H(2)O) have been acquired under stationary and magic-angle spinning conditions in magnetic fields of 11.75 and 21.1 T. Powder X-ray diffraction was used as an additional tool to confirm the purity and identity of the samples. Chlorine-35 quadrupolar coupling constants (C(Q)) range from essentially zero in cubic anhydrous SrCl(2) to 4.26+/-0.03 MHz in calcium chloride dihydrate. CS tensor spans, Omega, are between 40 and 72 ppm, for example, Omega= 45+/-20 ppm for SrCl(2).6H(2)O. Plane wave-pseudopotential density functional theory, as implemented in the CASTEP program, was employed to model the extended solid lattices of these materials for the calculation of their chlorine EFG and nuclear magnetic shielding tensors, and allowed for the assignment of the two-site chlorine NMR spectra of barium chloride dihydrate. This work builds upon our current understanding of the relationship between chlorine NMR interaction tensors and the local molecular and electronic structure, and highlights the particular sensitivity of quadrupolar nucleus solid-state NMR spectroscopy to the differences between various pseudopolymorphic structures in the case of strontium chloride. PMID:17385204

  4. Chemical compositions of sulfate and chloride salts over the last termination reconstructed from the Dome Fuji ice core, inland Antarctica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oyabu, Ikumi; Iizuka, Yoshinori; Uemura, Ryu; Miyake, Takayuki; Hirabayashi, Motohiro; Motoyama, Hideaki; Sakurai, Toshimitsu; Suzuki, Toshitaka; Hondoh, Takeo

    2014-12-01

    The flux and chemical composition of aerosols impact the climate. Antarctic ice cores preserve the record of past atmospheric aerosols, providing useful information about past atmospheric environments. However, few studies have directly measured the chemical composition of aerosol particles preserved in ice cores. Here we present the chemical compositions of sulfate and chloride salts from aerosol particles in the Dome Fuji ice core. The analysis method involves ice sublimation, and the period covers the last termination, 25.0-11.0 thousand years before present (kyr B.P.), with a 350 year resolution. The major components of the soluble particles are CaSO4, Na2SO4, and NaCl. The dominant sulfate salt changes at 16.8 kyr B.P. from CaSO4, a glacial type, to Na2SO4, an interglacial type. The sulfate salt flux (CaSO4 plus Na2SO4) inversely correlates with δ18O in Dome Fuji over millennial timescales. This correlation is consistent with the idea that sulfate salt aerosols contributed to the last deglacial warming of inland Antarctica by reducing the aerosol indirect effect. Between 16.3 and 11.0 kyr B.P., the presence of NaCl suggests that winter atmospheric aerosols are preserved. A high NaCl/Na2SO4 fraction between 12.3 and 11.0 kyr B.P. indicates that the contribution from the transport of winter atmospheric aerosols increased during this period.

  5. Effects of calcium chloride and sodium hexametaphosphate on certain chemical and physical properties of soymilk.

    PubMed

    Pathomrungsiyounggul, P; Grandison, A S; Lewis, M J

    2007-10-01

    Soymilks with sodium hexametaphosphate (SHMP) (0% to 1.2%) and calcium chloride (12.50, 18.75, and 25.00 mM Ca) were analyzed for total Ca, Ca ion concentration, pH, kinematic viscosity, particle diameter, and sediment after pasteurization. Higher added Ca led to significant (P

  6. Surface chemical study on the covalent attachment of hydroxypropyltrimethyl ammonium chloride chitosan to titanium surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Xiaofen; Wang, Ling; Guo, Shengrong; Lei, Lei; Tang, Tingting

    2011-10-01

    An anti-microbial and bioactive coating could not only reduce the probability of infection related to titanium implants but also support the growth of surrounding osteogenic cells. Our previous study has showed that hydroxypropyltrimethyl ammonium chloride chitosan (HACC) with a DS (degrees of substitution) of 18% had improved solubility and significantly higher antibacterial activities against three bacteria which were usually associated with infections in orthopaedics. In the current study, HACC with a DS of 18% coating was bonded to titanium surface by a three-step process. The titanium surface after each individual reaction step was analyzed by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and attenuated total reflection (ATR) of Fourier-transformed infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopy. The XPS results demonstrated that there were great changes in the atomic ratios of C/Ti, O/Ti, and N/Ti after each reaction step. The XPS high resolution and corresponding devolution spectra of carbon, oxygen, nitrogen, and titanium were also in good coordination with the anticipated reaction steps. Additionally, the absorption bands around 3365 cm -1 (-OH vibration), 1664 cm -1 (Amide I), 1165 cm -1 ( νas, C-O-C bridge), and the broad absorption bands between 958 cm -1 and 1155 cm -1 (skeletal vibrations involving the C-O stretching of saccharide structure of HACC) verified that HACC was successfully attached to titanium surface.

  7. Controlling attachment and growth of Listeria monocytogenes in polyvinyl chloride model floor drains using a peroxide chemical, chitosan-arginine, or heat.

    PubMed

    Berrang, Mark E; Hofacre, Charles L; Frank, Joseph F

    2014-12-01

    Listeria monocytogenes can colonize a poultry processing plant as a resident in floor drains. Limiting growth and attachment to drain surfaces may help lessen the potential for cross-contamination of product. The objective of this study was to compare a hydrogen peroxide-peroxyacetic acid-based chemical to chitosan-arginine or heat to prevent attachment of or destroy existing L. monocytogenes on the inner surface of model floor drains. L. monocytogenes was introduced to result in about 10(9) planktonic and attached cells within untreated polyvinyl chloride model drain pipes. Treatments (0.13 % peroxide-based sanitizer, 0.1 % chitosan-arginine, or 15 s of hot water at 95 to 100°C) were applied immediately after inoculation or after 24 h of incubation. Following treatment, all pipes were incubated for an additional 24 h; planktonic and attached cells were enumerated by plate count. All treatments significantly (P < 0.05) lowered numbers of planktonic and attached cells recovered. Chitosan-arginine resulted in approximately a 6-log reduction in planktonic cells when applied prior to incubation and a 3-log reduction after the inoculum had a chance to grow. Both heat and peroxide significantly outperformed chitosan-arginine (8- to 9-log reduction) and were equally effective before and after incubation. Heat was the only treatment that eliminated planktonic L. monocytogenes. All treatments were less effective against attached cells. Chitosan-arginine provided about a 4.5-log decrease in attached cells when applied before incubation and no significant decrease when applied after growth. Like with planktonic cells, peroxide-peroxyacetic acid and heat were equally effective before or after incubation, causing decreases ranging from 7 to 8.5 log for attached L. monocytogenes. Applied at the most efficacious time, any of these techniques may lessen the potential for L. monocytogenes to remain as a long-term resident in processing plant floor drains. PMID:25474061

  8. The Use of Chemical Probes for the Characterization of the Predominant Abiotic Reductants in Anaerobic Sediments

    EPA Science Inventory

    Identifying the predominant chemical reductants and pathways for electron transfer in anaerobic systems is paramount to the development of environmental fate models that incorporate pathways for abiotic reductive transformations. Currently, such models do not exist. In this chapt...

  9. Biochemical and EPR-Spectroscopic Investigation into Heterologously Expressed Vinyl Chloride Reductive Dehalogenase (VcrA) from Dehalococcoides mccartyi Strain VS

    PubMed Central

    Parthasarathy, Anutthaman; Stich, Troy A.; Lohner, Svenja T.; Lesnefsky, Ann; Britt, R. David; Spormann, Alfred M.

    2015-01-01

    Reductive dehalogenases play a critical role in the microbial detoxification of aquifers contaminated with chloroethenes and chlorethanes by catalyzing the reductive elimination of a halogen. We report here the first heterologous production of vinyl chloride reductase VcrA from Dehalococcoides mccartyi strain VS. Heterologously expressed VcrA was reconstituted to its active form by addition of hydroxocobalamin/adenosylcobalamin, Fe3+, and sulfide in the presence of mercaptoethanol. The kinetic properties of reconstituted VcrA catalyzing vinyl chloride reduction with Ti(III)-citrate as reductant and methyl viologen as mediator were similar to those obtained previously for VcrA as isolated from D. mccartyi strain VS. VcrA was also found to catalyze a novel reaction, the environmentally important dihaloelimination of 1,2-dichloroethane to ethene. Electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopic studies with reconstituted VcrA in the presence of mercaptoethanol revealed the presence of Cob(II)alamin. Addition of Ti(III)-citrate resulted in the appearance of a new signal characteristic of a reduced [4Fe–4S] cluster and the disappearance of the Cob(II)alamin signal. UV–vis absorption spectroscopy of Ti(III)citrate-treated samples revealed the formation of two new absorption maxima characteristic of Cob(I)alamin. No evidence for the presence of a [3Fe–4S] cluster was found. We postulate that during the reaction cycle of VcrA, a reduced [4Fe–4S] cluster reduces Co(II) to Co(I) of the enzyme-bound cobalamin. Vinyl chloride reduction to ethene would be initiated when Cob(I)alamin transfers an electron to the substrate, generating a vinyl radical as a potential reaction intermediate. PMID:25686300

  10. Chemical reactions occurring during direct solar reduction of CO2.

    PubMed

    Lyma, J L; Jensen, R J

    2001-09-28

    At high temperatures carbon dioxide may absorb solar radiation and react to form carbon monoxide and molecular oxygen. The CO, so produced, may be converted by well-established means to a combustible fuel, such as methanol. We intend to make a future demonstration of the solar reduction of CO2 based on these processes. This paper, however, addresses only the problem of preserving, or even enhancing, the initial photolytic CO by quenching the hot gas with colder H2O or CO2. We present model calculations with a reaction mechanism used extensively in other calculations. If a CO2 gas stream is heated and photolyzed by intense solar radiation and then allowed to cool slowly, it will react back to the initial CO2 by a series of elementary chemical reactions. The back reaction to CO2 can be terminated with the rapid addition of CO2, water, or a mixture. Calculations show that a three-fold quench with pure CO2 will stop the reactions and preserve over 90% of the initial photolytic CO. We find that water has one of two effects. It can either increase the CO level, or it can catalyze the recombination of O and CO to CO2. The gas temperature is the determining factor. If the quench gas is not sufficient to keep the temperature below approximately 1100 K, a chain-branching reaction dominates and the reaction to CO2 occurs. If the temperature stays below that level a chain terminating reaction dominates and the CO is increased. The former case occurs below approximately a fourfold quench with a water/CO2 mixture. The later case occurs when the quench is greater than fourfold. We conclude that CO2, H2O, or a mixture may quench the hot gas stream photolyzed by solar radiation and preserve the photolytic CO. PMID:11589409

  11. Antibacterial activity of silver bionanocomposites synthesized by chemical reduction route

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The aim of this study is to investigate the functions of polymers and size of nanoparticles on the antibacterial activity of silver bionanocomposites (Ag BNCs). In this research, silver nanoparticles (Ag NPs) were incorporated into biodegradable polymers that are chitosan, gelatin and both polymers via chemical reduction method in solvent in order to produce Ag BNCs. Silver nitrate and sodium borohydride were employed as a metal precursor and reducing agent respectively. On the other hand, chitosan and gelatin were added as a polymeric matrix and stabilizer. The antibacterial activity of different sizes of silver nanoparticles was investigated against Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria by the disk diffusion method using Mueller-Hinton Agar. Results The properties of Ag BNCs were studied as a function of the polymer weight ratio in relation to the use of chitosan and gelatin. The morphology of the Ag BNCs films and the distribution of the Ag NPs were also characterized. The diameters of the Ag NPs were measured and their size is less than 20 nm. The antibacterial trait of silver/chitosan/gelatin bionanocomposites was investigated. The silver ions released from the Ag BNCs and their antibacterial activities were scrutinized. The antibacterial activities of the Ag BNC films were examined against Gram-negative bacteria (E. coli and P. aeruginosa) and Gram-positive (S. aureus and M. luteus) by diffusion method using Muller-Hinton agar. Conclusions The antibacterial activity of Ag NPs with size less than 20 nm was demonstrated and showed positive results against Gram-negative and Gram-positive bacteria. The Ag NPs stabilized well in the polymers matrix. PMID:22967920

  12. Less is Better. Laboratory Chemical Management for Waste Reduction.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    American Chemical Society, Washington, DC.

    An objective of the American Chemical Society is to promote alternatives to landfilling for the disposal of laboratory chemical wastes. One method is to reduce the amount of chemicals that become wastes. This is the basis for the "less is better" philosophy. This bulletin discusses various techniques involved in purchasing control, inventory…

  13. Response Behaviour of a Hydrogen Sensor Based on Ionic Conducting Polymer-metal Interfaces Prepared by the Chemical Reduction Method

    PubMed Central

    Sakthivel, Mariappan; Weppner, Werner

    2006-01-01

    A solid-state amperometric hydrogen sensor based on a protonated Nafion membrane and catalytic active electrode operating at room temperature was fabricated and tested. Ionic conducting polymer-metal electrode interfaces were prepared chemically by using the impregnation-reduction method. The polymer membrane was impregnated with tetra-ammine platinum chloride hydrate and the metal ions were subsequently reduced by using either sodium tetrahydroborate or potassium tetrahydroborate. The hydrogen sensing characteristics with air as reference gas is reported. The sensors were capable of detecting hydrogen concentrations from 10 ppm to 10% in nitrogen. The response time was in the range of 10-30 s and a stable linear current output was observed. The thin Pt films were characterized by XRD, Infrared Spectroscopy, Optical Microscopy, Atomic Force Microscopy, Scanning Electron Microscopy and EDAX.

  14. Microorganism-mediated synthesis of chemically difficult-to-synthesize Au nanohorns with excellent optical properties in the presence of hexadecyltrimethylammonium chloride

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Miao; Odoom-Wubah, Tareque; Chen, Huimei; Jing, Xiaolian; Kong, Tao; Sun, Daohua; Huang, Jiale; Li, Qingbiao

    2013-06-01

    Closely packed, size-controllable and stable Au nanohorns (AuNHs) that are difficult to synthesize through pure chemical reduction are facilely synthesized using a microorganism-mediated method in the presence of hexadecyltrimethylammonium chloride (CTAC). The results showed that the size of the as-synthesized AuNHs could be tuned by adjusting the dosage of the Pichia pastoris cells (PPCs). The initial concentrations of CTAC, ascorbic acid (AA) and tetrachloroaurate trihydrate (HAuCl4.3H2O) significantly affected the formation of the AuNHs. Increasing the diameters of AuNHs led to a red shift of the absorbance bands around 700 nm in their UV-vis-NIR spectra. Interestingly, the AuNH/PPC composites exhibited excellent Raman enhancement such that rhodamine 6G with concentration as low as (10-9 M) could be effectively detected. The formation process of the AuNHs involved the initial binding of the Au ions onto the PPCs with subsequent reduction by AA to form supported Au nanoparticles (AuNPs) based on preferential nucleation and initial anisotropic growth on the platform of the PPCs. The anisotropic growth of these AuNPs, which was influenced by CTAC and PPCs, resulted in the formation of growing AuNHs, while the secondary nucleation beyond the PPCs produced small AuNPs that were subsequently consumed through Ostwald ripening during the aging of the AuNHs. This work exemplifies the fabrication of novel gold nanostructures and stable bio-Au nanocomposites with excellent optical properties by combining microorganisms and a surfactant.Closely packed, size-controllable and stable Au nanohorns (AuNHs) that are difficult to synthesize through pure chemical reduction are facilely synthesized using a microorganism-mediated method in the presence of hexadecyltrimethylammonium chloride (CTAC). The results showed that the size of the as-synthesized AuNHs could be tuned by adjusting the dosage of the Pichia pastoris cells (PPCs). The initial concentrations of CTAC, ascorbic acid

  15. Reduction of Salmonella on chicken meat and chicken skin by combined or sequential application of lytic bacteriophage with chemical antimicrobials.

    PubMed

    Sukumaran, Anuraj T; Nannapaneni, Rama; Kiess, Aaron; Sharma, Chander Shekhar

    2015-08-17

    The effectiveness of recently approved Salmonella lytic bacteriophage preparation (SalmoFresh™) in reducing Salmonella in vitro and on chicken breast fillets was examined in combination with lauric arginate (LAE) or cetylpyridinium chloride (CPC). In another experiment, a sequential spray application of this bacteriophage (phage) solution on Salmonella inoculated chicken skin after a 20s dip in chemical antimicrobials (LAE, CPC, peracetic acid, or chlorine) was also examined in reducing Salmonella counts on chicken skin. The application of phage in combination with CPC or LAE reduced S. Typhimurium, S. Heidelberg, and S. Enteritidis up to 5 log units in vitro at 4 °C. On chicken breast fillets, phage in combination with CPC or LAE resulted in significant (p<0.05) reductions of Salmonella ranging from 0.5 to 1.3 log CFU/g as compared to control up to 7 days of refrigerated storage. When phage was applied sequentially with chemical antimicrobials, all the treatments resulted in significant reductions of Salmonella. The application of chlorine (30 ppm) and PAA (400 ppm) followed by phage spray (10(9)PFU/ml) resulted in highest Salmonella reductions of 1.6-1.7 and 2.2-2.5l og CFU/cm(2), respectively. In conclusion, the surface applications of phage in combination with LAE or CPC significantly reduced Salmonella counts on chicken breast fillets. However, higher reductions in Salmonella counts were achieved on chicken skin by the sequential application of chemical antimicrobials followed by phage spray. The sequential application of chlorine, PAA, and phage can provide additional hurdles to reduce Salmonella on fresh poultry carcasses or cut up parts. PMID:25950852

  16. Selective production of chemicals from biomass pyrolysis over metal chlorides supported on zeolite.

    PubMed

    Leng, Shuai; Wang, Xinde; Cai, Qiuxia; Ma, Fengyun; Liu, Yue'e; Wang, Jianguo

    2013-12-01

    Direct biomass conversion into chemicals remains a great challenge because of the complexity of the compounds; hence, this process has attracted less attention than conversion into fuel. In this study, we propose a simple one-step method for converting bagasse into furfural (FF) and acetic acid (AC). In this method, bagasse pyrolysis over ZnCl2/HZSM-5 achieved a high FF and AC yield (58.10%) and a 1.01 FF/AC ratio, but a very low yield of medium-boiling point components. However, bagasse pyrolysis using HZSM-5 alone or ZnCl2 alone still remained large amounts of medium-boiling point components or high-boiling point components. The synergistic effect of HZSM-5 and ZnCl2, which combines pyrolysis, zeolite cracking, and Lewis acid-selective catalysis results in highly efficient bagasse conversion into FF and AC. Therefore, our study provides a novel, simple method for directly converting biomass into high-yield useful chemical. PMID:24128395

  17. Methyl chloride via oxyhydrochlorination of methane: A building block for chemicals and fuels from natural gas. Environmental assessment

    SciTech Connect

    1996-09-01

    DOE`s natural gas mission, in partnership with its stakeholders, is to undertake and promote activities to maximize the Nation`s ability to supply, transport, and use natural gas to encourage economic growth, enhance energy interests security, and improve the environment. In implementing this mission, DOE has been involved in promoting domestic natural gas as a clean, abundant, and reliable source of energy. In particular, DOE is interested in technologies capable of converting natural gas to other valuable resources, such as transportation fuels, hydrogen, and premium chemicals. The purpose of the proposed action is to further examine the potential of one such technology for natural gas conversion. Over the past five years, DOE`s Pittsburgh Energy Technology Center has supported a research program to determine the feasibility of producing methyl chloride (CH{sub 3}Cl), a key ingredient used in the silicone industry, directly from methane (the primary component of natural gas) via an oxyhydrochlorination (OHC) process. As a result of this research program the OHC process is now ready for further development. The proposed action would advance the OHC natural gas conversion technology to an integrated engineering-scale process at the Dow Corning plant in Carrollton, Kentucky.

  18. The physical and chemical stability of cisplatin (Teva) in concentrate and diluted in sodium chloride 0.9%

    PubMed Central

    Szałek, Edyta; Urjasz, Hanna; Głęboka, Aleksandra; Mierzwa, Emilia; Grześkowiak, Edmund

    2012-01-01

    Aim of the study The subject of study was the stability of cisplatin in concentrate in glass vials and diluted in polyethylene (PE) bags stored at 15–25°C for up to 30 days. Material and methods Original vials of cisplatin injection (1 mg/ml, Teva) were stored at room temperature and subjected to re-piercing after 1, 2, 3, 7, 14, 21, 28 and 30 days following the initial piercing. Cisplatin infusions at nominal concentrations of 0.1 mg/ml were prepared in 0.9% sodium chloride (1000 ml) in PE bags. Chemical stability was measured by means of a stability-indicating high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) assay. Physical stability was assessed by visual inspection in normal light. Results The concentration of cisplatin at each sampling time in the analysed solutions remained within 92.0–100.7% of initial concentration, regardless of the container. No changes in colour or turbidity were observed in any of the vials or prepared solutions. Conclusions Cisplatin, both undiluted in glass containers and diluted with NaCl 0.9% in PE bags, remains stable (< 10% degradation) for at least 30 days at room temperature when protected from light. PMID:23788924

  19. Chemical, physical, and sensory characteristics of mozzarella cheese fortified using protein-chelated iron or ferric chloride.

    PubMed

    Rice, W H; McMahon, D J

    1998-02-01

    Mozzarella cheese containing 25 and 50 mg of iron/kg of cheese was manufactured from milk that had been fortified with casein-chelated iron, whey protein-chelated iron, or FeCl3. Chemical, physical, and sensory characteristics were compared with those of a control cheese. Physical properties were assessed by testing melting, apparent viscosity, and browning of heated cheese. Cheeses were evaluated by trained panelists for the presence of metallic flavors, oxidized flavors, and other undesirable flavors. Addition of 25 mg iron/kg of cheese had no effects on the physical properties of Mozzarella cheese. Apparent viscosity of cheese fortified with 50 mg of iron/kg of cheese tended to be slightly higher than the control cheese, although this difference was not statistically significant at all storage times. Cook color was not affected by iron fortification. No increase in chemical oxidation (measured using thiobarbituric acid assay) was observed between the control and iron-fortified cheeses. Slight but statistically significant increases in metallic flavors, oxidized flavors, and off-flavors in the iron-fortified cheese were observed by the trained sensory panel, but the flavor defects were of very low intensity. For metallic flavors, oxidized flavors, and off-flavors, the control cheese scored 1.5, 1.5, and 1.3, respectively; the iron-fortified cheese scored 2.1, 2.0, and 1.6 based on a nine-point scale (where 1 = not perceptible to 3 = slightly perceptible). Sensory scores for iron-fortified cheese made using casein-chelated iron or whey protein-chelated iron was not significantly different from those of cheese made using ferric chloride. When used on pizza, consumer panels rated the iron-fortified cheeses as comparable with the control cheese. PMID:9532487

  20. Model reduction for stochastic chemical systems with abundant species.

    PubMed

    Smith, Stephen; Cianci, Claudia; Grima, Ramon

    2015-12-01

    Biochemical processes typically involve many chemical species, some in abundance and some in low molecule numbers. We first identify the rate constant limits under which the concentrations of a given set of species will tend to infinity (the abundant species) while the concentrations of all other species remains constant (the non-abundant species). Subsequently, we prove that, in this limit, the fluctuations in the molecule numbers of non-abundant species are accurately described by a hybrid stochastic description consisting of a chemical master equation coupled to deterministic rate equations. This is a reduced description when compared to the conventional chemical master equation which describes the fluctuations in both abundant and non-abundant species. We show that the reduced master equation can be solved exactly for a number of biochemical networks involving gene expression and enzyme catalysis, whose conventional chemical master equation description is analytically impenetrable. We use the linear noise approximation to obtain approximate expressions for the difference between the variance of fluctuations in the non-abundant species as predicted by the hybrid approach and by the conventional chemical master equation. Furthermore, we show that surprisingly, irrespective of any separation in the mean molecule numbers of various species, the conventional and hybrid master equations exactly agree for a class of chemical systems. PMID:26646867

  1. Model reduction for stochastic chemical systems with abundant species

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Stephen; Cianci, Claudia; Grima, Ramon

    2015-12-01

    Biochemical processes typically involve many chemical species, some in abundance and some in low molecule numbers. We first identify the rate constant limits under which the concentrations of a given set of species will tend to infinity (the abundant species) while the concentrations of all other species remains constant (the non-abundant species). Subsequently, we prove that, in this limit, the fluctuations in the molecule numbers of non-abundant species are accurately described by a hybrid stochastic description consisting of a chemical master equation coupled to deterministic rate equations. This is a reduced description when compared to the conventional chemical master equation which describes the fluctuations in both abundant and non-abundant species. We show that the reduced master equation can be solved exactly for a number of biochemical networks involving gene expression and enzyme catalysis, whose conventional chemical master equation description is analytically impenetrable. We use the linear noise approximation to obtain approximate expressions for the difference between the variance of fluctuations in the non-abundant species as predicted by the hybrid approach and by the conventional chemical master equation. Furthermore, we show that surprisingly, irrespective of any separation in the mean molecule numbers of various species, the conventional and hybrid master equations exactly agree for a class of chemical systems.

  2. Model reduction for stochastic chemical systems with abundant species

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, Stephen; Cianci, Claudia; Grima, Ramon

    2015-12-07

    Biochemical processes typically involve many chemical species, some in abundance and some in low molecule numbers. We first identify the rate constant limits under which the concentrations of a given set of species will tend to infinity (the abundant species) while the concentrations of all other species remains constant (the non-abundant species). Subsequently, we prove that, in this limit, the fluctuations in the molecule numbers of non-abundant species are accurately described by a hybrid stochastic description consisting of a chemical master equation coupled to deterministic rate equations. This is a reduced description when compared to the conventional chemical master equation which describes the fluctuations in both abundant and non-abundant species. We show that the reduced master equation can be solved exactly for a number of biochemical networks involving gene expression and enzyme catalysis, whose conventional chemical master equation description is analytically impenetrable. We use the linear noise approximation to obtain approximate expressions for the difference between the variance of fluctuations in the non-abundant species as predicted by the hybrid approach and by the conventional chemical master equation. Furthermore, we show that surprisingly, irrespective of any separation in the mean molecule numbers of various species, the conventional and hybrid master equations exactly agree for a class of chemical systems.

  3. Fe-57 Moessbauer Spectroscopy of Fulgurites: Implications for Chemical Reduction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sheffer, A. A.; Dyar, M. D.

    2004-01-01

    The high temperature (superliquidus) processing of silicates often results in very reduced products, such as Si-bearing Fe metal in type-1 chondrules and in lunar regolith agglutinates. Previous work on fulgurites (the glassy products of the lightning strike fusion of sand, soil, or rock) found silicon metal and iron-silicon alloys inside the silicate glass. The mechanism for this extreme reduction is not yet understood. In this work, we begin a Fe-57 Moessbauer spectroscopy study as well as continuing a microprobe study of several fulgurites in order to better constrain the extent and process of Fe reduction.

  4. Method for Derivatization and Detection of Chemical Weapons Convention Related Sulfur Chlorides via Electrophilic Addition with 3-Hexyne.

    PubMed

    Goud, D Raghavender; Pardasani, Deepak; Purohit, Ajay Kumar; Tak, Vijay; Dubey, Devendra Kumar

    2015-07-01

    Sulfur monochloride (S2Cl2) and sulfur dichloride (SCl2) are important precursors of the extremely toxic chemical warfare agent sulfur mustard and classified, respectively, into schedule 3.B.12 and 3.B.13 of the Chemical Weapons Convention (CWC). Hence, their detection and identification is of vital importance for verification of CWC. These chemicals are difficult to detect directly using chromatographic techniques as they decompose and do not elute. Until now, the use of gas chromatographic approaches to follow the derivatized sulfur chlorides is not reported in the literature. The electrophilic addition reaction of sulfur monochloride and sulfur dichloride toward 3-hexyne was explored for the development of a novel derivatization protocol, and the products were subjected to gas chromatography-mass spectrometric (GC-MS) analysis. Among various unsaturated reagents like alkenes and alkynes, symmetrical alkyne 3-hexyne was optimized to be the suitable derivatizing agent for these analytes. Acetonitrile was found to be the suitable solvent for the derivatization reaction. The sample preparation protocol for the identification of these analytes from hexane spiked with petrol matrix was also optimized. Liquid-liquid extraction followed by derivatization was employed for the identification of these analytes from petrol matrix. Under the established conditions, the detection and quantification limits are 2.6 μg/mL, 8.6 μg/mL for S2Cl2 and 2.3 μg/mL, 7.7 μg/mL for SCl2, respectively, in selected ion monitoring (SIM) mode. The calibration curve had a linear relationship with y = 0.022x - 0.331 and r(2) = 0.992 for the working range of 10 to 500 μg/mL for S2Cl2 and y = 0.007x - 0.064 and r(2) = 0.991 for the working range of 10 to 100 μg/mL for SCl2, respectively. The intraday RSDs were between 4.80 to 6.41%, 2.73 to 6.44% and interday RSDs were between 2.20 to 7.25% and 2.34 to 5.95% for S2Cl2 and SCl2, respectively. PMID:26054007

  5. A POLLUTION REDUCTION METHODOLOGY FOR CHEMICAL PROCESS SIMULATORS

    EPA Science Inventory

    A pollution minimization methodology was developed for chemical process design using computer simulation. It is based on a pollution balance that at steady state is used to define a pollution index with units of mass of pollution per mass of products. The pollution balance has be...

  6. Tool for the Reduction and Assessment of Chemical and other Environmental Impacts

    EPA Science Inventory

    TRACI, the Tool for the Reduction and Assessment of Chemical and other environmental Impacts, has been developed by the US Environmental Protection Agency’s National Risk Management Research Laboratory to facilitate the characterization of stressors that have potential effects, ...

  7. GREENER CHEMICAL PROCESS DESIGN ALTERNATIVES ARE REVEALED USING THE WASTE REDUCTION DECISION SUPPORT SYSTEM (WAR DSS)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Waste Reduction Decision Support System (WAR DSS) is a Java-based software product providing comprehensive modeling of potential adverse environmental impacts (PEI) predicted to result from newly designed or redesigned chemical manufacturing processes. The purpose of this so...

  8. TRACI - THE TOOL FOR THE REDUCTION AND ASSESSMENT OF CHEMICAL AND OTHER ENVIRONMENTAL IMPACTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    TRACI, The Tool for the Reduction and Assessment of Chemical and other environmental Impacts, is described along with its history, the underlying research, methodologies, and insights within individual impact categories. TRACI facilitates the characterization of stressors that ma...

  9. Effect of alkali and alkaline-earth chloride addition on electrolytic reduction of UO 2 in LiCl salt bath

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakamura, Yoshiharu

    2011-05-01

    The electrolytic reduction process of actinide oxides in a LiCl salt bath at 923 K has been developed for nuclear fuel reprocessing. Since some salt-soluble fission products, such as Cs, Sr and Ba, accumulate in the LiCl salt bath, their effect on UO 2 reduction was investigated. In the experiments, UO 2 specimens were reduced by potential- or current-controlled electrolysis in various LiCl salt baths containing up to 30 mol% of KCl, CsCl, SrCl 2 or BaCl 2. The rate of UO 2 reduction in a LiCl salt bath was considerably decreased by the addition of alkali metal chlorides (KCl and CsCl) and slightly decreased by BaCl 2 addition. SrCl 2 addition had no appreciable effect. It was suggested that the diffusion of O 2- ions from the inside of UO 2 specimens to the bulk salt determined the reduction rate during the electrolysis and that the effect of salt composition was related to the solubility of O 2- ions in the salt bath.

  10. Analysis and reduction of chemical models under uncertainty.

    SciTech Connect

    Oxberry, Geoff; Debusschere, Bert J.; Najm, Habib N.

    2008-08-01

    While models of combustion processes have been successful in developing engines with improved fuel economy, more costly simulations are required to accurately model pollution chemistry. These simulations will also involve significant parametric uncertainties. Computational singular perturbation (CSP) and polynomial chaos-uncertainty quantification (PC-UQ) can be used to mitigate the additional computational cost of modeling combustion with uncertain parameters. PC-UQ was used to interrogate and analyze the Davis-Skodje model, where the deterministic parameter in the model was replaced with an uncertain parameter. In addition, PC-UQ was combined with CSP to explore how model reduction could be combined with uncertainty quantification to understand how reduced models are affected by parametric uncertainty.

  11. Reduction of percutaneous absorption of toxic chemicals by dendrimers.

    PubMed

    Moghimi, Hamid R; Varshochian, Reyhaneh; Kobarfard, Farzad; Erfan, Mohammad

    2010-03-01

    Polyamidoamine (PAMAM) dendrimer, a reactive nanoparticle, was investigated as a potential protectant against percutaneous absorption of chemicals. Permeation of furfural (model toxicant) through rat skin from a 1-mg/mL solution was studied in the absence and presence of PAMAM dendrimer, which was applied either as 1, 4, and 6 mg/mL in furfural solution (cotreatment) or 2.2 mg/cm(2) deposited on skin surface before furfural application (pretreatment). Furfural flux, about 70 microg/cm(2)/h in untreated samples, was decreased by PAMAM dendrimer in a concentration-dependent manner up to 12 times with the cotreatment methods and 2.3 times with the pretreatment method, indicating PAMAM's protective ability against cutaneous toxicants. PMID:19995245

  12. Reduction of Microbial and Chemical Contaminants in Water Using POU/POE & Mobile Treatment Technologies

    EPA Science Inventory

    POU/POE may be a cost-effective option for reductions of a particular chemical to achieve water quality compliance under certain situations and given restrictions. Proactive consumers seeking to reduce exposure to potential pathogens, trace chemicals, and nanoparticles not curre...

  13. In-Situ Chemical Reduction and Oxidation of VOCs in Groundwater: Groundwater Treatability Studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Keith, Amy; Glasgow, Jason; McCaleh, Rececca C. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    This paper presents NASA Marshall Space Flight Center's treatability studies for volatile organic compounds in groundwater. In-Situ groundwater treatment technologies include: 1) Chemical Reduction(Ferox); 2) Chemical Oxidation (Fenton Reagents, Permanganate, and Persulfate); and 3) Thermal (Dynamic Underground Stripping, Six-Phase Heating). This paper is presented in viewgraph form.

  14. Effect of chlorine, sodium chloride, trisodium phosphate, and ultraviolet radiation on the reduction of Yersinia enterocolitica and mesophilic aerobic bacteria from eggshell surface.

    PubMed

    Favier, G L; Escudero, M E; de Guzman, A M

    2001-10-01

    Eggshell sanitizing practices are necessary to improve microbiological safety of fresh hen eggs and their products. In this work, the effects of 100 mg/liter free chlorine (chl), 3% sodium chloride (NaCl), 1, 5, and 12% trisodium phosphate (TSP) in wash solutions, and UVR (ultraviolet radiation; 4.573 microW/cm2) were studied at different times on uninoculated and Yersinia enterocolitica-inoculated eggs. On uninoculated eggs, the best results were obtained with 100 mg/liter chlorine and UV exposure for >25 min, with reductions of 1.28 and 1.60 log cycles, respectively, compared to the average bacterial count (4.55 log CFU/egg) on the control (untreated eggs). On Y. enterocolitica-inoculated eggs, highest reductions of the average bacterial count (7.35 log CFU/egg) were obtained with 5 and 12% TSP and 100 mg/liter chl. The decrease obtained with 12% TSP (3.74-log reduction) was significantly higher (P < 0.05) than those obtained with the remaining treatments. Y. enterocolitica was more resistant to UVR than the eggshell natural mesophilic aerobic microflora, except when low inoculum (4.39 log CFU/egg) was assayed. Changes in eggshell microstructure were measured by the blue lake staining method. The presence of Yersinia and Salmonella in eggshell natural flora was also investigated. PMID:11601717

  15. In Situ Chemical Reduction of Aquifer Sediments: Enhancement of Reactive Iron Phases and TCE Dechlorination

    SciTech Connect

    Szecsody, Jim E.; Fruchter, Jonathan S.; Williams, Mark D.; Vermeul, Vince R.; Sklarew, Debbie S.

    2004-07-29

    In situ chemical reduction of aquifer sediments is currently being used for chromate and TCE remediation by forming a permeable reactive barrier. The chemical and physical processes that occur during abiotic reduction of natural sediments by sodium dithionite were investigated. In different aquifer sediments, 15 to 25% of Fe{sup III} -oxides were dissolved/reduced, which produces primarily adsorbed Fe{sup II}, and some siderite. The sediment reduction rate ({approx} 5h) was the chemically controlled (58 kJ/mole) reduction of a minor phase (<20%). It was necessary to maintain neutral to high pH to maintain reduction efficiency and prevent iron mobilization, as reduction generated H{sup +}. Sequential extractions on reduced sediment showed that adsorbed ferrous iron and iron oxides on the clay size fraction controlled TCE reactivity, and not structural ferrous iron in clay. The mass and rate of field-scale reduction of aquifer sediments were generally predicted with laboratory data using a single reduction reaction.

  16. Roles of Cationic and Elemental Calcium in the Electro-Reduction of Solid Metal Oxides in Molten Calcium Chloride

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qiu, Guohong; Jiang, Kai; Ma, Meng; Wang, Dihua; Jin, Xianbo; Chen, George Z.

    2007-06-01

    Previous work, mainly from this research group, is re-visited on electrochemical reduction of solid metal oxides, in the form of compacted powder, in molten CaCl2, aiming at further understanding of the roles of cationic and elemental calcium. The discussion focuses on six aspects: 1.) debate on two mechanisms proposed in the literature, i. e. electro-metallothermic reduction and electro-reduction (or electro-deoxidation), for the electrolytic removal of oxygen from solid metals or metal oxides in molten CaCl2; 2.) novel metallic cavity working electrodes for electrochemical investigations of compacted metal oxide powders in high temperature molten salts assisted by a quartz sealed Ag/AgCl reference electrode (650 ºC- 950 ºC); 3.) influence of elemental calcium on the background current observed during electrolysis of solid metal oxides in molten CaCl2; 4.) electrochemical insertion/ inclusion of cationic calcium into solid metal oxides; 5.) typical features of cyclic voltammetry and chronoamperometry (potentiostatic electrolysis) of metal oxide powders in molten CaCl2; and 6.) some kinetic considerations on the electrolytic removal of oxygen.

  17. On the preparation of TiAl alloy by direct reduction of the oxide mixtures in calcium chloride melt

    SciTech Connect

    Prabhat K. Tripathy; Derek J. Fray

    2011-11-01

    electrode in a pool of molten calcium chloride at a temperature of 9000C. The dominant mechanism of the oxygen removal was the ionization of oxygen followed by its subsequent discharge, as CO2/CO, at the anode surface. The removal of oxygen from the oxide mixture helped form the alloy in situ. The presentation shall cover the detailed experimental results pertaining to the preparation, evaluation and characterization of Ti-47Al-2Nb-2Cr (atom%) alloy.

  18. Automated determination of nitrate plus nitrite in aqueous samples with flow injection analysis using vanadium (III) chloride as reductant.

    PubMed

    Wang, Shu; Lin, Kunning; Chen, Nengwang; Yuan, Dongxing; Ma, Jian

    2016-01-01

    Determination of nitrate in aqueous samples is an important analytical objective for environmental monitoring and assessment. Here we report the first automatic flow injection analysis (FIA) of nitrate (plus nitrite) using VCl3 as reductant instead of the well-known but toxic cadmium column for reducing nitrate to nitrite. The reduced nitrate plus the nitrite originally present in the sample react with the Griess reagent (sulfanilamide and N-1-naphthylethylenediamine dihydrochloride) under acidic condition. The resulting pink azo dye can be detected at 540 nm. The Griess reagent and VCl3 are used as a single mixed reagent solution to simplify the system. The various parameters of the FIA procedure including reagent composition, temperature, volume of the injection loop, and flow rate were carefully investigated and optimized via univariate experimental design. Under the optimized conditions, the linear range and detection limit of this method are 0-100 µM (R(2)=0.9995) and 0.1 µM, respectively. The targeted analytical range can be easily extended to higher concentrations by selecting alternative detection wavelengths or increasing flow rate. The FIA system provides a sample throughput of 20 h(-1), which is much higher than that of previously reported manual methods based on the same chemistry. National reference solutions and different kinds of aqueous samples were analyzed with our method as well as the cadmium column reduction method. The results from our method agree well with both the certified value and the results from the cadmium column reduction method (no significant difference with P=0.95). The spiked recovery varies from 89% to 108% for samples with different matrices, showing insignificant matrix interference in this method. PMID:26695325

  19. Recovery of Cu(II) by chemical reduction using sodium dithionite.

    PubMed

    Chou, Yi-Hsuan; Yu, Jui-Hsuan; Liang, Yang-Min; Wang, Pin-Jan; Li, Chi-Wang; Chen, Shiao-Shing

    2015-12-01

    Wastewaters containing Cu(II) along with ligands are ubiquitous in various industrial sectors. Efficacy of treatment processes for copper removal, especially precipitation, is greatly debilitated by ligands. Chemical reduction being commonly employed for production of metal nanoparticles has also been used for removing copper. Addition of ammonia was reported to be essential for improving copper reduction efficiency by increasing copper solubility at alkaline pH values. In this study, chemical reduction was employed to treat ligand-containing wastewater, exploiting the fact that ligands and metals are coexisted in many wastewaters. Result shows that copper ions were removed by either reduction or precipitation mechanisms depending on pH, type of ligands, and mixing condition. Complete copper reduction/removal was achieved under optimal condition. The lowest removal efficiency observed at pH 9.0 for ammonia system is due to formation of nano-sized particles, which are readily to pass through 0.45μm filter used for sample pretreatment before copper analysis. Instead of producing metallic copper, cuprous and copper oxide are identified in the samples collected from ammonia system and EDTA system, respectively. Re-oxidation of metallic copper particles by atmospheric oxygen during sample handling or incomplete reduction of Cu(II) ions during reduction process might be the cause. Finally, reduction process was applied to treat real wastewater, achieving complete removal of copper but only 10% of nickel. PMID:26210323

  20. Photochemical reduction of CO{sub 2} to fuels and chemicals

    SciTech Connect

    DuBois, D.; Eisenberg, R.; Fujita, E.

    1996-09-01

    Photochemical reduction of CO{sub 2} represents a potentially useful approach to developing a sustainable source of carbon-based chemicals, fuels, and materials. In this report the present status of photochemical CO{sub 2} reduction is assessed, areas that need to be better understood for advancement are identified, and approaches to overcoming barriers are suggested. Because of the interdisciplinary nature of this field, assessments of three closely interrelated areas are given including integrated photochemical systems for catalytic CO{sub 2} reduction, thermal catalytic CO{sub 2} reactions, and electrochemical CO{sub 2} reduction. The report concludes with a summary and assessment of potential impacts of this area on chemical and energy technologies.

  1. Partitioning of mercury, arsenic, selenium, boron, and chloride in a full-scale coal combustion process equipped with selective catalytic reduction, electrostatic precipitation, and flue gas desulfurization systems

    SciTech Connect

    Chin-Min Cheng; Pauline Hack; Paul Chu; Yung-Nan Chang; Ting-Yu Lin; Chih-Sheng Ko; Po-Han Chiang; Cheng-Chun He; Yuan-Min Lai; Wei-Ping Pan

    2009-09-15

    A full-scale field study was carried out at a 795 MWe coal-fired power plant equipped with selective catalytic reduction (SCR), an electrostatic precipitator (ESP), and wet flue gas desulfurization (FGD) systems to investigate the distribution of selected trace elements (i.e., mercury, arsenic, selenium, boron, and chloride) from coal, FGD reagent slurry, makeup water to flue gas, solid byproduct, and wastewater streams. Flue gases were collected from the SCR outlet, ESP inlet, FGD inlet, and stack. Concurrent with flue gas sampling, coal, bottom ash, economizer ash, and samples from the FGD process were also collected for elemental analysis. By combining plant operation parameters, the overall material balances of selected elements were established. The removal efficiencies of As, Se, Hg, and B by the ESP unit were 88, 56, 17, and 8%, respectively. Only about 2.5% of Cl was condensed and removed from flue gas by fly ash. The FGD process removed over 90% of Cl, 77% of B, 76% of Hg, 30% of Se, and 5% of As. About 90% and 99% of the FGD-removed Hg and Se were associated with gypsum. For B and Cl, over 99% were discharged from the coal combustion process with the wastewater. Mineral trona (trisodium hydrogendicarbonate dehydrate, Na{sub 3}H(CO{sub 3}){sub 2}.2H{sub 2}O) was injected before the ESP unit to control the emission of sulfur trioxide (SO{sub 3}). By comparing the trace elements compositions in the fly ash samples collected from the locations before and after the trona injection, the injection of trona did not show an observable effect on the partitioning behaviors of selenium and arsenic, but it significantly increased the adsorption of mercury onto fly ash. The stack emissions of mercury, boron, selenium, and chloride were for the most part in the gas phase. 47 refs., 3 figs., 11 tabs.

  2. Reduction study of oxidized two-dimensional graphene-based materials by chemical and thermal reduction methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Douglas, Amber M.

    Graphene is a two-dimensional (2D) sp2-hybridized carbon-based material possessing properties which include high electrical conductivity, ballistic thermal conductivity, tensile strength exceeding that of steel, high flexural strength, optical transparency, and the ability to adsorb and desorb atoms and molecules. Due to the characteristics of said material, graphene is a candidate for applications in integrated circuits, electrochromic devices, transparent conducting electrodes, desalination, solar cells, thermal management materials, polymer nanocomposites, and biosensors. Despite the above mentioned properties and possible applications, very few technologies have been commercialized utilizing graphene due to the high cost associated with the production of graphene. Therefore, a great deal of effort and research has been performed to produce a material that provides similar properties, reduced graphene oxide due (RGO) to the ease of commercial scaling of the production processes. This material is typically prepared through the oxidation of graphite in an aqueous media to graphene oxide (GO) followed by reduction to yield RGO. Although this material has been extensively studied, there is a lack of consistency in the scientific community regarding the analysis of the resulting RGO material. In this dissertation, a study of the reduction methods for GO and an alternate 2D carbon-based material, humic acid (HA), followed by analysis of the materials using Raman spectroscopy and Energy Dispersive X-ray Spectroscopy (EDS). Means of reduction will include chemical and thermal methods. Characterization of the material has been carried out on both before and after reduction.

  3. Catalytic destruction of perchlorate in ferric chloride and hydrochloric acid solution with control of temperature, pressure and chemical reagents

    DOEpatents

    Gu, Baohua; Cole, David R.; Brown, Gilbert M.

    2004-10-05

    A method is described to decompose perchlorate in a FeCl.sub.3 /HCl aqueous solution such as would be used to regenerate an anion exchange resin used to remove perchlorate. The solution is mixed with a reducing agent, preferably an organic alcohol and/or ferrous chloride, and can be heated to accelerate the decomposition of perchlorate. Lower temperatures may be employed if a catalyst is added.

  4. Chloride flux in phagocytes.

    PubMed

    Wang, Guoshun

    2016-09-01

    Phagocytes, such as neutrophils and macrophages, engulf microbes into phagosomes and launch chemical attacks to kill and degrade them. Such a critical innate immune function necessitates ion participation. Chloride, the most abundant anion in the human body, is an indispensable constituent of the myeloperoxidase (MPO)-H2 O2 -halide system that produces the potent microbicide hypochlorous acid (HOCl). It also serves as a balancing ion to set membrane potentials, optimize cytosolic and phagosomal pH, and regulate phagosomal enzymatic activities. Deficient supply of this anion to or defective attainment of this anion by phagocytes is linked to innate immune defects. However, how phagocytes acquire chloride from their residing environment especially when they are deployed to epithelium-lined lumens, and how chloride is intracellularly transported to phagosomes remain largely unknown. This review article will provide an overview of chloride protein carriers, potential mechanisms for phagocytic chloride preservation and acquisition, intracellular chloride supply to phagosomes for oxidant production, and methods to measure chloride levels in phagocytes and their phagosomes. PMID:27558337

  5. Evaluation of microbial reduction of Fe(III)EDTA in a chemical absorption-biological reduction integrated NOx removal system.

    PubMed

    Li, Wei; Wu, Cheng-Zhi; Zhang, Shi-Han; Shao, Ke; Shi, Yao

    2007-01-15

    A chemical absorption-biological reduction integrated process can be used to remove nitrogen oxides (NOx) from flue gas. In such a process, nitric oxide (NO) can be effectively absorbed by the ferrous chelate of ethylenediaminetetraacetate (Fe(II)EDTA) to form Fe(II)EDTA-NO, which can be biologically regenerated by denitrifying bacteria. However, in the course of these processes, part of the Fe(II)EDTA is also oxidized to Fe(III)EDTA. The reduction of Fe(III)EDTA to Fe(II)EDTA depends on the activity of iron-reducing bacteria in the system. Therefore, the effectiveness of the system relies on how to effectively bioreduce Fe(III)EDTA and Fe(II)EDTA-NO in the system. In this paper, a strain identified as Escherichia coli FR-2 (iron-reducing bacterium) was used to investigate the reduction rate of Fe(III)EDTA. The experimental results indicate that Fe(III)EDTA-NO and Fe(II)EDTA in the system can inhibit both the FR-2 cell growth and thus affect the Fe(III)EDTA reduction. The FR-2 cell growth rate and Fe(III)EDTA reduction rate decreased with increasing Fe(II)EDTA-NO and Fe(II)EDTA concentration in the solution. When the concentration of Fe(II)EDTA-NO reached 3.7 mM, the FR-2 cell growth almost stopped. A mathematical model was developed to explain the cell growth and inhibition kinetics. The predicted results are close to the experimental data and provide a preliminary evaluation of the kinetics of the biologically mediated reactions necessary to regenerate the spent scrubber solution. PMID:17310734

  6. Biological and chemical interaction of oxygen on the reduction of Fe(III)EDTA in a chemical absorption-biological reduction integrated NOx removal system.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Shi-Han; Shi, Yao; Li, Wei

    2012-03-01

    A promising chemical absorption-biological reduction integrated process has been proposed. A major problem of the process is oxidation of the active absorbent, ferrous ethylenediaminetetraacetate (Fe(II)EDTA), to the ferric species, leading to a significant decrease in NO removal efficiency. Thus the biological reduction of Fe(III)EDTA is vitally important for the continuous NO removal. Oxygen, an oxidizing agent and biological inhibitor, is typically present in the flue gas. It can significantly retard the application of the integrated process. This study investigated the influence mechanism of oxygen on the regeneration of Fe(II)EDTA in order to provide insight on how to eliminate or decrease the oxygen influence. The experimental results revealed that the dissolved oxygen and Fe(III)EDTA simultaneously served as electron acceptor for the microorganism. The Fe(III)EDTA reduction activity were directly inhibited by the dissolved oxygen. When the bioreactor was supplied with 3% and 8% oxygen in the gas phase, the concentration of initial dissolved oxygen in the liquid phase was 0.28 and 0.68 mg l(-1). Correspondingly, the instinct Fe(III)EDTA reduction activity of the microorganism determined under anoxic condition in a rotation shaker decreased from 1.09 to 0.84 and 0.49 mM h(-1). The oxidation of Fe(II)EDTA with dissolved oxygen prevented more dissolved oxygen access to the microorganism and eased the inhibition of dissolved oxygen on the microorganisms. PMID:21931973

  7. A MIXED CHEMICAL REDUCTANT FOR TREATING HEXAVALENT CHROMIUM IN A CHROMITE ORE PROCESSING SOLID WASTE

    EPA Science Inventory

    We evaluated a method for delivering ferrous iron into the subsurface to enhance chemical reduction of Cr(VI) in a chromite ore processing solid waste (COPSW). The COPSW is characterized by high pH (8.5 -11.5), high Cr(VI) concentrations in the solid phase (up to 550 mg kg-1) and...

  8. ECO LOGIC INTERNATIONAL GAS-PHASE CHEMICAL REDUCTION PROCESS - THE THERMAL DESORPTION UNIT - APPLICATIONS ANALYSIS REPORT

    EPA Science Inventory

    ELI ECO Logic International, Inc.'s Thermal Desorption Unit (TDU) is specifically designed for use with Eco Logic's Gas Phase Chemical Reduction Process. The technology uses an externally heated bath of molten tin in a hydrogen atmosphere to desorb hazardous organic compounds fro...

  9. APPLICATIONS ANALYSIS REPORT: ECO LOGIC INTERNATIONAL GAS-PHASE CHEMICAL REDUCTION PROCESS - THE REACTOR SYSTEM

    EPA Science Inventory

    This report details the Superfund Innovative Technology Evaluation of Eco Logic International's gas-phase chemical reduction process, with an emphasis on their Reactor System. he Eco Logic process employees a high temperature reactor filled with hydrogen gas as the means to destr...

  10. Chloride Test

    MedlinePlus

    ... Addison disease, or increased salt intake. If both chloride and sodium levels are high in a person on a ... anything else I should know? Drugs that affect sodium blood levels will also cause changes in chloride. In addition, swallowing large amounts of baking soda ...

  11. Characterization of an H{sub 2}-utilizing enrichment culture that reductivity dechlorinates tetrachloroethene to vinyl chloride and ethene in the absence of methanogenesis and acetogenesis

    SciTech Connect

    Maymo-Gatell, X.; Tandoi, V.; Zinder, S.H.

    1995-11-01

    We have been studying an anaerobic enrichment culture which, by using methanol as an electron donor, dechlorinates tetrachloroethene (PCE) to vinyl chloride and ethene. Our previous results indicated that H{sub 2} was the direct electron donor for reductive dechlorination of PCE by the methanol-PCE culture. Most-probable-number counts performed on this culture indicated low numbers ({le}10{sup 4}/ml) of sulfidogens, methanol-utilizing acetogens, fermentative heterotrophs, and PCE dechlorinators using H{sub 2}{center_dot}-PCE culture used PCE at increasing rates over time when transferred to fresh medium and could be transferred indefinitely with H{sub 2} as the electron donor-acceptor pair for energy conservation growth. Sustained PCE dechlorination by this culture was supported by supplementation with 0.05 mg of vitamin B{sub 12} per liter, 25% (vol/vol) anaerobic digestor sludge supernatant,and 2 mM acetate, which presumably served as a carbon source. Neither methanol nor acetate could serve as an electron donor for dechlorination by the H{sub 2}-PCE culture, and it did not produce CH{sub 4} or acetate from H{sub 2}-CO{sub 2} or methanol, indicating the absense of methanogenic and acetogenic bacteria. Microscopic observations of the purified H{sub 2}-PCE culture showed only two major morphotypes: irregular cocci and small rods. 31 refs., 6 figs., 2 tabs.

