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Sample records for chlorobium tepidum comparison

  1. Crystallization and preliminary X-ray studies of ferredoxin-NAD(P)+ reductase from Chlorobium tepidum

    PubMed Central

    Muraki, Norifumi; Seo, Daisuke; Shiba, Tomoo; Sakurai, Takeshi; Kurisu, Genji

    2008-01-01

    Ferredoxin-NAD(P)+ reductase (FNR) is a key enzyme that catalyzes the photoreduction of NAD(P)+ to generate NAD(P)H during the final step of the photosynthetic electron-transport chain. FNR from the green sulfur bacterium Chlorobium tepidum is a homodimeric enzyme with a molecular weight of 90 kDa; it shares a high level of amino-acid sequence identity to thioredoxin reductase rather than to conventional plant-type FNRs. In order to understand the structural basis of the ferredoxin-dependency of this unique photosynthetic FNR, C. tepidum FNR has been heterologously expressed, purified and crystallized in two forms. Form I crystals belong to space group C2221 and contain one dimer in the asymmetric unit, while form II crystals belong to space group P4122 or P4322. Diffraction data were collected from a form I crystal to 2.4 Å resolution on the synchrotron-radiation beamline NW12 at the Photon Factory. PMID:18323604

  2. Two exopolyphosphatases with distinct molecular architectures and substrate specificities from the thermophilic green-sulfur bacterium Chlorobium tepidum TLS.

    PubMed

    Albi, Tomás; Serrano, Aurelio

    2014-09-01

    The genome of the thermophilic green-sulfur bacterium Chlorobium tepidum TLS possesses two genes encoding putative exopolyphosphatases (PPX; EC 3.6.1.11), namely CT0099 (ppx1, 993 bp) and CT1713 (ppx2, 1557 bp). The predicted polypeptides of 330 and 518 aa residues are Ppx-GppA phosphatases of different domain architectures - the largest one has an extra C-terminal HD domain - which may represent ancient paralogues. Both ppx genes were cloned and overexpressed in Escherichia coli BL21(DE3). While CtPPX1 was validated as a monomeric enzyme, CtPPX2 was found to be a homodimer. Both PPX homologues were functional, K(+)-stimulated phosphohydrolases, with an absolute requirement for divalent metal cations and a marked preference for Mg(2+). Nevertheless, they exhibited remarkably different catalytic specificities with regard to substrate classes and chain lengths. Even though both enzymes were able to hydrolyse the medium-size polyphosphate (polyP) P13-18 (polyP mix with mean chain length of 13-18 phosphate residues), CtPPX1 clearly reached its highest catalytic efficiency with tripolyphosphate and showed substantial nucleoside triphosphatase (NTPase) activity, while CtPPX2 preferred long-chain polyPs (>300 Pi residues) and did not show any detectable NTPase activity. These catalytic features, taken together with the distinct domain architectures and molecular phylogenies, indicate that the two PPX homologues of Chl. tepidum belong to different Ppx-GppA phosphatase subfamilies that should play specific biochemical roles in nucleotide and polyP metabolisms. In addition, these results provide an example of the remarkable functional plasticity of the Ppx-GppA phosphatases, a family of proteins with relatively simple structures that are widely distributed in the microbial world. PMID:24969471

  3. X-Ray Scattering and Electron Cryomicroscopy Study on the Effect of Carotenoid Biosynthesis to the Structure of Chlorobium tepidum Chlorosomes

    PubMed Central

    Ikonen, T. P.; Li, H.; Pšenčík, J.; Laurinmäki, P. A.; Butcher, S. J.; Frigaard, N.-U.; Serimaa, R. E.; Bryant, D. A.; Tuma, R.

    2007-01-01

    Chlorosomes, the main antenna complexes of green photosynthetic bacteria, were isolated from null mutants of Chlorobium tepidum, each of which lacked one enzyme involved in the biosynthesis of carotenoids. The effects of the altered carotenoid composition on the structure of the chlorosomes were studied by means of x-ray scattering and electron cryomicroscopy. The chlorosomes from each mutant strain exhibited a lamellar arrangement of the bacteriochlorophyll c aggregates, which are the major constituents of the chlorosome interior. However, the carotenoid content and composition had a pronounced effect on chlorosome biogenesis and structure. The results indicate that carotenoids with a sufficiently long conjugated system are important for the biogenesis of the chlorosome baseplate. Defects in the baseplate structure affected the shape of the chlorosomes and were correlated with differences in the arrangement of lamellae and spacing between the lamellar planes of bacteriochlorophyll aggregates. In addition, comparisons among the various mutants enabled refinement of the assignments of the x-ray scattering peaks. While the main scattering peaks come from the lamellar structure of bacteriochlorophyll c aggregates, some minor peaks may originate from the paracrystalline arrangement of CsmA in the baseplate. PMID:17468163

  4. Hexanol-induced order-disorder transitions in lamellar self-assembling aggregates of bacteriochlorophyll c in Chlorobium tepidum chlorosomes.

    PubMed

    Arellano, Juan B; Torkkeli, Mika; Tuma, Roman; Laurinmäki, Pasi; Melø, Thor B; Ikonen, Teemu P; Butcher, Sarah J; Serimaa, Ritva E; Psencík, Jakub

    2008-03-01

    Chlorosomes are light-harvesting complexes of green photosynthetic bacteria. Chlorosomes contain bacteriochlorophyll (BChl) c, d, or e aggregates that exhibit strong excitonic coupling. The short-range order, which is responsible for the coupling, has been proposed to be augmented by pigment arrangement into undulated lamellar structures with spacing between 2 and 3 nm. Treatment of chlorosomes with hexanol reversibly converts the aggregated chlorosome chlorophylls into a form with spectral properties very similar to that of the monomer. Although this transition has been extensively studied, the structural basis remains unclear due to variability in the obtained morphologies. Here we investigated hexanol-induced structural changes in the lamellar organization of BChl c in chlorosomes from Chlorobium tepidum by a combination of X-ray scattering, electron cryomicroscopy, and optical spectroscopy. At a low hexanol/pigment ratio, the lamellae persisted in the presence of hexanol while the short-range order and exciton interactions between chlorin rings were effectively eliminated, producing a monomer-like absorption. The result suggested that hexanol hydroxyls solvated the chlorin rings while the aliphatic tail partitioned into the hydrophobic part of the lamellar structure. This partitioning extended the chlorosome along its long axis. Further increase of the hexanol/pigment ratio produced round pigment-hexanol droplets, which lost all lamellar order. After hexanol removal the spectral properties were restored. In the samples treated under the high hexanol/pigment ratio, lamellae reassembled in small domains after hexanol removal while the shape and long-range order were irreversibly lost. Thus, all the interactions required for establishing the short-range order by self-assembly are provided by BChl c molecules alone. However, the long-range order and overall shape are imposed by an external structure, e.g., the proteinaceous chlorosome baseplate. PMID:18197717

  5. Structure of Chlorobium tepidum sepiapterin reductase complex reveals the novel substrate binding mode for stereospecific production of L-threo-tetrahydrobiopterin.

    PubMed

    Supangat, Supangat; Seo, Kyung Hye; Choi, Yong Kee; Park, Young Shik; Son, Daeyoung; Han, Chang-deok; Lee, Kon Ho

    2006-01-27

    Sepiapterin reductase (SR) is involved in the last step of tetrahydrobiopterin (BH(4)) biosynthesis by reducing the di-keto group of 6-pyruvoyl tetrahydropterin. Chlorobium tepidum SR (cSR) generates a distinct BH(4) product, L-threo-BH(4) (6R-(1'S,2'S)-5,6,7,8-BH(4)), whereas animal enzymes produce L-erythro-BH(4) (6R-(1'R,2'S)-5,6,7,8-BH(4)) although it has high amino acid sequence similarities to the other animal enzymes. To elucidate the structural basis for the different reaction stereospecificities, we have determined the three-dimensional structures of cSR alone and complexed with NADP and sepiapterin at 2.1 and 1.7 A resolution, respectively. The overall folding of the cSR, the binding site for the cofactor NADP(H), and the positions of active site residues were quite similar to the mouse and the human SR. However, significant differences were found in the substrate binding region of the cSR. In comparison to the mouse SR complex, the sepiapterin in the cSR is rotated about 180 degrees around the active site and bound between two aromatic side chains of Trp-196 and Phe-99 so that its pterin ring is shifted to the opposite side, but its side chain position is not changed. The swiveled sepiapterin binding results in the conversion of the side chain configuration, exposing the opposite face for hydride transfer from NADPH. The different sepiapterin binding mode within the conserved catalytic architecture presents a novel strategy of switching the reaction stereospecificities in the same protein fold. PMID:16308317

  6. Role of Phe-99 and Trp-196 of sepiapterin reductase from Chlorobium tepidum in the production of L-threo-tetrahydrobiopterin.

    PubMed

    Supangat, Supangat; Park, Sun Ok; Seo, Kyung Hye; Lee, Sang Yeol; Park, Young Shik; Lee, Kon Ho

    2008-06-01

    Sepiapterin reductase from Chlorobium tepidum (cSR) catalyzes the synthesis of a distinct tetrahydrobiopterin (BH4), L-threo-BH4, different from the mammalian enzyme product. The 3-D crystal structure of cSR has revealed that the product configuration is determined solely by the substrate binding mode within the well-conserved catalytic triads. In cSR, the sepiapterin is stacked between two aromatic side chains of Phe-99 and Trp-196 and rotated approximately 180 degrees C around the active site from the position in mouse sepiapterin reductase. To confirm their roles in substrate binding, we mutated Phe-99 and/or Trp-196 to alanine (F99A, W196A) by site-directed mutagenesis and comparatively examined substrate binding of the purified proteins by kinetics analysis and differential scanning calorimetry. These mutants had higher Km values than the wild type. Remarkably, the W196A mutation resulted in a higher Km increase compared with the F99A mutation. Consistent with the results, the melting temperature (Tm) in the presence of sepiapterin was lower in the mutant proteins and the worst was W196A. These findings indicate that the two residues are indispensable for substrate binding in cSR, and Trp-196 is more important than Phe-99 for different stereoisomer production. PMID:18542834

  7. The crystal structure of ferritin from Chlorobium tepidum reveals a new conformation of the 4-fold channel for this protein family.

    PubMed

    Arenas-Salinas, Mauricio; Townsend, Philip D; Brito, Christian; Marquez, Valeria; Marabolli, Vanessa; Gonzalez-Nilo, Fernando; Matias, Cata; Watt, Richard K; López-Castro, Juan D; Domínguez-Vera, José; Pohl, Ehmke; Yévenes, Alejandro

    2014-11-01

    Ferritins are ubiquitous iron-storage proteins found in all kingdoms of life. They share a common architecture made of 24 subunits of five α-helices. The recombinant Chlorobium tepidum ferritin (rCtFtn) is a structurally interesting protein since sequence alignments with other ferritins show that this protein has a significantly extended C-terminus, which possesses 12 histidine residues as well as several aspartate and glutamic acid residues that are potential metal ion binding residues. We show that the macromolecular assembly of rCtFtn exhibits a cage-like hollow shell consisting of 24 monomers that are related by 4-3-2 symmetry; similar to the assembly of other ferritins. In all ferritins of known structure the short fifth α-helix adopts an acute angle with respect to the four-helix bundle. However, the crystal structure of the rCtFtn presented here shows that this helix adopts a new conformation defining a new assembly of the 4-fold channel of rCtFtn. This conformation allows the arrangement of the C-terminal region into the inner cavity of the protein shell. Furthermore, two Fe(III) ions were found in each ferroxidase center of rCtFtn, with an average FeA-FeB distance of 3 Å; corresponding to a diferric μ-oxo/hydroxo species. This is the first ferritin crystal structure with an isolated di-iron center in an iron-storage ferritin. The crystal structure of rCtFtn and the biochemical results presented here, suggests that rCtFtn presents similar biochemical properties reported for other members of this protein family albeit with distinct structural plasticity. PMID:25079050

  8. Internal Structure of Chlorosomes from Brown-Colored Chlorobium Species and the Role of Carotenoids in Their Assembly

    PubMed Central

    Pšenčík, Jakub; Arellano, Juan B.; Ikonen, Teemu P.; Borrego, Carles M.; Laurinmäki, Pasi A.; Butcher, Sarah J.; Serimaa, Ritva E.; Tuma, Roman

    2006-01-01

    Chlorosomes are the main light harvesting complexes of green photosynthetic bacteria. Recently, a lamellar model was proposed for the arrangement of pigment aggregates in Chlorobium tepidum chlorosomes, which contain bacteriochlorophyll (BChl) c as the main pigment. Here we demonstrate that the lamellar organization is also found in chlorosomes from two brown-colored species (Chl. phaeovibrioides and Chl. phaeobacteroides) containing BChl e as the main pigment. This suggests that the lamellar model is universal among green sulfur bacteria. In contrast to green-colored Chl. tepidum, chlorosomes from the brown-colored species often contain domains of lamellar aggregates that may help them to survive in extremely low light conditions. We suggest that carotenoids are localized between the lamellar planes and drive lamellar assembly by augmenting hydrophobic interactions. A model for chlorosome assembly, which accounts for the role of carotenoids and secondary BChl homologs, is presented. PMID:16731553

  9. Sulfite Oxidation in Chlorobaculum Tepidum

    PubMed Central

    Rodriguez, Jesse; Hiras, Jennifer; Hanson, Thomas E.

    2011-01-01

    The green sulfur bacterium Chlorobaculum tepidum is proposed to oxidize sulfide and elemental sulfur via sulfite as an obligate intermediate. The sulfite pool is predicted to be contained in the cytoplasm and be oxidized by the concerted action of ApsBA, which directly oxidizes sulfite, and QmoABC, which transfers electrons from ApsBA to the quinone pool. Like other green sulfur bacteria, C. tepidum was unable to use exogenously provided sulfite as the sole electron donor. However, exogenous sulfite significantly stimulated the growth yield of sulfide limited batch cultures. The growth of C. tepidum mutant strains, CT0867/qmoB::TnOGm and CT0868/qmoC::TnOGm, was not increased by sulfite. Furthermore, these strains accumulated sulfite and displayed a growth yield decrease when grown on sulfide as the sole electron donor. These results support an obligate, cytoplasmic sulfite intermediate as part of the canonical sulfur oxidation pathway in C. tepidum that requires the Qmo complex for oxidation. PMID:21747809

  10. Conformational heterogeneity of the Roc domains in C. tepidum Roc–COR and implications for human LRRK2 Parkinson mutations

    PubMed Central

    Rudi, Katharina; Ho, Franz Y.; Gilsbach, Bernd K.; Pots, Henderikus; Wittinghofer, Alfred; Kortholt, Arjan; Klare, Johann P.

    2015-01-01

    Ras of complex proteins (Roc) is a Ras-like GTP-binding domain that always occurs in tandem with the C-terminal of Roc (COR) domain and is found in bacteria, plants and animals. Recently, it has been shown that Roco proteins belong to the family of G-proteins activated by nucleotide (nt)-dependent dimerization (GADs). We investigated the RocCOR tandem from the bacteria Chlorobium tepidum with site-directed spin labelling and pulse EPR distance measurements to follow conformational changes during the Roco G-protein cycle. Our results confirm that the COR domains are a stable dimerization device serving as a scaffold for the Roc domains that, in contrast, are structurally heterogeneous and dynamic entities. Contrary to other GAD proteins, we observed only minor structural alterations upon binding and hydrolysis of GTP, indicating significant mechanistic variations within this protein class. Mutations in the most prominent member of the Roco family of proteins, leucine-rich repeat (LRR) kinase 2 (LRRK2), are the most frequent cause of late-onset Parkinson's disease (PD). Using a stable recombinant LRRK2 Roc-COR-kinase fragment we obtained detailed kinetic data for the G-protein cycle. Our data confirmed that dimerization is essential for efficient GTP hydrolysis and PD mutations in the Roc domain result in decreased GTPase activity. Previous data have shown that these LRRK2 PD-mutations are located in the interface between Roc and COR. Importantly, analogous mutations in the conserved C. tepidum Roc/COR interface significantly influence the structure and nt-induced conformational changes of the Roc domains. PMID:26310572

  11. Characterization of the quinones in purple sulfur bacterium Thermochromatium tepidum.

    PubMed

    Kimura, Yuuka; Kawakami, Tomoaki; Yu, Long-Jiang; Yoshimura, Miku; Kobayashi, Masayuki; Wang-Otomo, Zheng-Yu

    2015-07-01

    Quinone distributions in the thermophilic purple sulfur bacterium Thermochromatium tepidum have been investigated at different levels of the photosynthetic apparatus. Here we show that, on average, the intracytoplasmic membrane contains 18 ubiquinones (UQ) and 4 menaquinones (MQ) per reaction center (RC). About one-third of the quinones are retained in the light-harvesting-reaction center core complex (LH1-RC) with a similar ratio of UQ to MQ. The numbers of quinones essentially remains unchanged during crystallization of the LH1-RC. There are 1-2 UQ and 1 MQ associated with the RC-only complex in the purified solution sample. Our results suggest that a large proportion of the quinones are confined to the core complex and at least five UQs remain invisible in the current LH1-RC crystal structure. PMID:26048701

  12. Unusually Stable Spinae from a Freshwater Chlorobium sp

    PubMed Central

    Brooke, J. S.; Koval, S. F.; Beveridge, T. J.

    1995-01-01

    A green Chlorobium sp. with spinae, strain JSB1, was isolated from an enrichment culture previously obtained from Fayetteville Green Lake, N.Y. (J. S. Brooke, J. B. Thompson, T. J. Beveridge, and S. F. Koval, Arch. Microbiol. 157:319-322, 1992). Cells were gram-negative, nonmotile rods which contained bacteriochlorophyll c and chlorosomes. Spinae were best seen by transmission electron microscopy in thin sections of cells fixed in the presence of tannic acid. High-resolution scanning electron microscopy showed the spinae randomly distributed at the cell surface and at the junctions between cells. Spinae were physically sheared from cells and isolated from the culture supernatant by ultrafiltration. As observed by electron microscopy, spinae demonstrated unusual structural stability when exposed for 1 h at 37 deg C to chemical treatments such as hydrogen bond-breaking agents, detergents, metal-chelating agents, proteases, and organic solvents. They were stable for 1 h at 37 deg C over the pH range 2.3 to 9.9 and in 1 M HCl and 1 M NaOH. The structural integrity of the spinae was also maintained when spinae were subjected to harsher treatments of autoclaving in 2% (wt/vol) sodium dodecyl sulfate and exposure to dithiothreitol at pH 9 for 1 h at 100 deg C. Partially dissociated spinae were obtained after 5 h at 100 deg C in 1 M HCl and 1 M NaOH. In acid, the tubular spinae became amorphous structures, with no helical striations visible. In alkali, the spinae had dissociated into irregular aggregates of disks. Since both high temperature and extremes of pH were required to achieve partial dissociation of the spinae, the strength of the structure presumably comes from covalent bonding. PMID:16534897

  13. Draft Genome Sequence of Lampenflora Chlorobium limicola Strain Frasassi in a Sulfidic Cave System.

    PubMed

    Mansor, Muammar; Macalady, Jennifer L

    2016-01-01

    The draft genome sequence of Chlorobium limicola strain Frasassi was assembled from metagenomic sequencing of a green mat in an artificially lighted aquarium inside the Frasassi caves in Italy. The genome is 2.08 Mbp in size and contains the necessary genes for anoxygenic photosynthesis and CO2 fixation. PMID:27174272

  14. Draft Genome Sequence of Lampenflora Chlorobium limicola Strain Frasassi in a Sulfidic Cave System

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    The draft genome sequence of Chlorobium limicola strain Frasassi was assembled from metagenomic sequencing of a green mat in an artificially lighted aquarium inside the Frasassi caves in Italy. The genome is 2.08 Mbp in size and contains the necessary genes for anoxygenic photosynthesis and CO2 fixation. PMID:27174272

  15. Mechanism of biosynthesis of 2-oxo-3-methylvalerate in Chlorobium vibrioforme.

    PubMed

    Nesbakken, T; Kolsaker, P; Ormerod, J

    1988-07-01

    The biosynthesis of 2-oxo-3-methylvalerate in Chlorobium vibrioforme was investigated by 13C nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy of the oxoacid formed from 13C-labeled acetate by washed suspensions. The threonine pathway could be excluded, and the results are in accord with a mechanism for the formation of 2-oxobutyrate from acetyl coenzyme A and pyruvate via citramalate. PMID:3384813

  16. Final Report - "CO2 Sequestration in Cell Biomass of Chlorobium Thiosulfatophilum"

    SciTech Connect

    James L. Gaddy, PhD; Ching-Whan Ko, PhD

    2009-05-04

    World carbon dioxide emissions from the combustion of fossil fuels have increased at a rate of about 3 percent per year during the last 40 years to over 24 billion tons today. While a number of methods have been proposed and are under study for dealing with the carbon dioxide problem, all have advantages as well as disadvantages which limit their application. The anaerobic bacterium Chlorobium thiosulfatophilum uses hydrogen sulfide and carbon dioxide to produce elemental sulfur and cell biomass. The overall objective of this project is to develop a commercial process for the biological sequestration of carbon dioxide and simultaneous conversion of hydrogen sulfide to elemental sulfur. The Phase I study successfully demonstrated the technical feasibility of utilizing this bacterium for carbon dioxide sequestration and hydrogen sulfide conversion to elemental sulfur by utilizing the bacterium in continuous reactor studies. Phase II studies involved an advanced research and development to develop the engineering and scale-up parameters for commercialization of the technology. Tasks include culture isolation and optimization studies, further continuous reactor studies, light delivery systems, high pressure studies, process scale-up, a market analysis and economic projections. A number of anaerobic and aerobic microorgansims, both non-photosynthetic and photosynthetic, were examined to find those with the fastest rates for detailed study to continuous culture experiments. C. thiosulfatophilum was selected for study to anaerobically produce sulfur and Thiomicrospira crunogena waws selected for study to produce sulfate non-photosynthetically. Optimal conditions for growth, H2S and CO2 comparison, supplying light and separating sulfur were defined. The design and economic projections show that light supply for photosynthetic reactions is far too expensive, even when solar systems are considered. However, the aerobic non-photosynthetic reaction to produce sulfate with T

  17. Structure analysis and comparative characterization of the cytochrome c' and flavocytochrome c from thermophilic purple photosynthetic bacterium Thermochromatium tepidum.

    PubMed

    Hirano, Yu; Kimura, Yukihiro; Suzuki, Hideaki; Miki, Kunio; Wang, Zheng-Yu

    2012-08-21

    The thermodynamic and spectroscopic properties of two soluble electron transport proteins, cytochrome (Cyt) c' and flavocytochrome c, isolated from thermophilic purple sulfur bacterium Thermochromatium (Tch.) tepidum were examined and compared with those of the corresponding proteins from a closely related mesophilic bacterium Allochromatium (Alc.) vinosum. These proteins share sequence identities of 82% for the cytochromes c' and 86% for the flavocytochromes c. Crystal structures of the two proteins have been determined at high resolutions. Differential scanning calorimetry and denaturing experiments show that both proteins from Tch. tepidum are thermally and structurally much more stable than their mesophilic counterparts. The denaturation temperature of Tch. tepidum Cyt c' was 22 °C higher than that of Alc. vinosum Cyt c', and the midpoints of denaturation using guanidine hydrochloride were 2.0 and 1.2 M for the Tch. tepidum and Alc. vinosum flavocytochromes c, respectively. The enhanced stabilities can be interpreted on the basis of the structural and sequence information obtained in this study: increased number of hydrogen bonds formed between main chain nitrogen and oxygen atoms, more compact structures and reduced number of glycine residues. Many residues with large side chains in Alc. vinosum Cyt c' are substituted by alanines in Tch. tepidum Cyt c'. Both proteins from Tch. tepidum exhibit high structural similarities to their counterparts from Alc. vinosum, and the different residues between the corresponding proteins are mainly located on the surface and exposed to the solvent. Water molecules are found in the heme vicinity of Tch. tepidum Cyt c' and form hydrogen bonds with the heme ligand and C-terminal charged residues. Similar bound waters are also found in the vicinity of one heme group in the diheme subunit of Tch. tepidum flavocytochrome c. Electron density map of the Tch. tepidum flavocytochrome c clearly revealed the presence of disulfur atoms

  18. Metabolic flux analysis of the mixotrophic metabolisms in the green sulfur bacterium Chlorobaculum tepidum.

    PubMed

    Feng, Xueyang; Tang, Kuo-Hsiang; Blankenship, Robert E; Tang, Yinjie J

    2010-12-10

    The photosynthetic green sulfur bacterium Chlorobaculum tepidum assimilates CO(2) and organic carbon sources (acetate or pyruvate) during mixotrophic growth conditions through a unique carbon and energy metabolism. Using a (13)C-labeling approach, this study examined biosynthetic pathways and flux distributions in the central metabolism of C. tepidum. The isotopomer patterns of proteinogenic amino acids revealed an alternate pathway for isoleucine synthesis (via citramalate synthase, CimA, CT0612). A (13)C-assisted flux analysis indicated that carbons in biomass were mostly derived from CO(2) fixation via three key routes: the reductive tricarboxylic acid (RTCA) cycle, the pyruvate synthesis pathway via pyruvate:ferredoxin oxidoreductase, and the CO(2)-anaplerotic pathway via phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase. During mixotrophic growth with acetate or pyruvate as carbon sources, acetyl-CoA was mainly produced from acetate (via acetyl-CoA synthetase) or citrate (via ATP citrate lyase). Pyruvate:ferredoxin oxidoreductase converted acetyl-CoA and CO(2) to pyruvate, and this growth-rate control reaction is driven by reduced ferredoxin generated during phototrophic growth. Most reactions in the RTCA cycle were reversible. The relative fluxes through the RTCA cycle were 80∼100 units for mixotrophic cultures grown on acetate and 200∼230 units for cultures grown on pyruvate. Under the same light conditions, the flux results suggested a trade-off between energy-demanding CO(2) fixation and biomass growth rate; C. tepidum fixed more CO(2) and had a higher biomass yield (Y(X/S), mole carbon in biomass/mole substrate) in pyruvate culture (Y(X/S) = 9.2) than in acetate culture (Y(X/S) = 6.4), but the biomass growth rate was slower in pyruvate culture than in acetate culture. PMID:20937805

  19. Ab initio calculation of excitonic Hamiltonian of light-harvesting complex LH1 of Thermochromatium tepidum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kozlov, Maxim I.; Poddubnyy, Vladimir V.; Glebov, Ilya O.; Belov, Aleksandr S.; Khokhlov, Daniil V.

    2016-02-01

    The electronic properties of light-harvesting complexes determine the efficiency of energy transfer in photosynthetic antennae. Ab initio calculations of the electronic properties of bacteriochlorophylls (composing the LH1 complex of the purple bacteria Thermochromatium tepidum) were performed. Based on these calculations, the excitonic Hamiltonian of a native cyclic complex and the Hamiltonians of open complexes with several removed bacteriochlorophylls were constructed. Absorption spectra calculated based on these Hamiltonians agree well with the experimental data. We found that the parameters of interaction between the neighboring bacteriochlorophylls are significantly larger than the empirical parameters suggested previously.

  20. In situ high-resolution structure of the baseplate antenna complex in Chlorobaculum tepidum

    PubMed Central

    Nielsen, Jakob Toudahl; Kulminskaya, Natalia V.; Bjerring, Morten; Linnanto, Juha M.; Rätsep, Margus; Pedersen, Marie Østergaard; Lambrev, Petar H.; Dorogi, Márta; Garab, Győző; Thomsen, Karen; Jegerschöld, Caroline; Frigaard, Niels-Ulrik; Lindahl, Martin; Nielsen, Niels Chr.

    2016-01-01

    Photosynthetic antenna systems enable organisms harvesting light and transfer the energy to the photosynthetic reaction centre, where the conversion to chemical energy takes place. One of the most complex antenna systems, the chlorosome, found in the photosynthetic green sulfur bacterium Chlorobaculum (Cba.) tepidum contains a baseplate, which is a scaffolding super-structure, formed by the protein CsmA and bacteriochlorophyll a. Here we present the first high-resolution structure of the CsmA baseplate using intact fully functional, light-harvesting organelles from Cba. tepidum, following a hybrid approach combining five complementary methods: solid-state NMR spectroscopy, cryo-electron microscopy, isotropic and anisotropic circular dichroism and linear dichroism. The structure calculation was facilitated through development of new software, GASyCS for efficient geometry optimization of highly symmetric oligomeric structures. We show that the baseplate is composed of rods of repeated dimers of the strongly amphipathic CsmA with pigments sandwiched within the dimer at the hydrophobic side of the helix. PMID:27534696

  1. In situ high-resolution structure of the baseplate antenna complex in Chlorobaculum tepidum.

    PubMed

    Nielsen, Jakob Toudahl; Kulminskaya, Natalia V; Bjerring, Morten; Linnanto, Juha M; Rätsep, Margus; Pedersen, Marie Østergaard; Lambrev, Petar H; Dorogi, Márta; Garab, Győző; Thomsen, Karen; Jegerschöld, Caroline; Frigaard, Niels-Ulrik; Lindahl, Martin; Nielsen, Niels Chr

    2016-01-01

    Photosynthetic antenna systems enable organisms harvesting light and transfer the energy to the photosynthetic reaction centre, where the conversion to chemical energy takes place. One of the most complex antenna systems, the chlorosome, found in the photosynthetic green sulfur bacterium Chlorobaculum (Cba.) tepidum contains a baseplate, which is a scaffolding super-structure, formed by the protein CsmA and bacteriochlorophyll a. Here we present the first high-resolution structure of the CsmA baseplate using intact fully functional, light-harvesting organelles from Cba. tepidum, following a hybrid approach combining five complementary methods: solid-state NMR spectroscopy, cryo-electron microscopy, isotropic and anisotropic circular dichroism and linear dichroism. The structure calculation was facilitated through development of new software, GASyCS for efficient geometry optimization of highly symmetric oligomeric structures. We show that the baseplate is composed of rods of repeated dimers of the strongly amphipathic CsmA with pigments sandwiched within the dimer at the hydrophobic side of the helix. PMID:27534696

  2. Insights into the Excitonic States of Individual Chlorosomes from Chlorobaculum tepidum

    PubMed Central

    Jendrny, Marc; Aartsma, Thijs J.; Köhler, Jürgen

    2014-01-01

    Green-sulfur bacteria have evolved a unique light-harvesting apparatus, the chlorosome, by which it is perfectly adapted to thrive photosynthetically under extremely low light conditions. We have used single-particle, optical spectroscopy to study the structure-function relationship of chlorosomes each of which incorporates hundreds of thousands of self-assembled bacteriochlorophyll (BChl) molecules. The electronically excited states of these molecular assemblies are described as Frenkel excitons whose photophysical properties depend crucially on the mutual arrangement of the pigments. The signature of these Frenkel excitons and its relation to the supramolecular organization of the chlorosome becomes accessible by optical spectroscopy. Because subtle spectral features get obscured by ensemble averaging, we have studied individual chlorosomes from wild-type Chlorobaculum tepidum by polarization-resolved fluorescence-excitation spectroscopy. This approach minimizes the inherent sample heterogeneity and allows us to reveal properties of the exciton states without ensemble averaging. The results are compared with predictions from computer simulations of various models of the supramolecular organization of the BChl monomers. We find that the photophysical properties of individual chlorosomes from wild-type Chlorobaculum tepidum are consistent with a (multiwall) helical arrangement of syn-anti stacked BChl molecules in cylinders and/or spirals of different size. PMID:24806924

  3. Origin of bimodal fluorescence enhancement factors of Chlorobaculum tepidum reaction centers on silver island films.

    PubMed

    Maćkowski, Sebastian; Czechowski, Nikodem; Ashraf, Khuram U; Szalkowski, Marcin; Lokstein, Heiko; Cogdell, Richard J; Kowalska, Dorota

    2016-08-01

    We focus on the spectral dependence of plasmon-induced enhancement of fluorescence of Chlorobaculum tepidum reaction centers. When deposited on silver island film, they exhibit up to a 60-fold increase in fluorescence. The dependence of enhancement factors on the excitation wavelength is not correlated with the absorption spectrum of the plasmonic structure. In particular, the presence of one (or multiple) trimers of the Fenna-Matthews-Olson (FMO) protein reveals itself in bimodal distribution of enhancement factors for the excitation at 589 nm, the wavelength corresponding to bacteriochlorophyll absorption of FMO and the core of the RC. We conclude that the structure of multichromophoric complexes can substantially affect the impact of plasmonic excitations, which is important in the context of assembling functional biohybrid systems. PMID:27406896

  4. Glycolipid analyses of light-harvesting chlorosomes from envelope protein mutants of Chlorobaculum tepidum.

    PubMed

    Tsukatani, Yusuke; Mizoguchi, Tadashi; Thweatt, Jennifer; Tank, Marcus; Bryant, Donald A; Tamiaki, Hitoshi

    2016-06-01

    Chlorosomes are large and efficient light-harvesting organelles in green photosynthetic bacteria, and they characteristically contain large numbers of bacteriochlorophyll c, d, or e molecules. Self-aggregated bacteriochlorophyll pigments are surrounded by a monolayer envelope membrane comprised of glycolipids and Csm proteins. Here, we analyzed glycolipid compositions of chlorosomes from the green sulfur bacterium Chlorobaculum tepidum mutants lacking one, two, or three Csm proteins by HPLC equipped with an evaporative light-scattering detector. The ratio of monogalactosyldiacylglyceride (MGDG) to rhamnosylgalactosyldiacylglyceride (RGDG) was smaller in chlorosomes from mutants lacking two or three proteins in CsmC/D/H motif family than in chlorosomes from the wild-type, whereas chlorosomes lacking CsmIJ showed relatively less RGDG than MGDG. The results suggest that the CsmC, CsmD, CsmH, and other chlorosome proteins are involved in organizing MGDG and RGDG and thereby affect the size and shape of the chlorosome. PMID:26869354

  5. Triplet excited state spectra and dynamics of carotenoids from the thermophilic purple photosynthetic bacterium Thermochromatium tepidum

    SciTech Connect

    Niedzwiedzki, Dariusz; Kobayashi, Masayuki; Blankenship, R. E.

