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Sample records for chlorine 40

  1. 40 CFR 704.45 - Chlorinated terphenyl.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... means the percent by weight of chlorine for each isomer (ortho, meta, and para). (3) Isomeric ratio... chlorinated terphenyl. (4) A description of the isomeric ratio and extent of chlorination of the...

  2. 40 CFR 704.43 - Chlorinated naphthalenes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... the chlorine atom(s) on the naphthalene. (4) Polychlorinated biphenyl means any chemical substance that is limited to the biphenyl molecule and that has been chlorinated to varying degrees. (5)...

  3. 40 CFR 704.43 - Chlorinated naphthalenes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... the chlorine atom(s) on the naphthalene. (4) Polychlorinated biphenyl means any chemical substance that is limited to the biphenyl molecule and that has been chlorinated to varying degrees. (5)...

  4. 40 CFR 704.43 - Chlorinated naphthalenes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... the chlorine atom(s) on the naphthalene. (4) Polychlorinated biphenyl means any chemical substance that is limited to the biphenyl molecule and that has been chlorinated to varying degrees. (5)...

  5. 40 CFR 704.43 - Chlorinated naphthalenes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... the chlorine atom(s) on the naphthalene. (4) Polychlorinated biphenyl means any chemical substance that is limited to the biphenyl molecule and that has been chlorinated to varying degrees. (5)...

  6. 40 CFR 704.43 - Chlorinated naphthalenes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... the chlorine atom(s) on the naphthalene. (4) Polychlorinated biphenyl means any chemical substance that is limited to the biphenyl molecule and that has been chlorinated to varying degrees. (5)...

  7. Chlorine Inactivation of Adenovirus Type 40 and Feline Calicivirus

    PubMed Central

    Thurston-Enriquez, Jeanette A.; Haas, Charles N.; Jacangelo, Joseph; Gerba, Charles P.

    2003-01-01

    Ct values, the concentration of free chlorine multiplied by time of contact with virus, were determined for free-chlorine inactivation experiments carried out with chloroform-extracted (dispersed) and non-chloroform-extracted (aggregated) feline calicivirus (FCV), adenovirus type 40 (AD40), and polio virus type 1 (PV-1). Experiments were carried out with high and low pH and temperature conditions. Ct values were calculated directly from bench-scale free-chlorine inactivation experiments and from application of the efficiency factor Hom model. For each experimental condition, Ct values were higher at pH 8 than at pH 6, higher at 5°C than at 15°C, and higher for dispersed AD40 (dAD40) than for dispersed FCV (dFCV). dFCV and dAD40 were more sensitive to free chlorine than dispersed PV-1 (dPV-1). Cts for 2 log inactivation of aggregated FCV (aFCV) and aggregated PV-1 (aPV-1) were 31.0 and 2.8 orders of magnitude higher than those calculated from experiments carried out with dispersed virus. Cts for 2 log inactivation of dFCV and dAD40 in treated groundwater at 15°C were 1.2 and 13.7 times greater than in buffered-demand-free (BDF) water experiments at 5°C. Ct values listed in the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Guidance Manual were close to, or lower than, Ct values generated for experiments conducted with dispersed and aggregated viruses suspended in BDF water and for dispersed viruses suspended in treated groundwater. Since the state of viruses in water is most likely to be aggregated and associated with organic or inorganic matter, reevaluation of the EPA Guidance Manual Ct values is necessary, since they would not be useful for ensuring inactivation of viruses in these states. Under the tested conditions, dAD40, dFCV, aFCV, dPV-1, and aPV-1 particles would be inactivated by commonly used free chlorine concentrations (1 mg/liter) and contact times (60 to 237 min) applied for drinking water treatment in the United States. PMID:12839771

  8. Chlorine

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Young, Jay A.

    2004-01-01

    A chemical laboratory information profile (CLIP) of the chemical chlorine, produced in small quantities in the laboratory, is presented. The profile summarizes physical and harmful properties, exposure limits, reactivity risks, and symptoms of major exposure for the benefit of teachers and students using the chemical in the laboratory.

  9. Chlorine

    Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS)

    Chlorine ; CASRN 7782 - 50 - 5 Human health assessment information on a chemical substance is included in the IRIS database only after a comprehensive review of toxicity data , as outlined in the IRIS assessment development process . Sections I ( Health Hazard Assessments for Noncarcinogenic Effects

  10. Chlorine

    SciTech Connect

    Talmage, Sylvia Smith

    2009-01-01

    Following a brief description of the use of chlorine as a chemical warfare agent in World War I, this chapter summarizes physical and chemical data and recent clinical and controlled laboratory studies on the irritant and lethal effects of chlorine. The mechanism of toxicity for both irritation and lethal effects is described. The mathematical relationship between concentration and exposure duration for a set endpoint is given for both an irritancy response and mortality. This information can be used to assist in time-scaling for the set endpoint to other exposure durations. Risk assessment addresses the potential for greater effects in sensitive populations such as asthmatics. A concentration of 0.5 ppm for up to 8 hours is a no-adverse-effect concentration in most sensitive subjects; whereas, a concentration of 1.0 ppm induces some sensory irritation and transient changes in respiratory tract airflow parameters. Treatment and intervention of exposed individuals is dependent upon symptoms

  11. 40 CFR 180.1095 - Chlorine gas; exemptions from the requirement of a tolerance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 24 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Chlorine gas; exemptions from the requirement of a tolerance. 180.1095 Section 180.1095 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION... Exemptions From Tolerances § 180.1095 Chlorine gas; exemptions from the requirement of a tolerance....

  12. 40 CFR 180.1095 - Chlorine gas; exemptions from the requirement of a tolerance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 23 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Chlorine gas; exemptions from the requirement of a tolerance. 180.1095 Section 180.1095 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION... Exemptions From Tolerances § 180.1095 Chlorine gas; exemptions from the requirement of a tolerance....

  13. 40 CFR 180.1095 - Chlorine gas; exemptions from the requirement of a tolerance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 25 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Chlorine gas; exemptions from the requirement of a tolerance. 180.1095 Section 180.1095 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION... Exemptions From Tolerances § 180.1095 Chlorine gas; exemptions from the requirement of a tolerance....

  14. 40 CFR 180.1095 - Chlorine gas; exemptions from the requirement of a tolerance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 24 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Chlorine gas; exemptions from the requirement of a tolerance. 180.1095 Section 180.1095 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION... Exemptions From Tolerances § 180.1095 Chlorine gas; exemptions from the requirement of a tolerance....

  15. 40 CFR 180.1095 - Chlorine gas; exemptions from the requirement of a tolerance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 25 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Chlorine gas; exemptions from the requirement of a tolerance. 180.1095 Section 180.1095 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION... Exemptions From Tolerances § 180.1095 Chlorine gas; exemptions from the requirement of a tolerance....

  16. 40 CFR 266.107 - Standards to control hydrogen chloride (HCl) and chlorine gas (Cl2) emissions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 28 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Standards to control hydrogen chloride... Industrial Furnaces § 266.107 Standards to control hydrogen chloride (HCl) and chlorine gas (Cl2) emissions. (a) General. The owner or operator must comply with the hydrogen chloride (HCl) and chlorine...

  17. 40 CFR 266.107 - Standards to control hydrogen chloride (HCl) and chlorine gas (Cl2) emissions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 27 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Standards to control hydrogen chloride... Industrial Furnaces § 266.107 Standards to control hydrogen chloride (HCl) and chlorine gas (Cl2) emissions. (a) General. The owner or operator must comply with the hydrogen chloride (HCl) and chlorine...

  18. 40 CFR 266.107 - Standards to control hydrogen chloride (HCl) and chlorine gas (Cl2) emissions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 28 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Standards to control hydrogen chloride... Industrial Furnaces § 266.107 Standards to control hydrogen chloride (HCl) and chlorine gas (Cl2) emissions. (a) General. The owner or operator must comply with the hydrogen chloride (HCl) and chlorine...

  19. 40 CFR 266.107 - Standards to control hydrogen chloride (HCl) and chlorine gas (Cl2) emissions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 27 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Standards to control hydrogen chloride... Industrial Furnaces § 266.107 Standards to control hydrogen chloride (HCl) and chlorine gas (Cl2) emissions. (a) General. The owner or operator must comply with the hydrogen chloride (HCl) and chlorine...

  20. 40 CFR 266.107 - Standards to control hydrogen chloride (HCl) and chlorine gas (Cl2) emissions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 26 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Standards to control hydrogen chloride... Industrial Furnaces § 266.107 Standards to control hydrogen chloride (HCl) and chlorine gas (Cl2) emissions. (a) General. The owner or operator must comply with the hydrogen chloride (HCl) and chlorine...

  1. 40 CFR 63.1215 - What are the health-based compliance alternatives for total chlorine?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... alternatives for total chlorine? 63.1215 Section 63.1215 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION... Combustors Other § 63.1215 What are the health-based compliance alternatives for total chlorine? (a) General... chlorine under the procedures prescribed in this section for your hazardous waste combustors other...

  2. 40 CFR 63.1215 - What are the health-based compliance alternatives for total chlorine?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... alternatives for total chlorine? 63.1215 Section 63.1215 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION... Waste Combustors Other § 63.1215 What are the health-based compliance alternatives for total chlorine... total chlorine under the procedures prescribed in this section for your hazardous waste combustors...

  3. 40 CFR 63.1215 - What are the health-based compliance alternatives for total chlorine?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... alternatives for total chlorine? 63.1215 Section 63.1215 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION... Waste Combustors Other § 63.1215 What are the health-based compliance alternatives for total chlorine... total chlorine under the procedures prescribed in this section for your hazardous waste combustors...

  4. 40 CFR 63.1215 - What are the health-based compliance alternatives for total chlorine?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... alternatives for total chlorine? 63.1215 Section 63.1215 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION... Combustors Other § 63.1215 What are the health-based compliance alternatives for total chlorine? (a) General... chlorine under the procedures prescribed in this section for your hazardous waste combustors other...

  5. 40 CFR 141.535 - What if my system uses chloramines, ozone, or chlorine dioxide for primary disinfection?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 23 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false What if my system uses chloramines, ozone, or chlorine dioxide for primary disinfection? 141.535 Section 141.535 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) WATER PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) NATIONAL PRIMARY DRINKING WATER REGULATIONS Enhanced Filtration...

  6. 40 CFR 141.535 - What if my system uses chloramines, ozone, or chlorine dioxide for primary disinfection?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 22 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false What if my system uses chloramines, ozone, or chlorine dioxide for primary disinfection? 141.535 Section 141.535 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) WATER PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) NATIONAL PRIMARY DRINKING...

  7. 40 CFR 141.544 - What if my system uses chloramines, ozone, or chlorine dioxide for primary disinfection?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 22 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false What if my system uses chloramines, ozone, or chlorine dioxide for primary disinfection? 141.544 Section 141.544 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) WATER PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) NATIONAL PRIMARY DRINKING...

  8. 40 CFR 141.544 - What if my system uses chloramines, ozone, or chlorine dioxide for primary disinfection?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 23 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false What if my system uses chloramines, ozone, or chlorine dioxide for primary disinfection? 141.544 Section 141.544 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) WATER PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) NATIONAL PRIMARY DRINKING WATER REGULATIONS Enhanced Filtration...

  9. 40 CFR 141.544 - What if my system uses chloramines, ozone, or chlorine dioxide for primary disinfection?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ..., ozone, or chlorine dioxide for primary disinfection? 141.544 Section 141.544 Protection of Environment... Benchmark § 141.544 What if my system uses chloramines, ozone, or chlorine dioxide for primary disinfection? If your system uses chloramines, ozone or chlorine dioxide for primary disinfection your system...

  10. 40 CFR 141.535 - What if my system uses chloramines, ozone, or chlorine dioxide for primary disinfection?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ..., ozone, or chlorine dioxide for primary disinfection? 141.535 Section 141.535 Protection of Environment... § 141.535 What if my system uses chloramines, ozone, or chlorine dioxide for primary disinfection? If your system uses chloramines, ozone, or chlorine dioxide for primary disinfection, you must...

  11. 40 CFR 141.535 - What if my system uses chloramines, ozone, or chlorine dioxide for primary disinfection?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ..., ozone, or chlorine dioxide for primary disinfection? 141.535 Section 141.535 Protection of Environment... § 141.535 What if my system uses chloramines, ozone, or chlorine dioxide for primary disinfection? If your system uses chloramines, ozone, or chlorine dioxide for primary disinfection, you must...

  12. 40 CFR 141.544 - What if my system uses chloramines, ozone, or chlorine dioxide for primary disinfection?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ..., ozone, or chlorine dioxide for primary disinfection? 141.544 Section 141.544 Protection of Environment... Benchmark § 141.544 What if my system uses chloramines, ozone, or chlorine dioxide for primary disinfection? If your system uses chloramines, ozone or chlorine dioxide for primary disinfection your system...

  13. 40 CFR 141.535 - What if my system uses chloramines, ozone, or chlorine dioxide for primary disinfection?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ..., ozone, or chlorine dioxide for primary disinfection? 141.535 Section 141.535 Protection of Environment... § 141.535 What if my system uses chloramines, ozone, or chlorine dioxide for primary disinfection? If your system uses chloramines, ozone, or chlorine dioxide for primary disinfection, you must...

  14. 40 CFR 141.544 - What if my system uses chloramines, ozone, or chlorine dioxide for primary disinfection?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ..., ozone, or chlorine dioxide for primary disinfection? 141.544 Section 141.544 Protection of Environment... Benchmark § 141.544 What if my system uses chloramines, ozone, or chlorine dioxide for primary disinfection? If your system uses chloramines, ozone or chlorine dioxide for primary disinfection your system...

  15. 40 CFR 63.9914 - What test methods and other procedures must I use to demonstrate initial compliance with chlorine...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... must I use to demonstrate initial compliance with chlorine and hydrochloric acid emission limits? 63... chlorine and hydrochloric acid emission limits? (a) You must conduct each performance test that applies to... the applicable emission limits for chlorine and hydrochloric acid in Table 1 to this subpart, you...

  16. 40 CFR 63.9914 - What test methods and other procedures must I use to demonstrate initial compliance with chlorine...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... must I use to demonstrate initial compliance with chlorine and hydrochloric acid emission limits? 63... chlorine and hydrochloric acid emission limits? (a) You must conduct each performance test that applies to... the applicable emission limits for chlorine and hydrochloric acid in Table 1 to this subpart, you...

  17. 40 CFR 63.9914 - What test methods and other procedures must I use to demonstrate initial compliance with chlorine...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... must I use to demonstrate initial compliance with chlorine and hydrochloric acid emission limits? 63... chlorine and hydrochloric acid emission limits? (a) You must conduct each performance test that applies to... the applicable emission limits for chlorine and hydrochloric acid in Table 1 to this subpart, you...

  18. 40 CFR 63.9914 - What test methods and other procedures must I use to demonstrate initial compliance with chlorine...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... must I use to demonstrate initial compliance with chlorine and hydrochloric acid emission limits? 63... chlorine and hydrochloric acid emission limits? (a) You must conduct each performance test that applies to... the applicable emission limits for chlorine and hydrochloric acid in Table 1 to this subpart, you...

  19. 40 CFR 63.9914 - What test methods and other procedures must I use to demonstrate initial compliance with chlorine...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... must I use to demonstrate initial compliance with chlorine and hydrochloric acid emission limits? 63... chlorine and hydrochloric acid emission limits? (a) You must conduct each performance test that applies to... the applicable emission limits for chlorine and hydrochloric acid in Table 1 to this subpart, you...

  20. 40 CFR 415.60 - Applicability; description of the chlorine and sodium or potassium hydroxide production subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... chlorine and sodium or potassium hydroxide production subcategory. 415.60 Section 415.60 Protection of... MANUFACTURING POINT SOURCE CATEGORY Chlor-alkali Subcategory (Chlorine and Sodium or Potassium Hydroxide Production) § 415.60 Applicability; description of the chlorine and sodium or potassium hydroxide...

  1. 40 CFR 415.60 - Applicability; description of the chlorine and sodium or potassium hydroxide production subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... chlorine and sodium or potassium hydroxide production subcategory. 415.60 Section 415.60 Protection of... MANUFACTURING POINT SOURCE CATEGORY Chlor-alkali Subcategory (Chlorine and Sodium or Potassium Hydroxide Production) § 415.60 Applicability; description of the chlorine and sodium or potassium hydroxide...

  2. 40 CFR 415.60 - Applicability; description of the chlorine and sodium or potassium hydroxide production subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... chlorine and sodium or potassium hydroxide production subcategory. 415.60 Section 415.60 Protection of... MANUFACTURING POINT SOURCE CATEGORY Chlor-alkali Subcategory (Chlorine and Sodium or Potassium Hydroxide Production) § 415.60 Applicability; description of the chlorine and sodium or potassium hydroxide...

  3. 40 CFR 415.60 - Applicability; description of the chlorine and sodium or potassium hydroxide production subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... chlorine and sodium or potassium hydroxide production subcategory. 415.60 Section 415.60 Protection of... MANUFACTURING POINT SOURCE CATEGORY Chlor-alkali Subcategory (Chlorine and Sodium or Potassium Hydroxide Production) § 415.60 Applicability; description of the chlorine and sodium or potassium hydroxide...

  4. 40 CFR 415.60 - Applicability; description of the chlorine and sodium or potassium hydroxide production subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... chlorine and sodium or potassium hydroxide production subcategory. 415.60 Section 415.60 Protection of... MANUFACTURING POINT SOURCE CATEGORY Chlor-alkali Subcategory (Chlorine and Sodium or Potassium Hydroxide Production) § 415.60 Applicability; description of the chlorine and sodium or potassium hydroxide...

  5. 40 CFR 268.33 - Waste specific prohibitions-chlorinated aliphatic wastes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... CFR part 261 as EPA Hazardous Wastes Numbers K174, and K175, soil and debris contaminated with these... 40 CFR 268.45 Table 1 unless the waste is placed in: (1) A Subtitle C monofill containing only K175 wastes that meet all applicable 40 CFR 268.40 treatment standards; or (2) A dedicated Subtitle C...

  6. 40 CFR 268.33 - Waste specific prohibitions-chlorinated aliphatic wastes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... CFR part 261 as EPA Hazardous Wastes Numbers K174, and K175, soil and debris contaminated with these... 40 CFR 268.45 Table 1 unless the waste is placed in: (1) A Subtitle C monofill containing only K175 wastes that meet all applicable 40 CFR 268.40 treatment standards; or (2) A dedicated Subtitle C...

  7. 40 CFR 268.33 - Waste specific prohibitions-chlorinated aliphatic wastes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... CFR part 261 as EPA Hazardous Wastes Numbers K174, and K175, soil and debris contaminated with these... 40 CFR 268.45 Table 1 unless the waste is placed in: (1) A Subtitle C monofill containing only K175 wastes that meet all applicable 40 CFR 268.40 treatment standards; or (2) A dedicated Subtitle C...

  8. 40 CFR 268.33 - Waste specific prohibitions-chlorinated aliphatic wastes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... CFR part 261 as EPA Hazardous Wastes Numbers K174, and K175, soil and debris contaminated with these... 40 CFR 268.45 Table 1 unless the waste is placed in: (1) A Subtitle C monofill containing only K175 wastes that meet all applicable 40 CFR 268.40 treatment standards; or (2) A dedicated Subtitle C...

  9. 40 CFR 268.33 - Waste specific prohibitions-chlorinated aliphatic wastes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... CFR part 261 as EPA Hazardous Wastes Numbers K174, and K175, soil and debris contaminated with these... 40 CFR 268.45 Table 1 unless the waste is placed in: (1) A Subtitle C monofill containing only K175 wastes that meet all applicable 40 CFR 268.40 treatment standards; or (2) A dedicated Subtitle C...

  10. 40 CFR Appendix II to Part 266 - Tier I Feed Rate Screening Limits for Total Chlorine

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 5.3E+01 4.1E+01 10 1.2E+02 6.2E+01 5.8E+01 12 1.3E+02 7.7E+01 7.2E+01 14 1.5E+02 9.1E+01 9.1E+01 16 1.7E+02 1.2E+02 1.1E+02 18 1.9E+02 1.4E+02 1.2E+02 20 2.1E+02 1.8E+02 1.3E+02 22 2.4E+02 2.3E+02 1....8E+02 2.1E+02 35 5.3E+02 9.6E+02 2.6E+02 40 6.2E+02 1.4E+03 3.3E+02 45 8.2E+02 2.0E+03 4.0E+02 50...

  11. 40 CFR Appendix II to Part 266 - Tier I Feed Rate Screening Limits for Total Chlorine

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 5.3E+01 4.1E+01 10 1.2E+02 6.2E+01 5.8E+01 12 1.3E+02 7.7E+01 7.2E+01 14 1.5E+02 9.1E+01 9.1E+01 16 1.7E+02 1.2E+02 1.1E+02 18 1.9E+02 1.4E+02 1.2E+02 20 2.1E+02 1.8E+02 1.3E+02 22 2.4E+02 2.3E+02 1....8E+02 2.1E+02 35 5.3E+02 9.6E+02 2.6E+02 40 6.2E+02 1.4E+03 3.3E+02 45 8.2E+02 2.0E+03 4.0E+02 50...

  12. 40 CFR Appendix II to Part 266 - Tier I Feed Rate Screening Limits for Total Chlorine

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 5.3E+01 4.1E+01 10 1.2E+02 6.2E+01 5.8E+01 12 1.3E+02 7.7E+01 7.2E+01 14 1.5E+02 9.1E+01 9.1E+01 16 1.7E+02 1.2E+02 1.1E+02 18 1.9E+02 1.4E+02 1.2E+02 20 2.1E+02 1.8E+02 1.3E+02 22 2.4E+02 2.3E+02 1....8E+02 2.1E+02 35 5.3E+02 9.6E+02 2.6E+02 40 6.2E+02 1.4E+03 3.3E+02 45 8.2E+02 2.0E+03 4.0E+02 50...

  13. 40 CFR Appendix II to Part 266 - Tier I Feed Rate Screening Limits for Total Chlorine

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 5.3E+01 4.1E+01 10 1.2E+02 6.2E+01 5.8E+01 12 1.3E+02 7.7E+01 7.2E+01 14 1.5E+02 9.1E+01 9.1E+01 16 1.7E+02 1.2E+02 1.1E+02 18 1.9E+02 1.4E+02 1.2E+02 20 2.1E+02 1.8E+02 1.3E+02 22 2.4E+02 2.3E+02 1....8E+02 2.1E+02 35 5.3E+02 9.6E+02 2.6E+02 40 6.2E+02 1.4E+03 3.3E+02 45 8.2E+02 2.0E+03 4.0E+02 50...

  14. 40 CFR Appendix II to Part 266 - Tier I Feed Rate Screening Limits for Total Chlorine

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 5.3E+01 4.1E+01 10 1.2E+02 6.2E+01 5.8E+01 12 1.3E+02 7.7E+01 7.2E+01 14 1.5E+02 9.1E+01 9.1E+01 16 1.7E+02 1.2E+02 1.1E+02 18 1.9E+02 1.4E+02 1.2E+02 20 2.1E+02 1.8E+02 1.3E+02 22 2.4E+02 2.3E+02 1....8E+02 2.1E+02 35 5.3E+02 9.6E+02 2.6E+02 40 6.2E+02 1.4E+03 3.3E+02 45 8.2E+02 2.0E+03 4.0E+02 50...

  15. Chlorine dioxide

    Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS)

    Chlorine dioxide ; CASRN 10049 - 04 - 4 Human health assessment information on a chemical substance is included in the IRIS database only after a comprehensive review of toxicity data , as outlined in the IRIS assessment development process . Sections I ( Health Hazard Assessments for Noncarcinogeni

  16. Chlorine cyanide

    Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS)

    Chlorine cyanide ; CASRN 506 - 77 - 4 Human health assessment information on a chemical substance is included in the IRIS database only after a comprehensive review of toxicity data , as outlined in the IRIS assessment development process . Sections I ( Health Hazard Assessments for Noncarcinogenic

  17. Chlorine-36 in fossil rat urine: An archive of cosmogenic nuclide deposition during the past 40,000 years

    SciTech Connect

    Plummer, M.A.; Phillips, F.M.; Fabryka-Martin, J.

    1997-07-25

    Knowledge of the production history of cosmogenic nuclides, which is needed for geological and archaeological dating, has been uncertain. Measurements of chlorine-36/chlorine ({sup 36}Cl/Cl) ratios in fossil packrat middens from Nevada that are radiocarbon-dated between about 38 thousand years ago (ka) and the present showed that {sup 36}Cl/Cl ratios were higher by a factor of about 2 before {approx} 11 ka. This raises the possibility that cosmogenic production rates just before the close of the Pleistocene were up to 50% higher than is suggested by carbon-14 calibration data. The discrepancy could be explained by addition of low-carbon-14 carbon dioxide to the atmosphere during that period, which would have depressed atmospheric radiocarbon activity. Alternatively, climatic effects on {sup 36}Cl deposition may have enhanced the {sup 36}Cl/Cl ratios. 49 refs., 3 figs.

  18. Chlorine Clues

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    This plot shows that levels of the element chlorine rise dramatically in the deeper rocks lining the walls of the crater dubbed 'Endurance.' The data shown here were taken by the Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity's alpha particle X-ray spectrometer at Endurance and 'Eagle Crater,' the site where Opportunity first landed at Meridiani Planum.

    Opportunity has been inching down the walls of Endurance Crater, investigating distinct layers of rock as it goes for clues to Mars' buried past. The various Endurance layers have been informally labeled 'A' through 'F.' Targets within these layers are listed on the graph along with previous targets from Eagle Crater. All the rocks listed here were observed after they had been drilled by the rover's rock abrasion tool.

    The observations indicate that the elements making up the shallow rock layers of Endurance Crater resemble those of Eagle, while the deeper layers of Endurance possess increasingly higher concentrations of the element chlorine.

    Opportunity will continue to roll deeper into Endurance to see if this puzzling trend continues. Scientists hope the new data will help them figure out how the presence of chlorine fits into the history of water at Endurance Crater.

  19. The Chlorination Quandary

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Josephson, Julian

    1978-01-01

    Current use of chlorination technology to disinfect water supplies can cause the production of undesirable products, among them chloroform and chlorobenzene. Alternatives to this methodology include the use of ozone, chlorine dioxide, and bromine chloride in place of chlorine. Presently, the methods are feasible in developed countries only. (MA)

  20. REVIEW OF CHLORINATED PHENOLS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The chlorinated phenols are a group of 19 isomers composed of phenol with substituted chlorines. These chemicals are readily soluble in organic solvents but only slightly soluble in water, except for the chlorophenate salts. Chlorophenols with less than 3 chlorines are not used e...

  1. First spectra of chlorine, bromine, and iodine in the 1.8- to 4.0-micron region.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Humphreys, C. J.; Paul, E., Jr.

    1972-01-01

    Use of liquid-nitrogen-cooled lead sulfide detectors to extend observations of the first spectra of the halogens in the infrared region as far as 4.0 microns. Descriptions, comprising wavelengths, wave numbers, intensities, and classifications, are presented that serve to close the gap between the upper wavelength limit of the detailed published analyses of these spectra at about 2.5 microns and the groups of recently classified lines near 4 microns, and also to report newly observed lines in the 1.8- to 2.5-micron region made accessible by detectors of improved response characteristics. Listed wavelengths of observed and identified lines are calculated from established values of the energy levels. The descriptions should facilitate the identification of halogen lines in mixed spectra excited in electrodeless tubes containing halogen compounds.

  2. Hydrochloric Acid and the Chlorine Budget of the Lower Stratosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Webster, C.; May, R.; Jaegle, L.; Hu, H.; Sander, S.; Gunson, M.; Toon, G.; Russell, J., III; Stimpfle, R.; Koplow, J.; Salawitch, R.; Michelsen, H.

    1994-01-01

    Concentrations of hc1 measured in the lower stratosphere in 1993 by the ALIAS instrument on the ER-2 aircraft reveal that only 40% of inorganic chlorine (CL sub y, inferred from in situ measurements of organic chlorinated source gases) is present as HC1, significantly lower than model predictions.

  3. Water Treatment Technology - Chlorination.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ross-Harrington, Melinda; Kincaid, G. David

    One of twelve water treatment technology units, this student manual on chlorination provides instructional materials for nine competencies. (The twelve units are designed for a continuing education training course for public water supply operators.) The competencies focus on the following areas: purpose and process of chlorination, chlorine…

  4. Inhalation of chlorine gas.

    PubMed

    Williams, J G

    1997-11-01

    The clinical features of acute chlorine gas inhalation, and its management are reviewed. Current medical views on the chronic effects of an acute overwhelming exposure on lung function (reactive airways dysfunction syndrome), and the more controversial field of lung disease secondary to repeated inhalations of lower concentrations of chlorine gas are discussed. PMID:9519180

  5. Aqueous chlorination of resorcinol

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Heasley, V.L.; Burns, M.D.; Kemalyan, N.A.; Mckee, T.C.; Schroeter, H.; Teegarden, B.R.; Whitney, S.E.; Wershaw, R. L.

    1989-01-01

    An investigation of the aqueous chlorination (NaOCl) of resorcinol is reported. The following intermediates were detected in moderate to high yield at different pH values and varying percentages of chlorination: 2-chloro-, 4-chloro-, 2,4-dichloro-, 4,6-dichloro- and 2,4,6-trichlororesorcinol. Only trace amounts of the intermediates were detected when the chlorination was conducted in the presence of phosphate buffer. This result has significant implications since resorcinol in phosphate buffer has been used as a model compound in several recent studies on the formation of chlorinated hydrocarbons during chlorination of drinking water. Relative rates of chlorination were determined for resorcinol and several of the chlorinated resorcinols. Resorcinol was found to chlorinate only three times faster than 2,4,6-trichlororesorcinol. The structure 2,4,6-trichlororesorcinol was established as a monohydrate even after sublimation. A tetrachloro or pentachloro intermediate was not detected, suggesting that the ring-opening step of such an intermediate must be rapid. ?? 1989.

  6. 40 CFR 141.65 - Maximum residual disinfectant levels.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... MRDL (mg/L) Chlorine 4.0 (as Cl2). Chloramines 4.0 (as Cl2). Chlorine dioxide 0.8 (as ClO2). (b... chlorine dioxide as a disinfectant or oxidant must comply with the chlorine dioxide MRDL beginning January 1, 2002. Subpart H systems serving fewer than 10,000 persons and using chlorine dioxide as...

  7. 40 CFR 141.65 - Maximum residual disinfectant levels.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... MRDL (mg/L) Chlorine 4.0 (as Cl2). Chloramines 4.0 (as Cl2). Chlorine dioxide 0.8 (as ClO2). (b... chlorine dioxide as a disinfectant or oxidant must comply with the chlorine dioxide MRDL beginning January 1, 2002. Subpart H systems serving fewer than 10,000 persons and using chlorine dioxide as...

  8. 40 CFR 141.65 - Maximum residual disinfectant levels.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... MRDL (mg/L) Chlorine 4.0 (as Cl2). Chloramines 4.0 (as Cl2). Chlorine dioxide 0.8 (as ClO2). (b... chlorine dioxide as a disinfectant or oxidant must comply with the chlorine dioxide MRDL beginning January 1, 2002. Subpart H systems serving fewer than 10,000 persons and using chlorine dioxide as...

  9. CHLORINATED SOLVENT PLUME CONTROL

    EPA Science Inventory

    This lecture will cover recent success in controlling and assessing the treatment of shallow ground water plumes of chlorinated solvents, other halogenated organic compounds, and methyl tert-butyl ether (MTBE).

  10. Breathing with chlorinated solvents

    SciTech Connect

    McCarty, P.L.

    1997-06-06

    Chlorinated solvents are effective cleaners and in the past dirted solvents were dumped into landfills, stored in tanks that often leaked, or spilled. As a result the most common contaminants of organic groundwater at hazardous waste sites are the two major chlorinated solvents - tetrachloroethylene (PCE) and trichloroethylene (TCE). Both are suspected carcinogens and both are highly resistant to biodegradation. Now however, there is a report of a bacterium that can remove all of the chlorine atoms from both by halorespiration to form ethene, an innocuous end product. This article goes on to discuss the background of biodegradation of chlorinated compounds, why it is so difficult, and what the future is in this area. 9 refs., 1 fig.

  11. Bugs digest chlorinated organics

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-02-01

    This article describes a new bioreactor that uses a consortium of aerobic bacteria to biodegrade chlorinated aromatic hydrocarbons. Methanotrophic bacteria are cultivated for their MMO enzyme. After the MMO enzyme breaks down the chlorinated organics by oxidation, non-methanotrophic bacteria consume the byproducts. Pilot-scale testing has demonstrated successful treatment of groundwater containing coal-tar constituents, toluene, trichloroethylene, vinyl chlorides, chlorobenzene, and methyl methacrylate from three Superfund sites.

  12. Review of chlorinated phenols

    SciTech Connect

    Exon, J.H.

    1984-12-01

    The chlorinated phenols are a group of 19 isomers composed of phenol with substituted chlorines. These chemicals are readily soluble in organic solvents but only slightly soluble in water, except for the chlorophenate salts. Chlorophenols with less than 3 chlorines are not used extensively except in the production of higher chlorophenols and chlorophenyloxyacetic acid herbicides. Pentachlorophenol and some tetrachlorophenols are used worldwide, primarily as wood preservatives or fungicides. Residues of chlorophenols have been found worldwide in soil, water and air samples, in food products, and in human and animal tissues and body fluids. Environmental contamination with these chemicals occurs from industrial effluents, agricultural runoff, breakdown of chlorophenyloxyacetic acid herbicides and hexachlorobenzene, and from spontaneous formation following chlorination of water for disinfection and deodorization. The acute toxicity of these chemicals is relatively low and little is known concerning their chronic effects. Chlorophenols have not been shown conclusively to be mutagens, teratogens or carcinogens. However, these compounds may act as promotors or cocarcinogens and the immune system is particularly sensitive to their toxic effects. Transplacental exposure to chlorophenols may result in embryotoxicity and abortion. The major mode of toxic action is as uncouplers of oxidative phosphorylation. The toxicity of chlorophenols decreases with decreasing chlorination. These chemicals are mild hepatotoxins and are stored mainly in hepatic and renal tissues.

  13. Percutaneous and oral absorption of chlorinated paraffins in the rat.

    PubMed

    Yang, J J; Roy, T A; Neil, W; Krueger, A J; Mackerer, C R

    1987-09-01

    Parallel percutaneous absorption studies of two 14C-labelled chlorinated paraffins (C18, 50-53% chlorination; C28, 47% chlorination) were carried out in the Sprague-Dawley rat. The dermally applied dose (66 mg/cm2) was approximately equivalent to 2.0 g/kg of body weight. An oral absorption study with the C18-chlorinated paraffin (0.5 g/kg) was carried out in rats for comparison. Less than 1% of the dermally applied dose of [1-14C]polychlorooctadecane (50-53% chlorination) and less than 0.1% of the applied dose of [14,15-14C]polychlorooctacosane (47% chlorination) were recovered in excreta, expired air and tissues after 96 hours. In contrast, approximately 86% of the orally administered dose of [1-14C]polychlorooctadecane (0.5 g/kg) was recovered. These results indicate that rat skin acts as an effective barrier to chlorinated paraffins containing eighteen or more carbons and more than 40% chlorine by weight. The oral absorption of the C18 chlorinated paraffin can be estimated to be nearly 100 times greater than its dermal absorption. Based on current toxicity results from rodent experiments and these present findings, chlorinated paraffins of the type tested would be expected to have little or no effect in animals as a result of dermal exposure. It is reasonable to assume that such chlorinated paraffins are unlikely to be systemically toxic to humans by skin contact under normal conditions of production and use. PMID:3686542

  14. Chlorine characterization and thermal behavior in MSW and RDF.

    PubMed

    Ma, Wenchao; Hoffmann, Gaston; Schirmer, Mattias; Chen, Guanyi; Rotter, Vera Susanne

    2010-06-15

    Chlorine, as a key element causing high temperature corrosion and low efficiency in waste-to-energy plants, and its thermal behavior has widely drawn attention. In this study, the chlorine content in eight fractions of municipal solid waste (MSW) was quantified and characterized using five analytical methods. The influence of the operating temperature, and fuel additives like sulfur and silica on the volatilization of chlorine in combustion process was also investigated. The results showed: these fractions cover a wide range of chlorine content from 0.1 wt.% in wood to >6 wt.% in non-packaging plastics (dry basis). Polyvinylchloride (PVC) from packaging, electrical wire insulation etc. in plastics and chloride salts (mainly NaCl) in kitchen waste are the main sources of organic and inorganic chlorine. The increase of the operating temperature from 700 degrees C to 1000 degrees C has more influence on the HCl formation for kitchen waste than that for PVC. Sulfur addition leads to 20-40% higher HCl formation rate in most fractions. Silica supports the chlorine release at relatively low temperatures between 700 degrees C and 850 degrees C. These findings enhance to understand the thermal behavior of chlorine in MSW and RDF (refuse derived fuel) in waste-to-energy plants and lead to the suggestions for a fuel management for waste derived fuels in order to avoid chlorine induced corrosion. PMID:20171781

  15. Chlorine: state of the art.

    PubMed

    Evans, Richard B

    2005-01-01

    Chlorine is a widely used industrial chemical. Individuals can be exposed to chlorine through transportation accidents, industrial exposures or misuse of domestic cleaners. While most exposed individuals recover normal pulmonary function, chlorine can cause a variety of lung injuries including pulmonary edema, restrictive lung disease, and obstructive disease, including Reactive Airways Dysfunction Syndrome. Residual effects of chlorine exposure are a function of intensity of exposure, minute ventilation during exposure, and host characteristics such as cigarette smoking and atopy. This monograph will summarize uses of chlorine, the potential for accidents, the mechanism of chlorine toxicity in the lung, and review acute and chronic effects of chlorine exposure on the lung, as well as systemic effects of massive chlorine exposure. PMID:16078037

  16. A Visible-Light-Induced α-H Chlorination of Alkylarenes with Inorganic Chloride under NanoAg@AgCl.

    PubMed

    Liu, Shouxin; Zhang, Qi; Li, Huiying; Yang, Yihua; Tian, Xia; Whiting, Andrew

    2015-06-26

    An efficient, photocatalytic chlorination of alkylarene α-H groups using NaCl/HCl as a chlorine source has been developed, which involves a radical mechanism under visible-light (including sunlight) conditions. A chlorine radical is proposed to be formed by an electron transfer from chloride ion to O2 in air through the bandgap hole of the semiconductor AgCl. The chlorination protocol is characterized by its use of natural sunlight or other visible light, mild conditions, cheap source of chlorine, green solvent, and high selectivity. The yield of benzylchloride is 95% with a toluene conversion as high as 40%, which rivals traditional chlorination methods. PMID:26061749

  17. Hydrodesulfurization of chlorinized coal

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kalvinskas, J. J.; Rohatgi, N. K. (Inventor)

    1983-01-01

    A method of desulfurization is described in which high sulfur coals are desulfurized by low temperature chlorinolysis of coal in liquid media, preferably water, followed by hydrodesulfurization at a temperature above 500 C. The coals are desulfurized to an extent of up to 90% by weight and simultaneously dechlorinated to a chlorine content below 0.1% by weight. The product coals have lower volatiles loss, lower oxygen and nitrogen content and higher fixed carbon than raw coals treated with hydrogen under the same conditions. Heating the chlorinated coal to a temperature above 500 C. in inert gas such as nitrogen results in significantly less desulfurization.

  18. Efficient photosensitization by a chlorin-polyoxometalate supramolecular complex.

    PubMed

    Yoon, Il; Kim, Jung Hwa; Li, Jia Zhu; Lee, Woo Kyoung; Shim, Young Key

    2014-01-01

    The 4:1 supramolecular complexed ionic salt between pyridinium chlorin and polyanionic [α-SiMo12O40](4-) exhibits significantly enhanced photodynamic activity against A549 cell lines because of increased singlet oxygen photogeneration through high cellular penetration and localization of the chlorin molecules on the ionic salt into the cancer cell. Confocal laser scanning microscopy images clearly represent a higher uptake and photodynamic effect of this supramolecular complex corresponding to the lower IC50 value compared to the free chlorin. PMID:24320629

  19. Reaction products of chlorine dioxide.

    PubMed Central

    Stevens, A A

    1982-01-01

    Inspection of the available literature reveals that a detailed investigation of the aqueous organic chemistry of chlorine dioxide and systematic identification of products formed during water disinfection has not been considered. This must be done before an informed assessment can be made of the relative safety of using chlorine dioxide as a disinfectant alternative to chlorine. Although trihalomethanes are generally not formed by the action of chlorine dioxide, the products of chlorine dioxide treatment of organic materials are oxidized species, some of which also contain chlorine. The relative amounts of species types may depend on the amount of chlorine dioxide residual maintained and the concentration and nature of the organic material present in the source water. The trend toward lower concentrations of chlorinated by-products with increasing ClO2 concentration, which was observed with phenols, has not been observed with natural humic materials as measured by the organic halogen parameter. Organic halogen concentrations have been shown to increase with increasing chlorine dioxide dose, but are much lower than those observed when chlorine is applied. Aldehydes have been detected as apparent by-products of chlorine dioxide oxidation reactions in a surface water that is a drinking water source. Some other nonchlorinated products of chlorine dioxide treatment may be quinones and epoxides. The extent of formation of these moieties within the macromolecular humic structure is also still unknown. PMID:7151750

  20. Chlorine Dioxide (Gas)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Chlorine dioxide (ClO2) gas is registered by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) as a sterilant for use in manufacturing, laboratory equipment, medical devices, environmental surfaces, tools and clean rooms. Aqueous ClO2 is registered by the EPA as a surface disinfectant and sanitizer fo...

  1. Chlorination of lanthanum oxide.

    PubMed

    Gaviría, Juan P; Navarro, Lucas G; Bohé, Ana E

    2012-03-01

    The reactive system La(2)O(3)(s)-Cl(2)(g) was studied in the temperature range 260-950 °C. The reaction course was followed by thermogravimetry, and the solids involved were characterized by X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, and energy dispersive spectroscopy. The results showed that the reaction leads to the formation of solid LaOCl, and for temperatures above 850 °C, the lanthanum oxychloride is chlorinated, producing LaCl(3)(l). The formation of the oxychloride progresses through a nucleation and growth mechanism, and the kinetic analysis showed that at temperatures below 325 °C the system is under chemical control. The influence of diffusive processes on the kinetics of production of LaOCl was evaluated by studying the effect of the reactive gas flow rate, the mass of the sample, and the chlorine diffusion through the boundary layer surrounding the solid sample. The conversion curves were analyzed and fitted according to the Johnson-Mehl-Avrami description, and the reaction order with respect to the chlorine partial pressure was obtained by varying this partial pressure between 10 and 70 kPa. The rate equation was obtained, which includes the influence of the temperature, chlorine partial pressure, and reaction degree. PMID:22280490

  2. Chlorine dioxide and hemodialysis

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, R.P. . Dept. of Pharmacology and Toxicology)

    1989-05-01

    Because it has little or no tendency to generate carcinogenic trihalomethanes such as chloroform, chlorine dioxide is an attractive alternative to chlorine for drinking water disinfection. There are, however, concerns about its acute toxicity, and the toxic effects of its by-products, chlorite and chlorate. The human experience with chlorine dioxide in both controlled, prospective studies and in actual use situations in community water supplies have as yet failed to reveal adverse health effects. The EPA has recommended standards of 0.06 mg/L for chlorine dioxide and standards of 0.007 mg/L for chlorite and chlorate in drinking water. Among groups who may be at special risk from oxychlorines in drinking water are patients who must undergro chronic extracorporeal hemodialysis. Although even units for home hemodialysis are supposed to be equipped with devices which effectively remove oxychlorines, there is a always a possibility of operator error or equipment failure. When the equipment is adequately maintained, it is likely that dialysis patients will have more intensive exposures from drinking water than from dialysis fluids despite the much larger volumes of water that are involved in dialysis. This paper discusses a hemodialysis and the standards and effects of oxychlorines. 90 refs., 2 tabs.

  3. Chlorine isotope variability in subglacial glasses from Iceland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Halldorsson, S. A.; Barnes, J.; Stefansson, A.; Hilton, D. R.; Hauri, E. H.

    2014-12-01

    Chlorine concentrations tend to be significantly enriched in surface reservoirs relative to that of the mantle. This large contrast in chlorine contents makes primary asthenospheric melts, highly susceptible to contamination by surficial chlorine in shallow-level crustal environments. Indeed, on the basis of both chlorine abundance systematics [e.g., 1], and chlorine isotopes [2], previous researchers have argued for a surficial chlorine component in controlling the chlorine systematics of MORB. In contrast, other studies suggest recycling of ancient chlorine via a subducted, altered oceanic lithospheric component as a means of controlling the chlorine isotope composition of the mantle [3]. So far, very few high precision chlorine isotope data are available from key oceanic islands, which potentially provide access to deeper parts of the mantle and thus allow for testing of the relative role of these ideas. We report new chlorine isotope (reported as δ37Cl; n=22) and abundance data (SIMS) derived from fresh subglacial glasses from Iceland. The glasses, which cover all the currently active volcanic zones of Iceland, span a wide range in their major element composition with MgO contents between 2.1 and 10.0 wt% and chlorine contents, that vary by almost two orders of magnitude, of 17 to 1270 ppm. Chlorine contents show significant correlations (R2 > 0.9) with incompatible elements such as potassium, consistent with earlier observations from Iceland and the adjacent Reykjanes Ridge [4, 5]. δ37Cl values range from -0.6‰ to +1.4‰. Significantly, δ37Cl values strongly correlate with Cl and MgO contents, with low δ37Cl values in samples with low Cl and high MgO concentrations. The data are consistent with mixing between two different reservoirs: a upper mantle reservoir with low Cl concentration and a slightly negative δ37Cl value and a crustal reservoir with a high Cl concentration and enriched in 37Cl. To further investigate the origin of these chlorine isotope

  4. Formation and speciation characteristics of brominated trihalomethanes in seawater chlorination.

    PubMed

    Padhi, R K; Sowmya, M; Mohanty, A K; Bramha, S N; Satpathy, K K

    2012-11-01

    Formation character of brominated-trihalomethanes (Br-THMs) in chlorinated seawater and its dependence on applied chlorine dose, reaction time, and temperature were investigated in the laboratory. Seawater was collected from the east coast of India and a chlorine dose of 1, 3, 5, and 10 ppm was each applied at a temperature of 20, 30, and 40 degrees C to investigate the yield and kinetics of Br-THMs formation. Qualitative and quantitative estimation of THM formation at various intervals of time ranging from 5 min to 168 h was determined by a gas chromatograph equipped with an electron capture detector (GC-ECD). Chlorine dose, chlorine contact time, and reaction temperature positively affected the load of THMs. The ratio of chlorine dose to halogen incorporation decreased from 12% to 5% with increasing applied chlorine dose from 1 to 10 ppm. Significant levels of THMs were found to be formed within 0.5 h of reaction, followed by a very slow rate of formation. Elevated temperature favored both increased rate of formation and overall THM yield. The formation order of different trihalomethane species at all studied temperatures was observed to be bromodichloromethane (CHCl2Br) < dibromochloromethane (CHClBr2) < bromoform (CHBr3). Formation of chloroform was not observed, and bromoform was the dominant (96% to 98%) among the three THM species formed. PMID:23356015

  5. Degradation mechanisms of geosmin and 2-MIB during UV photolysis and UV/chlorine reactions.

    PubMed

    Kim, Tae-Kyoung; Moon, Bo-Ram; Kim, Taeyeon; Kim, Moon-Kyung; Zoh, Kyung-Duk

    2016-11-01

    We conducted chlorination, UV photolysis, and UV/chlorin reactions to investigate the intermediate formation and degradation mechanisms of geosmin and 2-methylisoborneol (2-MIB) in water. Chlorination hardly removed geosmin and 2-MIB, while the UV/chlorine reaction at 254 nm completely removed geosmin and 2-MIB within 40 min and 1 h, respectively, with lesser removals of both compounds during UV photolysis. The kinetics during both UV photolysis and UV/chlorine reactions followed a pseudo first-order reaction. Chloroform was found as a chlorinated intermediate during the UV/chlorine reaction of both geosmin and 2-MIB. The pH affected both the degradation and chloroform production during the UV/chlorine reaction. The open ring and dehydration intermediates identified during UV/chlorine reactions were 1,4-dimethyl-adamantane, and 1,3-dimethyl-adamantane from geosmin, 2-methylenebornane, and 2-methyl-2-bornene from 2-MIB, respectively. Additionally, 2-methyl-3-pentanol, 2,4-dimethyl-1-heptene, 4-methyl-2-heptanone, and 1,1-dichloro-2,4-dimethyl-1-heptane were newly identified intermediates from UV/chlorine reactions of both geosmin and 2-MIB. These intermediates were degraded as the reaction progressed. We proposed possible degradation pathways during the UV photolysis and UV/chlorine reactions of both compounds using the identified intermediates. PMID:27494316

  6. EFFECTS OF OZONE, CHLORINE DIOXIDE, CHLORINE, AND MONOCHLORAMINE ON CRYPTOSPORIDIUM PARVUM OOCYST VIABILITY

    EPA Science Inventory

    Purified Cryptosporidium parvum oocysts were exposed to ozone, chlorine dioxide, chlorine, and monochloramine. xcystation and mouse infectivity were comparatively evaluated to assess oocyst viability. zone and chlorine dioxide more effectively inactivated oocysts than chlorine an...

  7. A comparison of chlorinated organic material produced by chlorine and chlorine dioxide bleaching

    SciTech Connect

    McKaque, A.B.; Reeve, D.W.

    1995-12-31

    Chlorine and chlorine dioxide react differently with pulp during bleaching and produce different types of organic by-products. The main differences are the large reduction in the amount of AOX (adsorbable organic halogen) in the effluent and EOX (extractable organic halogen) in the pulp. This talk reviews the differences in the amounts and types of chlorinated organic by-products produced by the two different bleaching agents.

  8. REACTION OF ACTIVATED CARBON WITH AQUEOUS CHLORINE AND CHLORINE DIOXIDE

    EPA Science Inventory

    The objective of this research was to determine whether aqueous chlorine and chlorine dioxide react with activated carbon, or with compounds adsorbed on activated carbon, to produce compounds that would not form in the absence of activated carbon. The experimental conditions were...

  9. Tropospheric budget of reactive chlorine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Graedel, T. E.; Keene, W. C.

    1995-03-01

    Reactive chlorine in the lower atmosphere (as distinguished from chlorofluorocarbon-derived chlorine in the stratosphere) is important to considerations of precipitation acidity, corrosion, foliar damage, and chemistry of the marine boundary layer. Many of the chlorine-containing gases are difficult to measure, and natural sources appear to dominate anthropogenic sources for some chemical species. As a consequence, no satisfactory budget for reactive chlorine in the lower atmosphere is available. We have reviewed information on sources; source strengths; measurements in gas, aqueous, and aerosol phases; and chemical processes and from those data derive global budgets for nine reactive chlorine species and for reactive chlorine as a whole. The typical background abundance of reactive chlorine in the lower tropospheric is about 1.5 ppbv. The nine species, CH3 Cl, CH3 CCl3, HCl, CHClF2, Cl2* (thought to be HOCl and/or Cl2), CCl2 = CCl2, CH2 Cl2 , COCl2 , and CHCl3, each contribute at least a few percent to that total. The tropospheric reactive chlorine burden of approximately 8.3 Tg Cl is dominated by CH3 Cl (≈45 %) and CH3 CCl3 (≈25 %) and appears to be increasing by several percent per year. By far the most vigorous chlorine cycling appears to occur among seasalt aerosol, HCl, and Cl2*. The principal sources of reactive chlorine are volatilization from seasalt (enhanced by anthropogenically generated reactants), marine algae, volcanoes, and coal combustion (natural sources being thus quite important to the budget). It is anticipated that the concentrations of tropospheric reactive chlorine will continue to increase in the next several decades, particularly near urban areas in the rapidly developing countries.

  10. Chlorine adsorption on Au(111): chlorine overlayer or surface chloride?

    PubMed

    Gao, Weiwei; Baker, Thomas A; Zhou, Ling; Pinnaduwage, Dilini S; Kaxiras, Efthimios; Friend, Cynthia M

    2008-03-19

    We report the first scanning tunneling microscope (STM) investigation, combined with density functional theory calculations, to resolve controversy regarding the bonding and structure of chlorine adsorbed on Au(111). STM experiments are carried out at 120 K to overcome instability caused by mobile species upon chlorine adsorption at room temperature. Chlorine adsorption initially lifts the herringbone reconstruction. At low coverages (<0.33 ML), chlorine binds to the top of Au(111)-(1 x 1) surface and leads to formation of an overlayer with (square root(3) x square root(3))R30 degree structure at 0.33 ML. At higher coverages, packing chlorine into an overlayer structure is no longer favored. Gold atoms incorporate into a complex superlattice of a Au-Cl surface compound. PMID:18290645

  11. Toxicity, pharmacokinetics, and photodynamic properties of chlorin e6

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kostenich, Gennady; Zhuravkin, Ivan N.; Gurinovich, G. P.; Zhavrid, Edvard A.

    1993-03-01

    Toxicity, pharmacokinetics, and the tumor damage effect of chlorin e6 after light irradiation were studied. The results show that chlorin e6 LD50 value in C57Bl mice was 189 +/- 10 mg/kg, in non-inbred white rats it was 99 +/- 14 mg/kg 14 days after the agent iv injection. The concentration of chlorin e6 in blood, liver, kidney, spleen, and tumors (sarcoma M-1 and sarcoma 45) of the rats was determined by the fluorescence method 3, 6, 12, 18, 24, 48, and 72 hours after the agent iv injection at the dose of 10 mg/kg. For this purpose chlorin e6 was extracted from tissues by detergent triton X-100. The depth of necrosis spreading in tumor tissue was evaluated after chlorin e6 injection at the doses of 1 - 10 mg/kg and subsequent irradiation by a krypton laser with light energy density of 90 J/cm2, using the method of vital staining with Evans blue. It was found that depending on the agent dose and time interval between chlorin e6 injection and photoradiation, the depth of tumor necrosis varied from 4.0 to 16.6 mm in sarcoma M-1 and from 5.0 to 15.0 in sarcoma 45.

  12. [Synergistic disinfection of Bacillus subtilis spores by UV irradiation and chlorine].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yong-ji; Liu, Wen-jun; Zhang, Lin

    2006-02-01

    The inactivation effect of Bacillus subtilis spores was studied, both UV irradiation and chlorine disinfection individual and combined application process was examined with laboratory water samples. Results show that only 0.53 lg reduction was achieved by chlorine with CT value of 300 (mg x min)/L, UV irradiation is more effective than that of chlorination, at a UV dose of 40mJ/cm2 results in 3.3 lg reduction. Up to 6.2 lg reduction are achieved with a UV dose of 40mJ/cm2 following by chlorine with CT value of 300 (mg x min)/L. The calculation from the Berenbaum formula verified that the effect of the combined applications of UV irradiation and chlorine in inactivatiing Bacillus subtilis is a kind of synergistic effect. PMID:16686199

  13. Synergistic effect between UV and chlorine (UV/chlorine) on the degradation of carbamazepine: Influence factors and radical species.

