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Sample records for cholangiography

  1. Intraoperative cholangiography and bile duct injury.

    PubMed

    Sarli, L; Costi, R; Roncoroni, L

    2006-01-01

    We are not in agreement with the opinion that the credit for excellent results after laparoscopic cholecystectomy is to be attributed to the routine performing of intraoperative cholangiography. We performed 2538 laparoscopic cholecystectomies without routine intraoperative cholangiography and we obtained very low rate and severity of common bile duct injuries: there was a total of four common bile duct injuries (0.16%), in no case was the injury a major transaction, and injuries were detected intraoperatively and easily repaired with a T-tube. Cholangiography could prevent bile duct transaction, but that it is not necessary for intraoperative cholangiography to be routinely performed for this purpose. It is sufficient for intraoperative cholangiography to be performed whenever the surgeon is in doubt as to the biliary anatomy or common bile duct clearance, and that when dissection of the cholecystic peduncle proves difficult he does not hesitate to convert to open access. PMID:16333543

  2. Laparoscopy-Assisted Percutaneous Cholangiography in Biliary Atresia Diagnosis: Comparison with Open Technique

    PubMed Central

    Alkan, Murat; Tutus, Kamuran; Fakıoglu, Ender; Ozden, Onder; Hatipoglu, Zehra; Iskit, Serdar Hilmi; Tuncer, Recep; Zorludemir, Unal

    2016-01-01

    Introduction. Biliary atresia is a surgical cause of prolonged jaundice, which needs to be diagnosed with cholangiography that has traditionally been performed via laparotomy. Laparoscopic assistance has lately been introduced to avoid unnecessary laparotomy. We aim to evaluate the benefits of the laparoscopy-assisted cholangiography and compare it to the traditional procedure via laparotomy. Patients and Method. The medical records of the cases who had undergone cholangiography for prolonged jaundice between 2007 and 2014 were analyzed. The patients were grouped according to cholangiography technique (laparotomy/laparoscopy). The laparoscopy and laparotomy groups with patent bile ducts were focused and compared in terms of operation duration, postoperative initiation time of enteral feeding, and full enteral feeding achievement time. Results. Sixty-one infants with prolonged jaundice were evaluated between 2007 and 2014. Among the patients with patent bile ducts, operation duration, postoperative enteral feeding initiation time, and the time to achieve full enteral feeding were shorter in laparoscopy group. Conclusion. Laparoscopic cholangiography is safe and less time-consuming compared to laparotomy, with less postoperative burden. As early age of operation is a very important prognostic factor, laparoscopic evaluation should be an early option in work-up of the infants with prolonged jaundice with direct hyperbilirubinemia, for diagnosis/exclusion of biliary atresia. PMID:26819607

  3. Recurrent pyogenic cholangitis in Asian immigrants: use of ultrasonography, computed tomography, and cholangiography

    SciTech Connect

    Federle, M.P.; Cello J.P.; Laing, F.C.; Jeffery, R.B. Jr.

    1982-04-01

    Five cases of recurrent pyogenic cholangitis (RPC) were studied by ultrasonography, computed tomography (CT), and cholangiography. All patients were recent immigrants from the Orient or Indonesia and had had recurrent attacks of cholangitis for many years. The bile was infected by E. coli and the biliary ducts were dilated; in addition, extrahepatic bile-pigment calculi we represent in all 5 and intrahepatic calculi in 4. Abdominal ultrasound usually failed to demonstrate duct calculi and extrahepatic dilatation due to the soft, mud-like consistency of the stones. CT was successful in showing the calculi and the full extent of dilatation. The authors conclude that preoperative diagnosis of RPC is best achieved by awareness of the characteristic clinical presentation and the findings on abdominal CT. Preoperative cholangiography provides excellent detail, but poses the danger of biliary sepsis requiring antibiotics.

  4. Magnetic resonance cholangiography in the assessment and management of biliary complications after OLT

    PubMed Central

    Girometti, Rossano; Cereser, Lorenzo; Bazzocchi, Massimo; Zuiani, Chiara

    2014-01-01

    Despite advances in patient and graft management, biliary complications (BC) still represent a challenge both in the early and delayed period after orthotopic liver transplantation (OLT). Because of unspecific clinical presentation, imaging is often mandatory in order to diagnose BC. Among imaging modalities, magnetic resonance cholangiography (MRC) has gained widespread acceptance as a tool to represent the reconstructed biliary tree noninvasively, using both the conventional technique (based on heavily T2-weighted sequences) and contrast-enhanced MRC (based on the acquisition of T1-weighted sequences after the administration of hepatobiliary contrast agents). On this basis, MRC is generally indicated to: (1) avoid unnecessary procedures of direct cholangiography in patients with a negative examination and/or identify alternative complications; and (2) provide a road map for interventional procedures or surgery. As illustrated in the review, MRC is accurate in the diagnosis of different types of biliary complications, including anastomotic strictures, non-anastomotic strictures, leakage and stones. PMID:25071883

  5. Percutaneous transhepatic cholangiography in the investigation of the persistent postoperative bile leak.

    PubMed

    Kissin, C M; Grundy, A

    1987-01-01

    Percutaneous transhepatic cholangiography (PTHC) is now a widely available, inexpensive investigation with a low incidence of complications, especially in the nonobstructed system, and a high success rate. Its role in the management of obstructive jaundice is well established but it is only infrequently performed in the investigation of persistent bile leakage following biliary tract surgery. Four cases are reported in which the superior demonstration of biliary anatomy provided by PTHC allowed successful identification of the site of postoperative biliary leakage. We compared PTHC with other diagnostic imaging techniques available and conclude that it is a safe, accurate, and reliable technique. PMID:3596138

  6. [Value of injection hepato-lymphography during percutaneous transhepatic cholangiography in patients with cholestasis].

    PubMed

    Sharipov, V Sh

    2000-01-01

    Injection hepatography (IH) was made in 278 patients with cholestasis to study the drainage function of the liver. In 208 cases. IH was performed as a test during percutaneous transhepatic cholangiography (PTHC). The hepatic lymph pathways were imaged in 167 (60%) patients. Images of the biliary tract were obtained in 245 (88.1%) patients with cholestasis, it being not dilated in 34 (12.2%) patients. The fact that hepatolymphography may be performed during PTHC as an independent test permits verification of hepatic lymph circulatory disorders that are an index of the rate of inflammation in the organ. PMID:12717913

  7. Clinical applications of gadobenate dimeglumine-enhanced magnetic resonance cholangiography: an expanded pictorial review.

    PubMed

    Turkbey, Baris; Akpinar, Erhan; Balli, Omur; Tirnaksiz, Bulent; Akata, Deniz; Akhan, Okan; Karcaaltincaba, Musturay

    2011-01-01

    Gadobenate dimeglumine (Gd-BOPTA) is taken up by functioning hepatocellular cells and is partially excreted into the biliary system; therefore, it can be used as a potential intrabiliary contrast agent for magnetic resonance cholangiography applications for various clinical conditions such as obstructive disorders (e.g., choledocholithiasis, hepatolithiasis), inflammatory disorders (e.g., acute cholecystitis, cholangitis), benign biliary disorders, and pre- and postprocedural evaluation of the biliary system. In this pictorial review, we aimed to demonstrate the clinical applications of Gd-BOPTA as an intrabiliary contrast agent for imaging various biliary pathologies. PMID:21264655

  8. Natural history of primary sclerosing cholangitis and prognostic value of cholangiography in a Dutch population

    PubMed Central

    Ponsioen, C Y; Vrouenraets, S M E; Prawirodirdjo, W; Rajaram, R; Rauws, E A J; Mulder, C J J; Reitsma, J B; Heisterkamp, S H; Tytgat, G N J

    2002-01-01

    Background: Median survival of patients with primary sclerosing cholangitis (PSC) has been estimated to be 12 years. Cholangiography is the gold standard for diagnosis but is rarely used in estimating prognosis. Aims: To assess the natural history of Dutch PSC patients and to evaluate the prognostic value of a cholangiographic classification system. Patients: A total of 174 patients with established PSC attending a university hospital and three teaching hospitals from 1970 to 1999. Methods: Charts were reviewed for validity and time of diagnosis, concurrent inflammatory bowel disease, interventions, liver transplantation, occurrence of cholangiocarcinoma, and death. Follow up data were obtained from the charts and from the attending clinician or family physician. Median follow up was 76 months (range 1–300). The earliest available cholangiography was scored using a radiological classification system for the severity of sclerosis, developed in our institution. Survival curves were computed by the Kaplan-Meier method. Cholangiographic staging was used to construct a prognostic model, applying Cox proportional hazards analysis. Results: The estimated median survival from time of diagnosis to death from liver disease or liver transplantation was 18 years. Cholangiocarcinoma was found in 18 (10%) patients. Fourteen patients (8%) underwent liver transplantation. Cholangiographic scoring was inversely correlated with survival. A combination of intrahepatic and extrahepatic scoring, together with age at endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography, proved strongly predictive of survival. Conclusions: The observed survival was considerably better than reported in earlier series from Sweden, the UK, and the USA. Classification and staging of cholangiographic abnormalities has prognostic value. PMID:12235081

  9. Multiple orifices and cholangiography with a "fire-like" appearance after Kasai hepatoportoenterostomy for biliary atresia.

    PubMed

    Yokoyama, Kensuke; Hatanaka, Hisashi; Inoue, Mikihiro; Yano, Tomonori; Numao, Norikatsu; Ushio, Jun; Lefor, Alan Kawarai; Tamada, Kiichi; Yamamoto, Hironori

    2016-09-01

    A 21-year-old female underwent a Kasai hepatoportoenterostomy with Roux-en-Y reconstruction for typeIII biliary atresia at age 63 days. At the age of 19 years, she developed cholangitis and CT scan revealed hepatolithiasis. She presented for treatment of the intrahepatic stone and the hepatportoenterostomy was directly visualized with double-balloon endoscopy (DBE). Endoscopic findings showed multiple intrahepatic bile ducts open to the jejunum through multiple orifices. Cholangiography showed narrowing of intrahepatic bile duct branches with a "fire-like" appearance. These findings have not been previously reported, since endoscopic approaches to patients with a hepaticojejunostomy were limited. DBE was useful to directly visualize the anastomosis in a patient status-post the Kasai operation for biliary atresia with a Rouxen-Y reconstruction. PMID:27502010

  10. Biliary pressure: manometric and perfusion studies at percutaneous transhepatic cholangiography and percutaneous biliary drainage

    SciTech Connect

    vanSonnenberg, E.; Ferrucci, J.T. Jr.; Neff, C.C.; Mueller, P.R.; Simeone, J.F.; Wittenberg, J.

    1983-07-01

    Manometric pressure recordings were attempted during percutaneous transhepatic cholangiography (PTC) and after percutaneous biliary drainage (PBD) in 203 cases. Successful readings were achieved at PTC in 85% (104/122) of patients. Pressure measurements were also obtained through 56 biliary drainage catheters, and controlled perfusion challenges were performed in 12 patients (on 18 occasions). Documentation of the occasionally poor correlation between the caliber of ducts and the degree of obstruction (i.e., pressure) was shown, and it was suggested that very high pressures may be predictive of a bile leak after PTC. Adequacy of percutaneous drainage and stricture dilatation were further assessed with these manometric techniques. Pressure and perfusion data aided in detecting and determining the significance of the nondilated obstructed duct, the dilated nonobstructed ductal system, and subtle distal ductal strictures. The knowledge obtained from percutaneous pressure recordings may help to determine appropriate therapy.

  11. Air cholangiography in endoscopic bilateral stent-in-stent placement of metallic stents for malignant hilar biliary obstruction

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jae Min; Lee, Sang Hyub; Jang, Dong Kee; Chung, Kwang Hyun; Park, Jin Myung; Paik, Woo Hyun; Lee, Jun Kyu; Ryu, Ji Kon; Kim, Yong-Tae

    2016-01-01

    Background: Although endoscopic bilateral stent-in-stent (SIS) placement of self-expandable metallic stents (SEMS) is one of the major palliative treatments for unresectable malignant hilar biliary obstruction, post-endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP) cholangitis can occur frequently due to inadequate drainage, especially after contrast injection into the biliary tree. The aim of this study is to evaluate the efficacy and safety of air cholangiography-assisted stenting. Methods: This study included 47 patients with malignant hilar biliary obstruction who underwent endoscopic bilateral SEMS placement using the SIS technique. They were divided into two groups, air (n = 23) or iodine contrast (n = 24) cholangiography. We retrospectively compared comprehensive clinical and laboratory data of both groups. Results: There were no significant differences found between the two groups with respect to technical success (87% versus 87.5%, air versus contrast group, respectively), functional success (95% versus 95.2%), 30-day mortality (8.3% versus 8.7%) and stent patency. Post-ERCP adverse events occurred in 5 (21.7%) of the patients in the air group and 8 (33.3%) of the patients in the contrast group. Among these, the rate of cholangitis was significantly lower in the air group (4.8% versus 29.2%, p = 0.048). In multivariate analysis, air cholangiography, technical success and a shorter procedure time were significantly associated with a lower incidence of post-ERCP cholangitis. Conclusions: Air cholangiography-assisted stenting can be a safe and effective method for endoscopic bilateral SIS placement of SEMS in patients with malignant hilar biliary obstruction. PMID:26929781

  12. Laparoscopy assisted transjejunal endoscopic retrograde cholangiography for treatment of intrahepatic duct stones in a post Roux-en-Y patient.

    PubMed

    Mansor, Salah M; Abdalla, Salem I; Bendardaf, Rashed S

    2015-01-01

    We report a case of a 17-year-old female patient, who was operated on for choledocal cyst with Roux-en Y hepatojejunostomy. She was admitted to hospital with recurrent attacks of acute ascending cholangitis due to left intrahepatic duct stones. After a failed attempt at conventional endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography through the anatomical route, she was treated successfully with laparoscopy assisted transjejunal endoscopic retrograde cholangiography.  PMID:25630013

  13. Laparoscopy assisted transjejunal endoscopic retrograde cholangiography for treatment of intrahepatic duct stones in a post Roux-en-Y patient

    PubMed Central

    Mansor, Salah M.; Abdalla, Salem I.; Bendardaf, Rashed S.

    2015-01-01

    We report a case of a 17-year-old female patient, who was operated on for choledocal cyst with Roux-en Y hepatojejunostomy. She was admitted to hospital with recurrent attacks of acute ascending cholangitis due to left intrahepatic duct stones. After a failed attempt at conventional endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography through the anatomical route, she was treated successfully with laparoscopy assisted transjejunal endoscopic retrograde cholangiography. PMID:25630013

  14. Massive Intrabile Duct Invasion Caused by a Fatal Progression of Colonic Adenocarcinoma: Abdominal Computed Tomography Findings and Cholangiography Correlation

    PubMed Central

    Abbitt, Michael Tyler B; Fernádez, Marisol; Camuñez, Fernando; Pérez-Rodríguez, Francisco José

    2016-01-01

    In this report, we present an unusual case of jaundice in a patient with advanced colorectal cancer due to intraductal tumour invasion of the intra- and extrahepatic biliary tree. This complication proved to be fatal despite aggressive therapeutic management. A correct diagnosis of this type of involvement was achieved by a combination of diagnostic and therapeutic cholangiography. Despite adequate biliary decompression, the patient died from liver failure and biliary sepsis. PMID:27190935

  15. Laparoscopic cholecystectomy is more difficult after a previous endoscopic retrograde cholangiography

    PubMed Central

    Reinders, Jan Siert Kayitsinga; Gouma, Dirk Joan; Heisterkamp, Joos; Tromp, Ellen; van Ramshorst, Bert; Boerma, Djamila

    2013-01-01

    Background Endoscopic retrograde cholangiography (ERCP) with endoscopic sphincterotomy (ES) followed by a laparoscopic cholecystectomy (LC) is generally accepted as the treatment of choice for patients with choledochocystolithiasis who are eligible for surgery. Previous studies have shown that LC after ES is associated with a high conversion rate. The aim of the present study was to assess the complexity of LC after ES compared with standard LC for symptomatic uncomplicated cholecystolithiasis. Methods The study population consisted of two patient cohorts: patients who had undergone a previous ERCP with ES for choledocholithiasis (PES) and patients with cholecystolithiasis who had no previous intervention prior to LC (NPES). Results The PES group consisted of 93 patients and the NPES group consisted of 83 consecutive patients. Patients in the PES group had higher risks for longer [more than 65 min, odds ratio (OR) = 4.21 (95% confidence interval (CI) 1.79–9.91)] and more complex [higher than 6 points, on a 0–10 scale, OR 3.12 (95% CI 1.43–6.81)] surgery. The conversion rate in the PES and NPES group (6.5% versus 2.4%, respectively) and the complication rate (12.9% versus 9.6%, respectively) were not significantly different. Discussion A laparoscopic cholecystectomy after ES is lengthier and more difficult than in uncomplicated cholelithiasis and should therefore be performed by an experienced surgeon. PMID:23374364

  16. Endoscopic retrograde cholangiography for pediatric choledocholithiasis: Assessing the need for endoscopic intervention

    PubMed Central

    Fishman, Douglas S; Chumpitazi, Bruno P; Raijman, Isaac; Tsai, Cynthia Man-Wai; Smith, E O’Brian; Mazziotti, Mark V; Gilger, Mark A

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To assess pediatric patients for choledocholithiasis. We applied current adult guidelines to identify predictive factors in children. METHODS: A single-center retrospective analysis was performed at a tertiary children’s hospital. We evaluated 44 consecutive pediatric patients who underwent endoscopic retrograde cholangiography (ERCP) for suspected choledocholithiasis. Patients were stratified into those with common bile duct stones (CBDS) at ERCP vs those that did not using the American Society of Gastrointestinal Endoscopy (ASGE) guidelines (Very Strong and Strong criteria) for suspected CBDS. RESULTS: CBDS were identified in 84% at the time of ERCP. Abdominal ultrasound identified CBDS in 36% of patients. Conjugated bilirubin ≥ 0.5 mg/dL was an independent risk factor for CBDS (P = 0.003). The Very Strong (59.5%) and Strong (48.6%) ASGE criteria identified the majority of patients (P = 0.0001). A modified score using conjugated bilirubin had a higher sensitivity (81.2% vs 59.5%) and more likely to identify a stone than the standard criteria, odds ratio of 25.7 compared to 8.8. Alanine aminotransferase and gamma-glutamyl transferase values identified significant differences in a subset of patients with odds ratio of 4.1 and 3.25, respectively. CONCLUSION: Current adult guidelines identified the majority of pediatric patients with CBDS, but specific pediatric guidelines may improve detection, thus decreasing risks and unnecessary procedures. PMID:27298714

  17. Measures of patient radiation exposure during endoscopic retrograde cholangiography: Beyond fluoroscopy time

    PubMed Central

    Kachaamy, Toufic; Harrison, Edwyn; Pannala, Rahul; Pavlicek, William; Crowell, Michael D; Faigel, Douglas O

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To determine whether fluoroscope time is a good predictor of patient radiation exposure during endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography. METHODS: This is a prospective observational study of consecutive patients undergoing endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography in a tertiary care setting. Data related to radiation exposure were collected. The following measures were obtained: Fluoroscopy time (FT), dose area product (DAP) and dose at reference point (DOSERP). Coefficients of determination were calculated to analyze the correlation between FT, DAP and DOSRP. Agreement between FT and DAP/DOSRP was assessed using Bland Altman plots. RESULTS: Four hundred sixty-three data sets were obtained. Fluoroscopy time average was 7.3 min. Fluoroscopy related radiation accounted for 86% of the total DAP while acquisition films related radiation accounted for 14% of the DAP. For any given FT there are wide ranges of DAP and DOSERP and the variability in both increases as fluoroscopy time increases. The coefficient of determination (R2) on the non transformed data for DAP and DOSERP versus FT were respectively 0.416 and 0.554. While fluoroscopy use was the largest contributor to patient radiation exposure during endoscopic retrograde cholangiography (ERCP), there is a wide variability in DAP and DOSERP that is not accounted for by FT. DAP and DOSERP increase in variability as FT increases. This translates into poor accuracy of FT in predicting DAP and DOSERP at higher radiation doses. CONCLUSION: DAP and DOSERP in addition to FT should be adopted as new ERCP quality measures to estimate patient radiation exposure. PMID:25684958

  18. Techniques of Fluorescence Cholangiography During Laparoscopic Cholecystectomy for Better Delineation of the Bile Duct Anatomy

    PubMed Central

    Kono, Yoshiharu; Ishizawa, Takeaki; Tani, Keigo; Harada, Nobuhiro; Kaneko, Junichi; Saiura, Akio; Bandai, Yasutsugu; Kokudo, Norihiro

    2015-01-01

    Abstract To evaluate the clinical and technical factors affecting the ability of fluorescence cholangiography (FC) using indocyanine green (ICG) to delineate the bile duct anatomy during laparoscopic cholecystectomy (LC). Application of FC during LC began after laparoscopic fluorescence imaging systems became commercially available. In 108 patients undergoing LC, FC was performed by preoperative intravenous injection of ICG (2.5 mg) during dissection of Calot's triangle, and clinical factors affecting the ability of FC to delineate the extrahepatic bile ducts were evaluated. Equipment-related factors associated with bile duct detectability were also assessed among 5 laparoscopic systems and 1 open fluorescence imaging system in ex vivo studies. FC delineated the confluence between the cystic duct and common hepatic duct (CyD–CHD) before and after dissection of Calot's triangle in 80 patients (74%) and 99 patients (92%), respectively. The interval between ICG injection and FC before dissection of Calot's triangle was significantly longer in the 80 patients in whom the CyD–CHD confluence was detected by fluorescence imaging before dissection (median, 90 min; range, 15–165 min) than in the remaining 28 patients in whom the confluence was undetectable (median, 47 min; range, 21–205 min; P < 0.01). The signal contrast on the fluorescence images of the bile duct samples was significantly different among the laparoscopic imaging systems and tended to decrease more steeply than those of the open imaging system as the target-laparoscope distance increased and porcine tissues covering the samples became thicker. FC is a simple navigation tool for obtaining a biliary roadmap to reach the “critical view of safety” during LC. Key factors for better bile duct identification by FC are administration of ICG as far in advance as possible before surgery, sufficient extension of connective tissues around the bile ducts, and placement of the tip of

  19. Acute liver function decompensation in a patient with sickle cell disease managed with exchange transfusion and endoscopic retrograde cholangiography

    PubMed Central

    Ona, Mel A.; Changela, Kinesh; Sadanandan, Swayamprabha; Jelin, Abraham; Anand, Sury; Duddempudi, Sushil

    2014-01-01

    Sickle cell intrahepatic cholestasis is a relatively uncommon complication of homozygous sickle cell anemia, which may lead to acute hepatic failure and death. Treatment is mainly supportive, but exchange transfusion is used as salvage therapy in life threatening situations. We describe a case of a 16-year-old female with homozygous sickle cell anemia who presented to the emergency room with fatigue, malaise, dark urine, lower back pain, scleral icterus and jaundice. She was found to have marked hyperbilirubinemia, which persisted after exchange transfusion. Because of the concomitant presence of gallstones and choledocholithiasis, the patient underwent endoscopic ultrasound and laparoscopic cholecystectomy followed by endoscopic retrograde cholangiography and sphincterotomy. PMID:25177368

  20. The Impact of Gd-Eob-Dtpa-Enhanced MR Cholangiography in Biliary Diseases: Comparison with T2-Weighted MR Cholangiopancreatography

    PubMed Central

    Özmen, Evrim; Algın, Oktay; Evrimler, Şehnaz; Arslan, Halil

    2016-01-01

    Background: Contrast enhanced magnetic resonance cholangiography is a novel technique and promising method in demonstrating biliary tree anatomy and evaluating biliary disorders. However, to date, there are a limited number of studies that have focused on the impact of this technique. Aims: We aimed to evaluate the additional role of contrast enhanced MR cholangiography (MRC) and compare contrast enhanced MRC with T2-weighted (w) magnetic resonance cholangiopancreatography (MRCP) in the diagnosis of biliary disorders. Study Design: Diagnostic accuracy study. Methods: The T2w-MRCP and contrast enhanced MRC sequences of 31 patients whose gold standard test results were available were scored visually for the existence of pathological findings with regard to any of the biliary diseases. Gadolinium ethoxybenzyl diethylenetriamine pentaacetic acid (Gd-EOB-DTPA) was used as the contrast agent. The correlation values were determined according to the statistical analysis made from those scores and the sensitivity, specificity and accuracy values of each sequence were detected as well. Results: We detected that the correlation values with gold standard methods of contrast enhanced MRC sequences were significantly higher than the ones of T2w-MRCP sequences. The correlation ratios of T2w-MRCP sequences were between 26 and 34%, while those for contrast enhanced MRC sequences were between 81 and 83% for the first reader and the correlation ratios of T2w-MRCP sequences were between 10 and 61%, whereas those of contrast enhanced MRC were between 79 and 81% for the second reader The mean sensitivity, specificity and accuracy values of T2w-MRCP sequences were 14.3–42.5%, 85–89.2% and 59.3–72.5%, respectively, while the mean sensitivity, specificity and accuracy values of contrast enhanced MRC sequences were 100%, 86.7% and 93.2–93.3%, respectively. Conclusion: We suggest that obtaining of contrast enhanced MRC sequences in addition to the T2w-MRCP can be useful in the

  1. Intraoperative Laparoscopic Near-Infrared Fluorescence Cholangiography to Facilitate Anatomical Identification: When to Give Indocyanine Green and How Much.

    PubMed

    Zarrinpar, Ali; Dutson, Erik P; Mobley, Constance; Busuttil, Ronald W; Lewis, Catherine E; Tillou, Areti; Cheaito, Ali; Hines, O Joe; Agopian, Vatche G; Hiyama, Darryl T

    2016-08-01

    Recent technological advances have enabled real-time near-infrared fluorescence cholangiography (NIRFC) with indocyanine green (ICG). Whereas several studies have shown its feasibility, dosing and timing for practical use have not been optimized. We undertook a prospective study with systematic variation of dosing and timing from injection of ICG to visualization. Adult patients undergoing laparoscopic biliary and hepatic operations were enrolled. Intravenous ICG (0.02-0.25 mg/kg) was administered at times ranging from 10 to 180 minutes prior to planned visualization. The porta hepatis was examined using a dedicated laparoscopic system equipped to detect NIRFC. Quantitative analysis of intraoperative fluorescence was performed using a scoring system to identify biliary structures. A total of 37 patients were enrolled. Visualization of the extrahepatic biliary tract improved with increasing doses of ICG, with qualitative scores improving from 1.9 ± 1.2 (out of 5) with a 0.02-mg/kg dose to 3.4 ± 1.3 with a 0.25-mg/kg dose (P < .05 for 0.02 vs 0.25 mg/kg). Visualization was also significantly better with increased time after ICG administration (1.1 ± 0.3 for 10 minutes vs 3.4 ± 1.1 for 45 minutes, P < .01). Similarly, quantitative measures also improved with both dose and time. There were no complications from the administration of ICG. These results suggest that a dose of 0.25 mg/kg administered at least 45 minutes prior to visualization facilitates intraoperative anatomical identification. The dosage and timing of administration of ICG prior to intraoperative visualization are within a range where it can be administered in a practical, safe, and effective manner to allow intraoperative identification of extrahepatic biliary anatomy using NIRFC. PMID:26964557

  2. Meta-analysis of the diagnostic accuracy of laparoscopic ultrasonography and intraoperative cholangiography in detection of common bile duct stones.

    PubMed

    Jamal, K N; Smith, H; Ratnasingham, K; Siddiqui, M R; McLachlan, G; Belgaumkar, A P

    2016-04-01

    Introduction During laparoscopic cholecystectomy, intraoperative cholangiography (IOC) is currently regarded as the gold standard in the detection of choledocholithiasis. Laparoscopic ultrasonography (LUS) is an attractive alternative with several potential advantages. Methods A systematic review was undertaken of the published literature comparing LUS with IOC in the assessment of common bile duct (CBD) stones. Results Twenty-one comparative studies were analysed. There were 4,566 patients in the IOC group and 5,044 in the LUS group. The combined sensitivity and specificity of IOC in the detection of CBD stones were 0.87 (95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.83-0.89) and 0.98 (95% CI: 0.98-0.98) respectively with a pooled area under the curve (AUC) of 0.985 and a diagnostic odds ratio (OR) of 260.65 (95% CI: 160.44-423.45). This compares with a sensitivity and specificity for LUS of 0.90 (95% CI: 0.87-0.92) and 0.99 (95% CI: 0.99-0.99) respectively with a pooled AUC of 0.982 and a diagnostic OR of 765.15 (95% CI: 450.78-1,298.76). LUS appeared to be more successful in terms of coming to a clinical decision regarding CBD stones than IOC (random effects, risk ratio: 0.95, 95% CI: 0.93-0.98, df=20, z=-3.7, p<0.005). Furthermore, LUS took less time (random effects, standardised mean difference: 0.95, 95% CI: 0.93-0.98, df=20, z=-3.7, p<0.005). Conclusions LUS is comparable with IOC in the detection of CBD stones. The main advantages of LUS are that it does not involve ionising radiation, is quicker to perform, has a lower failure rate and can be repeated during the procedure as required. PMID:26985813

  3. Definitive exclusion of biliary atresia in infants with cholestatic jaundice: the role of percutaneous cholecysto-cholangiography.

    PubMed

    Nwomeh, Benedict C; Caniano, Donna A; Hogan, Mark

    2007-09-01

    Definitive exclusion of biliary atresia in the infant with cholestatic jaundice usually requires operative cholangiography. This approach suffers from the disadvantage that sick infants are subjected to a time-consuming and potentially negative surgical exploration. The purpose of this study was to determine if percutaneous cholecystocholangiography (PCC) prevents unnecessary laparotomy in infants whose cholestasis is caused by diseases other than biliary atresia. This study is a 10 year retrospective review of all infants with persistent direct hyperbilirubinemia and inconclusive biliary nuclear scans who underwent further evaluation for suspected biliary atresia. A gallbladder ultrasound (US) was obtained in all patients. When the gallbladder was visualized, further imaging by PCC was done under intravenous sedation; otherwise, the standard operative cholangiogram (OCG) was performed, with liver biopsy as indicated. The primary outcome was the diagnostic accuracy of PCC, especially with respect to preventing a laparotomy. There were 35 infants with suspected biliary atresia, with a mean age of 8 weeks (range 1-14 weeks). Nine infants whose gallbladder was visualized by ultrasound underwent PCC that definitively excluded biliary atresia. Of this group, the most frequent diagnosis (five patients) was total parenteral nutrition-associated cholestasis. The other 26 infants with absent or decompressed gallbladder had laparotomy and OCG, which identified biliary atresia in 16 patients (61%). Laparotomy was avoided in all 9 patients who underwent PCC, thus reducing the negative laparotomy rate by 47%. There were no complications associated with PCC. Several alternative techniques to operative cholangiogram have been described for the definitive exclusion of biliary atresia, but many of these have distinct drawbacks. Advances in interventional radiology techniques have permitted safe percutaneous contrast evaluation of the biliary tree. Identification of a normal gall

  4. Microbiological Assessment of Bile and Corresponding Antibiotic Treatment: A Strobe-Compliant Observational Study of 1401 Endoscopic Retrograde Cholangiographies.

    PubMed

    Rupp, Christian; Bode, Konrad; Weiss, Karl Heinz; Rudolph, Gerda; Bergemann, Janine; Kloeters-Plachky, Petra; Chahoud, Fadi; Stremmel, Wolfgang; Gotthardt, Daniel Nils; Sauer, Peter

    2016-03-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the antibiotic susceptibility profiles of bacteria in bile samples and to analyze the clinical relevance of the findings as only limited information about risk factors for elevated frequence of bacterial and fungal strains in routinely collected bile samples has been described so far.A prospective cohort study at a tertiary care center was conducted. Seven hundred forty-four patients underwent 1401 endoscopic retrograde cholangiographies (ERCs) as indicated by liver transplantation (427/1401), primary sclerosing cholangitis (222/1401), choledocholithiasis only (153/1401), obstruction due to malignancy (366/1401), or other conditions (233/1401). Bile samples for microbiological analysis were obtained in all patients.The 71.6% (823/1150) samples had a positive microbiological finding, and 57% (840/1491) of the bacterial isolates were gram-positive. The main species were Enterococcus spp (33%; 494/1491) and Escherichia coli (12%; 179/1491). Of the samples, 53.8% had enteric bacteria and 24.7% had Candida spp; both were associated with clinical and laboratory signs of cholangitis (C-reactive proteins 35.0 ± 50.1 vs 44.8 ± 57.6; 34.5 ± 51.2 vs 52.9 ± 59.7; P < 0.001), age, previous endoscopic intervention, and immunosuppression. Multi-resistant (MR) strains were found in 11.3% of all samples and were associated with clinical and laboratory signs of cholangitis, previous intervention, and immunocompromised status. In subgroup analysis, strain-specific antibiotic therapy based on bile sampling was achieved in 56.3% (89/158) of the patients. In cases with a positive bile culture and available blood culture, blood cultures were positive in 29% of cases (36/124), and 94% (34/36) of blood cultures had microbial species identical to the bile cultures.Bactobilia and fungobilia can usually be detected by routine microbiological sampling, allowing optimized, strain-specific antibiotic treatment. Previous endoscopic

  5. The value of percutaneous cholangiography

    PubMed Central

    Evison, Gordon; McNulty, Myles; Thomson, Colin

    1973-01-01

    Percutaneous cholangiograms performed on fifty patients in a district general hospital have been reviewed, and the advantages and limitations of the examination are described. The investigation is considered to have sufficient diagnostic value to warrant its inclusion in the diagnostic armamentarium of every general radiological department. ImagesFig. 1Fig. 2Fig. 3Fig. 4 PMID:4788917

  6. [Oral cholangiography and duodenal atresia].

    PubMed

    Baeza-Herrera, Carlos; León-Cruz, Alberto; Sanjuán-Fabián, Héctor; García-Cabello, Luís Manuel

    2006-01-01

    A newborn male patient with trisomy-21 presented with bilious hemesis. The patient was icteric with slight hepatomegaly. Simple abdominal X-ray and upper gastrointestinal series with barium showed a dilated duodenal loop and inflammatory changes involving the duodenal mucosa. This image known as "double bubble" is characteristic of congenital duodenal obstruction. Simultaneously the gallbladder and choledochus were visualized. The former X-ray finding is very unusual. An uneventful Kimura procedure was performed. PMID:16711553

  7. Primary sclerosing cholongitis: findings on cholangiography and pancreatography

    SciTech Connect

    MacCarty, R.L.; LaRusso, N.F.; Wiesner, R.H.; Ludwig, J.

    1983-10-01

    Cholangiograms of 86 patients with primary sclerosing cholangitis (PSC) were compared with those of 82 patients with primary bile duct carcinoma and 16 with primary biliary cirrhosis. Multifocal strictures involving both intra- and extra-hepatic bile ducts were most common in PSC; they were diffusely distributed, short, and annular, alternating with normal or slightly dilated segments to product a beaded appearance. Very short, band-like strictures occurred in 18 patients; 9 also had diverticulum-like outpouchings. Fourteen patients had diverticula without band strictures. Both findings appear to be specific for PSC. Inflammatory bowel disease was seen in 57 patients (66%), who could not be distinguished cholangiographically from other PSC patients. Of 40 patients with adequate retrograde pancreatograms, 3 had abnormalities of the pancreatic ducts.