    2011-01-13

    Light-harvesting complex 2 from the anoxygenic phototrophic purple bacterium Thermochromatium tepidum was purified and studied by steady-state absorption, fluorescence and flash photolysis spectroscopy. Steady-state absorption and fluorescence measurements show that carotenoids play a negligible role as supportive energy donors and transfer excitation to bacteriochlorophyll-a with low energy transfer efficiency of ~30%. HPLC analysis determined that the dominant carotenoids in the complex are rhodopin and spirilloxanthin. Carotenoid excited triplet state formation upon direct (carotenoid) or indirect (bacteriochlorophyll-a Q{sub x} band) excitation shows that carotenoid triplets are mostly localized on spirilloxanthin. In addition, no triplet excitation transfer between carotenoids was observed. Such specific carotenoid composition and spectroscopic results strongly suggest that this organism optimized carotenoid composition in the light-harvesting complex 2 in order to maximize photoprotective capabilities of carotenoids but subsequently drastically suppressed their supporting role in light-harvesting process.

  6. A sulfide:quinone oxidoreductase from Chlorobaculum tepidum displays unusual kinetic properties.

    PubMed

    Shuman, Kevin E; Hanson, Thomas E

    2016-06-01

    Sulfide:quinone oxidoreductase (SQR) is the primary sulfide-oxidizing enzyme found in all three domains of life. Of the six phylogenetically distinct types of SQR, four have representatives that have been biochemically characterized. The genome of Chlorobaculum tepidum encodes three SQR homologs. One of these, encoded by CT1087, is a type VI SQR that has been previously shown to be required for growth at high sulfide concentrations and to be expressed in sulfide-dependent manner. Therefore, CT1087 was hypothesized to be a high sulfide adapted SQR. CT1087 was expressed in Escherichia coli with an N-terminal His-tag (CT1087NHis6) and purified by Ni-NTA chromatography. CT1087NHis6 was active and contained FAD as a strongly bound cofactor. The measured kinetic parameters for CT1087NHis6 indicate a low affinity for sulfide and a high enzymatic turnover rate consistent with the hypothesis for its function inferred from genetic and expression data. These are the first kinetic data for a type VI SQR and have implications for structure-function analyses of all SQR's. PMID:27190141

  7. Sulfide pulsing as the controlling factor of spinae production in Chlorobium limicola strain UdG 6038

    PubMed

    Pibernat; Abella

    1996-04-01

    Chlorobium limicola UdG 6038, a green sulfur bacterium, was isolated from anoxic sediments. Cells were gram-negative, non-motile, ovoid shaped, and contained chlorobactene and bacteriochlorophyll c as the main photosynthetic pigments. The DNA G+C content was 56.4 mol%. Ultrastructural studies revealed the presence of abundant spinae (45-110 spinae per cell) attached to the cell wall. India-ink-stained cells observed under the optical microscope were surrounded by a large capsule (5-11 &mgr;m total diameter). The presence of this capsule was coincident with the presence of a large number of spinae (> 30 spinae per cell). The mucilaginous capsule was attached to the spinae without penetrating it. In batch culture, the synthesis of spinae in strain UdG 6038 was not affected by changes in temperature, pH, salt concentration, or illumination at physiological ranges and hence, the cells remained spined. The control of spinae production was experimentally confirmed using a semicontinuous batch culture refed by sulfide pulsing. The culture remained at a low spination level (> 30 spinae per cell) only when the duration of sulfide starvation between pulses was less than 5 h. After longer sulfide starvation periods, the cells remained spined (more than 38 ± 6.3 spinae per cell). This observation supports the idea that the duration of sulfide limitation in the culture plays a key role in controlling the spination process in strain C. limicola UdG 6038. Chlorobium spinae may play an eco-physiological role in buoyancy capacity and adhesion of sulfur globules to the cells in natural environments where sulfide concentrations are expected to be highly variable. PMID:8952947

  8. Biosynthesis of unnatural bacteriochlorophyll c derivatives esterified with α,ω-diols in the green sulfur photosynthetic bacterium Chlorobaculum tepidum.

    PubMed

    Nishimori, Risato; Mizoguchi, Tadashi; Tamiaki, Hitoshi; Kashimura, Shigenori; Saga, Yoshitaka

    2011-09-13

    Unnatural bacteriochlorophyll (BChl) c derivatives possessing a hydroxy group at the terminus of a hydrocarbon chain at the 17-propionate were biosynthesized in the green sulfur photosynthetic bacterium Chlorobaculum tepidum. Addition of exogenous 1,8-octanediol, 1,12-dodecanediol, and 1,16-hexadecanediol in acetone to liquid cultures resulted in accumulation of BChl c monoesterified with the corresponding diols. The relative ratios of the novel BChl c derivatives esterified with 1,8-, 1,12-, and 1,16-diols to totally producing BChl c were 8.2, 50.2, and 57.6% in the cells grown with additive α,ω-diols at concentrations of 1.5, 0.06, and 0.06 mM, respectively, at the final concentration. The homologue composition of BChl c derivatives esterified with these α,ω-diols was similar to that of original, coexisting BChl c esterified with farnesol (BChl c(F)), suggesting that esterification of α,ω-diols occurred at the last step of the BChl c biosynthetic pathway by BChl c synthase, BchK, in the same manner as in BChl c(F). Chlorosomes, which were isolated from cells grown in the presence of exogenous α,ω-diols, contained a ratio and a composition of BChl c derivatives esterified with the diols similar to those in the whole cells, indicating that these BChl c derivatives were actually present in chlorosomes. Q(y) absorption bands of C. tepidum cells containing the novel BChl c derivatives were shifted to a shorter wavelength, although their bandwidths were analogous to those of cells obtained by normal cultivation. Circular dichroism spectra of cells that had BChl c derivatives esterified with α,ω-diols exhibited S-shaped signals in the Q(y) region, whose polarities were the reverse of those of cells grown in the normal medium and by supplementation with neat acetone as a control experiment. These spectral features of C. tepidum possessing BChl c derivatives esterified with α,ω-diols imply that the novel BChl c derivatives possessing a hydroxy group at the

  9. Chlorobium limicola forma thiosulfatophilum: biocatalyst in the production of sulfur and organic carbon from a gas stream containing H/sub 2/O and CO/sub 2/

    SciTech Connect

    Cork, D.J.; Garunas, R.; Sajjad, A.

    1983-03-01

    Chlorobium limicola forma thiosulfatophilum (ATCC 17092) was grown in a 1-liter continuously stirred tank reactor (800-ml liquid volume) at pH 6.8, 30/sup 0/C, saturated light intensity, and gas flow rate of 23.6 ml/min from a gas cylinder blend consisting of 3.9 mol% H/sub 2/S, 9.2 mol% CO/sub 2/, 86.4 mol% N/sub 2/, and 0.5 mol% H/sub 2/. This is the first demonstration of photoautotrophic growth of a Chlorobium sp. on a continuous inorganic gas feed. A significant potential exists for applying this photoautotrophic process to desulfurization and CO/sub 2/ fixation of gases containing acidic components (H/sub 2/S and CO/sub 2/).

  10. Ultrafast time-resolved spectroscopy of the light-harvesting complex 2 (LH2) from the photosynthetic bacterium Thermochromatium tepidum

    SciTech Connect

    Niedzwiedzki, Dariusz M.; Fuciman, Marcel; Kobayashi, Masayuki; Frank, Harry A.; Blankenship, Robert E.

    2011-10-08

    The light-harvesting complex 2 from the thermophilic purple bacterium Thermochromatium tepidum was purified and studied by steady-state absorption and fluorescence, sub-nanosecond-time-resolved fluorescence and femtosecond time-resolved transient absorption spectroscopy. The measurements were performed at room temperature and at 10 K. The combination of both ultrafast and steady-state optical spectroscopy methods at ambient and cryogenic temperatures allowed the detailed study of carotenoid (Car)-to-bacteriochlorophyll (BChl) as well BChl-to-BChl excitation energy transfer in the complex. The studies show that the dominant Cars rhodopin (N = 11) and spirilloxanthin (N = 13) do not play a significant role as supportive energy donors for BChl a. This is related with their photophysical properties regulated by long π-electron conjugation. On the other hand, such properties favor some of the Cars, particularly spirilloxanthin (N = 13) to play the role of the direct quencher of the excited singlet state of BChl.

  11. Introduction of perfluoroalkyl chain into the esterifying moiety of bacteriochlorophyll c in the green sulfur photosynthetic bacterium Chlorobaculum tepidum by pigment biosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Saga, Yoshitaka; Yamashita, Hayato; Hirota, Keiya

    2016-09-15

    The green sulfur photosynthetic bacterium Chlorobaculum (Cba.) tepidum was grown in liquid cultures containing perfluoro-1-decanol, 1H,1H,2H,2H-heptadecafluoro-1-decanol [CF3(CF2)7(CH2)2OH] or 1H,1H-nonadecafluoro-1-decanol [CF3(CF2)8CH2OH], to introduce rigid and fluorophilic chains into the esterifying moiety of light-harvesting bacteriochlorophyll (BChl) c. Exogenous 1H,1H,2H,2H-heptadecafluoro-1-decanol was successfully attached to the 17(2)-carboxy group of bacteriochlorophyllide (BChlide) c in vivo: the relative ratio of the unnatural BChl c esterified with this perfluoroalcohol over the total BChl c was 10.3%. Heat treatment of the liquid medium containing 1H,1H,2H,2H-heptadecafluoro-1-decanol with β-cyclodextrin before inoculation increased the relative ratio of the BChl c derivative esterified with this alcohol in the total BChl c in Cba. tepidum. In a while, 1H,1H-nonadecafluoro-1-decanol was not attached to BChlide c in Cba. tepidum, which was grown by its supplementation. These results suggest that the rigidity close to the hydroxy group of the esterifying alcohol is not suitable for the recognition by the BChl c synthase called BchK in Cba. tepidum. The unnatural BChl c esterified with 1H,1H,2H,2H-heptadecafluoro-1-decanol participated in BChl c self-aggregates in chlorosomes. PMID:27427396

  12. Metabolic analysis of Chlorobium chlorochromatii CaD3 reveals clues of the symbiosis in ‘Chlorochromatium aggregatum'.

    PubMed Central

    Cerqueda-García, Daniel; Martínez-Castilla, León P; Falcón, Luisa I; Delaye, Luis

    2014-01-01

    A symbiotic association occurs in ‘Chlorochromatium aggregatum', a phototrophic consortium integrated by two species of phylogenetically distant bacteria composed by the green-sulfur Chlorobium chlorochromatii CaD3 epibiont that surrounds a central β-proteobacterium. The non-motile chlorobia can perform nitrogen and carbon fixation, using sulfide as electron donors for anoxygenic photosynthesis. The consortium can move due to the flagella present in the central β-protobacterium. Although Chl. chlorochromatii CaD3 is never found as free-living bacteria in nature, previous transcriptomic and proteomic studies have revealed that there are differential transcription patterns between the symbiotic and free-living status of Chl. chlorocromatii CaD3 when grown in laboratory conditions. The differences occur mainly in genes encoding the enzymatic reactions involved in nitrogen and amino acid metabolism. We performed a metabolic reconstruction of Chl. chlorochromatii CaD3 and an in silico analysis of its amino acid metabolism using an elementary flux modes approach (EFM). Our study suggests that in symbiosis, Chl. chlorochromatii CaD3 is under limited nitrogen conditions where the GS/GOGAT (glutamine synthetase/glutamate synthetase) pathway is actively assimilating ammonia obtained via N2 fixation. In contrast, when free-living, Chl. chlorochromatii CaD3 is in a condition of nitrogen excess and ammonia is assimilated by the alanine dehydrogenase (AlaDH) pathway. We postulate that ‘Chlorochromatium aggregatum' originated from a parasitic interaction where the N2 fixation capacity of the chlorobia would be enhanced by injection of 2-oxoglutarate from the β-proteobacterium via the periplasm. This consortium would have the advantage of motility, which is fundamental to a phototrophic bacterium, and the syntrophy of nitrogen and carbon sources. PMID:24285361

  13. A Monogalactosyldiacylglycerol Synthase Found in the Green Sulfur Bacterium Chlorobaculum tepidum Reveals Important Roles for Galactolipids in Photosynthesis[W

    PubMed Central

    Masuda, Shinji; Harada, Jiro; Yokono, Makio; Yuzawa, Yuichi; Shimojima, Mie; Murofushi, Kazuhiro; Tanaka, Hironori; Masuda, Hanako; Murakawa, Masato; Haraguchi, Tsuyoshi; Kondo, Maki; Nishimura, Mikio; Yuasa, Hideya; Noguchi, Masato; Oh-oka, Hirozo; Tanaka, Ayumi; Tamiaki, Hitoshi; Ohta, Hiroyuki

    2011-01-01

    Monogalactosyldiacylglycerol (MGDG), which is conserved in almost all photosynthetic organisms, is the most abundant natural polar lipid on Earth. In plants, MGDG is highly accumulated in the chloroplast membranes and is an important bulk constituent of thylakoid membranes. However, precise functions of MGDG in photosynthesis have not been well understood. Here, we report a novel MGDG synthase from the green sulfur bacterium Chlorobaculum tepidum. This enzyme, MgdA, catalyzes MGDG synthesis using UDP-Gal as a substrate. The gene encoding MgdA was essential for this bacterium; only heterozygous mgdA mutants could be isolated. An mgdA knockdown mutation affected in vivo assembly of bacteriochlorophyll c aggregates, suggesting the involvement of MGDG in the construction of the light-harvesting complex called chlorosome. These results indicate that MGDG biosynthesis has been independently established in each photosynthetic organism to perform photosynthesis under different environmental conditions. We complemented an Arabidopsis thaliana MGDG synthase mutant by heterologous expression of MgdA. The complemented plants showed almost normal levels of MGDG, although they also had abnormal morphological phenotypes, including reduced chlorophyll content, no apical dominance in shoot growth, atypical flower development, and infertility. These observations provide new insights regarding the importance of regulated MGDG synthesis in the physiology of higher plants. PMID:21764989

  14. All-atom structures and calcium binding sites of the bacterial photosynthetic LH1-RC core complex from Thermochromatium tepidum.

    PubMed

    Khrenova, Maria G; Nemukhin, Alexander V; Grigorenko, Bella L; Wang, Peng; Zhang, Jian-Ping

    2014-06-01

    Computationally derived structures of the photosynthetic core complex composed of the light-harvesting (LH) system LH1 and the reaction center (RC) from a thermophilic purple sulfur bacterium Thermochromatium tepidum are reported providing first models of the LH1 system at atomic resolution. We used the known primary structure of α and β polypeptides from this particular LH1 complex and the related bacterial LH templates to design the LH1 torus composed of 16 αβ subunits trapping bacteriochlorophyll (BChl-a) dimers and carotenoid molecules. The macromolecule of RC was placed in the center of the ring and the LH1-RC complex was inserted inside the lipid bilayer to simulate the membrane environment. Since thermal stability of the LH1-RC complex is linked to Ca(2+) binding by the complex, location of trapping sites of calcium ions in the LH1 polypeptides is examined by using molecular dynamics simulations of the entire system solvated in water with CaCl2 molecules in the system. The newly predicted Ca(2+) trapping sites can be responsible for attractive interaction of neighboring αβ subunits of LH1 with relevance to stability of the calcium-bound LH1-RC complex. PMID:24852455

  15. Calcium ions are required for the enhanced thermal stability of the light-harvesting-reaction center core complex from thermophilic purple sulfur bacterium Thermochromatium tepidum.

    PubMed

    Kimura, Yukihiro; Yu, Long-Jiang; Hirano, Yu; Suzuki, Hiroaki; Wang, Zheng-Yu

    2009-01-01

    Thermochromatium tepidum is a thermophilic purple sulfur photosynthetic bacterium collected from the Mammoth Hot Springs, Yellowstone National Park. A previous study showed that the light-harvesting-reaction center core complex (LH1-RC) purified from this bacterium is highly stable at room temperature (Suzuki, H., Hirano, Y., Kimura, Y., Takaichi, S., Kobayashi, M., Miki, K., and Wang, Z.-Y. (2007) Biochim. Biophys. Acta 1767, 1057-1063). In this work, we demonstrate that thermal stability of the Tch. tepidum LH1-RC is much higher than that of its mesophilic counterparts, and the enhanced thermal stability requires Ca2+ as a cofactor. Removal of the Ca2+ from Tch. tepidum LH1-RC resulted in a complex with the same degree of thermal stability as that of the LH1-RCs purified from mesophilic bacteria. The enhanced thermal stability can be restored by addition of Ca2+ to the Ca2+-depleted LH1-RC, and this process is fully reversible. Interchange of the thermal stability between the two forms is accompanied by a shift of the LH1 Qy transition between 915 nm for the native and 880 nm for the Ca2+-depleted LH1-RC. Differential scanning calorimetry measurements reveal that degradation temperature of the native LH1-RC is 15 degrees C higher and the enthalpy change is about 28% larger than the Ca2+-depleted LH1-RC. Substitution of the Ca2+ with other metal cations caused a decrease in thermal stability of an extent depending on the properties of the cations. These results indicate that Ca2+ ions play a dual role in stabilizing the structure of the pigment-membrane protein complex and in altering its spectroscopic properties, and hence provide insight into the adaptive strategy of this photosynthetic organism to survive in extreme environments using natural resources. PMID:18977753

  16. Effect of Spectral Density Shapes on the Excitonic Structure and Dynamics of the Fenna-Matthews-Olson Trimer from Chlorobaculum tepidum.

    PubMed

    Kell, Adam; Blankenship, Robert E; Jankowiak, Ryszard

    2016-08-11

    The Fenna-Matthews-Olson (FMO) trimer (composed of identical subunits) from the green sulfur bacterium Chlorobaculum tepidum is an important protein model system to study exciton dynamics and excitation energy transfer (EET) in photosynthetic complexes. In addition, FMO is a popular model for excitonic calculations, with many theoretical parameter sets reported describing different linear and nonlinear optical spectra. Due to fast exciton relaxation within each subunit, intermonomer EET results predominantly from the lowest energy exciton states (contributed to by BChl a 3 and 4). Using experimentally determined shapes for the spectral densities, simulated optical spectra are obtained for the entire FMO trimer. Simultaneous fits of low-temperature absorption, fluorescence, and hole-burned spectra place constraints on the determined pigment site energies, providing a new Hamiltonian that should be further tested to improve modeling of 2D electronic spectroscopy data and our understanding of coherent and dissipation effects in this important protein complex. PMID:27438068

  17. The origin of the unusual Qy red shift in LH1-RC complexes from purple bacteria Thermochromatium tepidum as revealed by Stark absorption spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Ma, Fei; Yu, Long-Jiang; Wang-Otomo, Zheng-Yu; van Grondelle, Rienk

    2015-12-01

    Native LH1-RC of photosynthetic purple bacteria Thermochromatium (Tch.) tepidum, B915, has an ultra-red BChl a Qy absorption. Two blue-shifted complexes obtained by chemical modification, B893 and B882, have increasing full widths at half maximum (FWHM) and decreasing transition dipole oscillator strength. 77K Stark absorption spectroscopy studies were employed for the three complexes, trying to understand the origin of the 915 nm absorption. We found that Tr(∆α) and |∆μ| of both Qy and carotenoid (Car) bands are larger than for other purple bacterial LH complexes reported previously. Moreover, the red shifts of the Qy bands are associated with (1) increasing Tr(∆α) and |∆μ| of the Qy band, (2) the red shift of the Car Stark signal and (3) the increasing |∆μ| of the Car band. Based on the results and the crystal structure, a combined effect of exciton-charge transfer (CT) states mixing, and inhomogeneous narrowing of the BChl a site energy is proposed to be the origin of the 915 nm absorption. CT-exciton state mixing has long been found to be the origin of strong Stark signal in LH1 and special pair, and the more extent of the mixing in Tch. tepidum LH1 is mainly the consequence of the shorter BChl-BChl distances. The less flexible protein structure results in a smaller site energy disorder (inhomogeneous narrowing), which was demonstrated to be able to influence |∆μ| and absorption. PMID:26341015

  18. Temperature dependent LH1→RC energy transfer in purple bacteria Tch. tepidum with shiftable LH1-Qy band: A natural system to investigate thermally activated energy transfer in photosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Ma, Fei; Yu, Long-Jiang; Wang-Otomo, Zheng-Yu; van Grondelle, Rienk

    2016-04-01

    The native LH1-RC complex of the purple bacterium Thermochromatium (Tch.) tepidum has an ultra-red LH1-Qy absorption at 915nm, which can shift to 893 and 882nm by means of chemical modifications. These unique complexes are a good natural system to investigate the thermally activated energy transfer process, with the donor energies different while the other factors (such as the acceptor energy, special pair at 890nm, and the distance/relative orientation between the donor and acceptor) remain the same. The native B915-RC, B893-RC and B882-RC complexes, as well as the LH1-RC complex of Rhodobacter (Rba.) sphaeroides were studied by temperature-dependent time-resolved absorption spectroscopy. The energy transfer time constants, kET(-1), are 65, 45, 46 and 45ps at room temperature while 225, 58, 85, 33ps at 77K for the B915-RC, B893-RC, B882-RC and Rba. sphaeroides LH1-RC, respectively. The dependences of kET on temperature have different trends. The reorganization energies are determined to be 70, 290, 200 and 45cm(-1), respectively, by fitting kET vs temperature using Marcus equation. The activation energies are 200, 60, 115 and 20cm(-1), respectively. The influences of the structure (the arrangement of the 32 BChl a molecules) on kET are discussed based on these results, to reveal how the B915-RC complex accomplishes its energy transfer function with a large uphill energy of 290cm(-1). PMID:26702949

  19. Functional Analysis of Three Sulfide:Quinone Oxidoreductase Homologs in Chlorobaculum tepidum▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Chan, Leong-Keat; Morgan-Kiss, Rachael M.; Hanson, Thomas E.

    2009-01-01

    Sulfide:quinone oxidoreductase (SQR) catalyzes sulfide oxidation during sulfide-dependent chemo- and phototrophic growth in bacteria. The green sulfur bacterium Chlorobaculum tepidum (formerly Chlorobium tepidum) can grow on sulfide as the sole electron donor and sulfur source. C. tepidum contains genes encoding three SQR homologs: CT0117, CT0876, and CT1087. This study examined which, if any, of the SQR homologs possess sulfide-dependent ubiquinone reduction activity and are required for growth on sulfide. In contrast to CT0117 and CT0876, transcripts of CT1087 were detected only when cells actively oxidized sulfide. Mutation of CT0117 or CT1087 in C. tepidum decreased SQR activity in membrane fractions, and the CT1087 mutant could not grow with ≥6 mM sulfide. Mutation of both CT0117 and CT1087 in C. tepidum completely abolished SQR activity, and the double mutant failed to grow with ≥4 mM sulfide. A C-terminal His6-tagged CT1087 protein was membrane localized, as was SQR activity. Epitope-tagged CT1087 was detected only when sulfide was actively consumed by cells. Recombinantly produced CT1087 and CT0117 proteins had SQR activity, while CT0876 did not. In summary, we conclude that, under the conditions tested, both CT0117 and CT1087 function as SQR proteins in C. tepidum. CT0876 may support the growth of C. tepidum at low sulfide concentrations, but no evidence was found for SQR activity associated with this protein. PMID:19028893

  20. Biochemistry and control of the reductive tricarboxylic acid pathway of CO2 fixation and physiological role of the Rubis CO-like protein

    SciTech Connect

    Tabita, F. Robert

    2008-12-04

    During the past years of this project we have made progress relative to the two major goals of the proposal: (1) to study the biochemistry and regulation of the reductive TCA cycle of CO2 fixation and (2) to probe the physiological role of a RubisCO-like protein (RLP). Both studies primarily employ the green sulfur bacterium Chlorobium tepidum as well as other photosynthetic bacteria including Rhodospirillum rubrum and Rhodopseudomonas palustris.

  1. Influence of organics and silica on Fe(II) oxidation rates and cell-mineral aggregate formation by the green-sulfur Fe(II)-oxidizing bacterium Chlorobium ferrooxidans KoFox - Implications for Fe(II) oxidation in ancient oceans

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gauger, Tina; Byrne, James M.; Konhauser, Kurt O.; Obst, Martin; Crowe, Sean; Kappler, Andreas

    2016-06-01

    Most studies on microbial phototrophic Fe(II) oxidation (photoferrotrophy) have focused on purple bacteria, but recent evidence points to the importance of green-sulfur bacteria (GSB). Their recovery from modern ferruginous environments suggests that these photoferrotrophs can offer insights into how their ancient counterparts grew in Archean oceans at the time of banded iron formation (BIF) deposition. It is unknown, however, how Fe(II) oxidation rates, cell-mineral aggregate formation, and Fe-mineralogy vary under environmental conditions reminiscent of the geological past. To address this, we studied the Fe(II)-oxidizer Chlorobium ferrooxidans KoFox, a GSB living in co-culture with the heterotrophic Geospirillum strain KoFum. We investigated the mineralogy of Fe(III) metabolic products at low/high light intensity, and in the presence of dissolved silica and/or fumarate. Silica and fumarate influenced the crystallinity and particle size of the produced Fe(III) minerals. The presence of silica also enhanced Fe(II) oxidation rates, especially at high light intensities, potentially by lowering Fe(II)-toxicity to the cells. Electron microscopic imaging showed no encrustation of either KoFox or KoFum cells with Fe(III)-minerals, though weak associations were observed suggesting co-sedimentation of Fe(III) with at least some biomass via these aggregates, which could support diagenetic Fe(III)-reduction. Given that GSB are presumably one of the most ancient photosynthetic organisms, and pre-date cyanobacteria, our findings, on the one hand, strengthen arguments for photoferrotrophic activity as a likely mechanism for BIF deposition on a predominantly anoxic early Earth, but, on the other hand, also suggest that preservation of remnants of Fe(II)-oxidizing GSB as microfossils in the rock record is unlikely.