    PubMed

    Wang, Wen-Long; Wu, Qian-Yuan; Huang, Nan; Wang, Ting; Hu, Hong-Ying

    2016-07-01

    For successful wastewater reclamation, advanced oxidation processes have attracted attention for elimination of emerging contaminants. In this study, the synergistic treatment with UV irradiation and chlorine (UV/chlorine) was used to degrade carbamazepine (CBZ). Neither UV irradiation alone nor chlorination alone could efficiently degraded CBZ. UV/chlorine oxidation showed a significant synergistic effect on CBZ degradation through generation of radical species (OH and Cl), and this process could be well depicted by pseudo first order kinetic. The degradation rate constants (kobs,CBZ) of CBZ increased linearly with increasing UV irradiance and chlorine dosage. The degradation of CBZ by UV/chlorine in acidic solutions was more efficient than that in basic solutions mainly due to the effect of pH on the dissociation of HOCl and OCl(-) and then on the quantum yields and radical species quenching of UV/chlorine. When pH was increased from 5.5 to 9.5, the rate constants of degradation of CBZ by OH decreased from 0.65 to 0.14 min(-1) and that by Cl decreased from 0.40 to 0.11 min(-1). The rate constant for the reaction between Cl and CBZ was 5.6 ± 1.6 × 10(10) M(-1) s(-1). Anions of HCO3(-) (1-50 mM) showed moderate inhibition of CBZ degradation by UV/chlorine, while Cl(-) did not. UV/chlorine could efficiently degrade CBZ in wastewater treatment plant effluent, although the degradation was inhibited by about 30% compared with that in ultrapure water with chlorine dosage of 0.14-0.56 mM. Nine main oxidation products of the CBZ degradation by UV/chlorine were identified using the HPLC-QToF MS/MS. Initial oxidation products arose from hydroxylation, carboxylation and hydrogen atom abstraction of CBZ by OH and Cl, and were then further oxidized to generate acylamino cleavage and decarboxylation products of acridine and acridione. PMID:27105033

  14. Chlorinated hydrocarbons in peat

    SciTech Connect

    Rapaport, R.A.

    1985-01-01

    Concentrations (ng/g), accumulation rates (ug/m/sup 2/=yr) and burdens were determined for DDT (1,1,1-trichlorophenyl2-2'bis(p-chlorophenyl)ethane), polychlorinated biphenyls. Toxaphene, hexachlorobenzene (HCB) and a,b,g-hexachlorocyclohexanes (HCHs) in peat cores taken across the mid-latitudes of North America. Because peat bogs are ombrotrophic, thereby receiving all contaminant inputs from the atmosphere and because peat cores were dated, atmospheric input functions were constructed for all of the compounds listed above excepting the HCHs. Compound inventories (burdens) in peat cores of PCBs, HCB, HCHs, Toxaphene, DDT, Pb and Zn were compared, indicating a strong influence from areas proximate to industrial sources and the atmospheric transport from source regions. Untransformed parent DDT (p,p' and o,p'-DDT) in surface peat and in precipitation provides evidence for the long range transport of DDT from neighboring countries where use has increased over the past 10-15 years. Present accumulation rates of DDT in peat are about 10-20% of maximum levels associated with peak use in the US around 1960. The DDT input function that was developed can be used to date peat cores. Transformations of DDT and PCBs were also examined in peat cores. First order transformation rates of DDT (p,p' and o,p') to DDD in anaerobic peat core environments ranged from 0.03 to 0.09 yr/sup -1/ with differences related to temperature. Aerobic transformation of PCB congeners in peat cores and microcosms was rapid for 2,3 and several 4 chlorinated congeners (T/sub 1/2 less than or equal to 0.2 to 3 years) and declined with increasing chlorine number.

  15. 46 CFR 151.50-31 - Chlorine.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Chlorine. 151.50-31 Section 151.50-31 Shipping COAST... LIQUID HAZARDOUS MATERIAL CARGOES Special Requirements § 151.50-31 Chlorine. (a) Chlorine barges. Subparts 98.03 and 98.20 of Part 98 of this chapter have been revoked. However, chlorine barges that...

  16. 46 CFR 151.50-31 - Chlorine.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Chlorine. 151.50-31 Section 151.50-31 Shipping COAST... LIQUID HAZARDOUS MATERIAL CARGOES Special Requirements § 151.50-31 Chlorine. (a) Chlorine barges. Subparts 98.03 and 98.20 of Part 98 of this chapter have been revoked. However, chlorine barges that...

  17. 46 CFR 151.50-31 - Chlorine.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Chlorine. 151.50-31 Section 151.50-31 Shipping COAST... LIQUID HAZARDOUS MATERIAL CARGOES Special Requirements § 151.50-31 Chlorine. (a) Chlorine barges. Subparts 98.03 and 98.20 of Part 98 of this chapter have been revoked. However, chlorine barges that...

  18. 46 CFR 151.50-31 - Chlorine.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Chlorine. 151.50-31 Section 151.50-31 Shipping COAST... LIQUID HAZARDOUS MATERIAL CARGOES Special Requirements § 151.50-31 Chlorine. (a) Chlorine barges. Subparts 98.03 and 98.20 of Part 98 of this chapter have been revoked. However, chlorine barges that...

  19. Zebra mussel mortality with chlorine

    SciTech Connect

    Van Benschoten, J.E.; Jensen, J.N.; Harrington, D.; DeGirolamo, D.J.

    1995-05-01

    The rate of mortality of the zebra mussel in response to chlorine is described by a kinetic model that combines a statistical characterization of mussel mortality with a disinfection-type modeling approach. Parameter estimates were made with nine sets of data from experiments conducted in Niagara River water. From the kinetic model, an operational diagram was constructed that describes the time to 95% mortality as a function of chlorine concentration and temperature. Either the model or the diagram can be used to assist utilities in planning chlorination treatments for controlling zebra mussels.

  20. Leaching of oxidic zinc materials with chlorine and chlorine hydrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomas, B. K.; Fray, D. J.

    1981-06-01

    Low grade zinc ores and residues were leached in chlorine water and chlorine hydrate water mixtures. It was found that the rate of leaching Adrar ore and Electric Arc Furnace dust obeyed a shrinking core diffusion model, whereas, the rate of leaching of Turkish ore appeared to be controlled by a surface reaction. In all cases, lead leached with the zinc but the iron oxides remained virtually undissolved.

  1. Gaseous, chlorine-free chlorine dioxide for drinking water

    SciTech Connect

    Gordon, G.; Rosenblatt, A.

    1996-11-01

    The benefits of applying chlorine dioxide (ClO{sub 2}) for the oxidative treatment of drinking water are well established. Chlorine dioxide treated finished water typically has substantially lower trihalomethane (THM) levels because ClO{sub 2} will not form chlorinated organic species as a by-product of disinfection. The THMs that are formed are probably due to chlorine from the generator or chlorine used to maintain a post-disinfection residual. An emerging regulatory issue concerning the formation of disinfection by-products (DBPs) is causing the water industry to set standards for the generation and delivery of ClO{sub 2}. The Federal Register (11 February 1994) contains language developed to limit the production of the unwanted inorganic by-products chlorite (ClO{sub 2}{sup -}), chlorate (ClO{sub 3}{sup -}), and bromate (BrO{sub 3}{sup -}) ions by requiring utilities to maintain high (95%) generation efficiencies and by limiting the amount of excess Cl{sub 2} that can be used during the generation process. The efficiency and excess Cl{sub 2} regulations may be problematic for utilities that over-chlorinate to attain chlorine dioxide high yields. Many utilities will have to decide either to reduce the amount of Cl{sub 2} used to react with sodium chlorite (NaClO{sub 2}), thereby increasing the ClO{sub 2}{sup -} residual in finished water, or over-chlorinate to increase yields and surpass the excess Cl{sub 2} limits.

  2. Effect of chlorination and ultraviolet disinfection on tetA-mediated tetracycline resistance of Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Huang, Jing-Jing; Hu, Hong-Ying; Wu, Yin-Hu; Wei, Bin; Lu, Yun

    2013-02-01

    Antibiotic-resistant bacteria are an emerging threat to public health during drinking water consumption and reclaimed water reuse. Several studies have shown that the proportions of antibiotic-resistant bacteria in waters may increase when exposed to low doses of UV light or chlorine. In this study, inactivation of tetracycline-resistant Escherichia coli and antibiotic-sensitive E. coli by UV disinfection and chlorination was compared to determine the tolerance of tetracycline-resistant E. coli to UV light and chlorine, and tetracycline resistance of a tetracycline-resistant E. coli population was studied under different doses of the disinfectants. Our results showed that relative to antibiotic-sensitive E. coli, tetracycline-resistant E. coli had the same tolerance to UV light and a potentially higher tolerance to chlorination. The mortality frequency distributions of tetracycline-resistant E. coli exposed to tetracycline were shifted by both chlorination and UV disinfection. When compared to the hemi-inhibitory concentrations (IC(50)) of tetracycline-resistant E. coli with no exposure to UV or chlorination, the IC(50) of tetracycline-resistant E. coli treated with tetracycline was 40% lower when inactivation by UV light or chlorination reached 3-log but was 1.18 times greater when inactivation by chlorination reached 4.3-log. Chlorination applied to drinking water or reclaimed water treatment may increase the risk of selection for highly tetracycline-resistant E. coli. PMID:23123077

  3. Process for Photochemical Chlorination of Hydrocarbons

    DOEpatents

    Beanblossom, W S

    1951-08-28

    A process for chlorination of a major portion of the hydrogen atoms of paraffinic hydrocarbons of five or more carbon atoms may be replaced by subjecting the hydrocarbon to the action of chlorine under active light. The initial chlorination is begun at 25 to 30 deg C with the chlorine diluted with HCl. The later stages may be carried out with undiluted chlorine and the temperature gradually raised to about 129 deg C.

  4. CHLORINE INACTIVATION OF BACILLUS ENDOSPORES

    EPA Science Inventory

    The possibility of a bioterrorism event resulting in the release of Bacillus anthracis endospores into a drinking water distribution system necessitates research into means by which these endospores can be inactivated. This study was designed to determine the chlorine resistance...

  5. CHLORINATION OF AQUATIC HUMIC SUBSTANCES

    EPA Science Inventory

    This research program was initiated with the overall objective of increasing our understanding of the chemical structures of aquatic humic material and their behavior during chemical oxidation in particular with chlorine. Experimental methods were devised for the isolation of hum...

  6. IDENTIFICATION OF NEW DRINKING WATER DISINFECTION BY-PRODUCTS FROM OZONE, CHLORINE DIOXIDE, CHLORAMINE, AND CHLORINE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Due to concern over the potential adverse health effects of trihalomethanes (THMs) and other chlorinated by-products in chlorinated drinking water, alternative disinfection methods are being explored. Ozone, chlorine dioxide, and chloramine are currently popular alternatives to ...

  7. EFFECTS OF OZONE, CHLORINE DIOXIDE, CHLORINE, AND MONOCHLORAMINE ON CRYTOSPORIDIUM PARVUM OOCYST VIABILITY

    EPA Science Inventory

    Purified Cryptosporiodium parvum oocysts were exposed to ozone, chlorine dioxide, chlorine, and monochloramine. Excystation and mouse infectivity were compareatively evaluated to assess oocyst viability. Ozone and chlorine dioxide more effectively inactivated oocysts than chlor...

  8. Transformation of iopamidol during chlorination.

    PubMed

    Wendel, Friedrich M; Lütke Eversloh, Christian; Machek, Edward J; Duirk, Stephen E; Plewa, Michael J; Richardson, Susan D; Ternes, Thomas A

    2014-11-01

    The transformation of the iodinated X-ray contrast media (ICM) iopamidol, iopromide, iohexol, iomeprol, and diatrizoate was examined in purified water over the pH range from 6.5 to 8.5 in the presence of sodium hypochlorite, monochloramine, and chlorine dioxide. In the presence of aqueous chlorine, only iopamidol was transformed. All other ICM did not show significant reactivity, regardless of the oxidant used. Chlorination of iopamidol followed a second order reaction, with an observed rate constant of up to 0.87 M(-1) s(-1) (±0.021 M(-1) s(-1)) at pH 8.5. The hypochlorite anion was identified to be the reactive chlorine species. Iodine was released during the transformation of iopamidol, and was mainly oxidized to iodate. Only a small percentage (less than 2% after 24 h) was transformed to known organic iodinated disinfection byproducts (DBPs) of low molecular weight. Some of the iodine was still present in high-molecular weight DBPs. The chemical structures of these DBPs were elucidated via MSn fragmentation and NMR. Side chain cleavage was observed as well as the exchange of iodine by chlorine. An overall transformation pathway was proposed for the degradation of iopamidol. CHO cell chronic cytotoxicity tests indicate that chlorination of iopamidol generates a toxic mixture of high molecular weight DBPs (LC50 332 ng/μL). PMID:25325766

  9. Cleaning without chlorinated solvents

    SciTech Connect

    Thompson, L.M.; Simandl, R.F.

    1994-12-31

    Because of health and environmental concerns, many regulations have been passed in recent years regarding the use of chlorinated solvents. The Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant has had an active program to find alternatives for these solvents used in cleaning applications for the past 7 years. During this time frame, the quantity of solvents purchased has been reduced by 92%. The program has been a twofold effort. Vapor degreasers used in batch cleaning-operations have been replaced by ultrasonic cleaning with aqueous detergent, and other organic solvents have been identified for use in hand-wiping or specialty operations. In order to qualify these alternatives for use, experimentation was conducted on cleaning ability as well as effects on subsequent operations such as welding, painting and bonding. Cleaning ability was determined using techniques such as X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy (FTIR) which are capable of examining monolayer levels of contamination on a surface. Solvents have been identified for removal of rust preventative oils, lapping oils, machining coolants, lubricants, greases, and mold releases. Solvents have also been evaluated for cleaning urethane foam spray guns, swelling of urethanes and swelling of epoxies.

  10. Cleaning without chlorinated solvents

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thompson, L. M.; Simandl, R. F.

    1995-01-01

    Because of health and environmental concerns, many regulations have been passed in recent years regarding the use of chlorinated solvents. The Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant has had an active program to find alternatives for these solvents used in cleaning applications for the past 7 years. During this time frame, the quantity of solvents purchased has been reduced by 92 percent. The program has been a twofold effort. Vapor degreasers used in batch cleaning operations have been replaced by ultrasonic cleaning with aqueous detergent, and other organic solvents have been identified for use in hand-wiping or specialty operations. In order to qualify these alternatives for use, experimentation was conducted on cleaning ability as well as effects on subsequent operations such as welding, painting, and bonding. Cleaning ability was determined using techniques such as x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) which are capable of examining monolayer levels of contamination on a surface. Solvents have been identified for removal of rust preventative oils, lapping oils, machining coolants, lubricants, greases, and mold releases. Solvents have also been evaluated for cleaning urethane foam spray guns, swelling of urethanes, and swelling of epoxies.

  11. Inactivation of antibiotic resistance genes in municipal wastewater effluent by chlorination and sequential UV/chlorination disinfection.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yingying; Zhuang, Yao; Geng, Jinju; Ren, Hongqiang; Zhang, Yan; Ding, Lili; Xu, Ke

    2015-04-15

    This study investigated disinfection methods including chlorination, ultraviolet (UV) irradiation and sequential UV/chlorination treatment on the inactivation of antibiotic resistance genes (ARGs). ARGs including sul1, tetX, tetG, intI1, and 16S rRNA genes in municipal wastewater treatment plant (MWTP) effluent were examined. The results indicated a positive correlation between the removal of ARGs and chlorine dosage (p=0.007-0.014, n=6),as well as contact time (p=0.0001, n=10). Greater free chlorine (FC) dosage leads to higher removal for all the genes and the maximum removal (1.30-1.49 logs) could be achieved at FC dosage of 30 mg L(-1). The transformation kinetic data for ARGs removal (log C0/C) followed the second-order reaction kinetic model with FC dosage (R(2)=0.6829-0.9999) and contact time (R(2)=0.7353-8634), respectively. Higher ammonia nitrogen (NH3-N) concentration was found to lead to lower removal of ARGs at the same chlorine dosage. When the applied Cl2:NH3-N ratio was over 7.6:1, a significant reduction of ARGs (1.20-1.49 logs) was achieved. By using single UV irradiation, the log removal values of tetX and 16Ss rRNA genes were 0.58 and 0.60, respectively, while other genes were 0.36-0.40 at a fluence of 249.5 mJ cm(-2), which was observed to be less effective than chlorination. With sequential UV/chlorination treatment, 0.006 to 0.31 log synergy values of target genes were observed under different operation parameters. PMID:25616228

  12. Anaerobic biotransformation of chlorinated alkenes

    SciTech Connect

    Zhuang, P.

    1994-01-01

    Chlorinated alkenes are widely found in contaminated subsurface soil and groundwater. The highly chlorinated alkene (i.e., PCE) is not subject to aerobic biotransformation. The aim of this research was to explore the potential of using anaerobic processes (i.e., denitrification, sulfate-reduction and methanogenesis) for chlorinated alkenes biotransformation. Contaminated soil samples were used throughout this study. Soil microcosms simulating field anoxic conditions with various nutrients amendment, liquid microcosms as well as enrichment liquid cultures were developed to delineate the dechlorination process. The effect of biomass, chlorinated alkenes concentration and site specific conditions (e.g., temperature and pH) on the dechlorination and the primary metabolic process was investigated. The role of sorption and nutritional needs (i.e., electron donor) were also studied. A preliminary study revealed that denitrification was the least affected by low temperatures as compared to sulfate-reduction and methanogenesis. Although dechlorination took place under sequential denitrifying and methanogenic conditions and under sulfate-reducing conditions, further studies concluded that fermentative and methanogenic bacteria were responsible for the observed dechlorination. In most cases, dechlorination of PCE or TCE resulted in the accumulation of cDCE. However, a VC-producing culture was developed from the PCE-contaminated soil. In general, the dechlorination process could be enhanced by increasing electron donor and biomass concentration. At relatively low concentrations, the dechlorination rate was also increased with increasing chlorinated alkene concentration. Dechlorination even proceeded at high chlorinated alkene concentrations when methane production was inhibited. However, as the concentration of the chlorinated alkenes increased, severe toxicity eventually halted the dechlorination process.

  13. Chemistry of combined residual chlorination

    SciTech Connect

    Leao, S.F.; Selleck, R.E.

    1982-01-01

    The decay of the combined chlorine residual was investigated in this work. Recent concerns about the formation of undesirable compounds such as chloroform with free residual chlorination have focused attention on the alternative use of combined residual chlorination. This work investigates the applicability of reactions proposed to describe the transformations and decay of the combined residual with time. Sodium hypochlorite was added to buffered solutions of ammonia with the chlorine residual being monitored over periods extending up to 10 days. The reaction was studied at four initial concentrations of hypochlorite of 100, 50, 25 and 10 mg/L as Cl/sub 2/ with molar application ratios of chlorine to ammonia, defined herein as M ratios, of 0.90, 0.50, 0.25 and 0.05 at each hypochlorite dose. Sixty-eight experiments were conducted at the pH of 6.6 and 7.2. The conclusions are: (1) in the absence of free chlorine, the concentration of NH/sub 3/ does not seem to affect the rate of disappearance of the residual other than through the formation of NHCl/sub 2/ by NH/sub 2/Cl hydrolysis; (2) the reaction between NHCl/sub 2/ and NH/sub 4//sup +/ to form NH/sub 2/Cl is either much slower than reported by Gray et. al. or the mechanism is different with a rate limiting step not involving NH/sub 3/ or NH/sub 4//sup +/; (3) a redox reaction in addition to the first-order decomposition of NHCl/sub 2/ appears necessary. Model simulation results indicated that a reaction of the type NH/sub 2/Cl + NHCl/sub 2/ ..-->.. P added to the first-order NHCl/sub 2/ decomposition can explain the results observed except at the higher chlorine doses.

  14. Variation in assimilable organic carbon formation during chlorination of Microcystis aeruginosa extracellular organic matter solutions.

    PubMed

    Sun, Xingbin; Yuan, Ting; Ni, Huishan; Li, Yanpeng; Hu, Yang

    2016-07-01

    This study investigated the chlorination of Microcystis aeruginosa extracellular organic matter (EOM) solutions under different conditions, to determine how the metabolites produced by these organisms affect water safety and the formation of assimilable organic carbon (AOC). The effects of chlorine dosages, coagulant dosage, reaction time and temperature on the formation of AOC were investigated during the disinfection of M.aeruginosa metabolite solutions. The concentration of AOC followed a decreasing and then increasing pattern with increasing temperature and reaction time. The concentration of AOC decreased and then increased with increasing chlorination dosage, followed by a slight decrease at the highest level of chlorination. However, the concentration of AOC decreased continuously with increasing coagulant dosage. The formation of AOC can be suppressed under appropriate conditions. In this study, chlorination at 4mg/L, combined with a coagulant dose of 40mg/L at 20°C over a reaction time of 12hr, produced the minimum AOC. PMID:27372113

  15. A membrane process to recover chlorine from chloralkali plant tail gas

    SciTech Connect

    Lokhandwala, K.A.; Segelke, S.; Nguyen, P.; Baker, R.W.; Su, T.T.; Pinnau, I.

    1999-10-01

    Chlorine is manufactured by the electrolysis of brine. The chlorine product is a gas, which is collected, dried, compressed, and cooled to produce a liquid. This paper describes the development and field demonstration of a membrane process to recover chlorine from the liquefaction tail gas of chloralkali plants. The tail gas consists of about 20% chlorine and 50--70% air, with the balance being hydrogen and carbon dioxide. A number of membrane materials can achieve a selectivity of 20 or more for chlorine from nitrogen, but degradation of the membrane materials in the presence of high concentrations of chlorine gas often occurs. However, modified silicone rubber membranes are stable to chlorine gas streams. Silicone rubber composite membranes were prepared and formed into modules of 1--2 m{sup 2} membrane area. The modules were tested in the laboratory and in a field test on a slip stream from a chlorine liquefaction unit. In the laboratory, chlorine/nitrogen membrane selectivities of more than 40 were obtained, but selectivities of 6--10 were measured in the field test. This decrease in selectivity was caused by low gas flow rates through the modules, which resulted in concentration polarization effects. However, the membrane maintained essentially constant fluxes and selectivities in field tests lasting more than 1 month. Calculated plant designs based on a selectivity of 8 are able to recover more than 95% of the chlorine in the tail gas. Typical project payback times based on the value of the recovered chlorine and avoided caustic scrubber chemical use are expected to be 1--2 years.

  16. Evaluation of chlorine dioxide gas treatment to inactivate Salmonella enterica on mungbean sprouts.

    PubMed

    Prodduk, Vara; Annous, Bassam A; Liu, Linshu; Yam, Kit L

    2014-11-01

    Although freshly sprouted beans and grains are considered to be a source of nutrients, they have been associated with foodborne outbreaks. Sprouts provide good matrices for microbial localization and growth due to optimal conditions of temperature and humidity while sprouting. Also, the lack of a kill step postsprouting is a major safety concern. The objective of this work was to evaluate the effectiveness of chlorine dioxide gas treatment to reduce Salmonella on artificially inoculated mungbean sprouts. The effectiveness of gaseous chlorine dioxide (0.5 mg/liter of air) with or without tumbling (mechanical mixing) was compared with an aqueous chlorine (200 ppm) wash treatment. Tumbling the inoculated sprouts during the chlorine dioxide gas application for 15, 30, and 60 min reduced Salmonella populations by 3.0, 4.0, and 5.5 log CFU/g, respectively, as compared with 3.0, 3.0, and 4.0 log CFU/g reductions obtained without tumbling, respectively. A 2.0 log CFU/g reduction in Salmonella was achieved with an aqueous chlorine wash. The difference in microbial reduction between chlorine dioxide gas versus aqueous chlorine wash points to the important role of surface topography, pore structure, bacterial attachment, and/or biofilm formation on sprouts. These data suggested that chlorine dioxide gas was capable of penetrating and inactivating cells that are attached to inaccessible sites and/or are within biofilms on the sprout surface as compared with an aqueous chlorine wash. Consequently, scanning electron microscopy imaging indicated that chlorine dioxide gas treatment was capable of penetrating and inactivating cells attached to inaccessible sites and within biofilms on the sprout surfaces. PMID:25364920

  17. Influence of drinking water treatments on chlorine dioxide consumption and chlorite/chlorate formation.

    PubMed

    Sorlini, Sabrina; Gialdini, Francesca; Biasibetti, Michela; Collivignarelli, Carlo

    2014-05-01

    Disinfection is the last treatment stage of a Drinking Water Treatment Plant (DWTP) and is carried out to maintain a residual concentration of disinfectant in the water distribution system. Chlorine dioxide (ClO2) is a widely used chemical employed for this purpose. The aim of this work was to evaluate the influence of several treatments on chlorine dioxide consumption and on chlorite and chlorate formation in the final oxidation/disinfection stage. A number of tests was performed at laboratory scale employing water samples collected from the DWTP of Cremona (Italy). The following processes were studied: oxidation with potassium permanganate, chlorine dioxide and sodium hypochlorite, coagulation/flocculation with ferric chloride and aluminum sulfate, filtration and adsorption onto activated carbon. The results showed that the chlorine dioxide demand is high if sodium hypochlorite or potassium permanganate are employed in pre-oxidation. On the other hand, chlorine dioxide leads to the highest production of chlorite and chlorate. The coagulation/flocculation process after pre-oxidation shows that chlorine dioxide demand decreases if potassium permanganate is employed as an oxidant, both with ferric chloride and aluminum sulfate. Therefore, the combination of these processes leads to a lower production of chlorite and chlorate. Aluminum sulfate is preferable in terms of the chlorine dioxide demand reduction and minimization of the chlorite and chlorate formation. Activated carbon is the most effective solution as it reduced the chlorine dioxide consumption by about 50% and the DBP formation by about 20-40%. PMID:24534637

  18. Detection of chlorinated aromatic compounds

    DOEpatents

    Ekechukwu, A.A.

    1996-02-06

    A method for making a composition for measuring the concentration of chlorinated aromatic compounds in aqueous fluids, and an optical probe for use with the method are disclosed. The composition comprises a hydrophobic polymer matrix, preferably polyamide, with a fluorescent indicator uniformly dispersed therein. The indicator fluoresces in the presence of the chlorinated aromatic compounds with an intensity dependent on the concentration of these compounds in the fluid of interest, such as 8-amino-2-naphthalene sulfonate. The probe includes a hollow cylindrical housing that contains the composition in its distal end. The probe admits an aqueous fluid to the probe interior for exposure to the composition. An optical fiber transmits excitation light from a remote source to the composition while the indicator reacts with chlorinated aromatic compounds present in the fluid. The resulting fluorescence light signal is reflected to a second optical fiber that transmits the light to a spectrophotometer for analysis. 5 figs.

  19. Inactivation of Helicobacter pylori by chlorination.

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, C H; Rice, E W; Reasoner, D J

    1997-01-01

    Three strains of Helicobacter pylori were studied to determine their resistance to chlorination. The organisms were readily inactivated by free chlorine and should therefore be controlled by disinfection practices normally employed in the treatment of drinking water. PMID:9406419

  20. THE ROLE OF CHLORINE IN DIOXIN FORMATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    There is poor correlation between total chlorine in waste streams and formation of polychlorinated dibenzodioxin and polychlorinated dibenzofuran (PCDD/F) during waste combustion. This is because the active chlorine (Cl) species are strongly dependent upon combustion conditions. ...

  1. Reactions of aqueous chlorine and chlorine dioxide with model food compounds.

    PubMed Central

    Fukayama, M Y; Tan, H; Wheeler, W B; Wei, C I

    1986-01-01

    Chlorine and chlorine dioxide (ClO2), common disinfecting and bleaching chemicals used in the food industry, are potent oxidizing and chlorinating agents. Unfortunately, little is known about the nature of the reactions of chlorine with organic food constituents. This presentation reviews published information concerning the reactions of chlorine gas (Cl2[g]), aqueous chlorine, and ClO2 with model food compounds, the fate of chlorine during the chlorination of specific food products, and the potential toxicity of the reaction products. Fatty acids and their methyl esters react with chlorine with the degree of incorporation corresponding to their degree of unsaturation. Aqueous chlorine oxidizes and chlorinates lipids and amino acids much more readily than ClO2. Several amino acids are highly susceptible to oxidation and chlorination by chlorine compounds. Reactions of chlorine and ClO2 with several food products, including flour and shrimp, have also been characterized. In one model system, 99% of Cl2(g) either reacted with components of flour or was consumed by oxidation/chlorination reactions. The lipids extracted from the chlorinated flour contained significant amounts of chlorine. Exposure of shrimp to hypochlorous acid (HOCl) solution resulted in significant incorporation of chlorine into the edible portion. Although significant quantities of chlorine can be incorporated into specific model compounds and food products, the health risks associated with exposure to chlorinated organic products are unknown. Preliminary studies using the Ames Salmonella/microsome mutagenicity assay indicate that the reaction products from mixtures of aqueous chlorine and various lipids or tryptophan are nonmutagenic. Nevertheless, additional studies are warranted, so that the toxicological significance of these reaction products can be understood more fully. PMID:3545804

  2. Radiolytic dechlorination of chlorinated organics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taghipour, Fariborz; Evans, Greg J.

    1997-02-01

    The radiolytic dechlorination of 12 low molecular weight chlorinated organic compounds present in pulp mill effluent was investigated. For most of these chloro-organic compounds more than 90% dechlorination was obtained for gamma doses up to 20 kGy. Parameters such as the number of chlorine atoms and aqueous solution concentration were found to affect the dechlorination rate. A reaction set was also created to model the behavior of irradiated 0.49-49 mol m -3 chloroform solutions, giving good agreement with experimental results.

  3. Colorectal cancers and chlorinated water

    PubMed Central

    El-Tawil, Ahmed Mahmoud

    2016-01-01

    Published reports have revealed increased risk of colorectal cancers in people exposed to chlorinated drinking water or chemical derivatives of chlorination. Oestrogen plays a dual positive functions for diminishing the possibilities of such risk by reducing the entrance, and increasing the excretion, of these chemicals. In addition, there are supplementary measures that could be employed in order to reduce this risk further, such as boiling the drinking water, revising the standard concentrations of calcium, magnesium and iron in the public drinking water and prescribing oestrogen in susceptible individuals. Hypo-methylation of genomic DNA could be used as a biological marker for screening for the potential development of colorectal cancers. PMID:27096035

  4. STABLE CHLORINE ISOTOPE ANALYSIS OF CHLORINATED ORGANIC CONTAMINANTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The biogeochemical cycling of chlorinated organic contaminants in the environment is often difficult to understand because of the complex distributions of these compounds and variability of sources. To address these issues from an isotopic perspective, we have measured the, 37Cl...

  5. 49 CFR 179.102-2 - Chlorine.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Chlorine. 179.102-2 Section 179.102-2... Tank Car Tanks (Classes DOT-105, 109, 112, 114 and 120) § 179.102-2 Chlorine. (a) Each tank car used to transport chlorine must comply with all of the following: (1) Tanks must be fabricated from carbon...

  6. 49 CFR 179.102-2 - Chlorine.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Chlorine. 179.102-2 Section 179.102-2... Specifications for Pressure Tank Car Tanks (Classes DOT-105, 109, 112, 114 and 120) § 179.102-2 Chlorine. (a) Each tank car used to transport chlorine must comply with all of the following: (1) Tanks must...

  7. 49 CFR 179.102-2 - Chlorine.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Chlorine. 179.102-2 Section 179.102-2... Tank Car Tanks (Classes DOT-105, 109, 112, 114 and 120) § 179.102-2 Chlorine. (a) Each tank car used to transport chlorine must comply with all of the following: (1) Tanks must be fabricated from carbon...

  8. 49 CFR 179.102-2 - Chlorine.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Chlorine. 179.102-2 Section 179.102-2... Tank Car Tanks (Classes DOT-105, 109, 112, 114 and 120) § 179.102-2 Chlorine. (a) Each tank car used to transport chlorine must comply with all of the following: (1) Tanks must be fabricated from carbon...

  9. 49 CFR 179.102-2 - Chlorine.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Chlorine. 179.102-2 Section 179.102-2... Tank Car Tanks (Classes DOT-105, 109, 112, 114 and 120) § 179.102-2 Chlorine. (a) Each tank car used to transport chlorine must comply with all of the following: (1) Tanks must be fabricated from carbon...

  10. BOOSTER CHLORINATION FOR MANAGING DISINFECTANT RESIDUALS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Booster chlorination is an approach to residual maintenance in which chlorine is applied at strategic locations within the distribution system. Situations in which booster chlorination may be most effective for maintaining a residual are explained informally in the context of a ...

  11. An Easy Way To Make Chlorine Water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holmes, L. H., Jr.

    1997-11-01

    Chlorine water can be made easily by mixing hypochlorite and hydrochloric acid. The equilibrium lies toward Cl2 in the reaction HOCl + HCl -> Cl2 + H2O and this can be used to make chlorine water from sodium hypochlorite and hydrochloric acid if the presence of NaCl in the chlorine water does not interfere with its use.

  12. CHLORINE DIOXIDE FOR DRINKING WATER RESEARCH DIVISION

    EPA Science Inventory

    In order to comply with the trihalomethane regulation, many drinking water utilities have had to alter their treatment methods. ne option available to these utilities is to use a disinfectant other than chlorine such as chlorine dioxide. ith chlorine dioxide disinfection, trihalo...

  13. Disinfectants: Chlorine and chlorine dioxide. (Latest citations from the Life Sciences Collection database). Published Search

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-05-01

    The bibliography contains citations concerning the antimicrobial properties of chlorine and chlorine dioxide. The use of chlorine for the inactivation of viruses, bacteria, and fungi in wastewater treatment plants is discussed, including the mode of action and factors influencing inactivation. The use of chlorine dioxide as an alternative to chlorine disinfection in swimming pools and water supplies, and possible adverse effects are also discussed. (Contains a minimum of 157 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.)

  14. Growth of long chains in mixed ethylene-chlorine crystals at helium temperatures

    SciTech Connect

    Titov, V.A.; Filippov, P.G.; Misochko, E.Ya.; Usmanov, R.D.; Benderskii, V.A.

    1987-04-01

    The crystal growth of ethylene chloride under conditions of the chlorination of ethylene and the photolytic absorption of chlorine under the influence of the radiation of a helium-cadmium laser at 40 degrees Kelvin is studied using ultraviolet and infrared spectroscopy. The structural and kinetic analysis reveals information on the crystal and molecular structure and on the forbidden vibrational transitions and hyperfine splitting behavior occurring in the compound.

  15. NATURAL ATTENUATION OF CHLORINATED SOLVENTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The protocol will simply describe in detail, with references and illustrations, the approach currently used by staff of the SPRD to evaluate natural attenuation of chlorinated solvents in ground water. Staff of SPRD, and staff of the Air Force Center for environmental excellence...

  16. VOLTAMMETRIC MEMBRANE CHLORINE DIOXIDE ELECTRODE

    EPA Science Inventory

    A voltammetric membrane electrode system has been modified and applied to the in situ measurement of chlorine dioxide. The electrode system consisted of a gold cathode, a silver/silver chloride reference electrode, and a gold counter electrode. Different membrane materials were t...

  17. Chlorine Abundances in Martian Meteorites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bogard, D.D.; Garrison, D.H.; Park, J.

    2009-01-01

    Chlorine measurements made in martian surface rocks by robotic spacecraft typically give Chlorine (Cl) abundances of approximately 0.1-0.8%. In contrast, Cl abundances in martian meteorites appear lower, although data is limited, and martian nakhlites were also subjected to Cl contamination by Mars surface brines. Chlorine abundances reported by one lab for whole rock (WR) samples of Shergotty, ALH77005, and EET79001 range 108-14 ppm, whereas Cl in nakhlites range 73-1900 ppm. Measurements of Cl in various martian weathering phases of nakhlites varied 0.04-4.7% and reveal significant concentration of Cl by martian brines Martian meteorites contain much lower Chlorine than those measured in martian surface rocks and give further confirmation that Cl in these surface rocks was introduced by brines and weathering. It has been argued that Cl is twice as effective as water in lowering the melting point and promoting melting at shallower martian depths, and that significant Cl in the shergottite source region would negate any need for significant water. However, this conclusion was based on experiments that utilized Cl concentrations more analogous to martian surface rocks than to shergottite meteorites, and may not be applicable to shergottites.

  18. Environmental factors regulating soil organic matter chlorination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Svensson, Teresia; Montelius, Malin; Reyier, Henrik; Rietz, Karolina; Karlsson, Susanne; Lindberg, Cecilia; Andersson, Malin; Danielsson, Åsa; Bastviken, David

    2016-04-01

    Natural chlorination of organic matter is common in soils. Despite the widespread abundance of soil chlorinated soil organic matter (SOM), frequently exceeding soil chloride abundance in surface soils, and a common ability of microorganisms to produce chlorinated SOM, we lack fundamental knowledge about dominating processes and organisms responsible for the chlorination. To take one step towards resolving the terrestrial chlorine (Cl) puzzle, this study aims to analyse how environmental factors influence chlorination of SOM. Four factors were chosen for this study: soil moisture (W), nitrogen (N), chloride (Cl) and organic matter quality (C). These factors are all known to be important for soil processes. Laboratory incubations with 36Cl as a Cl tracer were performed in a two soil incubation experiments. It was found that addition of chloride and nitrogen seem to hamper the chlorination. For the C treatment, on the other hand, the results show that chlorination is enhanced by increased availability of labile organic matter (glucose and maltose). Even higher chlorination was observed when nitrogen and water were added in combination with labile organic matter. The effect that more labile organic matter strongly stimulated the chlorination rates was confirmed by the second separate experiment. These results indicate that chlorination was not primarily a way to cut refractory organic matter into digestible molecules, representing one previous hypothesis, but is related with microbial metabolism in other ways that will be further discussed in our presentation.

  19. Fate of Antibiotic Resistant Bacteria and Genes during Wastewater Chlorination: Implication for Antibiotic Resistance Control

    PubMed Central

    Yuan, Qing-Bin; Guo, Mei-Ting; Yang, Jian

    2015-01-01

    This study investigated fates of nine antibiotic-resistant bacteria as well as two series of antibiotic resistance genes in wastewater treated by various doses of chlorine (0, 15, 30, 60, 150 and 300 mg Cl2 min/L). The results indicated that chlorination was effective in inactivating antibiotic-resistant bacteria. Most bacteria were inactivated completely at the lowest dose (15 mg Cl2 min/L). By comparison, sulfadiazine- and erythromycin-resistant bacteria exhibited tolerance to low chlorine dose (up to 60 mg Cl2 min/L). However, quantitative real-time PCRs revealed that chlorination decreased limited erythromycin or tetracycline resistance genes, with the removal levels of overall erythromycin and tetracycline resistance genes at 0.42 ± 0.12 log and 0.10 ± 0.02 log, respectively. About 40% of erythromycin-resistance genes and 80% of tetracycline resistance genes could not be removed by chlorination. Chlorination was considered not effective in controlling antimicrobial resistance. More concern needs to be paid to the potential risk of antibiotic resistance genes in the wastewater after chlorination. PMID:25738838

  20. Factors affecting trihalomethane formation and speciation during chlorination of reclaimed water.

    PubMed

    Ma, Defang; Gao, Baoyu; Wang, Yan; Yue, Qinyan; Li, Qian

    2015-01-01

    A hybrid process with membrane bioreactor (MBR) and powdered activated carbon (PAC), PAC/MBR, was used for real municipal wastewater treatment and reuse. The roles of chlorine dose, contact time, pH and bromide in trihalomethane (THM) formation and speciation during chlorination of the reclaimed water were investigated. Total trihalomethane (TTHM) yield exponentially increased to maximum with increasing chlorine dose (correlation coefficient R2=0.98). Prolonging substrate chlorine contact time significantly promoted TTHM formation. Less than 40% of THMs formed in the first 24 h, indicating that the PAC/MBR effluent organic matters were mostly composed of slow-reacting precursors. Increasing pH and bromide concentration facilitated THM formation. Higher chlorine dose and contact time enhanced chloro-THM formation. The bromo-THM formation was favored at near neutral condition. Despite the variation of chlorine dose, contact time and pH, the yield of THM species in order was usually CHCl3>CHBrCl2>CHBr2Cl>CHBr3. However, THM speciation shifted from chlorinated species to brominated species with increasing bromide concentration. PMID:26247761

  1. Ordered chlorinated monolayer silicene structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Wenbin; Sheng, Shaoxiang; Chen, Jian; Cheng, Peng; Chen, Lan; Wu, Kehui

    2016-04-01

    We report on a systematic experimental study on the chlorination of monatomic silicene layer on Ag(111) by scanning tunneling microscopy. Monolayer silicene on Ag(111) can form 4×4, (√13×√13)R ± 13.9°, and (2√3×2√3)R30° reconstructions due to their different buckling configurations. We found that at low dosage, Cl atoms attach to the upper buckled Si atoms without changing the buckling configuration of the silicene monolayer. However, at high coverage, the global buckling configuration will be significantly changed, resulting in new ordered structures. Interestingly, all monolayer silicene structures, regardless of their initial reconstructions, tend to form a local silicene 1×1 structure at the saturation coverage. The mechanism for chlorination of monolayer silicene is explained.

  2. Chlorine signal attenuation in concrete.

    PubMed

    Naqvi, A A; Maslehuddin, M; ur-Rehman, Khateeb; Al-Amoudi, O S B

    2015-11-01

    The intensity of prompt gamma-ray was measured at various depths from chlorine-contaminated silica fume (SF) concrete slab concrete specimens using portable neutron generator-based prompt gamma-ray setup. The intensity of 6.11MeV chloride gamma-rays was measured from the chloride contaminated slab at distance of 15.25, 20.25, 25.25, 30.25 and 35.25cm from neutron target in a SF cement concrete slab specimens. Due to attenuation of thermal neutron flux and emitted gamma-ray intensity in SF cement concrete at various depths, the measured intensity of chlorine gamma-rays decreases non-linearly with increasing depth in concrete. A good agreement was noted between the experimental results and the results of Monte Carlo simulation. This study has provided useful experimental data for evaluating the chloride contamination in the SF concrete utilizing gamma-ray attenuation method. PMID:26218450

  3. Detection of chlorinated aromatic compounds

    DOEpatents

    Ekechukwu, Amy A.

    1996-01-01

    A method for making a composition for measuring the concentration of chloated aromatic compounds in aqueous fluids, and an optical probe for use with the method. The composition comprises a hydrophobic polymer matrix, preferably polyamide, with a fluorescent indicator uniformly dispersed therein. The indicator fluoresces in the presence of the chlorinated aromatic compounds with an intensity dependent on the concentration of these compounds in the fluid of interest, such as 8-amino-2-naphthalene sulfonate. The probe includes a hollow cylindrical housing that contains the composition in its distal end. The probe admits an aqueous fluid to the probe interior for exposure to the composition. An optical fiber transmits excitation light from a remote source to the composition while the indicator reacts with chlorinated aromatic compounds present in the fluid. The resulting fluorescence light signal is reflected to a second optical fiber that transmits the light to a spectrophotometer for analysis.

  4. Coal desulfurization by aqueous chlorination

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kalvinskas, J. J.; Vasilakos, N.; Corcoran, W. H.; Grohmann, K.; Rohatgi, N. K. (Inventor)

    1982-01-01

    A method of desulfurizing coal is described in which chlorine gas is bubbled through an aqueous slurry of coal at low temperature below 130 degrees C., and at ambient pressure. Chlorinolysis converts both inorganic and organic sulfur components of coal into water soluble compounds which enter the aqueous suspending media. The media is separated after chlorinolysis and the coal dechlorinated at a temperature of from 300 C to 500 C to form a non-caking, low-sulfur coal product.

  5. Microbial based chlorinated ethene destruction

    DOEpatents

    Bagwell, Christopher E.; Freedman, David L.; Brigmon, Robin L.; Bratt, William B.; Wood, Elizabeth A.

    2009-11-10

    A mixed culture of Dehalococcoides species is provided that has an ability to catalyze the complete dechlorination of polychlorinated ethenes such as PCE, TCE, cDCE, 1,1-DCE and vinyl chloride as well as halogenated ethanes such as 1,2-DCA and EDB. The mixed culture demonstrates the ability to achieve dechlorination even in the presence of high source concentrations of chlorinated ethenes.

  6. The effect of chlorine and combined chlorine/UV treatment on coliphages in drinking water disinfection.

    PubMed

    Zyara, Alyaa M; Torvinen, Eila; Veijalainen, Anna-Maria; Heinonen-Tanski, Helvi

    2016-08-01

    Chlorine disinfection is a globally used method to ensure the safety of drinking water. However, it has not always been successful against viruses and, therefore, it is important to find new methods to disinfect water. Seventeen different coliphages were isolated from the treated municipal wastewater. These coliphages and MS2 were treated with different dosages of chlorine in drinking water, and a combined chlorine/ultraviolet irradiation treatment for the chlorine-resistant coliphages. Chlorine disinfection with 0.3-0.5 mg/L total chlorine (free Cl-dosage 0.12-0.21 mg/L) for 10 min achieved 2.5-5.7 Log10-reductions for 11 sensitive coliphages. The six most resistant coliphages showed no reduction with these chlorine concentrations. MS2 was intermediate in chlorine resistance, and thus it is not a good indicator for viruses in chlorine disinfection. In the combined treatment total chlorine of 0.05-0.25 mg/L (free Cl-dosage 0.02-0.08 mg/L) and ultraviolet irradiation (14-22 mWs/cm(2)) were more effective than chlorine alone, and 3-5 Log10-reductions were achieved for the chlorine-resistant strains. The chlorination efficiency could be increased by higher dosages and longer contact times, but this could increase the formation of disinfection by-products. Therefore, the combination treatment is a recommended disinfection method. PMID:27441859

  7. UV/chlorine process for ammonia removal and disinfection by-product reduction: comparison with chlorination.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xinran; Li, Weiguang; Blatchley, Ernest R; Wang, Xiaoju; Ren, Pengfei

    2015-01-01

    The combined application of UV irradiation at 254 nm and chlorination (UV/chlorine process) was investigated for ammonia removal in water treatment. The UV/chlorine process led to higher ammonia removal with less chlorine demand, as compared to breakpoint chlorination. Chlorination of NH₃ led to NH₂Cl formation in the first step. The photolysis of NH₂Cl and radical- mediated oxidation of ammonia appeared to represent the main pathways for ammonia removal. The trivalent nitrogen of ammonia was oxidized, presumably by reactions with aminyl radicals and chlorine radicals. Measured products included NO₃⁻and NO₂⁻; it is likely that N₂ and N₂O were also generated. In addition, UV irradiation appeared to have altered the reactivity of NOM toward free chlorine. The UV/chlorine process had lower chlorine demand, less C-DBPs (THMs and HAAs), but more HANs than chlorination. These results indicate that the UV/chlorine process could represent an alternative to conventional breakpoint chlorination for ammonia-containing water, with several advantages in terms of simplicity, short reaction time, and reduced chemical dosage. PMID:25466638

  8. Reactions of aqueous chlorine and chlorine dioxide with model food compounds

    SciTech Connect

    Fukayama, M.Y.; Tan, H.; Wheeler, W.B.; Wei, C.

    1986-11-01

    This presentation reviews published information concerning the reactions of chlorine gas (CL/sub 2/(g)), aqueous chlorine, and ClO/sub 2/ with model food compounds, the fate of chlorine during the chlorination of specific food products, and the potential toxicity of the reaction products. Fatty acids and their methyl esters react with chlorine with the degree of incorporation corresponding to their degree of unsaturation. Aqueous chlorine oxidizes and chlorinates lipids and amino acids much more readily than ClO/sub 2/. Several amino acids are highly susceptible to oxidation and chlorination by chlorine compounds. Reactions of chlorine and ClO/sub 2/ with several food products, including flour and shrimp, have also been characterized. Although significant quantities of chlorine can be incorporated into specific model compounds and food products, the health risks associated with exposure to chlorinated organic products are unknown. Preliminary studies using the Ames Salmonella/microsome mutagenicity assay indicate that the reaction products from mixtures of aqueous chlorine and various lipids or tryptophan are nonmutagenic. Nevertheless, additional studies are warranted, so that the toxicological significance of these reaction products can be understood more fully.

  9. Perchlorate production by photodecomposition of aqueous chlorine solutions.

    PubMed

    Rao, Balaji; Estrada, Nubia; McGee, Shelly; Mangold, Jerry; Gu, Baohua; Jackson, W Andrew

    2012-11-01

    Aqueous chlorine solutions (defined as chlorine solutions (Cl(2,T)) containing solely or a combination of molecular chlorine (Cl(2)), hypochlorous acid (HOCl), and hypochlorite (OCl(-))) are known to produce toxic inorganic disinfection byproduct (e.g., chlorate and chlorite) through photoactivated transformations. Recent reports of perchlorate (ClO(4)(-)) production-a well-known thyroid hormone disruptor- from stored bleach solutions indicates the presence of unexplored transformation pathway(s). The evaluation of this potential ClO(4)(-) source is important given the widespread use of aqueous chlorine as a disinfectant. In this study, we perform detailed rate analysis of ClO(4)(-) generation from aqueous chlorine under varying environmental conditions including ultraviolet (UV) light sources, intensity, solution pH, and Cl(2,T) concentrations. Our results show that ClO(4)(-) is produced upon UV exposure of aqueous chlorine solutions with yields ranging from 0.09 × 10(-3) to 9.2 × 10(-3)% for all experimental conditions. The amount of ClO(4)(-) produced depends on the starting concentrations of Cl(2,T) and ClO(3)(-), UV source wavelength, and solution pH, but it is independent of light intensity. We hypothesize a mechanistic pathway derived from known reactions of Cl(2,T) photodecomposition that involves the reaction of Cl radicals with ClO(3)(-) to produce ClO(4)(-) with calculated rate coefficient (k(ClO4-)) of (4-40) × 10(5) M(-1) s(-1) and (3-250) × 10(5) M(-1) s(-1) for UV-B/C and UV-A, respectively. The measured ClO(4)(-) concentrations for both UV-B and UV-C experiments agreed well with our model (R(2) = 0.88-0.99), except under UV-A light exposure (R(2) = 0.52-0.93), suggesting the possible involvement of additional pathways at higher wavelengths. Based on our results, phototransformation of aqueous chlorine solutions at concentrations relevant to drinking water treatment would result in ClO(4)(-) concentrations (~0.1 μg L(-1)) much below the proposed

  10. Inactivation of Salmonella on Eggshells by Chlorine Dioxide Gas.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hyobi; Yum, Bora; Yoon, Sung-Sik; Song, Kyoung-Ju; Kim, Jong-Rak; Myeong, Donghoon; Chang, Byungjoon; Choe, Nong-Hoon

    2016-01-01

    Microbiological contamination of eggs should be prevented in the poultry industry, as poultry is one of the major reservoirs of human Salmonella. ClO2 gas has been reported to be an effective disinfectant in various industry fields, particularly the food industry. The aims of this study were to evaluate the antimicrobial effect of chlorine dioxide gas on two strains of Salmonella inoculated onto eggshells under various experimental conditions including concentrations, contact time, humidity, and percentage organic matter. As a result, it was shown that chlorine dioxide gas under wet conditions was more effective in inactivating Salmonella Enteritidis and Salmonella Gallinarum compared to that under dry conditions independently of the presence of organic matter (yeast extract). Under wet conditions, a greater than 4 log reduction in bacterial populations was achieved after 30 min of exposure to ClO2 each at 20 ppm, 40 ppm, and 80 ppm against S. Enteritidis; 40 ppm and 80 ppm against S. Gallinarum. These results suggest that chlorine dioxide gas is an effective agent for controlling Salmonella, the most prevalent contaminant in the egg industry. PMID:27499670

  11. Inactivation of Salmonella on Eggshells by Chlorine Dioxide Gas

    PubMed Central

    Yum, Bora; Yoon, Sung-Sik; Song, Kyoung-Ju; Kim, Jong-Rak

    2016-01-01

    Microbiological contamination of eggs should be prevented in the poultry industry, as poultry is one of the major reservoirs of human Salmonella. ClO2 gas has been reported to be an effective disinfectant in various industry fields, particularly the food industry. The aims of this study were to evaluate the antimicrobial effect of chlorine dioxide gas on two strains of Salmonella inoculated onto eggshells under various experimental conditions including concentrations, contact time, humidity, and percentage organic matter. As a result, it was shown that chlorine dioxide gas under wet conditions was more effective in inactivating Salmonella Enteritidis and Salmonella Gallinarum compared to that under dry conditions independently of the presence of organic matter (yeast extract). Under wet conditions, a greater than 4 log reduction in bacterial populations was achieved after 30 min of exposure to ClO2 each at 20 ppm, 40 ppm, and 80 ppm against S. Enteritidis; 40 ppm and 80 ppm against S. Gallinarum. These results suggest that chlorine dioxide gas is an effective agent for controlling Salmonella, the most prevalent contaminant in the egg industry. PMID:27499670

  12. Observations of interstellar chlorine and phosphorus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jura, M.; York, D. G.

    1978-01-01

    Copernicus observations of interstellar Cl I, Cl II, and P II UV lines toward 10 stars are reported. Column densities are estimated for each species, and upper limits are computed for HCl column densities. Derivation of the gas-phase abundances of chlorine and phosphorus indicates that the averages of both the chlorine and the phosphorus logarithmic abundances relative to hydrogen are between 5.0 and 5.1. It is suggested that interstellar chlorine may be depleted by about a factor of 3 relative to the solar abundance and that interstellar phosphorus is depleted by a factor of 2 to 3. The results are shown to support the prediction that chlorine is ionized in regions containing primarily atomic oxygen and is neutral in regions where there is a significant amount of molecular hydrogen. The photoionization rate of neutral chlorine toward 15 Mon is estimated, and it is concluded that most chlorine is contained within the gas phase.

  13. IDENTIFICATION OF DRINKING WATER DISINFECTION BY-PRODUCTS FROM OZONE, CHLORINE DIOXIDE, CHLORAMINE, AND CHLORINE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Many drinking water treatment plants are currently using alternative disinfectants to treat drinking water, with ozone, chlorine dioxide, and chloramine being the most popular. However, compared to chlorine, which has been much more widely studied, there is little information abo...

  14. EVALUATION OF MUTAGENIC AND CARCINOGENIC PROPERTIES OF BROMINATED AND CHLORINATED ACETONITRILES: BY-PRODUCTS OF CHLORINATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    The present study was undertaken to determine if chlorinated and brominated acetonitriles formed during the chlorination of drinking water possess mutagenic and/or carcinogenic properties. Chloroacetonitrile (CAN), dichloroacetonitrile (DCAN), trichloroacetonitrile (TCAN), bromoc...

  15. PRODUCTION OF CHLORINE ATOMS FROM THE REACTION OF OH WITH CHLORINATED HYDROCARBONS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Measurements from previous studies have shown that when hydroxyl radicals react with various chlorinated hydrocarbons under atmospheric conditions, free chlorine atoms can be produced. hetechnique described in this study involves scavenging Cl atoms produced by the reaction (usin...

  16. Characterization and identification of a chlorine-resistant bacterium, Sphingomonas TS001, from a model drinking water distribution system.

    PubMed

    Sun, Wenjun; Liu, Wenjun; Cui, Lifeng; Zhang, Minglu; Wang, Bei

    2013-08-01

    This study describes the identification and characterization of a new chlorine resistant bacterium, Sphingomonas TS001, isolated from a model drinking water distribution system. The isolate was identified by 16s rRNA gene analysis and morphological and physiological characteristics. Phylogenetic analysis indicates that TS001 belongs to the genus Sphingomonas. The model distribution system HPC results showed that, when the chlorine residual was greater than 0.7 mg L(-1), 100% of detected heterotrophic bacteria (HPC) was TS001. The bench-scale inactivation efficiency testing showed that this strain was very resistant to chlorine, and 4 mg L(-1) of chlorine with 240 min retention time provided only approximately 5% viability reduction of TS001. In contrast, a 3-log inactivation (99.9%) was obtained for UV fluencies of 40 mJ cm(-2). A high chlorine-resistant and UV sensitive bacterium, Sphingomonas TS001, was documented for the first time. PMID:23648446

  17. 40 CFR 423.11 - Specialized definitions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... addition to the definitions set forth in 40 CFR part 401, the following definitions apply to this part: (a) The term total residual chlorine (or total residual oxidants for intake water with bromides) means the value obtained using the amperometric method for total residual chlorine described in 40 CFR part...