  12. Degradation of vinyl chloride (VC) by the sulfite/UV advanced reduction process (ARP): effects of process variables and a kinetic model.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xu; Yoon, Sunhee; Batchelor, Bill; Abdel-Wahab, Ahmed

    2013-06-01

    Vinyl chloride (VC) poses a threat to humans and environment due to its toxicity and carcinogenicity. In this study, an advanced reduction process (ARP) that combines sulfite with UV light was developed to destroy VC. The degradation of VC followed pseudo-first-order decay kinetics and the effects of several experimental factors on the degradation rate constant were investigated. The largest rate constant was observed at pH9, but complete dechlorination was obtained at pH11. Higher sulfite dose and light intensity were found to increase the rate constant linearly. The rate constant had a little drop when the initial VC concentration was below 1.5mg/L and then was approximately constant between 1.5mg/L and 3.1mg/L. A degradation mechanism was proposed to describe reactions between VC and the reactive species that were produced by the photolysis of sulfite. A kinetic model that described major reactions in the system was developed and was able to explain the dependence of the rate constant on the experimental factors examined. This study may provide a new treatment technology for the removal of a variety of halogenated contaminants. PMID:23570912

  13. Preparation of Copper Telluride Films by Co-Reduction of Cu(I) and Te(IV) Ions in Choline Chloride: Ethylene Glycol Ionic Liquid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Golgovici, Florentina; Catrangiu, Adriana-Simona; Stoian, Andrei Bogdan; Anicai, Liana; Visan, Teodor

    2016-07-01

    Cathodic processes of direct co-reduction of Cu+ and Te4+ ions on Pt electrode at 60°C were investigated using cyclic voltammetry and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy techniques. The ionic liquid as background electrolyte consisted of a mixture of choline chloride and ethylene glycol (ChCl-EG 1:2 mol ratio) in which 5-20 mM CuCl and 8 mM TeO2 were dissolved. The voltammograms exhibited the following successive cathodic processes: Cu2+/Cu+ reduction, Te underpotential deposition, simultaneous deposition of Cu metal and CuTe compound, and deposition of Te-rich CuTe compound at the most negative potentials (from -0.5 V to -0.8 V). Corresponding dissolution or oxidation peaks were recorded on the anodic branch. The voltammetric results were confirmed by electrochemical impedance spectra. Copper telluride films have been synthesized on platinum substrate via potentiostatic electrodeposition at 60°C. It was found from atomic force microscopy that CuTe film samples prepared from ChCl-EG + 5 mM CuCl + 8 mM TeO2 ionic liquid have high growth rates. The x-ray diffraction patterns of the deposited films from ChCl-EG + 10 mM CuCl + 8 mM TeO2 ionic liquid indicated the presence of a Cu2Te phase for film deposited at -0.7 V and a Cu0.656Te0.344 phase for film deposited at -0.6 V.

  14. Predictive model for the reduction of heat resistance of Listeria monocytogenes in ground beef by the combined effect of sodium chloride and apple polyphenols.

    PubMed

    Juneja, Vijay K; Altuntaş, Evrim Güneş; Ayhan, Kamuran; Hwang, Cheng-An; Sheen, Shiowshuh; Friedman, Mendel

    2013-06-01

    We investigated the combined effect of three internal temperatures (57.5, 60, and 62.5°C) and different concentrations (0 to 3.0 wt/wt.%) of sodium chloride (NaCl) and apple polyphenols (APP), individually and in combination, on the heat-resistance of a five-strain cocktail of Listeria monocytogenes in ground beef. A complete factorial design (3×4×4) was used to assess the effects and interactions of heating temperature, NaCl, and APP. All 48 combinations were tested twice, to yield 96 survival curves. Mathematical models were then used to quantitate the combined effect of these parameters on heat resistance of the pathogen. The theoretical analysis shows that compared with heat alone, the addition of NaCl enhanced and that of APP reduced the heat resistance of L. monocytogenes measured as D-values. By contrast, the protective effect of NaCl against thermal inactivation of the pathogen was reduced when both additives were present in combination, as evidenced by reduction of up to ~68% in D-values at 57.5°C; 65% at 60°C; and 25% at 62.5°C. The observed high antimicrobial activity of the combination of APP and low salt levels (e.g., 2.5% APP and 0.5% salt) suggests that commercial and home processors of meat could reduce the salt concentration by adding APP to the ground meat. The influence of the combined effect allows a reduction of the temperature of heat treatments as well as the salt content of the meat. Meat processors can use the predictive model to design processing times and temperatures that can protect against adverse effects of contaminated meat products. Additional benefits include reduced energy use in cooking, and the addition of antioxidative apple polyphenols may provide beneficial health affects to consumers. PMID:23587714

  15. Preparation of Copper Telluride Films by Co-Reduction of Cu(I) and Te(IV) Ions in Choline Chloride: Ethylene Glycol Ionic Liquid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Golgovici, Florentina; Catrangiu, Adriana-Simona; Stoian, Andrei Bogdan; Anicai, Liana; Visan, Teodor

    2016-05-01

    Cathodic processes of direct co-reduction of Cu+ and Te4+ ions on Pt electrode at 60°C were investigated using cyclic voltammetry and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy techniques. The ionic liquid as background electrolyte consisted of a mixture of choline chloride and ethylene glycol (ChCl-EG 1:2 mol ratio) in which 5-20 mM CuCl and 8 mM TeO2 were dissolved. The voltammograms exhibited the following successive cathodic processes: Cu2+/Cu+ reduction, Te underpotential deposition, simultaneous deposition of Cu metal and CuTe compound, and deposition of Te-rich CuTe compound at the most negative potentials (from -0.5 V to -0.8 V). Corresponding dissolution or oxidation peaks were recorded on the anodic branch. The voltammetric results were confirmed by electrochemical impedance spectra. Copper telluride films have been synthesized on platinum substrate via potentiostatic electrodeposition at 60°C. It was found from atomic force microscopy that CuTe film samples prepared from ChCl-EG + 5 mM CuCl + 8 mM TeO2 ionic liquid have high growth rates. The x-ray diffraction patterns of the deposited films from ChCl-EG + 10 mM CuCl + 8 mM TeO2 ionic liquid indicated the presence of a Cu2Te phase for film deposited at -0.7 V and a Cu0.656Te0.344 phase for film deposited at -0.6 V.

  16. Reduction of risk to the marine environment from oilfield chemicals - balancing environmental and technical needs

    SciTech Connect

    O`Neill, J.E.; Hill, D.G.

    1996-12-31

    The study argues that the regulation of offshore use of hazardous chemicals for oilfield stimulation and Completion applications is an important but not a total solution to reduce marine pollution from offshore sources. The aim of the study is to demonstrate that for a complete solution, chemical reformulation must be considered hand-in-band with improved operational practices to provide a maximum effect on overall risk reduction. The study is directed at one major service company`s approach to the whole issue of chemical management in the 1990s, based mainly on North Sea experience in cementing, drilling fluid and stimulation activities. Oilfield chemicals are incorporated into a fluid design to solve a specific technical problem in a well, such as well completion, stimulation and damage removal. While it is desirable to replace all the harmful chemicals, the practicalities of doing so are limited if the industry is to continue to produce efficiently. Other alternatives need consideration. By their very chemistry, some chemicals have primary active ingredients which may be harmful if discharged into the environment. Improving the characteristics of chemicals to marine life requires the change of previously acceptable products, such as the elimination of banned materials as well as incorporating components with reduced toxicity and greater biodegradability. The idealistic goal is the immediate replacement of all chemicals by nontoxic, biodegrade alternatives; the practical solution is replacement reformulation where possible and the improved isolation the oilwell and marine environments through improvements in continuous-mix technology along with reduction of the chemicals by better job design.

  17. Development Of Chemical Reduction And Air Stripping Processes To Remove Mercury From Wastewater

    SciTech Connect

    Jackson, Dennis G.; Looney, Brian B.; Craig, Robert R.; Thompson, Martha C.; Kmetz, Thomas F.

    2013-07-10

    This study evaluates the removal of mercury from wastewater using chemical reduction and air stripping using a full-scale treatment system at the Savannah River Site. The existing water treatment system utilizes air stripping as the unit operation to remove organic compounds from groundwater that also contains mercury (C ~ 250 ng/L). The baseline air stripping process was ineffective in removing mercury and the water exceeded a proposed limit of 51 ng/L. To test an enhancement to the existing treatment modality a continuous dose of reducing agent was injected for 6-hours at the inlet of the air stripper. This action resulted in the chemical reduction of mercury to Hg(0), a species that is removable with the existing unit operation. During the injection period a 94% decrease in concentration was observed and the effluent satisfied proposed limits. The process was optimized over a 2-day period by sequentially evaluating dose rates ranging from 0.64X to 297X stoichiometry. A minimum dose of 16X stoichiometry was necessary to initiate the reduction reaction that facilitated the mercury removal. Competing electron acceptors likely inhibited the reaction at the lower 1 doses, which prevented removal by air stripping. These results indicate that chemical reduction coupled with air stripping can effectively treat large-volumes of water to emerging part per trillion regulatory standards for mercury.

  18. Chemical and enzymatic reductive activation of acylfulvene to isomeric cytotoxic reactive intermediates

    PubMed Central

    Pietsch, Kathryn E.; Neels, James F.; Yu, Xiang; Gong, Jiachang; Sturla, Shana J.

    2011-01-01

    Acylfulvenes, a class of semisynthetic analogues of the sesquiterpene natural product illudin S, are cytotoxic towards cancer cells. The minor structural changes between illudin S and AFs translate to an improved therapeutic window in preclinical cell-based assays and xenograft models. AFs are, therefore, unique tools for addressing the chemical and biochemical basis of cytotoxic selectivity. AFs elicit cytotoxic responses by alkylation of biological targets, including DNA. While AFs are capable of direct alkylation, cytosolic reductive bioactivation to an electrophilic intermediate is correlated with enhanced cytotoxicity. Data obtained in this study illustrates chemical aspects of the process of AF activation. By tracking reaction mechanisms with stable isotope-labeled reagents, enzymatic versus chemical activation pathways for AF were compared for reactions involving the NADPH-dependent enzyme prostaglandin reductase 1 (PTGR1) or sodium borohydride, respectively. These two processes resulted in isomeric products that appear to give rise to similar patterns of DNA modification. The chemically activated isomer has been newly isolated and chemically characterized in this study, including an assessment of its relative stereochemistry, and stability at varying pH and under bioassay conditions. In mammalian cancer cells, this chemically activated analog was shown to not rely on further cellular activation to significantly enhance cytotoxic potency, in contrast to the requirements of AF. On the basis of this study, we anticipate that the chemically activated form of AF will serve as a useful chemical probe for evaluating biomolecular interactions independent of enzyme-mediated activation. PMID:21939268

  19. Fundamental limits on gas-phase chemical reduction of NOx in a plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Penetrante, B.M.; Hsiao, M.C.; Merritt, B.T.; Vogtlin, G.E.

    1997-12-31

    In the plasma, the electrons do not react directly with the NOx molecules. The electrons collide mainly with the background gas molecules like N{sub 2}, O{sub 2} and H{sub 2}O. Electron impact on these molecules result partly in dissociation reactions that produce reactive species like N, O and OH. The NOx in the engine exhaust gas initially consist mostly of NO. The ground state nitrogen atom, N, is the only species that could lead to the chemical reduction of NO to N{sub 2}. The O radical oxidizes NO to NO{sub 2} leaving the same amount of NOx. The OH radical converts NO{sub 2} to nitric acid. Acid products in the plasma can easily get adsorbed on surfaces in the plasma reactor and in the pipes. When undetected, the absence of these oxidation products can often be mistaken for chemical reduction of NOx. In this paper the authors will examine the gas-phase chemical reduction of NOx. They will show that under the best conditions, the plasma can chemically reduce 1.6 grams of NOx per brake-horsepower-hour [g(NOx)/bhp-hr] when 5% of the engine output energy is delivered to the plasma.

  20. Regeneration of anion exchange resins by catalyzed electrochemical reduction

    DOEpatents

    Gu, Baohua; Brown, Gilbert M.

    2002-01-01

    Anion exchange resins sorbed with perchlorate may be regenerated by a combination of chemical reduction of perchlorate to chloride using a reducing agent and an electrochemical reduction of the oxidized reducing agent. Transitional metals including Ti, Re, and V are preferred chemical reagents for the reduction of perchlorate to chloride. Complexing agents such as oxalate are used to prevent the precipitation of the oxidized Ti(IV) species, and ethyl alcohol may be added to accelerate the reduction kinetics of perchlorate. The regeneration may be performed by continuously recycling the regenerating solution through the resin bed and an electrochemical cell so that the secondary waste generation is minimized.

  1. Selective recovery of pure copper nanopowder from indium-tin-oxide etching wastewater by various wet chemical reduction process: Understanding their chemistry and comparisons of sustainable valorization processes.

    PubMed

    Swain, Basudev; Mishra, Chinmayee; Hong, Hyun Seon; Cho, Sung-Soo

    2016-05-01

    Sustainable valorization processes for selective recovery of pure copper nanopowder from Indium-Tin-Oxide (ITO) etching wastewater by various wet chemical reduction processes, their chemistry has been investigated and compared. After the indium recovery by solvent extraction from ITO etching wastewater, the same is also an environmental challenge, needs to be treated before disposal. After the indium recovery, ITO etching wastewater contains 6.11kg/m(3) of copper and 1.35kg/m(3) of aluminum, pH of the solution is very low converging to 0 and contain a significant amount of chlorine in the media. In this study, pure copper nanopowder was recovered using various reducing reagents by wet chemical reduction and characterized. Different reducing agents like a metallic, an inorganic acid and an organic acid were used to understand reduction behavior of copper in the presence of aluminum in a strong chloride medium of the ITO etching wastewater. The effect of a polymer surfactant Polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP), which was included to prevent aggregation, to provide dispersion stability and control the size of copper nanopowder was investigated and compared. The developed copper nanopowder recovery techniques are techno-economical feasible processes for commercial production of copper nanopowder in the range of 100-500nm size from the reported facilities through a one-pot synthesis. By all the process reported pure copper nanopowder can be recovered with>99% efficiency. After the copper recovery, copper concentration in the wastewater reduced to acceptable limit recommended by WHO for wastewater disposal. The process is not only beneficial for recycling of copper, but also helps to address environment challenged posed by ITO etching wastewater. From a complex wastewater, synthesis of pure copper nanopowder using various wet chemical reduction route and their comparison is the novelty of this recovery process. PMID:26918838

  2. Synthesis of cuprous oxide nanocomposite electrodes by room-temperature chemical partial reduction.

    PubMed

    Park, Kyung-Soo; Seo, Seung-Deok; Jin, Yun-Ho; Lee, Seung-Hun; Shim, Hyun-Woo; Lee, Du-Hee; Kim, Dong-Wan

    2011-10-01

    We demonstrate a template-free synthetic approach for the preparation of a highly conductive Cu/Cu(2)O nanocomposite electrode by a chemical reduction process. Cu(2)O octahedra were prepared through chemical dehydrogenation of as-synthesized Cu(OH)(2) nanowire precursors. To provide a sufficiently electron-conducting network, the Cu(2)O particles were transformed into Cu/Cu(2)O nanocomposites by an intentional reduction process. The Cu/Cu(2)O nanocomposite electrodes showed enhanced cycling performance compared to Cu(2)O particles. Furthermore, their rate capabilities were superior to those of their mechanically mixed Cu/Cu(2)O counterparts. This enhanced electrochemical performance of the hybrid Cu/Cu(2)O nanocomposites was ascribed to the formation of homogeneous nanostructures, offering an efficient electron-transport path provided by the presence of highly dispersed Cu nanoparticles. PMID:21850303

  3. Sulfa Drugs Inhibit Sepiapterin Reduction and Chemical Redox Cycling by Sepiapterin Reductase

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Shaojun; Jan, Yi-Hua; Mishin, Vladimir; Richardson, Jason R.; Hossain, Muhammad M.; Heindel, Ned D.; Heck, Diane E.; Laskin, Debra L.

    2015-01-01

    Sepiapterin reductase (SPR) catalyzes the reduction of sepiapterin to dihydrobiopterin (BH2), the precursor for tetrahydrobiopterin (BH4), a cofactor critical for nitric oxide biosynthesis and alkylglycerol and aromatic amino acid metabolism. SPR also mediates chemical redox cycling, catalyzing one-electron reduction of redox-active chemicals, including quinones and bipyridinium herbicides (e.g., menadione, 9,10-phenanthrenequinone, and diquat); rapid reaction of the reduced radicals with molecular oxygen generates reactive oxygen species (ROS). Using recombinant human SPR, sulfonamide- and sulfonylurea-based sulfa drugs were found to be potent noncompetitive inhibitors of both sepiapterin reduction and redox cycling. The most potent inhibitors of sepiapterin reduction (IC50s = 31–180 nM) were sulfasalazine, sulfathiazole, sulfapyridine, sulfamethoxazole, and chlorpropamide. Higher concentrations of the sulfa drugs (IC50s = 0.37–19.4 μM) were required to inhibit redox cycling, presumably because of distinct mechanisms of sepiapterin reduction and redox cycling. In PC12 cells, which generate catecholamine and monoamine neurotransmitters via BH4-dependent amino acid hydroxylases, sulfa drugs inhibited both BH2/BH4 biosynthesis and redox cycling mediated by SPR. Inhibition of BH2/BH4 resulted in decreased production of dopamine and dopamine metabolites, 3,4-dihydroxyphenylacetic acid and homovanillic acid, and 5-hydroxytryptamine. Sulfathiazole (200 μM) markedly suppressed neurotransmitter production, an effect reversed by BH4. These data suggest that SPR and BH4-dependent enzymes, are “off-targets” of sulfa drugs, which may underlie their untoward effects. The ability of the sulfa drugs to inhibit redox cycling may ameliorate ROS-mediated toxicity generated by redox active drugs and chemicals, contributing to their anti-inflammatory activity. PMID:25550200

  4. Sulfa drugs inhibit sepiapterin reduction and chemical redox cycling by sepiapterin reductase.

    PubMed

    Yang, Shaojun; Jan, Yi-Hua; Mishin, Vladimir; Richardson, Jason R; Hossain, Muhammad M; Heindel, Ned D; Heck, Diane E; Laskin, Debra L; Laskin, Jeffrey D

    2015-03-01

    Sepiapterin reductase (SPR) catalyzes the reduction of sepiapterin to dihydrobiopterin (BH2), the precursor for tetrahydrobiopterin (BH4), a cofactor critical for nitric oxide biosynthesis and alkylglycerol and aromatic amino acid metabolism. SPR also mediates chemical redox cycling, catalyzing one-electron reduction of redox-active chemicals, including quinones and bipyridinium herbicides (e.g., menadione, 9,10-phenanthrenequinone, and diquat); rapid reaction of the reduced radicals with molecular oxygen generates reactive oxygen species (ROS). Using recombinant human SPR, sulfonamide- and sulfonylurea-based sulfa drugs were found to be potent noncompetitive inhibitors of both sepiapterin reduction and redox cycling. The most potent inhibitors of sepiapterin reduction (IC50s = 31-180 nM) were sulfasalazine, sulfathiazole, sulfapyridine, sulfamethoxazole, and chlorpropamide. Higher concentrations of the sulfa drugs (IC50s = 0.37-19.4 μM) were required to inhibit redox cycling, presumably because of distinct mechanisms of sepiapterin reduction and redox cycling. In PC12 cells, which generate catecholamine and monoamine neurotransmitters via BH4-dependent amino acid hydroxylases, sulfa drugs inhibited both BH2/BH4 biosynthesis and redox cycling mediated by SPR. Inhibition of BH2/BH4 resulted in decreased production of dopamine and dopamine metabolites, 3,4-dihydroxyphenylacetic acid and homovanillic acid, and 5-hydroxytryptamine. Sulfathiazole (200 μM) markedly suppressed neurotransmitter production, an effect reversed by BH4. These data suggest that SPR and BH4-dependent enzymes, are "off-targets" of sulfa drugs, which may underlie their untoward effects. The ability of the sulfa drugs to inhibit redox cycling may ameliorate ROS-mediated toxicity generated by redox active drugs and chemicals, contributing to their anti-inflammatory activity. PMID:25550200

  5. Intriguing I2 Reduction in the Iodide for Chloride Ligand Substitution at a Ru(II) Complex: Role of Mixed Trihalides in the Redox Mechanism.

    PubMed

    Mosquera, Marta E G; Gomez-Sal, Pilar; Diaz, Isabel; Aguirre, Lina M; Ienco, A; Manca, Gabriele; Mealli, Carlo

    2016-01-01

    The compound [Ru(CN(t)Bu)4(Cl)2], 1, reacts with I2, yielding the halogen-bonded (XB) 1D species {[Ru(CN(t)Bu)4(I)2]·I2}n, (2·I2)n, whose building block contains I(-) ligands in place of Cl(-) ligands, even though no suitable redox agent is present in solution. Some isolated solid-state intermediates, such as {[Ru(CN(t)Bu)4(Cl)2]·2I2}n, (1·2I2)n, and {[Ru(CN(t)Bu)4(Cl)(I)]·3I2}n, (3·3I2)n, indicate the stepwise substitution of the two trans-halide ligands in 1, showing that end-on-coordinated trihalides play a key role in the process. In particular, the formation of ClI2(-) triggers electron transfer, possibly followed by an inverted coordination of the triatomic species through the external iodine atom. This allows I-Cl separation, as corroborated by Raman spectra. The process through XB intermediates corresponds to reduction of one iodine atom combined with the oxidation of one coordinated chloride ligand to give the corresponding zerovalent atom of I-Cl. This redox process, explored by density functional theory calculations (B97D/6-31+G(d,p)/SDD (for I and Ru atoms)), is apparently counterintuitive with respect to the known behavior of the corresponding free halogen systems, which favor iodide oxidation by Cl2. On the other hand, similar energy barriers are found for the metal-assisted process and require a supply of energy to be passed. In this respect, the control of the temperature is fundamental in combination with the favorable crystallizations of the various solid-state products. As an important conclusion, trihalogens, as XB adducts, are not static in nature but are able to undergo dynamic inner electron transfers consistently with implicit redox chemistry. PMID:26675208

  6. Are sulfur isotope ratios sufficient to determine the antiquity of sulfate reduction. [implications for chemical evolution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ashendorf, D.

    1980-01-01

    Possible limitations on the use of sulfur isotope ratios in sedimentary sulfides to infer the evolution of microbial sulfate reduction are discussed. Current knowledge of the ways in which stable sulfur isotope ratios are altered by chemical and biological processes is examined, with attention given to the marine sulfur cycle involving various microbial populations, and sulfur reduction processes, and it is noted that satisfactory explanations of sulfur isotope ratios observed in live organisms and in sediments are not yet available. It is furthermore pointed out that all members of the same genus of sulfate reducing bacteria do not always fractionate sulfur to the same extent, that the extent of sulfur fractionation by many sulfate-reducing organisms has not yet been determined, and that inorganic processes can also affect sulfur isotope fractionation values. The information currently available is thus concluded to be insufficient to determine the time of initial appearance of biological sulfate reduction.

  7. Chemically modified carbon paste and membrane sensors for the determination of benzethonium chloride and some anionic surfactants (SLES, SDS, and LABSA): Characterization using SEM and AFM.

    PubMed

    Issa, Yousry M; Mohamed, Sabrein H; Baset, Mohamed Abd-El

    2016-08-01

    Chemically modified carbon-paste (CMCP) and membrane- sensors based on incorporating benzothonium-tetraphenylborate (BT-TPB) were constructed for the analysis of benzethonium chloride, and some other surfactants such as sodium lauryl ether sulphate (SLES), sodium dodecyl sulphate (SDS), and linear alkylbenzene sulphonic acid (LABSA). All sensors showed good sensitivity and reverse wide linearity over a concentration range of 5.97×10(-7) to 1.00×10(-3) and 5.96×10(-7) to 3.03×10(-3)molL(-1) with limit of detection of 3.92×10(-7)and 3.40×10(-7)molL(-1) for membrane and chemically modified carbon paste sensors, respectively, with respect to benzethonium chloride (BT.Cl). They could be used over a wide pH range of 2.0-10.0. The thermal coefficients of membrane and CMCP sensors are 5.40×10(-4), 1.17×10(-4)V/°C, respectively. The sensors indicated a wide selectivity over different inorganic cations. The effect of soaking on the surface morphology of the membrane sensor was studied using EDX-SEM and AFM techniques. The response time was <10s The freshly prepared, exhausted membrane, and CMCP sensors were successfully applied for the potentiometric determination of the pure BT.Cl solution. They were also used for the determination of its pharmaceutical formulation Dermoplast(®) antibacterial spray (20% benzocaine+0.2% benzethonium chloride) with recovery values ranging from 97.54±1.70 to 101.25±1.12 and from 96.32±2.49 to 101.23±2.15%. The second goal of these sensors is the potentiometric determination of different surfactants such as SLES, SDS, and LABSA with good recovery values using BT.Cl as a titrant in their pure forms, and in samples containing one of them (shampoo, Touri(®) dishwashing liquid, and waste water). The statistical analysis of the obtained data was studied. PMID:27216669

  8. Chemical and Biological Interactions during Nitrate and Goethite Reduction by Shewanella putrefaciens 200

    PubMed Central

    Cooper, D. Craig; Picardal, Flynn W.; Schimmelmann, Arndt; Coby, Aaron J.

    2003-01-01

    Although previous research has demonstrated that NO3− inhibits microbial Fe(III) reduction in laboratory cultures and natural sediments, the mechanisms of this inhibition have not been fully studied in an environmentally relevant medium that utilizes solid-phase, iron oxide minerals as a Fe(III) source. To study the dynamics of Fe and NO3− biogeochemistry when ferric (hydr)oxides are used as the Fe(III) source, Shewanella putrefaciens 200 was incubated under anoxic conditions in a low-ionic-strength, artificial groundwater medium with various amounts of NO3− and synthetic, high-surface-area goethite. Results showed that the presence of NO3− inhibited microbial goethite reduction more severely than it inhibited microbial reduction of the aqueous or microcrystalline sources of Fe(III) used in other studies. More interestingly, the presence of goethite also resulted in a twofold decrease in the rate of NO3− reduction, a 10-fold decrease in the rate of NO2− reduction, and a 20-fold increase in the amounts of N2O produced. Nitrogen stable isotope experiments that utilized δ15N values of N2O to distinguish between chemical and biological reduction of NO2− revealed that the N2O produced during NO2− or NO3− reduction in the presence of goethite was primarily of abiotic origin. These results indicate that concomitant microbial Fe(III) and NO3− reduction produces NO2− and Fe(II), which then abiotically react to reduce NO2− to N2O with the subsequent oxidation of Fe(II) to Fe(III). PMID:12788758

  9. Influence of physical and chemical aquifer heterogeneity on nitrate reduction processes by numerical simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalbacher, T.; Jang, E.; He, W.; Savoy, H.; Schueth, C.; Kolditz, O.

    2015-12-01

    Nitrate reduction reactions, as one of the most important redox reactions in a subsurface system, are strongly influenced by various heterogeneity factors which influence transport of chemical species and spatial distribution of redox substances and consequently have an effect on overall nitrate reduction capacity. In this presented work, the influence of two heterogeneity factors, spatially heterogeneity of hydrological parameters versus spatial heterogeneity of geochemical reactive substances distribution, are discussed with a focus on nitrate transport and redox transformation processes. For this purpose, a coupling interface OGS#IPhreeqc is employed. This code combines Finite-Element groundwater flow and multi-species transport code of OpenGeoSys (OGS) with the IPhreeqc module of open source geochemical solver PHREEQC. The resulting coupled model is applied for simulation of nitrate reduction processes with a series of hypothetical aquifer systems, built using exponentially-correlated log-normal distributed hydraulic conductivity and reactive substances. The spatially heterogeneous aquifer system is realized by a RandomFields package using a statistical program R. Results show that the heterogeneous hydraulics conductivity field has larger impact on nitrate reduction capacity than heterogeneous reactive substances distribution. Moreover, nitrate reduction capacity can be increased by enhanced mixing in heterogeneous hydraulic conductivity field however its overall reduction capacity has gradually decreased as a degree of heterogeneity has increased since accessibility of the chemical species by the reactive substances may be limited. These results support that appropriate characterization of the variance of hydraulic conductivity within the aquifer is important to predict contaminant fate and transport and quantify the impact of uncertainty on numerical groundwater simulation.

  10. Effect of chemical sanitizers with and without ultrasonication on Listeria monocytogenes as a biofilm within polyvinyl chloride drain pipes

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    As part of a biofilm in a floor drain, L. monocytogenes is exceedingly difficult to eradicate with standard sanitizing protocols. The objective of these studies was to test the use of ultra-sonication to break up biofilm architecture allowing chemical sanitizers to contact cells directly. L. monoc...

  11. Applying the Philosophical Concept of Reduction to the Chemistry of Water: Implications for Chemical Education

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Erduran, Sibel

    Even though philosophical themes in science education have been advocated for several decades, little attention has been paid to how these themes can be contextualized in the teaching of a particular domain of science. The purpose of this paper is to provide an example theoretical framework for applying a philosophical theme, reduction, in chemistry education. The inclusion of the concept reduction in chemistry education not only elaborates on this important philosophical thesis in the specific context of chemistry but also it might offer some insight into how students interest in philosophical aspects of chemistry might be stimulated. The consideration of concepts such as chemical composition, molecular structure and bonding in chemistry of water provides an example for the application of reduction in chemistry education. The water example also promotes the reflection on the microscopic, macroscopic and symbolic features of substances, themes which are repeatedly covered in secondary as well as tertiary chemical education. Some implications include the need for restructuring the curriculum in higher education to be more inclusive of the controversial nature of quantum mechanical applications in chemistry.

  12. The environmental chemical tributyltin chloride (TBT) shows both estrogenic and adipogenic activities in mice which might depend on the exposure dose

    SciTech Connect

    Penza, M.; Jeremic, M.; Marrazzo, E.; Maggi, A.; Ciana, P.; Rando, G.; Grigolato, P.G.; Di Lorenzo, D.

    2011-08-15

    Exposure during early development to chemicals with hormonal action may be associated with weight gain during adulthood because of altered body homeostasis. It is known that organotins affect adipose mass when exposure occurs during fetal development, although no knowledge of effects are available for exposures after birth. Here we show that the environmental organotin tributyltin chloride (TBT) exerts adipogenic action when peripubertal and sexually mature mice are exposed to the chemical. The duration and extent of these effects depend on the sex and on the dose of the compound, and the effects are relevant at doses close to the estimated human intake (0.5 {mu}g/kg). At higher doses (50-500 {mu}g/kg), TBT also activated estrogen receptors (ERs) in adipose cells in vitro and in vivo, based on results from acute and longitudinal studies in ERE/luciferase reporter mice. In 3T3-L1 cells (which have no ERs), transiently transfected with the ERE-dependent reporter plus or minus ER{alpha} or ER{beta}, TBT (in a dose range of 1-100 nM) directly targets each ER subtype in a receptor-specific manner through a direct mechanism mediated by ER{alpha} in undifferentiated preadipocytic cells and by ER{beta} in differentiating adipocytes. The ER antagonist ICI-182,780 inhibits this effect. In summary, the results of this work suggest that TBT is adipogenic at all ages and in both sexes and that it might be an ER activator in fat cells. These findings might help to resolve the apparent paradox of an adipogenic chemical being also an estrogen receptor activator by showing that the two apparently opposite actions are separated by the different doses to which the organism is exposed. - Research Highlights: > The environmental organotin tributyltin chloride shows dose-dependent estrogenic and adipogenic activities in mice. > The duration and extent of these effects depend on the sex and the dose of the compound. > The estrogenic and adipogenic effects of TBT occur at doses closed to

  13. Synthesis of Hierarchical Nanoporous Microstructures via the Kirkendall Effect in Chemical Reduction Process

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Ling; Pang, Chao; He, Dafang; Shen, Liming; Gupta, Arunava; Bao, Ningzhong

    2015-01-01

    A series of novel hierarchical nanoporous microstructures have been synthesized through one-step chemical reduction of micron size Cu2O and Co3O4 particles. By controlling the reduction time, non-porous Cu2O microcubes sequentially transform to nanoporous Cu/Cu2O/Cu dented cubic composites and hollow eightling-like Cu microparticles. The mechanism involved in the complex structural evolution is explained based on oxygen diffusion and Kirkendall effect. The nanoporous Cu/Cu2O/Cu dented cubic composites exhibit superior electrochemical performance as compared to solid Cu2O microcubes. The reduction of nonporous Co3O4 also exhibits a uniform sequential reduction process from nonporous Co3O4 to porous Co3O4/CoO composites, porous CoO, porous CoO/Co composites, and porous foam-like Co particles. Nanoscale channels originate from the particle surface and eventually develop inside the entire product, resulting in porous foam-like Co microparticles. The Kirkendall effect is believed to facilitate the formation of porous structures in both processes. PMID:26552845

  14. Synthesis of Hierarchical Nanoporous Microstructures via the Kirkendall Effect in Chemical Reduction Process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Ling; Pang, Chao; He, Dafang; Shen, Liming; Gupta, Arunava; Bao, Ningzhong

    2015-11-01

    A series of novel hierarchical nanoporous microstructures have been synthesized through one-step chemical reduction of micron size Cu2O and Co3O4 particles. By controlling the reduction time, non-porous Cu2O microcubes sequentially transform to nanoporous Cu/Cu2O/Cu dented cubic composites and hollow eightling-like Cu microparticles. The mechanism involved in the complex structural evolution is explained based on oxygen diffusion and Kirkendall effect. The nanoporous Cu/Cu2O/Cu dented cubic composites exhibit superior electrochemical performance as compared to solid Cu2O microcubes. The reduction of nonporous Co3O4 also exhibits a uniform sequential reduction process from nonporous Co3O4 to porous Co3O4/CoO composites, porous CoO, porous CoO/Co composites, and porous foam-like Co particles. Nanoscale channels originate from the particle surface and eventually develop inside the entire product, resulting in porous foam-like Co microparticles. The Kirkendall effect is believed to facilitate the formation of porous structures in both processes.

  15. Synthesis and spectroscopic characterization of gold nanobipyramids prepared by a chemical reduction method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thanh Ngo, Vo Ke; Phat Huynh, Trong; Giang Nguyen, Dang; Phuong Uyen Nguyen, Hoang; Lam, Quang Vinh; Dat Huynh, Thanh

    2015-12-01

    Gold nanobipyramids (NBPs) have attracted much attention because they have potential for applications in smart sensing devices, such as medical diagnostic equippments. This is due to the fact that they show more advantageous plasmonic properties than other gold nanostructures. We describe a chemical reduction method for synthesizing NBPs using conventional heating with ascorbic acid reduction and cetyltrimethylamonium bromide (CTAB) + AgNO3 as capping agents. The product was characterized by ultraviolet-visible spectroscopy (UV-vis), Fourier transmission infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), x-ray powder diffraction (XRD). The results showed that gold nanoparticles were formed with bipyramid shape (tip-to-tip distance of 88.4 ± 9.4 nm and base length of 29.9 ± 3.2 nm) and face-centered-cubic crystalline structure. Optimum parameters for preparation of NBPs are also found.

  16. Raman Chemical Imaging of Chromate Reduction Sites in a Single Bacterium Using Intracellularly Grown Gold Nanoislands

    PubMed Central

    Ravindranath, Sandeep P.; Henne, Kristene L.; Thompson, Dorothea K.; Irudayaraj, Joseph

    2011-01-01

    Imagingon act live molecular events within micro-organisms at single cell resolution would deliver valuable mechanistic information much needed in understanding key biological processes. We present a surface-enhanced Raman (SERS) chemical imaging strategy as a first step towards exploring the intracellular bioreduction pockets of toxic chromate in Shewanella. In order to achieve this, we take advantage of an innate reductive mechanism in bacteria of reducing gold ions into intracellular gold nanoislands which provide the necessary enhancement for SERS imaging. We show that SERS has the sensitivity and selectivity not only to identify, but also to differentiate between the two stable valence forms of chromate in cells. The imaging platform was used to understand intracellular metal reductiivities in a ubiquitous metal-reducing organism Shewanella oneidensis MR-1, by mapping Chromate reduction. PMID:21634405

  17. Synthesis of high magnetization Fe and FeCo nanoparticles by high temperature chemical reduction

    SciTech Connect

    Kandapallil, B; Colborn, RE; Bonitatibus, PJ; Johnson, F

    2015-03-15

    Fe and FeCo ferromagnetic nanoparticles in the 5-10 nm size regimes featuring high magnetization were synthesized using a modified chemical reduction method. The structure and morphology of these nanoparticles were confirmed by XRD and TOM analysis. These small, monodisperse and phase pure nanoparticles exhibited magnetic saturation of 210 emu/g (Fe) and 220 emu/g (Fe+Co) for Fe and FeCo nanoparticles respectively. The magnetization was found to be dependent on the temperature at which the reducing agent was introduced. (C) 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved,

  18. Heavy metal removal by chemical reduction with sodium borohydride. A pilot-plant study

    SciTech Connect

    Gomez-Lahoz, C.; Garcia-Herruzo, F.; Rodriguez-Maroto, J.M.; Rodriguez, J.J. )

    1992-10-01

    A 1,000/h continuous pilot-plant study dealing with Cu{sup 2+} and Co{sup 2+} removal from simulated industrial wastewater by means of chemical reduction with sodium borohydride is presented. Initial metal concentrations in the 25 to 40 mg range have been tested. Residual concentrations lower than 0.1 mg have been achieved when operating under optimal conditions. Prior addition of sodium dithionite was required to avoid reoxidation problems arising from dissolved oxygen. Flocculation-sedimentation and sand filtration have been studied for sludge separation.

  19. A comparison of the efficacy of organic and mixed-organic polymers with polyaluminium chloride in chemically assisted primary sedimentation (CAPS).

    PubMed

    De Feo, G; Galasso, M; Landi, R; Donnarumma, A; De Gisi, S

    2013-01-01

    CAPS is the acronym for chemically assisted primary sedimentation, which consists of adding chemicals to raw urban wastewater to increase the efficacy of coagulation, flocculation and sedimentation. The principal benefits of CAPS are: upgrading of urban wastewater treatment plants; increasing efficacy of primary sedimentation; and the major production of energy from the anaerobic digestion of primary sludge. Metal coagulants are usually used because they are both effective and cheap, but they can cause damage to the biological processes of anaerobic digestion. Generally, biodegradable compounds do not have these drawbacks, but they are comparatively more expensive. Both metal coagulants and biodegradable compounds have preferential and penalizing properties in terms of CAPS application. The problem can be solved by means of a multi-criteria analysis. For this purpose, a series of tests was performed in order to compare the efficacy of several organic and mixed-organic polymers with that of polyaluminium chloride (PACl) under specific conditions. The multi-criteria analysis was carried out coupling the simple additive weighting method with the paired comparison technique as a tool to evaluate the criteria priorities. Five criteria with the following priorities were used: chemical oxygen demand (COD) removal > turbidity, SV60 > coagulant dose, and coagulant cost. The PACl was the best alternative in 70% of the cases. The CAPS process using PACl made it possible to obtain an average COD removal of 68% compared with 38% obtained, on average, with natural sedimentation and 61% obtained, on average, with the best PACl alternatives (cationic polyacrylamide, natural cationic polymer, dicyandiamide resin). PMID:24191462

  20. AlN nanorod and nanoneedle arrays prepared by chloride assisted chemical vapor deposition for field emission applications.

    PubMed

    Song, Xubo; Guo, Zhigang; Zheng, Jie; Li, Xingguo; Pu, Yikang

    2008-03-19

    Hexagonal AlN nanorod and nanoneedle arrays were synthesized through the direct reaction of AlCl(3) and NH(3) by chemical vapor deposition at about 750 °C. Both the AlN nanoneedle and nanorod samples were of wurtzite structure and grew preferentially along the c-axis. With an increase in the ratio of NH(3) to Ar, an evolution from nanorods to nanoneedles was observed. A growth model was proposed to explain the possible growth mechanism. Measurements in field emission show that AlN nanoneedle arrays have a much lower turn-on field (3.1 V µm(-1)) compared to nanorod arrays (15.3 V µm(-1)), due to their large curvature geometry. The AlN nanoneedle arrays have potential applications in many fields, such as electron-emitting nanodevices and field-emission-based flat-panel displays. PMID:21730560

  1. A chemical heat pump based on the reaction of calcium chloride and methanol for solar heating, cooling and storage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Offenhartz, P. O.

    1981-03-01

    An engineering development test prototype of the CaCl2-CheOH chemical heat pump was tested. The unit, which has storage capacity in excess of 100,000 BTU, completed over 100 full charge-discharge cycles. Cycling data show that the rate of heat pumping depends strongly on the absorber-evaporator temperature difference. These rates are more than adequate for solar heating or for solar cooling using dry ambient air heat rejection. Performance degradation after 100 cycles, expressed as a contact resistance, was less than 2 C. The heat exchangers showed some warpage due to plastic flow of the salt, producing the contact resistance. The experimental COP for cooling was 0.52, close to the theoretically predicted value.

  2. IF-WS{sub 2} nanoparticles size design and synthesis via chemical reduction

    SciTech Connect

    Ghoreishi, S.M.; Meshkat, S.S.; Dadkhah, A.A.

    2010-05-15

    An innovative synthesis of inorganic fullerene-like disulfide tungsten (IF-WS{sub 2}) nanoparticles was developed using a chemical reduction reaction in a horizontal quartz reactor. In this process, first tungsten trisulfide (WS{sub 3}) was formed via a chemical reaction of tetra thiotungstate ammonium ((NH{sub 4}){sub 2}WS{sub 4}), polyethylene glycol (PEG), and hydrochloric acid (HCl) at ambient temperature and pressure. Subsequently, WS{sub 3} was reacted with hydrogen (H{sub 2}) at high temperature (1173-1373 K) in a quartz tube. The produced WS{sub 2} nanoparticles were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), energy dispersive X-ray (EDAX), and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The characterization results indicated that the high-purity (100%) IF-WS{sub 2} nanoparticles were produced. Moreover, addition of surfactant (PEG) and higher operating temperature (1173-1373 K) decreased the particles agglomeration, and consequently led to the reduction of average diameter of WS{sub 2} particles in the range of 50-78 nm. The developed method is simple, environmentally compatible, and cost-effective in contrast to the conventional techniques.

  3. Predictive model for the reduction of heat resistance of Listeria monocytogenes in ground beef by the combined effect of sodium chloride and apple polyphenols

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    We investigated the combined effect of three internal temperatures (57.5, 60, and 62.5C) and different concentrations (0 to 3.0 wt/wt %) of sodium chloride (NaCl) and apple polyphenols (APP), individually and in combination, on the heat-resistance of a five-strain cocktail of Listeria monocytogenes ...

  4. Physico-chemical and sensory quality of fresh cut papaya (Carica papaya) packaged in micro-perforated polyvinyl chloride containers.

    PubMed

    Jayathunge, K G L R; Gunawardhana, D K S N; Illeperuma, D C K; Chandrajith, U G; Thilakarathne, B M K S; Fernando, M D; Palipane, K B

    2014-12-01

    Papaya cubes at maturity stages, 5-45 % yellow (more green than yellow) and 55-80 % yellow (more yellow than green) were washed with 5 % H2O2, drained and packaged in PVC trays having five, seven and ten micro-perforations and stored for 19 days. PVC trays with 3 mm diameter punch holes were used as the control. Based on physico-chemical properties, optimum maturity for papaya and micro-perforation level of PVC trays were determined. Effectiveness of citric acid in prevention of browning was also tested. Firmness and TSS changed significantly, on day 19. O2, CO2 and C2H4 concentration changed 2.4 to 4.2 %, 23.4 to 5.9 %, and 0 to 0.13 % respectively, from day 3 to 19. pH and titratable acidity did not change significantly throughout the storage. Pretreated papaya cubes, packaged in PVC trays with ten micro-perforations, kept under 4 °C had storage lives of 19 days. PMID:25477661

  5. Reduction kinetics of iron-based oxygen carriers using methane for chemical-looping combustion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, Ming; Wang, Shuzhong; Wang, Longfei; Lv, Mingming

    2014-12-01

    The performance of three iron-based oxygen carriers (pure Fe2O3, synthetic Fe2O3/MgAl2O4 and iron ore) in reduction process using methane as fuel is investigated in thermo-gravimetric analyzer (TGA). The reaction rate and mechanism between three oxygen carriers and methane are investigated. On the basis of reactivity in reduction process, it may be concluded that Fe2O3/MgAl2O4 has the best reactivity with methane. The reaction rate constant is found to be in the following order: Fe2O3/MgAl2O4 > pure Fe2O3 > iron ore and the activation energy varies between 49 and 184 kJ mol-1. Reduction reactions for the pure Fe2O3 and synthetic Fe2O3/MgAl2O4 are well represented by the reaction controlling mechanism, and for the iron ore the phase-boundary controlled (contracting cylinder) model dominates. The particles of iron ore and synthetic Fe2O3/MgAl2O4 have better stability than that of pure Fe2O3 when the reaction temperature is limited to lower than 1223 K. These preliminary results suggest that iron-based mixed oxygen carrier particles are potential to be used in methane chemical looping process, but the reactivity of the iron ore needs to be increased.

  6. Reduction of chemical oxygen demand of industrial wastes using subcritical water oxidation

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, J.C.; Chang, C.J. )

    1992-10-01

    If wastes have strong toxicity, high organic content, and a deep hue, they are difficult to handle in the waste disposal. It is very practical that waste of this kind is treated by Subcritical Water Oxidation (SWO). In our work, caprolactum (CPL) waste, purged from a petrochemical plant, and dyeing waste, purged from a textile plant, were individually treated by a semi-batch SWO process. Within a one-hour treatment, Chemical Oxygen Demand (COD) reduction reached 89% for CPL waste (6.90 MPa, 260[degree]C) and 95% for dyeing waste (6.90 MPa, 240[degree]C). There is also a great improvement in hue, especially for the dyeing waste. When CPL wastewater was treated by the SWO process using a chromium metal powder as a catalyst, COD reduction improved further under the same operating conditions. A kinetic model was used to illustrate the oxidation mechanism and the effectiveness of the catalyst. The oxygen concentration in the effluent showed that oxygen consumption corresponded to COD reduction. With the monitoring of concentrations of total soluble chromium in the effluent, a suitable reaction period could be found in order to meet the standard of the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). 12 refs., 11 figs., 2 tabs.

  7. Visible light Cr(VI) reduction and organic chemical oxidation by TiO2 photocatalysis.

    PubMed

    Sun, Bo; Reddy, Ettireddy P; Smirniotis, Panagiotis G

    2005-08-15

    Here we report the simultaneous Cr(VI) reduction and 4-chlorophenol (4-CP) oxidation in water under visible light (wavelength > 400 nm) using commercial Degussa P25 TiO2. This remarkable observation was attributed to a synergistic effect among TiO2, Cr(VI), and 4-CP. It is well known that TiO2 alone cannot remove either 4-CP or Cr(VI) efficiently under visible light. Moreover, the interaction between Cr(VI) and 4-CP is minimal if not negligible. However, we found that the combination of TiO2, Cr(VI), and 4-CP together can enable efficient Cr(VI) reduction and 4-CP oxidation under visible light. The specific roles of the three ingredients in the synergistic system were studied parametrically. It was found that optimal concentrations of Cr(VI) and TiO2 exist for the Cr(VI) reduction and 4-CP oxidation. Cr(VI) was compared experimentally with other metals such as Cu(ll), Fe(lll), Mn(IV), Ce(IV), and V(V). Among all these metal ions, only Cr(VI) promotes the photocatalytic oxidation of 4-CP. The amount of 4-CP removed was directly related to the initial concentration of Cr(VI). The system was also tested with four other chemicals (aniline, salicylic acid, formic acid, and diethyl phosphoramidate). We found that the same phenomenon occurred for organics containing acid and/or phenolic groups. Cr(VI) was reduced at the same time as the organic chemicals being oxidized during photoreaction under visible light. The synergistic effect was also found with pure anatase TiO2 and rutile TiO2. This study demonstrates a possible economical way for environmental cleanup under visible light. PMID:16173589

  8. In situ observation of reduction kinetics and 2D mapping of chemical state for heterogeneous reduction in iron-ore sinters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kimura, M.; Murao, R.; Ohta, N.; Noami, K.; Uemura, Y.; Niwa, Y.; Kimijima, K.; Takeichi, Y.; Nitani, H.

    2016-05-01

    Iron-ore sinters constitute the major component of the iron-bearing burden in blast furnaces, and the mechanism of their reduction is one of the key processes in iron making. The heterogeneous reduction of sintered oxides was investigated by the combination of X-ray fluorescence and absorption fine structure, X-ray diffraction, and computed tomography. Two - dimensional mapping of the chemical states (CSs) was performed. The iron CSs FeIII, FeII, and Fe0 exhibited a heterogeneous distribution in a reduced sinter. The reduction started near micro pores, at iron-oxide grains rather than calcium-ferrite ones. The heterogeneous reduction among grains in a sinter may cause the formation of micro cracks. These results provide fundamental insights into heterogeneous reduction schemes for iron-ore sinters.

  9. Decolourisation of palm oil mill biogas plant wastewater using Poly-Diallyldimethyl Ammonium Chloride (polyDADMAC) and other chemical coagulants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zahrim, A. Y.; Dexter, Z. D.

    2016-06-01

    Palm oil mill effluent was expected as a future source of renewable biogas. Nevertheless,colours in palm oil mill biogas plant wastewater (POMBPW) causes negative perception among the public and the wastewater is difficult to be treated biologically. In this study, the performance of various chemical coagulants i.e., calcium lactate, magnesium hydroxide, ferric chloride, aluminium chlorohydrate i.e. CK-800, CK-1000, and polyDADMAC, forPOMBPW colour removal were investigated. PolyDADMAC (1,000 mg/L) shows best colour removal (∼48%). The main coagulation process with polyDADMACcould be due to charge neutralization-bridging mechanism. The zeta potential analysis supports the finding where the value became positive as the dosage increases. The addition of polyDADMAC has increased the conductivity of the treated wastewater up to 9.22%; however, the final pH is maintained (8.0-8.3). It can be deduced that polyDADMAC has potential to treat POMBPW at low dosage.

  10. Chemical forms and sources of extremely high nitrate and chloride in winter aerosol pollution in the Kanto Plain of Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaneyasu, Naoki; Yoshikado, Hiroshi; Mizuno, Tateki; Sakamoto, Kazuhiko; Soufuku, Masataka

    The spatial distributions, chemical forms, and potential sources have been investigated for extremely high concentrations of Cl - and NO -3 in aerosols collected during an extensive study for winter pollution episodes in the Kanto Plain of Japan. Air monitoring are conducted at 10 sites including the rooftops of skyscrapers during two measurement periods in November-December 1991. Similarity in the diurnal variation patterns of NO -3 among the sampling sites suggests that its precursor HNO 3 is formed by reactions in the atmosphere, while difference in the maximum concentration of Cl - between the sites indicates the presence of local sources. Measurements at ground level and on the rooftops of skyscrapers show that the pronounced diurnal variations of both components are phenomena occurring in the layer extending from the ground surface to at least 200 m height. Intensified measurements at two ground sites indicate that (1) NO -3 and non sea-salt Cl - are predominantly in the fine mode, (2) [NO -3] + [Cl -] and [NH +4] are in equivalence, (3) gaseous HCl, HNO 3, and NH 3 are in equilibrium with particulate NH 4Cl and NH 4NO 3. From these results, it is concluded that measured Cl - and NO -3 are predominantly in the form of NH 4Cl and NH 4NO 3, respectively. The behavior of peroxyacetyl nitrate (PAN) indicates that HNO 3, the precursor of NO -3, is produced in the photochemical reactions of the NO x-hydrocarbons system. The elevated concentration of NO 2 measured simultaneously in the pollution episodes is regarded as an alternative form of O 3 produced in photochemical reactions. As the precursor of Cl - in aerosols, sources of HCl are discussed, and the emission from incineration of domestic and industrial waste in the area is estimated.

  11. Reduction of VOCs during pressing of OSB with the use of chemical additives

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, L.S.; McGinnis, G.D.; Kleinheinz, G.T.; Niemi, B.A.; Flicker, T.M.

    1999-07-01

    As air pollution regulations continue to become increasingly stringent, it is critical for the wood composite industry to develop more efficient and economical methods for handling air pollutant emissions. Technologies currently being used for end of pipeline control are often expensive to install and operate; therefore, more cost-effective methods of reduction are necessary. This project was undertaken to determine the feasibility of using various chemical compounds during pressing or drying of wood particles to minimize/reduce volatile organic compound (VOC) emissions from wood composite plants. This study was designed specifically to develop chemical treatment systems, which would reduce VOCs in air emitted from presses and dryers during the oriented strandboard (OSB) manufacturing process. A series of acids, bases, oxidizing agents and nucleophiles were evaluated in this study. The initial model waste stream consisted of furfural and a series of mono-terpenes. The first year results indicated that several of the chemicals did destroy the VOCs; in some cases destruction was observed as high as 75%. The first year of this study was conducted in the laboratory, while the second and third years will combine laboratory studies and OSB plant studies.