  8. Single Balloon Enteroscopy for Endoscopic Retrograde Cholangiography in a Patient with Hepaticojejunostomy after Liver Transplant

    PubMed Central

    Di Pisa, Marta; Miraglia, Roberto; Volpes, Riccardo; Gruttadauria, Salvatore; Traina, Mario

    2010-01-01

    We report a case of a post-transplant patient with hepaticojejunostomy in whom we used a single balloon enteroscopy to access the biliary tree. This procedure seems to be safe and feasible for approaching the biliary anastomosis by means of the overtube and fixation of the small bowel by the balloon. PMID:20454574

  9. Relevance of 3D Cholangiography and Transient Elastography to Assess Cystic Fibrosis-Associated Liver Disease?

    PubMed Central

    Lemaitre, C.; Dominique, S.; Billoud, E.; Eliezer, M.; Montialoux, H.; Quillard, M.; Riachi, G.; Koning, E.; Morisse-Pradier, H.; Savoye, G.; Savoye-Collet, C.; Goria, O.

    2016-01-01

    Background. Cystic fibrosis-associated liver disease (CFLD) is a major cause of death. The objective of our retrospective study was to describe the relevance of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and liver stiffness measurement (LSM) for CFLD evaluation. Methods. All cystic fibrosis adult patients evaluated by MRI and LSM were included. MR signs of portal hypertension (PHT), dysmorphia, or cholangitis were collected and LSM expressed in kPa and Metavir. Results. Of 25 patients, 52% had abnormal MRI. Median LSM was 5.7 kPa (3.4–9.9). Three patients had F2 score and one had F3 score. In patients with PHT, LSM was 7.85 kPa (3.7–9.9) compared to 5 (3.4–7.5) in others, p = 0.02. In patients with abnormal liver function tests, 50% had increased LSM (≥F2), whereas 94% with normal tests had normal LSM (p = 0.04). Seven patients had abnormal MRI despite normal ultrasonography. Conclusions. MRI and LSM provide useful information on CFLD and may help to screen patients with PHT. PMID:27445541

  10. Gallbladder Agenesis and Cystic Duct Absence in an Adult Patient Diagnosed by Magnetic Resonance Cholangiography: Report of a Case and Review of the Literature

    PubMed Central

    Fiaschetti, Valeria; Calabrese, Giovanna; Viarani, Silvia; Bazzocchi, Gabriele; Simonetti, Giovanni

    2009-01-01

    Gallbladder agenesis (GA) is a rare congenital anomaly of the biliary system often associated with other congenital abnormalities. Patients become symptomatic in 23% of cases. GA is often misinterpreted as other diseases, therefore, leading to unnecessary surgery. We report a case of congenital GA associated to cystic duct absence and a biliary tract abnormality diagnosed by Magnetic Resonance with Cholangiopancreatography. PMID:20148075

  11. Accuracy of magnetic resonance cholangiography compared to operative endoscopy in detecting biliary stones, a single center experience and review of literature

    PubMed Central

    Polistina, Francesco A; Frego, Mauro; Bisello, Marco; Manzi, Emy; Vardanega, Antonella; Perin, Bortolo

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To compare diagnostic sensitivity, specificity and accuracy of magnetic resonance cholangiopancreatography (MRCP) without contrast medium and endoscopic ultrasound (EUS)/endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP) for biliary calculi. METHODS: From January 2012 to December 2013, two-hundred-sixty-three patients underwent MRCP at our institution, all MRCP procedure were performed with the same machinery. In two-hundred MRCP was done for pure hepatobiliary symptoms and these patients are the subjects of this study. Among these two-hundred patients, one-hundred-eleven (55.5%) underwent ERCP after MRCP. The retrospective study design consisted in the systematic revision of all images from MRCP and EUS/ERCP performed by two radiologist with a long experience in biliary imaging, an experienced endoscopist and a senior consultant in Hepatobiliopancreatic surgery. A false positive was defined an MRCP showing calculi with no findings at EUS/ERCP; a true positive was defined as a concordance between MRCP and EUS/ERCP findings; a false negative was defined as the absence of images suggesting calculi at MRCP with calculi localization/extraction at EUS/ERCP and a true negative was defined as a patient with no calculi at MRCP ad at least 6 mo of asymptomatic follow-up. Biliary tree dilatation was defined as a common bile duct diameter larger than 6 mm in a patient who had an in situ gallbladder. A third blinded radiologist who examined the MRCP and ERCP data reviewed misdiagnosed cases. Once obtained overall data on sensitivity, specificity, accuracy, positive predictive value (PPV) and negative predictive value (NPV) we divided patients in two groups composed of those having concordant MRCP and EUS/ERCP (Group A, 72 patients) and those having discordant MRCP and EUS/ERCP (Group B, 20 patients). Dataset comparisons had been made by the Student’s t-test and χ2 when appropriate. RESULTS: Two-hundred patients (91 men, 109 women, mean age 67.6 years, and range 25-98 years) underwent MRCP. All patients attended regular follow-up for at least 6 mo. Morbidity and mortality related to MRCP were null. MRCP was the only exam performed in 89 patients because it did show only calculi into the gallbladder with no signs of the presence of calculi into the bile duct and symptoms resolved within a few days or after colecistectomy. The patients remained asymptomatic for at least 6 mo, and we assumed they were true negatives. One hundred eleven (53 men, 58 women, mean age 69 years, range 25-98 years) underwent ERCP following MRCP. We did not find any difference between the two groups in terms of race, age, and sex. The overall median interval between MRCP and ERCP was 9 d. In detecting biliary stones MRCP Sensitivity was 77.4%, Specificity 100% and Accuracy 80.5% with a PPV of 100% and NPV of 85%; EUS showed 95% sensitivity, 100% specificity, 95.5% accuracy with 100% PPV and 57.1% NPV. The association of EUS with ERCP performed at 100% in all the evaluated parameters. When comparing the two groups, we did not find any statistically significant difference regarding age, sex, and race. Similarly, we did not find any differences regarding the number of extracted stones: 116 stones in Group A (median 2, range 1 to 9) and 27 in Group B (median 2, range 1 to 4). When we compared the size of the extracted stones we found that the patients in Group B had significantly smaller stones: 14.16 ± 8.11 mm in Group A and 5.15 ± 2.09 mm in Group B; 95% confidence interval = 5.89-12.13, standard error = 1.577; P < 0.05. We also found that in Group B there was a significantly higher incidence of stones smaller than 5 mm: 36 in Group A and 18 in Group B, P < 0.05. CONCLUSION: Major finding of the present study is that choledocholithiasis is still under-diagnosed in MRCP. Smaller stones (< 5 mm diameter) are hardly visualized on MRCP. PMID:25918584

  12. Near-infrared fluorescence cholangiography assisted laparoscopic cholecystectomy versus conventional laparoscopic cholecystectomy (FALCON trial): study protocol for a multicentre randomised controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    van den Bos, Jacqueline; Schols, Rutger M; Luyer, Misha D; van Dam, Ronald M; Vahrmeijer, Alexander L; Meijerink, Wilhelmus J; Gobardhan, Paul D; van Dam, Gooitzen M; Bouvy, Nicole D; Stassen, Laurents P S

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Misidentification of the extrahepatic bile duct anatomy during laparoscopic cholecystectomy (LC) is the main cause of bile duct injury. Easier intraoperative recognition of the biliary anatomy may be accomplished by using near-infrared fluorescence (NIRF) imaging after an intravenous injection of indocyanine green (ICG). Promising results were reported for successful intraoperative identification of the extrahepatic bile ducts compared to conventional laparoscopic imaging. However, routine use of ICG fluorescence laparoscopy has not gained wide clinical acceptance yet due to a lack of high-quality clinical data. Therefore, this multicentre randomised clinical study was designed to assess the potential added value of the NIRF imaging technique during LC. Methods and analysis A multicentre, randomised controlled clinical trial will be carried out to assess the use of NIRF imaging in LC. In total, 308 patients scheduled for an elective LC will be included. These patients will be randomised into a NIRF imaging laparoscopic cholecystectomy (NIRF-LC) group and a conventional laparoscopic cholecystectomy (CLC) group. The primary end point is time to ‘critical view of safety’ (CVS). Secondary end points are ‘time to identification of the cystic duct (CD), of the common bile duct, the transition of CD in the gallbladder and the transition of the cystic artery in the gallbladder, these all during dissection of CVS’; ‘total surgical time’; ‘intraoperative bile leakage from the gallbladder or cystic duct’; ‘bile duct injury’; ‘postoperative length of stay’, ‘complications due to the injected ICG’; ‘conversion to open cholecystectomy’; ‘postoperative complications (until 90 days postoperatively)’ and ‘cost-minimisation’. Ethics and dissemination The protocol has been approved by the Medical Ethical Committee of Maastricht University Medical Center/Maastricht University; the trial has been registered at ClinicalTrials.gov. The findings of this study will be disseminated widely through peer-reviewed publications and conference presentations. Trial registration number NCT02558556. PMID:27566635

  13. Benign Biliary Strictures: Diagnostic Evaluation and Approaches to Percutaneous Treatment.

    PubMed

    Fidelman, Nicholas

    2015-12-01

    Interventional radiologists are often consulted to help identify and treat biliary strictures that can result from a variety of benign etiologies. Mainstays of noninvasive imaging for benign biliary strictures include ultrasound, contrast-enhanced computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging, magnetic resonance cholangiopancreatography, and computed tomography cholangiography. Endoscopic retrograde cholangiography is the invasive diagnostic procedure of choice, allowing both localization of a stricture and treatment. Percutaneous biliary interventions are reserved for patients who are not candidates for endoscopic retrograde cholangiography (eg, history of distal gastrectomy and biliary-enteric anastomosis to a jejunal roux limb). This review discusses the roles of percutaneous transhepatic cholangiography and biliary drainage in the diagnosis of benign biliary strictures. The methodology for crossing benign biliary strictures, approaches to balloon dilation, management of recalcitrant strictures (ie, large-bore biliary catheters and retrievable covered stents), and the expected outcomes and complications of percutaneous treatment of benign biliary strictures are also addressed. PMID:26615161

  14. The radiological diagnosis of gallbladder disease. An imaging symposium

    SciTech Connect

    Berk, R.N.; Ferrucci, J.T. Jr.; Fordtran, J.S.; Cooperberg, P.L.; Weissmann, H.S.

    1981-01-01

    Changes in the radiological diagnosis of gallbladder disease are occurring at a remarkable rate. In this symposium, several recognized authorities place the various diagnostic modalities and their interrelation in modern perspective. The present and future roles of oral cholecystography and intravenous cholangiography, the radiological diagnosis of chronic acalculous cholecystitis, and the use of ultrasonography and cholescintigraphy are analyzed.

  15. IgG4-related Sclerosing Cholangitis with No Biliary Stricture but Severe Thickening of the Bile Duct Wall.

    PubMed

    Shimizu, Shuya; Naitoh, Itaru; Nakazawa, Takahiro; Hayashi, Kazuki; Miyabe, Katsuyuki; Kondo, Hiromu; Nishi, Yuji; Yoshida, Michihiro; Umemura, Shuichiro; Hori, Yasuki; Kato, Akihisa; Ohara, Hirotaka; Kuno, Toshiya; Takahashi, Satoru; Joh, Takashi

    2016-01-01

    We herein report a case of a 56-year-old man with IgG4-related sclerosing cholangitis (IgG4-SC) with no biliary stricture, but with a severely thickened bile duct wall. Contrast-enhanced computed tomography showed diffuse swelling of the pancreas and thickening of the common bile duct (CBD) wall with delayed enhancement. Obvious diffuse wall thickening of the CBD was observed on endoscopic ultrasonography. However, endoscopic retrograde cholangiography showed no biliary stricture in the CBD that had thickened. Although IgG4-SC has been classified by a stenotic lesion on cholangiography, we should be aware of some IgG4-SC cases showing only bile duct wall thickness without any biliary stricture. PMID:27301508

  16. [Association between Crohn's disease and primary sclerosing cholangitis in a 10 year old girl].

    PubMed

    Muñoz Lozón, Ana; Iglesias Blázquez, Cristina; Menéndez Arias, Cristina; Domínguez Sánchez, Patricia

    2016-06-01

    A 10 year old girl with diarrhea, abdominal pain, weight loss and fever of one month and a half of evolution. Analytical and sonographic findings raised the possibility of inflammatory bowel disease. Endoscopy and histology showed findings consistent with Crohn's disease. Treatment was initiated with mesalazine and exclusive enteral nutrition. Later corticosteroid treatment, immunosuppressive drugs and ursodeoxycholic acid were added due to cholestasis and persistent hypergammaglobulinemia. Magnetic resonance cholangiography and liver biopsy confirmed the diagnosis of concomitant primary sclerosing cholangitis. The association between Crohn's disease and primary sclerosing cholangitis is rare, predominantly in males between 20 and 40 years old and it presents a great clinical variability. The confirmation of the diagnosis requires magnetic resonance cholangiography or endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography. The prognosis is poor and there is no treatment to slow the progression of the disease. PMID:27164355

  17. Traumatic Gallbladder Rupture Treated by Laparoscopic Cholecystectomy.

    PubMed

    Egawa, Noriyuki; Ueda, Junji; Hiraki, Masatsugu; Ide, Takao; Inoue, Satoshi; Sakamoto, Yuichiro; Noshiro, Hirokazu

    2016-01-01

    Gallbladder rupture due to blunt abdominal injury is rare. There are few reports of traumatic gallbladder injury, and it is commonly associated with other concomitant visceral injuries. Therefore, it is difficult to diagnose traumatic gallbladder rupture preoperatively when it is caused by blunt abdominal injury. We report a patient who underwent laparoscopic cholecystectomy after an exact preoperative diagnosis of traumatic gallbladder rupture. A 43-year-old man was admitted to our hospital due to blunt abdominal trauma. The day after admission, abdominal pain and ascites increased and a muscular defense sign appeared. Percutaneous drainage of the ascites was performed, and the aspirated fluid was bloody and almost pure bile. He was diagnosed with gallbladder rupture by the cholangiography using the endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography technique. Laparoscopic cholecystectomy was performed safely, and he promptly recovered. If accumulated fluids contain bile, endoscopic cholangiography is useful not only to diagnose gallbladder injury but also to determine the therapeutic strategy. PMID:27462188

  18. Intrahepatic versus extrahepatic cholestasis. Discrimination with biliary scintigraphy combined with ultrasound

    SciTech Connect

    Lieberman, D.A.; Krishnamurthy, G.T.

    1986-03-01

    Biliary scintigraphy and ultrasound imaging were performed in 52 patients with suspected biliary tract pathology. Results were correlated with the findings of direct cholangiography. Several new innovations in scintigraphic technique were used. The combination of ultrasound imaging and scintigraphy correctly identified biliary tract obstruction in 17 of 19 patients, 12 of whom had dilated bile ducts on ultrasonography. Intrahepatic cholestasis was correctly diagnosed in 11 of 13 patients. Accurate discrimination between intrahepatic and extrahepatic cholestasis was achieved in 28 of 32 patients (88%) with the combined studies. Scintigraphy also provided a correct diagnosis of acute cholecystitis in all 9 patients with surgically confirmed disease. Eleven additional patients with gallbladder or pancreatic disease had normal bile ducts at scintigraphy, which was confirmed with cholangiography. When combined with ultrasound imaging, modern biliary scintigraphy can (a) provide excellent discrimination between intrahepatic and extrahepatic cholestasis and (b) help determine the need for subsequent invasive diagnostic studies in selected patients.

  19. Klatskin tumor: Diagnosis, preoperative evaluation and surgical considerations.

    PubMed

    Molina, Víctor; Sampson, Jaime; Ferrer, Joana; Sanchez-Cabus, Santiago; Calatayud, David; Pavel, Mihai Calin; Fondevila, Constantino; Fuster, Jose; García-Valdecasas, Juan Carlos

    2015-11-01

    Hiliar cholangiocarcinoma is the most common type of cholangiocarcinoma, an represent around 10% of all hepatobiliary tumors. It is an aggressive malignancy, resectable in around 47% of the patients at diagnosis. Complete resection is the most effective and only potentially curative therapy, with a survival rate of less than 12 months in unresectable cases. Axial computerized tomography and magnetic resonance are the most useful image techniques to determine the surgical resectability. Clinically, jaundice and pruritus are the most common symptoms at diagnosis;preoperative biliary drainage is recommended using endoscopic retrograde cholangiography or percutaneous transhepatic cholangiography. Surgery using extended liver resections with an en bloc resection of the liver with vascular reconstruction is the technique with the highest survival. Complete resection with histologically negative resection margins (R0), nodal involvement and metastases are the most important prognostic factors. PMID:26298684

  20. Ascariasis of the gall bladder. Report of two cases.

    PubMed

    Dantas, W; Salles, C G

    1976-01-01

    A radiological diagnosis of ascariasis of the gallbladder was made in two middle-aged women with high abdominal pain having biliary colic characteristics. In one case round worm was demonstrated by means of the intravenous cholangiography, but in the other the procedure was negative only the common bile duct being contrasted. Oral cholangiography made some days later permitted the visualization of the parasite in the gallbladder. The patients were treated by cholecistectomy and choledocostomy and the diagnosis was confirmed. The post-operative course was uneventful. There was Ascaris lumbricoides ova in the feces and the histological examination of the removed gallbladder showed large eosinophilic infiltration in both cases. The patients received levamisole some days after surgery. PMID:829874

  1. Traumatic Gallbladder Rupture Treated by Laparoscopic Cholecystectomy

    PubMed Central

    Egawa, Noriyuki; Ueda, Junji; Hiraki, Masatsugu; Ide, Takao; Inoue, Satoshi; Sakamoto, Yuichiro; Noshiro, Hirokazu

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Gallbladder rupture due to blunt abdominal injury is rare. There are few reports of traumatic gallbladder injury, and it is commonly associated with other concomitant visceral injuries. Therefore, it is difficult to diagnose traumatic gallbladder rupture preoperatively when it is caused by blunt abdominal injury. We report a patient who underwent laparoscopic cholecystectomy after an exact preoperative diagnosis of traumatic gallbladder rupture. A 43-year-old man was admitted to our hospital due to blunt abdominal trauma. The day after admission, abdominal pain and ascites increased and a muscular defense sign appeared. Percutaneous drainage of the ascites was performed, and the aspirated fluid was bloody and almost pure bile. He was diagnosed with gallbladder rupture by the cholangiography using the endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography technique. Laparoscopic cholecystectomy was performed safely, and he promptly recovered. If accumulated fluids contain bile, endoscopic cholangiography is useful not only to diagnose gallbladder injury but also to determine the therapeutic strategy. PMID:27462188

  2. Percutaneous transhepatic cholangial drainage: direct approach under fluoroscopic control.

    PubMed

    Takada, T; Hanyu, F; Kobayashi, S; Uchida, Y

    1976-01-01

    We devised a direct percutaneous transhepatic cholangial drainage under fluoroscopic control. The principle is as follows. After percutaneous transhepatic cholangiography, the three dimensional structure of intrahepatic bile ducts is projected to a two dimensional plane under fluoroscopy; the needle can then be introduced into the selected bile duct with accuracy. The technique can be used as a preoperative management of operations of patients with jaundice and also as a palliative management of advanced cancer without much complication. PMID:1249944

  3. Biliary ascariasis. A case report.

    PubMed

    Sarihan, H; Gürkök, S; Sari, A

    1995-01-01

    Ascaris lumbricoides is a worldwide intestinal infestation that may cause various complications. Biliary ascariasis, however, is a rare condition. We describe a child with biliary ascariasis. The patient's clinical symptoms were pain, vomiting and abdominal tenderness, and she was thought to have acute appendicitis. However, laboratory examination revealed high serum alkaline phosphatase and amylase levels, and ultrasonography and percutaneous cholangiography demonstrated biliary ascariasis. The patient was successfully treated with mebendazole and antispasmolytic drugs. PMID:8560608

  4. Cholecystitis of a duplicated gallbladder complicated by a cholecystoenteric fistula.

    PubMed

    Huang, Brady K; Chess, Mitchell A

    2009-04-01

    Gallbladder duplications are uncommon anatomic variants that are sometimes mistaken for other entities on imaging. We present a surgically confirmed case of cholecystitis in a ductular-type duplicated gallbladder complicated by the formation of an inflammatory fistula to the adjacent duodenum. Both US and magnetic resonance cholangiopancreatography were performed preoperatively, in addition to intraoperative cholangiography, which confirmed the presence of a duplicated gallbladder. PMID:19205686

  5. Evaluation of biliary disease by scintigraphy

    SciTech Connect

    Ram, M.D.; Hagihara, P.F.; Kim, E.E.; Coupal, J.; Griffen, W.O.

    1981-01-01

    The value of biliary scintigraphy was studied in 180 patients with suspected biliary tract disease. Most of the patients were investigated additionally by conventional techniques such as cholecystography, cholangiography and ultrasonography. It is concluded that biliary scintigraphy is a simple and safe technique for visualization of the biliary tract. It is particularly useful in the evaluation of acute cholecystitis, in patients with iodine sensitivity obstructive from nonobstructive jaundice.

  6. Inflammatory pancreatic masses: problems in differentiating focal pancreatitis from carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Neff, C.C.; Simeone, J.F.; Wittenberg, J.; Mueller, P.R.; Ferrucci, J.T. Jr.

    1984-01-01

    The authors studied 19 patients with focal inflammatory masses of the pancreas over an 18-month period. In 13 cases, transhepatic cholangiography and/or endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography were unsuccessful in differentiating pancreatitis from carcinoma. Eighteen patients had a history of alcohol abuse, and 12 had had pancreatitis previously. Pre-existing glandular injury appears to be a prerequisite to formation of focal inflammatory pancreatic masses.

  7. Bile duct injury during laparoscopic cholecystectomy: a report of the Standards Sub-committee of the Victorian State Committee of the Royal Australasian College of Surgeons.

    PubMed

    Cocks, J; Johnson, W; Cade, R; Collopy, B; Ewing, H; Rogerson, J; Rosengarten, D; Thompson, G; Turner, P; Wale, R

    1993-09-01

    A survey of Victorian surgeons performing laparoscopic cholecystectomy was carried out. This report discusses the bile duct injuries identified in the survey. Twelve injuries were recorded, a rate of 0.2%. Three of the 12 required formal repair, the other 9 being treated by T-tube alone. Possible mechanisms of these injuries, the experience of the surgeon, the role of operative cholangiography and delays in recognition of the injury are discussed. PMID:8363476

  8. Diagnosis of hypertonic Oddi's sphincter dyskinesia

    SciTech Connect

    Varro, V.; Doebroente, Z.; Hajnal, F.; Csernay, L.; Nemessanyi, Z.; Lang, J.; Narai, G.; Szabo, E.

    1983-11-01

    The diagnostic possibility of hypertonic Oddi's sphincter dysfunction was evaluated in 100 cholecystectomized and 28 noncholecystectomized patients. An organic lesion interfering with free bile flow was ruled out in every case. The existence of the syndrome, i.e., the dysfunction of the Oddi's musculature, was verified using the morphine-choleretic test combined with either dynamic hepatobiliary scintigraphy or (in selected cases) percutaneous transhepatic cholangiography. Hypertonic Oddi's sphincter dyskinesia can be regarded as an independent clinical syndrome.

  9. [The radiodiagnosis of the indicators of pancreatic cancer].

    PubMed

    Korotkin, V N; Babiĭ, Ia S; Bezrodnyĭ, B G; Bychkov, V V; Furmanenko, N F; Levadnaia, N M; Gotlib, V A; Bodnar', V V; Chegusov, V V

    1992-02-01

    For suspicion of pancreatic cancer 84 patients were subjected to ultrasonic examination, computerized tomography, x-ray of the stomach and duodenum and as indicated endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography and percutaneous transhepatic cholangiography combined with external cholangiostomy. The semeiotics of cancer of the pancreas was evaluated on the basis of radiation methods. Practical recommendations on the diagnosis and scope of surgical treatment as assessed preoperatively are given. PMID:1441330

  10. Sclerosing cholangitis associated with Crohn's disease and autoimmune haemolytic anaemia.

    PubMed Central

    Eilam, O.; Goldin, E.; Shouval, D.; Gimon, T.; Brautbar, C.

    1993-01-01

    A middle-aged man was found to have autoimmune haemolytic anaemia. Seven years after the first manifestations of the anaemia, he developed jaundice without haemolysis and a diagnosis of primary sclerosing cholangitis was made by endoscopic retrograde cholangiography. Crohn's colitis was later confirmed by X-rays and colonoscopy. This association is unique to the best of our knowledge and suggests that genetic and immunological mechanisms may be involved in the pathogenesis of these diseases. Images Figure 1 PMID:8234117

  11. Benign disease of the common bile duct.

    PubMed

    Saxena, R; Pradeep, R; Chander, J; Kumar, P; Wig, J D; Yadav, R V; Kaushik, S P

    1988-08-01

    The incidence of common bile duct (CBD) pathology in a group of patients with benign biliary disease (n = 505) was found to be 23.2 per cent. The spectrum included 111 patients (90.2 per cent) with CBD stones, 37 of whom (33.3 per cent) had no symptoms or findings pre-operatively indicating CBD involvement. Five patients had papillary stenosis, three had postoperative CBD strictures, one had a choledochal cyst and one had an external biliary fistula. Of the 100 CBDs measuring more than 10 mm in diameter, 90 harboured calculi. In the remaining 23 CBDs measuring less than 10 mm, calculi were present in 21. The presence of CBD calculi was demonstrated by intra-operative cholangiography in 49 patients. In the remaining patients (n = 74), the diagnosis of CBD pathology was made either by percutaneous transhepatic cholangiography, endoscopic retrograde cholangio-pancreatography, T-tube cholangiography or peroperative palpation. The surgical procedures performed included choledochotomy and T-tube drainage (n = 74), transduodenal sphincteroplasty (n = 27) and choledochoduodenostomy (n = 18). The overall mortality and morbidity of CBD exploration was 3.3 per cent and 24.4 per cent respectively, which was significantly greater than that for cholecystectomy alone (0.3 per cent and 8.6 per cent respectively). Transduodenal sphincteroplasty carried a much higher mortality (11 per cent) and morbidity (52 per cent) when compared with other procedures. PMID:3167536

  12. Radiological investigation in laparoscopic compared with conventional cholecystectomy--an early assessment.

    PubMed

    McLoughlin, R F; Gibney, R G; Mealy, K; Hyland, J

    1992-04-01

    The implications of laparoscopic cholecystectomy (LC) for radiology were assessed by comparing imaging investigations in 48 LC and 48 conventional cholecystectomy (CC) patients. In addition, we attempted to identify findings on pre-operative ultrasound (US) which predicted operative difficulties at LC. There were no per-operative or T-tube cholangiograms in the LC patients, but otherwise the pattern of investigation was similar in both groups. Forty of the 48 CC patients underwent cholangiography (per-operative cholangiography in 36, endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP) in two, and both in two) demonstrating calculi in eight (16.7%) cases. Only four LC patients had cholangiography (ERCP in all cases) demonstrating common bile duct (CBD) calculi in one (2.1%) case. Ultrasound failed to identify the gall-bladder with certainty in three of the five failed LC cases. Neither gall-bladder wall thickness, contraction nor calculus size on pre-operative US served as predictors of other per-operative difficulties. Our results indicate that there may be some patients with retained CBD calculi in the LC group. The role of pre-operative US in predicting operative difficulties needs further assessment in a prospective study. PMID:1395385

  13. [Changes in the surgical approach of impacted lithiasis in the terminal choledochus].

    PubMed

    Arozamena, C J; Gutiérrez, V P; Novo, J

    1995-01-01

    Transduodenal sphincterotomy used to be was a common procedure when the surgeon couldn't remove stones from the terminal choledochus. We treated 6 patients in whom instead of a sphincterotomy, the stone was left in place and the duct drained with a T-tube. The first three cases were so managed because an emergency left no other option in the other three the decision was elective. Operative cholangiographies showed the impacted stones and in the postoperative cholangiographies, the stones had passed down to the stones had moved upward because of the decompression with the T-tube. The problem in all five patients with residual stone was easily solved. In one patient the stone was moshed down to the duodenum with biliary irrigation. The other four underwent transfistular extraction. Reviewing the morbility of transduodenal sphincterotomy we concluded that in an impacted stone it has currently few indications. In this era of "Biliary Perestroika" and specifically in emergencies or surgeons not fully experienced in transduodenal sphincterotomies, to put a T-tube and in the postoperative period complete others non surgical methods is an acceptable criteria. Also this approach can be applied to laparoscopic surgery when the operative cholangiography shows an unexpected biliary duct stone. The technique of leaving a transcistic catheter followed in the postoperative period by other therapeutic methods maintained in the discussion, could avoid a conversion to laparatomy or a laparoscopic choledochotomy, technique still in a developing period. PMID:8525766

  14. Radiation Exposure in Biliary Procedures Performed to Manage Anastomotic Strictures in Pediatric Liver Transplant Recipients: Comparison Between Radiation Exposure Levels Using an Image Intensifier and a Flat-Panel Detector-Based System

    SciTech Connect

    Miraglia, Roberto Maruzzelli, Luigi; Tuzzolino, Fabio; Indovina, Pietro Luigi; Luca, Angelo

    2013-12-15

    Purpose: The aim of this study was to estimate radiation exposure in pediatric liver transplants recipients who underwent biliary interventional procedures and to compare radiation exposure levels between biliary interventional procedures performed using an image intensifier-based angiographic system (IIDS) and a flat panel detector-based interventional system (FPDS). Materials and Methods: We enrolled 34 consecutive pediatric liver transplant recipients with biliary strictures between January 2008 and March 2013 with a total of 170 image-guided procedures. The dose-area product (DAP) and fluoroscopy time was recorded for each procedure. The mean age was 61 months (range 4-192), and mean weight was 17 kg (range 4-41). The procedures were classified into three categories: percutaneous transhepatic cholangiography and biliary catheter placement (n = 40); cholangiography and balloon dilatation (n = 55); and cholangiography and biliary catheter change or removal (n = 75). Ninety-two procedures were performed using an IIDS. Seventy-eight procedures performed after July 2010 were performed using an FPDS. The difference in DAP between the two angiographic systems was compared using Wilcoxon rank-sum test and a multiple linear regression model. Results: Mean DAP in the three categories was significantly greater in the group of procedures performed using the IIDS compared with those performed using the FPDS. Statistical analysis showed a p value = 0.001 for the PTBD group, p = 0.0002 for the cholangiogram and balloon dilatation group, and p = 0.00001 for the group with cholangiogram and biliary catheter change or removal. Conclusion: In our selected cohort of patients, the use of an FPDS decreases radiation exposure.

  15. Successful Removal of a Large Common Bile Duct Stone by Using Direct Peroral Cholangioscopy and Laser Lithotripsy in a Patient with Severe Kyphosis.

    PubMed

    Lee, Song I; Lim, Byung Hun; Heo, Won Gak; Kim, Young Jun; Kim, Tae Hyeon

    2016-07-01

    A 75-year-old woman with hypertension presented with acute suppurative cholangitis. Chest radiography revealed severe kyphosis. Abdominal computed tomography revealed a large stone impacted in the common bile duct (CBD). The patient underwent emergent endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography, and cholangiography revealed a large stone (7×3 cm) in the CBD that could not be captured using a large basket. We could not use the percutaneous approach for stone fragmentation by using a cholangioscope because of severe degenerative kyphosis. Finally, we performed holmium laser lithotripsy under peroral cholangioscopy by using an ultraslim endoscope, and the large stone in the CBD was successfully fragmented and removed without complications. PMID:27000425

  16. Successful Removal of a Large Common Bile Duct Stone by Using Direct Peroral Cholangioscopy and Laser Lithotripsy in a Patient with Severe Kyphosis

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Song I; Lim, Byung Hun; Heo, Won Gak; Kim, Young Jun; Kim, Tae Hyeon

    2016-01-01

    A 75-year-old woman with hypertension presented with acute suppurative cholangitis. Chest radiography revealed severe kyphosis. Abdominal computed tomography revealed a large stone impacted in the common bile duct (CBD). The patient underwent emergent endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography, and cholangiography revealed a large stone (7×3 cm) in the CBD that could not be captured using a large basket. We could not use the percutaneous approach for stone fragmentation by using a cholangioscope because of severe degenerative kyphosis. Finally, we performed holmium laser lithotripsy under peroral cholangioscopy by using an ultraslim endoscope, and the large stone in the CBD was successfully fragmented and removed without complications. PMID:27000425

  17. Acute acalculous cholecystitis

    SciTech Connect

    Fox, M.S.; Wilk, P.J.; Weissmann, H.S.; Freeman, L.M.; Gliedman, M.L.

    1984-07-01

    Sixty-eight patients with acute acalculous cholecystitis were reviewed. The results of history and physical examinations were usually nondiagnostic. IDA cholescintigraphy (93 per cent accuracy rate) was the only reliable diagnostic modality. The results of oral cholecystography, intravenous cholangiography and ultrasonography were considerably less reliable. One-half of the patients had gangrenous cholecystitis. Cholecystectomy was the preferred operation with an over-all mortality of 9 per cent. IDA cholescintigraphy is an important new modality for the diagnosis of acute acalculous cholecystitis which, in the past, has often been difficult to diagnose.

  18. Interventional radiology in infants and children: clinical and technical aspects

    SciTech Connect

    Diament, M.J.; Boechat, M.I.; Kangarloo, H.

    1985-02-01

    The authors performed 53 extravascular interventional procedures in 47 pediatric patients between July 1981 and September 1983. Except for transhepatic cholangiography in patients without intrahepatic biliary dilatation, the success rate was high. There were few complications, and none that were life-threatening or required surgery. Factors essential to safe and successful intervention in infants, children, and adolescents, in the authors' opinion, include (a) active involvement by the radiologist, (b) guidance by real-time imaging, (c) careful matching of needles, catheters, and guidewires to patient size, and (d) adequate sedation and analgesia.

  19. EFSUMB Guidelines on Interventional Ultrasound (INVUS), Part III - Abdominal Treatment Procedures (Short Version).

    PubMed

    Dietrich, C F; Lorentzen, T; Appelbaum, L; Buscarini, E; Cantisani, V; Correas, J M; Cui, X W; D'Onofrio, M; Gilja, O H; Hocke, M; Ignee, A; Jenssen, C; Kabaalioğlu, A; Leen, E; Nicolau, C; Nolsøe, C P; Radzina, M; Serra, C; Sidhu, P S; Sparchez, Z; Piscaglia, F

    2016-02-01

    The third part of the European Federation of Societies for Ultrasound in Medicine and Biology (EFSUMB) Guidelines on Interventional Ultrasound assesses the evidence for ultrasound-guided and assisted interventions in abdominal treatment procedures. Recommendations for clinical practice are presented covering indications, contraindications, safety and efficacy of the broad variety of these techniques. In particular, drainage of abscesses and fluid collections, interventional tumor ablation techniques, interventional treatment of symptomatic cysts and echinococcosis, percutaneous transhepatic cholangiography and drainage, percutaneous gastrostomy, urinary bladder drainage, and nephrostomy are addressed (short version; a long version is published online). PMID:26871408

  20. EFSUMB Guidelines on Interventional Ultrasound (INVUS), Part III - Abdominal Treatment Procedures (Long Version).

    PubMed

    Dietrich, C F; Lorentzen, T; Appelbaum, L; Buscarini, E; Cantisani, V; Correas, J M; Cui, X W; D'Onofrio, M; Gilja, O H; Hocke, M; Ignee, A; Jenssen, C; Kabaalioğlu, A; Leen, E; Nicolau, C; Nolsøe, C P; Radzina, M; Serra, C; Sidhu, P S; Sparchez, Z; Piscaglia, F

    2016-02-01

    The third part of the European Federation of Societies for Ultrasound in Medicine and Biology (EFSUMB) Guidelines on Interventional Ultrasound (INVUS) assesses the evidence for ultrasound-guided and assisted interventions in abdominal treatment procedures. Recommendations for clinical practice are presented covering indications, contraindications, and safe and effective performance of the broad variety of these techniques. In particular, drainage of abscesses and fluid collections, interventional tumor ablation techniques, interventional treatment of symptomatic cysts and echinococcosis, percutaneous transhepatic cholangiography and drainage, percutaneous gastrostomy, urinary bladder drainage, and nephrostomy are addressed (long version). PMID:26670019

  1. Pneumoperitoneum Following Percutaneous Biliary Intervention: Not Necessarily a Cause for Alarm

    SciTech Connect

    Amonkar, Suraj J. Laasch, Hans-Ulrich; Valle, Juan W.