  18. Formation of chlorinated lipids post-chlorine gas exposure.

    PubMed

    Ford, David A; Honavar, Jaideep; Albert, Carolyn J; Duerr, Mark A; Oh, Joo Yeun; Doran, Stephen; Matalon, Sadis; Patel, Rakesh P

    2016-08-01

    Exposure to chlorine (Cl2) gas can occur during accidents and intentional release scenarios. However, biomarkers that specifically indicate Cl2 exposure and Cl2-derived products that mediate postexposure toxicity remain unclear. We hypothesized that chlorinated lipids (Cl-lipids) formed by direct reactions between Cl2 gas and plasmalogens serve as both biomarkers and mediators of post-Cl2 gas exposure toxicities. The 2-chloropalmitaldehyde (2-Cl-Pald), 2-chlorostearaldehyde (2-Cl-Sald), and their oxidized products, free- and esterified 2-chloropalmitic acid (2-Cl-PA) and 2-chlorostearic acid were detected in the lungs and plasma of mouse and rat models of Cl2 gas exposure. Levels of Cl-lipids were highest immediately post-Cl2 gas exposure, and then declined over 72 h with levels remaining 20- to 30-fold higher at 24 h compared with baseline. Glutathione adducts of 2-Cl-Pald and 2-Cl-Sald also increased with levels peaking at 4 h in plasma. Notably, 3-chlorotyrosine also increased after Cl2 gas exposure, but returned to baseline within 24 h. Intranasal administration of 2-Cl-PA or 2-Cl-Pald at doses similar to those formed in the lung after Cl2 gas exposure led to increased distal lung permeability and inflammation and systemic endothelial dysfunction characterized by loss of eNOS-dependent vasodilation. These data suggest that Cl-lipids could serve as biomarkers and mediators for Cl2 gas exposure and toxicity. PMID:27324796

  19. Chlorine hazard evaluation for the zinc-chlorine electric vehicle battery. Final technical report

    SciTech Connect

    Zalosh, R.G.; Bajpai, S.N.; Short, T.P.; Tsui, R.K.

    1980-04-01

    An evaluation of the hazards associated with conceivable accidental chlorine releases from zinc-chlorine electric vehicle batteries is presented. Since commercial batteries are not yet available, this hazard assessment is based both on theoretical chlorine dispersion models and small-scale and large-scale spill tests with chlorine hydrate. Six spill tests involving chlorine hydrate indicate that the danger zone in which chlorine vapor concentrations intermittently exceed 100 ppM extends at least 23 m directly downwind of a spill onto a warm road surface. Chlorine concentration data from the hydrate spill tests compare favorably with calculations based on a quasi-steady area source dispersion model and empirical estimates of the hydrate decomposition rate. The theoretical dispersion model has been combined with assumed hydrate spill probabilities and current motor vehicle accident statistics in order to project expected chlorine-induced fatality rates. These calculations indicate that expected chlorine fatality rates are several times higher in a city with a warm and calm climate than in a colder and windier city. Calculated chlorine-induced fatality rate projections for various climates are presented as a function of hydrate spill probability in order to illustrate the degree of vehicle/battery crashworthiness required to maintain chlorine-induced fatality rates below current vehicle fatility rates due to fires and asphyxiations.

  20. REACTION PRODUCTS FROM THE CHLORINATION OF SEAWATER

    EPA Science Inventory

    Chemical treatment of natural waters, in particular the use of chlorine as a biocide, modifies the chemistry of these waters in ways that are not fully understood. The research described in this report examined both inorganic and organic reaction products from the chlorination of...

  1. Chlorination products: emerging links with allergic diseases.

    PubMed

    Bernard, A

    2007-01-01

    Exposure of the human population to chlorination products has considerably increased during the 20(th) century especially after the 1960s with the development of public and leisure pools. The present article summarizes current knowledge regarding the human exposure to chlorination products and reviews studies suggesting that these chemicals might be involved in the development or exacerbation of allergic diseases. Populations regularly in contact with chlorination products such as swimmers, lifeguards or workers using chlorine as cleaning or bleaching agent show increased risks of allergic diseases or of respiratory disorders frequently associated with allergy. Experimental evidence suggests that chlorination products promote allergic sensitization by compromising the permeability or the immunoregulatory function of epithelial barriers. These findings led to the chlorine hypothesis proposing that the rise of allergic diseases could result less from the declining exposure to microbial agents (the hygiene hypothesis) than from the increasing and largely uncontrolled exposure to products of chlorination, the most widely used method to achieve hygiene in the developed world. Giving the increasing popularity of water recreational areas, there is an obvious need to assess the effects of chlorine-based oxidants on human health and their possible implication in the epidemic of allergic diseases. PMID:17627515

  2. FATE OF CHROMIUM (III) IN CHLORINATED WATER

    EPA Science Inventory

    The oxidation of trivalent chromium, Cr(III), to the more toxic Cr(VI) in chlorinated water is thermodynamically feasible and was the subject of the study. The study found that free available chlorine (FAC) readily converts Cr(III) to Cr(VI) at a rate that is highly dependent upo...

  3. Chemotaxis of Pseudomonas putida toward chlorinated benzoates

    SciTech Connect

    Harwood, C.S.; Parales, R.E.; Dispensa, M. )

    1990-05-01

    The chlorinated aromatic acids 3-chlorobenzoate and 4-chlorobenzoate are chemoattractants for Pseudomonas putida PRS2000. These compounds are detected by a chromosomally encoded chemotactic response to benzoate which is inducible by {beta}-ketoadipate, and intermediate of benzoate catabolism. Plasmid pAC27, encoding enzymes for 3-chlorobenzoate degradation, does not appear to carry genes for chemotaxis toward chlorinated compounds.

  4. Effects of ozone, chlorine dioxide, chlorine, and monochloramine on Cryptosporidium parvum oocyst viability.

    PubMed Central

    Korich, D G; Mead, J R; Madore, M S; Sinclair, N A; Sterling, C R

    1990-01-01

    Purified Cryptosporidium parvum oocysts were exposed to ozone, chlorine dioxide, chlorine, and monochloramine. Excystation and mouse infectivity were comparatively evaluated to assess oocyst viability. Ozone and chlorine dioxide more effectively inactivated oocysts than chlorine and monochloramine did. Greater than 90% inactivation as measured by infectivity was achieved by treating oocysts with 1 ppm of ozone (1 mg/liter) for 5 min. Exposure to 1.3 ppm of chlorine dioxide yielded 90% inactivation after 1 h, while 80 ppm of chlorine and 80 ppm of monochloramine required approximately 90 min for 90% inactivation. The data indicate that C. parvum oocysts are 30 times more resistant to ozone and 14 times more resistant to chlorine dioxide than Giardia cysts exposed to these disinfectants under the same conditions. With the possible exception of ozone, the use of disinfectants alone should not be expected to inactivate C. parvum oocysts in drinking water. PMID:2339894

  5. Effects of ozone, chlorine dioxide, chlorine, and monochloramine on Cryptosporidium parvum oocyst viability

    SciTech Connect

    Korich, D.G.; Mead, J.R.; Madore, M.S.; Sinclair, N.A.; Sterling, C.R. )

    1990-05-01

    Purified Cryptosporidium parvum oocysts were exposed to ozone, chlorine dioxide, chlorine, and monochloramine. Excystation and mouse infectivity were comparatively evaluated to assess oocyst viability. Ozone and chlorine dioxide more effectively inactivated oocysts than chlorine and monochloramine did. Greater than 90% inactivation as measured by infectivity was achieved by treating oocysts with 1 ppm of ozone (1 mg/liter) for 5 min. Exposure to 1.3 ppm of chlorine dioxide yielded 90% inactivation after 1 h, while 80 ppm of chlorine and 80 ppm of monochloramine required approximately 90 min for 90% inactivation. The data indicate that C. parvum oocysts are 30 times more resistant to ozone and 14 times more resistant to chlorine dioxide than Giardia cysts exposed to these disinfectants under the same conditions. With the possible exception of ozone, the use of disinfectants alone should not be expected to inactivate C. parvum oocysts in drinking water.

  6. Chlorine

    MedlinePlus

    ... gas are inhaled. Fluid in the lungs (pulmonary edema) that may be delayed for a few hours ... problems such as fluid in the lungs (pulmonary edema) following the initial exposure. How people can protect ...

  7. Soil peroxidase-mediated chlorination of fulvic acid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asplund, Gunilla; Borén, Hans; Carlsson, Uno; Grimvall, Anders

    Humic matter has recently been shown to contain considerable quantities of naturally produced organohalogens. The present study investigated the possibility of a non-specific, enzymatically mediated halogenation of organic matter in soil. The results showed that, in the presence of chloride and hydrogen peroxide, the enzyme chloroperoxidase (CPO) from the fungus Caldariomyces fumago catalyzes chlorination of fulvic acid. At pH 2.5 - 6.0, the chlorine to fulvic acid ratio in the tested sample was elevated from 12 mg/g to approximately 40-50 mg/g. It was also shown that this reaction can take place at chloride and hydrogen peroxide concentrations found in the environment. An extract from spruce forest soil was shown to have a measurable chlorinating capacity. The activity of an extract of 0.5 kg soil corresponded to approximately 0.3 enzyme units, measured as CPO activity. Enzymatically mediated halogenation of humic substances may be one of the mechanisms explaining the widespread occurrence of adsorbable organic halogens (AOX) in soil and water.

  8. Detection of chlorinated methanes by tin oxide gas sensors.

    PubMed

    Park, S H; Son, Y C; Shaw, B R; Creasy, K E; Suib, S L

    2001-08-01

    Tin oxide thin films prepared by thermal oxidation of Sn films were used for the detection of chlorinated methanes (CH2Cl2, CHCl3 and CCl4). This resulted in better chemical selectivity, sensitivity, response speed and detection limit than seen with previous detectors. The temperature dependence of the sensing of 1% CCl4 gas was studied and the best sensing behavior was observed at 300 degrees C. The films showed different chemical selectivity in both speed and direction of sensing response to each gas and were stable for more than 3 weeks under operating conditions. The films showed rapid gas sensing (<40 s to reach 90% of full response) and low detection limits (< 4 ppm CCl4). The role of oxygen in the detection of chlorinated methanes and in resistance changes without chlorinated methanes was also studied. The changes at the surface of the film after gas sensing were examined using scanning electron microscopy with energy-dispersive X-ray spectrometry. PMID:11534610

  9. Decontamination of Pangasius fish (Pangasius hypophthalmus) with chlorine or peracetic acid in the laboratory and in a Vietnamese processing company.

    PubMed

    Tong Thi, Anh Ngoc; Sampers, Imca; Van Haute, Sam; Samapundo, Simbarashe; Ly Nguyen, Binh; Heyndrickx, Marc; Devlieghere, Frank

    2015-09-01

    This study evaluated the decontamination of Pangasius fillets in chlorine or peracetic acid treated wash water. First, the decontamination efficacy of the washing step with chlorinated water applied by a Vietnamese processing company during trimming of Pangasius fillets was evaluated and used as the basis for the experiments performed on a laboratory scale. As chlorine was only added at the beginning of the batch and used continuously without renewal for 239min; a rapid increase of the bacterial counts and a fast decrease of chlorine in the wash water were found. This could be explained by the rapid accumulation of organic matter (ca. 400mg O2/L of COD after only 24min). Secondly, for the experiments performed on a laboratory scale, a single batch approach (one batch of wash water for treating a fillet) was used. Chlorine and PAA were evaluated at 10, 20, 50 and 150ppm at contact times of 10, 20 and 240s. Washing with chlorine and PAA wash water resulted in a reduction of Escherichia coli on Pangasius fish which ranged from 0-1.0 and 0.4-1.4logCFU/g, respectively while less to no reduction of total psychrotrophic counts, lactic acid bacteria and coliforms on Pangasius fish was observed. However, in comparison to PAA, chlorine was lost rapidly. As an example, 53-83% of chlorine and 15-17% of PAA were lost after washing for 40s (COD=238.2±66.3mg O2/L). Peracetic acid can therefore be an alternative sanitizer. However, its higher cost will have to be taken into consideration. Where (cheaper) chlorine is used, the processors have to pay close attention to the residual chlorine level, pH and COD level during treatment for optimal efficacy. PMID:26058007

  10. Chlorine-induced cardiopulmonary injury.

    PubMed

    Carlisle, Matthew; Lam, Adam; Svendsen, Erik R; Aggarwal, Saurabh; Matalon, Sadis

    2016-06-01

    Chlorine (Cl2 ) is utilized worldwide for a diverse range of industrial applications, including pulp bleaching, sanitation, and pharmaceutical development. Though Cl2 has widespread use, little is known regarding the mechanisms of toxicity associated with Cl2 exposure, which occurs during industrial accidents or acts of terrorism. Previous instances of Cl2 exposure have led to reported episodes of respiratory distress that result in high morbidity and mortality. Furthermore, studies suggest that acute Cl2 exposure also results in systemic vascular injury and subsequent myocardial contractile dysfunction. Here, we review both lung and cardiac pathology associated with acute Cl2 inhalation and discuss recently published data that suggest that mitochondrial dysfunction underlies the pathogenesis of Cl2 -induced toxicity. Last, we discuss our findings that suggest that upregulation of autophagy protects against Cl2 -induced lung inflammation and can be a potential therapeutic target for ameliorating the toxic effects of Cl2 exposure. PMID:27303906

  11. The occurrence of chlorine in serpentine minerals

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Miura, Y.; Rucklidge, J.; Nord, G.L., Jr.

    1981-01-01

    Partially serpentinized dunites containing small amounts of Chlorine (< 0.5%) from Dumont, Quebec, and Horoman, Hokkaido, Japan, and one containing less than 0.05% Chlorine from Higashi-Akaishi-Yama, Ehime, Japan have been examined using the electron probe microanalyzer and scanning transmission electron microscope with X-ray analytical capabilities. Chlorine was found together with Si, Mg, Ca and Fe in the serpentine minerals of the Dumont and Hokkaido dunites but not in the Ehime dunite. Chlorine is found associated only with the most finely crystalline facies of the serpentine (grain size less than 10 nm). The Ehime dunite contained no such fine grained serpentine, and was thus effectively chlorine-free, as are the coarser grained serpentines of the other samples. The finegrained chlorine-bearing serpentine also has a much higher concentration of Fe, and can contain smaller amounts of Ca, Ni and Mn than the coarse-grained variety as well as minute awaruite (FeNi3) grains. This fine-grained serpentine probably represents an early stage in the transformation of olivine to serpentine, with chlorine from hydrothermal solutions assisting the necessary chemical changes. The Cl increases the reaction rate by lowering the activation barrier to reaction by the introduction of reaction steps. ?? 1981 Springer-Verlag.

  12. Legionella pneumophila transcriptional response to chlorine treatment.

    PubMed

    Bodet, Charles; Sahr, Tobias; Dupuy, Mathieu; Buchrieser, Carmen; Héchard, Yann

    2012-03-01

    Legionella pneumophila is a ubiquitous environmental microorganism found in freshwater that can cause an acute form of pneumonia known as Legionnaires' disease. Despite widespread use of chlorine to ensure drinking water quality and awareness that L. pneumophila may escape these treatments, little is known about its effects on L. pneumophila. The aim of this study was to investigate the L. pneumophila transcriptional response induced by chlorine treatment. Transcriptome analysis, using DNA arrays, showed that a sublethal dose of chlorine induces a differential expression of 391 genes involved in stress response, virulence, general metabolism, information pathways and transport. Many of the stress response genes were significantly upregulated, whereas a significant number of virulence genes were repressed. In particular, exposure of L. pneumophila to chlorine induced the expression of cellular antioxidant proteins, stress proteins and transcriptional regulators. In addition, glutathione S-transferase specific activity was enhanced following chlorine treatment. Our results clearly indicate that chlorine induces expression of proteins involved in cellular defence mechanisms against oxidative stress that might be involved in adaptation or resistance to chlorine treatment. PMID:22192759

  13. Acanthamoeba castellanii: cellular changes induced by chlorination.

    PubMed

    Mogoa, Emerancienne; Bodet, Charles; Legube, Bernard; Héchard, Yann

    2010-09-01

    Chlorination is a well-known disinfection method, used in water treatment to inactivate various microorganisms, it induces numerous cellular changes. Even though Acanthamoebae are frequently found in water, the cellular changes induced in Acanthamoebae have not been described in the literature. Acanthamoebae are pathogenic amoebae and may provide a reservoir for pathogenic bacteria such as Legionellapneumophila; it is consequently important to understand the response of this amoeba to chlorination, and our study was indeed aimed at examining cellular changes in Acanthamoebae following chlorination. Acanthamoeba trophozoites were treated at various chlorine concentrations (1-5mg/L). A 3-log reduction in Acanthamoebae population was achieved with 5mg/L of free chlorine. Confocal microscopy and flow cytometry experiments indicated that chlorination induced cell permeabilization, size reduction and likely intracellular thiol concentration. Our data show that among the non-cultivable cells some remained impermeabilized (negative staining with propidium iodide), thereby suggesting that these cells might remained viable. A similar state is described in other microorganisms as a VBNC (viable but not cultivable) state. Electron microscopy observations illustrate drastic morphological changes: the pseudopods disappeared and subcellular components, such as mitochondrion, were pronouncedly affected. In conclusion, depending on the concentration used, chlorination leads to many cellular effects on Acanthamoeba that could well arise in cell inactivation. PMID:20034490

  14. Toxicity of chlorine to zebrafish embryos

    PubMed Central

    Kent, Michael L.; Buchner, Cari; Barton, Carrie; Tanguay, Robert L.

    2014-01-01

    Surface disinfection of fertilized fish eggs is widely used in aquaculture to reduce extraovum pathogens that may be released from brood fish during spawning, and this is routinely used in zebrafish (Danio rerio) research laboratories. Most laboratories use approximately 25 – 50 ppm unbuffered chlorine solution for 5 – 10 min. Treatment of embryos with chlorine has significant germicidal effects for many Gram-negative bacteria, viruses, and trophozoite stages of protozoa, it has reduced efficacy against cyst or spore stages of protozoa and certain Mycobacterium spp. Therefore, we evaluated the toxicity of unbufferred and buffered chlorine solution to embryos exposed at 6 or 24 hours post-fertilization (hpf) to determine if higher concentrations can be used for treating zebrafish embryos. Most of our experiments entailed using an outbred line (5D), with both mortality and malformations as endpoints. We found that 6 hpf embryos consistently were more resistant than 24 hpf embryos to the toxic effects of chlorine. Chlorine is more toxic and germicidal at lower pHs, and chlorine causes elevated pH. Consistent with this, we found that unbufferred chlorine solutions (pH ca 8–9) were less toxic at corresponding concentrations than solutions buffered to pH 7. Based on our findings here, we recommend treating 6 hpf embryos for 10 min and 24 hpf for 5 min with unbuffered chlorine solution at 100 ppm. One trial indicated that AB fish, a popular outbred line, are more susceptible to toxicity than 5Ds. This suggests that variability between zebrafish lines occurs, and researchers should evaluate each line or strain under their particular laboratory conditions for selection of the optimum chlorine treatment procedure. PMID:24429474

  15. Chlorination. Training Module 2.300.2.77.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kirkwood Community Coll., Cedar Rapids, IA.

    This document is an instructional module package prepared in objective form for use by an instructor familiar with chlorine, the reasons for chlorination and safe operation and maintenance of gas chlorine, dry calcium hypochlorite and liquid sodium hypochlorite chlorination systems for water supply and wastewater treatment facilities. Included are…

  16. Chlorination of Wastewater, Manual of Practice No. 4.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Water Pollution Control Federation, Washington, DC.

    This manual reviews chlorination practices in the treatment and disposal of wastes from the earliest known applications. The application of chlorination for various purposes is described but no attempt has been made to compare chlorination with other methods. Included are chapters on the development and practice of wastewater chlorination,…

  17. Influence of Chlorine Emissions on Ozone Levels in the Troposphere

    EPA Science Inventory

    Chlorine emissions from cooling towers are emitted mainly as hypochlous acid, not as molecular chlorine. Chlorine emissions from cooling towers in electric utilities in the U.S. are estimated to be 4,400 tons per year. Molecular chlorine increases more tropospheric ozone than hyp...

  18. 21 CFR 177.1610 - Polyethylene, chlorinated.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... Chlorine in Vinyl Chloride Polymers and Copolymers,” which is incorporated by reference (Copies may be... percent in plastic articles prepared from polyvinyl chloride and/or from vinyl chloride...

  19. 21 CFR 177.1610 - Polyethylene, chlorinated.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... Chlorine in Vinyl Chloride Polymers and Copolymers,” which is incorporated by reference (Copies may be... percent in plastic articles prepared from polyvinyl chloride and/or from vinyl chloride...

  20. 21 CFR 177.1610 - Polyethylene, chlorinated.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... Chlorine in Vinyl Chloride Polymers and Copolymers,” which is incorporated by reference (Copies may be... percent in plastic articles prepared from polyvinyl chloride and/or from vinyl chloride...

  1. Innovative Technologies for Chlorinated Solvent Remediation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pennell, Kurt D.; Cápiro, Natalie L.

    2014-07-01

    The following sections are included: * INTRODUCTION * TRADITIONAL REMEDIATION TECHNOLOGIES (1980s) * RESEARCH AND DEVELOPMENT OF INNOVATIVE REMEDIATION TECHNOLOGIES (1990s-2000s) * CURRENT TRENDS IN CHLORINATED SOLVENT REMEDIATION (2010s) * CLOSING THOUGHTS * REFERENCES

  2. Behavior of chlorine during coal pyrolysis

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Shao, D.; Hutchinson, E.J.; Cao, H.; Pan, W.-P.; Chou, C.-L.

    1994-01-01

    The behavior of chlorine in Illinois coals during pyrolysis was evaluated by combined thermo-gravimetry-Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy-ion chromatography (TG-FTIR-IC) techniques. It was found that more than 90% of chlorine in Illinois coals (IBC-103, 105, 106, and 109) was liberated as HCl gas during pyrolysis from 300 to 600??C, with the rate reaching a maximum at 440 ??C. Similarity of the HCl and NH3 release profiles during pyrolysis of IBC-109 supports the hypothesis that the chlorine in coal may be associated with nitrogen and the chlorine is probably bonded to the basic nitrogen sites on the inner walls of coal micropores. ?? 1994 American Chemical Society.

  3. 21 CFR 177.1610 - Polyethylene, chlorinated.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... chlorination of polyethylene conforming to the density, maximum n-hexane extractable fraction, and maximum... polyethylene is limited to use only as a modifier admixed at levels not exceeding 15 weight percent in...

  4. 21 CFR 177.1610 - Polyethylene, chlorinated.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... produced by the direct chlorination of polyethylene conforming to the density, maximum n-hexane extractable... percent in plastic articles prepared from polyvinyl chloride and/or from vinyl chloride...

  5. Ozone depletion and chlorine loading potentials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pyle, John A.; Wuebbles, Donald J.; Solomon, Susan; Zvenigorodsky, Sergei; Connell, Peter; Ko, Malcolm K. W.; Fisher, Donald A.; Stordal, Frode; Weisenstein, Debra

    1991-01-01

    The recognition of the roles of chlorine and bromine compounds in ozone depletion has led to the regulation or their source gases. Some source gases are expected to be more damaging to the ozone layer than others, so that scientific guidance regarding their relative impacts is needed for regulatory purposes. Parameters used for this purpose include the steady-state and time-dependent chlorine loading potential (CLP) and the ozone depletion potential (ODP). Chlorine loading potentials depend upon the estimated value and accuracy of atmospheric lifetimes and are subject to significant (approximately 20-50 percent) uncertainties for many gases. Ozone depletion potentials depend on the same factors, as well as the evaluation of the release of reactive chlorine and bromine from each source gas and corresponding ozone destruction within the stratosphere.

  6. Imidazole catalyzes chlorination by unreactive primary chloramines

    PubMed Central

    Roemeling, Margo D.; Williams, Jared; Beckman, Joseph S.; Hurst, James K.

    2015-01-01

    Hypochlorous acid and simple chloramines (RNHCl) are stable biologically-derived chlorinating agents. In general, the chlorination potential of HOCl is much greater than that of RNHCl, allowing it to oxidize or chlorinate a much wider variety of reaction partners. However, in this study we demonstrate by kinetic analysis that the reactivity of RNHCl can be dramatically promoted by imidazole and histidyl model compounds via intermediary formation of the corresponding imidazole chloramines. Two biologically relevant reactions were investigated—loss of imidazole-catalyzed chlorinating capacity and phenolic ring chlorination using fluorescein and the tyrosine analog, 4-hydroxyphenylacetic acid (HPA). HOCl reacted stoichiometrically with imidazole, N-acetylhistidine (NAH), or imidazoleacetic acid to generate the corresponding imidazole chloramines which subsequently decomposed. Chloramine (NH2Cl) also underwent a markedly accelerated loss in chlorinating capacity when NAH was present, although in this case NAHCl did not accumulate, indicating that the catalytic intermediate must be highly reactive. Mixing HOCl with 1-methylimidazole (MeIm) led to very rapid loss in chlorinating capacity via formation of a highly reactive chlorinium ion (MeImCl+) intermediate; this behavior suggests that the reactive forms of the analogous imidazole chloramines are their conjugate acids, e.g., the imidazolechlorinium ion (HImCl+). HOCl-generated imidazole chloramine (ImCl) reacted rapidly with fluorescein in a specific acid-catalyzed second order reaction to give 3′-monochloro and 3′,5′-dichloro products. Equilibrium constants for the transchlorination reactions: HOCl + HIm = H2O + ImCl and NH2Cl + HIm = NH3 + ImCl were estimated from the dependence of the rate constants upon [HIm]/[HOCl] and literature data. Acid catalysis again suggests that the actual chlorinating agent is HImCl+; consistent with this interpretation, MeIm markedly catalyzed fluorescein chlorination by HOCl

  7. Imidazole catalyzes chlorination by unreactive primary chloramines.

    PubMed

    Roemeling, Margo D; Williams, Jared; Beckman, Joseph S; Hurst, James K

    2015-05-01

    Hypochlorous acid and simple chloramines (RNHCl) are stable biologically derived chlorinating agents. In general, the chlorination potential of HOCl is much greater than that of RNHCl, allowing it to oxidize or chlorinate a much wider variety of reaction partners. However, in this study we demonstrate by kinetic analysis that the reactivity of RNHCl can be dramatically promoted by imidazole and histidyl model compounds via intermediary formation of the corresponding imidazole chloramines. Two biologically relevant reactions were investigated--loss of imidazole-catalyzed chlorinating capacity and phenolic ring chlorination using fluorescein and the tyrosine analog, 4-hydroxyphenylacetic acid (HPA). HOCl reacted stoichiometrically with imidazole, N-acetylhistidine (NAH), or imidazoleacetic acid to generate the corresponding imidazole chloramines which subsequently decomposed. Chloramine (NH2Cl) also underwent a markedly accelerated loss in chlorinating capacity when NAH was present, although in this case N-α-acetylhistidine chloramine (NAHCl) did not accumulate, indicating that the catalytic intermediate must be highly reactive. Mixing HOCl with 1-methylimidazole (MeIm) led to very rapid loss in chlorinating capacity via formation of a highly reactive chlorinium ion (MeImCl(+)) intermediate; this behavior suggests that the reactive forms of the analogous imidazole chloramines are their conjugate acids, e.g., the imidazolechlorinium ion (HImCl(+)). HOCl-generated imidazole chloramine (ImCl) reacted rapidly with fluorescein in a specific acid-catalyzed second-order reaction to give 3'-monochloro and 3',5'-dichloro products. Equilibrium constants for the transchlorination reactions HOCl + HIm = H2O + ImCl and NH2Cl + HIm = NH3 + ImCl were estimated from the dependence of the rate constants on [HIm]/[HOCl] and literature data. Acid catalysis again suggests that the actual chlorinating agent is HImCl(+); consistent with this interpretation, MeIm markedly catalyzed

  8. Stratospheric chlorine: Blaming it on nature

    SciTech Connect

    Taube, G.

    1993-06-11

    Much of the bitter public debate over ozone depletion has centered on the claim that chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs) pale into insignificance alongside natural sources of chlorine in the stratosphere. If so, goes the argument, chlorine could not be depleting ozone as atmospheric scientists claim, because the natural sources have been around since time immemorial, and the ozone layer is still there. The claim, put forward in a book by Rogelio Maduro and Ralf Schauerhammer, has since been touted by former Atomic Energy Commissioner Dixy Lee Ray and talk-show host Rush Limbaugh, and it forms the basis of much of the backlash now being felt by atmospheric scientists. The argument is simple: Maduro and Schauerhammer calculate that 600 million tons of chlorine enters the atmosphere annually from seawater, 36 million tons from volcanoes, 8.4 million tons from biomass burning, and 5 million tons from ocean biota. In contrast, CFCs account for a mere 750,000 tons of atmospheric chlorine a year. Besides disputing the numbers, scientists have both theoretical and observational bases for doubting that much of this chlorine is getting into the stratosphere, where it could affect the ozone layer. Linwood Callis of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration's (NASA) Langley Research Center points out one crucial problem with the argument: Chlorine from natural sources is soluble, and so it gets rained out of the lower atmosphere. CFCs, in contrast, are insoluble and inert and thus make it to the stratosphere to release their chlorine. What's more, observations of stratospheric chemistry don't support the idea that natural sources are contributing much to the chlorine there.

  9. Chemistry of saline-water chlorination

    SciTech Connect

    Haag, W.R.

    1981-06-01

    Vast quantities of natural waters are used by power plants for cooling purposes. This water is chlorinated to prevent slime build-up inside the cooling pipes, is circulated through the cooling system, and eventually discharged back into the water body. In order to assess the environmental impact of water chlorination, it is necessary to know what chemical compounds are produced and discharged into the receiving waters. To attack this problem, a review of the present state of knowledge of natural water chlorination chemistry was performed, and some experimental work explained the results of previous workers by showing that chlorine losses at very high doses in seawater are simply the result of chlorate and bromate formation which, however, is negligible at normal doses. The most important chlorine-produced oxidants, along with the relevant chemical reactions, were chosen as a basis for a kinetic model of saline water chlorination chemistry. Kinetic data were compiled in a computer program which simultaneously solves 24 differential equations, one for each species modelled. Estimates were made for the unknown rate constants. A purely predictive model was not possible due to the great variability in the organic demand; however, the model is applicable under a broad variety of conditions (except sunlight), and it provides a reasonably good description of a halamine chemistry under environmental conditions.

  10. Reaction mechanism for chlorination of urea.

    PubMed

    Blatchley, Ernest R; Cheng, Mingming

    2010-11-15

    Experiments were conducted to elucidate the mechanism of the reaction between free chlorine and urea. In combination with findings of previous investigations, the results of these experiments indicate a process by which urea undergoes multiple N-chlorination steps. The first of these steps results in the formation of N-chlorourea; this step appears to require Cl₂ to proceed and is the overall rate-limiting step in the reaction for conditions that correspond to most swimming pools. N-Chlorourea then appears to undergo further chlorine substitution; the fully N-chlorinated urea molecule is hypothesized to undergo hydrolysis and additional chlorination to yield NCl₃ as an intermediate. NCl₃ is hydrolyzed to yield NH₂Cl and NHCl₂, with subsequent decay to stable end products, including N₂ and NO₃⁻. Conversion of urea-N to nitrate is pH-dependent. The pattern of nitrate yield is believed to be attributable to the fact that when urea serves as the source of reduced-N, entry into the reactions that describe chlorination of ammoniacal nitrogen is through NCl₃, whereas when NH₃ is the source of reduced-N, entry to these reactions is through NH₂Cl. PMID:20964367

  11. Impact of Chlorine and Heat on the Survival of Hartmannella vermiformis and Subsequent Growth of Legionella pneumophila

    PubMed Central

    Kuchta, John M.; Navratil, Jeannine S.; Shepherd, Megan E.; Wadowsky, Robert M.; Dowling, John N.; States, Stanley J.; Yee, Robert B.

    1993-01-01

    Hartmannella vermiformis, a common amoebal inhabitant of potable-water systems, supports intracellular multiplication of Legionella pneumophila and is probably important in the transportation and amplification of legionellae within these systems. To provide a practical guide for decontamination of potable-water systems, we assessed the chlorine and heat resistance of H. vermiformis. H. vermiformis cysts and trophozoites were treated independently with chlorine at concentrations of 2.0 to 10.0 ppm for 30 min and then cocultured with L. pneumophila. Both cysts and trophozoites were sensitive to concentrations between 2.0 and 4.0 ppm and above (trophozoites somewhat more so than cysts), and 10.0 ppm was lethal to both forms. Hartmannellae treated with chlorine up to a concentration of 4.0 ppm supported the growth of legionellae. To determine whether heat would be an effective addendum to chlorine treatment of amoebae, hartmannellae were subjected to temperatures of 55 and 60°C for 30 min and alternatively to 50°C followed by treatment with chlorine at a concentration of 2 ppm. Fewer than 0.05% of the amoebae survived treatment at 55°C, and there were no survivors at 60°C. Pretreatment at 50°C appeared to make hartmannella cysts more susceptible to chlorine but did not further reduce the concentration of trophozoites. PMID:16349110

  12. 40 CFR Table 2 to Subpart Mmm of... - Standards for New and Existing PAI Sources

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... Monitoring and leak repair program as in HON. a Table 9 is listed in the appendix to subpart G of 40 CFR part... ≤20 ppmv TOC. Processes having uncontrolled HCl and chlorine emissions ≥6.8 Mg/yr 94% for HCl and chlorine per process or to outlet HCl and chlorine concentration of ≤20 ppmv. Individual process...

  13. Maxillofacial prostheses of chlorinated polyethylene.

    PubMed

    May, P D

    1978-05-01

    There is clearly a need for maxillofacial prosthetic materials with improved properties. The chlorinated polyethylenes are thermoplastic elastomers which have particularly promising properties, and were used by us to prepare improved maxillofacial prostheses. Suitable CPE resins were compounded with other polymers and with pigments on a heated rubber mill to form thin sheets in a variety of shades. These were heated at 190 degrees C for 10 min and placed between heated linotype mold halves. The prosthesis was formed in a hand press. Sometimes heating and pressing were repeated. After cooling in water, the prosthesis was removed and hand-shaded with oil-soluble dyes. Physical properties were evaluated using standard techniques; skin irritation studies were conducted by 14-day insult patch tests on rabbits. Clinical evaluations were conducted on human volunteers. Parallel evaluations were conducted on commerically available materials for comparison. The CPE was superior to all of the three commerical materials in most properties, and comparable to the better of the three in the remaining properties. On balance, CPE was significantly superior. Early results indicate that the materials and techniques required are easily handled in the dental lab and that the final prosthesis has excellent aesthetic and patient acceptability. PMID:670262

  14. The effect of advanced treatment on chlorine decay in metallic pipes.

    PubMed

    Rossman, Lewis A

    2006-07-01

    Experiments were run to measure what effect advanced treatment might have on the kinetics of chlorine and chloramine decay in metallic pipes that comprise many drinking water distribution systems. A recirculating loop of 6-in diameter unlined ductile iron pipe was used to simulate turbulent flow conditions in a pipe with significant corrosion and tubercle buildup. Conventionally treated test water was subjected to either ozonation, carbon adsorption (GAC), reverse osmosis (RO) or no further treatment before being chlorinated and introduced into the pipeline simulator. Results showed that overall chlorine decay in the simulator was consistently dominated by wall reactions whose first-order rate constants were an order of magnitude higher than those for the bulk water. With free chlorine, the wall rate constants for ozonated and GAC-treated water were about twice those of conventional or RO-treated water. This behavior is believed due to the effect that changes in the organic content of water have on its ability to complex iron and the effect that changes in water conductivity have on pipe wall corrosion. Tests run with chloraminated water showed no statistically significant effect of treatment type and had wall rate constants that were only 40 to 70% as high as those using free chlorine. PMID:16806395

  15. Chlorine isotope geochemistry of Icelandic thermal fluids: Implications for geothermal system behavior at divergent plate boundaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stefánsson, Andri; Barnes, Jaime D.

    2016-09-01

    The chlorine isotope composition of thermal fluids from Iceland were measured in order to evaluate the source of chlorine and possible chlorine isotope fractionation in geothermal systems at divergent plate boundaries. The geothermal systems studied have a wide range of reservoir temperatures from 40 to 437 °C and in-situ pH of 6.15 to 7.15. Chlorine concentrations range from 5.2 to 171 ppm and δ37 Cl values are -0.3 to + 2.1 ‰ (n = 38). The δ37 Cl values of the thermal fluids are interpreted to reflect the source of the chlorine in the fluids. Geothermal processes such as secondary mineral formation, aqueous and vapor speciation and boiling were found to have minimal effects on the δ37 Cl values. However, further work is needed on incorporation of Cl into secondary minerals and its effect on Cl isotope fractionation. Results of isotope geochemical modeling demonstrate that the range of δ37 Cl values documented in the natural thermal fluids can be explained by leaching of the basaltic rocks by meteoric source water under geothermal conditions. Magmatic gas partitioning may also contribute to the source of Cl in some cases. The range of δ37 Cl values of the fluids result mainly from the large range of δ37 Cl values observed for Icelandic basalts, which range from -0.6 to + 1.2 ‰.

  16. Evaluation of short-term exposure to heated water and chlorine for control of the Asiatic clam (Corbicula fluminea)

    SciTech Connect

    Mattice, J.S.; McLean, R.B.; Burch, M.B.

    1982-01-01

    Based on the need for development of efficient procedures for prevention or control of fouling by the Asiatic clam, Corbicula fluminea, the response of these clams to chlorine in combination with rapid increases in water temperature was examined. Small clams were acclimated to 10 and 25/sup 0/C, and large clams were acclimated to 25/sup 0/C. Experiments with each of these acclimation groups consisted of variables of total residual chlorine concentration (0, 5, 7.5, and 10 mg/L) and test temperature (ambient and 3 test temperatures ranging from 35 to 46/sup 0/C). The periods of exposure to increased temperature and chlorine were 40 and 30 min respectively. Clam mortalities were related to water temperature but not to chlorine exposure. At high temperatures at least 50% of the clams remained open through the entire chlorine exposure period. At higher temperatures all of the clams remained open. Even when clams remained open for the entire 30-min chlorine exposure period, all clams were not killed. However, virtually all clams exposed to 41 to 43/sup 0/C water temperatures were killed whether open or closed during the exposure period. Death due to temperature shock is the logical conclusion from these data. Combined application of heated water and chlorine at the concentrations used is not more effective in killing Corbicula than is heated water alone. Current regulations on the concentration of chlorine in power plant effluents indicate that further studies of control of Corbicula using chlorine offer little likelihood for success. (ERB)

  17. 40 CFR 63.453 - Monitoring requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... with 40 CFR 430.24, shall monitor the chlorine and hypochlorite application rates, in kg of bleaching... comply with the bleaching system requirements of § 63.445(c) or the sulfite pulping system requirements... the chlorine outlet concentration of each gas scrubber used to comply with the bleaching system...

  18. Two-photon excitation of chlorin-e6-C15 monomethyl ester for photodynamic therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Ping; Zhao, P. D.; Guo, P.; Lin, Lie; Liu, J. Wei; Yu, Q.

    2005-01-01

    Two-photon-induced fluorescence spectrum and lifetime of Chlorin-e6-C15 Monomethyl Ester in tetrahydrofura (THF) are experimentally examined with femtosecond laser pulses at 800 nm from a Ti:sapphire laser. The two-photon excited fluorescence spectra of the molecule are basically similar to those obtained by one-photon excitation. The lifetimes of two-photon and one-photon excitation fluorescence of this molecule in the solution are of the order of 5.2 ns and 4.8 ns respectively. Our experimental results indicate that the two-photon-induced photodynamic processes of Chlorin-e6-C15 Monomethyl Ester are similar to one-photon-induced photodynamic processes. The two-photon absorption cross section of the molecule is measured at 800 nm as about σ2' ~ 29.1 x 10-50 cm4 " s/photon. As an example for two-photon photodynamic therapy, we also further examine the cell-damaging effects of the Ester. Our preliminary results of cell viability test indicate that Chlorin-e6-C15 Monomethyl Ester can effectively damage the liver cancer cells BEL-7402 under two-photon irradiation. Our results suggest Chlorin-e6-C15 Monomethyl Ester may become a potential two-photon phototherapeutic agent.

  19. Effects of chlorine and chlorine dioxide on human rotavirus infectivity and genome stability.

    PubMed

    Xue, Bin; Jin, Min; Yang, Dong; Guo, Xuan; Chen, Zhaoli; Shen, Zhiqiang; Wang, Xinwei; Qiu, Zhigang; Wang, Jingfeng; Zhang, Bin; Li, Junwen

    2013-06-15

    Despite the health risks posed by waterborne human rotavirus (HRV), little information is available concerning the effectiveness of chlorine or chlorine dioxide (ClO2), two common disinfectants of public water sources, against HRV and their effects on its genome remain poorly understood. This study investigated the effects of chlorine and ClO2 on purified HRV by using cell culture and RT-PCR to assess virus infectivity and genetic integrity, respectively. The disinfection efficacy of ClO2 was found to be higher than that of chlorine. According to the efficiency factor Hom model, Ct value (mg/L min) ranges required for a 4-log reduction of HRV at 20 °C by chlorine and ClO2 were 5.55-5.59 and 1.21-2.47 mg/L min, respectively. Detection of the 11 HRV genome segments revealed that damage to the 1227-2354 bp of the VP4 gene was associated with the disappearance of viral infectivity by chlorine. However, no complete accordance between culturing and RT-PCR assays was observed after treatment of HRV with ClO2. These results collectively indicate that the current practice of chlorine disinfection may be inadequate to manage the risk of waterborne HRV infection, and offer the potential to monitor the infectivity of HRV adapting PCR-based protocols in chlorine disinfection. PMID:23591108

  20. Bromate ion formation in dark chlorination and ultraviolet/chlorination processes for bromide-containing water.

    PubMed

    Huang, Xin; Gao, Naiyun; Deng, Yang

    2008-01-01

    Bormate (BrO3(-)) is a carcinogenic chemical produced in ozonation or chlorination of bromide-containing water. Although its formation in seawater with or without sunlight has been previously investigated, the formation of bromate in dilute solutions, particularly raw water for water treatment plant, is unknown. In this article, the results of bench scale tests to measure the formation rates of bromate formation in dilute solutions, including de-ionized water and raw water from Yangtze River, were presented in dark chlorination and ultraviolet (UV)/chlorination processes. And the effects of initial pH, initial concentration of NaOCl, and UV light intensity on bromate formation in UV/chlorination of the diluted solutions were investigated. Detectable bromate was formed in dark chlorination of the two water samples with a relatively slow production rate. Under routine disinfecting conditions, the amount of formed bromate is not likely to exceed the national standards (10 microg/L). UV irradiation enhanced the decay of free chlorine, and, simultaneously, 6.6%--32% of Br was oxidized to BrO3(-). And the formation of bromate exhibited three stages: rapid stage, slow stage and plateau. Under the experimental conditions (pH = 4.41--11.07, Ccl2 = 1.23--4.50 mg/L), low pH and high chlorine concentration favored the generation of bromate. High light intensity promoted the production rate of bromate, but decreased its total generation amount due to acceleration of chlorine decomposition. PMID:18574968

  1. Possible role of reactive chlorine in microbial antagonism and organic matter chlorination in terrestrial environments.

    PubMed

    Bengtson, Per; Bastviken, David; de Boer, Wietse; Oberg, Gunilla

    2009-06-01

    Several studies have demonstrated that extensive formation of organically bound chlorine occurs both in soil and in decaying plant material. Previous studies suggest that enzymatic formation of reactive chlorine outside cells is a major source. However, the ecological role of microbial-induced extracellular chlorination processes remains unclear. In the present paper, we assess whether or not the literature supports the hypothesis that extracellular chlorination is involved in direct antagonism against competitors for the same resources. Our review shows that it is by no means rare that biotic processes create conditions that render biocidal concentrations of reactive chlorine compounds, which suggest that extracellular production of reactive chlorine may have an important role in antagonistic microbial interactions. To test the validity, we searched the UniprotPK database for microorganisms that are known to produce haloperoxidases. It appeared that many of the identified haloperoxidases from terrestrial environments are originating from organisms that are associated with living plants or decomposing plant material. The results of the in silico screening were supported by various field and laboratory studies on natural chlorination. Hence, the ability to produce reactive chlorine seems to be especially common in environments that are known for antibiotic-mediated competition for resources (interference competition). Yet, the ability to produce haloperoxidases is also recorded, for example, for plant endosymbionts and parasites, and there is little or no empirical evidence that suggests that these organisms are antagonistic. PMID:19453612

  2. 40 CFR 423.15 - New source performance standards (NSPS).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... the monitoring in 40 CFR 122.11(b), compliance with the limitations for the 126 priority pollutants in... regulated pollutants are not detectable in the final discharge by the analytical methods in 40 CFR part 136... concentration (mg/l) Total residual chlorine 0.20 (2) Total residual chlorine may not be discharged from...

  3. 40 CFR 423.15 - New source performance standards (NSPS).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... the monitoring in 40 CFR 122.11(b), compliance with the limitations for the 126 priority pollutants in... regulated pollutants are not detectable in the final discharge by the analytical methods in 40 CFR part 136... concentration (mg/l) Total residual chlorine 0.20 (2) Total residual chlorine may not be discharged from...

  4. 40 CFR 423.15 - New source performance standards (NSPS).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... the monitoring in 40 CFR 122.11(b), compliance with the limitations for the 126 priority pollutants in... regulated pollutants are not detectable in the final discharge by the analytical methods in 40 CFR part 136... concentration (mg/l) Total residual chlorine 0.20 (2) Total residual chlorine may not be discharged from...

  5. 40 CFR 423.15 - New source performance standards (NSPS).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... the monitoring in 40 CFR 122.11(b), compliance with the limitations for the 126 priority pollutants in... regulated pollutants are not detectable in the final discharge by the analytical methods in 40 CFR part 136... concentration (mg/l) Total residual chlorine 0.20 (2) Total residual chlorine may not be discharged from...

  6. 40 CFR 423.15 - New source performance standards (NSPS).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... the monitoring in 40 CFR 122.11(b), compliance with the limitations for the 126 priority pollutants in... regulated pollutants are not detectable in the final discharge by the analytical methods in 40 CFR part 136... concentration (mg/l) Total residual chlorine 0.20 (2) Total residual chlorine may not be discharged from...

  7. Chlorine dioxide treatment for zebra mussel control

    SciTech Connect

    Rybarik, D.; Byron, J.; Germer, M.

    1995-06-01

    Chlorine is recognized and commonly used biocide for power plant cooling water and service water treatment programs, including the control of zebra mussels. Chlorine dioxide has recently become a popular method of zebra mussel control because of its economy, safety, environmental acceptability, and effectiveness when compared to other mussel control methods. This control technique was recently demonstrated at Dairyland Power Cooperative`s Alma Generating Station on the east bank of the upper Mississippi River in Alma, Wisconsin. The project was assisted with EPRI Tailored Collaboration Program funds. The Dairyland Power Alam Generating Station consists of five generating units that utilize raw, untreated Mississippi River water for condenser, circulating, and service water supplies. The first units were built in 1947, with the final and largest unit being completed in 1960. Total station generating capacity is 200 MW. Because of recent increases in the zebra mussel density at the station intake, Dairyland Power selected the team of Nalco and Rio Linda to perform a chlorine dioxide treatment of the station`s new water systems to eradicate and control the mussels before their presence created operational difficulties. This paper will present the results of the treatment including treatment theory, design and construction of the treatment system, the method of chlorine dioxide generation, treatment concentration, analytical methods o monitoring chlorine dioxide generation, residuals and trihalomethane (THM) concentrations, protocol for monitoring treatment mortality, and the effects of chlorine dioxide and detoxification on other water chemistry parameters and equipment materials. The goal of this paper is to inform and assist users with establishing consistent and uniform practices for safely utilizing and monitoring chlorine dioxide in the eradication and control of zebra mussels.

  8. Summary of airborne chlorine and hydrogen chloride gas measurements for August 20 and September 5, 1977 Voyager launches at Air Force Eastern Test Range, Florida

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gregory, G. L.; Emerson, B. R., Jr.; Hudgins, C. H.

    1978-01-01

    Airborne chlorine and hydrogen chloride measurements were made in the tropospheric ground cloud following the Voyager launches of August 20 and September 5, 1977. The maximum observed hydrogen chloride concentration for both launches was about 25 to 30 parts per million (ppm) occurring typically 2 to 6 minutes after launch. By completion of the sampling mission (1-1/2 hours for August, 4-1/2 hours for September), the maximum in-cloud concentration decayed to about 1 to 2 ppm. Maximum observed chlorine concentrations were about 40 to 55 parts per billion (ppb) about 2 to 8 minutes after launch; by about 15 minutes after launch, chlorine concentrations were less than 10 ppb (detection limit). In-cloud chlorine concentrations were well below 1 percent of hydrogen chloride concentrations. The appendix of the report discusses the chlorine instrument and the laboratory evaluation of the detector.

  9. Water chlorination: An enigma for modern-day environmental chemists

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, J.D.; Jolley, R.L.

    1987-01-01

    The challenge of modern-day water chlorination is to reap the benefits of chlorine's excellent disinfection efficacy while minimizing its environmental impacts and byproduct toxicity. Chemists, biologists, and engineers need to work together to identify, quantify, and use most effectively the disinfectant forms of chlorine to maximize disinfection, while at the same time they also need to identify, quantify, and minimize the toxic forms of by-products produced by chlorine's reactions with the organic compounds found in water. To the extent that this is possible, we can enjoy the benefits of chlorine disinfection and minimize the human and environmental impacts of chlorination by-products. 22 refs.

  10. Formation of Chlorination Byproducts and Their Emission Pathways in Chlorine Mediated Electro-Oxidation of Urine on Active and Nonactive Type Anodes.

    PubMed

    Zöllig, Hanspeter; Remmele, Annette; Fritzsche, Cristina; Morgenroth, Eberhard; Udert, Kai M

    2015-09-15

    Chlorination byproducts (CBPs) are harmful to human health and the environment. Their formation in chlorine mediated electro-oxidation is a concern for electrochemical urine treatment. We investigated the formation of chlorate, perchlorate, and organic chlorination byproducts (OCBPs) during galvanostatic (10, 15, 20 mA · cm(-2)) electro-oxidation of urine on boron-doped diamond (BDD) and thermally decomposed iridium oxide film (TDIROF) anodes. In the beginning of the batch experiments, the production of perchlorate was prevented by competing active chlorine and chlorate formation as well as by direct oxidation of organic substances. Perchlorate was only formed at higher specific charges (>17 Ah · L(-1) on BDD and >29 Ah · L(-1) on TDIROF) resulting in chlorate and perchlorate being the dominant CBPs (>90% of initial chloride). BDD produced mainly short chained OCBPs (dichloromethane, trichloromethane, and tetrachloromethane), whereas longer chained OCBPs (1,2-dichloropropane and 1,2-dichloroethane) were more frequently found on TDIROF. The OCBPs were primarily eliminated by electrochemical stripping: On BDD, this pathway accounted for 40% (dichloromethane) to 100% (tetrachloromethane) and on TDIROF for 90% (1,2-dichloroethane) to 100% (trichloromethane) of what was produced. A post-treatment of the liquid as well as the gas phase should be foreseen if CBP formation cannot be prevented by eliminating chloride or organic substances in a pretreatment. PMID:26214011

  11. Temporal Decrease in Upper Atmospheric Chlorine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Froidevaux, L.; Livesey, N. J.; Read, W. G.; Salawitch, R. J.; Waters, J. W.; Drouin, B.; MacKenzie, I. A.; Pumphrey, H. C.; Bernath, P.; Boone, C.; Nassar, R.; Montzka, S.; Elkins, J.; Cunnold, D.; Waugh, D.

    2006-01-01

    We report a steady decrease in the upper stratospheric and lower mesospheric abundances of hydrogen chloride (HCl) from August 2004 through January 2006, as measured by the Microwave Limb Sounder (MLS) aboard the Aura satellite. For 60(deg)S to 60(deg)N zonal means, the average yearly change in the 0.7 to 0.1 hPa (approx.50 to 65 km) region is -27 +/- 3 pptv/year, or -0.78 +/- 0.08 percent/year. This is consistent with surface abundance decrease rates (about 6 to 7 years earlier) in chlorine source gases. The MLS data confirm that international agreements to reduce global emissions of ozone-depleting industrial gases are leading to global decreases in the total gaseous chlorine burden. Tracking stratospheric HCl variations on a seasonal basis is now possible with MLS data. Inferred stratospheric total chlorine (CITOT) has a value of 3.60 ppbv at the beginning of 2006, with a (2-sigma) accuracy estimate of 7%; the stratospheric chlorine loading has decreased by about 43 pptv in the 18-month period studied here. We discuss the MLS HCl measurements in the context of other satellite-based HCl data, as well as expectations from surface chlorine data. A mean age of air of approx. 5.5 years and an age spectrum width of 2 years or less provide a fairly good fit to the ensemble of measurements.

  12. Chlorination of organophosphorus pesticides in natural waters.

    PubMed

    Acero, Juan L; Benítez, F Javier; Real, Francisco J; González, Manuel

    2008-05-01

    Unknown second-order rate constants for the reactions of three organophosphorus pesticides (chlorpyrifos, chlorfenvinfos and diazinon) with chlorine were determined in the present study, and the influence of pH and temperature was established. It was found that an increase in the pH provides a negative effect on the pesticides degradation rates. Apparent second-order rate constants at 20 degrees C and pH 7 were determined to be 110.9, 0.004 and 191.6 M(-1) s(-1) for chlorpyrifos, chlorfenvinfos and diazinon, respectively. A higher reactivity of chlorine with the phosphorothioate group (chlorpyrifos and diazinon) than with the phosphate moiety (chlorfenvinfos) could explain these results. Intrinsic rate constant for the elementary reactions of chlorine species with chlorpyrifos and diazinon were also calculated, leading to the conclusion that the reaction between hypochlorous acid and the pesticide is predominant at neutral pH. The elimination of these pesticides in surface waters was also investigated. A chlorine dose of 2.5 mg L(-1) was enough to oxidize chlorpyrifos and diazinon almost completely, with a formation of trihalomethanes below the EU standard for drinking water. However, the removal of chlorfenvinfos was not appreciable. Therefore, chlorination is a feasible option for the removal of organophosphorus pesticides with phosphorothioate group during oxidation and disinfection processes, but not for the elimination of pesticides with phosphate moiety. PMID:17904287

  13. Accumulation of chlorinated benzenes in earthworms

    SciTech Connect

    Beyer, W.N.

    1996-12-31

    Chlorinated benzenes are widespread in the environment. Hexachlorobenzene, pentachlorobenzene and all isomers of dichlorobenzenes, trichlorobenzenes, and tetrachlorobenzenes, have been detected in fish, water, and sediments from the Great Lakes. They probably entered the water as leachates from chemical waste dumps and as effluents from manufacturing. Hexachlorobenzene and pentachlorobenzene are commonly present in Herring gull (Larus argentatus) eggs from the Great Lakes, and some of the isomers of trichlorobenzene and tetrachlorobenzene are occasionally detected at low concentrations. Hexachlorobenzene, which was formerly used as a fungicide, has been the most thoroughly studied chlorinated benzene, and has been detected in many species. Its use as a fungicide in the United States was canceled in 1984. Since about 1975 hexachlorobenzene has been formed mainly in the production of chlorinated solvents. It is highly persistent in the environment and some species are poisoned by hexachlorobenzene at very low chronic dietary exposures. As little as 1 ppm in the diet of mink (Mustela vison) reduced the birth weights of young, and 5 ppm in the diet of Japanese quail (Coturnix coturnix japonica) caused slight liver damage. This paper describes a long-term (26 wk) experiment relating the concentrations of chlorinated benzenes in earthworms to length of exposure and three 8 wk experiments relating concentration to the concentration in soil the soil organic matter content, and the degree of chlorination. 20 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  14. Chemical additive to enhance antimicrobial efficacy of chlorine and control cross-contamination during immersion chill of broiler carcasses.