  12. Reduction, partial evaporation, and spattering - Possible chemical and physical processes in fluid drop chondrule formation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    King, E. A.

    1983-01-01

    The major chemical differences between fluid drop chondrules and their probable parent materials may have resulted from the loss of volatiles such as S, H2O, Fe, and volatile siderophile elements by partial evaporation during the chondrule-forming process. Vertical access solar furnace experiments in vacuum and hydrogen have demonstrated such chemical fractionation trends using standard rock samples. The formation of immiscible iron droplets and spherules by in situ reduction of iron from silicate melt and the subsequent evaporation of the iron have been observed directly. During the time that the main sample bead is molten, many small spatter spherules are thrown off the main bead, thereby producing many additional chondrule-like melt spherules that cool rapidly and generate a population of spherules with size frequency distribution characteristics that closely approximate some populations of fluid drop chondrules in chondrites. It is possible that spatter-produced fluid drop chondrules dominate the meteoritic fluid drop chondrule populations. Such meteoritic chondrule populations should be chemically related by various relative amounts of iron and other volatile loss by vapor fractionation.

  13. Single crystal XRD, vibrational spectra, quantum chemical and thermal studies on a new semi-organic crystal: 4-Aminium antipyrine chloride

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chitradevi, A.; Suresh Kumar, S.; Athimoolam, S.; Asath Bahadur, S.; Sridhar, B.

    2015-11-01

    The new semi-organic crystal of 4-aminium antipyrine chloride was grown as a single crystal by slow evaporation solution growth method. The crystal and molecular structure of the grown crystal was determined by single crystal diffraction techniques. The single crystal XRD studies reveal that the phenyl ring and pyrazolone ring of the cation has been inclined at an angle of 52.3 (1)°. The molecular aggregations were stabilized through intricate three dimensional hydrogen bonding network formed by the classical N-H⋯O and N-H⋯Cl hydrogen bonds. The cationic dimer R22(10) motif formed through N-H⋯O intermolecular hydrogen bonds was observed around the inversion center of the unit cell. The amino group from the cation and the chlorine anion was linked through N-H⋯Cl intermolecular hydrogen bond leading to a R24 (8) ring motif. These two ring motifs were extended along the a-axis of the unit cell and forms a hydrophilic layer at z = 0 and 1, which is sandwiched between the hydrophobic layer at z = 1/2. Geometry optimization of the molecules was done by Density Functional Theory (DFT) using the B3LYP function and Hartree-Fock (HF) level with 6-311++G(d,p) basis set. The optimized molecular geometry and computed vibrational spectra were compared with experimental results which show a significant agreement. The natural bond orbital (NBO) analysis was carried out to interpret hyperconjucative interaction and intramolecular charge transfer (ICT). The chemical hardness, electro-negativity and chemical potential of the molecule were carried out by HOMO-LUMO plot. The lower band gap value of the frontier orbitals shows the possible bioactivity of the molecule.

  14. Chemical and biological reduction of the radical SAM enzyme CPH4 synthase

    PubMed Central

    Bruender, Nathan A.; Young, Anthony P.; Bandarian, Vahe

    2016-01-01

    The radical S-adenosyl-l-methionine (SAM) superfamily is a large and growing group of enzymes that carry out complex radical-mediated transformations. A one-electron reduction of SAM via the +1 state of the cubane [4Fe-4S] cluster generates a 5′-deoxyadenosyl radical, which initiates turnover. The [4Fe-4S] cluster must be reduced from its resting +2 to the catalytically active +1 oxidation state by an electron. In practice, dithionite or the Escherichia coli flavodoxin (EcFldA)/ferredoxin (flavodoxin):NADP+ oxidoreductase (Fpr)/NADPH system is used. Herein, we present a systematic investigation of the reductive activation of the radical SAM enzyme CDG synthase (BsQueE) from Bacillus subtilis comparing biological and chemical reductants. These data show that either of the flavodoxin homologs encoded by the B. subtilis genome, BsYkuN or BsYkuP, as well as a series of small molecule redox mediators, support BsQueE activity. With dithionite as a reductant, activity of BsQueE is ~75-fold greater in the presence of BsYkuN and BsYkuP compared to dithionite alone. By contrast, EcFldA supports turnover to ~10-fold greater levels than dithionite alone under the same conditions. Comparing the ratio of the rate of turnover to the apparent binding constant for the flavodoxin homologs reveals 10- and 240-fold preference for BsYkuN over BsYkuP and EcFldA respectively. The differential activation of the enzyme cannot be explained by the abortive cleavage of SAM. We conclude from these observations that the differential activation of BsQueE by Fld homologs may reside in the details of the interaction between the flavodoxin and the radical SAM enzyme. PMID:25933252

  15. Chemical and Biological Reduction of the Radical SAM Enzyme CPH4 Synthase.

    PubMed

    Bruender, Nathan A; Young, Anthony P; Bandarian, Vahe

    2015-05-12

    The radical S-adenosyl-L-methionine (SAM) superfamily is a large and growing group of enzymes that conduct complex radical-mediated transformations. A one-electron reduction of SAM via the +1 state of the cubane [4Fe-4S] cluster generates a 5'-deoxyadenosyl radical, which initiates turnover. The [4Fe-4S] cluster must be reduced from its resting +2 state to the catalytically active +1 oxidation state by an electron. In practice, dithionite or the Escherichia coli flavodoxin (EcFldA)/ferredoxin (flavodoxin):NADP(+) oxidoreductase (Fpr)/NADPH system is used. Herein, we present a systematic investigation of the reductive activation of the radical SAM enzyme CDG synthase (BsQueE) from Bacillus subtilis comparing biological and chemical reductants. These data show that either of the flavodoxin homologues encoded by the B. subtilis genome, BsYkuN or BsYkuP, as well as a series of small molecule redox mediators, supports BsQueE activity. With dithionite as a reductant, the activity of BsQueE is ~75-fold greater in the presence of BsYkuN and BsYkuP compared to that in the presence of dithionite alone. By contrast, EcFldA supports turnover to ~10-fold greater levels than dithionite alone under the same conditions. Comparing the ratio of the rate of turnover to the apparent binding constant for the flavodoxin homologues reveals 10- and 240-fold preferences for BsYkuN over BsYkuP and EcFldA, respectively. The differential activation of the enzyme cannot be explained by the abortive cleavage of SAM. We conclude from these observations that the differential activation of BsQueE by Fld homologues may reside in the details of the interaction between the flavodoxin and the radical SAM enzyme. PMID:25933252

  16. Distinguishing solid bitumens formed by thermochemical sulfate reduction and thermal chemical alteration

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kelemen, S.R.; Walters, C.C.; Kwiatek, P.J.; Afeworki, M.; Sansone, M.; Freund, H.; Pottorf, R.J.; Machel, H.G.; Zhang, T.; Ellis, G.S.; Tang, Y.; Peters, K.E.

    2008-01-01

    Insoluble solid bitumens are organic residues that can form by the thermal chemical alteration (TCA) or thermochemical sulfate reduction (TSR) of migrated petroleum. TCA may actually encompass several low temperature processes, such as biodegradation and asphaltene precipitation, followed by thermal alteration. TSR is an abiotic redox reaction where petroleum is oxidized by sulfate. It is difficult to distinguish solid bitumens associated with TCA of petroleum from those associated with TSR when both processes occur at relatively high temperature. The focus of the present work was to characterize solid bitumen samples associated with TCA or TSR using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). XPS is a surface analysis conducted on either isolated or in situ (>25 ??m diameter) solid bitumen that can provide the relative abundance and chemical speciation of carbon, organic and inorganic heteroatoms (NSO). In this study, naturally occurring solid bitumens from three locations, Nisku Fm. Brazeau River area (TSR-related), LaBarge Field Madison Fm. (TSR-related), and the Alaskan Brooks range (TCA-related), are compared to organic solids generated during laboratory simulation of the TSR and TCA processes. The abundance and chemical nature of organic nitrogen and sulfur in solid bitumens can be understood in terms of the nature of (1) petroleum precursor molecules, (2) the concentration of nitrogen by way of thermal stress and (3) the mode of sulfur incorporation. TCA solid bitumens originate from polar materials that are initially rich in sulfur and nitrogen. Aromaticity and nitrogen increase as thermal stress cleaves aliphatic moieties and condensation reactions take place. Organic sulfur in TCA organic solids remains fairly constant with increasing maturation (3.5 to ???17 sulfur per 100 carbons) into aromatic structures and to the low levels of nitrogen in their hydrocarbon precursors. Hence, XPS results provide organic chemical composition information that helps to

  17. Synthesis of Cu core Ag shell nanoparticles using chemical reduction method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chinh Trinh, Dung; Dung Dang, Thi My; Khanh Huynh, Kim; Fribourg-Blanc, Eric; Chien Dang, Mau

    2015-01-01

    A simple chemical reduction method is used to prepare colloidal bimetallic Cu-Ag core-shell (Cu@Ag) nanoparticles. Polyvinyl pyrrolidone (PVP) was used as capping agent, and ascorbic acid (C6H8O6) and sodium borohydride (NaBH4) were used as reducing agents. The obtained Cu@Ag nanoparticles were characterized by powder x-ray diffraction (XRD), transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and UV-vis spectrophotometry. The influence of [Ag]/[Cu] molar ratios on the formation of Ag coatings on the Cu particles was investigated. From the TEM results we found that the ratio [Ag+]/[Cu2+] = 0.2 is the best for the stability of Cu@Ag nanoparticles with an average size of 22 nm. It is also found out that adding ammonium hydroxide (NH4OH) makes the obtained Cu@Ag nanoparticles more stable over time when pure deionized water is used as solvent.

  18. Reduction and Uncertainty Analysis of Chemical Mechanisms Based on Local and Global Sensitivities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Esposito, Gaetano

    Numerical simulations of critical reacting flow phenomena in hypersonic propulsion devices require accurate representation of finite-rate chemical kinetics. The chemical kinetic models available for hydrocarbon fuel combustion are rather large, involving hundreds of species and thousands of reactions. As a consequence, they cannot be used in multi-dimensional computational fluid dynamic calculations in the foreseeable future due to the prohibitive computational cost. In addition to the computational difficulties, it is also known that some fundamental chemical kinetic parameters of detailed models have significant level of uncertainty due to limited experimental data available and to poor understanding of interactions among kinetic parameters. In the present investigation, local and global sensitivity analysis techniques are employed to develop a systematic approach of reducing and analyzing detailed chemical kinetic models. Unlike previous studies in which skeletal model reduction was based on the separate analysis of simple cases, in this work a novel strategy based on Principal Component Analysis of local sensitivity values is presented. This new approach is capable of simultaneously taking into account all the relevant canonical combustion configurations over different composition, temperature and pressure conditions. Moreover, the procedure developed in this work represents the first documented inclusion of non-premixed extinction phenomena, which is of great relevance in hypersonic combustors, in an automated reduction algorithm. The application of the skeletal reduction to a detailed kinetic model consisting of 111 species in 784 reactions is demonstrated. The resulting reduced skeletal model of 37--38 species showed that the global ignition/propagation/extinction phenomena of ethylene-air mixtures can be predicted within an accuracy of 2% of the full detailed model. The problems of both understanding non-linear interactions between kinetic parameters and

  19. Chemical degradation and toxicity reduction of 4-chlorophenol in different matrices by gamma-ray treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, Sung-Wook; Shim, Seung-Bo; Park, Young-Kwon; Jung, Jinho

    2011-03-01

    Gamma-ray treatment of 4-chlorophenol (4-CP) in different matrices was studied in terms of both chemical degradation and toxicity reduction. Degradation of 4-CP in a complex effluent matrix was less efficient than that in ultrapure water. This is most likely due to the consumption of reactive radicals by matrix components, such as dissolved organic matter in effluents. The matrix effect caused much more profound changes in toxicity. Gamma-ray treatment of 4-CP in ultrapure water abruptly increased acute toxicity toward Daphnia magna while slightly decreased toxicity of 4-CP in effluent. In the presence of ZrO 2 catalyst, degradation of 4-CP as well as toxicity reduction was substantially improved mostly by adsorption of 4-CP onto the nanoparticles. It was found that benzoquinone, hydroquinone and 4-chlorocatechol were generated for ultrapure water sample while only 4-chlorocatechol was formed for effluent samples by gamma-ray treatment. As determined in this work, EC 50 values of benzoquinone (0.46 μM), hydroquinone (0.61 μM) and chlorocatechol (8.87 μM) were much lower than those of 4-CP (31.50 μM), explaining different toxicity changes of 4-CP in different matrices by gamma-ray treatment. The observed toxicity of gamma-ray treated 4-CP was well correlated with the one calculated from individual toxicity based on EC 50 value.

  20. Assembly of FePt nanoparticles by chemical reduction within nanochannels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sui, Yucheng; Sellmyer, David J.

    2003-03-01

    A novel way of assembling FePt nanoparticles into long nanochannels of porous alumina templates is reported. The templates consist of closely packed parallel nanochannels with diameter of about 20 nm and length of 50 um. An aqueous solution of hexachloroplatinate acid and iron acetate with 1:1 molar ratio was inserted into the pores. After drying and surface cleaning, the impregnated templates were heated in flowing hydrogen at different temperatures. Through this hydrogen reduction process, FePt L10 nanoparticles with average particle size of about 15 nm were grown in the nanochannels when treated at 900oC. As the chemical reduction of Pt and Co takes place within the one-dimension nanochannels and the final products of the FePt nanoparticles were also confined in the channels, the largest particle sizes should be less than 20 nm, which is consist with the x-ray results. Coercivity as high as 29.6 kOe was obtained when the samples were treated in flowing hydrogen at 900oC. This work is supported by DOE, NSF-MRSEC, NRI and CMRA.

  1. Sequential repetitive chemical reduction technique to study size-property relationships of graphene attached Ag nanoparticle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haider, M. Salman; Badejo, Abimbola Comfort; Shao, Godlisten N.; Imran, S. M.; Abbas, Nadir; Chai, Young Gyu; Hussain, Manwar; Kim, Hee Taik

    2015-06-01

    The present study demonstrates a novel, systematic and application route synthesis approach to develop size-property relationship and control the growth of silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) embedded on reduced graphene oxide (rGO). A sequential repetitive chemical reduction technique to observe the growth of silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) attached to rGO, was performed on a single solution of graphene oxide (GO) and silver nitrate solution (7 runs, R1-R7) in order to manipulate the growth and size of the AgNPs. The physical-chemical properties of the samples were examined by RAMAN, XPS, XRD, SEM-EDAX, and HRTEM analyses. It was confirmed that AgNPs with diameter varying from 4 nm in first run (R1) to 50 nm in seventh run (R7) can be obtained using this technique. A major correlation between particle size and activities was also observed. Antibacterial activities of the samples were carried out to investigate the disinfection performance of the samples on the Gram negative bacteria (Escherichia coli). It was suggested that the sample obtained in the third run (R3) exhibited the highest antibacterial activity as compared to other samples, toward disinfection of bacteria due to its superior properties. This study provides a unique and novel application route to synthesize and control size of AgNPs embedded on graphene for various applications.

  2. In situ self-assembly of mild chemical reduction graphene for three-dimensional architectures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Wufeng; Yan, Lifeng

    2011-08-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) architectures of graphene are of interest in applications in electronics, catalysis devices, and sensors. However, it is still a challenge to fabricate macroscopic all-graphene 3D architectures under mild conditions. Here, a simple method for the preparation of 3D architectures of graphene is developed via the in situ self-assembly of graphene prepared by mild chemical reduction at 95 °C under atmospheric pressure without stirring. No chemical or physical cross-linkers or high pressures are required. The reducing agents include NaHSO3, Na2S, Vitamin C, HI, and hydroquinone. Both graphene hydrogels and aerogels can be prepared by this method, and the shapes of the 3D architectures can be controlled by changing the type of reactor. The 3D architectures of graphene have low densities, high mechanical properties, thermal stability, high electrical conductivity, and high specific capacitance, which make them candidates for potential applications in supercapacitors, hydrogen storage and as supports for catalysts.

  3. Chemical noise reduction via mass spectrometry and ion/ion charge inversion: amino acids.

    PubMed

    Hassell, Kerry M; LeBlanc, Yves C; McLuckey, Scott A

    2011-05-01

    Charge inversion ion/ion reactions can provide a significant reduction in chemical noise associated with mass spectra derived from complex mixtures for species composed of both acidic and basic sites, provided the ions derived from the matrix largely undergo neutralization. Amino acids constitute an important class of amphoteric compounds that undergo relatively efficient charge inversion. Precipitated plasma constitutes a relatively complex biological matrix that yields detectable signals at essentially every mass-to-charge value over a wide range. This chemical noise can be dramatically reduced using multiply charged reagent ions that can invert the charge of species amenable to the transfer of multiple charges upon a single interaction and by detecting product ions of opposite polarity. The principle is illustrated here with amino acids present in precipitated plasma subjected to ionization in the positive mode, reaction with anions derived from negative nanoelectrospray ionization of poly (amido amine) dendrimer generation 3.5, and mass analysis in the negative ion mode. PMID:21456599

  4. Implications of Arctic Sea Ice Reduction on Arctic Tropospheric Chemical Change (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nghiem, S. V.

    2009-12-01

    We examine the drastic reduction of Arctic sea ice in this decade and discuss the potential implications on bromine, ozone, and mercury change in the Arctic troposphere. We are witnessing extraordinary change in the Arctic sea ice cover. In the context of a half century change, perennial sea ice, the class of thicker and older ice important to the stability of Arctic sea ice, has been declining precipitously in this decade. Perennial ice extent declines at rate of 0.5 million km2 per decade in the 1970s-1990s while there is no discernable trend in the 1950s-1960s. Abruptly, the rate of decrease has tripled to 1.5 million km2 per decade in the 2000s. A record was set in the reduction of Arctic perennial ice extent in winter 2008. By 1 March 2008, perennial ice extent was reduced by one million km2 compared to that at the same time in 2007, which continued the precipitous declining trend observed in this decade. While the record low of total ice extent in summer 2007 is a historical mark of sea ice loss, the distribution and extent of different sea ice classes in spring (March-May) are critical information to understand the implications of sea ice reduction on photochemical processes, such as bromine explosions, ozone depletion episodes (ODEs), gaseous elementary mercury depletion episodes (MDEs), which occur at the time of polar sunrise. In this regard, the drastic reduction of perennial ice means that the Arctic becomes dominated by seasonal ice consisting of thinner ice, more leads, polynyas, frost flowers, and salty snow (due to seawater spray from open water), representing the overall saltier condition of the Arctic sea ice cover conducive to ice-mediated chemical processes leading to Arctic tropospheric ODEs and MDEs. To date (2009), the extent of perennial sea ice remains low and the extent of the thinner and saltier seasonal ice continues to dominate the Arctic sea ice cover. The shift of the state of Arctic sea ice cover to the dominance domain of seasonal

  5. Effects of substrates and phosphate on INT (2-(4-iodophenyl)-3-(4-nitrophenyl)-5-phenyl tetrazolium chloride) and CTC (5-cyano-2,3-ditolyl tetrazolium chloride) reduction in Escherichia coli

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, J. J.; McFeters, G. A.

    1996-01-01

    The effects of substrates of primary aerobic dehydrogenases, and inorganic phosphate on aerobic INT and CTC reduction in Escherichia coli were examined. In general, INT produced less formazan than CTC, but INT (+) cell counts remained near values of CTC (+) cells. INT and CTC (+) cell numbers were higher than plate counts on R2A medium using succinate, formate, lactate, casamino acids, glucose, glycerol (INT only) and no substrate. Formate resulted in the greatest amount of INT and CTC formazan. Reduction of both INT and CTC was inhibited above 10 mmol l-1 phosphate, and this appeared to be related to decreased rates of O2 consumption. Formation of fluorescent CTC (+), but not INT (+) cells was also inhibited in a concentration dependent manner by phosphate above 10 mmol l-1. From light microscopic observations it appeared CTC formed increasing amounts of poorly or non-fluorescent formazan with increasing phosphate. Therefore, use of phosphate buffer in excess of 10 mmol l-1 may not be appropriate in CTC and INT reduction assays.

  6. Reduction of hexavalent chromium by fasted and fed human gastric fluid. I. Chemical reduction and mitigation of mutagenicity.

    PubMed

    De Flora, Silvio; Camoirano, Anna; Micale, Rosanna T; La Maestra, Sebastiano; Savarino, Vincenzo; Zentilin, Patrizia; Marabotto, Elisa; Suh, Mina; Proctor, Deborah M

    2016-09-01

    Evaluation of the reducing capacity of human gastric fluid from healthy individuals, under fasted and fed conditions, is critical for assessing the cancer hazard posed by ingested hexavalent chromium [Cr(VI)] and for developing quantitative physiologically-based pharmacokinetic models used in risk assessment. In the present study, the patterns of Cr(VI) reduction were evaluated in 16 paired pre- and post-meal gastric fluid samples collected from 8 healthy volunteers. Human gastric fluid was effective both in reducing Cr(VI), as measured by using the s-diphenylcarbazide colorimetric method, and in attenuating mutagenicity in the Ames test. The mean (±SE) Cr(VI)-reducing ability of post-meal samples (20.4±2.6μgCr(VI)/mL gastric fluid) was significantly higher than that of pre-meal samples (10.2±2.3μgCr(VI)/mL gastric fluid). When using the mutagenicity assay, the decrease of mutagenicity produced by pre-meal and post-meal samples corresponded to reduction of 13.3±1.9 and 25.6±2.8μgCr(VI)/mL gastric fluid, respectively. These data are comparable to parallel results conducted by using speciated isotope dilution mass spectrometry. Cr(VI) reduction was rapid, with >70% of total reduction occurring within 1min and 98% of reduction is achieved within 30min with post-meal gastric fluid at pH2.0. pH dependence was observed with decreasing Cr(VI) reducing capacity at higher pH. Attenuation of the mutagenic response is consistent with the lack of DNA damage observed in the gastrointestinal tract of rodents following administration of ≤180ppm Cr(VI) for up to 90days in drinking water. Quantifying Cr(VI) reduction kinetics in the human gastrointestinal tract is necessary for assessing the potential hazards posed by Cr(VI) in drinking water. PMID:27404458

  7. Simultaneous nitrate reduction and acetaminophen oxidation using the continuous-flow chemical-less VUV process as an integrated advanced oxidation and reduction process.

    PubMed

    Moussavi, Gholamreza; Shekoohiyan, Sakine

    2016-11-15

    This work was aimed at investigating the performance of the continuous-flow VUV photoreactor as a novel chemical-less advanced process for simultaneously oxidizing acetaminophen (ACT) as a model of pharmaceuticals and reducing nitrate in a single reactor. Solution pH was an important parameter affecting the performance of VUV; the highest ACT oxidation and nitrate reduction attained at solution pH between 6 and 8. The ACT was oxidized mainly by HO while the aqueous electrons were the main working agents in the reduction of nitrate. The performance of VUV photoreactor improved with the increase of hydraulic retention time (HRT); the complete degradation of ACT and ∼99% reduction of nitrate with 100% N2 selectivity achieved at HRT of 80min. The VUV effluent concentrations of nitrite and ammonium at HRT of 80min were below the drinking water standards. The real water sample contaminated with the ACT and nitrate was efficiently treated in the VUV photoreactor. Therefore, the VUV photoreactor is a chemical-less advanced process in which both advanced oxidation and advanced reduction reactions are accomplished. This unique feature possesses VUV photoreactor as a promising method of treating water contaminated with both pharmaceutical and nitrate. PMID:27434736

  8. Occurrence of two-photon absorption saturation in Ag nanocolloids, prepared by chemical reduction method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rahulan, K. Mani; Ganesan, S.; Aruna, P.

    2012-09-01

    Silver nanocolloids stabilized with polyvinyl pyrrolidone (PVP) have been prepared from (AgNO3) by a chemical reduction method, involving the intermediate preparation of (Ag2O) colloidal dispersions in the presence of sodium dodecycle sulfate as a surfactant and formaldehyde as reducing agent. The molecules of PVP play an important role in growth and agglomeration of silver nanocolloids. The formation of Ag nanocolloids was studied from the UV-vis absorption characteristics. An energy dispersive X-ray (EDX) spectrum and X-ray diffraction peak of the nanoparticles showed the highly crystalline nature of silver structure. The particle size was found to be 40 nm as analyzed from Field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM). The nonlinear optical and optical limiting properties of these nanoparticle dispersions were studied by using the Z-scan technique at 532 nm. Experimental results show that the Ag nanocolloids possess strong optical limiting effect, originated from absorption saturation followed by two-photon mechanism. The data show that Ag nanocolloids have great potential for nonlinear optical devices.

  9. Synthesis and optical properties of copper nanoparticles prepared by a chemical reduction method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dung Dang, Thi My; Tuyet Thu Le, Thi; Fribourg-Blanc, Eric; Chien Dang, Mau

    2011-03-01

    Copper nanoparticles, due to their interesting properties, low cost preparation and many potential applications in catalysis, cooling fluid or conductive inks, have attracted a lot of interest in recent years. In this study, copper nanoparticles were synthesized through the chemical reduction of copper sulfate with sodium borohydride in water without inert gas protection. In our synthesis route, ascorbic acid (natural vitamin C) was employed as a protective agent to prevent the nascent Cu nanoparticles from oxidation during the synthesis process and in storage. Polyethylene glycol (PEG) was added and worked both as a size controller and as a capping agent. Cu nanoparticles were characterized by Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopy to investigate the coordination between Cu nanoparticles and PEG. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and UV–vis spectrometry contributed to the analysis of size and optical properties of the nanoparticles, respectively. The average crystal sizes of the particles at room temperature were less than 10 nm. It was observed that the surface plasmon resonance phenomenon can be controlled during synthesis by varying the reaction time, pH, and relative ratio of copper sulfate to the surfactant. The surface plasmon resonance peak shifts from 561 to 572 nm, while the apparent color changes from red to black, which is partly related to the change in particle size. Upon oxidation, the color of the solution changes from red to violet and ultimately a blue solution appears.

  10. Chemical evaluation of odor reduction by soil injection of animal manure.

    PubMed

    Feilberg Tavs Nyord, Anders; Hansen, Martin Nørregaard; Lindholst, Sabine

    2011-01-01

    Field application of animal manure is a major cause of odor nuisance in the local environment. Therefore, there is a need for methods for measuring the effect of technologies for reducing odor after manure application. In this work, chemical methods were used to identify key odorants from field application of pig manure based on experiments with surface application by trailing hoses and soil injection. Results from three consecutive years of field trials with full-scale equipment are reported. Methods applied were: membrane inlet mass spectrometry (MIMS), proton-transfer-reaction mass spectrometry (PTR-MS), gold-film hydrogen sulfide (H₂S) detection, all performed on site, and thermal desorption gas chromatography with mass spectrometry (TD-GC/MS) based on laboratory analyses of field samples. Samples were collected from a static flux chamber often used for obtaining samples for dynamic olfactometry. While all methods were capable of detecting relevant odorants, PTR-MS gave the most comprehensive results. Based on odor threshold values, 4-methylphenol, H₂S, and methanethiol are suggested as key odorants. Significant odorant reductions by soil injection were consistently observed in all trials. The flux chamber technique was demonstrated to be associated with critical errors due to compound instabilities in the chamber. This was most apparent for H₂S, on a time scale of a few minutes, and on a longer time scale for methanethiol. PMID:21869529

  11. Sulfur and ash reduction potential and selected chemical and physical properties of United States coals

    SciTech Connect

    Cavallaro, J.A.; Deurbrouck, A.W.; Killmeyer, R.P.; Fuchs, W. ); Jacobsen, P.S. )

    1991-09-01

    This report summarizes the washability and comprehensive characterization of 975 raw coal channel samples collected from the Eastern, Central, and Western Regions (including Alaska) of the United States. All of this information is sorted in the Pittsburgh Energy Technology Center (PETC) Coal Technology Data Base. Individual reports for each region were completed previously as Volumes 1, 2, and 3 and included the detailed data for each of the 975 samples. This report is a summation of the results of those three reports on a state- and region-wide basis only, and does not include the data for individual samples, but only includes the composite data for each state and region. Graphical summations are presented by state, section or rank, and region showing the effects of crushing on impurity reductions and showing the distribution of raw and clean coal samples meeting various levels of SO{sub 2} emissions. The statistical evaluations in the Appendices present the composited washability data of 1.30, 1.40, and 1.60 specific gravities of separation, the selected chemical and physical properties, and the composited washability data interpolated at various levels of Btu recovery. 13 refs., 93 figs., 9 tabs.

  12. Deposition of silver nanoparticles on multiwalled carbon nanotubes by chemical reduction process and their antimicrobial effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haider, Adawiya J.; Thamir, Amin D.; Ahmed, Duha S.; Mohammad, M. R.

    2016-07-01

    In this paper, the functionalization of raw-MWCNTs involves oxidation reaction using concentrated acid mixture of HNO3:H2SO4 (1:3), via ultrasonic bath (170 W, 50 kHz) to obtain functional groups. Then Ag nanoparticles are decorated the outside over the surface of functionalized MWCNTs using a chemical reduction process resulting in the formation of(Ag/ MWCNTs) hybrid material. The results showed that outer diameter functionalized F-MWCNTs andAg nanoparticles size was about (11-80) nm and (10 to 25) nm, respectively using TEM and HRTEM. The crystallographic structure of MWCNTs using X-ray diffraction (XRD) analysis proved diffraction peaks at 38.1°, 44.3°, 64.7° and 77.4° degrees namely, Ag (111), Ag (200), Ag (220), and Ag (311) of the face-centered cubic lattice of Ag, respectively, excepting the peak at 2θ =25.6°, which correspond to the (0 0 2) reflection of the MWNTs are corresponding to Ag/MWNTs. The antimicrobial activities of Ag/MWCNTs hybrid using plate count method showed that decreasing a large number of bacteria colonies of E. coli and S. aureu with increasing the hybrid concentrations after incubation for 24h in shaker incubator with percentage of inhibition approaching 100%.

  13. A Biophysicochemical Model for NO Removal by the Chemical Absorption-Biological Reduction Integrated Process.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Jingkai; Xia, Yinfeng; Li, Meifang; Li, Sujing; Li, Wei; Zhang, Shihan

    2016-08-16

    The chemical absorption-biological reduction (CABR) integrated process is regarded as a promising technology for NOx removal from flue gas. To advance the scale-up of the CABR process, a mathematic model based on mass transfer with reaction in the gas, liquid, and biofilm was developed to simulate and predict the NOx removal by the CABR system in a biotrickling filter. The developed model was validated by the experimental results and subsequently was used to predict the system performance under different operating conditions, such as NO and O2 concentration and gas and liquid flow rate. NO distribution in the gas phase along the biotrickling filter was also modeled and predicted. On the basis of the modeling results, the liquid flow rate and total iron concentration were optimized to achieve >90% NO removal efficiency. Furthermore, sensitivity analysis of the model revealed that the performance of the CABR process was controlled by the bioreduction activity of Fe(III)EDTA. This work will provide the guideline for the design and operation of the CABR process in the industrial application. PMID:27442232

  14. TRACI THE TOOL FOR THE REDUCTION AND ASSESSMENT OF CHEMICAL AND OTHER ENVIRONMENTAL IMPACTS - VERSION 2 CHANGES

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Tool for the Reduction and Assessment of Chemical and other environmental Impacts (TRACI) was developed to allow the quantification of environmental impacts for a variety of impact categories which are necessary for a comprehensive impact assessment. See Figure 1. TRACI is c...

  15. TRACI 2.0 - The Tool for the Reduction and Assessment of Chemical and other environmental Impacts

    EPA Science Inventory

    TRACI 2.0, the Tool for the Reduction and Assessment of Chemical and other environmental Impacts 2.0, has been expanded and developed for sustainability metrics, life cycle impact assessment, industrial ecology, and process design impact assessment for developing increasingly sus...

  16. Estimating the One-Electron Reduction Potential for Vanadium (V) by Chemical Techniques: An Experiment for General Chemistry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wentworth, R. A. D.

    1985-01-01

    Describes an experiment which requires only qualitative observations, is suitable for general chemistry students, prompts an understanding of thermodynamic spontaneity, gives chemical meaning to electrode potentials, requires non-electrochemical equipment, and allows estimates of the standard potential for the reduction of Vanadium (V) to V (IV).…

  17. SITE PROGRAM DEMONSTRATION ECO LOGIC INTERNATIONAL GAS-PHASE CHEMICAL REDUCTION PROCESS, BAY CITY, MICHIGAN TECHNOLOGY EVALUATION REPORT

    EPA Science Inventory

    The SITE Program funded a field demonstration to evaluate the Eco Logic Gas-Phase Chemical Reduction Process developed by ELI Eco Logic International Inc. (ELI), Ontario, Canada. The Demonstration took place at the Middleground Landfill in Bay City, Michigan using landfill wa...

  18. Light-induced reduction of rhodium(III) and palladium(II) on titanium dioxide dispersions and the selective photochemical separation and recovery of gold(III), platinum(IV), and rhodium(III) in chloride media

    SciTech Connect

    Borgarello, E.; Serpone, N.; Emo, G.; Harris, R.; Pelizzetti, E.; Minero, C.

    1986-12-03

    Irradiation of aqueous TiO/sub 2/ dispersions containing palladium(II) or rhodium(III) chloride salts with AM1 simulated sunlight leads to the photoreduction of these metals, which are deposited on the semiconductor particle surface. Oxygen is detrimental to the photoreduction of rhodium(III) but not the photoreduction of palladium(II). However, in both cases the reduction process is most efficient if the solution contains CH/sub 3/OH, which acts to scavenge valence band holes of the illuminated TiO/sub 2/ semiconductor. The selective photoreduction and recovery of precious metals from a dilute solution (as might be found in industrial wastes) have been investigated for a mixture of gold(III), platinum(IV), and rhodium(III) chloride salts as a function of various parameters (pH, presence or absence of O/sub 2/, presence or absence of a hole scavenger, and the concentration of the semiconductor). At pH 0, gold is easily separated from platinum and rhodium. The rate of photoreduction of gold(III) on TiO/sub 2/ is nearly independent of the concentration of the semiconductor, under the experimental conditions employed; the limiting rate is 2.7 x 10/sup -7/ M s/sup -1/. The potential utility of this selective photochemical technique is discussed.

  19. Laser using lead chloride vapor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, C. J.

    1975-01-01

    By applying electric discharge, lead chloride vapor in tube is dissociated into lead and chlorine atoms. Population inversion of lead atoms is attained subsequently by second discharge, before chemical recombination of lead and chlorine has occurred. Optimum time interval between two discharges is required for maximum laser output.

  20. Photochemical modeling in California with two chemical mechanisms: model intercomparison and response to emission reductions.

    PubMed

    Cai, Chenxia; Kelly, James T; Avise, Jeremy C; Kaduwela, Ajith P; Stockwell, William R

    2011-05-01

    An updated version of the Statewide Air Pollution Research Center (SAPRC) chemical mechanism (SAPRC07C) was implemented into the Community Multiscale Air Quality (CMAQ) version 4.6. CMAQ simulations using SAPRC07C and the previously released version, SAPRC99, were performed and compared for an episode during July-August, 2000. Ozone (O3) predictions of the SAPRC07C simulation are generally lower than those of the SAPRC99 simulation in the key areas of central and southern California, especially in areas where modeled concentrations are greater than the federal 8-hr O3 standard of 75 parts per billion (ppb) and/or when the volatile organic compound (VOC)/nitrogen oxides (NOx) ratio is less than 13. The relative changes of ozone production efficiency (OPE) against the VOC/NOx ratio at 46 sites indicate that the OPE is reduced in SAPRC07C compared with SAPRC99 at most sites by as much as approximately 22%. The SAPRC99 and SAPRC07C mechanisms respond similarly to 20% reductions in anthropogenic VOC emissions. The response of the mechanisms to 20% NOx emissions reductions can be grouped into three cases. In case 1, in which both mechanisms show a decrease in daily maximum 8-hr O3 concentration with decreasing NOx emissions, the O3 decrease in SAPRC07C is smaller. In case 2, in which both mechanisms show an increase in O3 with decreasing NOx emissions, the O3 increase is larger in SAPRC07C. In case 3, SAPRC07C simulates an increase in O3 in response to reduced NOx emissions whereas SAPRC99 simulates a decrease in O3 for the same region. As a result, the areas where NOx controls would be disbeneficial are spatially expanded in SAPRC07C. Although the results presented here are valuable for understanding differences in predictions and model response for SAPRC99 and SAPRC07C, the study did not evaluate the impact of mechanism differences in the context of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's guidance for using numerical models in demonstrating air quality attainment

  1. Plasma chemical reduction of model corrosion brass layers prepared in soil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Radkova, Lucie; Mikova, Petra; Prikryl, Radek; Krcma, Frantisek

    2016-08-01

    The brass plates of (50 × 10 × 1) mm3 were prepared with model corrosion layer because the real archaeological artifacts could be damaged during the method optimization. Samples corroded naturally more than 2 years in the soil. Excavated samples were treated in the low pressure (150 Pa) quartz glass plasma reactor (90 cm long and 9.5 cm in diameter) which was surrounded by two external copper electrodes supplied by radio-frequency generator (13.56 MHz). The experiments were carried out in a hydrogen-argon gas mixture at mass flows of 30 sccm for hydrogen and 20 sccm for argon for 90 min. The plasma power was 100, 200, 300 and 400 W in continuous and pulsed mode. Maximum sample temperature was set at 120 °C. The whole process was monitored by optical emission spectroscopy and the obtained data were used to calculate the relative intensity of OH radicals and rotational temperature. The results showed that the higher power had the greater maximum intensity of the OH radicals and rapidly degraded the corrosion layer. Corrosion layer was not completely removed during the reduction, but due to the reactions which occur in the plasma corrosion layer became brittle and after plasma chemical treatment can be removed easily. Finally, the SEM-EDX analysis of the surface composition confirmed removal of chlorine and oxygen from the corrosion products layers. Contribution to the topical issue "6th Central European Symposium on Plasma Chemistry (CESPC-6)", edited by Nicolas Gherardi, Ester Marotta and Cristina Paradisi

  2. Bacterial Disproportionation of Elemental Sulfur Coupled to Chemical Reduction of Iron or Manganese

    PubMed Central

    Thamdrup, Bo; Finster, Kai; Hansen, Jens Würgler; Bak, Friedhelm

    1993-01-01

    A new chemolithotrophic bacterial metabolism was discovered in anaerobic marine enrichment cultures. Cultures in defined medium with elemental sulfur (S0) and amorphous ferric hydroxide (FeOOH) as sole substrates showed intense formation of sulfate. Furthermore, precipitation of ferrous sulfide and pyrite was observed. The transformations were accompanied by growth of slightly curved, rod-shaped bacteria. The quantification of the products revealed that S0 was microbially disproportionated to sulfate and sulfide, as follows: 4S0 + 4H2O → SO42- + 3H2S + 2H+. Subsequent chemical reactions between the formed sulfide and the added FeOOH led to the observed precipitation of iron sulfides. Sulfate and iron sulfides were also produced when FeOOH was replaced by FeCO3. Further enrichment with manganese oxide, MnO2, instead of FeOOH yielded stable cultures which formed sulfate during concomitant reduction of MnO2 to Mn2+. Growth of small rod-shaped bacteria was observed. When incubated without MnO2, the culture did not grow but produced small amounts of SO42- and H2S at a ratio of 1:3, indicating again a disproportionation of S0. The observed microbial disproportionation of S0 only proceeds significantly in the presence of sulfide-scavenging agents such as iron and manganese compounds. The population density of bacteria capable of S0 disproportionation in the presence of FeOOH or MnO2 was high, > 104 cm-3 in coastal sediments. The metabolism offers an explanation for recent observations of anaerobic sulfide oxidation to sulfate in anoxic sediments. PMID:16348835

  3. Effect of five cycle rapid freeze-thaw treatment in conjunction with various chemicals for the reduction of Salmonella typhimurium.

    PubMed

    Olson, V M; Swaminathan, B; Pratt, D E; Stadelman, W J

    1981-08-01

    A five cycle rapid freeze-rapid thaw process was used in conjunction with chemicals to reduce numbers of Salmonella typhimurium cells on poultry meat. The second portion of chicken wings consisting of ulna and radius with attached skin and muscle was inoculated with 400 to 900 colony forming units (CFU/g) of a nalidixic acid resistant strain of S. typhimurium. Chemicals used were 20 ppm chlorine, 5% potassium sorbate, 5% lactic acid, and 5% calcium propionate. The wings were either sprayed with or dipped into all chemicals before the freeze-thaw process. Wings were also chemically treated and not subjected to the freeze-thaw process. Numbers of S. typhimurium were determined by the most probable number procedure. The relative effectiveness of combinations of chemicals and the freeze-thaw process was compared to a control with the following percentage reductions of numbers of S. typhimurium cells: lactic acid, 98%; calcium propionate, 96%; potassium sorbate, 96%; chlorine, 95%; and freeze-thaw process without chemicals, 95%. There were no statistically significant differences among the treatments. In pilot plant study simulating commercial conditions, a carbon dioxide freezer was used for the rapid freeze and a microwave oven was used for the rapid thaw. Treatment of wings with 5% lactic acid plus freeze-thaw process resulted in statistically significant fewer numbers of S. typhimurium cells when compared to the freeze-thaw process without chemical treatment or to wings chemically treated without the freeze-thaw process. PMID:7322982

  4. Recovery of Cu(II) by chemical reduction using sodium dithionite: effect of pH and ligands.

    PubMed

    Chou, Yi-Hsuan; Yu, Jui-Hsuan; Liang, Yang-Min; Wang, Pin-Jan; Li, Chi-Wang; Chen, Shiao-Shing

    2015-01-01

    Wastewaters containing Cu(II) and ligands are ubiquitous in various industrial sectors, and efficacy of copper removal processes, especially precipitation, is greatly compromised by ligands. Chemical reduction, being commonly employed for production of metal nanoparticles, is also effective for metal removal. Adjustment of pH and addition of ligands are important to control the particle size in metallic nanoparticle production. Exploiting the fact that ligands and metals coexist in many wastewaters, chemical reduction was employed to treat ligand-containing wastewater in this study. The experimental result shows that depending on pH, type of ligands, and copper:ligand molar ratio, copper could be removed by either the reduction or precipitation mechanism. Almost complete copper removal could be achieved by the reduction mechanism under optimal condition for solutions containing either EDTA (ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid) or citrate ligands. For solutions containing ammonia, depending on pH and Cu:ammonia molar ratio, copper was removed by both precipitation and reduction mechanisms. At pH of 9.0, formation of nano-sized particles, which readily pass through a 0.45 μm filter used for sample pretreatment before residual copper analysis, results in the lowest copper removal efficiency. Both cuprous oxide and metallic copper are identified in the solids produced, and the possible explanations are provided. PMID:26606104

  5. Synthesis of silver nanoparticles by chemical reduction at various fraction of MSA and their structure characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diantoro, Markus; Fitrianingsih, Rina; Mufti, Nandang; Fuad, Abdulloh

    2014-03-01

    Nanosilver is currently one of the most common engineered nanomaterials and is used in many applications that lead to the release of silver nanoparticles and silver ions into aqueous systems. Nanosilver also possesses enhanced antimicrobial activity and bioavailability that may less environmental risk compared with other manufactured nanomaterials. Described in this research are the synthesis of silver nanoparticle produced by chemical reduction from silver nitrate (AgNO3) solution. As a reducing agent, Sodium Borohydride (NaBH4) was used and mercaptosuccinic Acid (MSA) as stabilizer to prevent the nanoparticle from aglomerating. It was also used two kinds of solvent, they are water and methanol. In typical experiment MSA was dissolve in methanol with a number of variation of molarity i.e. 0,03 M, 0,06 M, 0,12 M, 0,15 M, and the mixture was kept under vigorous stirring in an ice bath. A solution of silver nitrate of 340 mg in 6,792 ml water was added. A freshly prepared aqueous solution of sodium borohydride (756,6 mL in 100 mL of water) was added drop wisely. The solution was kept for half an hour for stirring and were allowed to settle down in methanol. The obtained samples then characterized by means of x-ray diffractometer, and scanning electron microscopy, as well as transmission electron microscopy to obtain their structures of silver nanoparticles, morphology, and sizes. It is shown that diameter of silver nanoparticle sized about 24.3 nm (Ag@MSA 0.03 M), 20.4 nm (Ag@MSA 0.06 M), 16.8 nm (Ag@MSA 0.12 M), 16.9 nm (Ag@MSA 0.15 M) which was calculated by Scherrer formula by taking the FWHM from fitting to Gaussian. The phases and lattice parameter showed that there is no significant change in its volume by increasing molarity of stabilizer. In contrast, the size of particles is decreasing.

  6. Synthesis of silver nanoparticles by chemical reduction at various fraction of MSA and their structure characterization

    SciTech Connect

    Diantoro, Markus Fitrianingsih, Rina Mufti, Nandang Fuad, Abdulloh

    2014-03-24

    Nanosilver is currently one of the most common engineered nanomaterials and is used in many applications that lead to the release of silver nanoparticles and silver ions into aqueous systems. Nanosilver also possesses enhanced antimicrobial activity and bioavailability that may less environmental risk compared with other manufactured nanomaterials. Described in this research are the synthesis of silver nanoparticle produced by chemical reduction from silver nitrate (AgNO{sub 3}) solution. As a reducing agent, Sodium Borohydride (NaBH{sub 4}) was used and mercaptosuccinic Acid (MSA) as stabilizer to prevent the nanoparticle from aglomerating. It was also used two kinds of solvent, they are water and methanol. In typical experiment MSA was dissolve in methanol with a number of variation of molarity i.e. 0,03 M, 0,06 M, 0,12 M, 0,15 M, and the mixture was kept under vigorous stirring in an ice bath. A solution of silver nitrate of 340 mg in 6,792 ml water was added. A freshly prepared aqueous solution of sodium borohydride (756,6 mL in 100 mL of water) was added drop wisely. The solution was kept for half an hour for stirring and were allowed to settle down in methanol. The obtained samples then characterized by means of x-ray diffractometer, and scanning electron microscopy, as well as transmission electron microscopy to obtain their structures of silver nanoparticles, morphology, and sizes. It is shown that diameter of silver nanoparticle sized about 24.3 nm (Ag@MSA 0.03 M), 20.4 nm (Ag@MSA 0.06 M), 16.8 nm (Ag@MSA 0.12 M), 16.9 nm (Ag@MSA 0.15 M) which was calculated by Scherrer formula by taking the FWHM from fitting to Gaussian. The phases and lattice parameter showed that there is no significant change in its volume by increasing molarity of stabilizer. In contrast, the size of particles is decreasing.

  7. Fast variance reduction for steady-state simulation and sensitivity analysis of stochastic chemical systems using shadow function estimators

    SciTech Connect

    Milias-Argeitis, Andreas Khammash, Mustafa; Lygeros, John

    2014-07-14

    We address the problem of estimating steady-state quantities associated to systems of stochastic chemical kinetics. In most cases of interest, these systems are analytically intractable, and one has to resort to computational methods to estimate stationary values of cost functions. In this work, we introduce a novel variance reduction algorithm for stochastic chemical kinetics, inspired by related methods in queueing theory, in particular the use of shadow functions. Using two numerical examples, we demonstrate the efficiency of the method for the calculation of steady-state parametric sensitivities and evaluate its performance in comparison to other estimation methods.

  8. Fast variance reduction for steady-state simulation and sensitivity analysis of stochastic chemical systems using shadow function estimators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Milias-Argeitis, Andreas; Lygeros, John; Khammash, Mustafa

    2014-07-01

    We address the problem of estimating steady-state quantities associated to systems of stochastic chemical kinetics. In most cases of interest, these systems are analytically intractable, and one has to resort to computational methods to estimate stationary values of cost functions. In this work, we introduce a novel variance reduction algorithm for stochastic chemical kinetics, inspired by related methods in queueing theory, in particular the use of shadow functions. Using two numerical examples, we demonstrate the efficiency of the method for the calculation of steady-state parametric sensitivities and evaluate its performance in comparison to other estimation methods.

  9. Adsorption and chemical reaction of gaseous mixtures of hydrogen chloride and water on aluminum oxide and application to solid-propellant rocket exhaust clouds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cofer, W. R., III; Pellett, G. L.

    1978-01-01

    Hydrogen chloride (HCl) and aluminum oxide (Al2O3) are major exhaust products of solid rocket motors (SRM). Samples of calcination-produced alumina were exposed to continuously flowing mixtures of gaseous HCl/H2O in nitrogen. Transient sorption rates, as well as maximum sorptive capacities, were found to be largely controlled by specific surface area for samples of alpha, theta, and gamma alumina. Sorption rates for small samples were characterized linearly with an empirical relationship that accounted for specific area and logarithmic time. Chemisorption occurred on all aluminas studied and appeared to form from the sorption of about a 2/5 HCl-to-H2O mole ratio. The chemisorbed phase was predominantly water soluble, yielding chloride/aluminum III ion mole ratios of about 3.3/1 suggestive of dissolved surface chlorides and/or oxychlorides. Isopiestic experiments in hydrochloric acid indicated that dissolution of alumina led to an increase in water-vapor pressure. Dissolution in aqueous SRM acid aerosol droplets, therefore, might be expected to promote evaporation.

  10. Continuum and Quantum-Chemical Modeling of Oxygen Reduction on the Cathode in a Solid Oxide Fuel Cell

    SciTech Connect

    Choi, Yongman; Mebane, David S.; Wang, Jeng-Han; Liu, Meilin

    2009-10-08

    Solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs) have several advantages over other types of fuels cells such as high-energy efficiency and excellent fuel flexibility. To be economically competitive, however, new materials with extraordinary transport and catalytic properties must be developed to dramatically improve the performance while reducing the cost. This article reviews recent advancements in understanding oxygen reduction on various cathode materials using phenomenological and quantum chemical approaches in order to develop novel cathode materials with high catalytic activity toward oxygen reduction. We summarize a variety of results relevant to understanding the interactions between O2 and cathode materials at the molecular level as predicted using quantum-chemical cal-culations and probed using in situ surface vibrational spectroscopy. It is hoped that this in-depth understanding may provide useful insights into the design of novel cath-ode materials for a new generation of SOFCs.

  11. Synthesis of copper quantum dots by chemical reduction method and tailoring of its band gap

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prabhash, P. G.; Nair, Swapna S.

    2016-05-01

    Metallic copper nano particles are synthesized with citric acid and CTAB (cetyltrimethylammonium bromide) as surfactant and chlorides as precursors. The particle size and surface morphology are analyzed by High Resolution Transmission Electron Microscopy. The average size of the nano particle is found to be 3 - 10 nm. The optical absorption characteristics are done by UV-Visible spectrophotometer. From the Tauc plots, the energy band gaps are calculated and because of their smaller size the particles have much higher band gap than the bulk material. The energy band gap is changed from 3.67 eV to 4.27 eV in citric acid coated copper quantum dots and 4.17 eV to 4.52 eV in CTAB coated copper quantum dots.

  12. Function of a landscape lake in the reduction of biotoxicity related to trace organic chemicals from reclaimed water.

    PubMed

    Ma, Xiaoyan Y; Wang, Xiaochang C; Wang, Donghong; Ngo, Huu Hao; Zhang, Qiuya; Wang, Yongkun; Dai, Dinan

    2016-11-15

    The storage of water in a landscape lake can act as a buffer zone between reclaimed water production and reuse, but there is still uncertainty about the variation of water quality and toxic effects during the open-storage process. In this study, long-term sample collection, chemical analyses and biotoxicity assessments were conducted on reclaimed water before and after open storage in a landscape lake. The organic contents, in terms of chemical oxygen demand and total organic carbon, were found to be slightly higher in the lake water than that in the reclaimed water, but substantial reduction of the total concentration of 52 trace organic chemicals was obtained and microorganism toxicity, phytotoxicity, aquatic vertebrate toxicity and genotoxicity, were significantly weakened after open storage. Furthermore, the total risk quotient (RQTotal) decreased from 5.12 (potential ecological risk level) in the reclaimed water to 0.18 (negligible ecological risk level) in the lake water. The removal of chlorpyrifos, dichlorphos and tetracycline was identified as the main reason for biotoxicity reduction after open storage. The seminatural environment of the landscape lake would have provided a favorable condition for the decay of toxic trace organic chemicals so that the stored water turned to be safer for further reuse. PMID:27475464

  13. Lithium metal reduction of plutonium oxide to produce plutonium metal

    DOEpatents

    Coops, Melvin S.

    1992-01-01

    A method is described for the chemical reduction of plutonium oxides to plutonium metal by the use of pure lithium metal. Lithium metal is used to reduce plutonium oxide to alpha plutonium metal (alpha-Pu). The lithium oxide by-product is reclaimed by sublimation and converted to the chloride salt, and after electrolysis, is removed as lithium metal. Zinc may be used as a solvent metal to improve thermodynamics of the reduction reaction at lower temperatures. Lithium metal reduction enables plutonium oxide reduction without the production of huge quantities of CaO--CaCl.sub.2 residues normally produced in conventional direct oxide reduction processes.

