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Sample records for cholangiopancreatography endoscopic retrograde

  1. Huge biloma after endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography and endoscopic biliary sphincterotomy

    PubMed Central

    Alkhateeb, Harith M.; Aljanabi, Thaer J.; Al-azzawi, Khairallh H.; Alkarboly, Taha A.

    2015-01-01

    Background Biliary leak can occur as a complication of biliary surgery, endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography manipulations and endoscopic biliary sphincterotomy. Consequently, bile may collect in the abdominal cavity, a condition called biloma. Rarely, it may reach a massive size. Case presentation A 72-year-old man presented with gastric upset with gradual abdominal distension reaching a large size due to intra-abdominal bile collection (biloma) after endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography plus endoscopic biliary sphincterotomy and stenting for post laparoscopic cholecystectomy common bile duct stricture. This huge biloma was treated by percutaneous insertion of a tube drain for a few days, evacuating the collection successfully without recurrence. Discussion This patient might sustain injury to the common bile duct either by the guide wire or stent, or the injury occurred at the angle between the common bile duct and duodenum during sphincterotomy of the ampulla. Although any of these rents may lead to a bile leak, causing a huge biloma, they could be successfully treated by percutaneous drainage. Conclusions (1) Following endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography, a patient’s complaints should not be ignored. (2) A massive biloma can occur due to such procedures. (3) Conservative treatment with minimal invasive technique can prove to be effective. PMID:26402876

  2. Endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography during pregnancy without radiation

    PubMed Central

    Akcakaya, Adem; Ozkan, Orhan Veli; Okan, Ismail; Kocaman, Orhan; Sahin, Mustafa

    2009-01-01

    AIM: To present our experience with pregnant patients who underwent endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP) without using radiation, and to evaluate the acceptability of this alternative therapeutic pathway for ERCP during pregnancy. METHODS: Between 2000 and 2008, six pregnant women underwent seven ERCP procedures. ERCP was performed under mild sedoanalgesia induced with pethidine HCl and midazolam. The bile duct was cannulated with a guidewire through the papilla. A catheter was slid over the guidewire and bile aspiration and/or visualization of the bile oozing around the guidewire was used to confirm correct cannulation. Following sphincterotomy, the bile duct was cleared by balloon sweeping. When indicated, stents were placed. Confirmation of successful biliary cannulation and stone extraction was made by laboratory, radiological and clinical improvement. Neither fluoroscopy nor spot radiography was used during the procedure. RESULTS: The mean age of the patients was 28 years (range, 21-33 years). The mean gestational age for the fetus was 23 wk (range, 14-34 wk). Five patients underwent ERCP because of choledocholithiasis and/or choledocholithiasis-induced acute cholangitis. In one case, a stone was extracted after precut papillotomy with a needle-knife, since the stone was impacted. One patient had ERCP because of persistent biliary fistula after hepatic hydatid disease surgery. Following sphincterotomy, scoleces were removed from the common bile duct. Two weeks later, because of the absence of fistula closure, repeat ERCP was performed and a stent was placed. The fistula was closed after stent placement. Neither post-ERCP complications nor premature birth or abortion was seen. CONCLUSION: Non-radiation ERCP in experienced hands can be performed during pregnancy. Stent placement should be considered in cases for which complete common bile duct clearance is dubious because of a lack of visualization of the biliary tree. PMID:19653343

  3. Endoscopic prevention of post-endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Tae Hoon; Park, Do Hyun

    2014-01-01

    Post-endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP) pancreatitis (PEP) is not an uncommon adverse event but may be an avoidable complication. Although pancreatitis of severe grade is reported in 0.1%-0.5% of ERCP patients, a serious clinical course may be lethal. For prevention of severe PEP, patient risk stratification, appropriate selection of patients using noninvasive diagnostic imaging methods such as magnetic resonance cholangiopancreatography or endoscopic ultrasonography (EUS), and avoidance of unnecessary invasive procedures, are important measures to be taken before any procedure. Pharmacological prevention is also commonly attempted but is usually ineffective. No ideal agent has not yet been found and the available data conflict. Currently, rectal non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs are used to prevent PEP in high-risk patients, but additional studies using larger numbers of subjects are necessary to confirm any prophylactic effect. In this review, we focus on endoscopic procedures seeking to prevent or decrease the severity of PEP. Among various cannulation methods, wire-guided cannulation, precut fistulotomy, and transpancreatic septostomy are reviewed. Prophylactic pancreatic stent placement, which is the best-known prophylactic method, is reviewed with reference to the ideal stent type, adequate duration of stent placement, and stent-related complications. Finally, we comment on other treatment alternatives, and make the point that further advances in EUS-guided techniques may afford useful PEP prophylaxis. PMID:25469026

  4. Selective biliary cannulation techniques for endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography procedures and prevention of post- endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Mukai, Shuntaro; Itoi, Takao

    2016-06-01

    Numerous endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP) techniques have been reported to achieve selective biliary cannulation success. For standard biliary cannulation procedures, the wire-guided cannulation technique has been reported to reduce the rate of post-ERCP pancreatitis (PEP) and increase the biliary cannulation success rate, although conflicting reports exist. The pancreatic or double-guidewire technique and several precut techniques have been reported as useful techniques in difficult biliary cannulation cases. Although ERCP is a useful endoscopic procedure, the risk of adverse events, particularly post-ERCP pancreatitis, is inevitable. Previous studies and analyses have revealed the risk factors for PEP. The efficacy of prophylactic pancreatic duct stent placement and the administration of rectal nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs for preventing PEP has also been reported. Herein, we reviewed reports in the literature regarding the current status of selective biliary cannulation techniques and PEP prevention. PMID:26782710

  5. Endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography in ruptured liver hydatid cyst.

    PubMed

    Borahma, Mohamed; Afifi, Rajaa; Benelbarhdadi, Imane; Ajana, Fatima Zahra; Essamri, Wafaa; Essaid, Abdellah

    2015-07-01

    One of the most common and serious complications of hepatic hydatid cyst disease is communication between the cyst and the biliary tree. Surgical management of biliary fistula is associated with high morbidity and mortality. We retrospectively reviewed the effectiveness of endoscopic treatment of ruptured hydatid cyst into intrahepatic bile ducts. Diagnosis of intrabiliary rupture of hydatid cyst was mostly suspected by acute cholangitis, jaundice, pain, and/or persistent external biliary fistula after surgery. The diagnosis was confirmed by radiology and endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP) findings. We retrospectively reviewed clinical, laboratory, imagery, and ERCP findings for all patients. The therapeutic methods performed were endoscopic sphincterotomy, extraction by balloon or Dormia basket, stenting, or nasobiliary drainage. Sixteen patients with ruptured hepatic hydatid cyst into bile ducts were seen in 9 years. Nine of 16 patients had a surgical history of hepatic hydatid cyst and three patients had a percutanous treatment history. We carried out ERCP with sphincterotomy and extraction of hydatid materials (extraction balloon n = 11; Dormia basket n = 5) or biliary drainage (nasobiliary drainage n = 1; biliary stenting n = 1). The fistula healed in 80 % of patients with a median time of 6 weeks [range, 1-12] after endoscopic treatment. ERCP was an effective method of treatment for hepatic hydatid cyst with biliary fistula. PMID:26345677

  6. Endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography-related perforations: Diagnosis and management

    PubMed Central

    Vezakis, Antonios; Fragulidis, Georgios; Polydorou, Andreas

    2015-01-01

    Endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP) has become an important therapeutic modality for biliary and pancreatic disorders. Perforation is one of the most feared complications of ERCP and endoscopic sphincterotomy. A MEDLINE search was performed from 2000-2014 using the keywords “perforation”, “ERCP” and “endoscopic sphincterotomy”. All articles including more than nine cases were reviewed. The incidence of ERCP-related perforations was low (0.39%, 95%CI: 0.34-0.69) with an associated mortality of 7.8% (95%CI: 3.80-13.07). Endoscopic sphincterotomy was responsible for 41% of perforations, insertion and manipulations of the endoscope for 26%, guidewires for 15%, dilation of strictures for 3%, other instruments for 4%, stent insertion or migration for 2% and in 7% of cases the etiology was unknown. The diagnosis was made during ERCP in 73% of cases. The mechanism, site and extent of injury, suggested by clinical and radiographic findings, should guide towards operative or non-operative management. In type I perforations early surgical repair is indicated, unless endoscopic closure can be achieved. Patients with type II perforations should be treated initially non-operatively. Non-operative treatment includes biliary stenting, fasting, intravenous fluid resuscitation, nasogastric drainage, broad spectrum antibiotics, percutaneous drainage of fluid collections. Non-operative treatment was successful in 79% of patients with type II injuries, with an overall mortality of 9.4%. Non-operative treatment was sufficient in all patients with type III injuries. Surgical technique depends on timing, site and size of defect and clinical condition of the patient. In conclusion, diagnosis is based on clinical suspicion and clinical and radiographic findings. Whilst surgery is usually indicated in patients with type I injuries, patients with type II or III injuries should be treated initially non-operatively. A minority of them will finally require surgical

  7. Advances in endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography for the treatment of cholangiocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Uppal, Dushant S; Wang, Andrew Y

    2015-01-01

    Cholangiocarcinoma (CCA) is a malignancy of the bile ducts that carries high morbidity and mortality. Patients with CCA typically present with obstructive jaundice, and associated complications of CCA include cholangitis and biliary sepsis. Endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP) is a valuable treatment modality for patients with CCA, as it enables internal drainage of blocked bile ducts and hepatic segments by using plastic or metal stents. While there remains debate as to if bilateral (or multi-segmental) hepatic drainage is required and/or superior to unilateral drainage, the underlying tenant of draining any persistently opacified bile ducts is paramount to good ERCP practice and good clinical outcomes. Endoscopic therapy for malignant biliary strictures from CCA has advanced to include ablative therapies via ERCP-directed photodynamic therapy (PDT) or radiofrequency ablation (RFA). While ERCP techniques cannot cure CCA, advancements in the field of ERCP have enabled us to improve upon the quality of life of patients with inoperable and incurable disease. ERCP-directed PDT has been used in lieu of brachytherapy to provide neoadjuvant local tumor control in patients with CCA who are awaiting liver transplantation. Lastly, mounting evidence suggests that palliative ERCP-directed PDT, and probably ERCP-directed RFA as well, offer a survival advantage to patients with this difficult-to-treat malignancy. PMID:26140095

  8. Endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography in periampullary diverticulum: The challenge of cannulation.

    PubMed

    Altonbary, Ahmed Youssef; Bahgat, Monir Hussein

    2016-03-25

    Periampullary diverticulum (PAD) is duodenal outpunching defined as herniation of the mucosa or submucosa that occurs via a defect in the muscle layer within an area of 2 to 3 cm around the papilla. Although PAD is usually asymptomatic and discovered incidentally during endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP), it is associated with different pathological conditions such as common bile duct obstruction, pancreatitis, perforation, bleeding, and rarely carcinoma. ERCP has a low rate of success in patients with PAD, suggesting that this condition may complicate the technical application of the ERCP procedure. Moreover, cannulation of PAD can be challenging, time consuming, and require the higher level of skill of more experienced endoscopists. A large portion of the failures of cannulation in patients with PAD can be attributed to inability of the endoscopist to detect the papilla. In cases where the papilla is identified but does not point in a suitable direction for cannulation, different techniques have been described. Endoscopists must be aware of papilla identification in the presence of PAD and of different cannulation techniques, including their technical feasibility and safety, to allow for an informed decision and ensure the best outcome. Herein, we review the literature on this practical topic and propose an algorithm to increase the success rate of biliary cannulation. PMID:27014423

  9. Endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography in periampullary diverticulum: The challenge of cannulation

    PubMed Central

    Altonbary, Ahmed Youssef; Bahgat, Monir Hussein

    2016-01-01

    Periampullary diverticulum (PAD) is duodenal outpunching defined as herniation of the mucosa or submucosa that occurs via a defect in the muscle layer within an area of 2 to 3 cm around the papilla. Although PAD is usually asymptomatic and discovered incidentally during endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP), it is associated with different pathological conditions such as common bile duct obstruction, pancreatitis, perforation, bleeding, and rarely carcinoma. ERCP has a low rate of success in patients with PAD, suggesting that this condition may complicate the technical application of the ERCP procedure. Moreover, cannulation of PAD can be challenging, time consuming, and require the higher level of skill of more experienced endoscopists. A large portion of the failures of cannulation in patients with PAD can be attributed to inability of the endoscopist to detect the papilla. In cases where the papilla is identified but does not point in a suitable direction for cannulation, different techniques have been described. Endoscopists must be aware of papilla identification in the presence of PAD and of different cannulation techniques, including their technical feasibility and safety, to allow for an informed decision and ensure the best outcome. Herein, we review the literature on this practical topic and propose an algorithm to increase the success rate of biliary cannulation. PMID:27014423

  10. Acute pulmonary embolism during an endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography.

    PubMed

    Painter, Nate P; Kumar, Priya A; Arora, Harendra

    2014-01-01

    A 76-year-old female patient presented for an endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP) for the removal of a biliary stent and lithotripsy. During the procedure, an acute drop in the end-tidal CO 2 , followed by cardiovascular collapse prompted the initiation of the advanced cardiac life support protocol. Transesophageal echocardiography (TEE) demonstrated direct evidence of pulmonary embolism. The patient was promptly treated with thrombolytic therapy and subsequently discharged home on oral warfarin therapy, with no noted sequelae. Although, there have been case reports of air embolism during an ERCP presenting with cardiovascular collapse, to the best of our knowledge, there are no reported cases of acute pulmonary embolus during this procedure. While the availability of TEE in the operating suites is quite common, quick access and interpretation capabilities in remote locations may not be as common. With the expansion of anesthesia services outside of the operating rooms, it may be prudent to develop rapid response systems that incorporate resources such as TEE and trained personnel to deal with such emergent situations. PMID:24732617

  11. Radiation dose to patients during endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography

    PubMed Central

    Boix, Jaume; Lorenzo-Zúñiga, Vicente

    2011-01-01

    Endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP) is an important tool for the diagnosis and treatment of the hepatobiliary system. The use of fluoroscopy to aid ERCP places both the patient and the endoscopy staff at risk of radiation-induced injury. Radiation dose to patients during ERCP depends on many factors, and the endoscopist cannot control some variables, such as patient size, procedure type, or fluoroscopic equipment used. Previous reports have demonstrated a linear relationship between radiation dose and fluoroscopy duration. When fluoroscopy is used to assist ERCP, the shortest fluoroscopy time possible is recommended. Pulsed fluoroscopy and monitoring the length of fluoroscopy have been suggested for an overall reduction in both radiation exposure and fluoroscopy times. Fluoroscopy time is shorter when ERCP is performed by an endoscopist who has many years experience of performing ERCP and carried out a large number of ERCPs in the preceding year. In general, radiation exposure is greater during therapeutic ERCP than during diagnostic ERCP. Factors associated with prolonged fluoroscopy have been delineated recently, but these have not been validated. PMID:21860683

  12. Paradoxical air embolus during endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography: an uncommon fatal complication.

    PubMed

    Markin, Nicholas W; Montzingo, Candice R

    2015-04-01

    Air embolism during endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography is a rare but potentially fatal complication. A 66-year-old man underwent endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography and remained stable until the end of the procedure, when he was found to have mottling on his right side and became hypoxic and unresponsive. Transesophageal echocardiography showed air within the left ventricle, consistent with systemic air embolism. Mortality resulted from significant cardiac and cerebral ischemia. The literature suggests that capnography is helpful in early diagnosis of air embolus, but it could not be used in this case because the patient's trachea was not intubated. PMID:25827860

  13. Biliary and pancreatic stenting: Devices and insertion techniques in therapeutic endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography and endoscopic ultrasonography.

    PubMed

    Mangiavillano, Benedetto; Pagano, Nico; Baron, Todd H; Arena, Monica; Iabichino, Giuseppe; Consolo, Pierluigi; Opocher, Enrico; Luigiano, Carmelo

    2016-02-10

    Stents are tubular devices made of plastic or metal. Endoscopic stenting is the most common treatment for obstruction of the common bile duct or of the main pancreatic duct, but also employed for the treatment of bilio-pancreatic leakages, for preventing post- endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography pancreatitis and to drain the gallbladder and pancreatic fluid collections. Recent progresses in techniques of stent insertion and metal stent design are represented by new, fully-covered lumen apposing metal stents. These stents are specifically designed for transmural drainage, with a saddle-shape design and bilateral flanges, to provide lumen-to-lumen anchoring, reducing the risk of migration and leakage. This review is an update of the technique of stent insertion and metal stent deployment, of the most recent data available on stent types and characteristics and the new applications for biliopancreatic stents. PMID:26862364

  14. Unusual Complications Related to Endoscopic Retrograde Cholangiopancreatography and Its Endoscopic Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Kwon, Chang-Il; Song, Sang Hee; Hahm, Ki Baik

    2013-01-01

    Endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP)-induced complications, once occurred, can lead to significant morbidity. Commonly 5% to 10% of patients experience procedure related complications such as post-ERCP pancreatitis, biliary hemorrhage, and cholangitis, in descending order. However, complications such as perforation, pneumothorax, air embolism, splenic injury, and basket impaction are rare but are associated with high mortality if occurred. Such unexpected unusual complications might extend the length of hospitalization, require urgent surgical intervention, and put the patient in miserable condition leading to permanent disability or mortality. Although these ERCP-induced complications can be minimized by a skilled operator using advanced techniques and devices, the occurrence of unusual complications are hard to expect and induce very difficult management condition. In this review, we will focus on the uncommon complications related to ERCP. This review is also aimed at suggesting optimal endoscopic treatment strategies for several complications based on our institutional experiences. PMID:23767036

  15. Biliary and pancreatic stenting: Devices and insertion techniques in therapeutic endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography and endoscopic ultrasonography

    PubMed Central

    Mangiavillano, Benedetto; Pagano, Nico; Baron, Todd H; Arena, Monica; Iabichino, Giuseppe; Consolo, Pierluigi; Opocher, Enrico; Luigiano, Carmelo

    2016-01-01

    Stents are tubular devices made of plastic or metal. Endoscopic stenting is the most common treatment for obstruction of the common bile duct or of the main pancreatic duct, but also employed for the treatment of bilio-pancreatic leakages, for preventing post- endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography pancreatitis and to drain the gallbladder and pancreatic fluid collections. Recent progresses in techniques of stent insertion and metal stent design are represented by new, fully-covered lumen apposing metal stents. These stents are specifically designed for transmural drainage, with a saddle-shape design and bilateral flanges, to provide lumen-to-lumen anchoring, reducing the risk of migration and leakage. This review is an update of the technique of stent insertion and metal stent deployment, of the most recent data available on stent types and characteristics and the new applications for biliopancreatic stents. PMID:26862364

  16. Recent Advanced Endoscopic Management of Endoscopic Retrograde Cholangiopancreatography Related Duodenal Perforations

    PubMed Central

    Park, Seon Mee

    2016-01-01

    The management strategy for endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography-related duodenal perforation can be determined based on the site and extent of injury, the patient’s condition, and time to diagnosis. Most cases of perivaterian or bile duct perforation can be managed with a biliary stent or nasobiliary drainage. Duodenal wall perforations had been treated with immediate surgical repair. However, with the development of endoscopic devices and techniques, endoscopic closure has been reported to be a safe and effective treatment that uses through-the-scope clips, ligation band, fibrin glue, endoclips and endoloops, an over-the-scope clipping device, suturing devices, covering luminal stents, and open-pore film drainage. Endoscopic therapy could be instituted in selected patients in whom perforation was identified early or during the procedure. Early diagnosis, proper conservative management, and effective endoscopic closure are required for favorable outcomes of non-surgical management. If endoscopic treatment fails, or in the cases of clinical deterioration, prompt surgical management should be considered. PMID:27484814

  17. Air Embolism after Endoscopic Retrograde Cholangiopancreatography in a Patient with Budd Chiari Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Wills-Sanin, Beatriz; Cárdenas, Yenny R.; Polanco, Lucas; Rivero, Oscar; Suarez, Sebastian; Buitrago, Andrés F.

    2014-01-01

    Endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography is a procedure commonly used for the diagnosis and treatment of various pancreatic and biliary diseases. Air embolism is a rare complication, which may be associated with this procedure. This condition can be manifested as cardiopulmonary instability and/or neurological symptoms. Known risk factors include: sphincterotomy; application of air with high intramural pressure; anatomic abnormalities; and chronic hepatobiliary inflammation. It is important for the health-care staff, including anesthesiologists, interventional gastroenterologists, and critical care specialists, amongst others, to promptly recognize air embolism and to initiate therapy in a timely fashion, thus preventing potentially fatal outcomes. We submit a brief review of the literature and a case report of air embolism which occurred in the immediate postoperative stage of an endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography, performed in a woman with a history of liver transplantation due to Budd Chiari syndrome and biliary stricture. PMID:25478242

  18. The Role of Endoscopic Retrograde Cholangiopancreatography in Management of Pancreatic Diseases.

    PubMed

    Riff, Brian P; Chandrasekhara, Vinay

    2016-03-01

    Endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography is an effective platform for a variety of therapies in the management of benign and malignant disease of the pancreas. Over the last 50 years, endotherapy has evolved into the first-line therapy in the majority of acute and chronic inflammatory diseases of the pancreas. As this field advances, it is important that gastroenterologists maintain an adequate knowledge of procedure indication, maintain sufficient procedure volume to handle complex pancreatic endotherapy, and understand alternate approaches to pancreatic diseases including medical management, therapy guided by endoscopic ultrasonography, and surgical options. PMID:26895680

  19. Using balloon-overtube-assisted enteroscopy for postoperative endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography

    PubMed Central

    Skinner, Matthew; Velázquez-Aviña, Jacobo

    2014-01-01

    Endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP) is technically more challenging in patients with postsurgical anatomy such as Roux-en-Y anastomosis, frequently mandating an operative intervention. Although limited, there is growing evidence that ERCP can be performed using the balloon-overtube-assisted enteroscopy (BOAE) in patients with complex postoperative anatomy. We present the technical aspects of performing ERCP with the BOAE in patients presenting with complex postsurgical anatomy having biliary problems. ERCP using the BOAE is feasible in patients with complex postsurgical anatomy, permitting diagnostic and therapeutic interventions in 80% of patients. PMID:25364385

  20. Subcapsular hepatic haematoma of the right lobe following endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography: Case report and literature review.

    PubMed

    Zappa, Marco Antonio; Aiolfi, Alberto; Antonini, Ilaria; Musolino, Cinzia Domenica; Porta, Andrea

    2016-05-01

    Sub capsular hepatic haematoma is a rare complication after endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP). Exact pathological mechanism is still unclear and few reports are nowadays available in literature. We report the case of a 58-year-old woman with recurrent episodes of upper abdominal pain, nausea and vomiting. On the basis of laboratory exams, abdomen ultrasound and magnetic resonance imaging she was diagnosed with a common bile duct stone. Endoscopic biliary sphincterotomy was performed. On the following day the patient complaint severe abdominal pain with rebound and hemodynamic instability. A computed tomography scan reveal a 14 cm × 6 cm × 19 cm sub-capsular hepatic haematoma on the right lobe that was successfully managed via percutaneous embolization. Sub capsular liver haematoma is a rare life threatening complication after ERCP that should be managed according to patients' haemodynamic and clinic. PMID:27158211

  1. Subcapsular hepatic haematoma of the right lobe following endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography: Case report and literature review

    PubMed Central

    Zappa, Marco Antonio; Aiolfi, Alberto; Antonini, Ilaria; Musolino, Cinzia Domenica; Porta, Andrea

    2016-01-01

    Sub capsular hepatic haematoma is a rare complication after endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP). Exact pathological mechanism is still unclear and few reports are nowadays available in literature. We report the case of a 58-year-old woman with recurrent episodes of upper abdominal pain, nausea and vomiting. On the basis of laboratory exams, abdomen ultrasound and magnetic resonance imaging she was diagnosed with a common bile duct stone. Endoscopic biliary sphincterotomy was performed. On the following day the patient complaint severe abdominal pain with rebound and hemodynamic instability. A computed tomography scan reveal a 14 cm × 6 cm × 19 cm sub-capsular hepatic haematoma on the right lobe that was successfully managed via percutaneous embolization. Sub capsular liver haematoma is a rare life threatening complication after ERCP that should be managed according to patients’ haemodynamic and clinic. PMID:27158211

  2. Sudden Death After Endoscopic Retrograde Cholangiopancreatography (ERCP)—Case Report and Literature Review

    PubMed Central

    Hauser, Goran; Milosevic, Marko; Zelić, Marko; Stimac, Davor

    2014-01-01

    Abstract There are only a few cases found in literature regarding air embolism in endoscopic procedures, especially in connection to endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP). We are presenting a case of a 56-year-old female patient who suffered from non-Hodgkin lymphoma located in her right groin. She was also diagnosed with choledocholithiasis and underwent ERCP to remove the gallstones. Immediately after the procedure she went into sudden cardiac arrest and subsequently died, despite all of our efforts. We reviewed literature in order to identify possible causes of death because fatal outcome following an uneventful and successful procedure was not expected. It is important to bear in mind all possible complications of ERCP. Our focus during the literature search was on air embolism. PMID:25501087

  3. Early endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography after laparoscopic cholecystectomy can strain the occurrence of trocar site hernia.

    PubMed

    Sumer, Fatih; Kayaalp, Cuneyt; Yagci, Mehmet Ali; Otan, Emrah; Kocaaslan, Huseyin

    2014-11-16

    This study reports a 69-year-old, obese, female patient presenting with a biliary leakage after laparoscopic cholecystectomy for cholelithiasis. Closure of the umbilical trocar site had been neglected during the laparoscopic cholecystectomy. Early, on postoperative day five, endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP) requirement after laparoscopic cholecystectomy resolved the biliary leakage problem but resulted with a more complicated clinical picture with an intestinal obstruction and severe abdominal pain. Computed tomography revealed a strangulated hernia from the umbilical trocar site. Increased abdominal pressure during ERCP had strained the weak umbilical trocar site. Emergency surgical intervention through the umbilicus revealed an ischemic small bowel segment which was treated with resection and anastomosis. This report demonstrates that negligence of trocar site closure can result in very early herniation, particularly if an endoscopic intervention is required in the early postoperative period. PMID:25400872

  4. Early endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography after laparoscopic cholecystectomy can strain the occurrence of trocar site hernia

    PubMed Central

    Sumer, Fatih; Kayaalp, Cuneyt; Yagci, Mehmet Ali; Otan, Emrah; Kocaaslan, Huseyin

    2014-01-01

    This study reports a 69-year-old, obese, female patient presenting with a biliary leakage after laparoscopic cholecystectomy for cholelithiasis. Closure of the umbilical trocar site had been neglected during the laparoscopic cholecystectomy. Early, on postoperative day five, endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP) requirement after laparoscopic cholecystectomy resolved the biliary leakage problem but resulted with a more complicated clinical picture with an intestinal obstruction and severe abdominal pain. Computed tomography revealed a strangulated hernia from the umbilical trocar site. Increased abdominal pressure during ERCP had strained the weak umbilical trocar site. Emergency surgical intervention through the umbilicus revealed an ischemic small bowel segment which was treated with resection and anastomosis. This report demonstrates that negligence of trocar site closure can result in very early herniation, particularly if an endoscopic intervention is required in the early postoperative period. PMID:25400872

  5. Fatal air embolism during endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP): An 'impossible' diagnosis for the forensic pathologist.

    PubMed

    Marchesi, Matteo; Battistini, Alessio; Pellegrinelli, Moira; Gentile, Guendalina; Zoja, Riccardo

    2016-01-01

    Fatal air embolism related to endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography is a very rare phenomenon. The authors describe the case of a 51-year-old female patient who developed this mortal complication; a computed tomography (CT) examination was performed in articulo mortis by the physicians. Autopsy was unreliable because of bizarre post-mortem changes (reabsorption of intra-cardiac gas vs. conservation of intra-cranial gas) and a lack of strong diagnostic value of histological findings. The right diagnosis was possible thanks only to the CT examination that permitted the assumption of this possible cause of death before the autopsy and to prepare the necessary procedures to recognise and probe air embolism. This case exemplifies how early post-mortem imaging can be crucial to avoid a wrong diagnosis. PMID:26209631

  6. Immediate detection of endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography-related periampullary perforation: Fluoroscopy or endoscopy?

    PubMed Central

    Motomura, Yasuaki; Akahoshi, Kazuya; Gibo, Junya; Kanayama, Kenji; Fukuda, Shinichiro; Hamada, Shouhei; Otsuka, Yoshihiro; Kubokawa, Masaru; Kajiyama, Kiyoshi; Nakamura, Kazuhiko

    2014-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the causes and intraoperative detection of endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP)-related perforations to support immediate or early diagnosis. METHODS: Consecutive patients who underwent ERCP procedures at our hospital between January 2008 and June 2013 were retrospectively enrolled in the study (n = 2674). All procedures had been carried out using digital fluoroscopic assistance with the patient under conscious sedation. For patients showing alterations in the gastrointestinal anatomy, a short-type double balloon enteroscope had been applied. Cases of perforation had been identified by the presence of air in or leakage of contrast medium into the retroperitoneal space, or upon endoscopic detection of an abdominal cavity related to the perforated lumen. For patients with ERCP-related perforations, the data on medical history, endoscopic findings, radiologic findings, diagnostic methods, management, and clinical outcomes were used for descriptive analysis. RESULTS: Of the 2674 ERCP procedures performed during the 71-mo study period, only six (0.22%) resulted in perforations (male/female, 2/4; median age: 84 years; age range: 57-97 years). The cases included an endoscope-related duodenal perforation, two periampullary perforations related to endoscopic sphincterotomy, two periampullary perforations related to endoscopic papillary balloon dilation, and a periampullary or bile duct perforation secondary to endoscopic instrument trauma. No cases of guidewire-related perforation occurred. The video endoscope system employed in all procedures was only able to immediately detect the endoscope-related perforation; the other five perforation cases were all detected by subsequent digital fluoroscope applied intraoperatively (at a median post-ERCP intervention time of 15 min). Three out of the six total perforation cases, including the single case of endoscope-related duodenal injury, were surgically treated; the remaining three cases were

  7. Bile duct injury after laparoscopic cholecystectomy: the value of endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography.

    PubMed Central

    Davids, P H; Ringers, J; Rauws, E A; de Wit, L T; Huibregtse, K; van der Heyde, M N; Tytgat, G N

    1993-01-01

    This study describes the value of endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP) in patients with bile duct injury after laparoscopic cholecystectomy. Twelve consecutive patients were studied over a one year period. In all patients the biliary tree was visualised during ERCP. Four patients had complete bile duct obstruction, seven patients had a stricture (two with concomitant leakage), and one patient had leakage from a hepatic branch. Three patients with complete obstruction, presented with a relatively prolonged symptom free, 'silent' period before diagnosis. In all four patients with complete transection, a proximal hepaticojejunostomy was performed. In one patient with a tough fibrous stricture, secondary to incorrect clip placement, passage of the guidewire was impossible, leaving surgical reconstruction as the only therapeutic option. All remaining seven patients with leakage or strictures, or both were successfully treated by endoscopic sphincterotomy only (n = 1) or sphincterotomy and subsequent stent placement (n = 6). When patients do not recover uneventfully after laparoscopic cholecystectomy even without cholestasis or jaundice, early ERCP is recommended as a safe and valuable method to detect bile duct injury and to suggest treatment. Subsequently, more than half of such patients can be treated endoscopically. Extended follow up is needed to evaluate the longterm results. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 PMID:8406163

  8. Role of endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography in the management of hepatic hydatid disease

    PubMed Central

    Dolay, Kemal; Akbulut, Sami

    2014-01-01

    Most cases of hepatic hydatid disease exhibit uncomplicated clinical course and management. However, the diagnosis and management of complicated hepatic hydatid disease is a special issue. One of the most common and serious complications of hepatic hydatid disease is the rupture of the cyst into intrahepatic bile ducts. The clinical appearance of intrabiliary rupture can range from asymptomatic to jaundice, cholecystitis, cholangitis, liver abscess, pancreatitis and septicemia. Current treatments for major ruptures can result in high morbidity and mortality rates. Furthermore, ruptures that cannot be diagnosed preoperatively can induce complications such as biliary fistulae, biloma, cavitary infection and obstructive jaundice. In the past, these complications were diagnosed and treated by surgical methods. Currently, complications in both the pre- and postoperative periods are diagnosed and treated by non-invasive or minimally invasive methods. In clinical practice, endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP) is indicated for patients with preoperative frank intrabiliary rupture in which hydatid elements are clearly seen in the bile ducts, or for biliary adverse events after surgery, including persistent biliary fistulae and jaundice. However, controversy concerning routine preoperative ERCP and prophylactic endoscopic sphincterotomy in patients suspected of having minor cystobiliary communications still remains. In this article, the role of ERCP in the diagnosis and management of hepatic hydatid disease during the pre- and postoperative periods is reviewed. PMID:25386073

  9. Evidence-Based Selection of Sedation Agents for Patients Undergoing Endoscopic Retrograde Cholangiopancreatography.

    PubMed

    Smith, Angela; Silvestro, Loraine; Rodriguez, Ricardo E; Austin, Paul N

    2016-01-01

    Sedating patients undergoing advanced endoscopic procedures such as endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP) is challenging for the endoscopy team. Considering these challenges and concerns with the use of propofol for deep sedation of older adults and high-risk patients, colleagues of one of the authors (AS) were interested in the identification of techniques for the anesthetic management of subjects undergoing therapeutic ERCP. A search strategy revealed a total of 7 evidence sources. The appraised evidence examined the efficacy and sedation-related effects of anesthesia regimens. Deep sedation with propofol was identified as the most commonly used anesthetic technique for subjects undergoing therapeutic ERCP. The sedation-related unwanted effects of propofol appear to be dose-related and occur more frequently in the high-risk and elderly populations. However, the data were inconclusive in identifying an ideal agent offering superior efficacy with fewer unwanted sedation-related effects. Providers should strongly consider the subject's age, history of coexisting illness, and the pharmacological effects of selected anesthetic agents when choosing an appropriate anesthetic technique. Larger randomized controlled studies are needed to identify risk factors associated with sedation-related complications and to identify alternative options for the anesthetic management of subjects undergoing ERCP. PMID:26825562

  10. Refinement of canine pancreatitis model: inducing pancreatitis by using endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography.

    PubMed

    Ruben, Dawn S; Scorpio, Diana G; Gabrielson, K L; Simon, B W; Buscaglia, Jonathan M

    2009-02-01

    The causes and treatments of pancreatitis have been studied in diverse species, but the canine pancreatitis model has been used most often due to its similarities to the condition in humans. Although pancreatitis in dogs can be induced readily by numerous methods, managing these dogs can be difficult because they often develop severe abdominal pain, vomiting, inappetance, and lethargy. In an effort to study pancreatitis, we performed a pilot study to determine whether an endoscopic pancreatic procedure would be possible in a dog and whether, through various manipulations, a new method of inducing pancreatitis could be developed. The model uses endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP), a common procedure in human gastroenterology that has been associated with postprocedural pancreatitis. Although all 8 dogs used in developing the ERCP model had both biochemical and histologic changes consistent with pancreatitis, 7 of the 8 dogs remained free of classic clinical signs of the disease. This method is presented as a refinement of a canine model and presents an alternative method of inducing pancreatitis, with decreased risk of developing associated clinical signs. PMID:19295057

  11. Is rectal indomethacin effective in preventing of post-endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography pancreatitis?

    PubMed Central

    Döbrönte, Zoltán; Szepes, Zoltán; Izbéki, Ferenc; Gervain, Judit; Lakatos, László; Pécsi, Gyula; Ihász, Miklós; Lakner, Lilla; Toldy, Erzsébet; Czakó, László

    2014-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the effectiveness of rectally administered indomethacin in the prophylaxis of post-endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP) pancreatitis and hyperamylasaemia in a multicentre study. METHODS: A prospective, randomised, placebo-controlled multicentre study in five endoscopic units was conducted on 686 patients randomised to receive a suppository containing 100 mg indomethacin, or an inert placebo, 10-15 min before ERCP. Post-ERCP pancreatitis and hyperamylasaemia were evaluated 24 h following the procedure on the basis of clinical signs and laboratory parameters, and computed tomography/magnetic resonance imaging findings if required. RESULTS: Twenty-one patients were excluded because of incompleteness of their data or because of protocol violation. The results of 665 investigations were evaluated: 347 in the indomethacin group and 318 in the placebo group. The distributions of the risk factors in the two groups did not differ significantly. Pancreatitis developed in 42 patients (6.3%): it was mild in 34 (5.1%) and severe in eight (1.2%) cases. Hyperamylaesemia occurred in 160 patients (24.1%). There was no significant difference between the indomethacin and placebo groups in the incidence of either post-ERCP pancreatitis (5.8% vs 6.9%) or hyperamylasaemia (23.3% vs 24.8%). Similarly, subgroup analysis did not reveal any significant differences between the two groups. CONCLUSION: 100 mg rectal indomethacin administered before ERCP did not prove effective in preventing post-ERCP pancreatitis. PMID:25110443

  12. Review of diagnostic and therapeutic endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography using several endoscopic methods in patients with surgically altered gastrointestinal anatomy

    PubMed Central

    Shimatani, Masaaki; Takaoka, Makoto; Tokuhara, Mitsuo; Miyoshi, Hideaki; Ikeura, Tsukasa; Okazaki, Kazuichi

    2015-01-01

    The endoscopic approach for biliary diseases in patients with surgically altered gastrointestinal anatomy (SAGA) had been generally deemed impractical. However, it was radically made feasible by the introduction of double balloon endoscopy (DBE) that was originally developed for diagnosis and treatments for small-bowel diseases. Followed by the subsequent development of single-balloon endoscopy (SBE) and spiral endoscopy (SE), interventions using several endoscopes for biliary disease in patients with SAGA widely gained an acceptance as a new modality. Many studies have been made on this new technique. Yet, some problems are to be solved. For instance, the mutual unavailability among devices due to different working lengths and channels, and unestablished standardization of procedural techniques can be raised. Additionally, in an attempt to standardize endoscopic procedures, it is important to evaluate biliary cannulating methods by case with existence of papilla or not. A full comprehension of the features of respective scope types is also required. However there are not many papers written as a review. In our manuscript, we would like to evaluate and make a review of the present status of diagnostic and therapeutic endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography applying DBE, SBE and SE for biliary diseases in patients with SAGA for establishment of these modalities as a new technology and further improvement of the scopes and devices. PMID:26078830

  13. Adverse reactions to iodinated contrast media administered at the time of endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP).