    PubMed

    Schambach, B T; Berrang, M E; Harrison, M A; Meinersmann, R J

    2014-09-01

    Immersion chilling of broiler carcasses can be a site for cross-contamination between the occasional highly contaminated carcass and those that are co-chilled. Chlorine is often used as an antimicrobial but can be overcome by organic material. A proprietary chlorine stabilizer (T-128) based on phosphoric acid-propylene glycol was tested as a chill tank additive in experiments simulating commercial broiler chilling. In bench-scale experiments, 0.5% T-128 was compared with plain water (control), 50 ppm of chlorine, and the combination of 0.5% T-128 with 50 ppm of chlorine to control transfer of Salmonella and Campylobacter from inoculated wing drummettes to co-chilled uninoculated drummettes. Both chlorine and T-128 lessened cross-contamination with Salmonella (P < 0.05); T-128 and T-128 with chlorine were significantly more effective (P < 0.05) than the control or plain chlorine for control of Campylobacter. T-128 treatments were noted to have a pH of less than 4.0; an additional experiment demonstrated that the antimicrobial effect of T-128 was not due merely to a lower pH. In commercial broiler chilling, a pH close to 6.0 is preferred to maximize chlorine effectiveness, while maintaining water-holding capacity of the meat. In a set of pilot-scale experiments with T-128, a near-ideal pH of 6.3 was achieved by using tap water instead of the distilled water used in bench-scale experiments. Pilot-scale chill tanks were used to compare the combination of 0.5% T-128 and 50 ppm of chlorine with 50 ppm of plain chlorine for control of cross-contamination between whole carcasses inoculated with Salmonella and Campylobacter and co-chilled uninoculated carcasses. The T-128 treatment resulted in significantly less crosscontamination by either direct contact or water transfer with both organisms compared with plain chlorine treatment. T-128 may have use in commercial broiler processing to enhance the effectiveness of chlorine in processing water. PMID:25198851

  15. Characterization and Application of a Chlorine Microelectrode for Measuring Monochloramine within a Biofilm

    EPA Science Inventory

    Chlorine microelectrodes with tip sizes of 5-15 μm were developed and used to measure biofilm monochloramine penetration profiles. The chlorine microelectrode showed response to total chlorine, including free chlorine, monochloramine, and dichloramine under various conditions. ...

  16. 40 CFR 60.2125 - How do I conduct the initial and annual performance test?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... octa-chlorinated isomer emitted using EPA Method 23 at 40 CFR part 60, appendix A-7. (2) Quantify...-through octa-chlorinated isomer emitted using EPA Method 23 at 40 CFR part 60, appendix A-7. (2) Quantify... of dioxins/furans emitted in terms of toxic equivalency. (h) Method 22 at 40 CFR part 60, appendix...

  17. 40 CFR 60.2125 - How do I conduct the initial and annual performance test?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... octa-chlorinated isomer emitted using EPA Method 23 at 40 CFR part 60, appendix A-7. (2) For each...-chlorinated isomer emitted using EPA Method 23 at 40 CFR part 60, appendix A-7. (2) Quantify isomers meeting...) Method 22 at 40 CFR part 60, appendix A-7 of this part must be used to determine compliance with...

  18. Modelling and control of potable water chlorination.

    PubMed

    Pastre, A; Mulholland, M; Brouckaert, C J; Buckler, C A; Le Lann, M V; Roustan, M; Naidoo, D; Mabeer, V

    2002-01-01

    The Umgeni Water Wiggins water treatment plant feeds the southern areas of Durban in South Africa and has a maximum treatment capacity of about 350 Ml/d. Two interconnected reservoirs at this facility hold treated water before it enters the distribution network. Because of the variable demand, the reservoir levels and residence times undergo considerable variation. This has a strong influence on the free chlorine concentration in the water leaving the reservoir, which should be 0.8 to 1.2 mg/l, to ensure an adequate disinfection potential within the network. This paper describes a model which accounts for the observed variations of chlorine concentration, and will form the basis of a predictive controller for the chlorine concentration in the outlet. PMID:12448458

  19. Alkaline dechlorination of chlorinated volatile organic compounds

    SciTech Connect

    Gu, B.; Siegrist, R.L.

    1996-06-01

    The vast majority of contaminated sites in the United States and abroad are contaminated with chlorinated volatile organic compounds (VOCs) such as trichloroethylene (TCE), trichloroethane (TCA), and chloroform. These VOCs are mobile and persistent in the subsurface and present serious health risks at trace concentrations. The goal of this project was to develop a new chemical treatment system that can rapidly and effectively degrade chlorinated VOCs. The system is based on our preliminary findings that strong alkalis such as sodium hydroxide (NaOH) can absorb and degrade TCE. The main objectives of this study were to determine the reaction rates between chlorinated VOCs, particularly TCE, and strong alkalis, to elucidate the reaction mechanisms and by-products, to optimize the chemical reactions under various experimental conditions, and to develop a laboratory bench- scale alkaline destruction column that can be used to destroy vapor- phase TCE.

  20. Study on chlorine removal from mixture of waste plastics.

    PubMed

    Kakuta, Yusuke; Hirano, Katsumi; Sugano, Motoyuki; Mashimo, Kiyoshi

    2008-01-01

    The recycling of waste plastics that include plastics that contain chlorine, such as polyvinyl chloride, is difficult because the chlorine leads to the corrosion of equipment. Then, the dechlorination method of waste plastics containing chlorine (CCWP) that consists of a series of melt process and hot water process was examined. CCWP was put into the melt process with coal tar (HOB) and converter dust (CD) to inhibit the diffusion of the chlorine-containing gas. The results indicated that iron oxide of the principal element of CD combines with chlorine eliminated from CCWP, and forms water-soluble iron chloride on the melt process. HOB dissolves or adsorbs a part of the chlorine during the melt process, and inhibits the diffusion of the chlorine-containing gas. Approximately 98% of the chlorine in the CCWP reacts with CD and forms iron chloride, which can be extracted on the hot water process. PMID:17482803

  1. PROTOZOAN SOURCES OF SPONTANEOUS COLIFORM OCCURRENCE IN CHLORINATED DRINKING WATER

    EPA Science Inventory

    The spontaneous occurrence of coliforms in chlorinated drinking waters has resulted in concern over their potential source and mechanism(s) of introduction into water delivery systems. Previous observations related to protozoal resistance to chlorine coupled with the ingestion of...

  2. EXPERIENCE WITH CHLORINE DIOXIDE AT DENVER'S REUSE PLANT

    EPA Science Inventory

    Researchers at Denver's reuse demonstration plant found that the effectiveness of chlorine dioxide treatment is critically dependent on the performance of the generator. Because high chlorine dioxide yields can be obtained even when excessive concentrations of undesirable by-prod...

  3. EFFECTS OF CHLORINATED SEAWATER ON DECAPOD CRUSTACEANS AND 'MULINIA' LARVAE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Eggs and larvae of decapod crustaceans and embryos of Mulinia lateralis were exposed to chlorinated seawater for varying periods in continuous flow systems. Mortality, developmental rate, and general behavior were recorded. Panopeus herbstii zoeae were more sensitive to chlorine-...

  4. The effects of low level chlorination and chlorine dioxide on biofouling control in a once-through service water system

    SciTech Connect

    Garrett, W.E. Jr.

    1995-06-01

    Continuous chlorination has been successfully used for the control of Corbicula at a nuclear power plant located on the Chattahoochee River in southeastern Alabama, since 1986. The purpose of this study was to investigate further minimization of chlorine usage and determine if chlorine dioxide is a feasible alternative. Four continuous biocide treatments were evaluated for macro and microfouling control effectiveness, operational feasibility, and environmental acceptability. One semi-continuous chlorination treatment was also evaluated for macrofouling control effectiveness. Higher treatment residuals were possible with chlorine dioxide than with chlorination due to the river discharge limitations. At the levels tested, continuous chlorine dioxide was significantly more effective in providing both macro and microfouling control. Semi-continuous chlorination was just as effective as continuous chlorination for controlling macrofouling. The Corbicula treatment programs that were tested should all provide sufficient control for zebra mussels. Chlorine dioxide was not as cost effective as chlorination for providing macrofouling control. The semi-continuous treatment save 50% on chemical usage and will allow for the simultaneous treatment of two service water systems. Chlorite levels produced during the chlorine dioxide treatments were found to be environmentally acceptable. Levels of trihalomethanes in the chlorinated service water were less than the maximum levels allowed in drinking water.

  5. Production of chlorine from chloride salts

    DOEpatents

    Rohrmann, Charles A.

    1981-01-01

    A process for converting chloride salts and sulfuric acid to sulfate salts and elemental chlorine is disclosed. A chloride salt and sulfuric acid are combined in a furnace where they react to produce a sulfate salt and hydrogen chloride. Hydrogen chloride from the furnace contacts a molten salt mixture containing an oxygen compound of vanadium, an alkali metal sulfate and an alkali metal pyrosulfate to recover elemental chlorine. In the absence of an oxygen-bearing gas during the contacting, the vanadium is reduced, but is regenerated to its active higher valence state by separately contacting the molten salt mixture with an oxygen-bearing gas.

  6. Determination of chlorine in silicate rocks

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Peck, L.C.

    1959-01-01

    In a rapid accurate method for the determination of chlorine in silicate rocks, the rock powder is sintered with a sodium carbonate flux containing zinc oxide and magnesium carbonate. The sinter cake is leached with water, the resulting solution is filtered, and the filtrate is acidified with nitric acid. Chlorine is determined by titrating this solution with mercuric nitrate solution using sodium nitroprusside as the indicator. The titration is made in the dark with a beam of light shining through the solution. The end point of the titration is found by visually comparing the intensity of this beam of light with that of a similar beam of light in a reference solution.

  7. Bromine and Chlorine Go Separate Ways

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    This graph shows the relative concentrations of bromine and chlorine at various locations on Earth and Mars. Typically, bromine and chlorine stick together in a fixed ratio, as in martian meteorites and Earth seawater. But sometimes the elements split apart and their relative quantities diverge. This separation is usually caused by evaporation processes, as in the Dead Sea on Earth. On Mars, at Meridiani Planum and Gusev Crater, this split has been observed to an even greater degree than seen on Earth. This puzzling result is currently being further explored by Mars Exploration Rover scientists. Data for the Mars locations were taken by the rover's alpha particle X-ray spectrometer.

  8. Chlorinated organic compounds produced by Fusarium graminearum.

    PubMed

    Ntushelo, Khayalethu

    2016-06-01

    Fusarium graminearum, a pathogen of wheat and maize, not only reduces grain yield and degrades quality but also produces mycotoxins in the infected grain. Focus has been on mycotoxins because of the human and animal health hazards associated with them. In addition to work done on mycotoxins, chemical profiling of F. graminearum to identify other compounds produced by this fungus remains critical. With chemical profiling of F. graminearum the entire chemistry of this fungus can be understood. The focus of this work was to identify chlorinated compounds produced by F. graminearum. Various chlorinated compounds were detected and their role in F. graminearum is yet to be understood. PMID:27165533

  9. Diurnal variation of stratospheric chlorine monoxide - A critical test of chlorine chemistry in the ozone layer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Solomon, P. M.; De Zafra, R.; Parrish, A.; Barrett, J. W.

    1984-01-01

    Ground-based observations of a mm-wave spectral line at 278 GHz have yielded stratospheric chlorine monoxide column density diurnal variation records which indicate that the mixing ratio and column density of this compound above 30 km are about 20 percent lower than model predictions based on 2.1 parts/billion of total stratospheric chlorine. The observed day-to-night variation is, however, in good agreement with recent model predictions, both confirming the existence of a nighttime reservoir for chlorine and verifying the predicted general rate of its storage and retrieval.

  10. A stable isotope approach for source apportionment of chlorinated ethene plumes at a complex multi-contamination events urban site.

    PubMed

    Nijenhuis, Ivonne; Schmidt, Marie; Pellegatti, Eleonora; Paramatti, Enrico; Richnow, Hans Hermann; Gargini, Alessandro

    2013-10-01

    The stable carbon isotope composition of chlorinated aliphatic compounds such as chlorinated methanes, ethanes and ethenes was examined as an intrinsic fingerprint for apportionment of sources. A complex field site located in Ferrara (Italy), with more than 50years history of use of chlorinated aliphatic compounds, was investigated in order to assess contamination sources. Several contamination plumes were found in a complex alluvial sandy multi-aquifer system close to the river Po; sources are represented by uncontained former industrial and municipal dump sites as well as by spills at industrial areas. The carbon stable isotope signature allowed distinguishing 2 major sources of contaminants. One source of chlorinated aliphatic contaminants was strongly depleted in ¹³C (<-60‰) suggesting production lines which have used depleted methane for synthesis. The other source had typical carbon isotope compositions of >-40‰ which is commonly observed in recent production of chlorinated solvents. The degradation processes in the plumes could be traced interpreting the isotope enrichment and depletion of parent and daughter compounds, respectively. We demonstrate that, under specific production conditions, namely when highly chlorinated ethenes are produced as by-product during chloromethanes production, ¹³C depleted fingerprinting of contaminants can be obtained and this can be used to track sources and address the responsible party of the pollution in urban areas. PMID:24077332

  11. Inactivation of antibiotic resistance genes in municipal wastewater by chlorination, ultraviolet, and ozonation disinfection.

    PubMed

    Zhuang, Yao; Ren, Hongqiang; Geng, Jinju; Zhang, Yingying; Zhang, Yan; Ding, Lili; Xu, Ke

    2015-05-01

    This study investigated the inactivation of two antibiotic resistance genes (ARGs)-sul1 and tetG, and the integrase gene of class 1 integrons-intI1 by chlorination, ultraviolet (UV), and ozonation disinfection. Inactivation of sul1, tetG, and intI1 underwent increased doses of three disinfectors, and chlorine disinfection achieved more inactivation of ARGs and intI1 genes (chlorine dose of 160 mg/L with contact time of 120 min for 2.98-3.24 log reductions of ARGs) than UV irradiation (UV dose of 12,477 mJ/cm(2) for 2.48-2.74 log reductions of ARGs) and ozonation disinfection (ozonation dose of 177.6 mg/L for 1.68-2.55 log reductions of ARGs). The 16S rDNA was more efficiently removed than ARGs by ozone disinfection. The relative abundance of selected genes (normalized to 16S rDNA) increased during ozonation and with low doses of UV and chlorine disinfection. Inactivation of sul1 and tetG showed strong positive correlations with the inactivation of intI1 genes (for sul1, R (2)  = 0.929 with p < 0.01; for tetG, R (2)  = 0.885 with p < 0.01). Compared to other technologies (ultraviolet disinfection, ozonation disinfection, Fenton oxidation, and coagulation), chlorination is an alternative method to remove ARGs from wastewater effluents. At a chlorine dose of 40 mg/L with 60 min contact time, the selected genes inactivation efficiency could reach 1.65-2.28 log, and the cost was estimated at 0.041 yuan/m(3). PMID:25483976

  12. Chlorine: Undergraduate Research on an Element of Controversy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Hasok

    2009-04-01

    If chemical elements were people, chlorine would be a celebrity. Although intrinsically no more or less important than any other element, chlorine has had a knack of making headlines. The genre of "object biography" has been quite successful in popular science recently. We took this opportunity to write a "biographical" study of chlorine. Chlorine's wide range of interesting controversies is well suited for attracting and maintaining the enthusiasm of the diverse range of students we teach in our department.

  13. 49 CFR 176.225 - Stowage of chlorine.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Stowage of chlorine. 176.225 Section 176.225 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation PIPELINE AND HAZARDOUS MATERIALS SAFETY... Requirements for Class 2 (Compressed Gas) Materials § 176.225 Stowage of chlorine. Chlorine (UN 1017) must...

  14. 49 CFR 176.225 - Stowage of chlorine.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Stowage of chlorine. 176.225 Section 176.225 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation PIPELINE AND HAZARDOUS MATERIALS SAFETY... Requirements for Class 2 (Compressed Gas) Materials § 176.225 Stowage of chlorine. Chlorine (UN 1017) must...

  15. 49 CFR 176.225 - Stowage of chlorine.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Stowage of chlorine. 176.225 Section 176.225 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation PIPELINE AND HAZARDOUS MATERIALS SAFETY... Requirements for Class 2 (Compressed Gas) Materials § 176.225 Stowage of chlorine. Chlorine (UN 1017) must...

  16. 49 CFR 176.225 - Stowage of chlorine.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Stowage of chlorine. 176.225 Section 176.225 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation PIPELINE AND HAZARDOUS MATERIALS SAFETY... Requirements for Class 2 (Compressed Gas) Materials § 176.225 Stowage of chlorine. Chlorine (UN 1017) must...

  17. 49 CFR 176.225 - Stowage of chlorine.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Stowage of chlorine. 176.225 Section 176.225 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation PIPELINE AND HAZARDOUS MATERIALS SAFETY... Requirements for Class 2 (Compressed Gas) Materials § 176.225 Stowage of chlorine. Chlorine (UN 1017) must...

  18. Chlorine Gas: An Evolving Hazardous Material Threat and Unconventional Weapon

    PubMed Central

    Jones, Robert; Wills, Brandon; Kang, Christopher

    2010-01-01

    Chlorine gas represents a hazardous material threat from industrial accidents and as a terrorist weapon. This review will summarize recent events involving chlorine disasters and its use by terrorists, discuss pre-hospital considerations and suggest strategies for the initial management for acute chlorine exposure events. PMID:20823965

  19. EFFECT OF BROMIDE ION ON FORMATION OF HAAS DURING CHLORINATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    loacetic acids (HAAs) during chlorination and he effects of independent variables, including pH, reaction time, and chlorine dosage. Almost all of the indpendent loaetic acids (HAAs) during chlorin...designed to statistically evaluate the influence of bromide ion on the formatio...

  20. Chlorine gas: an evolving hazardous material threat and unconventional weapon.

    PubMed

    Jones, Robert; Wills, Brandon; Kang, Christopher

    2010-05-01

    Chlorine gas represents a hazardous material threat from industrial accidents and as a terrorist weapon. This review will summarize recent events involving chlorine disasters and its use by terrorists, discuss pre-hospital considerations and suggest strategies for the initial management for acute chlorine exposure events. PMID:20823965

  1. Decay kinetics of free chlorine in fresh produce wash system

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Chlorinated water wash is a critical step employed in the production of fresh-cut produce. The efficacy of chlorinated water was affected largely by the concentration of active chlorine ingredients, which degrades due to the presence of microorganisms, as well as inorganic and organic matters. It is...

  2. PRACTICAL APPLICATIONS OF CHLORINE DIOXIDE/FIELD DATA

    EPA Science Inventory

    Chlorine dioxide is an effective drinking water disinfectant. he major by-products of chlorine dioxide that are a concern, at this time are chlorite and chlorate. herefore, residual concentrations of these by-products should be kept as low as possible by efficient chlorine dioxid...

  3. Efficacy of copper and silver ions and reduced levels of free chlorine in inactivation of Legionella pneumophila.

    PubMed Central

    Landeen, L K; Yahya, M T; Gerba, C P

    1989-01-01

    Water disinfection systems utilizing electrolytically generated copper and silver ions (200 and 20, 400 and 40, or 800 and 80 micrograms/liter) and low levels of free chlorine (0.1 to 0.4 mg/liter) were evaluated at room (21 to 23 degrees C) and elevated (39 to 40 degrees C) temperatures in filtered well water (pH 7.3) for their efficacy in inactivating Legionella pneumophila (ATCC 33155). At room temperature, a contact time of at least 24 h was necessary for copper and silver (400 and 40 micrograms/liter) to achieve a 3-log10 reduction in bacterial numbers. As the copper and silver concentration increased to 800 and 80 micrograms/liter, the inactivation rate significantly (P less than or equal to 0.05) increased from K = 2.87 x 10(-3) to K = 7.50 x 10(-3) (log10 reduction per minute). In water systems with and without copper and silver (400 and 40 micrograms/liter), the inactivation rates significantly increased as the free chlorine concentration increased from 0.1 mg/liter (K = 0.397 log10 reduction per min) to 0.4 mg/liter (K = 1.047 log10 reduction per min). Compared to room temperature, no significant differences were observed when 0.2 mg of free chlorine per liter with and without 400 and 40 micrograms of copper and silver per liter was tested at 39 to 40 degrees C. All disinfection systems, regardless of temperature or free chlorine concentration, showed increase inactivation rates when 400 and 40 micrograms of copper and silver per liter was added; however, this trend was significant only at 0.4 mg of free chlorine per liter. PMID:2619303

  4. 40 CFR 63.453 - Monitoring requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... with 40 CFR 430.24, shall monitor the chlorine and hypochlorite application rates, in kg of bleaching... degraded in the biological treatment system as specified in § 63.457(l), conduct the sampling and...

  5. Modelling Of Chlorine Inductive Discharges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chabert P.; Despiau-Pujo, E.

    2010-07-01

    .02, which is much lower than the value predicted for stainless steel walls (? = 0.6). This is consistent with reactor wall contaminations classi- cally observed in such discharges. The plasma electronegativity decreases with RF power and increases with Cl2 content. At high pressure, the power absorption and distribution of charged particles become more localized below the quartz window. Although the experi- mental trends are well reproduced by the model, the calculated charged particle densities are systematically overestimated by a factor of 3-5. The reasons for this discrepancy are discussed in the paper. Experimental studies have also shown that low-pressure inductive discharges operating with electronegative gases are subject to instabilities near the transition between capacitive (E) and inductive (H) modes. A global model, consisting of two particle balance equations and one energy balance equation, has been previously proposed to describe the instability mechanism in SF6/ArSF6 (Lieberman et al. 1999). This model, which agrees qualitatively well with experimental observations, leaves significant quantitative differences. In this work, this global model is revisited with Cl2 as the feedstock gas (Despiau-Pujo and Chabert 2009). An alternative treatment of the inductive power deposition is evaluated and chlorine chemistry is included. Old and new models are systematically compared. The alternative inductive coupling description slightly modifies the results. The effect of gas chemistry is even more pronounced. The instability window is smaller in pressure and larger in absorbed power, the frequency is higher and the amplitudes of oscillations are reduced. The feedstock gas is weakly dissociated (~16%) and Cl2+ is the dominant positive ion, which is consistent with the moderate electron density during the instability cycle.

  6. ANALYSIS OF CHLORINATED ORGANIC COMPOUNDS FORMED DURING CHLORINATION OF WASTEWATER PRODUCTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Chemical byproducts produced during the chlorination of municipal wastewater were examined in a study that employed several specially modified analytical methodologies. Volatile byproducts were examined by the use of gas chromatography with selective detectors and gas chromatogra...

  7. 21 CFR 173.300 - Chlorine dioxide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Chlorine dioxide. 173.300 Section 173.300 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION (CONTINUED) SECONDARY DIRECT FOOD ADDITIVES PERMITTED IN FOOD FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION Specific Usage Additives § 173.300...

  8. Ozone-destroying chlorine tops out

    SciTech Connect

    Kerr, R.A.

    1996-01-05

    This article explores the reality of whether the Montreal Protocol to protect the ozone layer has worked. The prime evidence for the success of the 1987 Protocal is that atmospheric chlorine has peaked and is on the way down. However, there are some concerns that gaps in the existing protocal could slow the recovery.

  9. Photoabsorption and photoionization of chlorine dioxide

    SciTech Connect

    Flesch, R.; Ruehl, E.; Hottmann, K.; Baumgaertel, H. )

    1993-01-28

    Photoprocesses of chlorine dioxide in the near-UV have become highly important for stratospheric photoprocesses at high latitudes, especially in Antarctica. Chlorine dioxide has been identified among other absorbers because of its specific absorption cross section in the near-UV. Possible contributions of chlorine dioxide photochemistry to polar ozone depletion have been discussed recently. The high-resolution He I photoelectron spectrum and the absolute (vacuum-UV) absorption cross section (6-25 eV) as well as the ionic fragmentation of chlorine dioxide (OCIO) are reported. The photoelectron spectrum is interpreted in terms of exchange splitting effects of the various singlet and triplet cation states as well as by comparison to chemically related molecules. The vacuum-UV absorption spectrum shows different Rydberg series converging to the cation states. These Rydberg series and their vibrational progressions are assigned by term value arguments, dipole selection rules, and comparison with the photoelectron spectrum. Photoionization mass spectrometry is used for measurements of the ionization and fragmentation threshold of OCIO. The major fragment is ClO[sup +] which occurs above 13.4 eV. Thermomechanical data such as heats of formation and bond dissociation energies are derived. No evidence for isomerization of OClO[sup +] is found, as observed for the electronically excited neutral molecule. 54 refs., 6 figs., 7 tabs.

  10. CHLORINE DISINFECTION STUDIES OF ENCEPHALITOZOON (SEPTATA) INTESTINALIS

    EPA Science Inventory

    A reproducible standardized assay was designed to determine two infective doses for E.intestinalis, the TCID50 and the MID. These doses can be used to assess the potential effectiveness of chlorine disinfection and can also be used to assess other disinfection parameters and ant...

  11. CHLORINE ABSORPTION IN S(IV) SOLUTIONS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The rate of chlorine (Cl2) absorption into aqueous sulfite/bisulfite [S(IV)] solutions was measured at ambient temperature using a highly characterized stirred cell reactor. The reactor media were 0 to 10 mM S(IV) with pH ranging from 3.5 to 8.5. Experiments were performed using ...

  12. 46 CFR 151.50-31 - Chlorine.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... desired rate of discharge, provided the air or gas is oil-free and thoroughly dried by passing it over activated aluminum oxide, silica gel, or other acceptable drying agent, and provided the supply pressure is...-resistant to chlorine in either the gas or liquid phase. Cast or malleable iron shall not be used....

  13. Chlorinated organic compounds in urban river sediments

    SciTech Connect

    Soma, Y.; Shiraishi, H.; Inaba, K.

    1995-12-31

    Among anthropogenic chemicals, many chlorinated organic compounds have been used as insecticides and detected frequently as contaminants in urban river sediments so far. However, the number and total amount of chemicals produced commercially and used are increasing year by year, though each amount of chemicals is not so high. New types of contaminants in the environment may be detected by the use of newly developed chemicals. Chlorinated organic compounds in the urban river sediments around Tokyo and Kyoto, large cities in Japan, were surveyed and recent trends of contaminants were studied. Contaminants of the river sediments in industrial areas had a variety, but PCB (polychlorinated biphenyls) was detected in common in industrial areas. Concentration of PCB related well to the number of factories on both sides of rivers, although the use of PCB was stopped 20 years ago. In domestic areas, Triclosan (5-chloro-2-(2,4-dichlorophenoxy)-phenol) and Triclocarban (3,4,4{prime}-trichlorocarbanilide)(both are contained in soap or shampoo for fungicides), p-dichlorobenzene (insecticides for wears) and TCEP(tris-chloroethyl phosphate) were detected. EOX(extracted organic halogen) in the sediments was 5 to 10 times of chlorinated organic compounds detected by GC/MS. Major part of organic halogen was suggested to be included in chlorinated organics formed by bleaching or sterilization.

  14. Origin of the regioselective reduction of chlorins.

    PubMed

    Bruhn, Torsten; Brückner, Christian

    2015-05-15

    The reduction of a free-base chlorin generally forms a bacteriochlorin (BC), while the reduction of the corresponding metallochlorin forms a metalloisobacteriochlorin (M-iBC). This regioselectivity has been long known but was never fully rationalized. In the free-base case, this regioselectivity can be explained using resonance arguments, but the explanations for the regioselectivity in the metallochlorin reactions requires a more sophisticated approach. A combination of DFT-calculated average local ionization energies (ALIEs), thermodynamics of the products, and the transition-state trajectories of reduction reactions of meso-tetraaryl- and β-octaethylchlorins, as their free bases and zinc complexes, now fully delineate the theoretical basis of the reduction regioselectivity. The reactions are kinetically controlled. Steric effects originating in the conformational flexibility of the chlorin macrocycle direct the reactions toward the formation of iBCs. Only when electronic effects are strong enough to override the steric effects are BCs formed. Depending on the substituents present on the chlorin, this regioselectivity may change, but ALIE calculations provide reliable guidelines to predict this. The practical value of this work lies in the presentation of a simple predictive method toward synthetic tetrahydroporphyrins by reduction of chlorins. PMID:25719438

  15. CHLORINE ABSORPTION IN S(IV) SOLUTIONS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report gives results of measurements of the rate of Chlorine (Cl2) absorption into aqueous sulfite/bisulfite -- S(IV) -- solutions at ambient temperature using a highly characterized stirred-cell reactor. The reactor media were 0 to 10 mM S(IV) with pHs of 3.5-8.5. Experiment...

  16. Chlorine-hydrocarbon photochemistry in the marine troposphere and lower stratosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singh, H. B.; Kasting, J. F.

    1988-01-01

    The role of chlorine atoms in the oxidation of methane and nonmethane hydrocarbons (NMHCs) in the marine troposphere and lower stratosphere was investigated using a one-dimensional photochemical model that incorporated the chemistry of CH4, NMHCs, NO(x), O(x), and HO(x), as well as organic and inorganic halogens in the troposphere and lower stratosphere. The model predicted that chlorine atoms are present in the marine troposphere at the concentrations of about 1000/cu cm, mostly as a product of the reaction between OH and HCl released from sea spray. The results indicate that Cl atoms cause 20 to 40 percent of NMHC oxidation in the troposphere and 40 to 90 percent in the lower stratosphere. At 15 km, the NMHC-Cl reactions account for nearly 80 percent of the PAN produced. Where available, experimental data confirmed the model predictions.

  17. SUBSTITUENT EFFECTS AND ADDITIVITY IN THE CARBON-13 NUCLEAR MAGNETIC RESONANCE SPECTRA OF CHLORINATED NAPHTHALENES AND THEIR CHLORINATED NAPHTHOL METABOLITES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Carbon-13 and proton nuclear magnetic resonance spectra were obtained for 12 chlorinated naphthalenes and six chlorinated naphthols, some of which are metabolites of the naphthalenes. The validity of the use of additivity of chlorine and hydroxyl substituent effects to predict 13...

  18. Shelf-Life of Chlorine Solutions Recommended in Ebola Virus Disease Response

    PubMed Central

    Iqbal, Qais; Lubeck-Schricker, Maya; Wells, Emma; Lantagne, Daniele

    2016-01-01

    In Ebola Virus Disease (EVD) outbreaks, it is widely recommended to wash living things (handwashing) with 0.05% (500 mg/L) chlorine solution and non-living things (surfaces, personal protective equipment, dead bodies) with 0.5% (5,000 mg/L) chlorine solution. Chlorine solutions used in EVD response are primarily made from powdered calcium hypochlorite (HTH), granular sodium dichloroisocyanurate (NaDCC), and liquid sodium hypochlorite (NaOCl), and have a pH range of 5–11. Chlorine solutions degrade following a reaction highly dependent on, and unusually sensitive to, pH, temperature, and concentration. We determined the shelf-life of 0.05% and 0.5% chlorine solutions used in EVD response, including HTH, NaDCC, stabilized NaOCl, generated NaOCl, and neutralized NaOCl solutions. Solutions were stored for 30 days at 25, 30, and 35°C, and tested daily for chlorine concentration and pH. Maximum shelf-life was defined as days until initial concentration fell to <90% of initial concentration in ideal laboratory conditions. At 25–35°C, neutralized-NaOCl solutions (pH = 7) had a maximum shelf-life of a few hours, NaDCC solutions (pH = 6) 2 days, generated NaOCl solutions (pH = 9) 6 days, and HTH and stabilized NaOCl solutions (pH 9–11) >30 days. Models were developed for solutions with maximum shelf-lives between 1–30 days. Extrapolating to 40°C, the maximum predicted shelf-life for 0.05% and 0.5% NaDCC solutions were 0.38 and 0.82 hours, respectively; predicted shelf-life for 0.05% and 0.5% generated NaOCl solutions were >30 and 5.4 days, respectively. Each chlorine solution type offers advantages and disadvantages to responders, as: NaDCC is an easy-to-import high-concentration effervescent powder; HTH is similar, but forms a precipitate that may clog pipes; and, NaOCl solutions can be made locally, but are difficult to transport. We recommend responders chose the most appropriate source chlorine compound for their use, and ensure solutions are stored at

  19. Shelf-Life of Chlorine Solutions Recommended in Ebola Virus Disease Response.

    PubMed

    Iqbal, Qais; Lubeck-Schricker, Maya; Wells, Emma; Wolfe, Marlene K; Lantagne, Daniele

    2016-01-01

    In Ebola Virus Disease (EVD) outbreaks, it is widely recommended to wash living things (handwashing) with 0.05% (500 mg/L) chlorine solution and non-living things (surfaces, personal protective equipment, dead bodies) with 0.5% (5,000 mg/L) chlorine solution. Chlorine solutions used in EVD response are primarily made from powdered calcium hypochlorite (HTH), granular sodium dichloroisocyanurate (NaDCC), and liquid sodium hypochlorite (NaOCl), and have a pH range of 5-11. Chlorine solutions degrade following a reaction highly dependent on, and unusually sensitive to, pH, temperature, and concentration. We determined the shelf-life of 0.05% and 0.5% chlorine solutions used in EVD response, including HTH, NaDCC, stabilized NaOCl, generated NaOCl, and neutralized NaOCl solutions. Solutions were stored for 30 days at 25, 30, and 35°C, and tested daily for chlorine concentration and pH. Maximum shelf-life was defined as days until initial concentration fell to <90% of initial concentration in ideal laboratory conditions. At 25-35°C, neutralized-NaOCl solutions (pH = 7) had a maximum shelf-life of a few hours, NaDCC solutions (pH = 6) 2 days, generated NaOCl solutions (pH = 9) 6 days, and HTH and stabilized NaOCl solutions (pH 9-11) >30 days. Models were developed for solutions with maximum shelf-lives between 1-30 days. Extrapolating to 40°C, the maximum predicted shelf-life for 0.05% and 0.5% NaDCC solutions were 0.38 and 0.82 hours, respectively; predicted shelf-life for 0.05% and 0.5% generated NaOCl solutions were >30 and 5.4 days, respectively. Each chlorine solution type offers advantages and disadvantages to responders, as: NaDCC is an easy-to-import high-concentration effervescent powder; HTH is similar, but forms a precipitate that may clog pipes; and, NaOCl solutions can be made locally, but are difficult to transport. We recommend responders chose the most appropriate source chlorine compound for their use, and ensure solutions are stored at appropriate

  20. Chlorinated aromatics from combustion: influence of chlorine, combustion conditions, and catalytic activity.

    PubMed

    Oberg, T; Ohrström, T

    2003-09-01

    Research on the formation of chlorinated aromatics in combustion processes has mainly taken place in the laboratory. Previous attempts to correlate observation data from commercial plants have been inconclusive. This study reports on the outcome of an industrial experiment in a full-scale afterburner. The influence of chlorine input, combustion temperature, and catalytic activity was investigated in a factorial design with two blocks. Polychlorinated benzenes, dibenzo-p-dioxins, and dibenzofurans were formed both at combustion temperatures and below 400 degrees C. The results show that all three experimental factors have statistically significant impact on the formation and release of these toxic byproducts. The quantitative dependence between chlorine input and the occurrence of chlorinated aromatics is of particular interest due to previous controversy. The purpose with this study was to ensure that the installation of a boiler for energy recovery would not cause elevated emissions of chlorinated aromatics. The experiment demonstrated that this risk is probably low, since the presence of catalytic material or an increase in chlorine input is required for this to happen. A general conclusion was that industrial experimentation employing the principles of statistical design could improve the validity in recommendations regarding commercial plant operation. PMID:12967125

  1. Kinetic models and pathways of ronidazole degradation by chlorination, UV irradiation and UV/chlorine processes.

    PubMed

    Qin, Lang; Lin, Yi-Li; Xu, Bin; Hu, Chen-Yan; Tian, Fu-Xiang; Zhang, Tian-Yang; Zhu, Wen-Qian; Huang, He; Gao, Nai-Yun

    2014-11-15

    Degradation kinetics and pathways of ronidazole (RNZ) by chlorination (Cl2), UV irradiation and combined UV/chlorine processes were investigated in this paper. The degradation kinetics of RNZ chlorination followed a second-order behavior with the rate constants calculated as (2.13 ± 0.15) × 10(2) M(-2) s(-1), (0.82 ± 0.52) × 10(-2) M(-1) s(-1) and (2.06 ± 0.09) × 10(-1) M(-1) s(-1) for the acid-catalyzed reaction, as well as the reactions of RNZ with HOCl and OCl(-), respectively. Although UV irradiation degraded RNZ more effectively than chlorination did, very low quantum yield of RNZ at 254 nm was obtained as 1.02 × 10(-3) mol E(-1). RNZ could be efficiently degraded and mineralized in the UV/chlorine process due to the generation of hydroxyl radicals. The second-order rate constant between RNZ and hydroxyl radical was determined as (2.92 ± 0.05) × 10(9) M(-1) s(-1). The degradation intermediates of RNZ during the three processes were identified with Ultra Performance Liquid Chromatography - Electrospray Ionization - mass spectrometry and the degradation pathways were then proposed. Moreover, the variation of chloropicrin (TCNM) and chloroform (CF) formation after the three processes were further evaluated. Enhanced formation of CF and TCNM precursors during UV/chlorine process deserves extensive attention in drinking water treatment. PMID:25141357

  2. In vitro characterization of monoaspartyl chlorin e6 and diaspartyl chlorin e6 for photodynamic therapy.

    PubMed

    Roberts, W G; Shiau, F Y; Nelson, J S; Smith, K M; Berns, M W

    1988-05-01

    The characteristics of two new chlorin photosensitizers were studied in cell culture by determining phototoxicity, subcellular localization, and photophysical properties. Monoaspartyl chlorin e6 (MACE) and diaspartyl chlorin e6 (DACE) are new photosensitizers that show promise for use in photodynamic therapy. These chlorins are pure, monomeric compounds as determined by high-pressure liquid chromatography. Both compounds absorb substantially at a longer wavelength (664 nm) than does dihematoporphyrin ether-ester (DHE). Tumor diagnosis with the use of fluorescence should be facilitated due to the purity of the compounds and the single fluorescence emission peak. Phototoxicity dose-response curves of the sensitizers were completed using a standard clonogenic assay to determine cell viability. The chlorins showed good sensitizing capabilities with light. In addition, subcellular localization of MACE, DACE, and DHE was studied using fluorescence microscopy. Whereas DHE was located throughout the cytoplasm, the primary site of localization of the chlorins appeared to be in the lysosome. The results demonstrate that MACE and DACE are effective photosensitizing agents in vitro and compare favorably to DHE. PMID:2965763

  3. Diurnal variation of stratospheric chlorine monoxide: a critical test of chlorine chemistry in the ozone layer.

    PubMed

    Solomon, P M; de Zafra, R; Parrish, A; Barrett, J W

    1984-06-15

    This article reports measurements of the column density of stratospheric chlorine monoxide and presents a complete diurnal record of its variation (with 2-hour resolution) obtained from ground-based observations of a millimeter-wave spectral line at 278 gigahertz. Observations were carried out during October and December 1982 from Mauna Kea, Hawaii. The results reported here indicate that the mixing ratio and column density of chlorine monoxide above 30 kilometers during the daytime are approximately 20 percent lower than model predictions based on 2.1 parts per billion of total stratospheric chlorine. The observed day-to-night variation of chlorine monoxide is, however, in good agreement with recent model predictions, confirms the existence of a nighttime reservoir for chlorine, and verifies the predicted general rate of its storage and retrieval. From this evidence, it appears that the chlorine chemistry above 30 kilometers is close to being understood in current stratospheric models. Models based on this chemistry and measured reaction rates predict a reduction in the total stratospheric ozone content in the range of 3 to 5 percent in the final steady state for an otherwise unperturbed atmosphere, although the percentage decrease in the upper stratosphere is much higher. PMID:17819478

  4. Turbidity and chlorine demand reduction using alum and moringa flocculation before household chlorination in developing countries.

    PubMed

    Preston, Kelsey; Lantagne, Daniele; Kotlarz, Nadine; Jellison, Kristen

    2010-03-01

    Over 1.1 billion people in the world lack access to improved drinking water. Diarrhoeal and other waterborne diseases cause an estimated 1.87 million deaths per year. The Safe Water System (SWS) is a household water treatment intervention that reduces diarrhoeal disease incidence among users in developing countries. Turbid waters pose a particular challenge to implementation of SWS programmes; although research shows that a 3.75 mg l(-1) sodium hypochlorite dose effectively treats turbid waters, users sometimes object to the strong chlorine taste and prefer to drink water that is more aesthetically pleasing. This study investigated the efficacy of two locally available chemical water treatments-alum and Moringa oleifera flocculation-to reduce turbidity and chlorine demand at turbidities of 10, 30, 70, 100 and 300 NTU. Both treatments effectively reduced turbidity (alum flocculation 23.0-91.4%; moringa flocculation 14.2-96.2%). Alum flocculation effectively reduced chlorine demand compared with controls at 30, 70, 100 and 300 NTU (p=0.01-0.06). Moringa flocculation increased chlorine demand to the point where adequate free chlorine residual was not maintained for 24 hours after treatment. Alum pretreatment is recommended in waters>or=30 NTU for optimum water disinfection. Moringa flocculation is not recommended before chlorination. PMID:20009248

  5. Dehalogenation of chlorinated organic compounds by strong alkalis

    SciTech Connect

    Gu, B.; Siegrist, R.L.

    1997-10-01

    Chlorinated organic compounds such as trichloroethylene (TCE) are the most prevalent contaminants found in soil and ground water, and pose serious health risks even at trace concentrations. This research reports a new chemical treatment technique for rapid degradation of TCE in strong alkaline solutions. Batch kinetic reactions between TCE and NaOH indicate that TCE can be rapidly and completely dechlorinated in NaOH at elevated temperatures. The reaction can be described by a pseudo-first-order rate kinetics with an estimated activation energy of {approximately}85 kJ/mol. The half-lives for TCE degradation in 2M NaOH at 40, 60, 80, and 100 C were approximately 347, 48.8, 4.0, and 2.4 min, respectively. The reaction end-products are primarily Cl{sup {minus}} anions and Na-glycollate, both of which are nonhazardous. This treatment technique is applicable for degrading other halogenated organic compounds wherein a nucleophilic substitution or elimination is the major reaction mechanism or pathway. Potential applications of this technology include the removal and destruction of vapor-phase chlorinated volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in off-gases when soil vapor extraction or air-stripping techniques are used for remediating VOC-contaminated soils and ground water. A bench-scale alkaline destruction module was tested, and results indicated that {approximately}90% of TCE was destroyed when TCE vapor (10 mg/L) was passed through a destruction column with a retention time of {approximately}1 min at 95 C.

  6. Assimilation of chlorinated alkanes by hydrocarbon-utilizing fungi

    SciTech Connect

    Murphy, G.L.; Perry, J.J.

    1984-12-01

    The fatty acid compositions of two filamentous fungi (Cunninghamella elegans and Penicillium zonatum) and a yeast (Candida lipolytica) were determined after the organisms were grown on 1-chlorohexadecane or 1-chlorooctadecane. These organisms utilized the chlorinated alkanes as sole sources of carbon and energy. Analyses of the fatty acids present after growth on the chlorinated alkanes indicated that 60 to 70% of the total fatty acids in C. elegans were chlorinated. Approximately 50% of the fatty acids in C. lipolytica were also chlorinated. P. zonatum contained 20% 1-chlorohexadecanoic acid after growth on either substrate but did not incorporate C/sub 18/ chlorinated fatty acids.

  7. VIBRIO CHOLERAE 01 CAN ASSUME A "RUGOSE" SURVIVAL FORM THAT RESISTS KILLING BY CHLORINE, YET RETAINS VIRULENCE

    EPA Science Inventory

    V. cholerae 01 are able to shift between smooth and "wrinkled" or "rugose" colonial morphologies. ultures of smooth V. cholerae strains were inactivated in less than 40 and 20 seconds by concentrations of 0.5 mg/L and 1.0 mg/L free chlorine, respectively. n contrast, cultures of ...

  8. DETERMINATION OF CHLORINATED ACID HERBICIDES AND RELATED COMPOUNDS IN WATER BY CAPILLARY ELECTROPHORESIS-ELECTROSPRAY NEGATIVE ION MASS SPECTROMETRY

    EPA Science Inventory

    Capillary electrophoresis electrospray negative ion mass spectrometry was investigated for the determination of chlorinated acid herbicides and several phenols in water. Sixteen analytes were separated as their anions in less than 40 min with a buffer consisting of 5 mM ammonium ...

  9. Solid recovered fuel: influence of waste stream composition and processing on chlorine content and fuel quality.

    PubMed

    Velis, Costas; Wagland, Stuart; Longhurst, Phil; Robson, Bryce; Sinfield, Keith; Wise, Stephen; Pollard, Simon

    2012-02-01

    Solid recovered fuel (SRF) produced by mechanical-biological treatment (MBT) of municipal waste can replace fossil fuels, being a CO(2)-neutral, affordable, and alternative energy source. SRF application is limited by low confidence in quality. We present results for key SRF properties centered on the issue of chlorine content. A detailed investigation involved sampling, statistical analysis, reconstruction of composition, and modeling of SRF properties. The total chlorine median for a typical plant during summer operation was 0.69% w/w(d), with lower/upper 95% confidence intervals of 0.60% w/w(d) and 0.74% w/w(d) (class 3 of CEN Cl indicator). The average total chlorine can be simulated, using a reconciled SRF composition before shredding to <40 mm. The relative plastics vs paper mass ratios in particular result in an SRF with a 95% upper confidence limit for ash content marginally below the 20% w/w(d) deemed suitable for certain power plants; and a lower 95% confidence limit of net calorific value (NCV) at 14.5 MJ kg(ar)(-1). The data provide, for the first time, a high level of confidence on the effects of SRF composition on its chlorine content, illustrating interrelationships with other fuel properties. The findings presented here allow rational debate on achievable vs desirable MBT-derived SRF quality, informing the development of realistic SRF quality specifications, through modeling exercises, needed for effective thermal recovery. PMID:22191490

  10. Thermal treatment for chlorine removal from coal. Final technical report, September 1, 1991--December 31, 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Muchmore, C.B.; Hesketh, H.E.; Chen, Han Lin

    1992-12-31

    It was the goal of this research to provide the technical basis for development of a process to remove chlorine from coal prior to combustion, based on a thermal treatment process. Reaction rate constants and activation energy have been determined, and energy and mass balances performed. Substitution of a synthetic flue gas (7% 0{sub 2}, 12% CO{sub 2}, 81% N{sub 2}) for nitrogen in the tube furnace resulted in at least equivalent chlorine removal (85.5%) compared to nitrogen. The fluidized bed dechlorination system modifications have resulted in a steady increase in performance, the most recent run providing 64% reduction in chlorine concentration. Addition of supplemental heat to the column should permit attainment of the slightly higher temperatures required to attain over 80% removal of the chlorine. Calcium chloride by-product of 67% purity has been produced. A bench scale catenary grid concentrator with supplemental heating coils and limited insulation is capable of concentrating CaCl{sub 2} solution up to essentially 40%, with no sign of scale or plugging. Further development of the process should include a thorough evaluation of the use of combustion gases to serve as the fluidizing medium and to provide the energy for the thermal dechlorination process.

  11. Making chlorine greener: performance of alternative dechlorination agents in wastewater.

    PubMed

    MacCrehan, William A; Bedner, Mary; Helz, George R

    2005-07-01

    The residual chlorine in chlorine-disinfected and dechlorinated wastewater was characterized using a liquid chromatograph that was switched between reversed-phase separation and flow injection analysis modes, permitting measurement of fractionated and total residual chlorine, respectively. Residuals were detected in the effluent of an operating wastewater treatment plant employing chlorine disinfection and sulfite dechlorination. Despite dechlorination, an estimated total residual chlorine of 3 microM (0.2 ppm as Cl2) was detected in the effluent. To improve dechlorination effectiveness, four alternative agents (ascorbic acid, iron, sulfite plus iodide mediator, thiosulfate) were compared to sulfite on laboratory-chlorinated wastewater. Listed in order of decreasing relative effectiveness, we found: iron metal > sulfite plus iodide approximately = thiosulfate > sulfite > ascorbic acid. Only the iron metal column was completely effective at rapidly removing all traces of residual chlorine. PMID:15924957

  12. Chlorine hazard evaluation for the zinc-chlorine electric vehicle battery. Final technical report. [50 kWh

    SciTech Connect

    Zalosh, R. G.; Bajpai, S. N.; Short, T. P.; Tsui, R. K.

    1980-04-01

    Hazards associated with conceivable accidental chlorine releases from zinc-chlorine electric vehicle batteries are evaluated. Since commercial batteries are not yet available, this hazard assessment is based on both theoretical chlorine dispersion models and small-scale and large-scale spill tests with chlorine hydrate (which is the form of chlorine storage in the charged battery). Six spill tests involving the chlorine hydrate equivalent of a 50-kWh battery indicate that the danger zone in which chlorine vapor concentrations intermittently exceed 100 ppM extends at least 23 m directly downwind of a spill onto a warm (30 to 38/sup 0/C) road surface. Other accidental chlorine release scenarios may also cause some distress, but are not expected to produce the type of life-threatening chlorine exposures that can result from large hydrate spills. Chlorine concentration data from the hydrate spill tests compare favorably with calculations based on a quasi-steady area source dispersion model and empirical estimates of the hydrate decomposition rate. The theoretical dispersion model was combined with assumed hydrate spill probabilities and current motor vehicle accident statistics in order to project expected chlorine-induced fatality rates. These calculations indicate that expected chlorine fataility rates are several times higher in a city such as Los Angeles with a warm and calm climate than in a colder and windier city such as Boston. Calculated chlorine-induced fatality rate projections for various climates are presented as a function of hydrate spill probability in order to illustrate the degree of vehicle/battery crashworthiness required to maintain chlorine-induced fatality rates below current vehicle fatality rates due to fires and asphyxiations. 37 figures, 19 tables.

  13. Behavioral toxicology, risk assessment, and chlorinated hydrocarbons.

    PubMed Central

    Evangelista de Duffard, A M; Duffard, R

    1996-01-01

    Behavioral end points are being used with greater frequency in neurotoxicology to detect and characterize the adverse effects of chemicals on the nervous system. Behavioral measures are particularly important for neurotoxicity risk assessment since many known neurotoxicants do not result in neuropathology. The chlorinated hydrocarbon class consists of a wide variety of chemicals including polychlorinated biphenyls, clioquinol, trichloroethylene, hexachlorophene, organochlorine insecticides (DDT, dicofol, chlordecone,dieldrin, and lindane), and phenoxyherbicides. Each of these chemicals has effects on motor, sensory, or cognitive function that are detectable using functional measures such as behavior. Furthermore, there is evidence that if exposure occurs during critical periods of development, many of the chlorinated hydrocarbons are developmental neurotoxicants. Developmental neurotoxicity is frequently expressed as alterations in motor function or cognitive abilities or changes in the ontogeny of sensorimotor reflexes. Neurotoxicity risk assessment should include assessments of the full range of possible neurotoxicological effects, including both structural and functional indicators of neurotoxicity. PMID:9182042

  14. Stable isotope investigations of chlorinated aliphatic hydrocarbons.

    SciTech Connect

    Abrajano, T.; Heraty, L. J.; Holt, B. D.; Huang, L.; Sturchio, N. C.

    1999-06-01

    Stable isotope ratio measurements for carbon (C) and chlorine (Cl) can be used to elucidate the processes affecting transformation and transportation of chlorinated aliphatic hydrocarbons (CAHs) in the environment. Methods recently developed in our laboratory for isotopic analysis of CAHs have been applied to laboratory measurements of the kinetic isotope effects associated with aerobic degradation of dichloromethane (DCM) and with both anaerobic and aerobic cometabolic degradation of trichlomethene (TCE) in batch and column microbial cultures. These experimental determinations of fractionation factors are crucial for understanding the behavior of CAHs in complex natural systems, where the extent of biotransformation can be masked by dispersion and volatilization. We have also performed laboratory investigations of kinetic isotope effects accompanying evaporation of CAHs, as well as field investigations of natural attenuation and in situ remediation of CAHs in a number of contaminated shallow aquifers at sites operated by the federal government and the private sector.

  15. Bacterial responses to reactive chlorine species.

    PubMed

    Gray, Michael J; Wholey, Wei-Yun; Jakob, Ursula

    2013-01-01

    Hypochlorous acid (HOCl), the active ingredient of household bleach, is the most common disinfectant in medical, industrial, and domestic use and plays an important role in microbial killing in the innate immune system. Given the critical importance of the antimicrobial properties of chlorine to public health, it is surprising how little is known about the ways in which bacteria sense and respond to reactive chlorine species (RCS). Although the literature on bacterial responses to reactive oxygen species (ROS) is enormous, work addressing bacterial responses to RCS has begun only recently. Transcriptomic and proteomic studies now provide new insights into how bacteria mount defenses against this important class of antimicrobial compounds. In this review, we summarize the current knowledge, emphasizing the overlaps between RCS stress responses and other more well-characterized bacterial defense systems, and identify outstanding questions that represent productive avenues for future research. PMID:23768204

  16. Gas phase chemistry of chlorine nitrate

    SciTech Connect

    Okumura, M.; Moore, T.A.; Crellin, K.C.

    1995-12-31

    Chlorine nitrate (ClONO{sub 2}) is a reservoir of both ClO{sub x} and NO{sub x} radicals in Earth`s stratosphere, and its decomposition is important in determining the abundance of stratospheric ozone. We present experimental and theoretical studies that explore the mechanisms and dynamics of processes leading to ClONO{sub 2} destruction in the stratosphere. Molecular beam photodissociation experiments have been performed to determine the decomposition pathways of ClONO{sub 2} upon excitation at 308 nm and to explore the possibility of a long-lived excited state. We have also investigated the reaction of chlorine nitrate with chloride ions Cl{sup -} in the gas phase. The gas phase ionic reaction may elucidate ionic mechanisms of heterogeneous reactions occurring on the surfaces of Polar Stratospheric Cloud particles and also raise doubts about proposed schemes to mitigate ozone depletion by electrifying the stratosphere.

  17. Chlorine-Free Red-Burning Pyrotechnics.

    PubMed

    Sabatini, Jesse J; Koch, Ernst-Christian; Poret, Jay C; Moretti, Jared D; Harbol, Seth M

    2015-09-01

    The development of a red, chlorine-free pyrotechnic illuminant of high luminosity and spectral purity was investigated. Red-light emission based solely on transient SrOH(g) has been achieved by using either 5-amino-1H-tetrazole or hexamine to deoxidize the combustion flame of a Mg/Sr(NO3 )2 /Epon-binder composition and reduce the amount of both condensed and gaseous SrO, which emits undesirable orange-red light. The new formulations were found to possess high thermal onset temperatures. Avoiding chlorine in these formulations eliminates the risk of the formation of PCBs, PCDDs, and PCDFs. This finding, hence, will have a great impact on both military pyrotechnics and commercial firework sectors. PMID:26333055

  18. Virucidal effect of chlorinated water containing cyanuric acid.

    PubMed Central

    Yamashita, T.; Sakae, K.; Ishihara, Y.; Isomura, S.; Inoue, H.

    1988-01-01

    The inhibitory influence of cyanuric acid on the virucidal effect of chlorine was studied. The time required for 99.9% inactivation of ten enteroviruses and two adenoviruses by 0.5 mg/l free available chlorine at pH 7.0 and 25 degrees C was prolonged approximately 4.8-28.8 times by the addition of 30 mg/l cyanuric acid. Comparative inactivation of poliovirus 1 by free available chlorine with or without cyanuric acid revealed the following. The inactivation rate by 1.5 mg/l free available chlorine with 30 mg/l cyanuric acid or by 0.5 mg/l free available chlorine with 1 mg/l cyanuric acid was slower than by 0.5 mg/l free available chlorine alone. Temperature and pH did not affect the inhibitory influence of cyanuric acid on the disinfectant action of chlorine. In the swimming-pool and tap water, cyanuric acid delayed the virucidal effect of chlorine as much as in the 'clean' condition of chlorine-buffered distilled water. The available chlorine value should be increased to 1.5 mg/l when cyanuric acid is used in swimming-pool water. PMID:2850940

  19. Stability and effectiveness of chlorine disinfectants in water distribution systems

    SciTech Connect

    Olivieri, V.P.; Snead, M.C.; Kruse, C.W.; Kawata, K.

