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Sample records for chloroplast differentiation annual

  1. Nitrogen control of chloroplast differentiation. Annual progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Schmidt, G.W.

    1992-07-01

    This project is directed toward understanding how the availability of nitrogen affects the accumulation of chloroplast pigments and proteins functioning in energy transduction and carbon metabolism. Molecular analyses performed with Chlamydomonas reinhardtii grown in a continuous culture system such that ammonium concentration is maintained at a low steady-state concentration so as to limit cell division. As compared to chloroplasts from cells of non-limiting nitrogen provisions, chloroplasts of N-limited cells are profoundly chlorophyll-deficient but still assimilate carbon for deposition of as starch and as storage lipids. Chlorophyll deficiency arises by limiting accumulation of appropriate nuclear-encoded mRNAs of and by depressed rates of translation of chloroplast mRNAs for apoproteins of reaction centers. Chloroplast translational effects can be partially ascribed to diminished rates of chlorophyll biosynthesis in N-limited cells, but pigment levels are not determinants for expression of the nuclear light-harvesting protein genes. Consequently, other signals that are responsive to nitrogen availability mediate transcriptional or post-transcriptional processes for accumulation of the mRNAs for LHC apoproteins and other mRNAs whose abundance is dependent upon high nitrogen levels. Conversely, limited nitrogen availability promotes accumulation of other proteins involved in carbon metabolism and oxidative electron transport in chloroplasts. Hence, thylakoids of N-limited cells exhibit enhanced chlororespiratory activities wherein oxygen serves as the electron acceptor in a pathway that involves plastoquinone and other electron carrier proteins that remain to be thoroughly characterized. Ongoing and future studies are also outlined.

  2. Nitrogen control of chloroplast development and differentiation. Annual progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Schmidt, G.W.

    1991-12-01

    The growth and development of plants and photosynthetic microorganisms is commonly limited by the availability of nitrogen. Our work concerns understanding the mechanisms by which plants and algae that are subjected to nitrogen deprivation alter the composition of photosynthetic membranes and enzymes involved in photosynthetic carbon metabolism. Toward these ends, we study biosynthetic and gene expression processes in the unicellular green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii which is grown in an ammonium-limited continuous culture system. We have found that the expression of nuclear genes, including those encoding for light-harvesting proteins, are severely repressed in nitrogen-limited cells whereas, in general, chloroplast protein synthesis is attenuated primarily at the level of mRNA translation. Conversely, nitrogen deprivation appears to lead to enhanced synthesis of enzymes that are involved in starch and storage lipid deposition. In addition, as a possible means by which photosynthetic electron transport activities and ATP synthesis is sustained during chronic periods of nitrogen deprivation, thylakoid membranes become enriched with components for chlororespiration. Characterization of the chlororespiratory electron transport constituents, including cytochrome complexes and NAD(P)H dehydrogenase is a major current effort. Also, we are striving to isolate the genes encoding chlororespiration proteins toward determining how they and others that are strongly responsive to nutrient availability are regulated.

  3. Dynamics of Chloroplast Translation during Chloroplast Differentiation in Maize

    PubMed Central

    Chotewutmontri, Prakitchai; Barkan, Alice

    2016-01-01

    Chloroplast genomes in land plants contain approximately 100 genes, the majority of which reside in polycistronic transcription units derived from cyanobacterial operons. The expression of chloroplast genes is integrated into developmental programs underlying the differentiation of photosynthetic cells from non-photosynthetic progenitors. In C4 plants, the partitioning of photosynthesis between two cell types, bundle sheath and mesophyll, adds an additional layer of complexity. We used ribosome profiling and RNA-seq to generate a comprehensive description of chloroplast gene expression at four stages of chloroplast differentiation, as displayed along the maize seedling leaf blade. The rate of protein output of most genes increases early in development and declines once the photosynthetic apparatus is mature. The developmental dynamics of protein output fall into several patterns. Programmed changes in mRNA abundance make a strong contribution to the developmental shifts in protein output, but output is further adjusted by changes in translational efficiency. RNAs with prioritized translation early in development are largely involved in chloroplast gene expression, whereas those with prioritized translation in photosynthetic tissues are generally involved in photosynthesis. Differential gene expression in bundle sheath and mesophyll chloroplasts results primarily from differences in mRNA abundance, but differences in translational efficiency amplify mRNA-level effects in some instances. In most cases, rates of protein output approximate steady-state protein stoichiometries, implying a limited role for proteolysis in eliminating unassembled or damaged proteins under non-stress conditions. Tuned protein output results from gene-specific trade-offs between translational efficiency and mRNA abundance, both of which span a large dynamic range. Analysis of ribosome footprints at sites of RNA editing showed that the chloroplast translation machinery does not generally

  4. Nitrogen control of chloroplast differentiation

    SciTech Connect

    Schmidt, G.W.

    1992-07-01

    This project is directed toward understanding how the availability of nitrogen affects the accumulation of chloroplast pigments and proteins functioning in energy transduction and carbon metabolism. Molecular analyses performed with Chlamydomonas reinhardtii grown in a continuous culture system such that ammonium concentration is maintained at a low steady-state concentration so as to limit cell division. As compared to chloroplasts from cells of non-limiting nitrogen provisions, chloroplasts of N-limited cells are profoundly chlorophyll-deficient but still assimilate carbon for deposition of as starch and as storage lipids. Chlorophyll deficiency arises by limiting accumulation of appropriate nuclear-encoded mRNAs of and by depressed rates of translation of chloroplast mRNAs for apoproteins of reaction centers. Chloroplast translational effects can be partially ascribed to diminished rates of chlorophyll biosynthesis in N-limited cells, but pigment levels are not determinants for expression of the nuclear light-harvesting protein genes. Consequently, other signals that are responsive to nitrogen availability mediate transcriptional or post-transcriptional processes for accumulation of the mRNAs for LHC apoproteins and other mRNAs whose abundance is dependent upon high nitrogen levels. Conversely, limited nitrogen availability promotes accumulation of other proteins involved in carbon metabolism and oxidative electron transport in chloroplasts. Hence, thylakoids of N-limited cells exhibit enhanced chlororespiratory activities wherein oxygen serves as the electron acceptor in a pathway that involves plastoquinone and other electron carrier proteins that remain to be thoroughly characterized. Ongoing and future studies are also outlined.

  5. Nitrogen control of chloroplast differentiation. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Schmidt, G.W.

    1998-05-01

    This project was directed toward understanding at the physiological, biochemical and molecular levels of how photosynthetic organisms adapt to long-term nitrogen-deficiency conditions is quite incomplete even though limitation of this nutrient is the most commonly restricts plant growth and development. For our work on this problem, the unicellular green alga, Chlamydomonas reinhardtii, was grown in continuous cultures in which steady-state levels of nitrogen can be precisely controlled. N-limited cells exhibit the classical symptoms of deficiency of this nutrient, chlorosis and slow growth rates, and respond to nitrogen provision by rapid greening and chloroplast differentiation. We have addressed three aspects of this problem: (1) the regulation of pigment synthesis; (2) control of expression of nuclear genes encoding photosynthetic proteins; (3) changes in metabolic and electron transport pathways that enable sustained CO{sub 2} fixation even though they cannot be readily converted into amino and nucleic acids. For the last, principle components are: (a) enhanced mitochondrial respiratory activity intimately associated with photosynthates, and (b) the occurrence in thylakoids of a supplemental electron transport pathway that facilitates reduction of the plastoquinone pool. Together, these distinguishing features of N-limited cells are likely to enable cell survival, especially under conditions of high irradiance stress.

  6. Nitrogen control of chloroplast development and differentiation

    SciTech Connect

    Schmidt, G.W.

    1991-12-01

    The growth and development of plants and photosynthetic microorganisms is commonly limited by the availability of nitrogen. Our work concerns understanding the mechanisms by which plants and algae that are subjected to nitrogen deprivation alter the composition of photosynthetic membranes and enzymes involved in photosynthetic carbon metabolism. Toward these ends, we study biosynthetic and gene expression processes in the unicellular green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii which is grown in an ammonium-limited continuous culture system. We have found that the expression of nuclear genes, including those encoding for light-harvesting proteins, are severely repressed in nitrogen-limited cells whereas, in general, chloroplast protein synthesis is attenuated primarily at the level of mRNA translation. Conversely, nitrogen deprivation appears to lead to enhanced synthesis of enzymes that are involved in starch and storage lipid deposition. In addition, as a possible means by which photosynthetic electron transport activities and ATP synthesis is sustained during chronic periods of nitrogen deprivation, thylakoid membranes become enriched with components for chlororespiration. Characterization of the chlororespiratory electron transport constituents, including cytochrome complexes and NAD(P)H dehydrogenase is a major current effort. Also, we are striving to isolate the genes encoding chlororespiration proteins toward determining how they and others that are strongly responsive to nutrient availability are regulated.

  7. The PLASTID DIVISION1 and 2 Components of the Chloroplast Division Machinery Determine the Rate of Chloroplast Division in Land Plant Cell Differentiation[C][W

    PubMed Central

    Okazaki, Kumiko; Kabeya, Yukihiro; Suzuki, Kenji; Mori, Toshiyuki; Ichikawa, Takanari; Matsui, Minami; Nakanishi, Hiromitsu; Miyagishima, Shin-ya

    2009-01-01

    In most algae, the chloroplast division rate is held constant to maintain the proper number of chloroplasts per cell. By contrast, land plants evolved cell and chloroplast differentiation systems in which the size and number of chloroplasts change along with their respective cellular function by regulation of the division rate. Here, we show that PLASTID DIVISION (PDV) proteins, land plant–specific components of the division apparatus, determine the rate of chloroplast division. Overexpression of PDV proteins in the angiosperm Arabidopsis thaliana and the moss Physcomitrella patens increased the number but decreased the size of chloroplasts; reduction of PDV levels resulted in the opposite effect. The level of PDV proteins, but not other division components, decreased during leaf development, during which the chloroplast division rate also decreased. Exogenous cytokinins or overexpression of the cytokinin-responsive transcription factor CYTOKININ RESPONSE FACTOR2 increased the chloroplast division rate, where PDV proteins, but not other components of the division apparatus, were upregulated. These results suggest that the integration of PDV proteins into the division machinery enabled land plant cells to change chloroplast size and number in accord with the fate of cell differentiation. PMID:19567705

  8. Functional Differentiation of Bundle Sheath and Mesophyll Maize Chloroplasts Determined by Comparative ProteomicsW⃞

    PubMed Central

    Majeran, Wojciech; Cai, Yang; Sun, Qi; van Wijk, Klaas J.

    2005-01-01

    Chloroplasts of maize (Zea mays) leaves differentiate into specific bundle sheath (BS) and mesophyll (M) types to accommodate C4 photosynthesis. Consequences for other plastid functions are not well understood but are addressed here through a quantitative comparative proteome analysis of purified M and BS chloroplast stroma. Three independent techniques were used, including cleavable stable isotope coded affinity tags. Enzymes involved in lipid biosynthesis, nitrogen import, and tetrapyrrole and isoprenoid biosynthesis are preferentially located in the M chloroplasts. By contrast, enzymes involved in starch synthesis and sulfur import preferentially accumulate in BS chloroplasts. The different soluble antioxidative systems, in particular peroxiredoxins, accumulate at higher levels in M chloroplasts. We also observed differential accumulation of proteins involved in expression of plastid-encoded proteins (e.g., EF-Tu, EF-G, and mRNA binding proteins) and thylakoid formation (VIPP1), whereas others were equally distributed. Enzymes related to the C4 shuttle, the carboxylation and regeneration phase of the Calvin cycle, and several regulators (e.g., CP12) distributed as expected. However, enzymes involved in triose phosphate reduction and triose phosphate isomerase are primarily located in the M chloroplasts, indicating that the M-localized triose phosphate shuttle should be viewed as part of the BS-localized Calvin cycle, rather than a parallel pathway. PMID:16243905

  9. Maintenance of Chloroplast Components during Chromoplast Differentiation in the Tomato Mutant Green Flesh.

    PubMed Central

    Cheung, A. Y.; McNellis, T.; Piekos, B.

    1993-01-01

    ripened either in the dark or in the light. These results suggest that the lesion in gf may alleviate conditions associated with chloroplast deterioration during the chloroplast-chromoplast transition in tomato ripening but has no direct effect on chromoplast differentiation per se. The ultrastructure of gf provides unequivocal evidence that, in ripening tomato, chromoplasts indeed differentiate from preexisting chloroplasts; on the other hand, chromoplast differentiation in the dark-matured and -ripened tomato fruits indicates that chromoplast development can be a process entirely independent of the chloroplasts. PMID:12231777

  10. Differential positioning of C(4) mesophyll and bundle sheath chloroplasts: recovery of chloroplast positioning requires the actomyosin system.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, Hiroaki; Yamada, Masahiro; Taniguchi, Mitsutaka; Kawasaki, Michio; Sugiyama, Tatsuo; Miyake, Hiroshi

    2009-01-01

    In C(4) plants, bundle sheath (BS) chloroplasts are arranged in the centripetal position or in the centrifugal position, although mesophyll (M) chloroplasts are evenly distributed along cell membranes. To examine the molecular mechanism for the intracellular disposition of these chloroplasts, we observed the distribution of actin filaments in BS and M cells of the C(4) plants finger millet (Eleusine coracana) and maize (Zea mays) using immunofluorescence. Fine actin filaments encircled chloroplasts in both cell types, and an actin network was observed adjacent to plasma membranes. The intracellular disposition of both chloroplasts in finger millet was disrupted by centrifugal force but recovered within 2 h in the dark. Actin filaments remained associated with chloroplasts during recovery. We also examined the effects of inhibitors on the rearrangement of chloroplasts. Inhibitors of actin polymerization, myosin-based activities and cytosolic protein synthesis blocked migration of chloroplasts. In contrast, a microtubule-depolymerizing drug had no effect. These results show that C(4) plants possess a mechanism for keeping chloroplasts in the home position which is dependent on the actomyosin system and cytosolic protein synthesis but not tubulin or light. PMID:19022806

  11. Exploring mechanisms linked to differentiation and function of dimorphic chloroplasts in the single cell C4 species Bienertia sinuspersici

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background In the model single-cell C4 plant Bienertia sinuspersici, chloroplast- and nuclear-encoded photosynthetic enzymes, characteristically confined to either bundle sheath or mesophyll cells in Kranz-type C4 leaves, all occur together within individual leaf chlorenchyma cells. Intracellular separation of dimorphic chloroplasts and key enzymes within central and peripheral compartments allow for C4 carbon fixation analogous to NAD-malic enzyme (NAD-ME) Kranz type species. Several methods were used to investigate dimorphic chloroplast differentiation in B. sinuspersici. Results Confocal analysis revealed that Rubisco-containing chloroplasts in the central compartment chloroplasts (CCC) contained more photosystem II proteins than the peripheral compartment chloroplasts (PCC) which contain pyruvate,Pi dikinase (PPDK), a pattern analogous to the cell type-specific chloroplasts of many Kranz type NAD-ME species. Transient expression analysis using GFP fusion constructs containing various lengths of a B. sinuspersici Rubisco small subunit (RbcS) gene and the transit peptide of PPDK revealed that their import was not specific to either chloroplast type. Immunolocalization showed the rbcL-specific mRNA binding protein RLSB to be selectively localized to the CCC in B. sinuspersici, and to Rubisco-containing BS chloroplasts in the closely related Kranz species Suaeda taxifolia. Comparative fluorescence analyses were made using redox-sensitive and insensitive GFP forms, as well comparative staining using the peroxidase indicator 3,3-diaminobenzidine (DAB), which demonstrated differences in stromal redox potential, with the CCC having a more negative potential than the PCC. Conclusions Both CCC RLSB localization and the differential chloroplast redox state are suggested to have a role in post-transcriptional rbcL expression. PMID:24443986

  12. Consequences of C4 Differentiation for Chloroplast Membrane Proteomes in Maize Mesophyll and Bundle Sheath Cells *S⃞

    PubMed Central

    Majeran, Wojciech; Zybailov, Boris; Ytterberg, A. Jimmy; Dunsmore, Jason; Sun, Qi; van Wijk, Klaas J.

    2008-01-01

    Chloroplasts of maize leaves differentiate into specific bundle sheath (BS) and mesophyll (M) types to accommodate C4 photosynthesis. Chloroplasts contain thylakoid and envelope membranes that contain the photosynthetic machineries and transporters but also proteins involved in e.g. protein homeostasis. These chloroplast membranes must be specialized within each cell type to accommodate C4 photosynthesis and regulate metabolic fluxes and activities. This quantitative study determined the differentiated state of BS and M chloroplast thylakoid and envelope membrane proteomes and their oligomeric states using innovative gel-based and mass spectrometry-based protein quantifications. This included native gels, iTRAQ, and label-free quantification using an LTQ-Orbitrap. Subunits of Photosystems I and II, the cytochrome b6f, and ATP synthase complexes showed average BS/M accumulation ratios of 1.6, 0.45, 1.0, and 1.33, respectively, whereas ratios for the light-harvesting complex I and II families were 1.72 and 0.68, respectively. A 1000-kDa BS-specific NAD(P)H dehydrogenase complex with associated proteins of unknown function containing more than 15 proteins was observed; we speculate that this novel complex possibly functions in inorganic carbon concentration when carboxylation rates by ribulose-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase are lower than decarboxylation rates by malic enzyme. Differential accumulation of thylakoid proteases (Egy and DegP), state transition kinases (STN7,8), and Photosystem I and II assembly factors was observed, suggesting that cell-specific photosynthetic electron transport depends on post-translational regulatory mechanisms. BS/M ratios for inner envelope transporters phosphoenolpyruvate/Pi translocator, Dit1, Dit2, and Mex1 were determined and reflect metabolic fluxes in carbon metabolism. A wide variety of hundreds of other proteins showed differential BS/M accumulation. Mass spectral information and functional annotations are available

  13. Phosphoinositides Play Differential Roles in Regulating Phototropin1- and Phototropin2-Mediated Chloroplast Movements in Arabidopsis

    PubMed Central

    Aggarwal, Chhavi; Łabuz, Justyna; Gabryś, Halina

    2013-01-01

    Phototropins are UVA/blue-light receptors involved in controlling the light-dependent physiological responses which serve to optimize the photosynthetic activity of plants and promote growth. The phototropin-induced phosphoinositide (PI) metabolism has been shown to be essential for stomatal opening and phototropism. However, the role of PIs in phototropin-induced chloroplast movements remains poorly understood. The aim of this work is to determine which PI species are involved in the control of chloroplast movements in Arabidopsis and the nature of their involvement. We present the effects of the inactivation of phospholipase C (PLC), PI3-kinase (PI3K) and PI4-kinase (PI4K) on chloroplast relocations in Arabidopsis. The inhibition of the phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphospahte [PI(4,5)P2]-PLC pathway, using neomycin and U73122, suppressed the phot2-mediated chloroplast accumulation and avoidance responses, without affecting movement responses controlled by phot1. On the other hand, PI3K and PI4K activities are more restricted to phot1- and phot2-induced weak-light responses. The inactivation of PI3K and PI4K by wortmannin and LY294002 severely affected the weak blue-light-activated accumulation response but had little effect on the strong blue-light-activated avoidance response. The inhibitory effect observed with PI metabolism inhibitors is, at least partly, due to a disturbance in Ca2+(c) signaling. Using the transgenic aequorin system, we show that the application of these inhibitors suppresses the blue-light-induced transient Ca2+(c) rise. These results demonstrate the importance of PIs in chloroplast movements, with the PI(4,5)P2-PLC pathway involved in phot2 signaling while PI3K and PI4K are required for the phot1- and phot2-induced accumulation response. Our results suggest that these PIs modulate cytosolic Ca2+ signaling during movements. PMID:23405144

  14. Differential Subplastidial Localization and Turnover of Enzymes Involved in Isoprenoid Biosynthesis in Chloroplasts

    PubMed Central

    Perello, Catalina; Llamas, Ernesto; Burlat, Vincent; Ortiz-Alcaide, Miriam; Phillips, Michael A.; Pulido, Pablo; Rodriguez-Concepcion, Manuel

    2016-01-01

    Plastidial isoprenoids are a diverse group of metabolites with roles in photosynthesis, growth regulation, and interaction with the environment. The methylerythritol 4-phosphate (MEP) pathway produces the metabolic precursors of all types of plastidial isoprenoids. Proteomics studies in Arabidopsis thaliana have shown that all the enzymes of the MEP pathway are localized in the plastid stroma. However, immunoblot analysis of chloroplast subfractions showed that the first two enzymes of the pathway, deoxyxylulose 5-phosphate synthase (DXS) and reductoisomerase (DXR), can also be found in non-stromal fractions. Both transient and stable expression of GFP-tagged DXS and DXR proteins confirmed the presence of the fusion proteins in distinct subplastidial compartments. In particular, DXR-GFP was found to accumulate in relatively large vesicles that could eventually be released from chloroplasts, presumably to be degraded by an autophagy-independent process. Together, we propose that protein-specific mechanisms control the localization and turnover of the first two enzymes of the MEP pathway in Arabidopsis chloroplasts. PMID:26919668

  15. Differential Subplastidial Localization and Turnover of Enzymes Involved in Isoprenoid Biosynthesis in Chloroplasts.

    PubMed

    Perello, Catalina; Llamas, Ernesto; Burlat, Vincent; Ortiz-Alcaide, Miriam; Phillips, Michael A; Pulido, Pablo; Rodriguez-Concepcion, Manuel

    2016-01-01

    Plastidial isoprenoids are a diverse group of metabolites with roles in photosynthesis, growth regulation, and interaction with the environment. The methylerythritol 4-phosphate (MEP) pathway produces the metabolic precursors of all types of plastidial isoprenoids. Proteomics studies in Arabidopsis thaliana have shown that all the enzymes of the MEP pathway are localized in the plastid stroma. However, immunoblot analysis of chloroplast subfractions showed that the first two enzymes of the pathway, deoxyxylulose 5-phosphate synthase (DXS) and reductoisomerase (DXR), can also be found in non-stromal fractions. Both transient and stable expression of GFP-tagged DXS and DXR proteins confirmed the presence of the fusion proteins in distinct subplastidial compartments. In particular, DXR-GFP was found to accumulate in relatively large vesicles that could eventually be released from chloroplasts, presumably to be degraded by an autophagy-independent process. Together, we propose that protein-specific mechanisms control the localization and turnover of the first two enzymes of the MEP pathway in Arabidopsis chloroplasts. PMID:26919668

  16. Transposon-induced nuclear mutations that alter chloroplast gene expression. Annual report, September 1, 1991--August 31, 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Barkan, A.

    1992-12-31

    The goal of this project is to use mutant phenotypes as a guide to nuclear genes that determine the timing and localization of chloroplast development The immediate goals are to identify nuclear mutants with defects in chloroplast gene expression from maize lines harboring active Mu transposons; characterize their phenotypes to determine the precise defect in gene expression; clone several of the most interesting mutations by exploiting the transposon tag; and use the clones to further define the roles of these genes in modulating chloroplast gene expression. Three mutants were described earlier that had global defects in chloroplast gene expression. We have found that two of these mutations are allelic. Both alleles have global defects in chloroplast translation initiation, as revealed by the failure to assemble chloroplast mRNAs into polysomes. We have isolated and characterized three new mutants from Mu lines that have novel defects in chloroplast RNA metabolism. We are now ready to begin the task of cloning several of these genes, by using the Mu transposon tag.

  17. Genetic diversity and differentiation in Prunus species (Rosaceae) using chloroplast and mitochondrial DNA CAPS markers.

    PubMed

    Ben Mustapha, S; Ben Tamarzizt, H; Baraket, G; Abdallah, D; Salhi Hannachi, A

    2015-01-01

    Chloroplast (cpDNA) and mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) were analyzed to establish genetic relationships among Tunisian plum cultivars using the polymerase chain reaction restriction fragment length polymorphism (PCR-RFLP) technique. Two mtDNA regions (nad 1 b/c and nad 4 1/2) and a cpDNA region (trnL-trnF) were amplified and digested using restriction enzymes. Seventy and six polymorphic sites were revealed in cpDNA and mtDNA, respectively. As a consequence, cpDNA appears to be more polymorphic than mtDNA. The unweighted pair group method with arithmetic mean (UPGMA) dendrogram showed that accessions were distributed independently of their geographical origin, and introduced and local cultivars appear to be closely related. Both UPGMA and principal component analysis grouped Tunisian plum accessions into similar clusters. The analysis of the pooled sequences allowed the detection of 17 chlorotypes and 12 mitotypes. The unique haplotypes detected for cultivars are valuable for management and preservation of the plum local resources. From this study, PCR-RFLP analysis appears to be a useful approach to detect and identify cytoplasmic variation in plum trees. Our results also provide useful information for the management of genetic resources and to establish a program to improve the genetic resources available for plums. PMID:25966190

  18. Plastid Transcriptomics and Translatomics of Tomato Fruit Development and Chloroplast-to-Chromoplast Differentiation: Chromoplast Gene Expression Largely Serves the Production of a Single Protein[W][OA

    PubMed Central

    Kahlau, Sabine; Bock, Ralph

    2008-01-01

    Plastid genes are expressed at high levels in photosynthetically active chloroplasts but are generally believed to be drastically downregulated in nongreen plastids. The genome-wide changes in the expression patterns of plastid genes during the development of nongreen plastid types as well as the contributions of transcriptional versus translational regulation are largely unknown. We report here a systematic transcriptomics and translatomics analysis of the tomato (Solanum lycopersicum) plastid genome during fruit development and chloroplast-to-chromoplast conversion. At the level of RNA accumulation, most but not all plastid genes are strongly downregulated in fruits compared with leaves. By contrast, chloroplast-to-chromoplast differentiation during fruit ripening is surprisingly not accompanied by large changes in plastid RNA accumulation. However, most plastid genes are translationally downregulated during chromoplast development. Both transcriptional and translational downregulation are more pronounced for photosynthesis-related genes than for genes involved in gene expression, indicating that some low-level plastid gene expression must be sustained in chromoplasts. High-level expression during chromoplast development identifies accD, the only plastid-encoded gene involved in fatty acid biosynthesis, as the target gene for which gene expression activity in chromoplasts is maintained. In addition, we have determined the developmental patterns of plastid RNA polymerase activities, intron splicing, and RNA editing and report specific developmental changes in the splicing and editing patterns of plastid transcripts. PMID:18441214

  19. Transposon-induced nuclear mutations that alter chloroplast gene expression. Annual report, September 1, 1992--April 15, 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Barkan, A.

    1993-04-20

    The goal of this project is to use mutant phenotypes as a guide to nuclear genes that control the timing and cell-type specificity of chloroplast gene expression. Studies are being conducted with nuclear mutants of maize that are defective in the biogenesis or translation of chloroplast mRNAs. Currently studies are focused on two nuclear mutants with specific and unique lesions in chloroplast RNA processing (crp mutants). Crp1 mutants (formerly called hcf136) fail to accumulate the cytochrome f/b6 complex. The protein loss is due to a defect in the metabolism of transcripts encoding the petB and petD gene products, two subunits of the missing complex. Mutant seedlings lack the monocistronic petB and petD MRNAS, which both arise in nominal plants by endonucleolytic cleavage of the polycistronic primary transcript of the psbB gene cluster. Precursor mRNAs accumulate normally in crp1, indicating that its defect is due either to a failure to cleave the precursors, or a failure to stabilize the fully processed mRNAs. We are interested in both the biochemistry of this site-specific RNA processing and in the role of the processing in generating translatable mRNAs. To address the latter, we are quantifying the rates of synthesis of the petB and petD gene products with the goal of determining whether the missing transcripts are more efficiently translated than their precursors. To address the biochemistry of the defect in RNA metabolism, the crp1 gene is being cloned via the transposon tag. crp2 (formerly called hcf142) lacks the predominant mRNA encoding petA, but appears to be otherwise unimpaired in chloroplast RNA metabolism. The precise role of crp2 in synthesizing or stabilizing the petA mRNA is being investigated through biochemical studies.

  20. Genetic differentiation and admixture among Eurasian and North American Leymus (Triticeae) wildryes detected using chloroplast DNA sequences and AFLP profiles

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Leymus is a genomically defined group of allopolyploid Triticeae taxa that show homologous chromosome pairing when hybridized and contain the Ns and Xm subgenomes. Recent investigations showed that Leymus chloroplast DNA sequences are polyphyletic with most Eurasian taxa similar to the Psathyrostac...

  1. Genetic Differentiation and Hybridization Among Festuca Idahoensis, F. Roemeri, and F. Ovina Detected From AFLP, ITS, and Chloroplast DNA

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    North American forms of the F. ovina complex, Festuca idahoensis and F. roemert are distributed broadly east and narrowly west of the Cascade Mountains, respectively. The psbA-trnH and rps16-trnK chloroplast DNA intergenic sequences, 18S-5.8S-26S nuclear ribosomal DNA internal transcribed spacer (I...

  2. Abscisic acid represses the transcription of chloroplast genes*

    PubMed Central

    Yamburenko, Maria V.; Zubo, Yan O.; Börner, Thomas

    2013-01-01

    Numerous studies have shown effects of abscisic acid (ABA) on nuclear genes encoding chloroplast-localized proteins. ABA effects on the transcription of chloroplast genes, however, have not been investigated yet thoroughly. This work, therefore, studied the effects of ABA (75 μM) on transcription and steady-state levels of transcripts in chloroplasts of basal and apical segments of primary leaves of barley (Hordeum vulgare L.). Basal segments consist of young cells with developing chloroplasts, while apical segments contain the oldest cells with mature chloroplasts. Exogenous ABA reduced the chlorophyll content and caused changes of the endogenous concentrations not only of ABA but also of cytokinins to different extents in the basal and apical segments. It repressed transcription by the chloroplast phage-type and bacteria-type RNA polymerases and lowered transcript levels of most investigated chloroplast genes drastically. ABA did not repress the transcription of psbD and a few other genes and even increased psbD mRNA levels under certain conditions. The ABA effects on chloroplast transcription were more pronounced in basal vs. apical leaf segments and enhanced by light. Simultaneous application of cytokinin (22 μM 6-benzyladenine) minimized the ABA effects on chloroplast gene expression. These data demonstrate that ABA affects the expression of chloroplast genes differentially and points to a role of ABA in the regulation and coordination of the activities of nuclear and chloroplast genes coding for proteins with functions in photosynthesis. PMID:24078671

  3. Classification and differentiation of the genus Peganum indigenous to China based on chloroplast trnL-F and psbA-trnH sequences and seed coat morphology.

    PubMed

    Zhao, T; Wang, Z-T; Branford-White, C J; Xu, H; Wang, C-H

    2011-11-01

    The genus Peganum (Zygophyllaceae) consists of six species and one subspecies; three of which are distributed in China, P. harmala Linn, P. nigellastrum Bunge and P. multisectum (Maxim.) Bobr. A probable new or intermediate species, Peganum sp., has been suggested in the wild in northwest China. Traditional classification in genus Peganum has focused on hairs on the plant surface. In this study, seed coat characteristics of Peganum species were investigated using light and scanning electron microscopy, demonstrating clear differences in morphology between species. In addition, DNA sequence data from two sequences (chloroplast: trnL-F, psbA-trnH) were used to differentiate Peganum sp. and study polygenetic relationships. Diversity in DNA sequences among Peganum species was found, with inter-specific sequence divergence ranging from 0.6% to 5.6% in psbA-trnH, and 0.0% to 1.8% in trnL-F. The variations within species were low: from 0.0% to 0.4% in psbA-trnH and 0.0% to 0.4% in trnL-F. Therefore, Peganum species can now be easily identified as separate entities based on variations in DNA sequences. Phylogenetic trees were constructed from the combined data set for the two gene fragments, and the results indicate that Peganum sp. is monophyletic and sister to P. harmala and P. nigellastrum, while P. multisectum is also monophyletic. DNA data further confirmed that P. multisectum is an independent species and that a new species, Peganum sp., exists within the genus Peganum growing wild in China. PMID:21972911

  4. Chloroplast and Cytoplasmic Enzymes

    PubMed Central

    Anderson, Louise E.; Pacold, Ivan

    1972-01-01

    Several peaks of aldolase activity are found in the isoelectric focusing pattern of pea (Pisum sativum) leaf chloroplast extracts. One peak, separated by 0.5 pH unit from the major chloroplast aldolase peak, is found when cytoplasmic extracts are focused. The chloroplast and cytoplasmic enzymes have a pH 7.4 optimum with fructose 1,6-diphosphate. The Michaelis constant for fructose-1,6-diphosphate is 19 μM for the chloroplast, 21 μM for the cytoplasmic enzyme, and for sedoheptulose 1,7-diphosphate, 8 μM for the chloroplast enzyme, 18 μM for the cytoplasmic enzyme. Both enzymes are inhibited by d-glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate and by ribulose 1,5-diphosphate. The similarity in the catalytic properties of the isoenzymes suggests that both enzymes have an amphibolic role in carbon metabolism in the green leaf. PMID:16657968

  5. Auxin and chloroplast movements.

    PubMed

    Eckstein, Aleksandra; Krzeszowiec, Weronika; Waligórski, Piotr; Gabryś, Halina

    2016-03-01

    Auxin is involved in a wide spectrum of physiological processes in plants, including responses controlled by the blue light photoreceptors phototropins: phototropic bending and stomatal movement. However, the role of auxin in phototropin-mediated chloroplast movements has never been studied. To address this question we searched for potential interactions between auxin and the chloroplast movement signaling pathway using different experimental approaches and two model plants, Arabidopsis thaliana and Nicotiana tabacum. We observed that the disturbance of auxin homeostasis by shoot decapitation caused a decrease in chloroplast movement parameters, which could be rescued by exogenous auxin application. In several cases, the impairment of polar auxin transport, by chemical inhibitors or in auxin carrier mutants, had a similar negative effect on chloroplast movements. This inhibition was not correlated with changes in auxin levels. Chloroplast relocations were also affected by the antiauxin p-chlorophenoxyisobutyric acid and mutations in genes encoding some of the elements of the SCF(TIR1)-Aux/IAA auxin receptor complex. The observed changes in chloroplast movement parameters are not prominent, which points to a modulatory role of auxin in this process. Taken together, the obtained results suggest that auxin acts indirectly to regulate chloroplast movements, presumably by regulating gene expression via the SCF(TIR1)-Aux/IAA-ARF pathway. Auxin does not seem to be involved in controlling the expression of phototropins. PMID:26467664

  6. Activation of Polyphenol Oxidase of Chloroplasts 1

    PubMed Central

    Tolbert, N. E.

    1973-01-01

    Polyphenol oxidase of leaves is located mainly in chloroplasts isolated by differential or sucrose density gradient centrifugation. This activity is part of the lamellar structure that is not lost on repeated washing of the plastids. The oxidase activity was stable during prolonged storage of the particles at 4 C or —18 C. The Km (dihydroxyphenylalanine) for spinach leaf polyphenol oxidase was 7 mm by a spectrophotometric assay and 2 mm by the manometric assay. Polyphenol oxidase activity in the leaf peroxisomal fraction, after isopycnic centrifugation on a linear sucrose gradient, did not coincide with the peroxisomal enzymes but was attributed to proplastids at nearly the same specific density. Plants were grouped by the latency properties for polyphenol oxidase in their isolated chloroplasts. In a group including spinach, Swiss chard, and beet leaves the plastids immediately after preparation from fresh leaves required a small amount of light for maximal rates of oxidation of dihydroxyphenylalanine. Polyphenol oxidase activity in the dark or light increased many fold during aging of these chloroplasts for 1 to 5 days. Soluble polyphenol oxidase of the cytoplasm was not so stimulated. Chloroplasts prepared from stored leaves were also much more active than from fresh leaves. Maximum rates of dihydroxyphenylalanine oxidation were 2 to 6 mmoles × mg−1 chlorophyll × hr−1. Equal stimulation of latent polyphenol oxidase in fresh or aged chloroplasts in this group was obtained by either light, an aged trypsin digest, 3-(4-chlorophenyl)-1, 1-dimethylurea, or antimycin A. A variety of other treatments did not activate or had little effect on the oxidase, including various peptides, salts, detergents, and other proteolytic enzymes. Activation of latent polyphenol oxidase in spinach chloroplasts by trypsin amounted to as much as 30-fold. The trypsin activation occurred even after the trypsin had been treated with 10% trichloroacetic acid, 1.0 n HCl or boiled for 30

  7. Betaine synthesis in chenopods: localization in chloroplasts

    SciTech Connect

    Hanson, A.D.; May A.M.; Grumet, R.; Bode, J.; Jamieson, G.C.; Rhodes, D.

    1985-06-01

    Plants from several families (Chenopodiaceae, Gramineae, Compositae) accumulate betaine (glycine betaine) in response to salt or water stress via the pathway: choline betainal (betaine aldehyde) betaine. Betaine accumulation is probably a metabolic adaptation to stress. Intact protoplasts from leaves of spinach (Spinacia oleracea) oxidized ( UC)choline to betainal and betaine, as did protoplast lysates. Upon differential centrifugation, the ( UC)choline-oxidizing activity of lysates sedimented with chloroplasts. Chloroplasts purified from protoplast lysates by a Percoll cushion procedure retained strong ( UC)choline-oxidizing activity, although the proportion of the intermediate, ( UC)betainal, in the reaction products was usually higher than for protoplasts. Isolated chloroplasts also readily oxidized ( UC)betainal to betaine. Light increased the oxidation of both ( UC)choline and ( UC)betainal by isolated chloroplasts. Similar results were obtained with another chenopod (Beta vulgaris) but not with pea (Pisum sativum), a species that accumulates no betaine. The chloroplast site for betaine synthesis in chenopods contrasts with the mitochondrial site in mammals.

  8. Differential Contribution of Endoplasmic Reticulum and Chloroplast ω-3 Fatty Acid Desaturase Genes to the Linolenic Acid Content of Olive (Olea europaea) Fruit.