  2. Redox effects on the excited-state lifetime in chlorosomes and bacteriochlorophyll c oligomers.

    PubMed Central

    van Noort, P I; Zhu, Y; LoBrutto, R; Blankenship, R E

    1997-01-01

    Oligomers of [E,E] BChl CF (8, 12-diethyl bacteriochlorophyll c esterified with farnesol (F)) and [Pr,E] BChl CF (analogously, M methyl, Pr propyl) in hexane and aqueous detergent or lipid micelles were studied by means of steady-state absorption, time-resolved fluorescence, and electron spin resonance spectroscopy. The maximum absorption wavelength, excited-state dynamics, and electron spin resonance (EPR) linewidths are similar to those of native and reconstituted chlorosomes of Chlorobium tepidum. The maximum absorption wavelength of oligomers of [E,E] BChl CF was consistently blue-shifted as compared to that of [Pr,E] BChl CF oligomers, which is ascribed to the formation of smaller oligomers with [E,E] BChl CF than [Pr,E] BChl CF. Time-resolved fluorescence measurements show an excited-state lifetime of 10 ps or less in nonreduced samples of native and reconstituted chlorosomes of Chlorobium tepidum. Under reduced conditions the excited-state lifetime increased to tens of picoseconds, and energy transfer to BChl a or long-wavelength absorbing BChl c was observed. Oligomers of [E,E] BChl CF and [Pr,E] BChl CF in aqueous detergent or lipid micelles show a similar short excited-state lifetime under nonreduced conditions and an increase up to several tens of picoseconds upon reduction. These results indicate rapid quenching of excitation energy in nonreduced samples of chlorosomes and aqueous BChl c oligomers. EPR spectroscopy shows that traces of oxidized BChl c radicals are present in nonreduced and absent in reduced samples of chlorosomes and BChl c oligomers. This suggests that the observed short excited-state lifetimes in nonreduced samples of chlorosomes and BChl c oligomers may be ascribed to excited-state quenching by BChl c radicals. The narrow EPR linewidth suggests that the BChl c are arranged in clusters of 16 and 6 molecules in chlorosomes of Chlorobium tepidum and Chloroflexus aurantiacus, respectively. PMID:8994616

  3. Coherent Control Protocol for Separating Energy-Transfer Pathways in Photosynthetic Complexes by Chiral Multidimensional Signals†

    PubMed Central

    Abramavicius, Darius; Mukamel, Shaul

    2013-01-01

    Adaptive optimizations performed using a genetic algorithm are employed to construct optimal laser pulse configurations that separate spectroscopic features associated with the two main energy-transfer pathways in the third-order nonlinear optical response simulated for the Fenna–Matthews–Olson (FMO) photosynthetic complex from the green sulfur bacterium Chlorobium tepidum. Superpositions of chirality-induced tensor components in both collinear and noncollinear pulse configurations are analyzed. The optimal signals obtained by manipulating the ratios of various 2D spectral peaks reveal detailed information about the excitation dynamics. PMID:21495702

  4. Specific Gene bciD for C7-Methyl Oxidation in Bacteriochlorophyll e Biosynthesis of Brown-Colored Green Sulfur Bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Harada, Jiro; Mizoguchi, Tadashi; Satoh, Souichirou; Tsukatani, Yusuke; Yokono, Makio; Noguchi, Masato; Tanaka, Ayumi; Tamiaki, Hitoshi

    2013-01-01

    The gene named bciD, which encodes the enzyme involved in C7-formylation in bacteriochlorophyll e biosynthesis, was found and investigated by insertional inactivation in the brown-colored green sulfur bacterium Chlorobaculum limnaeum (previously called Chlorobium phaeobacteroides). The bciD mutant cells were green in color, and accumulated bacteriochlorophyll c homologs bearing the 7-methyl group, compared to C7-formylated BChl e homologs in the wild type. BChl-c homolog compositions in the mutant were further different from those in Chlorobaculum tepidum which originally produced BChl c: (31S)-8-isobutyl-12-ethyl-BChl c was unusually predominant. PMID:23560066

  5. Chirality-Based Signatures of Local Protein Environments in Two-Dimensional Optical Spectroscopy of Two Species Photosynthetic Complexes of Green Sulfur Bacteria: Simulation Study

    PubMed Central

    Voronine, Dmitri V.; Abramavicius, Darius; Mukamel, Shaul

    2008-01-01

    Two-dimensional electronic chirality-induced signals of excitons in the photosynthetic Fenna-Matthews-Olson complex from two species of green sulfur bacteria (Chlorobium tepidum and Prosthecochloris aestuarii) are compared. The spectra are predicted to provide sensitive probes of local protein environment of the constituent bacteriochlorophyll a chromophores and reflect electronic structure variations (site energies and couplings) of the two complexes. Pulse polarization configurations are designed that can separate the coherent and incoherent exciton dynamics contributions to the two-dimensional spectra. PMID:18676650

  6. Perturbation of bacteriochlorophyll molecules in Fenna-Matthews-Olson protein complexes through mutagenesis of cysteine residues.

    PubMed

    Saer, Rafael; Orf, Gregory S; Lu, Xun; Zhang, Hao; Cuneo, Matthew J; Myles, Dean A A; Blankenship, Robert E

    2016-09-01

    The Fenna-Matthews-Olson (FMO) pigment-protein complex in green sulfur bacteria transfers excitation energy from the chlorosome antenna complex to the reaction center. In understanding energy transfer in the FMO protein, the individual contributions of the bacteriochlorophyll pigments to the FMO complex's absorption spectrum could provide detailed information with which molecular and energetic models can be constructed. The absorption properties of the pigments, however, are such that their spectra overlap significantly. To overcome this, we used site-directed mutagenesis to construct a series of mutant FMO complexes in the model green sulfur bacterium Chlorobaculum tepidum (formerly Chlorobium tepidum). Two cysteines at positions 49 and 353 in the C. tepidum FMO complex, which reside near hydrogen bonds between BChls 2 and 3, and their amino acid binding partner serine 73 and tyrosine 15, respectively, were changed to alanine residues. The resulting C49A, C353A, and C49A C353A double mutants were analyzed with a combination of optical absorption and circular dichroism (CD) spectroscopies. Our results revealed changes in the absorption properties of several underlying spectral components in the FMO complex, as well as the redox behavior of the complex in response to the reductant sodium dithionite. A high-resolution X-ray structure of the C49A C353A double mutant reveals that these spectral changes appear to be independent of any major structural rearrangements in the FMO mutants. Our findings provide important tests for theoretical calculations of the C. tepidum FMO absorption spectrum, and additionally highlight a possible role for cysteine residues in the redox activity of the pigment-protein complex. PMID:27114180

  7. Software Comparison

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blanchard, D. C.

    1986-01-01

    Software Comparison Package (SCP) compares similar files. Normally, these are 90-character files produced by CDC UPDATE utility from program libraries that contain FORTRAN source code plus identifier. SCP also used to compare load maps, cross-reference outputs, and UPDATE corrections sets. Helps wherever line-by-line comparison of similarly structured files required.

  8. Characterization of an FMO Variant of Chlorobaculum tepidum Carrying Bacteriochlorophyll a Esterified by Geranylgeraniol

    SciTech Connect

    Wen, Jianzhong; Harada, Jiro; Buyle, Kenny; Yuan, Kevin; Tamiaki, Hitoshi; Oh-oka, Hirozo; Loomis, Richard A; Blankenship, R. E.

    2010-06-15

    The Fenna-Matthews-Olson light-harvesting antenna (FMO) protein has been a model system for understanding pigment-protein interactions in the energy transfer process in photosynthesis. All previous studies have utilized wild-type FMO proteins from several species. Here we report the purification and characterization of the first FMO protein variant generated via replacement of the esterifying alcohol at the C-17 propionate residue of bacteriochlorophyll (BChl) a, phytol, with geranylgeraniol, which possesses three more double bonds. The FMO protein still assembles with the modified pigment, but both the whole cell absorption and the biochemical purification indicate that the mutant cells contain a much less mature FMO protein. The gene expression was checked using qRT-PCR, and none of the genes encoding BChl a-binding proteins are strongly regulated at the transcriptional level. The smaller amount of the FMO protein in the mutant cell is probably due to the degradation of the apo-FMO protein at different stages after it does not bind the normal pigment. The absorption, fluorescence, and CD spectra of the purified FMO variant protein are similar to those of the wild-type FMO protein except the conformations of most pigments are more heterogeneous, which broadens the spectral bands. Interestingly, the lowest-energy pigment binding site seems to be unchanged and is the only peak that can be well resolved in 77 K absorption spectra. The excited-state lifetime of the variant FMO protein is unchanged from that of the wild type and shows a temperature-dependent modulation similar to that of the wild type. The variant FMO protein is less thermally stable than the wild type. The assembly of the FMO protein and also the implications of the decreased FMO/chlorosome stoichiometry are discussed in terms of the topology of these two antennas on the cytoplasmic membrane.

  9. Social Comparison and Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Levine, John M.

    The classroom environment elicits social comparison behavior in which a student uses peers' performance as a gauge for his own self-assessment. Social comparison as it relates to ability is a four phase sequential process. In phase one, stimulation of social comparison is elicited through developmentally-determined cognitive capacities and motives…

  10. Acquisition of Comparison Constructions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hohaus, Vera; Tiemann, Sonja; Beck, Sigrid

    2014-01-01

    This article presents a study on the time course of the acquisition of comparison constructions. The order in which comparison constructions (comparatives, measure phrases, superlatives, degree questions, etc.) show up in English- and German-learning children's spontaneous speech is quite fixed. It is shown to be insufficiently determined by…

  11. Pairwise-Comparison Software

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ricks, Wendell R.

    1995-01-01

    Pairwise comparison (PWC) is computer program that collects data for psychometric scaling techniques now used in cognitive research. It applies technique of pairwise comparisons, which is one of many techniques commonly used to acquire the data necessary for analyses. PWC administers task, collects data from test subject, and formats data for analysis. Written in Turbo Pascal v6.0.

  12. Public opinion: Country comparisons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hopkins, Debbie

    2015-11-01

    Climate change awareness, risk perception and policy support vary between and within countries. National-scale comparisons can help to explain this variability and be used to develop targeted interventions.

  13. Exciton Theory for Supramolecular Chlorosomal Aggregates: 1. Aggregate Size Dependence of the Linear Spectra

    PubMed Central

    Prokhorenko, V. I.; Steensgaard, D. B.; Holzwarth, A. R.

    2003-01-01

    The interior of chlorosomes of green bacteria forms an unusual antenna system organized without proteins. The steady-spectra (absorption, circular dichroism, and linear dichroism) have been modeled using the Frenkel Hamiltonian for the large tubular aggregates of bacteriochlorophylls with geometries corresponding to those proposed for Chloroflexus aurantiacus and Chlorobium tepidum chlorosomes. For the Cf. aurantiacus aggregates we apply a structure used previously (V. I. Prokhorenko., D. B. Steensgaard, and A. R. Holzwarth, Biophys. J. 2000, 79:2105–2120), whereas for the Cb. tepidum aggregates a new extended model of double-tube aggregates, based on recently published solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance studies (B.-J. van Rossum, B. Y. van Duhl, D. B. Steensgaard, T. S. Balaban, A. R. Holzwarth, K. Schaffner, and H. J. M. de Groot, Biochemistry 2001, 40:1587–1595), is developed. We find that the circular dichroism spectra depend strongly on the aggregate length for both types of chlorosomes. Their shape changes from “type-II” (negative at short wavelengths to positive at long wavelengths) to the “mixed-type” (negative-positive-negative) in the nomenclature proposed in K. Griebenow, A. R. Holzwarth, F. van Mourik, and R. van Grondelle, Biochim. Biophys. Acta 1991, 1058:194–202, for an aggregate length of 30–40 bacteriochlorophyll molecules per stack. This “size effect” on the circular dichroism spectra is caused by appearance of macroscopic chirality due to circular distribution of the transition dipole moment of the monomers. We visualize these distributions, and also the corresponding Frenkel excitons, using a novel presentation technique. The observed size effects provide a key to explain many previously puzzling and seemingly contradictory experimental data in the literature on the circular and linear dichroism spectra of seemingly identical types of chlorosomes. PMID:14581217

  14. Phylogeny and molecular signatures (conserved proteins and indels) that are specific for the Bacteroidetes and Chlorobi species

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Radhey S; Lorenzini, Emily

    2007-01-01

    Background The Bacteroidetes and Chlorobi species constitute two main groups of the Bacteria that are closely related in phylogenetic trees. The Bacteroidetes species are widely distributed and include many important periodontal pathogens. In contrast, all Chlorobi are anoxygenic obligate photoautotrophs. Very few (or no) biochemical or molecular characteristics are known that are distinctive characteristics of these bacteria, or are commonly shared by them. Results Systematic blast searches were performed on each open reading frame in the genomes of Porphyromonas gingivalis W83, Bacteroides fragilis YCH46, B. thetaiotaomicron VPI-5482, Gramella forsetii KT0803, Chlorobium luteolum (formerly Pelodictyon luteolum) DSM 273 and Chlorobaculum tepidum (formerly Chlorobium tepidum) TLS to search for proteins that are uniquely present in either all or certain subgroups of Bacteroidetes and Chlorobi. These studies have identified > 600 proteins for which homologues are not found in other organisms. This includes 27 and 51 proteins that are specific for most of the sequenced Bacteroidetes and Chlorobi genomes, respectively; 52 and 38 proteins that are limited to species from the Bacteroidales and Flavobacteriales orders, respectively, and 5 proteins that are common to species from these two orders; 185 proteins that are specific for the Bacteroides genus. Additionally, 6 proteins that are uniquely shared by species from the Bacteroidetes and Chlorobi phyla (one of them also present in the Fibrobacteres) have also been identified. This work also describes two large conserved inserts in DNA polymerase III (DnaE) and alanyl-tRNA synthetase that are distinctive characteristics of the Chlorobi species and a 3 aa deletion in ClpB chaperone that is mainly found in various Bacteroidales, Flavobacteriales and Flexebacteraceae, but generally not found in the homologs from other organisms. Phylogenetic analyses of the Bacteroidetes and Chlorobi species is also reported based on

  15. Theoretical Simulations and Ultrafast Pump-probe Spectroscopy Experiments in Pigment-protein Photosynthetic Complexes

    SciTech Connect

    Buck, D.R.

    2000-09-12

    Theoretical simulations and ultrafast pump-probe laser spectroscopy experiments were used to study photosynthetic pigment-protein complexes and antennae found in green sulfur bacteria such as Prosthecochloris aestuarii, Chloroflexus aurantiacus, and Chlorobium tepidum. The work focused on understanding structure-function relationships in energy transfer processes in these complexes through experiments and trying to model that data as we tested our theoretical assumptions with calculations. Theoretical exciton calculations on tubular pigment aggregates yield electronic absorption spectra that are superimpositions of linear J-aggregate spectra. The electronic spectroscopy of BChl c/d/e antennae in light harvesting chlorosomes from Chloroflexus aurantiacus differs considerably from J-aggregate spectra. Strong symmetry breaking is needed if we hope to simulate the absorption spectra of the BChl c antenna. The theory for simulating absorption difference spectra in strongly coupled photosynthetic antenna is described, first for a relatively simple heterodimer, then for the general N-pigment system. The theory is applied to the Fenna-Matthews-Olson (FMO) BChl a protein trimers from Prosthecochloris aestuarii and then compared with experimental low-temperature absorption difference spectra of FMO trimers from Chlorobium tepidum. Circular dichroism spectra of the FMO trimer are unusually sensitive to diagonal energy disorder. Substantial differences occur between CD spectra in exciton simulations performed with and without realistic inhomogeneous distribution functions for the input pigment diagonal energies. Anisotropic absorption difference spectroscopy measurements are less consistent with 21-pigment trimer simulations than 7-pigment monomer simulations which assume that the laser-prepared states are localized within a subunit of the trimer. Experimental anisotropies from real samples likely arise from statistical averaging over states with diagonal energies shifted by

  16. Redox regulation of energy transfer efficiency in antennas of green photosynthetic bacteria

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blankenship, R. E.; Cheng, P.; Causgrove, T. P.; Brune, D. C.; Wang, J.

    1993-01-01

    The efficiency of energy transfer from the peripheral chlorosome antenna structure to the membrane-bound antenna in green sulfur bacteria depends strongly on the redox potential of the medium. The fluorescence spectra and lifetimes indicate that efficient quenching pathways are induced in the chlorosome at high redox potential. The midpoint redox potential for the induction of this effect in isolated chlorosomes from Chlorobium vibrioforme is -146 mV at pH 7 (vs the normal hydrogen electrode), and the observed midpoint potential (n = 1) decreases by 60 mV per pH unit over the pH range 7-10. Extraction of isolated chlorosomes with hexane has little effect on the redox-induced quenching, indicating that the component(s) responsible for this effect are bound and not readily extractable. We have purified and partially characterized the trimeric water-soluble bacteriochlorophyll a-containing protein from the thermophilic green sulfur bacterium Chlorobium tepidum. This protein is located between the chlorosome and the membrane. Fluorescence spectra of the purified protein indicate that it also contains groups that quench excitations at high redox potential. The results indicate that the energy transfer pathway in green sulfur bacteria is regulated by redox potential. This regulation appears to operate in at least two distinct places in the energy transfer pathway, the oligomeric pigments in the interior of the chlorosome and in the bacteriochlorophyll a protein. The regulatory effect may serve to protect the cell against superoxide-induced damage when oxygen is present. By quenching excitations before they reach the reaction center, reduction and subsequent autooxidation of the low potential electron acceptors found in these organisms is avoided.

  17. Fall 2013 International Comparisons

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Northwest Evaluation Association, 2014

    2014-01-01

    This Fall report is an aggregated statistical analysis of Measures of Academic Progress® (MAP®) data from international schools. The report provides a consistent means of comparisons of specific sub-groups by subject and grade, which allows partners to compare their MAP® results with other schools within their region or membership organization.…

  18. Spring 2013 International Comparisons

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Northwest Evaluation Association, 2013

    2013-01-01

    This report is an aggregated statistical analysis of Measures of Academic Progress® (MAP®) data from international schools. The report provides a consistent means of comparisons of specific sub-groups by subject and grade, which allows partners to compare their MAP® results with other schools within their region or membership organization. There…

  19. Echocardiographic speckle reduction comparison.

    PubMed

    Finn, Seán; Glavin, Martin; Jones, Edward

    2011-01-01

    In this paper, a detailed description and comparison of speckle reduction of medical ultrasound, and in particular echocardiography, is presented. Fifteen speckle reduction filters are described in a detailed fashion to facilitate implementation for research and evaluation. The filtering techniques considered include anisotropic diffusion, wavelet denoising, and local statistics. Common nomenclature and notation are adopted, to expedite comparison between approaches. Comparison of the filters is based on their application to simulated images, clinical videos, and a computational requirement analysis. The ultrasound simulation method provides a realistic model of the image acquisition process, and permits the use of a noise-free reference image for comparison. Application of objective quality metrics quantifies the preservation of image edges, overall image distortion, and improvement in image contrast. The computational analysis quantifies the number of operations required for each speckle reduction method. A speed-accuracy analysis of discretization methods for anisotropic diffusion is included. It is concluded that the optimal method is the OSRAD diffusion filter. This method is capable of strong speckle suppression, increasing the average SNRA of the simulated images by a factor of two. This method also shows favorable edge preservation and contrast improvement, and may be efficiently implemented. PMID:21244977

  20. Retained gas inventory comparison

    SciTech Connect

    BARTON, W.B.

    1999-05-18

    Gas volume data derived from four different analytical methods were collected and analyzed for comparison to volumes originally used in the technical basis for the Basis for Interim Operations (BIO). The original volumes came from Hodgson (1996) listed in the reference section of this document. Hodgson (1996) screened all 177 single and double-shell tanks for the presence of trapped gas in waste via two analytical methods: Surface Level Rise (SLR), and Barometric Pressure Effect (BPE). More recent gas volume projections have been calculated using different analytical techniques along with updates to the parameters used as input to the SLR and BPE models. Gas volumes derived from new analytical instruments include those as measured by the Void Fraction Instrument (VFI) and Retained Gas Sampler (RGS). The results of this comparison demonstrate that the original retained gas volumes of Hodgson (1996) used as a technical basis in developing the BIO were conservative, and were conservative from a safety analysis standpoint. These results represent only comparisons to the original reported volumes using the limited set of newly acquired data that is available.

  1. Unravelling coherent dynamics and energy dissipation in photosynthetic complexes by 2D spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Abramavicius, Darius; Voronine, Dmitri V; Mukamel, Shaul

    2008-05-01

    Spectroscopic studies of light harvesting and the subsequent energy conversion in photosynthesis can track quantum dynamics happening on the microscopic level. The Fenna-Matthews-Olson complex of the photosynthetic green sulfur bacteria Chlorobium tepidum is a prototype efficient light-harvesting antenna: it stores the captured photon energy in the form of excitons (collective excitations), which are subsequently converted to chemical energy with almost 100% efficiency. These excitons show an elaborate relaxation pattern involving coherent and incoherent pathways. We make use of the complex chirality and fundamental symmetries of multidimensional optical signals to design new sequences of ultrashort laser pulses that can distinguish between coherent quantum oscillations and incoherent energy dissipation during the exciton relaxation. The cooperative dynamical features, which reflect the coherent nature of excitations, are amplified. The extent of quantum oscillations and their timescales in photosynthesis can be readily extracted from the designed signals, showing that cooperativity is maintained during energy transport in the Fenna-Matthews-Olson complex. The proposed pulse sequences may also be applied to reveal information on the robustness of quantum states in the presence of fluctuating environments in other nanoscopic complexes and devices. PMID:18192357

  2. Phylobiochemical Characterization of Class-Ib Aspartate/Prephenate Aminotransferases Reveals Evolution of the Plant Arogenate Phenylalanine Pathway[W

    PubMed Central

    Dornfeld, Camilla; Weisberg, Alexandra J.; K C, Ritesh; Dudareva, Natalia; Jelesko, John G.; Maeda, Hiroshi A.

    2014-01-01

    The aromatic amino acid Phe is required for protein synthesis and serves as the precursor of abundant phenylpropanoid plant natural products. While Phe is synthesized from prephenate exclusively via a phenylpyruvate intermediate in model microbes, the alternative pathway via arogenate is predominant in plant Phe biosynthesis. However, the molecular and biochemical evolution of the plant arogenate pathway is currently unknown. Here, we conducted phylogenetically informed biochemical characterization of prephenate aminotransferases (PPA-ATs) that belong to class-Ib aspartate aminotransferases (AspAT Ibs) and catalyze the first committed step of the arogenate pathway in plants. Plant PPA-ATs and succeeding arogenate dehydratases (ADTs) were found to be most closely related to homologs from Chlorobi/Bacteroidetes bacteria. The Chlorobium tepidum PPA-AT and ADT homologs indeed efficiently converted prephenate and arogenate into arogenate and Phe, respectively. A subset of AspAT Ib enzymes exhibiting PPA-AT activity was further identified from both Plantae and prokaryotes and, together with site-directed mutagenesis, showed that Thr-84 and Lys-169 play key roles in specific recognition of dicarboxylic keto (prephenate) and amino (aspartate) acid substrates. The results suggest that, along with ADT, a gene encoding prephenate-specific PPA-AT was transferred from a Chlorobi/Bacteroidetes ancestor to a eukaryotic ancestor of Plantae, allowing efficient Phe and phenylpropanoid production via arogenate in plants today. PMID:25070637

  3. Low-Temperature Fluorescence from Single Chlorosomes, Photosynthetic Antenna Complexes of Green Filamentous and Sulfur Bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Shibata, Yutaka; Saga, Yoshitaka; Tamiaki, Hitoshi; Itoh, Shigeru

    2006-01-01

    Fluorescence spectra of single chlorosomes isolated from a green filamentous bacterium (Chloroflexus (Cfl.) aurantiacus) and a green sulfur bacterium (Chlorobium (Cb.) tepidum) were measured by using a confocal laser microscope at 13 K. Chlorosomes were frozen either in a liquid solution (floating chlorosome) or on a quartz plate after being adsorbed (adsorbed chlorosome). Fluorescence peak wavelengths were shorter for the adsorbed single chlorosomes than for the floating ones. Single floating Cfl. chlorosomes showed a distribution of fluorescence peak positions having a center at 759.0 nm with a full width at half maximum of 6.3 nm. Single floating Cb. chlorosomes showed a 782.7 nm center with a full width at half-maximum of 3.4 nm. The distribution shifted to the blue and became wider with increasing temperature, especially in Cb. chlorosomes, suggesting a large excitonic density of states just above the lowest level. Energy transfer from BChl-c aggregates to BChl-a molecules in the baseplate proteins was observed in the floating chlorosomes but not in the adsorbed ones. A positive correlation was found between the peak wavelength of BChl-c fluorescence and the intensity of BChl-a fluorescence in single Cfl. chlorosomes. The results suggest that the BChl-c aggregates with longer wavelengths of the fluorescence peaks have a more efficient Förster-type energy transfer to the baseplate BChl-a. PMID:16950839

  4. Nonphotochemical Hole-Burning Studies of Energy Transfer Dynamics in Antenna Complexes of Photosynthetic Bacteria

    SciTech Connect

    Satoshi Matsuzaki

    2002-08-01

    This thesis contains the candidate's original work on excitonic structure and energy transfer dynamics of two bacterial antenna complexes as studied using spectral hole-burning spectroscopy. The general introduction is divided into two chapters (1 and 2). Chapter 1 provides background material on photosynthesis and bacterial antenna complexes with emphasis on the two bacterial antenna systems related to the thesis research. Chapter 2 reviews the underlying principles and mechanism of persistent nonphotochemical hole-burning (NPHB) spectroscopy. Relevant energy transfer theories are also discussed. Chapters 3 and 4 are papers by the candidate that have been published. Chapter 3 describes the application of NPHB spectroscopy to the Fenna-Matthews-Olson (FMO) complex from the green sulfur bacterium Prosthecochloris aestuarii; emphasis is on determination of the low energy vibrational structure that is important for understanding the energy transfer process associated within three lowest energy Qy-states of the complex. The results are compared with those obtained earlier on the FMO complex from Chlorobium tepidum. In Chapter 4, the energy transfer dynamics of the B800 molecules of intact LH2 and B800-deficient LH2 complexes of the purple bacterium Rhodopseudomonas acidophila are compared. New insights on the additional decay channel of the B800 ring of bacteriochlorophyll a (BChl a) molecules are provided. General conclusions are given in Chapter 5.

  5. Lamellar Organization of Pigments in Chlorosomes, the Light Harvesting Complexes of Green Photosynthetic Bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Pšenčík, J.; Ikonen, T. P.; Laurinmäki, P.; Merckel, M. C.; Butcher, S. J.; Serimaa, R. E.; Tuma, R.

    2004-01-01

    Chlorosomes of green photosynthetic bacteria constitute the most efficient light harvesting complexes found in nature. In addition, the chlorosome is the only known photosynthetic system where the majority of pigments (BChl) is not organized in pigment-protein complexes but instead is assembled into aggregates. Because of the unusual organization, the chlorosome structure has not been resolved and only models, in which BChl pigments were organized into large rods, were proposed on the basis of freeze-fracture electron microscopy and spectroscopic constraints. We have obtained the first high-resolution images of chlorosomes from the green sulfur bacterium Chlorobium tepidum by cryoelectron microscopy. Cryoelectron microscopy images revealed dense striations ∼20 Å apart. X-ray scattering from chlorosomes exhibited a feature with the same ∼20 Å spacing. No evidence for the rod models was obtained. The observed spacing and tilt-series cryoelectron microscopy projections are compatible with a lamellar model, in which BChl molecules aggregate into semicrystalline lateral arrays. The diffraction data further indicate that arrays are built from BChl dimers. The arrays form undulating lamellae, which, in turn, are held together by interdigitated esterifying alcohol tails, carotenoids, and lipids. The lamellar model is consistent with earlier spectroscopic data and provides insight into chlorosome self-assembly. PMID:15298919

  6. Lamellar organization of pigments in chlorosomes, the light harvesting complexes of green photosynthetic bacteria.

    PubMed

    Psencík, J; Ikonen, T P; Laurinmäki, P; Merckel, M C; Butcher, S J; Serimaa, R E; Tuma, R

    2004-08-01

    Chlorosomes of green photosynthetic bacteria constitute the most efficient light harvesting complexes found in nature. In addition, the chlorosome is the only known photosynthetic system where the majority of pigments (BChl) is not organized in pigment-protein complexes but instead is assembled into aggregates. Because of the unusual organization, the chlorosome structure has not been resolved and only models, in which BChl pigments were organized into large rods, were proposed on the basis of freeze-fracture electron microscopy and spectroscopic constraints. We have obtained the first high-resolution images of chlorosomes from the green sulfur bacterium Chlorobium tepidum by cryoelectron microscopy. Cryoelectron microscopy images revealed dense striations approximately 20 A apart. X-ray scattering from chlorosomes exhibited a feature with the same approximately 20 A spacing. No evidence for the rod models was obtained. The observed spacing and tilt-series cryoelectron microscopy projections are compatible with a lamellar model, in which BChl molecules aggregate into semicrystalline lateral arrays. The diffraction data further indicate that arrays are built from BChl dimers. The arrays form undulating lamellae, which, in turn, are held together by interdigitated esterifying alcohol tails, carotenoids, and lipids. The lamellar model is consistent with earlier spectroscopic data and provides insight into chlorosome self-assembly. PMID:15298919

  7. Structures of Open (R) and Close (T) States of Prephenate Dehydratase (PDT) - Implication of Allosteric Regulation by L-Phenylalanine

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Kemin; Li, Hui; Zhang, Rongguang; Gu, Minyi; Clancy, Shonda T.; Joachimiak, Andrzej

    2011-01-01

    The enzyme prephenate dehydratase (PDT) converts prephenate to phenylpyruvate in L-phenylalanine biosynthesis. PDT is allosterically regulated by L-Phe and other amino acids. We report the first crystal structures of PDT from Staphylococcus aureus in a relaxed (R) state and PDT from Chlorobium tepidum in a tense (T) state. The two enzymes show low sequence identity (27.3%) but the same prototypic architecture and domain organization. Both enzymes are tetramers (dimer of dimers) in crystal and solution while a PDT dimer can be regarded as a basic catalytic unit. The N-terminal PDT domain consists of two similar subdomains with a cleft in between, which hosts the highly conserved active site. In one PDT dimer two clefts are aligned to form an extended active site across the dimer interface. Similarly at the interface two ACT regulatory domains create two highly conserved pockets. Upon binding of the L-Phe inside the pockets, PDT transits from an open to a closed conformation. PMID:18171624

  8. NTP comparison process

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Corban, Robert

    1993-01-01

    The systems engineering process for the concept definition phase of the program involves requirements definition, system definition, and consistent concept definition. The requirements definition process involves obtaining a complete understanding of the system requirements based on customer needs, mission scenarios, and nuclear thermal propulsion (NTP) operating characteristics. A system functional analysis is performed to provide a comprehensive traceability and verification of top-level requirements down to detailed system specifications and provides significant insight into the measures of system effectiveness to be utilized in system evaluation. The second key element in the process is the definition of system concepts to meet the requirements. This part of the process involves engine system and reactor contractor teams to develop alternative NTP system concepts that can be evaluated against specific attributes, as well as a reference configuration against which to compare system benefits and merits. Quality function deployment (QFD), as an excellent tool within Total Quality Management (TQM) techniques, can provide the required structure and provide a link to the voice of the customer in establishing critical system qualities and their relationships. The third element of the process is the consistent performance comparison. The comparison process involves validating developed concept data and quantifying system merits through analysis, computer modeling, simulation, and rapid prototyping of the proposed high risk NTP subsystems. The maximum amount possible of quantitative data will be developed and/or validated to be utilized in the QFD evaluation matrix. If upon evaluation of a new concept or its associated subsystems determine to have substantial merit, those features will be incorporated into the reference configuration for subsequent system definition and comparison efforts.

  9. MACPEX Water Measurement Comparison

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Al-Saadi, J. A.; Thornhill, A.; Alston, E. J.; Chen, G.; Fahey, D. W.; Jensen, E. J.; Mace, G. G.

    2012-12-01

    The Mid-latitude Airborne Cirrus Properties Experiment (MACPEX) airborne field campaign was conducted in March and April 2011 to investigate cirrus cloud properties and the processes that affect their impact on radiation. In pursuit of this goal the NASA WB-57 was outfitted with dozens of in-situ instruments from government and university science teams including a wide range of water instruments. This provided an unprecedented situation to compare eight water instruments on one platform measuring water vapor (CIMS, DLH, HWV, JLH, and ULH), total water (ALIAS and FISH) and ice water content (CLH/IWC) for 14 flight days. Objective and data-driven approaches were applied to analyze the comparison data and to assess the consistency levels between the instruments and instrument uncertainties. The analysis is primarily focused on the upper tropospheric and lower stratospheric conditions, paying particular attention to water levels below 20 ppmv and between 20 - 120 ppmv depending on specific instrument data coverage. To be presented are comparison results suggesting the level of the agreement among the instrument as a function of atmospheric conditions, e.g., temperature and water vapor. Also discussed are some exploratory analyses of instrument precisions.