    1986-11-01

    A test system for water distribution was used to evaluate the stability and effectiveness of three residual disinfectants - free chlorine, combined chlorine, and chlorine dioxide - when challenged with a sewage contaminant. The test distribution system consisted of the street main and internal plumbing for two barracks at Fort George G. Meade, MD. To the existing pipe network, 152 m (500 ft) of 13-mm (0.5 in.) copper pipe were added for sampling, and 60 m (200 ft) of 2.54-cm (1.0 in.) plastic pipe were added for circulation. The levels of residual disinfectants tested were 0.2 mg/L and 1.0 mg/L as available chlorine. In the absence of a disinfectant residual, microorganisms in the sewage contaminant were consistently recovered at high levels. The presence of any disinfectant residual reduced the microorganism level and frequency of occurrence at the consumer's tap. Free chlorine was the most effective residual disinfectant and may serve as a marker or flag in the distribution network. Free chlorine and chlorine dioxide were the least stable in the pipe network. The loss of disinfectant in the pipe network followed first-order kinetics. The half-life determined in static tests for free chlorine, chlorine dioxide, and combined chlorine was 140, 93, and 1680 min.

  20. Stability and effectiveness of chlorine disinfectants in water distribution systems.

    PubMed Central

    Olivieri, V P; Snead, M C; Krusé, C W; Kawata, K

    1986-01-01

    A test system for water distribution was used to evaluate the stability and effectiveness of three residual disinfectants--free chlorine, combined chlorine, and chlorine dioxide--when challenged with a sewage contaminant. The test distribution system consisted of the street main and internal plumbing for two barracks at Fort George G. Meade, MD. To the existing pipe network, 152 m (500 ft) of 13-mm (0.5 in.) copper pipe were added for sampling, and 60 m (200 ft) of 2.54-cm (1.0 in.) plastic pipe were added for circulation. The levels of residual disinfectants tested were 0.2 mg/L and 1.0 mg/L as available chlorine. In the absence of a disinfectant residual, microorganisms in the sewage contaminant were consistently recovered at high levels. The presence of any disinfectant residual reduced the microorganism level and frequency of occurrence at the consumer's tap. Free chlorine was the most effective residual disinfectant and may serve as a marker or flag in the distribution network. Free chlorine and chlorine dioxide were the least stable in the pipe network. The loss of disinfectant in the pipe network followed first-order kinetics. The half-life determined in static tests for free chlorine, chlorine dioxide, and combined chlorine was 140, 93, and 1680 min. PMID:3028767

  1. A comparison of iodinated trihalomethane formation from chlorine, chlorine dioxide and potassium permanganate oxidation processes.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Tian-Yang; Xu, Bin; Hu, Chen-Yan; Lin, Yi-Li; Lin, Lin; Ye, Tao; Tian, Fu-Xiang

    2015-01-01

    This study compared the formation of iodinated trihalomethanes (I-THMs) from iodide-containing raw waters oxidized by chlorine, chlorine dioxide (ClO₂) and potassium permanganate (KMnO₄) at different oxidant concentrations, reaction times, pHs, initial iodide concentrations and bromide to iodide mass ratios. Among the six investigated I-THMs, iodoform was the major species formed during the oxidation using chlorine, ClO₂ and KMnO₄. When oxidant concentration increased from 0.1 to 3.0 mg/L, the formation of I-THMs increased and then decreased for chlorine and ClO₂, but kept increasing for KMnO₄. As the reaction time went by, I-THM concentration increased to a plateau within 10 h (ClO₂ within only 1 h, especially) for all the three oxidants. I-THM formation gradually increased from pH 3.0 to 9.0 and remained stable at pH values higher than 7.5 for chlorine; however, for ClO₂ and KMnO₄ the highest I-THM formation showed at pH 7.0 and 7.5, respectively. As initial iodide concentration increased from 20 to 800 μg/L, the total amount and species of I-THMs increased for the three oxidants. Iodide contributed to I-THM formation much more significantly than bromide. PMID:25462746

  2. The effect of nebulized NaHCO3 treatment on "RADS" due to chlorine gas inhalation.

    PubMed

    Aslan, Sahin; Kandiş, Hayati; Akgun, Metin; Cakir, Zeynep; Inandi, Tacettin; Görgüner, Metin

    2006-10-01

    Chlorine is one of the most common substances involved in toxic inhalation. As with all irritant gases, the airway injuries caused by chlorine gas may result in clinical manifestations similar to those of asthma. In this study, we investigated the effect of nebulized sodium bicarbonate (NSB) on the treatment and quality of life (QoL) of victims exposed to chlorine gas. Forty-four consecutive patients with reactive airways dysfunction syndrome (RADS) due to chlorine inhalation (40 females and 4 males, age range 17-56 yr) were included in this study. Patients were placed in control and treatment groups in a sequential odd-even fashion based on their order of presentation. Treatment of all patients included corticosteroids and nebulized short-acting beta2-agonists. Then the control group (n = 22) received nebulized placebo (NP), and the NSB group (n = 22) received NSB treatment (4 cm3 of 4.20% sodium bicarbonate solution). A quality of life (QoL) questionnaire and pulmonary function tests (PFTs) were performed before and after treatments in both groups. The most common symptoms were dyspnea (82%) and chest tightness (82%). Baseline characteristics of both groups were similar. Compared to the placebo group, the NSB group had significantly higher FEV1 values at 120 and 240 min (p < .05). Significantly more improvement in QoL questionnaire scores occurred in the NSB group compared to the NP group (p < .001). Thus, NSB is a clinically useful treatment, as tested by PFTs and QoL questionnaire, for patients with RADS caused by exposure to chlorine gas. PMID:16864407

  3. Impacts of the January 2005 solar particle events on middle atmospheric chlorine species

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Winkler, Holger; Sinnhuber, Miriam; Notholt, Justus; Maik Wissing, Jan; Kallenrode, May-Britt; Santee, Michelle

    It is well established that solar particle events (SPEs) are sources of significant chemical dis-turbances in the Earth's polar atmosphere. The observed SPE effects on nitrogen, hydrogen and oxygen compounds have been investigated in some detail in recent years, and they can be reproduced by atmospheric models using basic parametrizations for NOx and HOx produc-tion as a funtion of the particle impact ionisation. However, there are considerable differences between model predictions and measurements concerning several other trace gases including chlorine species. Two major SPEs occurred on January 17, and January 20, 2005. The latter had an exceptionally hard energy spectrum which caused maximum particle impact ionization at stratospheric altitudes. The Microwave Limb Sounder (MLS) instrument on-board the Aura satellite has measured a short-term decrease of HCl in the northern polar region corresponding to January 2005 SPEs. The peak HCl depletion is ˜300 ppt at 35-40 km. This is comparable to the depletion of messopheric HCl observed by the HALOE instrument during the July 2000 SPE. We will present simulation results of the University of Bremen Ion Chemistry (UBIC) model for the SPEs in January 2005 focusing on chlorine species. The simulations indicate that the observed short-term decrease of middle atmospheric HCl is due to a conversion into active chlorine species such as Cl, ClO and HOCl. The magnitude of the observed HCl loss can only be reproduced if reactions of negative chlorine species and the production of O(1 D) from the reaction N(2 D) + O2 are taken into account. The model results will be compared to MLS/Aura data of HCl, HOCl and ClO. Additionally, the impacts of the observed chlorine activation, e.g. on ozone, will be assessed.

  4. Transformation of acetaminophen during water chlorination treatment: kinetics and transformation products identification.

    PubMed

    Cao, Fei; Zhang, Mengtao; Yuan, Shoujun; Feng, Jingwei; Wang, Qiquan; Wang, Wei; Hu, Zhenhu

    2016-06-01

    As a high-consumption drug in the world, acetaminophen (AAP) has been widely detected in natural waters and wastewaters. Its reactivity and the transformation products formed during chlorination may greatly threaten the safety of drinking water. The reaction kinetics of AAP during chlorination was investigated in this study. The results showed that the reaction kinetics could be well described with a kinetics model of -d[AAP]/dt = k app[AAP]t (0.63)[Cl2]t (1.37). The values of apparent rate constant (k app) were dependent on reaction temperature, ammonium, and pH. With the increase in reaction temperature from 5.0 ± 1.0 to 40.0 ± 1.0 °C, the removal efficiency of AAP increased from 60 to 100 %. When ammonium was present in the solution at 2.0 mg/L, the transformation of AAP was inhibited due to the rapid formation of chloramines. The maximum of k app was 0.58 × 10(2) M(-1) · min(-1) at pH 9.0, and the minimum was 0.27 M(-1) · min(-1) at pH 11.0. A low mineralization of AAP (about 7.2 %) with chlorination was observed through TOC analysis, implying the formation of plenty of transformation products during chlorination. The main transformation products, hydroquinone and two kinds of chlorinated compounds, monochlorinated acetaminophen and dichlorinated acetaminophen, were detected in gas chromatography-mass spectrometry analysis. PMID:26983813

  5. 40 CFR 413.02 - General definitions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... to the definitions set forth in 40 CFR part 401 and the chemical analysis methods set forth in 40 CFR... part: (a) The term CN,A shall mean cyanide amenable to chlorination as defined by 40 CFR 136. (b) The...) Aldrin Dieldrin Chlordane (technical mixture and metabolites) 4,4-DDT 4,4-DDE (p,p-DDX) 4,4-DDD...

  6. 40 CFR 413.02 - General definitions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... to the definitions set forth in 40 CFR part 401 and the chemical analysis methods set forth in 40 CFR... part: (a) The term CN,A shall mean cyanide amenable to chlorination as defined by 40 CFR 136. (b) The... (dichloromethane) Methyl chloride (chloromethane) Methyl bromide (bromomethane) Bromoform...

  7. 40 CFR 413.02 - General definitions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... to the definitions set forth in 40 CFR part 401 and the chemical analysis methods set forth in 40 CFR... part: (a) The term CN,A shall mean cyanide amenable to chlorination as defined by 40 CFR 136. (b) The... (dichloromethane) Methyl chloride (chloromethane) Methyl bromide (bromomethane) Bromoform...

  8. 40 CFR 413.02 - General definitions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... to the definitions set forth in 40 CFR part 401 and the chemical analysis methods set forth in 40 CFR... part: (a) The term CN,A shall mean cyanide amenable to chlorination as defined by 40 CFR 136. (b) The... (dichloromethane) Methyl chloride (chloromethane) Methyl bromide (bromomethane) Bromoform...

  9. Selected alternatives to conventional chlorination. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Garey, J.F.

    1980-10-01

    This study was jointly funded by EPRI and five electric utility companies in New England (New England Power, Northeast Utilities, United Illuminating, Vermont Yankee Nuclear, and Public Service of New Hampshire). Previous investigations had identified three major areas for further study: continuous low-level chlorination, dechlorination, and condenser biofouling control. Continuous low-level chlorination, studied at two locations, one on open coastal water and the other in an industrialized estuarine area, showed that 0.1 ppM total residual oxidant (TRO) prevented attachment of the blue mussel (Mytilus edulis) to concrete surfaces. Chronic bioassays showed that 0.075 ppM TRO reduced biofouling by indigenous organisms; 0.1 ppM TRO slightly increased mortalities of the Atlantic silversides (Menidia menidia) but had no effect on the American oyster (Crassostrea virginica). Dechlorination investigations showed that threespine sticklebacks (Gasterosteus aculeatus), Atlantic silversides (Menidia menidia), larval bay scallops (Argopecten irradians), and the copepod Acartia tonsa exposed to water chlorinated to 0.5 ppM TRO for 10, 100, and 1000 seconds, followed by dechlorination with sodium thiosulfate, all suffered significant toxic effects. Condenser tube biofouling studies showed that there was a strong correlation between condenser performance and condenser tube biofouling; biofilm induction varied inversely with ambient water temperature, but orientation of the tubes had no effect on biofilm formation; and all chemicals tested (mono-, di-, and trisodium phosphate; Polident; and TRO at 0.1 ppM) reduced but did not remove biofilms.

  10. Radioimmunoassay for chlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins

    SciTech Connect

    Albro, P.W.; Chae, K.; Luster, M.I.; Mckinney, J.D.

    1980-12-09

    The invention provides a double-antibody radioimmunoassay method for the determination of chlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins, particularly, 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin, in environmental samples including animal tissues such as monkey liver and adipose tissues. The limit of detection is approximately 25 picograms for 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-pdioxin. Assuming an appropriate cleanup procedure is used, chlorinated dibenzofurans are the only likely interferences, and these can be distinguished through the use of two antisers of different dibenzo-furan/dibenzodioxin selectivities. The invention includes the preparation of a reproducible antigen, an appropriate radiolabeled hapten, and effective sample extracts. A feature of the assay method is the use of a nonionic detergent (e.g., ''cutscum'' or ''triton x-305'') to solubilize the extremely hydrophobic dibenzo-p-dioxins in a manner permitting their binding by antibodies. The immunoassay is applicable to screening samples in order to minimize the demand for mass spectrometric screening, and to routine monitoring for exposure to known chlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins in potentially contaminated environments.

  11. Approaches for the analysis of chlorinated lipids.

    PubMed

    Wang, Wen-Yi; Albert, Carolyn J; Ford, David A

    2013-12-15

    Leukocytes are key cellular mediators of human diseases through their role in inflammation. Identifying unique molecules produced by leukocytes may provide new biomarkers and mechanistic insights into the role of leukocytes in disease. Chlorinated lipids are generated as a result of myeloperoxidase-containing leukocyte-derived hypochlorous acid targeting the vinyl ether bond of plasmalogens. The initial product of this reaction is α-chlorofatty aldehyde. α-Chlorofatty aldehyde is both oxidized to α-chlorofatty acid and reduced to α-chlorofatty alcohol by cellular metabolism. This review focuses on the separation techniques and quantitative analysis for these chlorinated lipids. For α-chlorofatty acid, the negative charge of carboxylic acids is exploited to detect the chlorinated lipid species of these acids by electrospray ionization mass spectrometry in the negative ion mode. In contrast, α-chlorofatty aldehyde and α-chlorofatty alcohol are converted to pentafluorobenzyl oxime and pentafluorobenzoyl ester derivatives, which are detected by negative ion chemical ionization mass spectrometry. These two detection methods coupled with the use of stable isotope internal standards and either liquid chromatography or gas chromatography provide highly sensitive analytical approaches to measure these novel lipids. PMID:24056259

  12. Hydrochloric acid and the chlorine budget of the lower statosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Webster, C. R.; May, R. D.; Jaegle, L.; Hu, H.; Sander, S. P.; Gunson, M. R.; Toon, G. C.; Russell, J. M., III; Stimpfle, R. M.; Koplow, J. P.

    1994-01-01

    Concentrations of HCl measurements in the lower stratosphere in 1993 by the ALIAS instrument on the ER-2 aircraft reveal that only 40% of inorganic chlorine (Cl(y), inferred from in situ measurements of organic chlorinated sources gases) is present as HCl, significantly lower than model predictions. Although the sum of measured HCl, ClO and ClONO2, the latter inferred from measurements of ClO and NO2 equals Cl(y) to within the incertainty of measurement, it is systematically less than Cl(y) by 30-50%. This discrepancy suggests that concentrations of ClONO2 may exceed those of HC; near 20 km altitude, consistent with a slower photolysis rate for ClONO2 than calculated using recommended cross sections. Comparison of profiles of HCl measured during 1992 and 1193 at mid-latitudes by balloon (BLISS and MARKIV), space shuttle (ATMOS), and satellite (HALOE) instruments with the aircraft data reveal an apparent pressure dependence to the HCl to Cl(y) ratio, consistent with a factor of 3-10 reduction in the photolysis rate for ClONO2 at ER-2 altitudes. However, the diurnal variation of ClO is well-simulated by models using the recommended photolysis rate, and simulations measurements of ClONO2 and HCl at mid-latitudes by ATMOS and MARKIV report HCl (HCL+ ClONO2) ratios greater than or equal to 50%. Premliminary measurements by ALIAS in the southern hemisphere report HCl/Cl(y) values of about 75%.

  13. Effects of chlorine on freshwater fish under various time and chemical conditions: toxicity of chlorine to freshwater fish. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Brooks, A.S.; Bartos, J.M.; Danos, P.T.

    1982-07-01

    Laboratory bioassays to determine the acute toxicity of monochloramine, dichloramine, hypochlorous acid, and hypochlorite ion to emerald shiners, channel catfish, and rainbow trout were conducted. Four exposure regimes typical of chlorination schedules at operating steam electric power plants were used. Fish were exposed to single 15-minute, 30-minute, 120-minute, and quadruple 30-minute periods. No mortality or LC50 values were determined for each species of fish and chemical species of chlorine. Hypochlorous acid was the most toxic form of chlorine studied, followed closely by dichloramine. Monochloramine and hypochlorite ion were three to four times less toxic than hypochlorous acid and dichloramine. On the average, emerald shiners were 1.8 times more sensitive to chlorine than channel catfish and 3.3 times more sensitive than rainbow trout to the four forms of chlorine. The fish were more tolerant of chlorine during short duration exposures and most sensitive during the continuous 120-minute exposures. The significant differences in toxicity noted among the various chlorine species suggest that careful attention should be paid not only to total residual chlorine but to both the chlorine and fish species present and the duration of exposure expected in establishing chlorination regimes.

  14. Aqueous chlorination kinetics of some endocrine disruptors.

    PubMed

    Deborde, Marie; Rabouan, Sylvie; Gallard, Hervé; Legube, Bernard

    2004-11-01

    The aqueous chlorination kinetics of six endocrine disruptors (EDs: 4-n-nonylphenol, beta-estradiol, estrone, estriol, 17alpha-ethinylestradiol, progesterone) were studied in the 3.50-12.00 pH range, at 20+/-2 degrees C, in the presence of an excess of total chlorine. Under these conditions, all molecules with a phenolic group in their structure were rapidly oxidized by chlorine, whereas progesterone remained unchanged. In the first step, apparent kinetic rate constants were determined at various pH levels. Then each elementary reaction kinetic rate constant, i.e., the reaction of hypochlorous acid (HOCl) with ionized EDs and neutral EDs and an acid-catalyzed reaction of HOCl with neutral EDs, was calculated in the second step. The results showed that chlorination exhibits a second-order reaction rate. The rate constants for the acid-catalyzed reaction ranged from 3.02 x 10(4) M(-1) s(-1) (for 4-n-nonylphenol) to 1.82-2.62 x 10(5) M(-1) s(-1) (for hormones). The rate constants of HOCI reactions with ionized EDs were found to be equal to 7.5 x 10(4) M(-1) s(-1) (for 4-n-nonylphenol) and between 3.52 and 4.15 x 10(5) M(-1) s(-1) (for hormones), while the rate contants of HOCI with neutral EDs were much lower, i.e., between 1.31 M(-1) s(-1) (for 4-n-nonylphenol) and 3.74-4.82 M(-1) s(-1) (for hormones). At pH 7, the apparent-second-order rate constants were calculated to range from 12.6 to 131.1 M(-1) s(-1). For a total chlorine concentration of 1 mg/L, the corresponding half-life times at pH 7 were about 65 min for 4-n-nonylphenol and 6-8 min for hormones. PMID:15575274

  15. Chlorine adsorption on the InAs (001) surface

    SciTech Connect

    Bakulin, A. V.; Eremeev, S. V.; Tereshchenko, O. E.; Kulkova, S. E.

    2011-01-15

    Chlorine adsorption on the In-stabilized InAs(001) surface with {zeta}-(4 Multiplication-Sign 2) and {beta}3 Prime -(4 Multiplication-Sign 2) reconstructions and on the Ga-stabilized GaAs (001)-{zeta}-(4 Multiplication-Sign 2) surface has been studied within the electron density functional theory. The equilibrium structural parameters of these reconstructions, surface atom positions, bond lengths in dimers, and their changes upon chlorine adsorption are determined. The electronic characteristics of the clean surface and the surface with adsorbed chlorine are calculated. It is shown that the most energetically favorable positions for chlorine adsorption are top positions over dimerized indium or gallium atoms. The mechanism of chlorine binding with In(Ga)-stabilized surface is explained. The interaction of chlorine atoms with dimerized surface atoms weakens surface atom bonds and controls the initial stage of surface etching.

  16. Chlorine sensing properties of zigzag boron nitride nanoribbons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Srivastava, Pankaj; Jaiswal, Neeraj K.; Tripathi, Gagan Kant

    2014-05-01

    The density functional theory based first-principles calculations have been employed to explore the chlorine sensing properties of zigzag boron nitride nanoribbons (ZBNNR). The sensing was investigated by calculating electronic structures and current-voltage (I-V) behavior. Three different possibilities were considered for the chlorine adsorption on ZBNNR and the findings were compared with bare ribbons. It is revealed that presence of chlorine has a profound effect on the electronic and transport properties of ZBNNR. Bare ZBNNR are half-metallic in nature whereas chlorine adsorption turns them semiconducting irrespective of adsorption site. Further, the negative differential resistance has been observed in bare ribbons which disappear upon the chlorine adsorption. Enhanced sensing capability is predicted when chlorine is attached at the N edge or at both the edges of the ZBNNR.

  17. Kinetic modelling of chlorination of nitrided ilmenite using MATLAB

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramakrishnan, Sivakumar; Kwok, Teong Chen; Hamid, Sheikh Abdul Rezan Sheikh Abdul

    2016-07-01

    In the present study, chlorination of nitride ilmenite using 2k factorial design was investigated. The reduction experiments were carried out in a temperature range of 400°C to 500°C, chlorination duration from 1 hour to 3 hours and using different type of carbon reactant. Phases of raw materials and reduced samples were analyzed by X-ray diffraction (XRD). Ilmenite was reduced to TiOxCyNz through carbothermal and nitridation for further chlorination into titanium tetrachloride. The Design of Experiment analysis suggested that the types of carbon reactant contribute most influence to the extent of chlorination of nitride ilmenite. The extent of chlorination was highest at 500°C with 3 hours chlorination time and carbon nanotube as carbon reactant.

  18. Are BKME effects on fish caused by chlorinated compounds?

    SciTech Connect

    Burnison, B.K.; Hodson, P.V.; Parrott, J.

    1995-12-31

    Much of the debate about the use and environmental impacts of chlorinated compounds has been fueled by attempts to regulate the effluents discharged by pulp and paper mills. Swedish field studies have associated effects on fish health and reproduction with the discharge of AOX. A recent study has demonstrated that the effect of black liquor is three orders of magnitude more potent than the first chlorine dioxide bleachery effluent on fish. Black liquors from various pulp mills, including a mill which uses alcohol to extract lignin, also suggest that effects on fish could be caused by non-chlorinated wood extractives, Chemical analysis of isolated fractions from final BKME effluent and pure compound bioassays also indicate the high probability that non-chlorinated compounds may be responsible for fish effects. While chlorination may increase the potency of these compounds, it is clear that chlorine is not essential for effects on fish.

  19. Electric plasma discharge combustion synthesis of chlorine dioxide

    SciTech Connect

    Dotson, R. L.; Geren, G. W.

    1984-09-18

    A process for the production of chlorine dioxide comprises feeding an inert gas to a reaction zone and applying an electrical discharge to the inert gas to produce a high temperature plasma. Chlorine gas and oxygen gas are supplied simultaneously to the reaction zone and reacted in the plasma to produce a gaseous mixture comprised of chlorine dioxide, chlorine, oxygen and inert gas, the molar ratio of oxygen to chlorine in the reaction zone being at least about 2.5;1. The gaseous mixture is recovered from the reaction zone. Chlorine dioxide, which may be recovered as a gas or reacted to produce an alkali metal chlorite, is employed as a bleaching agent and a water treatment agent.

  20. Carbon and chlorine isotopologue fractionation of chlorinated hydrocarbons during diffusion in water and low permeability sediments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wanner, Philipp; Hunkeler, Daniel

    2015-05-01

    To identify reactive processes in diffusion dominated water-saturated systems using compound-specific isotope analysis (CSIA), the effect of the diffusive transport process on isotope ratios needs to be known. This study aims to quantify the magnitude of carbon and chlorine isotopologue fractionation of two chlorinated hydrocarbons (trichloroethene (TCE) and 1,2-dichloroethane (1,2-DCA)) during diffusion in the aqueous phase and to relate for the first time laboratory with field results. Diffusion coefficient ratios in the aqueous phase were experimentally quantified with a modified Stokes diffusion cell. The experiment revealed a significant shift of carbon and chlorine isotopologue ratios of TCE and 1,2-DCA during diffusion. For both TCE and 1,2-DCA, the magnitude of the shift of chlorine isotopologue ratios was larger (TCE: D132/D130 = 0.99963 ± 0.00003; 1,2-DCA: D102/D100 = 0.99939 ± 0.00003) in comparison to carbon isotopologue ratios (TCE: D131/D130 = 0.99978 ± 0.00006; 1,2-DCA: D101/D100 = 0.99977 ± 0.00004), which is consistent with the larger mass difference between stable chlorine compared to carbon isotopes. Determined diffusion coefficients for carbon and chlorine isotopologues of TCE and 1,2-DCA follow an inverse power law form (D ∝m-β) with β < 0.5 revealing that the magnitude of isotopologue fractionation of TCE and 1,2-DCA is lower than in the previously postulated kinetic theory (D ∝m-0.5). To relate laboratory with field results, a water-saturated clay core from a VOC contaminated site was retrieved and subsampled as a function of depth to assess possible shifts in isotopologue ratios during downward diffusion of VOCs into the low permeable clay. Observed small shifts of TCE carbon and chlorine isotopologue ratio profiles were consistent with laboratory determined diffusion coefficient ratios, demonstrated by a 1D-diffusion model. Further 1D-simulations for shorter diffusion periods (5-10 years) than observed in the retrieved clay core

  1. Significant Biogenesis of Chlorinated Aromatics by Fungi in Natural Environments

    PubMed Central

    de Jong, Ed; Field, Jim A.; Spinnler, Henri-Eric; Wijnberg, Joannes B. P. A.; de Bont, Jan A. M.

    1994-01-01

    Common wood- and forest litter-degrading fungi produce chlorinated anisyl metabolites. These compounds, which are structurally related to xenobiotic chloroaromatics, occur at high concentrations of approximately 75 mg of chlorinated anisyl metabolites kg of wood-1 or litter-1 in the environment. The widespread ability among common fungi to produce large amounts of chlorinated aromatic compounds in the environment makes us conclude that these kinds of compounds can no longer be considered to originate mainly from anthropogenic sources. PMID:16349156

  2. Comparison of chlorine-poisoned experiments to calculations

    SciTech Connect

    Hicks, J.; Wilson, R.E.

    2000-07-01

    The Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site (RFETS) has fissile materials in salt, which could be processed for disposal more efficiently if the nuclear poison effect of the chlorine were validated. The authors conclude that chlorine can be credited as poison when present in thermal systems. The 27-, 44-, and 238-group libraries in SCALE and the ENDFB-B libraries with MCNP underpredict the poisonous effect of chlorine in thermal systems.

  3. Review of toxicology studies on cyanurate and its chlorinated derivatives

    SciTech Connect

    Hammond, B.G.; Barbee, S.J.; Inoue, T.; Ishida, N.; Levinskas, G.J.; Stevens, M.W.; Wheeler, A.G.; Cascieri, T.

    1986-11-01

    Chlorinated cyanurates are added to swimming pools as disinfectants. In the presence of water, these materials hydrolyze to yield cyanurate and hypochlorous acid. To evaluate the safety of exposure to these materials, a comprehensive testing program was undertaken. This review summarizes the results of acute subchronic tests on chlorinated isocyanurates. Findings from acute, subchronic, reproduction, metabolism, mutagenicity, and chronic/carcinogenicity tests on cyanurate are also summarized. Results from these tests indicate that chlorinated isocyanurates are safe for use in swimming pools.

  4. Reactions of chlorine and bromine fluorosulfates with perfluoroalkyl halides in a strongly acidic medium

    SciTech Connect

    Fokin, A.V.; Rapkin, A.I.; Seryanov, Y.V.; Studnev, Y.N.; Tatarinov, A.S.

    1986-01-01

    The authors find that in HSO/sub 3/F medium containing SbF/sub 5/ (preferably ca 20-40%), already at a temperature much lower than O C, ClOSO/sub 2/F exothermally substitutes bromine in 1,2-dibromotetrafluoroethane, leading to 1,2-bis(fluorosulfonxyloxy)tetrafluoroethane (I) in a high yield (greater than 80%). Bromine fluorosulfate BrOSO/sub 2/F was found to be less active than ClOSO/sub 2/F with respect to 1,2-dibromotetrafluoroethane in both the presence and in absence of the HSO/sub 3/F/SbF/sub 5/ mixture. In a fluorosulfonic acid medium containing antimony pentafluoride, the reaction with chlorine fluorosulfate leads to the substitution of the primary chlorine atom in perfluoroalkyl chlorides, and also the primary and secondary bromine atoms in perfluoroalkyl bromides by the fluorosulfate group under mild conditions.

  5. Chlorine effect on the formation of carbon nanofibers.

    PubMed

    Lin, Wang-Hua; Takahashi, Yusuke; Li, Yuan-Yao; Sakoda, Akiyoshi

    2012-12-01

    Platelet graphite nanofibers (GNFs) and turbostratic carbon nanofibers (CNFs) are synthesized by the thermal evaporation and decomposition of a polymer-based mixture at 700 degrees C using Ni as a catalyst. The mixture consists of poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG), serving as the carbon source, and hydrochloric acid solution (HCl(aq)), serving as the promoter/additive for the growth of CNFs. High-purity zigzag-shaped platelet GNFs form with 10 wt% HCl(aq) as an additive in the PEG. The diameters of the platelet GNFs are in the range of 40-60 nm, with lengths of a few micrometers. High-resolution transmission electron microscopy images indicate a high degree of graphitization and well ordered graphene layers along the fiber axis. In contrast, high-purity turbostratic CNFs form with 20 wt% HCl(aq) in the PEG. The diameter and length of the turbostratic CNFs are 20-40 nm and a few micrometers, respectively. The participation of HCl in the thermal process leads to the formation of Ni-Cl compounds. The amount of chlorine affects the shape of the Ni catalyst, which determines the type of CNF formed. PMID:23447943

  6. High levels of molecular chlorine in the Arctic atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liao, Jin; Huey, L. Gregory; Liu, Zhen; Tanner, David J.; Cantrell, Chris A.; Orlando, John J.; Flocke, Frank M.; Shepson, Paul B.; Weinheimer, Andrew J.; Hall, Samuel R.; Ullmann, Kirk; Beine, Harry J.; Wang, Yuhang; Ingall, Ellery D.; Stephens, Chelsea R.; Hornbrook, Rebecca S.; Apel, Eric C.; Riemer, Daniel; Fried, Alan; Mauldin, Roy L.; Smith, James N.; Staebler, Ralf M.; Neuman, J. Andrew; Nowak, John B.

    2014-02-01

    Chlorine radicals can function as a strong atmospheric oxidant, particularly in polar regions, where levels of hydroxyl radicals are low. In the atmosphere, chlorine radicals expedite the degradation of methane and tropospheric ozone, and the oxidation of mercury to more toxic forms. Here we present direct measurements of molecular chlorine levels in the Arctic marine boundary layer in Barrow, Alaska, collected in the spring of 2009 over a six-week period using chemical ionization mass spectrometry. We report high levels of molecular chlorine, of up to 400 pptv. Concentrations peaked in the early morning and late afternoon, and fell to near-zero levels at night. Average daytime molecular chlorine levels were correlated with ozone concentrations, suggesting that sunlight and ozone are required for molecular chlorine formation. Using a time-dependent box model, we estimate that the chlorine radicals produced from the photolysis of molecular chlorine oxidized more methane than hydroxyl radicals, on average, and enhanced the abundance of short-lived peroxy radicals. Elevated hydroperoxyl radical levels, in turn, promoted the formation of hypobromous acid, which catalyses mercury oxidation and the breakdown of tropospheric ozone. We therefore suggest that molecular chlorine exerts a significant effect on the atmospheric chemistry of the Arctic.

  7. Preparation, characterization and conductivity studies of chlorinated natural rubber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    M, Subburaj; Ramesan, M. T.; Pradyumnan, P. P.

    2014-10-01

    Chlorinated natural rubber (CNR) was prepared by alkaline hydrolysis of chloroform using phase transfer catalyst. The chlorination in CNR was monitored by FTIR and UV spectroscopy and these studies indicated the formation of dichloro cyclopropyl ring to the double bond of natural rubber (NR). XRD and SEM analysis revealed the extent of chlorination in natural rubber. Electrical properties such as AC conductivity, dielectric constant and dielectric loss of CNR was higher than that of NR. Conductivity of NR increased with the increase in the concentration of chlorine percentage. LOI values indicated that the chemical modification imparts better flame resistant to NR.

  8. The effect of inorganic precursors on disinfection byproduct formation during UV-chlorine/chloramine drinking water treatment.

    PubMed

    Lyon, Bonnie A; Dotson, Aaron D; Linden, Karl G; Weinberg, Howard S

    2012-10-01

    Ultraviolet (UV) disinfection is being increasingly used in drinking water treatment. It is important to understand how its application to different types of water may influence finished water quality, particularly as anthropogenic activity continues to impact the quality of source waters. The objective of this study was to evaluate the effect of inorganic precursors on the formation of regulated and unregulated disinfection byproducts (DBPs) during UV irradiation of surface waters when combined with chlorination or chloramination. Samples were collected from three drinking water utilities supplied by source waters with varying organic and inorganic precursor content. The filtered samples were treated in the laboratory with a range of UV doses delivered from low pressure (LP, UV output at 253.7 nm) and medium pressure (MP, polychromatic UV output 200-400 nm) mercury lamps followed by chlorination or chloramination, in the presence and absence of additional bromide and nitrate. The regulated trihalomethanes and haloacetic acids were not affected by UV pretreatment at disinfection doses (40-186 mJ/cm²). With higher doses (1000 mJ/cm²), trihalomethane formation was increased 30-40%. While most effects on DBPs were only observed with doses much higher than typically used for UV disinfection, there were some effects on unregulated DBPs at lower doses. In nitrate-spiked samples (1-10 mg N/L), chloropicrin formation doubled and increased three- to six-fold with 40 mJ/cm² MP UV followed by chloramination and chlorination, respectively. Bromopicrin formation was increased in samples containing bromide (0.5-1 mg/L) and nitrate (1-10 mg N/L) when pretreated with LP or MP UV (30-60% with 40 mJ/cm² LP UV and four- to ten-fold increase with 40 mJ/cm² MP UV, after subsequent chlorination). The formation of cyanogen chloride doubled and increased three-fold with MP UV doses of 186 and 1000 mJ/cm², respectively, when followed by chloramination in nitrate-spiked samples but

  9. CHLORINE DECAY AND BIOFILM STUDIES IN A PILOT SCALE DRINKING WATER DISTRIBUTION DEAD END PIPE SYSTEM

    EPA Science Inventory

    Chlorine decay experiments using a pilot-scale water distribution dead end pipe system were conducted to define relationships between chlorine decay and environmental factors. These included flow rate, biomass concentration and biofilm density, and initial chlorine concentrations...

  10. IDENTIFICATION OF CHLORINE DIOXIDE AND CHLORAMINE DRINKING WATER DISINFECTION BY-PRODUCTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Due to concern over the potential adverse health effects of trihalomethanes (THMs) and other chlorinated by-products in chlorinated drinking water, alternative disinfection methods are being explored. Chlorine dioxide and chloramine are two popular alternative disinfectants, with...

  11. IDENTIFICATION OF CHLORINE DIOXIDE DRINKING WATER DISINFECTION BY-PRODUCTS FORMED AT HIGH BROMIDE LEVELS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Due to concern over the potential adverse health effects of trihalomethanes (THMs), haloacetic acids, and other chlorinated by-products in chlorinated drinking water, alternative disinfection methods are being explored. Chlorine dioxide is a popular alternative, with over 500 dri...

  12. THE EFFECT OF CHLORINE EMISSIONS ON TROPOSPHERIC OZONE IN THE UNITED STATES

    EPA Science Inventory

    The effect of chlorine emissions on atmospheric ozone in the continental United States was evaluated. Atmospheric chlorine chemistry was combined with the carbon bond mechanism and incorporated into the Community Multiscale Air Quality model. Sources of chlorine included anthrop...

  13. AN AUTOMATIC CHLORINATION SYSTEM FOR ELIMINATING BIOLOGICAL GROWTH IN PUMPING SYSTEMS FOR AUTOMATIC INSTRUMENTATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    Automatic chlorination was determined to be satisfactory for elimination of microbial growth (slime) in monitor pumping systems. With chlorination, changes in dissolved oxygen levels through the sampling system were minimized. Optimum chlorine concentration and frequency of chlor...

  14. Influence of humic substances on the formation of chlorinated polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons during chlorination of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon polluted water

    SciTech Connect

    Johnsen, S.; Gribbestad, I.S.

    1988-08-01

    Chlorinated polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) are present at nanogram per liter levels in lake water. Some of these compounds are known to be mutagenic in the Ames Salmonella test. The PAH compounds fluorene, anthracene, fluoranthene, and benzo(a)pyrene were dissolved in lake water with low humus content and in humus water with 9.17 mg of total organic carbon/L, followed by sodium hypochlorite chlorination at different concentrations. Reaction of PAH and formation of chlorinated PAH were measured by cyclohexane extraction of the samples 3 days after chlorination and gas chromatography/mass spectrometry analyses of the extracts. The PAH-chlorine reaction was found to be dependent upon the concentration of free active chlorine in the water, and the presence of humic substances was found to affect the formation of chlorinated PAH. Chlorinated PAH were formed in the lake water samples of fluoranthene and benzo(a)pyrene, but no chlorinated PAH were detected in the presence of humic substances.

  15. Cellular response of the amoeba Acanthamoeba castellanii to chlorine, chlorine dioxide, and monochloramine treatments.

    PubMed

    Mogoa, Emerancienne; Bodet, Charles; Morel, Franck; Rodier, Marie-Hélène; Legube, Bernard; Héchard, Yann

    2011-07-01

    Acanthamoeba castellanii is a free-living amoebae commonly found in water systems. Free-living amoebae might be pathogenic but are also known to bear phagocytosis-resistant bacteria, protecting these bacteria from water treatments. The mode of action of these treatments is poorly understood, particularly on amoebae. It is important to examine the action of these treatments on amoebae in order to improve them. The cellular response to chlorine, chlorine dioxide, and monochloramine was tested on A. castellanii trophozoites. Doses of disinfectants leading to up to a 3-log reduction were compared by flow cytometry and electron microscopy. Chlorine treatment led to size reduction, permeabilization, and retraction of pseudopods. In addition, treatment with chlorine dioxide led to a vacuolization of the cytoplasm. Monochloramine had a dose-dependent effect. At the highest doses monochloramine treatment resulted in almost no changes in cell size and permeability, as shown by flow cytometry, but the cell surface became smooth and dense, as seen by electron microscopy. We show that these disinfectants globally induced size reduction, membrane permeabilization, and morphological modifications but that they have a different mode of action on A. castellanii. PMID:21602398

  16. Cellular Response of the Amoeba Acanthamoeba castellanii to Chlorine, Chlorine Dioxide, and Monochloramine Treatments ▿

    PubMed Central

    Mogoa, Emerancienne; Bodet, Charles; Morel, Franck; Rodier, Marie-Hélène; Legube, Bernard; Héchard, Yann

    2011-01-01

    Acanthamoeba castellanii is a free-living amoebae commonly found in water systems. Free-living amoebae might be pathogenic but are also known to bear phagocytosis-resistant bacteria, protecting these bacteria from water treatments. The mode of action of these treatments is poorly understood, particularly on amoebae. It is important to examine the action of these treatments on amoebae in order to improve them. The cellular response to chlorine, chlorine dioxide, and monochloramine was tested on A. castellanii trophozoites. Doses of disinfectants leading to up to a 3-log reduction were compared by flow cytometry and electron microscopy. Chlorine treatment led to size reduction, permeabilization, and retraction of pseudopods. In addition, treatment with chlorine dioxide led to a vacuolization of the cytoplasm. Monochloramine had a dose-dependent effect. At the highest doses monochloramine treatment resulted in almost no changes in cell size and permeability, as shown by flow cytometry, but the cell surface became smooth and dense, as seen by electron microscopy. We show that these disinfectants globally induced size reduction, membrane permeabilization, and morphological modifications but that they have a different mode of action on A. castellanii. PMID:21602398

  17. GENOTOXIC AND CARCINOGENIC PROPERTIES OF CHLORINATED FURANONES - IMPORTANT BY-PRODUCTS OF WATER CHLORINATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    The widespread presence of genotoxins in drinking water can be directly linked to the chlorination stage of water treatment. ecent studies in Finland, the United States and Great Britain have shown that a single compound, 3-chloro-4-(dichlo-romethyl)-5-hydroxy-2(5H)-furanone (MX)...

  18. Explosion risk from swimming pool chlorinators and review of chlorine toxicity.

    PubMed

    Martinez, T T; Long, C

    1995-01-01

    Two patients were admitted to the hospital emergency room in respiratory distress after an accidental explosion involving chlorinating agents for the swimming pool. The two primary agents involved were calcium hypochlorite and trichloro-s-triazinetrione; both are commonly used chlorinating agents. These chemicals were tested in a bomb apparatus measuring temperature and gas production. Combining the two chlorinators at 2, 6, 12, or 18 g of each produced a progressive increase in gas production from 234 to 1422 mL. The temperature increased from 30 degrees C at 2 g to 63 degrees C at 18 g. The time to complete the reaction decreased from 6.2 minutes at 2 g to 3.8 minutes at 18 g. The third run at the 18 g level resulted in an explosion. The results indicate that gas generation is dependent on both products. The addition of organic material was abandoned because of the explosive nature of the reaction. The amount of calcium hypochlorite primarily determines the rate of reaction and heat generation. Appropriate emergency action and treatment for chlorine gas is discussed. PMID:7629902

  19. Influence of chlorine on methane oxidation.

    PubMed

    Chi, Yong; Wang, Bo; Yan, Jianhua; Ni, Mingjiang

    2009-01-01

    Experiments on CH4/Cl2/O2/N2 oxidation were conducted in an atmospheric pressure flow reactor to understand the influence of chlorine on hydrocarbon oxidation in hazardous waste incineration. The reaction temperature varied from 973 to 1273 K and the chlorine to hydrogen mole ratio (Cl/H) of the inlet mixture varied from 0 to 0.44. The species produced in the reaction were measured online with Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR). It was found that the destruction and removal efficiency of CH4 increased with Cl/H mole ratio. Increasing Cl/H favored COCl2 and CO formation and inhibited the CO oxidation process. As Cl/H approached 0.44, the concentrations of CH2Cl2 and CH3Cl first increased, and then declined. Reaction temperature greatly affected the reaction system. Increasing temperatures raised the destruction removal efficiency of CH4 and decreased the concentrations of CH3Cl and CH2Cl2. With a certain ratio of Cl/H, the concentrations of CO and COCl2 first increased and then declined. The CO and COCl2 concentration peak was observed around 1100 K and 1023 K, respectively. When the reaction temperature exceeded 1273 K, carbon in CH4 was mostly converted to CO2. It could be concluded that the presence of chlorine enhanced the destruction of CH4, but resulted in the more toxic incomplete combustion products emission such as COCl2 when the reaction temperature was not high enough. PMID:19999983

  20. Scenarios Evaluation Tool for Chlorinated Solvent MNA

    SciTech Connect

    Vangelas, Karen; Michael J. Truex; Charles J. Newell; Brian Looney

    2007-02-28

    Over the past three decades, much progress has been made in the remediation of chlorinated solvents from the subsurface. Yet these pervasive contaminants continue to present a significant challenge to the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), other federal agencies, and other public and private organizations. The physical and chemical properties of chlorinated solvents make it difficult to rapidly reach the low concentrations typically set as regulatory limits. These technical challenges often result in high costs and long remediation time frames. In 2003, the DOE through the Office of Environmental Management funded a science-based technical project that uses the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's technical protocol (EPA, 1998) and directives (EPA, 1999) on Monitored Natural Attenuation (MNA) as the foundation on which to introduce supporting concepts and new scientific developments that will support remediation of chlorinated solvents based on natural attenuation processes. This project supports the direction in which many site owners want to move to complete the remediation of their site(s), that being to complete the active treatment portion of the remedial effort and transition into MNA. The overarching objective of the effort was to examine environmental remedies that are based on natural processes--remedies such as Monitored Natural Attenuation (MNA) or Enhanced Attenuation (EA). The research program did identify several specific opportunities for advances based on: (1) mass balance as the central framework for attenuation based remedies, (2) scientific advancements and achievements during the past ten years, (3) regulatory and policy development and real-world experience using MNA, and (4) exploration of various ideas for integrating attenuation remedies into a systematic set of ''combined remedies'' for contaminated sites. These opportunities are summarized herein and are addressed in more detail in referenced project documents and journal articles, as well

  1. Theoretical and experimental formation of low chlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins and dibenzofurans in the Fenton oxidation of chlorophenol solutions.

    PubMed

    Fernández-Castro, Pablo; San Román, M Fresnedo; Ortiz, Inmaculada

    2016-10-01

    The formation of chlorinated and non-chlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins and dibenzofurans (PCDD/Fs) has been experimentally investigated after the Fenton oxidation of 2-chlorophenol (2-CP, 15.56 mM) aqueous solutions by assessing the influence of iron concentration (0.09-2.88 mM), hydrogen peroxide dose (40.44-202.20 mM), temperature (20-70 °C) and chloride concentration (0-56.35 mM). The presence of chloride in the medium together with room temperature and substoichiometric Fenton conditions (40.44 mM H2O2) led to an increase in total PCDD/Fs concentration from less than 1 ng L(-1) to 2 μg L(-1). Results showed a dominance of the dichlorinated species (DCDD/Fs) in the homologue profile of total PCDD/Fs reaching values up to 1.5 μg L(-1). Furthermore, the products distribution exhibited a gradual decrease in the homologue concentration as the chlorination degree increased from di-to octachloro-substituted positions. Considering the characteristics of the reaction medium, the experimental results, and the information gathered in bibliography with regard to the generation of active radicals from 2-chlorophenol, a mechanism describing the formation of low chlorinated PCDD/Fs in a Fenton oxidizing aqueous system has been proposed. PMID:27424055

  2. Variations in Stratospheric Inorganic Chlorine Between 1991 and 2006

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lary, D. J.; Waugh, D. W.; Douglass, A. R.; Stolarski, R. S.; Newman, P. A.; Mussa, H.

    2007-01-01

    So how quickly will the ozone hole recover? This depends on how quickly the chlorine content (Cl2) of the atmosphere will decline. The ozone hole forms over the Antarctic each southern spring (September and October). The extremely small ozone amounts in the ozone hole are there because of chemical reactions of ozone with chlorine. This chlorine originates largely from industrially produced chlorofluorocarbon (CFC) compounds. An international agreement, the Montreal Protocol, is drastically reducing the amount of chlorine-containing compounds that we are releasing into the atmosphere. To be able to attribute changes in stratospheric ozone to changes in chlorine we need to know the distribution of atmospheric chlorine. However, due to a lack of continuous observations of all the key chlorine gases, producing a continuous time series of stratospheric chlorine has not been achieved to date. We have for the first time devised a technique to make a 17-year time series for stratospheric chlorine that uses the long time series of HCl observations made from several space borne instruments and a neural network. The neural networks allow us to both inter-calibrate the various HCl instruments and to infer the total amount of atmospheric chlorine from HCl. These new estimates of Cl, provide a much needed critical test for current global models that currently predict significant differences in both Cl(sub y) and ozone recovery. These models exhibit differences in their projection of the recovery time and our chlorine content time series will help separate the good from the bad in these projections.

  3. Aqueous chlorination of carbamazepine: kinetic study and transformation product identification.

    PubMed

    Soufan, M; Deborde, M; Delmont, A; Legube, B

    2013-09-15

    Carbamazepine reactivity and fate during chlorination was investigated in this study. From a kinetic standpoint, a third-order reaction (first-order relative to the CBZ concentration and second-order relative to the free chlorine concentration) was observed at neutral and slightly acidic pH, whereas a second-order reaction (first order relative to the CBZ concentration and first order relative to the free chlorine concentration) was noted under alkaline conditions. In order to gain insight into the observed pH-dependence of the reaction order, elementary reactions (i.e. reactions of Cl2, Cl2O, HOCl with CBZ and of ClO(-) with CBZ or of HOCl with the ionized form of CBZ) were highlighted and second order rate constants of each of them were calculated. Close correlations between the experimental and modeled values were obtained under these conditions. Cl2 and Cl2O were the main chlorination agents at neutral and acidic pH. These results indicate that, for a 1 mg/L free chlorine concentration and 1-10 mg/L chloride concentration at pH 7, halflives about 52-69 days can be expected. A low reactivity of chlorine with CBZ could thus occur under the chlorination steps used during water treatment. From a mechanistic viewpoint, several transformation products were observed during carbamazepine chlorination. As previously described for the chlorination of polynuclear aromatic or unsaturated compounds, we proposed monohydroxylated, epoxide, diols or chlorinated alcohol derivatives of CBZ for the chemical structures of these degradation products. Most of these compounds seem to accumulate in solution in the presence of excess chlorine. PMID:23891541

  4. Chlorine residuals and haloacetic acid reduction in rapid sand filtration.

    PubMed

    Chuang, Yi-Hsueh; Wang, Gen-Shuch; Tung, Hsin-hsin

    2011-11-01

    It is quite rare to find biodegradation in rapid sand filtration for drinking water treatment. This might be due to frequent backwashes and low substrate levels. High chlorine concentrations may inhibit biofilm development, especially for plants with pre-chlorination. However, in tropical or subtropical regions, bioactivity on the sand surface may be quite significant due to high biofilm development--a result of year-round high temperature. The objective of this study is to explore the correlation between biodegradation and chlorine concentration in rapid sand filters, especially for the water treatment plants that practise pre-chlorination. In this study, haloacetic acid (HAA) biodegradation was found in conventional rapid sand filters practising pre-chlorination. Laboratory column studies and field investigations were conducted to explore the association between the biodegradation of HAAs and chlorine concentrations. The results showed that chlorine residual was an important factor that alters bioactivity development. A model based on filter influent and effluent chlorine was developed for determining threshold chlorine for biodegradation. From the model, a temperature independent chlorine concentration threshold (Cl(threshold)) for biodegradation was estimated at 0.46-0.5mgL(-1). The results imply that conventional filters with adequate control could be conducive to bioactivity, resulting in lower HAA concentrations. Optimizing biodegradable disinfection by-product removal in conventional rapid sand filter could be achieved with minor variation and a lower-than-Cl(threshold) influent chlorine concentration. Bacteria isolation was also carried out, successfully identifying several HAA degraders. These degraders are very commonly seen in drinking water systems and can be speculated as the main contributor of HAA loss. PMID:21974919

  5. High Levels of Molecular Chlorine found in the Arctic Atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liao, J.; Huey, L. G.; Liu, Z.; Tanner, D.; Cantrell, C. A.; Orlando, J. J.; Flocke, F. M.; Shepson, P. B.; Weinheimer, A. J.; Hall, S. R.; Beine, H.; Wang, Y.; Ingall, E. D.; Thompson, C. R.; Hornbrook, R. S.; Apel, E. C.; Fried, A.; Mauldin, L.; Smith, J. N.; Staebler, R. M.; Neuman, J. A.; Nowak, J. B.

    2014-12-01

    Chlorine radicals are a strong atmospheric oxidant, particularly in polar regions where levels of hydroxyl radicals can be quite low. In the atmosphere, chlorine radicals expedite the degradation of methane and tropospheric ozone and the oxidation of mercury to more toxic forms. Here, we present direct measurements of molecular chlorine levels in the Arctic marine boundary layer in Barrow, Alaska, collected in the spring of 2009 over a six-week period using chemical ionization mass spectrometry. We detected high levels of molecular chlorine of up to 400 pptv. Concentrations peaked in the early morning and late afternoon and fell to near-zero levels at night. Average daytime molecular chlorine levels were correlated with ozone concentrations, suggesting that sunlight and ozone are required for molecular chlorine formation. Using a time-dependent box model, we estimated that the chlorine radicals produced from the photolysis of molecular chlorine on average oxidized more methane than hydroxyl radicals and enhanced the abundance of short-lived peroxy radicals. Elevated hydroperoxyl radical levels, in turn, promoted the formation of hypobromous acid, which catalyzed mercury oxidation and the breakdown of tropospheric ozone. Therefore, we propose that molecular chlorine exerts a significant effect on the atmospheric chemistry in the Arctic. While the formation mechanisms of molecular chlorine are not yet understood, the main potential sources of chlorine include snowpack, sea salt, and sea ice. There is recent evidence of molecular halogen (Br2 and Cl2) formation in the Arctic snowpack. The coverage and composition of the snow may control halogen chemistry in the Arctic. Changes of sea ice and snow cover in the changing climate may affect air-snow-ice interaction and have a significant impact on the levels of radicals, ozone, mercury and methane in the Arctic troposphere.

  6. Chlorine gas exposure and the lung: a review.

    PubMed

    Das, R; Blanc, P D

    1993-01-01

    We conducted a review of the literature detailing the respiratory effects of chlorine, an extremely important but toxic halogen. Historically, the heaviest mass inhalational exposures to chlorine resulted from World War I gassing. Currently potential human exposure to chlorine inhalation occurs in a variety of settings in the workplace, as a result of inadvertent environmental releases, and even in the home due to household cleaning mishaps. Chlorine species are highly reactive; tissue injury results from exposure to chlorine, hydrochloric acid, hypochlorous acid, or chloramines. Acute, high level exposure to chlorine gas in occupational or environmental settings results in a variety of dose-related lung effects ranging from respiratory mucus membrane irritation to pulmonary edema. Pulmonary function testing can reveal either obstructive or restrictive deficits immediately following exposure, with resolution over time in the majority of cases. However, some of those exposed may demonstrate long-term persistent obstructive or restrictive pulmonary deficits or increased nonspecific airway reactivity after high level exposure to chlorine gas. Symptoms and signs following inhalation of mixtures of chlorine-containing cleaners in the home are similar to those after occupational exposures and environmental releases. Although generally less severe, these events may be extremely common. Controlled human exposure data suggest that some subjects may be more responsive to the effects of chlorine gas; epidemiologic data also indicate that certain subpopulations (e.g., smokers) may be at greater risk of adverse outcome after chlorine inhalation. Although these findings are intriguing, additional study is needed to better delineate the risk factors that predispose toward the development of long-term pulmonary sequelae following chlorine gas exposure. PMID:8367885

  7. Chlorination of alumina in kaolinitic clay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grob, B.; Richarz, W.

    1984-09-01

    The chlorination of alumina in kaolinitic clay with Cl2 and CO gas mixtures was studied gravimetrically. The effects of the calcination method and of NaCl addition on the reactivity of the clay were examined. Fast reaction rates were achieved only with samples previously exposed to a sulfating treatment. Optimum conditions, with maximum yield and selectivity to A1C13 and minimum SiO2 conversion, were found between 770 and 970 K. At higher temperatures the SiCl4 formed poisons the reactive alumina surface by selective chemisorption with a marked decrease of the reaction rate.

  8. Biological Chlorine Cycling in Arctic Peat Soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zlamal, J. E.; Raab, T. K.; Lipson, D.