    PubMed

    Hernández, M Luisa; Sicardo, M Dolores; Martínez-Rivas, José M

    2016-01-01

    Linolenic acid is a polyunsaturated fatty acid present in plant lipids, which plays key roles in plant metabolism as a structural component of storage and membrane lipids, and as a precursor of signaling molecules. The synthesis of linolenic acid is catalyzed by two different ω-3 fatty acid desaturases, which correspond to microsomal- (FAD3) and chloroplast- (FAD7 and FAD8) localized enzymes. We have investigated the specific contribution of each enzyme to the linolenic acid content in olive fruit. With that aim, we isolated two different cDNA clones encoding two ω-3 fatty acid desaturases from olive (Olea europaea cv. Picual). Sequence analysis indicates that they code for microsomal (OepFAD3B) and chloroplast (OepFAD7-2) ω-3 fatty acid desaturase enzymes, different from the previously characterized OekFAD3A and OekFAD7-1 genes. Functional expression in yeast of the corresponding OepFAD3A and OepFAD3B cDNAs confirmed that they encode microsomal ω-3 fatty acid desaturases. The linolenic acid content and transcript levels of olive FAD3 and FAD7 genes were measured in different tissues of Picual and Arbequina cultivars, including mesocarp and seed during development and ripening of olive fruit. Gene expression and lipid analysis indicate that FAD3A is the gene mainly responsible for the linolenic acid present in the seed, while FAD7-1 and FAD7-2 contribute mostly to the linolenic acid present in the mesocarp and, therefore, in the olive oil. These results also indicate the relevance of lipid trafficking between the endoplasmic reticulum and chloroplast in determining the linolenic acid content of membrane and storage lipids in oil-accumulating photosynthetic tissues. PMID:26514651

  9. Longevity of guard cell chloroplasts in falling leaves: implication for stomatal function and cellular aging

    SciTech Connect

    Zeiger, E.; Schwartz, A.

    1982-11-12

    Guard cell chloroplasts in senescing leaves from 12 species of perennial trees and three species of annual plants survived considerably longer than their mesophyll counterparts. In Ginkgo biloba, stomata from yellow leaves opened during the day and closed at night; guard cell chloroplasts from these leaves showed fluorescence transients associated with electron transport and photophosphorylation. These findings indicate that guard cell chloroplasts are highly conserved throughout the life-span of the leaf and that leaves retain stomatal control during senescence.

  10. Multiplexed Fragaria Chloroplast Genome Sequencing

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A method to sequence multiple chloroplast genomes that uses the sequencing depth of ultra high throughput sequencing technologies was recently described. Sequencing complete chloroplast genomes can resolve phylogenetic relationships at low taxonomic levels and identify point mutations and indels tha...

  11. Studying the structure and processing of chloroplast transcripts.

    PubMed

    Barkan, Alice

    2011-01-01

    Most chloroplast genes in land plants are represented by multiple transcript isoforms that arise via differential splicing, endo- and exo-nucleolytic processing, and/or RNA editing. Exploration of the functional significance and mechanisms of these processing events is an active area of current research. This chapter focuses on methods that can be used to define the termini of chloroplast RNAs, quantify the relative levels of alternative processed RNA isoforms, and identify the binding sites of proteins that mediate chloroplast RNA processing. Various approaches for defining the sequence specificity of chloroplast RNA binding proteins are discussed, as are the parameters to consider in designing in vitro assays for RNA binding activities. A protocol is provided for a poisoned-primer extension assay for quantifying different splice isoforms. PMID:21822840

  12. Differential Annual Movement Patterns in a Migratory Species: Effects of Experience and Sexual Maturation

    PubMed Central

    Jorge, Paulo E.; Sowter, David; Marques, Paulo A. M.

    2011-01-01

    Some animals migrate long distances to exploit important seasonal food resources in the northern regions of the northern hemisphere, whilst avoiding winter starvation. Changes in the individual's age and navigational skills are likely to affect migration, which in turn influences the geographic distribution of individuals. Processes such as sexual maturation and navigational abilities are affected by age, and age is thus a key factor in understanding migration patterns and differences in distribution ranges. In the present study, we investigated the effects of age on the geographic distribution of a population of Lesser Black-backed Gulls Larus fuscus throughout its annual cycle, by analyzing a dataset of 19,096 records from 10,000 color-ringed gulls. In contrast to previous assumptions, the results showed that gulls were geographically segregated by age throughout the entire annual cycle, rather than showing a geographic age-related cline only in the wintering areas. This asymmetric distribution results from a reduction in the annual range of sexually mature gulls, and the differential distribution of mature and immature individuals (mature birds remained in more northern areas, compared to immature birds, throughout the annual cycle). Furthermore, although immature gulls travelled longer distances than adults, they initiated their fall migration with short movements, in contrast to adults that migrated using longer movements. The effects identified in this study explain the non-homogenous distribution of populations throughout the annual cycle, with wide implications for the development of effective human health policies and/or wildlife management strategies. PMID:21799853

  13. Viability, ultrastructure and cytokinin metabolism of free and immobilized tobacco chloroplasts.

    PubMed

    Polanská, Lenka; Vicánková, Anna; Dobrev, Petre I; Cková, Ivana Macháv; Vanková, Radomíra

    2004-10-01

    Cytokinins play a decisive role in regulation of plastid development and differentiation, but their metabolism in plastids is not known. Metabolic studies using intact chloroplasts are prevented by their instability once they are isolated from leaf cells. Chloroplasts of Nicotiana tabacum L. cv. Petit Havana SR1 were therefore immobilized into low-viscosity alginate. Their intactness was assessed by a glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase assay which indicated that free chloroplasts totally disintegrated within 7 h, while more than 50% of immobilized chloroplasts remained intact after 24 h. The immobilization had no marked impact on ultrastructure and postponed final destruction. The metabolite profile was similar in free and immobilized chloroplasts after 4 h incubation with tritiated zeatin. Nevertheless, the yield of conversion products decreased twice in immobilized chloroplasts, which was probably the outcome of mass transfer limitations and/or the sorption to polysaccharide matrix. PMID:15604795

  14. Post-transcriptional control of cell type-specific gene expression in bundle sheath and mesophyll chloroplasts of Amaranthus hypochondriacus.

    PubMed

    Boinski, J J; Wang, J L; Xu, P; Hotchkiss, T; Berry, J O

    1993-06-01

    Plants that utilize the highly efficient C4 photosynthetic pathway possess two types of specialized leaf cells, the mesophyll and bundle sheath. In mature leaves of amaranth, a dicotyledonous C4 plant, ribulose 1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase (Rubisco) is localized specifically to the chloroplasts of bundle sheath cells, and is not present in the chloroplasts of mesophyll cells. The cell type-specific expression of the chloroplast-encoded Rubisco large subunit (rbcL) gene, and other representative chloroplastic genes, was investigated by using separated bundle sheath and mesophyll chloroplasts prepared from mature amaranth leaves. One-dimensional SDS-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis revealed several differences in the polypeptide compositions of the two chloroplast types. Western analysis demonstrated that, as in the intact leaves, the Rubisco LSU polypeptide was present only in chloroplast preparations from bundle sheath cells. Pyruvate orthophosphate dikinase (PPdK), a nuclear-encoded chloroplastic enzyme, was found only in the mesophyll chloroplast preparations. rbcL mRNA was present only in the bundle sheath chloroplast preparations, whereas transcripts for the chloroplast-encoded psbA, psaA-B, and rpl2 genes were present in both chloroplast types. Although the rbcL message accumulated only in bundle sheath chloroplasts, run-on transcription analysis indicated that the rbcL gene was transcribed in both bundle sheath and mesophyll chloroplast preparations. Therefore, differential rbcL gene expression in the isolated C4 chloroplasts is regulated, at least in part, at the post-transcriptional level. Possibly this control is mediated by differential processing or stabilization of the rbcL transcript. PMID:8329680

  15. Adaptive differentiation of traits related to resource use in a desert annual along a resource gradient.

    PubMed

    Brouillette, Larry C; Mason, Chase M; Shirk, Rebecca Y; Donovan, Lisa A

    2014-03-01

    • Plant resource-use traits are generally hypothesized to be adaptively differentiated for populations distributed along resource gradients. Although nutrient limitations are expected to select for resource-conservative strategies, water limitations may select for either resource-conservative or -acquisitive strategies. We test whether population differentiation reflects local adaptation for traits associated with resource-use strategies in a desert annual (Helianthus anomalus) distributed along a gradient of positively covarying water and nutrient availability. • We compared quantitative trait variation (Q(ST)) with neutral genetic differentiation (F(ST)), in a common garden glasshouse study, for leaf economics spectrum (LES) and related traits: photosynthesis (A(mass), A(area)), leaf nitrogen (N(mass), N(area)), leaf lifetime (LL), leaf mass per area (LMA), leaf water content (LWC), water-use efficiency (WUE, estimated as δ(13)C) and days to first flower (DFF). • Q(ST)-F(ST) differences support adaptive differentiation for Amass , N(mass), N(area), LWC and DFF. The trait combinations associated with drier and lower fertility sites represent correlated trait evolution consistent with the more resource-acquisitive end of the LES. There was no evidence for adaptive differentiation for A(area), LMA and WUE. • These results demonstrate that hot dry environments can selectively favor correlated evolution of traits contributing to a resource-acquisitive and earlier reproduction 'escape' strategy, despite lower fertility. PMID:24325125

  16. Chloroplast ribosomes and protein synthesis.

    PubMed Central

    Harris, E H; Boynton, J E; Gillham, N W

    1994-01-01

    Consistent with their postulated origin from endosymbiotic cyanobacteria, chloroplasts of plants and algae have ribosomes whose component RNAs and proteins are strikingly similar to those of eubacteria. Comparison of the secondary structures of 16S rRNAs of chloroplasts and bacteria has been particularly useful in identifying highly conserved regions likely to have essential functions. Comparative analysis of ribosomal protein sequences may likewise prove valuable in determining their roles in protein synthesis. This review is concerned primarily with the RNAs and proteins that constitute the chloroplast ribosome, the genes that encode these components, and their expression. It begins with an overview of chloroplast genome structure in land plants and algae and then presents a brief comparison of chloroplast and prokaryotic protein-synthesizing systems and a more detailed analysis of chloroplast rRNAs and ribosomal proteins. A description of the synthesis and assembly of chloroplast ribosomes follows. The review concludes with discussion of whether chloroplast protein synthesis is essential for cell survival. PMID:7854253

  17. Genetic Analysis of Chloroplast Translation

    SciTech Connect

    Barkan, Alice

    2005-08-15

    The assembly of the photosynthetic apparatus requires the concerted action of hundreds of genes distributed between the two physically separate genomes in the nucleus and chloroplast. Nuclear genes coordinate this process by controlling the expression of chloroplast genes in response to developmental and environmental cues. However, few regulatory factors have been identified. We used mutant phenotypes to identify nuclear genes in maize that modulate chloroplast translation, a key control point in chloroplast gene expression. This project focused on the nuclear gene crp1, required for the translation of two chloroplast mRNAs. CRP1 is related to fungal proteins involved in the translation of mitochondrial mRNAs, and is the founding member of a large gene family in plants, with {approx}450 members. Members of the CRP1 family are defined by a repeated 35 amino acid motif called a ''PPR'' motif. The PPR motif is closely related to the TPR motif, which mediates protein-protein interactions. We and others have speculated that PPR tracts adopt a structure similar to that of TPR tracts, but with a substrate binding surface adapted to bind RNA instead of protein. To understand how CRP1 influences the translation of specific chloroplast mRNAs, we sought proteins that interact with CRP1, and identified the RNAs associated with CRP1 in vivo. We showed that CRP1 is associated in vivo with the mRNAs whose translation it activates. To explore the functions of PPR proteins more generally, we sought mutations in other PPR-encoding genes: mutations in the maize PPR2 and PPR4 were shown to disrupt chloroplast ribosome biogenesis and chloroplast trans-splicing, respectively. These and other results suggest that the nuclear-encoded PPR family plays a major role in modulating the expression of the chloroplast genome in higher plants.

  18. Heme content in developing chloroplasts

    SciTech Connect

    Thomas, J.; Weinstein, J.D. )

    1991-05-01

    Heme regulates tetrapyrrole biosynthesis by inhibition of {delta}-aminolevulinic acid synthesis, product inhibition of heme synthesis, and possibly other mechanisms. Determination of the physiological relevance of this inhibition requires a sensitive measurement which can distinguish regulatory free heme from heme which is an integral part of functional hemoproteins. A preliminary estimate was provided by reconstituting peroxidase activity from apo-peroxidase and the heme contained in broken plastids. However, subsequent experiments have suggested that this initial estimate was too large due to reconstitution of apo-peroxidase with heme from functional hemoproteins (i.e. heme stealing). The authors have now refined the measurement techniques to greatly reduce the extent of this heme stealing. Incubation of broken plastids with apo-peroxidase at 10C resolves the kinetics of reconstitution into two components. A fast component levels off after 100 min, and a slow component increases linearly for up to 6 hours. They believe that the heme which reconstitutes during the fast phase represents free heme, and the linear slow component represents heme stealing. In support of this theory, incubation at 15C increases the rate of both components. However, extrapolation to zero time of the slow components of the 10C and 15C time courses results in equivalent amounts of heme. Based on this kinetic differentiation between free heme and hemoprotein heme, chloroplasts isolated from cucumber cotyledons after 30 h of greening contain substantially greater amounts of free heme than etioplasts.

  19. Species versus guild level differentiation revealed across the annual cycle by isotopic niche examination.

    PubMed

    Bodey, Thomas W; Ward, Eric J; Phillips, Richard A; McGill, Rona A R; Bearhop, Stuart

    2014-03-01

    Interspecific competitive interactions typically result in niche differentiation to alleviate competition through mechanisms including character displacement. However, competition is not the sole constraint on resource partitioning, and its effects are mediated by factors including the environmental context in which species coexist. Colonial seabirds provide an excellent opportunity to investigate the importance of competition in shaping realized niche widths because their life histories lead to variation in intra- and interspecific competition across the annual cycle. Dense breeding aggregations result in intense competition for prey in surrounding waters, whereas non-breeding dispersal to larger geographical areas produces lower densities of competitors. Bayesian hierarchical models of the isotopic niche, closely aligned to the trophic niche, reveal the degree of segregation between species and functional groups during both time periods. Surprisingly, species explained far more of the variance in the isotopic niche during the non-breeding than the breeding period. Our results underline the key role of non-breeding dynamics in alleviating competition and promoting distinctions between species through the facilitation of resource partitioning. Such situations may be common in a diverse range of communities sustained by ephemeral but abundant food items. This highlights how consideration of the hierarchical grouping of competitive interactions alongside consideration of abiotic constraints across the complete annual cycle allows a full understanding of the role of competition in driving patterns of character displacement. PMID:24215391

  20. Mutation of the rice ASL2 gene encoding plastid ribosomal protein L21 causes chloroplast developmental defects and seedling death.

    PubMed

    Lin, D; Jiang, Q; Zheng, K; Chen, S; Zhou, H; Gong, X; Xu, J; Teng, S; Dong, Y

    2015-05-01

    The plastid ribosome proteins (PRPs) play important roles in plastid protein biosynthesis, chloroplast differentiation and early chloroplast development. However, the specialised functions of individual protein components of the chloroplast ribosome in rice (Oryza sativa) remain unresolved. In this paper, we identified a novel rice PRP mutant named asl2 (Albino seedling lethality 2) exhibiting an albino, seedling death phenotype. In asl2 mutants, the alteration of leaf colour was associated with chlorophyll (Chl) content and abnormal chloroplast development. Through map-based cloning and complementation, the mutated ASL2 gene was isolated and found to encode the chloroplast 50S ribosome protein L21 (RPL21c), a component of the chloroplast ribosome large subunit, which was localised in chloroplasts. ASL2 was expressed at a higher level in the plumule and leaves, implying its tissue-specific expression. Additionally, the expression of ASL2 was regulated by light. The transcript levels of the majority of genes for Chl biosynthesis, photosynthesis and chloroplast development were strongly affected in asl2 mutants. Collectively, the absence of functional ASL2 caused chloroplast developmental defects and seedling death. This report establishes the important role of RPL21c in chloroplast development in rice. PMID:25280352

  1. Chloroplast evolution, structure and functions

    PubMed Central

    Jensen, Poul Erik

    2014-01-01

    In this review, we consider a selection of recent advances in chloroplast biology. These include new findings concerning chloroplast evolution, such as the identification of Chlamydiae as a third partner in primary endosymbiosis, a second instance of primary endosymbiosis represented by the chromatophores found in amoebae of the genus Paulinella, and a new explanation for the longevity of captured chloroplasts (kleptoplasts) in sacoglossan sea slugs. The controversy surrounding the three-dimensional structure of grana, its recent resolution by tomographic analyses, and the role of the CURVATURE THYLAKOID1 (CURT1) proteins in supporting grana formation are also discussed. We also present an updated inventory of photosynthetic proteins and the factors involved in the assembly of thylakoid multiprotein complexes, and evaluate findings that reveal that cyclic electron flow involves NADPH dehydrogenase (NDH)- and PGRL1/PGR5-dependent pathways, both of which receive electrons from ferredoxin. Other topics covered in this review include new protein components of nucleoids, an updated inventory of the chloroplast proteome, new enzymes in chlorophyll biosynthesis and new candidate messengers in retrograde signaling. Finally, we discuss the first successful synthetic biology approaches that resulted in chloroplasts in which electrons from the photosynthetic light reactions are fed to enzymes derived from secondary metabolism. PMID:24991417

  2. Evolution of Chloroplast J Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Chiu, Chi-Chou; Chen, Lih-Jen; Su, Pai-Hsiang; Li, Hsou-min

    2013-01-01

    Hsp70 chaperones are involved in multiple biological processes and are recruited to specific processes by designated J domain-containing cochaperones, or J proteins. To understand the evolution and functions of chloroplast Hsp70s and J proteins, we identified the Arabidopsis chloroplast J protein constituency using a combination of genomic and proteomic database searches and individual protein import assays. We show that Arabidopsis chloroplasts have at least 19 J proteins, the highest number of confirmed J proteins for any organelle. These 19 J proteins are classified into 11 clades, for which cyanobacteria and glaucophytes only have homologs for one clade, green algae have an additional three clades, and all the other 7 clades are specific to land plants. Each clade also possesses a clade-specific novel motif that is likely used to interact with different client proteins. Gene expression analyses indicate that most land plant-specific J proteins show highly variable expression in different tissues and are down regulated by low temperatures. These results show that duplication of chloroplast Hsp70 in land plants is accompanied by more than doubling of the number of its J protein cochaperones through adding new J proteins with novel motifs, not through duplications within existing families. These new J proteins likely recruit chloroplast Hsp70 to perform tissue specific functions related to biosynthesis rather than to stress resistance. PMID:23894646

  3. Isolation of chloroplastic phosphoglycerate kinase

    SciTech Connect

    Macioszek, J.; Anderson, L.E. ); Anderson, J.B. )

    1990-09-01

    We report here a method for the isolation of high specific activity phosphoglycerate kinase (EC 2.7.2.3) from chloroplasts. The enzyme has been purified over 200-fold from pea (Pisum sativum L.) stromal extracts to apparent homogeneity with 23% recovery. Negative cooperativity is observed with the two enzyme phosphoglycerate kinase/glyceraldehyde-3-P dehydrogenase (EC 1.2.1.13) couple restored from the purified enzymes when NADPH is the reducing pyridine nucleotide, consistent with earlier results obtained with crude chloroplastic extracts. Michaelis Menten kinetics are observed when 3-phosphoglycerate is held constant and phosphoglycerate kinase is varied, which suggests that phosphoglycerate kinase-bound 1,3-bisphosphoglycerate may be the preferred substrate for glyceraldehyde-3-P dehydrogenase in the chloroplast.

  4. Biosynthesis of starch in chloroplasts.

    PubMed

    Nomura, T; Nakayama, N; Murata, T; Akazawa, T

    1967-03-01

    The enzymic synthesis of ADP-glucose and UDP-glucose by chloroplastic pyrophosphorylase of bean and rice leaves has been demonstrated by paper chromatographic techniques. In both tissues, the activity of UDP-glucose-pyrophosphorylase was much higher than ADP-glucose-pyrophosphorylase. Glycerate-3-phosphate, phosphoenolpyruvate and fructose-1,6-diphosphate did not stimulate ADP-glucose formation by a pyrophosphorylation reaction. The major metabolic pathway for UDP-glucose utilization appears to be the synthesis of either sucrose or sucrose-P. On the other hand, a specific precursor role of ADP-glucose for synthesizing chloroplast starch by the ADP-glucose-starch transglucosylase reaction is supported by the coupled enzyme system of ADP-glucose-pyrophosphorylase and transglucosylase, isolated from chloroplasts. None of the glycolytic intermediates stimulated the glucose transfer in the enzyme sequence of reaction system employed. PMID:4292567

  5. Purity of Chloroplasts Prepared from the Siphonous Green Alga, Caulerpa simpliciuscula, as Determined by Their Ultrastructure and Their Enzymic Content 1

    PubMed Central

    Grant, Bruce R.; Wright, Simon W.

    1980-01-01

    The ultrastructure and enzyme distribution in chloroplasts and other subcellular fractions isolated from the siphonous green alga, Caulerpa simpliciuscula, are described. The isolated chloroplasts were similar in appearance to those in the tissue from which they were derived, and in typical preparations 70% or more were intact. Chloroplasts which had lost their outer envelopes could be separated from intact plastids by centrifugation at low speeds through gradients of colloidal silica. Intact chloroplasts separated in this way retained their photosynthetic capacity and were impermeable to ferricyanide ions. The chloroplast preparations separated by differential centrifugation and refractionated using either discontinuous or continuous Percoll gradients contained non-chloroplast material. It was estimated that this amounted to a maximum of 10% of the mitochondrial population and 6% of cytoplasm extracted from the plant. The contaminating material surrounded the chloroplasts in a thin layer and was surrounded by a membrane. Images PMID:16661374

  6. Thermal Damage to Chloroplast Envelope Membranes 1

    PubMed Central

    McCain, Douglas C.; Croxdale, Judith; Markley, John L.

    1989-01-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance was used to detect thermal injury to chloroplasts in vivo. A lesion occurs in the chloroplast envelope membrane at temperatures between 53°C and 57°C, depending on species, leaf condition, and heating rate. The injury is associated with a sudden loss of water from the chloroplast. PMID:16666815

  7. Photomorphogenic Regulation of Chloroplast Replication in Euglena

    PubMed Central

    Srinivas, Usha; Lyman, Harvard

    1980-01-01

    Chloroplast replication in Euglena gracilis is specifically inhibited by ultraviolet light and the effect is photoreactivable. The ability of irradiated cells to be photoreactivated is lost more rapidly if cells are incubated in red light than in darkness. A mutant, Y9ZNa1L, which lacks the red-blue photomorphogenic system regulating chloroplast synthesis does not show the red-light-enhanced loss of photoreactivability. Another mutant, Y11P27ZD which has the red-blue system, but lacks the blue-light system also regulating chloroplast synthesis, shows the red-light effect. The red-light effect is seen in a mutant of photosynthetic electron transport, P4ZUL, which rules out a product of photosynthesis as a mediator of the effect. Inhibitors of protein synthesis on chloroplast ribosomes do not prevent the red-light-enhanced loss of chloroplast DNA. Chloroplast DNA is lost rapidly when UV-irradiated cells are incubated in red light, showing that the loss of photoreactivability is due to the loss of the substrate for photoreactivation, chloroplast DNA. Therefore, the red-blue photomorphogenic system is activating a chloroplast DNA-specific nuclease(s). A model is proposed for a light-mediated mechanism regulating the amount of chloroplast DNA: blue light would promote chloroplast DNA synthesis; red light would promote its degradation. The photomorphogenic systems regulating chloroplast synthesis might work by activating a chloroplast-specific modification-restriction mechanism. PMID:16661425

  8. Protein import into chloroplasts requires a chloroplast ATPase

    SciTech Connect

    Pain, D.; Blobel, G.

    1987-05-01

    The authors have transcribed mRNA from a cDNA clone coding for pea ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase, translated the mRNA in a wheat germ cell-free system, and studied the energy requirement for posttranslational import of the (/sup 35/S)methionine-labeled protein into the stroma of pea chloroplasts. They found that import depends on ATP hydrolysis within the stroma. Import is not inhibited when H/sup +/, K/sup +/, Na/sup +/, or divalent cation gradients across the chloroplast membranes are dissipated by ionophores, as long as exogenously added ATP is also present during the import reaction. The data suggest that protein import into the chloroplast stroma requires a chloroplast ATPase that does not function to generate a membrane potential for driving the import reaction but that exerts its effect in another, yet-to-be-determined, mode. They have carried out a preliminary characterization of this ATPase regarding its nucleotide specificity and the effects of various ATPase inhibitors.

  9. Mutational dynamics of aroid chloroplast genomes.

    PubMed

    Ahmed, Ibrar; Biggs, Patrick J; Matthews, Peter J; Collins, Lesley J; Hendy, Michael D; Lockhart, Peter J

    2012-01-01

    A characteristic feature of eukaryote and prokaryote genomes is the co-occurrence of nucleotide substitution and insertion/deletion (indel) mutations. Although similar observations have also been made for chloroplast DNA, genome-wide associations have not been reported. We determined the chloroplast genome sequences for two morphotypes of taro (Colocasia esculenta; family Araceae) and compared these with four publicly available aroid chloroplast genomes. Here, we report the extent of genome-wide association between direct and inverted repeats, indels, and substitutions in these aroid chloroplast genomes. We suggest that alternative but not mutually exclusive hypotheses explain the mutational dynamics of chloroplast genome evolution. PMID:23204304

  10. Chloroplast division in higher plants requires members of two functionally divergent gene families with homology to bacterial ftsZ.

    PubMed Central

    Osteryoung, K W; Stokes, K D; Rutherford, S M; Percival, A L; Lee, W Y

    1998-01-01

    The division of plastids is critical for viability in photosynthetic eukaryotes, but the mechanisms associated with this process are still poorly understood. We previously identified a nuclear gene from Arabidopsis encoding a chloroplast-localized homolog of the bacterial cell division protein FtsZ, an essential cytoskeletal component of the prokaryotic cell division apparatus. Here, we report the identification of a second nuclear-encoded FtsZ-type protein from Arabidopsis that does not contain a chloroplast targeting sequence or other obvious sorting signals and is not imported into isolated chloroplasts, which strongly suggests that it is localized in the cytosol. We further demonstrate using antisense technology that inhibiting expression of either Arabidopsis FtsZ gene (AtFtsZ1-1 or AtFtsZ2-1) in transgenic plants reduces the number of chloroplasts in mature leaf cells from 100 to one, indicating that both genes are essential for division of higher plant chloroplasts but that each plays a distinct role in the process. Analysis of currently available plant FtsZ sequences further suggests that two functionally divergent FtsZ gene families encoding differentially localized products participate in chloroplast division. Our results provide evidence that both chloroplastic and cytosolic forms of FtsZ are involved in chloroplast division in higher plants and imply that important differences exist between chloroplasts and prokaryotes with regard to the roles played by FtsZ proteins in the division process. PMID:9836740

  11. Comparative chromatography of chloroplast pigment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grandolfo, M.; Sherma, J.; Strain, H. H.

    1969-01-01

    Methods for isolation of low concentration pigments of the cocklebur species are described. The methods entail two step chromatography so that the different sorption properties of the various pigments in varying column parameters can be utilized. Columnar and thin layer methods are compared. Many conditions influence separability of the chloroplasts.

  12. Two distinct redox cascades cooperatively regulate chloroplast functions and sustain plant viability.

    PubMed

    Yoshida, Keisuke; Hisabori, Toru

    2016-07-01

    The thiol-based redox regulation system is believed to adjust chloroplast functions in response to changes in light environments. A redox cascade via the ferredoxin-thioredoxin reductase (FTR)/thioredoxin (Trx) pathway has been traditionally considered to serve as a transmitter of light signals to target enzymes. However, emerging data indicate that chloroplasts have a complex redox network composed of diverse redox-mediator proteins and target enzymes. Despite extensive research addressing this system, two fundamental questions are still unresolved: How are redox pathways orchestrated within chloroplasts, and why are chloroplasts endowed with a complicated redox network? In this report, we show that NADPH-Trx reductase C (NTRC) is a key redox-mediator protein responsible for regulatory functions distinct from those of the classically known FTR/Trx system. Target screening and subsequent biochemical assays indicated that NTRC and the Trx family differentially recognize their target proteins. In addition, we found that NTRC is an electron donor to Trx-z, which is a key regulator of gene expression in chloroplasts. We further demonstrate that cooperative control of chloroplast functions via the FTR/Trx and NTRC pathways is essential for plant viability. Arabidopsis double mutants impaired in FTR and NTRC expression displayed lethal phenotypes under autotrophic growth conditions. This severe growth phenotype was related to a drastic loss of photosynthetic performance. These combined results provide an expanded map of the chloroplast redox network and its biological functions. PMID:27335455

  13. Covariations in the nuclear chloroplast transcriptome reveal a regulatory master-switch

    PubMed Central

    Richly, Erik; Dietzmann, Angela; Biehl, Alexander; Kurth, Joachim; Laloi, Christophe; Apel, Klaus; Salamini, Francesco; Leister, Dario

    2003-01-01

    The evolution of the endosymbiotic progenitor into the chloroplast organelle was associated with the transfer of numerous chloroplast genes into the nucleus. Hence, inter-organellar signalling, and the co-ordinated expression of sets of nuclear genes, was set up to control the metabolic and developmental status of the chloroplast. Here, we show by the differential-expression analysis of 3,292 genes, that most of the 35 environmental and genetic conditions tested, including plastid signalling mutations, elicit only three main classes of response from the nuclear chloroplast transcriptome. Two classes, probably involving GUN (genomes uncoupled)-type plastid signalling, are characterized by alterations, in opposite directions, in the expression of largely overlapping sets of genes. PMID:12776738

  14. Stable Expression of Basic Fibroblast Growth Factor in Chloroplasts of Tobacco.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yun-Peng; Wei, Zheng-Yi; Zhong, Xiao-Fang; Lin, Chun-Jing; Cai, Yu-Hong; Ma, Jian; Zhang, Yu-Ying; Liu, Yan-Zhi; Xing, Shao-Chen

    2016-01-01

    Basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF) is a multifunctional factor in acceleration of cell proliferation, differentiation and transference, and therefore widely used in clinical applications. In this study, expression vector pWX-Nt03 harboring a codon-optimized bFGF gene was constructed and introduced into the tobacco chloroplasts by particle bombardment. After four rounds of selection, bFGF was proved to integrate into the chloroplast genome of regenerated plants and two of four transgenic plants were confirmed to be homoplastomic by PCR and Southern hybridization. ELISA assay indicated that bFGF represented approximately 0.1% of total soluble protein in the leaves of transplastomic tobacco plants. This is the first report of bFGF expression via chloroplast transformation in model plant, providing an additional option for the production of chloroplast-produced therapeutic proteins. PMID:26703590

  15. Stable Expression of Basic Fibroblast Growth Factor in Chloroplasts of Tobacco

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yun-Peng; Wei, Zheng-Yi; Zhong, Xiao-Fang; Lin, Chun-Jing; Cai, Yu-Hong; Ma, Jian; Zhang, Yu-Ying; Liu, Yan-Zhi; Xing, Shao-Chen

    2015-01-01

    Basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF) is a multifunctional factor in acceleration of cell proliferation, differentiation and transference, and therefore widely used in clinical applications. In this study, expression vector pWX-Nt03 harboring a codon-optimized bFGF gene was constructed and introduced into the tobacco chloroplasts by particle bombardment. After four rounds of selection, bFGF was proved to integrate into the chloroplast genome of regenerated plants and two of four transgenic plants were confirmed to be homoplastomic by PCR and Southern hybridization. ELISA assay indicated that bFGF represented approximately 0.1% of total soluble protein in the leaves of transplastomic tobacco plants. This is the first report of bFGF expression via chloroplast transformation in model plant, providing an additional option for the production of chloroplast-produced therapeutic proteins. PMID:26703590

  16. Formation of putative chloroplast cytochromes in isolated developing pea chloroplasts

    SciTech Connect

    Thaver, S.S.; Bhava, D.; Castelfranco, P.A.

    1986-04-01

    In addition to chlorophyll-protein complexes, other proteins were labeled when isolated developing pea chloroplasts were incubated with (/sup 14/C)-5-aminolevulinic acid (/sup 14/C)-ALA. The major labeled band (M/sub r/ = 43 kDa by LDS-PAGE) was labeled even in the presence of chloramphenicol. Heme-dependent peroxidase activity (as detected by the tetramethyl benzidine-H/sub 2/O/sub 2/ stain) was not visibly associated with this band. The radioactive band was stable to heat, 5% HCl in acetone, and was absent if the incubation with (/sup 14/C)-5-aminolevulinic acid was carried out in the presence of N-methyl protoporphyrin IX dimethyl ester (a specific inhibitor of ferrochelatase). Organic solvent extraction procedures for the enrichment of cytochrome f from chloroplast membranes also extracted this unknown labeled product. It was concluded that this labeled product was probably a c-type cytochrome. The effect of exogenous iron, iron chelators, gabaculine (an inhibitor of ALA synthesis) and other incubation conditions upon the in vitro formation of putative chloroplast cytochromes will be discussed.

  17. In vivo effects of NbSiR silencing on chloroplast development in Nicotiana benthamiana.

    PubMed

    Kang, Yong-Won; Lee, Jae-Yong; Jeon, Young; Cheong, Gang-Won; Kim, Moonil; Pai, Hyun-Sook

    2010-04-01

    Sulfite reductase (SiR) performs dual functions, acting as a sulfur assimilation enzyme and as a chloroplast (cp-) nucleoid binding protein. In this study, we examined the in vivo effects of SiR deficiency on chloroplast development in Nicotiana benthamiana. Virus-induced gene silencing of NbSiR resulted in leaf yellowing and growth retardation phenotypes, which were not rescued by cysteine supplementation. NbSiR:GFP fusion protein was targeted to chloroplasts and colocalized with cp-nucleoids. Recombinant full-length NbSiR protein and the C-terminal half of NbSiR possessed cp-DNA compaction activities in vitro, and expression of full-length NbSiR in E. coli caused condensation of genomic DNA. NbSiR silencing differentially affected expression of plastid-encoded genes, inhibiting expression of several genes more severely than others. In the later stages, depletion of NbSiR resulted in chloroplast ablation. In NbSiR-silenced plants, enlarged cp-nucleoids containing an increased amount of cp-DNA were observed in the middle of the abnormal chloroplasts, and the cp-DNAs were predominantly of subgenomic sizes based on pulse field gel electrophoresis. The abnormal chloroplasts developed prolamellar body-like cubic lipid structures in the light without accumulating NADPH:protochlorophyllide oxidoreductase proteins. Our results suggest that NbSiR plays a role in cp-nucleoid metabolism, plastid gene expression, and thylakoid membrane development. PMID:20047069

  18. GROWTH REGULATING FACTOR5 Stimulates Arabidopsis Chloroplast Division, Photosynthesis, and Leaf Longevity1[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Vercruyssen, Liesbeth; Tognetti, Vanesa B.; Gonzalez, Nathalie; Van Dingenen, Judith; De Milde, Liesbeth; Bielach, Agnieszka; De Rycke, Riet; Van Breusegem, Frank; Inzé, Dirk

    2015-01-01

    Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) leaf development relies on subsequent phases of cell proliferation and cell expansion. During the proliferation phase, chloroplasts need to divide extensively, and during the transition from cell proliferation to expansion, they differentiate into photosynthetically active chloroplasts, providing the plant with energy. The transcription factor GROWTH REGULATING FACTOR5 (GRF5) promotes the duration of the cell proliferation period during leaf development. Here, it is shown that GRF5 also stimulates chloroplast division, resulting in a higher chloroplast number per cell with a concomitant increase in chlorophyll levels in 35S:GRF5 leaves, which can sustain higher rates of photosynthesis. Moreover, 35S:GRF5 plants show delayed leaf senescence and are more tolerant for growth on nitrogen-depleted medium. Cytokinins also stimulate leaf growth in part by extending the cell proliferation phase, simultaneously delaying the onset of the cell expansion phase. In addition, cytokinins are known to be involved in chloroplast development, nitrogen signaling, and senescence. Evidence is provided that GRF5 and cytokinins synergistically enhance cell division and chlorophyll retention after dark-induced senescence, which suggests that they also cooperate to stimulate chloroplast division and nitrogen assimilation. Taken together with the increased leaf size, ectopic expression of GRF5 has great potential to improve plant productivity. PMID:25604530

  19. Fluorescence Properties of Guard Cell Chloroplasts

    PubMed Central

    Zeiger, Eduardo; Armond, Paul; Melis, Anastasios

    1981-01-01

    The presence of chloroplasts in guard cells from leaf epidermis, coleoptile, flowers, and albino portions of variegated leaves was established by incident fluorescence microscopy, thus confirming the notion that guard cell chloroplasts are remarkably conserved. Room temperature emission spectra from a few chloroplasts in a single guard cell of Vicia faba showed one major peak at around 683 nanometers. Low-temperature (77 K) emission spectra from peels of albino portions of Chlorophytum comosum leaves and from mesophyll chloroplasts of green parts of the same leaves showed major peaks at around 687 and 733 nanometers, peaks usually attributed to photosystem II and photosystem I pigment systems, respectively. Spectra of peels of V. faba leaves showed similar peaks. However, fluorescence microscopy revealed that the Vicia peels, as well as those from Allium cepa and Tulipa sp., were contaminated with non-guard cell chloroplasts which were practically undetectable under bright field illumination. These observations pose restrictions on the use of epidermal peels as a source of isolated guard cell chloroplasts. Studies on the 3-(3,4-dichlorophenyl)-1,1-dimethylurea-sensitive variable fluorescence kinetics of uncontaminated epidermal peels of C. comosum indicated that guard cell chloroplasts operate a normal, photosystem II-dependent, linear electron transport. The above properties in combination with their reported inability to fix CO2 photosynthetically may render the guard cell chloroplasts optimally suited to supply the reducing and high-energy phosphate equivalents needed to sustain active ion transport during stomatal opening in daylight. PMID:16661620

  20. Insights into chloroplast biogenesis and development.

    PubMed

    Pogson, Barry J; Ganguly, Diep; Albrecht-Borth, Verónica

    2015-09-01

    In recent years many advances have been made to obtain insight into chloroplast biogenesis and development. In plants several plastids types exist such as the proplastid (which is the progenitor of all plastids), leucoplasts (group of colourless plastids important for storage including elaioplasts (lipids), amyloplasts (starch) or proteinoplasts (proteins)), chromoplasts (yellow to orange-coloured due to carotenoids, in flowers or in old leaves as gerontoplasts), and the green chloroplasts. Chloroplasts are indispensable for plant development; not only by performing photosynthesis and thus rendering the plant photoautotrophic, but also for biochemical processes (which in some instances can also take place in other plastids types), such as the synthesis of pigments, lipids, and plant hormones and sensing environmental stimuli. Although we understand many aspects of these processes there are gaps in our understanding of the establishment of functional chloroplasts and their regulation. Why is that so? Even though chloroplast function is comparable in all plants and most of the algae, ferns and moss, detailed analyses have revealed many differences, specifically with respect to its biogenesis. As an update to our prior review on the genetic analysis of chloroplast biogenesis and development [1] herein we will focus on recent advances in Angiosperms (monocotyledonous and dicotyledonous plants) that provide novel insights and highlight the challenges and prospects for unravelling the regulation of chloroplast biogenesis specifically during the establishment of the young plants. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Chloroplast Biogenesis. PMID:25667967

