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Sample records for chlorite matrix wf10

  1. Interaction of the chlorite-based drug WF10 and chlorite with hemoglobin, methemoglobin and ferryl hemoglobin.

    PubMed

    Pichert, Annelie; Arnhold, Jürgen

    2015-11-01

    The interaction of the chlorite-based drug solution WF10 with human oxyhemoglobin and oxidized hemoglobin forms was investigated monitoring the corresponding spectral changes in heme states. The chlorite component of WF10 converts oxyhemoglobin into methemoglobin with a rate of 35.4 M(-1)s(-1). Methemoglobin is also formed upon the interaction of ferryl hemoglobin and WF10/chlorite. The rate of this interconversion depends on the oxidation state of ferryl hemoglobin. This rate is 114 M(-1)s(-1), when ferryl hemoglobin was generated upon reaction of oxyhemoglobin and hydrogen peroxide. A considerable higher rate (6600 M(-1)s(-1)) is measured between the chlorite components of WF10 and ferryl hemoglobin after formation of the latter species from methemoglobin. WF10/chlorite inactivates also methemoglobin as evidenced by the continuous decrease of the Soret band and all other absorbances with a rate of 8.3 M(-1)s(-1). In all interconversions, the chlorite component of WF10 was the active principle as shown in experiments applying pure chlorite at the same concentration as in WF10. Thus, WF10 is able to diminish efficiently the yield of cytotoxic hemoglobin species that might appear after excessive hemolysis of red blood cells under pathologic situations. PMID:26391926

  2. The pro-oxidative drug WF-10 inhibits serial killing by primary human cytotoxic T-cells

    PubMed Central

    Wabnitz, G H; Balta, E; Schindler, S; Kirchgessner, H; Jahraus, B; Meuer, S; Samstag, Y

    2016-01-01

    Cytotoxic T-cells (CTLs) play an important role in many immune-mediated inflammatory diseases. Targeting cytotoxicity of CTLs would allow to interfere with immune-mediated tissue destruction. Here we demonstrate that WF-10, a pro-oxidative compound, inhibits CTL-mediated cytotoxicity. WF-10 did not influence early steps of target-cell killing, but impaired the ability of CTLs to detach from the initial target cell and to move to a second target cell. This reduced serial killing was accompanied by stronger enrichment of the adhesion molecule LFA-1 in the cytolytic immune synapse. LFA-1 clustering requires activation of the actin-bundling protein L-plastin and was accordingly diminished in L-plastin knockdown cells. Interestingly, WF-10 likely acts through regulating L-plastin: (I) It induced L-plastin activation through phosphorylation leading to enhanced LFA-1-mediated cell adhesion, and, importantly, (II) WF-10 lost its influence on target-cell killing in L-plastin knockdown cells. Finally, we demonstrate that WF-10 can improve immunosuppression by conventional drugs. Thus, while cyclosporine A alone had no significant effect on cytotoxicity of CTLs, a combination of cyclosporine A and WF-10 blocked target-cell killing synergistically. Together, our findings suggest that WF-10 – either alone or in combination with conventional immunosuppressive drugs – may be efficient to control progression of diseases, in which CTLs are crucially involved. PMID:27551545

  3. The pro-oxidative drug WF-10 inhibits serial killing by primary human cytotoxic T-cells.

    PubMed

    Wabnitz, G H; Balta, E; Schindler, S; Kirchgessner, H; Jahraus, B; Meuer, S; Samstag, Y

    2016-01-01

    Cytotoxic T-cells (CTLs) play an important role in many immune-mediated inflammatory diseases. Targeting cytotoxicity of CTLs would allow to interfere with immune-mediated tissue destruction. Here we demonstrate that WF-10, a pro-oxidative compound, inhibits CTL-mediated cytotoxicity. WF-10 did not influence early steps of target-cell killing, but impaired the ability of CTLs to detach from the initial target cell and to move to a second target cell. This reduced serial killing was accompanied by stronger enrichment of the adhesion molecule LFA-1 in the cytolytic immune synapse. LFA-1 clustering requires activation of the actin-bundling protein L-plastin and was accordingly diminished in L-plastin knockdown cells. Interestingly, WF-10 likely acts through regulating L-plastin: (I) It induced L-plastin activation through phosphorylation leading to enhanced LFA-1-mediated cell adhesion, and, importantly, (II) WF-10 lost its influence on target-cell killing in L-plastin knockdown cells. Finally, we demonstrate that WF-10 can improve immunosuppression by conventional drugs. Thus, while cyclosporine A alone had no significant effect on cytotoxicity of CTLs, a combination of cyclosporine A and WF-10 blocked target-cell killing synergistically. Together, our findings suggest that WF-10 - either alone or in combination with conventional immunosuppressive drugs - may be efficient to control progression of diseases, in which CTLs are crucially involved. PMID:27551545

  4. Simultaneous determination of bromate, chlorite and haloacetic acids by two-dimensional matrix elimination ion chromatography with coupled conventional and capillary columns.

    PubMed

    Teh, Hui Boon; Li, Sam Fong Yau

    2015-02-27

    A new, highly sensitive and reliable two-dimensional matrix elimination ion chromatography (IC) method was developed for simultaneous detection of bromate, chlorite and five haloacetic acids. This method combined the conventional IC in first dimension with capillary IC in the second dimension coupled with suppressed conductivity detection. The first dimension utilizes a high capacity column to partially resolve matrix from target analytes. By optimizing the cut window, the target analytes were selectively cut and trapped in a trap column through the use of a six-port valve, while the separated matrix were diverted to waste. The trapped target analytes were delivered on to the capillary column for further separation and detection. Temperature programming was used to improve selectivity in second dimension column to obtain complete resolution of the target analytes. Compared to the performance of one-dimensional IC, the two-dimensional approach resulted in a significant increase in sensitivity for all target analytes with limit of detection ranging from 0.30 to 0.64μg/L and provided more reliable analysis due to second column confirmation. Good linearity was obtained for all the target analytes with correlation coefficients >0.998. The proposed method was successfully applied to the determination of oxyhalides and haloacetic acids in various matrices with recoveries ranging from 90 to 116% and RSD less than 6.1%. The method allows direct injection of samples and the use of columns with different selectivity, thus significantly reduces the level of false positive results. The method is fully automated and simple, making it practical for routine monitoring of water quality. The satisfactory results also demonstrated that the two-dimensional matrix elimination method coupled with capillary IC is a promising approach for detection of trace substances in complex matrices. PMID:25650354

  5. Chlorite (sodium salt)

    Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS)

    Chlorite ( sodium salt ) ; CASRN 7758 - 19 - 2 Human health assessment information on a chemical substance is included in the IRIS database only after a comprehensive review of toxicity data , as outlined in the IRIS assessment development process . Sections I ( Health Hazard Assessments for Noncarc

  6. 21 CFR 186.1750 - Sodium chlorite.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Sodium chlorite. 186.1750 Section 186.1750 Food... of Specific Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 186.1750 Sodium chlorite. (a) Sodium chlorite (NaCLO2, CAS... passing chlorine dioxide into a solution of sodium hydroxide and hydrogen peroxide. (b) the ingredient...

  7. 21 CFR 186.1750 - Sodium chlorite.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Sodium chlorite. 186.1750 Section 186.1750 Food... of Specific Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 186.1750 Sodium chlorite. (a) Sodium chlorite (NaCLO2, CAS... passing chlorine dioxide into a solution of sodium hydroxide and hydrogen peroxide. (b) the ingredient...

  8. 21 CFR 186.1750 - Sodium chlorite.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Sodium chlorite. 186.1750 Section 186.1750 Food... of Specific Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 186.1750 Sodium chlorite. (a) Sodium chlorite (NaCLO2, CAS... passing chlorine dioxide into a solution of sodium hydroxide and hydrogen peroxide. (b) the ingredient...

  9. 21 CFR 186.1750 - Sodium chlorite.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Sodium chlorite. 186.1750 Section 186.1750 Food... GRAS § 186.1750 Sodium chlorite. (a) Sodium chlorite (NaCLO2, CAS Reg. No. 7758-19-2) exists as... solution of sodium hydroxide and hydrogen peroxide. (b) the ingredient is used at levels from 125 to...

  10. Interlayer bonding in IIb chlorite

    SciTech Connect

    Bish, D.L.; Giese, R.F. Jr.

    1981-01-01

    The interlayer bond energy of a IIb-4 chlorite has been calculated as a function of layer charge, the site of the charge and the selective replacement of hydroxyl groups by fluoride ions. Long hydrogen bonds between the hydroxide sheet and the adjacent oxygens are strong and by themselves sufficient to create a stable structure. Coupled substitutions giving the 2:1 layer a negative charge and the hydroxide sheet a positive charge increase substantially the interlayer bond energy. 3 figures.

  11. 21 CFR 186.1750 - Sodium chlorite.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Sodium chlorite. 186.1750 Section 186.1750 Food and... Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 186.1750 Sodium chlorite. (a) Sodium chlorite (NaCLO2, CAS Reg. No. 7758-19-2... into a solution of sodium hydroxide and hydrogen peroxide. (b) the ingredient is used at levels...

  12. Authigenic chlorites in sandstones as indicators of high-temperature diagenesis, Arkoma Foreland Basin, USA

    SciTech Connect

    Spoetl, C.; Houseknecht, D.W. ); Longstaffe, F.J. . Dept. of Earth Sciences)

    1994-07-01

    Abundant authigenic chamosite associated with higher-than-average porosities is present in a deep gas reservoir (Spiro sandstone) of the Arkoma Basin, east-central Oklahoma. Three types of chlorite can be distinguished petrographically, all of which appear texturally to have formed early: chlorite peloids, diffuse matrix, and grain coatings. X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, and electron microprobe studies show that most chlorites are composed of two distinct polytypes, Ib ([beta] = 90[degree]) and IIb. A third structure, Ia[prime] polytype, was identified in only one sample. The relative percentage of the high-temperature IIb structure increases gradually with increasing thermal maturity, from [le] 10% at 2.0% R[sub o] up to [le] 40% at 3.5% R[sub o]. IIb chlorite forms rather thick, blocky crystals distinct from the thin, pseudohexagonal plates typical of low-temperature Ib chlorite. Temperature estimates based on data on vitrinite reflectance and fluid inclusions suggest that IIb chlorite formed at burial temperatures [ge] 150--180 C. Higher contents of tetrahedral Al[sup 3+] and slightly higher Fe/[Fe+Mg] ratios in IIb chlorite are consistent with precipitation temperatures higher than those of the Ib structure. A higher-temperature origin for the IIb structure is also consistent with oxygen isotope data.

  13. Experimental determination of chlorite dissolution rates

    SciTech Connect

    Rochelle, C.A.; Bateman, K.; MacGregor, R.; Pearce, J.M.; Wetton, P.D.; Savage, D.

    1995-12-31

    Current concepts of the geological disposal of low- and intermediate-level radioactive wastes in the UK envisage the construction of a mined facility (incorporating cementitious engineered barriers) in chlorite-bearing rocks. To model accurately the fluid-rock reactions within the disturbed zone surrounding a repository requires functions that describe mineral dissolution kinetics under pH conditions that vary from near neutral to highly alkaline. Therefore, an experimental study to determine the dissolution rates of Fe-rich chlorite has been undertaken as part of the Nirex Safety Assessment Research Program. Four experiments have been carried out at 25 C and four at 70 C, both sets using a range of NaCl/NaOH solutions of differing pH (of nominal pH 9.0, 10.3, 11.6 and 13.0 [at 25 C]). Dissolution rates have been calculated and were found to increase with increasing pH and temperature. However, increased pH resulted in non-stoichiometric dissolution possibly due to preferential dissolution of part of the chlorite structure relative to another, or reprecipitation of some elements as thin hydroxide or oxyhydroxide surface coatings on the chlorite. These results also show that chlorite dissolution is appreciably slower than that of albite and quartz at both 25 and 70 C, but slightly faster than that of muscovite at 70 C.

  14. TOXICOLOGICAL EFFECTS OF CHLORITE IN THE MOUSE

    EPA Science Inventory

    When exposed to a maximum level of 100 ppm chlorine dioxide in their drinking water, neither A/J or C57L/J mice exhibited any hematologic changes. Chlorite exposure under similar conditions produced increases for red blood cells in osmotic fragility, mean corpuscular volume, and ...

  15. Mechanism of chlorite degradation to chloride and dioxygen by the enzyme chlorite dismutase.

    PubMed

    Schaffner, Irene; Hofbauer, Stefan; Krutzler, Michael; Pirker, Katharina F; Furtmüller, Paul G; Obinger, Christian

    2015-05-15

    Heme b containing chlorite dismutase (Cld) catalyses the conversion of chlorite to chloride and dioxygen which includes an unusual OO bond formation. This review summarizes our knowledge about the interaction of chlorite with heme enzymes and introduces the biological role, phylogeny and structure of functional chlorite dismutases with differences in overall structure and subunit architecture. The paper sums up the available experimental and computational studies on chlorite degradation by water soluble porphyrin complexes as well as a model based on the active site of Cld. Finally, it reports the available biochemical and biophysical data of Clds from different organisms which allow the presentation of a general reaction mechanism. It includes binding of chlorite to ferric Cld followed by subsequent heterolytic OCl bond cleavage leading to the formation of Compound I and hypochlorite, which finally recombine for production of chloride and O2. The role of the Cld-typical distal arginine in catalysis is discussed together with the pH dependence of the reaction and the role of transiently produced hypochlorite in irreversible inactivation of the enzyme. PMID:25748001

  16. The homopentameric chlorite dismutase from Magnetospirillum sp.

    PubMed

    Freire, Diana M; Rivas, Maria G; Dias, André M; Lopes, Ana T; Costa, Cristina; Santos-Silva, Teresa; Van Doorslaer, Sabine; González, Pablo J

    2015-10-01

    Chlorite dismutase (Cld) is a b-type heme containing enzyme that catalyzes the reduction of chlorite into chloride plus dioxygen. This enzyme has gained attention because it can be used in the development of bioremediation processes, biosensors, and controlled dioxygen production. In the present work, Cld was purified from Magnetospirillum sp. cells cultured anaerobically with acetate/perchlorate until stationary phase. Biochemical, spectroscopic and X-ray crystallography methods showed that Cld from Magnetospirillum sp. is a ~140 kDa homopentamer comprising ~27.8 kDa monomers. Preliminary X-ray crystallography studies confirmed the quaternary structure and the presence of one b-type heme per monomer. The EPR spectroscopic signature of the as-purified Cld samples is affected by the buffer composition used during the purification. Potassium phosphate buffer is the only buffer that affected neither the spectral nor the kinetic properties of Cld. Kinetic studies in solution revealed that Cld from Magnetospirillum sp. decomposes chlorite at high turnover rates with optimal pH6.0. A temperature below 10 °C is required to avoid enzyme inactivation due to cofactor bleaching during turnover, and to achieve full substrate consumption. Cld kinetic parameters were not affected when kinetic assays were performed in the presence of air or under argon atmosphere, but chloride is a weak mixed inhibitor that modifies the EPR signal of as-prepared samples. PMID:26218477

  17. Periodic and nonperiodic interstratification in the chlorite-biotite series

    SciTech Connect

    Hu, Huifang; Zhang, Yiqiang; Veblen, D.R.

    1996-11-01

    A systematic TEM investigation of interstratified chlorite-biotite crystals showed that the crystals are composed of domains of periodically interstratified chlorite-biotite, non-periodically interstratified chlorite-biotite, biotite, and chlorite. The interstratified chlorite-biotite occurs as a vein filling and was apparently crystallized from a hydrothermal solution. The complex structure of the interstratified chlorite-biotite presumably results from a nonlinear growth phenomenon occurring under a nonequilibrium state. A simple nonlinear dynamics model derived from Duffing`s equation was constructed with an additional chemical potential that accounts for the variation of structural configuration of tetrahedral sheets or 2:1 layers in chlorite and biotite, a simple periodic fluctuation of hydrothermal fluid composition, and a simple damping force for two-dimensional lattice misfit on (001) resulting from the intergrowth of different types of layers with different structural configurations and other dissipation effects. Solutions to the equations of the model show that periodic interstratification, nonperiodic interstratification, and domains of the two end-member components (biotite, chlorite) can be formed during crystallization under various conditions. The nonperiodic sequences of biotite and chlorite layers along the c axis in the interstratified crystals produced by this model are chaotic rather than random. The calculations suggest that both periodic and nonperiodic interstratifications can result from periodic external force, e.g., compositional fluctuation of the fluid.

  18. Methane oxidation linked to chlorite dismutation

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Laurence G.; Baesman, Shaun M.; Carlström, Charlotte I.; Coates, John D.; Oremland, Ronald S.

    2014-01-01

    We examined the potential for CH4 oxidation to be coupled with oxygen derived from the dissimilatory reduction of perchlorate, chlorate, or via chlorite (ClO−2) dismutation. Although dissimilatory reduction of ClO−4 and ClO−3 could be inferred from the accumulation of chloride ions either in spent media or in soil slurries prepared from exposed freshwater lake sediment, neither of these oxyanions evoked methane oxidation when added to either anaerobic mixed cultures or soil enriched in methanotrophs. In contrast, ClO−2 amendment elicited such activity. Methane (0.2 kPa) was completely removed within several days from the headspace of cell suspensions of Dechloromonas agitata CKB incubated with either Methylococcus capsulatus Bath or Methylomicrobium album BG8 in the presence of 5 mM ClO−2. We also observed complete removal of 0.2 kPa CH4 in bottles containing soil enriched in methanotrophs when co-incubated with D. agitata CKB and 10 mM ClO−2. However, to be effective these experiments required physical separation of soil from D. agitata CKB to allow for the partitioning of O2 liberated from chlorite dismutation into the shared headspace. Although a link between ClO−2 and CH4 consumption was established in soils and cultures, no upstream connection with either ClO−4 or ClO−3 was discerned. This result suggests that the release of O2 during enzymatic perchlorate reduction was negligible, and that the oxygen produced was unavailable to the aerobic methanotrophs. PMID:24987389

  19. Methane oxidation linked to chlorite dismutation

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Miller, Laurence G.; Baesman, Shaun M.; Carlström, Charlotte I.; Coates, John D.; Oremland, Ronald S.

    2014-01-01

    We examined the potential for CH4 oxidation to be coupled with oxygen derived from the dissimilatory reduction of perchlorate, chlorate, or via chlorite (ClO−2) dismutation. Although dissimilatory reduction of ClO−4 and ClO−3 could be inferred from the accumulation of chloride ions either in spent media or in soil slurries prepared from exposed freshwater lake sediment, neither of these oxyanions evoked methane oxidation when added to either anaerobic mixed cultures or soil enriched in methanotrophs. In contrast, ClO−2 amendment elicited such activity. Methane (0.2 kPa) was completely removed within several days from the headspace of cell suspensions of Dechloromonas agitata CKB incubated with either Methylococcus capsulatus Bath or Methylomicrobium album BG8 in the presence of 5 mM ClO−2. We also observed complete removal of 0.2 kPa CH4 in bottles containing soil enriched in methanotrophs when co-incubated with D. agitata CKB and 10 mM ClO−2. However, to be effective these experiments required physical separation of soil from D. agitata CKB to allow for the partitioning of O2 liberated from chlorite dismutation into the shared headspace. Although a link between ClO−2 and CH4 consumption was established in soils and cultures, no upstream connection with either ClO−4 or ClO−3 was discerned. This result suggests that the release of O2 during enzymatic perchlorate reduction was negligible, and that the oxygen produced was unavailable to the aerobic methanotrophs.

  20. Methane oxidation linked to chlorite dismutation.

    PubMed

    Miller, Laurence G; Baesman, Shaun M; Carlström, Charlotte I; Coates, John D; Oremland, Ronald S

    2014-01-01

    We examined the potential for CH4 oxidation to be coupled with oxygen derived from the dissimilatory reduction of perchlorate, chlorate, or via chlorite (ClO(-) 2) dismutation. Although dissimilatory reduction of ClO(-) 4 and ClO(-) 3 could be inferred from the accumulation of chloride ions either in spent media or in soil slurries prepared from exposed freshwater lake sediment, neither of these oxyanions evoked methane oxidation when added to either anaerobic mixed cultures or soil enriched in methanotrophs. In contrast, ClO(-) 2 amendment elicited such activity. Methane (0.2 kPa) was completely removed within several days from the headspace of cell suspensions of Dechloromonas agitata CKB incubated with either Methylococcus capsulatus Bath or Methylomicrobium album BG8 in the presence of 5 mM ClO(-) 2. We also observed complete removal of 0.2 kPa CH4 in bottles containing soil enriched in methanotrophs when co-incubated with D. agitata CKB and 10 mM ClO(-) 2. However, to be effective these experiments required physical separation of soil from D. agitata CKB to allow for the partitioning of O2 liberated from chlorite dismutation into the shared headspace. Although a link between ClO(-) 2 and CH4 consumption was established in soils and cultures, no upstream connection with either ClO(-) 4 or ClO(-) 3 was discerned. This result suggests that the release of O2 during enzymatic perchlorate reduction was negligible, and that the oxygen produced was unavailable to the aerobic methanotrophs. PMID:24987389

  1. Chlorite reactivity and contribution to flow path modifications under conditions relevant for CO2 sequestration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beckingham, L. E.; Yang, L.; Ajo Franklin, J. B.; Voltolini, M.; Banuelos, J. L.; Anovitz, L. M.; Bourg, I. C.; Steefel, C. I.

    2013-12-01

    Iron-bearing clay minerals, such as chlorite, have been identified as key reactants with CO2 in caprock and reservoir formations and have been frequently shown to coat pores and even govern connected microporosity in these formations. Some studies have linked the total amount of CO2 trapped as carbonate minerals to the abundance of chlorite, glauconite, and smectite. However, the reactivity of these minerals under the conditions and timescales relevant for geologic sequestration of CO2 is largely unknown. When these minerals occur along a fracture leakage pathway, dissolution and precipitation reactions may create self-sealing or self-enhancing leakage pathways. In this presentation, we describe experiments that probe the reactivity of chlorite and its potential to alter connected porosity and either enhance or seal fracture leakage pathways. Our experiments use a network of capillary tubes packed with chlorite to mimic the case where a CO2-acidified brine flows through a fracture and reacts with iron-bearing clays in the caprock matrix. Before and after reaction, the chlorite-filled capillaries are imaged using 3D X-ray synchrotron microtomography at three points along the column to track changes in the pore structure. During the experiment, effluent ion concentrations are tracked using ICP-MS to infer mineralogical changes. The packed capillaries are imaged periodically during the experiment using Raman Spectroscopy to interpret the evolution of minerals along the tube length. Alteration of nanoporosity is assessed through TEM imaging or SAXS. Our experiments reveal how the couplings between mass transport, weathering reactions, and pore structure alteration affect the geochemical evolution of fracture permeability.

  2. Sensitivity of antioxidant-deficient yeast to hypochlorite and chlorite.

    PubMed

    Kwolek-Mirek, Magdalena; Bartosz, Grzegorz; Spickett, Corinne M

    2011-08-01

    Sodium hypochlorite and sodium chlorite are commonly used as disinfectants, and understanding the mechanisms of microbial resistance to these compounds is of considerable importance. In this study, the role of oxidative stress and antioxidant enzymes in the sensitivity of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae to hypochlorite and chlorite was studied. Yeast mutants lacking Cu-Zn superoxide dismutase, but not mutants deficient in cytoplasmic and peroxisomal catalase, were hypersensitive to the action of both hypochlorite and chlorite. Both compounds depleted cellular glutathione, induced the production of reactive oxygen species and decreased the viability of the cells. The toxicity of hypochlorite and chlorite was abolished by hypoxic and anoxic conditions and ameliorated by thiol antioxidants and ascorbate. The results demonstrated that the action of hypochlorite and chlorite involves the formation of superoxide and peroxide and that SOD1 is protective, probably by limiting the formation of hydroxyl radicals and damage to proteins. PMID:21761455

  3. Redox kinetics and colloid formation during water-chlorite interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, E. G.; Ahn, H.; Ryu, J. H.; Jo, H. Y.

    2014-12-01

    For the isolation of high-level radioactive wastes from biosphere, the deep geological repository should be maintained reducing conditions. Surface groundwater can flow along fractures into the deep geological repository, which may cause oxic conditions. In the oxic conditions, uranium can be oxidized from U(Ⅳ) to U(Ⅵ) and U(Ⅵ) can easily migrate in groundwater due to its high mobility. Chlorite with Fe(Ⅱ), which is a phyllosilicate minerals generally occurred in fractures, can help maintenance of the reducing condition because chlorite can consume oxidizing agents by redox reactions. In this study, redox kinetics of chlorite were investigated by conducting redox batch kinetic tests at various conditions (i.e., concentration of oxidizing agent, pH, and presence of NaCl). Colloidal particle formation during redox reactions of chlorite was also investigated. Two types of chlorite samples: low iron content (CCa-2) and high iron content (Chlorite from Daejeon, South Korea) were used. Redox batch kinetic tests were conducted for 60 days. The solutions, reactants, and colloidal particles collected from the redox batch kinetic tests every 10 days were characterized. Results show that the concentration of oxidizing agent decreased more in the chlorite sample having higher Fe(Ⅱ) content than that having lower Fe(Ⅱ) content. After 10 days, both the chlorite samples tend to be reached steady-state conditions and then no changes in the concentration of oxidizing agent were observed. SEM analysis shows that surface and edge of the chlorite samples tend to be crispy and smoothy with increasing reaction time. SEM-EDS analysis on colloidal particles shows that colloidal particles consisted of Fe and O, which were identified as ferrihydrite.

  4. Mechanism of reaction of chlorite with mammalian heme peroxidases

    PubMed Central

    Jakopitsch, Christa; Pirker, Katharina F.; Flemmig, Jörg; Hofbauer, Stefan; Schlorke, Denise; Furtmüller, Paul G.; Arnhold, Jürgen; Obinger, Christian

    2014-01-01

    This study demonstrates that heme peroxidases from different superfamilies react differently with chlorite. In contrast to plant peroxidases, like horseradish peroxidase (HRP), the mammalian counterparts myeloperoxidase (MPO) and lactoperoxidase (LPO) are rapidly and irreversibly inactivated by chlorite in the micromolar concentration range. Chlorite acts as efficient one-electron donor for Compound I and Compound II of MPO and LPO and reacts with the corresponding ferric resting states in a biphasic manner. The first (rapid) phase is shown to correspond to the formation of a MPO-chlorite high-spin complex, whereas during the second (slower) phase degradation of the prosthetic group was observed. Cyanide, chloride and hydrogen peroxide can block or delay heme bleaching. In contrast to HRP, the MPO/chlorite system does not mediate chlorination of target molecules. Irreversible inactivation is shown to include heme degradation, iron release and decrease in thermal stability. Differences between mammalian peroxidases and HRP are discussed with respect to differences in active site architecture and heme modification. PMID:24632343

  5. Chlorites in reservoir sandstones of the Guadalupian Delaware Mountain Group

    SciTech Connect

    Walling, S.D. )

    1992-04-01

    Late-stage authigenic clay minerals are pervasive in the very fine-grained, subarkosic sandstones of the Guadalupian Delaware Mountain Group, comprising up to 10% of the bulk rock. Thus, reservoir rock properties are influenced by these minerals. Samples selected from cored intervals, ranging from 600 to 2500 m, were studied using optical and electron microscopy and x-ray diffraction methods to determine the distribution and nature of occurrence of the authigenic clay minerals. In thin sections, the clay minerals are recognizable as grain coatings, with thickness varying from a few micrometers to tens of micrometers. A correlation between the morphology and the amount of interstratification has been observed, with more interstratification corresponding to the formless chlorite variety. The structural and morphological evidence suggests that the chlorites represent different stages of development, possibly evolving from a smectite component through an interstratified intermediate, to a more well-ordered form. There appears to be no systematic trends vertically or laterally in clay mineralogy. The importance of understanding the clay mineralogy and chemistry in these sandstones is evident when considering enhanced recovery procedures. Different clay structures and chemistries may respond differently to production and stimulation techniques. The proposed chlorite diagenetic sequence suggests that drastic changes in borehole fluid chemistry may cause retrogression of chlorite to some expansive forms, which may be water sensitive or inclined to migration.

  6. A Dimeric Chlorite Dismutase Exhibits O2-Generating Activity and Acts as a Chlorite Antioxidant in Klebsiella pneumoniae MGH 78578

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Chlorite dismutases (Clds) convert chlorite to O2 and Cl–, stabilizing heme in the presence of strong oxidants and forming the O=O bond with high efficiency. The enzyme from the pathogen Klebsiella pneumoniae (KpCld) represents a subfamily of Clds that share most of their active site structure with efficient O2-producing Clds, even though they have a truncated monomeric structure, exist as a dimer rather than a pentamer, and come from Gram-negative bacteria without a known need to degrade chlorite. We hypothesized that KpCld, like others in its subfamily, should be able to make O2 and may serve an in vivo antioxidant function. Here, it is demonstrated that it degrades chlorite with limited turnovers relative to the respiratory Clds, in part because of the loss of hypochlorous acid from the active site and destruction of the heme. The observation of hypochlorous acid, the expected leaving group accompanying transfer of an oxygen atom to the ferric heme, is consistent with the more open, solvent-exposed heme environment predicted by spectroscopic measurements and inferred from the crystal structures of related proteins. KpCld is more susceptible to oxidative degradation under turnover conditions than the well-characterized Clds associated with perchlorate respiration. However, wild-type K. pneumoniae has a significant growth advantage in the presence of chlorate relative to a Δcld knockout strain, specifically under nitrate-respiring conditions. This suggests that a physiological function of KpCld may be detoxification of endogenously produced chlorite. PMID:25437493

  7. A dimeric chlorite dismutase exhibits O2-generating activity and acts as a chlorite antioxidant in Klebsiella pneumoniae MGH 78578.

    PubMed

    Celis, Arianna I; Geeraerts, Zachary; Ngmenterebo, David; Machovina, Melodie M; Kurker, Richard C; Rajakumar, Kumar; Ivancich, Anabella; Rodgers, Kenton R; Lukat-Rodgers, Gudrun S; DuBois, Jennifer L

    2015-01-20

    Chlorite dismutases (Clds) convert chlorite to O2 and Cl(-), stabilizing heme in the presence of strong oxidants and forming the O═O bond with high efficiency. The enzyme from the pathogen Klebsiella pneumoniae (KpCld) represents a subfamily of Clds that share most of their active site structure with efficient O2-producing Clds, even though they have a truncated monomeric structure, exist as a dimer rather than a pentamer, and come from Gram-negative bacteria without a known need to degrade chlorite. We hypothesized that KpCld, like others in its subfamily, should be able to make O2 and may serve an in vivo antioxidant function. Here, it is demonstrated that it degrades chlorite with limited turnovers relative to the respiratory Clds, in part because of the loss of hypochlorous acid from the active site and destruction of the heme. The observation of hypochlorous acid, the expected leaving group accompanying transfer of an oxygen atom to the ferric heme, is consistent with the more open, solvent-exposed heme environment predicted by spectroscopic measurements and inferred from the crystal structures of related proteins. KpCld is more susceptible to oxidative degradation under turnover conditions than the well-characterized Clds associated with perchlorate respiration. However, wild-type K. pneumoniae has a significant growth advantage in the presence of chlorate relative to a Δcld knockout strain, specifically under nitrate-respiring conditions. This suggests that a physiological function of KpCld may be detoxification of endogenously produced chlorite. PMID:25437493

  8. 40 CFR 180.1070 - Sodium chlorite; exemption from the requirement of a tolerance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 24 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Sodium chlorite; exemption from the... Exemptions From Tolerances § 180.1070 Sodium chlorite; exemption from the requirement of a tolerance. Sodium chlorite is exempted from the requirement of a tolerance for residues when used in accordance with...

  9. 40 CFR 180.1070 - Sodium chlorite; exemption from the requirement of a tolerance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 24 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Sodium chlorite; exemption from the... Exemptions From Tolerances § 180.1070 Sodium chlorite; exemption from the requirement of a tolerance. Sodium chlorite is exempted from the requirement of a tolerance for residues when used in accordance with...

  10. 40 CFR 180.1070 - Sodium chlorite; exemption from the requirement of a tolerance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 23 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Sodium chlorite; exemption from the... Exemptions From Tolerances § 180.1070 Sodium chlorite; exemption from the requirement of a tolerance. Sodium chlorite is exempted from the requirement of a tolerance for residues when used in accordance with...

  11. 40 CFR 180.1070 - Sodium chlorite; exemption from the requirement of a tolerance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 25 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Sodium chlorite; exemption from the... Exemptions From Tolerances § 180.1070 Sodium chlorite; exemption from the requirement of a tolerance. Sodium chlorite is exempted from the requirement of a tolerance for residues when used in accordance with...

  12. 40 CFR 180.1070 - Sodium chlorite; exemption from the requirement of a tolerance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 25 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Sodium chlorite; exemption from the... Exemptions From Tolerances § 180.1070 Sodium chlorite; exemption from the requirement of a tolerance. Sodium chlorite is exempted from the requirement of a tolerance for residues when used in accordance with...

  13. Variations of chlorites and illites and porosity in Mississippian sandstone reservoirs in the Illinois basin

    SciTech Connect

    Moore, D.M.; Hughes, R.E. )

    1991-03-01

    Shallow marine, Mississippian, siliclastics in the Illinois basin, although predominantly quartz, contain other minerals that directly influence the porosity and permeability of these reservoir rocks. These sandstones contain more chlorite and kaolinite, relative to illite, than the authors have observed for shales from other Chesterian and Valmeyeran strata. Clay mineral suites in reservoirs appear to be diagenetic. The Aux Vases Sandstone contains illite, illite/smectite, and chlorite; kaolinite is absent. The Cypress Sandstone contains illite, illite/smectite, chlorite, and kaolinite. Chlorite in the Aux Vases Sandstone varies from moderately Fe-rich to Mg-rich, whereas the chlorite in the Cypress Sandstone is uniformly Fe-rich. As the percentage of clay minerals in these rocks decreases, the proportion of chlorite to other clay minerals increases. In some chlorites, the width of the 003 and 005 peaks at half-height is greater than that of the 002 and 004 peaks. This suggests an interlayering of a 7{angstrom} mineral, probably berthierine- or serpentine-like. SEM photos show chlorite coating quartz grains. In some samples there are quartz overgrowths in spite of the presence of a coating of chlorite; in others, chlorite interlayered with the 7{angstrom} phase seems to have interfered with or suppressed overgrowths. Correspondingly, there is a correlation between the 7{angstrom} phase/chlorite and porosity. Therefore, identification of the type of chlorite in a potential reservoir may be an indicator of porosity, as well as a guide for selecting completion and stimulation treatments.

  14. Electrical conductivity of chlorite at high pressures and high temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eymard, I.; Mibe, K.; Reynard, B.

    2012-12-01

    In the mantle wedge of subduction zones, high electrical-conductivity bodies have been observed. In order to understand the cause of high-conductivity body in subduction zones, we measured the electrical conductivity of polycrystalline chlorite, at pressures from 2 to 4 GPa and at high temperatures up to 850K using complex impedance spectroscopy in a multi-anvil high-pressure apparatus. The electrical conductivity increased slightly with increasing pressure. The obtained electrical conductivity values are higher than serpentine and talc (Reynard et al., 2011; Guo et al., 2011) and are slightly lower than brucite (Fujita et al., 2007). Although the obtained values are higher compared to serpentine, the presence of chlorite alone is not high enough to explain high-conductivity bodies in subduction-zones. Instead, the presence of some amount of saline fluids is inferred.

  15. Preliminary evaluation of oxygen isotopic exchange between chlorite and water

    SciTech Connect

    Cole, D.R.