    PubMed

    Pan, Jen-Jung; Draganov, Peter V

    2009-03-01

    Adverse reactions after intravascular administration of iodine contrast media are common and prophylactic regiments consisting of the use of steroids and low osmolality contrast media are highly effective in significantly decreasing the adverse reactions rate. The same type of contrast media are also used for opacification of the biliary tree and the pancreatic duct at the time of endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP). Systemic absorption of contrast media after ERCP routinely occurs. Although the adverse reaction rate appears to be very low the exact incidence remains unknown due to the retrospective nature of all reports. Despite the lack of formal recommendations, numerous prophylactic regiments are routinely used prior to ERCP in patients with history of prior reaction to intravascular contrast media. Moreover, the use of prophylaxis has even expanded to patients with no prior reaction to intravascular contrast media who are somehow perceived to be at increase risk (e.g. shellfish allergy). Recently, the first large scale prospective study reported exceedingly low incidence of adverse reaction to high oslmolality iodine-containing contrast media administered at the time of ERCP done without prophylactic premedication even in patients considered to be at the highest risk (prior severe reaction to intravascular contrast media administration). These data suggest that the use of prophylactic regiments prior to ERCP appears to be unnecessary. PMID:19275689

  14. Improved endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography brush increases diagnostic yield of malignant biliary strictures

    PubMed Central

    Shieh, Frederick K; Luong-Player, Adelina; Khara, Harshit S; Liu, Haiyan; Lin, Fan; Shellenberger, Matthew J; Johal, Amitpal S; Diehl, David L

    2014-01-01

    AIM: To determine if a new brush design could improve the diagnostic yield of biliary stricture brushings. METHODS: Retrospective chart review was performed of all endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography procedures with malignant biliary stricture brushing between January 2008 and October 2012. A standard wire-guided cytology brush was used prior to protocol implementation in July 2011, after which, a new 9 French wire-guided cytology brush (Infinity sampling device, US Endoscopy, Mentor, OH) was used for all cases. All specimens were reviewed by blinded pathologists who determined whether the sample was positive or negative for malignancy. Cellular yield was quantified by describing the number of cell clusters seen. RESULTS: Thirty-two new brush cases were compared to 46 historical controls. Twenty-five of 32 (78%) cases in the new brush group showed abnormal cellular findings consistent with malignancy as compared to 17 of 46 (37%) in the historical control group (P = 0.0003). There was also a significant increase in the average number of cell clusters of all sizes (21.1 vs 9.9 clusters, P = 0.0007) in the new brush group compared to historical controls. CONCLUSION: The use of a new brush design for brush cytology of biliary strictures shows increased diagnostic accuracy, likely due to improved cellular yield, as evidenced by an increase in number of cellular clusters obtained. PMID:25031790

  15. Failed biliary cannulation: Clinical and technical outcomes after tertiary referral endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography

    PubMed Central

    Swan, Michael P; Bourke, Michael J; Williams, Stephen J; Alexander, Sina; Moss, Alan; Hope, Rick; Ruppin, David

    2011-01-01

    AIM: Prospective evaluation of repeat endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP) for failed Schutz grade 1 biliary cannulation in a high-volume center. METHODS: Prospective intention-to-treat analysis of patients referred for biliary cannulation following recent unsuccessful ERCP. RESULTS: Fifty-one patients (35 female; mean age: 62.5 years; age range: 40-87 years) with previous failed biliary cannulation were referred for repeat ERCP. The indication for ERCP was primarily choledocholithiasis (45%) or pancreatic malignancy (18%). Successful biliary cannulation was 100%. The precut needle knife sphincterotomy (NKS) rate was 27.4%. Complications occurred in 3.9% (post-ERCP pancreatitis). An identifiable reason for initial unsuccessful biliary cannulation was present in 55% of cases. Compared to a cohort of 940 naïve papilla patients (female 61%; mean age: 59.9 years; age range: 18-94 years) who required sphincterotomy over the same time period, there was no statistical difference in the cannulation success rate (100% vs 98%) or post-ERCP pancreatitis (3.1% vs 3.9%). Precut NKS use was more frequent (27.4% vs 12.7%) (P = 0.017). CONCLUSION: Referral to a high-volume center following unsuccessful ERCP is associated with high technical success, with a favorable complication rate, compared to routine ERCP procedures. PMID:22174549

  16. Computed tomography, angiography, and endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography in the nonoperative management of hepatic and splenic trauma.

    PubMed

    Delgado Millán, M A; Deballon, P O

    2001-11-01

    There is a marked trend toward nonoperative management of abdominal trauma. This has been possible thanks to the advances in imaging and interventional techniques. In this work we review in which way computed tomography (CT) abdominal scans, angiography, and endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP) can guide the nonoperative management of hepatic and splenic trauma. The CT abdominal scan with intravenous contrast is the "departure imaging" of choice for the nonoperative management of hepatic and splenic trauma in the hemodynamically stable patient. It is the most accurate test for detecting, defining, and characterizing these injuries, the associated hemoperitoneum, and other abdominal abnormalities (the hollow viscus injuries missed on the CT scan were detected by clinical parameters and had no negative consequences in the outcome). It has an accuracy of more than 95% for these injuries, but CT grading alone cannot decide which patient can be treated conservatively and which patient requires surgery. Its usefulness for follow-up seems challenging. Angiography can be therapeutic, thereby avoiding surgery (some report that angiography can be performed even in patients with active bleeding as damage control); if vessel injury, active bleeding or hemobilia are suspected on the basis of a CT scan in a stable patient, angiography should be carried out. ERCP should be performed in patients with suspected injury to the biliary tree, even with normal iminodiacetic acid radionuclide scanning (HIDA) if symptoms persist. A biliary stent can be placed. Indications for angiography and ERCP remain unclear. PMID:11760741

  17. Reduction of Radiation Doses to Patients and Staff During Endoscopic Retrograde Cholangiopancreatography

    PubMed Central

    Sulieman, Abdelmoneim; Paroutoglou, Georgios; Kapsoritakis, Andreas; Kapatenakis, Anargeyros; Potamianos, Spiros; Vlychou, Marianna; Theodorou, Kiki

    2011-01-01

    Background/Aim: Endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP) is associated with a considerable radiation exposure for patients and staff. While optimization of the radiation dose is recommended, few studies have been published. The purpose of this study has been to measure patient and staff radiation dose, to estimate the effective dose and radiation risk using digital fluoroscopic images. Entrance skin dose (ESD), organ and effective doses were estimated for patients and staff. Materials and Methods: Fifty-seven patients were studied using digital X-ray machine and thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLD) to measure ESD at different body sites. Organ and surface dose to specific radiosensitive organs was carried out. The mean, median, minimum, third quartile and the maximum values are presented due to the asymmetry in data distribution. Results: The mean ESD, exit and thyroid surface dose were estimated to be 75.6 mGy, 3.22 mGy and 0.80 mGy, respectively. The mean effective dose for both gastroenterologist and assistant is 0.01 mSv. The mean patient effective dose was 4.16 mSv, and the cancer risk per procedure was estimated to be 2 × 10-5 Conclusion: ERCP with fluoroscopic technique demonstrate improved dose reduction, compared to the conventional radiographic based technique, reducing the surface dose by a factor of 2, without compromising the diagnostic findings. The radiation absorbed doses to the different organs and effective doses are relatively low. PMID:21196649

  18. Who experiences endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography after laparoscopic cholecystectomy for symptomatic gallstone disease?

    PubMed Central

    Joo, Sun-Hyung; Cho, Sungsin; Han, Min-Soo

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Laparoscopic cholecystectomy (LC) has become a standard treatment of symptomatic gallstone disease. But, some patients suffer from retained common bile duct stones after LC. The aim of this study is to analyze the predicting factors associated with subsequent postoperative endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP) after LC. Methods We retrospectively reviewed a database of every LC performed between July 2006 and September 2012. We classify 28 patients who underwent ERCP within 6 months after LC for symptomatic gallstone disease as the ERCP group and 56 patients who underwent LC for symptomatic gallstone disease during same period paired by sex, age, underlying disease, operation history, and body mass index as the control group. To identify risk factor performing postoperative ERCP after LC, we compared admission route, preoperative biochemical liver function test, number of gall stones, gallstone size, adhesion around GB, wall thickening of GB, and existence of acute cholecystitis between the 2 groups. Results Admission route, preoperative AST, ALT, and ALP, stone size, longer operation time, and acute cholecystitis were identified as risk factors of postoperative ERCP in univariate analyses. But, longer operation time (P = 0.004) and acute cholecystitis (P = 0.048) were identified as independent risk factors of postoperative ERCP in multivariate analyses. Conclusion The patient who underwent ERCP after LC for symptomatic gallstone disease are more likely experienced longer operation time and acute cholecystitis than the patient who did not undergo ERCP after LC. PMID:27274506

  19. Evaluation of radiation doses in patient and medical staff during endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography procedures.

    PubMed

    Seo, Deoknam; Kim, Kie Hwan; Kim, Jung-Su; Han, Seonggyu; Park, Kyung; Kim, Jungmin

    2016-03-01

    The radiation exposure dose must be optimised because the hazard resulting from an interventional radiology procedure is long term depending on the patient. The aim of this study was to measure the radiation doses received by the patients and medical staff during endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP) procedures. Data were collected during 126 ERCP procedures, including the dose-area product (DAP), entrance dose (ED), effective dose (E), fluoroscopy time (T) and number of digital radiographs (F). The medical staff members each wore a personal thermoluminescence dosemeter to monitor exposure during ERCP procedures. The mean DAP, ED, E and T were 47.06 Gy cm(2), 196.06 mGy, 8.93 mSv, 7.65 min and 9.21 images, respectively. The mean dose to the staff was 0.175 mSv and that to the assistant was 0.069 mSv. The dose to the medical staff was minimal when appropriate protective measures were used. The large variation in the patient doses must be further investigated. PMID:26269518

  20. Immune dysfunction in patients with obstructive jaundice before and after endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography

    PubMed Central

    Chowdhury, Abeed H.; Camara, Miguel; Martinez-Pomares, Luisa; Zaitoun, Abed M.; Eremin, Oleg; Aithal, Guruprasad P.

    2016-01-01

    This prospective observational study investigated monocyte cytokine responses to lipopolysaccharide (LPS) in patients with obstructive jaundice (OJ) before and after endoscopic biliary drainage. Dendritic cell (DC) subsets and their expression of co-stimulatory molecules were also studied. Forty patients with OJ and ten non-jaundiced patients with normal gastroscopy findings were recruited. Ten healthy volunteers provided control blood samples for immunological assays. Patients with OJ had blood and duodenal mucosa sampled at the time of endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP) and further blood sampled during the recovery phase. Monocyte cytokine responses to LPS, DC subsets and co-stimulatory molecule expression were compared with controls. Duodenal morphology and occludin expression were also assessed. Monocytes obtained before ERCP from jaundiced patients demonstrated reduced cytokine responses to endotoxin compared with controls (IL-1β: 2678 compared with 4631 pg/ml, P=0.04 and IL-6: 3442 compared with 6157 pg/ml, P=0.002). Monocytes from patients with malignancy had poorer responses to endotoxin than from those with benign OJ (IL-1β: 2025 compared with 3332 pg/ml, P=0.001). After ERCP, the secretion of inflammatory cytokines by monocytes obtained from jaundiced patients increased (IL-1β: 2150 compared with 2520 pg/ml, P=0.03 and IL-6: 2488 compared with 3250 pg/ml, P=0.01). Occludin expression (85 compared with 95%, P=0.004) and mean duodenal villus height (334 compared with 404 μm, P=0.03) were lower in jaundiced patients. Before biliary drainage, patients with OJ had a higher percentage of myeloid dendritic cells (mDCs) and greater mDC expression of CD40 (P=0.04) and CD86 (P=0.04). Monocytes from patients with OJ had lower proinflammatory cytokine secretion in response to LPS, an effect reversed following biliary drainage. PMID:27252406

  1. Immune dysfunction in patients with obstructive jaundice before and after endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography.

    PubMed

    Chowdhury, Abeed H; Camara, Miguel; Martinez-Pomares, Luisa; Zaitoun, Abed M; Eremin, Oleg; Aithal, Guruprasad P; Lobo, Dileep N

    2016-09-01

    This prospective observational study investigated monocyte cytokine responses to lipopolysaccharide (LPS) in patients with obstructive jaundice (OJ) before and after endoscopic biliary drainage. Dendritic cell (DC) subsets and their expression of co-stimulatory molecules were also studied. Forty patients with OJ and ten non-jaundiced patients with normal gastroscopy findings were recruited. Ten healthy volunteers provided control blood samples for immunological assays. Patients with OJ had blood and duodenal mucosa sampled at the time of endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP) and further blood sampled during the recovery phase. Monocyte cytokine responses to LPS, DC subsets and co-stimulatory molecule expression were compared with controls. Duodenal morphology and occludin expression were also assessed. Monocytes obtained before ERCP from jaundiced patients demonstrated reduced cytokine responses to endotoxin compared with controls (IL-1β: 2678 compared with 4631 pg/ml, P=0.04 and IL-6: 3442 compared with 6157 pg/ml, P=0.002). Monocytes from patients with malignancy had poorer responses to endotoxin than from those with benign OJ (IL-1β: 2025 compared with 3332 pg/ml, P=0.001). After ERCP, the secretion of inflammatory cytokines by monocytes obtained from jaundiced patients increased (IL-1β: 2150 compared with 2520 pg/ml, P=0.03 and IL-6: 2488 compared with 3250 pg/ml, P=0.01). Occludin expression (85 compared with 95%, P=0.004) and mean duodenal villus height (334 compared with 404 μm, P=0.03) were lower in jaundiced patients. Before biliary drainage, patients with OJ had a higher percentage of myeloid dendritic cells (mDCs) and greater mDC expression of CD40 (P=0.04) and CD86 (P=0.04). Monocytes from patients with OJ had lower proinflammatory cytokine secretion in response to LPS, an effect reversed following biliary drainage. PMID:27252406

  2. Efficacy and safety of a patient-positioning device (EZ-FIX) for endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Seungho; Han, Joung-Ho; Lee, Hee Seung; Kim, Ki Bae; Lee, In-kwang; Cha, Eun-Jong; Shin, Young Duck; Park, Namgyu; Park, Seon Mee

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To assess the efficacy and safety of a patient-positioning device (EZ-FIX) for endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP). METHODS: A total of 105 patients were randomized to the EZ-FIX (n = 53) or non-EZ-FIX (n = 52) group in this prospective study. Midazolam and propofol, titrated to provide an adequate level of sedation during therapeutic ERCP, were administered by trained registered nurses under endoscopist supervision. Primary outcome measures were the total dose of propofol and sedative-related complications, including hypoxia and hypotension. Secondary outcome measures were recovery time and sedation satisfaction of the endoscopist, nurses, and patients. RESULTS: There was no significant difference in the rate of hypoxia, but there was a statistical trend (EX-FIX group; n = 4, 7.55%, control group; n = 6, 11.53%, P = 0.06). The mean total dose of propofol was lower in the EZ-FIX group than in the non-EZ-FIX group (89.43 ± 49.8 mg vs 112.4 ± 53.8 mg, P = 0.025). In addition, the EZ-FIX group had a shorter mean recovery time (11.23 ± 4.61 mg vs 14.96 ± 5.12 mg, P < 0.001). Sedation satisfaction of the endoscopist and nurses was higher in the EX-FIX group than in the non-EZ-FIX group. Technical success rates of the procedure were 96.23% and 96.15%, respectively (P = 0.856). Procedure-related complications did not differ by group (11.32% vs 13.46%, respectively, P = 0.735). CONCLUSION: Using EZ-FIX reduced the total dose of propofol and the recovery time, and increased the satisfaction of the endoscopist and nurses. PMID:26019465

  3. Endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography in patients with biliary complications after orthotopic liver transplantation: outcomes and complications.

    PubMed

    Sanna, C; Saracco, G M; Reggio, D; Moro, F; Ricchiuti, A; Strignano, P; Mirabella, S; Ciccone, G; Salizzoni, M

    2009-05-01

    Biliary complications after orthotopic liver transplantation (OLT) still remain a major cause of morbidity and mortality. The most frequent complications are strictures and leakages in OLT cases with duct-to-duct biliary reconstruction (D-D), which can be treated with dilatation or stent placement during endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP), although this procedure is burdened with potentially severe complications, such as retroperitoneal perforation, acute pancreatitis, septic cholangitis, bleeding, recurrence of stones, strictures due to healing process. The aim of the study was to analyze the outcome of this treatment and the complications related to the procedure. Among 1634 adult OLTs, we compared postprocedural complications and mortality rates with a group of 5852 nontransplanted patients (n-OLTs) who underwent ERCP. Of 472 (28,8%) post-OLT biliary complications, 319 (67.6%) occurred in D-D biliary anstomosis cases and 94 (29.5%) patients underwent 150 ERCP sessions. Among 49/80 patients (61.2%) who completed the procedure, ERCP treatment was successful. Overall complication rate was 10.7% in OLT and 12.8% in n-OLT (P = NS). Compared with the n-OLT group, post-ERCP bleeding was more frequent in OLT (5.3% vs 1.3%, P = .0001), while the incidence of pancreatitis was lower (4.7% vs 9.6%, P = .04). Procedure-related mortality rate was 0% in OLT and 0.1% in n-OLT (P = NS). ERCP is a safe procedure for post-OLT biliary complications in the presence of a D-D anastomosis. Morbidity and mortality related with this procedure are acceptable and similar to those among nontransplanted population. PMID:19460551

  4. Preliminary diagnostic reference levels for endoscopic retrograde cholangio-pancreatography in Greece.

    PubMed

    Tsapaki, V; Delinikolas, P; Paraskeva, K D; Paspatis, I A G; Scotiniotis, H; Georgopoulos, P; Voudoukis, E; Finou, P; Athanasopoulos, N; Lydakis, I; Giannakopoulos, A; Mathou, N; Angelogiannakopoulou, N; Triantopoulou, C; Karagiannis, J A

    2016-04-01

    The main objective of this study was to determine the preliminary Diagnostic Reference Levels (DRLs) in terms of Kerma Area Product (KAP) and fluoroscopy time (Tf) during Endoscopic Retrograde Cholangio-Pancreatography (ERCP) procedures. Additionally, an investigation was conducted to explore the statistical relation between KAP and Tf. Data from a set of 200 randomly selected patients treated in 4 large hospitals in Greece (50 patients per hospital) were analyzed in order to obtain preliminary DRLs for KAP and Tf during therapeutic ERCP procedures. Non-parametric statistic tests were performed in order to determine a statistically significant relation between KAP and Tf. The resulting third quartiles for KAP and Tf for hospitals (A, B, C and D) were found as followed: KAPA=10.7Gycm(2), TfA=4.9min; KAPB=7.5Gycm(2), TfB=5.0min; KAPC=19.0Gycm(2), TfC=7.3min; KAPD=52.4Gycm(2), TfD=15.8min. The third quartiles, calculated for the total 200 cases sample, are: KAP=18.8Gycm(2) and Tf=8.2min. For 3 out of 4 hospitals and for the total sample, p-values of statistical indices (correlation of KAP and Tf) are less than 0.001, while for the Hospital A p-values are ranging from 0.07 to 0.08. Using curve fitting, we finally determine that the relation of Tf and KAP is deriving from a power equation (KAP=Tf(1.282)) with R(2)=0.85. The suggested Preliminary DRLs (deriving from the third quartiles of the total sample) for Greece are: KAP=19Gycm(2) and Tf=8min, while the relation between KAP and Tf is efficiently described by a power equation. PMID:27068273

  5. Comparison of Clinical Effects of Dexketoprofen and Paracetamol Used for Analgesia in Endoscopic Retrograde Cholangiopancreatography

    PubMed Central

    Akıncı, Nuran; Bakan, Nurten; Karaören, Gülşah; Tomruk, Senay Göksu; Sökmen, Hacı Mehmet; Yanlı, Yonca; Akçay, Mehmet Erdem

    2016-01-01

    Objective This study aimed to compare 50 mg dexketoprofen vs. 1 g paracetamol that were parenterally administered before endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP) under sedoanalgesia with comparable anaesthesia depth regarding haemodynamic, pain, narcotic analgesic requirement, recovery and post-procedural cognitive functions. Methods Overall, 80 ASA I–III patients aged 18–75 years who were undergoing scheduled ERCP were randomly assigned into three groups. In all patients, the mini-mental test (MMT) was conducted before the procedure. No drug was administered to controls (Group C; n=26); patients were transferred to ERCP unite 30 min after parenteral dexketoprofen (50 mg) in group D (n=27) and paracetamol (1 g) in group P (n=27). The standard monitoring was applied. After intravenously administering loading doses of midazolam (0.02 mgkg) and propofol (1 mg kg−1), propofol infusion was administered at a dose of 2–4 mg kg−1 h−1 to maintain a bispectral index value of 50–70. Fentanyl (0.05 μg kg−1) was intravenously administered when patients experienced pain. Haemodynamic effects, additional analgesic requirement, adverse effects during procedure, time to reach Aldrete score of 9 and satisfaction of an endoscopist and patient were recorded. MMT was repeated 3 h after completing the procedure. Results Fentanyl requirement during the procedure was significantly low in group D (p<0.05). Apnoea during the procedure and nausea after the procedure were least common in group D while significantly lower than group C (p<0.05). There was no significant difference with respect to MMT scores and endoscopist’s satisfaction, while patient satisfaction was greater in group P. Conclusion Parenterally administered dexketoprofen provided better haemodynamic effect and pain control, thereby decreasing incidence of adverse events by reducing the requirement for narcotic analgesics. PMID:27366549

  6. Use of the Conventional Side-viewing Duodenoscope for Successful Endoscopic Retrograde Cholangiopancreatography in Postgastrectomy Patients

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Wen-Guang; Mei, Jia-wei; Zhao, Ming-Ning; Zhang, Wen-Jie; Gu, Jun; Tao, Yi-Jing; Liu, Ying-Bin

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: The aim of this study was to evaluate the usefulness of the conventional side-viewing duodenoscope for successful endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP) in postgastrectomy patients. Methods: A total of 220 consecutive patients with bile duct stones or a distal common bile duct stricture who had previously undergone gastrectomy and were referred for ERCP were analyzed for the outcome of their ERCP. All ERCP procedures were performed using a conventional side-viewing duodenoscope. In patients who had undergone a Billroth II gastroenterostomy and total gastrectomy with Roux-en-Y reconstruction, we also used the procedure of retrieval balloon–assisted enterography. Results: The study group included 220 patients who had previously undergone gastrectomy (77 women and 143 men; mean age, 72.2 y; range, 11 to 93 y). The overall enterography success rate was 90.5% (199/220), and the diagnostic and ERCP success rates were both 88.6% (195/220). Endoscopy was unsuccessful in 21 patients who received Billroth II gastroenterostomy and Roux-en-Y reconstruction. After successful endoscopy, diagnostic and ERCP success was not achieved in 4 patients with Billroth II gastroenterostomy, with or without Braun anastomosis, due to cannulation failure. The procedure-related complication rate was 5.5% (12/220), including immediate bleeding (0.9%, 2/220), pancreatitis (4.1%, 9/220), and perforation (0.5%, 1/220). There were no procedure-related deaths. Conclusions: The side-viewing duodenoscope is a useful instrument for performing successful ERCP in patients postgastrectomy. In addition, retrieval balloon–assisted enterography may improve the enterography success rate in postgastrectomy patients with Billroth II and Roux-en-Y reconstruction. PMID:26535481

  7. An extended fluorescence in situ hybridization approach for the cytogenetic study of cholangiocarcinoma on endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography brushing cytology preparations.

    PubMed

    Vasilieva, Larisa E; Papadhimitriou, Stefanos I; Alexopoulou, Alexandra; Pavlidis, Dimitris; Kostopoulos, Ioannis; Georgiakaki, Maria; Xinopoulos, Dimitrios; Romanos, Andreas; Dourakis, Spyridon P

    2013-10-01

    The cytological diagnosis of cholangiocarcinoma has been significantly aided by applying a 4-probe fluorescence in situ hybridization system on endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography brushing smears, aiming mainly at the detection of hyperdiploidy. However, this approach adds little to our understanding of the genetic background of the disease. With the prospect of obtaining additional data on chromosomal aberrations, we have extended the fluorescence in situ hybridization study, with the application of 4 independent 2-probe systems in 35 patients with documented cholangiocarcinoma. Fluorescence in situ hybridization assays were performed on endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography brushing smears, with probes for the 7q31, 11q13 (CCND1), 17p53 (TP53), and 9p21 (INK4 locus) bands, together with the respective centromeric probe. Hyperdiploidy, involving at least 2 of the 4 chromosomes targeted, was found in 31 patients. 17p13 deletion was detected in 3, and 9p21 deletion, in 5 of the hyperdiploid cases, with the 2 aberrations concurrent in 1. CCND1 amplification was found in 1 case as the sole abnormality and in another together with hyperdiploidy, but in apparently unrelated clones. This work indicates that interphase fluorescence in situ hybridization is a practical and useful tool for the cytogenetic study of cholangiocarcinoma on endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography brushing smears, which is often the only available tissue specimen of the tumor. Apart from hyperdiploidy, it provides additional data on the genetic profile of cholangiocarcinoma, especially regarding structural chromosomal aberrations and clonal diversity. This line of investigation may prove useful in the delineation of oncogenesis and the interpretation of the diverse clinical features of the disease. PMID:23845469

  8. Surgical Success in Chronic Pancreatitis: Sequential Endoscopic Retrograde Cholangiopancreatography and Surgical Longitudinal Pancreatojejunostomy (Puestow Procedure).

    PubMed

    Ford, Kathryn; Paul, Anu; Harrison, Phillip; Davenport, Mark

    2016-06-01

    Introduction Chronic pancreatitis (CP) can be a cause of recurrent, severe, disabling abdominal pain in children. Surgery has been suggested as a useful therapy, although experience is limited and the results unpredictable. We reviewed our experience of a two-stage protocol-preliminary endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP) and duct stenting, and if symptoms resolved, definitive surgical decompression by longitudinal pancreatojejunostomy (LPJ) (Puestow operation). Patients and Methods This is a single-center, retrospective review of children with established CP who underwent an LPJ between February 2002 and September 2012. A questionnaire was completed (incorporating visual analog scale pain and lifestyle scores) to assess functional outcome. Data are expressed as median (range). Results In this study, eight (M:F ratio of 4:4) children underwent an LPJ and one female child had a more limited pancreatojejunostomy anastomosis following preliminary ERCP and stent placement where possible. Diagnoses included hereditary pancreatitis (n = 3), idiopathic or structural pancreatitis (n = 5), and duct stricture following radiotherapy (n = 1). Median duct diameter presurgery was 5 (4-11) mm. Endoscopic placement of a Zimmon pancreatic stent was possible in six with relief of symptoms in all. Median age at definitive surgery was 11 (range, 7-17) years with a median postoperative stay of 9 (range, 7-12) days and a follow-up of 6 (range, 0.5-12) years. All children reported markedly reduced episodes of pain postprocedure. One developed diabetes mellitus, while three had exocrine deficiency (fecal elastase < 200 µg/g) requiring enzyme supplementation. The child with limited LPJ had symptomatic recurrence and required restenting and further surgery to widen the anastomosis to become pain free. Conclusion ERCP and stenting provide a therapeutic trial to assess possible benefit of a definitive duct drainage procedure. LPJ-the modified Puestow

  9. Suppository naproxen reduces incidence and severity of post-endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography pancreatitis: Randomized controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    Mansour-Ghanaei, Fariborz; Joukar, Farahnaz; Taherzadeh, Zahra; Sokhanvar, Homayoon; Hasandokht, Tolou

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To determine the efficacy of rectally administered naproxen for the prevention of post-endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP) pancreatitis (PEP). METHODS: This double-blind randomized control trial conducted from January 2013 to April 2014 at the Gastrointestinal and Liver Diseases Research Center in Rasht, Iran. A total of 324 patients were selected from candidates for diagnostic or therapeutic ERCP by using the simple sampling method. Patients received a single dose of Naproxen (500 mg; n = 162) or a placebo (n = 162) per rectum immediately before ERCP. The overall incidence of PEP, incidence of mild to severe PEP, serum amylase levels and adverse effects were measured. The primary outcome measure was the development of pancreatitis onset of pain in the upper abdomen and elevation of the serum amylase level to > 3 × the upper normal limit (60-100 IU/L) within 24 h after ERCP. The severity of PEP was classified according to the duration of therapeutic intervention for PEP: mild, 2-3 d; moderate 4-10 d; and severe, > 10 d and/or necessitated surgical or intensive treatment, or contributed to death. RESULTS: PEP occurred in 12% (40/324) of participants, and was significantly more frequent in the placebo group compared to the naproxen group (P < 0.01). Of the participants, 25.9% (84/324) developed hyperamylasemia within 2 h of procedure completion, among whom only 35 cases belonged to the naproxen group (P < 0.01). The incidence of PEP was significantly higher in female sex, in patients receiving pancreatic duct injection, more than 3 times pancreatic duct cannulations, and ERCP duration more than 40 min (Ps < 0.01). There were no statistically significant differences between the groups regarding the procedures or factors that might increase the risk of PEP, sphincterotomy, precut requirement, biliary duct injection and number of pancreatic duct cannulations. In the subgroup of patients with pancreatic duct injection, the rate of pancreatitis in

  10. Endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography in octogenarians: A population-based study using the nationwide inpatient sample

    PubMed Central

    Clark, Clancy J.; Coe, Adam; Fino, Nora F.; Pawa, Rishi

    2016-01-01

    Background and study aims: In the elderly population, there is a growing demand for minimally invasive procedures as the incidence of pancreaticobiliary disease increases with age. Patients with advanced age offer unique challenges for any procedure because they also tend to have a higher rate of baseline comorbidities and malignancy. The aim of the current study was to characterize the mortality and length of stay of octogenarians undergoing inpatient endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP). Patients and methods: Using the 2007 – 2010 Nationwide Inpatient Sample (NIS), we performed a retrospective analysis of health-related outcomes among 80- to 89-year-old patients undergoing inpatient ERCP. Surgical patients were excluded. Results: An estimated 61,322 octogenarians underwent inpatient ERCP in the United States from 2007 to 2010. The mean age was 84.2 (SE 0.02) with 59.5 % (n = 36,460) of the patients being female. A large majority of the patients were white (79. %, n = 41,144) and 63.5 % (n = 38,940) had a comorbidity index of at least 2. The mean length of stay was 7.1 days (SE 0.08) with an in-hospital mortality of 3.1 % (n = 1,919). The primary discharge diagnosis was most often biliary stone disease (55.9 %, n = 34,263). A diagnosis of any infection was recorded in 45.0 % (n = 27,609) of patients. Infection was associated with a significantly higher risk of in-hospital mortality (OR 3.3, 95 % CI 2.6 – 4.2, P < 0.001). Conclusions: ERCP is now routinely being performed during inpatient admissions for octogenarians with diseases of the biliary tract. The mortality of octogenarians undergoing inpatient ERCP is higher than previous reports and is likely due to superimposed infection during the same admission. PMID:27556068

  11. Short-type single balloon enteroscope for endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography with altered gastrointestinal anatomy

    PubMed Central

    Yamauchi, Hiroshi; Kida, Mitsuhiro; Okuwaki, Kosuke; Miyazawa, Shiro; Iwai, Tomohisa; Takezawa, Miyoko; Kikuchi, Hidehiko; Watanabe, Maya; Imaizumi, Hiroshi; Koizumi, Wasaburo

    2013-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate the effectiveness of a short-type single-balloon-enteroscope (SBE) for endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP) in patients with a reconstructed intestine. METHODS: Short-type SBE was developed to perform ERCP in postoperative patients with a reconstructed intestine. Short-type SBE is a direct-viewing endoscope with the following specifications: working length, 1520 mm; total length, 1840 mm; channel diameter, 3.2 mm. In addition, short-type SBE has a water-jet channel. The study group comprised 22 patients who underwent 31 sessions of short-type SBE-assisted ERCP from June 2011 through May 2012. Reconstruction was performed by Billroth-II (B-II) gastrectomy in 6 patients (8 sessions), Roux-en-Y (R-Y) gastrectomy in 14 patients (21 sessions), and R-Y hepaticojejunostomy in 2 patients (2 sessions). We retrospectively studied the rate of reaching the blind end (papilla of Vater or choledochojejunal anastomosis), mean time required to reach the blind end, diagnostic success rate (defined as the rate of successfully imaging the bile and pancreatic ducts), therapeutic success rate (defined as the rate of successfully completing endoscopic treatment), mean procedure time, and complications. RESULTS: Among the 31 sessions of ERCP, the rate of reaching the blind end was 88% in B-II gastrectomy, 91% in R-Y gastrectomy, and 100% in R-Y hepaticojejunostomy. The mean time required to reach the papilla was 18.3 min in B-II gastrectomy, 21.1 min in R-Y gastrectomy, and 32.5 min in R-Y hepaticojejunostomy. The diagnostic success rates in all patients and those with an intact papilla were respectively 86% and 86% in B-II gastrectomy, 90% and 87% in R-Y gastrectomy, and 100% in R-Y hepaticojejunostomy. The therapeutic success rates in all patients and those with an intact papilla were respectively 100% and 100% in B-II gastrectomy, 94% and 92% in R-Y gastrectomy, and 100% in R-Y hepaticojejunostomy. Because the channel diameter was 3.2 mm, stone

  12. Pulseless electrical activity arrest due to air embolism during endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography: a case report and review of the literature

    PubMed Central

    Mathew, Jacob; Parker, Calvin; Wang, James

    2015-01-01

    While most gastroenterologists are aware of the more common complications of endoscopy such as bleeding, infection and perforation, air embolism remains an under-recognised and difficult to diagnose problem due to its varying modes of presentation. This is the case of a 55-year-old man with right upper quadrant pain and imaging notable for cholecystitis and choledocholithiasis, who underwent endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP). During the ERCP, and shortly after a sphincterotomy was performed, he became hypotensive and hypoxic, quickly decompensating into pulseless electrical activity. While advanced cardiac life support was initiated, the patient passed away. Autopsy revealed air in the pulmonary artery suggestive of a pulmonary embolism. While air embolism remains a rare complication of upper endoscopy, increased awareness and prompt recognition of signs that may point to this diagnosis may potentially save lives by allowing for earlier possible interventions. PMID:26462286

  13. Innovations and techniques for balloon-enteroscope-assisted endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography in patients with altered gastrointestinal anatomy.

    PubMed

    Yamauchi, Hiroshi; Kida, Mitsuhiro; Imaizumi, Hiroshi; Okuwaki, Kosuke; Miyazawa, Shiro; Iwai, Tomohisa; Koizumi, Wasaburo

    2015-06-01

    Endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP) remains challenging in patients who have undergone surgical reconstruction of the intestine. Recently, many studies have reported that balloon-enteroscope-assisted ERCP (BEA-ERCP) is a safe and effective procedure. However, further improvements in outcomes and the development of simplified procedures are required. Percutaneous treatment, Laparoscopy-assisted ERCP, endoscopic ultrasound-guided anterograde intervention, and open surgery are effective treatments. However, treatment should be noninvasive, effective, and safe. We believe that these procedures should be performed only in difficult-to-treat patients because of many potential complications. BEA-ERCP still requires high expertise-level techniques and is far from a routinely performed procedure. Various techniques have been proposed to facilitate scope insertion (insertion with percutaneous transhepatic biliary drainage (PTBD) rendezvous technique, Short type single-balloon enteroscopes with passive bending section, Intraluminal injection of indigo carmine, CO2 inflation guidance), cannulation (PTBD or percutaneous transgallbladder drainage rendezvous technique, Dilation using screw drill, Rendezvous technique combining DBE with a cholangioscope, endoscopic ultrasound-guided rendezvous technique), and treatment (overtube-assisted technique, Short type balloon enteroscopes) during BEA-ERCP. The use of these techniques may allow treatment to be performed by BEA-ERCP in many patients. A standard procedure for ERCP yet to be established for patients with a reconstructed intestine. At present, BEA-ERCP is considered the safest and most effective procedure and is therefore likely to be recommended as first-line treatment. In this article, we discuss the current status of BEA-ERCP in patients with surgically altered gastrointestinal anatomy. PMID:26074685

  14. Innovations and techniques for balloon-enteroscope-assisted endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography in patients with altered gastrointestinal anatomy

    PubMed Central

    Yamauchi, Hiroshi; Kida, Mitsuhiro; Imaizumi, Hiroshi; Okuwaki, Kosuke; Miyazawa, Shiro; Iwai, Tomohisa; Koizumi, Wasaburo

    2015-01-01

    Endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP) remains challenging in patients who have undergone surgical reconstruction of the intestine. Recently, many studies have reported that balloon-enteroscope-assisted ERCP (BEA-ERCP) is a safe and effective procedure. However, further improvements in outcomes and the development of simplified procedures are required. Percutaneous treatment, Laparoscopy-assisted ERCP, endoscopic ultrasound-guided anterograde intervention, and open surgery are effective treatments. However, treatment should be noninvasive, effective, and safe. We believe that these procedures should be performed only in difficult-to-treat patients because of many potential complications. BEA-ERCP still requires high expertise-level techniques and is far from a routinely performed procedure. Various techniques have been proposed to facilitate scope insertion (insertion with percutaneous transhepatic biliary drainage (PTBD) rendezvous technique, Short type single-balloon enteroscopes with passive bending section, Intraluminal injection of indigo carmine, CO2 inflation guidance), cannulation (PTBD or percutaneous transgallbladder drainage rendezvous technique, Dilation using screw drill, Rendezvous technique combining DBE with a cholangioscope, endoscopic ultrasound-guided rendezvous technique), and treatment (overtube-assisted technique, Short type balloon enteroscopes) during BEA-ERCP. The use of these techniques may allow treatment to be performed by BEA-ERCP in many patients. A standard procedure for ERCP yet to be established for patients with a reconstructed intestine. At present, BEA-ERCP is considered the safest and most effective procedure and is therefore likely to be recommended as first-line treatment. In this article, we discuss the current status of BEA-ERCP in patients with surgically altered gastrointestinal anatomy. PMID:26074685

  15. Evaluation of staff, patient and foetal radiation doses due to endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP) procedures in a pregnant patient.

    PubMed

    Huda, A; Garzón, W J; Filho, G C L; Vieira, B; Kramer, R; Xu, X G; Gao, Y; Khoury, H J

    2016-03-01

    The use of endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP) in pregnant patients is not rare. Most studies on the safety and efficacy of these procedures report short- and long-term pregnancy outcomes and but not foetal absorbed doses. This investigation reports on an ERCP procedure for a 40-y-old woman who was 32-34 weeks pregnant. Thermoluminescent dosemeters (TLD 100) were used to measure doses received by the patient and the staff. Additionally, Monte Carlo calculations were performed using a 3D computational phantom representing a 9-month pregnant patient to estimate the foetal absorbed dose. The results show that the spleen of the mother received the largest absorbed dose of 12.18 mGy since it was closer to the source than other internal organs. For the foetus and uterus, the lowest absorbed dose was found to be 0.01 mGy to the foetal brain, while the largest absorbed dose was estimated to be 0.13 mGy to the placenta. PMID:26084305

  16. [Thoracoabdominal CT scan: a useful tool for the diagnosis of air embolism during an endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography].

    PubMed

    Tan, B K; Saunier, C-F; Cotton, F; Gueugniaud, P-Y; Piriou, V

    2008-03-01

    We report the case of an 82-year-old woman treated with biliary stents for an ampulloma of Vater's papilla, with recurrent stenosis of the common bile duct. She was hospitalized with a cholestasis. An endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP) was scheduled to change the biliary stent for a metallic one, under general anaesthesia, with oral intubation. The ERCP was performed initially without any complication, but as the metallic biliary stent was placed, an air embolism occurred and a cardiac arrest happened immediately. The etiologic diagnosis was quickly confirmed by an injected multislice body-scan, which showed liver, right heart and brain gas embolism. Cardiopulmonary resuscitation allowed a complete haemodynamic recovery but a poor neurological recovery. The patient was transferred in intensive care unit, were she died 12 days after, despite hyperbaric oxygen therapy and the disappearance of the air embolism on the following computed tomography scan. This case may be useful to recall the utility of a body-scan for the diagnosis, treatment and follow-up of an air embolism during ERCP. PMID:18313255

  17. The impact of brush cytology from endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP) on patient management at a UK teaching hospital

    PubMed Central

    Sethi, Rajiv; Singh, Kaushiki; Warner, Ben; Mahadeva, Ula; Wilkinson, Mark

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Patients with suspected pancreaticobiliary cancers frequently undergo endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP) to obtain brush cytology for confirmatory diagnosis. The outcome of this often leads to the management of the patient and can avoid more invasive investigations. There is a wide range of sensitivities and specificities reported in the literature. Aims To determine the accuracy of the brush cytology obtained at ERCP by performing a retrospective audit of all patients admitted to Guy's and St. Thomas’ Hospital for ERCP during 2008–2013. Also, to evaluate the impact of cytology results on patient care following ERCP. Method Data were collected from 4 January 2008 to 27 December 2013. This involved analysing EndoSoft (the in-house software for endoscopic data entry), Pathnet (the pathology database) and Electronic Patient Records. Results 162 patients underwent brush cytology during ERCP. 58 patients had positive cytology. With intention-to-treat analysis, sensitivity was 54.7%, specificity was 100.0% and negative predictive value was 53.9% with a positive predictive value of 100%. Patients with a positive brush cytology result required fewer investigations compared with patients with a negative cytology result. Conclusions Our results compare favourably with previous studies in the field. Brush cytology has been ignored in recent times due to perceived poor results and efficacy. Our audit shows that it can reduce the number of investigations required to reach a diagnosis of malignancy and so is a valuable tool in the diagnosis of pancreaticobiliary malignancies. However, better guidance on preparation of samples for cytology is needed to reduce the number of insufficient samples. PMID:27103983

  18. Role of endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography in the management of benign biliary strictures: What's new?