  1. Chloroplasts as functional organelles in animal tissues.

    PubMed

    Trench, R K; Greene, R W; Bystrom, B G

    1969-08-01

    The marine gastropod molluscs Tridachia crispata, Tridachiella diomedea, and Placobranchus ianthobapsus (Sacoglossa, Opisthobranchia) possess free functional chloroplasts within the cells of the digestive diverticula, as determined by observations on ultrastructure, pigment analyses, and experiments on photosynthetic capacity. In the light, the chloroplasts incorporate H(14)CO(3) (-)in situ. Reduced radiocarbon is translocated to various chloroplast-free tissues in the animals. The slugs feed on siphonaceous algae from which the chloroplasts are derived. Pigments from the slugs and from known siphonaceous algae, when separated chromatographically and compared, showed similar components. Absorption spectra of extracts of slugs and algae were very similar. The larvae of the slugs are pigment-free up to the post-veliger stage, suggesting that chloroplasts are acquired de novo. with each new generation. PMID:5792329

  2. Interaction of Chloroplasts with Inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Ridley, Stuart M.

    1983-01-01

    Several effects on pea (Pisum sativum L. var Onwards) chloroplasts of a new diphenylether herbicide, fomesafen (5-[2-chloro-4-trifluoromethyl-phenoxy]-N-methanesulfonyl-2 -nitrobenzamide) have been compared with those of a herbicide of related structure, nitrofluorfen (2-chloro-1-[4-nitrophenoxy]-4-[trifluoromethyl]benzene). Although both compounds produce the same light-dependent symptoms of desiccation and chlorosis indicative of a common primary mechanism of action, this study is concerned with a more broadly based investigation of different effects on the electron transport system. Comparisons have also been made with other compounds interacting with the chloroplast. Unlike nitrofluorfen, fomesafen has little effect as an inhibitor of electron flow or energy transfer. Both compounds have the ability to stimulate superoxide production through a functional electron transport system, and this involves specifically the p-nitro substituent. The stimulation, which is not likely to be an essential part of the primary herbicidal effect, is diminished under conditions that remove the coupling factor. Evidence suggests that both diphenylethers may be able to bind to the coupling factor, and kinetic studies reveal this for dibromothymoquinone as well. Such a binding site might be an important feature in allowing the primary effect of the diphenylether herbicides to be expressed. PMID:16663025

  3. Plastidic Isoprenoid Synthesis during Chloroplast Development 1

    PubMed Central

    Heintze, Adolf; Görlach, Jörn; Leuschner, Carola; Hoppe, Petra; Hagelstein, Petra; Schulze-Siebert, Detlef; Schultz, Gernot

    1990-01-01

    The chloroplast isoprenoid synthesis of very young leaves is supplied by the plastidic CO2 → pyruvate → acetyl-coenzyme A (C3 → C2) metabolism (D Schulze-Siebert, G Schultz [1987] Plant Physiol 84: 1233-1237) and occurs via the plastidic mevalonate pathway. The plastidic C3 → C2 metabolism and/or plastidic mevalonate pathway of barley (Hordeum vulgare L.) seedlings changes from maximal activity at the leaf base (containing developing chloroplasts with incomplete thylakoid stacking but a considerable rate of photosynthetic CO2-fixation) almost to ineffectivity at the leaf tip (containing mature chloroplasts with maximal photosynthetic activity). The ability to import isopentenyl diphosphate from the extraplastidic space gradually increases to substitute for the loss of endogenous intermediate supply for chloroplast isoprenoid synthesis (change from autonomic to division-of-labor stage). Fatty acid synthesis from NaH14CO3 decreases in the same manner as shown for leaf sections and chloroplasts isolated from these. Evidence has been obtained for a drastic decrease of pyruvate decarboxylase-dehydrogenase activity during chloroplast development compared with other anabolic chloroplast pathways (synthesis of aromatic amino acid and branched chain amino acids). The noncompetition of pyruvate and acetate in isotopic dilution studies indicates that both a pyruvate-derived and an acetate-derived compound are simultaneously needed to form introductory intermediates of the mevalonate pathway, presumably acetoacetyl-coenzyme A. PMID:16667567

  4. Comparative Proteomics of Chloroplasts Envelopes from Bundle Sheath and Mesophyll Chloroplasts Reveals Novel Membrane Proteins with a Possible Role in C4-Related Metabolite Fluxes and Development

    PubMed Central

    Manandhar-Shrestha, K.; Tamot, B.; Pratt, E. P. S.; Saitie, S.; Bräutigam, A.; Weber, A. P. M.; Hoffmann-Benning, Susanne

    2013-01-01

    As the world population grows, our need for food increases drastically. Limited amounts of arable land lead to a competition between food and fuel crops, while changes in the global climate may impact future crop yields. Thus, a second “green revolution” will need a better understanding of the processes essential for plant growth and development. One approach toward the solution of this problem is to better understand regulatory and transport processes in C4 plants. C4 plants display an up to 10-fold higher apparent CO2 assimilation and higher yields while maintaining high water use efficiency. This requires differential regulation of mesophyll (M) and bundle sheath (BS) chloroplast development as well as higher metabolic fluxes of photosynthetic intermediates between cells and particularly across chloroplast envelopes. While previous analyses of overall chloroplast membranes have yielded significant insight, our comparative proteomics approach using enriched BS and M chloroplast envelopes of Zea mays allowed us to identify 37 proteins of unknown function that have not been seen in these earlier studies. We identified 280 proteins, 84% of which are known/predicted to be present in chloroplasts. Seventy-four percent have a known or predicted membrane association. Twenty-one membrane proteins were 2–15 times more abundant in BS cells, while 36 of the proteins were more abundant in M chloroplast envelopes. These proteins could represent additional candidates of proteins essential for development or metabolite transport processes in C4 plants. RT-PCR confirmed differential expression of 13 candidate genes. Chloroplast association for seven proteins was confirmed using YFP/GFP labeling. Gene expression of four putative transporters was examined throughout the leaf and during the greening of leaves. Genes for a PIC-like protein and an ER-AP-like protein show an early transient increase in gene expression during the transition to light. In addition, PIC gene

  5. The complexity of chloroplast chaperonins.

    PubMed

    Vitlin Gruber, Anna; Nisemblat, Shahar; Azem, Abdussalam; Weiss, Celeste

    2013-12-01

    Type I chaperonins are large oligomeric protein ensembles that are involved in the folding and assembly of other proteins. Chloroplast chaperonins and co-chaperonins exist in multiple copies of two distinct isoforms that can combine to form a range of labile oligomeric structures. This complex system increases the potential number of chaperonin substrates and possibilities for regulation. The incorporation of unique subunits into the oligomer can modify substrate specificity. Some subunits are upregulated in response to heat shock and some show organ-specific expression, whereas others possess additional functions that are unrelated to their role in protein folding. Accumulating evidence suggests that specific subunits have distinct roles in biogenesis of ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase oxygenase (Rubisco). PMID:24035661

  6. Analysis of the differential response of five annuals to elevated CO sub 2 during growth

    SciTech Connect

    Garbutt, K. ); Williams, W.E. ); Bazzaz, F.A. )

    1990-06-01

    In order to investigate the effects, without competition, of CO{sub 2} on germination, growth, physiological response, and reproduction, the authors focussed on co-occurring species that are prominent members of an annual community in Illinois. Five species of old field annual plants - Abutilon theophrasti (C{sub 3}), Amaranthus retroflexus (C{sub 4}), Ambrosia artemisiifolia (C{sub 3}), Chenopodium album (C{sub 3}), and Setaria faberii (C{sub 4}) - were grown for their entire life cycle as individuals at CO{sub 2} concentration of 350 {mu}L/O, 500 {mu}L/L, and 700 {mu}L/L. Emergence time, growth rate, shoot water status, photosynthesis, conductance, flowering time, nitrogen content, and biomass and reproductive biomass were measured. There was no detectable effect of enhanced CO{sub 2} on timing of emergency in any of the species. The three levels of carbon dioxide concentration were shown to produce varying effects on remaining quantities measured in the five different plants. Some of these differences were not statistically significant. The response of most characters had a significant species {times} CO{sub 2} interaction. However, this was not simply caused by the C{sub 3}/C{sub 4} dichotomy. Reproductive biomass (seed, fruits, and flowers) increased with increasing CO{sub 2} in Amaranthus (C{sub 4}) and in Chenopodium and Ambrosia (both C{sub 3}), but there was no change in Setaria (C{sub 4}), and Abutilon (C{sub 3}) showed a peak at 500 {mu}L/L. Species of the same community differed in their response to CO{sub 2}, and these differences may help explain the outcome of competitive interactions among these species above ambient CO{sub 2} levels.

  7. An Arabidopsis soluble chloroplast proteomic analysis reveals the participation of the Executer pathway in response to increased light conditions

    PubMed Central

    Uberegui, Estefanía; Hall, Michael; Lorenzo, Óscar; Schröder, Wolfgang P.; Balsera, Mónica

    2015-01-01

    The Executer1 and Executer2 proteins have a fundamental role in the signalling pathway mediated by singlet oxygen in chloroplast; nonetheless, not much is known yet about their specific activity and features. Herein, we have followed a differential-expression proteomics approach to analyse the impact of Executer on the soluble chloroplast protein abundance in Arabidopsis. Because singlet oxygen plays a significant role in signalling the oxidative response of plants to light, our analysis also included the soluble chloroplast proteome of plants exposed to a moderate light intensity in the time frame of hours. A number of light- and genotype-responsive proteins were detected, and mass-spectrometry identification showed changes in abundance of several photosynthesis- and carbon metabolism-related proteins as well as proteins involved in plastid mRNA processing. Our results support the participation of the Executer proteins in signalling and control of chloroplast metabolism, and in the regulation of plant response to environmental changes. PMID:25740923

  8. Chloroplasts at work during plant innate immunity.

    PubMed

    Serrano, Irene; Audran, Corinne; Rivas, Susana

    2016-06-01

    The major role played by chloroplasts during light harvesting, energy production, redox homeostasis, and retrograde signalling processes has been extensively characterized. Beyond the obvious link between chloroplast functions in primary metabolism and as providers of photosynthesis-derived carbon sources and energy, a growing body of evidence supports a central role for chloroplasts as integrators of environmental signals and, more particularly, as key defence organelles. Here, we review the importance of these organelles as primary sites for the biosynthesis and transmission of pro-defence signals during plant immune responses. In addition, we highlight interorganellar communication as a crucial process for amplification of the immune response. Finally, molecular strategies used by microbes to manipulate, directly or indirectly, the production/function of defence-related signalling molecules and subvert chloroplast-based defences are also discussed. PMID:26994477

  9. Solar energy conversion by chloroplast photoelectrochemical cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhardwaj, R.; Pan, R. L.; Gross, E. L.

    1981-01-01

    A photoelectrochemical cell based on chloroplasts which generates large photovoltages and photocurrents from solar energy is presented. The cell contains broken Type C chloroplasts placed on a filter separating compartments containing an electron acceptor and electron donor with platinum electrodes in each. Photovoltages were observed across a load resistance of 3000 ohms with either flavin mononucleotide or anthroquinone 2-sulphonate as the electron acceptor and dichlorophenol indophenol as the donor, and persisted for 1-2 hr after the light was turned off. The powers and short circuit currents obtained in the chloroplast cells are nearly equal to those obtained in cells based on isolated photosystem I particles. Finally, an efficiency of 2.3% has been measured for the chloroplast contribution to the total power in flavin mononucleotide cells.

  10. Proteomic comparison reveals the contribution of chloroplast to salt tolerance of a wheat introgression line.

    PubMed

    Xu, Wenjing; Lv, Hongjun; Zhao, Mingming; Li, Yongchao; Qi, Yueying; Peng, Zhenying; Xia, Guangmin; Wang, Mengcheng

    2016-01-01

    We previously bred a salt tolerant wheat cv. SR3 with bread wheat cv. JN177 as the parent via asymmetric somatic hybridization, and found that the tolerance is partially attributed to the superior photosynthesis capacity. Here, we compared the proteomes of two cultivars to unravel the basis of superior photosynthesis capacity. In the maps of two dimensional difference gel electrophoresis (2D-DIGE), there were 26 differentially expressed proteins (DEPs), including 18 cultivar-based and 8 stress-responsive ones. 21 of 26 DEPs were identified and classified into four categories, including photosynthesis, photosynthesis system stability, linolenic acid metabolism, and protein synthesis in chloroplast. The chloroplast localization of some DEPs confirmed that the identified DEPs function in the chloroplast. The overexpression of a DEP enhanced salt tolerance in Arabidopsis thaliana. In line with these data, it is concluded that the contribution of chloroplast to high salinity tolerance of wheat cv. SR3 appears to include higher photosynthesis efficiency by promoting system protection and ROS clearance, stronger production of phytohormone JA by enhancing metabolism activity, and modulating the in chloroplast synthesis of proteins. PMID:27562633

  11. Proteomic comparison reveals the contribution of chloroplast to salt tolerance of a wheat introgression line

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Wenjing; Lv, Hongjun; Zhao, Mingming; Li, Yongchao; Qi, Yueying; Peng, Zhenying; Xia, Guangmin; Wang, Mengcheng

    2016-01-01

    We previously bred a salt tolerant wheat cv. SR3 with bread wheat cv. JN177 as the parent via asymmetric somatic hybridization, and found that the tolerance is partially attributed to the superior photosynthesis capacity. Here, we compared the proteomes of two cultivars to unravel the basis of superior photosynthesis capacity. In the maps of two dimensional difference gel electrophoresis (2D-DIGE), there were 26 differentially expressed proteins (DEPs), including 18 cultivar-based and 8 stress-responsive ones. 21 of 26 DEPs were identified and classified into four categories, including photosynthesis, photosynthesis system stability, linolenic acid metabolism, and protein synthesis in chloroplast. The chloroplast localization of some DEPs confirmed that the identified DEPs function in the chloroplast. The overexpression of a DEP enhanced salt tolerance in Arabidopsis thaliana. In line with these data, it is concluded that the contribution of chloroplast to high salinity tolerance of wheat cv. SR3 appears to include higher photosynthesis efficiency by promoting system protection and ROS clearance, stronger production of phytohormone JA by enhancing metabolism activity, and modulating the in chloroplast synthesis of proteins. PMID:27562633

  12. Differentiation of the seed coat and composition of the mucilage of Lepidium perfoliatum L.: a desert annual with typical myxospermy.

    PubMed

    Huang, Daihong; Wang, Cui; Yuan, Junwen; Cao, Jing; Lan, Haiyan

    2015-10-01

    Myxospermy is an important feature in seeds of many plant species grown in desert region. Fertilization can initiate differentiation of the seed coat epidermis into a specialized cell type with mucilage production. In the present study, comprehensive analyses were performed on the seed coat differentiation, mucilage production and composition, and seed germination in Lepidium perfoliatum (Brassicaceae), a desert annual with typical myxospermy in China. First, results indicated that mucilage was secreted uniformly at the outer tangential wall, resulting in compression of the cytoplasm to the bottom of the epidermal cells. Secondly, the inner tangential wall and two radial walls of the subepidermal cells were apparently thickened by production of a secondary cell wall material, which resulted in a 'typical' palisade appearance. Thirdly, immunohistochemical staining combined with the enzymatic digestion and infrared spectrum analysis of the mucilage indicated that, while one important component of the seed coat mucilage in L. perfoliatum was pectin, it also contained β-1,3-d-glucan and xyloglucan. Finally, seed germination showed that seeds with mucilage displayed significantly higher germination percentage than that of demucilaged seeds in abundant or excess water conditions. These results suggest that the possible ecological role of mucilage in L. perfoliatum is in the adaptation to habitats with well-watered and water-logged conditions, rather than water stress. PMID:26341978

  13. Transient foreign gene expression in chloroplasts of cultured tobacco cells after biolistic delivery of chloroplast vectors.

    PubMed Central

    Daniell, H; Vivekananda, J; Nielsen, B L; Ye, G N; Tewari, K K; Sanford, J C

    1990-01-01

    Expression of chloramphenicol acetyltransferase (cat) by suitable vectors in chloroplasts of cultured tobacco cells, delivered by high-velocity microprojectiles, is reported here. Several chloroplast expression vectors containing bacterial cat genes, placed under the control of either psbA promoter region from pea (pHD series) or rbcL promoter region from maize (pAC series) have been used in this study. In addition, chloroplast expression vectors containing replicon fragments from pea, tobacco, or maize chloroplast DNA have also been tested for efficiency and duration of cat expression in chloroplasts of tobacco cells. Cultured NT1 tobacco cells collected on filter papers were bombarded with tungsten particles coated with pUC118 (negative control), 35S-CAT (nuclear expression vector), pHD312 (repliconless chloroplast expression vector), and pHD407, pACp18, and pACp19 (chloroplast expression vectors with replicon). Sonic extracts of cells bombarded with pUC118 showed no detectable cat activity in the autoradiograms. Nuclear expression of cat reached two-thirds of the maximal 48 hr after bombardment and the maximal at 72 hr. Cells bombarded with chloroplast expression vectors showed a low level of expression until 48 hr of incubation. A dramatic increase in the expression of cat was observed 24 hr after the addition of fresh medium to cultured cells in samples bombarded with pHD407; the repliconless vector pHD312 showed about 50% of this maximal activity. The expression of nuclear cat and the repliconless chloroplast vector decreased after 72 hr, but a high level of chloroplast cat expression was maintained in cells bombarded with pHD407. Organelle-specific expression of cat in appropriate compartments was checked by introducing various plasmid constructions into tobacco protoplasts by electroporation. Although the nuclear expression vector 35S-CAT showed expression of cat, no activity was observed with any chloroplast vectors. Images PMID:2404285

  14. REDUCED CHLOROPLAST COVERAGE genes from Arabidopsis thaliana help to establish the size of the chloroplast compartment

    PubMed Central

    Larkin, Robert M.; Stefano, Giovanni; Ruckle, Michael E.; Stavoe, Andrea K.; Sinkler, Christopher A.; Brandizzi, Federica; Malmstrom, Carolyn M.; Osteryoung, Katherine W.

    2016-01-01

    Eukaryotic cells require mechanisms to establish the proportion of cellular volume devoted to particular organelles. These mechanisms are poorly understood. From a screen for plastid-to-nucleus signaling mutants in Arabidopsis thaliana, we cloned a mutant allele of a gene that encodes a protein of unknown function that is homologous to two other Arabidopsis genes of unknown function and to FRIENDLY, which was previously shown to promote the normal distribution of mitochondria in Arabidopsis. In contrast to FRIENDLY, these three homologs of FRIENDLY are found only in photosynthetic organisms. Based on these data, we proposed that FRIENDLY expanded into a small gene family to help regulate the energy metabolism of cells that contain both mitochondria and chloroplasts. Indeed, we found that knocking out these genes caused a number of chloroplast phenotypes, including a reduction in the proportion of cellular volume devoted to chloroplasts to 50% of wild type. Thus, we refer to these genes as REDUCED CHLOROPLAST COVERAGE (REC). The size of the chloroplast compartment was reduced most in rec1 mutants. The REC1 protein accumulated in the cytosol and the nucleus. REC1 was excluded from the nucleus when plants were treated with amitrole, which inhibits cell expansion and chloroplast function. We conclude that REC1 is an extraplastidic protein that helps to establish the size of the chloroplast compartment, and that signals derived from cell expansion or chloroplasts may regulate REC1. PMID:26862170

  15. Three-Dimensional Visualization of the Tubular-Lamellar Transformation of the Internal Plastid Membrane Network during Runner Bean Chloroplast Biogenesis.

    PubMed

    Kowalewska, Łucja; Mazur, Radosław; Suski, Szymon; Garstka, Maciej; Mostowska, Agnieszka

    2016-04-01

    Chloroplast biogenesis is a complex process that is integrated with plant development, leading to fully differentiated and functionally mature plastids. In this work, we used electron tomography and confocal microscopy to reconstruct the process of structural membrane transformation during the etioplast-to-chloroplast transition in runner bean (Phaseolus coccineus). During chloroplast development, the regular tubular network of paracrystalline prolamellar bodies (PLBs) and the flattened porous membranes of prothylakoids develop into the chloroplast thylakoids. Three-dimensional reconstruction is required to provide us with a more complete understanding of this transformation. We provide spatial models of the bean chloroplast biogenesis that allow such reconstruction of the internal membranes of the developing chloroplast and visualize the transformation from the tubular arrangement to the linear system of parallel lamellae. We prove that the tubular structure of the PLB transforms directly to flat slats, without dispersion to vesicles. We demonstrate that the grana/stroma thylakoid connections have a helical character starting from the early stages of appressed membrane formation. Moreover, we point out the importance of particular chlorophyll-protein complex components in the membrane stacking during the biogenesis. The main stages of chloroplast internal membrane biogenesis are presented in a movie that shows the time development of the chloroplast biogenesis as a dynamic model of this process. PMID:27002023

  16. Genome Sequences of Populus tremula Chloroplast and Mitochondrion: Implications for Holistic Poplar Breeding

    PubMed Central

    Mader, Malte; Le Paslier, Marie-Christine; Bounon, Rémi; Berard, Aurélie; Vettori, Cristina; Schroeder, Hilke; Leplé, Jean-Charles; Fladung, Matthias

    2016-01-01

    Complete Populus genome sequences are available for the nucleus (P. trichocarpa; section Tacamahaca) and for chloroplasts (seven species), but not for mitochondria. Here, we provide the complete genome sequences of the chloroplast and the mitochondrion for the clones P. tremula W52 and P. tremula x P. alba 717-1B4 (section Populus). The organization of the chloroplast genomes of both Populus clones is described. A phylogenetic tree constructed from all available complete chloroplast DNA sequences of Populus was not congruent with the assignment of the related species to different Populus sections. In total, 3,024 variable nucleotide positions were identified among all compared Populus chloroplast DNA sequences. The 5-prime part of the LSC from trnH to atpA showed the highest frequency of variations. The variable positions included 163 positions with SNPs allowing for differentiating the two clones with P. tremula chloroplast genomes (W52, 717-1B4) from the other seven Populus individuals. These potential P. tremula-specific SNPs were displayed as a whole-plastome barcode on the P. tremula W52 chloroplast DNA sequence. Three of these SNPs and one InDel in the trnH-psbA linker were successfully validated by Sanger sequencing in an extended set of Populus individuals. The complete mitochondrial genome sequence of P. tremula is the first in the family of Salicaceae. The mitochondrial genomes of the two clones are 783,442 bp (W52) and 783,513 bp (717-1B4) in size, structurally very similar and organized as single circles. DNA sequence regions with high similarity to the W52 chloroplast sequence account for about 2% of the W52 mitochondrial genome. The mean SNP frequency was found to be nearly six fold higher in the chloroplast than in the mitochondrial genome when comparing 717-1B4 with W52. The availability of the genomic information of all three DNA-containing cell organelles will allow a holistic approach in poplar molecular breeding in the future. PMID:26800039

  17. FtsHi4 Is Essential for Embryogenesis Due to Its Influence on Chloroplast Development in Arabidopsis

    PubMed Central

    Li, Shipeng; Su, Yanping; Liang, Qiuju; Meng, Hongyan; Shen, Songdong; Fan, Yunliu; Liu, Chunming; Zhang, Chunyi

    2014-01-01

    Chloroplast formation is associated with embryo development and seedling growth. However, the relationship between chloroplast differentiation and embryo development remains unclear. Five FtsHi genes that encode proteins with high similarity to FtsH proteins, but lack Zn2+-binding motifs, are present in the Arabidopsis genome. In this study, we showed that T-DNA insertion mutations in the Arabidopsis FtsHi4 gene resulted in embryo arrest at the globular-to-heart–shaped transition stage. Transmission electron microscopic analyses revealed abnormal plastid differentiation with a severe defect in thylakoid formation in the mutant embryos. Immunocytological studies demonstrated that FtsHi4 localized in chloroplasts as a thylakoid membrane-associated protein, supporting its essential role in thylakoid membrane formation. We further showed that FtsHi4 forms protein complexes, and that there was a significant reduction in the accumulation of D2 and PsbO (two photosystem II proteins) in mutant ovules. The role of FtsHi4 in chloroplast development was confirmed using an RNA-interfering approach. Additionally, mutations in other FtsHi genes including FtsHi1, FtsHi2, and FtsHi5 caused phenotypic abnormalities similar to ftshi4 with respect to plastid differentiation during embryogenesis. Taken together, our data suggest that FtsHi4, together with FtsHi1, FtsHi2, and FtsHi5 are essential for chloroplast development in Arabidopsis. PMID:24964212

  18. Defining the Core Proteome of the Chloroplast Envelope Membranes

    PubMed Central

    Simm, Stefan; Papasotiriou, Dimitrios G.; Ibrahim, Mohamed; Leisegang, Matthias S.; Müller, Bernd; Schorge, Tobias; Karas, Michael; Mirus, Oliver; Sommer, Maik S.; Schleiff, Enrico

    2013-01-01

    High-throughput protein localization studies require multiple strategies. Mass spectrometric analysis of defined cellular fractions is one of the complementary approaches to a diverse array of cell biological methods. In recent years, the protein content of different cellular (sub-)compartments was approached. Despite of all the efforts made, the analysis of membrane fractions remains difficult, in that the dissection of the proteomes of the envelope membranes of chloroplasts or mitochondria is often not reliable because sample purity is not always warranted. Moreover, proteomic studies are often restricted to single (model) species, and therefore limited in respect to differential individual evolution. In this study we analyzed the chloroplast envelope proteomes of different plant species, namely, the individual proteomes of inner and outer envelope (OE) membrane of Pisum sativum and the mixed envelope proteomes of Arabidopsis thaliana and Medicago sativa. The analysis of all three species yielded 341 identified proteins in total, 247 of them being unique. 39 proteins were genuine envelope proteins found in at least two species. Based on this and previous envelope studies we defined the core envelope proteome of chloroplasts. Comparing the general overlap of the available six independent studies (including ours) revealed only a number of 27 envelope proteins. Depending on the stringency of applied selection criteria we found 231 envelope proteins, while less stringent criteria increases this number to 649 putative envelope proteins. Based on the latter we provide a map of the outer and inner envelope core proteome, which includes many yet uncharacterized proteins predicted to be involved in transport, signaling, and response. Furthermore, a foundation for the functional characterization of yet unidentified functions of the inner and OE for further analyses is provided. PMID:23390424

  19. Chloroplasts Are Central Players in Sugar-Induced Leaf Growth.

    PubMed

    Van Dingenen, Judith; De Milde, Liesbeth; Vermeersch, Mattias; Maleux, Katrien; De Rycke, Riet; De Bruyne, Michiel; Storme, Véronique; Gonzalez, Nathalie; Dhondt, Stijn; Inzé, Dirk

    2016-05-01

    Leaves are the plant's powerhouses, providing energy for all organs through sugar production during photosynthesis. However, sugars serve not only as a metabolic energy source for sink tissues but also as signaling molecules, affecting gene expression through conserved signaling pathways to regulate plant growth and development. Here, we describe an in vitro experimental assay, allowing one to alter the sucrose (Suc) availability during early Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) leaf development, with the aim to identify the affected cellular and molecular processes. The transfer of seedlings to Suc-containing medium showed a profound effect on leaf growth by stimulating cell proliferation and postponing the transition to cell expansion. Furthermore, rapidly after transfer to Suc, mesophyll cells contained fewer and smaller plastids, which are irregular in shape and contain fewer starch granules compared with control mesophyll cells. Short-term transcriptional responses after transfer to Suc revealed the repression of well-known sugar-responsive genes and multiple genes encoded by the plastid, on the one hand, and up-regulation of a GLUCOSE-6-PHOSPHATE TRANSPORTER (GPT2), on the other hand. Mutant gpt2 seedlings showed no stimulation of cell proliferation and no repression of chloroplast-encoded transcripts when transferred to Suc, suggesting that GPT2 plays a critical role in the Suc-mediated effects on early leaf growth. Our findings, therefore, suggest that induction of GPT2 expression by Suc increases the import of glucose-6-phosphate into the plastids that would repress chloroplast-encoded transcripts, restricting chloroplast differentiation. Retrograde signaling from the plastids would then delay the transition to cell expansion and stimulate cell proliferation. PMID:26932234

  20. Vectorial photocurrents and photoconductivity in metalized chloroplasts

    SciTech Connect

    Greenbaum, E. )

    1990-08-09

    A novel photobiophysical phenomenon was observed in isolated spinach chloroplasts that were metalized by precipitating colloidal platinum onto the surface of the thylakoid membranes. A two-point irradiation and detection system was constructed in which a continuous-beam helium-neon laser ({lambda} = 632.8 nm) was used to irradiate the platinized chloroplasts at varying perpendicular distances (Figure 1) from a single linear platinum electrode in pressure contact with the platinized chloroplasts. No external voltage bias was applied to the system. The key objective of the experiments reported in this report was to measure the relative photoconductivity of the chloroplast-metal composite matrix. Unlike conventional photosynthetic electrochemical cells, in which irradiated chloroplasts are in close proximity to an electrode or linked to the electrode by an electrode-active mediator, the flow of photocurrent was through the biocomposite material. A sustained steady-state vectorial flow of current in the plane of the entrapped composite from the point of laser irradiation to the wire electrode was measured.

  1. Heme content and breakdown in developing chloroplasts

    SciTech Connect

    Thomas, J.; Weinstein, J.D. )

    1990-05-01

    Heme regulates tetrapyrrole biosynthesis in plants by inhibition of {delta}-aminolevulinic acid (ALA) synthesis, product inhibition of heme synthesis, and possibly other mechanisms. Plastid heme levels may be modulated by heme synthesis, breakdown and/or efflux. Heme breakdown may be catalyzed by a chloroplast localized heme oxygenase. Chloroplasts isolated from greening cucumber cotyledons were incubated in the presence or absence of various components thought to modulate heme breakdown. Following the incubations, the chloroplasts were broken (freeze-thaw) and then supplemented with horseradish peroxidase apoenzyme. The reconstituted peroxidase activity was used to determine the amount of free heme remaining (Thomas Weinstein (1989) Plant Physiol. 89S: 74). Chloroplasts, freshly isolated from seedlings greened for 16 hours, contained approximately 37 pmol heme/mg protein. When chloroplasts were incubated with 5 mM NADPH for 30 min, the endogenous heme dropped to unmeasurable levels. Exogenous heme was also broken down when NADPH was included in the incubation. Heme levels could be increased by the inclusion of 50 {mu}M ALA and/or p-hydroxymercuribenzoate. The increase due to exogenous ALA was blocked by levulinic acid, an inhibitor of ALA utilization. NADPH-dependent heme breakdown acid was inhibited by p-hydroxymercuribenzoate.

  2. Quercetin interaction with the chloroplast ATPase complex.

    PubMed

    Shoshan, V; Shahak, Y; Shavit, N

    1980-07-01

    1. Quercetin, a flavonoid which acts as an energy transfer inhibitor in photophosphorylation is shown to inhibit the P-ATP exchange activity of membrane-bound CF1 and the ATPase activity of isolated CF1. Quercetin, affects also the proton uptake in chloroplasts in a manner similar to that of dicyclohexylcarbodiimide. 2. The light-dependent proton uptake in EDTA-treated chloroplasts is stimulated by quercetin. In untreated chloroplasts quercetin has a dual effect: it enhances at pH above 7.5 while at lower pH values it decreases the extent of H+ uptake. Similar effects were obtained with dicyclohexylcarbodiimide. 3. Like quercetin, dicyclohexylcarbodiimide was also found to inhibit the ATPase activity of isolated CF1. 4. Quercetin inhibits uncoupled electron transport induced by either EDTA-treatment of chloroplasts or by addition of uncouplers. Quercetin restores H+ uptake in both types of uncoupled chloroplasts. 5. The mode of action of quercetin and dicyclohexylcarbodiimide in photophosphorylation is discussed, and interaction with both CF1 and F0 is suggested. PMID:6446936

  3. Glycolate transporter of the pea chloroplast envelope

    SciTech Connect

    Howitz, K.T.

    1985-01-01

    The discovery of a glycolate transporter in the pea (Pisum sativum) chloroplast envelope is described. Several novel silicone oil centrifugation methods were developed to resolve the initial rate kinetics of (/sup 14/C)glycolate transport by isolated, intact pea chloroplasts. Chloroplast glycolate transport was found to be carrier mediated. Transport rates saturated with increasing glycolate concentration. N-Ethylmaleimide (NEM) pretreatment of chloroplasts inhibited transport, an inhibition prevented by glycolate. Glycolate distributed across the envelope in a way which equalized stromal and medium glycolic acid concentrations, limiting possible transport mechanisms to facilitated glycolic acid diffusion, proton symport or hydroxyl antiport. The effects of stomal and medium pH's on the K/sub m/ and V/sub max/ fit the predictions of mobile carrier kinetic models of hydroxyl antiport or proton symport (H/sup +/ binds first). The carrier mediated transport was fast enough to be consistent with in vivo rates of photorespiration. The 2-hydroxymonocarboxylates, glycerate, lactate and glyoxylate are competitive inhibitors of chloroplast glycolate uptake. Glyoxylate, D-lactate and D-glycerate cause glycolate counterflow, indicating that they are also substrates of the glycolate carrier. This finding was confirmed for D-glycerate by studies on glycolate effects on (1-/sup 14/C)D-glycerate transport.

  4. Isolation, quantification, and analysis of chloroplast DNA.

    PubMed

    Rowan, Beth A; Bendich, Arnold J

    2011-01-01

    Many areas of chloroplast research require methods that can assess the quality and quantity of chloroplast DNA (cpDNA). The study of chloroplast functions that depend on the proper maintenance and expression of the chloroplast genome, understanding cpDNA replication and repair, and the development of technologies for chloroplast transformation are just some of the disciplines that require the isolation of high-quality cpDNA. Arabidopsis thaliana offers several advantages for studying these processes because of the sizeable collection of mutants and natural varieties (accessions) available from stock centers and a broad community of researchers that has developed many other genetic resources. Several approaches for the isolation and quantification of cpDNA have been developed, but little consideration has been given to the strengths and weaknesses and the type of information obtained by each method, especially with respect to A. thaliana. Here, we provide protocols for obtaining high-quality cpDNA for PCR and other applications, and we evaluate several different isolation and analytical methods in order to build a robust framework for the study of cpDNA with this model organism. PMID:21822838

  5. Proteomic Insight into the Response of Arabidopsis Chloroplasts to Darkness

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jing; Yu, Qingbo; Xiong, Haibo; Wang, Jun; Chen, Sixue; Yang, Zhongnan; Dai, Shaojun

    2016-01-01

    Chloroplast function in photosynthesis is essential for plant growth and development. It is well-known that chloroplasts respond to various light conditions. However, it remains poorly understood about how chloroplasts respond to darkness. In this study, we found 81 darkness-responsive proteins in Arabidopsis chloroplasts under 8 h darkness treatment. Most of the proteins are nucleus-encoded, indicating that chloroplast darkness response is closely regulated by the nucleus. Among them, 17 ribosome proteins were obviously reduced after darkness treatment. The protein expressional patterns and physiological changes revealed the mechanisms in chloroplasts in response to darkness, e.g., (1) inhibition of photosystem II resulted in preferential cyclic electron flow around PSI; (2) promotion of starch degradation; (3) inhibition of chloroplastic translation; and (4) regulation by redox and jasmonate signaling. The results have improved our understanding of molecular regulatory mechanisms in chloroplasts under darkness. PMID:27137770

  6. A Putative Chloroplast Thylakoid Metalloprotease VIRESCENT3 Regulates Chloroplast Development in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Qi, Yafei; Liu, Xiayan; Liang, Shuang; Wang, Rui; Li, Yuanfeng; Zhao, Jun; Shao, Jingxia; An, Lijun; Yu, Fei

    2016-02-12

    The chloroplast is the site of photosynthesis and many other essential plant metabolic processes, and chloroplast development is an integral part of plant growth and development. Mutants defective in chloroplast development can display various color phenotypes including the intriguing virescence phenotype, which shows yellow/white coloration at the leaf base and greening toward the leaf tip. Through large scale genetic screens, we identified a series of new virescent mutants including virescent3-1 (vir3-1), vir4-1, and vir5-1 in Arabidopsis thaliana. We showed that VIR3 encodes a putative chloroplast metalloprotease by map-based cloning. Through site-directed mutagenesis, we showed that the conserved histidine 235 residue in the zinc binding motif HEAGH of VIR3 is indispensable for VIR3 accumulation in the chloroplast. The chloroplast localization of VIR3 was confirmed by the transient expression of VIR3-GFP in leaf protoplasts. Furthermore, taking advantage of transgenic lines expressing VIR3-FLAG, we demonstrated that VIR3 is an intrinsic thylakoid membrane protein that mainly resides in the stromal lamellae. Moreover, topology analysis using transgenic lines expressing a dual epitope-tagged VIR3 indicated that both the N and C termini of VIR3 are located in the stroma, and the catalytic domain of VIR3 is probably facing the stroma. Blue native gel analysis indicated that VIR3 is likely present as a monomer or part of a small complex in the thylakoid membrane. This work not only implicates VIR3 as a new factor involved in early chloroplast development but also provides more insight into the roles of chloroplast proteases in chloroplast biogenesis. PMID:26702056

  7. Analyses of Charophyte Chloroplast Genomes Help Characterize the Ancestral Chloroplast Genome of Land Plants

    PubMed Central

    Civáň, Peter; Foster, Peter G.; Embley, Martin T.; Séneca, Ana; Cox, Cymon J.