    1985-01-01

    Variations in the oxygen isotopic composition of biotites altering to chlorite have been monitored as a function of time from 16 hydrothermal granite-water experiments conducted at the following conditions: T = 170/sup 0/ - 300/sup 0/C; P = 100-300 bars; mNaCl = 0.1-1.0; water/biotite mass ratio = 1-60 for periods up to 900 hours. The magnitude of delta/sup 18/O depletion in biotite increased with increasing temperature and time. Detailed thin section, x-ray and SEM studies demonstrated that biotite is altered exclusively to chlorite in 11 of the 16 experiments. The amounts of chlorite formed in these experiments increased with increasing temperature as well as time. The isotopic compositions of chlorite were calculated from mass balance, and compared with the final measured delta/sup 18/O of the fluids. These fractionations (..delta..Ch1-w) average 0.26, 0.77, and 3.74 per thousand for T = 300/sup 0/, 250/sup 0/, and 200/sup 0/C, respectively. Several lines of evidence will be discussed that suggest these data may represent equilibrium values. A least-squares regression of the data yields the following preliminary equation: 1000 ln ..cap alpha../sub/ Chl-W/ = 08.38 (10/sup 3//T) + 4.81 (10/sup 6//T/sup 2/). The error about this curve is at least +/-0.5 per thousand at 250/sup 0/ and 300/sup 0/C, and +/- 1 per thousand at 200/sup 0/C. There is excellent agreement between this curve and the curve given by Wenner and Taylor (1971) for the temperature range of 250/sup 0/ to 300/sup 0/C. However, below 250/sup 0/C, the new chloride-water results predict consistently higher temperatures compared to previous estimates.

  16. Thermodynamic properties of chlorite and berthierine derived from calorimetric measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blanc, Philippe; Gailhanou, Hélène; Rogez, Jacques; Mikaelian, Georges; Kawaji, Hitoshi; Warmont, Fabienne; Gaboreau, Stéphane; Grangeon, Sylvain; Grenèche, Jean-Marc; Vieillard, Philippe; Fialips, Claire I.; Giffaut, Eric; Gaucher, Eric C.; Claret, F.

    2014-09-01

    In the context of the deep waste disposal, we have investigated the respective stabilities of two iron-bearing clay minerals: berthierine ISGS from Illinois [USA; (Al0.975FeIII0.182FeII1.422Mg0.157Li0.035Mn0.002)(Si1.332Al0.668)O5(OH)4] and chlorite CCa-2 from Flagstaff Hill, California [USA; (Si2.633Al1.367)(Al1.116FeIII0.215Mg2.952FeII1.712Mn0.012Ca0.011)O10(OH)8]. For berthierine, the complete thermodynamic dataset was determined at 1 bar and from 2 to 310 K, using calorimetric methods. The standard enthalpies of formation were obtained by solution-reaction calorimetry at 298.15 K, and the heat capacities were measured by heat-pulse calorimetry. For chlorite, the standard enthalpy of formation is measured by solution-reaction calorimetry at 298.15 K. This is completing the entropy and heat capacity obtained previously by Gailhanou et al. (Geochim Cosmochim Acta 73:4738-4749, 2009) between 2 and 520 K, by using low-temperature adiabatic calorimetry and differential scanning calorimetry. For both minerals, the standard entropies and the Gibbs free energies of formation at 298.15 K were then calculated. An assessment of the measured properties could be carried out with respect to literature data. Eventually, the thermodynamic dataset allowed realizing theoretical calculations concerning the berthierine to chlorite transition. The latter showed that, from a thermodynamic viewpoint, the main factor controlling this transition is probably the composition of the berthierine and chlorite minerals and the nature of the secondary minerals rather than temperature.

  17. Ligand Binding to Chlorite Dismutase from Magnetospirillum sp.

    PubMed

    De Schutter, Amy; Correia, Hugo D; Freire, Diana M; Rivas, María G; Rizzi, Alberto; Santos-Silva, Teresa; González, Pablo J; Van Doorslaer, Sabine

    2015-10-29

    Chlorite dismutase (Cld) catalyzes the reduction of chlorite to chloride and dioxygen. Here, the ligand binding to Cld of Magnetospirillum sp. (MaCld) is investigated with X-ray crystallography and electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR). EPR reveals a large heterogeneity in the structure of wild-type MaCld, showing a variety of low- and high-spin ferric heme forms. Addition of an axial ligand, such as azide or imidazole, removes this heterogeneity almost entirely. This is in line with the two high resolution crystal structures of MaCld obtained in the presence of azide and thiocyanate that show the coordination of the ligands to the heme iron. The crystal structure of the MaCld-azide complex reveals a single well-defined orientation of the azide molecule in the heme pocket. EPR shows, however, a pH-dependent heme structure, probably due to acid-base transitions of the surrounding amino-acid residues stabilizing azide. For the azide and imidazole complex of MaCld, the hyperfine and nuclear quadrupole interactions with the close-by (14)N and (1)H nuclei are determined using pulsed EPR. These values are compared to the corresponding data for the low-spin forms observed in the ferric wild-type MaCld and to existing EPR data on azide and imidazole complexes of other heme proteins. PMID:26287794

  18. Kinetics and Mechanism of Oxidation of Methimazole by Chlorite in Slightly Acidic Media.

    PubMed

    Chipiso, Kudzanai; Simoyi, Reuben H

    2016-06-01

    The kinetics and mechanism of the oxidation of methimazole (1-methyl-3H-imidazole), MMI, by chlorite in mildly acidic environments were studied. It is a complex reaction that gives oligo-oscillations in chlorine dioxide concentrations in excess chlorite conditions. The stoichiometry is strictly 2:1, with the sulfur center being oxidized to sulfate and the organic moiety being hydrolyzed to several indeterminate species. In excess MMI conditions over chlorite, the sulfinic acid and sulfonic acid were observed as major intermediates. The sulfenic acid, which was observed in the electrochemical oxidation of MMI, was not observed with chlorite oxidations. Initial reduction of chlorite produced HOCl, an autocatalytic species in chlorite oxidations. HOCl rapidly reacts with chlorite to produce chlorine dioxide, which, in turn, reacts rapidly with MMI to produce more chlorite. The reaction of chlorine dioxide with MMI is competitive, in rate, with the chlorite-MMI and HOCl-ClO2(-) reactions. This explains the oligo-oscillations in ClO2 concentrations. PMID:27126471

  19. Structural features promoting dioxygen production by Dechloromonas aromatica chlorite dismutase

    SciTech Connect

    Goblirsch, Brandon R.; Streit, Bennett R.; DuBois, Jennifer L.; Wilmot, Carrie M.

    2010-08-12

    Chlorite dismutase (Cld) is a heme enzyme capable of rapidly and selectively decomposing chlorite (ClO{sub 2}{sup -}) to Cl{sup -} and O{sub 2}. The ability of Cld to promote O{sub 2} formation from ClO{sub 2}{sup -} is unusual. Heme enzymes generally utilize ClO{sub 2}{sup -} as an oxidant for reactions such as oxygen atom transfer to, or halogenation of, a second substrate. The X-ray crystal structure of Dechloromonas aromatica Cld co-crystallized with the substrate analogue nitrite (NO{sub 2}{sup -}) was determined to investigate features responsible for this novel reactivity. The enzyme active site contains a single b-type heme coordinated by a proximal histidine residue. Structural analysis identified a glutamate residue hydrogen-bonded to the heme proximal histidine that may stabilize reactive heme species. A solvent-exposed arginine residue likely gates substrate entry to a tightly confined distal pocket. On the basis of the proposed mechanism of Cld, initial reaction of ClO{sub 2}{sup -} within the distal pocket generates hypochlorite (ClO{sup -}) and a compound I intermediate. The sterically restrictive distal pocket probably facilitates the rapid rebound of ClO{sup -} with compound I forming the Cl{sup -} and O{sub 2} products. Common to other heme enzymes, Cld is inactivated after a finite number of turnovers, potentially via the observed formation of an off-pathway tryptophanyl radical species through electron migration to compound I. Three tryptophan residues of Cld have been identified as candidates for this off-pathway radical. Finally, a juxtaposition of hydrophobic residues between the distal pocket and the enzyme surface suggests O{sub 2} may have a preferential direction for exiting the active site.

  20. Water incorporation in NAMs after antigorite and chlorite dehydration reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Padrón-Navarta, José Alberto; Hermann, Jörg

    2014-05-01

    Subduction zones play a fundamental role in the deep water cycle making the Earth unique among other terrestrial planets. Water is incorporated into hydrous minerals during seafloor alteration of the oceanic lithosphere. During subduction of the oceanic lithosphere, dehydration of these hydrous minerals produces a fluid phase. A part of this fluid phase will be recycled back to the Earth's surface through hydrothermal aqueous fluids or through hydrous arc magmas, whereas another part of the water will be transported to the deep mantle by Nominally Anhydrous Minerals (NAMs) such as olivine, pyroxene and garnet. The partitioning of water between these two processes is crucial for our understanding of the mantle-scale water recycling in the Earth. This can be investigated experimentally under water-saturated conditions because this situation is met during dehydration reactions. However relatively low temperature conditions for such reactions make challenging these experiments. An alternative can be found in the natural record. The Alpine Betic-Rif orogen together with Central and Western Alps offer an invaluable diversity of ultramafic lenses that record a significant range of pressure-temperature and cooling rates. Hence these samples portray an excellent data set of 24 samples to survey the transfer of fluids from hydrous phases (brucite, antigorite and chlorite) to NAMs (olivine, orthopyroxene, clinopyroxene and garnet). Well-studied samples from these localities have been selected for water measurement using FTIR spectroscopy. The selected suite comprises the following high-pressure peridotite outcrops: Malenco serpentinite, Cerro del Almirez (1.6-1.9 GPa and 680-710ºC), Alpe Arami (3.2 GPa and 840ºC), Cima di Gagnone (3.0 GPa and 750-800ºC) and Alpe Albion (0.6 GPa and 730ºC). The infrared signature of olivine in all localities contains water (hydroxyl groups) associated to intrinsic defects (mostly point defects related to Ti4+) and extrinsic submicroscopic

  1. Geochemistry of sericite and chlorite in well 14-2 Roosevelt Hot Springs geothermal system and in mineralized hydrothermal systems

    SciTech Connect

    Ballantyne, J.M.

    1980-06-01

    Chemical compositions of chlorite and sericite from one production well in the Roosevelt geothermal system have been determined by electron probe methods and compared with compositions of chlorite and sericite from porphyry copper deposits. Modern system sericite and chlorite occur over a depth interval of 2 km and a temperature interval of 250/sup 0/C.

  2. Investigation of ion binding in chlorite dismutases by means of molecular dynamics simulations.

    PubMed

    Sündermann, Axel; Reif, Maria M; Hofbauer, Stefan; Obinger, Christian; Oostenbrink, Chris

    2014-07-29

    Chlorite dismutases are prokaryotic heme b oxidoreductases that convert chlorite to chloride and dioxygen. It has been postulated that during turnover hypochlorite is formed transiently, which might be responsible for the observed irreversible inactivation of these iron proteins. The only charged distal residue in the heme cavity is a conserved and mobile arginine, but its role in catalysis and inactivation is not fully understood. In the present study, the pentameric chlorite dismutase (Cld) from the bacterium Candidatus Nitrospira defluvii was probed for binding of the low spin ligand cyanide, the substrate chlorite, and the intermediate hypochlorite. Simulations were performed with the enzyme in the ferrous, ferric, and compound I state. Additionally, the variant R173A was studied. We report the parametrization for the GROMOS force field of the anions ClO(-), ClO2(-), ClO3(-), and ClO4(-) and describe spontaneous binding, unbinding, and rebinding events of chlorite and hypochlorite, as well as the dynamics of the conformations of Arg173 during simulations. The findings suggest that (i) chlorite binding to ferric NdCld occurs spontaneously and (ii) that Arg173 is important for recognition and to impair hypochlorite leakage from the reaction sphere. The simulation data is discussed in comparison with experimental data on catalysis and inhibition of chlorite dismutase. PMID:24988286

  3. Investigation of Ion Binding in Chlorite Dismutases by Means of Molecular Dynamics Simulations

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Chlorite dismutases are prokaryotic heme b oxidoreductases that convert chlorite to chloride and dioxygen. It has been postulated that during turnover hypochlorite is formed transiently, which might be responsible for the observed irreversible inactivation of these iron proteins. The only charged distal residue in the heme cavity is a conserved and mobile arginine, but its role in catalysis and inactivation is not fully understood. In the present study, the pentameric chlorite dismutase (Cld) from the bacterium Candidatus Nitrospira defluvii was probed for binding of the low spin ligand cyanide, the substrate chlorite, and the intermediate hypochlorite. Simulations were performed with the enzyme in the ferrous, ferric, and compound I state. Additionally, the variant R173A was studied. We report the parametrization for the GROMOS force field of the anions ClO–, ClO2–, ClO3–, and ClO4– and describe spontaneous binding, unbinding, and rebinding events of chlorite and hypochlorite, as well as the dynamics of the conformations of Arg173 during simulations. The findings suggest that (i) chlorite binding to ferric NdCld occurs spontaneously and (ii) that Arg173 is important for recognition and to impair hypochlorite leakage from the reaction sphere. The simulation data is discussed in comparison with experimental data on catalysis and inhibition of chlorite dismutase. PMID:24988286

  4. Investigation of U(VI) Adsorption in Quartz-Chlorite Mineral Mixtures

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Zheming; Zachara, John M.; Shang, Jianying; Jeon, Choong; Liu, Juan; Liu, Chongxuan

    2014-08-25

    A batch and cryogenic laser-induced time-resolved fluorescence spectroscopy investigation of U(VI) adsorbed on quartz-chlorite mixtures with variable mass ratios have been performed under field-relevant uranium concentrations (5x10-7 M and 5x10-6 M) in pH 8.1 synthetic groundwater. The U(VI) adsorption Kd values steadily increased as the mass fraction of chlorite increased, indicating preferential sorption to chlorite. For all mineral mixtures, U(VI) adsorption Kd values were lower than that calculated from the assumption of component additivity; The largest deviation occurred when the mass fractions of the two minerals were equal. U(VI) adsorbed on quartz and chlorite displayed characteristic individual fluorescence spectra that were not affected by mineral mixing. The spectra of U(VI) adsorbed within the mixtures could be simulated by one surface U(VI) species on quartz and two on chlorite. The fluorescence intensity decreased in a nonlinear manner as the adsorbed U(VI) concentration increased with increasing chlorite mass fraction – likely due to ill-defined fluorescence quenching by both structural Fe/Cr in chlorite, and trace amounts of solubilized and re-precipitated Fe/Cr in the aqueous phase. However, the fractional spectral intensities of U(VI) adsorbed on quartz and chlorite followed the same trend of fractional adsorbed U(VI) concentration in each mineral phase; approximate linear correlations in the quartz:chlorite mass ratio ranges of 0.0 - 0.2 and 0.2 - 1.0, offering a method to estimate of U(VI) concentration distribution between the mineral components.

  5. Inhibition of apple polyphenol oxidase activity by sodium chlorite.

    PubMed

    Lu, Shengmin; Luo, Yaguang; Feng, Hao

    2006-05-17

    Sodium chlorite (SC) was shown to have strong efficacy both as a sanitizer to reduce microbial growth on produce and as a browning inhibitor on fresh-cut apples in previous experiments. This study was undertaken to investigate the inhibitory effect of SC on polyphenol oxidase (PPO) and the associated mechanisms. The experiment showed that SC had a strong inhibition of apple PPO. The extent of inhibition was influenced by SC concentration and pH. Inhibition was most prominent at pH 4.5, at which approximately 30% of enzyme activity was lost in the presence of 10 mM SC, followed closely by that at pH 4.0 with a 26% reduction in PPO activity. The inhibition mode was determined using Dixon and Lineweaver-Burk plots, which established SC to be a mixed inhibitor of apple PPO for the oxidation of catechol. Preincubation of PPO with 8 mM SC for 8 min caused a maximum of 46% activity reduction compared to noninhibited control. However, preincubation of SC with catechol for 8 min resulted in no additional loss of PPO activity. These findings provide further evidence that the inhibition of PPO activity by SC is due to the inhibition of the enzyme itself rather than removal of the substrate. PMID:19127746

  6. Determination of Chlorine Dioxide and Chlorite in Water Supply Systems by Verified Methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tkáčová, Jana; Božíková, Jarmila

    2014-07-01

    This work is dedicated to the development and optimization of appropriate analytical methods for the determination of chlorine dioxide and chlorite in drinking water in order to obtain accurate and correct results in the quality control of drinking water. The work deals with the development and optimization of a method for the determination of chlorine dioxide using chlorophenol red. Furthermore, a new spectrophotometric method for the determination of chlorite via bromometry using methyl orange was developed, optimized and validated. An electrochemical method for the determination of chlorite by flow coulometry was also developed, optimized and validated.

  7. The distribution of Fe and Mn between chlorite and fluid: Evidence from fluid inclusions

    SciTech Connect

    Bottrell, S.H.; Yardley, B.W.D. )

    1991-01-01

    The Fe/Mn ratio of fluid inclusions from low-grade metamorphic quartz veins has been analyzed by an improved crush-leach method. When compared with Fe and Mn in coexisting vein chlorites, exchange between fluid and chlorite is shown to vary with the redox state of the wall rocks, but is independent of the salinity of the fluid. Agreement between our results and theoretical predictions of Fe/Mn partitioning between fluid and chlorite are good for veins from relatively oxidized rocks, but vein fluids from reduced hosts are enriched in Fe.

  8. Chloritization of Late Ordovician K-bentonites from the northern Baltic Palaeobasin influence from source material or diagenetic environment?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hints, Rutt; Kirsimäe, Kalle; Somelar, Peeter; Kallaste, Toivo; Kiipli, Tarmo

    2006-09-01

    The Baltic Ordovician-Silurian sedimentary succession embodies numerous altered volcanic ash beds that are illite-smectite dominated. Only a few beds rich in chlorite-smectite are known from the Upper Ordovician Pirgu Stage of Estonia. Mixed-layer chlorite-smectite occurs commonly in low-grade metamorphic and hydrothermal environments. However, chloritic K-bentonites of the Pirgu Stage have never been buried deeply and lack signs of metamorphic overprinting. In order to understand the origin of chloritization, three distinct beds were sampled in 14 drillcores from Estonia and Latvia and analysed by means of XRD and SEM. The principal authigenic assemblage of the bulk samples consists of chlorite-smectite (corrensite) together with illite-smectite and K-feldspar. The actual mineral composition of K-bentonites though varies from sample to sample. The clay mineral assemblages range from virtually pure chlorite-smectite to illite-smectite dominated assemblages with minor or no chlorite-smectite. The proportion of chlorite-smectite in K-bentonites shows systematic lateral variations: the share of chloritic phases is highest in the shallower-water part of the palaeobasin and decreases towards the deeper part of the basin. Such regular lateral variations suggest a possible link between chloritization and the configuration of ancient palaeobasin. The present study suggests that the chloritization of primary felsic ashes occurred during early diagenesis and that it was caused by an influx of Mg-rich water probably from a marine sabkha-type environment.

  9. Unusually large shear wave anisotropy for chlorite in subduction zone settings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mookherjee, Mainak; Mainprice, David

    2014-03-01

    Using first principle simulations we calculated the elasticity of chlorite. At a density ρ~ 2.60 g cm-3, the elastic constant tensor reveals significant elastic anisotropy: VP ~27%, VS1 ~56%, and VS2 ~43%. The shear anisotropy is exceptionally large for chlorite and enhances upon compression. Upon compression, the shear elastic constant component C44 and C55 decreases, whereas C66 shear component stiffens. The softening in C44 and C55 is reflected in shear modulus, G, and the shear wave velocity, VS. Our results on elastic anisotropy at conditions relevant to the mantle wedge indicates that a 10-20 km layer of hydrated peridotite with serpentine and chlorite could account for the observed shear polarization anisotropy and associated large delay times of 1-2 s observed in some subduction zone settings. In addition, chlorite could also explain the low VP/VS ratios that have been observed in recent high-resolution seismological studies.

  10. The effect of sodium chlorite solutions on zebra mussel mortality

    SciTech Connect

    Dion, J.; Richer, Y.; Messer, R.

    1995-06-01

    The effect of four dilutions, 8 ppm, 40 ppm, 120 ppm and 473 ppm of the stock solution of a first product, Z-8, on zebra mussel mortality was investigated in static continuous exposure systems and compared to controls. The entire size class spectrum of the mussel population present at the sampling site was tested by leaving mussels attached to their original rock substrata. Two size class grouping of mussels, 13 mm and less and more than 13 mm in length, were exposed in the same test chambers but were analyzed separately. No mortality occurred in the controls. Concentration 8 ppm had no effect after 166 hours on both size class groupings. Concentrations 40, 120 and 473 ppm had observable killing effect within the 331 hours of experiment for both size groupings. The smaller mussels died faster than the larger ones. Another product, Z-11, was similarly tested during fall 1994 with dilutions 8, 40, 80 and 120 ppm. At 8 ppm dilution, Z-11 had induced only little mortality on both size class groupings after 739 hours. At 40, 80 and 120 ppm dilutions, Z-11 had interesting killing effect for both mussel size groupings within the 739 hours of experiment considering the somehow intermittent treatment used. The results already appear to show that sodium chlorite solutions have the potential for eventually becoming a surrogate to the use of chlorine for the control of zebra mussels. That is because they already show a good killing efficiency without being involved in the formation of undesired by-products such as the use of chlorine is. On this purpose, the product is engaged in the process of homologation by Agriculture Canada for it use as treatment against zebra mussels.

  11. The reactivity of chlorite surfaces: Microscopic alteration processes and the transport behaviour of uranium(VI)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bosbach, D.; Brandt, F.; Arnold, T.; Krawczyk-Baersch, E.; Bernhard, G.

    2003-04-01

    The transport of U(VI) in phyllite rocks or on granitic fractures is significantly affected by the dissolution of chlorite and the re-precipitation of various secondary phases. However, in order to be able to predict the behaviour of radionuclides in these systems a sound understanding of the reaction kinetics of chlorite alteration/dissolution processes as well as the precipitation of secondary phases is required. We have studied the dissolution of chlorite with mixed-flow reactor experiments and in-situ AFM observations far from equilibrium over a broad pH range. Key parameters such as the reactive surface area as well as the stoichiometry and pH dependency of the dissolution reaction were determined. Speciation calculations indicate that no secondary phases have formed (except under neutral pH conditions). Under acidic conditions the brucite-like layer of the chlorite structure dissolves faster than the 2:1 TOT layer whereas above pH 8 a reverse dissolution behaviour was observed. Under acidic conditions (pH < 5) chlorite transforms to a vermiculite-like clay mineral, which has also been identified in field studies. In addition, static batch dissolution experiments with chlorite were performed in order to mimic more closely natural systems. In these experiments various secondary phases including hydrous ferrous oxides (HFO) were formed as coatings on chlorite surfaces and as colloids in solution. Batch adsorption experiments indicate that U(VI) has a strong affinity to HFO and that retardation of U(VI) occurs via adsorption to immobile HFO coatings on chlorite surfaces. Heterogeneous HFO formation seems to be favoured on {hk0} edge surfaces in the near neutral pH range. The formation mechanism of HFO coatings was studied systematically with titration experiments, in order to be able to quantify the homogeneous and heterogeneous formation of these secondary phases as a function of the geochemical conditions.

  12. The smectite to chlorite transition in the Chipilapa geothermal system, El Salvador

    SciTech Connect

    Robinson, D.; Santana de Zamora, A.

    1999-04-01

    Clay mineralogical, X-ray diffraction and electron microprobe studies have been carried out on separated <2 {micro}m fractions from cutting and core material from three wells in the Chipilapa geothermal system in El Salvador. The data indicate that the smectite to chlorite transition is prevalent, but a secondary smectite to illite transition is also present. At depths approximately <750 m, smectite with very minor chlorite mixed-layers (approximately <15%) is dominant, and has a composition midway between a di- and tri-smectite. At {approximately}750 m there is a very clear distinction and sharp transition into discrete chlorite with very minor smectite mixed-layers (approximately <10%). Corrensite is recorded only as a rare and minor phase. Smectite occurs in abundance at temperatures up to {approximately}200 C, and the transition from a smectite-dominant to chlorite-dominant assemblage takes place over a narrow temperature range ({approximately}150 to 200 C). The stability range of smectite is very similar to that recorded in other geothermal systems, whereas the smectite to chlorite transition differs greatly from that recorded in other systems. The transition does not involve continuous chlorite/smectite mixed-layering but a marked step: It is the sharpest and most discontinuous stepped sequence of this mineralogical transition recorded.

  13. Chloritization and associated alteration at the Jabiluka unconformity-type uranium deposit, Northern Territory, Australia

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Nutt, Constance J.

    1989-01-01

    Jabiluka is the largest of four known uncomformity-type uranium deposits that are hosted by brecciated and altered metasedimentary rocks in the Pine Creek geosyncline, Northern Territory, Australia. The alteration zone at Jabiluka is dominated by chlorite, but also contains white mica, tourmaline and apatite; hematite is present, but only in minor amounts. Added quartz is mainly restricted to fractures and breccias. Chlorite, which formed during episodic fluid movement, partly to totally replaced all pre-existing minerals. Chloritized rocks are enriched in Mg, and depleted in K, Ca, Na and Si. Five types of chlorite are optically and chemically distinguishable in the rocks at Jabiluka. Chloritization is proposed as a mechanism that lowered the pH of the circulating fluid, and also caused significant loss of silica from the altered rocks. The proposed constraints on alteration, and presumably on at least part of the uranium mineralization, neither require nor preclude the existence of the unconformity as necessary for the formation of ore.

  14. Unexpected Diversity of Chlorite Dismutases: a Catalytically Efficient Dimeric Enzyme from Nitrobacter winogradskyi ▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Mlynek, Georg; Sjöblom, Björn; Kostan, Julius; Füreder, Stephanie; Maixner, Frank; Gysel, Kira; Furtmüller, Paul Georg; Obinger, Christian; Wagner, Michael; Daims, Holger; Djinović-Carugo, Kristina

    2011-01-01

    Chlorite dismutase (Cld) is a unique heme enzyme catalyzing the conversion of ClO2− to Cl− and O2. Cld is usually found in perchlorate- or chlorate-reducing bacteria but was also recently identified in a nitrite-oxidizing bacterium of the genus Nitrospira. Here we characterized a novel Cld-like protein from the chemolithoautotrophic nitrite oxidizer Nitrobacter winogradskyi which is significantly smaller than all previously known chlorite dismutases. Its three-dimensional (3D) crystal structure revealed a dimer of two identical subunits, which sharply contrasts with the penta- or hexameric structures of other chlorite dismutases. Despite a truncated N-terminal domain in each subunit, this novel enzyme turned out to be a highly efficient chlorite dismutase (Km = 90 μM; kcat = 190 s−1; kcat/Km = 2.1 × 106 M−1 s−1), demonstrating a greater structural and phylogenetic diversity of these enzymes than was previously known. Based on comparative analyses of Cld sequences and 3D structures, signature amino acid residues that can be employed to assess whether uncharacterized Cld-like proteins may have a high chlorite-dismutating activity were identified. Interestingly, proteins that contain all these signatures and are phylogenetically closely related to the novel-type Cld of N. winogradskyi exist in a large number of other microbes, including other nitrite oxidizers. PMID:21441524

  15. Transiently Produced Hypochlorite Is Responsible for the Irreversible Inhibition of Chlorite Dismutase

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Chlorite dismutases (Clds) are heme b-containing prokaryotic oxidoreductases that catalyze the reduction of chlorite to chloride with the concomitant release of molecular oxygen. Over time, they are irreversibly inactivated. To elucidate the mechanism of inactivation and investigate the role of the postulated intermediate hypochlorite, the pentameric chlorite dismutase of “Candidatus Nitrospira defluvii” (NdCld) and two variants (having the conserved distal arginine 173 exchanged with alanine and lysine) were recombinantly produced in Escherichia coli. Exchange of the distal arginine boosts the extent of irreversible inactivation. In the presence of the hypochlorite traps methionine, monochlorodimedone, and 2-[6-(4-aminophenoxy)-3-oxo-3H-xanthen-9-yl]benzoic acid, the extent of chlorite degradation and release of molecular oxygen is significantly increased, whereas heme bleaching and oxidative modifications of the protein are suppressed. Among other modifications, hypochlorite-mediated formation of chlorinated tyrosines is demonstrated by mass spectrometry. The data obtained were analyzed with respect to the proposed reaction mechanism for chlorite degradation and its dependence on pH. We discuss the role of distal Arg173 by keeping hypochlorite in the reaction sphere for O–O bond formation. PMID:24754261

  16. Vanadium chlorite from a sandstone-hosted vanadium-uranium deposit, Henry basin, Utah.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Whitney, G.; Northrop, H.R.

    1986-01-01

    This ore deposit formed by reduction and precipitation of U and V in the presence of organic matter at the interface between a stagnant brine and overlying circulating meteoric water. Some samples of the vanadium chlorite (heated before analysis) contain = or >10% V2O5; in fresh samples most of the V is in the V3+ state. XRD data suggest that Fe and V are concentrated preferentially in the interlayer hydroxide sheets of the chlorite. A d060 value of 1.52 A indicates that the chlorite probably has a dioctahedral structure distended by the presence of octahedral Fe and V; it is a IIb polytype. The V ore zone is flanked by peripheral zones with perfectly ordered chlorite/smectite containing much less V than the pure chlorite. Chemical analysis of a sample heated to 900oC before analysis gave SiO2 44.89, Al2O3 25.14, TiO2 0.35, Fe2O3 8.29, MgO 8.47, CaO 0.84, Na2O 0.27, K2O 2.18, Li2O 0.16, UO3 0.92, V2O5 9.14, = 100.65, together with Cr 10, Mn 200, Co 150, Ni 5.8, Cu 10, Zn 140 ppm; XRD, DTG, TG and IR curves are presented. -R.A.H.

  17. Compatible mechanism to characterize three independent but cross-coupled reactions of chlorite ion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagypál, István; Horváth, Attila K.

    2015-06-01

    Individually proposed kinetic models of the key subsystems of the chlorite-thiosulfate reaction, such as the hypochlorous acid-chlorite, tetrathionate-chlorite, and tetrathionate-chlorine dioxide reactions, have been unified to be able to describe all the main characteristics of these systems simultaneously. A complex 38-step kinetic model is composed in which the subsystems are coupled by the necessary short-lived intermediates and such species that is products or reactants in one system but transients in the other. Such a cross-coupling between the individual systems as well as the sound agreement between the measured and calculated absorbance-time profiles in 367 experimental curves strongly validates the proposed kinetic model.

  18. Compatible mechanism to characterize three independent but cross-coupled reactions of chlorite ion.

    PubMed

    Nagypál, István; Horváth, Attila K

    2015-06-01

    Individually proposed kinetic models of the key subsystems of the chlorite-thiosulfate reaction, such as the hypochlorous acid-chlorite, tetrathionate-chlorite, and tetrathionate-chlorine dioxide reactions, have been unified to be able to describe all the main characteristics of these systems simultaneously. A complex 38-step kinetic model is composed in which the subsystems are coupled by the necessary short-lived intermediates and such species that is products or reactants in one system but transients in the other. Such a cross-coupling between the individual systems as well as the sound agreement between the measured and calculated absorbance-time profiles in 367 experimental curves strongly validates the proposed kinetic model. PMID:26117129

  19. A chlorite solid solution geothermometer the Los Azufres (Mexico) geothermal system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cathelineau, Michel; Nieva, David

    1985-11-01

    Chlorite constitutes a major hydrothermal alteration product of metamorphism of andesites, in the active geothermal system of Los Azufres (Mexico). Electron microprobe analyses performed on a set of crystals from each sample show wide variations in composition. Correlation coefficients among chemical constituents were calculated. It is shown that the tetrahedral charge is positively correlated with the octahedral vacancy and negatively with the iron content, and there is almost no correlation with the octahedral aluminium and magnesium content. A procedure is proposed to select end-members and substitution vectors, and to give a general formula for these chlorites. Their formation temperatures are estimated with great accuracy, combining results of microthermometric data on fluid inclusions from gangue minerals of chlorites (quartz, calcite), direct measurements in wells (Kuster equipment), and chemical geothermometers. Correlations between chlorite compositions, range and nature of site occupancy, and temperature are good. Formation temperatures of chlorites range from 130° C to 300° C. As no other thermodynamic parameter varies significantly in the studied field (composition of the host rocks, nature of the geothermal fluids, pressure, ...), these variations of site occupancy (mainly Al(IV) and the octahedral occupancy (6-Al(VI)-(Mg+Fe(2+)) = VAC) are considered mainly as temperature dependent. Molar fractions of each end-member show very different variations with increasing temperature: X-kaolinite decreases, and X-chamosite increases, while X-talc-3 brucite does not show significant change. From these data, activity coefficients and standard state chemical potential of major components, and molar free energy formation of chlorite have been calculated for each temperature of crystallisation.