    PubMed

    Ferreira, Rosa; Loureiro, Rui; Nunes, Nuno; Santos, António Alberto; Maio, Rui; Cravo, Marília; Duarte, Maria Antónia

    2016-02-25

    Benign biliary strictures comprise a heterogeneous group of diseases. The most common strictures amenable to endoscopic treatment are post-cholecystectomy, post-liver transplantation, related to primary sclerosing cholangitis and to chronic pancreatitis. Endoscopic treatment of benign biliary strictures is widely used as first line therapy, since it is effective, safe, noninvasive and repeatable. Endoscopic techniques currently used are dilation, multiple plastic stents insertion and fully covered self-expandable metal stents. The main indication for dilation alone is primary sclerosing cholangitis related strictures. In the vast majority of the remaining cases, temporary placement of multiple plastic stents with/without dilation is considered the treatment of choice. Although this approach is effective, it requires multiple endoscopic sessions due to the short duration of stent patency. Fully covered self-expandable metal stents appear as a good alternative to plastic stents, since they have an increased radial diameter, longer stent patency, easier insertion technique and similar efficacy. Recent advances in endoscopic technique and various devices have allowed successful treatment in most cases. The development of novel endoscopic techniques and devices is still ongoing. PMID:26962404

  19. Role of endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography in the management of benign biliary strictures: What’s new?

    PubMed Central

    Ferreira, Rosa; Loureiro, Rui; Nunes, Nuno; Santos, António Alberto; Maio, Rui; Cravo, Marília; Duarte, Maria Antónia

    2016-01-01

    Benign biliary strictures comprise a heterogeneous group of diseases. The most common strictures amenable to endoscopic treatment are post-cholecystectomy, post-liver transplantation, related to primary sclerosing cholangitis and to chronic pancreatitis. Endoscopic treatment of benign biliary strictures is widely used as first line therapy, since it is effective, safe, noninvasive and repeatable. Endoscopic techniques currently used are dilation, multiple plastic stents insertion and fully covered self-expandable metal stents. The main indication for dilation alone is primary sclerosing cholangitis related strictures. In the vast majority of the remaining cases, temporary placement of multiple plastic stents with/without dilation is considered the treatment of choice. Although this approach is effective, it requires multiple endoscopic sessions due to the short duration of stent patency. Fully covered self-expandable metal stents appear as a good alternative to plastic stents, since they have an increased radial diameter, longer stent patency, easier insertion technique and similar efficacy. Recent advances in endoscopic technique and various devices have allowed successful treatment in most cases. The development of novel endoscopic techniques and devices is still ongoing. PMID:26962404

  20. The dexmedetomidine “augmented” sedato analgesic cocktail: An effective approach for sedation in prolonged endoscopic retrograde cholangio-pancreatography

    PubMed Central

    Mukhopadhyay, Sandip; Niyogi, Mausumi; Sarkar, Joydip; Mukhopadhyay, Basabdatta Samanta; Halder, Swapan Kumar

    2015-01-01

    Background and Aims: In absence of any published standard guideline for sedation or anesthesia practice for prolonged therapeutic “endoscopic retrograde cholangio-pancreatography (ERCP)”, safe and cost-effective sedation protocol is the need of the hour. Our study aims to evaluate the efficacy of a dexmedetomidine as an add-on for prolonged deep sedation for ERCP and to compare three deep sedation regimens regarding safety and efficacy. Material and Methods: Forty-five consecutively enrolled patients planned for therapeutic ERCP and assumed to have prolonged procedural duration (>50 min) were divided into three groups in a randomized assessor blinded fashion. Group 1 received propofol and midazolam, Group 2 received the sedato-analgesic cocktail containing ketamine-propofol-midazolam-pentazocine, and the Group 3 received sedate-analgesic cocktail plus dexmedetomidine infusion under monitoring of vital parameters and according to the judgment of the concerned anesthesiologist. Total propofol requirement, episodes of gagging, oxygen desaturation, changes in mean blood pressure (MBP), recovery and satisfaction score of endoscopist, anesthetist and patient were noted and analyzed statistically using one way ANOVA with Bonferroni correction and Chi-square test. Results: Mean propofol requirement, incidences of gagging and oxygen desaturation was significantly less in Group 2 and 3 compared to Group 1. MBP was more stable and recovery was faster in Group 3. Anesthetist's satisfaction was more with Group 2 and even more with Group 3. Conclusions: The sedato-analgesic cocktail was superior to the conventional propofol-midazolam regimen, dexmedetomidine as add-on increased the efficacy and safety of sedate-analgesic cocktail. It reduces propofol requirement, helps to maintain the patient in a safe and more stable level of sedation and increases satisfaction of the anesthetist. PMID:25948901

  1. Prevention of post-endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography pancreatitis by pancreatic duct stenting using a loop-tipped guidewire

    PubMed Central

    Sakai, Yuji; Tsuyuguchi, Toshio; Sugiyama, Harutoshi; Hayashi, Masahiro; Senoo, Jun-ichi; Sasaki, Reina; Kusakabe, Yuko; Nakamura, Masato; Yasui, Shin; Mikata, Rintaro; Miyazaki, Masaru; Yokosuka, Osamu

    2016-01-01

    AIM To examine whether it is possible to prevent the occurrence of post-endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP) pancreatitis in patients experiencing difficulties with selective biliary duct cannulation by pancreatic duct stenting using a loop-tipped guidewire. METHODS Procedure success rate, frequency of unintended insertion of the guidewire into side branches of the pancreatic duct, and incidence of procedural accidents were examined using a loop-tipped guidewire (Group A, 20 patients), and a conventional straight-type guidewire (Group B, 20 patients). RESULTS The success rate of the procedure was 100% in both groups. Unintended insertion of the guidewire into a side branch of the pancreatic duct occurred 0.056 ± 0.23 (0-1) times in Group A and 2.3 ± 1.84 (0-5) times in Group B; thus, unintended insertion of the guidewire into a side branch of the pancreatic duct was seen significantly less frequently in Group A. There were no procedural accidents in Group A, whereas pancreatitis occurred in one Group B patient; however, the difference between the two groups was not statistically significant. The serum amylase level after ERCP was 257.15 ± 136.4 (88-628) IU/L in Group A, and 552.05 ± 534.57 (101-2389) IU/L in Group B, showing a significantly lower value in Group A. Hyperamylasemia was found in two patients (10%) in Group A, and nine (45%) in Group B, showing a significantly lower value in Group A. CONCLUSION The results suggest that in patients who experience difficulties with biliary cannulation, the use of a loop-tipped guidewire for pancreatic duct stenting may assist with the prevention of post-ERCP pancreatitis, and thereby to a reduction of the risk of post-ERCP pancreatitis or hyperamylasemia. PMID:27574608

  2. Two Cases of Cerebral Air Embolism That Occurred during Esophageal Ballooning and Endoscopic Retrograde Cholangiopancreatography

    PubMed Central

    Park, Suyeon; Ahn, Ji Yong; Ahn, Young Eun; Jeon, Sang-Beom; Lee, Sang Soo; Jung, Hwoon-Yong; Kim, Jin-Ho

    2016-01-01

    Cerebral air embolism is an extremely rare complication of endoscopic procedure and often life threatening. We present two cases of cerebral infarction due to air embolization caused by an endoscopic intervention. The first case occurred during esophageal balloon dilatation for the treatment of a stricture of an anastomosis site in a 59-year-old man and the second case occurred during endoscopic papillary balloon dilatation in a 69-year-old man who had distal common bile duct stones. After the procedure, cardiopulmonary instability and altered mental status were observed in both patients, and cerebral air embolism was diagnosed in both cases. Hyperbaric oxygen therapy was started in the first case, and high FiO2 therapy was applied in the second case. Although this complication is rare, patient outcomes can be improved if physicians are aware of this potential complication, and immediately begin proper management. PMID:26898514

  3. Two Cases of Cerebral Air Embolism That Occurred during Esophageal Ballooning and Endoscopic Retrograde Cholangiopancreatography.

    PubMed

    Park, Suyeon; Ahn, Ji Yong; Ahn, Young Eun; Jeon, Sang-Beom; Lee, Sang Soo; Jung, Hwoon-Yong; Kim, Jin-Ho

    2016-03-01

    Cerebral air embolism is an extremely rare complication of endoscopic procedure and often life threatening. We present two cases of cerebral infarction due to air embolization caused by an endoscopic intervention. The first case occurred during esophageal balloon dilatation for the treatment of a stricture of an anastomosis site in a 59-year-old man and the second case occurred during endoscopic papillary balloon dilatation in a 69-year-old man who had distal common bile duct stones. After the procedure, cardiopulmonary instability and altered mental status were observed in both patients, and cerebral air embolism was diagnosed in both cases. Hyperbaric oxygen therapy was started in the first case, and high FiO2 therapy was applied in the second case. Although this complication is rare, patient outcomes can be improved if physicians are aware of this potential complication, and immediately begin proper management. PMID:26898514

  4. A Prospective Blinded Study Evaluating the Role of Endoscopic Ultrasound before Endoscopic Retrograde Cholangiopancreatography in the Setting of "Positive" Intraoperative Cholangiogram during Cholecystectomy.

    PubMed

    Luthra, Anjuli K; Aggarwal, Vipul; Mishra, Girish; Conway, Jason; Evans, John A

    2016-04-01

    During laparoscopic cholecystectomy, intraoperative cholangiography (IOC) is used to identify common bile duct (CBD) stones. In patients whose IOC is suspicious for stones, endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP) is the modality of choice for stone removal. However, IOC has a false positive rate of 30 to 60 per cent, and ERCP adverse events may occur in 11 per cent of patients. Endoscopic ultrasound (EUS) may serve as a noninvasive means of diagnosing suspected CBD stones. This study sought to assess the role of EUS in predicting the likelihood of choledocholithiasis at ERCP in patients found to have a positive IOC. This was a prospective blinded study of EUS before ERCP in patients with a positive IOC. Recruited subjects who underwent cholecystectomy and had an IOC with suspicion for obstruction were referred for ERCP within one month of their procedure. In patients with a positive IOC, EUS had a positive predictive value of 95 per cent in detecting choledocholithiasis. IOC with single or multiple filling defects more often correlated to the presence of CBD stones. At ERCP, choledocholithiasis was present in 65 per cent of patients who had an IOC suspicious for CBD stones. EUS should be used as a noninvasive method to correctly identify retained CBD stones in low-to-moderate risk patients with a positive IOC. PMID:27097628

  5. Stereotypical Metabolic Response to Endoscopic Retrograde Cholangiopancreatography Show Alterations in Pancreatic Function Regardless of Post-Procedure Pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Lusczek, Elizabeth R; Colling, Kristen; Muratore, Sydne; Conwell, Darwin; Freeman, Martin; Beilman, Greg

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Metabolomics-based diagnosis or prediction of risk may improve patient outcomes and improve understanding of the pathogenesis of acute pancreatitis (AP). Endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP) is a risk factor for developing AP. This pilot study examined metabolomes of patients before and after ERCP, hypothesizing that metabolomics could differentiate between patients who did and did not develop post-ERCP pancreatitis, and that biomarkers associated with development of AP could be identified. METHODS: Patients at high risk for developing post-ERCP pancreatitis were prospectively enrolled at the University of Minnesota from October 2012 to February 2014. Urine and serum samples were collected before ERCP, 2 h after ERCP, and daily thereafter if patients were admitted to the hospital with AP. Pancreatitis severity was calculated with Bedside Index for Severity in Acute Pancreatitis (BISAP) and Modified Glasgow scores. Patients who developed AP (n=9) were matched to patients who did not develop AP (n=18) by age and gender. Urine and serum metabolites were profiled with nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. Partial least squares discriminant analysis (PLS-DA) was performed to detect changes in metabolic profiles associated with development of pancreatitis. Metabolic networks were constructed to probe functional relationships among metabolites. RESULTS: Of the 113 enrolled patients, 9 developed mild AP according to BISAP and modified Glasglow scores. PLS-DA showed common differences between pre- and post-ERCP metabolic profiles in urine and serum regardless of AP status, characterized by increases in serum and urine ketones and serum glucose. Pre-ERCP lipase levels were somewhat elevated in those who went on to develop AP, though this did not reach statistical significance. Metabolic networks differed between patients with AP and those without after ERCP; however, metabolomics did not identify specific prognostic or diagnostic markers of

  6. Antioxidant therapy in acute, chronic and post-endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography pancreatitis: An updated systematic review and meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Gooshe, Maziar; Abdolghaffari, Amir Hossein; Nikfar, Shekoufeh; Mahdaviani, Parvin; Abdollahi, Mohammad

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the efficacy and adverse effects of antioxidant therapy in acute pancreatitis (AP), chronic pancreatitis (CP) and post-endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography pancreatitis (PEP). METHODS: PubMed, Scopus, Google Scholar, Cochrane library database, and Evidence-based medicine/clinical trials published before August 2014 were searched. Clinical and laboratory outcomes of randomized trials of antioxidant therapy in patients with AP, CP and PEP were included. The methodological quality of the trials was assessed by the Jadad score based on the description of randomization, blinding, and dropouts (withdrawals). The results of the studies were pooled and meta-analyzed to provide estimates of the efficacy of antioxidant therapy. RESULTS: Thirty four trials out of 1069 potentially relevant studies with data for 4898 patients were eligible for inclusion. Antioxidant therapy significantly reduced the length of hospital stay in AP patients {mean difference -2.59 d (95%CI: -4.25-(-0.93)], P = 0.002}. Although, antioxidant therapy had no significant effect on serum C reactive protein (CRP) after 5-7 d in AP patients [mean difference -9.57 (95%CI: -40.61-21.48, P = 0.55], it significantly reduced serum CRP after 10 d {mean difference -45.16 [95%CI: -89.99-(-0.33)], P = 0.048}. In addition, antioxidant therapy had no significant effect on CP-induced pain [mean difference -2.13 (95%CI: -5.87-1.6), P = 0.26]. Antioxidant therapy had no significant effects on the incidence of all types of PEP [mean difference 1.05 (95%CI: 0.74-1.5), P = 0.78], severe PEP [mean difference 0.92 (95%CI: 0.43-1.97), P = 0.83], moderate PEP [mean difference 0.82 (95%CI: 0.54-1.23), P = 0.33], and mild PEP [mean difference 1.33 (95%CI: 0.99-1.78), P = 0.06]. Furthermore, while antioxidant therapy had no significant effect on serum amylase after less than 8 h sampling [mean difference -20.61 (95%CI: -143.61-102.39), P = 0.74], it significantly reduced serum amylase close to 24-h

  7. ERCP (Endoscopic Retrograde Cholangiopancreatography)

    MedlinePlus

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  8. ERCP (Endoscopic Retrograde Cholangiopancreatography)

    MedlinePlus

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  9. Effects of pinaverium bromide in the premedication of endoscopic retrograde cholangio-pancreatography and on motor activity of the sphincter of Oddi.

    PubMed

    Lamazza, A; Tofi, A; Bolognese, A; Fontana, B; De Masi, E; Frontespezi, S

    1986-01-01

    A double-blind study was carried out in 18 patients with biliary and pancreatic disease to assess the use of pinaverium bromide in premedication for endoscopic retrograde cholangio-pancreatography and its effects on motor activity of the sphincter of Oddi. Patients were divided at random into three groups. One group received 100 mg pinaverium bromide twice daily for 3 days before and then 100 mg 1 hour before the examination, the second group received placebo, and the third had no medication. All patients received 10 to 20 mg diazepam intravenously 10 minutes before endoscopy. Assessments were made of the transit time of various endoscopic phases and patients' tolerance of the procedure. The effects of treatment on the sphincter of Oddi were estimated by means of endoscopic manometry. The results showed that pinaverium bromide allowed transit time reduction in endoscopic procedure, a greater tolerance on the part of the patient and marked reduction in the amplitude and duration of the phasic activity of the sphincter. PMID:3780291

  10. Prospective international multicenter study on endoscopic ultrasound-guided biliary drainage for patients with malignant distal biliary obstruction after failed endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography

    PubMed Central

    Khashab, Mouen A.; Van der Merwe, Schalk; Kunda, Rastislav; El Zein, Mohamad H.; Teoh, Anthony Y.; Marson, Fernando P.; Fabbri, Carlo; Tarantino, Ilaria; Varadarajulu, Shyam; Modayil, Rani J.; Stavropoulos, Stavros N.; Peñas, Irene; Ngamruengphong, Saowanee; Kumbhari, Vivek; Romagnuolo, Joseph; Shah, Raj; Kalloo, Anthony N.; Perez-Miranda, Manuel; Artifon, Everson L.

    2016-01-01

    Background and aims: Endoscopic ultrasound-guided biliary drainage (EUS-BD) has emerged as an alternative to traditional radiologic and surgical drainage procedures after failed endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP). However, prospective multicenter data are lacking. The aims of this study were to prospectively assess the short- and long-term efficacy and safety of EUS-BD in patients with malignant distal biliary obstruction. Patients and methods: Consecutive patients at 12 tertiary centers (5 US, 5 European, 1 Asian, 1 South American) with malignant distal biliary obstruction and failed ERCP underwent EUS-BD. Technical success was defined as successful stent placement in the desired position. Clinical success was defined as a reduction in bilirubin by 50 % at 2 weeks or to below 3 mg/dL at 4 weeks. Adverse events were prospectively tracked and graded according to the American Society for Gastrointestinal Endoscopy (ASGE) lexicon’s severity grading system. Overall survival and duration of stent patency were calculated using Kaplan–Meier analysis. Results: A total of 96 patients (mean age 66 years, female 45 %, pancreatic cancer 55 %) underwent EUS-BD. Stent placement (technical success) was achieved in 92 (95.8 %) patients (metallic stent 84, plastic stent 8). Mean procedure time was 40 minutes. Clinical success was achieved in 86 (89.5 %) patients. A total of 10 (10.5 %) adverse events occurred: pneumoperitoneum (n = 2), sheared wire (n = 1), bleeding (n = 1), bile leak (n = 3), cholangitis (n = 2), and unintentional perforation (n = 1); 4 graded as mild, 4 moderate, 1 severe, and 1 fatal (due to perforation). A total of 38 (44 %) patients died of disease progression during the study period. The median patient survival was 167 days (95 %CI 112 – 221) days. The 6-month stent patency rate was 95 % (95 %CI 94.94 – 95.06 %) and the 1-year stent patency was 86 % (95 %CI 85.74 – 86

  11. Outcome of probe-based confocal laser endomicroscopy (pCLE) during endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography: A single-center prospective study in 45 patients

    PubMed Central

    Lönnebro, Ragnar; Stigliano, Serena; Haas, Stephan L; Swahn, Fredrik; Enochsson, Lars; Noel, Rozh; Segersvärd, Ralf; Chiaro, Marco Del; Verbeke, Caroline S; Arnelo, Urban

    2015-01-01

    Background Diagnosis of pre-malignant and malignant lesions in the bile duct and the pancreas is sometimes cumbersome. This applies in particular to intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasia (IPMN) and bile duct strictures in primary sclerosing cholangitis (PSC). Aims To evaluate in a prospective cohort study the sensitivity and specificity of probe-based confocal laser microscopy (pCLE) during endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP). Methods We performed pCLE together with mother-baby endoscopy (SpyGlass) during 50 ERCP sessions in 45 patients. The Miami and Paris criteria were applied. Clinical diagnosis via imaging was compared to pCLE and the final pathological diagnosis from surgically-resected, biopsy, or cytology specimens. Patients were followed up for at least 1 year. Results We were able to perform pCLE in all patients. Prior to endoscopy, the diagnosis was benign in 23 patients and undetermined (suspicious) in 16 patients, while six patients had an unequivocal diagnosis of malignancy. Sensitivity was 91% and specificity 52%. The positive (PPV) and negative predictive value (NPV) was 82% and 100%, respectively. Apart from mild post-ERCP pancreatitis in two patients, no complications occurred. Conclusions Our study showed that pCLE is a safe, expert endoscopic method with high technical feasibility, high sensitivity and high NPV. It provided diagnostic information that can be helpful for decisions on patient management, especially in the case of IPMN and unclear pancreatic lesions, in individuals whom are at increased risk for pancreatic cancer. PMID:26668748

  12. Occupational radiation dose to eyes from endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography procedures in light of the revised eye lens dose limit from the International Commission on Radiological Protection

    PubMed Central

    Gallagher, A; Malone, L; O’Reilly, G

    2013-01-01

    Objective: Endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP) is a common procedure that combines the use of X-ray fluoroscopy and endoscopy for examination of the bile duct. Published data on ERCP doses are limited, including staff eye dose from ERCP. Occupational eye doses are of particular interest now as the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) has recommended a reduction in the dose limit to the lens of the eye. The aim of this study was to measure occupational eye doses obtained from ERCP procedures. Methods: A new eye lens dosemeter (EYE-D™, Radcard, Krakow, Poland) was used to measure the ERCP eye dose, Hp(3), at two endoscopy departments in Ireland. A review of radiation protection practice at the two facilities was also carried out. Results: The mean equivalent dose to the lens of the eye of a gastroenterologist is 0.01 mSv per ERCP procedure with an undercouch X-ray tube and 0.09 mSv per ERCP procedure with an overcouch X-ray tube. Staff eye dose normalised to patient kerma area product is also presented. Conclusion: Staff eye doses in ERCP have the potential to exceed the revised ICRP limit of 20 mSv per annum when an overcouch X-ray tube is used. The EYE-D dosemeter was found to be a convenient method for measuring lens dose. Eye doses in areas outside of radiology departments should be kept under review, particularly in light of the new ICRP eye dose limit. Advances in knowledge: Occupational eye lens doses from ERCP procedures have been established using a new commercially available dedicated Hp(3) dosemeter. PMID:23385992

  13. Understanding ERCP (Endoscopic Retrograde Cholangiopancreatography)

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  14. 0.025-inch vs 0.035-inch guide wires for wire-guided cannulation during endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography: A randomized study

    PubMed Central

    Kitamura, Katsuya; Yamamiya, Akira; Ishii, Yu; Sato, Yoshiki; Iwata, Tomoyuki; Nomoto, Tomohiro; Ikegami, Akitoshi; Yoshida, Hitoshi

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To compare the clinical outcomes between 0.025-inch and 0.035-inch guide wires (GWs) when used in wire-guided cannulation (WGC). METHODS: A single center, randomized study was conducted between April 2011 and March 2013. This study was approved by the Medical Ethics Committee at our hospital. Informed, written consent was obtained from each patient prior to study enrollment. Three hundred and twenty-two patients with a naïve papilla of Vater who underwent endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP) for the purpose of selective bile duct cannulation with WGC were enrolled in this study. Fifty-three patients were excluded based on the exclusion criteria, and 269 patients were randomly allocated to two groups by a computer and analyzed: the 0.025-inch GW group (n = 109) and the 0.035-inch GW group (n = 160). The primary endpoint was the success rate of selective bile duct cannulation with WGC. Secondary endpoints were the success rates of the pancreatic GW technique and precutting, selective bile duct cannulation time, ERCP procedure time, the rate of pancreatic duct stent placement, the final success rate of selective bile duct cannulation, and the incidence of post-ERCP pancreatitis (PEP). RESULTS: The primary success rates of selective bile duct cannulation with WGC were 80.7% (88/109) and 86.3% (138/160) for the 0.025-inch and the 0.035-inch groups, respectively (P = 0.226). There were no statistically significant differences in the success rates of selective bile duct cannulation using the pancreatic duct GW technique (46.7% vs 52.4% for the 0.025-inch and 0.035-inch groups, respectively; P = 0.884) or in the success rates of selective bile duct cannulation using precutting (66.7% vs 63.6% for the 0.025-inch and 0.035-inch groups, respectively; P = 0.893). The final success rates for selective bile duct cannulation using these procedures were 92.7% (101/109) and 97.5% (156/160) for the 0.025-inch and 0.035-inch groups, respectively (P = 0

  15. Comparing cost-effectiveness between endoscopic ultrasound and endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography in diagnosis of common bile duct stone in patients with predefined risks: A study from a developing country

    PubMed Central

    Netinatsunton, Nisa; Attasaranya, Siriboon; Sottisuporn, Jaksin; Witeerungrot, Teepawit; Jongboonyanuparp, Theeratus; Piratvisuth, Teerha; Ovartlarnporn, Bancha

    2016-01-01

    Background and Objectives: Endoscopic ultrasound (EUS) achieves results comparable to endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP) in the diagnosis of common bile duct (CBD) stone, but studies from the western have shown EUS to be less expensive in patients with intermediate risk for CBD stones. The aim of this study was to compare the costs of EUS and ERCP in the diagnosis of CBD stones in a developing country. Materials and Methods: A prospective study was done with 141 patients with suspected CBD stones, categorized as having high or intermediate risk for CBD stone. All underwent EUS, and the high-risk patients had ERCP after the EUS. For intermediate-risk patients, an ERCP was done at the discretion of the attending physician. The CBD stone was confirmed by ERCP in patients who underwent both EUS and ERCP. Patients who received EUS only were followed up every 3 months for 1 year. The false negative rate in patients with EUS and ERCP was estimated in the clinical follow-up. Result: One hundred and forty-one patients (141: 83 females, 58 males) with a mean age ± standard deviation (SD) of 55.71 ±18.68 years were recruited. Ninety-four (94) patients underwent both EUS and ERCP. ERCP confirmed the diagnosis in 83 of 85 patients (97.6%) with CBD stone detected by EUS. Forty-seven (47) patients with a negative EUS and no ERCP done were symptom-free during the follow-up. The overall sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value, and negative predictive value of EUS were 97.6%, 80%, 97.6%, and 80% respectively. An EUS-based strategy for high-risk patients was 15% more expensive than an ERCP-based strategy, but the EUS-based strategy reduced the cost to 37.78% less than the ERCP-based strategy in intermediate-risk patients. The EUS-based strategy was cost-saving when the CBD stone prevalence was less than 52.5%. Conclusion: EUS is safer and less costly than ERCP for CBD stone diagnosis in patients with intermediate risk. PMID:27386473

  16. Laparoscopy assisted transjejunal endoscopic retrograde cholangiography for treatment of intrahepatic duct stones in a post Roux-en-Y patient.

    PubMed

    Mansor, Salah M; Abdalla, Salem I; Bendardaf, Rashed S

    2015-01-01

    We report a case of a 17-year-old female patient, who was operated on for choledocal cyst with Roux-en Y hepatojejunostomy. She was admitted to hospital with recurrent attacks of acute ascending cholangitis due to left intrahepatic duct stones. After a failed attempt at conventional endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography through the anatomical route, she was treated successfully with laparoscopy assisted transjejunal endoscopic retrograde cholangiography.  PMID:25630013

  17. Laparoscopy assisted transjejunal endoscopic retrograde cholangiography for treatment of intrahepatic duct stones in a post Roux-en-Y patient

    PubMed Central

    Mansor, Salah M.; Abdalla, Salem I.; Bendardaf, Rashed S.

    2015-01-01

    We report a case of a 17-year-old female patient, who was operated on for choledocal cyst with Roux-en Y hepatojejunostomy. She was admitted to hospital with recurrent attacks of acute ascending cholangitis due to left intrahepatic duct stones. After a failed attempt at conventional endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography through the anatomical route, she was treated successfully with laparoscopy assisted transjejunal endoscopic retrograde cholangiography. PMID:25630013

  18. Endoscopic retrograde cholangio pancreatography (ERCP) - slideshow

    MedlinePlus

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  19. Measures of patient radiation exposure during endoscopic retrograde cholangiography: Beyond fluoroscopy time

    PubMed Central

    Kachaamy, Toufic; Harrison, Edwyn; Pannala, Rahul; Pavlicek, William; Crowell, Michael D; Faigel, Douglas O

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To determine whether fluoroscope time is a good predictor of patient radiation exposure during endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography. METHODS: This is a prospective observational study of consecutive patients undergoing endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography in a tertiary care setting. Data related to radiation exposure were collected. The following measures were obtained: Fluoroscopy time (FT), dose area product (DAP) and dose at reference point (DOSERP). Coefficients of determination were calculated to analyze the correlation between FT, DAP and DOSRP. Agreement between FT and DAP/DOSRP was assessed using Bland Altman plots. RESULTS: Four hundred sixty-three data sets were obtained. Fluoroscopy time average was 7.3 min. Fluoroscopy related radiation accounted for 86% of the total DAP while acquisition films related radiation accounted for 14% of the DAP. For any given FT there are wide ranges of DAP and DOSERP and the variability in both increases as fluoroscopy time increases. The coefficient of determination (R2) on the non transformed data for DAP and DOSERP versus FT were respectively 0.416 and 0.554. While fluoroscopy use was the largest contributor to patient radiation exposure during endoscopic retrograde cholangiography (ERCP), there is a wide variability in DAP and DOSERP that is not accounted for by FT. DAP and DOSERP increase in variability as FT increases. This translates into poor accuracy of FT in predicting DAP and DOSERP at higher radiation doses. CONCLUSION: DAP and DOSERP in addition to FT should be adopted as new ERCP quality measures to estimate patient radiation exposure. PMID:25684958

  20. [Intraparenchymal hepatic haematoma after endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreotography overinfected by Citrobacter freundii and Klebsiella pneumoniae BLEE].

    PubMed

    Carrica, Sebastián A; Belloni, Rodrigo; Baldoni, Fernando; Yantorno, Martín; Correa, Gustavo; Bologna, Adrián; Barbero, Rodolfo; Villaverde, Augusto; Chopita, Néstor

    2014-06-01

    This case report describes a 37-year-old woman who develops an intraparenchymal hepatic haematoma after an endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography with papillotomy and stone extraction. The procedure requires the passage of a guidewire. The patient develops acute abdominal pain 72 hours later and a magnetic resonance shows a hematoma of 124 x 93 mm. She remains under observation. Twenty one days later she complains of upper right abdominal pain and fever. Consequently, a percutaneous drainage is performed isolating Citrobacter freundii and Klebsiella pneumoniae BLEE. The patient has a good evolution. PMID:25199307

  1. Imaging of the pancreatic duct by linear endoscopic ultrasound

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Malay; Rai, Praveer; Rameshbabu, Chittapuram Srinivasan; Arya, Shalini

    2015-01-01

    The current gold standard investigation for anatomic exploration of the pancreatic duct (PD) is endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography. Magnetic resonance cholangiopancreatography is a noninvasive method for exploration of the PD. A comprehensive evaluation of the course of PD and its branches has not been described by endoscopic ultrasound (EUS). In this article, we describe the techniques of imaging of PD using linear EUS. PMID:26374577

  2. Pancreatitis with an unusual fatal complication following endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreaticography: a case report

    PubMed Central

    Kanen, Boris; Loffeld, Ruud JLF

    2008-01-01

    Introduction Endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreaticography has been the treatment of choice for stones in the common bile duct. Although the procedure is usually safe, procedure-related complications do occur. Case presentation A case of pancreatitis following endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreaticography is described in a 55-year-old woman. After an uneventful recovery the patient's condition deteriorated rapidly 16 days after the endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreaticography, and the patient died within 1 hour. Post-mortem examination revealed massive intrapulmonary fat embolism. The complications of endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreaticography and pancreatitis are described. Conclusion Fat embolism can occur after the remission of pancreatitis and pancreatic necrosis may be overlooked on contrast-enhanced computed tomography scanning. PMID:18577211

  3. Vesicourethral fistula after retrograde primary endoscopic realignment in posterior urethral injury.

    PubMed

    Arora, Rajat; John, Nirmal Thampi; Kumar, Santosh

    2015-01-01

    A 22-year-old male patient presented with iatrogenic vesicourethral fistula after immediate retrograde endoscopic realignment of urethra after a posterior urethral injury associated with pelvic fracture. PMID:25440761

  4. Endoscopic ultrasound versus magnetic resonance cholangiopancreatography in suspected choledocholithiasis: A systematic review

    PubMed Central

    De Castro, Vinicius Leite; Moura, Eduardo G.H.; Chaves, Dalton M.; Bernardo, Wanderley M.; Matuguma, Sergio E.; Artifon, Everson L.A.

    2016-01-01

    Background and Objectives: There is a lack of consensus about the optimal noninvasive strategy for patients with suspected choledocholithiasis. Two previous systematic reviews used different methodologies not based on pretest probabilities that demonstrated no statistically significant difference between Endoscopic ultrasound (EUS) and magnetic resonance cholangiopancreatography (MRCP) for the detection of choledocholithiasis. In this article, we made a comparison of the diagnostic ability of EUS and MRCP to detect choledocholithiasis in suspected patients. Methods: We conducted a systematic review in accordance with the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses (PRISMA) recommendations with all published randomized prospective trials. We performed the systemic review using MedLine, EMBASE, Cochrane, LILACS, and Scopus reviews through May 2015. We identified eight randomized, prospective, blinded trials comparing EUS and MRCP. All the patients were submitted to a gold standard method. We calculated the study-specific variables and performed analyses using aggregated variables such as sensitivity, specificity, prevalence, positive predictive value (PPV) and negative predictive value (NPV), and accuracy. Results: Five hundred and thirty eight patients were included in the analysis. The pretest probability for choledocholithiasis was 38.7. The mean sensitivity of EUS and MRCP for detection of choledocholithiasis was 93.7 and 83.5, respectively; the specificity was 88.5 and 91.5, respectively. Regarding EUS and MRCP, PPV was 89 and 87.8, respectively, and NPV was 96.9 and 87.8, respectively. The accuracy of EUS and MRCP was 93.3 and 89.7, respectively. Conclusions: For the same pretest probability of choledocholithiasis, EUS has higher posttest probability when the result is positive and a lower posttest probability when the result is negative compared with MRCP. PMID:27080611

  5. Combination treatment of transjugular retrograde obliteration and endoscopic embolization for portosystemic encephalopathy with esophageal varices.

    PubMed

    Chikamori, Fumio; Kuniyoshi, Nobutoshi; Shibuya, Susumu; Takase, Yasuhiro

    2004-01-01

    The treatment of chronic portosystemic encephalopathy with esophageal varices has not yet been established. We were able to control a case of chronic portosystemic encephalopathy with esophageal varices using a combination treatment of transjugular retrograde obliteration and endoscopic embolization. A 57-year-old man came to our hospital in a confused, apathetic and tremulous state. The grade of encephalopathy was II. The plasma ammonia level was abnormally elevated to 119 microg/dL, and the ICGR15 was 59%. Endoscopic examination revealed nodular esophageal varices with cherry-red spots. There were no gastric varices. Ultrasonography and CT revealed liver cirrhosis with a splenorenal shunt. We first applied endoscopic embolization for the esophageal varices before transjugular retrograde obliteration. We injected 5% ethanolamine oleate with iopamidol retrogradely into the esophageal varices and their associated blood routes under fluoroscopy and obliterated the palisade vein, the cardiac venous plexus and left gastric vein. Transjugular retrograde obliteration was performed 14 days after endoscopic embolization. Retrograde shunt venography visualized the splenorenal shunt and communicating route to the retroperitoneal vein. There was no communicating route to the azygos vein. After obliteration of the communicating route to the retroperitoneal vein with absolute ethanol, 5% ethanolamine oleate with iopamidol was injected into the splenorenal shunt as far as the root of the posterior gastric vein. After transjugular retrograde obliteration, the encephalopathy improved to grade 0 even without the administration of lactulose and branched-chain amino acid. The plasma ammonia level and ICGR15 were reduced to 62 microg/dL and 26%. We conclude that combination treatment of transjugular retrograde obliteration and endoscopic embolization is a rational, effective and safe treatment for chronic portosystemic encephalopathy complicated with esophageal varices. PMID:15362757

  6. Endoscopic retrograde cholangiography for pediatric choledocholithiasis: Assessing the need for endoscopic intervention

    PubMed Central

    Fishman, Douglas S; Chumpitazi, Bruno P; Raijman, Isaac; Tsai, Cynthia Man-Wai; Smith, E O’Brian; Mazziotti, Mark V; Gilger, Mark A

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To assess pediatric patients for choledocholithiasis. We applied current adult guidelines to identify predictive factors in children. METHODS: A single-center retrospective analysis was performed at a tertiary children’s hospital. We evaluated 44 consecutive pediatric patients who underwent endoscopic retrograde cholangiography (ERCP) for suspected choledocholithiasis. Patients were stratified into those with common bile duct stones (CBDS) at ERCP vs those that did not using the American Society of Gastrointestinal Endoscopy (ASGE) guidelines (Very Strong and Strong criteria) for suspected CBDS. RESULTS: CBDS were identified in 84% at the time of ERCP. Abdominal ultrasound identified CBDS in 36% of patients. Conjugated bilirubin ≥ 0.5 mg/dL was an independent risk factor for CBDS (P = 0.003). The Very Strong (59.5%) and Strong (48.6%) ASGE criteria identified the majority of patients (P = 0.0001). A modified score using conjugated bilirubin had a higher sensitivity (81.2% vs 59.5%) and more likely to identify a stone than the standard criteria, odds ratio of 25.7 compared to 8.8. Alanine aminotransferase and gamma-glutamyl transferase values identified significant differences in a subset of patients with odds ratio of 4.1 and 3.25, respectively. CONCLUSION: Current adult guidelines identified the majority of pediatric patients with CBDS, but specific pediatric guidelines may improve detection, thus decreasing risks and unnecessary procedures. PMID:27298714

  7. [Clinical applications of magnetic resonance cholangiopancreatography].