    2014-01-01

    Despite the significance of the relationships between embryophytes and their charophyte algal ancestors in deciphering the origin and evolutionary success of land plants, few chloroplast genomes of the charophyte algae have been reconstructed to date. Here, we present new data for three chloroplast genomes of the freshwater charophytes Klebsormidium flaccidum (Klebsormidiophyceae), Mesotaenium endlicherianum (Zygnematophyceae), and Roya anglica (Zygnematophyceae). The chloroplast genome of Klebsormidium has a quadripartite organization with exceptionally large inverted repeat (IR) regions and, uniquely among streptophytes, has lost the rrn5 and rrn4.5 genes from the ribosomal RNA (rRNA) gene cluster operon. The chloroplast genome of Roya differs from other zygnematophycean chloroplasts, including the newly sequenced Mesotaenium, by having a quadripartite structure that is typical of other streptophytes. On the basis of the improbability of the novel gain of IR regions, we infer that the quadripartite structure has likely been lost independently in at least three zygnematophycean lineages, although the absence of the usual rRNA operonic synteny in the IR regions of Roya may indicate their de novo origin. Significantly, all zygnematophycean chloroplast genomes have undergone substantial genomic rearrangement, which may be the result of ancient retroelement activity evidenced by the presence of integrase-like and reverse transcriptase-like elements in the Roya chloroplast genome. Our results corroborate the close phylogenetic relationship between Zygnematophyceae and land plants and identify 89 protein-coding genes and 22 introns present in the chloroplast genome at the time of the evolutionary transition of plants to land, all of which can be found in the chloroplast genomes of extant charophytes. PMID:24682153

  8. Analyses of charophyte chloroplast genomes help characterize the ancestral chloroplast genome of land plants.

    PubMed

    Civaň, Peter; Foster, Peter G; Embley, Martin T; Séneca, Ana; Cox, Cymon J

    2014-04-01

    Despite the significance of the relationships between embryophytes and their charophyte algal ancestors in deciphering the origin and evolutionary success of land plants, few chloroplast genomes of the charophyte algae have been reconstructed to date. Here, we present new data for three chloroplast genomes of the freshwater charophytes Klebsormidium flaccidum (Klebsormidiophyceae), Mesotaenium endlicherianum (Zygnematophyceae), and Roya anglica (Zygnematophyceae). The chloroplast genome of Klebsormidium has a quadripartite organization with exceptionally large inverted repeat (IR) regions and, uniquely among streptophytes, has lost the rrn5 and rrn4.5 genes from the ribosomal RNA (rRNA) gene cluster operon. The chloroplast genome of Roya differs from other zygnematophycean chloroplasts, including the newly sequenced Mesotaenium, by having a quadripartite structure that is typical of other streptophytes. On the basis of the improbability of the novel gain of IR regions, we infer that the quadripartite structure has likely been lost independently in at least three zygnematophycean lineages, although the absence of the usual rRNA operonic synteny in the IR regions of Roya may indicate their de novo origin. Significantly, all zygnematophycean chloroplast genomes have undergone substantial genomic rearrangement, which may be the result of ancient retroelement activity evidenced by the presence of integrase-like and reverse transcriptase-like elements in the Roya chloroplast genome. Our results corroborate the close phylogenetic relationship between Zygnematophyceae and land plants and identify 89 protein-coding genes and 22 introns present in the chloroplast genome at the time of the evolutionary transition of plants to land, all of which can be found in the chloroplast genomes of extant charophytes. PMID:24682153

  9. The chloroplast genome exists in multimeric forms

    SciTech Connect

    Deng, Xingwang; Wing, R.A.; Gruissem, W. )

    1989-06-01

    Chloroplast DNA conformation was analyzed by pulse-field gel electrophoresis. The authors found that spinach leaf chloroplast DNA molecules exist in at least four distinct forms with the apparent molecular weights of monomer, dimer, trimer, and tetramer. Two-dimensional gel analysis of DNA after UV nicking and in the presence of ethidium bromide indicates that they are not isomers that differ in superhelical density. DNA gyrase decatenation analysis demonstrates that the majority of the DNA molecules are oligomers rather than catenanes. The relative amounts of monomer, dimer, trimer, and tetramer forms, quantitated by molecular hybridization, are 1, 1/3, 1/9, and 1/27, respectively, and do not change during leaf maturation. The possible mechanisms of chloroplast DNA oligomer formation are discussed.

  10. Chloroplast-Diphenyl Ether Interactions II 1

    PubMed Central

    Wettlaufer, S. H.; Alscher, Ruth; Strick, Christine

    1985-01-01

    Acifluorfen, a p-nitrodiphenyl ether herbicide, is inhibitory to those photosynthetic functions that require a functioning chloroplast envelope. Functions involving the stroma are also affected. Acifluorfen does not lyse intact spinach chloroplasts, yet does increase the sensitivity of CO2-dependent O2 evolution to exogenous inorganic phosphate without directly affecting the function of the phosphate translocator. Acifluorfen penetrates into the chloroplast stroma in a light-independent fashion. Once inside, it causes the inactivation of light and dithiothreitol-activated fructose 1,6-bisphosphatase. Light-activated glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (NADP) is also inactivated by acifluorfen. These data suggest that acifluorfen stimulates a pathway for inactivation of fructose 1,6-bisphosphatase and glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate dehydrogenase (NADP) which uses oxygen as a terminal oxidant and which involves thioredoxin and ferredoxin-thioredoxin reductase. PMID:16664219

  11. Protein methylation reactions in intact pea chloroplasts

    SciTech Connect

    Niemi, K.J. )

    1989-04-01

    Post-translational protein methylation was investigated in Pisum sativum chloroplasts. Intact pea chloroplasts were incubated with ({sup 3}H-methyl)-S-adenosylmethionine under various conditions. The chloroplasts were then separated into stromal and thylakoid fractions and analyzed for radioactivity transferred to protein. Light enhanced the magnitude of labeling in both fractions. One thylakoid polypeptide with an apparent molecular mass of 43 kDa was labeled only in the light. Several other thylakoid and stromal proteins were labeled in both light and dark-labeling conditions. Both base-labile methylation, carboxy-methylesters and base-stable groups, N-methylations were found. Further characterization of the methyl-transfer reactions will be presented.

  12. Chloroplast Response to Low Leaf Water Potentials

    PubMed Central

    Keck, R. W.; Boyer, J. S.

    1974-01-01

    Cyclic and noncyclic photophosphorylation and electron transport by photosystem 1, photosystem 2, and from water to methyl viologen (“whole chain”) were studied in chloroplasts isolated from sunflower (Helianthus annus L. var Russian Mammoth) leaves that had been desiccated to varying degrees. Electron transport showed considerable inhibition at leaf water potentials of −9 bars when the chloroplasts were exposed to an uncoupler in vitro, and it continued to decline in activity as leaf water potentials decreased. Electron transport by photosystem 2 and coupled electron transport by photosystem 1 and the whole chain were unaffected at leaf water potentials of −10 to −11 bars but became progressively inhibited between leaf water potentials of −11 and −17 bars. A low, stable activity remained at leaf water potentials below −17 bars. In contrast, both types of photophosphorylation were unaffected by leaf water potentials of −10 to −11 bars, but then ultimately became zero at leaf water potentials of −17 bars. Although the chloroplasts isolated from the desiccated leaves were coupled at leaf water potentials of −11 to −12 bars, they became progressively uncoupled as leaf water potentials decreased to −17 bars. Abscisic acid and ribonuclease had no effect on chloroplast photophosphorylation. The results are generally consistent with the idea that chloroplast activity begins to decrease at the same leaf water potentials that cause stomatal closure in sunflower leaves and that chloroplast electron transport begins to limit photosynthesis at leaf water potentials below about −11 bars. However, it suggests that, during severe desiccation, the limitation may shift from electron transport to photophosphorylation. PMID:16658727

  13. Chloroplast signaling within, between and beyond cells

    PubMed Central

    Bobik, Krzysztof; Burch-Smith, Tessa M.

    2015-01-01

    The most conspicuous function of plastids is the oxygenic photosynthesis of chloroplasts, yet plastids are super-factories that produce a plethora of compounds that are indispensable for proper plant physiology and development. Given their origins as free-living prokaryotes, it is not surprising that plastids possess their own genomes whose expression is essential to plastid function. This semi-autonomous character of plastids requires the existence of sophisticated regulatory mechanisms that provide reliable communication between them and other cellular compartments. Such intracellular signaling is necessary for coordinating whole-cell responses to constantly varying environmental cues and cellular metabolic needs. This is achieved by plastids acting as receivers and transmitters of specific signals that coordinate expression of the nuclear and plastid genomes according to particular needs. In this review we will consider the so-called retrograde signaling occurring between plastids and nuclei, and between plastids and other organelles. Another important role of the plastid we will discuss is the involvement of plastid signaling in biotic and abiotic stress that, in addition to influencing retrograde signaling, has direct effects on several cellular compartments including the cell wall. We will also review recent evidence pointing to an intriguing function of chloroplasts in regulating intercellular symplasmic transport. Finally, we consider an intriguing yet less widely known aspect of plant biology, chloroplast signaling from the perspective of the entire plant. Thus, accumulating evidence highlights that chloroplasts, with their complex signaling pathways, provide a mechanism for exquisite regulation of plant development, metabolism and responses to the environment. As chloroplast processes are targeted for engineering for improved productivity the effect of such modifications on chloroplast signaling will have to be carefully considered in order to avoid

  14. Tic32, an essential component in chloroplast biogenesis.

    PubMed

    Hörmann, Friederike; Küchler, Michael; Sveshnikov, Dmitry; Oppermann, Udo; Li, Yong; Soll, Jürgen

    2004-08-13

    Chloroplast protein import across the inner envelope is facilitated by the translocon of the inner envelope of chloroplasts (Tic). Here we have identified Tic32 as a novel subunit of the Tic complex. Tic32 can be purified from solubilized inner envelope membranes by chromatography on Tic110 containing affinity matrix. Co-immunoprecipitation experiments using either Tic32 or Tic110 antisera indicated a tight association between these polypeptides as well as with other Tic subunits, e.g. Tic40, Tic22, or Tic62, whereas the outer envelope protein Toc75 was not found in this complex. Chemical cross-linking suggests that Tic32 is involved late in the overall translocation process, because both the precursor form as well as the mature form of Rubisco small subunit can be detected. We were unable to isolate Arabidopsis null mutants of the attic32 gene, indicating that Tic32 is essential for viability. Deletion of the attic32 gene resulted in early seed abortion because the embryo was unable to differentiate from the heart stage to the torpedo stage. The homology of Tic32 to short-chain dehydrogenases suggests a dual role of Tic32 in import, one as a regulatory component and one as an important subunit in the assembly of the entire complex. PMID:15180984

  15. Chloroplast-derived enzyme cocktails hydrolyse lignocellulosic biomass and release fermentable sugars

    PubMed Central

    Verma, Dheeraj; Kanagaraj, Anderson; Jin, Shuangxia; Singh, Nameirakpam D.; Kolattukudy, Pappachan E; Daniell, Henry

    2009-01-01

    Summary It is widely recognized that biofuel production from lignocellulosic materials is limited by inadequate technology to efficiently and economically release fermentable sugars from the complex multi-polymeric raw materials. Therefore, endoglucanases, exoglucanase, pectate lyases, cutinase, swollenin, xylanase, acetyl xylan esterase, beta glucosidase and lipase genes from bacteria or fungi were expressed in E. coli or tobacco chloroplasts. A PCR based method was used to clone genes without introns from Trichoderma reesei genomic DNA. Homoplasmic transplastomic lines showed normal phenotype and were fertile. Based on observed expression levels, up to 49, 64 and 10,751 million units of pectate lyases or endoglucanase can be produced annually, per acre of tobacco. Plant production cost of endoglucanase is 3,100-fold and pectate lyase is 1,057 or 1,480 fold lower than the same recombinant enzymes sold commercially, produced via fermentation. Chloroplast-derived enzymes had higher temperature stability and wider pH optima than enzymes expressed in E. coli. Plant crude-extracts showed higher enzyme activity than E. coli with increasing protein concentration, demonstrating their direct utility without purification. Addition of E. coli extracts to the chloroplast-derived enzymes significantly decreased their activity. Chloroplast-derived crude-extract enzyme cocktails yielded more (up to 3,625%) glucose from filter paper, pine wood or citrus peel than commercial cocktails. Furthermore, pectate lyase transplastomic plants showed enhanced resistance to Erwina soft rot. This is the first report of using plant-derived enzyme cocktails for production of fermentable sugars from lignocellulosic biomass. Limitations of higher cost and lower production capacity of fermentation systems are addressed by chloroplast-derived enzyme cocktails. PMID:20070870

  16. The evolution of chloroplast RNA editing.

    PubMed

    Tillich, Michael; Lehwark, Pascal; Morton, Brian R; Maier, Uwe G

    2006-10-01

    RNA editing alters the nucleotide sequence of an RNA molecule so that it deviates from the sequence of its DNA template. Different RNA-editing systems are found in the major eukaryotic lineages, and these systems are thought to have evolved independently. In this study, we provide a detailed analysis of data on C-to-U editing sites in land plant chloroplasts and propose a model for the evolution of RNA editing in land plants. First, our data suggest that the limited RNA-editing system of seed plants and the much more extensive systems found in hornworts and ferns are of monophyletic origin. Further, although some eukaryotic editing systems appear to have evolved to regulate gene expression, or at least are now involved in gene regulation, there is no evidence that RNA editing plays a role in gene regulation in land plant chloroplasts. Instead, our results suggest that land plant chloroplast C-to-U RNA editing originated as a mechanism to generate variation at the RNA level, which could complement variation at the DNA level. Under this model, many of the original sites, particularly in seed plants, have been subsequently lost due to mutation at the DNA level, and the function of extant sites is merely to conserve certain codons. This is the first comprehensive model for the evolution of the chloroplast RNA-editing system of land plants and may also be applicable to the evolution of RNA editing in plant mitochondria. PMID:16835291

  17. From extracellular to intracellular: the establishment of mitochondria and chloroplasts.

    PubMed

    Whatley, J M; John, P; Whatley, F R

    1979-04-11

    Paracoccus and Rhodopseudomonas are unusual among bacteria in having a majority of the biochemical features of mitochondria; blue-green algae have many of the features of chloroplasts. The theory of serial endosymbiosis proposes that a primitive eukaryote successively took up bacteria and blue-green algae to yield mitochondria and chloroplasts respectively. Possible characteristics of transitional forms are indicated both by the primitive amoeba, Pelomyxa, which lacks mitochondria but contains a permanent population of endosymbiotic bacteria, and by several anomalous eukaryotic algae, e.g. Cyanophora, which contain cyanelles instead of chloroplasts. Blue-green algae appear to be obvious precursors of red algal chloroplasts but the ancestry of other chloroplasts is less certain, though the epizoic symbiont, Prochloron, may resemble the ancestral green algal chloroplast. We speculate that the chloroplasts of the remaining algae may have been a eukaryotic origin. The evolution or organelles from endosymbiotic precursors would involve their integration with the host cell biochemically, structurally and numerically. PMID:36620

  18. Motif analysis unveils the possible co-regulation of chloroplast genes and nuclear genes encoding chloroplast proteins.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ying; Ding, Jun; Daniell, Henry; Hu, Haiyan; Li, Xiaoman

    2012-09-01

    Chloroplasts play critical roles in land plant cells. Despite their importance and the availability of at least 200 sequenced chloroplast genomes, the number of known DNA regulatory sequences in chloroplast genomes are limited. In this paper, we designed computational methods to systematically study putative DNA regulatory sequences in intergenic regions near chloroplast genes in seven plant species and in promoter sequences of nuclear genes in Arabidopsis and rice. We found that -35/-10 elements alone cannot explain the transcriptional regulation of chloroplast genes. We also concluded that there are unlikely motifs shared by intergenic sequences of most of chloroplast genes, indicating that these genes are regulated differently. Finally and surprisingly, we found five conserved motifs, each of which occurs in no more than six chloroplast intergenic sequences, are significantly shared by promoters of nuclear-genes encoding chloroplast proteins. By integrating information from gene function annotation, protein subcellular localization analyses, protein-protein interaction data, and gene expression data, we further showed support of the functionality of these conserved motifs. Our study implies the existence of unknown nuclear-encoded transcription factors that regulate both chloroplast genes and nuclear genes encoding chloroplast protein, which sheds light on the understanding of the transcriptional regulation of chloroplast genes. PMID:22733202

  19. Changes in Chloroplast mRNA Stability during Leaf Development.

    PubMed Central

    Klaff, P; Gruissem, W

    1991-01-01

    During spinach leaf development, chloroplast-encoded mRNAs accumulate to different steady-state levels. Their relative transcription rates alone, however, cannot account for the changes in mRNA amount. In this study, we examined the importance of mRNA stability for the regulation of plastid mRNA accumulation using an in vivo system to measure mRNA decay in intact leaves by inhibiting transcription with actinomycin D. Decay of psbA and rbcL mRNAs was assayed in young and mature leaves. The psbA mRNA half-life was increased more than twofold in mature leaves compared with young leaves, whereas rbcL mRNA decayed with a similar relative half-life at both leaf developmental stages. The direct in vivo measurements demonstrated that differential mRNA stability in higher plant plastids can account for differences in mRNA accumulation during leaf development. The role of polysome association in mRNA decay was also investigated. Using organelle-specific translation inhibitors that force mRNAs into a polysome-bound state or deplete mRNAs of ribosomes, we measured mRNA decay in vivo in either state. The results showed that rbcL and psbA mRNAs are less stable when bound to polysomes relative to the polysome-depleted mRNAs and that their stabilities are differentially affected by binding to polysomes. The results suggested that ribosome binding and/or translation of the psbA and rbcL mRNAs may function to modulate the rate of their decay in chloroplasts. PMID:12324602

  20. Polymorphic simple sequence repeat regions in chloroplast genomes: applications to the population genetics of pines.

    PubMed Central

    Powell, W; Morgante, M; McDevitt, R; Vendramin, G G; Rafalski, J A

    1995-01-01

    Simple sequence repeats (SSRs), consisting of tandemly repeated multiple copies of mono-, di-, tri-, or tetranucleotide motifs, are ubiquitous in eukaryotic genomes and are frequently used as genetic markers, taking advantage of their length polymorphism. We have examined the polymorphism of such sequences in the chloroplast genomes of plants, by using a PCR-based assay. GenBank searches identified the presence of several (dA)n.(dT)n mononucleotide stretches in chloroplast genomes. A chloroplast (cp) SSR was identified in three pine species (Pinus contorta, Pinus sylvestris, and Pinus thunbergii) 312 bp upstream of the psbA gene. DNA amplification of this repeated region from 11 pine species identified nine length variants. The polymorphic amplified fragments were isolated and the DNA sequence was determined, confirming that the length polymorphism was caused by variation in the length of the repeated region. In the pines, the chloroplast genome is transmitted through pollen and this PCR assay may be used to monitor gene flow in this genus. Analysis of 305 individuals from seven populations of Pinus leucodermis Ant. revealed the presence of four variants with intrapopulational diversities ranging from 0.000 to 0.629 and an average of 0.320. Restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis of cpDNA on the same populations previously failed to detect any variation. Population subdivision based on cpSSR was higher (Gst = 0.22, where Gst is coefficient of gene differentiation) than that revealed in a previous isozyme study (Gst = 0.05). We anticipate that SSR loci within the chloroplast genome should provide a highly informative assay for the analysis of the genetic structure of plant populations. Images Fig. 2 PMID:7644491

  1. Effect of light intensity on pigments and main acyl lipids during 'natural' chloroplast development in wheat seedlings.

    PubMed

    Lechowicz, W; Maternicka, K; Faltynowicz, M; Poskuta, J

    1986-01-01

    The content and composition of pigments and acyl lipids (monogalactosyl diacylglycerol, digalactosyl diacylglycerol and phosphatidyl glycerol) have been investigated in developing chloroplasts isolated from successive 2-cm sections along the leaves of wheat seedlings grown either under 100, 30 or 3 W·m(-2). In all examined stages of plastid development chlorophyll a/b and chlorophyll/carotenoid ratios were higher with increasing irradiance, whereas chlorophyll content expressed on fresh weight basis gradually decreased.Concentrations of monogalactosyl diacylglycerol, digalactosyl diacylglycerol and phosphatidyl glycerol decreased per chlorophyll unit with increasing plastid maturity. The higher was the light intensity applied during plant growth, the higher were galactolipid and phosphatidyl glycerol contents in developing chloroplasts. During plastid development the percentage of α-linolenic acid markedly increased in total and individual acyl lipids. Under high light conditions, the accumulation of this fatty acid proceeded more rapidly. Significantly higher proportion of α-linolenic acid was found in acyl lipid fraction of chloroplasts differentiating in high light grown plants, than in those from plants exposed to lower light intensities. The differences in the double bond index may indicate higher fluidity of thylakoid membranes in sun-type chloroplasts.Trans-3Δ-hexadecenoic acid, virtually absent in the youngest plastids, was found in much higher concentration (per chlorophyll unit and as mol % of phosphatidyl glycerol fatty acids) in chloroplasts developing at high light conditions. PMID:24443210

  2. Direct Chloroplast Sequencing: Comparison of Sequencing Platforms and Analysis Tools for Whole Chloroplast Barcoding

    PubMed Central

    Brozynska, Marta; Furtado, Agnelo; Henry, Robert James

    2014-01-01

    Direct sequencing of total plant DNA using next generation sequencing technologies generates a whole chloroplast genome sequence that has the potential to provide a barcode for use in plant and food identification. Advances in DNA sequencing platforms may make this an attractive approach for routine plant identification. The HiSeq (Illumina) and Ion Torrent (Life Technology) sequencing platforms were used to sequence total DNA from rice to identify polymorphisms in the whole chloroplast genome sequence of a wild rice plant relative to cultivated rice (cv. Nipponbare). Consensus chloroplast sequences were produced by mapping sequence reads to the reference rice chloroplast genome or by de novo assembly and mapping of the resulting contigs to the reference sequence. A total of 122 polymorphisms (SNPs and indels) between the wild and cultivated rice chloroplasts were predicted by these different sequencing and analysis methods. Of these, a total of 102 polymorphisms including 90 SNPs were predicted by both platforms. Indels were more variable with different sequencing methods, with almost all discrepancies found in homopolymers. The Ion Torrent platform gave no apparent false SNP but was less reliable for indels. The methods should be suitable for routine barcoding using appropriate combinations of sequencing platform and data analysis. PMID:25329378

  3. Isolation and identification of chloroplast lipids.

    PubMed

    Sato, Norihiro; Tsuzuki, Mikio

    2011-01-01

    Glycerolipids of photosynthetic organisms are accounted for largely by thylakoid membrane lipids consisting of chloroplast-specific glycolipids such as monogalactosyl diacylglycerol, digalactosyl diacylglycerol, and sulfoquinovosyl diacylglycerol, and a sole phospholipid, phosphatidylglycerol. In this chapter, methods for characterization of lipids from plant cells are described. The methods include extraction of total lipids from the cells, separation of these lipids into individual lipid classes by thin-layer chromatography, and identification of respective lipid classes by their mobility. We also present methods for the determination of compositions of constituent fatty acids, distribution of fatty acids between sn-1 and sn-2 positions, and determination of contents of individual lipid classes by gas-liquid chromatography. These methods are applicable to isolated chloroplasts or some membrane fractions such as thylakoid membranes. PMID:20960124

  4. The complete chloroplast genome of Cynara humilis.

    PubMed

    Curci, Pasquale Luca; Sonnante, Gabriella

    2016-07-01

    The complete chloroplast genome of the wild thistle Cynara humilis L. (Asteraceae) is presented in this study. The genome is 152,585 bp in length and has a quadripartite structure composed by a large single-copy (LSC) of 83,622 bp, a small single-copy (SSC) of 18,651 bp and two inverted repeats (IRb/a) of 25,156 bp each. The GC content corresponds to 37.7%. The amount of unique genes is 114, in which 17 are duplicated in the IRs, for a total of 131 genes. A maximum parsimony phylogenetic analysis revealed that C. humilis chloroplast genome is closely related to that of the globe artichoke within the Carduoideae subfamily. PMID:25812057

  5. Posttranslational Modifications of Chloroplast Proteins: An Emerging Field1

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Posttranslational modifications of proteins are key effectors of enzyme activity, protein interactions, targeting, and turnover rate, but despite their importance, they are still poorly understood in plants. Although numerous reports have revealed the regulatory role of protein phosphorylation in photosynthesis, various other protein modifications have been identified in chloroplasts only recently. It is known that posttranslational Nα-acetylation occurs in both nuclear- and plastid-encoded chloroplast proteins, but the physiological significance of this acetylation is not yet understood. Lysine acetylation affects the localization and activity of key metabolic enzymes, and it may work antagonistically or cooperatively with lysine methylation, which also occurs in chloroplasts. In addition, tyrosine nitration may help regulate the repair cycle of photosystem II, while N-glycosylation determines enzyme activity of chloroplastic carbonic anhydrase. This review summarizes the progress in the research field of posttranslational modifications of chloroplast proteins and points out the importance of these modifications in the regulation of chloroplast metabolism. PMID:25911530

  6. Action of Nalidixic Acid on Chloroplast Replication in Euglena gracilis.

    PubMed

    Lyman, H; Jupp, A S; Larrinua, I

    1975-02-01

    The role of light in nalidixic acid bleaching of Euglena gracilis var. bacillaris was investigated. The kinetics of loss of the chloroplast-associated DNA and the sensitivity of chloroplast replication to ultraviolet light was followed during treatment with nalidixic acid. By using the mutant P(4)ZUL, and 3-(3,4-dichlorophenyl)-, 1-dimethylurea, it was demonstrated that the requirement for light was a functioning photosynthetic electron transport system. Ultracentifugal analysis showed a substantial decrease in chloroplast-associated DNA after 6 hours of treatment with nalidixic acid. Ultraviolet target analysis revealed that the number of chloroplast genomes per cell had been reduced. The possible role of light and implications of the reduction in chloroplast genomes for chloroplast replication are discussed. PMID:16659089

  7. Posttranslational Modifications of Chloroplast Proteins: An Emerging Field.

    PubMed

    Lehtimäki, Nina; Koskela, Minna M; Mulo, Paula

    2015-07-01

    Posttranslational modifications of proteins are key effectors of enzyme activity, protein interactions, targeting, and turnover rate, but despite their importance, they are still poorly understood in plants. Although numerous reports have revealed the regulatory role of protein phosphorylation in photosynthesis, various other protein modifications have been identified in chloroplasts only recently. It is known that posttranslational N(α)-acetylation occurs in both nuclear- and plastid-encoded chloroplast proteins, but the physiological significance of this acetylation is not yet understood. Lysine acetylation affects the localization and activity of key metabolic enzymes, and it may work antagonistically or cooperatively with lysine methylation, which also occurs in chloroplasts. In addition, tyrosine nitration may help regulate the repair cycle of photosystem II, while N-glycosylation determines enzyme activity of chloroplastic carbonic anhydrase. This review summarizes the progress in the research field of posttranslational modifications of chloroplast proteins and points out the importance of these modifications in the regulation of chloroplast metabolism. PMID:25911530

  8. Protein methylation in pea chloroplasts. [Pisum sativum

    SciTech Connect

    Niemi, K.J.; Adler, J.; Selman, B.R. )

    1990-07-01

    The methylation of chloroplast proteins has been investigated by incubating intact pea (Pisum sativum) chloroplasts with ({sup 3}H-methyl)-S-adenosylmethionine. Incubation in the light increases the amount of methylation in both the thylakoid and stromal fractions. Numerous thylakoid proteins serve as substrates for the methyltransfer reactions. Three of these thylakoid proteins are methylated to a significantly greater extent in the light than in the dark. The primary stromal polypeptide methylated is the large subunit of ribulose bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase. One other stromal polypeptide is also methylated much more in the light than in the dark. Two distinct types of protein methylation occur. One methylinkage is stable to basic conditions whereas a second type is base labile. The base-stable linkage is indicative of N-methylation of amino acid residues while base-lability is suggestive of carboxymethylation of amino acid residues. Labeling in the light increases the percentage of methylation that is base labile in the thylakoid fraction while no difference is observed in the amount of base-labile methylations in light-labeled and dark-labeled stromal proteins. Also suggestive of carboxymethylation is the detection of volatile ({sup 3}H)methyl radioactivity which increases during the labeling period and is greater in chloroplasts labeled in the light as opposed to being labeled in the dark; this implies in vivo turnover of the ({sup 3}H)methyl group.

  9. Chloroplast Genome Evolution in the Euglenaceae.

    PubMed

    Bennett, Matthew S; Triemer, Richard E

    2015-01-01

    Over the last few years multiple studies have been published outlining chloroplast genomes that represent many of the photosynthetic euglenid genera. However, these genomes were scattered throughout the euglenophyceaean phylogenetic tree, and focused on comparisons with Euglena gracilis. Here, we present a study exclusively on taxa within the Euglenaceae. Six new chloroplast genomes were characterized, those of Cryptoglena skujai, E. gracilis var. bacillaris, Euglena viridis, Euglenaria anabaena, Monomorphina parapyrum, and Trachelomonas volvocina, and added to six previously published chloroplast genomes to determine if trends existed within the family. With this study: at least one genome has now been characterized for each genus, the genomes of different strains from two taxa were characterized to explore intraspecific variability, and a second taxon has been characterized for the genus Monomorphina to examine intrageneric variability. Overall results showed a large amount of variability among the genomes, though a few trends could be identified both within Euglenaceae and within Euglenophyta. In addition, the intraspecific analysis indicated that the similarity of a genome sequence between strains was taxon dependent, and the intrageneric analysis indicated that the majority of the evolutionary changes within the Euglenaceae occurred intergenerically. PMID:25976746

  10. A Large Population of Small Chloroplasts in Tobacco Leaf Cells Allows More Effective Chloroplast Movement Than a Few Enlarged Chloroplasts1

    PubMed Central

    Jeong, Won Joong; Park, Youn-Il; Suh, KyeHong; Raven, John A.; Yoo, Ook Joon; Liu, Jang Ryol

    2002-01-01

    We generated transgenic tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum cv Xanthi) plants that contained only one to three enlarged chloroplasts per leaf mesophyll cell by introducing NtFtsZ1-2, a cDNA for plastid division. These plants were used to investigate the advantages of having a large population of small chloroplasts rather than a few enlarged chloroplasts in a leaf mesophyll cell. Despite the similarities in photosynthetic components and ultrastructure of photosynthetic machinery between wild-type and transgenic plants, the overall growth of transgenic plants under low- and high-light conditions was retarded. In wild-type plants, the chloroplasts moved toward the face position under low light and toward the profile position under high-light conditions. However, chloroplast rearrangement in transgenic plants in response to light conditions was not evident. In addition, transgenic plant leaves showed greatly diminished changes in leaf transmittance values under both light conditions, indicating that chloroplast rearrangement was severely retarded. Therefore, under low-light conditions the incomplete face position of the enlarged chloroplasts results in decreased absorbance of light energy. This, in turn, reduces plant growth. Under high-light conditions, the amount of absorbed light exceeds the photosynthetic utilization capacity due to the incomplete profile position of the enlarged chloroplasts, resulting in photodamage to the photosynthetic machinery, and decreased growth. The presence of a large number of small and/or rapidly moving chloroplasts in the cells of higher land plants permits more effective chloroplast phototaxis and, hence, allows more efficient utilization of low-incident photon flux densities. The photosynthetic apparatus is, consequently, protected from damage under high-incident photon flux densities. PMID:12011343

  11. Preparation of stroma, thylakoid membrane, and lumen fractions from Arabidopsis thaliana chloroplasts for proteomic analysis.

    PubMed

    Hall, Michael; Mishra, Yogesh; Schröder, Wolfgang P

    2011-01-01

    For many studies regarding important chloroplast processes such as oxygenic photosynthesis, fractionation of the total chloroplast proteome is a necessary first step. Here, we describe a method for isolating the stromal, the thylakoid membrane, and the thylakoid lumen subchloroplast fractions from Arabidopsis thaliana leaf material. All three fractions can be isolated sequentially from the same plant material in a single day preparation. The isolated fractions are suitable for various proteomic analyses such as simple mapping studies or for more complex experiments such as differential expression analysis using two-dimensional difference gel electrophoresis (2D-DIGE) or mass spectrometry (MS)-based techniques. Besides this, the obtained fractions can also be used for many other purposes such as immunological assays, enzymatic activity assays, and studies of protein complexes by native-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (native-PAGE). PMID:21863445

  12. Pyruvate Dehydrogenase Complex from Chloroplasts of Pisum sativum L 1

    PubMed Central

    Williams, Michael; Randall, Douglas D.

    1979-01-01

    Pyruvate dehydrogenase complex is associated with intact chloroplasts and mitochondria of 9-day-old Pisum sativum L. seedlings. The ratio of the mitochondrial complex to the chloroplast complex activities is about 3 to 1. Maximal rates observed for chloroplast pyruvate dehydrogenase complex activity ranged from 6 to 9 micromoles of NADH produced per milligram of chlorophyll per hour. Osmotic rupture of pea chloroplasts released 88% of the complex activity, indicating that chloroplast pyruvate dehydrogenase complex is a stromal complex. The pH optimum for chloroplast pyruvate dehydrogenase complex was between 7.8 and 8.2, whereas the mitochondrial pyruvate dehydrogenase complex had a pH optimum between 7.3 and 7.7. Chloroplast pyruvate dehydrogenase complex activity was specific for pyruvate, dependent upon coenzyme A and NAD and partially dependent upon Mg2+ and thiamine pyrophosphate. Chloroplast-associated pyruvate dehydrogenase complex provides a direct link between pyruvate metabolism and chloroplast fatty acid biosynthesis by providing the substrate, acetyl-CoA, necessary for membrane development in young plants. Images PMID:16661100

  13. The complete chloroplast genome of Phalaenopsis "Tiny Star".

    PubMed

    Kim, Goon-Bo; Kwon, Youngeun; Yu, Hee-Ju; Lim, Ki-Byung; Seo, Jae-Hwan; Mun, Jeong-Hwan

    2016-01-01

    We determined the complete chloroplast DNA sequence of Phalaenopsis "Tiny Star" based on Illumina sequencing. The total length of the chloroplast genome is 148,918 bp long with GC content of 36.7%. It contains 70 protein-coding genes, 30 tRNA genes, and 4 rRNA genes. Comparative analysis with the reported orchid chloroplast sequences identified unique InDel variations in the "Tiny Star" chloroplast genome that have potential as genetic markers to investigate the maternal lineage of Phalaenopsis and Doritaenopsis cultivars. PMID:25093401

  14. Fine tuning chloroplast movements through physical interactions between phototropins

    PubMed Central

    Sztatelman, Olga; Łabuz, Justyna; Hermanowicz, Paweł; Banaś, Agnieszka Katarzyna; Bażant, Aneta; Zgłobicki, Piotr; Aggarwal, Chhavi; Nadzieja, Marcin; Krzeszowiec, Weronika; Strzałka, Wojciech; Gabryś, Halina

    2016-01-01

    Phototropins are plant photoreceptors which regulate numerous responses to blue light, including chloroplast relocation. Weak blue light induces chloroplast accumulation, whereas strong light leads to an avoidance response. Two Arabidopsis phototropins are characterized by different light sensitivities. Under continuous light, both can elicit chloroplast accumulation, but the avoidance response is controlled solely by phot2. As well as continuous light, brief light pulses also induce chloroplast displacements. Pulses of 0.1s and 0.2s of fluence rate saturating the avoidance response lead to transient chloroplast accumulation. Longer pulses (up to 20s) trigger a biphasic response, namely transient avoidance followed by transient accumulation. This work presents a detailed study of transient chloroplast responses in Arabidopsis. Phototropin mutants display altered chloroplast movements as compared with the wild type: phot1 is characterized by weaker responses, while phot2 exhibits enhanced chloroplast accumulation, especially after 0.1s and 0.2s pulses. To determine the cause of these differences, the abundance and phosphorylation levels of both phototropins, as well as the interactions between phototropin molecules are examined. The formation of phototropin homo- and heterocomplexes is the most plausible explanation of the observed phenomena. The physiological consequences of this interplay are discussed, suggesting the universal character of this mechanism that fine-tunes plant reactions to blue light. Additionally, responses in mutants of different protein phosphatase 2A subunits are examined to assess the role of protein phosphorylation in signaling of chloroplast movements. PMID:27406783

  15. Complex chloroplast RNA metabolism: just debugging the genetic programme?

    PubMed Central

    Maier, Uwe G; Bozarth, Andrew; Funk, Helena T; Zauner, Stefan; Rensing, Stefan A; Schmitz-Linneweber, Christian; Börner, Thomas; Tillich, Michael

    2008-01-01

    Background The gene expression system of chloroplasts is far more complex than that of their cyanobacterial progenitor. This gain in complexity affects in particular RNA metabolism, specifically the transcription and maturation of RNA. Mature chloroplast RNA is generated by a plethora of nuclear-encoded proteins acquired or recruited during plant evolution, comprising additional RNA polymerases and sigma factors, and sequence-specific RNA maturation factors promoting RNA splicing, editing, end formation and translatability. Despite years of intensive research, we still lack a comprehensive explanation for this complexity. Results We inspected the available literature and genome databases for information on components of RNA metabolism in land plant chloroplasts. In particular, new inventions of chloroplast-specific mechanisms and the expansion of some gene/protein families detected in land plants lead us to suggest that the primary function of the additional nuclear-encoded components found in chloroplasts is the transgenomic suppression of point mutations, fixation of which occurred due to an enhanced genetic drift exhibited by chloroplast genomes. We further speculate that a fast evolution of transgenomic suppressors occurred after the water-to-land transition of plants. Conclusion Our inspections indicate that several chloroplast-specific mechanisms evolved in land plants to remedy point mutations that occurred after the water-to-land transition. Thus, the complexity of chloroplast gene expression evolved to guarantee the functionality of chloroplast genetic information and may not, with some exceptions, be involved in regulatory functions. PMID:18755031

  16. Nanophotonics of Chloroplasts for Bio-Inspired Solar Energy Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gourley, Paul L.; Gourley, Cheryl R.

    2011-03-01

    In the search for new energy sources, lessons can be learned from chloroplast photonics. The nano-architecture of chloroplasts is remarkably well-adapted to mediate sunlight interactions for efficient energy conversion. We carried out experiments with chloroplasts isolated from spinach and leaf lettuce to elucidate the relationship between nano-architecture, biomolecular composition and photonic properties. We obtained high-resolution microscopic images of single chloroplasts to identify geometries of chloroplasts and interior grana. We performed micro-spectroscopy to identify strengths of absorption and fluorescence transitions and related them to broadband reflectance and transmittance spectra of whole leaf structures. Finally, the nonlinear optical properties were investigated with nanolaser spectroscopy by placing chloroplasts into micro-resonators and optically pumping. These spectra reveal chloroplast photonic modes and allow measurement of single chloroplast light scattering cross section, polarizability, and refractive index. The nanolaser spectra recorded at increasing pump powers enabled us to observe non-linear optics, photon dynamics, and stimulated emission from single chloroplasts. All of these experiments provide insight into plant photonics and inspiration of paradigms for synthetic biomaterials to harness sunlight in new ways.

  17. Copper Delivery to Chloroplast Proteins and its Regulation

    PubMed Central

    Aguirre, Guadalupe; Pilon, Marinus

    2016-01-01

    Copper is required for photosynthesis in chloroplasts of plants because it is a cofactor of plastocyanin, an essential electron carrier in the thylakoid lumen. Other chloroplast copper proteins are copper/zinc superoxide dismutase and polyphenol oxidase, but these proteins seem to be dispensable under conditions of low copper supply when transcripts for these proteins undergo microRNA-mediated down regulation. Two ATP-driven copper transporters function in tandem to deliver copper to chloroplast compartments. This review seeks to summarize the mechanisms of copper delivery to chloroplast proteins and its regulation. We also delineate some of the unanswered questions that still remain in this field. PMID:26793223

  18. Cold-induced responses in annual bluegrass genotypes with differential resistance to pink snow mold (Microdochium nivale).