  20. Dehydration of chlorite explains anomalously high electrical conductivity in the mantle wedges.

    PubMed

    Manthilake, Geeth; Bolfan-Casanova, Nathalie; Novella, Davide; Mookherjee, Mainak; Andrault, Denis

    2016-05-01

    Mantle wedge regions in subduction zone settings show anomalously high electrical conductivity (~1 S/m) that has often been attributed to the presence of aqueous fluids released by slab dehydration. Laboratory-based measurements of the electrical conductivity of hydrous phases and aqueous fluids are significantly lower and cannot readily explain the geophysically observed anomalously high electrical conductivity. The released aqueous fluid also rehydrates the mantle wedge and stabilizes a suite of hydrous phases, including serpentine and chlorite. In this present study, we have measured the electrical conductivity of a natural chlorite at pressures and temperatures relevant for the subduction zone setting. In our experiment, we observe two distinct conductivity enhancements when chlorite is heated to temperatures beyond its thermodynamic stability field. The initial increase in electrical conductivity to ~3 × 10(-3) S/m can be attributed to chlorite dehydration and the release of aqueous fluids. This is followed by a unique, subsequent enhancement of electrical conductivity of up to 7 × 10(-1) S/m. This is related to the growth of an interconnected network of a highly conductive and chemically impure magnetite mineral phase. Thus, the dehydration of chlorite and associated processes are likely to be crucial in explaining the anomalously high electrical conductivity observed in mantle wedges. Chlorite dehydration in the mantle wedge provides an additional source of aqueous fluid above the slab and could also be responsible for the fixed depth (120 ± 40 km) of melting at the top of the subducting slab beneath the subduction-related volcanic arc front. PMID:27386526

  1. Dehydration of chlorite explains anomalously high electrical conductivity in the mantle wedges

    PubMed Central

    Manthilake, Geeth; Bolfan-Casanova, Nathalie; Novella, Davide; Mookherjee, Mainak; Andrault, Denis

    2016-01-01

    Mantle wedge regions in subduction zone settings show anomalously high electrical conductivity (~1 S/m) that has often been attributed to the presence of aqueous fluids released by slab dehydration. Laboratory-based measurements of the electrical conductivity of hydrous phases and aqueous fluids are significantly lower and cannot readily explain the geophysically observed anomalously high electrical conductivity. The released aqueous fluid also rehydrates the mantle wedge and stabilizes a suite of hydrous phases, including serpentine and chlorite. In this present study, we have measured the electrical conductivity of a natural chlorite at pressures and temperatures relevant for the subduction zone setting. In our experiment, we observe two distinct conductivity enhancements when chlorite is heated to temperatures beyond its thermodynamic stability field. The initial increase in electrical conductivity to ~3 × 10−3 S/m can be attributed to chlorite dehydration and the release of aqueous fluids. This is followed by a unique, subsequent enhancement of electrical conductivity of up to 7 × 10−1 S/m. This is related to the growth of an interconnected network of a highly conductive and chemically impure magnetite mineral phase. Thus, the dehydration of chlorite and associated processes are likely to be crucial in explaining the anomalously high electrical conductivity observed in mantle wedges. Chlorite dehydration in the mantle wedge provides an additional source of aqueous fluid above the slab and could also be responsible for the fixed depth (120 ± 40 km) of melting at the top of the subducting slab beneath the subduction-related volcanic arc front. PMID:27386526

  2. Kikuchi-Fujimoto disease presenting after consumption of 'Miracle Mineral Solution' (sodium chlorite).

    PubMed

    Loh, John Ming Ren; Shafi, Humaira

    2014-01-01

    We present a case report of a 41-year-old woman of Malay ethnicity who presented with an 11-day history of fever and left-sided lymphadenopathy after consuming 'Miracle Mineral Solution' (sodium chlorite solution) for the first time. A diagnosis of Kikuchi-Fujimoto disease was established via lymph node biopsy after other differentials were excluded. The aetiology of Kikuchi-Fujimoto disease remains controversial, but viral, autoimmune and physicochemical causes have been suggested as possibilities. In this case, we hypothesise that oxidative injury from sodium chlorite initiated an inflammatory response, which triggered the onset of Kikuchi-Fujimoto disease. PMID:25422331

  3. Cloning, expression, purification, crystallization and preliminary X-ray diffraction analysis of chlorite dismutase: a detoxifying enzyme producing molecular oxygen

    SciTech Connect

    Geus, Daniël C. de Thomassen, Ellen A. J.; Feltz, Clarisse L. van der; Abrahams, Jan Pieter

    2008-08-01

    Preliminary X-ray data collection and analysis for crystals of chlorite dismutase, a haem-based enzyme that very effectively reduces chlorite to chloride while producing molecular oxygen, is reported to 2.1 Å resolution. Chlorite dismutase, a homotetrameric haem-based protein, is one of the key enzymes of (per)chlorate-reducing bacteria. It is highly active (< 2 kU mg{sup −1}) in reducing the toxic compound chlorite to the innocuous chloride anion and molecular oxygen. Chlorite itself is produced as the intermediate product of (per)chlorate reduction. The chlorite dismutase gene in Azospira oryzae strain GR-1 employing degenerate primers has been identified and the active enzyme was subsequently overexpressed in Escherichia coli. Chlorite dismutase was purified, proven to be active and crystallized using sitting drops with PEG 2000 MME, KSCN and ammonium sulfate as precipitants. The crystals belonged to space group P2{sub 1}2{sub 1}2 and were most likely to contain six subunits in the asymmetric unit. The refined unit-cell parameters were a = 164.46, b = 169.34, c = 60.79 Å. The crystals diffracted X-rays to 2.1 Å resolution on a synchrotron-radiation source and a three-wavelength MAD data set has been collected. Determination of the chlorite dismutase structure will provide insights into the active site of the enzyme, for which no structures are currently available.

  4. Structure and heme-binding properties of HemQ (chlorite dismutase-like protein) from Listeria monocytogenes

    PubMed Central

    Hofbauer, Stefan; Hagmüller, Andreas; Schaffner, Irene; Mlynek, Georg; Krutzler, Michael; Stadlmayr, Gerhard; Pirker, Katharina F.; Obinger, Christian; Daims, Holger; Djinović-Carugo, Kristina; Furtmüller, Paul G.

    2015-01-01

    Chlorite dismutase-like proteins are structurally closely related to functional chlorite dismutases which are heme b-dependent oxidoreductases capable of reducing chlorite to chloride with simultaneous production of dioxygen. Chlorite dismutase-like proteins are incapable of performing this reaction and their biological role is still under discussion. Recently, members of this large protein family were shown to be involved in heme biosynthesis in Gram-positive bacteria, and thus the protein was renamed HemQ in these organisms. In the present work the structural and heme binding properties of the chlorite dismutase-like protein from the Gram-positive pathogen Listeria monocytogenes (LmCld) were analyzed in order to evaluate its potential role as a regulatory heme sensing protein. The homopentameric crystal structure (2.0 Å) shows high similarity to chlorite-degrading chlorite dismutases with an important difference in the structure of the putative substrate and heme entrance channel. In solution LmCld is a stable hexamer able to bind the low-spin ligand cyanide. Heme binding is reversible with KD-values determined to be 7.2 μM (circular dichroism spectroscopy) and 16.8 μM (isothermal titration calorimetry) at pH 7.0. Both acidic and alkaline conditions promote heme release. Presented biochemical and structural data reveal that the chlorite dismutase-like protein from L. monocytogenes could act as a potential regulatory heme sensing and storage protein within heme biosynthesis. PMID:25602700

  5. Structure and heme-binding properties of HemQ (chlorite dismutase-like protein) from Listeria monocytogenes.

    PubMed

    Hofbauer, Stefan; Hagmüller, Andreas; Schaffner, Irene; Mlynek, Georg; Krutzler, Michael; Stadlmayr, Gerhard; Pirker, Katharina F; Obinger, Christian; Daims, Holger; Djinović-Carugo, Kristina; Furtmüller, Paul G

    2015-05-15

    Chlorite dismutase-like proteins are structurally closely related to functional chlorite dismutases which are heme b-dependent oxidoreductases capable of reducing chlorite to chloride with simultaneous production of dioxygen. Chlorite dismutase-like proteins are incapable of performing this reaction and their biological role is still under discussion. Recently, members of this large protein family were shown to be involved in heme biosynthesis in Gram-positive bacteria, and thus the protein was renamed HemQ in these organisms. In the present work the structural and heme binding properties of the chlorite dismutase-like protein from the Gram-positive pathogen Listeria monocytogenes (LmCld) were analyzed in order to evaluate its potential role as a regulatory heme sensing protein. The homopentameric crystal structure (2.0Å) shows high similarity to chlorite-degrading chlorite dismutases with an important difference in the structure of the putative substrate and heme entrance channel. In solution LmCld is a stable hexamer able to bind the low-spin ligand cyanide. Heme binding is reversible with KD-values determined to be 7.2μM (circular dichroism spectroscopy) and 16.8μM (isothermal titration calorimetry) at pH 7.0. Both acidic and alkaline conditions promote heme release. Presented biochemical and structural data reveal that the chlorite dismutase-like protein from L. monocytogenes could act as a potential regulatory heme sensing and storage protein within heme biosynthesis. PMID:25602700

  6. ASSESSMENT OF MATERNAL TOXICITY, EMBRYOTOXICITY AND TERATOGENIC POTENTIAL OF SODIUM CHLORITE IN SPRAGUE-DAWLEY RATS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Groups of up to 13 pregnant rats were individually caged. Body weight, food and water consumption were recorded at days 1, 8, 15 and 22 of gestation and the dams were treated on days 8-15 with sodium chlorite, 0.1%, 0.5% or 2% in drinking water or by injection of 10, 20, or 50 mg...

  7. Elucidation of the mechanism of enzymatic browning inhibition by sodium chlorite

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Sodium chlorite (SC) is a well known anti-microbial agent and its strong inhibitory effect on enzymatic browning of fresh-cut produce has recently been identified. We investigated the mechanisms of browning inhibition by SC using chlorogenic acid (CA) and PPO extracted from mushroom to emulate the b...

  8. Acidified sodium chlorite as an alternative to chlorine for elimination of Salmonella on alfalfa seeds

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The disadvantage associated with the use of chlorine for food processing and water treatment had been documented previously. This study was conducted to determine if acidified sodium chlorite (ASC) could be used to replace calcium hypochlorite [Ca(OCl)2] for disinfection of alfalfa seeds. Seeds co...

  9. EFFICACY OF SODIUM CHLORITE AS AN INHIBITOR OF ENZYMATIC BROWNING IN APPLE SLICES

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Sodium chlorite (SC) is an effective sanitizer for inhibiting microbial growth. This investigation was conducted to determine the efficacy of SC as a browning control agent for use on fresh-cut apple slices, applied alone, or in conjunction with organic acids. Additionally, the authors compared the ...

  10. Influence of drinking water treatments on chlorine dioxide consumption and chlorite/chlorate formation.

    PubMed

    Sorlini, Sabrina; Gialdini, Francesca; Biasibetti, Michela; Collivignarelli, Carlo

    2014-05-01

    Disinfection is the last treatment stage of a Drinking Water Treatment Plant (DWTP) and is carried out to maintain a residual concentration of disinfectant in the water distribution system. Chlorine dioxide (ClO2) is a widely used chemical employed for this purpose. The aim of this work was to evaluate the influence of several treatments on chlorine dioxide consumption and on chlorite and chlorate formation in the final oxidation/disinfection stage. A number of tests was performed at laboratory scale employing water samples collected from the DWTP of Cremona (Italy). The following processes were studied: oxidation with potassium permanganate, chlorine dioxide and sodium hypochlorite, coagulation/flocculation with ferric chloride and aluminum sulfate, filtration and adsorption onto activated carbon. The results showed that the chlorine dioxide demand is high if sodium hypochlorite or potassium permanganate are employed in pre-oxidation. On the other hand, chlorine dioxide leads to the highest production of chlorite and chlorate. The coagulation/flocculation process after pre-oxidation shows that chlorine dioxide demand decreases if potassium permanganate is employed as an oxidant, both with ferric chloride and aluminum sulfate. Therefore, the combination of these processes leads to a lower production of chlorite and chlorate. Aluminum sulfate is preferable in terms of the chlorine dioxide demand reduction and minimization of the chlorite and chlorate formation. Activated carbon is the most effective solution as it reduced the chlorine dioxide consumption by about 50% and the DBP formation by about 20-40%. PMID:24534637

  11. Spectral characteristics of chlorites and Mg-serpentines using high- resolution reflectance spectroscopy

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    King, T.V.V.; Clark, R.N.

    1989-01-01

    The present laboratory study using high-resolution reflectance spectroscopy (0.25-2.7 ??m) focuses on two primary phyllosilicate groups, serpentines and chlorites. The results show that it is possible to spectrally distinguish between isochemical end-members of the Mg-rich serpentine group (chrysotile, antigorite, and lizardite) and to recognize spectral variations in chlorites as a function of Fe/Mg ratio (~8-38 wt% Fe). The position and relative strength of the 1.4-??m absorption feature in the trioctahedral chlorites appear to be correlated to the total iron content and/or the Mg/Si ratio and the loss on ignition values of the sample. Spectral differences in the 2.3-??m wavelength region can be attributed to differences in lattice environments and are characteristic for specific trioctahedral chlorites. The 1.4-??m feature in the isochemical Mg-rich serpentines (total iron content ~1.5-7.0 wt%) show marked spectral differences, apparently due to structural differences. -Authors

  12. Chlorite dismutases – a heme enzyme family for use in bioremediation and generation of molecular oxygen

    PubMed Central

    Hofbauer, Stefan; Schaffner, Irene; Furtmüller, Paul G; Obinger, Christian

    2014-01-01

    Chlorite is a serious environmental concern, as rising concentrations of this harmful anthropogenic compound have been detected in groundwater, drinking water, and soil. Chlorite dismutases (Clds) are therefore important molecules in bioremediation as Clds catalyze the degradation of chlorite to chloride and molecular oxygen. Clds are heme b-containing oxidoreductases present in numerous bacterial and archaeal phyla. This review presents the phylogeny of functional Clds and Cld-like proteins, and demonstrates the close relationship of this novel enzyme family to the recently discovered dye-decolorizing peroxidases. The available X-ray structures, biophysical and enzymatic properties, as well as a proposed reaction mechanism, are presented and critically discussed. Open questions about structure-function relationships are addressed, including the nature of the catalytically relevant redox and reaction intermediates and the mechanism of inactivation of Clds during turnover. Based on analysis of currently available data, chlorite dismutase from “Candidatus Nitrospira defluvii” is suggested as a model Cld for future application in biotechnology and bioremediation. Additionally, Clds can be used in various applications as local generators of molecular oxygen, a reactivity already exploited by microbes that must perform aerobic metabolic pathways in the absence of molecular oxygen. For biotechnologists in the field of chemical engineering and bioremediation, this review provides the biochemical and biophysical background of the Cld enzyme family as well as critically assesses Cld's technological potential. PMID:24519858

  13. Studies of carcinogenicity of sodium chlorite in B6C3F1 mice

    SciTech Connect

    Yokose, Y.; Uchida, K.; Nakae, D.; Shiraiwa, K.; Yamamoto, K.; Konishi, Y.

    1987-12-01

    The carcinogenic activities of sodium chlorite in B6C3F1 mice were examined. Sodium chlorite was given at concentration of 0 (control), 0.025% (low dose), or 0.05% (high dose) in the drinking water of 150 female and 150 male mice for 80 weeks, after which time the animals were returned to distilled water without sodium chlorite. All mice were sacrificed 85 weeks from the beginning of the experiment. The incidence of tumor-bearing animals was 32% (control), 34% (low dose), and 26% (high dose) in female mice, and 46% (control), 57% (low dose), and 53% (high dose) in male mice. The types and incidence of neoplasms that occurred frequently in each group of both sexes were similar to those observed spontaneously in B6C3F1 mice. The incidence of lymphomas/leukemias in the high dose group of females (2%), however, was lower than that in the control group (15%). Furthermore, the incidence of pulmonary adenomas in the high dose group of males (12%) was higher than that in the control group (0%), but neither dose-related increases in the adenoma incidences nor increased incidences of the adenocarcinomas were observed. These results indicated no clear evidence of a carcinogenic potential of sodium chlorite in B6C3F1 mice.

  14. SODIUM CHLORITE ADMINISTRATION IN LONG-EVANS RATS: REPRODUCTIVE AND ENDOCRINE EFFECTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Long-Evans rats, 4-6 weeks of age, were given access to 0, 1, 10, or 100 ppm sodium chlorite in deionized water ad libitum as drinking water. Males were evaluated for sperm parameters and reproductive tract histopathology following the breeding. Females were exposed throughout ge...

  15. REACTIONS OF CHLORITE WITH ACTIVATED CARBON AND WITH VANILLIC ACID AND INDAN ADSORBED ON ACTIVATED CARBON

    EPA Science Inventory

    The reaction between chlorite (CO2(-1)) and vanillic acid, at pH 6.0 in the presence of granular activated carbon (GAC), yielded several reaction products identifiable by GC/MS; no products were found in the absence of GAC. Indan and ClO2 or ClO2(-1) reacted in aqueous solution a...

  16. IIb trioctahedral chlorite from the Barberton greenstone belt: crystal structure and rock composition constraints with implications to geothermometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, Xiaogang; Byerly, Gary R.; Ferrell, Ray E., Jr.

    IIb trioctahedral chlorite in the Barberton greenstone belt (BGB) metavolcanic rocks was formed during pervasive greenschist metamorphism. The chem-ical composition of the chlorite is highly variable, with the Fe/(Fe+Mg) ratio ranging from 0.12 to 0.8 among 53 samples. The chemical variation of the chlorite results from the chemical diversity of the host rock, especially the MgO content of the rock, but major details of the variation pattern of the chlorite are due to the crystal structure of the chlorite. All major cation abundances in the chlorite are strongly correlated with each other. Sil-icon increases with Mg and decreases with Fe, while AlIV and AlVI decrease with Mg and increase with Fe2+. A complex exchange vector explains over 90% of the chlorite compositional variation: Mg4SiFe2+-3AlVI-1 AlIV-1, which has 3 parts Fe-Mg substitution coupled with one part tschermakite substitution. This ratio is required to maintain the charge and site balances and the dimensional fit between the tetrahedral and octahedral sheets. The subtle change in Al substitution in chlorite implies that AlVI is preferentially ordered in the M(4) site, and about 84% of the AlVI present is in the M(4) sites when they are nearly filled with AlVI. Based on 47 analyzed chlorite-bearing rock samples, chlorite (Chl) composition is strongly correlated with the MgO content of the host rock. Calculated correlation coefficients are +0.91 for SiO2Chl-MgORock, -0.87 for Al2O3Chl-MgORock, +0.89 for MgOChl-MgORock, and -0.85 for FeOChl-MgORock. Only weak correlations have been found between chlorite oxides and other oxides of rock (between same oxides in chlorite and rock: SiO2-0.67, Al2O3+0.59, FeO -0.41). However, MgOChl is saturated at about 36 wt% in rocks that have MgO above 22 wt%.The MgOChl is about 5 wt% when the host rock approaches 0 wt% of MgO. This implies that Mg substituting into the chlorite is approximately limited to 1.5-9.2 Mg atoms per formula unit and 1.0-3.2 AlIV. Chlorite

  17. Surface energy of talc and chlorite: Comparison between electronegativity calculation and immersion results.

    PubMed

    Douillard, Jean-Marc; Salles, Fabrice; Henry, Marc; Malandrini, Harold; Clauss, Frédéric

    2007-01-15

    The surface energies of talc and chlorite is computed using a simple model, which uses the calculation of the electrostatic energy of the crystal. It is necessary to calculate the atomic charges. We have chosen to follow Henry's model of determination of partial charges using scales of electronegativity and hardness. The results are in correct agreement with a determination of the surface energy obtained from an analysis of the heat of immersion data. Both results indicate that the surface energy of talc is lower than the surface energy of chlorite, in agreement with observed behavior of wettability. The influence of Al and Fe on this phenomenon is discussed. Surface energy of this type of solids seems to depend more strongly on the geometry of the crystal than on the type of atoms pointing out of the surface; i.e., the surface energy depends more on the physics of the system than on its chemistry. PMID:17081554

  18. Kinetics and mechanism of oxidation of nitrous acid by chlorite ion

    SciTech Connect

    Lengyel, I.; Gaspar, V.; Beck, M.T.

    1988-01-14

    Although the oxidation of nitrite by chlorite both stoichiometrically and kinetically is a fairly simple reaction when nitrite is in excess and the pH is above 4, it becomes exceedingly complex in acidic solution containing chlorite in excess. Cl/sub 2/O/sub 2/ appears to be a key intermediate, the transitory formation of which explains both the formation of ClO/sub 2/ and peculiar three-extrema E versus time curve. Assuming that the electrode process on the bright Pt electrode is HOCl + e/sup -/ + H/sup +/ = Cl/sub 2/ + H/sub 2/O, the reaction is an oligooscillatory one in which the concentration of HOCl exhibits three extrema at most.

  19. Serpentines, talc, chlorites, and their high-pressure phase transitions: a Raman spectroscopic study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reynard, Bruno; Bezacier, Lucile; Caracas, Razvan

    2015-09-01

    Raman spectra of magnesian phyllosilicates belonging to the serpentine, talc, and chlorite groups have been obtained at ambient conditions, and at high pressures and up to 200 °C in order to study high-pressure transformations in the 10 GPa range. The complex and distinct Raman spectra of these minerals allow straightforward identification, which may otherwise be difficult from optical microscopy. High-pressure measurements are in good agreement with DFT calculations for talc and lizardite. Pressure-induced displacive modifications are identified in lizardite and antigorite serpentines, and in chlorite at ~4, 7 and 8 GPa, respectively, while talc shows no transition up to ~11 GPa. At high temperature, the high-pressure distortions of serpentines shift to higher pressures. Given the stability limits of these minerals, and the natural range of P-T conditions, none of the high-pressure distortions observed at high pressure are likely to occur at depth in the Earth.

  20. Manipulating Conserved Heme Cavity Residues of Chlorite Dismutase: Effect on Structure, Redox Chemistry, and Reactivity

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Chlorite dismutases (Clds) are heme b containing oxidoreductases that convert chlorite to chloride and molecular oxygen. In order to elucidate the role of conserved heme cavity residues in the catalysis of this reaction comprehensive mutational and biochemical analyses of Cld from “Candidatus Nitrospira defluvii” (NdCld) were performed. Particularly, point mutations of the cavity-forming residues R173, K141, W145, W146, and E210 were performed. The effect of manipulation in 12 single and double mutants was probed by UV–vis spectroscopy, spectroelectrochemistry, pre-steady-state and steady-state kinetics, and X-ray crystallography. Resulting biochemical data are discussed with respect to the known crystal structure of wild-type NdCld and the variants R173A and R173K as well as the structures of R173E, W145V, W145F, and the R173Q/W146Y solved in this work. The findings allow a critical analysis of the role of these heme cavity residues in the reaction mechanism of chlorite degradation that is proposed to involve hypohalous acid as transient intermediate and formation of an O=O bond. The distal R173 is shown to be important (but not fully essential) for the reaction with chlorite, and, upon addition of cyanide, it acts as a proton acceptor in the formation of the resulting low-spin complex. The proximal H-bonding network including K141-E210-H160 keeps the enzyme in its ferric (E°′ = −113 mV) and mainly five-coordinated high-spin state and is very susceptible to perturbation. PMID:24364531

  1. An AFM study of the chlorite-fluid interface. [Atomic Force Microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Vrdoljak, G.A.; Henderson, G.S.; Fawcett, J.J. . Dept. of Geology)

    1992-01-01

    Chlorite is a ubiquitous mineral in many geologic environments and plays an important role in elemental adsorption and retention in soils. Chlorite has a 2:1 layer structure consisting of two tetrahedral sheets with an octahedral sheet between them (talc-like layer). The 2:1 layer is charge balanced and hydrogen-bonded by an interlayer of MgOH[sub 6] octahedra (brucite-like layer). The nature of chlorite's structure, its ease of imaging, and perfect 001 cleavage, make this mineral an ideal substrate for use in elemental adsorption studies in solution, with the AFM. The 001 cleavage plane of a 2b polytype with composition (Mg[sub 4.4]Fe[sub 0.6]Al[sub 1.0])[(Si[sub 2.9]Al[sub 1.1])]O[sub 10](OH)[sub g] has been imaged in air, water, and oil by atomic force microscopy. Dissolution features are observed in water, showing sub-micron features dissolving in real-time. Atomic resolution of both the talc-like and brucite-like layers has been obtained in air. However, only the tetrahedral sheet of the talc-like layer has been imaged at atomic resolution in oil and water, which may indicate a structural instability of the brucite-like surface in solution. Measurements of the unit-cell dimensions (a and b) for the talc-like layer in the three different media indicate a structural expansion of the mineral surface in solution. The a unit cell dimension expands by 7.4 [+-] 0.1% when in water; conversely, the b dimension varies greatly when in oil ([minus]10% to +20%), relative to air. The effects of these solution media on the structure of chlorite are revealed by characterization with the AFM. This information should prove useful in future studies of adsorption onto layer silicates.

  2. “Development of an Automated On-line Electrochemical Chlorite Ion Sensor”

    PubMed Central

    Myers, John N.; Steinecker, William H.; Sandlin, Zechariah D.; Cox, James A.; Gordon, Gilbert; Pacey, Gilbert E.

    2012-01-01

    A sensor system for the automatic, in-line, determination of chlorite ion is reported. Electroanalytical measurements were performed in electrolyte-free liquids by using an electrochemical probe (EC), which enables in-line detection in high-resistance media such as disinfected water. Cyclic voltammetry scan rate studies suggest that the current arising from the oxidation of chlorite ion at an EC probe is mass-transfer limited. By coupling FIA with an EC probe amperometric cell, automated analysis was achieved. This sensor is intended to fulfill the daily monitoring requirements of the EPA DBP regulations for chlorite ion. Detection limits of 0.02-0.13 mg/L were attained, which is about one order of magnitude below the MRDL. The sensor showed no faradaic signal for perchlorate, chlorate, or nitrate. The lifetime and stability of the sensor were investigated by measuring calibration curves over time under constant-flow conditions. Detection limits of <0.1 mg/L were repeatedly achieved over a period of three weeks. PMID:22608440

  3. Convection-Induced Fingering Fronts in the Chlorite-Trithionate Reaction.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yang; Zhou, Wenxiu; Zheng, Ting; Zhao, Yuemin; Gao, Qingyu; Pan, Changwei; Horváth, Attila K

    2016-04-28

    Based upon a former study, the chlorite-trithionate reaction can avoid the side reactions arising from the well-known alkaline decomposition of polythionates, making it a suitable candidate for investigating spatial front instabilities in a reaction-diffusion-convection system. In this work, the chlorite-trithionate reaction was investigated in a Hele-Shaw cell, in which fingering patterns were observed over a wide range of reactant concentrations. A significant density increment crossing the propagating front indicates that the fingering pattern is generated as a consequence of the buoyancy-driven instability due to the density changes of solute when the gap thickness is less than 4 mm. The velocity of the steepest descent in the propagating front depends almost linearly on the gap thickness but displays a saturation-like profile on the trithionate concentration as well as a maximum on the chlorite concentration. Numerical simulation using the Stokes-Brinkman Equation coupled to the reaction-diffusion processes, including hydrogen ion autocatalysis and consumption, reproduces the observed fingering fronts. PMID:27059304

  4. Nanoscale channels on ectomycorrhizal-colonized chlorite: Evidence for plant-driven fungal dissolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gazzè, Salvatore A.; Saccone, Loredana; Vala Ragnarsdottir, K.; Smits, Mark M.; Duran, Adele L.; Leake, Jonathan R.; Banwart, Steven A.; McMaster, Terence J.

    2012-09-01

    The roots of many trees in temperate and boreal forests are sheathed with ectomycorrhizal fungi (EMF) that extend into the soil, forming intimate contact with soil minerals, from which they absorb nutrient elements required by the plants and, in return, are supported by the organic carbon photosynthesized by the trees. While EMF are strongly implicated in mineral weathering, their effects on mineral surfaces at the nanoscale are less documented. In the present study, we investigated the effects of symbiotic EMF on the topography of a chlorite mineral using atomic force microscopy. A cleaning protocol was successfully applied to remove fungal hyphae without altering the underlying mineral structure and topography. Examination of the exposed chlorite surface showed the presence of primary channels, of the order of a micron in width and up to 50 nm in depth, the morphology of which strongly indicates a fungal-induced origin. Smaller secondary channels were observed extending from the primary channels and would appear to be involved in their enlargement. The presence of channels is the first nanoscale demonstration of the effects of fungal interaction, fuelled by plant photosynthate, on the topography of a chlorite mineral, and it provides clear evidence of the ability of EMF to enhance mineral dissolution.

  5. How active site protonation state influences the reactivity and ligation of the heme in chlorite dismutase

    PubMed Central

    Streit, Bennett R.; Blanc, Béatrice; Lukat-Rodgers, Gudrun S.; Rodgers, Kenton R.; DuBois, Jennifer L.

    2010-01-01

    Chlorite dismutase catalyzes O2 release from chlorite with exquisite efficiency and specificity. The spectroscopic properties, ligand binding affinities, and steady state kinetics of chlorite dismutase from Dechloromonas aromatica were examined over pH 3–11.5 to gain insight into how the protonation state of the heme environment influences dioxygen formation. An acid/base transition was observed by UV/visible and resonance Raman spectroscopy with a pKa of 8.7, 2–3 pH units below analogous transitions observed in typical His-ligated peroxidases. This transition marks the conversion of a five coordinate high spin Fe(III) to a mixed high/low spin ferric-hydroxide, as confirmed by resonance Raman (rR) spectroscopy. The two Fe–OH stretching frequencies are quite low, consistent with a weak Fe–OH bond, despite the nearly neutral imidazole side chain of the proximal histidine ligand. The hydroxide is proposed to interact strongly with a distal H-bond donor, thereby weakening the Fe–OH bond. The rR spectra of Cld-CO as a function of pH reveal two forms of the complex, one in which there is minimal interaction of distal residues with the carbonyl oxygen and another, acidic form in which the oxygen is under the influence of positive charge. Recent crystallographic data reveal arginine 183 as the lone H-bond donating residue in the distal pocket. It is likely that this Arg is the strong, positively charged H-bond donor implicated by vibrational data to interact with exogenous axial heme ligands. The same Arg in its neutral (pKa ~ 6.5) form also appears to act as the active site base in binding reactions of protonated ligands, such as HCN, to ferric Cld. The steady state profile for the rate of chlorite decomposition is characterized by these same pKas. The 5 coordinate high spin acidic Cld is more active than the alkaline hydroxide-bound form. The acid form decomposes chlorite most efficiently when the distal Arg is protonated/cationic (maximum kcat = 2.0 (±0.6)

  6. Cloning, expression, purification, crystallization and preliminary X-ray diffraction analysis of chlorite dismutase: a detoxifying enzyme producing molecular oxygen

    PubMed Central

    de Geus, Daniël C.; Thomassen, Ellen A. J.; van der Feltz, Clarisse L.; Abrahams, Jan Pieter

    2008-01-01

    Chlorite dismutase, a homotetrameric haem-based protein, is one of the key enzymes of (per)chlorate-reducing bacteria. It is highly active (>2 kU mg−1) in reducing the toxic compound chlorite to the innocuous chloride anion and molecular oxygen. Chlorite itself is produced as the intermediate product of (per)chlorate reduction. The chlorite dismutase gene in Azospira oryzae strain GR-1 employing degenerate primers has been identified and the active enzyme was subsequently overexpressed in Escherichia coli. Chlorite dismutase was purified, proven to be active and crystallized using sitting drops with PEG 2000 MME, KSCN and ammonium sulfate as precipitants. The crystals belonged to space group P21212 and were most likely to contain six subunits in the asymmetric unit. The refined unit-cell parameters were a = 164.46, b = 169.34, c = 60.79 Å. The crystals diffracted X-rays to 2.1 Å resolution on a synchrotron-radiation source and a three-wavelength MAD data set has been collected. Determination of the chlorite dismutase structure will provide insights into the active site of the enzyme, for which no structures are currently available. PMID:18678943

  7. Mineralogy and geochemistry of laterites developed on chlorite schists in Tchollire region, North Cameroon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Banakeng, L. A.; Zame, P. Zo'o.; Tchameni, R.; Mamdem, L.; Bitom, D.

    2016-07-01

    Laterites developed from the weathering of chlorite schists have been studied in Tchollire region, North Cameroon. They include two profiles: a 5.5 m depth profile in Doudja site and a 12.3 m profile in Fimbe site. The chlorite schists have a lepidoblastic to lepidogranoblastic texture and are mainly composed of chlorite, muscovite, biotite, feldspars and quartz but that of Fimbe is marked by the presence of amphibole. It is felsic with a high SiO2 content (67%) and low Fe2O3 (5.8%) and MgO (2.4%) contents in Doudja site but has a lower content of SiO2 (46%) in the Fimbe site where it is mafic with higher contents in Fe2O3 (12.4%) and MgO (6.3%). The chlorite schists of Doudja show high contents in Zr, Sr, Ta, with moderate contents in Cr, V, U and Zn. That of Fimbe is particularly rich in Cr, V, Ni, Sr and Zn with a moderate Zr content. All chlorite schists have high barium contents (270-393 ppm) with LREE-enrichment. The soils are yellowish and, from bottom to top, are composed of a coarse saprolite, fine saprolite, loose clayey horizon and an organo mineral horizon. The main minerals are chlorite, muscovite, biotite, feldspars, quartz, smectites, vermiculite, kaolinite, hematite and goethite. In Doudja, SiO2 mainly decreases from the bottom to the top of the profile while, Al2O3 and Fe2O3 generally increase; in Fimbe, SiO2 and Al2O3 increase up the profile but Fe2O3 decreases; the general high Fe and corresponding decrease in Mg contents in the soils show that the smectite formed is nontronite. Chromium, V, Cu, Ba and Sr show high contents in the two studied profiles but Zr, U and Ta is higher in Doudja than in Fimbe. Copper generally has high contents in the loose clayey and organo mineral horizons. Nickel is higher in the Fimbe profile and probably issued from the Ni-rich mafic protolith. SiO2 has positive correlations with K2O, Zr, Li and Rb. Correlations of SiO2 with CaO, TiO2 and Cr are negative. Al2O3 and Fe2O3 have a positive correlation with Pb. Doudja

  8. S-oxygenation of thiocarbamides V: oxidation of tetramethylthiourea by chlorite in slightly acidic media.

    PubMed

    Chigwada, Tabitha; Mbiya, Wilbes; Chipiso, Kudzanai; Simoyi, Reuben H

    2014-08-01

    The reaction between tetramethylthiourea (TTTU) and slightly acidic chlorite has been studied. The reaction is much faster than comparable oxidations of the parent thiourea compound as well as other substituted thioureas. The stoichiometry of the reaction in excess oxidant showed a complete desulfurization of the thiocarbamide to yield the corresponding urea and sulfate: 2ClO2(-) + (Me2N)2C ═ S + H2O → (Me2N)2C ═ O + SO4(2-) + 2Cl(-) + 2H(+). The reaction mechanism is unique in that the most stable metabolite before formation of the corresponding urea is the S-oxide. This is one of the rare occasions in which a low-molecular-weight S-oxide has been stabilized without the aid of large steric groups. ESI-MS data show almost quantitative formation of the S-oxide and negligible formation of the sulfinic and sulfonic acids. TTTU, in contrast to other substituted thioureas, can only stabilize intermediate oxoacids, before formation of sulfate, in the form of zwitterions. With a stoichiometric excess of TTTU over oxidant, the TTTU dimer is the predominant product. Chlorine dioxide, which is formed from the reaction of excess chlorite and HOCl, is a very important reactant in the overall mechanism. It reacts rapidly with TTTU to reform ClO2(-). Oxidation of TTTU by chlorite has a complex dependence on acid as a result of chlorous acid dissociation and protonation of the thiol group on TTTU in high-acid conditions, which renders the thiol center a less effective nucleophile. PMID:24922053

  9. Redox interactions between Cr(VI) and Fe(II) in bioreduced biotite and chlorite.

    PubMed

    Brookshaw, Diana R; Coker, Victoria S; Lloyd, Jonathan R; Vaughan, David J; Pattrick, Richard A D

    2014-10-01

    Contamination of the environment with Cr as chromate (Cr(VI)) from industrial activities is of significant concern as Cr(VI) is a known carcinogen, and is mobile in the subsurface. The capacity of Fe(II)-containing phyllosilicates including biotite and chlorite to alter the speciation, and thus the mobility, of redox-sensitive contaminants including Cr(VI) is of great interest since these minerals are common in soils and sediments. Here, the capacity of bacteria, ubiquitous in the surface and near-surface environment, to reduce Fe(III) in phyllosilicate minerals and, thus, alter their redox reactivity was investigated in two-step anaerobic batch experiments. The model Fe(III)-reducing bacterium Geobacter sulfurreducens was used to reduce Fe(III) in the minerals, leading to a significant transformation of structural Fe(III) to Fe(II) of 0.16 mmol/g (∼ 40%) in biotite and 0.15 mmol/g (∼ 20%) in chlorite. The unaltered minerals could not remove Cr(VI) from solution despite containing a larger excess of Fe(II) than would be required to reduce all the added Cr(VI), unless they were supplied in a very high concentration (a 1:10 solid to solution ratio). By contrast, even at very low concentrations, the addition of bioreduced biotite and chlorite caused removal of Cr(VI) from solution, and surface and near surface X-ray absorption spectroscopy confirmed that this immobilization was through reductive transformation to Cr(III). We provide empirical evidence that the amount of Fe(II) generated by microbial Fe(III) reduction is sufficient to reduce the Cr(VI) removed and, in the absence of reduction by the unaltered minerals, suggest that only the microbially reduced fraction of the iron in the minerals is redox-active against the Cr(VI). PMID:25196156

  10. Dimeric chlorite dismutase from the nitrogen-fixing cyanobacterium Cyanothece sp. PCC7425.

    PubMed

    Schaffner, Irene; Hofbauer, Stefan; Krutzler, Michael; Pirker, Katharina F; Bellei, Marzia; Stadlmayr, Gerhard; Mlynek, Georg; Djinovic-Carugo, Kristina; Battistuzzi, Gianantonio; Furtmüller, Paul G; Daims, Holger; Obinger, Christian

    2015-06-01

    It is demonstrated that cyanobacteria (both azotrophic and non-azotrophic) contain heme b oxidoreductases that can convert chlorite to chloride and molecular oxygen (incorrectly denominated chlorite 'dismutase', Cld). Beside the water-splitting manganese complex of photosystem II, this metalloenzyme is the second known enzyme that catalyses the formation of a covalent oxygen-oxygen bond. All cyanobacterial Clds have a truncated N-terminus and are dimeric (i.e. clade 2) proteins. As model protein, Cld from Cyanothece sp. PCC7425 (CCld) was recombinantly produced in Escherichia coli and shown to efficiently degrade chlorite with an activity optimum at pH 5.0 [kcat 1144 ± 23.8 s(-1), KM 162 ± 10.0 μM, catalytic efficiency (7.1 ± 0.6) × 10(6) M(-1) s(-1)]. The resting ferric high-spin axially symmetric heme enzyme has a standard reduction potential of the Fe(III)/Fe(II) couple of -126 ± 1.9 mV at pH 7.0. Cyanide mediates the formation of a low-spin complex with k(on)  = (1.6 ± 0.1) × 10(5) M(-1) s(-1) and k(off) = 1.4 ± 2.9 s(-1) (KD ∼ 8.6 μM). Both, thermal and chemical unfolding follows a non-two-state unfolding pathway with the first transition being related to the release of the prosthetic group. The obtained data are discussed with respect to known structure-function relationships of Clds. We ask for the physiological substrate and putative function of these O2 -producing proteins in (nitrogen-fixing) cyanobacteria. PMID:25732258

  11. Mechanism of and exquisite selectivity for O–O bond formation by the heme-dependent chlorite dismutase

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Amanda Q.; Streit, Bennett R.; Zdilla, Michael J.; Abu-Omar, Mahdi M.; DuBois, Jennifer L.