    2008-03-15

    Percutaneous transhepatic cholangiography (PTC) is a well-established technique for assessing and treating obstructive jaundice. Plastic and self-expanding metal stents can be deployed as an alternative when ERCP is not feasible or hilar strictures require an antegrade approach. Complication rates of percutaneous procedures are low, and are usually related to bile leakage or hemorrhage; pneumoperitoneum following PTC is rare and is usually taken to indicate bowel perforation. We describe two cases of pneumoperitoneum without peritonitis following PTC and stenting, both of which resolved spontaneously with conservative management. The literature is reviewed and possible causes discussed.

  2. Tenoxicam-associated hepatic injury: a case report and review.

    PubMed

    Katsinelos, P; Katsos, I; Patsiaoura, K; Xiarchos, P; Goulis, I; Eugenidis, N

    1997-04-01

    A 51-year-old woman developed jaundice while taking tenoxicam. A full evaluation, including ultrasound, computed tomography, endoscopic cholangiography and liver biopsy, confirmed the diagnosis of mixed hepatic injury. The patient's jaundice and all other liver function abnormalities normalized 1 month after she discontinued taking tenoxicam. This is the first case report of mixed hepatic injury, confirmed with biopsy, associated with tenoxicam. Tenoxicam should be considered as a potential cause of hepatic injury when other more common aetiologies have been excluded. PMID:9160206

  3. Diagnosis and management of choledocholithiasis in the golden age of imaging, endoscopy and laparoscopy

    PubMed Central

    Costi, Renato; Gnocchi, Alessandro; Di Mario, Francesco; Sarli, Leopoldo

    2014-01-01

    Biliary lithiasis is an endemic condition in both Western and Eastern countries, in some studies affecting 20% of the general population. In up to 20% of cases, gallbladder stones are associated with common bile duct stones (CBDS), which are asymptomatic in up to one half of cases. Despite the wide variety of examinations and techniques available nowadays, two main open issues remain without a clear answer: how to cost-effectively diagnose CBDS and, when they are finally found, how to deal with them. CBDS diagnosis and management has radically changed over the last 30 years, following the dramatic diffusion of imaging, including endoscopic ultrasound (EUS) and magnetic resonance cholangiography (MRC), endoscopy and laparoscopy. Since accuracy, invasiveness, potential therapeutic use and cost-effectiveness of imaging techniques used to identify CBDS increase together in a parallel way, the concept of “risk of carrying CBDS” has become pivotal to identifying the most appropriate management of a specific patient in order to avoid the risk of “under-studying” by poor diagnostic work up or “over-studying” by excessively invasive examinations. The risk of carrying CBDS is deduced by symptoms, liver/pancreas serology and ultrasound. “Low risk” patients do not require further examination before laparoscopic cholecystectomy. Two main “philosophical approaches” face each other for patients with an “intermediate to high risk” of carrying CBDS: on one hand, the “laparoscopy-first” approach, which mainly relies on intraoperative cholangiography for diagnosis and laparoscopic common bile duct exploration for treatment, and, on the other hand, the “endoscopy-first” attitude, variously referring to MRC, EUS and/or endoscopic retrograde cholangiography for diagnosis and endoscopic sphincterotomy for management. Concerning CBDS diagnosis, intraoperative cholangiography, EUS and MRC are reported to have similar results. Regarding management, the recent

  4. Role of HIDA scanning in the assessment of external biliary fistulae

    SciTech Connect

    McPherson, G.A.; Collier, N.A.; Lavender, J.P.; Blumgart, L.H.

    1984-01-01

    Three patients with postoperative external biliary fistula are described. In each, radionuclide /sup 99m/Tc HIDA was used to define the anatomy of the fistula. The extent of the fistula and the presence of distal obstruction to bile flow could also be determined. This information was used to predict the likelihood of spontaneous fistula closure. HIDA scanning is a useful noninvasive alternative to other investigations, such as fistulography and cholangiography, which do not always provide useful information. The results of HIDA scanning can aid the clinical decision on the need for surgical intervention to correct an external biliary fistula.

  5. Extrahepatic Bile Duct Obstruction and Erosive Disruption by Cavitating Porta Hepatis Nodal Metastasis, Treated by Uncovered Wallstent

    SciTech Connect

    Trambert, Jonathan J. Frost, Andrei; Malasky, Charlotte

    2004-08-15

    A 45-year-old woman with advanced gastric carcinoma presented with obstructive jaundice. Percutaneous transhepatic cholangiography (PTC) revealed erosive disruption of the extrahepatic bile ducts by a cavitating metastasis in the porta hepatis, as well as a biliary-duodenal fistula. External-internal biliary drainage via the fistula was plagued by recurrent drain occlusion by necrotic debris. This was ultimately alleviated by successful catheterization of the distal common bile duct (CBD) through the cavity, and linking the common hepatic duct (CHD) and CBD with a Wallstent, across the cavity. This succeeded in improving internal biliary drainage and isolating the exfoliating debris of the cavity from the bile ducts.

  6. Laparoscopic Common Bile Duct Exploration Four-Task Training Model: Construct Validity

    PubMed Central

    Otaño, Natalia; Rodríguez, Omaira; Sánchez, Renata; Benítez, Gustavo; Schweitzer, Michael

    2012-01-01

    Background: Training models in laparoscopic surgery allow the surgical team to practice procedures in a safe environment. We have proposed the use of a 4-task, low-cost inert model to practice critical steps of laparoscopic common bile duct exploration. Methods: The performance of 3 groups with different levels of expertise in laparoscopic surgery, novices (A), intermediates (B), and experts (C), was evaluated using a low-cost inert model in the following tasks: (1) intraoperative cholangiography catheter insertion, (2) transcystic exploration, (3) T-tube placement, and (4) choledochoscope management. Kruskal-Wallis and Mann-Whitney tests were used to identify differences among the groups. Results: A total of 14 individuals were evaluated: 5 novices (A), 5 intermediates (B), and 4 experts (C). The results involving intraoperative cholangiography catheter insertion were similar among the 3 groups. As for the other tasks, the expert had better results than the other 2, in which no significant differences occurred. The proposed model is able to discriminate among individuals with different levels of expertise, indicating that the abilities that the model evaluates are relevant in the surgeon's performance in CBD exploration. Conclusions: Construct validity for tasks 2 and 3 was demonstrated. However, task 1 was no capable of distinguishing between groups, and task 4 was not statistically validated. PMID:22906323

  7. The diagnosis of jaundice by the minilaparotomy open transhepatic cholangiogram.

    PubMed Central

    Stein, H D

    1975-01-01

    The precise diagnosis of the etiology of jaundice is of considerable value to the clinician in caring for the icteric patient. A series of twenty-three patients who underwent minilaparotomy (open transhepatic cholangiogram) is presented. This procedure allows for inspection, biopsy, cholangiography and omental venography under direct visualization and at minimal risk to the patient. In this series the cause of jaundice was successfully determined in 96% of the cases. Cholangiography was used to visualize the ducts in 20 patients and in 2 others, the diagnosis was made by inspection and liver biopsy. The literature on alternative diagnostic methods is reviewed and compared to other procedures the minilaparotomy has relatively few contraindications and many advantages. It is a useful and safe technique in the face of abnormal clotting factors, obstructive jaundice, ascites or hepatitis. By using the multiple diagnostic modalities available in a minilaparotomy, the rate of successful diagnosis equals or exceeds that of the other procedures. It is therefore recommended that this approach be considered as a diagnostic tool in the evaluation of jaundice. PMID:1130856

  8. Biliary tract obstruction secondary to cancer: management guidelines and selected literature review.

    PubMed

    Lokich, J J; Kane, R A; Harrison, D A; McDermott, W V

    1987-06-01

    Malignant biliary tract obstruction (MBTO) due to either primary biliary tract cancer or metastasis to the porta hepatis is a common clinical problem. The most common metastatic tumors causing MBTO in order of frequency are gastric, colon, breast, and lung cancers. Radiographic diagnostic procedures should proceed in a cost-effective sequence from ultrasonography, computerized tomography (CT), percutaneous transhepatic cholangiography (PTHC), and endoscopic retrograde pancreatography with the goal of establishing the site of the biliary tract obstruction. The identification of the site of obstruction could be established by ultrasound 70% to 80%, CT scan 80% to 90%, PTHC 100%, and endoscopic retrograde cholangiography (ERCP) 85%. Therapeutic intervention by radiographic decompression (PTHC or endoscopic prosthesis), surgical bypass, or radiation therapy with or without chemotherapy may be selectively used based on (1) the site of obstruction; (2) the type of primary tumor; and (3) the presence of specific symptoms related to the obstruction. ("Prophylactic" biliary tract decompression to prevent ascending cholangitis is not supported by the literature in that the frequency of sepsis in the face of malignant obstruction is small (in contrast to sepsis associated with stone disease). Furthermore, PTHC with drainage as a long-term procedure is associated with a substantial frequency of sepsis and is unnecessary and possibly problematic as a preoperative procedure simply to reduce the bilirubin level. The use of radiation therapy in conjunction with chemotherapy for patients not deemed suitable for a surgical bypass because of the presence of proximal obstruction is an important alternative to PTHC. PMID:3295131

  9. Conservative management of cholestasis with and without fever in acute biliary pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Santos, José Sebastião; Kemp, Rafael; Ardengh, José Celso; Jr, Jorge Elias

    2012-01-01

    The presence of cholestasis in both mild and severe forms of acute biliary pancreatitis (ABP) does not justify, of itself, early endoscopic retrograde cholangiography (ERC) or endoscopic sphincterotomy (ES). Clinical support treatment of acute pancreatitis for one to two weeks is usually accompanied by regression of pancreatic edema, of cholestasis and by stone migration to the duodenum in 60%-88% of cases. On the other hand, in cases with both cholestasis and fever, a condition usually characterized as ABP associated with cholangitis, early ES is normally indicated. However, in daily clinical practice, it is practically impossible to guarantee the coexistence of cholangitis and mild or severe acute pancreatitis. Pain, fever and cholestasis, as well as mental confusion and hypotension, may be attributed to inflammatory and necrotic events related to ABP. Under these circumstances, evaluation of the bile duct by endo-ultrasonography (EUS) or magnetic resonance cholangiography (MRC) before performing ERC and ES seems reasonable. Thus, it is necessary to assess the effects of the association between early and opportune access to the treatment of local and systemic inflammatory/infectious effects of ABP with cholestasis and fever, and to characterize the possible scenarios and the subsequent approaches to the common bile duct, directed by less invasive examinations such as MRC or EUS. PMID:22530079

  10. Outcomes after discontinuation of routine use of transanastomotic biliary stents in pediatric liver transplantation at a single site.

    PubMed

    Valentino, Pamela L; Jonas, Maureen M; Lee, Christine K; Kim, Heung B; Vakili, Khashayar; Elisofon, Scott A

    2016-08-01

    Routine use of transanastomotic biliary stents (RTBS) for biliary reconstruction in liver transplantation (LT) is controversial, with conflicting outcomes in adult randomized trials. Pediatric literature contains limited data. This study is a retrospective review of 99 patients who underwent first LT (2005-2014). In 2011, RTBS was discontinued at our center. This study describes biliary complications following LT with and without RTBS. 56 (56%) patients had RTBS. Median age at LT was 1.9 yr (IQR 0.7, 8.6); 55% were female. Most common indication for LT was biliary atresia (36%). Most common biliary reconstruction was Roux-en-Y choledochojejunostomy (75% with RTBS, 58% without RTBS, p = 0.09). Biliary complications (strictures, bile leaks, surgical revision) occurred in 23% without significant difference between groups (20% with RTBS, 28% without RTBS, p = 0.33). Patients with RTBS had routine cholangiography via the tube at 6-8 wk; thus, significantly more patients with RTBS had cholangiograms (91% vs. 19%, p < 0.0001). There was no difference in the number of patients who required therapeutic intervention via endoscopic or percutaneous transhepatic cholangiography (11% with RTBS, 19% no RTBS, p = 0.26). Routine use of RTBS for biliary reconstruction in pediatric LT may not be necessary, and possibly associated with need for costlier, invasive imaging without improvement in outcomes. PMID:27239056

  11. Cholestatic phenotypes of autoimmune hepatitis.

    PubMed

    Czaja, Albert J

    2014-09-01

    Autoimmune hepatitis can have cholestatic features that are outside the codified diagnostic criteria. These features have uncertain effects on the clinical presentation and progression of disease. Patients with autoimmune hepatitis can have antimitochondrial antibodies and coincidental bile duct injury or loss (2%-13% of patients), focal biliary strictures and dilations based on cholangiography (2%-11%), or histologic changes of bile duct injury or loss in the absence of other features (5%-11%). These findings probably represent atypical manifestations of autoimmune hepatitis or variants of primary biliary cirrhosis or primary sclerosing cholangitis, depending on the predominant findings. Serum levels of alkaline phosphatase and γ-glutamyl transferase, histologic features of bile duct injury, and findings from cholangiography are associated with responsiveness to corticosteroid therapy and individualized alternative treatments. Corticosteroid therapy, in combination with low-dose ursodeoxycholic acid, has been promulgated by international societies, but these recommendations are not based on strong evidence. The frequency, variable outcomes, and uncertainties in diagnosis and management of the cholestatic phenotypes must be addressed by a collaborative investigational network. This network should define the genetic and pathologic features of these disorders, standardize their nomenclature, and establish a treatment algorithm. In this review, the different cholestatic phenotypes of autoimmune hepatitis, mechanisms of pathogenesis, current management strategies and outcomes, and opportunities for improving understanding and therapy are presented. PMID:24013108

  12. Surgical aspect ot cystic dilatation of the bile duct. An anomalous junction of the pancreaticobiliary tract in adults.

    PubMed Central

    Ono, J; Sakoda, K; Akita, H

    1982-01-01

    Twenty-two cholangiograms of adults with congenital dilatation of the common bile duct were studied and analyzed. Diagnosis of this disease was established by endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreaticography in nine patients, by percutaneous transhepatic cholangiography in two patients, and by operative cholangiography in 11 patients. All patients, except one with Caroli's disease, were classified as type I according to Alonso-Lej. An anomalous junction of the pancreaticobiliary ductal system (AJPBDS) was observed in 15 cases. In nine patients the common bile duct joined the main pancreatic duct, and in the remaining six patients, the pancreatic duct was noted to join the common bile duct. These anomalies are considered to be an important etiologic factor in the development of choledochal dilatation. Total cyst excision and hepaticojejunostomy in a Roux-en-Y fashion is recommended as the procedure of choice in those cases with AJPBDS. This is based on the high incidence of cholangitis and the high propensity to induce malignancy of cystic wall following simple drainage. Images Fig. 2. Fig. 3. Fig. 4. PMID:7055397

  13. [Radiological diagnosis and intervention of cholangiocarcinomas (CC)].

    PubMed

    Vogl, T J; Zangos, S; Eichler, K; Gruber-Rouh, T; Hammerstingl, R M; Trojan, J; Weisser, P

    2012-10-01

    To present current data on diagnosis, indication and different therapy options in patients with cholangiocarcinoma (CC) based on an analysis of the current literature and clinical experience. The diagnostic routine includes laboratory investigations with parameters of cholestasis and also serum tumor markers CA19 - 9 and CEA. After ultrasound for clarifying a tumor and/or dilated bile ducts, contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) should be performed with magnetic resonance cholangiography (MRCP). The accuracy (positive predictive value) for diagnosing a CC is 37-84% (depending on the location) for ultrasound, 79-94% for computed tomography (CT), and 95% for MRI and MRCP. An endoscopic retrograde cholangiography (ERCP) can then be planned, especially if biliary drainage or cytological or histological specimen sampling is intended. A curative approach can be achieved by surgical resection, rarely by liver transplantation. However, many patients are not eligible for surgery. In addition to systemic chemotherapy, locoregional therapies such as transarterial chemoembolization (TACE), hepatic arterial infusion (HAI)--also known as chemoperfusion--, drug eluting beads-therapy (DEB) as well as thermoablative procedures, such as laser-induced thermotherapy (LITT), microwave ablation (MWA) and radiofrequency ablation (RFA) can be provided with a palliative intention. PMID:22711249

  14. Hilar cholangiocarcinoma. An evaluation of subtypes with CT and angiography.

    PubMed

    Yamashita, Y; Takahashi, M; Kanazawa, S; Charnsangavej, C; Wallace, S

    1992-07-01

    Sixty-seven patients had hilar cholangiocarcinomas which were divided into 3 types based on tumor morphology as observed on cholangiography and CT. The pathology, vascularity, and pattern of tumor spread of these types were compared. Most of the infiltrative tumors (n = 44) were scirrhous adenocarcinomas, which on CT showed poor or no contrast enhancement with frequent lymph node metastases and liver atrophy. At angiography, there was vascular encasement in 52%, in rare cases neovascularity, and tumor stain. The exophytic type (n = 19) was divided into 2 subgroups depending on the main location of the tumor. The nodular subtype (n = 16) was mainly inside the liver and somewhat hypervascular similar to peripheral cholangiocarcinoma, often with intrahepatic metastases. The periductal subtype (n = 3) was hypovascular, similar to the infiltrative cholangiocarcinoma, and had a tendency to spread along the portal vein. The intraductal type (n = 4) was observed as a filling defect on cholangiography. CT revealed an intraluminal low density mass. Histologically, they were papillary adenocarcinomas. The radiologic types of hilar cholangiocarcinoma showed different characteristics with regard to pathologic findings, vascularity, and pattern of spread. PMID:1321653

  15. Scintiscanning in the evaluation of biliary enteric anastomoses.

    PubMed

    Tidmore, H; Ram, M D

    1985-03-01

    The evaluation of symptomatic patients who have undergone biliary enteric anastomoses, particularly when the diversion was into the jejunum, is difficult. Conventional techniques for evaluation, such as oral cholecystography (OCG), intravenous cholangiography (IVC), ultrasonography (US), computer-assisted tomography scanning (CT scanning), or endoscopy are not adequate to provide definitive information on the patency of the anastomoses. Hepatobiliary scintiscanning using 99mTc-HIDA and BIDA (iminodiacetic acid derivatives) was performed on 12 patients. The patients were from 11 to 72 years of age and included ten men and two women. The scan results were correlated with US, CT scan, percutaneous transhepatic cholangiography (PTC), operative findings, and final diagnosis. Scanning was highly accurate in this group and could be performed successfully even in jaundiced patients (total serum bilirubin level up to 20.0 mg/dl). In patients in whom dilated bile ducts were demonstrated (by US, CT scan, or scintiscan), only the scintiscan revealed the true patency of the anastomoses. The advantages of the technique are that it is simple and noninvasive. Delayed transit of bile (scanning agent) to bowel is a very reliable indication of partial or complete obstruction. Scintiscanning is the only technique that demonstrated the functional state of biliary secretion and excretion into bowel in patients with previous biliary enteric anastomoses. PMID:3883866

  16. Pediatric Liver Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Dominguez, Rodrigo; Young, Lionel W.; Ledesma-Medina, Jocyline; Cienfuegos, Javier; Gartner, J. Carlton; Bron, Klaus M.; Starzl, Thomas E.

    2010-01-01

    The postoperative diagnostic imaging examinations of 44 children who underwent 59 orthotopic liver transplantations were reviewed. The imaging modalities used for the evaluation of suspected complications include plain roentgenography, ultrasonography (US), computed tomography (CT), nuclear scintigraphy, arteriography, percutaneous and operative cholangiography, and endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography. The main postoperative complications included ischemia, thrombosis (hepatic artery and portal vein), infarction, obstruction or leakage of the biliary anastomosis, hepatic and perihepatic infection, and allograft rejection. US, the most frequently used abdominal imaging modality, was best suited for detection of biliary duct dilatation, fluid collections in or around the transplanted liver, and hepatic arterial, inferior vena caval, and portal vein thrombosis. CT was especially helpful in corroborating findings of infection and in locating abscesses. Technetium 99m sulfur colloid (early- and late-phase imaging) provided a sensitive, although nonspecific, means of assessing allograft vascularization and morphology. Angiography showed vascularity most clearly, and cholangiography was the most useful In the assessment of bile duct patency. A diagnostic imaging algorithm is proposed for evaluation of suspected complications. PMID:3901104

  17. Management of Biliary Strictures After Liver Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Villa, Nicolas A.

    2015-01-01

    Strictures of the bile duct are a well-recognized complication of liver transplant and account for more than 50% of all biliary complications after deceased donor liver transplant and living donor liver transplant. Biliary strictures that develop after transplant are classified as anastomotic strictures or nonanastomotic strictures, depending on their location in the bile duct. The incidence, etiology, natural history, and response to therapy of the 2 types vary greatly, so their distinction is clinically important. The imaging modality of choice for the diagnosis of biliary strictures is magnetic resonance cholangiopancreatography because of its high rate of diagnostic accuracy and limited risk of complications. Biliary strictures that develop after liver transplant may be managed with endoscopic retrograde cholangiography (ERC), percutaneous transhepatic cholangiography (PTC), or surgical revision, including retransplant. The initial treatment of choice for these strictures is ERC with progressive balloon dilation and the placement of increasing numbers of plastic stents. PTC and surgery are generally reserved for failures of endoscopic therapy or for anatomic variants that are not suitable for ERC. In this article, we discuss the classification of biliary strictures, their diagnosis, and the therapeutic strategies that can be used to manage these common complications of liver transplant. PMID:27482175

  18. Portal Cavernoma Cholangiopathy: Consensus Statement of a Working Party of the Indian National Association for Study of the Liver

    PubMed Central

    Dhiman, Radha K.; Saraswat, Vivek A.; Valla, Dominique C.; Chawla, Yogesh; Behera, Arunanshu; Varma, Vibha; Agarwal, Swastik; Duseja, Ajay; Puri, Pankaj; Kalra, Naveen; Rameshbabu, Chittapuram S.; Bhatia, Vikram; Sharma, Malay; Kumar, Manoj; Gupta, Subhash; Taneja, Sunil; Kaman, Leileshwar; Zargar, Showkat A.; Nundy, Samiran; Singh, Shivaram P.; Acharya, Subrat K.; Dilawari, Jang B.

    2014-01-01

    Portal cavernoma cholangiopathy (PCC) is defined as abnormalities in the extrahepatic biliary system including the cystic duct and gallbladder with or without abnormalities in the 1st and 2nd generation biliary ducts in a patient with portal cavernoma. Presence of a portal cavernoma, typical cholangiographic changes on endoscopic or magnetic resonance cholangiography and the absence of other causes of these biliary changes like bile duct injury, primary sclerosing cholangitis, cholangiocarcinoma etc are mandatory to arrive a diagnosis. Compression by porto-portal collateral veins involving the paracholedochal and epicholedochal venous plexuses and cholecystic veins and ischemic insult due to deficient portal blood supply or prolonged compression by collaterals bring about biliary changes. While the former are reversible after porto-systemic shunt surgery, the latter are not. Majority of the patients with PCC are asymptomatic and approximately 21% are symptomatic. Symptoms in PCC could be in the form of long standing jaundice due to chronic cholestasis, or biliary pain with or without cholangitis due to biliary stones. Endoscopic retrograde cholangiography has no diagnostic role because it is invasive and is associated with risk of complications, hence it is reserved for therapeutic procedures. Magnetic resonance cholangiography and portovenography is a noninvasive and comprehensive imaging technique, and is the modality of choice for mapping of the biliary and vascular abnormalities in these patients. PCC is a progressive condition and symptoms develop late in the course of portal hypertension only in patients with severe or advanced changes of cholangiopathy. Asymptomatic patients with PCC do not require any treatment. Treatment of symptomatic PCC can be approached in a phased manner, coping first with biliary clearance by nasobiliary or biliary stent placement for acute cholangitis and endoscopic biliary sphincterotomy for biliary stone removal; second, with

  19. Bronchobiliary Fistula Treated by Self-expanding ePTFE-Covered Nitinol Stent-Graft

    SciTech Connect

    Gandini, Roberto; Konda, Daniel Tisone, Giuseppe; Pipitone, Vincenzo; Anselmo, Alessandro; Simonetti, Giovanni

    2005-12-15

    A 71-year-old man, who had undergone right hepatectomy extended to the caudate lobe with terminolateral Roux-en-Y left hepatojejunostomy for a Klatskin tumor, developed bilioptysis 3 weeks postoperatively due to bronchobiliary fistula. Percutaneous transhepatic cholangiography revealed a non-dilated biliary system with contrast medium extravasation to the right subphrenic space through a resected anomalous right posterior segmental duct. After initial unsuccessful internal-external biliary drainage, the fistula was sealed with a VIATORR covered self-expanding nitinol stent-graft placed with its distal uncovered region in the hepatojejunal anastomosis and the proximal ePTFE-lined region in the left hepatic duct. A 10-month follow-up revealed no recurrence of bilioptysis and confirmed the complete exclusion of the bronchobiliary fistula.

  20. Successful Treatment of Persistent Postcholecystectomy Bile Leak Using Percutaneous Cystic Duct Coiling

    PubMed Central

    Rai, Vinay; Beckley, Akin; Fabre, Anna; Bellows, Charles F.

    2015-01-01

    Laparoscopic cholecystectomy is one of the most commonly performed operations worldwide. Cystic duct is the most common site of bile leak after cholecystectomy. The treatment of choice is usually conservative. Using sufficient percutaneous drainage of the biloma cavity and endoscopic retrograde cholangiography (ERCP) with sphincterotomy and/or stenting, the cure rate of bile leaks is greater than 90%. In very rare cases, all of these measures remain unsuccessful. We report a technique for the successful treatment of persistent cystic duct leak. After failed ERCP and stenting, bile leak was treated by coiling the cystic duct through a drain tract. This technique is safe and effective and helps avoid the morbidity of reoperation. PMID:26798539

  1. Endoscopic management of post-liver transplant biliary complications.

    PubMed

    Girotra, Mohit; Soota, Kaartik; Klair, Jagpal S; Dang, Shyam M; Aduli, Farshad

    2015-05-16

    Biliary complications are being increasingly encountered in post liver transplant patients because of increased volume of transplants and longer survival of these recipients. Overall management of these complications may be challenging, but with advances in endoscopic techniques, majority of such patients are being dealt with by endoscopists rather than the surgeons. Our review article discusses the recent advances in endoscopic tools and techniques that have proved endoscopic retrograde cholangiography with various interventions, like sphincterotomy, bile duct dilatation, and stent placement, to be the mainstay for management of most of these complications. We also discuss the management dilemmas in patients with surgically altered anatomy, where accessing the bile duct is challenging, and the recent strides towards making this prospect a reality. PMID:25992185

  2. Double gallbladder with different disease entities: A case report

    PubMed Central

    Vijayaraghavan, R; Belagavi, Charalingappa S

    2006-01-01

    We report a rare case of gallbladder duplication in a young male patient with acute pyocoele in one vesicle and acute cholecystitis with cystadenoma in the other; another unusual feature was the absent or obliterated cystic duct in the proximal vesicle and non-communication with the second vesicle or the biliary system. Ultrasound examination had suggested a septate gallbladder; the diagnosis of dual gallbladder was made per-operatively during separation of the distal moiety which was presumed to be an adherent duodenum initially. Intraoperative cholecystogram confirmed the diagnosis and both gallbladders were removed successfully laparoscopically. A high degree of awareness, detailed preoperative investigations when anomalies are suspected and intraoperative cholangiography are necessary for accurate detailing of the biliary tree to avoid inadvertent damage to the biliary ductal system and overlooking of second or third gallbladder during surgery. PMID:21170223

  3. Annular pancreas intra operatively discovered: a case report

    PubMed Central

    Zeineb, Mzoughi; Sadri, Ben Abid; Nizar, Miloudi; Hassen, Hentati; Nafaa, Arfa; Taher, Khalfallah

    2011-01-01

    Annular pancreas is a rare congenital abnormality. This entity can rarely be symptomatic. Patients can present with gastrointestinal obstruction or acute pancreatitis. We report a case with a rich iconography, of an annular pancreas discovered intraoperatively. A 46-year-old woman was operated with the diagnosis of acute cholecystitis with common bile duct stones. At operation, a strip of pancreatic tissue (2 cm) completely encircled the second duodenum. Open cholecytectomy with choledocotomy and stones extractionwas done. Postoperatively, she developed an acute pancreatitis. The post-operative cholangiography showed the annular duct surrounding the second duodenum. Annular pancreas is rare. Symptoms may occur in newborn children. In adults, annular pancreas discovering is radiological or intra operatively. PMID:24765382

  4. Clinical observation of laser treatment of cholelithiasis in 105 cases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Guang-hua; Gu, Xi-rong; Chen, Bin-jun; Xia, Guo-pin

    1993-03-01

    This paper reports the results of non-operative therapy for cholelithiasis in 105 cases using He-Ne laser lithotripsy and a high fat diet, as well as Chinese and Western medicine. There were 32 male and 73 female patients ages 11 - 67 years (with an average of 41.2 years). All cases were confirmed by either B mode sonography or cholangiography. This paper presents the technique of treatment, its indications, contraindications, and therapeutic results. The results reveal a cure rate of 20% (21/105), satisfactory in 72.4% (76/105), and failed in 7.6% (8/105). Successful passage of gallstones was found in 92.4% and 52 samples of gallstones were examined qualitatively. The results show that He-Ne laser irradiation in the treatment of cholelithiasis is associated with neither pain, side-effect, nor cross infection, and is readily accepted by the patients.

  5. Congenital absence of the gallbladder and the cystic duct.

    PubMed

    Bekele, Zenebe

    2002-04-01

    A 47 years old female with congenital absence of the gallbladder and the cystic duct was presented. The diagnosis was confirmed by exploratory laparatomy, common duct tube cholangiography, and ultrasonography. Most of the operated cases of congenital absence of the gallbladder are symptomatic, and they get relief after common duct exploration. Although the biliary tree is normal on inspection at exploration, it is believed that the symptomatology may have root in congenital abnormality of function. Treatment of the agenesis of the gallbladder as described in earlier days has been discussed. In the present situation, specially in a country like Ethiopia where long time care of internal drains is a worrisome problem, and a major point for concern, the author believes choledocho-enteric anastomosis to be a good solution. PMID:12240579

  6. Liver cysts associated with polycystic kidney disease: Role of Tc-99m hepatobiliary imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Salam, M.; Keeffe, E.B. )

    1989-11-01

    A 42-year-old woman with multiple hepatic cysts associated with autosomal polycystic kidney disease was evaluated for abdominal discomfort and new liver test abnormalities following blind aspirations of her liver cysts. Tc-99m mebrofenin hepatobiliary imaging revealed a markedly enlarged liver with multiple photon deficient areas, focal retention of isotope in the left hepatic ductal system, no accumulation of radionuclide in cysts, and an unusual medial gallbladder position. Endoscopic retrograde cholangiography confirmed all of these findings. Abdominal discomfort and liver biochemical abnormalities were attributed to cyst compression of nearby structures, including bile ducts. Hepatobiliary imaging is useful to exclude communication of bile ducts with hepatic cysts, to detect incidental abnormalities such as partial bile duct obstruction, and to distinguish the gallbladder from nearby hepatic cysts.

  7. Reliability of pre- and intraoperative tests for biliary lithiasis

    SciTech Connect

    Escallon, A. Jr.; Rosales, W.; Aldrete, J.S.

    1985-05-01

    The records of 242 patients, operated consecutively for biliary lithiasis, were analyzed to determine the reliability of oral cholecystography (OCG), ultrasonography (US), and HIDA in detecting biliary calculi. Preoperative interpretations were correlated to operative findings. OCG obtained in 138 patients was accurate in 92%. US obtained in 150 was correct in 89%. The accuracy of HIDA was 92% in acute and 78% in chronic cholecystitis. Intraoperative cholangiography (IOC) done in 173 patients indicated the need for exploratory choledochotomy in 24; 21 had choledocholithiasis. These observations suggest that OCG and US are very accurate, but not infallible, in detecting cholelithiasis. US should be done first; when doubt persists, the addition of OCG allows the preoperative diagnosis of gallstones in 97% of the cases. HIDA is highly accurate but not infallible in detecting acute calculous cholecystitis. IOC is very reliable in detecting choledocholithiasis; thus, its routine is justifiable.

  8. The effect of bilipolinum (Adipiodon), an iodine contrast medium on erythrocyte enzymes.

    PubMed

    Kwiatkowska, J; Kwiatkowska, D; Dawiskiba, J

    1980-01-01

    Bilipolinum (Adipiodon), iodine contrast medium used in cholangiography, showed an inhibitory effect on the activity of human erythrocyte phosphohexoseisomerase, phosphofructokinase, aldolase and glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase. The addition of glucose metabolites (glucose-6-phosphate, fructose-6-phosphate, fructose-1,6-bis-phosphate, pyruvate and lactate) abolished the inhibitory effect of Bilipolinum. In the presence of Bilipolinum purified erythrocyte phosphofructokinase showed a decreased affinity towards substrate, modified allosteric properties and reduced stability at pH below 7.5. Purified erythrocyte glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase was also affected by Bilipolinum and its affinity for NADP was decreased. Testing of erythrocyte enzymes in the evaluation of toxicity of iodine contrast media is discussed. PMID:6452104

  9. Endoscopic retrograde cholangio-pancreatographic diagnosis and extraction of massive biliary ascariasis presented with acute pancreatitis: a case report.

    PubMed

    Saowaros, V

    1999-05-01

    This paper reports the case of a young female Thai patient who presented with periodic severe abdominal pains which proved to be acute pancreatitis. Conventional investigations and treatments failed to prove and improve her condition. ERCP was done on the twelfth day after admission. 3 caudal ends of living round worms were noted protruding from the papillary orifice during endoscopy. Cholangiography revealed impacted multiple round worms in the common bile duct and both intrahepatic ducts. Endoscopic extraction of the worms was done by using dormia basket and removed with endoscope. Repeated procedure was done 21 times in two and a half hours, obtaining 26 live, mature Ascaris lumbricoides varying from 13 to 24 cm in length. Repeated cholangiogram confirmed complete removal of the worms. The patient was relieved from abdominal pain immediately after the procedure, and given oral albendazole 400 mg daily for 7 days. She was discharged asymptomatic 8 days after Ascaris removal. PMID:10443103

  10. Clinical aspects of nonsurgical percutaneous transhepatic bile drainage in obstructive lesions of the extrahepatic bile ducts.