    PubMed

    Bertrand, Annick; Castonguay, Yves; Azaiez, Aïda; Hsiang, Tom; Dionne, Julie

    2011-01-01

    Greens-type annual bluegrass (Poa annua L.) is susceptible to winter stresses including subfreezing temperatures and pink snow mold (SM). To better understand the mechanisms of SM resistance in annual bluegrass, four SM-resistant and four SM-sensitive genotypes were incubated at low temperature with Microdochium nivale (Fries) Samuels & Hallett, the causal agent of pink snow mold. We assessed the impact of a 6-week incubation period with SM at 2 °C under high humidity (≥ 98%) on the accumulation of cold-induced metabolites and on freezing tolerance. Incubation of annual bluegrass inoculated with SM lead to a major decrease in concentration of cryoprotective sugars such as sucrose and HDP (high degree of polymerization) fructans. Conversely, major amino acids linked to stress resistance such as glutamine and arginine increased in crowns of annual bluegrass in response to SM inoculation. One of the major differences between resistant and sensitive genotypes was found in the concentration of HDP fructans, which remained higher in SM-resistant genotypes throughout the incubation period. HDP fructans were also more abundant in freeze-tolerant genotypes, reinforcing their positive impact on winter survival of annual bluegrass. The identification of genotypes that are resistant to both SM and freezing shows the possibility of being able to improve both traits concomitantly. PMID:21421353

  19. Phylogeny of the genus Pistacia as determined from analysis of the chloroplast genome.

    PubMed

    Parfitt, D E; Badenes, M L

    1997-07-22

    Classification within the genus Pistacia has been based on leaf morphology and geographical distribution. Molecular genetic tools (PCR amplification followed by restriction analysis of a 3.2-kb region of variable chloroplast DNA, and restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis of the Pistacia cpDNA with tobacco chloroplast DNA probes) provided a new set of variables to study the phylogenetic relationships of 10 Pistacia species. Both parsimony and cluster analyses were used to divide the genus into two major groups. P. vera was determined to be the least derived species. P. weinmannifolia, an Asian species, is most closely related to P. texana and P. mexicana, New World species. These three species share a common origin, suggesting that a common ancestor of P. texana and P. mexicana originated in Asia. P. integerrima and P. chinensis were shown to be distinct whereas the pairs of species were monophyletic within each of two tertiary groups, P. vera:P. khinjuk and P. mexicana:P. texana. An evolutionary trend from large to small nuts and leaves with few, large leaflets to many, small leaflets was supported. The genus Pistacia was shown to have a low chloroplast DNA mutation rate: 0.05-0.16 times that expected of annual plants. PMID:9223300

  20. Analyses of the complete genome and gene expression of chloroplast of sweet potato [Ipomoea batata].

    PubMed

    Yan, Lang; Lai, Xianjun; Li, Xuedan; Wei, Changhe; Tan, Xuemei; Zhang, Yizheng

    2015-01-01

    Sweet potato [Ipomoea batatas (L.) Lam] ranks among the top seven most important food crops cultivated worldwide and is hexaploid plant (2n=6x=90) in the Convolvulaceae family with a genome size between 2,200 to 3,000 Mb. The genomic resources for this crop are deficient due to its complicated genetic structure. Here, we report the complete nucleotide sequence of the chloroplast (cp) genome of sweet potato, which is a circular molecule of 161,303 bp in the typical quadripartite structure with large (LSC) and small (SSC) single-copy regions separated by a pair of inverted repeats (IRs). The chloroplast DNA contains a total of 145 genes, including 94 protein-encoding genes of which there are 72 single-copy and 11 double-copy genes. The organization and structure of the chloroplast genome (gene content and order, IR expansion/contraction, random repeating sequences, structural rearrangement) of sweet potato were compared with those of Ipomoea (L.) species and some basal important angiosperms, respectively. Some boundary gene-flow and gene gain-and-loss events were identified at intra- and inter-species levels. In addition, by comparing with the transcriptome sequences of sweet potato, the RNA editing events and differential expressions of the chloroplast functional-genes were detected. Moreover, phylogenetic analysis was conducted based on 77 protein-coding genes from 33 taxa and the result may contribute to a better understanding of the evolution progress of the genus Ipomoea (L.), including phylogenetic relationships, intraspecific differentiation and interspecific introgression. PMID:25874767

  1. Analyses of the Complete Genome and Gene Expression of Chloroplast of Sweet Potato [Ipomoea batata

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Lang; Lai, Xianjun; Li, Xuedan; Wei, Changhe; Tan, Xuemei; Zhang, Yizheng

    2015-01-01

    Sweet potato [Ipomoea batatas (L.) Lam] ranks among the top seven most important food crops cultivated worldwide and is hexaploid plant (2n=6x=90) in the Convolvulaceae family with a genome size between 2,200 to 3,000 Mb. The genomic resources for this crop are deficient due to its complicated genetic structure. Here, we report the complete nucleotide sequence of the chloroplast (cp) genome of sweet potato, which is a circular molecule of 161,303 bp in the typical quadripartite structure with large (LSC) and small (SSC) single-copy regions separated by a pair of inverted repeats (IRs). The chloroplast DNA contains a total of 145 genes, including 94 protein-encoding genes of which there are 72 single-copy and 11 double-copy genes. The organization and structure of the chloroplast genome (gene content and order, IR expansion/contraction, random repeating sequences, structural rearrangement) of sweet potato were compared with those of Ipomoea (L.) species and some basal important angiosperms, respectively. Some boundary gene-flow and gene gain-and-loss events were identified at intra- and inter-species levels. In addition, by comparing with the transcriptome sequences of sweet potato, the RNA editing events and differential expressions of the chloroplast functional-genes were detected. Moreover, phylogenetic analysis was conducted based on 77 protein-coding genes from 33 taxa and the result may contribute to a better understanding of the evolution progress of the genus Ipomoea (L.), including phylogenetic relationships, intraspecific differentiation and interspecific introgression. PMID:25874767

  2. Field production and functional evaluation of chloroplast-derived interferon-α2b

    PubMed Central

    Arlen, Philip A.; Falconer, Regina; Cherukumilli, Sri; Cole, Amy; Cole, Alexander M.; Oishi, Karen K.; Daniell, Henry

    2008-01-01

    Summary Type I interferons (IFNs) inhibit viral replication and cell growth and enhance the immune response, and therefore have many clinical applications. IFN-α2b ranks third in world market use for a biopharmaceutical, behind only insulin and erythropoietin. The average annual cost of IFN-α2b for the treatment of hepatitis C infection is $26 000, and is therefore unavailable to the majority of patients in developing countries. Therefore, we expressed IFN-α2b in tobacco chloroplasts, and transgenic lines were grown in the field after obtaining United States Department of Agriculture Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service (USDA-APHIS) approval. Stable, site-specific integration of transgenes into chloroplast genomes and homoplasmy through several generations were confirmed. IFN-α2b levels reached up to 20% of total soluble protein, or 3 mg per gram of leaf (fresh weight). Transgenic IFN-α2b had similar in vitro biological activity to commercially produced PEG-Intron™ when tested for its ability to protect cells against cytopathic viral replication in the vesicular stomatitis virus cytopathic effect (VSV CPE) assay and to inhibit early-stage human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection. The antitumour and immunomodulating properties of IFN-α2b were also seen in vivo . Chloroplast-derived IFN-α2b increased the expression of major histocompatibility complex class I (MHC I) on splenocytes and the total number of natural killer (NK) cells. Finally, IFN-α2b purified from chloroplast transgenic lines (cpIFN-α2b) protected mice from a highly metastatic tumour line. This demonstration of high levels of expression of IFN-α2b, transgene containment and biological activity akin to that of commercial preparations of IFN-α2b facilitated the first field production of a plant-derived human blood protein, a critical step towards human clinical trials and commercialization. PMID:17490449

  3. Ectopic Overexpression of The Transcription Factor OsGLK1 Induces Chloroplast Development in Non-Green Rice Cells

    PubMed Central

    Nakamura, Hidemitsu; Muramatsu, Masayuki; Hakata, Makoto; Ueno, Osamu; Nagamura, Yoshiaki; Hirochika, Hirohiko; Takano, Makoto; Ichikawa, Hiroaki

    2009-01-01

    For systematic and genome-wide analyses of rice gene functions, we took advantage of the full-length cDNA overexpresser (FOX) gene-hunting system and generated >12 000 independent FOX-rice lines from >25 000 rice calli treated with the rice-FOX Agrobacterium library. We found two FOX-rice lines generating green calli on a callus-inducing medium containing 2,4-D, on which wild-type rice calli became ivory yellow. In both lines, OsGLK1 cDNA encoding a GARP transcription factor was ectopically overexpressed. Using rice expression-microarray and northern blot analyses, we found that a large number of nucleus-encoded genes involved in chloroplast functions were highly expressed and transcripts of plastid-encoded genes, psaA, psbA and rbcL, increased in the OsGLK1-FOX calli. Transmission electron microscopy showed the existence of differentiated chloroplasts with grana stacks in OsGLK1-FOX calli cells. However, in darkness, OsGLK1-FOX calli did not show a green color or develop grana stacks. Furthermore, we found developed chloroplasts in vascular bundle and bundle sheath cells of coleoptiles and leaves from OsGLK1-FOX seedlings. The OsGLK1-FOX calli exhibited high photosynthetic activity and were able to grow on sucrose-depleted media, indicating that developed chloroplasts in OsGLK1-FOX rice calli are functional and active. We also observed that the endogenous OsGLK1 mRNA level increased synchronously with the greening of wild-type calli after transfer to plantlet regeneration medium. These results strongly suggest that OsGLK1 regulates chloroplast development under the control of light and phytohormones, and that it is a key regulator of chloroplast development. PMID:19808806

  4. KNOX genes influence a gradient of fruit chloroplast development through regulation of GOLDEN2-LIKE expression in tomato.

    PubMed

    Nadakuduti, Satya Swathi; Holdsworth, William L; Klein, Chelsey L; Barry, Cornelius S

    2014-06-01

    The chlorophyll content of unripe fleshy fruits is positively correlated with the nutrient content and flavor of ripe fruit. In tomato (Solanum lycopersicum) fruit, the uniform ripening (u) locus, which encodes a GOLDEN 2-LIKE transcription factor (SlGLK2), influences a gradient of chloroplast development that extends from the stem end of the fruit surrounding the calyx to the base of the fruit. With the exception of the u locus, the factors that influence the formation of this developmental gradient are unknown. In this study, characterization and positional cloning of the uniform gray-green (ug) locus of tomato reveals a thus far unknown role for the Class I KNOTTED1-LIKE HOMEOBOX (KNOX) gene, TKN4, in specifying the formation of this chloroplast gradient. The involvement of KNOX in fruit chloroplast development was confirmed through characterization of the Curl (Cu) mutant, a dominant gain-of-function mutation of TKN2, which displays ectopic fruit chloroplast development that resembles SlGLK2 over-expression. TKN2 and TKN4 act upstream of SlGLK2 and the related gene ARABIDOPSIS PSEUDO RESPONSE REGULATOR 2-LIKE (SlAPRR2-LIKE) to establish their latitudinal gradient of expression across developing fruit that leads to a gradient of chloroplast development. Class I KNOX genes typically influence plant morphology through maintenance of meristem activity, but this study identifies a role for TKN2 and TKN4 in specifically influencing chloroplast development in fruit but not leaves, suggesting that this fundamental process is differentially regulated in these two organs. PMID:24689783

  5. Computational methods and software for differential equations and their applications. Annual report, November 16, 1984-November 15, 1985

    SciTech Connect

    Gear, C.W.

    1985-01-01

    This report summarizes the progress on the project over the last twelve months. Work has continued in two areas: numerical techniques for differential equations and software tools for scientific problem solving. Within these areas we have been working on the following: (1) Syntax-directed editors for mathematical software, (2) Polylith: a system for module interconnection, (3) mathematical expression input and editing, (4) a tool for examining fill-in in Gauss elimination, (5) a theoretical examination of fill-in, (6) a technique for determining the structural index of a differential-algebraic system, (7) invariant-conserving methods for differential equations, (9) iterative methods for stiff equations, (10) singular two-point boundary value problems, (11) initial value problems in Banach spaces, (12) computational error estimates for stiff ODEs, (13); multigrid solution of collocation equations, and (14) parallel techniques for ordinary differential equations.

  6. Chloroplast Proteases: Updates on Proteolysis within and across Suborganellar Compartments.

    PubMed

    Nishimura, Kenji; Kato, Yusuke; Sakamoto, Wataru

    2016-08-01

    Chloroplasts originated from the endosymbiosis of ancestral cyanobacteria and maintain transcription and translation machineries for around 100 proteins. Most endosymbiont genes, however, have been transferred to the host nucleus, and the majority of the chloroplast proteome is composed of nucleus-encoded proteins that are biosynthesized in the cytosol and then imported into chloroplasts. How chloroplasts and the nucleus communicate to control the plastid proteome remains an important question. Protein-degrading machineries play key roles in chloroplast proteome biogenesis, remodeling, and maintenance. Research in the past few decades has revealed more than 20 chloroplast proteases, which are localized to specific suborganellar locations. In particular, two energy-dependent processive proteases of bacterial origin, Clp and FtsH, are central to protein homeostasis. Processing endopeptidases such as stromal processing peptidase and thylakoidal processing peptidase are involved in the maturation of precursor proteins imported into chloroplasts by cleaving off the amino-terminal transit peptides. Presequence peptidases and organellar oligopeptidase subsequently degrade the cleaved targeting peptides. Recent findings have indicated that not only intraplastidic but also extraplastidic processive protein-degrading systems participate in the regulation and quality control of protein translocation across the envelopes. In this review, we summarize current knowledge of the major chloroplast proteases in terms of type, suborganellar localization, and diversification. We present details of these degradation processes as case studies according to suborganellar compartment (envelope, stroma, and thylakoids). Key questions and future directions in this field are discussed. PMID:27288365

  7. Why have chloroplasts developed a unique motility system?

    PubMed Central

    Suetsugu, Noriyuki; Dolja, Valerian V

    2010-01-01

    Organelle movement in plants is dependent on actin filaments with most of the organelles being transported along the actin cables by class XI myosins. Although chloroplast movement is also actin filament-dependent, a potential role of myosin motors in this process is poorly understood. Interestingly, chloroplasts can move in any direction and change the direction within short time periods, suggesting that chloroplasts use the newly formed actin filaments rather than preexisting actin cables. Furthermore, the data on myosin gene knockouts and knockdowns in Arabidopsis and tobacco do not support myosins' XI role in chloroplast movement. Our recent studies revealed that chloroplast movement and positioning are mediated by the short actin filaments localized at chloroplast periphery (cp-actin filaments) rather than cytoplasmic actin cables. The accumulation of cp-actin filaments depends on kinesin-like proteins, KAC1 and KAC2, as well as on a chloroplast outer membrane protein CHUP1. We propose that plants evolved a myosin XI-independent mechanism of the actin-based chloroplast movement that is distinct from the mechanism used by other organelles. PMID:20855973

  8. Tools for regulated gene expression in the chloroplast of Chlamydomonas.

    PubMed

    Rochaix, Jean-David; Surzycki, Raymond; Ramundo, Silvia

    2014-01-01

    The green unicellular alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii has emerged as a very attractive model system for chloroplast genetic engineering. Algae can be transformed readily at the chloroplast level through bombardment of cells with a gene gun, and transformants can be selected using antibiotic resistance or phototrophic growth. An inducible chloroplast gene expression system could be very useful for several reasons. First, it could be used to elucidate the function of essential chloroplast genes required for cell growth and survival. Second, it could be very helpful for expressing proteins which are toxic to the algal cells. Third, it would allow for the reversible depletion of photosynthetic complexes thus making it possible to study their biogenesis in a controlled fashion. Fourth, it opens promising possibilities for hydrogen production in Chlamydomonas. Here we describe an inducible/repressible chloroplast gene expression system in Chlamydomonas in which the copper-regulated Cyc6 promoter drives the expression of the nuclear Nac2 gene encoding a protein which is targeted to the chloroplast where it acts specifically on the chloroplast psbD 5'-untranslated region and is required for the stable accumulation of the psbD mRNA and photosystem II. The system can be used for any chloroplast gene or transgene by placing it under the control of the psbD 5'-untranslated region. PMID:24599871

  9. Protein Methylation in Pea Chloroplasts 1

    PubMed Central

    Niemi, Kevin J.; Adler, Julius; Selman, Bruce R.

    1990-01-01

    The methylation of chloroplast proteins has been investigated by incubating intact pea (Pisum sativum) chloroplasts with [3H-methyl]-S-adenosylmethionine. Incubation in the light increases the amount of methylation in both the thylakoid and stromal fractions. Numerous thylakoid proteins serve as substrates for the methyltransfer reactions. Three of these thylakoid proteins are methylated to a significantly greater extent in the light than in the dark. One is a polypeptide with a molecular mass of 64 kD, a second has an Mr of 48 kD, and the third has a molecular mass of less than 10 kD. The primary stromal polypeptide methylated is the large subunit of ribulose bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase. One other stromal polypeptide, having a molecular mass of 24 kD, is also methylated much more in the light than in the dark. Two distinct types of protein methylation occur. One methyl-linkage is stable to basic conditions whereas a second type is base labile. The base-stable linkage is indicative of N-methylation of amino acid residues while base-lability is suggestive of carboxymethylation of amino acid residues. Labeling in the light increases the percentage of methylation that is base labile in the thylakoid fraction while no difference is observed in the amount of base-labile methylations in light-labeled and dark-labeled stromal proteins. Also suggestive of carboxymethylation is the detection of volatile [3H]methyl radioactivity which increases during the labeling period and is greater in chloroplasts labeled in the light as opposed to being labeled in the dark; this implies in vivo turnover of the [3H]methyl group. Images Figure 1 PMID:16667584

  10. Expression of eukaryotic polypeptides in chloroplasts

    DOEpatents

    Mayfield, Stephen P

    2013-06-04

    The present invention relates to a gene expression system in eukaryotic and prokaryotic cells, preferably plant cells and intact plants. In particular, the invention relates to an expression system having a RB47 binding site upstream of a translation initiation site for regulation of translation mediated by binding of RB47 protein, a member of the poly(A) binding protein family. Regulation is further effected by RB60, a protein disulfide isomerase. The expression system is capable of functioning in the nuclear/cytoplasm of cells and in the chloroplast of plants. Translation regulation of a desired molecule is enhanced approximately 100 fold over that obtained without RB47 binding site activation.

  11. The complete chloroplast genome of the Dendrobium strongylanthum (Orchidaceae: Epidendroideae).

    PubMed

    Li, Jing; Chen, Chen; Wang, Zhe-Zhi

    2016-07-01

    Complete chloroplast genome sequence is very useful for studying the phylogenetic and evolution of species. In this study, the complete chloroplast genome of Dendrobium strongylanthum was constructed from whole-genome Illumina sequencing data. The chloroplast genome is 153 058 bp in length with 37.6% GC content and consists of two inverted repeats (IRs) of 26 316 bp. The IR regions are separated by large single-copy region (LSC, 85 836 bp) and small single-copy (SSC, 14 590 bp) region. A total of 130 chloroplast genes were successfully annotated, including 84 protein coding genes, 38 tRNA genes, and eight rRNA genes. Phylogenetic analyses showed that the chloroplast genome of Dendrobium strongylanthum is related to that of the Dendrobium officinal. PMID:26153739

  12. The complete chloroplast genome sequence of Panax quinquefolius (L.).

    PubMed

    Kim, Kyunghee; Lee, Sang-Choon; Lee, Junki; Kim, Nam-Hoon; Jang, Woojong; Yang, Tae-Jin

    2016-07-01

    The complete chloroplast genome sequence of Panax quinquefolius, an important medicinal herb, was generated by de novo assembly with low-coverage whole-genome sequence data and manual correction. A circular 156 088-bp chloroplast genome showed typical chloroplast genome structure comprising a large single copy region of 86 095 bp, a small single copy region of 17 993 bp, and a pair of inverted repeats of 26 000 bp. The chloroplast genome had 87 protein-coding genes, 37 tRNA genes, and eight rRNA genes. Phylogenetic analysis with the chloroplast genome revealed that P. quinquefolius is much closer to P. ginseng than P. notoginseng. PMID:26162051

  13. Non-contact intracellular binding of chloroplasts in vivo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yuchao; Xin, Hongbao; Liu, Xiaoshuai; Li, Baojun

    2015-06-01

    Non-contact intracellular binding and controllable manipulation of chloroplasts in vivo was demonstrated using an optical fiber probe. Launching a 980-nm laser beam into a fiber, which was placed about 3 μm above the surface of a living plant (Hydrilla verticillata) leaf, enabled stable binding of different numbers of chloroplasts, as well as their arrangement into one-dimensional chains and two-dimensional arrays inside the leaf without damaging the chloroplasts. Additionally, the formed chloroplast chains were controllably transported inside the living cells. The optical force exerted on the chloroplasts was calculated to explain the experimental results. This method provides a flexible method for studying intracellular organelle interaction with highly organized organelle-organelle contact in vivo in a non-contact manner.

  14. Comparative proteomic analysis of amaranth mesophyll and bundle sheath chloroplasts and their adaptation to salt stress.

    PubMed

    Joaquín-Ramos, Ahuitzolt; Huerta-Ocampo, José Á; Barrera-Pacheco, Alberto; De León-Rodríguez, Antonio; Baginsky, Sacha; Barba de la Rosa, Ana P

    2014-09-15

    The effect of salt stress was analyzed in chloroplasts of Amaranthus cruentus var. Amaranteca, a plant NAD-malic enzyme (NAD-ME) type. Morphology of chloroplasts from bundle sheath (BSC) and mesophyll (MC) was observed by transmission electron microscopy (TEM). BSC and MC from control plants showed similar morphology, however under stress, changes in BSC were observed. The presence of ribulose bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase (RuBisCO) was confirmed by immunohistochemical staining in both types of chloroplasts. Proteomic profiles of thylakoid protein complexes from BSC and MC, and their changes induced by salt stress were analyzed by blue-native polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis followed by SDS-PAGE (2-D BN/SDS-PAGE). Differentially accumulated protein spots were analyzed by LC-MS/MS. Although A. cruentus photosynthetic tissue showed the Kranz anatomy, the thylakoid proteins showed some differences at photosystem structure level. Our results suggest that A. cruentus var. Amaranteca could be better classified as a C3-C4 photosynthetic plant. PMID:25046763

  15. Phylogenetic affinities of the grasses to other monocots as revealed by molecular analysis of chloroplast DNA.

    PubMed

    Katayama, H; Ogihara, Y

    1996-05-01

    The distribution of structural alterations of the chloroplast genome found in grass chloroplast (cp) DNA in comparison with that of tobacco was systematically surveyed in the cpDNAs of monocots. Southern hybridization and/or PCR analyses for the detection of (1) three inversions in the large single-copy region, (2) loss of an intron in the rpoC1 gene, (3) an extra-sequence insertion in the rpoC2 gene, (4) the deletion of ORF2280, (5) rearrangements of the accD (ORF512) gene, and (6) non-reciprocal translocation of the rpl23 gene, were carried out on cpDNAs isolated from 58 species, 22 families, and 11 orders, which covered almost all families of monocots. These structural alterations of cpDNA mostly occurred at the family level. However, only part of the Restionaceae possessed the inversion that characterizes the lineage of grass differentiation. The order of mutational events made it possible to reconstruct grass phylogeny in monocots. Since no variations in structural alterations of the cpDNA were found among the Poaceae, grass plants were inferred to have originated from an ancestor harboring these structural alterations of the chloroplast genome. These phylogenetic relationships were supported by the sequence data of rbcL. PMID:8662197

  16. Chloroplast targeting of FtsHprotease is essential for chloroplast development and thylakoid stability at elevated temperatures in plants

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    AtFtsH11 is a chloroplast and mitochondria dual targeted metalloprotease, identified as essential for Arabidopsis plant to survive at moderate high temperatures at all developmental stages. Our study showed that FtsH11 plays critical roles in both the early stages of chloroplast biogenesis and main...

  17. The Chloroplast Genome of Pellia endiviifolia: Gene Content, RNA-Editing Pattern, and the Origin of Chloroplast Editing

    PubMed Central

    Grosche, Christopher; Funk, Helena T.; Maier, Uwe G.; Zauner, Stefan

    2012-01-01

    RNA editing is a post-transcriptional process that can act upon transcripts from mitochondrial, nuclear, and chloroplast genomes. In chloroplasts, single-nucleotide conversions in mRNAs via RNA editing occur at different frequencies across the plant kingdom. These range from several hundred edited sites in some mosses and ferns to lower frequencies in seed plants and the complete lack of RNA editing in the liverwort Marchantia polymorpha. Here, we report the sequence and edited sites of the chloroplast genome from the liverwort Pellia endiviifolia. The type and frequency of chloroplast RNA editing display a pattern highly similar to that in seed plants. Analyses of the C to U conversions and the genomic context in which the editing sites are embedded provide evidence in favor of the hypothesis that chloroplast RNA editing evolved to compensate mutations in the first land plants. PMID:23221608

  18. Ferredoxin-linked chloroplast enzymes. Progress report

    SciTech Connect

    1993-12-31

    This report summarizes research on ferredoxin:NADP{sup +} oxidoreductase and ferredoxin:thioredoxin reductase. One of the primary goals of the original proposal was to map the ferredoxin-binding sites on three soluble enzymes that are located in spinach chloroplasts and utilize ferredoxin as an electron donor:Ferredoxin:NADP{sup +} oxidoreductase (FNR); ferredoxin:thioredoxin reductase (FTR) and glutamate synthase. As the availability of amino acid sequences for the enzymes are important in such studies, it was proposed that the amino acid sequence of glutamate synthase be determined. The amino acid sequences of FNR, FTR and ferredoxin are already known. An aim related to elucidating the binding sites on these enzymes for ferredoxin was to determine whether there is a common site on ferredoxin involved in binding to all of these ferredoxin-dependent chloroplast enzymes and, if so, to map it. One additional aim was to characterize thioredoxin binding by FTR and determine whether the same site on FTR is involved in binding both ferredoxin and thioredoxin. Considerable progress has been made on most of these original projects, although work conducted on FTR is still in its preliminary stages.

  19. The complete chloroplast genome of Capsella rubella.

    PubMed

    Wu, Zhiqiang

    2016-07-01

    The whole nucleotide sequence of the chloroplast genome from Capsella rubella is determined in this study using short Illumina sequence data from public database. The circular double-stranded DNA, which consists of 154,601 base pairs (bp) in size, contains a pair of inverted repeats (IRa and IRb) of 26,462 bp each, which are separated by a small and large single-copies (SSC and LSC) of 17,855 and 83,822 bp, respectively. The overall GC content of the chloroplast genome is 36.54% and the GC contents of LSC, IRs and SSC are 34.33%, 42.38% and 29.61% separately. One hundred and twelve unique genes were annotated, including 78 protein-coding genes, 30 tRNA genes and 4 rRNA genes. Among these, 16 are duplicated in the inverted repeat regions, 15 genes contained 1 intron, and 3 genes (rps12, clpP and ycf3) comprised of 2 introns. Two protein genes (rps19 and ycf1) span in the boundaries of LSC-IR and IR-SSC to produce two partial pseudogenes. PMID:26024136

  20. Transposon-induced nuclear mutations that alter chloroplast gene expression

    SciTech Connect

    Barkan, A.

    1992-01-01

    The goal of this project is to use mutant phenotypes as a guide to nuclear genes that determine the timing and localization of chloroplast development The immediate goals are to identify nuclear mutants with defects in chloroplast gene expression from maize lines harboring active Mu transposons; characterize their phenotypes to determine the precise defect in gene expression; clone several of the most interesting mutations by exploiting the transposon tag; and use the clones to further define the roles of these genes in modulating chloroplast gene expression. Three mutants were described earlier that had global defects in chloroplast gene expression. We have found that two of these mutations are allelic. Both alleles have global defects in chloroplast translation initiation, as revealed by the failure to assemble chloroplast mRNAs into polysomes. We have isolated and characterized three new mutants from Mu lines that have novel defects in chloroplast RNA metabolism. We are now ready to begin the task of cloning several of these genes, by using the Mu transposon tag.

  1. Programmed cell death in plants: A chloroplastic connection

    PubMed Central

    Ambastha, Vivek; Tripathy, Baishnab C; Tiwari, Budhi Sagar

    2015-01-01

    Programmed cell death (PCD) is an integral cellular program by which targeted cells culminate to demise under certain developmental and pathological conditions. It is essential for controlling cell number, removing unwanted diseased or damaged cells and maintaining the cellular homeostasis. The details of PCD process has been very well elucidated and characterized in animals but similar understanding of the process in plants has not been achieved rather the field is still in its infancy that sees some sporadic reports every now and then. The plants have 2 energy generating sub-cellular organelles- mitochondria and chloroplasts unlike animals that just have mitochondria. The presence of chloroplast as an additional energy transducing and ROS generating compartment in a plant cell inclines to advocate the involvement of chloroplasts in PCD execution process. As chloroplasts are supposed to be progenies of unicellular photosynthetic organisms that evolved as a result of endosymbiosis, the possibility of retaining some of the components involved in bacterial PCD by chloroplasts cannot be ruled out. Despite several excellent reviews on PCD in plants, there is a void on an update of information at a place on the regulation of PCD by chloroplast. This review has been written to provide an update on the information supporting the involvement of chloroplast in PCD process and the possible future course of the field. PMID:25760871

  2. Mining the soluble chloroplast proteome by affinity chromatography.

    PubMed

    Bayer, Roman G; Stael, Simon; Csaszar, Edina; Teige, Markus

    2011-04-01

    Chloroplasts are fundamental organelles enabling plant photoautotrophy. Besides their outstanding physiological role in fixation of atmospheric CO(2), they harbor many important metabolic processes such as biosynthesis of amino acids, vitamins or hormones. Technical advances in MS allowed the recent identification of most chloroplast proteins. However, for a deeper understanding of chloroplast function it is important to obtain a complete list of constituents, which is so far limited by the detection of low-abundant proteins. Therefore, we developed a two-step strategy for the enrichment of low-abundant soluble chloroplast proteins from Pisum sativum and their subsequent identification by MS. First, chloroplast protein extracts were depleted from the most abundant protein ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase by SEC or heating. Further purification was carried out by affinity chromatography, using ligands specific for ATP- or metal-binding proteins. By these means, we were able to identify a total of 448 proteins including 43 putative novel chloroplast proteins. Additionally, the chloroplast localization of 13 selected proteins was confirmed using yellow fluorescent protein fusion analyses. The selected proteins included a phosphoglycerate mutase, a cysteine protease, a putative protein kinase and an EF-hand containing substrate carrier protein, which are expected to exhibit important metabolic or regulatory functions. PMID:21365755

  3. Chloroplast-like transfer RNA genes expressed in wheat mitochondria.

    PubMed Central

    Joyce, P B; Gray, M W

    1989-01-01

    In the course of a systematic survey of wheat mitochondrial tRNA genes, we have sequenced chloroplast-like serine (trnS-GGA), phenylalanine (trnF-GAA) and cysteine (trnC-GCA) tRNA genes and their flanking regions. These genes are remnants of 'promiscuous' chloroplast DNA that has been incorporated into wheat mtDNA in the course of its evolution. Each gene differs by one or a few nucleotides from the authentic chloroplast homolog previously characterized in wheat or other plants, and each could potentially encode a functional tRNA whose secondary structure shows no deviations from the generalized model. To determine whether these chloroplast-like tRNA genes are actually expressed, wheat mitochondrial tRNAs were resolved by a series of polyacrylamide gel electrophoreses, after being specifically end-labeled in vitro by 3'-CCA addition mediated by wheat tRNA nucleotidyltransferase. Subsequent direct RNA sequence analysis identified prominent tRNA species corresponding to the mitochondrial and not the chloroplast trnS, trnF and trnC genes. This analysis also revealed chloroplast-like elongator methionine, asparagine and tryptophan tRNAs. Our results suggest that at least some chloroplast-like tRNA genes in wheat mtDNA are transcribed, with transcripts undergoing processing, post-transcriptional modification and 3'-CCA addition, to produce mature tRNAs that may participate in mitochondrial protein synthesis. Images PMID:2762145

  4. Mining the soluble chloroplast proteome by affinity chromatography

    PubMed Central

    Bayer, Roman G; Stael, Simon; Csaszar, Edina; Teige, Markus

    2011-01-01

    Chloroplasts are fundamental organelles enabling plant photoautotrophy. Besides their outstanding physiological role in fixation of atmospheric CO2, they harbor many important metabolic processes such as biosynthesis of amino acids, vitamins or hormones. Technical advances in MS allowed the recent identification of most chloroplast proteins. However, for a deeper understanding of chloroplast function it is important to obtain a complete list of constituents, which is so far limited by the detection of low-abundant proteins. Therefore, we developed a two-step strategy for the enrichment of low-abundant soluble chloroplast proteins from Pisum sativum and their subsequent identification by MS. First, chloroplast protein extracts were depleted from the most abundant protein ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase by SEC or heating. Further purification was carried out by affinity chromatography, using ligands specific for ATP- or metal-binding proteins. By these means, we were able to identify a total of 448 proteins including 43 putative novel chloroplast proteins. Additionally, the chloroplast localization of 13 selected proteins was confirmed using yellow fluorescent protein fusion analyses. The selected proteins included a phosphoglycerate mutase, a cysteine protease, a putative protein kinase and an EF-hand containing substrate carrier protein, which are expected to exhibit important metabolic or regulatory functions. PMID:21365755

  5. Chloroplast diversity in a putative hybrid swarm of Ponderosae (Pinaceae).

    PubMed

    Epperson, Bryan K; Telewski, Frank W; Willyard, Ann

    2009-03-01

    The Ponderosae subsection of the genus Pinus contains numerous taxa in disjunct mountain ranges of southern Arizona and New Mexico, differing for several leaf and cone traits, key among which is the number of leaf needles per fascicle. Trees with three needles are often found together with trees having five needles and mixed numbers. One taxonomic hypothesis is that there are swarms of hybrids between P. ponderosa and P. arizonica. A second hypothesis is that there are spatial mixtures of two separate taxa, five-needle P. arizonica and a "taxon X" containing three needle and mixed needle trees. We genotyped chloroplasts in one putative hybrid swarm on Mt. Lemmon using microsatellite markers and show that cpDNA is almost completely differentiated between two separate morphotypes corresponding to P. arizonica and "taxon X." Little if any introgression has occurred on Mt. Lemmon, and the simplest explanation is that little or no effective hybridization has occurred. Further results indicate that not only is taxon X not of hybrid origin, it is more closely related to nonregional Ponderosae other than P. ponderosa and P. arizonica. The results further suggest that other putative hybrid swarms in the region are also spatial mixtures of distinct taxa. PMID:21628225

  6. Production of therapeutic proteins in the chloroplast of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Chloroplast transformation in the photosynthetic alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii has been used to explore the potential to use it as an inexpensive and easily scalable system for the production of therapeutic recombinant proteins. Diverse proteins, such as bacterial and viral antigens, antibodies and, immunotoxins have been successfully expressed in the chloroplast using endogenous and chimeric promoter sequences. In some cases, proteins have accumulated to high level, demonstrating that this technology could compete with current production platforms. This review focuses on the works that have engineered the chloroplast of C. reinhardtii with the aim of producing recombinant proteins intended for therapeutical use in humans or animals. PMID:25136510

  7. Production of therapeutic proteins in the chloroplast of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii.

    PubMed

    Almaraz-Delgado, Alma Lorena; Flores-Uribe, José; Pérez-España, Víctor Hugo; Salgado-Manjarrez, Edgar; Badillo-Corona, Jesús Agustín

    2014-01-01

    Chloroplast transformation in the photosynthetic alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii has been used to explore the potential to use it as an inexpensive and easily scalable system for the production of therapeutic recombinant proteins. Diverse proteins, such as bacterial and viral antigens, antibodies and, immunotoxins have been successfully expressed in the chloroplast using endogenous and chimeric promoter sequences. In some cases, proteins have accumulated to high level, demonstrating that this technology could compete with current production platforms. This review focuses on the works that have engineered the chloroplast of C. reinhardtii with the aim of producing recombinant proteins intended for therapeutical use in humans or animals. PMID:25136510

  8. Chloroplast phylogeny indicates that bryophytes are monophyletic.

    PubMed

    Nishiyama, Tomoaki; Wolf, Paul G; Kugita, Masanori; Sinclair, Robert B; Sugita, Mamoru; Sugiura, Chika; Wakasugi, Tatsuya; Yamada, Kyoji; Yoshinaga, Koichi; Yamaguchi, Kazuo; Ueda, Kunihiko; Hasebe, Mitsuyasu

    2004-10-01

    Opinions on the basal relationship of land plants vary considerably and no phylogenetic tree with significant statistical support has been obtained. Here, we report phylogenetic analyses using 51 genes from the entire chloroplast genome sequences of 20 representative green plant species. The analyses, using translated amino acid sequences, indicated that extant bryophytes (mosses, liverworts, and hornworts) form a monophyletic group with high statistical confidence and that extant bryophytes are likely sisters to extant vascular plants, although the support for monophyletic vascular plants was not strong. Analyses at the nucleotide level could not resolve the basal relationship with statistical confidence. Bryophyte monophyly inferred using amino acid sequences has a good statistical foundation and is not rejected statistically by other data sets. We propose bryophyte monophyly as the currently best hypothesis. PMID:15240838

  9. Chloroplast Phylogenomic Inference of Green Algae Relationships

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Linhua; Fang, Ling; Zhang, Zhenhua; Chang, Xin; Penny, David; Zhong, Bojian

    2016-01-01

    The green algal phylum Chlorophyta has six diverse classes, but the phylogenetic relationship of the classes within Chlorophyta remains uncertain. In order to better understand the ancient Chlorophyta evolution, we have applied a site pattern sorting method to study compositional heterogeneity and the model fit in the green algal chloroplast genomic data. We show that the fastest-evolving sites are significantly correlated with among-site compositional heterogeneity, and these sites have a much poorer fit to the evolutionary model. Our phylogenomic analyses suggest that the class Chlorophyceae is a monophyletic group, and the classes Ulvophyceae, Trebouxiophyceae and Prasinophyceae are non-monophyletic groups. Our proposed phylogenetic tree of Chlorophyta will offer new insights to investigate ancient green algae evolution, and our analytical framework will provide a useful approach for evaluating and mitigating the potential errors of phylogenomic inferences. PMID:26846729

  10. Dynamics of chloroplast genomes in green plants.

    PubMed

    Xu, Jian-Hong; Liu, Qiuxiang; Hu, Wangxiong; Wang, Tingzhang; Xue, Qingzhong; Messing, Joachim

    2015-10-01

    Chloroplasts are essential organelles, in which genes have widely been used in the phylogenetic analysis of green plants. Here, we took advantage of the breadth of plastid genomes (cpDNAs) sequenced species to investigate their dynamic changes. Our study showed that gene rearrangements occurred more frequently in the cpDNAs of green algae than in land plants. Phylogenetic trees were generated using 55 conserved protein-coding genes including 33 genes for photosynthesis, 16 ribosomal protein genes and 6 other genes, which supported the monophyletic evolution of vascular plants, land plants, seed plants, and angiosperms. Moreover, we could show that seed plants were more closely related to bryophytes rather than pteridophytes. Furthermore, the substitution rate for cpDNA genes was calculated to be 3.3×10(-10), which was almost 10 times lower than genes of nuclear genomes, probably because of the plastid homologous recombination machinery. PMID:26206079

  11. Light Quality Effects on Corn Chloroplast Development

    PubMed Central

    Eskins, Kenneth; Duysen, Murray; Dybas, Linda; McCarthy, Susan

    1985-01-01

    Corn was grown under greenhouse and controlled light quality conditions incluing full spectrum, red (R), and far-red (FR) sources. Young leaf samples were analyzed for pigments, pigment-proteins, membrane polypeptides, and ultrastructure. Chloroplast development in full spectrum white light was similar to that found in R but different from that found in FR plus low R. Compared to greenhouse and R, FR plus low R (670-760) repressed the formation of photosystem I reaction center protein (CP1 + CP1a) and enhanced those of photosystem II (CPa) in both bundle sheath and mesophyll cells. Photosystem II polypeptides were present in both cell types, with the 46 and 34 kilodalton proteins predominant in mesophyll cells. Bundle sheath cells contained relatively more of the 51 kilodalton and less of the 46 kilodalton proteins. However, they also contained measurable amounts of ribulose bisphosphate carboxylase which may interfere with estimates of the 51 kilodalton protein. Images Fig. 4 PMID:16664023

  12. Origins of prokaryotes, eukaryotes, mitochondria, and chloroplasts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schwartz, R. M.; Dayhoff, M. O.