    2008-01-01

    Chlorite dismutase (Cld) is a heme b-dependent, O–O bond forming enzyme that transforms toxic chlorite (ClO2−) into innocuous chloride and molecular oxygen. The mechanism and specificity of the reaction with chlorite and alternate oxidants were investigated. Chlorite is the sole source of dioxygen as determined by oxygen-18 labeling studies. Based on ion chromatography and mass spectrometry results, Cld is highly specific for the dismutation of chlorite to chloride and dioxygen with no other side products. Cld does not use chlorite as an oxidant for oxygen atom transfer and halogenation reactions (using cosubstrates guaiacol, thioanisole, and monochlorodimedone, respectively). When peracetic acid or H2O2 was used as an alternative oxidant, oxidation and oxygen atom transfer but not halogenation reactions occurred. Monitoring the reaction of Cld with peracetic acid by rapid-mixing UV-visible spectroscopy, the formation of the high valent compound I intermediate, [(Por•+)FeIV = O], was observed [k1 = (1.28 ± 0.04) × 106 M−1 s−1]. Compound I readily decayed to form compound II in a manner that is independent of peracetic acid concentration (k2 = 170 ± 20 s−1). Both compound I and a compound II-associated tryptophanyl radical that resembles cytochrome c peroxidase (Ccp) compound I were observed by EPR under freeze-quench conditions. The data collectively suggest an O–O bond-forming mechanism involving generation of a compound I intermediate via oxygen atom transfer from chlorite, and subsequent recombination of the resulting hypochlorite and compound I. PMID:18840691

  12. Three-dimensional convection-driven fronts of the exothermic chlorite-tetrathionate reaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schuszter, Gábor; Pótári, Gábor; Horváth, Dezső; Tóth, Ágota

    2015-06-01

    Horizontally propagating autocatalytic reaction fronts in fluids are often accompanied by convective motion in the presence of gravity. We experimentally and numerically investigate the stable complex three-dimensional pattern arising in the exothermic chlorite-tetrathionate reaction as a result of the antagonistic thermal and solutal contribution to the density change. By particle image velocimetry measurements, we construct the flow field that stabilizes the front structure. The calculations applied for incompressible fluids using the empirical rate-law model reproduce the experimental observations with good agreement.

  13. Horizontally propagating three-dimensional chemo-hydrodynamic patterns in the chlorite-tetrathionate reaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pópity-Tóth, Éva; Horváth, Dezső; Tóth, Ágota

    2012-09-01

    Planar reaction fronts resulting from the coupling of exothermic autocatalytic reactions and transport processes can be deformed by convection in the presence of gravity field. We have experimentally investigated how buoyancy affects the spatiotemporal pattern formation at various solution thicknesses in three-dimensional medium. In the chlorite-tetrathionate reaction, a stable structure propagating horizontally with constant velocity and geometry develops when appropriately thick solutions are studied. Both the horizontal and the vertical projections of the resulting three-dimensional structures are quantitatively characterized: the smooth leading edge of the front is independent of the solution thickness and the structured trailing edge ends in a center cusp with a constant angle.

  14. Three-dimensional convection-driven fronts of the exothermic chlorite-tetrathionate reaction.

    PubMed

    Schuszter, Gábor; Pótári, Gábor; Horváth, Dezső; Tóth, Ágota

    2015-06-01

    Horizontally propagating autocatalytic reaction fronts in fluids are often accompanied by convective motion in the presence of gravity. We experimentally and numerically investigate the stable complex three-dimensional pattern arising in the exothermic chlorite-tetrathionate reaction as a result of the antagonistic thermal and solutal contribution to the density change. By particle image velocimetry measurements, we construct the flow field that stabilizes the front structure. The calculations applied for incompressible fluids using the empirical rate-law model reproduce the experimental observations with good agreement. PMID:26117124

  15. Chlorite topography and dissolution of the interlayer studied with Atomic Force Microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Gazze, Salvatore; Stack, Andrew G; Ragnarsdottir, K. Vala; McMaster, Terence

    2014-01-01

    Chlorite has a structure composed of a combination of two distinct layers, the tetrahedral15 octahedral-tetrahedral (TOT) and the interlayer (i.e. the octahedral layer between TOT layers). In this study, the morphology and dissolution of chlorite in pure water has been visualized using Atomic Force Microscopy. Upon cleavage, the TOT layer shows atomically flat terraces and steps, while the interlayer presents strips and voids. In pure water, dissolution channels and equilateral, mono-oriented triangular etch pits form in the interlayer and lead to progressively increased solubilisation. Dissolution channels are proposed to originate from structural defects, while a conceptual model is discussed to explain the presence of triangular etch pits. In this model, their formation is driven by the different reactivity of the two octahedral configurations along the etch pits. It is not currently known which of these is the most stable configuration, however we propose arguments that point towards a specific orientation. The conceptual model is supported by experimental data and is potentially applicable to all mineral structures constituted by continuous octahedral layers.

  16. Evaluation of experimental teat dip containing sodium chlorite and lactic acid by excised teat assay.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, A L; Oliver, S P; Fydenkevez, M E

    1984-12-01

    An experimental teat dip containing sodium chlorite and lactic acid, diluted in water, was evaluated by excised teat protocol. The teat dip was tested against 21 microorganisms. Included were: Staphylococcus aureus, Streptococcus agalactiae, Streptococcus dysgalactiae, Streptococcus uberis, Escherichia coli, Klebsiella oxytoca, Klebsiella pneumoniae, and Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Numerous strains were tested for strain differences. Environmental bacteria were included because of their increasing importance as a cause of bovine mastitis. All excised teats were dipped in a bacterial suspension containing about 1 X 10(8) cfu/ml. Negative control teats were not dipped in a germicidal compound. Positive controls were dipped in 1% iodophor. Effectiveness of the experimental teat dip was expressed as the percent reduction in mean log of bacteria recovered from dipped teats as compared to numbers recovered from control teats. The sodium chlorite - lactic acid dip caused a greater percent log reduction than iodophor for 14 of 21 strains tested. However, differences were generally slight. The experimental teat dip appeared effective against Gram-negative bacteria. Some differences in percent log reduction were observed between strains of the same species. Lowest effectiveness and greatest strain variation were observed with Staphylococcus aureus for both dips tested. PMID:6530497

  17. Dissimilatory perchlorate reduction linked to aerobic methane oxidation via chlorite dismutase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oremland, R. S.; Baesman, S. M.; Miller, L. G.

    2013-12-01

    The presence of methane (CH4) in the atmosphere of Mars is controversial yet the evidence has aroused scientific interest, as CH4 could be a harbinger of extant or extinct microbial life. There are various oxidized compounds present on the surface of Mars that could serve as electron acceptors for the anaerobic oxidation of CH4, including perchlorate (ClO4-). We examined the role of perchlorate, chlorate (ClO3-) and chlorite (ClO2-) as oxidants linked to CH4 oxidation. Dissimilatory perchlorate reduction begins with reduction of ClO4- to ClO2- and ends with dismutation of chlorite to yield chloride (Cl-) and molecular oxygen (O2). We explored the potential for aerobic CH4 oxidizing bacteria to couple with oxygen derived from chlorite dismutation during dissimilatory perchlorate reduction. Methane (0.2 kPa) was completely removed within several days from the N2-flushed headspace above cell suspensions of methanotrophs (Methylobacter albus strain BG8) and perchlorate reducing bacteria (Dechloromonas agitata strain CKB) in the presence of 5 mM ClO2-. Similar rates of CH4 consumption were observed for these mixed cultures whether they were co-mingled or segregated under a common headspace, indicating that direct contact of cells was not required for methane consumption to occur. We also observed complete removal of 0.2 kPa CH4 in bottles containing dried soil (enriched in methanotrophs by CH4 additions over several weeks) and D. agitata CKB and in the presence of 10 mM ClO2-. This soil (seasonally exposed sediment) collected from the shoreline of a freshwater lake (Searsville Lake, CA) demonstrated endogenous CH4 uptake as well as perchlorate, chlorate and chlorite reduction/dismutation. However, these experiments required physical separation of soil from the aqueous bacterial culture to allow for the partitioning of O2 liberated from chlorite dismutation into the shared headspace. Although dissimilatory reduction of ClO4- and ClO3- could be inferred from the

  18. Preservation of anomalously high porosity in deeply buried sandstones by grain-coating chlorite: Examples from the Norwegian Continental Shelf

    SciTech Connect

    Ehrenberg, S.N. )

    1993-07-01

    Five Lower to Middle Jurassic sandstone reservoirs from the Norwegian sector provide examples of deep porosity preservation caused by grain-coating, authigenic chlorite. Wide porosity variations in clean sandstones correlate with an abundance of grain-coating chlorite and consequent inhibition of quarts cementation. Maximum porosities tend to decrease with increasing depth but generally are 10-15% higher than would be predicted from regional trends of mean porosity vs. depth. It is proposed in this paper that the high chlorite content of the porous zones reflects syndepositional concentration of Fe-rich marine clays analogous to minerals of the modern verdine facies. Fe-clay mineralization would have been localized where Fe-rich river water was discharged into the sea. The syndepositional clays were transformed during burial diagenesis into grain coatings of radially oriented chlorite crystals. Petrographic relationships indicate that these coatings grew mainly before the beginning of quartz cementation and feldspar grain dissolution (probably within the first 2 km of burial) but after grain contacts had become adjusted by mechanical compaction. The Norwegian examples demonstrate that a wide range of nearshore marine sand-body types is susceptible to chlorite mineralization. The distribution of anomalous porosity and the proportion of the net sand affected depend upon sedimentary facies architecture and the pattern of discharge of Fe-rich river water during sand deposition. This phenomenon can be critically important for hydrocarbon exploration because it can provide good reservoir quality at depths far below the [open quotes]economic basement[close quotes] originally defined on the basis of sandstones lacking chlorite coatings. 58 refs., 25 figs., 1 tab.

  19. Chemical and Steady-State Kinetic Analyses of a Heterologously Expressed Heme Dependent Chlorite Dismutase†

    PubMed Central

    Streit, Bennett R.; DuBois, Jennifer L.

    2013-01-01

    Chlorite dismutase carries out the heme-catalyzed decomposition of ClO2– to Cl– and O2, an unusual transformation with biotechnological and bioremediative applications. The enzyme has been successfully overexpressed for the first time in highly functional form in Escherichia coli and its steady state kinetics studied. The purified enzyme is abundant (55 mg/L cell culture), highly active (~4.7 × 103 μmol of ClO2– min–1 mg–1 subunit) and nearly stoichiometric in heme; further, it shares spectroscopic and physicochemical features with chlorite dismutases previously isolated from three organisms. A careful study of the enzyme's steady state kinetics has been carried out. ClO2– consumption and O2 release rates were measured, yielding comparable values of kcat (4.5 × 105 min–1), Km (~215 μM), and kcat/Km (3.5 × 107 M–1 s–1) via either method (4 °C, pH 6.8; all values referenced per heme-containing subunit). ClO2–:O2 stoichiometry exhibited a 1:1 relationship under all conditions measured. Though the value of kcat/Km indicates near diffusion control of the reaction, viscosogens had no effect on kcat/Km or Vmax. The product O2 did not inhibit the reaction at saturating [O2], but Cl– is a mixed inhibitor with relatively high values of KI (225 mM for enzyme and 95.6 mM for the enzyme–substrate complex), indicating a relatively low affinity of the heme iron for halogen ions. Chlorite irreversibly inactivates the enzyme after ~1.7 × 104 turnovers (per heme) and with a half-life of 0.39 min, resulting in bleaching of the heme chromophore. The inactivation KI (Kinact) of 166 μM is similar in magnitude to Km, consistent with a common Michaelis complex on the pathway to both reaction and inactivation. The one-electron peroxidase substrate guaiacol offers incomplete protection of the enzyme from inactivation. Mechanisms in keeping with the available data and the properties of other well-described heme enzymes are proposed. PMID:18422344

  20. Dimeric chlorite dismutase from the nitrogen‐fixing cyanobacterium C yanothece sp. PCC7425

    PubMed Central

    Schaffner, Irene; Hofbauer, Stefan; Krutzler, Michael; Pirker, Katharina F.; Bellei, Marzia; Stadlmayr, Gerhard; Mlynek, Georg; Djinovic‐Carugo, Kristina; Battistuzzi, Gianantonio; Furtmüller, Paul G.; Daims, Holger

    2015-01-01

    Summary It is demonstrated that cyanobacteria (both azotrophic and non‐azotrophic) contain heme b oxidoreductases that can convert chlorite to chloride and molecular oxygen (incorrectly denominated chlorite ‘dismutase’, Cld). Beside the water‐splitting manganese complex of photosystem II, this metalloenzyme is the second known enzyme that catalyses the formation of a covalent oxygen–oxygen bond. All cyanobacterial Clds have a truncated N‐terminus and are dimeric (i.e. clade 2) proteins. As model protein, Cld from C yanothece sp. PCC7425 (CCld) was recombinantly produced in E scherichia coli and shown to efficiently degrade chlorite with an activity optimum at pH 5.0 [k cat 1144 ± 23.8 s−1, KM 162 ± 10.0 μM, catalytic efficiency (7.1 ± 0.6) × 106 M−1 s−1]. The resting ferric high‐spin axially symmetric heme enzyme has a standard reduction potential of the Fe(III)/Fe(II) couple of −126 ± 1.9 mV at pH 7.0. Cyanide mediates the formation of a low‐spin complex with k on = (1.6 ± 0.1) × 105 M−1 s−1 and k off = 1.4 ± 2.9 s−1 (KD ∼ 8.6 μM). Both, thermal and chemical unfolding follows a non‐two‐state unfolding pathway with the first transition being related to the release of the prosthetic group. The obtained data are discussed with respect to known structure–function relationships of Clds. We ask for the physiological substrate and putative function of these O2‐producing proteins in (nitrogen‐fixing) cyanobacteria. PMID:25732258

  1. Chlorite Dissolution Rates From 25 to 275 degrees and pH 3 to 10

    DOE Data Explorer

    Carroll, Susan

    2013-09-27

    We have calculated a chlorite dissolution rate equation at far from equilibrium conditions by combining new data (20 experiments at high temperature) with previously published data Smith et al. 2013 and Lowson et al. 2007. All rate data (from the 127 experiments) are tabulated in this data submission. More information on the calculation of the rate data can be found in our FY13 Annual support (Carroll LLNL, 2013) which has been submitted to the GDR. The rate equation fills a data gap in geothemal kinetic data base and can be used directly to estimate the impact of chemical alteration on all geothermal processes. It is especially important for understanding the role of chemical alteration in the weakening for shear zones in EGS systems.

  2. Enhancement of the nanofibrillation of wood cellulose through sequential periodate-chlorite oxidation.

    PubMed

    Liimatainen, Henrikki; Visanko, Miikka; Sirviö, Juho Antti; Hormi, Osmo E O; Niinimaki, Jouko

    2012-05-14

    Sequential regioselective periodate-chlorite oxidation was employed as a new and efficient pretreatment to enhance the nanofibrillation of hardwood cellulose pulp through homogenization. The oxidized celluloses with carboxyl contents ranging from 0.38 to 1.75 mmol/g could nanofibrillate to highly viscous and transparent gels with yields of 100-85% without clogging the homogenizer (one to four passes). On the basis of field-emission scanning electron microscopy images, the nanofibrils obtained were of typical widths of approximately 25 ± 6 nm. All of the nanofibrillar samples maintained their cellulose I crystalline structure according to wide-angle X-ray diffraction results, and the crystallinity index was approximately 40% for all samples. PMID:22512713

  3. Bioavailability of 2,4-D sorbed to a chlorite-like complex.

    PubMed

    McGhee, I; Sannino, F; Gianfreda, L; Burns, R G

    1999-07-01

    An Al(OH)x-montmorillonite (chlorite) complex (AM18) was prepared and 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid (2,4-D) sorbed to saturation. After several washing cycles the 'strongly sorbed' 2,4-D was 507 micrograms g-1 AM18. The bioavailability of sorbed 2,4-D was assessed in a minimal salts medium with the AM18-2,4-D as the sole C and energy source. Over a 28-day period a Pseudomonas sp. degraded 23% more of the sorbed 2,4-D than could be accounted for by desorption from AM18 in the non-inoculated controls. Possible explanations for the increase in bioavailability are presented. PMID:10399845

  4. Fe-SAPONITE and Chlorite Growth on Stainless Steel in Hydrothermal Engineered Barrier Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheshire, M. C.; Caporuscio, F. A.; McCarney, M.

    2012-12-01

    The United States recently has initiated the Used Fuel Disposition campaign to evaluate various generic geological repositories for the disposal of high-level, spent nuclear fuel within environments ranging from hard-rock, salt/clay, to deep borehole settings. Previous work describing Engineered Barrier Systems (EBS) for repositories focused on low temperature and pressure conditions. The focus of this experimental work is to characterize the stability and alteration of a bentonite-based EBS with different waste container materials in brine at higher heat loads and pressures. All experiments were run at ~150 bar and 125 to 300 C for ~1 month. Unprocessed bentonite from Colony, Wyoming was used in the experiments as the clay buffer material. The redox conditions for each system were buffered along the magnetite-iron oxygen fugacity univariant curve using Fe3O4 and Feo filings. A K-Na-Ca-Cl-based salt solution was chosen to replicate deep groundwater compositions. The experimental mixtures were 1) salt solution-clay; 2) salt solution -clay-304 stainless steel; and 3) salt solution -clay-316 stainless steel with a water/bentonite ratio of ~9. Mineralogy and aqueous geochemistry of each experiment was evaluated to monitor the reactions that took place. No smectite illitization was observed in these reactions. However, it appears that K-smectite was produced, possibly providing a precursor to illitization. It is unclear whether reaction times were sufficient for bentonite illitization at 212 and 300 C or whether conditions conducive to illite formation were obtained. The more notable clay mineral reactions occurred at the stainless steel surfaces. Authigenic chlorite and Fe-saponite grew with their basal planes near perpendicular to the steel plate, forming a 10 - 40 μm thick 'corrosion' layer. Partial dissolution of the steel plates was the likely iron source for chlorite/saponite formation; however, dissolution of the Feo/Fe3O4 may also have acted as an iron source

  5. Deformation microstructure of the chlorite dunite from the Åheim, Norway

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jung, S.; Yamamoto, T.; Ando, J. I.; Jung, H.

    2015-12-01

    The microstructure of the chlorite dunite samples from the Åheim, Norway was analyzed to understand the evolution of the microstructure through the Scandian Orogeny and the subsequent exhumation process. The lattice preferred orientation (LPO) of olivine and the slip systems of the dislocations in olivine are analyzed and compared to understand the relationship of the olivine fabrics and dislocation microstructures of olivine and their evolution during the orogenic event. To determine the LPO of olivine, an electron back-scattered diffraction (EBSD) system was used. For the olivine crystals with the subgrain boundaries, EBSD mapping along the olivine subgrain boundaries were performed to determine the dominant slip system of dislocations in subgrain walls. In addition, the thickness-fringe method was applied to weak-beam dark-field (WBDF) images of TEM to identify the Burgers vector and the slip system of dislocations in olivine. The Åheim chlorite dunites show porphyroclastic texture with subgrain boundaries. The sample with a large grain size showed A-type olivine LPO, which corresponds to the initial stage of deformation. On the other hand, the other sample with mostly recrystallized olivine grains showed the B-type of olivine LPO and it represents the secondary stage deformation in the water-rich condition during exhumation process. The EBSD mapping and TEM observation revealed that most olivine subgrain boundaries consist of the dislocations with (001)[100] slip systems. These subgrain boundaries might be resulted from the later stage deformation with a moderate water content in olivine or low strain deformation. TEM observation with the thickness-fringe method revealed that the free dislocations with (010)[100] slip system of olivine were dominant for both samples. Our data suggest that the subgrain boundaries and free dislocations in the olivines represent the later stage deformation associated with the exhumation process.

  6. Controlled clinical evaluations of chlorine dioxide, chlorite and chlorate in man.

    PubMed Central

    Lubbers, J R; Chauan, S; Bianchine, J R

    1982-01-01

    To assess the relative safety of chronically administered chlorine water disinfectants in man, a controlled study was undertaken. The clinical evaluation was conducted in the three phases common to investigational drug studies. Phase I, a rising dose tolerance investigation, examined the acute effects of progressively increasing single doses of chlorine disinfectants to normal healthy adult male volunteers. Phase II considered the impact on normal subjects of daily ingestion of the disinfectants at a concentration of 5 mg/l. for twelve consecutive weeks. Persons with a low level of glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase may be expected to be especially susceptible to oxidative stress; therefore, in Phase III, chlorite at a concentration of 5 mg/l. was administered daily for twelve consecutive weeks to a small group of potentially at-risk glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase-deficient subjects. Physiological impact was assessed by evaluation of a battery of qualitative and quantitative tests. The three phases of this controlled double-blind clinical evaluation of chlorine dioxide and its potential metabolites in human male volunteer subjects were completed uneventfully. There were no obvious undesirable clinical sequellae noted by any of the participating subjects or by the observing medical team. In several cases, statistically significant trends in certain biochemical or physiological parameters were associated with treatment; however, none of these trends was judged to have physiological consequence. One cannot rule out the possibility that, over a longer treatment period, these trends might indeed achieve proportions of clinical importance. However, by the absence of detrimental physiological responses within the limits of the study, the relative safety of oral ingestion of chlorine dioxide and its metabolites, chlorite and chlorate, was demonstrated. PMID:6961033

  7. Identification of spectrally similar materials using the USGS Tetracorder algorithm: The calcite-epidote-chlorite problem

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dalton, J.B.; Bove, D.J.; Mladinich, C.S.; Rockwell, B.W.

    2004-01-01

    A scheme to discriminate and identify materials having overlapping spectral absorption features has been developed and tested based on the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) Tetracorder system. The scheme has been applied to remotely sensed imaging spectroscopy data acquired by the Airborne Visible and Infrared Imaging Spectrometer (AVIRIS) instrument. This approach was used to identify the minerals calcite, epidote, and chlorite in the upper Animas River watershed, Colorado. The study was motivated by the need to characterize the distribution of calcite in the watershed and assess its acid-neutralizing potential with regard to acidic mine drainage. Identification of these three minerals is difficult because their diagnostic spectral features are all centered at 2.3 ??m, and have similar shapes and widths. Previous studies overestimated calcite abundance as a result of these spectral overlaps. The use of a reference library containing synthetic mixtures of the three minerals in varying proportions was found to simplify the task of identifying these minerals when used in conjunction with a rule-based expert system. Some inaccuracies in the mineral distribution maps remain, however, due to the influence of a fourth spectral component, sericite, which exhibits spectral absorption features at 2.2 and 2.4 ??m that overlap the 2.3-??m absorption features of the other three minerals. Whereas the endmember minerals calcite, epidote, chlorite, and sericite can be identified by the method presented here, discrepancies occur in areas where all four occur together as intimate mixtures. It is expected that future work will be able to reduce these discrepancies by including reference mixtures containing sericite. ?? 2004 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Dual effectiveness of sodium chlorite for enzymatic browning inhibition and Escherichia coli inactivation on fresh-cut apples

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This study investigated the dual effectiveness of sodium chlorite (SC) for browning inhibition and microbial inactivation on fresh-cut apples. The SC treatment exhibited a strong inhibition on browning reaction of fresh-cut Red Delicious apples during cold storage. Test results from examination of t...

  9. Effects of various pH conditions on authigenic chlorite and kaolinite surface characteristics using SEM and x-ray microanalysis

    SciTech Connect

    Dogan, A.U.; Leung, W.K.

    1987-05-01

    Authigenic chlorite and kaolinite are major diagenetic minerals in petroleum-bearing sandstone units. Authigenic chlorite in marine sandstone units of the Upper Cretaceous Parkman formation of Wyoming occurs as grain coatings which line pores. Chlorite plates developed on grain surfaces perpendicular to grain margins, with individual crystals being about 3 to 5 microns in diameter and 0.1 micron thick. Authigenic kaolinite occurs as stacked pseudohexagonal booklets that fill pores. Its crystal diameter is about 10 microns. Well-developed chlorite and kaolinite crystals coexist in many sandstone units. Some workers claim that chlorite is extremely sensitive to acid, and some claim that acidic conditions are required to form kaolinite, although fresh water need not be the only source of acidity. In the Parkman formation, chlorite is well preserved in pores. Therefore, it appears that the chlorite-bearing units may not have been subjected to acidic conditions after chlorite was formed. However, kaolinite in these units appears to have precipitated after chlorite formation. If this is so, then acidic conditions required to form kaolinite would have destroyed earlier formed chlorite. To test this problem, a laboratory experiment was designed to show effects of varying pH conditions on these crystals. Experiments were done under atmospheric conditions. Solutions were maintained with pH of 4, 6, 7, 8, and 10. Physical chemical changes on crystal surfaces were studied using scanning electron microscopy, x-ray microanalysis, and Shape Analyzer. Details of the precipitation mechanism and kinetics of equilibrium of these minerals will be discussed.

  10. Scales of equilibrium and disequilibrium during cleavage formation in chlorite and biotite-grade phyllites, SE Vermont

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McWilliams, C.K.; Wintsch, R.P.; Kunk, M.J.

    2007-01-01

    Detailed electron microprobe analyses of phyllosilicates in crenulated phyllites from south-eastern Vermont show that grain-scale zoning is common, and sympathetic zoning in adjacent minerals is nearly universal. We interpret this to reflect a pressure-solution mechanism for cleavage development, where precipitation from a very small fluid reservoir fractionated that fluid. Multiple analyses along single muscovite, biotite and chlorite grains (30-200 ??m in length) show zoning patterns indicating Tschermakitic substitutions in muscovite and both Tschermakitic and di/trioctahedral substitutions in biotite and chlorite. Using cross-cutting relationships and mineral chemistry it is shown that these patterns persist in cleavages produced at metamorphic conditions of chlorite-grade, chlorite-grade overprinted by biotite-grade and biotite-grade. Zoning patterns are comparable in all three settings, requiring a similar cleavage-forming mechanism independent of metamorphic grade. Moreover, the use of 40Ar/ 39Ar geochronology demonstrates this is true regardless of age. Furthermore, samples with chlorite-grade cleavages overprinted by biotite porphyroblasts suggest the closure temperatures for the diffusion of Al, Si, Mg and Fe ions are greater than the temperature of the biotite isograd (>???400 ??C). Parallel and smoothly fanning tie lines produced by coexisting muscovite-chlorite, and muscovite-biotite pairs on compositional diagrams demonstrate effectively instantaneous chemical equilibrium and probably indicate simultaneous crystallization. These results do not support theories suggesting cleavages form in fluid-dominated systems. If crenulation cleavages formed in systems in which the chemical potentials of all major components are fixed by an external reservoir, then the compositions of individual grains defining these cleavages would be uniform. On the contrary, the fine-scale chemical zoning observed probably reflects a grain-scale process consistent with a

  11. Evidence for multi-stage metasomatism of chlorite-amphibole peridotites (Ulten Zone, Italy): Constraints from trace element compositions of hydrous phases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marocchi, Marta; Hermann, Jörg; Morten, Lauro

    2007-11-01

    Peridotites from the Ulten Zone (Upper Austroalpine Domain, Central-Eastern Alps, Italy) derive from a mantle wedge environment and record a complex metamorphic history. This study focuses on amphibole-spinel peridotites and chlorite-tremolite peridotites. Chlorite is generally closely intergrown with Cr-spinel, indicating that it grew at the expense of former Al-spinel. No garnet relics or chlorite pseudomorphs after garnet have been found. Moreover, amphibole and chlorite trace element patterns display no fractionation in HREE, suggesting that these chlorite peridotites never equilibrated in the garnet stability field. On the basis of textures, bulk rock and mineral major and trace element compositions three stages of metasomatism are documented in the mantle rocks. We propose that the earliest stage represents melt impregnation at plagioclase peridotite conditions and is unrelated to subduction. The metasomatism leading to spinel- and chlorite-amphibole peridotites is related to the progressive influx of a fluid with crustal signature, derived from neighbouring subducted continental crust as the mantle wedge peridotites approach the slab. The observation that garnet peridotites and chlorite peridotites, which never equilibrated in the garnet stability field, are hosted within the same gneisses, suggests that slices of mantle wedge peridotite with different P-T trajectories can be sampled by subducted and exhumed crust.

  12. A saponite and chlorite-rich clay assemblage in permian evaporite and red-bed strata, Palo Duro Basin, Texas Panhandle

    SciTech Connect

    Palmer, D.P.

    1987-01-01

    In this Department of Energy-funded project, the author describes lithology of core samples from two Department of Energy wells in Randall and Swisher Counties and determines clay mineralogy and X-ray diffraction response using 73 samples from the Randall County well and 40 samples from the Swisher County well. On the basis of his analyses, the author identifies the clay assemblage in the Palo Duro Basin evaporites as consisting of saponite, a magnesium-rich smectite; mixed-layer chlorite/smectite; chlorite/vermiculite; chlorite/swelling chlorite; vermiculite/swelling chlorite; chlorite, and illite. Chemical analyses reveal that the chemical composition of the mixed-layer clays is intermediate between normal aluminum-rich detrital clays and normal vermiculite and chlorite, magnesium clays of hydrothermal or metamorphic origin. The author postulates that rates and amounts of clay alteration are probably controlled by magnesium ion activity, brine salinity, brine pH, and sediment and clay residence time in the marine evaporite environment.

  13. Zn-Al-rich chlorite in interleaved phyllosilicate grains from the low-temperature metamorphic Ordovician terrane of Iglesiente, south-west Sardinia, Italy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cruciani, Gabriele; Franceschelli, Marcello; Battaglia, Stefano; Pasci, Sandro; Puxeddu, Mariano

    2015-12-01

    Zn-Al chlorite with a ZnO content of 2-3 wt% has been found in the Monte Argentu Formation that belongs to the external zone of the Variscan Sardinian Belt in SW Sardinia. This chlorite occurs in metasiltite rocks characterized by the alternation of dark-coloured layers rich in Fe- and Ti-oxides and light-coloured layers rich in quartz and phyllosilicates. The Zn-Al chlorite is associated with K-white mica, pyrophyllite, and quartz. The most common interleavings consist of K-white mica + Zn-Al chlorite, K-white mica + pyrophyllite, K-white mica + Zn-Al chlorite + pyrophyllite, and Zn-Al chlorite + pyrophyllite. The X-ray patterns of the <2 μm fraction of the investigated samples are characterized by peaks for illite, pyrophyllite, chlorite and quartz. Metamorphic temperatures of 300°-400°C have been estimated on the basis of the pyrophyllite occurrence. Pressure estimated on the basis of K-white mica composition is in the 0.3-0.6 GPa range.

  14. EXAFS Study of Sr sorption to Illite, Goethite, Chlorite, and Mixed Sediment under Hyperalkaline Conditions.

    PubMed

    Fuller, Adam J; Shaw, Samuel; Peacock, Caroline L; Trivedi, Divyesh; Burke, Ian T

    2016-03-29

    Strontium is an important contaminant radionuclide at many former nuclear sites. This paper investigates the effect of changing pH and ionic strength on the sorption of Sr to a range of common soil minerals. Specifically it focuses on the sorption of Sr onto illite, chlorite, goethite, and a mixed sediment. The interplay between ionic strength and pH was determined by varying the background ionic strength of the system using both NaCl (for a constant pH) and NaOH (to also vary pH). Under conditions of moderate pH, Sr sorption decreased with increasing ionic strength, due to competition between the Na and Sr atoms for the outer-sphere complexes. However, where increasing ionic strength was accompanied by increasing pH, Sr sorption remained high. This suggested that Sr was sorbed to the minerals without competition from background Na ions. Extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) spectra confirmed that at highly alkaline pH (>12.5) Sr was forming inner-sphere complexes on the surfaces of all minerals. This specific adsorption of the Sr (as SrOH(+)) explains why it was still adsorbed to the minerals under very high ionic strength conditions and was not out-competed by Na. PMID:26938867

  15. Long-lived oscillations in the chlorite-iodide-malonic acid reaction in batch

    SciTech Connect

    Noszticzius, Z.; Ouyang, Qi; McCormick, W.D.; Swinney, H.L.

    1992-05-20

    The title reaction is the subject of current interest because the first experimental Turing patterns were observed recently in this system. Here, the authors report the first observation of oscillations that are long lived (over 1 h) in this system in a batch reactor; even after cessation the oscillations can be restarted several times by adding ClO{sub 2} to the exhausted system. These low-frequency low-amplitude (LL) oscillations were detected with both platinum and iodide-selective electrodes in the chlorite-iodide-malonic acid (original CIMA) reaction and in the closely related chlorine dioxide-iodide-malonic acid (minimal CIMA) system. The LL oscillations follow after the already known high frequency oscillations, sometimes separated by a second induction period. LL oscillations can appear without any induction period if appropriate concentrations of chlorine dioxide, iodomalonic acid, and chloride (CIMA-Cl system) are established in a dilute sulfuric acid medium. In this case neither iodine, iodide, nor malonic acid is needed. Some suggestions are made regarding the mechanism of these newly discovered oscillations. 33 refs., 6 figs., 1 tab.