  10. Long History of IAM Comparisons

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, Steven J.; Clarke, Leon E.; Edmonds, James A.; Kejun, Jiang; Kriegler, Elmar; Masui, Toshihiko; Riahi, Keywan; Shukla, Priyadarshi R.; Tavoni, Massimo; Van Vuuren, Detlef; Weyant, John

    2015-04-23

    Correspondence to editor: We agree with the editors that the assumptions behind models of all types, including integrated assessment models (IAMs), should be as transparent as possible. The editors were in error, however, when they implied that the IAM community is just “now emulating the efforts of climate researchers by instigating their own model inter-comparison projects (MIPs).” In fact, model comparisons for integrated assessment and climate models followed a remarkably similar trajectory. Early General Circulation Model (GCM) comparison efforts, evolved to the first Atmospheric Model Inter-comparison Project (AMIP), which was initiated in the early 1990s. Atmospheric models evolved to coupled atmosphere-ocean models (AOGCMs) and results from the first Coupled Model Inter-Comparison Project (CMIP1) become available about a decade later. Results of first energy model comparison exercise, conducted under the auspices of the Stanford Energy Modeling Forum, were published in 1977. A summary of the first comparison focused on climate change was published in 1993. As energy models were coupled to simple economic and climate models to form IAMs, the first comparison exercise for IAMs (EMF-14) was initiated in 1994, and IAM comparison exercises have been on-going since this time.

  11. Geology orbiter comparison study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cutts, J. A. J.; Blasius, K. R.; Davis, D. R.; Pang, K. D.; Shreve, D. C.

    1977-01-01

    Instrument requirements of planetary geology orbiters were examined with the objective of determining the feasibility of applying standard instrument designs to a host of terrestrial targets. Within the basic discipline area of geochemistry, gamma-ray, X-ray fluorescence, and atomic spectroscopy remote sensing techniques were considered. Within the discipline area of geophysics, the complementary techniques of gravimetry and radar were studied. Experiments using these techniques were analyzed for comparison at the Moon, Mercury, Mars and the Galilean satellites. On the basis of these comparative assessments, the adaptability of each sensing technique was judged as a basic technique for many targets, as a single instrument applied to many targets, as a single instrument used in different mission modes, and as an instrument capability for nongeoscience objectives.

  12. Glovebox decontamination technology comparison

    SciTech Connect

    Quintana, D.M.; Rodriguez, J.B.; Cournoyer, M.E.

    1999-09-26

    Reconfiguration of the CMR Building and TA-55 Plutonium Facility for mission requirements will require the disposal or recycle of 200--300 gloveboxes or open front hoods. These gloveboxes and open front hoods must be decontaminated to meet discharge limits for Low Level Waste. Gloveboxes and open front hoods at CMR have been painted. One of the deliverables on this project is to identify the best method for stripping the paint from large numbers of gloveboxes. Four methods being considered are the following: conventional paint stripping, dry ice pellets, strippable coatings, and high pressure water technology. The advantages of each technology will be discussed. Last, cost comparisons between the technologies will be presented.

  13. Social Comparison Processes in Organizations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Greenberg, Jerald; Ashton-James, Claire E.; Ashkanasy, Neal M.

    2007-01-01

    We systematically analyze the role of social comparison processes in organizations. Specifically, we describe how social comparison processes have been used to explain six key areas of organizational inquiry: (1) organizational justice, (2) performance appraisal, (3) virtual work environments, (4) affective behavior in the workplace, (5) stress,…

  14. Learning a Network of Comparisons

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moeser, Shannon D.; Tarrant, Barbara L.

    1977-01-01

    Using a network of comparisons, B. Hayes-Roth and F. Hayes-Roth found that subjects performed better on adjacent than on nonadjacent comparisons. Results suggested that such networks are processed in a manner fundamentally different from simple linear arrays. Here subjects were required to learn a similar knowledge structure. These results…

  15. Social Comparison in the Classroom: A Review

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dijkstra, Pieternel; Kuyper, Hans; van der Werf, Greetje; Buunk, Abraham P.; van der Zee, Yvonne G.

    2008-01-01

    This article reviews research conducted on social comparison processes in the classroom since Festinger proposed his theory of social comparison. It covers the theoretical framework of social comparison theory, and it is organized around the following themes: motives for social comparison, dimensions of social comparison, direction of social…

  16. Indirect comparisons of therapeutic interventions

    PubMed Central

    Schöttker, Ben; Lühmann, Dagmar; Boulkhemair, Dalila; Raspe, Heiner

    2009-01-01

    Health political background The comparison of the effectiveness of health technologies is not only laid down in German law (Social Code Book V, § 139 and § 35b) but also constitutes a central element of clinical guidelines and decision making in health care. Tools supporting decision making (e. g. Health Technology Assessments (HTA)) are therefore in need of a valid methodological repertoire for these comparisons. Scientific background Randomised controlled head-to-head trials which directly compare the effects of different therapies are considered the gold standard methodological approach for the comparison of the efficacy of interventions. Because this type of trial is rarely found, comparisons of efficacy often need to rely on indirect comparisons whose validity is being controversially debated. Research questions Research questions for the current assessment are: Which (statistical) methods for indirect comparisons of therapeutic interventions do exist, how often are they applied and how valid are their results in comparison to the results of head-to-head trials? Methods In a systematic literature research all medical databases of the German Institute of Medical Documentation and Information (DIMDI) are searched for methodological papers as well as applications of indirect comparisons in systematic reviews. Results of the literature analysis are summarized qualitatively for the characterisation of methods and quantitatively for the frequency of their application. The validity of the results from indirect comparisons is checked by comparing them to the results from the gold standard – a direct comparison. Data sets from systematic reviews which use both direct and indirect comparisons are tested for consistency by of the z-statistic. Results 29 methodological papers and 106 applications of indirect methods in systematic reviews are being analysed. Four methods for indirect comparisons can be identified: Unadjusted indirect comparisons include, independent of

  17. {sup 129}I interlaboratory comparison

    SciTech Connect

    Roberts, M.L.; Caffee, M.W.; Proctor, L.D.

    1996-05-01

    An interlaboratory comparison exercise for {sup 129}I has been organized and conducted. A total of seven laboratories participated in the exercise to either a full or limited extent. In the comparison, a suite of 11 samples were used. This suite of standards contained both synthetic `standard type` materials(i.e., AgI) and environmental materials. The isotopic {sup 129}I/{sup 127}I ratio of the samples varied from 10{sup -8} to 10{sup -14}. Preliminary results of the comparison are presented.

  18. Comparison of Artificial Compressibility Methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kiris, Cetin; Housman, Jeffrey; Kwak, Dochan

    2004-01-01

    Various artificial compressibility methods for calculating the three-dimensional incompressible Navier-Stokes equations are compared. Each method is described and numerical solutions to test problems are conducted. A comparison based on convergence behavior, accuracy, and robustness is given.

  19. COMPARISON OF FRACTURED BEDROCK REMEDIATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    This report compares the technologies/approaches used at 7 Superfund sites to treat contaminated groundwater in fractured bedrock. The comparison shows how well each technology/approach met the stated goal, problems encountered, and lessons learned.

  20. Protein Structure Comparison and Classification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Çamoǧlu, Orhan; Singh, Ambuj K.

    The success of genome projects has generated an enormous amount of sequence data. In order to realize the full value of the data, we need to understand its functional role and its evolutionary origin. Sequence comparison methods are incredibly valuable for this task. However, for sequences falling in the twilight zone (usually between 20 and 35% sequence similarity), we need to resort to structural alignment and comparison for a meaningful analysis. Such a structural approach can be used for classification of proteins, isolation of structural motifs, and discovery of drug targets.

  1. Matrixed business support comparison study.

    SciTech Connect

    Parsons, Josh D.

    2004-11-01

    The Matrixed Business Support Comparison Study reviewed the current matrixed Chief Financial Officer (CFO) division staff models at Sandia National Laboratories. There were two primary drivers of this analysis: (1) the increasing number of financial staff matrixed to mission customers and (2) the desire to further understand the matrix process and the opportunities and challenges it creates.

  2. Inhibition in Dot Comparison Tasks

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clayton, Sarah; Gilmore, Camilla

    2015-01-01

    Dot comparison tasks are commonly used to index an individual's Approximate Number System (ANS) acuity, but the cognitive processes involved in completing these tasks are poorly understood. Here, we investigated how factors including numerosity ratio, set size and visual cues influence task performance. Forty-four children aged 7-9 years completed…

  3. Characteristics of Multiple Comparison Procedures.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yusuf, Mian Muhammad; And Others

    Multiple comparison procedures (MCPs), in the context of analysis of variance, are becoming more popular than the overall F tests. An attempt is made to clarify confusion among the different MCPs by systematically comparing and contrasting the procedures in terms of their purposes, restrictions, robustness to assumptions, and other special…

  4. [Individual difference in making temporal comparisons: development of Temporal Comparison Orientation Scale].

    PubMed

    Namikawa, Tsutomu

    2011-02-01

    This study developed the Temporal Comparison Orientation Scale and investigated its reliability and validity. Study 1 (N = 481) examined the factor structure and correlations with other related scales (self-consciousness scale; revaluation tendency scale; self-esteem scale; depression scale; social comparison orientation scale). The results suggested that the Temporal Comparison Orientation Scale had good reliability and validity. Study 2 examined the relationship between temporal comparison orientation and affect generated by temporal comparisons. The results showed that individuals high in temporal comparison orientation experienced more negative affect after upward and downward comparisons than individuals low in temporal comparison orientation. The possible uses and limitations of the scale were discussed. PMID:21400863

  5. Comparison of Optimal Thermodynamic Models of the Tricarboxylic Acid Cycle from Heterotrophs, Cyanobacteria, and Green Sulfur Bacteria.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Dennis G; Jaramillo-Riveri, Sebastian; Baxter, Douglas J; Cannon, William R

    2014-12-26

    We have applied a new stochastic simulation approach to predict the metabolite levels, material flux, and thermodynamic profiles of the oxidative TCA cycles found in E. coli and Synechococcus sp. PCC 7002, and in the reductive TCA cycle typical of chemolithoautotrophs and phototrophic green sulfur bacteria such as Chlorobaculum tepidum. The simulation approach is based on modeling states using statistical thermodynamics and employs an assumption similar to that used in transition state theory. The ability to evaluate the thermodynamics of metabolic pathways allows one to understand the relationship between coupling of energy and material gradients in the environment and the self-organization of stable biological systems, and it is shown that each cycle operates in the direction expected due to its environmental niche. The simulations predict changes in metabolite levels and flux in response to changes in cofactor concentrations that would be hard to predict without an elaborate model based on the law of mass action. In fact, we show that a thermodynamically unfavorable reaction can still have flux in the forward direction when it is part of a reaction network. The ability to predict metabolite levels, energy flow, and material flux should be significant for understanding the dynamics of natural systems and for understanding principles for engineering organisms for production of specialty chemicals. PMID:25495377

  6. Comparison of Optimal Thermodynamic Models of the Tricarboxylic Acid Cycle from Heterotrophs, Cyanobacteria, and Green Sulfur Bacteria

    SciTech Connect

    Thomas, Dennis G.; Jaramillo Riveri, Sebastian I.; Baxter, Douglas J.; Cannon, William R.

    2014-12-15

    We have applied a new stochastic simulation approach to predict the metabolite levels, energy flow, and material flux in the different oxidative TCA cycles found in E. coli and Synechococcus sp. PCC 7002, and in the reductive TCA cycle typical of chemolithoautotrophs and phototrophic green sulfur bacteria such as Chlorobaculum tepidum. The simulation approach is based on equations of state and employs an assumption similar to that used in transition state theory. The ability to evaluate the thermodynamics of metabolic pathways allows one to understand the relationship between coupling of energy and material gradients in the environment and the selforganization of stable biological systems, and it is shown that each cycle operates in the direction expected due to its environmental niche. The simulations predict changes in metabolite levels and flux in response to changes in cofactor concentrations that would be hard to predict without an elaborate model based on the law of mass action. In fact, we show that a thermodynamically unfavorable reaction can still have flux in the forward direction when it is part of a reaction network. The ability to predict metabolite levels, energy flow and material flux should be significant for understanding the dynamics of natural systems and for understanding principles for engineering organisms for production of specialty chemicals, such as biofuels.

  7. Performance Comparison: Superbeams, Beta Beams, Neutrino Factory

    SciTech Connect

    Winter, Walter

    2011-10-06

    In this talk, the performance comparison among superbeams (SB), beta beams (BB), and the Neutrino Factory (NF) is discussed. The ingredients to such a comparison are described, and the optimization and status of BB and NF are addressed. Finally, one example for the performance comparison is shown.

  8. Inverter performance comparison at PVUSA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farmer, Brian K.; Stolte, Walter J.; Reyes, Antonio B.

    1996-01-01

    The paper is a summary of the Photovoltaics for Utility Scale Applications (PVUSA) Project's experience with procurement, testing, operation and maintenance of photovoltaic (PV) power conditioning units (PCUs) at the PVUSA Davis and Kerman sites. Brief descriptions of each of five different PCU models are included to explain tests and operational characteristics. A comparison of the PCUs' performances is presented, and conclusions are offered. Further details are in a forthcoming PVUSA report on PCUs and Power Quality [1].

  9. Comparison of Artificial Compressibility Methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kiris, Cetin; Housman, Jeffrey; Kwak, Dochan

    2003-01-01

    Various artificial compressibility methods for calculating three-dimensional, steady and unsteady, laminar and turbulent, incompressible Navier-Stokes equations are compared in this work. Each method is described in detail along with appropriate physical and numerical boundary conditions. Analysis of well-posedness and numerical solutions to test problems for each method are provided. A comparison based on convergence behavior, accuracy, stability and robustness is used to establish the relative positive and negative characteristics of each method.

  10. High pressure rinsing system comparison

    SciTech Connect

    D. Sertore; M. Fusetti; P. Michelato; Carlo Pagani; Toshiyasu Higo; Jin-Seok Hong; K. Saito; G. Ciovati; T. Rothgeb

    2007-06-01

    High pressure rinsing (HPR) is a key process for the surface preparation of high field superconducting cavities. A portable apparatus for the water jet characterization, based on the transferred momentum between the water jet and a load cell, has been used in different laboratories. This apparatus allows to collected quantitative parameters that characterize the HPR water jet. In this paper, we present a quantitative comparison of the different water jet produced by various nozzles routinely used in different laboratories for the HPR process

  11. How collective comparisons emerge without individual comparisons of the options.

    PubMed

    Robinson, Elva J H; Feinerman, Ofer; Franks, Nigel R

    2014-07-22

    Collective decisions in animal groups emerge from the actions of individuals who are unlikely to have global information. Comparative assessment of options can be valuable in decision-making. Ant colonies are excellent collective decision-makers, for example when selecting a new nest-site. Here, we test the dependency of this cooperative process on comparisons conducted by individual ants. We presented ant colonies with a choice between new nests: one good and one poor. Using individually radio-tagged ants and an automated system of doors, we manipulated individual-level access to information: ants visiting the good nest were barred from visiting the poor one and vice versa. Thus, no ant could individually compare the available options. Despite this, colonies still emigrated quickly and accurately when comparisons were prevented. Individual-level rules facilitated this behavioural robustness: ants allowed to experience only the poor nest subsequently searched more. Intriguingly, some ants appeared particularly discriminating across emigrations under both treatments, suggesting they had stable, high nest acceptance thresholds. Overall, our results show how a colony of ants, as a cognitive entity, can compare two options that are not both accessible by any individual ant. Our findings illustrate a collective decision process that is robust to differences in individual access to information. PMID:24920474

  12. Comparison of automatic control systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oppelt, W

    1941-01-01

    This report deals with a reciprocal comparison of an automatic pressure control, an automatic rpm control, an automatic temperature control, and an automatic directional control. It shows the difference between the "faultproof" regulator and the actual regulator which is subject to faults, and develops this difference as far as possible in a parallel manner with regard to the control systems under consideration. Such as analysis affords, particularly in its extension to the faults of the actual regulator, a deep insight into the mechanism of the regulator process.

  13. Comparison of ASGARD and UFOCapture

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blaauw, Rhiannon C.; Cruse, Katherine S.

    2011-01-01

    The Meteoroid Environment Office is undertaking a comparison between UFOCapture/Analyzer and ASGARD (All Sky and Guided Automatic Realtime Detection). To accomplish this, video output from a Watec video camera on a 17 mm Schneider lens (25 degree field of view) was split and input into the two different meteor detection softwares. The purpose of this study is to compare the sensitivity of the two systems, false alarm rates and trajectory information, among other quantities. The important components of each software will be highlighted and comments made about the detection/rejection algorithms and the amount of user-labor required for each system.

  14. RISKIND verification and benchmark comparisons

    SciTech Connect

    Biwer, B.M.; Arnish, J.J.; Chen, S.Y.; Kamboj, S.

    1997-08-01

    This report presents verification calculations and benchmark comparisons for RISKIND, a computer code designed to estimate potential radiological consequences and health risks to individuals and the population from exposures associated with the transportation of spent nuclear fuel and other radioactive materials. Spreadsheet calculations were performed to verify the proper operation of the major options and calculational steps in RISKIND. The program is unique in that it combines a variety of well-established models into a comprehensive treatment for assessing risks from the transportation of radioactive materials. Benchmark comparisons with other validated codes that incorporate similar models were also performed. For instance, the external gamma and neutron dose rate curves for a shipping package estimated by RISKIND were compared with those estimated by using the RADTRAN 4 code and NUREG-0170 methodology. Atmospheric dispersion of released material and dose estimates from the GENII and CAP88-PC codes. Verification results have shown the program to be performing its intended function correctly. The benchmark results indicate that the predictions made by RISKIND are within acceptable limits when compared with predictions from similar existing models.

  15. Comparisons of gyrofluid and gyrokinetic simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Parker, S.E.; Dorland, W.; Santoro, R.A.; Beer, M.A.; Liu, Q.P.; Lee, W.W.; Hammett, G.W.

    1994-03-01

    The gyrokinetic and gyrofluid models show the most promise for large scale simulations of tokamak microturbulence. This paper discusses detailed comparisons of these two complementary approaches. Past comparisons with linear theory have been fairly good, therefore the emphasis here is on nonlinear comparisons. Simulations include simple two dimensional slab test cases, turbulent three dimensional slab cases, and toroidal cases, each modeling the nonlinear evolution of the ion temperature gradient instability. There is good agreement in both turbulent and coherent nonlinear slab comparisons in terms of the ion heat flux, both in magnitude and scaling with magnetic shear. However, the nonlinear saturation level for {vert_bar}{Phi}{vert_bar} in the slab comparisons show differences of approximately 40%. Preliminary toroidal comparisons show agreement within 50%, in terms of ion heat flux and saturation level.

  16. Computational Chemistry Comparison and Benchmark Database

    National Institute of Standards and Technology Data Gateway

    SRD 101 NIST Computational Chemistry Comparison and Benchmark Database (Web, free access)   The NIST Computational Chemistry Comparison and Benchmark Database is a collection of experimental and ab initio thermochemical properties for a selected set of molecules. The goals are to provide a benchmark set of molecules for the evaluation of ab initio computational methods and allow the comparison between different ab initio computational methods for the prediction of thermochemical properties.

  17. Characterization of the chlorosome antenna of the filamentous anoxygenic phototrophic bacterium Chloronema sp. strain UdG9001.

    PubMed

    Gich, Frederic; Airs, Ruth L; Danielsen, Marianne; Keely, Brendan J; Abella, Carles A; Garcia-Gil, Jesús; Miller, Mette; Borrego, Carles M

    2003-12-01

    The absorption and fluorescence properties of chlorosomes of the filamentous anoxygenic phototrophic bacterium Chloronema sp. strain UdG9001 were analyzed. The chlorosome antenna of Chloronema consists of bacteriochlorophyll (BChl) d and BChl c together with gamma-carotene as the main carotenoid. HPLC analysis combined with APCI LC-MS/MS showed that the chlorosomal BChls comprise a highly diverse array of homologues that differ in both the degree of alkylation of the macrocycle at C-8 and/or C-12 and the alcohol moiety esterified to the propionic acid group at C-17. BChl c and BChl d from Chloronema were mainly esterified with geranylgeraniol (33% of the total), heptadecanol (24%), octadecenol (19%), octadecanol (14%), and hexadecenol (9%). Despite this pigment heterogeneity, fluorescence emission of the chlorosomes showed a single peak centered at 765 nm upon excitation at wavelengths ranging from 710 to 740 nm. This single emission, assigned to BChl c, indicates an energy transfer from BChl d to BChl c within the same chlorosome. Likewise, incubation of chlorosomes under reducing conditions caused a weak increase in fluorescence emission, which indicates a small redox-dependent fluorescence. Finally, protein analysis of Chloronema chlorosomes using SDS-PAGE and MALDI-TOF-MS revealed the presence of a chlorosomal polypeptide with a molecular mass of 5.7 kDa, resembling the CsmA protein found in Chloroflexus aurantiacus and Chlorobium tepidum chlorosomes. Several minor polypeptides were also detected but not identified. These results indicate that, compared with other members of filamentous anoxygenic phototrophic bacteria and green sulfur bacteria, Chloronema possesses an antenna system with novel features that may be of interest for further investigations. PMID:14610639

  18. Nonphotochemical Hole-Burning Studies of Energy Transfer Dynamics in Antenna Complexes of Photosynthetic Bacteria

    SciTech Connect

    Satoshi Matsuzaki

    2002-06-27

    This thesis contains the candidate's original work on excitonic structure and energy transfer dynamics of two bacterial antenna complexes as studied using spectral hole-burning spectroscopy. The general introduction is divided into two chapters (1 and 2). Chapter 1 provides background material on photosynthesis and bacterial antenna complexes with emphasis on the two bacterial antenna systems related to the thesis research. Chapter 2 reviews the underlying principles and mechanism of persistent nonphotochemical hole-burning (NPHB) spectroscopy. Relevant energy transfer theories are also discussed. Chapters 3 and 4 are papers by the candidate that have been published. Chapter 3 describes the application of NPHB spectroscopy to the Fenna-Matthews-Olson (FMO) complex from the green sulfur bacterium Prosthecochloris aestuarii; emphasis is on determination of the low energy vibrational structure that is important for understanding the energy transfer process associated within three lowest energy Q{sub y}-states of the complex. The results are compared with those obtained earlier on the FMO complex from Chlorobium tepidum. In Chapter 4, the energy transfer dynamics of the B800 molecules of intact LH2 and B800-deficient LH2 complexes of the purple bacterium Rhodopseudomonas acidophila are compared. New insights on the additional decay channel of the B800 ring of bacteriochlorophyll{sub a} (BChl{sub a}) molecules are provided. General conclusions are given in Chapter 5. A version of the hole spectrum simulation program written by the candidate for the FMO complex study (Chapter 3) is included as an appendix. The references for each chapter are given at the end of each chapter.

  19. European Measurement Comparisons of Environmental Radioactivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wätjen, Uwe

    2008-08-01

    The scheme of European measurement comparisons to verify radioactivity monitoring in the European Union is briefly explained. After a review of comparisons conducted during the years 1990, the approach of IRMM organising these comparisons since 2003 is presented. IRMM is providing comparison samples with a reference value traceable to the SI units and which is fully documented to all participants and national authorities after completion of the comparison. The sample preparation and determination of traceable reference values at IRMM, the sample treatment and measurement in the participating laboratories, as well as the evaluation of comparison results are described in some detail using the example of an air filter comparison. The results of a comparison to determine metabolised 40K, 90Sr and 137Cs in milk powder are presented as well. The necessary improvements in the estimation of measurement uncertainty by the participating laboratories are discussed. The performance of individual laboratories which have participated in at least four comparison exercises over the years is studied in terms of observable trends.

  20. European Measurement Comparisons of Environmental Radioactivity

    SciTech Connect

    Waetjen, Uwe

    2008-08-14

    The scheme of European measurement comparisons to verify radioactivity monitoring in the European Union is briefly explained. After a review of comparisons conducted during the years 1990, the approach of IRMM organising these comparisons since 2003 is presented. IRMM is providing comparison samples with a reference value traceable to the SI units and which is fully documented to all participants and national authorities after completion of the comparison. The sample preparation and determination of traceable reference values at IRMM, the sample treatment and measurement in the participating laboratories, as well as the evaluation of comparison results are described in some detail using the example of an air filter comparison. The results of a comparison to determine metabolised {sup 40}K, {sup 90}Sr and {sup 137}Cs in milk powder are presented as well. The necessary improvements in the estimation of measurement uncertainty by the participating laboratories are discussed. The performance of individual laboratories which have participated in at least four comparison exercises over the years is studied in terms of observable trends.

  1. The neural correlates of beauty comparison

    PubMed Central

    Mussweiler, Thomas; Mullins, Paul; Linden, David E. J.

    2014-01-01

    Beauty is in the eye of the beholder. How attractive someone is perceived to be depends on the individual or cultural standards to which this person is compared. But although comparisons play a central role in the way people judge the appearance of others, the brain processes underlying attractiveness comparisons remain unknown. In the present experiment, we tested the hypothesis that attractiveness comparisons rely on the same cognitive and neural mechanisms as comparisons of simple nonsocial magnitudes such as size. We recorded brain activity with functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) while participants compared the beauty or height of two women or two dogs. Our data support the hypothesis of a common process underlying these different types of comparisons. First, we demonstrate that the distance effect characteristic of nonsocial comparisons also holds for attractiveness comparisons. Behavioral results indicated, for all our comparisons, longer response times for near than far distances. Second, the neural correlates of these distance effects overlapped in a frontoparietal network known for its involvement in processing simple nonsocial quantities. These results provide evidence for overlapping processes in the comparison of physical attractiveness and nonsocial magnitudes. PMID:23508477

  2. The neural correlates of beauty comparison.

    PubMed

    Kedia, Gayannée; Mussweiler, Thomas; Mullins, Paul; Linden, David E J

    2014-05-01

    Beauty is in the eye of the beholder. How attractive someone is perceived to be depends on the individual or cultural standards to which this person is compared. But although comparisons play a central role in the way people judge the appearance of others, the brain processes underlying attractiveness comparisons remain unknown. In the present experiment, we tested the hypothesis that attractiveness comparisons rely on the same cognitive and neural mechanisms as comparisons of simple nonsocial magnitudes such as size. We recorded brain activity with functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) while participants compared the beauty or height of two women or two dogs. Our data support the hypothesis of a common process underlying these different types of comparisons. First, we demonstrate that the distance effect characteristic of nonsocial comparisons also holds for attractiveness comparisons. Behavioral results indicated, for all our comparisons, longer response times for near than far distances. Second, the neural correlates of these distance effects overlapped in a frontoparietal network known for its involvement in processing simple nonsocial quantities. These results provide evidence for overlapping processes in the comparison of physical attractiveness and nonsocial magnitudes. PMID:23508477

  3. Comparison Direction and Comparison Dimension among Disabled Individuals: Toward a Refined Conceptualization of Social Comparison under Stress.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Buunk, Bram P.

    1995-01-01

    Illuminates the nature and direction of social comparison research using a sample of 168 Dutch individuals. Some of the findings revealed uncertainty and frustration related to a need for social comparison, a desire more for information than affiliation about similar others, and the influence of health problems in evaluating one's situation. (RJM)

  4. MCNPX Model/Table Comparison

    SciTech Connect

    J.S. Hendricks

    2003-03-03

    MCNPX is a Monte Carlo N-Particle radiation transport code extending the capabilities of MCNP4C. As with MCNP, MCNPX uses nuclear data tables to transport neutrons, photons, and electrons. Unlike MCNP, MCNPX also uses (1) nuclear data tables to transport protons; (2) physics models to transport 30 additional particle types (deuterons, tritons, alphas, pions, muons, etc.); and (3) physics models to transport neutrons and protons when no tabular data are available or when the data are above the energy range (20 to 150 MeV) where the data tables end. MCNPX can mix and match data tables and physics models throughout a problem. For example, MCNPX can model neutron transport in a bismuth germinate (BGO) particle detector by using data tables for bismuth and oxygen and using physics models for germanium. Also, MCNPX can model neutron transport in UO{sub 2}, making the best use of physics models and data tables: below 20 MeV, data tables are used; above 150 MeV, physics models are used; between 20 and 150 MeV, data tables are used for oxygen and models are used for uranium. The mix-and-match capability became available with MCNPX2.5.b (November 2002). For the first time, we present here comparisons that calculate radiation transport in materials with various combinations of data charts and model physics. The physics models are poor at low energies (<150 MeV); thus, data tables should be used when available. Our comparisons demonstrate the importance of the mix-and-match capability and indicate how well physics models work in the absence of data tables.

  5. Comparison of Two Cryogenic Radiometers at NIST

    PubMed Central

    Houston, Jeanne M.; Livigni, David J.

    2001-01-01

    Two cryogenic radiometers from NIST, one from the Optical Technology Division and the other from the Optoelectronics Division, were compared at three visible laser wavelengths. For this comparison, each radiometer calibrated two photodiode trap detectors for spectral responsivity. The calibration values for the two trap detectors agreed within the expanded (k = 2) uncertainties. This paper describes the measurement and results of this comparison.

  6. Affective and Behavioral Consequences of Social Comparison.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Testa, Maria N.; Major, Brenda

    Considerable attention in recent years has focused on the consequences of social comparisons and has suggested that learning that one's outcomes or abilities compare unfavorably to others' is an unpleasant, if not painful experience. Indeed, upward comparisons have been shown to result in negative affect, loss of self-esteem, stress symptoms, and…

  7. Adaptive sequential testing for multiple comparisons.

    PubMed

    Gao, Ping; Liu, Lingyun; Mehta, Cyrus

    2014-01-01

    We propose a Markov process theory-based adaptive sequential testing procedure for multiple comparisons. The procedure can be used for confirmative trials involving multi-comparisons, including dose selection or population enrichment. Dose or subpopulation selection and sample size modification can be made at any interim analysis. Type I error control is exact. PMID:24926848

  8. Comparison of debris flux models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sdunnus, H.; Beltrami, P.; Klinkrad, H.; Matney, M.; Nazarenko, A.; Wegener, P.