    PubMed

    Soto, J A; Castrillón, G A

    2007-01-01

    Magnetic resonance cholangiopancreatography (MRCP) is the most important diagnostic alternative that has been developed in recent years for the evaluation of the biliary and pancreatic ducts. The advantages of this technique are: it does not use contrast media or ionizing radiation; it is noninvasive and complication free; and, the examination is relatively short (approximately 20 to 30 minutes). MRCP has high sensitivity and specificity for diagnosing biliary dilatation and for determining the site and cause of stenosis. Its diagnostic precision for biliary and pancreatic stones is similar to that of endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP). MRCP has replaced ERCP in biliary and pancreatic anatomic variants. In unsuccessful ERCP, MRCP is nearly the only diagnostic modality for the evaluation of the biliary tract. Other applications include primary sclerosing cholangitis, stenosis after liver transplantation, and the evaluation of bilioenteric anastomoses. This article reviews the clinical applications of MRCP in the evaluation of biliopancreatic diseases. PMID:18021667

  8. Endoscopic dilation of complete oesophageal obstructions with a combined antegrade-retrograde rendezvous technique

    PubMed Central

    Bertolini, Reto; Meyenberger, Christa; Putora, Paul Martin; Albrecht, Franziska; Broglie, Martina Anja; Stoeckli, Sandro J; Sulz, Michael Christian

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the combined antegrade-retrograde endoscopic rendezvous technique for complete oesophageal obstruction and the swallowing outcome. METHODS: This single-centre case series includes consecutive patients who were unable to swallow due to complete oesophageal obstruction and underwent combined antegrade-retrograde endoscopic dilation (CARD) within the last 10 years. The patients’ demographic characteristics, clinical parameters, endoscopic therapy, adverse events, and outcomes were obtained retrospectively. Technical success was defined as effective restoration of oesophageal patency. Swallowing success was defined as either percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy (PEG)-tube independency and/or relevant improvement of oral food intake, as assessed by the functional oral intake scale (FOIS) (≥ level 3). RESULTS: The cohort consisted of six patients [five males; mean age 71 years (range, 54-74)]. All but one patient had undergone radiotherapy for head and neck or oesophageal cancer. Technical success was achieved in five out of six patients. After discharge, repeated dilations were performed in all five patients. During follow-up (median 27 mo, range, 2-115), three patients remained PEG-tube dependent. Three of four patients achieved relevant improvement of swallowing (two patients: FOIS 6, one patient: FOIS 7). One patient developed mediastinal emphysema following CARD, without a need for surgery. CONCLUSION: The CARD technique is safe and a viable alternative to high-risk blind antegrade dilation in patients with complete proximal oesophageal obstruction. Although only half of the patients remained PEG-tube independent, the majority improved their ability to swallow. PMID:26900299

  9. Endoscopic management of benign biliary strictures

    PubMed Central

    Visrodia, Kavel H; Tabibian, James H; Baron, Todd H

    2015-01-01

    Endoscopic management of biliary obstruction has evolved tremendously since the introduction of flexible fiberoptic endoscopes over 50 years ago. For the last several decades, endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP) has become established as the mainstay for definitively diagnosing and relieving biliary obstruction. In addition, and more recently, endoscopic ultrasonography (EUS) has gained increasing favor as an auxiliary diagnostic and therapeutic modality in facilitating decompression of the biliary tree. Here, we provide a review of the current and continually evolving role of gastrointestinal endoscopy, including both ERCP and EUS, in the management of biliary obstruction with a focus on benign biliary strictures. PMID:26322153

  10. Endoscopic ultrasound-guided hepaticogastrostomy using a 6-F cystotome and 12-cm covered metal stent

    PubMed Central

    Mandai, Koichiro; Uno, Koji; Okada, Yusuke; Suzuki, Azumi; Yasuda, Kenjiro

    2016-01-01

    Background and study aims: An iincreasing number of reports describe endoscopic ultrasound-guided hepaticogastrostomy for malignant biliary obstruction in patients with endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography failure. However, this procedure has not yet been standardized; as a result, the rate of adverse events, including bile leakage and stent migration, is relatively high. Here, we report our experience with four cases of endoscopic ultrasound-guided hepaticogastrostomy performed according to our institutional procedure. PMID:27004245

  11. Laparoscopic cholecystectomy is more difficult after a previous endoscopic retrograde cholangiography

    PubMed Central

    Reinders, Jan Siert Kayitsinga; Gouma, Dirk Joan; Heisterkamp, Joos; Tromp, Ellen; van Ramshorst, Bert; Boerma, Djamila

    2013-01-01

    Background Endoscopic retrograde cholangiography (ERCP) with endoscopic sphincterotomy (ES) followed by a laparoscopic cholecystectomy (LC) is generally accepted as the treatment of choice for patients with choledochocystolithiasis who are eligible for surgery. Previous studies have shown that LC after ES is associated with a high conversion rate. The aim of the present study was to assess the complexity of LC after ES compared with standard LC for symptomatic uncomplicated cholecystolithiasis. Methods The study population consisted of two patient cohorts: patients who had undergone a previous ERCP with ES for choledocholithiasis (PES) and patients with cholecystolithiasis who had no previous intervention prior to LC (NPES). Results The PES group consisted of 93 patients and the NPES group consisted of 83 consecutive patients. Patients in the PES group had higher risks for longer [more than 65 min, odds ratio (OR) = 4.21 (95% confidence interval (CI) 1.79–9.91)] and more complex [higher than 6 points, on a 0–10 scale, OR 3.12 (95% CI 1.43–6.81)] surgery. The conversion rate in the PES and NPES group (6.5% versus 2.4%, respectively) and the complication rate (12.9% versus 9.6%, respectively) were not significantly different. Discussion A laparoscopic cholecystectomy after ES is lengthier and more difficult than in uncomplicated cholelithiasis and should therefore be performed by an experienced surgeon. PMID:23374364

  12. Acute liver function decompensation in a patient with sickle cell disease managed with exchange transfusion and endoscopic retrograde cholangiography

    PubMed Central

    Ona, Mel A.; Changela, Kinesh; Sadanandan, Swayamprabha; Jelin, Abraham; Anand, Sury; Duddempudi, Sushil

    2014-01-01

    Sickle cell intrahepatic cholestasis is a relatively uncommon complication of homozygous sickle cell anemia, which may lead to acute hepatic failure and death. Treatment is mainly supportive, but exchange transfusion is used as salvage therapy in life threatening situations. We describe a case of a 16-year-old female with homozygous sickle cell anemia who presented to the emergency room with fatigue, malaise, dark urine, lower back pain, scleral icterus and jaundice. She was found to have marked hyperbilirubinemia, which persisted after exchange transfusion. Because of the concomitant presence of gallstones and choledocholithiasis, the patient underwent endoscopic ultrasound and laparoscopic cholecystectomy followed by endoscopic retrograde cholangiography and sphincterotomy. PMID:25177368

  13. Successful endoscopic hemostasis for ruptured duodenal varices after balloon-occluded retrograde transvenous obliteration.

    PubMed

    Soga, Koichi; Tomikashi, Koichi; Fukumoto, Kohei; Miyawaki, Ki-Ichirou; Okuda, Kotaro; Konishi, Hideyuki; Yagi, Nobuaki; Wakabayashi, Naoki; Kokura, Satoshi; Naito, Yuji; Yoshikawa, Toshikazu

    2010-10-01

    A 75-year-old man with general malaise and appetite loss was transferred to our hospital for assessment and treatment of liver failure. Laboratory findings on admission showed anemia, and gastroduodenoscopy (GDS) revealed linear esophageal varices and tensive duodenal varices (DV) in the second portion of the duodenum. Systemic examinations did not reveal any significant lesion capable of explaining his anemia, except for DV. Balloon-occluded retrograde transvenous obliteration was carried out to prevent DV bleeding. Good pooling of sclerosant was observed using two balloon catheters. However, contrast-enhanced computed tomography after the procedure revealed no thrombosis in DV, and the patient complained of tarry stools before additional therapy. Emergent GDS revealed ruptured DV with fresh blood and erosions on the surface. Emergent endoscopic obliteration using the tissue adhesive N-butyl-2-cyanoacrylate was carried out and complete hemostasis was achieved. Although no rebleeding episodes were observed after emergent obliteration, the patient died of sepsis following spontaneous bacterial peritonitis 53 days after admission. Autopsy revealed that DV dropped out, and the deep vein was replaced by granulation tissue. No signs of thrombi were detected, except varices. This autopsy case revealed the difficulty in DV management. PMID:21175490

  14. Repeat endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreaticography after failed initial precut sphincterotomy for biliary cannulation

    PubMed Central

    Pavlides, Michael; Barnabas, Ashley; Fernandopulle, Nilesh; Bailey, Adam A; Collier, Jane; Phillips-Hughes, Jane; Ellis, Anthony; Chapman, Roger; Braden, Barbara

    2014-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the outcome of repeating endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreaticography (ERCP) after initially failed precut sphincterotomy to achieve biliary cannulation. METHODS: In this retrospective study, consecutive ERCPs performed between January 2009 and September 2012 were included. Data from our endoscopy and radiology reporting databases were analysed for use of precut sphincterotomy, biliary access rate, repeat ERCP rate and complications. Patients with initially failed precut sphincterotomy were identified. RESULTS: From 1839 consecutive ERCPs, 187 (10%) patients underwent a precut sphincterotomy during the initial ERCP in attempts to cannulate a native papilla. The initial precut was successful in 79/187 (42%). ERCP was repeated in 89/108 (82%) of patients with failed initial precut sphincterotomy after a median interval of 4 d, leading to successful biliary cannulation in 69/89 (78%). In 5 patients a third ERCP was attempted (successful in 4 cases). Overall, repeat ERCP after failed precut at the index ERCP was successful in 73/89 patients (82%). Complications after precut-sphincterotomy were observed in 32/187 (17%) patients including pancreatitis (13%), retroperitoneal perforations (1%), biliary sepsis (0.5%) and haemorrhage (3%). CONCLUSION: The high success rate of biliary cannulation in a second attempt ERCP justifies repeating ERCP within 2-7 d after unsuccessful precut sphincterotomy before more invasive approaches should be considered. PMID:25278710

  15. Placement of multiple metal stents for malignant intrahepatic biliary obstruction via an endoscopic ultrasound-guided choledochoduodenostomy fistula.

    PubMed

    Akiyama, Dai; Hamada, Tsuyoshi; Nakai, Yousuke; Isayama, Hiroyuki; Takagi, Kaoru; Mizuno, Suguru; Koike, Kazuhiko

    2015-01-01

    Endoscopic ultrasound-guided choledochoduodenostomy (EUS-CDS) using a fully-covered self-expandable metal stent (SEMS) is increasingly used as an alternative to failed endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography. An EUS-CDS fistula can provide endoscopists with a new approach route for intrahepatic bile ducts. Here, we present successful placement of multiple SEMS for intrahepatic biliary obstruction via an EUS-CDS fistula. PMID:26462843

  16. Endoscopic Ultrasound-Assisted Pancreaticobiliary Access.

    PubMed

    Weilert, Frank; Binmoeller, Kenneth F

    2015-10-01

    Endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP) is the primary approach to drain an obstructed pancreatic or biliary duct. Failed biliary drainage is traditionally referred for percutaneous transhepatic biliary drainage or surgical bypass, which carry significantly higher morbidity and mortality rates compared with ERCP and transpapillary drainage. Endoscopic ultrasound provides a real-time imaging platform to access and deliver therapy to organs and tissues outside of the bowel lumen. The bile and pancreatic ducts can be directly accessed from the stomach and duodenum, offering an alternative to ERCP when this fails or is not feasible. PMID:26431606

  17. Endoscopic diagnostic of chronic pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Cubranić, Aleksandar; Dintinjana, Renata Dobrila; Vanis, Nenad

    2014-12-01

    Chronic pancreatitis is defined as a continuous inflammatory pancreatic disease, one characterized by irreversible morphological changes, often associates with pain and sometimes with the loss of endocrine and exocrine function. As a histological confirmation of chronic pancreatitis is often unavailable, the diagnosis is traditionally based on imaging methods such as computerized tomography (CT) or endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP), and recently magnetic resonance cholangiopancreatography (MRCP) as a noninvasive alternative to ERCP. Developments in the classification system of CP include the Marseille classification of 1963 which offered histopathologic criteria for CP, the Cambridge classification of 1984 which introduced imaging features of computed tomography (CT), transabdominal ultrasound (TUS) and endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP) for classification of CP as well as Rosemont classification system of 2007 which presented the endoscopic ultrasonography diagnosis of CP. Endoscopic ultra-sonography (EUS) was first introduced as a diagnostic method for evaluation of pancreatic disease in 1986. It has experienced significant improvements since then and allowed for an alternative approach in diagnosing patients with pancreatic diseases. In patients with suspected pancreatic masses EUS-guided fine needle aspiration (EUS-FNA) is the best method for obtaining tissue diagnosis and differentiating CP from pancreatic carcinoma. The recent studies indicate that EUS is the method of choice when compared with other imaging methods such as ERCP because it frequently provides more accurate diagnostics. The aim of this review is to discuss the findings in endoscopic diagnostics up to the present moment and to indicate advantages, limitations and possible complications along with the current recommendations in CP diagnostics. PMID:25842773

  18. Endoscopic management of hilar biliary strictures.

    PubMed

    Singh, Rajiv Ranjan; Singh, Virendra

    2015-07-10

    Hilar biliary strictures are caused by various benign and malignant conditions. It is difficult to differentiate benign and malignant strictures. Postcholecystectomy benign biliary strictures are frequently encountered. Endoscopic management of these strictures is challenging. An endoscopic method has been advocated that involves placement of increasing number of stents at regular intervals to resolve the stricture. Malignant hilar strictures are mostly unresectable at the time of diagnosis and only palliation is possible.Endoscopic palliation is preferred over surgery or radiological intervention. Magnetic resonance cholangiopancreaticography is quite important in the management of these strictures. Metal stents are superior to plastic stents. The opinion is divided over the issue of unilateral or bilateral stenting.Minimal contrast or no contrast technique has been advocated during endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography of these patients. The role of intraluminal brachytherapy, intraductal ablation devices, photodynamic therapy, and endoscopic ultrasound still remains to be defined. PMID:26191345

  19. Endoscopic management of hilar biliary strictures

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Rajiv Ranjan; Singh, Virendra

    2015-01-01

    Hilar biliary strictures are caused by various benign and malignant conditions. It is difficult to differentiate benign and malignant strictures. Postcholecystectomy benign biliary strictures are frequently encountered. Endoscopic management of these strictures is challenging. An endoscopic method has been advocated that involves placement of increasing number of stents at regular intervals to resolve the stricture. Malignant hilar strictures are mostly unresectable at the time of diagnosis and only palliation is possible.Endoscopic palliation is preferred over surgery or radiological intervention. Magnetic resonance cholangiopancreaticography is quite important in the management of these strictures. Metal stents are superior to plastic stents. The opinion is divided over the issue of unilateral or bilateral stenting.Minimal contrast or no contrast technique has been advocated during endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography of these patients. The role of intraluminal brachytherapy, intraductal ablation devices, photodynamic therapy, and endoscopic ultrasound still remains to be defined. PMID:26191345

  20. Portal biliopathy treated with endoscopic biliary stenting

    PubMed Central

    Jeon, Sung Jin; Min, Jae Ki; Kwon, So Young; Kim, Jun Hyun; Moon, Sun Young; Lee, Kang Hoon; Kim, Jeong Han; Choe, Won Hyeok; Cheon, Young Koog; Kim, Tae Hyung; Park, Hee Sun

    2016-01-01

    Portal biliopathy is defined as abnormalities in the extra- and intrahepatic ducts and gallbladder of patients with portal hypertension. This condition is associated with extrahepatic venous obstruction and dilatation of the venous plexus of the common bile duct, resulting in mural irregularities and compression of the biliary tree. Most patients with portal biliopathy remain asymptomatic, but approximately 10% of them advance to symptomatic abdominal pain, jaundice, and fever. Magnetic resonance cholangiopancreatography and endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography are currently used as diagnostic tools because they are noninvasive and can be used to assess the regularity, length, and degree of bile duct narrowing. Management of portal biliopathy is aimed at biliary decompression and reducing the portal pressure. Portal biliopathy has rarely been reported in Korea. We present a symptomatic case of portal biliopathy that was complicated by cholangitis and successfully treated with biliary endoscopic procedures. PMID:27044769

  1. Endoscopic Ultrasonograpy for Choledocholithiasis and Biliary Malignancy.

    PubMed

    Moparty, Bhavani; Bhutani, Manoop S

    2005-04-01

    Endoscopic ultrasound (EUS) is a valuable tool in gastrointestinal endoscopy, with various applications such as diagnosis, staging, and evaluation of the pancreaticobiliary system. EUS has comparable sensitivity to magnetic resonance cholangiopancreatography and endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP) for detection of choledocholithiasis. EUS may be considered for evaluation for choledocholithiasis as prelude to ERCP when there is a low to intermediate suspicion for common bile duct stones or when there is an increased risk for complications from ERCP. Endosonography may also be useful in the evaluation of cholangiocarcinoma. Intraductal ultrasound within the bile duct may help differentiate malignant from benign strictures. EUS-guided fine needle aspiration can be helpful in the diagnosis of cholangiocarcinoma, especially in the region of the hilum. PMID:15769435

  2. [Pain and jaundice secondary to hemobilia resolved by ERCP and endoscopic sphincterectomy].

    PubMed

    Defarges, V; Loscos, J M; Meroño, E; Fernández Madrid, J; Carda, P

    1996-06-01

    We report the case of a patient with hemobilia resulting from a liver biopsy where the performance of the endoscopic sphincterectomy solved the jaundice and the pain of the patient. ERCP has been used previously in the diagnosis of biliary and pancreatic tumors that manifested themselves as an hemobilia. The therapeutic utilization of endoscopic sphincterotomy had been described rarely in this type of bleedings. We recommend endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography and sphincterotomy in the cases of hemobilia with severe abdominal pain resulting from the accumulation of clots inside the biliary tract. PMID:8755328

  3. [A case of ruptured duodenal varices successfully treated by combination therapy with endoscopic clipping and balloon-occluded retrograde transvenous obliteration].

    PubMed

    Taniguchi, Hideaki; Shibagaki, Koutaro; Goto, Daisuke; Kakehi, Eiichi

    2015-11-01

    An 80-year-old woman with a history of chronic hepatitis B was referred to our hospital because of upper gastrointestinal bleeding of unknown origin. Dynamic computed tomography revealed liver cirrhosis and hepatofugal collateral vessels around the duodenum. Emergency esophagogastroduodenoscopy showed duodenal varices with an erosive spot, highly suggestive of a variceal rupture site. We immediately performed endoscopic clipping of the ruptured site to achieve temporary hemostasis. Ten days later, elective balloon-occluded retrograde transvenous obliteration (B-RTO) was performed to prevent recurrence. We describe a successfully treated case of duodenal variceal rupture managed by combination therapy with endoscopic clipping and B-RTO. PMID:26537327

  4. Microbiological Assessment of Bile and Corresponding Antibiotic Treatment: A Strobe-Compliant Observational Study of 1401 Endoscopic Retrograde Cholangiographies.

    PubMed

    Rupp, Christian; Bode, Konrad; Weiss, Karl Heinz; Rudolph, Gerda; Bergemann, Janine; Kloeters-Plachky, Petra; Chahoud, Fadi; Stremmel, Wolfgang; Gotthardt, Daniel Nils; Sauer, Peter

    2016-03-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the antibiotic susceptibility profiles of bacteria in bile samples and to analyze the clinical relevance of the findings as only limited information about risk factors for elevated frequence of bacterial and fungal strains in routinely collected bile samples has been described so far.A prospective cohort study at a tertiary care center was conducted. Seven hundred forty-four patients underwent 1401 endoscopic retrograde cholangiographies (ERCs) as indicated by liver transplantation (427/1401), primary sclerosing cholangitis (222/1401), choledocholithiasis only (153/1401), obstruction due to malignancy (366/1401), or other conditions (233/1401). Bile samples for microbiological analysis were obtained in all patients.The 71.6% (823/1150) samples had a positive microbiological finding, and 57% (840/1491) of the bacterial isolates were gram-positive. The main species were Enterococcus spp (33%; 494/1491) and Escherichia coli (12%; 179/1491). Of the samples, 53.8% had enteric bacteria and 24.7% had Candida spp; both were associated with clinical and laboratory signs of cholangitis (C-reactive proteins 35.0 ± 50.1 vs 44.8 ± 57.6; 34.5 ± 51.2 vs 52.9 ± 59.7; P < 0.001), age, previous endoscopic intervention, and immunosuppression. Multi-resistant (MR) strains were found in 11.3% of all samples and were associated with clinical and laboratory signs of cholangitis, previous intervention, and immunocompromised status. In subgroup analysis, strain-specific antibiotic therapy based on bile sampling was achieved in 56.3% (89/158) of the patients. In cases with a positive bile culture and available blood culture, blood cultures were positive in 29% of cases (36/124), and 94% (34/36) of blood cultures had microbial species identical to the bile cultures.Bactobilia and fungobilia can usually be detected by routine microbiological sampling, allowing optimized, strain-specific antibiotic treatment. Previous endoscopic

  5. Endoscopic management of benign biliary strictures.

    PubMed

    Rustagi, Tarun; Jamidar, Priya A

    2015-01-01

    Benign biliary strictures are a common indication for endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP). Endoscopic management has evolved over the last 2 decades as the current standard of care. The most common etiologies of strictures encountered are following surgery and those related to chronic pancreatitis. High-quality cross-sectional imaging provides a road map for endoscopic management. Currently, sequential placement of multiple plastic biliary stents represents the preferred approach. There is an increasing role for the treatment of these strictures using covered metal stents, but due to conflicting reports of efficacies as well as cost and complications, this approach should only be entertained following careful consideration. Optimal management of strictures is best achieved using a team approach with the surgeon and interventional radiologist playing an important role. PMID:25613176

  6. Endoscopic ultrasound-guided biliary drainage as an alternative to percutaneous drainage and surgical bypass.

    PubMed

    Prachayakul, Varayu; Aswakul, Pitulak

    2015-01-16

    Endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography had been a treatment modality of choice for both benign and malignant biliary tract obstruction for more than half century, with a very high clinical success rate and low complications. But in certain circumstances, such as advanced and locally advanced pancreatobiliary malignancies (pancreatic cancer, cholangiocarcinoma, ampullary tumor) and tight benign strictures, endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP) fails. Up to this point, the only alternative interventions for these conditions were percutaneous transhepatic biliary drainage or surgery. Endoscopic ultrasound guided interventions was introduced for a couple decades with the better visualization and achievement of the pancreatobiliary tract. And it's still in the process of ongoing development. The inventions of new techniques and accessories lead to more feasibility of high-ended procedures. Endoscopic ultrasound guided biliary drainage was a novel treatment modality for the patient who failed ERCP with the less invasive technique comparing to surgical bypass. The technical and clinical success was high with acceptable complications. Regarded the ability to drain the biliary tract internally without an exploratory laparotomy, this treatment modality became a very interesting procedures for many endosonographers, worldwide, in a short period. We have reviewed the literature and suggest that endoscopic ultrasound-guided biliary drainage is also an option, and one with a high probability of success, for biliary drainage in the patients who failed conventional endoscopic drainage. PMID:25610532

  7. Balloon-occluded retrograde transvenous obliteration versus endoscopic injection sclerotherapy for isolated gastric varices: a comparative study.

    PubMed

    Emori, Keigo; Toyonaga, Atsushi; Oho, Kazuhiko; Kumamoto, Masafumi; Haruta, Tsuyoshi; Inoue, Hiroto; Morita, Yukihiko; Mitsuyama, Keiichi; Tsuruta, Osamu; Sata, Michio

    2014-01-01

    Isolated gastric varices (IGV) have a lower risk of bleeding than esophageal varices, however IGV bleeding is associated with a higher mortality than bleeding of esophageal varices. In recent years, two widely used treatments for IGV have been balloon-occluded retrograde transvenous obliteration (B-RTO) and endoscopic injection sclerotherapy (EIS) using cyanoacrylate or ethanolamine oleate (EO). This study compared these two treatment methods for IGV. The subjects were 112 patients who were treated at our hospital for IGV bleeding between October 1990 and December 2003. Forty-nine (49) patients were treated with B-RTO and 63 patients with EIS. These two patient groups were compared as regards content of treatment, post-treatment incidence of variceal bleeding, incidence of IGV rebleeding, survival rate, cause of death, and complications. Multivariate analysis was performed on post-treatment variceal bleeding and survival. Although EO was used in higher amounts in the B-RTO group than in the EIS group, the B-RTO group had a significantly lower number of treatment sessions and a significantly shorter treatment period (p<0.05). The EIS group had significantly more patients with IGV rebleeding after treatment than the B-RTO group. Treatment method was the only independent prognostic factor of IGV bleeding after treatment (p=0.024). The two groups did not differ significantly in the percentage of patients with aggravated esophageal varices after treatment. Bleeding from ectopic varices was not observed in any patient. There was no significant difference in survival by treatment method. The presence of hepatocellular carcinoma was the only independent prognostic factor for survival (p=0.003). It is concluded that B-RTO was more effective than EIS in the eradication of IGV and prevention of IGV recurrence and rebleeding. PMID:24858411

  8. Endoscopic Ultrasound-guided Antegrade Stenting in an Occluded Biliary Self-expandable Metal Stent

    PubMed Central

    Almadi, Majid A.; Eltayeb, Mohanned; Thaniah, Salem

    2016-01-01

    Endoscopic ultrasound-guided biliary drainage (EUS-BD) is an attractive option for patients who cannot undergo conventional endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP) and do not want surgery or percutaneous drainage procedures. We present the use of EUS-antegrade (EUS-AG) insertion of a self-expandable metal stent (SEMS) in a patient with a common hepatic duct cholangiocarcinoma, as well as a huge gastric lipoma, after recurrent biliary obstruction of a prior SEMS inserted via ERCP in the same session as a duodenal stent insertion for gastric outlet obstruction. PMID:27488330

  9. [Endoscopic ultrasound-guided choledocho-duodenostomy in advanced pancreatic cancer with duodenal obstruction].

    PubMed

    Mella, José Manuel; Guidi, Martín; De María, Julio; Hwang, Hui-Jer; Curvale, Cecilia R; Matano, Raúl

    2015-01-01

    Endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP) is considered the first-approach for biliary drainage. In cases of ERCP failure, patients are usually referred for percutaneous transhepatic biliary drainage or surgical biliary bypass. In the last decade, the indications of endoscopic ultrasound (EUS) in the management of patients with pancreatic cancer have increased, and numerous cases of EUS-guided biliary drainage have been reported in patients with failures during the ERCP. Our goal is to report a patient with locally advanced pancreatic cancer who presented with painless jaundice and cholestasis with biliary and duodenal obstruction. A EUS-guided choledochoduodenostomy was performed by placement of a self-expanding metal stent. PMID:26502467

  10. Developments in flexible endoscopic surgery: a review

    PubMed Central

    Feussner, Hubertus; Becker, Valentin; Bauer, Margit; Kranzfelder, Michael; Schirren, Rebekka; Lüth, Tim; Meining, Alexander; Wilhelm, Dirk

    2015-01-01

    Flexible endoscopy is increasingly developing into a therapeutic instead of a purely diagnostic discipline. Improved visualization makes early lesions easily detectable and allows us to decide ad hoc on the required treatment. Deep enteroscopy allows the exploration of even the small bowel – for long a “white spot” for gastrointestinal endoscopy – and to perform direct treatment. Endoscopic submucosal dissection is a considerable step forward in oncologically correct endoscopic treatment of (early) malignant lesions. Though still technically challenging, it is increasingly facilitated by new manipulation techniques and tools that are being steadily optimized. Closure of wall defects and hemostasis could be improved significantly. Even the anatomy beyond the gastrointestinal wall is being explored by the therapeutic use of endoluminal ultrasound. Endosonographic-guided surgery is not only a suitable fallback solution if conventional endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography fails, but even makes necrosectomy procedures, abscess drainage, and neurolysis feasible for the endoscopist. Newly developed endoscopic approaches aim at formerly distinctive surgical domains like gastroesophageal reflux disease, appendicitis, and cholecystitis. Combined endoscopic/laparoscopic interventional techniques could become the harbingers of natural orifice transluminal endoscopic surgery, whereas pure natural orifice transluminal endoscopic surgery is currently still in its beginnings. PMID:25565878

  11. Endoscopic Gallbladder Drainage for Acute Cholecystitis

    PubMed Central

    Widmer, Jessica; Alvarez, Paloma; Sharaiha, Reem Z.; Gossain, Sonia; Kedia, Prashant; Sarkaria, Savreet; Sethi, Amrita; Turner, Brian G.; Millman, Jennifer; Lieberman, Michael; Nandakumar, Govind; Umrania, Hiren; Gaidhane, Monica

    2015-01-01

    Background/Aims Surgery is the mainstay of treatment for cholecystitis. However, gallbladder stenting (GBS) has shown promise in debilitated or high-risk patients. Endoscopic transpapillary GBS and endoscopic ultrasound-guided GBS (EUS-GBS) have been proposed as safe and effective modalities for gallbladder drainage. Methods Data from patients with cholecystitis were prospectively collected from August 2004 to May 2013 from two United States academic university hospitals and analyzed retrospectively. The following treatment algorithm was adopted. Endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP) with sphincterotomy and cystic duct stenting was initially attempted. If deemed feasible by the endoscopist, EUS-GBS was then pursued. Results During the study period, 139 patients underwent endoscopic gallbladder drainage. Among these, drainage was performed in 94 and 45 cases for benign and malignant indications, respectively. Successful endoscopic gallbladder drainage was defined as decompression of the gallbladder without incidence of cholecystitis, and was achieved with ERCP and cystic duct stenting in 117 of 128 cases (91%). Successful endoscopic gallbladder drainage was also achieved with EUS-guided gallbladder drainage using transmural stent placement in 11 of 11 cases (100%). Complications occurred in 11 cases (8%). Conclusions Endoscopic gallbladder drainage techniques are safe and efficacious methods for gallbladder decompression in non-surgical patients with comorbidities. PMID:26473125

  12. Reality named endoscopic ultrasound biliary drainage

    PubMed Central

    Guedes, Hugo Gonçalo; Lopes, Roberto Iglesias; de Oliveira, Joel Fernandez; Artifon, Everson Luiz de Almeida

    2015-01-01

    Endoscopic ultrasound (EUS) is used for diagnosis and evaluation of many diseases of the gastrointestinal (GI) tract. In the past, it was used to guide a cholangiography, but nowadays it emerges as a powerful therapeutic tool in biliary drainage. The aims of this review are: outline the rationale for endoscopic ultrasound-guided biliary drainage (EGBD); detail the procedural technique; evaluate the clinical outcomes and limitations of the method; and provide recommendations for the practicing clinician. In cases of failed endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP), patients are usually referred for either percutaneous transhepatic biliary drainage (PTBD) or surgical bypass. Both these procedures have high rates of undesirable complications. EGBD is an attractive alternative to PTBD or surgery when ERCP fails. EGBD can be performed at two locations: transhepatic or extrahepatic, and the stent can be inserted in an antegrade or retrograde fashion. The drainage route can be transluminal, duodenal or transpapillary, which, again, can be antegrade or retrograde [rendezvous (EUS-RV)]. Complications of all techniques combined include pneumoperitoneum, bleeding, bile leak/peritonitis and cholangitis. We recommend EGBD when bile duct access is not possible because of failed cannulation, altered upper GI tract anatomy, gastric outlet obstruction, a distorted ampulla or a periampullary diverticulum, as a minimally invasive alternative to surgery or radiology. PMID:26504507

  13. Reality named endoscopic ultrasound biliary drainage.

    PubMed

    Guedes, Hugo Gonçalo; Lopes, Roberto Iglesias; de Oliveira, Joel Fernandez; Artifon, Everson Luiz de Almeida

    2015-10-25

    Endoscopic ultrasound (EUS) is used for diagnosis and evaluation of many diseases of the gastrointestinal (GI) tract. In the past, it was used to guide a cholangiography, but nowadays it emerges as a powerful therapeutic tool in biliary drainage. The aims of this review are: outline the rationale for endoscopic ultrasound-guided biliary drainage (EGBD); detail the procedural technique; evaluate the clinical outcomes and limitations of the method; and provide recommendations for the practicing clinician. In cases of failed endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP), patients are usually referred for either percutaneous transhepatic biliary drainage (PTBD) or surgical bypass. Both these procedures have high rates of undesirable complications. EGBD is an attractive alternative to PTBD or surgery when ERCP fails. EGBD can be performed at two locations: transhepatic or extrahepatic, and the stent can be inserted in an antegrade or retrograde fashion. The drainage route can be transluminal, duodenal or transpapillary, which, again, can be antegrade or retrograde [rendezvous (EUS-RV)]. Complications of all techniques combined include pneumoperitoneum, bleeding, bile leak/peritonitis and cholangitis. We recommend EGBD when bile duct access is not possible because of failed cannulation, altered upper GI tract anatomy, gastric outlet obstruction, a distorted ampulla or a periampullary diverticulum, as a minimally invasive alternative to surgery or radiology. PMID:26504507

  14. Endoscopic ultrasound-guided pancreaticobiliary intervention in patients with surgically altered anatomy and inaccessible papillae: A review of current literature

    PubMed Central

    Martin, Aaron; Kistler, Charles Andrew; Wrobel, Piotr; Yang, Juliana F.; Siddiqui, Ali A.

    2016-01-01

    The management of pancreaticobiliary disease in patients with surgically altered anatomy is a growing problem for gastroenterologists today. Over the years, endoscopic ultrasound (EUS) has emerged as an important diagnostic and therapeutic modality in the treatment of pancreaticobiliary disease. Patient anatomy has become increasingly complex due to advances in surgical resection of pancreaticobiliary disease and EUS has emerged as the therapy of choice when endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography failed cannulation or when the papilla is inaccessible such as in gastric obstruction or duodenal obstruction. The current article gives a comprehensive review of the current literature for EUS-guided intervention of the pancreaticobiliary tract in patients with altered surgical anatomy. PMID:27386471

  15. Endoscopic management of choledocholithiasis and cholelithiasis in patients with cirrhosis.

    PubMed

    Khan, Ali S; Eloubeidi, Mohamad A; Khashab, Mouen A

    2016-07-01

    Treatment of choledocholithiasis and cholelithiasis in patients with cirrhosis often requires diagnostic and therapeutic endoscopy such as endoscopic ultrasound (EUS) and endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP). Patients with underlying cirrhosis may have coagulopathy, hepatic encephalopathy, ascites and other comorbidities associated with cirrhosis that can make endoscopic therapy challenging and can be associated with a higher risk of adverse events. Given the unique derangements of physiologic parameters associated with cirrhosis this population requires a truly multifaceted and multidisciplinary understanding between therapeutic endoscopists, hepatologists and anesthesiologists. For therapeutic endoscopists, it is critical to be aware of the specific issues unique to this population of patients to optimize outcomes and avoid adverse events. The epidemiology of gallstone disease, the diagnostic and therapeutic approach to patients with varying degree of hepatic dysfunction, and a review of the available literature in this area are presented. PMID:26799755

  16. Endoscopic Management of Bile Leakage after Liver Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Oh, Dongwook; Lee, Sung Koo; Song, Tae Jun; Park, Do Hyun; Lee, Sang Soo; Seo, Dong-Wan; Kim, Myung-Hwan

    2015-01-01

    Background/Aims Endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP) can be an effective treatment for bile leakage after liver transplantation. We evaluated the efficacy of endoscopic treatment in liver transplantation in patients who developed bile leaks. Methods Forty-two patients who developed bile leaks after liver transplantation were included in the study. If a bile leak was observed on ERCP, a sphincterotomy was performed, and a nasobiliary catheter was then inserted. If a bile leak was accompanied by a bile duct stricture, either the stricture was dilated with balloons, followed by nasobiliary catheter insertion across the bile duct stricture, or endoscopic retrograde biliary drainage was performed. Results In the bile leakage alone group (22 patients), endoscopic treatment was technically successful in 19 (86.4%) and clinically successful in 17 (77.3%) cases. Among the 20 patients with bile leaks with bile duct strictures, endoscopic treatment was technically successful in 13 (65.0%) and clinically successful in 10 (50.0%) cases. Among the 42 patients who underwent ERCP, technical success was achieved in 32 (76.2%) cases and clinical success was achieved in 27 (64.3%) cases. Conclusions ERCP is an effective and safe therapeutic modality for bile leaks after liver transplantation. ERCP should be considered as an initial therapeutic modality in post-liver transplantation patients. PMID:25717048

  17. Predictors of re-bleeding after endoscopic hemostasis for delayed post-endoscopic sphincterotomy bleeding

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Mu-Hsien; Tsou, Yung-Kuan; Lin, Cheng-Hui; Lee, Ching-Song; Liu, Nai-Jen; Sung, Kai-Feng; Cheng, Hao-Tsai

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To predict the re-bleeding after endoscopic hemostasis for delayed post-endoscopic sphincterotomy (ES) bleeding. METHODS: Over a 15-year period, data from 161 patients with delayed post-ES bleeding were retrospectively collected from a single medical center. To identify risk factors for re-bleeding after initial successful endoscopic hemostasis, parameters before, during and after the procedure of endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography were analyzed. These included age, gender, blood biochemistry, co-morbidities, endoscopic diagnosis, presence of peri-ampullary diverticulum, occurrence of immediate post-ES bleeding, use of needle knife precut sphincterotomy, severity of delayed bleeding, endoscopic features on delayed bleeding, and type of endoscopic therapy. RESULTS: A total of 35 patients (21.7%) had re-bleeding after initial successful endoscopic hemostasis for delayed post-ES bleeding. Univariate analysis revealed that malignant biliary stricture, serum bilirubin level of greater than 10 mg/dL, initial bleeding severity, and bleeding diathesis were significant predictors of re-bleeding. By multivariate analysis, serum bilirubin level of greater than 10 mg/dL and initial bleeding severity remained significant predictors. Re-bleeding was controlled by endoscopic therapy in a single (n = 23) or multiple (range, 2-7; n = 6) sessions in 29 of the 35 patients (82.9%). Four patients required transarterial embolization and one went for surgery. These five patients had severe bleeding when delayed post-ES bleeding occurred. One patient with decompensated liver cirrhosis died from re-bleeding. CONCLUSION: Re-bleeding occurs in approximately one-fifth of patients after initial successful endoscopic hemostasis for delayed post-ES bleeding. Severity of initial bleeding and serum bilirubin level of greater than 10 mg/dL are predictors of re-bleeding. PMID:27003996

  18. International Live Endoscopic Multichannel Demonstration Using Superfast Broadband Internet Connections

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Sang Pyo; Lee, Hang Lak; Choi, Ho Soon; Joe, Inwhee; Shimizu, Shuji

    2012-01-01

    Background/Aims Telemedicine is a convenient and efficient tool for remote education in various fields. The telemedicine system can also be used to educate doctors and medical students. The aim of our study was to establish the effectiveness of the telemedical system for use in a live endoscopic multichannel demonstration conference and to test the effectiveness and usefulness of a multicenter-based live endoscopic demonstration through live, interactive, high resolution video transmission using advanced networks and the digital video transport system (DVTS). Methods This study is a prospective multicenter pilot study. A live demonstration of an endoscopic submucosal dissection (ESD) and an endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP) using advanced network technology was performed. Results The DVTS successfully transmitted uncompressed, high-resolution, digital lectures with endoscopy video during a multichannel endoscopic live demonstration of ESD and ERCP over multiple advanced networks. The overall satisfaction rating when the endoscopic lecture demonstration was performed by combining DVTS was generally good. Conclusions We believe that a multicenter-based live endoscopic demonstration is a very effective conferencing method when using advanced networks and DVTS. PMID:22741135

  19. Pancreas divisum

    MedlinePlus

    Abdominal ultrasound Abdominal CT scan Amylase and lipase blood test Endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP) Magnetic resonance cholangiopancreatography (MRCP) Endoscopic ultrasound (EUS)

  20. Biliary hemostasis using an endoscopic plastic stent placement for uncontrolled hemobilia caused by transpapillary forceps biopsy (with video).

    PubMed

    Shinjo, Kunihiro; Matsubayashi, Hiroyuki; Matsui, Toru; Kawata, Noboru; Uemura, Sunao; Yamamoto, Yusuke; Ono, Hiroyuki

    2016-04-01

    A 78-year-old woman was referred to our hospital for the examination and treatment of jaundice. A transpapillary forceps biopsy for a long distal bile duct stricture was performed using endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography. Immediately after the biopsy, massive bleeding was observed from the orifice of the papilla. Although hemobilia was pulsatile, an endoscopic biliary plastic stent placement was very effective in achieving hemostasis. However, a nasal biliary catheter was required because a blood clot clogged the stent on the following day. Although covered self-expandable metal stent (CSEMS) placement has been reported for achieving endoscopic hemostasis for bleeding, we chose to use a plastic stent to reduce the risk of post-procedure pancreatitis. The placement of both an endoscopic biliary plastic stent and a nasobiliary drainage catheter can be an alternative hemostatic tool to CSEMSs. PMID:26960930

  1. Endoscopic retrograde cholangio-pancreatographic diagnosis and extraction of massive biliary ascariasis presented with acute pancreatitis: a case report.