  16. Temperature micro-mapping and redox conditions of a chlorite zoning pattern in green-schist facies fault zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trincal, Vincent; Lanari, Pierre; Lacroix, Brice; Buatier, Martine D.; Charpentier, Delphine; Labaume, Pierre; Muñoz, Manuel

    2014-05-01

    Faults are major discontinuities driving fluid flows and playing a major role in precipitation of ore deposits. Mineral paragenesis and crystal chemistry depend on Temperature (T) condition, fluid composition but also on the redox environment of precipitation. The studied samples come from the Pic de Port Vieux thrust sheet, a minor thrust sheet associated to Gavarnie thrust fault zone (Central Pyrenees). The Pic de Port Vieux Thrust sheet comprises a 1-20 meter thick layer of Triassic red beds and mylonitized Cretaceous limestone. The thrust sheet is affected by faults and cleavage; the other important deformation product is a set of veins filled by quartz and chlorite. Microstructural and mineralogical investigations were performed based on the previous work of Grant (1992). The crystallization of chlorite is syn-tectonic and strongly controlled by the fluid circulation during the Gavarnie thrust sheet emplacement. Chlorite precipitated in extension veins, crack-seal shear veins or in open cavities. The chlorite filling the open cavities occurs as pseudo-uniaxial plates arranged in rosette-shaped aggregates. These aggregates appear to have developed as a result of radial growth of the chlorite platelets. According to point and microprobe X-ray images, these chlorites display oscillatory chemical zoning patterns with alternating iron rich and magnesium rich bands. The chlorite composition ranges from Fe rich pole (Si2.62Al1.38O10(Al1.47Fe1.87Mg2.61)6(OH)8) to Mg rich pole (Si2.68Al1.31O10(Al1.45Fe1.41Mg3.06)6(OH)8). In metamorphic rocks, zoning pattern or rimmed minerals results for varying P or T conditions and can be used to unravel the P-T history of the sample. In the present study, temperature maps are derived from standardized microprobe X-ray images using the program XMapTools (Lanari et al 2014). The (Fe3+/Fetot) value in chlorite was directly measured using μXANES spot analyses collected at the Fe-K edge. The results indicate a homogeneous temperature of

  17. Redox Interactions of Tc(VII), U(VI), and Np(V) with Microbially Reduced Biotite and Chlorite.

    PubMed

    Brookshaw, Diana R; Pattrick, Richard A D; Bots, Pieter; Law, Gareth T W; Lloyd, Jonathan R; Mosselmans, J Fredrick W; Vaughan, David J; Dardenne, Kathy; Morris, Katherine

    2015-11-17

    Technetium, uranium, and neptunium are contaminants that cause concern at nuclear facilities due to their long half-life, environmental mobility, and radiotoxicity. Here we investigate the impact of microbial reduction of Fe(III) in biotite and chlorite and the role that this has in enhancing mineral reactivity toward soluble TcO4(-), UO2(2+), and NpO2(+). When reacted with unaltered biotite and chlorite, significant sorption of U(VI) occurred in low carbonate (0.2 mM) buffer, while U(VI), Tc(VII), and Np(V) showed low reactivity in high carbonate (30 mM) buffer. On reaction with the microbially reduced minerals, all radionuclides were removed from solution with U(VI) reactivity influenced by carbonate. Analysis by X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) confirmed reductive precipitation to poorly soluble U(IV) in low carbonate conditions and both Tc(VII) and Np(V) in high carbonate buffer were also fully reduced to poorly soluble Tc(IV) and Np(IV) phases. U(VI) reduction was inhibited under high carbonate conditions. Furthermore, EXAFS analysis suggested that in the reaction products, Tc(IV) was associated with Fe, Np(IV) formed nanoparticulate NpO2, and U(IV) formed nanoparticulate UO2 in chlorite and was associated with silica in biotite. Overall, microbial reduction of the Fe(III) associated with biotite and chlorite primed the minerals for reductive scavenging of radionuclides: this has clear implications for the fate of radionuclides in the environment. PMID:26488884

  18. EFFECT OF EXOGENOUS GLUTATHIONE, GLUTATHIONE REDUCTASE, CHLORINE DIOXIDE, AND CHLORITE ON OSMOTIC FRAGILITY OF RAT BLOOD IN VITRO

    EPA Science Inventory

    Chlorine dioxide (ClO2), chlorite (ClO2(-1)), and chlorate (ClO3(-1)) in drinking water decreased blood glutathione and RBC osmotic fragility in vivo. The osmotic fragility and glutathione content were also studied in rat blood treated with ClO2, ClO2(-1), ClO3(-1) in vitro. RBC ...

  19. Timing and origin of zircon-bearing chlorite schists in the Ronda peridotites (Betic Cordilleras, Southern Spain)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Esteban, J. J.; Cuevas, J.; Tubía, J. M.; Liati, A.; Seward, D.; Gebauer, D.

    2007-11-01

    This paper reports the finding of zircon-bearing chlorite schists in the south-western part of the Sierra Bermeja, the largest massif of the Ronda peridotites (Alpujarride Complex, Betic Cordilleras, Spain). The chlorite schists contain unusually high amounts of zircon and monazite, never previously recorded in the granite dykes intruded into the peridotites nor in their country rocks. Structural, petrographic, geochemical and geochronological data suggest that late high temperature fluids/melts emanating from the crustally derived granite dykes locally altered the peridotites. The large, euhedral and U-rich zircons are very different to those of the granite dykes but probably formed from late high temperature fluids/melts. U-Pb SHRIMP data of these zircons yielded an age of 21.8 ± 0.5 Ma, leading to a precise age estimation for the emplacement of the granite dykes. In the course of later serpentinization processes chlorite schist formation took place during cooling at lower temperatures (289-322 °C). Fission-track zircon ages at 19.2 ± 1.1 Ma date this episode of cooling during exhumation of the peridotites.

  20. Redox Thermodynamics of High-Spin and Low-Spin Forms of Chlorite Dismutases with Diverse Subunit and Oligomeric Structures

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Chlorite dismutases (Clds) are heme b-containing oxidoreductases that convert chlorite to chloride and dioxygen. In this work, the thermodynamics of the one-electron reduction of the ferric high-spin forms and of the six-coordinate low-spin cyanide adducts of the enzymes from Nitrobacter winogradskyi (NwCld) and Candidatus “Nitrospira defluvii” (NdCld) were determined through spectroelectrochemical experiments. These proteins belong to two phylogenetically separated lineages that differ in subunit (21.5 and 26 kDa, respectively) and oligomeric (dimeric and pentameric, respectively) structure but exhibit similar chlorite degradation activity. The E°′ values for free and cyanide-bound proteins were determined to be −119 and −397 mV for NwCld and −113 and −404 mV for NdCld, respectively (pH 7.0, 25 °C). Variable-temperature spectroelectrochemical experiments revealed that the oxidized state of both proteins is enthalpically stabilized. Molecular dynamics simulations suggest that changes in the protein structure are negligible, whereas solvent reorganization is mainly responsible for the increase in entropy during the redox reaction. Obtained data are discussed with respect to the known structures of the two Clds and the proposed reaction mechanism. PMID:23126649

  1. O2-evolving Chlorite Dismutase as a Tool to Study O2-Utilizing Enzymes†

    PubMed Central

    Dassama, Laura M. K.; Yosca, Timothy H.; Conner, Denise A.; Lee, Michael H.; Blanc, Béatrice; Streit, Bennett R.; Green, Michael T.; DuBois, Jennifer L.; Krebs, Carsten; Bollinger, J. Martin

    2012-01-01

    The direct interrogation of fleeting intermediates by rapid-mixing kinetic methods has significantly advanced our understanding of enzymes that utilize dioxygen. The gas’s modest aqueous solubility (< 2 mM at 1 atm) presents a technical challenge to this approach, because it limits the rate of formation and extent of accumulation of intermediates. This challenge can be overcome by use of the heme enzyme chlorite dismutase (Cld1) for the rapid, in situ generation of O2 at concentrations far exceeding 2 mM. This method was used to define the [O2] dependence of the reaction of the class Ic ribonucleotide reductase (RNR) from Chlamydia trachomatis, in which the enzyme’s MnIV/FeIII cofactor forms from a MnII/FeII complex and O2 via a MnIV/FeIV intermediate, at effective O2 concentrations as high as ~10 mM. With a more soluble receptor, myoglobin, an O2 adduct was accumulated to > 6 mM in < 15 ms. Finally, the C–H-bond-cleaving FeIV-oxo complex, J, in taurine:α-ketoglutarate dioxygenase and superoxo-Fe2III/III complex, G, in myo-inositol oxygenase, and the tyrosyl-radical-generating Fe2III/IV intermediate, X, in Escherichia coli RNR were all accumulated to yields more than twice those previously attained. This means of in situ O2 evolution permits a > 5 mM “pulse” of O2 to be generated in < 1 ms at the easily accessible [Cld] of 50 μM. It should therefore significantly extend the range of kinetic and spectroscopic experiments that can routinely be undertaken in the study of these enzymes and could also facilitate resolution of mechanistic pathways in cases of either sluggish or thermodynamically unfavorable O2-addition steps. PMID:22304240

  2. The effects of oil on As(V) adsorption on illite, kaolinite, montmorillonite and chlorite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wainipee, Wimolporn; Cuadros, Javier; Sephton, Mark A.; Unsworth, Catherine; Gill, Martin G.; Strekopytov, Stanislav; Weiss, Dominik J.

    2013-11-01

    The effect of oil on As(V) adsorption on clay minerals has been investigated using batch experiments at low and high pH, NaCl concentration and oil contents. Four clay minerals were chosen because of their abundance in sediments and their different crystal chemistry: illite, kaolinite, montmorillonite, and chlorite. The values for pH were 4 and 8 and salt concentrations were 0.001 and 0.7 M NaCl to appreciate the effects of changing salinity, e.g. from fresh water to seawater conditions. For the coating experiments, a well-characterised oil was used to survey the main effects of complex organic mixtures on adsorption and oil to clay mineral (w/w) ratios were 0.0325 and 0.3250. As(V) adsorption increased with increasing NaCl concentration, suggesting that the mechanisms of As(V) adsorption are related to the formation of surface complexes in which Na+ ions act as bridges between the clay surface and the As(V) anions. Cation bridging is also indicated by zeta potential measurements which show that higher NaCl concentrations along with the presence of As(V) can cause the clay particles and adsorbed ions to have a more negative overall charge. Adsorption is lower at higher pH due to the reduced number of positively charged sites on the edge of clay mineral layers. Oil coating reduces As(V) adsorption by decreasing the available surface area of clay minerals, except in the case of oil-coated montmorillonite, where surface area following dispersion in water is increased. The main variables controlling As(V) adsorption are surface area and surface charge density, as confirmed by a simplified quantitative model. These findings advance our ability to predict the effects of complex pollution events in various freshwater and marine settings.

  3. Preventing bovine mastitis by a postmilking teat disinfectant containing acidified sodium chlorite.

    PubMed

    Hillerton, J E; Cooper, J; Morelli, J

    2007-03-01

    A split-herd study was performed to determine if an acidified, sodium chlorite teat disinfectant, UDDERgold Platinum Germicidal Barrier Teat Dip (UG Pt, Ecolab Inc., Redmond, WA), was effective in preventing new intramammary infections (IMI) in lactating dairy cows compared with a licensed, iodophor teat disinfectant (Iosan, Novartis Animal Health, Ltd., Whittlesford, UK), and to show that the test product was tolerated equally well by teat skin. The study lasted 114 d and covered all weather conditions. The teats of 176 cows were dipped after each milking in UG Pt and the teats of 172 cows were dipped in Iosan, the positive-control product. Routine milk samples were taken from each quarter of every cow every 4 wk. Additional samples were taken from newly calved cows joining the trial and from cows with clinical signs of mastitis. Milk samples were cultured for the presence of bacteria and the cause of clinical mastitis. Each quarter was eligible for only 1 infection during the trial. The number of clinical cases was identical in each group (n = 13) and the number of subclinical infections was slightly lower in the UG Pt group than in the Iosan group (n = 27 and 31, respectively). These rates of infection suggest that the products did not differ in their ability to prevent a new IMI. At least 203 cows were assessed for skin integrity before the start of the trial and every 28 d throughout. The UG Pt teat dip had no adverse effects on teat condition. The prevalence of hyperkeratosis did not change with time for both groups (0.90 +/- 1.08 and 0.95 +/- 1.06 at wk 0 vs. 0.65 +/- 0.87 and 0.49 +/- 0.74 at wk 16 for fore and hind teats, respectively, for UG Pt and 1.02 +/- 1.25 and 1.16 +/- 1.11 at wk 0 vs. 0.51 +/- 0.71 and 0.45 +/- 0.65 at wk 16, respectively, for Iosan); no redness of the skin was observed in either group. Application of recommended statistical methods to demonstrate noninferiority was problematic. PMID:17297095

  4. Understanding the roles of strictly conserved tryptophan residues in O2 producing chlorite dismutases

    PubMed Central

    Blanc, Beatrice; Rodgers, Kenton R.

    2013-01-01

    The chlorite dismutases (Clds) degrade ClO2− to O2 and Cl− in perchlorate respiring bacteria, and they serve still poorly defined cellular roles in other diverse microbes. These proteins share 3 highly conserved Trp residues, W155, W156, and W227, on the proximal side of the heme. The Cld from Dechloromonas aromatica (DaCld) has been shown to form protein-based radicals in its reactions with ClO2− and peracetic acid. The roles of the conserved Trp residues in radical generation and in enzymatic function were assessed via spectroscopic and kinetic analysis of their Phe mutants. The W155F mutant was the most dramatically affected, appearing to lose the characteristic pentameric oligomerization state, secondary structure, and heme binding properties of the WT protein. The W156F mutant initially retains many features of the WT protein but over time acquires many of the features of W155F. Conversion to an inactive, heme-free form is accelerated by dilution, suggesting loss of the protein’s pentameric state. Hence, both W155 and W156 are important for heme binding and maintenance of the protein’s reactive pentameric structure. W227F by contrast retains many properties of the WT protein. Important differences are noted in the transient kinetic reactions with peracetic acid (PAA), where W227F appears to form an [Fe(IV)=O]-containing intermediate, which subsequently converts to an uncoupled [Fe(IV)=O + AA+.] system in a [PAA]-dependent manner. This is in contrast to the peroxidase-like formation of [Fe(IV)=O] coupled to a porphyrin π-cation radical in the WT protein, which decays in a [PAA]-independent manner. These observations and the lack of redox protection for the heme in any of the Trp mutants suggests a tendency for protein radical formation in DaCld that is independent of any of these conserved active site residues. PMID:23241559

  5. Chlorite dissolution rates under CO2 saturated conditions from 50 to 120 °C and 120 to 200 bar CO2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Black, Jay R.; Haese, Ralf R.

    2014-01-01

    Chlorite dissolution rates were measured in a series of batch reactor experiments testing the effect of pCO2, pH, chloride and bicarbonate concentrations and temperature. Chlorite is an important diagenetic mineral in sedimentary basins, often found cementing mineral grains and filling pore space in formations that may serve as reservoirs for storing carbon dioxide. Conflicting reports of whether chlorite acts as a barrier to reservoir rock reactivity or leads to enhanced porosity due to dissolution, after the injection of supercritical CO2 into a reservoir, makes studying the reactivity of chlorite in contact with CO2 saturated waters pertinent. Measured dissolution rates were initially rapid and decreased over time as the saturation state of solution relative to chlorite increased. Temperature had the strongest effect on dissolution rate, with an apparent activation energy of 16 ± 0.5 kJ mol-1 and rate constant of log k0 = -9.56 ± 0.07 mol m-2 s-1 assuming a rate law of the form: rate = k0exp(-EA/RT). The apparent activation energy is lower than previously accepted values, but is consistent with a study of chlorite dissolution using flow through techniques (Smith et al., 2013). Mineral dissolution rates are typically proton enhanced, but the lack of a significant pH effect or pCO2 effect on chlorite dissolution rate in this study suggests that the use of NaHCO3 to buffer the pH of CO2 saturated solutions led to an inhibition of mineral dissolution in competition with the expected pH effect. This is supported by the observed dissolution rate increasing dramatically (half a log unit) with the use of an organic acid buffer (KHpthalate) under CO2 free conditions. The effect of chloride (NaCl ∼5 to 50 g/L) was found not to affect the dissolution rate of chlorite. Various empirical rate laws are proposed and fit to the data and lead to the development of a surface complex model describing proton promoted dissolution and bicarbonate inhibition of chlorite

  6. Understanding How the Distal Environment Directs Reactivity in Chlorite Dismutase: Spectroscopy and Reactivity of Arg183 Mutants

    PubMed Central

    Blanc, Béatrice; Mayfield, Jeffery A.; McDonald, Claudia A.; Lukat-Rodgers, Gudrun S.; Rodgers, Kenton R.; DuBois, Jennifer L.

    2012-01-01

    The chlorite dismutase from Dechloromonas aromatica (DaCld) catalyzes the highly efficient decomposition of chlorite to O2 and chloride. Spectroscopic, equilibrium thermodynamic, and kinetic measurements have indicated that Cld has two pH sensitive moieties; one is the heme, and Arg183 in the distal heme pocket has been hypothesized to be the second. This active site residue has been examined by site-directed mutagenesis to understand the roles of positive charge and hydrogen bonding in O–O bond formation. Three Cld mutants, Arg183 to Lys (R183K), Arg183 to Gln (R183Q), and Arg183 to Ala (R183A), were investigated to determine their respective contributions to the decomposition of chlorite ion, the spin state and coordination states of their ferric and ferrous forms, their cyanide and imidazole binding affinities, and their reduction potentials. UV–visible and resonance Raman spectroscopies showed that DaCld(R183A) contains five-coordinate high-spin (5cHS) heme, the DaCld(R183Q) heme is a mixture of five-coordinate and six-coordinate high spin (5c/6cHS) heme, and DaCld(R183K) contains six-coordinate low-spin (6cLS) heme. In contrast to wild-type (WT) Cld, which exhibits pKa values of 6.5 and 8.7, all three ferric mutants exhibited pH-independent spectroscopic signatures and kinetic behaviors. Steady state kinetic parameters of the chlorite decomposition reaction catalyzed by the mutants suggest that in WT DaCld the pKa of 6.5 corresponds to a change in the availability of positive charge from the guanidinium group of Arg183 to the heme site. This could be due to either direct acid–base chemistry at the Arg183 side chain or a flexible Arg183 side chain that can access various orientations. Current evidence is most consistent with a conformational adjustment of Arg183. A properly oriented Arg183 is critical for the stabilization of anions in the distal pocket and for efficient catalysis. PMID:22313119

  7. Germicidal activity of a chlorous acid-chlorine dioxide teat dip and a sodium chlorite teat dip during experimental challenge with Staphylococcus aureus and Streptococcus agalactiae.

    PubMed

    Boddie, R L; Nickerson, S C; Adkinson, R W

    1998-08-01

    Three postmilking teat dips were tested for efficacy against Staphylococcus aureus and Streptococcus agalactiae in two separate studies using experimental challenge procedures that were recommended by the National Mastitis Council. The first study evaluated a barrier teat dip product containing chlorous acid-chlorine dioxide as the germicidal agent, and the second study evaluated a sodium chlorite product with a barrier component as well as a sodium chlorite product without a barrier component. The chlorous acid-chlorine dioxide teat dip reduced new intramammary infections (IMI) caused by Staph. aureus by 91.5% and reduced new IMI caused by Strep. agalactiae by 71.7%. The barrier dip containing sodium chlorite reduced new IMI caused by Staph. aureus and Strep. agalactiae by 41.0 and 0%, respectively. The nonbarrier dip containing sodium chlorite reduced new IMI caused by Staph. aureus by 65.6% and reduced new IMI caused by Strep. agalactiae by 39.1%. Teat skin and teat end conditions were evaluated before and after the second study; no deleterious effects among dipped quarters compared with control quarters were noted for the two sodium chlorite products. PMID:9749396

  8. The dissolution of biotite and chlorite at 25°C in the near-neutral pH region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malmström, Maria; Banwart, Steven; Lewenhagen, Jeanette; Duro, Lara; Bruno, Jordi

    1996-02-01

    We studied the dissolution of biotite and chlorite in laboratory systems with flow-through and batch reactors. The initial dissolution of biotite in the near-neutral pH region, under N 2(g) atmosphere is highly non-stoichiometric. A slow linear release of iron during a period of weeks indicates a surface-chemical-reaction-controlled mechanism of release for iron. The release of potassium is much faster than that of iron. A parabolic dependence of accumulated release with time suggests a diffusion-controlled mechanism of potassium release. The rates of magnesium, aluminium and silicon release are between those for potassium and iron and approach that of iron with time. There is no significant influence of (bi)carbonate or pH on biotite dissolution rate or stoichiometry in the pH region 7 < pH < 8.5. The release rates of elements from chlorite are close to stoichiometric and similar to the iron release rate from biotite. In closed batch reactors at near-basic pH the composition of test solutions in contact with biotite is apparently controlled by gibbsite (Al), kaolinite (Si) and Fe(III)-(hydr)oxide. We estimated a turn-over time (10 1-10 2 yr) for molecular oxygen and a time scale (10 months) to develop characteristic Fe(II) concentrations for a granitic groundwater.

  9. Succession of Permian and Mesozoic metasomatic events in the eastern Pyrenees with emphasis on the Trimouns talc-chlorite deposit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boutin, Alexandre; de Saint Blanquat, Michel; Poujol, Marc; Boulvais, Philippe; de Parseval, Philippe; Rouleau, Caroline; Robert, Jean-François

    2016-04-01

    Recent studies proposing pre-orogenic mantle exhumation models have helped renew the interest of the geosciences community in the Pyrenees, which should be now interpreted as a hyper-extended passive margin before the convergence between Iberia and Eurasia occurred. Unresolved questions of the Pyrenean geology, as well as the understanding of the formation of hyper-extended passive margins, are how the crust was thinned, and when, where and how the crustal breakoff occurred. The study of the Variscan and pre-Variscan Pyrenean basement is thus critical to document and understand this Cretaceous crustal thinning. In order to specify the timing of Mesozoic metasomatism and the associated deformation in the pre-Mesozoic basement of the Pyrenees, we carried out a U-Th-Pb laser ablation ICP-MS study on a large panel of REE and titanium-rich minerals (titanite and rutile) from talc-chlorite ores from the eastern Pyrenees, with a special emphasis on the Trimouns deposit, the world's largest talc quarry. Our results suggest that the Trimouns talc formation was restricted to the upper Aptian-Cenomanian time, while the talc and chlorite formation in the eastern Pyrenees occurred during several distinct Permian, Jurassic and Cretaceous episodes. These results give strong constraints on the tectonic setting of the Pyrenean domain during the transition between the Variscan and Alpine orogenic cycles, and particularly on when and how the upper crust was thinned before the crustal breakoff and the final mantle exhumation.

  10. Single Molecule Investigation of Glycine-Chlorite Interaction by Cross-Correlated Scanning Probe Microscopy and Quantum Mechanics Simulations.

    PubMed

    Moro, Daniele; Ulian, Gianfranco; Valdrè, Giovanni

    2015-04-21

    In this work, we studied the interaction of glycine with the (001) surface of chlorite mineral at a single molecule level by cross-correlating scanning probe microscopy (SPM) and ab initio quantum mechanics (QM) investigations. Chlorite mineral is particularly interesting and peculiar for the interaction with organic molecules because it presents an alternated stacking of brucite-like (hydrophobic) and talc-like (hydrophilic) layers of different polarities. Brucite-like is positive, whereas talc-like is negative. The experimental atomic force microscopy (AFM) observations show that glycine is stably and selectively adsorbed on the brucite-like layer, organized in monolayers with different patterns. The sizes of single molecules of glycine measured by AFM are in agreement with those calculated by QM. Glycine molecules were found to align both at the edges and on the terraces of the brucitic surface. QM simulations confirmed the AFM observations that glycine molecule is adsorbed with high adsorption energy preferentially with its plane parallel to the (001) brucite-like surface. QM also provided the geometry conformation of the molecule and the bonding scheme between glycine and brucite surface. This kind of data can be very helpful both to biotechnological applications of this substrate and to depict some important processes that might have been occurred in prebiotic environments. PMID:25830864

  11. DC conductivity, cationic exchange capacity, and specific surface area related to chemical composition of pore lining chlorites.

    PubMed

    Henn, François; Durand, Claudine; Cerepi, Adrian; Brosse, Etienne; Giuntini, J C

    2007-07-15

    Low resistivity in argillaceous sandstone reservoirs may be attributed either to the effect of microporosity, or to specific effects due to intrinsic clays' conducting properties or to other conducting minerals. In order to distinguish these effects, cation exchange capacity, specific surface areas, and dc conductivity of various pore lining chlorite-bearing sandstones from different hydrocarbon reservoir measurements are investigated. Cation exchange capacity and specific surface area are measured on whole rocks as well as on size-separated fractions. Both sets of values are low, in agreement with the structural and textural observations. The conductivity of these chlorites, measured in air conditions and after dehydration, is investigated by means of complex impedance spectroscopy on size-separated fractions as a function of temperature and compared to that of reference clays. The results show a large influence of moisture, applied electric field frequency, and temperature on the electrical properties. The magnitude of the dehydrated clays' conductivity is such that its influence on the conductivity of argillaceous sandstone is lower than that related to the presence of water or brine by several orders of magnitude. The dc conductivity and the related activation energy of the dehydrated samples appear to be related to the chemical composition of the clays. More specifically, a clear correlation occurs with the electrical charges of the clay network, that is to say with the location, i.e., tetrahedral or octahedral sites, of the substituting trivalent elements. PMID:17433348

  12. Effectiveness of acidified sodium chlorite and other sanitizers to control Escherichia coli O157:H7 on tomato surfaces.

    PubMed

    Inatsu, Yasuhiro; Kitagawa, Tomoko; Bari, Md Latiful; Nei, Daisuke; Juneja, Vijay; Kawamoto, Shinichi

    2010-06-01

    The use of a suitable sanitizer can reduce the risk of produce-related foodborne illnesses. We evaluated the effectiveness of several sanitizers to reduce inoculated Escherichia coli O157:H7 on the surface of cherry tomatoes (Solanum lycopersicum var. cerasiform). Depending on the method of inoculation (dipping/spotting), each of 80 g (eight tomatoes) of inoculated cherry tomatoes was washed in 400 mL of sanitizer solutions or 400 mL distilled water for 5 minutes. The effectiveness of sanitizers on spot-inoculated E. coli O157:H7 on tomato surfaces was found higher than on dip-inoculated tomatoes. Washing with water or chlorine water (0.1 g/L as free chlorine) could reduce 1.3 log CFU/g of E. coli O157:H7 in dip-inoculated (6.8 log CFU/g) tomatoes. Washing with lactic acid (LA) solution (1.0 g/L), phytic acid solution (1.0 g/L), calcinated seashells (oyster/sakhalin surf clam), and 1.0 g/L chitosan in 0.5 g/L LA (Chito) did not exhibit a significant higher effectiveness than that of water wash alone (1.0 log CFU/g). Acidified sodium chlorite (ASC) solution prepared from 0.5 g/L of sodium chlorite and 1.0 g/L LA or phytic acid reduced 3.5 log CFU/g of E. coli O157:H7 in dip-inoculated tomato surfaces. ASC (0.5 g/L of sodium chlorite and 1.0 g/L of LA) wash followed by a second wash with LA exhibited an additional sanitary effectiveness compared to a single wash with ASC. However, washing with ASC followed by a second wash with Chito exhibited an additional 1.0 log CFU/g reduction compared to a secondary wash with water. No significant difference of color, taste, and texture was observed among the washed cherry tomatoes. PMID:20113205

  13. Multiple hydrothermal and metamorphic events in the Kidd Creek volcanogenic massive sulphide deposit, Timmins, Ontario: evidence from tourmalines and chlorites

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Slack, J.F.; Coad, P.R.

    1989-01-01

    The tourmalines and chlorites record a series of multiple hydrothermal and metamorphic events. Paragenetic studies suggest that tourmaline was deposited during several discrete stages of mineralization, as evidence by brecciation and cross-cutting relationships. Most of the tourmalines have two concentric growth zones defined by different colours (green, brown, blue, yellow). Some tourmalines also display pale discordant rims that cross-cut and embay the inner growth zones and polycrystalline, multiple-extinction domains. Late sulphide veinlets (chalcopyrite, pyrrhotite) transect the inner growth zones and pale discordant rims of many crystals. The concentric growth zones are interpreted as primary features developed by the main ore-forming hydrothermal system, whereas the discordant rims, polycrystalline domains, and cross-cutting sulphide veinlets reflect post-ore metamorphic processes. Variations in mineral proportions and mineral chemistry within the deposit mainly depend on fluctuations in temperature, pH, water/rock ratios, and amounts of entrained seawater. -from Authors

  14. Reverse osmosis membrane composition, structure and performance modification by bisulphite, iron(III), bromide and chlorite exposure.

    PubMed

    Ferrer, O; Gibert, O; Cortina, J L

    2016-10-15

    Reverse osmosis (RO) membrane exposure to bisulphite, chlorite, bromide and iron(III) was assessed in terms of membrane composition, structure and performance. Membrane composition was determined by Rutherford backscattering spectrometry (RBS) and membrane performance was assessed by water and chloride permeation, using a modified version of the solution-diffusion model. Iron(III) dosage in presence of bisulphite led to an autooxidation of the latter, probably generating free radicals which damaged the membrane. It comprised a significant raise in chloride passage (chloride permeation coefficient increased 5.3-5.1 fold compared to the virgin membrane under the conditions studied) rapidly. No major differences in terms of water permeability and membrane composition were observed. Nevertheless, an increase in the size of the network pores, and a raise in the fraction of aggregate pores of the polyamide (PA) layer were identified, but no amide bond cleavage was observed. These structural changes were therefore, in accordance with the transport properties observed. PMID:27470468

  15. Chlorite dismutases, DyPs, and EfeB: 3 microbial heme enzyme families comprise the CDE structural superfamily

    PubMed Central

    Goblirsch, Brandon; Kurker, Richard C.; Streit, Bennett R.; Wilmot, Carrie M.; DuBois, Jennifer L.

    2011-01-01

    Heme proteins are extremely diverse, widespread, and versatile biocatalysts, sensors, and molecular transporters. The chlorite dismutase family of hemoproteins received its name due to the ability of the first-isolated members to detoxify anthropogenic ClO2−, a function believed to have evolved only in the last few decades. Family members have since been found in fifteen bacterial and archaeal genera, suggesting ancient roots. A structure- and sequence-based examination of the family is presented, in which key sequence and structural motifs are identified and possible functions for family proteins are proposed. Newly identified structural homologies moreover demonstrate clear connections to two other large, ancient, and functionally mysterious protein families. We propose calling them collectively the CDE superfamily of heme proteins. PMID:21354424

  16. Authigenic chlorite as a controlling factor in the exploration of Turonian/Coniacian turbidites in the Santos Basin

    SciTech Connect

    Porsche, E.; Lopes de Freitas, E.

    1996-08-01

    Upper Turonian/Coniacian and Campanian turbidites are major targets for petroleum exploration in the Santos Basin, southeastern Brazil. They occur between 140 and 1000 m of present water depth, are buried at about 4500 m, and reach thickness of up to 60 m. The main reservoir facies is composed of unstratified, fine to very fine grained, poorly sorted sandstones, which framework is compositionally immature, including a high proportion of feldspars and volcanic rock fragments. Early coating of grains by authigenic chlorite inhibited pressure solution and quartz cementation in the reservoir. This diagenetic characteristic allowed important preservation of primary porosity (>20%) in the reservoir; nevertheless its permeability never exceeds 30 ml. The study of sedimentary facies and related depositional processes has been conducted to predict the distribution of petroleum-bearing turbidites throughout the Santos Basin; this comprises a major challenge for the petroleum exploration in this important Brazilian exploration frontier.

  17. Phyllosilicate weathering pathways in chlorite-talc bearing soil parent materials, D.R. Congo: early findings.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dumon, Mathijs; Oostermeyer, Fran; Timmermans, Els; De Meulemeester, Aschwin; Mees, Florias; Van Driessche, Isabel; Erens, Hans; Bazirake Mujinya, Basile; Van Ranst, Eric

    2015-04-01

    The study of the formation and transformation of clay minerals is of the upmost importance to understand soil formation and to adjust land-use management to the land surface conditions. These clay minerals determine to a large extent the soil physical and chemical properties. It is commonly observed that over time the mineralogy of any parent material is transformed to a simple assemblage composed mostly of Al and Fe oxides and low-activity clays, e.g. kaolinite. This is especially obvious in the humid tropics, which have been protected from glacial erosion, allowing deep, highly weathered soils to form. Despite the abundant presence of kaolinite in these soils, its formation pathways are still under debate: either neoformation by dissolution-crystallisation reactions or solid-state transformation of 2:1 phyllosilicates. To elucidate this, weathering sequences in a unique 40 m core taken below a termite mound, reaching a talc-chlorite bearing substrate in the Lubumbashi area, Katanga, DR Congo are being investigated in detail using a.o. quantitative X-ray diffraction analysis, chemical characterization, micromorphology and µXRF-scanning with the main objective to improve the understanding of the formation pathways of kaolinite subgroup minerals in humid tropical environments. Based on an initial characterization of the core, two zones of interest were selected for more detailed analysis, for which the early findings will be presented. The first zone extends from ca. 9 m to 11 m below the surface is dominated by kaolinite but shows early traces of primary talc and micas. The second zone extends from 34 to 36 m below the surface and contains large amounts of chlorite, with smaller amounts of talc, micas and kaolinite.

  18. From chlorite dismutase towards HemQ–the role of the proximal H-bonding network in haeme binding

    PubMed Central

    Hofbauer, Stefan; Howes, Barry D.; Flego, Nicola; Pirker, Katharina F.; Schaffner, Irene; Mlynek, Georg; Djinović-Carugo, Kristina; Furtmüller, Paul G.; Smulevich, Giulietta; Obinger, Christian

    2016-01-01

    Chlorite dismutase (Cld) and HemQ are structurally and phylogenetically closely related haeme enzymes differing fundamentally in their enzymatic properties. Clds are able to convert chlorite into chloride and dioxygen, whereas HemQ is proposed to be involved in the haeme b synthesis of Gram-positive bacteria. A striking difference between these protein families concerns the proximal haeme cavity architecture. The pronounced H-bonding network in Cld, which includes the proximal ligand histidine and fully conserved glutamate and lysine residues, is missing in HemQ. In order to understand the functional consequences of this clearly evident difference, specific hydrogen bonds in Cld from ‘Candidatus Nitrospira defluvii’ (NdCld) were disrupted by mutagenesis. The resulting variants (E210A and K141E) were analysed by a broad set of spectroscopic (UV–vis, EPR and resonance Raman), calorimetric and kinetic methods. It is demonstrated that the haeme cavity architecture in these protein families is very susceptible to modification at the proximal site. The observed consequences of such structural variations include a significant decrease in thermal stability and also affinity between haeme b and the protein, a partial collapse of the distal cavity accompanied by an increased percentage of low-spin state for the E210A variant, lowered enzymatic activity concomitant with higher susceptibility to self-inactivation. The high-spin (HS) ligand fluoride is shown to exhibit a stabilizing effect and partially restore wild-type Cld structure and function. The data are discussed with respect to known structure–function relationships of Clds and the proposed function of HemQ as a coprohaeme decarboxylase in the last step of haeme biosynthesis in Firmicutes and Actinobacteria. PMID:26858461

  19. From chlorite dismutase towards HemQ - the role of the proximal H-bonding network in haeme binding.

    PubMed

    Hofbauer, Stefan; Howes, Barry D; Flego, Nicola; Pirker, Katharina F; Schaffner, Irene; Mlynek, Georg; Djinović-Carugo, Kristina; Furtmüller, Paul G; Smulevich, Giulietta; Obinger, Christian

    2016-01-01

    Chlorite dismutase (Cld) and HemQ are structurally and phylogenetically closely related haeme enzymes differing fundamentally in their enzymatic properties. Clds are able to convert chlorite into chloride and dioxygen, whereas HemQ is proposed to be involved in the haeme b synthesis of Gram-positive bacteria. A striking difference between these protein families concerns the proximal haeme cavity architecture. The pronounced H-bonding network in Cld, which includes the proximal ligand histidine and fully conserved glutamate and lysine residues, is missing in HemQ. In order to understand the functional consequences of this clearly evident difference, specific hydrogen bonds in Cld from 'Candidatus Nitrospira defluvii' (NdCld) were disrupted by mutagenesis. The resulting variants (E210A and K141E) were analysed by a broad set of spectroscopic (UV-vis, EPR and resonance Raman), calorimetric and kinetic methods. It is demonstrated that the haeme cavity architecture in these protein families is very susceptible to modification at the proximal site. The observed consequences of such structural variations include a significant decrease in thermal stability and also affinity between haeme b and the protein, a partial collapse of the distal cavity accompanied by an increased percentage of low-spin state for the E210A variant, lowered enzymatic activity concomitant with higher susceptibility to self-inactivation. The high-spin (HS) ligand fluoride is shown to exhibit a stabilizing effect and partially restore wild-type Cld structure and function. The data are discussed with respect to known structure-function relationships of Clds and the proposed function of HemQ as a coprohaeme decarboxylase in the last step of haeme biosynthesis in Firmicutes and Actinobacteria. PMID:26858461

  20. Assessment of sodium hypochlorite and acidified sodium chlorite as antimicrobial agents to inhibit growth of Escherichia coli O157:H7 and natural microflora on shredded carrots

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The influence of cold tap water, sodium hypochlorite (200 ppm) and acidified sodium chlorite (100, 250, 500 and 1000 ppm) washes on survival and growth of Escherichia coli O157:H7 inoculated onto shredded carrots was determined after treatment and 7 and 14 days of storage. Growth of total mesophilic...