    The availability of models to estimate the impact risk from the man-made space debris and the natural meteoroid environment is essential for both, manned and unmanned satellite missions. Various independent tools based on different approaches have been developed in the past years. Due to an increased knowledge of the debris environment and its sources e.g. from improved measurement capabilities, these models could be updated regularly, providing more detailed and more reliable simulations. This paper addresses an in-depth, quantitative comparison of widely distributed debris flux models which were recently updated, namely ESA's MASTER 2001 model, NASA's ORDEM 2000 and the Russian SDPA 2000 model. The comparison was performed in the frame of the work of the 20t h Interagency Debris Coordination (IADC) meeting held in Surrey, UK. ORDEM 2000ORDEM 2000 uses careful empirical estimates of the orbit populations based onthree primary data sources - the US Space Command Catalog, the H ystackaRadar, and the Long Duration Exposure Facility spacecraft returned surfaces.Further data (e.g. HAX and Goldstone radars, impacts on Shuttle windows andradiators, and others) were used to adjust these populations for regions in time,size, and space not covered by the primary data sets. Some interpolation andextrapolation to regions with no data (such as projections into the future) wasprovided by the EVOLVE model. MASTER 2001The ESA MASTER model offers a full three dimensional description of theterrestrial debris distribution reaching from LEO up to the GEO region. Fluxresults relative to an orbiting target or to an inertial volume can be resolved intosource terms, impactor characteristics and orbit, as well as impact velocity anddirection. All relevant debris source terms are considered by the MASTERmodel. For each simulated source, a corresponding debris generation model interms of mass/diameter distribution, additional velocities, and directionalspreading has been developed. A

  9. Microphone interlaboratory comparison in the Americas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wong, George S. K.; Wu, Lixue

    2002-11-01

    The final results of a Sistema Interamericano de Metrologia (SIM) interlaboratory comparison on microphone calibration are presented. Initially the comparison involved NORAMET countries: USA, Canada, and Mexico. Later, the comparison was extended to include Argentina and Brazil, resulting in a SIM AUV.A-K1 microphone interlaboratory comparison. The National Metrology Institutes (NMIs) of the five American countries that participated were the Institute for National Measurement Standards (INMS--Canada), National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST--USA), Centro Nacional de Metrologia (CENAM--Mexico), Instituto Nacional de Metrologia, Normalizacao e Qualidade Industrial (INMETRO--Brazil) and Unidad Tecnica Acustica, (INTI--Argentina). INMS, Canada was the pilot laboratory that provided the data for the final report. The maximum rms deviation for the two LS1P laboratory standard microphones measured by the above participants is 0.037 dB that may be considered as the key comparison reference value.

  10. Risk comparisons, conflict, and risk acceptability claims.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Branden B

    2004-02-01

    Despite many claims for and against the use of risk comparisons in risk communication, few empirical studies have explored their effect. Even fewer have examined the public's relative preferences among different kinds of risk comparisons. Two studies, published in this journal in 1990 and 2003, used seven measures of "acceptability" to examine public reaction to 14 examples of risk comparisons, as used by a hypothetical factory manager to explain risks of his ethylene oxide plant. This study examined the effect on preferences of scenarios involving low or high conflict between the factory manager and residents of the hypothetical town (as had the 2003 study), and inclusion of a claim that the comparison demonstrated the risks' acceptability. It also tested the Finucane et al. (2000) affect hypothesis that information emphasizing low risks-as in these risk comparisons-would raise benefits estimates without changing risk estimates. Using similar but revised scenarios, risk comparison examples (10 instead of 14), and evaluation measures, an opportunity sample of 303 New Jersey residents rated the comparisons, and the risks and benefits of the factory. On average, all comparisons received positive ratings on all evaluation measures in all conditions. Direct and indirect measures showed that the conflict manipulation worked; overall, No-Conflict and Conflict scenarios evoked scores that were not significantly different. The attachment to each risk comparison of a risk acceptability claim ("So our factory's risks should be acceptable to you.") did not worsen ratings relative to conditions lacking this claim. Readers who did or did not see this claim were equally likely to infer an attempt to persuade them to accept the risk from the comparison. As in the 2003 article, there was great individual variability in inferred rankings of the risk comparisons. However, exposure to the risk comparisons did not reduce risk estimates significantly (while raising benefit estimates

  11. Distributed Wind Policy Comparison Tool

    SciTech Connect

    2011-12-01

    Power through Policy: 'Best Practices' for Cost-Effective Distributed Wind is a U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)-funded project to identify distributed wind technology policy best practices and to help policymakers, utilities, advocates, and consumers examine their effectiveness using a pro forma model. Incorporating a customized feed from the Database of State Incentives for Renewables and Efficiency (DSIRE), the Web-based Distributed Wind Policy Comparison Tool (Policy Tool) is designed to assist state, local, and utility officials in understanding the financial impacts of different policy options to help reduce the cost of distributed wind technologies. The Policy Tool can be used to evaluate the ways that a variety of federal and state policies and incentives impact the economics of distributed wind (and subsequently its expected market growth). It also allows policymakers to determine the impact of policy options, addressing market challenges identified in the U.S. DOE’s '20% Wind Energy by 2030' report and helping to meet COE targets.

  12. Comparison theorems for causal diamonds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berthiere, Clément; Gibbons, Gary; Solodukhin, Sergey N.

    2015-09-01

    We formulate certain inequalities for the geometric quantities characterizing causal diamonds in curved and Minkowski spacetimes. These inequalities involve the redshift factor which, as we show explicitly in the spherically symmetric case, is monotonic in the radial direction, and it takes its maximal value at the center. As a by-product of our discussion we rederive Bishop's inequality without assuming the positivity of the spatial Ricci tensor. We then generalize our considerations to arbitrary, static and not necessarily spherically symmetric, asymptotically flat spacetimes. In the case of spacetimes with a horizon our generalization involves the so-called domain of dependence. The respective volume, expressed in terms of the duration measured by a distant observer compared with the volume of the domain in Minkowski spacetime, exhibits behaviors which differ if d =4 or d >4 . This peculiarity of four dimensions is due to the logarithmic subleading term in the asymptotic expansion of the metric near infinity. In terms of the invariant duration measured by a comoving observer associated with the diamond we establish an inequality which is universal for all d . We suggest some possible applications of our results including comparison theorems for entanglement entropy, causal set theory, and fundamental limits on computation.

  13. Statistical comparison of dissolution profiles.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yifan; Snee, Ronald D; Keyvan, Golshid; Muzzio, Fernando J

    2016-05-01

    Statistical methods to assess similarity of dissolution profiles are introduced. Sixteen groups of dissolution profiles from a full factorial design were used to demonstrate implementation details. Variables in the design include drug strength, tablet stability time, and dissolution testing condition. The 16 groups were considered similar when compared using the similarity factor f2 (f2 > 50). However, multivariate ANOVA (MANOVA) repeated measures suggested statistical differences. A modified principal component analysis (PCA) was used to describe the dissolution curves in terms of level and shape. The advantage of the modified PCA approach is that the calculated shape principal components will not be confounded by level effect. Effect size test using omega-squared was also used for dissolution comparisons. Effects indicated by omega-squared are independent of sample size and are a necessary supplement to p value reported from the MANOVA table. Methods to compare multiple groups show that product strength and dissolution testing condition had significant effects on both level and shape. For pairwise analysis, a post-hoc analysis using Tukey's method categorized three similar groups, and was consistent with level-shape analysis. All these methods provide valuable information that is missed using f2 method alone to compare average profiles. The improved statistical analysis approach introduced here enables one to better ascertain both statistical significance and clinical relevance, supporting more objective regulatory decisions. PMID:26294289

  14. RTU Comparison Calculator Enhancement Plan

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, James D.; Wang, Weimin; Katipamula, Srinivas

    2014-03-31

    Over the past two years, Department of Energy’s Building Technologies Office (BTO) has been investigating ways to increase the operating efficiency of the packaged rooftop units (RTUs) in the field. First, by issuing a challenge to the RTU manufactures to increase the integrated energy efficiency ratio (IEER) by 60% over the existing ASHRAE 90.1-2010 standard. Second, by evaluating the performance of an advanced RTU controller that reduces the energy consumption by over 40%. BTO has previously also funded development of a RTU comparison calculator (RTUCC). RTUCC is a web-based tool that provides the user a way to compare energy and cost savings for two units with different efficiencies. However, the RTUCC currently cannot compare savings associated with either the RTU Challenge unit or the advanced RTU controls retrofit. Therefore, BTO has asked PNNL to enhance the tool so building owners can compare energy and savings associated with this new class of products. This document provides the details of the enhancements that are required to support estimating energy savings from use of RTU challenge units or advanced controls on existing RTUs.

  15. RTU Comparison Calculator Enhancement Plan

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, James D.; Wang, Weimin; Katipamula, Srinivas

    2015-07-01

    Over the past two years, Department of Energy’s Building Technologies Office (BTO) has been investigating ways to increase the operating efficiency of the packaged rooftop units (RTUs) in the field. First, by issuing a challenge to the RTU manufactures to increase the integrated energy efficiency ratio (IEER) by 60% over the existing ASHRAE 90.1-2010 standard. Second, by evaluating the performance of an advanced RTU controller that reduces the energy consumption by over 40%. BTO has previously also funded development of a RTU comparison calculator (RTUCC). RTUCC is a web-based tool that provides the user a way to compare energy and cost savings for two units with different efficiencies. However, the RTUCC currently cannot compare savings associated with either the RTU Challenge unit or the advanced RTU controls retrofit. Therefore, BTO has asked PNNL to enhance the tool so building owners can compare energy and savings associated with this new class of products. This document provides the details of the enhancements that are required to support estimating energy savings from use of RTU challenge units or advanced controls on existing RTUs.

  16. Performance Comparison of CGM Systems

    PubMed Central

    Kirchsteiger, Harald; Heinemann, Lutz; Freckmann, Guido; Lodwig, Volker; Schmelzeisen-Redeker, Günther; Schoemaker, Michael; del Re, Luigi

    2015-01-01

    Background: The ongoing progress of continuous glucose monitoring (CGM) systems results in an increasing interest in comparing their performance, in particular in terms of accuracy, that is, matching CGM readings with reference values measured at the same time. Most often accuracy is evaluated by the mean absolute relative difference (MARD). It is frequently overseen that MARD does not only reflect accuracy, but also the study protocol and evaluation procedure, making a cross-study comparison problematic. Methods: We evaluate the effect of several factors on the MARD statistical properties: number of paired reference and CGM values, distribution of the paired values, accuracy of the reference measurement device itself and the time delay between data pairs. All analysis is done using clinical data from 12 patients wearing 6 sensors each. Results: We have found that a few paired points can have a potentially high impact on MARD. Leaving out those points for evaluation thus reduces the MARD. Similarly, accuracy of the reference measurements greatly affects the MARD as numerical and graphical data show. Results also show that a log-normal distribution of the paired references provides a significantly different MARD than, for example, a uniform distribution. Conclusions: MARD is a reasonable parameter to characterize the performance of CGM systems when keeping its limitations in mind. To support clinicians and patients in selecting which CGM system to use in a clinical setting, care should be taken to make MARD more comparable by employing a standardized evaluation procedure. PMID:26330485

  17. Attractor comparisons based on density

    SciTech Connect

    Carroll, T. L.

    2015-01-15

    Recognizing a chaotic attractor can be seen as a problem in pattern recognition. Some feature vector must be extracted from the attractor and used to compare to other attractors. The field of machine learning has many methods for extracting feature vectors, including clustering methods, decision trees, support vector machines, and many others. In this work, feature vectors are created by representing the attractor as a density in phase space and creating polynomials based on this density. Density is useful in itself because it is a one dimensional function of phase space position, but representing an attractor as a density is also a way to reduce the size of a large data set before analyzing it with graph theory methods, which can be computationally intensive. The density computation in this paper is also fast to execute. In this paper, as a demonstration of the usefulness of density, the density is used directly to construct phase space polynomials for comparing attractors. Comparisons between attractors could be useful for tracking changes in an experiment when the underlying equations are too complicated for vector field modeling.

  18. CCN Cloud Processing Interhemispheric Comparisons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tabor, S. S.; Noble, S. R., Jr.; Hudson, J. G.

    2014-12-01

    Cloud processing of CCN spectra is described by Hudson and Noble (2014) and Noble and Hudson (2014). Bimodal CCN spectra have also been observed in 4 Southern Hemisphere (SH) cloud research projects: SOCEX1, July 1993 and 2, Jan-Feb, 1995 and ACE1, Nov-Dec, 1995 all off Tasmania and INDOEX, Feb-Mar, 1999 Indian Ocean (Fig.). However, as in the Northern Hemisphere (NH) bimodal CCN spectra are interspersed with monomodal spectra, which indicates that cloudy boundary layers are not as well-mixed as conventional wisdom. Hoppel minima between the modes provide estimates of cloud effective supersaturations (Seff). Unlike DMA measurements particle composition/hygroscopicity (κ) is not needed for these Seff estimate because CCN are measured in terms of S. However, these Hoppel Seff often tend to be lower than Seff obtained by comparing below cloud CCN spectra with nearby cloud droplet concentrations (Nc). These Seff differences may be due to less cloud processing by smaller cloud droplets. However, this may be a smaller issue in the SH due to larger droplets in cleaner air masses. Furthermore, SH Seff may also tend to be higher for the same reason. This might reduce the Seff differences of the two types of estimates compared to the more polluted NH. SH/NH comparisons of detailed differential CCN spectra can provide an important baseline for preindustrial aerosol. Relative differences between the contribution of chemical and physical cloud processing between hemispheres also provide important baseline characteristics. Chemical processing enhance the indirect aerosol effect (IAE) by moving CCN to lower critical S (Sc), which increases droplet concentrations (Nc) whereas physical processing reduces IAE by inherently reducing CCN (Noble and Hudson 2014). The extent of cloud processing is as important as CCN sources. Hudson and Noble 2014, this meeting. Noble and Hudson 2014, this meeting.

  19. Uav Photogrammetry: Block Triangulation Comparisons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gini, R.; Pagliari, D.; Passoni, D.; Pinto, L.; Sona, G.; Dosso, P.

    2013-08-01

    UAVs systems represent a flexible technology able to collect a big amount of high resolution information, both for metric and interpretation uses. In the frame of experimental tests carried out at Dept. ICA of Politecnico di Milano to validate vector-sensor systems and to assess metric accuracies of images acquired by UAVs, a block of photos taken by a fixed wing system is triangulated with several software. The test field is a rural area included in an Italian Park ("Parco Adda Nord"), useful to study flight and imagery performances on buildings, roads, cultivated and uncultivated vegetation. The UAV SenseFly, equipped with a camera Canon Ixus 220HS, flew autonomously over the area at a height of 130 m yielding a block of 49 images divided in 5 strips. Sixteen pre-signalized Ground Control Points, surveyed in the area through GPS (NRTK survey), allowed the referencing of the block and accuracy analyses. Approximate values for exterior orientation parameters (positions and attitudes) were recorded by the flight control system. The block was processed with several software: Erdas-LPS, EyeDEA (Univ. of Parma), Agisoft Photoscan, Pix4UAV, in assisted or automatic way. Results comparisons are given in terms of differences among digital surface models, differences in orientation parameters and accuracies, when available. Moreover, image and ground point coordinates obtained by the various software were independently used as initial values in a comparative adjustment made by scientific in-house software, which can apply constraints to evaluate the effectiveness of different methods of point extraction and accuracies on ground check points.

  20. An ecological momentary assessment of comparison target as a moderator of the effects of appearance-focused social comparisons.

    PubMed

    Leahey, Tricia M; Crowther, Janis H

    2008-09-01

    This research examined whether comparison target moderates the effects of naturally occurring appearance-focused social comparisons on women's affect, appearance esteem, and dieting thoughts. During daily activities, body-satisfied (BS) women and body-dissatisfied (BD) women recorded their comparison targets and reactions to comparison information. For BS women, upward comparisons with peers were associated with more positive affect (PA) and appearance esteem and less guilt than upward comparisons with media images and downward comparisons with peers were associated with less PA than downward comparisons with media images. For BD women, upward comparisons with peers were associated with more appearance esteem and diet thoughts than upward comparisons with media images and downward comparisons with peers were associated with less PA, appearance esteem, and diet thoughts and more guilt than downward comparisons with media images. PMID:18585108

  1. OpenMP Experiences and Comparisons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nelson, Terry; Thigpen, William W. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    The document discusses message passage interfaces (MPI), open message passage issues and parallelization. A comparison of the two vector platforms, C90 and SVlex is presented. Sections of the document are written in computer code.

  2. STS-134 Launch Composite Video Comparison

    NASA Video Gallery

    A side-by-side comparison video shows a one-camera view of the STS-134 launch (left) with the six-camera composited view (right). Imaging experts funded by the Space Shuttle Program and located at ...

  3. Doctoral Program Selection Using Pairwise Comparisons.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tadisina, Suresh K.; Bhasin, Vijay

    1989-01-01

    The application of a pairwise comparison methodology (Saaty's Analytic Hierarchy Process) to the doctoral program selection process is illustrated. A hierarchy for structuring and facilitating the doctoral program selection decision is described. (Author/MLW)

  4. Pairwise Multiple Comparisons: New Yardstick, New Results.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cribbie, Robert A.

    2003-01-01

    Monte Carlo study results show that recently proposed multiple comparison procedures (MCPs) that are not intended to control the familywise error rate had consistently larger true model rates than did familywise error controlling MCPs. (SLD)

  5. Comparison of LASSO and GPS time transfers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lewandowski, W.; Petit, G.; Baumont, F.; Fridelance, P.; Gaignebet, J.; Grudler, P.; Veillet, C.; Wiant, J.; Klepczynski, W. J.

    1994-01-01

    The LASSO is a technique which should allow the comparison of remote atomic clocks with sub-nanosecond precision and accuracy. The first successful time transfer using LASSO has been carried out between the Observatoire de la Cote d'Azur in France and the McDonald Observatory in Texas, United States. This paper presents a preliminary comparison of LASSO time transfer with GPS common-view time transfer.

  6. Rankings, Standards, and Competition: Task vs. Scale Comparisons

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Garcia, Stephen M.; Tor, Avishalom

    2007-01-01

    Research showing how upward social comparison breeds competitive behavior has so far conflated local comparisons in "task" performance (e.g. a test score) with comparisons on a more general "scale" (i.e. an underlying skill). Using a ranking methodology (Garcia, Tor, & Gonzalez, 2006) to separate task and scale comparisons, Studies 1-2 reveal that…

  7. 16 CFR 233.2 - Retail price comparisons; comparable value comparisons.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... GUIDES AGAINST DECEPTIVE PRICING § 233.2 Retail price comparisons; comparable value comparisons. (a... fountain pens at $10, it is not dishonest for retailer Doe to advertise: “Brand X Pens, Price Elsewhere $10... here would be deceptive, since the price charged by the small suburban outlets would have no...

  8. Interprovincial Comparisons of University Financing. Eleventh Report of the Tripartite Committee on Interprovincial Comparisons.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Council of Ontario Universities, Toronto.

    This report presents comparisons of Canadian university financing on a province by province basis. An introductory section describes the project through which the study was undertaken, explains the indicators used, and discusses structural problems encountered in making comparisons. The central portion of the report is a tabulation of these…

  9. Interprovincial Comparisons of University Financing. Fourth Report of the Tripartite Committee on Interprovincial Comparisons.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Council of Ontario Universities, Toronto.

    Eight indicators used to make interprovincial comparisons of university financing in Canada are outlined and the values of these indicators are presented for 1974-1975 to 1980-1981. The Tripartite Committee on Interprovincial Comparisons has directed attention to how much financial support is provided to universities, how university financing fits…

  10. Differential Item Functioning Detection across Two Methods of Defining Group Comparisons: Pairwise and Composite Group Comparisons

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sari, Halil Ibrahim; Huggins, Anne Corinne

    2015-01-01

    This study compares two methods of defining groups for the detection of differential item functioning (DIF): (a) pairwise comparisons and (b) composite group comparisons. We aim to emphasize and empirically support the notion that the choice of pairwise versus composite group definitions in DIF is a reflection of how one defines fairness in DIF…

  11. Sonic Boom Prediction Exercise: Experimental Comparisons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tu, Eugene; Cheung, Samson; Edwards, Thomas

    1999-01-01

    The success of a future High Speed Civil Transport (HSCT) depends on the ability to accurately assess and, possibly, modify the sonic boom signatures of potential designs. In 1992, the Sonic Boom Steering Committee initiated a prediction exercise to assess the current computational capabilities for the accurate and efficient prediction of sonic boom signatures and loudness levels. A progress report of this effort was given at the Sonic Boom Workshop held at NASA Ames Research Center in 1993 where predictions from CFD and Modified Linear Theory (MLT) methods were given. Comparisons between the methods were made at near-, mid- and far-field locations. However, at that time, experimental data from wind-tunnel tests were not available. The current paper presents a comparison of computational results with the now available experimental data. Further comparisons between the computational methods and analyses of the discrepancies in the results are presented.

  12. Real medical benefit assessed by indirect comparison.

    PubMed

    Falissard, Bruno; Zylberman, Myriam; Cucherat, Michel; Izard, Valérie; Meyer, François

    2009-01-01

    Frequently, in data packages submitted for Marketing Approval to the CHMP, there is a lack of relevant head-to-head comparisons of medicinal products that could enable national authorities responsible for the approval of reimbursement to assess the Added Therapeutic Value (ASMR) of new clinical entities or line extensions of existing therapies.Indirect or mixed treatment comparisons (MTC) are methods stemming from the field of meta-analysis that have been designed to tackle this problem. Adjusted indirect comparisons, meta-regressions, mixed models, Bayesian network analyses pool results of randomised controlled trials (RCTs), enabling a quantitative synthesis.The REAL procedure, recently developed by the HAS (French National Authority for Health), is a mixture of an MTC and effect model based on expert opinions. It is intended to translate the efficacy observed in the trials into effectiveness expected in day-to-day clinical practice in France. PMID:19671436

  13. Photon/Electron Benchmarks for Intercode Comparisons

    SciTech Connect

    Hughes, Henry Grady III; Sweezy, Jeremy Ed; Lemaire, Sebastien

    2015-07-21

    The goal of this work was to improve accuracy and efficiency of two Monte-Carlo transport codes (MCNP and DIANE) with an emphasis on γ+electron physics. The approach involved intercode comparisons + measurements for gamma/e- energy deposition in a cylinder with a photon source and different materials (C, Pb) and the bombardment of 15-MeV electrons on thick targets (Al, Be, Pb). Comparisons of the codes DIANE and MCNP6 showed good agreement (differences < 3%) for gamma-electron energy deposition in a 2D cylinder, except for the first 0.1 μm of lead (difference < 10%). Comparisons with measurements showed generally good agreement, often better than 10%; best-performing codes/options are problem-dependent; and single-event discrepancies are in active use in reviewing electron elastic scattering.

  14. Key comparison of liquid density standards

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buchner, Christian; Zelenka, Zoltan; Kajastie, Heikki; Madec, Tanguy; Wolf, Henning; Vámossy, Csilla; Lorefice, Salvatore; Garberg, Torgunn; Lenard, Elżbieta; Spohr, Isabel; Mares, Gabriela; Spurný, Robert; Lumbreras, Angel; Medina, Nieves; Y Akçadağ, Ümit; Perkin, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Hydrostatic density determination for liquids is mainly performed by laboratories to provide means for calibrating liquid density measuring instruments such as oscillation-type density meters. From 2002 to 2005 the CIPM key comparison CCM.D-K2 'comparison of liquid density standards' was carried out piloted by the PTB. The aim was to compare the results of the density determination by the participating laboratories to support entries to the CMC tables in this sub-field. To provide further laboratories the possibility to support their entries to the CMC tables at the meeting of the EUROMET Working Group on Density in 2007 this comparison was agreed on. BEV (Austria) organized the comparison supported by the PTB (Germany). For the comparison samples of pentadecane, water, tetrachloroethylene and of an oil of high viscosity were measured in the temperature range from 5 °C to 60 °C at atmospheric pressure by hydrostatic weighing. The measurements were completed in 2008. The reference values of the first reports based on the draft of the CCM.D-K2. After the official publication of the CCM.D-K2 the reference values were recalculated and the report was finalised in 2015. Main text To reach the main text of this paper, click on Final Report. Note that this text is that which appears in Appendix B of the BIPM key comparison database kcdb.bipm.org/. The final report has been peer-reviewed and approved for publication by the CCM, according to the provisions of the CIPM Mutual Recognition Arrangement (CIPM MRA).

  15. Infrared spectral normal emittance/emissivity comparison

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hanssen, L.; Wilthan, B.; Filtz, J.-R.; Hameury, J.; Girard, F.; Battuello, M.; Ishii, J.; Hollandt, J.; Monte, C.

    2016-01-01

    The National Measurement Institutes (NMIs) of the United States, Germany, France, Italy and Japan, have joined in an inter-laboratory comparison of their infrared spectral emittance scales. This action is part of a series of supplementary inter-laboratory comparisons (including thermal conductivity and thermal diffusivity) sponsored by the Consultative Committee on Thermometry (CCT) Task Group on Thermophysical Quantities (TG-ThQ). The objective of this collaborative work is to strengthen the major operative National Measurement Institutes' infrared spectral emittance scales and consequently the consistency of radiative properties measurements carried out worldwide. The comparison has been performed over a spectral range of 2 μm to 14 μm, and a temperature range from 23 °C to 800 °C. Artefacts included in the comparison are potential standards: oxidized Inconel, boron nitride, and silicon carbide. The measurement instrumentation and techniques used for emittance scales are unique for each NMI, including the temperature ranges covered as well as the artefact sizes required. For example, all three common types of spectral instruments are represented: dispersive grating monochromator, Fourier transform and filter-based spectrometers. More than 2000 data points (combinations of material, wavelength and temperature) were compared. Ninety-eight percent (98%) of the data points were in agreement, with differences to weighted mean values less than the expanded uncertainties calculated from the individual NMI uncertainties and uncertainties related to the comparison process. Main text To reach the main text of this paper, click on Final Report. Note that this text is that which appears in Appendix B of the BIPM key comparison database kcdb.bipm.org/. The final report has been peer-reviewed and approved for publication by the CCT, according to the provisions of the CIPM Mutual Recognition Arrangement (CIPM MRA).

  16. Metrics for comparison of crystallographic maps

    SciTech Connect

    Urzhumtsev, Alexandre; Afonine, Pavel V.; Lunin, Vladimir Y.; Terwilliger, Thomas C.; Adams, Paul D.

    2014-10-01

    Numerical comparison of crystallographic contour maps is used extensively in structure solution and model refinement, analysis and validation. However, traditional metrics such as the map correlation coefficient (map CC, real-space CC or RSCC) sometimes contradict the results of visual assessment of the corresponding maps. This article explains such apparent contradictions and suggests new metrics and tools to compare crystallographic contour maps. The key to the new methods is rank scaling of the Fourier syntheses. The new metrics are complementary to the usual map CC and can be more helpful in map comparison, in particular when only some of their aspects, such as regions of high density, are of interest.

  17. Performance comparison of electronic radon monitors.

    PubMed

    Lin, Chi-Feng; Wang, Jeng-Jong; Lin, Shih-Jung; Lin, Chien-Kung

    2013-11-01

    The electronic radon monitors are noted for their convenience and acceptable accuracy. Even so, it is necessary to reassure their data quality regularly. We utilized a performance comparison system for this purpose. The instruments in our laboratories (Alphaguard, RAD7, RTM-2100 and Safety Siren) were tested via the comparison experiments. We conclude that by utilizing this system with the concept of calibration factor, it can be helpful to decide whether to send the monitors back to the original manufacturers for adjustment. PMID:23566805

  18. Systematic Comparison of Operating Reserve Methodologies: Preprint

    SciTech Connect

    Ibanez, E.; Krad, I.; Ela, E.

    2014-04-01

    Operating reserve requirements are a key component of modern power systems, and they contribute to maintaining reliable operations with minimum economic impact. No universal method exists for determining reserve requirements, thus there is a need for a thorough study and performance comparison of the different existing methodologies. Increasing penetrations of variable generation (VG) on electric power systems are posed to increase system uncertainty and variability, thus the need for additional reserve also increases. This paper presents background information on operating reserve and its relationship to VG. A consistent comparison of three methodologies to calculate regulating and flexibility reserve in systems with VG is performed.

  19. On relative distortion in fingerprint comparison.

    PubMed

    Kalka, Nathan D; Hicklin, R Austin

    2014-11-01

    When fingerprints are deposited, non-uniform pressure in conjunction with the inherent elasticity of friction ridge skin often causes linear and non-linear distortions in the ridge and valley structure. The effects of these distortions must be considered during analysis of fingerprint images. Even when individual prints are not notably distorted, relative distortion between two prints can have a serious impact on comparison. In this paper we discuss several metrics for quantifying and visualizing linear and non-linear fingerprint deformations, and software tools to assist examiners in accounting for distortion in fingerprint comparisons. PMID:25216456

  20. Quantum private comparison over noisy channels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siddhu, Vikesh; Arvind

    2015-08-01

    Quantum private comparison (QPC) allows us to protect private information during its comparison. In the past, various three-party quantum protocols have been proposed that claim to work well under noisy conditions. Here, we tackle the problem of QPC under noise. We analyze the EPR-based protocol under depolarizing noise, bit flip and phase flip noise. We show how noise affects the robustness of the EPR-based protocol. We then present a straightforward protocol based on CSS codes to perform QPC which is robust against noise and secure under general attacks.

  1. A comparison of Monte Carlo generators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Golan, Tomasz

    2015-05-01

    A comparison of GENIE, NEUT, NUANCE, and NuWro Monte Carlo neutrino event generators is presented using a set of four observables: protons multiplicity, total visible energy, most energetic proton momentum, and π+ two-dimensional energy vs cosine distribution.

  2. Comparison of Classical and Quantum Mechanical Uncertainties.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Peslak, John, Jr.

    1979-01-01

    Comparisons are made for the particle-in-a-box, the harmonic oscillator, and the one-electron atom. A classical uncertainty principle is derived and compared with its quantum-mechanical counterpart. The results are discussed in terms of the statistical interpretation of the uncertainty principle. (Author/BB)

  3. On the comparison of fundamental numerical ephemerides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tkachuk, V. V.; Choliy, V. Ya.

    2013-12-01

    We present the results of our comparison of three main numerical ephemerides (DELE, INPOP, EPM) for the determination of precision and errors of their dynamical coordinate systems. It was shown that all of them have comparable levels of precision, however the EPM demonstrates an unusual shift of the coordinate origin. Systematic errors were estimated as well, and mutual shifts of coordinate centres were found.

  4. International Comparisons and Sensitivity to Instruction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wiliam, Dylan

    2008-01-01

    While international comparisons such as those provided by PISA may be meaningful in terms of overall judgements about the performance of educational systems, caution is needed in terms of more fine-grained judgements. In particular it is argued that the results of PISA to draw conclusions about the quality of instruction in different systems is…

  5. Do Young Children Understand Relative Value Comparisons?

    PubMed Central

    Benenson, Joyce F.; Markovits, Henry; Whitmore, Bjorn; Van, Christophe; Margolius, Sara; Wrangham, Richard W.