  14. Reactivity, SCE induction and mutagenicity of benzyl chloride derivatives.

    PubMed

    Hemminki, K; Falck, K; Linnainmaa, K

    1983-08-01

    Benzyl chloride, benzyl bromide, p-methylbenzyl chloride, and p-nitrobenzyl chloride were used to study chemical reactivity with 4-(p-nitrobenzyl)-pyridine (NBP), and with guanosine in vitro, in relation to mutagenic potency in S. typhimurium and sister chromatid exchange (SCE) induction in CHO cells. Benzyl bromide was found to be the most reactive compound, followed by p-methylbenzyl chloride, benzyl chloride and p-nitrobenzyl chloride. The order of mutagenicity was p-nitrobenzyl chloride much greater than benzyl bromide greater than benzyl chloride approximately equal to p-methylbenzyl chloride. The compounds tested caused base-pair mutations only. The order of SCE-inducing ability decreased as follows: benzyl bromide greater than benzyl chloride approximately equal to p-nitrobenzyl chloride approximately equal to p-methylbenzyl chloride. The particularly high mutagenicity of p-nitrobenzyl chloride in bacteria may be due to reactions other than direct aralkylation, or it may react particularly actively with DNA. Among the other compounds, benzyl bromide was the most active aralkylating compound, mutagen and SCE inducer. The results suggested that reaction of N2 of guanine, as compared with N-7 of guanine, failed to show any remarkable mutagenicity or SCE induction, since p-methylbenzyl chloride, reacting preferentially at N2 of guanosine, failed to show unexceptional potency. PMID:6358331

  15. Chloride in diet

    MedlinePlus

    ... found in table salt or sea salt as sodium chloride. It is also found in many vegetables. Foods ... Nutrition Board. Dietary Reference Intakes for Water, Potassium, Sodium, Chloride, and Sulfate. National Academy Press, Washington, DC: 2005. ...

  16. DNAPL mass transfer and permeability reduction during in situ chemical oxidation with permanganate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, X. David; Schwartz, Franklin W.

    2004-03-01

    This study utilized a series of laboratory experiments to examine the DNAPL mass removal rate and permeability reduction during ISCO using permanganate (MnO4-). Results show that MnO4- oxidation is effective in removing residual DNAPL from a porous medium. The DNAPL mass removal rate correlated positively with both the hydraulic stress and the oxidant load. A power relationship model of DNAPL mass removal under ISCO was proposed. Results also show that oxidation by-products CO2(g) and Mn oxide can cause pore plugging and flow by-passing. The reduction in hydraulic conductivity due to the Mn oxide precipitates was quantified. Hydraulic conductivity reduction as high as 80% was observed for oxidizing a small quantity of TCE.

  17. Nickel chloride (NiCl2)-caused inflammatory responses via activation of NF-κB pathway and reduction of anti-inflammatory mediator expression in the kidney

    PubMed Central

    Cui, Hengmin; Peng, Xi; Fang, Jing; Zuo, Zhicai; Deng, Junliang; Wang, Xun; Wu, Bangyuan; Chen, Kejie

    2015-01-01

    Nickel (Ni) or Ni compounds target a number of organs and produce multiple toxic effects. Kidney is the major organ for Ni accumulation and excretion. There are no investigations on the Ni- or Ni compounds-induced renal inflammatory responses in human beings and animals at present. Therefore, we determined NiCl2-caused alteration of inflammatory mediators, and functional damage in the broiler's kidney by the methods of biochemistry, immunohistochemistry and quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR). Dietary NiCl2 in excess of 300 mg/kg caused the renal inflammatory responses that characterized by increasing mRNA expression levels of the pro-inflammatory mediators including tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2), interleukin-1β (IL-1β), interleukin-6 (IL-6), interleukin-8 (IL-8) and interleukin-18 (IL-18) via the activation of nucleic factor κB (NF-κB), and decreasing mRNA expression levels of the anti-inflammatory mediators including interleukin-2 (IL-2), interleukin-4 (IL-4) and interleukin-13 (IL-13). Concurrently, NiCl2 caused degeneration, necrosis and apoptosis of the tubular cells, which was consistent with the alteration of renal function parameters including elevated alkaline phosphatase (AKP) activity, and reduced activities of sodium-potassium adenosine triphosphatase (Na+/K+-ATPase), calcium adenosine triphosphatase (Ca2+-ATPase), lactic dehydrogenase (LDH), succinate dehydrogenase (SDH) and acid phosphatase (ACP) in the kidney. The above-mentioned results present that the activation of NF-κB pathway and reduction of anti-inflammatory mediator expression are main mechanisms of NiCl2-caused renal inflammatory responses and that the renal function is decreased or impaired after NiCl2-treated. PMID:26417933

  18. Nickel chloride (NiCl2)-caused inflammatory responses via activation of NF-κB pathway and reduction of anti-inflammatory mediator expression in the kidney.

    PubMed

    Guo, Hongrui; Deng, Huidan; Cui, Hengmin; Peng, Xi; Fang, Jing; Zuo, Zhicai; Deng, Junliang; Wang, Xun; Wu, Bangyuan; Chen, Kejie

    2015-10-01

    Nickel (Ni) or Ni compounds target a number of organs and produce multiple toxic effects. Kidney is the major organ for Ni accumulation and excretion. There are no investigations on the Ni- or Ni compounds-induced renal inflammatory responses in human beings and animals at present. Therefore, we determined NiCl2-caused alteration of inflammatory mediators, and functional damage in the broiler's kidney by the methods of biochemistry, immunohistochemistry and quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR). Dietary NiCl2 in excess of 300 mg/kg caused the renal inflammatory responses that characterized by increasing mRNA expression levels of the pro-inflammatory mediators including tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2), interleukin-1β (IL-1β), interleukin-6 (IL-6), interleukin-8 (IL-8) and interleukin-18 (IL-18) via the activation of nucleic factor κB (NF-κB), and decreasing mRNA expression levels of the anti-inflammatory mediators including interleukin-2 (IL-2), interleukin-4 (IL-4) and interleukin-13 (IL-13). Concurrently, NiCl2 caused degeneration, necrosis and apoptosis of the tubular cells, which was consistent with the alteration of renal function parameters including elevated alkaline phosphatase (AKP) activity, and reduced activities of sodium-potassium adenosine triphosphatase (Na(+)/K(+)-ATPase), calcium adenosine triphosphatase (Ca(2+)-ATPase), lactic dehydrogenase (LDH), succinate dehydrogenase (SDH) and acid phosphatase (ACP) in the kidney. The above-mentioned results present that the activation of NF-κB pathway and reduction of anti-inflammatory mediator expression are main mechanisms of NiCl2-caused renal inflammatory responses and that the renal function is decreased or impaired after NiCl2-treated. PMID:26417933

  19. Integration of polyelectrolyte enhanced ultrafiltration and chemical reduction for metal-containing wastewater treatment and metal recovery.

    PubMed

    Yu, Jui-Hsuan; Chou, Yi-Hsuan; Liang, Yang-Min; Li, Chi-Wang

    2015-01-01

    Chemical reduction was firstly employed to treat synthetic wastewaters of various compositions prepared to simulate the retentate stream of polyelectrolyte enhanced ultrafiltration (PEUF). With fixed Cu:polyethylenimine (PEI) monomer:dithionite molar ratio, increasing copper concentration increases copper removal efficiency. Under fixed Cu:dithionite molar ratio and fixed Cu concentration, increasing PEI monomer:copper molar ratio decreases copper removal efficiency. The formation of nano-sized copper particles, which readily pass through 0.45 μm filter used for sample pretreatment before residual copper analysis, might be the reason behind the decreasing copper removal efficiency observed. Particle size analysis shows that the size of copper particles, which are formed through reduction reaction, increases with decreasing pH value and increasing reaction time. As ultrafiltration is capable of removing these nano-sized particles, integration of chemical reduction and PEUF is proposed to simultaneously achieve regeneration of polyelectrolyte and recovery of copper in one process. Results show that the proposed process could achieve almost complete copper removal without being affected by reaction pH. PMID:26398024

  20. Applying the Philosophical Concept of Reduction to the Chemistry of Water: Implications for Chemical Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Erduran, Sibel

    2005-01-01

    Even though philosophical themes in science education have been advocated for several decades, little attention has been paid to how these themes can be contextualized in the teaching of a particular domain of science. The purpose of this paper is to provide an example theoretical framework for applying a philosophical theme, reduction, in…

  1. QUANTITATIVE STRUCTURE-ACTIVITY RELATIONSHIPS FOR CHEMICAL REDUCTIONS OF ORGANIC CONTAMINANTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Sufficient kinetic data on abiotic reduction reactions involving organic contaminants are now available that quantitative structure-activity relationships (QSARs) for these reactions can be developed. Over 50 QSARs have been reported, most in just the last few years, and they ar...

  2. Chemical reduction of actinides probed by resonant inelastic X-ray scattering.

    PubMed

    Butorin, Sergei M; Shuh, David K; Kvashnina, Kristina O; Guo, Jinghua; Werme, Lars; Nordgren, Joseph

    2013-12-01

    The study addresses the possibilities of immobilizing the mobile species of actinides in the geosphere using metallic iron. Sorption on corroding iron is well-known, but there have been uncertainties with regard to the possibilities of reducing the actinyl species to sparingly soluble oxides and, thereby, permanently immobilizing them. Resonant inelastic X-ray scattering (RIXS) measurements at the actinide 5d edges on Fe foils exposed to uranium(VI) and neptunium(V) solutions in groundwater unambigiously indicate reduction of actinides to, respectively, uranium(IV) and neptunium(IV) on iron surfaces. The reduction manifests itself in an appearance of distinct specific signatures of uranium(IV) and neptunium(IV) in the RIXS profile of 5f-5f excitations. Such signatures and RIXS intensity/cross-section behavior with varying energy of incident photons can be reproduced by model atomic-multiplet calculations of the RIXS spectra. By normalizing the RIXS signal of corresponding 5f-5f excitations to core-to-core 6p-to-5d characteristic fluorescence transitions of actinides, their reduction rates on Fe samples with different exposure to actinide solutions can be estimated. Observed reduction implies similar processes in the nuclear waste canister thus suggesting reduced probability of nuclear waste release with ground waters from the canister. PMID:24187957

  3. DEMONSTRATION BULLETIN: GAS-PHASE CHEMICAL REDUCTION - ECO LOGIC INTERNATIONAL, INC.

    EPA Science Inventory

    The patented Eco Logic Process employs a gas-phase reduction reaction of hydrogen with organic and chlorinated organic compounds at elevated temperatures to convert aqueous and oily hazardous contaminants into a hydrocarbon-rich gas product. After passing through a scrubber, the ...

  4. Highly Stable and Tunable Chemical Doping of Multilayer WS2 Field Effect Transistor: Reduction in Contact Resistance.

    PubMed

    Khalil, Hafiz M W; Khan, Muhammad Farooq; Eom, Jonghwa; Noh, Hwayong

    2015-10-28

    The development of low resistance contacts to 2D transition-metal dichalcogenides (TMDs) is still a big challenge for the future generation field effect transistors (FETs) and optoelectronic devices. Here, we report a chemical doping technique to achieve low contact resistance by keeping the intrinsic properties of few layers WS2. The transfer length method has been used to investigate the effect of chemical doping on contact resistance. After doping, the contact resistance (Rc) of multilayer (ML) WS2 has been reduced to 0.9 kΩ·μm. The significant reduction of the Rc is mainly due to the high electron doping density, thus a reduction in Schottky barrier height, which limits the device performance. The threshold voltage of ML-WS2 FETs confirms a negative shift upon the chemical doping, as further confirmed from the positions of E(1)2g and A1g peaks in Raman spectra. The n-doped samples possess a high drain current of 65 μA/μm, with an on/off ratio of 1.05 × 10(6) and a field effect mobility of 34.7 cm(2)/(V·s) at room temperature. Furthermore, the photoelectric properties of doped WS2 flakes were also measured under deep ultraviolet light. The potential of using LiF doping in contact engineering of TMDs opens new ways to improve the device performance. PMID:26434774

  5. Chemical methods for reduction of the transfer of radionuclides to farm animals in semi-natural environments.

    PubMed

    Hove, K

    1993-09-24

    The same chemicals can be used for reduction of radionuclide transfer to animals whether kept on farms or grazing in semi-natural and natural habitats. However, different techniques are required for administration of the active compounds. Dairy ruminants may be treated effectively by inclusion of chemicals in supplemental concentrates. Practical experience gained after the Chernobyl accident has shown that both clay minerals and hexacyanoferrates are effective in preventing high radiocaesium levels in animal products. Chemicals such as bentonite clays and CaCO3, used for reduction of 137Cs and 90Sr transfer respectively, must be fed in hectogram quantities and are only practical for dairy animals in semi-natural ecosystems. Salt licks and sustained release boli with hexacyanoferrates as caesium binders have been developed and used successfully after the Chernobyl accident for meat producing cattle, sheep and reindeer which graze freely for extended periods. Daily doses of 25-300 mg in sheep and 250-2000 mg in cows reduces 137Cs accumulation 2-10-fold. Binders for 90Sr have not been tested in grazing animals. Stable iodine could be provided in salt licks and indwelling rumen boli at rates required to block radioiodine uptake by the thyroid gland. Boli and salt licks are highly cost effective in reducing doses to man when compared to interdiction of food from farm animals. PMID:8248770

  6. Asymptotic expansions of slow invariant manifolds and reduction of chemical kinetics models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sobolev, V. A.; Tropkina, E. A.

    2012-01-01

    Methods of the geometric theory of singular perturbations are used to reduce the dimensions of problems in chemical kinetics. The methods are based on using slow invariant manifolds. As a result, the original system is replaced by one on an invariant manifold, whose dimension coincides with that of the slow subsystem. Explicit and implicit representations of slow invariant manifolds are applied. The mathematical apparatus described is used to develop N.N. Semenov's fundamental ideas related to the method of quasi-stationary concentrations and is used to study particular problems in chemical kinetics.

  7. Embedded chloride detectors for roadways and bridges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fuhr, Peter L.; Huston, Dryver R.; McPadden, Adam P.; Cauley, Robert F.

    1996-04-01

    The problems associated with the application of chloride-based deicing agents to roadways and specifically bridges include chemical pollution and accelerated corrosion of strength members (especially rebar) within the structure. In many instances, local ordinances are attempting to force state agencies to reduce, if not eliminate, the use of these chlorides (typically at the cost of increased driving hazards). With respect to the corrosion aspects of chloride application, cracks that occur in the roadway/bridge pavement allow water to seep into the pavement carrying the chloride to the rebar with the resultant increase in corrosion. In response to this problem, particularly in high roadsalt usage areas, a chloride/water impermeable membrane is placed above the rebar matrix so if/when roadway cracking occurs, the roadsalts won't be able to damage the rebar. Such a membrane is costly -- and the question of its in-service performance is questionable. In a joint effort between the University of Vermont and the Vermont Agency of Transportation, we are developing fiber optic chloride detectors which are capable of being embedded into the rebar-concrete roadway under this membrane. The sensing mechanism relies on spectroscopic analysis of a chemical reaction of chloride and reagents (which have been coated onto the ends of fibers). Laboratory results of these detectors and a usable system configuration are presented.

  8. Reduction of Cr(VI) to Cr(III) in Artificially-Contaminated Soil using Chemical Reagents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kostarelos, Konstantinos; Rao, Ennio; Reale, Daniela

    2010-05-01

    The presence of hexavalent chromium (CrVI) in soil is an environmental concern due to its effect on human health. The concern arises from the leaching and the seepage of Cr(VI) from soil to groundwater. A remediation approach that has been studied in the literature is that of reducing the hexavalent chromium to its trivalent form using a chemical reagent, namely ferrous sulfate heptahydrate (FeSO4.7H20). In this study, we compared performance of ferrous sulfate heptahydrate to sodium thiosulfate (Na2S2O3), a less costly reductant. The means of measuring the performance of the reductants is the US EPA's Toxicity Characteristic Leaching Procedure (TCLP), which states that the total chromium release from the soil must be less than 5 ppm. Because this treatment approach is pH sensitive and thus, susceptible to acid rain effects, it was studied with the intention that it be coupled with a stabilization/fixation approach so as to provide a second level of treatment; i.e., it is not intended to be the stand-alone treatment approach. In this study, the reductants were initially used to treat a contaminated, artificial soil and allowed to cure for varying time periods to determine the minimum curing time. Contaminated artificial soil were then prepared using the same percentage of white sand, kaolinite clay and potassium chromate and varying amount of water as a function of the humidity of the specimens in order to illucidate the effect of moisture on the reductant performance. Finally, the reductant (either ferrous sulfate heptahydrate or sodium thiosulfate) was added in varying doses to determine the best ratio Cr/reagent dose. Chromium release from the soil was evaluated with a modified Toxicity Characteristic Leaching Procedure (TCLP) test after allowing the samples to cure. Results indicated that chromium(VI) released from the specimens was less than 5 ppm for the samples treated with either ferrous sulfate heptahydrate (99.9% of reduction) and sodium thiosulfate (98

  9. The Reduction of Microbial and Chemical Contaminants with Selected POU/POE Systems

    EPA Science Inventory

    Centralized drinking water treatment and distribution alone may not always be the most practical or cost-effective option. Also, some consumers seeking a proactive measure to reduce exposure to pathogens and chemicals not currently monitored or regulated might consider employing...

  10. Reduction of Allowed Inventory When Chemicals are Located in Close Proximity with Explosives

    SciTech Connect

    Chong, Y P; Nguyen, S N

    2006-09-27

    The objective of this report is to determine the allowed inventory of chemicals stored in the same bay, building or magazine, i.e., in close proximity, with high explosives (HE) that would, in the event of an accident, result in acceptable risks to colocated workers and the public.

  11. ECO LOGIC INTERNATIONAL GAS-PHASE CHEMICAL REDUCTION PROCESS - THE REACTOR SYSTEM - APPLICATIONS ANALYSIS REPORT

    EPA Science Inventory

    The ELI Eco Logic International Inc. (Eco Logic) process thermally separates organics, then chemically reduces them in a hydrogen atmosphere, converting them to a reformed gas that consists of light hydrocarbons and water. A scrubber treats the reformed gas to remove hydrogen chl...

  12. Features in chemical kinetics. I. Signatures of self-emerging dimensional reduction from a general format of the evolution law

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nicolini, Paolo; Frezzato, Diego

    2013-06-01

    Simplification of chemical kinetics description through dimensional reduction is particularly important to achieve an accurate numerical treatment of complex reacting systems, especially when stiff kinetics are considered and a comprehensive picture of the evolving system is required. To this aim several tools have been proposed in the past decades, such as sensitivity analysis, lumping approaches, and exploitation of time scales separation. In addition, there are methods based on the existence of the so-called slow manifolds, which are hyper-surfaces of lower dimension than the one of the whole phase-space and in whose neighborhood the slow evolution occurs after an initial fast transient. On the other hand, all tools contain to some extent a degree of subjectivity which seems to be irremovable. With reference to macroscopic and spatially homogeneous reacting systems under isothermal conditions, in this work we shall adopt a phenomenological approach to let self-emerge the dimensional reduction from the mathematical structure of the evolution law. By transforming the original system of polynomial differential equations, which describes the chemical evolution, into a universal quadratic format, and making a direct inspection of the high-order time-derivatives of the new dynamic variables, we then formulate a conjecture which leads to the concept of an "attractiveness" region in the phase-space where a well-defined state-dependent rate function ω has the simple evolution dot{ω }= - ω ^2 along any trajectory up to the stationary state. This constitutes, by itself, a drastic dimensional reduction from a system of N-dimensional equations (being N the number of chemical species) to a one-dimensional and universal evolution law for such a characteristic rate. Step-by-step numerical inspections on model kinetic schemes are presented. In the companion paper [P. Nicolini and D. Frezzato, J. Chem. Phys. 138, 234102 (2013)], 10.1063/1.4809593 this outcome will be naturally

  13. Permanent reduction of dissipation in nanomechanical Si resonators by chemical surface protection.

    PubMed

    Tao, Y; Navaretti, P; Hauert, R; Grob, U; Poggio, M; C L Degen

    2015-11-20

    We report on mechanical dissipation measurements carried out on thin (∼100 nm), single-crystal silicon cantilevers with varying chemical surface termination. We find that the 1-2 nm-thick native oxide layer of silicon contributes about 85% to the friction of the mechanical resonance. We show that the mechanical friction is proportional to the thickness of the oxide layer and that it crucially depends on oxide formation conditions. We further demonstrate that chemical surface protection by nitridation, liquid-phase hydrosilylation, or gas-phase hydrosilylation can inhibit rapid oxide formation in air and results in a permanent improvement of the mechanical quality factor between three- and five-fold. This improvement extends to cryogenic temperatures. Presented recipes can be directly integrated with standard cleanroom processes and may be especially beneficial for ultrasensitive nanomechanical force- and mass sensors, including silicon cantilevers, membranes, or nanowires. PMID:26501931

  14. Permanent reduction of dissipation in nanomechanical Si resonators by chemical surface protection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tao, Y.; Navaretti, P.; Hauert, R.; Grob, U.; Poggio, M.; Degen, C. L.

    2015-11-01

    We report on mechanical dissipation measurements carried out on thin (˜100 nm), single-crystal silicon cantilevers with varying chemical surface termination. We find that the 1-2 nm-thick native oxide layer of silicon contributes about 85% to the friction of the mechanical resonance. We show that the mechanical friction is proportional to the thickness of the oxide layer and that it crucially depends on oxide formation conditions. We further demonstrate that chemical surface protection by nitridation, liquid-phase hydrosilylation, or gas-phase hydrosilylation can inhibit rapid oxide formation in air and results in a permanent improvement of the mechanical quality factor between three- and five-fold. This improvement extends to cryogenic temperatures. Presented recipes can be directly integrated with standard cleanroom processes and may be especially beneficial for ultrasensitive nanomechanical force- and mass sensors, including silicon cantilevers, membranes, or nanowires.

  15. Chemical Fouling Reduction of a Submersible Steel Spectrophotometer in Estuarine Environments Using a Sacrificial Zinc Anode.

    PubMed

    Tait, Zachary S; Thompson, Megan; Stubbins, Aron

    2015-07-01

    The availability of in situ spectrophotometers, such as the S::CAN spectro::lyser, has expanded the possibilities for high-frequency water quality data collection. However, biological and chemical fouling can degrade the performance of in situ spectrophotometers, especially in saline environments with rapid flow rates. A complex freshwater washing system has been previously designed to reduce chemical fouling for the S::CAN spectro::lyser spectrophotometer. In the current study, we present a simpler, cheaper alternative: the attachment of a sacrificial zinc anode. Results are presented detailing the S::CAN spectro::lyser performance with and without the addition of the sacrificial anode. Attachment of the zinc anode provided efficient corrosion protection during 2-wk deployments in a highly dynamic (average tidal range, 2.5 m) saline tidal saltmarsh creek at Groves Creek, Skidaway Institute of Oceanography, Savannah, GA. PMID:26437114

  16. Removal efficiency and toxicity reduction of 4-chlorophenol with physical, chemical and biochemical methods.

    PubMed

    Gómez, M; Murcia, M D; Dams, R; Christofi, N; Gómez, E; Gómez, J L

    2012-01-01

    Chlorophenols are well-known priority pollutants and many different treatments have been assessed to facilitate their removal from industrial wastewater. However, an absolute and optimum solution still has to be practically implemented in an industrial setting. In this work, a series ofphysical, chemical and biochemical treatments have been systematically tested for the removal of 4-chlorophenol, and their results have been compared in order to determine the most effective treatment based on removal efficiency and residual by-product formation. Chemical treatments based on advanced oxidation processes (AOP) produced the best results on rate and extent of pollutant removal. The non-chemical technologies showed advantages in terms of complete (in the case of adsorption) or easy (enzymatic treatments) removal of toxic treatment by-products. The AOP methods led to the production of different photoproducts depending on the chosen treatment. Toxic products remained in most cases following treatment, though the toxicity level is significantly reduced with combination treatments. Among the treatments, a photochemical method combining UV, produced with a KrCl excilamp, and hydrogen peroxide achieved total removal of chlorophenol and all by-products and is considered the best treatment for chlorophenol removal. PMID:22720434

  17. Tool for the Reduction and Assessment of Chemical and Other Environmental Impacts (TRACI) TRACI version 2.1 User’s Guide

    EPA Science Inventory

    TRACI 2.1 (the Tool for the Reduction and Assessment of Chemical and other environmental Impacts) has been developed for sustainability metrics, life cycle impact assessment, industrial ecology, and process design impact assessment for developing increasingly sustainable products...

  18. Electrochemical and Structural Study of a Chemically Dealloyed PtCu Oxygen Reduction Catalyst.

    PubMed

    Dutta, Indrajit; Carpenter, Michael K; Balogh, Michael P; Ziegelbauer, Joseph M; Moylan, Thomas E; Atwan, Mohammed H; Irish, Nicholas P

    2010-10-01

    A carbon-supported, dealloyed platinum-copper (Pt-Cu) oxygen reduction catalyst was prepared using a multi-step synthetic procedure. Material produced at each step was characterized using high angle annular dark field scanning transmission electron microscopy (HAADF-STEM), electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS) mapping, x-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS), x-ray diffraction (XRD), and cyclic voltammetry (CV), and its oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) activity was measured by a thin-film rotating disk electrode (TF-RDE) technique. The initial synthetic step, a co-reduction of metal salts, produced a range of poorly crystalline Pt, Cu, and Pt-Cu alloy nanoparticles that nevertheless exhibited good ORR activity. Annealing this material alloyed the metals and increased particle size and crystallinity. TEM shows the annealed catalyst to include particles of various sizes, large (>25 nm), medium (12-25 nm), and small (<12 nm). Most of the small and medium-sized particles exhibited a partial or complete coreshell (Cu-rich core and Pt shell) structure with the smaller particles typically having more complete shells. The appearance of Pt shells after annealing indicates that they are formed by a thermal diffusion mechanism. Although the specific activity of the catalyst material was more than doubled by annealing, the concomitant decrease in Pt surface area resulted in a drop in its mass activity. Subsequent dealloying of the catalyst by acid treatment to partially remove the copper increased the Pt surface area by changing the morphology of the large and some medium particles to a "Swiss cheese" type structure having many voids. The smaller particles retained their core-shell structure. The specific activity of the catalyst material was little reduced by dealloying, but its mass activity was more than doubled due to the increase in surface area. The possible origins of these results are discussed in this report. PMID:23807900

  19. Electrochemical and Structural Study of a Chemically Dealloyed PtCu Oxygen Reduction Catalyst

    PubMed Central

    Dutta, Indrajit; Carpenter, Michael K; Balogh, Michael P; Ziegelbauer, Joseph M; Moylan, Thomas E; Atwan, Mohammed H; Irish, Nicholas P

    2013-01-01

    A carbon-supported, dealloyed platinum-copper (Pt-Cu) oxygen reduction catalyst was prepared using a multi-step synthetic procedure. Material produced at each step was characterized using high angle annular dark field scanning transmission electron microscopy (HAADF-STEM), electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS) mapping, x-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS), x-ray diffraction (XRD), and cyclic voltammetry (CV), and its oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) activity was measured by a thin-film rotating disk electrode (TF-RDE) technique. The initial synthetic step, a co-reduction of metal salts, produced a range of poorly crystalline Pt, Cu, and Pt-Cu alloy nanoparticles that nevertheless exhibited good ORR activity. Annealing this material alloyed the metals and increased particle size and crystallinity. TEM shows the annealed catalyst to include particles of various sizes, large (>25 nm), medium (12–25 nm), and small (<12 nm). Most of the small and medium-sized particles exhibited a partial or complete coreshell (Cu-rich core and Pt shell) structure with the smaller particles typically having more complete shells. The appearance of Pt shells after annealing indicates that they are formed by a thermal diffusion mechanism. Although the specific activity of the catalyst material was more than doubled by annealing, the concomitant decrease in Pt surface area resulted in a drop in its mass activity. Subsequent dealloying of the catalyst by acid treatment to partially remove the copper increased the Pt surface area by changing the morphology of the large and some medium particles to a “Swiss cheese” type structure having many voids. The smaller particles retained their core-shell structure. The specific activity of the catalyst material was little reduced by dealloying, but its mass activity was more than doubled due to the increase in surface area. The possible origins of these results are discussed in this report. PMID:23807900

  20. Experimental and quantum-chemical studies of 15N NMR coordination shifts in palladium and platinum chloride complexes with pyridine, 2,2'-bipyridine and 1,10-phenanthroline.

    PubMed

    Pazderski, Leszek; Szłyk, Edward; Sitkowski, Jerzy; Kamieński, Bohdan; Kozerski, Lech; Tousek, Jaromír; Marek, Radek

    2006-02-01

    A series of Pd and Pt chloride complexes with pyridine (py), 2,2'-bipyridine (bpy) and 1,10-phenanthroline (phen), of general formulae trans-/cis-[M(py)2Cl2], [M(py)4]Cl2, trans-/cis-[M(py)2Cl4], [M(bpy)Cl2], [M(bpy)Cl4], [M(phen)Cl2], [M(phen)Cl4], where M = Pd, Pt, was studied by 1H, 195Pt, and 15N NMR. The 90-140 ppm low-frequency 15N coordination shifts are discussed in terms of such structural features of the complexes as the type of platinide metal, oxidation state, coordination sphere geometry and the type of ligand. The results of quantum-chemical NMR calculations were compared with the experimental 15N coordination shifts, well reproducing their magnitude and correlation with the molecular structure. PMID:16392105

  1. Development of oxide dispersion strengthened ferritic steel prepared by chemical reduction and mechanical milling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Q. X.; Fang, Q. F.; Zhou, Y.; Xia, Y. P.; Zhang, T.; Wang, X. P.; Liu, C. S.

    2013-08-01

    The oxide dispersion strengthened ferritic steel with a nominal composition of Fe-14Cr-2W-0.5Ti-0.06Si-0.2V-0.1Mn-0.05Ta-0.03C-0.3Y2O3 (14Cr-ODS) was fabricated by sol-gel method in combination with hydrogen reduction, mechanical alloying (MA) and hot isostatic pressing (HIP) techniques. Pure Fe-1.5Y2O3 precursor was obtained by a sol-gel process and a reduction process at 650 °C for 3 h and pure 14Cr-ODS alloy powders were obtained from this precursor and the alloying metallic powders by mechanical alloying. The microstructure analysis investigated by transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and energy dispersive spectrometry (EDS) reveal that Y-Ti-O complexes and V-Ti-O complexes with a main particle size of 8 nm are formed in the 14Cr-ODS steel matrix. After HIP sintering the weight and the relative density of the compacted ingots are about 0.8 kg and 99.7%. The uniform elongation and ultimate tensile strength of the ODS steel obtained by HIP after annealing at 1100 °C for 5 h are about 13% and 840 MPa, respectively.

  2. Factors affecting chemical and biological reduction of hexavalent chromium in soil

    SciTech Connect

    Losi, M.E.; Amrhein, C.; Frankenberger, W.T. Jr. . Dept. of Soil and Environmental Sciences)

    1994-11-01

    Hexavalent chromium [Cr(VI)] is a common environmental pollutant that is mobile in soils and is a known mutagen. The trivalent form [Cr(III)] has not known mutagenic properties and is highly insoluble and immobile above pH 5.5. Reduction to the trivalent state thus represents an effective mechanism for detoxification and immobilization of Cr(VI) in soil/water systems. In this study, the authors conducted experiments to examine various parameters involving aerobic reduction of Cr(VI) in a field soil. They found that organic matter content, bioactivity, and oxygen status were important factors. Under optimum conditions, the soil reduced 96% of added Cr(VI) under aerobic, field-moist conditions. The pH of the system was shown to have little effect. Both biological and nonbiological processes were influential, and, of 20 chromate-resistant bacterial cultures isolated from soils, 9 were found to actively reduce Cr(VI) to Cr(III) in liquid media. Their study suggests that organic-amended soils can readily reduce Cr(VI) and could promote excellent removal efficiency either as a primary treatment technique, or in conjunction with bioreactor-type wastewater treatment systems.

  3. NO(x) removal from simulated flue gas by chemical absorption-biological reduction integrated approach in a biofilter.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Shi-Han; Cai, Ling-Lin; Mi, Xu-Hong; Jiang, Jin-Lin; Li, Wei

    2008-05-15

    A chemical absorption-biological reduction integrated approach, which combines the advantages of both the chemical and biological technologies, is employed to achieve the removal of nitrogen monoxide (NO) from the simulated flue gas. The biological reduction of NO to nitrogen gas (N2) and regeneration of the absorbent Fe(II)EDTA (EDTA:ethylenediaminetetraacetate) take place under thermophilic conditions (50 +/- 0.5 degrees C). The performance of a laboratory-scale biofilter was investigated for treating NO(x) gas in this study. Shock loading studies were performed to ascertain the response of the biofilter to fluctuations of inlet loading rates (0.48 approximately 28.68 g NO m(-3) h(-1)). A maximum elimination capacity (18.78 g NO m(-3) h(-1)) was achieved at a loading rate of 28.68 g NO m(-3) h(-1) and maintained 5 h operation at the steady state. Additionally, the effect of certain gaseous compounds (e.g., O2 and SO2) on the NO removal was also investigated. A mathematical model was developed to describe the system performance. The model has been able to predict experimental results for different inlet NO concentrations. In summary, both theoretical prediction and experimental investigation confirm that biofilter can achieve high removal rate for NO in high inlet concentrations under both steady and transient states. PMID:18546728

  4. Reduction kinetics of aqueous U(VI) in acidic chloride brines to uraninite by methane, hydrogen or C-graphite under hydrothermal conditions: Implications for the genesis of unconformity-related uranium ore deposits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dargent, Maxime; Truche, Laurent; Dubessy, Jean; Bessaque, Gilles; Marmier, Hervé

    2015-10-01

    The formation of hydrothermal uranium ore deposits involves the reduction of dissolved U(VI)(aq) to uraninite. However, the nature of the reducing agent and the kinetics of such a process are currently unknown. These questions are addressed through dedicated experiments performed under conditions relevant for the genesis of unconformity-related uranium (URU) deposits. We tested the efficiency of the following potential reductants supposed to be involved in the reaction: H2, CH4, C-graphite and dissolved Fe(II). Results demonstrate the great efficiency of H2, CH4 and C-graphite to reduce U(VI)(aq) into uraninite in acidic chloride brines, unlike dissolved Fe(II). Times needed for H2 (1.4 bar), CH4 (2.4 bar) and C-graphite (water/carbon mass ratio = 10) to reduce 1 mM of U(VI)(aq) in an acidic brine (1 m LiCl, pH ≈ 1 fixed by HCl) to uraninite at 200 °C are 12 h, 3 days and 4 months, respectively. The effects of temperature (T) between 100 °C and 200 °C, H2 partial pressure (0.14, 1.4, and 5.4 bar), salinity (0.1, 1 and 3.2 m LiCl) and pH at 25 °C (0.8 and 3.3) on the reduction rate were also investigated. Results show that increasing temperature and H2 partial pressure increase the reaction rate, whereas increasing salinity or pH have the reverse effect. The reduction of uranyl to uraninite follows an apparent zero-order with respect to time, whatever the considered electron donor. From the measured rate constants, the following values of activation energy (Ea), depending on the nature of the electron donor, have been derived: EaC-graphite = 155 ± 3 kJ mol-1, EaCH4 = 143 ± 6 kJ mol-1, and EaH2 = 124 ± 15 kJ mol-1 at T < 150 °C and 32 ± 6 kJ mol-1 at T > 150 °C. An empirical relationship between the reaction rate, the hydrogen partial pressure, the uranyl speciation, and the temperature is also proposed. This allows an estimation of the time of formation of a giant U ore deposit such as McArthur River (Canada). The duration of the mineralizing event is

  5. Electrochemical and Structural Study of a Chemically Dealloyed PtCu Oxygen Reduction Catalyst

    SciTech Connect

    Dutta, Indrajit; Carpenter, Michael K.; Balogh, Michael P.; Ziegelbauer, Joseph M.; Moylan, Thomas E.; Atwan, Mohammed H.; Irish, Nicholas P.

    2010-10-22

    A carbon-supported, dealloyed platinum-copper (Pt-Cu) oxygen reduction catalyst was prepared using a multistep synthetic procedure. Material produced at each step was characterized using high-angle annular dark-field scanning transmission electron microscopy, electron energy loss spectroscopy mapping, X-ray absorption spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction, and cyclic voltammetry, and its oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) activity was measured by a thin-film rotating disk electrode technique. The initial synthetic step, a coreduction of metal salts, produced a range of poorly crystalline Pt, Cu, and Pt-Cu alloy nanoparticles that nevertheless exhibited good ORR activity. Annealing this material alloyed the metals and increased particle size and crystallinity. Transmission electron microscopy shows the annealed catalyst to include particles of various sizes, large (>25 nm), medium (12-25 nm), and small (<12 nm). Most of the small and medium-sized particles exhibited a partial or complete core-shell (Cu-rich core and Pt shell) structure with the smaller particles typically having more complete shells. The appearance of Pt shells after annealing indicates that they are formed by a thermal diffusion mechanism. Although the specific activity of the catalyst material was more than doubled by annealing, the concomitant decrease in Pt surface area resulted in a drop in its mass activity. Subsequent dealloying of the catalyst by acid treatment to partially remove the copper increased the Pt surface area by changing the morphology of the large and some medium particles to a 'Swiss cheese' type structure having many voids. The smaller particles retained their core-shell structure. The specific activity of the catalyst material was little reduced by dealloying, but its mass activity was more than doubled due to the increase in surface area. The possible origins of these results are discussed in this report.

  6. Melaminium chloride hemihydrate.

    PubMed

    Janczak, J; Perpétuo, G J

    2001-09-01

    The crystals of a new melaminium salt, 2,4,6-triamino-1,3,5-triazin-1-ium chloride hemihydrate, C(3)H(7)N(6)(+).Cl(-).0.5H(2)O, are built up from single-protonated melaminium residues, chloride anions and water molecules. The protonated melaminium cations lie on a twofold axis, while the chloride anions and water molecule lie on the m plane. The melaminium residues are interconnected by N-H...N hydrogen bonds, forming chains parallel to the (001) plane. The chains of melaminium residues form a three-dimensional network through hydrogen-bond interactions with chloride anions and water molecules. PMID:11588391

  7. A review of chemical, electrochemical and biological methods for aqueous Cr(VI) reduction.

    PubMed

    Barrera-Díaz, Carlos E; Lugo-Lugo, Violeta; Bilyeu, Bryan

    2012-07-15

    Hexavalent chromium is of particular environmental concern due to its toxicity and mobility and is challenging to remove from industrial wastewater. It is a strong oxidizing agent that is carcinogenic and mutagenic and diffuses quickly through soil and aquatic environments. It does not form insoluble compounds in aqueous solutions, so separation by precipitation is not feasible. While Cr(VI) oxyanions are very mobile and toxic in the environment, Cr(III) cations are not. Like many metal cations, Cr(III) forms insoluble precipitates. Thus, reducing Cr(VI) to Cr(III) simplifies its removal from effluent and also reduces its toxicity and mobility. In this review, we describe the environmental implications of Cr(VI) presence in aqueous solutions, the chemical species that could be present and then we describe the technologies available to efficiently reduce hexavalent chromium. PMID:22608208

  8. IN-SITU CHEMICAL STABILIZATION OF METALS AND RADIONUCLIDES THROUGH ENHANCED ANAEROBIC REDUCTIVE PRECIPITATION

    SciTech Connect

    Christopher C. Lutes; Angela Frizzell, PG; Todd A. Thornton; James M. Harrington

    2003-08-01

    The objective of this NETL sponsored bench-scale study was to demonstrate the efficacy of enhanced anaerobic reductive precipitation (EARP) technology for precipitating uranium using samples from contaminated groundwater at the Fernald Closure Project (FCP) in Cincinnati, Ohio. EARP enhances the natural biological reactions in the groundwater through addition of food grade substrates (typically molasses) to drive the oxidative-reductive potential of the groundwater to a lower, more reduced state, thereby precipitating uranium from solution. In order for this in-situ technology to be successful in the long term, the precipitated uranium must not be re-dissolved at an unacceptable rate once groundwater geochemical conditions return to their pretreatment, aerobic state. The approach for this study is based on the premise that redissolution of precipitated uranium will be slowed by several mechanisms including the presence of iron sulfide precipitates and coatings, and sorption onto fresh iron oxides. A bench-scale study of the technology was performed using columns packed with site soil and subjected to a continuous flow of uranium-contaminated site groundwater (476 {micro}g/L). The ''treated'' column received a steady stream of dilute food grade molasses injected into the contaminated influent. Upon attainment of a consistently reducing environment and demonstrated removal of uranium, an iron sulfate amendment was added along with the molasses in the influent solution. After a month long period of iron addition, the treatments were halted, and uncontaminated, aerobic, unamended water was introduced to the treated column to assess rebound of uranium concentrations. In the first two months of treatment, the uranium concentration in the treated column decreased to the clean-up level (30 {micro}g/L) or below, and remained there for the remainder of the treatment period. A brief period of resolubilization of uranium was observed as the treated column returned to aerobic

  9. Synthesis of reduced graphene oxide (rGO) via chemical reduction

    SciTech Connect

    Thakur, Alpana Rangra, V. S.; Kumar, Sunil

    2015-05-15

    Natural flake Graphite was used as the starting material for the graphene synthesis. In the first step flake graphite was treated with oxidizing agents under vigorous conditions to obtain graphite oxide. Layered graphite oxide decorated with oxygen has large inter-layer distance leading easy exfoliation into single sheets by ultrasonication giving graphene oxide. In the last step exfoliated graphene oxide sheets were reduced slowly with the help of reducing agent to obtain fine powder which is labeled as reduced graphene oxide (rGO). This rGO was further characterized by X-Ray Diffraction (XRD), Scanning Tunneling Microscopy (SEM) and Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy (FTIR), Raman Spectroscopy techniques. XRD pattern shows peaks corresponding to (002) graphitic lattice planes indicating the formation of network of sp{sup 2} like carbon structure. SEM images show the ultrathin, wrinkled, paper-like morphology of graphene sheets. IR study shows that the graphite has been oxidized to graphite oxide with the presence of various absorption bands confirming the presence of oxidizing groups. The FTIR spectrum of rGO shows no sharp peaks confirming the efficient reduction of rGO. The Raman spectrum shows disorder in the graphene sheets.

  10. Synthesis of reduced graphene oxide (rGO) via chemical reduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thakur, Alpana; Kumar, Sunil; Rangra, V. S.

    2015-05-01

    Natural flake Graphite was used as the starting material for the graphene synthesis. In the first step flake graphite was treated with oxidizing agents under vigorous conditions to obtain graphite oxide. Layered graphite oxide decorated with oxygen has large inter-layer distance leading easy exfoliation into single sheets by ultrasonication giving graphene oxide. In the last step exfoliated graphene oxide sheets were reduced slowly with the help of reducing agent to obtain fine powder which is labeled as reduced graphene oxide (rGO). This rGO was further characterized by X-Ray Diffraction (XRD), Scanning Tunneling Microscopy (SEM) and Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy (FTIR), Raman Spectroscopy techniques. XRD pattern shows peaks corresponding to (002) graphitic lattice planes indicating the formation of network of sp2 like carbon structure. SEM images show the ultrathin, wrinkled, paper-like morphology of graphene sheets. IR study shows that the graphite has been oxidized to graphite oxide with the presence of various absorption bands confirming the presence of oxidizing groups. The FTIR spectrum of rGO shows no sharp peaks confirming the efficient reduction of rGO. The Raman spectrum shows disorder in the graphene sheets.

  11. Reduction of Contaminants (Physical, Chemical, and Microbial) in Domestic Wastewater through Hybrid Constructed Wetland

    PubMed Central

    Sehar, Shama; Aamir, Rabia; Naz, Iffat; Ali, Naeem; Ahmed, Safia

    2013-01-01

    The current research was focused mainly on the designing and construction of efficient laboratory scale hybrid constructed wetland (HCW) for the treatment of domestic wastewater. Parameters like COD, BOD5, PO4, SO4, NO3, NO2, and pathogenic indicator microbes were monitored after hydraulic retention time (HRT) of 4, 8, 12, 16, and 20 days. Treatment efficiency of HCW kept on increasing with the increase in hydraulic retention time. Maximum efficiency of HCW was observed with a 20-day HRT, that is, 97.55, 97.5, 89.35, 80.75, 96.04, 91.52, and 98.6% reduction from the zero time value for COD, BOD5, PO4, SO4, NO3, NO2, and fecal coliforms, respectively. After 20 days' time, the treated water was free of almost all nutrients and microbial pollutants. Hence, increasing hydraulic retention time was found to ameliorate the operational competence of HCW. Thus HCW can serve as a promising technology for wastewater treatment and can be scaled up for small communities in the developing countries. PMID:23724336

  12. Photomask defect tracing, analysis, and reduction with chemically amplified resist process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Cheng-ming; Lai, Rick; Huang, W. H.; Wang, B. C.; Chen, C. Y.; Kung, C. H.; Yoo, Chue-San; Chen, Jieh-Jang; Lee, Sheng-Cha

    2003-08-01

    The features of optical proximity correction are becoming very aggressive as production technology migrates into 90nm/130 nm regime. The complicated optical proximity correction (OPC) patterns often result in un-repairable defects, a major yield loss mechanisms in a mask production line. Defect control is increasingly important. A methodology for identifying defect sources and reduction is demonstrated in this paper. The mechanisms and causes of defect formation could be determined with corresponding process step on the strength of sequence inspections. The cause of half-etched opaque defect on negative CAR process was found from PR fragment contamination of e-beam exposure step. After clean-up of e-beam chamber, yield was increased over 20%. Big pinhole defect and contact of AttPSM positive process was found on ADI step. The possible cause was poor CAR adhesion. These two type defects were decreased by modification of developing recipe, special on rinse step. Design experiment with Taguchi method was used to optimize the interactive recipe of plasma descum and rinse step on developing step of implanted layer. Average defect density was decreased from 0.99 to 0.27, and percentage of zero defect rate has been increased from 29.5 to 63.3%.

  13. Quantifying the value of information for uncertainty reduction in chemical EOR modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leray, Sarah; Yeates, Christopher; Douarche, Frédéric; Roggero, Frédéric

    2016-04-01

    Reservoir modeling is a powerful tool to assess the technical and economic feasibility of chemical Enhanced Oil Recovery methods such as the joint injection of surfactant and polymer. Laboratory recovery experiments are usually undertaken on cores to understand recovery mechanisms and to estimate properties, that will be further used to build large scale models. To capture the different processes involved in chemical EOR, models are described by a large number of parameters which are basically only partially constrained by recovery experiments and additional characterizations, mainly because of cost and time restrictions or limited representativeness. Among the most uncertain properties, features the surfactant adsorption which cannot be straightforwardly derived from bulk or simplified dynamic measurements (e.g. single phase dynamic adsorption experiments). It is unfortunately critical for the economics of the process. Identifying the most informative observations (e.g. saturation scans, pressure differential, surfactant production, oil recovery) is of primary interest to compensate deficiency of some characterizations and improve models robustness and their predictive capability. Building a consistent set of recovery experiments that will allow to seize recovery mechanisms is critical as well. To address these inverse methodology issues, we create a synthetic numerical model with a well-defined set of parameter values, considered to be our reference case. This choice of model is based on a similar real data set and a broad literature review. It consists of a water-wet sandstone subject to typical surfactant-polymer injections. We first study the effect of a salinity gradient injected after a surfactant-polymer slug, as it is known to significantly improve oil recovery. We show that reaching optimal conditions of salinity gradient is a fragile balance between surfactant desorption and interfacial tension increase. This high dependence on surfactant adsorption

  14. Software algorithms for false alarm reduction in LWIR hyperspectral chemical agent detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manolakis, D.; Model, J.; Rossacci, M.; Zhang, D.; Ontiveros, E.; Pieper, M.; Seeley, J.; Weitz, D.

    2008-04-01

    The long-wave infrared (LWIR) hyperpectral sensing modality is one that is often used for the problem of detection and identification of chemical warfare agents (CWA) which apply to both military and civilian situations. The inherent nature and complexity of background clutter dictates a need for sophisticated and robust statistical models which are then used in the design of optimum signal processing algorithms that then provide the best exploitation of hyperspectral data to ultimately make decisions on the absence or presence of potentially harmful CWAs. This paper describes the basic elements of an automated signal processing pipeline developed at MIT Lincoln Laboratory. In addition to describing this signal processing architecture in detail, we briefly describe the key signal models that form the foundation of these algorithms as well as some spatial processing techniques used for false alarm mitigation. Finally, we apply this processing pipeline to real data measured by the Telops FIRST hyperspectral (FIRST) sensor to demonstrate its practical utility for the user community.

  15. 40 CFR 721.10154 - Quaternary ammonium compounds, dicoco alkyldimethyl, chlorides, reaction products with silica.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ..., dicoco alkyldimethyl, chlorides, reaction products with silica. (a) Chemical substance and significant... alkyldimethyl, chlorides, reaction products with silica. 721.10154 Section 721.10154 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) TOXIC SUBSTANCES CONTROL ACT SIGNIFICANT NEW USES OF...

  16. 40 CFR 721.10154 - Quaternary ammonium compounds, dicoco alkyldimethyl, chlorides, reaction products with silica.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ..., dicoco alkyldimethyl, chlorides, reaction products with silica. (a) Chemical substance and significant... alkyldimethyl, chlorides, reaction products with silica. 721.10154 Section 721.10154 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) TOXIC SUBSTANCES CONTROL ACT SIGNIFICANT NEW USES OF...

  17. 40 CFR 721.10154 - Quaternary ammonium compounds, dicoco alkyldimethyl, chlorides, reaction products with silica.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ..., dicoco alkyldimethyl, chlorides, reaction products with silica. (a) Chemical substance and significant... alkyldimethyl, chlorides, reaction products with silica. 721.10154 Section 721.10154 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) TOXIC SUBSTANCES CONTROL ACT SIGNIFICANT NEW USES OF...

  18. 40 CFR 721.10154 - Quaternary ammonium compounds, dicoco alkyldimethyl, chlorides, reaction products with silica.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ..., dicoco alkyldimethyl, chlorides, reaction products with silica. (a) Chemical substance and significant... alkyldimethyl, chlorides, reaction products with silica. 721.10154 Section 721.10154 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) TOXIC SUBSTANCES CONTROL ACT SIGNIFICANT NEW USES OF...

  19. 40 CFR 721.10154 - Quaternary ammonium compounds, dicoco alkyldimethyl, chlorides, reaction products with silica.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ..., dicoco alkyldimethyl, chlorides, reaction products with silica. (a) Chemical substance and significant... alkyldimethyl, chlorides, reaction products with silica. 721.10154 Section 721.10154 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) TOXIC SUBSTANCES CONTROL ACT SIGNIFICANT NEW USES OF...

  20. Experimental and quantum-chemical studies of 1H, 13C and 15N NMR coordination shifts in Pd(II) and Pt(II) chloride complexes with quinoline, isoquinoline, and 2,2'-biquinoline.

    PubMed

    Pazderski, Leszek; Tousek, Jaromír; Sitkowski, Jerzy; Kozerski, Lech; Szłyk, Edward

    2007-12-01

    1H, 13C, and 15N NMR studies of platinide(II) (M=Pd, Pt) chloride complexes with quinolines (L=quinoline-quin, or isoquinoline-isoquin; LL=2,2'-biquinoline-bquin), having the general formulae trans-/cis-[ML2Cl2] and [M(LL)Cl2], were performed and the respective chemical shifts (delta1H, delta13C, delta15N) reported. 1H coordination shifts of various signs and magnitudes (Delta1Hcoord=delta1Hcomplex-delta1Hligand) are discussed in relation to the changes of diamagnetic contribution to the relevant 1H shielding constants. The comparison to the literature data for similar complexes containing auxiliary ligands other than chlorides exhibited a large dependence of delta1H parameters on electron density variations and ring-current effects (inductive and anisotropic phenomena). The influence of deviations from planarity, concerning either MN2Cl2 chromophores or azine ring systems, revealed by the known X-ray structures of [Pd(bquin)Cl2] and [Pt(bquin)Cl2], is discussed in respect to 1H NMR spectra. 15N coordination shifts (Delta15Ncoord=delta15Ncomplex-delta15Nligand) of ca. 78-100 ppm (to lower frequency) are attributed mainly to the decrease of the absolute value of paramagnetic contribution in the relevant 15N shielding constants, this phenomenon being noticeably dependent on the type of a platinide metal and coordination sphere geometry. The absolute magnitude of Delta15Ncoord parameter increased by ca 15 ppm upon Pd(II)-->Pt(II) replacement but decreased by ca. 15 ppm following trans-->cis transition. Experimental 1H, 13C, 15N NMR chemical shifts are compared to those quantum-chemically calculated by B3LYP/LanL2DZ+6-31G**//B3LYP/LanL2DZ+6-31G*, both in vacuo and in CHCl3 or DMF solution. PMID:18044805

  1. Three Dimensional P-doped Graphene Synthesized by Eco-Friendly Chemical Vapor Deposition for Oxygen Reduction Reactions.

    PubMed

    Li, Xiaoguang; Qiu, Yunfeng; Hu, Ping An

    2016-06-01

    Heteroatom doping provides possibilities for changing the electronic properties of graphene. Three Dimensional P-doped graphene (3DPG) was fabricated via chemical vapor deposition (CVD) using nickel foam as template and triphenylphosphine (TPP) as C and P sources simultaneously without using toxic organic solvent as carrier liquid. The invasion of P atoms into graphene networks make them non-electroneutral and consequently favor the adsorption of oxygen and O-O bond cleavage due to the charge polarization increase of the P-C bond. Thus, the as-prepared 3DPG served as an efficient electrocatalyst for oxygen reduction reaction (ORR). Additionally, the 3D porous structure is favorable for the mass transfer of electrolytes ions, hence 3DPG exhibit better electrocatalytic activity, long-term stability, and tolerance to crossover effect of methanol than pristine 3D graphene and Pt/C for ORR. PMID:27427693

  2. Fractal aggregation and optical absorption of copper nanoparticles prepared by in situ chemical reduction within a Cu2+-polymer complex

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, C.; Yang, C. Z.

    1999-03-01

    A polymer-matrix nanocomposite containing copper particles has been prepared by in situ chemical reduction within a Cu2+-poly(itaconic acid-co-acrylic acid) complex solid film. The copper particle size in the order of 10 nm is controlled by the initial content of the metal ions in the complex. Their fractal pattern and the value of the fractal dimension indicate that there exists a cluster-cluster aggregation process in the present system. Optical absorption spectra of copper-polymer nanocomposites show distinct plasma absorption bands and quantum size effect in the samples. The calculated blueshift of the resonance peak based on a quantum-sphere model gives remarkable agreement with the experimental data as the size of copper particles embedded in the polymer becomes smaller.