    1978-01-01

    A computer branching model is used to analyze cellular evolution. Attention is given to certain key amino acids and nucleotide residues (ferredoxin, 5s ribosomal RNA, and c-type cytochromes) because of their commonality over a wide variety of cell types. Each amino acid or nucleotide residue is a sequence in an inherited biological trait; and the branching method is employed to align sequences so that changes reflect substitution of one residue for another. Based on the computer analysis, the symbiotic theory of cellular evolution is considered the most probable. This theory holds that organelles, e.g., mitochondria and chloroplasts invaded larger bodies, e.g., bacteria, and combined functions to form eucaryotic cells.

  13. Full transcription of the chloroplast genome in photosynthetic eukaryotes

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Chao; Wang, Shuo; Xia, En-Hua; Jiang, Jian-Jun; Zeng, Fan-Chun; Gao, Li-Zhi

    2016-01-01

    Prokaryotes possess a simple genome transcription system that is different from that of eukaryotes. In chloroplasts (plastids), it is believed that the prokaryotic gene transcription features govern genome transcription. However, the polycistronic operon transcription model cannot account for all the chloroplast genome (plastome) transcription products at whole-genome level, especially regarding various RNA isoforms. By systematically analyzing transcriptomes of plastids of algae and higher plants, and cyanobacteria, we find that the entire plastome is transcribed in photosynthetic green plants, and that this pattern originated from prokaryotic cyanobacteria — ancestor of the chloroplast genomes that diverged about 1 billion years ago. We propose a multiple arrangement transcription model that multiple transcription initiations and terminations combine haphazardly to accomplish the genome transcription followed by subsequent RNA processing events, which explains the full chloroplast genome transcription phenomenon and numerous functional and/or aberrant pre-RNAs. Our findings indicate a complex prokaryotic genome regulation when processing primary transcripts. PMID:27456469

  14. Photosynthetic light reactions: integral to chloroplast retrograde signalling.

    PubMed

    Gollan, Peter J; Tikkanen, Mikko; Aro, Eva-Mari

    2015-10-01

    Chloroplast retrograde signalling is ultimately dependent on the function of the photosynthetic light reactions and not only guides the acclimation of the photosynthetic apparatus to changing environmental and metabolic cues, but has a much wider influence on the growth and development of plants. New information generated during the past few years about regulation of photosynthetic light reactions and identification of the underlying regulatory proteins has paved the way towards better understanding of the signalling molecules produced in chloroplasts upon changes in the environment. Likewise, the availability of various mutants lacking regulatory functions has made it possible to address the role of excitation energy distribution and electron flow in the thylakoid membrane in inducing the retrograde signals from chloroplasts to the nucleus. Such signalling molecules also induce and interact with hormonal signalling cascades to provide comprehensive information from chloroplasts to the nucleus. PMID:26318477

  15. The complete chloroplast genome sequence of Zanthoxylum piperitum.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jonghoon; Lee, Hyeon Ju; Kim, Kyunghee; Lee, Sang-Choon; Sung, Sang Hyun; Yang, Tae-Jin

    2016-09-01

    The complete chloroplast genome sequence of Zanthoxylum piperitum, a plant species with useful aromatic oils in family Rutaceae, was generated in this study by de novo assembly with whole-genome sequence data. The chloroplast genome was 158 154 bp in length with a typical quadripartite structure containing a pair of inverted repeats of 27 644 bp, separated by large single copy and small single copy of 85 340 bp and 17 526 bp, respectively. The chloroplast genome harbored 112 genes consisting of 78 protein-coding genes 30 tRNA genes and 4 rRNA genes. Phylogenetic analysis of the complete chloroplast genome sequences with those of known relatives revealed that Z. piperitum is most closely related to the Citrus species. PMID:26260183

  16. Full transcription of the chloroplast genome in photosynthetic eukaryotes.

    PubMed

    Shi, Chao; Wang, Shuo; Xia, En-Hua; Jiang, Jian-Jun; Zeng, Fan-Chun; Gao, Li-Zhi

    2016-01-01

    Prokaryotes possess a simple genome transcription system that is different from that of eukaryotes. In chloroplasts (plastids), it is believed that the prokaryotic gene transcription features govern genome transcription. However, the polycistronic operon transcription model cannot account for all the chloroplast genome (plastome) transcription products at whole-genome level, especially regarding various RNA isoforms. By systematically analyzing transcriptomes of plastids of algae and higher plants, and cyanobacteria, we find that the entire plastome is transcribed in photosynthetic green plants, and that this pattern originated from prokaryotic cyanobacteria - ancestor of the chloroplast genomes that diverged about 1 billion years ago. We propose a multiple arrangement transcription model that multiple transcription initiations and terminations combine haphazardly to accomplish the genome transcription followed by subsequent RNA processing events, which explains the full chloroplast genome transcription phenomenon and numerous functional and/or aberrant pre-RNAs. Our findings indicate a complex prokaryotic genome regulation when processing primary transcripts. PMID:27456469

  17. Chloroplast genome variation in upland and lowland switchgrass

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Switchgrass (Panicum virgatum L.) exists at multiple ploidies and two phenotypically distinct ecotypes. To facilitate interploidal comparisons and to understand the extent of sequence variation within existing breeding pools, two complete switchgrass chloroplast genomes were sequenced from individu...

  18. Prenylquinone profiling in whole leaves and chloroplast subfractions.

    PubMed

    Kessler, Felix; Glauser, Gaetan

    2014-01-01

    Prenylquinones are indispensable molecules in plants and animals. In plants, phylloquinone (vitamin K) and plastoquinone are electron carriers during photosynthesis in chloroplasts, whereas tocopherol (vitamin E) functions as a lipid antioxidant. The biosynthetic pathways of the prenylquinones have been largely characterized but the mechanisms regulating their production and distribution in various subcompartments of the chloroplast are only starting to emerge. Research on chloroplast lipid droplets (plastoglobules) has unraveled a complex network of intersecting prenylquinone metabolic pathways that are providing unprecedented insight into the regulatory processes. In this chapter, we describe how to isolate chloroplast membrane fractions, in particular the plastoglobule lipid droplets, and how to profile the prenylquinones that are contained in these fractions. PMID:24777800

  19. Transport of Ions Across the Inner Envelope Membrane of Chloroplasts

    SciTech Connect

    McCarty, R. E.

    2004-06-02

    The technical report outlines the results of nine years of research on how ions cross the inner envelope membrane of chloroplasts. The ions include protons, nitrite, calcium and ferrous iron. Bicarbonate transport was also studied.

  20. Separation of Chloroplast Pigments Using Reverse Phase Chromatography.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reese, R. Neil

    1997-01-01

    Presents a protocol that uses reverse phase chromatography for the separation of chloroplast pigments. Provides a simple and relatively safe procedure for use in teaching laboratories. Discusses pigment extraction, chromatography, results, and advantages of the process. (JRH)

  1. A Nucleus-Encoded Chloroplast Protein YL1 Is Involved in Chloroplast Development and Efficient Biogenesis of Chloroplast ATP Synthase in Rice

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Fei; Dong, Guojun; Wu, Limin; Wang, Fang; Yang, Xingzheng; Ma, Xiaohui; Wang, Haili; Wu, Jiahuan; Zhang, Yanli; Wang, Huizhong; Qian, Qian; Yu, Yanchun

    2016-01-01

    Chloroplast ATP synthase (cpATPase) is an importance thylakoid membrane-associated photosynthetic complex involved in the light-dependent reactions of photosynthesis. In this study, we isolated and characterized a rice (Oryza sativa) mutant yellow leaf 1 (yl1), which exhibits chlorotic leaves throughout developmental stages. The YL1 mutation showed reduced chlorophyll contents, abnormal chloroplast morphology, and decreased photochemical efficiency. Moreover, YL1 deficiency disrupts the expression of genes associated with chloroplast development and photosynthesis. Molecular and genetic analyses revealed that YL1 is a nucleus-encoded protein with a predicted transmembrane domain in its carboxyl-terminus that is conserved in the higher plant kingdom. YL1 localizes to chloroplasts and is preferentially expressed in green tissues containing chloroplasts. Immunoblot analyses showed that inactivation of YL1 leads to drastically reduced accumulation of AtpA (α) and AtpB (β), two core subunits of CF1αβ subcomplex of cpATPase, meanwhile, a severe decrease (ca. 41.7%) in cpATPase activity was observed in the yl1-1 mutant compared with the wild type. Furthermore, yeast two-hybrid and bimolecular fluorescence complementation assays revealed a specific interaction between YL1 and AtpB subunit of cpATPase. Taken together, our results suggest that YL1 is a plant lineage-specific auxiliary factor involved in the biogenesis of the cpATPase complex, possibly via interacting with the β-subunit. PMID:27585744

  2. A Nucleus-Encoded Chloroplast Protein YL1 Is Involved in Chloroplast Development and Efficient Biogenesis of Chloroplast ATP Synthase in Rice.

    PubMed

    Chen, Fei; Dong, Guojun; Wu, Limin; Wang, Fang; Yang, Xingzheng; Ma, Xiaohui; Wang, Haili; Wu, Jiahuan; Zhang, Yanli; Wang, Huizhong; Qian, Qian; Yu, Yanchun

    2016-01-01

    Chloroplast ATP synthase (cpATPase) is an importance thylakoid membrane-associated photosynthetic complex involved in the light-dependent reactions of photosynthesis. In this study, we isolated and characterized a rice (Oryza sativa) mutant yellow leaf 1 (yl1), which exhibits chlorotic leaves throughout developmental stages. The YL1 mutation showed reduced chlorophyll contents, abnormal chloroplast morphology, and decreased photochemical efficiency. Moreover, YL1 deficiency disrupts the expression of genes associated with chloroplast development and photosynthesis. Molecular and genetic analyses revealed that YL1 is a nucleus-encoded protein with a predicted transmembrane domain in its carboxyl-terminus that is conserved in the higher plant kingdom. YL1 localizes to chloroplasts and is preferentially expressed in green tissues containing chloroplasts. Immunoblot analyses showed that inactivation of YL1 leads to drastically reduced accumulation of AtpA (α) and AtpB (β), two core subunits of CF1αβ subcomplex of cpATPase, meanwhile, a severe decrease (ca. 41.7%) in cpATPase activity was observed in the yl1-1 mutant compared with the wild type. Furthermore, yeast two-hybrid and bimolecular fluorescence complementation assays revealed a specific interaction between YL1 and AtpB subunit of cpATPase. Taken together, our results suggest that YL1 is a plant lineage-specific auxiliary factor involved in the biogenesis of the cpATPase complex, possibly via interacting with the β-subunit. PMID:27585744

  3. Complete Chloroplast Genome of Tanaecium tetragonolobum: The First Bignoniaceae Plastome

    PubMed Central

    Nazareno, Alison Gonçalves; Carlsen, Monica; Lohmann, Lúcia Garcez

    2015-01-01

    Bignoniaceae is a Pantropical plant family that is especially abundant in the Neotropics. Members of the Bignoniaceae are diverse in many ecosystems and represent key components of the Tropical flora. Despite the ecological importance of the Bignoniaceae and all the efforts to reconstruct the phylogeny of this group, whole chloroplast genome information has not yet been reported for any members of the family. Here, we report the complete chloroplast genome sequence of Tanaecium tetragonolobum (Jacq.) L.G. Lohmann, which was reconstructed using de novo and referenced-based assembly of single-end reads generated by shotgun sequencing of total genomic DNA in an Illumina platform. The gene order and organization of the chloroplast genome of T. tetragonolobum exhibits the general structure of flowering plants, and is similar to other Lamiales chloroplast genomes. The chloroplast genome of T. tetragonolobum is a circular molecule of 153,776 base pairs (bp) with a quadripartite structure containing two single copy regions, a large single copy region (LSC, 84,612 bp) and a small single copy region (SSC, 17,586 bp) separated by inverted repeat regions (IRs, 25,789 bp). In addition, the chloroplast genome of T. tetragonolobum has 38.3% GC content and includes 121 genes, of which 86 are protein-coding, 31 are transfer RNA, and four are ribosomal RNA. The chloroplast genome of T. tetragonolobum presents a total of 47 tandem repeats and 347 simple sequence repeats (SSRs) with mononucleotides being the most common and di-, tri-, tetra-, and hexanucleotides occurring with less frequency. The results obtained here were compared to other chloroplast genomes of Lamiales available to date, providing new insight into the evolution of chloroplast genomes within Lamiales. Overall, the evolutionary rates of genes in Lamiales are lineage-, locus-, and region-specific, indicating that the evolutionary pattern of nucleotide substitution in chloroplast genomes of flowering plants is complex

  4. Sequence evidence for the symbiotic origins of chloroplasts and mitochondria

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    George, D. G.; Hunt, L. T.; Dayhoff, M. O.

    1983-01-01

    The origin of mitochondria and chloroplasts is investigated on the basis of prokaryotic and early-eukaryotic evolutionary trees derived from protein and nucleic-acid sequences by the method of Dayhoff (1979). Trees for bacterial ferrodoxins, 5S ribosomal RNA, c-type cytochromes, the lipid-binding subunit of ATPase, and dihydrofolate reductase are presented and discussed. Good agreement among the trees is found, and it is argued that the mitochondria and chloroplasts evolved by multiple symbiotic events.

  5. Evidence that sigma factors are components of chloroplast RNA polymerase.

    PubMed Central

    Troxler, R F; Zhang, F; Hu, J; Bogorad, L

    1994-01-01

    Plastid genes are transcribed by DNA-dependent RNA polymerase(s), which have been incompletely characterized and have been examined in a limited number of species. Plastid genomes contain rpoA, rpoB, rpoC1, and rpoC2 coding for alpha, beta, beta', and beta" RNA polymerase subunits that are homologous to the alpha, beta, and beta' subunits that constitute the core moiety of RNA polymerase in bacteria. However, genes with homology to sigma subunits in bacteria have not been found in plastid genomes. An antibody directed against the principal sigma subunit of RNA polymerase from the cyanobacterium Anabaena sp. PCC 7120 was used to probe western blots of purified chloroplast RNA polymerase from maize, rice, Chlamydomonas reinhardtii, and Cyanidium caldarium. Chloroplast RNA polymerase from maize and rice contained an immunoreactive 64-kD protein. Chloroplast RNA polymerase from C. reinhardtii contained immunoreactive 100- and 82-kD proteins, and chloroplast RNA polymerase from C. caldarium contained an immunoreactive 32-kD protein. The elution profile of enzyme activity of both algal chloroplast RNA polymerases coeluted from DEAE with the respective immunoreactive proteins, indicating that they are components of the enzyme. These results provide immunological evidence for sigma-like factors in chloroplast RNA polymerase in higher plants and algae. PMID:8159791

  6. Amino acid incorporation by ribosomes and polyribosomes from wheat chloroplasts.

    PubMed

    Hadziyev, D; Zalik, S

    1970-01-01

    Sucrose-gradient and analytical ultracentrifugation showed that chloroplast polyribosomes from 4-day-old seedlings had mono-, di-, tri-, tetra- and traces of penta-ribosomes, in contrast with those from 7-day-old seedlings in which only the mono-, di- and traces of tri-ribosomes were present. Without Mg(2+) the polyribosomes dissociated into ribosomal subunits. The rate of l-[U-(14)C]phenylalanine incorporation was threefold greater for preparations from 4- than from 7-day-old seedlings. Incorporation by the latter was stimulated by polyuridylic acid. The rates of incorporation were similar whether the reaction mixture contained chloroplast or wheat-germ transfer RNA and amino acid synthetases purified on methylated albumin-on-kieselguhr and Sephadex G-75 columns respectively. The cofactor requirement was the same as for isolated intact chloroplasts. Osmotic rupture of chloroplasts with and without Triton X-100 revealed the presence of free and bound ribosomes. Free single ribosomes isolated by osmotic shrinkage or prepared by pancreatic ribonuclease digestion of chloroplast polyribosomes had negligible incorporation activity. This activity was increased by washing or by polyuridylic acid, but was still only a fraction of that given by polyribosomes. A comparison of incorporation activity of chloroplast polyribosomes with those from the surrounding cytoplasm showed the former to be 20 times more active. PMID:5411422

  7. Export of Carbon from Chloroplasts at Night1

    PubMed Central

    Schleucher, Jürgen; Vanderveer, Peter J.; Sharkey, Thomas D.

    1998-01-01

    Hexose export from chloroplasts at night has been inferred in previous studies of mutant and transgenic plants. We have tested whether hexose export is the normal route of carbon export from chloroplasts at night. We used nuclear magnetic resonance to distinguish glucose (Glc) made from hexose export and Glc made from triose export. Glc synthesized in vitro from fructose-6-phosphate in the presence of deuterium-labeled water had deuterium incorporated at C-2, whereas synthesis from triose phosphates caused C-2 through C-5 to become deuterated. In both tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum L.) and bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.), Glc from sucrose made at night in the presence of deuterium-enriched water was deuterated only in the C-2 position, indicating that >75% of carbon is exported as hexoses at night. In darkness the phosphate in the cytosol was 28 mm, whereas that in the chloroplasts was 5 mm, but hexose phosphates were 10-fold higher in the cytosol than in the chloroplasts. Therefore, hexose phosphates would not move out of chloroplasts without the input of energy. We conclude that most carbon leaves chloroplasts at night as Glc, maltose, or higher maltodextrins under normal conditions. PMID:9847119

  8. Chloroplast unfolded protein response, a new plastid stress signaling pathway?

    PubMed

    Ramundo, Silvia; Rochaix, Jean-David

    2014-01-01

    A unique feature of the ATP-dependent ClpP protease of eukaryotic photosynthetic organisms is that its catalytic subunit ClpP1 is encoded by the chloroplast genome. Attempts to inactivate this subunit through chloroplast transformation have failed because it is essential for cell survival. To study the function of ClpP we have developed a repressible chloroplast gene expression system in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii. This system is based on the use of a chimeric nuclear gene in which the vitamin-repressible MetE promoter and Thi4 riboswitch have been fused to the coding sequence of Nac2. Upon entry into the chloroplast the Nac2 protein specifically interacts with the psbD 5'UTR and is required for the proper processing/translation of the psbD mRNA. This property can be conveyed to any chloroplast mRNA by replacing its 5'UTR with that of psbD. In this study we have chosen clpP1 as plastid target gene and examined the cellular events induced upon depletion of ClpP through transcriptomic, proteomic, biochemical and electron microscope analysis. Among the most striking features, a massive increase in protein abundance occurs for plastid chaperones, proteases and proteins involved in membrane assembly/disassembly strongly suggesting the existence of a chloroplast unfolded protein response. PMID:25482768

  9. Role of mitochondria in sulfolipid biosynthesis by Euglena chloroplasts

    SciTech Connect

    Saidha, T.; Schiff, J.A.

    1987-04-01

    Sulfate activation occurs in Euglena mitochondria the authors now find that the sulfate activating enzymes are absent from Euglena chloroplasts. Cells of mutant W/sub 10/BSmL lacking plastids also lack detectable sulfolipid (SL) when grown on /sup 35/SO/sub 4//sup 2 -/ indicating that SL is absent from the mitochondria and is exclusively in the plastids. Plastids alone will convert /sup 35/S-cysteine to /sup 35/SL in the presence of ATP and Mg/sup 2 +/; light is stimulatory. Under similar conditions, chloroplasts and mitochondria incubated together convert /sup 35/SO/sub 4//sup 2 -/ to plastid-localized /sup 35/SL but either organelle incubated alone fails to effect this conversion. Unlabeled cysteine blocks SL labeling from sulfate in the mixed incubation; since cysteine is formed from sulfate by Euglena mitochrondria, cysteine (and other compounds) may move from the mitochondrion to the chloroplast to provide the sulfo group for SL formation. Although mitochondria form labeled protein from /sup 35/SO/sub 4//sup 2 -/ via cysteine, chloroplasts alone do not form labeled protein from /sup 35/SO/sub 4//sup 2 -/, ATP and Mg/sup 2 +/ in light or darkness; incubation of chloroplasts plus mitochondria under these conditions labels chloroplast protein.

  10. Dimorphic chloroplasts in the epidermis of Podostemoideae, a subfamily of the unique aquatic angiosperm family Podostemaceae.

    PubMed

    Fujinami, Rieko; Yoshihama, Isao; Imaichi, Ryoko

    2011-09-01

    Plants of the Podostemoideae, a subfamily of the unique aquatic angiosperm family Podostemaceae, which are found in rapids and waterfalls of the tropics and subtropics, have two different sizes of chloroplasts in their epidermis. These small and large chloroplasts are located separately in each epidermal cell along its upper and inner tangential walls, respectively. This is the first case of the chloroplast dimorphism in a single epidermal cell of angiosperms. While the large chloroplasts have well developed starch grains, the small chloroplasts have a normal granal ultrastructure but very few starch grains. This suggests that the small chloroplasts mainly function in CO(2) uptake for photosynthesis from torrential water. PMID:21120679

  11. WHIRLY1 is a major organizer of chloroplast nucleoids

    PubMed Central

    Krupinska, Karin; Oetke, Svenja; Desel, Christine; Mulisch, Maria; Schäfer, Anke; Hollmann, Julien; Kumlehn, Jochen; Hensel, Götz

    2014-01-01

    WHIRLY1 is an abundant protein of chloroplast nucleoids, which has also been named pTAC-1 with regard to its detection in the proteome of transcriptionally active chromosomes (TAC). In barley primary foliage leaves, expression of the WHIRLY1 gene is highest at the base whereas protein accumulation is highest in the middle of the leaf where young developing chloroplasts are found. In order to elucidate the function of WHIRLY1 in chloroplast nucleoids, transgenic barley plants with an RNAi-mediated knock-down of the HvWHIRLY1 gene (RNAi-W1) were generated. The homozygous RNAi-W1-7 plants, barely containing traces of the WHIRLY1 protein, were chosen for detailed analyses of nucleoids. Nucleic acid specific-staining with YO-PRO®-1 revealed that in comparison to wild type chloroplasts, which have multiple small nucleoids attached to thylakoids, chloroplasts of the transgenic plants contain large irregularly formed patches of DNA besides nucleoids that are similar in size and shape to those of wild type chloroplasts. In large electron lucent areas, filamentous structures were detected by conventional transmission electron microscopy. Analyses of ptDNA levels by both DNA dot-blot hybridization and quantitative PCR showed that leaves of the transgenic plants have a two- to three-fold higher level of ptDNA than the wild type. The higher ptDNA level in RNAi-W1 plants coincided with an enhanced expression of the gene encoding a putative organelle targeted DNA polymerase in the mid part of primary foliage leaves. Furthermore, overexpression of the barley WHIRLY1 gene in E. coli cells revealed a higher compaction of bacterial nucleoids. These results suggest that WHIRLY1 belongs to the group of plastid nucleoid associated proteins (ptNAP) having a function in compacting a subpopulation of chloroplast nucleoids thereby affecting DNA replication. PMID:25237316

  12. Transplastomic integration of a cyanobacterial bicarbonate transporter into tobacco chloroplasts.

    PubMed

    Pengelly, J J L; Förster, B; von Caemmerer, S; Badger, M R; Price, G D; Whitney, S M

    2014-07-01

    Improving global yields of agricultural crops is a complex challenge with evidence indicating benefits in productivity are achieved by enhancing photosynthetic carbon assimilation. Towards improving rates of CO2 capture within leaf chloroplasts, this study shows the versatility of plastome transformation for expressing the Synechococcus PCC7002 BicA bicarbonate transporter within tobacco plastids. Fractionation of chloroplast membranes from transplastomic tob(BicA) lines showed that ~75% of the BicA localized to the thylakoid membranes and ~25% to the chloroplast envelope. BicA levels were highest in young emerging tob(BicA) leaves (0.12 μmol m(-2), ≈7mg m(-2)) accounting for ~0.1% (w/w) of the leaf protein. In these leaves, the molar amount of BicA was 16-fold lower than the abundant thylakoid photosystem II D1 protein (~1.9 μmol m(-2)) which was comparable to the 9:1 molar ratio of D1:BicA measured in air-grown Synechococcus PCC7002 cells. The BicA produced had no discernible effect on chloroplast ultrastructure, photosynthetic CO2-assimilation rates, carbon isotope discrimination, or growth of the tob(BicA) plants, implying that the bicarbonate transporter had little or no activity. These findings demonstrate the utility of plastome transformation for targeting bicarbonate transporter proteins into the chloroplast membranes without impeding growth or plastid ultrastructure. This study establishes the span of experimental measurements required to verify heterologous bicarbonate transporter function and location in chloroplasts and underscores the need for more detailed understanding of BicA structure and function to identify solutions for enabling its activation and operation in leaf chloroplasts. PMID:24965541

  13. Nitrite Uptake into Intact Pea Chloroplasts 1

    PubMed Central

    Brunswick, Pamela; Cresswell, Christopher F.

    1988-01-01

    The relationship between net nitrite uptake and its reduction in intact pea chloroplasts was investigated employing electron transport regulators, uncouplers, and photophosphorylation inhibitors. Observations confirmed the dependence of nitrite uptake on stromal pH and nitrite reduction but also suggested a partial dependance upon PSI phosphorylation. It was also suggested that ammonia stimulates nitrogen assimilation in the dark by association with stromal protons. Inhibition of nitrite uptake by N-ethylmaleimide and dinitrofluorobenzene could not be completely attributed to their inhibition of carbon dioxide fixation. Other protein binding reagents which inhibited photosynthesis showed no effect on nitrite uptake, except for p-chlormercuribenzoate which stimulated nitrite uptake. The results with N-ethylmaleimide and dinitrofluorobenzene tended to support the proposed presence of a protein permeation channel for nitrite uptake in addition to HNO2 penetration. On the basis of a lack of effect by known anion uptake inhibitors, it was concluded that the nitrite uptake mechanism was distinct from that of phosphate and chloride/sulfate transport. PMID:16665917

  14. Chloroplast genome structure in Ilex (Aquifoliaceae)

    PubMed Central

    Yao, Xin; Tan, Yun-Hong; Liu, Ying-Ying; Song, Yu; Yang, Jun-Bo; Corlett, Richard T.

    2016-01-01

    Aquifoliaceae is the largest family in the campanulid order Aquifoliales. It consists of a single genus, Ilex, the hollies, which is the largest woody dioecious genus in the angiosperms. Most species are in East Asia or South America. The taxonomy and evolutionary history remain unclear due to the lack of a robust species-level phylogeny. We produced the first complete chloroplast genomes in this family, including seven Ilex species, by Illumina sequencing of long-range PCR products and subsequent reference-guided de novo assembly. These genomes have a typical bicyclic structure with a conserved genome arrangement and moderate divergence. The total length is 157,741 bp and there is one large single-copy region (LSC) with 87,109 bp, one small single-copy with 18,436 bp, and a pair of inverted repeat regions (IR) with 52,196 bp. A total of 144 genes were identified, including 96 protein-coding genes, 40 tRNA and 8 rRNA. Thirty-four repetitive sequences were identified in Ilex pubescens, with lengths >14 bp and identity >90%, and 11 divergence hotspot regions that could be targeted for phylogenetic markers. This study will contribute to improved resolution of deep branches of the Ilex phylogeny and facilitate identification of Ilex species. PMID:27378489

  15. Limited variation across two chloroplast genomes with finishing chloroplast genome of Capsella grandiflora.

    PubMed

    Wu, Zhiqiang; Ma, Qiumao

    2016-09-01

    The complete chloroplast genome of Capsella grandiflora is finished in this study, which consists of 154 638 base pairs (bp) in size containing a pair of inverted repeats (IRa and IRb) of 26 462 bp each and a small and large single-copies (SSC and LSC) of 17 835 and 83 879 bp, respectively. The overall GC content is 36.54% and the GC contents of LSC, IRs, and SSC are 34.34%, 42.38%, and 29.61% separately. The gene contents and numbers are the same with other two published species in genus Capsella with 112 annotated unique genes including 78 protein-coding genes, 30 tRNA genes, and four rRNA genes. Among these, 16 are duplicated in the inverted repeat regions, 15 genes contained one intron, and three genes (rps12, clpP, and ycf3) comprising two introns. Based on the whole genome comparison, only 28 SNPs and 16 Indels (insertion and deletion) are detected between two closed relatives' chloroplast genomes. PMID:26186303

  16. Chloroplasts Are Central Players in Sugar-Induced Leaf Growth1[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    De Milde, Liesbeth; Maleux, Katrien

    2016-01-01

    Leaves are the plant’s powerhouses, providing energy for all organs through sugar production during photosynthesis. However, sugars serve not only as a metabolic energy source for sink tissues but also as signaling molecules, affecting gene expression through conserved signaling pathways to regulate plant growth and development. Here, we describe an in vitro experimental assay, allowing one to alter the sucrose (Suc) availability during early Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) leaf development, with the aim to identify the affected cellular and molecular processes. The transfer of seedlings to Suc-containing medium showed a profound effect on leaf growth by stimulating cell proliferation and postponing the transition to cell expansion. Furthermore, rapidly after transfer to Suc, mesophyll cells contained fewer and smaller plastids, which are irregular in shape and contain fewer starch granules compared with control mesophyll cells. Short-term transcriptional responses after transfer to Suc revealed the repression of well-known sugar-responsive genes and multiple genes encoded by the plastid, on the one hand, and up-regulation of a GLUCOSE-6-PHOSPHATE TRANSPORTER (GPT2), on the other hand. Mutant gpt2 seedlings showed no stimulation of cell proliferation and no repression of chloroplast-encoded transcripts when transferred to Suc, suggesting that GPT2 plays a critical role in the Suc-mediated effects on early leaf growth. Our findings, therefore, suggest that induction of GPT2 expression by Suc increases the import of glucose-6-phosphate into the plastids that would repress chloroplast-encoded transcripts, restricting chloroplast differentiation. Retrograde signaling from the plastids would then delay the transition to cell expansion and stimulate cell proliferation. PMID:26932234

  17. Inhibition of chloroplastic respiration by osmotic dehydration. [Spinacia oleracea L

    SciTech Connect

    Willeford, K.O.; Ahluwalia, K.J.K.; Gibbs, M. )

    1989-04-01

    The respiratory capacity of isolated spinach (Spinacia oleracea L.) chloroplasts, measured as the rate of {sup 14}CO{sub 2} evolved from the oxidative pentose phosphate cycle in darkened chloroplasts exogenously supplied with ({sup 14}C)glucose, was progressively diminished by escalating osmotic dehydration with betaine or sorbitol. Comparing the inhibitions of CO{sub 2} evolution generated by osmotic dehydration in chloroplasts given C-1 and C-6 labeled glucose, 54% and 84%, respectively, indicates that osmotic dehydration effects to a greater extent the recycling of the oxidative pentose phosphate intermediates, fructose-6P and glyceraldehyde-3P. Respiratory inhibition in the darkened chloroplast could be alleviated by addition of NH{sub 4}Cl (a stromal alkylating agent), iodoacetamide (an inhibitor of glyceraldehyde-3P dehydrogenase), or glycolate-2P (an inhibitor of phosphofructokinase). It is concluded that the site which primarily mediates respiratory inhibition in the darkened chloroplast occurs at the fructose 1,6-bisphosphatase/phosphofructokinase junction.

  18. Comparison of intraspecific, interspecific and intergeneric chloroplast diversity in Cycads.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Guo-Feng; Hinsinger, Damien Daniel; Strijk, Joeri Sergej

    2016-01-01

    Cycads are among the most threatened plant species. Increasing the availability of genomic information by adding whole chloroplast data is a fundamental step in supporting phylogenetic studies and conservation efforts. Here, we assemble a dataset encompassing three taxonomic levels in cycads, including ten genera, three species in the genus Cycas and two individuals of C. debaoensis. Repeated sequences, SSRs and variations of the chloroplast were analyzed at the intraspecific, interspecific and intergeneric scale, and using our sequence data, we reconstruct a phylogenomic tree for cycads. The chloroplast was 162,094 bp in length, with 133 genes annotated, including 87 protein-coding, 37 tRNA and 8 rRNA genes. We found 7 repeated sequences and 39 SSRs. Seven loci showed promising levels of variations for application in DNA-barcoding. The chloroplast phylogeny confirmed the division of Cycadales in two suborders, each of them being monophyletic, revealing a contradiction with the current family circumscription and its evolution. Finally, 10 intraspecific SNPs were found. Our results showed that despite the extremely restricted distribution range of C. debaoensis, using complete chloroplast data is useful not only in intraspecific studies, but also to improve our understanding of cycad evolution and in defining conservation strategies for this emblematic group. PMID:27558458

  19. The chloroplast view of the evolution of polyploid wheat.

    PubMed

    Gornicki, Piotr; Zhu, Huilan; Wang, Junwei; Challa, Ghana S; Zhang, Zhengzhi; Gill, Bikram S; Li, Wanlong

    2014-11-01

    Polyploid wheats comprise four species: Triticum turgidum (AABB genomes) and T. aestivum (AABBDD) in the Emmer lineage, and T. timopheevii (AAGG) and T. zhukovskyi (AAGGA(m) A(m) ) in the Timopheevi lineage. Genetic relationships between chloroplast genomes were studied to trace the evolutionary history of the species. Twenty-five chloroplast genomes were sequenced, and 1127 plant accessions were genotyped, representing 13 Triticum and Aegilops species. The A. speltoides (SS genome) diverged before the divergence of T. urartu (AA), A. tauschii (DD) and the Aegilops species of the Sitopsis section. Aegilops speltoides forms a monophyletic clade with the polyploid Emmer and Timopheevi wheats, which originated within the last 0.7 and 0.4 Myr, respectively. The geographic distribution of chloroplast haplotypes of the wild tetraploid wheats and A. speltoides illustrates the possible geographic origin of the Emmer lineage in the southern Levant and the Timopheevi lineage in northern Iraq. Aegilops speltoides is the closest relative of the diploid donor of the chloroplast (cytoplasm), as well as the B and G genomes to Timopheevi and Emmer lineages. Chloroplast haplotypes were often shared by species or subspecies within major lineages and between the lineages, indicating the contribution of introgression to the evolution and domestication of polyploid wheats. PMID:25059383

  20. Arabidopsis chloroplast chaperonin 10 is a calmodulin-binding protein

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yang, T.; Poovaiah, B. W.

    2000-01-01

    Calcium regulates diverse cellular activities in plants through the action of calmodulin (CaM). By using (35)S-labeled CaM to screen an Arabidopsis seedling cDNA expression library, a cDNA designated as AtCh-CPN10 (Arabidopsis thaliana chloroplast chaperonin 10) was cloned. Chloroplast CPN10, a nuclear-encoded protein, is a functional homolog of E. coli GroES. It is believed that CPN60 and CPN10 are involved in the assembly of Rubisco, a key enzyme involved in the photosynthetic pathway. Northern analysis revealed that AtCh-CPN10 is highly expressed in green tissues. The recombinant AtCh-CPN10 binds to CaM in a calcium-dependent manner. Deletion mutants revealed that there is only one CaM-binding site in the last 31 amino acids of the AtCh-CPN10 at the C-terminal end. The CaM-binding region in AtCh-CPN10 has higher homology to other chloroplast CPN10s in comparison to GroES and mitochondrial CPN10s, suggesting that CaM may only bind to chloroplast CPN10s. Furthermore, the results also suggest that the calcium/CaM messenger system is involved in regulating Rubisco assembly in the chloroplast, thereby influencing photosynthesis. Copyright 2000 Academic Press.