    PubMed

    Saowaros, V

    1999-05-01

    This paper reports the case of a young female Thai patient who presented with periodic severe abdominal pains which proved to be acute pancreatitis. Conventional investigations and treatments failed to prove and improve her condition. ERCP was done on the twelfth day after admission. 3 caudal ends of living round worms were noted protruding from the papillary orifice during endoscopy. Cholangiography revealed impacted multiple round worms in the common bile duct and both intrahepatic ducts. Endoscopic extraction of the worms was done by using dormia basket and removed with endoscope. Repeated procedure was done 21 times in two and a half hours, obtaining 26 live, mature Ascaris lumbricoides varying from 13 to 24 cm in length. Repeated cholangiogram confirmed complete removal of the worms. The patient was relieved from abdominal pain immediately after the procedure, and given oral albendazole 400 mg daily for 7 days. She was discharged asymptomatic 8 days after Ascaris removal. PMID:10443103

  2. Delayed Severe Hemobilia after Endoscopic Biliary Plastic Stent Insertion

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Sung Hak; Hong, Seung Goun; Lee, Kyoung yong; Park, Pyung Kang; Kim, Sung Du; Lee, Mahn; Yu, Dong Wook; Hong, Man Yong

    2016-01-01

    Hemobilia is a rare gastrointestinal bleeding, usually caused by injury to the bile duct. Hemobilia after endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP) is generally self-limiting and patients will spontaneously recover, but some severe and fatal hemorrhages have been reported. ERCP-related bowel or bile duct perforation should be managed promptly, according to the type of injury and the status of the patient. We recently experienced a case of late-onset severe hemobilia in which the patient recovered after endoscopic biliary stent insertion. The problem was attributable to ERCP-related bile duct perforation during stone removal, approximately 5 weeks prior to the hemorrhagic episode. The removal of the stent was performed 10 days before the onset of hemobilia. The bleeding was successfully treated by two sessions of transarterial coil embolization. PMID:27012288

  3. Urgent endoscopic ultrasound-guided choledochoduodenostomy for acute obstructive suppurative cholangitis-induced sepsis.

    PubMed

    Minaga, Kosuke; Kitano, Masayuki; Imai, Hajime; Yamao, Kentaro; Kamata, Ken; Miyata, Takeshi; Omoto, Shunsuke; Kadosaka, Kumpei; Yoshikawa, Tomoe; Kudo, Masatoshi

    2016-04-28

    Acute obstructive suppurative cholangitis (AOSC) due to biliary lithiasis is a life-threatening condition that requires urgent biliary decompression. Although endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP) with stent placement is the current gold standard for biliary decompression, it can sometimes be difficult because of failed biliary cannulation. In this retrospective case series, we describe three cases of successful biliary drainage with recovery from septic shock after urgent endoscopic ultrasound-guided choledochoduodenostomy (EUS-CDS) was performed for AOSC due to biliary lithiasis. In all three cases, technical success in inserting the stents was achieved and the patients completely recovered from AOSC with sepsis in a few days after EUS-CDS. There were no procedure-related complications. When initial ERCP fails, EUS-CDS can be an effective life-saving endoscopic biliary decompression procedure that shortens the procedure time and prevents post-ERCP pancreatitis, particularly in patients with AOSC-induced sepsis. PMID:27122677

  4. Endoscopic Extraction of Biliary Fascioliasis Diagnosed Using Intraductal Ultrasonography in a Patient with Acute Cholangitis

    PubMed Central

    Ha, Ji Su; Choi, Hyun Jong; Moon, Jong Ho; Lee, Yun Nah; Tae, Jae Woong; Choi, Moon Han; Lee, Tae Hoon; Cha, Sang-Woo

    2015-01-01

    Fasciola hepatica infection may result in biliary obstruction with or without cholangitis in the chronic biliary phase. Because clinical symptoms and signs of F. hepatica are similar to other biliary diseases that cause bile duct obstruction, such as stones or bile duct malignancies, that are, in fact, more common, this condition may not be suspected and diagnosis may be overlooked and delayed. Patients undergoing endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography or endoscopic ultrasonography for the evaluation of bile duct obstruction may be incidentally detected with the worm, and diagnosis can be confirmed by extraction of the leaf-like trematode from the bile duct. Intraductal ultrasonography (IDUS) can provide high-resolution cross-sectional images of the bile duct, and is useful in evaluating indeterminate biliary diseases. We present a case of biliary fascioliasis that was diagnosed using IDUS and managed endoscopically in a patient with acute cholangitis. PMID:26668810

  5. Endoscopic Extraction of Biliary Fascioliasis Diagnosed Using Intraductal Ultrasonography in a Patient with Acute Cholangitis.

    PubMed

    Ha, Ji Su; Choi, Hyun Jong; Moon, Jong Ho; Lee, Yun Nah; Tae, Jae Woong; Choi, Moon Han; Lee, Tae Hoon; Cha, Sang-Woo

    2015-11-01

    Fasciola hepatica infection may result in biliary obstruction with or without cholangitis in the chronic biliary phase. Because clinical symptoms and signs of F. hepatica are similar to other biliary diseases that cause bile duct obstruction, such as stones or bile duct malignancies, that are, in fact, more common, this condition may not be suspected and diagnosis may be overlooked and delayed. Patients undergoing endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography or endoscopic ultrasonography for the evaluation of bile duct obstruction may be incidentally detected with the worm, and diagnosis can be confirmed by extraction of the leaf-like trematode from the bile duct. Intraductal ultrasonography (IDUS) can provide high-resolution cross-sectional images of the bile duct, and is useful in evaluating indeterminate biliary diseases. We present a case of biliary fascioliasis that was diagnosed using IDUS and managed endoscopically in a patient with acute cholangitis. PMID:26668810

  6. Urgent endoscopic ultrasound-guided choledochoduodenostomy for acute obstructive suppurative cholangitis-induced sepsis

    PubMed Central

    Minaga, Kosuke; Kitano, Masayuki; Imai, Hajime; Yamao, Kentaro; Kamata, Ken; Miyata, Takeshi; Omoto, Shunsuke; Kadosaka, Kumpei; Yoshikawa, Tomoe; Kudo, Masatoshi

    2016-01-01

    Acute obstructive suppurative cholangitis (AOSC) due to biliary lithiasis is a life-threatening condition that requires urgent biliary decompression. Although endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP) with stent placement is the current gold standard for biliary decompression, it can sometimes be difficult because of failed biliary cannulation. In this retrospective case series, we describe three cases of successful biliary drainage with recovery from septic shock after urgent endoscopic ultrasound-guided choledochoduodenostomy (EUS-CDS) was performed for AOSC due to biliary lithiasis. In all three cases, technical success in inserting the stents was achieved and the patients completely recovered from AOSC with sepsis in a few days after EUS-CDS. There were no procedure-related complications. When initial ERCP fails, EUS-CDS can be an effective life-saving endoscopic biliary decompression procedure that shortens the procedure time and prevents post-ERCP pancreatitis, particularly in patients with AOSC-induced sepsis. PMID:27122677

  7. Endoscopic management of choledochocele complicated with choledocholithiasis and pancreatitis in an old patient.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Liang; Zeng, Hao; Chen, You-Xiang; Lu, Nong-Hua

    2015-02-01

    Choledochocele, or type III choledochal cyst, is a rare congenital disease and is even less common among adults compared with children. In this case, a 75-year-old female was admitted to our hospital presented with epigastric pain and vomiting for one day. Abdominal computed tomography revealed dilated common bile duct, pancreatitis and peripancreatic effusion. The patient was treated with fasting, fluid resuscitation, anti-acid agents, somatostatin and antibiotics. Endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography was employed for the further diagnosis of choledochocele, choledocholithiasis and biliary stenosis. Endoscopic sphincterotomy, stone extraction and plastic stent placement were performed for treatment. The patient recovered quickly after the treatment and no signs of recurrence and complications were observed during the first follow-up. Endoscopic management may be a promising and alternative therapy for choledochocele although long-term follow-up is necessary to confirm the efficacy and safety of this procedure in the future. PMID:24859881

  8. Efficacy and Safety of Pancreatobiliary Endoscopic Procedures during Pregnancy

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jae Joon; Lee, Sung Koo; Kim, Sang Hyung; Kim, Ga Hee; Park, Do Hyun; Lee, Sangsoo; Seo, Dongwan; Kim, Myung-Hwan

    2015-01-01

    Background/Aims Endoscopic therapy with endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP) has been suggested as an effective diagnostic and therapeutic tool for biliary and pancreatic disorders during pregnancy. In this report, we describe our experiences with pancreatobiliary endoscopic procedures during pregnancy. Methods We reviewed ERCP and endoscopic ultrasonography (EUS) procedures that were performed at a single tertiary care referral center between January 2002 and October 2013. Medical records were reviewed for the procedure indication, the duration of fluoroscopy, postprocedure complications, etc. Pregnancy outcomes and fetal complications were identified by chart review and phone calls to patients. Results A total of 10 ER-CPs and five EUSs were performed in 13 pregnant patients: four of whom underwent the procedure in the first trimester, eight in the second trimester, and one in the third trimester. Indications for endoscopic therapy included gallstone pancreatitis, obstructive jaundice with common bile duct (CBD) stone, asymptomatic CBD stone, pancreatic cyst, choledochal cyst, and acute cholecystitis. Only one patient had a complication, which was postprocedural hyperamylasemia. Two patients underwent an artificial abortion, one according to her own decision and the other due to an adverse drug reaction. Conclusions ERCP seems to be effective and safe for pregnant women. Additionally, EUS can be an alternative to ERCP during pregnancy. PMID:26087783

  9. Endoscopic therapy in chronic pancreatitis: current perspectives.

    PubMed

    Seicean, Andrada; Vultur, Simona

    2015-01-01

    Endoscopic therapy in chronic pancreatitis (CP) aims to provide pain relief and to treat local complications, by using the decompression of the pancreatic duct and the drainage of pseudocysts and biliary strictures, respectively. This is the reason for using it as first-line therapy for painful uncomplicated CP. The clinical response has to be evaluated at 6-8 weeks, when surgery may be chosen. This article reviews the main possibilities of endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP) and endoscopic ultrasound (EUS) therapies. Endotherapy for pancreatic ductal stones uses ultrasound wave lithotripsy and sometimes additional stone extractions. The treatment of pancreatic duct strictures consists of a single large stenting for 1 year. If the stricture persists, simultaneous multiple stents are applied. In case of unsuccessful ERCP, the EUS-guided drainage of the main pancreatic duct (MPD) or a rendezvous technique can solve the ductal strictures. EUS-guided celiac plexus block has limited efficiency in CP. The drainage of symptomatic or complicated pancreatic pseudocysts can be performed transpapillarily or transgastrically/transduodenally, preferably by EUS guidance. When the biliary stricture is symptomatic or progressive, multiple plastic stents are indicated. In conclusion, as in many fields of symptomatic treatment, endoscopy remains the first choice, either by using ERCP or EUS-guided procedures, after consideration of a multidisciplinary team with endoscopists, surgeons, and radiologists. However, what is crucial is establishing the right timing for surgery. PMID:25565876

  10. Endoscopic assessment of primary sclerosing cholangitis.

    PubMed

    De Vries, Boudewijn; Weersma, Rinse K

    2016-03-01

    Primary sclerosing cholangitis (PSC) is a rare chronic liver disease of unknown etiology for which the only known curative treatment is liver transplantation. The disease is defined by progressive inflammation and fibrosis of the bile ducts, causing biliary strictures and cholestasis. Common complications of the disease are the presence of biliary lithiasis requiring stone extraction, and development of dominant bile duct strictures requiring balloon dilatation and stent placement through endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography. The increased development of cholangiocarcinoma is a dreaded complication in PSC, as it is often detected in an advanced stage and is associated with a poor prognosis. Several endoscopic techniques, including endoscopic ultrasound, confocal laser endomicroscopy and peroral cholangioscopy are applied in the management of PSC and detection of cholangiocarcinoma. Tissue sampling through different types of biopsies and biliary brush combined with fluorescence in situ hybridization are used to differentiate benign dominant strictures from biliary neoplasia. Nonetheless early detection of cholangiocarcinoma in PSC remains a clinical challenge requiring a specialized diagnostic workup. The aim of this review is to discuss the role of diagnostic and therapeutic endoscopy in management of PSC, providing an overview of current literature. PMID:26446685

  11. Gallstone Ileus following Endoscopic Stone Extraction

    PubMed Central

    Wakui, Noritaka; Asai, Yasutsugu; Dan, Nobuhiro; Takeda, Yuki; Ueki, Nobuo; Otsuka, Takahumi; Oba, Nobuyuki; Nisinakagawa, Shuta; Kojima, Tatsuya

    2014-01-01

    An 85-year-old woman was an outpatient treated at Tokyo Rosai Hospital for cirrhosis caused by hepatitis B. She had previously been diagnosed as having common bile duct stones, for which she underwent endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP). However, as stone removal was unsuccessful, a plastic stent was placed after endoscopic sphincterotomy. In October 2012, the stent was replaced endoscopically because she developed cholangitis due to stent occlusion. Seven days later, we performed ERCP to treat recurring cholangitis. During the procedure, the stone was successfully removed by a balloon catheter when cleaning the common bile duct. The next day, the patient developed abdominal pain, abdominal distension, and nausea and was diagnosed as having gallstone ileus based on abdominal computed tomography (CT) and abdominal ultrasonography findings of an incarcerated stone in the terminal ileum. Although colonoscopy was performed after inserting an ileus tube, no stone was visible. Subsequent CT imaging verified the disappearance of the incarcerated stone from the ileum, suggesting that the stone had been evacuated naturally via the transanal route. Although it is extremely rare for gallstone ileus to develop as a complication of ERCP, physicians should be aware of gallstone ileus and follow patients carefully, especially after removing huge stones. PMID:25328725

  12. Diagnostic yield of secretin-enhanced magnetic resonance cholangiopancreatography in the investigation of patients with acalculous biliary pain

    PubMed Central

    Dronamraju, Shridhar; Scott, John; Oppong, Kofi; Nayar, Manu

    2016-01-01

    Background Secretin-enhanced magnetic resonance cholangiopancreatography (S-MRCP) facilitates better visualization of the pancreaticobiliary ductal system but its role in patients with acalculous biliary pain (ABP) is yet to be established. The aim of this study was to assess the diagnostic yield and the role of S-MRCP in the investigation of ABP patients. Methods This is a retrospective analysis of patients who had S-MRCP to investigate ABP over a 5-year period from June 2008 to May 2013. The findings and diagnosis as reported in the S-MRCP were compared with the findings on MRCP. The primary endpoint was the diagnostic yield of S-MRCP in ABP patients. Results A total of 117 patients with ABP [28 (24%) male] had S-MRCP during the study period. The most common abnormality identified was obstruction at the level of ampulla or in the proximal pancreatic duct. S-MRCP was able to identify significant pathological findings in 8 of 34 (22%) patients in whom MRCP did not detect any abnormality. Endoscopic ultrasound (EUS) was performed in 67% of patients. S-MRCP identified abnormalities in 21 of 41 (54%) patients who had a normal EUS. Conclusions We conclude that the diagnostic yield of S-MRCP for recognizing anatomical variants of the pancreatic ductal system, in particular ampullary or proximal pancreatic duct stricture, is better than MRCP and EUS. These findings reflect the dynamic nature of S-MRCP and its complementary role alongside MRCP, EUS and endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography in ABP patients. PMID:27366040

  13. Advances in endoscopic ultrasound-guided biliary drainage: a comprehensive review.

    PubMed

    Sarkaria, Savreet; Lee, Ho-Su; Gaidhane, Monica; Kahaleh, Michel

    2013-03-01

    Endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP) has become the first-line therapy for bile duct drainage. In the hands of experienced endoscopists, conventional ERCP results in a failed cannulation rate of 3% to 5%. This failure can occur more commonly in the setting of altered anatomy or technically difficult cases due to either duodenal or biliary obstruction. In cases of ERCP failure, patients have traditionally been referred for either percutaneous transhepatic biliary drainage (PTBD) or surgery. However, both PTBD and surgery have higher than desirable complication rates. Within the last decade, endoscopic ultrasound-guided biliary drainage (EUS-BD) has become an attractive alternative to PTBD after failed ERCP. Many groups have reported on the feasibility, efficacy and safety of this technique. This article reviews the indications for ERCP and the currently practiced EUS-BD techniques, including EUS-guided rendezvous, EUS-guided choledochoduodenostomy and EUS-guided hepaticogastrostomy. PMID:23560147

  14. Finding of Biliary Fascioliasis by Endoscopic Ultrasonography in a Patient with Eosinophilic Liver Abscess

    PubMed Central

    Behzad, Catherine; Lahmi, Farhad; Iranshahi, Majid; Alizadeh, Amir Houshang Mohammad

    2014-01-01

    Fascioliasis is an endemic zoonotic disease in Iran. It occurs mainly in sheep-rearing areas of temperate climates, but sporadic cases have been reported from many other parts of the world. The usual definitive host is the sheep. Humans are accidental hosts in the life cycle of Fasciola. Typical symptoms may be associated with fascioliasis, but in some cases diagnosis and treatment may be preceded by a long period of abdominal pain and vague gastrointestinal symptoms. We report a case with epigastric and upper quadrant abdominal pain for the last 6 months, with imaging suggesting liver abscess and normal biliary ducts. The patient had no eosinophilia with negative stool examinations, so she was initially treated with antibiotics for liver abscess. Her clinical condition as well as follow-up imagings showed appropriate response after antibiotic therapy. Finally, endoscopic ultrasonography revealed Fasciola hepatica, which was then extracted with endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography. PMID:25473389

  15. Flexible endoscopes: structure and function--the air and water system.

    PubMed

    Holland, P; Shoop, N

    2000-01-01

    Flexible endoscopes are complex medical instruments that are easily damaged. To maintain the flexible endoscope in optimum working condition, the user must have a thorough understanding of the structure and function of the instrument. This series of articles will present an in-depth look at the care and handling of these expensive devices. The flexible endoscope is constructed of several systems that operate simultaneously to produce a highly technical, yet effective diagnostic and therapeutic medical device. These systems include the air and water system, the suction and operating channel system, the mechanical system, the endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP) elevator system, the optical system, and the electrical system. This first article in a series will focus on the air and water system of the endoscope. A review of the internal and external structure of the flexible endoscope and the functions of the air and water system, including infection control issues, potential problems and evaluation, and prevention of minor problems to avoid expensive repairs, will be addressed. PMID:11854970

  16. Endoscopic Electrosurgery in Patients with Cardiac Implantable Electronic Devices

    PubMed Central

    Baeg, Myong Ki; Kim, Sang-Woo; Ko, Sun-Hye; Lee, Yoon Bum; Hwang, Seawon; Lee, Bong-Woo; Choi, Hye Jin; Park, Jae Myung; Lee, In-Seok; Oh, Yong-Seog; Choi, Myung-Gyu

    2016-01-01

    Background/Aims: Patients with cardiac implantable electronic devices (CIEDs) undergoing endoscopic electrosurgery (EE) are at a risk of electromagnetic interference (EMI). We aimed to analyze the effects of EE in CIED patients. Methods: Patients with CIED who underwent EE procedures such as snare polypectomy, endoscopic submucosal dissection (ESD), and endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP) with endoscopic sphincterotomy (EST) were retrospectively analyzed. Postprocedural symptoms as well as demographic and outpatient follow-up data were reviewed through medical records. Electrical data, including preprocedural and postprocedural arrhythmia records, were reviewed through pacemaker interrogation, 24-hour Holter monitoring, or electrocardiogram. Results: Fifty-nine procedures in 49 patients were analyzed. Fifty procedures were performed in 43 patients with a pacemaker, and nine were performed in six patients with an implantable cardioverter-defibrillator. There were one gastric and 44 colon snare polypectomies, five gastric and one colon ESDs, and eight ERCPs with EST. Fifty-five cases of electrical follow-up were noted, with two postprocedural changes not caused by EE. Thirty-one pacemaker interrogations had procedure recordings, with two cases of asymptomatic tachycardia. All patients were asymptomatic with no adverse events. Conclusions: Our study reports no adverse events from EE in patients with CIED, suggesting that this procedure is safe. However, because of the possibility of EMI, recommendations on EE should be followed. PMID:26867552

  17. Lower incidence of complications in endoscopic nasobiliary drainage for hilar cholangiocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Kawakubo, Kazumichi; Kawakami, Hiroshi; Kuwatani, Masaki; Haba, Shin; Kudo, Taiki; Taya, Yoko A; Kawahata, Shuhei; Kubota, Yoshimasa; Kubo, Kimitoshi; Eto, Kazunori; Ehira, Nobuyuki; Yamato, Hiroaki; Onodera, Manabu; Sakamoto, Naoya

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To identify the most effective endoscopic biliary drainage technique for patients with hilar cholangiocarcinoma. METHODS: In total, 118 patients with hilar cholangiocarcinoma underwent endoscopic management [endoscopic nasobiliary drainage (ENBD) or endoscopic biliary stenting] as a temporary drainage in our institution between 2009 and 2014. We retrospectively evaluated all complications from initial endoscopic drainage to surgery or palliative treatment. The risk factors for biliary reintervention, post-endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (post-ERCP) pancreatitis, and percutaneous transhepatic biliary drainage (PTBD) were also analyzed using patient- and procedure-related characteristics. The risk factors for bilateral drainage were examined in a subgroup analysis of patients who underwent initial unilateral drainage. RESULTS: In total, 137 complications were observed in 92 (78%) patients. Biliary reintervention was required in 83 (70%) patients. ENBD was significantly associated with a low risk of biliary reintervention [odds ratio (OR) = 0.26, 95%CI: 0.08-0.76, P = 0.012]. Post-ERCP pancreatitis was observed in 19 (16%) patients. An absence of endoscopic sphincterotomy was significantly associated with post-ERCP pancreatitis (OR = 3.46, 95%CI: 1.19-10.87, P = 0.023). PTBD was required in 16 (14%) patients, and Bismuth type III or IV cholangiocarcinoma was a significant risk factor (OR = 7.88, 95%CI: 1.33-155.0, P = 0.010). Of 102 patients with initial unilateral drainage, 49 (48%) required bilateral drainage. Endoscopic sphincterotomy (OR = 3.24, 95%CI: 1.27-8.78, P = 0.004) and Bismuth II, III, or IV cholangiocarcinoma (OR = 34.69, 95%CI: 4.88-736.7, P < 0.001) were significant risk factors for bilateral drainage. CONCLUSION: The endoscopic management of hilar cholangiocarcinoma is challenging. ENBD should be selected as a temporary drainage method because of its low risk of complications. PMID:27170839

  18. Endoscopic Hands-Off Technique versus Conventional Technique for Conversion from an Orobiliary to a Nasobiliary Tube

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Miyeon; Kim, Soon Sun; Yoo, Byung Moo; Kim, Jin Hong

    2016-01-01

    Background. The aim of this study was to compare the outcomes of the endoscopic hands-off technique and the conventional technique when repositioning an endoscopic nasobiliary drainage (ENBD) tube from the mouth to the nose. Methods. We conducted a retrospective cohort study of all endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatographies (ERCPs) performed between July 2013 and May 2015 at a single tertiary referral center. A total of 1187 ERCPs were performed during the study period. Among them, 114 patients who underwent ENBD were enrolled in this study. In those patients, we used the endoscopic hands-off technique between July 2013 and May 2014 (endoscopy group) and the conventional technique between June 2014 and May 2015 (conventional group). Results. Technical success was achieved in 100% (58/58) of the endoscopy group and 94.6% (53/56) of the conventional group (P = 0.115). In the 3 cases of failed conventional technique, the endoscopic hands-off technique was then performed, and conversion of the ENBD tube was successful in all of these patients. The procedure time was significantly shorter in the endoscopy group than in the conventional group (124 s versus 149 s, P = 0.001). Conclusion. The endoscopic hands-off technique was feasible and effective for oral-nasal conversion of an ENBD tube. PMID:27462348

  19. Mirizzi Syndrome with Endoscopic Ultrasound Image

    PubMed Central

    Rayapudi, K.; Gholami, P.; Olyaee, M.

    2013-01-01

    We describe a 66-year-old Caucasian man with type 1 Mirizzi syndrome diagnosed on endoscopic ultrasound. He presented with acute onset of jaundice, malaise, dark urine over 3–4 days, and was found to have obstructive jaundice on lab testing. CT scan of the abdomen showed intrahepatic biliary ductal dilation, a 1.5 cm common bile duct (CBD) above the pancreas, and possible stones in the CBD, but no masses. Endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP) by a community gastroenterologist failed to cannulate the CBD. At the University Center, type 1 Mirizzi syndrome was noted on endoscopic ultrasound with narrowing of the CBD with extrinsic compression from cystic duct stone. During repeat ERCP, the CBD could be cannulated over the pancreatic duct wire. A mid CBD narrowing, distal CBD stones, proximal CBD and extrahepatic duct dilation were noted, and biliary sphincterotomy was performed. A small stone in the distal CBD was removed with an extraction balloon. The cystic duct stone was moved with the biliary balloon into the CBD, mechanical basket lithotripsy was performed and stone fragments were delivered out with an extraction balloon. The patient was seen 7 weeks later in the clinic. Skin and scleral icterus had cleared up and he is scheduled for an elective cholecystectomy. Mirizzi syndrome refers to biliary obstruction resulting from impacted stone in the cystic duct or neck of the gallbladder and commonly presents with obstructive jaundice. Type 1 does not have cholecystocholedochal fistulas, but they present in types 2, 3 and 4. Surgery is the mainstay of therapy. Endoscopic treatment is effective and can also be used as a temporizing measure or definitive treatment in poor surgical risk candidates. PMID:23741207

  20. Endoscopic radiofrequency ablation for malignant biliary strictures

    PubMed Central

    WANG, FEI; LI, QUANPENG; ZHANG, XIUHUA; JIANG, GUOBING; GE, XIANXIU; YU, HONG; NIE, JUNJIE; JI, GUOZHONG; MIAO, LIN

    2016-01-01

    Endoscopic radiofrequency ablation (RFA) is a novel palliation therapy for malignant biliary stricture; however, its feasibility and safety has not yet been clearly defined. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the feasibility and safety of endoscopic RFA for the treatment of malignant biliary strictures. A total of 12 patients treated by endoscopic RFA between December 2011 and October 2013 were retrospectively analyzed. Adverse events within 30 days post-intervention, stricture diameters prior to and following RFA, stent patency and survival time were investigated. A total of 12 patients underwent 20 RFA procedures as a treatment for malignant biliary strictures. Two patients required repeated elective RFA (4 and 6 times, respectively). All 20 RFA procedures were successfully performed without technical problems. During a 30 day period following each RFA procedure, two patients experienced fever (38.2 and 38.9°C, respectively) and another patient exhibited post-endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography pancreatitis. The 30- and 90-day mortality rates were 0 and 8.3%, respectively. Mean stricture diameter prior to RFA was 5.3 mm (standard deviation (SD), 0.9 mm; range, 5–8 mm), and the mean diameter following RFA was 12.6 mm (SD, 3.1 mm; range, 8–15 mm). There was a significant increase of 7.3 mm in the bile duct diameter following RFA in comparison with prior to RFA (t=8.6; P≤0.001). Of the 11 patients with stents inserted following RFA, the median stent patency was 125.0 days [95% confidence interval (CI), 94.7–155.3 days]. Extrapolated median survival following the first RFA was 232 days (95% CI, 94.3–369.7 days). In conclusion, RFA appears to be an efficient and safe treatment strategy for the palliation of unresectable malignant biliary strictures. PMID:27284336

  1. Genomic Epidemiology of an Endoscope-Associated Outbreak of Klebsiella pneumoniae Carbapenemase (KPC)-Producing K. pneumoniae

    PubMed Central

    Marsh, Jane W.; Krauland, Mary G.; Nelson, Jemma S.; Schlackman, Jessica L.; Brooks, Anthony M.; Pasculle, A. William; Shutt, Kathleen A.; Doi, Yohei; Querry, Ashley M.; Muto, Carlene A.; Harrison, Lee H.

    2015-01-01

    Increased incidence of infections due to Klebsiella pneumoniae carbapenemase (KPC)-producing Klebsiella pneumoniae (KPC-Kp) was noted among patients undergoing endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP) at a single hospital. An epidemiologic investigation identified KPC-Kp and non-KPC-producing, extended-spectrum β-lactamase (ESBL)-producing Kp in cultures from 2 endoscopes. Genotyping was performed on patient and endoscope isolates to characterize the microbial genomics of the outbreak. Genetic similarity of 51 Kp isolates from 37 patients and 3 endoscopes was assessed by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) and multi-locus sequence typing (MLST). Five patient and 2 endoscope isolates underwent whole genome sequencing (WGS). Two KPC-encoding plasmids were characterized by single molecule, real-time sequencing. Plasmid diversity was assessed by endonuclease digestion. Genomic and epidemiologic data were used in conjunction to investigate the outbreak source. Two clusters of Kp patient isolates were genetically related to endoscope isolates by PFGE. A subset of patient isolates were collected post-ERCP, suggesting ERCP endoscopes as a possible source. A phylogeny of 7 Kp genomes from patient and endoscope isolates supported ERCP as a potential source of transmission. Differences in gene content defined 5 ST258 subclades and identified 2 of the subclades as outbreak-associated. A novel KPC-encoding plasmid, pKp28 helped define and track one endoscope-associated ST258 subclade. WGS demonstrated high genetic relatedness of patient and ERCP endoscope isolates suggesting ERCP-associated transmission of ST258 KPC-Kp. Gene and plasmid content discriminated the outbreak from endemic ST258 populations and assisted with the molecular epidemiologic investigation of an extended KPC-Kp outbreak. PMID:26637170

  2. Retrograde ejaculation

    MedlinePlus

    Retrograde ejaculation occurs when semen enters the bladder instead of going out through the urethra during ejaculation. ... bladder (bladder neck) does not close. This causes semen to go backwards into the bladder rather than ...

  3. Endoscopic ultrasound-guided biliary drainage of hilar biliary obstruction.

    PubMed

    Park, Do Hyun

    2015-09-01

    Only 20-30% of patients with hilar cholangiocarcinoma (CC) are candidates for potentially curative resection. However, even after curative (R0) resection, these patients have a disease recurrence rate of up to 76%. The prognosis of hilar cholangiocarcinoma (CC) is limited by tumor spread along the biliary tree leading to obstructive jaundice, cholangitis, and liver failure. Therefore, palliative biliary drainage may be a major goal for patients with hilar CC. Endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP) with stent placement is an established method for palliation of patients with malignant biliary obstruction. However, there are patients for whom endoscopic stent placement is not possible because of failed biliary cannulation or tumor infiltration that limits transpapillary access. In this situation, percutaneous transhepatic biliary drainage (PTBD) is an alternative method. However, PTBD has a relatively high rate of complications and is frequently associated with patient discomfort related to external drainage. Endoscopic ultrasound-guided biliary drainage has therefore been introduced as an alternative to PTBD in cases of biliary obstruction when ERCP is unsuccessful. In this review, the indications, technical tips, outcomes, and the future role of EUS-guided intrahepatic biliary drainage, such as hepaticogastrostomy or hepaticoduodenostomy, for hilar biliary obstruction will be summarized. PMID:26178753

  4. Endoscopic ultrasound guided interventional procedures

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Vishal; Rana, Surinder S; Bhasin, Deepak K

    2015-01-01

    Endoscopic ultrasound (EUS) has emerged as an important diagnostic and therapeutic modality in the field of gastrointestinal endoscopy. EUS provides access to many organs and lesions which are in proximity to the gastrointestinal tract and thus giving an opportunity to target them for therapeutic and diagnostic purposes. This modality also provides a real time opportunity to target the required area while avoiding adjacent vascular and other structures. Therapeutic EUS has found role in management of pancreatic fluid collections, biliary and pancreatic duct drainage in cases of failed endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography, drainage of gallbladder, celiac plexus neurolysis/blockage, drainage of mediastinal and intra-abdominal abscesses and collections and in targeted cancer chemotherapy and radiotherapy. Infact, therapeutic EUS has emerged as the therapy of choice for management of pancreatic pseudocysts and recent innovations like fully covered removable metallic stents have improved results in patients with organised necrosis. Similarly, EUS guided drainage of biliary tract and pancreatic duct helps drainage of these systems in patients with failed cannulation, inaccessible papilla as with duodenal/gastric obstruction or surgically altered anatomy. EUS guided gall bladder drainage is a useful emergent procedure in patients with acute cholecystitis who are not fit for surgery. EUS guided celiac plexus neurolysis and blockage is more effective and less morbid vis-à-vis the percutaneous technique. The field of interventional EUS is rapidly advancing and many more interventions are being continuously added. This review focuses on the current status of evidence vis-à-vis the established indications of therapeutic EUS. PMID:26078831

  5. Endoscopic removal of a spontaneously fractured biliary uncovered self-expandable metal stent.

    PubMed

    Kawakubo, Kazumichi; Isayama, Hiroyuki; Tsujino, Takeshi; Nakai, Yousuke; Sasahira, Naoki; Kogure, Hirofumi; Hamada, Tsuyoshi; Nagano, Rie; Miyabayashi, Kouji; Yamamoto, Keisuke; Mohri, Dai; Sasaki, Takashi; Ito, Yukiko; Yamamoto, Natsuyo; Hirano, Kenji; Tada, Minoru; Koike, Kazuhiko

    2012-05-01

    Self-expandable metal stents (SEMS) are widely used for the palliative treatment of unresectable malignant biliary obstruction. However, the long-term durability of SEMSs in biliary strictures is not clear. We describe a case of endoscopic removal of spontaneously fractured uncovered biliary SEMS. A 59-year-old woman presented to our institution with a 1-year history of recurrent cholangitis. Her medical history included a proctectomy for rectal cancer and right hemihepatectomy for liver metastasis 10 years earlier. Five years after these operations, she developed a benign hilar stricture and had an uncovered SEMS placed in another hospital. Endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography demonstrated that the SEMS was torn in half and the distal part of the stent was floating in the dilated common bile duct. The papillary orifice was dilated by endoscopic papillary large balloon dilation (EPLBD) using a 15-mm wire-guided balloon catheter. Subsequently, we inserted biopsy forceps into the bile duct and grasped the distal end of the broken SEMS under fluoroscopy. We successfully removed the fragment of the SEMS from the bile duct, along with the endoscope. The patient was discharged without complications. Placement of an uncovered biliary SEMS is not the preferred treatment for benign biliary strictures. Spontaneous fracture of an uncovered biliary SEMS is an extremely rare complication. We should be aware that stent fracture can occur when placing uncovered biliary SEMSs in patients with a long life expectancy. EPLBD is very useful for retrieving the fractured fragment of SEMS. PMID:22507093

  6. Endocoil placement after endoscopic ultrasound-guided biliary drainage may prevent a bile leak

    PubMed Central

    van der Merwe, Schalk Willem; Omoshoro-Jones, Jones; Sanyika, Charles

    2013-01-01

    AIM: To further reduce the risk of bleeding or bile leakage. METHODS: We performed endoscopic ultrasound guided biliary drainage in 6 patients in whom endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP) had failed. Biliary access of a dilated segment 2 or 3 duct was achieved from the stomach using a 19G needle. After radiologically confirming access a guide wire was placed, a transhepatic tract created using a 6 Fr cystotome followed by balloon dilation of the stricture and antegrade metallic stent placement across the malignant obstruction. This was followed by placement of an endocoil in the transhepatic tract. RESULTS: Dilated segmental ducts were observed in all patients with the linear endoscopic ultrasound scope from the proximal stomach. Transgastric biliary access was obtained using a 19G needle in all patients. Biliary drainage was achieved in all patients. Placement of an endocoil was possible in 5/6 patients. All patients responded to biliary drainage and no complications occurred. CONCLUSION: We show that placing endocoils at the time of endoscopic ultrasound guided biliary stenting is feasible and may reduce the risk of bleeding or bile leakage. PMID:23678378

  7. Is endoscopic papillary balloon dilatation really a risk factor for post-ERCP pancreatitis?

    PubMed

    Fujisawa, Toshio; Kagawa, Koichi; Hisatomi, Kantaro; Kubota, Kensuke; Nakajima, Atsushi; Matsuhashi, Nobuyuki

    2016-07-14

    Endoscopic papillary balloon dilatation (EPBD) is useful for decreasing early complications of endoscopic retrograde cholangio-pancreatography (ERCP), including bleeding, biliary infection, and perforation, but it is generally avoided in Western countries because of a relatively high reported incidence of post-ERCP pancreatitis (PEP). However, as the efficacy of endoscopic papillary large-balloon dilatation (EPLBD) becomes widely recognized, EPBD is attracting attention. Here we investigate whether EPBD is truly a risk factor for PEP, and seek safer and more effective EPBD procedures by reviewing past studies. We reviewed thirteen randomised control trials comparing EPBD and endoscopic sphincterotomy (EST) and ten studies comparing direct EPLBD and EST. Three randomized controlled trials of EPBD showed significantly higher incidence of PEP than EST, but no study of EPLBD did. Careful analysis of these studies suggested that longer and higher-pressure inflation of balloons might decrease PEP incidence. The paradoxical result that EPBD with small-calibre balloons increases PEP incidence while EPLBD does not may be due to insufficient papillary dilatation in the former. Insufficient dilatation could cause the high incidence of PEP through the use of mechanical lithotripsy and stress on the papilla at the time of stone removal. Sufficient dilation of the papilla may be useful in preventing PEP. PMID:27468185

  8. Is endoscopic papillary balloon dilatation really a risk factor for post-ERCP pancreatitis?

    PubMed Central

    Fujisawa, Toshio; Kagawa, Koichi; Hisatomi, Kantaro; Kubota, Kensuke; Nakajima, Atsushi; Matsuhashi, Nobuyuki

    2016-01-01

    Endoscopic papillary balloon dilatation (EPBD) is useful for decreasing early complications of endoscopic retrograde cholangio-pancreatography (ERCP), including bleeding, biliary infection, and perforation, but it is generally avoided in Western countries because of a relatively high reported incidence of post-ERCP pancreatitis (PEP). However, as the efficacy of endoscopic papillary large-balloon dilatation (EPLBD) becomes widely recognized, EPBD is attracting attention. Here we investigate whether EPBD is truly a risk factor for PEP, and seek safer and more effective EPBD procedures by reviewing past studies. We reviewed thirteen randomised control trials comparing EPBD and endoscopic sphincterotomy (EST) and ten studies comparing direct EPLBD and EST. Three randomized controlled trials of EPBD showed significantly higher incidence of PEP than EST, but no study of EPLBD did. Careful analysis of these studies suggested that longer and higher-pressure inflation of balloons might decrease PEP incidence. The paradoxical result that EPBD with small-calibre balloons increases PEP incidence while EPLBD does not may be due to insufficient papillary dilatation in the former. Insufficient dilatation could cause the high incidence of PEP through the use of mechanical lithotripsy and stress on the papilla at the time of stone removal. Sufficient dilation of the papilla may be useful in preventing PEP. PMID:27468185

  9. Retrograde ejaculation

    MedlinePlus

    ... problem. Alternative Names Ejaculation retrograde; Dry climax Images Male reproductive system References Bhasin S, Basson R. Sexual dysfunction in men and women. In: Kronenberg HM, Melmed S, Polonsky KS, Larsen PR, eds. Williams ... management of male infertility. In: Wein AJ, ed. Campbell-Walsh Urology . ...