  3. Efficiency of some soil bacteria for chemical oxygen demand reduction of synthetic chlorsulfuron solutions under agiated culture conditions.

    PubMed

    Erguven, G O; Yildirim, N

    2016-01-01

    This study searches the efficiency of certain soil bacteria on chemical oxygen demand (COD) reduction of synthetic chlorsulfuron solutions under agitated culture conditions. It also aims to determine the turbidity of liquid culture medium with chlorsulfuron during bacterial incubation for 120 hours. As a result the highest and lowest COD removal efficiency of bacteria was determined for Bacillus simplex as 94% and for Micrococcus luteus as 70%, respectively at the end of the 96th hour. It was found that COD removal efficiency showed certain differences depend on the bacterial species. It was also observed that B. simplex had the highest COD removal efficiency and it was a suitable bacterium species for bioremediation of a chlorsulfuron contaminated soils. PMID:27262810

  4. Experimental and quantum-chemical studies of 1H, 13C and 15N NMR coordination shifts in Au(III), Pd(II) and Pt(II) chloride complexes with picolines.

    PubMed

    Pazderski, Leszek; Tousek, Jaromír; Sitkowski, Jerzy; Malináková, Katerina; Kozerski, Lech; Szłyk, Edward

    2009-03-01

    (1)H, (13)C and (15)N NMR studies of gold(III), palladium(II) and platinum(II) chloride complexes with picolines, [Au(PIC)Cl(3)], trans-[Pd(PIC)(2)Cl(2)], trans/cis-[Pt(PIC)(2)Cl(2)] and [Pt(PIC)(4)]Cl(2), were performed. After complexation, the (1)H and (13)C signals were shifted to higher frequency, whereas the (15)N ones to lower (by ca 80-110 ppm), with respect to the free ligands. The (15)N shielding phenomenon was enhanced in the series [Au(PIC)Cl(3)] < trans-[Pd(PIC)(2)Cl(2)] < cis-[Pt(PIC)(2)Cl(2)] < trans-[Pt(PIC)(2)Cl(2)]; it increased following the Pd(II) --> Pt(II) replacement, but decreased upon the trans --> cis-transition. Experimental (1)H, (13)C and (15)N NMR chemical shifts were compared to those quantum-chemically calculated by B3LYP/LanL2DZ + 6-31G**//B3LYP/LanL2DZ + 6-31G*. PMID:19097135

  5. The first UK measurements of nitryl chloride using a chemical ionization mass spectrometer in central London in the summer of 2012, and an investigation of the role of Cl atom oxidation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bannan, Thomas J.; Booth, A. Murray; Bacak, Asan; Muller, Jennifer B. A.; Leather, Kimberley E.; Le Breton, Michael; Jones, Benjamin; Young, Dominique; Coe, Hugh; Allan, James; Visser, Suzanne; Slowik, Jay G.; Furger, Markus; Prévôt, André S. H.; Lee, James; Dunmore, Rachel E.; Hopkins, James R.; Hamilton, Jacqueline F.; Lewis, Alastair C.; Whalley, Lisa K.; Sharp, Thomas; Stone, Daniel; Heard, Dwayne E.; Fleming, Zoë L.; Leigh, Roland; Shallcross, Dudley E.; Percival, Carl J.

    2015-06-01

    The first nitryl chloride (ClNO2) measurements in the UK were made during the summer 2012 ClearfLo campaign with a chemical ionization mass spectrometer, utilizing an I- ionization scheme. Concentrations of ClNO2 exceeded detectable limits (11 ppt) every night with a maximum concentration of 724 ppt. A diurnal profile of ClNO2 peaking between 4 and 5 A.M., decreasing directly after sunrise, was observed. Concentrations of ClNO2 above the detection limit are generally observed between 8 P.M. and 11 A.M. Different ratios of the production of ClNO2:N2O5 were observed throughout with both positive and negative correlations between the two species being reported. The photolysis of ClNO2 and a box model utilizing the Master Chemical Mechanism modified to include chlorine chemistry was used to calculate Cl atom concentrations. Simultaneous measurements of hydroxyl radicals (OH) using low pressure laser-induced fluorescence and ozone enabled the relative importance of the oxidation of three groups of measured VOCs (alkanes, alkenes, and alkynes) by OH radicals, Cl atoms, and O3 to be compared. For the day with the maximum calculated Cl atom concentration, Cl atoms in the early morning were the dominant oxidant for alkanes and, over the entire day, contributed 15%, 3%, and 26% toward the oxidation of alkanes, alkenes, and alkynes, respectively.

  6. Determination of decimal reduction time (D value) of chemical agents used in hospitals for disinfection purposes

    PubMed Central

    Mazzola, Priscila Gava; Penna, Thereza Christina Vessoni; da S Martins, Alzira M

    2003-01-01

    Background Prior to the selection of disinfectants for low, intermediate and high (sterilizing) levels, the decimal reduction time, D-value, for the most common and persistent bacteria identified at a health care facility should be determined. Methods The D-value was determined by inoculating 100 mL of disinfecting solution with 1 mL of a bacterial suspension (104 – 105 CFU/mL for vegetative and spore forms). At regular intervals, 1 mL aliquots of this mixture were transferred to 8 mL of growth media containing a neutralizing agent, and incubated at optimal conditions for the microorganism. Results The highest D-values for various bacteria were determined for the following solutions: (i) 0.1% sodium dichloroisocyanurate (pH 7.0) – E. coli and A. calcoaceticus (D = 5.9 min); (ii) sodium hypochlorite (pH 7.0) at 0.025% for B. stearothermophilus (D = 24 min), E. coli and E. cloacae (D = 7.5 min); at 0.05% for B. stearothermophilus (D = 9.4 min) and E. coli (D = 6.1 min) and 0.1% for B. stearothermophilus (D = 3.5 min) and B. subtilis (D = 3.2 min); (iii) 2.0% glutaraldehyde (pH 7.4) – B. stearothermophilus, B. subtilis (D = 25 min) and E. coli (D = 7.1 min); (iv) 0.5% formaldehyde (pH 6.5) – B. subtilis (D = 11.8 min), B. stearothermophilus (D = 10.9 min) and A. calcoaceticus (D = 5.2 min); (v) 2.0% chlorhexidine (pH 6.2) – B. stearothermophilus (D = 9.1 min), and at 0.4% for E. cloacae (D = 8.3 min); (vi) 1.0% Minncare® (peracetic acid and hydrogen peroxide, pH 2.3) – B. stearothermophilus (D = 9.1 min) and E. coli (D = 6.7 min). Conclusions The suspension studies were an indication of the disinfectant efficacy on a surface. The data in this study reflect the formulations used and may vary from product to product. The expected effectiveness from the studied formulations showed that the tested agents can be recommended for surface disinfection as stated in present guidelines and emphasizes the importance and need to develop routine and novel programs to

  7. Synthesis and characterization of silver/montmorillonite/chitosan bionanocomposites by chemical reduction method and their antibacterial activity

    PubMed Central

    Shameli, Kamyar; Ahmad, Mansor Bin; Zargar, Mohsen; Yunus, Wan Md Zin Wan; Ibrahim, Nor Azowa; Shabanzadeh, Parvaneh; Moghaddam, Mansour Ghaffari

    2011-01-01

    Silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) of a small size were successfully synthesized using the wet chemical reduction method into the lamellar space layer of montmorillonite/chitosan (MMT/Cts) as an organomodified mineral solid support in the absence of any heat treatment. AgNO3, MMT, Cts, and NaBH4 were used as the silver precursor, the solid support, the natural polymeric stabilizer, and the chemical reduction agent, respectively. MMT was suspended in aqueous AgNO3/Cts solution. The interlamellar space limits were changed (d-spacing = 1.24–1.54 nm); therefore, AgNPs formed on the interlayer and external surface of MMT/Cts with d-average = 6.28–9.84 nm diameter. Characterizations were done using different methods, ie, ultraviolet-visible spectroscopy, powder X-ray diffraction, transmission electron microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, energy dispersive X-ray fluorescence spectrometry, and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. Silver/montmorillonite/chitosan bionanocomposite (Ag/MMT/Cts BNC) systems were examined. The antibacterial activity of AgNPs in MMT/Cts was investigated against Gram-positive bacteria, ie, Staphylococcus aureus and methicillin-resistant S. aureus and Gram-negative bacteria, ie, Escherichia coli, E. coli O157:H7, and Pseudomonas aeruginosa by the disc diffusion method using Mueller Hinton agar at different sizes of AgNPs. All of the synthesized Ag/MMT/Cts BNCs were found to have high antibacterial activity. These results show that Ag/MMT/Cts BNCs can be useful in different biological research and biomedical applications, including surgical devices and drug delivery vehicles. PMID:21499424

  8. Chemical and Microbial Characterization of North Slope Viscous Oils to Assess Viscosity Reduction and Enhanced Recovery

    SciTech Connect

    Shirish Patil; Abhijit Dandekar; Mary Beth Leigh

    2008-12-31

    A large proportion of Alaska North Slope (ANS) oil exists in the form of viscous deposits, which cannot be produced entirely using conventional methods. Microbially enhanced oil recovery (MEOR) is a promising approach for improving oil recovery for viscous deposits. MEOR can be achieved using either ex situ approaches such as flooding with microbial biosurfactants or injection of exogenous surfactant-producing microbes into the reservoir, or by in situ approaches such as biostimulation of indigenous surfactant-producing microbes in the oil. Experimental work was performed to analyze the potential application of MEOR to the ANS oil fields through both ex situ and in situ approaches. A microbial formulation containing a known biosurfactant-producing strain of Bacillus licheniformis was developed in order to simulate MEOR. Coreflooding experiments were performed to simulate MEOR and quantify the incremental oil recovery. Properties like viscosity, density, and chemical composition of oil were monitored to propose a mechanism for oil recovery. The microbial formulation significantly increased incremental oil recovery, and molecular biological analyses indicated that the strain survived during the shut-in period. The indigenous microflora of ANS heavy oils was investigated to characterize the microbial communities and test for surfactant producers that are potentially useful for biostimulation. Bacteria that reduce the surface tension of aqueous media were isolated from one of the five ANS oils (Milne Point) and from rock oiled by the Exxon Valdez oil spill (EVOS), and may prove valuable for ex situ MEOR strategies. The total bacterial community composition of the six different oils was evaluated using molecular genetic tools, which revealed that each oil tested possessed a unique fingerprint indicating a diverse bacterial community and varied assemblages. Collectively we have demonstrated that there is potential for in situ and ex situ MEOR of ANS oils. Future work

  9. One-Step Synthesis and Magnetic Phase Transformation of Ln-TM-B Alloy by Chemical Reduction.

    PubMed

    Kim, Chang Woo; Kim, Young Hwan; Cha, Hyun Gil; Lee, Don Keun; Kang, Young Soo

    2007-04-11

    Binary and ternary intermetallic alloy systems are of interest for a variety of academic and technological applications. Despite recent advances in synthesizing binary alloy, there are very few reports of ternary alloy related to lanthanide series. The purpose of this work is to contribute to ternary alloy systems such as lanthanide-transition metal-boron with a simple chemical method and analysis of its magnetic behavior. Ternary Nd-Fe-B amorphous alloy was successfully synthesized with borohydride. The magnetic behavior in the process of formation of ternary Nd-Fe-B alloy and Nd2Fe14B from amorphous phase alloy is reported. Compared with the synthesis of a transition metal, the existence of a lanthanide ion makes aggregates-like particles with a diameter of 2 nm possible in the formation of a nanosphere, which is a significantly important result in terms of acceleration of the reduction-diffusion reaction for the formation of ternary alloy. In the process of reduction and diffusion, the Nd phase is diffused into the Fe-based phase, and then the ternary Nd2Fe14B intermetallic compound is fabricated. PMID:17425319

  10. Current advances of integrated processes combining chemical absorption and biological reduction for NO x removal from flue gas.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Shihan; Chen, Han; Xia, Yinfeng; Liu, Nan; Lu, Bi-Hong; Li, Wei

    2014-10-01

    Anthropogenic nitrogen oxides (NO x ) emitted from the fossil-fuel-fired power plants cause adverse environmental issues such as acid rain, urban ozone smoke, and photochemical smog. A novel chemical absorption-biological reduction (CABR) integrated process under development is regarded as a promising alternative to the conventional selective catalytic reduction processes for NO x removal from the flue gas because it is economic and environmentally friendly. CABR process employs ferrous ethylenediaminetetraacetate [Fe(II)EDTA] as a solvent to absorb the NO x following microbial denitrification of NO x to harmless nitrogen gas. Meanwhile, the absorbent Fe(II)EDTA is biologically regenerated to sustain the adequate NO x removal. Compared with conventional denitrification process, CABR not only enhances the mass transfer of NO from gas to liquid phase but also minimize the impact of oxygen on the microorganisms. This review provides the current advances of the development of the CABR process for NO x removal from the flue gas. PMID:25149446

  11. Size Control and Characterization of Sn-Ag-Cu Lead-Free Nanosolders by a Chemical Reduction Process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yung, K. C.; Law, C. M. T.; Lee, C. P.; Cheung, B.; Yue, T. M.

    2012-02-01

    Sn-3.0Ag-0.5Cu nanosolders were synthesized via a chemical reduction method. Polyvinyl pyrrolidone (PVP) and sodium borohydride (NaBH4) were employed as surfactant and reducing agent, respectively. Ultraviolet-visible (UV-visible) absorption and x-ray diffraction patterns revealed that alloying had successfully taken place during the reduction process. Different amounts of PVP and NaBH4 additions influenced the nanosolder particle size. Under varying reaction temperatures and pH values, various ranges of nanosolder size were obtained. Optimized nanosolders were studied by differential scanning calorimetry to investigate the depression of the melting temperature, and were analyzed by transmission electron microscopy to measure actual particle sizes. The dependence of the particle size on the melting temperature was observed. The melting point was depressed to 204.4°C when the average diameter of the nanosolders was 20 nm. Although SnO2 was formed on the nanosolders, it could be cleaned by citric acid. These low-melting-temperature Sn-Ag-Cu nanosolders are candidates for use in lead-free interconnect applications.

  12. Direct growth of tellurium nanorod arrays on Pt/FTO/glass through a surfactant-assisted chemical reduction.

    PubMed

    Liu, Hongmei; Zeng, Boming; Jia, Falong

    2011-07-29

    Uniform tellurium nanorod arrays (TNA) have been successfully deposited directly on Pt/FTO (F-doped SnO(2))/glass substrate through a facile surfactant-assisted approach, which involved chemical reduction of TeO(3)(2-) ions by hydrazine hydrate. The whole synthesis process is highly repeatable and performed simply by immersing the Pt/FTO/glass in the solution for a certain time. During the growth of TNA, Pt catalyzed the reduction of TeO(3)(2-) ions by hydrazine hydrate and Te nanoparticles were deposited firmly on the substrate at first. Then, under the regulation of the surfactant (cetyltrimethylammonium bromide, CTAB), the deposited Te grew into nanorod arrays and adhered firmly to the substrate. Similar Te nanorod arrays could also grow on a Pd substrate which has the same catalytic performance as that of Pt. The as-synthesized TNA could be used as a good template to synthesize platinum-and gold-coated nanorods through convenient galvanic replacement. As a demonstration of potential application, the gold/tellurium nanorods showed uniform surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) using rhodamine 6G (Rh6G) as the analyte. This approach provides a simple route for the growth of standing Te nanorods on a substrate, which may be used for the synthesis of other standing one-dimensional materials through a similar mechanism. PMID:21719969

  13. Direct growth of tellurium nanorod arrays on Pt/FTO/glass through a surfactant-assisted chemical reduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Hongmei; Zeng, Boming; Jia, Falong

    2011-07-01

    Uniform tellurium nanorod arrays (TNA) have been successfully deposited directly on Pt/FTO (F-doped SnO2)/glass substrate through a facile surfactant-assisted approach, which involved chemical reduction of TeO32 - ions by hydrazine hydrate. The whole synthesis process is highly repeatable and performed simply by immersing the Pt/FTO/glass in the solution for a certain time. During the growth of TNA, Pt catalyzed the reduction of TeO32 - ions by hydrazine hydrate and Te nanoparticles were deposited firmly on the substrate at first. Then, under the regulation of the surfactant (cetyltrimethylammonium bromide, CTAB), the deposited Te grew into nanorod arrays and adhered firmly to the substrate. Similar Te nanorod arrays could also grow on a Pd substrate which has the same catalytic performance as that of Pt. The as-synthesized TNA could be used as a good template to synthesize platinum-and gold-coated nanorods through convenient galvanic replacement. As a demonstration of potential application, the gold/tellurium nanorods showed uniform surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) using rhodamine 6G (Rh6G) as the analyte. This approach provides a simple route for the growth of standing Te nanorods on a substrate, which may be used for the synthesis of other standing one-dimensional materials through a similar mechanism.

  14. Chemical decontamination of Campylobacter jejuni on chicken skin and meat.

    PubMed

    Riedel, Charlotte Tandrup; Brøndsted, Lone; Rosenquist, Hanne; Haxgart, Sine Nygaard; Christensen, Bjarke Bak

    2009-06-01

    This study evaluated the effectiveness of 11 chemical compounds to reduce Campylobacter jejuni on chicken skin and meat samples dipped in chemical solutions. Treatment of skin samples for 1 min using tartaric acid (2%) and caprylic acid sodium salt (5%) caused reductions of C. jejuni NCTC11168, which were not significantly different from the reduction obtained by sterile water (0.95 log). Statistically larger reductions (1.57 to 3.81 log) were caused by formic acid (2%), lactic acid (2.5%), trisodium phosphate (10%), capric acid sodium salt (5%), grapefruit seed extract (1.6%), and chlorhexidine diacetate salt hydrate (1%). The most effective compounds were cetylpyridinium chloride (0.5%) and benzalkonium chloride (1%) (>4.2 log). However, when these treated samples were stored for 24 h at 5 degrees C, cetylpyridinium chloride, benzalkonium chloride, and grapefruit seed extract were less effective, indicating that some cells may recover after a 1-min treatment with these chemicals. An increase in treatment time to 15 min resulted in higher effectiveness of trisodium phosphate and formic acid. Interestingly, when reduction of the C. jejuni population was compared on chicken skin and meat, sterile water and lactic acid caused considerably larger reductions on skin than on meat, whereas the opposite was seen for caprylic acid sodium salt. In conclusion, this study has identified chemicals with substantial reduction effects on C. jejuni. The analysis has further emphasized that treatment time and food matrix affect the outcome in an unpredictable manner and, therefore, detailed studies are needed to evaluate the reduction effectiveness of chemicals. PMID:19610327

  15. Purification of aqueous plutonium chloride solutions via precipitation and washing.

    SciTech Connect

    Stroud, M. A.; Salazar, R. R.; Abney, Kent David; Bluhm, E. A.; Danis, J. A.

    2003-01-01

    Pyrochemical operations at Los Alamos Plutonium Facility (TA-55) use high temperature melt s of calcium chloride for the reduction of plutonium oxide to plutonium metal and hi gh temperature combined melts of sodium chloride and potassium chloride mixtures for the electrorefining purification of plutonium metal . The remaining plutonium and americium are recovered from thes e salts by dissolution in concentrated hydrochloric acid followed by either solvent extraction or io n exchange for isolation and ultimately converted to oxide after precipitation with oxalic acid . Figur e 1 illustrates the current aqueous chloride flow sheet used for plutonium processing at TA-55 .

  16. HEALTH ASSESSMENT DOCUMENT FOR VINYLIDENE CHLORIDE. FINAL REPORT

    EPA Science Inventory

    Vinylidene chloride is a highly reactive, flammable, clear colorless liquid. In the absence of chemical inhibitors, it can produce violently explosive, complex peroxides. The estimated, ambient air level of vinylidene chloride in urban-suburban areas of the United States is 20 mi...

  17. Effects of Cations on Corrosion of Inconel 625 in Molten Chloride Salts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Ming; Ma, Hongfang; Wang, Mingjing; Wang, Zhihua; Sharif, Adel

    2016-04-01

    Hot corrosion of Inconel 625 in sodium chloride, potassium chloride, magnesium chloride, calcium chloride and their mixtures with different compositions is conducted at 900°C to investigate the effects of cations in chloride salts on corrosion behavior of the alloy. XRD, SEM/EDS were used to analyze the compositions, phases, and morphologies of the corrosion products. The results showed that Inconel 625 suffers more severe corrosion in alkaline earth metal chloride molten salts than alkaline metal chloride molten salts. For corrosion in mixture salts, the corrosion rate increased with increasing alkaline earth metal chloride salt content in the mixture. Cations in the chloride molten salts mainly affect the thermal and chemical properties of the salts such as vapor pressure and hydroscopicities, which can affect the basicity of the molten salt. Corrosion of Inconel 625 in alkaline earth metal chloride salts is accelerated with increasing basicity.

  18. Reaction of uranium oxides with chlorine and carbon or carbon monoxide to prepare uranium chlorides

    SciTech Connect

    Haas, P.A.; Lee, D.D.; Mailen, J.C.

    1991-11-01

    The preferred preparation concept of uranium metal for feed to an AVLIS uranium enrichment process requires preparation of uranium tetrachloride (UCI{sub 4}) by reacting uranium oxides (UO{sub 2}/UO{sub 3}) and chlorine (Cl{sub 2}) in a molten chloride salt medium. UO{sub 2} is a very stable metal oxide; thus, the chemical conversion requires both a chlorinating agent and a reducing agent that gives an oxide product which is much more stable than the corresponding chloride. Experimental studies in a quartz reactor of 4-cm ID have demonstrated the practically of some chemical flow sheets. Experimentation has illustrated a sequence of results concerning the chemical flow sheets. Tests with a graphite block at 850{degrees}C demonstrated rapid reactions of Cl{sub 2} and evolution of carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) as a product. Use of carbon monoxide (CO) as the reducing agent also gave rapid reactions of Cl{sub 2} and formation of CO{sub 2} at lower temperatures, but the reduction reactions were slower than the chlorinations. Carbon powder in the molten salt melt gave higher rates of reduction and better steady state utilization of Cl{sub 2}. Addition of UO{sub 2} feed while chlorination was in progress greatly improved the operation by avoiding the plugging effects from high UO{sub 2} concentrations and the poor Cl{sub 2} utilizations from low UO{sub 2} concentrations. An UO{sub 3} feed gave undesirable effects while a feed of UO{sub 2}-C spheres was excellent. The UO{sub 2}-C spheres also gave good rates of reaction as a fixed bed without any molten chloride salt. Results with a larger reactor and a bottom condenser for volatilized uranium show collection of condensed uranium chlorides as a loose powder and chlorine utilizations of 95--98% at high feed rates. 14 refs., 7 figs., 14 tabs.

  19. Study of Impacts of Arctic Sea Ice Reduction on Atmospheric Chemical Processes - The BROMEX 2012 Field Campaign

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nghiem, S. V.

    2012-12-01

    Arctic perennial sea ice has decreased drastically in the last decade and still remained low in spring 2012 as observed from scatterometer datasets acquired by QuikSCAT and Oceansat-2 satellites. In particular, the thinner, weaker, and saltier seasonal sea ice has dominated over the perennial ice in the Chukchi Sea and Beaufort Sea. To investigate impacts of sea ice reduction on atmospheric chemical processes, we conducted the BRomine, Ozone, and Mercury EXperiment in (BROMEX) in March-April 2012 around Barrow, extending out to a large region offshore and inland. Here we present overview results from BROMEX, which was successfully carried out by about 30 scientists, researchers, and field workers from multiple international institutions. For BROMEX, we coordinated and collected satellite data, including a number of near-real-time products, from multiple satellite instruments including MODIS, AMSR-E, GOME-2, SCIAMACHY, OMI, RADARSAT-2, Envisat ASAR, TanDEM-X, SMOS, CryoSat-2, and Oceansat-2. Over the BROMEX field region, we made measurements and collected sea ice, snow, ocean, and air samples for physical, meteorological, chemical, biological, and acoustic studies. A helicopter was used to deploy chemical and meteorological buoys in the Chukchi Sea and the Beaufort Sea. Measurements were also made with airborne sensors across sea ice, leads, lagoon, and tundra along various flight patterns of the ALAR aircraft. Furthermore, we coordinated with the NASA IceBridge P3 aircraft to collect surface temperature, surface height, snow depth, and ice thickness measurements. We set up and maintained field sites on sea ice and in the tundra to measure bromine, ozone, mercury, and other chemical species. Moreover, we obtained temperature data from many different types of temperature sensors for temperature accuracy assessment to identify potential issues that might cause errors or biases in temperature measurements. An enormous amount of in-situ snow and ice data was collected

  20. Mercuric chloride (HgCl2)

    Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS)

    Mercuric chloride ( HgCl2 ) ; CASRN 7487 - 94 - 7 Human health assessment information on a chemical substance is included in the IRIS database only after a comprehensive review of toxicity data , as outlined in the IRIS assessment development process . Sections I ( Health Hazard Assessments for Nonc

  1. 21 CFR 184.1446 - Manganese chloride.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ..., and crystallized. (b) The ingredient meets the specifications of the Food Chemicals Codex, 3d Ed... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Manganese chloride. 184.1446 Section 184.1446 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD...

  2. Strontium-89 Chloride

    MedlinePlus

    ... ask your doctor or pharmacist for more information.Strontium-89 chloride is in a class of drugs known as radioisotopes. It delivers radiation to cancer sites and ultimately decreases bone pain. The length of treatment depends on the ...

  3. Mercuric chloride poisoning

    MedlinePlus

    ... Mercuric chloride is a very poisonous form of mercury. It is a type of mercury salt. There are different types of mercury poisonings . This article discusses poisoning from swallowing mercuric ...

  4. Hydrogen chloride test set

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Workman, G. L.

    1976-01-01

    Detector uses tertiary amine, which makes reaction fairly specific for relatively small highly polarized hydrogen chloride molecule. Reaction is monitored by any microbalance capable of measuring extremely small mass differences in real time.

  5. NITRO-HYDROLYSIS: AN ENERGY EFFICIENT SOURCE REDUCTION AND CHEMICAL PRODUCTION PROCESS FOR WASTEWATER TREATMENT PLANT BIOSOLIDS

    SciTech Connect

    Klasson, KT

    2003-03-10

    The nitro-hydrolysis process has been demonstrated in the laboratory in batch tests on one municipal waste stream. This project was designed to take the next step toward commercialization for both industrial and municipal wastewater treatment facility (WWTF) by demonstrating the feasibility of the process on a small scale. In addition, a 1-lb/hr continuous treatment system was constructed at University of Tennessee to treat the Kuwahee WWTF (Knoxville, TN) sludge in future work. The nitro-hydrolysis work was conducted at University of Tennessee in the Chemical Engineering Department and the gas and liquid analysis were performed at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. Nitro-hydrolysis of sludge proved a very efficient way of reducing sludge volume, producing a treated solution which contained unreacted solids (probably inorganics such as sand and silt) that settled quickly. Formic acid was one of the main organic acid products of reaction when larger quantities of nitric acid were used in the nitrolysis. When less nitric acid was used formic acid was initially produced but was later consumed in the reactions. The other major organic acid produced was acetic acid which doubled in concentration during the reaction when larger quantities of nitric acid were used. Propionic acid and butyric acid were not produced or consumed in these experiments. It is projected that the commercial use of nitro-hydrolysis at municipal wastewater treatment plants alone would result in a total estimated energy savings of greater than 20 trillion Btu/yr. A net reduction of 415,000 metric tons of biosolids per year would be realized and an estimated annual cost reduction of $122M/yr.

  6. Diluting ferric carboxymaltose in sodium chloride infusion solution (0.9% w/v) in polypropylene bottles and bags: effects on chemical stability

    PubMed Central

    Philipp, Erik; Braitsch, Michaela; Bichsel, Tobias; Mühlebach, Stefan

    2016-01-01

    Objectives This study was designed to assess the physicochemical stability of colloidal ferric carboxymaltose solution (Ferinject) when diluted and stored in polypropylene (PP) bottles and bags for infusion. Methods Two batches of ferric carboxymaltose solution (Ferinject) were diluted (500 mg, 200 mg and 100 mg iron in 100 mL saline) in PP bottles or bags under aseptic conditions. The diluted solutions were stored at 30°C and 75%±5% relative humidity (rH) for 72 h, and samples were withdrawn aseptically at preparation and after 24 h, 48 h and 72 h. Multiple parameters were used to test stability-related measures (pH, total iron and iron (II) content, molecular weight range determination, microbial contamination and particles count ≥10 μm). Results Overall, Ferinject diluted in 0.9% (w/v) NaCl solution and stored in PP bottles and bags was stable within the specifications for the complex and the acceptability limits set for all assays. In both containers, total iron content remained stable, within 10% of the theoretical iron content, and levels of iron (II) remained far below the threshold of acceptability. All preparations were free from sediments, particle numbers were acceptable and there was no microbial contamination. The molecular weight distribution and polydispersity index were also acceptable. Conclusions Under the tested experimental conditions, colloidal ferric carboxymaltose solution (Ferinject) diluted in saline in PP infusion bottles or bags demonstrated physical and chemical stability for up to 72 h at 30°C and 75% rH. Because of the lack of additional clinical data, when using ferric carboxymaltose, physicians/pharmacists should refer to the dilution and storing recommendations given in the product's summary of product characteristics. PMID:26835007

  7. Mitigation of chloride and sulfate based corrosion in reinforced concrete via electrokinetic nanoparticle treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kupwade-Patil, Kunal

    Concrete is a porous material which is susceptible to the migration of highly deleterious species such as chlorides and sulfates. Various external sources, including sea salt spray, direct seawater wetting, deicing salts and chlorides can contaminate reinforced concrete. Chlorides diffuse into the capillary pores of concrete and come into contact with the reinforcement. When chloride concentration at the reinforcement exceeds a threshold level it breaks down the passive oxide layer, leading to chloride induced corrosion. The application of electrokinetics using positively charged nanoparticles for corrosion protection in reinforced concrete structures is an emerging technology. This technique involves the principle of electrophoretic migration of nanoparticles to hinder chloride diffusion in the concrete. The return of chlorides is inhibited by the electrodeposited assembly of the nanoparticles at the reinforcement interface. This work examined the nanoparticle treatment impact on chloride and sulfate induced corrosion in concrete. Electrokinetic Nanoparticle (EN) treatments were conducted on reinforced cylindrical concrete, rectangular ASTM G109 specimens that simulate a bridge deck and full scale beam specimens. EN treatment to mitigate external sulfate attack in concrete was performed on cylindrical concrete specimens. Corrosion results indicated lower corrosion potentials and rates as compared to the untreated specimens. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) showed a dense microstructure within the EN treated specimens. Chemical analysis (Raman spectroscopy, X ray-diffraction, and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy FTIR) showed the presence of strength enhancing phases such as calcium aluminate hydrate (C-A-H) and increased amounts of calcium silicate hydrate (C-S-H) within the EN treated specimens. Strength and porosity results showed an increase in strength and a reduction in porosity among the EN treated specimens. EN treatment acted as a protective

  8. Vitrification of Polyvinyl Chloride Waste from Korean Nuclear Power Plants

    SciTech Connect

    Sheng, Jiawei; Choi, Kwansik; Yang, Kyung-Hwa; Lee, Myung-Chan; Song, Myung-Jae

    2000-02-15

    Vitrification is considered as an economical and safe treatment technology for low-level radioactive waste (LLW) generated from nuclear power plants (NPPs). Korea is in the process of preparing for its first ever vitrification plant to handle LLW from its NPPs. Polyvinyl chloride (PVC) has the largest volume of dry active wastes and is the main waste stream to treat. Glass formulation development for PVC waste is the focus of study. The minimum additive waste stabilization approach has been utilized in vitrification. It was found that glasses can incorporate a high content of PVC ash (up to 50 wt%), which results in a large volume reduction. A glass frit, KEP-A, was developed to vitrify PVC waste after the optimization of waste loading, melt viscosity, melting temperature, and chemical durability. The KEP-A could satisfactorily vitrify PVC with a waste loading of 30 to 50 wt%. The PVC-frit was tolerant of variations in waste composition.

  9. Vinyl chloride: a case study of data suppression and misrepresentation.

    PubMed

    Sass, Jennifer Beth; Castleman, Barry; Wallinga, David

    2005-07-01

    When the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) finalized its 2000 update of the toxicological effects of vinyl chloride (VC), it was concerned with two issues: the classification of VC as a carcinogen and the numerical estimate of its potency. In this commentary we describe how the U.S. EPA review of VC toxicology, which was drafted with substantial input from the chemical industry, weakened safeguards on both points. First, the assessment down-plays risks from all cancer sites other than the liver. Second, the estimate of cancer potency was reduced 10-fold from values previously used for environmental decision making, a finding that reduces the cost and extent of pollution reduction and cleanup measures. We suggest that this assessment reflects discredited scientific practices and recommend that the U.S. EPA reverse its trend toward ever-increasing collaborations with the regulated industries when generating scientific reviews and risk assessments. PMID:16002366

  10. Application of integrated ozone and granular activated carbon for decolorization and chemical oxygen demand reduction of vinasse from alcohol distilleries.

    PubMed

    Hadavifar, Mojtaba; Younesi, Habibollah; Zinatizadeh, Ali Akbar; Mahdad, Faezeh; Li, Qin; Ghasemi, Zahra

    2016-04-01

    This study investigates the treatment of the distilleries vinasse using a hybrid process integrating ozone oxidation and granular activated carbons (GAC) in both batch and continuous operation mode. The batch-process studies have been carried out to optimize initial influent pH, GAC doses, the effect of the ozone (O3) and hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) concentrations on chemical oxygen demand (COD) and color removal of the distilleries vinasse. The continuous process was carried out on GAC and ozone treatment alone as well as the hybrid process comb both methods to investigate the synergism effectiveness of the two methods for distilleries vinasse COD reduction and color removal. In a continuous process, the Yan model described the experimental data better than the Thomas model. The efficiency of ozonation of the distilleries vinasse was more effective for color removal (74.4%) than COD removal (25%). O3/H2O2 process was not considerably more effective on COD and color removal. Moreover, O3/GAC process affected negatively on the removal efficiency by reducing COD and color from distilleries vinasse. The negative effect decreased by increasing pH value of the influent. PMID:26789200

  11. Sulfur and ash reduction potential and selected chemical and physical properties of United States coals. [Contains glossary

    SciTech Connect

    Cavallaro, J.A.; Deurbrouck, A.W.; Killmeyer, R.P.; Fuchs, W. ); Jacobsen, P.S. )

    1990-01-01

    This report presents the washability and comprehensive characterization results of 543 raw coal samples collected from the Eastern Region of the United States. This is the first volume of a three-volume report on the coals of the United States. All the data are presented in six appendices. Statistical techniques and definitions are presented in Appendix A, and a glossary of terms is presented in Appendix B. The complete washability data and an in- depth characterization of each sample are presented alphbetically by state in Appendix C. In Appendix D, a statistical evaluation is given for the composited washability data, selected chemical and physical properties, and washability data interpolated at various levels of Btu recovery. This presentation is shown by state, section, and region where four or more samples were collected. Appendix E presents coalbed codes and names for the Eastern Region coals. Graphical summations are presented by state, section, and region showing the effects of crushing on impurity reductions, and the distribution of raw and clean coal samples meeting various levels of SO{sub 2} emissions. 14 refs., 27 figs., 3 tabs.

  12. Effects of Ni content on nanocrystalline Fe-Co-Ni ternary alloys synthesized by a chemical reduction method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chokprasombat, Komkrich; Pinitsoontorn, Supree; Maensiri, Santi

    2016-05-01

    Magnetic properties of Fe-Co-Ni ternary alloys could be altered by changing of the particle size, elemental compositions, and crystalline structures. In this work, Fe50Co50-xNix nanoparticles (x=10, 20, 40, and 50) were prepared by the novel chemical reduction process. Hydrazine monohydrate was used as a reducing agent under the concentrated basic condition with the presence of poly(vinylpyrrolidone). We found that the nanoparticles were composed of Fe, Co and Ni with compositions according to the molar ratio of the metal sources. Interestingly, the particles were well-crystalline at the as-prepared state without post-annealing at high temperature. Increasing Ni content resulted in phase transformation from body centered cubic (bcc) to face centered cubic (fcc). For the fcc phase, the average particle size decreased when increased the Ni content; the Fe50Ni50 nanoparticles had the smallest average size with the narrowest size distribution. In additions, the particles exhibited ferromagnetic properties at room temperature with the coercivities higher than 300 Oe, and the saturation magnetiation decreased with increasing Ni content. These results suggest that the structural and magnetic properties of Fe-Co-Ni alloys could be adjusted by varying the Ni content.

  13. Sulfur and ash reduction potential and selected chemical and physical properties of United States coals. [Contains glossary

    SciTech Connect

    Cavallaro, J.A.; Deurbrouck, A.W.; Killmeyer, R.P.; Fuchs, W. . Coal Preparation Div.); Jacobsen, P.S. )

    1991-06-01

    This report presents the washability and comprehensive characterization results of 247 raw coal channel samples, including anthracite, bituminous and lignite coals, collected from the Western Region of the United States. Although the Western Region includes Alaska, coal data from this state will often be cited apart from the Western Region data from the lower United States. This is the third of a three volume report on the coals of the United States. All the data are presented in six appendices. Statistical techniques and definitions are presented in Appendix A, and a glossary of terms is presented in Appendix B. The complete washability data and an in-depth characterization of each sample are presented alphabetically by state in Appendix C. In Appendix D, a statistical evaluation is given for the composited washability data, selected chemical and physical properties, and washability data interpolated at various levels of Btu recovery. This presentation is shown by state, section, and region where four or more samples were collected. Appendix E presents coalbed codes and names for the Western Region coals. Graphical summations are presented by state, rank, and region showing the effects of crushing on impurity reductions, and the distribution of raw and clean coal samples meeting various levels of SO{sub 2} emissions. 35 figs., 3 tabs.

  14. Synthesis and characterization of novel bactericidal Cu/HPMC BNCs using chemical reduction method for food packaging.

    PubMed

    Ebrahimiasl, Saeideh; Rajabpour, Ataollah

    2015-09-01

    In this research copper nanoparticles (Cu NPs) were incorporated in the biodegradable hydroxypropyl methylcellulose (HPMC) matrix using the simple and low cost chemical reduction method for application as food packaging material. The properties of Cu/HPMC bionanocomposites (BNCs) were studied as a function of the CuSO4 concentration. Surface morphology of the film was investigated by scanning electron microscopy. Mechanical analysis and water vapor barrier properties of HPMC/Cu nanocomposites were analyzed. It was observed that mechanical and water vapor barrier properties of the films were improved by the concentration of CuSO4. The antibacterial activity of HPMC/Cu thin films were evaluated based on the diameter of inhibition zone in a disk diffusion test against Gram positive bacteria, ie, Streptococus A., S. epidermidis, S.aureus , B.cereus and Gram negative bacteria, ie, E. coli, E. faecalis, Salmonella, P. aeruginosa using Mueller Hinton agar at different concentration of CuSO4. The results revealed a greater bactericidal effectiveness for nanocomposite films containing 5 % of CuSO4. Packages prepared from HPMC/Cu nanocomposite films were used for meat packaging. The films were filled with meat and then stored at 4 °C. Microbial stability of the meat was evaluated after 3, 7, 10 and 15 days of storage. The results showed that microbial growth rate significantly reduced as a result of using this nanocomposite packaging material. PMID:26345017

  15. Carbon emissions reduction potential in the US chemicals and pulp and paper industries by applying CHP technologies

    SciTech Connect

    Khrushch, M.; Worrell, E.; Price, L.; Martin, N.; Einstein, D.

    1999-07-01

    The chemical and the pulp/paper industries combined provide 55% of CHP generation in the US industry. Yet, significant potential for new CHP capacities exists in both industries. From the present steam consumption data, the authors estimate about 50 GW of additional technical potential for CHP in both industries. The reduced carbon emissions will be equivalent to 44% of the present carbon emissions in these industries. They find that most of the carbon emissions reductions can be achieved at negative costs. Depending on the assumptions used in calculations, the economic potential of CHP in these industries can be significantly lower, and carbon emissions mitigation costs can be much higher. Using sensitivity analyses, they determine that the largest effect on the CHP estimate have the assumptions in the costs of CHP technology, in the assumed discount rates, in improvements in efficiency of CHP technologies, and in the CHP equipment depreciation periods. Changes in fuel and electricity prices and the growth in the industries' steam demand have less of an effect. They conclude that the lowest carbon mitigation costs are achieved with the CHP facility is operated by the utility and when industrial company that owns the CHP unit can sell extra electricity and steam to the open wholesale market. Based on the results of the analyses they discuss policy implications.

  16. Sulfur and ash reduction potential and selected chemical and physical properties of United States coals. [Contains glossary

    SciTech Connect

    Cavallaro, J.A.; Deurbrouck, A.W.; Killmeyer, R.P.; Fuchs, W. . Coal Preparation Div.); Jacobsen, P.S. )

    1991-02-01

    This report presents the washability and comprehensive characterization results of 184 raw coal channel samples, including anthracite, bituminous and lignite coals, collected from the Central Region of the United States. This is the second of a three volume report on the coals of the United States. All the data are presented in six appendices. Statistical techniques and definitions are presented in Appendix A, and a glossary of terms is presented in Appendix B. The complete washability data and an in-depth characterization of each sample are presented alphabetically by state in Appendix C. In Appendix D, a statistical evaluation is given for the composited washability data, selected chemical and physical properties and washability data interpolated at various levels of Btu recovery. This presentation is shown by state, section, and region where four or more samples were collected. Appendix E presents coalbed codes and names for the Central Region coals. Graphical summations are presented by state, section and region showing the effects of crushing on impurity reductions, and the distribution of raw and clean coal samples meeting various levels of SO{sub 2} emissions. 35 figs., 5 tabs.

  17. Influence of Sn on the magnetic ordering of Ni-Sn alloy synthesized using chemical reduction method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dhanapal, K.; Narayanan, V.; Stephen, A.

    2016-05-01

    The Ni-Sn alloy was synthesized using borohydride assisted chemical reduction method. The composition of the synthesized alloy was determined using atomic absorption spectroscopy which revealed that the observed composition of Sn is high when compared to the initial composition. The ultrafine particles are clearly observed from field emission scanning electron microscope for all the sample. The X-ray diffraction measurement confirmed that the as-synthesized samples are of amorphous like nature while the samples annealed at 773 K showed crystalline nature. The Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy confirmed metallic bond stretching in the alloy samples. The crystallization and phase transition temperature was observed from differential scanning calorimetry. The shift in the crystallization temperature of Ni with increasing percentage of Sn was observed. The vibrating sample magnetometer was employed to understand the magnetic behavior of the Ni-Sn alloy. As-synthesized alloy samples showed paramagnetic nature while the annealed ones exhibit the soft ferromagnetic, antiferromagnetic and paramagnetic nature. The saturation magnetization value and magnetic ordering in the Ni-Sn alloys depend on the percentage of Sn present in the alloy.

  18. 40 CFR 721.10622 - Copper(2+), tetraammine-, chloride (1:2).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Copper(2+), tetraammine-, chloride (1... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.10622 Copper(2+), tetraammine-, chloride (1:2). (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified as...

  19. 40 CFR 721.10622 - Copper(2+), tetraammine-, chloride (1:2).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Copper(2+), tetraammine-, chloride (1... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.10622 Copper(2+), tetraammine-, chloride (1:2). (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified as...

  20. CHLORIDE WASHER PERFORMACE TESTING

    SciTech Connect

    Coughlin, J; David Best, D; Robert Pierce, R

    2007-11-30

    Testing was performed to determine the chloride (Cl-) removal capabilities of the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) designed and built Cl- washing equipment intended for HB-Line installation. The equipment to be deployed was tested using a cerium oxide (CeO2) based simulant in place of the 3013 plutonium oxide (PuO2) material. Two different simulant mixtures were included in this testing -- one having higher Cl- content than the other. The higher Cl- simulant was based on K-Area Interim Surveillance Inspection Program (KIS) material with Cl- content approximately equal to 70,000 ppm. The lower Cl- level simulant was comparable to KIS material containing approximately 8,000-ppm Cl- content. The performance testing results indicate that the washer is capable of reducing the Cl- content of both surrogates to below 200 ppm with three 1/2-liter washes of 0.1M sodium hydroxide (NaOH) solution. Larger wash volumes were used with similar results - all of the prescribed test parameters consistently reduced the Cl- content of the surrogate to a value below 200 ppm Cl- in the final washed surrogate material. The washer uses a 20-micron filter to retain the surrogate solids. Tests showed that 0.16-0.41% of the insoluble fraction of the starting mass passed through the 20-micron filter. The solids retention performance indicates that the fissile masses passing through the 20-micron filter should not exceed the waste acceptance criteria for discard in grout to TRU waste. It is recommended that additional testing be pursued for further verification and optimization purposes. It is likely that wash volumes smaller than those tested could still reduce the Cl- values to acceptable levels. Along with reduced wash volumes, reuse of the third wash volume (in the next run processed) should be tested as a wash solution minimization plan. A 67% reduction in the number of grouted paint pails could be realized if wash solution minimization testing returned acceptable results.

  1. Chloride removal from vitrification offgas

    SciTech Connect

    Slaathaug, E.J.

    1995-06-01

    This study identified and investigated techniques of selectively purging chlorides from the low-level waste (LLW) vitrification process with the purge stream acceptable for burial on the Hanford Site. Chlorides will be present in high concentration in several individual feeds to the LLW Vitrification Plant. The chlorides are highly volatile in combustion type melters and are readily absorbed by wet scrubbing of the melter offgas. The Tank Waste Remediation System (TWRS) process flow sheets show that the resulting chloride rich scrub solution is recycled back to the melter. The chlorides must be purged from the recycle loop to prevent the buildup of excessively high chloride concentrations.

  2. Strontium-89 Chloride

    MedlinePlus

    ... doctor if you have or have ever had bone marrow disease, blood disorders, or kidney disease.you should know that strontium-89 chloride may interfere with the normal menstrual cycle (period) in women and may stop sperm production in men. However, ...

  3. Lithium thionyl chloride battery

    SciTech Connect

    Saathoff, D.J.; Venkatasetty, H.V.

    1982-10-19

    The discharge rate and internal conductivity of electrochemical cell including a lithium anode, and a cathode and an electrolyte including LiAlCl4 and SOC2 is improved by the addition of an amount of a mixture containing AlCl3 and butyl pyridinium chloride.

  4. PHOTOOXIDATION OF ALLYL CHLORIDE

    EPA Science Inventory

    The photooxidation of allyl chloride was studied by irradiation either in 100-L Teflon bags or in a 22.7-cu m Teflon smog chamber in the presence of added NOx. In the absence of added hydrocarbons, the reaction involves a Cl atom chain, which leads to a highly reactive system. A ...

  5. Developmental toxicity of copper chloride, methylene chloride, and 6-aminonicotinamide to embryos of the grass shrimp Palaemonetes pugio

    SciTech Connect

    Rayburn, J.R.; Fisher, W.S.

    1999-05-01

    Embryos of estuarine grass shrimp Palaemonetes pugio have demonstrated sensitivity to various solvents and petroleum products, indicating utility for evaluating estuarine contamination. Testing was performed to establish concentration-response curves for methylene chloride, copper chloride, and 6-aminonicotinamide, three known teratogenic chemicals. Two exposure periods were used, 4 d and 12 d, and both periods extended through hatching. The average 4-d LC50 values for methylene chloride, copper chloride, and 6-aminonicotinamide were 0.071% v/v, 1.82 mg/L, and 0.21 mg/ml, respectively. The average 12-d LC50 values for methylene chloride, copper chloride, and 6-aminonicotinamide were 0.031% v/v, 1.44 mg/L, and 0.057 mg/ml, respectively. Eye malformations were observed with embryos exposed to concentrations greater than 3 mg/L copper chloride or greater than 0.07% v/v methylene chloride. Very few abnormalities were observed in embryos exposed to 6-aminonicotinamide. Abnormal larval development was found with exposure to copper chloride at concentrations greater than 1 mg/L. The sensitivity and low variability found here further supports the development of these relatively simple methods using grass shrimp embryos. Establishment of sublethal developmental endpoints warrants further investigation because of their potential correspondence to mechanisms of toxic action.

  6. Automatic electrochemical ambient air monitor for chloride and chlorine

    DOEpatents

    Mueller, Theodore R.

    1976-07-13

    An electrochemical monitoring system has been provided for determining chloride and chlorine in air at levels of from about 10-1000 parts per billion. The chloride is determined by oxidation to chlorine followed by reduction to chloride in a closed system. Chlorine is determined by direct reduction at a platinum electrode in 6 M H.sub.2 SO.sub.4 electrolyte. A fully automated system is utilized to (1) acquire and store a value corresponding to electrolyte-containing impurities, (2) subtract this value from that obtained in the presence of air, (3) generate coulometrically a standard sample of chlorine mixed with air sample, and determine it as chlorine and/or chloride, and (4) calculate, display, and store for permanent record the ratio of the signal obtained from the air sample and that obtained with the standard.

  7. Investigation of factors influencing chloride extraction efficiency during electrochemical chloride extraction from reinforcing concrete

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharp, Stephen R.

    2005-11-01

    residue revealed that it contains calcium carbonate, calcium chloride, and other yet unidentified minor components when calcium hydroxide was used as the electrolyte. The surface film can be completely removed mechanically or to some extent inhibited chemically, with both of these processes resulting in an increase in the efficiency of the electrochemical chloride extraction process. In addition, an obvious relationship between the cover depth, water-to-cement ratio, and chloride extraction efficiency does not exist, however, cover depth does influence the current density. The final phase of this study will be presented in a VTRC/FHWA final report. This report will include the results that are presented in this dissertation, in addition to the results from the ongoing research. It will also include an estimation of the additional service life that can be expected following treatment.

  8. Chloride Channels of Intracellular Membranes

    PubMed Central

    Edwards, John C.; Kahl, Christina R.

    2010-01-01

    Proteins implicated as intracellular chloride channels include the intracellular ClC proteins, the bestrophins, the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator, the CLICs, and the recently described Golgi pH regulator. This paper examines current hypotheses regarding roles of intracellular chloride channels and reviews the evidence supporting a role in intracellular chloride transport for each of these proteins. PMID:20100480

  9. Chloride metallurgy: PGM recovery and titanium dioxide production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Puvvada, G. V. K.; Sridhar, R.; Lakshmanan, V. I.

    2003-08-01

    This paper examines in detail the thermodynamics and application of chloride metallurgy for the extraction of precious metals, such as gold and silver, and platinum-group metals. The advantages with regard to the solubilities of metal ion species and their reduction potentials in chloride media are discussed with examples. The use of chloride media for the extraction of platinum-group metals from spent autocatalysts and for the production of high-purity pigment-grade TiO2 and titanium metal from ilmenite feed stocks is discussed in the case studies provided.

  10. Carcinogenicity and epidemiological profile analysis of vinyl chloride and polyvinyl chloride

    SciTech Connect

    Kalmaz, E.E.; Kalmaz, G.D.

    1984-03-01

    The carcinogenicity of vinyl chloride and polyvinyl chloride (VC/PVC) is reviewed with specific attention to the gaps in knowledge for risk estimation and epidemiological presentation of the available data. Although experimental studies have demonstrated the carcinogenicity and mutagenicity of VC/PVC in general, the epidemiologic studies available for review do not include an assessment of carcinogenic risk among humans exposed to these chemicals. This conclusion is based on the observation that the majority of cohort studies reviewed lacked sufficient statistical power because of small sample sizes. Further, in epidemiological studies, individuals were not followed over an adequate period of time during which cancer could become clinically manifest.

  11. [Degradation of succinylcholine chloride].

    PubMed

    Németh, G; Török, I; Paál, T

    1993-05-01

    Quantitative thin-layer chormatographic method has been developed for the investigation of the degradation of injection formulations containing succinylcholinium chloride. The method is based on the denistometric determination of the main degradation product, choline at 430 nm after visualization with iodine vapour. The stability of the injection was investigated under various storage conditions and it has been stated that considerable decomposition takes place during as short a period as one week. PMID:8362654

  12. Chloride channels as drug targets

    PubMed Central

    Verkman, Alan S.; Galietta, Luis J. V.

    2013-01-01

    Chloride channels represent a relatively under-explored target class for drug discovery as elucidation of their identity and physiological roles has lagged behind that of many other drug targets. Chloride channels are involved in a wide range of biological functions, including epithelial fluid secretion, cell-volume regulation, neuroexcitation, smooth-muscle contraction and acidification of intracellular organelles. Mutations in several chloride channels cause human diseases, including cystic fibrosis, macular degeneration, myotonia, kidney stones, renal salt wasting and hyperekplexia. Chloride-channel modulators have potential applications in the treatment of some of these disorders, as well as in secretory diarrhoeas, polycystic kidney disease, osteoporosis and hypertension. Modulators of GABAA (γ-aminobutyric acid A) receptor chloride channels are in clinical use and several small-molecule chloride-channel modulators are in preclinical development and clinical trials. Here, we discuss the broad opportunities that remain in chloride-channel-based drug discovery. PMID:19153558

  13. Method for the production of uranium chloride salt

    DOEpatents

    Westphal, Brian R.; Mariani, Robert D.

    2013-07-02

    A method for the production of UCl.sub.3 salt without the use of hazardous chemicals or multiple apparatuses for synthesis and purification is provided. Uranium metal is combined in a reaction vessel with a metal chloride and a eutectic salt- and heated to a first temperature under vacuum conditions to promote reaction of the uranium metal with the metal chloride for the production of a UCl.sub.3 salt. After the reaction has run substantially to completion, the furnace is heated to a second temperature under vacuum conditions. The second temperature is sufficiently high to selectively vaporize the chloride salts and distill them into a condenser region.