    2015-01-01

    Many forms of judgments, such as those used in economic games or measures of social comparison, require understanding relative value, as well as the more complex ability to make comparisons between relative values. To examine whether young children can accurately compare relative values, we presented children 4 to 7 years with simple judgments of relative value in two scenarios. Children then were asked to compare the relative values in the two scenarios. Results show that even the youngest children downgraded evaluations of a reward when another has a larger amount, indicating the ability to make relative value judgments. When asked to compare relative values however, only the oldest children were able to make these comparisons consistently. We then extended this analysis to economic game performance. Specifically, previous results using economic games suggest that younger children are more generous than older ones. We replicate this result, and then show that a simple change in procedure, based on the initial study, is sufficient to change young children’s choices. Our results strongly suggest that conclusions regarding young children’s pro-social motives based on relative value comparisons should be viewed cautiously. PMID:25875949

  6. Multiple Comparison Procedures when Population Variances Differ.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Olejnik, Stephen; Lee, JaeShin

    A review of the literature on multiple comparison procedures suggests several alternative approaches for comparing means when population variances differ. These include: (1) the approach of P. A. Games and J. F. Howell (1976); (2) C. W. Dunnett's C confidence interval (1980); and (3) Dunnett's T3 solution (1980). These procedures control the…

  7. International Comparisons of Vocational Education and Training.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Freeland, Brett

    This report, which is based primarily on figures released by the Organisation for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD), reviews the indicators available for international comparisons of vocational education and training (VET) to clarify the following issues: the kinds of comparability problems that exit, their extent and severity, their…

  8. Measurement of Social Development: An International Comparison

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ray, Amal Kanti

    2008-01-01

    PQLI and HDI are the two most popular measures of development, besides per capita income. Over the years, PQLI appears to be not much in use for regional comparisons, especially after the introduction of HDI. While PQLI considers only the physical variables--adult literacy, life expectancy at birth and infant survival rate, HDI has life expectancy…

  9. The discovery and comparison of symbolic magnitudes.

    PubMed

    Chen, Dawn; Lu, Hongjing; Holyoak, Keith J

    2014-06-01

    Humans and other primates are able to make relative magnitude comparisons, both with perceptual stimuli and with symbolic inputs that convey magnitude information. Although numerous models of magnitude comparison have been proposed, the basic question of how symbolic magnitudes (e.g., size or intelligence of animals) are derived and represented in memory has received little attention. We argue that symbolic magnitudes often will not correspond directly to elementary features of individual concepts. Rather, magnitudes may be formed in working memory based on computations over more basic features stored in long-term memory. We present a model of how magnitudes can be acquired and compared based on BARTlet, a representationally simpler version of Bayesian Analogy with Relational Transformations (BART; Lu, Chen, & Holyoak, 2012). BARTlet operates on distributions of magnitude variables created by applying dimension-specific weights (learned with the aid of empirical priors derived from pre-categorical comparisons) to more primitive features of objects. The resulting magnitude distributions, formed and maintained in working memory, are sensitive to contextual influences such as the range of stimuli and polarity of the question. By incorporating psychological reference points that control the precision of magnitudes in working memory and applying the tools of signal detection theory, BARTlet is able to account for a wide range of empirical phenomena involving magnitude comparisons, including the symbolic distance effect and the semantic congruity effect. We discuss the role of reference points in cognitive and social decision-making, and implications for the evolution of relational representations. PMID:24531498

  10. Inter-comparison of subglacial hydrological models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Fleurian, Basile; Werder, Mauro

    2016-04-01

    The recent emergence of a number of subglacial hydrological models allows us to obtain theoretical insights on basal processes; for instance on the coupling between water pressure and the sliding of glaciers. In ice-flow models, it is relatively clear what the simulated physics ought to be. Conversely, the physical processes incorporated into subglacial hydrology models are diverse as it is yet unclear which ones are of relevance for a particular setting. An inter-comparison of hydrology models will therefore need a somewhat different approach to the one used in the many ice-flow model inter-comparisons (EISMINT, ISMIP, etc.). Here, we present a set of experiments that will allow the comparison of the behavior of different hydrology models. The design of the benchmark aims at allowing the participation of a wide range of models based on different physical approaches. We aim at evaluating the models with a focus on the effective pressure which has the most impact on the dynamics of glaciers. The aim of this inter-comparison is to provide modellers with the necessary data to make an informed decision on which subglacial hydrology model to use for a particular study.

  11. Immediacy bias in social-emotional comparisons.

    PubMed

    White, Katherine; Van Boven, Leaf

    2012-08-01

    In seven studies of naturally occurring, "real-world" emotional events, people demonstrated an immediacy bias in social-emotional comparisons, perceiving their own current or recent emotional reactions as more intense compared with others' emotional reactions to the same events. The events examined include crossing a scary bridge (study 1a), a national tragedy (study 1b), terrorist attacks (studies 2a and 3b), a natural disaster (study 2b), and a presidential election (study 3b). These perceived differences between one's own and others' emotions declined over time, as relatively immediate and recent emotions subsided, a pattern that people were not intuitively aware of (study 2c). This immediacy bias in social-emotional comparisons emerged for both explicit comparisons (studies 1a, 1b, and 3b), and for absolute judgments of emotional intensity (studies 2a, 2b, and 3a). Finally, the immediacy bias in social-emotional comparisons was reduced when people were reminded that emotional display norms might lead others' appearances to understate emotional intensity (studies 3a and 3b). Implications of these findings for social-emotional phenomena are discussed. PMID:22148998

  12. COMPARISONS AND CONTRASTS AMONG DIFFERENT SCALED ASSESSMENTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    A comparison of a regional (multi-state) and local (multi-county) scale assessment was done to evaluate similarities and differences in the collection, analysis, and interpretation of landscape data. The study areas included EP A Region 3 a11d a sub-region spanning North and Sout...

  13. Social Comparison of Pay and Inequity Theory.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Judd, Ben

    Inequity theory differs from social exchange theory in its analysis of a worker's reaction to pay by asserting that effects on work performance caused by high or low pay are due to social comparison of fairness rather than principles of direct exchange, such as reciprocity and power. The present experiment held piece-rate pay constant at two…

  14. ABL and BAM Friction Analysis Comparison

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Warner, Kirstin F.; Sandstrom, Mary M.; Brown, Geoffrey W.; Remmers, Daniel L.; Phillips, Jason J.; Shelley, Timothy J.; Reyes, Jose A.; Hsu, Peter C.; Reynolds, John G.

    2014-12-29

    Here, the Integrated Data Collection Analysis (IDCA) program has conducted a proficiency study for Small-Scale Safety and Thermal (SSST) testing of homemade explosives (HMEs). Described here is a comparison of the Alleghany Ballistic Laboratory (ABL) friction data and Bundesanstalt fur Materialforschung und -prufung (BAM) friction data for 19 HEM and military standard explosives.

  15. "Units of Comparison" across Languages, across Time

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thomas, Margaret

    2009-01-01

    Lardiere's keynote article adverts to a succession of "units of comparison" that have been employed in the study of cross-linguistic differences, including mid-twentieth-century structural patterns, generative grammar's parameters, and (within contemporary Minimalism) features. This commentary expands on the idea of units of cross-linguistic…

  16. A comparison of Monte Carlo generators

    SciTech Connect

    Golan, Tomasz

    2015-05-15

    A comparison of GENIE, NEUT, NUANCE, and NuWro Monte Carlo neutrino event generators is presented using a set of four observables: protons multiplicity, total visible energy, most energetic proton momentum, and π{sup +} two-dimensional energy vs cosine distribution.

  17. Cross-Cultural Comparisons: The Validity of Assessment by Indices of Factor Comparison.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eysenck, Hans J.

    1986-01-01

    Considers the cross-cultural consistency of personality inventories, concluding that it is justifiable to use the scale of the Eysenck Personality Questionnaire for comparisons within and between different countries. (Author/LHW)

  18. SUPPLEMENTARY COMPARISON: Final report on COOMET.L-S6: Comparison of standards of evolvent surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vladimir Semenovich, Kupko

    2010-01-01

    TThe COOMET Project No 314/UA/04, 'Comparison of the involute surface standards', KCDB Reference COOMET.L-S6, was organized by TC 1.5 'Length and Angle' of COOMET. This supplementary comparison started in September 2004 and finished in July 2007. It was piloted by the National Scientific Centre 'Institute of Metrology', Kharkov, Ukraine, and VNIIMS, Russia, participated in the comparison. The comparison standard of NSC 'Institute of Metrology' was carried to the place of the comparison (VNIIMS) by NCS IM attendant specialists as personal baggage, where it was measured by reference to the VNIIMS measuring instrument of parameters of evolvent surfaces, VNIIMS ZMC-550. The pilot laboratory processed the data for estimating measurement result differences between the measuring instruments of NSC IM and VNIIMS. The following parameters were determined: deviation from profile form, deviation from profile position and full profile error. The conclusion is that the equivalence of the reference installations for parameter measurements of involute surfaces of NSC 'Institute of Metrology', Ukraine, and of VNIIMS, Russia, is sufficient and constitutes an appropriate basis for mutual recognition of measurement results. Main text. To reach the main text of this paper, click on Final Report. Note that this text is that which appears in Appendix B of the BIPM key comparison database kcdb.bipm.org/. The final report has been peer-reviewed and approved for publication by COOMET, according to the provisions of the CIPM Mutual Recognition Arrangement (MRA).

  19. 16 CFR 233.1 - Former price comparisons.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... DECEPTIVE PRICING § 233.1 Former price comparisons. (a) One of the most commonly used forms of bargain..., not for the purpose of establishing a fictitious higher price on which a deceptive comparison might...

  20. Learning through Case Comparisons: A Meta-Analytic Review

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alfieri, Louis; Nokes-Malach, Timothy J.; Schunn, Christian D.

    2013-01-01

    Over the past 20 years, there has been much research on how people learn from case comparisons. This work has implemented comparison activities in a variety of different ways across a wide range of laboratory and classroom contexts. In an effort to assess the overall effectiveness of case comparisons across this diversity of implementation and…

  1. Supplement to photographic catalog of selected planetary size comparisons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meszaros, Stephen Paul

    1991-01-01

    This document updates and extends the photographic catalog of selected planetary size comparisons. It utilizes photographs taken by NASA spacecraft to illustrate size comparisons of planets and moons of the solar system. Global views are depicted at the same scale, within each comparison, allowing size relationships to be studied visually.

  2. The Performance versus Ability Distinction Following Social Comparison Feedback

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Buckingham, Justin T.; LeBeau, Lavonia Smith; Klein, William M. P.

    2011-01-01

    Previous research suggests that self-evaluations can be influenced by social comparison feedback. The present study tested whether social comparison feedback has stronger effects on self-evaluations of performance than ability. Participants received social comparison feedback indicating that they had performed above or below average. In addition…

  3. Comparison versus Contrast: Task Specifics Affect Category Acquisition

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ankowski, Amber A.; Vlach, Haley A.; Sandhofer, Catherine M.

    2013-01-01

    A large literature has documented that comparison and contrast lead to better performance in a variety of tasks. However, studies of comparison and contrast present contradictory conclusions as to when and how these processes benefit learners. Across four studies, we examined how the specifics of the comparison and contrast task affect performance…

  4. 30 CFR 1206.155 - Accounting for comparison.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 3 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Accounting for comparison. 1206.155 Section... INTERIOR Natural Resources Revenue PRODUCT VALUATION Federal Gas § 1206.155 Accounting for comparison. (a... with § 1206.152 of this subpart. (b) The requirement for accounting for comparison contained in...

  5. Metrics for comparison of crystallographic maps

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Urzhumtsev, Alexandre; Afonine, Pavel V.; Lunin, Vladimir Y.; Terwilliger, Thomas C.; Adams, Paul D.

    2014-10-01

    Numerical comparison of crystallographic contour maps is used extensively in structure solution and model refinement, analysis and validation. However, traditional metrics such as the map correlation coefficient (map CC, real-space CC or RSCC) sometimes contradict the results of visual assessment of the corresponding maps. This article explains such apparent contradictions and suggests new metrics and tools to compare crystallographic contour maps. The key to the new methods is rank scaling of the Fourier syntheses. The new metrics are complementary to the usual map CC and can be more helpful in map comparison, in particular when only some of their aspects,more » such as regions of high density, are of interest.« less

  6. Robot trajectories comparison: a statistical approach.

    PubMed

    Ansuategui, A; Arruti, A; Susperregi, L; Yurramendi, Y; Jauregi, E; Lazkano, E; Sierra, B

    2014-01-01

    The task of planning a collision-free trajectory from a start to a goal position is fundamental for an autonomous mobile robot. Although path planning has been extensively investigated since the beginning of robotics, there is no agreement on how to measure the performance of a motion algorithm. This paper presents a new approach to perform robot trajectories comparison that could be applied to any kind of trajectories and in both simulated and real environments. Given an initial set of features, it automatically selects the most significant ones and performs a statistical comparison using them. Additionally, a graphical data visualization named polygraph which helps to better understand the obtained results is provided. The proposed method has been applied, as an example, to compare two different motion planners, FM(2) and WaveFront, using different environments, robots, and local planners. PMID:25525618

  7. Investigation criteria for dosimetry results comparisons

    SciTech Connect

    Hough, E.G. )

    1984-01-01

    This paper reports that the Oconee Nuclear Station, like most nuclear facilities, monitors its personnel with two types of dosimeters: a thermoluminescent dosimeter (TLD), which is normally used for determining the official dose equivalent, and a pocket ionization chamber (PIC), which is used to estimate exposure for control purposes. At Oconee, the results obtained from the two types of dosimeters are compared on a monthly basis as a part of the routine exchange and processing of worker TLDs. Each worker's TLD result is compared to the sum of the PIC dose estimates for the month that the TLD was used. The TLD result is accepted as the official dose equivalent for the month if the comparison results are within the tolerance limits specified by the criteria. An out-of-tolerance comparison requires investigation, which consists of performance tests of the dosimetry involved and reviews of exposure records. Adjustments to a worker's official dose equivalent are made when warranted by an investigation.

  8. Robot Trajectories Comparison: A Statistical Approach

    PubMed Central

    Ansuategui, A.; Arruti, A.; Susperregi, L.; Yurramendi, Y.; Jauregi, E.; Lazkano, E.; Sierra, B.

    2014-01-01

    The task of planning a collision-free trajectory from a start to a goal position is fundamental for an autonomous mobile robot. Although path planning has been extensively investigated since the beginning of robotics, there is no agreement on how to measure the performance of a motion algorithm. This paper presents a new approach to perform robot trajectories comparison that could be applied to any kind of trajectories and in both simulated and real environments. Given an initial set of features, it automatically selects the most significant ones and performs a statistical comparison using them. Additionally, a graphical data visualization named polygraph which helps to better understand the obtained results is provided. The proposed method has been applied, as an example, to compare two different motion planners, FM2 and WaveFront, using different environments, robots, and local planners. PMID:25525618

  9. 33alloy: comparison between experiment and simulation

    SciTech Connect

    Kramer, M J; Mendelev, M I; Asta, M

    2014-04-22

    We report data on the structure of liquid Al and an Al67Mg33 alloy obtained from state-of-the-art X-ray diffraction experiments and ab initio molecular dynamics (AIMD) simulations. To facilitate a direct comparison between these data, we develop a method to elongate the AIMD pair correlation function in order to obtain reliable AIMD structure factors. The comparison reveals an appreciable level of discrepancy between experimental and AIMD liquid structures, with the latter being consistently more ordered than the former at the same temperature. The discrepancy noted in this study is estimated to have significant implications for simulation-based calculations of liquid transport properties and solid–liquid interface kinetic properties.

  10. Visual comparison testing of automotive paint simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meyer, Gary; Fan, Hua-Tzu; Seubert, Christopher; Evey, Curtis; Meseth, Jan; Schnackenberg, Ryan

    2015-03-01

    An experiment was performed to determine whether typical industrial automotive color paint comparisons made using real physical samples could also be carried out using a digital simulation displayed on a calibrated color television monitor. A special light booth, designed to facilitate evaluation of the car paint color with reflectance angle, was employed in both the real and virtual color comparisons. Paint samples were measured using a multi-angle spectrophotometer and were simulated using a commercially available software package. Subjects performed the test quicker using the computer graphic simulation, and results indicate that there is only a small difference between the decisions made using the light booth and the computer monitor. This outcome demonstrates the potential of employing simulations to replace some of the time consuming work with real physical samples that still characterizes material appearance work in industry.

  11. Comparison of interventions to reduce sun exposure.

    PubMed

    Roberts, Dawn C; Black, Danielle

    2009-01-01

    Exposure to ultraviolet (UV) light is the leading behavioral cause of skin cancer. This study evaluated the efficacy of 2 interventions to reduce UV exposure in college students prior to an opportunity for high-intensity exposure. Participants of 1 college campus were assigned randomly to 1 of 2 interventions prior to their spring holiday spent in a warm, sunny location: (1) a community-based informational campaign, or (2) a combination of the campaign and a cognitive-behavioral small group intervention. Participants of a second college campus served as a comparison group. The cognitive-behavioral group exhibited increased knowledge, more positive attitudes toward UV protection, greater advancement through stages of change, and greater protective clothing use relative to the comparison or community-education groups. The informational campaign had little apparent impact in this study. PMID:19433378

  12. Inter-species comparisons of carcinogenicity.

    PubMed Central

    Purchase, I. F.

    1980-01-01

    The carcinogenicity of 250 chemicals in 2 species, usually the rat and the mouse, was obtained from the published literature through 3 independent sources. Of the 250 compounds listed, 38% were non-carcinogenic in both rats and mice, and 44% were carcinogenic in both species. A total of 43 compounds had different results in the two species, 21 (8%) being carcinogenic in mice only, 17 (7%) in rats only and 5 (2%) having differing results from other species. A comparison of the major target organs affected by chemicals carcinogenic in both species revealed that 64% of the chemicals studied produced cancer at the same site. This comparison of carcinogenic activity in 2 species suggests that extrapolation from results in a single-animal study to man may be subject to substantial errors. PMID:7387835

  13. Comparisons of activity measurements with radionuclide calibrators.

    PubMed

    Oropesa, P; Hernández, A T; Serra, R; Martínez, E; Varela, C

    2003-01-01

    The correct administration to a patient of the prescribed activity of a radiopharmaceutical is an important factor to ensure the confidence in the diagnosis or the therapeutic efficiency, while at the same time keeping the unnecessary human exposure as low as possible. Comparisons of activity measurements for 131I, 201Tl and 99mTc with radionuclide calibrators were organized the first time in Cuba during 2002 with the aim of obtaining information about the quality of administration of radiopharmaceuticals. Ten Cuban nuclear medicine departments and the laboratories involved in the production of these kinds of compounds participated in the comparison runs. The results presented in this paper facilitated the identification of several problems and initiated corrective actions. In addition, they indicate the necessity of establishing Quality Systems in nuclear medicine in Cuba. PMID:14622940

  14. Bayesian hypothesis testing for key comparisons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wübbeler, Gerd; Bodnar, Olha; Elster, Clemens

    2016-08-01

    Unilateral degrees of equivalence are the key result in the analysis of key comparison data and they are used to approve, or disapprove, calibration and measurement capabilities of the participating laboratories. To this end, it is checked whether a degree of equivalence differs significantly from zero. Proceeding in such a way can be viewed as carrying out a classical hypothesis test. We develop a Bayesian counterpart to this approach which has the advantage that it can include prior assessment of the corresponding Consultative Committee about the calibration and measurement capabilities of the participating laboratories. Simple expressions are derived and their implementation is provided in terms of MATLAB® and R programs. The novel procedure is illustrated by its application to two recent key comparisons CCL-K1 and CCM.FF-K4.1.2011.

  15. Comparison of two dissimilar modal identification techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pappa, Richard S.; Schenk, Axel; Niedbal, Norbert; Klusowski, Erhard

    1992-01-01

    Recent laboratory results using a refined phase resonance method and the eigensystem realization algorithm on the same test structure are reported. These methods are dissimilar modal identification techniques suitable for future large spacecraft. The theory, application approach, and results obtained for each technique are summarized and compared. Although both methods worked well in this investigation, significant differences occurred in some identified mode shapes. Comparison of independently derived modal parameters provides the means for disclosing such discrepancies in flight projects.

  16. Comparison results for ignition in conjugate systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pushpavanam, S.; Narayanan, R.

    1988-01-01

    The exothermic reaction of an arbitrarily shaped solid in a well-mixed continuous flow of constant density and velocity is investigated analytically, with a focus on a zeroth-order reaction in a pellet. Comparison theorems for the basic problem and the eigenvalue problem of ignition are derived, and the domain dependence of the bifurcation point is explored using the method of Joseph (1976). Some typical analytical results are presented in tables and compared with published values obtained using numerical methods.

  17. Spectral comparisons of sunlight and different lamps

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Deitzer, Gerald

    1994-01-01

    The tables in this report were compiled to characterize the spectra of available lamp types and provide comparison to the spectra of sunlight. Table 1 reports the spectral distributions for various lamp sources and compares them to those measured for sunlight. Table 2 provides the amount of energy in Wm(exp -2) relative to the number of photons of PAR (photosynthetically active radiation) (400-700 nm) for each light source.

  18. KEY COMPARISON: Final report on CCQM-K69 key comparison: Testosterone glucuronide in human urine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Fong-Ha; Mackay, Lindsey; Murby, John

    2010-01-01

    The CCQM-K69 key comparison of testosterone glucuronide in human urine was organized under the auspices of the CCQM Organic Analysis Working Group (OAWG). The National Measurement Institute Australia (NMIA) acted as the coordinating laboratory for the comparison. The samples distributed for the key comparison were prepared at NMIA with funding from the World Anti-Doping Agency (WADA). WADA granted the approval for this material to be used for the intercomparison provided the distribution and handling of the material were strictly controlled. Three national metrology institutes (NMIs)/designated institutes (DIs) developed reference methods and submitted data for the key comparison along with two other laboratories who participated in the parallel pilot study. A good selection of analytical methods and sample workup procedures was displayed in the results submitted considering the complexities of the matrix involved. The comparability of measurement results was successfully demonstrated by the participating NMIs. Only the key comparison data were used to estimate the key comparison reference value (KCRV), using the arithmetic mean approach. The reported expanded uncertainties for results ranged from 3.7% to 6.7% at the 95% level of confidence and all results agreed within the expanded uncertainty of the KCRV. Main text. To reach the main text of this paper, click on Final Report. Note that this text is that which appears in Appendix B of the BIPM key comparison database kcdb.bipm.org/. The final report has been peer-reviewed and approved for publication by the CCQM, according to the provisions of the CIPM Mutual Recognition Arrangement (MRA).

  19. AERICOMP: an aerial photo comparison system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grewe, Lynne L.; Rowe, Neil; Baer, Wolfgang

    2000-08-01

    This paper describes a system, which compares aerial photographs of the same terrain taken at different times and tires to recognize straight-edged cultural features that have changed. This work is intended to be highly robust, handling very different lighting conditions, weather, times of year, camera, and film between the images to be compared. Our system AERICOMP is designed to facilitate battlefield terrain modeling by permitting automatic updates form new images. AERICOMP does coarse registration, image correction, feature detection, automatic refined registration, feature difference detection and reduction, feature difference presentation and operator acceptance, difference identification, and database update. It emphasizes line segments for comparisons because differences in them are more robust for photometric changes between terrain images. In addition, line segment comparisons require less computation than pixel comparisons and are more compatible with identification tasks. For our intended application of battlefield terrain modeling, detecting changes in man-made structures is of much greater importance than changes in vegetation, and line segments are the key to identifying such structures. We show results involving change analysis between color IR and black/white USGS photographs of the same area six years apart. Even a mostly automatic system benefits form user interacting at key points. AERICOMP exploits user judgements at the beginning and end of its processing to assist in coarse registration and to approve the significance of any differences found. AERICOMP is currently under development at the Naval Postgraduate School, and is supported by the TENCAPS project under the US Navy.

  20. Hydraulic fracture model comparison study: Complete results

    SciTech Connect

    Warpinski, N.R.; Abou-Sayed, I.S.; Moschovidis, Z.; Parker, C.

    1993-02-01

    Large quantities of natural gas exist in low permeability reservoirs throughout the US. Characteristics of these reservoirs, however, make production difficult and often economic and stimulation is required. Because of the diversity of application, hydraulic fracture design models must be able to account for widely varying rock properties, reservoir properties, in situ stresses, fracturing fluids, and proppant loads. As a result, fracture simulation has emerged as a highly complex endeavor that must be able to describe many different physical processes. The objective of this study was to develop a comparative study of hydraulic-fracture simulators in order to provide stimulation engineers with the necessary information to make rational decisions on the type of models most suited for their needs. This report compares the fracture modeling results of twelve different simulators, some of them run in different modes for eight separate design cases. Comparisons of length, width, height, net pressure, maximum width at the wellbore, average width at the wellbore, and average width in the fracture have been made, both for the final geometry and as a function of time. For the models in this study, differences in fracture length, height and width are often greater than a factor of two. In addition, several comparisons of the same model with different options show a large variability in model output depending upon the options chosen. Two comparisons were made of the same model run by different companies; in both cases the agreement was good. 41 refs., 54 figs., 83 tabs.

  1. Goals and Social Comparisons Promote Walking Behavior.

    PubMed

    Chapman, Gretchen B; Colby, Helen; Convery, Kimberly; Coups, Elliot J

    2016-05-01

    The effectiveness of a pedometer intervention was affected by manipulating the goals given to participants and by providing social comparison feedback about how participants' performance compared with others. In study 1 (n= 148), university staff members received a low, medium, or high walking goal (10%, 50%, or 100% increase over baseline walking). Participants walked 1358 more steps per day (95% confidence interval [CI], 729, 1985), when receiving a high goal than when receiving a medium goal, but a medium goal did not increase walking relative to a low goal (554 more steps; 95% CI, -71,1179). In study 2 (n= 64), participants received individual feedback only or individual plus social comparison feedback. Participants walked 1120 more steps per day (95% CI, 538, 1703) when receiving social comparison feedback than when receiving only individual feedback. Goals and the performance of others act as reference points and influence the effect that pedometer feedback has on walking behavior, illustrating the applicability of the principles of behavioral economics and social psychology to the design of health behavior interventions. PMID:26139447

  2. Multiple comparisons in complex clinical trial designs.

    PubMed

    Hung, H M James; Wang, Sue-Jane

    2013-05-01

    Multiple comparisons have drawn a great deal of attention in evaluation of statistical evidence in clinical trials for regulatory applications. As the clinical trial methodology is increasingly more complex to properly take into consideration many practical factors, the multiple testing paradigm widely employed for regulatory applications may not suffice to interpret the results of an individual trial and of multiple trials. In a large outcome trial, an increasing need of studying more than one dose complicates a proper application of multiple comparison procedures. Additional challenges surface when a special endpoint, such as mortality, may need to be tested with multiple clinical trials combined, especially under group sequential designs. Another interesting question is how to study mortality or morbidity endpoints together with symptomatic endpoints in an efficient way, where the former type of endpoints are often studied in only one single trial but the latter type of endpoints are usually studied in at least two independent trials. This article is devoted to discussion of insufficiency of such a widely used paradigm applying only per-trial based multiple comparison procedures and to expand the utility of the procedures to such complex trial designs. A number of viable expanded strategies are stipulated. PMID:23620458

  3. KEY COMPARISON: Final report on international comparison COOMET.QM-K23b: Natural gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Konopelko, L. A.; Kustikov, Y. A.; Gromova, E. V.; Rozhnov, M. S.; Mironchik, A. M.; Kluchits, A. S.; Heine, H.-J.; Valkova, M.; Musil, S.; Tichy, J.

    2010-01-01

    The composition of natural gas is one of the significant objects for comparison study. Since 2000 three key comparisons of natural gas within CCQM have been implemented: CCQM-K1e-g, CCQM-K16a-b and CCQM-K23a-c. In 2007 VNIIM offered to organize within COOMET a key comparison of natural gas linked to CCQM-K23b. There were five NMIs that decided to take part in COOMET.QM-K23b in order to claim new or improve present CMCs: Ukrmetrteststandard (Ukraine), BelGIM (Belarus), BAM (Germany), SMU (Slovak Republic) and CMI (Czech Republic). Most of the NMIs (VNIIM, BAM, SMU, CMI) participated in CCQM-K23b; BelGIM and Ukrmetrteststandard participated in a comparison of natural gas for the first time. The gas mixtures for study contained nitrogen, carbon dioxide, ethane, propane, iso-butane, n-butane and methane. The key comparison reference value (KCRV) was based on the gravimetric preparation for all components. In order to determine the link between COOMET.QM-K23b and CCQM-K23b the uncertainty of degrees of equivalence of all the participants included the degree of equivalence of VNIIM in CCQM-K23b. The agreement of the results in this key comparison is very good. Most of the results agree with the KCRV within 0.5% relative. BelGIM and Ukrmetrteststandard participated in a comparison of natural gas for the first time, and both laboratories performed well in this key comparison. CMI obtained better results than in CCQM-K23b. Main text. To reach the main text of this paper, click on Final Report. Note that this text is that which appears in Appendix B of the BIPM key comparison database kcdb.bipm.org/. The final report has been peer-reviewed and approved for publication by the CCQM, according to the provisions of the CIPM Mutual Recognition Arrangement (MRA).

  4. Economic comparison of nuclear and coal-fired generation. [Monograph

    SciTech Connect

    Corey, G.R.

    1980-01-01

    This paper compares the current and historic operating performance of 12 large nuclear and coal-fired units now operated by Commonwealth Edison Co., and provides specific comparisons of busbar costs of electricity generated by those units in recent years. It also provides cost comparisons for future nuclear and coal-fired units, and attempts to deal realistically with the effect of future inflation upon these comparisons. The paper deals with the problem of uncertainty, the effect of future developments on present-day comparisons, and how published comparisons have varied over the past four or five years. 9 tables.

  5. On the role of code comparisons in verification and validation.

    SciTech Connect

    Oberkampf, William Louis; Trucano, Timothy Guy; Pilch, Martin M.

    2003-08-01

    This report presents a perspective on the role of code comparison activities in verification and validation. We formally define the act of code comparison as the Code Comparison Principle (CCP) and investigate its application in both verification and validation. One of our primary conclusions is that the use of code comparisons for validation is improper and dangerous. We also conclude that while code comparisons may be argued to provide a beneficial component in code verification activities, there are higher quality code verification tasks that should take precedence. Finally, we provide a process for application of the CCP that we believe is minimal for achieving benefit in verification processes.

  6. KEY COMPARISON: Final report of International Comparison EUROMET.QM-K1c: Comparison of measurements of nitrogen monoxide in nitrogen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van der Veen, A. M. H.; Nieuwenkamp, G.; Oudwater, R.; Wessel, R. M.; Novak, J.; Perrochet, J.-F.; Ackermann, A.; Rakowska, A.; Cortez, L.; Dias, F.; Konopelko, L.; Kustikov, Y.; Sutour, C.; Masé, T.; Milton, M. J. T.; Uprichard, I. J.; Woods, P. T.; Walden, J.; Lopez Esteban, M. T.