  10. Technical tips for endoscopic ultrasound-guided hepaticogastrostomy

    PubMed Central

    Ogura, Takeshi; Higuchi, Kazuhide

    2016-01-01

    Interventional procedures using endoscopic ultrasound (EUS) have recently been developed. For biliary drainage, EUS-guided trans-luminal drainage has been reported. In this procedure, the transduodenal approach for extrahepatic bile ducts is called EUS-guided choledochoduodenostomy, and the transgastric approach for intrahepatic bile ducts is called EUS-guided hepaticogastrostomy (EUS-HGS). These procedures have several effects, such as internal drainage and avoiding post-endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP) pancreatitis, and they are indicated for an inaccessible ampulla of Vater due to duodenal obstruction or surgical anatomy. EUS-HGS has particularly wide indications and clinical impact as an alternative biliary drainage method. In this procedure, it is necessary to dilate the fistula, and several devices and approaches have been reported. Stent selection is also important. In previous reports, the overall technical success rate was 82% (221/270), the clinical success rate was 97% (218/225), and the overall adverse event rate for EUS-HGS was 23% (62/270). Adverse events of EUS-biliary drainage are still high compared with ERCP or PTCD. EUS-HGS should continue to be performed by experienced endoscopists who can use various strategies when adverse events occur. PMID:27099437

  11. Emerging applications of endoscopic ultrasound in gastrointestinal cancers.

    PubMed

    Hernandez, Lyndon V; Bhutani, Manoop S

    2008-07-01

    Endoscopic ultrasound (EUS) has been adopted into numerous interventional techniques and strategies that promise to improve diagnosis and management of gastrointestinal (GI) cancers. EUS-guided fine-needle aspiration (EUS-FNA) is recommended as a procedure of choice for tissue diagnosis of pancreatic cancer. Potential benefits of EUS-FNA in diagnosis of pancreatic cancer include the ability to detect small, discrete lesions compared with conventional imaging and the ability to provide staging information by examination of blood vessels surrounding the pancreas. EUS-FNA currently is being evaluated in strategies for improving diagnosis in pancreatic cancer through analysis of molecular markers, including strategies for distinguishing malignant pancreatic cysts. EUS-guided fineneedle injection currently is being investigated in a broad range of settings in GI cancers, including use in intratumoral injection in pancreas and esophageal cancers, ethanol lavage for nonmalignant pancreatic cystic tumors, and brachytherapy in nonresectable pancreatic cancer. Other applications of EUS currently being evaluated include EUS-guided biliary access in patients with unsuccessful endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography and EUS-guided anastamoses in the GI tract. EUS-guided interventions have enormous potential to advance diagnosis and treatment of GI cancers. PMID:19259286

  12. Technical tips for endoscopic ultrasound-guided hepaticogastrostomy.

    PubMed

    Ogura, Takeshi; Higuchi, Kazuhide

    2016-04-21

    Interventional procedures using endoscopic ultrasound (EUS) have recently been developed. For biliary drainage, EUS-guided trans-luminal drainage has been reported. In this procedure, the transduodenal approach for extrahepatic bile ducts is called EUS-guided choledochoduodenostomy, and the transgastric approach for intrahepatic bile ducts is called EUS-guided hepaticogastrostomy (EUS-HGS). These procedures have several effects, such as internal drainage and avoiding post-endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP) pancreatitis, and they are indicated for an inaccessible ampulla of Vater due to duodenal obstruction or surgical anatomy. EUS-HGS has particularly wide indications and clinical impact as an alternative biliary drainage method. In this procedure, it is necessary to dilate the fistula, and several devices and approaches have been reported. Stent selection is also important. In previous reports, the overall technical success rate was 82% (221/270), the clinical success rate was 97% (218/225), and the overall adverse event rate for EUS-HGS was 23% (62/270). Adverse events of EUS-biliary drainage are still high compared with ERCP or PTCD. EUS-HGS should continue to be performed by experienced endoscopists who can use various strategies when adverse events occur. PMID:27099437

  13. Eleven-year experience on the endoscopic treatment of post-cholecystectomy bile leaks

    PubMed Central

    Fasoulas, Kostas; Zavos, Christos; Chatzimavroudis, Grigoris; Trakateli, Christina; Vasiliadis, Themistoklis; Ioannidis, Aristidis; Kountouras, Jannis; Katsinelos, Panagiotis

    2011-01-01

    Background Bile leak is a common and serious complication of cholecystectomy with endotherapy being an established method of treatment. This retrospective study presents the 11-year experience of a referral center in endoscopic management of post-cholecystectomy bile leaks. Methods During the period between January 2000 and December 2010, records of patients who had undergone endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP) for suspected post-cholecystectomy bile leaks were reviewed for evidence of clinical presentation of bile leaks, cholangiographic findings, type of endoscopic intervention, procedural complications and post-procedure follow-up. Results Seventy-one patients with suspected post-cholecystectomy bile leak were referred for ERCP. Common bile duct (CBD) cannulation was successful in 70 patients (98.59%). Complete transection of CBD was diagnosed in 4 patients; they were treated with surgery. A leak from the cystic duct stump was demonstrated in 49 patients (74.24%), from the ducts of Luschka in 4 (6.06%), from the gallbladder bed in 2 (3.03%), from the CBD in 7 (10.61%) and from the common hepatic duct (CHD) in 4 patients (6.06%). Endoscopic sphincterotomy (ES) plus endoprosthesis was performed in 64 patients (96.97%). A 12-year-old girl with a leak from cystic duct stump was successfully treated with stenting without ES and one patient with leak from gallbladder bed underwent only ES. Endoscopic intervention failed to treat a leak from CHD in one patient. During the follow-up, three patients developed bile duct stricture. Two were treated endoscopically and one with hepaticojejunostomy. Conclusions ES plus large-bore straight plastic biliary stent placement is a safe and effective intervention in post-cholecystectomy bile leaks. PMID:24713781

  14. Cost-Utility of Competing Strategies to Prevent Endoscopic Transmission of Carbapenem-Resistant Enterobacteriaceae

    PubMed Central

    Almario, Christopher V.; May, Folasade P.; Shaheen, Nicholas J.; Murthy, Rekha; Gupta, Kapil; Jamil, Laith H.; Lo, Simon K.; Spiegel, Brennan M.R.

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVES Prior reports have linked patient transmission of carbapenem-resistant Enterobacteriaceae (CRE, or “superbug”) to endoscopes used during endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP). We performed a decision analysis to measure the cost-effectiveness of four competing strategies for CRE risk management. METHODS We used decision analysis to calculate the cost-effectiveness of four approaches to reduce the risk of CRE transmission among patients presenting to the hospital for symptomatic common bile duct stones. The strategies included: (1) perform ERCP followed by U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA)-recommended endoscope reprocessing procedures; (2) perform ERCP followed by “endoscope culture and hold”; (3) perform ERCP followed by ethylene oxide (EtO) sterilization of the endoscope; and (4) stop performing ERCP in lieu of laparoscopic cholecystectomy (LC) with common bile duct exploration (CBDE). Our outcome was incremental cost per quality-adjusted life year (QALY) gained. RESULTS In the base-case scenario, ERCP with FDA-recommended endoscope reprocessing was the most cost-effective strategy. Both the ERCP with culture and hold ($4,228,170/QALY) and ERCP with EtO sterilization ($50,572,348/QALY) strategies had unacceptable incremental costs per QALY gained. LC with CBDE was dominated, being both more costly and marginally less effective versus the alternatives. In sensitivity analysis, ERCP with culture and hold became the most cost-effective approach when the pretest probability of CRE exceeded 24%. CONCLUSIONS In institutions with a low CRE prevalence, ERCP with FDA-recommended reprocessing is the most cost-effective approach for mitigating CRE transmission risk. Only in settings with an extremely high CRE prevalence did ERCP with culture and hold become cost-effective. PMID:26526083

  15. Improving patient and user safety during endoscopic investigation of the pancreatic and biliary ducts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chandler, John E.; Melville, C. David; Lee, Cameron M.; Saunders, Michael D.; Burkhardt, Matthew R.; Seibel, Eric J.

    2011-03-01

    Endoscopic investigation of the main pancreatic duct and biliary ducts is called endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP), and carries a risk of pancreatitis for the patient. During ERCP, a metal guidewire is inserted into the pancreatobiliary duct from a side-viewing large endoscope within the duodenum. To verify correct placement of the ERCP guidewire, an injection of radiopaque dye is required for fluoroscopic imaging, which exposes the patient and clinical team to x-ray radiation. A safer and more effective means to access the pancreatobiliary system can use direct optical imaging, although the endoscope diameter and stiffness will be significantly larger than a guidewire's. To quantify this invasiveness before human testing, a synthetic force-sensing pancreas was fabricated and attached to an ERCP training model. The invasiveness of a new, 1.7-mm diameter, steerable scanning fiber endoscope (SFE) was compared to the standard ERCP guidewire of 0.89-mm (0.035") diameter that is not steerable. Although twice as large and significantly stiffer than the ERCP guidewire, the SFE generated lower or significantly less average force during insertion at all 4 sensor locations (P<0.05) within the main pancreatic duct. Therefore, the addition of steering and forward visualization at the tip of the endoscope reduced the invasiveness of the in vitro ERCP procedure. Since fluoroscopy is not required, risks associated with dye injection and x-ray exposure can be eliminated when using direct optical visualization. Finally, the SFE provides wide-field high resolution imaging for image-guided interventions, laser-based fluorescence biomarker imaging, and spot spectral analysis for future optical biopsy.

  16. Endoscopic treatment of duodenal fistula after incomplete closure of ERCP-related duodenal perforation

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Dong Wook; Hong, Man Yong; Hong, Seung Goun

    2014-01-01

    Endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP) is an important diagnostic and therapeutic modality for various pancreatic and biliary diseases. The most common ERCP-induced complication is pancreatitis, whereas hemorrhage, cholangitis, and perforation occur less frequently. Early recognition and prompt treatment of these complications may minimize the morbidity and mortality. One of the most serious complications is perforation. Although the incidence of duodenal perforation after ERCP has decreased to < 1.0%, severe cases still require prolonged hospitalization and urgent surgical intervention, potentially leading to permanent disability or mortality. Surgery remains the mainstay treatment for perforations of the luminal organs of the gastrointestinal tract. However, evidence from case reports and case series support a beneficial role of endoscopic clipping in the closure of these defects. Duodenal fistulas are usually a result of sphincterotomies, perforated duodenal ulcers, or gastrectomy. Other causative factors include Crohn’s disease, trauma, pancreatitis, and cancer. The majority of duodenal fistulas heal with nonoperative management. Those that fail to heal are best treated with gastrojejunostomy. Recently proposed endoscopic approaches for managing gastrointestinal leaks caused by fistulas include fibrin glue injection and positioning of endoclips. Our patient developed a secondary persistent duodenal fistula as a result of previous incomplete closure of duodenal perforation with hemoclips and an endoloop. The fistula was successfully repaired by additional clipping and fibrin glue injection. PMID:24932379

  17. Endoscopic Ultrasound Practice Survey in Latin America

    PubMed Central

    Drigo, Juliana Marques; Castillo, Cecilia; Wever, Wallia; Obaldía, José Ricardo Ruíz; Fillipi, Sheila; Ribeiro, Manoel C. S. A.; Rossini, Lucio G. B.

    2013-01-01

    Objective: Endoscopic ultrasound (EUS) has become an important imaging modality for the diagnosis, staging and treatment of gastrointestinal disorders. However, no official data exists regarding clinical EUS practice in Latin America (LA). This study assessed current EUS practice and training. Patients and Methods: A direct mail survey questionnaire was sent to 268 Capítulo Latino Americano de Ultrasonido Endoscópico members between August 2012 and January 2013. The questionnaire was sent out in English, Spanish and Portuguese languages and was available through the following site: http://www.cleus-encuesta.com. Responses were requested only from physicians who perform EUS. Results: A total of 70 LA physicians answered the questionnaire until January 2013. Most of the participants were under 42 years of age (53%) and 80% were men. Most participants (45.7%) perform EUS in Brazil, 53% work in a private hospital. The majority (70%) also perform endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography. A total 42% had performed EUS for 2 years or less and 22.7% for 11 years or more. Only 10% performed more than 5000 EUS. The most common indication was an evaluation of pancreatic-biliary-ampullary lesions. Regarding training, 48.6% had more than 6 months of dedicated hands-on EUS and 37% think that at least 6 months of formal training is necessary to acquire competence. Furthermore, 64% think that more than 50 procedures for pancreatic-biliary lesions are necessary. Conclusion: This survey provides insight into the status of EUS in LA. EUS is performed mostly by young endoscopists in LA. Diagnostic upper EUS is the most common EUS procedure. Most endosonographers believe that formal training is necessary to acquire competence. PMID:24949398

  18. Endoscopic ultrasound-guided choledochoduodenostomy with a lumen-apposing, self-expandable fully covered metal stent for palliative biliary drainage.

    PubMed

    French, Joshua Blake; Coe, Adam Wesley; Pawa, Rishi

    2016-04-01

    In addition to the poor prognosis associated with pancreatic adenocarcinoma, it can also lead to several other conditions including obstructive jaundice that can affect a patient's quality of life. This is a major concern in non-operative patients where palliation is considered the main therapeutic goal. Traditionally, there are several ways to pursue palliative biliary drainage including endoscopic methods, a variety of surgical procedures, and percutaneous techniques. Generally, endoscopic methods such as endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP) with transpapillary stent placement are considered first-line therapies. Unfortunately, ERCP is not always possible due to several potential reasons. Although endoscopic ultrasound-guided biliary puncture has been well described for several years, there are limitations to its usefulness in biliary drainage, in part due to complication concerns. However, more recently a lumen-apposing, self-expandable fully covered metal stent has been employed for such situations. We describe two cases in which this type of stent was used in patients for palliative biliary drainage in pancreatic adenocarcinoma where standard ERCP was not feasible. In both cases, stent deployment was successful without immediate complications related to the procedure or the stent. Furthermore, the main goal of these therapies was palliation and in both cases the patient chose this procedure for quality of life reasons. In the future, randomized trials are needed to better define the long-term effectiveness and safety of these stents compared to more standard therapies. PMID:26956721

  19. Endoscopic snare papillectomy for a solitary Peutz-Jeghers-type polyp in the duodenum with ingrowth into the common bile duct: Case report.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Keiichi; Higuchi, Hajime; Shimizu, Sayaka; Nakano, Masaru; Serizawa, Hiroshi; Morinaga, Shojiro

    2015-07-14

    Solitary duodenal Peutz-Jeghers (PJ)-type hamartomatous polyps are rare and considered a different disease entity than classic PJ syndrome. We describe the case of an 89-year-old man admitted to our emergency department with symptoms of acute cholangitis, liver dysfunction, and slight jaundice. Magnetic resonance imaging showed multiple signal voids, reflecting choledocholithiasis, and an oval-shaped tumor in the common bile duct (CBD). Following endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography, the patient was diagnosed with a lower CBD tumor 20 mm in diameter. Endoscopic sphincterotomy was performed for choledocholithotomy, resulting in the expulsion of a large tumor with a stalk connected to the papilla of Vater. The tumor was successfully excised en bloc by endoscopic snare papillectomy. Histopathologic examination showed that the tumor was a PJ-type hamartomatous polyp. No mucocutaneous pigmentation of the skin was evident and the patient's family history was negative. Solitary duodenal PJ-type hamartomatous polyps are usually diagnosed incidentally during endoscopy for other indications because most of these tumors are asymptomatic or have nonspecific presentations. To our knowledge, this is the first reported solitary PJ-type polyp with intra-CBD growth treated by endoscopic snare papillectomy. PMID:26185397

  20. Endoscopic and anesthetic feasibility of EUS and ERCP combined in a single session versus two different sessions

    PubMed Central

    Vila, Juan J; Kutz, Marcos; Goñi, Silvia; Ostiz, Miriam; Amorena, Edurne; Prieto, Carlos; Rodriguez, Cristina; Fernández-Urien, Ignacio; Jiménez, Francisco J

    2011-01-01

    AIM: To discuss the feasibility of single session endoscopic ultrasonography (EUS) to discuss and endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP) execution. METHODS: Retrospective endoscopic and anesthetic outcome comparison of performing both EUS and ERCP in a single endoscopic session (Group I) versus performing each procedure in two different sessions (Group II) was made. The following variables were evaluated: epidemiological variables, American Society of Anesthesiologists Physical Status Classification (ASA) level, procedural time, propofol dose, anesthetic complications, endoscopic complications and diagnostic yield, and therapeutic procedures on both groups. T-student, Chi-Square and Fisher test were used for comparison. RESULTS: We included 39 patients in Group I (mean age: 69.85 ± 9.25; 27 men) and 46 in Group II (mean age: 67.46 ± 12.57; 25 men). Procedural time did not differ significantly between both groups (Group Ivs Group II: 93 ± 32.78 vs 98.98 ± 38.17; P >0.05) but the dose of propofol differed (Group I vs Group II: 322.28 ± 250.54 mg vs 516.96 ± 289.06 mg; P = 0.001). Three patients had normal findings on both explorations. Three anesthetic complications [O2 desaturation (2), broncoaspiration (1)] and 9 endoscopic complications [pancreatitis (6), bleeding (1), perforation (1), cholangitis (1)] occurred without significant differences between both groups (P > 0.05). We did not find any significant difference regarding age, sex, ASA scale level, diagnostic yield or therapeutic maneuvers between both groups. CONCLUSION: The performance of EUS and ERCP in a single session offers a similar diagnostic and therapeutic yield, does not entail a higher complication risk and requires a significantly smaller dose of propofol for sedation compared with performing each exploration in a different session. PMID:21455343

  1. Cannulation of the biliary tree under endoscopic control with an echoendoscope, without fluoroscopy: report of a case series

    PubMed Central

    Mangiavillano, Benedetto; Carrara, Silvia; Petrone, Maria Chiara; Santoro, Tara; Testoni, Pier Alberto

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Endoscopic ultrasonography (EUS) is a validated technique allowing precise diagnosis and staging of pancreatic, biliary and ampullary disease. Developments in instruments and accessories have led to a more extensive use of this technology to perform operations. The use of EUS as an operative technique, alone or in conjunction with other endoscopic procedures, has already been described in the literature in several reports. However, despite the use of EUS, fluoroscopy has always been required to perform these operations. There are no data in the literature describing the feasibility, safety and efficacy of operative EUS in the treatment of common bile duct (CBD) obstruction, following a malignant or benign disease, performed completely under EUS guidance without fluoroscopic assistance. Methods: In this series we describe three cases of EUS treatment of CBD diseases performed without fluoroscopic assistance. Results: All the cases were treated by EUS without fluoroscopic assistance and no complications were encountered. Conclusion: Operative EUS without fluoroscopy appears to be a feasible technique. Its major advantages could be to shorten the examination time and to enable biliary or pancreatic operative endoscopy in patients in whom fluoroscopy could be dangerous, such as pregnant women. The endoscopist should have a good training both in EUS and endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography. Prospective, larger studies are needed to confirm our preliminary data. PMID:25949525

  2. Endoscopic bile duct and/or pancreatic duct cannulation technique for patients with surgically altered gastrointestinal anatomy.

    PubMed

    Okabe, Yoshinobu; Ishida, Yusuke; Kuraoka, Kei; Ushijima, Tomoyuki; Tsuruta, Osamu

    2014-04-01

    There are two major hurdles to carrying out endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP) in patients with altered gastrointestinal anatomy (Billroth II gastrectomy [B-II], Roux-en-Y anastomosis [R-Y] etc.), post-pancreatoduodenectomy or post-choledochojejunostomy. These are: (i) the endoscopic approach to the afferent loop, blind end, and the site of bilio-pancreatic anastomosis; and (ii) bile duct and/or pancreatic duct cannulation. Balloon-assisted enteroscopy (BAE) became available in recent years and is now being actively used to overcome the first hurdle and, at least, the success rate has improved. However, room for improvement still remains in regards to the second hurdle (i.e. the success rate of cannulation of the bile duct and/or pancreatic duct), and there has been a desire for the development of dedicated devices (ERCP catheters, hoods etc.) and for improvement in the functionality of the enteroscopes etc. In the present review, we explain the basic procedure for bile duct and/or pancreatic duct cannulation with conventional endoscopes and BAE, and modifications of the basic procedure. PMID:24750161

  3. Endoscopic duodenal perforation: surgical strategies in a regional centre

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Duodenal perforation is an uncommon complication of endoscopic retrograde cholangio-pancreatography (ERCP) and a rare complication of upper gastrointestinal endoscopy. Most are minor perforations that settle with conservative management. A few perforations however result in life-threatening retroperitoneal necrosis and require surgical intervention. There is a relative paucity of references specifically describing the surgical interventions required for this eventuality. Methods Five cases of iatrogenic duodenal perforation were ascertained between 2002 and 2007 at Cairns Base Hospital. Clinical features were analyzed and compared, with reference to a review of ERCP at that institution for the years 2005/2006. Results One patient recovered with conservative management. Of the other four, one died after initial laparotomy. The other three survived, undergoing multiple procedures and long inpatient stays. Conclusions Iatrogenic duodenal perforation with retroperitoneal necrosis is an uncommon complication of endoscopy, but when it does occur it is potentially life-threatening. Early recognition may lead to a better outcome through earlier intervention, although a protracted course with multiple procedures should be anticipated. A number of surgical techniques may need to be employed according to the individual circumstances of the case. PMID:24461069

  4. Endoscopic ultrasound-guided treatments: Are we getting evidence based - a systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Fabbri, Carlo; Luigiano, Carmelo; Lisotti, Andrea; Cennamo, Vincenzo; Virgilio, Clara; Caletti, Giancarlo; Fusaroli, Pietro

    2014-01-01

    The continued need to develop less invasive alternatives to surgical and radiologic interventions has driven the development of endoscopic ultrasound (EUS)-guided treatments. These include EUS-guided drainage of pancreatic fluid collections, EUS-guided necrosectomy, EUS-guided cholangiography and biliary drainage, EUS-guided pancreatography and pancreatic duct drainage, EUS-guided gallbladder drainage, EUS-guided drainage of abdominal and pelvic fluid collections, EUS-guided celiac plexus block and celiac plexus neurolysis, EUS-guided pancreatic cyst ablation, EUS-guided vascular interventions, EUS-guided delivery of antitumoral agents and EUS-guided fiducial placement and brachytherapy. However these procedures are technically challenging and require expertise in both EUS and interventional endoscopy, such as endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography and gastrointestinal stenting. We undertook a systematic review to record the entire body of literature accumulated over the past 2 decades on EUS-guided interventions with the objective of performing a critical appraisal of published articles, based on the classification of studies according to levels of evidence, in order to assess the scientific progress made in this field. PMID:25024600

  5. The Clinical Usefulness of Simultaneous Placement of Double Endoscopic Nasobiliary Biliary Drainage

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Hong Jun; Lee, Sung Koo; Ryu, Choong Heon; Park, Do Hyun; Lee, Sang Soo; Seo, Dong Wan; Kim, Myung-Hwan

    2015-01-01

    Background/Aims: To evaluate the technical feasibility and clinical efficacy of double endoscopic nasobiliary drainage (ENBD) as a new method of draining multiple bile duct obstructions. Methods: A total of 38 patients who underwent double ENBD between January 2004 and February 2010 at the Asan Medical Center were retrospectively analyzed. We evaluated indications, laboratory results, and the clinical course. Results: Of the 38 patients who underwent double ENBD, 20 (52.6%) had Klatskin tumors, 12 (31.6%) had hepatocellular carcinoma, 3 (7.9%) had strictures at the anastomotic site following liver transplantation, and 3 (7.9%) had acute cholecystitis combined with cholangitis. Double ENBD was performed to relieve multiple biliary obstruction in 21 patients (55.1%), drain contrast agent filled during endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography in 4 (10.5%), obtain cholangiography in 4 (10.5%), drain hemobilia in 3 (7.9%), relieve Mirizzi syndrome with cholangitis in 3 (7.9%), and relieve jaundice in 3 (7.9%). Conclusions: Double ENBD may be useful in patients with multiple biliary obstructions. PMID:26668802

  6. Endoscopic Ultrasound of the Upper Gastrointestinal Tract and Mediastinum: Diagnosis and Therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Prasad, Priyajit; Wittmann, Johannes; Pereira, Stephen P.

    2006-12-15

    Endoscopic ultrasound (EUS) has developed significantly over the last two decades and has had a considerable impact on the imaging and staging of mass lesions within or in close proximity to the gastrointestinal (GI) tract. In conjunction with conventional imaging such as helical computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging, the indications for EUS include (1) differentiating between benign and malignant lesions of the mediastinum and upper GI tract, (2) staging malignant tumors of the lung, esophagus, stomach, and pancreas prior to surgery or oncological treatment, (3) excluding common bile duct stones before laparoscopic cholecystectomy, thereby avoiding the need for endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP) in some patients, and (4) assessing suspected lesions that are either equivocal or not seen on conventional imaging. In recent years, EUS has charted a course similar to that taken by ERCP, evolving from a purely diagnostic modality to one that is interventional and therapeutic. These indications include (5) obtaining a tissue diagnosis by EUS-guided fine-needle aspiration or trucut-type needle biopsy and (6) providing therapy such as coeliac plexus neurolysis and pancreatic pseudocyst drainage-in many cases, more accurately and safely than conventional techniques. Emerging investigational techniques include EUS-guided enteric anastomosis formation and fine-needle injection therapy for malignant disease.

  7. Endoscopic ultrasonography-guided biliary drainage: Who, when, which, and how?

    PubMed Central

    Hara, Kazuo; Yamao, Kenji; Mizuno, Nobumasa; Hijioka, Susumu; Imaoka, Hiroshi; Tajika, Masahiro; Tanaka, Tutomu; Ishihara, Makoto; Okuno, Nozomi; Hieda, Nobuhiro; Yoshida, Tukasa; Niwa, Yasumasa

    2016-01-01

    Both endoscopic ultrasonography (EUS)-guided choledochoduodenostomy (EUS-CDS) and EUS-guided hepaticogastrostomy (EUS-HGS) are relatively well established as alternatives to percutaneous transhepatic biliary drainage (PTBD). Both EUS-CDS and EUS-HGS have high technical and clinical success rates (more than 90%) in high-volume centers. Complications for both procedures remain high at 10%-30%. Procedures performed by endoscopists who have done fewer than 20 cases sometimes result in severe or fatal complications. When learning EUS-guided biliary drainage (EUS-BD), we recommend a mentor’s supervision during at least the first 20 cases. For inoperable malignant lower biliary obstruction, a skillful endoscopist should perform EUS-BD before EUS-guided rendezvous technique (EUS-RV) and PTBD. We should be select EUS-BD for patients having altered anatomy from malignant tumors before balloon-enteroscope-assisted endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography, EUS-RV, and PTBD. If both EUS-CDS and EUS-HGS are available, we should select EUS-CDS, according to published data. EUS-BD will potentially become a first-line biliary drainage procedure in the near future. PMID:26811666

  8. Adjunctive radiofrequency ablation for the endoscopic treatment of ampullary lesions with intraductal extension (with video)

    PubMed Central

    Suarez, Alejandro L.; Coté, Gregory A.; Elmunzer, B. Joseph

    2016-01-01

    Background and study aims: Catheter-based radiofrequency ablation (RFA) delivered during endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP) may represent a viable treatment option for intraductal extension of ampullary neoplasms, however, clinical experience with this modality is limited. After ampullary resection, 4 patients with intraductal extension underwent adjunctive RFA of the distal bile duct. All patients received a temporary pancreatic stent to reduce the risk of pancreatitis, as well as a plastic biliary stent to prevent biliary obstruction. Three patients were treated for adenoma and 1 for adenoma with a focus of adenocarcinoma. During a short follow-up period, 3 patients experienced complete eradication of the target lesion, whereas the patient with a focus of adenocarcinoma had progression to overt invasive cancer. There were no immediate adverse events. One patient developed a post-RFA bile duct stricture, which has required additional endoscopic therapy. Catheter-based RFA of ampullary lesions that extend up the bile duct is technically feasible. Additional research is necessary to understand the risks and long-term benefits of this technique.

  9. Endoscopic ultrasonography-guided biliary drainage: Who, when, which, and how?

    PubMed

    Hara, Kazuo; Yamao, Kenji; Mizuno, Nobumasa; Hijioka, Susumu; Imaoka, Hiroshi; Tajika, Masahiro; Tanaka, Tutomu; Ishihara, Makoto; Okuno, Nozomi; Hieda, Nobuhiro; Yoshida, Tukasa; Niwa, Yasumasa

    2016-01-21

    Both endoscopic ultrasonography (EUS)-guided choledochoduodenostomy (EUS-CDS) and EUS-guided hepaticogastrostomy (EUS-HGS) are relatively well established as alternatives to percutaneous transhepatic biliary drainage (PTBD). Both EUS-CDS and EUS-HGS have high technical and clinical success rates (more than 90%) in high-volume centers. Complications for both procedures remain high at 10%-30%. Procedures performed by endoscopists who have done fewer than 20 cases sometimes result in severe or fatal complications. When learning EUS-guided biliary drainage (EUS-BD), we recommend a mentor's supervision during at least the first 20 cases. For inoperable malignant lower biliary obstruction, a skillful endoscopist should perform EUS-BD before EUS-guided rendezvous technique (EUS-RV) and PTBD. We should be select EUS-BD for patients having altered anatomy from malignant tumors before balloon-enteroscope-assisted endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography, EUS-RV, and PTBD. If both EUS-CDS and EUS-HGS are available, we should select EUS-CDS, according to published data. EUS-BD will potentially become a first-line biliary drainage procedure in the near future. PMID:26811666

  10. Ureteral retrograde brush biopsy

    MedlinePlus

    Biopsy - brush - urinary tract; Retrograde ureteral brush biopsy cytology; Cytology - ureteral retrograde brush biopsy ... to be biopsied is rubbed with the brush. Biopsy forceps may be used instead to collect a ...

  11. Endoscopic sphincterotomy in patients with stenosis of ampulla of Vater: Three-year follow-up of exocrine pancreatic function and clinical symptoms

    PubMed Central

    Ewald, Nils; Marzeion, Axel Michael; Bretzel, Reinhard Georg; Kloer, Hans Ulrich; Hardt, Philip Daniel

    2007-01-01

    AIM: To investigate retrospectively the long-term effect of endoscopic sphincterotomy (ES) including exocrine pancreatic function in patients with stenosis of ampulla of Vater. METHODS: After diagnostic endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP) and ES because of stenosis of the ampulla of Vater (SOD Type I), follow-up examinations were performed in 60 patients (mean follow-up time 37.7 mo). Patients were asked about clinical signs and symptoms at present and before intervention using a standard questionnaire. Before and after ES exocrine pancreatic function was assessed by determination of immunoreactive fecal elastase 1. Serum enzymes indicating cholestasis as well as serum lipase and amylase were measured. RESULTS: Eighty percent of patients reported an improvement in their general condition after ES. The fecal elastase 1 concentrations (FEC) in all patients increased significantly after ES. This effect was even more marked in patients with pathologically low concentrations (< 200 μg/g) of fecal elastase prior to ES. The levels of serum lipase and amylase as well as serum alcaline phosphatase (AP) and gamma-glutamyltranspeptidase (GGT) decreased significantly after ES. CONCLUSION: The results of this study demonstrate that patients with stenosis of the ampulla of Vater can be successfully treated with endoscopic sphincterotomy. The positive effect is not only indicated by sustained improvement of clinical symptoms and cholestasis but also by improvement of exocrine pancreatic function. PMID:17352020

  12. What are the current and potential future roles for endoscopic ultrasound in the treatment of pancreatic cancer?

    PubMed

    Oh, Stephen Y; Irani, Shayan; Kozarek, Richard A

    2016-04-10

    Pancreatic adenocarcinoma is the fourth leading cause of cancer-related death in the United States. Due to the aggressive tumor biology and late manifestations of the disease, long-term survival is extremely uncommon and the current 5-year survival rate is 7%. Over the last two decades, endoscopic ultrasound (EUS) has evolved from a diagnostic modality to a minimally invasive therapeutic alternative to radiologic procedures and surgery for pancreatic diseases. EUS-guided celiac plexus intervention is a useful adjunct to conventional analgesia for patients with pancreatic cancer. EUS-guided biliary drainage has emerged as a viable option in patients who have failed endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography. Recently, the use of lumen-apposing metal stent to create gastrojejunal anastomosis under EUS and fluoroscopic guidance in patients with malignant gastric outlet obstruction has been reported. On the other hand, anti-tumor therapies delivered by EUS, such as the injection of anti-tumor agents, brachytherapy and ablations are still in the experimental stage without clear survival benefit. In this article, we provide updates on well-established EUS-guided interventions as well as novel techniques relevant to pancreatic cancer. PMID:27076870

  13. What are the current and potential future roles for endoscopic ultrasound in the treatment of pancreatic cancer?

    PubMed Central

    Oh, Stephen Y; Irani, Shayan; Kozarek, Richard A

    2016-01-01

    Pancreatic adenocarcinoma is the fourth leading cause of cancer-related death in the United States. Due to the aggressive tumor biology and late manifestations of the disease, long-term survival is extremely uncommon and the current 5-year survival rate is 7%. Over the last two decades, endoscopic ultrasound (EUS) has evolved from a diagnostic modality to a minimally invasive therapeutic alternative to radiologic procedures and surgery for pancreatic diseases. EUS-guided celiac plexus intervention is a useful adjunct to conventional analgesia for patients with pancreatic cancer. EUS-guided biliary drainage has emerged as a viable option in patients who have failed endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography. Recently, the use of lumen-apposing metal stent to create gastrojejunal anastomosis under EUS and fluoroscopic guidance in patients with malignant gastric outlet obstruction has been reported. On the other hand, anti-tumor therapies delivered by EUS, such as the injection of anti-tumor agents, brachytherapy and ablations are still in the experimental stage without clear survival benefit. In this article, we provide updates on well-established EUS-guided interventions as well as novel techniques relevant to pancreatic cancer. PMID:27076870

  14. Retrograde peri-implantitis.

    PubMed

    Mohamed, Jumshad B; Shivakumar, B; Sudarsan, Sabitha; Arun, K V; Kumar, T S S

    2010-01-01

    Retrograde peri-implantitis constitutes an important cause for implant failure. Retrograde peri-implantitis may sometimes prove difficult to identify and hence institution of early treatment may not be possible. This paper presents a report of four cases of (the implant placed developing to) retrograde peri-implantitis. Three of these implants were successfully restored to their fully functional state while one was lost due to extensive damage. The paper highlights the importance of recognizing the etiopathogenic mechanisms, preoperative assessment, and a strong postoperative maintenance protocol to avoid retrograde peri-implant inflammation. PMID:20922082

  15. Air cholangiography in endoscopic bilateral stent-in-stent placement of metallic stents for malignant hilar biliary obstruction

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jae Min; Lee, Sang Hyub; Jang, Dong Kee; Chung, Kwang Hyun; Park, Jin Myung; Paik, Woo Hyun; Lee, Jun Kyu; Ryu, Ji Kon; Kim, Yong-Tae

    2016-01-01

    Background: Although endoscopic bilateral stent-in-stent (SIS) placement of self-expandable metallic stents (SEMS) is one of the major palliative treatments for unresectable malignant hilar biliary obstruction, post-endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP) cholangitis can occur frequently due to inadequate drainage, especially after contrast injection into the biliary tree. The aim of this study is to evaluate the efficacy and safety of air cholangiography-assisted stenting. Methods: This study included 47 patients with malignant hilar biliary obstruction who underwent endoscopic bilateral SEMS placement using the SIS technique. They were divided into two groups, air (n = 23) or iodine contrast (n = 24) cholangiography. We retrospectively compared comprehensive clinical and laboratory data of both groups. Results: There were no significant differences found between the two groups with respect to technical success (87% versus 87.5%, air versus contrast group, respectively), functional success (95% versus 95.2%), 30-day mortality (8.3% versus 8.7%) and stent patency. Post-ERCP adverse events occurred in 5 (21.7%) of the patients in the air group and 8 (33.3%) of the patients in the contrast group. Among these, the rate of cholangitis was significantly lower in the air group (4.8% versus 29.2%, p = 0.048). In multivariate analysis, air cholangiography, technical success and a shorter procedure time were significantly associated with a lower incidence of post-ERCP cholangitis. Conclusions: Air cholangiography-assisted stenting can be a safe and effective method for endoscopic bilateral SIS placement of SEMS in patients with malignant hilar biliary obstruction. PMID:26929781

  16. Endoscopic ultrasound (EUS)-guided transhepatic anterograde self-expandable metal stent (SEMS) placement across malignant biliary obstruction.

    PubMed

    Nguyen-Tang, T; Binmoeller, K F; Sanchez-Yague, A; Shah, J N

    2010-03-01

    Endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP) with placement of self-expandable metal stents (SEMS) for palliation of malignant obstruction may not be possible in patients with an inaccessible biliary orifice. Endoscopic ultrasound (EUS)-guided drainage methods may be useful in this setting. This study aimed to determine the outcomes of EUS-guided anterograde SEMS placement across malignant strictures in patients with an inaccessible biliary orifice. Over a 2-year period, procedural and outcomes data on all patients undergoing EUS-guided anterograde SEMS drainage after failed ERCP were prospectively entered into a database and reviewed. Five patients underwent EUS-guided anterograde SEMS. Indications included: advanced pancreatic cancer (n = 3), metastatic cancer (n = 1), and anastomotic stricture (n = 1). The biliary orifice could not be reached endoscopically due to duodenal stricture (n = 4) or inaccessible hepaticojejunostomy (n = 1). EUS-guided punctures were performed transgastrically into left intrahepatic ducts (n = 4) or transbulbar into the common bile duct (n = 1). Guide wires were passed and SEMS were successfully deployed across strictures in an anterograde fashion in all patients. Jaundice resolved and serum bilirubin levels decreased in all cases. No procedure-related complications were noted during a mean follow-up of 9.2 months. EUS-guided anterograde SEMS placement appears to be a safe and efficient technique for palliation of biliary obstruction in patients with an endoscopically inaccessible biliary orifice. The procedure can be performed at the time of failed standard ERCP, and provides an alternative drainage option to percutaneous or surgical decompression and to EUS-guided creation of bilioenteric fistulae. PMID:20119894

  17. Endoscopic ultrasonography guided biliary drainage: Summary of consortium meeting, May 7th, 2011, Chicago

    PubMed Central

    Kahaleh, Michel; Artifon, Everson LA; Perez-Miranda, Manuel; Gupta, Kapil; Itoi, Takao; Binmoeller, Kenneth F; Giovannini, Marc

    2013-01-01

    Endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP) has become the preferred procedure for biliary or pancreatic drainage in various pancreatico-biliary disorders. With a success rate of more than 90%, ERCP may not achieve biliary or pancreatic drainage in cases with altered anatomy or with tumors obstructing access to the duodenum. In the past those failures were typically managed exclusively by percutaneous approaches by interventional radiologists or surgical intervention. The morbidity associated was significant especially in those patients with advanced malignancy, seeking minimally invasive interventions and improved quality of life. With the advent of biliary drainage via endoscopic ultrasound (EUS) guidance, EUS guided biliary drainage has been used more frequently within the last decade in different countries. As with any novel advanced endoscopic procedure that encompasses various approaches, advanced endoscopists all over the world have innovated and adopted diverse EUS guided biliary and pancreatic drainage techniques. This diversity has resulted in variations and improvements in EUS Guided biliary and pancreatic drainage; and over the years has led to an extensive nomenclature. The diversity of techniques, nomenclature and recent progress in our intrumentation has led to a dedicated meeting on May 7th, 2011 during Digestive Disease Week 2011. More than 40 advanced endoscopists from United States, Brazil, Mexico, Venezuela, Colombia, Italy, France, Austria, Germany, Spain, Japan, China, South Korea and India attended this pivotal meeting. The meeting covered improved EUS guided biliary access and drainage procedures, terminology, nomenclature, training and credentialing; as well as emerging devices for EUS guided biliary drainage. This paper summarizes the meeting’s agenda and the conclusions generated by the creation of this consortium group. PMID:23538784

  18. The Diagnostic Accuracy of Linear Endoscopic Ultrasound for Evaluating Symptoms Suggestive of Common Bile Duct Stones.