    PubMed Central

    Hansson, J A; Hoevels, J; Simert, G; Tylén, U; Vang, J

    1979-01-01

    Percutaneous transhepatic cholangiography (PTC) with subsequent external bile drainage by nonsurgically established percutaneous transhepatic intubation of bile ducts was performed in 105 patients with obstructive jaundice. Recovery of liver function and improvement in the patients' general condition prior to radical or palliative surgery, nonsurgical palliation in advanced cases of malignancy as well as relief of postoperative leakage from a biliodigestive anastomosis are the indications for the bile drainage technique used in the present study. Clinical aspects such as optimal period of preoperative drainage, frequency of catheter dislodgement, and rate of complications such as cholangitis, bile leakage to the abdominal cavity and risk for peritoneal hemorrhage are discussed. Two deaths occurred within this series. PMID:758865

  11. Common Hepatic Duct Mixed Adenoneuroendocrine Carcinoma Masquerading as Cholangiocarcinoma.

    PubMed

    Priyanka Akhilesh, Sali; Kamal Sunder, Yadav; Chandralekha, Tampi; Samir, Parikh; Prasad Kashinath, Wagle

    2016-01-01

    Bile duct mixed adenoneuroendocrine carcinoma (MANEC) is a rare entity. It is defined as having mixed elements of both neuroendocrine tumors (NET) and an adenocarcinoma element, the lesser component forming at least 30% of the tumor. It is a subtype of neuroendocrine carcinoma (NEC) showing both gland-forming epithelial tumor cells and neuroendocrine cells. It is generally misdiagnosed as cholangiocarcinoma on imaging studies. The preoperative pathological workup from the endoscopic retrograde cholangiography brush cytology usually misses the NET/NEC component since it often lies deeper in the tumor. However, it is reported that it is the NEC component that defines the prognosis of the tumor; hence, it is vital to identify the NEC component. We present a rare case of common hepatic duct (CHD) MANEC that was preoperatively misdiagnosed as cholangiocarcinoma. PMID:27375908

  12. Peribiliary hepatic cysts presenting as hilar cholangiocarcinoma in a patient with end-stage liver disease

    PubMed Central

    Lim, Jane; Nissen, Nicholas N.; McPhaul, Christopher; Annamalai, Alagappan; Klein, Andrew S.; Sundaram, Vinay

    2016-01-01

    Peribiliary cysts are cystic dilatations of peribiliary glands in the liver. They are present in ~50% of cirrhotic patients, but are underrecognized because they are usually asymptomatic and rarely present as obstructive jaundice. A 63-year-old male with hepatitis C cirrhosis, awaiting liver transplantation, had a new finding of intrahepatic dilatation on magnetic resonance imaging. This was initially concerning for cholangiocarcinoma, but was ultimately diagnosed as peribiliary cysts. Peribiliary cysts can imitate cholangiocarcinoma on imaging. Therefore, awareness of this condition is essential because misdiagnosis may lead to inappropriate delay or denial for liver transplantation. The ideal imaging modalities to identify peribiliary cysts are magnetic resonance cholangiography and drip infusion cholangiographic computed tomography, though hepatic dysfunction may limit the usefulness of the latter. Peribiliary cysts should be considered in cirrhotic patients with cholestasis, biliary dilatations and negative biopsy of the biliary system for malignancy. PMID:27511912

  13. An Overview of the Evolution of Direct Cholangioscopy Techniques for Diagnosis and Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Voaklander, Rebecca; Kim, Eileen; Brown, William H.; Kasmin, Franklin E.

    2016-01-01

    Direct examination of the biliary tree with endoscopes has been a challenge since endoscopists began performing endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP) in the late 1960s. Previously, surgeons had used rigid instruments intraoperatively, which made examination difficult. The first direct cholangioscopy performed by an endoscopist was likely unintentionally done in a patient with postsurgical anatomy. Indirect imaging, ERCP, and percutaneous transhepatic cholangiography are helpful modalities for examining the biliary tree, but they are limited procedures, particularly with regard to the evaluation and treatment of strictures and bile duct stones. This article reviews the history and evolution of direct cholangioscopy since the advent of flexible endoscopes. Additionally, the article describes a new single-operator cholan-gioscopy technique for direct visualization of the biliary tree for diagnosis and intervention. There remains opportunity for innovation as endoscopists strive for safe and less-invasive methods for the identification and treatment of biliary pathology. PMID:27489525

  14. Advanced endoscopic imaging of indeterminate biliary strictures

    PubMed Central

    Tabibian, James H; Visrodia, Kavel H; Levy, Michael J; Gostout, Christopher J

    2015-01-01

    Endoscopic evaluation of indeterminate biliary strictures (IDBSs) has evolved considerably since the development of flexible fiberoptic endoscopes over 50 years ago. Endoscopic retrograde cholangiography pancreatography (ERCP) was introduced nearly a decade later and has since become the mainstay of therapy for relieving obstruction of the biliary tract. However, longstanding methods of ERCP-guided tissue acquisition (i.e., biliary brushings for cytology and intraductal forceps biopsy for histology) have demonstrated disappointing performance characteristics in distinguishing malignant from benign etiologies of IDBSs. The limitations of these methods have thus helped drive the search for novel techniques to enhance the evaluation of IDBSs and thereby improve diagnosis and clinical care. These modalities include, but are not limited to, endoscopic ultrasound, intraductal ultrasound, cholangioscopy, confocal endomicroscopy, and optical coherence tomography. In this review, we discuss established and emerging options in the evaluation of IDBSs. PMID:26675379

  15. [Treatment of acute cholecystitis in a third-trimester pregnant women].

    PubMed

    Eller, Asger; Shim, Susy; Sigvardt, Louise; Rask, Peter; Nielsen, Michael Festersen

    2016-04-18

    This case report describes a 35-year-old female with acute cholecystitis 36 weeks into her pregnancy. Laparoscopic cholecystectomy was assessed not to be possible. An ultrasonic guided percutaneous transhepatic gall bladder drainage was performed resulting in immediate pain relief. The patient was discharged two days later, and the drain sat in place until a caesarian section was per--formed. A post-surgery cholangiography demonstrated stones in the gall bladder but no stones in the common bile duct. An uneventful laparoscopic cholecystectomy was carried out three months after surgery. The case report demonstrates that percutaneous transhepatic gall bladder drainage is a safe procedure to be considered in women with cholecystitis in which cholecystectomy is not possible or assumed to be associated with an unacceptable high risk. PMID:27094635

  16. Endoscopic management of post-liver transplant biliary complications

    PubMed Central

    Girotra, Mohit; Soota, Kaartik; Klair, Jagpal S; Dang, Shyam M; Aduli, Farshad

    2015-01-01

    Biliary complications are being increasingly encountered in post liver transplant patients because of increased volume of transplants and longer survival of these recipients. Overall management of these complications may be challenging, but with advances in endoscopic techniques, majority of such patients are being dealt with by endoscopists rather than the surgeons. Our review article discusses the recent advances in endoscopic tools and techniques that have proved endoscopic retrograde cholangiography with various interventions, like sphincterotomy, bile duct dilatation, and stent placement, to be the mainstay for management of most of these complications. We also discuss the management dilemmas in patients with surgically altered anatomy, where accessing the bile duct is challenging, and the recent strides towards making this prospect a reality. PMID:25992185

  17. Laparoscopic cholecystectomy using 2-mm instruments.

    PubMed

    Uranüs, S; Peng, Z; Kronberger, L; Pfeifer, J; Salehi, B

    1998-10-01

    Today, laparoscopic cholecystectomy is the method of choice for treatment of symptomatic gallbladder disorders. It minimizes effects of the operation that are independent of the gallbladder, such as trauma to the abdominal wall and other soft tissue. The surgical wounds were even smaller when 2-mm trocars were used. Laparoscopic cholecystectomy using 2-mm instruments was performed in a consecutive series of 14 patients with symptomatic gallstones. The procedure was completed in 12 cases, with conversion to open surgery in two cases. Intraoperative cholangiography was always performed. The postoperative course was always uneventful. The cosmetic effect was highly satisfactory. The procedure using 2-mm instruments could be indicated in selected patients with uncomplicated gallstone disease. PMID:9820716

  18. Long-Term Placement of Subcutaneous Ruesch-Type Stents for Double Biliary Stenosis in a Living-Donor Liver Transplant Recipient

    SciTech Connect

    Adani, Gian Luigi Baccarani, Umberto; Lorenzin, Dario; Risaliti, Andrea; Como, Giuseppe; Gasparini, Daniele; Sponza, Massimo; Bresadola, Vittorio; Bresadola, Fabrizio

    2007-04-15

    Biliary reconstruction continues to be a major source of morbidity following liver transplantation. The spectrum of biliary complications is evolving due to the increasing number of split-liver and living-donor liver transplantation, which are even associated with a higher incidence of biliary complications. Bile duct strictures are the most common cause of late biliary complications and account for up to 40% of all biliary complications. Optimal therapy for posttransplantation anastomotic biliary strictures remains uncertain and requires a multidisciplinary approach. We report the case of a 54-year-old Caucasian male affected by hepatocarcinoma and hepatitis C-related cirrhosis who underwent right-lobe living-donor liver transplantation from his son complicated by double anastomotic stenosis of the main right hepatic duct and of an accessory biliary duct draining segments 6 and 7 of the graft that was successfully treated by percutaneous transhepatic cholangiography with long-term subcutaneous placement of two internal Ruesch-type biliary stents.

  19. Sclerosing Cholangitis: Clinicopathologic Features, Imaging Spectrum, and Systemic Approach to Differential Diagnosis

    PubMed Central

    Seo, Nieun; Lee, Seung Soo; Byun, Jae Ho; Kim, Jin Hee; Kim, Hyoung Jung; Lee, Moon-Gyu

    2016-01-01

    Sclerosing cholangitis is a spectrum of chronic progressive cholestatic liver disease characterized by inflammation, fibrosis, and stricture of the bile ducts, which can be classified as primary and secondary sclerosing cholangitis. Primary sclerosing cholangitis is a chronic progressive liver disease of unknown cause. On the other hand, secondary sclerosing cholangitis has identifiable causes that include immunoglobulin G4-related sclerosing disease, recurrent pyogenic cholangitis, ischemic cholangitis, acquired immunodeficiency syndrome-related cholangitis, and eosinophilic cholangitis. In this review, we suggest a systemic approach to the differential diagnosis of sclerosing cholangitis based on the clinical and laboratory findings, as well as the typical imaging features on computed tomography and magnetic resonance (MR) imaging with MR cholangiography. Familiarity with various etiologies of sclerosing cholangitis and awareness of their typical clinical and imaging findings are essential for an accurate diagnosis and appropriate management. PMID:26798213

  20. Common Hepatic Duct Mixed Adenoneuroendocrine Carcinoma Masquerading as Cholangiocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Priyanka Akhilesh, Sali; Kamal Sunder, Yadav; Chandralekha, Tampi; Samir, Parikh; Prasad Kashinath, Wagle

    2016-01-01

    Bile duct mixed adenoneuroendocrine carcinoma (MANEC) is a rare entity. It is defined as having mixed elements of both neuroendocrine tumors (NET) and an adenocarcinoma element, the lesser component forming at least 30% of the tumor. It is a subtype of neuroendocrine carcinoma (NEC) showing both gland-forming epithelial tumor cells and neuroendocrine cells. It is generally misdiagnosed as cholangiocarcinoma on imaging studies. The preoperative pathological workup from the endoscopic retrograde cholangiography brush cytology usually misses the NET/NEC component since it often lies deeper in the tumor. However, it is reported that it is the NEC component that defines the prognosis of the tumor; hence, it is vital to identify the NEC component. We present a rare case of common hepatic duct (CHD) MANEC that was preoperatively misdiagnosed as cholangiocarcinoma. PMID:27375908

  1. Reliability of pre- and intraoperative tests for biliary lithiasis.

    PubMed

    Escallon, A; Rosales, W; Aldrete, J S

    1985-05-01

    The records of 242 patients, operated consecutively for biliary lithiasis, were analyzed to determine the reliability of oral cholecystography (OCG), ultrasonography (US), and HIDA in detecting biliary calculi. Preoperative interpretations were correlated to operative findings. OCG obtained in 138 patients was accurate in 92%. US obtained in 150 was correct in 89%. The accuracy of HIDA was 92% in acute and 78% in chronic cholecystitis. Intraoperative cholangiography (IOC) done in 173 patients indicated the need for exploratory choledochotomy in 24; 21 had choledocholithiasis. These observations suggest that OCG and US are very accurate, but not infallible, in detecting cholelithiasis. US should be done first; when doubt persists, the addition of OCG allows the preoperative diagnosis of gallstones in 97% of the cases. HIDA is highly accurate but not infallible in detecting acute calculous cholecystitis. IOC is very reliable in detecting choledocholithiasis; thus, its routine is justifiable. PMID:3888131

  2. A refractory duodenal ulcer with a biliary-duodenal fistula following the administration of bevacizumab.

    PubMed

    Horibe, Yohei; Adachi, Seiji; Okuno, Mitsuru; Ohno, Tomohiko; Goto, Naoe; Iwama, Midori; Yamauchi, Osamu; Saito, Koshiro; Yasuda, Ichiro; Shimizu, Masahito

    2016-07-01

    A 65-year-old woman with recurrent breast cancer was repeatedly treated with bevacizumab, an anti-VEGF antibody. In addition, she was also frequently prescribed a nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug for abdominal pain. Melena was revealed 2 months after the final treatment with bevacizumab, and an endoscopic study revealed a duodenal ulcer (DU) that was resistant to anti-ulcer therapy. A cholangiography identified a biliary-duodenal fistula with bile juice leaking from the ulcer base. Therefore, a biliary stent was placed into the common bile duct for 3 months until the DU healed. This is the first case of a refractory DU with a biliary-duodenal fistula in a patient treated with bevacizumab. PMID:27383109

  3. Polyurethane-covered wallstents to recanalize wallstents obstructed by tumor ingrowth from malignant common bile duct obstruction

    SciTech Connect

    Nakamura, Toshifumi; Kitagawa, Mutsuo; Takehira, Yasunori; Yamada, Masami; Kawasaki, Tsunehisa; Nakamura, Hirotoshi

    2000-03-15

    Four patients with malignant obstruction of the common bile duct had been treated with uncovered Wallstents and suffered from a reobstruction after 2-13 months (mean 5.3 months). Repeat cholangiography revealed severe stenosis of the stent lumen caused by tumor ingrowth through the mesh. A Wallstent with a self-made polyurethane-cover was inserted through the uncovered stent in these patients. The four patients were followed for 3-13 months (mean 6.3 months) until death. There was good drainage with no evidence of recurrent obstruction in all patients. We conclude that a covered Wallstent may extend patency of stented bile ducts, preventing tumor ingrowth in patients with neoplastic obstruction. Further observations are needed.

  4. IgG4-negative autoimmune pancreatitis with sclerosing cholangitis and colitis: possible association with primary sclerosing cholangitis?

    PubMed

    Saeki, Keita; Hozawa, Shigenari; Miyata, Naoteru; Nishizawa, Toshihiro; Soma, Hiromitsu; Iwao, Yasushi; Kameyama, Kaori; Hibi, Toshifumi

    2008-01-01

    We report a case of autoimmune pancreatitis (AIP) with cholangiography and histopathology showing features characteristic of primary sclerosing cholangitis (PSC) and colitis. A 55-year-old previously-healthy man was diagnosed with anti-nuclear antibody (ANA)-positive AIP according to the finding of serum biochemistry, abdominal US (ultrasonography), CT (computed tomography) and ERCP (endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography). However, bead-like strictures of intrahepatic bile ducts were also found and liver tissue showed onion skin-like periductal fibrosis but no anti-IgG4-positive cells. In addition, colon fiberscopy showed a pancolitis similar to ulcerative colitis indicating that, in this case, there may be an association with PSC. Here, we report a rare case of IgG4-negative AIP with sclerosing cholangitis and colitis with many clinical features that support an association with PSC. PMID:18480579

  5. Diagnosis of sclerosing cholangitis with technetium 99m-labeled iminodiacetic acid planar and single photon emission computed tomographic scintigraphy

    SciTech Connect

    Rodman, C.A.; Keeffe, E.B.; Lieberman, D.A.; Krishnamurthy, S.; Krishnamurthy, G.T.; Gilbert, S.; Eklem, M.J.

    1987-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine whether /sup 99m/Tc-iminodiacetic acid planar biliary scintigraphy combined with single photon emission computed tomography could detect sclerosing cholangitis and provide additional information regarding the extent and severity of disease. Thirteen patients with sclerosing cholangitis and 13 normal control subjects were studied. Scintigraphic results were also compared with previously reported studies of patients with isolated common bile duct obstruction and with primary biliary cirrhosis. The planar scintigraphy in patients with sclerosing cholangitis showed beading or bandlike constrictions of the biliary tract corresponding to lesions seen on cholangiography, and the image pattern was distinctly different from images obtained from patients with isolated common bile duct obstruction or primary biliary cirrhosis. The single photon emission computed tomography images of the liver in patients with sclerosing cholangitis demonstrated multiple focal areas of /sup 99m/Tc-iminodiacetic acid retention, representing bile stasis in intrahepatic bile ducts. Compared to controls, the mean hepatic clearance half-time of /sup 99m/Tc-iminodiacetic acid was markedly delayed in patients with sclerosing cholangitis (6-10 times normal). Individual patients with sclerosing cholangitis had wider variation in isotope clearance half-time from three regions of the liver than patients with isolated common bile duct obstruction, consistent with regional difference in disease severity and variable impairment of bile flow. In 4 patients with sclerosing cholangitis with incomplete filling of the right and left hepatic ducts at cholangiography, planar and single photon emission computed tomographic scintigraphy provided evidence of significant intrahepatic sclerosing cholangitis.

  6. Biliary complications of cystic fibrosis.

    PubMed Central

    O'Brien, S; Keogan, M; Casey, M; Duffy, G; McErlean, D; Fitzgerald, M X; Hegarty, J E

    1992-01-01

    One hundred and four adult patients with cystic fibrosis were evaluated for the presence of liver disease as defined by abnormal liver function tests of six months' duration, histological evidence of fibrosis or cirrhosis, or the presence of portal hypertension, or both. Twenty patients fulfilled these criteria and were evaluated further for the presence of biliary tract abnormalities with biliary scintigraphy using 99Tc diisopropylphenyl-carboxymethyl iminodiacetic acid (DISIDA) and endoscopic retrograde cholangiography. Clearance of 99Tc DISIDA from the liver and biliary tree was diminished at 45 (E45) and 60 (E60) minutes in the patients with liver disease compared with those without liver disease; E45 = 37.8% and 65.8%, p less than 0.01; E60 = 48.2% and 77.5%, p less than 0.01 respectively. Serial analogue images of the extrahepatic biliary tree were consistent with common bile duct obstruction with retention of DISIDA and tapering of the common bile duct in seven of 18 patients with and two of 10 patients without liver disease. Endoscopic retrograde cholangiography showed changes consistent with sclerosing cholangitis, with beading and stricturing of the intrahepatic ducts in 12 of the 14 patients. In all 14 patients, including those in whom biliary scintigraphy had suggested obstruction, no abnormality of the common bile duct was identified. These results indicate that abnormalities of the bile ducts in patients with cystic fibrosis related liver disease are confined to the intrahepatic biliary tree and that common bile duct strictures do not contribute to either the progression or development of liver disease in these patients. Images Figure 2 PMID:1568661

  7. Assessment of Chronological Effects of Irreversible Electroporation on Hilar Bile Ducts in a Porcine Model

    SciTech Connect

    Choi, Jae Woong Lu, David S. K. Osuagwu, Ferdnand Raman, Steven; Lassman, Charles

    2013-11-07

    PurposeTo evaluate the chronological effects of irreversible electroporation (IRE) on large hilar bile ducts in an in vivo porcine model correlated with computed tomography (CT) cholangiography and histopathology.Materials and MethodsTwelve IRE zones were made along hilar bile ducts intraoperatively under ultrasound (US)-guidance in 11 pigs. Paired electrodes were placed either on opposing sides of the bile duct (straddle [STR]) or both on one side of the bile duct (one-sided [OSD]). The shortest electrode-to-duct distance was classified as periductal (≤2 mm) or nonperiductal (>2 mm). CT cholangiography and laboratory tests were performed before IRE and again at 2 days, 4 weeks, and 8 weeks after IRE. Degree of bile duct injury were graded as follows: grade 0 = no narrowing; grade 1 = ≤50 % duct narrowing; grade 2 = >50 % narrowing without proximal duct dilatation; grade 3 = grade 2 with proximal duct dilatation; and grade 4 = grade 3 with enzyme elevation. Pigs were selected for killing and histopathology at 2 days, 4, and 8 weeks.ResultsNonperiductal electrode placement produced no long-term strictures in 5 of 5 ducts. Periductal electrode placement produced mild narrowing in 6 of 7 ducts: 5 grade 1 and 1 grade 2. None showed increased enzymes. There was no significant difference between STR versus OSD electrode placement. Histopathology showed minor but relatively greater ductal mural changes in narrowed ducts.ConclusionIn the larger hilar ducts, long-term patency and mural integrity appear resistant to IRE damage with the energy deposition used, especially if the electrode is not immediately periductal in position.

  8. Clinical course and prognosis of pediatric-onset primary sclerosing cholangitis

    PubMed Central

    Färkkilä, Martti; Arola, Johanna; Jaakkola, Tytti; Penagini, Roberto; Kolho, Kaija-Leena

    2015-01-01

    Background The natural history of pediatric-onset primary sclerosing cholangitis (PSC) and overlap with autoimmune hepatitis (PSC/AIH) is poorly known. Objective The aim of this study was to evaluate the clinical outcome of patients with pediatric-onset disease in a tertiary referral center. Methods We traced 33 patients (median age at diagnosis 16 years), with PSC or PSC/AIH in cholangiography and liver histology diagnosed between December 1993 and 2011, at Helsinki University Hospital. Diagnostic procedures and long-term follow-up were reassessed until the end of December 2013. Results PSC was confirmed in all 33 patients; 19 of them had an overlap with AIH. At diagnosis, three of 33 had cirrhosis. Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) was associated in 76% of the patients, mostly ulcerative colitis (70%); treatment of IBD being a minor determinant of the clinical outcome of liver disease. In the last follow-up (median nine years), all patients were alive, and no malignancy occurred. Most patients (91%) were on ursodeoxycholic acid and 12 PSC/AIH patients on immunosuppression. Endoscopic retrograde cholangiography during follow-up showed a progression of intra-hepatic disease in 12 patients (36%). Four patients (12%) had undergone liver transplantation, and one was listed; no recurrence of the disease in the graft was seen. Conclusion The clinical course and outcome of pediatric-onset PSC and PSC/AIH seem to be favourable in the majority of patients until early adulthood. In about one-third of patients, however, PSC is progressive, challenging the current treatment guidelines and warranting further studies on disease pathogenesis. PMID:27536366

  9. Treatment of Common Bile Duct Obstruction by Pancreatic Cancer Using Various Stents: Single-Center Experience

    SciTech Connect

    Nakamura, Toshifumi; Hirai, Ritsuko; Kitagawa, Mutsuo; Takehira, Yasunori; Yamada, Masami; Tamakoshi, Katsutoshi; Kobayashi, Yoshimasa; Nakamura, Hirotoshi; Kanamori, Masao

    2002-10-15

    Purpose: To compare the effectiveness of various means of stenting in patients with biliary obstruction caused by pancreatic cancer in a retrospective analysis. Methods: Sixty-two patients with biliary obstruction due to unresectable pancreatic cancer underwent biliary stenting. On the basis of the findings obtained by percutaneous transhepatic cholangiography(10 patients) and endoscopic retrograde cholangiography (52 patients),the site of obstruction was distal to the hilar confluence,predominantly especially in the middle to lower third of the common bile duct. Polyurethane-covered Wallstents (9 mm in diameter) we reinserted in 13 patients, while uncovered Wallstents (10 mm in diameter)were used in 10 patients and plastic stents (10 Fr and 12 Fr) were used in 39 patients. Results: Stenting was successful in 34 patients (87.2%) treated with plastic stents and in 22 patients(95.7%) treated with Wallstents. Effective biliary drainage was achieved in 32 out of 34 patients (94.1%) treated with plastic stents and in 21 out of 22 patients (95.5%) treated with Wallstents. The cumulative patency rate was significantly higher for the uncovered and covered Wallstents compared to plastic stents, but was not significantly higher for covered than for uncovered Wallstents. Stentocclusion occurred in 23 patients (70%; all by clogging) from the plastic stent group, in two patients (22%; by tumor ingrowth) from the uncovered Wallstent group, and in one patient (9%; by clogging) from the covered Wallstent group. The survival rate showed no significant difference among the three stent groups. Conclusion: The Wallstent is effective for long-term palliation in patients with obstruction caused by pancreatic cancer invading the middle to lower part of the common bile duct. The covered Wallstent can prevent tumor ingrowth, a problem with the uncovered Wallstent. However, it may be necessary to take measures to prevent the migration or clogging of covered Wallstents.

  10. Retroperitoneal Biloma due to Spontaneous Perforation of the Left Hepatic Duct

    PubMed Central

    Ishii, Kenjiro; Matsuo, Kazuhiro; Seki, Hiroaki; Yasui, Nobutaka; Sakata, Michio; Shimada, Akihiko; Matsumoto, Hidetoshi

    2016-01-01

    Patient: Male, 82 Final Diagnosis: Retroperitoneal biloma due to spontaneous perforation of the left hepatic duct Symptoms: Abdominal pain • high fever Medication: — Clinical Procedure: Emergent operation Specialty: Gastroenterology and Hepatology Objective: Rare disease Background: Spontaneous perforation of the bile duct in adults is very rare, particularly in cases accompanied by retroperitoneal biloma. We report a patient with retroperitoneal biloma due to a spontaneous perforation of the left hepatic duct. Case Report: An 82-year-old man was admitted to our institution with abdominal pain and a high fever. He had tenderness at the epi-mesogastrium. Computed tomography showed several stones in the gall bladder and common bile duct (CBD) and a few ascites. A substantial amount of fluid had collected from the dorsal stratum of the duodenum and pancreas head to the right paracolic gutter and anterior side of the right iliopsoas. Laboratory examination revealed a high inflammation score. He underwent emergent laparotomy. Biliary fluid was revealed after the mobilization of the pancreas head, duodenum, and right side of the colon. Bile duct perforation was suspected. Therefore, we exfoliated the dorsal side of the CBD to the cranial side, and intraoperative cholangiography was performed. However, the perforation site could not be detected. Cholecystectomy and choledocholithotomy were performed. A retrograde transhepatic biliary drainage tube was inserted, and primary closure of the CBD incision site was achieved. Postoperative cholangiography revealed leakage from the left hepatic duct near the caudate branch. Conclusions: There are a few reports of spontaneous bile duct perforation cases in the literature, particularly on infants or children with congenital anomalies, but it is rare in adults. It usually causes bile peritonitis, although bile duct perforation should be considered in the differential diagnosis of spontaneous retroperitoneal fluid collection in

  11. Cholangiocarcinoma: A 7-year experience at a single center in Greece

    PubMed Central

    Alexopoulou, Alexandra; Soultati, Aspasia; Dourakis, Spyros P; Vasilieva, Larissa; Archimandritis, Athanasios J

    2008-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate survival rate and clinical outcome of cholangiocarcinoma. METHODS: The medical records of 34 patients with cholangiocarcinoma, seen at a single hospital between the years 1999-2006, were retrospectively reviewed. RESULTS: Thirty-four patients with a median age of 75 years were included. Seventeen (50%) had painless jaundice at presentation. Sixteen (47.1%) were perihilar, 15 (44.1%) extrahepatic and three (8.8%) intrahepatic. Endoscopic retrograde cholangiography (ERCP) and/or magnetic resonance cholangiography (MRCP) were used for the diagnosis. Pathologic confirmation was obtained in seven and positive cytological examination in three. Thirteen patients had co-morbidities (38.2%). Four cases were managed with complete surgical resection. All the rest of the cases (30) were characterized as non-resectable due to advanced stage of the disease. Palliative biliary drainage was performed in 26/30 (86.6%). The mean follow-up was 32 mo (95% CI, 20-43 mo). Overall median survival was 8.7 mo (95% CI, 2-16 mo). The probability of 1-year, 2-year and 3-year survival was 46%, 20% and 7%, respectively. The survival was slightly longer in patients who underwent resection compared to those who did not, but this difference failed to reach statistical significance. Patients who underwent biliary drainage had an advantage in survival compared to those who did not (probability of survival 53% vs 0% at 1 year, respectively, P = 0.038). CONCLUSION: Patients with cholangiocarcinoma were usually elderly with co-morbidities and/or advanced disease at presentation. Even though a slight amelioration in survival with palliative biliary drainage was observed, patients had dismal outcome without resection of the tumor. PMID:18985813

  12. Primary sclerosing cholangitis, autoimmune hepatitis and overlap syndromes in inflammatory bowel disease

    PubMed Central

    Saich, Rebecca; Chapman, Roger

    2008-01-01

    Primary sclerosing cholangitis (PSC) is a chronic progressive disorder of unknown aetiology characterised by chronic inflammation and stricture formation of the biliary tree. Symptoms include itch and lethargy and in advanced cases cholangitis and end-stage liver disease, however increasing numbers of asymptomatic individuals are being identified. The disease is rare in the general population but is strongly associated with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) affecting up to 5% of patients with Ulcerative Colitis, with a slightly lower prevalence (up to 3.6%) in Crohn's disease. The strength of this association means that the vast majority (> 90%) of patients with PSC also have IBD, although many may have only mild gastro-intestinal symptoms. Usually IBD presents before PSC, although vice-versa can occur and the onset of both conditions can be separated in some cases by many years. Mean age of diagnosis of PSC is in the fifth decade of life with a strong male predominance. Risk is increased in those with a family history of PSC, suggesting a genetic predisposition and the disease is almost exclusive to non-smokers. The ulcerative colitis associated with PSC is characteristically mild, runs a quiescent course, is associated with rectal sparing, more severe right sided disease, backwash ileitis and has a high risk of pouchitis post-colectomy. Most worrisome is the high risk of colorectal malignancy which necessitates routine colonoscopic surveillance. Cholangiocarcinoma is also a frequent complication of PSC with a 10%-15% lifetime risk of developing this condition. Treatment with high dose ursodeoxycholic acid offers some chemoprotective effects against colorectal malignancy and may decrease symptoms, biochemical and histological progression of liver disease. Small duct PSC patients characteristically have normal cholangiography, and liver biopsy is required for diagnosis, it appears to have a more favourable prognosis. Autoimmune Hepatitis (AIH) is also more prevalent

  13. Difficulty in management of intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasm-associated pancreatobiliary fistulas and the role of “pig-nose” appearance and intraductal ultrasonography in diagnosis

    PubMed Central

    Koizumi, Mitsuhito; Kumagi, Teru; Kuroda, Taira; Azemoto, Nobuaki; Yamanishi, Hirofumi; Ohno, Yoshinori; Yokota, Tomoyuki; Ochi, Hironori; Tange, Kazuhiro; Ikeda, Yoshiou; Hiasa, Yoichi

    2016-01-01

    Pancreatobiliary fistulas associated with intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasms (IPMN) often develop obstructive jaundice and cholangitis; thus, early diagnosis is important. However, computed tomography and cholangiography, the current methods for detecting pancreatobiliary fistulas, are not always effective. We previously reported a case of IPMN-associated pancreatobiliary fistula and proposed a potential new diagnostic marker: the “pig-nose” appearance of the duodenal papilla, which results from dilated pancreatic and bile ducts and can be visualized via endoscopy. In this study, we report another three cases of IPMN-associated pancreatobiliary fistulas detected by a different technology, intraductal ultrasonography (IDUS). As with our previously reported case, we confirmed the utility of the “pig-nose” appearance and IDUS in the diagnosis of IPMN-associated pancreatobiliary fistulas. In addition, we found it difficult to manage biliary obstruction that resulted from the flow of mucinous material through pancreatobiliary fistulas. The obstruction was treated with endoscopic nasal biliary drainage (ENBD), but this was not always successful. In two of our cases, additional treatment with a large diameter fully covered metal stent failed to improve jaundice. Therefore, we conclude that standard endoscopic stenting may not be effective, and that alternative endoscopic methods or surgery may be necessary. PMID:27092326

  14. Endoscopic ultrasound-guided interventions in special situations

    PubMed Central

    Prachayakul, Varayu; Aswakul, Pitulak

    2016-01-01

    Endoscopic ultrasound (EUS) was introduced in 1982 and has since become a popular advanced procedure for diagnosis and therapeutic intervention. Initially, EUS was most commonly used for the diagnosis of pancreatobiliary diseases and tissue acquisition. EUS was first used for guided cholangiography in 1996, followed by EUS-guided biliary drainage in 2001. Advancements in equipment and endoscopic accessories have led to an expansion of EUS-guided procedures, which now include EUS-guided drainage of intra-abdominal abscesses or collections, intra-vascular treatment of refractory variceal and nonvariceal bleeding, transmural pancreatic drainage, common bile duct stone clearance, enteral feeding tube placement and entero-enteric anastomosis. Patients with surgically altered upper gastrointestinal anatomies have greatly benefited from EUS also. This systematic review describes and discusses EUS procedures performed in uncommon diseases and conditions, as well as applications on more vulnerable patients such as young children and pregnant women. In these cases, routine approaches do not always apply, and thus may require the use of innovative and unconventional techniques. Increased knowledge of such special applications will help increase the success rates of these procedures and provide a foundation for additional advances and utilizations of the technique. PMID:26839650

  15. EUS-guided biliary drainage with placement of a new partially covered biliary stent for palliation of malignant biliary obstruction: a case series.

    PubMed

    Fabbri, C; Luigiano, C; Fuccio, L; Polifemo, A M; Ferrara, F; Ghersi, S; Bassi, M; Billi, P; Maimone, A; Cennamo, V; Masetti, M; Jovine, E; D'Imperio, N

    2011-05-01

    Endoscopic ultrasonography-guided biliary drainage (EUS-BD) has been developed as an alternative drainage technique in patients with obstructive jaundice where endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP) has failed. Between July 2008 and December 2009, 16 patients (9 men; median age 79 years) with biliopancreatic malignancy, who were candidates for alternative techniques of biliary decompression because ERCP had been unsuccessful, underwent EUS-BD with placement of a transmural or transpapillary partially covered nitinol self-expandable metal stent (SEMS). EUS-assisted cholangiography was successful in all patients, with definition of the relevant anatomy, but biliary drainage was successfully performed in only 12 (75 %) of the 16 patients (9 choledochoduodenostomies with SEMS placement and 3 biliary rendezvous procedures with papillary SEMS placement), with regression of the cholestasis. No major complications and no procedure-related deaths occurred. There was one case of pneumoperitoneum which was managed conservatively. The median follow-up was 170 days. During the follow-up, eight patients of the 12 patients in whom biliary draining was successful died; four are currently alive. None of the patients required endoscopic reintervention. This series demonstrated that EUS-BD with a partially covered SEMS has a high rate of clinical success and low complication rates, and could represent an alternative choice for biliary decompression. PMID:21271507

  16. Reality named endoscopic ultrasound biliary drainage

    PubMed Central

    Guedes, Hugo Gonçalo; Lopes, Roberto Iglesias; de Oliveira, Joel Fernandez; Artifon, Everson Luiz de Almeida

    2015-01-01

    Endoscopic ultrasound (EUS) is used for diagnosis and evaluation of many diseases of the gastrointestinal (GI) tract. In the past, it was used to guide a cholangiography, but nowadays it emerges as a powerful therapeutic tool in biliary drainage. The aims of this review are: outline the rationale for endoscopic ultrasound-guided biliary drainage (EGBD); detail the procedural technique; evaluate the clinical outcomes and limitations of the method; and provide recommendations for the practicing clinician. In cases of failed endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP), patients are usually referred for either percutaneous transhepatic biliary drainage (PTBD) or surgical bypass. Both these procedures have high rates of undesirable complications. EGBD is an attractive alternative to PTBD or surgery when ERCP fails. EGBD can be performed at two locations: transhepatic or extrahepatic, and the stent can be inserted in an antegrade or retrograde fashion. The drainage route can be transluminal, duodenal or transpapillary, which, again, can be antegrade or retrograde [rendezvous (EUS-RV)]. Complications of all techniques combined include pneumoperitoneum, bleeding, bile leak/peritonitis and cholangitis. We recommend EGBD when bile duct access is not possible because of failed cannulation, altered upper GI tract anatomy, gastric outlet obstruction, a distorted ampulla or a periampullary diverticulum, as a minimally invasive alternative to surgery or radiology. PMID:26504507

  17. Temporal trends in the use of diagnostic imaging for inpatients with pancreatic conditions: How much ionizing radiation are we using?