  1. EVALUATION OF THE IMMUNOMODULATORY EFFECTS OF THE DISINFECTION BYPRODUCT, SODIUM CHLORITE, IN FEMALE B6C3F1 MICE: A DRINKING WATER STUDY

    EPA Science Inventory

    Evaluation of the Immunomodulatory Effects of the Disinfection By-product, Sodium chlorite, in Female B6C3f1 mice: A Drinking Water Study.

    Niel A. Karrow, Tal, L. Guo, J. Ann McCay, Greg W. Johnson, Ronnetta D. Brown, Debrorah L. Musgrove, Dori R. Germolec, Robert W. Lueb...

  2. Combination of sodium chlorite and calcium propionate reduces enzymatic browning and microbial population of fresh-cut ‘Granny Smith’ apples

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Tissue browning and microbial growth are the main concerns associated with fresh-cut apples. In this study, effects of sodium chlorite (SC) and calcium propionate (CP), individually and combined, on quality and microbial population of apple slices were investigated. ‘Granny Smith’ apple slices, dipp...

  3. Combined effects of sodium chlorite dip treatment and chitosan coatings on the quality of fresh-cut d’Anjou pears

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This study evaluated the effects of sodium chlorite (SC) alone and its sequential treatment with edible coatings on browning inhibition and quality maintenance of fresh-cut d’Anjou pears. Edible coatings were prepared from chitosan (CH) and its water soluble derivative: carboxymethyl chitosan (CMCH...

  4. Oxygen isotope fractionation between chlorite and water from 170 to 350 C: A preliminary assessment based on partial exchange and fluid/rock experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Cole, D.R.; Ripley, E.M.

    1999-02-01

    Oxygen isotope fractionations in laboratory systems have been determined between chlorite and water at 170--350 C. In one series of experiments, the Northrop-Clayton partial exchange method was used where three (sometimes four) isotopically different waters were reacted with chlorite. The percents of exchange determined for the four times from shortest to longest are 4.4, 6.5, 8.0, and 11.9. The fractionations calculated from the Northrop and Clayton method are in modest agreement for the four run durations: 0.13, 0.26, {minus}0.46, and {minus}0.55 per mil. Errors associated with each of these fractionations are quite large (e.g. {+-}1.2 per mil for the longest run). The value determined for the longest run of {approximately}20 weeks is the most reliable of the group and compares very closely with a value of {approximately}{minus}0.7 per mil estimated by Wenner and Taylor based on natural chlorides. Good agreement is also observed with the estimates, {minus}1.2 and {minus}1.3% calculated at 350 C for chlorite compositions with [({Sigma}Fe)/{Sigma}Fe + Mg] = 0.313 and 0.444, respectively, from equations given by Savin and Lee based on their empirical bond-type method. Additional fractionation data have been estimated from hydrothermal granite-fluid experiments where chlorite formed from biotite. Detailed thin section, scanning electron microscope (SEM), x-ray diffraction (XRD), and electron microprobe analyses demonstrate that biotite is altered exclusively to chlorite in 13 granite-fluid experiments conducted at the following conditions: T = 170--300 C, P = vapor saturation - 200 b, salinity = H{sub 2}O, 0.1 and 1 m NaCl, fluid/biotite mass ratios = 3--44, run durations = 122--772 h. The amount of chlorite, quantified through point counting and XRD, increased with increasing temperature, salinity, and time. The isotope compositions of chlorite were calculated from mass balance and compared to the final measured {delta}{sup 18}O of the fluids. The 10{sup 3}ln {alpha

  5. A thermodynamic model for di-trioctahedral chlorite from experimental and natural data in the system MgO-FeO-Al2O3-SiO2-H2O: applications to P- T sections and geothermometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lanari, Pierre; Wagner, Thomas; Vidal, Olivier

    2014-02-01

    We present a new thermodynamic activity-composition model for di-trioctahedral chlorite in the system FeO-MgO-Al2O3-SiO2-H2O that is based on the Holland-Powell internally consistent thermodynamic data set. The model is formulated in terms of four linearly independent end-members, which are amesite, clinochlore, daphnite and sudoite. These account for the most important crystal-chemical substitutions in chlorite, the Fe-Mg, Tschermak and di-trioctahedral substitution. The ideal part of end-member activities is modeled with a mixing-on-site formalism, and non-ideality is described by a macroscopic symmetric (regular) formalism. The symmetric interaction parameters were calibrated using a set of 271 published chlorite analyses for which robust independent temperature estimates are available. In addition, adjustment of the standard state thermodynamic properties of sudoite was required to accurately reproduce experimental brackets involving sudoite. This new model was tested by calculating representative P- T sections for metasediments at low temperatures (<400 °C), in particular sudoite and chlorite bearing metapelites from Crete. Comparison between the calculated mineral assemblages and field data shows that the new model is able to predict the coexistence of chlorite and sudoite at low metamorphic temperatures. The predicted lower limit of the chloritoid stability field is also in better agreement with petrological observations. For practical applications to metamorphic and hydrothermal environments, two new semi-empirical chlorite geothermometers named Chl(1) and Chl(2) were calibrated based on the chlorite + quartz + water equilibrium (2 clinochlore + 3 sudoite = 4 amesite + 4 H2O + 7 quartz). The Chl(1) thermometer requires knowledge of the (Fe3+/ΣFe) ratio in chlorite and predicts correct temperatures for a range of redox conditions. The Chl(2) geothermometer which assumes that all iron in chlorite is ferrous has been applied to partially recrystallized

  6. Matrix superpotentials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nikitin, Anatoly G.; Karadzhov, Yuri

    2011-07-01

    We present a collection of matrix-valued shape invariant potentials which give rise to new exactly solvable problems of SUSY quantum mechanics. It includes all irreducible matrix superpotentials of the generic form W=kQ+\\frac{1}{k} R+P, where k is a variable parameter, Q is the unit matrix multiplied by a real-valued function of independent variable x, and P and R are the Hermitian matrices depending on x. In particular, we recover the Pron'ko-Stroganov 'matrix Coulomb potential' and all known scalar shape invariant potentials of SUSY quantum mechanics. In addition, five new shape invariant potentials are presented. Three of them admit a dual shape invariance, i.e. the related Hamiltonians can be factorized using two non-equivalent superpotentials. We find discrete spectrum and eigenvectors for the corresponding Schrödinger equations and prove that these eigenvectors are normalizable.

  7. Combination of sodium chlorite and calcium propionate reduces enzymatic browning and microbial population of fresh-cut "Granny Smith" apples.

    PubMed

    Guan, Wenqiang; Fan, Xuetong

    2010-03-01

    Tissue browning and microbial growth are the main concerns associated with fresh-cut apples. In this study, effects of sodium chlorite (SC) and calcium propionate (CP), individually and combined, on quality and microbial population of apple slices were investigated. "Granny Smith" apple slices, dipped for 5 min in CP solutions at 0%, 0.5%, 1%, and 2% (w/v) either alone or in combination with 0.05% (w/v) SC, were stored at 3 and 10 degrees C for up to 14 d. Color, firmness, and microflora population were measured at 1, 7, and 14 d of storage. Results showed that CP alone had no significant effect on the browning of cut apples. Even though SC significantly inhibited tissue browning initially, the apple slices turned brown during storage at 10 degrees C. The combination of CP and SC was able to inhibit apple browning during storage. Samples treated with the combination of SC with CP did not show any detectable yeast and mold growth during the entire storage period at 3 degrees C. At 10 degrees C, yeast and mold count increased on apple slices during storage while CP reduced the increase. However, high concentrations of CP reduced the efficacy of SC in inactivating E. coli inoculated on apples. Overall, our results suggested that combination of SC with 0.5% and 1% CP could be used to inhibit tissue browning and maintain firmness while reducing microbial population. Practical Application: Apple slices, which contain antioxidants and other nutrient components, have emerged as popular snacks in food service establishments, school lunch programs, and for family consumption. However, the further growth of the industry is limited by product quality deterioration caused by tissue browning, short shelf-life due to microbial growth, and possible contamination with human pathogens during processing. Therefore, this study was conducted to develop treatments to reduce microbial population and tissue browning of "Granny Smith" apple slices. Results showed that an antimicrobial

  8. Linking deformation structures and low-temperature metamorphic recrystallization: chlorite-illite equilibria in the Nevado-Filabrides complex (Betic Cordillera, Spain)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jentzer, Michael; Verlaguet, Anne; Dubacq, Benoit; Agard, Philippe

    2013-04-01

    Ductile deformation is partly accommodated by mineral recrystallization. Mineral growth is controlled by both thermodynamics and reaction kinetics, where fluid availability and deformation also play a key role, in particular at temperatures below about 400°C. In these temperature conditions, phyllosilicates are ubiquitous and reactive, and often replace the peak metamorphic minerals along the retrograde path. Phyllosilicate assemblages are thus of potential to estimate the pressure-temperature conditions of deformation and provide information on the dynamics of shear zone development. This study focuses on a cross-section in the Nevado-Filabrides complex (Betic cordillera, Spain), which was exhumed along a ductile detachment. We present four outcrops located at different distances from the detachment, for which both the deformation structure densification with detachment proximity and the metamorphic P-T conditions have already been well constrained. The studied unit contains abundant chlorite and illite, often observed seemingly at textural equilibrium. In order to highlight the link between phyllosilicate crystallization and deformation, electron microprobe chemical maps were performed on deformation microstructures (schistosity, shear bands, pressure shadows) where chlorite and illite are present. Using a multi-equilibrium approach with a thermodynamic model for clay minerals, we estimated P-T conditions of crystallization for the successive chlorite-white mica and chlorite-illite assemblages. Obtained P-T paths span the range 250°C - 550°C. These results are in good agreement with calculated pseudo-sections but are inconsistent with parts of the previously published retrograde paths, whose low-pressure high-temperature results are likely offset. Interestingly, chlorite and illite seemingly at textural equilibrium were very rarely computed as such. This might be explained by 1) inadequacy of the thermodynamic models at the latest conditions of re

  9. Efficacy of sodium hypochlorite and acidified sodium chlorite in preventing browning and microbial growth on fresh-cut produce.

    PubMed

    Sun, Shih Hui; Kim, Su Jin; Kwak, Soo Jin; Yoon, Ki Sun

    2012-09-01

    The use of suitable sanitizers can increase the quality of fresh-cut produce and reduce the risk of foodborne illnesses. The objective of this study was to compare the washing effects of 100 mg/L sodium hypochlorite (SH) and 500 mg/L acidified sodium chlorite (ASC) on the prevention of enzymatic browning and the growth of microbial populations, including aerobic plate counts, E. coli, and coliforms, throughout storage at 4°C and 10°C. Fresh-cut zucchini, cucumbers, green bell peppers, and root vegetables such as potatoes, sweet potatoes, carrots, and radishes were used. Compared to SH washing, ASC washing significantly (p<0.05) reduced microbial contamination on the fresh-cut produce and prevented browning of fresh-cut potatoes and sweet potatoes during storage. More effective inhibition of aerobic plate counts and coliforms growth was observed on fresh-cut produce treated with ASC during storage at 10°C. Polyphenol oxidase (PPO) activity of fresh-cut potatoes and sweet potatoes was more effectively inhibited after washing with ASC. The use of 500 mg/L ASC can provide effective antimicrobial and anti-browning treatments of fresh-cut produce, including processed root vegetables. PMID:24471086

  10. Efficacy of Sodium Hypochlorite and Acidified Sodium Chlorite in Preventing Browning and Microbial Growth on Fresh-Cut Produce

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Shih Hui; Kim, Su Jin; Kwak, Soo Jin; Yoon, Ki Sun

    2012-01-01

    The use of suitable sanitizers can increase the quality of fresh-cut produce and reduce the risk of foodborne illnesses. The objective of this study was to compare the washing effects of 100 mg/L sodium hypochlorite (SH) and 500 mg/L acidified sodium chlorite (ASC) on the prevention of enzymatic browning and the growth of microbial populations, including aerobic plate counts, E. coli, and coliforms, throughout storage at 4°C and 10°C. Fresh-cut zucchini, cucumbers, green bell peppers, and root vegetables such as potatoes, sweet potatoes, carrots, and radishes were used. Compared to SH washing, ASC washing significantly (p<0.05) reduced microbial contamination on the fresh-cut produce and prevented browning of fresh-cut potatoes and sweet potatoes during storage. More effective inhibition of aerobic plate counts and coliforms growth was observed on fresh-cut produce treated with ASC during storage at 10°C. Polyphenol oxidase (PPO) activity of fresh-cut potatoes and sweet potatoes was more effectively inhibited after washing with ASC. The use of 500 mg/L ASC can provide effective antimicrobial and anti-browning treatments of fresh-cut produce, including processed root vegetables. PMID:24471086

  11. Thermal inactivation of Salmonella Enteritidis on chicken skin previously exposed to acidified Sodium chlorite or tri-sodium phosphate.

    PubMed

    Karuppasamy, K; Yadav, Ajit S; Saxena, Gaurav K

    2015-12-01

    Thermal inactivation of normal and starved cells of Salmonella Enteritidis on chicken skin previously exposed to different concentrations of acidified sodium chlorite (ASC) or tri-sodium phosphate (TSP) was investigated. Inoculated skin was pretreated with different concentration of ASC or TSP, packaged in bags, and then immersed in a circulating water bath at 60 to 68 °C. The recovery medium was Hektoen enteric agar. D-values, determined by linear regression, for normal cells on chicken skin, were 2.79, 1.17 and 0.53 min whereas D-values for starved cells were 4.15, 1.83 and 0.66 at 60, 64 and 68 °C, respectively. z-values for normal cells were 3.54 and for starved cells were 2.29. Pretreatment of Salmonella Enteritidis cells with 0 to 200 ppm of ASC or 0 to 1.0 % TSP resulted in lower D-values at all temperatures. Sensory results indicated no significance differences for control and treatments. Thus, results of this study indicated that pretreatment of chicken skin with ASC or TSP increased sensitivity of Salmonella Enteritidis to heat without affecting organoleptic quality of chicken meat. PMID:26604399

  12. Sync Matrix

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    2004-12-31

    Sync Matrix provides a graphic display of the relationships among all of the response activities of each jurisdiction. This is accomplished through software that organizes and displays the activities by jurisdiction, function, and time for easy review and analysis. The software can also integrate the displays of multiple jurisdictions to allow examination of the total response.

  13. A Case of Severe Chlorite Poisoning Successfully Treated With Early Administration of Methylene Blue, Renal Replacement Therapy, and Red Blood Cell Transfusion

    PubMed Central

    Gebhardtova, Andrea; Vavrinec, Peter; Vavrincova-Yaghi, Diana; Seelen, Mark; Dobisova, Anna; Flassikova, Zora; Cikova, Andrea; Henning, Robert H.; Yaghi, Aktham

    2014-01-01

    Abstract The case of a 55-year-old man who attempted suicide by ingesting <100 mL of 28% sodium chlorite solution is presented. On arrival in the intensive care unit, the patient appeared cyanotic with lowered consciousness and displayed anuria and chocolate brown serum. Initial laboratory tests revealed 40% of methemoglobin. The formation of methemoglobin was effectively treated with methylene blue (10% after 29 hours). To remove the toxin, and because of the anuric acute renal failure, the patient received renal replacement therapy. Despite these therapeutic measures, the patient developed hemolytic anemia and disseminated intravascular coagulation, which were treated with red blood cell transfusion and intermittent hemodialysis. These interventions led to the improvement of his condition and the patient eventually fully recovered. Patient gave written informed consent. This is the third known case of chlorite poisoning that has been reported. Based upon this case, we suggest the management of sodium chlorite poisoning to comprise the early administration of methylene blue, in addition to renal replacement therapy and transfusion of red blood cells. PMID:25144325

  14. Kinetics and Mechanism of the Chlorite-Periodate System: Formation of a Short-Lived Key Intermediate OClOIO3 and Its Subsequent Reactions.

    PubMed

    Baranyi, Nóra; Csekő, György; Valkai, László; Xu, Li; Horváth, Attila K

    2016-03-01

    The chlorite-periodate reaction has been studied spectrophotometrically in acidic medium at 25.0 ± 0.1 °C, monitoring the absorbance at 400 nm in acetate/acetic acid buffer at constant ionic strength (I = 0.5 M). We have shown that periodate was exclusively reduced to iodate, but chlorite ion was oxidized to chlorate and chlorine dioxide via branching pathways. The stoichiometry of the reaction can be described as a linear combination of two limiting stoichiometries under our experimental conditions. Detailed initial rate studies have clearly revealed that the formal kinetic orders of hydrogen ion, chlorite ion, and periodate ion are all strictly one, establishing an empirical rate law to be d[ClO2]/dt = kobs[ClO2(-)][IO4(-)][H(+)], where the apparent rate coefficient (kobs) was found to be 70 ± 13 M(-2) s(-1). On the basis of the experiments, a simple four-step kinetic model with three fitted kinetic parameters is proposed by nonlinear parameter estimation. The reaction was found to proceed via a parallel oxygen transfer reaction leading to the exclusive formation of chlorate and iodate as well as via the formation of a short-lived key intermediate OClOIO3 followed by its further transformations by a sequence of branching pathways. PMID:26849795

  15. Chlorite grain coats and preservation of primary porosity in deeply buried Springer Formation and lower Morrowan sandstones, southeastern Anadarko basin, Oklahoma

    SciTech Connect

    McBride, M.H.; Franks, P.C.; Larese, R.E.

    1987-08-01

    Petrographic studies of Upper Mississippian Springer and Lower Pennsylvanian (Morrowan) sandstones in six cores from the southeastern Anadarko basin, Caddo and Grady Counties, Oklahoma, reveal a complex diagenetic history that led to the destruction of much primary intergranular porosity. The Springer and lower Morrowan sandstones form prolific oil and gas reservoirs, despite the fine-grained nature of the rocks, the growth of authigenic clays, extensive cementation by quartz overgrowths and carbonate minerals, and burial depths of 11,500-14,800 ft. More than any other factors, the diagenetic creation and preservation of porosity are the major geologic controls on hydrocarbon production from these sandstones. Thin-section petrography and scanning electron microscopy show that porous intervals were formed mainly by extensive dissolution and leaching of detrital grains and authigenic cements. Locally, however, appreciable primary porosity was preserved in Cunningham (Springer Formation) and Primrose (Morrowan) sandstones (as much as 20% in one sample of Primrose sandstone) by the formation of chlorite grain coats on detrital quartz during the early stages of burial and diagenesis. The chlorite grain coats inhibited the occlusion of pore space by preventing pervasive cementation of the rocks by quartz overgrowths. Cross-plots of porosity versus the abundance of authigenic quartz and grain-coating chlorite document the relationship in two of the cores.

  16. Long-term in vivo carcinogenicity test of potassium bromate, sodium hypochlorite, and sodium chlorite conducted in Japan

    SciTech Connect

    Kurokawa, Y.; Takayama, S.; Konishi, Y.; Hiasa, Y.; Asahina, S.; Takahashi, M.; Maekawa, A.; Hayashi, Y.

    1986-11-01

    Long-term in vivo carcinogenicity tests of potassium bromate (KBrO/sub 3/), sodium hypochlorite (NaClO) and sodium chlorite (NaClO/sub 2/) have been conducted in Japan from 1977 to 1985. In these investigations, groups of approximately 50 male and 50 female F344 rats or B6C3F1 mice were given solutions of the compounds as their drinking water ad libitum at two dose levels determined on the basis of preliminary 13-weeks tests. The carcinogenic potential of KBrO/sub 3/ was tested by administering doses of 500 or 250 ppm to rats for 110 weeks. Significantly elevated incidences of renal cell tumors in males and females and mesotheliomas of the peritoneum in males as compared to controls were observed. When female mice were given KBrO/sub 3/ at doses of 1000 or 500 ppm for 78 weeks, no significant differences in tumor incidences between experimental and control groups were apparent. The incidences of tumors in NaClO-treated and control animals of both sexes were not significantly different in both rat and mouse studies. No statistically significant differences were observed in the incidences of tumor formation between NaClO/sub 2/-treated and control groups of rats male mice, the combined incidences of hyperplastic nodules and hepatocellular carcinomas of the liver in a low-dose group, and adenomas and adenocarcinomas of the lung in a high-dose group, were marginally increased compared to controls. The authors concluded that KBrO/sub 2/ was carcinogenic in rats of both sexes. NaClO was not carcinogenic in either rats and or mice under the conditions of the present studies. Although NaClO/sub 2/ was shown to be noncarcinogenic in rats, the results for mice were evaluated as inconclusive. Also the results of two-stage mouse skin carcinogenesis using KBrO/sub 3/, NaClO, and NaClO/sub 2/ are presented.

  17. Coupled Petrological and Geodynamic Models of Mantle Flow in Subduction Zones; the Importance of Chlorite in the Emergence of a Low-Viscosity Channel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, P. M.; Baker, L. J.; Asimow, P. D.; Gurnis, M. C.

    2007-12-01

    Seismic velocity and attenuation studies have shown that 5-20 km thick low velocity layers exist above seismically fast slabs and are associated with broad zones of high attenuation in many subduction zones. These observations are generally interpreted as formation of hydrous phases by dehydration of the slab, although the impact of water in nominally anhydrous minerals (NAM) on seismic wave propagation is largely unknown. Recent petrological experiments on hydrous peridotite at subduction zone conditions suggest that chlorite will be stable adjacent to the subducting slab in sufficient quantities to be a significant water sink. We use a scheme that couples a petrological model (pHMELTS) with a 2-D thermal and variable viscosity flow model (ConMan) to model energy and mass transfer within a subduction zone. By varying input parameters including the convergence rate and slab dip we have developed models for cases in the Costa-Rica and Izu- Bonin-Marianas arc systems and are able to predict major and trace element compositions of primary melts, as well as geophysical observables, such as the topography and geoid. We find that the emergence of a slab- adjacent low-viscosity channel (LVC) is a natural consequence of the thermal and chemical controls on mantle dynamics and feedback between them. In our earlier models, as the LVC is dragged downwards by the subducting slab, hornblende breaks down at about 2.5 GPa and other hydrous phases such as serpentine are secondary in importance to the NAM water reservoir. The spatial limit of the LVC is the water-saturated solidus of the hydrated peridotite; the LVC thickens as the peridotite is progressively depleted by melting and the solidus migrates into the warmer wedge, despite water replenishment at depth. pHMELTS is a hybrid of the pMELTS model of Ghiorso and co-workers and includes amphiboles, serpentines and micas. Chlorite was lacking but we have recently rectified this omission. Following De Capitani and co- workers, we

  18. Precipitation of uraninite in chlorite-bearing veins of the hydrothermal alteration zone (argile de pile) of the natural nuclear reactor at Bangombe, Republic of Gabon

    SciTech Connect

    Eberly, P.; Ewing, R.; Janeczek, J.

    1995-12-31

    This paper describes the mineralogy of a phyllosilicate/uraninite/galena-bearing vein located within the hydrothermal alteration halo associated with the Bangombe reactor. Phyllosilicates within the vein include a trioctahedral Al-Mg-Fe chlorite (ripidolite), Al-rich clay (kaolinite and/or donbassite) and illite. Textural relations obtained by backscattered-electron imaging suggest that ripidolite crystallized first among the sheet silicates. Uraninite is spatially associated with ripidolite and probably precipitated at a later time. While energy-dispersive X-ray analyses suggest that the uranium phase is predominantly uraninite, coffinite or other phases may also be present.

  19. Long-term in vivo carcinogenicity tests of potassium bromate, sodium hypochlorite, and sodium chlorite conducted in Japan.

    PubMed Central

    Kurokawa, Y; Takayama, S; Konishi, Y; Hiasa, Y; Asahina, S; Takahashi, M; Maekawa, A; Hayashi, Y

    1986-01-01

    Long-term in vivo carcinogenicity tests of potassium bromate (KBrO3), sodium hypochlorite (NaClO), and sodium chlorite (NaClO2) have been conducted in Japan from 1977 to 1985. In these investigations, groups of approximately 50 male and 50 female F344 rats or B6C3F1 mice were given solutions of the compounds as their drinking water ad libitum at two dose levels determined on the basis of preliminary 13-week tests. Control animals were given distilled water. The carcinogenic potential of KBrO3 was tested by administering doses of 500 or 250 ppm to rats for 110 weeks. Significantly elevated incidences of renal cell tumors in males and females and mesotheliomas of the peritoneum in males as compared to controls were observed. When female mice were given KBrO3 at doses of 1000 or 500 ppm for 78 weeks, no significant differences in tumor incidences between experimental and control groups were apparent. NaClO was administered to male and female rats, respectively, at doses of 1000 or 500 ppm and 2000 or 1000 ppm for 104 weeks. In mice, NaClO was given at doses of 1000 or 500 ppm to either sex for 103 weeks. The incidences of tumors in NaClO-treated and control animals of both sexes were not significantly different in both rat and mouse studies. NaClO2 was given to rats of both sexes at a dose of 600 or 300 ppm for 85 weeks. No statistically significant differences were observed in the incidences of tumor formation between NaClO2-treated and control groups of both sexes. NaClO2 was administered to mice at a concentration of 500 or 250 ppm for 85 weeks. In males, the combined incidences of hyperplastic nodules and hepatocellular carcinomas of the liver in a low-dose group, and adenomas and adenocarcinomas of the lung in a high-dose group, were marginally increased compared to controls (p less than 0.05). However, these incidences in treated males were within the range of values of historical control data in our program. We concluded that KBrO3 was carcinogenic in rats of

  20. Ultramafic-hosted Hydrothermal Systems at Mid-Ocean Ridges: Serpentinization, Chloritization and Geochemical Controls on Mass-Transfer Processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seyfried, W. E.; Pester, N. J.; Ding, K.

    2012-12-01

    concentrations and calculated subseafloor pH and temperature. The Rainbow hydrothermal system is also associated with a dome-like massif and morphology typical of Ocean Core Complexes. In sharp contrast with the LCHF, however, the Rainbow hydrothermal system is characterized by vent fluid temperatures in excess of 365°C, high dissolved Fe, Cu and Zn, and low pH (pH25°C=3.25). In-situ pH for Rainbow vent fluid (369°C) was determined to be 5.0±0.03. Trace alkali element concentrations indicate relatively low fluid/rock ratios, while dissolved B concentrations are depleted relative to seawater, but to a lesser degree than measured for Lost City vent fluid. Moderate concentrations of dissolved silica suggest fluid chemistry buffered by chlorite-fluid equilibria. Fluid flow in close proximity to gabbroic intrusions likely drives hydrothermal convection and mass transfer, although it is still unclear whether gabbroic intrusions alone can account for the enormous heat flux and the long duration of continuous hydrothermal activity observed for the Rainbow hydrothermal system.

  1. Peroxidase-type reactions suggest a heterolytic/nucleophilic O-O joining mechanism in the heme-dependent chlorite dismutase.

    PubMed

    Mayfield, Jeffrey A; Blanc, Béatrice; Rodgers, Kenton R; Lukat-Rodgers, Gudrun S; DuBois, Jennifer L

    2013-10-01

    Heme-containing chlorite dismutases (Clds) catalyze a highly unusual O-O bond-forming reaction. The O-O cleaving reactions of hydrogen peroxide and peracetic acid (PAA) with the Cld from Dechloromonas aromatica (DaCld) were studied to better understand the Cl-O cleavage of the natural substrate and subsequent O-O bond formation. While reactions with H2O2 result in slow destruction of the heme, at acidic pH heterolytic cleavage of the O-O bond of PAA cleanly yields the ferryl porphyrin cation radical (compound I). At alkaline pH, the reaction proceeds more rapidly, and the first observed intermediate is a ferryl heme. Freeze-quench EPR confirmed that the latter has an uncoupled protein-based radical, indicating that compound I is the first intermediate formed at all pH values and that radical migration is faster at alkaline pH. These results suggest by analogy that two-electron Cl-O bond cleavage to yield a ferryl-porphyrin cation radical is the most likely initial step in O-O bond formation from chlorite. PMID:24001266

  2. Efficacy of two acidified chlorite postmilking teat disinfectants with sodium dodecylbenzene sulfonic acid on prevention of contagious mastitis using an experimental challenge protocol.

    PubMed

    Oura, L Y; Fox, L K; Warf, C C; Kempt, G K

    2002-01-01

    Two acidified sodium chlorite postmilking teat disinfectants were evaluated for efficacy against Staphylococcus aureus and Streptococcus agalactiae by using National Mastitis Council experimental challenge procedures. The effect of these teat dips on teat skin and teat end condition was also determined. Both dips contained 0.32% sodium chlorite, 1.32% lactic, and 2.5% glycerin. Dips differed in the amount of sodium dodecylbenzene sulfonic acid (0.53 or 0.27%) added as a surfactant. Both dips significantly reduced new intramammary infection (IMI) rates compared with undipped controls. The dip containing 0.53% dodecylbenzene sulfonic acid reduced new IMI by Staph. aureus by 72% and Strep. agalactiae by 75%. The dip containing 0.27% dodecylbenzene sulfonic acid reduced new IMI by Staph. aureus by 100% and by Strep. agalactiae by 88%. Changes in teat skin and teat end condition for treatment and control groups varied in parallel over time. Teats treated with either teat dip had higher mean teat skin and teat end scores than control teats at some weeks. However, teat skin and teat end condition did not tend to change from the start to the completion of the trial. Application of the two new postmilking teat dips was effective in reducing new IMI from contagious mastitis pathogens. (Key words: teat dip, contagious mastitis, chlorous acid) PMID:11860118

  3. Peroxidase-type reactions suggest a heterolytic/nucleophilic O–O joining mechanism in the heme-dependent chlorite dismutase†

    PubMed Central

    Mayfield, Jeffrey A.; Blanc, Béatrice; Rodgers, Kenton R.; Lukat-Rodgers, Gudrun S.; DuBois, Jennifer L.

    2015-01-01

    Heme-containing chlorite dismutases (Clds) catalyze a highly unusual O–O bond forming reaction. The O–O cleaving reactions of hydrogen peroxide and peracetic acid (PAA) with the Cld from Dechloromonas aromatica (DaCld) were studied to better understand the Cl–O cleavage of the natural substrate and subsequent O–O bond formation. While reactions with H2O2 resulted in slow destruction of the heme, at acidic pH, heterolytic cleavage of the O–O bond of PAA cleanly yielded the ferryl porphyrin cation radical (Compound I). At alkaline pH, the reaction proceeds more rapidly and the first observed intermediate is a ferryl heme. Freezequench EPR confirmed that the latter has an uncoupled protein-based radical, indicating that Compound I is the first intermediate formed at all pH values and that radical migration is faster at alkaline pH. These results suggest by analogy that two-electron Cl–O bond cleavage to yield a ferryl-porphyrin cation radical is the most likely initial step in O–O bond formation from chlorite. PMID:24001266

  4. Implications for early hydrothermal environments on Mars through the spectral evidence for carbonation and chloritization reactions in the Nili Fossae region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Viviano, Christina E.; Moersch, Jeffrey E.; McSween, Harry Y.

    2013-09-01

    identification of serpentine and magnesium carbonate in the eastern Nili Fossae region of Mars indicates hydrothermal alteration of an olivine-rich protolith. Here we characterize Fe/Mg phyllosilicates associated with these units and present spectral evidence for the presence of a talc component, distinguishable from saponite. Locations with magnesium carbonate are exclusively associated with talc-related phyllosilicates. In the westernmost portions of the Nili Fossae region, where a mafic protolith dominates, Fe/Mg phyllosilicates display spectral evidence for a wide degree of chloritization. We propose that Noachian Fe/Mg smectites were uniformly buried by Hesperian lava flows that initiated hydrothermal alteration in the eastern Nili Fossae region. The chloritization of smectites may have produced silica-rich fluids necessary for the serpentinization of olivine; temperature and depth constraints indicated by their distribution also suggest a hydrothermal system was present. The subsequent carbonation of serpentine and/or olivine in eastern Nili Fossae, while requiring an additional CO2 source, provides an explanation for the limited occurrence of serpentine and the colocation of carbonate and talc-bearing material throughout this area. The consequence of the hypothesized carbonation reaction and the presence of serpentine provides geochemical constraints for the proportion of CO2 present in the fluids that interacted with the protolith. If this carbonation reaction was a widespread phenomenon, it may have been an important process in the ancient Martian carbon cycle and could have provided a sink for CO2 in the past.

  5. Hybrid matrix fiber composites

    DOEpatents

    Deteresa, Steven J.; Lyon, Richard E.; Groves, Scott E.

    2003-07-15

    Hybrid matrix fiber composites having enhanced compressive performance as well as enhanced stiffness, toughness and durability suitable for compression-critical applications. The methods for producing the fiber composites using matrix hybridization. The hybrid matrix fiber composites include two chemically or physically bonded matrix materials, whereas the first matrix materials are used to impregnate multi-filament fibers formed into ribbons and the second matrix material is placed around and between the fiber ribbons that are impregnated with the first matrix material and both matrix materials are cured and solidified.

  6. Kinetics and mechanism of formation of chlorate ion from the hypochlorous acid/chlorite ion reaction at pH 6-10

    SciTech Connect

    Gordon, G.; Tachiyashiki, Satoshi )

    1991-03-01

    The reaction between free chlorine (HOCl/OCl{sup {minus}}) and chlorite ion (ClO{sub 2}{sup {minus}}) has been studied in the pH 6.4-10.0 region. The reaction proceeds through the Cl{sub 2}O{sub 2} intermediate followed by a direct reaction of the intermediate with hypochlorous acid to form chlorate ion. Time-concentration profiles were measured for each chlorine species, resulting in both total chlorine and redox balance. Negligibly small amounts of chlorine dioxide are formed above pH 7. Indirect evidence suggests that, in this pH region, the formation of any chlorine dioxide is primarily due to the presence of concentration gradients or because of the adventitious presence of catalytic metal ion impurities. Details of the overall reaction mechanism for the formation of chlorate ion are presented.