    2005-01-01

    Following-up the key comparison CCQM-K1c, EUROMET organized a regional key comparison involving ten laboratories. The objectives of this EUROMET key comparison were essentially the same as for the CCQM-K1c comparison: to compare the measurement capabilities of national metrological institutes (NMIs) in measuring amount of substance fractions of nitrogen monoxide in nitrogen. The nominal amount of substance fraction of the standards used for the comparison was 100 µmol/mol. The pilot laboratory in this key comparison also piloted the CCQM key comparison and has long-term experience in the behaviour of these mixtures and the technical challenges in preparing batches of very similar mixtures. Most participants used chemiluminescence as the measurement method; two participants used UV techniques and one ND-IR. The degrees of equivalence between this comparison and CCQM-K1c were calculated; four laboratories participated in both key comparisons, thus providing sufficient data for demonstrating the comparability. Main text. To reach the main text of this paper, click on Final Report. The final report has been peer-reviewed and approved for publication by the CCQM, according to the provisions of the Mutual Recognition Arrangement (MRA).

  7. Social comparisons in novel situations: finding inspiration during life transitions.

    PubMed

    Lockwood, Penelope; Shaughnessy, Sarah C; Fortune, Jennifer L; Tong, Man-On

    2012-08-01

    The authors propose that individuals transitioning to a novel environment will prefer upward comparisons, particularly those made with individuals who have experienced a similar transition. Such comparisons help to reduce uncertainty and demonstrate that future success is possible. Study 1 found that individuals facing transitions to unfamiliar situations seek upward comparisons as a result of their uncertainty. Study 2 demonstrated that individuals who perceive themselves to be making a significant life transition are especially motivated by upward comparisons. Study 3 provided evidence that upward comparisons are especially inspiring to individuals making a transition to a novel cultural environment. Study 4 provided experimental evidence that individuals in a novel cultural environment are particularly inspired by upward comparisons with other newcomers. These studies suggest that upward comparisons with individuals who have experienced a similar transition enhance individuals' sense of control over future outcomes and play a key role during adjustment to novel environments. PMID:22825208

  8. Comparisons and perceived deprivation in ethnic minority settings.

    PubMed

    Zagefka, Hanna; Brown, Rupert

    2005-04-01

    Two studies investigated comparison choices among ethnic minorities and majorities. The perceived status of the self vis-á-vis different comparison targets also was assessed. Antecedents and consequences of comparisons and relative deprivation were examined. Predictions were derived from social comparison, stigma, social identity, and relative deprivation research. Two surveys were conducted, one in London with mainly Asian participants (N = 235) and one in Germany with Turkish and Aussiedler participants (N = 166) and German majority members (N = 351). Participants preferred intragroup and temporal comparisons (with other ingroup members and with the self in the past) to various types of cross-group comparisons (with outgroup members). Perceived similarity and contact with a target positively predicted interest in comparing with this target, and perceived higher status of the target was a negative predictor. Some evidence was found that feelings of deprivation depend on comparison choices. Deprivation negatively predicted self-esteem and life satisfaction. Deprivation and group identification were negatively correlated. PMID:15743982

  9. Physical appearance comparisons in ethnically diverse college women.

    PubMed

    Schaefer, Lauren M; Thibodaux, Lia K; Krenik, Daniel; Arnold, Elysse; Thompson, J Kevin

    2015-09-01

    Research demonstrates ethnic differences in rates of body dissatisfaction and disordered eating. Appearance comparison frequency is related to these outcomes, however, research has not examined possible ethnic differences in levels of appearance comparisons nor their relation to body dissatisfaction and disordered eating. The current study examined the frequency of appearance comparisons and the strength of the relationships between appearance comparisons, appearance evaluation, and disordered eating among White, Black, and Hispanic women. Measures of appearance comparison, appearance evaluation, and disordered eating were administered to 895 college women. Compared with White and Hispanic women, Black women reported fewer appearance comparisons, more positive appearance evaluation, and lower levels of disordered eating. Associations between examined variables were generally weaker among Black women. Results suggest that the reduced frequency and impact of appearance comparisons may contribute to more positive appearance evaluation and reduced levels of disordered eating among Black women. PMID:26453998

  10. Rooftop Unit Comparison Calculator User Manual

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, James D.

    2015-04-30

    This document serves as a user manual for the Packaged rooftop air conditioners and heat pump units comparison calculator (RTUCC) and is an aggregation of the calculator’s website documentation. Content ranges from new-user guide material like the “Quick Start” to the more technical/algorithmic descriptions of the “Methods Pages.” There is also a section listing all the context-help topics that support the features on the “Controls” page. The appendix has a discussion of the EnergyPlus runs that supported the development of the building-response models.

  11. Preference Learning and Ranking by Pairwise Comparison

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fürnkranz, Johannes; Hüllermeier, Eyke

    This chapter provides an overview of recent work on preference learning and ranking via pairwise classification. The learning by pairwise comparison (LPC) paradigm is the natural machine learning counterpart to the relational approach to preference modeling and decision making. From a machine learning point of view, LPC is especially appealing as it decomposes a possibly complex prediction problem into a certain number of learning problems of the simplest type, namely binary classification. We explain how to approach different preference learning problems, such as label and instance ranking, within the framework of LPC. We primarily focus on methodological aspects, but also address theoretical questions as well as algorithmic and complexity issues.

  12. Intercode comparison of gyrokinetic global electromagnetic modes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Görler, T.; Tronko, N.; Hornsby, W. A.; Bottino, A.; Kleiber, R.; Norscini, C.; Grandgirard, V.; Jenko, F.; Sonnendrücker, E.

    2016-07-01

    Aiming to fill a corresponding lack of sophisticated test cases for global electromagnetic gyrokinetic codes, a new hierarchical benchmark is proposed. Starting from established test sets with adiabatic electrons, fully gyrokinetic electrons, and electrostatic fluctuations are taken into account before finally studying the global electromagnetic micro-instabilities. Results from up to five codes involving representatives from different numerical approaches as particle-in-cell methods, Eulerian and Semi-Lagrangian are shown. By means of spectrally resolved growth rates and frequencies and mode structure comparisons, agreement can be confirmed on ion-gyro-radius scales, thus providing confidence in the correct implementation of the underlying equations.

  13. Comparison of erosion and channel characteristics

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Parker, Gene W.

    1998-01-01

    Erosion was observed at 33 percent of 22,495 bridge sites in nine States. Among sites with erosion, 56 percent were associated with skewed flows, curved channels, or a combination of these two conditions, and at 18 percent of the sites, channels were straight with steep bank angles. The remaining 26 percent are sites with observable erosion at piers or abutments on straight channels. Comparison of the sites with erosion to channel bed-material indicate that 44 percent of the single-span sites had gravel-size or smaller bed material and 70 percent of the multiple-span sites had gravel-size or smaller bed material.

  14. Interior structure of Neptune - Comparison with Uranus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hubbard, W. B.; Nellis, W. J.; Mitchell, A. C.; Holmes, N. C.; Mccandless, P. C.; Limaye, S. S.

    1991-01-01

    Measurements of rotation rates and gravitational harmonics of Neptune made with the Voyager 2 spacecraft allow tighter constraints on models of the planet's interior. Shock measurements of material that may match the composition of Neptune, the so-called planetary 'ice', have been carried out to pressures exceeding 200 gigapascals (2 megabars). Comparison of shock data with inferred pressure-density profiles for both Uranus and Neptune shows substantial similarity through most of the mass of both planets. Analysis of the effect of Neptune's strong differential rotation on its gravitational harmonics indicates that differential rotation involves only the outermost few percent of Neptune's mass.

  15. Comparison of RESRAD with hand calculations

    SciTech Connect

    Rittmann, P.D.

    1995-09-01

    This report is a continuation of an earlier comparison done with two other computer programs, GENII and PATHRAE. The dose calculations by the two programs were compared with each other and with hand calculations. These band calculations have now been compared with RESRAD Version 5.41 to examine the use of standard models and parameters in this computer program. The hand calculations disclosed a significant computational error in RESRAD. The Pu-241 ingestion doses are five orders of magnitude too small. In addition, the external doses from some nuclides differ greatly from expected values. Both of these deficiencies have been corrected in later versions of RESRAD.

  16. An architectural comparison of dataflow systems

    SciTech Connect

    Srini, V.P.

    1986-03-01

    A Distributed Computer System, or DCS, based on the dataflow model of computation has the potential to concurrently execute a large number of tasks employing potentially thousands of processors. Since control has to be distributed and asynchronous in such a DCS, several new challenges appear in the design of processors, momory, and interconnection networks. Some of the challenges in the design of processors is presented in this article. An architectural comparison of seven dataflow processors based on sixteen criteria forms the major part of the article.

  17. Comparison of FMS versus TDMS applications

    SciTech Connect

    Werner, N.E.

    1983-01-01

    A business application which uses forms management is described. The screen format, data dictionary, dataflow diagrams, minispecs, and structured design chart are included to provide the description of this application. It is implemented using TDMS and FMS in separate applications. Examples of code are included showing both methods of implementation. Finally, a comparison of FMS features and TDMS features is done, indicating that the nature of the application and also the environment under which the application will be used and maintained dictates which form product would be more suitable.

  18. Comparison of Ridges on Triton and Europa

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prockter, L. M.; Pappalardo, R. .

    2003-01-01

    Triton and Europa each display a variety of ridges and associated troughs. The resemblance of double ridges on these two satellites has been previously noted [R. Kirk, pers. comm.], but as yet, the similarities and differences between these feature types have not been examined in any detail. Triton s ridges, and Europa s, exhibit an evolutionary sequence ranging from isolated troughs, through doublet ridges, to complex ridge swaths [1, 2]. Comparison of ridges on Europa to those on Triton may provide insight into their formation on both satellites, and thereby have implications for the satellites' histories.

  19. Comparison of Shallow Survey 2012 Multibeam Datasets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramirez, T. M.

    2012-12-01

    The purpose of the Shallow Survey common dataset is a comparison of the different technologies utilized for data acquisition in the shallow survey marine environment. The common dataset consists of a series of surveys conducted over a common area of seabed using a variety of systems. It provides equipment manufacturers the opportunity to showcase their latest systems while giving hydrographic researchers and scientists a chance to test their latest algorithms on the dataset so that rigorous comparisons can be made. Five companies collected data for the Common Dataset in the Wellington Harbor area in New Zealand between May 2010 and May 2011; including Kongsberg, Reson, R2Sonic, GeoAcoustics, and Applied Acoustics. The Wellington harbor and surrounding coastal area was selected since it has a number of well-defined features, including the HMNZS South Seas and HMNZS Wellington wrecks, an armored seawall constructed of Tetrapods and Akmons, aquifers, wharves and marinas. The seabed inside the harbor basin is largely fine-grained sediment, with gravel and reefs around the coast. The area outside the harbor on the southern coast is an active environment, with moving sand and exposed reefs. A marine reserve is also in this area. For consistency between datasets, the coastal research vessel R/V Ikatere and crew were used for all surveys conducted for the common dataset. Using Triton's Perspective processing software multibeam datasets collected for the Shallow Survey were processed for detail analysis. Datasets from each sonar manufacturer were processed using the CUBE algorithm developed by the Center for Coastal and Ocean Mapping/Joint Hydrographic Center (CCOM/JHC). Each dataset was gridded at 0.5 and 1.0 meter resolutions for cross comparison and compliance with International Hydrographic Organization (IHO) requirements. Detailed comparisons were made of equipment specifications (transmit frequency, number of beams, beam width), data density, total uncertainty, and

  20. Comparison of hyperbolic and hyperboloid conductor electrostatics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lekner, John

    2006-01-01

    The potentials and fields of hyperbolic and hyperboloidal conductors are available analytically. A detailed comparison of the two-dimensional and three-dimensional problems shows strong similarities, but also interesting differences. The electric field near a hyperboloidal needle is stronger (ceteris paribus) than near a hyperbolic blade, and dies off faster. The field at the hyperbolic conductor varies as the 1/3 power of the local curvature. At the hyperboloid conductor the field varies as the 1/4 power of the local Gaussian curvature (which is the product of the two principal curvatures).

  1. Comparison of CALPUFF with ISC3

    SciTech Connect

    Coulter, C.T.; Eckhoff, P.A.

    1998-12-01

    In the report, a comparison is made of two different dispersion models, CALPUFF and ISC3. CALPUFF is a Lagrangian puff model which simulates continuous puffs of pollutants released into the ambient flow, whereas ISC3 is a Gaussian plume model that treats emissions from a source as a contiguous mass. CALPUFF may be configured to treat emissions as integrated puffs or as slugs. ISC3 is currently recommended for routine use in assessing source impacts involving transport distances of less than 50km. The report is being released to establish part of the basis for review of the consequences resulting from use of CALPUFF in routine dispersion modeling of air pollution impacts.

  2. A simple method for global sequence comparison.

    PubMed Central

    Pizzi, E; Attimonelli, M; Liuni, S; Frontali, C; Saccone, C

    1992-01-01

    A simple method of sequence comparison, based on a correlation analysis of oligonucleotide frequency distributions, is here shown to be a reliable test of overall sequence similarity. The method does not involve sequence alignment procedures and permits the rapid screening of large amounts of sequence data. It identifies those sequences which deserve more careful analysis of sequence similarity at the level of resolution of the single nucleotide. It uses observed quantities only and does not involve the adoption of any theoretical model. PMID:1738591

  3. Interior structure of Neptune: Comparison with Uranus

    SciTech Connect

    Hubbard, W.B. ); Nellis, W.J.; Mitchell, A.C.; Holmes, N.C.; McCandless, P.C. ); Limaye, S.S. )

    1991-08-09

    Measurements of rotation rates and gravitational harmonics of Neptune made with the Voyager 2 spacecraft allow tighter constraints on models of the planet's interior. Shock measurements of material that may match the composition of Neptune, the so-called planetary ice, have been carried out to pressures exceeding 200 gigapascals (2 megabars). Comparison of shock data with inferred pressure-density profiles for both Uranus and Neptune shows substantial similarity through most of the mass of both planets. Analysis of the effect of Neptune's strong differential rotation on its gravitational harmonics indicates that differential rotation involves only the outermost few percent of Neptune's mass.

  4. Cray 1 v. Cyber 205: some comparisons

    SciTech Connect

    Temperton, C.

    1983-04-01

    The author has been able to work on two of the world's fastest computers, the Cray-1 (at the European Centre for Medium Range Weather Forecasts) and the Cyber 205 (at the UK Meteorological Office). A comparison between the two machines is of interest not only to poential users but also to a more general audience. The author points out some of the differences between the two machines, and the impact these differences have on the way in which certain problems should be formulated and programmed.

  5. A comparison of thermal zone aggregation methods

    SciTech Connect

    Dobbs, Justin R.; Hencey, Brandon M.

    2012-12-10

    The impact of increasing energy prices on building operation budgets has fueled demand for more energy-efficient structures. Existing building energy simulation tools generate an immense amount of data yet comparatively little knowledge. This paper introduces a framework that allows aggregation-based model reduction to operate on geometric building information models. The resulting aggregation sequence provides designers with faster simulations and affords insight into complex multi-scale thermal interactions. A comparison of the trade-off between simulation speed and accuracy for three hierarchical cluster partitioning methods concludes the discussion.

  6. A comparison of RISKIND and RADTRAN 4

    SciTech Connect

    Brumburgh, G.P.; Alesso, H.P.

    1993-11-01

    Our objective in this paper is to provide preliminary comparisons between the two computer codes RISKIND and RADTRAN 4. These codes have utility in evaluating radiological consequences during the transportation of radioactive materials. We reviewed the codes to three criteria: (1) the code`s evaluation capability for accident sequences, frequencies, and environmental consequences, (2) the code`s ``user friendliness`` (as well as how much specific technical expertise the user needed to apply to it), and (3) compatibility with other code output or modules.

  7. Classifications and comparisons of multilocus recombination distributions

    PubMed Central

    Karlin, Samuel; Liberman, Uri

    1978-01-01

    Various classifications and representations of multilocus recombination structures are delineated based on generalized notions of linkage values and recombination rates. An important class of recombination distributions (called the count-location chiasma process) is parameterized by a distribution of the number of crossover events and, for each such crossover count, by a conditional distribution of crossover locations. A number of properties of this recombination structure are developed. A multilocus definition of a “natural” recombination range is set forth. Orderings among recombination distributions in the multilocus setting are also discussed. Comparisons are made in terms of complete linkage, free assortment and noninterference schemes serving as standards. PMID:16592601

  8. Brain potentials in outcome evaluation: when social comparison takes effect.

    PubMed

    Wu, Yan; Zhang, Dexuan; Elieson, Bill; Zhou, Xiaolin

    2012-08-01

    Social comparison, in which people evaluate their opinions and abilities by comparing them with the opinions and abilities of others, is a central feature of human social life. Previous work has highlighted the importance of social comparison in reward processing. However, the time-course of the social comparison effect in outcome evaluation remains largely unknown. The purpose of this study was to explore to what extent brain activity is modulated by social comparison between an individual and their anonymous partner. Event-related potentials (ERPs) were measured while the participants viewed their own and their partner's gain and loss outcomes based on their performance in a dot estimation task. Analysis of ERPs revealed that the feedback-related negativity (FRN) amplitude differences between gains and losses were not modulated by social comparison. In contrast, the P300 was larger for gains and showed an effect of social comparison independent of feedback valence. A late component, the late positive potential (LPP), was also modulated by social comparison, but it was insensitive to feedback valence. The data suggest that social comparison modulates outcome evaluation at several points in the information processing stream. Social comparison has no effect on the early coarse evaluation stage, but modulates the late cognitive/affective appraisal and re-appraisal processes. These findings provide neurophysiological evidence for the importance of social comparisons in outcome evaluations by the human brain. PMID:22705168

  9. KEY COMPARISON: Report on bilateral comparison COOMET.AUV.A-K1.1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fedtke, Thomas

    2009-01-01

    A bilateral comparison of primary standards for sound in air, COOMET.AUV.A-K1.1 was conducted in 2004 between the DNDI (Ukraine) and the PTB (Germany) with PTB acting as the linking laboratory to the previous COOMET.AUV.A-K1 comparison. A similar protocol was followed, and although measurements were made at 23 acoustic frequencies, the results were analysed in terms of degrees of equivalence only at the recommended frequencies of the CCAUV.A-K1 comparison so that the appropriate links could be made. The results were approved by CCAUV in October 2008 are in agreement with all the linked results within the uncertainties. Main text. To reach the main text of this paper, click on Final Report. Note that this text is that which appears in Appendix B of the BIPM key comparison database kcdb.bipm.org/. The final report has been peer-reviewed and approved for publication by the CCAUV, according to the provisions of the CIPM Mutual Recognition Arrangement (MRA).

  10. KEY COMPARISON International comparison CCQM-K46: Ammonia in nitrogen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van der Veen, Adriaan M. H.; Nieuwenkamp, Gerard; Wessel, Rob M.; Maruyama, Masaaki; Heo, Gwi Suk; Kim, Yong-doo; Moon, Dong Min; Niederhauser, Bernhard; Quintilii, Manuela; Milton, Martin J. T.; Cox, Maurice G.; Harris, Peter M.; Guenther, Franklin R.; Rhoderick, George C.; Konopelko, L. A.; Kustikov, Y. A.; Pankratov, V. V.; Selukov, D. N.; Petrov, V. A.; Gromova, E. V.

    2010-01-01

    Ammonia is an important compound in the chemical industry. It is widely used and is the basis for producing other compounds containing nitrogen. Ammonia is also very hazardous, and consequently emissions of ammonia need be controlled and monitored. In the past years, several national metrology institutes have developed facilities for the preparation of Primary Standard gas Mixtures (PSMs), dynamically generated ammonia mixtures and facilities for comparing and certifying gas mixtures containing ammonia. The amount-of-substance fraction level of ammonia chosen for this key comparison is 30-50 µmol/mol. The results of this key comparison revealed that there is at present no consensus among static and dynamic techniques for gas mixture preparation for this component in this range. As key comparison reference value (KCRV), the mean of the three methods is used. In its uncertainty, no allowance is made for the observed biases. With respect to the KCRV, only two laboratories report consistent results. When grouped in accordance with the employed methods, the results are consistent. Further experimental work is needed. Main text. To reach the main text of this paper, click on Final Report. Note that this text is that which appears in Appendix B of the BIPM key comparison database kcdb.bipm.org/. The final report has been peer-reviewed and approved for publication by the CCQM, according to the provisions of the CIPM Mutual Recognition Arrangement (MRA).

  11. Neuropsychological comparison of children with heavy prenatal alcohol exposure and an IQ-matched comparison group.

    PubMed

    Vaurio, Linnea; Riley, Edward P; Mattson, Sarah N

    2011-05-01

    An objective in current research on children with fetal alcohol spectrum disorders (FASD) is to determine neurobehavioral profiles to identify affected individuals. Deficits observed when children with FASD are compared to typically developing controls may be confounded by lower IQ scores in the subjects with FASD. To determine if prenatal alcohol exposure is associated with neurobehavioral deficits after controlling for IQ differences, multivariate analyses were conducted to compare alcohol-exposed (ALC) subjects to a comparison group closely matched on IQ (IQC). The initial analysis included a broad neuropsychological battery with measures of language, executive function, visual-motor integration, motor ability, and academic achievement. Additional, in depth comparisons focused on visual sustained attention, verbal learning and memory and parent/guardian-reported behavior problems. Group differences (ALC < IQC) were found on verbal learning and parent-rated behavior problems. Group differences were marginally significant (measures within the broad neuropsychological comparison) or not significant (visual attention, retention of verbal material) on the remaining comparisons. Therefore, some deficits (e.g., verbal learning and behavior problems) in children with heavy prenatal alcohol exposure cannot be explained by the lower FSIQ observed in the population. These areas of relative weakness could be useful in distinguishing children with FASD from other children with lowered IQ. PMID:21349236

  12. Comparison of State Unemployment Insurance Laws. Comparison Revision, Number 1, August 6, 1978.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Employment and Training Administration (DOL), Washington, DC. Unemployment Insurance Service.

    To inform the public about details of the employment security program and how it functions, this comparison of state unemployment insurance laws is presented. The report is based primarily on an analysis of state statutes. It examines state by state the types of workers and employers that are covered under the state law, the methods of financing…

  13. Interprovincial Comparisons of University Financing. Eighth Report of the Tripartite Committee on Interprovincial Comparisons.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Council of Ontario Universities, Toronto.

    Eight indicators used to make interprovincial comparisons of university financing in Canada are outlined and the amounts for these indicators for each of the 10 provinces are presented for 1974-1975 to 1984-1985. The eight indicators are as follows: provincial operating grants per student, provincial operating grants per capita, provincial…

  14. Interprovincial Comparisons of University Financing. Ninth Report of the Tripartite Committee on Interprovincial Comparisons.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Council of Ontario Universities, Toronto.

    Expenditures on universities by each of Canada's provinces are compared. An introductory section describes the project through which the study is undertaken, explains the indicators used, and discusses structural problems encountered in making comparisons. The central portion of the report is a tabulation of these indicators for each province and…

  15. A Comparison of Type I Error Rates of Alpha-Max with Established Multiple Comparison Procedures.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barnette, J. Jackson; McLean, James E.

    J. Barnette and J. McLean (1996) proposed a method of controlling Type I error in pairwise multiple comparisons after a significant omnibus F test. This procedure, called Alpha-Max, is based on a sequential cumulative probability accounting procedure in line with Bonferroni inequality. A missing element in the discussion of Alpha-Max was the…

  16. The interpretation of shoeprint comparison class correspondences.

    PubMed

    Hancock, Sheida; Morgan-Smith, Rian; Buckleton, John

    2012-12-01

    The underlying principles involved in the interpretation of shoeprint comparisons have become a topical subject due to criticisms in the 2009 National Academy of Science (NAS) report on forensic sciences [1]. Difficulties in the application and understanding of these principles were also highlighted in a recent court ruling [2-5]. We report here a survey that may inform some aspects of this interpretation and discuss the implications of findings from this survey in the light of that court ruling and more importantly the NAS report. Five hundred shoeprints taken from student volunteers in Auckland, New Zealand were compared against each other for the presence of any pattern correspondences. Comparisons were undertaken of the full outsole and of smaller portions of the more common patterns. Of the 500 shoe impressions collected 488 (97.6%) were ultimately represented only once in the survey. The greatest number of corresponding patterns was for the most common brand of shoe (Converse Chuck Taylor All Star) and occurred in 3 of 500 observations. No instances of an imitation brand matching the authentic brand were found. Smaller sections of the common patterns showed a greater number of corresponding prints. However, the greatest number of matching partial patterns was again for the most common brand of shoe (Converse Chuck Taylor All Star) and occurred in 29 of 500 observations. We conclude that pattern match alone is of considerable evidential value even when the print is partial. PMID:23068775

  17. PROCAIN: protein profile comparison with assisting information

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yong; Sadreyev, Ruslan I.; Grishin, Nick V.

    2009-01-01

    Detection of remote sequence homology is essential for the accurate inference of protein structure, function and evolution. The most sensitive detection methods involve the comparison of evolutionary patterns reflected in multiple sequence alignments (MSAs) of protein families. We present PROCAIN, a new method for MSA comparison based on the combination of ‘vertical’ MSA context (substitution constraints at individual sequence positions) and ‘horizontal’ context (patterns of residue content at multiple positions). Based on a simple and tractable profile methodology and primitive measures for the similarity of horizontal MSA patterns, the method achieves the quality of homology detection comparable to a more complex advanced method employing hidden Markov models (HMMs) and secondary structure (SS) prediction. Adding SS information further improves PROCAIN performance beyond the capabilities of current state-of-the-art tools. The potential value of the method for structure/function predictions is illustrated by the detection of subtle homology between evolutionary distant yet structurally similar protein domains. ProCAIn, relevant databases and tools can be downloaded from: http://prodata.swmed.edu/procain/download. The web server can be accessed at http://prodata.swmed.edu/procain/procain.php. PMID:19357092

  18. PROCAIN: protein profile comparison with assisting information.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yong; Sadreyev, Ruslan I; Grishin, Nick V

    2009-06-01

    Detection of remote sequence homology is essential for the accurate inference of protein structure, function and evolution. The most sensitive detection methods involve the comparison of evolutionary patterns reflected in multiple sequence alignments (MSAs) of protein families. We present PROCAIN, a new method for MSA comparison based on the combination of 'vertical' MSA context (substitution constraints at individual sequence positions) and 'horizontal' context (patterns of residue content at multiple positions). Based on a simple and tractable profile methodology and primitive measures for the similarity of horizontal MSA patterns, the method achieves the quality of homology detection comparable to a more complex advanced method employing hidden Markov models (HMMs) and secondary structure (SS) prediction. Adding SS information further improves PROCAIN performance beyond the capabilities of current state-of-the-art tools. The potential value of the method for structure/function predictions is illustrated by the detection of subtle homology between evolutionary distant yet structurally similar protein domains. ProCAIn, relevant databases and tools can be downloaded from: http://prodata.swmed.edu/procain/download. The web server can be accessed at http://prodata.swmed.edu/procain/procain.php. PMID:19357092

  19. Comparison of radar data versus rainfall data.

    PubMed

    Espinosa, B; Hromadka, T V; Perez, R

    2015-01-01

    Doppler radar data are increasingly used in rainfall-runoff synthesis studies, perhaps due to radar data availability, among other factors. However, the veracity of the radar data are often a topic of concern. In this paper, three Doppler radar outcomes developed by the United States National Weather Service at three radar sites are examined and compared to actual rain gage data for two separate severe storm events in order to assess accuracy in the published radar estimates of rainfall. Because the subject storms were very intense rainfall events lasting approximately one hour in duration, direct comparisons between the three radar gages themselves can be made, as well as a comparison to rain gage data at a rain gage location subjected to the same storm cells. It is shown that topographic interference with the radar outcomes can be a significant factor leading to differences between radar and rain gage readings, and that care is needed in calibrating radar outcomes using available rain gage data in order to interpolate rainfall estimates between rain gages using the spatial variation observed in the radar readings. The paper establishes and describes•the need for "ground-truthing" of radar data, and•possible errors due to topographic interference. PMID:26649276

  20. Solar Sail GN and C Model Comparisons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heaton, Andrew F.

    2004-01-01

    The Solar Sail Propulsion project is engaged in an ambitious program to raise the Technology Readiness Level of solar sails and prepare for a validation flight via a series of hardware ground demonstrations and development of a number of high fidelity simulations and models. Guidance, navigation, and control of solar sails is a key part of this effort. The large flexible structure and optical nature of solar sails create a considerable challenge for attitude control, thrust modeling, and navigation. In this paper, we present an overview and comparison of two recently delivered prototype solar sail guidance, navigation, and control software tools currently funded by the Solar Sail Propulsion project. The results of some key test cases are presented. Where possible, we also make comparisons to other software tools. We discuss the implications of the results of these comparative studies to the future direction and scope of development efforts for guidance, navigation and control software for solar sails, including the relationship to hardware test efforts such as the Thrust Vector Control Authority Demonstration.

  1. Alternate Propulsion Subsystem Concepts Tripropellant Comparison Study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Levack, Daniel

    1995-01-01

    A study was conducted under MSFC contract NAS8-39210 to compare tripropellant and bipropellant engine configurations for the SSTO mission. The objective was to produce an 'apples-to-apples' comparison to isolate the effects of design implementation, designing company, year of design, or technologies included from the basic tripropellant/bipropellant comparison. Consequently, identical technologies were included (e.g., jet pumps) and the same design groundrules and practices were used. Engine power cycles were examined as were turbomachinery/preburner arrangements for each cycle. The bipropellant approach and two tripropellant approaches were separately optimized in terms of operating parameters: exit pressures, mixture ratios, thrust splits, etc. This briefing presents the results of the study including engine weights for both tripropellant and bipropellant engines; dry vehicle weight performance for a range of engine chamber pressures; discusses the basis for the results; examines vehicle performance due to engine cycles and the margin characteristics of various cycles; and identifies technologies with significant payoffs for this application.

  2. Cirrus Parcel Model Comparison Project. Phase 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lin, Ruei-Fong; Starr, David O'C.; DeMott, Paul J.; Cotton, Richard; Jensen, Eric; Sassen, Kenneth

    2000-01-01

    The Cirrus Parcel Model Comparison (CPMC) is a project of the GEWEX Cloud System Study Working Group on Cirrus Cloud Systems (GCSS WG2). The primary goal of this project is to identify cirrus model sensitivities to the state of our knowledge of nucleation and microphysics. Furthermore, the common ground of the findings may provide guidelines for models with simpler cirrus microphysics modules. We focus on the nucleation regimes of the warm (parcel starting at -40 C and 340 hPa) and cold (-60 C and 170 hPa) cases studied in the GCSS WG2 Idealized Cirrus Model Comparison Project. Nucleation and ice crystal growth were forced through an externally imposed rate of lift and consequent adiabatic cooling. The background haze particles are assumed to be lognormally-distributed H2SO4 particles. Only the homogeneous nucleation mode is allowed to form ice crystals in the HN-ONLY runs; all nucleation modes are switched on in the ALL-MODE runs. Participants were asked to run the HN-lambda-fixed runs by setting lambda = 2 (lambda is further discussed in section 2) or tailoring the nucleation rate calculation in agreement with lambda = 2 (exp 1). The depth of parcel lift (800 m) was set to assure that parcels underwent complete transition through the nucleation regime to a stage of approximate equilibrium between ice mass growth and vapor supplied by the specified updrafts.