    PubMed Central

    Bressan, Alexsander K.; Ouellet, Jean-Francois; Tanyingoh, Divine; Dixon, Elijah; Kaplan, Gilaad G.; Grondin, Sean C.; Myers, Robert P.; Mohamed, Rachid; Ball, Chad G.

    2016-01-01

    Background Low-dose ionizing radiation from medical imaging has been indirectly linked with subsequent cancer and increased costs. Computed tomography (CT) is the gold standard for defining pancreatic anatomy and complications. Our primary goal was to identify the temporal trends associated with diagnostic imaging for inpatients with pancreatic diseases. Methods Data were extracted from the Healthcare Cost and Utilization Project Nationwide Inpatient Sample (NIS) database from 2000 to 2008. Pancreas-related ICD-9 diagnostic codes were matched to all relevant imaging modalities. Results Between 2000 and 2008, a significant increase in admissions (p < 0.001), but decrease in overall imaging procedures (p = 0.032), for all pancreatic disorders was observed. This was primarily a result of a reduction in the number of CT and endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography examinations (i.e., reduced radiation exposure, p = 0.008). A concurrent increase in the number of inpatient magnetic resonance cholangiopancreatography/magnetic resonance imaging performed was observed (p = 0.040). Intraoperative cholangiography and CT remained the dominant imaging modality of choice overall (p = 0.027). Conclusion Inpatients with pancreatic diseases often require diagnostic imaging during their stay. This results in substantial exposure to ionizing radiation. The observed decrease in the use of CT may reflect an improved awareness of potential stochastic risks. PMID:27240285

  18. The history and future of transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunt: food for thought.

    PubMed

    Saad, Wael E

    2014-09-01

    The origins of transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunt (TIPS) date back to the 1960s with inadvertent portal access during the early years of transjugular cholangiography. TIPS is now the most frequently performed portal hypertension decompressive procedure performed by interventional radiologists, and has become the primary portosystemic shunt (surgical or percutaneous) performed in the United States. One of the least discussed major advantages of TIPS in the transplant era is that it is intrahepatic and thus is removed in situ during a liver transplant, while extrahepatic shunts (surgical or percutaneous) have to be ligated or revised during the liver transplantation. However, since the widespread clinical utilization of TIPS in the 1990s, it has been plagued with two major problems, namely, patency and hepatic encephalopathy. With the advent of commercially available expanded polytetraflouroethylenne (e-PTFE) covered stents a decade ago, 12- to 24-month TIPS patency has improved significantly (by ∼20-30%). However, hepatic encephalopathy (although not proven to have increased due to e-PTFE covered stents grafts) remains a significant morbidity problem. The article discusses the history of TIPS, critiques the retrospective encephalopathy data in the literature, and discusses futuristic TIPS-design ideas about the management of post-TIPS hepatic encephalopathy. PMID:25177087

  19. [Identification of gallbladder pedicle anatomy during laparoscopic cholecystectomy].

    PubMed

    Tebala, Giovanni D; Innocenti, Paolo; Ciani, Renzo; Zumbo, Antonella; Fonsi, Giovanni B; Bellini, Pierpaolo; De Chiara, Fabio; Fittipaldi, Domenico; Hadjiamiri, Hossein; Lamaro, Stefano; Marinoni, Riccardo

    2004-01-01

    Laparoscopic cholecystectomy is widely accepted nowadays as the gold standard in the treatment of cholelithiasis. This new technique was initially associated with a significant increase in morbidity, and in particular in iatrogenic biliary injuries and arterial haemorrhages, perhaps due to a lack of knowledge of the "laparoscopic anatomy" of the gallbladder pedicle. In this technique the anatomical structures are viewed on a two-dimensional video monitor, and the dissection is performed with long instruments without manual sensitivity. Therefore, the laparoscopic surgeon has to deal with new anatomical views and must be aware of the possible arterial and biliary variants. In this review we describe our technique of laparoscopic cholecystectomy, with particular reference to manoeuvres useful for identifying the various anatomical structures at the gallbladder hilum. In our opinion, it is mandatory to avoid cutting any duct if its identity has yet to be established. For this reason, we pay great attention to the anatomical dissection of Calot's triangle, in order to accurately identify the cystic duct and the cystic artery and any other vascular or biliary structures. Routine intraoperative cholangiography may be useful for identifying the biliary anatomy. When in doubt, the surgeon should not hesitate to convert the procedure to open surgery. PMID:15287636

  20. Residual gallbladder stones after cholecystectomy: A literature review

    PubMed Central

    Chowbey, Pradeep; Sharma, Anil; Goswami, Amit; Afaque, Yusuf; Najma, Khoobsurat; Baijal, Manish; Soni, Vandana; Khullar, Rajesh

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Incomplete gallbladder removal following open and laparoscopic techniques leads to residual gallbladder stones. The commonest presentation is abdominal pain, dyspepsia and jaundice. We reviewed the literature to report diagnostic modalities, management options and outcomes in patients with residual gallbladder stones after cholecystectomy. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Medline, Google and Cochrane library between 1993 and 2013 were reviewed using search terms residual gallstones, post-cholecystectomy syndrome, retained gallbladder stones, gallbladder remnant, cystic duct remnant and subtotal cholecystectomy. Bibliographical references from selected articles were also analyzed. The parameters that were assessed include demographics, time of detection, clinical presentation, mode of diagnosis, nature of intervention, site of stone, surgical findings, procedure performed, complete stone clearance, sequelae and follow-up. RESULTS: Out of 83 articles that were retrieved between 1993 and 2013, 22 met the inclusion criteria. In most series, primary diagnosis was established by ultrasound/computed tomography scan. Localization of calculi and delineation of biliary tract was performed using magnetic resonance imaging/magnetic resonance cholangiopancreatography and endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography. In few series, diagnosis was established by endoscopic ultrasound, intraoperative cholangiogram and percutaneous transhepatic cholangiography. Laparoscopic surgery, endoscopic techniques and open surgery were the most common treatment modalities. The most common sites of residual gallstones were gallbladder remnant, cystic duct remnant and common bile duct. CONCLUSION: Residual gallbladder stones following incomplete gallbladder removal is an important sequelae after cholecystectomy. Completion cholecystectomy (open or laparoscopic) is the most common treatment modality reported in the literature for the management of residual gallbladder stones. PMID:26622110

  1. Agenesis of the gallbladder: A dangerously misdiagnosed malformation

    PubMed Central

    Peloponissios, Nicolas; Gillet, Michel; Cavin, René; Halkic, Nermin

    2005-01-01

    Isolated agenesis of the gallbladder is a rare anomaly, often asymptomatic. However, one patient out of four presented with right upper abdominal pain, nausea, and fatty food intolerance. The condition is frequently mistaken with an excluded or sclero-atrophic gallbladder, regardless of the imaging modality used. Consequently, AG often leads to unnecessary and potentially dangerous laparoscopic surgery as described in a few case reports over the last 10 years. The aim of this study is to clarify the diagnostic and therapeutic approach of this unusual pathology. Two cases seen in our institutions were retrospectively reviewed, together with a review of the American and European literature. During laparoscopy, the absence of normal anatomical structures and the impossibility of pulling on the gallbladder to expose and dissect the triangle of Callot increases the risk of iatrogenic injury to biliary or portal structures. Depending on the experiment of the surgeon in laparoscopic procedure, this has to be taken into account to decide a conversion to laparotomy. A high index of suspicion is necessary when interpreting the radiological images. In case of doubt, a MRI-cholangiography is mandatory. Because of possible inherited transmission, relatives with a history of biliary symptoms should be investigated. PMID:16273658

  2. Endoscopic ultrasound-guided treatments: Are we getting evidence based - a systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Fabbri, Carlo; Luigiano, Carmelo; Lisotti, Andrea; Cennamo, Vincenzo; Virgilio, Clara; Caletti, Giancarlo; Fusaroli, Pietro

    2014-01-01

    The continued need to develop less invasive alternatives to surgical and radiologic interventions has driven the development of endoscopic ultrasound (EUS)-guided treatments. These include EUS-guided drainage of pancreatic fluid collections, EUS-guided necrosectomy, EUS-guided cholangiography and biliary drainage, EUS-guided pancreatography and pancreatic duct drainage, EUS-guided gallbladder drainage, EUS-guided drainage of abdominal and pelvic fluid collections, EUS-guided celiac plexus block and celiac plexus neurolysis, EUS-guided pancreatic cyst ablation, EUS-guided vascular interventions, EUS-guided delivery of antitumoral agents and EUS-guided fiducial placement and brachytherapy. However these procedures are technically challenging and require expertise in both EUS and interventional endoscopy, such as endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography and gastrointestinal stenting. We undertook a systematic review to record the entire body of literature accumulated over the past 2 decades on EUS-guided interventions with the objective of performing a critical appraisal of published articles, based on the classification of studies according to levels of evidence, in order to assess the scientific progress made in this field. PMID:25024600

  3. Role of Interventional Radiology in the Treatment of Biliary Strictures Following Orthotopic Liver Transplantation

    SciTech Connect

    Righi, Dorico; Cesarani, Federico; Muraro, Emanuele; Gazzera, Carlo; Salizzoni, Mauro; Gandini, Giovanni

    2002-01-15

    Purpose: To evaluate the efficacy and safety of percutaneous treatment of biliary strictures complicating orthotopic liver transplantation (OLT). Methods: Between October 1990 and May 2000, 619 patients underwent 678 liver transplants. Seventy of the 619 (11%) patients were found to be affected by biliary strictures by July 2000. Bilioplasty was performed in 51 of these 70 (73%) patients. A cohort of 33 of 51 (65%) patients were clinically followed for more than 12 months after the last percutaneous treatment and included in the survey results. Results: After one to three treatments 24 of 33 (73%)patients were stricture-free on ultrasound and MR cholangiography follow-up. A delayed stricture recurrence required a fourth percutaneous bilioplasty in two of 33 (6%) patients. A surgical bilioenteric anastomosis was performed in six of 33 (18%) patients.Retransplantation was performed due to ischemic damage in one of 33(3%) patients. Conclusion: Interventional radiology is an effective therapeutic alternative for the treatment of most biliary strictures complicating OLT. It has a high success rate and should be considered before surgical interventions. Elective surgery may be necessary in a few failed cases or those with more severe and extensive biliary strictures.

  4. Primary cancers of extrahepatic biliary passages

    SciTech Connect

    Mittal, B.; Deutsch, M.; Iwatsuki, S.

    1985-04-01

    The records of 22 patients with cancers of extrahepatic biliary passages (EHBP) were analyzed to understand their natural histories and patterns of failure and to evaluate the effectiveness of various treatments. None of the preoperative investigations consistently defined the entire extent of tumor. Percutaneous transhepatic cholangiography (PTHC) was the most helpful (100%) in accurately defining the site of ductal obstruction. Computed tomography was helpful in diagnosing liver metastases in 53% and primary tumor mass in 23% of patients. The most common sites of tumor failure or persistence were: liver (67%), tumor bed (56%), peritoneum (22%), porta hepatis and lymph nodes (17%). The median survival for the entire group was 6.8 months. Surgery plays an important role in managing these tumors and in defining tumor extent for subsequent adjuvant irradiation. Patients receiving radiation doses greater than or equal to 70 TDF had a longer median survival (11 months) than patients receiving less than 70 TDF (4.4 months). All three patients, who were alive and free of disease greater than 1 year, received radiation doses greater than or equal to 70 TDF. From the data, it is difficult to comment on the effectiveness of chemotherapy. The authors have made suggestions regarding radiation volume and doses to various structures. The need for entering these patients into multi-institutional clinical trials is stressed.

  5. Primary cancers of extrahepatic biliary passages.

    PubMed

    Mittal, B; Deutsch, M; Iwatsuki, S

    1985-04-01

    We analyzed the records of 22 patients with cancers of extrahepatic biliary passages (EHBP) to understand their natural histories and patterns of failure and to evaluate the effectiveness of various treatments. None of the preoperative investigations consistently defined the entire extent of tumor. Percutaneous transhepatic cholangiography (PTHC) was the most helpful (100%) in accurately defining the site of ductal obstruction. Computed tomography was helpful in diagnosing liver metastases in 53% and primary tumor mass in 23% of patients. The most common sites of tumor failure or persistence were: liver (67%), tumor bed (56%), peritoneum (22%), porta hepatis and lymph nodes (17%). The median survival for the entire group was 6.8 months. Surgery plays an important role in managing these tumors and in defining tumor extent for subsequent adjuvant irradiation. Patients receiving radiation doses greater than or equal to 70 TDF had a longer median survival (11 months) than patients receiving less than 70 TDF (4.4 months). All three patients, who were alive and free of disease greater than 1 year, received radiation doses greater than or equal to 70 TDF. From our data, it is difficult to comment on the effectiveness of chemotherapy. We have made suggestions regarding radiation volume and doses to various structures. The need for entering these patients into multi-institutional clinical trials is stressed. PMID:3980281

  6. Efficacy of preoperative biliary tract decompression in patients with obstructive jaundice.

    PubMed

    Gundry, S R; Strodel, W E; Knol, J A; Eckhauser, F E; Thompson, N W

    1984-06-01

    Fifty consecutive matched patients with benign or malignant biliary tract obstruction were compared to determine the efficacy of preoperative percutaneous biliary drainage (PBD). Twenty-five patients underwent PBD for an average of nine days before operation; 25 patients underwent percutaneous transhepatic cholangiography ( PTHC ) followed immediately by operation. Serum bilirubin levels before PTHC were 16.5 +/- 7.6 mg/dL and 14.9 +/- 7.6 mg/dL in PBD and non-PBD groups, respectively. Serum bilirubin levels decreased to 6.5 +/- 6.2 mg/dL preoperatively in patients having PBD. One week after operation, bilirubin levels were 4.2 +/- 4.3 mg/dL and 9.0 +/- 5.2 mg/dL in the PBD and non-PBD groups, respectively. Major morbidity (sepsis, abscess, renal failure, or bleeding) occurred in two patients (8%) having PBD and in 13 patients (52%) without PBD. One patient (4%) with PBD, and five patients (20%) without PBD, died. The mean hospital stay was shorter for the PBD group. Preoperative PBD reduces operative mortality and morbidity and results in a more rapid resolution of hyperbilirubinemia during the postoperative period. PMID:6428380

  7. [Percutaneous needle biopsy of the distal part of the choledochal duct].

    PubMed

    Pesić, V; Lisanin, L; Lukac, S; Zica, D; Kupresanin, S; Spasić, V; Nikosavić, S

    1996-01-01

    The indication for the biopsy was the finding of stenosis of uncertain etiology even after the endoscopy and the attempt of endoscopic or brush biopsy. The experiences with needle biopsy in 6 patients were presented in the study. The biopsy was done with the needles with diameter less than 1 mm (Chiba needle 0.6-0.95 mm), Otto-cut 0.8 mm and Vacu-cut 0.8 mm. Percutaneous cholangiography that was firstly performed, showed the site of stenosis of common bile duct distal part and simultaneously the other structures of interest for biopsy performance. The needle was guided under radioscopic control in one attempt. In that way, the precise diagnosis of pathologic process, which induced the obstruction in the early disease stage was made in all six patients. On the basis of cited results, the percutaneous needle biopsy was found to be efficient and safe method to reveal the type of lesion in this region, if necessary conditions existed. Percutaneous needle biopsy is a very valuable method, less invasive and less expensive compared to the surgical biopsies and other methods. It demonstrated reliable results in our conditions. PMID:9229968

  8. Diagnosis and management of bile stone disease and its complications.

    PubMed

    Cremer, Anneline; Arvanitakis, Marianna

    2016-03-01

    Bile stone disease is one of the most prevalent gastroenterological diseases with a considerable geographical and ethnic variation. Bile stones can be classified according their origin, their localization and their biochemical structure. Development and clinical expression depend on a complex interaction between congenital and acquired risk factors. Indeed, bile stones can be either asymptomatic, or cause biliary colic or complications such as acute cholecystitis, jaundice, cholangitis and acute pancreatitis. Diagnosis is based on a combination of clinical features, laboratory findings and imaging techniques and correct identification of symptomatic gallstone patients is essential before cholecystectomy. Transabdominal ultrasonography is the gold standard for the diagnosis of gallstones. However, endoscopic ultrasonography, magnetic resonance cholangiopancreatography and intraoperative cholangiography may also play a role in the diagnosis of bile stones. Management includes prevention measures against modifiable risk factors. Biliary colic and acute cholecystitis are common indications of laparoscopic cholecystectomy, while endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP) with endoscopic biliary sphincterotomy and stone extraction is the gold standard for the treatment of common bile duct (CBD) stones. Timing of ERCP and cholecystectomy are of critical importance in the management. Lithotripsy modalities are generally reserved for patients with technically difficult CBD stone removal. Percutaneous access combined with lithotripsy may be helpful for complicated intrahepatic stones. PMID:26771377

  9. Role of Balloon-Sheathed Intraductal Ultrasonography for Patients with Extensive Pneumobilia

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Ha-Na; Park, Chang-Hwan; Cho, Eun-Ae; Rew, Soo-Jung; Park, In-Hyung; Lim, Sung-Uk; Jun, Chung-Hwan; Park, Seon-Young; Kim, Hyun-Soo; Choi, Sung-Kyu

    2015-01-01

    Intraductal ultrasonography (IDUS) is one of the most useful diagnostic tools for various extrahepatic biliary diseases. However, conventional IDUS has some limitations in providing accurate cross-sectional imaging of the bile duct in patients with extensive pneumobilia. Using a balloon-sheathed catheter, the US system (balloon-sheathed IDUS) can overcome these limitations. Sixteen patients underwent balloon-sheathed IDUS during endoscopic retrograde cholangiography. The balloon-sheathed IDUS was inserted via a transpapillary route when visualization of the bile duct with conventional IDUS was distorted by extensive pneumobilia. The patient group had a mean age of 65.5 years, and 56.3% (9/16) were male. The balloon-sheathed IDUS permitted successful visualization of the bile duct in all patients, regardless of the extent of pneumobilia. Using this system, remnant common bile duct stones were detected in five patients (31.3%), and cholangiocarcinoma was detected in one patient (6.3%). The balloon-sheath IDUS aided in stone sweeping. No significant complications, including bleeding, perforation, or pancreatitis, occurred in any of the patients. The balloon-sheathed catheter US system was useful and safe for biliary IDUS in patients with extensive pneumobilia. PMID:26033684

  10. The Clinical Usefulness of Simultaneous Placement of Double Endoscopic Nasobiliary Biliary Drainage

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Hong Jun; Lee, Sung Koo; Ryu, Choong Heon; Park, Do Hyun; Lee, Sang Soo; Seo, Dong Wan; Kim, Myung-Hwan

    2015-01-01

    Background/Aims: To evaluate the technical feasibility and clinical efficacy of double endoscopic nasobiliary drainage (ENBD) as a new method of draining multiple bile duct obstructions. Methods: A total of 38 patients who underwent double ENBD between January 2004 and February 2010 at the Asan Medical Center were retrospectively analyzed. We evaluated indications, laboratory results, and the clinical course. Results: Of the 38 patients who underwent double ENBD, 20 (52.6%) had Klatskin tumors, 12 (31.6%) had hepatocellular carcinoma, 3 (7.9%) had strictures at the anastomotic site following liver transplantation, and 3 (7.9%) had acute cholecystitis combined with cholangitis. Double ENBD was performed to relieve multiple biliary obstruction in 21 patients (55.1%), drain contrast agent filled during endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography in 4 (10.5%), obtain cholangiography in 4 (10.5%), drain hemobilia in 3 (7.9%), relieve Mirizzi syndrome with cholangitis in 3 (7.9%), and relieve jaundice in 3 (7.9%). Conclusions: Double ENBD may be useful in patients with multiple biliary obstructions. PMID:26668802

  11. Reality named endoscopic ultrasound biliary drainage.

    PubMed

    Guedes, Hugo Gonçalo; Lopes, Roberto Iglesias; de Oliveira, Joel Fernandez; Artifon, Everson Luiz de Almeida

    2015-10-25

    Endoscopic ultrasound (EUS) is used for diagnosis and evaluation of many diseases of the gastrointestinal (GI) tract. In the past, it was used to guide a cholangiography, but nowadays it emerges as a powerful therapeutic tool in biliary drainage. The aims of this review are: outline the rationale for endoscopic ultrasound-guided biliary drainage (EGBD); detail the procedural technique; evaluate the clinical outcomes and limitations of the method; and provide recommendations for the practicing clinician. In cases of failed endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP), patients are usually referred for either percutaneous transhepatic biliary drainage (PTBD) or surgical bypass. Both these procedures have high rates of undesirable complications. EGBD is an attractive alternative to PTBD or surgery when ERCP fails. EGBD can be performed at two locations: transhepatic or extrahepatic, and the stent can be inserted in an antegrade or retrograde fashion. The drainage route can be transluminal, duodenal or transpapillary, which, again, can be antegrade or retrograde [rendezvous (EUS-RV)]. Complications of all techniques combined include pneumoperitoneum, bleeding, bile leak/peritonitis and cholangitis. We recommend EGBD when bile duct access is not possible because of failed cannulation, altered upper GI tract anatomy, gastric outlet obstruction, a distorted ampulla or a periampullary diverticulum, as a minimally invasive alternative to surgery or radiology. PMID:26504507

  12. Intraoperative air leak test was useful for the detection of a small biliary fistula: A rare case of non-parasitic hepatic cysts with biliary communication

    PubMed Central

    Shimizu, Atsushi; Hata, Shojiro; Kobayashi, Kaoru; Teruya, Masanori; Kaminishi, Michio

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Symptomatic non-parasitic hepatic cysts with biliary communication are rare and no standard treatment has been established yet. Careful attention should be paid to avoidance of postoperative bile leakage during surgical treatment. Presentation of case We report the case of a 74-year-old man who visited our department complaining of right upper abdominal pain and elevated serum levels of the liver enzymes. Computed tomography revealed hepatic cysts including a large one measuring 16 cm in diameter in Segments IV and VIII. Percutaneous drainage of the cyst revealed bile-staining of the cyst fluid. Endoscopic retrograde cholangiography demonstrated the presence of a cyst–biliary communication. We performed open deroofing of the cyst. During the operation, the biliary fistula was invisible, however, air injection into the bile duct through the stump of the cystic duct caused release of air bubbles from the cyst cavity, which allowed us to detect the small biliary orifice and repair it successfully by suture. Discussion We utilized the intraoperative air leak test, which has previously been reported to be effective for preventing postoperative bile leakage in patients undergoing hepatectomy to detect of a small cyst–biliary communication in a case undergoing non-parasitic hepatic cyst surgery. Conclusion An intraoperative air leak test may be a useful test during surgical treatment of non-parasitic hepatic cysts with biliary communication. PMID:26398333

  13. Percutaneous Management of Biliary Strictures After Pediatric Liver Transplantation

    SciTech Connect

    Miraglia, Roberto Maruzzelli, Luigi; Caruso, Settimo; Riva, Silvia; Spada, Marco; Luca, Angelo; Gridelli, Bruno

    2008-09-15

    We analyze our experience with the management of biliary strictures (BSs) in 27 pediatric patients who underwent liver transplantation with the diagnosis of BS. Mean recipient age was 38 months (range, 2.5-182 months). In all patients percutaneous transhepatic cholangiography, biliary catheter placement, and bilioplasty were performed. In 20 patients the stenoses were judged resolved by percutaneous balloon dilatation and the catheters removed. Mean number of balloon dilatations performed was 4.1 (range, 3-6). No major complications occurred. All 20 patients are symptom-free with respect to BS at a mean follow-up of 13 months (range, 2-46 months). In 15 of 20 patients (75%) one course of percutaneous stenting and bilioplasty was performed, with no evidence of recurrence of BS at a mean follow-up of 15 months (range, 2-46 months). In 4 of 20 patients (20%) two courses of percutaneous stenting and bilioplasty were performed; the mean time to recurrence was 9.8 months (range, 2.4-24 months). There was no evidence of recurrence of BS at a mean follow-up of 12 months (range, 2-16 months). In 1 of 20 patients (5%) three courses of percutaneous stenting and bilioplasty were performed; there was no evidence of recurrence of BS at a mean follow-up of 10 months. In conclusion, BS is a major problem following pediatric liver transplantation. Radiological percutaneous treatment is safe and effective, avoiding, in most cases, surgical revision of the anastomosis.

  14. Recent advances in laparoscopic surgery.

    PubMed

    Lee, Wei-Jei; Chan, Chien-Pin; Wang, Bing-Yen

    2013-02-01

    Laparoscopic surgery has been widely adopted and new technical innovation, procedures and evidence based knowledge are persistently emerging. This review documents recent major advancements in laparoscopic surgery. A PubMed search was made in order to identify recent advances in this field. We reviewed the recent data on randomized trials in this field as well as papers of systematic review. Laparoscopic cholecystectomy is the most frequently performed procedure, followed by laparoscopic bariatric surgery. Although bile duct injuries are relatively uncommon (0.15%-0.6%), intraoperative cholangiography still plays a role in reducing the cost of litigation. Laparoscopic bariatric surgery is the most commonly performed laparoscopic gastrointestinal surgery in the USA, and laparoscopic Nissen fundoplication is the treatment of choice for intractable gastroesophageal reflux disease. Recent randomized trials have demonstrated that laparoscopic gastric and colorectal cancer resection are safe and oncologically correct procedures. Laparoscopic surgery has also been widely developed in hepatic, pancreatic, gynecological and urological surgery. Recently, SILS and robotic surgery have penetrated all specialties of abdominal surgery. However, evidence-based medicine has failed to show major advantages in SILS, and the disadvantage of robotic surgery is the high costs related to purchase and maintenance of technology. Laparoscopic surgery has become well developed in recent decades and is the choice of treatment in abdominal surgery. Recently developed SILS techniques and robotic surgery are promising but their benefits remain to be determined. PMID:23126424

  15. Imaging Features of Adult Choledochal Cysts: a Pictorial Review

    PubMed Central

    Park, Seong Jin; Yi, Bum Ha; Lee, A Leum; Moon, Jong Ho; Chang, Yun Woo

    2009-01-01

    Choledochal cysts are rare congenital anomalies which are principally diagnosed by disproportional dilatation of the extrahepatic bile ducts. In addition, choledochal cysts are believed to arise from the anomalous union of the common bile duct and pancreatic duct outside the duodenal wall which is also proximal to the sphincter of the Oddi mechanism. The various types of choledochal cysts have been classified on the basis of these anomalous unions (Komi classification) and their anatomical locations (Todani classification). The multidetector computed tomography with reformatted imaging, magnetic resonance cholangiopancreatography, and an endoscopic retrograde cholangiography represent the important techniques providing the anatomical resolution and detail required to properly diagnose and classify choledochal cysts and their associated abnormal features of the biliary tree, as well as their pancreaticobile duct union. This study describes the various imaging features of a choledochal cyst in adults according to the various types of anomalous unions of the pancreaticobile duct according to Komi's classification and anatomic location according to Todani's classification. Lastly, we also review and discuss the associated abnormal findings developed in biliary systems. PMID:19182506

  16. [Relative increase and metacritic aggravation in the diagnosis of anicteric cholestasis].

    PubMed

    Albot, G; Geraudias, P; Kind, M

    1975-02-14

    The authors report 3 cases and report the diagnostic usefulness of two signs of minor cholestasis described by one of them in 1966. A relative increase, in the absence of obvious virus hepatitis or cirrhosis, of the serum bilirubin, cholesterol, lipids and alkaline phosphatase, together with B.S.P. excretion. suggest minor cholestasis. The sign of "metacritical aggravation" when there is some suspicion of minor cholestasis, the supervision of the course of the disease, or a retrospective inquiry, permit, in the presence of minor symptoms, such as, pain, fever, jaundice, or pruritus, one to make the diagnosis of minor cholestasis. The latter is due either to the presence of small gall stones in the common bile duct, or to inflammation of the ampulla of Vater, or sphincter of Oddi, a Vaterian ampulloma, pancreatitis, or following damage to the common bile duct. In practice, liver biopsy confirms the diagnosis, and intravenous cholangiography, by the perfusion method, is usually able to demonstrate obstruction of the common bile duct. PMID:169583

  17. Biliary phosphatidylcholine and lysophosphatidylcholine profiles in sclerosing cholangitis

    PubMed Central

    Gauss, Annika; Ehehalt, Robert; Lehmann, Wolf-Dieter; Erben, Gerhard; Weiss, Karl-Heinz; Schaefer, Yvonne; Kloeters-Plachky, Petra; Stiehl, Adolf; Stremmel, Wolfgang; Sauer, Peter; Gotthardt, Daniel Nils

    2013-01-01

    AIM: To analyze phospholipid profiles in intrahepatic bile from patients with primary sclerosing cholangitis (PSC) and secondary sclerosing cholangitis (SSC). METHODS: Intrahepatic bile specimens collected via endoscopic retrograde cholangiography from 41 patients were analyzed. Fourteen of these patients were diagnosed with PSC, 10 with SSC, 11 with choledocholithiasis or no identifiable biliary disease, and 6 with cholangiocellular carcinoma (CCC). Bile acid, cholesterol, protein, and bilirubin contents as well as pancreas lipase activity in bile were determined by biochemical methods. Phosphatidylcholine (PC) and lysophosphatidylcholine (LPC) species were quantified using nano-electrospray ionization tandem mass spectrometry. RESULTS: Bile from all the examined patient groups showed a remarkably similar PC and LPC species composition, with only minor statistical differences. Total biliary PC concentrations were highest in controls (8030 ± 1843 μmol/L) and lowest in patients with CCC (1969 ± 981 μmol/L) (P = 0.005, controls vs SSC and CCC, respectively, P < 0.05). LPC contents in bile were overall low (4.2% ± 1.8%). Biliary LPC/PC ratios and ratios of biliary PC to bilirubin, PC to cholesterol, PC to protein, and PC to bile acids showed no intergroup differences. CONCLUSION: PC and LPC profiles being similar in patients with or without sclerosing cholangitis, these phospholipids are likely not of major pathogenetic importance in this disease group. PMID:24023488

  18. Development and validation of real-time simulation of X-ray imaging with respiratory motion.

    PubMed

    Vidal, Franck P; Villard, Pierre-Frédéric

    2016-04-01

    We present a framework that combines evolutionary optimisation, soft tissue modelling and ray tracing on GPU to simultaneously compute the respiratory motion and X-ray imaging in real-time. Our aim is to provide validated building blocks with high fidelity to closely match both the human physiology and the physics of X-rays. A CPU-based set of algorithms is presented to model organ behaviours during respiration. Soft tissue deformation is computed with an extension of the Chain Mail method. Rigid elements move according to kinematic laws. A GPU-based surface rendering method is proposed to compute the X-ray image using the Beer-Lambert law. It is provided as an open-source library. A quantitative validation study is provided to objectively assess the accuracy of both components: (i) the respiration against anatomical data, and (ii) the X-ray against the Beer-Lambert law and the results of Monte Carlo simulations. Our implementation can be used in various applications, such as interactive medical virtual environment to train percutaneous transhepatic cholangiography in interventional radiology, 2D/3D registration, computation of digitally reconstructed radiograph, simulation of 4D sinograms to test tomography reconstruction tools. PMID:26773644

  19. Unilateral pulmonary agenesis associated with oesophageal atresia and tracheoesophageal fistula: A case report with prenatal diagnosis

    PubMed Central

    Miyano, Go; Morita, Keiichi; Kaneshiro, Masakatsu; Miyake, Hiromu; Koyama, Mariko; Nouso, Hiroshi; Yamoto, Masaya; Nakano, Reiji; Tanaka, Yasuhiko; Nishiguchi, Tomizo; Kawamura, Takakazu; Fukumoto, Koji; Urushihara, Naoto

    2015-01-01

    We describe herein a case of unilateral pulmonary agenesis (PA) with oesophageal atresia (EA)/tracheoesophageal fistula (TEF) that was diagnosed prenatally and repaired by esophagoesophagostomy with stable postoperative course. The patient was born at 34 weeks gestation, after ultrasonography at 22 weeks gestation showed possible right-sided diaphragmatic eventration or PA and EA was subsequently suspected due to hydramnios. The initial X-ray showed mediastinal shift to the right, and coil up sign of the nasogastric tube, without intracardiac anomaly. Immediately after the diagnosis of EA/TEF and unilateral PA on day 0, the patient was intubated in the operating room, and a gastrostomy tube was placed. After pulmonary status stabilized, at 4 days old, EA/TEF was repaired through a thoracotomy in the right 4th intercostal space. The right main bronchus was noted to continue into the distal oesophagus; this fistula was ligated and divided, and a single-layer esophagoesophagostomy was performed under mild tension with one vertebral gap. The neonate was maintained on mechanical ventilation and gradually weaned to extubation at 7 days old. The postoperative course was uneventful, with the exception of prolonged jaundice that emerged at 3 months old. Laparoscopic cholangiography at that time excluded biliary atresia, and jaundice resolved spontaneously. The patient has not shown any respiratory symptoms or feeding difficulties as of the 12-month follow-up. PMID:25659560

  20. Direct Effective Dose Calculations in Pediatric Fluoroscopy-Guided Abdominal Interventions with Rando-Alderson Phantoms – Optimization of Preset Parameter Settings

    PubMed Central

    Wildgruber, Moritz; Müller-Wille, René; Goessmann, Holger; Uller, Wibke; Wohlgemuth, Walter A.