  7. A matrix lower bound

    SciTech Connect

    Grcar, Joseph F.

    2002-02-04

    A matrix lower bound is defined that generalizes ideas apparently due to S. Banach and J. von Neumann. The matrix lower bound has a natural interpretation in functional analysis, and it satisfies many of the properties that von Neumann stated for it in a restricted case. Applications for the matrix lower bound are demonstrated in several areas. In linear algebra, the matrix lower bound of a full rank matrix equals the distance to the set of rank-deficient matrices. In numerical analysis, the ratio of the matrix norm to the matrix lower bound is a condition number for all consistent systems of linear equations. In optimization theory, the matrix lower bound suggests an identity for a class of min-max problems. In real analysis, a recursive construction that depends on the matrix lower bound shows that the level sets of continuously differential functions lie asymptotically near those of their tangents.

  8. Carbonate fuel cell matrix

    DOEpatents

    Farooque, M.; Yuh, C.Y.

    1996-12-03

    A carbonate fuel cell matrix is described comprising support particles and crack attenuator particles which are made platelet in shape to increase the resistance of the matrix to through cracking. Also disclosed is a matrix having porous crack attenuator particles and a matrix whose crack attenuator particles have a thermal coefficient of expansion which is significantly different from that of the support particles, and a method of making platelet-shaped crack attenuator particles. 8 figs.

  9. Carbonate fuel cell matrix

    DOEpatents

    Farooque, Mohammad; Yuh, Chao-Yi

    1996-01-01

    A carbonate fuel cell matrix comprising support particles and crack attenuator particles which are made platelet in shape to increase the resistance of the matrix to through cracking. Also disclosed is a matrix having porous crack attenuator particles and a matrix whose crack attenuator particles have a thermal coefficient of expansion which is significantly different from that of the support particles, and a method of making platelet-shaped crack attenuator particles.

  10. Matrix differentiation formulas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Usikov, D. A.; Tkhabisimov, D. K.

    1983-01-01

    A compact differentiation technique (without using indexes) is developed for scalar functions that depend on complex matrix arguments which are combined by operations of complex conjugation, transposition, addition, multiplication, matrix inversion and taking the direct product. The differentiation apparatus is developed in order to simplify the solution of extremum problems of scalar functions of matrix arguments.

  11. Matrix with Prescribed Eigenvectors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ahmad, Faiz

    2011-01-01

    It is a routine matter for undergraduates to find eigenvalues and eigenvectors of a given matrix. But the converse problem of finding a matrix with prescribed eigenvalues and eigenvectors is rarely discussed in elementary texts on linear algebra. This problem is related to the "spectral" decomposition of a matrix and has important technical…

  12. Synergistic Effect of Sodium Chlorite and Edible Coating on Quality Maintenance of Minimally Processed Citrus grandis under Passive and Active MAP.

    PubMed

    Ban, Zhaojun; Feng, Jianhua; Wei, Wenwen; Yang, Xiangzheng; Li, Jilan; Guan, Junfeng; Li, Jiang

    2015-08-01

    Edible coating has been an innovation within the bioactive packaging concept. The comparative analysis upon the effect of edible coating, sodium chlorite (SC) and their combined application on quality maintenance of minimally processed pomelo (Citrus grandis) fruits during storage at 4 °C was conducted. Results showed that the combination of edible coating and SC dipping delayed the microbial development whereas the sole coating or dipping treatment was less efficient. The synergetic application of edible coating and SC treatment under modified atmosphere packaging (MAP, 10% O2 , 10% CO2 ) was able to maintain the total soluble solids level and ascorbic acid content, while reduce the weight loss as well as development of mesophiles and psychrotrophs. Nonetheless, the N, O-carboxymethyl chitosan solely coated samples showed significantly higher level of weight loss during storage with comparison to the untreated sample. Furthermore, the combined application of edible coating and SC dipping under active MAP best maintained the sensory quality of minimally processed pomelo fruit during storage. PMID:26147928

  13. Composition, diagenesis, and morphology of chlorite and illite/smectite mixed-layer clays in the Cherry Canyon Formation, Delaware Mountain Group, Screwbean field, Reeves County, Texas

    SciTech Connect

    Thomerson, M.D.; Henderson, S.K. )

    1993-09-01

    Oil and gas production in the Screwbean field of Reeves County, Texas, is predominantly from the subarkosic Bell Canyon (Ramsey sand member) and upper Cherry Canyon sandstones of the Permian (Guadalupian) Delaware Mountain Group. Authigenic clays compromise up to 10% of the bulk rock and can seriously degrade the production potential and performance of reservoir rock. The chlorite and illite/smectite mixed-layer clays can have several effects on the reservoir: loss of permeability as a result of swelling, formation damage because of acid sensitivity, and high irreducible water saturations (bound water) caused by microporosity. Twenty-five powdered samples from whole core taken in the Cherry Canyon Formation from a well in Reeves County were analyzed by x-ray diffraction. The actual x-ray diffraction patterns from the powdered samples were compared to simulated x-ray diffraction patterns generated by a microcomputer. Once matched, the computer models give the fractional clay composition of that particular sample. The prominent morphology of the authigenic clays is also very important. Photomicrographs taken with a scanning electron microscope were employed to delineate the clay morphologies and illustrate the intergranular habits of these clay minerals. The failure to recognize the aforementioned problems can lead to prematurely abandoning and bypassing possible productive zones. The data generated by this study will allow us to better use these reservoirs and more effectively explore future zones.

  14. Characteristics and alteration origins of matrix minerals in volcaniclastic kimberlite of the Muskox pipe (Nunavut, Canada)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hayman, P. C.; Cas, R. A. F.; Johnson, M.

    2009-11-01

    The matrix of volcaniclastic kimberlite (VK) from the Muskox pipe (Northern Slave Province, Nunavut, Canada) is interpreted to represent an overprint of an original clastic matrix. Muskox VK is subdivided into three different matrix mineral assemblages that reflect differences in the proportions of original primary matrix constituents, temperature of formation and nature of the altering fluids. Using whole rock X-ray fluorescence (XRF), whole rock X-ray diffraction (XRD), microprobe analyses, back-scatter electron (BSE) imaging, petrography and core logging, we find that most matrix minerals (serpentine, phlogopite, chlorite, saponite, monticellite, Fe-Ti oxides and calcite) lack either primary igneous or primary clastic textures. The mineralogy and textures are most consistent with formation through alteration overprinting of an original clastic matrix that form by retrograde reactions as the deposit cools, or, in the case of calcite, by precipitation from Ca-bearing fluids into a secondary porosity. The first mineral assemblage consists largely of serpentine, phlogopite, calcite, Fe-Ti oxides and monticellite and occurs in VK with relatively fresh framework clasts. Alteration reactions, driven by deuteric fluids derived from the juvenile constituents, promote the crystallisation of minerals that indicate relatively high temperatures of formation (> 400 °C). Lower-temperature minerals are not present because permeability was occluded before the deposit cooled to low temperatures, thus shielding the facies from further interaction with fluids. The other two matrix mineral assemblages consist largely of serpentine, phlogopite, calcite, +/- diopside, and +/- chlorite. They form in VK that contains more country rock, which may have caused the deposit to be cooler upon emplacement. Most framework components are completely altered, suggesting that larger volumes of fluids drove the alteration reactions. These fluids were likely of meteoric provenance and became heated

  15. Nanocrystal doped matrixes

    DOEpatents

    Parce, J. Wallace; Bernatis, Paul; Dubrow, Robert; Freeman, William P.; Gamoras, Joel; Kan, Shihai; Meisel, Andreas; Qian, Baixin; Whiteford, Jeffery A.; Ziebarth, Jonathan

    2010-01-12

    Matrixes doped with semiconductor nanocrystals are provided. In certain embodiments, the semiconductor nanocrystals have a size and composition such that they absorb or emit light at particular wavelengths. The nanocrystals can comprise ligands that allow for mixing with various matrix materials, including polymers, such that a minimal portion of light is scattered by the matrixes. The matrixes of the present invention can also be utilized in refractive index matching applications. In other embodiments, semiconductor nanocrystals are embedded within matrixes to form a nanocrystal density gradient, thereby creating an effective refractive index gradient. The matrixes of the present invention can also be used as filters and antireflective coatings on optical devices and as down-converting layers. Processes for producing matrixes comprising semiconductor nanocrystals are also provided. Nanostructures having high quantum efficiency, small size, and/or a narrow size distribution are also described, as are methods of producing indium phosphide nanostructures and core-shell nanostructures with Group II-VI shells.

  16. Biofilm Matrix Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Fong, Jiunn N. C.; Yildiz, Fitnat H.

    2015-01-01

    Proteinaceous components of the biofilm matrix include secreted extracellular proteins, cell surface adhesins and protein subunits of cell appendages such as flagella and pili. Biofilm matrix proteins play diverse roles in biofilm formation and dissolution. They are involved in attaching cells to surfaces, stabilizing the biofilm matrix via interactions with exopolysaccharide and nucleic acid components, developing three-dimensional biofilm architectures, and dissolving biofilm matrix via enzymatic degradation of polysaccharides, proteins, and nucleic acids. In this chapter, we will review functions of matrix proteins in a selected set of microorganisms, studies of the matrix proteomes of Vibrio cholerae and Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and roles of outer membrane vesicles and of nucleoid-binding proteins in biofilm formation. PMID:26104709

  17. Automatic switching matrix

    DOEpatents

    Schlecht, Martin F.; Kassakian, John G.; Caloggero, Anthony J.; Rhodes, Bruce; Otten, David; Rasmussen, Neil

    1982-01-01

    An automatic switching matrix that includes an apertured matrix board containing a matrix of wires that can be interconnected at each aperture. Each aperture has associated therewith a conductive pin which, when fully inserted into the associated aperture, effects electrical connection between the wires within that particular aperture. Means is provided for automatically inserting the pins in a determined pattern and for removing all the pins to permit other interconnecting patterns.

  18. The efficacy and safety of add-on 0.1% brimonidine tartrate preserved with sodium chlorite in on-treatment Japanese normal-tension glaucoma patients

    PubMed Central

    Tsumura, Toyoaki; Yoshikawa, Keiji; Kimura, Tairo; Suzumura, Hirotaka; Kawashima, Miwako; Nanno, Mami; Ishijima, Kiyotaka; Takeda, Ryuji

    2014-01-01

    Background To evaluate the efficacy and safety of newly formulated brimonidine (0.1% brimonidine tartrate preserved with sodium chlorite: brimonidine) as add-on therapy in on-treatment Japanese normal-tension glaucoma (NTG) patients. Methods Brimonidine was added to on-treatment NTG patients with intraocular pressures (IOP) of between 13 mmHg and 16 mmHg after three consecutive IOP measurements. The time courses of IOP, conjunctival hyperemia, superficial punctate keratitis, and adverse events were examined at 4, 8, and 12 weeks after brimonidine instillation. Results Though 75 of 83 patients (31 males and 52 females; mean age: 63.4±11.6 years) completed the study, six patients discontinued because of side effects and two patients withdrew. The mean IOP after brimonidine addition at week 4 (12.6±1.8 mmHg, P<0.001), week 8 (12.4±1.7 mmHg, P<0.001), and week 12 (12.6±1.8 mmHg, P<0.001) was significantly decreased compared with that before the addition of brimonidine (13.9±1.2 mmHg). No significant changes in superficial punctate keratitis or conjunctival hyperemia scores were observed throughout the study. Dizziness, sleepiness, eye pain, and itching (mild to moderate) were noted in five, four, three, and three patients, respectively. Conclusions The addition of newly formulated brimonidine to on-treatment Japanese NTG patients with IOP of 13–16 mmHg further reduced the levels of IOP with minimal side effects and adverse events. PMID:25214761

  19. Matrix cracking in ceramic-matrix composites

    SciTech Connect

    Danchaivijit, S.; Shetty, D.K. . Dept. of Materials Science and Engineering)

    1993-10-01

    Matrix cracking in ceramic-matrix composites with unbonded frictional interface has been studied using fracture mechanics theory. The critical stress for extension of a fiber-bridged crack has been analyzed using the stress-intensity approach. The analysis uses a new shear-lag formulation of the crack-closure traction applied by the bridging fibers based on the assumption of a constant sliding friction stress over the sliding length of the fiber-matrix interface. The new formulation satisfies two required limiting conditions: (a) when the stress in the bridging fiber approaches the far-field applied stress, the crack-opening displacement approaches a steady-state upper limit that is in agreement with the previous formulations; and (b) in the limit of zero crack opening, the stress in the bridging fiber approaches the far-field fiber stress. This lower limit of the bridging stress is distinctly different from the previous formulations. For all other conditions, the closure traction is a function of the far-field applied stress in addition to the local crack-opening displacement, the interfacial sliding friction stress, and the material properties. Numerical calculations using the stress-intensity approach indicate that the critical stress for crack extension decreases with increasing crack length and approaches a constant steady-state value for large cracks. The steady-state matrix-cracking stress agrees with a steady-state energy balance analysis applied to the continuum model, but it is slightly less than the matrix-cracking stress predicted by such theories of steady-state cracking as that of Aveston, Cooper, and Kelly. The origin of this difference and a method for reconciliation of the two theoretical approaches are discussed.

  20. Transfer function matrix

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Seraji, H.

    1987-01-01

    Given a multivariable system, it is proved that the numerator matrix N(s) of the transfer function evaluated at any system pole either has unity rank or is a null matrix. It is also shown that N(s) evaluated at any transmission zero of the system has rank deficiency. Examples are given for illustration.

  1. MATRIX AND VECTOR SERVICES

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    2001-10-18

    PETRA V2 provides matrix and vector services and the ability construct, query, and use matrix and vector objects that are used and computed by TRILINOS solvers. It provides all basic matr5ix and vector operations for solvers in TRILINOS.

  2. Matrix metalloproteinases and epileptogenesis.

    PubMed

    Ikonomidou, Chrysanthy

    2014-12-01

    Matrix metalloproteinases are vital drivers of synaptic remodeling in health and disease. It is suggested that at early stages of epileptogenesis, inhibition of matrix metalloproteinases may help ameliorate cell death, aberrant network rewiring, and neuroinflammation and prevent development of epilepsy. PMID:26567100

  3. Grassmann matrix quantum mechanics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anninos, Dionysios; Denef, Frederik; Monten, Ruben

    2016-04-01

    We explore quantum mechanical theories whose fundamental degrees of freedom are rectangular matrices with Grassmann valued matrix elements. We study particular models where the low energy sector can be described in terms of a bosonic Hermitian matrix quantum mechanics. We describe the classical curved phase space that emerges in the low energy sector. The phase space lives on a compact Kähler manifold parameterized by a complex matrix, of the type discovered some time ago by Berezin. The emergence of a semiclassical bosonic matrix quantum mechanics at low energies requires that the original Grassmann matrices be in the long rectangular limit. We discuss possible holographic interpretations of such matrix models which, by construction, are endowed with a finite dimensional Hilbert space.

  4. Time rate collision matrix

    SciTech Connect

    Stoenescu, M.L.; Smith, T.M.

    1980-02-01

    The collision integral terms in Boltzmann equation are reformulated numerically leading to the substitution of the multiple integrals with a multiplicative matrix of the two colliding species velocity distribution functions which varies with the differential collision cross section. A matrix of lower rank may be constructed when one of the distribution functions is specified, in which case the matrix elements represent kinetic transition probabilities in the velocity space and the multiplication of the time rate collision matrix with the unknown velocity distribution function expresses the time rate of change of the distribution. The collision matrix may be used to describe the time evolution of systems in nonequilibrium conditions, to evaluate the rate of momentum and energy transfer between given species, or to generate validity criteria for linearized kinetic equations.

  5. Hybrid matrix amplifier

    DOEpatents

    Martens, J.S.; Hietala, V.M.; Plut, T.A.

    1995-01-03

    The present invention comprises a novel matrix amplifier. The matrix amplifier includes an active superconducting power divider (ASPD) having N output ports; N distributed amplifiers each operatively connected to one of the N output ports of the ASPD; and a power combiner having N input ports each operatively connected to one of the N distributed amplifiers. The distributed amplifier can included M stages of amplification by cascading superconducting active devices. The power combiner can include N active elements. The resulting (N[times]M) matrix amplifier can produce signals of high output power, large bandwidth, and low noise. 6 figures.

  6. Hybrid matrix amplifier

    DOEpatents

    Martens, Jon S.; Hietala, Vincent M.; Plut, Thomas A.

    1995-01-01

    The present invention comprises a novel matrix amplifier. The matrix amplifier includes an active superconducting power divider (ASPD) having N output ports; N distributed amplifiers each operatively connected to one of the N output ports of the ASPD; and a power combiner having N input ports each operatively connected to one of the N distributed amplifiers. The distributed amplifier can included M stages of amplification by cascading superconducting active devices. The power combiner can include N active elements. The resulting (N.times.M) matrix amplifier can produce signals of high output power, large bandwidth, and low noise.

  7. Measurement matrix optimization method based on matrix orthogonal similarity transformation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pan, Jinfeng

    2016-05-01

    Optimization of the measurement matrix is one of the important research aspects of compressive sensing theory. A measurement matrix optimization method is presented based on the orthogonal similarity transformation of the information operator's Gram matrix. In terms of the fact that the information operator's Gram matrix is a singular symmetric matrix, a simplified orthogonal similarity transformation is deduced, and thus the simplified diagonal matrix that is orthogonally similar to it is obtained. Then an approximation of the Gram matrix is obtained by letting all the nonzero diagonal entries of the simplified diagonal matrix equal their average value. Thus an optimized measurement matrix can be acquired according to its relationship with the information operator. Results of experiments show that the optimized measurement matrix compared to the random measurement matrix is less coherent with dictionaries. The relative signal recovery error also declines when the proposed measurement matrix is utilized.

  8. Metal Matrix Composites

    SciTech Connect

    Hunt, Warren; Herling, Darrell R.

    2004-02-01

    Metal matrix composites have found selected application in areas that can cost-effectively capitalize on improvements in specific stiffness, specific strength, fatigue resistance, wear resistance, and coefficient of thermal expansion. Metal matrix composites comprise a relatively wide range of materials defined by the metal matrix, reinforcement type, and reinforcement geometry. In the area of the matrix, most metallic systems have been explored, including aluminum, beryllium, magnesium, titanium, iron, nickel, cobalt, and silver. However, aluminum is by far the most preferred. For reinforcements, the materials are typically ceramics, which provide a very beneficial combination of stiffness, strength, and relatively low density. Candidate reinforcement materials include SiC, Al2O3, B4C, TiC, TiB2, graphite, and a number of other ceramics. In addition, metallic materials such as tungsten and steel fibers have been considered.

  9. Pesticide-Exposure Matrix

    Cancer.gov

    The "Pesticide-exposure Matrix" was developed to help epidemiologists and other researchers identify the active ingredients to which people were likely exposed when their homes and gardens were treated for pests in past years.

  10. The Hill Interaction Matrix

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hill, William Fawcett

    1971-01-01

    Leadership style, group composition, and group development are simultaneously quantified through the use of the matrix. It represents an attempt to objectify the art of group therapy. Comment by Richard C. Rank follows. (Author)

  11. Matrix computations in MACSYMA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, P. S.

    1977-01-01

    Facilities built into MACSYMA for manipulating matrices with numeric or symbolic entries are described. Computations will be done exactly, keeping symbols as symbols. Topics discussed include how to form a matrix and create other matrices by transforming existing matrices within MACSYMA; arithmetic and other computation with matrices; and user control of computational processes through the use of optional variables. Two algorithms designed for sparse matrices are given. The computing times of several different ways to compute the determinant of a matrix are compared.

  12. Optical coherency matrix tomography

    PubMed Central

    Kagalwala, Kumel H.; Kondakci, H. Esat; Abouraddy, Ayman F.; Saleh, Bahaa E. A.

    2015-01-01

    The coherence of an optical beam having multiple degrees of freedom (DoFs) is described by a coherency matrix G spanning these DoFs. This optical coherency matrix has not been measured in its entirety to date—even in the simplest case of two binary DoFs where G is a 4 × 4 matrix. We establish a methodical yet versatile approach—optical coherency matrix tomography—for reconstructing G that exploits the analogy between this problem in classical optics and that of tomographically reconstructing the density matrix associated with multipartite quantum states in quantum information science. Here G is reconstructed from a minimal set of linearly independent measurements, each a cascade of projective measurements for each DoF. We report the first experimental measurements of the 4 × 4 coherency matrix G associated with an electromagnetic beam in which polarization and a spatial DoF are relevant, ranging from the traditional two-point Young’s double slit to spatial parity and orbital angular momentum modes. PMID:26478452

  13. Garnet peridotites and chlorite harzburgites from Cima di Gagnone (Central Alps, Switzerland): remnants of dehydrated serpentinites from the slab-mantle interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scambelluri, M.; Rampone, E.; Pettke, T.; Reusser, E.

    2012-04-01

    Serpentinites are key lithologies for subduction dynamics. Much debate concerns their role in volatile and fluid-mobile elements transfer to depth, the formation environments (slab vs mantle wedge) and influence on subduction tectonics. Still uncertain is their fate after antigorite breakdown because this reaction causes large density increase that hampers exhumation of rocks enabling direct investigation of de-serpentinization processes. We present a study of eclogite-facies garnet (grt) peridotite and chlorite (chl) harzburgite bodies from Cima di Gagnone (Adula Nappe), attributed to serpentinite protoliths and now teconically coupled with pelitic schists. This mix of crust and mantle is similar to what is envisaged for tectonic mèlanges at the plate interface (1-2). Using trace element data we test an origin of the Gagnone peridotites from serpentinites, to discuss the formation environment and characterize the dehydration fluids released. The Grt peridotites contain foliated olivine (ol), ortho and clinopyroxene (opx, cpx) and Ca-amphibole (amph) equilibated with poikiloblastic grt; olivine + ilmenite derive from Ti-clinohumite (Ticl). Grt hosts many solid monophase inclusions (prograde amph, chl, opx) aside of fluid-derived polyphase inclusions. Chl harzburgites display foliated and massive textures, showing coexistence of ol, opx, chl, minor F-bearing Ticl- and carbonate. Clinohumite preserves relict antigorite inclusions. Grt peridotites have flat HREE to MREE patterns (absolute concentrations = 0.31-1.39 x PM for MREE and HREE) and moderate LREE depletion (CeN/YbN 0.36-0.75). Chl peridotites have much lower absolute REE abundances (<1 x PM) and patterns showing depletion from HREE to MREE and LREE enrichment. Both peridotite varieties have positive spikes in As, Li, Cs, Pb and U. The REE compositions of cpx are heterogenous and record variable degrees of equilibration with garnet. Amphibole has variable HREE contents > 1 chondrite, pointing to

  14. Influence of Biogenic Fe(II) on the Extent of Microbial Reduction of Fe(III) in Clay Minerals Nontronite, Illite, and Chlorite

    SciTech Connect

    Jaisi, Deb P.; Dong, Hailiang; Liu, Chongxuan

    2007-03-01

    (II) was also observed in AH2DS reduction of clay Fe(III). The reduction extent consistently decreased with an increasing concentration of presorbed Fe(II) (onto clay surfaces) at the start of reduction experiments. The relative reduction extent (i.e., reduction extent after normalization to the reduction extent when spiked Fe(II) was zero) was similar for all clay minerals studied and showed a systematic decrease with increasing clay-sorbed Fe(II) concentration. These results suggest a similar inhibitory effect of clay-sorbed Fe(II) on the reduction extent for different clay minerals. An equilibrium thermodynamic model was established with independently estimated parameters to evaluate whether the cessation of Fe(III) reduction by AH2DS was due to the exhaustion of reaction free energy. Model-calculated reduction extents were, however, over 50% higher than experimentally measured, indicating that other factors, such as blockage of the electron transfer chain and mineralogy, restricted the reduction extent. This study also revealed that the relative reducibility of Fe(III) in different clay was as follows: nontronite > chlorite > illite. This order is qualitatively consistent with the differences in crystal chemistry of these minerals.

  15. Matrix interdiction problem

    SciTech Connect

    Pan, Feng; Kasiviswanathan, Shiva

    2010-01-01

    In the matrix interdiction problem, a real-valued matrix and an integer k is given. The objective is to remove k columns such that the sum over all rows of the maximum entry in each row is minimized. This combinatorial problem is closely related to bipartite network interdiction problem which can be applied to prioritize the border checkpoints in order to minimize the probability that an adversary can successfully cross the border. After introducing the matrix interdiction problem, we will prove the problem is NP-hard, and even NP-hard to approximate with an additive n{gamma} factor for a fixed constant {gamma}. We also present an algorithm for this problem that achieves a factor of (n-k) mUltiplicative approximation ratio.

  16. Tendon Functional Extracellular Matrix

    PubMed Central

    Screen, H.R.C.; Birk, D.E.; Kadler, K.E.; Ramirez, F; Young, M.F.

    2015-01-01

    This article is one of a series, summarising views expressed at the Orthopaedic Research Society New Frontiers in Tendon Research Conference. This particular article reviews the three workshops held under the “Functional Extracellular Matrix” stream. The workshops focused on the roles of the tendon extracellular matrix, such as performing the mechanical functions of tendon, creating the local cell environment and providing cellular cues. Tendon is a complex network of matrix and cells, and its biological functions are influenced by widely-varying extrinsic and intrinsic factors such as age, nutrition, exercise levels and biomechanics. Consequently, tendon adapts dynamically during development, ageing and injury. The workshop discussions identified research directions associated with understanding cell-matrix interactions to be of prime importance for developing novel strategies to target tendon healing or repair. PMID:25640030

  17. Complex matrix model duality

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, T. W.

    2011-04-15

    The same complex matrix model calculates both tachyon scattering for the c=1 noncritical string at the self-dual radius and certain correlation functions of operators which preserve half the supersymmetry in N=4 super-Yang-Mills theory. It is dual to another complex matrix model where the couplings of the first model are encoded in the Kontsevich-like variables of the second. The duality between the theories is mirrored by the duality of their Feynman diagrams. Analogously to the Hermitian Kontsevich-Penner model, the correlation functions of the second model can be written as sums over discrete points in subspaces of the moduli space of punctured Riemann surfaces.

  18. Matrixed business support comparison study.

    SciTech Connect

    Parsons, Josh D.

    2004-11-01

    The Matrixed Business Support Comparison Study reviewed the current matrixed Chief Financial Officer (CFO) division staff models at Sandia National Laboratories. There were two primary drivers of this analysis: (1) the increasing number of financial staff matrixed to mission customers and (2) the desire to further understand the matrix process and the opportunities and challenges it creates.

  19. Matrix Synthesis and Characterization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1984-01-01

    The role of NASA in the area of composite material synthesis; evaluation techniques; prediction analysis techniques; solvent-resistant tough composite matrix; resistance to paint strippers; acceptable processing temperature and pressure for thermoplastics; and the role of computer modeling and fiber interface improvement were discussed.

  20. The Acrosomal Matrix.

    PubMed

    Foster, James A; Gerton, George L

    2016-01-01

    The acrosome, a single exocytotic vesicle on the head of sperm, has an essential role in fertilization, but the exact mechanisms by which it facilitates sperm-egg interactions remain unresolved. The acrosome contains dozens of secretory proteins that are packaged into the forming structure during spermatogenesis; many of these proteins are localized into specific topographical areas of the acrosome, while others are more diffusely distributed. Acrosomal proteins can also be biochemically classified as components of the acrosomal matrix, a large, relatively insoluble complex, or as soluble proteins. This review focuses on recent findings using genetically modified mice (gene knockouts and transgenic "green acrosome" mice) to study the effects of eliminating acrosomal matrix-associated proteins on sperm structure and function. Some gene knockouts produce infertile phenotypes with obviously missing, specific activities that affect acrosome biogenesis during spermatogenesis or interfere with acrosome function in mature sperm. Mutations that delete some components produce fertile phenotypes with subtler effects that provide useful insights into acrosomal matrix function in fertilization. In general, these studies enable the reassessment of paradigms to explain acrosome formation and function and provide novel, objective insights into the roles of acrosomal matrix proteins in fertilization. The use of genetically engineered mouse models has yielded new mechanistic information that complements recent, important in vivo imaging studies. PMID:27194348

  1. Matrix Embedded Organic Synthesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kamakolanu, U. G.; Freund, F. T.

    2016-05-01

    In the matrix of minerals such as olivine, a redox reaction of the low-z elements occurs. Oxygen is oxidized to the peroxy state while the low-Z-elements become chemically reduced. We assign them a formula [CxHyOzNiSj]n– and call them proto-organics.

  2. Constructing the matrix

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elliott, John

    2012-09-01

    As part of our 'toolkit' for analysing an extraterrestrial signal, the facility for calculating structural affinity to known phenomena must be part of our core capabilities. Without such a resource, we risk compromising our potential for detection and decipherment or at least causing significant delay in the process. To create such a repository for assessing structural affinity, all known systems (language parameters) need to be structurally analysed to 'place' their 'system' within a relational communication matrix. This will need to include all known variants of language structure, whether 'living' (in current use) or ancient; this must also include endeavours to incorporate yet undeciphered scripts and non-human communication, to provide as complete a picture as possible. In creating such a relational matrix, post-detection decipherment will be assisted by a structural 'map' that will have the potential for 'placing' an alien communication with its nearest known 'neighbour', to assist subsequent categorisation of basic parameters as a precursor to decipherment. 'Universal' attributes and behavioural characteristics of known communication structure will form a range of templates (Elliott, 2001 [1] and Elliott et al., 2002 [2]), to support and optimise our attempt at categorising and deciphering the content of an extraterrestrial signal. Detection of the hierarchical layers, which comprise intelligent, complex communication, will then form a matrix of calculations that will ultimately score affinity through a relational matrix of structural comparison. In this paper we develop the rationales and demonstrate functionality with initial test results.

  3. Paths correlation matrix.

    PubMed

    Qian, Weixian; Zhou, Xiaojun; Lu, Yingcheng; Xu, Jiang

    2015-09-15

    Both the Jones and Mueller matrices encounter difficulties when physically modeling mixed materials or rough surfaces due to the complexity of light-matter interactions. To address these issues, we derived a matrix called the paths correlation matrix (PCM), which is a probabilistic mixture of Jones matrices of every light propagation path. Because PCM is related to actual light propagation paths, it is well suited for physical modeling. Experiments were performed, and the reflection PCM of a mixture of polypropylene and graphite was measured. The PCM of the mixed sample was accurately decomposed into pure polypropylene's single reflection, pure graphite's single reflection, and depolarization caused by multiple reflections, which is consistent with the theoretical derivation. Reflection parameters of rough surface can be calculated from PCM decomposition, and the results fit well with the theoretical calculations provided by the Fresnel equations. These theoretical and experimental analyses verify that PCM is an efficient way to physically model light-matter interactions. PMID:26371930

  4. Hypercube matrix computation task

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Calalo, Ruel H.; Imbriale, William A.; Jacobi, Nathan; Liewer, Paulett C.; Lockhart, Thomas G.; Lyzenga, Gregory A.; Lyons, James R.; Manshadi, Farzin; Patterson, Jean E.

    1988-01-01

    A major objective of the Hypercube Matrix Computation effort at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) is to investigate the applicability of a parallel computing architecture to the solution of large-scale electromagnetic scattering problems. Three scattering analysis codes are being implemented and assessed on a JPL/California Institute of Technology (Caltech) Mark 3 Hypercube. The codes, which utilize different underlying algorithms, give a means of evaluating the general applicability of this parallel architecture. The three analysis codes being implemented are a frequency domain method of moments code, a time domain finite difference code, and a frequency domain finite elements code. These analysis capabilities are being integrated into an electromagnetics interactive analysis workstation which can serve as a design tool for the construction of antennas and other radiating or scattering structures. The first two years of work on the Hypercube Matrix Computation effort is summarized. It includes both new developments and results as well as work previously reported in the Hypercube Matrix Computation Task: Final Report for 1986 to 1987 (JPL Publication 87-18).

  5. Standard Errors for Matrix Correlations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ogasawara, Haruhiko

    1999-01-01

    Derives the asymptotic standard errors and intercorrelations for several matrix correlations assuming multivariate normality for manifest variables and derives the asymptotic standard errors of the matrix correlations for two factor-loading matrices. (SLD)

  6. On the Matrix Exponential Function

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hou, Shui-Hung; Hou, Edwin; Pang, Wan-Kai

    2006-01-01

    A novel and simple formula for computing the matrix exponential function is presented. Specifically, it can be used to derive explicit formulas for the matrix exponential of a general matrix A satisfying p(A) = 0 for a polynomial p(s). It is ready for use in a classroom and suitable for both hand as well as symbolic computation.

  7. The cellulose resource matrix.

    PubMed

    Keijsers, Edwin R P; Yılmaz, Gülden; van Dam, Jan E G

    2013-03-01

    The emerging biobased economy is causing shifts from mineral fossil oil based resources towards renewable resources. Because of market mechanisms, current and new industries utilising renewable commodities, will attempt to secure their supply of resources. Cellulose is among these commodities, where large scale competition can be expected and already is observed for the traditional industries such as the paper industry. Cellulose and lignocellulosic raw materials (like wood and non-wood fibre crops) are being utilised in many industrial sectors. Due to the initiated transition towards biobased economy, these raw materials are intensively investigated also for new applications such as 2nd generation biofuels and 'green' chemicals and materials production (Clark, 2007; Lange, 2007; Petrus & Noordermeer, 2006; Ragauskas et al., 2006; Regalbuto, 2009). As lignocellulosic raw materials are available in variable quantities and qualities, unnecessary competition can be avoided via the choice of suitable raw materials for a target application. For example, utilisation of cellulose as carbohydrate source for ethanol production (Kabir Kazi et al., 2010) avoids the discussed competition with easier digestible carbohydrates (sugars, starch) deprived from the food supply chain. Also for cellulose use as a biopolymer several different competing markets can be distinguished. It is clear that these applications and markets will be influenced by large volume shifts. The world will have to reckon with the increase of competition and feedstock shortage (land use/biodiversity) (van Dam, de Klerk-Engels, Struik, & Rabbinge, 2005). It is of interest - in the context of sustainable development of the bioeconomy - to categorize the already available and emerging lignocellulosic resources in a matrix structure. When composing such "cellulose resource matrix" attention should be given to the quality aspects as well as to the available quantities and practical possibilities of processing the

  8. Ceramic matrix and resin matrix composites: A comparison

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hurwitz, Frances I.

    1987-01-01

    The underlying theory of continuous fiber reinforcement of ceramic matrix and resin matrix composites, their fabrication, microstructure, physical and mechanical properties are contrasted. The growing use of organometallic polymers as precursors to ceramic matrices is discussed as a means of providing low temperature processing capability without the fiber degradation encountered with more conventional ceramic processing techniques. Examples of ceramic matrix composites derived from particulate-filled, high char yield polymers and silsesquioxane precursors are provided.

  9. Ceramic matrix and resin matrix composites - A comparison

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hurwitz, Frances I.

    1987-01-01

    The underlying theory of continuous fiber reinforcement of ceramic matrix and resin matrix composites, their fabrication, microstructure, physical and mechanical properties are contrasted. The growing use of organometallic polymers as precursors to ceramic matrices is discussed as a means of providing low temperature processing capability without the fiber degradation encountered with more conventional ceramic processing techniques. Examples of ceramic matrix composites derived from particulate-filled, high char yield polymers and silsesquioxane precursors are provided.