    PubMed

    Wang, Min; He, Xu; Tian, Chuan; Li, Jian; Min, Feng; Li, Hong-Yan

    2016-01-01

    Background. In order to assess the diagnostic accuracy of linear EUS for evaluating clinically suggestive CBD stones in high-risk groups. Methods. 202 patients with clinically suggestive CBD stones in high-risk groups who underwent linear EUS examination between January 2012 and January 2015 were retrospectively reviewed. Endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP) with stone extraction or surgical choledochoscopy was only performed when a CBD stone was detected by linear EUS. Cases that were negative for CBD stones were followed up for at least 6 months. Results. Of 202 enrolled patients, 126 were positive for CBD stones according to linear EUS findings. 124 patients successfully underwent ERCP, and ERCP failed in 2 who were later successfully treated by surgical intervention. There were 2 false-positive cases with positive findings for CBD stones on ERCP. Among 76 patients without CBD stones, no false-negative cases were identified during the mean 6-month follow-up. Linear EUS had sensitivity, specificity, and positive and negative predictive values for the detection of CBD stones of 100%, 92.88%, 98.21%, and 100%, respectively. Conclusions. Linear EUS is a safe and efficacious diagnostic tool for evaluating clinically suggestive CBD stones with high risk of choledocholithiasis. Performing linear EUS prior to ERCP in patients with symptoms suggestive of CBD stones can reduce unnecessary ERCP procedures. PMID:27610131

  19. Endoscopic treatment for pancreatic diseases: Needle-knife-guided cannulation via the minor papilla

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Wei; Gong, Biao; Jiang, Wei-Song; Liu, Lei; Bielike, Kouken; Xv, Bin; Wu, Yun-Lin

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To determine the efficacy and safety of meticulous cannulation by needle-knife. METHODS: Three needle-knife procedures were used to facilitate cannulation in cases when standard cannulation techniques failed. A total of 104 cannulations via the minor papilla attempted in 74 patients at our center between January 2008 and June 2014 were retrospectively reviewed. RESULTS: Standard methods were successful in 79 cannulations. Of the 25 cannulations that could not be performed by standard methods, 19 were performed by needle-knife, while 17 (89.5%) were successful. Needle-knife use improved the success rate of cannulation [76.0%, 79/104 vs 92.3%, (79 + 17)/104; P = 0.001]. When the 6 cases not appropriate for needle-knife cannulation were excluded, the success rate was improved further (80.6%, 79/98 vs 98.0%, 96/98; P = 0.000). There were no significant differences in the rates of post-endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography adverse events between the group using standard methods alone and the group using needle-knife after failure of standard methods (4.7% vs 10.5%, P = 0.301). CONCLUSION: The needle-knife procedure may be an alternative method for improving the success rate of cannulation via the minor papilla, particularly when standard cannulation has failed. PMID:26019460

  20. The Diagnostic Accuracy of Linear Endoscopic Ultrasound for Evaluating Symptoms Suggestive of Common Bile Duct Stones

    PubMed Central

    He, Xu; Li, Jian; Min, Feng; Li, Hong-yan

    2016-01-01

    Background. In order to assess the diagnostic accuracy of linear EUS for evaluating clinically suggestive CBD stones in high-risk groups. Methods. 202 patients with clinically suggestive CBD stones in high-risk groups who underwent linear EUS examination between January 2012 and January 2015 were retrospectively reviewed. Endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP) with stone extraction or surgical choledochoscopy was only performed when a CBD stone was detected by linear EUS. Cases that were negative for CBD stones were followed up for at least 6 months. Results. Of 202 enrolled patients, 126 were positive for CBD stones according to linear EUS findings. 124 patients successfully underwent ERCP, and ERCP failed in 2 who were later successfully treated by surgical intervention. There were 2 false-positive cases with positive findings for CBD stones on ERCP. Among 76 patients without CBD stones, no false-negative cases were identified during the mean 6-month follow-up. Linear EUS had sensitivity, specificity, and positive and negative predictive values for the detection of CBD stones of 100%, 92.88%, 98.21%, and 100%, respectively. Conclusions. Linear EUS is a safe and efficacious diagnostic tool for evaluating clinically suggestive CBD stones with high risk of choledocholithiasis. Performing linear EUS prior to ERCP in patients with symptoms suggestive of CBD stones can reduce unnecessary ERCP procedures. PMID:27610131

  1. Endoscopic ultrasound-guided placement of the lumen-apposing self-expandable metallic stent for gallbladder drainage: a promising technique

    PubMed Central

    Patil, Rashmee; Ona, Mel A.; Papafragkakis, Charilaos; Anand, Sury; Duddempudi, Sushil

    2016-01-01

    Acute cholecystitis and other clinical problems requiring gallbladder removal or drainage have conventionally been treated with surgery, endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography or percutaneous transhepatic drainage of the gallbladder and/or extrahepatic bile duct. Patients unable to undergo these procedures due to functional status or anatomical anomalies are candidates for endoscopic ultrasound (EUS)-guided gallbladder drainage with stent placement. The aim of this review was to evaluate the technical feasibility and efficacy of EUS-guided placement of the recently developed lumen-apposing self-expandable metallic stent (LASEMS). A literature review was performed to identify the studies describing this technique. In this review article we have summarized case series or reports describing EUS-guided LASEMS placement. The indications, techniques, limitations and complications reported are discussed. A total of 78 patients were included across all studies described thus far in the literature. Studies have reported near 100% technical and clinical success rates in selected cases. No major complications were reported. EUS-guided gallbladder drainage and LASEMS placement can be a safe and effective alternative approach in the management of selected patients. PMID:27065728

  2. Endoscopic ultrasound-guided placement of the lumen-apposing self-expandable metallic stent for gallbladder drainage: a promising technique.

    PubMed

    Patil, Rashmee; Ona, Mel A; Papafragkakis, Charilaos; Anand, Sury; Duddempudi, Sushil

    2016-01-01

    Acute cholecystitis and other clinical problems requiring gallbladder removal or drainage have conventionally been treated with surgery, endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography or percutaneous transhepatic drainage of the gallbladder and/or extrahepatic bile duct. Patients unable to undergo these procedures due to functional status or anatomical anomalies are candidates for endoscopic ultrasound (EUS)-guided gallbladder drainage with stent placement. The aim of this review was to evaluate the technical feasibility and efficacy of EUS-guided placement of the recently developed lumen-apposing self-expandable metallic stent (LASEMS). A literature review was performed to identify the studies describing this technique. In this review article we have summarized case series or reports describing EUS-guided LASEMS placement. The indications, techniques, limitations and complications reported are discussed. A total of 78 patients were included across all studies described thus far in the literature. Studies have reported near 100% technical and clinical success rates in selected cases. No major complications were reported. EUS-guided gallbladder drainage and LASEMS placement can be a safe and effective alternative approach in the management of selected patients. PMID:27065728

  3. Endoscopic Intermetatarsal Ligament Decompression.

    PubMed

    Lui, Tun Hing

    2015-12-01

    Morton neuroma is an entrapment of the intermetatarsal nerve by the deep intermetatarsal ligament. It is usually treated conservatively. Surgery is considered if there is recalcitrant pain that is resistant to conservative treatment. The surgical options include resection of the neuroma or decompression of the involved nerve. Decompression of the nerve by release of the intermetatarsal ligament can be performed by either an open or minimally invasive approach. We describe 2-portal endoscopic decompression of the intermetatarsal nerve. The ligament is released by a retrograde knife through the toe-web portal under arthroscopic guidance through the plantar portal. PMID:27284515

  4. Percutaneous Transhepatic Endoscopic Holmium Laser Lithotripsy for Intrahepatic and Choledochal Biliary Stones

    SciTech Connect

    Rimon, Uri; Kleinmann, Nir; Bensaid, Paul; Golan, Gil; Garniek, Alexander; Khaitovich, Boris; Winkler, Harry

    2011-12-15

    Purpose: To report our approach for treating complicated biliary calculi by percutaneous transhepatic endoscopic biliary holmium laser lithotripsy (PTBL). Patients and Methods: Twenty-two symptomatic patients (11 men and 11 women, age range 51 to 88 years) with intrahepatic or common bile duct calculi underwent PTBL. Nine patients had undergone previous gastrectomy and small-bowel anastomosis, thus precluding endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography. In the other 13 patients, stone removal attempts by ERCP failed due to failed access or very large calculi. We used a 7.5F flexible ureteroscope and a 200-{mu}m holmium laser fiber by way of a percutaneous transhepatic tract, with graded fluoroscopy, to fragment the calculi with direct vision. Balloon dilatation was added when a stricture was seen. The procedure was performed with the patient under general anaesthesia. A biliary drainage tube was left at the end of the procedure. Results: All stones were completely fragmented and flushed into the small bowel under direct vision except for one patient in whom the procedure was aborted. In 18 patients, 1 session sufficed, and in 3 patients, 2 sessions were needed. In 7 patients, balloon dilatation was performed for benign stricture after Whipple operation (n = 3), for choledochalenteric anastomosis (n = 3), and for recurrent cholangitis (n = 1). Adjunctive 'balloon push' (n = 4) and 'rendezvous' (n = 1) procedures were needed to completely clean the biliary tree. None of these patients needed surgery. Conclusion: Complicated or large biliary calculi can be treated successfully using PTBL. We suggest that this approach should become the first choice of treatment before laparoscopic or open surgery is considered.

  5. Is Endoscopic Papillary Large Balloon Dilation Safe for Treating Large CBD Stones?

    PubMed Central

    Shim, Chan Sup; Kim, Ji Wan; Lee, Tae Yoon; Cheon, Young Koog

    2016-01-01

    In recent years, endoscopic papillary large balloon dilation (EPLBD) with endoscopic sphincterotomy (EST) has been shown to be an effective technique for the removal of large or difficult common bile duct (CBD) stones, as an alternative to EST. Reviewing the literature published since 2003, it is understood that EPLBD has fewer associated overall complications than EST. Bleeding occurred less frequently with EPLBD than with EST. There was no significant difference in postendoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography pancreatitis or perforation. Recent accumulated results of EPLBD with or even without EST suggest that it is a safe and effective procedure for the removal of large or difficult bile duct stones without any additional risk of severe adverse events, when performed under appropriate guidelines. Since use of a larger balloon can tear the sphincter as well as the bile duct, possibly resulting in bleeding and perforation, a balloon size that is equal to or smaller in diameter than the diameter of the native distal bile duct is recommended. The maximum transverse diameter of the stone and the balloon-stone diameter ratio have a tendency to affect the success or failure of complete removal of stones by large balloon dilation to prevent adverse effects such as perforation and bleeding. One should take into account the size of the native bile duct, the size and burden of stones, the presence of stricture of distal bile duct, and the presence of the papilla in or adjacent to a diverticulum. Even though the results of EPLBD indicate that it is a relatively safe procedure in patients with common duct stones with a dilated CBD, the recommended guidelines should be followed strictly for the prevention of major adverse events such as bleeding and perforation. PMID:27488319

  6. Ureteroscopy-Assisted Retrograde Nephrostomy (UARN) after Anatrophic Nephrolithotomy

    PubMed Central

    Kawahara, Takashi; Ito, Hiroki; Terao, Hideyuki; Kato, Yoshitake; Ogawa, Takehiko; Uemura, Hiroji; Kubota, Yoshinobu; Matsuzaki, Junichi

    2012-01-01

    Introduction. Open surgical anatrophic nephrolithotomy (ANL) had been the standard treatment for large renal calculi prior to the development of endoscopic devices and endoscopic techniques. A previous report described the efficacy of ureteroscopy-assisted retrograde nephrostomy (UARN) and presented a case of renal calculi successfully treated with UARN during percutaneous nephrolithotomy (PCNL) in a patient after ANL. Case Presentation. A 61-year-old male with left renal calculi was referred for further treatment. The patient was placed under general and epidural anesthesia, in a Galdakao-modified Valdivia position. A flexible ureteroscope (URS) was inserted, and a Lawson retrograde nephrostomy puncture wire was advanced into the flexible URS. The puncture wire then followed the route from the renal pelvis to the exit skin. Calculus fragmentation was undertaken using a pneumatic lithotripter. Conclusions. UARN for PCNL was therefore found to be a safe, effective, and appropriate treatment for a patient presenting with renal calculi after undergoing ANL. PMID:22924043

  7. Emerging Trends in Retrograde Signaling.

    PubMed

    Suvarna, Yashasvi; Maity, Nivedita; Shivamurthy, M C

    2016-05-01

    Retrograde signaling is defined as the signaling events leading from the plastids to the nucleus in plants and across the chemical synapse, from the postsynaptic neuron to the presynaptic neuron in animals. The discovery of various retrograde messengers has opened many avenues and clouds of thoughts as to the role of retrograde signaling. They have been implicated particularly in long-term potentiation (LTP) and synaptic plasticity. But the basic assumptions about retrograde signaling have not been studied upon for many years. This review focuses on established facts and hypothesis put forward in retrograde signaling. PMID:26081150

  8. Endoscopic Ultrasound-guided Bilio-pancreatic Drainage

    PubMed Central

    Giovannini, Marc; Bories, Erwan; Téllez-Ávila, Félix I.

    2012-01-01

    The echoendoscopic biliary drainage is an option to treat obstructive jaundices when endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP) drainage fails. These procedures compose alternative methods to the side of surgery and percutaneous transhepatic biliary drainage, and it was only possible by the continuous development and improvement of echoendoscopes and accessories. The development of linear sectorial array echoendoscopes in early 1990 brought a new approach to diagnostic and therapeutic dimension on echoendoscopy capabilities, opening the possibility to perform punction over direct ultrasonografic view. Despite of the high success rate and low morbidity of biliary drainage obtained by ERCP, difficulty could be found at the presence of stent tumor ingrown, tumor gut compression, periampullary diverticula and anatomic variation. The echoendoscopic technique starts performing punction and contrast of the left biliary tree. When performed from gastric wall, the access is made through hepatic segment III. From duodenum, direct common bile duct punction. Diathermic dilatation of the puncturing tract is required using a 6-Fr cystostome and a plastic or metal stent is introducted. The techincal success of hepaticogastrostomy is near 98%, and complications are present in 20%: pneumoperitoneum, choleperitoneum, infection and stent disfunction. To prevent bile leakage, we have used the 2-stent techniques. The first stent introduced was a long uncovered metal stent (8 or 10 cm) and inside this first stent a second fully covered stent of 6 cm was delivered to bridge the bile duct and the stomach. Choledochoduodenostomy overall success rate is 92%, and described complications include, in frequency order, pneumoperitoneum and focal bile peritonitis, present in 14%. By the last 10 years, the technique was especially performed in reference centers, by ERCP experienced groups, and this seems to be a general guideline to safer procedure execution. The ideal approach for

  9. Endoscopic ultrasound

    MedlinePlus

    Endoscopic ultrasound is a type of imaging test. It is used to see organs in and near the digestive ... Ultrasound is a way to see the inside of the body using high-frequency sound waves. Endoscopic ...

  10. Endoscopic management of chronic pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Oza, Veeral M; Kahaleh, Michel

    2013-01-01

    Chronic pancreatitis (CP) is a common gastrointestinal illness, which affects the quality of life with substantial morbidity and mortality. The management includes medical, endoscopic and surgical approaches with the need for interaction between various specialties, calling for a concerted multidisciplinary approach. However, at the time of this publication, guidelines to establish care of these patients are lacking. This review provides the reader with a comprehensive overview of the studies summarizing the various treatment options available, including medical, surgical and endoscopic options. In addition, technological advances such as endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatogrophy, endoscopic shock wave lithotripsy and endoscopic ultrasound can now be offered with reasonable success for pancreatic decompression, stricture dilatation with stent placement, stone fragmentation, pseudocyst drainage, and other endoscopic interventions such as celiac plexus block for pain relief. We emphasize the endoscopic options in this review, and attempt to extract the most up to date information from the current literature. The treatment of CP and its complications are discussed extensively. Complications such as biliary strictures. pancreatic pseudocysts, and chronic pain are common issues that arise as long-term complications of CP. These often require endoscopic or surgical management and possibly a combination of approaches, however choosing amongst the various therapeutic and palliative modalities while weighing the risks and benefits, makes the management of CP challenging. Treatment goals should be not just to control symptoms but also to prevent disease progression. Our aim in this paper is to advocate and emphasize an evidence based approach for the management of CP and associated long term complications. PMID:23330050

  11. Advanced endoscopic imaging of indeterminate biliary strictures

    PubMed Central

    Tabibian, James H; Visrodia, Kavel H; Levy, Michael J; Gostout, Christopher J

    2015-01-01

    Endoscopic evaluation of indeterminate biliary strictures (IDBSs) has evolved considerably since the development of flexible fiberoptic endoscopes over 50 years ago. Endoscopic retrograde cholangiography pancreatography (ERCP) was introduced nearly a decade later and has since become the mainstay of therapy for relieving obstruction of the biliary tract. However, longstanding methods of ERCP-guided tissue acquisition (i.e., biliary brushings for cytology and intraductal forceps biopsy for histology) have demonstrated disappointing performance characteristics in distinguishing malignant from benign etiologies of IDBSs. The limitations of these methods have thus helped drive the search for novel techniques to enhance the evaluation of IDBSs and thereby improve diagnosis and clinical care. These modalities include, but are not limited to, endoscopic ultrasound, intraductal ultrasound, cholangioscopy, confocal endomicroscopy, and optical coherence tomography. In this review, we discuss established and emerging options in the evaluation of IDBSs. PMID:26675379

  12. Anicteric early bile duct carcinoma detection with magnetic resonance cholangiopancreatography.

    PubMed

    Oshikiri, Taro; Morita, Takayuki; Fujita, Miyoshi; Miyasaka, Yuji; Senmaru, Naoto; Yamada, Hidehisa; Kondo, Satoshi; Katoh, Hiroyuki

    2005-01-01

    The poor prognosis of extrahepatic bile duct carcinoma makes early detection and diagnosis essential for positive patient outcomes. We describe 2 cases of jaundice-free early extrahepatic bile duct carcinoma detected by magnetic resonance cholangiopancreatography. Extrahepatic bile duct carcinoma was discovered incidentally in patient 1 by magnetic resonance cholangiopancreatography during evaluation of a gallbladder stone. In patient 2, extrahepatic bile duct carcinoma was found during a routine health maintenance exam. Both patients underwent radical surgical intervention. Both patient 1 and 2 have remained in good health for over one year, 3.5 and one year, respectively, and have not exhibited any signs or symptoms of relapse or cancer recurrence. Based on these cases, it appears that magnetic resonance cholangiopancreatography can play a significant role in the early detection of extrahepatic bile duct carcinoma and improve disease prognosis. PMID:15816438

  13. Comparison between loop-tip guidewire-assisted and conventional endoscopic cannulation in high risk patients

    PubMed Central

    Masci, Enzo; Mangiavillano, Benedetto; Luigiano, Carmelo; Bizzotto, Alessandra; Limido, Eugenio; Cantù, Paolo; Manes, Gianpiero; Viaggi, Paolo; Spinzi, Giancarlo; Radaelli, Franco; Mariani, Alberto; Virgilio, Clara; Alibrandi, Angela; Testoni, Pier Alberto

    2015-01-01

    Background: The guidewire biliary cannulation (GWC) technique may increase the cannulation rate and decrease the risk for post-endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP) pancreatitis. The aim of our multicenter prospective randomized controlled trial was to determine if the use of an atraumatic loop-tip guidewire reduces the rate of post-ERCP pancreatitis (PEP) compared with the standard contrast-assisted cannulation (CC) technique. Methods: From June 2012 to December 2013, a total of 320 patients who had a naïve papilla and were referred for ERCP were randomly assigned to the GWC group (n = 160) or the CC group (n = 160). GWC or CC was randomly used. In cases of failed cannulation in both arms after crossover, biliary access was attempted with alternative techniques (e. g., dual-wire technique, pancreatic duct stenting, precut). Results: The biliary cannulation rates were 81 % in the GWC group and 73 % in the CC group (P = n. s.). Following crossover, cannulation was successful in 8 % and 11 % of patients in the GWC and CC groups, respectively. With use of an alternative technique, the cannulation rates were 98 % in the GWC group and 96 % in the CC group, respectively. The rates of PEP were 5 % in the GWC group and 12 % in the CC group (P = 0.027). The post-interventional complication rates did not differ between the two groups. Conclusion: GWC with the new wire guide is associated with a lower rate of PEP in comparison with the CC technique. Clinical trial reference number: NCT01771419 PMID:26528503

  14. Evaluation of a novel, ultrathin, tip-bending endoscope in a synthetic force-sensing pancreas with comparison to medical guide wires

    PubMed Central

    Chandler, John E; Lee, Cameron M; Babchanik, Alexander P; Melville, C David; Saunders, Michael D; Seibel, Eric J

    2012-01-01

    Purpose Direct visualization of pancreatic ductal tissue is critical for early diagnosis of pancreatic diseases and for guiding therapeutic interventions. A novel, ultrathin (5 Fr) scanning fiber endoscope (SFE) with tip-bending capability has been developed specifically to achieve high resolution imaging as a pancreatoscope during endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP). This device has potential to dramatically improve both diagnostic and therapeutic capabilities during ERCP by providing direct video feedback and tool guidance to clinicians. Methods Invasiveness of the new tip-bending SFE was evaluated by a performance comparison to ERCP guide wires, which are routinely inserted into the pancreatic duct during ERCP. An in vitro test model with four force sensors embedded in a synthetic pancreas was designed to detect and compare the insertion forces for 0.89 mm and 0.53 mm diameter guide wires as well as the 1.7 mm diameter SFE. Insertions were performed through the working channel of a therapeutic duodenoscope for the two types of guide wires and using a statistically similar direct insertion method for comparison to the SFE. Results Analysis of the forces detected by the sensors showed the smaller diameter 0.53 mm wire produced significantly less average and maximum forces during insertion than the larger diameter 0.89 mm wire. With the use of tip-bending and optical visualization, the 1.7 mm diameter SFE produced significantly less average force during insertion than the 0.89 mm wire at every sensor, despite its larger size. It was further shown that the use of tip-bending with the SFE significantly reduced the forces at all sensors, compared to insertions when tip-bending was not used. Conclusion Combining high quality video imaging with two-axis tip-bending allows a larger diameter guide wire-style device to be inserted into the pancreatic duct during ERCP with improved capacity to perform diagnostics and therapy. PMID:23166452

  15. Anatomical Variations of Cystic Ducts in Magnetic Resonance Cholangiopancreatography and Clinical Implications

    PubMed Central

    Sarawagi, Radha; Sundar, Shyam; Gupta, Sanjeev K.; Raghuwanshi, Sameer

    2016-01-01

    Background. Anatomical variations of cystic duct (CD) are frequently unrecognized. It is important to be aware of these variations prior to any surgical, percutaneous, or endoscopic intervention procedures. Objectives. The purpose of our study was to demonstrate the imaging features of CD and its variants using magnetic resonance cholangiopancreatography (MRCP) and document their prevalence in our population. Materials and Methods. This study included 198 patients who underwent MRCP due to different indications. Images were evaluated in picture archiving communication system (PACS) and variations of CD were documented. Results. Normal lateral insertion of CD at middle third of common hepatic duct was seen in 51% of cases. Medial insertion was seen in 16% of cases, of which 4% were low medial insertions. Low insertion of CD was noted in 9% of cases. Parallel course of CD was present in 7.5% of cases. High insertion was noted in 6% and short CD in 1% of cases. In 1 case, CD was draining into right hepatic duct. Congenital cystic dilation of CD was noted in one case with evidence of type IV choledochal cyst. Conclusion. Cystic duct variations are common and MRCP is an optimal imaging modality for demonstration of cystic duct anatomy. PMID:27313891

  16. Cholestasis

    MedlinePlus

    ... duct (strictures) Stones in the common bile duct Pancreatitis Pancreatic tumor or pseudocyst Pressure on the bile ... Endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP) (can also determine cause) Ultrasound of the abdomen

  17. Dual Balloon-Occluded Retrograde Transvenous Obliteration of Gastric Varix Draining into the Left Adrenal Vein and Left Inferior Phrenic Vein

    SciTech Connect

    Nishida, Norifumi Ninoi, Teruhisa; Kitayama, Toshiaki; Yamamoto, Akira; Sakai, Yukimasa; Sato, Kimihiko; Hamuro, Masao; Nakamura, Kenji; Inoue, Yuichi; Yamada, Ryusaku

    2004-09-15

    A 66-year-old woman with a gastric varix, draining into a dilated left adrenal vein and a left inferior phrenic vein, was treated with dual balloon-occluded retrograde transvenous obliteration (B-RTO). Under balloon occlusion of the left adrenal vein and the left inferior phrenic vein, retrograde injection of a sclerosant (5% ethanolamine oleate) into the gastric varix was performed. Two weeks later, disappearance of flow in the gastric varix was confirmed on endoscopic ultrasound examination.

  18. Endoscopic Sinus Surgery

    MedlinePlus

    ... The nasal endoscope is a small, lighted metal telescope placed into the nostril. The endoscope allows the ... sinus surgery involves the use of a small telescope (nasal endoscope) that is inserted through the nostril ...

  19. Endoscopic neurosurgery.

    PubMed

    Auer, L M; Holzer, P; Ascher, P W; Heppner, F

    1988-01-01

    This paper describes an ultrasound-guided, laser-assisted, and TV-controlled endoscopic technique which has been used so far in 133 patients for a variety of intracranial lesions. Following CT or MRI image reconstruction, and a decision on the placement of a 1 cm or a 2 cm burrhole, a 1 cm 5.0 mHz or 7.5 mHz intraoperative ultrasound probe is used to direct the endoscope from the burrhole to the target area. A 22.5 cm long rigid endoscope tube with an outer diameter of 6 mm with an inbuilt suction irrigation system, Neodymium Yag laser with 600 micron Quartz glass-fibre and an inlet for various microinstruments is then introduced. The attachment of a TV camera to the ocular lens allows the operator to control further surgical steps in the target area via the TV screen and thus warrants sterility in the operating field. The technique has been used for evacuation of 77 spontaneous intracerebral haematomas (lobar, putaminal, thalamic), 8 traumatic intracerebral haematomas, 13 ventricular haematomas, 8 cerebellar haematomas and 1 brainstem haematoma. Total or subtotal evacuation was achieved in 33% of intracerebral haematomas, removal of more than 50% of the clot in 55%. Twenty-four brain tumours (12 ventricular, 12 cystic cerebral or cerebellar tumours) were operated on for biopsy, evacuation of cyst, resection or removal of the cyst wall and/or laser irradiation of solid tumour or the inner cyst wall of cystic tumours. The complication rate probably related to surgery was 1.6%, morbidity 1.6%, mortality 0%. This high-tec endoscopic technique with its minimal surgical trauma and short operation time can be recommended as a low-risk alternative to conventional neurosurgical techniques. PMID:3278501

  20. Endoscopic Cyclophotocoagulation

    PubMed Central

    Seibold, Leonard K.; SooHoo, Jeffrey R.; Kahook, Malik Y.

    2015-01-01

    In recent years, many new procedures and implants have been introduced as safer alternatives for the surgical treatment of glaucoma. The majority of these advances are implant-based with a goal of increased aqueous drainage to achieve lower intraocular pressure (IOP). In contrast, endoscopic cyclophotocoagulation (ECP) lowers IOP through aqueous suppression. Although ciliary body ablation is a well-established method of aqueous suppression, the novel endoscopic approach presents a significant evolution of this treatment with marked improvement in safety. The endoscope couples a light source, video imaging, and diode laser to achieve direct visualization of the ciliary processes during controlled laser application. The result is an efficient and safe procedure that can achieve a meaningful reduction in IOP and eliminate or reduce glaucoma medication use. From its initial use in refractory glaucoma, the indications for ECP have expanded broadly to include many forms of glaucoma across the spectrum of disease severity. The minimally-invasive nature of ECP allows for easy pairing with phacoemulsification in patients with coexisting cataract. In addition, the procedure avoids implant or device-related complications associated with newer surgical treatments. In this review, we illustrate the differences between ECP and traditional cyclophotocoagulation, then describe the instrumentation, patient selection, and technique for ECP. Finally, we summarize the available clinical evidence regarding the efficacy and safety of this procedure. PMID:25624669

  1. Endoscopic cyclophotocoagulation.

    PubMed

    Seibold, Leonard K; SooHoo, Jeffrey R; Kahook, Malik Y

    2015-01-01

    In recent years, many new procedures and implants have been introduced as safer alternatives for the surgical treatment of glaucoma. The majority of these advances are implant-based with a goal of increased aqueous drainage to achieve lower intraocular pressure (IOP). In contrast, endoscopic cyclophotocoagulation (ECP) lowers IOP through aqueous suppression. Although ciliary body ablation is a well-established method of aqueous suppression, the novel endoscopic approach presents a significant evolution of this treatment with marked improvement in safety. The endoscope couples a light source, video imaging, and diode laser to achieve direct visualization of the ciliary processes during controlled laser application. The result is an efficient and safe procedure that can achieve a meaningful reduction in IOP and eliminate or reduce glaucoma medication use. From its initial use in refractory glaucoma, the indications for ECP have expanded broadly to include many forms of glaucoma across the spectrum of disease severity. The minimally-invasive nature of ECP allows for easy pairing with phacoemulsification in patients with coexisting cataract. In addition, the procedure avoids implant or device-related complications associated with newer surgical treatments. In this review, we illustrate the differences between ECP and traditional cyclophotocoagulation, then describe the instrumentation, patient selection, and technique for ECP. Finally, we summarize the available clinical evidence regarding the efficacy and safety of this procedure. PMID:25624669

  2. Retrograde signaling: Organelles go networking.

    PubMed

    Kleine, Tatjana; Leister, Dario

    2016-08-01

    The term retrograde signaling refers to the fact that chloroplasts and mitochondria utilize specific signaling molecules to convey information on their developmental and physiological states to the nucleus and modulate the expression of nuclear genes accordingly. Signals emanating from plastids have been associated with two main networks: 'Biogenic control' is active during early stages of chloroplast development, while 'operational' control functions in response to environmental fluctuations. Early work focused on the former and its major players, the GUN proteins. However, our view of retrograde signaling has since been extended and revised. Elements of several 'operational' signaling circuits have come to light, including metabolites, signaling cascades in the cytosol and transcription factors. Here, we review recent advances in the identification and characterization of retrograde signaling components. We place particular emphasis on the strategies employed to define signaling components, spanning the entire spectrum of genetic screens, metabolite profiling and bioinformatics. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled 'EBEC 2016: 19th European Bioenergetics Conference, Riva del Garda, Italy, July 2-6, 2016', edited by Prof. Paolo Bernardi. PMID:26997501

  3. Endoscopic Microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Sokolov, Konstantin; Sung, Kung-Bin; Collier, Tom; Clark, Anne; Arifler, Dizem; Lacy, Alicia; Descour, Michael; Richards-Kortum, Rebecca

    2002-01-01

    In vivo endoscopic optical microscopy provides a tool to assess tissue architecture and morphology with contrast and resolution similar to that provided by standard histopathology – without need for physical tissue removal. In this article, we focus on optical imaging technologies that have the potential to dramatically improve the detection, prevention, and therapy of epithelial cancers. Epithelial pre-cancers and cancers are associated with a variety of morphologic, architectural, and molecular changes, which currently can be assessed only through invasive, painful biopsy. Optical imaging is ideally suited to detecting cancer-related alterations because it can detect biochemical and morphologic alterations with sub-cellular resolution throughout the entire epithelial thickness. Optical techniques can be implemented non-invasively, in real time, and at low cost to survey the tissue surface at risk. Our manuscript focuses primarily on modalities that currently are the most developed: reflectance confocal microscopy (RCM) and optical coherence tomography (OCT). However, recent advances in fluorescence-based endoscopic microscopy also are reviewed briefly. We discuss the basic principles of these emerging technologies and their current and potential applications in early cancer detection. We also present research activities focused on development of exogenous contrast agents that can enhance the morphological features important for cancer detection and that have the potential to allow vital molecular imaging of cancer-related biomarkers. In conclusion, we discuss future improvements to the technology needed to develop robust clinical devices. PMID:14646041

  4. Retrograde dilation of a complex radiation-induced esophageal stricture through percutaneous gastrostomy.

    PubMed

    Eminler, A T; Uslan, M I; Köksal, A Ş; Guven, M; Parlak, E

    2015-06-01

    Upper esophageal strictures occur in approximately 3-4% of patients who receive radiotherapy for head and neck cancers. The standart initial treatment is dilation by using bougie or through-the-scope balloon dilators. Endoscopic treatment requires the passage of a guidewire through the stricture which cannot be accomplished in some of the patients with complex strictures. Retrograde dilation of esophageal strictures through a mature percutaneous gastrostomy tract have been reported in a limited number of cases and small case series up to date and can be considered as a rescue treatment before considering surgery in such patients. Herein we report retrograde dilatation of a radiation-induced complex esophageal stricture through the percutaneous gastrostomy tract in a patient with operated larynx cancer. PMID:26151697

  5. Endoscopic management of post-liver transplant biliary complications.

    PubMed

    Girotra, Mohit; Soota, Kaartik; Klair, Jagpal S; Dang, Shyam M; Aduli, Farshad

    2015-05-16

    Biliary complications are being increasingly encountered in post liver transplant patients because of increased volume of transplants and longer survival of these recipients. Overall management of these complications may be challenging, but with advances in endoscopic techniques, majority of such patients are being dealt with by endoscopists rather than the surgeons. Our review article discusses the recent advances in endoscopic tools and techniques that have proved endoscopic retrograde cholangiography with various interventions, like sphincterotomy, bile duct dilatation, and stent placement, to be the mainstay for management of most of these complications. We also discuss the management dilemmas in patients with surgically altered anatomy, where accessing the bile duct is challenging, and the recent strides towards making this prospect a reality. PMID:25992185

  6. State-of-the-art endoscopic procedures for pancreatic cancer.

    PubMed

    Coronel, Emmanuel; Waxman, Irving

    2016-09-01

    Pancreatic cancer is the twelfth most common cancer worldwide, taking the fourth place in cancer-related mortality in western countries. Despite significant efforts in understanding the tumor biology of pancreatic cancer and introducing new technologies and therapies to improve the detection, staging and treatment of this disease, pancreatic cancer continues to have a high and almost unchanged mortality. In the last few decades, the development of techniques such as endoscopic retrograde cholangio pancreatography and endoscopic ultrasound have allowed us to directly access the pancreaticobiliary system and fight pancreatic cancer and its complications from different fronts. Our goal with this review is to discuss the most cutting-edge endoscopic techniques available in our armamentarium to diagnose, stage and treat pancreatic cancer. PMID:27339021

  7. Endoscopic management of post-liver transplant biliary complications

    PubMed Central

    Girotra, Mohit; Soota, Kaartik; Klair, Jagpal S; Dang, Shyam M; Aduli, Farshad

    2015-01-01

    Biliary complications are being increasingly encountered in post liver transplant patients because of increased volume of transplants and longer survival of these recipients. Overall management of these complications may be challenging, but with advances in endoscopic techniques, majority of such patients are being dealt with by endoscopists rather than the surgeons. Our review article discusses the recent advances in endoscopic tools and techniques that have proved endoscopic retrograde cholangiography with various interventions, like sphincterotomy, bile duct dilatation, and stent placement, to be the mainstay for management of most of these complications. We also discuss the management dilemmas in patients with surgically altered anatomy, where accessing the bile duct is challenging, and the recent strides towards making this prospect a reality. PMID:25992185

  8. Ultrathin flexible endoscopes for ureteroscopy. A preliminary experimental and clinical study.

    PubMed

    Vorreuther, R; Franzen, W; Engelking, R

    1989-01-01

    Recent advances in fiberoptic technology have resulted in the development of endoscopes with an outer diameter of less than 6 F, including an irrigating or working channel. After preliminary testing of these ultrathin fiberscopes for ureteroscopy on 6 pigs, 17 patients were examined during routine retrograde pyelography. Prototypes of flexible endoscopes without an actively deflectable tip and an outer diameter of 5.5 F (= 1.8 mm) and a 1.5 F (= 0.5 mm) channel were used. Fine-needle aspiration cytology was obtained through the channel. The feasibility, performance and benefits of ureteroscopy with ultrathin, flexible endoscopes were evaluated. At present the lack of maneuverability and the fragility of the fiberscopes limit this method. Yet its routine clinical use, in addition to retrograde ureteropyelography under local anesthesia, shows great promise. PMID:2623553

  9. Retrograde Percutaneous Transjejunal Creation of Biliary Neoanastomoses in Patients with Complete Hepaticojejunostomy Dehiscence.