  14. Absorption media for irreversibly gettering thionyl chloride

    DOEpatents

    Buffleben, George; Goods, Steven H.; Shepodd, Timothy; Wheeler, David R.; Whinnery, Jr., LeRoy

    2002-01-01

    Thionyl chloride is a hazardous and reactive chemical used as the liquid cathode in commercial primary batteries. Contrary to previous thinking, ASZM-TEDA.RTM. carbon (Calgon Corporation) reversibly absorbs thionyl chloride. Thus, several candidate materials were examined as irreversible getters for thionyl chloride. The capacity, rate and effect of temperature were also explored. A wide variety of likely materials were investigated through screening experiments focusing on the degree of heat generated by the reaction as well as the material absorption capacity and irreversibility, in order to help narrow the group of possible getter choices. More thorough, quantitative measurements were performed on promising materials. The best performing getter was a mixture of ZnO and ASZM-TEDA.RTM. carbon. In this example, the ZnO reacts with thionyl chloride to form ZnCl.sub.2 and SO.sub.2. The SO.sub.2 is then irreversibly gettered by ASZM-TEDA.RTM. carbon. This combination of ZnO and carbon has a high capacity, is irreversible and functions effectively above -20.degree. C.

  15. Controlling chloride ions diffusion in concrete

    PubMed Central

    Zeng, Lunwu; Song, Runxia

    2013-01-01

    The corrosion of steel in concrete is mainly due to the chemical reaction between the chloride ions and iron ions. Indeed, this is a serious threaten for reinforced concrete structure, especially for the reinforced concrete structure in the sea. So it is urgent and important to protect concrete against chloride ions corrosion. In this work, we report multilayer concrete can cloak chloride ions. We formulated five kinds of concrete A, B, C, D and E, which are made of different proportion of cement, sand and glue, and fabricated six-layer (ABACAD) cylinder diffusion cloak and background media E. The simulation results show that the six-layer mass diffusion cloak can protect concrete against chloride ions penetration, while the experiment results show that the concentration gradients are parallel and equal outside the outer circle in the diffusion flux lines, the iso-concentration lines are parallel outside the outer circle, and the concentration gradients in the inner circle are smaller than those outside the outer circle. PMID:24285220

  16. Synthesis and structural characterization of polyaniline/cobalt chloride composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asha, Goyal, Sneh Lata; Kishore, Nawal

    2016-05-01

    Polyaniline (PANI) and PANI /cobalt chloride composites were synthesized by in situ chemical oxidative polymerization of aniline with CoCl2.6H2O using ammonium peroxidisulphate as an oxidant. These composites were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD) and Scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The XRD study reveals that both PANI and composites are amorphous. The XRD and SEM results confirm the presence of cobalt chloride in the composites.

  17. THE SECOND GENERATION OF THE WASTE REDUCTION (WAR) ALGORITHM: A DECISION SUPPORT SYSTEM FOR GREENER CHEMICAL PROCESSES

    EPA Science Inventory

    chemical process designers using simulation software generate alternative designs for one process. One criterion for evaluating these designs is their potential for adverse environmental impacts due to waste generated, energy consumed, and possibilities for fugitive emissions. Co...

  18. Solution-Derived, Chloride-Containing Minerals as a Waste Form for Alkali Chlorides

    SciTech Connect

    Riley, Brian J.; Crum, Jarrod V.; Matyas, Josef; McCloy, John S.; Lepry, William C.

    2012-10-01

    Sodalite [Na8(AlSiO4)6Cl2] and cancrinite [(Na,K)6Ca2Al6Si6O24Cl4] are environmentally stable, chloride-containing minerals and are a logical waste form option for the mixed alkali chloride salt waste stream that is generated from a proposed electrochemical separations process during nuclear fuel reprocessing. Due to the volatility of chloride salts at moderate temperatures, the ideal processing route for these salts is a low-temperature approach such as the sol-gel process. The sodalite structure can be easily synthesized by the sol-gel process; however, it is produced in the form of a fine powder with particle sizes on the order of 1–10 µm. Due to the small particle size, these powders require additional treatment to form a monolith. In this study, the sol-gel powders were pressed into pellets and fired to achieve > 90% of theoretical density. The cancrinite structure, identified as the best candidate mineral form in terms of waste loading capacity, was only produced on a limited basis following the sol-gel process and converted to sodalite upon firing. Here we discuss the sol-gel process specifics, chemical durability of select waste forms, and the steps taken to maximize chloride-containing phases, decrease chloride loss during pellet firing, and increase pellet densities.

  19. Sulfidation of Nano Zerovalent Iron (nZVI) for Improved Selectivity During In-Situ Chemical Reduction (ISCR).

    PubMed

    Fan, Dimin; O'Brien Johnson, Graham; Tratnyek, Paul G; Johnson, Richard L

    2016-09-01

    The high reactivity of nano zerovalent iron (nZVI) leads to inefficient treatment due to competition with various natural reductant demand (NRD) processes, especially the reduction of water to hydrogen. Here we show that this limitation can be alleviated by sulfidation (i.e., modification by reducing sulfur compounds). nZVI synthesized on carboxylmethylcelluose (CMC-nZVI) was sulfidated with either sulfide or dithionite. The reactivity of the resulting materials was examined with three complementary assays: (i) direct measurement of hydrogen production, (ii) reduction of a colorimetric redox probe (indigo disulfonate, I2S), and (iii) dechlorination of trichloroethylene (TCE). The results indicate that sulfidation at S/Fe molar ratios of ≥0.3, effectively eliminates reaction with water, but retains significant reactivity with TCE. However, sulfidation with sulfide leaves most of the nZVI as Fe(0), whereas dithionite converts a majority of the nZVI to FeS (thus consuming much of the reducing capacity originally provided by the Fe(0)). Simplified numerical models show that the reduction kinetics of I2S and TCE are mainly dependent on the initial reducing equivalents and that the TCE reduction rate is affected by the aging of FeS. Overall, the results suggest that pretreatment of nZVI with reducing sulfur compounds could result in substantial improvement in nZVI selectivity. PMID:27454131

  20. Vitrification of an incinerator blowdown waste containing both chloride salts and carbon

    SciTech Connect

    Resce, J.L.; Ragsdale, R. G.; Overcamp, T.J.

    1996-10-01

    A low-level, mixed-waste simulant, derived from incinerator blowdown residue, has been vitrified in a series of crucible tests. Major components of this waste simulant included carbon, sodium chloride, silica, and alumina. Hazardous and surrogate radioactive metal complexes were also included. Two different formulations of additives were combined with the waste to facilitate glass formation. These glass formulations included NaNO{sub 3} to serve as a flux and to assist in the oxidation of the carbon. During vitrification, a chloride salt layer was observed on the melt surface which volatilized during the course of heating. Furthermore, significant concentrations of As, Cd, Cs, Ni, Pb, Sb, Se, Tl, and Zn had volatilized during vitrification. It is postulated that this was due, in part, to the formation of volatile metal chlorides. Upon quenching, small metal nuggets, containing Pb, Sb, Ag, and Ni separated from the glasses. This reduction of the metal oxides was caused by the presence of carbon in the simulant. The chemical durability was evaluated by both the Toxicity Characteristic Leaching Procedure (TCLP) and the Product Consistency Test (PCT). The TCLP results were below the limits for the toxicity characteristic for a hazardous waste and also met the Universal Treatment Standards for listed wastes such as F006. 11 refs., 5 tabs.

  1. Oxomemazine hydro-chloride.

    PubMed

    Siddegowda, M S; Butcher, Ray J; Akkurt, Mehmet; Yathirajan, H S; Ramesh, A R

    2011-08-01

    IN THE TITLE COMPOUND [SYSTEMATIC NAME: 3-(5,5-dioxo-phen-othia-zin-10-yl)-N,N,2-trimethyl-propanaminium chloride], C(18)H(23)N(2)O(2)S(+)·Cl(-), the dihedral angle between the two outer aromatic rings of the phenothia-zine unit is 30.5 (2)°. In the crystal, the components are linked by N-H⋯Cl and C-H⋯Cl hydrogen bonds and C-H⋯π inter-actions. PMID:22090928

  2. Functional Fixedness and Functional Reduction as Common Sense Reasonings in Chemical Equilibrium and in Geometry and Polarity of Molecules.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Furio, C.; Calatayud, M. L.; Barcenas, S. L.; Padilla, O. M.

    2000-01-01

    Focuses on learning difficulties in procedural knowledge, and assesses the procedural difficulties of grade 12 and first- and third-year university students based on common sense reasoning in two areas of chemistry--chemical equilibrium and geometry, and polarity of molecules. (Contains 55 references.) (Author/YDS)

  3. COMPUTER AIDED CHEMICAL PROCESS DESIGN METHODOLOGIES FOR POLLUTION REDUCTION(SYSTEMS ANALYSIS BRANCH, SUSTAINABLE TECHNOLOGY DIVISION, NRMRL)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The objective of the project is to develop computer optimization and simulation methodologies for the design of economical chemical manufacturing processes with a minimum of impact on the environment. The computer simulation and optimization tools developed in this project can be...

  4. Chloride supporting electrolytes for all-vanadium redox flow batteries.

    PubMed

    Kim, Soowhan; Vijayakumar, M; Wang, Wei; Zhang, Jianlu; Chen, Baowei; Nie, Zimin; Chen, Feng; Hu, Jianzhi; Li, Liyu; Yang, Zhenguo

    2011-10-28

    This paper examines vanadium chloride solutions as electrolytes for an all-vanadium redox flow battery. The chloride solutions were capable of dissolving more than 2.3 M vanadium at varied valence states and remained stable at 0-50 °C. The improved stability appeared due to the formation of a vanadium dinuclear [V(2)O(3)·4H(2)O](4+) or a dinuclear-chloro complex [V(2)O(3)Cl·3H(2)O](3+) in the solutions over a wide temperature range. The all-vanadium redox flow batteries with the chloride electrolytes demonstrated excellent reversibility and fairly high efficiencies. Only negligible, if any, gas evolution was observed. The improved energy capacity and good performance, along with the ease in heat management, would lead to substantial reduction in capital cost and life-cycle cost, making the vanadium chloride redox flow battery a promising candidate for stationary applications. PMID:21922094

  5. On the Theory of Oxidation-Reduction Reactions Involving Electron Transfer. V. Comparison and Properties of Electrochemical and Chemical Rate Constants

    DOE R&D Accomplishments Database

    Marcus, R. A.

    1962-01-01

    Using a theory of electron transfers which takes cognizance of reorganization of the medium outside the inner coordination shell and of changes of bond lengths inside it, relations between electrochemical and related chemical rate constants are deduced and compared with the experimental data. A correlation is found, without the use of arbitrary parameters. Effects of weak complexes with added electrolytes are included under specified conditions. The deductions offer a way of coordinating a variety of data in the two fields, internally as well as with each those in another. For example, the rate of oxidation or reduction of a series of related reactants by one reagent is correlated with that of another and with that of the corresponding electrochemical oxidation-reduction reaction, under certain specified conditions. These correlations may also provide a test for distinguishing an electron from an atom transfer mechanism. (auth)

  6. Continuous real-time monitoring of chloride in geothermal areas in Yellowstone National Park: initial results from newly developed long-term in-situ chloride analyzers.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chapin, T.; Heasler, H.; Hurwitz, S.

    2007-12-01

    Chloride in the surface waters of Yellowstone National Park is primarily derived from magmatic/hydrothermal sources. Discrete chloride measurements, collected at weekly to monthly intervals, are a key component of the ongoing geothermal monitoring program conducted by Yellowstone Volcano Observatory and National Park Service scientists. Chloride flux, estimated from discrete chloride measurements and streamflow data, could potentially be used as a proxy for geothermal heat flux and volcanic-geothermal unrest in the Park. However, infrequent chloride sampling restricts our understanding of dynamic geothermal processes, and the lack of real- time chloride data limits our ability to provide early warning and timely response to geologic hazards in Yellowstone. We seek to combine real-time chloride and streamflow data to examine variations in chloride flux due to changes in the volcanic-geothermal system and to determine if real-time chloride flux data can be used as an early warning indicator of volcanic hazards in the park. To address these objectives, we have developed a low-cost instrument for long-term, real-time, in-situ chemical analysis, the Field Sequential Injection Analyzer (Field-SIA). The Field-SIA is self-calibrating, performs hourly analyses for over two months between service visits, and integrates with existing USGS streamflow gaging stations which provide solar power and satellite telemetry of real-time chloride data. The Field-SIA greatly increases chemical data collection while significantly decreasing the cost of sampling and analysis. We will present data from long-term, high-resolution, real-time chloride monitoring of: 1) Tantalus Creek which drains the Norris Geyser Basin; 2) the Firehole River which drains the Upper, Middle, and Lower Geyser Basins; and 3) the Yellowstone River near Gardiner, MT. Initial results suggest that chloride fluctuations at Tantalus Creek were linked to diel temperature cycling while chloride fluctuations at the

  7. Single-step treatment of 2,4-dinitrotoluene via zero-valent metal reduction and chemical oxidation.

    PubMed

    Thomas, J Mathew; Hernandez, Rafael; Kuo, Chiang-Hai

    2008-06-30

    Many nitroaromatic compounds (NACs) are considered toxic and potential carcinogens. The purpose of this study was to develop an integrated reductive/oxidative process for treating NACs contaminated waters. The process consists of the combination of zero-valent iron and an ozonation based treatment technique. Corrosion promoters are added to the contaminated water to minimize passivation of the metallic species. Water contaminated with 2,4-dinitrotoluene (DNT) was treated with the integrated process using a recirculated batch reactor. It was demonstrated that addition of corrosion promoters to the contaminated water enhances the reduction of 2,4-DNT with zero-valent iron. The addition of corrosion promoters resulted in 62% decrease in 2,4-DNT concentration to 2,4-diaminotoluene. The data shows that iron reduced the 2,4-DNT and ozone oxidized these products resulting in a 73% removal of TOC and a 96% decrease in 2,4-DNT concentration. PMID:18166266

  8. Reduction of Large Detailed Chemical Kinetic Mechanisms for Autoignition Using Joint Analyses of Reaction Rates and Sensitivities

    SciTech Connect

    Saylam, A; Ribaucour, M; Pitz, W J; Minetti, R

    2006-11-29

    A new technique of reduction of detailed mechanisms for autoignition, which is based on two analysis methods is described. An analysis of reaction rates is coupled to an analysis of reaction sensitivity for the detection of redundant reactions. Thresholds associated with the two analyses have a great influence on the size and efficiency of the reduced mechanism. Rules of selection of the thresholds are defined. The reduction technique has been successfully applied to detailed autoignition mechanisms of two reference hydrocarbons: n-heptane and iso-octane. The efficiency of the technique and the ability of the reduced mechanisms to reproduce well the results generated by the full mechanism are discussed. A speedup of calculations by a factor of 5.9 for n-heptane mechanism and by a factor of 16.7 for iso-octane mechanism is obtained without losing accuracy of the prediction of autoignition delay times and concentrations of intermediate species.

  9. One-pot wet-chemical co-reduction synthesis of bimetallic gold-platinum nanochains supported on reduced graphene oxide with enhanced electrocatalytic activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, De-Jun; Zhang, Qian-Li; Feng, Jin-Xia; Ju, Ke-Jian; Wang, Ai-Jun; Wei, Jie; Feng, Jiu-Ju

    2015-08-01

    In this work, a simple, rapid and facile one-pot wet-chemical co-reduction method is developed for synthesis of bimetallic Au-Pt alloyed nanochains supported on reduced graphene oxide (Au-Pt NCs/RGO), in which caffeine is acted as a capping agent and a structure-directing agent, while no any seed, template, surfactant or polymer involved. The as-prepared nanocomposites display enlarged electrochemical active surface area, significantly enhanced catalytic activity and better stability for methanol and ethylene glycol oxidation, compared with commercial Pt-C (Pt 50 wt%), PtRu-C (Pt 30 wt% and Ru 15 wt%) and Pt black.

  10. Interplay between grain size reduction, chemical reaction, and shear localization in lower crustal rocks: a case study from Archaean Bundelkhand Craton, North-Central India

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhandari, Ankit; Nasipuri, Pritam; Saha, Lopamudra; Pati, Jayanta Kumar; Sarkar, Saheli; Purohit, Rohan

    2016-04-01

    Weakening of the rocks is pronounced during the formation of shear zone. Crustal scale shear zones at the plate boundary develop due to grain size reduction, either by mechanical breakdown of minerals or by the development of new minerals due to change in pressure (P) - temperature (T) conditions. In either of the mechanisms for grain size reduction, the Gibb's free energy of the system should be minimum in value to stabilize the mineral.In this contribution, we have studied the deformation mechanism and P-T conditions from acrustal scale shear zone, in the North Central Part of Archaean Bundelkhand Craton. In the Archaean Buldelkhand craton, tens of kilometre wide E-W trending shear zone developed in the sodic-potassic granite. The undeformed rock (protolith) is characterized by euhedral to subhedral sodic feldspar (XAb =0.80) and subordinate quartz, whereas the deformed rock is characterized by the development of extremely deformed feldspar and quartz associated with chlorite. The onset of the strain localization and shear zone formation in the proto-mylonite has been accompanied by developing brittle fractures in the euhedral feldspar grains. In contrast to the brittle deformation in feldspar, quartz grains are characterized by development of small bulges around the grain boundary. Chlorite develops at the fractures in the feldspar that are indicative of fluid infiltration in the proto-mylonite.In the extremely deformed samples (ultramylonite) grain size reduction occurs by bulging recrystallization in quartz. Flow stress obtained from grain size analysis of quartz indicates that the palaeo-stress varies from ~44-46 MPa in proto-mylonite to ~ 61-63 MPa in Ultra-mylonite. Mineral chemical analysis of undeformed feldspar grains in the protolith and mylonite indicate significant changes in the chemical composition that leads to minimum Gibbs energy. Also the presence of chlorite indicates hydration reaction, which has reduced the chemical energy of the system

  11. Reduction on the anaerobic biological activity inhibition caused by heavy metals and sulphates in effluents through chemical precipitation with soda and lime.

    PubMed

    Alves, L de Carvalho; Cammarota, M C; De França, F P

    2006-12-01

    The School of Chemistry Environmental Technology Laboratory generates 43.4 1 of effluent with low pH (0.7) and high contents of COD (1908 mgO2 l(-1)), phenol (132.1 mg l(-1)), sulfate (36700 mg l(-1)) and heavy metals (28.2 mg Hg l(-1); 82.1 mg Cr(total) l(-1); 30.8 mg Cu l(-1); 57.4 mg Fe(total) l(-1); 16.2 mg Al l(-1)) weekly. These data show that this effluent presents high toxicity for biological treatment, with a physical-chemical step being necessary before a biological step. Preliminary studies showed that the most toxic constituents of the effluent were sulfate, phenol and total chromium. In this work, a chemical precipitation step with sodium hydroxide or lime was evaluated for the toxicity reduction on anaerobic microbial consortium. These experiments were carried out with increasing concentrations of alkalis in the effluent in order to obtain pH initial values of 8-12. Similar results were obtained for COD (15-28%), turbidity (95-98%), phenol (13-24%) and total chromium (99.8-99.9%) removals in each condition studied with soda or lime. Sulfate was only removed by precipitation with lime, obtaining reductions from 84 to 88%. The toxicity on the anaerobic sludge was studied employing specific methanogenic activity (SMA) analysis of raw and treated effluent (after chemical precipitation step). The SMA experiments showed that chemical precipitation at pH 8 reduces the toxic effect of the effluent on anaerobic microbial consortium three times (with soda) and thirteen times (with lime). These results indicate that precipitation with lime is more efficient at toxicity removal, however the produced sludge volume is around two times higher than that produced with soda. PMID:17285944

  12. Solutia: Massachusetts Chemical Manufacturer Uses SECURE Methodology to Identify Potential Reductions in Utility and Process Energy Consumption

    SciTech Connect

    2005-07-01

    This case study prepared for the U.S. Department of Energy's Industrial Technologies Program describes a plant-wide energy assessment conducted at the Solutia Inc. chemical production facility in Springfield, Massachusetts. Solutia manufactures polymers, intermediates, and chemicals for a variety of products. The assessment focused on finding ways to reduce the plant's use of steam, electricity, compressed air, and water. If the company were to implement all the recommendations that came out of the assessment, its total annual energy savings could be about 9.6 million kWh for electricity and more than 338,000 MBtu for natural gas. Annual cost savings could amount to nearly $3.3 million.

  13. Perchlorate reduction by microbes inhabiting oil reservoirs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liebensteiner, Martin; Stams, Alfons; Lomans, Bart

    2014-05-01

    Microbial perchlorate and chlorate reduction is a unique type of anaerobic respiration as during reduction of (per)chlorate chlorite is formed, which is then split into chloride and molecular oxygen. In recent years it was demonstrated that (per)chlorate-reducing bacteria may employ oxygenase-dependent pathways for the degradation of aromatic and aliphatic hydrocarbons. These findings suggested that (per)chlorate may be used as oxygen-releasing compound in anoxic environments that contain hydrocarbons, such as polluted soil sites and oil reservoirs. We started to study perchlorate reduction by microbes possibly inhabiting oil reservoirs. One of the organisms studied was Archaeoglobus fulgidus. This extremely thermophilic archaeon is known as a major contributor to souring in hot oil reservoirs. A. fulgidus turned out to be able to use perchlorate as terminal electron acceptor for growth with lactate (Liebensteiner et al 2013). Genome based physiological experiments indicated that A. fulgidus possesses a novel perchlorate reduction pathway. Perchlorate is first reduced to chlorite, but chlorite is not split into chloride and molecular oxygen as occurs in bacteria. Rather, chlorite reacts chemically with sulfide, forming oxidized sulfur compounds, which are reduced to sulfide in the electron transport chain by the archaeon. The dependence of perchlorate reduction on sulfur compounds could be shown. The implications of our findings as novel strategy for microbiological enhanced oil recovery and for souring mitigation are discussed. Liebensteiner MG, Pinkse MWH, Schaap PJ, Stams AJM and Lomans BP (2013) Archaeal (per)chlorate reduction at high temperature, a matter of abiotic-biotic reactions. Science 340: 85-87

  14. Sorption and toxicity reduction of pharmaceutically active compounds and endocrine disrupting chemicals in the presence of colloidal humic acid.

    PubMed

    Kim, Injeong; Kim, Hyo-Dong; Jeong, Tae-Yong; Kim, Sang Don

    2016-01-01

    This study investigated the toxicity changes and sorption of pharmaceuticals and endocrine disrupters in the presence of humic acid (HA). For the sorption experiment, a dead end filtration (DEF) system was used to separate bound and free-form target compounds. An algae growth inhibition test and E-screen assay were conducted to estimate the toxic effect of pharmaceutically active compounds (PhACs) and endocrine disrupting chemicals (EDCs), respectively. The permeate concentration was confirmed using liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry. In the sorption test, we observed significant sorption of PhACs and EDCs on colloidal HA, except for sulfamethoxazole (SMX). The values of log KCOC derived from DEF determinations ranged from 4.40 to 5.03. The removal efficiency varied with the HA concentration and the target chemical properties. Tetracycline and 4-octylphenol showed the highest sorption or removal efficiency (≈50%), even at 5 mg C/L HA. The algal growth inhibition of PhACs and the estrogenic effects of EDCs were significantly decreased in proportion to HA concentrations, except for SMX. In addition, the chemical analysis results showed a positive relationship with the bioassay results. Consequently, the sorption of PhACs and EDCs onto colloidal HA should be emphasized in natural environments because it significantly reduces bioavailable concentrations and toxicity to aquatic organisms. PMID:27533865

  15. 21 CFR 184.1297 - Ferric chloride.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Ferric chloride. 184.1297 Section 184.1297 Food... GRAS § 184.1297 Ferric chloride. (a) Ferric chloride (iron (III) chloride, FeC13, CAS Reg. No. 7705-08-0) may be prepared from iron and chlorine or from ferric oxide and hydrogen chloride. The...

  16. 21 CFR 184.1297 - Ferric chloride.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Ferric chloride. 184.1297 Section 184.1297 Food... Specific Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1297 Ferric chloride. (a) Ferric chloride (iron (III) chloride... hydrogen chloride. The pure material occurs as hydroscopic, hexagonal, dark crystals. Ferric...

  17. 21 CFR 184.1297 - Ferric chloride.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Ferric chloride. 184.1297 Section 184.1297 Food... Specific Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1297 Ferric chloride. (a) Ferric chloride (iron (III) chloride... hydrogen chloride. The pure material occurs as hydroscopic, hexagonal, dark crystals. Ferric...

  18. Benzalkonium Chloride and Glaucoma

    PubMed Central

    Kaufman, Paul L.; Kiland, Julie A.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Glaucoma patients routinely take multiple medications, with multiple daily doses, for years or even decades. Benzalkonium chloride (BAK) is the most common preservative in glaucoma medications. BAK has been detected in the trabecular meshwork (TM), corneal endothelium, lens, and retina after topical drop installation and may accumulate in those tissues. There is evidence that BAK causes corneal and conjunctival toxicity, including cell loss, disruption of tight junctions, apoptosis and preapoptosis, cytoskeleton changes, and immunoinflammatory reactions. These same effects have been reported in cultured human TM cells exposed to concentrations of BAK found in common glaucoma drugs and in the TM of primary open-angle glaucoma donor eyes. It is possible that a relationship exists between chronic exposure to BAK and glaucoma. The hypothesis that BAK causes/worsens glaucoma is being tested experimentally in an animal model that closely reflects human physiology. PMID:24205938

  19. Chloride Ion Activity and Susceptibility of Al Alloys 7075-T6 and 5083-H131 to Stress Corrosion Cracking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ricker, R. E.; Lee, E. U.; Taylor, R.; Lei, C.; Pregger, B.; Lipnickas, E.

    2013-03-01

    The influence of chloride ion activity on the susceptibility of aluminum alloys 5083-H131 and 7075-T6 to stress corrosion cracking (SCC) was investigated by conducting slow strain-rate tensile tests at a strain-rate of 10-7 s-1 in naturally aerated aqueous solutions with varying NaCl mass fraction (0.001 to 20 pct) and in a 3.5 pct mass fraction NaCl solution with varying strain-rates (10-8 to 10-4 s-1). This study found that both alloys exhibited reduced strengths and failure strains (times) in the solutions compared with laboratory air. The extent of these reductions was greater in alloy 5083 for the conditions examined. The strength and ductility of both alloys decreased with chloride ion activity in a manner that indicates a chemical reaction is responsible. The strength and ductility of both alloys decreased with strain-rate in a sigmoidal manner, but the transition in alloy 7075 occurred at slower strain-rates of approximately two orders of magnitude. It was deduced that the chloride ion interacts chemically with the passivated surface in the potential gradient at the crack tip to cause SCC. While no mechanism of cracking can be eliminated on the basis of these results alone, the results are consistent with the hypothesis that the absorbed hydrogen causes cracking in alloy 7075 while cracking in 5083 is the result of a dissolution mechanism.

  20. Flow processes in overexpanded chemical rocket nozzles. Part 3: Methods for the aimed flow separation and side load reduction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schmucker, R. H.

    1983-01-01

    Methods aimed at reduction of overexpansion and side load resulting from asymmetric flow separation for rocket nozzles with a high opening ratio are described. The methods employ additional measures for nozzles with a fixed opening ratio. The flow separation can be controlled by several types of nozzle inserts, the properties of which are discussed. Side loads and overexpansion can be reduced by adapting the shape of the nozzle and taking other additional measures for controlled separation of the boundary layer, such as trip wires.

  1. Boldine action against the stannous chloride effect.

    PubMed

    Reiniger, I W; Ribeiro da Silva, C; Felzenszwalb, I; de Mattos, J C; de Oliveira, J F; da Silva Dantas, F J; Bezerra, R J; Caldeira-de-Araújo, A; Bernardo-Filho, M

    1999-12-15

    Peumus boldus extract has been used in popular medicine in the treatment of biliar litiase, hepatic insufficiency and liver congestion. Its effects are associated to the substance boldine that is present in its extract. In the present work, we evaluated the influence of boldine both in: (i) the structural conformation of a plasmid pUC 9.1 through gel electrophoresis analysis; and in (ii) the survival of the strain of Escherichia coli AB1157 submitted to reactive oxygen species (ROS), generated by a Fenton like reaction, induced by stannous chloride. Our results show a reduction of the lethal effect induced by stannous chloride on the survival of the E. coli culture in the presence of boldine. The supercoiled form of the plasmid is not modified by stannous chloride in the presence of boldine. We suggest that the protection induced by boldine could be explained by its anti-oxidant mechanism. In this way, the boldine could be reacting with stannous ions, protecting them against the oxidation and, consequently, avoiding the generation of ROS. PMID:10624900

  2. Understanding microwave vessel contamination by chloride species.

    PubMed

    Recchia, Sandro; Spanu, Davide; Bianchi, Davide; Dossi, Carlo; Pozzi, Andrea; Monticelli, Damiano

    2016-10-01

    Microwaves are widely used to assist digestion, general sample treatment and synthesis. The use of aqua regia is extensively adopted for the closed vessel mineralization of samples prior to trace element detection, leading to the contamination of microwave vessels by chlorine containing species. The latter are entrapped in the polymeric matrix of the vessels, leading to memory effects that are difficult to remove, among which the risk of silver incomplete recoveries by removal of the sparingly soluble chloride is the predominant one. In the present paper, we determined by mass spectrometry that hydrogen chloride is the species entrapped in the polymeric matrix and responsible for vessel contamination. Moreover, several decontamination treatments were considered to assess their efficiency, demonstrating that several cleaning cycles with water, nitric acid or silver nitrate in nitric acid were inefficient in removing chloride contamination (contamination reduction around 90%). Better results (≈95% decrease) were achieved by a single decontamination step in alkaline environment (sodium hydroxide or ammonia). Finally, a thermal treatment in a common laboratory oven (i.e. without vacuum and ventilation) was tested: a one hour heating at 150°C leads to a 98.5% decontamination, a figure higher than the ones obtained by wet treatments which requires comparable time. The latter treatment is a major advancement with respect to existing treatments as it avoids the need of a vacuum oven for at least 17h as presently proposed in the literature. PMID:27474275

  3. Preparation and characterization of silver chloride nanoparticles as an antibacterial agent

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duong Trinh, Ngoc; Thanh Binh Nguyen, Thi; Hai Nguyen, Thanh

    2015-12-01

    Silver chloride nanoparticles were prepared by the precipitation reaction between silver nitrate and sodium chloride in an aqueous solution containing poly(vinyl alcohol) as a stabilizing agent. Different characteristics of the nanoparticles in suspension and in lyophilized powder such as size, morphology, chemical nature, interaction with stabilizing agent and photo-stability were investigated. Biological tests showed that the obtained silver chloride nanoparticles displayed antibacterial activities against Escherichia coli and Staphylococcus aureus.

  4. Adsorption of hydrogen chloride on microcrystalline silica. [solid rocket propellant exhaust

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kang, Y.; Wightman, J. P.

    1979-01-01

    The interaction of hydrogen chloride with quartz was studied to determine the extent to which silica can irreversibly remove hydrogen chloride from the atmosphere. Adsorption isotherms were measured at 30 C for hydrogen chloride on silica outgassed between 100 C and 400 C. Readsorption isotherms were also measured. The silica surface was characterized further by infrared spectroscopy, electron spectroscopy for chemical analysis, scanning electron microscopy, and immersional calorimetry. Ground debris samples obtained from the Kennedy Space Center, were likewise examined.

  5. Chemical oxygen demand, total organic carbon and colour reduction in slaughterhouse wastewater by unmodified and iron-modified clinoptilolite-rich tuff.

    PubMed

    Torres-Pérez, J; Solache-Ríos, M; Martínez-Miranda, V

    2014-01-01

    In this study, reduction of chemical oxygen demand (COD), colour, and total organic carbon in effluents from a slaughterhouse in central Mexico was performed using clinoptilolite-rich tuff. The experimental parameters considered were initial concentration of the adsorbate, pH, adsorbent dosage, and contact time. Surface morphology of the materials was tested by using scanning electron microscopy. Specific surface area was analysed by using Brunauer-Emmett-Teller (BET) and phase composition was analysed by using X-ray diffraction. The experimental adsorption data were fitted to the first- and pseudo-second-order kinetic models. The highest COD removal was observed in slightly acidic pH conditions. The maximum reduction efficiency of COD was accomplished with unmodified clinoptilolite-rich tuff at a contact time of 1440 min. In these conditions, the adsorbent was efficient for treating wastewater from a slaughterhouse. Moreover, after several regeneration cycles with Fenton reagent or hydrogen peroxide, the regenerated zeolite with H2O2 (3%) showed the best reduction efficiencies. PMID:24701954

  6. Three-dimensional assemblies of graphene prepared by a novel chemical reduction-induced self-assembly method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Lianbin; Chen, Guoying; Hedhili, Mohamed Nejib; Zhang, Hongnan; Wang, Peng

    2012-10-01

    In this study, three-dimensional (3D) graphene assemblies are prepared from graphene oxide (GO) by a facile in situ reduction-assembly method, using a novel, low-cost, and environment-friendly reducing medium which is a combination of oxalic acid (OA) and sodium iodide (NaI). It is demonstrated that the combination of a reducing acid, OA, and NaI is indispensable for effective reduction of GO in the current study and this unique combination (1) allows for tunable control over the volume of the thus-prepared graphene assemblies and (2) enables 3D graphene assemblies to be prepared from the GO suspension with a wide range of concentrations (0.1 to 4.5 mg mL-1). To the best of our knowledge, the GO concentration of 0.1 mg mL-1 is the lowest GO concentration ever reported for preparation of 3D graphene assemblies. The thus-prepared 3D graphene assemblies exhibit low density, highly porous structures, and electrically conducting properties. As a proof of concept, we show that by infiltrating a responsive polymer of polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) into the as-resulted 3D conducting network of graphene, a conducting composite is obtained, which can be used as a sensing device for differentiating organic solvents with different polarity.In this study, three-dimensional (3D) graphene assemblies are prepared from graphene oxide (GO) by a facile in situ reduction-assembly method, using a novel, low-cost, and environment-friendly reducing medium which is a combination of oxalic acid (OA) and sodium iodide (NaI). It is demonstrated that the combination of a reducing acid, OA, and NaI is indispensable for effective reduction of GO in the current study and this unique combination (1) allows for tunable control over the volume of the thus-prepared graphene assemblies and (2) enables 3D graphene assemblies to be prepared from the GO suspension with a wide range of concentrations (0.1 to 4.5 mg mL-1). To the best of our knowledge, the GO concentration of 0.1 mg mL-1 is the lowest GO

  7. Reactor-chromatographic determination of vinyl chloride in polyvinyl chloride

    SciTech Connect

    Berezkin, V.G.

    1986-08-01

    The authors carry out a chromatographic study of the volatile products that evolve when various grades of domestic polyvinyl chloride are heated, to determine the concentration of residual monomer. To find vinyl chloride in complex mixtures of air pollutants the authors used sorptive reaction concentration of impurities. This new combination of methods is based on preliminary separation at the sampling stage of impurities that interfere in the analysis, followed by concentration of the desired components in a trap with an adsorbent, and chromatographic determination of the concentrated trace materials. The method obtains low vinyl chloride concentrations (down to 10/sup -4/-10/sup -5/ wt. %) with +/-5 relative error.

  8. Sodium-metal chloride battery research at JPL

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ratnakumar, B. V.; Attia, A. I.; Halpert, G.

    1991-01-01

    Sodium metal chloride batteries have certain distinct advantages over sodium sulfur batteries such as increased safety, inherent overcharge capability and lower operation temperatures. Two systems, i.e., Na/FeCl2 and Na/NiCl2 were developed extensively elsewhere and evaluated for various applications including electric vehicles and space. Their performance has been very encouraging and prompted a detailed fundamental study of these cathodes here at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory. A brief review of our studies on these new cathode materials is presented here. The initial efforts focussed on the methods of fabrication of the electrodes and their electrochemical characterization. Subsequent studies were aimed at establishing the reaction mechanism, determining the kinetics and identifying the rate limiting processes in the reduction of metal chloride cathodes. Nickel chloride emerged from these studies as the most promising candidate material and was taken up for further detailed study on its passivation - a rate limiting process - under different experimental conditions. Also, the feasibility of using copper chloride, which is expected to have higher energy density, has been assessed. Based on the criteria established from the voltammetric response of FeCl2, NiCl2, and CuCl2, several other transition metal chlorides were screened. Of these, molybdenum and cobalt chlorides appear promising.

  9. Chemical exposure reduction: Factors impacting on South African herbicide sprayers' personal protective equipment compliance and high risk work practices.

    PubMed

    Andrade-Rivas, Federico; Rother, Hanna-Andrea

    2015-10-01

    The high exposure risks of workers to herbicides in low- and middle-income countries is an important public health concern because of the potential resulting negative impacts on workers' health. This study investigated workers' personal protective equipment (PPE) compliance as a risk mitigation measure; particularly workers who apply herbicides for Working for Water (WfW) - a South African invasive alien vegetation control programme. The study aim was to understand workers' low PPE compliance by analysing their risk perceptions of herbicide use, working conditions and socio-cultural context. Research methods included ethnographic observations, informal interviews, visual media, questionnaires and a focus group. Study results indicated that low PPE compliance persists despite workers' awareness of herbicide exposure risks and as a result of the influence from workers' socio-cultural context (i.e. gender dynamics and social status), herbicide risk perceptions and working conditions (i.e. environmental and logistical). Interestingly, teams comprised of mostly women had the highest compliance rate. These findings highlighted that given the complexity of PPE compliance, especially in countries with several economic and social constraints, exposure reduction interventions should not rely solely on PPE use promotion. Instead, other control strategies requiring less worker input for effectiveness should be implemented, such as elimination and substitution of highly hazardous pesticides, and altering application methods. PMID:26093240

  10. 40 CFR 415.240 - Applicability; description of the ammonium chloride production subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 28 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true Applicability; description of the ammonium chloride production subcategory. 415.240 Section 415.240 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) EFFLUENT GUIDELINES AND STANDARDS INORGANIC CHEMICALS MANUFACTURING POINT SOURCE CATEGORY Ammonium Chloride...

  11. 40 CFR 415.240 - Applicability; description of the ammonium chloride production subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Applicability; description of the ammonium chloride production subcategory. 415.240 Section 415.240 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) EFFLUENT GUIDELINES AND STANDARDS INORGANIC CHEMICALS MANUFACTURING POINT SOURCE CATEGORY Ammonium Chloride...

  12. 40 CFR 415.160 - Applicability; description of the sodium chloride production subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 29 2014-07-01 2012-07-01 true Applicability; description of the sodium chloride production subcategory. 415.160 Section 415.160 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) EFFLUENT GUIDELINES AND STANDARDS INORGANIC CHEMICALS MANUFACTURING POINT SOURCE CATEGORY Sodium Chloride...

  13. Electrochemical and spectroscopic studies of sulfur in aluminum chloride-N-(n-butyl)pyridinium chloride

    SciTech Connect

    Marassi, R.; Laher, T.M.; Mamantov, G.; Trimble, D.S.

    1985-07-01

    The behavior of sulfur in aluminum chloride-N-(n-butyl)pyridinium chloride (AlCl/sub 3/-BPC) was studied using Raman spectroscopy and electrochemical techniques. In basic (BPC-rich) melts, sulfur can be reduced to sulfide, probably in the form of an AlSCl-like species. No oxidation to positive oxidation states of sulfur is observed in basic melts. In acidic (AlCl/sub 3/-rich) melts, sulfur can be oxidized to S(I) and eventually to S(IV), which is only stabl in the melt for short periods of time. No reduction to sulfide-like species or formation of low oxidation states is observed in acidic melts.

  14. Immediate effect of benzalkonium chloride in decongestant nasal spray on the human nasal mucosal temperature.

    PubMed

    Lindemann, J; Leiacker, R; Wiesmiller, K; Rettinger, G; Keck, T

    2004-08-01

    Benzalkonium chloride is a preservative commonly used in nasal decongestant sprays. It has been suggested that benzalkonium chloride may be harmful to the nasal mucosa. Decongestion with the vasoconstrictor xylometazoline containing benzalkonium chloride has been shown to cause a significant reduction of the nasal mucosal temperature. The purpose of the present study was to determine the short-term influence of xylometazoline nasal spray with and without benzalkonium chloride on the nasal mucosal temperature. Healthy volunteers (30) were included in the study. Fifteen volunteers received xylometazoline nasal spray (1.0 mg/mL) containing benzalkonium chloride (0.1 mg/mL) and 15 age-matched subjects, received xylometazoline nasal spray without benzalkonium chloride. Using a miniaturized thermocouple the septal mucosal temperature was continuously measured at defined intranasal detection sites before and after application of the nasal spray. The mucosal temperature values did not significantly differ between the group receiving xylometazoline containing benzalkonium chloride and the group receiving xylometazoline spray without benzalkonium chloride before and after decongestion (P > 0.05). In both study groups septal mucosal temperatures significantly decreased after decongestion (P < 0.05) because of a reduction of the nasal mucosal blood flow following vasoconstriction. This study indicates that benzalkonium chloride itself does not seem to influence nasal blood flow and nasal mucosal temperature in topical nasal decongestants. PMID:15270822

  15. 21 CFR 522.1862 - Sterile pralidoxime chloride.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Sterile pralidoxime chloride. 522.1862 Section 522.1862 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED... to those pesticides and chemicals of the organophosphate class which have anticholinesterase...

  16. 21 CFR 522.1862 - Sterile pralidoxime chloride.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Sterile pralidoxime chloride. 522.1862 Section 522.1862 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED... to those pesticides and chemicals of the organophosphate class which have anticholinesterase...

  17. 21 CFR 522.1862 - Sterile pralidoxime chloride.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Sterile pralidoxime chloride. 522.1862 Section 522.1862 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED... to those pesticides and chemicals of the organophosphate class which have anticholinesterase...

  18. 21 CFR 522.1862 - Sterile pralidoxime chloride.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Sterile pralidoxime chloride. 522.1862 Section 522.1862 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED... to those pesticides and chemicals of the organophosphate class which have anticholinesterase...

  19. A new system for early chloride detection in concrete

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laferrière, Francine; Inaudi, Daniele; Kronenberg, Pascal; Smith, Ian F. C.

    2008-08-01

    In a national and worldwide context, countless reinforced concrete structures are in an advanced state of deterioration. A principal cause of such degradation is chloride induced corrosion of reinforcement bars. This phenomenon is accentuated in countries where de-icing salts are used for road safety, as well as in maritime zones. To date, no non-destructive method quantifying chloride content during the corrosion initiation phase has been established. Measurement of such a parameter is important for the development of a better understanding of the complexity of corrosion phenomena and, more practically, for better management of existing structures. This paper proposes a new method for non-destructive measurement, for monitoring continuously and in real time free chloride content in concrete pores. In this context, a chemical sensor that employs optical fibers was developed and tested. The sensor functions using the fluorescence of an indicator dye that is sensitive to chlorides. Through fluorescence spectroscopy, variations in the concentration of free chlorides are related to intensity fluctuations of fluorescence. The use of optical fibers also provides an advantage compared with existing electric non-destructive detection systems due to superior electromagnetic stability. Theoretical and experimental studies calibrated and validated the sensor for implementation within mortar samples. Free chloride concentrations between 30 and 350 mM can be detected. Two experiments reproduced climatic variations in a controlled environment. The first test simulated a hot maritime climate and the second test simulated a cold continental climate. These tests confirmed that it is possible to determine with precision the free chloride content. Also, fluorescence spectroscopy with optical fibers offers an innovative means for early and non-destructive detection of free chloride content in concrete. As a result, this new method has potential for improving the science of corrosion

  20. Studies Update Vinyl Chloride Hazards.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rawls, Rebecca

    1980-01-01

    Extensive study affirms that vinyl chloride is a potent animal carcinogen. Epidemiological studies show elevated rates of human cancers in association with extended contact with the compound. (Author/RE)

  1. 40 CFR 721.10538 - Phosphonium, tetrakis(hydroxymethyl)-, chloride (1:1), reaction products with 1-tetradecanamine...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...)-, chloride (1:1), reaction products with 1-tetradecanamine and urea. 721.10538 Section 721.10538 Protection... NEW USES OF CHEMICAL SUBSTANCES Significant New Uses for Specific Chemical Substances § 721.10538 Phosphonium, tetrakis(hydroxymethyl)-, chloride (1:1), reaction products with 1-tetradecanamine and urea....

  2. 40 CFR 721.10538 - Phosphonium, tetrakis(hydroxymethyl)-, chloride (1:1), reaction products with 1-tetradecanamine...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...)-, chloride (1:1), reaction products with 1-tetradecanamine and urea. 721.10538 Section 721.10538 Protection... NEW USES OF CHEMICAL SUBSTANCES Significant New Uses for Specific Chemical Substances § 721.10538 Phosphonium, tetrakis(hydroxymethyl)-, chloride (1:1), reaction products with 1-tetradecanamine and urea....

  3. Toxicology and metabolism of methylene chloride. (Latest citations from the Life Sciences Collection database). Published Search

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-06-01

    The bibliography contains citations concerning methylene chloride, its effects on biological systems, and its metabolic fate. Both animal and human studies, and case reports are examined for methylene chloride toxicity. Exposure to the chemical through inhalation, ingestion, and contact is examined. Occupational exposure to methylene chloride is included, and risk factors are discussed. Long term carcinogenicity of methylene chloride is also considered. Toxicity of other chlorinated organic compounds is referenced in related bibliographies. (Contains a minimum of 78 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.)

  4. Chloride channels in stroke

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Ya-ping; Zhang, Hao; Duan, Dayue Darrel

    2013-01-01

    Vascular remodeling of cerebral arterioles, including proliferation, migration, and apoptosis of vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs), is the major cause of changes in the cross-sectional area and diameter of the arteries and sudden interruption of blood flow or hemorrhage in the brain, ie, stroke. Accumulating evidence strongly supports an important role for chloride (Cl−) channels in vascular remodeling and stroke. At least three Cl− channel genes are expressed in VSMCs: 1) the TMEM16A (or Ano1), which may encode the calcium-activated Cl− channels (CACCs); 2) the CLC-3 Cl− channel and Cl−/H+ antiporter, which is closely related to the volume-regulated Cl− channels (VRCCs); and 3) the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR), which encodes the PKA- and PKC-activated Cl− channels. Activation of the CACCs by agonist-induced increase in intracellular Ca2+ causes membrane depolarization, vasoconstriction, and inhibition of VSMC proliferation. Activation of VRCCs by cell volume increase or membrane stretch promotes the production of reactive oxygen species, induces proliferation and inhibits apoptosis of VSMCs. Activation of CFTR inhibits oxidative stress and may prevent the development of hypertension. In addition, Cl− current mediated by gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) receptor has also been implicated a role in ischemic neuron death. This review focuses on the functional roles of Cl− channels in the development of stroke and provides a perspective on the future directions for research and the potential to develop Cl− channels as new targets for the prevention and treatment of stroke. PMID:23103617

  5. Anaerobic mineralization of vinyl chloride in Fe(III)-reducing, aquifer sediments

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bradley, P.M.; Chapelle, F.H.

    1996-01-01

    Within anaerobic aquifer systems, reductive dehalogenation of polychlorinated ethenes commonly results in the accumulation of vinyl chloride, which is highly toxic and carcinogenic to humans. Anaerobic reduction of vinyl chloride is considered to be slow and incomplete. Here, we provide the first evidence for anaerobic oxidation of vinyl chloride under Fe(III)reducing conditions. Addition of chelated Fe(III) (as Fe-EDTA) to anaerobic aquifer microcosms resulted in mineralization of up to 34% of [1,2- 14C]vinyl chloride within 84 h. The results indicate that vinyl chloride can be mineralized under anaerobic, Fe(III)-reducing conditions and that the bioavailability of Fe(III) is an important factor affecting the rates of mineralization.

  6. Reduction of carbon dioxide gas formation at the anode of a direct methanol fuel cell using chemically enhanced solubility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lundin, Michael D.; McCready, Mark J.

    The production of CO 2 gas at the DMFC anode leads to dramatic increases in pumping power requirements and reduced power output because of mass transfer limitations as bubble trains form in the channels of larger stacks. Experimental observations taken in a 5 cm 2 DMFC test cell operated at 60 °C, 1 atm, and with a methanol/water fuel flow rates of 5-10 cm 3 min -1 indicate that the rate of bubble formation can be reduced by increasing the fuel flow because more liquid is available for the CO 2 to dissolve in. Further observations indicate that KOH and LiOH added to the fuel eliminates CO 2 gas formation in situ at low concentrations because of the greatly increased solubility that results. A mathematical model for the volumetric rate of CO 2 gas production that includes effects of temperature and solubility is developed and extended to include the effects of hydroxide ions in solution. The model is used to predict the onset location of gas formation in the flow field as well as the void fraction at any point in the flow field. Predictions from the model agree very well with our experiments. Model predictions explain differences in the initial location of bubble formation for fuel solutions pre-saturated with CO 2 as opposed to CO 2-free solutions. Experiments with KOH and LiOH added to fuel solutions confirm the validity of the model extension that includes solubility that is enhanced by chemical reaction. Experiments with LiOH, KOH, and ammonium hydroxide show that the long-term durability of standard Pt-Ru/Nafion ®/Pt membrane electrode assemblies is compromised because of the presence of lithium, potassium, and ammonium cations that interact with the Nafion ® membrane and result in increasing the ohmic limitations of the polymer electrolyte membrane. Experiments with Ca(OH) 2, while reducing gas formation, precipitate the product CaCO 3 out of solution too rapidly for downstream filtering, blocking channels in the flow field.

  7. Photo and Chemical Reduction of Copper onto Anatase-Type TiO2 Nanoparticles with Enhanced Surface Hydroxyl Groups as Efficient Visible Light Photocatalysts.

    PubMed

    Eskandarloo, Hamed; Badiei, Alireza; Behnajady, Mohammad A; Mohammadi Ziarani, Ghodsi

    2015-01-01

    In this study, the photocatalytic efficiency of anatase-type TiO2 nanoparticles synthesized using the sol-gel low-temperature method, were enhanced by a combined process of copper reduction and surface hydroxyl groups enhancement. UV-light-assisted photo and NaBH4 -assisted chemical reduction methods were used for deposition of copper onto TiO2. The surface hydroxyl groups of TiO2 were enhanced with the assistance of NaOH modification. The prepared catalysts were immobilized on glass plates and used as the fixed-bed systems for the removal of phenazopyridine as a model drug contaminant under visible light irradiation. NaOH-modified Cu/TiO2 nanoparticles demonstrated higher photocatalytic efficiency than that of pure TiO2 due to the extending of the charge carriers lifetime and enhancement of the adsorption capacity of TiO2 toward phenazopyridine. The relationship of structure and performance of prepared nanoparticles has been established by using various techniques, such as XRD, XPS, TEM, EDX, XRF, TGA, DRS and PL. The effects of preparation variables, including copper content, reducing agents rate (NaBH4 concentration and UV light intensity) and NaOH concentration were investigated on the photocatalytic efficiency of NaOH-modified Cu/TiO2 nanoparticles. PMID:25809844

  8. Using chemical reactivity to provide insights into environmental transformations of priority organic substances: the Fe⁰-mediated reduction of Acid Blue 129.

    PubMed

    Shirin, Salma; Balakrishnan, Vimal K

    2011-12-15

    Sulfonated anthracenedione dyes are medium priority organic compounds targeted for environmental assessment under the Government of Canada's Chemical Management Plan (CMP). Since organic compounds undergo transformations in environmental matrices, understanding these transformations is critical for a proper assessment of their environmental fate. In the current study, we used zero-valent iron (ZVI) to provide insight into reductive transformation processes available to the anthracenedione dye, Acid Blue 129 (AB 129), a dye which is used in the textile industry. At high temperatures, we found that AB 129 was rapidly reduced (within 3 h) after being adsorbed onto the ZVI-surface, whereupon decomposition took place via multiple competitive and consecutive reaction pathways. Reaction products were identified using state-of-the-art accurate mass Liquid Chromatography-Quadrupole Time of Flight-Mass Spectroscopy (LC-QToF-MS). Five transformation products were identified, including a genotoxic (and thus, potentially carcinogenic) end-product, 2,4,6-trimethylaniline. The same products were found at room temperature, demonstrating that the transformation pathways revealed here could plausibly arise from biological and/or environmental reductions of AB 129. Our results demonstrate the importance of identifying reaction product arising from priority substances as part of the environmental risk assessment process. PMID:22050543

  9. Kinetics of the reduction of hematite (Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}) by methane (CH{sub 4}) during chemical looping combustion: A global mechanism

    SciTech Connect

    Monazam, Esmail R; Breault, Ronald W; Siriwardane, Ranjani; Richards, George; Carpenter, Stephen

    2013-10-01

    Chemical-looping combustion (CLC) has emerged as a promising technology for fossil fuel combustion which produces a sequestration ready concentrated CO{sub 2} stream in power production. A CLC system is composed with two reactors, an air and a fuel reactor. An oxygen carrier such as hematite (94%Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}) circulates between the reactors, which transfers the oxygen necessary for the fuel combustion from the air to the fuel. An important issue for the CLC process is the selection of metal oxide as oxygen carrier, since it must retain its reactivity through many cycles. The primary objective of this work is to develop a global mechanism with respective kinetics rate parameters such that CFD simulations can be performed for large systems. In this study, thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) of the reduction of hematite (Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}) in a continuous stream of CH{sub 4} (15, 20, and 35%) was conducted at temperatures ranging from 700 to 825{degrees}C over ten reduction cycles. The mass spectroscopy analysis of product gas indicated the presence of CO{sub 2} and H{sub 2}O at the early stage of reaction and H{sub 2} and CO at the final stage of reactions. A kinetic model based on two parallel reactions, 1) first-order irreversible rate kinetics and 2) Avrami equation describing nucleation and growth processes, was applied to the reduction data. It was found, that the reaction rates for both reactions increase with, both, temperature and the methane concentration in inlet gas.