    2014-12-01

    Soils of the Arctic tundra near Barrow, Alaska are waterlogged and anoxic throughout most of the profile due to underlying permafrost. Microbial communities in these soils are adapted for the dominant anaerobic conditions and are capable of a surprising diversity of metabolic pathways. Anaerobic respiration in this environment warrants further study, particularly in the realm of electron cycling involving chlorine, which preliminary data suggest may play an important role in arctic anaerobic soil respiration. For decades, Cl was rarely studied outside of the context of solvent-contaminated sites due to the widely held belief that it is an inert element. However, Cl has increasingly become recognized as a metabolic player in microbial communities and soil cycling processes. Organic chlorinated compounds (Clorg) can be made by various organisms and used metabolically by others, such as serving as electron acceptors for microbes performing organohalide respiration. Sequencing our arctic soil samples has uncovered multiple genera of microorganisms capable of participating in many Cl-cycling processes including organohalide respiration, chlorinated hydrocarbon degradation, and perchlorate reduction. Metagenomic analysis of these soils has revealed genes for key enzymes of Cl-related metabolic processes such as dehalogenases and haloperoxidases, and close matches to genomes of known organohalide respiring microorganisms from the Dehalococcoides, Dechloromonas, Carboxydothermus, and Anaeromyxobacter genera. A TOX-100 Chlorine Analyzer was used to quantify total Cl in arctic soils, and these data were examined further to separate levels of inorganic Cl compounds and Clorg. Levels of Clorg increased with soil organic matter content, although total Cl levels lack this trend. X-ray Absorption Near Edge Structure (XANES) was used to provide information on the structure of Clorg in arctic soils, showing great diversity with Cl bound to both aromatic and alkyl groups

  9. Effects of chlorine content and carbon chain length in the bioaccumulation of chlorinated paraffins by juvenile rainbow trout

    SciTech Connect

    Fisk, A.T.; Cymbalisty, C.; Muir, D.C.G.; Bergman, A.

    1995-12-31

    Chlorinated paraffins (CPs) are C{sub 10{minus}30} chlorinated n-alkanes used as high pressure lubricants, flame retardants and plasticizers. Relatively little is known about their chemical-physical properties or bioaccumulation potential. Juvenile rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) were exposed to three dietary concentrations (approximately 0, 20 and 200 ng/g) of two {sup 14}C- dodecane (56 and 69% Cl) and hexadecane (35 and 69% Cl) CPs. Assimilation efficiencies ranged from a mean of 11.3 {+-} 3.1 % for the high chlorinated hexadecane to 49.2 {+-} 27.8% for the low chlorinated dodecane. Half-lives varied from a mean of 21 {+-} 1.6 days in the low chlorinated dodecane to 404 {+-} 289 days in the high chlorinated dodecane. The high chlorinated dodecane was found to have a biomagnification factor (BMF) of 14.8 and 2.5 for the low and high concentration treatments respectively, implying a potential to biomagnify. Chlorine content and carbon chain length both appear to effect bioaccumulation. Higher chlorination was associated with longer half lives and lower elimination rates. Longer carbon chain lengths produced lower assimilation efficiencies and BMF values. Low assimilation efficiencies (8.2 to 1 4.4%) and elimination rate constants (0.008 to 0.009 days-{minus}) found for the high chlorinated hexadecane may be attributed to the large size (MW 668) of this molecule. Short chain, highly chlorinated CPs are the most likely to bioaccumulate, and need further assessment of risk to the aquatic environment.

  10. Chlorine-resistant composite membranes with high organic rejection

    DOEpatents

    McCray, Scott B.; Friesen, Dwayne T.; Barss, Robert P.; Nelson, Leslie D.

    1996-01-01

    A method for making a chlorine-resistant composite polyamide membrane having high organic rejection, the essential step of which comprises treating a conventional composite membrane with an acyl halide. The novel membrane is especially suitable for the treatment of water containing chlorine or lower molecular weight organic compounds.

  11. Chlorine Analysis - Water. Training Module 5.260.2.77.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kirkwood Community Coll., Cedar Rapids, IA.

    This document is an instructional module package prepared in objective form for use by an instructor familiar with the procedures for chlorine residual analysis. It includes objectives, an instructor guide, and student handouts. The module addresses the determination of combined and free residual chlorine in water supply samples using three…

  12. Chlorine Dioxide Induced Multiple Chemical Sensitivity: MMPI Validity Problems.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tentoni, Stuart C.

    This paper discusses Minnesota Multiphasic Personality Inventory (MMPI) data obtained from individuals exposed to chlorine dioxide in the workplace who developed Multiple Chemical Sensitivity Syndrome. The paper explores current research on chlorine dioxide exposed persons who were misdiagnosed on the basis of MMPI interpretations. Difficulties…

  13. INACTIVATION OF BACILLUS GLOBIGII BY CHLORINATION: A HIERARCHICAL BAYESIAN MODEL

    EPA Science Inventory

    Recent events where spores of Bacillus anthracis have been used as a bioterrorist weapon have prompted interest in determining the resistance of this organism to commonly used disinfectants, such as chlorine, chlorine dioxide and ozone. This work was undertaken to study ...

  14. Aqueous chlorination of diclofenac: kinetic study and transformation products identification.

    PubMed

    Soufan, M; Deborde, M; Legube, B

    2012-06-15

    Diclofenac reactivity and fate during water chlorination was investigated in this work. In the first step, chlorination kinetic of diclofenac (DCF) was studied in the pH range of 4-10 at 20 ± 2 °C and in the presence of an excess of total chlorine. A second-order reaction (first-order relative to DCF concentration and first-order relative to free chlorine concentration) was shown with rate constant about 3.89 ± 1.17 M(-1) s(-1) at pH 7. The elementary reactions (i.e. reactions of hypochlorous acid (HOCl) with neutral and ionized forms of DCF, and acid-catalysed reaction of HOCl with neutral and ionized forms of DCF) were proposed to explain the pH-dependence of the rate constants and intrinsic constant of each of them were calculated. In the second step, several degradation products formed during chlorination of DCF were identified. These compounds could come from an initial chlorine electrophilic attack on aromatic ring or amine function of DCF. Some of these chlorinated derivatives seem to accumulate in solution in the presence of an excess of chlorine. PMID:22525458

  15. Chlorination of bisphenol A: kinetics and by-products formation.

    PubMed

    Gallard, Hervé; Leclercq, Amélie; Croué, Jean-Philippe

    2004-08-01

    The kinetics of initial chlorination of bisphenol A (BPA) was studied between pH 2 and 11 at room temperature (20 +/- 2 degrees C). pH Profile of the apparent second-order rate constant of the reaction of BPA with chlorine were modeled considering the elementary reactions of HOCl with BPA species and an acid-catalyzed reaction. The predominant reactions at near neutral pH were the reactions of HOCl with the two phenolate species of BPA (k = 3.10 x 10(4) M(-1)s(-1) for BPA- and 6.62 x 10(4) M(-1) s(-1) for BPA(2-)). At near neutral pH, half-life times of BPA were calculated to be less than 1.5 h for chlorine residual higher than 0.2 mg l(-1). Chlorination of synthetic treated waters spiked with BPA showed that BPA disappeared within 4 h and that chlorinated bisphenol A congeners were rapidly formed and remained in solution for up to 10-20 h when low chlorine dosages are applied (0.5-1 mg l(-1)). To limit their presence in drinking water networks, it is then necessary to maintain high chlorine residuals that rapidly produce and decompose chlorinated bisphenol A congeners. PMID:15212912

  16. FULL-SCALE DEMONSTRATION OF NITROGEN REMOVAL BY BREAKPOINT CHLORINATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    A large-scale breakpoint chlorination system was constructed and operated at Rancho Cordova, CA. Reliable operation was demonstrated and a number of observations regarding process chemistry and engineering were made, including (1) the chlorine to ammonia-N ratio required to reach...

  17. Chlorine resistant glutaraldehyde crosslinked polyelectrolyte multilayer membranes for desalination.

    PubMed

    Cho, Kwun Lun; Hill, Anita J; Caruso, Frank; Kentish, Sandra E

    2015-05-01

    Crosslinked polyelectrolyte multilayer membranes are synthesized with salt rejection values approaching those of commercial desalination membranes, but with increased chlorine resistance. The membranes are fabricated directly onto porous commercial substrates. Subsequent crosslinking of the polycation layers with glutaraldehyde leads to NaCl rejections of up to 97%, while the incorporation of a highly sulfonated polysulfone polyanion leads to high chlorine resistance. PMID:25776340

  18. Atomic scale insights on chlorinated gamma-alumina surfaces.

    PubMed

    Digne, Mathieu; Raybaud, Pascal; Sautet, Philippe; Guillaume, Denis; Toulhoat, Hervé

    2008-08-20

    The thermochemistry of chlorinated gamma-alumina surfaces is explored by means of density functional calculations as a function of relevant reaction conditions used in experiments and in high-octane fuel production in the refining industry such as hydrocarbon isomerization and reforming. The role of chlorine as a dope of the Brønsted acidity of gamma-alumina surfaces is investigated at an atomic scale. Combining infrared spectroscopy and density functional theory calculations, the most favorable location of chlorine atoms on the (110), (100) and (111) surfaces of gamma-alumina is found to result either from direct adsorption or from the exchange of basic hydroxyl groups. Moreover, the modification of the hydrogen bond network upon chlorine adsorption is put forward as a key parameter for changing the Brønsted acidity. In a second step, we use a thermodynamic approach based on DFT total energy calculations corrected by the chemical potentials of HCl and H2O to determine the adsorption isotherms of chlorine and the relative surface concentration of hydroxyl groups and chlorine species on the gamma-alumina surfaces. The determination of chlorine content as a function of temperature and partial pressures of H2O and HCl offers new quantitative data required for optimizing the state of the support surface in industrial conditions. The mechanisms of chlorination are also discussed as a function of reaction conditions. PMID:18646849

  19. OPPT workplan assessments for medium and long chain chlorinated paraffins

    EPA Science Inventory

    MCCPs (C14 – C17) and the C18-20 LCCPs are liquid mixtures of chlorinated alkanes. Short chain chlorinated paraffins (SCCPs, C10-C13) have been the focus of coordinated global action (including by US EPA as an action plan chemical), and MCCPs and LCCPs are alternatives to SCCPs f...

  20. 78 FR 66767 - Chlorinated Isocyanurates From China and Japan

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-11-06

    ... publishing the notice in the Federal Register of September 10, 2013 (78 FR 55293). The conference was held in... COMMISSION Chlorinated Isocyanurates From China and Japan Determinations On the basis of the record \\1... injured by reason of imports from China and Japan of chlorinated isocyanurates, provided for...

  1. DETERMINATION OF A CHLORINATED FURANONE (MX) IN TREATED WATER

    EPA Science Inventory

    A potent mutagen, 3-chloro-4-(dichloromethyl)-5-hydroxy2(5H)-furanone (MX) has been identified in three chlorinated drinking waters in the United States. It has also been identified in two chlorinated drinking waters by investigators in Finland. MX appears to account for a signif...

  2. ATRAZOME CHLORINATION TRANSFORMATION PRODUCTS UNDER DRINKING WATER DISTRIBUTION SYSTEM CONDITIONS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Chlorination is a commonly-used disinfectant step in drinking water treatment. Should free chlorine be added to water used as a drinking water source, it is widely understood that many biological species in the water, along with dissolved organic and inorganic chemicals, will rea...

  3. Altered UV absorbance and cytotoxicity of chlorinated sunscreen agents.

    PubMed

    Sherwood, Vaughn F; Kennedy, Steven; Zhang, Hualin; Purser, Gordon H; Sheaff, Robert J

    2012-12-01

    Sunscreens are widely utilized due to the adverse effects of ultraviolet (UV) radiation on human health. The safety of their active ingredients as well as that of any modified versions generated during use is thus of concern. Chlorine is used as a chemical disinfectant in swimming pools. Its reactivity suggests sunscreen components might be chlorinated, altering their absorptive and/or cytotoxic properties. To test this hypothesis, the UV-filters oxybenzone, dioxybenzone, and sulisobenzone were reacted with chlorinating agents and their UV spectra analyzed. In all cases, a decrease in UV absorbance was observed. Given that chlorinated compounds can be cytotoxic, the effect of modified UV-filters on cell viability was examined. Chlorinated oxybenzone and dioxybenzone caused significantly more cell death than unchlorinated controls. In contrast, chlorination of sulisobenzone actually reduced cytotoxicity of the parent compound. Exposing a commercially available sunscreen product to chlorine also resulted in decreased UV absorbance, loss of UV protection, and enhanced cytotoxicity. These observations show chlorination of sunscreen active ingredients can dramatically decrease UV absorption and generate derivatives with altered biological properties. PMID:22257218

  4. Degradation Products of Benzophenone-3 in Chlorinated Seawater Swimming Pools.

    PubMed

    Manasfi, Tarek; Storck, Veronika; Ravier, Sylvain; Demelas, Carine; Coulomb, Bruno; Boudenne, Jean-Luc

    2015-08-01

    Oxybenzone (2-hydroxy-4-methoxyphenone, benzophenone-3) is one of the UV filters commonly found in sunscreens. Its presence in swimming pools and its reactivity with chlorine has already been demonstrated but never in seawater swimming pools. In these pools, chlorine added for disinfection results in the formation of bromine, due to the high levels of bromide in seawater, and leads to the formation of brominated disinfection byproducts, known to be more toxic than chlorinated ones. Therefore, it seems important to determine the transformation products of oxybenzone in chlorinated seawater swimming pools; especially that users of seawater swimming pools may apply sunscreens and other personal-care products containing oxybenzone before going to pools. This leads to the introduction of oxybenzone to pools, where it reacts with bromine. For this purpose, the reactivity of oxybenzone has been examined as a function of chlorine dose and temperature in artificial seawater to assess its potential to produce trihalomethanes and to determine the byproducts generated following chlorination. Increasing doses of chlorine and increasing temperatures enhanced the formation of bromoform. Experiments carried out with excess doses of chlorine resulted in the degradation of oxybenzone and allowed the determination of the degradation mechanisms leading to the formation of bromoform. In total, ten transformation products were identified, based on which the transformation pathway was proposed. PMID:26167727

  5. Intrinsic chemical sensor fibers for extended-length chlorine detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cordero, Steven R.; Ruiz, David; Huang, Weijie; Cohen, Leonard G.; Lieberman, Robert A.

    2004-12-01

    A fiber optic chlorine sensor having its entire length as the sensing element is reported here. The fiber consists of a silica core and a chlorine-sensitive cladding. Upon exposure to chlorine, the cladding very rapidly changes color resulting in attenuation of the light throughput of the fiber. A two-meter portion of sensor fiber responds to 10-ppm chlorine in milliseconds and to 1 ppm in several seconds. Furthermore, response to 100 ppb chlorine is realized in minutes. The high sensitivity suggests that the propagating modes of the light interact strongly with the cladding, and that these interactions are massively increased (Beers Law) due to the extended sensor length. The sensitivity to 1 ppm chlorine gas as a function of the length of fiber exposed between 0.3-30 meters is presented. The sensitivity to concentrations of chlorine from 0.1ppm-10ppm has been determined for a fixed 2 meter length of fiber. Pre-exposure fiber attenuation measures 70 dB/km (@ 633 nm) making it possible to detect chlorine on a continuous length of fiber on the scale of one hundred meters or more using standard detection methods (e.g. laser and photodetectors). This will replace the need of having a collection of point-detectors to cover large areas.

  6. INDUCTION OF PROPHAGE LAMBDA BY CHLORINATED PESTICIDES (JOURNAL VERSION)

    EPA Science Inventory

    In an effort to identify a short-term assay sensitive to chlorinated carcinogens, a group of chlorinated pesticides were tested, most of which are carcinogenic in rodents, in a prophage-induction assay. The pesticides tested were malathion, monuron, p,p'-DDT, mirex, lindane, nitr...

  7. CHLORINE DIOXIDE CHEMISTRY, REACTIONS, AND DISINFECTION BY-PRODUCTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    This chapter contains two main sections-the first section describes the chemistry and reactions of chlorine dioxide, and the second describes the disinfection by-products (DBPs) of chlorine dioxide and their control. A short section on Research Needs completes this chapter. The...

  8. REACTION PRODUCTS FROM THE CHLORINATION OF SEAWATER. CHAPTER 34

    EPA Science Inventory

    Much of the present information on the products formed when seawater is chlorinated is based on observations of laboratory experiments in which chlorine was added to seawater to stimulate conditions of electricity generating plants. Results are reported for a field study at the P...

  9. ELECTROCHEMICAL DEGRADATION OF CHLORINATED CONTAMINANTS IN SEDIMENTS AND GROUNDWATER

    EPA Science Inventory

    Chlorinated aliphatic and aromatic compounds account for much of the contamination found at sediments sites. Chlorinated aliphatic hydrocarbons such as trichloroethylene (TCE) occur as serious contaminants at 358 major hazardous waste sites in the USA. TCE is widely used as a sol...

  10. Experimental and Theoretical Studies of Atmosphereic Inorganic Chlorine Chemistry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sander, Stanley P.; Friedl, Randall R.

    1993-01-01

    Over the last five years substantial progress has been made in defining the realm of new chlorine chemistry in the polar stratosphere. Application of existing experimental techniques to potentially important chlorine-containing compounds has yielded quantitative kinetic and spectroscopic data as well as qualitative mechanistic insights into the relevant reactions.

  11. CHARACTERIZATION OF CHLORINATION TRANSFORMATION PRODUCTS OF SELECTED PESTICIDES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Chlorination is a commonly-used disinfectant step in drinking water treatment. Should free chlorine be added to water used as a drinking water source, it is widely understood that many biological species in the water along with dissolved organic and inorganic chemicals will react...

  12. CONCERNS WITH USING CHLORINE DIOXIDE DISINFECTION IN THE UNITED STATES

    EPA Science Inventory

    There is a renewed interest in disinfection with chlorine dioxide in the United States because of upcoming Federal regulations on disinfection by-products. ench studies and field applications of chlorine dioxide have shown that it is an effective biocide that does not produce hal...

  13. MODELING CHLORINE RESIDUALS IN DRINKING-WATER DISTRIBUTION SYSTEMS

    EPA Science Inventory

    A mass-transfer-based model is developed for predicting chlorine decay in drinking-water distribution networks. The model considers first-order reactions of chlorine to occur both in the bulk flow and at the pipe wall. The overall rate of the wall reaction is a function of the ...

  14. POWER PLANT COOLING WATER CHLORINATION IN NORTHERN CALIFORNIA

    EPA Science Inventory

    A survey was conducted of chlorination practices at five power plants owned and operated by the Pacific Gas and Electric Company. Frequency and duration of chlorination varied significantly from plant to plant and was controlled analytically by the orthotolidine and/or amperometr...

  15. TREATMENT ALTERNATIVES FOR CONTROLLING CHLORINATED ORGANIC CONTAMINANTS IN DRINKING WATER

    EPA Science Inventory

    A pilot plant study was conducted by the City of Thornton, Colorado, to evaluate techniques for controlling chlorinated organic compounds formed in drinking water as a result of breakpoint, or free, chlorination. The pilot plant was operated for 46 months using the raw water sour...

  16. SUBCHRONIC TOXICOLOGY OF HUMIC ACID FOLLOWING CHLORINATION IN THE RAT

    EPA Science Inventory

    A subchronic 90-day study was conducted with chlorinated and non-chlorinated humic acids with male Sprague-Dawley rats. Body weight gain, terminal organ and body weights, food and fluid consumption, clinical chemistries, hematological parameters, and urinalyses were determined fo...

  17. 40 CFR 415.63 - Effluent limitations guidelines representing the degree of effluent reduction attainable by the...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... Chlorine 0.0032 0.0019 (b) Except as provided in 40 CFR 125.30 through 125.32, any existing point source... technology economically achievable (BAT). (a) Except as provided in 40 CFR 125.30 through 125.32, any...-alkali Subcategory (Chlorine and Sodium or Potassium Hydroxide Production) § 415.63 Effluent...

  18. 40 CFR 415.63 - Effluent limitations guidelines representing the degree of effluent reduction attainable by the...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... Chlorine 0.0032 0.0019 (b) Except as provided in 40 CFR 125.30 through 125.32, any existing point source... technology economically achievable (BAT). (a) Except as provided in 40 CFR 125.30 through 125.32, any...-alkali Subcategory (Chlorine and Sodium or Potassium Hydroxide Production) § 415.63 Effluent...

  19. 40 CFR 415.63 - Effluent limitations guidelines representing the degree of effluent reduction attainable by the...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... Chlorine 0.0032 0.0019 (b) Except as provided in 40 CFR 125.30 through 125.32, any existing point source... technology economically achievable (BAT). (a) Except as provided in 40 CFR 125.30 through 125.32, any...-alkali Subcategory (Chlorine and Sodium or Potassium Hydroxide Production) § 415.63 Effluent...

  20. 40 CFR 415.63 - Effluent limitations guidelines representing the degree of effluent reduction attainable by the...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... Chlorine 0.0032 0.0019 (b) Except as provided in 40 CFR 125.30 through 125.32, any existing point source... technology economically achievable (BAT). (a) Except as provided in 40 CFR 125.30 through 125.32, any...-alkali Subcategory (Chlorine and Sodium or Potassium Hydroxide Production) § 415.63 Effluent...

  1. Chlorinated ethenes from groundwater in tree trunks

    SciTech Connect

    Vroblesky, D.A.; Nietch, C.T.; Morris, J.T.

    1999-02-01

    The purpose of this investigation was to determine whether tree-core analysis could be used to delineate shallow groundwater contamination by chlorinated ethenes. Analysis of tree cores from bald cypress [Taxodium distichum (L.) Rich], tupelo (Nyssa aquatica L.), sweet gum (Liquidambar stryaciflua L.), oak (Quercus spp.), sycamore (Platanus occidentalis L.), and loblolly pine (Pinus taeda L.) growing over shallow groundwater contaminated with cis-1,2-dichloroethene (cDCE) and trichloroethene (TCE) showed that those compounds also were present in the trees. The cores were collected and analyzed by headspace gas chromatography. Bald cypress, tupelo, and loblolly pine contained the highest concentrations of TCE, with lesser amounts in nearby oak and sweet gum. The concentrations of cDCE and TCE in various trees appeared to reflect the configuration of the chlorinated-solvent groundwater contamination plume. Bald cypress cores collected along 18.6-m vertical transects of the same trunks showed that TCE concentrations decline by 30--70% with trunk height. The ability of the tested trees to take up cDCE and TCE make tree coring a potentially cost-effective and simple approach to optimizing well placement at this site.

  2. Individual biotransformation rates in chlorinated aliphatic mixtures

    SciTech Connect

    Hughes, J.B.; Parkin, G.F.

    1996-02-01

    Anaerobic biotransformation of chlorinated aliphatics has been widely studied over the past decade, and anaerobic bioremediation is considered a promising technique for restoration of contaminated aquifers. Studies using batch cultures and continuously fed attached-growth systems investigated the effect of mixtures of chlorinated aliphatics on the anaerobic biotransformation rates of individual components of the mixture. Dichloromethane (DCM), chloroform (CF), and 1,1,1-trichloroethane (TCA) were selected for study because of their frequent detection in groundwater. Biotransformation of CF and TCA occurred in all systems. When CF and TCA were fed together, transformation rates for both aliphatics were lower than when fed individually. DCM generally had minor to negligible effects on the transformation of CF and TCA, but in one case, it caused a slight but statistically significant decrease in TCA transformation (p = 0.05). DCM transformation was not observed when fed individually or in mixtures to batch resting cultures, so the effect of CF and TCA on DCM transformation could not be determined.

  3. Chlorinated ethenes from groundwater in tree trunks

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Vroblesky, Don A.; Nietch, C.T.; Morris, J.T.

    1999-01-01

    The purpose of this investigation was to determine whether tree-core analysis could be used to delineate shallow groundwater contamination by chlorinated ethenes. Analysis of tree cores from bald cypress [Taxodium distichum (L.) Rich], tupelo (Nyssa aquatica L.), sweet gum (Liquidambar stryaciflua L.), oak (Quercus spp.), sycamore (Platanus occidentalis L.), and loblolly pine (Pinus taeda L.) growing over shallow groundwater contaminated with cis-1,2-dichloroethene (cDCE) and trichloroethene (TCE) showed that those compounds also were present in the trees. The cores were collected and analyzed by headspace gas chromatography. Bald cypress, tupelo, and loblolly pine contained the highest concentrations of TCE, with lesser amounts in nearby oak and sweet gum. The concentrations of cDCE and TCE in various trees appeared to reflect the configuration of the chlorinated-solvent groundwater contamination plume. Bald cypress cores collected along 18.6-m vertical transects of the same trunks showed that TCE concentrations decline by 30−70% with trunk height. The ability of the tested trees to take up cDCE and TCE make tree coring a potentially cost-effective and simple approach to optimizing well placement at this site. 

  4. Bioremediation of chlorinated solvents and diesel soils

    SciTech Connect

    Huismann, S.S.; Peterson, M.A.; Jardine, R.J.

    1995-11-01

    The US Army, in a cooperative effort with the Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA) and its cooperator, ENSR, performed an innovative enhanced bioremediation project at Fort Gillem in Atlanta, Georgia. The objective of the project was to remediate six hundred cubic yards of soil affected by a mixture of chlorinated compounds and petroleum hydrocarbons which posed a threat to uppermost groundwater and private drinking water wells. ENSR completed a demonstration project to measure the effects of bioremediation on both chlorinated compounds (primarily TCE) and petroleum hydrocarbons ({number_sign}2 diesel). Contaminated soil was placed on top of a bermed polyethylene liner to construct an ex-situ biovault. Nutrients were added to the soil as it was loaded onto the liner. Contaminated soil was also used to construct a control vault. A methane barrier cover was placed over both piles. The cover was designed to prevent short circuiting of induced airflow in and around the enhanced pile, and to prevent the release of fugitive emissions from either pile.

  5. Automatic electrochemical ambient air monitor for chloride and chlorine

    DOEpatents

    Mueller, Theodore R.

    1976-07-13

    An electrochemical monitoring system has been provided for determining chloride and chlorine in air at levels of from about 10-1000 parts per billion. The chloride is determined by oxidation to chlorine followed by reduction to chloride in a closed system. Chlorine is determined by direct reduction at a platinum electrode in 6 M H.sub.2 SO.sub.4 electrolyte. A fully automated system is utilized to (1) acquire and store a value corresponding to electrolyte-containing impurities, (2) subtract this value from that obtained in the presence of air, (3) generate coulometrically a standard sample of chlorine mixed with air sample, and determine it as chlorine and/or chloride, and (4) calculate, display, and store for permanent record the ratio of the signal obtained from the air sample and that obtained with the standard.

  6. Inactivation of Naegleria gruberi cysts by chlorinated cyanurates.

    PubMed Central

    Engel, J P; Rubin, A J; Sproul, O J

    1983-01-01

    The resistance of Naegleria gruberi cysts to chlorine in the presence of cyanuric acid was compared at pH 5 and 7. An amperometric membrane electrode was used to measure HOCl concentrations independently of the chlorinated cyanurate species, thus permitting an analysis of the role of free chlorine versus chlorinated cyanurates in cyst inactivation. In the presence of cyanuric acid, the products of the HOCl residual and the contact time required for 99% cyst inactivation were 8.5 mg . min/liter and 13.9 mg . min/liter at pH 5 and 7, respectively. The Watson's Law coefficients of dilution (n) were 1.3 and 1.6 at pH 5 and 7, respectively. The results strongly suggest that HOCl is the predominant cysticide with no measurable cysticidal effect of the chlorinated cyanurate species. PMID:6316851

  7. Laboratory generation of free chlorine from HCl under stratospheric afterburning conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Burke, M.L.; Zittel, P.F.

    1998-01-01

    Experiments have been conducted using a low pressure laboratory flame apparatus to examine the chemistry of solid rocket motor (SRM) afterburning relevant for stratospheric altitudes. It was found that a significant fraction of the HCl injected into H{sub 2}-O{sub 2} and H{sub 2}-CO-O{sub 2} flames can be consumed, with observed losses of up to 40%. The extent of conversion of HCl was found to increase with increasing oxygen:fuel (O/F) ratio and decreasing pressure; the loss at a given O/F was also higher for flames with equal flows of H{sub 2} and CO compared to flames with no CO in the fuel. The major product of HCl reaction was found to be Cl{sub 2}, with no other chlorine-contained products observed via mass spectrometry. Distinct Cl{sub 2} B {yields} X emission bands were observed along with very weak CIO A {yields} C bands and a bright, white continuum emission that apparently arose from one or more chlorine-containing compounds. The general findings concerning the magnitude of HCl conversion and the formation of Cl{sub 2} are consistent with published modeling results for SRM stratospheric afterburning. This formation of free chlorine could lead to catalytic destruction of ozone in regions near the path the launch vehicle follows during boost through the stratosphere.

  8. Acute toxicity of copper, ammonia, and chlorine to glochidia and juveniles of freshwater mussels (Unionidae)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wang, N.; Ingersoll, C.G.; Hardesty, D.K.; Ivey, C.D.; Kunz, J.L.; May, T.W.; Dwyer, F.J.; Roberts, A.D.; Augspurger, T.; Kane, C.M.; Neves, R.J.; Barnhart, M.C.

    2007-01-01

    The objective of the present study was to determine acute toxicity of copper, ammonia, or chlorine to larval (glochidia) and juvenile mussels using the recently published American Society for Testing and Materials (ASTM) Standard guide for conducting laboratory toxicity tests with freshwater mussels. Toxicity tests were conducted with glochidia (24- to 48-h exposures) and juveniles (96-h exposures) of up to 11 mussel species in reconstituted ASTM hard water using copper, ammonia, or chlorine as a toxicant. Copper and ammonia tests also were conducted with five commonly tested species, including cladocerans (Daphnia magna and Ceriodaphnia dubia; 48-h exposures), amphipod (Hyalella azteca; 48-h exposures), rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss; 96-h exposures), and fathead minnow (Pimephales promelas; 96-h exposures). Median effective concentrations (EC50s) for commonly tested species were >58 ??g Cu/L (except 15 ??g Cu/L for C. dubia) and >13 mg total ammonia N/L, whereas the EC50s for mussels in most cases were 40 ??g/L and above the FAV in the WQC for chlorine. The results indicate that the early life stages of mussels generally were more sensitive to copper and ammonia than other organisms and that, including mussel toxicity data in a revision to the WQC, would lower the WQC for copper or ammonia. Furthermore, including additional mussel data in 2007 WQC for copper based on biotic ligand model would further lower the WQC. ?? 2007 SETAC.

  9. Ozone Depletion at Mid-Latitudes: Coupling of Volcanic Aerosols and Temperature Variability to Anthropogenic Chlorine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Solomon, S.; Portmann, R. W.; Garcia, R. R.; Randel, W.; Wu, F.; Nagatani, R.; Gleason, J.; Thomason, L.; Poole, L. R.; McCormick, M. P.

    1998-01-01

    Satellite observations of total ozone at 40-60 deg N are presented from a variety of instruments over the time period 1979-1997. These reveal record low values in 1992-3 (after Pinatubo) followed by partial but incomplete recovery. The largest post-Pinatubo reductions and longer-term trends occur in spring, providing a critical test for chemical theories of ozone depletion. The observations are shown to be consistent with current understanding of the chemistry of ozone depletion when changes in reactive chlorine and stratospheric aerosol abundances are considered along with estimates of wave-driven fluctuations in stratospheric temperatures derived from global temperature analyses. Temperature fluctuations are shown to make significant contributions to model calculated northern mid-latitude ozone depletion due to heterogeneous chlorine activation on liquid sulfate aerosols at temperatures near 200-210 K (depending upon water vapor pressure), particularly after major volcanic eruptions. Future mid-latitude ozone recovery will hence depend not only on chlorine recovery but also on temperature trends and/or variability, volcanic activity, and any trends in stratospheric sulfate aerosol.

  10. Bromine-Chlorine Coupling in the Antarctic Ozone Hole

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Danilin, Michael Y.; Sze, Nien-Dak; Ko, Malcolm K. W.; Rodriquez, Jose M.; Prather, Michael J.

    1996-01-01

    The contribution from the chlorine and bromine species in the formation of the Antarctic ozone hole is evaluated. Since chlorine and bromine compounds are of different industrial origin, it is desirable, from a policy point of view, to be able to attribute chlorine-catalyzed loss of ozone with those reactions directly involving chlorine species, and likewise for bromine-catalyzed loss. In the stratosphere, however, most of the chemical families are highly coupled, and, for example, changes in the chlorine abundance will alter the partitioninig in other families and thus the rate of ozone loss. This modeling study examines formation of the Antarctic ozone hole for a wide range of bromine concentrations (5 - 25 pptv) and for chlorine concentrations typical of the last two decades (1.5, 2.5 and 3.5 ppbv). We follow the photochemical evolution of a single parcel of air, typical of the inner Antarctic vortex (50 mbar, 70 deg. S, NO(sub y) = 2 ppbv, with Polar Stratospheric Clouds(PSC)) from August 1 to November 1. For all of these ranges of chlorine and bromine loading, we would predict a substantial ozone hole (local depletion greater than 90%) within the de-nitrified, PSC- perturbed vortex. The contributions of the different catalytic cycles responsible for ozone loss are tabulated. The deep minimum in ozone is driven primarily by the chlorine abundance. As bromine levels decrease, the magnitude of the chlorine-catalyzed ozone loss increases to take up the slack. This is because bromine suppresses ClO by accelerating the conversion of ClO an Cl2O2 back to HCI. For this range of conditions, the local relative efficiency of ozone destruction per bromine atom to that per chlorine atom (alpha-factor) ranges from 33 to 55, decreasing with increase of bromine.

  11. Effects of chlorine or chlorine dioxide during immersion chilling on recovery of bacteria from broiler carcasses and chiller water

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A study was conducted to determine the microbiological impact of immersion chilling broiler carcasses with chlorine or chlorine dioxide. Eviscerated, pre-chill commercial broiler carcasses were cut into left and right halves along the keel bone, and each half was rinsed (HCR) in 100 mL of 0.1% pept...

  12. An overview of the removal of chlorine from coal by precombustion treatment

    SciTech Connect

    Viswanath, D.S.; Muchmore, C.B.; Chen, H.L.; Hesketh, H.E.; Wang, L.; Hughes, A.; Ambrose, R.

    1994-12-31

    Several studies have established the detrimental effects of chlorine and the minimum tolerable limits of chlorine in coal. The chlorine content of coal can be as high as 1.2 to 1.5%, as documented in the literature. Research is being conducted to provide the technical basis for developing a process to remove chlorine from coal before combustion. Two methods are investigated: (1) water leaching of chlorine, and (2) a thermal treatment process. In addition to the amount of chlorine present in coal, the nature of chlorine in coal is an important factor, whether it exists as an organic chlorine or as an inorganic chlorine. It is, therefore, not surprising that water leaching of chlorine could not remove 100% of chlorine. This outcome led to a combined process of water leaching and heat treatment. In this paper, the authors review the work that has been carried out in laboratories at Southern Illinois University at Carbondale.

  13. Acute toxicity of copper, ammonia, and chlorine to glochidia and juveniles of freshwater mussels (Unionidae).

    PubMed

    Wang, Ning; Ingersoll, Christopher G; Hardesty, Douglas K; Ivey, Christopher D; Kunz, James L; May, Thomas W; Dwyer, F James; Roberts, Andy D; Augspurger, Tom; Kane, Cynthia M; Neves, Richard J; Barnhart, M Chris

    2007-10-01

    The objective of the present study was to determine acute toxicity of copper, ammonia, or chlorine to larval (glochidia) and juvenile mussels using the recently published American Society for Testing and Materials (ASTM) Standard guide for conducting laboratory toxicity tests with freshwater mussels. Toxicity tests were conducted with glochidia (24- to 48-h exposures) and juveniles (96-h exposures) of up to 11 mussel species in reconstituted ASTM hard water using copper, ammonia, or chlorine as a toxicant. Copper and ammonia tests also were conducted with five commonly tested species, including cladocerans (Daphnia magna and Ceriodaphnia dubia; 48-h exposures), amphipod (Hyalella azteca; 48-h exposures), rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss; 96-h exposures), and fathead minnow (Pimephales promelas; 96-h exposures). Median effective concentrations (EC50s) for commonly tested species were >58 microg Cu/L (except 15 microg Cu/L for C. dubia) and >13 mg total ammonia N/L, whereas the EC50s for mussels in most cases were <45 microg Cu/L or <12 mg N/L and were often at or below the final acute values (FAVs) used to derive the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency 1996 acute water quality criterion (WQC) for copper and 1999 acute WQC for ammonia. However, the chlorine EC50s for mussels generally were >40 microg/L and above the FAV in the WQC for chlorine. The results indicate that the early life stages of mussels generally were more sensitive to copper and ammonia than other organisms and that, including mussel toxicity data in a revision to the WQC, would lower the WQC for copper or ammonia. Furthermore, including additional mussel data in 2007 WQC for copper based on biotic ligand model would further lower the WQC. PMID:17867873

  14. Measurements of Active Chlorine in the Antarctic Ozone Hole: 1986 to 2005

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Solomon, P.; Barrett, J.; Connor, B.; Mooney, T.; Parrish, A.

    2005-12-01

    We will present and compare ground-based microwave measurements of stratospheric chlorine monoxide, ClO, from 1986, 1987 and 1996 through 2005 obtained from McMurdo and Scott Base, Antarctica (78° S). These measurements demonstrate the evolution of the ClO altitude profile (from 15 to 40 km) as the ozone hole progresses from the onset of sunlight in early August until the beginning of the breakup of the vortex in early October. The measurements from 1986 and 1987 were part of the National Ozone Expedition and the 1996 to 2005 measurements are carried out as part of the Network for the Detection of Stratospheric Change, NDSC. The 1986 measurements were the first detection of a huge excess of chlorine monoxide during the Antarctic ozone hole period and the 1987 measurements produced the first full altitude profile of ClO over Antarctica. The last 10 years of measurements were carried out with an instrument very similar to the one used in the 1980's, but automated for continuous operation. The ClO altitude profile from the older measurements will be compared to the more recent measurements and variations in the time sequence of active chlorine from year to year will be discussed. We will also report on changes and/or trends in the peak mixing ratios from year to year both within the 10 year sequence (1996 to 2005) and between the recent measurements and the data from the 1980's. The measurements will also be compared to models to test the current understanding of chlorine chemistry.

  15. Reduction of Escherichia coli 0157:H7 in shredded iceberg lettuce by chlorination and gamma irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Foley, D. M.; Dufour, A.; Rodriguez, L.; Caporaso, F.; Prakash, A.

    2002-03-01

    Lettuce was inoculated with a six-strain cocktail of acid-adapted Escherichia coli 0157:H7 at a level of 1×10 7 CFU/g. Following chlorination at 200 μg/ml, the lettuce was irradiated at 0.15, 0.38, or 0.55 kGy using a 60Co source. Survival of E. coli 0157:H7, aerobic mesophiles and yeast and molds were measured over a period of 10 days. For quality analysis, chlorinated lettuce was subjected to irradiation at 0.33 and 0.53 kGy and stored at 1.0°C, 4.0°C or 7.0°C. Changes in texture and color were determined by instrumental means and changes in flavor, odor, and visual quality were determined by sensory testing. Chlorination plus irradiation at 0.55 kGy produced a 5.4-log reduction in E. coli 0157:H7 levels. Chlorination alone reduced the E. coli 0157:H7 counts by 1-2 logs. Irradiation at 0.55 kGy was also effective in reducing standard plate counts and yeast and mold counts. Irradiation at this level did not cause softening of lettuce and sensory attributes were not adversely affected. In general, appearance and flavor were affected more by the length of storage than by temperature conditions. The 5+log reduction in E. coli counts and lack of adverse effects on sensory attributes indicate that low-dose irradiation can improve the safety and shelf-life of fresh-cut iceberg lettuce for retail sale or food service.

  16. Sorption and diffusion of chlorinated methanes in moist clay

    SciTech Connect

    Cabbar, H.C.; Varol, N.; McCoy, B.J.

    1998-06-01

    The dynamic behavior of chlorinated methanes in clays exposed to relative humidities (RH) from 0 to 80% was investigated with the single-pellet pulse-response moment technique. Values of effective diffusion coefficients obtained from zeroth moment analysis differed only slightly for dry and moist clay pellets. When the clay pellet was dry, equilibrium adsorption constants of dichloromethane (D), trichloromethane (T), and carbon tetrachloride (C) at the gas-mineral interface were determined from first moments to be 118, 92, and 90, respectively. Dryness factors (dry fraction of surface area) for clays with RH of 5, 20, 40, and 60% were also calculated from first moments as 0.5, 0.1, 0.04, and 0.01, respectively. When the pore surfaces were covered with the water film (dryness factor was 0 for the pellet at RH 80%), overall equilibrium adsorption constants for the same tracers (D, T, C) at the gas-water and water-mineral interfaces were determined to be 7.5, 7.2, and 3.6, respectively.

  17. Appraisal of chlorine contact tank modelling practices.

    PubMed

    Rauen, William B; Angeloudis, Athanasios; Falconer, Roger A

    2012-11-15

    With new water directives imposing strict regulations to reduce the footprint of treatment operations and contaminant levels, a performance review of water treatment facilities, including Chlorine Contact Tanks (CCTs) is required. This paper includes a critical appraisal of the international literature on CCT modelling practices to date, aiming to assist the identification of areas requiring further development, in particular, relating to the computational modelling capability and availability of tools to assist hydraulic design and optimisation studies of CCTs. It notes that the hydraulic optimisation practice of poorly designed tanks commenced with experimental studies undertaken in the 1960s and 1970s, which involved mainly two types of studies, namely in situ tracer tests and laboratory physical modelling. The former has traditionally been conducted to diagnose the hydraulic performance of existing CCTs, typically based on results such as Residence Time Distribution (RTD) curves and values of the Hydraulic Efficiency Indicators (HEIs). The latter has been useful in trial and error testing of the impact of certain design modifications on those results, with suggestions for later improvements of the field scale unit. In the 1980s mathematical and numerical modelling studies started to be used to assist CCT investigations, offering a greater level of detail in a more cost-effective manner than equivalent experimentally based investigations. With the growth of computing power and the popularisation of computational models, the 1990s saw the development and application of Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) tools to simulate the hydraulic performance of CCTs, sometimes independently of experimentation, other than by using available data to calibrate and validate modelling predictions. This has led to the current scenario of CFD models being invaluable assistive tools in optimisation studies of CCTs, with the experimentation practice continuing to allow for specific

  18. Ultrafast measurements of chlorine dioxide photochemistry

    SciTech Connect

    Ludowise, P.D.

    1997-08-01

    Time-resolved mass spectrometry and time-resolved photoelectron spectroscopy are used to study the ultrafast photodissociation dynamics of chlorine dioxide, an important constituent in stratospheric ozone depletion. Chapter 1 introduces these pump/probe techniques, in which a femtosecond pump pulse excites a molecule to a dissociative state. At a later time, a second femtosecond probe pulse ionizes the molecule. The resulting mass and photoelectron spectra are acquired as a function of the delay between the pump and probe pulses, which follows the evolution of the molecule on the excited state. A comparison to other techniques used to study reaction dynamics is discussed. Chapter 2 includes a detailed description of the design and construction of the experimental apparatus, which consists of a femtosecond laser system, a molecular beam time-of-flight spectrometer, and a data acquisition system. The time-of-flight spectrometer is specifically designed to have a short flight distance to maximize the photoelectron collection efficiency without degrading the resolution, which is limited by the bandwidth of the femtosecond laser system. Typical performance of the apparatus is demonstrated in a study of the time-resolved photoelectron spectroscopy of nitric oxide. The results of the time-resolved mass spectrometry experiments of chlorine dioxide are presented in Chapter 3. Upon excitation to the A {sup 2}A{sub 2} state near 3.2 eV, the molecule dissociates through an indirect two-step mechanism. The direct dissociation channel has been predicted to be open, but is not observed. A quantum beat is observed in the OClO{sup +} species, which is described as a vibrational coherence of the optically prepared A {sup 2}A{sub 2} state. Chapter 4 presents the results of the time-resolved photoelectron experiments of chlorine dioxide. At short delay time, the quantum beat of the OClO{sup +} species is observed in the X {sup 1}A{sub 1} state of the ion. At infinite delay, the signal

  19. Inactivation of Enteric Adenovirus and Feline Calicivirus by Chlorine Dioxide

    PubMed Central

    Thurston-Enriquez, Jeanette A.; Haas, Charles N.; Jacangelo, Joseph; Gerba, Charles P.

    2005-01-01

    Chlorine dioxide (ClO2) inactivation experiments were conducted with adenovirus type 40 (AD40) and feline calicivirus (FCV). Experiments were carried out in buffered, disinfectant demand-free water under high- and low-pH and -temperature conditions. Ct values (the concentration of ClO2 multiplied by contact time with the virus) were calculated directly from bench-scale experiments and from application of the efficiency factor Hom (EFH) model. AD40 Ct ranges for 4-log inactivation (Ct99.99%) at 5°C were >0.77 to <1.53 mg/liter × min and >0.80 to <1.59 mg/liter × min for pH 6 and 8, respectively. For 15°C AD40 experiments, >0.49 to <0.74 mg/liter × min and <0.12 mg/liter × min Ct99.99% ranges were observed for pH 6 and 8, respectively. FCV Ct99.99% ranges for 5°C experiments were >20.20 to <30.30 mg/liter × min and >0.68 mg/liter × min for pH 6 and 8, respectively. For 15°C FCV experiments, Ct99.99% ranges were >4.20 to <6.72 and <0.18 mg/liter × min for pH 6 and 8, respectively. Viral inactivation was higher at pH 8 than at pH 6 and at 15°C than at 5°C. Comparison of Ct values and inactivation curves demonstrated that the EFH model described bench-scale experiment data very well. Observed bench-scale Ct99.99% ranges and EFH model Ct99.99% values demonstrated that FCV is more resistant to ClO2 than AD40 for the conditions studied. U.S. Environmental Protection Agency guidance manual Ct99.99% values are higher than Ct99.99% values calculated from bench-scale experiments and from EFH model application. PMID:15933007

  20. Chlorine Isotopes: As a Possible Tracer of Fluid/Bio-Activities on Mars and a Progress Report on Chlorine Isotope Analysis by TIMs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nakamura, N.; Nyquist, L.E.; Reese, Y.; Shih, C-Y.; Numata, M.; Fujitani, T.; Okano, O.

    2009-01-01

    Significantly large mass fractionations between chlorine isotopes (Cl-35, Cl-37) have been reported for terrestrial materials including both geological samples and laboratory materials. Also, the chlorine isotopic composition can be used as a tracer for early solar system processes. Moreover, chlorine is ubiquitous on the Martian surface. Typical chlorine abundances in Gusev soils are approx.0.5 %. The global surface average chlorine abundance also is approx.0.5 %. Striking variations among outcrop rocks at Meridiani were reported with some chlorine abundances as high as approx.2%. Characterizing conditions under which chlorine isotopic fractionation may occur is clearly of interest to planetary science. Thus, we have initiated development of a chlorine isotopic analysis technique using TIMS at NASA-JSC. We present here a progress report on the current status of development at JSC and discuss the possible application of chlorine isotopic analysis to Martian meteorites in a search for fluid- and possibly biological activity on Mars.

  1. Lipoprotein-mediated distribution of N-aspartyl chlorin-E6 in the mouse.

    PubMed

    Kessel, D; Whitcomb, K L; Schulz, V

    1992-07-01

    The localization of many photosensitizing agents has been attributed to distribution of low density lipoprotein (LDL)-bound drug as a function of the relative numbers of LDL receptors in different tissues. While the chlorin derivative NPe6 is a potent photosensitizing agent in the mouse, it binds mainly to mouse plasma high density lipoproteins (HDL) and albumin, with only 1% bound to LDL. This pattern suggests only a minor role for the LDL-receptor pathway with regard to N-aspartyl chlorin e6 (NPe6) biodistribution. Moreover, patterns of accumulation of radioactive NPe6, LDL and HDL in murine tissues are consistent with the suggestion that distribution of NPe6 to different tissues cannot be explained on the basis of an LDL-mediated mechanism. PMID:1508982

  2. 40 CFR 423.11 - Specialized definitions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... addition to the definitions set forth in 40 CFR part 401, the following definitions apply to this part: (a... value obtained using the amperometric method for total residual chlorine described in 40 CFR part 136... control systems, ion exchange water treatment system, water treatment evaporator blowdown, laboratory...

  3. Cracking of Clay Due to Contact with Waste Chlorinated Solvents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Otero, M.; Ayral, D.; Shipan, J.; Goltz, M. N.; Huang, J.; Demond, A. H.

    2012-12-01

    Clays are known to crack upon desiccation. Desiccation cracks of up to 3 cm wide have been reported in natural soils. This raises the question if a similar behavior is seen when a dense non-aqueous phase liquids (DNAPL) waste is in contact with clay. The contact with organic liquids causes the clay structure to shrink, leading to the formation of cracks. Moreover, DNAPL waste not only contains the organic liquid solvent but also includes surface-active solutes or surfactants. Such solutes can enhance the interaction of the organic solvents with the clay. This research will assess whether or not contact with chlorinated organic waste causes cracking. In order to evaluate the possibility of cracking in the clay, microcosms have been constructed that mimic aquifer systems, consisting of a saturated layer of sand, a saturated layer of bentonite clay and a 2.5 cm layer of either pure chlorinated solvents or DNAPL waste. The onset of cracking for the microcosm with tetrachloroethylene (PCE) waste as the DNAPL layer occurred after ten days of contact. Similarly, at eight days, cracks were observed in a microcosm containing trichloroethylene (TCE) waste . Forty-four days later, the length and number of cracks have grown considerably; with a total crack length of 50 cm on a surface of 80 cm2 in the microcosm containing PCE waste. On the other hand it took approximately 161 days for the clay layer in the microcosm containing pure PCE to crack. To quantity the degree of cracking, crack maps were developed using the image software, Image J. Characteristics like crack length, crack aperture, and the percentage of total length for a range of apertures were calculated using this software. For example, for the PCE waste microcosm, it was calculated that 3.7% of the crack length had an aperture of 100-300 microns, 15.1% of the crack length had an aperture of 300-500 microns, 29.7% of the crack length had an aperture of 500-700 microns, 40.1% of the crack length had an aperture of

  4. Antarctic stratospheric chemistry of chlorine nitrate, hydrogen chloride, and ice - Release of active chlorine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Molina, Mario J.; Tso, Tai-Ly; Molina, Luisa T.; Wang, Frank C.-Y.

    1987-01-01

    The reaction rate between atmospheric hydrogen chloride (HCl) and chlorine nitrate (ClONO2) is greatly enhanced in the presence of ice particles; HCl dissolves readily into ice, and the collisional reaction probability for ClONO2 on the surface of ice with HCl in the mole fraction range from about 0.003 to 0.010 is in the range from about 0.05 to 0.1 for temperatures near 200 K. Chlorine is released into the gas phase on a time scale of at most a few milliseconds, whereas nitric acid (HNO3), the other product, remains in the condensed phase. This reaction could play an important role in explaining the observed depletion of ozone over Antarctica; it releases photolytically active chlorine from its most abundant reservoir species, and it promotes the formation of HNO3 and thus removes nitrogen dioxide from the gas phase. Hence it establishes the necessary conditions for the efficient catalytic destruction of ozone by halogenated free radicals.

  5. Antarctic Stratospheric Chemistry of Chlorine Nitrate, Hydrogen Chloride, and Ice: Release of Active Chlorine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Molina, Mario J.; Tso, Tai-Ly; Molina, Luisa T.; Wang, Frank C.-Y.

    1987-11-01

    The reaction rate between atmospheric hydrogen chloride (HCl) and chlorine nitrate (ClONO2) is greatly enhanced in the presence of ice particles; HCl dissolves readily into ice, and the collisional reaction probability for ClONO2 on the surface of ice with HCl in the mole fraction range from ~ 0.003 to 0.010 is in the range from ~ 0.05 to 0.1 for temperatures near 200 K. Chlorine (Cl2) is released into the gas phase on a time scale of at most a few milliseconds, whereas nitric acid (HNO3), the other product, remains in the condensed phase. This reaction could play an important role in explaining the observed depletion of ozone over Antarctica; it releases photolytically active chlorine from its most abundant reservoir species, and it promotes the formation of HNO3 and thus removes nitrogen dioxide (NO2) from the gas phase. Hence it establishes the necessary conditions for the efficient catalytic destruction of ozone by halogenated free radicals. In the absence of HCl, ClONO2 also reacts irreversibly with ice with a collision efficiency of ~ 0.02 at 200 K; the product hypochlorous acid (HOCl) is released to the gas phase on a time scale of minutes.

  6. Toxicity of chlorinated benzenes to marine algae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Yan-Jun; Wang, Xiu-Lin; Yu, Wei-Jun; Zhang, Li-Jun; Sun, Han-Zhang

    1997-12-01

    Growth of Chlorella marine, Nannochloropsis oculata, Pyramidomonas sp., Platymonas subcordiformis and Phaeodactylum tricornutum exposed to monochlorobenzene (MCB), 1,2-dichlorobenzene (1,2-DCB), 1, 2, 3, 4-tetrachlorobenzene (1, 2, 3, 4-TeCB) and pentachlorobenzene (PeCB) was tested. Tests of 72 h- EC 50 values showed that the toxicity ranged in the order: MCB<1,2-DCB<1,2,3,4-TeCBchlorinated benzene (CB) alone to marine algae was almost in the order: Pyramidomonas sp. < Platymonas subcordiformis < Nannochloropsis oculata < Chlorella marine < Phaeodactylum tricomutum. Study of the QSAR (Quantitative Structure-Activity Relationship) between K OW and toxicity of CBs to marine algae showed good relationships between -log EC 50 and log K OW.

  7. Novel drug form of chlorin e6

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abakumova, O. Y.; Baum, Rudolf P.; Ermakova, Natalia Y.; Gradyushko, A. T.; Guseva-Donskaya, T. N.; Karmenyan, Artashes V.; Koraboyev, U. M.; Laptev, V. P.; Mechkov, V. M.; Mikhailova, L. M.; Panferova, N. G.; Rebeko, Aleksei G.; Reshetnickov, Andrei V.; Ryabov, M. V.; Stranadko, Eugeny P.; Tsvetkova, Tatyana A.; Zhukova, O. S.

    1999-12-01

    A novel stable water-soluble form of well known photosensitizer chlorin e6 named `Photodithazine' has been obtained from Spirulina Platensis cyanobacteria as a noncovalent complex with N-methyl-D-glucosamine, and its biological characteristics evaluate, which proved to be as follows: in vitro photocytotoxicity was 1 (mu) M (EC50) as determined by the extent of DNA synthesis inhibition in CaOv cells after irradiation with 650 - 900 nm light, and 5 (mu) M (EC65) as determined using MTT test on PC12 cells after irradiation with 670 nm laser light at the doses of 15 and 20 J/cm2, respectively, with Al-sulfophthalocyanine `Photosense' (Russia; oligomerized hematoporphyrin-IX mixture `Photogen', Russia) being used as permitted reference drugs.

  8. Biological monitoring of chlorinated hydrocarbon solvents

    SciTech Connect

    Monster, A.C.

    1986-08-01

    The possibility of biological monitoring of exposure to some volatile, halogenated hydrocarbons will be discussed. Most of these agents are widely used as solvents. All agents act on the nervous system as narcotics and differ widely in toxicity. Most of the solvents undergo biotransformation to metabolites. This allows biological assessment of exposure by measurement of the solvent and/or metabolites in exhaled air, blood, and/or urine. However, the same metabolites may occur with exposure to different chlorinated hydrocarbons, eg, trichloroethanol and trichloroacetic acid from exposure to trichloroethene, tetrachloroethene, and 1,1,1-trichloroethane. On the other hand, these agents differ widely in the percentage that is metabolized. There are large gaps in our knowledge, however, and much research will have to be carried out before even tentative data can be established for most of the solvents.