    2016-01-01

    Objective The aim of the study was to calculate the effective dose during fluoroscopy-guided pediatric interventional procedures of the liver in a phantom model before and after adjustment of preset parameters. Methods Organ doses were measured in three anthropomorphic Rando-Alderson phantoms representing children at various age and body weight (newborn 3.5kg, toddler 10kg, child 19kg). Collimation was performed focusing on the upper abdomen representing mock interventional radiology procedures such as percutaneous transhepatic cholangiography and drainage placement (PTCD). Fluoroscopy and digital subtraction angiography (DSA) acquisitions were performed in a posterior-anterior geometry using a state of the art flat-panel detector. Effective dose was directly measured from multiple incorporated thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLDs) using two different parameter settings. Results Effective dose values for each pediatric phantom were below 0.1mSv per minute fluoroscopy, and below 1mSv for a 1 minute DSA acquisition with a frame rate of 2 f/s. Lowering the values for the detector entrance dose enabled a reduction of the applied effective dose from 12 to 27% for fluoroscopy and 22 to 63% for DSA acquisitions. Similarly, organ doses of radiosensitive organs could be reduced by over 50%, especially when close to the primary x-ray beam. Conclusion Modification of preset parameter settings enabled to decrease the effective dose for pediatric interventional procedures, as determined by effective dose calculations using dedicated pediatric Rando-Alderson phantoms. PMID:27556584

  1. Pseudoaneurysm of the gastroduodenal artery as a cause of obstructive jaundice.

    PubMed

    Kossak, J; Janik, J; Debski, J; Rytlewski, R; Sałaciński, A

    2001-01-01

    A 35-year-old man presented to our emergency room with asymptomatic jaundice. A physical exam revealed a palpable mass with audible bruit in the epigastrium. Total serum bilirubin was 21.7 mg%. A real time sonography/Doppler examination showed widening of the biliary tree (common bile duct diameter of 13 mm) and a mass in the pancreatic head with turbulent flow. Arteriography of the celiac axis revealed a pseudoaneurysm of the gastroduodenal artery. A ligation of the gastroduodenal artery was performed surgically, and the aneurysmal cavity was explored and emptied. An intraoperative cholangiography showed slight stenosis of the common bile duct distally, and so a choledochojejunostomy was performed. The patient's recovery was uneventful. A follow-up angiogram revealed the short stump of the gastroduodenal artery and no aneurysm or extravasation of dye. A follow-up ultrasound showed the common bile duct measuring 5.5 mm. The bilirubin level dropped to normal values. The patient was discharged on 12 days after surgery. Ten months following surgery he was doing well. The pathology, diagnosis, and treatment of such cases are briefly discussed. PMID:11433208

  2. Combined Endoscopic and Laparoscopic Management of Postcholecystectomy Mirizzi Syndrome from a Remnant Cystic Duct Stone: Case Report and Review of the Literature.

    PubMed

    Amin, Arpit; Zhurov, Yuriy; Ibrahim, George; Maffei, Anthony; Giannone, Jonathan; Cerabona, Thomas; Kaul, Ashutosh

    2016-01-01

    Mirizzi syndrome has been defined in the literature as common bile duct obstruction resulting from calculi within Hartmann's pouch or cystic duct. We present a case of a 78-year-old female, who developed postcholecystectomy Mirizzi syndrome from a remnant cystic duct stone. Diagnosis of postcholecystectomy Mirizzi syndrome was made on endoscopic retrograde cholangiography (ERCP) performed postoperatively. The patient was treated with a novel strategy by combining advanced endoscopic and laparoscopic techniques in three stages as follows: Stage 1 (initial presentation): endoscopic sphincterotomy with common bile duct stent placement; Stage 2 (6 weeks after Stage 1): laparoscopic ultrasonography to locate the remnant cystic duct calculi followed by laparoscopic retrieval of the calculi and intracorporeal closure of cystic duct stump; Stage 3 (6 weeks after Stage 2): endoscopic removal of common bile duct stent along with performance of completion endoscopic retrograde cholangiogram. In addition, we have performed an extensive review of the various endoscopic and laparoscopic management techniques described in the literature for the treatment of postcholecystectomy syndrome occurring from retained cystic duct stones. PMID:27047698

  3. Clonorchis sinensis ova in bile juice cytology from a patient with severe hyperbilirubinemia and portal vein thrombosis.

    PubMed

    Fujiya, Keiichi; Ganno, Hideaki; Ando, Masayuki; Chong, Ja-Mun

    2016-03-01

    Infection with the trematode Clonorchis sinensis is the most common human fluke infection in East Asian populations. Although this infection is associated with obstructive jaundice or choledocholithiasis, portal vein thrombosis has not been reported. Here, we report the first case of a 60-year-old man who had both C. sinensis infection and portal vein thrombosis with severe hyperbilirubinemia (75.4 mg/dl). He initially presented with abdominal pain and jaundice. Computed tomography revealed gallstones, common bile duct calculus, and thrombus in the left main branch of the portal vein. A nasobiliary tube was inserted under endoscopic retrograde cholangiography. Cytology of the bile juice revealed many C. sinensis eggs. The abdominal pain and jaundice improved following choledocholithotomy and combination treatment with a chemotherapeutic agent and anti-coagulant. This case suggests that inflammation around the portal vein as a result of C. sinensis infection has the potential to evoke portal vein thrombosis. Such cases should be treated with both a chemotherapeutic agent and anti-coagulant therapy. In conclusion, the possibility of infection with C. sinensis should be considered in patients presenting with hyperbilirubinemia and portal vein thrombosis, particularly in East Asian populations. PMID:26663478

  4. A Prospective Blinded Study Evaluating the Role of Endoscopic Ultrasound before Endoscopic Retrograde Cholangiopancreatography in the Setting of "Positive" Intraoperative Cholangiogram during Cholecystectomy.

    PubMed

    Luthra, Anjuli K; Aggarwal, Vipul; Mishra, Girish; Conway, Jason; Evans, John A

    2016-04-01

    During laparoscopic cholecystectomy, intraoperative cholangiography (IOC) is used to identify common bile duct (CBD) stones. In patients whose IOC is suspicious for stones, endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP) is the modality of choice for stone removal. However, IOC has a false positive rate of 30 to 60 per cent, and ERCP adverse events may occur in 11 per cent of patients. Endoscopic ultrasound (EUS) may serve as a noninvasive means of diagnosing suspected CBD stones. This study sought to assess the role of EUS in predicting the likelihood of choledocholithiasis at ERCP in patients found to have a positive IOC. This was a prospective blinded study of EUS before ERCP in patients with a positive IOC. Recruited subjects who underwent cholecystectomy and had an IOC with suspicion for obstruction were referred for ERCP within one month of their procedure. In patients with a positive IOC, EUS had a positive predictive value of 95 per cent in detecting choledocholithiasis. IOC with single or multiple filling defects more often correlated to the presence of CBD stones. At ERCP, choledocholithiasis was present in 65 per cent of patients who had an IOC suspicious for CBD stones. EUS should be used as a noninvasive method to correctly identify retained CBD stones in low-to-moderate risk patients with a positive IOC. PMID:27097628

  5. Predictive factors of difficult procedure in octogenarians undergoing elective laparoscopic cholecystectomy: a single center experience

    PubMed Central

    GUIDA, F.; MONACO, L.; SCHETTINO, M.; PORFIDIA, R.; IAPICCA, G.

    2016-01-01

    Aim To assess the feasibility and safety of laparoscopic cholecystectomy (LC) in very elderly patients with particular attention to the predicitive factors of difficulty. Patients and methods All patients aged ≥ 80 undergoing elective LC for lithiasis at our institution since 1st January 2015 to 31st December 2015 were included in the study. Exclusion criteria were: a) acute cholecystitis; b) biliary pancreatitis; c) biliary tract neoplasms; d) urgent procedure. Pre-, intra- and postoperative data were recorded. Results During the study period, we performed 72 LC and we enrolled 17 patients aged ≥ 80 with a M:F = 5:12. Of these, 10 patients had a “difficult” cholecystectomy. In seven cases an intraoperative cholangiography (IOC) was performed. Postoperative course was regular but in two patients we had an Oddian spasm in 1st postoperative day. Female sex (p=0.03) and preoperative high level of serum amylase (p= 0.02) were significantly associated to difficult cholecystectomy in elderly patients. Conclusion LC in octogenarians is feasible and safe. However, sex and serum amylase can help the surgeon to predict a more difficult procedure in elective LC. In this group of patients an approach based on the individual risk is desirable and the patient could be referred to a multidisciplinary approach. PMID:27381691

  6. Development of a Swine Benign Biliary Stricture Model Using Endoscopic Biliary Radiofrequency Ablation.

    PubMed

    Park, Jin Seok; Jeong, Seok; Kim, Joon Mee; Park, Sang Soon; Lee, Don Haeng

    2016-09-01

    The large animal model with benign biliary stricture (BBS) is essential to undergo experiment on developing new devices and endoscopic treatment. This study conducted to establish a clinically relevant porcine BBS model by means of endobiliary radiofrequency ablation (RFA). Endoscopic retrograde cholangiography (ERC) was performed on 12 swine. The animals were allocated to three groups (60, 80, and 100 W) according to the electrical power level of RFA electrode. Endobiliary RFA was applied to the common bile duct for 60 seconds using an RFA catheter that was endoscopically inserted. ERC was repeated two and four weeks, respectively, after the RFA to identify BBS. After the strictures were identified, histologic evaluations were performed. On the follow-up ERC two weeks after the procedure, a segmental bile duct stricture was observed in all animals. On microscopic examination, severe periductal fibrosis and luminal obliteration with transmural inflammation were demonstrated. Bile duct perforations occurred in two pigs (100 W, n = 1; 80 W, n = 1) but there were no major complications in the 60 W group. The application of endobiliary RFA with 60 W electrical power resulted in a safe and reproducible swine model of BBS. PMID:27510388

  7. Clinical application of indocyanine green-fluorescence imaging during hepatectomy.

    PubMed

    Ishizawa, Takeaki; Saiura, Akio; Kokudo, Norihiro

    2016-08-01

    In hepatobiliary surgery, the fluorescence and bile excretion of indocyanine green (ICG) can be used for real-time visualization of biological structure. Fluorescence cholangiography is used to obtain fluorescence images of the bile ducts following intrabiliary injection of 0.025-0.5 mg/mL ICG or intravenous injection of 2.5 mg ICG. Recently, the latter technique has been used in laparoscopic/robotic cholecystectomy. Intraoperative fluorescence imaging can be used to identify subcapsular hepatic tumors. Primary and secondary hepatic malignancy can be identified by intraoperative fluorescence imaging using preoperative intravenous injection of ICG through biliary excretion disorders that exist in cancerous tissues of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) and in non-cancerous hepatic parenchyma around adenocarcinoma foci. Intraoperative fluorescence imaging may help detect tumors to be removed, especially during laparoscopic hepatectomy, in which visual inspection and palpation are limited, compared with open surgery. Fluorescence imaging can also be used to identify hepatic segments. Boundaries of hepatic segments can be visualized following injection of 0.25-2.5 mg/mL ICG into the portal veins or by intravenous injection of 2.5 mg ICG following closure of the proximal portal pedicle toward hepatic regions to be removed. These techniques enable identification of hepatic segments before hepatectomy and during parenchymal transection for anatomic resection. Advances in imaging systems will increase the use of fluorescence imaging as an intraoperative navigation tool that can enhance the safety and accuracy of open and laparoscopic/robotic hepatobiliary surgery. PMID:27500144

  8. Imaging and radiological interventions in extra-hepatic portal vein obstruction

    PubMed Central

    Pargewar, Sudheer S; Desai, Saloni N; Rajesh, S; Singh, Vaibhav P; Arora, Ankur; Mukund, Amar

    2016-01-01

    Extrahepatic portal vein obstruction (EHPVO) is a primary vascular condition characterized by chronic long standing blockage and cavernous transformation of portal vein with or without additional involvement of intrahepatic branches, splenic or superior mesenteric vein. Patients generally present in childhood with multiple episodes of variceal bleed and EHPVO is the predominant cause of paediatric portal hypertension (PHT) in developing countries. It is a pre-hepatic type of PHT in which liver functions and morphology are preserved till late. Characteristic imaging findings include multiple parabiliary venous collaterals which form to bypass the obstructed portal vein with resultant changes in biliary tree termed portal biliopathy or portal cavernoma cholangiopathy. Ultrasound with Doppler, computed tomography, magnetic resonance cholangiography and magnetic resonance portovenography are non-invasive techniques which can provide a comprehensive analysis of degree and extent of EHPVO, collaterals and bile duct abnormalities. These can also be used to assess in surgical planning as well screening for shunt patency in post-operative patients. The multitude of changes and complications seen in EHPVO can be addressed by various radiological interventional procedures. The myriad of symptoms arising secondary to vascular, biliary, visceral and neurocognitive changes in EHPVO can be managed by various radiological interventions like transjugular intra-hepatic portosystemic shunt, percutaneous transhepatic biliary drainage, partial splenic embolization, balloon occluded retrograde obliteration of portosystemic shunt (PSS) and revision of PSS. PMID:27358683

  9. Percutaneous yttrium aluminum garnet-laser lithotripsy of intrahepatic stones and casts after liver transplantation.

    PubMed

    Schlesinger, Nis Hallundbaek; Svenningsen, Peter; Frevert, Susanne; Wettergren, André; Hillingsø, Jens

    2015-06-01

    Bile duct stones and casts (BDSs) contribute importantly to morbidity after liver transplantation (LT). The purpose of this study was to estimate the clinical efficacy, safety, and long-term results of percutaneous transhepatic cholangioscopic lithotripsy (PTCSL) in transplant recipients and to discuss underlying factors affecting the outcome. A retrospective chart review revealed 18 recipients with BDSs treated by PTCSL laser lithotripsy with a holmium-yttrium aluminum garnet laser probe at 365 to 550 µm. They were analyzed in a median follow-up time of 55 months. In all but 1 patient (17/18 or 94%), it was technically feasible to clear all BDSs with a mean of 1.3 sessions. PTCSL was unsuccessful in 1 patient because of multiple stones impacting the bile ducts bilaterally; 17% had early complications (Clavien II). All biliary casts were successfully cleared; 39% had total remission; 61% needed additional interventions in the form of percutaneous transhepatic cholangiography and dilation (17%), re-PTCSL (11%), self-expandable metallic stents (22%), or hepaticojejunostomy (6%); and 22% eventually underwent retransplantation. The overall liver graft survival rate was 78%. Two patients died during follow-up for reasons not related to their BDS. Nonanastomotic strictures (NASs) were significantly associated with treatment failure. We conclude that PTCSL in LT patients is safe and feasible. NASs significantly increased the risk of relapse. Repeated minimally invasive treatments, however, prevented graft failure in 78% of the cases. PMID:25821134

  10. Graft complications following orthotopic liver transplantation: Role of non-invasive cross-sectional imaging techniques.

    PubMed

    Boraschi, Piero; Della Pina, Maria Clotilde; Donati, Francescamaria

    2016-07-01

    Orthotopic liver transplantation is the treatment of choice in adult patients with endstage liver disease. Survival of both graft and patient has progressively improved over time due to improvements in surgical and medical treatment. However, post-transplant complications still have a significant impact on morbidity and mortality associated with transplant surgery. The most common adverse events of the graft include vascular (arterial and venous stenosis and thrombosis), biliary (leakage, strictures, stones) and parenchymal complications (hepatitis virus C infection, HCC recurrence, liver abscesses). The diagnosis of these adverse events is often challenging because of the low specificity of clinical and biologic findings. Different diagnostic algorithms have been proposed for the detection of graft complications and, in this setting, radiological evaluation plays a key role in differential diagnosis of graft complications and the exclusion of other adverse events. Ultrasound examination is established the first-line method of identifying adverse events in liver transplant recipients but a normal or a technically unsatisfactory study cannot exclude the presence of biliary, vascular and/or parenchymal complications. In these circumstances, before planning any treatment, multi-detector CT and/or MR imaging and MR cholangiography should be performed for the evaluation of vascular structures, biliary system, liver parenchyma and fluid collections. The aim of this review is to illustrate the role and state-of-the-art of non-invasive cross-sectional imaging techniques in the diagnosis and management of complications which primarily affect the graft in patients after liver transplantation. PMID:27235874

  11. Late Migration of Two Covered Biliary Stents Through a Spontaneous Bilioenteric Fistula in a Patient with Malignant Biliary Obstruction

    SciTech Connect

    Krokidis, Miltiadis E.; Hatzidakis, Adam A. Manousaki, Eirini G.; Gourtsoyiannis, Nicholas C.

    2008-01-15

    We report a case of simultaneous late migration of two ePTFE-FEP covered biliary endoprostheses (Viabil, W.L. Gore, Flagstaff, AZ, USA) that were percutaneously implanted for the treatment of malignant obstructive jaundice. The first Viabil covered stent was placed successfully without any evidence of dislocation or other complication during follow-up. Occlusion of the stent occurred 4 months later and was treated with the placement of a second stent of the same type. Thirteen months later the patient became symptomatic. Percutaneous transhepatic cholangiography (PTC) revealed the presence of a choledocho-duodenal fistula and the disappearance of the two endoprostheses previously implanted. A third metallic stent was then percutaneously positioned through the bilioenteric fistula. The computed tomography scan that followed for the detection of the metallic bodies did not reveal the dislocated metallic stents. Stent migration is a well-known complication of uncovered metallic stents, though Viabil stent migration is assumed to be most unlikely to happen due to the stent's anchoring barbs. Furthermore, the stent had already been tightly fixed by tumor over- and ingrowth, as recognized in previous imaging. This is a very unusual case, describing the disappearance of two metallic foreign bodies encapsulated by tumor.

  12. Laparoscopic cholecystectomy: evolution, early results, and impact on nonsurgical gallstone therapies.

    PubMed

    Brandon, J C; Velez, M A; Teplick, S K; Mueller, P R; Rattner, D W; Broadwater, J R; Lang, N P; Eidt, J F

    1991-08-01

    Laparoscopic cholecystectomy, a surgical technique first performed in France, has gained widespread acceptance among surgeons in the United States. The abdominal cavity is inflated by carbon dioxide, a video monitor is inserted via a laparoscope placed periumbilically, and the gallbladder is freed and removed from the liver bed by using small subcostal ports for access and dissection. Intraoperative cholangiography is routinely performed, but uncertainty exists about how best to manage choledocholithiasis. Compared with traditional cholecystectomy, initial reports describing laparoscopic cholecystectomy cite shorter recovery times because no large incisions are made, thus potentially reducing the cost and morbidity of cholecystectomy. A survey of 614 early cases supports these claims, with a reported complication rate of 1.5% and quick resumption of normal activities by patients. Because of its promise for reduced morbidity, laparoscopic cholecystectomy is challenging open cholecystectomy as the therapeutic gold standard for symptomatic cholelithiasis. Thus, the standard to which the nonsurgical gallstone therapies, such as lithotripsy and contact dissolution, will be compared may shift to laparoscopic cholecystectomy. As the laparoscopic complications are similar to those of traditional cholecystectomy, such as abscesses and bile leaks, their percutaneous treatment should not change. PMID:1830188

  13. Primary sclerosing cholangitis.

    PubMed

    Esber, E J; Ferguson, D R

    1994-06-01

    Primary sclerosing cholangitis (PSC) remains a disease of unknown etiology. The close association of PSC and inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), especially ulcerative colitis (UC), has been reconfirmed in numerous studies. Much has been learned about the pathogenesis, although the specific cause remains unknown. Copper overload and chronic hepatic bacterial infection have virtually been excluded as causes of PSC. Cytomegalovirus and reovirus remain under investigation. Familial clustering and HLA subtype similarities are seen in PSC with and without IBD. The finding of antineutrophil cytoplasmic antibodies (ANCA) in patients with PSC and those with UC suggests immunological features in the pathogenesis of PSC. Collected series of patients have better characterized clinical features of PSC. Endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP) and percutaneous transhepatic cholangiography (PTC) have provided both diagnostic features and means of therapeutic intervention. Treatment of PSC is symptomatic (pruritus control and vitamin deficiency correction); or experimental (D-penicillamine, ursodeoxycholic acid [UDCA], methotrexate, or corticosteroids). Liver transplantation remains the ultimate treatment for end-stage PSC. Statistical analyses of clinical and laboratory variables in PSC help to determine prognosis and proposed timing for transplantation to achieve maximal longevity and quality of life. PSC affects middle-aged people and is expensive to treat over the natural course of the disease, making it an economically and medically important disease. PMID:8055238

  14. Difficulty in management of intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasm-associated pancreatobiliary fistulas and the role of "pig-nose" appearance and intraductal ultrasonography in diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Koizumi, Mitsuhito; Kumagi, Teru; Kuroda, Taira; Azemoto, Nobuaki; Yamanishi, Hirofumi; Ohno, Yoshinori; Yokota, Tomoyuki; Ochi, Hironori; Tange, Kazuhiro; Ikeda, Yoshiou; Hiasa, Yoichi

    2016-04-01

    Pancreatobiliary fistulas associated with intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasms (IPMN) often develop obstructive jaundice and cholangitis; thus, early diagnosis is important. However, computed tomography and cholangiography, the current methods for detecting pancreatobiliary fistulas, are not always effective. We previously reported a case of IPMN-associated pancreatobiliary fistula and proposed a potential new diagnostic marker: the "pig-nose" appearance of the duodenal papilla, which results from dilated pancreatic and bile ducts and can be visualized via endoscopy. In this study, we report another three cases of IPMN-associated pancreatobiliary fistulas detected by a different technology, intraductal ultrasonography (IDUS). As with our previously reported case, we confirmed the utility of the "pig-nose" appearance and IDUS in the diagnosis of IPMN-associated pancreatobiliary fistulas. In addition, we found it difficult to manage biliary obstruction that resulted from the flow of mucinous material through pancreatobiliary fistulas. The obstruction was treated with endoscopic nasal biliary drainage (ENBD), but this was not always successful. In two of our cases, additional treatment with a large diameter fully covered metal stent failed to improve jaundice. Therefore, we conclude that standard endoscopic stenting may not be effective, and that alternative endoscopic methods or surgery may be necessary. PMID:27092326

  15. Combined Endoscopic and Laparoscopic Management of Postcholecystectomy Mirizzi Syndrome from a Remnant Cystic Duct Stone: Case Report and Review of the Literature

    PubMed Central

    Amin, Arpit; Zhurov, Yuriy; Ibrahim, George; Maffei, Anthony; Giannone, Jonathan; Cerabona, Thomas; Kaul, Ashutosh

    2016-01-01

    Mirizzi syndrome has been defined in the literature as common bile duct obstruction resulting from calculi within Hartmann's pouch or cystic duct. We present a case of a 78-year-old female, who developed postcholecystectomy Mirizzi syndrome from a remnant cystic duct stone. Diagnosis of postcholecystectomy Mirizzi syndrome was made on endoscopic retrograde cholangiography (ERCP) performed postoperatively. The patient was treated with a novel strategy by combining advanced endoscopic and laparoscopic techniques in three stages as follows: Stage 1 (initial presentation): endoscopic sphincterotomy with common bile duct stent placement; Stage 2 (6 weeks after Stage 1): laparoscopic ultrasonography to locate the remnant cystic duct calculi followed by laparoscopic retrieval of the calculi and intracorporeal closure of cystic duct stump; Stage 3 (6 weeks after Stage 2): endoscopic removal of common bile duct stent along with performance of completion endoscopic retrograde cholangiogram. In addition, we have performed an extensive review of the various endoscopic and laparoscopic management techniques described in the literature for the treatment of postcholecystectomy syndrome occurring from retained cystic duct stones. PMID:27047698

  16. Hepatobiliary scintigraphy in a patient with bilhemia.

    PubMed

    François, D; Walrand, S; Van Nieuwenhuyse, J P; de Ville de Goyet, J; Pauwels, S

    1994-09-01

    A 4-year-old child referred for acute jaundice following percutaneous needle biopsy of the liver underwent hepatobiliary scintigraphy. Although all conventional liver tests suggested preservation of hepatocyte function, the tracer uptake in the liver appeared dramatically reduced at scintigraphy and the blood pool activity did not decrease significantly until the end of the study. Visualization of the bile ducts indicated, however, that the tracer was taken up by the hepatocyte and further excreted into the biliary tree. There was no tracer pooling in the biliary tree although no bowel activity was observed, even on delayed images. The association of persistent blood pool activity, bile duct visualization without tracer pooling, and nonvisualization of the bowel was caused by a continuous recirculation of the tracer from the biliary tree into the bloodstream. The presence of a biliovenous fistula was further proven by percutaneous transhepatic cholangiography performed 24 h later. Since 1975, only 16 cases of bilhemia have been reported. To the best of our knowledge the scintigraphic pattern of this rare but life-threatening complication has not previously been reported. PMID:7995281

  17. Delayed biliary drainage is common in asymptomatic post-cholecystectomy volunteers.

    PubMed

    Elta, G H; Barnett, J L; Ellis, J H; Ackermann, R; Wahl, R

    1992-01-01

    A commonly used diagnostic criterion for sphincter of Oddi dysfunction is delayed drainage of contrast media from the bile ducts at endoscopic retrograde cholangiography (ERC), which is defined as the persistence of contrast greater than 45 min after injection. We performed ERC in 11 asymptomatic post-cholecystectomy volunteers for the purpose of evaluating biliary drainage time. In an attempt to more accurately quantify emptying, concomitant scintigraphy was performed at the time of ERC and contrast drainage. Sufficient contrast mixed with technetium-99m sulfur colloid to completely fill out the intra-hepatic tree was injected (mean volume, 9 ml) and the volunteers remained in the prone position during imaging. The length of time from cholecystectomy, bile duct size, volume of contrast injected, and scintigraphic T1/2s did not correlate with drainage time at ERC. At 45 min after injection the degree of residual contrast filling was scored as: empty in three volunteers, almost empty in one, one-fourth full in 5, and one-half full in two. Therefore, 7 of the 11 asymptomatic volunteers (63%) had delayed drainage. Even if more stringent criteria for delayed drainage were used (ducts one-half filled), 2 of the 11 (18%) had abnormal drainage. The frequent occurrence of delayed drainage in these asymptomatic post-cholecystectomy volunteers challenges the validity of the 45-min delayed drainage criterion for sphincter of Oddi dysfunction. PMID:1511817

  18. Potential Pitfalls on the 99mTc-Mebrofenin Hepatobiliary Scintigraphy in a Patient with Biliary Atresia Splenic Malformation Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Maestri Brittain, Jane; Borgwardt, Lise

    2016-01-01

    Biliary atresia (BA) is an obliterative cholangiopathy affecting 1:10.000–14.000 of newborns. Infants with Biliary Atresia Splenic Malformation syndrome (BASM) are a subgroup of BA patients with additional congenital anomalies. Untreated the disease will result in fatal liver failure within the first years of life. Kasai portoenterostomy restores bile flow and delay the progressive liver damage thereby postponing liver transplantation. An early diagnosis is of most importance to ensure the effectiveness of the operation. The 99mTc-Mebrofenin hepatobiliary scintigraphy is part of the diagnostic strategy when an infant presents jaundice due to conjugated hyperbilirubinemia (>20 µmol/L total bilirubin of which 20% is conjugated) with its high sensitivity of 97%–100% in refuting BA. Rapid extraction of tracer by the liver and no visible tracer in the small bowl after 24 h is indicative of BA. Laparotomy with antegrade cholangiography is then performed giving the final diagnosis when the remains of the obliterated biliary tree are revealed in the case of BA. We present a case demonstrating some of the challenges of interpreting the 99mTc-Mebrofenin hepatobiliary scintigraphy in an infant with BASM and stress the importance that the 99mTc-Mebrofenin hepatobiliary scintigraphy is part of a spectrum of imaging modalities in diagnosing BA. PMID:26838802

  19. Multimodal treatment strategies for advanced hilar cholangiocarcinoma.

    PubMed

    Weiss, Matthew J; Cosgrove, David; Herman, Joseph M; Rastegar, Neda; Kamel, Ihab; Pawlik, Timothy M

    2014-08-01

    Cholangiocarcinoma (CCA) is the second most common primary malignancy of the liver arising from malignant transformation and growth of biliary ductal epithelium. Approximately 50-70 % of CCAs arise at the hilar plate of the biliary tree, which are termed hilar cholangiocarcinoma (HC). Various staging systems are currently employed to classify HCs and determine resectability. Depending on the pre-operative staging, the mainstays of treatment include surgery, chemotherapy, radiation therapy, and photodynamic therapy. Surgical resection offers the only chance for cure of HC and achieving an R0 resection has demonstrated improved overall survival. However, obtaining longitudinal and radial surgical margins that are free of tumor can be difficult and frequently requires extensive resections, particularly for advanced HCs. Pre-operative interventions may be necessary to prepare patients for major hepatic resections, including endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography, percutaneous transhepatic cholangiography, and portal vein embolization. Multimodal therapy that combines chemotherapy with external beam radiation, stereotactic body radiation therapy, bile duct brachytherapy, and/or photodynamic therapy are all possible strategies for advanced HC prior to resection. Orthotopic liver transplantation is another therapeutic option that can achieve complete extirpation of locally advanced HC in judiciously selected patients following standardized neoadjuvant protocols. PMID:24962146

  20. Spread of Intraductal Papillary Neoplasm Arising from the Cystic Duct of the Biliary Tree

    PubMed Central

    Kadowaki, Yoshihiko; Yokota, Yuki; Komoto, Satoshi; Kubota, Nobuhito; Okamoto, Takahiro; Ishido, Nobuhiro; Okino, Tsuyoshi

    2016-01-01

    Intraductal papillary neoplasm of the bile duct (IPNB) is a variant type of the bile duct carcinoma characterized by intraductal growth. IPNB is also recognized as a precursor of invasive carcinoma. We describe herein an extremely rare case of IPNB arising from the cystic duct. A 68-year-old man was admitted to our hospital for investigation of epigastralgia and abnormal levels of biliary tract enzyme. Computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging showed a mass lesion spreading from the cystic duct to the upper-middle bile duct. Endoscopic retrograde cholangiography demonstrated diffuse duct dilation with a grossly visible intraductal mass and amorphous blobs, suggesting the presence of mucobilia or scattered tumors. We performed extrahepatic bile duct resection with lymphadenectomy. Macroscopically, a friable papillary tumor originated from the cystic duct grows intraluminally into the bile duct. Pathologically, the tumor was found to be intramucosal adenocarcinoma spreading to the whole extrahepatic bile duct, which was compatible with IPNB. We should discuss the features and progression processes of IPNB through this precious case.

  1. [Caroli's syndrome in a patient on hemodialysis: diagnostic and therapeutic difficulties].

    PubMed

    Duranti, Ennio; Gatti, Guido; Duranti, Diletta

    2010-01-01

    We present the case of a 65-year-old male patient without any family history of renal or hepatic disease. He had been on maintenance hemodialysis for 4 months because of autosomal recessive polycystic kidney disease. At the start of the hemodialysis session he reported general malaise, abdominal pain, fever and diarrhea occurring in the last two days. Laboratory workup showed neutrophilic leukocytosis and increased serum amylase and C-reactive protein. Abdominal contrast-enhanced CT scan and MRI cholangiography showed hepatic cysts with marked dilatation of the intra- and extrahepatic bile ducts. The patient underwent cholecystectomy with hepaticojejunal Rouxen- Y anastomosis and was discharged with oral ciprofloxacin. Histology confirmed marked cystic dilatation of the bile ducts. Because of persistent episodes of septic fever, administration of ciprofloxacin was continued. After 4 months retrograde endoscopic pancreatography was performed which led to a diagnosis of Caroli's syndrome associated with polycystic kidneys. Given the rarity of the disease and its difficult diagnosis, when patients with polycystic kidneys and liver cysts experience recurrent episodes of septic fever of unknown origin, Caroli's disease should be taken into account and the appropriate tests should be carried out to confirm the diagnosis. PMID:20922688

  2. Using a standardized method for laparoscopic cholecystectomy to create a concept operation-specific checklist

    PubMed Central

    Connor, Saxon J; Perry, William; Nathanson, Leslie; Hugh, Thomas B; Hugh, Thomas J

    2014-01-01

    Objectives Prevalences of bile duct injury (BDI) following laparoscopic cholecystectomy (LC) remain unacceptably high. There is no standardized method for performing an LC. This study aims to describe a standardized technique for LC that will allow for the development of a concept LC checklist, the use of which, it is hoped, will decrease the prevalence of BDI. Methods A standardized method for LC was developed based on previously published expert analysis supplemented by video error analysis of operations in which BDI occurred. Established checklist methodology was then used to construct an LC-specific concept checklist. Results A five-step technique for the safe establishment of the critical view was created to guide the development of the checklist. The five steps are: (i) confirm the gallbladder lies in the hepatic principal plane and is retracted to the 10 o'clock position; (ii) confirm Hartmann's pouch is lifted up and toward the segment IV pedicle; (iii) identify Rouvière's sulcus; (iv) confirm the release of the posterior leaf of the peritoneum covering the hepatobiliary triangle, and (v) confirm the critical view with or without intraoperative cholangiography. Conclusions A standardized approach to LC would allow for the creation of an LC-specific checklist that has the potential to lower the prevalence of BDI. PMID:23961737

  3. Intraductal ultrasonographic anatomy of biliary varices in patients with portal hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Takagi, Tadayuki; Irisawa, Atsushi; Shibukawa, Goro; Hikichi, Takuto; Obara, Katsutoshi; Ohira, Hiromasa

    2015-01-01

    Background and Objectives: The term, portal biliopathy, denotes various biliary abnormalities, such as stenosis and/or dilatation of the bile duct, in patients with portal hypertension. These vascular abnormalities sometimes bring on an obstructive jaundice, but they are not clear which vessels participated in obstructive jaundice. The aim of present study was clear the bile ductal changes in patients with portal hypertension in hopes of establishing a therapeutic strategy for obstructive jaundice caused by biliary varices. Materials and Methods: Three hundred and thirty-seven patients who underwent intraductal ultrasound (IDUS) during endoscopic retrograde cholangiography for biliary abnormalities were enrolled. Portal biliopathy was analyzed using IDUS. Results: Biliary varices were identified in 11 (2.7%) patients. IDUS revealed biliary varices as multiple, hypoechoic features surrounding the bile duct wall. These varices could be categorized into one of two groups according to their location in the sectional image of bile duct: epicholedochal and paracholedochal. Epicholedochal varices were identified in all patients, but paracholedochal varices were observed only in patients with extrahepatic portal obstruction. Conclusion: IDUS was useful to characterize the anatomy of portal biliopathy in detail. PMID:25789284

  4. Endoscopic Treatment of Biliary Stenosis in Patients with Alveolar Echinococcosis – Report of 7 Consecutive Patients with Serial ERC Approach

    PubMed Central

    Stojkovic, Marija; Junghanss, Thomas; Veeser, Mira; Weber, Tim F.; Sauer, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Background and Aims Biliary vessel pathology due to alveolar echicococcosis (AE) results in variable combinations of stenosis, necrosis and inflammation. Modern management strategies for patients with cholestasis are desperately needed. The aim is proof of principle of serial ERC (endoscopic retrograde cholangiography) balloon dilation for AE biliary pathology. Methods Retrospective case series of seven consecutive patients with AE-associated biliary pathology and ERC treatment in an interdisciplinary endoscopy unit at a University Hospital which hosts a national echinococcosis treatment center. The AE patient cohort consists of 106 patients with AE of the liver of which 13 presented with cholestasis. 6/13 received bilio-digestive anastomosis and 7/13 patients were treated by ERC and are reported here. Biliary stricture balloon dilation was performed with 18-Fr balloons at the initial and with 24-Fr balloons at subsequent interventions. If indicated 10 Fr plastic stents were placed. Results Six patients were treated by repeated balloon dilation and stenting, one by stenting only. After an acute phase of 6 months with repeated balloon dilation, three patients showed “sustained clinical success” and four patients “assisted therapeutic success,” of which one has not yet reached the six month endpoint. In one patient, sustained success could not be achieved despite repeated insertion of plastic stents and balloon dilation, but with temporary insertion of a fully covered self-expanding metal stent (FCSEMS). There was no loss to follow up. No major complications were observed. Conclusions Serial endoscopic dilation is a standard tool in the treatment of benign biliary strictures. Serial endoscopic intervention with balloon dilation combined with benzimidazole treatment can re-establish and maintain biliary duct patency in AE associated pathology and probably contributes to avoid or postpone bilio-digestive anastomosis. This approach is in accordance with current

  5. Isolated Right Segmental Hepatic Duct Injury Following Laparoscopic Cholecystectomy

    SciTech Connect

    Perini, Rafael F.; Uflacker, Renan Cunningham, John T.; Selby, J. Bayne; Adams, David

    2005-04-15

    Purpose. Laparoscopic cholecystectomy (LC) is the treatment of choice for gallstones. There is an increased incidence of bile duct injuries in LC compared with the open technique. Isolated right segmental hepatic duct injury (IRSHDI) represents a challenge not only for management but also for diagnosis. We present our experience in the management of IRSHDI, with long-term follow-up after treatment by a multidisciplinary approach. Methods. Twelve consecutive patients (9 women, mean age 48 years) were identified as having IRSHDI. Patients' demographics, clinical presentation, management and outcome were collected for analysis. The mean follow-up was 44 months (range 2-90 months). Results. Three patients had the LC immediately converted to open surgery without repair of the biliary injury before referral. Treatments before referral included endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP), percutaneous drainage and surgery, isolated or in combination. The median interval from LC to referral was 32 days. Eleven patients presented with biliary leak and biloma, one with obstruction of an isolated right hepatic segment. Post-referral management of the biliary lesion used a combination of ERCP stenting, percutaneous drainage and stent placement and surgery. In 6 of 12 patients ERCP was the first procedure, and in only one case was IRSHDI identified. In 6 patients, percutaneous transhepatic cholangiography (PTC) was performed first and an isolated right hepatic segment was demonstrated in all. The final treatment modality was endoscopic management and/or percutaneous drainage and stenting in 6 patients, and surgery in 6. The mean follow-up was 44 months. No mortality or significant morbidity was observed. Conclusion. Successful management of IRSHDI after LC requires adequate identification of the lesion, and multidisciplinary treatment is necessary. Half of the patients can be treated successfully by nonsurgical procedures.