  3. Comparison of radar data versus rainfall data

    PubMed Central

    Espinosa, B.; Hromadka, T.V.; Perez, R.

    2015-01-01

    Doppler radar data are increasingly used in rainfall-runoff synthesis studies, perhaps due to radar data availability, among other factors. However, the veracity of the radar data are often a topic of concern. In this paper, three Doppler radar outcomes developed by the United States National Weather Service at three radar sites are examined and compared to actual rain gage data for two separate severe storm events in order to assess accuracy in the published radar estimates of rainfall. Because the subject storms were very intense rainfall events lasting approximately one hour in duration, direct comparisons between the three radar gages themselves can be made, as well as a comparison to rain gage data at a rain gage location subjected to the same storm cells. It is shown that topographic interference with the radar outcomes can be a significant factor leading to differences between radar and rain gage readings, and that care is needed in calibrating radar outcomes using available rain gage data in order to interpolate rainfall estimates between rain gages using the spatial variation observed in the radar readings. The paper establishes and describes•the need for “ground-truthing” of radar data, and•possible errors due to topographic interference. PMID:26649276

  4. Water gun vs air gun: A comparison

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hutchinson, D.R.; Detrick, R. S.

    1984-01-01

    The water gun is a relatively new marine seismic sound source that produces an acoustic signal by an implosive rather than explosive mechanism. A comparison of the source characteristics of two different-sized water guns with those of conventional air guns shows the the water gun signature is cleaner and much shorter than that of a comparable-sized air gun: about 60-100 milliseconds (ms) for an 80-in3. (1.31-liter (I)) water gun compared with several hundred ms for an 80-in3. (1.31-1) air gun. The source spectra of water guns are richer in high frequencies (>200 Hz) than are those of air guns, but they also have less energy than those of air guns at low frequencies. A comparison between water gun and air gun reflection profiles in both shallow (Long Island Sound)-and deep (western Bermuda Rise)-water settings suggests that the water gun offers a good compromise between very high resolution, limited penetration systems (e.g. 3.5-kHz profilers and sparkers) and the large volume air guns and tuned air gun arrays generally used where significant penetration is required. ?? 1984 D. Reidel Publishing Company.

  5. Bilateral Comparison in Chemosensory-Mediated Foraging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Webster, D. R.; Rahman, S.; Dasi, L. P.

    2000-11-01

    Motivation is drawn from the need to determine the sensory cues that animals such as blue crabs and lobsters use to track chemical odor plumes to locate food or mates. Major steps forward with this difficult problem can only be achieved through an appreciation of the spatial and temporal variation of concentration fields and the information content available to a forager in the plume. Here we discuss the usefulness of bilateral comparison to an animal tracking a turbulent plume. Instantaneous concentration fields of a chemical plume diffusing in a fully-developed turbulent open channel flow are measured using planar laser-induced fluorescence (PLIF). The plume is released iso-kinetically 25 mm above the smooth bed (z+ = 90), thus transport is mainly due to advection and ambient turbulence. A spatial correlation function in the spanwise direction is a dramatic indicator of the relative position of the centerline and distance from the source. The relative direction of the plume centerline can be estimated from an instantaneous bilateral comparison provided the sensors are separated by a distance that is relatively large compared to the spanwise integral length scale based on the spatial correlation function.

  6. Final report on CCM key comparison CCM.D-K2: Comparison of liquid density standards

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bettin, Horst; Jacques, Claude; Zelenka, Zoltán; Fujii, Ken-ichi; Kuramoto, Naoki; Chang, Kyung-Ho; Lee, Yong Jae; Becerra, Luis Omar; Domostroeva, Natalia

    2013-01-01

    The results are presented of the key comparison CCM.D-K2 that covered the density measurements of four liquids: the density of water at 20 °C, of pentadecane at 15 °C, 20 °C, 40 °C and 60°C, of tetrachloroethlyene at 5 °C and 20 °C and of a viscous oil at 20 °C. Seven national metrology institutes measured the densities at atmospheric pressure by hydrostatic weighing of solid density standards in the time interval from 27 April 2004 to 28 June 2004. Since the participants were asked not to include components for a possible drift or inhomogeneity of the liquid in their uncertainty budget, these uncertainty contributions are investigated for the final evaluation of the data. For this purpose, results of stability and homogeneity measurements of the pilot laboratory are used. The participants decided not to include a possible drift of the liquid's density since no significant drift could be detected, and the influence of the drift and its uncertainty are negligible. Similarly, the inhomogeneity of the water and pentadecane samples is not significant and has no influence on the evaluation. Thus, it was neglected. Only the inhomogeneities of tetrachloroethylene and of the viscous oil were significant. Consequently, they were included in the evaluation. With one or two exceptions, the results show good agreement among the participants. Only in the case of water are the results clearly discrepant. The key comparison reference values were calculated by the weighted mean (taking into account a small correlation between two participants) in the case of consistent results. Otherwise the Procedure B of Cox was used. The expanded uncertainties of all reference densities are below 1 × 10-5 in relative terms. This satisfies the needs of all customers who wish to calibrate or check liquid density measuring instruments such as oscillation-type density meters. The comparison fully supports the calibration measurement capabilities table in the BIPM key comparison database

  7. SUPPLEMENTARY COMPARISON: Final report on CCL-S3 supplementary line scale comparison Nano3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bosse, Harald; Häßler-Grohne, Wolfgang; Flügge, Jens; Köning, Rainer

    2003-01-01

    This report describes the results of the international line scale comparison Nano3, which was carried out between 2000 and 2003 and which was accepted as supplementary comparison CCL-S3. This comparison was initiated by the BIPM working group on nanometrology as one of five international comparisons in the field of dimensional nanometrology. Two high quality line scales, one made of Zerodur and one made of fused silica (quartz), with 280 mm main graduation length and additional smaller graduations of only a few mm were chosen as transfer standards. These scales were produced using advanced and optimized lithography and processing technologies by the Dr Johannes Heidenhain GmbH, Germany. A considerable number of characterizations of the graduations were performed in order to ensure an optimized line edge quality of the scales used in the comparison. Moreover, it was decided to have long gauge blocks manufactured out of the same piece of substrate material as was used for the scales. In this way, it was possible to independently determine important substrate material parameters like thermal expansion, compressibility and to investigate the long-term stability of the substrate materials. The Zerodur line scale standard revealed a small length reduction of about (-7 +/- 4)×10-8/a, which was confirmed by the measurements on the long gauge blocks. This length change of the Zerodur line scale could be taken into account for the comparison of participant's data by the application of a linear drift model. On the quartz samples and linescales no comparable effects were observed. The line scales were measured by 13 national metrology institutes from four different metrology regions. Two institutes decided to withdraw from Nano3 after the measurements were performed, but before Draft A was circulated. The measurement uncertainties that were evaluated by the participants over the 280 mm length of the graduations showed a variation from about 300 nm down to 30 nm. The good line

  8. SUPPLEMENTARY COMPARISON: EUROMET.L-S10 Comparison of squareness measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mokros, Jiri

    2005-01-01

    The idea of performing a comparison of squareness resulted from the need to review the MRA Appendix C, Category 90° square. At its meeting in October 1999 (in Prague) it was decided upon a first comparison of squareness measurements in the framework of EUROMET, numbered #570, starting in 2000, with the Slovak Institute of Metrology (SMU) as the pilot laboratory. During the preparation stage of the project, it was agreed that it should be submitted as a EUROMET supplementary comparison in the framework of the Mutual Recognition Arrangement (MRA) of the Metre Convention and would boost confidence in calibration and measurement certificates issued by the participating national metrology institutes. The aim of the comparison of squareness measurement was to compare and verify the declared calibration measurement capabilities of participating laboratories and to investigate the effect of systematic influences in the measurement process and their elimination. Eleven NMIs from the EUROMET region carried out this project. Two standards were calibrated: granite squareness standard of rectangular shape, cylindrical squareness standard of steel with marked positions for the profile lines. The following parameters had to be calibrated: granite squareness standard: interior angle γB between two lines AB and AC (envelope - LS regression) fitted through the measured profiles, and/or granite squareness standard: interior angle γLS between two LS regression lines AB and AC fitted through the measured profiles, cylindrical squareness standard: interior angles γ0°, γ90°, γ180°, γ270° between the LS regression line fitted through the measurement profiles at 0°, 90°, 180°, 270° and the envelope plane of the basis (resting on a surface plate), local LS straightness deviation for all measured profiles (2 and 4) of both standards. The results of the comparison are the deviations of profiles and angles measured by the individual NMIs from the reference values. These resulted

  9. Incorporating multiple interventions in meta-analysis: an evaluation of the mixed treatment comparison with the adjusted indirect comparison

    PubMed Central

    O'Regan, Christopher; Ghement, Isabella; Eyawo, Oghenowede; Guyatt, Gordon H; Mills, Edward J

    2009-01-01

    Background Comparing the effectiveness of interventions is now a requirement for regulatory approval in several countries. It also aids in clinical and public health decision-making. However, in the absence of head-to-head randomized trials (RCTs), determining the relative effectiveness of interventions is challenging. Several methodological options are now available. We aimed to determine the comparative validity of the adjusted indirect comparisons of RCTs with the mixed treatment comparison approach. Methods Using systematic searching, we identified all meta-analyses evaluating more than 3 interventions for a similar disease state with binary outcomes. We abstracted data on each clinical trial including population n and outcomes. We conducted fixed effects meta-analysis of each intervention versus mutual comparator and then applied the adjusted indirect comparison. We conducted a mixed treatment meta-analysis on all trials and compared the point estimates and 95% confidence/credible intervals (CIs/CrIs) to determine important differences. Results We included data from 7 reviews that met our inclusion criteria, allowing a total of 51 comparisons. According to the a priori consistency rule, we found 2 examples where the analytic comparisons were statistically significant using the mixed treatment comparison over the adjusted indirect comparisons and 1 example where this was vice versa. We found 6 examples where the direction of effect differed according to the indirect comparison method chosen and we found 9 examples where the confidence intervals were importantly different between approaches. Conclusion In most analyses, the adjusted indirect comparison yields estimates of relative effectiveness equal to the mixed treatment comparison. In less complex indirect comparisons, where all studies share a mutual comparator, both approaches yield similar benefits. As comparisons become more complex, the mixed treatment comparison may be favoured. PMID:19772573

  10. How Social Neuroscience Can Inform Theories of Social Comparison

    PubMed Central

    Swencionis, Jillian K.; Fiske, Susan T.

    2016-01-01

    Social comparison pervades our interactions with others, informing us of our standing and motivating improvement, but producing negative emotional and behavioral consequences that can harm relationships and lead to poor health outcomes. Social neuroscience research has begun to illuminate some mechanisms by which status divides lead to interpersonal consequences. This review integrates core findings on the neuroscience of social comparison processes, showing the effects of comparing the self to relevant others on dimensions of competence and warmth. The literature converges to suggest that relative status divides initiate social comparison processes, that upward and downward comparisons initiate pain- and pleasure- related neural responses, and that these responses can predict people's kindly or aggressive intentions toward one another. Across different types of comparisons, brain regions involved in mentalizing are also sometimes involved. Along with future work, the research reviewed here may inform efforts to mitigate negative outcomes of constant social comparisons. PMID:24486767

  11. Remote and Ground Truth Spectral Measurement Comparisons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abercromby, Kira Jorgensen; Hamada, Kris; Guyote, Michael; Okada, Jennifer; Barker, Edwin

    2007-01-01

    FORMOSAT III are a set of six research satellites from Taiwan that were launched in April 2006. The satellites are in 800 km, 71 degree inclination orbits and separated by 24 degrees in ascending node. Ground truth spectral measurements were taken of outer surface materials on FORMOSAT III. From those measurements, a computer model was built to predict the spectral reflectance, which included phase angle and orientation of the spacecraft relative to the observer. However, materials exposed to the space environment have exhibited spectral changes including a darkening and a reddening of the spectra. This reddening was seen as an increase in slope of the reflectance as the wavelength increases. Therefore, the model of pristine materials was augmented to include the space weathering effects. Remote data were collected on two of the six FORMOSAT satellites using the 1.6 meter telescope at AMOS (Air Force Maui Optical and Supercomputing) site with the Spica spectrometer. Due to the separation in ascending node, observations were made on whichever one of the six satellites was visible on that specific night. Three nights of data were collected using the red (6000 9500 angstroms) filter and two nights of data were collected using the blue (3200 -6600 angstroms) filter. A comparison of the data showed a good match to the pristine model for the blue filter region. The absorption feature near 5500 angstroms due to the copper colored Kapton multi-layer insulation (MLI) was very apparent in the remote samples and a good fit to the data was seen in both satellites observed. The features in the red filter regime agreed with the pristine model up through 7000 angstroms where the reddening begins and the slope of the remote sample increases. A comparison of the two satellites showed similar features in the red and blue filter regions, i.e. the satellites were aging at the same rate. A comparison of the pristine model to the first month of remote measurements showed the amount by

  12. A comparison of two psychiatric screening tests.

    PubMed

    Goldberg, D P; Rickels, K; Downing, R; Hesbacher, P

    1976-07-01

    A comparison is made between the General Health Questionnaire (GHQ) and the Symptom Checklist (SCL) as psychiatric screening tests in community-based research projects. Both are shown to correlate equally well with independent clinical assessment, and the differences between them mainly reside in the form of their response scales. The GHQ works best as a screening test, since it has fewer false positives associated with its use, but it may miss those with long-standing disorders. The SCL tends not to miss long-standing disorders and furnishes diagnostic sub-scales if these are required. Both tests function better with men than with women and with whites than with blacks, but neither is affected by social class or age of the respondent. The study revealed high correlations between the symptoms of anxiety and depression, and indicated some possible differences between the symptom clusters seen in whites and in blacks. PMID:938806

  13. Group comparisons: imaging the aging brain

    PubMed Central

    D’Esposito, Mark

    2008-01-01

    With the recent growth of functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI), scientists across a range of disciplines are comparing neural activity between groups of interest, such as healthy controls and clinical patients, children and young adults and younger and older adults. In this edition of Tools of the Trade, we will discuss why great caution must be taken when making group comparisons in studies using fMRI. Although many methodological contributions have been made in recent years, the suggestions for overcoming common issues are too often overlooked. This review focuses primarily on neuroimaging studies of healthy aging, but many of the issues raised apply to other group designs as well. PMID:18846241

  14. An agreement coefficient for image comparison

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ji, L.; Gallo, K.

    2006-01-01

    Combination of datasets acquired from different sensor systems is necessary to construct a long time-series dataset for remotely sensed land-surface variables. Assessment of the agreement of the data derived from various sources is an important issue in understanding the data continuity through the time-series. Some traditional measures, including correlation coefficient, coefficient of determination, mean absolute error, and root mean square error, are not always optimal for evaluating the data agreement. For this reason, we developed a new agreement coefficient for comparing two different images. The agreement coefficient has the following properties: non-dimensional, bounded, symmetric, and distinguishable between systematic and unsystematic differences. The paper provides examples of agreement analyses for hypothetical data and actual remotely sensed data. The results demonstrate that the agreement coefficient does include the above properties, and therefore is a useful tool for image comparison. ?? 2006 American Society for Photogrammetry and Remote Sensing.

  15. Insights from Human/Mouse genome comparisons

    SciTech Connect

    Pennacchio, Len A.

    2003-03-30

    Large-scale public genomic sequencing efforts have provided a wealth of vertebrate sequence data poised to provide insights into mammalian biology. These include deep genomic sequence coverage of human, mouse, rat, zebrafish, and two pufferfish (Fugu rubripes and Tetraodon nigroviridis) (Aparicio et al. 2002; Lander et al. 2001; Venter et al. 2001; Waterston et al. 2002). In addition, a high-priority has been placed on determining the genomic sequence of chimpanzee, dog, cow, frog, and chicken (Boguski 2002). While only recently available, whole genome sequence data have provided the unique opportunity to globally compare complete genome contents. Furthermore, the shared evolutionary ancestry of vertebrate species has allowed the development of comparative genomic approaches to identify ancient conserved sequences with functionality. Accordingly, this review focuses on the initial comparison of available mammalian genomes and describes various insights derived from such analysis.

  16. Objective comparison of particle tracking methods

    PubMed Central

    Chenouard, Nicolas; Smal, Ihor; de Chaumont, Fabrice; Maška, Martin; Sbalzarini, Ivo F.; Gong, Yuanhao; Cardinale, Janick; Carthel, Craig; Coraluppi, Stefano; Winter, Mark; Cohen, Andrew R.; Godinez, William J.; Rohr, Karl; Kalaidzidis, Yannis; Liang, Liang; Duncan, James; Shen, Hongying; Xu, Yingke; Magnusson, Klas E. G.; Jaldén, Joakim; Blau, Helen M.; Paul-Gilloteaux, Perrine; Roudot, Philippe; Kervrann, Charles; Waharte, François; Tinevez, Jean-Yves; Shorte, Spencer L.; Willemse, Joost; Celler, Katherine; van Wezel, Gilles P.; Dan, Han-Wei; Tsai, Yuh-Show; de Solórzano, Carlos Ortiz; Olivo-Marin, Jean-Christophe; Meijering, Erik

    2014-01-01

    Particle tracking is of key importance for quantitative analysis of intracellular dynamic processes from time-lapse microscopy image data. Since manually detecting and following large numbers of individual particles is not feasible, automated computational methods have been developed for these tasks by many groups. Aiming to perform an objective comparison of methods, we gathered the community and organized, for the first time, an open competition, in which participating teams applied their own methods independently to a commonly defined data set including diverse scenarios. Performance was assessed using commonly defined measures. Although no single method performed best across all scenarios, the results revealed clear differences between the various approaches, leading to important practical conclusions for users and developers. PMID:24441936

  17. Interlaboratory Comparison of Magnetic Thin Film Measurements.

    PubMed

    da Silva, F C S; Wang, C M; Pappas, D P

    2003-01-01

    A potential low magnetic moment standard reference material (SRM) was studied in an interlaboratory comparison. The mean and the standard deviation of the saturation moment m s, the remanent moment m r, and the intrinsic coercivity H c of nine samples were extracted from hysteresis-loop measurements. Samples were measured by thirteen laboratories using inductive-field loopers, vibrating-sample magnetometers, alternating-gradient force magnetometers, and superconducting quantum-interference-device magnetometers. NiFe films on Si substrates had saturation moment measurements reproduced within 5 % variation among the laboratories. The results show that a good candidate for an SRM must have a highly square hysteresis loop (m r/m s > 90 %), H c ≈ 400 A·m(-1) (5 Oe), and m s ≈ 2 × 10(-7) A·m(2) (2 × 10(-4) emu). PMID:27413599

  18. Interlaboratory Comparison of Magnetic Thin Film Measurements

    PubMed Central

    da Silva, F. C. S.; Wang, C. M.; Pappas, D. P.

    2003-01-01

    A potential low magnetic moment standard reference material (SRM) was studied in an interlaboratory comparison. The mean and the standard deviation of the saturation moment ms, the remanent moment mr, and the intrinsic coercivity Hc of nine samples were extracted from hysteresis-loop measurements. Samples were measured by thirteen laboratories using inductive-field loopers, vibrating-sample magnetometers, alternating-gradient force magnetometers, and superconducting quantum-interference-device magnetometers. NiFe films on Si substrates had saturation moment measurements reproduced within 5 % variation among the laboratories. The results show that a good candidate for an SRM must have a highly square hysteresis loop (mr/ms > 90 %), Hc ≈ 400 A·m−1 (5 Oe), and ms ≈ 2 × 10−7 A·m2 (2 × 10−4 emu). PMID:27413599

  19. Model Comparison for Electron Thermal Transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moses, Gregory; Chenhall, Jeffrey; Cao, Duc; Delettrez, Jacques

    2015-11-01

    Four electron thermal transport models are compared for their ability to accurately and efficiently model non-local behavior in ICF simulations. Goncharov's transport model has accurately predicted shock timing in implosion simulations but is computationally slow and limited to 1D. The iSNB (implicit Schurtz Nicolai Busquet electron thermal transport method of Cao et al. uses multigroup diffusion to speed up the calculation. Chenhall has expanded upon the iSNB diffusion model to a higher order simplified P3 approximation and a Monte Carlo transport model, to bridge the gap between the iSNB and Goncharov models while maintaining computational efficiency. Comparisons of the above models for several test problems will be presented. This work was supported by Sandia National Laboratory - Albuquerque and the University of Rochester Laboratory for Laser Energetics.

  20. Comparison between liposomal formulations of amphotericin B.

    PubMed

    Adler-Moore, Jill P; Gangneux, Jean-Pierre; Pappas, Peter G

    2016-03-01

    Given the clinical success of commercial amphotericin B lipid products, investigators have begun making generic formulations of liposomal amphotericin B. Generic medicines are an attractive approach to help decrease the cost and accessibility to healthcare, provided that appropriate studies are performed to ensure bioequivalence with the parent product. This is of particular concern for liposomal drugs such as amphotericin B where liposomes are used as a carrier system to reduce the toxicity of the active agent. A favorable therapeutic profile for this form of the drug has to include the proper chemical composition along with strictly controlled manufacturing processes. Studies have shown that a comparison of liposomal amphotericin B products with different or the same chemical compositions, using different methods of production, will vary in size, and have significantly dissimilar in vitro and in vivo toxicities along with reduced efficacy. These results underscore the importance of establishing appropriate bioequivalence testing for liposome products to ensure uniformity of their therapeutic index. PMID:26768369

  1. Adaptive seeds tame genomic sequence comparison.

    PubMed

    Kiełbasa, Szymon M; Wan, Raymond; Sato, Kengo; Horton, Paul; Frith, Martin C

    2011-03-01

    The main way of analyzing biological sequences is by comparing and aligning them to each other. It remains difficult, however, to compare modern multi-billionbase DNA data sets. The difficulty is caused by the nonuniform (oligo)nucleotide composition of these sequences, rather than their size per se. To solve this problem, we modified the standard seed-and-extend approach (e.g., BLAST) to use adaptive seeds. Adaptive seeds are matches that are chosen based on their rareness, instead of using fixed-length matches. This method guarantees that the number of matches, and thus the running time, increases linearly, instead of quadratically, with sequence length. LAST, our open source implementation of adaptive seeds, enables fast and sensitive comparison of large sequences with arbitrarily nonuniform composition. PMID:21209072

  2. Quality of life: an international comparison

    SciTech Connect

    Hopkinson, J.; Anderson, C.F.; Liu, B.C.

    1980-04-01

    Dissatisfaction with gross national product (GNP) as a realistic yardstick for comparing the well-being of societies has led to a quality of life (QOL) concept which considers the environment in which people live. QOL includes both the economic and noneconomic factors affecting an individual's happiness. An international comparison of energy, GNP, and QOL in 50 countries considers five major categories (social, economic, health and education, environmental, and national vitality and security) and 12 subcategories. The study indicates that substantial increases in energy consumption will be needed to raise the living standards of developing countries. QOL appears to decline beyond a certain level of GNP, while continuing a direct relationship to per capita energy consumption and electricity production. 12 references. (DCK)

  3. GCSS Idealized Cirrus Model Comparison Project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Starr, David OC.; Benedetti, Angela; Boehm, Matt; Brown, Philip R. A.; Gierens, Klaus; Girard, Eric; Giraud, Vincent; Jakob, Christian; Jensen, Eric; Khvorostyanov, Vitaly; Einaudi, Franco (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    The GCSS Working Group on Cirrus Cloud Systems (WG2) is conducting a systematic comparison and evaluation of cirrus cloud models. This fundamental activity seeks to support the improvement of models used for climate simulation and numerical weather prediction through assessment and improvement of the "process" models underlying parametric treatments of cirrus cloud processes in large-scale models. The WG2 Idealized Cirrus Model Comparison Project is an initial comparison of cirrus cloud simulations by a variety of cloud models for a series of idealized situations with relatively simple initial conditions and forcing. The models (16) represent the state-of-the-art and include 3-dimensional large eddy simulation (LES) models, two-dimensional cloud resolving models (CRMs), and single column model (SCM) versions of GCMs. The model microphysical components are similarly varied, ranging from single-moment bulk (relative humidity) schemes to fully size-resolved (bin) treatments where ice crystal growth is explicitly calculated. Radiative processes are included in the physics package of each model. The baseline simulations include "warm" and "cold" cirrus cases where cloud top initially occurs at about -47C and -66C, respectively. All simulations are for nighttime conditions (no solar radiation) where the cloud is generated in an ice supersaturated layer, about 1 km in depth, with an ice pseudoadiabatic thermal stratification (neutral). Continuing cloud formation is forced via an imposed diabatic cooling representing a 3 cm/s uplift over a 4-hour time span followed by a 2-hour dissipation stage with no cooling. Variations of these baseline cases include no-radiation and stable-thermal-stratification cases. Preliminary results indicated the great importance of ice crystal fallout in determining even the gross cloud characteristics, such as average vertically-integrated ice water path (IWP). Significant inter-model differences were found. Ice water fall speed is directly

  4. Comparison Measurements of Silicon Carbide Temperature Monitors

    SciTech Connect

    J. L. Rempe; K. G. Condie; D. L. Knudson; L. L. Snead

    2010-06-01

    As part of the efforts initiated through the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) National Scientific User Facility (NSUF) program to make Silicon Carbide (SiC) temperature monitors available, a capability was developed at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) to complete post-irradiation evaluations of these monitors. INL selected the resistance measurement approach for detecting peak irradiation temperature from SiC temperature monitors. To demonstrate this new capability, comparison measurements were completed by INL and Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) on identical samples subjected to identical irradiation conditions. Results reported in this paper indicate that the resistance measurement approach can yield similar peak irradiation temperatures if appropriate equipment is used and appropriate procedures are followed.

  5. Critical comparison of 3D imaging approaches

    SciTech Connect

    Bennett, C L

    1999-06-03

    Currently three imaging spectrometer architectures, tunable filter, dispersive, and Fourier transform, are viable for imaging the universe in three dimensions. There are domains of greatest utility for each of these architectures. The optimum choice among the various alternative architectures is dependent on the nature of the desired observations, the maturity of the relevant technology, and the character of the backgrounds. The domain appropriate for each of the alternatives is delineated; both for instruments having ideal performance as well as for instrumentation based on currently available technology. The environment and science objectives for the Next Generation Space Telescope will be used as a specific representative case to provide a basis for comparison of the various alternatives.

  6. Comparison of select reference management tools.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yingting

    2012-01-01

    Bibliographic management tools have been widely used by researchers to store, organize, and manage their references for research papers, theses, dissertations, journal articles, and other publications. There are a number of reference management tools available. In order for users to decide which tool is best for their needs, it is important to know each tool's strengths and weaknesses. This article compares four reference management tools, one of which is licensed by University of Medicine and Dentistry of New Jersey libraries and the other three are open source and freely available. They were chosen based on their functionality, ease of use, availability to library users, and popularity. These four tools are EndNote/EndNote Web, Zotero, Connotea, and Mendeley Desktop/Mendeley Web. Each tool is analyzed in terms of the following features: accessing, collecting, organizing, collaborating, and citing/formatting. A comparison table is included to summarize the key features of these tools. PMID:22289095

  7. Poultry litter toxicity comparison from various bioassays

    SciTech Connect

    Gupta, G.; Kelly, P. )

    1992-01-01

    Poultry litter contains many toxic chemicals including Cu, As, Pb, Cd, Hg, Se and PCBs. Poultry litter leachate has been shown to be more toxic to marine luminescent organisms (Photobacterium phosphoreum) than other farm animal manures. A comparison of toxicity of the poultry litter leachate was undertaken using various bioassays. The EC{sub 50} (or LC{sub 50}) value for the leachate with the Microtox and Daphnia bioassays was 2.9 g/L/ Nitrobacter and Pseudomonas bioassays were not useful in determining the leachate toxicity because of the nutritional properties of the litter. Poultry litter leachate was found to be mutagenic to strains TA 97, TA 98, TA 100 and TA 102 using the Ames Test.

  8. Objective comparison of particle tracking methods.

    PubMed

    Chenouard, Nicolas; Smal, Ihor; de Chaumont, Fabrice; Maška, Martin; Sbalzarini, Ivo F; Gong, Yuanhao; Cardinale, Janick; Carthel, Craig; Coraluppi, Stefano; Winter, Mark; Cohen, Andrew R; Godinez, William J; Rohr, Karl; Kalaidzidis, Yannis; Liang, Liang; Duncan, James; Shen, Hongying; Xu, Yingke; Magnusson, Klas E G; Jaldén, Joakim; Blau, Helen M; Paul-Gilloteaux, Perrine; Roudot, Philippe; Kervrann, Charles; Waharte, François; Tinevez, Jean-Yves; Shorte, Spencer L; Willemse, Joost; Celler, Katherine; van Wezel, Gilles P; Dan, Han-Wei; Tsai, Yuh-Show; Ortiz de Solórzano, Carlos; Olivo-Marin, Jean-Christophe; Meijering, Erik

    2014-03-01

    Particle tracking is of key importance for quantitative analysis of intracellular dynamic processes from time-lapse microscopy image data. Because manually detecting and following large numbers of individual particles is not feasible, automated computational methods have been developed for these tasks by many groups. Aiming to perform an objective comparison of methods, we gathered the community and organized an open competition in which participating teams applied their own methods independently to a commonly defined data set including diverse scenarios. Performance was assessed using commonly defined measures. Although no single method performed best across all scenarios, the results revealed clear differences between the various approaches, leading to notable practical conclusions for users and developers. PMID:24441936

  9. Comparison of Recent Total Irradiance Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Helizon, R.; Pap, J.

    2002-12-01

    Total solar irradiance has been measured since 1978 from various satellites. Since the absolute accuracy of the current irradiance measurements is about 0.2%, one needs to compile composite irradiance time series to study long-term changes and to establish whether there are any secular variations over the last two and half decades. In this paper we compare the UARS/ACRIM II and SOHO/VIRGO total irradiance data as well as the SOHO/VIRGO and ACRIM III total irradiance. Our main goal is to validate the newly processed ACRIM II total irradiance. Comparison of the SOHO/VIRGO and ACRIM III data will also help to establish whether the high total irradiance values for the maximum of solar cycle 23 represent real solar, rather than, instrumental events.

  10. Comparison of historical documents for writership

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ball, Gregory R.; Pu, Danjun; Stritmatter, Roger; Srihari, Sargur N.

    2010-01-01

    Over the last century forensic document science has developed progressively more sophisticated pattern recognition methodologies for ascertaining the authorship of disputed documents. These include advances not only in computer assisted stylometrics, but forensic handwriting analysis. We present a writer verification method and an evaluation of an actual historical document written by an unknown writer. The questioned document is compared against two known handwriting samples of Herman Melville, a 19th century American author who has been hypothesized to be the writer of this document. The comparison led to a high confidence result that the questioned document was written by the same writer as the known documents. Such methodology can be applied to many such questioned documents in historical writing, both in literary and legal fields.