  9. In situ bioremediation of chlorinated solvents.

    PubMed Central

    Semprini, L

    1995-01-01

    Chlorinated solvents and their natural transformation products are the most frequently observed groundwater contaminants in the United States. In situ bioremediation using anaerobic or aerobic co-metabolic processes is a promising means of cleaning up contaminated aquifers. Studies show that under natural conditions trichloroethylene can be anaerobically degraded to dichloroethylene, vinyl chloride, and ethylene. Pilot scale field studies of in situ aerobic co-metabolic transformations have shown that indigenous microbes grown on phenol are more effective at degrading trichloroethylene and cis-1,2-dichloroethylene than microbes grown on methane. Modeling studies support field observations and indicate that the removal of trichloroethylene and cis-dichloroethylene results from the biostimulation of an indigenous microbial population. Field tests and modeling studies indicate that, at high TCE concentration, degradation becomes stoichiometrically limited. PMID:8565895

  10. Impacts of solar particle events on middle atmospheric chlorine compounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Winkler, Holger; Sinnhuber, Miriam; Wissing, Jan-Maik; Kallenrode, May-Britt; Stiller, Gabrielle; von Clarmann, Thomas; Funke, Bernd

    2010-05-01

    Solar particle events (SPEs) are well known sources of chemical perturbations in the middle atmosphere. A well-understood effect is the release of reactive NOx and HOx, and the subsequent destruction of ozone. Satellite measurements (HALOE, MIPAS, AURA-MLS) have shown that there is also chlorine activation in the stratosphere and mesosphere, and an increase of chlorine nitrate in the lower and middle stratosphere during SPEs. This cannot be explained by the NOx and HOx increase alone. Atmospheric models with standard parametrizations of NOx and HOx production due to SPEs fail to reproduce the magnitude of the observed chlorine disturbances. Numerical simulations using the University of Bremen ion chemistry (UBIC) model show a much better agreement with measurements if full negative ion chemistry is considered additionally to the NOx and HOx production. The UBIC results in combination with atmospheric models indicate that reactions of negative cluster ions can have a significant impact on the middle atmosphere's chlorine chemistry during SPEs. There is a transformation of HCl into active chlorine via anion cluster chemistry. Additionally, the release of O(1D) through N(2D) + O2 - NO + O(1D) has a considerable impact on chlorine species. Results of UBIC simulations for different SPEs (July 2000, October 2003, January 2005) are presented. They are compared with the observed changes of chlorine compounds - HCl, HOCl, ClO and ClONO2 - from the satellite instruments HALOE, MIPAS and AURA-MLS.

  11. Does chlorination of seawater reverse osmosis membranes control biofouling?

    PubMed

    Khan, Muhammad Tariq; Hong, Pei-Ying; Nada, Nabil; Croue, Jean Philippe

    2015-07-01

    Biofouling is the major problem of reverse osmosis (RO) membranes used for desalting seawater (SW). The use of chlorine is a conventional and common practice to control/prevent biofouling. Unlike polyamide RO membranes, cellulose triacetate (CTA) RO membranes display a high chlorine tolerance. Due to this characteristic, CTA membranes are used in most of the RO plants located in the Middle East region where the elevated seawater temperature and water quality promote the risk of membrane biofouling. However, there is no detailed study on the investigation/characterization of CTA-RO membrane fouling. In this investigation, the fouling profile of a full-scale SWRO desalination plant operating with not only continuous chlorination of raw seawater but also intermittent chlorination of CTA-RO membranes was studied. Detailed water quality and membrane fouling analyses were conducted. Profiles of microbiological, inorganic, and organic constituents of analysed fouling layers were extensively discussed. Our results clearly identified biofilm development on these membranes. The incapability of chlorination on preventing biofilm formation on SWRO membranes could be assigned to its failure in effectively reaching throughout the different regions of the permeators. This failure could have occurred due to three main factors: plugging of membrane fibers, chlorine consumption by organics accumulated on the front side fibers, or chlorine adaptation of certain bacterial populations. PMID:25917390

  12. [Toxicity and influencing factors of liquid chlorine on chironomid larvae].

    PubMed

    Sun, Xing-Bin; Cui, Fu-Yi; Zhang, Jin-Song; Guo, Zhao-Hai; Xu, Feng; Liu, Li-Jun

    2005-09-01

    The excessive propagation of Chironomid larvae (red worm) in the sedimentation tanks is a difficult problem for the normal function of waterworks. The toxic effect of liquid chlorine on the different instar larvae of Chironomid was studied using distilled water as test sample. Furthermore, the effect of pH value, organic matter content, ammonia nitrogen, and algae content on toxicity of liquid chlorine was observed. The results show that the tolerance of Chironomid larvae to liquid chlorine is strengthened with the increase in instar. The 24h semi-lethal concentration (LC50) of liquid chlorine to the 4th instar larvae of Chironomid is 3.39 mg/L. Low pH value and high algae content are helpful to improve the toxic effect of liquid chlorine to Chironomid larvae. In neutral water body, the increase in organic matter content results in the decrease in the death rate of Chironomid larvae. The toxicity of liquid chlorine differs greatly in different concentrations of ammonia nitrogen. The death rate of the 4th instar larvae of Chironomid in raw water is higher by contrast with that in sedimentation tanks water for 24h disposal with various amount of liquid chlorine. PMID:16366477

  13. Chlorination strategies for direct groundwater recharge of tertiary effluent

    SciTech Connect

    Fox, P.; Wang, L.; Johnson, P.C.; Houston, S.; Houston, W.N.; Brown, P.

    1998-07-01

    Chlorination for the control of biological activity during direct recharge of tertiary effluent was studied in bench-scale simulated aquifers. Both free chlorine and chloramine were studied at darcy velocities of 360 cm/d to 720 cm/d. A free chlorine residual of 5 mg/L or above inhibited biological activity in the 1.2 m of soil that was studied. A free chlorine residual concentration of 2 mg/L prevented biological activity in the first 0.9 m of exposed soil and significant biological clogging was observed in soil greater than 0.9 m from the injection point. A 2 mg/L residual concentration of chloramine resulted in biological clogging over the 0.9 m of soil adjacent to the injection point. No chlorine addition resulted in clogging adjacent to the injection point indicating that the chloramine inhibited biological activity and allowed biological activity to occur over a greater distance from the injection point. Dissolved oxygen levels decreased to zero in aquifers where significant biological activity was observed and trihalomethane concentrations decreased in these aquifers. Free chlorine appears to effectively control biological clogging adjacent to the injection point while permitting biological activity to develop after the chlorine has decayed.

  14. Chlorine-36 and the initial value problem

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Davis, S.N.; Cecil, D.; Zreda, M.; Sharma, Prakash

    1998-01-01

    Chlorine-36 is a radionuclide with a half-life of 3.01 ?? 105a. Most 36Cl in the hydrosphere originates from cosmic radiation interacting with atmospheric gases. Large amounts were also produced by testing thermonuclear devices during 1952-58. Because the monovalent anion, chloride, is the most common form of chlorine found in the hydrosphere and because it is extremely mobile in aqueous systems, analyses of both total Cl- as well as 36Cl have been important in numerous hydrologic studies. In almost all applications of 36Cl, a knowledge of the initial, or pre-anthropogenic, levels of 36CL is useful, as well as essential in some cases. Standard approaches to the determination of initial values have been to: (a) calculate the theoretical cosmogenic production and fallout, which varies according to latitude; (b) measure 36CL in present-day precipitation and assume that anthropogenic components can be neglected; (c) assume that shallow ground-water retains a record of the initial concentration; (d) extract 36CL from vertical depth profiles in desert soils; (e) recover 36CL from cores of glacial ice; and (f) calculate subsurface production of 36CL for water that has been isolated from the atmosphere for more than one million years. The initial value from soil profiles and ice cores is taken as the value that occurs directly below the depth of the easily defined bomb peak. All six methods have serious weaknesses. Complicating factors include 36CL concentrations not related to cosmogenic sources, changes in cosmogenic production with time, mixed sources of chloride in groundwater, melting and refrrezing of waterin glaciers, and seasonal groungwater recharge that does not contain average year-long concentrations of 36Cl.

  15. Minnows can acclimate to total residual chlorine

    SciTech Connect

    Lotts, J.W. Jr.; Stewart, A.J.

    1995-08-01

    Observations in a chlorine-contaminated stream in eastern Tennessee revealed several species of fish in areas where total residual chlorine (TRC) concentrations were often great enough to be lethal, based on the results of other studies. The authors used in situ and laboratory experiments to test the hypothesis that minnows could acclimate to TRC. Acclimation was assessed by time-to-death for fish exposed to a single lethal regime of TRC. In in situ experiments, striped shiner and central stoneroller minnows collected from East Fork Poplar Creek at a TRC-contaminated site and a site farther downstream, where TRC was below detection, were caged at sites in the stream where TRC concentrations were either nil or great enough to be lethal. At the cage with high TRC, minnows collected from the ``TRC-free`` site survived two to four times longer (15.8 h vs. 6.1 h) than the same species from the ``TRC-free`` site. In laboratory experiments, golden shiner minnows were exposed to TRC in a stepwise increasing concentration regime (0.04 mg/L during week 1, 0.08 mg/L during week 2, and 0.12 mg/L during week 3) before being challenged-tested with a lethal concentration of TRC. Minnows that had been previously exposed to TRC survived longer than controls in each test, and the magnitude of the mean time to death increased as the TRC concentration and duration of exposure increased (1.2-, 2.5-, and 3.9-fold increases for weeks 1, 2, and 3, respectively). Another experiment with golden shiner minnows showed that a 21-d exposure to TRC at a low concentration (0.04 mg/L) only slightly increased their tolerance to TRC. Thus, several minnow species apparently can acclimate, fairly rapidly, to TRC. This study may help explain why fish kills are less common than expected in TRC-contaminated streams.

  16. Impact of water quality on chlorine demand of corroding copper.

    PubMed

    Lytle, Darren A; Liggett, Jennifer

    2016-04-01

    Copper is widely used in drinking water premise plumbing system materials. In buildings such as hospitals, large and complicated plumbing networks make it difficult to maintain good water quality. Sustaining safe disinfectant residuals throughout a building to protect against waterborne pathogens such as Legionella is particularly challenging since copper and other reactive distribution system materials can exert considerable demands. The objective of this work was to evaluate the impact of pH and orthophosphate on the consumption of free chlorine associated with corroding copper pipes over time. A copper test-loop pilot system was used to control test conditions and systematically meet the study objectives. Chlorine consumption trends attributed to abiotic reactions with copper over time were different for each pH condition tested, and the total amount of chlorine consumed over the test runs increased with increasing pH. Orthophosphate eliminated chlorine consumption trends with elapsed time (i.e., chlorine demand was consistent across entire test runs). Orthophosphate also greatly reduced the total amount of chlorine consumed over the test runs. Interestingly, the total amount of chlorine consumed and the consumption rate were not pH dependent when orthophosphate was present. The findings reflect the complex and competing reactions at the copper pipe wall including corrosion, oxidation of Cu(I) minerals and ions, and possible oxidation of Cu(II) minerals, and the change in chlorine species all as a function of pH. The work has practical applications for maintaining chlorine residuals in premise plumbing drinking water systems including large buildings such as hospitals. PMID:26826646

  17. Behavior and stability of adenosine triphosphate (ATP) during chlorine disinfection.

    PubMed

    Nescerecka, Alina; Juhna, Talis; Hammes, Frederik

    2016-09-15

    Adenosine triphosphate (ATP) analysis is a cultivation-independent alternative method for the determination of bacterial viability in both chlorinated and non-chlorinated water. Here we investigated the behavior and stability of ATP during chlorination in detail. Different sodium hypochlorite doses (0-22.4 mg-Cl2 L(-1); 5 min exposure) were applied to an Escherichia coli pure culture suspended in filtered river water. We observed decreasing intracellular ATP with increasing chlorine concentrations, but extracellular ATP concentrations only increased when the chlorine dose exceeded 0.35 mg L(-1). The release of ATP from chlorine-damaged bacteria coincided with severe membrane damage detected with flow cytometry (FCM). The stability of extracellular ATP was subsequently studied in different water matrixes, and we found that extracellular ATP was stable in sterile deionized water and also in chlorinated water until extremely high chlorine doses (≤11.2 mg-Cl2 L(-1); 5 min exposure). In contrast, ATP decreased relatively slowly (k = 0.145 h(-1)) in 0.1 μm filtered river water, presumably due to degradation by either extracellular enzymes or the fraction of bacteria that were able to pass through the filter. Extracellular ATP decreased considerably faster (k = 0.368 h(-1)) during batch growth of a river water bacterial community. A series of growth potential tests showed that extracellular ATP molecules were utilized as a phosphorus source during bacteria proliferation. From the combined data we conclude that ATP released from bacteria at high chlorine doses could promote bacteria regrowth, contributing to biological instability in drinking water distribution systems. PMID:27295623

  18. Distinguishing effects of ultraviolet exposure and chlorination on the horizontal transfer of antibiotic resistance genes in municipal wastewater.

    PubMed

    Guo, Mei-Ting; Yuan, Qing-Bin; Yang, Jian

    2015-05-01

    Growing attention has been paid to the dissemination of antibiotic resistance genes (ARGs) in wastewater microbial communities; however, the disinfection processes, as microbial control technologies, have not been evaluated for their impacts on ARGs transfer. In this study, the effects of ultraviolet (UV) disinfection and chlorination on the frequency of ARGs transfer have been explored based on the conjugative transfer model between Gram-negative strains of E. coli. The results indicated that UV disinfection and chlorination exhibit distinct influences on the conjugative transfer. Low UV doses (up to 8 mJ/cm2) had little influence on the frequency of conjugative transfer, and UV exposure only decreased the bacterial number but did not change the cell permeability. By comparison, low chlorine doses (up to 40 mg Cl min/L) significantly promoted the frequency of conjugative transfer by 2-5-fold. The generated chloramine stimulated the bacteria and improved the cell permeability. More pilus were induced on the surface of conjugative cells, which acted as pathways for ARGs transfer. The frequency of ARG transfers was greatly suppressed by high doses of UV (>10 mJ/cm2) or chlorine (>80 mg Cl min/L). PMID:25853586

  19. Effect of Aloe vera, chlorine dioxide, and chlorhexidine mouth rinses on plaque and gingivitis: A randomized controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    Yeturu, Sravan Kumar; Acharya, Shashidhar; Urala, Arun Sreenivas; Pentapati, Kalyana Chakravarthy

    2015-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the effect of Aloe vera, chlorine dioxide, and chlorhexidine mouth rinses on plaque and gingivitis in orthodontic treatment. Materials and methods A randomized single-center, single-blind, parallel group, controlled trial was conducted among 90 subjects undergoing fixed orthodontic treatment. The subjects were randomly divided into one of the three study groups (Aloe vera, chlorhexidine, chlorine dioxide). Plaque and gingivitis were assessed using modified Silness and Loe Plaque Index and Gingival Index at baseline and at follow-up after 15 days. Paired t-test and ANOVA with post hoc Dunnett test were used. A p-value of <0.05 was considered statistically significant. Results A total of 85 participants completed the study; among them, 40 were male and 45 were female. There was significant reduction in mean plaque and gingival scores in all the 3 groups at follow-up when compared to baseline. A significantly higher reduction (plaque and gingival scores) was found in chlorhexidine when compared with the Aloe vera group. However, no significant difference was seen between chlorhexidine and chlorine dioxide with respect to mean reduction in plaque and gingival scores. Conclusion Chlorine dioxide can be a suitable and economical alternative for chlorhexidine. Further long-term studies are recommended for evaluating their effectiveness. PMID:26937371

  20. Chlorine-36 dating of saline sediments: Preliminary results from Searles Lake, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Phillips, F.M.; Smith, G.I.; Bentley, H.W.; Elmore, D.; Gove, H.E.

    1983-01-01

    Measurements have been made of the ratios of chlorine-36 to chlorine in five halite samples from Searles Lake sediments, previously dated by carbon-14, thorium-230, and magnetostratigraphic techniques. The ages calculated from the chlorine ratios are generally concordant with those from the other methods, implying the constancy of the chlorine input ratio over the last million years.

  1. Progressive vocal cord dysfunction subsequent to a chlorine gas exposure.

    PubMed

    Allan, Patrick F; Abouchahine, Sahar; Harvis, Lee; Morris, Michael J

    2006-06-01

    Chlorine gas inhalation, similar to other toxic gas exposures, can impart a variety of effects to the entire airway ranging from mucous membrane irritation to acute respiratory distress syndrome. The extent and location of damage is determined by numerous situational factors such as the duration of exposure, quantity of gas released, environmental factors, and instituted chemical defense measures. Reactive airways dysfunction and nonspecific bronchial hyperresponsiveness are commonly reported as sequelae to chlorine exposure. This article constitutes the first case of a single antecedent chlorine exposure inducing progressive vocal cord dysfunction. PMID:16293397

  2. Bench scale experiment of recovery of chlorine from waste gas

    SciTech Connect

    Hine, F.; Kurata, Y.; Nozaki, M.

    1984-12-01

    A bench scale experiment with a 50A cell equipped with a Nafion membrane has been conducted. Electrolyte is a mixture of HCl and CuCl/sub 2/. Chlorine is generated at the graphite anode, and cupric chloro-comple ions are reduced at the graphite cathode. The catholyte effluent is sent to the packed tower, where the cuprous ions are oxidized by chlorine in the waste gas. The cost evaluation for chlorine production in full-scale plants of various sizes is also described.

  3. Effects of continuous chlorination on entrained estuarine plankton

    SciTech Connect

    Erickson, S.J.; Foulk, H.R.

    1980-01-01

    Technical report: The effects of continuous chlorination in running sea water on entrained plankton were examined. The concentration of ATP was used as an indicator of biomass because: it is present in all living cells; the concentration is proportional to the living biomass; and dead cells lose ATP rapidly. Effects were measured by bioluminescence; luciferin-luciferase reagents from firefly lanterns were used to analyze ATP concentration. Results indicate that ATP measurement is an accurate, effective means of evaluating damage done to planktonic organisms by continuous chlorination. Further studies of the effects of low-concentration, continuous chlorination are recommended. (13 references, 1 table)

  4. The rotational spectrum and structure of chlorine peroxide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Birk, Manfred; Friedl, Randall R.; Cohen, Edward A.; Pickett, Herbert M.; Sander, Stanley P.

    1989-01-01

    The dimerization products of the ClO + ClO reaction were investigated in a flowing chemical reactor using submillimeter wave spectroscopy. The major products were identified as the chlorine peroxide (Cl2O2) and chlorine dioxide (OClO). The rotational constants as well as a complete set of quartic centrifugal distortion constants were determined. The identification of the chlorine peroxide supports the earlier proposed ClO-dimer mechanisms, which partly explain the ozone hole formation during the Antarctic springtime.

  5. Online analysis of chlorine stable isotopes in chlorinated ethylenes: an inter-laboratory study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bernstein, Anat; Shouakar-Stash, Orfan; Hunkeler, Daniel; Sakaguchi-Söder, Kaori; Laskov, Christine; Aravena, Ramon; Elsner, Martin

    2010-05-01

    In the last decade, compound-specific stable isotopes analysis of groundwater pollutants became an important tool to identify different sources of the same pollutant and for tracking natural attenuating processes in the sub-surface. It has been shown that trends in the isotopic composition of the target compounds can shed light on in-situ processes that are otherwise difficult to track. Analytical methods of carbon, nitrogen and hydrogen were established and are by now frequently used for a variety of organic pollutants. Yet, the motivation of introducing analytical methods for new isotopes is emerging. This motivation is further enhanced, as advantages of using two or more stable isotopes for gaining better insight on degradation pathways are well accepted. One important element which demands the development of appropriate analytical methods is chlorine, which is found in various groups of organic pollutants, among them the chlorinated ethylenes. Chlorinated ethylenes are considered as high priority environmental pollutants, and the development of suitable chlorine isotope methods for this group of pollutants is highly desired. Ideally, stable isotope techniques should have the capability to determine the isotopic composition of and individual target compound in a non-pure mixture, without the requirement of a laborious off-line treatment. Indeed, in the last years two different concepts for on-line chlorine isotope analysis methods were introduced, by using either a standard quadrapole GC/MS (Sakaguchi-Söder et al., 2007) or by using a GC/IRMS (Shouakar-Stash et al., 2006). We present a comparison of the performances of two concepts, carried out in five different laboratories: Waterloo (GC/IRMS), Neuchâtel (GC/MS), Darmstadt (GC/MS), Tübingen (GC/MS) and Munich (GC/IRMS). This comparison was performed on pure trichloroethylene and dichloroethylene products of different manufactures, as well as trichloroethylene and dichloroethylene samples that were exposed to

  6. A New, Rapid, Precise and Sensitive Method for Chlorine Stable Isotope Analysis of Chlorinated Aliphatic Hydrocarbons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Acker, M. R.; Shahar, A.; Young, E. D.; Coleman, M. L.

    2005-12-01

    Chlorinated aliphatic hydrocarbons (CAH) are recognized common groundwater contaminants. Because of their physico-chemical properties, their lifespan in groundwater is in the order of decades (Pankow and Cherry, 1996). Stable isotopes can play a role in determining the rate and extent of CAH attenuation (Slater, 2003). The use of chlorine has been hampered by the current time consuming and insensitive analytical methods. We present a new analytical procedure to measure chlorine stable isotope values using a gas chromatograph coupled to a multi-collector inductively coupled mass spectrometer (GC-MC-ICP-MS). The GC has a Porapack Q packed column. The carrier gas was helium and the temperature was constant at 160°C. The GC was coupled to the MC-ICP-MS by heated stainless steel tubing. Our high resolution spectra showed that 37Cl is free of its main interference 36Ar-H over a range of 0.004 amu. Two pure CAH, trichloroethene (TCE) and tetrachloroethene (PCE), were used for zero enrichment (sample relative to itself) and standard-sample difference measurements. Integrations and background corrections of transient signals were performed using Microsoft Excel after import of the raw data from the MC-ICPMS acquisition software. Zero enrichment tests with TCE and PCE yielded δ37Cl of -0.04±0.16‰ and -0.03±0.17‰, respectively, results for sample injections of 0.12 to 0.02 microliters. Accuracy was tested by injecting 0.24 microliters of a 50/50 mixture of TCE and PCE of known isotopic compositions as the difference between the two solvents was of paramount interest. The δ37Cl(TCE) value of PCE was -1.99±0.16‰. A highly satisfactory comparison with the conventional method is shown by published values for TCE and PCE, -2.04±0.12‰ and -0.30±0.14‰, respectively (Jendrzejewski et al., 2001), giving a δ37Cl(TCE) value for PCE of -2.34±0.18‰. These tests of the GC-MC-ICP-MS method showed that we can obtain reproducible and accurate Cl isotope values using an

  7. Selective determination of chlorine dioxide using gas diffusion flow injection analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Hollowell, D.A.; Pacey, G.E.; Gordon, G.

    1985-12-01

    An automated absorbance technique for the determination of aqueous chlorine dioxide has been developed by utilizing gas diffusion flow injection analysis. A gas diffusion membrane is used to separate the donor (sampling) stream from the acceptor (detecting) stream. The absorbance of chlorine dioxide is monitored at 359 nm. The first method uses distilled water as the acceptor stream and gives a detection limit of 0.25 mg/L chlorine dioxide. This system is over 550 times more selective for chlorine dioxide than chlorine. To further minimize chlorine interference, oxalic acid is used in the acceptor stream. The detection limit for this system is 0.45 mg/L chlorine dioxide. This second system is over 5400 times more selective for chlorine dioxide than chlorine. Both methods show excellent selectivity for chlorine dioxide over iron and manganese compounds, as well as other oxychlorinated compounds such as chlorite and perchlorate ions. 18 references, 7 figures, 3 tables.

  8. 40 CFR 63.445 - Standards for the bleaching system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... lines, 40 CFR 430.54(a) and (c), and 430.56(a) and (c). (2) Use no hypochlorite or chlorine for... limitation guidelines and standards specified in 40 CFR part 430: (i) Dissolving-grade kraft bleaching systems and lines, 40 CFR 430.14 through 430.17; (ii) Paper-grade kraft and soda bleaching systems...

  9. 40 CFR 63.445 - Standards for the bleaching system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... lines, 40 CFR 430.54(a) and (c), and 430.56(a) and (c). (2) Use no hypochlorite or chlorine for... limitation guidelines and standards specified in 40 CFR part 430: (i) Dissolving-grade kraft bleaching systems and lines, 40 CFR 430.14 through 430.17; (ii) Paper-grade kraft and soda bleaching systems...

  10. 40 CFR 63.445 - Standards for the bleaching system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... lines, 40 CFR 430.54(a) and (c), and 430.56(a) and (c). (2) Use no hypochlorite or chlorine for... limitation guidelines and standards specified in 40 CFR part 430: (i) Dissolving-grade kraft bleaching systems and lines, 40 CFR 430.14 through 430.17; (ii) Paper-grade kraft and soda bleaching systems...

  11. 40 CFR 63.445 - Standards for the bleaching system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... lines, 40 CFR 430.54(a) and (c), and 430.56(a) and (c). (2) Use no hypochlorite or chlorine for... limitation guidelines and standards specified in 40 CFR part 430: (i) Dissolving-grade kraft bleaching systems and lines, 40 CFR 430.14 through 430.17; (ii) Paper-grade kraft and soda bleaching systems...

  12. 40 CFR 63.445 - Standards for the bleaching system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... lines, 40 CFR 430.54(a) and (c), and 430.56(a) and (c). (2) Use no hypochlorite or chlorine for... limitation guidelines and standards specified in 40 CFR part 430: (i) Dissolving-grade kraft bleaching systems and lines, 40 CFR 430.14 through 430.17; (ii) Paper-grade kraft and soda bleaching systems...

  13. 40 CFR 268.44 - Variance from a treatment standard.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... according to provisions in 40 CFR 268.7. (2)—Cyanide Wastewater Standards for F006 are based on analysis of... disposal pursuant to 40 CFR 266.20 through 266.23. (n) (o) The following facilities are excluded from the... exiting the alkaline chlorination system. These facilities must also comply with 40 CFR § 268.7.a.4...

  14. 40 CFR 268.44 - Variance from a treatment standard.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... disposal pursuant to 40 CFR 266.20 through 266.23. (n) (o) The following facilities are excluded from the... according to provisions in 40 CFR 268.7. (2)—Cyanide Wastewater Standards for F006 are based on analysis of... exiting the alkaline chlorination system. These facilities must also comply with 40 CFR § 268.7.a.4...

  15. 40 CFR 268.44 - Variance from a treatment standard.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... disposal pursuant to 40 CFR 266.20 through 266.23. (n) (o) The following facilities are excluded from the... according to provisions in 40 CFR 268.7. (2)—Cyanide Wastewater Standards for F006 are based on analysis of... exiting the alkaline chlorination system. These facilities must also comply with 40 CFR § 268.7.a.4...

  16. 40 CFR 268.44 - Variance from a treatment standard.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... disposal pursuant to 40 CFR 266.20 through 266.23. (n) (o) The following facilities are excluded from the... standards according to provisions in 40 CFR 268.7. (2)—Cyanide Wastewater Standards for F006 are based on... wastewater exiting the alkaline chlorination system. These facilities must also comply with 40 CFR §...

  17. 40 CFR 268.44 - Variance from a treatment standard.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... disposal pursuant to 40 CFR 266.20 through 266.23. (n) (o) The following facilities are excluded from the... standards according to provisions in 40 CFR 268.7. (2)—Cyanide Wastewater Standards for F006 are based on... wastewater exiting the alkaline chlorination system. These facilities must also comply with 40 CFR §...

  18. TOXICITY OF RESIDUAL CHLORINE COMPOUNDS TO AQUATIC ORGANISMS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Laboratory studies on the acute and chronic toxicity of chlorine and inorganic chloramines to trout, salmon, minnows, bullhead, largemouth bass, and bluegill were conducted. Acute toxicity under continuous and intermittent patterns of exposure as well as behavioral, reproduction,...

  19. MULTISPECTRAL IDENTIFICATION OF CHLORINE DIOXIDE BYPRODUCTS IN DRINKING WATER

    EPA Science Inventory

    This paper discusses the identification of organic disinfectant byproducts (DNPS) at a pilot plant in Evansville, IN, that uses chlorine dioxide as a primary disinfectant. nconventional multispectral identification techniques (gas chromatography combined with high- and low-resolu...

  20. MICROEMULSION OF MIXED CHLORINATED SOLVENTS USING FOOD GRADE (EDIBLE) SURFACTANTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Ground water contamination frequently consists of mixed chlorinated solvents [e.g., tetrachloroethylene (PCE), trichloroethylene (TCE), and trans-1,2- dichloroethylene (DCE)]. In this research, mixtures of the food grade (edible) surfactants bis(2-ethylhexyl) sodium sulfosuccinat...

  1. BIODEGRADATION OF CHLORINATED SOLVENTS: REACTIONS NEAR DNAPL AND ENZYME FUNCTION

    EPA Science Inventory

    Chlorinated solvents are among the most common organic chemical groundwater contaminants at DOE sites, as well as at DOD and industrial facilities. Included are the solvents trichloroethene (TCE), tetrachloroethene (PCE), and carbon tetrachloride (CT). Commonly these contaminan...

  2. Three dimensional modelling of chlorine activation in the Arctic stratosphere

    SciTech Connect

    Kettleborough, J.A.; Carver, G.D.; Lary, D.J.; Pyle, J.A. ); Scott, P.A. )

    1994-06-22

    This paper presents the results of using the UK Universities Global Atmospheric Modelling Program (UGAMP) general circulation model to study the atmospheric chemistry of chlorine compounds in the arctic stratosphere during EASOE. Here the authors discuss the results of a model run started in early January 1992, which show that the low temperatures favored the production of polar stratospheric clouds which can process active chlorine compounds to densities in the ppbv range. The model also shows that lack of sunlight means that this reactive chlorine is not able to contribute to chemical destruction of ozone. As the temperatures rise, the active chlorine is seen to cycle back into the compound ClONO[sub 2].

  3. RESPONSES OF EXPERIMENTAL ESTUARINE COMMUNITIES TO CONTINUOUS CHLORINATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    The effects of continuous chlorination (as NaOCl) on estuarine benthic organisms were investigated with plankton-derived experimental communities. Twelve consecutive studies were conducted, each of which consisted of approximately 60 days colonization periods from flowing estuari...

  4. Survival of poliovirus within organic solids during chlorination.

    PubMed Central

    Hejkal, T W; Wellings, F M; LaRock, P A; Lewis, A L

    1979-01-01

    Poliovirus in fecal homogenates was used to determine the protection against inactivation by chlorination afforded virus that was occluded within particulates. Virus that was closely associated with or occluded within small fecal particulates was protected. A fourfold increase in combined residual chlorine was required to achieve the same degree of inactivation for occluded virus as for free or secondarily adsorbed virus. A combined chlorine residual of 6.6 mg/liter was necessary to achieve 50% inactivation in 15 min at pH 8.0 and 22 degrees C in a particulate suspension containing occluded virus compared to 1.4 mg/liter for free virus. These differences were found to be relatively small compared to differences due to the presence of dissolved organics or between free and combined chlorine residuals. The results suggest different mechanisms of protection due to adsorption and occlusion. PMID:225993

  5. PHOTOCHEMICAL REACTIONS AMONG FORMALDEHYDE, CHLORINE, AND NITROGEN DIOXIDE IN AIR

    EPA Science Inventory

    Photochemical reactions among chlorine, nitrogen dioxide, and formaldehyde were studied, using parts-per-million concentrations in 1 atm of air. The reactant mixtures were irradiated by ultraviolet fluorescent lamps and simultaneously analyzed by the Fourier transform infrared te...

  6. METHODOLOGIES FOR EVALUATING IN-SITU BIOREMEDIATION OF CHLORINATED SOLVENTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    This report summarizes the behavior of and requisite conditions for a class of natural biological processes that can transform chlorinated aliphatic compounds. hese compounds are among the most prevalent hazardous chemical contaminants found in municipal and industrial wastewater...

  7. Heterogeneous Reaction gaseous chlorine nitrate and solid sodium chloride

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Timonen, Raimo S.; Chu, Liang T.; Leu, Ming-Taun

    1994-01-01

    The heterogeneous reaction of gaseous chlorine nitrate and solid sodium chloride was investigated over a temperature range of 220 - 300 K in a flow-tube reactor interfaced with a differentially pumped quadrupole mass spectrometer.

  8. COMPARATIVE RESISTANCE OF ESCHERICHIA COLI AND ENTEROCOCCI TO CHLORINATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    Pure cultures of Escherichia coli and Enterococcus faecium were inactivated by free chlorine and monochloramine. ndigenous E. coli and enterococci in wastewater effluents were also inactivated. elective bacteriological media specifically designed for the enumeration of the target...

  9. MULTISPECTRAL IDENTIFICATION OF CHLORINE DIOXIDE DISINFECTION BYPRODUCTS IN DRINKING WATER

    EPA Science Inventory

    This paper discusses the identification of organic disinfection byproducts (DBPs) at a pilot plant in Evansville, IN, which uses chlorine dioxide as a primary disinfectant. Unconventional multispectral identification techniques (gas chromatography combined with high- and low reso...

  10. Xanthene dye chemiluminescence for determination of free chlorine in water

    SciTech Connect

    Yamada, M.; Hobo, T.; Suzuki, S.

    1988-10-01

    Preliminary investigations by a batch method are described for aiming at the flow determination of free chlorine in water with novel chemiluminescence (CL) detection. The CL originates from the reaction of xanthene dyes with free chlorine, Cl/sub 2/, HOCl, and OCl/sup -/. Through the measurements of CL decay curves, fundamental CL characteristics were explored from the analytical point of view. Among xanthene dyes tested, eosin Y, eosin B, pyronin B, and rhodamine 6G were found to be promising CL reagents with such sensitivity and selectivity that free chlorine can be readily determined in tap water. In particular, these CL systems have the special advantage of being insensitive to oxo acids of chlorine and chloramine. Recommended flow systems are proposed.

  11. U. S. EPA’S APPROACH FOR CHLORINATED SOLVENTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The approach for chlorinated solvents is similar to the approach for petroleum hydrocarbons. However, there are more mechanisms of removal, including reductive dechlorination (biotic or abiotic), dehydrochloroelimination (abiotic), and hydrolysis (biotic or abiotic). As a resul...

  12. METHODOLOGIES FOR EVALUATING IN-SITU BIOREMEDIATION OF CHLORINATED SOLVENTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    This report summarizes the behavior of and requisite conditions for a class of natural biological processes that can transform chlorinated aliphatic compounds. These compounds are among the most prevalent hazardous chemical contaminants found in municipal and industrial wastewate...

  13. Biodegradation of Chlorinated Solvents: Reactions near DNAPL and Enzyme Function

    SciTech Connect

    McCarty, Perry L.; Spormann, Alfred M.; Criddle, Craig S.

    2001-06-01

    The anaerobic biodegradation of chlorinated solvents is of great interest both for natural attenuation and for engineered remediation of these hazardous contaminants in groundwater. Compounds to be studied are carbon tetrachloride (CT) and the chlorinated ethenes, tetrachloroethene (PCE), trichloroethene (TCE) cis-1,2-dichloroethene (cDCE), and vinyl chloride (VC). The chlorinated solvents often are present as dense non-aqueous-phase liquids (DNAPLs), which are difficult to remove. Biodegradation of DNAPLs was previously thought not possible because of toxicity, but recent evidence indicates that under the right conditions, biodegradation is possible. Anaerobic biodegradation of DNAPLs is the major subject of this research. The specific objectives of this multi-investigator effort are: (1) Evaluate the potential for chlorinated solvent biodegradation near DNAPLs, (2) Provide a molecular understanding of the biological mechanisms involved, (3) Determine cellular components involved in carbon tetrachloride transformation by Pseudomonas stutzeri strain KC without chloroform formation.

  14. Biodegradation of Chlorinated Solvents: Reactions near DNAPL and Enzyme Function

    SciTech Connect

    McCarty, Perry L.; Spormann, Alfred M.; Criddle, Craig S.

    2003-06-01

    The anaerobic biodegradation of chlorinated solvents is of great interest both for natural attenuation and for engineered remediation of these hazardous contaminants in groundwater. Compounds to be studied are carbon tetrachloride (CT) and the chlorinated ethenes, tetrachloroethene (PCE), trichloroethene (TCE) cis-1,2-dichloroethene (cDCE), and vinyl chloride (VC). The chlorinated solvents often are present as dense non-aqueous-phase liquids (DNAPLs), which are difficult to remove. Biodegradation of DNAPLs was previously thought not possible because of toxicity, but recent evidence indicates that under the right conditions, biodegradation is possible. Anaerobic biodegradation of DNAPLs is the major subject of this research. The specific objectives of this multi-investigator effort are: (1) Evaluate the potential for chlorinated solvent biodegradation near DNAPLs, (2) Provide a molecular understanding of the biological mechanisms involved, (3) Determine cellular components involved in carbon tetrachloride transformation by Pseudomonas stutzeri strain KC without chloroform formation.

  15. Biodegradation of Chlorinated Solvents: Reactions near DNAPL and Enzyme Function

    SciTech Connect

    McCarty, Perry L.; Spormann, Alfred M.; Criddle, Craig S.

    2002-06-01

    The anaerobic biodegradation of chlorinated solvents is of great interest both for natural attenuation and for engineered remediation of these hazardous contaminants in groundwater. Compounds to be studied are carbon tetrachloride (CT) and the chlorinated ethenes, tetrachloroethene (PCE), trichloroethene (TCE) cis-1,2-dichloroethene (cDCE), and vinyl chloride (VC). The chlorinated solvents often are present as dense non-aqueous-phase liquids (DNAPLs), which are difficult to remove. Biodegradation of DNAPLs was previously thought not possible because of toxicity, but recent evidence indicates that under the right conditions, biodegradation is possible. Anaerobic biodegradation of DNAPLs is the major subject of this research. The specific objectives of this multi-investigator effort are: (1) Evaluate the potential for chlorinated solvent biodegradation near DNAPLs, (2) Provide a molecular understanding of the biological mechanisms involved, (3) Determine cellular components involved in carbon tetrachloride transformation by Pseudomonas stutzeri strain KC without chloroform formation.

  16. Factors Affecting Atrazine Concentration and Quantitative Determination in Chlorinated Water

    EPA Science Inventory

    Although the herbicide atrazine has been reported to not react measurably with free chlorine during drinking water treatment, this work demonstrates that at contact times consistent with drinking water distribution system residence times, a transformation of atrazine can be obser...

  17. ORGANOHALIDE FORMATION ON CHLORINATION OF ALGAL EXTRACELLULAR PRODUCTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    When certain chemical and physical parameters were controlled during chlorination of algal extracellular products (ECP), organohalide formation was modified. In general, decreases in temperature and contact time decreased the generation of purgeable (POX), nonpurgeable (NPOX), an...

  18. ANAEROBIC AND AEROBIC TREATMENT OF CHLORINATED ALIPHATIC COMPOUNDS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Biological degradation of 12 chlorinated aliphatic compounds (CACs) was assessed in bench-top reactors and in serum bottle tests. Three continuously mixed daily batch-fed reactor systems were evaluated: anaerobic, aerobic, and sequential-anaerobic-aerobic (sequential). Glucose,...

  19. CHLORINE INACTIVATION OF CATEGORY "A" BIO-TERRORISM AGENTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    This poster presents information on the inactivation of select bioterrorist agents. Information will be presented on chlorine disinfection of vegetative cells of Brucella suis, Brucella melitensis, Burkholderia mallei, Burkholderia pseudomallei, Francisella tularensis and endos...

  20. EFFECTS AND UPTAKE OF CHLORINATED NAPHTHALENES IN MARINE UNICELLULAR ALGAE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Chlorinated naphthalenes (chloronaphthalenes) comprise a group of compounds used for a variety of industrial purposes such as oil additives for cleaning sludge and petroleum deposits from engines, impregnating automobile capacitors, and electroplating stopoff compounds. This pape...

  1. ENZYME-BASED DETECTION OF CHLORINATED HYDROCARBONS IN WATER

    EPA Science Inventory

    An enzyme-based approach for detecting hazardous levels of high molecular weight chlorinated hydrocarbons in natural waters has been explored. An extensive review of the literature indicated that the enzymes, lactate dehydrogenase, carbonic anhydrase, hexokinase, phosphorylase an...

  2. 14. Water treatment plant interior view of chlorination room. View ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    14. Water treatment plant interior view of chlorination room. View to N - Fort Benton Water Treatment Plant, Filtration Plant, Lots 9-13 of Block 7, Fort Benton Original Townsite at Missouri River, Fort Benton, Chouteau County, MT

  3. 13. VIEW OF BOOSTER STATION 4 CHLORINATOR INTERIOR, FACING NORTH ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    13. VIEW OF BOOSTER STATION 4 CHLORINATOR INTERIOR, FACING NORTH - Nevada Test Site, Frenchman Flat Test Facility, Well Five Booster Stations, Intersection of 5-03 Road & Short Pole Line Road, Area 5, Frenchman Flat, Mercury, Nye County, NV

  4. Effect of Chlorine Dioxide Gas on Polymeric Packaging Materials

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Permeability, solubility and diffusion coefficients of chlorine dioxide for high-density polyethylene (HDPE), low-density polyethylene (LDPE), linear low-density polyethylene (LLDPE), polyvinyl chloride (PVC), polystyrene (PS), polyethylene terephthalate (PET), nylon, and multilayer of ethylene viny...

  5. Microwave spectra of some chlorine and fluorine compounds. [spectroscopic analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    White, W. F.

    1975-01-01

    A computer-controlled microwave spectrometer was used to catalog reference spectra for chemical analysis. Tables of absorption frequencies, peak absorption intensities, and integrated intensities are shown for 21 organic compounds which contain chlorine, fluorine, or both.

  6. EVALUATION OF ALTERNATIVES TO CHLORINATED SOLVENTS FOR METAL CLEANING

    EPA Science Inventory

    This project report details results of investigations into alternatives to chlorinated solvents used for metal degreasing. Three companies participated in this project. The results reported for one company document a situation where the conversion to an aqueous cleaning system ha...

  7. In situ bioremediation of chlorinated solvent with natural gas

    SciTech Connect

    Rabold, D.E.

    1996-12-31

    A bioremediation system for the removal of chlorinated solvents from ground water and sediments is described. The system involves the the in-situ injection of natural gas (as a microbial nutrient) through an innovative configuration of horizontal wells.

  8. EPIDEMIOLOGICAL EVIDENCE OF CARCINOGENICITY OF CHLORINATED ORGANICS IN DRINKING WATER

    EPA Science Inventory

    Concern has recently been voiced over possible chronic toxicity associated with chlorination of public drinking water supplies in the United States. This paper reviews the available evidence and the studies underway to further evaluate hypothesized associations between cancer ris...

  9. Enhanced Elemental Mercury Removal from Coal-fired Flue Gas by Sulfur-chlorine Compounds

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, Shih-Ger; Yan, Nai-Qiang; Qu, Zan; Chi, Yao; Qiao, Shao-Hua; Dod, Ray; Chang, Shih-Ger; Miller, Charles

    2008-07-02

    Oxidation of Hg0 with any oxidant or converting it to a particle-bound form can facilitate its removal. Two sulfur-chlorine compounds, sulfur dichloride (SCl2) and sulfur monochloride (S2Cl2), were investigated as oxidants for Hg0 by gas phase reaction and by surface-involved reactions in the presence of flyash or activated carbon. The gas phase reaction rate constants between Hg0 and the sulfur/chlorine compounds were determined, and the effects of temperature and the main components in flue gases were studied. The gas phase reaction between Hg0 and SCl2 is shown to be more rapid than the gas phase reaction with chlorine, and the second order rate constant was 9.1(+-0.5) x 10-18 mL-molecules-1cdots-1 at 373oK. Nitric oxide (NO) inhibited the gas phase reaction of Hg0 with sulfur-chlorine compounds. The presence of flyash or powdered activated carbon in flue gas can substantially accelerate the reaction. The predicted Hg0 removal is about 90percent with 5 ppm SCl2 or S2Cl2 and 40 g/m3 of flyash in flue gas. The combination of activated carbon and sulfur-chlorine compounds is an effective alternative. We estimate that co-injection of 3-5 ppm of SCl2 (or S2Cl2) with 2-3 Lb/MMacf of untreated Darco-KB is comparable in efficiency to the injection of 2-3 Lb/MMacf Darco-Hg-LH. Extrapolation of kinetic results also indicates that 90percent of Hg0 can be removed if 3 Lb/MMacf of Darco-KB pretreated with 3percent of SCl2 or S2Cl2 is used. Unlike gas phase reactions, NO exhibited little effect on Hg0 reactions with SCl2 or S2Cl2 on flyash or activated carbon. Mercuric sulfide was identified as one of the principal products of the Hg0/SCl2 or Hg0/S2Cl2 reactions. Additionally, about 8percent of SCl2 or S2Cl2 in aqueous solutions is converted to sulfide ions, which would precipitate mercuric ion from FGD solution.

  10. Behavior of Zn and Fe Content in Electric Arc Furnace Dust as Submitted to Chlorination Methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santos, Felipe; Brocchi, Eduardo; Araújo, Victor; Souza, Rodrigo

    2015-08-01

    This work covers initially a general thermodynamics assessment regarding the zinc ferrite (ZnFe2O4) behavior toward direct and reducing chlorination. Then, the use of alternative chlorination agents were also theoretically appreciated, before a set of experiments has been carried out with industrial residue (electric arc furnace dust). Besides identifying zinc ferrite (95.4 pct), the XRD analysis indicated the presence of ZnO (4.6 pct). Therefore, the main objective of the present work is related to a theoretical (thermodynamics) and experimental (kinetics) evaluation of the mentioned residue chemical behavior as submitted to chlorination methods. Several characterization methods were used, such as X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, X-ray fluorescence, mass spectroscopy (ICP-MS), and energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS). It was observed that zinc was present, mostly, in the form of zinc ferrite (franklinite). The thermodynamics study revealed that Zn has a more susceptible behavior regarding the oxides conversion into chlorides. However, this tendency is not necessarily associated with a selective reaction, as showed for the chlorination in the presence of carbon, as both iron and zinc chlorides formation is feasible. The experimental results have indicated that some reaction systems can be further studied in order to identify operational conditions that enable selective formations. So, it was observed that for the calcium chloride reaction conducted at 1273 K (1000 °C) for 30 minutes, the iron content in the residue slightly increases (with 15 pct removal), whereas the zinc content decreases from 20 to 12 pct (53 pct removal), suggesting complementary studies where this possible selectivity could be even more determinant. Such results have also indicated that the direct action of chlorine at 1073 K (800 °C) allowed complete removal of zinc, followed by conversion in the order of 40 pct in iron. Therefore, a complementary investigation over

  11. Effect of Chlorine on Giardia lamblia Cyst Viability

    PubMed Central

    Jarroll, Edward L.; Bingham, Alan K.; Meyer, Ernest A.

    1981-01-01

    The effect of chlorine concentration on Giardia lamblia cyst viability was tested under a variety of conditions. The ability of Giardia cysts to undergo excystation was used as the criterion of viability. The experimental variables employed included temperature (25, 15, and 5°C), pH (6, 7, and 8), chlorine-cyst contact time (10, 30, and 60 min), and chlorine concentration (1 to 8 mg/liter). In the pH range studied, cyst survival generally was observed to increase as buffer pH increased. Water temperature coupled with chlorination proved to be important in cyst survival. Results of these experiments at the three temperatures studied can be summarized as follows: at 25°C, exposure to 1.5 mg/liter for 10 min killed all cysts at pH 6, 7, and 8. At 15°C, 2.5 mg of chlorine per liter for 10 min killed all cysts at pH 6, but at pH 7 and 8 small numbers of cysts remained viable after 30 min but not after 60 min. At 5°C, 1 mg of chlorine per liter for 60 min failed to kill all the cysts at any pH tested. At this temperature, 2 mg of chlorine per liter killed all cysts after 60 min at pH 6 and 7, but not at pH 8. A chlorine concentration of 4 mg/liter killed all the cysts at all three pH values after 60 min, but not after 30 min. A chlorine concentration of 8 mg/liter killed all Giardia cysts at pH 6 and 7 after contact for 10 min, and at pH 8 after 30 min. This study points up the role of temperature, pH, and chlorine demand in the halogen treatment of drinking water to destroy cysts. It also raises an epidemiological problem, namely: low water temperatures, where killing of Giardia requires relatively high chlorine concentrations and long contact times, are (i) to be expected in many areas where epidemic waterborne giardiasis has been reported and (ii) particularly conducive to the long-term survival of Giardia cysts. PMID:7235695

  12. Partitioning of non-ionic surfactants between water and non-aqueous phase liquids (NAPLs) of chlorinated organics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    KANG, S.; Jeong, H. Y.

    2013-12-01

    Due to the hydrophobic nature, chlorinated organic compounds penetrate soil and groundwater to form non-aqueous phase liquids (NAPLs). At the sites contaminated with such NAPLs, thus, surfactants are applied to increase the aqueous solubility of chlorinated organics via micellar solubilization. However, a portion of surfactants can be partitioned into NAPL phases by forming reverse micelles within them. Consequently, lesser amounts of surfactants are available for the micellar solubilization of chlorinated organics in the aqueous phase. In this study, we investigated the partitioning behavior of non-ionic surfactants (Tween 20, Tween 40, Tween 80, and Triton X-100) between water and a NAPL phase consisting of tetrachloroethylene (PCE), trichloroethylene (TCE), or chloroform (CF). According to the experimental results, the partitioning of surfactants in the water-NAPL systems was found to follow linear or Langmuir-type isotherms. Regardless of type of surfactants, the partitioning loss of surfactants into NAPLs became greater with the more hydrophilic (i.e., the lower water-NAPL interfacial tension) chlorinated organics: PCE < TCE < CF. Notably, the partitioning of all Tween surfactants into the NAPLs consisting of the least hydrophilic PCE was minimal. The partitioning behavior among different surfactants was somewhat complicated. The partitioning extent into CF-NAPLs increased in the order of Tween 20 < Tween 40 < Tween 80 << Triton X-100, suggesting that the greater partitioning occurred with the more hydrophobic (i.e., the lower hydrophilic-lipophilic balance, HLB) surfactant. Consistent with this postulation, the surfactant partitioning into PCE-NAPLs showed the similar trend. In case of TCE-NAPLs, however, the more hydrophobic Tween 40 was partitioned to a less extent than Tween 20. Therefore, the specific interaction of a NAPL-surfactant pair as well as their individual properties should be considered when selecting an effective surfactant for the remediation

  13. SCENARIOS EVALUATION TOOL FOR CHLORINATED SOLVENT MNA

    SciTech Connect

    Vangelas, K; Brian02 Looney, B; Michael J. Truex; Charles J. Newell

    2006-08-16

    Over the past three decades, much progress has been made in the remediation of chlorinated solvents from the subsurface. Yet these pervasive contaminants continue to present a significant challenge to the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), other federal agencies, and other public and private organizations. The physical and chemical properties of chlorinated solvents make it difficult to rapidly reach the low concentrations typically set as regulatory limits. These technical challenges often result in high costs and long remediation time frames. In 2003, the DOE through the Office of Environmental Management funded a science-based technical project that uses the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's technical protocol (EPA, 1998) and directives (EPA, 1999) on Monitored Natural Attenuation (MNA) as the foundation on which to introduce supporting concepts and new scientific developments that will support remediation of chlorinated solvents based on natural attenuation processes. This project supports the direction in which many site owners want to move to complete the remediation of their site(s), that being to complete the active treatment portion of the remedial effort and transition into MNA. The overarching objective of the effort was to examine environmental remedies that are based on natural processes--remedies such as Monitored Natural Attenuation (MNA) or Enhanced Attenuation (EA). The research program did identify several specific opportunities for advances based on: (1) mass balance as the central framework for attenuation based remedies, (2) scientific advancements and achievements during the past ten years, (3) regulatory and policy development and real-world experience using MNA, and (4) exploration of various ideas for integrating attenuation remedies into a systematic set of ''combined remedies'' for contaminated sites. These opportunities are summarized herein and are addressed in more detail in referenced project documents and journal articles, as well

  14. Fate of free chlorine in drinking water during distribution in premise plumbing.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Muzi; He, Chunguang; He, Qiang

    2015-12-01

    Free chlorine is a potent oxidizing agent and has been used extensively as a disinfectant in processes including water treatment. The presence of free chlorine residual is essential for the prevention of microbial regrowth in water distribution systems. However, excessive levels of free chlorine can cause adverse health effects. It is a major challenge to maintain appropriate levels of free chlorine residual in premise plumbing. As the first effort to assessing the fate of chlorine in premise plumbing using actual premise plumbing pipe sections, three piping materials frequently used in premise plumbing, i.e. copper, galvanized iron, and polyvinyl chloride (PVC), were investigated for their performance in maintaining free chlorine residual. Free chlorine decay was shown to follow first-order kinetics for all three pipe materials tested. The most rapid chlorine decay was observed in copper pipes, suggesting the need for higher chlorine dosage to maintain appropriate levels of free chlorine residual if copper piping is used. PVC pipes exhibited the least reactivity with free chlorine, indicative of the advantage of PVC as a premise plumbing material for maintaining free chlorine residual. The reactivity of copper piping with free chlorine was significantly hindered by the accumulation of pipe deposits. In contrast, the impact on chlorine decay by pipe deposits was not significant in galvanized iron and PVC pipes. Findings in this study are of great importance for the development of effective strategies for the control of free chlorine residual and prevention of microbiological contamination in premise plumbing. PMID:26407709

  15. Oxidation of manganese(II) during chlorination: role of bromide.

    PubMed

    Allard, S; Fouche, L; Dick, J; Heitz, A; von Gunten, U

    2013-08-01

    The oxidation of dissolved manganese(II) (Mn(II)) during chlorination is a relatively slow process which may lead to residual Mn(II) in treated drinking waters. Chemical Mn(II) oxidation is autocatalytic and consists of a homogeneous and a heterogeneous process; the oxidation of Mn(II) is mainly driven by the latter process. This study demonstrates that Mn(II) oxidation during chlorination is enhanced in bromide-containing waters by the formation of reactive bromine species (e.g., HOBr, BrCl, Br2O) from the oxidation of bromide by chlorine. During oxidation of Mn(II) by chlorine in bromide-containing waters, bromide is recycled and acts as a catalyst. For a chlorine dose of 1 mg/L and a bromide level as low as 10 μg/L, the oxidation of Mn(II) by reactive bromine species becomes the main pathway. It was demonstrated that the kinetics of the reaction are dominated by the adsorbed Mn(OH)2 species for both chlorine and bromine at circumneutral pH. Reactive bromine species such as Br2O and BrCl significantly influence the rate of manganese oxidation and may even outweigh the reactivity of HOBr. Reaction orders in [HOBr]tot were found to be 1.33 (±0.15) at pH 7.8 and increased to 1.97 (±0.17) at pH 8.2 consistent with an important contribution of Br2O which is second order in [HOBr]tot. These findings highlight the need to take bromide, and the subsequent reactive bromine species formed upon chlorination, into account to assess Mn(II) removal during water treatment with chlorine. PMID:23859083

  16. Bromoform production in tropical open-ocean waters: OTEC chlorination

    SciTech Connect

    Hartwig, E.O.; Valentine, R.

    1981-09-01

    The bromoform, and other volatile organics produced while chlorinating both the evaporator and condenser seawater during operation of the one megawatt (1 MW) OTEC-1 test facility are reported. Although many halogenated compounds might be produced as a result of chlorination, the quantitative analyses in this study focused on volatile EPA priority pollutants. Bromoform is the compound specifically recognized as a potential pollutant. Its concentration may be indicative of other halogenated species.