  6. Percutaneous Transhepatic Removal of Bile Duct Stones: Results of 261 Patients

    SciTech Connect

    Ozcan, Nevzat Kahriman, Guven Mavili, Ertugrul

    2012-08-15

    Purpose: To determine the effectiveness of percutaneous transhepatic removal of bile duct stones when the procedure of endoscopic therapy fails for reasons of anatomical anomalies or is rejected by the patient. Methods: Between April 2001 and May 2010, 261 patients (138 male patients and 123 female patients; age range, 14-92 years; mean age, 64.6 years) with bile duct stones (common bile duct [CBD] stones = 248 patients and hepatolithiasis = 13 patients) were included in the study. Percutaneous transhepatic cholangiography was performed, and stones were identified. Percutaneous transhepatic balloon dilation of the papilla of Vater was performed. Then stones were pushed out into the duodenum with a Fogarty balloon catheter. If the stone diameter was larger than 15 mm, then basket lithotripsy was performed before balloon dilation. Results: Overall success rate was 95.7%. The procedure was successful in 97.5% of patients with CBD stones and in 61.5% of patients with hepatolithiasis. A total of 18 major complications (6.8%), including cholangitis (n = 7), subcapsular biloma (n = 4), subcapsular hematoma (n = 1), subcapsular abscess (n = 1), bile peritonitis (n = 1), duodenal perforation (n = 1), CBD perforation (n = 1), gastroduodenal artery pseudoaneurysm (n = 1), and right hepatic artery transection (n = 1), were observed after the procedure. There was no mortality. Conclusion: Our experience suggests that percutaneous transhepatic stone expulsion into the duodenum through the papilla is an effective and safe approach in the nonoperative management of the bile duct stones. It is a feasible alternative to surgery when endoscopic extraction fails or is rejected by the patient.

  7. Percutaneous Transhepatic Removal of Bile Duct Stones: Results of 261 Patients

    SciTech Connect

    Ozcan, Nevzat Kahriman, Guven Mavili, Ertugrul

    2012-06-15

    Purpose: To determine the effectiveness of percutaneous transhepatic removal of bile duct stones when the procedure of endoscopic therapy fails for reasons of anatomical anomalies or is rejected by the patient. Methods: Between April 2001 and May 2010, 261 patients (138 male patients and 123 female patients; age range, 14-92 years; mean age, 64.6 years) with bile duct stones (common bile duct [CBD] stones = 248 patients and hepatolithiasis = 13 patients) were included in the study. First, percutaneous transhepatic cholangiography was performed and stones were identified. Percutaneous transhepatic balloon dilation of the papilla of Vater was performed. Then stones were pushed out into the duodenum with a Fogarty balloon catheter. If the stone diameter was larger than 15 mm, then basket lithotripsy was performed before balloon dilation. Results: Overall success rate was 95.7%. The procedure was successful in 97.5% of patients with CBD stones and in 61.5% of patients with hepatolithiasis. A total of 18 (6.8%) major complications, including cholangitis (n = 7), subcapsular biloma (n = 4), subcapsular hematoma (n = 1), subcapsular abscess (n = 1), bile peritonitis (n = 1), duodenal perforation (n = 1), CBD perforation (n = 1), gastroduodenal artery pseudoaneurysm (n = 1), and right hepatic artery transection (n = 1), were seen after the procedure. There was no mortality. Conclusion: Our experience suggests that percutaneous transhepatic stone expulsion into the duodenum through the papilla is an effective and safe approach in the nonoperative management of the bile duct stones. It is a feasible alternative to surgery when endoscopic extraction fails or is rejected by the patient.

  8. Choledochal cysts: diagnosis and treatment.

    PubMed

    Popova-Jovanovska, R; Genadieva-Dimitrova, M; Trajkovska, M; Serafimoski, V

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study is to show the different diagnostic procedures and treatment in patients diagnosed with congenital choledochal cysts. Choledochal cysts are congenital anomalies of the bile ducts and include cystic dilatation of the extrahepatic and intrahepatic biliary ducts or both. The study shows ten patients diagnosed as having choledochal cysts. Diagnosis was established by clinical and radiographic findings including: ultrasound (US), magnetic resonance cholangiopancreatograpy (MRCP), endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP), percutaneous transhepatic cholangiography (PTC) and cytological examination of the bile juice. In the study choledochal cysts were classified according to the Todani classification. Most common cysts were type I (six cases); type III (one case), type IVa (one case) and two patients were type V cysts (Caroli disease). The most frequent symptoms were abdominal pain, jaundice and cholangitis. US findings were sensitive for the preliminary diagnosis of choledochal cysts in all the patients. MRCP accurately defined the cyst anatomy and the site of the biliary origin in all the cases with extrahepatic cysts. In three cases ERCP clearly demonstrated the cyst and by PTC smaller cysts were well defined. Cytological examination of the bile juice obtained during the PTC procedure showed malignant cells in one case. Therefore pancreaticoduodenectomy was performed and pathological examination showed associated cholangiocarcinoma. Five years after the operation the patient was well and free of the disease. Five patients underwent surgical treatment with a total cyst excision and Roux-en-Y hepaticojejunostomy while the surgical approach in two patients was partial cyst excision and cystojejunostomy. Patients with Caroli disease were conservatively treated and 3 with interventional endoscopic procedures. Despite US evidence suggesting choledochal cyst diagnosis, other supportive radiographic imaging modalities such as MRCP, ERCP and

  9. Combined radiological-endoscopic management of difficult bile duct stones: 18-year single center experience

    PubMed Central

    Cannavale, Alessandro; Bezzi, Mario; Cereatti, Fabrizio; Lucatelli, Pierleone; Fanello, Gianfranco; Salvatori, Filippo Maria; Fanelli, Fabrizio; Fiocca, Fausto; Donatelli, Gianfranco

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: Clinical evidence regarding radiological–endoscopic management of intrahepatic bile duct stones is currently lacking. Our aim is to report our 18-year experience in combined radiological–endoscopic management of intrahepatic difficult bile duct stones. Methods: From June 1994 to June 2012, 299 symptomatic patients with difficult bile duct stones were admitted to our institution. Percutaneous transhepatic cholangiography (PTC)/biliary drainage/s was performed, dilating the PTC track to 10 or 16 French within 3–7 days. Afterward we carried out percutaneous transhepatic cholangioscopy (PTCS) with electrohydraulic lithotripsy (EHL) and/or interventional radiology techniques. Follow up was made with clinical/laboratory tests and ultrasound (US). We retrospectively analyzed our radiological–endoscopic approach and reported our technical and clinical outcomes. Results: Complete stone clearance was achieved in 298 patients after a maximum of 4 consecutive sessions. Most patients (64.6%) were treated with PTCS/EHL alone, while the remaining with radiological techniques alone (26%) or a combination of both techniques (13.3%). Recurrence of stones occurred in 45 cases (15%, Tsunoda class III and class IV) within 2 years and were successfully retreated. Major adverse events were: 5 (1.6%) cases of massive bleeding that required embolisation, 2 (0.66%) perforations of the common bile duct and 31 cases (10.3%) of acute cholangitis managed with medical therapy or intervention. Conclusion: After 18 years of experience we demonstrated that our combined radiological–endoscopic approach to ‘difficult bile duct stones‘ may result in both immediate and long-term clearance of stones with a low rate of adverse events. PMID:26557890

  10. [Interdisciplinary diagnosis of and therapy for cholangiocarcinoma].

    PubMed

    Kolligs, F T; Zech, C J; Schönberg, S O; Schirra, J; Thasler, W; Graeb, C; Beuers, U; Wilkowski, R; Jacobs, T; Böck, S; Berster, J; Heinemann, V; Schäfer, C

    2008-01-01

    The diagnosis of and therapy for cholangiocarcinomas still remains an interdisciplinary challenge. For diagnostic and therapeutic purposes intra- and extrahepatic cholangiocarcinomas need to be distinguished. Multiple imaging tools such as sonography, multidetector computer tomography, magnetic resonance tomography as well as endoscopic ultrasound and endoscopic retrograde cholangiography for the diagnosis and localisation of these tumours are available. To date, surgical resection is the only curative treatment. At the time of diagnosis, most of the tumours are advanced. Therefore, only a small percentage of patients are suitable for curative surgery. Infiltration of the portal vein no longer constitutes a contraindication for surgery. Liver transplantation is not a reasonable option for intrahepatic cholangiocarcinomas but may be of advantage for perihilar Klatskin tumours. Severe cholangitis is the main cause of death of patients with obstructive cholangiocarcinomas. Drainage of the biliary tree system or surgery with construction of a biliary-digestive anastomosis is often necessary. If possible, a photodynamic therapy (PDT) should be performed in addition to biliary drainage. PDT has been shown to facilitate biliary drainage and to improve survival. The value of radiologist-assisted interventional procedures as well as percutaneous ablation and radiochemotherapy is not well established. In addition, so far, there is no standardised chemotherapy in a palliative situation established but there is some evidence for a benefit of gemcitabine-based chemotherapy. For the best care and treatment of patients with cholangiocarcinomas an interdisciplinary approach is required and to achieve progress in the therapy patients should be included in prospective clinical trials to test new approaches. PMID:18188818

  11. Novel technique for biliary reconstruction using an isolated gastric tube with a vascularized pedicle: a live animal experimental study and the first clinical case

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Biliary tract reconstruction continues to be a challenging surgical problem. Multiple experimental attempts have been reported to reconstruct biliary defects with different materials and variable outcome. Our aim was to evaluate a new method for biliary reconstruction using an isolated pedicled gastric tube in a live animal trial and also to present the first clinical case. Methods Seven mongrel dogs underwent biliary reconstruction using gastric tube harvested, completely separated from the greater curvature, and based on a vascularized pedicle with the right gastroepiploic vessels. The tube was interposed between the common bile duct (CBD) and the duodenum. Postoperative mortality, morbidity, liver functions, gross and microscopic histological picture were assessed. The first clinical case was also presented where, in a patient with post-cholecystectomy biliary injury, an isolated pedicled gastric tube was interposed between the proximal and distal ends of the CBD. Results One dog did not recover from anesthesia and another one died postoperatively from septic peritonitis. Five dogs survived the procedure and showed uneventful course and no cholestasis. The mean anastomotic circumference was 4.8 mm (range 4-6) for CBD anastomosis and 6.2 mm (range 5-7) for duodenal anastomosis. Histologically, anastomotic sites showed good evidence of healing. In the first clinical case, the patient showed clinical and biochemical improvement. Endoscopic retrograde cholangiography was feasible and assured patent biliary anastomoses. Conclusion In mongrel dogs, biliary reconstruction using pedicled gastric tube interposition between CBD and duodenum is feasible with satisfactory clinical results, anastomotic circumference and histological evidence of healing. The technique is also feasible in human and seems to be promising. PMID:21985492

  12. Experimental Study of Poly-l-Lactic Acid Biodegradable Stents in Normal Canine Bile Ducts

    SciTech Connect

    Yamamoto, Kiyosei Yoshioka, Tetsuya; Furuichi, Kinya; Sakaguchi, Hiroshi; Anai, Hiroshi; Tanaka, Toshihiro; Morimoto, Kengo; Uchida, Hideo; Kichikawa, Kimihiko

    2011-06-15

    Purpose: This study was designed to clarify the advantages of biodegradable stents in terms of mucosal reaction and biodegradation after placement. We designed a biodegradable stent and assessed stent degradation and changes in the normal bile ducts of dogs. Methods: The biodegradable stent is a balloon-expandable Z stent consisting of poly-l-lactic acid (PLLA) with a diameter of 6 mm and a length of 15 mm. We assessed four groups of three beagle dogs each at 1, 3, 6, and 9 months of follow-up. After evaluating stent migration by radiography and stent and bile duct patency by cholangiography, the dogs were sacrificed to remove the bile duct together with the stent. The bile duct lumen was examined macroscopically and histologically, and the stent degradation was examined macroscopically and by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Results: Bile duct obstruction was absent and none of the stents migrated. Macroscopic evaluation showed moderate endothelial proliferation in the bile ducts at the implant sites at 3 and 6 months and a slight change at 9 months. Slight mononuclear cell infiltration was histologically identified at all time points and epithelial hyperplasia that was moderate at 3 months was reduced to slight at 6 and 9 months. Stent degradation was macroscopically evident in all animals at 9 months and was proven by SEM in two dogs at 6 months and in all of them at 9 months. Conclusions: Our results suggest that PLLA bioabsorbable stents seems to be useful for implantation in the biliary system with further investigation.

  13. Patient and staff doses for some complex x-ray examinations.

    PubMed

    Olgar, T; Bor, D; Berkmen, G; Yazar, T

    2009-09-01

    The aim of this study was to measure patient and staff doses simultaneously for some complex x-ray examinations. Measurements of dose-area product (DAP) and entrance skin dose (ESD) were carried out in a sample of 107 adult patients who underwent different x-ray examinations such as double contrast barium enema (DCBE), single contrast barium enema (SCBE), barium swallow, endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP) and percutaneous transhepatic cholangiography (PTC), and various orthopaedic surgical procedures. Dose measurements were made separately for each projection, and DAP, thermoluminescent dosimetry (TLD), film dosimetry and tube output measurement techniques were used. Staff doses were measured simultaneously with patient doses for these examinations, with the exception of barium procedures. The measured mean DAP values were found to be 8.33, 90.24, 79.96 Gy cm(2) for barium swallow, SCBE and DCBE procedures with the fluoroscopy times of 3.1, 4.43 and 5.86 min, respectively. The calculated mean DAP was 26.33 Gy cm(2) for diagnostic and 89.76 Gy cm(2) therapeutic ERCP examinations with the average fluoroscopy times of 1.9 and 5.06 min respectively. Similarly, the calculated mean DAP was 97.53 Gy cm(2) with a corresponding fluoroscopy time of 6.1 min for PTC studies. The calculated mean entrance skin dose (ESD) was 172 mGy for the orthopaedic surgical studies. Maximum skin doses were measured as 324, 891, 1218, 750, 819 and 1397 mGy for barium swallow, SCBE, DCBE, ERCP, PTC and orthopaedic surgical procedures, respectively. The high number of radiographs taken during barium enema examinations, and the high x-ray outputs of the fluoroscopic units used in ERCP, were the main reasons for high doses, and some corrective actions were immediately taken. PMID:19690354

  14. Preoperative assessment for laparoscopic cholecystectomy: feasibility of using spiral computed tomography.

    PubMed Central

    Kwon, A H; Inui, H; Imamura, A; Uetsuji, S; Kamiyama, Y

    1998-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The authors investigated the preoperative feasibility of using spiral computed tomography (SCT) after intravenous infusion cholangiography (IVC-SCT) for laparoscopic cholecystectomy. SUMMARY BACKGROUND DATA: In laparoscopic cholecystectomy, the aberrant or unusual anatomy of the bile duct and severe inflammation or adhesions around the gallbladder sometimes require a conversion to open surgery. METHODS: Laparoscopic cholecystectomies (LC's) were attempted on 440 patients, and preoperative IVC-SCT also was attempted in all of these patients. Using this spiral scanning technique, the bile ducts, cystic duct, and gallbladder were assessed for contour abnormalities, relative position, and filling defects. Forty-seven patients were diagnosed with having stones in their common bile duct or common hepatic duct. RESULTS: Three-hundred eighty-seven patients out of the 440 patients (88.0%) who were subjected to IVC-SCT had the length and course of their cystic duct successfully determined. Anomalous unions of the cystic duct were seen in 59 (15.2%) of 387 patients with respect to the operative findings, and 48 of 440 patients (10.9%) had severe adhesions to Calot's triangle and the surrounding tissues. In these 48 patients, 45 patients (94%) had a nonvisualized cystic duct on IVC-SCT. The preoperative assessment of the feasibility (dense adhesions obscuring Calot's triangle) of using IVC-SCT demonstrated that the sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy were 93%, 98%, and 94%, respectively. Five patients had to be converted to open surgery, and the overall morbidity rates for patients undergoing laparoscopic cholecystectomy was 0.9% (4 of 440). CONCLUSIONS: The most important factor in assessing the feasibility of using laparoscopic cholecystectomy is not the nonvisualized gallbladder, but the nonvisualized cystic duct on IVC-SCT. IVC-SCT may be of benefit to those patients scheduled to undergo laparoscopic cholecystectomy. Images Figure 1. Figure 2. Figure 3

  15. Towards T-tube free laparoscopic bile duct exploration: a methodologic evolution during 300 consecutive procedures.

    PubMed Central

    Martin, I J; Bailey, I S; Rhodes, M; O'Rourke, N; Nathanson, L; Fielding, G

    1998-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To establish a simple, reproducible, and safe technique of laparoscopic common bile duct exploration (CBDE) with high clearance rates and low morbidity and mortality rates. SUMMARY BACKGROUND DATA: For most general surgeons, laparoscopic CBDE appears an unduly complex and demanding procedure. Since the introduction of laparoscopic cholecystectomy, many surgeons use endoscopic cholangiography (ERC) and endoscopic sphincterotomy as their only option in treating bile duct stones. ERC is more specific if used after surgery, but it carries an appreciable morbidity rate and has the disadvantage of requiring a second procedure to deal with bile duct stones. To this end, various methods of laparoscopic CBDE have been developed. METHODS: Between August 1991 and February 1997, 300 consecutive unselected patients underwent laparoscopic CBDE. RESULTS: Of 300 laparoscopic CBDE procedures, 173 (58%) were managed using a transcystic approach and 127 (42%) with choledochotomy. Successful laparoscopic stone clearance was achieved in 271 (90%). Of the 29 (10%) patients not cleared laparoscopically, 10 had an elective postsurgical ERC, 12 were converted to an open procedure early in the series, and 7 had unexpected retained stones. There was one death (mortality rate 0.3%) and major morbidity occurred in 22 patients (7%). The last 100 procedures were performed from July 1995 to February 1997, and stone clearance was unsuccessful in only two patients. CONCLUSIONS: Laparoscopic transcystic basket extraction of common duct stones under fluoroscopic guidance is a relatively quick, successful, and safe technique. Choledochotomy, when required, is associated with a higher morbidity rate, particularly with T-tube insertion, and the authors advocate primary bile duct closure with or without insertion of a biliary stent as a more satisfactory technique for both surgeon and patient. Most patients with gallbladder and common duct calculi should expect a curative one

  16. Successful Endoscopic Management of Acute Necrotic Pancreatitis and Walled Off Necrosis After Auxiliary Partial Orthotopic Living-Donor Liver Transplantation: A Case Report.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, T; Miura, K; Ishikawa, H; Soma, D; Zhang, Z; Yuza, K; Hirose, Y; Takizawa, K; Nagahashi, M; Sakata, J; Kameyama, H; Kosugi, S; Wakai, T

    2016-05-01

    Endoscopic management of acute necrotic pancreatitis and walled off necrosis is less invasive than surgical treatment and has become the 1st choice for treating pancreatic necrosis and abscess. We treated a case of acute necrotic pancreatitis and walled off necrosis after auxiliary partial orthotopic living-donor liver transplantation (APOLT). A 24-year-old woman was admitted to our university hospital for removal of the internal biliary stent, which had already been placed endoscopically for the treatment of biliary stricture after APOLT. She had been treated for acute liver failure by APOLT 10 years before. After we removed the internal stent with the use of an endoscopic retrograde approach, she presented with severe abdominal pain and a high fever. Her diagnosis was severe acute pancreatitis after endoscopic retrograde cholangiography (ERC). Her symptoms worsened, and she had multiple organ failure. She was transferred to the intensive care unit (ICU). Immunosuppression was discontinued because infection treatment was necessary and the native liver had already recovered sufficiently. After she had been treated for 19 days in the ICU, she recovered from her multiple organ failure. However, abdominal computerized tomography demonstrated the formation of pancreatic walled off necrosis and an abscess on the 20th day after ERC. We performed endoscopic ultrasonography-guided abscess drainage and repeated endoscopic necrosectomy. The walled off necrosis diminished gradually in size, and the symptoms disappeared. The patient was discharged on the 87th day after ERC. This is the 1st report of a case of acute necrotic pancreatitis and walled off necrosis that was successfully treated by endoscopic management after APOLT. PMID:27320589

  17. The Possible Role of Sphincteroplasty and Surgical Sphincterotomy in the Pathogenesis of Recurrent Common Duct Brown Stones

    PubMed Central

    1991-01-01

    The hypothesis has been tested that postcholecystectomy common duct stones of the brown subtype are a consequence of three factors: bile infection, old age and previous sphincterotomy. It was found that: (i) 27 of 39 consecutive patients with recurrent common duct stones had brown stones. Nineteen of these 27 patients (70.3%) had previous sphincterotomy or sphincteroplasty: (ii) six of 15 patients with stone and bile analysis both at the time of cholecystectomy and at the second operation and who had sterile operative bile and non brown stones at the first operation, formed brown stones after T-tube drainage and after the onset of bile infection; (iii) patients with both intra and postoperative negative bile culture (n = 39 out of 137) had a lower mean age (50.5 years) and less frequently had a sphincterotomy than did individuals with a negative culture at operation, who subsequently had bile infection (n = 37; mean age 58.5 years; sphincterotomy in 88.8% of cases). In addition, in a follow up study of 105 patients with sphincterotomy and with sphincteroplasty (including ERCP or i.v. cholangiography in all cases), mean follow-up interval 6.1 years, 11.3 % of patients had brown recurrent common duct stones. It is suggested that, since brown recurrent common duct stones are secondary to bile stasis and infection and the duodenum is going to be colonized by bacteria with increasing age, sphincterotomy (and subsequent stricture), facilitating bile contamination and bacterial overgrowth, could be one of the major determinants of brown recurrent common duct stones (RCS) formation. In particular, more than 11% of the patients with a sphincterotomy are going to form in the future RCS of the brown subtype. PMID:1810368

  18. Real-Time Intraoperative Near-Infrared Fluorescence Identification of the Extrahepatic Bile Ducts using Clinically-Available Contrast Agents

    PubMed Central

    Matsui, Aya; Tanaka, Eiichi; Choi, Hak Soo; Winer, Joshua H.; Kianzad, Vida; Gioux, Sylvain; Laurence, Rita G.; Frangioni, John V.

    2009-01-01

    Background Iatrogenic bile duct injuries are serious complications with patient morbidity. We hypothesized that the invisible near-infrared (NIR) fluorescence properties of methylene blue (MB) and indocyanine green (ICG) could be exploited for real-time, intraoperative imaging of the extrahepatic bile ducts during open and laparoscopic surgeries. Methods 2.0 mg/kg of MB and 0.05 mg/kg of ICG were intravenously injected into 35-kg female Yorkshire pigs and the extrahepatic bile ducts imaged over time using either the FLARE™ image-guided surgery system (open surgery) or a custom NIR fluorescence laparoscopy system. Surgical anatomy was confirmed using x-ray cholangiography. Contrast-to-background ratio (CBR), contrast-to-liver ratio (CLR), and chemical concentrations in the cystic duct (CD) and common bile duct (CBD) were measured, and the performance of each agent quantified. Results Using NIR fluorescence of MB, the CD and CBD could be identified with good sensitivity (CBR and CLR ≥ 4), during both open and laparoscopic surgeries, from 10 to 120 min post-injection. Functional impairment of the ducts, including constriction and injury were immediately identifiable. Using NIR fluorescence of ICG, extrahepatic bile ducts did not become visible until 90 min post-injection due to strong residual liver retention, however, between 90 to 240 min, ICG provided exquisitely high sensitivity for both CD and CBD, with CBR ≥ 8 and CLR ≥ 4. Conclusions We demonstrate that two clinically available NIR fluorophores, MB fluorescing at 700 nm and ICG fluorescing at 800 nm, provide sensitive, prolonged identification of the extrahepatic bile ducts and assessment of their functional status. PMID:20117813

  19. Living related liver transplantation in an adult patient with hepatocellular adenoma and carcinoma 13 years after bone marrow transplantation for Fanconi anemia: a case report

    PubMed Central

    Colle, Isabelle; Laureys, Geneviève; Raevens, Sarah; Libbrecht, Louis; Reyntjens, Koen; Geerts, Anja; Rogiers, Xavier; Troisi, Roberto; Hoehn, Holger; Schindler, Detlev; Hanenberg, Helmut; De Wilde, Vincent; Van Vlierberghe, Hans

    2013-01-01

    Fanconi anemia is an inherited bone marrow failure syndrome, characterised by failing DNA repair. Hematopoetic stem cell transplantation, known to be curative for the bone marrow failure, does neither prevent or cure other manifestations such as the development of malignancies. We describe a 26-year-old male patient with known Fanconi anemia and Marfan syndrome who in 1994 underwent a successful bone marrow transplantation of stem cells from his HLA-identical sister. In 2006, three hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) lesions in the liver were detected and promptly resected. The resection specimen contained 3 lesions, all showing activation of the beta-catenin pathway: a well differentiated steatotic HCC with remnants of the underlying adenoma from which it arose, an adenoma with small foci of well differentiated HCC and a cholestatic adenoma. Known risk factors for developing HCC include Fanconi anemia itself and the use of androgens (oxymetholone) for a period of 3 years preceeding transplantation. Because of the increased risk of developing additional HCC’s, liver transplantation was proposed, taking into account that immunosuppression increases the risk of other malignancies. By using part of the liver of the HLA-identical sister, already acting as bone marrow donor 13 years before, immunosuppression could be avoided. A left lobe liver transplantation was performed without immediate complications for donor and acceptor on July 2, 2007. Nine months after liver transplantation the recipient developed an anastomotic biliary stricture that had to be dilated by percutaneous transhepatic cholangiography. Two months later however, the stenosis recurred, necessitating a surgical reanastomosis (hepaticojejunostomy). Five years after liver transplantation the patient is still doing well. This case report is twofold special being the first case reporting Fanconi anemia linked to Marfan syndrome and being the first reported case of Fanconi anemia who was treated for

  20. Hilar cholangiocarcinoma: diagnosis, treatment options, and management

    PubMed Central

    Soares, Kevin C.; Kamel, Ihab; Cosgrove, David P.; Herman, Joseph M.

    2014-01-01

    Hilar cholangiocarcinoma (HC) is a rare disease with a poor prognosis which typically presents in the 6th decade of life. Of the 3,000 cases seen annually in the United States, less than one half of these tumors are resectable. A variety of risk factors have been associated with HC, most notably primary sclerosing cholangitis (PSC), biliary stone disease and parasitic liver disease. Patients typically present with abdominal pain, pruritis, weight loss, and jaundice. Computed topography (CT), magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), and ultrasound (US) are used to characterize biliary lesions. Endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP) and percutaneous transhepatic cholangiography (PTC) assess local ductal extent of the tumor while allowing for therapeutic biliary drainage. MRCP has demonstrated similar efficacies to PTC and ERCP in identifying anatomic extension of tumors with less complications. Treatment consists of surgery, radiation, chemotherapy and photodynamic therapy. Biliary drainage of the future liver remnant should be performed to decrease bilirubin levels thereby facilitating future liver hypertrophy. Standard therapy consists of surgical margin-negative (R0) resection with extrahepatic bile duct resection, hepatectomy and en bloc lymphadenectomy. Local resection should not be undertaken. Lymph node invasion, tumor grade and negative margins are important prognostic indicators. In instances where curative resection is not possible, liver transplantation has demonstrated acceptable outcomes in highly selected patients. Despite the limited data, chemotherapy is indicated for patients with unresectable tumors and adequate functional status. Five-year survival after surgical resection of HC ranges from 10% to 40% however, recurrence can be as high as 50-70% even after R0 resection. Due to the complexity of this disease, a multi-disciplinary approach with multimodal treatment is recommended for this complex disease. PMID:24696835

  1. Current diagnosis and treatment of benign biliary strictures after living donor liver transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Jae Hyuck; Lee, Inseok; Choi, Myung-Gyu; Han, Sok Won

    2016-01-01

    Despite advances in surgical techniques, benign biliary strictures after living donor liver transplantation (LDLT) remain a significant biliary complication and play an important role in graft and patient survival. Benign biliary strictures after transplantation are classified into anastomotic or non-anastomotic strictures. These two types differ in presentation, outcome, and response to therapy. The leading causes of biliary strictures include impaired blood supply, technical errors during surgery, and biliary anomalies. Because patients usually have non-specific symptoms, a high index of suspicion should be maintained. Magnetic resonance cholangiography has gained widespread acceptance as a reliable noninvasive tool for detecting biliary complications. Endoscopy has played an increasingly prominent role in the diagnosis and treatment of biliary strictures after LDLT. Endoscopic management in LDLT recipients may be more challenging than in deceased donor liver transplantation patients because of the complex nature of the duct-to-duct reconstruction. Repeated aggressive endoscopic treatment with dilation and the placement of multiple plastic stents is considered the first-line treatment for biliary strictures. Percutaneous and surgical treatments are now reserved for patients for whom endoscopic management fails and for those with multiple, inaccessible intrahepatic strictures or Roux-en-Y anastomoses. Recent advances in enteroscopy enable treatment, even in these latter cases. Direct cholangioscopy, another advanced form of endoscopy, allows direct visualization of the inner wall of the biliary tree and is expected to facilitate stenting or stone extraction. Rendezvous techniques can be a good option when the endoscopic approach to the biliary stricture is unfeasible. These developments have resulted in almost all patients being managed by the endoscopic approach. PMID:26819525

  2. Distinct Plasma Bile Acid Profiles of Biliary Atresia and Neonatal Hepatitis Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Kejun; Wang, Jun; Xie, Guoxiang; Zhou, Ying; Yan, Weihui; Pan, Weihua; Che, Yanran; Zhang, Ting; Wong, Linda; Kwee, Sandi; Xiao, Yongtao; Wen, Jie; Cai, Wei; Jia, Wei

    2015-11-01

    Biliary atresia (BA) is a severe chronic cholestasis disorder of infants that leads to death if not treated on time. Neonatal hepatitis syndrome (NHS) is another leading cause of neonatal cholestasis confounding the diagnosis of BA. Recent studies indicate that altered bile acid metabolism is closely associated with liver injury and cholestasis. In this study, we systematically measured the bile acid metabolome in plasma of BA, NHS, and healthy controls. Liver bile acids were also measured using biopsy samples from 48 BA and 16 NHS infants undergoing operative cholangiography as well as 5 normal adjacent nontumor liver tissues taken from hepatoblastoma patients as controls. Both BA and NHS samples had significantly elevated bile acid levels in plasma compared to normal controls. BA patients showed a distinct bile acid profile characterized by the higher taurochenodeoxycholic acid (TCDCA) level and lower chenodeoxycholic acid (CDCA) level than those in NHS patients. The ratio of TCDCA to CDCA in plasma was significantly higher in BA compared to healthy infants (p < 0.001) or NHS (p < 0.001). The area under receiver operating characteristic curve for TCDCA/CDCA to differentiate BA from NHS was 0.923 (95% CI: 0.862-0.984). These findings were supported by significantly altered expression levels of bile acid transporters and nuclear receptors in liver including farnesoid X receptor (FXR), small heterodimer partner (SHP), bile salt export pump (BSEP), and multidrug resistant protein 3 (MDR3) in BA compared to NHS. Taken together, the plasma bile acid profiles are distinct in BA, NHS, and normal infants, as characterized by the ratio of TCDCA/CDCA differentially distributed among the three groups of infants. PMID:26449593

  3. Clinical application of indocyanine green-fluorescence imaging during hepatectomy

    PubMed Central

    Ishizawa, Takeaki; Saiura, Akio

    2016-01-01

    In hepatobiliary surgery, the fluorescence and bile excretion of indocyanine green (ICG) can be used for real-time visualization of biological structure. Fluorescence cholangiography is used to obtain fluorescence images of the bile ducts following intrabiliary injection of 0.025−0.5 mg/mL ICG or intravenous injection of 2.5 mg ICG. Recently, the latter technique has been used in laparoscopic/robotic cholecystectomy. Intraoperative fluorescence imaging can be used to identify subcapsular hepatic tumors. Primary and secondary hepatic malignancy can be identified by intraoperative fluorescence imaging using preoperative intravenous injection of ICG through biliary excretion disorders that exist in cancerous tissues of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) and in non-cancerous hepatic parenchyma around adenocarcinoma foci. Intraoperative fluorescence imaging may help detect tumors to be removed, especially during laparoscopic hepatectomy, in which visual inspection and palpation are limited, compared with open surgery. Fluorescence imaging can also be used to identify hepatic segments. Boundaries of hepatic segments can be visualized following injection of 0.25−2.5 mg/mL ICG into the portal veins or by intravenous injection of 2.5 mg ICG following closure of the proximal portal pedicle toward hepatic regions to be removed. These techniques enable identification of hepatic segments before hepatectomy and during parenchymal transection for anatomic resection. Advances in imaging systems will increase the use of fluorescence imaging as an intraoperative navigation tool that can enhance the safety and accuracy of open and laparoscopic/robotic hepatobiliary surgery. PMID:27500144

  4. Hepatobiliary scintigraphy in children.

    PubMed

    Nadel, H R

    1996-01-01

    Hepatobiliary scintigraphy using iminodiacetic (IDA) radiopharmaceuticals provides clinically useful information on the function of the biliary tract in a variety of pathological processes in children, including neonatal jaundice, gallbladder dysfunction, trauma, and liver transplantation. Phenobarbital premedication (5 mg/kg per day for a minimum of 5 days in divided doses) is used in infants who are being examined for neonatal jaundice to increase the accuracy of 99mTc-IDA scintigraphy in differentiating extrahepatic biliary atresia from neonatal hepatitis. Biliary atresia can be ruled out in an infant if a patent biliary tree is shown with passage of activity into the bowel. If no radiopharmaceutical is noted in the bowel on imaging up to 24 hours, distinction between severe hepatocellular disease and biliary atresia cannot be made. The literature reports 91% accuracy, 97% sensitivity, and 82% specificity for hepatobiliary imaging in the diagnosis of biliary atresia. The impairment of both intrahepatic and extrahepatic biliary drainage is an important cause of liver disease in cystic fibrosis. Hepatobiliary scintigraphy in cystic fibrosis has shown characteristic patterns of dilatation of mainly the left hepatic duct, narrowing of the distal common bile duct, gallbladder dysfunction, and delayed bowel transit. Cholecystitis in children may be acalculous. Sensitivity and specificity for the scintigraphic diagnosis of acute acalculous cholecystitis is reported to range from 68% to 93% and 38% to 93%, respectively. Cholescintigraphy in a suspected bile leak provides information generally not available with other techniques, except for direct cholangiography. If the amount of intraperitoneal accumulation of the tracer is greater than that entering the gastrointestinal tract, surgery is usually indicated. Hepatobiliary imaging in children who have undergone liver transplantation will assess graft vascularity, parenchymal function, biliary drainage, presence of a leak

  5. Efficacy of quantitative hepatobiliary scintigraphy and fatty-meal sonography for evaluating patients with suspected partial common duct obstruction.