    PubMed

    Mansueto, Giancarlo; Contro, Alberto; Zamboni, Giulia A; De Robertis, Riccardo

    2015-10-01

    A technique of percutaneous hepaticojejunostomy (PHJ) was developed to allow creation of a neoanastomosis in cases of hepaticojejunostomy (HJ) dehiscence when endoscopic intervention is unfeasible as a result of postsurgical anatomy. PHJ involves transhepatic biliary catheterization and transjejunal retrograde enterotomy. A rendezvous establishes the communication between the bile ducts and the jejunum. PHJ was performed in five patients, and neoanastomosis creation without residual biliary leak was achieved in all cases, with no procedure-related complications. Bilirubin levels and white blood cell counts quickly decreased after PHJ (median, 1 d; range, 1-4 d). Median survival after PHJ was 210 days (range, 45-540 d). PMID:26408218

  10. Retrograde flexible ureteroscopy-assisted retroperitoneal laparoscopic ureteroureterostomy for refractory ureteral stricture: A case report

    PubMed Central

    Tsuru, Nobuo; Mugiya, Soichi; Sato, Shigenori

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Laparoscopic ureteroureterostomy (UU) is a preferred and valid minimally invasive procedure for treatment of benign ureteral strictures. In some cases with chronic inflammation or after repeated endoscopic ureteral surgery, it is difficult to identify the location of a ureteral stricture. Presentation of case We report a case of 48-year-old man with an impacted stone after laparoscopic partial nephrectomy. Although transurethral lithotripsy (TUL) was performed, the ureteral stricture did not improve by subsequent endoscopic ureteral Holmium laser incision and balloon dilation. Discussion To simultaneously identify the exact location of the constriction, we performed retroperitoneal laparoscopic ureteroureterostomy with intraoperative observations via super-slim flexible fiberoptic ureteroscopy retrograde. Conclusions Accurate identification of the ureteral stricture via observation by laparoscopy and observation by ureteroscopy was feasible. In contrast to the use of a rigid ureteroscopy, flexible fiberoptic ureteroscopy did not require placing the patient in an unnatural position. PMID:26826930

  11. Laparoscopic management of difficult recurrent choledocholithiasis.

    PubMed

    Dixit, Anupam; Wynne, Kamal S; Harris, Adrian M

    2007-01-01

    The management of common bile duct stones has traditionally required open laparotomy and bile duct exploration. With the advent of endoscopic and laparoscopic technology in the latter half of the last century, endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography and laparoscopic common bile duct exploration has become the mainstream treatment for common bile duct stones in most medical centers around the world. However, in some patients, endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography is difficult and laparoscopy is challenging because of previous surgery. These facts are highlighted in this report. PMID:17651582

  12. Outcome and Safety of Anterograde and Retrograde Single-Balloon Enteroscopy: Clinical Experience at a Tertiary Medical Center in Taiwan

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Meng-Chiung; Chen, Peng-Jen; Shih, Yu-Lueng; Huang, Hsin-Hung; Chang, Wei-Kuo; Hsieh, Tsai-Yuan; Huang, Tien-Yu

    2016-01-01

    Single-balloon enteroscopy (SBE) is designed for identifying possible small bowel lesions with balloon-assisted enteroscopy that allows deep intubation of the intestine. However, data regarding the outcome and safety of SBE remain limited. We conducted this study to evaluate the outcome and safety of anterograde and retrograde SBE approaches. This retrospective review from a tertiary medical center in Taiwan included endoscopic reports and chart data from 128 patients with 200 anterograde and retrograde procedures from September 2009 to November 2014. In this study, the most common indication for both anterograde and retrograde SBE was obscure gastrointestinal bleeding (64.4% vs. 60.6%). There were no significant differences between anterograde and retrograde approaches in terms of the diagnostic yield (69.3% vs. 52.5%) and intervention rate (23.8% vs. 17.2%). The procedure time was shorter for anterograde SBE than for retrograde SBE (68.1 ± 23.9 vs. 76.8 ± 27.7 min, P = 0.018). In addition, among the subgroup of patients with obscure gastrointestinal bleeding, the most common etiologies for those in different age-groups were angiodysplasia (≥ 65 years), non-specific ulcers (30–64 years), and Meckel’s diverticulum (< 30 years). The major complication rate during the study was 1.5%; the rate of asymptomatic hyperamylasemia was higher for patients who underwent anterograde SBE than for those who underwent retrograde SBE (13.9% vs. 2%, P = 0.005). The outcome and safety of anterograde and retrograde SBE are similar. However, anterograde SBE has a shorter procedural time and a higher rate of asymptomatic hyperamylasemia. PMID:27548619

  13. Retrogradation enthalpy does not always reflect the retrogradation behavior of gelatinized starch

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Shujun; Li, Caili; Zhang, Xiu; Copeland, Les; Wang, Shuo

    2016-01-01

    Starch retrogradation is a term used to define the process in which gelatinized starch undergoes a disorder-to-order transition. A thorough understanding of starch retrogradation behavior plays an important role in maintaining the quality of starchy foods during storage. By means of DSC, we have demonstrated for the first time that at low water contents, the enthalpy change of retrograded starch is higher than that of native starch. In terms of FTIR and Raman spectroscopic results, we showed that the molecular order of reheated retrograded starch samples is lower than that of DSC gelatinized starch. These findings have led us to conclude that enthalpy change of retrograded starch at low water contents involves the melting of recrystallized starch during storage and residual starch crystallites after DSC gelatinization, and that the endothermic transition of retrograded starch gels at low water contents does not fully represent the retrogradation behavior of starch. Very low or high water contents do not favor the occurrence of starch retrogradation. PMID:26860788

  14. Incremental Value of MR Cholangiopancreatography in Diagnosis of Biliary Atresia

    PubMed Central

    Sung, Siyoun; Jeon, Tae Yeon; Yoo, So-Young; Hwang, Sook Min; Choi, Young Hun; Kim, Woo Sun; Choe, Yon Ho; Kim, Ji Hye

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To evaluate the incremental value of a combination of magnetic resonance cholangiopancreatography (MRCP) and ultrasonography (US), compared to US alone, for diagnosing biliary atresia (BA) in neonates and young infants with cholestasis. Materials and Methods The institutional review board approved this retrospective study. The US and MRCP studies were both performed on 64 neonates and young infants with BA (n = 41) or without BA (non-BA) (n = 23). Two observers reviewed independently the US alone set and the combined US and MRCP set, and graded them using a five-point scale. Diagnostic performance was compared using pairwise comparison of the receiver operating characteristics (ROC) curve. The sensitivity, specificity, accuracy, positive predictive value (PPV), and negative predictive value were assessed. Results The diagnostic performance (the area under the ROC curve [Az]) for diagnosing BA improved significantly after additional review of MRCP images; Az improved from 0.688 to 0.901 (P = .015) for observer 1 and from 0.676 to 0.901 (P = .011) for observer 2. The accuracy of MRCP combined with US (observer 1, 95% [61/64]; observer 2 92% [59/64]) and PPV (observer 1, 95% [40/42]; observer 2 91% [40/44]) were significantly higher than those of US alone for both observers (accuracy: observer 1, 73% [47/64], P = 0.003; observer 2, 72% [46/64], P = 0.004; PPV: observer 1, 76% [35/46], P = 0.016; observer 2, 76% [34/45], P = 0.013). Interobserver agreement of confidence levels was good for US alone (ĸ = 0.658, P < .001) and was excellent for the combined set of US and MRCP (ĸ = 0.929, P < .001). Conclusion Better diagnostic performance was achieved with the combination of US and MRCP than with US alone for the evaluation of BA in neonates and young infants with cholestasis. PMID:27341698

  15. Endoscopic Evaluation of Swallowing (Endoscopy)

    MedlinePlus

    ... the Public / Speech, Language and Swallowing / Swallowing Endoscopic Evaluation of Swallowing (Endoscopy) Do you have problems swallowing? ... Some names you might hear are: Endoscopy Endoscopic Evaluation of swallowing FEES (Fiberoptic Endoscopic Evaluation of Swallowing) ...

  16. Process for forming retrograde profiles in silicon

    DOEpatents

    Weiner, Kurt H.; Sigmon, Thomas W.

    1996-01-01

    A process for forming retrograde and oscillatory profiles in crystalline and polycrystalline silicon. The process consisting of introducing an n- or p-type dopant into the silicon, or using prior doped silicon, then exposing the silicon to multiple pulses of a high-intensity laser or other appropriate energy source that melts the silicon for short time duration. Depending on the number of laser pulses directed at the silicon, retrograde profiles with peak/surface dopant concentrations which vary from 1-1e4 are produced. The laser treatment can be performed in air or in vacuum, with the silicon at room temperature or heated to a selected temperature.

  17. Process for forming retrograde profiles in silicon

    DOEpatents

    Weiner, K.H.; Sigmon, T.W.

    1996-10-15

    A process is disclosed for forming retrograde and oscillatory profiles in crystalline and polycrystalline silicon. The process consisting of introducing an n- or p-type dopant into the silicon, or using prior doped silicon, then exposing the silicon to multiple pulses of a high-intensity laser or other appropriate energy source that melts the silicon for short time duration. Depending on the number of laser pulses directed at the silicon, retrograde profiles with peak/surface dopant concentrations which vary are produced. The laser treatment can be performed in air or in vacuum, with the silicon at room temperature or heated to a selected temperature.

  18. Causes of retrograde flow in fish keratocytes.

    PubMed

    Fuhs, Thomas; Goegler, Michael; Brunner, Claudia A; Wolgemuth, Charles W; Kaes, Josef A

    2014-01-01

    Confronting motile cells with obstacles doubling as force sensors we tested the limits of the driving actin and myosin machinery. We could directly measure the force necessary to stop actin polymerization as well as the force present in the retrograde actin flow. Combined with detailed measurements of the retrograde flow velocity and specific manipulation of actin and myosin we found that actin polymerization and myosin contractility are not enough to explain the cells behavior. We show that ever-present depolymerization forces, a direct entropic consequence of actin filament recycling, are sufficient to fill this gap, even under heavy loads. PMID:24127260

  19. External security stitch for retrograde cardioplegia cannula.

    PubMed

    Gabbieri, Davide; Pedulli, Marco; Bianchi, Tiziano; Ghidoni, Italo

    2009-01-01

    Retrograde cardioplegia catheter displacement represents a troublesome complication, frequently forcing the surgeon to interrupt the operative procedure and cannulate newly the coronary sinus. However, this maneuver is time consuming, often implies the loss of surgical exposure, and exposes again the coronary sinus to the risk of iatrogenic injuries. We describe the use of an external security stitch through the muscular right atrial wall to avoid the displacement of a retrograde cardioplegia catheter and analyze the anatomic conditions which predispose to this complication. PMID:19583611

  20. Endoscopic Devices for Obesity.

    PubMed

    Sampath, Kartik; Dinani, Amreen M; Rothstein, Richard I

    2016-06-01

    The obesity epidemic, recognized by the World Health Organization in 1997, refers to the rising incidence of obesity worldwide. Lifestyle modification and pharmacotherapy are often ineffective long-term solutions; bariatric surgery remains the gold standard for long-term obesity weight loss. Despite the reported benefits, it has been estimated that only 1% of obese patients will undergo surgery. Endoscopic treatment for obesity represents a potential cost-effective, accessible, minimally invasive procedure that can function as a bridge or alternative intervention to bariatric surgery. We review the current endoscopic bariatric devices including space occupying devices, endoscopic gastroplasty, aspiration technology, post-bariatric surgery endoscopic revision, and obesity-related NOTES procedures. Given the diverse devices already FDA approved and in development, we discuss the future directions of endoscopic therapies for obesity. PMID:27115879

  1. Endoscopic Skull Base Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Senior, Brent A

    2008-01-01

    Endoscopic skull base surgery has undergone rapid advancement in the past decade moving from pituitary surgery to suprasellar lesions and now to a myriad of lesions extending from the cribriform plate to C2 and laterally out to the infratemporal fossa and petrous apex. Evolution of several technological advances as well as advances in understanding of endoscopic anatomy and the development of surgical techniques both in resection and reconstruction have fostered this capability. Management of benign disease via endoscopic methods is largely accepted now but more data is needed before the controversy on the role of endoscopic management of malignant disease is decided. Continued advances in surgical technique, navigation systems, endoscopic imaging technology, and robotics assure continued brisk evolution in this expanding field. PMID:19434274

  2. Retrograde Lymphatic Spread of Esophageal Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Oshiro, Hisashi; Osaka, Yoshiaki; Tachibana, Shingo; Aoki, Takaya; Tsuchiya, Takayoshi; Nagao, Toshitaka

    2015-01-01

    Abstract The concept of the retrograde lymphatic spread of cancer cells appears to account for a subset of the essential mechanisms of cancer metastasis in various organs. However, no adequate data currently exist to illustrate the pathology of the retrograde lymphatic metastasis of cancer cells in human bodies. To shed light on this phenomenon, we report a case of a 63-year-old Japanese man who underwent an esophagectomy and lymph node dissection for early-stage esophageal cancer. The patient's clinical information was evaluated by board-certified surgeons and internists. Surgically excised materials were histopathologically evaluated by attending pathologists. Postoperative pathological examination revealed that the patient's tumor was a well-differentiated squamous cell carcinoma with negative surgical margins (T1N0M0, stage I). Apart from the primary lesion, a single lymphatic vessel invasion was found between the lamina propria and lamina muscularis of the esophagus where intralymphatic cancer cells had spread against the direction of backflow prevention valves and skipped beyond these valves without destroying them. The present case demonstrated that the retrograde lymphatic spread of cancer cells can occur in valve-equipped lymphatic vessels. Our study may not only provide a scientific basis for the concept of retrograde lymphatic metastasis but also explain a portion of the complexities associated with the lymphogenous metastasis of esophageal cancer. PMID:26166121

  3. Combined Endoscopic and Percutaneous Retrieval of a Retained 4-Wire Ureteral Stone Basket

    PubMed Central

    Kaplan, Adam G.; Preminger, Glenn M.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Complex endourologic procedures may require the use of a combined ureteroscopic and percutaneous approach. Endoscopic removal of a retained 4-wire ureteral stone basket is particularly complex, as broken tines can potentially injure the ureter if the basket is removed in a retrograde manner. The patient in this case presented with a ureteral stone basket embedded within the urothelium of the upper pole of the kidney. Holmium laser incision of the overlying urothelium allowed retrieval of the basket, although the tines were broken. Endoscopically guided percutaneous access to the kidney was obtained to allow for direct passage of the retained basket out of a nephrostomy sheath, thereby protecting the kidney.

  4. Current applications of endoscopic suturing

    PubMed Central

    Stavropoulos, Stavros N; Modayil, Rani; Friedel, David

    2015-01-01

    Endoscopic suturing had previously been considered an experimental procedure only performed in a few centers and often by surgeons. Now, however, endoscopic suturing has evolved sufficiently to be easily implemented during procedures and is more commonly used by gastroenterologists. We have employed the Apollo OverStitch suturing device in a variety of ways including closure of perforations, closure of full thickness defects in the gastrointestinal wall created during endoscopic full thickness resection, closure of mucosotomies during peroral endoscopic myotomy, stent fixation, fistula closure, post endoscopic submucosal dissection, endoscopic mucosal resection and Natural Orifice Transluminal Endoscopic Surgery defect closures, post-bariatric surgery gastrojejunal anastomosis revision and primary sleeve gastroplasty. PMID:26191342

  5. Role of endoscopic ultrasound in pancreatic cancer.

    PubMed

    Chang, David K; Nguyen, Nam Q; Merrett, Neil D; Dixson, Hugh; Leong, Rupert W L; Biankin, Andrew V

    2009-06-01

    Pancreatic cancer (PC) is the fourth most common cause of cancer deaths in Western societies. It is an aggressive tumor with an overall 5-year survival rate of less than 5%. Surgical resection offers the only possibility of cure and long-term survival for patients suffering from PC; however, unfortunately, fewer than 20% of patients suffering from PC have disease that is amendable to surgical resection. Therefore, it is important to accurately diagnose and stage these patients to enable optimal treatment of their disease. The imaging modalities involved in the diagnosis and staging of PC include multidetector CT scanning, endoscopic ultrasound (EUS), endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreaticography and MRI. The roles and relative importance of these imaging modalities have changed over the last few decades and continue to change owing to the rapid technological advances in medical imaging, but these investigations continue to be complementary. EUS was first introduced in the mid-1980s in Japan and Germany and has quickly gained acceptance. Its widespread use in the last decade has revolutionized the management of pancreatic disease as it simultaneously provides primary diagnostic and staging information, as well as enabling tissue biopsy. This article discusses the potential benefits and drawbacks of EUS in the primary diagnosis, staging and assessment of resectability, and EUS-guided fine-needle aspiration in PC. Difficult diagnostic scenarios and pitfalls are also discussed. A suggested management algorithm for patients with suspected PC is also presented. PMID:19485810

  6. Endoscopic Bariatric Therapies.

    PubMed

    Goyal, Deepinder; Watson, Rabindra R

    2016-06-01

    Obesity and its associated cardio-metabolic comorbidities have emerged as a global pandemic. The efficacy of various hypo-caloric diets and prescription drugs has been poor with respect to sustained weight loss. Recent advancements in endoscopic technology and techniques have opened a new field of minimally invasive endoscopic treatment options for combatting obesity both as a first line and adjunctive therapy. Presently, two endoscopic space-occupying devices in the form of intragastric balloons have received FDA approval for 6-month implantation in patients within a BMI range of 30-40 kg/m(2). Furthermore, full-thickness suturing has led to the development of primary endoscopic sleeve gastroplasty and Roux-en-Y gastric bypass revision as viable endoscopic alternatives to surgical approaches. These techniques have the potential to reduce adverse events, cost, and recovery times. Looking forward, a variety of promising and novel medical devices and endoscopic platforms that target obesity and diabetes are in various phases of development and investigation. The present review aims to discuss the current and forthcoming endoscopic bariatric therapies with emphasis on relevant procedural technique and review of available evidence. PMID:27098813

  7. Endoscopic examination of snakes by access through an air sac.

    PubMed

    Jekl, V; Knotek, Z

    2006-03-25

    Sixteen boa constrictors (Boa constrictor), three royal pythons (Python regius) and 15 Burmese pythons (Python molurus bivittatus) were examined endoscopically by access through the air sac. The snakes were immobilised in a ventral position using a half-open anaesthetic system with assisted ventilation and a mixture of isoflurane and oxygen. The rigid endoscope was introduced percutaneously and the internal structure of the lungs and the air sac, and the shape, size and external surface of the liver were visible in the cranial direction. In the smaller snakes the bifurcation and caudal part of the trachea could be viewed, provided the endoscope was positioned in a retrograde orientation. The caudal orientation of the endoscope made it possible to view the gall bladder and the size, shape and surface of the spleen. In some cases, the pancreas and the surface of the stomach and colon could be monitored. Endoscopy through the air sac also made it possible to check the major veins in the coelom. The snakes were monitored for at least 30 days after the intervention and no changes in their respiratory function or general health were observed. PMID:16565339

  8. Effect of Endoscopic Sphincterotomy for Suspected Sphincter of Oddi Dysfunction on Pain-Related Disability Following Cholecystectomy

    PubMed Central

    Cotton, Peter B.; Durkalski, Valerie; Romagnuolo, Joseph; Pauls, Qi; Fogel, Evan; Tarnasky, Paul; Aliperti, Giuseppe; Freeman, Martin; Kozarek, Richard; Jamidar, Priya; Wilcox, Mel; Serrano, Jose; Brawman-Mintzer, Olga; Elta, Grace; Mauldin, Patrick; Thornhill, Andre; Hawes, Robert; Wood-Williams, April; Orrell, Kyle; Drossman, Douglas; Robuck, Patricia

    2015-01-01

    IMPORTANCE Abdominal pain after cholecystectomy is common and may be attributed to sphincter of Oddi dysfunction. Management often involves endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP) with manometry and sphincterotomy. OBJECTIVE To determine whether endoscopic sphincterotomy reduces pain and whether sphincter manometric pressure is predictive of pain relief. DESIGN, SETTING, AND PATIENTS Multicenter, sham-controlled, randomized trial involving 214 patients with pain after cholecystectomy without significant abnormalities on imaging or laboratory studies, and no prior sphincter treatment or pancreatitis randomly assigned (August 6, 2008-March 23, 2012) to undergo sphincterotomy or sham therapy at 7 referral medical centers. One-year follow-up was blinded. The final follow-up visit was March 21, 2013. INTERVENTIONS After ERCP, patients were randomized 2:1 to sphincterotomy (n = 141) or sham (n = 73) irrespective of manometry findings. Those randomized to sphincterotomy with elevated pancreatic sphincter pressures were randomized again (1:1) to biliary or to both biliary and pancreatic sphincterotomies. Seventy-two were entered into an observational study with conventional ERCP managemeny. MAIN OUTCOMES AND MEASURES Success of treatment was defined as less than 6 days of disability due to pain in the prior 90 days both at months 9 and 12 after randomization, with no narcotic use and no further sphincter intervention. RESULTS Twenty-seven patients (37%; 95%CI, 25.9%-48.1%) in the sham treatment group vs 32 (23%; 95%CI, 15.8%-29.6%) in the sphincterotomy group experienced successful treatment (adjusted risk difference, −15.6%; 95% CI, −28.0% to −3.3%; P = .01). Of the patients with pancreatic sphincter hypertension, 14 (30%; 95% CI, 16.7%-42.9%) who underwent dual sphincterotomy and 10 (20%; 95% CI, 8.7%-30.5%) who underwent biliary sphincterotomy alone experienced successful treatment. Thirty-seven treated patients (26%; 95% CI,19%-34%) and 25 patients

  9. Endoscopic treatment of gastroparesis

    PubMed Central

    McCarty, Thomas R; Rustagi, Tarun

    2015-01-01

    Gastroparesis has traditionally been a largely medically managed disease with refractory symptoms typically falling under the umbrella of the surgical domain. Surgical options include, but are not limited to, gastrostomy, jejunostomy, pyloromyotomy, or pyloroplasty, and the Food and Drug Administration approved gastric electrical stimulation implantation. Endoscopic management of gastroparesis most commonly involves intrapyloric botulinum toxin injection; however, there exists a variety of endoscopic approaches on the horizon that have the potential to radically shift standard of care. Endoscopic management of gastroparesis seeks to treat delayed gastric emptying with a less invasive approach compared to the surgical approach. This review will serve to highlight such innovative and potentially transformative, endoscopic interventions available to gastroenterologists in the management of gastroparesis. PMID:26078560

  10. Understanding EUS (Endoscopic Ultrasonography)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Certification (MOC) Course Calendar GI Outlook (GO) Practice Management Conference Endoscopic Learning Library IT&T Hands-On Training Training and ... ASGE Endorsed Activities Ambassador Program Trainee Resources Traveling Learning ... MANAGEMENT GI Outlook (GO) Practice Management Conference Featured Courses ...

  11. Effect of vinpocetine on retrograde axoplasmic transport.

    PubMed

    Knyihar-Csillik, Elizabeth; Vecsei, Laszlo; Mihaly, Andras; Fenyo, Robert; Farkas, Ibolya; Krisztin-Peva, Beata; Csillik, Bertalan

    2007-01-01

    Vinpocetine, a derivate of vincamine, is widely used in the clinical pharmacotherapy of cerebral circulatory diseases. Herewith we report on a novel effect of vinpocetine: inhibition of retrograde axoplasmic transport of nerve growth factor (NGF) in the peripheral nerve. Blockade of retrograde transport of NGF results in transganglionic degenerative atrophy (TDA) in the segmentally related ipsilateral superficial spinal dorsal horn, which is characterized by depletion of the marker enzymes fluoride-resistant acid phosphatase (FRAP) and thiamine monophosphatase (TMP). At the same time, pain-related neuropeptides such as substance P (SP) and calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP), are depleted from lamina I-III from the segmentally related, ipsitateral Rolando substance of the spinal cord. On the basis of these experiments it is suggested that vinpocetine may result in a locally restricted decrease of nociception, that might be useful in clinical treatment of intractable pain. Pilot self-experiments support this assumption. PMID:17319607

  12. Evaluation of early endoscopic realignment of post-traumatic complete posterior urethral rupture

    PubMed Central

    Abdelsalam, Yaser M; Abdalla, Medhat A; Safwat, Ahmad S; ElGanainy, Ehab O

    2013-01-01

    Introduction: to report our experience with 41 patients treated by early endoscopic realignment of complete post-traumatic rupture urethra. Materials and Methods: The study includes patients presented to our institute, between May 2004 and April 2009, with post-traumatic complete posterior urethral disruption. Preoperative retrograde urethrography, voiding cystourethrography and abdominopelvic CT were performed to evaluate the urethral defect length, the bladder neck competence, the prostate position, and the extent of the pelvic hematoma. Within the first week after trauma, antegrade and retrograde urethroscopy were performed to identify both urethral ends and insert urethral catheter. Patients were followed up by pericatheter retrograde urethrogram monthly postoperatively till catheter removal on disappearance of extravasation. Retrograde urethrography, voiding cystourethrography and urethroscopy were performed 1 month after the removal of the catheter. Follow-up abdominal ultrasound and uroflowmetry monthly till 6 months, bimonthly till 1 year, and every 3 months thereafter were encouraged. Urinary continence and postoperative erectile dysfunction were assessed by direct patient interview. Results: Forty one patients in the age group 17-61 years (mean 37.9) were treated. Patients were followed up for Conclusions: Early endoscopic realignment for complete posterior urethral rupture is a feasible technique with no or minimal intraoperative complications. The technique is successful as the definitive line of therapy in reasonable number of patients and seems to render further future interventions for inevitable urethral stricture easier. PMID:24082438

  13. Endoscopic Techniques in Tympanoplasty.

    PubMed

    Anzola, Jesus Franco; Nogueira, João Flávio

    2016-10-01

    The endoscope has transformed the way we observe, understand, and treat chronic ear disease. Improved view, exclusive transcanal techniques, assessment of ventilation routes and mastoid tissue preservation have led to decreased morbidity and functional enhancement of minimally invasive reconstruction of the middle ear. The philosophical identity of endoscopic ear surgery is evolving; new research, long-term results, and widespread acknowledgement of its postulates will undoubtedly define its role in otology. PMID:27565390

  14. Standardized endoscopic reporting.

    PubMed

    Aabakken, Lars; Barkun, Alan N; Cotton, Peter B; Fedorov, Evgeny; Fujino, Masayuki A; Ivanova, Ekaterina; Kudo, Shin-Ei; Kuznetzov, Konstantin; de Lange, Thomas; Matsuda, Koji; Moine, Olivier; Rembacken, Björn; Rey, Jean-Francois; Romagnuolo, Joseph; Rösch, Thomas; Sawhney, Mandeep; Yao, Kenshi; Waye, Jerome D

    2014-02-01

    The need for standardized language is increasingly obvious, also within gastrointestinal endoscopy. A systematic approach to the description of endoscopic findings is vital for the development of a universal language, but systematic also means structured, and structure is inherently a challenge when presented as an alternative to the normal spoken word. The efforts leading to the "Minimal Standard Terminology" (MST) of gastrointestinal endoscopy offer a standardized model for description of endoscopic findings. With a combination of lesion descriptors and descriptor attributes, this system gives guidance to appropriate descriptions of lesions and also has a normative effect on endoscopists in training. The endoscopic report includes a number of items not related to findings per se, but to other aspects of the procedure, formal, technical, and medical. While the MST sought to formulate minimal lists for some of these aspects (e.g. indications), they are not all well suited for the inherent structure of the MST, and many are missing. Thus, the present paper offers a recommended standardization also of the administrative, technical, and other "peri-endoscopic" elements of the endoscopic report; important also are the numerous quality assurance initiatives presently emerging. Finally, the image documentation of endoscopic findings is becoming more obvious-and accessible. Thus, recommendations for normal procedures as well as for focal and diffuse pathology are presented. The recommendations are "minimal," meaning that expansions and subcategories will likely be needed in most centers. Still, with a stronger common grounds, communication within endoscopy will still benefit. PMID:24329727

  15. Endoscopic video manifolds.

    PubMed

    Atasoy, Selen; Mateus, Diana; Lallemand, Joe; Meining, Alexander; Yang, Guang-Zhong; Navab, Nassir

    2010-01-01

    Postprocedural analysis of gastrointestinal (GI) endoscopic videos is a difficult task because the videos often suffer from a large number of poor-quality frames due to the motion or out-of-focus blur, specular highlights and artefacts caused by turbid fluid inside the GI tract. Clinically, each frame of the video is examined individually by the endoscopic expert due to the lack of a suitable visualisation technique. In this work, we introduce a low dimensional representation of endoscopic videos based on a manifold learning approach. The introduced endoscopic video manifolds (EVMs) enable the clustering of poor-quality frames and grouping of different segments of the GI endoscopic video in an unsupervised manner to facilitate subsequent visual assessment. In this paper, we present two novel inter-frame similarity measures for manifold learning to create structured manifolds from complex endoscopic videos. Our experiments demonstrate that the proposed method yields high precision and recall values for uninformative frame detection (90.91% and 82.90%) and results in well-structured manifolds for scene clustering. PMID:20879345

  16. Are Wnts Retrogradely Transported to the ER?

    PubMed

    Tang, Bor Luen

    2016-11-01

    A recent report showed that Drosophila miR-307a initiates endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress in wingless (wg)-expressing cells by suppression of the evolutionarily conserve Wnt secretion factor Wntless (Wls). Interestingly, the authors noted that wg has a putative C-terminal dilysine motif (KKVY), which is required for its apparent retrograde Golgi-to-ER transport. Wls suppression resulted in ER stress, which was phenocopied by several other manipulations that impaired wg secretion in flies, as well as Wnt5a secretion in mammalian cells. The authors surmised that their data "reveals a previously unknown Golgi-to-ER retrograde route of wg, and elucidates a correlation between Wnt secretion and ER stress." However, there are obvious caveats to this interpretation, as ER stress resulting from Wnt secretion impairment could be readily explained by its inability to leave the ER, and not resulting from Golgi-to-ER retrograde transport. J. Cell. Physiol. 231: 2315-2316, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26916992

  17. Sparse aperture endoscope

    DOEpatents

    Fitch, J.P.

    1999-07-06

    An endoscope is disclosed which reduces the volume needed by the imaging part, maintains resolution of a wide diameter optical system, while increasing tool access, and allows stereographic or interferometric processing for depth and perspective information/visualization. Because the endoscope decreases the volume consumed by imaging optics such allows a larger fraction of the volume to be used for non-imaging tools, which allows smaller incisions in surgical and diagnostic medical applications thus produces less trauma to the patient or allows access to smaller volumes than is possible with larger instruments. The endoscope utilizes fiber optic light pipes in an outer layer for illumination, a multi-pupil imaging system in an inner annulus, and an access channel for other tools in the center. The endoscope is amenable to implementation as a flexible scope, and thus increases it's utility. Because the endoscope uses a multi-aperture pupil, it can also be utilized as an optical array, allowing stereographic and interferometric processing. 7 figs.

  18. Sparse aperture endoscope

    DOEpatents

    Fitch, Joseph P.

    1999-07-06

    An endoscope which reduces the volume needed by the imaging part thereof, maintains resolution of a wide diameter optical system, while increasing tool access, and allows stereographic or interferometric processing for depth and perspective information/visualization. Because the endoscope decreases the volume consumed by imaging optics such allows a larger fraction of the volume to be used for non-imaging tools, which allows smaller incisions in surgical and diagnostic medical applications thus produces less trauma to the patient or allows access to smaller volumes than is possible with larger instruments. The endoscope utilizes fiber optic light pipes in an outer layer for illumination, a multi-pupil imaging system in an inner annulus, and an access channel for other tools in the center. The endoscope is amenable to implementation as a flexible scope, and thus increases the utility thereof. Because the endoscope uses a multi-aperture pupil, it can also be utilized as an optical array, allowing stereographic and interferometric processing.

  19. Mitochondrial emitted electromagnetic signals mediate retrograde signaling.

    PubMed

    Bagkos, Georgios; Koufopoulos, Kostas; Piperi, Christina

    2015-12-01

    Recent evidence shows that mitochondria regulate nuclear transcriptional activity both in normal and cell stress conditions, known as retrograde signaling. Under normal mitochondrial function, retrograde signaling is associated with mitochondrial biogenesis, normal cell phenotype and metabolic profile. In contrast, mitochondrial dysfunction leads to abnormal (oncogenic) cell phenotype and altered bio-energetic profile (nucleus reprogramming). Despite intense research efforts, a concrete mechanism through which mitochondria determine the group of genes expressed by the nucleus is still missing. The present paper proposes a novel hypothesis regarding retrograde signaling. More specifically, it reveals the mitochondrial membrane potential (MMP) and the accompanied strong electromagnetic field (EF) as key regulatory factors of nuclear activity. Mitochondrial emitted EFs extend in long distance and affect the function of nuclear membrane receptors. Depending on their frequencies, EFs can directly activate or deactivate different groups of nuclear receptors and so determine nuclear gene expression. One of the key features of the above hypothesis is that nuclear membrane receptors, besides their own endogenous or chemical ligands (hormones, lipids, etc.), can also be activated by electromagnetic signals. Moreover, normal MMP values (about -140 mV) are associated with the production of high ATP quantities and small levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS) while the hyperpolarization observed in all cancer cell types leads to a dramatic fall in ATP production and an analogous increase in ROS. The diminished ATP and increased ROS production negatively affect the function of all cellular systems including nucleus. Restoration of mitochondrial function, which is characterized by the fluctuation of MMP and EF values within a certain (normal) range, is proposed as a necessary condition for normal nuclear function and cancer therapy. PMID:26474928

  20. What is the current role of endoscopy in primary sclerosing cholangitis?

    PubMed Central

    Tharian, Benjamin; George, Nayana Elizabeth; Tham, Tony Chiew Keong

    2015-01-01

    Endoscopy has important roles in the management of primary sclerosing cholangitis (PSC), ranging from narrowing down the differential diagnoses, screening for complications, determining prognosis and therapy. While the need for a diagnostic endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP) may be obviated by a positive magnetic resonance cholangiopancreatography (MRCP), a negative MRCP does not exclude PSC and may therefore necessitate an ERCP, which is traditionally regarded as the gold standard. In this editorial we have not covered the endoscopic management of inflammatory bowel disease in the context of PSC nor of endoscopic surveillance and treatment of portal hypertension complicating PSC. PMID:26265986

  1. Mitochondrial Retrograde Signaling: Triggers, Pathways, and Outcomes

    PubMed Central

    da Cunha, Fernanda Marques; Torelli, Nicole Quesada; Kowaltowski, Alicia J.

    2015-01-01

    Mitochondria are essential organelles for eukaryotic homeostasis. Although these organelles possess their own DNA, the vast majority (>99%) of mitochondrial proteins are encoded in the nucleus. This situation makes systems that allow the communication between mitochondria and the nucleus a requirement not only to coordinate mitochondrial protein synthesis during biogenesis but also to communicate eventual mitochondrial malfunctions, triggering compensatory responses in the nucleus. Mitochondria-to-nucleus retrograde signaling has been described in various organisms, albeit with differences in effector pathways, molecules, and outcomes, as discussed in this review. PMID:26583058

  2. Transvaginal endoscopic appendectomy.

    PubMed

    Shin, Eung Jin; Jeong, Gui Ae; Jung, Jun Chul; Cho, Gyu Seok; Lim, Chul Wan; Kim, Hyung Chul; Song, Ok Pyung

    2010-12-01

    Since Kalloo and colleagues first reported the feasibility and safety of a peroral transgastric approach in the porcine model in 2004, various groups have reported more complex natural orifice transluminal endoscopic surgery (NOTES) procedures, such as the cholecystectomy, splenectomy and liver biopsy, in the porcine model. Natural orifice access to the abdominal cavity, such as transgastric, transvesical, transcolonic, and transvaginal, has been described. Although a novel, minimally invasive approach to the abdominal cavity is a peroral endoscopic transgastric approach, there are still some challenging issues, such as the risk of infection and leakage, and the method of gastric closure. Hybrid-NOTES is an ideal first step in humans. Human hybrid transvaginal access has been used for years by many surgeons for diagnostic and therapeutic purposes. Here, we report a transvaginal flexible endoscopic appendectomy, with a 5-mm umbilical port using ultrasonic scissors in a 74-year-old woman with acute appendicitis. PMID:21221245

  3. Technicalities of endoscopic biopsy.

    PubMed

    Tytgat, G N; Ignacio, J G

    1995-11-01

    Despite the wealth of biopsy forceps currently available, it is obvious that there are sufficient drawbacks and shortcomings to reconsider the overall design of the endoscopic biopsy depth, the short lifespan of reusable forceps, damage to the working channel, excessive time consumption, cleaning and disinfection difficulties, etc. Improvements should be possible that approach the same degree of sophistication as is currently available in endoscopic equipment. Fully-automated, repetitive, quickly targeted biopsy sampling should be possible, but it will require the utmost technical ingenuity and expertise to achieve. PMID:8903983

  4. Endoscopic Facial Nerve Surgery.

    PubMed

    Marchioni, Daniele; Soloperto, Davide; Rubini, Alessia; Nogueira, João Flávio; Badr-El-Dine, Mohamed; Presutti, Livio

    2016-10-01

    Tympanic facial nerve segment surgery has been traditionally performed using microscopic approaches, but currently, exclusive endoscopic approaches have been performed for traumatic, neoplastic, or inflammatory diseases, specially located at the geniculate ganglion, greater petrosal nerve, and second tract of the facial nerve, until the second genu. The tympanic segment of the facial nerve can be reached and visualized using an exclusive transcanal endoscopic approach, even in poorly accessible regions such as the second genu and geniculate ganglion, avoiding mastoidectomy, bony demolition, and meningeal or cerebral lobe tractions, with low complication rates using a minimally invasive surgical route. PMID:27468633

  5. Endoscopic Sedation: Medicolegal Considerations.

    PubMed

    Kralios, Andreas A; Feld, Kayla A; Feld, Andrew D

    2016-07-01

    Goals of endoscopic sedation are to provide patients with a successful procedure, and ensure that they remain safe and are relieved from anxiety and discomfort; agents should provide efficient, appropriate sedation and allow patients to recover rapidly. Sedation is usually safe and effective; however, complications may ensue. This paper outlines some medicolegal aspects of endoscopic sedation, including informed consent, possible withdrawal of consent during the procedure, standard of care for monitoring sedation, use of anesthesia personnel to deliver sedation, and new agents and devices. PMID:27372770

  6. Ultrasound of Biliary Cast Syndrome and Its Mimics.

    PubMed

    Hu, Bing; Horrow, Mindy M

    2016-09-01

    Biliary cast syndrome (BCS) consists of mass-like hardened collections of inspissated bile and sloughed biliary mucosa filling the intrahepatic and/or extrahepatic bile ducts, which show an alternating pattern of dilatation and stricture. It is a rare but serious complication of liver transplantation frequently necessitating repeated percutaneous, endoscopic or surgical stent placements, and cast retrieval. Although not typically considered as the modality of choice for BCS compared with magnetic resonance cholangiopancreatography and endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography, ultrasound can be quite useful for this diagnosis. This article reviews the sonographic appearance of BCS in postliver transplant patients and correlates with other imaging modalities including computed tomography, MRCP, and endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography. Also reviewed are other intrahepatic pathologies that mimic the appearance of BCS on ultrasound. PMID:26561220

  7. Outcomes Following Endoscopic Stapes Surgery.

    PubMed

    Hunter, Jacob B; Rivas, Alejandro

    2016-10-01

    There are limited studies describing the surgical and hearing outcomes following endoscopic stapes surgeries, despite the burgeoning interest and excitement in endoscopic ear surgery. Current studies have demonstrated that endoscopic stapes surgery is safe and has similar audiologic outcomes when compared with microscopic stapes procedures. However, preliminary studies show decreased postoperative pain in endoscopic cases compared with microscopic controls. In regards to possible endoscopic advantages, these few studies demonstrate mixed results when comparing the need to remove the bony medial external auditory canal wall to improve visualization and access to the oval window niche. PMID:27565387

  8. Terminal retrograde turn of rolling rings.

    PubMed

    Jalali, Mir Abbas; Sarebangholi, Milad S; Alam, Mohammad-Reza

    2015-09-01

    We report an unexpected reverse spiral turn in the final stage of the motion of rolling rings. It is well known that spinning disks rotate in the same direction of their initial spin until they stop. While a spinning ring starts its motion with a kinematics similar to disks, i.e., moving along a cycloidal path prograde with the direction of its rigid body rotation, the mean trajectory of its center of mass later develops an inflection point so that the ring makes a spiral turn and revolves in a retrograde direction around a new center. Using high speed imaging and numerical simulations of models featuring a rolling rigid body, we show that the hollow geometry of a ring tunes the rotational air drag resistance so that the frictional force at the contact point with the ground changes its direction at the inflection point and puts the ring on a retrograde spiral trajectory. Our findings have potential applications in designing topologically new surface-effect flying objects capable of performing complex reorientation and translational maneuvers. PMID:26465546

  9. Retrograde intrarenal surgery in pediatric patients.

    PubMed

    Resorlu, Berkan; Sancak, Eyup Burak; Resorlu, Mustafa; Gulpinar, Murat Tolga; Adam, Gurhan; Akbas, Alpaslan; Ozdemir, Huseyin

    2014-11-01

    Urinary tract stone disease is seen at a level of 1%-2% in childhood (< 18 years). In recent years, however, there has been a marked increased in pediatric stone disease, particularly in adolescence. A carbohydrate- and salt-heavy diet and a more sedentary lifestyle are implicated in this increase. Although stone disease is rare in childhood, its presence is frequently associated with metabolic or anatomical disorders or infectious conditions, for which reason there is a high possibility of post-therapeutic recurrence. Factors such as a high possibility of recurrence and increasing incidence further enhance the importance of minimally invasive therapeutic options in children, with their expectations of a long life. In children in whom active stone removal is decided on, the way to achieve the highest level of success with the least morbidity is to select the most appropriate treatment modality. Thanks to today's advanced technology, renal stones that were once treated only by surgery can now be treated with minimally invasive techniques, from invasion of the urinary system in an antegrade (percutaneous nephrolithotomy) or retrograde (retrograde intrarenal surgery) manner or shock wave lithotripsy to laparoscopic stone surgery. This compilation study examined studies involving the RIRS procedure, the latest minimally invasive technique, in children and compared the results of those studies with those from other techniques. PMID:25374812

  10. Terminal retrograde turn of rolling rings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jalali, Mir Abbas; Sarebangholi, Milad S.; Alam, Mohammad-Reza

    2015-09-01

    We report an unexpected reverse spiral turn in the final stage of the motion of rolling rings. It is well known that spinning disks rotate in the same direction of their initial spin until they stop. While a spinning ring starts its motion with a kinematics similar to disks, i.e., moving along a cycloidal path prograde with the direction of its rigid body rotation, the mean trajectory of its center of mass later develops an inflection point so that the ring makes a spiral turn and revolves in a retrograde direction around a new center. Using high speed imaging and numerical simulations of models featuring a rolling rigid body, we show that the hollow geometry of a ring tunes the rotational air drag resistance so that the frictional force at the contact point with the ground changes its direction at the inflection point and puts the ring on a retrograde spiral trajectory. Our findings have potential applications in designing topologically new surface-effect flying objects capable of performing complex reorientation and translational maneuvers.