  17. UV-induced effects on chlorination of creatinine.

    PubMed

    Weng, Shih Chi; Li, Jing; Wood, Karl V; Kenttämaa, Hilkka I; Williams, Peggy E; Amundson, Lucas M; Blatchley, Ernest R

    2013-09-15

    Ultraviolet (UV) irradiation is commonly employed for water treatment in swimming pools to complement conventional chlorination, and to reduce the concentration of inorganic chloramine compounds. The approach of combining UV irradiation and chlorination has the potential to improve water quality, as defined by microbial composition. However, relatively little is known about the effects of this process on water chemistry. To address this issue, experiments were conducted to examine the effects of sequential UV254 irradiation/chlorination, as will occur in recirculating system of swimming pools, on disinfection byproduct (DBP) formation. Creatinine, which is present in human sweat and urine, was selected as the target precursor for these experiments. Enhanced formation of dichloromethylamine (CH3NCl2) and inorganic chloramines was observed to result from post-chlorination of UV-irradiated samples. Chlorocreatinine was found to be more sensitive to UV254 irradiation than creatinine; UV254 irradiation of chlorocreatinine resulted in opening of the ring structure, thereby yielding a series of intermediates that were more susceptible to free chlorine attack than their parent compound. The quantum yields for photodegradation of creatinine and chlorocreatinine at 254 nm were estimated at 0.011 ± 0.002 mol/E and 0.144 ± 0.011 mol/E, respectively. The N-Cl bond was found to be common to UV-sensitive chlorinated compounds (e.g., inorganic chloramines, CH3NCl2, and chlorocreatinine); compounds that were less susceptible to UV-based attack generally lacked the N-Cl bond. This suggested that the N-Cl bond is susceptible to UV254 irradiation, and cleavage of the N-Cl bond appears to open or promote reaction pathways that involve free chlorine, thereby enhancing formation of some DBPs and promoting loss of free chlorine. Proposed reaction mechanisms to describe this behavior based on creatinine as a precursor are presented. PMID:23863372

  18. Algicidal Effect of Bromine and Chlorine on Chlorella pyrenoidosa

    PubMed Central

    Kott, Yehuda; Hershkovitz, Galila; Shemtob, A.; Sless, J. B.

    1966-01-01

    Chlorella pyrenoidosa was found to grow rapidly in tap water. Peak growth was reached after 2 to 3 days. Chlorine and bromine, added to such water, were shown to be effective inhibitors of algal growth. Bromine and bromamine were primarily algicidal, whereas chlorine and chloramines were mainly algistatic. It is assumed that the mechanisms of action of these halogens on Chlorella are not the same. PMID:5914499

  19. Assessment of the risk of transporting liquid chlorine by rail

    SciTech Connect

    Andrews, W.B.

    1980-03-01

    This report presents the risk of shipping liquid chlorine by rail. While chlorine is not an energy material, there are several benefits to studying chlorine transportation risks. First, chlorine, like energy materials, is widely used as a feedstock to industry. Second, it is the major purification agent in municipal water treatment systems and therefore, provides direct benefits to the public. Finally, other risk assessments have been completed for liquid chlorine shipments in the US and Europe, which provide a basis for comparison with this study. None of the previous PNL energy material risk assessments have had other studies for comparison. For these reasons, it was felt that a risk assessment of chlorine transportation by rail could provide information on chlorine risk levels, identify ways to reduce these risks and use previous studies on chlorine risks to assess the strengths and weaknesses of the PNL risk assessment methodology. The risk assessment methodology used in this study is summarized. The methodology is presented in the form of a risk assessment model which is constructed for ease of periodic updating of the data base so that the risk may be reevaluated as additional data become available. The report is sectioned to correspond to specific analysis steps identified in the model. The transport system and accident environment are described. The response of the transport system to accident environments is described. Release sequences are postulated and evaluated to determine both the likelihood and possible consequences of a release. Supportive data and analyses are given in the appendices. The risk assessment results are related to the year 1985 to allow a direct comparison with other reports in this series.

  20. Replacing Chlorinated-Solvent-Based Cleaners And Adhesives

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heaton, Harley; Davidson, Fred

    1995-01-01

    Brief report describes tests conducted to assess feasibility of using selected chemicals as replacements for selected cleaners, primers, and adhesives containing chlorinated solvents. Cleaners, primers, and adhesives in question used in bonding insulating material in steel cases of solid-fuel rocket motors. Necessary to phase out use of chlorinated solvents because of concerns over toxicity and adverse effects on ozone layer in upper atmosphere.

  1. Spatial and temporal variability of inorganic chlorine in Northwestern Europe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sommariva, R.; Hollis, L. D. J.; Baker, A. R.; Ball, S. M.; Bell, T. G.; Cordell, R. L.; Fleming, Z.; Gaget, M.; Yang, M. X.; Monks, P. S.

    2015-12-01

    Chlorine is well known to be a strong oxidant in the atmosphere;chlorine reactivity impacts the formation of tropospheric ozone, theoxidation of methane and non-methane hydrocarbons, and the cycling ofnitrogen, sulphur and mercury. An accurate assessment of the roleplayed by chlorine in tropospheric chemical processes is complicatedby the scarce knowledge of its sources, sinks and distribution.We report observations of inorganic chlorine species (Cl2, ClNO2,particulate chloride) taken over the period 2014-2015 at threedifferent locations in Britain: an urban site a hundred kilometersfrom the ocean (Leicester), a coastal site mostly affected by shiptraffic (Penlee Point, Cornwall) and a coastal site experiencingeither clean air from the North Sea or polluted air from inland(Weybourne, Norfolk).This dataset provides a first look into the geographical distributionand seasonal variability of chlorine in Northwestern Europe: theresults suggest that, during the night, ClNO2 is ubiquitous withconcentrations in the range of hundreds to thousands of pptV at alllocations, whereas Cl2 can be observed only at coastal sites, withconcentrations of a few tens of pptV. The implications of thewidespread presence of these forms of inorganic chlorine for ozoneproduction and, in general, for the oxidative processes in the loweratmosphere are discussed with the help of a wide range of supportingmeasurements.

  2. Carboranyl-Chlorin e6 as a Potent Antimicrobial Photosensitizer

    PubMed Central

    Omarova, Elena O.; Nazarov, Pavel A.; Firsov, Alexander M.; Strakhovskaya, Marina G.; Arkhipova, Anastasia Yu.; Moisenovich, Mikhail M.; Agapov, Igor I.; Ol’shevskaya, Valentina A.; Zaitsev, Andrey V.; Kalinin, Valery N.; Kotova, Elena A.; Antonenko, Yuri N.

    2015-01-01

    Antimicrobial photodynamic inactivation is currently being widely considered as alternative to antibiotic chemotherapy of infective diseases, attracting much attention to design of novel effective photosensitizers. Carboranyl-chlorin-e6 (the conjugate of chlorin e6 with carborane), applied here for the first time for antimicrobial photodynamic inactivation, appeared to be much stronger than chlorin e6 against Gram-positive bacteria, such as Bacillus subtilis, Staphyllococcus aureus and Mycobacterium sp. Confocal fluorescence spectroscopy and membrane leakage experiments indicated that bacteria cell death upon photodynamic treatment with carboranyl-chlorin-e6 is caused by loss of cell membrane integrity. The enhanced photobactericidal activity was attributed to the increased accumulation of the conjugate by bacterial cells, as evaluated both by centrifugation and fluorescence correlation spectroscopy. Gram-negative bacteria were rather resistant to antimicrobial photodynamic inactivation mediated by carboranyl-chlorin-e6. Unlike chlorin e6, the conjugate showed higher (compared to the wild-type strain) dark toxicity with Escherichia coli ΔtolC mutant, deficient in TolC-requiring multidrug efflux transporters. PMID:26535905

  3. Chlorobenzene outputs from combustion of chlorinated organic and inorganic compounds

    SciTech Connect

    Green, A.E.S.; Vitali, J.A.; Miller, T.L.

    1994-12-31

    The authors consider the gas phase formation of chlorinated benzenes and phenols as precursors of chlorinated dioxins and furans from the combustion of solid fuels containing organically bound chlorine. The model investigated is intended to apply to the combustion of medical waste, municipal waste and coals containing chlorine. Assuming a temperature-time profile drawn from incinerator experiments, the authors use kinetic modeling with known reaction rates to further investigate four models of chlorinated benzene formation. Since reaction rates for most chlorination processes are now known, the authors choose simple systems of reaction rates that yield outputs that can be made approximately compatible with results of the Pittsfield-Vicon incinerator and Clean Combustion Technology Laboratory experiments. The authors also consider recent measurements of HCI emissions from crematoria and the implication of this work with respect to the benefits of material substitution in medical and municipal waste incineration. These benefits should also accompany the dechlorination of coals. The authors note the disparity between the prevailing USA position and the emerging position of Germany on the issue of halogenated plastics. The authors also note that Europe and Asia are beginning to address solid fuel issues as a consolidated discipline. This pattern should be helpful in broadening the understanding of solid fuels combustion processes and in ferreting out erroneous data and conclusions. This is important in view of the recent concern about the role of low dioxin exposure levels on fetal development and the immune system.

  4. Chlorination of Betacyanins in Several Hypochlorous Acid Systems.

    PubMed

    Wybraniec, Sławomir; Starzak, Karolina; Pietrzkowski, Zbigniew

    2016-04-13

    This study presents a comparative evaluation of chlorination of betanin, betanidin, and neobetanin exposed to sodium hypochlorite and myeloperoxidase (MPO)/H2O2/Cl(-) systems. For betanin/betanidin, the chlorination takes place at the aglycone unit, but for neobetanin, no chlorinated products in the reaction mixtures can be detected. In the RP-HPLC system, monochloro-betanin/-betanidin were eluted earlier than their corresponding nonchlorinated substrates. An influence of Cl(-) concentration on betanin/betanidin chlorination efficiency in sodium hypochlorite and MPO systems was investigated. At pH 3-5, the yields of formed monochloro-betanin/-betanidin decrease dramatically at higher Cl(-) concentrations, indicating that generated Cl2 is not the chlorinating agent in the presence of sodium hypochlorite. The intriguing low activity of Cl2 in betanin/betanidin chlorination compared to HOCl and/or Cl2O can be explained by a special position of the attack by molecules of HOCl and/or Cl2O. In the MPO/H2O2/Cl(-) system, the highest efficiency of monochloro-betanin/-betanidin generation is observed at pH 5. PMID:26947920

  5. Shock-tube pyrolysis of chlorinated hydrocarbons - Formation of soot

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frenklach, M.; Hsu, J. P.; Miller, D. L.; Matula, R. A.

    1986-01-01

    Soot formation in pyrolysis of chlorinated methanes, their mixtures with methane, and chlorinated ethylenes were studied behind reflected shock waves by monitoring the attenuation of an He-Ne laser beam. An additional single-pulse shock-tube study was conducted for the pyrolysis of methane, methyl chloride, and dichloromethane. The experiments were performed at temperatures 1300-3000 K, pressures of 0.4-3.6 bar, and total carbon atom concentrations of 1-5 x 10 to the 17th atoms cu cm. The amounts of soot produced in the pyrolysis of chlorinated hydrocarbons are larger than that of their nonchlorinated counterparts. The sooting behavior and product distribution can be generally explained in terms of chlorine-catalyzed chemical reaction mechanisms. The pathway to soot from chlorinated methanes and ethylenes with high H:Cl ratio proceeds via the formation of C2H, C2H2, and C2H3 species. For chlorinated hydrocarbons with low H:Cl ratio, the formation of C2 and its contribution to soot formation at high temperatures becomes significant. There is evidence for the importance of CHCl radical and its reactions in the pyrolysis of dichloromethane.

  6. Carboranyl-Chlorin e6 as a Potent Antimicrobial Photosensitizer.

    PubMed

    Omarova, Elena O; Nazarov, Pavel A; Firsov, Alexander M; Strakhovskaya, Marina G; Arkhipova, Anastasia Yu; Moisenovich, Mikhail M; Agapov, Igor I; Ol'shevskaya, Valentina A; Zaitsev, Andrey V; Kalinin, Valery N; Kotova, Elena A; Antonenko, Yuri N

    2015-01-01

    Antimicrobial photodynamic inactivation is currently being widely considered as alternative to antibiotic chemotherapy of infective diseases, attracting much attention to design of novel effective photosensitizers. Carboranyl-chlorin-e6 (the conjugate of chlorin e6 with carborane), applied here for the first time for antimicrobial photodynamic inactivation, appeared to be much stronger than chlorin e6 against Gram-positive bacteria, such as Bacillus subtilis, Staphyllococcus aureus and Mycobacterium sp. Confocal fluorescence spectroscopy and membrane leakage experiments indicated that bacteria cell death upon photodynamic treatment with carboranyl-chlorin-e6 is caused by loss of cell membrane integrity. The enhanced photobactericidal activity was attributed to the increased accumulation of the conjugate by bacterial cells, as evaluated both by centrifugation and fluorescence correlation spectroscopy. Gram-negative bacteria were rather resistant to antimicrobial photodynamic inactivation mediated by carboranyl-chlorin-e6. Unlike chlorin e6, the conjugate showed higher (compared to the wild-type strain) dark toxicity with Escherichia coli ΔtolC mutant, deficient in TolC-requiring multidrug efflux transporters. PMID:26535905

  7. Zebra mussel control using periodic chlorine dioxide treatments

    SciTech Connect

    Tsou, J.; Coyle, J.; Crone, D.

    1996-08-01

    This paper summarizes the EPRI report (TR-105202) on the same topic as well as presents changes in current thinking on the suitability (applicability) of chlorine dioxide for fouling control. Chlorine dioxide was tested as a zebra mussel biocide at two steam electric generating stations in Illinois and one in Indiana. The purpose of these studies was to determine the efficacy of chlorine dioxide in killing zebra mussels and to develop site specific treatment programs for the three utilities. The Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) Zebra Mussel Consortium sponsored the testing of this recent use of chlorine dioxide. The raw water system at Central Illinois Public Service`s Meredosia Station, on the Illinois River, received applications of chlorine dioxide in April, July, and September 1994. The raw water system at Illinois Power Company`s Wood River Station, on the Mississippi River, received applications in July 1993, January, April, May, July, and September 1994. The Gallagher Station, on the Ohio River, was treated in July and October 1994. Chlorine dioxide was generated on-site and injected into the water intake structure. Both cooling and service water systems were treated at the facilities. 6 refs., 13 figs.

  8. Chlorine induced corrosion of steels in fossil fuel power plants

    SciTech Connect

    Spiegel, M.; Grabke, H.J.

    1998-12-31

    The corrosion of steels in power plants (coal combustion, waste incineration) is mainly due to condensed chlorides in the ash deposited on the boiler tubes. These chlorides are stabilized by HCl in the combustion gas. In the case of coal as a fuel, chlorine is present as chloride minerals in the raw material which is converted to HCl during the combustion process. Corrosion of steels in chlorine containing environments occurs by the active oxidation mechanism, which is a self-sustaining accelerated oxidation process, catalyzed by chlorine. This study shows that solid chlorides react with the oxide scale of the steels to form chlorine, which initiates active oxidation. In order to prevent chlorine induced corrosion, the deposition of chlorides on the tubes within the coal ash must be avoided. This is possible by the presence of SO{sub 2}, which is present in the combustion gas, converting the chlorides to sulfates in the gas phase. The paper presents an example of a failure case in a coal fired plant in Germany. In this plant, chlorine induced corrosion was observed after effective removal of SO{sub 2} by additions of CaO. From thermodynamic calculations it can be shown that a certain amount of SO{sub 2} is necessary in order to avoid deposition of chlorides and to prevent corrosion.

  9. Microbial Community Dynamics of an Urban Drinking Water Distribution System Subjected to Phases of Chloramination and Chlorination Treatments

    PubMed Central

    Hwang, Chiachi; Ling, Fangqiong; Andersen, Gary L.; LeChevallier, Mark W.

    2012-01-01

    Water utilities in parts of the U.S. control microbial regrowth in drinking water distribution systems (DWDS) by alternating postdisinfection methods between chlorination and chloramination. To examine how this strategy influences drinking water microbial communities, an urban DWDS (population ≅ 40,000) with groundwater as the source water was studied for approximately 2 years. Water samples were collected at five locations in the network at different seasons and analyzed for their chemical and physical characteristics and for their microbial community composition and structure by examining the 16S rRNA gene via terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism and DNA pyrosequencing technology. Nonmetric multidimension scaling and canonical correspondence analysis of microbial community profiles could explain >57% of the variation. Clustering of samples based on disinfection types (free chlorine versus combined chlorine) and sampling time was observed to correlate to the shifts in microbial communities. Sampling location and water age (<21.2 h) had no apparent effects on the microbial compositions of samples from most time points. Microbial community analysis revealed that among major core populations, Cyanobacteria, Methylobacteriaceae, Sphingomonadaceae, and Xanthomonadaceae were more abundant in chlorinated water, and Methylophilaceae, Methylococcaceae, and Pseudomonadaceae were more abundant in chloraminated water. No correlation was observed with minor populations that were detected frequently (<0.1% of total pyrosequences), which were likely present in source water and survived through the treatment process. Transient microbial populations including Flavobacteriaceae and Clostridiaceae were also observed. Overall, reversible shifts in microbial communities were especially pronounced with chloramination, suggesting stronger selection of microbial populations from chloramines than chlorine. PMID:22941076

  10. The synergistic effect of Escherichia coli inactivation by sequential disinfection with low level chlorine dioxide followed by free chlorine.

    PubMed

    Yang, Wu; Yang, Dong; Zhu, Sui-Yi; Chen, Bo-Yan; Huo, Ming-Xin; Li, Jun-Wen

    2012-12-01

    To the best of our knowledge, there was little information available on pathogen removal using low level disinfectant followed by free chlorine in sequential disinfection (SD). This study investigated Escherichia coli inactivation by four types of disinfection: single step disinfection (SSD), SD, traditional sequential disinfection (TSD) and mixed disinfectant disinfection (MDD). Results indicated that SD had higher ability to inactivate E. coli than the others, indicating there was a positive synergistic effect on chlorine disinfection by prior dosing with a low level of chlorine dioxide (ClO(2)). The ONPG assay suggested that the permeability of cell wall rather than the viability of E. coli were changed under 0.02 mg/l ClO(2) treatment. The coexistence of residual ClO(2) and free chlorine also plays an active synergistic effect. Additionally, temperature had a positive effect on E. coli inactivation in SD, while inactivation was reduced in alkaline compared to neutral and acidic conditions. PMID:23165713

  11. Efficacy of chlorine, acidic electrolyzed water and aqueous chlorine dioxide solutions to decontaminate Escherichia coli O157:H7 from lettuce leaves

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This study compared the efficacy of chlorine (20 – 200 ppm), acidic electrolyzed water (50 ppm chlorine, pH 2.6), acidified sodium chlorite (20 – 200 ppm chlorite ion concentration, Sanova), and aqueous chlorine dioxide (20 – 200 ppm chlorite ion concentration, TriNova) washes in reducing population...

  12. Chlorine Stabilizer T-128 enhances efficacy of chlorine against cross contamination by E. coli O157:H7 and Salmonella in fresh-cut lettuce processing

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    During fresh produce processing, organic materials released from cut tissues can rapidly react with free chlorine in the wash solution, leading to the potential survival of foodborne bacterial pathogens and cross-contamination when the free chlorine is depleted. A reported chlorine stabilizer, T128...

  13. Multi-route trihalomethane exposure in households using municipal tap water treated with chlorine or ozone-chlorine.

    PubMed

    Jo, Wan-Kuen; Kwon, Ki-Dong; Dong, Jong-In; Chung, Yong

    2005-03-01

    In Korea, data for multi-route trihalomethane (THM) exposure in households using municipal tap water treated with ozone-chlorine or chlorine are unavailable or very limited. Accordingly, the present study was designed to obtain those data by measurements of the THM concentrations in the tap water and indoor and outdoor air in the two types of households, along with an estimation of THM exposure from water ingestion, showering, and the inhalation of indoor air. Chloroform was the most abundant THM in all three media, yet no bromoform was detected in any sample. Similar to previous findings, the winter chloroform concentration in tap water treated with chlorine (22.1 microg/l, median) was significantly higher than that in the tap water treated with ozone-chlorine (16.8 microg/l, median). However, the summer water chloroform concentrations and summer and winter water concentrations of the other two THMs (bromodichloromethane and dibromochloromethane) exhibited no significant difference between the chlorine and ozone-chlorine-treated water. It was suggested that the effects of the water parameters including biochemical oxygen demand of raw water entering water treatment plants should be considered when evaluating the advantage of ozone-chlorine disinfection for THM formation over chlorine disinfection. The indoor air THM concentration trend was also consistent with the water concentration trend. The indoor to outdoor air concentration ratios were comparable with previous studies. The THM exposure estimates from water ingestion, showering, and the inhalation of apartment indoor air when not in the shower suggested that, for residents living in the surveyed households, their exposure to THMs in the home was mostly associated with their household water uses. The THM exposure estimates from tap water ingestion were similar to those from showering. PMID:15740765

  14. Development of compound-specific isotope analysis of stable chlorine in sub-µmol quantities of chlorinated organic substances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holmstrand, H.; Andersson, P.; Gustafsson, O.

    2003-04-01

    Chlorinated hydrocarbons is a common class of substances known to be of high ecotoxicity largely due to their persistence and strongly lipophilic properties. This group of chemicals include the semivolatile compounds dichloro-diphenyl-trichloroethane (DDT) and polychlorinated biphenyls (PCB), which, together with solvents like trichloroethylene (TCE) and perchloroethylene (PCE), are globally present at detectable levels in all natural environments. Recent reports on the possibility of enzymatic synthesis of chlorinated dioxins and furans, illustrate the need for means to distinguish the naturally produced contribution from anthropogenic input to the environment. Shifts in the chlorine isotope composition due to degradation, or synthesis, of a compound are in the order of a few per mil of the initial isotope ratio. The cause of the kinetic isotope effect (KIE) arises from differences in preferential phase distribution of isotopic species. Compound specific isotope analysis (CSIA) of stable chlorine should accordingly provide knowledge relevant to degradation rates, distribution patterns and reaction pathways for organochlorines. Isotope analysis of chlorine, derived from chlorinated hydrocarbons, can be performed using thermal ionisation mass spectrometry (TIMS) with positive ions. This lowers the limit of determination from about 30 μmol Cl for conventional electron ionisation mass spectrometry (EIMS), to less than 0.3 μmol Cl with a precision of 0.25 ppm (1s) for TIMS. Such a decrease by a factor 100 in the requirements of sample size will enable CSIA of sediment samples collected away from the immediate vicinity of strongly contaminated areas. The aim of this study is to develop a functioning sequence for i) sealed tube combustion with CuO of solid phase chlorinated hydrocarbons equivalent to <0.7 μmol Cl, ii) conversion of formed chloride to CsCl by ion exchange chromatography and iii) analysis of chlorine isotopes in TIMS. The described method can open new

  15. Electrochemical Membrane Reactors for Sustainable Chlorine Recycling

    PubMed Central

    Vidakovic-Koch, Tanja; Martinez, Isai Gonzalez; Kuwertz, Rafael; Kunz, Ulrich; Turek, Thomas; Sundmacher, Kai

    2012-01-01

    Polymer electrolyte membranes have found broad application in a number of processes, being fuel cells, due to energy concerns, the main focus of the scientific community worldwide. Relatively little attention has been paid to the use of these materials in electrochemical production and separation processes. In this review, we put emphasis upon the application of Nafion membranes in electrochemical membrane reactors for chlorine recycling. The performance of such electrochemical reactors can be influenced by a number of factors including the properties of the membrane, which play an important role in reactor optimization. This review discusses the role of Nafion as a membrane, as well as its importance in the catalyst layer for the formation of the so-called three-phase boundary. The influence of an equilibrated medium on the Nafion proton conductivity and Cl− crossover, as well as the influence of the catalyst ink dispersion medium on the Nafion/catalyst self-assembly and its importance for the formation of an ionic conducting network in the catalyst layer are summarized. PMID:24958294

  16. Environmental distribution of chlorinated organic pollutants

    SciTech Connect

    Emmi, F.

    1983-01-01

    A survey of the concentration of PCB's and chlorinated hydrocarbon pesticides in Susquehanna River Basin sediments was performed on samples collected from New York and Pennsylvania in 1976-1979. Highest concentrations were found for PCB's, with median and range of 38 and 13-524 ng/g, respectively. Pesticides had median concentrations ranging from approx.1 ng/g for DDT, DDD, and DDE, to less than 0.1 ng/g for aldrin and dieldrin. Highest concentrations generally were found downstream from industrial centers. Concentrations of PCB's and pesticides were also determined for soil composites collected from six areas of the basin. For several pollutants, the highest levels were found in the Pennsylvania areas, especially the Conestoga River Basin site. The PCB levels were the same (approx.35 ng/g) in all New York soil composites; this was consistent with concentrations predicted from known atmospheric deposition data. Adsorption of atrazine and simazine on model substrates was stuided to elucidate the partitioning of these herbicides on river sediments. Clean sea sand had little affinity for these compounds. Adsorption on illite clay and humic acid-coated sea sand gave relatively large K/sub p/ and K/sub oc/ values compared to the values for river sediments, suggesting that the nature of the sites available for absorbing organic molecules needs further study.

  17. Iron enhanced abiotic degradation of chlorinated hydrocarbons

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, C.T.

    1995-10-01

    Since the 1970s, several researchers have investigated the ability of certain zero-valent metals or alloys to enhance the degradation of halogenated organic compounds in contaminated water. Iron, zinc, aluminum, brass, copper, and stainless steel have been studied at various times with varying degrees of success. Gillham and O`Hannesin have recently made a literature review and conducted tests on 14 halogenated aliphatic compounds using zero-valent iron as an enhancing agent. The results showed that rapid dehalogenation occurred on all of the compounds tested except dichloromethane. Based on these test results, EnviroMetal Technologies, Inc. proposed to remediate groundwater contaminated with chlorinated organic compounds using this technology. The EPA Superfund Innovative Technology Evaluation (SITE) program has accepted this technology for demonstration. This demonstration project will include two processes, above ground reactor and in situ permeable wall. The demonstration on the above ground reactor is being conducted at a site in Wayne, New Jersey. The main contaminants at this site are tetrachloroethene (PCE) and trichloroethene (TCE). The in situ permeable wall process will be conducted at a site in upstate New York. This site is a shallow sand aquifer containing TCE, dichloroethenes, and 1,1,1-trichloroethane.

  18. Effect of soil moisture on chlorine deposition.

    PubMed

    Hearn, John; Eichler, Jeffery; Hare, Christopher; Henley, Michael

    2014-02-28

    The effect of soil moisture on chlorine (Cl(2)) deposition was examined in laboratory chamber experiments at high Cl(2) exposures by measuring the concentration of chloride (Cl(-)) in soil columns. Soil mixtures with varying amounts of clay, sand, and organic matter and with moisture contents up to 20% (w/w) were exposed to ≈3×10(4)ppm Cl(2) vapor. For low water content soils, additional water increased the reaction rate as evidenced by higher Cl(-) concentration at higher soil moisture content. Results also showed that the presence of water restricted transport of Cl(2) into the soil columns and caused lower overall deposition of Cl(2) in the top 0.48-cm layer of soil when water filled ≈60% or more of the void space in the column. Numerical solutions to partial differential equations of Fick's law of diffusion and a simple rate law for Cl(2) reaction corroborated conclusions derived from the data. For the soil mixtures and conditions of these experiments, moisture content that filled 30-50% of the available void space yielded the maximum amount of Cl(2) deposition in the top 0.48cm of soil. PMID:24434132

  19. Effect of peracetic acid, ultraviolet radiation, nanofiltration-chlorine in the disinfection of a non conventional source of water (Tula Valley).

    PubMed

    Trujillo, J; Barrios, J A; Jimenez, B

    2008-01-01

    Water supply for human consumption requires certain quality that reduces health risks to consumers. In this sense, the process of disinfection plays an important role in the elimination of pathogenic microorganisms. Even though chlorination is the most applied process based on its effectiveness and cost, its application is being questioned considering the formation of disinfection by-products (DBPs). Therefore, alternative disinfectants are being evaluated and some treatment processes have been proposed to remove DBPs precursors (organic matter. This paper reports the results of disinfection of a non conventional source of water (aquifer recharged unintentionally with raw wastewater) with peracetic acid (PAA) and ultraviolet radiation (UV) as well as nanofiltration (NF) followed by chlorination to produce safe drinking water. The results showed that a dose of 2 mg/L PAA was needed to eliminate total and faecal coliforms. For UV light, a dose of 12.40 mWs/cm2 reduced total and faecal coliforms below the detection limit. On the other hand, chlorine demand of water before NF was 1.1-1.3 mg/L with a trihalomethane formation potential (THMFP) of 118.62 microg/L, in contrast with chlorination after NF where the demand was 0.5 mg/L and THMFP of 17.64 microg/L. The recommended scheme is nanofiltration + chlorination. PMID:18360005

  20. Chlorine Dioxide Gas Sterilization under Square-Wave Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Jeng, David K.; Woodworth, Archie G.

    1990-01-01

    Experiments were designed to study chlorine dioxide (CD) gas sterilization under square-wave conditions. By using controlled humidity, gas concentration, and temperature at atmospheric pressure, standard biological indicators (BIs) and spore disks of environmental isolates were exposed to CD gas. The sporicidal activity of CD gas was found to be concentration dependent. Prehumidification enhanced the CD activity. The D values (time required for 90% inactivation) of Bacillus subtilis subsp. niger ATCC 9372 BIs were estimated to be 1.5, 2.5, and 4.2 min when exposed to CD concentrations of 30, 15, and 7 mg/liter, respectively, at 23°C and ambient (20 to 40%) relative humidity (RH). Survivor tailings were observed. Prehumidification of BIs to 70 to 75% RH in an environmental chamber for 30 min resulted in a D value of 1.6 min after exposure to a concentration of 6 to 7 mg of CD per liter at 23°C and eliminated survivor tailing. Prolonging prehumidification at 70 to 75% RH for up to 16 h did not further improve the inactivation rate. Prehumidification by ultrasonic nebulization was found to be more effective than prehumidification in the environmental chamber, improving the D value to 0.55 min at a CD concentration of 6 to 7 mg/liter. Based on the current observations, CD gas is estimated, on a molar concentration basis, to be 1,075 times more potent than ethylene oxide as a sterilant at 30°C. A comparative study showed B. subtilis var. niger BIs were more resistant than other types of BIs and most of the tested bacterial spores of environmental isolates. PMID:16348127

  1. Passive remediation of chlorinated volatile organic compounds using barometric pumping

    SciTech Connect

    Rossabi, J.; Looney, B.B.; Dilek, C.A.E.; Riha, B.; Rohay, V.J.

    1993-12-31

    The purpose of the Savannah River Integrated Demonstration Program, sponsored by the Department of Energy, is to demonstrate new subsurface characterization, monitoring, and remediation technologies. The interbedded clay and sand layers at the Integrated Demonstration Site (IDS) are contaminated with chlorinated volatile organic compounds (CVOCs). Characterization studies show that the bulk of the contamination is located in the approximately 40 m thick vadose zone. The most successful strategy for removing contaminants of this type from this environment is vapor extraction alone or in combination with other methods such as air sparging or enhanced bioremediation. Preliminary work at the IDS has indicated that natural pressure differences between surface and subsurface air caused by surface barometric fluctuations can produce enough gas flow to make barometric pumping a viable method for subsurface remediation. Air flow and pressure were measured in wells that are across three stratigraphic intervals in the vadose zone` The subsurface pressures were correlated to surface pressure fluctuations but were damped and lagging in phase corresponding to depth and stratum permeability. Piezometer wells screened at lower elevations exhibited a greater phase lag and damping than wells screened at higher elevations where the pressure wave from barometric fluctuations passes through a smaller number of low permeable layers. The phase lag between surface and subsurface pressures results in significant fluxes through these wells. The resultant air flows through the subsurface impacts CVOC fate and transport. With the appropriate controls (e.g. solenoid valves) a naturally driven vapor extraction system can be implemented requiring negligible operating costs yet capable of a large CVOC removal rate (as much as 1--2 kg/day in each well at the IDS).

  2. Stable Chlorine Isotope Study: Application to Early Solar System Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mala,ira. M/; Nyquist, L. E.; Reese, Y.; Shih, C-Y; Fujitani, T.; Okano, O.

    2010-01-01

    A significantly large mass fractionation between two stable chlorine isotopes is expected during planetary processes In addition, in view of the isotopic heterogeneity of other light elements, the chlorine isotopes can potentially be used as a tracer for the origins and evolutionary processes of early solar system materials. Due to analytical difficulties, however, current chlorine isotope studies on planetary materials are quite controversial among IRMS (gas source mass spectrometry) and/or TIMS (Thermal Ionization Mass Spectrometry) groups [i.e. 1-3]. Although a cross-calibration of IRMS and TIMS indicates that both techniques are sufficiently consistent with each other [4], some authors have claimed that the Cl-37/Cl-35 ratio of geological samples obtained by TIMS technique are, in general, misleadingly too high and variable compared to those of IRMS [3]. For example, almost no differences of Cl isotope composition were observed among mantle materials and carbonaceous meteorites by [3]. On the other hand, according to more recent IRMS work [2], significant Cl isotope variations are confirmed for mantle materials. Therefore, additional careful investigation of Cl isotope analyses are now required to confirm real chlorine isotope variations for planetary materials including carbonaceous chondrites [5]. A significantly large mass fractionation between two stable chlorine isotopes is expected during planetary processes In addition, in view of the isotopic heterogeneity of other light elements, the chlorine isotopes can potentially be used as a tracer for the origins and evolutionary processes of early solar system materials. Due to analytical difficulties, however, current chlorine isotope studies on planetary materials are quite controversial among IRMS (gas source mass spectrometry) and/or TIMS (Thermal Ionization Mass Spectrometry) groups [i.e. 1-3]. Although a cross-calibration of IRMS and TIMS indicates that both techniques are sufficiently consistent with each

  3. Analysis of residual chlorine in simple drinking water distribution system with intermittent water supply

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goyal, Roopali V.; Patel, H. M.

    2015-09-01

    Knowledge of residual chlorine concentration at various locations in drinking water distribution system is essential final check to the quality of water supplied to the consumers. This paper presents a methodology to find out the residual chlorine concentration at various locations in simple branch network by integrating the hydraulic and water quality model using first-order chlorine decay equation with booster chlorination nodes for intermittent water supply. The explicit equations are developed to compute the residual chlorine in network with a long distribution pipe line at critical nodes. These equations are applicable to Indian conditions where intermittent water supply is the most common system of water supply. It is observed that in intermittent water supply, the residual chlorine at farthest node is sensitive to water supply hours and travelling time of chlorine. Thus, the travelling time of chlorine can be considered to justify the requirement of booster chlorination for intermittent water supply.

  4. Theoretical study of the kinetics of chlorine atom abstraction from chloromethanes by atomic chlorine.

    PubMed

    Brudnik, Katarzyna; Twarda, Maria; Sarzyński, Dariusz; Jodkowski, Jerzy T

    2013-10-01

    Ab initio calculations at the G3 level were used in a theoretical description of the kinetics and mechanism of the chlorine abstraction reactions from mono-, di-, tri- and tetra-chloromethane by chlorine atoms. The calculated profiles of the potential energy surface of the reaction systems show that the mechanism of the studied reactions is complex and the Cl-abstraction proceeds via the formation of intermediate complexes. The multi-step reaction mechanism consists of two elementary steps in the case of CCl4 + Cl, and three for the other reactions. Rate constants were calculated using the theoretical method based on the RRKM theory and the simplified version of the statistical adiabatic channel model. The temperature dependencies of the calculated rate constants can be expressed, in temperature range of 200-3,000 K as [Formula: see text]. The rate constants for the reverse reactions CH3/CH2Cl/CHCl2/CCl3 + Cl2 were calculated via the equilibrium constants derived theoretically. The kinetic equations [Formula: see text] allow a very good description of the reaction kinetics. The derived expressions are a substantial supplement to the kinetic data necessary to describe and model the complex gas-phase reactions of importance in combustion and atmospheric chemistry. PMID:23455925

  5. Chlorination of tramadol: Reaction kinetics, mechanism and genotoxicity evaluation.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Hanyang; Song, Dean; Chang, Yangyang; Liu, Huijuan; Qu, Jiuhui

    2015-12-01

    Tramadol (TRA) is one of the most detected analgesics in environmental matrices, and it is of high significance to study the reactivity of TRA during chlorination considering its potential toxicity to the environment. The chlorine/TRA reaction is first order with respect to the TRA concentration, and a combination of first-order and second-order with respect to chlorine concentration. The pH dependence of the observed rate constants (kobs) showed that the TRA oxidation reactivity increased with increasing pH. kobs can be quantitatively described by considering all active species including Cl2, Cl2O and HOCl, and the individual rate constants of HOCl/TRA(0), HOCl/TRAH(+), Cl2/TRA and Cl2O/TRA reactions were calculated to be (2.61±0.29)×10(3)M(-1)s(-1), 14.73±4.17M(-1)s(-1), (3.93±0.34)×10(5)M(-1)s(-1) and (5.66±1.83)×10(6)M(-1)s(-1), respectively. Eleven degradation products were detected with UPLC-Q-TOF-MS, and the corresponding structures of eight products found under various pH conditions were proposed. The amine group was proposed to be the initial attack site under alkaline pH conditions, where reaction of the deprotonated amine group with HOCl is favorable. Under acidic and neutral pH conditions, however, two possible reaction pathways were proposed. One is an electrophilic substitution on the aromatic ring, and another is an electrophilic substitution on the nitrogen, leading to an N-chlorinated intermediate, which can be further oxidized. Finally, the SOS/umu test showed that the genotoxicity of TRA chlorination products increased with increasing dosage of chlorine, which was mostly attributed to the formation of some chlorine substitution products. PMID:26291914

  6. Can chlorination co-select antibiotic-resistance genes?

    PubMed

    Lin, Wenfang; Zhang, Menglu; Zhang, Shenghua; Yu, Xin

    2016-08-01

    Selective pressures, such as chemical or heavy metal pollution, may co-select for bacterial antibiotic resistance in the environment. However, whether chlorination in water treatment can co-select antibiotic-resistant bacteria is controversial. In this study, high capacity quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) analysis was applied to target almost all known antibiotic-resistance genes (ARGs) (282 types) and 13 mobile genetic elements (MGEs) in bacteria detected in secondary effluents from a municipal wastewater treatment plant after chlorination. The results revealed that 125 unique ARGs were detected in non-chlorinated samples, and the number decreased (79-91 types) as the chlorine concentration was increased. Moreover, 7.49 × 10(4)-3.92 × 10(7) copies/100 ml water reduction of ARGs occurred with 4 mg Cl2/l. Considering the relative abundance of ARGs (i.e., ARG copies normalized to 16S rRNA gene copies), 119 ARGs decreased in response to chlorination, whereas only six ARGs, such as dfrA1, tetPB-03, tetPA, ampC-04, tetA-02, and erm(36), were potentially enriched by 10.90-, 10.06-, 8.63-, 6.86-, 3.77-, and 1.09-fold, respectively. Furthermore, the relative abundance of 12 detected MGEs was lower after chlorination. Therefore, chlorination was effective in reducing ARGs and MGEs rather than co-selecting them. PMID:27192478

  7. Chlorination of Taurine by Human Neutrophils

    PubMed Central

    Weiss, Stephen J.; Klein, Roger; Slivka, Adam; Wei, Maria

    1982-01-01

    The model hydrogen peroxide-myeloperoxidase-chloride system is capable of generating the powerful oxidant hypochlorous acid, which can be quantitated by trapping the generated species with the β-amino acid, taurine. The resultant stable product, taurine chloramine, can be quantitated by its ability to oxidize the sulfhydryl compound, 5-thio-2-nitro-benzoic acid to the disulfide, 5,5′-dithiobis(2-nitroben-zoic acid) or to oxidize iodide to iodine. Using this system, purified myeloperoxidase in the presence of chloride and taurine converted stoichiometric quantities of hydrogen peroxide to taurine chloramine. Chloramine generation was absolutely dependent on hydrogen peroxide, myeloperoxidase, and chloride and could be inhibited by catalase, myeloperoxidase inhibitors, or chloride-free conditions. In the presence of taurine, intact human neutrophils stimulated with either phorbol myristate acetate or opsonized zymosan particles generated a stable species capable of oxidizing 5-thio-2-nitrobenzoic acid or iodide. Resting cells did not form this species. The oxidant formed by the stimulated neutrophils was identified as taurine chloramine by both ultraviolet spectrophotometry and electrophoresis. Taurine chloramine formation by the neutrophil was dependent on the taurine concentration, time, and cell number. Neutrophil-dependent chloramine generation was inhibited by catalase, the myeloperoxidase inhibitors, azide, cyanide, or aminotriazole and by chloride-free conditions, but not by superoxide dismutase or hydroxyl radical scavengers. Thus, it appears that stimulated human neutrophils can utilize the hydrogen peroxide-myeloperoxidase-chloride system to generate taurine chloramine. Based on the demonstrated ability of the myeloperoxidase system to generate free hypochlorous acid we conclude that neutrophils chlorinate taurine by producing this powerful oxidant. The biologic reactivity and cytotoxic potential of hypochlorous acid and its chloramine derivatives

  8. Evaluation of aqueous degreasers versus chlorinated solvents at the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant

    SciTech Connect

    Gunn, D.

    1988-10-31

    Spent chlorinated solvents are produced mainly as a result of degreasing operations at several Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant (PGDP) locations. This waste is a listed hazardous waste under Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) regulations (40 CFR 261). In addition, some of the solvents become contaminated with uranium which classifies the waste as a mixed waste for which no disposal method is currently available. Due to health and environmental concerns and the desire to minimize mixed and hazardous waste generation, degreasing operations in the plant were delineated and alternate nonhazardous solvents were evaluated for their suitability for replacing the chlorinated solvents. Metal cleanliness testing of eight aqueous degreasers using ultrasonic cleaning and immersion with agitation, and vapor degreasing with trichloroethylene (TCE) and 1,1,1-trichloroethane (TC-ane) was performed. Soils such as dust, fingerprints, lube oil, water-soluble oil, silicone grease, and petroleum-based grease were removed from Monel, copper, mild steel, aluminum, and phosphor bronze. Cleanliness was determined by estimating the surface energy of metal coupons before and after cleaning. A Kepner-Tregoe (KT) decision analysis was utilized to determine the three best multipurpose degreasers for the plant. Additional testing was performed on the top three selected degreasers to evaluate corrosive effects of the cleaning solutions (general surface corrosion and pitting), and to determine the compatability of any residual contamination with process gases. Corrosion testing was performed in an electrochemical corrosion tester. Cleaned coupons were exposed to uranium hexafluoride, fluorine, and chlorine trifluoride. In addition, metal cleanliness testing was conducted to evaluate the cleaning efficiency of parts cleaned in the field.

  9. Removal of carbamazepine in aqueous solutions through solar photolysis of free available chlorine.

    PubMed

    Yang, Bin; Kookana, Rai S; Williams, Mike; Du, Jun; Doan, Hai; Kumar, Anupama

    2016-09-01

    Removal of a persistent antiepileptic drug carbamazepine (CBZ) in aqueous solutions was investigated by using solar photolysis combined with free available chlorine (FAC). The combination of chlorination with simulated or natural sunlight markedly enhanced removal of CBZ in 10 mM phosphate buffer solution (pH 7.0) and river water (pH 7.0) compared with sunlight or FAC alone. Further analysis indicated that the observed enhancements in CBZ removal can be attributed to the in situ hydroxyl radical (HO) and ozone (O3) production during FAC photolysis. During 70 min simulated sunlight photolysis combined with FAC treatment, HO reaction contributed to 35.8% removal of CBZ and O3 reaction contributed to 40.6% removal, while only 5.3% of CBZ was removed by HOCl reaction. The oxidation products of CBZ, epoxide CBZ, 10,11-dihydro-10,11-dihydroxy CBZ, 1-(2-benzaldehyde)-4-hydro-(1H,3H)-quinazoline-2-one (BQM), 1-(2-benzaldehyde)-(1H,3H)-quinazoline-2,4-dione (BQD) and 4-aldehyde-9-acridone, were mainly formed from the HO and O3 attack at the double bond on the central heterocyclic ring of CBZ. Formation of these oxidation products did not cause any increase or decrease in toxicity to microbial species tested through Microbial Assay for Toxicity Risk Assessment (MARA). The initial FAC concentration and pH had a major influence on the removal process of CBZ during FAC photolysis, while temperature had a minor effect only. The combination of chlorination with natural sunlight could provide an effective approach for removal of CBZ and other contaminants during water treatment. PMID:27232985

  10. Biofouling control: Bacterial quorum quenching versus chlorination in membrane bioreactors.

    PubMed

    Weerasekara, Nuwan A; Choo, Kwang-Ho; Lee, Chung-Hak

    2016-10-15

    Biofilm formation (biofouling) induced via cell-to-cell communication (quorum sensing) causes problems in membrane filtration processes. Chorine is one of the most common chemicals used to interfere with biofouling; however, biofouling control is challenging because it is a natural process. This study demonstrates biofouling control for submerged hollow fiber membranes in membrane bioreactors by means of bacterial quorum quenching (QQ) using Rhodococcus sp. BH4 with chemically enhanced backwashing. This is the first trial to bring QQ alongside chlorine injection into practice. A high chlorine dose (100 mg/L as Cl2) to the system is insufficient for preventing biofouling, but addition of the QQ bacterium is effective for disrupting biofouling that cannot be achieved by chlorination alone. QQ reduces the biologically induced metal precipitate and extracellular biopolymer levels in the biofilm, and biofouling is significantly delayed when QQ is applied in addition to chlorine dosing. QQ with chlorine injection gives synergistic effects on reducing physically and chemically reversible fouling resistances while saving substantial filtration energy. Manipulating microbial community functions with chemical treatment is an attractive tool for biofilm dispersal in membrane bioreactors. PMID:27474939

  11. Synthesis of magnesium aluminate spinel by periclase and alumina chlorination

    SciTech Connect

    Orosco, Pablo; Barbosa, Lucía; Ruiz, María del Carmen

    2014-11-15

    Highlights: • Use of chlorination for the synthesis of magnesium aluminate spinel. • The reagents used were alumina, periclase and chlorine. • Isothermal and non-isothermal assays were performed in air and Cl{sub 2}–N{sub 2} flows. • The chlorination produced magnesium aluminate spinel at 700 °C. • Selectivity of the chlorination reaction to obtain spinel is very high. - Abstract: A pyrometallurgical route for the synthesis of magnesium aluminate spinel by thermal treatment of a mechanical mixture containing 29 wt% MgO (periclase) and 71 wt% Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} (alumina) in chlorine atmosphere was developed and the results were compared with those obtained by calcining the same mixture of oxides in air atmosphere. Isothermal and non-isothermal assays were performed in an experimental piece of equipment adapted to work in corrosive atmospheres. Both reagents and products were analyzed by differential thermal analysis (DTA), X-ray diffraction (XRD) and X-ray fluorescence (XRF). Thermal treatment in Cl{sub 2} atmosphere of the MgO–Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} mixture produces magnesium aluminate spinel at 700 °C, while in air, magnesium spinel is generated at 930 °C. The synthesis reaction of magnesium aluminate spinel was complete at 800 °C.

  12. Electrochemical chlorine evolution at rutile oxide (110) surfaces.

    PubMed

    Hansen, Heine A; Man, Isabela C; Studt, Felix; Abild-Pedersen, Frank; Bligaard, Thomas; Rossmeisl, Jan

    2010-01-01

    Based on density functional theory (DFT) calculations we study the electrochemical chlorine evolution reaction on rutile (110) oxide surfaces. First we construct the Pourbaix surface diagram for IrO(2) and RuO(2), and from this we find the chlorine evolution reaction intermediates and identify the lowest overpotential at which all elementary reaction steps in the chlorine evolution reaction are downhill in free energy. This condition is then used as a measure for catalytic activity. Linear scaling relations between the binding energies of the intermediates and the oxygen binding energies at cus-sites are established for MO(2) (M being Ir, Ru, Pt, Ti). The linear relations form the basis for constructing a generalized surface phase diagram where two parameters, the potential and the binding energy of oxygen, are needed to determine the surface composition. We calculate the catalytic activity as function of the oxygen binding energy, giving rise to a Sabatier volcano. By combining the surface phase diagram and the volcano describing the catalytic activity, we find that the reaction mechanism differs depending on catalyst material. The flexibility in reaction path means that the chlorine evolution activity is high for a wide range of oxygen binding energies. We find that the required overpotential for chlorine evolution is lower than the overpotential necessary for oxygen evolution. PMID:20024470

  13. Observation of Chlorine Activation near the Midlatitude Tropopause

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thornton, B.; Toohey, D.; Wilson, J. C.; Kelly, K. K.; Thompson, T. L.; Proffitt, M. H.; May, R. D.

    2004-12-01

    It has been proposed that heterogeneous chlorine activation on cirrus cloud particles near the tropopause could provide a chemical explanation for ozone trends in the midlatitude tropopause region. During the 1998 WAM (WB-57 Aerosol Mission) campaign, an in situ ClO instrument was deployed on the NASA WB-57 aircraft in the midlatitudes. On the 11 April 1998 flight, clear examples of enhancements to reactive chlorine in sunlit, wet, particle laden air near the tropopause were observed over eastern Wyoming (approximately 42\\deg N, 105\\deg E) at 11-12 km. The air being sampled appeared to contain evaporating cirrus, and the observed chlorine enhancements (up to 20% activation) were strongly correlated with both particle surface area and total water. Ozone values in this enhanced ClO region ranged from 80-300 ppbv, consistent with both tropospheric and lowermost stratospheric air. These observations suggest that near tropopause reactive chlorine enhancements likely occur in regions of recent stratospheric-tropospheric exchange providing water and increased particle surface area to otherwise relatively dry stratospheric air. Due to greater insolation, ozone loss rates in this region may be higher than those previously reported for similar active chlorine abundances at similar altitudes in the Arctic.

  14. Removal of trihalomethane from chlorinated seawater using gamma radiation.

    PubMed

    Rajamohan, R; Natesan, Usha; Venugopalan, V P; Rajesh, Puspalata; Rangarajan, S

    2015-12-01

    Chlorine addition as a biocide in seawater results in the formation of chlorination by-products such as trihalomethanes (THMs). Removal of THMs is of importance as they are potential mutagenic and carcinogenic agents. In this context, a study was conducted that used ionizing radiation to remove THMs from chlorinated (1, 3, and 5 mg/L) seawater by applying various dosages (0.4-5.0 kGy) of gamma radiation. Bromoform (BF) showed a faster rate of degradation as compared to other halocarbons such as bromodichloromethane (BDCM) and dibromochloromethane (DBCM). In chlorine-dosed seawater, total irradiation dose of 0.4 to 5 kGy caused percentage reduction in the range of 6.9 to 76.7%, 2.3 to 99.6%, and 45.7 to 98.3% for BDCM, DBCM, and BF, respectively. During the irradiation process, pH of the chlorinated seawater decreased with increase in the absorbed dose; however, no change in total organic carbon (TOC) was observed. The results show that gamma dose of 2.5 kGy was adequate for maximum degradation of THM; but for complete mineralization, higher dose would be required. PMID:26199004

  15. Bacterial repopulation of drinking water pipe walls after chlorination.

    PubMed

    Mathieu, Laurence; Francius, Grégory; El Zein, Racha; Angel, Edith; Block, Jean-Claude

    2016-09-01

    The short-term kinetics of bacterial repopulation were evaluated after chlorination of high-density polyethylene (HDPE) colonized with drinking water biofilms and compared with bare HDPE surfaces. The effect of chlorination was partial as a residual biofilm persisted and was time-limited as repopulation occurred immediately after water resupply. The total number of bacteria reached the same levels on both the bare and chlorinated biofilm-fouled HDPE after a seven-day exposure to drinking water. Due to the presence of a residual biofilm, the hydrophobicity of chlorinated biofilm-fouled surface exhibited much lower adhesion forces (2.1 nN) compared to bare surfaces (8.9 nN). This could explain the rapid repopulation after chlorination, with a twofold faster bacterial accumulation rate on the bare HDPE surface. γ-Proteobacteria dominated the early stages of repopulation of both surfaces and a shift in the dominance occurred over the colonization time. Such observations define a timescale for cleaning frequency in industrial environments and guidelines for a rinsing procedure using drinking water. PMID:27483985

  16. Biofilm formation by Pseudoalteromonas ruthenica and its removal by chlorine.

    PubMed

    Saravanan, Periasamy; Nancharaiah, Y Venkata; Venugopalan, Vayalam P; Rao, T Subba; Jayachandran, Seetharaman

    2006-01-01

    The distribution of a recently described marine bacterium, SBT 033 GenBank Accession No. AY723742), Pseudoalteromonas ruthenica, at the seawater intake point, outfall and mixing point of an atomic power plant is described, and its ability to form biofilm was investigated. The effectiveness of the antifouling biocide chlorine in the inactivation of planktonic as well as biofilm cells of P. ruthenica was studied in the laboratory. The results show that the planktonic cells were more readily inactivated than the cells enclosed in a biofilm matrix. Viable counting showed that P. ruthenica cells in biofilms were up to 10 times more resistant to chlorine than those in liquid suspension. Using confocal laser scanning microscopy it was shown that significant detachment of P. ruthenica biofilm developed on a glass substratum could be accomplished by treatment with a dose of 1 mg l-1 chlorine. Chlorine-induced detachment led to a significant reduction in biofilm thickness (up to 69%) and substratum coverage (up to 61%), after 5-min contact time. The results show that P. ruthenica has a remarkable ability to form biofilms but chlorine, a common biocide, can be used to effectively kill and detach these biofilms. PMID:17178570

  17. Ametryn degradation by aqueous chlorine: kinetics and reaction influences.

    PubMed

    Xu, Bin; Gao, Nai-yun; Cheng, Hefa; Hu, Chen-yan; Xia, Sheng-ji; Sun, Xiao-feng; Wang, Xuejiao; Yang, Shaogui

    2009-09-30

    The chemical oxidation of the herbicide ametryn was investigated by aqueous chlorination between pH 4 and 10 at a temperature of 25 degrees C. Ametryn was found to react very rapidly with aqueous chlorine. The reaction kinetics can be well described by a second-order kinetic model. The apparent second-order rate constants are greater than 5 x 10(2)M(-1)s(-1) under acidic and neutral conditions. The reaction proceeds much more slowly under alkaline conditions. The predominant reactions were found to be the reactions of HOCl with neutral ametryn and the charged ametryn, with rate constants equal to 7.22 x 10(2) and 1.58 x 10(3)M(-1)s(-1), respectively. The ametryn degradation rate increases with addition of bromide and decreases with addition of ammonia during the chlorination process. Based on elementary chemical reactions, a kinetic model of ametryn degradation by chlorination in the presence of bromide or ammonia ion was also developed. By employing this model, we estimate that the rate constants for the reactions of HOBr with neutral ametryn and charged ametryn were 9.07 x 10(3) and 3.54 x 10(6)M(-1)s(-1), respectively. These values are 10- to 10(3)-fold higher than those of HOCl, suggesting that the presence of bromine species during chlorination could significantly accelerate ametryn degradation. PMID:19423216

  18. Application of chlorine dioxide as an oilfield facilities treatment fluid

    SciTech Connect

    Romaine, J.; Strawser, T.G.; Knippers, M.L.

    1995-11-01

    Both mechanical and chemical treatments are used to clean water flood injection distribution systems whose efficiency has been reduced as a result of plugging material such as iron sulfide sludge. Most mechanical treatments rely on uniform line diameter to be effective, while chemical treatments require good contact with the plugging material for efficient removal. This paper describes the design and operation of a new innovative application using chlorine dioxide for the removal of iron sulfide sludge from water flood injection distribution systems. This technology has evolved from the use of chlorine dioxide in well stimulation applications. The use of chlorine dioxide for continuous treatment of injection brines will also be discussed. Exxon USA`s Hartzog Draw facility in Gillette, Wyoming was the site for the application described. 4,500 barrels of chlorine dioxide was pumped in three phases to clean sixty-six miles of the water flood distribution system. Results indicate that chlorine dioxide was effective in cleaning the well guard screens, the injection lines, frac tanks used to collect the treatment fluids and the injection wells.

  19. 40 CFR 63.8234 - What equations and procedures must I use for the initial compliance demonstration?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... and for each end box ventilation system vent, if applicable, from Method 101, 101A, or 102 (40 CFR... hydrogen streams and end box ventilation system vents. You must determine the total grams of mercury per Megagram of chlorine production (g Hg/Mg Cl2) of chlorine produced from all by-product hydrogen streams...

  20. 40 CFR 63.8234 - What equations and procedures must I use for the initial compliance demonstration?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... and for each end box ventilation system vent, if applicable, from Method 101, 101A, or 102 (40 CFR... hydrogen streams and end box ventilation system vents. You must determine the total grams of mercury per Megagram of chlorine production (g Hg/Mg Cl2) of chlorine produced from all by-product hydrogen streams...