  10. Reduction of Surrogates for Escherichia coli O157:H7 and Salmonella during the Production of Nonintact Beef Products by Chemical Antimicrobial Interventions.

    PubMed

    Ulbrich, Carson J; Lucia, Lisa M; Arnold, Ashley N; Taylor, T Matthew; Savell, Jeffrey W; Gehring, Kerri B

    2015-05-01

    The efficacy of chemical antimicrobials for controlling Escherichia coli O157:H7 and Salmonella during production of marinated nonintact beef products was evaluated using nonpathogenic surrogates. Boneless beef strip loins were inoculated with either approximately 5.8 or 1.9 log CFU/cm(2) (high and low inoculation levels, respectively) of nonpathogenic rifampin-resistant E. coli. Inoculated strip loins were chilled at 2°C for 24 h, vacuum packaged, and aged for 7 to 24 days at 2°C. After aging, strip loins received no treatment (control) or one of five antimicrobial spray treatments: 2.5% L-lactic acid (pH 2.6), 5.0% L-lactic acid (pH 2.4), 1,050 ppm of acidified sodium chlorite (pH 2.8), 205 ppm of peroxyacetic acid (pH 5.2), or tap water (pH 8.6). Mean application temperatures were 53, 26, 20, and 18°C for lactic acid, water, peroxyacetic acid, and acidified sodium chlorite treatments, respectively. Treated and control strip loins were vacuum tumbled in a commercial marinade. Samples were collected throughout the experiment to track the effects of antimicrobial treatment and processing on inoculated surrogates. For high-inoculation strip loins, the 5.0% L-lactic acid treatment was most effective for reducing surrogates on meat surfaces before marination, producing a 2.6-log mean reduction. Peroxyacetic acid treatment resulted in the greatest reduction of surface-located surrogate microorganisms in marinated product. Water treatment resulted in greater internalization of surrogate microorganisms compared with the control, as determined by enumeration of surrogates from cored samples. Producers of nonintact beef products should focus on use of validated antimicrobial sprays that maximize microbial reduction and minimize internalization of surface bacteria into the finished product. PMID:25951381

  11. An XAFS study of nickel chloride in the ionic liquid 1-ethyl-3-methyl imidazolium chloride/ aluminum chloride

    SciTech Connect

    D Roeper; G Cheek; K Pandya; W OGrady

    2011-12-31

    Nickel chloride was studied with cyclic voltammetry and X-ray absorption spectroscopy in acidic and basic aluminum chloride/1-ethyl-3-methyl imidazolium chloride (EMIC) ionic liquids. Acidic melts display metal stripping peaks which are not observed in the basic melt. EXAFS analysis shows that the nickel is tetrahedrally coordinated with chloride ions in the basic solution. In the acidic solution the nickel is coordinated by six chloride ions that are also associated with aluminum ions.

  12. The chemistry of sodium chloride involvement in processes related to hot corrosion. [in gas turbine engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stearns, C. A.; Kohl, F. J.; Fryburg, G. C.

    1979-01-01

    Thermodynamic and mass transport calculations, and laboratory experiments elucidating the behavior of sodium chloride in combustion environments, in the deposition process, and in reactions with certain oxides on the surfaces of superalloys are summarized. It was found that some of the ingested salt is separated out of the air stream by the compressor. However, sodium chloride does pass from the compressor to the combustor where numerous chemical reactions take place. Here some of the salt is vaporized to yield gaseous sodium chloride molecules. Hydrogen and oxygen atoms present in the combustion products react with some sodium chloride to yield other gaseous species such as sodium, and a fraction of the salt remains as particulates. Both the gas phase and condensed sodium chloride can lead to sodium sulfate formation by various routes, all of which involve reaction with sulfur oxides and oxygen. In addition to contributing to the formation of sodium sulfate, the sodium chloride can contribute to corrosion directly.

  13. Regeneration of zinc chloride hydrocracking catalyst

    DOEpatents

    Zielke, Clyde W.

    1979-01-01

    Improved rate of recovery of zinc values from the solids which are carried over by the effluent vapors from the oxidative vapor phase regeneration of spent zinc chloride catalyst is achieved by treatment of the solids with both hydrogen chloride and calcium chloride to selectively and rapidly recover the zinc values as zinc chloride.

  14. 21 CFR 184.1138 - Ammonium chloride.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... GRAS § 184.1138 Ammonium chloride. (a) Ammonium chloride (NH4Cl, CAS Reg. No. 12125-02-9) is produced by the reaction of sodium chloride and an ammonium salt in solution. The less soluble sodium salt... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Ammonium chloride. 184.1138 Section 184.1138...

  15. 21 CFR 184.1622 - Potassium chloride.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Potassium chloride. 184.1622 Section 184.1622 Food... Specific Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1622 Potassium chloride. (a) Potassium chloride (KCl, CAS Reg... levels not to exceed current good manufacturing practice. Potassium chloride may be used in...

  16. 21 CFR 184.1622 - Potassium chloride.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Potassium chloride. 184.1622 Section 184.1622 Food... Specific Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1622 Potassium chloride. (a) Potassium chloride (KCl, CAS Reg... levels not to exceed current good manufacturing practice. Potassium chloride may be used in...

  17. 21 CFR 184.1622 - Potassium chloride.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Potassium chloride. 184.1622 Section 184.1622 Food... Specific Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1622 Potassium chloride. (a) Potassium chloride (KCl, CAS Reg... levels not to exceed current good manufacturing practice. Potassium chloride may be used in...

  18. 21 CFR 184.1622 - Potassium chloride.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Potassium chloride. 184.1622 Section 184.1622 Food... GRAS § 184.1622 Potassium chloride. (a) Potassium chloride (KCl, CAS Reg. No. 7447-40-7) is a white... manufacturing practice. Potassium chloride may be used in infant formula in accordance with section 412(g)...

  19. 21 CFR 184.1622 - Potassium chloride.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Potassium chloride. 184.1622 Section 184.1622 Food... Specific Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1622 Potassium chloride. (a) Potassium chloride (KCl, CAS Reg... levels not to exceed current good manufacturing practice. Potassium chloride may be used in...

  20. Pathway of FeEDTA transformation and its impact on performance of NOx removal in a chemical absorption-biological reduction integrated process

    PubMed Central

    Li, Wei; Zhao, Jingkai; Zhang, Lei; Xia, Yinfeng; Liu, Nan; Li, Sujing; Zhang, Shihan

    2016-01-01

    A novel chemical absorption-biological reduction (CABR) integrated process, employing ferrous ethylenediaminetetraacetate (Fe(II)EDTA) as a solvent, is deemed as a potential option for NOx removal from the flue gas. Previous work showed that the Fe(II)EDTA concentration was critical for the NOx removal in the CABR process. In this work, the pathway of FeEDTA (Fe(III)/Fe(II)-EDTA) transformation was investigated to assess its impact on the NOx removal in a biofilter. Experimental results revealed that the FeEDTA transformation involved iron precipitation and EDTA degradation. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy analysis confirmed the iron was precipitated in the form of Fe(OH)3. The iron mass balance analysis showed 44.2% of the added iron was precipitated. The EDTA degradation facilitated the iron precipitation. Besides chemical oxidation, EDTA biodegradation occurred in the biofilter. The addition of extra EDTA helped recover the iron from the precipitation. The transformation of FeEDTA did not retard the NO removal. In addition, EDTA rather than the iron concentration determined the NO removal efficiency. PMID:26743930

  1. Fabrication of ultrafine tungsten-based alloy powders by novel soda reduction process

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Dong-Won; Turaev, Farkhod; Kim, Ju-Hyeong; Yang, Mingchuan

    2010-03-15

    A novel reduction method has been developed to fabricate ultrafine tungsten heavy alloy powders, with ammonium metatungstate (AMT), iron(II) chloride tetrahydrate (FeCl{sub 2}.4H{sub 2}O), nickel(II) chloride hexahydrate (NiCl{sub 2}.6H{sub 2}O) as source materials and sodium tungstate dihydrate (Na{sub 2}WO{sub 4}.2H{sub 2}O) as a reductant. In the preparation of mixtures the amounts of the source components were chosen so as to obtain alloy of 93W-5Ni-2Fe composition (wt.%). The obtained powders were characterized by X-ray diffraction, XPS, field-emission scanning microscope (FESEM), and chemical composition was analyzed by EDX.

  2. Optimization of the lithium/thionyl chloride battery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    White, Ralph E.

    1989-01-01

    A 1-D math model for the lithium/thionyl chloride primary cell is used in conjunction with a parameter estimation technique in order to estimate the electro-kinetic parameters of this electrochemical system. The electro-kinetic parameters include the anodic transfer coefficient and exchange current density of the lithium oxidation, alpha sub a,1 and i sub o,i,ref, the cathodic transfer coefficient and the effective exchange current density of the thionyl chloride reduction, alpha sub c,2 and a sup o i sub o,2,ref, and a morphology parameter, Xi. The parameter estimation is performed on simulated data first in order to gain confidence in the method. Data, reported in the literature, for a high rate discharge of an experimental lithium/thionyl chloride cell is used for an analysis.

  3. Effects of anodic potential and chloride ion on overall reactivity in electrochemical reactors designed for solar-powered wastewater treatment.

    PubMed

    Cho, Kangwoo; Qu, Yan; Kwon, Daejung; Zhang, Hao; Cid, Clément A; Aryanfar, Asghar; Hoffmann, Michael R

    2014-02-18

    We have investigated electrochemical treatment of real domestic wastewater coupled with simultaneous production of molecular H2 as useful byproduct. The electrolysis cells employ multilayer semiconductor anodes with electroactive bismuth-doped TiO2 functionalities and stainless steel cathodes. DC-powered laboratory-scale electrolysis experiments were performed under static anodic potentials (+2.2 or +3.0 V NHE) using domestic wastewater samples, with added chloride ion in variable concentrations. Greater than 95% reductions in chemical oxygen demand (COD) and ammonium ion were achieved within 6 h. In addition, we experimentally determined a decreasing overall reactivity of reactive chlorine species toward COD with an increasing chloride ion concentration under chlorine radicals (Cl·, Cl2(-)·) generation at +3.0 V NHE. The current efficiency for COD removal was 12% with the lowest specific energy consumption of 96 kWh kgCOD(-1) at the cell voltage of near 4 V in 50 mM chloride. The current efficiency and energy efficiency for H2 generation were calculated to range from 34 to 84% and 14 to 26%, respectively. The hydrogen comprised 35 to 60% by volume of evolved gases. The efficacy of our electrolysis cell was further demonstrated by a 20 L prototype reactor totally powered by a photovoltaic (PV) panel, which was shown to eliminate COD and total coliform bacteria in less than 4 h of treatment. PMID:24417418

  4. Mechanisms, chemistry, and kinetics of anaerobic biodegradation of cis-dichloroethylene and vinyl chloride. 1998 annual progress report

    SciTech Connect

    McCarty, P.L.; Spormann, A.M.

    1998-06-01

    'The objectives of this study are to: (1) determine the biochemical pathways for reductive dehalogenation of cis-1,2-dichloroethene (cDCE) and vinyl chloride (VC), including identification of the enzymes involved, (2) determine the chemical requirements, especially the type and quantity of electron donors needed by the microorganisms for reductive dehalogenation, and (3) evaluate the kinetics of the process with respect to the concentration of both the electron donors and the electron acceptors (cDCE and VC). Progress has been made under each of the three primary objectives. One manuscript related to the first objective has been published. Manuscripts related to the other two objectives have been submitted for publication. Findings related to the three objectives are summarized.'

  5. Analysis of antibacterial efficacy of plasma-treated sodium chloride solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hänsch, Mareike A. C.; Mann, Miriam; Weltmann, Klaus-Dieter; von Woedtke, Thomas

    2015-11-01

    In this study, the change of chemical composition of sodium chloride solutions (NaCl, 0.85%) induced by non-thermal atmospheric pressure plasma (APP) treatment and subsequent effects on bacteria (Escherichia coli) are investigated. Besides acidification caused by APP, hydrogen peroxide (H2O2), nitrite (\\text{NO}2- ), and nitrate (\\text{NO}3- ) are generated as stable end-products of various chemical reactions in APP-treated liquids. Inactivation kinetics and reduction factors were recorded for E. coli (K12). Almost identical antimicrobial effects were observed with both direct APP exposure to bacteria suspension and exposure of APP-treated liquids to bacteria (indirect treatment). Consequently, main bactericidal effects are caused by chemical reactions which are mediated via the liquid phase. Moreover, APP-treated liquids have shown long-term activity (30 min) that possibly correlates with the ratio of \\text{NO}2- /H2O2. Therefore, \\text{NO}2- and H2O2 are identified as key agents for antimicrobial short- and long-term effects, respectively. The antimicrobial stability observed is strongly dependent on the used treatment regime and correlates additionally with the altered chemical composition of APP-treated liquids. Besides these effects, it was also shown that bacteria do not acquire resistance to such APP-treated solutions.

  6. Performance of a 'Transitioned' Infiltration Basin Part 1: TSS, Metals, and Chloride Removals.

    PubMed

    Natarajan, Poornima; Davis, Allen P

    2015-09-01

    The water quality performance of a 'failed' stormwater infiltration basin that has 'transitioned' to a wetpond/wetland has been evaluated over a three-year period. Total suspended solids, heavy metals, and chloride in highway runoff and discharge from the transitioned basin were measured during 38 storm events. The transitioned basin provided significant reductions in TSS Event Mean Concentrations (EMCs) and mass in the runoff. Reductions in metal EMCs generally occurred. Chloride followed a seasonal cycle of high loading and mass export during colder periods, and gradual reductions in both EMCs and mass during other periods. The cumulative mass reductions were 89% TSS, 73% copper, 63% lead, 55% zinc, and 45% chloride for the study period. Combined with the dry-weather water quality in the transitioned basin, the mechanisms of pollutant removal were identified as volume reduction, sedimentation, adsorption, and dilution. The presence of wetpond/wetland features, including hydrophytic vegetatioņ enhanced the pollutant removal processes. PMID:26182408

  7. Fluid diversion and sweep improvement with chemical gels in oil recovery processes. [Four types of gels: resorcinol-formaldehyde; colloidal silica; Cr sup 3+ (chloride)-xanthan; and Cr sup 3+ (acetate)-polyacrylamide

    SciTech Connect

    Seright, R.S.; Martin, F.D.

    1992-09-01

    The objectives of this project were to identify the mechanisms by which gel treatments divert fluids in reservoirs and to establish where and how gel treatments are best applied. Several different types of gelants were examined, including polymer-based gelants, a monomer-based gelant, and a colloidal-silica gelant. This research was directed at gel applications in water injection wells, in production wells, and in high-pressure gas floods. The work examined how the flow properties of gels and gelling agents are influenced by permeability, lithology, and wettability. Other goals included determining the proper placement of gelants, the stability of in-place gels, and the types of gels required for the various oil recovery processes and for different scales of reservoir heterogeneity. During this three-year project, a number of theoretical analyses were performed to determine where gel treatments are expected to work best and where they are not expected to be effective. The most important, predictions from these analyses are presented. Undoubtedly, some of these predictions will be controversial. However, they do provide a starting point in establishing guidelines for the selection of field candidates for gel treatments. A logical next step is to seek field data that either confirm or contradict these predictions. The experimental work focused on four types of gels: (1) resorcinol-formaldehyde, (2) colloidal silica, (3) Cr{sup 3+}(chloride)-xanthan, and (4) Cr{sup 3+}(acetate)-polyacrylamide. All experiments were performed at 41{degrees}C.

  8. Effect of nitrate on microbial perchlorate reduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Y.; Coates, J. D.

    2007-12-01

    Over the last decade perchlorate has been recognized as an important emerging water contaminant that poses a significant public health threat. Because of its chemical stability, low ionic charge density, and significant water solubility microbial remediation has been identified as the most feasible method for its in situ attenuation. Our previous studies have demonstrated that dissimilatory perchlorate reducing bacteria (DPRB) capable of the respiratory reduction of perchlorate into innocuous chloride are ubiquitous in soil and sedimentary environments. As part of their metabolism these organisms reduce perchlorate to chlorite which is subsequently dismutated into chloride and molecular oxygen. These initial steps are mediated by the perchlorate reductase and chlorite dismutase enzymes respectively. Previously we found that the activity of these organisms is dependent on the presence of molybdenum and is inhibited by the presence of oxygen and to different extents nitrate. However, to date, there is little understanding of the mechanisms involved in the regulation of perchlorate reduction by oxygen and nitrate. As a continuation of our studies into the factors that control DPRB activity we investigated these regulatory mechanisms in more detail as a model organism, Dechloromonas aromatica strain RCB, transitions from aerobic metabolism through nitrate reduction to perchlorate reduction. In series of growth transition studies where both nitrate and perchlorate were present, preference for nitrate to perchlorate was observed regardless of the nitrate to perchlorate ratio. Even when the organism was pre-grown anaerobically in perchlorate, nitrate was reduced prior to perchlorate. Using non-growth washed cell suspension, perchlorate- grown D. aromatica was capable of reducing both perchlorate and nitrate concomitantly suggesting the preferentially utilization of nitrate was not a result of enzyme functionality. To elucidate the mechanism for preferential utilization of

  9. Reductive dechlorination of TCE by chemical model systems in comparison to dehalogenating bacteria: insights from dual element isotope analysis (13C/12C, 37Cl/35Cl).

    PubMed

    Cretnik, Stefan; Thoreson, Kristen A; Bernstein, Anat; Ebert, Karin; Buchner, Daniel; Laskov, Christine; Haderlein, Stefan; Shouakar-Stash, Orfan; Kliegman, Sarah; McNeill, Kristopher; Elsner, Martin

    2013-07-01

    Chloroethenes like trichloroethene (TCE) are prevalent environmental contaminants, which may be degraded through reductive dechlorination. Chemical models such as cobalamine (vitamin B12) and its simplified analogue cobaloxime have served to mimic microbial reductive dechlorination. To test whether in vitro and in vivo mechanisms agree, we combined carbon and chlorine isotope measurements of TCE. Degradation-associated enrichment factors ε(carbon) and ε(chlorine) (i.e., molecular-average isotope effects) were -12.2‰ ± 0.5‰ and -3.6‰ ± 0.1‰ with Geobacter lovleyi strain SZ; -9.1‰ ± 0.6‰ and -2.7‰ ± 0.6‰ with Desulfitobacterium hafniense Y51; -16.1‰ ± 0.9‰ and -4.0‰ ± 0.2‰ with the enzymatic cofactor cobalamin; -21.3‰ ± 0.5‰ and -3.5‰ ± 0.1‰ with cobaloxime. Dual element isotope slopes m = Δδ(13)C/ Δδ(37)Cl ≈ ε(carbon)/ε(chlorine) of TCE showed strong agreement between biotransformations (3.4 to 3.8) and cobalamin (3.9), but differed markedly for cobaloxime (6.1). These results (i) suggest a similar biodegradation mechanism despite different microbial strains, (ii) indicate that transformation with isolated cobalamin resembles in vivo transformation and (iii) suggest a different mechanism with cobaloxime. This model reactant should therefore be used with caution. Our results demonstrate the power of two-dimensional isotope analyses to characterize and distinguish between reaction mechanisms in whole cell experiments and in vitro model systems. PMID:23627862

  10. Chloride in vesicular trafficking and function.

    PubMed

    Stauber, Tobias; Jentsch, Thomas J

    2013-01-01

    Luminal acidification is of pivotal importance for the physiology of the secretory and endocytic pathways and its diverse trafficking events. Acidification by the proton-pumping V-ATPase requires charge compensation by counterion currents that are commonly attributed to chloride. The molecular identification of intracellular chloride transporters and the improvement of methodologies for measuring intraorganellar pH and chloride have facilitated the investigation of the physiology of vesicular chloride transport. New data question the requirement of chloride for pH regulation of various organelles and furthermore ascribe functions to chloride that are beyond merely electrically shunting the proton pump. This review surveys the currently established and proposed intracellular chloride transporters and gives an overview of membrane-trafficking steps that are affected by the perturbation of chloride transport. Finally, potential mechanisms of membrane-trafficking modulation by chloride are discussed and put into the context of organellar ion homeostasis in general. PMID:23092411

  11. Stability of succinylcholine chloride injection.

    PubMed

    Schmutz, C W; Mühlebach, S F

    1991-03-01

    The stability of succinylcholine chloride injection prepared by a hospital pharmacy was studied under a wide variety of conditions. Batches of succinylcholine chloride injection 10 mg/mL containing sodium chloride, methyl-4-hydroxybenzoate, hydrochloric acid, and water were prepared. Samples were tested for the effect of initial pH (3.0 and 4.2) and sterilization (steam treatment at 100 degrees C for 30 minutes and 121 degrees C for 20 minutes) on stability after three weeks; long-term stability under refrigeration (12, 17, and 23 months of storage at 4 degrees C); and the effect of storage temperature (4-6 degrees C, 20-26 degrees C, 35 degrees C, and 70 degrees C) and light exposure at various intervals up to 12 months. Samples were analyzed by thin-layer chromatography (TLC) and high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). Unlike heating at 121 degrees C, heating at 100 degrees C produced no significant loss of succinylcholine chloride, independent of the initial pH. Succinylcholine chloride was hydrolyzed only minimally over 23 months if the solution was stored at 4-6 degrees C. A 10% loss of drug content occurred if solutions were kept at 20-26 degrees C for five months, at 35 degrees C for one month, or at 70 degrees C for one day. Initial degradation was slowed if the solution was protected from light. The assessments by TLC proved to be more sensitive than the HPLC measurements. Succinylcholine chloride injection sterilized at 100 degrees C for 30 minutes can be stored for up to five months at room temperature if protected from light. The preparation is stable for at least two years under refrigeration. PMID:2028996

  12. Reduction kinetics of Cu-, Ni-, and Fe-based oxygen carriers using syngas (CO + H{sub 2}) for chemical-looping combustion

    SciTech Connect

    Alberto Abad; Francisco Garcia-Labiano; Luis F. de Diego; Pilar Gayn; Juan Adnez

    2007-08-15

    The reactivity of three Cu-, Fe-, and Ni-based oxygen carriers to be used in a chemical-looping combustion (CLC) system using syngas as fuel has been analyzed. The oxygen carriers exhibited high reactivity during reduction with fuel gases present in syngas (H{sub 2} and CO), with average values in the range 8-30% min{sup -1}. No effect of the gas products (H{sub 2}O, CO{sub 2}) on the reduction reaction rate was detected. The kinetic parameters of reaction with H{sub 2} and CO have been determined by thermogravimetric analysis. The grain model with spherical or platelike geometry in the grain was used for the kinetic determination, in which the chemical reaction controlled the global reaction rate. The activation energies determined for these reactions were low, with values ranging from 14 to 33 kJ mol{sup -1}. The reaction order depended on the reacting gas, and values from 0.5 to 1 were found. Moreover, the reactivity of the oxygen carriers when both H{sub 2} and CO are simultaneously present in the reacting gases has been analyzed, both at atmospheric and pressurized conditions. For the Cu- and Fe-based oxygen carriers, the reaction rate of the oxygen carrier with syngas corresponded to the addition of the reaction rates for the individual fuel gases, H{sub 2} and CO. For the Ni-based oxygen carrier, the reaction rate was that corresponding to the fuel gas that reacted faster with the oxygen carrier at the reacting conditions (fuel concentration, temperature, and pressure). The consequences of the behavior of the reaction of syngas and the water-gas shift (WGS) equilibrium on the design of the fuel reactor of a CLC system have been analyzed. A preliminary estimation of the solids inventory for the use of syngas in the fuel reactor of a CLC system gave values in the range of 19-34 kg MW{sup -1} when the WGS equilibrium was considered to be instantaneous. 8 figs., 4 tabs.

  13. Interaction of chloride and bicarbonate transport across the basolateral membrane of rabbit proximal straight tubule. Evidence for sodium coupled chloride/bicarbonate exchange.

    PubMed Central

    Sasaki, S; Yoshiyama, N

    1988-01-01

    The existence of chloride/bicarbonate exchange across the basolateral membrane and its physiologic significance were examined in rabbit proximal tubules. S2 segments of the proximal straight tubule were perfused in vitro and changes in intracellular pH (pHi) and chloride activity (aCli) were monitored by double-barreled microelectrodes. Total peritubular chloride replacement with gluconate increased pHi by 0.8, and this change was inhibited by a pretreatment with an anion transport inhibitor, SITS. Peritubular bicarbonate reduction increased aCli, and most of this increase was lost when ambient sodium was totally removed. The reduction rates of pHi induced by a peritubular bicarbonate reduction or sodium removal were attenuated by 20% by withdrawal of ambient chloride. SITS application to the bath in the control condition quickly increased pHi, but did not change aCli. However, the aCli slightly decreased in response to SITS when the basolateral bicarbonate efflux was increased by reducing peritubular bicarbonate concentration. It is concluded that sodium coupled chloride/bicarbonate exchange is present in parallel with sodium-bicarbonate cotransport in the basolateral membrane of the rabbit proximal tubule, and it contributes to the basolateral bicarbonate and chloride transport. PMID:2450891

  14. Photo-chemical reduction of iodate (IO3-) in sea-water leading to the emission of iodine (I2) in the atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, R.

    2013-12-01

    Iodine exists in open seawaters mainly in the inorganic forms iodate (IO3-) and iodide (I-). While the concentration of IO3- predominates in deep water, I- concentrations increase toward the surface. The primary precursor for iodine oxide particle (IOP) formation in the coastal marine boundary layer (MBL) is iodine (I2) originating from exposed macroalgae. In contrast, recent field measurements of IO above the open ocean suggest that biogenic organic-iodine emissions cannot account for the observed levels. Thus, the alternative mechanisms include the reduction of IO3- to I- in seawater which in turn is converted to, and emitted as I2 to the atmosphere which may contribute to observed levels of I2 in the MBL. In this study a series of laboratory investigations of the photo-chemical reduction of iodate (IO3-) to both aqueous iodide (I-) and a bound, soluble iodinated organic form have been conducted to investigate three potentially important processes likely to participate in the recycling of I2 from seawater in the presence of sunlight: (i) the role of dissolved organic materials (i.e. humic acid), (ii) the effect of salinity (Cl- concentration) and (iii) deposition and uptake of O3. The experiments involved the initial photolysis of IO3- solutions with either humic acid or Cl- added. The formation of I- in solution (due to IO3- reduction) was detected using time-resolved UV-Vis spectroscopy. Oxidation of iodide ions to I2 formation in the solutions and release to the gas-phase was confirmed indirectly by the detection of iodine oxide particles (IOPs) generated by the photo-oxidation of the gas-phase I2 released from solution using a coupled differential mobility analyser (DMA) and Faraday cup electrometer (FCE) system. The results indicate a constant fraction of ~ 20% of reduced iodate is in the form free iodide (I-) and by difference, ~ 80% of reduced iodate is most likely in an iodinated humic acid. Iodine (I2) is emitted by the uptake of ozone on iodide (I

  15. Slow strain rate fracture of high-strength steel at controlled electrochemical potentials in ammonium chloride, potassium chloride, and ammonium nitrate solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Nguyen, D.T.; Nichols, D.E. ); Daniels, R.D. . School of Chemical Engineering and Materials Science)

    1992-08-15

    Slow strain rate testing has been undertaken to determine the effects of individual chemical species on the fracture process of high-strength 4340 steel. Test environments included potassium chloride, ammonium nitrate, and ammonium chloride at concentrations from 0.001 to 1.0 mole por liter at ambient temperature. Tests were performed at cathodic and anodic controlled potentials, as well as at the open-circuit potential, to delineate the stress corrosion cracking range.

  16. Modelling the effect of ascorbic acid, sodium metabisulphite and sodium chloride on the kinetic responses of lactic acid bacteria and yeasts in table olive storage using a specifically implemented Quasi-chemical primary model.

    PubMed

    Echevarria, R; Bautista-Gallego, J; Arroyo-López, F N; Garrido-Fernández, A

    2010-04-15

    The goal of this work was to apply the Quasi-chemical primary model (a system of four ordinary differential equations that derives from a hypothetical four-step chemical mechanism involving an antagonistic metabolite) in the study of the evolution of yeast and lactic acid bacteria populations during the storage of Manzanilla-Aloreña table olives subjected to different mixtures of ascorbic acid, sodium metabisulphite and NaCl. Firstly, the Quasi-chemical model was applied to microbial count data to estimate the growth-decay biological parameters. The model accurately described the evolution of both populations during storage, providing detailed information on the microbial behaviour. Secondly, these parameters were used as responses and analysed according to a mixture design experiment (secondary model). The contour lines of the corresponding response surfaces clearly disclosed the relationships between growth and environmental conditions, showing the stimulating and inhibitory effect of ascorbic acid and sodium metabisulphite, respectively, on both populations of microorganisms. This work opens new possibilities for the potential use of the Quasi-chemical primary model in the study of table olive fermentations. PMID:20185187

  17. CHEMILUMINESCENT MONITOR FOR VINYL CHLORIDE

    EPA Science Inventory

    A monitor for vinyl chloride monomer (VCM) in ambient air was constructed using commercially available components of a gas chromatograph (GC) coupled with a chemiluminescence ozone analyzer slightly modified to make it suitable for use as a GC detector. The specificity for VCM is...

  18. Reduction of potassium permeability by chloride substitution in cardiac cells.

    PubMed Central

    Carmeliet, E; Verdonck, F

    1977-01-01

    1. The efflux of radioactive K and Cl ions was measured in cow Purkinje fibres and ventricular preparations of cow, cat and frog. The effect of K and Cl was studied by changing the extracellular K concentration between zero and 54 mM, and by substituting Cl ions by acetylglycinate, isethionate, benzenesulphonate, propionate and nitrate. 2. In the absence of Cl the rate coefficient for 42K efflux showed a pronounced fall, which was more pronounced the higher the K concentration. This effect was not related to the change in membrane potential. The rate coefficient for 42K efflux increased in the presence of higher extracellular K concentrations. 3. 36Cl efflux increased in the presence of reduced as well as increased extracellular K concentrations. 4. The calculated permeability coefficient for K (PK) was maximal at 5-4 mM-K, decreased slightly at higher K concentrations, but fell markedly in K-free solutions, (to about 1/5 of the value in 5-4 mM-K). In Cl-free medium PK reduced to 0-67 of the value in the Cl medium, irrespective of the K concentration. 5. The calculated PCl was greater in K-free and 16-2 mM-K than in 5-4 mM-K. 6. The ratio PK/PCl showed important changes as a function of extracellular K concentration: the value was 5 in 5-4 mM-K and fell to 2 and 0-5 respectively in 16-2 and K-free solutions. 7. The results suggest that part of the changes in membrane resistance measured by electrical methods in Cl-free media is due to a simultaneous decrease in K conductance. PMID:850161

  19. 76 FR 14432 - Methylene Chloride Standard; Extension of the Office of Management and Budget's (OMB) Approval of...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-03-16

    ... Paperwork Reduction Act of 1995 (44 U.S.C. 3506 et seq.) and Secretary of Labor's Order No. 4-2010 (75 FR... requirements specified by the Methylene Chloride Standard (29 CFR 1910.1052). DATES: Comments must be submitted... entitled ``Methylene Chloride'' (MC) (29 CFR 1910.1052; the ``Standard'') protects workers from the...

  20. Pharmacodynamics of benzyl chloride in rats.

    PubMed

    Saxena, S; Abdel-Rahman, M S

    1989-09-01

    In today's world of high industrialization, toxicity and pollution have become common terms of references. Both laymen and experts are becoming increasingly concerned about various health hazards created by occupational and industrial wastes dumped in and around public places. Benzyl chloride (BCl) was one of the chemicals dumped by Hooker Chemicals in Love Canal, N.Y. Benzyl chloride (BCl) is extensively used in industry in the manufacture of dyes, perfumes, resins, and synthetic tannins. It has been found at various dump sites and industrial wastes, which has led to potential hazards to health. This study was conducted to investigate the pharmacodynamics of BCl in rats. Rats were given 14C-BCl in corn oil by gavage. The peak plasma level was reached at 30 min and began to decline. BCl elimination pattern follows a two compartment model. The distribution half-life (alpha-phase) was 1.3 hr while the half-life of elimination (beta-phase) was 58.53 hr. Distribution studies after 48 hr of BCl administration revealed that the concentration of radioisotopes was highest in the stomach, gastric content, ileum, and duodenum followed by liver, adrenal, bone marrow, whole blood, pancreas, lung, esophagus, skin, kidney, heart, thymus, fat, testes, spleen, brain, and carcass. Approximately 76% of the initial dose was excreted by kidney during the 72 hr studies. About 7% was detected in expired air as 14CO2, while less than 1.3% was present as 14C-BCl or 14C-BCl metabolites in expired air during 72 hr. Metabolism studies revealed that S-benzyl-N-acetyl cysteine, benzyl alcohol, and benzaldehyde were the metabolites present in the urine.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:2802671

  1. Method for the abatement of hydrogen chloride

    DOEpatents

    Winston, S.J.; Thomas, T.R.

    1975-11-14

    A method is described for reducing the amount of hydrogen chloride contained in a gas stream by reacting the hydrogen chloride with ammonia in the gas phase so as to produce ammonium chloride. The combined gas stream is passed into a condensation and collection vessel, and a cyclonic flow is created in the combined gas stream as it passes through the vessel. The temperature of the gas stream is reduced in the vessel to below the condensation temperature of ammonium chloride in order to crystallize the ammonium chloride on the walls of the vessel. The cyclonic flow creates a turbulence which breaks off the larger particles of ammonium chloride which are, in turn, driven to the bottom of the vessel where the solid ammonium chloride can be removed from the vessel. The gas stream exiting from the condensation and collection vessel is further cleaned and additional ammonium chloride is removed by passing through additional filters.

  2. Method for the abatement of hydrogen chloride

    DOEpatents

    Winston, Steven J.; Thomas, Thomas R.

    1977-01-01

    The present invention provides a method for reducing the amount of hydrogen chloride contained in a gas stream by reacting the hydrogen chloride with ammonia in the gas phase so as to produce ammonium chloride. The combined gas stream is passed into a condensation and collection vessel and a cyclonic flow is created in the combined gas stream as it passes through the vessel. The temperature of the gas stream is reduced in the vessel to below the condensation temperature of ammonium chloride in order to crystallize the ammonium chloride on the walls of the vessel. The cyclonic flow creates a turbulence which breaks off the larger particles of ammonium chloride which are, in turn, driven to the bottom of the vessel where the solid ammonium chloride can be removed from the vessel. The gas stream exiting from the condensation and collection vessel is further cleaned and additional ammonium chloride is removed by passing through additional filters.

  3. 21 CFR 582.5446 - Manganese chloride.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS SUBSTANCES GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE Nutrients and/or Dietary Supplements 1 § 582.5446 Manganese chloride. (a) Product. Manganese chloride. (b) Conditions of use....

  4. 7 CFR 58.434 - Calcium chloride.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... Specifications for Dairy Plants Approved for USDA Inspection and Grading Service 1 Quality Specifications for Raw Material § 58.434 Calcium chloride. Calcium chloride, when used, shall meet the requirements of the...

  5. Deicing chemicals as source of constituents of highway runoff

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Granato, G.E.

    1996-01-01

    The dissolved major and trace constituents of deicing chemicals as a source of constituents in highway runoff must be quantified for interpretive studies of highway runoff and its effects on surface water and groundwater. Dissolved constituents of the deicing chemicals-sodium chloride, calcium chloride, and premix (a mixture of sodium and calcium chloride)-were determined by analysis of salt solutions created in the laboratory and are presented as mass ratios to chloride. Deicing chemical samples studied are about 98 and 97 percent pure sodium chloride and calcium chloride, respectively: however, each has a distinct major and trace ion constituent signature. The greatest impurity in sodium chloride road sail samples was sulfate, followed by calcium, potassium, bromide, vanadium, magnesium, fluoride, and other constituents with a ratio to chloride of less than 0.0001 by mass. The greatest impurity in the calcium chloride road salt samples was sodium, followed by potassium, sulfate, bromide, silica, fluoride. strontium, magnesium, and other constituents with a ratio to chloride of less than 0.0001 by mass. Major constituents of deicing chemicals in highway runoff may account for a substantial source of annual chemical loads. Comparison of estimated annual loads and first flush concentrations of deicing chemical constituents in highway runoff with those reported in the literature indicate that although deicing chemicals are not a primary source of trace constituents, they are not a trivial source, either. Therefore, deicing chemicals should be considered as a source of many major and trace constituents in highway and urban runoff.

  6. 21 CFR 184.1426 - Magnesium chloride.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Magnesium chloride. 184.1426 Section 184.1426 Food... Specific Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1426 Magnesium chloride. (a) Magnesium chloride (MgC12·6H2O, CAS... mineral bischofite. It is prepared by dissolving magnesium oxide, hydroxide, or carbonate in...

  7. 21 CFR 182.8985 - Zinc chloride.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Zinc chloride. 182.8985 Section 182.8985 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) SUBSTANCES GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE Nutrients § 182.8985 Zinc chloride. (a) Product. Zinc chloride. (b)...

  8. 21 CFR 582.5985 - Zinc chloride.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Zinc chloride. 582.5985 Section 582.5985 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS... 1 § 582.5985 Zinc chloride. (a) Product. Zinc chloride. (b) Conditions of use. This substance...

  9. 21 CFR 182.8985 - Zinc chloride.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Zinc chloride. 182.8985 Section 182.8985 Food and... CONSUMPTION (CONTINUED) SUBSTANCES GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE Nutrients § 182.8985 Zinc chloride. (a) Product. Zinc chloride. (b) Conditions of use. This substance is generally recognized as safe when used...

  10. 21 CFR 582.5985 - Zinc chloride.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Zinc chloride. 582.5985 Section 582.5985 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS... 1 § 582.5985 Zinc chloride. (a) Product. Zinc chloride. (b) Conditions of use. This substance...

  11. 21 CFR 582.5985 - Zinc chloride.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Zinc chloride. 582.5985 Section 582.5985 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS... 1 § 582.5985 Zinc chloride. (a) Product. Zinc chloride. (b) Conditions of use. This substance...

  12. 21 CFR 182.8985 - Zinc chloride.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Zinc chloride. 182.8985 Section 182.8985 Food and... CONSUMPTION (CONTINUED) SUBSTANCES GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE Nutrients § 182.8985 Zinc chloride. (a) Product. Zinc chloride. (b) Conditions of use. This substance is generally recognized as safe when used...

  13. 21 CFR 582.5985 - Zinc chloride.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Zinc chloride. 582.5985 Section 582.5985 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS... 1 § 582.5985 Zinc chloride. (a) Product. Zinc chloride. (b) Conditions of use. This substance...

  14. 21 CFR 582.5985 - Zinc chloride.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Zinc chloride. 582.5985 Section 582.5985 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS... 1 § 582.5985 Zinc chloride. (a) Product. Zinc chloride. (b) Conditions of use. This substance...

  15. 21 CFR 182.8985 - Zinc chloride.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Zinc chloride. 182.8985 Section 182.8985 Food and... CONSUMPTION (CONTINUED) SUBSTANCES GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE Nutrients § 182.8985 Zinc chloride. (a) Product. Zinc chloride. (b) Conditions of use. This substance is generally recognized as safe when used...

  16. 21 CFR 182.8985 - Zinc chloride.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Zinc chloride. 182.8985 Section 182.8985 Food and... CONSUMPTION (CONTINUED) SUBSTANCES GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE Nutrients § 182.8985 Zinc chloride. (a) Product. Zinc chloride. (b) Conditions of use. This substance is generally recognized as safe when used...

  17. REMOVAL OF CHLORIDE FROM AQUEOUS SOLUTIONS

    DOEpatents

    Schulz, W.W.

    1959-08-01

    The removal of chlorides from aqueons solutions is described. The process involves contacting the aqueous chloride containing solution with a benzene solution about 0.005 M in phenyl mercuric acetate whereby the chloride anions are taken up by the organic phase and separating the organic phase from the aqueous solutions.

  18. 21 CFR 184.1138 - Ammonium chloride.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    .... No. 12125-02-9) is produced by the reaction of sodium chloride and an ammonium salt in solution. The less soluble sodium salt separates out at elevated temperatures, and ammonium chloride is recovered... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Ammonium chloride. 184.1138 Section 184.1138...

  19. 21 CFR 184.1138 - Ammonium chloride.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    .... No. 12125-02-9) is produced by the reaction of sodium chloride and an ammonium salt in solution. The less soluble sodium salt separates out at elevated temperatures, and ammonium chloride is recovered... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Ammonium chloride. 184.1138 Section 184.1138...

  20. 21 CFR 184.1138 - Ammonium chloride.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    .... No. 12125-02-9) is produced by the reaction of sodium chloride and an ammonium salt in solution. The less soluble sodium salt separates out at elevated temperatures, and ammonium chloride is recovered... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Ammonium chloride. 184.1138 Section 184.1138...

  1. 21 CFR 184.1138 - Ammonium chloride.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    .... No. 12125-02-9) is produced by the reaction of sodium chloride and an ammonium salt in solution. The less soluble sodium salt separates out at elevated temperatures, and ammonium chloride is recovered... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Ammonium chloride. 184.1138 Section 184.1138...

  2. 21 CFR 182.8252 - Choline chloride.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Choline chloride. 182.8252 Section 182.8252 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) SUBSTANCES GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE Nutrients § 182.8252 Choline chloride. (a) Product. Choline chloride....

  3. 21 CFR 582.1193 - Calcium chloride.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Calcium chloride. 582.1193 Section 582.1193 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL... Additives § 582.1193 Calcium chloride. (a) Product. Calcium chloride. (b) Conditions of use. This...

  4. 21 CFR 582.6193 - Calcium chloride.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Calcium chloride. 582.6193 Section 582.6193 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL... Calcium chloride. (a) Product. Calcium chloride. (b) Conditions of use. This substance is...

  5. 7 CFR 58.434 - Calcium chloride.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Calcium chloride. 58.434 Section 58.434 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards... Material § 58.434 Calcium chloride. Calcium chloride, when used, shall meet the requirements of the...

  6. 21 CFR 582.5622 - Potassium chloride.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Potassium chloride. 582.5622 Section 582.5622 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL... Supplements 1 § 582.5622 Potassium chloride. (a) Product. Potassium chloride. (b) Conditions of use....

  7. 21 CFR 582.5622 - Potassium chloride.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Potassium chloride. 582.5622 Section 582.5622 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL... Supplements 1 § 582.5622 Potassium chloride. (a) Product. Potassium chloride. (b) Conditions of use....

  8. 21 CFR 582.5622 - Potassium chloride.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Potassium chloride. 582.5622 Section 582.5622 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL... Supplements 1 § 582.5622 Potassium chloride. (a) Product. Potassium chloride. (b) Conditions of use....

  9. 21 CFR 582.5622 - Potassium chloride.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Potassium chloride. 582.5622 Section 582.5622 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL... Supplements 1 § 582.5622 Potassium chloride. (a) Product. Potassium chloride. (b) Conditions of use....

  10. 21 CFR 582.5622 - Potassium chloride.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Potassium chloride. 582.5622 Section 582.5622 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL... Supplements 1 § 582.5622 Potassium chloride. (a) Product. Potassium chloride. (b) Conditions of use....

  11. 46 CFR 151.50-34 - Vinyl chloride (vinyl chloride monomer).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Vinyl chloride (vinyl chloride monomer). 151.50-34 Section 151.50-34 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) CERTAIN BULK DANGEROUS CARGOES BARGES CARRYING BULK LIQUID HAZARDOUS MATERIAL CARGOES Special Requirements § 151.50-34 Vinyl chloride (vinyl chloride monomer). (a)...

  12. Chemical speciation of PM emissions from heavy-duty diesel vehicles equipped with diesel particulate filter (DPF) and selective catalytic reduction (SCR) retrofits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biswas, Subhasis; Verma, Vishal; Schauer, James J.; Sioutas, Constantinos

    Four heavy-duty diesel vehicles (HDDVs) in six retrofitted configurations (CRT ®, V-SCRT ®, Z-SCRT ®, Horizon, DPX and CCRT ®) and a baseline vehicle operating without after--treatment were tested under cruise (50 mph), transient UDDS and idle driving modes. As a continuation of the work by Biswas et al. [Biswas, S., Hu, S., Verma, V., Herner, J., Robertson, W.J., Ayala, A., Sioutas, C., 2008. Physical properties of particulate matter (PM) from late model heavy-duty diesel vehicles operating with advanced emission control technologies. Atmospheric Environment 42, 5622-5634.] on particle physical parameters, this paper focuses on PM chemical characteristics (Total carbon [TC], Elemental carbon [EC], Organic Carbon [OC], ions and water-soluble organic carbon [WSOC]) for cruise and UDDS cycles only. Size-resolved PM collected by MOUDI-Nano-MOUDI was analyzed for TC, EC and OC and ions (such as sulfate, nitrate, ammonium, potassium, sodium and phosphate), while Teflon coated glass fiber filters from a high volume sampler were extracted to determine WSOC. The introduction of retrofits reduced PM mass emissions over 90% in cruise and 95% in UDDS. Similarly, significant reductions in the emission of major chemical constituents (TC, OC and EC) were achieved. Sulfate dominated PM composition in vehicle configurations (V-SCRT ®-UDDS, Z-SCRT ®-Cruise, CRT ® and DPX) with considerable nucleation mode and TC was predominant for configurations with less (Z-SCRT ®-UDDS) or insignificant (CCRT ®, Horizon) nucleation. The transient operation increases EC emissions, consistent with its higher accumulation PM mode content. In general, solubility of organic carbon is higher (average ˜5 times) for retrofitted vehicles than the baseline vehicle. The retrofitted vehicles with catalyzed filters (DPX, CCRT ®) had decreased OC solubility (WSOC/OC: 8-25%) unlike those with uncatalyzed filters (SCRT ®s, Horizon; WSOC/OC ˜ 60-100%). Ammonium was present predominantly in the

  13. An XAFS Study of Tantalum Chloride in the Ionic Liquid 1-ethyl-3-methyl Imidazolium Chloride/ aluminum Chloride

    SciTech Connect

    D Roeper; K Pandya; G Cheek; W OGrady

    2011-12-31

    Tantalum chloride was studied with extended X-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy (XAFS) in acidic and basic aluminum chloride/1-ethyl-3-methyl imidazolium chloride ionic liquids (ILs). Anhydrous Ta2Cl10 is more soluble in the basic solution than in the acidic solution and the X-ray absorption data shows that the coordination shell of chlorides around the tantalum is larger in the basic solution. In the acidic solution, tantalum has five chlorides in its coordination shell while in the basic solution; the tantalum is coordinated by seven chlorides. This indicates that the Lewis acidity of the tantalum chloride causes the Ta to coordinate differently in the acidic and the basic solutions.

  14. FIELD AND LABORATORY EVIDENCE FOR INTRINSIC BIODEGRADATION OF VINYL CHLORIDE CONTAMINATION IN A FE(III)-REDUCING AQUIFER

    EPA Science Inventory

    Intrinsic bioremediation of chlorinated ethenes in anaerobic aquifers previously has not been considered feasible, due, in large part, to 1) the production of vinyl chloride during microbial reductive dechlorination of higher chlorinated contaminants and 2) the apparent poor biod...

  15. Shock compression of polyvinyl chloride

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neogi, Anupam; Mitra, Nilanjan

    2016-04-01

    This study presents shock compression simulation of atactic polyvinyl chloride (PVC) using ab-initio and classical molecular dynamics. The manuscript also identifies the limits of applicability of classical molecular dynamics based shock compression simulation for PVC. The mechanism of bond dissociation under shock loading and its progression is demonstrated in this manuscript using the density functional theory based molecular dynamics simulations. The rate of dissociation of different bonds at different shock velocities is also presented in this manuscript.

  16. Absorption characteristics of elemental mercury in mercury chloride solutions.

    PubMed

    Ma, Yongpeng; Xu, Haomiao; Qu, Zan; Yan, Naiqiang; Wang, Wenhua

    2014-11-01

    Elemental mercury (Hg(0)) in flue gases can be efficiently captured by mercury chloride (HgCl2) solution. However, the absorption behaviors and the influencing effects are still poorly understood. The mechanism of Hg(0) absorption by HgCl2 and the factors that control the removal were studied in this paper. It was found that when the mole ratio of Cl(-) to HgCl2 is 10:1, the Hg(0) removal efficiency is the highest. Among the main mercury chloride species, HgCl3(-) is the most efficient ion for Hg(0) removal in the HgCl2 absorption system when moderate concentrations of chloride ions exist. The Hg(0) absorption reactions in the aqueous phase were investigated computationally using Moller-Plesset perturbation theory. The calculated Gibbs free energies and energy barriers are in excellent agreement with the results obtained from experiments. In the presence of SO3(2-) and SO2, Hg(2+) reduction occurred and Hg(0) removal efficiency decreased. The reduced Hg(0) removal can be controlled through increased chloride concentration to some degree. Low pH value in HgCl2 solution enhanced the Hg(0) removal efficiency, and the effect was more significant in dilute HgCl2 solutions. The presence of SO4(2-) and NO3(-) did not affect Hg(0) removal by HgCl2. PMID:25458680

  17. Surface-Bonded Antimicrobial Activity of an Organosilicon Quaternary Ammonium Chloride

    PubMed Central

    Isquith, A. J.; Abbott, E. A.; Walters, P. A.

    1972-01-01

    The hydrolysis product of 3-(trimethoxysilyl)-propyldimethyloctadecyl ammonium chloride exhibited antimicrobial activity against a broad range of microorganisms while chemically bonded to a variety of surfaces. The chemical was not removed from surfaces by repeated washing with water, and its antimicrobial activity could not be attributed to a slow release of the chemical, but rather to the surface-bonded chemical. Images PMID:4650597

  18. Chloride flux out of Yellowstone National Park

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Norton, Daniel R.; Friedman, Irving

    1985-12-01

    Monitoring of the chloride concentration, electrical conductivity, and discharge was carried out for the four major rivers of Yellowstone National Park from September 1982 to January 1984. Chloride flux out of the Park was determined from the measured values of chloride concentration and discharge. The annual chloride flux from the Park was 5.86 × 10 10 g. Of this amount 45% was from the Madison River drainage basin, 32% from the Yellowstone River basin, 12% from the Snake River basin, and 11% from the Falls River basin. Of the annual chloride flux from the Yellowstone River drainage basin 36% was attributed to the Yellowstone Lake drainage basin. The geothermal contribution to the chloride flux was determined by subtracting the chloride contribution from rock weathering and atmospheric precipitation and is 94% of the total chloride flux. Calculations of the geothermal chloride flux for each river are given and the implications of an additional chloride flux out of the western Park boundary discussed. An anomalous increase in chloride flux out of the Park was observed for several weeks prior to the Mt. Borah earthquake in Central Idaho on October 28, 1983, reaching a peak value shortly thereafter. It is suggested that the rise in flux was a precursor of the earthquake. The information in this paper provides baseline data against which future changes in the hydrothermal systems can be measured. It also provides measurements related to the thermal contributions from the different drainage basins of the Park.

  19. Chloride flux out of Yellowstone National Park

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Norton, D.R.; Friedman, I.

    1985-01-01

    Monitoring of the chloride concentration, electrical conductivity, and discharge was carried out for the four major rivers of Yellowstone National Park from September 1982 to January 1984. Chloride flux out of the Park was determined from the measured values of chloride concentration and discharge. The annual chloride flux from the Park was 5.86 ?? 1010 g. Of this amount 45% was from the Madison River drainage basin, 32% from the Yellowstone River basin, 12% from the Snake River basin, and 11% from the Falls River basin. Of the annual chloride flux from the Yellowstone River drainage basin 36% was attributed to the Yellowstone Lake drainage basin. The geothermal contribution to the chloride flux was determined by subtracting the chloride contribution from rock weathering and atmospheric precipitation and is 94% of the total chloride flux. Calculations of the geothermal chloride flux for each river are given and the implications of an additional chloride flux out of the western Park boundary discussed. An anomalous increase in chloride flux out of the Park was observed for several weeks prior to the Mt. Borah earthquake in Central Idaho on October 28, 1983, reaching a peak value shortly thereafter. It is suggested that the rise in flux was a precursor of the earthquake. The information in this paper provides baseline data against which future changes in the hydrothermal systems can be measured. It also provides measurements related to the thermal contributions from the different drainage basins of the Park. ?? 1985.

  20. Calibration of Yucca Mountain unsaturated zone flow and transport model using porewater chloride data.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jianchun; Sonnenthal, Eric L; Bodvarsson, Gudmundur S

    2003-01-01

    In this study, porewater chloride data from Yucca Mountain, NV are analyzed and modeled by three-dimensional chemical transport simulation and analytical methods. The simulation modeling approach is based on a continuum formulation of coupled multiphase fluid flow and tracer transport processes through fractured porous rock using a dual-continuum concept. Infiltration rate calibrations were performed using the porewater chloride data. Model results of chloride distributions were improved in matching the observed data with the calibrated infiltration rates. Statistical analyses of the frequency distribution for overall percolation fluxes and chloride concentration in the unsaturated zone system demonstrate that the use of the calibrated infiltration rates had an insignificant effect on the distribution of simulated percolation fluxes but significantly changed the predicted distribution of simulated chloride concentrations. An analytical method was also applied to model transient chloride transport. The method was verified by three-dimensional simulation results to be capable of capturing major chemical transient behavior and trends. Effects of lateral flow in the Paintbrush nonwelded unit on percolation fluxes and chloride distribution were studied by three-dimensional simulations with increased horizontal permeability. The combined results from these model calibrations furnish important information for the UZ model studies, contributing to performance assessment of the potential repository. PMID:12714292

  1. Calibration of Yucca Mountain unsaturated zone flow and transport model using porewater chloride data

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Jianchun; Sonnenthal, Eric L.; Bodvarsson, Gudmundur S.