  1. The complete chloroplast genome of Capsicum frutescens (Solanaceae)1

    PubMed Central

    Shim, Donghwan; Raveendar, Sebastin; Lee, Jung-Ro; Lee, Gi-An; Ro, Na-Young; Jeon, Young-Ah; Cho, Gyu-Taek; Lee, Ho-Sun; Ma, Kyung-Ho; Chung, Jong-Wook

    2016-01-01

    Premise of the study: We report the complete sequence of the chloroplast genome of Capsicum frutescens (Solanaceae), a species of chili pepper. Methods and Results: Using an Illumina platform, we sequenced the chloroplast genome of C. frutescens. The total length of the genome is 156,817 bp, and the overall GC content is 37.7%. A pair of 25,792-bp inverted repeats is separated by small (17,853 bp) and large (87,380 bp) single-copy regions. The C. frutescens chloroplast genome encodes 132 unique genes, including 87 protein-coding genes, 37 transfer RNA (tRNA) genes, and eight ribosomal RNA (rRNA) genes. Of these, seven genes are duplicated in the inverted repeats and 12 genes contain one or two introns. Comparative analysis with the reference chloroplast genome revealed 125 simple sequence repeat motifs and 34 variants, mostly located in the noncoding regions. Conclusions: The complete chloroplast genome sequence of C. frutescens reported here is a valuable genetic resource for Capsicum species. PMID:27213127

  2. Comparison of intraspecific, interspecific and intergeneric chloroplast diversity in Cycads

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Guo-Feng; Hinsinger, Damien Daniel; Strijk, Joeri Sergej

    2016-01-01

    Cycads are among the most threatened plant species. Increasing the availability of genomic information by adding whole chloroplast data is a fundamental step in supporting phylogenetic studies and conservation efforts. Here, we assemble a dataset encompassing three taxonomic levels in cycads, including ten genera, three species in the genus Cycas and two individuals of C. debaoensis. Repeated sequences, SSRs and variations of the chloroplast were analyzed at the intraspecific, interspecific and intergeneric scale, and using our sequence data, we reconstruct a phylogenomic tree for cycads. The chloroplast was 162,094 bp in length, with 133 genes annotated, including 87 protein-coding, 37 tRNA and 8 rRNA genes. We found 7 repeated sequences and 39 SSRs. Seven loci showed promising levels of variations for application in DNA-barcoding. The chloroplast phylogeny confirmed the division of Cycadales in two suborders, each of them being monophyletic, revealing a contradiction with the current family circumscription and its evolution. Finally, 10 intraspecific SNPs were found. Our results showed that despite the extremely restricted distribution range of C. debaoensis, using complete chloroplast data is useful not only in intraspecific studies, but also to improve our understanding of cycad evolution and in defining conservation strategies for this emblematic group. PMID:27558458

  3. Ftsz Ring Formation at the Chloroplast Division Site in Plants

    PubMed Central

    Vitha, Stanislav; McAndrew, Rosemary S.; Osteryoung, Katherine W.

    2001-01-01

    Among the events that accompanied the evolution of chloroplasts from their endosymbiotic ancestors was the host cell recruitment of the prokaryotic cell division protein FtsZ to function in chloroplast division. FtsZ, a structural homologue of tubulin, mediates cell division in bacteria by assembling into a ring at the midcell division site. In higher plants, two nuclear-encoded forms of FtsZ, FtsZ1 and FtsZ2, play essential and functionally distinct roles in chloroplast division, but whether this involves ring formation at the division site has not been determined previously. Using immunofluorescence microscopy and expression of green fluorescent protein fusion proteins in Arabidopsis thaliana, we demonstrate here that FtsZ1 and FtsZ2 localize to coaligned rings at the chloroplast midpoint. Antibodies specific for recognition of FtsZ1 or FtsZ2 proteins in Arabidopsis also recognize related polypeptides and detect midplastid rings in pea and tobacco, suggesting that midplastid ring formation by FtsZ1 and FtsZ2 is universal among flowering plants. Perturbation in the level of either protein in transgenic plants is accompanied by plastid division defects and assembly of FtsZ1 and FtsZ2 into filaments and filament networks not observed in wild-type, suggesting that previously described FtsZ-containing cytoskeletal-like networks in chloroplasts may be artifacts of FtsZ overexpression. PMID:11285278

  4. NUCLEIC ACIDS OF CHLOROPLASTS AND MITOCHONDRIA IN SWISS CHARD.

    PubMed

    KISLEV, N; SWIFT, H; BOGORAD, L

    1965-05-01

    Nucleic acids in young leaves of Swiss chard have been studied by light and electron microscope techniques. Leaf DNA has also been characterized by density gradient centrifugation and shown to contain a minor band of higher guanine plus cytosine (GC) content, presumably attributable to chloroplasts. The chloroplasts were faintly stained by the Feulgen reaction; radioautography demonstrated the incorporation of tritiated thymidine in the cytoplasm and in some nuclei. The Feulgen stainability and most of the radioactivity were removable with DNase. Under the electron microscope, both mitochondria and chloroplasts were found to contain filamentous and particulate components within the matrix areas. The morphology of the filamentous component was dependent on the fixation, being partially clumped after OSO(4) or formalin, but finely filamentous after Kellenberger fixation. The filaments were stainable with uranyl acetate, and were extractable with DNase following formalin fixation under conditions in which nuclear DNA was also extracted. The particulate component, after formalin fixation and uranyl staining, was prominent in chloroplasts from young leaves, but was only sparsely distributed in mitochondria. The stainability was removed with ribonuclease. We have concluded that chloroplasts and mitochondria of Swiss chard possess a filamentous component that contains DNA, probably responsible for both cytoplasmic thymidine incorporation and the minor band in CsCl centrifugation. A particulate ribosome-like component that contains RNA is also present. PMID:14287184

  5. Treatment with Antibiotics that Interfere with Peptidoglycan Biosynthesis Inhibits Chloroplast Division in the Desmid Closterium

    PubMed Central

    Matsumoto, Hiroko; Takechi, Katsuaki; Sato, Hiroshi; Takio, Susumu; Takano, Hiroyoshi

    2012-01-01

    Charophytes is a green algal group closely related to land plants. We investigated the effects of antibiotics that interfere with peptidoglycan biosynthesis on chloroplast division in the desmid Closterium peracerosum–strigosum–littorale complex. To detect cells just after division, we used colchicine, which inhibits Closterium cell elongation after division. Although normal Closterium cells had two chloroplasts before and after cell division, cells treated with ampicillin, D-cycloserine, or fosfomycin had only one chloroplast after cell division, suggesting that the cells divided without chloroplast division. The antibiotics bacitracin and vancomycin showed no obvious effect. Electron microscopic observation showed that irregular-shaped chloroplasts existed in ampicillin-treated Closterium cells. Because antibiotic treatments resulted in the appearance of long cells with irregular chloroplasts and cell death, we counted cell types in the culture. The results suggested that cells with one chloroplast appeared first and then a huge chloroplast was generated that inhibited cell division, causing elongation followed by cell death. PMID:22815801

  6. Whole Chloroplast Genome Sequencing in Fragaria Using Deep Sequencing: A Comparison of Three Methods

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Chloroplast sequences previously investigated in Fragaria revealed low amounts of variation. Deep sequencing technologies enable economical sequencing of complete chloroplast genomes. These sequences can potentially provide robust phylogenetic resolution, even at low taxonomic levels within plant gr...

  7. Chloroplast DNA diversity among wild and cultivated members of Cucurbita (Cucurbitaceae).

    PubMed

    Wilson, H D; Doebley, J; Duvall, M

    1992-09-01

    Cladistic analysis of 86 chloroplast DNA restriction-site mutations among 30 samples representing 15 species of Cucurbita indicates that annual species of the genus are derived from perennials. The Malabar Gourd, C. ficifolia, is placed as a basal, sister taxon relative to other domesticated species and allied wild-types. The pattern of variation supports three species groups as monophyletic: (1) C. fraterna, C. pepo, and C. texana, (2) C. lundelliana, C. martinezii, C. mixta, C. moschata and C. sororia, and (3) C. foetidissima and C. pedatifolia. Domesticated samples representing subspecies of C. pepo are divided into two concordant groups, one of which is allied to wild-types referable to C. texana and C. fraterna. The data failed to resolve relationships among cultivars of C. moschata and C. mixta and their association to the wild C. sororia. The South American domesticate, C. maxima, and its companion weed, C. andreana, show close affinity and alliance to C. equadorensis. PMID:24201487

  8. Development of chloroplast genomic resources for Cynara.

    PubMed

    Curci, Pasquale L; De Paola, Domenico; Sonnante, Gabriella

    2016-03-01

    In this study, new chloroplast (cp) resources were developed for the genus Cynara, using whole cp genomes from 20 genotypes, by means of high-throughput sequencing technologies. Our target species included seven globe artichokes, two cultivated cardoons, eight wild artichokes, and three other wild Cynara species (C. baetica, C. cornigera and C. syriaca). One complete cp genome was isolated using short reads from a whole-genome sequencing project, while the others were obtained by means of long-range PCR, for which primer pairs are provided here. A de novo assembly strategy combined with a reference-based assembly allowed us to reconstruct each cp genome. Comparative analyses among the newly sequenced genotypes and two additional Cynara cp genomes ('Brindisino' artichoke and C. humilis) retrieved from public databases revealed 126 parsimony informative characters and 258 singletons in Cynara, for a total of 384 variable characters. Thirty-nine SSR loci and 34 other INDEL events were detected. After data analysis, 37 primer pairs for SSR amplification were designed, and these molecular markers were subsequently validated in our Cynara genotypes. Phylogenetic analysis based on all cp variable characters provided the best resolution when compared to what was observed using only parsimony informative characters, or only short 'variable' cp regions. The evaluation of the molecular resources obtained from this study led us to support the 'super-barcode' theory and consider the total cp sequence of Cynara as a reliable and valuable molecular marker for exploring species diversity and examining variation below the species level. PMID:26354522

  9. Primary structure of maize chloroplast adenylate kinase.

    PubMed

    Schiltz, E; Burger, S; Grafmüller, R; Deppert, W R; Haehnel, W; Wagner, E

    1994-06-15

    This paper describes the sequence of adenylate kinase (Mg-ATP+AMP<-->Mg-ADP+ADP) from maize chloroplasts. This light-inducible enzyme is important for efficient CO2 fixation in the C4 cycle, by removing and recycling AMP produced in the reversible pyruvate phosphate dikinase reaction. The complete sequence was determined by analyzing peptides from cleavages with trypsin, AspN protease and CNBr and subcleavage of a major CNBr peptide with chymotrypsin. N-terminal Edman degradation and carboxypeptidase digestion established the terminal residues. Electrospray mass spectrometry confirmed the final sequence of 222 residues (M(r) = 24867) including one cysteine and one tryptophan. The sequence shows this enzyme to be a long-variant-type adenylate kinase, the nearest relatives being adenylate kinases from Enterobacteriaceae. Alignment of the sequence with the adenylate kinase from Escherichia coli reveals 44% identical residues. Since the E. coli structure has been published recently at 0.19-nm resolution with the inhibitor adenosine(5')pentaphospho(5')adenosine (Ap5A) [Müller, C. W. & Schulz, G. E. (1992) J. Mol. Biol. 224, 159-177], catalytically essential residues could be compared and were found to be mostly conserved. Surprisingly, in the nucleotide-binding Gly-rich loop Gly-Xaa-Pro-Gly-Xaa-Gly-Lys the middle Gly is replaced by Ala. This is, however, compensated by an Ile-->Val exchange in the nearest spatial neighborhood. A Thr-->Ala exchange explains the unusual tolerance of the enzyme for pyrimidine nucleotides in the acceptor site. PMID:8026505

  10. Chloroplast incorporation and long-term photosynthetic performance through the life cycle in laboratory cultures of Elysia timida (Sacoglossa, Heterobranchia)

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Introduction The Mediterranean sacoglossan Elysia timida is one of the few sea slug species with the ability to sequester chloroplasts from its food algae and to subsequently store them in a functional state in the digestive gland cells for more than a month, during which time the plastids retain high photosynthetic activity (= long-term retention). Adult E. timida have been described to feed on the unicellular alga Acetabularia acetabulum in their natural environment. The suitability of E. timida as a laboratory model culture system including its food source was studied. Results In contrast to the literature reporting that juvenile E. timida feed on Cladophora dalmatica first, and later on switch to the adult diet A. acetabulum, the juveniles in this study fed directly on A. acetabulum (young, non-calcified stalks); they did not feed on the various Cladophora spp. (collected from the sea or laboratory culture) offered. This could possibly hint to cryptic speciation with no clear morphological differences, but incipient ecological differentiation. Transmission electron microscopy of chloroplasts from A. acetabulum after initial intake by juvenile E. timida showed different states of degradation — in conglomerations or singularly — and fragments of phagosome membranes, but differed from kleptoplast images of C. dalmatica in juvenile E. timida from the literature. Based on the finding that the whole life cycle of E. timida can be completed with A. acetabulum as the sole food source, a laboratory culture system was established. An experiment with PAM-fluorometry showed that cultured E. timida are also able to store chloroplasts in long-term retention from Acetabularia peniculus, which stems from the Indo-Pacific and is not abundant in the natural environment of E. timida. Variations between three experiment groups indicated potential influences of temperature on photosynthetic capacities. Conclusions E. timida is a viable laboratory model system to study

  11. Oryza sativa Chloroplast Signal Recognition Particle 43 (OscpSRP43) Is Required for Chloroplast Development and Photosynthesis

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Xia; Wei, Yan-lin; Wang, Hui-mei; Zhang, Xiao-bo; Wu, Jian-li

    2015-01-01

    A rice chlorophyll-deficient mutant w67 was isolated from an ethyl methane sulfonate (EMS)–induced IR64 (Oryza sativa L. ssp. indica) mutant bank. The mutant exhibited a distinct yellow-green leaf phenotype in the whole plant growth duration with significantly reduced levels of chlorophyll and carotenoid, impaired chloroplast development and lowered capacity of photosynthesis compared with the wild-type IR64. Expression of a number of genes associated with chlorophyll metabolism, chloroplast biogenesis and photosynthesis was significantly altered in the mutant. Genetic analysis indicated that the yellow-green phenotype was controlled by a single recessive nuclear gene located on the short arm of chromosome 3. Using map-based strategy, the mutation was isolated and predicted to encode a chloroplast signal recognition particle 43 KD protein (cpSRP43) with 388 amino acid residuals. A single base substitution from A to T at position 160 resulted in a premature stop codon. OscpSRP43 was constitutively expressed in various organs with the highest level in the leaf. Functional complementation could rescue the mutant phenotype and subcellular localization showed that the cpSRP43:GFP fusion protein was targeted to the chloroplast. The data suggested that Oryza sativa cpSRP43 (OscpSRP43) was required for the normal development of chloroplasts and photosynthesis in rice. PMID:26600124

  12. Post-Transcriptional Control of Chloroplast Gene Expression

    PubMed Central

    del Campo, Eva M.

    2009-01-01

    Chloroplasts contain their own genome, organized as operons, which are generally transcribed as polycistronic transcriptional units. These primary transcripts are processed into smaller RNAs, which are further modified to produce functional RNAs. The RNA processing mechanisms remain largely unknown and represent an important step in the control of chloroplast gene expression. Such mechanisms include RNA cleavage of pre-existing RNAs, RNA stabilization, intron splicing, and RNA editing. Recently, several nuclear-encoded proteins that participate in diverse plastid RNA processing events have been characterised. Many of them seem to belong to the pentatricopeptide repeat (PPR) protein family that is implicated in many crucial functions including organelle biogenesis and plant development. This review will provide an overview of current knowledge of the post-transcriptional processing in chloroplasts. PMID:19838333

  13. The complete chloroplast genome sequence of Dieffenbachia seguine (Araceae).

    PubMed

    Wang, Bin; Han, Limin; Chen, Chen; Wang, Zhezhi

    2016-07-01

    The nucleotide sequence of the chloroplast genome from Dieffenbachia seguine is the first to have complete genome sequence from genus of Dieffenbachia family Araceae. The genome size is 163 699 bp in length, with 36.4% GC content. A pair of inverted repeats (IRs, 25 235 bp) is separated by a large single copy region (LSC, 90 780 bp) and a small single copy region (SSC, 22 449 bp). The chloroplast genome contains 113 unique genes, 88 protein-coding genes, 37 tRNA genes, and four rRNA genes. In these genes, 16 genes contained single intron and two genes composed of double introns. A maximum likelihood phylogenetic analysis using complete chloroplast genome revealed that Dieffenbachia seguine belongs to the Araceae family of the Arecidae group, which is conform to the traditional classification. PMID:26153749

  14. The complete chloroplast genome sequence of Anoectochilus roxburghii.

    PubMed

    Yu, Chao-Wei; Lian, Qin; Wu, Kang-Cheng; Yu, Shu-Han; Xie, Li-Yan; Wu, Zu-Jian

    2016-07-01

    The complete chloroplast sequence of the Anoectochilus roxburghii, a popular traditional Chinese medicine for the treatment of cancer, was determined in this study. The chloroplast genome (cpDNA)^ was 152,802 bp in length, containing a pair of inverted repeats of 52,728 bp separated by a large single-copy region and a small single-copy region of 82,641 bp and 17,433 bp, respectively. The chloroplast genome encodes 116 predicted functional genes, including 81 protein-coding genes, four ribosomal RNA genes, and 31 transfer RNA genes, 25 of which are duplicated in the inverted repeat regions. The cpDNA is GC-rich (36.9%). PMID:25865497

  15. The complete chloroplast genome sequence of Alocasia macrorrhizos.

    PubMed

    Wang, Bin; Han, Limin

    2016-09-01

    The complete chloroplast sequence of Alocasia macrorrhizos is 154 995 bp in length, containing a pair of inverted repeats of 25 944 bp separated by a large single-copy (LSC) region and a small single-copy (SSC) region of 87 366 bp and 15 741 bp, respectively. The chloroplast genome encodes 132 predicted functional genes, including 87 protein-coding genes, four ribosomal RNA genes, and 37 transfer RNA genes, 18 of which are duplicated in the inverted repeat regions. In these genes, 16 genes contained single intron and two genes comprising double introns. A maximum-likelihood phylogenetic analysis using complete chloroplast genome revealed that A. macrorrhizos does not belong to Araceae family, which infers that the A. macrorrhizos is distant from the species in Araceae family. PMID:26258514

  16. S-sulfocysteine synthase function in sensing chloroplast redox status

    PubMed Central

    Gotor, Cecilia; Romero, Luis C.

    2013-01-01

    The minor chloroplastic O-acetylserine(thiol)lyase isoform encoded by the CS26 gene in Arabidopsis thaliana has been described as an S-sulfocysteine synthase enzyme that plays an important role in chloroplast function. This enzyme is located in the thylakoid lumen, and its S-sulfocysteine activity is essential for the proper photosynthetic performance of the chloroplast under long-day growth conditions. Based on the present knowledge of this enzyme, we suggest that S-sulfocysteine synthase functions as a protein sensor to detect the accumulation of thiosulfate as a result of the inadequate detoxification of reactive oxygen species generated under conditions of excess light to produce the S-sulfocysteine molecule that triggers protection mechanisms of the photosynthetic apparatus. PMID:23333972

  17. Kinetic studies of interfacial photocurrents in platinized chloroplasts

    SciTech Connect

    Greenbaum, E.

    1992-12-01

    The present experiments focus on kinetic studies of phototocurrents generated in a photobioelectrochemical cell constructed from platinized chloroplast membranes. These chloroplast membranes although separated from the CO{sub 2}-reducing enzymes of the Calvin-Benson cycle, contain the full complement of photosystem I and II reaction centers along with the electron transport chain linking these two centers. The vectorial model of photosynthesis indicates that the orientation of the reaction centers in the photosynthetic membranes is such that electrons emerge from the membranes into the stroma region of the chloroplasts. Since the flattened saclike vesicles of the thylakoid membranes are topologically equivalent to spheres, it follows that, irrespective of the rotational orientation of the membranes, the photogenerated electrons emerge from the reaction centers in a radial direction away from the intra-thylakoid region.

  18. Breakthrough in chloroplast genetic engineering of agronomically important crops

    PubMed Central

    Daniell, Henry; Kumar, Shashi; Dufourmantel, Nathalie

    2012-01-01

    Chloroplast genetic engineering offers several unique advantages, including high-level transgene expression, multi-gene engineering in a single transformation event and transgene containment by maternal inheritance, as well as a lack of gene silencing, position and pleiotropic effects and undesirable foreign DNA. More than 40 transgenes have been stably integrated and expressed using the tobacco chloroplast genome to confer desired agronomic traits or express high levels of vaccine antigens and biopharmaceuticals. Despite such significant progress, this technology has not been extended to major crops. However, highly efficient soybean, carrot and cotton plastid transformation has recently been accomplished through somatic embryogenesis using species-specific chloroplast vectors. This review focuses on recent exciting developments in this field and offers directions for further research and development. PMID:15866001

  19. The complete chloroplast genome sequence of Perilla frutescens (L.).

    PubMed

    Shen, Qi; Yang, Jun; Lu, Chaolong; Wang, Bo; Song, Chi

    2016-09-01

    Perilla frutescens (L.) is a traditionally medical herb of East Asia. The complete chloroplast genome of P. frutescens (L.) Britton var. frutescens was assembled in this study. Total chloroplast genome size of Perilla was 153,666 bp in length, containing a pair of inverted repeats (IRs) of 25,677 bp, separated by large single copy (LSC) and small single copy (SSC) of 84,288 bp and 17,925 bp, respectively. Overall GC contents of the genome were 37.6%. The chloroplast genome harbored 127 annotated genes, including 89 protein-coding genes, 29 tRNA genes and 8 rRNA genes. Eleven genes contained one or two introns. PMID:25714143

  20. The complete chloroplast genome sequence of Spathiphyllum kochii.

    PubMed

    Han, Limin; Wang, Bin; Wang, Zhe Zhi

    2016-07-01

    The complete chloroplast sequence of the Spathiphyllum kochii is 163 368 bp in length, containing a pair of inverted repeats of 25 270 bp separated by a large single-copy region and a small single-copy region of 90 482 bp and 22 346 bp, respectively. The chloroplast genome encodes 133 predicted functional genes, including 88 protein-coding genes, four ribosomal RNA genes and 37 transfer RNA genes, 18 of which are duplicated in the inverted repeat regions. The cpDNA is GC-rich (37.6%). The chloroplast genome of S. kochii reported here will lay basis for identification, utilization and protection of its germplasm resources. PMID:26134343

  1. Transcriptome analysis of ectopic chloroplast development in green curd cauliflower (Brassica oleracea L. var. botrytis)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Chloroplasts are the green plastids where photosynthesis takes place. The biogenesis of chloroplasts requires the coordinate expression of both nuclear and chloroplast genes and is regulated by developmental and environmental signals. Despite extensive studies of this process, the genetic basis and ...

  2. Phosphatidylinositol 4-Phosphate Negatively Regulates Chloroplast Division in Arabidopsis[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Okazaki, Kumiko; Miyagishima, Shin-ya; Wada, Hajime

    2015-01-01

    Chloroplast division is performed by the constriction of envelope membranes at the division site. Although constriction of a ring-like protein complex has been shown to be involved in chloroplast division, it remains unknown how membrane lipids participate in the process. Here, we show that phosphoinositides with unknown function in envelope membranes are involved in the regulation of chloroplast division in Arabidopsis thaliana. PLASTID DIVISION1 (PDV1) and PDV2 proteins interacted specifically with phosphatidylinositol 4-phosphate (PI4P). Inhibition of phosphatidylinositol 4-kinase (PI4K) decreased the level of PI4P in chloroplasts and accelerated chloroplast division. Knockout of PI4Kβ2 expression or downregulation of PI4Kα1 expression resulted in decreased levels of PI4P in chloroplasts and increased chloroplast numbers. PI4Kα1 is the main contributor to PI4P synthesis in chloroplasts, and the effect of PI4K inhibition was largely abolished in the pdv1 mutant. Overexpression of DYNAMIN-RELATED PROTEIN5B (DRP5B), another component of the chloroplast division machinery, which is recruited to chloroplasts by PDV1 and PDV2, enhanced the effect of PI4K inhibition, whereas overexpression of PDV1 and PDV2 had additive effects. The amount of DRP5B that associated with chloroplasts increased upon PI4K inhibition. These findings suggest that PI4P is a regulator of chloroplast division in a PDV1- and DRP5B-dependent manner. PMID:25736058

  3. Salinity induces membrane structure and lipid changes in maize mesophyll and bundle sheath chloroplasts.

    PubMed

    Omoto, Eiji; Iwasaki, Yugo; Miyake, Hiroshi; Taniguchi, Mitsutaka

    2016-05-01

    The membranes of Zea mays (maize) mesophyll cell (MC) chloroplasts are more vulnerable to salinity stress than are those of bundle sheath cell (BSC) chloroplasts. To clarify the mechanism underlying this difference in salt sensitivity, we monitored changes in the glycerolipid and fatty acid compositions of both types of chloroplast upon exposure to salinity stress. The monogalactosyldiacylglycerol (MGDG) and digalactosyldiacylglycerol (DGDG) contents were higher in MC chloroplasts than in BSC chloroplasts, in both the presence and absence of salt treatment. Under salt conditions, the MGDG level in MC chloroplasts was significantly lower than under normal conditions, while it was unchanged in BSC chloroplasts. In both types of chloroplast, the contents of DGDG, phosphatidylglycerol and phosphatidylinositol remained at the same levels in control and salt-treated plants, whereas sulfoquinovosyldiacylglycerol and phosphatidylcholine were significantly lower and higher, respectively, upon salt treatment. In addition, the fatty acid composition and double bond index of individual lipid classes were changed by salt treatment in both BSC and MC chloroplasts, although these factors had no effect on glycerolipid content. These findings suggest that the difference in salt sensitivity of MC and BSC chloroplast membranes is related to differences in MGDG responses to salinity. Thus, we propose that the low MGDG content and the low sensitivity of MGDG to salinity in BSC chloroplasts render them more tolerant than MC chloroplasts to salinity stress. PMID:26555406

  4. Manipulating the chloroplast genome of Chlamydomonas: Present realities and future prospects

    SciTech Connect

    Boynton, J.; Gillham, N.; Hauser, C.; Heifetz, P.; Lers, A.; Newman, S.; Osmond, B.

    1992-12-31

    Biotechnology is being applied in vitro modification and stable reintroduction of chloroplast genes in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii and Nicotiana tabacum by homologous recombination. We are attempting the function analyses of plastid encoded proteins involved in photosynthesis, characterization of sequences which regulate expression of plastid genes at the transcriptional and translational levels, targeted disruption of chloroplast genes and molecular analysis of processes involved in chloroplast recombination.

  5. Manipulating the chloroplast genome of Chlamydomonas: Present realities and future prospects

    SciTech Connect

    Boynton, J.; Gillham, N.; Hauser, C.; Heifetz, P.; Lers, A.; Newman, S.; Osmond, B.

    1992-01-01

    Biotechnology is being applied in vitro modification and stable reintroduction of chloroplast genes in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii and Nicotiana tabacum by homologous recombination. We are attempting the function analyses of plastid encoded proteins involved in photosynthesis, characterization of sequences which regulate expression of plastid genes at the transcriptional and translational levels, targeted disruption of chloroplast genes and molecular analysis of processes involved in chloroplast recombination.

  6. Chloroplast Iron Transport Proteins - Function and Impact on Plant Physiology.

    PubMed

    López-Millán, Ana F; Duy, Daniela; Philippar, Katrin

    2016-01-01

    Chloroplasts originated about three billion years ago by endosymbiosis of an ancestor of today's cyanobacteria with a mitochondria-containing host cell. During evolution chloroplasts of higher plants established as the site for photosynthesis and thus became the basis for all life dependent on oxygen and carbohydrate supply. To fulfill this task, plastid organelles are loaded with the transition metals iron, copper, and manganese, which due to their redox properties are essential for photosynthetic electron transport. In consequence, chloroplasts for example represent the iron-richest system in plant cells. However, improvement of oxygenic photosynthesis in turn required adaptation of metal transport and homeostasis since metal-catalyzed generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) causes oxidative damage. This is most acute in chloroplasts, where radicals and transition metals are side by side and ROS-production is a usual feature of photosynthetic electron transport. Thus, on the one hand when bound by proteins, chloroplast-intrinsic metals are a prerequisite for photoautotrophic life, but on the other hand become toxic when present in their highly reactive, radical generating, free ionic forms. In consequence, transport, storage and cofactor-assembly of metal ions in plastids have to be tightly controlled and are crucial throughout plant growth and development. In the recent years, proteins for iron transport have been isolated from chloroplast envelope membranes. Here, we discuss their putative functions and impact on cellular metal homeostasis as well as photosynthetic performance and plant metabolism. We further consider the potential of proteomic analyses to identify new players in the field. PMID:27014281

  7. Non-reductive modulation of chloroplast fructose-1,6-bisphosphatase by 2-Cys peroxiredoxin

    SciTech Connect

    Caporaletti, Daniel; D'Alessio, Ana C.; Rodriguez-Suarez, Roberto J.; Senn, Alejandro M.; Duek, Paula D.; Wolosiuk, Ricardo A. . E-mail: rwolosiuk@leloir.org.ar

    2007-04-13

    2-Cys peroxiredoxin (2-Cys Prx) is a large group of proteins that participate in cell proliferation, differentiation, apoptosis, and photosynthesis. In the prevailing view, this ubiquitous peroxidase poises the concentration of H{sub 2}O{sub 2} and, in so doing, regulates signal transduction pathways or protects macromolecules against oxidative damage. Here, we describe First purification of 2-Cys Prx from higher plants and subsequently we show that the native and the recombinant forms of rapeseed leaves stimulate the activity of chloroplast fructose-1,6-bisphosphatase (CFBPase), a key enzyme of the photosynthetic CO{sub 2} assimilation. The absence of reductants, the strict requirement of both fructose 1,6-bisphosphate and Ca{sup 2+}, and the response of single mutants C174S and C179S CFBPase bring forward clear differences with the well-known stimulation mediated by reduced thioredoxin via the regulatory 170's loop of CFBPase. Taken together, these findings provide an unprecedented insight into chloroplast enzyme regulation wherein both 2-Cys Prx and the 170's loop of CFBPase exhibit novel functions.

  8. Systematic analysis of plant mitochondrial and chloroplast small RNAs suggests organelle-specific mRNA stabilization mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Ruwe, Hannes; Wang, Gongwei; Gusewski, Sandra; Schmitz-Linneweber, Christian

    2016-09-01

    Land plant organellar genomes encode a small number of genes, many of which are essential for respiration and photosynthesis. Organellar gene expression is characterized by a multitude of RNA processing events that lead to stable, translatable transcripts. RNA binding proteins (RBPs), have been shown to generate and protect transcript termini and eventually induce the accumulation of short RNA footprints. We applied knowledge of such RBP-derived footprints to develop software (sRNA miner) that enables identification of RBP footprints, or other clusters of small RNAs, in organelles. We used this tool to determine mitochondrial and chloroplast cosRNAs (clustered organellar sRNAs) in Arabidopsis. We found that in mitochondria, cosRNAs coincide with transcript 3'-ends, but are largely absent from 5'-ends. In chloroplasts this bias is absent, suggesting a different mode of 5' processing, possibly owing to different sets of RNases. Furthermore, we identified a large number of cosRNAs that represent silenced insertions of mitochondrial DNA in the nuclear genome of Arabidopsis. Steady-state RNA analyses demonstrate that cosRNAs display differential accumulation during development. Finally, we demonstrate that the chloroplast RBP PPR10 associates in vivo with its cognate cosRNA. A hypothetical role of cosRNAs as competitors of mRNAs for PPR proteins is discussed. PMID:27235415

  9. Multiple feedbacks between chloroplast and whole plant in the context of plant adaptation and acclimation to the environment

    PubMed Central

    Demmig-Adams, Barbara; Stewart, Jared J.; Adams, William W.

    2014-01-01

    This review focuses on feedback pathways that serve to match plant energy acquisition with plant energy utilization, and thereby aid in the optimization of chloroplast and whole-plant function in a given environment. First, the role of source–sink signalling in adjusting photosynthetic capacity (light harvesting, photochemistry and carbon fixation) to meet whole-plant carbohydrate demand is briefly reviewed. Contrasting overall outcomes, i.e. increased plant growth versus plant growth arrest, are described and related to respective contrasting environments that either do or do not present opportunities for plant growth. Next, new insights into chloroplast-generated oxidative signals, and their modulation by specific components of the chloroplast's photoprotective network, are reviewed with respect to their ability to block foliar phloem-loading complexes, and, thereby, affect both plant growth and plant biotic defences. Lastly, carbon export capacity is described as a newly identified tuning point that has been subjected to the evolution of differential responses in plant varieties (ecotypes) and species from different geographical origins with contrasting environmental challenges. PMID:24591724

  10. Multiple feedbacks between chloroplast and whole plant in the context of plant adaptation and acclimation to the environment.

    PubMed

    Demmig-Adams, Barbara; Stewart, Jared J; Adams, William W

    2014-04-19

    This review focuses on feedback pathways that serve to match plant energy acquisition with plant energy utilization, and thereby aid in the optimization of chloroplast and whole-plant function in a given environment. First, the role of source-sink signalling in adjusting photosynthetic capacity (light harvesting, photochemistry and carbon fixation) to meet whole-plant carbohydrate demand is briefly reviewed. Contrasting overall outcomes, i.e. increased plant growth versus plant growth arrest, are described and related to respective contrasting environments that either do or do not present opportunities for plant growth. Next, new insights into chloroplast-generated oxidative signals, and their modulation by specific components of the chloroplast's photoprotective network, are reviewed with respect to their ability to block foliar phloem-loading complexes, and, thereby, affect both plant growth and plant biotic defences. Lastly, carbon export capacity is described as a newly identified tuning point that has been subjected to the evolution of differential responses in plant varieties (ecotypes) and species from different geographical origins with contrasting environmental challenges. PMID:24591724

  11. A Metabolic Control Analysis of the Glutamine Synthetase/Glutamate Synthase Cycle in Isolated Barley (Hordeum vulgare L.) Chloroplasts.

    PubMed Central

    Baron, A. C.; Tobin, T. H.; Wallsgrove, R. M.; Tobin, A. K.

    1994-01-01

    Ammonia assimilation in chloroplasts occurs via the glutamine synthetase/glutamate synthase (GS/GOGAT) cycle. To determine the extent to which these enzymes contribute to the control of ammonia assimilation, a metabolic control analysis was performed on isolated barley (Hordeum vulgare L.) leaf chloroplasts. Pathway flux was measured polarographically as ammonium-plus-2-oxoglutarate-plus-glutamine-dependent O2 evolution in illuminated chloroplasts. Enzyme activity was modulated by titration with specific, irreversible inhibitors of GS (phosphinothricin) and GOGAT (azaserine). Flux control coefficients (CJ0E0) were determined (a) by differentiation of best-fit hyperbolic curves of the data sets (flux versus enzyme activity), and (b) from estimates of the deviation indices (D/[prime]E0). Both analyses gave similar values for the coefficients. The control coefficient for GS was relatively high and the value did not change significantly with changes in 2-oxoglutarate concentration (C/0E0 = 0.58 at 5 mM 2-oxoglutarate and 0.40 at 20 mM 2-oxoglutarate). The control coefficient for GOGAT decreased with decreasing glutamine concentrations, from 0.76 at 20 mM glutamine to 0.19 at 10 mM glutamine. Thus, at high concentrations of glutamine, GOGAT exerts a major control over flux with a significant contribution also from GS. At lower concentrations of glutamine, however, GOGAT exerts far less control over pathway flux. PMID:12232211

  12. Systematic analysis of plant mitochondrial and chloroplast small RNAs suggests organelle-specific mRNA stabilization mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Ruwe, Hannes; Wang, Gongwei; Gusewski, Sandra; Schmitz-Linneweber, Christian

    2016-01-01

    Land plant organellar genomes encode a small number of genes, many of which are essential for respiration and photosynthesis. Organellar gene expression is characterized by a multitude of RNA processing events that lead to stable, translatable transcripts. RNA binding proteins (RBPs), have been shown to generate and protect transcript termini and eventually induce the accumulation of short RNA footprints. We applied knowledge of such RBP-derived footprints to develop software (sRNA miner) that enables identification of RBP footprints, or other clusters of small RNAs, in organelles. We used this tool to determine mitochondrial and chloroplast cosRNAs (clustered organellar sRNAs) in Arabidopsis. We found that in mitochondria, cosRNAs coincide with transcript 3′-ends, but are largely absent from 5′-ends. In chloroplasts this bias is absent, suggesting a different mode of 5′ processing, possibly owing to different sets of RNases. Furthermore, we identified a large number of cosRNAs that represent silenced insertions of mitochondrial DNA in the nuclear genome of Arabidopsis. Steady-state RNA analyses demonstrate that cosRNAs display differential accumulation during development. Finally, we demonstrate that the chloroplast RBP PPR10 associates in vivo with its cognate cosRNA. A hypothetical role of cosRNAs as competitors of mRNAs for PPR proteins is discussed. PMID:27235415

  13. Oxidation versus reductive detoxification of SO sub 2 by chloroplasts

    SciTech Connect

    Ghisi, R.; Dittrich, A.P.M.; Heber, U. )

    1990-03-01

    Intact chloroplasts isolated from spinach (Spinacia oleracea L. cv Yates) both oxidized and reduced added sulfite in the light. Oxidation was fast only when endogenous superoxide dismutase was inhibited by cyanide. It was largely suppressed by scavengers of oxygen radicals. After addition of O-acetylserine, chloroplasts reduced sulfite to cysteine and exhibited sulfite-dependent oxygen evolution. Cysteine synthesis from sulfite was faster than from sulfate. The results are discussed in relation to species-specific differences in the phytotoxicity of SO{sub 2}.

  14. The complete chloroplast genome of Schrenkiella parvula (Brassicaceae).

    PubMed

    He, Qi; Hao, Guoqian; Wang, Xiaojuan; Bi, Hao; Li, Yuanshuo; Guo, Xinyi; Ma, Tao

    2016-09-01

    Schrenkiella parvula is an Arabidopsis-related model species used here for studying plant stress tolerance. In this study, the complete chloroplast genome sequence of S. parvula has been reported for the first time. The total length of the chloroplast genome was 153 979 bp, which had a typical quadripartite structure. The annotated plastid genome includes 87 protein-coding genes, 39 tRNA genes and 8 ribosomal RNA genes. The evolutionary relationships revealed by our phylogenetic analysis indicated that S. parvula is closer to the Brassiceae species when compared with Eutrema salsugineum. PMID:26260181

  15. Robust expression of a bioactive mammalian protein in chlamydomonas chloroplast

    DOEpatents

    Mayfield, Stephen P.

    2010-03-16

    Methods and compositions are disclosed to engineer chloroplast comprising heterologous mammalian genes via a direct replacement of chloroplast Photosystem II (PSII) reaction center protein coding regions to achieve expression of recombinant protein above 5% of total protein. When algae is used, algal expressed protein is produced predominantly as a soluble protein where the functional activity of the peptide is intact. As the host algae is edible, production of biologics in this organism for oral delivery or proteins/peptides, especially gut active proteins, without purification is disclosed.

  16. Robust expression of a bioactive mammalian protein in Chlamydomonas chloroplast

    DOEpatents

    Mayfield, Stephen P

    2015-01-13

    Methods and compositions are disclosed to engineer chloroplast comprising heterologous mammalian genes via a direct replacement of chloroplast Photosystem II (PSII) reaction center protein coding regions to achieve expression of recombinant protein above 5% of total protein. When algae is used, algal expressed protein is produced predominantly as a soluble protein where the functional activity of the peptide is intact. As the host algae is edible, production of biologics in this organism for oral delivery of proteins/peptides, especially gut active proteins, without purification is disclosed.