    PubMed

    Darweesh, R M; Dodds, W J; Hogan, W J; Geenen, J E; Collier, B D; Shaker, R; Kishk, S M; Stewart, E T; Lawson, T L; Hassanein, E H

    1988-03-01

    In this study we evaluated by blinded design the diagnostic efficacy of two noninvasive techniques, quantitative hepatobiliary scintigraphy (QHS) and fatty-meal sonography (FMS), for evaluating patients with suspected partial common duct obstruction. Quantitative hepatobiliary scintigraphy was performed on 56 cholecystectomized individuals (22 asymptomatic controls, 28 patients with suspected partial common duct obstruction, and 6 nonjaundiced cirrhotics) and FMS was done in 51 cases. For QHS, time-activity curves were generated for regions of interest over the liver, hepatic hilum, and common duct. For FMS, we measured common duct diameter before and 45 min after a fatty meal (Lipomul, 1.5 ml/kg). Each of the 28 patients with suspected partial common duct obstruction and 6 cirrhotic patients underwent endoscopic retrograde cholangiography, often accompanied by sphincter of Oddi manometry. Findings from these examinations were taken as the gold standard to determine the presence or absence of conditions that could account for intermittent symptomatic partial common duct obstruction. The most sensitive indicators for a positive test were a 45-min isotope clearance of less than 63% for QHS and a common duct increase of greater than or equal to 2 mm after the fatty meal for FMS. Of 28 patients with suspected partial common duct obstruction, 15 were judged to be true-positive and 13 true-negative. The 6 cirrhotic patients were without common duct obstruction. The study findings showed that each test had a 67% sensitivity that improved to 80% when the findings from both test results were combined. The specificity of QHS was 85% and that of FMS was 100%. All 6 cirrhotic patients had negative findings on FMS and 4 were false-positive on QHS. The true-positives included 8 patients with a small common duct stone and 6 with obstructive sphincter of Oddi dysfunction (4 stenosis, 2 dyskinesia). We conclude that noninvasive QHS and FMS afford good sensitivity and specificity

  6. Increased gall bladder volume in primary sclerosing cholangitis.

    PubMed Central

    van de Meeberg, P C; Portincasa, P; Wolfhagen, F H; van Erpecum, K J; VanBerge-Henegouwen, G P

    1996-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The diagnosis of primary sclerosing cholangitis (PSC) requires invasive procedures such as liver biopsy and endoscopic retrograde cholangiography (ERC). Sonographic measurement of fasting gall bladder volume, which has been reported to be enlarged in PSC, could serve as a non-invasive screening test. METHODS: Fasting gall bladder volume was studied in patients with PSC (n = 24), primary biliary cirrhosis (PBC, n = 13), liver cirrhosis due to other causes (n = 18), ulcerative colitis (n = 15), and healthy controls (n = 23). Meal induced gall bladder emptying was studied in patients with PSC, patients with PBC, and healthy controls. RESULTS: In patients with PSC gall bladder volume was greatly enlarged (72.9 (SEM 3.7) ml) compared with healthy controls (25.4 (1.7) ml, and patients with PBC (30.9 (2.7) ml), liver cirrhosis (31.3 (4.0) ml) or ulcerative colitis (25.8 (2.0) ml) (p < 0.0005 v all). In four patients with PSC the gall bladder wall was irregularly thickened (> 4 mm) as previously described in PSC. Postprandial residual fractions (% of fasting volume) were comparable between patients with PSC (17.5 (3.7)%) and those with PBC (23.6 (7.1%) and healthy controls (12.7 (2.3)%) Although gall bladder emptying seems normal, increased biliary pressure in patients with PSC cannot be excluded. CONCLUSION: Apart from wall thickening, patients with PSC often present with enlargement of the gall bladder. Sonographic determination of fasting gall bladder volume may be a useful, non-invasive, and easy to perform tool in the evaluation of patients suspected of having PSC. Images Figure 2 PMID:8944571

  7. Dual-energy CT revisited with multidetector CT: review of principles and clinical applications.

    PubMed

    Karçaaltıncaba, Muşturay; Aktaş, Aykut

    2011-09-01

    Although dual-energy CT (DECT) was first conceived in the 1970s, it was not widely used for CT indications. Recently, the simultaneous acquisition of volumetric dual-energy data has been introduced using multidetector CT (MDCT) with two X-ray tubes and rapid kVp switching (gemstone spectral imaging). Two major advantages of DECT are material decomposition by acquiring two image series with different kVp and the elimination of misregistration artifacts. Hounsfield unit measurements by DECT are not absolute and can change depending on the kVp used for an acquisition. Typically, a combination of 80/140 kVp is used for DECT, but for some applications, 100/140 kVp is preferred. In this study, we summarized the clinical applications of DECT and included images that were acquired using the dual-source CT and rapid kVp switching. In general, unenhanced images can be avoided by using DECT for body and neurological applications; iodine can be removed from the image, and a virtual, non-contrast (water) image can be obtained. Neuroradiological applications allow for the removal of bone and calcium from the carotid and brain CT angiography. Thorax applications include perfusion imaging in patients with pulmonary thromboemboli and other chest diseases, xenon ventilation-perfusion imaging and solitary nodule characterization. Cardiac applications include dual-energy cardiac perfusion, viability and cardiac iron detection. The removal of calcific plaques from arteries, bone removal and aortic stent graft evaluation may be achieved in the vascular system. Abdominal applications include the detection and characterization of liver and pancreas masses, the diagnosis of steatosis and iron overload, DECT colonoscopy and CT cholangiography. Urinary system applications are urinary calculi characterization (uric acid vs. non-uric acid), renal cyst characterization and mass characterization. Musculoskeletal applications permit the differentiation of gout from pseudogout and a reduction of

  8. Liver transplantation for a giant mesenchymal hamartoma of the liver in an adult: Case report and review of the literature

    PubMed Central

    Li, Jiang; Cai, Jin-Zhen; Guo, Qing-Jun; Li, Jun-Jie; Sun, Xiao-Ye; Hu, Zhan-Dong; Cooper, David KC; Shen, Zhong-Yang

    2015-01-01

    Mesenchymal hamartomas of the liver (MHLs) in adults are rare and potentially premalignant lesions, which present as solid/cystic neoplasms. We report a rare case of orthotopic liver transplantation in a patient with a giant MHL. In 2013, a 34-year-old female sought medical advice after a 2-year history of progressive abdominal distention and respiratory distress. Physical examination revealed an extensive mass in the abdomen. Computed tomography (CT) of her abdomen revealed multiple liver cysts, with the diameter of largest cyst being 16 cm × 14 cm. The liver hilar structures were not clearly displayed. The adjacent organs were compressed and displaced. Initial laboratory tests, including biochemical investigations and coagulation profile, were unremarkable. Tumor markers, including levels of AFP, CEA and CA19-9, were within the normal ranges. The patient underwent orthotopic liver transplantation in November 2013, the liver being procured from a 40-year-old man after cardiac death following traumatic brain injury. Warm ischemic time was 7.5 min and cold ischemic time was 3 h. The recipient underwent classical orthotopic liver transplantation. The recipient operative procedure took 8.5 h, the anhepatic phase lasting for 1 h without the use of venovenous bypass. The immunosuppressive regimen included intraoperative induction with basiliximab and high-dose methylprednisolone, and postoperative maintenance with tacrolimus, mycophenolate mofetil, and prednisone. The recipient’s diseased liver weighed 21 kg (dry weight) and measured 41 cm × 32 cm × 31 cm. Histopathological examination confirmed the diagnosis of an MHL. The patient did not experience any acute rejection episode or other complication. All the laboratory tests returned to normal within one month after surgery. Three months after transplantation, the immunosuppressive therapy was reduced to tacrolimus monotherapy, and the T-tube was removed after cholangiography showed no abnormalities. Twelve months

  9. Biliary leakage after urgent cholecystectomy: Optimization of endoscopic treatment

    PubMed Central

    Ljubičić, Neven; Bišćanin, Alen; Pavić, Tajana; Nikolić, Marko; Budimir, Ivan; Mijić, August; Đuzel, Ana

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the results of endoscopic treatment of postoperative biliary leakage occurring after urgent cholecystectomy with a long-term follow-up. METHODS: This is an observational database study conducted in a tertiary care center. All consecutive patients who underwent endoscopic retrograde cholangiography (ERC) for presumed postoperative biliary leakage after urgent cholecystectomy in the period between April 2008 and April 2013 were considered for this study. Patients with bile duct transection and biliary strictures were excluded. Biliary leakage was suspected in the case of bile appearance from either percutaneous drainage of abdominal collection or abdominal drain placed at the time of cholecystectomy. Procedural and main clinical characteristics of all consecutive patients with postoperative biliary leakage after urgent cholecystectomy, such as indication for cholecystectomy, etiology and type of leakage, ERC findings and post-ERC complications, were collected from our electronic database. All patients in whom the leakage was successfully treated endoscopically were followed-up after they were discharged from the hospital and the main clinical characteristics, laboratory data and common bile duct diameter were electronically recorded. RESULTS: During a five-year period, biliary leakage was recognized in 2.2% of patients who underwent urgent cholecystectomy. The median time from cholecystectomy to ERC was 6 d (interquartile range, 4-11 d). Endoscopic interventions to manage biliary leakage included biliary stent insertion with or without biliary sphincterotomy. In 23 (77%) patients after first endoscopic treatment bile flow through existing surgical drain ceased within 11 d following biliary therapeutic endoscopy (median, 4 d; interquartile range, 2-8 d). In those patients repeat ERC was not performed and the biliary stent was removed on gastroscopy. In seven (23%) patients repeat ERC was done within one to fourth week after their first ERC

  10. Endoscopic ultrasound-guided biliary intervention in patients with surgically altered anatomy

    PubMed Central

    Siripun, Aroon; Sripongpun, Pimsiri; Ovartlarnporn, Bancha

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate the efficacy of endoscopic ultrasound guided biliary drainage (EUS-BD) in patients with surgically altered anatomies. METHODS: We performed a search of the MEDLINE database for studies published between 2001 to July 2014 reporting on EUS-BD in patients with surgically altered anatomy using the terms “EUS drainage” and “altered anatomy”. All relevant articles were accessed in full text. A manual search of the reference lists of relevant retrieved articles was also performed. Only full-text English papers were included. Data regarding age, gender, diagnosis, method of EUS-BD and intervention, type of altered anatomy, technical success, clinical success, and complications were extracted and collected. Anatomic alterations were categorized as: group 1, Billroth I; group 2, Billroth II; group 4, Roux-en-Y with gastric bypass; and group 3, all other types. RESULTS: Twenty three articles identified in the literature search, three reports were from the same group with different numbers of cases. In total, 101 cases of EUS-BD in patients with altered anatomy were identified. Twenty-seven cases had no information and were excluded. Seventy four cases were included for analysis. Data of EUS-BD in patients categorized as group 1, 2 and 4 were limited with 2, 3 and 6 cases with EUS-BD done respectively. Thirty four cases with EUS-BD were reported in group 3. The pooled technical success, clinical success, and complication rates of all reports with available data were 89.18%, 91.07% and 17.5%, respectively. The results are similar to the reported outcomes of EUS-BD in general, however, with limited data of EUS-BD in patients with altered anatomy rendered it difficult to draw a firm conclusion. CONCLUSION: EUS-BD may be an option for patients with altered anatomy after a failed endoscopic-retrograde-cholangiography in centers with expertise in EUS-BD procedures in a research setting. PMID:25789101

  11. Efficacy of SpyGlassTM-directed biopsy compared to brush cytology in obtaining adequate tissue for diagnosis in patients with biliary strictures

    PubMed Central

    Rey, Johannes Wilhelm; Hansen, Torsten; Dümcke, Sebastian; Tresch, Achim; Kramer, Katja; Galle, Peter Robert; Goetz, Martin; Schuchmann, Marcus; Kiesslich, Ralf; Hoffman, Arthur

    2014-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate the diagnostic yield (inflammatory activity) and efficiency (size of the biopsy specimen) of SpyGlassTM-guided biopsy vs standard brush cytology in patients with and without primary sclerosing cholangitis (PSC). METHODS: At the University Medical Center Mainz, Germany, 35 consecutive patients with unclear biliary lesions (16 patients) or long-standing PSC (19 patients) were screened for the study. All patients underwent a physical examination, lab analyses, and abdominal ultrasound. Thirty-one patients with non-PSC strictures or with PSC were scheduled to undergo endoscopic retrograde cholangiography (ERC) and subsequent peroral cholangioscopy (POC). Standard ERC was initially performed, and any lesions or strictures were localized. POC was performed later during the same session. The Boston Scientific SpyGlass SystemTM (Natick, MA, United States) was used for choledochoscopy. The biliary tree was visualized, and suspected lesions or strictures were biopsied, followed by brush cytology of the same area. The study endpoints (for both techniques) were the degree of inflammation, tissue specimen size, and the patient populations (PSC vs non-PSC). Inflammatory changes were divided into three categories: none, low activity, and high activity. The specimen quantity was rated as low, moderate, or sufficient. RESULTS: SpyGlassTM imaging and brush cytology with material retrieval were performed in 29 of 31 (93.5%) patients (23 of the 29 patients were male). The median patient age was 45 years (min, 20 years; max, 76 years). Nineteen patients had known PSC, and 10 showed non-PSC strictures. No procedure-related complications were encountered. However, for both methods, tissues could only be retrieved from 29 patients. In cases of inflammation of the biliary tract, the diagnostic yield of the SpyGlassTM-directed biopsies was greater than that using brush cytology. More tissue material was obtained for the biopsy method than for the brush cytology method (P

  12. Anomalous opening of the common bile duct into the duodenal bulb: endoscopic treatment

    PubMed Central

    Disibeyaz, Selcuk; Parlak, Erkan; Cicek, Bahattin; Cengiz, Cem; Kuran, Sedef O; Oguz, Dilek; Güzel, Hakan; Sahin, Burhan

    2007-01-01

    Background Anomalous biliary opening especially the presence of the ampulla of Vater in the duodenal bulb is a very rare phenomenon. We report clinical implications, laboratory and ERCP findings and also therapeutic approaches in 53 cases. Methods The data were collected from the records of 12.158 ERCP. The diagnosis was established as an anomalous opening of the common bile duct (CBD) into the duodenal bulb when there is an orifice observed in the bulb with the absence of a papillary structure at its normal localization and when the CBD is visualized by cholangiography through this orifice without evidence of any other opening. Results A total of 53 cases were recruited. There was an obvious male preponderance (M/F: 49/4). Demographic data and ERCP findings were available for all, but clinical characteristics and laboratory findings could be obtained from 39 patients with full records. Thirty – seven of 39 cases had abdominal pain (95%) and 23 of them (59%) had cholangitis as well. Elevated AP and GGT were found in 97.4% (52/53). History of cholecystectomy was present in 64% of the cases, recurrent cholangitis in 26% and duodenal ulcer in 45%. Normal papilla was not observed in any of the patients and a cleft-like opening was evident instead. The CBD was hook shaped at the distal part that opens to the duodenal bulb. Pancreatic duct (PD) was opening separately into the bulb in all the cases when it was possible to visualize. Dilated CBD in ERCP was evident in 94% and the CBD stone was demonstrated in 51%. PD was dilated in four of 12 (33%) cases. None of them has a history of pancreatitis. Endoscopically, Papillary Balloon Dilatation instead of Sphincterotomy carried out in 19 of 27 patients (70%) with choledocholithiazis. Remaining eight patients had undergone surgery (30%). Clinical symptoms were resolved with medical treatment in 16(32%) patients with dilated CBD but no stone. Perforation and bleeding were occurred only in two patients, which stones extracted

  13. Evaluation of Biliary Calprotectin as a Biomarker in Primary Sclerosing Cholangitis.

    PubMed

    Gauss, Annika; Sauer, Peter; Stiehl, Adolf; Rupp, Christian; Krisam, Johannes; Leopold, Yvonne; Kloeters-Plachky, Petra; Stremmel, Wolfgang; Gotthardt, Daniel

    2016-04-01

    Primary sclerosing cholangitis (PSC) is a chronic inflammatory disease of the bile ducts with limited therapeutic options except liver transplantation. Reliable biomarkers to predict the disease course are unavailable, and currently employed disease activity scores such as the Mayo risk score (MRS) have limitations. The present study aims to evaluate biliary calprotectin as a marker of disease activity and prognosis in PSC.This is a monocentric retrospective observational study. Calprotectin concentrations were measured by an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay in bile samples collected by endoscopic retrograde cholangiography from 106 PSC patients and 20 controls. Biliary calprotectin concentrations were compared between the 2 groups. In PSC patients, results were evaluated with regard to the presence of dominant bile duct stenoses, bile microbiology, MRS, survival free of liver transplantation, and necessity for bile duct interventions in the further disease course.Median (interquartile ranges) biliary calprotectin concentrations were higher in PSC patients than in controls (3646 ng/mL, 249-9748 vs 116 ng/mL, 104-655; P < 0.001). In the PSC cohort, higher biliary calprotectin concentrations were associated with the presence of microbes in bile (P = 0.02), the occurrence of dominant bile duct stenosis at any time in the disease course (P = 0.005), and the necessity for future bile duct interventions (P = 0.02). Patients with biliary calprotectin concentrations above a cut-off of 11,610 ng/mL displayed significantly shorter transplantation-free survival than those with biliary calprotectin concentrations ≤11,610 ng/mL (P < 0.001). Univariate Cox regression analysis revealed high biliary calprotectin concentration (>11,610 ng/mL) as a risk factor of shorter transplantation-free survival of PSC patients (P < 0.001) beside high plasma alkaline phosphatase (ALP) concentration (>142.5 U/L) (P = 0.006), high MRS (≥2) (P < 0

  14. National survey on cholecystectomy related bile duct injury--public health and financial aspects in Belgian hospitals--1997.

    PubMed

    Van de Sande, St; Bossens, M; Parmentier, Y; Gigot, J F

    2003-04-01

    Public health and financial aspects of cholecystectomy related bile duct injury (BDI) are highlighted in a National Cholecystectomy Survey carried out through 'datamining' the Federal State Medical Records Summaries and Financial Summaries of all Belgian hospitals in 1997. All cancer diagnoses, children < or = 10 years, cholecystectomies performed as an abdominal co-procedure or patients having undergone other non-related surgery were excluded from the study. 10.595 laparoscopic (LC) and 1.033 open cholecystectomies (OC) as well as 137 secondary BDI treatments (LC/OC) were included in the survey (total 11.765). Both LC and OC groups turned out to be significantly different as to distribution of patient's age and APR-DRG severity classes. Composite criteria in terms of ICD-9-CM and billing codes were elaborated to classify: 1) primary, intra-operatively detected and treated BDI (N = 30), 2) primary delayed BDI treatments (N = 38), 3) secondary BDI treatments (N = 137), 4) non-BDI abdomino-surgical complications (N = 119), 4) uneventful laparoscopic (N = 7.476) and 5) uneventful open cholecystectomy (N = 681). Complication rates, community costs of LC and OC groups, incidence of preoperative ERCP and/or intra-operative cholangiography as well as interventions for complications were studied. Incidence of cholecystectomy related BDI was 0.37% in LC, 2.81% in OC and 0.58% overall. Average costs amounted to [symbol: see text] 1.721 for uneventful LC, [symbol: see text] 2.924 for uneventful OC, [symbol: see text] 7.250 for primary, intra-operatively detected and immediately treated BDI [symbol: see text] 9.258 for primary delayed BDI treatments, [symbol: see text] 6.076 for secondary BDI treatments and [symbol: see text] 10.363 for non-BDI abdomino-surgical complications. In conclusion BDI with cholecystectomy reveals to be a serious complication increasing the overall average cost factor ninefold if not detected intra-operatively, in which case the raise is only fourfold

  15. Evaluation of Biliary Calprotectin as a Biomarker in Primary Sclerosing Cholangitis

    PubMed Central

    Gauss, Annika; Sauer, Peter; Stiehl, Adolf; Rupp, Christian; Krisam, Johannes; Leopold, Yvonne; Kloeters-Plachky, Petra; Stremmel, Wolfgang; Gotthardt, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Primary sclerosing cholangitis (PSC) is a chronic inflammatory disease of the bile ducts with limited therapeutic options except liver transplantation. Reliable biomarkers to predict the disease course are unavailable, and currently employed disease activity scores such as the Mayo risk score (MRS) have limitations. The present study aims to evaluate biliary calprotectin as a marker of disease activity and prognosis in PSC. This is a monocentric retrospective observational study. Calprotectin concentrations were measured by an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay in bile samples collected by endoscopic retrograde cholangiography from 106 PSC patients and 20 controls. Biliary calprotectin concentrations were compared between the 2 groups. In PSC patients, results were evaluated with regard to the presence of dominant bile duct stenoses, bile microbiology, MRS, survival free of liver transplantation, and necessity for bile duct interventions in the further disease course. Median (interquartile ranges) biliary calprotectin concentrations were higher in PSC patients than in controls (3646 ng/mL, 249–9748 vs 116 ng/mL, 104–655; P < 0.001). In the PSC cohort, higher biliary calprotectin concentrations were associated with the presence of microbes in bile (P = 0.02), the occurrence of dominant bile duct stenosis at any time in the disease course (P = 0.005), and the necessity for future bile duct interventions (P = 0.02). Patients with biliary calprotectin concentrations above a cut-off of 11,610 ng/mL displayed significantly shorter transplantation-free survival than those with biliary calprotectin concentrations ≤11,610 ng/mL (P < 0.001). Univariate Cox regression analysis revealed high biliary calprotectin concentration (>11,610 ng/mL) as a risk factor of shorter transplantation-free survival of PSC patients (P < 0.001) beside high plasma alkaline phosphatase (ALP) concentration (>142.5 U/L) (P = 0.006), high MRS (

  16. Progressive familial intrahepatic cholestasis

    PubMed Central

    Davit-Spraul, Anne; Gonzales, Emmanuel; Baussan, Christiane; Jacquemin, Emmanuel

    2009-01-01

    Progressive familial intrahepatic cholestasis (PFIC) refers to heterogeneous group of autosomal recessive disorders of childhood that disrupt bile formation and present with cholestasis of hepatocellular origin. The exact prevalence remains unknown, but the estimated incidence varies between 1/50,000 and 1/100,000 births. Three types of PFIC have been identified and related to mutations in hepatocellular transport system genes involved in bile formation. PFIC1 and PFIC2 usually appear in the first months of life, whereas onset of PFIC3 may also occur later in infancy, in childhood or even during young adulthood. Main clinical manifestations include cholestasis, pruritus and jaundice. PFIC patients usually develop fibrosis and end-stage liver disease before adulthood. Serum gamma-glutamyltransferase (GGT) activity is normal in PFIC1 and PFIC2 patients, but is elevated in PFIC3 patients. Both PFIC1 and PFIC2 are caused by impaired bile salt secretion due respectively to defects in ATP8B1 encoding the FIC1 protein, and in ABCB11 encoding the bile salt export pump protein (BSEP). Defects in ABCB4, encoding the multi-drug resistant 3 protein (MDR3), impair biliary phospholipid secretion resulting in PFIC3. Diagnosis is based on clinical manifestations, liver ultrasonography, cholangiography and liver histology, as well as on specific tests for excluding other causes of childhood cholestasis. MDR3 and BSEP liver immunostaining, and analysis of biliary lipid composition should help to select PFIC candidates in whom genotyping could be proposed to confirm the diagnosis. Antenatal diagnosis can be proposed for affected families in which a mutation has been identified. Ursodeoxycholic acid (UDCA) therapy should be initiated in all patients to prevent liver damage. In some PFIC1 or PFIC2 patients, biliary diversion can also relieve pruritus and slow disease progression. However, most PFIC patients are ultimately candidates for liver transplantation. Monitoring of

  17. Biliary strictures and recurrence after liver transplantation for primary sclerosing cholangitis: A retrospective multicenter analysis.

    PubMed

    Hildebrand, Tatiana; Pannicke, Nadine; Dechene, Alexander; Gotthardt, Daniel N; Kirchner, Gabriele; Reiter, Florian P; Sterneck, Martina; Herzer, Kerstin; Lenzen, Henrike; Rupp, Christian; Barg-Hock, Hannelore; de Leuw, Philipp; Teufel, Andreas; Zimmer, Vincent; Lammert, Frank; Sarrazin, Christoph; Spengler, Ulrich; Rust, Christian; Manns, Michael P; Strassburg, Christian P; Schramm, Christoph; Weismüller, Tobias J

    2016-01-01

    Liver transplantation (LT) is the only definitive treatment for patients with end-stage liver disease due to primary sclerosing cholangitis (PSC), but a high rate of biliary strictures (BSs) and of recurrent primary sclerosing cholangitis (recPSC) has been reported. In this multicenter study, we analyzed a large patient cohort with a long follow-up in order to evaluate the incidence of BS and recPSC, to assess the impact on survival after LT, and to identify risk factors. We collected clinical, surgical, and laboratory data and records on inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), immunosuppression, recipient and graft outcome, and biliary complications (based on cholangiography and histology) of all patients who underwent LT for PSC in 10 German transplant centers between January 1990 and December 2006; 335 patients (68.4% men; mean age, 38.9 years; 73.5% with IBD) underwent transplantation 8.8 years after PSC diagnosis with follow-up for 98.8 months. The 1-, 5-, and 10-year recipient and graft survival was 90.7%, 84.8%, 79.4% and 79.1%, 69.0%, 62.4%, respectively. BS was diagnosed in 36.1% after a mean time of 3.9 years, and recPSC was diagnosed in 20.3% after 4.6 years. Both entities had a significant impact on longterm graft and recipient survival. Independent risk factors for BS were donor age, ulcerative colitis, chronic ductopenic rejection, bilirubin, and international normalized ratio (INR) at LT. Independent risk factors for recPSC were donor age, IBD, and INR at LT. These variables were able to categorize patients into risk groups for BS and recPSC. In conclusion, BS and recPSC affect longterm graft and patient survival after LT for PSC. Donor age, IBD, and INR at LT are independent risk factors for BS and recPSC and allow for risk estimation depending on the recipient-donor constellation. PMID:26438008

  18. Liver transplantation for a giant mesenchymal hamartoma of the liver in an adult: Case report and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Li, Jiang; Cai, Jin-Zhen; Guo, Qing-Jun; Li, Jun-Jie; Sun, Xiao-Ye; Hu, Zhan-Dong; Cooper, David K C; Shen, Zhong-Yang

    2015-05-28

    Mesenchymal hamartomas of the liver (MHLs) in adults are rare and potentially premalignant lesions, which present as solid/cystic neoplasms. We report a rare case of orthotopic liver transplantation in a patient with a giant MHL. In 2013, a 34-year-old female sought medical advice after a 2-year history of progressive abdominal distention and respiratory distress. Physical examination revealed an extensive mass in the abdomen. Computed tomography (CT) of her abdomen revealed multiple liver cysts, with the diameter of largest cyst being 16 cm × 14 cm. The liver hilar structures were not clearly displayed. The adjacent organs were compressed and displaced. Initial laboratory tests, including biochemical investigations and coagulation profile, were unremarkable. Tumor markers, including levels of AFP, CEA and CA19-9, were within the normal ranges. The patient underwent orthotopic liver transplantation in November 2013, the liver being procured from a 40-year-old man after cardiac death following traumatic brain injury. Warm ischemic time was 7.5 min and cold ischemic time was 3 h. The recipient underwent classical orthotopic liver transplantation. The recipient operative procedure took 8.5 h, the anhepatic phase lasting for 1 h without the use of venovenous bypass. The immunosuppressive regimen included intraoperative induction with basiliximab and high-dose methylprednisolone, and postoperative maintenance with tacrolimus, mycophenolate mofetil, and prednisone. The recipient's diseased liver weighed 21 kg (dry weight) and measured 41 cm × 32 cm × 31 cm. Histopathological examination confirmed the diagnosis of an MHL. The patient did not experience any acute rejection episode or other complication. All the laboratory tests returned to normal within one month after surgery. Three months after transplantation, the immunosuppressive therapy was reduced to tacrolimus monotherapy, and the T-tube was removed after cholangiography showed no abnormalities. Twelve months

  19. Long-Term Results of Percutaneous Bilioenteric Anastomotic Stricture Treatment in Liver-Transplanted Children

    SciTech Connect

    Moreira, Airton Mota Carnevale, Francisco Cesar; Tannuri, Uenis; Suzuki, Lisa; Gibelli, Nelson; Maksoud, Joao Gilberto; Cerri, Giovanni Guido

    2010-02-15

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the mid- and long-term results of percutaneous transhepatic cholangiography (PTC) and biliary drainage in children with isolated bilioenteric anastomotic stenosis (BAS) after pediatric liver transplantation. Sixty-four children underwent PTC from March 1993 to May 2008. Nineteen cholangiograms were normal; 10 showed intrahepatic biliary stenosis and BAS, and 35 showed isolated BAS. Cadaveric grafts were used in 19 and living donor grafts in 16 patients. Four patients received a whole liver, and 31 patients received a left lobe or left lateral segment. Roux-en-Y hepaticojejunostomy was performed in all patients. Indication for PTC was based on clinical, laboratory, and histopathologic findings. In patients with isolated BAS, dilation and biliary catheter placement, with changes every 2 months, were performed. Patients were separated into 4 groups according to number of treatment sessions required. The drainage catheter was removed if cholangiogram showed no significant residual stenosis and normal biliary emptying time after a minimum of 6 months. The relationship between risk factors (recipient's weight <10 kg, previous exposure to Cytomegalovirus, donor-recipient sex and weight relations, autoimmune disease as indication for transplantion, previous Kasai's surgery, use of reduced liver grafts, chronic or acute rejection occurrence) and treatment was evaluated. Before PTC, fever was observed in 46%, biliary dilation in 23%, increased bilirubin in 57%, and increased gamma-glutamyltransferase (GGT) in 100% of patients. In the group with BAS, 24 of 35 (69%) patients had histopathologic findings of cholestasis as did 9 of 19 (47%) patients in the group with normal PTC. Of the 35 patients, 23 (65.7%) needed 1 (group I), 7 needed 2 (group II), 4 needed 3 (group III), and 1 needed 4 treatment sessions (group IV). The best results were observed after 1 treatment session, and the mean duration of catheter placement and replacement

  20. Biliary complications in liver transplantation: Impact of anastomotic technique and ischemic time on short- and long-term outcome

    PubMed Central

    Kienlein, Stefan; Schoening, Wenzel; Andert, Anne; Kroy, Daniela; Neumann, Ulf Peter; Schmeding, Maximilian

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To elucidate the impact of various donor recipient and transplant factors on the development of biliary complications after liver transplantation. METHODS: We retrospectively reviewed 200 patients of our newly established liver transplantation (LT) program, who received full size liver graft. Biliary reconstruction was performed by side-to-side (SS), end-to-end (EE) anastomosis or hepeaticojejunostomy (HJ). Biliary complications (BC), anastomotic stenosis, bile leak, papillary stenosis, biliary drain complication, ischemic type biliary lesion (ITBL) were evaluated by studying patient records, corresponding radiologic imaging and reports of interventional procedures [e.g., endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP)]. Laboratory results included alanine aminotransferase (ALT), gammaglutamyltransferase and direct/indirect bilirubin with focus on the first and fifth postoperative day, six weeks after LT. The routinely employed external bile drain was examined by a routine cholangiography on the fifth postoperative day and six weeks after transplantation as a standard procedure, but also whenever clinically indicated. If necessary, interventional (e.g., ERCP) or surgical therapy was performed. In case of biliary complication, patients were selected, assigned to different complication-groups and subsequently reviewed in detail. To evaluate the patients outcome, we focussed on appearance of postoperative/post-interventional cholangitis, need for rehospitalisation, retransplantation, ITBL or death caused by BC. RESULTS: A total of 200 patients [age: 56 (19-72), alcoholic cirrhosis: n = 64 (32%), hepatocellular carcinoma: n = 40 (20%), acute liver failure: n = 23 (11.5%), cryptogenic cirrhosis: n = 22 (11%), hepatitis B virus /hepatitis C virus cirrhosis: n = 13 (6.5%), primary sclerosing cholangitis: n = 13 (6.5%), others: n = 25 (12.5%) were included. The median follow-up was 27 mo until June 2015. The overall biliary complication rate was 37.5% (n = 75

  1. [Laparoscopic and general surgery guided by open interventional magnetic resonance].

    PubMed

    Lauro, A; Gould, S W T; Cirocchi, R; Giustozzi, G; Darzi, A

    2004-10-01

    room, the tubing and light head being passed through penetration panels. Intraoperative MR-cholangiography was performed using fast spin echo (SSFSE) techniques with minimal intensity projection 3-dimensional reconstruction. About skin sarcomas, 2 of them were skin recurrences of previously surgically treated sarcomas (all of them received preoperative biopsy) and the extent of the lesion was then determined using short tau inversion recovery (STIR) sequence. The skin was closed in each case without need for any plastic reconstruction. The breast lesions were visualized with both Signa and real-time imaging and all enhanced with contrast: 2 (20%) were visualized only after contrast enhancement; intraoperative real time imaging clearly demonstrated a resection margin in all cases. Maximum dimensions of breast specimens (range 8-50 mm, median 24.5 mm) were not significantly different from those measured by Signa (p>0.17, Student's paired t-test) or real time images (p>0.4): also there was no significant difference in lesion size between Signa and real time images (p>0.25). All postprocedure scans clearly demonstrated complete excision. The extent of the tumor at MR imaging was greater in each case than suggested by clinical examination. Adequate resection margins were planned using STIR sequences. Histological examination confirmed clear surgical margins of at least 1 cm in each case. During right hemicolectomy, both intraoperative SSFSE and FSPGR contrast imaging revealed the lesion and details of the colonic surface; imaging of the lymph node draining right colon was only partially successful, due to movement artifact. Concerning laparoscopic procedures, both FSE and SSFSE techniques produced reasonable images of the gallbladder and intrahepatic ducts, but the FSE imaging was of poor quality due to respiration artifact; however, SSFSE allowed visualization of the gallbladder and part of the common bile duct. About skin sarcomas, the extent of the tumor at MR imaging