  10. Light cone matrix product

    SciTech Connect

    Hastings, Matthew B

    2009-01-01

    We show how to combine the light-cone and matrix product algorithms to simulate quantum systems far from equilibrium for long times. For the case of the XXZ spin chain at {Delta} = 0.5, we simulate to a time of {approx} 22.5. While part of the long simulation time is due to the use of the light-cone method, we also describe a modification of the infinite time-evolving bond decimation algorithm with improved numerical stability, and we describe how to incorporate symmetry into this algorithm. While statistical sampling error means that we are not yet able to make a definite statement, the behavior of the simulation at long times indicates the appearance of either 'revivals' in the order parameter as predicted by Hastings and Levitov (e-print arXiv:0806.4283) or of a distinct shoulder in the decay of the order parameter.

  11. Google matrix of Twitter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frahm, K. M.; Shepelyansky, D. L.

    2012-10-01

    We construct the Google matrix of the entire Twitter network, dated by July 2009, and analyze its spectrum and eigenstate properties including the PageRank and CheiRank vectors and 2DRanking of all nodes. Our studies show much stronger inter-connectivity between top PageRank nodes for the Twitter network compared to the networks of Wikipedia and British Universities studied previously. Our analysis allows to locate the top Twitter users which control the information flow on the network. We argue that this small fraction of the whole number of users, which can be viewed as the social network elite, plays the dominant role in the process of opinion formation on the network.

  12. Matrix membranes and integrability

    SciTech Connect

    Zachos, C.; Fairlie, D.; Curtright, T.

    1997-06-01

    This is a pedagogical digest of results reported in Curtright, Fairlie, {ampersand} Zachos 1997, and an explicit implementation of Euler`s construction for the solution of the Poisson Bracket dual Nahm equation. But it does not cover 9 and 10-dimensional systems, and subsequent progress on them Fairlie 1997. Cubic interactions are considered in 3 and 7 space dimensions, respectively, for bosonic membranes in Poisson Bracket form. Their symmetries and vacuum configurations are explored. Their associated first order equations are transformed to Nahm`s equations, and are hence seen to be integrable, for the 3-dimensional case, by virtue of the explicit Lax pair provided. Most constructions introduced also apply to matrix commutator or Moyal Bracket analogs.

  13. Hyaluronan: A Matrix Component

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rügheimer, Louise

    2008-09-01

    The glucosaminoglycan hyaluronan is a key component of the extracellular matrix. It is a large, negatively charged molecule that can act as an ion exchange reservoir for positive ions. Hyaluronan is involved in renomedullary water handling through its water-binding capacity. In the renal medulla, the main source for hyaluronan production is the renomedullary interstitial cells. Hyaluronan synthases are found in the inner part of the plasma membrane and polymerize hyaluronan chains which are extruded into the extracellular space. Hyaluronidases are a family of enzymes involved in the degradation of hyaluronan. They have a wide range of properties, including differences in size, inhibitor sensitivities, catalytic mechanisms, substrate specificities and pH optima.

  14. Mixed Mode Matrix Multiplication

    SciTech Connect

    Meng-Shiou Wu; Srinivas Aluru; Ricky A. Kendall

    2004-09-30

    In modern clustering environments where the memory hierarchy has many layers (distributed memory, shared memory layer, cache,...), an important question is how to fully utilize all available resources and identify the most dominant layer in certain computations. When combining algorithms on all layers together, what would be the best method to get the best performance out of all the resources we have? Mixed mode programming model that uses thread programming on the shared memory layer and message passing programming on the distributed memory layer is a method that many researchers are using to utilize the memory resources. In this paper, they take an algorithmic approach that uses matrix multiplication as a tool to show how cache algorithms affect the performance of both shared memory and distributed memory algorithms. They show that with good underlying cache algorithm, overall performance is stable. When underlying cache algorithm is bad, superlinear speedup may occur, and an increasing number of threads may also improve performance.

  15. A matrix model for WZW

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dorey, Nick; Tong, David; Turner, Carl

    2016-08-01

    We study a U( N) gauged matrix quantum mechanics which, in the large N limit, is closely related to the chiral WZW conformal field theory. This manifests itself in two ways. First, we construct the left-moving Kac-Moody algebra from matrix degrees of freedom. Secondly, we compute the partition function of the matrix model in terms of Schur and Kostka polynomials and show that, in the large N limit, it coincides with the partition function of the WZW model. This same matrix model was recently shown to describe non-Abelian quantum Hall states and the relationship to the WZW model can be understood in this framework.

  16. Clinical analysis of vitamin B(6): determination of pyridoxal 5'-phosphate and 4-pyridoxic acid in human serum by reversed-phase high-performance liquid chromatography with chlorite postcolumn derivatization.

    PubMed

    Rybak, Michael E; Pfeiffer, Christine M

    2004-10-15

    A reversed-phase high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) method with fluorometric detection was developed for the routine determination of pyridoxal 5'-phosphate (PLP) and 4-pyridoxic acid (4-PA) in serum. Chlorite postcolumn derivatization was used to oxidize PLP to a more fluorescent carboxylic acid form. Sensitivity improved fourfold for PLP using chlorite postcolumn derivatization over traditional bisulfite postcolumn derivatization. The HPLC injection cycle was 15 min, facilitating a throughput of 60 patient samples (72 injections that included standards and quality control (QC) samples) in 18.5h. Method precision was evaluated using three serum QC pools with PLP and 4-PA concentrations of 11.5-34.8 nmol/L and 10.4-21.0 nmol/L, respectively. Within-run (n=7) repeatabilities were 0.6-1.2% for PLP and 0.9-1.8% for 4-PA. Run-to-run (n=23) reproducibilities were 3.6-6.7% for PLP and 3.7-5.6% for 4-PA. Relative detection (3sigma(0)) and quantitation (10sigma(0)) limits were 0.3 and 0.9 nmol/L, respectively, for both PLP and 4-PA using a 10-microl sample injection volume. Analytical recoveries ranged from 97 to 102%. Patient-matched serum and plasma specimens (n=25) were analyzed to evaluate specimen-type bias. Of the plasma types evaluated, heparinized plasma introduced the lowest relative bias for PLP (-5.3%) and minimal bias for 4-PA (-2.3%) compared with serum. Ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA) plasma showed the lowest bias for 4-PA (0.7%) but a relatively high bias for PLP (13.0%) due to a chromatographic interference. Human serum samples from a non-representative population subset (n=303) were commensurate with values published for other vitamin B(6) HPLC methods. These values gave geometric means of 42.4 nmol/L for PLP and 27.3 nmol/L for 4-PA. Medians for PLP and 4-PA were 40.1 and 21.8 nmol/L, respectively. The high sensitivity, precision, and throughput of this method, combined with its minimal serum specimen (150 microl) and sample injection

  17. Matrix market: a web resource for test matrix collection

    SciTech Connect

    Boisvert, R.F.; Pozo, R.; Remington, K.; Barrett, R.F.; Dongarra, J.J. /

    1996-05-30

    We describe a repository of data for the testing of numerical algorithms and mathematical software for matrix computations. The repository is designed to accommodate both dense and sparse matrices, as well as software to generate matrices. It has been seeded with the well known Harwell-Boeing sparse matrix collection. The raw data files have been augmented with an integrated World Wide Web interface which describes the matrices in the collection quantitatively and visually, For example, each matrix has a Web page which details its attributes, graphically depicts its sparsity pattern, and provides access to the matrix itself in several formats. In addition, a search mechanism is included which allows retrieval of matrices based on a variety of attributes, such as type and size, as well as through free-text search in abstracts. The URL is http://math.nist.gov/MatrixMarket.

  18. Hybridized polymer matrix composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    House, E. E.; Hoggatt, J. T.; Symonds, W. A.

    1980-01-01

    The extent to which graphite fibers are released from resin matrix composites that are exposed to fire and impact conditions was determined. Laboratory simulations of those conditions that could exist in the event of an aircraft crash and burn situation were evaluated. The effectiveness of various hybridizing concepts in preventing this release of graphite fibers were also evaluated. The baseline (i.e., unhybridized) laminates examined were prepared from commercially available graphite/epoxy, graphite/polyimide, and graphite/phenolic materials. Hybridizing concepts investigated included resin fillers, laminate coatings, resin blending, and mechanical interlocking of the graphite reinforcement. The baseline and hybridized laminates' mechanical properties, before and after isothermal and humidity aging, were also compared. It was found that a small amount of graphite fiber was released from the graphite/epoxy laminates during the burn and impact conditions used in this program. However, the extent to which the fibers were released is not considered a severe enough problem to preclude the use of graphite reinforced composites in civil aircraft structure. It also was found that several hybrid concepts eliminated this fiber release. Isothermal and humidity aging did not appear to alter the fiber release tendencies.

  19. Emergency Response Synchronization Matrix

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    1999-06-01

    An emergency response to a disaster is complex, requiring the rapid integration, coordination, and synchronization of multiple levels of governmental and non-governmental organizations from numerous jurisdictions into a unified community response. For example, a community’s response actions to a fixed site hazardous materials incident could occur in an area extending from an on-site storage location to points 25 or more miles away. Response actions are directed and controlled by local governments and agencies situated withinmore » the response area, as well as by state and federal operaticns centers quite removed from the area of impact. Time is critical and the protective action decision-making process is greatly compressed. The response community must carefully plan and coordinate response operations in order to have confidence that they will be effectively implemented when faced with the potentially catastrophic nature of such releases. A graphical depiction of the entire response process via an emergency response synchronization matrix is an effective tool in optimizing the planning, exercising, and implementation of emergency plans. This system—based approach to emergency planning depicts how a community organizes its response tasks across space and time in relation to hazard actions. It provides the opportunity to make real—time adjustments as necessary for maximizing the often limited resources in protecting area residents. A response must involve the entire community and must not be limited by individual jurisdictions and organizations acting on their own without coordination, integration, and synchronization.« less

  20. Glass matrix armor

    DOEpatents

    Calkins, Noel C.

    1991-01-01

    An armor system which utilizes glass. A plurality of constraint cells are mounted on a surface of a substrate, which is metal armor plate or a similar tough material, such that the cells almost completely cover the surface of the substrate. Each constraint cell has a projectile-receiving wall parallel to the substrate surface and has sides which are perpendicular to and surround the perimeter of the receiving wall. The cells are mounted such that, in one embodiment, the substrate surface serves as a sixth side or closure for each cell. Each cell has inside of it a plate, termed the front plate, which is parallel to and in contact with substantially all of the inside surface of the receiving wall. The balance of each cell is completely filled with a projectile-abrading material consisting of glass and a ceramic material and, in certain embodiments, a polymeric material. The glass may be in monolithic form or particles of ceramic may be dispersed in a glass matrix. The ceramic material may be in monolithic form or may be in the form of particles dispersed in glass or dispersed in said polymer.

  1. Hypercube matrix computation task

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Calalo, R.; Imbriale, W.; Liewer, P.; Lyons, J.; Manshadi, F.; Patterson, J.

    1987-01-01

    The Hypercube Matrix Computation (Year 1986-1987) task investigated the applicability of a parallel computing architecture to the solution of large scale electromagnetic scattering problems. Two existing electromagnetic scattering codes were selected for conversion to the Mark III Hypercube concurrent computing environment. They were selected so that the underlying numerical algorithms utilized would be different thereby providing a more thorough evaluation of the appropriateness of the parallel environment for these types of problems. The first code was a frequency domain method of moments solution, NEC-2, developed at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. The second code was a time domain finite difference solution of Maxwell's equations to solve for the scattered fields. Once the codes were implemented on the hypercube and verified to obtain correct solutions by comparing the results with those from sequential runs, several measures were used to evaluate the performance of the two codes. First, a comparison was provided of the problem size possible on the hypercube with 128 megabytes of memory for a 32-node configuration with that available in a typical sequential user environment of 4 to 8 megabytes. Then, the performance of the codes was anlyzed for the computational speedup attained by the parallel architecture.

  2. Ceramic matrix composite article and process of fabricating a ceramic matrix composite article

    DOEpatents

    Cairo, Ronald Robert; DiMascio, Paul Stephen; Parolini, Jason Robert

    2016-01-12

    A ceramic matrix composite article and a process of fabricating a ceramic matrix composite are disclosed. The ceramic matrix composite article includes a matrix distribution pattern formed by a manifold and ceramic matrix composite plies laid up on the matrix distribution pattern, includes the manifold, or a combination thereof. The manifold includes one or more matrix distribution channels operably connected to a delivery interface, the delivery interface configured for providing matrix material to one or more of the ceramic matrix composite plies. The process includes providing the manifold, forming the matrix distribution pattern by transporting the matrix material through the manifold, and contacting the ceramic matrix composite plies with the matrix material.

  3. How to Study a Matrix

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jairam, Dharmananda; Kiewra, Kenneth A.; Kauffman, Douglas F.; Zhao, Ruomeng

    2012-01-01

    This study investigated how best to study a matrix. Fifty-three participants studied a matrix topically (1 column at a time), categorically (1 row at a time), or in a unified way (all at once). Results revealed that categorical and unified study produced higher: (a) performance on relationship and fact tests, (b) study material satisfaction, and…

  4. Synthetic Division and Matrix Factorization

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barabe, Samuel; Dubeau, Franc

    2007-01-01

    Synthetic division is viewed as a change of basis for polynomials written under the Newton form. Then, the transition matrices obtained from a sequence of changes of basis are used to factorize the inverse of a bidiagonal matrix or a block bidiagonal matrix.

  5. Direct injection ion chromatography for the control of chlorinated drinking water: simultaneous estimation of nine haloacetic acids and quantitation of bromate, chlorite and chlorate along with the major inorganic anions.

    PubMed

    Garcia-Villanova, Rafael J; Raposo Funcia, César; Oliveira Dantas Leite, M Vilani; Toruño Fonseca, Ivania M; Espinosa Nieto, Miguel; Espuelas India, Javier

    2014-09-01

    Most methods for the analysis of haloacetic acids published in recent years are based on ion chromatography with direct injection, employing a gradient elution with potassium hydroxide (KOH). This work reports the exploration of an alternative eluent, a buffer of sodium carbonate/sodium hydrogen carbonate, aimed at the simultaneous analysis of nine haloacetic acids along with bromate, chlorite and chlorate. The alternative of both a less alkaline eluent and a lower temperature of operation may prevent the partial decomposition of some of the haloacetic acids during the analytical process, especially the more vulnerable brominated ones. Gradient elution at temperature of 7 °C yielded the best results, with an acceptable separation of 17 analytes (which includes the major natural inorganic anions) and a good linearity. Precision ranges from 0.3 to 23.4 (% V.C.), and detection limits are within units of μg L⁻¹, except for tribromoacetic acid - somewhat high in comparison with those of the official methods. Nonetheless, with the basic instrumentation setup herein described, this method may be suitable for monitoring when the drinking water treatments are to be optimized. This is especially interesting for small communities or for developing/developed countries in which regulations on disinfection by-products others than trihalomethanes are being addressed. PMID:25252348

  6. The matrix of inspiration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oehlmann, Dietmar; Ohlmann, Odile M.; Danzebrink, Hans U.

    2005-04-01

    perform this exchange, as a matrix, understood as source, of new ideas.

  7. Matrix cracking in brittle-matrix composites with tailored interfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Danchaivijit, S.; Chao, L.Y.; Shetty, D.K.

    1995-10-01

    Matrix cracking from controlled through cracks with bridging filaments was studied in a model unidirectional composite of SiC filaments in an epoxy-bonded alumina matrix. An unbonded, frictional interface was produced by moderating the curing shrinkage of the epoxy with the alumina filler and coating the filaments with a releasing agent. Uniaxial tension test specimens (2.5 x 25 x 125 mm) with filament-bridged through cracks were fabricated by a novel two-step casting technique involving casting, precracking and joining of cracked and uncracked sections. Distinct matrix-cracking stresses, corresponding to the extension of the filament-bridged cracks, were measured in uniaxial tension tests using a high-sensitivity extensometer. The crack-length dependence of the matrix-cracking stress was found to be in good agreement with the prediction of a fracture-mechanics analysis that employed a new crack-closure force-crack-opening displacement relation in the calculation of the stress intensity for fiber-bridged cracks. The prediction was based on independent experimental measurements of the matrix fracture toughness (K{sub cm}), the interfacial sliding friction stress ({tau}) and the residual stress in the matrix ({sigma}{sub m}{sup I}). The matrix-cracking stress for crack lengths (2a) greater than 3 mm was independent of the crack length and agreed with the prediction of the steady-state theory of Budiansky, Hutchinson and Evans. Tests on specimens without the deliberately introduced cracks indicated a matrix-cracking stress significantly higher than the steady-state stress.

  8. High Temperature Polymer Matrix Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1985-01-01

    These are the proceedings of the High Temperature Polymer Matrix Composites Conference held at the NASA Lewis Research Center on March 16 to 18, 1983. The purpose of the conference is to provide scientists and engineers working in the field of high temperature polymer matrix composites an opportunity to review, exchange, and assess the latest developments in this rapidly expanding area of materials technology. Technical papers are presented in the following areas: (1) matrix development; (2) adhesive development; (3) characterization; (4) environmental effects; and (5) applications.

  9. Genotype imputation via matrix completion.

    PubMed

    Chi, Eric C; Zhou, Hua; Chen, Gary K; Del Vecchyo, Diego Ortega; Lange, Kenneth

    2013-03-01

    Most current genotype imputation methods are model-based and computationally intensive, taking days to impute one chromosome pair on 1000 people. We describe an efficient genotype imputation method based on matrix completion. Our matrix completion method is implemented in MATLAB and tested on real data from HapMap 3, simulated pedigree data, and simulated low-coverage sequencing data derived from the 1000 Genomes Project. Compared with leading imputation programs, the matrix completion algorithm embodied in our program MENDEL-IMPUTE achieves comparable imputation accuracy while reducing run times significantly. Implementation in a lower-level language such as Fortran or C is apt to further improve computational efficiency. PMID:23233546

  10. Canonical density matrix perturbation theory.

    PubMed

    Niklasson, Anders M N; Cawkwell, M J; Rubensson, Emanuel H; Rudberg, Elias

    2015-12-01

    Density matrix perturbation theory [Niklasson and Challacombe, Phys. Rev. Lett. 92, 193001 (2004)] is generalized to canonical (NVT) free-energy ensembles in tight-binding, Hartree-Fock, or Kohn-Sham density-functional theory. The canonical density matrix perturbation theory can be used to calculate temperature-dependent response properties from the coupled perturbed self-consistent field equations as in density-functional perturbation theory. The method is well suited to take advantage of sparse matrix algebra to achieve linear scaling complexity in the computational cost as a function of system size for sufficiently large nonmetallic materials and metals at high temperatures. PMID:26764847

  11. Matrix Elements for Hylleraas CI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harris, Frank E.

    The limitation to at most a single interelectron distance in individual configurations of a Hylleraas-type multiconfiguration wave function restricts significantly the types of integrals occurring in matrix elements for energy calculations, but even then if the formulation is not handled efficiently the angular parts of these integrals escalate to create expressions of great complexity. This presentation reviews ways in which the angular-momentum calculus can be employed to systematize and simplify the matrix element formulas, particularly those for the kinetic-energy matrix elements.

  12. Mechanotransduction and extracellular matrix homeostasis

    PubMed Central

    Humphrey, Jay D.; Dufresne, Eric R.; Schwartz, Martin A.

    2015-01-01

    Preface Soft connective tissues at steady state are yet dynamic; resident cells continually read environmental cues and respond to promote homeostasis, including maintenance of the mechanical properties of the extracellular matrix that are fundamental to cellular and tissue health. The mechanosensing process involves assessment of the mechanics of the matrix by the cells through integrins and the actomyosin cytoskeleton, and is followed by a mechano-regulation process that includes the deposition, rearrangement, or removal of matrix to maintain overall form and function. Progress toward understanding the molecular, cellular, and tissue scale effects that promote mechanical homeostasis has helped identify key questions for future research. PMID:25355505

  13. Matrix product operators, matrix product states, and ab initio density matrix renormalization group algorithms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chan, Garnet Kin-Lic; Keselman, Anna; Nakatani, Naoki; Li, Zhendong; White, Steven R.

    2016-07-01

    Current descriptions of the ab initio density matrix renormalization group (DMRG) algorithm use two superficially different languages: an older language of the renormalization group and renormalized operators, and a more recent language of matrix product states and matrix product operators. The same algorithm can appear dramatically different when written in the two different vocabularies. In this work, we carefully describe the translation between the two languages in several contexts. First, we describe how to efficiently implement the ab initio DMRG sweep using a matrix product operator based code, and the equivalence to the original renormalized operator implementation. Next we describe how to implement the general matrix product operator/matrix product state algebra within a pure renormalized operator-based DMRG code. Finally, we discuss two improvements of the ab initio DMRG sweep algorithm motivated by matrix product operator language: Hamiltonian compression, and a sum over operators representation that allows for perfect computational parallelism. The connections and correspondences described here serve to link the future developments with the past and are important in the efficient implementation of continuing advances in ab initio DMRG and related algorithms.

  14. Matrix product operators, matrix product states, and ab initio density matrix renormalization group algorithms.

    PubMed

    Chan, Garnet Kin-Lic; Keselman, Anna; Nakatani, Naoki; Li, Zhendong; White, Steven R

    2016-07-01

    Current descriptions of the ab initio density matrix renormalization group (DMRG) algorithm use two superficially different languages: an older language of the renormalization group and renormalized operators, and a more recent language of matrix product states and matrix product operators. The same algorithm can appear dramatically different when written in the two different vocabularies. In this work, we carefully describe the translation between the two languages in several contexts. First, we describe how to efficiently implement the ab initio DMRG sweep using a matrix product operator based code, and the equivalence to the original renormalized operator implementation. Next we describe how to implement the general matrix product operator/matrix product state algebra within a pure renormalized operator-based DMRG code. Finally, we discuss two improvements of the ab initio DMRG sweep algorithm motivated by matrix product operator language: Hamiltonian compression, and a sum over operators representation that allows for perfect computational parallelism. The connections and correspondences described here serve to link the future developments with the past and are important in the efficient implementation of continuing advances in ab initio DMRG and related algorithms. PMID:27394094

  15. Stochastic determination of matrix determinants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dorn, Sebastian; Enßlin, Torsten A.

    2015-07-01

    Matrix determinants play an important role in data analysis, in particular when Gaussian processes are involved. Due to currently exploding data volumes, linear operations—matrices—acting on the data are often not accessible directly but are only represented indirectly in form of a computer routine. Such a routine implements the transformation a data vector undergoes under matrix multiplication. While efficient probing routines to estimate a matrix's diagonal or trace, based solely on such computationally affordable matrix-vector multiplications, are well known and frequently used in signal inference, there is no stochastic estimate for its determinant. We introduce a probing method for the logarithm of a determinant of a linear operator. Our method rests upon a reformulation of the log-determinant by an integral representation and the transformation of the involved terms into stochastic expressions. This stochastic determinant determination enables large-size applications in Bayesian inference, in particular evidence calculations, model comparison, and posterior determination.

  16. Performance Appraisal for Matrix Management.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Edwards, M. R.; Sproull, J. Ruth

    1985-01-01

    A matrix management system designed for use by a highly technical nuclear weapons research and development facility to improve productivity and flexibility by the use of multiple authority, responsibility, and accountability relationships is described. (MSE)

  17. Extracellular matrix and wound healing.

    PubMed

    Maquart, F X; Monboisse, J C

    2014-04-01

    Extracellular matrix has been known for a long time as an architectural support for the tissues. Many recent data, however, have shown that extracellular matrix macromolecules (collagens, elastin, glycosaminoglycans, proteoglycans and connective tissue glycoproteins) are able to regulate many important cell functions, such as proliferation, migration, protein synthesis or degradation, apoptosis, etc., making them able to play an important role in the wound repair process. Not only the intact macromolecules but some of their specific domains, that we called "Matrikines", are also able to regulate many cell activities. In this article, we will summarize main findings showing the effects of extracellular matrix macromolecules and matrikines on connective tissue and epithelial cells, particularly in skin, and their potential implication in the wound healing process. These examples show that extracellular matrix macromolecules or some of their specific domains may play a major role in wound healing. Better knowledge of these interactions may suggest new therapeutic targets in wound healing defects. PMID:24650524

  18. Stochastic determination of matrix determinants.

    PubMed

    Dorn, Sebastian; Ensslin, Torsten A

    2015-07-01

    Matrix determinants play an important role in data analysis, in particular when Gaussian processes are involved. Due to currently exploding data volumes, linear operations-matrices-acting on the data are often not accessible directly but are only represented indirectly in form of a computer routine. Such a routine implements the transformation a data vector undergoes under matrix multiplication. While efficient probing routines to estimate a matrix's diagonal or trace, based solely on such computationally affordable matrix-vector multiplications, are well known and frequently used in signal inference, there is no stochastic estimate for its determinant. We introduce a probing method for the logarithm of a determinant of a linear operator. Our method rests upon a reformulation of the log-determinant by an integral representation and the transformation of the involved terms into stochastic expressions. This stochastic determinant determination enables large-size applications in Bayesian inference, in particular evidence calculations, model comparison, and posterior determination. PMID:26274302

  19. Molybdenum disilicide alloy matrix composite

    DOEpatents

    Petrovic, John J.; Honnell, Richard E.; Gibbs, W. Scott

    1990-01-01

    Compositions of matter consisting of matrix matrials having silicon carbide dispersed throughout them and methods of making the compositions. A matrix material is an alloy of an intermetallic compound, molybdenum disilicide, and at least one secondary component which is a refractory silicide. The silicon carbide dispersant may be in the form of VLS whiskers, VS whiskers, or submicron powder or a mixture of these forms.

  20. Form development sample test matrix

    SciTech Connect

    Ebbinghaus, B B

    1999-10-15

    This document summarizes the status of sample fabrication and analysis in the Form Development Sample Test Matrix. Since its publication in the ''Baseline Formulation'' report (UCRL-ID- 133089, PIP-99-O 12) and in the ''Complete Single-Phase Sample Fabrications that Support the Licensing Application and Complete Process and Compositional Extreme Sample Fabrications that Support the Licensing Application'' report (PIP-99-078), the Sample Test Matrix has been updated and expanded. This version is current though September 30, 1999.

  1. Molybdenum disilicide alloy matrix composite

    DOEpatents

    Petrovic, John J.; Honnell, Richard E.; Gibbs, W. Scott

    1991-01-01

    Compositions of matter consisting of matrix materials having silicon carbide dispersed throughout them and methods of making the compositions. A matrix material is an alloy of an intermetallic compound, molybdenum disilicide, and at least one secondary component which is a refractory silicide. The silicon carbide dispersant may be in the form of VLS whiskers, VS whiskers, or submicron powder or a mixture of these forms.

  2. Molybdenum disilicide alloy matrix composite

    DOEpatents

    Petrovic, J.J.; Honnell, R.E.; Gibbs, W.S.

    1991-12-03

    Compositions of matter consisting of matrix materials having silicon carbide dispersed throughout them and methods of making the compositions are disclosed. A matrix material is an alloy of an intermetallic compound, molybdenum disilicide, and at least one secondary component which is a refractory silicide. The silicon carbide dispersant may be in the form of VLS whiskers, VS whiskers, or submicron powder or a mixture of these forms. 3 figures.

  3. Universal Keplerian state transition matrix

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shepperd, S. W.

    1985-01-01

    A completely general method for computing the Keplerian state transition matrix in terms of Goodyear's universal variables is presented. This includes a new scheme for solving Kepler's problem which is a necessary first step to computing the transition matrix. The Kepler problem is solved in terms of a new independent variable requiring the evaluation of only one transcendental function. Furthermore, this transcendental function may be conveniently evaluated by means of a Gaussian continued fraction.

  4. Validation of lactic acid bacteria, lactic acid, and acidified sodium chlorite as decontaminating interventions to control Escherichia coli O157:H7 and Salmonella Typhimurium DT 104 in mechanically tenderized and brine-enhanced (nonintact) beef at the purveyor.

    PubMed

    Echeverry, Alejandro; Brooks, J Chance; Miller, Markus F; Collins, Jesse A; Loneragan, Guy H; Brashears, Mindy M

    2010-12-01

    After three different outbreaks were linked to the consumption of nonintact meat products contaminated with Escherichia coli O157:H7, the U.S. Food Safety and Inspection Service published notice requiring establishments producing mechanically tenderized and moisture-enhanced beef products to reassess their respective hazard analysis and critical control point systems, due to potential risk to the consumers. The objective of this study was to validate the use of lactic acid bacteria (LAB), acidified sodium chlorite (ASC), and lactic acid (LA) sprays when applied under a simulated purveyor setting as effective interventions to control and reduce E. coli O157:H7 and Salmonella Typhimurium DT 104 in inoculated U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) Choice strip loins (longissimus lumborum muscles) pieces intended for either mechanical blade tenderization or injection enhancement with a brine solution after an aging period of 14 or 21 days at 4.4°C under vacuum. After the mechanical process, translocation of E. coli O157:H7 and Salmonella Typhimurium DT 104 from the surface into the internal muscles occurred at levels between 1.00 and 5.72 log CFU/g, compared with controls. LAB and LA reduced internal E. coli O157:H7 loads up to 3.0 log, while ASC reduced the pathogen 1.4 to 2.3 log more than the control (P < 0.05), respectively. Salmonella Typhimurium DT 104 was also reduced internally 1.3 to 2.8, 1.0 to 2.3, and 1.4 to 1.8 log after application of LAB, LA, and ASC, respectively. The application of antimicrobials by purveyors prior to mechanical tenderization or enhancement of steaks should increase the safety of these types of products. PMID:21219733

  5. The Astrobiology Matrix and the "Drake Matrix" in Education

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mizser, A.; Kereszturi, A.

    2003-01-01

    We organized astrobiology lectures in the Eotvos Lorand University of Sciences and the Polaris Observatory in 2002. We present here the "Drake matrix" for the comparison of the astrobiological potential of different bodies [1], and astrobiology matrix for the visualization of the interdisciplinary connections between different fields of astrobiology. Conclusion: In Hungary it is difficult to integrate astrobiology in the education system but the great advantage is that it can connect different scientific fields and improve the view of students. We would like to get in contact with persons and organizations who already have experience in the education of astrobiology.

  6. Relativistic Dipole Matrix Element Zeros

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lajohn, L. A.; Pratt, R. H.

    2002-05-01

    There is a special class of relativistic high energy dipole matrix element zeros (RZ), whose positions with respect to photon energy ω , only depend on the bound state l quantum number according to ω^0=mc^2/(l_b+1) (independent of primary quantum number n, nuclear charge Z, central potential V and dipole retardation). These RZ only occur in (n,l_b,j_b)arrow (ɛ , l_b+1,j_b) transitions such as ns_1/2arrow ɛ p_1/2; np_3/2arrow ɛ d_3/2: nd_5/2arrow ɛ f_5/2 etc. The nonrelativistic limit of these matrix elements can be established explicitly in the Coulomb case. Within the general matrix element formalism (such as that in [1]); when |κ | is substituted for γ in analytic expressions for matrix elements, the zeros remain, but ω^0 now becomes dependent on n and Z. When the reduction to nonrelativistic form is completed by application of the low energy approximation ω mc^2 mc^2, the zeros disappear. This nonzero behavior was noted in nonrelativistic dipole Coulomb matrix elements by Fano and Cooper [2] and later proven by Oh and Pratt[3]. (J. H. Scofield, Phys. Rev. A 40), 3054 (1989 (U. Fano and J. W. Cooper, Rev. Mod. Phys. 40), 441 (1968). (D. Oh and R. H. Pratt, Phys. Rev. A 34), 2486 (1986); 37, 1524 (1988); 45, 1583 (1992).

  7. Matrix factorizations and elliptic fibrations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Omer, Harun

    2016-09-01

    I use matrix factorizations to describe branes at simple singularities of elliptic fibrations. Each node of the corresponding Dynkin diagrams of the ADE-type singularities is associated with one indecomposable matrix factorization which can be deformed into one or more factorizations of lower rank. Branes with internal fluxes arise naturally as bound states of the indecomposable factorizations. Describing branes in such a way avoids the need to resolve singularities. This paper looks at gauge group breaking from E8 fibers down to SU (5) fibers due to the relevance of such fibrations for local F-theory GUT models. A purpose of this paper is to understand how the deformations of the singularity are understood in terms of its matrix factorizations. By systematically factorizing the elliptic fiber equation, this paper discusses geometries which are relevant for building semi-realistic local models. In the process it becomes evident that breaking patterns which are identical at the level of the Kodaira type of the fibers can be inequivalent at the level of matrix factorizations. Therefore the matrix factorization picture supplements information which the conventional less detailed descriptions lack.

  8. The noncommutative S-Matrix

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raju, Suvrat

    2009-06-01

    As a simple example of how recently developed on-shell techniques apply to nonlocal theories, we study the S-matrix of noncommutative gauge theories. In the complex plane, this S-matrix has essential singularities that signal the nonlocal behavior of the theory. In spite of this, we show that tree-level amplitudes may be obtained by BCFW type recursion relations. At one loop we find a complete basis of master integrals (this basis is larger than the corresponding basis in the ordinary theory). Any one-loop noncommutative amplitude may be written as a linear combination of these integrals with coefficients that we relate to products of tree amplitudes. We show that the noncommutative Script N = 4 SYM theory has a structurally simple S-matrix, just like the ordinary Script N = 4 SYM theory.

  9. Extracellular matrix in ovarian follicles.

    PubMed

    Rodgers, R J; Irving-Rodgers, H F; van Wezel, I L

    2000-05-25

    A lot is known about the control of the development of ovarian follicles by growth factors and hormones, but less is known about the roles of extracellular matrix in the control of follicular growth and development. In this review we focus on the specialized extracellular matrix of the basal laminas that are present in ovarian follicles. These include the follicular basal lamina itself, the Call-Exner bodies of the membrana granulosa, the subendothelial and arteriole smooth muscle basal laminas in the theca, and the basal lamina-like material of the thecal matrix. We discuss the evidence that during follicle development the follicular basal lamina changes in composition, that many of its components are produced by the granulosa cells, and that the follicular basal laminas of different follicles have different ultrastructural appearances, linked to the shape of the aligning granulosa cells. All these studies suggest that the follicular basal lamina is extremely dynamic during follicular development. PMID:10963877

  10. Matrix model approach to cosmology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chaney, A.; Lu, Lei; Stern, A.

    2016-03-01

    We perform a systematic search for rotationally invariant cosmological solutions to toy matrix models. These models correspond to the bosonic sector of Lorentzian Ishibashi, Kawai, Kitazawa and Tsuchiya (IKKT)-type matrix models in dimensions d less than ten, specifically d =3 and d =5 . After taking a continuum (or commutative) limit they yield d -1 dimensional Poisson manifolds. The manifolds have a Lorentzian induced metric which can be associated with closed, open, or static space-times. For d =3 , we obtain recursion relations from which it is possible to generate rotationally invariant matrix solutions which yield open universes in the continuum limit. Specific examples of matrix solutions have also been found which are associated with closed and static two-dimensional space-times in the continuum limit. The solutions provide for a resolution of cosmological singularities, at least within the context of the toy matrix models. The commutative limit reveals other desirable features, such as a solution describing a smooth transition from an initial inflation to a noninflationary era. Many of the d =3 solutions have analogues in higher dimensions. The case of d =5 , in particular, has the potential for yielding realistic four-dimensional cosmologies in the continuum limit. We find four-dimensional de Sitter d S4 or anti-de Sitter AdS4 solutions when a totally antisymmetric term is included in the matrix action. A nontrivial Poisson structure is attached to these manifolds which represents the lowest order effect of noncommutativity. For the case of AdS4 , we find one particular limit where the lowest order noncommutativity vanishes at the boundary, but not in the interior.