  17. A chloroplast retrograde signal regulates nuclear alternative splicing

    PubMed Central

    Petrillo, Ezequiel; Herz, Micaela A. Godoy; Fuchs, Armin; Reifer, Dominik; Fuller, John; Yanovsky, Marcelo J.; Simpson, Craig; Brown, John W. S.; Barta, Andrea; Kalyna, Maria; Kornblihtt, Alberto R.

    2015-01-01

    Light is a source of energy and also a regulator of plant physiological adaptations. We show here that light/dark conditions affect alternative splicing of a subset of Arabidopsis genes preferentially encoding proteins involved in RNA processing. The effect requires functional chloroplasts and is also observed in roots when the communication with the photosynthetic tissues is not interrupted, suggesting that a signaling molecule travels through the plant. Using photosynthetic electron transfer inhibitors with different mechanisms of action we deduce that the reduced pool of plastoquinones initiates a chloroplast retrograde signaling that regulates nuclear alternative splicing and is necessary for proper plant responses to varying light conditions. PMID:24763593

  18. Circadian oscillations of cytosolic and chloroplastic free calcium in plants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, C. H.; Knight, M. R.; Kondo, T.; Masson, P.; Sedbrook, J.; Haley, A.; Trewavas, A.

    1995-01-01

    Tobacco and Arabidopsis plants, expressing a transgene for the calcium-sensitive luminescent protein apoaequorin, revealed circadian oscillations in free cytosolic calcium that can be phase-shifted by light-dark signals. When apoaequorin was targeted to the chloroplast, circadian chloroplast calcium rhythms were likewise observed after transfer of the seedlings to constant darkness. Circadian oscillations in free calcium concentrations can be expected to control many calcium-dependent enzymes and processes accounting for circadian outputs. Regulation of calcium flux is therefore fundamental to the organization of circadian systems.

  19. The complete chloroplast genome sequence of Sapindus mukorossi.

    PubMed

    Yang, Bingxian; Li, Mengzhu; Ma, Ji; Fu, Zhengzheng; Xu, Xiaobao; Chen, Qinyi; Zhu, Wei; Tian, Jingkui

    2016-05-01

    The complete chloroplast genome sequence of Sapindus mukorossi, a critical Chinese medicine, was reported here. The total length of the chloroplast genome is 160,481 bp long with 37.7% overall GC content. A pair of IRs (inverted repeats) of 27,979 bp were separated by SSC (18,873 bp) and LSC (85,650 bp). It contains 78 protein-coding genes, 30 tRNA genes and four rRNA genes. Sixteen genes contain one or two introns. PMID:25317637

  20. A mammalian cytochrome fused to a chloroplast transit peptide is a functional haemoprotein and is imported into isolated chloroplasts.

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Y Y; Kaderbhai, N; Kaderbhai, M A

    2000-01-01

    The small subunit of ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase (Rubisco) is a major chloroplast stromal protein that is cytosolically synthesized as a precursor with an N-terminal extension, known as the transit sequence or transit peptide (Tp). The Tp is essential for the post-translational uptake of the precursor by the chloroplast. The Tp is thought to influence the conformation of the precursor protein and to facilitate polypeptide translocation across the chloroplast envelope barrier via a Tp-selective translocon. To address these issues we have devised a novel strategy to generate substrate amounts of a chloroplast targeting sequence as a fusion with the chromogenic globular domain of cytochrome b(5) (Cyt). The chimaeric protein is an ideal probe for investigating the conformation of a preprotein and events surrounding protein import into isolated chloroplasts. The Cyt of liver endoplasmic reticulum was fused at its N-terminus with the Tp of the small subunit of Rubisco of Pisum sativum (pea). To enhance its production by clearance from the cytoplasm of Escherichia coli, the chimaera was engineered by further N-terminal linkage of a prokaryotic secretory signal. Expression of this tripartite fusion resulted in mg quantities of the signal sequence-processed Tp-Cyt protein, which was eventually targeted to the membranes. The chromogenic nature of the chimaera and its localization to the bacterial membrane facilitated the biochemical isolation of the precursor in a soluble and functional form. The purified preprotein displayed spectral and enzymic properties that were indistinguishable from the native parental Cyt, implying an absence of observable influence of the Tp on the conformation of the haemoprotein. The chimaeric precursor was imported into the stroma of the isolated chloroplasts in a dose-dependent manner. Import was also strongly dependent upon exogenously supplied ATP. The stromally imported chimaeric precursor protein was processed to a size

  1. Ubiquitin facilitates a quality-control pathway that removes damaged chloroplasts

    PubMed Central

    Woodson, Jesse D.; Joens, Matthew S.; Sinson, Andrew B.; Gilkerson, Jonathan; Salomé, Patrice A.; Weigel, Detlef; Fitzpatrick, James A.; Chory, Joanne

    2016-01-01

    Energy production by chloroplasts and mitochondria causes constant oxidative damage. A functioning photosynthetic cell requires quality-control mechanisms to turn over and degrade chloroplasts damaged by reactive oxygen species (ROS). Here, we generated a conditionally lethal Arabidopsis mutant that accumulated excess protoporphyrin IX in the chloroplast and produced singlet oxygen. Damaged chloroplasts were subsequently ubiquitinated and selectively degraded. A genetic screen identified the plant U-box 4 (PUB4) E3 ubiquitin ligase as being necessary for this process. pub4-6 mutants had defects in stress adaptation and longevity. Thus, we have identified a signal that leads to the targeted removal of ROS-overproducing chloroplasts. PMID:26494759

  2. Isolation of dimorphic chloroplasts from the single-cell C4 species Bienertia sinuspersici

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Three terrestrial plants are known to perform C4 photosynthesis without the dual-cell system by partitioning two distinct types of chloroplasts in separate cytoplasmic compartments. We report herein a protocol for isolating the dimorphic chloroplasts from Bienertia sinuspersici. Hypo-osmotically lysed protoplasts under our defined conditions released intact compartments containing the central chloroplasts and intact vacuoles with adhering peripheral chloroplasts. Following Percoll step gradient purification both chloroplast preparations demonstrated high homogeneities as evaluated from the relative abundance of respective protein markers. This protocol will open novel research directions toward understanding the mechanism of single-cell C4 photosynthesis. PMID:22394490

  3. WHITE PANICLE1, a Val-tRNA Synthetase Regulating Chloroplast Ribosome Biogenesis in Rice, Is Essential for Early Chloroplast Development1[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Chunming; Zheng, Ming; Lyu, Jia; Xu, Yang; Li, Xiaohui; Niu, Mei; Long, Wuhua; Wang, Di; Wang, Yihua; Wan, Jianmin

    2016-01-01

    Chloroplasts and mitochondria contain their own genomes and transcriptional and translational systems. Establishing these genetic systems is essential for plant growth and development. Here we characterized a mutant form of a Val-tRNA synthetase (OsValRS2) from Oryza sativa that is targeted to both chloroplasts and mitochondria. A single base change in OsValRS2 caused virescent to albino phenotypes in seedlings and white panicles at heading. We therefore named this mutant white panicle 1 (wp1). Chlorophyll autofluorescence observations and transmission electron microscopy analyses indicated that wp1 mutants are defective in early chloroplast development. RNA-seq analysis revealed that expression of nuclear-encoded photosynthetic genes is significantly repressed, while expression of many chloroplast-encoded genes also changed significantly in wp1 mutants. Western-blot analyses of chloroplast-encoded proteins showed that chloroplast protein levels were reduced in wp1 mutants, although mRNA levels of some genes were higher in wp1 than in wild type. We found that wp1 was impaired in chloroplast ribosome biogenesis. Taken together, our results show that OsValRS2 plays an essential role in chloroplast development and regulating chloroplast ribosome biogenesis. PMID:26839129

  4. DipM is required for peptidoglycan hydrolysis during chloroplast division

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Chloroplasts have evolved from a cyanobacterial endosymbiont and their continuity has been maintained over time by chloroplast division, a process which is performed by the constriction of a ring-like division complex at the division site. The division complex has retained certain components of the cyanobacterial division complex, which function inside the chloroplast. It also contains components developed by the host cell, which function outside of the chloroplast and are believed to generate constrictive force from the cytosolic side, at least in red algae and Viridiplantae. In contrast to the chloroplasts in these lineages, those in glaucophyte algae possess a peptidoglycan layer between the two envelope membranes, as do cyanobacteria. Results In this study, we show that chloroplast division in the glaucophyte C. paradoxa does not involve any known chloroplast division proteins of the host eukaryotic origin, but rather, peptidoglycan spitting and probably the outer envelope division process rely on peptidoglycan hydrolyzing activity at the division site by the DipM protein, as in cyanobacterial cell division. In addition, we found that DipM is required for normal chloroplast division in the moss Physcomitrella patens. Conclusions These results suggest that the regulation of peptidoglycan splitting was essential for chloroplast division in the early evolution of chloroplasts and this activity is likely still involved in chloroplast division in Viridiplantae. PMID:24602296

  5. Diversity of a ribonucleoprotein family in tobacco chloroplasts: two new chloroplast ribonucleoproteins and a phylogenetic tree of ten chloroplast RNA-binding domains.

    PubMed Central

    Ye, L H; Li, Y Q; Fukami-Kobayashi, K; Go, M; Konishi, T; Watanabe, A; Sugiura, M

    1991-01-01

    Two new ribonucleoproteins (RNPs) have been identified from a tobacco chloroplast lysate. These two proteins (cp29A and cp29B) are nuclear-encoded and have a less affinity to single-stranded DNA as compared with three other chloroplast RNPs (cp28, cp31 and cp33) previously isolated. DNA sequencing revealed that both contain two consensus sequence-type homologous RNA-binding domains (CS-RBDs) and a very acidic amino-terminal domain but shorter than that of cp28, cp31 and cp33. Comparison of cp29A and cp29B showed a 19 amino acid insertion in the region separating the two CS-RBDs in cp29B. This insertion results in three tandem repeats of a glycine-rich sequence of 10 amino acids, which is a novel feature in RNPs. The two proteins are encoded by different single nuclear genes and no alternatively spliced transcripts could be identified. We constructed a phylogenetic tree for the ten chloroplast CS-RBDs. These results suggest that there is a sizable RNP family in chloroplasts and the diversity was mainly generated through a series of gene duplications rather than through alternative pre-mRNA splicing. The gene for cp29B contains three introns. The first and second introns interrupt the first CS-RBD and the third intron does the second CS-RBD. The position of the first intron site is the same as that in the human hnRNP A1 protein gene. Images PMID:1721701

  6. Complete Chloroplast Genome Sequence of Phagomixotrophic Green Alga Cymbomonas tetramitiformis

    PubMed Central

    Paasch, Amber E.; Graham, Linda E.; Kim, Eunsoo

    2016-01-01

    We report here the complete chloroplast genome sequence of Cymbomonas tetramitiformis strain PLY262, which is a prasinophycean green alga that retains a phagomixotrophic mode of nutrition. The genome is 84,524 bp in length, with a G+C content of 37%, and contains 3 rRNAs, 26 tRNAs, and 76 protein-coding genes. PMID:27313295

  7. Choline oxidation by intact chloroplasts isolated directly from spinach leaves

    SciTech Connect

    Weigel, P.; Hanson, A.D.

    1986-04-01

    Illuminated chloroplasts derived from spinach leaf protoplasts synthesize betaine from choline via the intermediate betaine aldehyde (BAL) (PNAS 82:3678). Photosynthetically active chloroplasts isolated directly from spinach leaves oxidized (/sup 14/C)choline in the light at rates 10 times higher (25-80 nmol/mg chl b) than protoplast-derived chloroplasts. Up to 20% of the (/sup 14/C)choline supplied during a 30 min incubation was oxidized in the light; the main product was (/sup 14/C)BAL. Rates of (/sup 14/C)choline oxidation in darkness were only 5-30% of rates in light. Light-dependent (/sup 14/C)choline oxidation was abolished by DCMU and 5 mM DTT. Pre-illumination of the chloroplasts did not promote (/sup 14/C)choline oxidation in darkness. The uncouplers nigericin and CCCP at concentrations which eliminated CO/sub 2/-dependent O/sub 2/ evolution did not affect (/sup 14/C)choline oxidation in the light. They hypothesize that (/sup 14/C)choline oxidation is not dependent upon light activation of an enzymatic system or upon the electrochemical proton gradient but requires an oxidant generated in the light.

  8. Choline oxidation by intact spinach chloroplasts. [Spinacia oleracea L

    SciTech Connect

    Weigel, P.; Lerma, C.; Hanson, A.D.

    1988-01-01

    Plants synthesize betaine by a two-step oxidation of choline (choline ..-->.. betaine aldehyde ..-->.. betaine). Protoplast-derived chloroplasts of spinach (Spinacia oleracea L.) carry out both reactions, more rapidly in light than in darkness. We investigated the light-stimulated oxidation of choline, using spinach chloroplasts isolated directly from leaves. The rates of choline oxidation obtained (dark and light rates: 10-50 and 100-300 nanomoles per hour per milligram chlorophyll, respectively) were approximately 20-fold higher than for protoplast-derived chloroplasts. Betaine aldehyde was the main product. Choline oxidation in darkness and light was suppressed by hypoxia. Neither uncouplers not the Calvin cycle inhibitor glyceraldehyde greatly affected choline oxidation in the light, and maximal choline oxidation was attained far below light saturation of CO/sub 2/ fixation. The light stimulation of choline oxidation was abolished by the PSII inhibitors DCMU and dibromothymoquinone, and was partially restored by adding reduced diaminodurene, an electron donor to PSI. Both methyl viologen and phenazine methosulfate prevented choline oxidation. Adding dihydroxyacetone phosphate, which can generate NADPH in organello, doubled the dark rate of choline oxidation. These results indicate that choline oxidation in chloroplasts requires oxygen, and reducing power generated from PSI. Enzymic reactions consistent with these requirements are discussed.

  9. The complete chloroplast genome sequence of medicinal plant Pinellia ternata.

    PubMed

    Han, Limin; Chen, Chen; Wang, Bin; Wang, Zhe-Zhi

    2016-07-01

    Pinellia ternata is an important medicinal plant used in the treatment of cough, to dispel phlegm, to calm vomiting and to terminate early pregnancy, as an anti-ulcer and anti-tumor medicine. In this study, we found that the complete chloroplast genome of Pinellia ternata was 164 013 bp in length, containing a pair of inverted repeats of 25 625 bp separated by a large single-copy region and a small single-copy region of 89 783 bp and 22 980 bp, respectively. The chloroplast genome encodes 132 predicted functional genes, including 87 protein-coding genes, eight ribosomal RNA genes, and 37 transfer RNA genes. The chloroplast DNA is GC-rich (36.7%). The phylogenetic analysis showed a strong sister relationship with Colocasia esculenta, which also strongly supports the position of Pinellia ternata. The complete chloroplast genome sequence of Pinellia ternata reported here has the potential to advance population and phylogenetic studies of this medicinal plant. PMID:26153849

  10. Extending the biosynthetic repertoires of cyanobacteria and chloroplasts.

    PubMed

    Nielsen, Agnieszka Zygadlo; Mellor, Silas Busck; Vavitsas, Konstantinos; Wlodarczyk, Artur Jacek; Gnanasekaran, Thiyagarajan; Perestrello Ramos H de Jesus, Maria; King, Brian Christopher; Bakowski, Kamil; Jensen, Poul Erik

    2016-07-01

    Chloroplasts in plants and algae and photosynthetic microorganisms such as cyanobacteria are emerging hosts for sustainable production of valuable biochemicals, using only inorganic nutrients, water, CO2 and light as inputs. In the past decade, many bioengineering efforts have focused on metabolic engineering and synthetic biology in the chloroplast or in cyanobacteria for the production of fuels, chemicals and complex, high-value bioactive molecules. Biosynthesis of all these compounds can be performed in photosynthetic organelles/organisms by heterologous expression of the appropriate pathways, but this requires optimization of carbon flux and reducing power, and a thorough understanding of regulatory pathways. Secretion or storage of the compounds produced can be exploited for the isolation or confinement of the desired compounds. In this review, we explore the use of chloroplasts and cyanobacteria as biosynthetic compartments and hosts, and we estimate the levels of production to be expected from photosynthetic hosts in light of the fraction of electrons and carbon that can potentially be diverted from photosynthesis. The supply of reducing power, in the form of electrons derived from the photosynthetic light reactions, appears to be non-limiting, but redirection of the fixed carbon via precursor molecules presents a challenge. We also discuss the available synthetic biology tools and the need to expand the molecular toolbox to facilitate cellular reprogramming for increased production yields in both cyanobacteria and chloroplasts. PMID:27005523

  11. Chloroplast heterogeneity and historical admixture within the genus Malus

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Premise of the study: We examined chloroplast DNA sequence variation in 412 samples representing 30 Malus species (including Malus x domestica Borkh.). Malus wild species are of particular interest for providing novel alleles and traits in apple breeding programs, yet the taxonomic status of these s...

  12. Photobiotechnology: Algal hydrogen production and photoconductivity of metalized chloroplasts

    SciTech Connect

    Greenbaum, E.

    1991-01-01

    Sustained hydrogen photoevolution from Chlamydomonas reinhardtii and C. moewusii was measured under an anoxic, CO{sub 2}-containing atmosphere. It has been discovered that light intensity and temperature influence the partitioning of reductant between the hydrogen photoevolution pathway and the Calvin cycle. Under low incident light intensity (1-3 W m{sup {minus}2}) or low temperature (approx. O{degrees}C), the flow of photosynthetic reductant to the Calvin cycle was reduced, and reductant was partitioned to the hydrogen pathway as evidenced by sustained H{sub 2} photoevolution. Under saturating light (25 W m{sup {minus}2}) and moderate temperature 20 {plus minus} 5{degrees}C, the Calvin cycle became the absolute sink for reductant with the exception of a burst of H{sub 2} occurring at light on. A novel photobiophysical phenomenon was observed in isolated spinach chloroplasts that were metalized by precipitating colloidal platinum onto the surface of the thylakoid membranes. A two-point irradiation and detection system was constructed in which a continuous beam helium-neon laser ({lambda} = 632.8 nm) was used to irradiate the platinized chloroplasts at varying perpendicular distances from a single linear platinum electrode in pressure contact with the platinized chloroplasts. No external voltage bias was applied to the system. The key objective of the experiments reported in this report was to measure the relative photoconductivity of the chloroplast-metal composite matrix. 46 refs., 1 tab.

  13. Transport Across Chloroplast Membranes: Optimizing Photosynthesis for Adverse Environmental Conditions.

    PubMed

    Pottosin, Igor; Shabala, Sergey

    2016-03-01

    Chloroplasts are central to solar light harvesting and photosynthesis. Optimal chloroplast functioning is vitally dependent on a very intensive traffic of metabolites and ions between the cytosol and stroma, and should be attuned for adverse environmental conditions. This is achieved by an orchestrated regulation of a variety of transport systems located at chloroplast membranes such as porines, solute channels, ion-specific cation and anion channels, and various primary and secondary active transport systems. In this review we describe the molecular nature and functional properties of the inner and outer envelope and thylakoid membrane channels and transporters. We then discuss how their orchestrated regulation affects thylakoid structure, electron transport and excitation energy transfer, proton-motive force partition, ion homeostasis, stromal pH regulation, and volume regulation. We link the activity of key cation and anion transport systems with stress-specific signaling processes in chloroplasts, and discuss how these signals interact with the signals generated in other organelles to optimize the cell performance, with a special emphasis on Ca(2+) and reactive oxygen species signaling. PMID:26597501

  14. Chloroplast microsatellite markers for Artocarpus (Moraceae) developed from transcriptome sequences

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Premise of the study: Chloroplast microsatellite loci were characterized from transcriptomes of Artocarpus (A.) altilis (breadfruit) and A. camansi (breadnut). They were tested in A. odoratissimus (terap) and A. altilis and evaluated in silico for two congeners. Methods and Results: 15 simple seque...

  15. Chloroplast EF-Tu and thermal aggregation of Rubisco activase

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Chloroplast protein synthesis elongation factor, EF-Tu, has been implicated in heat tolerance in maize. The recombinant precursor of this protein, pre-EF-Tu, has been found to exhibit chaperone activity and protect heat-labile proteins, such as citrate synthase and malate dehydrogenase, from therma...

  16. Characterization of a chloroplast inner envelope K+ channel.

    PubMed Central

    Mi, F; Peters, J S; Berkowitz, G A

    1994-01-01

    A K(+)-conducting protein of the chloroplast inner envelope was characterized as a K+ channel. Studies of this transport protein in the native membrane documented its sensitivity to K+ channel blockers. Further studies of native membranes demonstrated a sensitivity of K+ conductance to divalent cations such as Mg2+, which modulate ion conduction through interaction with negative surface charges on the inner-envelope membrane. Purified chloroplast inner-envelope vesicles were fused into an artificial planar lipid bilayer to facilitate recording of single-channel K+ currents. These single-channel K+ currents had a slope conductance of 160 picosiemens. Antibodies generated against the conserved amino acid sequence that serves as a selectivity filter in the pore of K+ channels immunoreacted with a 62-kD polypeptide derived from the chloroplast inner envelope. This polypeptide was fractionated using density gradient centrifugation. Comigration of this immunoreactive polypeptide and K+ channel activity in sucrose density gradients further suggested that this polypeptide is the protein facilitating K+ conductance across the chloroplast inner envelope. PMID:8058841

  17. Structure of "Arabidopsis" chloroplastic monothiol glutaredoxin AtGRXcp

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Monothiol glutaredoxins (Grxs) play important roles in maintaining redox homeostasis in living cells and are conserved across species. "Arabidopsis thaliana" monothiol glutaredoxin AtGRXcp, is critical for protection from oxidative stress in chloroplasts. The crystal structure of AtGRXcp has been de...

  18. ULTRAVIOLET INACTIVATION OF CHLOROPLAST FORMATION IN SYNCHRONOUSLY DIVIDING EUGLENA GRACILIS.

    PubMed

    PETROPULOS, S F

    1964-07-24

    Ultraviolet inactivation of chloroplast formation was studied in synchronously dividing cultures of Euglena gracilis. Sensitivity to sublethal doses given at intervals throughout the cell cycle was greater just before cell division than during division. There was approximately a twofold difference in the doseresponse relationships for the periods of high and low sensitivity. PMID:14172598

  19. Complete Chloroplast Genome Sequence of Phagomixotrophic Green Alga Cymbomonas tetramitiformis.

    PubMed

    Satjarak, Anchittha; Paasch, Amber E; Graham, Linda E; Kim, Eunsoo

    2016-01-01

    We report here the complete chloroplast genome sequence of Cymbomonas tetramitiformis strain PLY262, which is a prasinophycean green alga that retains a phagomixotrophic mode of nutrition. The genome is 84,524 bp in length, with a G+C content of 37%, and contains 3 rRNAs, 26 tRNAs, and 76 protein-coding genes. PMID:27313295

  20. Efficiency of hydrogen photoproduction by chloroplast-bacterial hydrogenase systems.

    PubMed

    Krasnovsky, A A; Van Ni, C; Nikandrov, V V; Brin, G P

    1980-11-01

    A comparative study of H(2) photoproduction by chloroplasts and solubilized chlorophyll was performed in the presence of hydrogenase preparations of Clostridium butyricum. The photoproduction of H(2) by chloroplasts in the absence of exogenous electron donors, and with irreversibly oxidized dithiothreitol and cysteine, is thought to be limited by a cyclic transport of electrons wherein methylviologen short-circuits the electron transport in photosystem I. The efficiency of H(2) photoproduction by chloroplasts with ascorbate and NADPH is limited by a back reaction between light-reduced methylviologen and the oxidized electron donors. The use of a combination of electron donors (dithiothreitol and ascorbate), providing anaerobiosis without damage to chloroplasts, makes it possible to avoid consumption of reduced methylviologen for the reduction of oxidized electron donors and to exclude the short-circuiting of electron transfer. Under these conditions, photoproduction of H(2) was observed to occur with a rate of 350 to 400 micromoles H(2) per milligram chlorophyll per hour. In this case, the full electron-transferring capability of photosystem I (measured by irreversible photoreduction of methyl red or O(2)) is used to produce H(2). PMID:16661554

  1. Evolution of the Cp-Actin-based Motility System of Chloroplasts in Green Plants.

    PubMed

    Suetsugu, Noriyuki; Wada, Masamitsu

    2016-01-01

    During the course of green plant evolution, numerous light responses have arisen that optimize their growth under fluctuating light conditions. The blue light receptor phototropin mediates several photomovement responses at the tissue, cellular and organelle levels. Chloroplast photorelocation movement is one such photomovement response, and is found not only in most green plants, but also in some red algae and photosynthetic stramenopiles. In general, chloroplasts move toward weak light to maximally capture photosynthetically active radiation (the chloroplast accumulation response), and they move away from strong light to avoid photodamage (the avoidance response). In land plants, chloroplast movement is dependent on specialized actin filaments, chloroplast-actin filaments (cp-actin filaments). Through molecular genetic analysis using Arabidopsis thaliana, many molecular factors that regulate chloroplast photorelocation were identified. In this Perspective, we discuss the evolutionary history of the molecular mechanism for chloroplast photorelocation movement in green plants in view of cp-actin filaments. PMID:27200035

  2. Senescence-Associated Vacuoles, a Specific Lytic Compartment for Degradation of Chloroplast Proteins?

    PubMed Central

    Carrión, Cristian A.; Martínez, Dana E.; Costa, M. Lorenza; Guiamet, Juan José

    2014-01-01

    Degradation of chloroplasts and chloroplast components is a distinctive feature of leaf senescence. In spite of its importance in the nutrient economy of plants, knowledge about the mechanism(s) involved in the breakdown of chloroplast proteins is incomplete. A novel class of vacuoles, “senescence-associated vacuoles” (SAVs), characterized by intense proteolytic activity appear during senescence in chloroplast-containing cells of leaves. Since SAVs contain some chloroplast proteins, they are candidate organelles to participate in chloroplast breakdown. In this review we discuss the characteristics of SAVs, and their possible involvement in the degradation of Rubisco, the most abundant chloroplast protein. Finally, SAVs are compared with other extra-plastidial protein degradation pathways operating in senescing leaves. PMID:27135516

  3. Evolution of the Cp-Actin-based Motility System of Chloroplasts in Green Plants

    PubMed Central

    Suetsugu, Noriyuki; Wada, Masamitsu

    2016-01-01

    During the course of green plant evolution, numerous light responses have arisen that optimize their growth under fluctuating light conditions. The blue light receptor phototropin mediates several photomovement responses at the tissue, cellular and organelle levels. Chloroplast photorelocation movement is one such photomovement response, and is found not only in most green plants, but also in some red algae and photosynthetic stramenopiles. In general, chloroplasts move toward weak light to maximally capture photosynthetically active radiation (the chloroplast accumulation response), and they move away from strong light to avoid photodamage (the avoidance response). In land plants, chloroplast movement is dependent on specialized actin filaments, chloroplast-actin filaments (cp-actin filaments). Through molecular genetic analysis using Arabidopsis thaliana, many molecular factors that regulate chloroplast photorelocation were identified. In this Perspective, we discuss the evolutionary history of the molecular mechanism for chloroplast photorelocation movement in green plants in view of cp-actin filaments. PMID:27200035

  4. Reinvestigation of the triplet-minus-singlet spectrum of chloroplasts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jávorfi, T.; Garab, G.; Razi Naqvi, K.

    2000-01-01

    A comparison of the triplet-minus-singlet (TmS) absorption spectrum of spinach chloroplasts, recorded some thirty years ago, with the more recently published TmS spectrum of isolated Chl a/ b LHCII (light-harvesting complexes associated with photosystem II of higher plants) shows that the two spectra are very similar, which is to be expected, since only the carotenoid pigments contribute to each spectrum. Be that as it may, the comparison also reveals a dissimilarity: photoexcitation of the sample does, or does not, affect the absorbance in the Qy region (650-700 nm), depending on whether the sample is a suspension of chloroplasts or of isolated LHCII. The Qy-signal in the TmS spectrum of LHCII decays, it should be noted, at the same rate as the rest of the difference spectrum, and its most prominent feature is a negative peak. As the carotenoids do not absorb in the Qy region, the presence of a signal in this region calls for an explanation: van der Vos, Carbonera and Hoff, the first to find as well as fathom the phenomenon, attributed the Qy-signal to a change, in the absorption spectrum of a chlorophyll a (Chl a) molecule, brought about by the presence of triplet excitation on a neighbouring carotenoid (Car). The difference in the behaviours of chloroplasts and LHCII, if reproducible, would imply that the Car triplets which give rise to the TmS spectrum of chloroplasts do not influence the absorption spectra of their Chl a neighbours. With a view to reaching a firm conclusion about this vexed issue, spinach chloroplasts and thylakoids have been examined with the aid of the same kinetic spectrometer as that used for investigating LHCII; the TmS spectra of both chloroplasts and thylakoids contain prominent bleaching signals centred at 680 nm, and the triplet decay time in each case is comparable to that of the Chl a/ b LHCII triplets. Results pertaining to other closely related systems are recalled, and it is concluded that, so far as the overall appearance of the

  5. Glucose respiration in the intact chloroplast of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii

    SciTech Connect

    Changguo Chen; Gibbs, M. )

    1991-01-01

    Chloroplastic respiration was monitored by measuring {sup 14}CO{sub 2} from {sup 14}C glucose in the darkened Chlamydomonas reinhardtii F-60 chloroplast, The patterns of {sup 14}CO{sub 2} evolution from labeled glucose in the absence and presence of the inhibitors iodoacetamide, glycolate-2-phosphate, and phosphoenolypyruvate were those expected from the oxidative pentose phosphate cycle and glycolysis. The K{sub m} for glucose was 56 micromolar and for MgATP was 200 micromolar. Release of {sup 14}CO{sub 2} was inhibited by phloretin and inorganic phosphate. Comparing the inhibition of CO{sub 2} evolution generated by pH 7.5 with respect to pH 8.2 (optimum) in chloroplasts given C-1, C-2, and C-6 labeled glucose indicated that a suboptimum pH affects the recycling of the pentose phosphate intermediates to a greater extent than CO{sub 2} evolution from C-1 of glucose. Respiratory inhibition by pH 7.5 in the darkened chloroplast was alleviated by NH{sub 4}Cl and KCl (stromal alkalating agents), iodoacetamide (an inhibitor of glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate dehydrogenase), or phosphoenolypyruvate (an inhibitor of phosphofructokinase). It is concluded that the site which primarily mediates respiration in the darkened Chlamydomonas chloroplast is the fructose-1,6-bisphosphatase/phosphofructokinase junction. The respiratory pathways described here can account for the total oxidation of a hexose to Co{sub 2} and for interactions between carbohydrate metabolism and the oxyhydrogen reaction in algal cells adapted to a hydrogen metabolism.

  6. Possible function of VIPP1 in maintaining chloroplast membranes.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Lingang; Sakamoto, Wataru

    2015-09-01

    A protein designated as VIPP1 is found widely in organisms performing oxygenic photosynthesis, but its precise role in chloroplasts has remained somewhat mysterious. Based on its structural similarity, it presumably has evolved from bacterial Phage shock protein A (PspA) with a C-terminal extension of approximately 40 amino acids. Both VIPP1 and PspA are membrane-associated despite the lack of transmembrane helices. They form an extremely large homo-complex that consists of an oligomeric ring unit. Although PspA is known to respond to membrane stress and although it acts in maintaining proton motive force through membrane repair, the multiple function of VIPP1, such as vesicle budding from inner envelope to deliver lipids to thylakoids, maintenance of photosynthetic complexes in thylakoid membranes, biogenesis of Photosystem I, and protective role of inner envelope against osmotic stress, has been proposed. Whatever its precise function in chloroplasts, it is an important protein because depletion of VIPP1 in mutants severely affects photoautotrophic growth. Recent reports of the relevant literature describe that VIPP1 becomes highly mobile when chloroplasts receive hypotonic stress, and that VIPP1 is tightly bound to lipids, which implies a crucial role of VIPP1 in membrane repair through lipid transfer. This review presents a summary of our current knowledge related to VIPP1, particularly addressing the dynamic behavior of complexes against stress and its property of lipid binding. Those data altogether suggest that VIPP1 acts a priori in chloroplast membrane maintenance through its activity to transfer lipids rather than in thylakoid formation through vesicles. This article is part of a Special Issue titled: Chloroplast Biogenesis. PMID:25725437

  7. Genetic variation and species identification of Thai Boesenbergia (Zingiberaceae) analyzed by chloroplast DNA polymorphism.

    PubMed

    Techaprasan, Jiranan; Ngamriabsakul, Chatchai; Klinbunga, Sirawut; Chusacultanachai, Sudsanguan; Jenjittikul, Thaya

    2006-07-31

    Genetic variation and molecular phylogeny of 22 taxa representing 14 extant species and 3 unidentified taxa of Boesenbergia in Thailand and four outgroup species (Cornukaempferia aurantiflora, Hedychium biflorum, Kaempferia parviflora, and Scaphochlamys rubescens) were examined by sequencing of 3 chloroplast (cp) DNA regions (matK, psbA-trnH and petA-psbJ). Low interspecific genetic divergence (0.25-1.74%) were observed in these investigated taxa. The 50% majority-rule consensus tree constructed from combined chloroplast DNA sequences allocated Boesenbergia in this study into 3 different groups. Using psbA-1F/psbA-3R primers, an insertion of 491 bp was observed in B. petiolata. Restriction analysis of the amplicon (380-410 bp) from the remaining species with Rsa I further differentiated Boesenbergia to 2 groupings; I (B. basispicata, B. longiflora, B. longipes, B. plicata, B.pulcherrima, B. tenuispicata, B. thorelii, B. xiphostachya, Boesenbergia sp.1 and Boesenbergia sp.3; phylogenetic clade A) that possesses a Rsa I restriction site and II (B.curtisii, B. regalis, B. rotunda and Boesenbergia sp.2; phylogenetic clade B and B. siamensis; phylogenetic clade C) that lacks a restriction site of Rsa I. Single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) and indels found can be unambiguously applied to authenticate specie-origin of all investigated samples and revealed that Boesenbergia sp.1, Boesenbergia sp.2 and B. pulcherrima (Mahidol University, Kanchanaburi), B. cf. pulcherrima1 (Prachuap Khiri Khan) and B. cf. pulcherrima2 (Thong Pha Phum, Kanchanaburi) are B. plicata, B. rotunda and B. pulcherrima, respectively. In addition, molecular data also suggested that Boesenbergia sp.3 should be further differentiated from B. longiflora and regarded as a newly unidentified Boesenbergia species. PMID:16889678

  8. Chloroplast Genome Sequence of the Moss Tortula ruralis: Gene Content and Structural Arrangement Relative to Other Green Plant Chloroplast Genomes

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Tortula ruralis, a widely distributed moss species in the family Pottiaceae, is increasingly being used as a model organism for the study of desiccation tolerance and mechanisms of cellular repair. In this paper, we present the chloroplast genome sequence of Tortula ruralis, only the second publishe...

  9. Differential responses of seabirds to inter-annual environmental change in the continental shelf and oceanic habitats of southeastern Bering Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamamoto, T.; Kokubun, N.; Kikuchi, D. M.; Sato, N.; Takahashi, A.; Will, A.; Kitaysky, A. S.; Watanuki, Y.

    2015-11-01

    Seasonal sea-ice cover has been decreasing in the southeastern Bering Sea shelf, which might affect ecosystem dynamics and availability of food resources to marine top predators breeding in the region. In this study, we investigated the foraging responses of two seabird species, surface-foraging red-legged kittiwakes Rissa brevirostris (hereafter, RLKI) and pursuit-diving foraging thick-billed murres Uria lomvia (TBMU) to the inter-annual change in environmental conditions. Between the study years, winter ice retreated earlier and summer water temperatures were warmer in 2014 compared to those in 2013. At-sea distributions of RLKI and TBMU breeding on St. George Island, the largest seabird colony in the region, were recorded using GPS loggers, and blood samples were taken to examine their physiological condition and isotopic foraging niche in a given year. RLKI foraging occurred mostly over the oceanic basin in both years. TBMU, however, foraged mostly over the shelf, but showed a relatively higher use of the shelf break and oceanic basin in the colder year, 2013. The foraging distances from the colony peaked at 250-300 km in 2013 and, bimodally, at 150-250 and 300-350 km in 2014 for RLKI, and tended to be farther in 2013 compared to those in 2014 for TBMU. Plasma levels of corticosterone did not differ between years in RLKI, but differed in TBMU, showing higher levels of physiological stress incurred by murres during the colder year, 2013. δ13N (a proxy of trophic level of prey) did not differ between the years in either RLKI or TBMU, while δ13C (a proxy of prey origin) were lower in 2014 than in 2013 in both species, suggesting possible differences in influx of oceanic prey items into foraging areas. These results suggest that the response of ecosystem dynamics to climate variability in the southeast Bering Sea may differ between the ocean basin and continental shelf regions, which, in turn, may generate differential responses in seabirds relying on those

  10. Redirecting the Cyanobacterial Bicarbonate Transporters BicA and SbtA to the Chloroplast Envelope: Soluble and Membrane Cargos Need Different Chloroplast Targeting Signals in Plants

    PubMed Central

    Rolland, Vivien; Badger, Murray R.; Price, G. Dean

    2016-01-01

    Most major crops used for human consumption are C3 plants, which yields are limited by photosynthetic inefficiency. To circumvent this, it has been proposed to implement the cyanobacterial CO2-concentrating mechanism (CCM), principally consisting of bicarbonate transporters and carboxysomes, into plant chloroplasts. As it is currently not possible to recover homoplasmic transplastomic monocots, foreign genes must be introduced in these plants via nuclear transformation. Consequently, it is paramount to ensure that resulting proteins reach the appropriate sub-cellular compartment, which for cyanobacterial transporters BicA and SbtA, is the chloroplast inner-envelope membrane (IEM). At present, targeting signals to redirect large transmembrane proteins from non-chloroplastic organisms to plant chloroplast envelopes are unknown. The goal of this study was to identify such signals, using agrobacteria-mediated transient expression and confocal microscopy to determine the sub-cellular localization of ∼37 GFP-tagged chimeras. Initially, fragments of chloroplast proteins known to target soluble cargos to the stroma were tested for their ability to redirect BicA, but they proved ineffective. Next, different N-terminal regions from Arabidopsis IEM transporters were tested. We demonstrated that the N-terminus of AtHP59, AtPLGG1 or AtNTT1 (92–115 amino acids), containing a cleavable chloroplast transit peptide (cTP) and a membrane protein leader (MPL), was sufficient to redirect BicA or SbtA to the chloroplast envelope. This constitutes the first evidence that nuclear-encoded transmembrane proteins from non-chloroplastic organisms can be targeted to the envelope of plant chloroplasts; a finding which represents an important advance in chloroplast engineering by opening up the door to further manipulation of the chloroplastic envelope. PMID:26973659