    2002-09-01

    In this study, porewater chloride data from Yucca Mountain, Nevada, are analyzed and modeled by 3-D chemical transport simulations and analytical methods. The simulation modeling approach is based on a continuum formulation of coupled multiphase fluid flow and tracer transport processes through fractured porous rock, using a dual-continuum concept. Infiltration-rate calibrations were using the pore water chloride data. Model results of chloride distributions were improved in matching the observed data with the calibrated infiltration rates. Statistical analyses of the frequency distribution for overall percolation fluxes and chloride concentration in the unsaturated zone system demonstrate that the use of the calibrated infiltration rates had insignificant effect on the distribution of simulated percolation fluxes but significantly changed the predicated distribution of simulated chloride concentrations. An analytical method was also applied to model transient chloride transport. The method was verified by 3-D simulation results as able to capture major chemical transient behavior and trends. Effects of lateral flow in the Paintbrush nonwelded unit on percolation fluxes and chloride distribution were studied by 3-D simulations with increased horizontal permeability. The combined results from these model calibrations furnish important information for the UZ model studies, contributing to performance assessment of the potential repository.

  2. Salt, chloride, bleach, and innate host defense

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Guoshun; Nauseef, William M.

    2015-01-01

    Salt provides 2 life-essential elements: sodium and chlorine. Chloride, the ionic form of chlorine, derived exclusively from dietary absorption and constituting the most abundant anion in the human body, plays critical roles in many vital physiologic functions, from fluid retention and secretion to osmotic maintenance and pH balance. However, an often overlooked role of chloride is its function in innate host defense against infection. Chloride serves as a substrate for the generation of the potent microbicide chlorine bleach by stimulated neutrophils and also contributes to regulation of ionic homeostasis for optimal antimicrobial activity within phagosomes. An inadequate supply of chloride to phagocytes and their phagosomes, such as in CF disease and other chloride channel disorders, severely compromises host defense against infection. We provide an overview of the roles that chloride plays in normal innate immunity, highlighting specific links between defective chloride channel function and failures in host defense. PMID:26048979

  3. Salt, chloride, bleach, and innate host defense.

    PubMed

    Wang, Guoshun; Nauseef, William M

    2015-08-01

    Salt provides 2 life-essential elements: sodium and chlorine. Chloride, the ionic form of chlorine, derived exclusively from dietary absorption and constituting the most abundant anion in the human body, plays critical roles in many vital physiologic functions, from fluid retention and secretion to osmotic maintenance and pH balance. However, an often overlooked role of chloride is its function in innate host defense against infection. Chloride serves as a substrate for the generation of the potent microbicide chlorine bleach by stimulated neutrophils and also contributes to regulation of ionic homeostasis for optimal antimicrobial activity within phagosomes. An inadequate supply of chloride to phagocytes and their phagosomes, such as in CF disease and other chloride channel disorders, severely compromises host defense against infection. We provide an overview of the roles that chloride plays in normal innate immunity, highlighting specific links between defective chloride channel function and failures in host defense. PMID:26048979

  4. Study of chloride ion transport of composite by using cement and starch as a binder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Armynah, Bidayatul; Halide, Halmar; Zahrawani, Reski, Nurhadi; Tahir, Dahlang

    2016-03-01

    This study presents the chemical bonding and the structural properties of composites from accelerator chloride test migration (ACTM). The volume fractions between binder (cement and starch) and charcoal in composites are 20:80 and 60:40. The effect of the binder to the chemical composition, chemical bonding, and structural properties before and after chloride ion passing through the composites was determined by X-ray fluorescence (XRF), by Fourier transform infra-red (FTIR), and x-ray diffraction (XRD), respectively. From the XRD data, XRF data, and the FTIR data shows the amount of chemical composition, the type of binding, and the structure of composites are depending on the type of binder. The amount of chloride migration using starch as binder is higher than that of cement as a binder due to the density effects.

  5. 21 CFR 178.3790 - Polymer modifiers in semirigid and rigid vinyl chloride plastics.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... chemical reactions, other than addition reactions, occur when they are mixed. (2) Polymers identified in...; provided that no chemical reactions, other than addition reactions, occur when they are combined. Such..., other than addition reactions, occur among the vinyl chloride polymers and the modifying...

  6. 21 CFR 178.3790 - Polymer modifiers in semirigid and rigid vinyl chloride plastics.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... chemical reactions, other than addition reactions, occur when they are mixed. (2) Polymers identified in...; provided that no chemical reactions, other than addition reactions, occur when they are combined. Such..., other than addition reactions, occur among the vinyl chloride polymers and the modifying...

  7. Synthesis of graphene platelets by chemical and electrochemical route

    SciTech Connect

    Ramachandran, Rajendran; Felix, Sathiyanathan; Joshi, Girish M.; Raghupathy, Bala P.C.; Jeong, Soon Kwan; Grace, Andrews Nirmala

    2013-10-15

    Graphical abstract: A schematic showing the overall reduction process of graphite to reduced graphene platelets by chemical and electrochemical route. - Highlights: • Graphene was prepared by diverse routes viz. chemical and electrochemical methods. • NaBH{sub 4} was effective for removing oxygen functional groups from graphene oxide. • Sodium borohydride reduced graphene oxide (SRGO) showed high specific capacitance. • Electrochemical rendered a cheap route for production of graphene in powder form. - Abstract: Graphene platelets were synthesized from graphene oxide by chemical and electrochemical route. Under the chemical method, sodium borohydride and hydrazine chloride were used as reductants to produce graphene. In this paper, a novel and cost effective electrochemical method, which can simplify the process of reduction on a larger scale, is demonstrated. The electrochemical method proposed in this paper produces graphene in powder form with good yield. The atomic force microscopic images confirmed that the graphene samples prepared by all the routes have multilayers of graphene. The electrochemical process provided a new route to make relatively larger area graphene sheets, which will have interest for further patterning applications. Attempt was made to quantify the quantum of reduction using cyclic voltammetry and choronopotentiometry techniques on reduced graphene samples. As a measure in reading the specific capacitance values, a maximum specific capacitance value of 265.3 F/g was obtained in sodium borohydride reduced graphene oxide.

  8. IN SITU CHEMICAL REDUCTION OF CR(VI) IN GROUNDWATER USING A COMBINATION OF FERROUS SULFATE AND SODIUM DITHIONITE: A FIELD INVESTIGATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    A field pilot test was conducted to evaluate the effectiveness of a FeSO4 + Na2S2O4 reductant solution blend for in situ saturated zone treatment of dissolved-phase Cr(VI) at the former Macalloy Corporation site in Charleston, SC. The reductant blend was injected into the path o...

  9. CIS-DCE AND VC MICROBIAL COMMUNITY CHANGES ASSOCIATED WITH A SHIFT FROM REDUCTIVE DECHLORINATION OF PCE TO REDUCTIVE DECHLORINATION OF

    EPA Science Inventory

    Subcultures that reductively dechlorinate cis-dichloroethene (cis-DCE) or vinyl chloride (VC) were derived from three independent enrichments that completely dechlorinated tetrachloroethene (PCE) to ethene in order to study the reductive dechlorination of the lesser chlorinated e...

  10. Chemical and Electrochemical Processing of Aluminum Dross Using Molten Salts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Xiao Y.

    2008-04-01

    A novel molten salt process was investigated, where Al, as metal or contained in Al2O3 and AlN, was recovered from Al dross by chemical or direct electrochemical reduction in electrolytic cells. Electrolysis experiments were carried out under argon at temperatures from 1123 to 1243 K. In order to better understand the reduction behavior, the as-received Al dross was simulated using simplified systems, including pure Al2O3, pure AlN, an Al2O3/AlN binary mixture, and an Al2O3/AlN/Al ternary mixture. The reduction of the as-received dross was also studied experimentally. The studies showed that solid Al2O3 was chemically reduced by the Ca in a Ca-saturated Ca-CaCl2 melt to form Al2Ca or electrochemically reduced to Al-rich Al-Ca alloys and that the Al value in the Al2O3 was easily recovered from the Al drosses. It was found experimentally that solid AlN in the drosses could not be calciothermically reduced to any extent, consistent with thermodynamic evaluations. It was also found that the direct electrochemical reduction of the AlN in the drosses was confined to three phase boundaries (3PBs) between the AlN, the electrolyte, and the current collector and could not be enhanced by using the LiCl-containing chloride melt or the chloride-fluoride melts studied. The presence of Al powder in the Al2O3/AlN mixture facilitated the direct electrochemical reduction of both Al2O3 and AlN. The reduction mechanisms are discussed based upon the present experimental observations. Flow sheets for recovering the metallic Al and the Al in the Al2O3 and AlN from Al dross are finally proposed.

  11. Chloride Transporting CLC Proteins1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pusch, Michael

    In the early 1980s, Chris Miller and colleagues described a curious "double-barreled" chloride channel from the electric organ of Torpedo fish reconstituted in planar lipid bilayers (Miller and White, 1980). Single-channel openings occurred in "bursts" separated by long closures. A single burst was characterized by the presence of two open conductance levels of equal size and the gating (i.e., openings and closings) during a burst could be almost perfectly described as a superposition of two identical and independent conductances that switched between open and closed states with voltage-dependent rates α and β (Hanke and Miller, 1983) (Fig. 8.1).

  12. Oxomemazine hydro­chloride

    PubMed Central

    Siddegowda, M. S.; Butcher, Ray J.; Akkurt, Mehmet; Yathirajan, H. S.; Ramesh, A. R.

    2011-01-01

    In the title compound [systematic name: 3-(5,5-dioxo­phen­othia­zin-10-yl)-N,N,2-trimethyl­propanaminium chloride], C18H23N2O2S+·Cl−, the dihedral angle between the two outer aromatic rings of the phenothia­zine unit is 30.5 (2)°. In the crystal, the components are linked by N—H⋯Cl and C—H⋯Cl hydrogen bonds and C—H⋯π inter­actions. PMID:22090928

  13. An XAFS Study of Niobium chloride in the ionic liquid 1-ethyl-3-methyl imidazolium chloride/ aluminum chloride

    SciTech Connect

    D Roeper; K Pandya; G Cheek; W OGrady

    2011-12-31

    Niobium chloride was studied with extended X-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy (EXAFS) in acidic and basic aluminum chloride/1-ethyl-3-methyl imidazolium chloride (EMIC) ionic liquids. Although anhydrous Nb2Cl10 is more soluble in the basic melt than in the acidic melt, the EXAFS data shows that the coordination shell around the niobium does not change in the different ionic liquids. Both the acidic and basic melts show a coordination of five chlorides in the first shell. This indicates that in this series of ionic liquids, the Nb2Cl10 breaks up into two NbCl5 entities in both the acidic and the basic melts.

  14. Evaluation of Phenylephrine Stability in Polyvinyl Chloride Bags

    PubMed Central

    Oldland, Alan R.; Kiser, Tyree H.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Purpose: Phenylephrine hydrochloride (HCl) is commonly used to maintain adequate blood pressure during shock and shocklike states. Phenylephrine is prepared in concentrated stock vials that require further dilution prior to administration. This study evaluated the physical and chemical stability of phenylephrine in extemporaneously prepared polyvinyl chloride (PVC) bags. Methods: Phenylephrine HCl 10 mg/mL solution was diluted with 0.9% sodium chloride for injection to final concentrations of 200 µg/mL and 400 µg/mL and stored at room temperature (23°C-25°C) exposed to fluorescent light. Stability of phenylephrine HCl was evaluated by high-performance liquid chromatography on days 0, 7, 14, 21, 30, 45, and 60. Results: Phenylephrine HCl 200 and 400 µg/mL solutions in PVC bags were physically stable during the entire 60-day study period. Phenylephrine HCl retained > 95% of the original concentration. Conclusion: Phenylephrine HCl diluted to 200 or 400 µg/mL with 0.9% sodium chloride for injection is both physically and chemically stable for a period of 60 days with ≤5% degradation when stored at room temperature and exposed to fluorescent lighting. PMID:24958958

  15. Barium borohydride chlorides: synthesis, crystal structures and thermal properties.

    PubMed

    Grube, Elisabeth; Olesen, Cathrine H; Ravnsbæk, Dorthe B; Jensen, Torben R

    2016-05-10

    Here we report the synthesis, mechanism of formation, characterization and thermal decomposition of new barium borohydride chlorides prepared by mechanochemistry and thermal treatment of MBH4-BaCl2, M = Li, Na or K in ratios 1 : 1 and 1 : 2. Initially, orthorhombic barium chloride, o-BaCl2 transforms into o-Ba(BH4)xCl2-x, x ∼ 0.15. Excess LiBH4 leads to continued anion substitution and a phase transformation into hexagonal barium borohydride chloride h-Ba(BH4)xCl2-x, which accommodates higher amounts of borohydride, possibly x ∼ 0.85 and resembles h-BaCl2. Thus, two solid solutions are in equilibrium during mechano-chemical treatment of LiBH4-BaCl2 (1 : 1) whereas LiBH4-BaCl2 (2 : 1) converts to h-Ba(BH4)0.85Cl1.15. Upon thermal treatment at T > ∼200 °C, h-Ba(BH4)0.85Cl1.15 transforms into another orthorhombic barium borohydride chloride compound, o-Ba(BH4)0.85Cl1.15, which is structurally similar to o-BaBr2. The samples with M = Na and K have lower reactivity and form o-Ba(BH4)xCl2-x, x ∼ 0.1 and a solid solution of sodium chloride dissolved in solid sodium borohydride, Na(BH4)1-xClx, x = 0.07. The new compounds and reaction mechanisms are investigated by in situ synchrotron radiation powder X-ray diffraction (SR-PXD), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR) and simultaneous thermogravimetric analysis (TGA), differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), mass spectroscopy (MS) and temperature programmed photographic analysis (TPPA). PMID:27109871

  16. [Sodium chloride 0.9%: nephrotoxic crystalloid?].

    PubMed

    Dombre, Vincent; De Seigneux, Sophie; Schiffer, Eduardo

    2016-02-01

    Sodium chloride 0.9%, often incorrectly called physiological saline, contains higher concentration of chloride compared to plasma. It is known that the administration of sodium chloride 0.9% can cause hyperchloremic metabolic acidosis in a reproducible manner. The elevated chloride concentration in 0.9% NaCl solution can also adversely affect renal perfusion. This effect is thought to be induced by hyperchloremia that causes renal artery vasoconstriction. For these reasons, the use of 0.9% NaCl solution is raising attention and some would advocate the use of a more "physiological" solution, such as balanced solutions that contain a level of chloride closer to that of plasma. Few prospective, randomized, controlled trials are available today and most were done in a perioperative setting. Some studies suggest that the chloride excess in 0.9% NaCl solution could have clinical consequences; however, this remains to be established by quality randomized controlled trials. PMID:26999998

  17. Production of anhydrous aluminum chloride composition

    DOEpatents

    Vandergrift, G.F. III; Krumpelt, M.; Horwitz, E.P.

    1981-10-08

    A process is described for producing an anhydrous aluminum chloride composition from a water-based aluminous material such as a slurry of aluminum hydroxide in a multistage extraction process in which the aluminum ion is first extracted into an organic liquid containing an acidic extractant and then extracted from the organic phase into an alkali metal chloride or chlorides to form a melt containing a mixture of chlorides of alkali metal and aluminum. In the process, the organic liquid may be recycled. In addition, the process advantageously includes an electrolysis cell for producing metallic aluminum and the alkali metal chloride or chlorides may be recycled for extraction of the aluminum from the organic phase.

  18. Chloride transport in human red cells.

    PubMed Central

    Dalmark, M

    1975-01-01

    1. The chloride equilibrium flux (chloride self-exchange) was determined by measuring the rate of 36Cl efflux from radioactively labelled human red cells. The cellular chloride concentration was varied between 5 and 700 mM by the nystatin technique (Cass & Dalmark, 1973). The chloride transport capacity was not affected by the nystatin technique. 2. The chloride equilibrium flux showed saturation kinetics in the pH range between 6-2 and 9-2 (0 degrees C). The chloride transport decreased at chloride concentrations higher than those which gave the maximum transport. 3. The apparent half-saturation constant, (K1/2), depended on the pH and whether the chloride transport was perceived as a function of the chloride concentration in the medium or in the cell water. The (K1/2)m increased and the (K1/2)c decreased with increasing pH. The dependence of the chloride transport on the chloride concentration was described by Michaelis-Menten kinetics at pH 7-2, but at values of pH outside pH 7-8 S-shaped or steeper graphs were observed. 4. The chloride equilibrium flux varied with the pH at constant chloride concentration in the medium (pH 5-7-9-5). The transport had a bell-shaped pH dependence at chloride concentrations below 200 mM. At chloride concentrations between 300 and 600 mM the chloride transport increased with increasing pH to reach a plateau around pH 8. The position of the acidic branches of the pH graphs was independent of the chloride concentration (25-600 mM), but the position of the alkaline branches moved towards higher values of pH with increasing chloride concentration (5-150 mM). Thus, the position of the pH optimum increased with increasing chloride concentration. The chloride transport at low pH values was a function of the inverse second power of the hydrogen ion concentration. The pK of the groups which caused the inhibition was approximately 6 and independent of the temperature (0-18 degrees C). 5. The chloride equilibrium flux as a function of

  19. The gastric H,K-ATPase blocker lansoprazole is an inhibitor of chloride channels

    PubMed Central

    Schmarda, Andreas; Dinkhauser, Patrick; Gschwentner, Martin; Ritter, Markus; Fürst, Johannes; Scandella, Elke; Wöll, Ewald; Laich, Andreas; Rossmann, Heidi; Seidler, Ursula; Lang, Florian; Paulmichl, Markus

    2000-01-01

    It was postulated that swelling dependent chloride channels are involved in the proton secretion of parietal cells. Since omeprazole, lansoprazole and its acid activated sulphenamide form AG2000 are structurally related to phenol derivatives known to block swelling dependent chloride channels, we set out to test, whether these substances – which are known to block the H,K-ATPase – could also lead to an inhibition of swelling-dependent chloride channels. Swelling-dependent chloride channels – characterized in many different cell types – show highly conserved biophysical and pharmacological features, therefore we investigated the effect of omeprazole, lansoprazole and its acid activated sulphenamide form AG2000 on swelling-dependent chloride channels elicited in fibroblasts, after the reduction of the extracellular osmolarity. Omeprazole, lansoprazole and its acid activated sulphenamide form AG2000 are able to block swelling-dependent chloride channels (IClswell). Lansoprazole and its protonated metabolite AG2000 act on at least two different sites of the IClswell protein: on an extracellular site which seems to be in a functional proximity to the nucleotide binding site, and on an intracellular site which allows the formation of disulfide-bridges. The inhibition of the proton pump and the simultaneous blocking of chloride channels by omeprazole, lansoprazole and its acid activated sulphenamide form AG2000, as described here could be an effective mode to restrict proton secretion in parietal cells. PMID:10711360

  20. Indium-111 chloride imaging with ununited fractures

    SciTech Connect

    Sayle, B.A.; Fawcett, H.D.; Yudt, W.M.; Wang, S.C.; Mader, J.T.; Cierny, G. 3d.

    1987-03-01

    Twenty patients with ununited fractures and a suspicion of infection had In-111 chloride imaging. Surgically obtained cultures were positive for infection in 12 and negative in eight patients. In-111 chloride images were positive in all 12 patients with infection but also were positive in six of the patients with negative cultures. It is not possible to differentiate infected from noninfected ununited fractures by In-111 chloride imaging.

  1. Metal chloride cathode for a battery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bugga, Ratnakumar V. (Inventor); Distefano, Salvador (Inventor); Bankston, C. Perry (Inventor)

    1991-01-01

    A method of fabricating a rechargeable battery is disclosed which includes a positive electrode which contains a chloride of a selected metal when the electrode is in its active state. The improvement comprises fabricating the positive electrode by: providing a porous matrix composed of a metal; providing a solution of the chloride of the selected metal; and impregnating the matrix with the chloride from the solution.

  2. Enrofloxacin hydro-chloride dihydrate.

    PubMed

    Miranda-Calderón, Jorge E; Gutiérrez, Lilia; Flores-Alamo, Marcos; García-Gutiérrez, Ponciano; Sumano, Héctor

    2014-04-01

    The asymmetric unit of the title compound, C19H23FN3O3 (+)·Cl(-)·2H2O [systematic name: 4-(3-carb-oxy-1-cyclo-propyl-6-fluoro-4-oxo-1,4-di-hydro-quin-o-lin-7-yl)-1-ethyl-piperazin-1-ium chloride dihydrate], consists of two independent monocations of the protonated enrofloxacin, two chloride anions and four water mol-ecules. In the cations, the piperazinium rings adopt chair conformations and the dihedral angles between the cyclo-propyl ring and the 10-membered quinoline ring system are 56.55 (2) and 51.11 (2)°. An intra-molecular O-H⋯O hydrogen bond is observed in each cation. In the crystal, the components are connected via O-H⋯Cl, N-H⋯Cl and O-H⋯O hydrogen bonds, and a π-π inter-action between the benzene rings [centroid-centroid distance = 3.6726 (13) Å], resulting in a three-dimensional array. PMID:24826167

  3. Irreversible gettering of thionyl chloride

    SciTech Connect

    LeRoy Whinnery; Steve Goods; George Buffleben; Tim Sheppodd

    1999-11-01

    The authors have successfully demonstrated the irreversible gettering of SOCl{sub 2} by ZnO/ASZMTEDA carbon over a modest temperature range. While thionyl chloride decomposition was slow below {minus}20 C, lower temperatures are expected to be less of a problem than at higher temperatures. The approximately 30 cc of thionyl chloride in a typical D-cell would require 50 g of ZnO and 107 g of ASZMTEDA carbon. Fortunately, since it is unlikely to happen at all, it is common practice to assume only one cell will fail (leak) in a given battery pack. So, one charge of getter can protect the whole battery pack. In summary, ZnO/ASZMTEDA carbon fulfills all of the requirements of an ideal getter including: irreversible binding or reaction with SOCl{sub 2}, high volumetric uptake capacity, high efficiency, non-volatile, air stable, insensitive to poisoning, non-toxic, cheap, non-corrosive, and the gettering product is not a liquid or oil that could block further flow or accessibility. Future work in this area includes incorporation of the ZnO and carbon into a structural open-celled porous monolith, as well as, gettering for other types of batteries (e.g., Li/MnO{sub 2}).

  4. Arsenic removal by ferric chloride

    SciTech Connect

    Hering, J.G.; Chen, P.Y.; Wilkie, J.A.; Elimelech, M.; Liang, S.

    1996-04-01

    Bench-scale studies were conducted in model freshwater systems to investigate how various parameters affected arsenic removal during coagulation with ferric chloride and arsenic adsorption onto preformed hydrous ferric oxide. Parameters included arsenic oxidation state and initial concentration, coagulant dosage or adsorbent concentration, pH, and the presence of co-occurring inorganic solutes. Comparison of coagulation and adsorption experiments and of experimental results with predictions based on surface complexation modeling demonstrated that adsorption is an important (though not the sole) mechanism governing arsenic removal during coagulation. Under comparable conditions, better removal was observed with arsenic(V) [As(V)] than with arsenic(III) [As(III)] in both coagulation and adsorption experiments. Below neutral pH values, As(III) removal-adsorption was significantly decreased in the presence of sulfate, whereas only a slight decrease in As(V) removal-adsorption was observed. At high pH, removal-adsorption of As(V) was increased in the presence of calcium. Removal of As(V) during coagulation with ferric chloride is both more efficient and less sensitive than that of As(III) to variations in source water composition.

  5. Sodium chloride's effect on self-assembly of diphenylalanine bilayer.

    PubMed

    Kwon, Junpyo; Lee, Myeongsang; Na, Sungsoo

    2016-07-15

    Understanding self-assembling peptides becomes essential in nanotechnology, thereby providing a bottom-up method for fabrication of nanostructures. Diphenylalanine constitutes an outstanding building block that can be assembled into various nanostructures, including two-dimensional bilayers or nanotubes, exhibiting superb mechanical properties. It is known that the effect of the ions is critical in conformational and chemical interactions of bilayers or membranes. In this study, we analyzed the effect of sodium chloride on diphenylalanine bilayer using coarse-grained molecular dynamics simulations, and calculated the bending Young's modulus and the torsional modulus by applying normal modal analysis using an elastic network model. The results showed that sodium chloride dramatically increases the assembling efficiency and stability, thereby promising to allow the precise design and control of the fabrication process and properties of bio-inspired materials. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:27241039

  6. Production of chlorine from chloride salts

    DOEpatents

    Rohrmann, Charles A.

    1981-01-01

    A process for converting chloride salts and sulfuric acid to sulfate salts and elemental chlorine is disclosed. A chloride salt and sulfuric acid are combined in a furnace where they react to produce a sulfate salt and hydrogen chloride. Hydrogen chloride from the furnace contacts a molten salt mixture containing an oxygen compound of vanadium, an alkali metal sulfate and an alkali metal pyrosulfate to recover elemental chlorine. In the absence of an oxygen-bearing gas during the contacting, the vanadium is reduced, but is regenerated to its active higher valence state by separately contacting the molten salt mixture with an oxygen-bearing gas.

  7. Chloride ingress in cement paste and mortar

    SciTech Connect

    Jensen, O.M.; Hansen, P.F.; Coats, A.M.; Glasser, F.P.

    1999-09-01

    In this paper chloride ingress in cement paste and mortar is followed by electron probe microanalysis. The influence of several paste and exposure parameters on chloride ingress are examined (e.g., water-cement ratio, silica fume addition, exposure time, and temperature). The measurements are modelled on Fick's law modified by a term for chloride binding. Inclusion of chloride binding significantly improves the profile shape of the modelled ingress profiles. The presence of fine aggregate and formation of interfacial transition zones at paste-aggregate boundaries does not significantly affect diffusion rates.

  8. Fabrication Of Metal Chloride Cathodes By Sintering

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bugga, Ratnakumar V.; Di Stefano, Salvador; Bankston, C. Perry

    1992-01-01

    Transition-metal chloride cathodes for use in high-temperature rechargeable sodium batteries prepared by sintering transition-metal powders mixed with sodium chloride. Need for difficult and dangerous chlorination process eliminated. Proportions of transition metal and sodium chloride in mixture adjusted to suit specific requirements. Cathodes integral to sodium/metal-chloride batteries, which have advantages over sodium/sulfur batteries including energy densities, increased safety, reduced material and thermal-management problems, and ease of operation and assembly. Being evaluated for supplying electrical power during peak demand and electric vehicles.

  9. Field and laboratory evidence for intrinsic biodegradation of vinyl chloride contamination in a Fe(III)-reducing aquifer

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bradley, P.M.; Chapelle, F.H.; Wilson, J.T.

    1998-01-01

    Intrinsic bioremediation of chlorinated ethenes in anaerobic aquifers previously has not been considered feasible, due, in large part, to 1) the production of vinyl chloride during microbial reductive dechlorination of higher chlorinated contaminants and 2) the apparent poor biodegradability of vinyl chloride under anaerobic conditions. In this study, a combination of field geochemical analyses and laboratory radiotracer ([1,2-14C] vinyl chloride) experiments was utilized to assess the potential for intrinsic biodegradation of vinyl chloride contamination in an Fe(III)-reducing, anaerobic aquifer. Microcosm experiments conducted under Fe(III)-reducing conditions with material from the Fe(III)-reducing, chlorinated-ethene contaminated aquifer demonstrated significant oxidation of [1,2-14C] vinyl chloride to 14CO2 with no detectable production of ethene or other reductive dehalogenation products. Rates of degradation derived from the microcosm experiments (0.9-1.3% d-1) were consistent with field-estimated rates (0.03-0.2% d-1) of apparent vinyl chloride degradation. Field estimates of apparent vinyl chloride biodegradation were calculated using two distinct approaches; 1) a solute dispersion model and 2) a mass balance assessment. These findings demonstrate that degradation under Fe(III) reducing conditions can be an environmentally significant mechanism for intrinsic bioremediation of vinyl chloride in anaerobic ground-water systems.

  10. Impact of reaction parameters on the chemical profile of 3,4-methylenedioxymethamphetamine synthesized via reductive amination: target analysis based on GC-qMS compared to non-targeted analysis based on GC×GC-TOF-MS.

    PubMed

    Schäffer, M; Dieckmann, S; Pütz, M; Kohles, T; Pyell, U; Zimmermann, R

    2013-12-10

    The most common clandestine manufacturing procedure for the ecstasy derivative 3,4-methylenedioxymethamphetamine (MDMA), is the reductive amination of piperonylmethylketone (PMK) via platinum(IV) oxide/hydrogen. Deviations of the reaction conditions during the synthesis may result in different chemical profiles of the products. The chemical analysis of these profiles is an important objective for forensic drug intelligence. In this work we studied the impact of a systematic variation of the hydrogenation time, the reaction temperature and the precursor batch on the resulting organic chemical profiles of the MDMA bases and MDMA hydrochlorides. Target analysis was based on a gas chromatography mass spectrometry (GC-MS) method which was harmonized during the European project CHAMP.(2) In addition, samples were analyzed by comprehensive two-dimensional gas chromatography time-of-flight mass spectrometry (GC×GC-TOFMS) and subjected to non-targeted data analysis for a comprehensive analysis of the complete profiles. The reaction temperature, followed by the used precursor batch, revealed the highest impact on the chemical profile. The effect on individual impurity compounds is discussed in detail. With respect to the interpretation of the data, the profiles were compared to the profiles of MDMA samples obtained by reductive amination using sodium borohydride ("cold method") and aluminium/mercury amalgam as alternative reducing agents. Non-targeted analysis revealed that the discrimination according to the synthetic route and the batch of precursor used for the synthesis strongly depends on the selected target compounds. PMID:24314521

  11. 310 Facility chemical specifications

    SciTech Connect

    Hagerty, K.J.

    1997-05-21

    The 300 area Treated Effluent Disposal Facility (TEDF) was designed and built to treat the waste water from the 300 area process sewer system. Several treatment technologies are employed to remove the trace quantities of contaminants in the stream, including iron coprecipitation, clarification, filtration, ion exchange, and ultra violet light/hydrogen peroxide oxidation of organics. The chemicals that will be utilized in the treatment process are hydrogen peroxide, sulfuric acid, sodium hydroxide, and ferric chloride. This document annotates the required chemical characteristics of TEDF bulk chemicals as well as the criteria that were used to establish these criteria. The chemical specifications in appendix B are generated from this information.

  12. Effects of different operating parameters on the particle size of silver chloride nanoparticles prepared in a spinning disk reactor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dabir, Hossein; Davarpanah, Morteza; Ahmadpour, Ali

    2015-07-01

    The aim of this research was to present an experimental method for large-scale production of silver chloride nanoparticles using spinning disk reactor. Silver nitrate and sodium chloride were used as the reactants, and the protecting agent was gelatin. The experiments were carried out in a continuous mode by injecting the reactants onto the surface of the spinning disk, where a chemical precipitation reaction took place to form AgCl particles. The effects of various operating variables, including supersaturation, disk rotational speed, reactants flow rate, disk diameter, and excess ions, on the particle size of products were investigated. In addition, the AgCl nanoparticles were characterized by scanning electron microscopy, energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy, and X-ray diffraction. According to the results, smaller AgCl particles are obtained under higher supersaturations and also higher disk rotation speeds. Moreover, in the range of our investigation, the use of lower reactants flow rates and larger disk diameter can reduce the particle size of products. The non-stoichiometric condition of reactants has a significant influence on the reduction in particle aggregation. It was also found that by optimizing the operating conditions, uniform AgCl nanoparticles with the mean size of around 37 nm can be produced.

  13. Fixation of lead chloride on kaolinite and bentonite at temperatures between 550 and 950 C

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, J.; Takarada, Takayuki

    2000-02-01

    Vaporization of lead chloride (PbCl{sub 2}) on sorbents was carried out at linearly rising temperatures in flowing nitrogen with the use of a thermogravimetric apparatus. A modeling method has been proposed to depict the vaporization rate of lead chloride and to calculate the fraction of lead chloride fixed on sorbents during heat-up. The results revealed that dehydrated kaolinite (metakaolinite) had a moderate ability to fix lead chloride while fresh kaolinite showed a significantly increased fixation ability. The lead component formed by reaction with kaolinite or dehydrated kaolinite could hardly volatilize, even at a temperature up to 1,200 C. Bentonite also showed the moderate effectiveness for capturing lead chloride. However, at least part of the components or reaction products adsorbed on bentonite appeared to be thermally unstable and could volatilize gradually with a prolonged heating time at elevated temperatures. It was seen that during dehydroxylation of kaolinite, part of the chloride was released in the form of hydrochloric acid. Chemically bound water in kaolinite appeared to dramatically promote its reaction with lead chloride.

  14. Use of HPLC/UPLC-spectrophotometry for detection of formazan in in vitro Reconstructed human Tissue (RhT)-based test methods employing the MTT-reduction assay to expand their applicability to strongly coloured test chemicals.

    PubMed

    Alépée, N; Barroso, J; De Smedt, A; De Wever, B; Hibatallah, J; Klaric, M; Mewes, K R; Millet, M; Pfannenbecker, U; Tailhardat, M; Templier, M; McNamee, P

    2015-06-01

    A number of in vitro test methods using Reconstructed human Tissues (RhT) are regulatory accepted for evaluation of skin corrosion/irritation. In such methods, test chemical corrosion/irritation potential is determined by measuring tissue viability using the photometric MTT-reduction assay. A known limitation of this assay is possible interference of strongly coloured test chemicals with measurement of formazan by absorbance (OD). To address this, Cosmetics Europe evaluated use of HPLC/UPLC-spectrophotometry as an alternative formazan measurement system. Using the approach recommended by the FDA guidance for validation of bio-analytical methods, three independent laboratories established and qualified their HPLC/UPLC-spectrophotometry systems to reproducibly measure formazan from tissue extracts. Up to 26 chemicals were then tested in RhT test systems for eye/skin irritation and skin corrosion. Results support that: (1) HPLC/UPLC-spectrophotometry formazan measurement is highly reproducible; (2) formazan measurement by HPLC/UPLC-spectrophotometry and OD gave almost identical tissue viabilities for test chemicals not exhibiting colour interference nor direct MTT reduction; (3) independent of the test system used, HPLC/UPLC-spectrophotometry can measure formazan for strongly coloured test chemicals when this is not possible by absorbance only. It is therefore recommended that HPLC/UPLC-spectrophotometry to measure formazan be included in the procedures of in vitro RhT-based test methods, irrespective of the test system used and the toxicity endpoint evaluated to extend the applicability of these test methods to strongly coloured chemicals. PMID:25701760

  15. XAFS Studies of Ni Ta and Nb Chlorides in the Ionic Liquid 1-Ethyl-3-Methyl Imidazolium Chloride / Aluminum Chloride

    SciTech Connect

    W OGrady; D Roeper; K Pandya; G Cheek

    2011-12-31

    The structures of anhydrous nickel, niobium, and tantalum chlorides have been investigated in situ in acidic and basic ionic liquids (ILs) of 1-methyl-3-ethylimidazolium chloride (EMIC)/AlCl{sub 3} with X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS). The coordination of NiCl{sub 2} changes from tetrahedral in basic solution to octahedral in acidic solution. The NiCl{sub 2} is a strong Lewis acid in that it can induce the AlCl{sub 3} to share its chlorides in the highly acidic IL, forming a structure with six near Cl{sup -} ions and eight further distant Al ions which share the chloride ions surrounding the Ni{sup 2+}. When Nb{sub 2}Cl{sub 10}, a dimer, is added to the acidic or basic solution, the dimer breaks apart and forms two species. In the acid solution, two trigonal bipyramids are formed with five equal chloride distances, while in the basic solution, a square pyramid with four chlorides forming a square base and one shorter axial chloride bond. Ta{sub 2}Cl{sub 10} is also a dimer and divides into half in the acidic solution and forms two trigonal bipyramids. In the basic solution, the dimer breaks apart but the species formed is sufficiently acidic that it attracts two additional chloride ions and forms a seven coordinated tantalum species.

  16. Corneal Neurotoxicity Due to Topical Benzalkonium Chloride

    PubMed Central

    Sarkar, Joy; Chaudhary, Shweta; Namavari, Abed; Ozturk, Okan; Chang, Jin-Hong; Yco, Lisette; Sonawane, Snehal; Khanolkar, Vishakha; Hallak, Joelle; Jain, Sandeep

    2012-01-01

    Purpose. The aim of this study was to determine and characterize the effect of topical application of benzalkonium chloride (BAK) on corneal nerves in vivo and in vitro. Methods. Thy1-YFP+ neurofluorescent mouse eyes were treated topically with vehicle or BAK (0.01% or 0.1%). Wide-field stereofluorescence microscopy was performed to sequentially image the treated corneas in vivo every week for 4 weeks, and changes in stromal nerve fiber density (NFD) and aqueous tear production were determined. Whole-mount immunofluorescence staining of corneas was performed with antibodies to axonopathy marker SMI-32. Western immunoblot analyses were performed on trigeminal ganglion and corneal lysates to determine abundance of proteins associated with neurotoxicity and regeneration. Compartmental culture of trigeminal ganglion neurons was performed in Campenot devices to determine whether BAK affects neurite outgrowth. Results. BAK-treated corneas exhibited significantly reduced NFD and aqueous tear production, and increased inflammatory cell infiltration and fluorescein staining at 1 week (P < 0.05). These changes were most significant after 0.1% BAK treatment. The extent of inflammatory cell infiltration in the cornea showed a significant negative correlation with NFD. Sequential in vivo imaging of corneas showed two forms of BAK-induced neurotoxicity: reversible neurotoxicity characterized by axonopathy and recovery, and irreversible neurotoxicity characterized by nerve degeneration and regeneration. Increased abundance of beta III tubulin in corneal lysates confirmed regeneration. A dose-related significant reduction in neurites occurred after BAK addition to compartmental cultures of dissociated trigeminal ganglion cells. Although both BAK doses (0.0001% and 0.001%) reduced nerve fiber length, the reduction was significantly more with the higher dose (P < 0.001). Conclusion. Topical application of BAK to the eye causes corneal neurotoxicity, inflammation, and reduced aqueous

  17. Experimental and quantum-chemical studies of 1H, 13C and 15N NMR coordination shifts in Pd(II) and Pt(II) chloride complexes with methyl and phenyl derivatives of 2,2'-bipyridine and 1,10-phenanthroline.

    PubMed

    Pazderski, Leszek; Tousek, Jaromír; Sitkowski, Jerzy; Kozerski, Lech; Szłyk, Edward

    2007-12-01

    1H, 13C and 15N NMR studies of platinide(II) (M=Pd, Pt) chloride complexes with methyl and phenyl derivatives of 2,2'-bipyridine and 1,10-phenanthroline [LL=4,4'-dimethyl-2,2'-bipyridine (dmbpy); 4,4'-diphenyl-2,2'-bipyridine (dpbpy); 4,7-dimethyl-1,10-phenanthroline (dmphen); 4,7-diphenyl-1,10-phenanthroline (dpphen)] having a general [M(LL)Cl2] formula were performed and the respective chemical shifts (delta1H, delta13C, delta15N) reported. 1H high-frequency coordination shifts (Delta1Hcoord=delta1Hcomplex-delta1Hligand) were discussed in relation to the changes of diamagnetic contribution in the relevant 1H shielding constants. The comparison to literature data for similar [M(LL)(XX)], [M(LL)X2] and [M(LL)XY] coordination or organometallic compounds containing various auxiliary ligands revealed a large dependence of delta1H parameters on inductive and anisotropic effects. 15N low-frequency coordination shifts (Delta15Ncoord=delta 15Ncomplex-delta15Nligand) of ca 88-96 ppm for M=Pd and ca 103-111 ppm for M=Pt were attributed to both the decrease of the absolute value of paramagnetic contribution and the increase of the diamagnetic term in the expression for 15N shielding constants. The absolute magnitude of Delta15Ncoord parameter increased by ca 15 ppm upon Pd(II)-->Pt(II) transition and by ca 6-7 ppm following dmbpy-->dmphen or dpbpy-->dpphen ligand replacement; variations between analogous complexes containing methyl and phenyl ligands (dmbpy vs dpbpy; dmphen vs dpphen) did not exceed+/-1.5 ppm. Experimental 1H, 13C, 15N NMR chemical shifts were compared to those quantum-chemically calculated by B3LYP/LanL2DZ+6-31G**//B3LYP/LanL2DZ+6-31G*, both in vacuo and in DMSO or DMF solution. PMID:18044804

  18. Chloride substitution in sodium borohydride

    SciTech Connect

    Ravnsbaek, Dorthe B.; Rude, Line H.; Jensen, Torben R.

    2011-07-15

    The dissolution of sodium chloride and sodium borohydride into each other resulting in formation of solid solutions of composition Na(BH{sub 4}){sub 1-x}Cl{sub x} is studied. The dissolution reaction is facilitated by two methods: ball milling or combination of ball milling and annealing at 300 deg. C for three days of NaBH{sub 4}-NaCl samples in molar ratios of 0.5:0.5 and 0.75:0.25. The degree of dissolution is studied by Rietveld refinement of synchrotron radiation powder X-ray diffraction (SR-PXD) data. The results show that dissolution of 10 mol% NaCl into NaBH{sub 4}, forming Na(BH{sub 4}){sub 0.9}Cl{sub 0.1}, takes place during ball milling. A higher degree of dissolution of NaCl in NaBH{sub 4} is obtained by annealing resulting in solid solutions containing up to 57 mol% NaCl, i.e. Na(BH{sub 4}){sub 0.43}Cl{sub 0.57}. In addition, annealing results in dissolution of 10-20 mol% NaBH{sub 4} into NaCl. The mechanism of the dissolution during annealing and the decomposition pathway of the solid solutions are studied by in situ SR-PXD. Furthermore, the stability upon hydrogen release and uptake were studied by Sieverts measurements. - Graphical Abstract: Dissolution of sodium chloride and sodium borohydride into each other resulting in formation of solid solutions of composition Na(BH{sub 4}){sub 1-x}Cl{sub x} is studied. Dissolution is facilitated by two methods: ball milling or annealing at 300 deg. C for three days of NaBH{sub 4}-NaCl samples. Sample compositions and dissolution mechanism are studied by Rietveld refinement of synchrotron radiation powder X-ray diffraction data. Highlights: > Studies of dissolution of sodium chloride and sodium borohydride into each other. > Solid state diffusion facilitated by mechanical and thermal treatments. > Dissolution is more efficiently induced by heating than by mechanical treatment. > Mechanism for dissolution studied by Rietveld refinement of in situ SR-PXD data.

  19. Probing Oxygen Activation Sites in Two Flavoprotein Oxidases Using Chloride as an Oxygen Surrogate

    SciTech Connect

    Kommoju, Phaneeswara-Rao; Chen, Zhi-wei; Bruckner, Robert C.; Mathews, F. Scott; Jorns, Marilyn Schuman

    2011-08-16

    A single basic residue above the si-face of the flavin ring is the site of oxygen activation in glucose oxidase (GOX) (His516) and monomeric sarcosine oxidase (MSOX) (Lys265). Crystal structures of both flavoenzymes exhibit a small pocket at the oxygen activation site that might provide a preorganized binding site for superoxide anion, an obligatory intermediate in the two-electron reduction of oxygen. Chloride binds at these polar oxygen activation sites, as judged by solution and structural studies. First, chloride forms spectrally detectable complexes with GOX and MSOX. The protonated form of His516 is required for tight binding of chloride to oxidized GOX and for rapid reaction of reduced GOX with oxygen. Formation of a binary MSOX-chloride complex requires Lys265 and is not observed with Lys265Met. Binding of chloride to MSOX does not affect the binding of a sarcosine analogue (MTA, methylthioactetate) above the re-face of the flavin ring. Definitive evidence is provided by crystal structures determined for a binary MSOX-chloride complex and a ternary MSOX-chloride-MTA complex. Chloride binds in the small pocket at a position otherwise occupied by a water molecule and forms hydrogen bonds to four ligands that are arranged in approximate tetrahedral geometry: Lys265:NZ, Arg49:NH1, and two water molecules, one of which is hydrogen bonded to FAD:N5. The results show that chloride (i) acts as an oxygen surrogate, (ii) is an effective probe of polar oxygen activation sites, and (iii) provides a valuable complementary tool to the xenon gas method that is used to map nonpolar oxygen-binding cavities.

  20. Industrial preparation of poly(vinyl chloride).

    PubMed Central

    Cohan, G F

    1975-01-01

    Vinyl chloride (VCM) is unloaded from railroad tank cars or tank trucks into pressurized storage spheres. VCM, emulsifiers, and catalysts are metered into polymerization vessels wherein PVC is produced through a chemical reaction in an aqueous medium under controlled conditions of temperature and pressure. After the reaction reaches a predetermined completion, the contents are transferred to a secondary vessel wherein steam is injected and the VCM containing vapors are pumped to a recovery system. The VCM-containing vapors are compressed, cooled, condensed, decanted, and recycled to the process for reuse. The stripped PVC resin water slurry is then pumped to blending tanks where the batches from multiple reaction vessels are blended for product uniformity. From the plant tanks the PVC resin water slurry is pumped to a dewatering centrifuge, where approximately 90% of the water is removed and subsequently discharged to the industrial sewer system. The PVC resin wet cake is conveyed from the centrifuge to a flash dryer where essentially all the remaining water is removed. At this point, the dry resin is buoyant in an air stream and enters a two-stage collection system for separation of conveying air. The PVC resin is then screened and air-conveyed to storage for bulk shipment, compounding, or bagging. PMID:1175567

  1. Glutamate-gated Chloride Channels*

    PubMed Central

    Wolstenholme, Adrian J.

    2012-01-01

    Glutamate-gated chloride channels (GluCls) are found only in protostome invertebrate phyla but are closely related to mammalian glycine receptors. They have a number of roles in these animals, controlling locomotion and feeding and mediating sensory inputs into behavior. In nematodes and arthropods, they are targeted by the macrocyclic lactone family of anthelmintics and pesticides, making the GluCls of considerable medical and economic importance. Recently, the three-dimensional structure of a GluCl was solved, the first for any eukaryotic ligand-gated anion channel, revealing a macrocyclic lactone-binding site between the channel domains of adjacent subunits. This minireview will highlight some unique features of the GluCls and illustrate their contribution to our knowledge of the entire Cys loop ligand-gated ion channel superfamily. PMID:23038250

  2. Chloride ion pairs in water

    SciTech Connect

    Dang, L.X.; Pettitt, B.M.

    1987-09-02

    The study of ions in water by statistical mechanical methods has made a significant contribution to the authors understanding of solution chemistry and biological processes in saline solutions. Integral equation methods have been used recently by Pettitt and Rossky to study solvent-averaged forces and the effective interactions or the potentials of mean force (PMF) for the alkali halides in water at infinite dilution. In this communication, they report a quantitative study of the Cl/sup -/-Cl/sup -/ PMF in water with use of an umbrella sampling method and the same Hamiltonian as that used in the integral equation study. The system studied here consists of two chloride ions and 295 water molecules in a rectangular box with periodic boundary conditions and lengths of 25.4, 18.6, and 18.6 A in the x,y,z directions, respectively.

  3. Sodium-metal chloride batteries

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ratnakumar, B. V.; Attia, A. I.; Halpert, G.

    1992-01-01

    It was concluded that rapid development in the technology of sodium metal chloride batteries has been achieved in the last decade mainly due to the: expertise available with sodium sulfur system; safety; and flexibility in design and fabrication. Long cycle lives of over 1000 and high energy densities of approx. 100 Wh/kg have been demonstrated in both Na/FeCl2 and Na/NiCl2 cells. Optimization of porous cathode and solid electrolyte geometries are essential for further enhancing the battery performance. Fundamental studies confirm the capabilities of these systems. Nickel dichloride emerges as the candidate cathode material for high power density applications such as electric vehicle and space.

  4. 29 CFR 1910.1052 - Methylene Chloride.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 6 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Methylene Chloride. 1910.1052 Section 1910.1052 Labor Regulations Relating to Labor (Continued) OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR (CONTINUED) OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH STANDARDS (CONTINUED) Toxic and Hazardous Substances § 1910.1052 Methylene Chloride. This...

  5. 29 CFR 1910.1017 - Vinyl chloride.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 6 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Vinyl chloride. 1910.1017 Section 1910.1017 Labor Regulations Relating to Labor (Continued) OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR (CONTINUED) OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH STANDARDS (CONTINUED) Toxic and Hazardous Substances § 1910.1017 Vinyl chloride. (a) Scope and...

  6. 29 CFR 1915.1017 - Vinyl chloride.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 7 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Vinyl chloride. 1915.1017 Section 1915.1017 Labor Regulations Relating to Labor (Continued) OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR... § 1915.1017 Vinyl chloride. Note: The requirements applicable to shipyard employment under this...

  7. 29 CFR 1926.1117 - Vinyl chloride.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 8 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Vinyl chloride. 1926.1117 Section 1926.1117 Labor... (CONTINUED) SAFETY AND HEALTH REGULATIONS FOR CONSTRUCTION Toxic and Hazardous Substances § 1926.1117 Vinyl chloride. Note: The requirements applicable to construction work under this section are identical to...

  8. 29 CFR 1915.1017 - Vinyl chloride.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 7 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Vinyl chloride. 1915.1017 Section 1915.1017 Labor Regulations Relating to Labor (Continued) OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR... § 1915.1017 Vinyl chloride. Note: The requirements applicable to shipyard employment under this...

  9. 29 CFR 1926.1117 - Vinyl chloride.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 8 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Vinyl chloride. 1926.1117 Section 1926.1117 Labor... (CONTINUED) SAFETY AND HEALTH REGULATIONS FOR CONSTRUCTION Toxic and Hazardous Substances § 1926.1117 Vinyl chloride. Note: The requirements applicable to construction work under this section are identical to...

  10. 29 CFR 1926.1117 - Vinyl chloride.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 8 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Vinyl chloride. 1926.1117 Section 1926.1117 Labor... (CONTINUED) SAFETY AND HEALTH REGULATIONS FOR CONSTRUCTION Toxic and Hazardous Substances § 1926.1117 Vinyl chloride. Note: The requirements applicable to construction work under this section are identical to...

  11. 29 CFR 1915.1017 - Vinyl chloride.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 7 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Vinyl chloride. 1915.1017 Section 1915.1017 Labor Regulations Relating to Labor (Continued) OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR... § 1915.1017 Vinyl chloride. Note: The requirements applicable to shipyard employment under this...

  12. 29 CFR 1915.1017 - Vinyl chloride.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 7 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Vinyl chloride. 1915.1017 Section 1915.1017 Labor Regulations Relating to Labor (Continued) OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR... § 1915.1017 Vinyl chloride. Note: The requirements applicable to shipyard employment under this...

  13. 29 CFR 1926.1117 - Vinyl chloride.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 8 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Vinyl chloride. 1926.1117 Section 1926.1117 Labor... (CONTINUED) SAFETY AND HEALTH REGULATIONS FOR CONSTRUCTION Toxic and Hazardous Substances § 1926.1117 Vinyl chloride. Note: The requirements applicable to construction work under this section are identical to...

  14. 29 CFR 1915.1017 - Vinyl chloride.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 7 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Vinyl chloride. 1915.1017 Section 1915.1017 Labor Regulations Relating to Labor (Continued) OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR... § 1915.1017 Vinyl chloride. Note: The requirements applicable to shipyard employment under this...

  15. 29 CFR 1926.1117 - Vinyl chloride.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 8 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Vinyl chloride. 1926.1117 Section 1926.1117 Labor... (CONTINUED) SAFETY AND HEALTH REGULATIONS FOR CONSTRUCTION Toxic and Hazardous Substances § 1926.1117 Vinyl chloride. Note: The requirements applicable to construction work under this section are identical to...

  16. 21 CFR 184.1426 - Magnesium chloride.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Magnesium chloride. 184.1426 Section 184.1426 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) DIRECT FOOD SUBSTANCES AFFIRMED AS GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE Listing of Specific Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1426 Magnesium chloride. (a)...

  17. 21 CFR 582.5446 - Manganese chloride.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Manganese chloride. 582.5446 Section 582.5446 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS SUBSTANCES GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE Nutrients and/or Dietary Supplements 1 § 582.5446 Manganese chloride....

  18. 21 CFR 582.5252 - Choline chloride.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Choline chloride. 582.5252 Section 582.5252 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS SUBSTANCES GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE Nutrients and/or Dietary Supplements 1 § 582.5252 Choline chloride....

  19. Process for synthesis of beryllium chloride dietherate

    DOEpatents

    Bergeron, Charles; Bullard, John E.; Morgan, Evan

    1991-01-01

    A low temperature method of producing beryllium chloride dietherate through the addition of hydrogen chloride gas to a mixture of beryllium metal in ether in a reaction vessel is described. A reflux condenser provides an exit for hydrogen produced form the reaction. A distillation condenser later replaces the reflux condenser for purifying the resultant product.

  20. Fiber-optic chloride sensor development

    SciTech Connect

    Cosentino, P.; Grossman, B.; Shieh, C.; Doi, S.; Xi, H.; Erbland, P.

    1995-08-01

    Chloride in the form of salt water is a major contaminant of ground water, percolating through landfill liners and causing corrosion of steel. Four fiber-optic sensors capable of detecting chloride concentrations were developed. The most promising sensor detects chloride concentrations from 100 {micro}g/mL to greater than 3,000 {micro}g/mL. This sensor works when the chloride changes a reddish-brown silver chromate strip to white silver chloride. The color change causes the intensity of light propagating through the fiber to increase. The increase is monitored, and a calibration curve depicting light intensity versus chloride concentration results. The most promising sensor was multiplexed to determine the diffusion coefficients of chloride in a saturated sand column. The development, operation, and sensitivity of the sensors are described. Upon further development the sensor could be placed in the soil or in reinforced concrete for insitu monitoring of chloride. The sensor`s advantages over electronic sensors include immunity to corrosion and electromagnetic interference, and the ability for multiplexing sensors onto a single fiber.